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Sample records for absorption spectral features

  1. Spectral calibration of hyperspectral imagery using atmospheric absorption features.

    PubMed

    Guanter, Luis; Richter, Rudolf; Moreno, José

    2006-04-01

    One of the initial steps in the preprocessing of remote sensing data is the atmospheric correction of the at-sensor radiance images, i.e., radiances recorded at the sensor aperture. Apart from the accuracy in the estimation of the concentrations of the main atmospheric species, the retrieved surface reflectance is also influenced by the spectral calibration of the sensor, especially in those wavelengths mostly affected by gaseous absorptions. In particular, errors in the surface reflectance appear when a systematic shift in the nominal channel positions occurs. A method to assess the spectral calibration of hyperspectral imaging spectrometers from the acquired imagery is presented in this paper. The fundamental basis of the method is the calculation of the value of the spectral shift that minimizes the error in the estimates of surface reflectance. This is performed by an optimization procedure that minimizes the deviation between a surface reflectance spectrum and a smoothed one resulting from the application of a low-pass filter. A sensitivity analysis was performed using synthetic data generated with the MODTRAN4 radiative transfer code for several values of the spectral shift and the water vapor column content. The error detected in the retrieval is less than +/- 0.2 nm for spectral shifts smaller than 2 nm, and less than +/- 1.0 nm for extreme spectral shifts of 5 nm. A low sensitivity to uncertainties in the estimation of water vapor content was found, which reinforces the robustness of the algorithm. The method was successfully applied to data acquired by different hyperspectral sensors. PMID:16608005

  2. Using high spectral resolution spectrophotometry to study broad mineral absorption features on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blaney, D. L.; Crisp, D.

    1993-01-01

    Traditionally telescopic measurements of mineralogic absorption features have been made using relatively low to moderate (R=30-300) spectral resolution. Mineralogic absorption features tend to be broad so high resolution spectroscopy (R greater than 10,000) does not provide significant additional compositional information. Low to moderate resolution spectroscopy allows an observer to obtain data over a wide wavelength range (hundreds to thousands of wavenumbers) compared to the several wavenumber intervals that are collected using high resolution spectrometers. However, spectrophotometry at high resolution has major advantages over lower resolution spectroscopy in situations that are applicable to studies of the Martian surface, i.e., at wavelengths where relatively weak surface absorption features and atmospheric gas absorption features both occur.

  3. Ultrafast transient absorption revisited: Phase-flips, spectral fingers, and other dynamical features.

    PubMed

    Cina, Jeffrey A; Kovac, Philip A; Jumper, Chanelle C; Dean, Jacob C; Scholes, Gregory D

    2016-05-01

    We rebuild the theory of ultrafast transient-absorption/transmission spectroscopy starting from the optical response of an individual molecule to incident femtosecond pump and probe pulses. The resulting description makes use of pulse propagators and free molecular evolution operators to arrive at compact expressions for the several contributions to a transient-absorption signal. In this alternative description, which is physically equivalent to the conventional response-function formalism, these signal contributions are conveniently expressed as quantum mechanical overlaps between nuclear wave packets that have undergone different sequences of pulse-driven optical transitions and time-evolution on different electronic potential-energy surfaces. Using this setup in application to a simple, multimode model of the light-harvesting chromophores of PC577, we develop wave-packet pictures of certain generic features of ultrafast transient-absorption signals related to the probed-frequency dependence of vibrational quantum beats. These include a Stokes-shifting node at the time-evolving peak emission frequency, antiphasing between vibrational oscillations on opposite sides (i.e., to the red or blue) of this node, and spectral fingering due to vibrational overtones and combinations. Our calculations make a vibrationally abrupt approximation for the incident pump and probe pulses, but properly account for temporal pulse overlap and signal turn-on, rather than neglecting pulse overlap or assuming delta-function excitations, as are sometimes done. PMID:27155654

  4. Determination of the in-flight spectral calibration of AVIRIS using atmospheric absorption features

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, Robert O.

    1995-01-01

    Spectral calibration of the Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) as data are acquired in flight is essential to quantitative analysis of the measured upwelling spectral radiance. In each spectrum measured by AVIRIS in flight, there are numerous atmospheric gas absorption bands that drive this requirement for accurate spectral calibration. If the surface and atmospheric properties are measured independently, these atmospheric absorption bands may be used to deduce the in-flight spectral calibration of an imaging spectrometer. Both the surface and atmospheric characteristics were measured for a calibration target during an in-flight calibration experiment held at Lunar Lake, Nevada on April 5, 1994. This paper uses upwelling spectral radiance predicted for the calibration target with the MODTRAN radiative transfer code to validate the spectral calibration of AVIRIS in flight.

  5. Mapping vegetation types with the multiple spectral feature mapping algorithm in both emission and absorption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, Roger N.; Swayze, Gregg A.; Koch, Christopher; Ager, Cathy

    1992-01-01

    Vegetation covers a large portion of the Earth's land surface. Remotely sensing quantitative information from vegetation has proven difficult because in a broad sense, all vegetation is similar from a chemical viewpoint, and most healthy plants are green. Plant species are generally characterized by the leaf and flower or fruit morphology, not by remote sensing spectral signatures. But to the human eye, many plants show varying shades of green, so there is direct evidence for spectral differences between plant types. Quantifying these changes in a predictable manner has not been easy. The Clark spectral features mapping algorithm was applied to mapping spectral features in vegetation species.

  6. Revealing spectral features in two-photon absorption spectrum of Hoechst 33342: a combined experimental and quantum-chemical study.

    PubMed

    Olesiak-Banska, Joanna; Matczyszyn, Katarzyna; Zaleśny, Robert; Murugan, N Arul; Kongsted, Jacob; Ågren, Hans; Bartkowiak, Wojciech; Samoc, Marek

    2013-10-10

    We present the results of wide spectral range Z-scan measurements of the two-photon absorption (2PA) spectrum of the Hoechst 33342 dye. The strongest 2PA of the dye in aqueous solution is found at 575 nm, and the associated two-photon absorption cross section is 245 GM. A weak but clearly visible 2PA band at ∼850 nm is also observed, a feature that could not be anticipated from the one-photon absorption spectrum. On the basis of the results of hybrid quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics calculations, we put forward a notion that the long-wavelength feature observed in the two-photon absorption spectrum of Hoechst 33342 is due to the formation of dye aggregates. PMID:24016295

  7. Evidence for cyclotron absorption from spectral features in gamma-ray bursts seen with Ginga

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murakami, T.; Fujii, M.; Hayashida, K.; Itoh, M.; Nishimura, J.

    1988-01-01

    New observations by the gamma-ray burst detector on board the Ginga satellite, which has two well-calibrated detectors covering a wide energy range of 1.5 to 375 keV, are reported. The spectral features obtained are consistent with first and second cyclotron harmonics. This finding is taken as strong evidence for the magnetized neutron star model of gamma-ray bursts.

  8. Variability, absorption features, and parent body searches in "spectrally featureless" meteorite reflectance spectra: Case study - Tagish Lake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izawa, M. R. M.; Craig, M. A.; Applin, D. M.; Sanchez, J. A.; Reddy, V.; Le Corre, L.; Mann, P.; Cloutis, E. A.

    2015-07-01

    Reflectance spectra of many asteroids and other Solar System bodies are commonly reported as "featureless". Here, we show that weak but consistently detectable absorption bands are observable in 200-2500 nm spectra of the Tagish Lake meteorite, a likely compositional and spectral analogue for low-albedo, "spectrally-featureless" asteroids. Tagish Lake presents a rare opportunity to study multiple lithologies within a single meteorite. Reflectance spectra of Tagish Lake display significant variation between different lithologies. The spectral variations are due in part to mineralogical variations between different Tagish Lake lithologies. Ultraviolet reflectance spectra (200-400 nm), few of which have been reported in the literature to date, reveal albedo and spectral ratio variations as a function of mineralogy. Similarly visible-near infrared reflectance spectra reveal variations in albedo, spectral slope, and the presence of weak absorption features that persist across different lithologies and can be attributed to various phases present in Tagish Lake. These observations demonstrate that significant spectral variability may exist between different lithologies of Tagish Lake, which may affect the interpretation of potential source body spectra. It is also important to consider the spectral variability within the meteorite before excluding compositional links between possible parent bodies in the main belt and Tagish Lake. Tagish Lake materials may also be spectral-compositional analogues for materials on the surfaces of other dark asteroids, including some that are targets of upcoming spacecraft missions. Tagish Lake has been proposed as a spectral match for 'ultra-primitive' D or P-type asteroids, and the variability reported here may be reflected in spatially or rotationally-resolved spectra of possible Tagish Lake parent bodies and source objects in the Near-Earth Asteroid population. A search for objects with spectra similar to Tagish Lake has been carried

  9. Remote sensing of forage nutrients: Combining ecological and spectral absorption feature data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knox, Nichola M.; Skidmore, Andrew K.; Prins, Herbert H. T.; Heitkönig, Ignas M. A.; Slotow, Rob; van der Waal, Cornelis; de Boer, William F.

    2012-08-01

    Forage quality in grassland-savanna ecosystems support high biomass of both wild ungulates and domestic livestock. Forage quality is however variable in both space and time. In this study findings from ecological and laboratory studies, focused on assessing forage quality, are combined to evaluate the feasibility of a remote sensing approach for predicting the spatial and temporal variations in forage quality. Spatially available ecological findings (ancillary data), and physically linked spectral data (absorption data) are evaluated in this study and combined to create models which predict forage quality (nitrogen, phosphorus and fibre concentrations) of grasses collected in the Kruger National Park, South Africa, and analysed in both dry and wet seasons. Models were developed using best subsets regression modelling. Ancillary data alone, could predict forage components, with a higher goodness of fit and predictive capability, than absorption data (Ancillary: Radj2=0.42-0.74 compared with absorption: Radj2=0.11-0.51, and lower RMSE values for each nutrient produced by the ancillary models). Plant species and soil classes were found to be ecological variables most frequently included in prediction models of ancillary data. Models in which both ancillary and absorption variables were included, had the highest predictive capabilities ( Radj2=0.49-0.74 and lowest RMSE values) compared to models where data sources were derived from only one of the two groups. This research provides an important step in the process of creating biochemical models for mapping forage nutrients in savanna systems that can be generalised seasonally over large areas.

  10. Ultraviolet Broad Absorption Features and the Spectral Energy Distribution of the QSO PG 1351+641. 2.5

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zheng, W.; Kriss, G. A.; Wang, J. X.; Brotherton, M.; Oegerle, W. R.; Blair, W. P.; Davidsen, A. F.; Green, R. F.; Hutchings, J. B.; Kaiser, M. E.; Fisher, Richard R. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    We present a moderate-resolution (approximately 20 km/s) spectrum of the broad-absorption line QSO PG 1351+64 between 915-1180 angstroms, obtained with the Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer (FUSE). Additional low-resolution spectra at longer wavelengths were also obtained with the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) and ground-based telescopes. Broad absorption is present on the blue wings of C III lambda977, Ly-beta, O VI lambda-lambda-1032,1038, Ly-alpha, N V lambda-lambda-1238,1242, Si IV lambda-lambda-1393,1402, and C IV lambda-lambda-1548,1450. The absorption profile can be fitted with five components at velocities of approximately -780, -1049, -1629, -1833, and -3054 km/s with respect to the emission-line redshift of z = 0.088. All the absorption components cover a large fraction of the continuum source as well as the broad-line region. The O VI emission feature is very weak, and the O VI/Ly-alpha flux ratio is 0.08, one of the lowest among low-redshift active galaxies and QSOs. The ultraviolet continuum shows a significant change in slope near 1050 angstroms in the restframe. The steeper continuum shortward of the Lyman limit extrapolates well to the observed weak X-ray flux level. The absorbers' properties are similar to those of high-redshift broad absorption-line QSOs. The derived total column density of the UV absorbers is on the order of 10(exp 21)/s, unlikely to produce significant opacity above 1 keV in the X-ray. Unless there is a separate, high-ionization X-ray absorber, the QSO's weak X-ray flux may be intrinsic. The ionization level of the absorbing components is comparable to that anticipated in the broad-line region, therefore the absorbers may be related to broad-line clouds along the line of sight.

  11. Ultraviolet Broad Absorption Features and the Spectral Energy Distribution of the QSO PG 1351+64. 3.1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zheng, W.; Kriss, G. A.; Wang, J. X.; Brotherton, M.; Oegerle, W. R.; Blair, W. P.; Davidsen, A. F.; Green, R. F.; Hutchings, J. B.; Kaiser, M. E.; Fisher, R. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    We present a moderate-resolution (approximately 20 km s(exp -1) spectrum of the mini broad absorption line QSO PG 1351+64 between 915-1180 A, obtained with the Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer (FUSE). Additional low-resolution spectra at longer wavelengths were also obtained with the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) and ground-based telescopes. Broad absorption is present on the blue wings of C III (lambda)977, Ly(beta), O VI (lambda)(lambda)1032,1038, Ly(alpha), N V (lambda)(lambda)1238,1242, Si IV (lambda)(lambda)1393,1402, and C IV (lambda)(lambda)1548,1450. The absorption profile can be fitted with five components at velocities of approximately -780, -1049, -1629, -1833, and -3054 km s(exp -1) with respect to the emission-line redshift of z = 0.088. All the absorption components cover a large fraction of the continuum source as well as the broad-line region. The O VI emission feature is very weak, and the O VI/Ly(alpha) flux ratio is 0.08, one of the lowest among low-redshift active galaxies and QSOs. The UV (ultraviolet) continuum shows a significant change in slope near 1050 A in the restframe. The steeper continuum shortward of the Lyman limit extrapolates well to the observed weak X-ray flux level. The absorbers' properties are similar to those of high-redshift broad absorption-line QSOs. The derived total column density of the UV absorbers is on the order of 10(exp 21) cm(exp -2), unlikely to produce significant opacity above 1 keV in the X-ray. Unless there is a separate, high-ionization X-ray absorber, the QSO's weak X-ray flux may be intrinsic. The ionization level of the absorbing components is comparable to that anticipated in the broad-line region, therefore the absorbers may be related to broad-line clouds along the line of sight.

  12. [Plant Spectral Discrimination Based on Phenological Features].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lei; Zhao, Jian-long; Jia, Kun; Li, Xiao-song

    2015-10-01

    Spectral analysis plays a significant role onplant characteristic identification and mechanism recognition, there were many papers published on the aspects of absorption features in the spectra of chlorophyll and moisture, spectral analysis onvegetation red edge effect, spectra profile feature extraction, spectra profile conversion, vegetation leaf structure and chemical composition impacts on the spectra in past years. However, fewer researches issued on spectral changes caused by plant seasonal changes of life form, chlorophyll, leaf area index. This paper studied on spectral observation of 11 plants of various life form, plant leaf structure and its size, phenological characteristics, they include deciduous forest with broad vertical leaf, needle leaf evergreen forest, needle leaf deciduous forest, deciduous forest with broadflat leaf, high shrub with big leaf, high shrub with little leaf, deciduous forest with broad little leaf, short shrub, meadow, steppe and grass. Field spectral data were observed with SVC-HR768 (Spectra Vista company, USA), the band width covers 350-2 500 nm, spectral resolution reaches 1-4 nm. The features of NDVI, spectral maximum absorption depth in green band, and spectral maximum absorption depth in red band were measured after continuum removal processing, the mean, amplitude and gradient of these features on seasonal change profile were analyzed, meanwhile, separability research on plant spectral feature of growth period and maturation period were compared. The paper presents a calculation method of separability of vegetation spectra which consider feature spatial distances. This index is carried on analysis of the vegetation discrimination. The results show that: the spectral features during plant growth period are easier to distinguish than them during maturation period. With the same features comparison, plant separability of growth period is 3 points higher than it during maturation period. The overall separabilityof vegetation

  13. [Plant Spectral Discrimination Based on Phenological Features].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lei; Zhao, Jian-long; Jia, Kun; Li, Xiao-song

    2015-10-01

    Spectral analysis plays a significant role onplant characteristic identification and mechanism recognition, there were many papers published on the aspects of absorption features in the spectra of chlorophyll and moisture, spectral analysis onvegetation red edge effect, spectra profile feature extraction, spectra profile conversion, vegetation leaf structure and chemical composition impacts on the spectra in past years. However, fewer researches issued on spectral changes caused by plant seasonal changes of life form, chlorophyll, leaf area index. This paper studied on spectral observation of 11 plants of various life form, plant leaf structure and its size, phenological characteristics, they include deciduous forest with broad vertical leaf, needle leaf evergreen forest, needle leaf deciduous forest, deciduous forest with broadflat leaf, high shrub with big leaf, high shrub with little leaf, deciduous forest with broad little leaf, short shrub, meadow, steppe and grass. Field spectral data were observed with SVC-HR768 (Spectra Vista company, USA), the band width covers 350-2 500 nm, spectral resolution reaches 1-4 nm. The features of NDVI, spectral maximum absorption depth in green band, and spectral maximum absorption depth in red band were measured after continuum removal processing, the mean, amplitude and gradient of these features on seasonal change profile were analyzed, meanwhile, separability research on plant spectral feature of growth period and maturation period were compared. The paper presents a calculation method of separability of vegetation spectra which consider feature spatial distances. This index is carried on analysis of the vegetation discrimination. The results show that: the spectral features during plant growth period are easier to distinguish than them during maturation period. With the same features comparison, plant separability of growth period is 3 points higher than it during maturation period. The overall separabilityof vegetation

  14. Lanthanides and other spectral oddities in a Centauri. Ce III, Nd III, Kr II, and broad absorption features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cowley, C. R.; Hubrig, S.; González, J. F.

    2010-11-01

    Context. There is considerable interest in the helium variable a Cen as a bridge between helium-weak and helium-strong CP stars. Aims: We investigate Ce iii and other possible lanthanides in the spectrum the of hottest chemically peculiar (CP) star in which these elements have been found. A Kr ii line appears within a broad absorption which we suggest may be due to a high-level transition in C ii. Methods: Wavelengths and equivalent widths are measured on high-resolution UVES spectra, analyzed, and their phase-variations investigated. Results: New, robust identifications of Ce iii and Kr ii are demonstrated. Nd iii is likely present. A broad absorption near λ4619 is present at all phases of a Cen, and in some other early B stars. Conclusions: The presence of lanthanides in a Cen strengthens the view that this star is a significant link between the cooler CP stars and the hotter helium-peculiar stars. Broad absorptions in a Cen are not well explained. Based on observations collected at the European Southern Observatory, Paranal, Chile (ESO programmes 65.L-0316(A), 073.D-0504(A), and 076.B-0055(A)).

  15. Optimizing spectral resolutions for the classification of C3 and C4 grass species, using wavelengths of known absorption features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adjorlolo, Clement; Cho, Moses A.; Mutanga, Onisimo; Ismail, Riyad

    2012-01-01

    Hyperspectral remote-sensing approaches are suitable for detection of the differences in 3-carbon (C3) and four carbon (C4) grass species phenology and composition. However, the application of hyperspectral sensors to vegetation has been hampered by high-dimensionality, spectral redundancy, and multicollinearity problems. In this experiment, resampling of hyperspectral data to wider wavelength intervals, around a few band-centers, sensitive to the biophysical and biochemical properties of C3 or C4 grass species is proposed. The approach accounts for an inherent property of vegetation spectral response: the asymmetrical nature of the inter-band correlations between a waveband and its shorter- and longer-wavelength neighbors. It involves constructing a curve of weighting threshold of correlation (Pearson's r) between a chosen band-center and its neighbors, as a function of wavelength. In addition, data were resampled to some multispectral sensors-ASTER, GeoEye-1, IKONOS, QuickBird, RapidEye, SPOT 5, and WorldView-2 satellites-for comparative purposes, with the proposed method. The resulting datasets were analyzed, using the random forest algorithm. The proposed resampling method achieved improved classification accuracy (κ=0.82), compared to the resampled multispectral datasets (κ=0.78, 0.65, 0.62, 0.59, 0.65, 0.62, 0.76, respectively). Overall, results from this study demonstrated that spectral resolutions for C3 and C4 grasses can be optimized and controlled for high dimensionality and multicollinearity problems, yet yielding high classification accuracies. The findings also provide a sound basis for programming wavebands for future sensors.

  16. Spectral Deception: Understanding Misleading Spectral Features Using Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hummels, Cameron B.; Silvia, Devin W.; Smith, Britton

    2016-01-01

    Quasar absorption line studies are our primary source of information for revealing the state of the intergalactic and circumgalacic media (IGM and CGM). Using quasars as bright background sources, tenuous intervening gas clouds imprint absorption features in the resulting spectra providing clues to the clouds' density, temperature, metallicity, and ionization state. Correctly interpreting these spectra is crucial to understanding the distribution of baryons in the universe.Using the Trident code to generate synthetic spectra from high-resolution cosmological hydrodynamical simulations, we examine how spectral noise, instrument smoothing, and certain configurations of gas can mask the true nature of gas absorbers. We demonstrate how cold gas filaments can create broad spectral features mimicking hot absorbers, and chimneys of hot gas viewed side-on appear as narrow, cold absorbers. Understanding how commonly these conditions occur is critical for correctly characterizing the physical conditions in the media galactic.

  17. Molecular absorption in transition region spectral lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmit, D. J.; Innes, D.; Ayres, T.; Peter, H.; Curdt, W.; Jaeggli, S.

    2014-09-01

    Aims: We present observations from the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS) of absorption features from a multitude of cool atomic and molecular lines within the profiles of Si IV transition region lines. Many of these spectral lines have not previously been detected in solar spectra. Methods: We examined spectra taken from deep exposures of plage on 12 October 2013. We observed unique absorption spectra over a magnetic element which is bright in transition region line emission and the ultraviolet continuum. We compared the absorption spectra with emission spectra that is likely related to fluorescence. Results: The absorption features require a population of sub-5000 K plasma to exist above the transition region. This peculiar stratification is an extreme deviation from the canonical structure of the chromosphere-corona boundary. The cool material is not associated with a filament or discernible coronal rain. This suggests that molecules may form in the upper solar atmosphere on small spatial scales and introduces a new complexity into our understanding of solar thermal structure. It lends credence to previous numerical studies that found evidence for elevated pockets of cool gas in the chromosphere. Movies associated to Figs. 1 and 2 are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  18. Absorption Features in Soil Spectra Assessment.

    PubMed

    Vašát, Radim; Kodešová, Radka; Borůvka, Luboš; Jakšík, Ondřej; Klement, Aleš; Drábek, Ondřej

    2015-12-01

    From a wide range of techniques appropriate to relate spectra measurements with soil properties, partial least squares (PLS) regression and support vector machines (SVM) are most commonly used. This is due to their predictive power and the availability of software tools. Both represent exclusively statistically based approaches and, as such, benefit from multiple responses of soil material in the spectrum. However, physical-based approaches that focus only on a single spectral feature, such as simple linear regression using selected continuum-removed spectra values as a predictor variable, often provide accurate estimates. Furthermore, if this approach extends to multiple cases by taking into account three basic absorption feature parameters (area, width, and depth) of all occurring features as predictors and subjecting them to best subset selection, one can achieve even higher prediction accuracy compared with PLS regression. Here, we attempt to further extend this approach by adding two additional absorption feature parameters (left and right side area), as they can be important diagnostic markers, too. As a result, we achieved higher prediction accuracy compared with PLS regression and SVM for exchangeable soil pH, slightly higher or comparable for dithionite-citrate and ammonium oxalate extractable Fe and Mn forms, but slightly worse for oxidizable carbon content. Therefore, we suggest incorporating the multiple linear regression approach based on absorption feature parameters into existing working practices. PMID:26555184

  19. Absorption Features in Soil Spectra Assessment.

    PubMed

    Vašát, Radim; Kodešová, Radka; Borůvka, Luboš; Jakšík, Ondřej; Klement, Aleš; Drábek, Ondřej

    2015-12-01

    From a wide range of techniques appropriate to relate spectra measurements with soil properties, partial least squares (PLS) regression and support vector machines (SVM) are most commonly used. This is due to their predictive power and the availability of software tools. Both represent exclusively statistically based approaches and, as such, benefit from multiple responses of soil material in the spectrum. However, physical-based approaches that focus only on a single spectral feature, such as simple linear regression using selected continuum-removed spectra values as a predictor variable, often provide accurate estimates. Furthermore, if this approach extends to multiple cases by taking into account three basic absorption feature parameters (area, width, and depth) of all occurring features as predictors and subjecting them to best subset selection, one can achieve even higher prediction accuracy compared with PLS regression. Here, we attempt to further extend this approach by adding two additional absorption feature parameters (left and right side area), as they can be important diagnostic markers, too. As a result, we achieved higher prediction accuracy compared with PLS regression and SVM for exchangeable soil pH, slightly higher or comparable for dithionite-citrate and ammonium oxalate extractable Fe and Mn forms, but slightly worse for oxidizable carbon content. Therefore, we suggest incorporating the multiple linear regression approach based on absorption feature parameters into existing working practices.

  20. Analysis of exploitable spectral features of target and background materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winkelmann, Max

    2015-10-01

    The spectral behavior of textile camouflage materials in the electro-optical spectral range is analyzed and compared with different backgrounds. It is shown that it will be difficult to develop camouflage materials that match a vegetative background in the NIR and SWIR spectral range. The problem of water absorption spectral features is discussed. In addition the effect of different surface finishing of textiles is shown.

  1. Discerning Spectral Features in L Dwarfs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nunez, Alejandro; Cruz, K.; Burgasser, A. J.; Kirkpatrick, J. D.; Reid, I. N.

    2011-01-01

    Brown dwarfs are star-like objects that, due to their very low masses (less than 75 Jupiter masses,) never reach the main sequence, and instead cool with time. This cooling leads to a breakdown of the relationship between temperature and mass that exists for stars. Therefore, brown dwarfs with similar temperatures (as indicated by spectral type) could have very different masses and ages. We are investigating the near-infrared spectra of L dwarfs with the same optically derived spectral types (implying similar effective temperatures) with the goal of distinguishing subtle differences, patterns, and/or correlations among absorption features that could reveal information about their ages and masses. Our sample consists of 43 L0-L8 dwarfs with both optical and near-infrared spectra, thus covering the 0.65 to 2.4-micron range. Our analysis included objects with either "typical” or peculiar spectra. Some of the objects with peculiar spectra are suspected low-gravity/young and blue/low-metallicity dwarfs. For each optical type, we normalized and overplotted the spectra in four bands separately: Optical, J, H, and K band. Each resulting plot was examined by eye to look for subtle differences in spectral absorption features, likely due to age and mass. We present the preliminary results from this detailed spectral analysis. In particular, our analysis reveals the major spectral differences in the near infrared of both "red” and "blue” L dwarfs. This work was funded by the RISE Grant GM R25 6066, and we acknowledge the hospitality of the American Museum of Natural History.

  2. Io's Non-SO2 Spectral Features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smythe, W. D.; Soderblom, L. A.; Nelson, R. M.

