Science.gov

Sample records for absorption spectral bands

  1. Collisional Induced Absorption (CIA) bands measured in the IR spectral range .

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stefani, S.; Piccioni, G.; Snels, M.; Adriani, A.; Grassi, D.

    In this work we present two experimental setup able to characterize the optical properties of gases, in particular CO_2 and H_2, at typically planetary conditions. The apparatus consists of a Fourier Transform InfraRed (FT-IT) interferometer able to work in a wide spectral range, from 350 to 25000 cm-1 (0.4 to 29 mu m ) with a relatively high spectral resolution, from 10 to 0.07 cm-1. Two dedicated gas cells have been integrated with the FT-IR. The first, called High Pressure High Temperature (HP-HT), can support pressures up to 300 bar, temperatures up to 300oC and is characterized by an optical path of 2 cm. The second one, a Multi Pass (MP) absorption gas cell, is designed to have a variable optical path, from 2.5 to 30 m, can be heated up to 200o and operate at pressures up to 10 bar. In this paper, measurements of Collision-Induced Absorption (CIA) bands in carbon dioxide and hydrogen recorded in the InfraRed spectral range will be presented. In principle, linear symmetric molecules such as CO_2 and H_2 possess no dipole moment, but, even when the pressure is only a few bar, we have observed the Collisional Induced Absorption (CIA) bands. This absorption results from a short-time collisional interaction between molecules. The band integrated intensity shows a quadratic dependence versus density opposed to the absorption by isolated molecules, which follows Beer's law \\citep{Beer's}. This behaviour suggests an absorption by pairs rather than by individual molecules. The bands integrated intensities show a linear dependence vs square density according to \\citep {CIA Shape} and \\citep{CIA posi}. For what concerns the H_2 CIA bands, a preliminary comparison between simulated data obtained with the model described in \\citep{CIA H2}and measured, shows a good agreement. These processes are very relevant in the dense atmospheres of planets, such as those of Venus and Jupiter and also in extrasolar planets. A detailed knowledge of these contributions is very

  2. Sensitivity analysis of oxygen absorption lines in the 1.26-1.27 micron spectral band

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edwards, W. C.; Prasad, N.; Browell, E. V.

    2009-12-01

    In the Decadal Survey prepared by the National Research Council (Reference: Earth Science and Applications from Space: National Imperatives for the Next Decade and Beyond), the ASCENDS mission (Active Sensing of CO2 Emissions over Nights, Days and Seasons), requires simultaneous laser remote sensing of CO2 and O2 in order to convert CO2 atmospheric concentrations to mixing ratios. As the mission is envisioned, the CO2 mixing ratio needs to be measured to a precision of 0.5 percent of background or better (slightly less than 2 ppm) at 100-km horizontal length scale overland and at 200-km scale over open oceans. While the O2 measurement could be made at 0.765 µm (the oxygen A band), the absorption cross section is substantially higher and the scattering is lower in the 1.26-1.27 µm wavelength band, and as such it is anticipated that better accuracies could be accomplished. Hence, NASA Langley Research Center is developing oxygen lidar technology in the 1.26-1.27 micron band for surface pressure measurements. One or more wavelengths for differential absorption lidar operation have to be carefully chosen to eliminate ambient influences on them. The model optical depth calculation is very sensitive to knowledge of the transmitted wavelengths and to the choice of Voigt input parameters. Uncertainties in atmospheric profiles of temperature, pressure and relative humidity can cause ~0.5 % errors in model optical depths. In order to select candidate wavelengths in the 1.26 micron spectral band, wavelength uncertainties due to temperature and pressure have to be determined. Uncertainties at line center and offset wavelengths have to be known precisely to reduce uncertainties in oxygen concentration measurements from airborne and space based platforms. In this paper, based on HITRAN database and absorption line measurements, we evaluate systematic relative errors and their sources of pressure shift and atmospheric temperature influences for selected O2 lines suitable for

  3. Absolute Rovibrational Intensities of C-12O2-16 Absorption Bands in the 3090-3850/ CM Spectral Region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Devi, V. Malathy; Benner, D. Chris; Rinsland, Curtis P.; Smith, Mary Ann H.

    1998-01-01

    A multispectrum nonlinear least-squares fitting technique has been used to determine the absolute intensities for approximately 1500 spectral lines in 36 vibration - rotation bands Of C-12O2-16 between 3090 and 3850/ cm. A total of six absorption spectra of a high- purity (99.995% minimum) natural sample of carbon dioxide were used in the analysis. The spectral data (0.01/cm resolution) were recorded at room temperature and low pressure (1 to 10 Torr) using the McMath-Pierce Fourier transform spectrometer of the National Solar Observatory (NSO) on Kitt Peak. The absorption path lengths for these spectra varied between 24.86 and 385.76 m. The first experimental determination of the intensity of the theoretically predicted 2(nu)(sub 2, sup 2) + nu(sub 3) "forbidden" band has been made. The measured line intensities obtained for each band have been analyzed to determine the vibrational band intensity, S(sub nu), in /cm/( molecule/sq cm) at 296 K, square of the rotationless transition dipole moment |R|(exp 2) in Debye, as well as the nonrigid rotor coefficients. The results are compared to the values listed in the 1996 HITRAN database which are obtained using the direct numerical diagonalization (DND) technique as well as to other published values where available.

  4. Collisional Induced Absorption (CIA) bands of CO2 and H2 measured in the IR spectral range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stefani, S.; Piccioni, G.; Snels, M.; Adriani, A.; Grassi, D.

    2015-10-01

    In this paper we present the results on the Collisional Induced Absorption (CIA) bands of CO2 and H2 measured employing two different experimental setup. Each of them allows us to reproduce typical planetary conditions, at a pressure and temperature from 1 up to 50 bar and from 298 up to 500 K respectively. A detailed study on the temperature dependence of the CO2 CIA absorption bands will be presented.

  5. Iron-absorption band analysis for the discrimination of iron-rich zones. [infrared spectral reflectance of Nevada iron deposits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rowan, L. C. (Principal Investigator)

    1974-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. Most major rock units and unaltered and altered areas in the study area can be discriminated on the basis of visible and near-infrared spectral reflectivity differences recorded from satellite altitude. These subtle spectral differences are detectable by digital ratioing of the MSS bands and subsequent stretching to increase the contrast to enhance spectral differences. Hydrothermally altered areas appear as anomalous color patches within the volcanic-rock areas. A map has been prepared which can be regarded as an excellent reconnaissance exploration map, for use in targeting areas for more detailed geological, geochemical, and geophysical studies. Mafic and felsic rock types are easily discriminated on the color stretched-ratio composite. The ratioing process minimizes albedo effects, leaving only the recorded characteristic spectral response. The spectra of unaltered rocks appear different from those of altered rocks, which are typically dominated by limonite and clay minerals. It seems clear that differences in spectral shape can provide a basis for discrimination of geologic material, although the relations between visible and near-infrared spectral reflectivity and mineralogical composition are not yet entirely understood.

  6. Clay composition and swelling potential estimation of soils using depth of absorption bands in the SWIR (1100-2500 nm) spectral domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dufréchou, Grégory; Granjean, Gilles; Bourguignon, Anne

    2014-05-01

    Swelling soils contain clay minerals that change volume with water content and cause extensive and expensive damage on infrastructures. Presence of clay minerals is traditionally a good estimator of soils swelling and shrinking behavior. Montmorillonite (i.e. smectite group), illite, kaolinite are the most common minerals in soils and are usually associated to high, moderate, and low swelling potential when they are present in significant amount. Characterization of swelling potential and identification of clay minerals of soils using conventional analysis are slow, expensive, and does not permit integrated measurements. SWIR (1100-2500 nm) spectral domain are characterized by significant spectral absorption bands related to clay content that can be used to recognize main clay minerals. Hyperspectral laboratory using an ASD Fieldspec Pro spectrometer provides thus a rapid and less expensive field surface sensing that permits to measure soil spectral properties. This study presents a new laboratory reflectance spectroscopy method that used depth of clay diagnostic absorption bands (1400 nm, 1900 nm, and 2200 nm) to compare natural soils to synthetic montmorillonite-illite-kaolinite mixtures. We observe in mixtures that illite, montmorillonite, and kaolinite content respectively strongly influence the depth of absorption bands at 1400 nm (D1400), 1900 nm (D1900), and 2200 nm (D2200). To attenuate or removed effects of abundance and grain size, depth of absorption bands ratios were thus used to performed (i) 3D (using D1900/D2200, D1400/D1900, and D2200/D1400 as axis), and (ii) 2D (using D1400/D1900 and D1900/D2200 as axis) diagrams of synthetic mixtures. In this case we supposed that the overall reduction or growth of depth absorption bands should be similarly affected by the abundance and grain size of materials in soil. In 3D and 2D diagrams, the mixtures define a triangular shape formed by two clay minerals as external envelop and the three clay minerals mixtures

  7. Atmospheric Solar Heating in Minor Absorption Bands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chou, Ming-Dah

    1998-01-01

    Solar radiation is the primary source of energy driving atmospheric and oceanic circulations. Concerned with the huge computing time required for computing radiative transfer in weather and climate models, solar heating in minor absorption bands has often been neglected. The individual contributions of these minor bands to the atmospheric heating is small, but collectively they are not negligible. The solar heating in minor bands includes the absorption due to water vapor in the photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) spectral region from 14284/cm to 25000/cm, the ozone absorption and Rayleigh scattering in the near infrared, as well as the O2 and CO2 absorption in a number of weak bands. Detailed high spectral- and angular-resolution calculations show that the total effect of these minor absorption is to enhance the atmospheric solar heating by approximately 10%. Depending upon the strength of the absorption and the overlapping among gaseous absorption, different approaches are applied to parameterize these minor absorption. The parameterizations are accurate and require little extra time for computing radiative fluxes. They have been efficiently implemented in the various atmospheric models at NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center, including cloud ensemble, mesoscale, and climate models.

  8. Wavelength-resolved optical extinction measurements of aerosols using broad-band cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopy over the spectral range of 445-480 nm.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Weixiong; Dong, Meili; Chen, Weidong; Gu, Xuejun; Hu, Changjin; Gao, Xiaoming; Huang, Wei; Zhang, Weijun

    2013-02-19

    Despite the significant progress in the measurements of aerosol extinction and absorption using spectroscopy approaches such as cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS) and photoacoustic spectroscopy (PAS), the widely used single-wavelength instruments may suffer from the interferences of gases absorption present in the real environment. A second instrument for simultaneous measurement of absorbing gases is required to characterize the effect of light extinction resulted from gases absorption. We present in this paper the development of a blue light-emitting diode (LED)-based incoherent broad-band cavity-enhanced spectroscopy (IBBCEAS) approach for broad-band measurements of wavelength-resolved aerosol extinction over the spectral range of 445-480 nm. This method also allows for simultaneous measurement of trace gases absorption present in the air sample using the same instrument. On the basis of the measured wavelength-dependent aerosol extinction cross section, the real part of the refractive index (RI) can be directly retrieved in a case where the RI does not vary strongly with the wavelength over the relevant spectral region. Laboratory-generated monodispersed aerosols, polystyrene latex spheres (PSL) and ammonium sulfate (AS), were employed for validation of the RI determination by IBBCEAS measurements. On the basis of a Mie scattering model, the real parts of the aerosol RI were retrieved from the measured wavelength-resolved extinction cross sections for both aerosol samples, which are in good agreement with the reported values. The developed IBBCEAS instrument was deployed for simultaneous measurements of aerosol extinction coefficient and NO(2) concentration in ambient air in a suburban site during two representative days. PMID:23320530

  9. Absorption spectral band width of charge transfer transition of E(T)(30) dye in homogeneous and heterogeneous media.

    PubMed

    Das, Parimal Kumar; Pramanik, Ramkrishna; Bagchi, Sanjib

    2003-06-01

    Solvation characteristics in homogeneous and heterogeneous media have been probed by monitoring the band width of ICT band of 2,6-di-phenyl-4(2,4,6-triphenyl-1-pyridino) phenolate, the indicator solute for E(T)(30) scale, in pure, mixed binary solvents and aqueous micellar solution. Non-ideal solvation behaviour is observed in all the binary solvent mixtures. Index of preferential solvation has been calculated as a function of solvent composition. Study in micellar media indicates that the dye is located at the micelle-water interface. The effects of variation of micelle concentration, temperature and electrolyte concentration have also been studies. PMID:12736053

  10. Pulsed thermography in multiple infrared spectral bands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Netzelmann, U.; Abuhamad, M.

    2010-03-01

    Spectrally resolved active thermography by flash pulse excitation was performed in four sub-bands of a mid-wave infrared camera using spectral filtering and in the full long-wave band of a second infrared camera. On zirconia thermal barrier coatings on steel and PVC blocks, spectrally dependent decay rates of the thermal contrast were found. The observed behaviour can be explained by the infrared spectra of the specimens.

  11. Absorptivity of nitric oxide in the fundamental vibrational band

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holland, R. F.; Vasquez, M. C.; Beattie, W. H.; McDowell, R. S.

    1983-05-01

    From observations of the spectral absorbance of mixtures of nitric oxide in nitrogen at room temperature, an integrated absorptivity for the NO fundamental band of 137.3 + or - 4.6 per(sq cm atm) at 0 C is derived. The indicated uncertainty is the estimated maximum error.

  12. Cirrus cloud optical and microphysical property retrievals from eMAS during SEAC4RS using bi-spectral reflectance measurements within the 1.88 µm water vapor absorption band

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, Kerry; Platnick, Steven; Arnold, G. Thomas; Holz, Robert E.; Veglio, Paolo; Yorks, John; Wang, Chenxi

    2016-04-01

    Previous bi-spectral imager retrievals of cloud optical thickness (COT) and effective particle radius (CER) based on the Nakajima and King (1990) approach, such as those of the operational MODIS cloud optical property retrieval product (MOD06), have typically paired a non-absorbing visible or near-infrared wavelength, sensitive to COT, with an absorbing shortwave or mid-wave infrared wavelength sensitive to CER. However, in practice it is only necessary to select two spectral channels that exhibit a strong contrast in cloud particle absorption. Here it is shown, using eMAS observations obtained during NASA's SEAC4RS field campaign, that selecting two absorbing wavelength channels within the broader 1.88 µm water vapor absorption band, namely the 1.83 and 1.93 µm channels that have sufficient differences in ice crystal single scattering albedo, can yield COT and CER retrievals for thin to moderately thick single-layer cirrus that are reasonably consistent with other solar and IR imager-based and lidar-based retrievals. A distinct advantage of this channel selection for cirrus cloud retrievals is that the below-cloud water vapor absorption minimizes the surface contribution to measured cloudy top-of-atmosphere reflectance, in particular compared to the solar window channels used in heritage retrievals such as MOD06. This reduces retrieval uncertainty resulting from errors in the surface reflectance assumption and reduces the frequency of retrieval failures for thin cirrus clouds.

  13. SPECTRAL RELATIVE ABSORPTION DIFFERENCE METHOD

    SciTech Connect

    Salaymeh, S.

    2010-06-17

    When analyzing field data, the uncertainty in the background continuum emission produces the majority of error in the final gamma-source analysis. The background emission typically dominates an observed spectrum in terms of counts and is highly variable spatially and temporally. The majority of the spectral shape of the background continuum is produced by combinations of cosmic rays, {sup 40}K, {sup 235}U, and {sup 220}Rn, and the continuum is similar in shape to the 15%-20% level for most field observations. However, the goal of spectroscopy analysis is to pick up subtle peaks (<%5) upon this large background. Because the continuum is falling off as energy increases, peak detection algorithms must first define the background surrounding the peak. This definition is difficult when the range of background shapes is considered. The full spectral template matching algorithms are heavily weighted to solving for the background continuum as it produces significant counts over much of the energy range. The most appropriate background mitigation technique is to take a separate background observation without the source of interest. But, it is frequently not possible to record a background observation in the exact location before (or after) a source has been detected. Thus, one uses approximate backgrounds that rely on spatially nearby locations or similar environments. Since the error in many field observations is dominated by the background, a technique that is less sensitive to the background would be quite beneficial. We report the result of an initial investigation into a novel observation scheme for gamma-emission detection in high background environments. Employing low resolution, NaI, detectors, we examine the different between the direct emission and the 'spectral-shadow' that the gamma emission produces when passed through a thin absorber. For this detection scheme to be competitive, it is required to count and analyze individual gamma-events. We describe the

  14. Spectral Absorption Properties of Atmospheric Aerosols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bergstrom, R. W.; Pilewskie, P.; Russell, P. B.; Redemann, J.; Bond, T. C.; Quinn, P. K.; Sierau, B.

    2007-01-01

    We have determined the solar spectral absorption optical depth of atmospheric aerosols for specific case studies during several field programs (three cases have been reported previously; two are new results). We combined airborne measurements of the solar net radiant flux density and the aerosol optical depth with a detailed radiative transfer model for all but one of the cases. The field programs (SAFARI 2000, ACE Asia, PRIDE, TARFOX, INTEX-A) contained aerosols representing the major absorbing aerosol types: pollution, biomass burning, desert dust and mixtures. In all cases the spectral absorption optical depth decreases with wavelength and can be approximated with a power-law wavelength dependence (Absorption Angstrom Exponent or AAE). We compare our results with other recent spectral absorption measurements and attempt to briefly summarize the state of knowledge of aerosol absorption spectra in the atmosphere. We discuss the limitations in using the AAE for calculating the solar absorption. We also discuss the resulting spectral single scattering albedo for these cases.

  15. Aggregation of Hyperion hyperspectral spectral bands into Landsat-7 ETM+ spectral bands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jarecke, Peter J.; Barry, Pamela; Pearlman, Jay; Markham, Brian L.

    2002-01-01

    The LANDSAT-7 ETM+ spectral bands centered at 479nm, 561 nm, 661 nm and 834 nm (bands 1, 2, 3, and 4) fall nicely across the Hyperion VNIR hyperspectral response region. They have bandwidths of 67nm, 78nm, 60 nm and 120 nm, respectively. The Hyperion spectral bandwidth of 10.2 nm results in 10 to 15 Hyperion spectral samples across each Landsat band in the VNIR. When the Hyperion spectral responses in the 10.2 nm bands are properly weighted to aggregate to a given Landsat band, the radiometric response of the Landsat band can be reproduced by Hyperion. Landsat bands 5 and 7 centered at 1650 and 2207 nm (with bandwidths of 190 and 250 nm respectively) fall in the Hyperion SWIR spectral response region. Hyperion spectral response for one area of a scene in Railroad Valley, NV on May 13, 2001 has been binned into Landsat bands and compared with Landsat values collected at the same time.

  16. Full Spectral Resolution Data Generation from the Cross-track Infrared Sounder on S-NPP at NOAA and its Use to Investigate Uncertainty in Methane Absorption Band Near 7.66 µm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, X.; Peischl, J.; Ryerson, T. B.; Sasakawa, M.; Han, Y.; Chen, Y.; Wang, L.; Tremblay, D.; Jin, X.; Zhou, L.; Liu, Q.; Weng, F.; Machida, T.

    2015-12-01

    The Cross-track Infrared Sounder (CrIS) on Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership Satellite (S-NPP) is a Fourier transform spectrometer for atmospheric sounding. CrIS on S-NPP started to provide measurements in 1305 channels in its normal mode since its launch on November 2011 to December 4, 2014, and after that it was switched to the full spectral resolution (FSR) mode, in which the spectral resolutions are 0.625 cm-1 in all the MWIR (1210-1750 cm-1), SWIR (2155-2550 cm-1) and the LWIR bands (650-1095 cm-1) with a total of 2211 channels. While the NOAA operational Sensor Data Record (SDR) processing (IDPS) continues to produce the normal resolution SDRs by truncating full spectrum RDR data, NOAA STAR started to process the FSR SDRs data since December 4, 2014 to present, and the data is being delivered through NOAA STAR website (ftp://ftp2.star.nesdis.noaa.gov/smcd/xxiong/). The current FSR processing algorithm was developed on basis of the CrIS Algorithm Development Library (ADL), and is the baseline of J-1 CrIS SDR algorithm. One major benefit to use the FSR data is to improve the retrieval of atmospheric trace gases, such as CH4, CO and CO2 . From our previous studies to retrieve CH4 using Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) and Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI), it was found the uncertainty in the CH4 absorption band is up to 1-2%. So, in this study we computed the radiance using the community radiative transfer model (CRTM) and line-by-line model, with the inputs of "truth" of atmospheric temperature and moisture profiles from ECMWF model (and/or RAOB sounding) and CH4 profiles from in-situ aircraft measurements, then convoluted with the response function of CrIS. The difference between the simultaed radiance and the collocated CrIS FSR data is used to exam the uncertainty in these strong absorption channels.Through the improved fitting to the transmittance in these channels, it is expected to improve the retrieval of CH4 using CrIS on S

  17. Automated coregistration of MTI spectral bands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Theiler, James P.; Galbraith, Amy E.; Pope, Paul A.; Ramsey, Keri A.; Szymanski, John J.

    2002-08-01

    In the focal plane of a pushbroom imager, a linear array of pixels is scanned across the scene, building up the image one row at a time. For the Multispectral Thermal Imager (MTI), each of fifteen different spectral bands has its own linear array. These arrays are pushed across the scene together, but since each band's array is at a different position on the focal plane, a separate image is produced for each band. The standard MTI data products (LEVEL1B_R_COREG and LEVEL1B_R_GEO) resample these separate images to a common grid and produce coregistered multispectral image cubes. The coregistration software employs a direct ``dead reckoning' approach. Every pixel in the calibrated image is mapped to an absolute position on the surface of the earth, and these are resampled to produce an undistorted coregistered image of the scene. To do this requires extensive information regarding the satellite position and pointing as a function of time, the precise configuration of the focal plane, and the distortion due to the optics. These must be combined with knowledge about the position and altitude of the target on the rotating ellipsoidal earth. We will discuss the direct approach to MTI coregistration, as well as more recent attempts to tweak the precision of the band-to-band registration using correlations in the imagery itself.

  18. Automated coregistration of MTI spectral bands.

    SciTech Connect

    Theiler, J. P.; Galbraith, A. E.; Pope, P. A.; Ramsey, K. A.; Szymanski, J. J.

    2002-01-01

    In the focal plane of a pushbroom imager, a linear array of pixels is scanned across the scene, building up the image one row at a time. For the Multispectral Thermal Imager (MTI), each of fifteen different spectral bands has its own linear array. These arrays are pushed across the scene together, but since each band's array is at a different position on the focal plane, a separate image is produced for each band. The standard MTI data products resample these separate images to a common grid and produce coregistered multispectral image cubes. The coregistration software employs a direct 'dead reckoning' approach. Every pixel in the calibrated image is mapped to an absolute position on the surface of the earth, and these are resampled to produce an undistorted coregistered image of the scene. To do this requires extensive information regarding the satellite position and pointing as a function of time, the precise configuration of the focal plane, and the distortion due to the optics. These must be combined with knowledge about the position and altitude of the target on the rotating ellipsoidal earth. We will discuss the direct approach to MTI coregistration, as well as more recent attempts to 'tweak' the precision of the band-to-band registration using correlations in the imagery itself.

  19. Enhanced dual-band infrared absorption in a Fabry-Perot cavity with subwavelength metallic grating.

    PubMed

    Kang, Guoguo; Vartiainen, Ismo; Bai, Benfeng; Turunen, Jari

    2011-01-17

    The performance of infrared (IR) dual-band detector can be substantially improved by simultaneously increasing IR absorptions for both sensor bands. Currently available methods only provide absorption enhancement for single spectral band, but not for the dual-band. The Fabry-Perot (FP) cavity generates a series of resonances in multispectral bands. With this flexibility, we introduced a novel type of dual-band detector structure containing a multilayer FP cavity with two absorbing layers and a subwavelength-period grating mirror, which is capable of simultaneously enhancing the middle wave infrared (MWIR) and the long wave infrared (LWIR) detection. Compared with the bare-absorption-layer detector (common dual-band detector), the optimized FP cavity can provide about 13 times and 17 times absorption enhancement in LWIR and MWIR bands respectively. PMID:21263618

  20. Absorption band Q model for the Earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, D. L.; Given, J. W.

    1981-01-01

    Attenuation in solids and liquids, as measured by the quality factor Q, is typically frequency dependent. In seismology, however, Q is usually assumed to be independent of frequency. Body wave, surface wave, and normal mode data are used to place constraints on the frequency dependence of Q in the mantle. Specific features of the absorption band model are: low-Q in the seismic band at both the top and the base of the mantle, low-Q for long-period body waves in the outer core, an inner core Q sub s that increases with period, and low Q sub p/Q sub s at short periods in the middle mantle.

  1. Absorption coefficients and band strengths for the 703 nm and 727 bands of methane at 77 K

    SciTech Connect

    O`Brien, J.J.; Singh, K.

    1996-12-31

    The technique of intracavity laser spectroscopy has been used to obtain methane absorption spectra for the vibrational overtone bands that occur around 703 nm and 727 nm. Absorption coefficients for the 690-742 nm range have been obtained for a sample temperature of 77 K at a spectral resolution of <0.02 cm{sup -1}. A new method of data analysis is utilized in obtaining the results. It involves deconvolving the many ILS spectral profiles that comprise the absorption bands and summing the results. Values averaged over 1 cm{sup -1} and 1 {Angstrom} intervals are provided. Band strengths also are obtained. The total intensities of the 703 and 727 nm bands are in reasonable agreement with previous laboratory determinations which were obtained for relatively high pressures of methane at room temperature using lower spectral resolution. The methane bands appear in the reflected sunlight spectra from the outer planets. Results averaged over 1 nm intervals are compared with other laboratory studies and with those derived from observations of the outer planets. The band profiles differ considerably from other laboratory results but are in good accord with the planetary observations. Laboratory spectra of methane at appropriate conditions are required for the proper interpretation of the observational data. Absorption spectra can provide some of the most sensitive diagnostic data on the atmospheres of those bodies.

  2. Spectral image fusion using band reduction and contourlets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Yoonsuk; Sharifahmadian, Ershad; Latifi, Shahram

    2014-06-01

    Spectral images have relatively low spatial resolution, compared to high-resolution single band panchromatic (PAN) images. Therefore, fusing a spectral image with a PAN image has been widely studied to produce a high-resolution spectral image. However, raw spectral images are too large to process and contain redundant information that is not utilized in the fusion process. In this study, we propose a novel fusion method that employs a spectral band reduction and contourlets. The band reduction begins with the best two band combination, and this two-band combination is subsequently augmented to three, four, and more until the desired number of bands is selected. The adopted band selection algorithm using the endmember extraction concept employs a sequential forward search strategy. Next, the image fusion is performed with two different spectral images based on the frequency components that are newly obtained by contourlet transform (CT). One spectral image that is used as a dataset is multispectral (MS) image and the other is hyperspectral (HS) image. Each original spectral image is pre-processed by spectrally integrating over the entire spectral range to obtain a PAN source image that is used in the fusion process. This way, we can eliminate the step of image co-registration since the obtained PAN image is already perfectly aligned to the spectral image. Next, we fuse the band-reduced spectral images with the PAN images using contourlet-based fusion framework. The resultant fusion image provides enhanced spatial resolution while preserving the spectral information. In order to analyze the band reduction performance, the original spectral images are fused with the same PAN images to serve as a reference image, which is then compared to the band-reduced spectral image fusion results using six different quality metrics.

  3. Determination of the in-flight spectral calibration of AVIRIS using atmospheric absorption features

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, Robert O.

    1995-01-01

    Spectral calibration of the Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) as data are acquired in flight is essential to quantitative analysis of the measured upwelling spectral radiance. In each spectrum measured by AVIRIS in flight, there are numerous atmospheric gas absorption bands that drive this requirement for accurate spectral calibration. If the surface and atmospheric properties are measured independently, these atmospheric absorption bands may be used to deduce the in-flight spectral calibration of an imaging spectrometer. Both the surface and atmospheric characteristics were measured for a calibration target during an in-flight calibration experiment held at Lunar Lake, Nevada on April 5, 1994. This paper uses upwelling spectral radiance predicted for the calibration target with the MODTRAN radiative transfer code to validate the spectral calibration of AVIRIS in flight.

  4. Spectral band selection for classification of soil organic matter content

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henderson, Tracey L.; Szilagyi, Andrea; Baumgardner, Marion F.; Chen, Chih-Chien Thomas; Landgrebe, David A.

    1989-01-01

    This paper describes the spectral-band-selection (SBS) algorithm of Chen and Landgrebe (1987, 1988, and 1989) and uses the algorithm to classify the organic matter content in the earth's surface soil. The effectiveness of the algorithm was evaluated comparing the results of classification of the soil organic matter using SBS bands with those obtained using Landsat MSS bands and TM bands, showing that the algorithm was successful in finding important spectral bands for classification of organic matter content. Using the calculated bands, the probabilities of correct classification for climate-stratified data were found to range from 0.910 to 0.980.

  5. Spectral broadening of interacting pigments: polarized absorption by photosynthetic proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Somsen, O J; van Grondelle, R; van Amerongen, H

    1996-01-01

    Excitonic interaction between pigment molecules is largely responsible for the static and dynamic spectroscopic properties of photosynthetic pigment-proteins. This paper provides a new description of its effect on polarized absorption spectroscopy, in particular on circular dichroism (CD). We investigate excitonic spectra of finite width and use "spectral moments" to compare 1) inhomogeneously broadened excitonic spectra, 2) spectra that are (homogeneously broadened by vibrations or electron-phonon interaction, and 3) spectra that are simulated by applying convolution after the interaction has been evaluated. Two cases are distinguished. If the excitonic splitting is smaller than the width of the interacting absorption bands, the broadening of the excitonic spectrum can be approximated by a convolution approach, although a correction is necessary for CD spectra. If the excitonic splitting exceeds the bandwidth, the well-known exchange narrowing occurs. We demonstrate that this is accompanied by redistribution of dipole strength and spectral shifts. The magnitude of a CD spectrum is conveniently expressed by its first spectral moment. As will be shown, this is independent of spectral broadening as well as dispersive shifts induced by pigment-protein interactions. Consequently, it provides a simple tool to relate the experimental CD spectrum of a pigment complex to the excitonic interactions from which it originates. To illustrate the potential of the presented framework, the spectroscopy of the LH2 pigment-protein complex from purple bacteria is analyzed and compared for dimer-like and ring-like structures. Furthermore, it is demonstrated that the variability of the CD of chlorosomes from green bacteria can be explained by small changes in the structure of their cylindrical bacteriochlorophyll c subunits. Images FIGURE 3 FIGURE 4 PMID:8889168

  6. Observation of temperature dependence of the IR hydroxyl absorption bands in silica optical fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Li; Bonnell, Elizabeth; Homa, Daniel; Pickrell, Gary; Wang, Anbo; Ohodnicki, P. R.; Woodruff, Steven; Chorpening, Benjamin; Buric, Michael

    2016-07-01

    This study reports on the temperature dependent behavior of silica based optical fibers upon exposure to high temperatures in hydrogen and ambient air. The hydroxyl absorption bands in the wavelength range of 1000-2500 nm of commercially available multimode fibers with pure silica and germanium doped cores were examined in the temperature range of 20-800 °C. Two hydroxyl-related infrared absorption bands were observed: ∼2200 nm assigned to the combination of the vibration mode of Si-OH bending and the fundamental hydroxyl stretching mode, and ∼1390 nm assigned to the first overtone of the hydroxyl stretching. The absorption in the 2200 nm band decreased in intensity, while the 1390 nm absorption band shifted to longer wavelengths with an increase in temperature. The observed phenomena were reversible with temperature and suspected to be due, in part, to the conversion of the OH spectral components into each other and structural relaxation.

  7. Assessing Spectral Simulation Protocols for the Amide I Band of Proteins.

    PubMed

    Cunha, Ana V; Bondarenko, Anna S; Jansen, Thomas L C

    2016-08-01

    We present a benchmark study of spectral simulation protocols for the amide I band of proteins. The amide I band is widely used in infrared spectroscopy of proteins due to the large signal intensity, high sensitivity to hydrogen bonding, and secondary structural motifs. This band has, thus, proven valuable in many studies of protein structure-function relationships. We benchmark spectral simulation protocols using two common force fields in combination with several electrostatic mappings and coupling models. The results are validated against experimental linear absorption and two-dimensional infrared spectroscopy for three well-studied proteins. We find two-dimensional infrared spectroscopy to be much more sensitive to the simulation protocol than linear absorption and report on the best simulation protocols. The findings demonstrate that there is still room for ideas to improve the existing models for the amide I band of proteins. PMID:27348022

  8. [Spectral calibration for space-borne differential optical absorption spectrometer].

    PubMed

    Zhou, Hai-Jin; Liu, Wen-Qing; Si, Fu-Qi; Zhao, Min-Jie; Jiang, Yu; Xue, Hui

    2012-11-01

    Space-borne differential optical absorption spectrometer is used for remote sensing of atmospheric trace gas global distribution. This instrument acquires high accuracy UV/Vis radiation scattered or reflected by air or earth surface, and can monitor distribution and variation of trace gases based on differential optical absorption spectrum algorithm. Spectral calibration is the premise and base of quantification of remote sensing data of the instrument, and the precision of calibration directly decides the level of development and application of the instrument. Considering the characteristic of large field, wide wavelength range, high spatial and spectral resolution of the space-borne differential optical absorption spectrometer, a spectral calibration method is presented, a calibration device was built, the equation of spectral calibration was calculated through peak searching and regression analysis, and finally the full field spectral calibration of the instrument was realized. The precision of spectral calibration was verified with Fraunhofer lines of solar light. PMID:23387142

  9. Band analysis by spectral curve fitting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, C. L.; Shaw, J. H.; Calvert, J. G.

    1980-01-01

    A method of estimating the values of the parameters in the models describing the positions, widths, and intensities of the lines in rotation-vibration bands of gases, without the need for line by line analysis, is described. To illustrate the technique, portions of the 1-0 bands of HCl and CO have been analyzed. The values of up to 27 parameters, their standard deviations, and the correlations between the parameters required to describe the spectra have been obtained.

  10. Thermal Infrared Spectral Band Detection Limits for Unidentified Surface Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kirkland, Laurel E.; Herr, Kenneth C.; Salisbury, John W.

    2001-01-01

    Infrared emission spectra recorded by airborne or satellite spectrometers can be searched for spectral features to determine the composition of rocks on planetary surfaces. Surface materials are identified by detections of characteristic spectral bands. We show how to define whether to accept an observed spectral feature as a detection when the target material is unknown. We also use remotely sensed spectra measured by the Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) and the Spatially Enhanced Broadband Array Spectrograph System to illustrate the importance of instrument parameters and surface properties on band detection limits and how the variation in signal-to-noise ratio with wavelength affects the bands that are most detectable for a given instrument. The spectrometer's sampling interval, spectral resolution, signal-to-noise ratio as a function of wavelength, and the sample's surface properties influence whether the instrument can detect a spectral feature exhibited by a material. As an example, in the 6-13 micrometer wavelength region, massive carbonates exhibit two bands: a very strong, broad feature at approximately 6.5 micrometers and a less intense, sharper band at approximately 11.25 micrometers. Although the 6.5-micrometer band is stronger and broader in laboratory-measured spectra, the 11.25-micrometer band will cause a more detectable feature in TES spectra.

  11. Piecewise spectrally band-pass for compressive coded aperture spectral imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, Lu-Lu; Lü, Qun-Bo; Huang, Min; Xiang, Li-Bin

    2015-08-01

    Coded aperture snapshot spectral imaging (CASSI) has been discussed in recent years. It has the remarkable advantages of high optical throughput, snapshot imaging, etc. The entire spatial-spectral data-cube can be reconstructed with just a single two-dimensional (2D) compressive sensing measurement. On the other hand, for less spectrally sparse scenes, the insufficiency of sparse sampling and aliasing in spatial-spectral images reduce the accuracy of reconstructed three-dimensional (3D) spectral cube. To solve this problem, this paper extends the improved CASSI. A band-pass filter array is mounted on the coded mask, and then the first image plane is divided into some continuous spectral sub-band areas. The entire 3D spectral cube could be captured by the relative movement between the object and the instrument. The principle analysis and imaging simulation are presented. Compared with peak signal-to-noise ratio (PSNR) and the information entropy of the reconstructed images at different numbers of spectral sub-band areas, the reconstructed 3D spectral cube reveals an observable improvement in the reconstruction fidelity, with an increase in the number of the sub-bands and a simultaneous decrease in the number of spectral channels of each sub-band. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation for Distinguished Young Scholars of China (Grant No. 61225024) and the National High Technology Research and Development Program of China (Grant No. 2011AA7012022).

  12. Spectral Band Selection for Urban Material Classification Using Hyperspectral Libraries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Bris, A.; Chehata, N.; Briottet, X.; Paparoditis, N.

    2016-06-01

    In urban areas, information concerning very high resolution land cover and especially material maps are necessary for several city modelling or monitoring applications. That is to say, knowledge concerning the roofing materials or the different kinds of ground areas is required. Airborne remote sensing techniques appear to be convenient for providing such information at a large scale. However, results obtained using most traditional processing methods based on usual red-green-blue-near infrared multispectral images remain limited for such applications. A possible way to improve classification results is to enhance the imagery spectral resolution using superspectral or hyperspectral sensors. In this study, it is intended to design a superspectral sensor dedicated to urban materials classification and this work particularly focused on the selection of the optimal spectral band subsets for such sensor. First, reflectance spectral signatures of urban materials were collected from 7 spectral libraires. Then, spectral optimization was performed using this data set. The band selection workflow included two steps, optimising first the number of spectral bands using an incremental method and then examining several possible optimised band subsets using a stochastic algorithm. The same wrapper relevance criterion relying on a confidence measure of Random Forests classifier was used at both steps. To cope with the limited number of available spectra for several classes, additional synthetic spectra were generated from the collection of reference spectra: intra-class variability was simulated by multiplying reference spectra by a random coefficient. At the end, selected band subsets were evaluated considering the classification quality reached using a rbf svm classifier. It was confirmed that a limited band subset was sufficient to classify common urban materials. The important contribution of bands from the Short Wave Infra-Red (SWIR) spectral domain (1000-2400 nm) to material

  13. Increasing efficiency in intermediate band solar cells with overlapping absorptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishna, Akshay; Krich, Jacob J.

    2016-07-01

    Intermediate band (IB) materials are promising candidates for realizing high efficiency solar cells. In IB photovoltaics, photons are absorbed in one of three possible electronic transitions—valence to conduction band, valence to intermediate band, or intermediate to conduction band. With fully concentrated sunlight, when the band gaps have been chosen appropriately, the highest efficiency IB solar cells require that these three absorptions be non-overlapping, so absorbed photons of fixed energy contribute to only one transition. The realistic case of overlapping absorptions, where the transitions compete for photons, is generally considered to be a source of loss. We show that overlapping absorptions can in fact lead to significant improvements in IB solar cell efficiencies, especially for IB that are near the middle of the band gap. At low to moderate concentration, the highest efficiency requires overlapping absorptions. We use the detailed-balance method and indicate how much overlap of the absorptions is required to achieve efficiency improvements, comparing with some known cases. These results substantially broaden the set of materials that can be suitable for high-efficiency IB solar cells.

  14. Extraction of Optimal Spectral Bands Using Hierarchical Band Merging Out of Hyperspectral Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Bris, A.; Chehata, N.; Briottet, X.; Paparoditis, N.

    2015-08-01

    Spectral optimization consists in identifying the most relevant band subset for a specific application. It is a way to reduce hyperspectral data huge dimensionality and can be applied to design specific superspectral sensors dedicated to specific land cover applications. Spectral optimization includes both band selection and band extraction. On the one hand, band selection aims at selecting an optimal band subset (according to a relevance criterion) among the bands of a hyperspectral data set, using automatic feature selection algorithms. On the other hand, band extraction defines the most relevant spectral bands optimizing both their position along the spectrum and their width. The approach presented in this paper first builds a hierarchy of groups of adjacent bands, according to a relevance criterion to decide which adjacent bands must be merged. Then, band selection is performed at the different levels of this hierarchy. Two approaches were proposed to achieve this task : a greedy one and a new adaptation of an incremental feature selection algorithm to this hierarchy of merged bands.

  15. Spectral dependence of aerosol light absorption over the Amazon Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rizzo, L. V.; Correia, A. L.; Artaxo, P.; Procópio, A. S.; Andreae, M. O.

    2011-09-01

    In this study, we examine the spectral dependence of aerosol absorption at different sites and seasons in the Amazon Basin. The analysis is based on measurements performed during three intensive field experiments at a pasture site (Fazenda Nossa Senhora, Rondônia) and at a primary forest site (Cuieiras Reserve, Amazonas), from 1999 to 2004. Aerosol absorption spectra were measured using two Aethalometers: a 7-wavelength Aethalometer (AE30) that covers the visible (VIS) to near-infrared (NIR) spectral range, and a 2-wavelength Aethalometer (AE20) that measures absorption in the UV and in the NIR. As a consequence of biomass burning emissions, about 10 times greater absorption values were observed in the dry season in comparison to the wet season. Power law expressions were fitted to the measurements in order to derive the absorption Ångström exponent, defined as the negative slope of absorption versus wavelength in a log-log plot. At the pasture site, about 70 % of the absorption Ångström exponents fell between 1.5 and 2.5 during the dry season, indicating that biomass burning aerosols have a stronger spectral dependence than soot carbon particles. Ångström exponents decreased from the dry to the wet season, in agreement with the shift from biomass burning aerosols, predominant in the fine mode, to biogenic and dust aerosols, predominant in the coarse mode. The lowest absorption Ångström exponents (90 % of data below 1.5) were observed at the forest site during the dry season. Also, results indicate that low absorption coefficients were associated with low Ångström exponents. This finding suggests that biogenic aerosols from Amazonia have a weaker spectral dependence for absorption than biomass burning aerosols, contradicting our expectations of biogenic particles behaving as brown carbon. In a first order assessment, results indicate a small (<1 %) effect of variations in absorption Ångström exponents on 24-h aerosol forcings, at least in the spectral

  16. Photonic band-edge-induced enhancement in absorption and emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ummer, Karikkuzhi Variyath; Vijaya, Ramarao

    2015-01-01

    An enhancement in photonic band-edge-induced absorption and emission from rhodamine-B dye doped polystyrene pseudo gap photonic crystals is studied. The band-edge-induced enhancement in absorption is achieved by selecting the incident angle of the excitation beam so that the absorption spectrum of the emitter overlaps the photonic band edge. The band-edge-induced enhancement in emission, on the other hand, is possible with and without an enhancement in band-edge-induced absorption, depending on the collection angle of emission. Through a simple set of measurements with suitably chosen angles for excitation and emission, we achieve a maximum enhancement of 70% in emission intensity with band-edge-induced effects over and above the intrinsic emission in the case of self-assembled opals. This is a comprehensive effort to interpret tunable lasing in opals as well as to predict the wavelength of lasing arising as a result of band-edge-induced distributed feedback effects.

  17. Diversity in the Visible-NIR Absorption Band Characteristics of Lunar and Asteroidal Plagioclase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hiroi, T.; Kaiden, H.; Misawa, K.; Kojima, H.; Uemoto, K.; Ohtake, M.; Arai, T.; Sasaki, S.; Takeda, H.; Nyquist, L. E.; Shih, C.-Y.

    2012-01-01

    Studying the visible and near-infrared (VNIR) spectral properties of plagioclase has been challenging because of the difficulty in obtaining good plagioclase separates from pristine planetary materials such as meteorites and returned lunar samples. After an early study indicated that the 1.25 m band position of plagioclase spectrum might be correlated with the molar percentage of anorthite (An#) [1], there have been few studies which dealt with the band center behavior. In this study, the VNIR absorption band parameters of plagioclase samples have been derived using the modified Gaussian model (MGM) [2] following a pioneering study by [3].

  18. Feature Transformation Detection Method with Best Spectral Band Selection Process for Hyper-spectral Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hai-Wen; McGurr, Mike; Brickhouse, Mark

    2015-11-01

    We present a newly developed feature transformation (FT) detection method for hyper-spectral imagery (HSI) sensors. In essence, the FT method, by transforming the original features (spectral bands) to a different feature domain, may considerably increase the statistical separation between the target and background probability density functions, and thus may significantly improve the target detection and identification performance, as evidenced by the test results in this paper. We show that by differentiating the original spectral, one can completely separate targets from the background using a single spectral band, leading to perfect detection results. In addition, we have proposed an automated best spectral band selection process with a double-threshold scheme that can rank the available spectral bands from the best to the worst for target detection. Finally, we have also proposed an automated cross-spectrum fusion process to further improve the detection performance in lower spectral range (<1000 nm) by selecting the best spectral band pair with multivariate analysis. Promising detection performance has been achieved using a small background material signature library for concept-proving, and has then been further evaluated and verified using a real background HSI scene collected by a HYDICE sensor.

  19. Impurity Sub-Band in Heavily Cu-Doped InAs Nanocrystal Quantum Dots Detected by Ultrafast Transient Absorption.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chunfan; Faust, Adam; Amit, Yorai; Gdor, Itay; Banin, Uri; Ruhman, Sanford

    2016-05-19

    The effect of Cu impurities on the absorption cross section, the rate of hot exction thermalization, and on exciton recombination processes in InAs quantum dots was studied by femtosecond transient absorption. Our findings reveal dynamic spectral effects of an emergent impurity sub-band near the bottom of the conduction band. Previously hypothesized to explain static photophysical properties of this system, its presence is shown to shorten hot carrier relaxation. Partial redistribution of interband oscillator strength to sub-band levels reduces the band edge bleach per exciton progressively with the degree of doping, even though the total linear absorption cross section at the band edge remains unchanged. In contrast, no doping effects were detected on absorption cross sections high in the conduction band, as expected due to the relatively high density of sates of the undoped QDs. PMID:26720008

  20. Electronic Band Structure and Sub-band-gap Absorption of Nitrogen Hyperdoped Silicon

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Zhen; Shao, Hezhu; Dong, Xiao; Li, Ning; Ning, Bo-Yuan; Ning, Xi-Jing; Zhao, Li; Zhuang, Jun

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the atomic geometry, electronic band structure, and optical absorption of nitrogen hyperdoped silicon based on first-principles calculations. The results show that all the paired nitrogen defects we studied do not introduce intermediate band, while most of single nitrogen defects can introduce intermediate band in the gap. Considering the stability of the single defects and the rapid resolidification following the laser melting process in our sample preparation method, we conclude that the substitutional nitrogen defect, whose fraction was tiny and could be neglected before, should have considerable fraction in the hyperdoped silicon and results in the visible sub-band-gap absorption as observed in the experiment. Furthermore, our calculations show that the substitutional nitrogen defect has good stability, which could be one of the reasons why the sub-band-gap absorptance remains almost unchanged after annealing. PMID:26012369

  1. Applications of spectral band adjustment factors (SBAF) for cross-calibration

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chander, Gyanesh

    2013-01-01

    To monitor land surface processes over a wide range of temporal and spatial scales, it is critical to have coordinated observations of the Earth's surface acquired from multiple spaceborne imaging sensors. However, an integrated global observation framework requires an understanding of how land surface processes are seen differently by various sensors. This is particularly true for sensors acquiring data in spectral bands whose relative spectral responses (RSRs) are not similar and thus may produce different results while observing the same target. The intrinsic offsets between two sensors caused by RSR mismatches can be compensated by using a spectral band adjustment factor (SBAF), which takes into account the spectral profile of the target and the RSR of the two sensors. The motivation of this work comes from the need to compensate the spectral response differences of multispectral sensors in order to provide a more accurate cross-calibration between the sensors. In this paper, radiometric cross-calibration of the Landsat 7 Enhanced Thematic Mapper Plus (ETM+) and the Terra Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) sensors was performed using near-simultaneous observations over the Libya 4 pseudoinvariant calibration site in the visible and near-infrared spectral range. The RSR differences of the analogous ETM+ and MODIS spectral bands provide the opportunity to explore, understand, quantify, and compensate for the measurement differences between these two sensors. The cross-calibration was initially performed by comparing the top-of-atmosphere (TOA) reflectances between the two sensors over their lifetimes. The average percent differences in the long-term trends ranged from $-$5% to $+$6%. The RSR compensated ETM+ TOA reflectance (ETM+$^{ast}$) measurements were then found to agree with MODIS TOA reflectance to within 5% for all bands when Earth Observing-1 Hy- erion hyperspectral data were used to produce the SBAFs. These differences were later

  2. Spectral dependence of aerosol light absorption over the Amazon Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rizzo, L. V.; Correia, A. L.; Artaxo, P.; Procópio, A. S.; Andreae, M. O.

    2011-04-01

    In this study, we examine the spectral dependence of aerosol absorption at different sites and seasons in the Amazon Basin. The analysis is based on measurements performed during three intensive field experiments at a pasture site (Fazenda Nossa Senhora, Rondônia) and at a primary forest site (Cuieiras Reserve, Amazonas), from 1999 to 2004. Aerosol absorption spectra were measured using two Aethalometers: a 7-wavelength Aethalometer (AE30) that covers the visible (VIS) to near-infrared (NIR) spectral range, and a 2-wavelength Aethalometer (AE20) that measures absorption in the UV and in the visible. As a consequence of biomass burning emissions, about 10 times greater absorption values were observed in the dry season in comparison to the wet season. Power law expressions were fitted to the measurements in order to derive the Ångström exponent for absorption, defined as the negative slope of absorption vs. wavelength in a log-log plot. At the pasture site, about 70% of the Ångström exponents fell between 1.5 and 2.5 during the dry season, indicating that biomass burning aerosols have a stronger spectral dependence than soot carbon particles. Ångström exponents decreased from the dry to the wet season, in agreement with the shift from biomass burning aerosols, predominant in the fine mode, to biogenic and dust aerosols, predominant in the coarse mode. The lowest Ångström exponents (90% of data below 1.5) were observed at the forest site during the dry season. Also, results indicate that low absorption coefficients were associated with Ångström exponents below 1.0. This finding suggests that biogenic aerosols from Amazonia may have a weak spectral dependence for absorption, contradicting our expectations of biogenic particles behaving as brown carbon. Nevertheless, additional measurements should be taken in the future, to provide a complete picture of biogenic aerosol absorption spectral characteristics from different seasons and geographic locations. The

  3. Hyperspectral bands prediction based on inter-band spectral correlation structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, Ayman M.; Sharkawy, Mohamed El.; Elramly, Salwa H.

    2013-02-01

    Hyperspectral imaging has been widely studied in many applications; notably in climate changes, vegetation, and desert studies. However, such kind of imaging brings a huge amount of data, which requires transmission, processing, and storage resources for both airborne and spaceborne imaging. Compression of hyperspectral data cubes is an effective solution for these problems. Lossless compression of the hyperspectral data usually results in low compression ratio, which may not meet the available resources; on the other hand, lossy compression may give the desired ratio, but with a significant degradation effect on object identification performance of the hyperspectral data. Moreover, most hyperspectral data compression techniques exploits the similarities in spectral dimensions; which requires bands reordering or regrouping, to make use of the spectral redundancy. In this paper, we analyze the spectral cross correlation between bands for AVIRIS and Hyperion hyperspectral data; spectral cross correlation matrix is calculated, assessing the strength of the spectral matrix, we propose new technique to find highly correlated groups of bands in the hyperspectral data cube based on "inter band correlation square", and finally, we propose a new technique of band regrouping based on correlation values weights for different group of bands as network of correlation.

  4. Automated Extraction of Absorption Bands from Reflectance Special

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huguenin, R. L.; Vale, L.; Mcintire, D.; Jones, J.

    1985-01-01

    A multiple high order derivative spectroscopy technique has been developed for deriving wavelength positions, half widths, and heights of absorption bands in reflectance spectra. The technique is applicable to laboratory spectra as well as medium resolution (100-200/cm) telescope or spacecraft spectra with moderate (few percent) noise. The technique permits absorption band positions to be detected with an accuracy of better than 3%, and often better than 1%. The high complexity of radiative transfer processes in diffusely reflected spectra can complicate the determination of absorption band positions. Continuum reflections, random illumination geometries within the material, phase angle effects, composite overlapping bands, and calibration uncertainties can shift apparent band positions by 20% from their actual positions or mask them beyond detection. Using multiple high order derivative analysis, effects of scattering continua, phase angle, and calibration (smooth features) are suppressed. Inflection points that characterize the positions and half widths of constituent bands are enhanced by the process and directly detected with relatively high sensitivity.

  5. Wide-band array signal processing via spectral smoothing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xu, Guanghan; Kailath, Thomas

    1989-01-01

    A novel algorithm for the estimation of direction-of-arrivals (DOA) of multiple wide-band sources via spectral smoothing is presented. The proposed algorithm does not require an initial DOA estimate or a specific signal model. The advantages of replacing the MUSIC search with an ESPRIT search are discussed.

  6. Novel Cross-Band Relative Absorption (CoBRA) technique For Measuring Atmospheric Species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasad, N. S.; Pliutau, D.

    2013-12-01

    We describe a methodology called Cross-Band Relative Absorption (CoBRA) we have implemented to significantly reduce interferences due to variations in atmospheric temperature and pressure in molecular mixing ration measurements [1-4]. The interference reduction is achieved through automatic compensation based on selecting spectral line pairs exhibiting similar evolution behavior under varying atmospheric conditions. The method is applicable to a wide range of molecules including CO2 and CH4 which can be matched with O2 or any other well-mixed atmospheric molecule. Such matching results in automatic simultaneous adjustments of the spectral line shapes at all times with a high precision under varying atmospheric conditions of temperature and pressure. We present the results of our selected CoBRA analysis based on line-by-line calculations and the Modern Era Retrospective Analysis for Research and Applications (MERRA) dataset including more recent evaluation of the error contributions due to water vapor interference effects. References: 1) N. S. Prasad, D. Pliutau, 'Cross-band relative absorption technique for the measurement of molecular mixing ratios.', Optics Express, Vol. 21, Issue 11, pp. 13279-13292 (2013) 2) D. Pliutau and N. S. Prasad, "Cross-band Relative Absorption Technique for Molecular Mixing Ratio Determination," in CLEO: 2013, OSA Technical Digest (online) (Optical Society of America, 2013), paper CW3L.4. 3) Denis Pliutau; Narasimha S. Prasad; 'Semi-empirical validation of the cross-band relative absorption technique for the measurement of molecular mixing ratios',.Proc. SPIE 8731, Laser Radar Technology and Applications XVIII, 87310L (May 20, 2013); doi:10.1117/12.2016661. 4) Denis Pliutau,; Narasimha S. Prasad; 'Comparative analysis of alternative spectral bands of CO2 and O2 for the sensing of CO2 mixing ratios' Proc. SPIE 8718, Advanced Environmental, Chemical, and Biological Sensing Technologies X, 87180L (May 31, 2013); doi:10.1117/12.2016337.

  7. Band-integrated infrared absorptance of low-molecular-weight paraffin hydrocarbons at high temperatures.

    PubMed

    Fuss, S P; Hall, M J; Ezekoye, O A

    1999-05-01

    The spectral absorptance of the 3.4-microm band of methane, ethane, propane, and butane has been measured with a Fourier transform infrared spectrometer over a range of temperatures from 296 to 900 K. The measurements were made at a 4-cm(-1) resolution and integrated over the entire band to give the total absorptance. The total absorptance is found to behave in such a way that it can be correlated by a combination of algebraic expressions that depend on the gas temperature and concentration. Average discrepancies between the correlations and the measurements are less than 4%, with maximum differences of no greater than 17%. In addition, the correlations presented here for methane are shown to be in good agreement with established models. Expressions given for the integrated intensity of each gas show an inverse dependence on temperature, reflecting the associated change in density. PMID:18319871

  8. Effect of Sn on the optical band gap determined using absorption spectrum fitting method

    SciTech Connect

    Heera, Pawan; Kumar, Anup; Sharma, Raman

    2015-05-15

    We report the preparation and the optical studies on tellurium rich glasses thin films. The thin films of Se{sub 30}Te{sub 70-x} Sn{sub x} system for x= 0, 1.5, 2.5 and 4.5 glassy alloys prepared by melt quenching technique are deposited on the glass substrate using vacuum thermal evaporation technique. The analysis of absorption spectra in the spectral range 400nm–4000 nm at room temperature obtained from UV-VIS-NIR spectrophotometer [Perkin Elmer Lamda-750] helps us in the optical characterization of the thin films under study. The absorption spectrum fitting method is applied by using the Tauc’s model for estimating the optical band gap and the width of the band tail of the thin films. The optical band gap is calculated and is found to decrease with the Sn content.

  9. AKARI observations of ice absorption bands towards edge-on YSOs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aikawa, Y.; Kamuro, D.; Sakon, I.; Itoh, Y.; Noble, J. A.; Pontoppidan, K. M., Fraser, H. J.; Terada, H.; Tamura, M.; Kandori, R.; Kawamura, A.; Ueno, M.

    2011-05-01

    Circumstellar disks and envelopes of low-mass YSOs contain significant amounts of ice. Such icy material will evolve to volatile components of planetary systems, such as comets in our solar system. In order to investigate the composition and evolution of circumstellar ice around low-mass YSOs, we have observed ice absorption bands towards eight YSOs ranging from class 0 to class II, among which seven are associated with edge-on disks. Slit-less spectroscopic observations are performed using the grism mode of Infrared Camera (IRC) on board AKARI, which enables us to obtain full NIR spectra from 2.5 μm to 5 μm, including the CO_2 band and the blue wing of the H_2O band, which are not accessible from the ground. We developed procedures to reduce the spectra of targets with nebulosity. The spectra are fitted with polynomial baselines to derive the absorption spectra. Then we fit the molecular absorption bands with the laboratory spectra from the database, considering the instrumental line profile and the spectral resolution of the dispersion element. Towards the Class 0-I sources, absorption bands of H_2O, CO_2, CO and XCN (OCN^-) are clearly detected. Weak features of 13CO_2, HDO, the C-H band, and gaseous CO are detected as well. OCS ice absorption is tentatively detected towards IRC-L1041-2. The detected features would mostly originate in the cold envelope, while CO gas and OCN^- could originate in the region close to the protostar. Towards class II stars, H_2O ice band is detected. We also detected H_2O ice, CO_2 ice and tentative CO gas features of the foreground component of class II stars.

  10. Noise Reduction using Frequency Sub-Band Adaptive Spectral Subtraction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kozel, David

    2000-01-01

    A frequency sub-band based adaptive spectral subtraction algorithm is developed to remove noise from noise-corrupted speech signals. A single microphone is used to obtain both the noise-corrupted speech and the estimate of the statistics of the noise. The statistics of the noise are estimated during time frames that do not contain speech. These statistics are used to determine if future time frames contain speech. During speech time frames, the algorithm determines which frequency sub-bands contain useful speech information and which frequency sub-bands contain only noise. The frequency sub-bands, which contain only noise, are subtracted off at a larger proportion so the noise does not compete with the speech information. Simulation results are presented.

  11. High sensitivity ultra-broad-band absorption spectroscopy of inductively coupled chlorine plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marinov, Daniil; Foucher, Mickaël; Campbell, Ewen; Brouard, Mark; Chabert, Pascal; Booth, Jean-Paul

    2016-06-01

    We propose a method to measure the densities of vibrationally excited Cl2(v) molecules in levels up to v  =  3 in pure chlorine inductively coupled plasmas (ICPs). The absorption continuum of Cl2 in the 250–450 nm spectral range is deconvoluted into the individual components originating from the different vibrational levels of the ground state, using a set of ab initio absorption cross sections. It is shown that gas heating at constant pressure is the major depletion mechanism of the Cl2 feedstock in the plasma. In these line-integrated absorption measurements, the absorption by the hot (and therefore rarefied) Cl2 gas in the reactor centre is masked by the cooler (and therefore denser) Cl2 near the walls. These radial gradients in temperature and density make it difficult to assess the degree of vibrational excitation in the centre of the reactor. The observed line-averaged vibrational distributions, when analyzed taking into account the radial temperature gradient, suggest that vibrational and translational degrees of freedom in the plasma are close to local equilibrium. This can be explained by efficient vibrational-translational (VT) relaxation between Cl2 and Cl atoms. Besides the Cl2(v) absorption band, a weak continuum absorption is observed at shorter wavelengths, and is attributed to photodetachment of Cl‑ negative ions. Thus, line-integrated densities of negative ions in chlorine plasmas can be directly measured using broad-band absorption spectroscopy.

  12. Characterization of Spectral Absorption Properties of Aerosols Using Satellite Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Torres, O.; Jethva, H.; Bhartia, P. K.; Ahn, C.

    2012-01-01

    The wavelength-dependence of aerosol absorption optical depth (AAOD) is generally represented in terms of the Angstrom Absorption Exponent (AAE), a parameter that describes the dependence of AAOD with wavelength. The AAE parameter is closely related to aerosol composition. Black carbon (BC) containing aerosols yield AAE values near unity whereas Organic carbon (OC) aerosol particles are associated with values larger than 2. Even larger AAE values have been reported for desert dust aerosol particles. Knowledge of spectral AAOD is necessary for the calculation of direct radiative forcing effect of aerosols and for inferring aerosol composition. We have developed a satellitebased method of determining the spectral AAOD of absorbing aerosols. The technique uses high spectral resolution measurements of upwelling radiation from scenes where absorbing aerosols lie above clouds as indicated by the UV Aerosol Index. For those conditions, the satellite measured reflectance (rho lambda) is approximately given by Beer's law rho lambda = rho (sub 0 lambda) e (exp -mtau (sub abs lambda)) where rho(sub 0 lambda) is the cloud reflectance, m is the geometric slant path and tau (sub abs lambda) is the spectral AAOD. The rho (sub 0 lambda) term is determined by means of radiative transfer calculations using as input the cloud optical depth derived as described in Torres et al. [JAS, 2012] that accounts for the effects of aerosol absorption. In the second step, corrections for molecular and aerosol scattering effects are applied to the cloud reflectance term, and the spectral AAOD is then derived by inverting the equation above. The proposed technique will be discussed in detail and application results will be presented. The technique can be easily applied to hyper-spectral satellite measurements that include UV such as OMI, GOME and SCIAMACHY, or to multi-spectral visible measurements by other sensors provided that the aerosol-above-cloud events are easily identified.

  13. Radiation absorption by the C2 band systems for Jupiter entry conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sutton, K.; Moss, J. N.

    1979-01-01

    Revised values of the absorption cross sections for seven electronic band systems of C2 have been calculated using recently published experimental data for the electronic transition moments. Using these revised C2 cross section values, computations were made for the radiating flow field over a Jupiter entry probe with coupled ablation injection from a carbon-phenolic heat shield. Results are presented which show that radiation absorption within the ablation layer for the spectral range of 4 to 6 eV is less than that predicted using previous C2 absorption cross section values. The effect of the reduced radiation absorption by the C2 molecule is an increase in the radiative heating rates and ablation mass loss rates for the Jupiter entry conditions considered in the study.

  14. Spectral band passes for a high precision satellite sounder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaplan, L. D.; Chahine, M. T.; Susskind, J.; Searl, J. E.

    1977-01-01

    Atmospheric temperature soundings with significantly improved vertical resolution can be obtained from carefully chosen narrow band-pass measurements in the 4.3-micron band of CO2 by taking advantage of the variation of the absorption coefficients, and thereby the weighting functions, with pressure and temperature. A set of channels has been found in the 4.2-micron region that is capable of yielding about 2-km vertical resolution in the troposphere. The concept of a complete system is presented for obtaining high resolution retrievals of temperature and water vapor distribution, as well as surface and cloud top temperatures, even in the presence of broken clouds.

  15. Evidence for sulphur implantation in Europa's UV absorption band

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lane, A. L.; Nelson, R. M.; Matson, D. L.

    1981-01-01

    The UV spectral characteristics of the Galilean satellites are investigated (using data from the International Ultraviolet Explorer (IUE) spacecraft) as a function of the orbital position, large-scale areal variability, and temporal dynamics. The discovery of an absorption feature at 280 nm in Europa's reflection spectrum is reported and observations show that the absorption is strongest on the trailing hemisphere (central longitude 270 degrees). The feature resembles SO2 and seems to result from S-O bond formation between deeply implanted sulphur atoms and the adjacent damaged water-ice-lattice. The sulphur supposedly comes from energetic (hundreds of keV) sulphur ions that are present in the Jovian magnetosphere. An appropriate equilibrium condition can be found to match the observed spectral data if sputtering erosion occurs at no greater than approximately 20 meters per one billion years.

  16. Concentration measurement of NO using self-absorption spectroscopy of the γ band system in a pulsed corona discharge.

    PubMed

    Zhai, Xiaodong; Ding, Yanjun; Peng, Zhimin; Luo, Rui

    2012-07-10

    Nitric oxide (NO) concentrations were measured using the γ band system spectrum based on the strong self-absorption effect of NO in pulsed corona discharges. The radiative transitional intensities of the NO γ band were simulated based on the theory of molecular spectroscopy. The intensities of some bands, especially γ(0,0) and γ(1,0), are weakened by the self-absorption. The correlations between the spectral self-absorption intensities and NO concentration were validated using a modified Beer-Lambert law with a combined factor K relating the branching ratio and the NO concentration, and a nonlinear index α that is applicable to the broadband system. Optical emissive spectra in pulsed corona discharges in NO and N2/He mixtures were used to evaluate the two parameters for various conditions. Good agreement between the experimental and theoretical results verifies the self-absorption behavior seen in the UV spectra of the NO γ bands. PMID:22781235

  17. Plasma absorption evidence via chirped pulse spectral transmission measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Jedrkiewicz, Ottavia; Minardi, Stefano; Couairon, Arnaud; Jukna, Vytautas; Selva, Marco; Di Trapani, Paolo

    2015-06-08

    This work aims at highlighting the plasma generation dynamics and absorption when a Bessel beam propagates in glass. We developed a simple diagnostics allowing us to retrieve clear indications of the formation of the plasma in the material, thanks to transmission measurements in the angular and wavelength domains. This technique featured by the use of a single chirped pulse having the role of pump and probe simultaneously leads to results showing the plasma nonlinear absorption effect on the trailing part of the pulse, thanks to the spectral-temporal correspondence in the measured signal, which is also confirmed by numerical simulations.

  18. A wide spectral range photoacoustic aerosol absorption spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Haisch, C; Menzenbach, P; Bladt, H; Niessner, R

    2012-11-01

    A photoacoustic spectrometer for the measurement of aerosol absorption spectra, based on the excitation of a pulsed nanosecond optical parametrical oscillator (OPO), will be introduced. This spectrometer is working at ambient pressure and can be used to detect and characterize different classes of aerosols. The spectrometer features a spectral range of 410 to 2500 nm and a sensitivity of 2.5 × 10(-7) m(-1) at 550 nm. A full characterization of the system in the visible spectral range is demonstrated, and the potential of the system for near IR measurement is discussed. In the example of different kinds of soot particles, the performance of the spectrometer was assessed. As we demonstrate, it is possible to determine a specific optical absorption per particle by a combination of the new spectrometer with an aerosol particle counter. PMID:23035870

  19. Laboratory Measurements of the 940, 1130, and 1370 nm Water Vapor Absorption Band Profiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giver, Lawrence P.; Gore, Warren J.; Pilewskie, P.; Freedman, R. S.; Chackerian, C., Jr.; Varanasi, P.

    2001-01-01

    We have used the solar spectral flux radiometer (SSFR) flight instrument with the Ames 25 meter base-path White cell to obtain about 20 moderate resolution (8 nm) pure water vapor spectra from 650 to 1650 nm, with absorbing paths from 806 to 1506 meters and pressures up to 14 torr. We also obtained a set at 806 meters with several different air-broadening pressures. Model simulations were made for the 940, 1130, and 1370 nm absorption bands for some of these laboratory conditions using the Rothman, et al HITRAN-2000 linelist. This new compilation of HITRAN includes new intensity measurements for the 940 nm region. We compared simulations for our spectra of this band using HITRAN-2000 with simulations using the prior HITRAN-1996. The simulations of the 1130 nm band show about 10% less absorption than we measured. There is some evidence that the total intensity of this band is about 38% stronger than the sum of the HITRAN line intensities in this region. In our laboratory conditions the absorption depends approximately on the square root of the intensity. Thus, our measurements agree that the band is stronger than tabulated in HITRAN, but by about 20%, substantially less than the published value. Significant differences have been shown between Doppler-limited resolution spectra of the 1370 nm band obtained at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and HITRAN simulations. Additional new intensity measurements in this region are continuing to be made. We expect the simulations of our SSFR lab data of this band will show the relative importance of improving the HITRAN line intensities of this band for atmospheric measurements.

  20. End-to-end sensor simulation for spectral band selection and optimization with application to the Sentinel-2 mission.

    PubMed

    Segl, Karl; Richter, Rudolf; Küster, Theres; Kaufmann, Hermann

    2012-02-01

    An end-to-end sensor simulation is a proper tool for the prediction of the sensor's performance over a range of conditions that cannot be easily measured. In this study, such a tool has been developed that enables the assessment of the optimum spectral resolution configuration of a sensor based on key applications. It employs the spectral molecular absorption and scattering properties of materials that are used for the identification and determination of the abundances of surface and atmospheric constituents and their interdependence on spatial resolution and signal-to-noise ratio as a basis for the detailed design and consolidation of spectral bands for the future Sentinel-2 sensor. The developed tools allow the computation of synthetic Sentinel-2 spectra that form the frame for the subsequent twofold analysis of bands in the atmospheric absorption and window regions. One part of the study comprises the assessment of optimal spatial and spectral resolution configurations for those bands used for atmospheric correction, optimized with regard to the retrieval of aerosols, water vapor, and the detection of cirrus clouds. The second part of the study presents the optimization of thematic bands, mainly driven by the spectral characteristics of vegetation constituents and minerals. The investigation is performed for different wavelength ranges because most remote sensing applications require the use of specific band combinations rather than single bands. The results from the important "red-edge" and the "short-wave infrared" domains are presented. The recommended optimum spectral design predominantly confirms the sensor parameters given by the European Space Agency. The system is capable of retrieving atmospheric and geobiophysical parameters with enhanced quality compared to existing multispectral sensors. Minor spectral changes of single bands are discussed in the context of typical remote sensing applications, supplemented by the recommendation of a few new bands for

  1. Optimization of spectral band utilization in gridless WDM optical network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martins, Indayara B.; Aldaya, Ivan; Perez-Sanchez, G.; Gallion, Philippe

    2014-02-01

    In this paper, the effects of gridless spectrum allocation in Wavelength Division Multiplexed (WDM) optical networks are examined. The advanced modulation formats and multi-rate transmissions of the signals, which are key parameters in the optical system project, are taken into account. The consumed spectrum, as well as the impact of linear and nonlinear impairments on the signal transmission, are compared to WDM network adopting standard grid and gridless ITU. To analyze the influence of these physical effects, some key network design parameters are monitored and evaluated, such as the guard band size, the signal occupied bandwidth, the laser power and the quality of channels. The applied signal modulation formats were On/Off Keying (OOK), Quadrature Phase Shift keying (QPSK), and Dual Polarization State Phase Modulation (DP-QPSK), whereas the transmission rate per wavelength was varied from 10 Gb/s to 100Ghz. The guard band, signal band, and laser power were swept and the resulted Bit Error Rate (BER) was estimated from the eye-diagram. Analytical calculations and simulations are conducted in order to evaluate the impact of the gridless spectrum allocation on both the spectral consumption and the signal quality of transmission (QoT). Results reveal that a gridless transmission system reduces the spectral consumption while offering an acceptable QoT. This work was carried out with both analytical modeling and numerical calculation using the Optisystem as well as Matlab.

  2. Spectral absorption coefficients of argon and silicon and spectral reflectivity of aluminum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krascella, N. L.

    1972-01-01

    A theoretical investigation was conducted to estimate the spectral properties of argon as a function of pressure, temperature, and wave number. The spectral characteristics of the argon buffer gas exert a strong influence on radiative energy transfer in the in-reactor test configuration of the nuclear light bulb engine. An existing computer program was modified and used to calculate the spectral absorption coefficients of argon at total pressures of 50, 100, 250, 500, 750 and 1000 atm in the temperature interval between 1000 and 30,000 K. At each pressure and temperature, spectral properties were calculated for forty-seven wave numbers in the interval between 1000 and 1,000,000 cm/1. Estimates of the spectral absorption coefficients of silicon were made as part of an evaluation of silicon vapor as a possible buffer-gas seeding agent for the reference nuclear light bulb engine. Existing cross-section data were used to calculate the spectral characteristics of silicon at twenty-four temperatures in the interval between 2000 and 10,000 K.

  3. Absorption spectrum of NO in the {gamma}(O, O) band

    SciTech Connect

    Zobnin, A.V.; Korotkov, A.N.