    2003-04-01

    Introduction: Several absorptions have been identified in the Galileo NIMS spectra of Io that are not related to SO_2. [1,2]. These absorptions have band centers at 2.97, 3.15, 3.85, and 3.91 microns. There are also broad absorptions in the regions 1-1.3 and 3-3.4 microns. "Patterning" noise in wavelength registration, arising from the pushbroom imaging and grating motion of the NIMS instrument have previously inhibited reliable mapping of weak absorptions. Recent improvements in techniques to remove the coherent pattern noise from the NIMS dataset have been made by Soderblom. This greatly improves the signal to noise ratio and enables mapping of weak spectral signatures such as the 3.15 micron absorption on Io. The 3.15μ feature: The 3.15μ feature is a very weak band having an apparent band depth of less than 4% of the continuum - in contrast to many of the SO_2 features, which have apparent band depths ranging from 15-70%. The 3.15μ feature is reasonably ubiquitous on the surface of Io so it was seen in global average spectra obtained early in the Galileo mission [2]. The feature has not been identified but has been attributed variously to H_2S, H_2O, or OH stretch [2,3]. A map of this feature shows a variety of correlations. The feature is strongly present at lower latitudes, which suggests that it may be associated with a material less volatile than SO_2. However the absorption does appear above 30 degrees (north and south), suggesting its presence in not strictly a thermal issue. It is interesting that the absorption moves north of the equator above Pele apparently avoiding Pele's large plume deposit, is not present at Culann, yet covers Prometheus completely. The distribution at Prometheus suggests that the material leading to the 3.15μ absorption may be associated with the Prometheus SO_2 reservoir - but it is difficult to reconcile that with the behavior of the absorption about Pele and Culann. There is a reasonably good correlation with visibly white

  3. SPECTRAL RELATIVE ABSORPTION DIFFERENCE METHOD

    SciTech Connect

    Salaymeh, S.

    2010-06-17

    When analyzing field data, the uncertainty in the background continuum emission produces the majority of error in the final gamma-source analysis. The background emission typically dominates an observed spectrum in terms of counts and is highly variable spatially and temporally. The majority of the spectral shape of the background continuum is produced by combinations of cosmic rays, {sup 40}K, {sup 235}U, and {sup 220}Rn, and the continuum is similar in shape to the 15%-20% level for most field observations. However, the goal of spectroscopy analysis is to pick up subtle peaks (<%5) upon this large background. Because the continuum is falling off as energy increases, peak detection algorithms must first define the background surrounding the peak. This definition is difficult when the range of background shapes is considered. The full spectral template matching algorithms are heavily weighted to solving for the background continuum as it produces significant counts over much of the energy range. The most appropriate background mitigation technique is to take a separate background observation without the source of interest. But, it is frequently not possible to record a background observation in the exact location before (or after) a source has been detected. Thus, one uses approximate backgrounds that rely on spatially nearby locations or similar environments. Since the error in many field observations is dominated by the background, a technique that is less sensitive to the background would be quite beneficial. We report the result of an initial investigation into a novel observation scheme for gamma-emission detection in high background environments. Employing low resolution, NaI, detectors, we examine the different between the direct emission and the 'spectral-shadow' that the gamma emission produces when passed through a thin absorber. For this detection scheme to be competitive, it is required to count and analyze individual gamma-events. We describe the

  4. Plasma absorption evidence via chirped pulse spectral transmission measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Jedrkiewicz, Ottavia; Minardi, Stefano; Couairon, Arnaud; Jukna, Vytautas; Selva, Marco; Di Trapani, Paolo

    2015-06-08

    This work aims at highlighting the plasma generation dynamics and absorption when a Bessel beam propagates in glass. We developed a simple diagnostics allowing us to retrieve clear indications of the formation of the plasma in the material, thanks to transmission measurements in the angular and wavelength domains. This technique featured by the use of a single chirped pulse having the role of pump and probe simultaneously leads to results showing the plasma nonlinear absorption effect on the trailing part of the pulse, thanks to the spectral-temporal correspondence in the measured signal, which is also confirmed by numerical simulations.

  5. A wide spectral range photoacoustic aerosol absorption spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Haisch, C; Menzenbach, P; Bladt, H; Niessner, R

    2012-11-01

    A photoacoustic spectrometer for the measurement of aerosol absorption spectra, based on the excitation of a pulsed nanosecond optical parametrical oscillator (OPO), will be introduced. This spectrometer is working at ambient pressure and can be used to detect and characterize different classes of aerosols. The spectrometer features a spectral range of 410 to 2500 nm and a sensitivity of 2.5 × 10(-7) m(-1) at 550 nm. A full characterization of the system in the visible spectral range is demonstrated, and the potential of the system for near IR measurement is discussed. In the example of different kinds of soot particles, the performance of the spectrometer was assessed. As we demonstrate, it is possible to determine a specific optical absorption per particle by a combination of the new spectrometer with an aerosol particle counter. PMID:23035870

  6. A wide spectral range photoacoustic aerosol absorption spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Haisch, C; Menzenbach, P; Bladt, H; Niessner, R

    2012-11-01

    A photoacoustic spectrometer for the measurement of aerosol absorption spectra, based on the excitation of a pulsed nanosecond optical parametrical oscillator (OPO), will be introduced. This spectrometer is working at ambient pressure and can be used to detect and characterize different classes of aerosols. The spectrometer features a spectral range of 410 to 2500 nm and a sensitivity of 2.5 × 10(-7) m(-1) at 550 nm. A full characterization of the system in the visible spectral range is demonstrated, and the potential of the system for near IR measurement is discussed. In the example of different kinds of soot particles, the performance of the spectrometer was assessed. As we demonstrate, it is possible to determine a specific optical absorption per particle by a combination of the new spectrometer with an aerosol particle counter.

  7. Feature-enhanced spectral similarity measure for the analysis of hyperspectral imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Qingbo; Niu, Chunyang

    2015-01-01

    In hyperspectral remote sensing, the surface compositional material can be identified by means of spectral matching algorithms. In many cases, the importance of each spectral band to measure spectral similarity is different, whereas the traditional spectral matching algorithms implicitly assume all wavelength-dependent absorption features are equal. This may yield an unsatisfactory performance for spectral matching. To remedy this deficiency, we propose methods called feature-enhanced spectral similarity measures. They are hybrids of the spectral matching algorithms combined with a feature-enhanced space projection, termed feature-enhanced spectral angle measure, feature-enhanced Euclidean distance measure, feature-enhanced spectral correlation measure, and feature-enhanced spectral information divergence. The proposed methods creatively project the original spectra into spectral feature-enhanced space, in which important features for measuring the spectral similarity will be increased to a high degree, whereas features of low importance will be suppressed. In order to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed approaches, performances are compared on real hyperspectral image data from Airborne Visible Infrared Imaging Spectrometer. The proposed methods are found to possess significant improvements over the original four spectral matching algorithms.

  8. New spectral features from bound dark matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catena, Riccardo; Kouvaris, Chris

    2016-07-01

    We demonstrate that dark matter particles gravitationally bound to the Earth can induce a characteristic nuclear recoil signal at low energies in direct detection experiments. The new spectral feature that we predict can provide a complementary verification of dark matter discovery at experiments with positive signal but unclear background. The effect is generically expected, in that the ratio of bound over halo dark matter event rates at detectors is independent of the dark matter-nucleon cross section.

  9. Wavelength calibration of imaging spectrometer using atmospheric absorption features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Jiankang; Chen, Yuheng; Chen, Xinhua; Ji, Yiqun; Shen, Weimin

    2012-11-01

    Imaging spectrometer is a promising remote sensing instrument widely used in many filed, such as hazard forecasting, environmental monitoring and so on. The reliability of the spectral data is the determination to the scientific communities. The wavelength position at the focal plane of the imaging spectrometer will change as the pressure and temperature vary, or the mechanical vibration. It is difficult for the onboard calibration instrument itself to keep the spectrum reference accuracy and it also occupies weight and the volume of the remote sensing platform. Because the spectral images suffer from the atmospheric effects, the carbon oxide, water vapor, oxygen and solar Fraunhofer line, the onboard wavelength calibration can be processed by the spectral images themselves. In this paper, wavelength calibration is based on the modeled and measured atmospheric absorption spectra. The modeled spectra constructed by the atmospheric radiative transfer code. The spectral angle is used to determine the best spectral similarity between the modeled spectra and measured spectra and estimates the wavelength position. The smile shape can be obtained when the matching process across all columns of the data. The present method is successful applied on the Hyperion data. The value of the wavelength shift is obtained by shape matching of oxygen absorption feature and the characteristics are comparable to that of the prelaunch measurements.

  10. [Spectral calibration for space-borne differential optical absorption spectrometer].

    PubMed

    Zhou, Hai-Jin; Liu, Wen-Qing; Si, Fu-Qi; Zhao, Min-Jie; Jiang, Yu; Xue, Hui

    2012-11-01

    Space-borne differential optical absorption spectrometer is used for remote sensing of atmospheric trace gas global distribution. This instrument acquires high accuracy UV/Vis radiation scattered or reflected by air or earth surface, and can monitor distribution and variation of trace gases based on differential optical absorption spectrum algorithm. Spectral calibration is the premise and base of quantification of remote sensing data of the instrument, and the precision of calibration directly decides the level of development and application of the instrument. Considering the characteristic of large field, wide wavelength range, high spatial and spectral resolution of the space-borne differential optical absorption spectrometer, a spectral calibration method is presented, a calibration device was built, the equation of spectral calibration was calculated through peak searching and regression analysis, and finally the full field spectral calibration of the instrument was realized. The precision of spectral calibration was verified with Fraunhofer lines of solar light.

  11. Constraining Cometary Crystal Shapes from IR Spectral Features

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wooden, Diane H.; Lindsay, Sean; Harker, David E.; Kelley, Michael S. P.; Woodward, Charles E.; Murphy, James Richard

    2013-01-01

    A major challenge in deriving the silicate mineralogy of comets is ascertaining how the anisotropic nature of forsterite crystals affects the spectral features' wavelength, relative intensity, and asymmetry. Forsterite features are identified in cometary comae near 10, 11.05-11.2, 16, 19, 23.5, 27.5 and 33 microns [1-10], so accurate models for forsterite's absorption efficiency (Qabs) are a primary requirement to compute IR spectral energy distributions (SEDs, lambdaF lambda vs. lambda) and constrain the silicate mineralogy of comets. Forsterite is an anisotropic crystal, with three crystallographic axes with distinct indices of refraction for the a-, b-, and c-axis. The shape of a forsterite crystal significantly affects its spectral features [13-16]. We need models that account for crystal shape. The IR absorption efficiencies of forsterite are computed using the discrete dipole approximation (DDA) code DDSCAT [11,12]. Starting from a fiducial crystal shape of a cube, we systematically elongate/reduce one of the crystallographic axes. Also, we elongate/reduce one axis while the lengths of the other two axes are slightly asymmetric (0.8:1.2). The most significant grain shape characteristic that affects the crystalline spectral features is the relative lengths of the crystallographic axes. The second significant grain shape characteristic is breaking the symmetry of all three axes [17]. Synthetic spectral energy distributions using seven crystal shape classes [17] are fit to the observed SED of comet C/1995 O1 (Hale-Bopp). The Hale-Bopp crystalline residual better matches equant, b-platelets, c-platelets, and b-columns spectral shape classes, while a-platelets, a-columns and c-columns worsen the spectral fits. Forsterite condensation and partial evaporation experiments demonstrate that environmental temperature and grain shape are connected [18-20]. Thus, grain shape is a potential probe for protoplanetary disk temperatures where the cometary crystalline

  12. Spectral absorption index in hyperspectral image analysis for predicting moisture contents in pork longissimus dorsi muscles.

    PubMed

    Ma, Ji; Sun, Da-Wen; Pu, Hongbin

    2016-04-15

    Spectral absorption index was proposed to extract the morphological features of the spectral curves in pork meat samples (longissimus dorsi) under the conditions including fresh, frozen-thawed, heated-dehydrated and brined-dehydrated. Savitzky-Golay (SG) smoothing and multiplicative scatter correction (MSC) were used for calibrating both the spectral reflectance and absorbance values. The absorption values were better than the reflectance values and the calibrated spectra by MSC were better than the raw and SG smoothing corrected spectra in building moisture content predictive models. The optimized partial least square regression (PLSR) model attained good results with the MSC calibrated spectral absorption values based on the spectral absorption index features (R(2)P=0.952, RMSEP=1.396) and the optimal wavelengths selected by regression coefficients (R(2)P=0.966, RMSEP=0.855), respectively. The models proved spectral absorption index was promising in spectral analysis to predict moisture content in pork samples using HSI techniques for the first time.

  13. Spectral derivative feature coding for hyperspectral signature analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Chein-I.; Chakravarty, Sumit

    2006-08-01

    This paper presents a new approach to hyperspectral signature analysis, called Spectral Derivative Feature Coding (SDFC). It makes use of gradient changes in adjacent bands to characterize spectral variations so as to improve spectral discrimination and identification. In order to evaluate its performance, two binary coding methods, SPectral Analysis Manager (SPAM) and Spectral Feature-based Binary Coding (SFBC) are used to conduct comparative analysis. The experimental results demonstrate the proposed SDFC performs more effectively in capturing spectral characteristics.

  14. Relative spectral absorption of solar radiation by water vapor and cloud droplets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davies, R.; Ridgway, W. L.

    1983-01-01

    A moderate (20/cm) spectral resolution model which accounts for both the highly variable spectral transmission of solar radiation through water vapor within and above cloud, as well as the more slowly varying features of absorption and anisotropic multiple scattering by the cloud droplets, is presented. Results from this model as applied to the case of a typical 1 km thick stratus cloud in a standard atmosphere, with cloud top altitude of 2 km and overhead sun, are discussed, showing the relative importance of water vapor above the cloud, water vapor within the cloud, and cloud droplets on the spectral absorption of solar radiation.

  15. Spectral dependence of aerosol light absorption over the Amazon Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rizzo, L. V.; Correia, A. L.; Artaxo, P.; Procópio, A. S.; Andreae, M. O.

    2011-09-01

    In this study, we examine the spectral dependence of aerosol absorption at different sites and seasons in the Amazon Basin. The analysis is based on measurements performed during three intensive field experiments at a pasture site (Fazenda Nossa Senhora, Rondônia) and at a primary forest site (Cuieiras Reserve, Amazonas), from 1999 to 2004. Aerosol absorption spectra were measured using two Aethalometers: a 7-wavelength Aethalometer (AE30) that covers the visible (VIS) to near-infrared (NIR) spectral range, and a 2-wavelength Aethalometer (AE20) that measures absorption in the UV and in the NIR. As a consequence of biomass burning emissions, about 10 times greater absorption values were observed in the dry season in comparison to the wet season. Power law expressions were fitted to the measurements in order to derive the absorption Ångström exponent, defined as the negative slope of absorption versus wavelength in a log-log plot. At the pasture site, about 70 % of the absorption Ångström exponents fell between 1.5 and 2.5 during the dry season, indicating that biomass burning aerosols have a stronger spectral dependence than soot carbon particles. Ångström exponents decreased from the dry to the wet season, in agreement with the shift from biomass burning aerosols, predominant in the fine mode, to biogenic and dust aerosols, predominant in the coarse mode. The lowest absorption Ångström exponents (90 % of data below 1.5) were observed at the forest site during the dry season. Also, results indicate that low absorption coefficients were associated with low Ångström exponents. This finding suggests that biogenic aerosols from Amazonia have a weaker spectral dependence for absorption than biomass burning aerosols, contradicting our expectations of biogenic particles behaving as brown carbon. In a first order assessment, results indicate a small (<1 %) effect of variations in absorption Ångström exponents on 24-h aerosol forcings, at least in the spectral

  16. Spectral feature classification and spatial pattern recognition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sivertson, W. E., Jr.; Wilson, R. G.

    1979-01-01

    This paper introduces a spatial pattern recognition processing concept involving the use of spectral feature classification technology and coherent optical correlation. The concept defines a hybrid image processing system incorporating both digital and optical technology. The hybrid instrument provides simplified pseudopattern images as functions of pixel classification from information embedded within a real-scene image. These pseudoimages become simplified inputs to an optical correlator for use in a subsequent pattern identification decision useful in executing landmark pointing, tracking, or navigating functions. Real-time classification is proposed as a research tool for exploring ways to enhance input signal-to-noise ratio as an aid in improving optical correlation. The approach can be explored with developing technology, including a current NASA Langley Research Center technology plan that involves a series of related Shuttle-borne experiments. A first-planned experiment, Feature Identification and Location Experiment (FILE), is undergoing final ground testing, and is scheduled for flight on the NASA Shuttle (STS2/flight OSTA-1) in 1980. FILE will evaluate a technique for autonomously classifying earth features into the four categories: bare land; water; vegetation; and clouds, snow, or ice.

  17. Cooperative spectral and spatial feature fusion for camouflaged target detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sungho; Shim, Min-Sheob

    2015-05-01

    This paper presents a novel camouflaged target detection method using spectral and spatial feature fusion. Conventional unsupervised learning methods using spectral information only can be feasible solutions. Such approaches, however, sometimes produce incorrect detection results because spatial information is not considered. This paper proposes a novel band feature selection method by considering both the spectral distance and spatial statistics after spectral normalization for illumination invariance. The statistical distance metric can generate candidate feature bands and further analysis of the spatial grouping property can trim the useless feature bands. Camouflaged targets can be detected better with less computational complexity by the spectral-spatial feature fusion.

  18. Spectral dependence of aerosol light absorption over the Amazon Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rizzo, L. V.; Correia, A. L.; Artaxo, P.; Procópio, A. S.; Andreae, M. O.

    2011-04-01

    In this study, we examine the spectral dependence of aerosol absorption at different sites and seasons in the Amazon Basin. The analysis is based on measurements performed during three intensive field experiments at a pasture site (Fazenda Nossa Senhora, Rondônia) and at a primary forest site (Cuieiras Reserve, Amazonas), from 1999 to 2004. Aerosol absorption spectra were measured using two Aethalometers: a 7-wavelength Aethalometer (AE30) that covers the visible (VIS) to near-infrared (NIR) spectral range, and a 2-wavelength Aethalometer (AE20) that measures absorption in the UV and in the visible. As a consequence of biomass burning emissions, about 10 times greater absorption values were observed in the dry season in comparison to the wet season. Power law expressions were fitted to the measurements in order to derive the Ångström exponent for absorption, defined as the negative slope of absorption vs. wavelength in a log-log plot. At the pasture site, about 70% of the Ångström exponents fell between 1.5 and 2.5 during the dry season, indicating that biomass burning aerosols have a stronger spectral dependence than soot carbon particles. Ångström exponents decreased from the dry to the wet season, in agreement with the shift from biomass burning aerosols, predominant in the fine mode, to biogenic and dust aerosols, predominant in the coarse mode. The lowest Ångström exponents (90% of data below 1.5) were observed at the forest site during the dry season. Also, results indicate that low absorption coefficients were associated with Ångström exponents below 1.0. This finding suggests that biogenic aerosols from Amazonia may have a weak spectral dependence for absorption, contradicting our expectations of biogenic particles behaving as brown carbon. Nevertheless, additional measurements should be taken in the future, to provide a complete picture of biogenic aerosol absorption spectral characteristics from different seasons and geographic locations. The

  19. The optical properties and spectral features of malignant skin melanocytes in the terahertz frequency range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goryachuk, A. A.; Begaeva, V. A.; Khodzitsky, M. K.; Truloff, A. S.

    2016-08-01

    The samples of cells of mice's melanocytes have been investigated. Their optical properties and spectral features were investigated by terahertz time-domain spectroscopy (TDS) in transmission mode. It was found that the optical properties of oncological melanocytes and normal cells are different and oncological cells have spectral features of absorption coefficient so it can be concluded that it is easy to discriminate mice's oncological skin melanocytes by using THz TDS.

  20. Constraining Cometary Crystal Shapes from IR Spectral Features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wooden, D. H.; Lindsay, S.; Harker, D. E.; Kelley, M. S.; Woodward, C. E.; Murphy, J. R.

    2013-12-01

    A major challenge in deriving the silicate mineralogy of comets is ascertaining how the anisotropic nature of forsterite crystals affects the spectral features' wavelength, relative intensity, and asymmetry. Forsterite features are identified in cometary comae near 10, 11.05-11.2, 16, 19, 23.5, 27.5 and 33 μm [1-10], so accurate models for forsterite's absorption efficiency (Qabs) are a primary requirement to compute IR spectral energy distributions (SEDs, λFλ vs. λ) and constrain the silicate mineralogy of comets. Forsterite is an anisotropic crystal, with three crystallographic axes with distinct indices of refraction for the a-, b-, and c-axis. The shape of a forsterite crystal significantly affects its spectral features [13-16]. We need models that account for crystal shape. The IR absorption efficiencies of forsterite are computed using the discrete dipole approximation (DDA) code DDSCAT [11,12]. Starting from a fiducial crystal shape of a cube, we systematically elongate/reduce one of the crystallographic axes. Also, we elongate/reduce one axis while the lengths of the other two axes are slightly asymmetric (0.8:1.2). The most significant grain shape characteristic that affects the crystalline spectral features is the relative lengths of the crystallographic axes. The second significant grain shape characteristic is breaking the symmetry of all three axes [17]. Synthetic spectral energy distributions using seven crystal shape classes [17] are fit to the observed SED of comet C/1995 O1 (Hale-Bopp). The Hale-Bopp crystalline residual better matches equant, b-platelets, c-platelets, and b-columns spectral shape classes, while a-platelets, a-columns and c-columns worsen the spectral fits. Forsterite condensation and partial evaporation experiments demonstrate that environmental temperature and grain shape are connected [18-20]. Thus, grain shape is a potential probe for protoplanetary disk temperatures where the cometary crystalline forsterite formed. The

  1. Characterization of Spectral Absorption Properties of Aerosols Using Satellite Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Torres, O.; Jethva, H.; Bhartia, P. K.; Ahn, C.

    2012-01-01

    The wavelength-dependence of aerosol absorption optical depth (AAOD) is generally represented in terms of the Angstrom Absorption Exponent (AAE), a parameter that describes the dependence of AAOD with wavelength. The AAE parameter is closely related to aerosol composition. Black carbon (BC) containing aerosols yield AAE values near unity whereas Organic carbon (OC) aerosol particles are associated with values larger than 2. Even larger AAE values have been reported for desert dust aerosol particles. Knowledge of spectral AAOD is necessary for the calculation of direct radiative forcing effect of aerosols and for inferring aerosol composition. We have developed a satellitebased method of determining the spectral AAOD of absorbing aerosols. The technique uses high spectral resolution measurements of upwelling radiation from scenes where absorbing aerosols lie above clouds as indicated by the UV Aerosol Index. For those conditions, the satellite measured reflectance (rho lambda) is approximately given by Beer's law rho lambda = rho (sub 0 lambda) e (exp -mtau (sub abs lambda)) where rho(sub 0 lambda) is the cloud reflectance, m is the geometric slant path and tau (sub abs lambda) is the spectral AAOD. The rho (sub 0 lambda) term is determined by means of radiative transfer calculations using as input the cloud optical depth derived as described in Torres et al. [JAS, 2012] that accounts for the effects of aerosol absorption. In the second step, corrections for molecular and aerosol scattering effects are applied to the cloud reflectance term, and the spectral AAOD is then derived by inverting the equation above. The proposed technique will be discussed in detail and application results will be presented. The technique can be easily applied to hyper-spectral satellite measurements that include UV such as OMI, GOME and SCIAMACHY, or to multi-spectral visible measurements by other sensors provided that the aerosol-above-cloud events are easily identified.

  2. Learning Hierarchical Spectral-Spatial Features for Hyperspectral Image Classification.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yicong; Wei, Yantao

    2016-07-01

    This paper proposes a spectral-spatial feature learning (SSFL) method to obtain robust features of hyperspectral images (HSIs). It combines the spectral feature learning and spatial feature learning in a hierarchical fashion. Stacking a set of SSFL units, a deep hierarchical model called the spectral-spatial networks (SSN) is further proposed for HSI classification. SSN can exploit both discriminative spectral and spatial information simultaneously. Specifically, SSN learns useful high-level features by alternating between spectral and spatial feature learning operations. Then, kernel-based extreme learning machine (KELM), a shallow neural network, is embedded in SSN to classify image pixels. Extensive experiments are performed on two benchmark HSI datasets to verify the effectiveness of SSN. Compared with state-of-the-art methods, SSN with a deep hierarchical architecture obtains higher classification accuracy in terms of the overall accuracy, average accuracy, and kappa ( κ ) coefficient of agreement, especially when the number of the training samples is small.

  3. Modeling photoacoustic spectral features of micron-sized particles.

    PubMed

    Strohm, Eric M; Gorelikov, Ivan; Matsuura, Naomi; Kolios, Michael C

    2014-10-01

    The photoacoustic signal generated from particles when irradiated by light is determined by attributes of the particle such as the size, speed of sound, morphology and the optical absorption coefficient. Unique features such as periodically varying minima and maxima are observed throughout the photoacoustic signal power spectrum, where the periodicity depends on these physical attributes. The frequency content of the photoacoustic signals can be used to obtain the physical attributes of unknown particles by comparison to analytical solutions of homogeneous symmetric geometric structures, such as spheres. However, analytical solutions do not exist for irregularly shaped particles, inhomogeneous particles or particles near structures. A finite element model (FEM) was used to simulate photoacoustic wave propagation from four different particle configurations: a homogeneous particle suspended in water, a homogeneous particle on a reflecting boundary, an inhomogeneous particle with an absorbing shell and non-absorbing core, and an irregularly shaped particle such as a red blood cell. Biocompatible perfluorocarbon droplets, 3-5 μm in diameter containing optically absorbing nanoparticles were used as the representative ideal particles, as they are spherical, homogeneous, optically translucent, and have known physical properties. The photoacoustic spectrum of micron-sized single droplets in suspension and on a reflecting boundary were measured over the frequency range of 100-500 MHz and compared directly to analytical models and the FEM. Good agreement between the analytical model, FEM and measured values were observed for a droplet in suspension, where the spectral minima agreed to within a 3.3 MHz standard deviation. For a droplet on a reflecting boundary, spectral features were correctly reproduced using the FEM but not the analytical model. The photoacoustic spectra from other common particle configurations such as particle with an absorbing shell and a

  4. Spectral signatures of fluorescence and light absorption to identify crude oils found in the marine environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baszanowska, E.; Otremba, Z.

    2014-08-01

    To protect the natural marine ecosystem, it is necessary to continuously enhance knowledge of environmental contamination, including oil pollution. Therefore, to properly track the qualitative and quantitative changes in the natural components of seawater, a description of the essential spectral features describing petroleum products is necessary. This study characterises two optically-different types of crude oils (Petrobaltic and Romashkino) - substances belonging to multi-fluorophoric systems. To obtain the spectral features of crude oils, the excitation-emission spectroscopy technique was applied. The fluorescence and light absorption properties for various concentrations of oils at a stabilised temperature are described. Both excitation-emission spectra (EEMs) and absorption spectra of crude oils are discussed. Based on the EEM spectra, both excitation end emission peaks for the wavelengthindependent fluorescence maximum (Exmax/ Emmax) - characteristic points for each type of oil - were identified and compared with the literature data concerning typical marine chemical structures.

  5. Unavoidable CMB Spectral Features and Blackbody Photosphere of Our Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sunyaev, Rashid A.; Khatri, Rishi

    2015-01-01

    Spectral features in the CMB energy spectrum contain a wealth of information about the physical processes in the early Universe, z ≲ 2 × 106. The CMB spectral distortions are complementary to all other probes of cosmology. In fact, most of the information contained in the CMB spectrum is inaccessible by any other means. This review outlines the main physics behind the spectral features in the CMB throughout the history of the Universe, concentrating on the distortions which are inevitable and must be present at a level observable by the next generation of proposed CMB experiments. The spectral distortions considered here include spectral features from cosmological recombination, resonant scattering of CMB by metals during reionization which allows us to measure their abundances, y-type distortions during and after reionization and μ-type and i-type (intermediate between μ and y) distortions created at redshifts z ≳ 1.5 × 104.

  6. Spectral absorption and backscatter measurements of suspended particles

    SciTech Connect

    Wouts, R.; Warnock, R.; Baker, S.; Kromkamp, J.

    1997-06-01

    Three different methods for determining light attenuation by suspended particles under laboratory conditions are compared. One method, a direct application of Gershun`s equation, by measuring scalar irradiance and the gradient of the net-vector irradiance, allows one to determine the spectral absorption by the particles. Another method, measuring radiance attenuation in an isotropic light field, measures the sum of absorption and backscatter by the particles. The difference gives an estimate for the backscatter. The results were compared with an estimate based on an adaptation of the filterpad method that measures absorption by particles. We found that the filterpad measurements depend heavily on the filter load and the scattering characteristics of the particles involved. Increasing backscatter makes the measurements less reliable. It is argued that the filterpad method should not be used to obtain sea truth data for remote sensing measurements in coastal areas. These measurements were performed in a laboratory scale enclosure (volume 250 liters) on samples of natural silt and/or algal cultures grown in the tank. In our laboratory setup we have put special emphasis on measuring inherent optical properties of natural ({open_quotes}Wester Scheldt{close_quotes} estuary, The Netherlands) silt. Together with available (non-spectral) measurements of the volume scattering function of silt, this information can be used to test models for radiative transfer.

  7. Io's Thermal Regions and Non-SO2 Spectral Features

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smythe, W. D.; Soderblom, L. A.; Lopes, R. M. C.

    2003-01-01

    Several absorptions have been identified in the Galileo NIMS spectra of Io that are not related to SO2. [1,2]. These absorptions have band centers at 2.97, 3.15, 3.85, and 3.91 microns. There are also broad absorptions in the regions 1-1.3 and 3- 3.4 microns. Patterning noise in wavelength registration, arising from the pushbroom imaging and grating motion of the NIMS instrument have previously inhibited reliable mapping of weak absorptions. Recent improvements in techniques to remove the coherent pattern noise from the NIMS dataset have been made by Soderblom. This greatly improves the signal to noise ratio and enables mapping of weak spectral signatures such as the 3.15 micron absorption on Io.

  8. A High Spectral Resolution Lidar Based on Absorption Filter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Piironen, Paivi

    1996-01-01

    A High Spectral Resolution Lidar (HSRL) that uses an iodine absorption filter and a tunable, narrow bandwidth Nd:YAG laser is demonstrated. The iodine absorption filter provides better performance than the Fabry-Perot etalon that it replaces. This study presents an instrument design that can be used a the basis for a design of a simple and robust lidar for the measurement of the optical properties of the atmosphere. The HSRL provides calibrated measurements of the optical properties of the atmospheric aerosols. These observations include measurements of aerosol backscatter cross sections, optical depth, backscatter phase function depolarization, and multiple scattering. The errors in the HSRL data are discussed and the effects of different errors on the measured optical parameters are shown.

  9. Spectral absorption characteristics of the major components of dust clouds.

    PubMed

    Flanigan, D F; Delong, H P

    1971-01-01

    It is well known that dust clouds selectively absorb radiation in the 700-1300 cm(-1) atmospheric window region. Studies have shown that dust clouds are composed of the same minerals as surface soils, although in different proportion. We have examined seventy soil samples from a number of locations around the world to determine their compositions and spectral characteristics. The results indicate that there are five major components which selectively absorb radiation in the 700-1300 cm(-1) region. These are three clay minerals, silica, and calcium carbonate. Absorptivity coefficient spectra of representative soil samples are given.

  10. Spectral features of biogenic calcium carbonates and implications for astrobiology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berg, B. L.; Ronholm, J.; Applin, D. M.; Mann, P.; Izawa, M.; Cloutis, E. A.; Whyte, L. G.

    2014-09-01

    The ability to discriminate biogenic from abiogenic calcium carbonate (CaCO3) would be useful in the search for extant or extinct life, since CaCO3 can be produced by both biotic and abiotic processes on Earth. Bioprecipitated CaCO3 material was produced during the growth of heterotrophic microbial isolates on medium enriched with calcium acetate or calcium citrate. These biologically produced CaCO3, along with natural and synthetic non-biologically produced CaCO3 samples, were analysed by reflectance spectroscopy (0.35-2.5 μm), Raman spectroscopy (532 and 785 nm), and laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy (365 and 405 nm excitation). Optimal instruments for the discrimination of biogenic from abiogenic CaCO3 were determined to be reflectance spectroscopy, and laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy. Multiple absorption features in the visible light region occurred in reflectance spectra for most biogenic CaCO3 samples, which are likely due to organic pigments. Multiple fluorescence peaks occurred in emission spectra (405 nm excitation) of biogenic CaCO3 samples, which also are best attributed to the presence of organic compounds; however, further analyses must be performed in order to better determine the cause of these features to establish criteria for confirming the origin of a given CaCO3 sample. Raman spectroscopy was not useful for discrimination since any potential Raman peaks in spectra of biogenic carbonates collected by both the 532 and 785 nm lasers were overwhelmed by fluorescence. However, this also suggests that biogenic carbonates may be identified by the presence of this organic-associated fluorescence. No reliable spectroscopic differences in terms of parameters such as positions or widths of carbonate-associated absorption bands were found between the biogenic and abiogenic carbonate samples. These results indicate that the presence or absence of organic matter intimately associated with carbonate minerals is the only potentially useful

  11. Feature Transformation Detection Method with Best Spectral Band Selection Process for Hyper-spectral Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hai-Wen; McGurr, Mike; Brickhouse, Mark

    2015-11-01

    We present a newly developed feature transformation (FT) detection method for hyper-spectral imagery (HSI) sensors. In essence, the FT method, by transforming the original features (spectral bands) to a different feature domain, may considerably increase the statistical separation between the target and background probability density functions, and thus may significantly improve the target detection and identification performance, as evidenced by the test results in this paper. We show that by differentiating the original spectral, one can completely separate targets from the background using a single spectral band, leading to perfect detection results. In addition, we have proposed an automated best spectral band selection process with a double-threshold scheme that can rank the available spectral bands from the best to the worst for target detection. Finally, we have also proposed an automated cross-spectrum fusion process to further improve the detection performance in lower spectral range (<1000 nm) by selecting the best spectral band pair with multivariate analysis. Promising detection performance has been achieved using a small background material signature library for concept-proving, and has then been further evaluated and verified using a real background HSI scene collected by a HYDICE sensor.

  12. Spectral Similarity Assessment Based on a Spectrum Reflectance-Absorption Index and Simplified Curve Patterns for Hyperspectral Remote Sensing

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Dan; Liu, Jun; Huang, Junyi; Li, Huali; Liu, Ping; Chen, Huijuan; Qian, Jing

    2016-01-01

    Hyperspectral images possess properties such as rich spectral information, narrow bandwidth, and large numbers of bands. Finding effective methods to retrieve land features from an image by using similarity assessment indices with specific spectral characteristics is an important research question. This paper reports a novel hyperspectral image similarity assessment index based on spectral curve patterns and a reflection-absorption index. First, some spectral reflection-absorption features are extracted to restrict the subsequent curve simplification. Then, the improved Douglas-Peucker algorithm is employed to simplify all spectral curves without setting the thresholds. Finally, the simplified curves with the feature points are matched, and the similarities among the spectral curves are calculated using the matched points. The Airborne Visible Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) and Reflective Optics System Imaging Spectrometer (ROSIS) hyperspectral image datasets are then selected to test the effect of the proposed index. The practical experiments indicate that the proposed index can achieve higher precision and fewer points than the traditional spectral information divergence and spectral angle match. PMID:26821030

  13. Spectral Similarity Assessment Based on a Spectrum Reflectance-Absorption Index and Simplified Curve Patterns for Hyperspectral Remote Sensing.

    PubMed

    Ma, Dan; Liu, Jun; Huang, Junyi; Li, Huali; Liu, Ping; Chen, Huijuan; Qian, Jing

    2016-01-01

    Hyperspectral images possess properties such as rich spectral information, narrow bandwidth, and large numbers of bands. Finding effective methods to retrieve land features from an image by using similarity assessment indices with specific spectral characteristics is an important research question. This paper reports a novel hyperspectral image similarity assessment index based on spectral curve patterns and a reflection-absorption index. First, some spectral reflection-absorption features are extracted to restrict the subsequent curve simplification. Then, the improved Douglas-Peucker algorithm is employed to simplify all spectral curves without setting the thresholds. Finally, the simplified curves with the feature points are matched, and the similarities among the spectral curves are calculated using the matched points. The Airborne Visible Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) and Reflective Optics System Imaging Spectrometer (ROSIS) hyperspectral image datasets are then selected to test the effect of the proposed index. The practical experiments indicate that the proposed index can achieve higher precision and fewer points than the traditional spectral information divergence and spectral angle match. PMID:26821030

  14. Spectral Similarity Assessment Based on a Spectrum Reflectance-Absorption Index and Simplified Curve Patterns for Hyperspectral Remote Sensing.

    PubMed

    Ma, Dan; Liu, Jun; Huang, Junyi; Li, Huali; Liu, Ping; Chen, Huijuan; Qian, Jing

    2016-01-01

    Hyperspectral images possess properties such as rich spectral information, narrow bandwidth, and large numbers of bands. Finding effective methods to retrieve land features from an image by using similarity assessment indices with specific spectral characteristics is an important research question. This paper reports a novel hyperspectral image similarity assessment index based on spectral curve patterns and a reflection-absorption index. First, some spectral reflection-absorption features are extracted to restrict the subsequent curve simplification. Then, the improved Douglas-Peucker algorithm is employed to simplify all spectral curves without setting the thresholds. Finally, the simplified curves with the feature points are matched, and the similarities among the spectral curves are calculated using the matched points. The Airborne Visible Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) and Reflective Optics System Imaging Spectrometer (ROSIS) hyperspectral image datasets are then selected to test the effect of the proposed index. The practical experiments indicate that the proposed index can achieve higher precision and fewer points than the traditional spectral information divergence and spectral angle match.

  15. Spectral feature design in high dimensional multispectral data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Chih-Chien Thomas; Landgrebe, David A.

    1988-01-01

    The High resolution Imaging Spectrometer (HIRIS) is designed to acquire images simultaneously in 192 spectral bands in the 0.4 to 2.5 micrometers wavelength region. It will make possible the collection of essentially continuous reflectance spectra at a spectral resolution sufficient to extract significantly enhanced amounts of information from return signals as compared to existing systems. The advantages of such high dimensional data come at a cost of increased system and data complexity. For example, since the finer the spectral resolution, the higher the data rate, it becomes impractical to design the sensor to be operated continuously. It is essential to find new ways to preprocess the data which reduce the data rate while at the same time maintaining the information content of the high dimensional signal produced. Four spectral feature design techniques are developed from the Weighted Karhunen-Loeve Transforms: (1) non-overlapping band feature selection algorithm; (2) overlapping band feature selection algorithm; (3) Walsh function approach; and (4) infinite clipped optimal function approach. The infinite clipped optimal function approach is chosen since the features are easiest to find and their classification performance is the best. After the preprocessed data has been received at the ground station, canonical analysis is further used to find the best set of features under the criterion that maximal class separability is achieved. Both 100 dimensional vegetation data and 200 dimensional soil data were used to test the spectral feature design system. It was shown that the infinite clipped versions of the first 16 optimal features had excellent classification performance. The overall probability of correct classification is over 90 percent while providing for a reduced downlink data rate by a factor of 10.

  16. Spectral DAISY: a combined target spatial-spectral dense feature descriptor for improved tracking performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weinheimer, Jeffrey J.; Villeneuve, Pierre; Beaven, Scott G.

    2011-09-01

    In EO tracking, target spatial and spectral features can be used to improve performance since they help distinguish the targets from each other when confusion occurs during normal kinematic tracking. In this paper we introduce a method to encode a target's descriptive spatial information into a multi-dimensional signature vector, allowing us to convert the problem of spatial template matching into a form similar to spectral signature matching. This allows us to leverage multivariate algorithms commonly used with hyperspectral data to the problem of exploiting panchromatic imagery. We show how this spatial signature formulation naturally leads to a hybrid spatial-spectral descriptor vector that supports exploitation using commonly-used spectral algorithms. We introduce a new descriptor called Spectral DAISY for encoding spatial information into a signature vector, based on the concept of the DAISY dense descriptor. We demonstrate the process on real data and show how the combined spatial/spectral feature can be used to improve target/track association over spectral or spatial features alone.

  17. Estimation of phytoplankton size fractions based on spectral features of remote sensing ocean color data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zuchuan; Li, Lin; Song, Kaishan; Cassar, Nicolas

    2013-03-01

    Through its influence on the structure of pelagic ecosystems, phytoplankton size distribution (pico-, nano-, and micro-plankton) is believed to play a key role in "the biological pump." In this paper, an algorithm is proposed to estimate phytoplankton size fractions (PSF) for micro-, nano-, and pico-plankton (fm, fn, and fp, respectively) from the spectral features of remote-sensing data. From remote-sensing reflectance spectrum (Rrs(λ)), the algorithm constructs four types of spectral features: a normalized Rrs(λ), band ratios, continuum-removed spectra, and spectral curvatures. Using support vector machine recursive feature elimination, the algorithm ranks the constructed spectral features and Rrs(λ) according to their sensitivities to PSF which is then regressed against the sensitive spectral features through support vector regression. The algorithm is validated with (1) simulated Rrs(λ) and PSF, and (2) Rrs(λ) obtained by Sea-viewing Wide Field-of-view Sensor (SeaWiFS) and PSF determined from High-Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC) pigments. The validation results show the overall effectiveness of the algorithm in estimating PSF, with R2 of (1) 0.938 (fm) for the simulated SeaWiFS data set; and (2) 0.617 (fm), 0.475 (fn), and 0.587 (fp) for the SeaWiFS satellite data set. The validation results also indicate that continuum-removed spectra and spectral curvatures are the dominant spectral features sensitive to PSF with their wavelengths mainly centered on the pigment-absorption domain. Global spatial distributions of fm, fn, and fp were mapped with monthly SeaWiFS images. Overall, their biogeographical distributions are consistent with our current understanding that pico-plankton account for a large proportion of total phytoplankton biomass in oligotrophic regions, nano-plankton in transitional areas, and micro-plankton in high-productivity regions.

  18. On the nature of absorption features toward nearby stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohl, S.; Czesla, S.; Schmitt, J. H. M. M.

    2016-06-01

    Context. Diffuse interstellar absorption bands (DIBs) of largely unknown chemical origin are regularly observed primarily in distant early-type stars. More recently, detections in nearby late-type stars have also been claimed. These stars' spectra are dominated by stellar absorption lines. Specifically, strong interstellar atomic and DIB absorption has been reported in τ Boo. Aims: We test these claims by studying the strength of interstellar absorption in high-resolution TIGRE spectra of the nearby stars τ Boo, HD 33608, and α CrB. Methods: We focus our analysis on a strong DIB located at 5780.61 Å and on the absorption of interstellar Na. First, we carry out a differential analysis by comparing the spectra of the highly similar F-stars, τ Boo and HD 33608, whose light, however, samples different lines of sight. To obtain absolute values for the DIB absorption, we compare the observed spectra of τ Boo, HD 33608, and α CrB to PHOENIX models and carry out basic spectral modeling based on Voigt line profiles. Results: The intercomparison between τ Boo and HD 33608 reveals that the difference in the line depth is 6.85 ± 1.48 mÅ at the DIB location which is, however, unlikely to be caused by DIB absorption. The comparison between PHOENIX models and observed spectra yields an upper limit of 34.0 ± 0.3 mÅ for any additional interstellar absorption in τ Boo; similar results are obtained for HD 33608 and α CrB. For all objects we derive unrealistically large values for the radial velocity of any presumed interstellar clouds. In τ Boo we find Na D absorption with an equivalent width of 0.65 ± 0.07 mÅ and 2.3 ± 0.1 mÅ in the D2 and D1 lines. For the other Na, absorption of the same magnitude could only be detected in the D2 line. Our comparisons between model and data show that the interstellar absorption toward τ Boo is not abnormally high. Conclusions: We find no significant DIB absorption in any of our target stars. Any differences between modeled and

  19. Spectral feature variations in x-ray diffraction imaging systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolter, Scott D.; Greenberg, Joel A.

    2016-05-01

    Materials with different atomic or molecular structures give rise to unique scatter spectra when measured by X-ray diffraction. The details of these spectra, though, can vary based on both intrinsic (e.g., degree of crystallinity or doping) and extrinsic (e.g., pressure or temperature) conditions. While this sensitivity is useful for detailed characterizations of the material properties, these dependences make it difficult to perform more general classification tasks, such as explosives threat detection in aviation security. A number of challenges, therefore, currently exist for reliable substance detection including the similarity in spectral features among some categories of materials combined with spectral feature variations from materials processing and environmental factors. These factors complicate the creation of a material dictionary and the implementation of conventional classification and detection algorithms. Herein, we report on two prominent factors that lead to variations in spectral features: crystalline texture and temperature variations. Spectral feature comparisons between materials categories will be described for solid metallic sheet, aqueous liquids, polymer sheet, and metallic, organic, and inorganic powder specimens. While liquids are largely immune to texture effects, they are susceptible to temperature changes that can modify their density or produce phase changes. We will describe in situ temperature-dependent measurement of aqueous-based commercial goods in the temperature range of -20°C to 35°C.

  20. Characterization of fine resolution field spectrometers using solar Fraunhofer lines and atmospheric absorption features.

    PubMed

    Meroni, Michele; Busetto, Lorenzo; Guanter, Luis; Cogliati, Sergio; Crosta, Giovanni Franco; Migliavacca, Mirco; Panigada, Cinzia; Rossini, Micol; Colombo, Roberto

    2010-05-20

    The accurate spectral characterization of high-resolution spectrometers is required for correctly computing, interpreting, and comparing radiance and reflectance spectra acquired at different times or by different instruments. In this paper, we describe an algorithm for the spectral characterization of field spectrometer data using sharp atmospheric or solar absorption features present in the measured data. The algorithm retrieves systematic shifts in channel position and actual full width at half-maximum (FWHM) of the instrument by comparing data acquired during standard field spectroscopy measurement operations with a reference irradiance spectrum modeled with the MODTRAN4 radiative transfer code. Measurements from four different field spectrometers with spectral resolutions ranging from 0.05 to 3.5nm are processed and the results validated against laboratory calibration. An accurate retrieval of channel position and FWHM has been achieved, with an average error smaller than the instrument spectral sampling interval.

  1. Plant phenolics and absorption features in vegetation reflectance spectra near 1.66 μm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kokaly, Raymond F.; Skidmore, Andrew K.

    2015-12-01

    Past laboratory and field studies have quantified phenolic substances in vegetative matter from reflectance measurements for understanding plant response to herbivores and insect predation. Past remote sensing studies on phenolics have evaluated crop quality and vegetation patterns caused by bedrock geology and associated variations in soil geochemistry. We examined spectra of pure phenolic compounds, common plant biochemical constituents, dry leaves, fresh leaves, and plant canopies for direct evidence of absorption features attributable to plant phenolics. Using spectral feature analysis with continuum removal, we observed that a narrow feature at 1.66 μm is persistent in spectra of manzanita, sumac, red maple, sugar maple, tea, and other species. This feature was consistent with absorption caused by aromatic Csbnd H bonds in the chemical structure of phenolic compounds and non-hydroxylated aromatics. Because of overlapping absorption by water, the feature was weaker in fresh leaf and canopy spectra compared to dry leaf measurements. Simple linear regressions of feature depth and feature area with polyphenol concentration in tea resulted in high correlations and low errors (% phenol by dry weight) at the dry leaf (r2 = 0.95, RMSE = 1.0%, n = 56), fresh leaf (r2 = 0.79, RMSE = 2.1%, n = 56), and canopy (r2 = 0.78, RMSE = 1.0%, n = 13) levels of measurement. Spectra of leaves, needles, and canopies of big sagebrush and evergreens exhibited a weak absorption feature centered near 1.63 μm, short ward of the phenolic compounds, possibly consistent with terpenes. This study demonstrates that subtle variation in vegetation spectra in the shortwave infrared can directly indicate biochemical constituents and be used to quantify them. Phenolics are of lesser abundance compared to the major plant constituents but, nonetheless, have important plant functions and ecological significance. Additional research is needed to advance our understanding of the spectral influences

  2. Mapping vegetation in Yellowstone National Park using spectral feature analysis of AVIRIS data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kokaly, R.F.; Despain, D.G.; Clark, R.N.; Livo, K.E.

    2003-01-01

    Knowledge of the distribution of vegetation on the landscape can be used to investigate ecosystem functioning. The sizes and movements of animal populations can be linked to resources provided by different plant species. This paper demonstrates the application of imaging spectroscopy to the study of vegetation in Yellowstone National Park (Yellowstone) using spectral feature analysis of data from the Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS). AVIRIS data, acquired on August 7, 1996, were calibrated to surface reflectance using a radiative transfer model and field reflectance measurements of a ground calibration site. A spectral library of canopy reflectance signatures was created by averaging pixels of the calibrated AVIRIS data over areas of known forest and nonforest vegetation cover types in Yellowstone. Using continuum removal and least squares fitting algorithms in the US Geological Survey's Tetracorder expert system, the distributions of these vegetation types were determined by comparing the absorption features of vegetation in the spectral library with the spectra from the AVIRIS data. The 0.68 ??m chlorophyll absorption feature and leaf water absorption features, centered near 0.98 and 1.20 ??m, were analyzed. Nonforest cover types of sagebrush, grasslands, willows, sedges, and other wetland vegetation were mapped in the Lamar Valley of Yellowstone. Conifer cover types of lodgepole pine, whitebark pine, Douglas fir, and mixed Engelmann spruce/subalpine fir forests were spectrally discriminated and their distributions mapped in the AVIRIS images. In the Mount Washburn area of Yellowstone, a comparison of the AVIRIS map of forest cover types to a map derived from air photos resulted in an overall agreement of 74.1% (kappa statistic = 0.62).

  3. Low-Energy Study of Gamma-Ray Bursts Having Spectral Line Features

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pangia, Michael J.

    2003-01-01

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are energetic, short-duration emissions of gamma-rays. The Burst and Transient Source Experiment (BATSE) that was onboard NASA s Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory has done much to advance our understanding of GRBs. Perhaps foremost is to establish that GRBs originate from astronomical sources that exist well beyond our galaxy. Another area in which BATSE has been instrumental is to provide high-resolution data that can be used in spectral studies. Before BATSE, there were many reports of GRB spectra containing what appeared to be spectral absorption lines, whereas Briggs, after an extensive computer search of 117 bright BATSE GRBs, reported finding only one case that might be an absorption line and ten cases that might be emission lines. None of the eleven BATSE cases were definitively identified as spectral lines, and Briggs indicated reasons as to why the pre-BATSE reports should not be taken as conclusive. It remains an open question as to what these spectral-like features are, or if they are even real. The purpose of this work is, for the subset of the eleven BATSE GRBs for which low-energy data are available from two BATSE's Spectroscopy Detectors (SDs), to include these data in the spectral analysis. Such a study will provide additional constraints on the model spectral functions to better ascertain the reality of the line features. The spectral analysis program used was RMFIT. Of the six GRBs that met the selection criteria, the analysis was performed on only three of them due to a lack of time.

  4. Absorption features in the x-ray spectrum of an ordinary radio pulsar.

    PubMed

    Kargaltsev, Oleg; Durant, Martin; Misanovic, Zdenka; Pavlov, George G

    2012-08-24

    The vast majority of known nonaccreting neutron stars (NSs) are rotation-powered radio and/or γ-ray pulsars. So far, their multiwavelength spectra have all been described satisfactorily by thermal and nonthermal continuum models, with no spectral lines. Spectral features have, however, been found in a handful of exotic NSs and were thought to be a manifestation of their unique traits. Here, we report the detection of absorption features in the x-ray spectrum of an ordinary rotation-powered radio pulsar, J1740+1000. Our findings bridge the gap between the spectra of pulsars and other, more exotic, NSs, suggesting that the features are more common in the NS spectra than they have been thought so far.

  5. Guided-wave approaches to spectrally selective energy absorption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stegeman, G. I.; Burke, J. J.

    1987-01-01

    Results of experiments designed to demonstrate spectrally selective absorption in dielectric waveguides on semiconductor substrates are reported. These experiments were conducted with three waveguides formed by sputtering films of PSK2 glass onto silicon-oxide layers grown on silicon substrates. The three waveguide samples were studied at 633 and 532 nm. The samples differed only in the thickness of the silicon-oxide layer, specifically 256 nm, 506 nm, and 740 nm. Agreement between theoretical predictions and measurements of propagation constants (mode angles) of the six or seven modes supported by these samples was excellent. However, the loss measurements were inconclusive because of high scattering losses in the structures fabricated (in excess of 10 dB/cm). Theoretical calculations indicated that the power distribution among all the modes supported by these structures will reach its steady state value after a propagation length of only 1 mm. Accordingly, the measured loss rates were found to be almost independent of which mode was initially excited. The excellent agreement between theory and experiment leads to the conclusion that low loss waveguides confirm the predicted loss rates.

  6. Measurement of Broad Absorption Features Using a Tunable External Cavity Quantum Cascade Laser

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, Mark C.; Myers, Tanya L.; Wojcik, Michael D.; Cannon, Bret D.; Taubman, Matthew S.; Scott, David C.

    2007-09-25

    We demonstrate the use of a tunable external cavity quantum cascade laser system for measurement of broad absorption features in the mid-infrared spectral region. The thermoelectrically cooled external cavity laser was tuned over a 65 cm-1 range centered at 8.7 microns using stepper motor control. Pulsing the laser at a high duty cycle provided 3-5 mW average output power over the tuning range, and enabled phase-sensitive detection of amplitude-modulated signals. We used the laser system to measure the absorption spectra of Freon-125 using a Herriott cell. In addition, the absorption spectrum of water in the laboratory air was measured. The measurements showed excellent agreement with reference spectra, in both wavelength and amplitude. The measured scan resolution of 0.14 cm-1 is suitable for measurement of the absorption features of complex molecules as well as simple molecules with atmospherically broadened lines. We discuss the limits to the scan resolution due to effects of spectral chirp and mode-hops during pulsed operation.

  7. Measurement of broad absorption features using a tunable external cavity quantum cascade laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, Mark C.; Myers, Tanya L.; Wojcik, Michael D.; Cannon, Bret D.; Taubman, Matthew S.; Scott, David C.