    1995-05-01

    A promising technique for determining the concentration of nitrogen oxide in the air of an industrial zone and in process gases is the measurement of the absorption of UV radiation by this molecule in the {gamma}(O,O) band with the center of {lambda}{sub 0} = 226.5 nm. This band corresponds to the transition X{sup 2}{Pi}{yields}{Alpha}{sup 2}{Sigma} of the NO molecule and is characterized by a complex rotational structure consisting of about 400 lines. This structure cannot be resolved completely by most spectral instruments. However, if the width of the spread function of the device is perceptibly smaller than the width of the given absorption band ({approx_equal}2 nm), but larger than the characteristic space between rotational lines ({approx_equal}0.02 nm), then the recorded transmission spectra of NO are almost insensitive to a change in the form of this function. In the given case, to describe the transmission spectrum it is possible to use the absorption coefficient averaged over rotational lines. And even though the Bouger-Lambert-Beer law is not strictly applicable for this spectrum, the dependence of the transmission spectrum of NO on the optical thickness, temperature, and pressure of the broadening gas can be represented in the form of an empirical dependence that can be useful in practice, for example, when processing the absorption spectra recorded by dispersion gas analyzers. Thus, the need for complex and laborious calculations is avoided, and this simplifies considerably the instrumental implementation of this method of measuring the concentration of NO. The object of the present work is to determine the empirical dependence of the absorption spectrum of NO in the {gamma}(O, O) band on the optical thickness, temperature, and pressure of the broadening gas in the ranges most frequently encountered in operation of dispersion gas analyzers.

  4. Photodissociation of vibrationally excited water in the first absorption band

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weide, Klaus; Hennig, Steffen; Schinke, Reinhard

    1989-12-01

    We investigate the photodissociation of highly excited vibrational states of water in the first absorption band. The calculation includes an ab initio potential energy surface for the Östate and an ab initio X˜→Ã transition dipole function. The bending angle is fixed at the equilibrium value within the ground electronic state. Most interesting is the high sensitivity of the final vibrational distribution of OH on the initially prepared vibrational state of H2 O. At wavelengths near the onset of the absorption spectrum the vibrational state distribution can be qualitatively understood as a Franck-Condon mapping of the initial H2 O wave function. At smaller wavelengths final state interaction in the excited state becomes stronger and the distributions become successively broader. Our calculations are in satisfactory accord with recent measurements of Vander Wal and Crim.

  5. AKARI observations of ice absorption bands towards edge-on young stellar objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aikawa, Y.; Kamuro, D.; Sakon, I.; Itoh, Y.; Terada, H.; Noble, J. A.; Pontoppidan, K. M.; Fraser, H. J.; Tamura, M.; Kandori, R.; Kawamura, A.; Ueno, M.

    2012-02-01

    Context. Circumstellar disks and envelopes of low-mass young stellar objects (YSOs) contain significant amounts of ice. Such icy material will evolve to become volatile components of planetary systems, such as comets in our solar system. Aims: To investigate the composition and evolution of circumstellar ice around low-mass young stellar objects (YSOs), we observed ice absorption bands in the near infrared (NIR) towards eight YSOs ranging from class 0 to class II, among which seven are associated with edge-on disks. Methods: We performed slit-less spectroscopic observations using the grism mode of the InfraRed Camera (IRC) on board AKARI, which enables us to obtain full NIR spectra from 2.5 μm to 5 μm, including the CO2 band and the blue wing of the H2O band, which are inaccessible from the ground. We developed procedures to carefully process the spectra of targets with nebulosity. The spectra were fitted with polynomial baselines to derive the absorption spectra. The molecular absorption bands were then fitted with the laboratory database of ice absorption bands, considering the instrumental line profile and the spectral resolution of the grism dispersion element. Results: Towards the class 0-I sources (L1527, IRC-L1041-2, and IRAS 04302), absorption bands of H2O, CO2, CO, and XCN are clearly detected. Column density ratios of CO2 ice and CO ice relative to H2O ice are 21-28% and 13-46%, respectively. If XCN is OCN-, its column density is as high as 2-6% relative to H2O ice. The HDO ice feature at 4.1 μm is tentatively detected towards the class 0-I sources and HV Tau. Non-detections of the CH-stretching mode features around 3.5 μm provide upper limits to the CH3OH abundance of 26% (L1527) and 42% (IRAS 04302) relative to H2O. We tentatively detect OCS ice absorption towards IRC-L1041-2. Towards class 0-I sources, the detected features should mostly originate in the cold envelope, while CO gas and OCN- could originate in the region close to the protostar

  6. Assignment and rotational analysis of new absorption bands of carbon dioxide isotopologues in Venus spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robert, S.; Borkov, Yu. G.; Vander Auwera, J.; Drummond, R.; Mahieux, A.; Wilquet, V.; Vandaele, A. C.; Perevalov, V. I.; Tashkun, S. A.; Bertaux, J. L.

    2013-01-01

    We present absorption bands of carbon dioxide isotopologues, detected by the Solar Occultation for the Infrared Range (SOIR) instrument on board the Venus Express Satellite. The SOIR instrument combines an echelle spectrometer and an Acousto-Optical Tunable Filter (AOTF) for order selection. It performs solar occultation measurements in the Venus atmosphere in the IR region (2.2-4.3 μm), at a resolution of 0.12-0.18 cm-1. The wavelength range probed by SOIR allows a detailed chemical inventory of the Venus atmosphere above the cloud layer (65-150 km) to be made with emphasis on the vertical distributions of gases. Thanks to the SOIR spectral resolution, a new CO2 absorption band was identified: the 21101-01101 band of 16O12C18O with R branch up to J=31. Two other previously reported bands were observed dispelling any doubts about their identifications: the 20001-00001 band of 16O13C18O [Villanueva G, et al. J Quant Spectrosc Radiat Transfer 2008;109:883-894] and the 01111-00001 band of 16O12C18O [Villanueva G, et al. J Quant Spectrosc Radiat Transfer 2008;109:883-894 and Wilquet V, et al. J Quant Spectrosc Radiat Transfer 2008;109:895-905]. These bands were analyzed, and spectroscopic constants characterizing them were obtained. The rotational assignment of the 20001-00001 band was corrected. The present measurements are compared with data available in the HITRAN database.

  7. Spectral absorption-coefficient data on HCFC-22 and SF6 for remote-sensing applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Varanasi, P.; Li, Z.; Nemtchinov, V.; Cherukuri, A.

    1994-01-01

    Spectral absorption-coefficients (cross-sections) kappa(sub nu) (/cm/atm) have been measured in the 7.62, 8.97, and 12.3 micrometer bands of HCFC-22 (CHClF2) and the 10.6 micrometer bands of SF6 employing a high-resolution Fourier-transform spectrometer. Temperature and total pressure have been varied to simulate conditions corresponding to tropospheric and stratospheric layers in the atmosphere. The kappa(sub nu) are compared with values measured by us previously using a tunable diode laser spectrometer and with the appropriate entries in HITRAN and GEISA, two of the databases known to the atmospheric scientist. The measured absolute intensities of the bands are compared with previously published values.

  8. Atmospheric-water absorption features near 2.2 micrometers and their importance in high spectral resolution remote sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kruse, F. A.; Clark, R. N.

    1986-01-01

    Selective absorption of electromagnetic radiation by atmospheric gases and water vapor is an accepted fact in terrestrial remote sensing. Until recently, only a general knowledge of atmospheric effects was required for analysis of remote sensing data; however, with the advent of high spectral resolution imaging devices, detailed knowledge of atmospheric absorption bands has become increasingly important for accurate analysis. Detailed study of high spectral resolution aircraft data at the U.S. Geological Survey has disclosed narrow absorption features centered at approximately 2.17 and 2.20 micrometers not caused by surface mineralogy. Published atmospheric transmission spectra and atmospheric spectra derived using the LOWTRAN-5 computer model indicate that these absorption features are probably water vapor. Spectral modeling indicates that the effects of atmospheric absorption in this region are most pronounced in spectrally flat materials with only weak absorption bands. Without correction and detailed knowledge of the atmospheric effects, accurate mapping of surface mineralogy (particularly at low mineral concentrations) is not possible.

  9. Femtosecond supercontinuum generation in water in the vicinity of absorption bands.

    PubMed

    Dharmadhikari, J A; Steinmeyer, G; Gopakumar, G; Mathur, D; Dharmadhikari, A K

    2016-08-01

    We show that it is possible to overcome the perceived limitations caused by absorption bands in water so as to generate supercontinuum (SC) spectra in the anomalous dispersion regime that extend well beyond 2000 nm wavelength. By choosing a pump wavelength within a few hundred nanometers above the zero-dispersion wavelength of 1048 nm, initial spectral broadening extends into the normal dispersion regime and, in turn, the SC process in the visible strongly benefits from phase-matching and matching group velocities between dispersive radiation and light in the anomalous dispersion regime. Some of the SC spectra are shown to encompass two and a half octaves. PMID:27472597

  10. Optical Communications in the mid-wave IR spectral band

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasad, Narasimha S.

    The mid-wave IR (MWIR) spectral band extending from 3 to 5 microns is considered to be a low loss atmospheric window. The MWIR wavelengths are eye safe and are attractive for several free-space applications including remote sensing of chemical and biological species, hard target imaging, range finding, target illumination, and free-space Communications. Due to the nature of light-matter interaction characteristics, MWIR wavelength based Systems can provide unique advantages over other spectral bands for these applications, The MWIR wavelengths are found to effectively penetrate natural and anthropogenic obscurants. Consequently, MWIR Systems offer increased range Performance at reduced power levels. Free-space, line-of-sight optical communication links for terrestrial as well as space based platforms using MWIR wavelengths can be designed to operate under low visibility conditions. Combined with high-bandwidth, eye-safe, covert and jam proof features, a MWIR wavelength based optical communication link could play a vital role in hostile environments.

  11. Spectral calibration of hyperspectral imagery using atmospheric absorption features.

    PubMed

    Guanter, Luis; Richter, Rudolf; Moreno, José

    2006-04-01

    One of the initial steps in the preprocessing of remote sensing data is the atmospheric correction of the at-sensor radiance images, i.e., radiances recorded at the sensor aperture. Apart from the accuracy in the estimation of the concentrations of the main atmospheric species, the retrieved surface reflectance is also influenced by the spectral calibration of the sensor, especially in those wavelengths mostly affected by gaseous absorptions. In particular, errors in the surface reflectance appear when a systematic shift in the nominal channel positions occurs. A method to assess the spectral calibration of hyperspectral imaging spectrometers from the acquired imagery is presented in this paper. The fundamental basis of the method is the calculation of the value of the spectral shift that minimizes the error in the estimates of surface reflectance. This is performed by an optimization procedure that minimizes the deviation between a surface reflectance spectrum and a smoothed one resulting from the application of a low-pass filter. A sensitivity analysis was performed using synthetic data generated with the MODTRAN4 radiative transfer code for several values of the spectral shift and the water vapor column content. The error detected in the retrieval is less than +/- 0.2 nm for spectral shifts smaller than 2 nm, and less than +/- 1.0 nm for extreme spectral shifts of 5 nm. A low sensitivity to uncertainties in the estimation of water vapor content was found, which reinforces the robustness of the algorithm. The method was successfully applied to data acquired by different hyperspectral sensors. PMID:16608005

  12. A High Spectral Resolution Lidar Based on Absorption Filter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Piironen, Paivi

    1996-01-01

    A High Spectral Resolution Lidar (HSRL) that uses an iodine absorption filter and a tunable, narrow bandwidth Nd:YAG laser is demonstrated. The iodine absorption filter provides better performance than the Fabry-Perot etalon that it replaces. This study presents an instrument design that can be used a the basis for a design of a simple and robust lidar for the measurement of the optical properties of the atmosphere. The HSRL provides calibrated measurements of the optical properties of the atmospheric aerosols. These observations include measurements of aerosol backscatter cross sections, optical depth, backscatter phase function depolarization, and multiple scattering. The errors in the HSRL data are discussed and the effects of different errors on the measured optical parameters are shown.

  13. [Study on exploring for gas based on analysis of spectral absorption features].

    PubMed

    Xu, Da-Qi; Ni, Guo-Qiang; Jiang, Li-Li; Li, Ting; Ge, Shu-Le; Shu, Xian-Biao

    2007-11-01

    Reflectance spectra in the visible and near-infrared wavelength region provide a rapid and inexpensive means for determining the mineralogy of samples and obtaining information on chemical composition. Hydrocarbon microseepage theory establishes a cause-and-effect relation between oil and gas reservoirs and some special surface anomalies. Therefore the authors can explore for oil and gas by determining the reflectance spectra of surface anomalies. This determination can be fulfilled by means of field work and hyperspectral remote sensing. In the present paper, based on the analysis of reflectance spectra determined in the field of Qinghai X X area, firstly, a macroscopic feature of the reflectance spectra of typical observation points in the gas fields is presented. Secondly, absorption-band parameters of spectra such as the position, depth, width, and asymmetry are extracted. Based on the spectral absorption features of the spectra of 144 samples collected from the field, a spectral library for the Qinghai X X area is built to make the detection of the mineral alterations more rapid and reliable. Thirdly, two methods are improved and proposed to detect hydrocarbon microseepage using hydrocarbon absorption bands of reflectance spectra determined from the field. Finally, a linear unmixing model is studied based on the spectra of 144 samples so as to semi-quantitatively determine the abundance fractions of main minerals in the authors' studied area. PMID:18260381

  14. Spectral variation of the infrared absorption coefficient in pulsed photothermal profiling of biological samples.

    PubMed

    Majaron, Boris; Verkruysse, Wim; Tanenbaum, B Samuel; Milner, Thomas E; Nelson, J Stuart

    2002-06-01

    Pulsed photothermal radiometry can be used for non-invasive depth profiling of optically scattering samples, including biological tissues such as human skin. Computational reconstruction of the laser-induced temperature profile from recorded radiometric signals is sensitive to the value of the tissue absorption coefficient in the infrared detection band (muIR). While assumed constant in reported reconstruction algorithms, muIR of human skin varies by two orders of magnitude in the commonly used 3-5 microm detection band. We analyse the problem of selecting the effective absorption coefficient value to be used with such algorithms. In a numerical simulation of photothermal profiling we demonstrate that results can be markedly impaired, unless the reconstruction algorithm is augmented by accounting for spectral variation muIR(lambda). Alternatively, narrowing the detection band to 4.5-5 microm reduces the spectral variation muIR(lambda) to a level that permits the use of the simpler, unaugmented algorithm. Implementation of the latter approach for depth profiling of port wine stain birthmarks in vivo is presented and discussed. PMID:12108776

  15. The use of high spectral resolution bands for estimating absorbed photosynthetically active radiation (A par)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Moon S.; Daughtry, C. S. T.; Chappelle, E. W.; Mcmurtrey, J. E.; Walthall, C. L.

    1994-01-01

    Most remote sensing estimations of vegetation variables such as Leaf Area Index (LAI), Absorbed Photosynthetically Active Radiation (APAR), and phytomass are made using broad band sensors with a bandwidth of approximately 100 nm. However, high resolution spectrometers are available and have not been fully exploited for the purpose of improving estimates of vegetation variables. A study directed to investigate the use of high spectral resolution spectroscopy for remote sensing estimates of APAR in vegetation canopies in the presence of nonphotosynthetic background materials such as soil and leaf litter is presented. A high spectral resolution method defined as the Chlorophyll Absorption Ratio Index (CARI) was developed for minimizing the effects of nonphotosynthetic materials in the remote estimates of APAR. CARI utilizes three bands at 550, 670, and 700 nm with bandwidth of 10 nm. Simulated canopy reflectance of a range of LAI were generated with the SAIL model using measurements of 42 different soil types as canopy background. CARI obtained from the simulated canopy reflectance was compared with the broad band vegetation indices (Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI), Soil Adjusted Vegetation Index (SAVI), and Simple Ratio (SR)). CARI reduced the effect of nonphotosynthetic background materials in the assessment of vegetation canopy APAR more effectively than broad band vegetation indices.

  16. Oral cancer detection using diffuse reflectance spectral ratio R540/R575 of oxygenated hemoglobin bands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subhash, N.; Mallia, J. R.; Thomas, S. S.; Mathews, A.; Sebastian, P.; Madhaven, J.

    2006-01-01

    A low-cost, fast, and noninvasive method for early diagnosis of malignant lesions of oral mucosa based on diffuse reflectance spectral signatures is presented. In this technique, output of a tungsten halogen lamp is guided to the tissue through the central fiber of a reflection probe whose surrounding six fibers collects tissue reflectance. Ex vivo diffuse reflectance spectra in the 400 to 600-nm region is measured from surgically removed oral cavity lesions using a miniature fiber optic spectrometer connected to a computer. Reflectance spectral intensity is higher in malignant tissues and shows dips at 542 and 577 nm owing to absorption from oxygenated hemoglobin (HbO2). Measurements carried out, within an hour of surgical excision, on malignant lesion and adjoining uninvolved mucosa show that these absorption features are more prominent in neoplastic tissues owing to increased microvasculature and blood content. It is observed that reflectance intensity ratio of hemoglobin bands, R540/R575, from malignant sites are always lower than that from normal sites and vary according to the histological grade of malignancy. The diffuse reflectance intensity ratio R540/R575 of the hemoglobin bands appears to be a useful tool to discriminate between malignant lesions and normal mucosa of the oral cavity in a clinical setting.

  17. Dual spectral band reconnaissance systems for multiple platforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wyatt, Steve H.

    2002-11-01

    Recon/Optical, Inc. (ROI) has a family of digital, dual spectral band (visible/IR) cameras that is readily applicable for reconnaissance missions on virtually any airborne platform available today. Each camera is based on a modular design that allows reconfiguration for a multitude of volumetric and mission constraints. The open architecture facilitates integration as either a reconnaissance system components or as the system master controller. Output data can be formatted to satisfy either NITF or STANAG requirements making the camera adaptable to applications throughout the world. These cameras offer several key features, including a stabilization system, that can be tuned to each platform, optional data compression to optimize data storage and data link performance, and a camera-mounted inertial measurement unit for improved pointing accuracy. These and other core capabilities are especially beneficial to users with unique platform integration requirements. Camera flexibility translates into low-risk integration to a variety of reconnaissance platforms.

  18. Broad band spectral energy distribution studies of Fermi bright blazars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monte, C.; Giommi, P.; Cavazzuti, E.; Gasparrini, D.; Rainò, S.; Fuhrmann, L.; Angelakis, E.; Villata, M.; Raiteri, C. M.; Perri, M.; Richards, J.

    2011-02-01

    The Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope was successfully launched on June 11, 2008 and has already opened a new era for gamma-ray astronomy. The Large Area Telescope (LAT), the main instrument on board Fermi, presents a significant improvement in sensitivity over its predecessor EGRET, due to its large field of view and effective area, combined with its excellent timing capabilities. The preliminary results of the Spectral Energy Distribution Analysis performed on a sample of bright blazars are presented. For this study, the data from the first three months of data collection of Fermi have been used. The analysis is extended down to radio, mm, near-IR, optical, UV and X-ray bands and up to TeV energies based on unprecedented sample of simultaneous multi-wavelength observations by GASP-WEBT.

  19. A comparative study of the thematic mapper and Landsat spectral bands from field measurement data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Badhwar, G. D.; Henderson, K. E.

    1982-01-01

    Principal component and factor analysis techniques were applied to the spectral data collected over 27 field plots of various crops under varying agronomic conditions. The spectral data was integrated over the proposed thematic mapper bands and Landsat MSS spectral bands. The results were examined to compare the discrimination power of the thematic mapper. Previously announced in STAR as N81-33549

  20. M Dwarf Luminosity, Radius, and α-enrichment from I-band Spectral Features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terrien, Ryan C.; Mahadevan, Suvrath; Bender, Chad F.; Deshpande, Rohit; Robertson, Paul

    2015-03-01

    Despite the ubiquity of M dwarfs and their growing importance to studies of exoplanets, Galactic evolution, and stellar structure, methods for precisely measuring their fundamental stellar properties remain elusive. Existing techniques for measuring M dwarf luminosity, mass, radius, or composition are calibrated over a limited range of stellar parameters or require expensive observations. We find a strong correlation between the KS-band luminosity (MK), the observed strength of the I-band sodium doublet absorption feature, and [Fe/H] in M dwarfs without strong Hα emission. We show that the strength of this feature, coupled with [Fe/H] and spectral type, can be used to derive M dwarf MK and radius without requiring parallax. Additionally, we find promising evidence that the strengths of the I-band sodium doublet and the nearby I-band calcium triplet may jointly indicate α-element enrichment. The use of these I-band features requires only moderate-resolution near-infrared spectroscopy to provide valuable information about the potential habitability of exoplanets around M dwarfs, and surface gravity and distance for M dwarfs throughout the Galaxy. This technique has immediate applicability for both target selection and candidate planet-host system characterization for exoplanet missions such as TESS and K2.

  1. Calibration improvements for MODIS and VIIRS SWIR spectral bands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Xiaoxiong; Angal, Amit; Fulbright, Jon; Lei, Ning; Mu, Qiaozhen; Wang, Zhipeng; Wu, Aisheng

    2015-09-01

    Both MODIS and VIIRS use a solar diffuser (SD) to calibrate their reflective solar bands (RSB), covering wavelengths from 0.41 to 2.3 μm. On-orbit changes of the SD bi-directional reflectance factor (BRF) are tracked by an on-board solar diffuser stability monitor (SDSM). The current SDSM design only covers the spectral range from 0.41 to 0.93 μm. In general, the SD degradation is strongly wavelength-dependent with larger degradation occurring at shorter wavelengths, and the degradation in the SWIR region is expected to be extremely small. As each mission continues, however, the impact due to SD degradation at SWIR needs to be carefully examined and the correction if necessary should be applied in order to maintain the calibration quality. For Terra MODIS, alternative approaches have been developed and used to estimate the SD degradation for its band 5 at 1.24 μm and a time-dependent correction has already been applied to the current level 1B (L1B) collection 6 (C6). In this paper, we present different methodologies that can be used to examine the SD degradation and their applications for both Terra and Aqua MODIS and S-NPP VIIRS SWIR calibration. These methodologies include but not limited to the use of lunar observations, Pseudo Invariant Calibration Sites (PICS), and deep convective clouds (DCC). A brief description of relative approaches and their use is also provided in this paper.

  2. Airborne imaging spectrometer data of the Ruby Mountains, Montana: Mineral discrimination using relative absorption band-depth images

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Crowley, J.K.; Brickey, D.W.; Rowan, L.C.

    1989-01-01

    Airborne imaging spectrometer data collected in the near-infrared (1.2-2.4 ??m) wavelength range were used to study the spectral expression of metamorphic minerals and rocks in the Ruby Mountains of southwestern Montana. The data were analyzed by using a new data enhancement procedure-the construction of relative absorption band-depth (RBD) images. RBD images, like bandratio images, are designed to detect diagnostic mineral absorption features, while minimizing reflectance variations related to topographic slope and albedo differences. To produce an RBD image, several data channels near an absorption band shoulder are summed and then divided by the sum of several channels located near the band minimum. RBD images are both highly specific and sensitive to the presence of particular mineral absorption features. Further, the technique does not distort or subdue spectral features as sometimes occurs when using other data normalization methods. By using RBD images, a number of rock and soil units were distinguished in the Ruby Mountains including weathered quartz - feldspar pegmatites, marbles of several compositions, and soils developed over poorly exposed mica schists. The RBD technique is especially well suited for detecting weak near-infrared spectral features produced by soils, which may permit improved mapping of subtle lithologic and structural details in semiarid terrains. The observation of soils rich in talc, an important industrial commodity in the study area, also indicates that RBD images may be useful for mineral exploration. ?? 1989.

  3. Optical absorption of nanoporous silicon: quasiparticle band gaps and absorption spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Guangsha; Kioupakis, Emmanouil

    2013-03-01

    Silicon is an earth-abundant material of great importance in semiconductors electronics, but its photovoltaic applications are limited by the low absorption coefficient in the visible due to its indirect band gap. One strategy to improve the absorbance is to perforate silicon with nanoscale pores, which introduce carrier scattering that enables optical transitions across the indirect gap. We used density functional and many-body perturbation theory in the GW approximation to investigate the electronic and optical properties of porous silicon for various pore sizes, spacings, and orientations. Our calculations include up to 400 atoms in the unit cell. We will discuss the connection of the band-gap value and absorption coefficient to the underlying nanopore geometry. The absorption coefficient in the visible range is found to be optimal for appropriately chosen nanopore size, spacing, and orientation. Our work allows us to predict porous-silicon structures that may have optimal performance in photovoltaic applications. This research was supported as part of CSTEC, an Energy Frontier Research Center funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science. Computational resources were provided by the DOE NERSC facility.

  4. Spectrally resolved white light interferometry to measure material dispersion over a wide spectral band in a single acquisition.

    PubMed

    Arosa, Yago; Lago, Elena López; Varela, Luis Miguel; de la Fuente, Raúl

    2016-07-25

    In this paper we apply spectrally resolved white light interferometry to measure refractive and group index over a wide spectral band from 400 to 1000 nm. The output of a Michelson interferometer is spectrally decomposed by a homemade prism spectrometer with a high resolution camera. The group index is determined directly from the phase extracted from the spectral interferogram while the refractive index is estimated once its value at a given wavelength is known. PMID:27464179

  5. Propane absorption band intensities and band model parameters from 680 to 1580/cm at 296 and 200 K

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giver, L. P.; Valero, F. P. J.; Varanasi, P.

    1984-01-01

    Band intensities and profiles have been measured for the propane absorption bands from 680 to 1580/cm at 296 and 200 K. This work was stimulated by the discovery of several propane bands in the spectrum of Titan by the Voyager 1 spacecraft. The low temperature laboratory data show that the bands become narrower and the Q branches of the bands somewhat stronger than they are at room temperature. Random band model parameters were determined over the entire region from the 42 spectra obtained at room temperature.

  6. Spectral Similarity Assessment Based on a Spectrum Reflectance-Absorption Index and Simplified Curve Patterns for Hyperspectral Remote Sensing.

    PubMed

    Ma, Dan; Liu, Jun; Huang, Junyi; Li, Huali; Liu, Ping; Chen, Huijuan; Qian, Jing

    2016-01-01

    Hyperspectral images possess properties such as rich spectral information, narrow bandwidth, and large numbers of bands. Finding effective methods to retrieve land features from an image by using similarity assessment indices with specific spectral characteristics is an important research question. This paper reports a novel hyperspectral image similarity assessment index based on spectral curve patterns and a reflection-absorption index. First, some spectral reflection-absorption features are extracted to restrict the subsequent curve simplification. Then, the improved Douglas-Peucker algorithm is employed to simplify all spectral curves without setting the thresholds. Finally, the simplified curves with the feature points are matched, and the similarities among the spectral curves are calculated using the matched points. The Airborne Visible Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) and Reflective Optics System Imaging Spectrometer (ROSIS) hyperspectral image datasets are then selected to test the effect of the proposed index. The practical experiments indicate that the proposed index can achieve higher precision and fewer points than the traditional spectral information divergence and spectral angle match. PMID:26821030

  7. Spectral Similarity Assessment Based on a Spectrum Reflectance-Absorption Index and Simplified Curve Patterns for Hyperspectral Remote Sensing

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Dan; Liu, Jun; Huang, Junyi; Li, Huali; Liu, Ping; Chen, Huijuan; Qian, Jing

    2016-01-01

    Hyperspectral images possess properties such as rich spectral information, narrow bandwidth, and large numbers of bands. Finding effective methods to retrieve land features from an image by using similarity assessment indices with specific spectral characteristics is an important research question. This paper reports a novel hyperspectral image similarity assessment index based on spectral curve patterns and a reflection-absorption index. First, some spectral reflection-absorption features are extracted to restrict the subsequent curve simplification. Then, the improved Douglas-Peucker algorithm is employed to simplify all spectral curves without setting the thresholds. Finally, the simplified curves with the feature points are matched, and the similarities among the spectral curves are calculated using the matched points. The Airborne Visible Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) and Reflective Optics System Imaging Spectrometer (ROSIS) hyperspectral image datasets are then selected to test the effect of the proposed index. The practical experiments indicate that the proposed index can achieve higher precision and fewer points than the traditional spectral information divergence and spectral angle match. PMID:26821030

  8. Relationships between Electroencephalographic Spectral Peaks Across Frequency Bands

    PubMed Central

    van Albada, S. J.; Robinson, P. A.

    2013-01-01

    The degree to which electroencephalographic spectral peaks are independent, and the relationships between their frequencies have been debated. A novel fitting method was used to determine peak parameters in the range 2–35 Hz from a large sample of eyes-closed spectra, and their interrelationships were investigated. Findings were compared with a mean-field model of thalamocortical activity, which predicts near-harmonic relationships between peaks. The subject set consisted of 1424 healthy subjects from the Brain Resource International Database. Peaks in the theta range occurred on average near half the alpha peak frequency, while peaks in the beta range tended to occur near twice and three times the alpha peak frequency on an individual-subject basis. Moreover, for the majority of subjects, alpha peak frequencies were significantly positively correlated with frequencies of peaks in the theta and low and high beta ranges. Such a harmonic progression agrees semiquantitatively with theoretical predictions from the mean-field model. These findings indicate a common or analogous source for different rhythms, and help to define appropriate individual frequency bands for peak identification. PMID:23483663

  9. Testing of infrared image enhancing algorithm in different spectral bands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dulski, R.; Sosnowski, T.; Kastek, M.; Trzaskawka, P.

    2012-06-01

    The paper presents results of testing the infrared image quality enhancing algorithm based on histogram processing. Testing were performed on real images registered in NIR, MWIR, and LWIR spectral bands. Infrared images are a very specific type of information. The perception and interpretation of such image depends not only on radiative properties of observed objects and surrounding scenery. Probably still most important are skills and experience of an observer itself. In practice, the optimal settings of the camera as well as automatic temperature range or contrast control do not guarantee the displayed images are optimal from observer's point of view. The solution to this are algorithms of image quality enhancing based on digital image processing methods. Such algorithms can be implemented inside the camera or applied later, after image registration. They must improve the visibility of low-contrast objects. They should also provide effective dynamic contrast control not only across entire image but also selectively to specific areas in order to maintain optimal visualization of observed scenery. In the paper one histogram equalization algorithm was tested. Adaptive nature of the algorithm should assure significant improvement of the image quality and the same effectiveness of object detection. Another requirement and difficulty is that it should also be effective for any given thermal image and it should not cause a visible image degradation in unpredictable situations. The application of tested algorithm is a promising alternative to a very effective but complex algorithms due to its low complexity and real time operation.

  10. Degree of interdependence among atmospheric optical thicknesses in spectral bands between 0.36-2.4 micron

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fraser, R. S.

    1975-01-01

    The degree of dependence among the atmospheric optical thicknesses that are measured in nonselective absorption bands is studied. The observations were made previously in many spectral bands within the range 0.36-2.4 micron from near sea level in two continents where urban and industrial pollutions were weak. The sample covariance matrices and corresponding eigenvalues and eigenvectors are computed. The two highest eigenvalues account for 90% of the total variance in 10 spectral bands within the range 0.4-1.6 micron. The linear regression of the optical thickness on the total precipitable water vapor is computed to determine the attenuation coefficient that is associated with water vapor. This coefficient shows a rapid power-law decrease with wavelength in the visible spectrum and indicates that numerous water particles of radius 0.03-0.06 micron cause the attenuation.

  11. Effects of spectrometer band pass, sampling, and signal-to-noise ratio on spectral identification using the Tetracorder algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swayze, Gregg A.; Clark, Roger N.; Goetz, Alexander F. H.; Chrien, Thomas G.; Gorelick, Noel S.

    2003-09-01

    Estimates of spectrometer band pass, sampling interval, and signal-to-noise ratio required for identification of pure minerals and plants were derived using reflectance spectra convolved to AVIRIS, HYDICE, MIVIS, VIMS, and other imaging spectrometers. For each spectral simulation, various levels of random noise were added to the reflectance spectra after convolution, and then each was analyzed with the Tetracorder spectral identification algorithm [Clark et al., 2003]. The outcome of each identification attempt was tabulated to provide an estimate of the signal-to-noise ratio at which a given percentage of the noisy spectra were identified correctly. Results show that spectral identification is most sensitive to the signal-to-noise ratio at narrow sampling interval values but is more sensitive to the sampling interval itself at broad sampling interval values because of spectral aliasing, a condition when absorption features of different materials can resemble one another. The band pass is less critical to spectral identification than the sampling interval or signal-to-noise ratio because broadening the band pass does not induce spectral aliasing. These conclusions are empirically corroborated by analysis of mineral maps of AVIRIS data collected at Cuprite, Nevada, between 1990 and 1995, a period during which the sensor signal-to-noise ratio increased up to sixfold. There are values of spectrometer sampling and band pass beyond which spectral identification of materials will require an abrupt increase in sensor signal-to-noise ratio due to the effects of spectral aliasing. Factors that control this threshold are the uniqueness of a material's diagnostic absorptions in terms of shape and wavelength isolation, and the spectral diversity of the materials found in nature and in the spectral library used for comparison. Array spectrometers provide the best data for identification when they critically sample spectra. The sampling interval should not be broadened to

  12. Analysis of airborne imaging spectrometer data for the Ruby Mountains, Montana, by use of absorption-band-depth images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brickey, David W.; Crowley, James K.; Rowan, Lawrence C.

    1987-01-01

    Airborne Imaging Spectrometer-1 (AIS-1) data were obtained for an area of amphibolite grade metamorphic rocks that have moderate rangeland vegetation cover. Although rock exposures are sparse and patchy at this site, soils are visible through the vegetation and typically comprise 20 to 30 percent of the surface area. Channel averaged low band depth images for diagnostic soil rock absorption bands. Sets of three such images were combined to produce color composite band depth images. This relative simple approach did not require extensive calibration efforts and was effective for discerning a number of spectrally distinctive rocks and soils, including soils having high talc concentrations. The results show that the high spectral and spatial resolution of AIS-1 and future sensors hold considerable promise for mapping mineral variations in soil, even in moderately vegetated areas.

  13. A model for the spectral dependence of optically induced absorption in amorphous silicon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawandy, N. M.

    1990-01-01

    A model based on transitions from localized band tail states to states above the mobility edge is used to explain the broad band induced absorptions observed in recent pump-probe experiments. The model gives the observed decrease of absorption with frequency at subband gap photo energies and high carrier densities (of about 10 to the 20th/cu cm). At lower carrier densities, the absorption has a maximun which is sensitive to the spatial extent of the band tail states.

  14. Absorption and fluorescent spectral studies of imidazophenazine derivatives.

    PubMed

    Ryazanova, O A; Zozulya, V N; Voloshin, I M; Karachevtsev, V A; Makitruk, V L; Stepanian, S G

    2004-07-01

    Absorption and fluorescent spectra as well as fluorescence polarization degree of imidazo-[4,5-d]-phenazine (F1) and its two modified derivatives, 2-trifluoridemethylimidazo-[4,5-d]-phenazine (F2) and 1,2,3-triazole-[4,5-d]-phenazine (F3), were investigated in organic solvents of various polarities and hydrogen bonding abilities. Extinction coefficients of F2 and F3 are increased, their fluorescence Stokes shifts are reduced in comparison with those for unmodified imidazophenazine. For F3 a red shift of the longwave absorption band is observed by 15-20 nm. Modifications of imidazophenazine have led to a sufficient increase of fluorescence polarization degrees that enables to use F2 and F3 as promising fluorescent probes with polarization method application. The configuration, atomic charge distribution and dipole moments of the isolated dye molecules in the ground state were calculated by the DFT method. The computation has revealed that ground state dipole moments of F1, F2, and F3 differ slightly and are equal to 3.5, 3.2, and 3.7D, respectively. The changes in dipole moments upon the optical excitation for all derivatives estimated using Lippert equation were found to be Deltamu = 9 D. The energies of the electronic S1<--S0 transition in solvents of different proton donor abilities were determined, and energetic diagram illustrating the substituent effect was plotted. For nucleoside analogs of these compounds, covalently incorporated into a nucleotide chain, we have considered a possibility to use them as fluorescent reporters of hybridization of antisense oligonucleotides, as well as molecular anchors for its stabilization. PMID:15248979

  15. Iron mineralogy of the surface of Mars from the 1 μm band spectral properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrozzo, F. G.; Altieri, F.; Bellucci, G.; Poulet, F.; D'Aversa, E.; Bibring, J.-P.

    2012-10-01

    We study the 1 μm absorption from OMEGA/MEX spectra to map Martian iron mineralogy at a global scale. This band is covered on the left by the VNIR (visible and near infrared) OMEGA channel and on the right by the SWIR (short wavelengths infrared) one. We first perform a systematic spatial coregistration of the two channels after an improvement of the VNIR radiometric calibration. The update of the VNIR Instrumental Transfer Function (ITF) and the internal stray-light estimation is based on the spectra of the Phobos red units and of the water ice north polar cap of Mars, which have been fitted according to an iterative process. The level of the signal in the blue wavelength range, previously systematically overestimated due to a stray-light residual and the general shape of the spectrum for λ > 0.7 μm are improved . Global maps of the 1 μm signature have been derived from 9 new spectral indices. The largest values of the 1 μm band integral are found in Noachian terrains and in the dunes around the north polar cap. In the south polar region, an area centered at ˜155°W and ˜83°S is mapped as a distinctive spectral unit, dominated by pyroxene. The northern lowlands of Mars together with other dark terrains located in the northern hemisphere show very low values of some spectral indices due to the negative spectral slope in the NIR. This behavior is consistent with the presence of weathered basalts with a possible glassy or amorphous component. Among the hydrated terrains, the only ones that can be isolated by studying the 1 μm band are those located in Terra Meridiani, Aram Chaos and Capri Chasma, enriched in sulfate and hematite. On the other hand, the sulfates of the dark dunes surrounding the northern polar cap and the phyllosilicates of the bright hydrated deposits of Mawrth Vallis cannot be isolated combining the parameters used in this study. This suggests that their distinctive mineralogy does not affect the 1 μm band, remaining similar to the global

  16. Guided-wave approaches to spectrally selective energy absorption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stegeman, G. I.; Burke, J. J.

    1987-01-01

    Results of experiments designed to demonstrate spectrally selective absorption in dielectric waveguides on semiconductor substrates are reported. These experiments were conducted with three waveguides formed by sputtering films of PSK2 glass onto silicon-oxide layers grown on silicon substrates. The three waveguide samples were studied at 633 and 532 nm. The samples differed only in the thickness of the silicon-oxide layer, specifically 256 nm, 506 nm, and 740 nm. Agreement between theoretical predictions and measurements of propagation constants (mode angles) of the six or seven modes supported by these samples was excellent. However, the loss measurements were inconclusive because of high scattering losses in the structures fabricated (in excess of 10 dB/cm). Theoretical calculations indicated that the power distribution among all the modes supported by these structures will reach its steady state value after a propagation length of only 1 mm. Accordingly, the measured loss rates were found to be almost independent of which mode was initially excited. The excellent agreement between theory and experiment leads to the conclusion that low loss waveguides confirm the predicted loss rates.

  17. Effects of spectrometer band pass, sampling, and signal-to-noise ratio on spectral identification using the Tetracorder algorithm

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Swayze, G.A.; Clark, R.N.; Goetz, A.F.H.; Chrien, T.H.; Gorelick, N.S.

    2003-01-01

    Estimates of spectrometer band pass, sampling interval, and signal-to-noise ratio required for identification of pure minerals and plants were derived using reflectance spectra convolved to AVIRIS, HYDICE, MIVIS, VIMS, and other imaging spectrometers. For each spectral simulation, various levels of random noise were added to the reflectance spectra after convolution, and then each was analyzed with the Tetracorder spectra identification algorithm [Clark et al., 2003]. The outcome of each identification attempt was tabulated to provide an estimate of the signal-to-noise ratio at which a given percentage of the noisy spectra were identified correctly. Results show that spectral identification is most sensitive to the signal-to-noise ratio at narrow sampling interval values but is more sensitive to the sampling interval itself at broad sampling interval values because of spectral aliasing, a condition when absorption features of different materials can resemble one another. The band pass is less critical to spectral identification than the sampling interval or signal-to-noise ratio because broadening the band pass does not induce spectral aliasing. These conclusions are empirically corroborated by analysis of mineral maps of AVIRIS data collected at Cuprite, Nevada, between 1990 and 1995, a period during which the sensor signal-to-noise ratio increased up to sixfold. There are values of spectrometer sampling and band pass beyond which spectral identification of materials will require an abrupt increase in sensor signal-to-noise ratio due to the effects of spectral aliasing. Factors that control this threshold are the uniqueness of a material's diagnostic absorptions in terms of shape and wavelength isolation, and the spectral diversity of the materials found in nature and in the spectral library used for comparison. Array spectrometers provide the best data for identification when they critically sample spectra. The sampling interval should not be broadened to

  18. GEOS-2 C-band radar system project. Spectral analysis as related to C-band radar data analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    Work performed on spectral analysis of data from the C-band radars tracking GEOS-2 and on the development of a data compaction method for the GEOS-2 C-band radar data is described. The purposes of the spectral analysis study were to determine the optimum data recording and sampling rates for C-band radar data and to determine the optimum method of filtering and smoothing the data. The optimum data recording and sampling rate is defined as the rate which includes an optimum compromise between serial correlation and the effects of frequency folding. The goal in development of a data compaction method was to reduce to a minimum the amount of data stored, while maintaining all of the statistical information content of the non-compacted data. A digital computer program for computing estimates of the power spectral density function of sampled data was used to perform the spectral analysis study.

  19. Depth and Shape of the 0.94-microm Water Vapor Absorption Band for Clear and Cloudy Skies.

    PubMed

    Volz, F E

    1969-11-01

    Sky radiation near zenith and solar radiation in the rhosigmatau band region were recorded by means of a rotating interference filter (lambda0.98-0.88 microm) and a silicon detector. Although the spectral resolution of the simple spectrometer was not high, the water vapor content of the cloud free atmosphere was obtained with reasonable accuracy. The band depth of the radiation from thin, bright clouds was only slightly greater than that of the cloud free atmosphere, but dense and dark clouds showed deep bands mainly caused by increased path length as a result of multiple scattering. Considerable distortion of the band due to absorption by liquid water is observed in the radiation from very dark and dense clouds, and sometimes during snowfall. Some laboratory measurements are also discussed. PMID:20076009

  20. Spectral domain optical coherence tomography imaging of subretinal bands associated with chronic retinal detachments

    PubMed Central

    Kothari, Nikisha; Kuriyan, Ajay E; Flynn, Harry W

    2016-01-01

    We report three patients with subretinal bands associated with retinal detachment in chronic retinal detachments who underwent successful retinal reattachment. Subretinal bands before and after surgery can be identified on clinical examination and spectral domain optical coherence tomography. Removal of subretinal bands is not mandatory to achieve retinal reattachment. PMID:27099457

  1. Revealing spectral features in two-photon absorption spectrum of Hoechst 33342: a combined experimental and quantum-chemical study.

    PubMed

    Olesiak-Banska, Joanna; Matczyszyn, Katarzyna; Zaleśny, Robert; Murugan, N Arul; Kongsted, Jacob; Ågren, Hans; Bartkowiak, Wojciech; Samoc, Marek

    2013-10-10

    We present the results of wide spectral range Z-scan measurements of the two-photon absorption (2PA) spectrum of the Hoechst 33342 dye. The strongest 2PA of the dye in aqueous solution is found at 575 nm, and the associated two-photon absorption cross section is 245 GM. A weak but clearly visible 2PA band at ∼850 nm is also observed, a feature that could not be anticipated from the one-photon absorption spectrum. On the basis of the results of hybrid quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics calculations, we put forward a notion that the long-wavelength feature observed in the two-photon absorption spectrum of Hoechst 33342 is due to the formation of dye aggregates. PMID:24016295

  2. Hydrogen sulfide absorption spectrum in the 5700-6600 cm-1 spectral region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, L. R.; Naumenko, O. V.; Polovtseva, E. R.; Sinitsa, Leonid N.

    2004-01-01

    High resolution FT absorption spectrum of H2S from 5700 to 6600 cm-1 was experimentally recorded and theoretically treated. As a result of the spectrum assignment 1100 precise energy levels were derived for the 2nd hexad interacting states of H232S, H233S, and H234S isotope species including the highly excited (050) state. These energy levels were modeled using Watson-type rotational Hamiltonian and taking into account Coriolis, Darling-Dennison and weak Fermi-resonance interactions inside polyad of interacting states. An average accuracy of the energy levels fitting is of 0.0019 cm-1 for the main isotope species. New evaluation of the band origin of the dark (012) state Ev = 6385.299cm-1 is obtained from the fitting process which agrees well with recent prediction by Naumenko et al. (J. Mol. Spectrosc. 50, 100-110 (2001)). Precise line intensity measurements were performed for more than 1200 absorption lines with accuracy varying from 1 to 7%. These intensities were modeled within 3.3% using wavefunctions derived in the process of the energy levels fitting. The transformed transition moment expansion with 29 terms for 1088 intensities was used. Detailed and accurate H2S absorption line list was generated in the HITRAN format for the analyzed spectral region.

  3. Variability, absorption features, and parent body searches in "spectrally featureless" meteorite reflectance spectra: Case study - Tagish Lake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izawa, M. R. M.; Craig, M. A.; Applin, D. M.; Sanchez, J. A.; Reddy, V.; Le Corre, L.; Mann, P.; Cloutis, E. A.

    2015-07-01

    Reflectance spectra of many asteroids and other Solar System bodies are commonly reported as "featureless". Here, we show that weak but consistently detectable absorption bands are observable in 200-2500 nm spectra of the Tagish Lake meteorite, a likely compositional and spectral analogue for low-albedo, "spectrally-featureless" asteroids. Tagish Lake presents a rare opportunity to study multiple lithologies within a single meteorite. Reflectance spectra of Tagish Lake display significant variation between different lithologies. The spectral variations are due in part to mineralogical variations between different Tagish Lake lithologies. Ultraviolet reflectance spectra (200-400 nm), few of which have been reported in the literature to date, reveal albedo and spectral ratio variations as a function of mineralogy. Similarly visible-near infrared reflectance spectra reveal variations in albedo, spectral slope, and the presence of weak absorption features that persist across different lithologies and can be attributed to various phases present in Tagish Lake. These observations demonstrate that significant spectral variability may exist between different lithologies of Tagish Lake, which may affect the interpretation of potential source body spectra. It is also important to consider the spectral variability within the meteorite before excluding compositional links between possible parent bodies in the main belt and Tagish Lake. Tagish Lake materials may also be spectral-compositional analogues for materials on the surfaces of other dark asteroids, including some that are targets of upcoming spacecraft missions. Tagish Lake has been proposed as a spectral match for 'ultra-primitive' D or P-type asteroids, and the variability reported here may be reflected in spatially or rotationally-resolved spectra of possible Tagish Lake parent bodies and source objects in the Near-Earth Asteroid population. A search for objects with spectra similar to Tagish Lake has been carried

  4. Spectral Band Characterization for Hyperspectral Monitoring of Water Quality

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vermillion, Stephanie C.; Raqueno, Rolando; Simmons, Rulon

    2001-01-01

    A method for selecting the set of spectral characteristics that provides the smallest increase in prediction error is of interest to those using hyperspectral imaging (HSI) to monitor water quality. The spectral characteristics of interest to these applications are spectral bandwidth and location. Three water quality constituents of interest that are detectable via remote sensing are chlorophyll (CHL), total suspended solids (TSS), and colored dissolved organic matter (CDOM). Hyperspectral data provides a rich source of information regarding the content and composition of these materials, but often provides more data than an analyst can manage. This study addresses the spectral characteristics need for water quality monitoring for two reasons. First, determination of the greatest contribution of these spectral characteristics would greatly improve computational ease and efficiency. Second, understanding the spectral capabilities of different spectral resolutions and specific regions is an essential part of future system development and characterization. As new systems are developed and tested, water quality managers will be asked to determine sensor specifications that provide the most accurate and efficient water quality measurements. We address these issues using data from the Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) and a set of models to predict constituent concentrations.

  5. First detection of ionized helium absorption lines in infrared K band spectra of O-type stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conti, Peter S.; Block, David L.; Geballe, T. R.; Hanson, Margaret M.

    1993-01-01

    We have obtained high SNR, moderate-resolution K band spectra of two early O-type main sequence stars, HD 46150 O5 V, and HD 46223 O4 V, in the Rosette Nebula. We report the detection, for the first time, of the 2.189 micron He II line in O-type stars. Also detected is the 2.1661 micron Br-gamma line in absorption. The 2.058 micron He I line appears to be present in absorption in both stars, although its appearance at our resolution is complicated by atmospheric features. These three lines can form the basis for a spectral classification system for hot stars in the K band that may be used at infrared wavelengths to elucidate the nature of those luminous stars in otherwise obscured H II and giant H II regions.

  6. Experimental measurements of the spectral absorption coefficient of pure fused silica optical fibers.

    PubMed

    Moore, Travis J; Jones, Matthew R

    2015-02-20

    Knowledge of the spectral absorption coefficient of fused silica optical fibers is important in modeling heat transfer in the processes and applications in which these fibers are used. An experimental method used to measure the spectral absorption coefficient of optical fibers is presented. Radiative energy from a blackbody radiator set at different temperatures is directed through the optical fibers and into an FTIR spectrometer. Spectral instrument response functions are calculated for different fiber lengths. The ratios of the slopes of the instrument response functions for the different lengths of fibers are used to solve for the spectral absorption coefficient of the fibers. The spectral absorption coefficient of low OH pure fused silica optical fibers is measured between the wavelengths 1.5 and 2.5 μm. PMID:25968202

  7. Removal of OH Absorption Bands Due to Pyrohydrolysis Reactions in Fluoride-Containing Borosilicate Glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Keiji

    1997-05-01

    The purpose of this study is to decrease and to remove OH ions and H2O in borosilicate glasses. Fluoride-containing borosilicate glasses followed by dry-air-bubbling showed the significant decrease of OH absorption bands around 3500 cm-1. The decrease of OH absorption bands was elucidated by the use of pyrohydrolysis reactions in these glasses where fluoride ions react with OH ions or H2O during melting. The rates of the decrease of OH absorption bands substantially depend on high valence cations of fluorides. Particularly, the decrease rates of OH absorption coefficients were in the order of ZrF4-containing glass>AlF3-containing glass>ZnF2-containing glass. ZrF4-containing glass treated by dry-air-bubbling showed a good capability to remove OH absorption band. Fluoride-containing glasses showed the low flow point in comparison with fluoride-free glasses.

  8. Remote estimation of phytoplankton size fractions using the spectral shape of light absorption.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shengqiang; Ishizaka, Joji; Hirawake, Toru; Watanabe, Yuji; Zhu, Yuanli; Hayashi, Masataka; Yoo, Sinjae

    2015-04-20

    Phytoplankton size structure plays an important role in ocean biogeochemical processes. The light absorption spectra of phytoplankton provide a great potential for retrieving phytoplankton size structure because of the strong dependence on the packaging effect caused by phytoplankton cell size and on different pigment compositions related to phytoplankton taxonomy. In this study, we investigated the variability in light absorption spectra of phytoplankton in relation to the size structure. Based on this, a new approach was proposed for estimating phytoplankton size fractions. Our approach use the spectral shape of the normalized phytoplankton absorption coefficient (a(ph)(λ)) through principal component analysis (PCA). Values of a(ph)(λ) were normalized to remove biomass effects, and PCA was conducted to separate the spectral variance of normalized a(ph)(λ) into uncorrelated principal components (PCs). Spectral variations captured by the first four PC modes were used to build relationships with phytoplankton size fractions. The results showed that PCA had powerful ability to capture spectral variations in normalized a(ph)(λ), which were significantly related to phytoplankton size fractions. For both hyperspectral a(ph)(λ) and multiband a(ph)(λ), our approach is applicable. We evaluated our approach using wide in situ data collected from coastal waters and the global ocean, and the results demonstrated a good and robust performance in estimating phytoplankton size fractions in various regions. The model performance was further evaluated by a(ph)(λ) derived from in situ remote sensing reflectance (R(rs)(λ)) with a quasi-analytical algorithm. Using R(rs)(λ) only at six bands, accurate estimations of phytoplankton size fractions were obtained, with R(2) values of 0.85, 0.61, and 0.76, and root mean-square errors of 0.130, 0.126, and 0.112 for micro-, nano-, and picophytoplankton, respectively. Our approach provides practical basis for remote estimation of

  9. Experimental study of absorption band controllable planar metamaterial absorber using asymmetrical snowflake-shaped configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yongjun; Tian, Yiran; Wen, Guangjun; Zhu, Weiren

    2013-05-01

    In this paper, we systematically discuss a novel planar metamaterial absorber (PMA) based on asymmetrical snowflake-shaped resonators, which can exhibit two distinctly different absorption states, single- and dual-band absorptions, by controlling the branch lengths of the proposed resonators. Numerical simulations and experimental measurements are employed to investigate these two kinds of absorption characteristic in an X-band rectangular waveguide. Both results indicate that such a PMA exhibits a wide range of controllable operating frequencies for the single- and dual-band conditions. The proposed PMA is simple and easy to make, and it has wide applications in the fields of stealth technologies, thermal detectors, and imaging.

  10. Structural diversity of the 3-micron absorption band in Enceladus’ plume from Cassini VIMS: Insights into subsurface environmental conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhingra, Deepak; Hedman, Matthew M.; Clark, Roger N.

    2015-11-01

    Water ice particles in Enceladus’ plume display their diagnostic 3-micron absorption band in Cassini VIMS data. These near infrared measurements of the plume also exhibit noticeable variations in the character of this band. Mie theory calculations reveal that the shape and location of the 3-micron band are controlled by a number of environmental and structural parameters. Hence, this band provides important insights into the properties of the water ice grains and about the subsurface environmental conditions under which they formed. For example, the position of the 3-micron absorption band minimum can be used to distinguish between crystalline and amorphous forms of water ice and to constrain the formation temperature of the ice grains. VIMS data indicates that the water ice grains in the plume are dominantly crystalline which could indicate formation temperatures above 113 K [e.g. 1, 2]. However, there are slight (but observable) variations in the band minimum position and band shape that may hint at the possibility of varying abundance of amorphous ice particles within the plume. The modeling results further indicate that there are systematic shifts in band minimum position with temperature for any given form of ice but the crystalline and amorphous forms of water ice are still distinguishable at VIMS spectral resolution. Analysis of the eruptions from individual source fissures (tiger stripes) using selected VIMS observations reveal differences in the 3-micron band shape that may reflect differences in the size distributions of the water ice particles along individual fissures. Mie theory models suggest that big ice particles (>3 micron) may be an important component of the plume.[1] Kouchi, A., T. Yamamoto, T. Kozasa, T. Kuroda, and J. M. Greenberg (1994) A&A, 290, 1009-1018 [2] Mastrapa, R. M. E., W. M. Grundy, and M. S. Gudipati (2013) in M. S. Gudipati and J. Castillo-Rogez (Eds.), The Science of Solar System Ices, pp. 371.

  11. MODIS On-orbit Spectral Calibration for the Reflective Solar Bands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xiong, X.; Che, N.; Barnes, W.

    2004-01-01

    The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) makes observations in 36 spectral bands with wavelengths from 0.41 to 14.5 microns. The bands with center wavelengths below 2.2 microns are referred as the reflective solar bands (RSB) with their radiometric calibration performed by a solar diffuser (SD) and a solar diffuser stability monitor (SDSM). This paper focuses on the MODIS spectral calibration performed by its unique on-board calibrator (OBC): the Spectro-Radiometric Calibration Assembly (SRCA). When operated in the spectral mode, the SRCA acts as a monochromator with internal spherical integration source (SIS) that measures the spectral responses for all the reflective solar bands. A wavelength calibrator, a didymium filter with known spectral profile, is utilized to calibrate the wavelength scale for the grating positions during each SRCA spectral calibration activity. The capability of self-wavelength calibration allows the SRCA to track the center wavelength shifts and to monitor the spectral response changes throughout the instruments lifetime. The MODIS spectral calibration, same for both Terra and Aqua missions, is performed every three months on-orbit. An overview of MODIS spectral characterization approach and a summary of the on-orbit results will be presented in this paper.

  12. VARIABILITY OF WATER AND OXYGEN ABSORPTION BANDS IN THE DISK-INTEGRATED SPECTRA OF EARTH

    SciTech Connect

    Fujii, Yuka; Suto, Yasushi; Turner, Edwin L.

    2013-03-10

    We study the variability of major atmospheric absorption features in the disk-integrated spectra of Earth with future application to Earth-analogs in mind, concentrating on the diurnal timescale. We first analyze observations of Earth provided by the EPOXI mission, and find 5%-20% fractional variation of the absorption depths of H{sub 2}O and O{sub 2} bands, two molecules that have major signatures in the observed range. From a correlation analysis with the cloud map data from the Earth Observing Satellite (EOS), we find that their variation pattern is primarily due to the uneven cloud cover distribution. In order to account for the observed variation quantitatively, we consider a simple opaque cloud model, which assumes that the clouds totally block the spectral influence of the atmosphere below the cloud layer, equivalent to assuming that the incident light is completely scattered at the cloud top level. The model is reasonably successful, and reproduces the EPOXI data from the pixel-level EOS cloud/water vapor data. A difference in the diurnal variability patterns of H{sub 2}O and O{sub 2} bands is ascribed to the differing vertical and horizontal distribution of those molecular species in the atmosphere. On Earth, the inhomogeneous distribution of atmospheric water vapor is due to the existence of its exchange with liquid and solid phases of H{sub 2}O on the planet's surface on a timescale short compared with atmospheric mixing times. If such differences in variability patterns were detected in spectra of Earth-analogs, it would provide the information on the inhomogeneous composition of their atmospheres.

  13. Spectral slopes of the absorption coefficient of colored dissolved and detrital material inverted from UV-visible remote sensing reflectance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Jianwei; Lee, Zhongping; Ondrusek, Michael; Mannino, Antonio; Tzortziou, Maria; Armstrong, Roy

    2016-03-01

    The spectral slope of the absorption coefficient of colored dissolved and detrital material (CDM), Scdm (units: nm-1), is an important optical parameter for characterizing the absorption spectral shape of CDM. Although highly variable in natural waters, in most remote sensing algorithms, this slope is either kept as a constant or empirically modeled with multiband ocean color in the visible domain. In this study, we explore the potential of semianalytically retrieving Scdm with added ocean color information in the ultraviolet (UV) range between 360 and 400 nm. Unique features of hyperspectral remote sensing reflectance in the UV-visible wavelengths (360-500 nm) have been observed in various waters across a range of coastal and open ocean environments. Our data and analyses indicate that ocean color in the UV domain is particularly sensitive to the variation of the CDM spectral slope. Here, we used a synthesized dataset to show that adding UV wavelengths to the ocean color measurements will improve the retrieval of Scdm from remote sensing reflectance considerably, while the spectral band settings of past and current satellite ocean color sensors cannot fully account for the spectral variation of remote sensing reflectance. Results of this effort support the concept to include UV wavelengths in the next generation of satellite ocean color sensors.

  14. An absorption origin for the X-ray spectral variability of MCG-6-30-15

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, L.; Turner, T. J.; Reeves, J. N.

    2008-05-01

    Context: The Seyfert I galaxy MCG-6-30-15 shows one of the best examples of a broad “red wing” of emission in its X-ray spectrum at energies 2 < E < 6.4 keV, commonly interpreted as being caused by relativistically-blurred reflection close to the event horizon of the black hole. Aims: We aim to test an alternative model in which absorption creates the observed spectral shape, explains the puzzling lack of variability of the red wing and reduces the high reflection albedo, substantially greater than unity, that is otherwise inferred at energies E > 20 keV. Methods: We compiled all the available long-exposure, high-quality data for MCG-6-30-15: 522 ks of Chandra hetgs, 282 ks of XMM-Newton pn/rgs and 253 ks of Suzaku xis/pin data. This is the first analysis of this full dataset. We investigated the spectral variability on timescales >20 ks using principal components analysis and fitted spectral models to “flux state” and mean spectra over the energy range 0.5-45 keV (depending on detector). The absorber model was based on the zones previously identified in the high-resolution grating data. Joint fits were carried out to any data that were simultaneous. Results: Multiple absorbing zones covering a wide range of ionisation are required by the grating data, including a highly ionised outflowing zone. A variable partial-covering zone plus absorbed low-ionisation reflection, distant from the source, provides a complete description of the variable X-ray spectrum. A single model fits all the data. We conclude that these zones are responsible for the red wing, its apparent lack of variability, the absorption structure around the Fe Kα line, the soft-band “excess” and the high flux seen in the hard X-ray band. A relativistically-blurred Fe line is not required in this model. We suggest the partial covering zone is a clumpy wind from the accretion disk.

  15. Re-evaluation of pulsed photothermal radiometric profiling in samples with spectrally varied infrared absorption coefficient.

    PubMed

    Majaron, Boris; Milanic, Matija

    2007-02-21

    Spectral variation of the sample absorption coefficient in mid-infrared (muIR) demands caution in photothermal radiometric measurements, because a constant muIR is regularly assumed in inverse analysis of the acquired signals. Adverse effects of such approximation were recently demonstrated in numerical simulations of pulsed photothermal radiometric (PPTR) temperature profiling in soft biological tissues, utilizing a general-purpose optimization code in the reconstruction process. We present here an original reconstruction code, which combines a conjugate gradient minimization algorithm with non-negativity constraint to the sought temperature vector. For the same test examples as in the former report (hyper-Gaussian temperature profiles, InSb detector with 3-5 microm acquisition band, signal-to-noise ratio SNR=300) we obtain markedly improved reconstruction results, both when using a constant value mueff and when the spectral variation muIR(lambda) is accounted for in the analysis. By comparing the results, we find that the former approach introduces observable artefacts, especially in the superficial part of the profile (z<100 microm). However, the artefacts are much less severe than previously reported and are almost absent in the case of a deeper, single-lobed test profile. We demonstrate that the observed artefacts do not result from sub-optimal selection of mueff, and that they vary with specific realizations of white noise added to the simulated signals. The same holds also for a two-lobed test profile. PMID:17264372

  16. Position and Confidence Limits of an Extremum: The Determination of the Absorption Maximum in Wide Bands.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heilbronner, Edgar

    1979-01-01

    Discusses the determination of the position of the absorption maximum in wide bands as well as the confidence limits for such calculations. A simple method, suited for pocket calculators, for the numerical evaluation of these calculations is presented. (BB)

  17. Optical design and system calibration for three-band spectral imaging system with interchangeable filters

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The design and calibration of a three-band image acquisition system was reported. The prototype system developed in this research was a three-band spectral imaging system that acquired two visible (510 and 568 nm) images and a near-infrared (NIR) (800 nm) image simultaneously. The system was proto...

  18. TEMPORAL SPECTRAL SHIFT AND POLARIZATION OF A BAND-SPLITTING SOLAR TYPE II RADIO BURST

    SciTech Connect

    Du, Guohui; Chen, Yao; Lv, Maoshui; Kong, Xiangliang; Feng, Shiwei; Guo, Fan; Li, Gang

    2014-10-01

    In many type II solar radio bursts, the fundamental and/or the harmonic branches of the bursts can split into two almost parallel bands with similar spectral shapes and frequency drifts. However, the mechanisms accounting for this intriguing phenomenon remain elusive. In this study, we report a special band-splitting type II event in which spectral features appear systematically earlier on the upper band (with higher frequencies) than on the lower band (with lower frequencies) by several seconds. Furthermore, the emissions carried by the splitting band are moderately polarized with the left-hand polarized signals stronger than the right-hand ones. The polarization degree varies in a range of –0.3 to –0.6. These novel observational findings provide important constraints on the underlying physical mechanisms of band-splitting of type II radio bursts.

  19. HITEMP derived spectral database for the prediction of jet engine exhaust infrared emission using a statistical band model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindermeir, E.; Beier, K.

    2012-08-01

    The spectroscopic database HITEMP 2010 is used to upgrade the parameters of the statistical molecular band model which is part of the infrared signature prediction code NIRATAM (NATO InfraRed Air TArget Model). This band model was recommended by NASA and is applied in several codes that determine the infrared emission of combustion gases. The upgrade regards spectral absorption coefficients and line densities of the gases H2O, CO2, and CO in the spectral region 400-5000 cm-1 (2-25μm) with a spectral resolution of 5 cm-1. The temperature range 100-3000 K is covered. Two methods to update the database are presented: the usually applied method as provided in the literature and an alternative, more laborious procedure that employs least squares fitting. The achieved improvements resulting from both methods are demonstrated by comparisons of radiance spectra obtained from the band model to line-by-line results. The performance in a realistic scenario is investigated on the basis of measured and predicted spectra of a jet aircraft plume in afterburner mode.

  20. HAC: Band Gap, Photoluminescence, and Optical/Near-Infrared Absorption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Witt, Adolf N.; Ryutov, Dimitri; Furton, Douglas G.

    1996-01-01

    We report results of laboratory measurements which illustrate the wide range of physical properties found among hydrogenated amorphous carbon (HAC) solids. Within this range, HAC can match quantitatively the astronomical phenomena ascribed to carbonaceous coatings on interstellar grains. We find the optical band gap of HAC to be well correlated with other physical properties of HAC of astronomical interest, and conclude that interstellar HAC must be fairly hydrogen-rich with a band gap of E(sub g) is approx. greater than 2.0 eV.

  1. Spectral absorption index in hyperspectral image analysis for predicting moisture contents in pork longissimus dorsi muscles.

    PubMed

    Ma, Ji; Sun, Da-Wen; Pu, Hongbin

    2016-04-15

    Spectral absorption index was proposed to extract the morphological features of the spectral curves in pork meat samples (longissimus dorsi) under the conditions including fresh, frozen-thawed, heated-dehydrated and brined-dehydrated. Savitzky-Golay (SG) smoothing and multiplicative scatter correction (MSC) were used for calibrating both the spectral reflectance and absorbance values. The absorption values were better than the reflectance values and the calibrated spectra by MSC were better than the raw and SG smoothing corrected spectra in building moisture content predictive models. The optimized partial least square regression (PLSR) model attained good results with the MSC calibrated spectral absorption values based on the spectral absorption index features (R(2)P=0.952, RMSEP=1.396) and the optimal wavelengths selected by regression coefficients (R(2)P=0.966, RMSEP=0.855), respectively. The models proved spectral absorption index was promising in spectral analysis to predict moisture content in pork samples using HSI techniques for the first time. PMID:26617026

  2. Cause of absorption band shift of disperse red-13 attached on silica spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Byoung-Ju; Kim, Hyung-Deok; Kim, Na-Rae; Bang, Byeong-Gyu; Park, Eun-Hye; Kang, Kwang-Sun

    2015-08-01

    A reversible color change and large absorption band shift have been observed for the disperse red-13 (DR-13) attached on the surface of the monodisperse silica spheres. Two step synthetic processes including urethane bond formation and hydrolysis-condensation reactions were used to attach the DR-13 on the surface of the silica spheres. After the reaction, the characteristic absorption peak at 2270 cm-1 representing the -N=C=O asymmetric stretching vibration disappeared, and the a new absorption peak at 1700 cm-1 corresponding the C=O stretching vibration appeared. A visual and reversible color change was observed before and after wetting in alcohol. Although the absorption peak of DR-13 in alcohol is at 510 nm, the absorption peak shifts to 788 nm when it is dried. The absorption peak shifts to 718 nm when it is wetted in alcohol. This result can be explained by the formation of intramolecular charge transfer band.

  3. Estimation of plant water content by spectral absorption features centered at 1,450 nm and 1,940 nm regions.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jie; Xu, Ruisong; Yang, Shilun

    2009-10-01

    Vegetation water content could possibly provide widespread utility in agriculture, forestry and hydrology. In this article, three species leaves were measured radiometrically in order to determine a relationship between leaf water status and the spectral feature centered at 1,450 and 1,940 nm where there are strong water absorptions. The first step of our research is to measure leaf spectra with a FieldSpec-FR. After the spectral analysis using the continuum removal technique, the spectral absorption feature parameters: absorption band depth (D (1450), D (1940)), the normalized band depth of absorption in 1,450 and 1,940 nm (BNA(1450), BNA(1940)), the ratio of the two reflectance of continuum line (R (1450i )/R (1940i )), the ratio of the two band depth (D (1450)/D (1940)) and the ratio of the two absorption areas (A (1450)/A (1940)) in the two wavebands were extracted from each leaf spectrum. The fuel moisture content (FMC), specific leaf weight (SLW), equivalent water thickness (EWT) were measured for each leaf sample. A correlation analysis was conducted between the spectral absorption feature parameters and corresponding FMC, SLW and EWT. In addition, some existing indices for assessing water status such as WI (water index), WI/NDVI (water index/normalized difference vegetation index), MSI (moisture stress index), NDWI (normalized difference water index)were calculated and the correlation between them and water status were analyzed too. The results by comparing the correlations indicated that the spectral absorption feature indices we proposed were better. The indexes BNA(1940), D (1450)/D (1940), and A (1450)/A (1940) were well correlated with FMC, and the correlation between the indexes D (1450,) D (1940), R (1450i )/R (1940i ) and EWT were strong. The index A (1450)/A (1940) was tested to be a good indictor for evaluating plant water content, because there was strongest positive correlation between it and FMC than other indices. PMID:18853268

  4. Atmospheric absorption of high frequency noise and application to fractional-octave bands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shields, F. D.; Bass, H. E.

    1977-01-01

    Pure tone sound absorption coefficients were measured at 1/12 octave intervals from 4 to 100 KHz at 5.5K temperature intervals between 255.4 and 310.9 K and at 10 percent relative humidity increments between 0 percent and saturation in a large cylindrical tube (i.d., 25.4 cm; length, 4.8 m). Special solid-dielectric capacitance transducers, one to generate bursts of sound waves and one to terminate the sound path and detect the tone bursts, were constructed to fit inside the tube. The absorption was measured by varying the transmitter receiver separation from 1 to 4 m and observing the decay of multiple reflections or change in amplitude of the first received burst. The resulting absorption was compared with that from a proposed procedure for computing sound absorption in still air. Absorption of bands of noise was numerically computed by using the pure tone results. The results depended on spectrum shape, on filter type, and nonlinearly on propagation distance. For some of the cases considered, comparison with the extrapolation of ARP-866A showed a difference as large as a factor of 2. However, for many cases, the absorption for a finite band was nearly equal to the pure tone absorption at the center frequency of the band. A recommended prediction procedure is described for 1/3 octave band absorption coefficients.

  5. [Carbon monoxide gas detection system based on mid-infrared spectral absorption technique].

    PubMed

    Li, Guo-Lin; Dong, Ming; Song, Nan; Song, Fang; Zheng, Chuan-Tao; Wang, Yi-Ding

    2014-10-01

    Based on infrared spectral absorption technique, a carbon monoxide (CO) detection system was developed using the fundamental absorption band at the wavelength of 4.6 μm of CO molecule and adopting pulse-modulated wideband incandescence and dual-channel detector. The detection system consists of pulse-modulated wideband incandescence, open ellipsoid light-collec- tor gas-cell, dual-channel detector, main-control and signal-processing module. By optimizing open ellipsoid light-collector gas- cell, the optical path of the gas absorption reaches 40 cm, and the amplitude of the electrical signal from the detector is 2 to 3 times larger than the original signal. Therefore, by using the ellipsoidal condenser, the signal-to-noise ratio of the system will be to some extent increased to improve performance of the system. With the prepared standard CO gas sample, sensing characteris- tics on CO gas were investigated. Experimental results reveal that, the limit of detection (LOD) is about 10 ppm; the relative er- ror at the LOD point is less than 14%, and that is less than 7. 8% within the low concentration range of 20~180 ppm; the maxi- mum absolute error of 50 min long-term measurement concentration on the 0 ppm gas sample is about 3 ppm, and the standard deviation is as small as 0. 18 ppm. Compared with the CO detection systems utilizing quantum cascaded lasers (QCLs) and dis- tributed feedback lasers (DFBLs), the proposed sensor shows potential applications in CO detection under the circumstances of coal-mine and environmental protection, by virtue of high performance-cost ratio, simple optical-path structure, etc. PMID:25739235

  6. Recursive spectral similarity measure-based band selection for anomaly detection in hyperspectral imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Yuanlei; Liu, Daizhi; Yi, Shihua

    2011-01-01

    Band selection has been widely used in hyperspectral image processing for dimension reduction. In this paper, a recursive spectral similarity measure-based band selection (RSSM-BBS) method is presented. Unlike most of the existing image-based band selection techniques, it is for two hyperspectral signatures with its main focus on their spectral separability. Furthermore, it is unsupervised and based on the recursive calculation of the spectral similarity measure with an additional band. In order to demonstrate the utility of the proposed method, an anomaly detection algorithm is developed, which first extracts the anomalous target spectrum from the image using the automatic target detection and classification algorithm (ATDCA), followed by the maximum spectral screening (MSS) to obtain a good estimate of the background, and then implements RSSM-BBS to select bands that participate in the subsequent adaptive cosine/coherence estimator (ACE) target detection. As shown in the experimental result on the AVIRIS dataset, the detection performance of the ACE has been improved greatly with the bands selected by RSSM-BBS over that using full bands.

  7. Nonequilibrium Green's function formulation of intersubband absorption for nonparabolic single-band effective mass Hamiltonian

    SciTech Connect

    Kolek, Andrzej

    2015-05-04

    The formulas are derived that enable calculations of intersubband absorption coefficient within nonequilibrium Green's function method applied to a single-band effective-mass Hamiltonian with the energy dependent effective mass. The derivation provides also the formulas for the virtual valence band components of the two-band Green's functions which can be used for more exact estimation of the density of states and electrons and more reliable treatment of electronic transport in unipolar n-type heterostructure semiconductor devices.