    2007-09-01

    We demonstrate the use of a tunable external cavity quantum cascade laser system for measurement of broad absorption features in the mid-infrared spectral region. The thermoelectrically cooled external cavity laser was tuned over a 65 cm -1range centered at 8.7 microns using stepper motor control. Pulsing the laser at a high duty cycle provided 2-4.5 mW average output power over the tuning range, and enabled phase-sensitive detection of amplitude-modulated signals. We used the laser system to measure the absorption spectra of Freon-125 using a Herriott cell. In addition, the absorption spectrum of water in the laboratory air was measured. The measurements showed excellent agreement with reference spectra, in both wavelength and amplitude. The measured scan resolution of 0.14 cm -1 is suitable for measurement of the absorption features of complex molecules as well as simple molecules with atmospherically broadened lines. We discuss the limits to the scan resolution due to effects of spectral chirp and mode-hops during pulsed operation.

  8. Interactions of praseodymium and neodymium with nucleosides and nucleotides: absorption difference and comparative absorption spectral study.

    PubMed

    Misra, S N; Anjaiah, K; Joseph, G; Abdi, S H

    1992-02-01

    The interactions of praseodymium(III) and neodymium(III) with nucleosides and nucleotides have been studied in different stoichiometry in water and water-DMF mixtures by employing absorption difference and comparative absorption spectrophotometry. The 4f-4f bands were analysed by linear curve analysis followed by gaussian curve analysis, and various spectral parameters were computed, using partial and multiple regression method. The magnitude of changes in both energy interaction and intensity were used to explore the degree of outer and inner sphere coordination, incidence of covalency and the extent of metal 4f-orbital involvement in chemical bonding. Crystalline complexes of the type [Ln(nucleotide)2(H2O)2]- (where nucleotide--GMP or IMP) were characterized by IR, 1H NMR, 31P NMR data. These studies indicated that the binding of the nucleotide is through phosphate oxygen in a bidentate manner and the complexes undergo substantial ionisation in aqueous medium, thereby supporting the observed weak 4f-4f bands and lower values for nephelauxetic effect (1-beta), bonding (b) and covalency (delta) parameters derived from coulombic and spin orbit interaction parameters.

  9. Investigations on the 1.7 micron residual absorption feature in the vegetation reflection spectrum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Verdebout, J.; Jacquemoud, S.; Andreoli, G.; Hosgood, B.; Sieber, A.

    1993-01-01

    The detection and interpretation of the weak absorption features associated with the biochemical components of vegetation is of great potential interest to a variety of applications ranging from classification to global change studies. This recent subject is also challenging because the spectral signature of the biochemicals is only detectable as a small distortion of the infrared spectrum which is mainly governed by water. Furthermore, the interpretation is complicated by complexity of the molecules (lignin, cellulose, starch, proteins) which contain a large number of different and common chemical bonds. In this paper, we present investigations on the absorption feature centered at 1.7 micron; these were conducted both on AVIRIS data and laboratory reflectance spectra of leaves.

  10. Absorption Features in Spectra of Magnetized Neutron Stars

    SciTech Connect

    Suleimanov, V.; Hambaryan, V.; Neuhaeuser, R.; Potekhin, A. Y.; Pavlov, G. G.; Adelsberg, M. van; Werner, K.

    2011-09-21

    The X-ray spectra of some magnetized isolated neutron stars (NSs) show absorption features with equivalent widths (EWs) of 50-200 eV, whose nature is not yet well known.To explain the prominent absorption features in the soft X-ray spectra of the highly magnetized (B{approx}10{sup 14} G) X-ray dim isolated NSs (XDINSs), we theoretically investigate different NS local surface models, including naked condensed iron surfaces and partially ionized hydrogen model atmospheres, with semi-infinite and thin atmospheres above the condensed surface. We also developed a code for computing light curves and integral emergent spectra of magnetized neutron stars with various temperature and magnetic field distributions over the NS surface. We compare the general properties of the computed and observed light curves and integral spectra for XDINS RBS 1223 and conclude that the observations can be explained by a thin hydrogen atmosphere above the condensed iron surface, while the presence of a strong toroidal magnetic field component on the XDINS surface is unlikely.We suggest that the harmonically spaced absorption features in the soft X-ray spectrum of the central compact object (CCO) 1E 1207.4-5209 (hereafter 1E 1207) correspond to peaks in the energy dependence of the free-free opacity in a quantizing magnetic field, known as quantum oscillations. To explore observable properties of these quantum oscillations, we calculate models of hydrogen NS atmospheres with B{approx}10{sup 10}-10{sup 11} G(i.e., electron cyclotron energy E{sub c,e}{approx}0.1-1 keV) and T{sub eff} = 1-3 MK. Such conditions are thought to be typical for 1E 1207. We show that observable features at the electron cyclotron harmonics with EWs {approx_equal}100-200 eV can arise due to these quantum oscillations.

  11. [Decomposing total suspended particle absorption based on the spectral correlation relationship].

    PubMed

    Wang, Gui-Fen; Cao, Wen-Xi; Yang, Ding-Tian; Zhao, Jun

    2009-01-01

    A model for estimating the contributions of phytoplankton and nonalgal particles to the total particulate absorption coefficient was developed based on their separate spectral relationships, and a constrained nonlinear optimization code was used to realize the spectral decomposition. The spectral absorption of total particulate matter including phytoplankton and nonalgal particles was measured using the filter-pad method during two cruises in autumn in Northern South China Sea. Using the dataset collected in 2004, the spectral relationships of particle absorption coefficients were examined and the results showed that the phytoplankton absorption coefficients at various wavebands could be well expressed by aph (443) as the second-order quadratic equations; and the nonalgal particle absorption (aNAP(lambda)) could be successfully modeled with the simple exponential function. Based on these spectral relationships, we developed this partition model. The model was tested using the independently measured absorption by phytoplankton and nonalgal materials which were obtained in 2005 from the same area. The test results showed that the computed spectral absorption coefficients of phytoplankton and nonalgal particles were consistent with in situ measurement. Good correlations were fo und between the comput ed phytoplankton absorption coefficient and the measured value,with the determination coefficients (r2) being higher than 0.97 and slopes being around 1.0; and the RMSE values could be controlled within 17% over the main absorption wavebands such as 443, 490 and 683 nm. Compared with the other two existing models from Bricaud et al. and Oubelkheir et al., this method shows many advantages for local applications. Moreover, this model does not need any information about pigment concentrations and the selected spectral bands are consistent with the ocean color satellite sensor. This method could also be used in the total absorption coefficient decomposition which provides

  12. Camouflaged target detection based on polarized spectral features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Jian; Zhang, Junping; Zou, Bin

    2016-05-01

    The polarized hyperspectral images (PHSI) include polarization, spectral, spatial and radiant features, which provide more information about objects and scenes than traditional intensity or spectrum ones. And polarization can suppress the background and highlight the object, leading to the high potential to improve camouflaged target detection. So polarized hyperspectral imaging technique has aroused extensive concern in the last few years. Nowadays, the detection methods are still not very mature, most of which are rooted in the detection of hyperspectral image. And before using these algorithms, Stokes vector is used to process the original four-dimensional polarized hyperspectral data firstly. However, when the data is large and complex, the amount of calculation and error will increase. In this paper, tensor is applied to reconstruct the original four-dimensional data into new three-dimensional data, then, the constraint energy minimization (CEM) is used to process the new data, which adds the polarization information to construct the polarized spectral filter operator and takes full advantages of spectral and polarized information. This way deals with the original data without extracting the Stokes vector, so as to reduce the computation and error greatly. The experimental results also show that the proposed method in this paper is more suitable for the target detection of the PHSI.

  13. Spectral features control temporal plasticity in auditory cortex.

    PubMed

    Kilgard, M P; Pandya, P K; Vazquez, J L; Rathbun, D L; Engineer, N D; Moucha, R

    2001-01-01

    Cortical responses are adjusted and optimized throughout life to meet changing behavioral demands and to compensate for peripheral damage. The cholinergic nucleus basalis (NB) gates cortical plasticity and focuses learning on behaviorally meaningful stimuli. By systematically varying the acoustic parameters of the sound paired with NB activation, we have previously shown that tone frequency and amplitude modulation rate alter the topography and selectivity of frequency tuning in primary auditory cortex. This result suggests that network-level rules operate in the cortex to guide reorganization based on specific features of the sensory input associated with NB activity. This report summarizes recent evidence that temporal response properties of cortical neurons are influenced by the spectral characteristics of sounds associated with cholinergic modulation. For example, repeated pairing of a spectrally complex (ripple) stimulus decreased the minimum response latency for the ripple, but lengthened the minimum latency for tones. Pairing a rapid train of tones with NB activation only increased the maximum following rate of cortical neurons when the carrier frequency of each train was randomly varied. These results suggest that spectral and temporal parameters of acoustic experiences interact to shape spectrotemporal selectivity in the cortex. Additional experiments with more complex stimuli are needed to clarify how the cortex learns natural sounds such as speech.

  14. Anomalous two-photon spectral features in warm rubidium vapor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perrella, C.; Light, P. S.; Milburn, T. J.; Kielpinski, D.; Stace, T. M.; Luiten, A. N.

    2016-09-01

    We report observation of anomalous fluorescence spectral features in the environs of a two-photon transition in a rubidium vapor when excited with two different wavelength lasers that are both counterpropagating through the vapor. These features are characterized by an unusual trade-off between the detunings of the driving fields. Three different hypothetical processes are presented to explain the observed spectra: a simultaneous three-atom and four-photon collision, a four-photon excitation involving a light field produced via amplified spontaneous emission, and population pumping perturbing the expected steady-state spectra. Numerical modeling of each hypothetical process is presented, supporting the population pumping process as the most plausible mechanism.

  15. Indirect searches of dark matter via polynomial spectral features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia-Cely, Camilo; Heeck, Julian

    2016-08-01

    We derive the spectra arising from non-relativistic dark matter annihilations or decays into intermediary particles with arbitrary spin, which subsequently produce neutrinos or photons via two-body decays. Our approach is model independent and predicts spectral features restricted to a kinematic box. The overall shape within that box is a polynomial determined by the polarization of the decaying particle. We illustrate our findings with two examples. First, with the neutrino spectra arising from dark matter annihilations into the massive Standard Model gauge bosons. Second, with the gamma-ray and neutrino spectra generated by dark matter annihilations into hypothetical massive spin-2 particles. Our results are in particular applicable to the 750 GeV diphoton excess observed at the LHC if interpreted as a spin-0 or spin-2 particle coupled to dark matter. We also derive limits on the dark matter annihilation cross section into this resonance from the non-observation of the associated gamma-ray spectral features by the H.E.S.S. telescope.

  16. [Spectral features analysis of sea ice in the Arctic Ocean].

    PubMed

    Ke, Chang-qing; Xie, Hong-jie; Lei, Rui-bo; Li, Qun; Sun, Bo

    2012-04-01

    Sea ice in the Arctic Ocean plays an important role in the global climate change, and its quick change and impact are the scientists' focus all over the world. The spectra of different kinds of sea ice were measured with portable ASD FieldSpec 3 spectrometer during the long-term ice station of the 4th Chinese national Arctic Expedition in 2010, and the spectral features were analyzed systematically. The results indicated that the reflectance of sea ice covered by snow is the highest one, naked sea ice the second, and melted sea ice the lowest. Peak and valley characteristics of spectrum curves of sea ice covered by thick snow, thin snow, wet snow and snow crystal are very significant, and the reflectance basically decreases with the wavelength increasing. The rules of reflectance change with wavelength of natural sea ice, white ice and blue ice are basically same, the reflectance of them is medium, and that of grey ice is far lower than natural sea ice, white ice and blue ice. It is very significant for scientific research to analyze the spectral features of sea ice in the Arctic Ocean and to implement the quantitative remote sensing of sea ice, and to further analyze its response to the global warming.

  17. Spectrally queued feature selection for robotic visual odometery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pirozzo, David M.; Frederick, Philip A.; Hunt, Shawn; Theisen, Bernard; Del Rose, Mike

    2011-01-01

    Over the last two decades, research in Unmanned Vehicles (UV) has rapidly progressed and become more influenced by the field of biological sciences. Researchers have been investigating mechanical aspects of varying species to improve UV air and ground intrinsic mobility, they have been exploring the computational aspects of the brain for the development of pattern recognition and decision algorithms and they have been exploring perception capabilities of numerous animals and insects. This paper describes a 3 month exploratory applied research effort performed at the US ARMY Research, Development and Engineering Command's (RDECOM) Tank Automotive Research, Development and Engineering Center (TARDEC) in the area of biologically inspired spectrally augmented feature selection for robotic visual odometry. The motivation for this applied research was to develop a feasibility analysis on multi-spectrally queued feature selection, with improved temporal stability, for the purposes of visual odometry. The intended application is future semi-autonomous Unmanned Ground Vehicle (UGV) control as the richness of data sets required to enable human like behavior in these systems has yet to be defined.

  18. Plant phenolics and absorption features in vegetation reflectance spectra near 1.66 μm

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kokaly, Raymond F.; Skidmore, Andrew K

    2015-01-01

    Past laboratory and field studies have quantified phenolic substances in vegetative matter from reflectance measurements for understanding plant response to herbivores and insect predation. Past remote sensing studies on phenolics have evaluated crop quality and vegetation patterns caused by bedrock geology and associated variations in soil geochemistry. We examined spectra of pure phenolic compounds, common plant biochemical constituents, dry leaves, fresh leaves, and plant canopies for direct evidence of absorption features attributable to plant phenolics. Using spectral feature analysis with continuum removal, we observed that a narrow feature at 1.66 μm is persistent in spectra of manzanita, sumac, red maple, sugar maple, tea, and other species. This feature was consistent with absorption caused by aromatic C-H bonds in the chemical structure of phenolic compounds and non-hydroxylated aromatics. Because of overlapping absorption by water, the feature was weaker in fresh leaf and canopy spectra compared to dry leaf measurements. Simple linear regressions of feature depth and feature area with polyphenol concentration in tea resulted in high correlations and low errors (% phenol by dry weight) at the dry leaf (r2 = 0.95, RMSE = 1.0%, n = 56), fresh leaf (r2 = 0.79, RMSE = 2.1%, n = 56), and canopy (r2 = 0.78, RMSE = 1.0%, n = 13) levels of measurement. Spectra of leaves, needles, and canopies of big sagebrush and evergreens exhibited a weak absorption feature centered near 1.63 μm, short ward of the phenolic compounds, possibly consistent with terpenes. This study demonstrates that subtle variation in vegetation spectra in the shortwave infrared can directly indicate biochemical constituents and be used to quantify them. Phenolics are of lesser abundance compared to the major plant constituents but, nonetheless, have important plant functions and ecological significance. Additional research is needed to advance our understanding of the

  19. A new spectral feature on the trailing hemisphere of Europa at 3.78 microns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trumbo, Samantha K.; Fischer, Patrick D.; Brown, Michael E.

    2016-10-01

    We present hemispherically resolved spectra of the surface of Europa from 3.4 – 4.15 microns, which we obtained using Keck NIRSPEC. These include the first high-quality L-band spectra of the surface to extend beyond 4 microns. In our data, we identify a previously unseen spectral feature at 3.78 microns on the trailing hemisphere. This feature is coincident with an SO2 frost absorption. However the corresponding, typically stronger 4.07-micron feature of SO2 frost is absent from our data. This result is contrary to the suggested detection of SO2 at 4.05 microns in Galileo NIMS data [1] of the trailing hemisphere, which was severely affected by radiation noise. Thus, we use simple spectral modeling to argue that the 3.78-micron feature is not easily explained by the presence of SO2 frost on the surface. However, the longitudinal distribution of the feature is consistent with that of a radiolytic product. We explore alternative explanations and discuss other potential candidate species. [1] Hansen and McCord (2008) GRL, 35: L01202.

  20. Spectral properties of microwave graphs with local absorption.

    PubMed

    Allgaier, Markus; Gehler, Stefan; Barkhofen, Sonja; Stöckmann, H-J; Kuhl, Ulrich

    2014-02-01

    The influence of absorption on the spectra of microwave graphs has been studied experimentally. The microwave networks were made up of coaxial cables and T junctions. First, absorption was introduced by attaching a 50Ω load to an additional vertex for graphs with and without time-reversal symmetry. The resulting level-spacing distributions were compared with a generalization of the Wigner surmise in the presence of open channels proposed recently by Poli et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 108, 174101 (2012)]. Good agreement was found using an effective coupling parameter. Second, absorption was introduced along one individual bond via a variable microwave attenuator, and the influence of absorption on the length spectrum was studied. The peak heights in the length spectra corresponding to orbits avoiding the absorber were found to be independent of the attenuation, whereas, the heights of the peaks belonging to orbits passing the absorber once or twice showed the expected decrease with increasing attenuation.

  1. [Visible-NIR spectral feature of citrus greening disease].

    PubMed

    Li, Xiu-hua; Li, Min-zan; Won Suk, Lee; Reza, Ehsani; Ashish, Ratn Mishra

    2014-06-01

    Citrus greening (Huanglongbing, or HLB) is a devastating disease caused by Candidatus liberibacter which uses psyllids as vectors. It has no cure till now, and poses a huge threat to citrus industry around the world. In order to diagnose, assess and further control this disease, it is of great importance to first find a quick and effective way to detect it. Spectroscopy method, which was widely considered as a fast and nondestructive way, was adopted here to conduct a preliminary exploration of disease characteristics. In order to explore the spectral differences between the healthy and HLB infected leaves and canopies, this study measured the visible-NIR spectral reflectance of their leaves and canopies under lab and field conditions, respectively. The original spectral data were firstly preprocessed with smoothing (or moving average) and cluster average procedures, and then the first derivatives were also calculated to determine the red edge position (REP). In order to solve the multi-peak phenomenon problem, two interpolation methods (three-point Lagrangian interpolation and four-point linear extrapolation) were adopted to calculate the REP for each sample. The results showed that there were, obvious differences at the visible & NIR spectral reflectance between the healthy and HLB infected classes. Comparing with the healthy reflectance, the HLB reflectance was higher at the visible bands because of the yellowish symptoms on the infected leaves, and lower at NIR bands because the disease blocked water transportation to leaves. But the feature at NIR bands was easily affected by environmental factors such as light, background, etc. The REP was also a potential indicator to distinguish those two classes. The average REP was slowly moving toward red bands while the infection level was getting higher. The gap of the average REPs between the healthy and HLB classes reached to a maximum of 20 nm. Even in the dataset with relatively lower variation, the classification

  2. [Visible-NIR spectral feature of citrus greening disease].

    PubMed

    Li, Xiu-hua; Li, Min-zan; Won Suk, Lee; Reza, Ehsani; Ashish, Ratn Mishra

    2014-06-01

    Citrus greening (Huanglongbing, or HLB) is a devastating disease caused by Candidatus liberibacter which uses psyllids as vectors. It has no cure till now, and poses a huge threat to citrus industry around the world. In order to diagnose, assess and further control this disease, it is of great importance to first find a quick and effective way to detect it. Spectroscopy method, which was widely considered as a fast and nondestructive way, was adopted here to conduct a preliminary exploration of disease characteristics. In order to explore the spectral differences between the healthy and HLB infected leaves and canopies, this study measured the visible-NIR spectral reflectance of their leaves and canopies under lab and field conditions, respectively. The original spectral data were firstly preprocessed with smoothing (or moving average) and cluster average procedures, and then the first derivatives were also calculated to determine the red edge position (REP). In order to solve the multi-peak phenomenon problem, two interpolation methods (three-point Lagrangian interpolation and four-point linear extrapolation) were adopted to calculate the REP for each sample. The results showed that there were, obvious differences at the visible & NIR spectral reflectance between the healthy and HLB infected classes. Comparing with the healthy reflectance, the HLB reflectance was higher at the visible bands because of the yellowish symptoms on the infected leaves, and lower at NIR bands because the disease blocked water transportation to leaves. But the feature at NIR bands was easily affected by environmental factors such as light, background, etc. The REP was also a potential indicator to distinguish those two classes. The average REP was slowly moving toward red bands while the infection level was getting higher. The gap of the average REPs between the healthy and HLB classes reached to a maximum of 20 nm. Even in the dataset with relatively lower variation, the classification

  3. Automatic Diagnosis of Mild Cognitive Impairment Using Electroencephalogram Spectral Features

    PubMed Central

    Kashefpoor, Masoud; Rabbani, Hossein; Barekatain, Majid

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is one of the most expensive and fatal diseases in the elderly population. Up to now, no cure have been found for AD, so early stage diagnosis is the only way to control it. Mild cognitive impairment (MCI) usually is the early stage of AD which is defined as decreasing in mental abilities such a cognition, memory, and speech not too severe to interfere daily activities. MCI diagnosis is rather hard and usually assumed as normal consequences of aging. This study proposes an accurate, mobile, and nonexpensive diagnostic approach based on electroencephalogram (EEG) signal. EEG signals were recorded using 19 electrodes positioned according to the 10–20 International system at resting eyes closed state from 16 normal and 11 MCI participants. Nineteen Spectral features are computed for each channel and examined using a correlation based algorithm to select the best discriminative features. Selected features are classified using a combination of neurofuzzy system and k-nearest neighbor classifier. Final results reach 88.89%, 100%, and 83.33% for accuracy, sensitivity, and specificity, respectively, which shows the potential of proposed method to be used as an MCI diagnostic tool, especially for screening a large population. PMID:27014609

  4. IRCM spectral signature measurements instrumentation featuring enhanced radiometric accuracy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lantagne, Stéphane; Prel, Florent; Moreau, Louis; Roy, Claude; Willers, Cornelius J.

    2015-10-01

    Hyperspectral Infrared (IR) signature measurements are performed in military applications including aircraft- and -naval vessel stealth characterization, detection/lock-on ranges, and flares efficiency characterization. Numerous military applications require high precision measurement of infrared signature characterization. For instance, Infrared Countermeasure (IRCM) systems and Infrared Counter-Countermeasure (IRCCM) system are continuously evolving. Infrared flares defeated IR guided seekers, IR flares became defeated by intelligent IR guided seekers and Jammers defeated the intelligent IR guided seekers [7]. A precise knowledge of the target infrared signature phenomenology is crucial for the development and improvement of countermeasure and counter-countermeasure systems and so precise quantification of the infrared energy emitted from the targets requires accurate spectral signature measurements. Errors in infrared characterization measurements can lead to weakness in the safety of the countermeasure system and errors in the determination of detection/lock-on range of an aircraft. The infrared signatures are analyzed, modeled, and simulated to provide a good understanding of the signature phenomenology to improve the IRCM and IRCCM technologies efficiency [7,8,9]. There is a growing need for infrared spectral signature measurement technology in order to further improve and validate infrared-based models and simulations. The addition of imagery to Spectroradiometers is improving the measurement capability of complex targets and scenes because all elements in the scene can now be measured simultaneously. However, the limited dynamic range of the Focal Plane Array (FPA) sensors used in these instruments confines the ranges of measurable radiance intensities. This ultimately affects the radiometric accuracy of these complex signatures. We will describe and demonstrate how the ABB hyperspectral imaging spectroradiometer features enhanced the radiometric accuracy

  5. X-ray signatures: New time scales and spectral features

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boldt, E. A.

    1977-01-01

    The millisecond bursts from Cyg X-1 are investigated and the overall chaotic variability for the bulk of the Cyg X-1 emission is compared to that of Sco X-1, showing that the essential character is remarkably similar (i.e. shot noise) although the fundamental time scales involved differ widely, from a fraction of a second (for Cyg X-1) to a fraction of a day (for Sco X-1). Recent OSO-8 observations of spectra features attributable to iron are reviewed. In particular, line emission is discussed within the context of a model for thermal radiation by a hot evolved gas in systems as different as supernova remnants and clusters of galaxies. Newly observed spectral structure in the emission from the X-ray pulsar Her X-1 is reported.

  6. Spectral properties of molecular iodine in absorption cells filled to specified saturation pressure.

    PubMed

    Hrabina, Jan; Šarbort, Martin; Acef, Ouali; Burck, Frédéric Du; Chiodo, Nicola; Holá, Miroslava; Číp, Ondřej; Lazar, Josef

    2014-11-01

    We present the results of measurement and evaluation of spectral properties of iodine absorption cells filled at certain saturation pressure. A set of cells made of borosilicate glass instead of common fused silica was tested for their spectral properties in greater detail with special care for the long-term development of the absorption media purity. The results were compared with standard fused silica cells and the high quality of iodine was verified. A measurement method based on an approach relying on measurement of linewidth of the hyperfine transitions is proposed as a novel technique for iodine cell absorption media purity evaluation. A potential application in laser metrology of length is also discussed.

  7. Spectral absorption coefficients and imaginary parts of refractive indices of Saharan dust during SAMUM-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, T.; Schladitz, A.; Massling, A.; Kaaden, N.; Kandler, K.; Wiedensohler, A.

    2009-02-01

    ABSTRACT During the SAMUM-1 experiment, absorption coefficients and imaginary parts of refractive indices of mineral dust particles were investigated in southern Morocco. Main absorbing constituents of airborne samples were identified to be iron oxide and soot. Spectral absorption coefficients were measured using a spectral optical absorption photometer (SOAP) in the wavelength range from 300 to 800 nm with a resolution of 50 nm. A new method that accounts for a loading-dependent correction of fibre filter based absorption photometers, was developed. The imaginary part of the refractive index was determined using Mie calculations from 350 to 800 nm. The spectral absorption coefficient allowed a separation between dust and soot absorption. A correlation analysis showed that the dust absorption coefficient is correlated (R2 up to 0.55) with the particle number concentration for particle diameters larger than 0.5 μm, whereas the coefficient of determination R2 for smaller particles is below 0.1. Refractive indices were derived for both the total aerosol and a dust aerosol that was corrected for soot absorption. Average imaginary parts of refractive indices of the entire aerosol are 7.4 × 10-3, 3.4 × 10-3 and 2.0 × 10-3 at wavelengths of 450, 550 and 650 nm. After a correction for the soot absorption, imaginary parts of refractive indices are 5.1 × 10-3, 1.6 × 10-3 and 4.5 × 10-4.

  8. Thermal emission spectroscopy of microcrystalline sedimentary phases: Effects of natural surface roughness on spectral feature shape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hardgrove, C. J.; Rogers, A. D.; Glotch, T. D.; Arnold, J. A.

    2016-03-01

    Distinguishing between microcrystalline and macrocrystalline mineral phases can help constrain the conditions under which those minerals formed or the degree of postdepositional alteration. This study demonstrates the effects of crystal size and surface roughness on thermal infrared emission spectra of micro and macrocrystalline phases of the two most common minerals on Earth, quartz and calcite. Given the characteristic depositional and environmental conditions under which microcrystalline minerals form, and the recent observations of high-silica deposits on Mars, it is important to understand how these unique materials can be identified using remote infrared spectroscopy techniques. We find that (a) microcrystalline minerals exhibit naturally rough surfaces compared to their macrocrystalline counterparts at the 10 µm scale; and that (b) this roughness causes distinct spectral differences within the Reststrahlen bands of each mineral. These spectral differences occur for surfaces that are rough on the wavelength scale, where the absorption coefficient (k) is large. Specifically, the wavelength positions of the Reststrahlen features for microcrystalline phases are narrowed and shifted compared to macrocrystalline counterparts. The spectral shape differences are small enough that the composition of the material is still recognizable, but large enough such that a roughness effect could be detected. Petrographic and topographic analyses of microcrystalline samples suggest a relationship between crystal size and surface roughness. Together, these observations suggest it may be possible to make general inferences about microcrystallinity from the thermal infrared spectral character of samples, which could aid in reconstructions of sedimentary rock diagenesis where corresponding petrographic or microimaging is not available.