  8. Non-destructive estimation of foliar chlorophyll and carotenoid contents: Focus on informative spectral bands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kira, Oz; Linker, Raphael; Gitelson, Anatoly

    2015-06-01

    Leaf pigment content provides valuable insight into the productivity, physiological and phenological status of vegetation. Measurement of spectral reflectance offers a fast, nondestructive method for pigment estimation. A number of methods were used previously for estimation of leaf pigment content, however, spectral bands employed varied widely among the models and data used. Our objective was to find informative spectral bands in three types of models, vegetation indices (VI), neural network (NN) and partial least squares (PLS) regression, for estimating leaf chlorophyll (Chl) and carotenoids (Car) contents of three unrelated tree species and to assess the accuracy of the models using a minimal number of bands. The bands selected by PLS, NN and VIs were in close agreement and did not depend on the data used. The results of the uninformative variable elimination PLS approach, where the reliability parameter was used as an indicator of the information contained in the spectral bands, confirmed the bands selected by the VIs, NN, and PLS models. All three types of models were able to accurately estimate Chl content with coefficient of variation below 12% for all three species with VI showing the best performance. NN and PLS using reflectance in four spectral bands were able to estimate accurately Car content with coefficient of variation below 14%. The quantitative framework presented here offers a new way of estimating foliar pigment content not requiring model re-parameterization for different species. The approach was tested using the spectral bands of the future Sentinel-2 satellite and the results of these simulations showed that accurate pigment estimation from satellite would be possible.

  9. Relative spectral absorption of solar radiation by water vapor and cloud droplets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davies, R.; Ridgway, W. L.

    1983-01-01

    A moderate (20/cm) spectral resolution model which accounts for both the highly variable spectral transmission of solar radiation through water vapor within and above cloud, as well as the more slowly varying features of absorption and anisotropic multiple scattering by the cloud droplets, is presented. Results from this model as applied to the case of a typical 1 km thick stratus cloud in a standard atmosphere, with cloud top altitude of 2 km and overhead sun, are discussed, showing the relative importance of water vapor above the cloud, water vapor within the cloud, and cloud droplets on the spectral absorption of solar radiation.

  10. Spectral absorption coefficients and imaginary parts of refractive indices of Saharan dust during SAMUM-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, T.; Schladitz, A.; Massling, A.; Kaaden, N.; Kandler, K.; Wiedensohler, A.

    2009-02-01

    ABSTRACT During the SAMUM-1 experiment, absorption coefficients and imaginary parts of refractive indices of mineral dust particles were investigated in southern Morocco. Main absorbing constituents of airborne samples were identified to be iron oxide and soot. Spectral absorption coefficients were measured using a spectral optical absorption photometer (SOAP) in the wavelength range from 300 to 800 nm with a resolution of 50 nm. A new method that accounts for a loading-dependent correction of fibre filter based absorption photometers, was developed. The imaginary part of the refractive index was determined using Mie calculations from 350 to 800 nm. The spectral absorption coefficient allowed a separation between dust and soot absorption. A correlation analysis showed that the dust absorption coefficient is correlated (R2 up to 0.55) with the particle number concentration for particle diameters larger than 0.5 μm, whereas the coefficient of determination R2 for smaller particles is below 0.1. Refractive indices were derived for both the total aerosol and a dust aerosol that was corrected for soot absorption. Average imaginary parts of refractive indices of the entire aerosol are 7.4 × 10-3, 3.4 × 10-3 and 2.0 × 10-3 at wavelengths of 450, 550 and 650 nm. After a correction for the soot absorption, imaginary parts of refractive indices are 5.1 × 10-3, 1.6 × 10-3 and 4.5 × 10-4.

  11. Multi-spectral band selection for satellite-based systems

    SciTech Connect

    Clodius, W.B.; Weber, P.G.; Borel, C.C.; Smith, B.W.

    1998-09-01

    The design of satellite based multispectral imaging systems requires the consideration of a number of tradeoffs between cost and performance. The authors have recently been involved in the design and evaluation of a satellite based multispectral sensor operating from the visible through the long wavelength IR. The criteria that led to some of the proposed designs and the modeling used to evaluate and fine tune the designs will both be discussed. These criteria emphasized the use of bands for surface temperature retrieval and the correction of atmospheric effects. The impact of cost estimate changes on the final design will also be discussed.

  12. Possible spinel absorption bands in S-asteroid visible reflectance spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hiroi, T.; Vilas, F.; Sunshine, J. M.

    1994-01-01

    Minor absorption bands in the 0.55 to 0.7 micron wavelength range of reflectance spectra of 10 S asteroids have been found and compared with those of spinel-group minerals using the modified Gaussian model. Most of these S asteroids are consistently shown to have two absorption bands around 0.6 and 0.67 micron. Of the spinel-group minerals examined in this study, the 0.6 and 0.67 micron bands are most consistent with those seen in chromite. Recently, the existence of spinels has also been detected from the absorption-band features around 1 and 2 micron of two S-asteroid reflectance spectra, and chromite has been found in a primitive achondrite as its major phase. These new findings suggest a possible common existence of spinel-group minerals in the solar system.

  13. F, G, K, M Spectral Standards in the Y Band (0.95-1.11 μm)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharon, Chelsea; Hillenbrand, Lynne; Fischer, William; Edwards, Suzan

    2010-02-01

    We take advantage of good atmospheric transparency and the availability of high-quality instrumentation in the 1 μm near-infrared atmospheric window to present a grid of F, G, K, and M spectral standards observed at high spectral resolution (R ≈ 25, 000). In addition to a spectral atlas, we present a catalog of atomic line absorption features in the 0.95-1.11 μm range. The catalog includes a wide range of line excitation potentials, from 0-13 eV, arising from neutral and singly ionized species, most frequently those of Fe I and Ti I at low excitation, Cr I, Fe I, and Si I at moderate excitation, and C I, S I, and Si I having relatively high excitation. The spectra also include several prominent molecular bands from CN and FeH. For the atomic species, we analyze trends in the excitation potential, line depth, and equivalent width across the grid of spectroscopic standards to identify temperature and surface gravity diagnostics near 1 μm. We identify the line ratios that appear especially useful for spectral typing as those involving Ti I and C I or S I, which are temperature sensitive in opposite directions, and Sr II, which is gravity sensitive at all spectral types. ASCII versions of all spectra are available in the online version of the journal.

  14. Varied absorption peaks of dual-band metamaterial absorber analysis by using reflection theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Han; Yu, Yan-Tao; Tang, Ming-Chun; Chen, Shi-Yong; Liu, Dan-Ping; Ou, Xiang; Zeng, Hao

    2016-03-01

    Cross-resonator metamaterial absorbers (MMA) have been widely investigated from microwave to optical frequencies. However, only part of the factors influencing the absorption properties were analyzed in previous works at the same time. In order to completely understand how the spacer thickness, dielectric parameter and incidence angle affect the absorption properties of the dual-band MMA, two sets of simulation were performed. It was found that with increasing incident angles, the low-frequency absorption peak showed a blue shift, while the high-frequency absorption peaks showed a red shift. However, with the increase in spacer thickness, both of the absorption peaks showed a red shift. By using the reflection theory expressions, the physical mechanism of the cross-resonator MMA was well explained. This method provides an effective way to analyze multi-band absorber in technology.

  15. Electron paramagnetic resonance and optical absorption spectral studies on chalcocite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reddy, S. Lakshmi; Fayazuddin, Md.; Frost, Ray L.; Endo, Tamio

    2007-11-01

    A chalcocite mineral sample of Shaha, Congo is used in the present study. An electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) study on powdered sample confirms the presence of Mn(II), Fe(III) and Cu(II). Optical absorption spectrum indicates that Fe(III) impurity is present in octahedral structure whereas Cu(II) is present in rhombically distorted octahedral environment. Mid-infrared results are due to water and sulphate fundamentals.

  16. Electron paramagnetic resonance and optical absorption spectral studies on chalcocite.

    PubMed

    Reddy, S Lakshmi; Fayazuddin, Md; Frost, Ray L; Endo, Tamio

    2007-11-01

    A chalcocite mineral sample of Shaha, Congo is used in the present study. An electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) study on powdered sample confirms the presence of Mn(II), Fe(III) and Cu(II). Optical absorption spectrum indicates that Fe(III) impurity is present in octahedral structure whereas Cu(II) is present in rhombically distorted octahedral environment. Mid-infrared results are due to water and sulphate fundamentals. PMID:17324611

  17. THE 217.5 nm BAND, INFRARED ABSORPTION, AND INFRARED EMISSION FEATURES IN HYDROGENATED AMORPHOUS CARBON NANOPARTICLES

    SciTech Connect

    Duley, W. W.; Hu, Anming E-mail: a2hu@uwaterloo.ca

    2012-12-20

    We report on the preparation of hydrogenated amorphous carbon nanoparticles whose spectral characteristics include an absorption band at 217.5 nm with the profile and characteristics of the interstellar 217.5 nm feature. Vibrational spectra of these particles also contain the features commonly observed in absorption and emission from dust in the diffuse interstellar medium. These materials are produced under ''slow'' deposition conditions by minimizing the flux of incident carbon atoms and by reducing surface mobility. The initial chemistry leads to the formation of carbon chains, together with a limited range of small aromatic ring molecules, and eventually results in carbon nanoparticles having an sp {sup 2}/sp {sup 3} ratio Almost-Equal-To 0.4. Spectroscopic analysis of particle composition indicates that naphthalene and naphthalene derivatives are important constituents of this material. We suggest that carbon nanoparticles with similar composition are responsible for the appearance of the interstellar 217.5 nm band and outline how these particles can form in situ under diffuse cloud conditions by deposition of carbon on the surface of silicate grains. Spectral data from carbon nanoparticles formed under these conditions accurately reproduce IR emission spectra from a number of Galactic sources. We provide the first detailed fits to observational spectra of Type A and B emission sources based entirely on measured spectra of a carbonaceous material that can be produced in the laboratory.

  18. [Spectral absorption properties of the water constituents in the estuary of Zhujiang River].

    PubMed

    Wang, Shan-shan; Wang, Yong-bo; Fu, Qing-hua; Yin, Bin; Li, Yun-mei

    2014-12-01

    Spectral absorption properties of the water constituents is the main factor affecting the light field under the surface of the water and the spectrum above the surface of the water. Thus, the study is useful for understanding of the water spectral property and the remote reversing of water quality parameters. Absorption properties of total suspended particles, non-algal particles, phytoplankton and CDOM were analyzed using the 30 samples collected in July 2013 in the estuary of Zhujiang River. The results indicated that: (1) the non-algal particles absorption dominated the absorption of the total suspended particles; (2) the absorption coefficient of the non-algal particles, which mainly came from the terrigenous deposits, decreased exponentially from short to long wavelength. In addition, the average value and spatial variation of the slope S(d) were higher than those in inland case- II waters; (3) the absorption coefficient of phytoplankton in 440 nm showed a better polynomial relationship with chlorophyll a concentration, while the absorption coefficient of phytoplankton in 675 nm linearly related with the chlorophyll a concentration. Moreover, the influence of accessory pigments on phytoplankton absorption coefficient mainly existed in the range of short wavelength, and Chlorophyll a was the main influencing factor for phytoplankton absorption in long wavelength. The specific absorption coefficient of phytoplankton decreased the power exponentially with the increase of the chlorophyll a concentration; (4) CDOM mainly came from the terrigenous sources and its spectral curve had an absorption shoulder between 250-290 nm. Thus, a piecewise S(g) fitting function could effectively express CDOM absorption properties, i.e., M value and S(g) value in period A (240-260 nm) showed a strong positive correlation. The M value was low, and the humic acid had a high proportion in CDOM; (5) the non-algal particles absorption dominated the total absorption in the estuary of

  19. Gas-phase absorption cross sections of 24 monocyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in the UV and IR spectral ranges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Etzkorn, Thomas; Klotz, Björn; Sørensen, Søren; Patroescu, Iulia V.; Barnes, Ian; Becker, Karl H.; Platt, Ulrich

    Absorption cross sections of 24 volatile and non-volatile derivatives of benzene in the ultraviolet (UV) and the infrared (IR) regions of the electromagnetic spectrum have been determined using a 1080 l quartz cell. For the UV a 0.5 m Czerny-Turner spectrometer coupled with a photodiode array detector (spectral resolution 0.15 nm) was used. IR spectra were recorded with an FT-IR spectrometer (Bruker IFS-88, spectral resolution 1 cm -1). Absolute absorption cross sections and the instrument function are given for the UV, while for the IR, absorption cross sections and integrated band intensities are reported. The study focused primarily on the atmospherically relevant methylated benzenes (benzene, toluene, o-xylene, m-xylene, p-xylene, 1,2,4-trimethylbenzene, 1,3,5-trimethylbenzene, ethylbenzene, styrene) and their ring retaining oxidation products (benzaldehyde, o-tolualdehyde, m-tolualdehyde, p-tolualdehyde, phenol, o-cresol, m-cresol, p-cresol, 2,3-dimethylphenol, 2,4-dimethylphenol, 2,5-dimethylphenol, 2,6-dimethylphenol, 3,4-dimethylphenol, 3,5-dimethylphenol, 2,4,6-trimethylphenol and ( E,Z)- and ( E,E)-2,4-hexadienedial). The UV absorption cross sections reported here can be used for the evaluation of DOAS spectra (Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy) for measurements of the above compounds in the atmosphere and in reaction chambers, while the IR absorption cross sections will primarily be useful in laboratory studies on atmospheric chemistry, where FT-IR spectrometry is an important tool.

  20. Methane Absorption Coefficients in the 750-940 nm region derived from Intracavity Laser Absorption Spectral Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Brien, J. J.

    2002-09-01

    The absorption spectrum of methane has been recorded in the visible to near-IR region using the intracavity laser spectroscopy technique. Spectra are recorded at high spectral resolution for narrow overlapping intervals in the region for room and 77 K temperature methane samples. After spectra are deconvolved for the instrument function, absorption coefficients are derived. These will be presented (750-940 nm for room temperature methane; 850-920 nm for 77 K methane) and compared with results reported by other workers. Future work in this area also will be indicated. Support from NASA's Planetary Atmospheres Program (NAG5-6091 and a Major Equipment Grant) is gratefully acknowledged.

  1. Retrieval interval mapping, a tool to optimize the spectral retrieval range in differential optical absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogel, L.; Sihler, H.; Lampel, J.; Wagner, T.; Platt, U.

    2012-06-01

    Remote sensing via differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS) has become a standard technique to identify and quantify trace gases in the atmosphere. The technique is applied in a variety of configurations, commonly classified into active and passive instruments using artificial and natural light sources, respectively. Platforms range from ground based to satellite instruments and trace-gases are studied in all kinds of different environments. Due to the wide range of measurement conditions, atmospheric compositions and instruments used, a specific challenge of a DOAS retrieval is to optimize the parameters for each specific case and particular trace gas of interest. This becomes especially important when measuring close to the detection limit. A well chosen evaluation wavelength range is crucial to the DOAS technique. It should encompass strong absorption bands of the trace gas of interest in order to maximize the sensitivity of the retrieval, while at the same time minimizing absorption structures of other trace gases and thus potential interferences. Also, instrumental limitations and wavelength depending sources of errors (e.g. insufficient corrections for the Ring effect and cross correlations between trace gas cross sections) need to be taken into account. Most often, not all of these requirements can be fulfilled simultaneously and a compromise needs to be found depending on the conditions at hand. Although for many trace gases the overall dependence of common DOAS retrieval on the evaluation wavelength interval is known, a systematic approach to find the optimal retrieval wavelength range and qualitative assessment is missing. Here we present a novel tool to determine the optimal evaluation wavelength range. It is based on mapping retrieved values in the retrieval wavelength space and thus visualize the consequence of different choices of retrieval spectral ranges, e.g. caused by slightly erroneous absorption cross sections, cross correlations and

  2. Spectral narrowing of solid state lasers by narrow-band PTR Bragg mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, T.; Rapaport, A.; Chen, Y.; Smirnov, V.; Hemmer, M.; Glebov, L. B.; Richardson, M. C.; Bass, M.

    2006-05-01

    Dramatic spectral narrowing of normally broad band lasers, Ti:Sapphire,Cr:LiSAF, and alexandrite was achieved by simply replacing the output mirror with a reflective, volumetric Bragg grating recorded in photo thermal refractive (PTR) glass. The output power of each laser was changed very slightly from that obtained using dielectric coated output mirrors with the same output coupling as the Bragg grating while spectral brightness increased by about three orders of magnitude.

  3. Ground-based Photon Path Measurements from Solar Absorption Spectra of the O2 A-band

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, Z.; Wennberg, P. O.; Cageao, R. P.; Pongetti, T. J.; Toon, G. C.; Sander, S. P.

    2005-01-01

    High-resolution solar absorption spectra obtained from Table Mountain Facility (TMF, 34.38degN, 117.68degW, 2286 m elevation) have been analyzed in the region of the O2 A-band. The photon paths of direct sunlight in clear sky cases are retrieved from the O2 absorption lines and compared with ray-tracing calculations based on the solar zenith angle and surface pressure. At a given zenith angle, the ratios of retrieved to geometrically derived photon paths are highly precise (approx.0.2%), but they vary as the zenith angle changes. This is because current models of the spectral lineshape in this band do not properly account for the significant absorption that exists far from the centers of saturated lines. For example, use of a Voigt function with Lorentzian far wings results in an error in the retrieved photon path of as much as 5%, highly correlated with solar zenith angle. Adopting a super-Lorentz function reduces, but does not completely eliminate this problem. New lab measurements of the lineshape are required to make further progress.

  4. Development of simple band-spectral pyranometer and quantum meter using photovoltaic cells and bandpass filters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bilguun, Amarsaikhan; Nakaso, Tetsushi; Harigai, Toru; Suda, Yoshiyuki; Takikawa, Hirofumi; Tanoue, Hideto

    2016-02-01

    In recent years, greenhouse automatic-control, based on the measurement of solar irradiance, has been attracting attention. This control is an effective method for improving crop production. In the agricultural field, it is necessary to measure Photon Flux Density (PFD), which is an important parameter in the promotion of plant growth. In particular, the PFD of Photosynthetically Active Radiation (PAR, 400-700 nm) and Plant Biologically Active Radiation (PBAR, 300-800 nm) have been discussed in agricultural plant science. The commercial quantum meter (QM, PAR meter) can only measure Photosynthetically Photon Flux Density (PPFD) which is the integrated PFD quantity on the PAR wavelength. In this research, a band-spectral pyranometer or quantum meter using PVs with optical bandpass filters for dividing the PBAR wavelength into 100 nm bands (five independent channels) was developed. Before field testing, calibration of the instruments was carried out using a solar simulator. Next, a field test was conducted in three differing weather conditions such as clear, partly cloudy and cloudy skies. As a result, it was found that the response rate of the developed pyranometer was faster by four seconds compared with the response rate of the commercial pyranometer. Moreover, the outputs of each channel in the developed pyranometer were very similar to the integrated outputs of the commercial spectroradiometer. It was confirmed that the solar irradiance could be measured in each band separately using the developed band-spectral pyranometer. It was indicated that the developed band-spectral pyranometer could also be used as a PV band-spectral quantum meter which is obtained by converting the band irradiance into band PFD.

  5. Measurement of the depolarization ratio of Rayleigh scattering at absorption bands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anglister, J.; Steinberg, I. Z.

    1981-01-01

    Measurements of the depolarization ratio ρv of light scattered by the pigments lycopene and β-carotene at the red part of their absorption bands yielded values which are very close to the theoretical value 1/3 of a fully anisotropic molecular polarizability, i.e., that due to an electric dipole moment. Measurements of ρv at the blue edge of the visible absorption band of pinacyanol chloride yielded a value of 0.75 at 472.2 nm, which is the maximum value that a depolarization ratio can assume, and is attained if the average molecular polarizability is zero. This is possible only if the diagonalized polarizability tensor has at least one negative element to counterbalance the positive ones. A negative refractive index at the blue edge of the absorption band is thus experimentally demonstrated.

  6. Multi-spectral optical absorption in substrate-free nanowire arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Junpeng; Chia, Andrew; Boulanger, Jonathan; LaPierre, Ray; Dhindsa, Navneet; Khodadad, Iman; Saini, Simarjeet

    2014-09-22

    A method is presented of fabricating gallium arsenide (GaAs) nanowire arrays of controlled diameter and period by reactive ion etching of a GaAs substrate containing an indium gallium arsenide (InGaP) etch stop layer, allowing the precise nanowire length to be controlled. The substrate is subsequently removed by selective etching, using the same InGaP etch stop layer, to create a substrate-free GaAs nanowire array. The optical absorptance of the nanowire array was then directly measured without absorption from a substrate. We directly observe absorptance spectra that can be tuned by the nanowire diameter, as explained with rigorous coupled wave analysis. These results illustrate strong optical absorption suitable for nanowire-based solar cells and multi-spectral absorption for wavelength discriminating photodetectors. The solar-weighted absorptance above the bandgap of GaAs was 94% for a nanowire surface coverage of only 15%.

  7. Millimeter Wave Absorption Bands of Silver/copper Iodides-Phosphate Glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Awano, Teruyoshi; Takahashi, Toshiharu

    2013-07-01

    Millimeter wave absorption spectra of silver halides doped silver phosphate glasses were measured using an intense coherent transition radiation. Two bands were observed at 8.4cm-1 and 6.3cm-1 in AgI doped AgPO3 glass and 8.7cm-1 and 6.1cm-1 in AgBr doped one. Small difference of peak positions between these glasses suggests that these absorption bands are concerned with a large number of silver ions in dopant molecules. Cu+ conducting glasses

  8. Characterization of MODIS VIS/NIR spectral band detector-to-detector differences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, X.; Sun, J.; Meister, G.; Kwiatkowska, E.; Barnes, W. L.

    2008-08-01

    MODIS has 36 spectral bands with wavelengths in the visible (VIS), near-infrared (NIR), short-wave infrared (SWIR), mid-wave infrared (MWIR), and long-wave infrared (LWIR). It makes observations at three nadir spatial resolutions: 0.25km for bands 1-2 (40 detectors per band), 0.5km for bands 3-7 (20 detectors per band), and 1km for bands 8-36 (10 detectors per band). The VIS, NIR, and SWIR are the reflective solar bands (RSB), which are calibrated on-orbit by a solar diffuser (SD) and a solar diffuser stability monitor (SDSM). The bi-directional reflectance factor (BRF) of the SD provides a RSB calibration reference and its on-orbit changes are tracked by the SDSM. In addition, MODIS lunar observations are regularly scheduled and used to track the RSB calibration stability. On-orbit observations show that the changes in detector response are wavelength and scan angle dependent. In this study, we focus on detector-to-detector calibration differences in the MODIS VIS/NIR spectral bands, which are determined using SD and lunar observations, while the calibration performance is evaluated using the Earth view (EV) level 1B (L1B) data products. For Aqua MODIS, the detector calibration differences and their impact are also characterized using standard ocean color data products. The current calibration approach for MODIS RSB carries a band-averaged response versus scan angle (RVS) correction. The results from this study suggest that a detector-based RVS correction should, due to changes in the scan mirror's optical properties, be implemented in order to maintain and improve the current RSB L1B data product quality, particularly, for several VIS bands in Terra MODIS.

  9. Absorption spectroscopy in the ultraviolet and visible spectral range of hexavalent chromium aqueous solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mignani, Anna G.; Spadoni, Lorenzo

    1999-09-01

    In order to demonstrate the possibility of performing direct absorption spectroscopy of Hexavalent Chromium aqueous solutions, absorption measurements were performed at the dual- beam spectrophotometer in the 250 - 850 nm spectral range, with 10 mm and 100 mm path lengths. Low concentration (26 - 520 (mu) g/l) (and high concentration (2.6 - 52 mg/l) solutions were analyzed, showing that it is possible to implement a basic instrumentation for risk condition monitoring and a more advanced instrumentation for quantitative measurements.

  10. Spectral effects on direct-insolation absorptance of five collector coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hotchkiss, G. B.; Simon, F. F.; Burmeister, L. C.

    1979-01-01

    Absorptances for direct insolation of black chrome, black nickel, copper oxide, and two black zinc conversion selective coatings were calculated for a number of typical solar spectrums. Measured spectral reflectances were used while the effects of atmospheric ozone density, turbidity, and air mass were incorporated in calculated direct solar spectrums. Absorptance variation for direct insolation was found to be of the order of 1 percent for a typical range of clear-sky atmospheric conditions.

  11. Line parameters for ozone hot bands in the 4.8-micron spectral region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Camy-Peyret, Claude; Flaud, Jean-Marie; Rinsland, Curtis P.; Smith, Mary Ann H.; Devi, V. Malathy

    1990-01-01

    Line positions, intensities, and lower-state energies have been calculated for nine hot bands of (O-16)3 in the 4.8-micron spectral region using improved spectroscopic parameters deduced in recent high-resolution laboratory studies. The good quality of the hot-band parameters has been verified through comparisons of line-by-line simulations with 0.005/cm-resolution laboratory spectra of ozone. The present work and the line parameters calculated for the main bands by Pickett et al. (1988) provide a complete update of ozone spectroscopic parameters in the 4.8 micron region.

  12. [Hyperspectral Band Selection Based on Spectral Clustering and Inter-Class Separability Factor].

    PubMed

    Qin, Fang-pu; Zhang, Ai-wu; Wang, Shu-min; Meng, Xian-gang; Hu, Shao-xing; Sun, Wei-dong

    2015-05-01

    With the development of remote sensing technology and imaging spectrometer, the resolution of hyperspectral remote sensing image has been continually improved, its vast amount of data not only improves the ability of the remote sensing detection but also brings great difficulties for analyzing and processing at the same time. Band selection of hyperspectral imagery can effectively reduce data redundancy and improve classification accuracy and efficiency. So how to select the optimum band combination from hundreds of bands of hyperspectral images is a key issue. In order to solve these problems, we use spectral clustering algorithm based on graph theory. Firstly, taking of the original hyperspectral image bands as data points to be clustered , mutual information between every two bands is calculated to generate the similarity matrix. Then according to the graph partition theory, spectral decomposition of the non-normalized Laplacian matrix generated by the similarity matrix is used to get the clusters, which the similarity between is small and the similarity within is large. In order to achieve the purpose of dimensionality reduction, the inter-class separability factor of feature types on each band is calculated, which is as the reference index to choose the representative bands in the clusters furthermore. Finally, the support vector machine and minimum distance classification methods are employed to classify the hyperspectral image after band selection. The method in this paper is different from the traditional unsupervised clustering method, we employ spectral clustering algorithm based on graph theory and compute the interclass separability factor based on a priori knowledge to select bands. Comparing with traditional adaptive band selection algorithm and band index based on automatically subspace divided algorithm, the two sets of experiments results show that the overall accuracy of SVM is about 94. 08% and 94. 24% and the overall accuracy of MDC is about 87

  13. Surface plasmonic enhanced polarimetric longwave infrared photodetection with band pass spectral filtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasinajindakaw, Puminun; Vaillancourt, Jarrod; Gu, Guiru; Lu, Xuejun

    2012-06-01

    In this paper, we report a surface plasmonic enhanced polarimetric longwave infrared (LWIR) photodetector. Polarization-selective detection of LWIR incidence with different polarizations is achieved at different plasmonic resonant modes. Band-pass spectral filtering is also provided at the plasmonic resonant modes by the plasmonic enhancement. The extinction ratio (ER) of the polarimetric detection and its limiting factor is discussed.

  14. SNPP VIIRS spectral bands co-registration and spatial response characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Guoqing; Tilton, James C.; Wolfe, Robert E.; Tewari, Krishna P.; Nishihama, Masahiro

    2013-09-01

    The Visible Infrared Imager Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) instrument onboard the Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership (SNPP) satellite was launched on 28 October 2011. The VIIRS has 5 imagery spectral bands (I-bands), 16 moderate resolution spectral bands (M-bands) and a panchromatic day/night band (DNB). Performance of the VIIRS spatial response and band-to-band co-registration (BBR) was measured through intensive pre-launch tests. These measurements were made in the non-aggregated zones near the start (or end) of scan for the I-bands and M-bands and for a limited number of aggregation modes for the DNB in order to test requirement compliance. This paper presents results based on a recently re-processed pre-launch test data. Sensor (detector) spatial impulse responses in the scan direction are parameterized in terms of ground dynamic field of view (GDFOV), horizontal spatial resolution (HSR), modulation transfer function (MTF), ensquared energy (EE) and integrated out-of-pixel (IOOP) spatial response. Results are presented for the non-aggregation, 2-sample and 3-sample aggregation zones for the I-bands and M-bands, and for a limited number of aggregation modes for the DNB. On-orbit GDFOVs measured for the 5 I-bands in the scan direction using a straight bridge are also presented. Band-to-band co-registration (BBR) is quantified using the prelaunch measured band-to-band offsets. These offsets may be expressed as fractions of horizontal sampling intervals (HSIs), detector spatial response parameters GDFOV or HSR. BBR bases on HSIs in the non-aggregation, 2-sample and 3-sample aggregation zones are presented. BBR matrices based on scan direction GDFOV and HSR are compared to the BBR matrix based on HSI in the non-aggregation zone. We demonstrate that BBR based on GDFOV is a better representation of footprint overlap and so this definition should be used in BBR requirement specifications. We propose that HSR not be used as the primary image quality indicator, since we

  15. SNPP VIIRS Spectral Bands Co-Registration and Spatial Response Characterization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Guoqing; Tilton, James C.; Wolfe, Robert E.; Tewari, Krishna P.; Nishihama, Masahiro

    2013-01-01

    The Visible Infrared Imager Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) instrument onboard the Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership (SNPP) satellite was launched on 28 October 2011. The VIIRS has 5 imagery spectral bands (I-bands), 16 moderate resolution spectral bands (M-bands) and a panchromatic day/night band (DNB). Performance of the VIIRS spatial response and band-to-band co-registration (BBR) was measured through intensive pre-launch tests. These measurements were made in the non-aggregated zones near the start (or end) of scan for the I-bands and M-bands and for a limited number of aggregation modes for the DNB in order to test requirement compliance. This paper presents results based on a recently re-processed pre-launch test data. Sensor (detector) spatial impulse responses in the scan direction are parameterized in terms of ground dynamic field of view (GDFOV), horizontal spatial resolution (HSR), modulation transfer function (MTF), ensquared energy (EE) and integrated out-of-pixel (IOOP) spatial response. Results are presented for the non-aggregation, 2-sample and 3-sample aggregation zones for the I-bands and M-bands, and for a limited number of aggregation modes for the DNB. On-orbit GDFOVs measured for the 5 I-bands in the scan direction using a straight bridge are also presented. Band-to-band co-registration (BBR) is quantified using the prelaunch measured band-to-band offsets. These offsets may be expressed as fractions of horizontal sampling intervals (HSIs), detector spatial response parameters GDFOV or HSR. BBR bases on HSIs in the non-aggregation, 2-sample and 3-sample aggregation zones are presented. BBR matrices based on scan direction GDFOV and HSR are compared to the BBR matrix based on HSI in the non-aggregation zone. We demonstrate that BBR based on GDFOV is a better representation of footprint overlap and so this definition should be used in BBR requirement specifications. We propose that HSR not be used as the primary image quality indicator, since we

  16. Broadening of absorption band by coupled gap plasmon resonances in a near-infrared metamaterial absorber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cong, Jiawei; Yao, Hongbing; Gong, Daolei; Chen, Mingyang; Tong, Yanqun; Fu, Yonghong; Ren, Naifei

    2016-07-01

    We propose a strategy to broaden the absorption band of the conventional metamaterial absorber by incorporating alternating metal/dielectric films. Up to 7-fold increase in bandwidth and ∼95% average absorption are achieved arising from the coupling of induced multiple gap plasmon resonances. The resonance coupling is analytically demonstrated using the coupled oscillator model, which reveals that both the optimal coupling strength and the resonance wavelength matching are required for the enhancement of absorption bandwidth. The presented multilayer design is easily fabricated and readily implanted to other absorber configurations, offering a practical avenue for applications in photovoltaic cells and thermal emitters.

  17. Band Structure of the Rhodobacter sphaeroides Photosynthetic Reaction Center from Low-Temperature Absorption and Hole-Burned Spectra.

    PubMed

    Rancova, Olga; Jankowiak, Ryszard; Kell, Adam; Jassas, Mahboobe; Abramavicius, Darius

    2016-06-30

    Persistent/transient spectral hole burning (HB) and computer simulations are used to provide new insight into the excitonic structure and excitation energy transfer of the widely studied bacterial reaction center (bRC) of Rhodobacter (Rb.) sphaeroides. We focus on site energies of its cofactors and electrochromic shifts induced in the chemically oxidized (P(+)) and charge-separated (P(+)QM(-)) states. Theoretical models lead to two alternative interpretations of the H-band. On the basis of our experimental and simulation data, we suggest that the bleach near 813-825 nm in transient HB spectra in the P(+)QM(-) state, often assigned to the upper exciton component of the special pair, is mostly due to different electrochromic shifts of the BL/M cofactors. From the exciton compositions in the charge-neutral (CN) bRC, the weak fourth excitonic band near 780 nm can be denoted PY+, that is, the upper excitonic band of the special pair, which in the CN bRC behaves as a delocalized state over PM and PL pigments that weakly mixes with accessory BChls. Thus, the shoulder in the absorption of Rb. sphaeroides near 813-815 nm does not contain the PY+ exciton band. PMID:27266271

  18. [Wavebands selection for rice information extraction based on spectral bands inter-correlation].

    PubMed

    Wang, Fu-Min; Huang, Jing-Feng; Xu, Jun-Feng; Wang, Xiu-Zhen

    2008-05-01

    The hyperspectral remote sensing data usually involve hundreds or even thousands of narrow bands, which may be crucial for providing additional information with significant improvements over broad bands in quantifying biophysical and biochemical variables of agricultural crop. However, the huge data generated by hyperspectral systems, and the problems this presents for storage and analysis, have far prevented the routine use of such data. The objective of the present research was to identify the spectral bands in the visible and near-infrared range that were suitable for the study of rice. The hyperspectral reflectance of canopy in different development stages was measured in experimental field using a 1 nm-wide spectroradiometer but was aggregated to 10 nm-wide bandwidths to match the first spaceborne hyperspectral sensor, Hyperion. The correlation coefficients(r) between all the combinations of spectral bands were computed, and then they were converted to R2 , which constituted R2 matrices. The matrices were plotted against wavebands. The criterion of band selection is that the lower the R2 value, the less the redundancy between two wavebands while the higher R2 indicates that there is redundant information between two wavebands. According to the criterion, the wavebands corresponding to the first 100 minimum R2 values were selected from all canopy spectra collected on different dates. And then these bands were analyzed. The results indicate that the visible and infrared (NIR and SWIR) themselves contain redundant information. The wavebands containing abundant information of rice are located in specific bands in the longer wavelength portion of the visible region, with secondary clusters in red edge region, in strongly reflective near-infrared region with relatively higher reflectance, in one particular section of short wave near-infrared (SWIR) (1 530 nm) and in the second maximum reflectance region of SWIR (2 215 nm). Compared with the selected bands with other

  19. Spectral imaging of the 3.3 and 11.3 micron emission bands in NGC 1333 - Discovery of spatially separate band emissions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bregman, Jesse; Rank, David; Sandford, Scott A.; Temi, Pasquale

    1993-01-01

    Spectral images in the 3.3 and 11.3 micron IR emission band around the star SVS 3 in NGC 1333 indicate that the two bands have their origin in different locations, rendering them useless in estimates of the sizes of the molecules emitting the bands. This is in keeping with the emission bands' generation by a mixture of variously sized polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) whose smallest species have been dehydrogenated in the vicinity of SVS 3. Hot bands and overtone/combination bands may account for the 3.4-micron band, rather than molecular side-groups of the PAHs.

  20. Spectral Correspondence to the Evolution of Chemical Bond and Valence Band in Oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Chang Q.; Zhang, Sam; Hing, Peter; Wei, Jun; Xie, Hong; Wee, Andrew T. S.

    Spectroscopy covering energies around Fermi level of a metal is of particular interest as it does give direct information of bond forming and its consequence on the energy states (DOS). However, the origin of some outstanding spectral features from metal surface with chemisorbed oxygen has not yet been well established. It is shown in this letter that a bond-to-band model for oxidation enables the nature of a sum of spectral features to be consistently defined. All the spectral changes in the STS, XPS, UPS, photoemission spectroscopy (PES) and the thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS) are classified by four DOS features around Fermi level and three bonding processes. Such a definition leads not only to new knowledge of the nature of O-metal interaction but also to a direct understanding of the bond-and-band forming dynamics.

  1. The spectral response of the SCUBA-2 850- and 450-micron photometric bands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naylor, David A.; Gom, Brad G.; Abdelazim, Sherif; Friberg, Per; Bintley, Daniel; Holland, Wayne S.; MacIntosh, Michael J.; Ade, Peter A. R.; Tucker, Carole E.

    2014-07-01

    SCUBA-2 is a wide-field submillimeter bolometer camera operating at the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope. The camera has twin focal planes, each with 5120 superconducting Transition Edge Sensors, which provide simultaneous images in two filter bands at 450 and 850 microns matched to the atmospheric windows. Detailed knowledge of the optical filter profiles that define these bands is important for estimating potential contamination from the prevalent CO J = 3-2 and CO 6-5 line emission, and correctly interpreting the effects of the source spectral index on photometric observations. We present measurements of the spectral response of SCUBA-2 obtained with FTS-2, the ancillary Fourier transform spectrometer instrument at the JCMT. The spectral measurements will be compared with the predicted filter profile determined from the linear combination of the individual filter profiles present in the SCUBA-2 optical train.

  2. Voigt deconvolution method and its applications to pure oxygen absorption spectrum at 1270 nm band

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    AL-Jalali, Muhammad A.; Aljghami, Issam F.; Mahzia, Yahia M.

    2016-03-01

    Experimental spectral lines of pure oxygen at 1270 nm band were analyzed by Voigt deconvolution method. The method gave a total Voigt profile, which arises from two overlapping bands. Deconvolution of total Voigt profile leads to two Voigt profiles, the first as a result of O2 dimol at 1264 nm band envelope, and the second from O2 monomer at 1268 nm band envelope. In addition, Voigt profile itself is the convolution of Lorentzian and Gaussian distributions. Competition between thermal and collisional effects was clearly observed through competition between Gaussian and Lorentzian width for each band envelope. Voigt full width at half-maximum height (Voigt FWHM) for each line, and the width ratio between Lorentzian and Gaussian width (ΓLΓG- 1) have been investigated. The following applied pressures were at 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, and 8 bar, while the temperatures were at 298 K, 323 K, 348 K, and 373 K range.

  3. Voigt deconvolution method and its applications to pure oxygen absorption spectrum at 1270 nm band.

    PubMed

    Al-Jalali, Muhammad A; Aljghami, Issam F; Mahzia, Yahia M

    2016-03-15

    Experimental spectral lines of pure oxygen at 1270 nm band were analyzed by Voigt deconvolution method. The method gave a total Voigt profile, which arises from two overlapping bands. Deconvolution of total Voigt profile leads to two Voigt profiles, the first as a result of O2 dimol at 1264 nm band envelope, and the second from O2 monomer at 1268 nm band envelope. In addition, Voigt profile itself is the convolution of Lorentzian and Gaussian distributions. Competition between thermal and collisional effects was clearly observed through competition between Gaussian and Lorentzian width for each band envelope. Voigt full width at half-maximum height (Voigt FWHM) for each line, and the width ratio between Lorentzian and Gaussian width (ΓLΓG(-1)) have been investigated. The following applied pressures were at 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, and 8 bar, while the temperatures were at 298 K, 323 K, 348 K, and 373 K range. PMID:26709019

  4. Infrared band absorptance correlations and applications to nongray radiation. [mathematical models of absorption spectra for nongray atmospheres in order to study air pollution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tiwari, S. N.; Manian, S. V. S.

    1976-01-01

    Various mathematical models for infrared radiation absorption spectra for atmospheric gases are reviewed, and continuous correlations for the total absorptance of a wide band are presented. Different band absorptance correlations were employed in two physically realistic problems (radiative transfer in gases with internal heat source, and heat transfer in laminar flow of absorbing-emitting gases between parallel plates) to study their influence on final radiative transfer results. This information will be applied to the study of atmospheric pollutants by infrared radiation measurement.

  5. Collision-Induced Absorption by H2 Pairs in the Second Overtone Band at 298 and 77.5 K: Comparison between Experimental and Theoretical Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brodbeck, C.; Bouanich, J.-P.; van-Thanh, Nguyen; Fu, Y.; Borysow, A.

    1999-01-01

    The collision-induced spectra of hydrogen in the region of the second overtone at 0.8 microns have been recorded at temperatures of 298 and 77.5 K and for gas densities ranging from 100 to 800 amagats. The spectral profile defined by the absorption coefficient per squared density varies significantly with the density, so that the binary absorption coefficient has been determined by extrapolations to zero density of the measured profiles. Our extrapolated measurements and our recent ab initio quantum calculation are in relatively good agreement with one another. Taking into account the very weak absorption of the second overtone band, the agreement is, however, not as good as it has become (our) standard for strong bands.

  6. Spectral Absorption and Scattering Properties of Normal and Bruised Apple Tissue

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Knowledge of the spectral absorption and scattering properties of apple tissue, especially bruised tissue, can help us develop an effective method for detecting bruises during postharvest sorting and grading. This research was intended to determine the optical properties of normal and bruised apple ...

  7. Assessing multiple quality attributes of peaches using spectral absorption and scattering properties

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of this research was to measure the spectral absorption and reduced scattering coefficients of peaches, using a hyperspectral imaging-based spatially-resolved method, for maturity/quality assessment. A newly developed optical property measuring instrument was used for acquiring hypersp...

  8. Isothermal annealing of a 620 nm optical absorption band in Brazilian topaz crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isotani, Sadao; Matsuoka, Masao; Albuquerque, Antonio Roberto Pereira Leite

    2013-04-01

    Isothermal decay behaviors, observed at 515, 523, 562, and 693 K, for an optical absorption band at 620 nm in gamma-irradiated Brazilian blue topaz were analyzed using a kinetic model consisting of O- bound small polarons adjacent to recombination centers (electron traps). The kinetic equations obtained on the basis of this model were solved using the method of Runge-Kutta and the fit parameters describing these defects were determined with a grid optimization method. Two activation energies of 0.52±0.08 and 0.88±0.13 eV, corresponding to two different structural configurations of the O- polarons, explained well the isothermal decay curves using first-order kinetics expected from the kinetic model. On the other hand, thermoluminescence (TL) emission spectra measured at various temperatures showed a single band at 400 nm in the temperature range of 373-553 K in which the 620 nm optical absorption band decreased in intensity. Monochromatic TL glow curve data at 400 nm extracted from the TL emission spectra observed were found to be explained reasonably by using the knowledge obtained from the isothermal decay analysis. This suggests that two different structural configurations of O- polarons are responsible for the 620 nm optical absorption band and that the thermal annealing of the polarons causes the 400 nm TL emission band.

  9. Spectral properties of molecular iodine in absorption cells filled to specified saturation pressure.

    PubMed

    Hrabina, Jan; Šarbort, Martin; Acef, Ouali; Burck, Frédéric Du; Chiodo, Nicola; Holá, Miroslava; Číp, Ondřej; Lazar, Josef

    2014-11-01

    We present the results of measurement and evaluation of spectral properties of iodine absorption cells filled at certain saturation pressure. A set of cells made of borosilicate glass instead of common fused silica was tested for their spectral properties in greater detail with special care for the long-term development of the absorption media purity. The results were compared with standard fused silica cells and the high quality of iodine was verified. A measurement method based on an approach relying on measurement of linewidth of the hyperfine transitions is proposed as a novel technique for iodine cell absorption media purity evaluation. A potential application in laser metrology of length is also discussed. PMID:25402909

  10. Nonlinear polarization spectroscopy in the frequency domain of light-harvesting complex II: absorption band substructure and exciton dynamics.

    PubMed Central

    Lokstein, H; Leupold, D; Voigt, B; Nowak, F; Ehlert, J; Hoffmann, P; Garab, G

    1995-01-01

    Spectral substructure and ultrafast excitation dynamics have been investigated in the chlorophyll (Chl) a and b Qy region of isolated plant light-harvesting complex II (LHC II). We demonstrate the feasibility of Nonlinear Polarization Spectroscopy in the frequency domain, a novel photosynthesis research laser spectroscopic technique, to determine not only ultrafast population relaxation (T1) and dephasing (T2) times, but also to reveal the complex spectral substructure in the Qy band as well as the mode(s) of absorption band broadening at room temperature (RT). The study gives further direct evidence for the existence of up to now hypothetical "Chl forms". Of particular interest is the differentiated participation of the Chl forms in energy transfer in trimeric and aggregated LHC II. Limits for T2 are given in the range of a few ten fs. Inhomogeneous broadening does not exceed the homogeneous widths of the subbands at RT. The implications of the results for the energy transfer mechanisms in the antenna are discussed. PMID:8534824

  11. Understanding of sub-band gap absorption of femtosecond-laser sulfur hyperdoped silicon using synchrotron-based techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Limaye, Mukta V.; Chen, S. C.; Lee, C. Y.; Chen, L. Y.; Singh, Shashi B.; Shao, Y. C.; Wang, Y. F.; Hsieh, S. H.; Hsueh, H. C.; Chiou, J. W.; Chen, C. H.; Jang, L. Y.; Cheng, C. L.; Pong, W. F.; Hu, Y. F.

    2015-06-01

    The correlation between sub-band gap absorption and the chemical states and electronic and atomic structures of S-hyperdoped Si have been extensively studied, using synchrotron-based x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), x-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy (XANES), extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS), valence-band photoemission spectroscopy (VB-PES) and first-principles calculation. S 2p XPS spectra reveal that the S-hyperdoped Si with the greatest (~87%) sub-band gap absorption contains the highest concentration of S2- (monosulfide) species. Annealing S-hyperdoped Si reduces the sub-band gap absorptance and the concentration of S2- species, but significantly increases the concentration of larger S clusters [polysulfides (Sn2-, n > 2)]. The Si K-edge XANES spectra show that S hyperdoping in Si increases (decreased) the occupied (unoccupied) electronic density of states at/above the conduction-band-minimum. VB-PES spectra evidently reveal that the S-dopants not only form an impurity band deep within the band gap, giving rise to the sub-band gap absorption, but also cause the insulator-to-metal transition in S-hyperdoped Si samples. Based on the experimental results and the calculations by density functional theory, the chemical state of the S species and the formation of the S-dopant states in the band gap of Si are critical in determining the sub-band gap absorptance of hyperdoped Si samples.

  12. Precise methane absorption measurements in the 1.64 μm spectral region for the MERLIN mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delahaye, T.; Maxwell, S. E.; Reed, Z. D.; Lin, H.; Hodges, J. T.; Sung, K.; Devi, V. M.; Warneke, T.; Spietz, P.; Tran, H.

    2016-06-01

    In this article we describe a high-precision laboratory measurement targeting the R(6) manifold of the 2ν3 band of 12CH4. High-fidelity modeling of this absorption spectrum for atmospheric temperature and pressure conditions will be required by the Franco-German, Methane Remote Sensing LIDAR (MERLIN) space mission for retrievals of atmospheric methane. The analysis uses the Hartmann-Tran profile for modeling line shape and also includes line-mixing effects. To this end, six high-resolution and high signal-to-noise ratio absorption spectra of air-broadened methane were recorded using a frequency-stabilized cavity ring-down spectroscopy apparatus. Sample conditions corresponded to room temperature and spanned total sample pressures of 40 hPa-1013 hPa with methane molar fractions between 1 µmol mol-1 and 12 µmol mol-1. All spectroscopic model parameters were simultaneously adjusted in a multispectrum nonlinear least squares fit to the six measured spectra. Comparison of the fitted model to the measured spectra reveals the ability to calculate the room temperature, methane absorption coefficient to better than 0.1% at the online position of the MERLIN mission. This is the first time that such fidelity has been reached in modeling methane absorption in the investigated spectral region, fulfilling the accuracy requirements of the MERLIN mission. We also found excellent agreement when comparing the present results with measurements obtained over different pressure conditions and using other laboratory techniques. Finally, we also evaluated the impact of these new spectral parameters on atmospheric transmissions spectra calculations.

  13. Light absorption efficiencies of photosynthetic pigments: the dependence on spectral types of central stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komatsu, Yu; Umemura, Masayuki; Shoji, Mitsuo; Kayanuma, Megumi; Yabana, Kazuhiro; Shiraishi, Kenji

    2015-07-01

    For detecting life from reflection spectra on extrasolar planets, trace of photosynthesis is one of the indicators. However, it is not yet clear what kind of radiation environments is acceptable for photosynthesis. Light absorption in photosystems on the Earth occurs using limited photosynthetic pigments such as chlorophylls (Chls) and bacteriochlorophylls (BChls). Efficiencies of light absorption for the pigments were evaluated by calculating the specific molecular absorption spectra at the high accuracy-quantum mechanical level. We used realistic stellar radiation spectra such as F, G, K and M-type stars to investigate the efficiencies. We found that the efficiencies are increased with the temperature of stars, from M to F star. Photosynthetic pigments have two types of absorption bands, the Q y and Soret. In higher temperature stars like F star, contributions from the Soret region of the pigments are dominant for the efficiency. On the other hand, in lower temperature stars like M stars, the Q y band is crucial. Therefore, differences on the absorption intensity and the wavelength between the Q y and Soret band are the most important to characterize the photosynthetic pigments. Among photosynthetic pigments, Chls tend to be efficient in higher temperature stars, while BChls are efficient for M stars. Blueward of the 4000 Å break, the efficiencies of BChls are smaller than Chls in the higher temperature stars.

  14. Depolarisation of light scattered by disperse systems of low-dimensional potassium polytitanate nanoparticles in the fundamental absorption band

    SciTech Connect

    Zimnyakov, D A; Yuvchenko, S A; Pravdin, A B; Kochubey, V I; Gorokhovsky, A V; Tretyachenko, E V; Kunitsky, A I

    2014-07-31

    The results of experimental studies of depolarising properties of disperse systems on the basis of potassium polytitanate nanoplatelets and nanoribbons in the visible and near-UV spectral regions are presented. It is shown that in the fundamental absorption band of the nanoparticle material the increase in the depolarisation factor takes place for the radiation scattered perpendicularly to the direction of the probing beam. For nanoribbons a pronounced peak of depolarisation is observed, which is caused by the essential anisotropy of the particles shape and the peculiarities of the behaviour of the material dielectric function. The empirical data are compared with the theoretical results for 'nanodiscs' and 'nanoneedles' with the model dielectric function, corresponding to that obtained from optical constants of the titanium dioxide dielectric function. (laser biophotonics)

  15. Global four-band spectral classification of Jupiter's clouds - Color/albedo units and trends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, W. Reid

    Voyager 2 digital images of Jupiter have been used to construct a global data base of cloud reflectance in four spectral bands: three wideband 'colors' with effective wavelengths at 431 nm, 564 nm, and 599 nm, plus the narrowband CH4 filter centered at 621 nm. This data base has been spectrally classified at 0.5 deg resolution to separate the complex scene into cloud color/albedo units on a pixel-by-pixel basis, revealing 20 distinct and five tentative units. These include both large, globally distributed units and very small, localized units. Global color maps and unit membership maps are used to highlight associations and trends.

  16. [Laser induced breakdown spectra of coal sample and self-absorption of the spectral line].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Gui-yin; Ji, Hui; Jin, Yi-dong

    2014-12-01

    The LIBS of one kind of household fuel coal was obtained with the first harmonic output 532 nm of an Nd·YAG laser as radiation source. With the assignment of the spectral lines, it was found that besides the elements C, Si, Mg, Fe, Al, Ca, Ti, Na and K, which are reported to be contained in coal, the presented sample also contains trace elements, such as Cd, Co, Hf, Ir, Li, Mn, Ni, Rb, Sr, V, W, Zn, Zr etc, but the spectral lines corresponding to O and H elements did not appear in the spectra. This is owing to the facts that the transition probability of H and O atoms is small and the energy of the upper level for transition is higher. The results of measurement also show that the intensity of spectral line increases with the laser pulse energy and self-absorption of the spectral lines K766.493 nm and K769.921 nm will appear to some extent. Increasing laser energy further will make self-absorption more obvious. The presence of self-absorption can be attributed to two factors. One is the higher transition rate of K atoms, and the other is that the increase in laser intensity induces the enhancement of the particle number density in the plasma. PMID:25881446

  17. Characterization of NH overtone and combination bands in the near-infrared absorption spectra of simple cyclic imides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNeilly, Patrick J.; Andrea, Tariq A.; Krikorian, S. Edward

    1992-10-01

    Bands due to overtone and combination vibrational modes attributable to the imide grouping have been elucidated in the near-IR absorption spectra of small-ring cyclic imides, in which the grouping is in a cis, cis conformation. The spectra closely parallel the spectra of cis lactams except that two combination modes involving the carbonyl stretching fundamental, [ν(NH) + ν(CO)] and [2ν(C=O) + imide III], occur at higher wavenumbers in the imide spectra, reflecting the higher frequency at which this fundamental absorbs. This same factor results in a reversal in the wavenumber positions of the [2ν(CO) + imide III] and [ν(NH) + imide III] combination bands in the imide spectra relative to those in the lactam spectra. In addition, in-phase and out-of-phase vibrational coupling between the two carbonyl groups in the imides may compound the band due to the [ν(NH) + ν(CO)] combination mode. These three spectral characteristics serve to distinguish the imides from the lactams in the near-IR.

  18. Light fluence correction for quantitative determination of tissue absorption coefficient using multi-spectral optoacoustic tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brochu, Frederic M.; Joseph, James; Tomaszewski, Michal; Bohndiek, Sarah E.

    2015-07-01

    MultiSpectral Optoacoustic Tomography (MSOT) is a fast developing imaging modality, combining the high resolution and penetration depth of ultrasound with the excellent contrast from optical imaging of tissue. Absorption and scattering of the near infrared excitation light modulates the spectral profile of light as it propagates deep into biological tissue, meaning the images obtained provide only qualitative insight into the distribution of tissue chromophores. The goal of this work is to accurately recover the spectral profile of excitation light by modelling light fluence in the data reconstruction, to enable quantitative imaging. We worked with a commercial small animal MSOT scanner and developed our light fluence correction for its' cylindrical geometry. Optoacoustic image reconstruction pinpoints the sources of acoustic waves detected by the transducers and returns the initial pressure amplitude at these points. This pressure is the product of the dimensionless Grüneisen parameter, the absorption coefficient and the light fluence. Under the condition of constant Grüneisen parameter and well modelled light fluence, there is a linear relationship between the initial pressure amplitude measured in the optoacoustic image and the absorption coefficient. We were able to reproduce this linear relationship in different physical regions of an agarose gel phantom containing targets of known optical absorption coefficient, demonstrating that our light fluence model was working. We also demonstrate promising results of light fluence correction effects on in vivo data.

  19. Selection of a seventh spectral band for the LANDSAT-D thematic mapper

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holmes, Q. A. (Principal Investigator); Nuesch, D. R.

    1978-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. Each of the candidate bands were examined in terms of the feasibility of gathering high quality imagery from space while taking into account solar illumination, atmospheric attenuation, and the signal/noise ratio achievable within the TM sensor constraints. For the 2.2 micron region and the thermal IR region, inband signal values were calculated from representative spectral reflectance/emittance curves and a linear discriminant analysis was employed to predict classification accuracies. Based upon the substantial improvement (from 78 t0 92%) in discriminating zones of hydrothermally altered rocks from unaltered zones, over a broad range of observation conditions, a 2.08-2.35 micron spectral band having a ground resolution of 30 meters was recommended.

  20. Focused vs 'unlimited' spectral bands for aquatic remote sensing: potentials and limitations (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Z.

    2013-12-01

    It has long been concluded that the measurement of ocean (water) color with satellite sensors is an indispensable means for the study of biogeochemistry of the global oceans, and the first moderate-resolution map of biomass in the surface oceans was achieved with the Coastal Zone Color Scanner (CZCS) operated in the late 1970s and earlier 1980s. CZCS had 5 bands in the visible-near-infrared (VNIR) domain and was found inadequate for the separation of colored dissolved organic matter from phytoplankton. Subsequently more bands were included in ocean color sensors: the Sea-viewing Wide Field-of-view Sensor (SeaWiFS) had 7 bands, the Medium Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MERIS) had 12, and the Moderate-Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MODIS) has 8, while the newly launched Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) has 7 in the VNIR domain. Some airborne sensors, such as the Airborne Visible-Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) and the Portable Remote Imaging Spectrometer (PRISM), or experimental sensors, such as Hyperion and the Hyperspectral Imager for the Coastal Ocean (HICO), on the other hand, had much more spectral bands in the VNIR domain. Further, for ocean color missions planned for the coming decades, such as the Pre-Aerosol, Clouds, and ocean Ecosystem (PACE) and the Geostationary Coastal and Air Pollution Events (GEO-CAPE), there is a desire to use "hyperspectral" sensors. Do we really need a satellite sensor with 'hyperspectral', or contiguous, bands? What are the potentials and limitations? This review intends to provide a summary of research results of using both multi-band and "hyperspectral" data, and to discuss the pros and cons of employing a sensor with 'unlimited' spectral bands.

  1. The GOES-R Advanced Baseline Imager: detector spectral response effects on thermal emissive band calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pearlman, Aaron J.; Padula, Francis; Cao, Changyong; Wu, Xiangqian

    2015-10-01

    The Advanced Baseline Imager (ABI) will be aboard the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite R-Series (GOES-R) to supply data needed for operational weather forecasts and long-term climate variability studies, which depend on high quality data. Unlike the heritage operational GOES systems that have two or four detectors per band, ABI has hundreds of detectors per channel requiring calibration coefficients for each one. This increase in number of detectors poses new challenges for next generation sensors as each detector has a unique spectral response function (SRF) even though only one averaged SRF per band is used operationally to calibrate each detector. This simplified processing increases computational efficiency. Using measured system-level SRF data from pre-launch testing, we have the opportunity to characterize the calibration impact using measured SRFs, both per detector and as an average of detector-level SRFs similar to the operational version. We calculated the spectral response impacts for the thermal emissive bands (TEB) theoretically, by simulating the ABI response viewing an ideal blackbody and practically, with the measured ABI response to an external reference blackbody from the pre-launch TEB calibration test. The impacts from the practical case match the theoretical results using an ideal blackbody. The observed brightness temperature trends show structure across the array with magnitudes as large as 0.1 K for and 12 (9.61 µm), and 0.25 K for band 14 (11.2 µm) for a 300 K blackbody. The trends in the raw ABI signal viewing the blackbody support the spectral response measurements results, since they show similar trends in bands 12 (9.61µm), and 14 (11.2 µm), meaning that the spectral effects dominate the response differences between detectors for these bands. We further validated these effects using the radiometric bias calculated between calibrations using the external blackbody and

  2. Spectral control of an alexandrite laser for an airborne water-vapor differential absorption lidar system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ponsardin, Patrick; Grossmann, Benoist E.; Browell, Edward V.

    1994-01-01

    A narrow-linewidth pulsed alexandrite laser has been greatly modified for improved spectral stability in an aircraft environment, and its operation has been evaluated in the laboratory for making water-vapor differential absorption lidar measurements. An alignment technique is described to achieve the optimum free spectral range ratio for the two etalons inserted in the alexandrite laser cavity, and the sensitivity of this ratio is analyzed. This technique drastically decreases the occurrence of mode hopping, which is commonly observed in a tunable, two-intracavity-etalon laser system. High spectral purity (greater than 99.85%) at 730 nm is demonstrated by the use of a water-vapor absorption line as a notch filter. The effective cross sections of 760-nm oxygen and 730-nm water-vapor absorption lines are measured at different pressures by using this laser, which has a finite linewidth of 0.02 cm(exp -1) (FWHM). It is found that for water-vapor absorption linewidths greater than 0.04 cm(exp -1) (HWHM), or for altitudes below 10 km, the laser line can be considered monochromatic because the measured effective absorption cross section is within 1% of the calculated monochromatic cross section. An analysis of the environmental sensitivity of the two intracavity etalons is presented, and a closed-loop computer control for active stabilization of the two intracavity etalons in the alexandrite laser is described. Using a water-vapor absorption line as a wavelength reference, we measure a long-term frequency drift (approximately 1.5 h) of less than 0.7 pm in the laboratory.

  3. Rotational Profiles of Molecular Absorption Bands in Astrophysically Relevant Conditions: Ab-Initio Approach

    SciTech Connect

    Malloci, Giuliano; Mulas, Giacomo; Cappellini, Giancarlo; Satta, Guido; Porceddu, Ignazio; Benvenuti, Piero

    2004-05-01

    A theoretical study of rotational profiles of molecular absorption bands is essential for direct comparison with observations of diffuse interstellar bands. Applications using gaussian quantum-chemical approach within DFT are presented. Structural and vibrational properties of the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon ovalene cation (C32H14+) are obtained. We discuss the expected profile of the first electronic transition of such molecule, obtained with a Monte Carlo model of its rotation in the physical conditions of low temperatures and absence of collisions which are characteristic of the interstellar medium (ISM).

  4. Simulator spectral characterization using balloon calibrated solar cells with narrow band pass filters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodelle, G. S.; Brooks, G. R.; Seaman, C. H.

    1981-01-01

    The development and implementation of an instrument for spectral measurement of solar simulators for testing solar cell characteristics is reported. The device was constructed for detecting changes in solar simulator behavior and for comparing simulator spectral irradiance to solar AM0 output. It consists of a standard solar cell equipped with a band pass filter narrow enough so that, when flown on a balloon to sufficient altitude along with sufficient numbers of cells, each equipped with filters of different bandpass ratings, the entire spectral response of the standard cell can be determined. Measured short circuit currents from the balloon flights thus produce cell devices which, when exposed to solar simulator light, have a current which does or does not respond as observed under actual AM0 conditions. Improvements of the filtered cells in terms of finer bandpass filter tuning and measurement of temperature coefficients are indicated.

  5. Radiometric spectral and band rendering of targets using anisotropic BRDFs and measured backgrounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilgers, John W.; Hoffman, Jeffrey A.; Reynolds, William R.; Jafolla, James C.

    2000-07-01

    Achievement of ultra-high fidelity signature modeling of targets requires a significant level of complexity for all of the components required in the rendering process. Specifically, the reflectance of the surface must be described using the bi-directional distribution function (BRDF). In addition, the spatial representation of the background must be high fidelity. A methodology and corresponding model for spectral and band rendering of targets using both isotropic and anisotropic BRDFs is presented. In addition, a set of tools will be described for generating theoretical anisotropic BRDFs and for reducing data required for a description of an anisotropic BRDF by 5 orders of magnitude. This methodology is hybrid using a spectrally measured panoramic of the background mapped to a large hemisphere. Both radiosity and ray-tracing approaches are incorporated simultaneously for a robust solution. In the thermal domain the spectral emission is also included in the solution. Rendering examples using several BRDFs will be presented.

  6. The SDSS-III APOGEE Spectral Line List for H-band Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shetrone, M.; Bizyaev, D.; Lawler, J. E.; Allende Prieto, C.; Johnson, J. A.; Smith, V. V.; Cunha, K.; Holtzman, J.; García Pérez, A. E.; Mészáros, Sz.; Sobeck, J.; Zamora, O.; García-Hernández, D. A.; Souto, D.; Chojnowski, D.; Koesterke, L.; Majewski, S.; Zasowski, G.

    2015-12-01

    We present the H-band spectral line lists adopted by the Apache Point Observatory Galactic Evolution Experiment (APOGEE). The APOGEE line lists comprise astrophysical, theoretical, and laboratory sources from the literature, as well as newly evaluated astrophysical oscillator strengths and damping parameters. We discuss the construction of the APOGEE line list, which is one of the critical inputs for the APOGEE Stellar Parameters and Chemical Abundances Pipeline, and present three different versions that have been used at various stages of the project. The methodology for the newly calculated astrophysical line lists is reviewed. The largest of these three line lists contains 134,457 molecular and atomic transitions. In addition to the format adopted to store the data, the line lists are available in MOOG, Synspec, and Turbospectrum formats. The limitations of the line lists along with guidance for its use on different spectral types are discussed. We also present a list of H-band spectral features that are either poorly represented or completely missing in our line list. This list is based on the average of a large number of spectral fit residuals for APOGEE observations spanning a wide range of stellar parameters.

  7. An alternative model for photodynamic therapy of cancers: Hot-band absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jing; Chen, Jiyao

    2013-12-01

    The sulfonated aluminum phthalocyanine (AlPcS), a photosensitizer for photodynamic cancer therapy (PDT), has an absorption tail in the near-infrared region (700-900 nm) which is so-called hot band absorption (HBA). With the HBA of 800 nm, the up-conversion excitation of AlPcS was achieved followed by the anti-Stocks emission (688 nm band) and singlet oxygen production. The HBA PDT of AlPcS seriously damaged the KB and HeLa cancer cells, with a typical light dose dependent mode. Particularly, the in vitro experiments with the AlPcS shielding solutions further showed that the HBA PDT can overcome a self-shielding effect benefiting the PDT applications.

  8. Parallel LC circuit model for multi-band absorption and preliminary design of radiative cooling.

    PubMed

    Feng, Rui; Qiu, Jun; Liu, Linhua; Ding, Weiqiang; Chen, Lixue

    2014-12-15

    We perform a comprehensive analysis of multi-band absorption by exciting magnetic polaritons in the infrared region. According to the independent properties of the magnetic polaritons, we propose a parallel inductance and capacitance(PLC) circuit model to explain and predict the multi-band resonant absorption peaks, which is fully validated by using the multi-sized structure with identical dielectric spacing layer and the multilayer structure with the same strip width. More importantly, we present the application of the PLC circuit model to preliminarily design a radiative cooling structure realized by merging several close peaks together. This omnidirectional and polarization insensitive structure is a good candidate for radiative cooling application. PMID:25607485

  9. An Evaluation of Total Solar Reflectance and Spectral Band Ratioing Techniques for Estimating Soil Water Content

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reginato, R. J.; Vedder, J. F.; Idso, S. B.; Jackson, R. D.; Blanchard, M. B.; Goettelman, R.

    1977-01-01

    For several days in March of 1975, reflected solar radiation measurements were obtained from smooth and rough surfaces of wet, drying, and continually dry Avondale loam at Phoenix, Arizona, with pyranometers located 50 cm above the ground surface and a multispectral scanner flown at a 300-m height. The simple summation of the different band radiances measured by the multispectral scanner proved equally as good as the pyranometer data for estimating surface soil water content if the multispectral scanner data were standardized with respect to the intensity of incoming solar radiation or the reflected radiance from a reference surface, such as the continually dry soil. Without this means of standardization, multispectral scanner data are most useful in a spectral band ratioing context. Our results indicated that, for the bands used, no significant information on soil water content could be obtained by band ratioing. Thus the variability in soil water content should insignificantly affect soil-type discrimination based on identification of type-specific spectral signatures. Therefore remote sensing, conducted in the 0.4- to 1.0-micron wavelength region of the solar spectrum, would seem to be much More suited to identifying crop and soil types than to estimating of soil water content.

  10. Spectral and polarization structure of field-induced photonic bands in cholesteric liquid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palto, S. P.; Barnik, M. I.; Geivandov, A. R.; Kasyanova, I. V.; Palto, V. S.

    2015-09-01

    Transmission of planar layers of cholesteric liquid crystals is studied in pulsed electric fields perpendicular to the helix axis at normal incidence of both linearly polarized and unpolarized light. Spectral and light polarization properties of the primary photonic band and the field-induced bands up to fourth order of Bragg selective reflection are studied in detail. In our experiments we have achieved an electric field strength several times higher than the theoretical values corresponding to the critical field of full helix unwinding. However, the experiments show that despite the high strength of the electric field applied the helix does not unwind, but strongly deforms, keeping its initial spatial period. Strong helix deformation results in distinct spectral band splitting, as well as very high field-induced selective reflectance that can be applied in lasers and other optoelectronic devices. Peculiarities of inducing and splitting the bands are discussed in terms of the scattering coefficient approach. All observed effects are confirmed by numerical simulations. The simulations also show that liquid crystal surface anchoring is not the factor that prevents the helix unwinding. Thus, the currently acknowledged concept of continuous helix unwinding in the electric field should be reconsidered.

  11. Improving the spectral resolution of flat-field concave grating miniature spectrometers by dividing a wide spectral band into two narrow ones.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Qian; Pang, Jinchao; Li, Xinghui; Ni, Kai; Tian, Rui

    2015-11-10

    In this study, a new flat-field concave grating miniature spectrometer is proposed with improved resolution across a wide spectral band. A mirror is added to a conventional concave grating spectrometer and placed near the existing detector array, allowing a wide spectral band to be divided into two adjacent subspectral bands. One of these bands is directly detected by the detector, and the other is indirectly analyzed by the same detector after being reflected by the mirror. These two subspectral bands share the same entrance slit, concave grating, and detector, which allows for a compact size, while maintaining an improved spectral resolution across the entire spectral band. The positions of the mirror and other parameters of the spectrometer are designed by a computer procedure and the optical design software ZEMAX. Simulation results show that the resolution of this kind of flat-field concave grating miniature spectrometer is better than 1.6 nm across a spectral band of 700 nm. Experiments based on three laser sources reveal that the measured resolutions are comparable to the simulated ones, with a maximum relative error between them of less than 19%. PMID:26560772

  12. Some observations about the components of transonic fan noise from narrow-band spectral analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saule, A. V.

    1974-01-01

    Qualitative and quantitative spectral analyses are presented that give the broadband-noise, discrete-tone, and multiple-tone properties of the noise generated by a full-scale high-bypass single-stage axial-flow transonic fan (fan B, NASA Quiet Engine Program). The noise components were obtained from narrow-band spectra in conjunction with 1/3-octave-band spectra. Variations in the pressure levels of the noise components with fan speed, forward-quadrant azimuth angle, and frequency are presented and compared. The study shows that much of the apparent broadband noise on 1/3-octave-band plots consists of a complex system of shaft-order tones. The analyses also indicate the difficulties in determining or defining noise components, especially the broadband level under the discrete tones. The sources which may be associated with the noise components are discussed.

  13. Spectral signatures of fluorescence and light absorption to identify crude oils found in the marine environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baszanowska, E.; Otremba, Z.

    2014-08-01

    To protect the natural marine ecosystem, it is necessary to continuously enhance knowledge of environmental contamination, including oil pollution. Therefore, to properly track the qualitative and quantitative changes in the natural components of seawater, a description of the essential spectral features describing petroleum products is necessary. This study characterises two optically-different types of crude oils (Petrobaltic and Romashkino) - substances belonging to multi-fluorophoric systems. To obtain the spectral features of crude oils, the excitation-emission spectroscopy technique was applied. The fluorescence and light absorption properties for various concentrations of oils at a stabilised temperature are described. Both excitation-emission spectra (EEMs) and absorption spectra of crude oils are discussed. Based on the EEM spectra, both excitation end emission peaks for the wavelengthindependent fluorescence maximum (Exmax/ Emmax) - characteristic points for each type of oil - were identified and compared with the literature data concerning typical marine chemical structures.

  14. [Measurement of Mole Ratio for Alkali Metal Mixture by Using Spectral Absorption Method].

    PubMed

    Zou, Sheng; Zhang, Hong; Chen, Yao; Chen, Xi-yuan

    2015-08-01

    The ratio of alkali metal mixture is one of the most important parameters in gauge head belonging to the ultra-sensitivity inertial measurement equipment, which is required to detect precisely. According to the feature that ratio of alkali metal is related to alkali metal vapor density, the theory of optical depth is used to detect the ratio of alkali metal in the present article. The result shows that the data got by the theory of optical depth compared with empirical formula differs at three orders of magnitude, which can't ensure the accuracy. By changing the data processing method, model between spectral absorption rate and temperature in cell is established. The temperature in alkali metal cell is calibrated by spectral absorption rate. The ratio of alkali metal atoms in the cell is analyzed by calculating the alkali density with empirical formula. The computational error is less than 10%. PMID:26672309

  15. Effect of differential spectral reflectance on DIAL measurements using topographic targets. [Differential Absorption Lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grant, W. B.

    1982-01-01

    Differential absorption lidar (DIAL) measurements of atmospheric gases and temperature made using topographic targets to provide the backscattered signal are subject to errors from the differential spectral reflectance of the target materials. The magnitude of this effect is estimated for a number of DIAL measurements reported in the literature. Calculations are presented for several topographic targets. In general the effect on a DIAL measurement increases directly with increasing wavelength and laser line separation, and inversely with differential absorption coefficient and distance to the target. The effect can be minimized by using tunable or isotope lasers to reduce the laser line separation or by using additional reference wavelengths to determine the surface differential spectral reflectance.

  16. Nitric oxide γ band fluorescent scattering and self-absorption in the mesosphere and lower thermosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevens, Michael H.