  9. Comparison between different spectral models of the diffuse attenuation and absorption coefficients of seawater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopelevich, Oleg V.; Filippov, Yuri V.

    1994-10-01

    The goal of this work is to verify different spectral models of the diffuse attenuation and absorption coefficients of sea water and to work out a recommendation for their use. It is shown that the spectral models of the diffuse attenuation coefficient Kd((lambda) ) developed by Austin, Petzold, 1984 and by Volynsky, Sud'bin, 1992 correspond with each other, as well the models of Ivanov, Shemshura, 1973 and of Kopelevich, Shemshura, 1988 for calculation of the spectral absorption coefficient a((lambda) ) on the values of Kd((lambda) ). Theoretical foundation of the relation between a((lambda) ) and Kd((lambda) ) is given. The up-to-date physical model of the sea water light absorption is considered and checked by means of comparison with measured values of the attenuation coefficient at the ultraviolet and visible spectral ranges.

  10. Detection of the 2175 Å Dust Feature in Mg II Absorption Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malhotra, Sangeeta

    1997-10-01

    The broad absorption bump at 2175 Å due to dust, which is ubiquitous in the Galaxy and is seen in the Magellanic clouds, is also seen in a composite spectrum of Mg II absorbers. The composite absorber spectrum is obtained by taking the geometric mean of 92 quasar spectra after aligning them in the rest frame of 96 absorbers. By aligning the spectra according to absorber redshifts, we reinforce the spectral features of the absorbers and smooth over possible bumps and wiggles in the emission spectra as well as small features in the flat-fielding of the spectra. The width of the observed absorption feature is 200-300 Å (FWHM), or 0.4-0.6 μm-1, and the central wavelength is 2240 Å. These are somewhat different from the central wavelength of 2176 Å and FWHM = 0.8-1.25 μm-1 found in the Galaxy. Simulations show that this discrepancy between the properties of the 2175 Å feature in Mg II absorbers and the Galactic interstellar medium can be mostly explained by the different methods used to measure them.

  11. Spectral EEG Features of a Short Psycho-physiological Relaxation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teplan, Michal; Krakovská, Anna; Špajdel, Marián

    2014-08-01

    Short-lasting psycho-physiological relaxation was investigated through an analysis of its bipolar electroencephalographic (EEG) characteristics. In 8 subjects, 6-channel EEG data of 3-minute duration were recorded during 88 relaxation sessions. Time course of spectral EEG features was examined. Alpha powers were decreasing during resting conditions of 3-minute sessions in lying position with eyes closed. This was followed by a decrease of total power in centro-parietal cortex regions and an increase of beta power in fronto-central areas. Represented by EEG coherences the interhemispheric communication between the parieto-occipital regions was enhanced within a frequency range of 2-10 Hz. In order to discern between higher and lower levels of relaxation distinguished according to self-rated satisfaction, EEG features were assessed and discriminating parameters were identified. Successful relaxation was determined mainly by the presence of decreased delta-1 power across the cortex. Potential applications for these findings include the clinical, pharmacological, and stress management fields.

  12. Spectral slopes of the absorption coefficient of colored dissolved and detrital material inverted from UV-visible remote sensing reflectance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Jianwei; Lee, Zhongping; Ondrusek, Michael; Mannino, Antonio; Tzortziou, Maria; Armstrong, Roy

    2016-03-01

    The spectral slope of the absorption coefficient of colored dissolved and detrital material (CDM), Scdm (units: nm-1), is an important optical parameter for characterizing the absorption spectral shape of CDM. Although highly variable in natural waters, in most remote sensing algorithms, this slope is either kept as a constant or empirically modeled with multiband ocean color in the visible domain. In this study, we explore the potential of semianalytically retrieving Scdm with added ocean color information in the ultraviolet (UV) range between 360 and 400 nm. Unique features of hyperspectral remote sensing reflectance in the UV-visible wavelengths (360-500 nm) have been observed in various waters across a range of coastal and open ocean environments. Our data and analyses indicate that ocean color in the UV domain is particularly sensitive to the variation of the CDM spectral slope. Here, we used a synthesized dataset to show that adding UV wavelengths to the ocean color measurements will improve the retrieval of Scdm from remote sensing reflectance considerably, while the spectral band settings of past and current satellite ocean color sensors cannot fully account for the spectral variation of remote sensing reflectance. Results of this effort support the concept to include UV wavelengths in the next generation of satellite ocean color sensors.

  13. Electron paramagnetic resonance and optical absorption spectral studies on chalcocite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reddy, S. Lakshmi; Fayazuddin, Md.; Frost, Ray L.; Endo, Tamio

    2007-11-01

    A chalcocite mineral sample of Shaha, Congo is used in the present study. An electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) study on powdered sample confirms the presence of Mn(II), Fe(III) and Cu(II). Optical absorption spectrum indicates that Fe(III) impurity is present in octahedral structure whereas Cu(II) is present in rhombically distorted octahedral environment. Mid-infrared results are due to water and sulphate fundamentals.

  14. Electron paramagnetic resonance and optical absorption spectral studies on chalcocite.

    PubMed

    Reddy, S Lakshmi; Fayazuddin, Md; Frost, Ray L; Endo, Tamio

    2007-11-01

    A chalcocite mineral sample of Shaha, Congo is used in the present study. An electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) study on powdered sample confirms the presence of Mn(II), Fe(III) and Cu(II). Optical absorption spectrum indicates that Fe(III) impurity is present in octahedral structure whereas Cu(II) is present in rhombically distorted octahedral environment. Mid-infrared results are due to water and sulphate fundamentals. PMID:17324611

  15. Spectral fluorescence signature techniques and absorption measurements for continuous monitoring of biofuel-producing microalgae cultures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martín de la Cruz, M. C.; Gonzalez Vilas, L.; Yarovenko, N.; Spyrakos, E.; Torres Palenzuela, J. M.

    2013-08-01

    Biofuel production from microalgae can be both sustainable and economically viable. Particularly in the case of algal growth in wastewater an extra benefit is the removal or biotransformation of pollutants from these types of waters. A continuous monitoring system of the microalgae status and the concentration of different wastewater contaminants could be of great help in the biomass production and the water characterisation. In this study we present a system where spectral fluorescence signature (SFS) techniques are used along with absorption measurements to monitor microalgae cultures in wastewater and other mediums. This system aims to optimise the microalgae production for biofuel applications or other uses and was developed and tested in prototype indoor photo-bioreactors at the University of Vigo. SFS techniques were applied using the fluorescence analyser INSTAND-SCREENER developed by Laser Diagnostic Instruments AS. INSTAND-SCREENER permits wavelength scanning in two modes, one in UV and another in VIS. In parallel, it permits the on-line monitoring and rapid analysis of both water quality and phytoplankton status without prior treatment of the sample. Considering that different contaminants and microalgae features (density, status etc.) have different spectral signatures of fluorescence and absorption properties, it is possible to characterise them developing classification libraries. Several algorithms were used for the classification. The implementation of this system in an outdoor raceway reactor in a Spanish wastewater treatment plant is also discussed. This study was part of the Project EnerBioAlgae (http://www.enerbioalgae.com/), which was funded by the Interreg SUDOE and led by the University of Vigo.

  16. Spectral features of background ULF noise during magnetic storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotik, Dmitry; Ermakova, Elena; Ryabov, Alexander; Shchecoldin, Aexander

    The monitoring of tangential components of ULF noise below first Schumann resonance was permanently provided since 2003 up to now at mid-latitude station New Life (56N, 44,7E). The regular structure in ULF spectrograms named SRS -spectral resonance structure could be observed practically every night excepting years of solar activity maximum. The SRS appears in the ULF noise due existing the resonator for Alfven waves in the ionosphere at heights from the bottom up to 600 -1000 km [1]. It was noticed that during magnetically disturbed time the strong anti-correlation between the intensity of SRS events and K index from station on neighbor magnetic meridian [2]. For more detail investigation it was choused several magnetic storms. First one is storm witch has began at November 20, 2003 with maximum Kp=9 (strong), second -at March 19, 2006 with Kp=6+ (moderate) and the third -at November 25, 2008 with Kp=5 (weak). The spectra of magnetic component amplitude and polarization parameter were analyzed. The comparison with ionosond and magnetic field data as well as world TEC maps for mentioned storm periods were made. The dynamics of changing the properties of ULF spectra during the storms were explored. The general regularities of these changes were displayed. One of the prominent feathers appeared at the end of the strong and moderate storms looked like fish shoals. Perhaps this kind of ULF bursts is the same nature as well known pearls pulsation but displayed in broad frequency range 1-6 Hz. May be it could be classified as special spectral structure. The analysis of changing the properties of ULF spectra during the storms together with geo-physical data has shown that the main regularities in changes the SRS caused by changing of the ionospheric parameters above the observation point. But some of ULF spectral features are results of interaction waves and particles in the magnetosphere. 1. Belyaev P.P., Polyakov S.V., Ermakova E.N., Isaev S.V. Solar cycle variations in

  17. Scintillation detectors in gamma spectral logging; geometry, absorption and calibration

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schimschal, Ulrich

    1980-01-01

    The theory for the evaluation of the effects of geometry in gamma ray absorption is developed for cylindrical scintillation detectors as applicable to borehole gamma spectrometry. The results of a laboratory experiment are shown for comparison. A calibration procedure to determine detector efficiency is given for application to borehole probes. It is shown that the response of a crystal can be separated in terms of geometric effects and instrumentation effects. It is also shown that approximating crystal detectors with point detectors in mathematical theory is grossly oversimplified. (USGS)

  18. Studying Absorption Line Feature in the Relativistic Jet Source GRS 1915+105

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tavani, Marco

    1998-01-01

    The galactic superluminal source GRS 1915+105 is among the most interesting objects in our Galaxy. It is subject to erratic accretion instabilities with energization of relativistic jets producing X-ray, optical and radio emission. This source was observed by ASCA on Sept. 27, 1994, April 20, 1995, October 23, 1996 and April 25, 1997 as part of a long timescale investigation. We detected strong variability of the source, and in particular the existence of burst/dip structure in October 1996 and April 1997. Clear evidence of transient absorption features at 6.7, 7.0 and 8.0 keV was obtained for the first time in September 1994 and April 1995. Given the phenomenology of plasmoid energization and ejection, these transient spectral features might be produced by material entrained in the radio jets or in other high-velocity outflows. Our contribution to the interpretation is to incorporate these observations into a overall theoretical picture for GRS 1915+105 also taking into account other observations by XTE and BSAX. The emerging picture is complex. The central source is subject to (most likely) super-Eddington instabilities mediated by magnetic field build-up, reconnection and dissipation in the form of blobs that eventually leads to the formation of transient spectral features from the surrounding of the plasmoid emitting region. A comprehensive theoretical investigation is in progress.

  19. Spectral feature characterization methods for blood stain detection in crime scene backgrounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jie; Mathew, Jobin J.; Dube, Roger R.; Messinger, David W.

    2016-05-01

    Blood stains are one of the most important types of evidence for forensic investigation. They contain valuable DNA information, and the pattern of the stains can suggest specifics about the nature of the violence that transpired at the scene. Blood spectral signatures containing unique reflectance or absorption features are important both for forensic on-site investigation and laboratory testing. They can be used for target detection and identification applied to crime scene hyperspectral imagery, and also be utilized to analyze the spectral variation of blood on various backgrounds. Non-blood stains often mislead the detection and can generate false alarms at a real crime scene, especially for dark and red backgrounds. This paper measured the reflectance of liquid blood and 9 kinds of non-blood samples in the range of 350 nm - 2500 nm in various crime scene backgrounds, such as pure samples contained in petri dish with various thicknesses, mixed samples with different colors and materials of fabrics, and mixed samples with wood, all of which are examined to provide sub-visual evidence for detecting and recognizing blood from non-blood samples in a realistic crime scene. The spectral difference between blood and non-blood samples are examined and spectral features such as "peaks" and "depths" of reflectance are selected. Two blood stain detection methods are proposed in this paper. The first method uses index to denote the ratio of "depth" minus "peak" over"depth" add"peak" within a wavelength range of the reflectance spectrum. The second method uses relative band depth of the selected wavelength ranges of the reflectance spectrum. Results show that the index method is able to discriminate blood from non-blood samples in most tested crime scene backgrounds, but is not able to detect it from black felt. Whereas the relative band depth method is able to discriminate blood from non-blood samples on all of the tested background material types and colors.

  20. Mapping the mineralogy and lithology of Canyonlands, Utah with imaging spectrometer data and the multiple spectral feature mapping algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, Roger N.; Swayze, Gregg A.; Gallagher, Andrea

    1992-01-01

    The sedimentary sections exposed in the Canyonlands and Arches National Parks region of Utah (generally referred to as 'Canyonlands') consist of sandstones, shales, limestones, and conglomerates. Reflectance spectra of weathered surfaces of rocks from these areas show two components: (1) variations in spectrally detectable mineralogy, and (2) variations in the relative ratios of the absorption bands between minerals. Both types of information can be used together to map each major lithology and the Clark spectral features mapping algorithm is applied to do the job.

  1. Spectral shape of the UV ionizing background and He II absorption at redshifts 1.8 < z < 2.9

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agafonova, I. I.; Levshakov, S. A.; Reimers, D.; Fechner, C.; Tytler, D.; Simcoe, R. A.; Songaila, A.

    2007-01-01

    Aims:The shape of the UV ionizing background is reconstructed from optically thin metal absorption-line systems identified in spectra of HE 2347-4342, Q 1157+3143, and HS 1700+6416 in the redshift interval 1.8 < z < 2.9. Methods: The systems are analyzed by means of the Monte Carlo Inversion method completed with the spectral shape recovering procedure. Results: The UVB spectral shape fluctuates at 2.4 < z < 2.9 mostly due to radiative transfer processes in the clumpy IGM. At z ⪉ 1.8, the IGM becomes almost transparent both in the H I and He II Lyman continua and the variability of the spectral shape comes from diversity of spectral indices describing the QSO/AGN intrinsic radiation. At z > 2.4, the recovered spectral shapes show intensity depression between 3 and 4 Ryd due to He II Lyα absorption in the IGM clouds (line blanketing) and continuous medium (true Gunn-Petersen effect). The mean He II Lyα opacity estimated from the depth of this depression corresponds within 1-2σ to the values directly measured from the H I/He II Lyα forest towards the quasars studied. The observed scatter in η = N(He II)/N(H I) and anti-correlation between N(H I) and η can be explained by the combined action of variable spectral softness and differences in the mean gas density between the absorbing clouds. Neither of the recovered spectral shapes show features which can be attributed to the putative input of radiation from soft sources like starburst galaxies.

  2. Spectral variation of scattering and absorption by cirrus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hein, Paul F.; Davis, John M.; Cox, Stephen K.

    1993-01-01

    The impact of cirrus clouds on the radiative budget of the earth depends on the microphysics and scattering properties of the clouds. Cirrus clouds have been especially difficult to observe because of their high altitude and complex tenuous structure. Observations by Abakumova et. al. (1991) show that the near infrared wavelengths are more sensitive to the cirrus cloud properties than the shorter ultraviolet wavelengths. Anikin (1991) was able to show that collimated spectral measurements can be used to determine an effective particle size of the cirrus clouds. Anikin (1991) also showed that the effect of scattering through cloud causes the apparent optical depth of a 10 degrees field of view pyrheliometer to be roughly half the actual optical depth. Stackhouse and Stephens (1991) have shown that the existence of small ice crystals do dramatically affect the radiative properties of the cirrus, though observations taken during the 1986 FIRE were not totally explained by their presence.

  3. Absorption and fluorescent spectral studies of imidazophenazine derivatives.

    PubMed

    Ryazanova, O A; Zozulya, V N; Voloshin, I M; Karachevtsev, V A; Makitruk, V L; Stepanian, S G

    2004-07-01

    Absorption and fluorescent spectra as well as fluorescence polarization degree of imidazo-[4,5-d]-phenazine (F1) and its two modified derivatives, 2-trifluoridemethylimidazo-[4,5-d]-phenazine (F2) and 1,2,3-triazole-[4,5-d]-phenazine (F3), were investigated in organic solvents of various polarities and hydrogen bonding abilities. Extinction coefficients of F2 and F3 are increased, their fluorescence Stokes shifts are reduced in comparison with those for unmodified imidazophenazine. For F3 a red shift of the longwave absorption band is observed by 15-20 nm. Modifications of imidazophenazine have led to a sufficient increase of fluorescence polarization degrees that enables to use F2 and F3 as promising fluorescent probes with polarization method application. The configuration, atomic charge distribution and dipole moments of the isolated dye molecules in the ground state were calculated by the DFT method. The computation has revealed that ground state dipole moments of F1, F2, and F3 differ slightly and are equal to 3.5, 3.2, and 3.7D, respectively. The changes in dipole moments upon the optical excitation for all derivatives estimated using Lippert equation were found to be Deltamu = 9 D. The energies of the electronic S1<--S0 transition in solvents of different proton donor abilities were determined, and energetic diagram illustrating the substituent effect was plotted. For nucleoside analogs of these compounds, covalently incorporated into a nucleotide chain, we have considered a possibility to use them as fluorescent reporters of hybridization of antisense oligonucleotides, as well as molecular anchors for its stabilization. PMID:15248979

  4. Multi-spectral optical absorption in substrate-free nanowire arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Junpeng; Chia, Andrew; Boulanger, Jonathan; LaPierre, Ray; Dhindsa, Navneet; Khodadad, Iman; Saini, Simarjeet

    2014-09-22

    A method is presented of fabricating gallium arsenide (GaAs) nanowire arrays of controlled diameter and period by reactive ion etching of a GaAs substrate containing an indium gallium arsenide (InGaP) etch stop layer, allowing the precise nanowire length to be controlled. The substrate is subsequently removed by selective etching, using the same InGaP etch stop layer, to create a substrate-free GaAs nanowire array. The optical absorptance of the nanowire array was then directly measured without absorption from a substrate. We directly observe absorptance spectra that can be tuned by the nanowire diameter, as explained with rigorous coupled wave analysis. These results illustrate strong optical absorption suitable for nanowire-based solar cells and multi-spectral absorption for wavelength discriminating photodetectors. The solar-weighted absorptance above the bandgap of GaAs was 94% for a nanowire surface coverage of only 15%.

  5. Dynamics of CO(2) laser pulse filamentation in air influenced by spectrally selective molecular absorption.

    PubMed

    Geints, Yuri E; Zemlyanov, Alexander A

    2014-09-01

    The theoretical aspects of self-focusing and filamentation of high-power pulsed CO(2) laser radiation with carrier wavelength 10.6 μm in air are considered. The spectrally selective molecular absorption of realistic atmospheric air is included in the theoretical model. In the conditions of strong pulse self-phase modulation and pulse spectral broadening, the supercontinual radiation spectrum is substantially influenced by the selective atmospheric absorption that destabilizes the filamentation process and results in considerable shortening of the filamentation length. PMID:25321358

  6. In Situ Measurements of Aerosol Mass Concentration and Spectral Absorption in Xianghe, SE of Beijing, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaudhry, Z.; Martins, V.; Li, Z.

    2005-12-01

    China's rapid industrialization over the last few decades has affected air quality in many regions of China, and even the regional climate. As a part of the EAST-AIRE (East Asian Study of Tropospheric Aerosols: an International Regional Experiment) study, Nuclepore filters were collected in two size ranges (PM10 and PM2.5) at 12 hour intervals since January 2005 at Xianghe, about 70 km southeast of Beijing. Each filter was analyzed for mass concentration, aerosol scattering and absorption efficiencies. Mass concentrations during the winter months (January-March) ranged from 9 to 459 μg/m3 in the coarse mode with an average concentration of 122 μg/m3, and from 11 to 203 μg/m3 in the fine mode with an average concentration of 45 μg/m3. While some of the extreme values are likely linked to local emissions, regional air pollution episodes also played important roles. Absorption efficiency measurements at 550 nm show very high values compared to measurements performed in the United States during the CLAMS experiment. The spectral mass absorption efficiency was measured from 350 to 2500 nm and shows large differences between the absorption properties of soil dust, black carbon, and organic aerosols. The strong spectral differences observed can be related to differences in refractive indices from the several collected species and particle size effects. The absorption properties from aerosols measured in China show large absorption efficiencies, compared to aerosols measured in the US, possibly linked to different technology practices used in these countries. For organic plus black carbon aerosols, where the refractive index seems to be relatively constant, the absorption efficiency spectral dependence for fine mode aerosols falls between 1/λ and 1/λ2. The coarse mode absorption shows much less spectral dependence.

  7. Retrieval interval mapping, a tool to optimize the spectral retrieval range in differential optical absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogel, L.; Sihler, H.; Lampel, J.; Wagner, T.; Platt, U.

    2012-06-01

    Remote sensing via differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS) has become a standard technique to identify and quantify trace gases in the atmosphere. The technique is applied in a variety of configurations, commonly classified into active and passive instruments using artificial and natural light sources, respectively. Platforms range from ground based to satellite instruments and trace-gases are studied in all kinds of different environments. Due to the wide range of measurement conditions, atmospheric compositions and instruments used, a specific challenge of a DOAS retrieval is to optimize the parameters for each specific case and particular trace gas of interest. This becomes especially important when measuring close to the detection limit. A well chosen evaluation wavelength range is crucial to the DOAS technique. It should encompass strong absorption bands of the trace gas of interest in order to maximize the sensitivity of the retrieval, while at the same time minimizing absorption structures of other trace gases and thus potential interferences. Also, instrumental limitations and wavelength depending sources of errors (e.g. insufficient corrections for the Ring effect and cross correlations between trace gas cross sections) need to be taken into account. Most often, not all of these requirements can be fulfilled simultaneously and a compromise needs to be found depending on the conditions at hand. Although for many trace gases the overall dependence of common DOAS retrieval on the evaluation wavelength interval is known, a systematic approach to find the optimal retrieval wavelength range and qualitative assessment is missing. Here we present a novel tool to determine the optimal evaluation wavelength range. It is based on mapping retrieved values in the retrieval wavelength space and thus visualize the consequence of different choices of retrieval spectral ranges, e.g. caused by slightly erroneous absorption cross sections, cross correlations and

  8. High-Velocity Absorption Features in FUSE Spectra of Eta Carinae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sonneborn, G.; Iping, R. C.; Gull, T. R.; Vieira, G.

    2002-12-01

    Numerous broad (200 to 1000 km/sec) features in the FUSE spectrum (905-1187 A) of eta Carinae are identified as absorption by a forest of high-velocity narrow lines formed in the expanding circumstellar envelope. These features were previously thought to be P-Cygni lines arising in the wind of the central star. The features span a heliocentric velocity range of -140 to -580 km/sec and are seen prominently in low-ionization ground-state transitions (e.g. N I 1134-35, Fe II 1145-42, 1133, 1127-22, P II 1153, C I 1158) in addition to C III] 1176 A. The high-velocity components of the FUSE transitions have depths about 50% below the continuum. The identifications are consistent with the complex velocity structures seen in ground- and excited-state transitions of Mg I, Mg II, Fe II, V II, etc observed in STIS/E230H spectra (see accompanying posters by Gull, Vieira, and Danks). The origin of other broad features of similar width and depth in the FUSE spectrum, but without low-velocity ISM absorption, are unidentified. However, they are suspected of being absorption of singly-ionized iron-peak elements (e.g. Fe II, V II, Cr II) out of excited levels 1,000 to 20,000 cmE-1 above the ground state. The high-velocity features seen in Fe II 1145 are also present in Fe II 1608 (STIS/E140M), but are highly saturated in the latter. Since these transitions have nearly identical log (flambda) (1.998 vs. 2.080), the differences in the profiles are attributable to the different aperture sizes used (30x30 arcsec for FUSE, 0.2x0.2 arcsec for STIS/E140M). The high-velocity gas appears to be very patchy or has a small covering factor near the central star. Eta Carinae has been observed several times by FUSE over the past three years. The FUSE flux levels and spectral features in eta Car are essentially unchanged over the 2000 March to June 2002 period, establishing a baseline far-UV spectrum in advance of the predicted spectroscopic miniumum in 2003.

  9. High-Velocity Absorption Features in FUSE Spectra of Eta Carinae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sonneborn, G.; Iping, R. C.; Gull, T. R.; Vieira, G.

    2003-01-01

    Numerous broad (200 to 1000 km/sec) features in the FUSE spectrum (905-1187 A) of eta Carinae are identified as absorption by a forest of high-velocity narrow lines formed in the expanding circumstellar envelope. These features were previously thought to be P-Cygni lines arising in the wind of the central star. The features span a heliocentric velocity range of -140 to -580 km/sec and are seen prominently in low-ionization ground-state transitions (e.g. N I 1134-35, Fe II 1145-42, 1133, 1127- 22, P II 1153, C I 1158) in addition to C III] 1176 A. The high-velocity components of the FUSE transitions have depths about 50% below the continuum. The identifications are consistent with the complex velocity structures seen in ground- and excited-state transitions of Mg I, Mg 11, Fe II, V II, etc observed in STIS/E230H spectra. The origin of other broad features of similar width and depth in the FUSE spectrum, but without low-velocity ISM absorption, are unidentified. However, they are suspected of being absorption of singly-ionized iron-peak elements (e.g. Fe II, V II, Cr II) out of excited levels 1,000 to 20,000 cmE-l above the ground state. The high-velocity features seen in Fe II 1145 are also present in Fe II 1608 (STIS/E140M), but are highly saturated in the latter. Since these transitions have nearly identical log (flambda) (1.998 vs. 2.080), the differences in the profiles are attributable to the different aperture sizes used (30 x 30 arcsec for FUSE, 0.2 x 0.2 arcsec for STIS/E140M). The high-velocity gas appears to be very patchy or has a small covering factor near the central star. Eta Carinae has been observed several times by FUSE over the past three years. The FUSE flux levels and spectral features in eta Car are essentially unchanged over the 2000 March to June 2002 period, establishing a baseline far-UV spectrum in advance of the predicted spectroscopic minimum in 2003.

  10. M DWARF LUMINOSITY, RADIUS, AND α-ENRICHMENT FROM I-BAND SPECTRAL FEATURES

    SciTech Connect

    Terrien, Ryan C.; Mahadevan, Suvrath; Bender, Chad F.; Deshpande, Rohit; Robertson, Paul

    2015-03-20

    Despite the ubiquity of M dwarfs and their growing importance to studies of exoplanets, Galactic evolution, and stellar structure, methods for precisely measuring their fundamental stellar properties remain elusive. Existing techniques for measuring M dwarf luminosity, mass, radius, or composition are calibrated over a limited range of stellar parameters or require expensive observations. We find a strong correlation between the K{sub S}-band luminosity (M{sub K}), the observed strength of the I-band sodium doublet absorption feature, and [Fe/H] in M dwarfs without strong Hα emission. We show that the strength of this feature, coupled with [Fe/H] and spectral type, can be used to derive M dwarf M{sub K} and radius without requiring parallax. Additionally, we find promising evidence that the strengths of the I-band sodium doublet and the nearby I-band calcium triplet may jointly indicate α-element enrichment. The use of these I-band features requires only moderate-resolution near-infrared spectroscopy to provide valuable information about the potential habitability of exoplanets around M dwarfs, and surface gravity and distance for M dwarfs throughout the Galaxy. This technique has immediate applicability for both target selection and candidate planet–host system characterization for exoplanet missions such as TESS and K2.

  11. Enhanced plasmonic light absorption engineering of graphene: simulation by boundary-integral spectral element method.

    PubMed

    Niu, Jun; Luo, Ma; Zhu, Jinfeng; Liu, Qing Huo

    2015-02-23

    Graphene's relatively poor absorption is an essential obstacle for designing graphene-based photonic devices with satisfying photo-responsivity. To enhance the tunable light absorption of graphene, appropriate excitation of localized surface plasmon resonance is considered as a promising approach. In this work, the strategy of incorporating periodic cuboid gold nanoparticle (NP) cluster arrays and cylindrical gold NP arrays with Bragg reflectors into graphene-based photodetectors are theoretically studied by the boundary-integral spectral element method (BI-SEM). With the BI-SEM, the models can be numerically analyzed with excellent accuracy and efficiency. Numerical simulation shows that the proposed structures can effectively engineer the light absorption in graphene by tuning plasmon resonance. In the spectra of 300 nm to 1000 nm, a maximum light absorption of 67.54% is observed for the graphene layer with optimal parameters of the photodetector model.

  12. Empathic Features and Absorption in Fantasy Role-Playing.

    PubMed

    Rivers, Anissa; Wickramasekera, Ian E; Pekala, Ronald J; Rivers, Jennifer A

    2016-01-01

    This study examined the levels of empathy and absorption of individuals who regularly play fantasy and science fiction role-playing games. A hypothesis was developed that higher levels of empathy would be found in individuals who fantasy role-play based upon previous research in hypnosis such as J. R. Hilgard's (1970) imaginative involvement hypothesis, research into the "fantasy prone" personality type (Wilson & Barber, 1981), and the empathic involvement hypothesis (Wickramasekera II & Szlyk, 2003). The participants in the current study were 127 fantasy role-players who volunteered and completed the Davis Interpersonal Reactivity Index (empathy) and the Tellegen Absorption Scale (absorption). The results demonstrated that those who play fantasy role-playing games scored significantly higher than the comparison group on the IRI scale of empathy, confirming the hypothesis that fantasy role-players report experiencing higher levels of empathic involvement with others. Correlational analysis between the measures demonstrated a significant positive correlation between empathy and absorption (r = .43, p < .001). These results collectively suggest that fantasy role-players have a uniquely empathically-imaginative style. The results also confirm and extend previous findings on the relationship between empathy and absorption as predicted by the Empathic Involvement Hypothesis (Wickramasekera II & Szlyk, 2003).

  13. Light fluence correction for quantitative determination of tissue absorption coefficient using multi-spectral optoacoustic tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brochu, Frederic M.; Joseph, James; Tomaszewski, Michal; Bohndiek, Sarah E.

    2015-07-01

    MultiSpectral Optoacoustic Tomography (MSOT) is a fast developing imaging modality, combining the high resolution and penetration depth of ultrasound with the excellent contrast from optical imaging of tissue. Absorption and scattering of the near infrared excitation light modulates the spectral profile of light as it propagates deep into biological tissue, meaning the images obtained provide only qualitative insight into the distribution of tissue chromophores. The goal of this work is to accurately recover the spectral profile of excitation light by modelling light fluence in the data reconstruction, to enable quantitative imaging. We worked with a commercial small animal MSOT scanner and developed our light fluence correction for its' cylindrical geometry. Optoacoustic image reconstruction pinpoints the sources of acoustic waves detected by the transducers and returns the initial pressure amplitude at these points. This pressure is the product of the dimensionless Grüneisen parameter, the absorption coefficient and the light fluence. Under the condition of constant Grüneisen parameter and well modelled light fluence, there is a linear relationship between the initial pressure amplitude measured in the optoacoustic image and the absorption coefficient. We were able to reproduce this linear relationship in different physical regions of an agarose gel phantom containing targets of known optical absorption coefficient, demonstrating that our light fluence model was working. We also demonstrate promising results of light fluence correction effects on in vivo data.

  14. Retrieval of absorptive gas columnar amounts using atmospheric hyper-spectral irradiance measurements within visible spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Hua; Li, Zhengqiang; Li, Donghui; Xie, Yisong; Li, Kaitao; Qie, Lili; Zhang, Ying; Chen, Xingfeng; Zheng, Xiaobin; Li, Xin; Zhang, Yanna

    2015-10-01

    A hyper spectral ground-based instrument named Atmosphere-Surface Radiation Automatic Instrument (ASRAI) has been developed for the purpose of in-situ calibration of satellites. The apparatus has both upward and downward looking views, and thus can observe both the atmosphere and land surface. The solar transmitted irradiance can be derived from the measured full spectral irradiance and diffused spectral irradiance of atmosphere within visible spectrum (0.4-1.0μm). A method similar to that of King et al. which originally intended to apply to multi-wavelength measurements, is adopted to determine absorptive gaseous columnar amount from hyper spectrum. The solar irradiance at top of atmosphere and absorption coefficients of water vapor (H2O), ozone (O3), oxygen (O2) and nitrogen dioxide (NO2) are recalculated at an instrumental spectral resolution by convolution method. Based on the gaseous characteristics of absorption, the total columnar amounts of water vapor and oxygen are first inferred from solar transmitted irradiance at strong absorption wavelength of 0.934μm and 0.763μm respectively. The total columnar amounts of ozone and nitrogen dioxide, together with aerosol optical depth, are determined by a nonlinear least distance fitting method which minimizes a χ2 statistic to obtain optimal solutions. ASRAI was deployed for observation in Dunhuang site in China in August of 2014. Our results demonstrate that the algorithm is reasonable. Although the validation is preliminary, the hyper spectrum measured by ASRAI exhibits good ability to retrieve the abundance of absorptive gases and aerosols.

  15. Spectral control of an alexandrite laser for an airborne water-vapor differential absorption lidar system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ponsardin, Patrick; Grossmann, Benoist E.; Browell, Edward V.

    1994-01-01

    A narrow-linewidth pulsed alexandrite laser has been greatly modified for improved spectral stability in an aircraft environment, and its operation has been evaluated in the laboratory for making water-vapor differential absorption lidar measurements. An alignment technique is described to achieve the optimum free spectral range ratio for the two etalons inserted in the alexandrite laser cavity, and the sensitivity of this ratio is analyzed. This technique drastically decreases the occurrence of mode hopping, which is commonly observed in a tunable, two-intracavity-etalon laser system. High spectral purity (greater than 99.85%) at 730 nm is demonstrated by the use of a water-vapor absorption line as a notch filter. The effective cross sections of 760-nm oxygen and 730-nm water-vapor absorption lines are measured at different pressures by using this laser, which has a finite linewidth of 0.02 cm(exp -1) (FWHM). It is found that for water-vapor absorption linewidths greater than 0.04 cm(exp -1) (HWHM), or for altitudes below 10 km, the laser line can be considered monochromatic because the measured effective absorption cross section is within 1% of the calculated monochromatic cross section. An analysis of the environmental sensitivity of the two intracavity etalons is presented, and a closed-loop computer control for active stabilization of the two intracavity etalons in the alexandrite laser is described. Using a water-vapor absorption line as a wavelength reference, we measure a long-term frequency drift (approximately 1.5 h) of less than 0.7 pm in the laboratory.

  16. Tunneling Spectral Dip Feature in High Tc Cuprates: Experiment and Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zasadzinski, John; Coffey, Liam; Kurter, Cihan; Gray, Ken

    2009-03-01

    A fully self-consistent Eliashberg analysis is presented to analyze the spectral dip feature observed in tunnel junctions on Bi2212. Methods include SIS break junctions, intrinsic Josephson junctions in mesas and SIN junctions from STM. This analysis is presented for a variety of doping levels and the resulting electron-boson spectral function and self-energy is compared with other spectroscopic probes. Evidence of spectral dip features in other high Tc cuprates is presented including Tl2212 to demonstrate the universality of the spectral dip and its relation to the mechanism of pairing.

  17. Developement of the method for realization of spectral irradiance scale featuring system of spectral comparisons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skerovic, V.; Zarubica, V.; Zekovic, L.; Belca, I.; Aleksić, M.

    2010-10-01

    Realization of the scale of spectral responsivity of the detectors in the Directorate of Measures and Precious Metals (DMDM) is based on silicon detectors traceable to LNE-INM. In order to realize the unit of spectral irradiance in the laboratory for photometry and radiometry of the Bureau of Measures and Precious Metals, the new method based on the calibration of the spectroradiometer by comparison with standard detector has been established. The development of the method included realization of the System of Spectral Comparisons (SSC), together with the detector spectral responsivity calibrations by means of a primary spectrophotometric system. The linearity testing and stray light analysis were preformed to characterize the spectroradiometer. Measurement of aperture diameter and calibration of transimpedance amplifier were part of the overall experiment. In this paper, the developed method is presented and measurement results with the associated measurement uncertainty budget are shown.

  18. Effect of differential spectral reflectance on DIAL measurements using topographic targets. [Differential Absorption Lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grant, W. B.

    1982-01-01

    Differential absorption lidar (DIAL) measurements of atmospheric gases and temperature made using topographic targets to provide the backscattered signal are subject to errors from the differential spectral reflectance of the target materials. The magnitude of this effect is estimated for a number of DIAL measurements reported in the literature. Calculations are presented for several topographic targets. In general the effect on a DIAL measurement increases directly with increasing wavelength and laser line separation, and inversely with differential absorption coefficient and distance to the target. The effect can be minimized by using tunable or isotope lasers to reduce the laser line separation or by using additional reference wavelengths to determine the surface differential spectral reflectance.

  19. Modelling of the X-ray broad absorption features in Narrow-Line Seyfert 1s

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porquet, Delphine; Mouchet, Martine; Dumont Anne-Marie

    2000-09-01

    We investigate the origin of the broad absorption features detected near 1-1.4 keV in several Narrow-Line Seyfert 1 galaxies, by modelling the absorbing medium with various physical parameters, using the ionization code PEGAS. The observed properties of the X-ray absorption features can be reproduced by taking into account the peculiar soft X-ray excess which is well fitted by a blackbody plus an underlying power law. We equally stress that the emission coming from the absorbing medium (related to the covering factor) has a strong influence on the resulting X-ray spectrum, in particular on the apparent position and depth of the absorption features. A non-solar iron abundance may be required to explain the observed deep absorption. We also investigate the influence of an additional collisional ionization process ("hybrid case") on the predicted absorption features.

  20. Spectral Morphology for Feature Extraction from Multi- and Hyper-spectral Imagery.

    SciTech Connect

    Harvey, N. R.; Porter, R. B.

    2005-01-01

    For accurate and robust analysis of remotely-sensed imagery it is necessary to combine the information from both spectral and spatial domains in a meaningful manner. The two domains are intimately linked: objects in a scene are defined in terms of both their composition and their spatial arrangement, and cannot accurately be described by information from either of these two domains on their own. To date there have been relatively few methods for combining spectral and spatial information concurrently. Most techniques involve separate processing for extracting spatial and spectral information. In this paper we will describe several extensions to traditional morphological operators that can treat spectral and spatial domains concurrently and can be used to extract relationships between these domains in a meaningful way. This includes the investgation and development of suitable vector-ordering metrics and machine-learning-based techniques for optimizing the various parameters of the morphological operators, such as morphological operator, structuring element and vector ordering metric. We demonstrate their application to a range of multi- and hyper-spectral image analysis problems.

  1. Absorption spectroscopy setup for determination of whole human blood and blood-derived materials spectral characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wróbel, M. S.; Gnyba, M.; Milewska, D.; Mitura, K.; Karpienko, K.

    2015-09-01

    A dedicated absorption spectroscopy system was set up using tungsten-halogen broadband source, optical fibers, sample holder, and a commercial spectrometer with CCD array. Analysis of noise present in the setup was carried out. Data processing was applied to the absorption spectra to reduce spectral noise, and improve the quality of the spectra and to remove the baseline level. The absorption spectra were measured for whole blood samples, separated components: plasma, saline, washed erythrocytes in saline and human whole blood with biomarkers - biocompatible nanodiamonds (ND). Blood samples had been derived from a number of healthy donors. The results prove a correct setup arrangement, with adequate preprocessing of the data. The results of blood-ND mixtures measurements show no toxic effect on blood cells, which proves the NDs as a potential biocompatible biomarkers.

  2. Water vapor absorption coefficients in the 8-13-micron spectral region - A critical review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grant, William B.

    1990-01-01

    Measurements of water vapor absorption coefficients in the thermal IR atmospheric window (8-13 microns) during the past 20 years obtained by a variety of techniques are reviewed for consistency and compared with computed values based on the AFGL spectral data tapes. The methods of data collection considered were atmospheric long path absorption with a CO2 laser or a broadband source and filters, a White cell and a CO2 laser or a broadband source and a spectrometer, and a spectrophone with a CO2 laser. Advantages and disadvantages of each measurement approach are given as a guide to further research. Continuum absorption has apparently been measured accurately to about the 5-10 percent level in five of the measurements reported.

  3. Spectral Absorption By Particulate Impurities in Snow Determined By Photometric Analysis Of Filters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grenfell, T. C.; Doherty, S. J.; Clarke, A. D.

    2009-12-01

    Our work is motivated by the 1983-84 survey by Clarke and Noone (Atmos. Environ., 1985) of soot in Arctic snow. Our objective is to resurvey the original area they covered and to extend the observations around the entire Arctic Basin under the auspices of the IPY program. We use the filtering and integrating sandwich techniques developed by Clarke and Noone to process the snow samples. Among the advantages of this method are that (a) it provides a direct measure of light absorption and the result is closely related to the actual absorption of sunlight in the snow or ice, (b) processing and filtering of the snow samples can be carried out in remote locations and (c) it is not necessary to transport large quantities of snow back to our home laboratory. Here we describe the construction, calibration, and some applications of an integrating sphere spectrophotometer system designed to take advantage of recent advances in instrumentation to improve the accuracy of measurements of absorption by particulate impurities collected on nuclepore filters used in our survey. Filter loading in terms of effective black carbon (BC) amount is determined together with the ratio of non-BC to BC concentrations using a set of reference filters with known loadings of Monarch 71 BC prepared by A. D. Clarke. The new spectrophotometer system has (a) system stability of approximately 0.5%; (b) precision relative to ADC standards of 3-4% for filter loadings greater than about 0.5 microgm Carbon/cm2. (c) We can distinguish BC from non-BC from relative spectral shapes of the energy absorption curves with an accuracy that depends on our knowledge of the spectral absorption curves of the non-BC components; and (d) by-eye estimates are consistent with spectrophotometric results. The major outstanding uncertainty is the appropriate value to use for the mass absorption efficiency for BC.

  4. [Spectral curve shape feature-based hyperspectral remote sensing image retrieval].

    PubMed

    Li, Fei; Zhou, Cheng-Hu; Chen, Rong-Guo

    2008-11-01

    With the rapid development of technology of sensors and data transmission, using all kinds of airplane sensors and satellite sensors, the authors can get different voluminous remote sensing image data of earth. Those voluminous remote sensing image data bring problems of data storage and management. It is becoming increasingly necessary to retrieve some information the authors need from those voluminous image data. Image retrieval was proposed by CHANG firstly in 1980 and can be regarded as expansion of traditional information retrieval. Oriented to the demands of efficient retrieval for voluminous remote sensing image, and considering that there are many bands in hyperspectral remote sensing image, the authors first analyzed image distance function and similarity measure in image retrieval. The most crucial issues in retrieval are spectral features extraction and similarity measure. In the present paper, the authors used classical Douglas-Peucker algorithm (hereinafter referred to DP algorithm) for curve simplification to extract shape features of spectral curve, in order to speed up hyperspectral remote sensing image retrieval. And the authors proposed a new method of spectral curve and remote sensing image retrieval, called Douglas-Peucker Spectral Retrieval algorithm (hereinafter referred to DPSR algorithm). Spectral shape features were used in image retrieval. DPSR used features of spectral curve, reduced the computation amount, realized match and retrieval efficiently, and is suitable for spectral curve retrieval in hyperspectral remote sensing image. The authors selected four ground features (grass, apple garden, grape garden and pond) in OMISI hyperspectral remote sensing image to compute similarity measure results, in order to test the effect of DPSR algorithm. Compared with traditional analysis method such as spectral angle match (SAM) and spectral information divergence (SID), DPSR can maintain high precision of results with less amount of computation

  5. FOCUSR: Feature Oriented Correspondence using Spectral Regularization–A Method for Precise Surface Matching

    PubMed Central

    Lombaert, Herve; Grady, Leo; Polimeni, Jonathan R.; Cheriet, Farida

    2013-01-01

    Existing methods for surface matching are limited by the trade-off between precision and computational efficiency. Here we present an improved algorithm for dense vertex-to-vertex correspondence that uses direct matching of features defined on a surface and improves it by using spectral correspondence as a regularization. This algorithm has the speed of both feature matching and spectral matching while exhibiting greatly improved precision (distance errors of 1.4%). The method, FOCUSR, incorporates implicitly such additional features to calculate the correspondence and relies on the smoothness of the lowest-frequency harmonics of a graph Laplacian to spatially regularize the features. In its simplest form, FOCUSR is an improved spectral correspondence method that nonrigidly deforms spectral embeddings. We provide here a full realization of spectral correspondence where virtually any feature can be used as additional information using weights on graph edges, but also on graph nodes and as extra embedded coordinates. As an example, the full power of FOCUSR is demonstrated in a real case scenario with the challenging task of brain surface matching across several individuals. Our results show that combining features and regularizing them in a spectral embedding greatly improves the matching precision (to a sub-millimeter level) while performing at much greater speed than existing methods. PMID:23868776

  6. An Investigation of Mars NIR Spectral Features using Absolutely Calibrated Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klassen, D. R.; Bell, J. F., III

    1998-09-01

    We used the NSFCAM 256x256 InSb array camera at the NASA Infrared Telescope Facility to gather near-infrared (NIR) spectral image sets of Mars through the 1995 opposition. In previous studies with these data [1-6] we noted several interesting spectral features, some of which are diagnostic volatile absorption bands that allow the discrimination between CO_2 or H_2O ices. Band depth maps of these regions show polar and morning and evening limb ices composed of water and some indication of polar CO_2 ices. Other features, near 3.33 and 3.4\\micron, appear to be confined to particular geographic regions; specifically Syrtis Major. However, the images used in these previous studies were calibrated to either the disk average or only to a rough scaled reflectance by simple division by solar-type star data gathered at the same time as the images. This only allowed determinations of spectral features either relative to some global average of the feature, or to some unit not directly comparable to other published data. For at least three of our observation nights the conditions and data are sufficient to absolutely calibrate the images to radiance factors. For this work we reinvestigate the spectra and band depth mapping results using these absolutely calibrated images. In general we find that bright regions have peak radiance factors of 0.5 to 0.6 at 2.25\\micron\\ and 0.3 to 0.4 at 3.5\\micron; dark regions have radiance factors of 0.2 to 0.25 at 2.25\\micron\\ and 0.1 to 0.15 at 3.5\\micron. Overall, precision errors are about 0.025 in radiance factor and absolute errors are at the 10-15% level. These results are consistent with previous studies that found radiance factors of 0.35 in Tharsis, 0.47 in Elysium, and 0.26 in dark regions at 2.25\\micron\\ [7,8] and 0.3 in bright regions and 0.1 in dark regions at 3.5\\micron\\ [8]. These absolute flux values will allow direct comparison of these results to radiative transfer models of the behavior of the surface and

  7. External Cavity Quantum Cascade Laser for Quartz Tuning Fork Photoacoustic Spectroscopy of Broad Absorption Features

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, Mark C.; Myers, Tanya L.; Wojcik, Michael D.; Cannon, Bret D.

    2007-05-01

    We demonstrate mid-infrared spectroscopy of large molecules with broad absorption features using a tunable external cavity quantum cascade laser. Absorption spectra for two different Freons are measured over the range 1130-1185 cm-1 with 0.2 cm-1 resolution via laser photoacoustic spectroscopy with quartz tuning forks as acoustic transducers. The measured spectra are in excellent agreement with published reference absorption spectra.

  8. VNIR spectral features observed by the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity in hematite-bearing materials at Meridiani Planum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farrand, W. H.; Bell, J. F.; Morris, R. V.; Joliff, B. L.; Squyres, S. W.; Souza, P. A.

    2004-12-01

    The Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity was sent to Meridiani Planum based largely on MGS TES spectroscopic evidence of a large surface exposure of coarse grained gray hematite. The presence of hematite at Meridiani Planum has been confirmed through thermal infrared spectroscopy by the rover's Mini-TES instrument and by in-situ measurements by its Moessbauer (MB) spectrometer. Several types of hematite, as expressed by differences in MB spectral parameters, have been associated with various rocks and soils examined in Eagle crater and on the surrounding plains. The host materials include the small spherules (informally known as "blueberries") littering the floor of Eagle crater and the plains of Meridiani, the outcrop rock itself, specific types of soils, and two measurements on unique rocks in the Shoemaker's Patio area of Eagle crater. At the visible to near infrared (VNIR) wavelengths covered by the rover's multispectral Panoramic camera (Pancam), gray hematite is spectrally neutral. However, multispectral observations by Pancam of some of these hematite-bearing materials show discernable spectral features. Specifically, portions of the outcrop visible in the walls of Eagle crater display a strong 535 nm absorption feature. This feature resembles a similar feature in laboratory spectra of red hematite, but the characteristic 860 nm absorption of red hematite is either absent or is instead replaced by a longer wavelength absorption centered on Pancam's 900 nm channel. The blueberries display a deep and broad absorption centered on 900 nm and as well as an increase in reflectance in the 1009 nm band. The shape of the absorption feature in the blueberries is consistent with that seen in red hematite, but again the band minimum is displaced to a longer wavelength than would be expected for red hematite. The blueberries also lack the prominent absorption at the shortest wavelengths that would be expected of red hematite. The unique hematite-bearing (or coated) rocks

  9. Measuring high spectral resolution specific absorption coefficients for use with hyperspectral imagery

    SciTech Connect

    Keller, M.; Bostater, C.

    1997-06-01

    A portable, long path length (50 cm), flow through, absorption tube system is utilized to obtain in-situ specific absorption coefficients from various water environments consisting of both clear and turbid water conditions from an underway ship or vessel. The high spectral resolution absorption signatures can be obtained and correlated with measured water quality parameters along a ship track. The long path cuvette system is capable of measuring important water quality parameters such as chlorophyll-a, seston or total suspended matter, tannins, humics, fulvic acids, or dissolved organic matter (dissolved organic carbon, DOC). The various concentrations of these substances can be determined and correlated with laboratory measurements using the double inflection ratio (DIR) of the spectra based upon derivative spectroscopy. The DIR is determined for all of the possible combinations of the bands ranging from 362-1115 nm using 252 channels, as described previously by Bostater. The information gathered from this system can be utilized in conjunction with hyperspectral imagery that allows one to relate reflectance and absorption to water quality of a particular environment. A comparison is made between absorption signatures and reflectance obtained from the Banana River, Florida.

  10. Differences in spectral absorption properties between active neovascular macular degeneration and mild age related maculopathy.

    PubMed

    Balaskas, Konstantinos; Nourrit, Vincent; Dinsdale, Michelle; Henson, David B; Aslam, Tariq

    2013-05-01

    This study examines the differences in spectral absorption properties between the maculae of patients with active neovascular macular degeneration and those with early age related maculopathy (ARM). Patients attending for management of neovascular age related macular degeneration (AMD) underwent multispectral imaging with a system comprising of a modified digital fundus camera coupled with a 250-W tungsten-halogen lamp and a liquid crystal fast-tuneable filter. Images were obtained at 8 wavelengths between 496 and 700 nm. Aligned images were used to generate a DLA (differential light absorption, a measure of spectral absorption properties) map of the macular area. DLA maps were generated for both eyes of 10 sequential patients attending for anti-vascular endothelial growth factor injections. Each of these patients had active leaking neovascular AMD in one eye and early ARM or milder disease in the fellow eye. Eyes with neovascular AMD demonstrated lower average levels of DLA compared with their fellow eyes with early ARM (p=0.037, t test). The significant difference in DLA demonstrates the potential of multispectral imaging for differentiating the two pathologies non-invasively. PMID:23137662

  11. ON NEUTRAL ABSORPTION AND SPECTRAL EVOLUTION IN X-RAY BINARIES

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, J. M.; Cackett, E. M.; Reis, R. C.

    2009-12-10

    Current X-ray observatories make it possible to follow the evolution of transient and variable X-ray binaries across a broad range in luminosity and source behavior. In such studies, it can be unclear whether evolution in the low-energy portion of the spectrum should be attributed to evolution in the source, or instead to evolution in neutral photoelectric absorption. Dispersive spectrometers make it possible to address this problem. We have analyzed a small but diverse set of X-ray binaries observed with the Chandra High Energy Transmission Grating Spectrometer across a range in luminosity and different spectral states. The column density in individual photoelectric absorption edges remains constant with luminosity, both within and across source spectral states. This finding suggests that absorption in the interstellar medium strongly dominates the neutral column density observed in spectra of X-ray binaries. Consequently, evolution in the low-energy spectrum of X-ray binaries should properly be attributed to evolution in the source spectrum. We discuss our results in the context of X-ray binary spectroscopy with current and future X-ray missions.

  12. Collisional Induced Absorption (CIA) bands measured in the IR spectral range .

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stefani, S.; Piccioni, G.; Snels, M.; Adriani, A.; Grassi, D.

    In this work we present two experimental setup able to characterize the optical properties of gases, in particular CO_2 and H_2, at typically planetary conditions. The apparatus consists of a Fourier Transform InfraRed (FT-IT) interferometer able to work in a wide spectral range, from 350 to 25000 cm-1 (0.4 to 29 mu m ) with a relatively high spectral resolution, from 10 to 0.07 cm-1. Two dedicated gas cells have been integrated with the FT-IR. The first, called High Pressure High Temperature (HP-HT), can support pressures up to 300 bar, temperatures up to 300oC and is characterized by an optical path of 2 cm. The second one, a Multi Pass (MP) absorption gas cell, is designed to have a variable optical path, from 2.5 to 30 m, can be heated up to 200o and operate at pressures up to 10 bar. In this paper, measurements of Collision-Induced Absorption (CIA) bands in carbon dioxide and hydrogen recorded in the InfraRed spectral range will be presented. In principle, linear symmetric molecules such as CO_2 and H_2 possess no dipole moment, but, even when the pressure is only a few bar, we have observed the Collisional Induced Absorption (CIA) bands. This absorption results from a short-time collisional interaction between molecules. The band integrated intensity shows a quadratic dependence versus density opposed to the absorption by isolated molecules, which follows Beer's law \\citep{Beer's}. This behaviour suggests an absorption by pairs rather than by individual molecules. The bands integrated intensities show a linear dependence vs square density according to \\citep {CIA Shape} and \\citep{CIA posi}. For what concerns the H_2 CIA bands, a preliminary comparison between simulated data obtained with the model described in \\citep{CIA H2}and measured, shows a good agreement. These processes are very relevant in the dense atmospheres of planets, such as those of Venus and Jupiter and also in extrasolar planets. A detailed knowledge of these contributions is very

  13. [Study of the Detecting System of CH4 and SO2 Based on Spectral Absorption Method and UV Fluorescence Method].