    1995-08-01

    The fluorescent scattering of UV sunlight and self-absorption by the nitric oxide (NO) γ bands between 2000-2500 Å are quantified for the purpose of inferring NO density profiles as a function of altitude in the mesosphere and above. Rotational line emission rate factors and cross sections are calculated at a variety of temperatures. The observed variation of the solar spectrum across the γ bands and its effect on emission rate factors are explored by using irradiance measurements that resolve features down to 0.1 Å. The model also includes quenching by O2 and N2, multiple scattering, temperature effects, attenuation of the solar irradiance by O2 and ozone, and self-absorption with the summation of adjacent rotational features. Results indicate that for resonant γ bands, the rotational structure in emission is not symmetric to that in absorption so that as self-absorption increases the shape of the observed emission envelope changes. For γ(1,0) this is largely characterized by an increase in the integrated emission observed longward of 2151 Å compared to shortward. It is found that solar irradiances measured at 0.1 Å resolution decrease the calculated γ(1,0) and γ(0,0) band emission rate factors by less than 3% compared to those measured at 2 Å resolution. However, more Fraunhofer structure included in the calculation is reflected in the relative intensities of the rotational features. It is also found that extinction of the solar irradiance by ozone and quenching by O2 rapidly reduce the γ(1,0) emission rate factor with decreasing altitude below 60 km.

  17. Spectral calibration for infrared hyperspectral imaging Fourier transform spectrometer based on absorption peaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, YaSheng; Chen, Yan; Liao, Ningfang; Lyu, Hang; He, Shufang; Wan, Lifang

    2015-08-01

    A new calibration method for infrared hyperspectral imaging Fourier transform spectrometer is presented. Two kinds of common materials as Polypropylene (PP) and Polyethylene Terephthalate (PET) films which have special absorption peaks in the infrared band were used in the calibration experiment. As the wavelengths at the sharp absorption peaks of the films are known, an infrared imaging spectrometer can be calibrated on spectra with two or three peaks. With high precision and stability, this method simplifies the calibration work. It is especially appropriate for the measuring condition with a lack of calibration equipment or with inconvenience to calibrate the multiple light sources outdoors.

  18. Analysis of the 4800-Å absorption band of Cs 2 by the classical method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tellinghuisen, Joel; Moeller, Michael B.

    1980-09-01

    The broad absorption band in Cs 2 having peak intensity near 4800 Å is analyzed through computational simulation of the experimental spectrum using the classical method. The absorption, which terminates in a weak satellite at 5223 Å, can be interpreted in terms of a single transition from the ground state ( Re = 4.65 Å, ω e = 42 cm -1) to an upper state having Te = 20 470 cm -1, ω e = 33 cm -1 and Re = 5.28 Å. The absolute absorption strength is roughly consistent with published lifetime data, but its reliability is limited by thermodynamic uncertainties stemming from the remaining uncertainty in the Cs 2 ground state dissociation enegy. The paper includes a summary of diatomic radiation relations pertinent to the analysis of low-resolution spectra, and a brief discussion of the reduced potential method applied to the alkali dimer ground states.

  19. Decomposing the First Absorption Band of OCS Using Photofragment Excitation Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Toulson, Benjamin W; Murray, Craig

    2016-09-01

    Photofragment excitation spectra of carbonyl sulfide (OCS) have been recorded from 212-260 nm by state-selectively probing either electronically excited S((1)D) or ground state S((3)P) photolysis products via 2 + 1 resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization. Probing the major S((1)D) product results in a broad, unstructured action spectrum that reproduces the overall shape of the first absorption band. In contrast, spectra obtained probing S((3)P) products display prominent resonances superimposed on a broad continuum; the resonances correspond to the diffuse vibrational structure observed in the conventional absorption spectrum. The vibrational structure is assigned to four progressions, each dominated by the C-S stretch, ν1, following direct excitation to quasi-bound singlet and triplet states. The S((3)PJ) products are formed with a near-statistical population distribution over the J = 2, 1, and 0 spin-orbit levels across the wavelength range investigated. Although a minor contributor to the S atom yield near the peak of the absorption cross section, the relative yield of S((3)P) increases significantly at longer wavelengths. The experimental measurements validate recent theoretical work characterizing the electronic states responsible for the first absorption band by Schmidt and co-workers. PMID:27552402

  20. Effects of RF side-bands on spectral reproducibility for infrared synchrotron radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Biscardi, R.; Ramirez, G.; Williams, G.P.; Zimba, C.

    1994-11-01

    We have investigated the effects of audio side-bands from the main RF of the NSLS VUV storage ring on beam motion and specifically on spectral reproducibility in the infra-red region. For this spectral region it is advantageous to use Michelson interferometers because of their high throughput (Jacquinot advantage). A second advantage is that interferometers inherently give a multiplex or Felgett advantage, since one is always looking at all the wavelengths for all of the measuring time, even though there is only one detector. In such instruments it is beneficial to scan the moving mirror at a fast rate so that any mechanical or other low frequency noise shows up as a slow modulation in the interferogram and disappears altogether in the Fourier transform from the spectral region of interest. However, audio frequency side-bands appear from the RF energy restoring cavity as noise on the beam. These always occur at multiples of 60 Hz and can thus be readily identified. They can also be confirmed by changing the mirror velocity which changes where they appear in the spectra in a predictable way. In the present work, we measured spectra while simultaneously reducing and shifting the side bands in the RF and thus were able to correlate the effects and ultimately eliminate them as a source of noise. Ultimately we were able to achieve reproducibilities of <1% in 15 seconds of scanning time across the entire spectral region from 800 cm{sup {minus}1} to 4000cm{sup {minus}1} with a sample throughput of only l0{sup {minus}10} meter{sup 2} steradians.

  1. Absorption and related optical dispersion effects on the spectral response of a surface plasmon resonance sensor

    SciTech Connect

    Nakkach, Mohamed; Lecaruyer, Pierre; Bardin, Fabrice; Sakly, Jaouhar; Lakhdar, Zohra Ben; Canva, Michael

    2008-11-20

    Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) sensing is an optical technique that allows real time detection of small changes in the physical properties, in particular in the refractive index, of a dielectric medium near a metal film surface. One way to increase the SPR signal shift is then to incorporate a substance possessing a strong dispersive refractive index in the range of the plasmon resonance band. In this paper, we investigate the impact of materials possessing a strong dispersive index integrated to the dielectric medium on the SPR reflectivity profile. We present theoretical results based on chromophore absorption spectra and on their associated refractive index obtained from the Lorentz approach and Kramers-Kroenig equations. As predicted by the theory, the experimental results show an enhancement of the SPR response, maximized when the chromophore absorption band coincides with the plasmon resonant wavelength. This shows that chromophores labeling can provide a potential way for SPR response enhancement.

  2. Absorption spectroscopy setup for determination of whole human blood and blood-derived materials spectral characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wróbel, M. S.; Gnyba, M.; Milewska, D.; Mitura, K.; Karpienko, K.

    2015-09-01

    A dedicated absorption spectroscopy system was set up using tungsten-halogen broadband source, optical fibers, sample holder, and a commercial spectrometer with CCD array. Analysis of noise present in the setup was carried out. Data processing was applied to the absorption spectra to reduce spectral noise, and improve the quality of the spectra and to remove the baseline level. The absorption spectra were measured for whole blood samples, separated components: plasma, saline, washed erythrocytes in saline and human whole blood with biomarkers - biocompatible nanodiamonds (ND). Blood samples had been derived from a number of healthy donors. The results prove a correct setup arrangement, with adequate preprocessing of the data. The results of blood-ND mixtures measurements show no toxic effect on blood cells, which proves the NDs as a potential biocompatible biomarkers.

  3. Water vapor absorption coefficients in the 8-13-micron spectral region - A critical review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grant, William B.

    1990-01-01

    Measurements of water vapor absorption coefficients in the thermal IR atmospheric window (8-13 microns) during the past 20 years obtained by a variety of techniques are reviewed for consistency and compared with computed values based on the AFGL spectral data tapes. The methods of data collection considered were atmospheric long path absorption with a CO2 laser or a broadband source and filters, a White cell and a CO2 laser or a broadband source and a spectrometer, and a spectrophone with a CO2 laser. Advantages and disadvantages of each measurement approach are given as a guide to further research. Continuum absorption has apparently been measured accurately to about the 5-10 percent level in five of the measurements reported.

  4. Spectral Absorption By Particulate Impurities in Snow Determined By Photometric Analysis Of Filters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grenfell, T. C.; Doherty, S. J.; Clarke, A. D.

    2009-12-01

    Our work is motivated by the 1983-84 survey by Clarke and Noone (Atmos. Environ., 1985) of soot in Arctic snow. Our objective is to resurvey the original area they covered and to extend the observations around the entire Arctic Basin under the auspices of the IPY program. We use the filtering and integrating sandwich techniques developed by Clarke and Noone to process the snow samples. Among the advantages of this method are that (a) it provides a direct measure of light absorption and the result is closely related to the actual absorption of sunlight in the snow or ice, (b) processing and filtering of the snow samples can be carried out in remote locations and (c) it is not necessary to transport large quantities of snow back to our home laboratory. Here we describe the construction, calibration, and some applications of an integrating sphere spectrophotometer system designed to take advantage of recent advances in instrumentation to improve the accuracy of measurements of absorption by particulate impurities collected on nuclepore filters used in our survey. Filter loading in terms of effective black carbon (BC) amount is determined together with the ratio of non-BC to BC concentrations using a set of reference filters with known loadings of Monarch 71 BC prepared by A. D. Clarke. The new spectrophotometer system has (a) system stability of approximately 0.5%; (b) precision relative to ADC standards of 3-4% for filter loadings greater than about 0.5 microgm Carbon/cm2. (c) We can distinguish BC from non-BC from relative spectral shapes of the energy absorption curves with an accuracy that depends on our knowledge of the spectral absorption curves of the non-BC components; and (d) by-eye estimates are consistent with spectrophotometric results. The major outstanding uncertainty is the appropriate value to use for the mass absorption efficiency for BC.

  5. High resolution spectral analysis of oxygen. III. Laboratory investigation of the airglow bands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drouin, Brian J.; Yu, Shanshan; Elliott, Ben M.; Crawford, Timothy J.; Miller, Charles E.

    2013-10-01

    We report the first high spectral resolution laboratory measurements of simulated oxygen A-band night glow. Our static discharge system approximates the conditions of the mesospheric oxygen night glow - suggesting O(1D) + O2 (X ^3Σ _g^-) → O(3P) + O2 (b ^1Σ _g^+) → O2 (X ^3Σ _g^-) + hν as the primary source of the emission. Additionally, use of the static cell has enabled us to collect spectra for all six molecular oxygen isotopologues using isotopically enriched samples. The (0,0), (0,1), and (1,1) b - X vibrational bands were observed for all six isotopologues. The (1,2) and (2,2) bands were also observed for 16O2. The frequencies of the observed (0,1) transitions resolved discrepancies in Raman data for 16O17O, 17O2, and 17O18O, enabling us to improve the vibrational parameterization of the ground electronic state global fit. Rotationally resolved intensities were determined for the (0,0), (0,1), and (1,1) bands. The experimental band intensity ratios I(0,0)/I(0,1) = 13.53(24); I(1,1)/I(1,0) = 11.9(65); I(0,0)/I(0,2) = 503(197); and I(1,1)/I(1,2) = 5.6(19) are in excellent agreement with the recent mesospheric remote sensing data and calculated Franck-Condon factors.

  6. The Fundamental Quadrupole Band of (14)N2: Line Positions from High-Resolution Stratospheric Solar Absorption Spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rinsland, C. P.; Zander, R.; Goldman, A.; Murcray, F. J.; Murcray, D. G.; Grunson, M. R.; Farmer, C. B.

    1991-01-01

    The purpose of this note is to report accurate measurements of the positions of O- and S-branch lines of the (1-0) vibration-rotation quadrupole band of molecular nitrogen ((14)N2) and improved Dunham coefficients derived from a simultaneous least-squares analysis of these measurements and selected infrared and far infrared data taken from the literature. The new measurements have been derived from stratospheric solar occultation spectra recorded with Fourier transform spectrometer (FTS) instruments operated at unapodized spectral resolutions of 0.002 and 0.01 /cm. The motivation for the present investigation is the need for improved N2 line parameters for use in IR atmospheric remote sensing investigations. The S branch of the N2 (1-0) quadrupole band is ideal for calibrating the line-of-sight airmasses of atmospheric spectra since the strongest lines are well placed in an atmospheric window, their absorption is relatively insensitive to temperature and is moderately strong (typical line center depths of 10 to 50% in high-resolution ground-based solar spectra and in lower stratospheric solar occultation spectra), and the volume mixing ratio of nitrogen is constant in the atmosphere and well known. However, a recent investigation has'shown the need to improve the accuracies of the N2 fine positions, intensities, air-broadened half-widths, and their temperature dependences to fully exploit this calibration capability (1). The present investigation addresses the problem of improving the accuracy of the N2 line positions.

  7. Study (301)-(000) D2O band in 10200 - 10450 cm-1 spectral region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinitsa, L. N.; Serdyukov, V. I.; Shcherbakov, A. P.; Sergeeva, A. S.; Miheenko, M. O.

    2015-11-01

    Measurements of D2O absorption spectra in the visible spectral region near 0.98 μm are performed using FT-spectrometer IFS-125M and Light-emitting diode (LED) as source of radiation. Water vapor spectrum has been obtained by averaging over 17136 scans recorded at 24 m optical path length, temperature 24 C and pressure of sample 27 mBar. Due to strong emission of LED source it was possible to achieve signal-to-noise ratio about 104 and to record weak lines with intensities of 6 10-27 cm/molecule. Comparisons with results of early works are made.

  8. Optical properties of narrow-band spectral filter coatings related to layer structure and preparation.

    PubMed

    Gibson, D; Lissberger, P H

    1983-01-15

    The optical properties of thirty-five all-dielectric spectral filter coatings for the visible spectrum have been investigated and correlated with the deposition conditions of the constituent layers of cryolite and zinc sulfide and with the processes which occur when the coatings are exposed to atmosphere. It will be shown that the results of measurements of transmittance and reflectance over the passband wavelengths can be predicted theoretically only if account is taken of absorption in the layers and scattering at the rough boundaries and of changes in the refractive indices of the layers due to water penetration. PMID:18195779

  9. Photoadaptation in marine phytoplankton: changes in spectral absorption and excitation of chlorophyll a fluorescence

    SciTech Connect

    Neori, A.; Holm-Hansen, O.; Mitchell, B.G.; Kiefer, D.A.

    1984-10-01

    The optical properties of marine phytoplankton were examined by measuring the absorption spectra and fluorescence excitation spectra of chlorophyll a for natural marine particles collected on glass fiber filters. Samples were collected at different depths from stations in temperate waters of the Southern California Bight and in polar waters of the Scotia and Ross Seas. At all stations, phytoplankton fluorescence excitation and absorption spectra changed systematically with depth and vertical stability of the water columns. In samples from deeper waters, both absorption and chlorophyll a fluorescence excitation spectra showed enhancement in the blue-to-green portion of the spectrum (470-560 nm) relative to that at 440 nm. Since similar changes in absorption and excitation were induced by incubating sea water samples at different light intensities, the changes in optical properties can be attributed to photoadaptation of the phytoplankton. The data indicate that in the natural populations studied, shade adaptation caused increases in the concentration of photosynthetic accessory pigments relative to chlorophyll a. These changes in cellular pigment composition were detectable within less than 1 day. Comparisons of absorption spectra with fluorescence excitation spectra indicate an apparent increase in the efficiency of sensitization of chlorophyll a fluorescence in the blue and green spectral regions for low light populations. 30 references, 6 figures.

  10. Electronic absorption band broadening and surface roughening of phthalocyanine double layers by saturated solvent vapor treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Jinhyun; Yim, Sanggyu

    2012-10-15

    Variations in the electronic absorption (EA) and surface morphology of three types of phthalocyanine (Pc) thin film systems, i.e. copper phthalocyanine (CuPc) single layer, zinc phthalocyanine (ZnPc) single layer, and ZnPc on CuPc (CuPc/ZnPc) double layer film, treated with saturated acetone vapor were investigated. For the treated CuPc single layer film, the surface roughness slightly increased and bundles of nanorods were formed, while the EA varied little. In contrast, for the ZnPc single layer film, the relatively high solubility of ZnPc led to a considerable shift in the absorption bands as well as a large increase in the surface roughness and formation of long and wide nano-beams, indicating a part of the ZnPc molecules dissolved in acetone, which altered their molecular stacking. For the CuPc/ZnPc film, the saturated acetone vapor treatment resulted in morphological changes in mainly the upper ZnPc layer due to the significantly low solubility of the underlying CuPc layer. The treatment also broadened the EA band, which involved a combination of unchanged CuPc and changed ZnPc absorption.

  11. Broad-band analysis of the spectral evolution of GX 339-4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clavel, M.; Rodriguez, J.; Corbel, S.

    2015-07-01

    Black Hole X-ray binaries display large outbursts during which their spectral properties are strongly variable. Their high-energy emission includes the contribution of thermal and non-thermal components that are respectively attributed to the emission of an accretion disk and the one of a jet. How these structures form and evolve over time is still under investigation. The aim of our group is to provide the most up to date generic properties of these objects, as observed along the course of their outbursts, in order to constrain the theoretical models. Therefore, I will present the systematic broad-band analysis of the spectral properties of black hole binaries that we are currently developing, using the 2010 outburst of GX 339-4 as an example. I will give an overview of the results we obtained using observations at all wavelengths from proprietary radio data to hard X-rays.

  12. Spectral line parameters for the O2 Herzberg I band system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cann, M. W. P.; Nicholls, R. W.

    1991-09-01

    Spectral line parameters required for line-by-line spectral synthesis have been calculated for the weak Herzberg I band system of O2. The line locations were calculated with constants from Borrell et al. (1986) and agree closely with these authors' measured wave numbers. Line strengths were calculated using formulas given by Lewis and Gibson (1990), but empirically modified to concur with the relative strengths measured by Herzberg (1952), the only ones found in the literature. Line strengths and line widths are both very uncertain and need to be revised as more information becomes available. Line parameters were calculated for transitions from the nu-double prime = 0, 1, and 2 vibrational levels.

  13. Imaging Breathing Rate in the CO2Absorption Band.

    PubMed

    Fei, Jin; Zhu, Zhen; Pavlidis, Ioannis

    2005-01-01

    Following up on our previous work, we have developed one more non-contact method to measure human breathing rate. We have retrofitted our Mid-Wave Infra-Red (MWIR) imaging system with a narrow band-pass filter in the CO2absorption band (4.3 µm). This improves the contrast between the foreground (i.e., expired air) and background (e.g., wall). Based on the radiation information within the breath flow region, we get the mean dynamic thermal signal. This signal is quasi-periodic due to the interleaving of high and low intensities corresponding to expirations and inspirations respectively. We sample the signal at a constant rate and then determine the breathing frequency through Fourier analysis. We have performed experiments on 9 subjects at distances ranging from 6-8 ft. We compared the breathing rate computed by our novel method with ground-truth measurements obtained via a traditional contact device (PowerLab/4SP from ADInstruments with an abdominal transducer). The results show high correlation between the two modalities. For the first time, we report a Fourier based breathing rate computation method on a MWIR signal in the CO2absorption band. The method opens the way for desktop, unobtrusive monitoring of an important vital sign, that is, breathing rate. It may find widespread applications in preventive medicine as well as sustained physiological monitoring of subjects suffering from chronic ailments. PMID:17282279

  14. Understanding of sub-band gap absorption of femtosecond-laser sulfur hyperdoped silicon using synchrotron-based techniques

    PubMed Central

    Limaye, Mukta V.; Chen, S. C.; Lee, C. Y.; Chen, L. Y.; Singh, Shashi B.; Shao, Y. C.; Wang, Y. F.; Hsieh, S. H.; Hsueh, H. C.; Chiou, J. W.; Chen, C. H.; Jang, L. Y.; Cheng, C. L.; Pong, W. F.; Hu, Y. F.

    2015-01-01

    The correlation between sub-band gap absorption and the chemical states and electronic and atomic structures of S-hyperdoped Si have been extensively studied, using synchrotron-based x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), x-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy (XANES), extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS), valence-band photoemission spectroscopy (VB-PES) and first-principles calculation. S 2p XPS spectra reveal that the S-hyperdoped Si with the greatest (~87%) sub-band gap absorption contains the highest concentration of S2− (monosulfide) species. Annealing S-hyperdoped Si reduces the sub-band gap absorptance and the concentration of S2− species, but significantly increases the concentration of larger S clusters [polysulfides (Sn2−, n > 2)]. The Si K-edge XANES spectra show that S hyperdoping in Si increases (decreased) the occupied (unoccupied) electronic density of states at/above the conduction-band-minimum. VB-PES spectra evidently reveal that the S-dopants not only form an impurity band deep within the band gap, giving rise to the sub-band gap absorption, but also cause the insulator-to-metal transition in S-hyperdoped Si samples. Based on the experimental results and the calculations by density functional theory, the chemical state of the S species and the formation of the S-dopant states in the band gap of Si are critical in determining the sub-band gap absorptance of hyperdoped Si samples. PMID:26098075

  15. Infrared absorption band in deformed qtz crystals analyzed by combining different microstructural methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stunitz, Holger; Thust, Anja; Behrens, Harald; Heilbronner, Renee; Kilian, Ruediger

    2016-04-01

    Natural single crystals of quartz have been experimentally deformed in two orientations: (1) normal to one prism-plane, (2) In O+ orientation at temperatures of 900 and 1000°C, pressures of 1.0 and 1.5 GPa, and strain rates of ~1 x 10-6s-1. The starting material is milky quartz, consisting of dry quartz (H2O contents of <150 H/106Si) with fluid inclusions (FI). During pressurization many FÍs decrepitate. Cracks heal and small neonate FÍs form, increasing the number of FÍs drastically. During subsequent deformation, the size of FÍs is further reduced (down to ~10 nm). Sample deformation occurs by dominant dislocation glide on selected slip systems, accompanied by some dynamic recovery. Strongly deformed regions show FTIR spectra with a pointed broad absorption band in the ~3400 cm-1 region as a superposition of molecular H2O bands and three discrete absorption bands (at 3367, 3400, and 3434 cm-1). In addition, there is a discrete absorption band at 3585 cm-1, which only occurs in deformed regions. The 3585 cm-1 band is reduced or even disappears after annealing. This band is polarized and represents structurally bound H, its H-content is estimated to be 1-3% of the total H2O-content and appears to be associated with dislocations. The H2O weakening effect in our FI-bearing natural quartz crystals is assigned to the processes of dislocation generation and multiplication at small FÍs. The deformation processes in these crystals represent a recycling of H2O between FÍs, dislocation generation at very small fluid inclusions, incorporation of structurally bound H into dislocation cores, and release of H2O from dislocations back into FÍs during recovery. Cracking and crack healing play an important role in the recycling process and imply a close interrelationship between brittle and crystal plastic deformation. The H2O weakening by this process is of a disequilibrium nature and thus depends on the amount of H2O available.

  16. Deep galaxy count predictions in the radio, infrared, and X-ray spectral bands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Treyer, Marie-Agnes; Silk, Joseph

    1993-01-01

    The existence of a dominant population of strongly evolving starburst sources at moderate redshift is a plausible explanation for the excess number of faint blue galaxies detected in deep sky surveys. Multiwavelength observations at faint magnitudes would allow the existence of such a population to be confirmed. We use observed luminosity correlations and physical properties of known starburst galaxies to predict their contribution to the deep radio, infrared, and X-ray counts, as well as to the diffuse extragalactic background radiation in these various spectral bands.

  17. Narrow spectral band monolithic lead-chalcogenide-on-Si mid-IR photodetectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zogg, Hans; Arnold, Martin

    2007-01-01

    Narrow spectral band infrared detectors are required for multispectral infrared imaging. We review the first photovoltaic resonant cavity enhanced detectors (RCED) for the mid-IR range. The lead-chalcogenide (PbEuSe) photodetector is placed as a very thin layer inside an optical cavity. At least one side is terminated with an epitaxial Bragg mirror (consisting of quarter wavelength PbEuSe/BaF 2 pairs), while the second mirror may be a metal. Linewidths are as narrow as 37 nm at a peak wavelength of 4400 nm, and peak quantum efficiencies up to above 50% are obtained.

  18. Differences in spectral absorption properties between active neovascular macular degeneration and mild age related maculopathy.

    PubMed

    Balaskas, Konstantinos; Nourrit, Vincent; Dinsdale, Michelle; Henson, David B; Aslam, Tariq

    2013-05-01

    This study examines the differences in spectral absorption properties between the maculae of patients with active neovascular macular degeneration and those with early age related maculopathy (ARM). Patients attending for management of neovascular age related macular degeneration (AMD) underwent multispectral imaging with a system comprising of a modified digital fundus camera coupled with a 250-W tungsten-halogen lamp and a liquid crystal fast-tuneable filter. Images were obtained at 8 wavelengths between 496 and 700 nm. Aligned images were used to generate a DLA (differential light absorption, a measure of spectral absorption properties) map of the macular area. DLA maps were generated for both eyes of 10 sequential patients attending for anti-vascular endothelial growth factor injections. Each of these patients had active leaking neovascular AMD in one eye and early ARM or milder disease in the fellow eye. Eyes with neovascular AMD demonstrated lower average levels of DLA compared with their fellow eyes with early ARM (p=0.037, t test). The significant difference in DLA demonstrates the potential of multispectral imaging for differentiating the two pathologies non-invasively. PMID:23137662

  19. ON NEUTRAL ABSORPTION AND SPECTRAL EVOLUTION IN X-RAY BINARIES

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, J. M.; Cackett, E. M.; Reis, R. C.

    2009-12-10

    Current X-ray observatories make it possible to follow the evolution of transient and variable X-ray binaries across a broad range in luminosity and source behavior. In such studies, it can be unclear whether evolution in the low-energy portion of the spectrum should be attributed to evolution in the source, or instead to evolution in neutral photoelectric absorption. Dispersive spectrometers make it possible to address this problem. We have analyzed a small but diverse set of X-ray binaries observed with the Chandra High Energy Transmission Grating Spectrometer across a range in luminosity and different spectral states. The column density in individual photoelectric absorption edges remains constant with luminosity, both within and across source spectral states. This finding suggests that absorption in the interstellar medium strongly dominates the neutral column density observed in spectra of X-ray binaries. Consequently, evolution in the low-energy spectrum of X-ray binaries should properly be attributed to evolution in the source spectrum. We discuss our results in the context of X-ray binary spectroscopy with current and future X-ray missions.

  20. Pansharpening on the Narrow Vnir and SWIR Spectral Bands of SENTINEL-2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaiopoulos, A. D.; Karantzalos, K.

    2016-06-01

    In this paper results from the evaluation of several state-of-the-art pansharpening techniques are presented for the VNIR and SWIR bands of Sentinel-2. A procedure for the pansharpening is also proposed which aims at respecting the closest spectral similarities between the higher and lower resolution bands. The evaluation included 21 different fusion algorithms and three evaluation frameworks based both on standard quantitative image similarity indexes and qualitative evaluation from remote sensing experts. The overall analysis of the evaluation results indicated that remote sensing experts disagreed with the outcomes and method ranking from the quantitative assessment. The employed image quality similarity indexes and quantitative evaluation framework based on both high and reduced resolution data from the literature didn't manage to highlight/evaluate mainly the spatial information that was injected to the lower resolution images. Regarding the SWIR bands none of the methods managed to deliver significantly better results than a standard bicubic interpolation on the original low resolution bands.

  1. Origin of the red shifts in the optical absorption bands of nonplanar tetraalkylporphyrins.

    PubMed

    Haddad, Raid E; Gazeau, Stéphanie; Pécaut, Jacques; Marchon, Jean-Claude; Medforth, Craig J; Shelnutt, John A

    2003-02-01

    The view that the large red shifts seen in the UV-visible absorption bands of peripherally crowded nonplanar porphyrins are the result of nonplanar deformations of the macrocycle has recently been challenged by the suggestion that the red shifts arise from substituent-induced changes in the macrocycle bond lengths and bond angles, termed in-plane nuclear reorganization (IPNR). We have analyzed the contributions to the UV-visible band shifts in a series of nickel or zinc meso-tetraalkylporphyrins to establish the origins of the red shifts in these ruffled porphyrins. Structures were obtained using a molecular mechanics force field optimized for porphyrins, and the nonplanar deformations were quantified by using normal-coordinate structural decomposition (NSD). Transition energies were calculated by the INDO/S semiempirical method. These computational studies demonstrate conclusively that the large Soret band red shifts ( approximately 40 nm) seen for very nonplanar meso-tetra(tert-butyl)porphyrin compared to meso-tetra(methyl)porphyrin are primarily the result of nonplanar deformations and not IPNR. Strikingly, nonplanar deformations along the high-frequency 2B(1u) and 3B(1u) normal coordinates of the macrocycle are shown to contribute significantly to the observed red shifts, even though these deformations are an order of magnitude smaller than the observed ruffling (1B(1u)) deformation. Other structural and electronic influences on the UV-visible band shifts are discussed and problems with the recent studies are examined (e.g., the systematic underestimation of the 2B(1u) and 3B(1u) modes in artificially constrained porphyrin structures that leads to a mistaken attribution of the red shift to IPNR). The effect of nonplanar deformations on the UV-visible absorption bands is then probed experimentally with a series of novel bridled nickel chiroporphyrins. In these compounds, the substituent effect is essentially invariant and the amount of nonplanar deformation

  2. Ultra-narrow band perfect absorbers based on plasmonic analog of electromagnetically induced absorption.

    PubMed

    He, Jinna; Ding, Pei; Wang, Junqiao; Fan, Chunzhen; Liang, Erjun

    2015-03-01

    A novel plasmonic metamaterial consisting of the solid (bar) and the inverse (slot) compound metallic nanostructure for electromagnetically induced absorption (EIA) is proposed in this paper, which is demonstrated to achieve an ultra-narrow absorption peak with the linewidth less than 8 nm and the absorptivity exceeding 97% at optical frequencies. This is attributed to the plasmonic EIA resonance arising from the efficient coupling between the magnetic response of the slot (dark mode) and the electric resonance of the bar (bright mode). To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time that the plasmonic EIA is used to realize the narrow-band perfect absorbers. The underlying physics are revealed by applying the two-coupled-oscillator model. The near-perfect-absorption resonance also causes an enhancement of about 50 times in H-field and about 130 times in E-field within the slots. Such absorber possesses potential for applications in filter, thermal emitter, surface enhanced Raman scattering, sensing and nonlinear optics. PMID:25836832

  3. Modeling ocean primary production: Sensitivity to spectral resolution of attenuation and absorption of light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kettle, Helen; Merchant, Chris J.

    2008-08-01

    Modeling the vertical penetration of photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) through the ocean, and its utilization by phytoplankton, is fundamental to simulating marine primary production. The variation of attenuation and absorption of light with wavelength suggests that photosynthesis should be modeled at high spectral resolution, but this is computationally expensive. To model primary production in global 3d models, a balance between computer time and accuracy is necessary. We investigate the effects of varying the spectral resolution of the underwater light field and the photosynthetic efficiency of phytoplankton ( α∗), on primary production using a 1d coupled ecosystem ocean turbulence model. The model is applied at three sites in the Atlantic Ocean (CIS (∼60°N), PAP (∼50°N) and ESTOC (∼30°N)) to include the effect of different meteorological forcing and parameter sets. We also investigate three different methods for modeling α∗ - as a fixed constant, varying with both wavelength and chlorophyll concentration [Bricaud, A., Morel, A., Babin, M., Allali, K., Claustre, H., 1998. Variations of light absorption by suspended particles with chlorophyll a concentration in oceanic (case 1) waters. Analysis and implications for bio-optical models. J. Geophys. Res. 103, 31033-31044], and using a non-spectral parameterization [Anderson, T.R., 1993. A spectrally averaged model of light penetration and photosynthesis. Limnol. Oceanogr. 38, 1403-1419]. After selecting the appropriate ecosystem parameters for each of the three sites we vary the spectral resolution of light and α∗ from 1 to 61 wavebands and study the results in conjunction with the three different α∗ estimation methods. The results show modeled estimates of ocean primary productivity are highly sensitive to the degree of spectral resolution and α∗. For accurate simulations of primary production and chlorophyll distribution we recommend a spectral resolution of at least six wavebands

  4. Theoretical reproduction of the Q-band absorption spectrum of free-base chlorin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wójcik, Justyna; Ratuszna, Alicja; Peszke, Jerzy; Wrzalik, Roman

    2015-01-01

    The computational results of the features observed in the room-temperature Q-band absorption spectrum of free-base chlorin (H2Ch) are presented. The vibrational structures of the first and second excited singlet states were calculated based on a harmonic approximation using density functional theory and its time dependent extension within the Franck-Condon and Herzberg-Teller approaches. The outcome allowed to identify the experimental bands and to assign them to the specific vibrational transitions. A very good agreement between the simulated and measured wavelengths and their relative intensities provided the opportunity to predict the origin of the S0 → S2 transition which could not be determined experimentally.

  5. Theoretical reproduction of the Q-band absorption spectrum of free-base chlorin.

    PubMed

    Wójcik, Justyna; Ratuszna, Alicja; Peszke, Jerzy; Wrzalik, Roman

    2015-01-21

    The computational results of the features observed in the room-temperature Q-band absorption spectrum of free-base chlorin (H2Ch) are presented. The vibrational structures of the first and second excited singlet states were calculated based on a harmonic approximation using density functional theory and its time dependent extension within the Franck-Condon and Herzberg-Teller approaches. The outcome allowed to identify the experimental bands and to assign them to the specific vibrational transitions. A very good agreement between the simulated and measured wavelengths and their relative intensities provided the opportunity to predict the origin of the S0 → S2 transition which could not be determined experimentally. PMID:25612704

  6. Study of sub band gap absorption of Sn doped CdSe thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaur, Jagdish; Rani, Mamta; Tripathi, S. K.

    2014-04-01

    The nanocrystalline thin films of Sn doped CdSe at different dopants concentration are prepared by thermal evaporation technique on glass substrate at room temperature. The effect of Sn doping on the optical properties of CdSe has been studied. A decrease in band gap value is observed with increase in Sn concentration. Constant photocurrent method (CPM) is used to study the absorption coefficient in the sub band gap region. Urbach energy has been obtained from CPM spectra which are found to increase with amount of Sn dopants. The refractive index data calculated from transmittance is used for the identification of oscillator strength and oscillator energy using single oscillator model which is found to be 7.7 and 2.12 eV, 6.7 and 2.5 eV for CdSe:Sn 1% and CdSe:Sn 5% respectively.

  7. Study of sub band gap absorption of Sn doped CdSe thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Kaur, Jagdish; Rani, Mamta; Tripathi, S. K.

    2014-04-24

    The nanocrystalline thin films of Sn doped CdSe at different dopants concentration are prepared by thermal evaporation technique on glass substrate at room temperature. The effect of Sn doping on the optical properties of CdSe has been studied. A decrease in band gap value is observed with increase in Sn concentration. Constant photocurrent method (CPM) is used to study the absorption coefficient in the sub band gap region. Urbach energy has been obtained from CPM spectra which are found to increase with amount of Sn dopants. The refractive index data calculated from transmittance is used for the identification of oscillator strength and oscillator energy using single oscillator model which is found to be 7.7 and 2.12 eV, 6.7 and 2.5 eV for CdSe:Sn 1% and CdSe:Sn 5% respectively.

  8. Theoretical modeling of low-energy electronic absorption bands in reduced cobaloximes

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Bhattacharjee, Anirban; Chavarot-Kerlidou, Murielle; Dempsey, Jillian L.; Gray, Harry B.; Fujita, Etsuko; Muckerman, James T.; Fontecave, Marc; Artero, Vincent; Arantes, Guilherme M.; Field, Martin J.

    2014-08-11

    Here, we report that the reduced Co(I) states of cobaloximes are powerful nucleophiles that play an important role in the hydrogen-evolving catalytic activity of these species. In this work we have analyzed the low energy electronic absorption bands of two cobaloxime systems experimentally and using a variety of density functional theory and molecular orbital ab initio quantum chemical approaches. Overall we find a reasonable qualitative understanding of the electronic excitation spectra of these compounds but show that obtaining quantitative results remains a challenging task.

  9. Thermochromic Absorption, Fluorescence Band Shifts and Dipole Moments of BADAN and ACRYLODAN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawski, A.; Kukliński, B.; Bojarski, P.

    2002-08-01

    Using the thermochromic shift method of absorption and fluorescence bands, the electric dipole moments in the ground (μg) and excited (μe) state are simultaneously determined for BADAN (6-bromoacetyl-2-dimethylamino-naphtalene) and ACRYLODAN (6-acrylolyl-2-dimethylamino-naphtalene) in ethyl acetate. For these compounds the same ratio μe/μg = 2.9 was found, which is similar to that of PRODAN (6-propionyl-2-dimethylamino-naphtalene). The estimated empirical Onsager radii afor BADAN and ACRYLODAN are the same, and they are somewhat smaller than the calculated geometrical values.

  10. Theoretical modeling of low-energy electronic absorption bands in reduced cobaloximes

    SciTech Connect

    Bhattacharjee, Anirban; Chavarot-Kerlidou, Murielle; Dempsey, Jillian L.; Gray, Harry B.; Fujita, Etsuko; Muckerman, James T.; Fontecave, Marc; Artero, Vincent; Arantes, Guilherme M.; Field, Martin J.

    2014-08-11

    Here, we report that the reduced Co(I) states of cobaloximes are powerful nucleophiles that play an important role in the hydrogen-evolving catalytic activity of these species. In this work we have analyzed the low energy electronic absorption bands of two cobaloxime systems experimentally and using a variety of density functional theory and molecular orbital ab initio quantum chemical approaches. Overall we find a reasonable qualitative understanding of the electronic excitation spectra of these compounds but show that obtaining quantitative results remains a challenging task.

  11. Theoretical Modeling of Low Energy Electronic Absorption Bands in Reduced Cobaloximes

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharjee, Anirban; Chavarot-Kerlidou, Murielle; Dempsey, Jillian L.; Gray, Harry B.; Fujita, Etsuko; Muckerman, James T.; Fontecave, Marc; Artero, Vincent; Arantes, Guilherme M.; Field, Martin J.

    2015-01-01

    The reduced Co(I) states of cobaloximes are powerful nucleophiles that play an important role in the hydrogen-evolving catalytic activity of these species. In this work we have analyzed the low energy electronic absorption bands of two cobaloxime systems experimentally and using a variety of density functional theory and molecular orbital ab initio quantum chemical approaches. Overall we find a reasonable qualitative understanding of the electronic excitation spectra of these compounds but show that obtaining quantitative results remains a challenging task. PMID:25113847

  12. Broad-band spectral energy distribution of 3000 Å break quasars from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meusinger, H.; Schalldach, P.; Mirhosseini, A.; Pertermann, F.

    2016-03-01

    Context. In past decades, huge surveys have confirmed the existence of populations of exotic and hitherto unknown quasar types. The discovery and investigation of these rare peculiar objects is important because they may represent links to special evolutionary stages and hold clues to the evolution of quasars and galaxies. Aims: The Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) discovered the unusual quasars J010540.75-003313.9 and J220445.27+003141.8 and a small number of similar objects. Their spectra are characterised by a break in the continuum around 3000 Å that neither shows the typical structure of broad absorption line (BAL) troughs nor is explained by typical intrinsic dust reddening. The main aim of the present paper was twofold. First, a new target-oriented search was performed in the spectra database of the SDSS to construct a sizable sample of such 3000 Å break quasars. Second, their broad-band spectral energy distribution (SED) was compared with SEDs of BAL quasars. Methods: We used the method of Kohonen self-organising maps for data mining in the SDSS spectra archive to search for more quasars with properties comparable to the prototypes J010540.75-003313.9 and J220445.27+003141.8. We constructed a sample of 3000 Å break quasars and comparison samples of quasars with similar properties, to some extent, but also showing indications for typical BAL features. Particular attention was payed to a possible contamination by rare stellar spectral types, in particular DQ white dwarfs. We construct ensemble-averaged broad-band SEDs based on archival data from SDSS, GALEX, 2MASS, UKIDSS, WISE, and other surveys. The SEDs were corrected for dust absorption at the systemic redshifts of the quasars by the comparison with the average SED of normal quasars. Results: We compiled a list of 23 quasars classified as 3000 Å break quasars with properties similar to 010540.75-003313.9 and J220445.27+003141.8. Their de-reddened arithmetic median composite SED is indistinguishable

  13. High Spectral Resolution Lidar Measurements Using an I2 Absorption Filter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eloranta, E. W.; Piironen, P.

    1996-01-01

    The University of Wisconsin high spectral resolution lidar (HSRL) measures optical properties of the atmosphere by separating the Doppler-broadened molecular backscatter return from the unbroadened aerosol return. The HSRL was modified to use an I2 absorption cell The modified HSRL transmitter uses a continuously pumped, Q-switched, injection seeded, frequency doubled Nd:YAG laser operating at a 4 kHz pulse repetition rate. This laser is tunable over a 124 GHz frequency range by temperature tuning the seed laser under computer control.

  14. Spectral Absorption of Solar Radiation by Aerosols during ACE-Asia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bergstrom, R. W.; Pilewskie, P.; Pommier, J.; Rabbette, M.; Russell, P. B.; Schmid, B.; Redermann, J.; Higurashi, A.; Nakajima, T.; Quinn, P. K.

    2004-01-01

    As part of the Asian Pacific Regional Aerosol Characterization Experiment (ACE-Asia), the upward and downward spectral solar radiant fluxes were measured with the Spectral Solar Flux Radiometer (SSFR), and the aerosol optical depth was measured with the Ames Airborne Tracking Sunphotometer (AATS-14) aboard the Center for INterdisciplinary Remotely-Piloted Aircraft Studies (CIRPAS) Twin Otter aircraft. IN this paper, we examine the data obtained for two cases: a moderately thick aerosol layer, 12 April, and a relatively thin aerosol case, 16 April 2001. ON both days, the Twin Otter flew vertical profiles in the Korean Strait southeast of Gosan Island. For both days we determine the aerosol spectral absorption of the layer and estimate the spectral aerosol absorption optical depth and single-scattering albedo. The results for 12 April show that the single-scattering albedo increases with wavelength from 0.8 at 400 nm to 0.95 at 900 nm and remains essentially constant from 950 to 1700 nm. On 16 April the amount of aerosol absorption was very low; however, the aerosol single-scattering albedo appears to decrease slightly with wavelength in the visible region. We interpret these results in light of the two absorbing aerosol species observed during the ACE-asia study: mineral dust and black carbon. The results for 12 April are indicative of a mineral dust-black carbon mixture. The 16 April results are possibly caused by black carbon mixed with nonabsorbing pollution aerosols. For the 12 April case we attempt to estimate the relative contributions of the black carbon particles and the mineral dust particles. We compare our results with other estimates of the aerosol properties from a Sea-Viewing Wide Field-of-View Sensor (SeaWiFS) satellite analysis and aerosol measurements made aboard the Twin Otter, aboard the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Ronald H Brown ship, and at ground sites in Gosan and Japan. The results indicate a relatively complicated aerosol

  15. Spectral optimization studies and schemes to enhance target detection and display for a three-band staring LWIR sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayer, Rulon R.; Waterman, James; Schuler, Jonathon; Scribner, Dean

    2003-12-01

    To achieve enhanced target discrimination, prototype three- band long wave infrared (LWIR) focal plane arrays (FPA) for missile defense applications have recently been constructed. The cutoff wavelengths, widths, and spectral overlap of the bands are critical parameters for the multicolor sensor design. Previous calculations for sensor design did not account for target and clutter spectral features in determining the optimal band characteristics. The considerable spectral overlap and correlation between the bands and attendant reduction in color contrast is another unexamined issue. To optimize and simulate the projected behavior of three-band sensors, this report examined a hyperspectral LWIR image cube. Our study starts with 30 bands of the LWIR spectra of three man-made targets and natural backgrounds that were binned to 3 bands using weighted band binning. This work achieves optimal binning by using a genetic algorithm approach and the target-to-clutter-ratio (TCR) as the optimization criterion. Another approach applies a genetic algorithm to maximize discrimination among the spectral reflectivities in the Non-conventional Exploitation Factors Data System (NEFDS) library. Each candidate band was weighted using a Fermi function to represent four interacting band edges for three- bands. It is found that choice of target can significantly influence the optimal choice of bands as expressed through the TCR and the Receiver Operator Characteristic curve. This study shows that whitening the image data prominently displays targets relative to backgrounds by increasing color contrast and also maintains color constancy. Three-color images are displayed by assigning red, green, blue colors directly to the whitened data set. Achieving constant colors of targets and backgrounds over time can greatly aid human viewers in the interpretation of the images and discriminate targets.

  16. Spectral optimization studies and schemes to enhance target detection and display for a three-band staring LWIR sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayer, Rulon R.; Waterman, James; Schuler, Jonathon; Scribner, Dean

    2004-01-01

    To achieve enhanced target discrimination, prototype three- band long wave infrared (LWIR) focal plane arrays (FPA) for missile defense applications have recently been constructed. The cutoff wavelengths, widths, and spectral overlap of the bands are critical parameters for the multicolor sensor design. Previous calculations for sensor design did not account for target and clutter spectral features in determining the optimal band characteristics. The considerable spectral overlap and correlation between the bands and attendant reduction in color contrast is another unexamined issue. To optimize and simulate the projected behavior of three-band sensors, this report examined a hyperspectral LWIR image cube. Our study starts with 30 bands of the LWIR spectra of three man-made targets and natural backgrounds that were binned to 3 bands using weighted band binning. This work achieves optimal binning by using a genetic algorithm approach and the target-to-clutter-ratio (TCR) as the optimization criterion. Another approach applies a genetic algorithm to maximize discrimination among the spectral reflectivities in the Non-conventional Exploitation Factors Data System (NEFDS) library. Each candidate band was weighted using a Fermi function to represent four interacting band edges for three- bands. It is found that choice of target can significantly influence the optimal choice of bands as expressed through the TCR and the Receiver Operator Characteristic curve. This study shows that whitening the image data prominently displays targets relative to backgrounds by increasing color contrast and also maintains color constancy. Three-color images are displayed by assigning red, green, blue colors directly to the whitened data set. Achieving constant colors of targets and backgrounds over time can greatly aid human viewers in the interpretation of the images and discriminate targets.

  17. Combining the absorptive and radiative loss in metasurfaces for multi-spectral shaping of the electromagnetic scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Wenbo; Huang, Cheng; Pu, Mingbo; Ma, Xiaoliang; Cui, Jianhua; Zhao, Bo; Luo, Xiangang

    2016-02-01

    The absorptive and radiative losses are two fundamental aspects of the electromagnetic responses, which are widely occurring in many different systems such as waveguides, solar cells, and antennas. Here we proposed a metasurface to realize the control of the absorptive and radiative loss and to reduce the radar cross section (RCS) in multi-frequency bands. The anti-phase gradient and absorptive metasurfaces were designed that consists of metallic square patch and square loop structure inserted with resistors, acting as an phase gradient material in the X and Ku band, while behaving as an absorber in the S band. The simulation and experiment results verified the double-band, wideband and polarization-independent RCS reduction by the absorptive and anti-phase gradient metasurfaces.

  18. Combining the absorptive and radiative loss in metasurfaces for multi-spectral shaping of the electromagnetic scattering

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Wenbo; Huang, Cheng; Pu, Mingbo; Ma, Xiaoliang; Cui, Jianhua; Zhao, Bo; Luo, Xiangang

    2016-01-01

    The absorptive and radiative losses are two fundamental aspects of the electromagnetic responses, which are widely occurring in many different systems such as waveguides, solar cells, and antennas. Here we proposed a metasurface to realize the control of the absorptive and radiative loss and to reduce the radar cross section (RCS) in multi-frequency bands. The anti-phase gradient and absorptive metasurfaces were designed that consists of metallic square patch and square loop structure inserted with resistors, acting as an phase gradient material in the X and Ku band, while behaving as an absorber in the S band. The simulation and experiment results verified the double-band, wideband and polarization-independent RCS reduction by the absorptive and anti-phase gradient metasurfaces. PMID:26891773

  19. Combining the absorptive and radiative loss in metasurfaces for multi-spectral shaping of the electromagnetic scattering.

    PubMed

    Pan, Wenbo; Huang, Cheng; Pu, Mingbo; Ma, Xiaoliang; Cui, Jianhua; Zhao, Bo; Luo, Xiangang

    2016-01-01

    The absorptive and radiative losses are two fundamental aspects of the electromagnetic responses, which are widely occurring in many different systems such as waveguides, solar cells, and antennas. Here we proposed a metasurface to realize the control of the absorptive and radiative loss and to reduce the radar cross section (RCS) in multi-frequency bands. The anti-phase gradient and absorptive metasurfaces were designed that consists of metallic square patch and square loop structure inserted with resistors, acting as an phase gradient material in the X and Ku band, while behaving as an absorber in the S band. The simulation and experiment results verified the double-band, wideband and polarization-independent RCS reduction by the absorptive and anti-phase gradient metasurfaces. PMID:26891773

  20. Spectral band difference effects on radiometric cross-calibration between multiple satellite sensors in the Landsat solar-reflective spectral domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teillet, Philippe M.; Fedosejevs, Gunar; Thome, Kurtis J.

    2004-11-01

    This paper reports on an investigation of radiometric calibration errors due to differences in spectral response functions between satellite sensors when attempting cross-calibration based on near-simultaneous imaging of common ground targets in analogous spectral bands. Five Earth observation sensors on three satellite platforms were included on the basis of their overpass times being within 45 minutes of each other on the same day (Landsat-7 ETM+; EO-1 ALI; Terra MODIS; Terra ASTER; Terra MISR). The simulation study encompassed spectral band difference effects (SBDE) on cross-calibration between all combinations of the sensors considered, using the Landsat solar reflective spectral domain as a framework. Scene content was simulated using ground target spectra for the calibration test sites at Railroad Valley Playa, Nevada and Niobrara Grassland, Nebraska. Results were obtained as a function of calibration test site, satellite sensor, and spectral region. Overall, in the absence of corrections for SBDE, the Railroad Valley Playa site is a "good" to "very good" ground target for cross-calibration between most but not all satellite sensors considered in most but not all spectral regions investigated. "Good" and "very good" are defined as SBDEs within +/- 3 % and +/- 1 %, respectively. Without SBDE corrections, the Niobrara test site is only "good" for cross-calibration between certain sensor combinations in some spectral regions. The paper includes recommendations for spectral data and tools that would facilitate cross-calibration between multiple satellite sensors.

  1. High resolution spectral analysis of oxygen. III. Laboratory investigation of the airglow bands.

    PubMed

    Drouin, Brian J; Yu, Shanshan; Elliott, Ben M; Crawford, Timothy J; Miller, Charles E

    2013-10-14

    We report the first high spectral resolution laboratory measurements of simulated oxygen A-band night glow. Our static discharge system approximates the conditions of the mesospheric oxygen night glow--suggesting O((1)D) + O2 (X(3)Σg(-)) → O((3)P) + O2 (b(1)Σg(+)) → O2 (X(3)Σg(-)) + hν as the primary source of the emission. Additionally, use of the static cell has enabled us to collect spectra for all six molecular oxygen isotopologues using isotopically enriched samples. The (0,0), (0,1), and (1,1) b - X vibrational bands were observed for all six isotopologues. The (1,2) and (2,2) bands were also observed for (16)O2. The frequencies of the observed (0,1) transitions resolved discrepancies in Raman data for (16)O(17)O, (17)O2, and (17)O(18)O, enabling us to improve the vibrational parameterization of the ground electronic state global fit. Rotationally resolved intensities were determined for the (0,0), (0,1), and (1,1) bands. The experimental band intensity ratios I(0,0)/I(0,1) = 13.53(24); I(1,1)/I(1,0) = 11.9(65); I(0,0)/I(0,2) = 503(197); and I(1,1)/I(1,2) = 5.6(19) are in excellent agreement with the recent mesospheric remote sensing data and calculated Franck-Condon factors. PMID:24116613

  2. An automated astronomical scanning complex for parallel and independent operation in two spectral bands.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vdovichenko, V. D.; Gajsin, S. M.; Lukichev, A. G.; Mosina, S. A.

    A new medium-resolution spectrometer for the 1.5-meter telescope is described. To improve efficiency and broaden the working band in the spectrum, the beam is split by a dichroic filter after reflection from the collimator and directed into two spectral channels, each with its own diffraction grating and camera. The first ("blue") channel works in the spectral range 300 - 780 nm, and the second ("red") channel at 760 - 1100 nm. The FEU-39, -79, -136, and -83 photomultiplier radiation detectors used in these channels are operated in the photon-counting mode. The information in each channel is registered independently and concurrently. In addition to the spectral channels there is a reference photometric channel for atmospheric-transparency monitoring. A diaphragm unit is placed in the plane of the spectrometer entrance slit so that the photometric profiles of extended objects can be obtained by image scanning. All mechanical operations are performed with the aid of computer-controlled stepping motors and electromagnets.

  3. Standoff aircraft IR characterization with ABB dual-band hyper spectral imager

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prel, Florent; Moreau, Louis; Lantagne, Stéphane; Bullis, Ritchie D.; Roy, Claude; Vallières, Christian; Levesque, Luc

    2012-09-01

    Remote sensing infrared characterization of rapidly evolving events generally involves the combination of a spectro-radiometer and infrared camera(s) as separated instruments. Time synchronization, spatial coregistration, consistent radiometric calibration and managing several systems are important challenges to overcome; they complicate the target infrared characterization data processing and increase the sources of errors affecting the final radiometric accuracy. MR-i is a dual-band Hyperspectal imaging spectro-radiometer, that combines two 256 x 256 pixels infrared cameras and an infrared spectro-radiometer into one single instrument. This field instrument generates spectral datacubes in the MWIR and LWIR. It is designed to acquire the spectral signatures of rapidly evolving events. The design is modular. The spectrometer has two output ports configured with two simultaneously operated cameras to either widen the spectral coverage or to increase the dynamic range of the measured amplitudes. Various telescope options are available for the input port. Recent platform developments and field trial measurements performances will be presented for a system configuration dedicated to the characterization of airborne targets.

  4. Predicting spectral features in galaxy spectra from broad-band photometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdalla, F. B.; Mateus, A.; Santos, W. A.; Sodrè, L., Jr.; Ferreras, I.; Lahav, O.

    2008-07-01

    We explore the prospects of predicting emission-line features present in galaxy spectra given broad-band photometry alone. There is a general consent that colours, and spectral features, most notably the 4000 Å break, can predict many properties of galaxies, including star formation rates and hence they could infer some of the line properties. We argue that these techniques have great prospects in helping us understand line emission in extragalactic objects and might speed up future galaxy redshift surveys if they are to target emission-line objects only. We use two independent methods, Artificial Neural Networks (based on the ANNz code) and Locally Weighted Regression (LWR), to retrieve correlations present in the colour N-dimensional space and to predict the equivalent widths present in the corresponding spectra. We also investigate how well it is possible to separate galaxies with and without lines from broad-band photometry only. We find, unsurprisingly, that recombination lines can be well predicted by galaxy colours. However, among collisional lines some can and some cannot be predicted well from galaxy colours alone, without any further redshift information. We also use our techniques to estimate how much information contained in spectral diagnostic diagrams can be recovered from broad-band photometry alone. We find that it is possible to classify active galactic nuclei and star formation objects relatively well using colours only. We suggest that this technique could be used to considerably improve redshift surveys such as the upcoming Fibre Multi Object Spectrograph (FMOS) survey and the planned Wide Field Multi Object Spectrograph (WFMOS) survey.

  5. Multiwavelength observations of the energetic GRB 080810: detailed mapping of the broad-band spectral evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Page, K. L.; Willingale, R.; Bissaldi, E.; Postigo, A. De Ugarte; Holland, S. T.; McBreen, S.; O'Brien, P. T.; Osborne, J. P.; Prochaska, J. X.; Rol, E.; Rykoff, E. S.; Starling, R. L. C.; Tanvir, N. R.; van der Horst, A. J.; Wiersema, K.; Zhang, B.; Aceituno, F. J.; Akerlof, C.; Beardmore, A. P.; Briggs, M. S.; Burrows, D. N.; Castro-Tirado, A. J.; Connaughton, V.; Evans, P. A.; Fynbo, J. P. U.; Gehrels, N.; Guidorzi, C.; Howard, A. W.; Kennea, J. A.; Kouveliotou, C.; Pagani, C.; Preece, R.; Perley, D.; Steele, I. A.; Yuan, F.

    2009-11-01

    GRB 080810 was one of the first bursts to trigger both Swift and the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope. It was subsequently monitored over the X-ray and UV/optical bands by Swift, in the optical by Robotic Optical Transient Search Experiment (ROTSE) and a host of other telescopes, and was detected in the radio by the Very Large Array. The redshift of z = 3.355 +/- 0.005 was determined by Keck/High Resolution Echelle Spectrometer (HIRES) and confirmed by RTT150 and NOT. The prompt gamma/X-ray emission, detected over 0.3-103 keV, systematically softens over time, with Epeak moving from ~600 keV at the start to ~40 keV around 100s after the trigger; alternatively, this spectral evolution could be identified with the blackbody temperature of a quasi-thermal model shifting from ~60 to ~3keV over the same time interval. The first optical detection was made at 38s, but the smooth, featureless profile of the full optical coverage implies that this is originated from the afterglow component, not from the pulsed/flaring prompt emission. Broad-band optical and X-ray coverage of the afterglow at the start of the final X-ray decay (~8ks) reveals a spectral break between the optical and X-ray bands in the range of 1015-2 × 1016Hz. The decay profiles of the X-ray and optical bands show that this break initially migrates blueward to this frequency and then subsequently drifts redward to below the optical band by ~3 × 105s. GRB 080810 was very energetic, with an isotropic energy output for the prompt component of 3 × 1053 and 1.6 × 1052 erg for the afterglow; there is no evidence for a jet break in the afterglow up to 6d following the burst. This paper is dedicated to the memory of Professor Martin Turner, who sadly passed away during its writing. Martin was an influential figure in X-ray Astronomy and an excellent PhD supervisor. He will be greatly missed. E-mail: kpa@star.le.ac.uk ‡ NASA postdoctoral program fellow.

  6. A study of the structure of the ν1(HF) absorption band of the СH3СN…HF complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gromova, E. I.; Glazachev, E. V.; Bulychev, V. P.; Koshevarnikov, A. M.; Tokhadze, K. G.

    2015-09-01

    The ν1(HF) absorption band shape of the CH3CN…HF complex is studied in the gas phase at a temperature of 293 K. The spectra of gas mixtures CH3CN/HF are recorded in the region of 4000-3400 cm-1 at a resolution from 0.1 to 0.005 cm-1 with a Bruker IFS-120 HR vacuum Fourier spectrometer in a cell 10 cm in length with wedge-shaped sapphire windows. The procedure used to separate the residual water absorption allows more than ten fine-structure bands to be recorded on the low-frequency wing of the ν1(HF) band. It is shown that the fine structure of the band is formed primarily due to hot transitions from excited states of the low-frequency ν7 librational vibration. Geometrical parameters of the equilibrium nuclear configuration, the binding energy, and the dipole moment of the complex are determined from a sufficiently accurate quantum-chemical calculation. The frequencies and intensities for a number of spectral transitions of this complex are obtained in the harmonic approximation and from variational solutions of anharmonic vibrational problems.

  7. Linear-Circular Dichroism of Four-Photon Absorption of Light in Semiconductors with a Complex Valence Band

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasulov, R. Ya.; Rasulov, V. R.; Eshboltaev, I.

    2016-04-01

    Matrix elements of optical transitions occuring between the subbands of the valence band of a p-GaAs type semiconductor are calculated. Transitions associated with the non-simultaneous absorption of single photons and simultaneous absorption of two photons are taken into account. The expressions are obtained for the average values of the square modulus of matrix elements calculated with respect to the solid angle of the wave vector of holes. Linear-circular dichroism of four-photon absorption of light in semiconductors with a complex valence band is theoretically studied.

  8. Absolute high spectral resolution measurements of surface solar radiation for detection of water vapour continuum absorption.

    PubMed

    Gardiner, T D; Coleman, M; Browning, H; Tallis, L; Ptashnik, I V; Shine, K P

    2012-06-13

    Solar-pointing Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy offers the capability to measure both the fine scale and broadband spectral structure of atmospheric transmission simultaneously across wide spectral regions. It is therefore suited to the study of both water vapour monomer and continuum absorption behaviours. However, in order to properly address this issue, it is necessary to radiatively calibrate the FTIR instrument response. A solar-pointing high-resolution FTIR spectrometer was deployed as part of the 'Continuum Absorption by Visible and Infrared radiation and its Atmospheric Relevance' (CAVIAR) consortium project. This paper describes the radiative calibration process using an ultra-high-temperature blackbody and the consideration of the related influence factors. The result is a radiatively calibrated measurement of the solar irradiation at the ground across the IR region from 2000 to 10 000 cm(-1) with an uncertainty of between 3.3 and 5.9 per cent. This measurement is shown to be in good general agreement with a radiative-transfer model. The results from the CAVIAR field measurements are being used in ongoing studies of atmospheric absorbers, in particular the water vapour continuum. PMID:22547234

  9. Spectral interferometric microscopy reveals absorption by individual optical nanoantennas from extinction phase.

    PubMed

    Gennaro, Sylvain D; Sonnefraud, Yannick; Verellen, Niels; Van Dorpe, Pol; Moshchalkov, Victor V; Maier, Stefan A; Oulton, Rupert F

    2014-01-01

    Optical antennas transform light from freely propagating waves into highly localized excitations that interact strongly with matter. Unlike their radio frequency counterparts, optical antennas are nanoscopic and high frequency, making amplitude and phase measurements challenging and leaving some information hidden. Here we report a novel spectral interferometric microscopy technique to expose the amplitude and phase response of individual optical antennas across an octave of the visible to near-infrared spectrum. Although it is a far-field technique, we show that knowledge of the extinction phase allows quantitative estimation of nanoantenna absorption, which is a near-field quantity. To verify our method we characterize gold ring-disk dimers exhibiting Fano interference. Our results reveal that Fano interference only cancels a bright mode's scattering, leaving residual extinction dominated by absorption. Spectral interference microscopy has the potential for real-time and single-shot phase and amplitude investigations of isolated quantum and classical antennas with applications across the physical and life sciences. PMID:24781663

  10. Absorption coefficients for the 6190-A CH4 band between 290 and 100 K with application to Uranus' atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Wm. Hayden; Conner, Charles P.; Baines, Kevin H.

    1990-01-01

    A novel laser intracavity photoacoustic spectroscopy method allowing high sample control accuracy due to the small sample volume required has been used to obtain absorption coefficients for the CH4 6190 A band as a function of temperature, from 290 to 100 K. The peak absorption coefficient is found to increase from 0.6 to 1.0/cm, and to be accompanied by significant band shape changes. When used to further constrain the Baines and Bergstrahl (1986) standard model of the Uranus atmosphere, the low-temperature data yield an excellent fit to the bandshape near the 6190 A band's minimum.

  11. Nanosecond light induced, thermally tunable transient dual absorption bands in a-Ge₅As₃₀Se₆₅ thin film.

    PubMed

    Khan, Pritam; Saxena, Tarun; Jain, H; Adarsh, K V

    2014-01-01

    In this article, we report the first observation of nanosecond laser induced transient dual absorption bands, one in the bandgap (TA₁) and another in the sub-bandgap (TA₂) regions of a-Ge₅As₃₀Se₆₅ thin films. Strikingly, these bands are thermally tunable and exhibit a unique contrasting characteristic: the magnitude of TA₁ decreases while that of TA₂ increases with increasing temperature. Further, the decay kinetics of these bands is strongly influenced by the temperature, which signifies a strong temperature dependent exciton recombination mechanism. The induced absorption shows quadratic and the decay time constant shows linear dependence on the laser beam fluence. PMID:25300520

  12. Absorption coefficients for the 6190-A CH sub 4 band between 290 and 100 K with application to Uranus' atmosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, WM.H.; Conner, C.P.; Baines, K.H. JPL, Pasadena, CA )

    1990-05-01

    A novel laser intracavity photoacoustic spectroscopy method allowing high sample control accuracy due to the small sample volume required has been used to obtain absorption coefficients for the CH{sub 4} 6190 A band as a function of temperature, from 290 to 100 K. The peak absorption coefficient is found to increase from 0.6 to 1.0/cm, and to be accompanied by significant band shape changes. When used to further constrain the Baines and Bergstrahl (1986) standard model of the Uranus atmosphere, the low-temperature data yield an excellent fit to the bandshape near the 6190 A band's minimum. 18 refs.

  13. Shallow electron traps in alkali halide crystals: Mollwo-Ivey relations of the optical absorption bands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziraps, Valters

    2001-03-01

    Evidences are given that two classes of the transient IR- absorption bands: (a) with max. at 0.27-0.36 eV in NaCl, KCl, KBr, KI and RbCl (due to shallow electron traps according G. Jacobs or due to bound polarons according E.V. Korovkin and T.A. Lebedkina) and (b) with max. at 0.15-0.36 eV in NaI, NaBr, NaCl:I, KCl:I, RbCl:I and RbBr:I (due to on-center STE localized at iodine dimer according M. Hirai and collaborators) are caused by the same defect- atomic alkali impurity center [M+]c0e- (electron e- trapped by a substitutional smaller size alkali cation impurity [M+]c0). The Mollwo-Ivey plots (for the transient IR-absorption bands) of the zero-phonon line energy E0 (for NaCl, KCl, KBr, RbCl and NaBr, KCl:I) and/or the low-energy edge valued E0 (for NaI, RbCl:I, RbBr:I) versus anion-cation distance (d) evidence that two types of the [M+]c0e- centers are predominant: (a) [Na+]c0e- in the KX and RbX host crystals with the relation E0approximately equals 6.15/d2.74, (b) [Li+]c03- in the NaX host crystals - E0approximately equals 29.4/d4.72. The Mollwo-Ivey relation E0approximately equals 18.36/d(superscript 2.70 is fulfilled as well for the F' band in NaCl, KCl, KBr, KI, RbCl, RbI if we use the F' center optical binding energy values E0.

  14. Ultra-wideband microwave absorber by connecting multiple absorption bands of two different-sized hyperbolic metamaterial waveguide arrays

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Xiang; Long, Chang; Li, Junhao; Zhu, Hua; Chen, Lin; Guan, Jianguo; Li, Xun

    2015-01-01

    Microwave absorbers have important applications in various areas including stealth, camouflage, and antenna. Here, we have designed an ultra-broadband light absorber by integrating two different-sized tapered hyperbolic metamaterial (HMM) waveguides, each of which has wide but different absorption bands due to broadband slow-light response, into a unit cell. Both the numerical and experimental results demonstrate that in such a design strategy, the low absorption bands between high absorption bands with a single-sized tapered HMM waveguide array can be effectively eliminated, resulting in a largely expanded absorption bandwidth ranging from 2.3 to 40 GHz. The presented ultra-broadband light absorber is also insensitive to polarization and robust against incident angle. Our results offer a further step in developing practical artificial electromagnetic absorbers, which will impact a broad range of applications at microwave frequencies. PMID:26477740

  15. Ultra-wideband microwave absorber by connecting multiple absorption bands of two different-sized hyperbolic metamaterial waveguide arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Xiang; Long, Chang; Li, Junhao; Zhu, Hua; Chen, Lin; Guan, Jianguo; Li, Xun

    2015-10-01

    Microwave absorbers have important applications in various areas including stealth, camouflage, and antenna. Here, we have designed an ultra-broadband light absorber by integrating two different-sized tapered hyperbolic metamaterial (HMM) waveguides, each of which has wide but different absorption bands due to broadband slow-light response, into a unit cell. Both the numerical and experimental results demonstrate that in such a design strategy, the low absorption bands between high absorption bands with a single-sized tapered HMM waveguide array can be effectively eliminated, resulting in a largely expanded absorption bandwidth ranging from 2.3 to 40 GHz. The presented ultra-broadband light absorber is also insensitive to polarization and robust against incident angle. Our results offer a further step in developing practical artificial electromagnetic absorbers, which will impact a broad range of applications at microwave frequencies.

  16. Ultra-wideband microwave absorber by connecting multiple absorption bands of two different-sized hyperbolic metamaterial waveguide arrays.

    PubMed

    Yin, Xiang; Long, Chang; Li, Junhao; Zhu, Hua; Chen, Lin; Guan, Jianguo; Li, Xun

    2015-01-01

    Microwave absorbers have important applications in various areas including stealth, camouflage, and antenna. Here, we have designed an ultra-broadband light absorber by integrating two different-sized tapered hyperbolic metamaterial (HMM) waveguides, each of which has wide but different absorption bands due to broadband slow-light response, into a unit cell. Both the numerical and experimental results demonstrate that in such a design strategy, the low absorption bands between high absorption bands with a single-sized tapered HMM waveguide array can be effectively eliminated, resulting in a largely expanded absorption bandwidth ranging from 2.3 to 40 GHz. The presented ultra-broadband light absorber is also insensitive to polarization and robust against incident angle. Our results offer a further step in developing practical artificial electromagnetic absorbers, which will impact a broad range of applications at microwave frequencies. PMID:26477740

  17. Thermally induced effect on sub-band gap absorption in Ag doped CdSe thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaur, Jagdish; Sharma, Kriti; Bharti, Shivani; Tripathi, S. K.

    2015-05-01

    Thin films of Ag doped CdSe have been prepared by thermal evaporation using inert gas condensation (IGC) method taking Argon as inert gas. The prepared thin films are annealed at 363 K for one hour. The sub-band gap absorption spectra in the as deposited and annealed thin films have been studied using constant photocurrent method (CPM). The absorption coefficient in the sub-band gap region is described by an Urbach tail in both as deposited and annealed thin films. The value of Urbach energy and number density of trap states have been calculated from the absorption coefficient in the sub-band gap region which have been found to increase after annealing treatment indicating increase in disorderness in the lattice. The energy distribution of the occupied density of states below Fermi level has also been studied using derivative procedure of absorption coefficient.

  18. Total ozone and aerosol optical depths inferred from radiometric measurements in the Chappuis absorption band

    SciTech Connect

    Flittner, D.E.; Herman, B.M.; Thome, K.J.; Simpson, J.M.; Reagan, J.A. )

    1993-04-15

    A second-derivative smoothing technique, commonly used in inversion work, is applied to the problem of inferring total columnar ozone amounts and aerosol optical depths. The application is unique in that the unknowns (i.e., total columnar ozone and aerosol optical depth) may be solved for directly without employing standard inversion methods. It is shown, however, that by employing inversion constraints, better solutions are normally obtained. The current method requires radiometric measurements of total optical depth through the Chappuis ozone band. It assumes no a priori shape for the aerosol optical depth versus wavelength profile and makes no assumptions about the ozone amount. Thus, the method is quite versatile and able to deal with varying total ozone and various aerosol size distributions. The technique is applied first in simulation, then to 119 days of measurements taken in Tucson, Arizona, that are compared to TOMS values for the same dates. The technique is also applied to two measurements taken at Mauna Loa, Hawaii, for which Dobson ozone values are available in addition to the TOMS values, and the results agree to within 15%. It is also shown through simulations that additional information can be obtained from measurements outside the Chappuis band. This approach reduces the bias and spread of the estimates total ozone and is unique in that it uses measurements from both the Chappuis and Huggins absorption bands. 12 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  19. New H-band Stellar Spectral Libraries for the SDSS-III/APOGEE Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zamora, O.; García-Hernández, D. A.; Allende Prieto, C.; Carrera, R.; Koesterke, L.; Edvardsson, B.; Castelli, F.; Plez, B.; Bizyaev, D.; Cunha, K.; García Pérez, A. E.; Gustafsson, B.; Holtzman, J. A.; Lawler, J. E.; Majewski, S. R.; Manchado, A.; Mészáros, Sz.; Shane, N.; Shetrone, M.; Smith, V. V.; Zasowski, G.

    2015-06-01

    The Sloan Digital Sky Survey-III (SDSS-III) Apache Point Observatory Galactic Evolution Experiment (APOGEE) has obtained high-resolution (R ˜ 22,500), high signal-to-noise ratio (\\gt 100) spectra in the H-band (˜1.5-1.7 μm) for about 146,000 stars in the Milky Way galaxy. We have computed spectral libraries with effective temperature ({{T}eff}) ranging from 3500 to 8000 K for the automated chemical analysis of the survey data. The libraries, used to derive stellar parameters and abundances from the APOGEE spectra in the SDSS-III data release 12 (DR12), are based on ATLAS9 model atmospheres and the ASSɛT spectral synthesis code. We present a second set of libraries based on MARCS model atmospheres and the spectral synthesis code Turbospectrum. The ATLAS9/ASSɛT ({{T}eff} = 3500-8000 K) and MARCS/Turbospectrum ({{T}eff} = 3500-5500 K) grids cover a wide range of metallicity (-2.5 ≤slant [M/H] ≤slant +0.5 dex), surface gravity (0 ≤ log g ≤slant 5 dex), microturbulence (0.5 ≤slant ξ ≤slant 8 km s-1), carbon (-1 ≤slant [C/M] ≤slant +1 dex), nitrogen (-1 ≤slant [N/M] ≤slant +1 dex), and α-element (-1 ≤slant [α/M] ≤slant +1 dex) variations, having thus seven dimensions. We compare the ATLAS9/ASSɛT and MARCS/Turbospectrum libraries and apply both of them to the analysis of the observed H-band spectra of the Sun and the K2 giant Arcturus, as well as to a selected sample of well-known giant stars observed at very high resolution. The new APOGEE libraries are publicly available and can be employed for chemical studies in the H-band using other high-resolution spectrographs.

  20. Identification of key aerosol populations through their size and composition resolved spectral scattering and absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costabile, F.; Barnaba, F.; Angelini, F.; Gobbi, G. P.