    PubMed

    Wang, Shu-tao; Wang, Zhi-fang; Liu, Ming-hua; Wei, Meng; Chen, Dong-ying; Wang, Xing-long

    2016-01-01

    According to the spectral absorption characteristics of polluting gases and fluorescence characteristics, a time-division multiplexing detection system is designed. Through this system we can detect Methane (CH4) and sulfur dioxide (SO2) by using spectral absorption method and the SO2 can be detected by using UV fluorescence method. The system consists of four parts: a combination of a light source which could be switched, the common optical path, the air chamber and the signal processing section. The spectral absorption characteristics and fluorescence characteristics are measured first. Then the experiment of detecting CH4 and SO2 through spectral absorption method and the experiment of detecting SO2 through UV fluorescence method are conducted, respectively. Through measuring characteristics of spectral absorption and fluorescence, we get excitation wavelengths of SO2 and CH4 measured by spectral absorption method at the absorption peak are 280 nm and 1.64 μm, respectively, and the optimal excitation wavelength of SO2 measured by UV fluorescence method is 220 nm. we acquire the linear relation between the concentration of CH4 and relative intensity and the linear relation between the concentration of SO2 and output voltage after conducting the experiment of spectral absorption method, and the linearity are 98.7%, 99.2% respectively. Through the experiment of UV fluorescence method we acquire that the relation between the concentration of SO2 and the voltage is linear, and the linearity is 99.5%. Research shows that the system is able to be applied to detect the polluted gas by absorption spectrum method and UV fluorescence method. Combing these two measurement methods decreases the costing and the volume, and this system can also be used to measure the other gases. Such system has a certain value of application. PMID:27228784

  14. [Study of the Detecting System of CH4 and SO2 Based on Spectral Absorption Method and UV Fluorescence Method].

    PubMed

    Wang, Shu-tao; Wang, Zhi-fang; Liu, Ming-hua; Wei, Meng; Chen, Dong-ying; Wang, Xing-long

    2016-01-01

    According to the spectral absorption characteristics of polluting gases and fluorescence characteristics, a time-division multiplexing detection system is designed. Through this system we can detect Methane (CH4) and sulfur dioxide (SO2) by using spectral absorption method and the SO2 can be detected by using UV fluorescence method. The system consists of four parts: a combination of a light source which could be switched, the common optical path, the air chamber and the signal processing section. The spectral absorption characteristics and fluorescence characteristics are measured first. Then the experiment of detecting CH4 and SO2 through spectral absorption method and the experiment of detecting SO2 through UV fluorescence method are conducted, respectively. Through measuring characteristics of spectral absorption and fluorescence, we get excitation wavelengths of SO2 and CH4 measured by spectral absorption method at the absorption peak are 280 nm and 1.64 μm, respectively, and the optimal excitation wavelength of SO2 measured by UV fluorescence method is 220 nm. we acquire the linear relation between the concentration of CH4 and relative intensity and the linear relation between the concentration of SO2 and output voltage after conducting the experiment of spectral absorption method, and the linearity are 98.7%, 99.2% respectively. Through the experiment of UV fluorescence method we acquire that the relation between the concentration of SO2 and the voltage is linear, and the linearity is 99.5%. Research shows that the system is able to be applied to detect the polluted gas by absorption spectrum method and UV fluorescence method. Combing these two measurement methods decreases the costing and the volume, and this system can also be used to measure the other gases. Such system has a certain value of application.

  15. Phyllosilicate absorption features in main-belt and outer-belt asteroid reflectance spectra.

    PubMed

    Vilas, F; Gaffey, M J

    1989-11-10

    Absorption features having depths up to 5% are identified in high-quality, high-resolution reflectance spectra of 16 dark asteroids in the main belt and in the Cybele and Hilda groups. Analogs among the CM2 carbonaceous chondrite meteorites exist for some of these asteroids, suggesting that these absorptions are due to iron oxides in phyllosilicates formed on the asteroidal surfaces by aqueous alteration processes. Spectra of ten additional asteroids, located beyond the outer edge of the main belt, show no discernible absorption features, suggesting that aqueous alteration did not always operate at these heliocentric distances.

  16. Determination of the concentration of mineral particles and suspended organic substance based on their spectral absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konovalov, B. V.; Kravchishina, M. D.; Belyaev, N. A.; Novigatsky, A. N.

    2014-09-01

    A method to determine the concentrations of the particulate mineral matter ( C PMM) and the particulate organic matter ( C POM) is suggested. The values of C PMM and C POM are calculated from the measurements of the spectral coefficients of the light absorption a POM(440) and a PMM(750) using empirical equations. The latter have been obtained by comparing the concentrations of the suspended solids measured by means of the gravimetric method with the spectral values of the optical density of the suspended matter settled on membrane filters. The data used are typical of the coastal waters of inland and marginal seas and the open ocean and cover the range of three and two orders of magnitude for the concentrations of C PMM and C POM, respectively.

  17. Spectral mapping of morphological features on the moon with MGM and SAM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kodikara, Gayantha R. L.; Champati ray, P. K.; Chauhan, Prakash; Chatterjee, R. S.

    2016-02-01

    Three types of morphological features observed in different lunar crustal terrains were studied and mapped using hyperspectral Moon mineralogy mapper (M3) data onboard Chandrayaan 1 mission in order to assess the utility of cascaded MGM-SAM spectral mixture modeling approach to characterize the surface materials, which may occur as mineral mixtures, at different topography of the lunar surface. Selected morphological features include: the impact melts in Orientale basin, sinuous rilles in Procellarum KREEP Terrane (PKT) and a rayed crater in Feldspathic Highland Terrane (FHT). Methodology involves extraction of spectrally pure pixels (endmembers) of the area using Pixel Purity Index (PPI), identification of mineralogy of the selected endmember spectrum using the Modified Gaussian Method (MGM) and mapping of mineralogically identified endmembers using the Spectral Angle Mapper (SAM) method. Mapping results demonstrate both the capabilities and the limitations of the MGM method of spectral deconvolution and the SAM method of spectral matching as effective tools for compositional characterizations of morphological features on the lunar surface. As a method of spectral deconvolution, MGM was able to identify and characterize both high- and low - Ca pyroxenes along with plagioclase feldspar. The Spectral Angle Mapper (SAM) was able to map identified mineral mixtures from MGM.

  18. Interaction of some fluorinated nucleic acid components with praseodymium: an absorption spectral approach.

    PubMed

    Misra, S N

    1990-10-01

    Absorption difference and comparative absorption spectrophotometric studies on praseodymium(III) and fluorouracil, fluorocytosine, fluoroadenine, fluorothymine, fluorouridine, fluorocytidine, fluoroadenosine and fluorothymidine systems at pH approximately 5.5 and in different stoichiometries in 80% DMF medium have been carried out. Magnitudes of spectral parameters, viz. Coulombic (Fk), spin-orbit (zeta 4f), nephelauxetic (beta), bonding (b), intensity (T lambda Judd-Ofelt), and oscillator strength (P) and their variation have provided information on the binding mode of these biomolecules in terms of outer and inner sphere complexation, degree of covalency and extent of 4f orbital involvement. Preliminary ultrasonic studies have indicated that these biomolecules behave as structure breakers, hence weak ligands in aqueous medium, while strengthening water structure in semi-nonaqueous medium. The analysis of the isolated solid complexes has suggested octa- and nona-coordination for praseodymium(III) in fluorinated nucleic bases and fluorinated nucleoside complexes.

  19. Spectral Absorption of Solar Radiation by Aerosols during ACE-Asia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bergstrom, R. W.; Pilewskie, P.; Pommier, J.; Rabbette, M.; Russell, P. B.; Schmid, B.; Redermann, J.; Higurashi, A.; Nakajima, T.; Quinn, P. K.

    2004-01-01

    As part of the Asian Pacific Regional Aerosol Characterization Experiment (ACE-Asia), the upward and downward spectral solar radiant fluxes were measured with the Spectral Solar Flux Radiometer (SSFR), and the aerosol optical depth was measured with the Ames Airborne Tracking Sunphotometer (AATS-14) aboard the Center for INterdisciplinary Remotely-Piloted Aircraft Studies (CIRPAS) Twin Otter aircraft. IN this paper, we examine the data obtained for two cases: a moderately thick aerosol layer, 12 April, and a relatively thin aerosol case, 16 April 2001. ON both days, the Twin Otter flew vertical profiles in the Korean Strait southeast of Gosan Island. For both days we determine the aerosol spectral absorption of the layer and estimate the spectral aerosol absorption optical depth and single-scattering albedo. The results for 12 April show that the single-scattering albedo increases with wavelength from 0.8 at 400 nm to 0.95 at 900 nm and remains essentially constant from 950 to 1700 nm. On 16 April the amount of aerosol absorption was very low; however, the aerosol single-scattering albedo appears to decrease slightly with wavelength in the visible region. We interpret these results in light of the two absorbing aerosol species observed during the ACE-asia study: mineral dust and black carbon. The results for 12 April are indicative of a mineral dust-black carbon mixture. The 16 April results are possibly caused by black carbon mixed with nonabsorbing pollution aerosols. For the 12 April case we attempt to estimate the relative contributions of the black carbon particles and the mineral dust particles. We compare our results with other estimates of the aerosol properties from a Sea-Viewing Wide Field-of-View Sensor (SeaWiFS) satellite analysis and aerosol measurements made aboard the Twin Otter, aboard the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Ronald H Brown ship, and at ground sites in Gosan and Japan. The results indicate a relatively complicated aerosol

  20. THE 217.5 nm BAND, INFRARED ABSORPTION, AND INFRARED EMISSION FEATURES IN HYDROGENATED AMORPHOUS CARBON NANOPARTICLES

    SciTech Connect

    Duley, W. W.; Hu, Anming E-mail: a2hu@uwaterloo.ca

    2012-12-20

    We report on the preparation of hydrogenated amorphous carbon nanoparticles whose spectral characteristics include an absorption band at 217.5 nm with the profile and characteristics of the interstellar 217.5 nm feature. Vibrational spectra of these particles also contain the features commonly observed in absorption and emission from dust in the diffuse interstellar medium. These materials are produced under ''slow'' deposition conditions by minimizing the flux of incident carbon atoms and by reducing surface mobility. The initial chemistry leads to the formation of carbon chains, together with a limited range of small aromatic ring molecules, and eventually results in carbon nanoparticles having an sp {sup 2}/sp {sup 3} ratio Almost-Equal-To 0.4. Spectroscopic analysis of particle composition indicates that naphthalene and naphthalene derivatives are important constituents of this material. We suggest that carbon nanoparticles with similar composition are responsible for the appearance of the interstellar 217.5 nm band and outline how these particles can form in situ under diffuse cloud conditions by deposition of carbon on the surface of silicate grains. Spectral data from carbon nanoparticles formed under these conditions accurately reproduce IR emission spectra from a number of Galactic sources. We provide the first detailed fits to observational spectra of Type A and B emission sources based entirely on measured spectra of a carbonaceous material that can be produced in the laboratory.

  1. Absolute calibration and atmospheric versus mineralogic origin of absorption features in 2.0 to 2.5 micron Mars spectra obtained during 1993

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bell, James F., III; Pollack, James B.; Geballe, Thomas R.; Cruikshank, Dale P.; Freedman, Richard

    1994-01-01

    We obtained new high resolution reflectance spectra of Mars during the 1993 opposition from Mauna Kea Observatory using the UKIRT CGS4 spectrometer. Fifty spectra of 1600-2000 km surface regions and a number of standard star spectra were obtained in the 2.04 to 2.44 micron wavelength region on 4 February 1993 UT. Near-simultaneous observations of bright standard stars were used to perform terrestrial atmospheric corrections and an absolute flux calibration. Using the known magnitude of the stars and assuming blackbody continuum behavior, the flux from Mars could be derived. A radiative transfer model and the HITRAN spectral line data base were used to compute atmospheric transmission spectra for Mars and the Earth in order to simulate the contributions of these atmospheres to our observed data. Also, we examined the ATMOS solar spectrum in the near-IR to try to identify absorption features in the spectrum of the Sun that could be misinterpreted as Mars features. Eleven absorption features were detected in our Mars spectra. Our data provide no conclusive identification of the mineralogy responsible for the absorption features we detected. However, examination of terrestrial spectral libraries and previous high spectral resolution mineral studies indicates that the most likely origin of these features is either CO3(sup 2-), HCO3(-), or HSO4(-) anions in framework silicates or possibly (Fe, Mg)-OH bonds in sheet silicates.

  2. GENIE: A HYBRID GENETIC ALGORITHM FOR FEATURE CLASSIFICATION IN MULTI-SPECTRAL IMAGES

    SciTech Connect

    S. PERKINS; ET AL

    2000-12-01

    We consider the problem of pixel-by-pixel classification of a multi-spectral image using supervised learning. Conventional supervised classification techniques such as maximum likelihood classification and less conventional ones such as neural networks, typically base such classifications solely on the spectral components of each pixel. It is easy to see why the color of a pixel provides a nice, bounded, fixed dimensional space in which these classifiers work well. It is often the case however, that spectral information alone is not sufficient to correctly classify a pixel. Maybe spatial neighborhood information is required as well. Or may be the raw spectral components do not themselves make for easy classification, but some arithmetic combination of them would. In either of these cases we have the problem of selecting suitable spatial, spectral or spatio-spectral features that allow the classifier to do its job well. The number of all possible such features is extremely large. How can we select a suitable subset? We have developed GENIE, a hybrid learning system that combines a genetic algorithm that searches a space of image processing operations for a set that can produce suitable feature planes, and a more conventional classifier which uses those feature planes to output a final classification. In this paper we show that the use of a hybrid GA provides significant advantages over using either a GA alone or more conventional classification methods alone. We present results using high-resolution IKONOS data, looking for regions of burned forest and for roads.

  3. Apple flavonols during fruit adaptation to solar radiation: spectral features and technique for non-destructive assessment.

    PubMed

    Merzlyak, Mark N; Solovchenko, Alexei E; Smagin, Alexei I; Gitelson, Anatoly A

    2005-02-01

    Spectral properties of flavonols of three varieties (Golden Delicious, Antonovka, and Renet Simirenko) of anthocyanin-free apple fruit were investigated with reflectance spectroscopy. The results of spectral and biochemical analyses suggested that fruit reflectance in a broad spectral range 365-430 nm is strongly dependent on and, in sunlit fruit surfaces, governed by flavonols. The build up of peel flavonols (mainly rutin and other quercetin glycosides) resulted in a dramatic decrease of fruit reflectance in this range, flattening of the spectrum, and extending the region with low reflectance (4-5%) to ca. 410 nm. The spectral features observed suggest that flavonols contribute significantly to screening of excessive radiation, not only UV-A, but in the short-wave bands of chlorophyll and carotenoid absorption in the visible part of the spectrum as well. To retrieve quantitatively flavonol content from reflectance spectra, we tested the applicability of an inversion technique developed for non-destructive leaf pigment assessment. The model for flavonol content assessment was suggested in the form (R(-1)410 - R(-1)460)R800, where Rlambda is reflectance at wavelength lambda. The model was linearly related to flavonol content between 8 and 220nmol/cm2 with the coefficient of determination r2=0.92 and root mean square error of flavonol estimation of 20 nmol/ cm2 regardless of cultivar, chlorophyll, and carotenoid content.

  4. Spectral characteristics and feature selection of satellite remote sensing data for climate and anthropogenic changes assessment in Bucharest area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zoran, Maria; Savastru, Roxana; Savastru, Dan; Tautan, Marina; Miclos, Sorin; Cristescu, Luminita; Carstea, Elfrida; Baschir, Laurentiu

    2010-05-01

    Urban systems play a vital role in social and economic development in all countries. Their environmental changes can be investigated on different spatial and temporal scales. Urban and peri-urban environment dynamics is of great interest for future planning and decision making as well as in frame of local and regional changes. Changes in urban land cover include changes in biotic diversity, actual and potential primary productivity, soil quality, runoff, and sedimentation rates, and cannot be well understood without the knowledge of land use change that drives them. The study focuses on the assessment of environmental features changes for Bucharest metropolitan area, Romania by satellite remote sensing and in-situ monitoring data. Rational feature selection from the varieties of spectral channels in the optical wavelengths of electromagnetic spectrum (VIS and NIR) is very important for effective analysis and information extraction of remote sensing data. Based on comprehensively analyses of the spectral characteristics of remote sensing data is possibly to derive environmental changes in urban areas. The information quantity contained in a band is an important parameter in evaluating the band. The deviation and entropy are often used to show information amount. Feature selection is one of the most important steps in recognition and classification of remote sensing images. Therefore, it is necessary to select features before classification. The optimal features are those that can be used to distinguish objects easily and correctly. Three factors—the information quantity of bands, the correlation between bands and the spectral characteristic (e.g. absorption specialty) of classified objects in test area Bucharest have been considered in our study. As, the spectral characteristic of an object is influenced by many factors, being difficult to define optimal feature parameters to distinguish all the objects in a whole area, a method of multi-level feature selection

  5. Presence of terrestrial atmospheric gas absorption bands in standard extraterrestrial solar irradiance curves in the near-infrared spectral region.

    PubMed

    Gao, B C; Green, R O

    1995-09-20

    The solar irradiance curves compiled by Wehrli [Physikalisch-Meteorologisches Observatorium Publ. 615 (World Radiation Center, Davosdorf, Switzerland, 1985)] and by Neckel and Labs [Sol. Phys. 90, 205 (1984)] are widely used. These curves were obtained based on measurements of solar radiation from the ground and from aircraft platforms. Contaminations in these curves by atmospheric gaseous absorptions were inevitable. A technique for deriving the transmittance spectrum of the Sun's atmosphere from high-resolution (0.01 cm(-1)) solar occultation spectra measured above the Earth's atmosphere by the use of atmospheric trace molecule spectroscopy (ATMOS) aboard the space shuttle is described. The comparisons of the derived ATMOS solar transmittance spectrum with the two solar irradiance curves show that he curve derived by Wehrli contains many absorption features in the 2.0-2.5-µm region that are not of solar origin, whereas the curve obtained by Neckel and Labs is completely devoid of weak solar absorption features that should be there. An Earth atmospheric oxygen band at 1.268 µm and a water-vapor band near 0.94 µm are likely present in the curve obtained by Wehrli. It is shown that the solar irradiance measurement errors in some narrow spectral intervals can be as large as 20%. An improved solar irradiance spectrum is formed by the incorporation of the solar transmittance spectrum derived from the ATMOS data into the solar irradiance spectrum from Neckel and Labs. The availability of a new solar spectrum from 50 to 50 000 cm(-1) from the U.S. Air Force Phillips Laboratory is also discussed.

  6. Spectral lag features of GRB 060814 from swift bat and Suzaku observations

    SciTech Connect

    Roychoudhury, Arundhati; Sarkar, Samir K.; Bhadra, Arunava E-mail: samirksarkar@rediffmail.com

    2014-02-20

    This work reports a study on the spectral lag of the prompt emission spectrum of a multi-pulse gamma-ray burst (GRB) GRB 060814 (z = 0.84) using the observations of the Swift Burst Alert Telescope and the Suzaku Wide Area Monitor. We found that the spectral lag for GRB 060814 is positive for the first two and the fourth pulses, while the third pulse exhibits negative lag. However, the time variation of the E {sub peak} of all the stated pulses shows a similar trend. The leading models for spectral lags in GRBs are thus found inadequate to explain the observed spectral lag features of GRB 060814. Probable causes of the spectral lag characteristics of GRB 060814 are discussed.

  7. Multi range spectral feature fitting for hyperspectral imagery in extracting oilseed rape planting area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Zhuokun; Huang, Jingfeng; Wang, Fumin

    2013-12-01

    Spectral feature fitting (SFF) is a commonly used strategy for hyperspectral imagery analysis to discriminate ground targets. Compared to other image analysis techniques, SFF does not secure higher accuracy in extracting image information in all circumstances. Multi range spectral feature fitting (MRSFF) from ENVI software allows user to focus on those interesting spectral features to yield better performance. Thus spectral wavelength ranges and their corresponding weights must be determined. The purpose of this article is to demonstrate the performance of MRSFF in oilseed rape planting area extraction. A practical method for defining the weighted values, the variance coefficient weight method, was proposed to set up criterion. Oilseed rape field canopy spectra from the whole growth stage were collected prior to investigating its phenological varieties; oilseed rape endmember spectra were extracted from the Hyperion image as identifying samples to be used in analyzing the oilseed rape field. Wavelength range divisions were determined by the difference between field-measured spectra and image spectra, and image spectral variance coefficient weights for each wavelength range were calculated corresponding to field-measured spectra from the closest date. By using MRSFF, wavelength ranges were classified to characterize the target's spectral features without compromising spectral profile's entirety. The analysis was substantially successful in extracting oilseed rape planting areas (RMSE ≤ 0.06), and the RMSE histogram indicated a superior result compared to a conventional SFF. Accuracy assessment was based on the mapping result compared with spectral angle mapping (SAM) and the normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI). The MRSFF yielded a robust, convincible result and, therefore, may further the use of hyperspectral imagery in precision agriculture.

  8. Modeling the spectral absorption by CDOM in Meiliang Bay, Taihu Lake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Qinghua; Wang, Shixin; Zhou, Yi; Yan, Fuli; Wang, Jingjing

    2007-06-01

    The interpretation of remotely sensed images of turbid coastal waters or inland lake waters is more difficult than case 1 water, because their optical properties are complex, and their optical constituents are independent of phytoplankton concentrations. In recent years significant efforts have been made to develop ocean color satellite missions with improved spectral and radiometric performance, and in the same time, techniques for constituent retrieval have evolved from empirical towards analytical algorithms. Analytical models can be developed and inverted to yield concentrations (Carder et al. 1999) of substances in the water from reflectance measurements, which require a suitable parameterization of the optically active constituents and their optical properties. This paper focused on absorption by chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM; also Gelbstoff or yellow substances), which was the pool of absorbing substances in water and one of the main optically active constituents in Case 2 waters. The absorption of CDOM is generally considered as the exponential form model, which have three important main parameters, S, a(λ 0), λ 0. The S results got from the exponential form model fit using CDOM normalization absorptions by 350nm, or 400nm, or 440nm absorption were the same, and the final value of S for CDOM in Meiliang Bay, Taihu Lake was 0.0106, namely the mean of S for all samples; Normally, a(λ 0) is simply taken to be the mean of the absorption coefficient of CDOM of field samples in the reference wavelength, however, this study found that a(λ 0) a varied greatly between samples ( λ 0 = 400, 1.93

  9. Spectroscopic Character and Spatial Distribution of Hydroxyl and Water Absorption Features Measured on the Lunar Surface by the Moon Mineralogy Mapper Imaging Spectrometer on Chandrayaan-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, R. O.; Pieters, C. M.; Goswami, J.; Clark, R. N.; Annadurai, M.; Boardman, J. W.; Buratti, B. J.; Combe, J.; Dyar, M. D.; Head, J. W.; Hibbitts, C.; Hicks, M.; Isaacson, P.; Klima, R. L.; Kramer, G. Y.; Kumar, S.; Livo, K. E.; Lundeen, S.; Malaret, E.; McCord, T. B.; Mustard, J. F.; Nettles, J. W.; Petro, N. E.; Runyon, C. J.; Staid, M.; Sunshine, J. M.; Taylor, L. A.; Tompkins, S.; Varanasi, P.

    2009-12-01

    The Moon Mineralogy Mapper imaging spectrometer on Chandrayaan-1 has a broad spectral range from 430 to 3000 nm. By design, the range was specified to extend to 3000 nm to allow for possible detection of trace volatile compounds that possess absorption bands near 3000 nm. Soon after acquisition and calibration of a large fraction of the lunar surface in early February 2009, absorption features in the 2700 to 3000 nm region were detected over unexpectedly large regional areas. This extraordinary discovery has withstood extensive re-analysis and falsification efforts. We have concluded these absorption features are fundamentally present in the M3 measurements and are indicators of extensive hydroxyl and water-bearing materials occurring on the surface of the Moon. Based on current analyses, these absorption features appear strongest at high latitudes, but also occur in association with several fresh feldspathic craters. Interestingly, the distribution of these absorption features are not directly correlated with existing neutron spectrometer hydrogen abundance data for the sunlight surface. This may indicate that the formation and retention of hydroxyl and water is an active process largely restricted to the upper most surface. We present the detailed spectroscopic character of these absorption features in the 2700 to 3000 nm spectral region, including selected examples through all levels of measurement processing from raw data to calibrated apparent surface reflectance. In summary we show the measured strength and latitudinal distribution of the absorptions as well as selected localized occurrences in association with fresh feldspathic craters. The presence of hydroxyl and water bearing material over extensive regions of the lunar surface provides a new and unexpected source of volatiles. Options for harvesting these elements directly from the regolith may provide an alternate supply of volatiles for long term human exploration objectives.

  10. Spectral interferometric microscopy reveals absorption by individual optical nanoantennas from extinction phase

    PubMed Central

    Gennaro, Sylvain D.; Sonnefraud, Yannick; Verellen, Niels; Van Dorpe, Pol; Moshchalkov, Victor V.; Maier, Stefan A.; Oulton, Rupert F.

    2014-01-01

    Optical antennas transform light from freely propagating waves into highly localized excitations that interact strongly with matter. Unlike their radio frequency counterparts, optical antennas are nanoscopic and high frequency, making amplitude and phase measurements challenging and leaving some information hidden. Here we report a novel spectral interferometric microscopy technique to expose the amplitude and phase response of individual optical antennas across an octave of the visible to near-infrared spectrum. Although it is a far-field technique, we show that knowledge of the extinction phase allows quantitative estimation of nanoantenna absorption, which is a near-field quantity. To verify our method we characterize gold ring-disk dimers exhibiting Fano interference. Our results reveal that Fano interference only cancels a bright mode’s scattering, leaving residual extinction dominated by absorption. Spectral interference microscopy has the potential for real-time and single-shot phase and amplitude investigations of isolated quantum and classical antennas with applications across the physical and life sciences. PMID:24781663

  11. Spectral interferometric microscopy reveals absorption by individual optical nanoantennas from extinction phase.

    PubMed

    Gennaro, Sylvain D; Sonnefraud, Yannick; Verellen, Niels; Van Dorpe, Pol; Moshchalkov, Victor V; Maier, Stefan A; Oulton, Rupert F

    2014-04-30

    Optical antennas transform light from freely propagating waves into highly localized excitations that interact strongly with matter. Unlike their radio frequency counterparts, optical antennas are nanoscopic and high frequency, making amplitude and phase measurements challenging and leaving some information hidden. Here we report a novel spectral interferometric microscopy technique to expose the amplitude and phase response of individual optical antennas across an octave of the visible to near-infrared spectrum. Although it is a far-field technique, we show that knowledge of the extinction phase allows quantitative estimation of nanoantenna absorption, which is a near-field quantity. To verify our method we characterize gold ring-disk dimers exhibiting Fano interference. Our results reveal that Fano interference only cancels a bright mode's scattering, leaving residual extinction dominated by absorption. Spectral interference microscopy has the potential for real-time and single-shot phase and amplitude investigations of isolated quantum and classical antennas with applications across the physical and life sciences.