    2013-03-01

    Characterizing chemical and physical aerosol properties is important to understand their sources, effects, and feedback mechanisms in the atmosphere. This study proposes a scheme to classify aerosol populations based on their spectral optical properties (absorption and scattering). The scheme is obtained thanks to the outstanding set of information on particle size and composition these properties contain. The spectral variability of the aerosol single scattering albedo (dSSA), and the extinction, scattering and absorption Angstrom exponents (EAE, SAE and AAE, respectively) were observed on the basis of two-year measurements of aerosol optical properties (scattering and absorption coefficients at blue, green and red wavelengths) performed in the suburbs of Rome (Italy). Optical measurements of various aerosol types were coupled to measurements of particle number size distributions and relevant optical properties simulations (Mie theory). These latter allowed the investigation of the role of the particle size and composition in the bulk aerosol properties observed. The combination of simulations and measurements suggested a general "paradigm" built on dSSA, SAE and AAE to optically classify aerosols. The paradigm proved suitable to identify the presence of key aerosol populations, including soot, biomass burning, organics, dust and marine particles. The work highlights that (i) aerosol populations show distinctive combinations of SAE and dSSA times AAE, these variables being linked by a linear inverse relation varying with varying SSA; (ii) fine particles show EAE > 1.5, whilst EAE < 2 is found for both coarse particles and ultrafine soot-rich aerosols; (iii) fine and coarse particles both show SSA > 0.8, whilst ultrafine urban Aitken mode and soot particles show SSA < 0.8. The proposed paradigm agrees with aerosol observations performed during past major field campaigns, this indicating that relations concerning the paradigm have a general validity.

  1. Approach for determining the contributions of phytoplankton, colored organic material, and nonalgal particles to the total spectral absorption in marine waters.

    PubMed

    Lin, Junfang; Cao, Wenxi; Wang, Guifeng; Hu, Shuibo

    2013-06-20

    Using a data set of 1333 samples, we assess the spectral absorption relationships of different wave bands for phytoplankton (ph) and particles. We find that a nonlinear model (second-order quadratic equations) delivers good performance in describing their spectral characteristics. Based on these spectral relationships, we develop a method for partitioning the total absorption coefficient into the contributions attributable to phytoplankton [a(ph)(λ)], colored dissolved organic material [CDOM; a(CDOM)(λ)], and nonalgal particles [NAP; a(NAP)(λ)]. This method is validated using a data set that contains 550 simultaneous measurements of phytoplankton, CDOM, and NAP from the NASA bio-Optical Marine Algorithm Dataset. We find that our method is highly efficient and robust, with significant accuracy: the relative root-mean-square errors (RMSEs) are 25.96%, 38.30%, and 19.96% for a(ph)(443), a(CDOM)(443), and the CDOM exponential slope, respectively. The performance is still satisfactory when the method is applied to water samples from the northern South China Sea as a regional case. The computed and measured absorption coefficients (167 samples) agree well with the RMSEs, i.e., 18.50%, 32.82%, and 10.21% for a(ph)(443), a(CDOM)(443), and the CDOM exponential slope, respectively. Finally, the partitioning method is applied directly to an independent data set (1160 samples) derived from the Bermuda Bio-Optics Project that contains relatively low absorption values, and we also obtain good inversion accuracy [RMSEs of 32.37%, 32.57%, and 11.52% for a(ph)(443), a(CDOM)(443), and the CDOM exponential slope, respectively]. Our results indicate that this partitioning method delivers satisfactory performance for the retrieval of a(ph), a(CDOM), and a(NAP). Therefore, this may be a useful tool for extracting absorption coefficients from in situ measurements or remotely sensed ocean-color data. PMID:23842167

  2. Ultrafast transient absorption revisited: Phase-flips, spectral fingers, and other dynamical features.

    PubMed

    Cina, Jeffrey A; Kovac, Philip A; Jumper, Chanelle C; Dean, Jacob C; Scholes, Gregory D

    2016-05-01

    We rebuild the theory of ultrafast transient-absorption/transmission spectroscopy starting from the optical response of an individual molecule to incident femtosecond pump and probe pulses. The resulting description makes use of pulse propagators and free molecular evolution operators to arrive at compact expressions for the several contributions to a transient-absorption signal. In this alternative description, which is physically equivalent to the conventional response-function formalism, these signal contributions are conveniently expressed as quantum mechanical overlaps between nuclear wave packets that have undergone different sequences of pulse-driven optical transitions and time-evolution on different electronic potential-energy surfaces. Using this setup in application to a simple, multimode model of the light-harvesting chromophores of PC577, we develop wave-packet pictures of certain generic features of ultrafast transient-absorption signals related to the probed-frequency dependence of vibrational quantum beats. These include a Stokes-shifting node at the time-evolving peak emission frequency, antiphasing between vibrational oscillations on opposite sides (i.e., to the red or blue) of this node, and spectral fingering due to vibrational overtones and combinations. Our calculations make a vibrationally abrupt approximation for the incident pump and probe pulses, but properly account for temporal pulse overlap and signal turn-on, rather than neglecting pulse overlap or assuming delta-function excitations, as are sometimes done. PMID:27155654

  3. Ultrafast transient absorption revisited: Phase-flips, spectral fingers, and other dynamical features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cina, Jeffrey A.; Kovac, Philip A.; Jumper, Chanelle C.; Dean, Jacob C.; Scholes, Gregory D.

    2016-05-01

    We rebuild the theory of ultrafast transient-absorption/transmission spectroscopy starting from the optical response of an individual molecule to incident femtosecond pump and probe pulses. The resulting description makes use of pulse propagators and free molecular evolution operators to arrive at compact expressions for the several contributions to a transient-absorption signal. In this alternative description, which is physically equivalent to the conventional response-function formalism, these signal contributions are conveniently expressed as quantum mechanical overlaps between nuclear wave packets that have undergone different sequences of pulse-driven optical transitions and time-evolution on different electronic potential-energy surfaces. Using this setup in application to a simple, multimode model of the light-harvesting chromophores of PC577, we develop wave-packet pictures of certain generic features of ultrafast transient-absorption signals related to the probed-frequency dependence of vibrational quantum beats. These include a Stokes-shifting node at the time-evolving peak emission frequency, antiphasing between vibrational oscillations on opposite sides (i.e., to the red or blue) of this node, and spectral fingering due to vibrational overtones and combinations. Our calculations make a vibrationally abrupt approximation for the incident pump and probe pulses, but properly account for temporal pulse overlap and signal turn-on, rather than neglecting pulse overlap or assuming delta-function excitations, as are sometimes done.

  4. Confinement effect of laser ablation plume in liquids probed by self-absorption of C{sub 2} Swan band emission

    SciTech Connect

    Sakka, Tetsuo; Saito, Kotaro; Ogata, Yukio H.

    2005-01-01

    The (0,0) Swan band of the C{sub 2} molecules in a laser ablation plume produced on the surface of graphite target submerged in water was used as a probe to estimate the density of C{sub 2} molecules in the plume. Observed emission spectra were reproduced excellently by introducing a self-absorption parameter to the theoretical spectral profile expected by a rotational population distribution at a certain temperature. The optical density of the ablation plume as a function of time was determined as a best-fit parameter by the quantitative fitting of the whole spectral profile. The results show high optical densities for the laser ablation plume in water compared with that in air. It is related to the plume confinement or the expansion, which are the important phenomena influencing the characteristics of laser ablation plumes in liquids.

  5. Polarization-adjustable dual-band absorption in GHz-band metamaterial, based-on no-smoking symbol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoo, Young Joon; Kim, Young Ju; Lee, YoungPak; Lee, Myung Whan; Lee, Tae Gyun; Kim, Min Woo; Park, Jae Hyun

    2015-11-01

    We propose three kinds of the perfect metamaterial absorbers based on the well-known no-smoking symbol, which can adjust the absorption according to the polarization of incident electromagnetic wave. By modifying no-smoking symbol, a resonance absorption peak at 6.75 GHz can be controlled. In addition, a split-ring structure and the no-smoking symbol also adjust the absorption. We also demonstrate the absorption mechanism for all the structures. These results can be used in controlling absorption by the electromagnetic-wave detector.

  6. Narrow spectral band monolithic lead-chalcogenide-on-Si mid-IR photodetectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zogg, H.; Arnold, M.

    2006-03-01

    Narrow spectral band infrared detectors are required for multispectral infrared imaging. Wavelength selectivity can be obtained by placing passive line filters in front of the detectors, or, the preferred choice, by making the detectors themselves wavelength selective. We review the first photovoltaic resonant cavity enhanced detectors (RCED) for the mid-IR range. The lead-chalcogenide (PbEuSe) photodetector is placed as a very thin layer inside an optical cavity. At least one side is terminated with an epitaxial Brugg mirror (consisting of quarter wavelength PbEuSe/BaF2 pairs), while the second mirror may be a metal. Linewidths are as narrow as 37 nm at a peak wavelength of 4400 nm, and peak quantum efficiencies up to above 50% are obtained.

  7. An examination of spectral band ratioing to reduce the topographic effect on remotely sensed data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holben, B.; Justice, C.

    1981-01-01

    Spectral-band ratioing of radiance data is examined as a means of reducing the topographic effect in multispectral data. A ground-based nadir-pointing two-channel radiometer filtered for the red and photographic IR portions of the spectrum was used to measure the topographic effect associated with a uniform surface inclined from horizontal to 60 deg at 16 compass points and for several solar elevations. It is found that ratioing reduced the topographic effect in the field-measured radiance data by an average of 83%, that the remaining topographic effect could be further reduced by subtracting the scattered-light component of the global irradiance before ratioing, and that ratioing was not effective in reducing the topographic effect on shaded surfaces illuminated solely by scattered light. It is concluded that additional variations in ratios can be expected for Landsat data owing to sensor calibration and quantization.

  8. Multiplexed Volume Bragg Gratings in Narrowand Broad-band Spectral Systems: Analysis and Application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ingersoll, Gregory B.

    Volume Bragg gratings (VBGs) are important holographic optical elements in many spectral systems. Using multiple volume gratings, whether multiplexed or arranged sequentially, provides advantages to many types of systems in overall efficiency, dispersion performance, flexibility of design, etc. However, the use of multiple gratings---particularly when the gratings are multiplexed in a single holographic optical element (HOE)---is subject to inter-grating coupling effects that ultimately limit system performance. Analyzing these coupling effects requires a more complex mathematical model than the straightforward analysis of a single volume grating. We present a matrix-based algorithm for determining diffraction efficiencies of significant coupled waves in these multiplexed grating holographic optical elements (HOEs). Several carefully constructed experiments with spectrally multiplexed gratings in dichromated gelatin verify our conclusions. Applications of this theory to broad- and narrow-band systems are explored in detailed simulations. Broadband systems include spectrum splitters for diverse-bandgap photovoltaic (PV) cells. Volume Bragg gratings can serve as effective spectrum splitters, but the inherent dispersion of a VBG can be detrimental given a broad-spectrum input. The performance of a holographic spectrum splitter element can be improved by utilizing multiple volume gratings, each operating in a slightly different spectral band. However, care must be taken to avoid inter-grating coupling effects that limit ultimate performance. We explore broadband multi-grating holographic optical elements (HOEs) in sandwiched arrangements where individual single-grating HOEs are placed in series, and in multiplexed arrangements where multiple gratings are recorded in a single HOE. Particle swarm optimization (PSO) is used to tailor these systems to the solar spectrum taking into account both efficiency and dispersion. Both multiplexed and sandwiched two-grating systems

  9. Quasi-random narrow-band model fits to near-infrared low-temperature laboratory methane spectra and derived exponential-sum absorption coefficients

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baines, Kevin H.; West, Robert A.; Giver, Lawrence P.; Moreno, Fernando

    1993-01-01

    Near-infrared 10/cm resolution spectra of methane obtained at various temperatures, pressures, and abundances are fit to a quasi-random narrow-band model. Exponential-sum absorption coefficients for three temperatures (112, 188, and 295 K), and 20 pressures from 0.0001 to 5.6 bars, applicable to the cold environments of the major planets, are then derived from the band model for the 230 wavelengths measured from 1.6 to 2.5 microns. RMS deviations between the laboratory and the exponential-sum synthetic transmissions are reported for the best fitting 50 wavelengths. Deviations relevant to broadband, 1-percent spectral resolution observations are also presented. The validity of exponential-sum coefficients derived from broadband (10/cm) transmission data is demonstrated via direct comparison with line-by-line calculations. The complete atlas of coefficients is available from the Planetary Data System-Planetary Atmospheres Discipline Node.

  10. Jupiter's atmospheric composition and cloud structure deduced from absorption bands in reflected sunlight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sato, M.; Hansen, J. E.

    1979-01-01

    The spectrum of sunlight reflected by Jupiter is analyzed by comparing observations of Woodman (1979) with multiple-scattering computations. The analysis yields information on the vertical cloud structure at several latitudes and on the abundance of CH4 and NH3 in the atmosphere of Jupiter. The abundances of CH4 and NH3 suggest that all ices and rocks are overabundant on Jupiter by a factor of 2 or more, providing an important constraint on models for the formation of Jupiter from the primitive solar nebula. The pressure level of the clouds, the gaseous NH3 abundance, the mean temperature profile, and the Clausius-Clapeyron relation suggest that these clouds are predominantly ammonia crystals with the cloud bottom at 600-700 mb. A diffuse distribution of aerosols exists between 150 and 500 mb, and the spectral variation of albedo reflects a changing bulk absorption coefficient of the material composing the aerosols and is diagnostic of the aerosol composition.

  11. A Steady-State Kalman Predictor-Based Filtering Strategy for Non-Overlapping Sub-Band Spectral Estimation

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zenghui; Xu, Bin; Yang, Jian; Song, Jianshe

    2015-01-01

    This paper focuses on suppressing spectral overlap for sub-band spectral estimation, with which we can greatly decrease the computational complexity of existing spectral estimation algorithms, such as nonlinear least squares spectral analysis and non-quadratic regularized sparse representation. Firstly, our study shows that the nominal ability of the high-order analysis filter to suppress spectral overlap is greatly weakened when filtering a finite-length sequence, because many meaningless zeros are used as samples in convolution operations. Next, an extrapolation-based filtering strategy is proposed to produce a series of estimates as the substitutions of the zeros and to recover the suppression ability. Meanwhile, a steady-state Kalman predictor is applied to perform a linearly-optimal extrapolation. Finally, several typical methods for spectral analysis are applied to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed strategy. PMID:25609038

  12. A steady-state Kalman predictor-based filtering strategy for non-overlapping sub-band spectral estimation.

    PubMed

    Li, Zenghui; Xu, Bin; Yang, Jian; Song, Jianshe

    2015-01-01

    This paper focuses on suppressing spectral overlap for sub-band spectral estimation, with which we can greatly decrease the computational complexity of existing spectral estimation algorithms, such as nonlinear least squares spectral analysis and non-quadratic regularized sparse representation. Firstly, our study shows that the nominal ability of the high-order analysis filter to suppress spectral overlap is greatly weakened when filtering a finite-length sequence, because many meaningless zeros are used as samples in convolution operations. Next, an extrapolation-based filtering strategy is proposed to produce a series of estimates as the substitutions of the zeros and to recover the suppression ability. Meanwhile, a steady-state Kalman predictor is applied to perform a linearly-optimal extrapolation. Finally, several typical methods for spectral analysis are applied to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed strategy. PMID:25609038

  13. [The Near Infrared Spectral Bands Optimal Selection in the Application of Liquor Fermented Grains Composition Analysis].

    PubMed

    Xiong, Ya-ting; Li, Zong-peng; Wang, Jian; Zhang, Ying; Wang, Shu-jun; Yin, Jian-jun; Song, Quan-hou

    2016-01-01

    In order to improve the technical level of the rapid detection of liquor fermented grains, in this paper, use near infrared spectroscopy technology to quantitative analysis moisture, starch, acidity and alcohol of liquor fermented grains. Using CARS, iPLS and no information variable elimination method (UVE), realize the characteristics of spectral band selection. And use the multiple scattering correction (MSC), derivative and standard normal variable transformation (SNV) pretreatment method to optimize the models. Establish models of quantitative analysis of fermented grains by PLS, and in order to select the best modeling method, using R2, RMSEP and optimal number of main factors to evaluate models. The results showed that the band selection is vital to optimize the model and CARS is the best optimization of the most significant effect. The calculation results showed that R2 of moisture, starch, acidity and alcohol were 0.885, 0.915, 0.951, 0.885 respectively and RMSEP of moisture, starch, acidity and alcohol were 0.630, 0.519, 0.228, 0.234 respectively. After optimization, the model prediction effect is good, the models can satisfy the requirement of the rapid detection of liquor fermented grains, which has certain reference value in the practical. PMID:27228746

  14. Anomalously Broad Diffuse Interstellar Bands and Excited CH+ Absorption in the Spectrum of Herschel 36

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    York, D. G.; Dahlstrom, J.; Welty, D. E.; Oka, T.; Hobbs, L. M.; Johnson, S.; Friedman, S. D.; Jiang, Z.; Rachford, B. L.; Snow, T. P.; Sherman, R.; Sonnentrucker, P.

    2014-02-01

    Anomalously broad diffuse interstellar bands (DIBs) at 5780.5, 5797.1, 6196.0, and 6613.6 Å are found in absorption along the line of sight to Herschel 36, an O star system next to the bright Hourglass nebula of the Hii region Messier 8. Excited lines of CH and CH+ are seen as well. We show that the region is very compact and itemize other anomalies of the gas. An infrared-bright star within 400 AU is noted. The combination of these effects produces anomalous DIBs, interpreted by Oka et al. (2013, see also this volume) as being caused predominantly by infrared pumping of rotational levels of relatively small molecules.

  15. Analysis of Oxygen Spectral Lines in the 1.27 Micron Band for the ASCENDS Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pliutau, Denis; Prasad, Narasimha S.

    2011-01-01

    The ASCENDS mission requires simultaneous laser remote sensing of CO2 and O2 in order to convert CO2 column number densities to average column CO2 mixing ratios (XCO2). As such, the CO2 column number density and the O2 column number density will be utilized to derive the average XCO2 column. NASA Langley Research Center, working with its partners, is developing O2 lidar technology in the 1.26-1.27- m band for surface pressure measurements. The O2 model optical depth calculation is very sensitive to knowledge of the transmitted wavelengths and to the choice of Voigt input parameters. Modeling using the HITRAN database is being carried out to establish the evolution of candidate O2 absorption lines as a function of atmospheric parameters such as altitude, temperature, and pressure. Preliminary results indicate limitations of the Voigt profile and the need to utilize more advanced models which take into account line mixing, line narrowing, and speed dependence. In this paper, we evaluate alternative lineshape models to establish the optimum lineshapes which better account for the variability of individual O2 absorption lines at various atmospheric conditions. The combination of our modeling efforts with accurate laboratory measurements is anticipated to aid in achieving the desired CO2 mixing ratio measurement accuracy requirement of for the ASCENDS mission.

  16. Measurements of mesospheric water vapour, aerosols and temperatures with the Spectral Absorption Line Imager (SALI-AT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shepherd, M. G.; Mullins, M.; Brown, S.; Sargoytchev, S. I.

    2001-08-01

    Water vapour concentration is one of the most important, yet one of the least known quantities of the mesosphere. Knowledge of water vapour concentration is the key to understanding many mesospheric processes, including the one that is primary focus of our investigation, mesospheric clouds (MC). The processes of formation and occurrence parameters of MC constitute an interesting problem in their own right, but recently evidence has been provided which suggests that they are a critical indicator of atmospheric change. The aim of the SALI-AT experiment is to make simultaneous (although not strictly collocated) measurements of water vapour, aerosols and temperature in the mesosphere and the mesopause region under twilight condition in the presence of mesospheric clouds. The water vapour will be measured in the regime of solar occultation utilizing a water vapour absorption band at 936 nm wavelength employing the SALI (Spectral Absorption Line Imager) instrument concept. A three-channel zenith photometer, AT-3, with wavelengths of 385 nm, 525 nm, and 1040 nm will measure Mie and Rayleigh scattering giving both mesospheric temperature profiles and the particle size distribution. Both instruments are small, low cost and low mass. It is envisioned that the SALI-AT experiment be flown on a small rocket - the Improved Orion/Hotel payload configuration, from the Andoya Rocket range, Norway. Alternatively the instrument can be flown as a "passenger" on larger rocket carrying other experiments. In either case flight costs are relatively low. Some performance simulations are presented showing that the instrument we have designed will be sufficiently sensitive to measure water vapor in concentrations that are expected at the summer mesopause, about 85 km height.

  17. An infrared remote sensor with high integration and multi-spectral bands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Lisha; Liu, Zhaojun; Ma, Wenpo; Tang, Shaofan; Hu, Bin

    2014-11-01

    Along with the further application of optical remote sensing, it becomes main trend to realize high spatial resolution, high time resolution, high spectrum resolution and high irradiance sensitivity simultaneously. We present a new satellite-based imaging system that will provide images with these high performances. The structure of the system is compact with small size and light weight. The IR imager, a new generation of high resolution optical remote sensing, is universally acknowledged as the most effective approach to surveil dynamic changes in the environment on the earth. Pushbroom imaging fashion with high efficiency and long-array focal plane detector with passive cooling are adopted to realize area imaging relevant to the flight direction of satellite. The instrument is a dual-optical-path system with long-wave infrared (LWIR) and mid-short-wave infrared (MW-SWIR) bands - which has 4 narrow spectrum bands respectively. An IR dichroic beam-splitter is use to divide wideband incident infrared into LWIR and MW-SWIR. Then two pieces of joint filters, which are integrated in front of detectors and then enveloped by IR Dewars, are used to divide the LWIR and MWIR into 4 spectral bands separately. The focal plane arrays (FPA) are fixed on the optical imaging plane of the lens. The LWIR and MW-SWIR FPA are cooled around 80K or even below. For cooled FPA, optical system must provide a real, accessible exit pupil coupled with a fast f/number refractive component in a Dewar and very close to the FPA. Compared to traditional infrared instruments, high spatial resolution and spectrum resolution can be obtained simultaneously within mass, volume and performance constraints.

  18. Comparing Broad-Band and Red Edge-Based Spectral Vegetation Indices to Estimate Nitrogen Concentration of Crops Using Casi Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yanjie; Liao, Qinhong; Yang, Guijun; Feng, Haikuan; Yang, Xiaodong; Yue, Jibo

    2016-06-01

    In recent decades, many spectral vegetation indices (SVIs) have been proposed to estimate the leaf nitrogen concentration (LNC) of crops. However, most of these indices were based on the field hyperspectral reflectance. To test whether they can be used in aerial remote platform effectively, in this work a comparison of the sensitivity between several broad-band and red edge-based SVIs to LNC is investigated over different crop types. By using data from experimental LNC values over 4 different crop types and image data acquired using the Compact Airborne Spectrographic Imager (CASI) sensor, the extensive dataset allowed us to evaluate broad-band and red edge-based SVIs. The result indicated that NDVI performed the best among the selected SVIs while red edge-based SVIs didn't show the potential for estimating the LNC based on the CASI data due to the spectral resolution. In order to search for the optimal SVIs, the band combination algorithm has been used in this work. The best linear correlation against the experimental LNC dataset was obtained by combining the 626.20nm and 569.00nm wavebands. These wavelengths correspond to the maximal chlorophyll absorption and reflection position region, respectively, and are known to be sensitive to the physiological status of the plant. Then this linear relationship was applied to the CASI image for generating an LNC map, which can guide farmers in the accurate application of their N fertilization strategies.

  19. Simulating the spectral response of quantum dot-in-well infrared photodetectors from eight band k.p method

    SciTech Connect

    Anjan Kumar, V. Pendyala, Naresh Babu; Banerjee, Arup

    2014-11-28

    Conduction band energy levels in quantum-dot-in-a-well structures are computed by eight band k.p method (Burt-Foreman Hamiltonian) using finite element software. Optical absorption spectrum due to intersubband transitions is simulated using Fermi golden rule. The use of contact pair boundary condition in strain calculation and criteria for choosing band mixing parameter (E{sub p}) to avoid the spurious solutions are examined in this paper. The simulated intersubband optical absorption spectrum of different structures reported in the literature is in close agreement with the experimentally measured photoconductive absorption region and shows that the method can be used as an effective modeling for quick design of the heterostructures based infrared photodetectors for various wavelengths.

  20. Spectral absorptions on Phobos and Deimos in the visible/near infrared wavelengths and their compositional constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fraeman, A. A.; Murchie, S. L.; Arvidson, R. E.; Clark, R. N.; Morris, R. V.; Rivkin, A. S.; Vilas, F.

    2014-02-01

    Absorption features on Phobos and Deimos in the visible/near infrared wavelength region (0.4-3.9 μm) are mapped using observations from the Compact Reconnaissance Imaging Spectrometer for Mars (CRISM). Fe2+ electronic absorptions diagnostic of olivine and pyroxene are not detected. A broad absorption centered around 0.65 μm within the red spectral units of both moons is detected, and this feature is also evident in telescopic, Pathfinder, and Phobos-2 observations of Phobos. A 2.8 μm metal-OH combination absorption on both moons is also detected in the CRISM data, and this absorption is shallower in the Phobos blue unit than in the Phobos red unit and Deimos. The strength, position, and shape of both of the 0.65 μm and 2.8 μm absorptions are similar to features seen on red-sloped, low-albedo primitive asteroids. Two end-member hypotheses are presented to explain the spectral features on Phobos and Deimos. The first invokes the presence of highly desiccated Fe-phyllosilicate minerals indigenous to the bodies, and the second invokes Rayleigh scattering and absorption of small iron particles formed by exogenic space weathering processing, coupled with implantation of H from solar wind. Both end-member hypotheses may play a role, and in situ exploration will be needed to ultimately determine the underlying causes for the pair of spectral features observed on Phobos and Deimos.

  1. Numerical calculations of spectral turnover and synchrotron self-absorption in CSS and GPS radio sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeyakumar, S.

    2016-06-01

    The dependence of the turnover frequency on the linear size is presented for a sample of Giga-hertz Peaked Spectrum and Compact Steep Spectrum radio sources derived from complete samples. The dependence of the luminosity of the emission at the peak frequency with the linear size and the peak frequency is also presented for the galaxies in the sample. The luminosity of the smaller sources evolve strongly with the linear size. Optical depth effects have been included to the 3D model for the radio source of Kaiser to study the spectral turnover. Using this model, the observed trend can be explained by synchrotron self-absorption. The observed trend in the peak-frequency-linear-size plane is not affected by the luminosity evolution of the sources.

  2. Spectral fluorescence signature techniques and absorption measurements for continuous monitoring of biofuel-producing microalgae cultures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martín de la Cruz, M. C.; Gonzalez Vilas, L.; Yarovenko, N.; Spyrakos, E.; Torres Palenzuela, J. M.

    2013-08-01

    Biofuel production from microalgae can be both sustainable and economically viable. Particularly in the case of algal growth in wastewater an extra benefit is the removal or biotransformation of pollutants from these types of waters. A continuous monitoring system of the microalgae status and the concentration of different wastewater contaminants could be of great help in the biomass production and the water characterisation. In this study we present a system where spectral fluorescence signature (SFS) techniques are used along with absorption measurements to monitor microalgae cultures in wastewater and other mediums. This system aims to optimise the microalgae production for biofuel applications or other uses and was developed and tested in prototype indoor photo-bioreactors at the University of Vigo. SFS techniques were applied using the fluorescence analyser INSTAND-SCREENER developed by Laser Diagnostic Instruments AS. INSTAND-SCREENER permits wavelength scanning in two modes, one in UV and another in VIS. In parallel, it permits the on-line monitoring and rapid analysis of both water quality and phytoplankton status without prior treatment of the sample. Considering that different contaminants and microalgae features (density, status etc.) have different spectral signatures of fluorescence and absorption properties, it is possible to characterise them developing classification libraries. Several algorithms were used for the classification. The implementation of this system in an outdoor raceway reactor in a Spanish wastewater treatment plant is also discussed. This study was part of the Project EnerBioAlgae (http://www.enerbioalgae.com/), which was funded by the Interreg SUDOE and led by the University of Vigo.

  3. Simultaneous Multi-Spectral Narrow Band Auroral Imagery From Space (1150Å to 6300Å)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schenkel, F. W.; Ogorzalek, B. S.; Gardner, R. R.; Hutchins, R. A.; Huffman, R. E.; Larrabee, J. C.

    1986-12-01

    The design of a multi-mode instrument known as the Auroral Ionospheric Remote Sensor, AIRS, is described. The design criteria are enumerated. The goal of the AIRS instrument is to produce data on the global imaging of the auroral display in both dark and sunlit hemispheres with the remote sensing of ionospheric airglows to deduce ionospheric parameters such as electron density profiles and atmospheric background emissions. The AIRS will fly on the POLAR BEAR spacecraft in a near polar circular orbit at an altitude of 1,000 km with a scheduled launch in the fall of 1986. The AIRS instrument is designed as a multi-mode system with four (4) channels of data to yield simultaneous operation in the vacuum ultraviolet (VUV), near ultraviolet (UV) and visible spectral bands. Two of the data channels are designed to operate in the VUV with 30A windows having a 240Å separation. These two channels utilize an Ebert-Fastie spectrometer which can provide total coverage for each of these channels from 1150Å to 1800Å. The other two channels utilize a filter selector system to provide preselected, 10Å bandwidth spectral channels at 3371Å, 3914Å and 6300Å, and a 200Å wide channel centered at 2250Å. These spectral bands are paired to provide simultaneous pair coverage of 2250Å and 3371Å and simultaneous pair coverage of 3914Å and 6300Å. All four channels view the auroral scene of the north polar cap via appropriate optics and a scan mirror system. In effect a line scan image of the auroral scene is produced via the scan mirror operating in the orbit cross plane with the longitudinal direction provided by the forward motion of the spacecraft. All four channels can also operate in the photometer mode by locking of the scan mirror in the nadir viewing position. The two VUV channels can also operate in a spectrometer mode with the scan mirror locked in the nadir viewing position and the Ebert-Fastie spectrometer performing a spectral scan. The basic ground level spatial

  4. A method to compute the n-dimensional solid spectral angle between vectors and its use for band selection in hyperspectral data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, M.; Feng, J.; Rivard, B.; Zhao, C.

    2016-08-01

    This study presents the calculation of spectral angle beyond two endmember vectors to the n-dimensional solid spectral angle (NSSA). The calculation of the NSSA is used to characterize the local spectral shape difference among a set of endmembers, leading to a methodology for band selection based on spectral shape variations of more than two spectra. Equidistributed sequences used in the quasi-Monte Carlo method (ESMC) for numerical simulations are shown to expedite the calculation of the NSSA. We develop a band selection method using the computation of NSSA(ϑn) in the context of a sliding window. By sliding the window over all bands available for varying band intervals, the calculated solid spectral angle values can capture the similarity of the endmembers over all spectral regions available and for spectral features of varying widths. By selecting a subset of spectral bands with largest solid spectral angles, a methodology can be developed to capture the most important spectral information for the separation or mapping of endmembers. We provide an example of the merits of the NSSA-ESMC method for band selection as applied to linear spectral unmixing. Specifically, we examine the endmember abundance errors resulting from the NSSA band selection method as opposed to using the full spectral dimensionality available.

  5. Investigation of band gap narrowing in nitrogen-doped La2Ti2O7 with transient absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Yost, Brandon T; Cushing, Scott K; Meng, Fanke; Bright, Joeseph; Bas, Derek A; Wu, Nianqiang; Bristow, Alan D

    2015-12-14

    Doping a semiconductor can extend the light absorption range, however, it usually introduces mid-gap states, reducing the charge carrier lifetime. This report shows that doping lanthanum dititinate (La2Ti2O7) with nitrogen extends the valence band edge by creating a continuum of dopant states, increasing the light absorption edge from 380 nm to 550 nm without adding mid-gap states. The dopant states are experimentally resolved in the excited state by correlating transient absorption spectroscopy with a supercontinuum probe and DFT prediction. The lack of mid-gap states is further confirmed by measuring the excited state lifetimes, which reveal the shifted band edge only increased carrier thermalization rates to the band edge and not interband charge recombination under both ultraviolet and visible excitation. Terahertz (time-domain) spectroscopy also reveals that the conduction mechanism remains unchanged after doping, suggesting the states are delocalized. PMID:26531849

  6. Spectral optimization studies and simulations for two-, three-, and four-band staring LWIR sensors in missile defense scenarios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayer, Rulon R.; Scribner, Dean; Fleet, Erin; Waterman, James; Schuler, Jonathon; Kruer, Mel

    2004-10-01

    Prototype 2-, 3-, and 4- band long wave infrared (LWIR) focal plane arrays (FPA) for missile defense applications have recently been constructed to enhance target discrimination in space-based interceptor seekers. To address issues related to target identification such as algorithm choice and band number, this study created synthesized, optimized (using a genetic algorithm) image cubes (8- 12 mm) of targets and backgrounds compatible with expected mid-course defense scenarios and current multicolor sensors. Each candidate band was weighted using an interacting band edge model for 2-, 3- or 4- band sensors, consistent with a DRS multi-color HgCdTe LWIR FPA. Whitening the binned cubes and assigning red, green, blue colors directly to the whitened data set can prominently display and identify targets. Modified target signatures applied in matched filters searches and spectral angle maps autonomously searched for targets in the synthetic binned image cubes. Target discrimination diminished with decreasing target temperature and/or increasing distance between sensor and targets due to mixing subpixel target spectra with noise background. Spectral angle maps identified target temperatures and materials substantively better than the matched filter in this particular study. Target material and temperature identification improved by increasing number of bands, with greatest improvement for 3 bands relative to 2 bands. Extending detector sensitivity to 6-14 mm failed to improve target identification. This is the first study to systematically examine target identification in synthetic images cubes, consistent with missile defense scenarios and current multi-sensor technology.

  7. Online Spectral Fit Tool for Analyzing Reflectance Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penttilä, A.; Kohout, T.

    2015-11-01

    The Online Spectral Fit Tool is developed for analyzing Vis-NIR spectral behavior of asteroids and meteorites. Implementation is done using JavaScript/HTML. Fitted spectra consist of spline continuum and gamma distributions for absorption bands.

  8. Molar absorptivity (ε) and spectral characteristics of cyanidin-based anthocyanins from red cabbage.

    PubMed

    Ahmadiani, Neda; Robbins, Rebecca J; Collins, Thomas M; Giusti, M Monica

    2016-04-15

    Red cabbage extract contains mono and di-acylated cyanidin (Cy) anthocyanins and is often used as food colorants. Our objectives were to determine the molar absorptivity (ε) of different red cabbage Cy-derivatives and to evaluate their spectral behaviors in acidified methanol (MeOH) and buffers pH 1-9. Major red cabbage anthocyanins were isolated using a semi-preparatory HPLC, dried and weighed. Pigments were dissolved in MeOH and diluted with either MeOH (0.1% HCl) or buffers to obtain final concentrations between 5×10(-5) and 1×10(-3) mol/L. Spectra were recorded and ε calculated using Lambert-Beer's law. The ε in acidified MeOH and buffer pH 1 ranged between ~16,000-30,000 and ~13,000-26,000 L/mol cm, respectively. Most pigments showed higher ε in pH 8 than pH 2, and lowest ε between pH 4 and 6. There were bathochromic shifts (81-105 nm) from pH 1 to 8 and hypsochromic shifts from pH 8 to 9 (2-19 nm). Anthocyanins molecular structures and the media were important variables which greatly influenced their ε and spectral behaviors. PMID:26617032

  9. Temperature dependence of aggregated structure of β-carotene by absorption spectral experiment and simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Liping; Wu, Jie; Wei, Liangshu; Wu, Fang

    2016-12-01

    β-carotene can self-assemble to form J- or H-type aggregate in hydrophilic environments, which is crucial for the proper functioning of biological system. Although several ways controlling the formation of the two types of aggregate in hydrated ethanol have been investigated in recent years, our study provided another way to control whether J- or H- β-carotene was formed and presented a method to investigate the aggregated structure. For this purpose, the aggregates of β-carotene formed at different temperatures were studied by UV-Vis spectra and a computational method based on Frenkel exciton was applied to simulate the absorption spectra to obtain the aggregated structure of the β-carotene. The analysis showed that β-carotene formed weakly coupled H-aggregate at 15 °C in 1:1 ethanol-water solvent, and with the increase of temperature it tended to form J-type of aggregate. The absorption spectral simulation based on one-dimensional Frenkel exciton model revealed that good fit with the experiment was obtained with distance between neighbor molecules r = 0.82 nm, disorder of the system D = 1500 cm- 1 for H-type and r = 1.04 nm, D = 1800 cm- 1 for J-type.

  10. Temperature dependence of aggregated structure of β-carotene by absorption spectral experiment and simulation.

    PubMed

    Lu, Liping; Wu, Jie; Wei, Liangshu; Wu, Fang

    2016-12-01

    β-carotene can self-assemble to form J- or H-type aggregate in hydrophilic environments, which is crucial for the proper functioning of biological system. Although several ways controlling the formation of the two types of aggregate in hydrated ethanol have been investigated in recent years, our study provided another way to control whether J- or H- β-carotene was formed and presented a method to investigate the aggregated structure. For this purpose, the aggregates of β-carotene formed at different temperatures were studied by UV-Vis spectra and a computational method based on Frenkel exciton was applied to simulate the absorption spectra to obtain the aggregated structure of the β-carotene. The analysis showed that β-carotene formed weakly coupled H-aggregate at 15°C in 1:1 ethanol-water solvent, and with the increase of temperature it tended to form J-type of aggregate. The absorption spectral simulation based on one-dimensional Frenkel exciton model revealed that good fit with the experiment was obtained with distance between neighbor molecules r=0.82nm, disorder of the system D=1500cm(-1) for H-type and r=1.04nm, D=1800cm(-1) for J-type. PMID:27348046

  11. Linking CDOM spectral absorption to dissolved organic carbon concentrations and loadings in boreal estuaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asmala, Eero; Stedmon, Colin A.; Thomas, David N.

    2012-10-01

    The quantity of chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM) and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) in three Finnish estuaries (Karjaanjoki, Kyrönjoki and Kiiminkijoki) was investigated, with respect to predicting DOC concentrations and loadings from spectral CDOM absorption measurements. Altogether 87 samples were collected from three estuarine transects which were studied in three seasons, covering a salinity range between 0 and 6.8, and DOC concentrations from 1572 μmol l-1 in freshwater to 222 μmol l-1 in coastal waters. CDOM absorption coefficient, aCDOM(375) values followed the trend in DOC concentrations across the salinity gradient and ranged from 1.67 to 33.4 m-1. The link between DOC and CDOM was studied using a range of wavelengths and algorithms. Wavelengths between 250 and 270 nm gave the best predictions with single linear regression. Total dissolved iron was found to influence the prediction in wavelengths above 520 nm. Despite significant seasonal and spatial differences in DOC-CDOM models, a universal relationship was tested with an independent data set and found to be robust. DOC and CDOM yields (loading/catchment area) from the catchments ranged from 1.98 to 5.44 g C m-2 yr-1, and 1.67 to 11.5 aCDOM(375) yr-1, respectively.

  12. Experimental investigation of X-ray spectral absorption coefficients in heated Al and Ge on the Iskra-5 laser facility

    SciTech Connect

    Bondarenko, S V; Garanin, Sergey G; Zhidkov, N V; Pinegin, A V; Suslov, N A

    2012-01-31

    We set forth the data of experimental investigation of X-ray spectral absorption coefficients in the 1.1 - 1.6 keV photon energy range for Al and Ge specimens bulk heated by soft X-ray radiation. Two experimental techniques are described: with the use of one facility channel and the heating of specimens by the X-ray radiation from a plane burnthrough target, as well as with the use of four channels and the heating by the radiation from two cylindrical targets with internal input of laser radiation. The X-ray radiation absorption coefficients were studied by way of transmission absorption spectroscopy using backlighting X-ray radiation from a point source. The results of investigation of X-ray spectral absorption coefficients on the 1s - 2p transitions in Al atoms and the 2p - 3d transitions in Ge atoms are presented.

  13. Self-absorption theory applied to rocket measurements of the nitric oxide (1, 0) gamma band in the daytime thermosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eparvier, F. G.; Barth, C. A.

    1992-01-01

    Observations of the UV fluorescent emissions of the NO (1, 0) and (0, 1) gamma bands in the lower-thermospheric dayglow, made with a sounding rocket launched on March 7, 1989 from Poker Flat, Alaska, were analyzed. The resonant (1, 0) gamma band was found to be attenuated below an altitude of about 120 km. A self-absorption model based on Holstein transmission functions was developed for the resonant (1, 0) gamma band under varying conditions of slant column density and temperature and was applied for the conditions of the rocket flight. The results of the model agreed with the measured attenuation of the band, indicating the necessity of including self-absorption theory in the analysis of satellite and rocket limb data of NO.

  14. A new method to retrieve spectral absorption coefficient of highly-scattering and weakly-absorbing materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dombrovsky, Leonid A.

    2016-03-01

    A significant uncertainty in the absorption coefficient of highly scattering dispersed materials is typical in the spectral ranges of very weak absorption. The traditional way to identify the main absorption and scattering characteristics of semi-transparent materials is based on spectral measurements of normal-hemispherical reflectance and transmittance for the material sample. Unfortunately this way cannot be used in the case of in vivo measurements of optical properties of biological tissues. A method suggested in the present paper is based on thermal response to the periodic radiative heating of the open surface of a semi-transparent material. It is shown that the period of a variation of the surface temperature is sensitive to the value of an average absorption coefficient in the surface layer. As a result, the monochromatic external irradiation combined with the surface temperature measurements can be used to retrieve the spectral values of absorption coefficient. Possible application of this method to porous semi-transparent ceramics is considered. An example problem is also solved to illustrate the applicability of this method to human skin. The approach suggested enables one to estimate an average absorption coefficient of human skin of a patient just before the thermal processing.

  15. Use of EO-1 Hyperion data to calculate spectral band adjustment factors (SBAF) between the L7 ETM+ and Terra MODIS sensors

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chander, Gyanesh; Mishra, N.; Helder, Dennis L.; Aaron, D.; Choi, T.; Angal, A.; Xiong, X.

    2010-01-01

    Different applications and technology developments in Earth observations necessarily require different spectral coverage. Thus, even for the spectral bands designed to look at the same region of the electromagnetic spectrum, the relative spectral responses (RSR) of different sensors may be different. In this study, spectral band adjustment factors (SBAF) are derived using hyperspectral Earth Observing-1 (EO-1) Hyperion measurements to adjust for the spectral band differences between the Landsat 7 (L7) Enhanced Thematic Mapper Plus (ETM+) and the Terra Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) top-of-atmosphere (TOA) reflectance measurements from 2000 to 2009 over the pseudo-invariant Libya 4 reference standard test site.

  16. Towards photodetection with high efficiency and tunable spectral selectivity: graphene plasmonics for light trapping and absorption engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jianfa; Zhu, Zhihong; Liu, Wei; Yuan, Xiaodong; Qin, Shiqiao

    2015-08-01

    Plasmonics can be used to improve absorption in optoelectronic devices and has been intensively studied for solar cells and photodetectors. Graphene has recently emerged as a powerful plasmonic material. It shows significantly less loss compared to traditional plasmonic materials such as gold and silver and its plasmons can be tuned by changing the Fermi energy with chemical or electrical doping. Here we propose the use of graphene plasmonics for light trapping in optoelectronic devices and show that the excitation of localized plasmons in doped, nanostructured graphene can enhance optical absorption in its surrounding medium including both bulky and two-dimensional materials by tens of times, which may lead to a new generation of photodetectors with high efficiency and tunable spectral selectivity in the mid-infrared and THz ranges.Plasmonics can be used to improve absorption in optoelectronic devices and has been intensively studied for solar cells and photodetectors. Graphene has recently emerged as a powerful plasmonic material. It shows significantly less loss compared to traditional plasmonic materials such as gold and silver and its plasmons can be tuned by changing the Fermi energy with chemical or electrical doping. Here we propose the use of graphene plasmonics for light trapping in optoelectronic devices and show that the excitation of localized plasmons in doped, nanostructured graphene can enhance optical absorption in its surrounding medium including both bulky and two-dimensional materials by tens of times, which may lead to a new generation of photodetectors with high efficiency and tunable spectral selectivity in the mid-infrared and THz ranges. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Spectral tuning of absorption by changing the diameter of graphene nanodisks. Perfect light absorption in the whole structure and further enhancement of absorption in the underlying absorptive layer with a back mirror. Light trapping and enhancement of

  17. X-ray absorption and reflection as probes of the GaN conduction bands: Theory and experiment of the N K-edge and Ga M{sub 2,3} edges

    SciTech Connect

    Lambrecht, W.R.L.; Rashkeev, S.N.; Segall, B.; Lawniczak-Jablonska, K.; Suski, T.; Gullikson, E.M.; Underwood, J.H.; Perera, R.C.C.; Rife, J.C.

    1997-12-31

    X-ray absorption and glancing angle reflectivity measurements in the energy range of the Nitrogen K-edge and Gallium M{sub 2,3} edges are reported. Linear muffin-tin orbital band-structure and spectral function calculations are used to interpret the data. Polarization effects are evidenced for the N-K-edge spectra by comparing X-ray reflectivity in s- and p-polarized light.

  18. Spectral Absorption Depth Profile: A Step Forward to Plasmonic Solar Cell Design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hossain, Mohammad K.; Mukhaimer, Ayman W.; Drmosh, Qasem A.

    2016-07-01

    Absorption depth profile, a deterministic and key factor that defines the quality of excitons generation rate in optoelectronic devices, is numerically predicted using finite different time domain analysis. A typical model, nanoparticles array on silicon slab, was devised considering the concept of plasmonic solar cell design. The trend of spectral absorption depth profile distributions at various wavelengths of the solar spectrum, 460 nm, 540 nm, 650 nm, 815 nm, and 1100 nm, was obtained. A stronger and well-distributed absorption profile was obtained at ˜650 nm of the solar spectrum (i.e. ˜1.85 eV, c-Si bandgap), although the absorbing layer was affected more than a half micron depth at shorter wavelengths. Considering the observations obtained from this simulation, we have shown a simple two-step method in fabricating ultra-pure silver (Ag) nanoparticles that can be used as plasmonic nanoscatterers in a thin film solar cell. The morphology and elemental analysis of as-fabricated Ag nanoparticles was confirmed by field emission scanning electron microscope (FESEM) and FESEM-coupled electron diffraction spectroscopy. The size of the as-fabricated Ag nanoparticles was found to range from 50 nm to 150 nm in diameter. Further investigations on structural and optical properties of the as-fabricated specimen were carried out using ultraviolet-visible (UV-Vis) absorption, photoluminesce, and x-ray diffraction (XRD). Preferential growth of ZnO along {002} was confirmed by XRD pattern that was more intense and broadened at increasing annealing temperatures. The lattice parameter c was found to increase, whereas grain size increased with increasing annealing temperature. The optical bandgap was also observed to decrease from 3.31 eV to 3.25 eV at increasing annealing temperatures through UV-Vis measurements. This parallel investigation on optical properties by simulation is in line with experimental studies and, in fact, facilitates devising optimum process cost for

  19. Retrieval of phytoplankton and colored detrital matter absorption coefficients with remote sensing reflectance in an ultraviolet band.

    PubMed

    Wei, Jianwei; Lee, Zhongping

    2015-02-01

    The light absorption of phytoplankton and colored detrital matter (CDM), which includes contribution of gelbstoff and detrital matters, has distinctive yet overlapping features in the ultraviolet (UV) and visible domain. The CDM absorption (a(dg)) increases exponentially with decreasing wavelength while the absorption coefficient of phytoplankton (a(ph)) generally decreases toward the shorter bands for the range of 350-450 nm. It has long been envisioned that including ocean color measurements in the UV range may help the separation of these two components from the remotely sensed ocean color spectrum. An attempt is made in this study to provide an analytical assessment of this expectation. We started with the development of an absorption decomposition model [quasi-analytical algorithm (QAA)-UV], analogous to the QAA, that partitions the total absorption coefficient using information at bands 380 and 440 nm. Compared to the retrieval results relying on the absorption information at 410 and 440 nm of the original QAA, our analyses indicate that QAA-UV can improve the retrieval of a(ph) and a(dg), although the improvement in accuracy is not significant for values at 440 nm. The performance of the UV-based algorithm is further evaluated with in situ measurements. The limited improvement observed with the field measurements highlights that the separation of a(dg) and a(ph) is highly dependent on the accuracy of the ocean color measurements and the estimated total absorption coefficient. PMID:25967770

  20. Study on the Relationship between the Depth of Spectral Absorption and the Content of the Mineral Composition of Biotite.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chang-bao; Zhang, Chen-xi; Liu, Fang; Jiang, Qi-gang

    2015-09-01

    The mineral composition of rock is one of the main factors affecting the spectral reflectance characteristics, and it's an important reason for generating various rock characteristic spectra. This study choose the rock samples provided by Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) (including all kinds of mineral percentage of rocks, and spectral reflectances range from 0.35 to 2.50 μm wavelength measured by ASD spectrometer), and the various types of mineral spectral reflectances contained within the rocks are the essential data. Using the spectral linear mixture model of rocks and their minerals, firstly, a simulation study on the mixture of rock and mineral composition is achieved, the experimental results indicate that rock spectral curves using the model which based on the theory of the linear mixture are able to simulate better and preserve the absorption characteristics of various mineral components well. Then, 8 samples which contain biotite mineral are picked from the rock spectra of igneous, biotite contents and the absorption depth characteristics of spectral reflection at 2.332 μm, furthermore, a variety of linear and nonlinear normal statistical models are used to fit the relationship between the depth of absorption spectra and the content of the mineral composition of biotite, finally, a new simulation model is build up with the Growth and the Exponential curve model, and a statistical response relationship between the spectral absorption depth and the rock mineral contents is simulated by using the new model, the fitting results show that the correlation coefficient reaches 0.9984 and the standard deviation is 0.572, although the standard deviation using Growth and Exponential model is less than the two model combined with the new model fitting the standard deviation, the correlation coefficient of the new model had significantly increased, which suggesting that the, new model fitting effect is closer to the measured values of samples, it proves that the

  1. Efficient snoring and breathing detection based on sub-band spectral statistics.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xiang; Kim, Jin Young; Won, Yonggwan; Kim, Jung-Ja; Kim, Kyung-Ah

    2015-01-01

    Snoring, a common symptom in the general population may indicate the presence of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). In order to detect snoring events in sleep sound recordings, a novel method was proposed in this paper. The proposed method operates by analyzing the acoustic characteristics of the snoring sounds. Based on these acoustic properties, the feature vectors are obtained using the mean and standard deviation of the sub-band spectral energy. A support vector machine is then applied to perform the frame-based classification procedure. This method was demonstrated experimentally to be effective for snoring detection. The database for detection included full-night audio recordings from four individuals who acknowledged having snoring habits. The performance of the proposed method was evaluated by classifying different events (snoring, breathing and silence) from the sleep sound recordings and comparing the classification against ground truth. The proposed algorithm was able to achieve an accuracy of 99.61% for detecting snoring events, 99.16% for breathing, and 99.55% for silence. PMID:26406075

  2. Searching for I-band variability in stars in the M/L spectral transition region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramsay, Gavin; Hakala, Pasi; Doyle, J. Gerry

    2015-10-01

    We report on I-band photometric observations of 21 stars with spectral types between M8 and L4 made using the Isaac Newton Telescope. The total amount of time for observations which had a cadence of <2.3 min was 58.5 h, with additional data with lower cadence. We test for photometric variability using the Kruskal-Wallis H-test and find that four sources (2MASS J10224821+5825453, 2MASS J07464256+2000321, 2MASS J16262034+3925190 and 2MASS J12464678+4027150) were found to be significantly variable at least on one epoch. Three of these sources are reported as photometrically variable for the first time. If we include sources which were deemed marginally variable, the number of variable sources is 6 (29 per cent). No flares were detected from any source. The percentage of sources which we found were variable is similar to previous studies. We summarize the mechanisms which have been put forward to explain the light curves of brown dwarfs.

  3. Improvement of axial resolution of spectral domain optical coherence tomography with wide band PLC splitter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eom, Joo Beom; Min, Eun Jung; Lee, Byeong Ha

    2012-06-01

    We report the development and performance of high resolution spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) system based on 2×2 planar lightwave circuit (PLC) splitter that was designed as a single mode splitter at near infrared and used as the beam splitter for a SD-OCT system. The splitter has been made by coupling SMFs to a planar lightwave circuit (PLC) splitter chip. The PLC splitter chip was fabricated to have a single mode property with 740 nm cutoff wavelength and the SMFs, which have 730 nm cutoff wavelength, were securely connected to the PLC chip through fiber block arrays having lithographically fabricated V grooves. With the implemented PLC splitter, we have obtained a low excess loss of 0.4 dB at 840 nm with wide band coupling property. With the proposed 2×2 PLC splitter and fabricated WDM coupler, SD-OCT images of samples successfully obtained by using combined source with 840 nm and 880 nm SLDs.

  4. Aspects for efficient wide spectral band THz generation via CO2 laser down conversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panchenko, Yu. N.; Andreev, Yu. M.; Lanskii, G. V.; Losev, V. F.; Lubenko, D. M.

    2015-02-01

    Detailed model study of THz generation by CO2 laser down-conversion in pure and solid solution crystals GaSe1-xSx is carried out for the first time. Both forward and backward collinear interactions of common (eo-e, oe-e, oe-o, oo-e, ee-o) and original (ee-e, oo-o) types are considered. Possibility of realization, phase matching angles and figure of merits are estimated for line mixing within 9 μm and 10 μm emission bands, as well between them. Dispersion properties of o- and e-wave refractive indices and absorption coefficients for GaSe, GaS and GaSe1-xSx crystals were preliminary measured by THz-TDS, approximated in the equation form and then used in the study. Estimated results are presented in the form of 3-D figures that are suitable for rapid analyses of DFG parameters. The most efficient type of interaction is eo-o type. Optimally doped (x = 0.09-0.13) GaSe1-xSx crystals are from 4 to 5 times more efficient at limit pump intensity than not doped GaSe crystals.

  5. Accurate measurements of ozone absorption cross-sections in the Hartley band

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viallon, J.; Lee, S.; Moussay, P.; Tworek, K.; Petersen, M.; Wielgosz, R. I.

    2015-03-01

    Ozone plays a crucial role in tropospheric chemistry, is the third largest contributor to greenhouse radiative forcing after carbon dioxide and methane and also a toxic air pollutant affecting human health and agriculture. Long-term measurements of tropospheric ozone have been performed globally for more than 30 years with UV photometers, all relying on the absorption of ozone at the 253.65 nm line of mercury. We have re-determined this cross-section and report a value of 11.27 x 10-18 cm2 molecule-1 with an expanded relative uncertainty of 0.86% (coverage factor k= 2). This is lower than the conventional value currently in use and measured by Hearn (1961) with a relative difference of 1.8%, with the consequence that historically reported ozone concentrations should be increased by 1.8%. In order to perform the new measurements of cross-sections with reduced uncertainties, a system was set up to generate pure ozone in the gas phase together with an optical system based on a UV laser with lines in the Hartley band, including accurate path length measurement of the absorption cell and a careful evaluation of possible impurities in the ozone sample by mass spectrometry and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. This resulted in new measurements of absolute values of ozone absorption cross-sections of 9.48 x 10-18, 10.44 x 10-18 and 11.07 x 10-18 cm2 molecule-1, with relative expanded uncertainties better than 0.7%, for the wavelengths (in vacuum) of 244.06, 248.32, and 257.34 nm respectively. The cross-section at the 253.65 nm line of mercury was determined by comparisons using a Standard Reference Photometer equipped with a mercury lamp as the light source. The newly reported value should be used in the future to obtain the most accurate measurements of ozone concentration, which are in closer agreement with non-UV-photometry based methods such as the gas phase titration of ozone with nitrogen monoxide.

  6. Two-photon absorption cross section measurement in the gamma band system of nitric oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Burris, J.F. Jr.

    1982-01-01

    A dye laser with a single longitudinal mode and very stable spatial mode structure has been constructed. With this laser system a four-wave mixing experiment was done in the gamma bands of nitric oxide using two photon resonance. Another four-wave mixing experiment was done in nitrogen using coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) and the two signals ratioed. Using accurately known values of the Raman scattering cross section, the third order susceptibility in NO was determined without needing to know the spatial and temporal properties of the dye lasers. From this susceptibility, the two photon absorption cross section was calculated with the explicit dependence of sigma/sup (2)/ upon X/sup (3)/ shown. For the R/sub 22/ + S/sub 12/(J'' = 9 1/2) (A/sup 2/..sigma..+(v' = 0) -- X/sup 2/..pi..(v'' = 0)) line, sigma/sup (2)/ = (1.0 +/- 0.6) x 10/sup -38/cm/sup 4/g(2/sub 1/-Vertical Barsub f/ is the normalized lineshape. Branching ratios for the A/sup 2/..sigma..+(v' = n) ..-->.. X/sup 2/..omega..(v'' = n)(n = o,...9) transitions of NO were also measured, Franck-Condon factors calculated and the lifetime of the A state determined.

  7. Absolute radical densities in etching plasmas determined by broad-band UV absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Booth, Jean-Paul; Cunge, Gilles; Neuilly, François; Sadeghi, Nader

    1998-08-01

    Broad-band UV absorption spectroscopy was used to determine radical densities in reactive gas plasmas generated in a 13.56 MHz capacitively coupled parallel plate reactor. Five radical species were detected: 0963-0252/7/3/021/img1, CF, AlF, 0963-0252/7/3/021/img2 and 0963-0252/7/3/021/img3. Absolute (line-integrated) 0963-0252/7/3/021/img1 densities were determined in 0963-0252/7/3/021/img5 and 0963-0252/7/3/021/img6 plasmas, as were the 0963-0252/7/3/021/img1 vibrational and rotational temperatures in the latter case. In 0963-0252/7/3/021/img5 plasmas the CF radical was also detected, along with the etch products AlF (from the Al powered electrode) and 0963-0252/7/3/021/img2 (when an Si substrate was present). The fraction that 0963-0252/7/3/021/img2 comprises of the total etch products was estimated. Finally, the 0963-0252/7/3/021/img3 dimer was detected in an 0963-0252/7/3/021/img12 plasma in the presence of an Si substrate. This simple technique allows absolute concentrations of many key reactive species to be determined in reactive plasmas, without the need to analyse the complex rotational spectra of these polyatomic molecules.

  8. Anomalous atmospheric spectral features between 300 and 310 nm interpreted in light or new ozone absorption coefficient measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcpeters, R. D.; Bass, A. M.

    1982-01-01

    Real structure is revealed, by an analysis of continuous scan data from the solar backscattered UV instrument on Nimbus 7, in the backscattered atmospheric albedo region between 300 and 310 nm where spectral anomalies have been reported in ground-based observation. The spectral anomalies are explainable as structure at the 1-5% level in the ozone absorption coefficient, as measured by Bass and Paur (1981). The new absorption coefficient measurements are judged to approach the 1%-level of accuracy in atmospheric radiation calculation, which should resolve discrepancies between different Dobson wavelength pairs and between different instruments and permit the more accurate analysis of such second-order effects as NO emission, SO2 absorption in polluted atmospheres, and Raman scattering effects.

  9. Assignment and modeling of the absorption spectrum of 13CH4 at 80 K in the region of the 2ν3 band (5853-6201 cm-1)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Starikova, E.; Nikitin, A. V.; Rey, M.; Tashkun, S. A.; Mondelain, D.; Kassi, S.; Campargue, A.; Tyuterev, Vl. G.

    2016-07-01

    The absorption spectrum of the 13CH4 methane isotopologue has been recently recorded by Differential Absorption Spectroscopy (DAS) at 80 K in the 5853-6201 cm-1 spectral range. An empirical list of 3717 lines was constructed for this spectral range corresponding to the upper part of the Tetradecad dominated by the 2ν3 band near 5987 cm-1. In this work, we present rovibrational analyses of these spectra obtained via two theoretical approaches. Assignments of strong and medium lines were achieved with variational calculations using ab initio potential energy (PES) and dipole moment surfaces. For further analysis a non-empirical effective Hamiltonian (EH) of the methane polyads constructed by high-order Contact Transformations (CT) from an ab initio PES was employed. Initially predicted values of EH parameters were empirically optimized using 2898 assigned line positions fitted with an rms deviation of 5×10-3 cm-1. More than 1860 measured line intensities were modeled using the effective dipole transition moments approach with the rms deviation of about 10%. These new data were used for the simultaneous fit of the 13CH4 Hamiltonian parameters of the {Ground state/Dyad/Pentad/Octad/Tetradecad} system and the dipole moment parameters of the {Ground state-Tetradecad} system. Overall, 10 vibrational states and 28 vibration sublevels of the 13CH4 Tetradecad are determined. The comparison of their energy values with corresponding theoretical calculations is discussed.

  10. Tunable narrow-band spectral peak imposed onto a soliton with an acoustic long-period grating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolger, Jeremy A.; Luan, Feng; Yeom, Dong-Il; Tsoy, Eduard; de Sterke, C. Martijn; Eggleton, Benjamin J.

    2008-01-01

    We demonstrate a method of local spectral enhancement of an ultrafast soliton pulse. We use an in-line acoustic long-period grating (LPG), a periodic structure modifying both the phase and the loss of the propagating light, and which is readily tuned by simple adjustment of an applied electrical signal. The soliton perturbed by this narrow-band filter evolves with nonlinear propagation into an intense localised spectral peak. Our setup consists of creation of a red-shifted optical soliton by propagation of pulses from a fibre laser in standard single-mode optical fibre, followed by imposition of a spectrally narrow LPG near to the soliton peak, and then continuing propagation. The wavelength and the peak value of the resulting local enhancement can be tuned by adjustment of the applied acoustic frequency and amplitude. The physics of the observed local spectral enhancement will be discussed in detail here.

  11. Band gap tuning and optical absorption in type-II InAs/GaSb mid infrared short period superlattices: 14 bands K Dot-Operator p study

    SciTech Connect

    AbuEl-Rub, Khaled M.

    2012-09-06

    The MBE growth of short-period InAs/GaSb type-II superlattice structures, varied around 20.5 A InAs/24 A GaSb were [J. Applied physics, 96, 2580 (2004)] carried out by Haugan et al. These SLs were designed to produce devices with an optimum mid-infrared photoresponse and a sharpest photoresponse cutoff. We have used a realistic and reliable 14-band k.p formalism description of the superlattice electronic band structure to calculate the absorption coefficient in such short-period InAs/GaSb type-II superlattices. The parameters for this formalism are known from fitting to independent experiments for the bulk materials. The band-gap energies are obtained without any fitting parameters, and are in good agreement with experimental data.

  12. Confirmation of uncontrolled flow dynamics in clinical simulated multi-infusion setups using absorption spectral photometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timmerman, Anna M.; Riphagen, Brechtje; Klaessens, John H.; Verdaasdonk, Rudolf M.

    2010-02-01

    Multi-infusion systems are used frequently at intensive care units to administer several liquid therapeutic agents to patients simultaneously. By passively combining the separate infusion lines in one central line, the number of punctures needed to access the patient's body, is reduced. So far, the mutual influence between the different infusion lines is unknown. Although the flow properties of single infusion systems have been investigated extensively, only a few research groups have investigated the flow properties of multi-infusion systems. We showed in a previous study that applying multi-infusion can lead to fluctuations in syringe pump infusions, resulting in uncontrolled and inaccurate drug administration. This study presents a performance analysis of multi-infusion systems as used in the Neonatology Intensive Care Unit. The dynamics between multiple infusion lines in multi-infusion systems were investigated by simulation experiments of clinical conditions. A newly developed real-time spectral-photometric method was used for the quantitative determination of concentration and outflow volume using a deconvolution method of absorption spectra of mixed fluids. The effects for common clinical interventions were studied in detail. Results showed mutual influence between the different infusion lines following these interventions. This mutual influence led to significant volume fluctuations up to 50%. These deviations could result in clinically dangerous situations. A complete analysis of the multiinfusion system characteristics is recommended in further research to estimate both the presence and severity of potential risks in clinical use.

  13. Measurement of the Spectral Absorption of Liquid Water in Melting Snow With an Imaging Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, Robert O.; Dozier, Jeff

    1995-01-01

    Melting of the snowpack is a critical parameter that drives aspects of the hydrology in regions of the Earth where snow accumulates seasonally. New techniques for measurement of snow melt over regional scales offer the potential to improve monitoring and modeling of snow-driven hydrological processes. In this paper we present the results of measuring the spectral absorption of liquid water in a melting snowpack with the Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS). AVIRIS data were acquired over Mammoth Mountain, in east central California on 21 May 1994 at 18:35 UTC. The air temperature at 2926 m on Mammoth Mountain at site A was measured at 15-minute intervals during the day preceding the AVIRIS data acquisition. At this elevation. the air temperature did not drop below freezing the night of the May 20 and had risen to 6 degrees Celsius by the time of the overflight on May 21. These temperature conditions support the presence of melting snow at the surface as the AVIRIS data were acquired.

  14. Measurement of the spectral absorption of liquid water in melting snow with an imaging spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, Robert O.; Dozier, Jeff

    1995-01-01

    Melting of the snowpack is a critical parameter that drives aspects of the hydrology in regions of the earth where snow accumulates seasonally. New techniques for measurement of snow melt over regional scales offer the potential to improve monitoring and modeling of snow-driven hydrological processes. We present the results of measuring the spectral absorption of liquid water in a melting snowpack with the Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS). AVIRIS data were acquired over Mammoth Mountain, in east central California on 21 May 1994 at 18:35 UTC. The air temperature at 2926 m on Mammoth Mountain at site A was measured at 15-minute intervals during the day preceding the AVIRIS data acquisition. At this elevation, the air temperature did not drop below freezing the night of May 20 and had risen to 6 degrees Celsius by the time of the overflight on May 21. These temperature conditions support the presence of melting snow at the surface as the AVIRIS data were acquired.

  15. Classification method, spectral diversity, band combination and accuracy assessment evaluation for urban feature detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erener, A.

    2013-04-01

    Automatic extraction of urban features from high resolution satellite images is one of the main applications in remote sensing. It is useful for wide scale applications, namely: urban planning, urban mapping, disaster management, GIS (geographic information systems) updating, and military target detection. One common approach to detecting urban features from high resolution images is to use automatic classification methods. This paper has four main objectives with respect to detecting buildings. The first objective is to compare the performance of the most notable supervised classification algorithms, including the maximum likelihood classifier (MLC) and the support vector machine (SVM). In this experiment the primary consideration is the impact of kernel configuration on the performance of the SVM. The second objective of the study is to explore the suitability of integrating additional bands, namely first principal component (1st PC) and the intensity image, for original data for multi classification approaches. The performance evaluation of classification results is done using two different accuracy assessment methods: pixel based and object based approaches, which reflect the third aim of the study. The objective here is to demonstrate the differences in the evaluation of accuracies of classification methods. Considering consistency, the same set of ground truth data which is produced by labeling the building boundaries in the GIS environment is used for accuracy assessment. Lastly, the fourth aim is to experimentally evaluate variation in the accuracy of classifiers for six different real situations in order to identify the impact of spatial and spectral diversity on results. The method is applied to Quickbird images for various urban complexity levels, extending from simple to complex urban patterns. The simple surface type includes a regular urban area with low density and systematic buildings with brick rooftops. The complex surface type involves almost all

  16. Spectral shapes of Ar-broadened HCl lines in the fundamental band by classical molecular dynamics simulations and comparison with experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Tran, H.; Domenech, J.-L.

    2014-08-14

    Spectral shapes of isolated lines of HCl perturbed by Ar are investigated for the first time using classical molecular dynamics simulations (CMDS). Using reliable intermolecular potentials taken from the literature, these CMDS provide the time evolution of the auto-correlation function of the dipole moment, whose Fourier-Laplace transform leads to the absorption spectrum. In order to test these calculations, room temperature spectra of various lines in the fundamental band of HCl diluted in Ar are measured, in a large pressure range, with a difference-frequency laser spectrometer. Comparisons between measured and calculated spectra show that the CMDS are able to predict the large Dicke narrowing effect on the shape of HCl lines and to satisfactorily reproduce the shapes of HCl spectra at different pressures and for various rotational quantum numbers.

  17. An experimental study of the electronic absorption and fluorescence spectral properties of new p-substituted-N-phenylpyrroles and their electrosynthesized polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diaw, A. K. D.; Gningue-Sall, D.; Yassar, A.; Brochon, J.-C.; Henry, E.; Aaron, J.-J.

    2015-01-01

    Electronic absorption and fluorescence spectral properties of new p-substituted-N-phenylpyrroles (N-PhPys), including HOPhPy, MeOPhPy, ThPhPy, PhDPy, DPhDPy, PyPhThThPhPy, and their available, electrosynthesized polymers were investigated. Electronic absorption spectra, fluorescence excitation and emission spectra, fluorescence quantum yields (ΦF) and lifetimes (τF), and other photophysical parameters of these N-PhPy derivatives and their polymers were measured in DMF, DMSO diluted solutions and/or solid state at room temperature. The electronic absorption spectra of N-PhPy derivatives and their polymers included one to several bands, located in the 270-395 nm region, according to the p-phenyl substituent electron-donating effect and conjugated heteroaromatic system length. The fluorescence excitation spectra were characterized by one broad main peak, with, in most cases, one (or more) poorly resolved shoulder (s), appearing in the 270-405 nm region, and their emission spectra were generally constituted of several bands located in the 330-480 nm region. No significant shift of the absorption, fluorescence excitation and emission spectra wavelengths was found upon going from the monomers to the corresponding polymers. ΦF values were high, varying between 0.11 and 0.63, according to the nature of substituents(s) and to the conjugated system extension. Fluorescence decays were mono-exponential for the monomers and poly-exponential for PyPhThThPhPy and for polymers. τF values were relatively short (0.35-5.17 ns), and markedly decreased with the electron-donor character of the phenyl group p-substituent and the conjugated system extension.

  18. An experimental study of the electronic absorption and fluorescence spectral properties of new p-substituted-N-phenylpyrroles and their electrosynthesized polymers.

    PubMed

    Diaw, A K D; Gningue-Sall, D; Yassar, A; Brochon, J-C; Henry, E; Aaron, J-J

    2015-01-25

    Electronic absorption and fluorescence spectral properties of new p-substituted-N-phenylpyrroles (N-PhPys), including HOPhPy, MeOPhPy, ThPhPy, PhDPy, DPhDPy, PyPhThThPhPy, and their available, electrosynthesized polymers were investigated. Electronic absorption spectra, fluorescence excitation and emission spectra, fluorescence quantum yields (ΦF) and lifetimes (τF), and other photophysical parameters of these N-PhPy derivatives and their polymers were measured in DMF, DMSO diluted solutions and/or solid state at room temperature. The electronic absorption spectra of N-PhPy derivatives and their polymers included one to several bands, located in the 270-395 nm region, according to the p-phenyl substituent electron-donating effect and conjugated heteroaromatic system length. The fluorescence excitation spectra were characterized by one broad main peak, with, in most cases, one (or more) poorly resolved shoulder (s), appearing in the 270-405 nm region, and their emission spectra were generally constituted of several bands located in the 330-480 nm region. No significant shift of the absorption, fluorescence excitation and emission spectra wavelengths was found upon going from the monomers to the corresponding polymers. ΦF values were high, varying between 0.11 and 0.63, according to the nature of substituents(s) and to the conjugated system extension. Fluorescence decays were mono-exponential for the monomers and poly-exponential for PyPhThThPhPy and for polymers. τF values were relatively short (0.35-5.17 ns), and markedly decreased with the electron-donor character of the phenyl group p-substituent and the conjugated system extension. PMID:25173528

  19. Spectral line shapes of P-branch transitions of oxygen B-band

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wójtewicz, Szymon; Cygan, Agata; Masłowski, Piotr; Domysławska, Jolanta; Wcisło, Piotr; Zaborowski, Mikołaj; Lisak, Daniel; Trawiński, Ryszard S.; Ciuryło, Roman

    2014-06-01

    The precise line-shape measurements of self- and foreign-broadened P-branch transitions of the oxygen B band near 689 nm are presented. Data were obtained using the Pound-Drever-Hall-locked frequency-stabilized cavity ring-down spectrometer assisted by the optical frequency comb.1,2 This technique enables us to achieve high spectral resolution (about 1 MHz) and high signal-to-noise ratio spectra (above 10000:1) of weak transitions.3,4 It is showed that the inclusion of the line-narrowing effects (Dicke narrowing or the speed dependence of collisional broadening) is necessary to properly model measured line shapes. The multispectrum fitting technique is used to minimize correlation between line-shape parameters. Relations between the line narrowing obtained from different line-shape models in the low pressure limit (below 5 kPa) were verified experimentally. Line positions with uncertainties of about 170 kHz, intensities and the collisional broadening coefficients with uncertainties of about 0.5% are reported and compared to data available in the literature.5 The research is part of the program of the National Laboratory FAMO in Toruń, Poland, and is supported by the Polish National Science Centre Projects no. DEC-2011/01/B/ST2/00491 and UMO-2012/05/N/ST2/02717. The research is also supported by the Foundation for Polish Science TEAM and HOMING PLUS Projects co-financed by the EU European Regional Development Fund. A. Cygan is partially supported by the Foundation for Polish Science START Project.

  20. Recovery of x-ray absorption spectral profile in etched TiO{sub 2} thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Sano, Keiji; Niibe, Masahito; Kawakami, Retsuo; Nakano, Yoshitaka

    2015-05-15

    Near edge x-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectra of plasma-etched TiO{sub 2} thin films were observed using the total fluorescence yield method involving visible emission. The disrupted spectrum recovered its as-grown (nonetched) profile, upon soft x-ray (SX) irradiation. This recovery was investigated by ultraviolet (UV) irradiation, spatial distribution measurements, exposing recovered samples to air, and NEXAFS measurements of ultrafine TiO{sub 2} particles. The spectral profile recovered upon UV irradiation, and at sample positions outside of the SX irradiation site. The recovered spectral profiles were disrupted again, upon exposure to air. Nonetched ultrafine TiO{sub 2} particles also exhibited a disrupted spectral profile, which was recovered upon SX irradiation. The spectral recovery is explained by a model involving electrons trapped in oxygen vacancies generated by etching.

  1. Quantitative study of detection performance for LWIR hyperspectral imagers as a function of number of spectral bands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayer, Rulon R.; Priest, Richard G.

    2001-08-01

    Remote passive sensors can collect data that depict both the spatial distribution of objects in the scene and the spectral distributions for those objects within the scene. Target search techniques, such as matched filter algorithms, use highly resolved wavelength spectra (large number of bands) to help detect fine features in the spectrum in order to discriminate objects from the background. The use of a large number of bands during the target search, however, significantly slows image collection and area coverage rates. This study quantitatively examines how binning or integrating bands can affect target detection. Our study examines the long-wave infrared spectra of man-made targets and natural backgrounds obtained with the SEBASS (8-12 micrometers ) imager as part of the Dark HORSE 2 exercise during the HYDRA data collection in November, 1998. In this collection, at least 30 bands of data were obtained, but they were then binned to as few as 2 bands. This study examines the effect on detection performance of reducing the number of bands, through computation of the signal to clutter ratio (SCR) for a variety of target types. In addition, this study examines how band reduction affects the receiver operator curves (ROC) i.e. the target detection probability versus false alarm rate, for matched filter algorithms using in-scene target signatures and hyperspectral images. Target detection, as measured by SCR, for a variety of target types, improves with increasing number of bands. The enhancement in SCR levels off at approximately 10 bands, with only a small increase in SCR obtained from 10 to 30 bands. Variable number of bands within a bin (for fixed number of bins), generated by a genetic algorithm, increases SCR and ROC curve performance for multi-temporal studies. Thus, optimal selection of bands derived from one mission, may be robust and stable, and provide enhanced target detection for data collected on subsequent days. This investigation is confined to the

  2. Evidence for strange stars from joint observation of harmonic absorption bands and of redshift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagchi, Manjari; Ray, Subharthi; Dey, Mira; Dey, Jishnu

    2006-05-01

    From recent reports on terrestrial heavy ion collision experiments it appears that one may not obtain information about the existence of asymptotic freedom (AF) and chiral symmetry restoration (CSR) for quarks of QCD at high density. This information may still be obtained from compact stars - if they are made up of strange quark matter (SQM). Very high gravitational redshift lines (GRL), seen from some compact stars, seem to suggest high ratios of mass and radius (M/R) for them. This is suggestive of strange stars (SS) and can in fact be fitted very well with SQM equation of state (EOS) deduced with built in AF and CSR. In some other stars broad absorption bands (BAB) appear at about ~0.3keV and multiples thereof, that may fit in very well with resonance with harmonic compressional breathing mode frequencies of these SS. Emission at these frequencies are also observed in six stars. If these two features of large GRL and BAB were observed together in a single star, it would strengthen the possibility for the existence of SS in nature and would vindicate the current dogma of AF and CSR that we believe in QCD. Recently, in 4U 1700 - 24, both features appear to be detected, which may well be interpreted as observation of SS - although the group that analyzed the data did not observe this possibility. We predict that if the shifted lines, that has been observed, are from neon with GRL shift z= 0.4- then the compact object emitting it is a SS of mass 1.2Msolar and radius 7km. In addition the fit to the spectrum leaves a residual with broad dips at 0.35keV and multiples thereof, as in 1E 1207 - 5209 which is again suggestive of SS.

  3. Mapping atomic and diffuse interstellar band absorption across the Magellanic Clouds and the Milky Way

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bailey, Mandy; van Loon, Jacco Th.; Sarre, Peter J.; Beckman, John E.

    2015-12-01

    Diffuse interstellar bands (DIBs) trace warm neutral and weakly ionized diffuse interstellar medium (ISM). Here we present a dedicated, high signal-to-noise spectroscopic survey of two of the strongest DIBs, at 5780 and 5797 Å, in optical spectra of 666 early-type stars in the Small and Large Magellanic Clouds, along with measurements of the atomic Na I D and Ca II K lines. The resulting maps show for the first time the distribution of DIB carriers across large swathes of galaxies, as well as the foreground Milky Way ISM. We confirm the association of the 5797 Å DIB with neutral gas, and the 5780 Å DIB with more translucent gas, generally tracing the star-forming regions within the Magellanic Clouds. Likewise, the Na I D line traces the denser ISM whereas the Ca II K line traces the more diffuse, warmer gas. The Ca II K line has an additional component at ˜200-220 km s-1 seen towards both Magellanic Clouds; this may be associated with a pan-Magellanic halo. Both the atomic lines and DIBs show sub-pc-scale structure in the Galactic foreground absorption; the 5780 and 5797 Å DIBs show very little correlation on these small scales, as do the Ca II K and Na I D lines. This suggests that good correlations between the 5780 and 5797 Å DIBs, or between Ca II K and Na I D, arise from the superposition of multiple interstellar structures. Similarity in behaviour between DIBs and Na I in the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC), Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) and Milky Way suggests the abundance of DIB carriers scales in proportion to metallicity.

  4. PtSi Schottky-barrier focal plane arrays for multispectral imaging in ultraviolet, visible, and infrared spectral bands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsaur, Bor-Yeu; Chen, C. K.; Mattia, John-Paul

    1990-04-01

    PtSi Schottky-barrier detectors, which are conventionally used in the back-illumination mode for thermal imaging in the 3-5 micron infrared (IR) spectral band, are shown to exhibit excellent photoresponse in the near-ultraviolet and visible regions when operated in the front-illumination mode. For devices without antireflection coatings, external quantum efficiency in excess of 60 percent has been obtained for wavelengths between 400 and 800 nm. The efficiency decreases below 400 nm but is still about 35 percent at 290 nm. High-quality imaging has been demonstrated in both the visible and 3-5 micron spectral bands for front-illuminated 160- x 244-element PtSi focal plane arrays integrated with monolithic CCD readout circuitry.

  5. An absorption spectral study of Nd (III) with glutathione (reduced), GSH in aqueous and aquated organic solvent in presence and absence of Zn (II)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehta, Jignasu P.; Bhatt, Prashant N.; Misra, Sudhindra N.

    2003-02-01

    The coordination chemistry of glutathione (reduced) GSH is of great importance as it acts as an excellent model system for the binding of metal ions. The GSH complexation with metal ions is involved in the toxicology of different metal ions. Its coordination behaviour for soft metal ions and hard metal ions is found different because of the structure of GSH and its different potential binding sites. We have studied two chemically dissimilar metal ions viz. Nd (III) being hard metal ion, which will prefer hard donor sites like carboxylic groups, and Zn (II) the soft metal ion more suited to peptide—NH and sulfhydryl groups. The absorption difference and comparative absorption spectroscopy involving 4 f-4 f transitions of the heterobimetallic complexation of GSH with Nd (III) and Zn (II) has been explored in aqueous and aquated organic solvents. The changes in the oscillator strengths of different 4 f-4 f bands and Judd-Ofelt intensity ( Tλ) parameters determined experimentally is being used to investigate the complexation of GSH. The in vivo intracellular complexation of GSH with Ca (II) in presence of Zn (II) ion has been mimicked through Nd (III)-GSH-Zn (II) absorption spectral studies in vitro.

  6. The absorption coefficient of the liquid N2 2.15-micron band and application to Triton

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grundy, William M.; Fink, Uwe

    1991-01-01

    The present measurements of the temperature dependence exhibited by the liquid N2 2.15-micron 2-0 collision-induced band's absorption coefficient and integrated absorption show the latter to be smaller than that of the N2 gas, and to decrease with decreasing temperature. Extrapolating this behavior to Triton's nominal surface temperature yields a new estimate of the N2-ice grain size on the Triton south polar cap; a mean N2 grain size of 0.7-3.0 cm is consistent with grain growth rate calculation results.

  7. First-principles study of the band structure and optical absorption of CuGaS2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguilera, Irene; Vidal, Julien; Wahnón, Perla; Reining, Lucia; Botti, Silvana

    2011-08-01

    CuGaS2 is the most promising chalcopyrite host for intermediate-band thin-film solar cells. Standard Kohn-Sham density functional theory fails in describing the band structure of chalcopyrite materials, due to the strong underestimation of the band gap and the poor description of p-d hybridization, which makes it inadvisable to use this approach to study the states in the gap induced by doping. We used a state-of-the-art restricted self-consistent GW approach to determine the electronic states of CuGaS2: in the energy range of interest for optical absorption, the GW corrections shift the Kohn-Sham bands almost rigidly, as we proved through analysis of the effective masses, bandwidths, and relative position of the conduction energy valleys. Furthermore, starting from the GW quasiparticle bands, we calculated optical absorption spectra using different approximations. We show that the time-dependent density functional theory can be an efficient alternative to the solution of the Bethe-Salpeter equation when the exchange-correlation kernels derived from the Bethe-Salpeter equation are employed. This conclusion is important for further studies of optical properties of supercells including dopants.

  8. HST ROTATIONAL SPECTRAL MAPPING OF TWO L-TYPE BROWN DWARFS: VARIABILITY IN AND OUT OF WATER BANDS INDICATES HIGH-ALTITUDE HAZE LAYERS

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Hao; Apai, Dániel; Karalidi, Theodora; Marley, Mark S.; Saumon, Didier; Morley, Caroline V.; Buenzli, Esther; Artigau, Étienne; Radigan, Jacqueline; Metchev, Stanimir; Burgasser, Adam J.; Mohanty, Subhanjoy; Lowrance, Patrick J.; Showman, Adam P.; Flateau, Davin; Heinze, Aren N.

    2015-01-01

    We present time-resolved near-infrared spectroscopy of two L5 dwarfs, 2MASS J18212815+1414010 and 2MASS J15074759–1627386, observed with the Wide Field Camera 3 instrument on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). We study the wavelength dependence of rotation-modulated flux variations between 1.1 μm and 1.7 μm. We find that the water absorption bands of the two L5 dwarfs at 1.15 μm and 1.4 μm vary at similar amplitudes as the adjacent continuum. This differs from the results of previous HST observations of L/T transition dwarfs, in which the water absorption at 1.4 μm displays variations of about half of the amplitude at other wavelengths. We find that the relative amplitude of flux variability out of the water band with respect to that in the water band shows a increasing trend from the L5 dwarfs toward the early T dwarfs. We utilize the models of Saumon and Marley and find that the observed variability of the L5 dwarfs can be explained by the presence of spatially varying high-altitude haze layers above the condensate clouds. Therefore, our observations show that the heterogeneity of haze layers—the driver of the variability—must be located at very low pressures, where even the water opacity is negligible. In the near future, the rotational spectral mapping technique could be utilized for other atomic and molecular species to probe different pressure levels in the atmospheres of brown dwarfs and exoplanets and uncover both horizontal and vertical cloud structures.

  9. HST Rotational Spectral Mapping Of Two L-Type Brown Dwarfs: Variability In And Out Of Water Bands Indicates High-Altitude Haze Layers

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Yang, Hao; Apai, Dániel; Marley, Mark S.; Saumon, Didier; Morley, Caroline V.; Buenzli, Esther; Artigau, Étienne; Radigan, Jacqueline; Metchev, Stanimir; Burgasser, Adam J.; et al

    2014-12-17

    We present time-resolved near-infrared spectroscopy of two L5 dwarfs, 2MASS J18212815+1414010 and 2MASS J15074759-1627386, observed with the Wide Field Camera 3 instrument on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). We study the wavelength dependence of rotation-modulated flux variations between 1.1 μm and 1.7 μm. We find that the water absorption bands of the two L5 dwarfs at 1.15 μm and 1.4 μm vary at similar amplitudes as the adjacent continuum. This differs from the results of previous HST observations of L/T transition dwarfs, in which the water absorption at 1.4 μm displays variations of about half of the amplitude at othermore » wavelengths. We find that the relative amplitude of flux variability out of the water band with respect to that in the water band shows a increasing trend from the L5 dwarfs toward the early T dwarfs. We utilize the models of Saumon & Marley (2008) and find that the observed variability of the L5 dwarfs can be explained by the presence of spatially varying high-altitude haze layers above the condensate clouds. Therefore, our observations show that the heterogeneity of haze layers - the driver of the variability - must be located at very low pressures, where even the water opacity is negligible. In the near future, the rotational spectral mapping technique could be utilized for other atomic and molecular species to probe different pressure levels in the atmospheres of brown dwarfs and exoplanets and uncover both horizontal and vertical cloud structures.« less

  10. HST Rotational Spectral Mapping Of Two L-Type Brown Dwarfs: Variability In And Out Of Water Bands Indicates High-Altitude Haze Layers

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Hao; Apai, Dániel; Marley, Mark S.; Saumon, Didier; Morley, Caroline V.; Buenzli, Esther; Artigau, Étienne; Radigan, Jacqueline; Metchev, Stanimir; Burgasser, Adam J.; Mohanty, Subhanjoy; Lowrance, Patrick J.; Showman, Adam P.; Karalidi, Theodora; Flateau, Davin; Heinze, Aren N.

    2014-12-17

    We present time-resolved near-infrared spectroscopy of two L5 dwarfs, 2MASS J18212815+1414010 and 2MASS J15074759-1627386, observed with the Wide Field Camera 3 instrument on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). We study the wavelength dependence of rotation-modulated flux variations between 1.1 μm and 1.7 μm. We find that the water absorption bands of the two L5 dwarfs at 1.15 μm and 1.4 μm vary at similar amplitudes as the adjacent continuum. This differs from the results of previous HST observations of L/T transition dwarfs, in which the water absorption at 1.4 μm displays variations of about half of the amplitude at other wavelengths. We find that the relative amplitude of flux variability out of the water band with respect to that in the water band shows a increasing trend from the L5 dwarfs toward the early T dwarfs. We utilize the models of Saumon & Marley (2008) and find that the observed variability of the L5 dwarfs can be explained by the presence of spatially varying high-altitude haze layers above the condensate clouds. Therefore, our observations show that the heterogeneity of haze layers - the driver of the variability - must be located at very low pressures, where even the water opacity is negligible. In the near future, the rotational spectral mapping technique could be utilized for other atomic and molecular species to probe different pressure levels in the atmospheres of brown dwarfs and exoplanets and uncover both horizontal and vertical cloud structures.

  11. X-ray absorption and reflection as probes of the GaN conduction bands: Theory and experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Lambrecht, W.R.L.; Rashkeev, S.N.; Segall, B.

    1997-04-01

    X-ray absorption measurements are a well-known probe of the unoccupied states in a material. The same information can be obtained by using glancing angle X-ray reflectivity. In spite of several existing band structure calculations of the group III nitrides and previous optical studies in UV range, a direct probe of their conduction band densities of states is of interest. The authors performed a joint experimental and theoretical investigation using both of these experimental techniques for wurtzite GaN.

  12. Model Calculations of Solar Spectral Irradiance in the 3.7 Micron Band for Earth Remote Sensing Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Platnick, Steven; Fontenla, Juan M.

    2006-01-01

    Since the launch of the first Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) instrument aboard TIROS-N, measurements in the 3.7 micron atmospheric window have been exploited for use in cloud detection and screening, cloud thermodynamic phase and surface snow/ice discrimination, and quantitative cloud particle size retrievals. The utility of the band has led to the incorporation of similar channels on a number of existing satellite imagers and future operational imagers. Daytime observations in the band include both reflected solar and thermal emission energy. Since 3.7 micron channels are calibrated to a radiance scale (via onboard blackbodies), knowledge of the top-of-atmosphere solar irradiance in the spectral region is required to infer reflectance. Despite the ubiquity of 3.7 micron channels, absolute solar spectral irradiance data comes from either a single measurement campaign (Thekaekara et al. 1969) or synthetic spectra. In this study, we compare historical 3.7 micron band spectral irradiance data sets with the recent semi-empirical solar model of the quiet-Sun by Fontenla et al. (2006). The model has expected uncertainties of about 2 % in the 3.7 pm spectral region. We find that channel-averaged spectral irradiances using the observations reported by Thekaekara et al. are 3.2-4.1% greater than those derived from the Fontenla et al. model for MODIS and AVHRR instrument bandpasses; the Kurucz spectrum (1995) as included in the MODTRAN4 distribution, gives channel-averaged irradiances 1.2-1.5 % smaller than the Fontenla model. For the MODIS instrument, these solar irradiance uncertainties result in cloud microphysical retrievals uncertainties comparable with other fundamental reflectance error sources.

  13. Characterization of Cirrus Cloud Properties by Airborne Differential Absorption and High Spectral Resolution Lidar Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehret, G.; Gross, S.; Schäfler, A.; Wirth, M.; Fix, A.; Kiemle, C.

    2014-12-01

    Despite the large impact of cirrus clouds on the Earth's climate system, their effects are still only poorly understood. Our knowledge of the climate effect of cirrus clouds is mainly based on theoretical simulations using idealized cloud structure and microphysics, as well as radiative transfer approximations. To improve the representation of cirrus clouds in idealized simulations and circulation models, we need a better understanding of the micro- and macrophysical properties of cirrus clouds. Airborne lidar measurements provide two-dimensional information of the atmospheric structure, and are thus a suitable tool to study the fine-structure of cirrus clouds, as well as their macrophysical properties. Aerosol and water vapor was measured with the airborne high spectral resolution lidar (HSRL) and differential absorption lidar (DIAL) system WALES of the German Aerospace Center (DLR), Oberpfaffenhofen. The system was operated onboard the German high altitude and long range research aircraft HALO during the Next-generation remote sensing for validation studies campaign (NARVAL) in December 2013 over the tropical North-Atlantic and in January 2014 out of Iceland, and during the ML-Cirrus campaign in March/April 2014 over Central and Southern Europe. During NARVAL 18 flights with more than 110 flight hours were performed providing a large number of cirrus cloud overpasses with combined lidar and radar instrumentation. In the framework of the ML-Cirrus campaign 17 flights with more than 80 flight hours were performed to characterize cirrus cloud properties in different environmental conditions using a combination of remote sensing (e.g. lidar) and in-situ observations. In our presentation we will give a general overview of the campaigns and of the WALES measurements. We will show first results from the aerosol and water vapor lidar measurements with focus on the structure of cirrus clouds, the humidity distribution within and outside the cloud and on the impact of the

  14. Quantitative filter technique measurements of spectral light absorption by aquatic particles using a portable integrating cavity absorption meter (QFT-ICAM).

    PubMed

    Röttgers, Rüdiger; Doxaran, David; Dupouy, Cecile

    2016-01-25

    The accurate determination of light absorption coefficients of particles in water, especially in very oligotrophic oceanic areas, is still a challenging task. Concentrating aquatic particles on a glass fiber filter and using the Quantitative Filter Technique (QFT) is a common practice. Its routine application is limited by the necessary use of high performance spectrophotometers, distinct problems induced by the strong scattering of the filters and artifacts induced by freezing and storing samples. Measurements of the sample inside a large integrating sphere reduce scattering effects and direct field measurements avoid artifacts due to sample preservation. A small, portable, Integrating Cavity Absorption Meter setup (QFT-ICAM) is presented, that allows rapid measurements of a sample filter. The measurement technique takes into account artifacts due to chlorophyll-a fluorescence. The QFT-ICAM is shown to be highly comparable to similar measurements in laboratory spectrophotometers, in terms of accuracy, precision, and path length amplification effects. No spectral artifacts were observed when compared to measurement of samples in suspension, whereas freezing and storing of sample filters induced small losses of water-soluble pigments (probably phycoerythrins). Remaining problems in determining the particulate absorption coefficient with the QFT-ICAM are strong sample-to-sample variations of the path length amplification, as well as fluorescence by pigments that is emitted in a different spectral region than that of chlorophyll-a. PMID:26832563

  15. SIELETERS, an airborne infrared dual-band spectro-imaging system for measurement of scene spectral signatures.

    PubMed

    Coudrain, Christophe; Bernhardt, Sylvie; Caes, Marcel; Domel, Roland; Ferrec, Yann; Gouyon, Rémi; Henry, Didier; Jacquart, Marc; Kattnig, Alain; Perrault, Philippe; Poutier, Laurent; Rousset-Rouvière, Laurent; Tauvy, Michel; Thétas, Sophie; Primot, Jérôme

    2015-06-15

    More and more, hyperspectral images are envisaged to improve the aerial reconnaissance capability of airborne systems, both for civilian and military applications. To confirm the hopes put in this new way of imaging a scene, it is necessary to develop airborne systems allowing the measurement of the spectral signatures of objects of interest in real conditions, with high spectral and spatial resolutions. The purpose of this paper is to present the design and the first in-flight results of the dual-band infrared spectro-imaging system called Sieleters. This system has demonstrated simultaneously a ground sampling distance of 0.5m, associated with a spectral resolution of 11 cm(-1) for the Mid-Wave InfraRed (MWIR) and 5 cm(-1) for the Long-Wave InfraRed (LWIR). PMID:26193589

  16. Detection of metal stress in boreal forest species using the 0.67-micron chlorophyll absorption band

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singhroy, Vernon H.; Kruse, Fred A.

    1991-01-01

    Several recent studies have shown that a shift of the red-edge inflection near 0.70 micron in vegetation reflectance spectra is an indicator of metal stress, partially attributable to changes in chlorophyll concentration. This 'red-edge shift', however, is difficult to detect and has been reported both toward longer (red) and shorter (blue) wavelengths. Our work demonstrates that direct measurement of the depth and width of the chlorophyll absorption band at 0.67 micron using digital feature extraction and absorption band characterization procedures developed for the analysis of mineral spectra is a more consistent indicator of metal stress. Additionally, the magnitude of these parameters is generally greater than that of the red edge shift and thus should be more amenable to detection and mapping using field and aircraft spectrometers.

  17. Water-vapor absorption line measurements in the 940-nm band by using a Raman-shifted dye laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chu, Zhiping; Wilkerson, Thomas D.; Singh, Upendra N.

    1993-01-01

    We report water-vapor absorption line measurements that are made by using the first Stokes radiation (930-982 nm) with HWHM 0.015/cm generated by a narrow-linewidth, tunable dye laser. Forty-five absorption line strengths are measured with an uncertainty of 6 percent and among them are fourteen strong lines that are compared with previous measurements for the assessment of spectral purity of the light source. Thirty air-broadened linewidths are measured with 8 percent uncertainty at ambient atmospheric pressure with an average of 0.101/cm. The lines are selected for the purpose of temperature-sensitive or temperature-insensitive lidar measurements. Results for these line strengths and linewidths are corrected for broadband radiation and finite laser linewidth broadening effects and compared with the high-resolution transmission molecular absorption.

  18. The Pt2 (1,0) band of System VI in the near infrared by intracavity laser absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Brien, Leah C.; O'Brien, James J.

    2011-05-01

    Intracavity laser absorption spectroscopy has been used to record rotationally resolved electronic spectra of Pt2 in the near infrared. The metal dimers were created using a 50 mm-long, platinum-lined hollow cathode plasma discharge. The observed transition at 12 937 cm-1 is identified as the (1,0) band of System VI, with state symmetries Ω = 0 - X Ω = 0.

  19. Precise ro-vibrational analysis of molecular bands forbidden in absorption: The ν8 +ν10 band of 13C2H4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulenikov, O. N.; Gromova, O. V.; Bekhtereva, E. S.; Kashirina, N. V.; Maul, C.; Bauerecker, S.

    2015-10-01

    The high resolution spectra of the 13C2H4 molecule was recorded with a Bruker IFS 120 Fourier transform spectrometer and theoretically analyzed in the 1650 - 1800cm-1 region of the ν8 +ν10 band which is forbidden in absorption. About 1200 experimental transitions with the maximum values of quantum numbers Jmax. = 34 and Kamax. = 17 were assigned to the ν8 +ν10 band. On that basis the 516 high accuracy ro-vibrational energies of the (v8=v10=1) vibrational state, as well as energy levels with J ≤ 2 of the (v4 =v8 = 1) and (v7 =v8 = 1) vibrational states, were determined which then were used as input data in the weighted fit of spectroscopic parameters of the Hamiltonian (strong local resonance interactions of the ν8 +ν10 band with the bands ν4 +ν8 and ν7 +ν8 have been taken into account). A set of 34 vibrational, rotational, centrifugal distortion, and resonance interaction parameters was obtained from the fit. These parameters reproduce positions of about 1200 experimentally recorded and assigned transitions with the rms error drms = 0.00018cm-1 (blended and very weak transitions are not taken into account in that case).

  20. Single-tone and two-tone AM-FM spectral calculations for tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chou, Nee-Yin; Sachse, Glen W.

    1987-01-01

    A generalized theory for optical heterodyne spectroscopy with phase modulated laser radiation is used which allows the calculation of signal line shapes for frequency modulation spectroscopy of Lorentzian gas absorption lines. In particular, synthetic spectral line shapes for both single-tone and two-tone modulation of lead-salt diode lasers are presented in which the contributions from both amplitude and frequency modulations are included.

  1. Conditional-likelihood approach to material decomposition in spectral absorption-based or phase-contrast CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baturin, Pavlo

    2015-03-01

    Material decomposition in absorption-based X-ray CT imaging suffers certain inefficiencies when differentiating among soft tissue materials. To address this problem, decomposition techniques turn to spectral CT, which has gained popularity over the last few years. Although proven to be more effective, such techniques are primarily limited to the identification of contrast agents and soft and bone-like materials. In this work, we introduce a novel conditional likelihood, material-decomposition method capable of identifying any type of material objects scanned by spectral CT. The method takes advantage of the statistical independence of spectral data to assign likelihood values to each of the materials on a pixel-by-pixel basis. It results in likelihood images for each material, which can be further processed by setting certain conditions or thresholds, to yield a final material-diagnostic image. The method can also utilize phase-contrast CT (PCI) data, where measured absorption and phase-shift information can be treated as statistically independent datasets. In this method, the following cases were simulated: (i) single-scan PCI CT, (ii) spectral PCI CT, (iii) absorption-based spectral CT, and (iv) single-scan PCI CT with an added tumor mass. All cases were analyzed using a digital breast phantom; although, any other objects or materials could be used instead. As a result, all materials were identified, as expected, according to their assignment in the digital phantom. Materials with similar attenuation or phase-shift values (e.g., glandular tissue, skin, and tumor masses) were especially successfully when differentiated by the likelihood approach.

  2. Short term X-ray spectral variability of the strong iron-k absorption feature in PDS 456

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matzeu, G.; Reeves, J.; Gofford, J.; Nardini, E.; Costa, M.; Braito, V.; O'Brien, P.; Ward, M.; Turner, J.; Miller, L.

    2014-07-01

    We present a recent 500 ks Suzaku and a simultaneous 500 ks XMM-Newton & NuSTAR observations, carried out in 2013, of the nearby (z=0.184) luminous (L_{bol}˜10^{47} erg s^{-1}) quasar PDS 456. Short term X-ray spectral variability, including the presence of a strong and rapidly variable iron-K absorption feature, is observed and subsequently investigated. Here, our attention is focused on the physical interpretation of the short term variability where two models are adopted in the spectral analysis (partial covering vs coronal changes), leading to two valid interpretations. In the partial covering scenario, rapidly varying absorption is due to inhomogeneous dense material and such short timescale changes also entail that that the absorption is due to gas located in the vicinity of the black hole possibly shielding part of the outflow. In the second scenario, the complex spectral variability is due to variations in the intrinsic continuum observed as changes in the soft X-ray spectrum leading subsequent changes in the hard X-ray power-law, possibly induced by Comptonisation in the disc corona. Furthermore it was possible to extrapolate the size and the location of the absorber, its outflowing velocity and a direct estimation of the size of the X-ray emitting region ˜20 R_{g}.

  3. Wide angle and narrow-band asymmetric absorption in visible and near-infrared regime through lossy Bragg stacks.

    PubMed

    Shu, Shiwei; Zhan, Yawen; Lee, Chris; Lu, Jian; Li, Yang Yang

    2016-01-01

    Absorber is an important component in various optical devices. Here we report a novel type of asymmetric absorber in the visible and near-infrared spectrum which is based on lossy Bragg stacks. The lossy Bragg stacks can achieve near-perfect absorption at one side and high reflection at the other within the narrow bands (several nm) of resonance wavelengths, whereas display almost identical absorption/reflection responses for the rest of the spectrum. Meanwhile, this interesting wavelength-selective asymmetric absorption behavior persists for wide angles, does not depend on polarization, and can be ascribed to the lossy characteristics of the Bragg stacks. Moreover, interesting Fano resonance with easily tailorable peak profiles can be realized using the lossy Bragg stacks. PMID:27251768

  4. Wide angle and narrow-band asymmetric absorption in visible and near-infrared regime through lossy Bragg stacks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shu, Shiwei; Zhan, Yawen; Lee, Chris; Lu, Jian; Li, Yang Yang

    2016-06-01

    Absorber is an important component in various optical devices. Here we report a novel type of asymmetric absorber in the visible and near-infrared spectrum which is based on lossy Bragg stacks. The lossy Bragg stacks can achieve near-perfect absorption at one side and high reflection at the other within the narrow bands (several nm) of resonance wavelengths, whereas display almost identical absorption/reflection responses for the rest of the spectrum. Meanwhile, this interesting wavelength-selective asymmetric absorption behavior persists for wide angles, does not depend on polarization, and can be ascribed to the lossy characteristics of the Bragg stacks. Moreover, interesting Fano resonance with easily tailorable peak profiles can be realized using the lossy Bragg stacks.

  5. Wide angle and narrow-band asymmetric absorption in visible and near-infrared regime through lossy Bragg stacks

    PubMed Central

    Shu, Shiwei; Zhan, Yawen; Lee, Chris; Lu, Jian; Li, Yang Yang

    2016-01-01

    Absorber is an important component in various optical devices. Here we report a novel type of asymmetric absorber in the visible and near-infrared spectrum which is based on lossy Bragg stacks. The lossy Bragg stacks can achieve near-perfect absorption at one side and high reflection at the other within the narrow bands (several nm) of resonance wavelengths, whereas display almost identical absorption/reflection responses for the rest of the spectrum. Meanwhile, this interesting wavelength-selective asymmetric absorption behavior persists for wide angles, does not depend on polarization, and can be ascribed to the lossy characteristics of the Bragg stacks. Moreover, interesting Fano resonance with easily tailorable peak profiles can be realized using the lossy Bragg stacks. PMID:27251768

  6. Spectral Signature of Column Solar Radiation Absorption During the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Enhanced Shortwave Experiment (ARESE). Revision

    SciTech Connect

    O'Hirok, William; Gautier, Catherine; Ricchiazzi, Paul

    1999-11-01

    Spectral and broadband shortwave radiative flux data obtained from the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Enhanced Shortwave Experiment (ARESE) are compared with 3-D radiative transfer computations for the cloud field of October 30, 1995. Because the absorption of broadband solar radiation in the cloudy atmosphere deduced from observations and modeled differ by 135 Wm{sup -2}, we performed a consistency analysis using spectral observations and the model to integrate for wavelengths between the spectral observations. To match spectral measurements, aerosols need a reduction in both single scattering albedo (from 0.938 to 0.82) and asymmetry factor (from 0.67 to 0.61), and cloud droplets require a three-fold increase in co-albedo. Even after modifying the model inputs and microphysics the difference in total broadband absorption is still of the order of 75Wm{sup -2}. Finally, an unexplained absorber centered around 1.06 {micro}m appears in the comparison that is much too large to be explained by dimers.

  7. Biomass estimator for NIR image with a few additional spectral band images taken from light UAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pölönen, Ilkka; Salo, Heikki; Saari, Heikki; Kaivosoja, Jere; Pesonen, Liisa; Honkavaara, Eija

    2012-05-01

    A novel way to produce biomass estimation will offer possibilities for precision farming. Fertilizer prediction maps can be made based on accurate biomass estimation generated by a novel biomass estimator. By using this knowledge, a variable rate amount of fertilizers can be applied during the growing season. The innovation consists of light UAS, a high spatial resolution camera, and VTT's novel spectral camera. A few properly selected spectral wavelengths with NIR images and point clouds extracted by automatic image matching have been used in the estimation. The spectral wavelengths were chosen from green, red, and NIR channels.

  8. Relative spectral response corrected calibration inter-comparison of S-NPP VIIRS and Aqua MODIS thermal emissive bands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Efremova, Boryana; Wu, Aisheng; Xiong, Xiaoxiong

    2014-09-01

    The S-NPP Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) instrument is built with strong heritage from EOS MODIS, and has very similar thermal emissive bands (TEB) calibration algorithm and on-board calibrating source - a V-grooved blackbody. The calibration of the two instruments can be assessed by comparing the brightness temperatures retrieved from VIIRS and Aqua MODIS simultaneous nadir observations (SNO) from their spectrally matched TEB. However, even though the VIIRS and MODIS bands are similar there are still relative spectral response (RSR) differences and thus some differences in the retrieved brightness temperatures are expected. The differences depend on both the type and the temperature of the observed scene, and contribute to the bias and the scatter of the comparison. In this paper we use S-NPP Cross-track Infrared Sounder (CrIS) data taken simultaneously with the VIIRS data to derive a correction for the slightly different spectral coverage of VIIRS and MODIS TEB bands. An attempt to correct for RSR differences is also made using MODTRAN models, computed with physical parameters appropriate for each scene, and compared to the value derived from actual CrIS spectra. After applying the CrIS-based correction for RSR differences we see an excellent agreement between the VIIRS and Aqua MODIS measurements in the studied band pairs M13-B23, M15-B31, and M16- B32. The agreement is better than the VIIRS uncertainty at cold scenes, and improves with increasing scene temperature up to about 290K.

  9. Mapping vegetation types with the multiple spectral feature mapping algorithm in both emission and absorption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, Roger N.; Swayze, Gregg A.; Koch, Christopher; Ager, Cathy

    1992-01-01

    Vegetation covers a large portion of the Earth's land surface. Remotely sensing quantitative information from vegetation has proven difficult because in a broad sense, all vegetation is similar from a chemical viewpoint, and most healthy plants are green. Plant species are generally characterized by the leaf and flower or fruit morphology, not by remote sensing spectral signatures. But to the human eye, many plants show varying shades of green, so there is direct evidence for spectral differences between plant types. Quantifying these changes in a predictable manner has not been easy. The Clark spectral features mapping algorithm was applied to mapping spectral features in vegetation species.

  10. Spectral Fingerprinting of Individual Cells Visualized by Cavity-Reflection-Enhanced Light-Absorption Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Arai, Yoshiyuki; Yamamoto, Takayuki; Minamikawa, Takeo; Takamatsu, Tetsuro; Nagai, Takeharu

    2015-01-01

    The absorption spectrum of light is known to be a “molecular fingerprint” that enables analysis of the molecular type and its amount. It would be useful to measure the absorption spectrum in single cell in order to investigate the cellular status. However, cells are too thin for their absorption spectrum to be measured. In this study, we developed an optical-cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopic microscopy method for two-dimensional absorption imaging. The light absorption is enhanced by an optical cavity system, which allows the detection of the absorption spectrum with samples having an optical path length as small as 10 μm, at a subcellular spatial resolution. Principal component analysis of various types of cultured mammalian cells indicates absorption-based cellular diversity. Interestingly, this diversity is observed among not only different species but also identical cell types. Furthermore, this microscopy technique allows us to observe frozen sections of tissue samples without any staining and is capable of label-free biopsy. Thus, our microscopy method opens the door for imaging the absorption spectra of biological samples and thereby detecting the individuality of cells. PMID:25950513

  11. Optimization of spectral sensitivities of mosaic five-band camera for estimating chromophore densities from skin images including shading and surface reflections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirose, Misa; Akaho, Rina; Maita, Chikashi; Sugawara, Mai; Tsumura, Norimichi

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, the spectral sensitivities of a mosaic five-band camera were optimized using a numerical skin phantom to perform the separation of chromophore densities, shading and surface reflection. To simulate the numerical skin phantom, the spectral reflectance of skin was first calculated by Monte Carlo simulation of photon migration for different concentrations of melanin, blood and oxygen saturation levels. The melanin and hemoglobin concentration distributions used in the numerical skin phantom were obtained from actual skin images by independent component analysis. The calculated components were assigned as concentration distributions. The spectral sensitivities of the camera were then optimized using a nonlinear technique to estimate the spectral reflectance for skin separation. In this optimization, the spectral sensitivities were assumed to be normally distributed, and the sensor arrangement was identical to that of a conventional mosaic five-band camera. Our findings demonstrated that spectral estimation could be significantly improved by optimizing the spectral sensitivities.

  12. Optimization of spectral sensitivities of mosaic five-band camera for estimating chromophore densities from skin images including shading and surface reflections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirose, Misa; Akaho, Rina; Maita, Chikashi; Sugawara, Mai; Tsumura, Norimichi

    2016-02-01

    In this paper, the spectral sensitivities of a mosaic five-band camera were optimized using a numerical skin phantom to perform the separation of chromophore densities, shading and surface reflection. To simulate the numerical skin phantom, the spectral reflectance of skin was first calculated by Monte Carlo simulation of photon migration for different concentrations of melanin, blood and oxygen saturation levels. The melanin and hemoglobin concentration distributions used in the numerical skin phantom were obtained from actual skin images by independent component analysis. The calculated components were assigned as concentration distributions. The spectral sensitivities of the camera were then optimized using a nonlinear technique to estimate the spectral reflectance for skin separation. In this optimization, the spectral sensitivities were assumed to be normally distributed, and the sensor arrangement was identical to that of a conventional mosaic five-band camera. Our findings demonstrated that spectral estimation could be significantly improved by optimizing the spectral sensitivities.

  13. Modeling of collision-induced infrared absorption spectra of H2 pairs in the first overtone band at temperatures from 20 to 500 K

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zheng, Chunguang; Borysow, Aleksandra

    1995-01-01

    A simple formalism is presented that permits quick computations of the low-resolution, rotovibrational collision-induced absorption (RV CIA) spectra of H2 pairs in the first overtone band of hydrogen, at temperatures from 20 to 500 K. These spectra account for the free-free transitions. The sharp dimer features, originating from the bound-free, free-bound, and bound-bound transitions are ignored, though their integrated intensities are properly accounted for. The method employs spectral model line- shapes with parameters computed from the three lowest spectral moments. The moments are obtained from first principles expressed as analytical functions of temperature. Except for the sharp dimer features, which are absent in this model, the computed spectra reproduce closely the results of exact quantum mechanical lineshape computations. Comparisons of the computed spectra with existing experimental data also show good agreement. The work interest for the modeling of the atmospheres of the outer planets in the near-infrared region of the spectrum. The user-friendly Fortran program developed here is available on request from the authors.

  14. Time-resolved absorption changes of the pheophytin Q{sub x} band in isolated photosystem II reaction centers at 7K : energy transfer and charge separation.

    SciTech Connect

    Greenfield, S. R.; Seibert, M.; Wasielewski, M. R.; Chemistry; LANL; NREL; Northwestern Univ.

    1999-09-30

    The pheophytin {alpha} Q{sub x} spectral region of the isolated photosystem II reaction center was investigated at 7 K using femtosecond transient absorption spectroscopy. At this temperature, uphill energy transfer, which greatly complicates the interpretation of the kinetics at or near room temperature, should be essentially shut off. Low-energy ({approx}100 nJ) pulses at 661 and 683 nm were used to excite the short-wavelength and long-wavelength sides of the composite Q{sub y} band, providing preferential excitation of the accessory pigment pool and P680, respectively. The data analysis uses a background subtraction technique developed earlier (Greenfield et al. J. Phys. Chem. B 1997, 101, 2251-2255) to remove the kinetic components of the data that are due to the large time-dependent changes in the background that are present in this spectral region. The instantaneous amplitude of the bleach of the pheophytin {alpha} Q{sub x} band with 683 nm excitation is roughly two-thirds of its final amplitude, providing strong evidence of a multimer description of the reaction center core. The subsequent growth of the bleach shows biphasic kinetics, similar to our earlier results at 278 K. The rate constant of the faster component is (5 ps){sup -1} for 683 nm excitation (a factor of almost two faster than at 278 K), and represents the intrinsic rate constant for charge separation. The bleach growth with 661 nm excitation is also biphasic; however, the faster component appears to be a composite of a (5 ps){sup -1} component corresponding to charge separation following subpicosecond energy transfer to the long-wavelength pigments and a roughly (22 ps){sup -1} component corresponding to charge separation limited by slow energy transfer. The combined quantum yield for these two energy transfer processes is near unity. For both excitation wavelengths, there is also a roughly (100 ps){sup -1} component to the bleach growth. Exposure to high excitation energies ({>=}1 {mu}J) at

  15. Time-resolved absorption changes of the pheophytin Q{sub x} band in isolated photosystem II reaction centers at 7 K: Energy transfer and charge separation

    SciTech Connect

    Greenfield, S.R.; Seibert, M.; Wasielewski, M.R.

    1999-09-30

    The pheophytin a Q{sub x} spectral region of the isolated photosystem II reaction center was investigated at 7 K using femtosecond transient absorption spectroscopy. At this temperature, uphill energy transfer, which greatly complicates the interpretation of the kinetics at or near room temperature, should be essentially shut off. Low-energy ({approximately}100 nJ) pulses at 661 and 683 nm were used to excite the short-wavelength and long-wavelength sides of the composite Q{sub y} band, providing preferential excitation of the accessory pigment pool and P680, respectively. The data analysis uses a background subtraction technique developed earlier (Greenfield et al. J. Phys. Chem. B 1997, 101, 2251--2255) to remove the kinetic components of the data that are due to the large time-dependent changes in the background that are present in this spectral region. The instantaneous amplitude of the bleach of the pheophytin a Q{sub x} band with 683 nm excitation is roughly two-thirds of its final amplitude, providing strong evidence of a multimer description of the reaction center core. The subsequent growth of the bleach shows biphasic kinetics, similar to the earlier results at 278 K. The rate constant of the faster component is (5 ps){sup {minus}1} for 683 nm excitation (a factor of almost two faster than at 278 K), and represents the intrinsic rate constant for charge separation. The bleach growth with 661 nm excitation is also biphasic; however, the faster component appears to be a composite of a (5 ps){sup {minus}1} component corresponding to charge separation following subpicosecond energy transfer to the long-wavelength pigments and a roughly (22 ps){sup {minus}1} component corresponding to charge separation limited by slow energy transfer. The combined quantum yield for these two energy transfer processes is near unity. For both excitation wavelengths, there is also a roughly (100 ps){sup {minus}1} component to the bleach growth. Exposure to high excitation

  16. Determination of The Inflight Spectral Calibration of AVIRIS Using Atmospheric Absorption Features

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, Robert O.

    1995-01-01

    Both the surface and atmospheric characteistics were measured for a calibration target during an inflight calibration experiment held at Lunar Lake, Nevada on April 5, 1994 (Green, et al., 1995). This paper uses upwelling spectral radiance predicted for the calibration target with the MODTRAN radiative transfer code (Berk, et al., 1986) to validage the spectral calibration of AVIRIS inflight.

  17. Time-Resolved IR-Absorption Spectroscopy of Hot-Electron Dynamics in Satellite and Upper Conduction Bands in GaP

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cavicchia, M. A.; Alfano, R. R.

    1995-01-01

    The relaxation dynamics of hot electrons in the X6 and X7 satellite and upper conduction bands in GaP was directly measured by femtosecond UV-pump-IR-probe absorption spectroscopy. From a fit to the induced IR-absorption spectra the dominant scattering mechanism giving rise to the absorption at early delay times was determined to be intervalley scattering of electrons out of the X7 upper conduction-band valley. For long delay times the dominant scattering mechanism is electron-hole scattering. Electron transport dynamics of the upper conduction band of GaP has been time resolved.

  18. Multi-band morpho-Spectral Component Analysis Deblending Tool (MuSCADeT): Deblending colourful objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joseph, R.; Courbin, F.; Starck, J.-L.

    2016-05-01

    We introduce a new algorithm for colour separation and deblending of multi-band astronomical images called MuSCADeT which is based on Morpho-spectral Component Analysis of multi-band images. The MuSCADeT algorithm takes advantage of the sparsity of astronomical objects in morphological dictionaries such as wavelets and their differences in spectral energy distribution (SED) across multi-band observations. This allows us to devise a model independent and automated approach to separate objects with different colours. We show with simulations that we are able to separate highly blended objects and that our algorithm is robust against SED variations of objects across the field of view. To confront our algorithm with real data, we use HST images of the strong lensing galaxy cluster MACS J1149+2223 and we show that MuSCADeT performs better than traditional profile-fitting techniques in deblending the foreground lensing galaxies from background lensed galaxies. Although the main driver for our work is the deblending of strong gravitational lenses, our method is fit to be used for any purpose related to deblending of objects in astronomical images. An example of such an application is the separation of the red and blue stellar populations of a spiral galaxy in the galaxy cluster Abell 2744. We provide a python package along with all simulations and routines used in this paper to contribute to reproducible research efforts. Codes can be found at http://lastro.epfl.ch/page-126973.html

  19. Infrared spectral marker bands characterizing a transient water wire inside a hydrophobic membrane protein.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Steffen; Freier, Erik; Cui, Qiang; Gerwert, Klaus

    2014-12-14

    Proton conduction along protein-bound "water wires" is an essential feature in membrane proteins. Here, we analyze in detail a transient water wire, which conducts protons via a hydrophobic barrier within a membrane protein to create a proton gradient. It is formed only for a millisecond out of three water molecules distributed at inactive positions in a polar environment in the ground state. The movement into a hydrophobic environment causes characteristic shifts of the water bands reflecting their different chemical properties. These band shifts are identified by time-resolved Fourier Transform Infrared difference spectroscopy and analyzed by biomolecular Quantum Mechanical/Molecular Mechanical simulations. A non-hydrogen bonded ("dangling") O-H stretching vibration band and a broad continuum absorbance caused by a combined vibration along the water wire are identified as characteristic marker bands of such water wires in a hydrophobic environment. The results provide a basic understanding of water wires in hydrophobic environments. PMID:25494795

  20. Infrared spectral marker bands characterizing a transient water wire inside a hydrophobic membrane protein

    SciTech Connect

    Wolf, Steffen; Gerwert, Klaus; Freier, Erik; Cui, Qiang

    2014-12-14

    Proton conduction along protein-bound “water wires” is an essential feature in membrane proteins. Here, we analyze in detail a transient water wire, which conducts protons via a hydrophobic barrier within a membrane protein to create a proton gradient. It is formed only for a millisecond out of three water molecules distributed at inactive positions in a polar environment in the ground state. The movement into a hydrophobic environment causes characteristic shifts of the water bands reflecting their different chemical properties. These band shifts are identified by time-resolved Fourier Transform Infrared difference spectroscopy and analyzed by biomolecular Quantum Mechanical/Molecular Mechanical simulations. A non-hydrogen bonded (“dangling”) O–H stretching vibration band and a broad continuum absorbance caused by a combined vibration along the water wire are identified as characteristic marker bands of such water wires in a hydrophobic environment. The results provide a basic understanding of water wires in hydrophobic environments.

  1. Infrared spectral marker bands characterizing a transient water wire inside a hydrophobic membrane protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolf, Steffen; Freier, Erik; Cui, Qiang; Gerwert, Klaus

    2014-12-01

    Proton conduction along protein-bound "water wires" is an essential feature in membrane proteins. Here, we analyze in detail a transient water wire, which conducts protons via a hydrophobic barrier within a membrane protein to create a proton gradient. It is formed only for a millisecond out of three water molecules distributed at inactive positions in a polar environment in the ground state. The movement into a hydrophobic environment causes characteristic shifts of the water bands reflecting their different chemical properties. These band shifts are identified by time-resolved Fourier Transform Infrared difference spectroscopy and analyzed by biomolecular Quantum Mechanical/Molecular Mechanical simulations. A non-hydrogen bonded ("dangling") O-H stretching vibration band and a broad continuum absorbance caused by a combined vibration along the water wire are identified as characteristic marker bands of such water wires in a hydrophobic environment. The results provide a basic understanding of water wires in hydrophobic environments.

  2. Semi-Empirical Validation of the Cross-Band Relative Absorption Technique for the Measurement of Molecular Mixing Ratios

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pliutau, Denis; Prasad, Narasimha S

    2013-01-01

    Studies were performed to carry out semi-empirical validation of a new measurement approach we propose for molecular mixing ratios determination. The approach is based on relative measurements in bands of O2 and other molecules and as such may be best described as cross band relative absorption (CoBRA). . The current validation studies rely upon well verified and established theoretical and experimental databases, satellite data assimilations and modeling codes such as HITRAN, line-by-line radiative transfer model (LBLRTM), and the modern-era retrospective analysis for research and applications (MERRA). The approach holds promise for atmospheric mixing ratio measurements of CO2 and a variety of other molecules currently under investigation for several future satellite lidar missions. One of the advantages of the method is a significant reduction of the temperature sensitivity uncertainties which is illustrated with application to the ASCENDS mission for the measurement of CO2 mixing ratios (XCO2). Additional advantages of the method include the possibility to closely match cross-band weighting function combinations which is harder to achieve using conventional differential absorption techniques and the potential for additional corrections for water vapor and other interferences without using the data from numerical weather prediction (NWP) models.

  3. Semi-empirical validation of the cross-band relative absorption technique for the measurement of molecular mixing ratios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pliutau, Denis; Prasad, Narasimha S.

    2013-05-01

    Studies were performed to carry out semi-empirical validation of a new measurement approach we propose for molecular mixing ratios determination. The approach is based on relative measurements in bands of O2 and other molecules and as such may be best described as cross band relative absorption (CoBRA). The current validation studies rely upon well verified and established theoretical and experimental databases, satellite data assimilations and modeling codes such as HITRAN, line-by-line radiative transfer model (LBLRTM), and the modern-era retrospective analysis for research and applications (MERRA). The approach holds promise for atmospheric mixing ratio measurements of CO2 and a variety of other molecules currently under investigation for several future satellite lidar missions. One of the advantages of the method is a significant reduction of the temperature sensitivity uncertainties which is illustrated with application to the ASCENDS mission for the measurement of CO2 mixing ratios (XCO2). Additional advantages of the method include the possibility to closely match cross-band weighting function combinations which is harder to achieve using conventional differential absorption techniques and the potential for additional corrections for water vapor and other interferences without using the data from numerical weather prediction (NWP) models.

  4. Effect of radiometric errors on accuracy of temperature-profile measurement by spectral scanning using absorption-emission pyrometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buchele, D. R.

    1972-01-01

    The spectral-scanning method may be used to determine the temperature profile of a jet- or rocket-engine exhaust stream by measurements of gas radiation and transmittance, at two or more wavelengths. A single, fixed line of sight is used, using immobile radiators outside of the gas stream, and there is no interference with the flow. At least two sets of measurements are made, each set consisting of the conventional three radiometric measurements of absorption-emission pyrometry, but each set is taken over a different spectral interval that gives different weight to the radiation from a different portion of the optical path. Thereby, discrimination is obtained with respect to location along the path. A given radiometric error causes an error in computed temperatures. The ratio between temperature error and radiometric error depends on profile shape, path length, temperature level, and strength of line absorption, and the absorption coefficient and its temperature dependency. These influence the choice of wavelengths, for any given gas. Conditions for minimum temperature error are derived. Numerical results are presented for a two-wavelength measurement on a family of profiles that may be expected in a practical case of hydrogen-oxygen combustion. Under favorable conditions, the fractional error in temperature approximates the fractional error in radiant-flux measurement.

  5. High spectral efficient W-band optical/wireless system employing single-sideband single-carrier modulation.

    PubMed

    Ho, Chun-Hung; Lin, Chun-Ting; Cheng, Yu-Hsuan; Huang, Hou-Tzu; Wei, Chia-Chien; Chi, Sien

    2014-02-24

    With broader available bandwidth, W-band wireless transmission has attracted a lot of interests for future Giga-bit communication. In this article, we experimentally demonstrate W-band radio-over-fiber (RoF) system employing single-sideband single-carrier (SSB-SC) modulation with lower peak-to-average-power ratio (PAPR) than orthogonal frequency division multiplex (OFDM). To overcome the inter-symbol interference (ISI) of the penalty from uneven frequency response and SSB-SC modulation, frequency domain equalizer (FDE) and decision feedback equalizer (DFE) are implemented. We discuss the maximum available bandwidth of different modulation formats between SSB-SC and OFDM signals at the BER below forward error correction (FEC) threshold (3.8 × 10(-3)). Up to 50-Gbps 32-QAM SSB-SC signals with spectral efficiency of 5 bit/s/Hz can be achieved. PMID:24663711

  6. CMOS color image sensor with overlaid organic photoconductive layers having narrow absorption band

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takada, Shunji; Ihama, Mikio; Inuiya, Masafumi; Komatsu, Takashi; Saito, Takahiro

    2007-02-01

    At EI2006, we proposed the CMOS image sensor, which was overlaid with organic photoconductive layers in order to incorporate in it large light-capturing ability of a color film owing to its multiple-layer structure, and demonstrated the pictures taken by the trial product of the proposed CMOS image sensor overlaid with an organic layer having green sensitivity. In this study, we have tried to get the optimized spectral sensitivity for the proposed CMOS image sensor by means of the simulation to minimize the color difference between the original Macbeth chart and its reproduction with the spectral sensitivity of the sensor as a parameter. As a result, it has been confirmed that the proposed CMOS image sensor with multiple-layer structure possesses high potential capability in terms of imagecapturing efficiency when it is provided with the optimized spectral sensitivity.

  7. Improved line parameters for ozone bands in the 10-micron spectral region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flaud, Jean-Marie; Camy-Peyret, Claude; Rinsland, Curtis P.; Smith, Mary Ann H.; Devi, Malathy V.

    1990-01-01

    A complete update of spectroscopic line parameters for the 10-micron bands of ozone is reported. The listing contains calculated positions, intensities, lower state energies, and air- and self-broadened halfwidths of more than 53,000 lines. The results have been generated using improved spectroscopic parameters obtained in a number of recent high resolution laboratory studies. A total of eighteen bands of (O-16)3 (sixteen hot bands plus the nu(1) and nu(3) fundamentals) are included along with the nu(1) and nu(3) fundamentals of both (O-16)(O-16)(O-18) and (O-16)(O-18)(O-16). As shown by comparisons of line-by-line simulations with 0.003/cm resolution balloon-borne stratospheric solar spectra, the new parameters greatly improve the accuracy of atmospheric calculations in the 10-micron region, especially for the isotopic (O-16)(O-16)(O-18) and (O-16)(O-18)(O-16) lines.

  8. Chlorophyll pigment concentration using spectral curvature algorithms - An evaluation of present and proposed satellite ocean color sensor bands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoge, Frank E.; Swift, Robert N.

    1986-01-01

    During the past several years symmetric three-band (460-, 490-, 520-nm) spectral curvature algorithm (SCA) has demonstrated rather accurate determination of chlorophyll pigment concentration using low-altitude airborne ocean color data. It is shown herein that the in-water asymmetric SCA, when applied to certain recently proposed OCI (NOAA-K and SPOT-3) and OCM (ERS-1) satellite ocean color bands, can adequately recover chlorophyll-like pigments. These airborne findings suggest that the proposed new ocean color sensor bands are in general satisfactorily, but not necessarily optimally, positioned to allow space evaluation of the SCA using high-precision atmospherically corrected satellite radiances. The pigment concentration recovery is not as good when existing Coastal Zone Color Scanner bands are used in the SCA. The in-water asymmetric SCA chlorophyll pigment recovery evaluations were performed using (1) airborne laser-induced chlorophyll fluorescence and (2) concurrent passive upwelled radiances. Data from a separate ocean color sensor aboard the aircraft were further used to validate the findings.

  9. Red and blue shifts of spectral luminescence band of CuInS2 nanothermometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skaptsov, Alexander A.; Novikova, Anastasia S.; Galushka, Viktor V.; Markin, Alexey V.; Kochubey, Vyacheslav I.; Goryacheva, Irina Y.

    2016-04-01

    Control methods of temperature fields inside a tissue during laser photothermolysis are an important point to develop biomedical applications of thermal destructions of cancer. One of the most promising approaches to measure and to control of temperature is the application of luminescence nanothermometers such as CuInS2 nanoparticles. Temperature measurement can be carried out by determination of the maximum of the luminescence band. Thus, we have investigated the influence of exposure time and temperature on the position of the maximum of the luminescence band of CuInS2 nanoparticles.

  10. Line selection and sensitivity analysis for oxygen sensing in the 1.26-1.27 micron spectral band for the ASCENDS mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasad, N.; Browell, E. V.; Zaccheo, T. S.; Karpowicz, B.

    2010-12-01

    The National Research Council’s (NRC) Decadal Survey (DS) of Earth Science and Applications from Space has identified the Active Sensing of CO2 Emissions over Nights, Days, and Seasons (ASCENDS) as an important atmospheric science mission. The CO2 mixing ratio needs to be measured to a precision of 0.5 percent of background or better (slightly less than 2 ppm) at 100-km horizontal resolution overland and 200-km resolution over oceans. To meet this goal, the ASCENDS mission requires simultaneous laser remote sensing of CO2 and O2 in order to convert CO2 column number densities to average column CO2 mixing ratios (XCO2). As such, the CO2 column number density and the O2 column number density will be utilized to derive the average XCO2 column. NASA Langley Research Center, working with its partners, is developing O2 lidar technology in the 1.26-1.27-μm band for surface pressure measurements. To obtain XCO2 with LAS technique the simultaneous measurement of the CO2 column number density, the O2 column number density for converting the CO2 column number density to XCO2 and the total path length of the measurement are required. The O2 LAS operating at 1.26 μm will be used to convert CO2 number density to mixing ratio. The 1.26-μm spectral band was chosen due to architectural advantage from wavelengths being close to 1.57-μm CO2 LAS column measurements and the favorable spectroscopic characteristics of the O2 absorption line parameters. Furthermore, the surface and atmospheric scattering characteristics from aerosols and thin clouds are nearly the same as for 1.26-μm O2 measurements and the 1.57-μm CO2 measurements. One or more "on-line" wavelengths in the 1.26-μm O2 absorption band have to be carefully chosen to eliminate ambient influences on them when used in conjunction with the integrated path differential absorption (IPDA) technique. The O2 model optical depth calculation is very sensitive to knowledge of the transmitted wavelengths and to the choice of

  11. Signatures of a conical intersection in photofragment distributions and absorption spectra: Photodissociation in the Hartley band of ozone

    SciTech Connect

    Picconi, David; Grebenshchikov, Sergy Yu.

    2014-08-21

    Photodissociation of ozone in the near UV is studied quantum mechanically in two excited electronic states coupled at a conical intersection located outside the Franck-Condon zone. The calculations, performed using recent ab initio PESs, provide an accurate description of the photodissociation dynamics across the Hartley/Huggins absorption bands. The observed photofragment distributions are reproduced in the two electronic dissociation channels. The room temperature absorption spectrum, constructed as a Boltzmann average of many absorption spectra of rotationally excited parent ozone, agrees with experiment in terms of widths and intensities of diffuse structures. The exit channel conical intersection contributes to the coherent broadening of the absorption spectrum and directly affects the product vibrational and translational distributions. The photon energy dependences of these distributions are strikingly different for fragments created along the adiabatic and the diabatic paths through the intersection. They can be used to reverse engineer the most probable geometry of the non-adiabatic transition. The angular distributions, quantified in terms of the anisotropy parameter β, are substantially different in the two channels due to a strong anticorrelation between β and the rotational angular momentum of the fragment O{sub 2}.

  12. Higher-order mode absorption measurement of X-band choke-mode cavities in a radial line structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zha, Hao; Shi, Jiaru; Wu, Xiaowei; Chen, Huaibi

    2016-04-01

    An experiment is presented to study the higher-order mode (HOM) suppression of X-band choke-mode structures with a vector network analyzer (VNA). Specific radial line disks were built to test the reflection from the corresponding damping load and different choke geometries. The mismatch between the radial lines and the VNA was calibrated through a special multi-short-load calibration method. The measured reflections of different choke geometries showed good agreement with the theoretical calculations and verified the HOM absorption feature of each geometric design.

  13. Band-Selective Measurements of Electron Dynamics in VO2 UsingFemtosecond Near-Edge X-Ray Absorption

    SciTech Connect

    Cavalleri, A.; Rini, M.; Chong, H.H.W.; Fourmaux, S.; Glover,T.E.; Heimann, P.A.; Kieffer, J.C.; Schoenlein, R.W.

    2005-07-20

    We report on the first demonstration of femtosecond x-rayabsorption spectroscopy, made uniquely possible by the use of broadlytunable bending-magnet radiation from "laser-sliced" electron buncheswithin a synchrotron storage ri ng. We measure the femtosecond electronicrearrangements that occur during the photoinduced insulator-metal phasetransition in VO2. Symmetry- and element-specific x-ray absorption fromV2p and O1s core levels (near 500 eV) separately measures the fillingdynamics of differently hybridized V3d-O2p electronic bands near theFermi level.

  14. Analysis of functional groups in atmospheric aerosols by infrared spectroscopy: sparse methods for statistical selection of relevant absorption bands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahama, Satoshi; Ruggeri, Giulia; Dillner, Ann M.

    2016-07-01

    Various vibrational modes present in molecular mixtures of laboratory and atmospheric aerosols give rise to complex Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) absorption spectra. Such spectra can be chemically informative, but they often require sophisticated algorithms for quantitative characterization of aerosol composition. Naïve statistical calibration models developed for quantification employ the full suite of wavenumbers available from a set of spectra, leading to loss of mechanistic interpretation between chemical composition and the resulting changes in absorption patterns that underpin their predictive capability. Using sparse representations of the same set of spectra, alternative calibration models can be built in which only a select group of absorption bands are used to make quantitative prediction of various aerosol properties. Such models are desirable as they allow us to relate predicted properties to their underlying molecular structure. In this work, we present an evaluation of four algorithms for achieving sparsity in FT-IR spectroscopy calibration models. Sparse calibration models exclude unnecessary wavenumbers from infrared spectra during the model building process, permitting identification and evaluation of the most relevant vibrational modes of molecules in complex aerosol mixtures required to make quantitative predictions of various measures of aerosol composition. We study two types of models: one which predicts alcohol COH, carboxylic COH, alkane CH, and carbonyl CO functional group (FG) abundances in ambient samples based on laboratory calibration standards and another which predicts thermal optical reflectance (TOR) organic carbon (OC) and elemental carbon (EC) mass in new ambient samples by direct calibration of infrared spectra to a set of ambient samples reserved for calibration. We describe the development and selection of each calibration model and evaluate the effect of sparsity on prediction performance. Finally, we ascribe

  15. Multi-band optical observations of V404 Cygni and correlated spectral changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scarpaci, John; Maitra, Dipankar; Hynes, Rob; Markoff, Sera

    2015-06-01

    We report optical observations of V404 Cygni between 2015 June 27.10 - 27.34 UT made using Wheaton College Observatory's 0.3m telescope. During the course of the night observations were made by continuously cycling through V, R, and I band Johnson/Cousins filters.

  16. Spectral identification of the u-band variable sources in two LAMOST fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Tian-Wen; Yang, Ming; Wu, Hong; Zhang, Tian-Meng; Shi, Jian-Rong; Zhang, Hao-Tong; Yang, Fan; Zhao, Jing-Kun; Zhou, Xu; Fan, Zhou; Jiang, Zhao-Ji; Ma, Jun; Wang, Jia-Li; Wu, Zhen-Yu; Zou, Hu; Zhou, Zhi-Min; Nie, Jun-Dan; Luo, A.-Li; Wu, Xue-Bing; Zhao, Yong-Heng

    2016-09-01

    We selected 82 u-band variable objects based on the u-band photometry data from SCUSS and SDSS, in the field of LAMOST Complete Spectroscopic Survey of Pointing Area at Southern Galactic Cap. The magnitude variation of the targets is restricted to larger than 0.2 mag and limiting magnitude down to 19.0 mag in u-band. According to the spectra from LAMOST, there are 11 quasars with redshift between 0.4 and 1.8, 60 variable stars and 11 unidentified targets. The variable stars include one active M-dwarf with a series of Balmer emission lines, seven Horizontal Branch stars containing six RR Lyrae stars matching with SIMBAD, and one giant, one AGB star and two RR Lyrae candidates by different color selections. All these variable stars mainly locate near the main sequence in the g--r vs. u--g diagram. The quasars are well distinguished from stars by both u--g color and variation in u-band.

  17. Doping evolution of Zhang-Rice singlet spectral weight: A comprehensive examination by x-ray absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Y.-J.; Jiang, M. G.; Luo, C. W.; Lin, J.-Y.; Wu, K. H.; Lee, J. M.; Chen, J. M.; Kuo, Y. K.; Juang, J. Y.; Mou, Chung-Yu

    2013-10-01

    The total spectral weight S of the emergent low-energy quasiparticles in high-temperature superconductors (HTSCs) is explored by x-ray absorption spectroscopy. In order to examine the applicability of the Hubbard model, regimes that cover from zero doping to overdoping are investigated. In contrast to results of mean-field theory, we found that S deviates from linear dependence on the doping level p. The slope of S versus p changes continuously throughout the whole doping range with no sign of saturation up to p=0.23. Therefore, the picture of the Zhang-Rice singlet remains intact within the most prominent doping regimes of HTSCs.

  18. Broadband cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopy in the ultraviolet spectral region for measurements of nitrogen dioxide and formaldehyde

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Washenfelder, R. A.; Attwood, A. R.; Flores, J. M.; Zarzana, K. J.; Rudich, Y.; Brown, S. S.

    2016-01-01

    Formaldehyde (CH2O) is the most abundant aldehyde in the atmosphere, and it strongly affects photochemistry through its photolysis. We describe simultaneous measurements of CH2O and nitrogen dioxide (NO2) using broadband cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopy in the ultraviolet spectral region. The light source consists of a continuous-wave diode laser focused into a Xenon bulb to produce a plasma that emits high-intensity, broadband light. The plasma discharge is optically filtered and coupled into a 1 m optical cavity. The reflectivity of the cavity mirrors is 0.99930 ± 0.00003 (1- reflectivity = 700 ppm loss) at 338 nm, as determined from the known Rayleigh scattering of He and zero air. This mirror reflectivity corresponds to an effective path length of 1.43 km within the 1 m cell. We measure the cavity output over the 315-350 nm spectral region using a grating monochromator and charge-coupled device array detector. We use published reference spectra with spectral fitting software to simultaneously retrieve CH2O and NO2 concentrations. Independent measurements of NO2 standard additions by broadband cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopy and cavity ring-down spectroscopy agree within 2 % (slope for linear fit = 1.02 ± 0.03 with r2 = 0.998). Standard additions of CH2O measured by broadband cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopy and calculated based on flow dilution are also well correlated, with r2 = 0.9998. During constant mixed additions of NO2 and CH2O, the 30 s measurement precisions (1σ) of the current configuration were 140 and 210 pptv, respectively. The current 1 min detection limit for extinction measurements at 315-350 nm provides sufficient sensitivity for measurement of trace gases in laboratory experiments and ground-based field experiments. Additionally, the instrument provides highly accurate, spectroscopically based trace gas detection that may complement higher precision techniques based on non

  19. A multi-band spectral subtraction-based algorithm for real-time noise cancellation applied to gunshot acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramos, António L. L.; Holm, Sverre; Gudvangen, Sigmund; Otterlei, Ragnvald

    2013-06-01

    Acoustical sniper positioning is based on the detection and direction-of-arrival estimation of the shockwave and the muzzle blast acoustical signals. In real-life situations, the detection and direction-of-arrival estimation processes is usually performed under the influence of background noise sources, e.g., vehicles noise, and might result in non-negligible inaccuracies than can affect the system performance and reliability negatively, specially when detecting the muzzle sound under long range distance and absorbing terrains. This paper introduces a multi-band spectral subtraction based algorithm for real-time noise reduction, applied to gunshot acoustical signals. The ballistic shockwave and the muzzle blast signals exhibit distinct frequency contents that are affected differently by additive noise. In most real situations, the noise component is colored and a multi-band spectral subtraction approach for noise reduction contributes to reducing the presence of artifacts in denoised signals. The proposed algorithm is tested using a dataset generated by combining signals from real gunshots and real vehicle noise. The noise component was generated using a steel tracked military tank running on asphalt and includes, therefore, the sound from the vehicle engine, which varies slightly in frequency over time according to the engine's rpm, and the sound from the steel tracks as the vehicle moves.

  20. An Interferometric Spectral Line and Imaging Survey of VY Canis Majoris in the 345 GHz Band

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamiński, T.; Gottlieb, C. A.; Young, K. H.; Menten, K. M.; Patel, N. A.

    2013-12-01

    A spectral line survey of the oxygen-rich red supergiant VY Canis Majoris was made between 279 and 355 GHz with the Submillimeter Array (SMA). Two hundred twenty-three spectral features from 19 molecules (not counting isotopic species of some of them) were observed, including the rotational spectra of TiO, TiO2, and AlCl for the first time in this source. The parameters and an atlas of all spectral features are presented. Observations of each line with a synthesized beam of ~0.''9, reveal the complex kinematics and morphology of the nebula surrounding VY CMa. Many of the molecules are observed in high-lying rotational levels or in excited vibrational levels. From these, it was established that the main source of the submillimeter-wave continuum (dust) and the high-excitation molecular gas (the star) are separated by about 0.''15. Apparent coincidences between the molecular gas observed with the SMA, and some of the arcs and knots observed at infrared wavelengths and in the optical scattered light by the Hubble Space Telescope are identified. The observations presented here provide important constraints on the molecular chemistry in oxygen-dominated circumstellar environments and a deeper picture of the complex circumstellar environment of VY CMa.

  1. Iron absorption band analysis for the discrimination of iron rich zones

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rowan, L. C. (Principal Investigator)

    1973-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. A lineament study of the Nevada test site is near completion. Two base maps (1:500,000) have been prepared, one of band 7 lineaments and the other of band 5 lineaments. In general, more lineaments and more faults are seen on band 5. About 45% of the lineaments appear to be faults and contacts, the others being predominantly streams, roads, railway tracks, and mountain crests. About 25% of the lineaments are unidentified so far. Special attention is being given to unmapped extensions of faults, groups of unmapped lineaments, and known mineralized areas and alteration zones. Earthquake epicenters recorded from 1869 to 1963 have been plotted on the two base maps. Preliminary examination as yet indicates no basic correlation with the lineaments. Attempts are being made to subtract bands optically, using an I2S viewer, an enlarger, and a data color viewer. Success has been limited so far due to technical difficulties, mainly vignetting and poor light sources, within the machines. Some vegetation and rock type differences, however, have been discerned.

  2. Modeled and Empirical Approaches for Retrieving Columnar Water Vapor from Solar Transmittance Measurements in the 0.72, 0.82, and 0.94 Micrometer Absorption Bands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ingold, T.; Schmid, B.; Maetzler, C.; Demoulin, P.; Kaempfer, N.

    2000-01-01

    A Sun photometer (18 channels between 300 and 1024 nm) has been used for measuring the columnar content of atmospheric water vapor (CWV) by solar transmittance measurements in absorption bands with channels centered at 719, 817, and 946 nm. The observable is the band-weighted transmittance function defined by the spectral absorption of water vapor and the spectral features of solar irradiance and system response. The transmittance function is approximated by a three-parameter model. Its parameters are determined from MODTRAN and LBLRTM simulations or empirical approaches using CWV data of a dual-channel microwave radiometer (MWR) or a Fourier transform spectrometer (FTS). Data acquired over a 2-year period during 1996-1998 at two different sites in Switzerland, Bern (560 m above sea level (asl)) and Jungfraujoch (3580 m asl) were compared to MWR, radiosonde (RS), and FTS retrievals. At the low-altitude station with an average CWV amount of 15 mm the LBLRTM approach (based on recently corrected line intensities) leads to negligible biases at 719 and 946 nm if compared to an average of MWR, RS, and GPS retrievals. However, at 817 nm an overestimate of 2.7 to 4.3 mm (18-29%) remains. At the high-altitude station with an average CWV amount of 1.4 mm the LBLRTM approaches overestimate the CWV by 1.0, 1.4. and 0.1 mm (58, 76, and 3%) at 719, 817, and 946 nm, compared to the ITS instrument. At the low-altitude station, CWV estimates, based on empirical approaches, agree with the MWR within 0.4 mm (2.5% of the mean); at the high-altitude site with a factor of 10 less water vapor the agreement of the sun photometers (SPM) with the ITS is 0.0 to 0.2 mm (1 to 9% of the mean CWV there). Sensitivity analyses show that for the conditions met at the two stations with CWV ranging from 0.2 to 30 mm, the retrieval errors are smallest if the 946 nm channel is used.

  3. On the absorption and electromagnetic field spectral shifts in plasmonic nanotriangle arrays.

    PubMed

    Vedraine, Sylvain; Hou, Renjie; Norton, Peter R; Lagugné-Labarthet, François

    2014-06-01

    The behavior of the electromagnetic field interaction with gold nanotriangles organized in bow-tie arrays is investigated. A side-by-side comparison between the measured absorbance of the array and the modelled integrated electric field resonances confined around the gold structures is presented and discussed to explain the spectral shift between both parameters. Finite difference time domain calculations and Raman measurements of gold triangles of different sizes and periodicity are systematically performed. Numerical calculations show that the spectral maximum of the electric field varies in distinct areas over the metallic structures. PMID:24921524

  4. Analytical algorithm to determine the spherical particle size distribution from spectral absorption measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Jian-Qi; Li, Jiangnan

    2015-11-01

    A modified anomalous diffraction theory (MADT) by including the effects of reflection and refraction is proposed. With respect to MADT, an analytical technique for retrieval of spherical particle size distribution (PSD), based on absorption was developed. Also, an MADT transform pair between the size distribution and the absorption spectrum was constructed. This provides a new tool to study the related particle optical properties. By Gaver-Stehfest inversion method, the derived complex-inversion formula is finally converted into the new real-inversion formula so that the measured absorption data can be applied directly. The inversion experiments show that the use of extended precision instead of double precision arithmetic can produce more reliable results at the expense of CPU time. The effects of complex refractive index on retrieval of PSD were examined. Also it was found that an appropriate reduction of the truncation number with the smoothing technique improved the anti-noise ability for the algorithm.

  5. Variability of light absorption by aquatic particles in the near-infrared spectral region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tassan, Stelvio; Ferrari, Giovanni M.

    2003-08-01

    We have measured the light absorption of a set of particle suspensions of varying nature (pure minerals, particulate standards, aquatic particles) using a double-beam spectrophotometer with a 15-cm-diameter integrating sphere. The sample was located inside the sphere so as to minimize the effect of light scattering by the particles. The results obtained showed highly variable absorption in the near-IR region of the wavelength spectrum. The same particle samples were deposited on glass-fiber filters, and their absorption was measured by the transmittance-reflectance method, based on a theoretical model that corrects for the effect of light scattering. The good agreement found between the results of the measurements carried out inside the sphere and by the transmittance-reflectance method confirms the validity of the scattering correction included in the above method.

  6. Solar absorption by elemental and brown carbon determined from spectral observations

    PubMed Central

    Bahadur, Ranjit; Praveen, Puppala S.; Xu, Yangyang; Ramanathan, V.

    2012-01-01

    Black carbon (BC) is functionally defined as the absorbing component of atmospheric total carbonaceous aerosols (TC) and is typically dominated by soot-like elemental carbon (EC). However, organic carbon (OC) has also been shown to absorb strongly at visible to UV wavelengths and the absorbing organics are referred to as brown carbon (BrC), which is typically not represented in climate models. We propose an observationally based analytical method for rigorously partitioning measured absorption aerosol optical depths (AAOD) and single scattering albedo (SSA) among EC and BrC, using multiwavelength measurements of total (EC, OC, and dust) absorption. EC is found to be strongly absorbing (SSA of 0.38) whereas the BrC SSA varies globally between 0.77 and 0.85. The method is applied to the California region. We find TC (EC + BrC) contributes 81% of the total absorption at 675 nm and 84% at 440 nm. The BrC absorption at 440 nm is about 40% of the EC, whereas at 675 nm it is less than 10% of EC. We find an enhanced absorption due to OC in the summer months and in southern California (related to forest fires and secondary OC). The fractions and trends are broadly consistent with aerosol chemical-transport models as well as with regional emission inventories, implying that we have obtained a representative estimate for BrC absorption. The results demonstrate that current climate models that treat OC as nonabsorbing are underestimating the total warming effect of carbonaceous aerosols by neglecting part of the atmospheric heating, particularly over biomass-burning regions that emit BrC. PMID:23045698

  7. A spectral line survey of Orion KL in the bands 486-492 and 541-577 GHz with the Odin satellite. I. The observational data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olofsson, A. O. H.; Persson, C. M.; Koning, N.; Bergman, P.; Bernath, P. F.; Black, J. H.; Frisk, U.; Geppert, W.; Hasegawa, T. I.; Hjalmarson, Å.; Kwok, S.; Larsson, B.; Lecacheux, A.; Nummelin, A.; Olberg, M.; Sandqvist, Aa.; Wirström, E. S.

    2007-12-01

    Aims:Spectral line surveys are useful since they allow identification of new molecules and new lines in uniformly calibrated data sets. The subsequent multi-transition analysis will provide improved knowledge of molecular abundances, cloud temperatures and densities, and may also reveal previously unsuspected blends of molecular lines, which otherwise may lead to erroneous conclusions. Nonetheless, large portions of the sub-millimetre spectral regime remain unexplored due to severe absorptions by H{2}O and O{2} in the terrestrial atmosphere. The purpose of the measurements presented here is to cover wavelength regions at and around 0.55 mm - regions largely unobservable from the ground. Methods: Using the Odin astronomy/aeronomy satellite, we performed the first spectral survey of the Orion KL molecular cloud core in the bands 486-492 and 541-576 GHz with rather uniform sensitivity (22-25 mK baseline noise). Odin's 1.1 m size telescope, equipped with four cryo-cooled tuneable mixers connected to broad band spectrometers, was used in a satellite position-switching mode. Two mixers simultaneously observed different 1.1 GHz bands using frequency steps of 0.5 GHz (25 h each). An on-source integration time of 20 h was achieved for most bands. The entire campaign consumed 1100 orbits, each containing one hour of serviceable astro-observation. Results: We identified 280 spectral lines from 38 known interstellar molecules (including isotopologues) having intensities in the range 80 to 0.05 K. An additional 64 weak lines remain unidentified. Apart from the ground state rotational 1{1,0}-1{0,1} transitions of ortho-H{2}O, H{2}18O and H{2}17O, the high energy 6{2,4}-7{1,7} line of para-H{2}O (Eu=867 K) and the HDO(2{0,2}-1{1,1}) line have been observed, as well as the 1{0}-0{1} lines from NH{3} and its rare isotopologue 15NH{3}. We suggest assignments for some unidentified features, notably the new interstellar molecules ND and SH-. Severe blends have been detected in the

  8. Validation of H2O Continuum Absorption Models in the Wave Number Range 180-600 cm-1 with Atmospheric Emitted Spectral Radiance Measured at the Antarctica Dome-C Site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liuzzi, Giuliano; Masiello, Guido; Serio, Carmine; Venafra, Sara; Blasi, Maria Grazia; Palchetti, Luca; Bianchini, Giovanni

    2014-06-01

    We present the results concerning the analysis of a set of atmospheric emitted (down welling) spectral radiance observations in the spectral range 180 to 1100 cm-1 acquired at the Dome-C site in Antarctica during an extensive field campaign in 2011-2012. The work has been mainly focused on retrieving and validating the coefficients of the foreign contribution to the water vapour continuum absorption, within a spectral range overlapping the water vapour rotational band. Retrievals have been performed by using a simultaneous physical retrieval procedure for atmospheric and spectroscopic parameters. Both day (summer) and night (winter) spectra have been used in our analysis. This new set of observations in the far infrared range has allowed us to extend validation and verification of state-of-the-art water vapour continuum absorption models down to 180 cm-1. The results show that discrepancies between measurements and models are less than 10% in the interval 350-590 cm-1, while they are slightly larger at wave numbers below 350 cm-1. Overall, our study shows a good consistency between observations and state-of-the-art models and gives evidence for the need of also adjusting line absorption as done in Delamere et al. (2010). Finally, it has been found that there is a good agreement between the coefficients retrieved using either summer or winter spectra, which are acquired in far different meteorological conditions.

  9. Simultaneous multi-spectral narrow-band auroral imagery from space (1150A to 6300A2)

    SciTech Connect

    Schenkel, F.W.; Ogorzalek, B.S.; Gardner, R.R.; Hutchins, R.A.; Huffman, R.E.

    1986-01-01

    The design of a multi-mode instrument known as the Auroral Ionospheric Remote Sensor, AIRS, is described. The goal of the AIRS instrument is to produce data on the global imaging of the auroral display in both dark and sunlit hemispheres with the remote sensing of ionospheric airglows to deduce ionospheric parameters such as electron-density profiles and atmospheric background emissions. The AIRS will fly on a the POLAR BEAR spacecraft in a near-polar circular orbit at an altitude of 1000 km with a scheduled launch in the fall of 1986. The AIRS instrument is designed as a multi-mode system with four (4) channels of data to yield simultaneous operation in the vacuum ultraviolet (VUV), near ultraviolet (UV), and visible spectral bands. Two of the data channels are designed to operate in the VUV with 30A windows having a 240A separation. These two channels utilize an Ebert-Fastile spectrometer which can provide total coverage for each of these channels from 1150A to 1800A. The other two channels utilize a filter selector system to provide preselected, 10A bandwidth spectral channels at 3371A, 3914A, and 6300A, and a 200A wide channel centered at 2250A. These spectral bands are paired to provide simultaneous pair coverage of 2250A and 3371A and simultaneous pair coverage of 3914A and 6300A. All four channels view the auroral scene of the north polar cap via appropriate optics and scan mirror system. In effect, a line-scan image of the auroral scene is produced via the scan mirror operating in the orbit cross plane with the longitudinal direction provided by the forward motion of the spacecraft.

  10. CHEMICAL ABUNDANCES IN FIELD RED GIANTS FROM HIGH-RESOLUTION H-BAND SPECTRA USING THE APOGEE SPECTRAL LINELIST

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Verne V.; Cunha, Katia; Shetrone, Matthew D.; Meszaros, Szabolcs; Allende Prieto, Carlos; Bizyaev, Dmitry; Garcia Perez, Ana; Majewski, Steven R.; Schiavon, Ricardo; Holtzman, Jon; Johnson, Jennifer A.

    2013-03-01

    High-resolution H-band spectra of five bright field K, M, and MS giants, obtained from the archives of the Kitt Peak National Observatory Fourier transform spectrometer, are analyzed to determine chemical abundances of 16 elements. The abundances were derived via spectrum synthesis using the detailed linelist prepared for the Sloan Digital Sky Survey III Apache Point Galactic Evolution Experiment (APOGEE), which is a high-resolution near-infrared spectroscopic survey to derive detailed chemical abundance distributions and precise radial velocities for 100,000 red giants sampling all Galactic stellar populations. The red giant sample studied here was chosen to probe which chemical elements can be derived reliably from the H-band APOGEE spectral region. These red giants consist of two K-giants ({alpha} Boo and {mu} Leo), two M-giants ({beta} And and {delta} Oph), and one thermally pulsing asymptotic giant branch (TP-AGB) star of spectral type MS (HD 199799). Measured chemical abundances include the cosmochemically important isotopes {sup 12}C, {sup 13}C, {sup 14}N, and {sup 16}O, along with Mg, Al, Si, K, Ca, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, and Cu. The K and M giants exhibit the abundance signature of the first dredge-up of CN-cycle material, while the TP-AGB star shows clear evidence of the addition of {sup 12}C synthesized during {sup 4}He-burning thermal pulses and subsequent third dredge-up. A comparison of the abundances derived here with published values for these stars reveals consistent results to {approx}0.1 dex. The APOGEE spectral region and linelist is thus well suited for probing both Galactic chemical evolution, as well as internal nucleosynthesis and mixing in populations of red giants via high-resolution spectroscopy.

  11. Vegetation Red-edge Spectral Modeling for Solar-induced Chlorophyll Fluorescence Retrieval at O2-B Band

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, C.; Zhang, L.; Qiao, N.; Zhang, X.; Li, Y.

    2015-12-01

    Remotely sensed solar-induced chlorophyll fluorescence (SIF) has been considered an ideal probe in monitoring global vegetation photosynthesis. However, challenges in accurate estimate of faint SIF (less than 5% of the total reflected radiation in near infrared bands) from the observed apparent reflected radiation greatly limit its wide applications. Currently, the telluric O2-B (~688nm) and O2-A (~761nm) have been proved to be capable of SIF retrieval based on Fraunhofer line depth (FLD) principle. They may still work well even using conventional ground-based commercial spectrometers with typical spectral resolutions of 2~5 nm and high enough signal-to-noise ratio (e.g., the ASD spectrometer). Nevertheless, almost all current FLD based algorithms were mainly developed for O2-A, a few concentrating on the other SIF emission peak in O2-B. One of the critical reasons is that it is very difficult to model the sudden varying reflectance around O2-B band located in the red-edge spectral region (about 680-800 nm). This study investigates a new method by combining the established inverted Gaussian reflectance model (IGM) and FLD principle using diurnal canopy spectra with relative low spectral resolutions of 1 nm (FluorMOD simulations) and 3 nm (measured by ASD spectrometer) respectively. The IGM has been reported to be an objective and good method to characterize the entire vegetation red-edge reflectance. Consequently, the proposed SIF retrieval method (hereinafter called IGMFLD) could exploit all the spectral information along the whole red-edge (680-800 nm) to obtain more reasonable reflectance and fluorescence correction coefficients than traditional FLD methods such as the iFLD. Initial results show that the IGMFLD can better capture the spectrally non-linear characterization of the reflectance in 680-800 nm and thereby yields much more accurate SIFs in O2-B than typical FLD methods, including sFLD, 3FLD and iFLD (see figure 1). Finally, uncertainties and prospect

  12. Near infrared iron absorption bands: Applications to geologic mapping and mineral exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rowan, L. C.

    1972-01-01

    A spectroscopic analysis of the difference in reflectance of iron-rich and iron-poor minerals was made. Attempts were made to use these minima contrast in geological mapping and metallic mineral exploration of large areas from near infrared and visible satellite images. Data cover pertinent laboratory spectroscopic investigations, applications of spectral differences to the discrimination of two important metamorphic rock types, and mineral exploration by aircraft in Beartooth Mountains, Montana.

  13. High resolution absorption spectroscopy of the ν1=2-6 acetylenic overtone bands of propyne: Spectroscopy and dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campargue, A.; Biennier, L.; Garnache, A.; Kachanov, A.; Romanini, D.; Herman, M.

    1999-11-01

    The rotationally resolved nν1 (n=2-6) overtone transitions of the CH acetylenic stretching of propyne (CH3-C≡C-H) have been recorded by using Fourier transform spectroscopy (n=2), various intracavity laser absorption spectrometers (n=3, 4, and 6) and cavity ring down spectroscopy (CRDS) (n=5). The 2ν1, 3ν1, and 6ν1 bands exhibit a well-resolved and mostly unperturbed J-rotational structure, whose analysis is reported. The 5ν1 band recorded by pulsed CRDS shows an unresolved rotational envelope. In the region of 12 700 cm-1, an anharmonic interaction is confirmed between 4ν1 and 3ν1+ν3+ν5. The band at a higher wave number in this dyad exhibits a partly resolved K-structure, whose analysis is reported. The mixing coefficient of the two interacting states is determined consistently using different procedures. The 1/35 anharmonic resonance evidenced in the 4ν1 manifold induces weaker intensity borrowing from the 2ν1 and 3ν1 levels to the ν1+ν3+ν5 and 2ν1+ν3+ν5 level, respectively, which have been predicted and identified. Several hot bands around the 2ν1, 3ν1, and 3ν1+ν3+ν5 bands arising from the ν9=1 and ν10=1 and 2 bending levels are identified and rotationally analyzed, also leading to determine x1,9 [-20.3(3) cm-1], x1,10 [-1.7975(75) cm-1], and x3,10 [-6.56 cm-1]. The J-clumps of the P and R branches in the 6ν1 band at 18 499 cm-1 show a Lorentzian homogeneous profile mostly J-independent with an average full width at half maximum (FWHM) of 0.17 cm-1, attributed to arising from the intramolecular vibrational energy redistribution towards the bath of vibrational states. A detailed comparative examination of the fine structure in all investigated nν1 (n=2 to 7) overtone bands and the similar behavior of the cold and hot bands arising from ν10=1 definitively suggests that a highly specific low-order anharmonic coupling, still unidentified, dominates the hierarchy of interaction mechanisms connecting the nν1 levels to the background

  14. Development of a narrow-band, tunable, frequency-quadrupled diode laser for UV absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Koplow, J P; Kliner, D A; Goldberg, L

    1998-06-20

    A compact, lightweight, low-power-consumption source of tunable, narrow-bandwidth blue and UV radiation is described. In this source, a single-longitudinal-mode diode laser seeds a pulsed, GaAlAs tapered amplifier whose ~860-nm output is frequency quadrupled by two stages of single-pass frequency doubling. Performance of the laser system is characterized over a wide range of amplifier duty cycles (0.1-1.0), pulse durations (50 ns-1.0 mus), peak currents (absorption spectra of nitric oxide and sulfur dioxide near 215 nm; the SO(2) spectrum was found to have significantly more structure and higher peak absorption cross sections than previously reported. PMID:18273363

  15. Absorption spectral analysis of proteins and free amino acids in Pleurotus ostreatus fruiting body extracts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kostyshyn, S.; Gorshynska, I.; Guminetsky, S. G.

    2002-02-01

    The paper deals with the results of spectrophotometric studies of the extracts of Pleurotus ostreatus fruiting bodies, grown in natural conditions in different habitats of Chernivtsy region, in the spectral interval of 215 - 340 nm. It is shown that the samples reveal considerable difference both in free amino acid content and reserved protein content of albumins, globulins, prolamins, glutelins.

  16. Narrow-band, tunable, semiconductor-laser-based source for deep-UV absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Kliner, D A; Koplow, J P; Goldberg, L

    1997-09-15

    Tunable, narrow-bandwidth (<200-MHz), ~215-nm radiation was produced by frequency quadrupling the ~860-nm output of a high-power, pulsed GaAlAs tapered amplifier seeded by an external-cavity diode laser. Pulsing the amplifier increased the 860 nm?215 nm conversion efficiency by 2 orders of magnitude with respect to cw operation. Detection of nitric oxide and sulfur dioxide by high-resolution absorption spectroscopy was demonstrated. PMID:18188256

  17. Scaling effects in area-averaged values of two-band spectral vegetation indices represented in a general form

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obata, Kenta; Miura, Tomoaki; Yoshioka, Hiroki

    2012-01-01

    Area-averaged vegetation index (VI) depends on spatial resolution and the computational approach used to calculate the VI from the data. Certain data treatments can introduce scaling effects and a systematic bias into datasets gathered from different sensors. This study investigated the mechanisms underlying the scaling effects of a two-band spectral VI defined in terms of the ratio of two linear sums of the red and near-infrared reflectances (a general form of the two-band VI). The general form of the VI model was linearly transformed to yield a common functional VI form that elucidated the nature of the monotonic behavior. An analytic investigation was conducted in which a two-band linear mixture model was assumed. The trends (increasing or decreasing) in the area-averaged VIs could be explained in terms of a single scalar index, ην, which may be expressed in terms of the spectra of the vegetation and nonvegetation endmembers as well as the coefficients unique to each VI. The maximum error bounds on the scaling effects were derived as a function of the endmember spectra and the choice of VI. The validity of the expressions was explored by conducting a set of numerical experiments that focused on the monotonic behavior and trends in several VIs.

  18. Generation of multiple spectral bands in a diode-pumped self-mode-locked Nd:YAP laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Y. J.; Tzeng, Y. S.; Cho, H. H.; Chen, Y. F.; Chen, W. D.; Zhang, G.; Chen, T. C.

    2016-02-01

    A single- and multispectral-band diode end-pumped self-mode-locked Nd:YAP laser is originally demonstrated with an intracavity etalon to properly control the gain-to-loss ratios among the intermanifold lines on the 4F3/2  →  4I11/2 transition level. With a pulse repetition rate of 5.07 GHz, the shortest pulse durations under the single-spectral-band operation are achieved to be 11.1 ps at 1073 nm, 10.9 ps at 1080 nm, and 15.1 ps at 1084 nm, respectively. Moreover, the temporal overlapping of the multispectral-band pulses is experimentally found to lead to the generation of an intensity fringe pattern in the autocorrelation trace with the optical-beat frequency reaching several terahertz. A simple mathematical model is developed to elucidate the formation of a train of optical-beat pulses.

  19. Internal quality evaluation of apples using spectral absorption and scattering properties

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of this research was to measure the absorption and reduced scattering coefficients of apples via a spatially-resolved hyperspectral imaging technique and relate them to fruit firmness and soluble solids content (SSC). Spatially-resolved hyperspectral images were acquired from 600 ‘Gold...

  20. X-ray absorption spectral studies of copper (II) mixed ligand complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soni, B.; Dar, Davood Ah; Shrivastava, B. D.; Prasad, J.; Srivastava, K.

    2014-09-01

    X-ray absorption spectra at the K-edge of copper have been studied in two copper mixed ligand complexes, one having tetramethyethylenediamine (tmen) and the other having tetraethyethylenediamine (teen) as one of the ligands. The spectra have been recorded at BL-8 dispersive extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) beamline at the 2.5 GeV INDUS- 2 synchrotron, RRCAT, Indore, India. The data obtained has been processed using the data analysis program Athena. The energy of the K-absorption edge, chemical shift, edge-width and shift of the principal absorption maximum in the complexes have been determined and discussed. The values of these parameters have been found to be approximately the same in both the complexes indicating that the two complexes possess similar chemical environment around the copper metal atom. The chemical shift has been utilized to estimate effective nuclear charge on the absorbing atom. The normalized EXAFS spectra have been Fourier transformed. The position of the first peak in the Fourier transform gives the value of first shell bond length, which is shorter than the actual bond length because of energy dependence of the phase factors in the sine function of the EXAFS equation. This distance is thus the phase- uncorrected bond length. Bond length has also been determined by Levy's, Lytle's and Lytle, Sayers and Stern's (LSS) methods. The results obtained from LSS and the Fourier transformation methods are comparable with each other, since both are phase uncorrected bond lengths.

  1. Prediction of apple internal quality using spectral absorption and scattering properties

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This paper reports on the measurement of the absorption and reduced scattering coefficients of apples via a new spatially-resolved hyperspectral imaging technique and their correlation with fruit firmness and soluble solids content (SSC). Spatially-resolved hyperspectral scattering profiles were acq...

  2. Thermal control design of the Lightning Mapper Sensor narrow-band spectral filter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flannery, Martin R.; Potter, John; Raab, Jeff R.; Manlief, Scott K.

    1992-01-01

    The performance of the Lightning Mapper Sensor is dependent on the temperature shifts of its narrowband spectral filter. To perform over a 10 degree FOV with an 0.8 nm bandwidth, the filter must be 15 cm in diameter and mounted externally to the telescope optics. The filter thermal control required a filter design optimized for minimum bandpass shift with temperature, a thermal analysis of substrate materials for maximum temperature uniformity, and a thermal radiation analysis to determine the parameter sensitivity of the radiation shield for the filter, the filter thermal recovery time after occultation, and heater power to maintain filter performance in the earth-staring geosynchronous environment.

  3. Detection of Solar Rotational Variability in the Large Yield RAdiometer (LYRA) 190 - 222 nm Spectral Band

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shapiro, A. V.; Shapiro, A. I.; Dominique, M.; Dammasch, I. E.; Wehrli, C.; Rozanov, E.; Schmutz, W.

    2013-08-01

    We analyze the variability of the spectral solar irradiance during the period from 7 January 2010 until 20 January 2010 as measured by the Herzberg channel (190 - 222 nm) of the Large Yield RAdiometer (LYRA) onboard PROBA2. In this period of time, observations by the LYRA nominal unit experienced degradation and the signal produced by the Herzberg channel frequently jumped from one level to another. Both factors significantly complicate the analysis. We present the algorithm that allowed us to extract the solar variability from the LYRA data and compare the results with SORCE/SOLSTICE measurements and with modeling based on the Code for the Solar Irradiance (COSI).

  4. Fluorinated graphene oxide for enhanced S and X-band microwave absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sudeep, P. M.; Vinayasree, S.; Mohanan, P.; Ajayan, P. M.; Narayanan, T. N.; Anantharaman, M. R.

    2015-06-01

    Here we report the microwave absorbing properties of three graphene derivatives, namely, graphene oxide (GO), fluorinated GO (FGO, containing 5.6 at. % Fluorine (F)), and highly FGO (HFGO, containing 23 at. % F). FGO is known to be exhibiting improved electrochemical and electronic properties when compared to GO. Fluorination modifies the dielectric properties of GO and hence thought of as a good microwave absorber. The dielectric permittivities of GO, FGO, and HFGO were estimated in the S (2 GHz to 4 GHz) and X (8 GHz to 12 GHz) bands by employing cavity perturbation technique. For this, suspensions containing GO/FGO/HFGO were made in N-Methyl Pyrrolidone (NMP) and were subjected to cavity perturbation. The reflection loss was then estimated and it was found that -37 dB (at 3.2 GHz with 6.5 mm thickness) and -31 dB (at 2.8 GHz with 6 mm thickness) in the S band and a reflection loss of -18 dB (at 8.4 GHz with 2.5 mm thickness) and -10 dB (at 11 GHz with 2 mm thickness) in the X band were achieved for 0.01 wt. % of FGO and HFGO in NMP, respectively, suggesting that these materials can serve as efficient microwave absorbers even at low concentrations.

  5. SPECTRAL POLARIZATION OF THE REDSHIFTED 21 cm ABSORPTION LINE TOWARD 3C 286

    SciTech Connect

    Wolfe, Arthur M.; Jorgenson, Regina A.; Robishaw, Timothy; Heiles, Carl; Xavier Prochaska, J. E-mail: raj@ast.cam.ac.uk E-mail: heiles@astro.berkeley.edu

    2011-05-20

    A reanalysis of the Stokes-parameter spectra obtained of the z = 0.692 21 cm absorption line toward 3C 286 shows that our original claimed detection of Zeeman splitting by a line-of-sight magnetic field, B{sub los} = 87 {mu}G, is incorrect. Because of an insidious software error, what we reported as Stokes V is actually Stokes U: the revised Stokes V spectrum indicates a 3{sigma} upper limit of B{sub los}< 17 {mu}G. The correct analysis reveals an absorption feature in fractional polarization that is offset in velocity from the Stokes I spectrum by -1.9 km s{sup -1}. The polarization position-angle spectrum shows a dip that is also significantly offset from the Stokes I feature, but at a velocity that differs slightly from the absorption feature in fractional polarization. We model the absorption feature with three velocity components against the core-jet structure of 3C 286. Our {chi}{sup 2} minimization fitting results in components with differing (1) ratios of H I column density to spin temperature, (2) velocity centroids, and (3) velocity dispersions. The change in polarization position angle with frequency implies incomplete coverage of the background jet source by the absorber. It also implies a spatial variation of the polarization position angle across the jet source, which is observed at frequencies higher than the 839.4 MHz absorption frequency. The multi-component structure of the gas is best understood in terms of components with spatial scales of {approx}100 pc comprised of hundreds of low-temperature (T {<=} 200 K) clouds with linear dimensions of <<100 pc. We conclude that previous attempts to model the foreground gas with a single uniform cloud are incorrect.

  6. Spectroscopic determination of leaf biochemistry using band-depth analysis of absorption features and stepwise multiple linear regression

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kokaly, R.F.; Clark, R.N.

    1999-01-01

    We develop a new method for estimating the biochemistry of plant material using spectroscopy. Normalized band depths calculated from the continuum-removed reflectance spectra of dried and ground leaves were used to estimate their concentrations of nitrogen, lignin, and cellulose. Stepwise multiple linear regression was used to select wavelengths in the broad absorption features centered at 1.73 ??m, 2.10 ??m, and 2.30 ??m that were highly correlated with the chemistry of samples from eastern U.S. forests. Band depths of absorption features at these wavelengths were found to also be highly correlated with the chemistry of four other sites. A subset of data from the eastern U.S. forest sites was used to derive linear equations that were applied to the remaining data to successfully estimate their nitrogen, lignin, and cellulose concentrations. Correlations were highest for nitrogen (R2 from 0.75 to 0.94). The consistent results indicate the possibility of establishing a single equation capable of estimating the chemical concentrations in a wide variety of species from the reflectance spectra of dried leaves. The extension of this method to remote sensing was investigated. The effects of leaf water content, sensor signal-to-noise and bandpass, atmospheric effects, and background soil exposure were examined. Leaf water was found to be the greatest challenge to extending this empirical method to the analysis of fresh whole leaves and complete vegetation canopies. The influence of leaf water on reflectance spectra must be removed to within 10%. Other effects were reduced by continuum removal and normalization of band depths. If the effects of leaf water can be compensated for, it might be possible to extend this method to remote sensing data acquired by imaging spectrometers to give estimates of nitrogen, lignin, and cellulose concentrations over large areas for use in ecosystem studies.We develop a new method for estimating the biochemistry of plant material using

  7. Infrared, visible and ultraviolet absorptions of transition metal doped ZnS crystals with spin-polarized bands

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, J.H.; Ding, J.W.; Cao, J.X.; Zhang, Y.L.

    2011-03-15

    The formation energies, electronic structures and optical properties of TM:ZnS systems (TM=Cr{sup 2+}, Mn{sup 2+}, Fe{sup 2+}, Co{sup 2+} and Ni{sup 2+}) are investigated by using the first principles method. It is found that the wurtzite and zinc-blende structures have about the same stability, and thus can coexist in the TM:ZnS system. From the wurtzite TM:ZnS, especially, a partially filled intermediate band (IB) is obtained at TM=Cr{sup 2+}, Ni{sup 2+} and Fe{sup 2+}, while it is absent at TM=Mn{sup 2+} and Co{sup 2+}. The additional absorptions are obtained in infrared, visible and ultraviolet (UV) regions, due to the completely spin-polarized IB at Fermi level. The results are very helpful for both the designs and applications of TM:ZnS opto-electronics devices, such as solar-cell prototype. -- Graphical abstract: Absorption coefficients of w-TM{sub x}Zn{sub 1-x}S crystals (TM=Cr{sup 2+}, Mn{sup 2+}, Fe{sup 2+}, Co{sup 2+} and Ni{sup 2+}) at x=0.028. The results may be helpful for the design and applications of TM:ZnS devices, especially for the new high efficiency solar-cell prototype, UV detector and UV LEDs. Display Omitted Research highlights: > It is found that the wurtzite and zinc-blende structures can coexist in TM:ZnS. > An intermediate band is obtained in TM:ZnS at TM=Cr{sup 2+}, Ni{sup 2+} and Fe{sup 2+}. > The absorption coefficients are obtained in infrared, visible and ultraviolet regions.

  8. On the sub-band gap optical absorption in heat treated cadmium sulphide thin film deposited on glass by chemical bath deposition technique

    SciTech Connect

    Chattopadhyay, P.; Karim, B.; Guha Roy, S.

    2013-12-28

    The sub-band gap optical absorption in chemical bath deposited cadmium sulphide thin films annealed at different temperatures has been critically analyzed with special reference to Urbach relation. It has been found that the absorption co-efficient of the material in the sub-band gap region is nearly constant up to a certain critical value of the photon energy. However, as the photon energy exceeds the critical value, the absorption coefficient increases exponentially indicating the dominance of Urbach rule. The absorption coefficients in the constant absorption region and the Urbach region have been found to be sensitive to annealing temperature. A critical examination of the temperature dependence of the absorption coefficient indicates two different kinds of optical transitions to be operative in the sub-band gap region. After a careful analyses of SEM images, energy dispersive x-ray spectra, and the dc current-voltage characteristics, we conclude that the absorption spectra in the sub-band gap domain is possibly associated with optical transition processes involving deep levels and the grain boundary states of the material.

  9. Spectral turning bands for efficient Gaussian random fields generation on GPUs and accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunger, L.; Cosenza, B.; Kimeswenger, S.; Fahringer, T.

    2015-11-01

    A random field (RF) is a set of correlated random variables associated with different spatial locations. RF generation algorithms are of crucial importance for many scientific areas, such as astrophysics, geostatistics, computer graphics, and many others. Current approaches commonly make use of 3D fast Fourier transform (FFT), which does not scale well for RF bigger than the available memory; they are also limited to regular rectilinear meshes. We introduce random field generation with the turning band method (RAFT), an RF generation algorithm based on the turning band method that is optimized for massively parallel hardware such as GPUs and accelerators. Our algorithm replaces the 3D FFT with a lower-order, one-dimensional FFT followed by a projection step and is further optimized with loop unrolling and blocking. RAFT can easily generate RF on non-regular (non-uniform) meshes and efficiently produce fields with mesh sizes bigger than the available device memory by using a streaming, out-of-core approach. Our algorithm generates RF with the correct statistical behavior and is tested on a variety of modern hardware, such as NVIDIA Tesla, AMD FirePro and Intel Phi. RAFT is faster than the traditional methods on regular meshes and has been successfully applied to two real case scenarios: planetary nebulae and cosmological simulations.

  10. Random fields generation on the GPU with the spectral turning bands method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunger, L.; Cosenza, B.; Kimeswenger, S.; Fahringer, T.

    2014-08-01

    Random field (RF) generation algorithms are of paramount importance for many scientific domains, such as astrophysics, geostatistics, computer graphics and many others. Some examples are the generation of initial conditions for cosmological simulations or hydrodynamical turbulence driving. In the latter a new random field is needed every time-step. Current approaches commonly make use of 3D FFT (Fast Fourier Transform) and require the whole generated field to be stored in memory. Moreover, they are limited to regular rectilinear meshes and need an extra processing step to support non-regular meshes. In this paper, we introduce TBARF (Turning BAnd Random Fields), a RF generation algorithm based on the turning band method that is optimized for massively parallel hardware such as GPUs. Our algorithm replaces the 3D FFT with a lower order, one-dimensional FFT followed by a projection step, and is further optimized with loop unrolling and blocking. We show that TBARF can easily generate RF on non-regular (non uniform) meshes and can afford mesh sizes bigger than the available GPU memory by using a streaming, out-of-core approach. TBARF is 2 to 5 times faster than the traditional methods when generating RFs with more than 16M cells. It can also generate RF on non-regular meshes, and has been successfully applied to two real case scenarios: planetary nebulae and cosmological simulations.

  11. Fluorinated graphene oxide for enhanced S and X-band microwave absorption

    SciTech Connect

    Sudeep, P. M.; Vinayasree, S.; Mohanan, P.; Ajayan, P. M.; Narayanan, T. N.; Anantharaman, M. R.

    2015-06-01

    Here we report the microwave absorbing properties of three graphene derivatives, namely, graphene oxide (GO), fluorinated GO (FGO, containing 5.6 at. % Fluorine (F)), and highly FGO (HFGO, containing 23 at. % F). FGO is known to be exhibiting improved electrochemical and electronic properties when compared to GO. Fluorination modifies the dielectric properties of GO and hence thought of as a good microwave absorber. The dielectric permittivities of GO, FGO, and HFGO were estimated in the S (2 GHz to 4 GHz) and X (8 GHz to 12 GHz) bands by employing cavity perturbation technique. For this, suspensions containing GO/FGO/HFGO were made in N-Methyl Pyrrolidone (NMP) and were subjected to cavity perturbation. The reflection loss was then estimated and it was found that −37 dB (at 3.2 GHz with 6.5 mm thickness) and −31 dB (at 2.8 GHz with 6 mm thickness) in the S band and a reflection loss of −18 dB (at 8.4 GHz with 2.5 mm thickness) and −10 dB (at 11 GHz with 2 mm thickness) in the X band were achieved for 0.01 wt. % of FGO and HFGO in NMP, respectively, suggesting that these materials can serve as efficient microwave absorbers even at low concentrations.

  12. Iron-absorption band analysis for the discrimination of iron-rich zones

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rowan, L. C. (Principal Investigator)

    1973-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. Study has concentrated on the two primary aspects of the project, structural analysis through evaluation of lineaments and circular features and spectral analyses through digital computer-processing techniques. Several previously unrecognized lineaments are mapped which may be the surface manifestations of major fault or fracture zones. Two of these, the Walker Lane and the Midas Trench lineament system, transect the predominantly NNE-NNW-trending moutain ranges for more than 500 km. Correlation of major lineaments with productive mining districts implies a genetic relationship, the 50 circular or elliptical features delineated suggest a related role for Tertiary volcanism. Color-ratio composites have been used to identify limonitic zones and to discriminate mafic and felsic rock by combing diazo color transparencies of three different ratios. EROS Data Center scene identification number for color composite in this report is ER 1 CC 500. Refinement of enhancement procedures for the ratio images is progressing. Fieldwork in coordination with both spectral and structural analyses is underway.

  13. Orthogonal spectra and cross sections: Application to optimization of multi-spectral absorption and fluorescence lidar

    SciTech Connect

    Shokair, I.R.

    1997-09-01

    This report addresses the problem of selection of lidar parameters, namely wavelengths for absorption lidar and excitation fluorescence pairs for fluorescence lidar, for optimal detection of species. Orthogonal spectra and cross sections are used as mathematical representations which provide a quantitative measure of species distinguishability in mixtures. Using these quantities, a simple expression for the absolute error in calculated species concentration is derived and optimization is accomplished by variation of lidar parameters to minimize this error. It is shown that the optimum number of wavelengths for detection of a species using absorption lidar (excitation fluorescence pairs for fluorescence lidar) is the same as the number of species in the mixture. Each species present in the mixture has its own set of optimum wavelengths. There is usually some overlap in these sets. The optimization method is applied to two examples, one using absorption and the other using fluorescence lidar, for analyzing mixtures of four organic compounds. The effect of atmospheric attenuation is included in the optimization process. Although the number of optimum wavelengths might be small, it is essential to do large numbers of measurements at these wavelengths in order to maximize canceling of statistical errors.

  14. AN INTERFEROMETRIC SPECTRAL-LINE SURVEY OF IRC+10216 IN THE 345 GHz BAND

    SciTech Connect

    Patel, Nimesh A.; Young, Ken H.; Gottlieb, Carl A.; Thaddeus, Patrick; Wilson, Robert W.; Reid, Mark J.; McCarthy, Michael C.; Keto, Eric; Menten, Karl M.; Cernicharo, Jose; He Jinhua; Bruenken, Sandra; Trung, Dinh-V.

    2011-03-15

    We report a spectral-line survey of the extreme carbon star IRC+10216 carried out between 293.9 and 354.8 GHz with the Submillimeter Array. A total of 442 lines were detected, more than 200 for the first time; 149 are unassigned. Maps at an angular resolution of {approx}3'' were obtained for each line. A substantial new population of narrow lines with an expansion velocity of {approx}4 km s{sup -1} (i.e., {approx}30% of the terminal velocity) was detected. Most of these are attributed to rotational transitions within vibrationally excited states, emitted from energy levels above the v = 0, J = 0 ground state with excitation energy of 1000-3000 K. Emission from these lines appears to be centered on the star with an angular extent of <1''. We use multiple transitions detected in several molecules to derive physical conditions in this inner envelope of IRC+10216.

  15. Cloud top height retrieval using the imaging polarimeter (3MI) top-of-atmosphere reflectance measurements in the oxygen absorption band

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kokhanovsky, Alexander; Munro, Rose

    2016-04-01

    The determination of cloud top height from a satellite has a number of applications both for climate studies and aviation safety. A great variety of methods are applied using both active and passive observation systems in the optical and microwave spectral regions. One of the most popular methods with good spatial coverage is based on the measurement of outgoing radiation in the spectral range where oxygen strongly absorbs incoming solar light. Clouds shield tropospheric oxygen reducing the depth of the corresponding absorption line as detected by a satellite instrument. Radiative transfer models are used to connect the solar light reflectance, e.g., in the oxygen A-band located around 761nm, and the cloud top height. The inverse problem is then solved e.g. using look-up tables, to determine the cloud top height. In this paper we propose a new fast and robust oxygen A-band method for the retrieval of cloud altitude using the Multi-viewing Multi-channel Multi-polarization Imaging instrument (3MI) on board the EUMETSAT Polar System Second Generation (EPS-SG). The 3MI measures the intensity at the wavelengths of 410, 443, 490, 555, 670, 763, 765, 865, 910, 1370, 1650, and 2130nm, and (for selected channels) the second and third Stokes vector components which allows the degree of linear polarization and the polarization orientation angle of reflected solar light to be derived at up to 14 observation angles. The instrument response function (to a first approximation) can be modelled by a Gaussian distribution with the full width at half maximum (FWHM) equal to 20nm for all channels except 765nm, 865nm, 1370nm, 1650nm, and 2130nm, where it is equal to 40nm. The FWHM at 763nm (the oxygen A-band location) is equal to 10nm. The following 3MI channels are used in the retrieval procedure: 670, 763, and 865nm. The channels at 670 and 865 nm are not affected by the oxygen absorption. The channel at 763nm is affected by the oxygen concentration vertical profile. The higher

  16. Multilayer Cloud Detection with the MODIS Near-Infrared Water Vapor Absorption Band

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wind, Galina; Platnick, Steven; King, Michael D.; Hubanks, Paul A,; Pavolonis, Michael J.; Heidinger, Andrew K.; Yang, Ping; Baum, Bryan A.

    2009-01-01

    Data Collection 5 processing for the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) onboard the NASA Earth Observing System EOS Terra and Aqua spacecraft includes an algorithm for detecting multilayered clouds in daytime. The main objective of this algorithm is to detect multilayered cloud scenes, specifically optically thin ice cloud overlying a lower-level water cloud, that presents difficulties for retrieving cloud effective radius using single layer plane-parallel cloud models. The algorithm uses the MODIS 0.94 micron water vapor band along with CO2 bands to obtain two above-cloud precipitable water retrievals, the difference of which, in conjunction with additional tests, provides a map of where multilayered clouds might potentially exist. The presence of a multilayered cloud results in a large difference in retrievals of above-cloud properties between the CO2 and the 0.94 micron methods. In this paper the MODIS multilayered cloud algorithm is described, results of using the algorithm over example scenes are shown, and global statistics for multilayered clouds as observed by MODIS are discussed. A theoretical study of the algorithm behavior for simulated multilayered clouds is also given. Results are compared to two other comparable passive imager methods. A set of standard cloudy atmospheric profiles developed during the course of this investigation is also presented. The results lead to the conclusion that the MODIS multilayer cloud detection algorithm has some skill in identifying multilayered clouds with different thermodynamic phases

  17. Cooling the Martian atmosphere: The spectral overlap of the C02 15 micrometers band and dust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindner, Bernhard Lee

    1994-01-01

    Careful consideration must be given to the simultaneous treatment of the radiative transfer of the CO2 15 micron band and dust calculations for the Martian winter polar region show that a simple sum of separately calculated CO2 cooling rates and dust cooling rates can easily result a 30 percent error in the net cooling particularly near the surface. CO2 and dust hinder each others ability to cool the atmosphere. Even during periods of low dust opacity, dust still reduces the efficacy of CO2 at cooling the atmosphere. At the other extreme, when dust storms occur, CO2 still significantly impedes the ability of dust to cool the atmosphere. Hence, both CO2 and dust must be considered in radiative transfer models.

  18. Spectral line shapes of self-broadened P-branch transitions of oxygen B band

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wójtewicz, S.; Cygan, A.; Masłowski, P.; Domysławska, J.; Lisak, D.; Trawiński, R. S.; Ciuryło, R.

    2014-09-01

    We used the Pound-Drever-Hall-locked frequency-stabilized cavity ring-down spectrometer assisted by the optical frequency comb for systematic line-shape study of self-broadened P-branch transitions of the O216B band [b1Σg+(v=1)←X3Σg-(v=0)]. In the line-shape analysis we take into account the line-narrowing effects described by Dicke narrowing or the speed dependence of collisional broadening. The relation between the parameters describing Dicke narrowing with the use of the soft- and hard-collision models is discussed and verified experimentally in the low pressure regime using the multispectrum fitting technique. We report line positions with uncertainties of about 170 kHz, the collisional broadening coefficients with 0.45% uncertainties, and line intensities with 0.5% uncertainties. We compare these results to data available in the literature.

  19. Spectral line shapes and frequencies of the molecular oxygen B-band R-branch transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domysławska, Jolanta; Wójtewicz, Szymon; Masłowski, Piotr; Cygan, Agata; Bielska, Katarzyna; Trawiński, Ryszard S.; Ciuryło, Roman; Lisak, Daniel

    2015-04-01

    We present the line-shape parameters for the first 11 lines of the oxygen B-band R-branch self-broadened transitions measured at low pressures by the Pound-Drever-Hall-locked frequency-stabilized cavity ring-down spectrometer (PDH-locked FS-CRDS) linked to the optical frequency comb. The collisional self-broadening, shifting and narrowing parameters were determined together with the quadratic speed-dependence as well as phase- and velocity-changing correlations parameters. The absolute frequencies of the transitions with combined standard uncertainties below 150 kHz are reported. Dependence of line parameters on choice of the line-shape model is discussed.

  20. The development of a power spectral density processor for C and L band airborne radar scatterometer sensor systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harrison, D. A., III; Chladek, J. T.

    1983-01-01

    A real-time signal processor was developed for the NASA/JSC L-and C-band airborne radar scatterometer sensor systems. The purpose of the effort was to reduce ground data processing costs. Conversion of two quadrature channels of data (like and cross polarized) was made to obtain Power Spectral Density (PSD) values. A chirp-z transform (CZT) approach was used to filter the Doppler return signal and improved high frequency and angular resolution was realized. The processors have been tested with record signals and excellent results were obtained. CZT filtering can be readily applied to scatterometers operating at other wavelengths by altering the sample frequency. The design of the hardware and software and the results of the performance tests are described in detail.

  1. Spectral line-shapes of oxygen B-band transitions measured with cavity ring-down spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wójtewicz, S.; Cygan, A.; Masłowski, P.; Domysławska, J.; Wcisło, P.; Zaborowski, M.; Lisak, D.; Trawiński, R. S.; Ciuryło, R.

    2014-11-01

    Results of line-shape measurements of self- and N2-broadened P9 P9 transition of the oxygen B band are presented. Spectra were acquired using the optical frequency comb- assisted Pound-Drever-Hall-locked frequency-stabilized cavity ring-down spectrometer (PDH- locked FS-CRDS). In the line-shape analysis the line narrowing described by Dicke narrowing or/and the speed dependence of collisional broadening were taken into account. The multispectrum fitting technique was used to minimize numerical correlations between line-shape parameters. Collisional broadening and shifting coefficients are reported with sub-percent uncertainties. Influence of the spectral line-shape model used in data analysis on determined line intensities and collisional broadening is discussed.

  2. Ion-absorption band analysis for the discrimination of iron-rich zones. [Nevada

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rowan, L. C. (Principal Investigator); Wetlaufer, P. H.

    1974-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. A technique which combines digital computer processing and color composition was devised for detecting hydrothermally altered areas and for discriminating among many rock types in an area in south-central Nevada. Subtle spectral reflectance differences among the rock types are enhanced by ratioing and contrast-stretching MSS radiance values for form ratio images which subsequently are displayed in color-ratio composites. Landform analysis of Nevada shows that linear features compiled without respect to length results in approximately 25 percent coincidence with mapped faults. About 80 percent of the major lineaments coincides with mapped faults, and substantial extension of locally mapped faults is commonly indicated. Seven major lineament systems appear to be old zones of crustal weakness which have provided preferred conduits for rising magma through periodic reactivation.

  3. Transient magneto-photoinduced absorption study of singlet fission in low band gap copolymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huynh, Uyen; Vardeny, Z. Valy

    2015-03-01

    We have observed the existence of singlet fission in thin films of low band gap (LBG) copolymers, PDTP-DFBT and PTB7, using the ultrafast optical pump/probe spectroscopy, probed at the energy range from IR to MIR. The singlet fission is the dissociation of a singlet exciton into two triplets through an intermediate triplet pair state (TT pair) in an overall singlet configuration; in the studied copolymers, it was observed to be very fast, in femtosecond time domain. The intermediate TT state, which dissociates into two separated triplets at later time, or recombines to the ground state appears instantaneously with the singlet exciton formation using our laser system that has ~ 150 fs time resolution. The interplay between the rate of singlet fission into sTT pairs, triplet fusion back to singlet excitons and relaxation between the TT spin sublevels explains the obtained opposite pattern of the transient magnetic field response on the dynamics of singlet excitons and TT pairs.

  4. Electron paramagnetic resonance, optical absorption and Raman spectral studies on a pyrite/chalcopyrite mineral

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Udayabhaskar Reddy, G.; Seshamaheswaramma, K.; Nakamura, Yoshinobu; Lakshmi Reddy, S.; Frost, Ray L.; Endo, Tamio

    2012-10-01

    Pyrite and chalcopyrite mineral samples from Mangampet barite mine, Kadapa, Andhra Pradesh, India are used in the present study. XRD data indicate that the pyrite mineral has a face centered cubic lattice structure with lattice constant 5.4179 Å. Also it possesses an average particle size of 91.9 nm. An EPR study on the powdered samples confirms the presence of iron in pyrite and iron and Mn(II) in chalcopyrite. The optical absorption spectrum of chalcopyrite indicates presence of copper which is in a distorted octahedral environment. NIR results confirm the presence of water fundamentals and Raman spectrum reveals the presence of water and sulfate ions.

  5. Detection of small surface vessels in near, medium, and far infrared spectral bands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dulski, R.; Milewski, S.; Kastek, M.; Trzaskawka, P.; Szustakowski, M.; Ciurapinski, W.; Zyczkowski, M.

    2011-11-01

    Protection of naval bases and harbors requires close co-operation between security and access control systems covering land areas and those monitoring sea approach routes. The typical location of naval bases and harbors - usually next to a large city - makes it difficult to detect and identify a threat in the dense regular traffic of various sea vessels (i.e. merchant ships, fishing boats, tourist ships). Due to the properties of vessel control systems, such as AIS (Automatic Identification System), and the effectiveness of radar and optoelectronic systems against different targets it seems that fast motor boats called RIB (Rigid Inflatable Boat) could be the most serious threat to ships and harbor infrastructure. In the paper the process and conditions for the detection and identification of high-speed boats in the areas of ports and naval bases in the near, medium and far infrared is presented. Based on the results of measurements and recorded thermal images the actual temperature contrast delta T (RIB / sea) will be determined, which will further allow to specify the theoretical ranges of detection and identification of the RIB-type targets for an operating security system. The data will also help to determine the possible advantages of image fusion where the component images are taken in different spectral ranges. This will increase the probability of identifying the object by the multi-sensor security system equipped additionally with the appropriate algorithms for detecting, tracking and performing the fusion of images from the visible and infrared cameras.

  6. Comparative Analysis of Alternative Spectral Bands of CO2 and O2 for the Sensing of CO2 Mixing Ratios

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pliutau, Denis; Prasad, Narasimha S.

    2013-01-01

    We performed comparative studies to establish favorable spectral regions and measurement wavelength combinations in alternative bands of CO2 and O2, for the sensing of CO2 mixing ratios (XCO2) in missions such as ASCENDS. The analysis employed several simulation approaches including separate layers calculations based on pre-analyzed atmospheric data from the modern-era retrospective analysis for research and applications (MERRA), and the line-byline radiative transfer model (LBLRTM) to obtain achievable accuracy estimates as a function of altitude and for the total path over an annual span of variations in atmospheric parameters. Separate layer error estimates also allowed investigation of the uncertainties in the weighting functions at varying altitudes and atmospheric conditions. The parameters influencing the measurement accuracy were analyzed independently and included temperature sensitivity, water vapor interferences, selection of favorable weighting functions, excitations wavelength stabilities and other factors. The results were used to identify favorable spectral regions and combinations of on / off line wavelengths leading to reductions in interferences and the improved total accuracy.

  7. Spectrally resolved intraband transitions on two-step photon absorption in InGaAs/GaAs quantum dot solar cell

    SciTech Connect

    Tamaki, Ryo Shoji, Yasushi; Okada, Yoshitaka; Miyano, Kenjiro

    2014-08-18

    Two-step photon absorption processes in a self-organized In{sub 0.4}Ga{sub 0.6}As/GaAs quantum dot (QD) solar cell have been investigated by monitoring the mid-infrared (IR) photoinduced modulation of the external quantum efficiency (ΔEQE) at low temperature. The first step interband and the second step intraband transitions were both spectrally resolved by scanning photon energies of visible to near-IR CW light and mid-IR pulse lasers, respectively. A peak centered at 0.20 eV corresponding to the transition to virtual bound states and a band above 0.42 eV probably due to photoexcitation to GaAs continuum states were observed in ΔEQE spectra, when the interband transition was above 1.4 eV, directly exciting wetting layers or GaAs spacer layers. On the other hand, resonant excitation of the ground state of QDs at 1.35 eV resulted in a reduction of EQE. The sign of ΔEQE below 1.40 eV changed from negative to positive by increasing the excitation intensity of the interband transition. We ascribe this to the filling of higher energy trap states.

  8. Preparation of Ni-B Coating on Carbonyl Iron and Its Microwave Absorption Properties in the X Band

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Rong; Zhou, Wan-Cheng; Qing, Yu-Chang

    2014-09-01

    Ni-B coated carbonyl iron particles (CI@Ni-B) are prepared by the electroless plating technique. The structure, morphology, and antioxidant properties of the CI@Ni-B particles are analyzed. The results demonstrate that the CI particles have been coated with intact spherical-shell Ni-B coating, indicating the core-shell structure of CI@Ni-B particles, and the Ni-B coating can prevent the further oxidation of the CI particles. Compared with the raw CI particles/paraffin coatings with the same coating thickness of 2.0 mm and particles content of 70%, the CI@Ni-B particles/paraffin coatings possess higher microwave absorption (the RL exceeding -10 dB is obtained in the whole X band (8.2-12.4 GHz) with minimal RL of -35.0 dB at 9.2 GHz).

  9. Wide-Band Spatially Tunable Photonic Bandgap in Visible Spectral Range and Laser based on a Polymer Stabilized Blue Phase.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jia-De; Wang, Tsai-Yen; Mo, Ting-Shan; Huang, Shuan-Yu; Lee, Chia-Rong

    2016-01-01

    This work successfully develops a largely-gradient-pitched polymer-stabilized blue phase (PSBP) photonic bandgap (PBG) device with a wide-band spatial tunability in nearly entire visible region within a wide blue phase (BP) temperature range including room temperature. The device is fabricated based on the reverse diffusion of two injected BP-monomer mixtures with a low and a high chiral concentrations and afterwards through UV-curing. This gradient-pitched PSBP can show a rainbow-like reflection appearance in which the peak wavelength of the PBG can be spatially tuned from the blue to the red regions at room temperature. The total tuning spectral range for the cell is as broad as 165 nm and covers almost the entire visible region. Based on the gradient-pitched PSBP, a spatially tunable laser is also demonstrated in this work. The temperature sensitivity of the lasing wavelength for the laser is negatively linear and approximately -0.26 nm/°C. The two devices have a great potential for use in applications of photonic devices and displays because of their multiple advantages, such as wide-band tunability, wide operated temperature range, high stability and reliability, no issue of hysteresis, no need of external controlling sources, and not slow tuning speed (mechanically). PMID:27456475

  10. Wide-Band Spatially Tunable Photonic Bandgap in Visible Spectral Range and Laser based on a Polymer Stabilized Blue Phase

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Jia-De; Wang, Tsai-Yen; Mo, Ting-Shan; Huang, Shuan-Yu; Lee, Chia-Rong

    2016-01-01

    This work successfully develops a largely-gradient-pitched polymer-stabilized blue phase (PSBP) photonic bandgap (PBG) device with a wide-band spatial tunability in nearly entire visible region within a wide blue phase (BP) temperature range including room temperature. The device is fabricated based on the reverse diffusion of two injected BP-monomer mixtures with a low and a high chiral concentrations and afterwards through UV-curing. This gradient-pitched PSBP can show a rainbow-like reflection appearance in which the peak wavelength of the PBG can be spatially tuned from the blue to the red regions at room temperature. The total tuning spectral range for the cell is as broad as 165 nm and covers almost the entire visible region. Based on the gradient-pitched PSBP, a spatially tunable laser is also demonstrated in this work. The temperature sensitivity of the lasing wavelength for the laser is negatively linear and approximately −0.26 nm/°C. The two devices have a great potential for use in applications of photonic devices and displays because of their multiple advantages, such as wide-band tunability, wide operated temperature range, high stability and reliability, no issue of hysteresis, no need of external controlling sources, and not slow tuning speed (mechanically). PMID:27456475

  11. Wide-Band Spatially Tunable Photonic Bandgap in Visible Spectral Range and Laser based on a Polymer Stabilized Blue Phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Jia-De; Wang, Tsai-Yen; Mo, Ting-Shan; Huang, Shuan-Yu; Lee, Chia-Rong

    2016-07-01

    This work successfully develops a largely-gradient-pitched polymer-stabilized blue phase (PSBP) photonic bandgap (PBG) device with a wide-band spatial tunability in nearly entire visible region within a wide blue phase (BP) temperature range including room temperature. The device is fabricated based on the reverse diffusion of two injected BP-monomer mixtures with a low and a high chiral concentrations and afterwards through UV-curing. This gradient-pitched PSBP can show a rainbow-like reflection appearance in which the peak wavelength of the PBG can be spatially tuned from the blue to the red regions at room temperature. The total tuning spectral range for the cell is as broad as 165 nm and covers almost the entire visible region. Based on the gradient-pitched PSBP, a spatially tunable laser is also demonstrated in this work. The temperature sensitivity of the lasing wavelength for the laser is negatively linear and approximately ‑0.26 nm/°C. The two devices have a great potential for use in applications of photonic devices and displays because of their multiple advantages, such as wide-band tunability, wide operated temperature range, high stability and reliability, no issue of hysteresis, no need of external controlling sources, and not slow tuning speed (mechanically).

  12. Efficient tissue ablation using a laser tunable in the water absorption band at 3 microns with little collateral damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nierlich, Alexandra; Chuchumishev, Danail; Nagel, Elizabeth; Marinova, Kristiana; Philipov, Stanislav; Fiebig, Torsten; Buchvarov, Ivan; Richter, Claus-Peter

    2014-03-01

    Lasers can significantly advance medical diagnostics and treatment. At high power, they are typically used as cutting tools during surgery. For lasers that are used as knifes, radiation wavelengths in the far ultraviolet and in the near infrared spectral regions are favored because tissue has high contents of collagen and water. Collagen has an absorption peak around 190 nm, while water is in the near infrared around 3,000 nm. Changing the wavelength across the absorption peak will result in significant differences in laser tissue interactions. Tunable lasers in the infrared that could optimize the laser tissue interaction for ablation and/or coagulation are not available until now besides the Free Electron Laser (FEL). Here we demonstrate efficient tissue ablation using a table-top mid-IR laser tunable between 3,000 to 3,500 nm. A detailed study of the ablation has been conducted in different tissues. Little collateral thermal damage has been found at a distance above 10-20 microns from the ablated surface. Furthermore, little mechanical damage could be seen in conventional histology and by examination of birefringent activity of the samples using a pair of cross polarizing filters.

  13. Comprehensive survey of Pc4 and Pc5 band spectral content in Cluster magnetic field data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clausen, L. B. N.; Yeoman, T. K.

    2009-08-01

    In the first part of this study we present two case studies of pulsations that, with the help of ground-based data, are identified as field line resonances (FLRs). These pulsations occurred at frequencies which belong to a set of frequencies that has been suggested to be preferred in the terrestrial magnetosphere (CMS frequencies). We go on to show that for both events there is a significant signature at the same frequency in the time series of the compressional magnetic field observed by the conjugate Cluster satellites. We interpret these as signatures of the compressional mode driving the FLRs. In the second part we present a statistical study including one year's worth of Cluster magnetic field data. For each orbit between May 2004 and June 2005 we identified a three hour interval during which the satellites were located on closed magnetic field lines. We identified peaks in the spectrum between 1.0 and 15.0 mHz of the compressional, poloidal and toroidal components of the magnetic field. We use this database of spectral peaks observed on closed magnetic field lines to investigate whether peaks occur at a preferred set of frequencies which would be indicative for the Earth's magnetosphere behaving like a cavity/waveguide. We find no consistent preference for all CMS frequencies in our dataset, however we do find a preference for certain higher frequencies suggesting that higher harmonics of the cavity/waveguide are a persistent feature of the inner magnetosphere, and are detected by the Cluster spacecraft. This result could be explained by the polar orbit of the Cluster satellites.

  14. Infrared absorption band and vibronic structure of the nitrogen-vacancy center in diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kehayias, P.; Doherty, M. W.; English, D.; Fischer, R.; Jarmola, A.; Jensen, K.; Leefer, N.; Hemmer, P.; Manson, N. B.; Budker, D.

    2013-10-01

    Negatively charged nitrogen-vacancy (NV-) color centers in diamond have generated much interest for use in quantum technology. Despite the progress made in developing their applications, many questions about the basic properties of NV- centers remain unresolved. Understanding these properties can validate theoretical models of NV-, improve their use in applications, and support their development into competitive quantum devices. In particular, knowledge of the phonon modes of the 1A1 electronic state is key for understanding the optical pumping process. Using pump-probe spectroscopy, we measured the phonon sideband of the 1E→1A1 electronic transition in the NV- center. From this we calculated the 1E→1A1 one-phonon absorption spectrum and found it to differ from that of the 3E→3A2 transition, a result which is not anticipated by previous group-theoretical models of the NV- electronic states. We identified a high-energy 169-meV localized phonon mode of the 1A1 level.

  15. Spectral x-ray phase contrast imaging for single-shot retrieval of absorption, phase, and differential-phase imagery.

    PubMed

    Das, Mini; Liang, Zhihua

    2014-11-01

    In this Letter, we propose the first single-shot, noninterferometric x-ray imaging method for simultaneous retrieval of absorption, phase, and differential-phase imagery with quantitative accuracy. Our method utilizes a photon-counting spectral x-ray detector in conjunction with a simplified transport-of-intensity equation for coded-aperture phase-contrast imaging to efficiently solve the retrieval problem. This method can utilize an incoherent and polychromatic (clinical or laboratory) x-ray tube and can enable retrieval for a wide range and composition of material properties. The proposed method has been validated via computer simulations and is expected to significantly benefit applications that are sensitive to complexity of measurement, radiation dose and imaging time. PMID:25361350

  16. Intervalence-Band Absorption Saturation And Optically Induced Damage Of GaAs By Pulsed CO2 Laser Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James, R. B.; Christie, W. H.; Eby, R. E.; Darken, L. S.; Mills, B. E.

    1985-11-01

    The absorption of CO2, laser radiation in p-type GaAs is dominated by direct free-hole transitions between states in the heavy- and light-hole bands. For laser intensities on the order of 10 MW/cm2, the absorption associated with these transitions in moderately Zn-doped GaAs begins to saturate in a manner predicted by an inhomogeneously broadened two-level model. For heavily Zn-doped samples (>1018 cm -3), large areas of the surface are found to melt at comparable laser energy densities, in contrast to the lightly doped samples in which the damage initially occurs in small localized sites. As the energy density of the CO2 laser radiation is progressively increased, the surface topography of the samples shows signs of ripple patterns, high local stress, vaporization of material, and exfoliation of solid GaAs fragments. X-ray emission data taken on the laser-melted samples show that there is a loss of As, compared to Ga, from the surface during the high temperature cycling. Secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) measurements are used to study the diffusion of oxygen from the native oxide and the incorporation of trapped oxygen in the near-surface region of the GaAs samples that have been melted by a CO2 laser pulse. We find that oxygen trapping does occur, and that the amount and depth of the oxygen signal depends on the laser energy density and number of laser shots.

  17. Photodissociation of water in the first absorption band: A prototype for dissociation on a repulsive potential energy surface

    SciTech Connect

    Engel, V.; Staemmler, V.; Vander Wal, R.L.; Crim, F.F.

    1992-04-16

    The photodissociation of water in the first absorption band, H{sub 2}O(X) + {Dirac_h}{omega} {yields} H{sub 2}O(A{sup 1}B{sub 1}) {yields} H({sup 2}S) + OH({sup 2}II), is a prototype of fast and direct bond rupture in an excited electronic state. It has been investigated from several perspectives-absorption spectrum, final state distributions of the products, dissociation of vibrationally excited states, isotope effects, and emission spectroscopy. The availability of a calculated potential energy surface for the A state, including all three internal degrees of freedom, allows comparison of all experimental data with the results of rigorous quantum mechanical calculations without any fitting parameters or simplifying model assumptions. As the result of the confluence of ab initio electronic structure theory, dynamical theory, and experiment, water is probably the best studied and best understood polyatomic photodissociation system. In this article we review the joint experimental and theoretical advances which make water a unique system for studying molecular dynamics in excited electronic states. We focus our attention especially on the interrelation between the various perspectives and the correlation with the characteristic features of the upper-state potential energy surface. 80 refs., 14 figs.

  18. The role of volume scattering in reducing spectral contrast of reststrahlen bands in spectra of powdered minerals. [implication for remote sensing of earth, moon, Mars, and asteroids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salisbury, John W.; Wald, Andrew

    1992-01-01

    The first high-resolution quantitative directional hemispherical reflectance spectra of minerals were obtained for different particle sizes, and were used to develop an accurate prediction of the particles' spectral emissivity, using Kirchhoff's law (Nicodemus, 1965) and to interpret the nature and causes of changes in the spectral contrast of reststrahlen bands. It was found that the reststrahlen bands change in shape as well as intensity; this is explained by the occurrence of substantial volume scattering at fine particle sizes. The implication of this finding for remote sensing of the earth, moon, Mercury, Mars, and the asteroids is discussed.

  19. Ultrafast Time-Resolved Emission and Absorption Spectra of meso-Pyridyl Porphyrins upon Soret Band Excitation Studied by Fluorescence Up-Conversion and Transient Absorption Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Venkatesh, Yeduru; Venkatesan, M; Ramakrishna, B; Bangal, Prakriti Ranjan

    2016-09-01

    A comprehensive study of ultrafast molecular relaxation processes of isomeric meso-(pyridyl) porphyrins (TpyPs) has been carried out by using femtosecond time-resolved emission and absorption spectroscopic techniques upon pumping at 400 nm, Soret band (B band or S2), in 4:1 dichloromethane (DCM) and tetrahydrofuran (THF) solvent mixture. By combined studies of fluorescence up-conversion, time-correlated single photon counting, and transient absorption spectroscopic techniques, a complete model with different microscopic rate constants associated with elementary processes involved in electronic manifolds has been reported. Besides, a distinct coherent nuclear wave packet motion in Qy state is observed at low-frequency mode, ca. 26 cm(-1) region. Fluorescence up-conversion studies constitute ultrafast time-resolved emission spectra (TRES) over the whole emission range (430-710 nm) starting from S2 state to Qx state via Qy state. Careful analysis of time profiles of up-converted signals at different emission wavelengths helps to reveal detail molecular dynamics. The observed lifetimes are as indicated: A very fast decay component with 80 ± 20 fs observed at ∼435 nm is assigned to the lifetime of S2 (B) state, whereas being a rise component in the region of between 550 and 710 nm emission wavelength pertaining to Qy and Qx states, it is attributed to very fast internal conversion (IC) occurring from B → Qy and B → Qx as well. Two distinct components of Qy emission decay with ∼200-300 fs and ∼1-1.5 ps time constants are due to intramolecular vibrational redistribution (IVR) induced by solute-solvent inelastic collisions and vibrational redistribution induced by solute-solvent elastic collision, respectively. The weighted average of these two decay components is assigned as the characteristic lifetime of Qy, and it ranges between 0.3 and 0.5 ps. An additional ∼20 ± 2 ps rise component is observed in Qx emission, and it is assigned to the formation time of

  20. Visible-band (390-940nm) monitoring of the Pluto absorption spectrum during the New Horizons encounter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Robert J.; Marchant, Jonathan M.

    2015-11-01

    Whilst Earth-based observations obviously cannot compete with New Horizons’ on-board instrumentation in most regards, the New Horizons data set is essentially a snapshot of Pluto in July 2015. The New Horizons project team therefore coordinated a broad international observing campaign to provide temporal context and to take advantage of the once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to directly link our Earth-based view of Pluto with “ground truth” provided by in situ measurements. This both adds value to existing archival data sets and forms the basis of long term, monitoring as we watch Pluto recede from the Sun over the coming years. We present visible-band (390-940nm) monitoring of the Pluto absorption spectrum over the period July - October 2015 from the Liverpool Telescope (LT). In particular we wished to understand the well-known 6-day fluctuation in the methane ice absorption spectrum which is observable from Earth in relation to the never-before-available high resolution maps of the Pluto surface. The LT is a fully robotic 2.0m optical telescope that automatically and dynamically schedules observations across 30+ observing programmes with a broad instrument suite. It is ideal for both reactive response to dynamic events (such as the fly-by) and long term, stable monitoring with timing constraints individually optimised to the science requirements of each programme. For example past studies of the observed CH4 absorption variability have yielded ambiguity of whether they were caused by real physical changes or geometric observation constraints, in large part because of the uneven time sampling imposed by traditional telescope scheduling.

  1. Experimental and theoretical study of absorption spectrum of the (CH3)2CO···HF complex. Influence of anharmonic interactions on the frequency and intensity of the C=O and H-F stretching bands.

    PubMed

    Bulychev, V P; Svishcheva, E A; Tokhadze, K G

    2014-01-01

    IR absorption spectra of mixtures (CH3)2CO/HF and free (CH3)2CO molecules are recorded in the region of 4000-900 cm(-1) with a Bruker IFS-125 HR vacuum Fourier spectrometer at room temperature with a resolution up to 0.02 cm(-1). Spectral characteristics of the 2ν(C=O) overtone band of free acetone are reliably measured. The ν1(HF) and ν(C=O) absorption bands of the (CH3)2CO···HF complex are obtained by subtracting the absorption bands of free HF and acetone and absorption lines of atmospheric water from the experimental spectrum of mixtures. The experimental data are compared with theoretical results obtained from variational solutions of 1D-4D vibrational Schrödinger equations. The anharmonic potential energy and dipole moment surfaces used in the calculations were computed in the MP2/6-311++G(2d,2p) approximation with corrections for the basis set superposition error. Comparison of the data derived from solutions for different combinations of vibrational degrees of freedom shows that taking the inter-mode anharmonic interactions into account has different effects on the transition frequencies and intensities. Particular attention has been given to elucidation of the influence of anharmonic coupling of the H-F and C=O stretches with the low-frequency intermolecular modes on their frequencies and intensities and the strength of resonance between the fundamental H-F and the first overtone C=O transitions. PMID:24128921

  2. Spectral Moments of Collision-Induced Absorption of CO2 Pairs: The Role of the Intermolecular Potential

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gruszka, Marcin; Borysow, Aleksandra

    1994-01-01

    In this paper we examine the role of the anisotropy of the intermolecular potential in the rototranslational collision-induced absorption of the CO2 pairs. Using newly developed formulas that include the effects of anisotropy of the potential to all orders, we calculate the two lowest spectral moments gamma(prime), and alpha(prime), for four different classes of C02 pair potentials and compare the results with the experimental values. We assumed only multipolar induction in the process of forming the induced dipole, with the second-order contributions included. Using a site-site LJ and a site-site semi-ab initio intermolecular potentials we were able to reproduce the experimental values of gamma(prime), and alpha(prime) moments over entire temperature range from 230 to 330 K. Also, the role of an electrostatic interaction between two C02 molecules and its impact on the spectral moments is thoroughly investigated. An isotropic core with a point quadrupole centered at each molecule is shown to be an inadequate representation of the C02-CO2 potential. Additionally, we show the results obtained with the first- and second-order perturbation theory to be more than twice too small.

  3. A critical review of measurements of water vapor absorption in the 840 to 1100 cm(-1) spectral region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grant, William B.

    1987-01-01

    A set of eleven measurements of the water vapor continuum absorption in the 840 to 1100 sq cm spectral region is reviewed and compared with spectral models maintained by the Air Force Geophysics Laboratory. The measurements were made in four different ways: spectrometer with a White cell, CO2 laser with a White cell, CO2 laser with a spectrophone, and broadband radiation source over a long atmospheric path. Where possible, the data were selected at a water vapor partial pressure of ten torr buffered to 760 torr with N2 or synthetic air and a temperature of between 296 and 300 K. The intercomparison of the data leads to several observations and conclusions. First, there are four sets of laboratory data taken with nitrogen as the buffer gas which generally agree well mutually and with AFGL's HITRAN code. Second, there is one set of laboratory data that shows that using air as the buffer gas gives a few percent decrease in the water vapor continuum compared with using nitrogen as the buffer gas. Third, the atmospheric long-path measurements for water vapor partial pressure below about 12 torr are roughly grouped within 20 percent of the HITRAN values. Fourth, there are three sets of spectrophone data for water vapor in synthetic air which are significantly higher than any of the other measurements. This discrepancy is attributed to the effects of impurity gases in the cell.

  4. Transition state region in the A-Band photodissociation of allyl iodide—A femtosecond extreme ultraviolet transient absorption study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacherjee, Aditi; Attar, Andrew R.; Leone, Stephen R.

    2016-03-01

    Femtosecond extreme ultraviolet (XUV) transient absorption spectroscopy based on a high-harmonic generation source is used to study the 266 nm induced A-band photodissociation dynamics of allyl iodide (CH2 =CHCH2I). The photolysis of the C—I bond at this wavelength produces iodine atoms both in the ground (2P3/2, I) and spin-orbit excited (2P1/2, I*) states, with the latter as the predominant channel. Using XUV absorption at the iodine N4/5 edge (45-60 eV), the experiments constitute a direct probe of not only the long-lived atomic iodine reaction products but also the fleeting transition state region of the repulsive nIσ∗C—I excited states. Specifically, three distinct features are identified in the XUV transient absorption spectrum at 45.3 eV, 47.4 eV, and 48.4 eV (denoted transients A, B, and C, respectively), which arise from the repulsive valence-excited nσ∗ states and project onto the high-lying core-excited states of the dissociating molecule via excitation of 4d(I) core electrons. Transients A and B originate from 4d(I) → n(I) core-to-valence transitions, whereas transient C is best assigned to a 4d(I) →σ∗(C—I) transition. The measured differential absorbance of these new features along with the I/I* branching ratios known from the literature is used to suggest a more definitive assignment, albeit provisional, of the transients to specific dissociative states within the A-band manifold. The transients are found to peak around 55 fs-65 fs and decay completely by 145 fs-185 fs, demonstrating the ability of XUV spectroscopy to map the evolution of reactants into products in real time. The similarity in the energies of transients A and B with analogous features observed in methyl iodide [Attar et al. J. Phys. Chem. Lett. 6, 5072, (2015)] together with the new observation of transient C in the present work provides a more complete picture of the valence electronic structure in the transition state region. The results provide a benchmark for

  5. Interference effects in angular and spectral distributions of X-ray Transition Radiation from Relativistic Heavy Ions crossing a radiator: Influence of absorption and slowing-down

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiks, E. I.; Pivovarov, Yu. L.

    2015-07-01

    Theoretical analysis and representative calculations of angular and spectral distributions of X-ray Transition Radiation (XTR) by Relativistic Heavy Ions (RHI) crossing a radiator are presented taking into account both XTR absorption and RHI slowing-down. The calculations are performed for RHI energies of GSI, FAIR, CERN SPS and LHC and demonstrate the influence of XTR photon absorption as well as RHI slowing-down in a radiator on the appearance/disappearance of interference effects in both angular and spectral distributions of XTR.

  6. Interpretation of the Minkowski bands in Grw + 70 deg 8247.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Angel, J. R. P.

    1972-01-01

    Demonstration on the basis of the spectral structure of circular polarization in Grw + 70 deg 8247, that the absorption bands are at least in part molecular in origin. The spectrum of molecular helium has strong bands coincident with several of the Minkowski bands and, in particular, at high temperature shows a strong band head at about 4125 A. Helium molecules could be formed in sufficient density to give the absorption features in the star if it has a pure helium atmosphere. The Zeeman effect in molecular helium can explain in general the observed spectral features in the polarization and also may be responsible for the continuum polarization.

  7. Relationships between Visual Field Sensitivity and Spectral Absorption Properties of the Neuroretinal Rim in Glaucoma by Multispectral Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Denniss, Jonathan; Schiessl, Ingo; Nourrit, Vincent; Fenerty, Cecilia H.; Gautam, Ramesh; Henson, David B.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose. To investigate the relationship between neuroretinal rim (NRR) differential light absorption (DLA, a measure of spectral absorption properties) and visual field (VF) sensitivity in primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG). Methods. Patients diagnosed with (n = 22) or suspected of having (n = 7) POAG were imaged with a multispectral system incorporating a modified digital fundus camera, 250-W tungsten-halogen lamp, and fast-tuneable liquid crystal filter. Five images were captured sequentially within 1.0 second at wavelengths selected according to absorption properties of hemoglobin (range, 570–610 nm), and a Beer-Lambert law model was used to produce DLA maps of residual NRR from the images. Patients also underwent VF testing. Differences in NRR DLA in vertically opposing 180° and 45° sectors either side of the horizontal midline were compared with corresponding differences in VF sensitivity on both decibel and linear scales by Spearman's rank correlation. Results. The decibel VF sensitivity scale showed significant relationships between superior–inferior NRR DLA difference and sensitivity differences between corresponding VF areas in 180° NRR sectors (Spearman ρ = 0.68; P < 0.0001), superior-/inferior-temporal 45° NRR sectors (ρ = 0.57; P < 0.002), and superior-/inferior-nasal 45° NRR sectors (ρ = 0.59; P < 0.001). Using the linear VF sensitivity scale significant relationships were found for 180° NRR sectors (ρ = 0.62; P < 0.0002) and superior–inferior–nasal 45° NRR sectors (ρ = 0.53; P < 0.002). No significant difference was found between correlations using the linear or decibel VF sensitivity scales. Conclusions. Residual NRR DLA is related to VF sensitivity in POAG. Multispectral imaging may provide clinically important information for the assessment and management of POAG. PMID:21980002

  8. Spectroscopic evidence for the formation of singlet molecular oxygen (/sup 1/. delta. /sub g/O/sub 2/) upon irradiation of a solvent-oxygen (/sup 3/Sigma/sub g//sup -/O/sub 2/) cooperative absorption band

    SciTech Connect

    Scurlock, R.D.; Ogilby, P.R.

    1988-01-20

    It is well-known that the presence of molecular oxygen (/sup 3/..sigma../sub g//sup -/O/sub 2/) in a variety of organic solvents causes an often substantial red shift in the solvent absorption spectrum. This extra, broad absorption feature is reversibly removed by purging the solvent with nitrogen gas. Mulliken and Tsubomura assigned the oxygen-dependent absorption band to a transition from a ground state solvent-oxygen complex to a solvent-oxygen charge transfer (CT) state (sol/sup .+/O/sub 2//sup .-/). In addition to the broad Mulliken CT band, there are, often in the same spectral region, distinct singlet-triplet transitions (T/sub 1/ reverse arrow S/sub 0/) which are enhanced by molecular oxygen (/sup 3/..sigma../sub g//sup -/O/sub 2/). Since both of these solvent-oxygen cooperative transitions may result in the formation of reactive oxygenating species, singlet molecular oxygen (/sup 1/..delta../sub g/O/sub 2/) and/or the superoxide ion (O/sub 2//sup .-/), it follows that recent studies have focused on unsaturated hydrocarbon oxygenation subsequent to the irradiation of the oxygen-induced absorption bands in both the solution phase and cryogenic (10 K) glasses. In these particular experiments, oxygenated products characteristic of both /sup 1/..delta../sub g/O/sub 2/ and O/sub 2//sub .-/ were obtained, although the systems studied appeared to involve the participation of one intermediate at the exclusion of the other. In this communication, the authors provide, for the first time, direct spectroscopic evidence for the formation of /sup 1/..delta../sub g/O/sub 2/ following a solvent-oxygen (/sup 3/..sigma../sub g//sup -/O/sub 2/) cooperative absorption. They have observed, in a time-resolved experiment, a near-IR luminescence subsequent to laser excitation of the oxygen-induced absorption bands of mesitylene, p-xylene, o-xylene, toluene, and benzene at 355 nm and 1,4-dioxane at 266 nm. They suggest that this signal is due to /sup 1/..delta../sub g/O/sub 2

  9. High-accuracy measurement of low-water-content in liquid using NIR spectral absorption method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Bao-Jin; Wan, Xu; Jin, Hong-Zhen; Zhao, Yong; Mao, He-Fa

    2005-01-01

    Water content measurement technologies are very important for quality inspection of food, medicine products, chemical products and many other industry fields. In recent years, requests for accurate low-water-content measurement in liquid are more and more exigent, and great interests have been shown from the research and experimental work. With the development and advancement of modern production and control technologies, more accurate water content technology is needed. In this paper, a novel experimental setup based on near-infrared (NIR) spectral technology and fiber-optic sensor (OFS) is presented. It has a good measurement accuracy about -/+ 0.01%, which is better, to our knowledge, than most other methods published until now. It has a high measurement resolution of 0.001% in the measurement range from zero to 0.05% for water-in-alcohol measurement, and the water-in-oil measurement is carried out as well. In addition, the advantages of this method also include pollution-free to the measured liquid, fast measurement and so on.

  10. In Situ Measurements of Aerosol Mass Concentration and Spectral Absorption at Three Location in and Around Mexico City

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaudhry, Z.; Martins, V.; Li, Z.

    2006-12-01

    As a result of population growth and increasing industrialization, air pollution in heavily populated urban areas is one of the central environmental problems of the century. As a part of the MILAGRO (Megacity Initiative: Local and Global Research Observations) study, Nuclepore filters were collected in two size ranges (PM10 and PM2.5) at 12 hour intervals at three location in Mexico during March, 2006. Sampling stations were located at the Instituto Mexicano del Petroleo (T0), at the Rancho La Bisnago in the State of Hidalgo (T2) and along the Gulf Coast in Tampico (Tam). Each filter was analyzed for mass concentration, aerosol scattering and absorption efficiencies. Mass concentrations at T0 ranged from 47 to 179 μg/m3 for PM10 with an average concentration of 96 μg/m3, and from 20 to 93 μg/m3 for PM2.5 with an average concentration of 41 μg/m3. Mass concentrations at T2 ranged from 12 to 154 μg/m3 for PM10 with an average concentration of 51 μg/m3, and from 7 to 50 μg/m3 for PM2.5 with an average concentration of 25 μg/m3. Mass concentrations at Tam ranged from 34 to 80 μg/m3 for PM10 with an average concentration of 52 μg/m3, and from 8 to 23 μg/m3 for PM2.5 with an average concentration of 13 μg/m3. While some of the extreme values are likely linked to local emissions, regional air pollution episodes also played important roles. Each of the sampling stations experienced a unique atmospheric condition. The site at T0 was influenced by urban air pollution and dust storms, the site at T2 was significantly less affected by air pollution but more affected by regional dust storms and local dust devils while Tam was influenced by air pollution, dust storms and the natural marine environment. The spectral mass absorption efficiency was measured from 350 to 2500 nm and shows large differences between the absorption properties of soil dust, black carbon, and organic aerosols. The strong spectral differences observed can be related to differences in

  11. Correlation of Coal Calorific Value and Sulphur Content with 57Fe Mössbauer Spectral Absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wynter, C. I.; May, L.; Oliver, F. W.; Hall, J. A.; Hoffman, E. J.; Kumar, A.; Christopher, L.

    Coal is the most abundant, most economical and widely distributed fossil fuel in the world today. It is also the principal form of reductant in the iron and steel industry. This study was undertaken to not only add to the growing use of Mössbauer spectroscopy application in industry but also to increase the chemistry and physics knowledge base of coal. Coal is 40 to 80 percent carbon with small amounts of sulphur and iron as pyrite and ferrous sulphate. The environmental concern associated with mining and burning of coal has long been a subject of investigation with emphasis on the sulphur content. We examined five ranks of coal: anthracite, Eastern bituminous, bituminous, sub-bituminous, and lignite. Relationships were investigated between the Calorific Value (CV) of coal and inorganic sulphur content, 57Fe Mössbauer absorption, and ratio of pyrite (FeS2) to FeSO4. Twenty-eight samples of the five different types of coal had CVs ranging from 32,403 to 16,100 kJ/kg and sulphur concentrations ranging from 0.28 to 2.5 percent. CV appeared to be positively correlated with concentrations of sulphur and of iron-sulphur salts, although there appears to be little connection with the distribution of their oxidation states.

  12. Temperature profile retrieval in axisymmetric combustion plumes using multilayer perceptron modeling and spectral feature selection in the infrared CO2 emission band.

    PubMed

    García-Cuesta, Esteban; de Castro, Antonio J; Galván, Inés M; López, Fernando

    2014-01-01

    In this work, a methodology based on the combined use of a multilayer perceptron model fed using selected spectral information is presented to invert the radiative transfer equation (RTE) and to recover the spatial temperature profile inside an axisymmetric flame. The spectral information is provided by the measurement of the infrared CO2 emission band in the 3-5 μm spectral region. A guided spectral feature selection was carried out using a joint criterion of principal component analysis and a priori physical knowledge of the radiative problem. After applying this guided feature selection, a subset of 17 wavenumbers was selected. The proposed methodology was applied over synthetic scenarios. Also, an experimental validation was carried out by measuring the spectral emission of the exhaust hot gas plume in a microjet engine with a Fourier transform-based spectroradiometer. Temperatures retrieved using the proposed methodology were compared with classical thermocouple measurements, showing a good agreement between them. Results obtained using the proposed methodology are very promising and can encourage the use of sensor systems based on the spectral measurement of the CO2 emission band in the 3-5 μm spectral window to monitor combustion processes in a nonintrusive way. PMID:25061791

  13. Review of an assortment of IR materials-devices technologies used for imaging in spectral bands ranging from the visible to very long wavelengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeWames, Roger E.

    2016-05-01

    In this paper we review the intrinsic and extrinsic technological properties of the incumbent technology, InP/In0.53Ga0.47As/InP, for imaging in the visible- short wavelength spectral band, InSb and HgCdTe for imaging in the mid-wavelength spectral band and HgCdTe for imaging in the long wavelength spectral band. These material systems are in use for a wide range of applications addressing compelling needs in night vision imaging, low light level astronomical applications and defense strategic satellite sensing. These materials systems are direct band gap energy semiconductors hence the internal quantum efficiency η, is near unity over a wide spectral band pass. A key system figure of merit of a shot noise limited detector technology is given by the equation (1+Jdark. /Jphoton), where Jdark is the dark current density and Jphoton ~qηΦ is the photocurrent density; Φ is the photon flux incident on the detector and q is the electronic charge. The capability to maintain this factor for a specific spectral band close to unity for low illumination conditions and low temperature onset of non-ideal dark current components, basically intrinsic diffusion limited performance all the way, is a marker of quality and versatility of a semiconductor detector technology. It also enables the highest temperature of operation for tactical illumination conditions. A purpose of the work reported in this paper is to explore the focal plane array data sets of photodiode detector technologies widely used to bench mark their fundamental and technology properties and identify paths for improvements.

  14. Effect of long-term training on sound localization performance with spectrally warped and band-limited head-related transfer functions.

    PubMed

    Majdak, Piotr; Walder, Thomas; Laback, Bernhard

    2013-09-01

    Sound localization in the sagittal planes, including the ability to distinguish front from back, relies on spectral features caused by the filtering effects of the head, pinna, and torso. It is assumed that important spatial cues are encoded in the frequency range between 4 and 16 kHz. In this study, in a double-blind design and using audio-visual training covering the full 3-D space, normal-hearing listeners were trained 2 h per day over three weeks to localize sounds which were either band limited up to 8.5 kHz or spectrally warped from the range between 2.8 and 16 kHz to the range between 2.8 and 8.5 kHz. The training effect for the warped condition exceeded that for procedural task learning, suggesting a stable auditory recalibration due to the training. After the training, performance with band-limited sounds was better than that with warped ones. The results show that training can improve sound localization in cases where spectral cues have been reduced by band-limiting or remapped by warping. This suggests that hearing-impaired listeners, who have limited access to high frequencies, might also improve their localization ability when provided with spectrally warped or band-limited sounds and adequately trained on sound localization. PMID:23967945

  15. ENVISAT.MERIS spectral bands and ENVISAT ASAR - discussion on applications of Sentinel 1 and 2 for agriculture in Poland.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dabrowska-Zielinska, K.; Budzynska, M.; Tomaszewska, M.; Bartold, M.; Turlej, K.

    2012-04-01

    -5, red 6-9, and NIR 10-15. Among considered indices, the best results for getting LAI has been obtained using index 12/5 - the ratio between NIR registered in band 12 and green registered in band 5. The highest correlation was for spring cereals, the lowest for corn (R2=0.81 and R2=0.43). After statistical analyses of spectral reflectance of various crops, supervised classification of the following MERIS bands: 2, 3, 4, 5, 7, 10, 13, and 15 has been applied. From the classification of MERIS image acquired on 26.04.2007 the following crop types have been distinguished: spring cereals, winter cereals, rape, as well as grassland and bare soil, at which beet roots or corn were in germination or emergence phenological stage. The overall accuracy calculated from error matrix equals to 76%.

  16. The spectral variability of the GHZ-Peaked spectrum radio source PKS 1718-649 and a comparison of absorption models

    SciTech Connect

    Tingay, S. J.; Macquart, J.-P.; Wayth, R. B.; Trott, C. M.; Emrich, D.; Collier, J. D.; Wong, G. F.; Rees, G.; Stevens, J.; Carretti, E.; Callingham, J. R.; Gaensler, B. M.; McKinley, B.; Briggs, F.; Bernardi, G.; Bowman, J. D.; Cappallo, R. J.; Corey, B. E.; Deshpande, A. A.; Goeke, R.; and others

    2015-02-01

    Using the new wideband capabilities of the ATCA, we obtain spectra for PKS 1718-649, a well-known gigahertz-peaked spectrum radio source. The observations, between approximately 1 and 10 GHz over 3 epochs spanning approximately 21 months, reveal variability both above the spectral peak at ∼3 GHz and below the peak. The combination of the low- and high-frequency variability cannot be easily explained using a single absorption mechanism, such as free–free absorption or synchrotron self-absorption. We find that the PKS 1718-649 spectrum and its variability are best explained by variations in the free–free optical depth on our line of sight to the radio source at low frequencies (below the spectral peak) and the adiabatic expansion of the radio source itself at high frequencies (above the spectral peak). The optical depth variations are found to be plausible when X-ray continuum absorption variability seen in samples of active galactic nuclei is considered. We find that the cause of the peaked spectrum in PKS 1718-649 is most likely due to free–free absorption. In agreement with previous studies, we find that the spectrum at each epoch of observation is best fit by a free–free absorption model characterized by a power-law distribution of free–free absorbing clouds. This agreement is extended to frequencies below the 1 GHz lower limit of the ATCA by considering new observations with Parkes at 725 MHz and 199 MHz observations with the newly operational Murchison Widefield Array. These lower frequency observations argue against families of absorption models (both free–free and synchrotron self-absorption) that are based on simple homogenous structures.

  17. Modified thermal-optical analysis using spectral absorption selectivity to distinguish black carbon from pyrolized organic carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Hadley, Odelle; Hadley, O.L.; Corrigan, C.E.; Kirchstetter, T.W.

    2008-04-14

    Black carbon (BC), a main component of combustion-generated soot, is a strong absorber of sunlight and contributes to climate change. Measurement methods for BC are uncertain, however. This study presents a method for analyzing the BC mass loading on a quartz fiber filter using a modified thermal-optical analysis method, wherein light transmitted through the sample is measured over a spectral region instead of at a single wavelength as the sample is heated. Evolution of the spectral light transmission signal depends on the relative amounts of light-absorbing BC and char, the latter of which forms when organic carbon in the sample pyrolyzes during heating. Absorption selectivities of BC and char are found to be distinct and are used to apportion the amount of light attenuated by each component in the sample. Light attenuation is converted to mass concentration based on derived mass attenuation efficiencies (MAE) of BC and char. The fraction of attenuation due to each component are scaled by their individual MAE values and added together as the total mass of light absorbing carbon (LAC). An iterative algorithm is used to find the MAE values for both BC and char that provide the best fit to the carbon mass remaining on the filter (derived from direct measurements of thermally evolved CO{sub 2}) at temperatures higher than 480 C. This method was applied to measure the BC concentration in precipitation samples collected from coastal and mountain sites in Northern California. The uncertainty in measured BC concentration of samples that contained a high concentration of organics susceptible to char ranged from 12 to 100 percent, depending on the mass loading of BC on the filter. The lower detection limit for this method was approximately 0.35 {micro}g BC and uncertainty approached 20 percent for BC mass loading greater than 1.0 {micro}g BC.

  18. Modified thermal-optical analysis using spectral absorption selectivity to distinguish black carbon from pyrolized organic carbon.

    PubMed

    Hadley, Odelle L; Corrigan, Craig E; Kirchstetter, Thomas W

    2008-11-15

    This study presents a method for analyzing the black carbon (BC) mass loading on a quartz fiber filter using a modified thermal-optical analysis method, wherein light transmitted through the sample is measured over a spectral region instead of at a single wavelength. Evolution of the spectral light transmission signal depends on the relative amounts of light-absorbing BC and char, the latter of which forms when organic carbon in the sample pyrolyzes during heating. Absorption selectivities of BC and char are found to be distinct and are used to apportion the amount of light attenuated by each component in the sample. Light attenuation is converted to mass concentration on the basis of derived mass attenuation efficiencies (MAEs) of BC and char. The fractions of attenuation due to each component are scaled by their individual MAE values and added together as the total mass of light absorbing carbon (LAC). An iterative algorithm is used to find the MAE values for both BC and char that provide the best fit to the carbon mass remaining on the filter (derived from direct measurements of thermally evolved CO2) at temperatures higher than 480 degrees C. This method was applied to measure the BC concentration in precipitation samples collected in northern California. The uncertainty in the measured BC concentration of samples that contained a high concentration of organics susceptible to char ranged from 12% to 100%, depending on the mass loading of BC on the filter. The lower detection limit for this method was approximately 0.35 microg of BC, and the uncertainty approached 20% for BC mass loading greater than 1.0 microg of BC. PMID:19068832

  19. Spectrally Consistent Scattering, Absorption, and Polarization Properties of Atmospheric Ice Crystals at Wavelengths from 0.2 to 100 um

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, Ping; Bi, Lei; Baum, Bryan A.; Liou, Kuo-Nan; Kattawar, George W.; Mishchenko, Michael I.; Cole, Benjamin

    2013-01-01

    A data library is developed containing the scattering, absorption, and polarization properties of ice particles in the spectral range from 0.2 to 100 microns. The properties are computed based on a combination of the Amsterdam discrete dipole approximation (ADDA), the T-matrix method, and the improved geometric optics method (IGOM). The electromagnetic edge effect is incorporated into the extinction and absorption efficiencies computed from the IGOM. A full set of single-scattering properties is provided by considering three-dimensional random orientations for 11 ice crystal habits: droxtals, prolate spheroids, oblate spheroids, solid and hollow columns, compact aggregates composed of eight solid columns, hexagonal plates, small spatial aggregates composed of 5 plates, large spatial aggregates composed of 10 plates, and solid and hollow bullet rosettes. The maximum dimension of each habit ranges from 2 to 10,000 microns in 189 discrete sizes. For each ice crystal habit, three surface roughness conditions (i.e., smooth, moderately roughened, and severely roughened) are considered to account for the surface texture of large particles in the IGOM applicable domain. The data library contains the extinction efficiency, single-scattering albedo, asymmetry parameter, six independent nonzero elements of the phase matrix (P11, P12, P22, P33, P43, and P44), particle projected area, and particle volume to provide the basic single-scattering properties for remote sensing applications and radiative transfer simulations involving ice clouds. Furthermore, a comparison of satellite observations and theoretical simulations for the polarization characteristics of ice clouds demonstrates that ice cloud optical models assuming severely roughened ice crystals significantly outperform their counterparts assuming smooth ice crystals.

  20. Application of independent component analysis method in real-time spectral analysis of gaseous mixtures for acousto-optical spectrometers based on differential optical absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fadeyev, A. V.; Pozhar, V. E.

    2012-10-01

    It is discussed the reliability problem of time-optimized method for remote optical spectral analysis of gas-polluted ambient air. The method based on differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS) enables fragmentary spectrum registration (FSR) and is suitable for random-spectral-access (RSA) optical spectrometers like acousto-optical (AO) ones. Here, it is proposed the algorithm based on statistical method of independent component analysis (ICA) for estimation of a correctness of absorption spectral lines selection for FSR-method. Implementations of ICA method for RSA-based real-time adaptive systems are considered. Numerical simulations are presented with use of real spectra detected by the trace gas monitoring system GAOS based on AO spectrometer.

  1. Experimental recovery of intrinsic fluorescence and fluorophore concentration in the presence of hemoglobin: spectral effect of scattering and absorption on fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du Le, Vinh Nguyen; Patterson, Michael S.; Farrell, Thomas J.; Hayward, Joseph E.; Fang, Qiyin

    2015-12-01

    The ability to recover the intrinsic fluorescence of biological fluorophores is crucial to accurately identify the fluorophores and quantify their concentrations in the media. Although some studies have successfully retrieved the fluorescence spectral shape of known fluorophores, the techniques usually came with heavy computation costs and did not apply for strongly absorptive media, and the intrinsic fluorescence intensity and fluorophore concentration were not recovered. In this communication, an experimental approach was presented to recover intrinsic fluorescence and concentration of fluorescein in the presence of hemoglobin (Hb). The results indicated that the method was efficient in recovering the intrinsic fluorescence peak and fluorophore concentration with an error of 3% and 10%, respectively. The results also suggested that chromophores with irregular absorption spectra (e.g., Hb) have more profound effects on fluorescence spectral shape than chromophores with monotonic absorption and scattering spectra (e.g., black India ink and polystyrene microspheres).

  2. Estimation of variability of specific absorption rate with physical description of children exposed to electromagnetic field in the VHF band.

    PubMed

    Nagaoka, T; Watanabe, S

    2009-01-01

    Recently, there has been an increasing concern regarding the effects of electromagnetic waves on the health of humans. The safety of radio frequency electromagnetic fields (RF-EMFs) is evaluated by the specific absorption rate (SAR). In recent years, SAR has been estimated by numerical simulation using fine-resolution and anatomically realistic reference whole-body voxel models of people of various ages. The variation in SAR with a change in the physical features of a real person is hardly studied, although every person has different physical features. In this study, in order to estimate the individual variability in SAR of persons, we obtained considerable 3D body shape data from actual three-year-old children and developed several homogeneous models of these children. The variability in SAR of the homogeneous models of three-year-old children for whole-body exposure to RF electromagnetic fields in the very high frequency (VHF) band calculated using the finite-difference time-domain method has been described. PMID:19964253

  3. Microwave-assisted synthesis of graphene-Ni composites with enhanced microwave absorption properties in Ku-band

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Zetao; Sun, Xin; Li, Guoxian; Xue, Hairong; Guo, Hu; Fan, Xiaoli; Pan, Xuchen; He, Jianping

    2015-03-01

    Recently, graphene has been applied as a new microwave absorber because of its high dielectric loss and low density. Nevertheless, the high dielectric constant of pristine graphene has caused unbalanced electromagnetic parameters and results in a bad impedance matching characteristic. In this study, we report a facile microwave-assisted heating approach to produce reduced graphene oxide-nickel (RGO-Ni) composites. The phase and morphology of as-synthesized RGO-Ni composites are characterized by XRD, Raman, FESEM and TEM. The results show that Ni nanoparticles with a diameter around 20 nm are grown densely and uniformly on the RGO sheets. In addition, enhanced microwave absorption properties in Ku-band of RGO-Ni composites is mainly due to the synergistic effect of dielectric loss and magnetic loss and the dramatically electron polarizations caused by the formation of large conductive network. The minimum reflection loss of RGO-Ni-2 composite with the thickness of 2 mm can reaches -42 dB at 17.6 GHz. The RGO-Ni composite is an attractive candidate for the new type of high performance microwave absorbing material.

  4. High resolution absorption cross sections in the transmission window region of the Schumann-Runge bands and Herzberg continuum of O2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yoshino, K.; Esmond, J. R.; Cheung, A. S.-C.; Freeman, D. E.; Parkinson, W. H.

    1992-01-01

    Results are presented on measurements, conducted in the wavelength region 180-195 nm, and at different pressures of oxygen (between 2.5-760 torr) in order to separate the pressure-dependent absorption from the main cross sections, of the absorption cross sections of the Schumann-Runge bands in the window region between the rotational lines of S-R bands of O2. The present cross sections supersede the earlier published cross sections (Yoshino et al., 1983). The combined cross sections are presented graphically; they are available at wavenumber intervals of about 0.1/cm from the National Space Science Data Center. The Herzberg continuum cross sections are derived after subtracting calculated contributions from the Schumann-Runge bands. These are significantly smaller than any previous measurements.

  5. Vegetation species composition and canopy architecture information expressed in leaf water absorption measured in the 1000 nm and 2200 spectral region by an imaging spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, Robert O.; Roberts, Dar A.

    1995-01-01

    Plant species composition and plant architectural attributes are critical parameters required for the measuring, monitoring, and modeling of terrestrial ecosystems. Remote sensing is commonly cited as an important tool for deriving vegetation properties at an appropriate scale for ecosystem studies, ranging from local to regional and even synoptic scales. Classical approaches rely on vegetation indices such as the normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) to estimate biophysical parameters such as leaf area index or intercepted photosynthetically active radiation (IPAR). Another approach is to apply a variety of classification schemes to map vegetation and thus extrapolate fine-scale information about specific sites to larger areas of similar composition. Imaging spectrometry provides additional information that is not obtainable through broad-band sensors and that may provide improved inputs both to direct biophysical estimates as well as classification schemes. Some of this capability has been demonstrated through improved discrimination of vegetation, estimates of canopy biochemistry, and liquid water estimates from vegetation. We investigate further the potential of leaf water absorption estimated from Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) data as a means for discriminating vegetation types and deriving canopy architectural information. We expand our analysis to incorporate liquid water estimates from two spectral regions, the 1000-nm region and the 2200-nm region. The study was conducted in the vicinity of Jasper Ridge, California, which is located on the San Francisco peninsula to the west of the Stanford University campus. AVIRIS data were acquired over Jasper Ridge, CA, on June 2, 1992, at 19:31 UTC. Spectra from three sites in this image were analyzed. These data are from an area of healthy grass, oak woodland, and redwood forest, respectively. For these analyses, the AVIRIS-measured upwelling radiance spectra for the entire Jasper

  6. Co-registered Topographical, Band Excitation Nanomechanical, and Mass Spectral Imaging Using a Combined Atomic Force Microscopy/Mass Spectrometry Platform

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Ovchinnikova, Olga S.; Tai, Tamin; Bocharova, Vera; Okatan, Mahmut Baris; Belianinov, Alex; Kertesz, Vilmos; Jesse, Stephen; Van Berkel, Gary J.

    2015-03-18

    The advancement of a hybrid atomic force microscopy/mass spectrometry imaging platform demonstrating for the first time co-registered topographical, band excitation nanomechanical, and mass spectral imaging of a surface using a single instrument is reported. The mass spectrometry-based chemical imaging component of the system utilized nanothermal analysis probes for pyrolytic surface sampling followed by atmospheric pressure chemical ionization of the gas phase species produced with subsequent mass analysis. We discuss the basic instrumental setup and operation and the multimodal imaging capability and utility are demonstrated using a phase separated polystyrene/poly(2-vinylpyridine) polymer blend thin film. The topography and band excitation images showedmore » that the valley and plateau regions of the thin film surface were comprised primarily of one of the two polymers in the blend with the mass spectral chemical image used to definitively identify the polymers at the different locations. Data point pixel size for the topography (390 nm x 390 nm), band excitation (781 nm x 781 nm), mass spectrometry (690 nm x 500 nm) images was comparable and submicrometer in all three cases, but the data voxel size for each of the three images was dramatically different. The topography image was uniquely a surface measurement, whereas the band excitation image included information from an estimated 10 nm deep into the sample and the mass spectral image from 110-140 nm in depth. Moreover, because of this dramatic sampling depth variance, some differences in the band excitation and mass spectrometry chemical images were observed and were interpreted to indicate the presence of a buried interface in the sample. The spatial resolution of the mass spectral image was estimated to be between 1.5 m 2.6 m, based on the ability to distinguish surface features in that image that were also observed in the other images.« less

  7. Co-registered Topographical, Band Excitation Nanomechanical, and Mass Spectral Imaging Using a Combined Atomic Force Microscopy/Mass Spectrometry Platform

    SciTech Connect

    Ovchinnikova, Olga S.; Tai, Tamin; Bocharova, Vera; Okatan, Mahmut Baris; Belianinov, Alex; Kertesz, Vilmos; Jesse, Stephen; Van Berkel, Gary J.

    2015-03-18

    The advancement of a hybrid atomic force microscopy/mass spectrometry imaging platform demonstrating for the first time co-registered topographical, band excitation nanomechanical, and mass spectral imaging of a surface using a single instrument is reported. The mass spectrometry-based chemical imaging component of the system utilized nanothermal analysis probes for pyrolytic surface sampling followed by atmospheric pressure chemical ionization of the gas phase species produced with subsequent mass analysis. We discuss the basic instrumental setup and operation and the multimodal imaging capability and utility are demonstrated using a phase separated polystyrene/poly(2-vinylpyridine) polymer blend thin film. The topography and band excitation images showed that the valley and plateau regions of the thin film surface were comprised primarily of one of the two polymers in the blend with the mass spectral chemical image used to definitively identify the polymers at the different locations. Data point pixel size for the topography (390 nm x 390 nm), band excitation (781 nm x 781 nm), mass spectrometry (690 nm x 500 nm) images was comparable and submicrometer in all three cases, but the data voxel size for each of the three images was dramatically different. The topography image was uniquely a surface measurement, whereas the band excitation image included information from an estimated 10 nm deep into the sample and the mass spectral image from 110-140 nm in depth. Moreover, because of this dramatic sampling depth variance, some differences in the band excitation and mass spectrometry chemical images were observed and were interpreted to indicate the presence of a buried interface in the sample. The spatial resolution of the mass spectral image was estimated to be between 1.5 m 2.6 m, based on the ability to distinguish surface features in that image that were also observed in the other images.

  8. Analysis of simultaneous emission and absorption Ti spectral features observed with the MMI instrument in OMEGA implosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, Tirtha; Johns, Heather; Mayes, Daniel; Durmaz, Tunay; Mancini, Roberto; Tommasini, Riccardo; Delettrez, Jack; Regan, Sean; Nagayama, Taisuke

    2012-10-01

    We discuss the observation and analysis of spectra from titanium-doped OMEGA direct-drive implosions. The targets were spherical plastic shells with a submicron Ti-doped tracer-layer initially located on the inner surface of the shell and filled with deuterium gas. The x-ray signal from the titanium tracer is observed at the collapse of the implosion and recorded with a streaked spectrometer (SSCA) and three identical gated,multi-monochromatic x-ray imager (MMI) instruments that view the implosion along three quasi-orthogonal lines-of-sight. Both streaked and MMI data show simultaneous emission and absorption features due to titanium K-shell line transitions but only the MMI data permits to diagnose the tracer's spatial properties in the core. To this end, MMI data were processed to obtain narrow-band images and spatially-resolved spectra.footnotetextT. Nagayama et al., J. App. Phys.109, 093303 (2011). Abel inversion of angle-averaged image intensity profiles reveal the spatial distribution of the titanium tracer in the core, while detailed analysis of the space-resolved spectra yields temperature, density and mixing distributions. Results are presented for several shell thicknesses and implosions driven with different laser pulse shapes.

  9. Spectral line survey toward the spiral arm of M51 in the 3 and 2 mm bands

    SciTech Connect

    Watanabe, Yoshimasa; Sakai, Nami; Yamamoto, Satoshi; Sorai, Kazuo

    2014-06-10

    We have conducted a spectral line survey in the 3 and 2 mm bands toward two positions in a spiral arm of M51 (NGC 5194) with the Institut de Radioastronomie Millimétrique 30 m telescope. In this survey, we have identified 13 molecular species, including CN, CCH, N{sub 2}H{sup +}, HNCO, and CH{sub 3}OH. Furthermore, six isotopologues of the major species have been detected. On the other hand, SiO, HC{sub 3}N, CH{sub 3}CN, and deuterated species such as DCN and DCO{sup +} were not detected. The deuterium fractionation ratios are evaluated to be less than 0.8% and 1.2% for DCN/HCN and DCO{sup +}/HCO{sup +}, respectively. By comparing the results of the two positions with different star formation activities, we have found that the observed chemical compositions do not strongly depend on star formation activities. They seem to reflect a chemical composition averaged over the 1 kpc scale region including many giant molecular clouds. Among the detected molecules CN, CCH, and CH{sub 3}OH are found to be abundant. High abundances of CN and CCH are consistent with the above picture of a widespread distribution of molecules because they can be produced by photodissociation. On the other hand, it seems likely that CH{sub 3}OH is liberated in the gas phase by shocks associated with large-scale phenomena such as cloud-cloud collisions and/or by nonthermal desorption processes such as photoevaporation due to cosmic-ray-induced UV photons. The present result demonstrates a characteristic chemical composition of a giant molecular cloud complex in the spiral arm, which can be used as a standard reference for studying chemistry in active galactic nuclei and starbursts.

  10. Analysis of Mars surface hydration through the MEx/OMEGA observation of the 3 μm absorption band.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jouglet, D.; Poulet, F.; Bibring, J. P.; Langevin, Y.; Gondet, B.; Milliken, R. E.; Mustard, J. F.

    The near infrared Mars surface global mapping done by OMEGA gives the first opportunity to study the global and detailed characteristics of the 3µm hydration absorption band on Mars surface. This feature is indistinctly due to bending and stretching vibrations of water bound in minerals or adsorbed at their surface, and of hydroxyl groups (for a review, see e.g. [1] or [2]). Its study may give new elements to determine the geologic and climatic past of Mars, and may put new constrain about the current water cycle of Mars. OMEGA data are processed in a pipeline that converts raw data to radiance, removes atmospheric effects and gets I/F. Specific data reduction scheme has been developed to assess temperature of OMEGA spectra at 5 µm and to remove their thermal part so as to get the albedo from 1.µm to 5.1µm ([2]). Two methods, the Integrated Band Depth and the water content based on comparison with laboratory measures of Yen et al. ([3]), have been used to assess the 3µm band depth. These two methods where applied to OMEGA spectra acquired at a nominal calibration level and not exhibiting water ice features. This corresponds to approximately 35 million spectra ([2]). The data processed show the presence of this absorption feature overall the Martian surface, which could be explained by the presence of adsorbed water up to 1% water mass percentage ([4]) and by rinds or coating resulting from weathering (see e.g. [5] or [6]). A possible increase of hydration with albedo is discussed so as to discriminate between the albedo-dependence of the method and hydration variations. Terrains enriched in phyllosilicates ([7]), sulfates ([8]) or hydroxides exhibit an increased hydration at 3 µm. This terrains show that the 3 µm band can bring additional information about composition, for example by observing a variation in the shape of the band. A decrease of hydration with elevation is observed on the processed data independently of the value of albedo. This correlation

  11. Modeling of collision-induced infrared absorption spectra of H2-H2 pairs in the fundamental band at temperatures from 20 to 300 K. [Planetary atmospheres

    SciTech Connect

    Borysow, A. )

    1991-08-01

    The 20-300 K free-free rotovibrational collision-induced absorption (RV CIA) spectra of H2-H2 pairs are presently obtained by a numerical method which, in addition to closely matching known CIA spectra of H2-H2, can reproduce the results of the quantum-mechanical computations to within a few percent. Since the spectral lineshape parameters are derivable by these means from the lowest three quantum-mechanical spectral moments, these outer-planet atmosphere-pertinent model spectra may be computed on even small computers. 35 refs.

  12. Intraband absorption in the 8-12 μm band from Si-doped vertically aligned InGaAs/GaAs quantum-dot superlattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhuang, Q. D.; Li, J. M.; Li, H. X.; Zeng, Y. P.; Pan, L.; Chen, Y. H.; Kong, M. Y.; Lin, L. Y.

    1998-12-01

    Normal-incident infrared absorption in the 8-12-μm-atmospheric spectral window in the InGaAs/GaAs quantum-dot superlattice is observed. Using cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy, we find that the InGaAs quantum dots are perfectly vertically aligned in the growth direction (100). Under the normal incident radiation, a distinct absorption peaked at 9.9 μm is observed. This work indicates the potential of this quantum-dot superlattice structure for use as normal-incident infrared imaging focal arrays application without fabricating grating structures.

  13. Spectral modification of the laser emission of a terahertz quantum cascade laser induced by broad-band double pulse injection seeding

    SciTech Connect

    Markmann, Sergej Nong, Hanond Hekmat, Negar; Jukam, Nathan; Pal, Shovon; Scholz, Sven; Kukharchyk, Nadezhda; Ludwig, Arne; Wieck, Andreas D.; Dhillon, Sukhdeep; Tignon, Jérôme; Marcadet, Xavier; Bock, Claudia; Kunze, Ulrich

    2015-09-14

    We demonstrate by injection seeding that the spectral emission of a terahertz (THz) quantum cascade laser (QCL) can be modified with broad-band THz pulses whose bandwidths are greater than the QCL bandwidth. Two broad-band THz pulses delayed in time imprint a modulation on the single THz pulse spectrum. The resulting spectrum is used to injection seed the THz QCL. By varying the time delay between the THz pulses, the amplitude distribution of the QCL longitudinal modes is modified. By applying this approach, the QCL emission is reversibly switched from multi-mode to single mode emission.

  14. Radiative analysis of global mean temperature trends in the middle atmosphere: Effects of non-locality and secondary absorption bands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fomichev, V. I.; Jonsson, A. I.; Ward, W. E.

    2016-02-01

    In this paper, we provide a refined and extended assignment of past and future temperature changes relative to previous analyses and describe and evaluate the relevance of vertical coupling and non-linear and secondary radiative mechanisms for the interpretation of climatic temperature variations in the middle atmosphere. Because of their nature, the latter mechanisms are not adequately accounted for in most regression analyses of temperature trends as a function of local constituent variations. These mechanisms are examined using (1) globally averaged profiles from transient simulations with the Canadian Middle Atmosphere Model (CMAM) forced by changes in greenhouse gases and ozone depleting substances and (2) a one-dimensional radiative-equilibrium model forced using the diagnosed global mean changes in radiatively active constituents as derived from the CMAM model runs. The conditions during the periods 1975 to 1995 and 2010 to 2040 (during which the rates of change in ozone and CO2 differ) provide a suitable contrast for the role of the non-linear and non-local mechanisms being evaluated in this paper to be clearly differentiated and evaluated. Vertical coupling of radiative transfer effects and the influence of secondary absorption bands are important enough to render the results of multiple linear regression analyses between the temperature response and constituent changes misleading. These effects are evaluated in detail using the 1D radiative-equilibrium model using profiles from the CMAM runs as inputs. In order to explain the differences in the CMAM temperature trends prior to and after 2000 these other radiative effects must be considered in addition to local changes in the radiatively active species. The middle atmosphere temperature cools in response to CO2 and water vapor increases, but past and future trends are modulated by ozone changes.

  15. Spectral analysis on origination of the bands at 437 nm and 475.5 nm of chlorophyll fluorescence excitation spectrum in Arabidopsis chloroplasts.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Lizhang; Wang, Yongqiang; Zhou, Jun

    2016-05-01

    Chlorophyll fluorescence has been often used as an intrinsic optical molecular probe to study photosynthesis. In this study, the origin of bands at 437 and 475.5 nm in the chlorophyll fluorescence excitation spectrum for emission at 685 nm in Arabidopsis chloroplasts was investigated using various optical analysis methods. The results revealed that this fluorescence excitation spectrum was related to the absorption characteristics of pigment molecules in PSII complexes. Moreover, the excitation band centred at 475.5 nm had a blue shift, but the excitation band at 437 nm changed relatively less due to induction of non-photochemical quenching (NPQ). Furthermore, fluorescence emission spectra showed that this blue shift occurred when excitation energy transfer from both chlorophyll b (Chl b) and carotenoids (Cars) to chlorophyll a (Chl a) was blocked. These results demonstrate that the excitation band at 437 nm was mainly contributed by Chl a, while the excitation band at 475.5 nm was mainly contributed by Chl b and Cars. The chlorophyll fluorescence excitation spectrum, therefore, could serve as a useful tool to describe specific characteristics of light absorption and energy transfer between light-harvesting pigments. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26358732

  16. Absorption spectral analysis of 4f-4f transitions for the complexation of Pr(III) and Nd(III) with thiosemicarbazide in absence and presence of Zn(II) in aqueous and organic solvents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anita, K.; Rajmuhon Singh, N.

    2011-10-01

    The complexation of thiosemicarbazide with Pr(III) and Nd(III) in absence and presence of Zn(II), a soft metal ion in aqueous and organic solvents like CH 3OH,CH 3CN, dioxane (C 4H 8O 2) and DMF (C 3H 7NO) and their equimolar mixtures are discussed by employing absorption difference and comparative absorption spectrophotometry. Complexation of thiosemicarbazide with Pr(III) and Nd(III) is indicated by the changes in the absorption intensity following the subsequent changes in the oscillator strength of different 4f-4f bands and Judd-Ofelt intensity ( Tλ) parameters. The other spectral parameters like energy interaction parameters namely Slater-Condon ( Fk), Racah ( Ek), Lande ( ξ4f), Nephelauxetic ratio ( β) and bonding parameters ( b1/2) are further computed to explain the nature of complexation. The difference in the energy parameters with respect to donor atoms and solvents reveal that the chemical environment around the lanthanide ions has great impact on f-f transition and any change in the environment result in modification of the spectra. Various solvents and their equimolar mixtures are also used to discuss the participation of solvents in the complexation.

  17. Uncovering the mechanism for selective control of the visible and near-IR absorption bands in bacteriochlorophylls a, b and g

    PubMed Central

    Fujisawa, Jun-ichi; Nagata, Morio

    2014-01-01

    Bacteriochlorophylls (BChls) play an important role as light harvesters in photosynthetic bacteria. Interestingly, bacteriochlorophylls (BChls) a, b, and g selectively tune their visible (Qx) and near IR (Qy) absorption bands by the substituent changes. In this paper, we theoretically study the mechanism for the selective control of the absorption bands. Density functional theory (DFT) and time-dependent DFT (TD-DFT) and four-orbital model analyses reveal that the selective red-shift of the Qy band with the substituent change from BChl a to b occurs with the lower-energy shift of the (HOMO, LUMO) excited state directly induced by the molecular-orbital energy changes. In contrast, the Qx band hardly shifts by the cancellation between the higher- and lower-energy shifts of the (HOMO-1, LUMO) excited state directly induced by the molecular-orbital energy changes and configuration interaction, respectively. On the other hand, with the substituent changes from BChl a to g, the Qx band selectively blue-shifts by the larger higher-energy shift of the (HOMO-1, LUMO) excited state directly induced by the molecular-orbital energy shifts than the lower-energy shift due to the configuration interaction. In contrast, the Qy band hardly shifts by the cancellation between the higher- and lower-energy shifts of the (HOMO, LUMO) excited state directly induced by the molecular-orbital energy changes and configuration interaction, respectively. Our work provides the important knowledge for understanding how nature controls the light-absorption properties of the BChl dyes, which might be also useful for design of porphyrinoid chromophores. PMID:27493495

  18. Projected performance of an enhanced VIIRS with spectral bands near 6.7 μm for measuring water vapor distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puschell, Jeffery J.; Herbst, Stephen J.

    2012-10-01

    The Visible Infrared Imager Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) is the next-generation imaging spectroradiometer for the NOAA/NASA Joint Polar Satellite System (JPSS). Flight unit 1 (F1) was successfully launched onboard the Suomi NPP spacecraft in 2011. Measured performance shows that VIIRS F1 offers important new capabilities for a wide range of weather and Earth science applications. VIIRS replaces four different sensors with a single instrument built into a flight proven rotating telescope scene scanning architecture first used in the highly successful SeaWiFS ocean color imager starting in the 1990s. This flexible VIIRS architecture can be adapted and enhanced to respond to a wide range of requirements and to incorporate new technology as it becomes available. Possible VIIRS improvements include adding water vapor and temperature sounding bands, improving spatial resolution near nadir by transmitting all unaggregated data to Earth thus avoiding aggregation of saturated or corrupted pixels with good measurements and improving sensitivity especially at the longest wavelength bands by replacing the passive radiative cooler with an active mechanical cooler. This paper extends previous work that showed that the VIIRS design can accommodate adding three water vapor bands by describing an even simpler modification to VIIRS that would involve replacing one of the current VIIRS spectral bands with a single water vapor band. Two cases are considered. The first involves replacing a redundant spectral filter and associated microlenses for the VIIRS M16 band at 12.0 μm with a water vapor band filter and microlenses based on MODIS Band 27 (MB27) at 6.7 μm, while making no changes to the detector material or ROIC. The second case involves making the same spectral filter and microlens replacements, while also improving optimization of the detector material and ROIC for operation at MB27. Expected radiometric sensitivity performance of MB27 in VIIRS is excellent in both cases and

  19. Strong heavy-to-light hole intersubband absorption in the valence band of carbon-doped GaAs/AlAs superlattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hossain, M. I.; Ikonic, Z.; Watson, J.; Shao, J.; Harrison, P.; Manfra, M. J.; Malis, O.

    2013-02-01

    We report strong mid-infrared absorption of in-plane polarized light due to heavy-to-light hole intersubband transitions in the valence band of C-doped GaAs quantum wells with AlAs barriers. The transition energies are well reproduced by theoretical calculations including layer inter-diffusion. The inter-diffusion length was estimated to be 8 ± 2 Å, a value that is consistent with electron microscopy measurements. These results highlight the importance of modeling the nanoscale structure of the semiconductors for accurately reproducing intra-band transition energies of heavy carriers such as the holes.

  20. Absence of systematic relationships between REMS duration episodes and spectral power Delta and Ultra-Slow bands in contiguous NREMS episodes in healthy humans.

    PubMed

    Le Bon, O; Linkowski, P

    2013-07-01

    Previous studies in animals and humans have reported correlations between the durations of rapid eye movement sleep (REMS) episodes and immediately preceding or subsequent non-REMS (NREMS) episodes. The relationship between these two types of sleep is a crucial component in understanding the regulation and neurophysiology of ultradian alternations that occur during sleep. Although the present study replicated previous studies, we also measured NREMS in terms of spectral power Delta and Ultra-Slow bands in addition to duration in examining correlations. The spectral power Delta band, also known as slow-wave activity, measures sleep quantity and is believed to reflect sleep physiology better than mere episode durations. The Ultra-Slow spectral power band was analyzed in parallel. Healthy human participants of both sexes (n = 26, age range 15-45 yr, n = 12 female) were carefully selected to participate in two consecutive series of home polysomnograms performed after 2 nights of habituation to the equipment. In the analyses, REMS episode durations (minutes) were compared with immediately preceding and immediately subsequent NREMS episodes (Delta and Ultra-Slow power) in each sleep cycle. REMS episode duration was more strongly correlated with preceding NREMS episodes than with subsequent NREMS episodes. However, in most cases, no correlations were observed in either direction. One ultradian sleep regulation hypothesis, which is based on stronger correlations between REMS and subsequent NREMS episode durations, holds that the main purpose of REMS is to reactivate NREMS during each sleep cycle. The present results do not support that hypothesis. PMID:23596336

  1. Optical coherence microscopy in 1700 nm spectral band for high-resolution label-free deep-tissue imaging

    PubMed Central

    Yamanaka, Masahito; Teranishi, Tatsuhiro; Kawagoe, Hiroyuki; Nishizawa, Norihiko

    2016-01-01

    Optical coherence microscopy (OCM) is a label-free, high-resolution, three-dimensional (3D) imaging technique based on optical coherence tomography (OCT) and confocal microscopy. Here, we report that the 1700-nm spectral band has the great potential to improve the imaging depth in high-resolution OCM imaging of animal tissues. Recent studies to improve the imaging depth in OCT revealed that the 1700-nm spectral band is a promising choice for imaging turbid scattering tissues due to the low attenuation of light in the wavelength region. In this study, we developed high-resolution OCM by using a high-power supercontinuum source in the 1700-nm spectral band, and compared the attenuation of signal-to-noise ratio between the 1700-nm and 1300-nm OCM imaging of a mouse brain under the condition of the same sensitivity. The comparison clearly showed that the 1700-nm OCM provides larger imaging depth than the 1300-nm OCM. In this 1700-nm OCM, the lateral resolution of 1.3 μm and the axial resolution of 2.8 μm, when a refractive index was assumed to be 1.38, was achieved. PMID:27546517

  2. Optical coherence microscopy in 1700 nm spectral band for high-resolution label-free deep-tissue imaging.

    PubMed

    Yamanaka, Masahito; Teranishi, Tatsuhiro; Kawagoe, Hiroyuki; Nishizawa, Norihiko

    2016-01-01

    Optical coherence microscopy (OCM) is a label-free, high-resolution, three-dimensional (3D) imaging technique based on optical coherence tomography (OCT) and confocal microscopy. Here, we report that the 1700-nm spectral band has the great potential to improve the imaging depth in high-resolution OCM imaging of animal tissues. Recent studies to improve the imaging depth in OCT revealed that the 1700-nm spectral band is a promising choice for imaging turbid scattering tissues due to the low attenuation of light in the wavelength region. In this study, we developed high-resolution OCM by using a high-power supercontinuum source in the 1700-nm spectral band, and compared the attenuation of signal-to-noise ratio between the 1700-nm and 1300-nm OCM imaging of a mouse brain under the condition of the same sensitivity. The comparison clearly showed that the 1700-nm OCM provides larger imaging depth than the 1300-nm OCM. In this 1700-nm OCM, the lateral resolution of 1.3 μm and the axial resolution of 2.8 μm, when a refractive index was assumed to be 1.38, was achieved. PMID:27546517

  3. Multispectrum measurements of spectral line parameters including temperature dependences of N2- and self-broadened half-width coefficients in the region of the v9 band of 12C2H6

    SciTech Connect

    Malathy Devi, V.; Benner, D. C.; Rinsland, C.P.; Smith, M.A.H.; Sams, Robert L.; Blake, Thomas A.; Flaud, Jean Marie; Sung, Keeyoon; Brown, L.R.; Mantz, A. W.

    2010-11-01

    Ethane is a prominent contributor to the spectrum of Titan, particularly in the region of the v9 band at 12μm. A multispectrum nonlinear least squares fitting program was applied to laboratory spectra of ethane to measure accurate positions, absolute intensities, N2- and selfbroadened half- width coefficients and their temperature dependences for a large number transitions. These measurements include several pQ and rQ sub-bands (and other sub-bands such as pP, rR) in the v9 fundamental band of 12C2H6 centered near 822 cm-1. Positions were measured for 2958 transitions and intensities for 3771 transitions. N2- and self-broadened half-width coefficients were determined for over 1700 transitions while temperature dependence exponents were retrieved for over 1350 of those transitions. Of these, many measurements (mostly line positions and intensities) belong to the v9+v4-v4 hot band, v9+2v4-2v4 hot band, 13C12CH6 v9 band and unidentified transitions. Forty-three high resolution (0.0016-0.005 cm-1) infrared laboratory absorption spectra recorded at temperatures between 148 and 298 K were fitted simultaneously to retrieve these parameters. Forty-one of these spectra were obtained in the temperature range of 211-298 K using the Bruker IFS 120HR interferometer located at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) in Richland, Washington. Two additional spectra at 148 K were recorded using a new temperature stabilized cryogenic cell designed to work inside the sample compartment of the high resolution Bruker IFS 125HR interferometer of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) in Pasadena California. The specialized cooling cell developed at Connecticut College and capable of achieving gas sample temperatures down to 70 K with a temperature stability and uniformity of better than ±0.05 K was employed to record the 148 K spectra. Constraints to intensity ratios, doublet separations, half-width coefficients and their temperature dependence exponents were required to

  4. High-power supercontinuum generation using high-repetition-rate ultrashort-pulse fiber laser for ultrahigh-resolution optical coherence tomography in 1600 nm spectral band

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamanaka, Masahito; Kawagoe, Hiroyuki; Nishizawa, Norihiko

    2016-02-01

    We describe the generation of a high-power, spectrally smooth supercontinuum (SC) in the 1600 nm spectral band for ultrahigh-resolution optical coherence tomography (UHR-OCT). A clean SC was achieved by using a highly nonlinear fiber with normal dispersion properties and a high-quality pedestal-free pulse obtained from a passively mode-locked erbium-doped fiber laser operating at 182 MHz. The center wavelength and spectral width were 1578 and 172 nm, respectively. The output power of the SC was 51 mW. Using the developed SC source, we demonstrated UHR-OCT imaging of biological samples with a sensitivity of 109 dB and an axial resolution of 4.9 µm in tissue.

  5. Preparation and Absorption Spectral Property of a Multifunctional Water-Soluble Azo Compound with D-π-A Structure, 4-(4- Hydroxy-1-Naphthylazo)Benzoic Acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, L.; Lv, H.; Xie, C. G.; Chang, W. G.; Yan, Z. Q.

    2015-07-01

    A multifunctional water-soluble azo dye with the D-π-A conjugated structure, 4-(4-hydroxy-1-naphthylazo) benzoic acid ( HNBA), was designed and synthesized using 1-naphanol as the electron donator, benzoic acid as the electron acceptor, and -N=N- as the bridging group. After its structure was characterized by FTIR, 1H NMR, and element analysis, the UV-Vis absorption spectral performance of the target dye was studied in detail. The results showed that the dye, combining hydroxyl group, azo group, and carboxyl group, possessed excellent absorption spectral properties (ɛ = 1.2·104 l·mol-1·cm-1) changing with pH and solvents. In particular, in polar and protonic water, it had excellent optical response to some metal ions, i.e., Fe3+ and Pb2+, which might make it a latent colorimetric sensor for detecting heavy metal ions.

  6. Thermodynamic derivatives of infrared absorptance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Broersma, S.; Walls, W. L.

    1974-01-01

    Calculation of the concentration, pressure, and temperature dependence of the spectral absorptance of a vibrational absorption band. A smooth thermodynamic dependence was found for wavelength intervals where the average absorptance is less than 0.65. Individual rotational lines, whose parameters are often well known, were used as bases in the calculation of medium resolution spectra. Two modes of calculation were combined: well-separated rotational lines plus interaction terms, or strongly overlapping lines that were represented by a compound line of similar shape plus corrections. The 1.9- and 6.3-micron bands of H2O and the 4.3-micron band of CO2 were examined in detail and compared with experiment.

  7. A Broad-band Spectral and Timing Study of the X-Ray Binary System Centaurus X-3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Audley, Michael Damian

    1998-01-01

    This dissertation describes a multi-mission investigation of the high mass X-ray binary pulsar Centaurus X-3. Cen X-3 was observed with the Broad Band X-Ray Telescope (BBXRT) in December 1990. This was the first high-resolution solid state X-ray spectrometer to cover the iron K fluorescence region. The Fe K emission feature was resolved into two components for the first time. A broad 6.7 keV feature was found to be a blend of lines from Fe XXI-Fe XXVI with energies ranging from 6.6 to 6.9 keV due to photoionization of the companion's stellar wind. A narrow line at 6.4 keV due to fluorescence of iron in relatively low ionization states was also found. The quasi-periodic oscillations (QPO) at about 40 mHz were used to estimate the surface magnetic field of Cen X-3 as approx. 2.6 x 10(exp 12) G and to predict that there should be a cyclotron scattering resonance absorption feature (CSRF) near 30 keV. In order to further resolve the iron line complex and to investigate the pulse-phase dependence of the iron line intensities, Cen X-3 was observed with the Advanced Satellite for Cosmology and Astrophysics (ASCA). Using ASCA's state-of-the-art non-dispersive X-ray spectrometers the 6.4 keV fluorescent iron line was found to be pulsing while the intensities of the 6.7 and 6.9 keV recombination lines do not vary with pulse phase. This confirms that the 6.4 keV line is due to reflection by relatively neutral matter close to the neutron star while the recombination lines originate in the extended stellar wind. The continuum spectrum was found to be modified by reflection from matter close to the neutron star. Observations with the EXOSAT GSPC were used to search for a CSRF. The EXOSAT spectra were consistent with the presence of a CSRF but an unambiguous detection was not possible because of a lack of sensitivity at energies higher than the cyclotron energy. Cen X-3 was then observed with the Rossi X-Ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) and evidence for a CSRF at 25.1 +/- 0.3 keV was

  8. Temperature dependence of the far-infrared absorption spectrum of gaseous methane.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Codastefano, P.; Dore, P.; Nencini, L.

    The rototranslational absorption spectrum of gaseous methane has been measured at seven different temperatures from 296 to 140 K. The authors have analyzed both the spectral moments and the experimental absorption shapes, assuming that only octupolar and hexadecapolar induction mechanisms contribute to the absorption. This assumption allows to parameterize the temperature dependence of both the intensity and the shape of the absorption band. The results obtained indicate that other contributions to absorption are not negligible.

  9. The distribution of spectral index of magnetic field and ion velocity in Pi2 frequency band in BBFs: THEMIS statistics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Q.; Du, A. M.; Volwerk, M.; Wang, G. Q.

    2016-09-01

    A statistical study of the THEMIS FGM and ESA data is performed on turbulence of magnetic field and velocity for 218 selected 12 min intervals in BBFs. The spectral index α in the frequency range of 0.005-0.06 Hz are Gaussian distributions. The peaks indexes of total ion velocity Vi and parallel velocity V‖ are 1.95 and 2.07 nearly the spectral index of intermittent low frequency turbulence with large amplitude. However, most probable α of perpendicular velocity V⊥ is about 1.75. It is a little bigger than 5/3 of Kolmogorov (1941). The peak indexes of total magnetic field BT is 1.70 similar to V⊥. Compression magnetic field B‖ are 1.85 which is smaller than 2 and bigger than 5/3 of Kolmogorov (1941). The most probable spectral index of shear B⊥ is about 1.44 which is close to 3/2 of Kraichnan (1965). Max V⊥ have little effect on the power magnitude of VT and V‖ but is positively correlated to spectral index of V⊥. The spectral power of BT, B‖ and B⊥ increase with max perpendicular velocity but spectral indexes of them are negatively correlated to V⊥. The spectral index and the spectral power of magnetic field over the frequency interval 0.005-0.06 Hz is very different from that over 0.08-1 Hz.

  10. Strong interlayer coupling mediated giant two-photon absorption in MoS e2 /graphene oxide heterostructure: Quenching of exciton bands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Rituraj; Aneesh, J.; Yadav, Rajesh Kumar; Sanda, Suresh; Barik, A. R.; Mishra, Ashish Kumar; Maji, Tuhin Kumar; Karmakar, Debjani; Adarsh, K. V.

    2016-04-01

    A complex few-layer MoS e2 /graphene oxide (GO) heterostructure with strong interlayer coupling was prepared by a facile hydrothermal method. In this strongly coupled heterostructure, we demonstrate a giant enhancement of two-photon absorption that is in stark contrast to the reverse saturable absorption of a weakly coupled MoS e2 /GO heterostructure and saturable absorption of isolated MoS e2 . Spectroscopic evidence of our study indicates that the optical signatures of isolated MoS e2 and GO domains are significantly modified in the heterostructure, displaying a direct coupling of both domains. Furthermore, our first-principles calculations indicate that strong interlayer coupling between the layers dramatically suppresses the MoS e2 excitonic bands. We envision that our findings provide a powerful tool to explore different optical functionalities as a function of interlayer coupling, which may be essential for the development of device technologies.

  11. Optical absorption and band gap reduction in (Fe1-xCrx)2O3 solid solutions: A first-principles study

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Yong; Lopata, Kenneth A.; Chambers, Scott A.; Govind, Niranjan; Sushko, Petr V.

    2013-12-02

    We provide a detailed theoretical analysis of the character of optical transitions and band gap reduction in (Fe1-xCrx)2O3 solid solutions using extensive periodic model and embedded cluster calculations. Optical absorption bands for x = 0.0, 0.5, and 1.0 are assigned on the basis of timedependent density functional theory (TDDFT) calculations. A band-gap reduction of as much as 0.7 eV with respect to that of pure α-Fe2O3 is found. This result can be attributed to predominantly two effects: (i) the higher valence band edge for x ≈ 0.5, as compared to those in pure α-Fe2O3 and α-Cr2O3, and, (ii) the appearance of Cr  Fe d–d transitions in the solid solutions. Broadening of the valence band due to hybridization of the O 2p states with Fe and Cr 3d states also contributes to band gap reduction.

  12. A laboratory Atlas of the 5 nu-1 NH3 absorption band at 6475 A with applications to Jupiter and Saturn

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giver, L. P.; Miller, J. H.; Boese, R. W.

    1975-01-01

    A complete atlas of the 5 nu-1 absorption band of NH3 is presented together with measurements of the total band intensity, line intensities, and self-broadening coefficients. The spectrum, which is displayed in the interval from 6418 to 6550 A, was obtained photoelectrically at a pressure of 0.061 atm, and many more lines were seen in this spectrum than in a previous one obtained at a pressure of 0.39 atm. The band intensity is used to derive the NH3 abundance in the atmospheres of Jupiter and Saturn, and the abundances in a single vertical path are found to be about 10 m amagat for Jupiter and 2 m amagat for Saturn. These results are shown to be in agreement with previous results obtained from higher resolution photographic spectra.

  13. Ortho-Rectification of Narrow Band Multi-Spectral Imagery Assisted by Dslr RGB Imagery Acquired by a Fixed-Wing Uas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rau, J.-Y.; Jhan, J.-P.; Huang, C.-Y.

    2015-08-01

    Miniature Multiple Camera Array (MiniMCA-12) is a frame-based multilens/multispectral sensor composed of 12 lenses with narrow band filters. Due to its small size and light weight, it is suitable to mount on an Unmanned Aerial System (UAS) for acquiring high spectral, spatial and temporal resolution imagery used in various remote sensing applications. However, due to its wavelength range is only 10 nm that results in low image resolution and signal-to-noise ratio which are not suitable for image matching and digital surface model (DSM) generation. In the meantime, the spectral correlation among all 12 bands of MiniMCA images are low, it is difficult to perform tie-point matching and aerial triangulation at the same time. In this study, we thus propose the use of a DSLR camera to assist automatic aerial triangulation of MiniMCA-12 imagery and to produce higher spatial resolution DSM for MiniMCA12 ortho-image generation. Depending on the maximum payload weight of the used UAS, these two kinds of sensors could be collected at the same time or individually. In this study, we adopt a fixed-wing UAS to carry a Canon EOS 5D Mark2 DSLR camera and a MiniMCA-12 multi-spectral camera. For the purpose to perform automatic aerial triangulation between a DSLR camera and the MiniMCA-12, we choose one master band from MiniMCA-12 whose spectral range has overlap with the DSLR camera. However, all lenses of MiniMCA-12 have different perspective centers and viewing angles, the original 12 channels have significant band misregistration effect. Thus, the first issue encountered is to reduce the band misregistration effect. Due to all 12 MiniMCA lenses being frame-based, their spatial offsets are smaller than 15 cm and all images are almost 98% overlapped, we thus propose a modified projective transformation (MPT) method together with two systematic error correction procedures to register all 12 bands of imagery on the same image space. It means that those 12 bands of images acquired at

  14. Estimation of leaf water content using spectral bands from the commercial satellite, DigitalGlobe WorldView-3

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A recently-launched high-resolution commercial satellite, DigitalGlobe’s WorldView-3, has 8 bands in the shortwave infrared (SWIR) wavelength region, which may be capable of estimating canopy water content at 3.7-m spatial resolution. WorldView-3 also has 8 multispectral bands at 1.24-m resolution ...

  15. Sub-gap and band edge optical absorption in a-Si:H by photothermal deflection spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, W. B.; Amer, N. M.

    1981-07-01

    Using photothermal deflection spectroscopy, the optical absorption of various a-Si:H films was investigated in the range of 2.1 to 0.6 eV. An absorption shoulder which depends on deposition conditions and on doping was found and was attributed to dangling bonds. The exponential edge broadens with increasing spin density.

  16. Complexities in pyroxene compositions derived from absorption band centers: Examples from Apollo samples, HED meteorites, synthetic pure pyroxenes, and remote sensing data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moriarty, D. P.; Pieters, C. M.

    2016-02-01

    We reexamine the relationship between pyroxene composition and near-infrared absorption bands, integrating measurements of diverse natural and synthetic samples. We test an algorithm (PLC) involving a two-part linear continuum removal and parabolic fits to the 1 and 2 μm bands—a computationally simple approach which can easily be automated and applied to remote sensing data. Employing a suite of synthetic pure pyroxenes, the PLC technique is shown to derive similar band centers to the modified Gaussian model. PLC analyses are extended to natural pyroxene-bearing materials, including (1) bulk lunar basalts and pyroxene separates, (2) diverse lunar soils, and (3) HED meteorites. For natural pyroxenes, the relationship between composition and absorption band center differs from that of synthetic pyroxenes. These differences arise from complexities inherent in natural materials such as exsolution, zoning, mixing, and space weathering. For these reasons, band center measurements of natural pyroxene-bearing materials are compositionally nonunique and could represent three distinct scenarios (1) pyroxene with a narrow compositional range, (2) complexly zoned pyroxene grains, or (3) a mixture of multiple pyroxene (or nonpyroxene) components. Therefore, a universal quantitative relationship between band centers and pyroxene composition cannot be uniquely derived for natural pyroxene-bearing materials without additional geologic context. Nevertheless, useful relative relationships between composition and band center persist in most cases. These relationships are used to interpret M3 data from the Humboldtianum Basin. Four distinct compositional units are identified (1) Mare Humboldtianum basalts, (2) distinct outer basalts, (3) low-Ca pyroxene-bearing materials, and (4) feldspathic materials.

  17. 8-band k·p modelling of mid-infrared intersubband absorption in Ge quantum wells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, D. J.

    2016-07-01

    The 8-band k.p parameters which include the direct band coupling between the conduction and the valence bands are derived and used to model optical intersubband transitions in Ge quantum well heterostructure material grown on Si substrates. Whilst for Si rich quantum wells the coupling between the conduction bands and valence bands is not important for accurate modelling, the present work demonstrates that the inclusion of such coupling is essential to accurately determine intersubband transitions between hole states in Ge and Ge-rich Si1-xGex quantum wells. This is due to the direct bandgap being far smaller in energy in Ge compared to Si. Compositional bowing parameters for a range of the key modelling input parameters required for Ge/SiGe heterostructures, including the Kane matrix elements, the effective mass of the Γ 2 ' conduction band, and the Dresselhaus parameters for both 6- and 8-band k.p modelling, have been determined. These have been used to understand valence band intersubband transitions in a range of Ge quantum well intersubband photodetector devices in the mid-infrared wavelength range.

  18. Optical parametric chirped pulse amplification and spectral shaping of a continuum generated in a photonic band gap fiber.

    PubMed

    Hugonnot, E; Somekh, M; Villate, D; Salin, F; Freysz, E

    2004-05-31

    A chirped pulse, spectrally broadened in a photonic bandgap optical fiber by 120 fs Ti:Sapphire laser pulses, is parametrically amplified in a BBO crystal pumped by a frequency doubled nanosecond Nd:YAG laser pulse. Without changing the frequency of the Ti:Sapphire, a spectral tunability of the amplified pulses is demonstrated. The possibility to achieve broader spectral range amplification is confirmed for a non-collinear pump-signal interaction geometry. For optimal non-collinear interaction geometry, the pulse duration of the original and amplified pulse are similar. Finally, we demonstrate that the combination of two BBO crystals makes it possible to spectrally shape the amplified pulses. PMID:19475076

  19. Conduction-band electronic states of YbInCu{sub 4} studied by photoemission and soft x-ray absorption spectroscopies

    SciTech Connect

    Utsumi, Yuki; Kurihara, Hidenao; Maso, Hiroyuki; Tobimatsu, Komei; Sato, Hitoshi; Shimada, Kenya; Namatame, Hirofumi; Hiraoka, Koichi; Kojima, Kenichi; Ohkochi, Takuo; Fujimori, Shin-ichi; Takeda, Yukiharu; Saitoh, Yuji; Mimura, Kojiro; Ueda, Shigenori; Yamashita, Yoshiyuki; Yoshikawa, Hideki; Kobayashi, Keisuke; Oguchi, Tamio; Taniguchi, Masaki

    2011-09-15

    We have studied conduction-band (CB) electronic states of a typical valence-transition compound YbInCu{sub 4} by means of temperature-dependent hard x-ray photoemission spectroscopy (HX-PES) of the Cu 2p{sub 3/2} and In 3d{sub 5/2} core states taken at h{nu}=5.95 keV, soft x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) of the Cu 2p{sub 3/2} core absorption region around h{nu}{approx}935 eV, and soft x-ray photoemission spectroscopy (SX-PES) of the valence band at the Cu 2p{sub 3/2} absorption edge of h{nu}=933.0 eV. With decreasing temperature below the valence transition at T{sub V}=42 K, we have found that (1) the Cu 2p{sub 3/2} and In 3d{sub 5/2} peaks in the HX-PES spectra exhibit the energy shift toward the lower binding-energy side by {approx}40 and {approx}30 meV, respectively, (2) an energy position of the Cu 2p{sub 3/2} main absorption peak in the XAS spectrum is shifted toward higher photon-energy side by {approx}100 meV, with an appearance of a shoulder structure below the Cu 2p{sub 3/2} main absorption peak, and (3) an intensity of the Cu L{sub 3}VV Auger spectrum is abruptly enhanced. These experimental results suggest that the Fermi level of the CB-derived density of states is shifted toward the lower binding-energy side. We have described the valence transition in YbInCu{sub 4} in terms of the charge transfer from the CB to Yb 4f states.

  20. Intensities and self-broadening coefficients of the strongest water vapour lines in the 2.7 and 6.25 μm absorption bands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ptashnik, Igor V.; McPheat, Robert; Polyansky, Oleg L.; Shine, Keith P.; Smith, Kevin M.

    2016-07-01

    Intensities and self-broadening coefficients are presented for about 460 of the strongest water vapour lines in the spectral regions 1400-1840 cm-1 and 3440-3970 cm-1 at room temperature, obtained from rather unique measurements using a 5-mm-path-length cell. The retrieved spectral line parameters are compared with those in the HITRAN database ver. 2008 and 2012 and with recent ab-initio calculations. Both the retrieved intensitie