  12. EMD-Based Temporal and Spectral Features for the Classification of EEG Signals Using Supervised Learning.

    PubMed

    Riaz, Farhan; Hassan, Ali; Rehman, Saad; Niazi, Imran Khan; Dremstrup, Kim

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a novel method for feature extraction from electroencephalogram (EEG) signals using empirical mode decomposition (EMD). Its use is motivated by the fact that the EMD gives an effective time-frequency analysis of nonstationary signals. The intrinsic mode functions (IMF) obtained as a result of EMD give the decomposition of a signal according to its frequency components. We present the usage of upto third order temporal moments, and spectral features including spectral centroid, coefficient of variation and the spectral skew of the IMFs for feature extraction from EEG signals. These features are physiologically relevant given that the normal EEG signals have different temporal and spectral centroids, dispersions and symmetries when compared with the pathological EEG signals. The calculated features are fed into the standard support vector machine (SVM) for classification purposes. The performance of the proposed method is studied on a publicly available dataset which is designed to handle various classification problems including the identification of epilepsy patients and detection of seizures. Experiments show that good classification results are obtained using the proposed methodology for the classification of EEG signals. Our proposed method also compares favorably to other state-of-the-art feature extraction methods.

  13. Identification of key aerosol populations through their size and composition resolved spectral scattering and absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costabile, F.; Barnaba, F.; Angelini, F.; Gobbi, G. P.

    2013-03-01

    Characterizing chemical and physical aerosol properties is important to understand their sources, effects, and feedback mechanisms in the atmosphere. This study proposes a scheme to classify aerosol populations based on their spectral optical properties (absorption and scattering). The scheme is obtained thanks to the outstanding set of information on particle size and composition these properties contain. The spectral variability of the aerosol single scattering albedo (dSSA), and the extinction, scattering and absorption Angstrom exponents (EAE, SAE and AAE, respectively) were observed on the basis of two-year measurements of aerosol optical properties (scattering and absorption coefficients at blue, green and red wavelengths) performed in the suburbs of Rome (Italy). Optical measurements of various aerosol types were coupled to measurements of particle number size distributions and relevant optical properties simulations (Mie theory). These latter allowed the investigation of the role of the particle size and composition in the bulk aerosol properties observed. The combination of simulations and measurements suggested a general "paradigm" built on dSSA, SAE and AAE to optically classify aerosols. The paradigm proved suitable to identify the presence of key aerosol populations, including soot, biomass burning, organics, dust and marine particles. The work highlights that (i) aerosol populations show distinctive combinations of SAE and dSSA times AAE, these variables being linked by a linear inverse relation varying with varying SSA; (ii) fine particles show EAE > 1.5, whilst EAE < 2 is found for both coarse particles and ultrafine soot-rich aerosols; (iii) fine and coarse particles both show SSA > 0.8, whilst ultrafine urban Aitken mode and soot particles show SSA < 0.8. The proposed paradigm agrees with aerosol observations performed during past major field campaigns, this indicating that relations concerning the paradigm have a general validity.

  14. Mixing state and spectral absorption of atmospheric aerosols observed at a marine background site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cayetano, M. G.; Lee, K. Y.; Kim, Y. J.

    2011-12-01

    Mineral dust and sea salt particles are portions of atmospheric aerosols in Korea due to the periodic transport of loess dust particles from Gobi and Taklimakan deserts in west China, as well as the sea salt enrichment of atmospheric particles from the seas surrounding the Korean peninsula [Kim et al., 2009; Sahu et al., 2009]. Carbonaceous particles and secondary inorganic aerosols (sulphates and nitrates) are ubiquitous due to the proliferating biomass burning [Ryu et al., 2004], as well as the increasing use of fossil fuels locally and by regional transport from neighbouring countries. Collectively, when these aerosols are transported, their compositions are further modified due to the aging process, impacting their physico-chemical properties including spectral absorption. In order to investigate the spectral response of the absorption under different ambient aerosol conditions, measurements have been conducted at a marine background site in Korea (Deokjeok Island. 37° 13' 33" N, 126° 8' 51" E) during the spring (13 days) and fall (8 days) seasons of 2009 using an aethalometer (Magee AE31), a nephelometer (Optec NGN2a) and other supporting instruments (PILS-IC, PM2.5 cyclone samplers for off-line OC/EC measurements). It has been found that spring aerosols were dominated by sulphate-rich and carbonaceous-rich fractions (21.4%±8.0% and 28.8%±7.9%, respectively), with an Angström exponent of absorption, αabs = 1.3±0.1 at 370-950 nm. The fall season aerosols were grouped based on their chemical composition as acidic aerosols, dust-enriched, and seasalt-enriched aerosols. Angström exponent of absorption, αabs for acidic aerosols was obtained to be 1.3±0.2 at 370-950 nm. However, dust enriched aerosols showed increased absorption in the short UV-Vis range (370-590 nm), which can be attributed to their mixing with light absorbing aerosols. Different types of aerosols exhibit different spectral absorption characteristics depending on their composition and

  15. Characterization of protein and carbohydrate mid-IR spectral features in crop residues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xin, Hangshu; Zhang, Yonggen; Wang, Mingjun; Li, Zhongyu; Wang, Zhibo; Yu, Peiqiang

    2014-08-01

    To the best of our knowledge, a few studies have been conducted on inherent structure spectral traits related to biopolymers of crop residues. The objective of this study was to characterize protein and carbohydrate structure spectral features of three field crop residues (rice straw, wheat straw and millet straw) in comparison with two crop vines (peanut vine and pea vine) by using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) technique with attenuated total reflectance (ATR). Also, multivariate analyses were performed on spectral data sets within the regions mainly related to protein and carbohydrate in this study. The results showed that spectral differences existed in mid-IR peak intensities that are mainly related to protein and carbohydrate among these crop residue samples. With regard to protein spectral profile, peanut vine showed the greatest mid-IR band intensities that are related to protein amide and protein secondary structures, followed by pea vine and the rest three field crop straws. The crop vines had 48-134% higher spectral band intensity than the grain straws in spectral features associated with protein. Similar trends were also found in the bands that are mainly related to structural carbohydrates (such as cellulosic compounds). However, the field crop residues had higher peak intensity in total carbohydrates region than the crop vines. Furthermore, spectral ratios varied among the residue samples, indicating that these five crop residues had different internal structural conformation. However, multivariate spectral analyses showed that structural similarities still exhibited among crop residues in the regions associated with protein biopolymers and carbohydrate. Further study is needed to find out whether there is any relationship between spectroscopic information and nutrition supply in various kinds of crop residue when fed to animals.

  16. Characterization of protein and carbohydrate mid-IR spectral features in crop residues.

    PubMed

    Xin, Hangshu; Zhang, Yonggen; Wang, Mingjun; Li, Zhongyu; Wang, Zhibo; Yu, Peiqiang

    2014-08-14

    To the best of our knowledge, a few studies have been conducted on inherent structure spectral traits related to biopolymers of crop residues. The objective of this study was to characterize protein and carbohydrate structure spectral features of three field crop residues (rice straw, wheat straw and millet straw) in comparison with two crop vines (peanut vine and pea vine) by using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) technique with attenuated total reflectance (ATR). Also, multivariate analyses were performed on spectral data sets within the regions mainly related to protein and carbohydrate in this study. The results showed that spectral differences existed in mid-IR peak intensities that are mainly related to protein and carbohydrate among these crop residue samples. With regard to protein spectral profile, peanut vine showed the greatest mid-IR band intensities that are related to protein amide and protein secondary structures, followed by pea vine and the rest three field crop straws. The crop vines had 48-134% higher spectral band intensity than the grain straws in spectral features associated with protein. Similar trends were also found in the bands that are mainly related to structural carbohydrates (such as cellulosic compounds). However, the field crop residues had higher peak intensity in total carbohydrates region than the crop vines. Furthermore, spectral ratios varied among the residue samples, indicating that these five crop residues had different internal structural conformation. However, multivariate spectral analyses showed that structural similarities still exhibited among crop residues in the regions associated with protein biopolymers and carbohydrate. Further study is needed to find out whether there is any relationship between spectroscopic information and nutrition supply in various kinds of crop residue when fed to animals.

  17. Temperature-dependent spectral weight transfer in YBa2Cu3Ox probed by x-ray absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, J.-Y.

    2010-03-01

    The x-ray absorption spectroscopy was utilized to critically examine the temperature dependency of the spectral weight in YBa2Cu3Ox. Large excess spectral weight for the Zhang- Rice singlet due to dynamics of holes is found with its doping dependence showing similar doom-like shape as that for Tc. Furthermore, appreciable spectral weight transfer from the upper Hubbard band to Zhang-Rice singlet was observed as the temperature acrosses the onset temperature for the pseudogap. The observed spectral weight transfer follows the change of the pseudogap, indicating a strong link between pseudogap and the upper Hubbard band.

  18. Time variations of an absorption feature in the spectrum of the gamma-ray burst on 1980 April 19

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dennis, B. R.; Frost, K. J.; Kiplinger, A. L.; Orwig, L. E.; Desai, U.; Cline, T. L.

    1982-01-01

    The photon number spectrum integrated over the impulsive part of the event is shown to fit a thermal bremsstrahlung function with a temperature of 330 + or - 70 keV at energies between 151 and 487 keV. At lower energies, the data points lie considerably below this function, indicating a broad absorption feature extending down to values less than or equal to 28 keV, the lowest energy measured. The upper energy of this absorption feature varies from 100 to 150 keV on a time scale less than or equal to 0.5 s. This event is interpreted as a typical gamma ray burst, even though it is still considered remotely possible that it is of solar origin. The spectral features, together with their variability, are interpreted in terms of electron interactions at the cyclotron resonance frequency in magnetic fields of 10 to the 12th - 10 to the 13th gauss close to the surface of a neutron star.

  19. Spatially Resolved HCN Absorption Features in the Circumnuclear Region of NGC 1052

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sawada-Satoh, Satoko; Roh, Duk-Gyoo; Oh, Se-Jin; Lee, Sang-Sung; Byun, Do-Young; Kameno, Seiji; Yeom, Jae-Hwan; Jung, Dong-Kyu; Kim, Hyo-Ryoung; Hwang, Ju-Yeon

    2016-10-01

    We present the first VLBI detection of HCN molecular absorption in the nearby active galactic nucleus NGC 1052. Utilizing the 1 mas resolution achieved by the Korean VLBI Network, we have spatially resolved the HCN absorption against a double-sided nuclear jet structure. Two velocity features of HCN absorption are detected significantly at the radial velocity of 1656 and 1719 km s‑1, redshifted by 149 and 212 km s‑1 with respect to the systemic velocity of the galaxy. The column density of the HCN molecule is estimated to be 1015–1016 cm‑2, assuming an excitation temperature of 100–230 K. The absorption features show high optical depth localized on the receding jet side, where the free–free absorption occurred due to the circumnuclear torus. The size of the foreground absorbing molecular gas is estimated to be on approximately one-parsec scales, which agrees well with the approximate size of the circumnuclear torus. HCN absorbing gas is likely to be several clumps smaller than 0.1 pc inside the circumnuclear torus. The redshifted velocities of the HCN absorption features imply that HCN absorbing gas traces ongoing infall motion inside the circumnuclear torus onto the central engine.

  20. Spectral Features and Charge Dynamics of Lead Halide Perovskites: Origins and Interpretations.

    PubMed

    Sum, Tze Chien; Mathews, Nripan; Xing, Guichuan; Lim, Swee Sien; Chong, Wee Kiang; Giovanni, David; Dewi, Herlina Arianita

    2016-02-16

    to the spectral features of halide perovskites and their origins. In the process, we emphasize some key findings of seminal photophysical studies and draw attention to the interpretations that remain divergent and the open questions. This is followed by a general description into how we prepare and conduct the TAS characterization of CH3NH3PbI3 thin films in our laboratory with specific discussions into the potential pitfalls and the influence of thin film processing on the kinetics. Lastly, we conclude with our views on the challenges and opportunities from the photophysical perspective for the field and our expectations for systems beyond lead halide perovskites. PMID:26820796

  1. Improved discrete Fourier transform based spectral feature for surface electromyogram signal classification.

    PubMed

    He, Jiayuan; Zhang, Dingguo; Sheng, Xinjun; Meng, Jianjun; Zhu, Xiangyang

    2013-01-01

    An improved discrete Fourier transform (iDFT) is presented in this study as a novel feature for surface electromyogram (sEMG) pattern classification. It employs the principle that the spectrum of sEMG signals changes regarding different motions. iDFT feature focuses on global information of local bands to increase the inter-class distance. The experiment results showed that iDFT feature had a better separability than two other spectral features, auto regression (AR) and Power spectral density (PSD), both on experienced and inexperienced subjects. The optimal bandwidth is between 30 and 50 Hz and influence of division methods is not significant. With the low computation cost and property of insensitivity to sampling frequency, our proposed method provides a competitive choice for prosthetic control.

  2. [The changes in spectral features of the staple-food bamboos of giant panda after flowering].

    PubMed

    Liu, Xue-Hua; Wu, Yan

    2012-12-01

    Large-area flowering of the giant pandas' staple food is an important factor which can influence their survival. Therefore, it is necessary to predict the bamboo flowering. Foping Nature Reserve was taken as the study area. The research selected the giant pandas' staple-food bamboos Bashania fargesii, Fargesia qinlingensis and Fargesia dracocephala with different flowering situations (i. e., flowering, potential flowering, non-flowering with far distance) to measure the spectral reflectance of bamboo leaves. We studied the influence of bamboo flowering on the spectral features of three bamboo species through analyzing the original spectral reflectance and their red edge parameters. The results showed that (1) the flowering changed the spectra features of bamboo species. The spectral reflectance of B. fargesii shows a pattern: flowering bamboo < potential flowering bamboo < non-flowering bamboo with far distance, while F. qinlingensis and F. dracocephala show the different pattern: flowering bamboo > or = potential flowering bamboo > non-flowering bamboo with far distance. Among three bamboo species, F. dracocephala showed the greatest change, and then F. qinlingensis. (2) After bamboo flowering, the red edge of B. fargesii has no obvious shifting, while the other two bamboos have distinctive shifting towards the shorter waves. The study found that the original spectral feature and the red edge all changed under various flowering states, which can be used to provide the experimental basis and theoretic support for the future prediction of bamboo flowering through remote sensing.

  3. [The changes in spectral features of the staple-food bamboos of giant panda after flowering].

    PubMed

    Liu, Xue-Hua; Wu, Yan

    2012-12-01

    Large-area flowering of the giant pandas' staple food is an important factor which can influence their survival. Therefore, it is necessary to predict the bamboo flowering. Foping Nature Reserve was taken as the study area. The research selected the giant pandas' staple-food bamboos Bashania fargesii, Fargesia qinlingensis and Fargesia dracocephala with different flowering situations (i. e., flowering, potential flowering, non-flowering with far distance) to measure the spectral reflectance of bamboo leaves. We studied the influence of bamboo flowering on the spectral features of three bamboo species through analyzing the original spectral reflectance and their red edge parameters. The results showed that (1) the flowering changed the spectra features of bamboo species. The spectral reflectance of B. fargesii shows a pattern: flowering bamboo < potential flowering bamboo < non-flowering bamboo with far distance, while F. qinlingensis and F. dracocephala show the different pattern: flowering bamboo > or = potential flowering bamboo > non-flowering bamboo with far distance. Among three bamboo species, F. dracocephala showed the greatest change, and then F. qinlingensis. (2) After bamboo flowering, the red edge of B. fargesii has no obvious shifting, while the other two bamboos have distinctive shifting towards the shorter waves. The study found that the original spectral feature and the red edge all changed under various flowering states, which can be used to provide the experimental basis and theoretic support for the future prediction of bamboo flowering through remote sensing. PMID:23427564

  4. Separation of Atmospheric and Surface Spectral Features in Mars Global Surveyor Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) Spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Michael D.; Bandfield, Joshua L.; Christensen, Philip R.

    2000-01-01

    We present two algorithms for the separation of spectral features caused by atmospheric and surface components in Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) data. One algorithm uses radiative transfer and successive least squares fitting to find spectral shapes first for atmospheric dust, then for water-ice aerosols, and then, finally, for surface emissivity. A second independent algorithm uses a combination of factor analysis, target transformation, and deconvolution to simultaneously find dust, water ice, and surface emissivity spectral shapes. Both algorithms have been applied to TES spectra, and both find very similar atmospheric and surface spectral shapes. For TES spectra taken during aerobraking and science phasing periods in nadir-geometry these two algorithms give meaningful and usable surface emissivity spectra that can be used for mineralogical identification.

  5. Spectral Light Absorption and Scattering by Aerosol Particles in Central Amazonia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Artaxo, P.; Holanda, B. A.; Ferreira De Brito, J.; Carbone, S.; Barbosa, H. M.; Rizzo, L. V.; Cirino, G. G.; Andreae, M. O.; Saturno, J.; Pöhlker, C.; Martin, S. T.; Holben, B. N.; Schafer, J.

    2015-12-01

    As part of the GoAmazon2014/5, a detailed characterization of spectral light absorption and light scattering was performed at four research sites located in the central Amazon forest at different distances upwind and downwind of Manaus. The sites ATTO (T0a) and Embrapa (T0e) are located upwind of Manaus where it is possible to observe very pristine atmospheric conditions in wet season. The site Tiwa (T2) is being operated under the direct influence of the Manaus plume at 5 km downwind of Manaus and, finally, the Manacapuru (T3) site is located at about 60 km downwind of Manaus. The spectral dependence of light absorption and light scattering were measured using Aethalometers (7-wavelengths) and Nephelometers (3-wavelengths), respectively. By calculating the Absorption Angstrom Exponent (AAE), it was possible to get information about the source of the aerosol whereas the Scattering Angstrom Exponent (SAE) gives information about its size distribution. Sunphotometers from the AERONET network were set up at T3 and T0e sites to measure column Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD). For all the stations, much higher absorption and scattering coefficients were observed during the dry season in comparison to the wet season, as a result of the larger concentration of BC and OC present in the biomass burning events. Additionally, we also observed Manaus plume pollution that alters the BC signal. There is also an increase of the AAE during the dry season due to the larger amount of aerosols from biomass burning compared with urban pollution. High values of AAE are also observed during the wet season, attributed to the presence of long-range transport of aerosols from Africa. The SAE for all the sites are lower during the wet season, with the dominance of large biological particles, and increases during the dry season as a consequence of fine particles emitted from both biomass and fossil fuel burning. The AOD at T0e and T3 (Jan-Jun/2014) showed very similar values ranging from 0.05 to

  6. Origin of the X-ray broad iron spectral feature in GRS 1915+105

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizumoto, Misaki; Ebisawa, Ken; Tsujimoto, Masahiro; Inoue, Hajime

    2016-06-01

    The X-ray spectrum of GRS 1915+105 is known to have a "broad iron spectral feature" in the spectral hard state. Similar spectral features are often observed in active galactic nuclei (AGNs) and other black-hole binaries (BHBs), and several models have been proposed for explaining it. In order to distinguish spectral models, time variation provides an important key. In AGNs, variation amplitude has been found to drop significantly at the iron K-energy band at timescales of ˜10 ks. If spectral variations of black holes are normalized by their masses, the spectral variations of BHBs on timescales of sub-seconds should exhibit similar characteristics to those of AGNs. In this paper, we investigated spectral variations of GRS 1915+105 at timescales down to ˜10 ms. This was made possible for the first time with the Suzaku XIS Parallel-sum clocking (P-sum) mode, which has the CCD energy-resolution as well as a time-resolution of 7.8 ms. Consequently, we found that the variation amplitude of GRS 1915+105 does not drop at the iron K-energy band on any timescales from 0.06 s to 63000 s, and that the entire X-ray flux and the iron feature are independently variable at timescales of hours. These are naturally understood in the framework of the "partial covering" model, in which variation timescales of the continuum flux and partial absorbers are independent. The difference of the energy dependence of the variation amplitude between AGNs and BHBs is presumably due to different mechanisms of the outflow winds, i.e., the partial absorbers are due to UV-line driven winds (AGNs) or thermally driven winds (BHBs).

  7. A method for fast selecting feature wavelengths from the spectral information of crop nitrogen

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Research on a method for fast selecting feature wavelengths from the nitrogen spectral information is necessary, which can determine the nitrogen content of crops. Based on the uniformity of uniform design, this paper proposed an improved particle swarm optimization (PSO) method. The method can ch...

  8. Numerical calculations of spectral turnover and synchrotron self-absorption in CSS and GPS radio sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeyakumar, S.

    2016-06-01

    The dependence of the turnover frequency on the linear size is presented for a sample of Giga-hertz Peaked Spectrum and Compact Steep Spectrum radio sources derived from complete samples. The dependence of the luminosity of the emission at the peak frequency with the linear size and the peak frequency is also presented for the galaxies in the sample. The luminosity of the smaller sources evolve strongly with the linear size. Optical depth effects have been included to the 3D model for the radio source of Kaiser to study the spectral turnover. Using this model, the observed trend can be explained by synchrotron self-absorption. The observed trend in the peak-frequency-linear-size plane is not affected by the luminosity evolution of the sources.

  9. Utilizing spatial and spectral features of photoacoustic imaging for ovarian cancer detection and diagnosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hai; Kumavor, Patrick; Salman Alqasemi, Umar; Zhu, Quing

    2015-01-01

    A composite set of ovarian tissue features extracted from photoacoustic spectral data, beam envelope, and co-registered ultrasound and photoacoustic images are used to characterize malignant and normal ovaries using logistic and support vector machine (SVM) classifiers. Normalized power spectra were calculated from the Fourier transform of the photoacoustic beamformed data, from which the spectral slopes and 0-MHz intercepts were extracted. Five features were extracted from the beam envelope and another 10 features were extracted from the photoacoustic images. These 17 features were ranked by their p-values from t-tests on which a filter type of feature selection method was used to determine the optimal feature number for final classification. A total of 169 samples from 19 ex vivo ovaries were randomly distributed into training and testing groups. Both classifiers achieved a minimum value of the mean misclassification error when the seven features with lowest p-values were selected. Using these seven features, the logistic and SVM classifiers obtained sensitivities of 96.39±3.35% and 97.82±2.26%, and specificities of 98.92±1.39% and 100%, respectively, for the training group. For the testing group, logistic and SVM classifiers achieved sensitivities of 92.71±3.55% and 92.64±3.27%, and specificities of 87.52±8.78% and 98.49±2.05%, respectively.

  10. Molar absorptivity (ε) and spectral characteristics of cyanidin-based anthocyanins from red cabbage.

    PubMed

    Ahmadiani, Neda; Robbins, Rebecca J; Collins, Thomas M; Giusti, M Monica

    2016-04-15

    Red cabbage extract contains mono and di-acylated cyanidin (Cy) anthocyanins and is often used as food colorants. Our objectives were to determine the molar absorptivity (ε) of different red cabbage Cy-derivatives and to evaluate their spectral behaviors in acidified methanol (MeOH) and buffers pH 1-9. Major red cabbage anthocyanins were isolated using a semi-preparatory HPLC, dried and weighed. Pigments were dissolved in MeOH and diluted with either MeOH (0.1% HCl) or buffers to obtain final concentrations between 5×10(-5) and 1×10(-3) mol/L. Spectra were recorded and ε calculated using Lambert-Beer's law. The ε in acidified MeOH and buffer pH 1 ranged between ~16,000-30,000 and ~13,000-26,000 L/mol cm, respectively. Most pigments showed higher ε in pH 8 than pH 2, and lowest ε between pH 4 and 6. There were bathochromic shifts (81-105 nm) from pH 1 to 8 and hypsochromic shifts from pH 8 to 9 (2-19 nm). Anthocyanins molecular structures and the media were important variables which greatly influenced their ε and spectral behaviors. PMID:26617032

  11. Molar absorptivity (ε) and spectral characteristics of cyanidin-based anthocyanins from red cabbage.

    PubMed

    Ahmadiani, Neda; Robbins, Rebecca J; Collins, Thomas M; Giusti, M Monica

    2016-04-15

    Red cabbage extract contains mono and di-acylated cyanidin (Cy) anthocyanins and is often used as food colorants. Our objectives were to determine the molar absorptivity (ε) of different red cabbage Cy-derivatives and to evaluate their spectral behaviors in acidified methanol (MeOH) and buffers pH 1-9. Major red cabbage anthocyanins were isolated using a semi-preparatory HPLC, dried and weighed. Pigments were dissolved in MeOH and diluted with either MeOH (0.1% HCl) or buffers to obtain final concentrations between 5×10(-5) and 1×10(-3) mol/L. Spectra were recorded and ε calculated using Lambert-Beer's law. The ε in acidified MeOH and buffer pH 1 ranged between ~16,000-30,000 and ~13,000-26,000 L/mol cm, respectively. Most pigments showed higher ε in pH 8 than pH 2, and lowest ε between pH 4 and 6. There were bathochromic shifts (81-105 nm) from pH 1 to 8 and hypsochromic shifts from pH 8 to 9 (2-19 nm). Anthocyanins molecular structures and the media were important variables which greatly influenced their ε and spectral behaviors.

  12. Digital mammography: Mixed feature neural network with spectral entropy decision for detection of microcalcifications

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, B. |; Qian, W.; Clarke, L.P.

    1996-10-01

    A computationally efficient mixed feature based neural network (MFNN) is proposed for the detection of microcalcification clusters (MCC`s) in digitized mammograms. The MFNN employs features computed in both the spatial and spectral domain and uses spectral entropy as a decision parameter. Backpropagation with Kalman Filtering (KF) is employed to allow more efficient network training as required for evaluation of different features, input images, and related error analysis. A previously reported, wavelet-based image-enhancement method is also employed to enhance microcalcification clusters for improved detection. The relative performance of the MFNN for both the raw and enhanced images is evaluated using a common image database of 30 digitized mammograms, with 20 images containing 21 biopsy proven MCC`s and ten normal cases. The computed sensitivity (true positive (TP) detection rate) was 90.1% with an average low false positive (FP) detection of 0.71 MCCs/image for the enhanced images using a modified k-fold validation error estimation technique. The corresponding computed sensitivity for the raw images was reduced to 81.4% and with 0.59 FP`s MCCs/image. A relative comparison to an earlier neural network (NN) design, using only spatially related features, suggests the importance of the addition of spectral domain features when the raw image data are analyzed.

  13. Experimental investigation of X-ray spectral absorption coefficients in heated Al and Ge on the Iskra-5 laser facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bondarenko, S. V.; Garanin, Sergey G.; Zhidkov, N. V.; Pinegin, A. V.; Suslov, N. A.

    2012-01-01

    We set forth the data of experimental investigation of X-ray spectral absorption coefficients in the 1.1 — 1.6 keV photon energy range for Al and Ge specimens bulk heated by soft X-ray radiation. Two experimental techniques are described: with the use of one facility channel and the heating of specimens by the X-ray radiation from a plane burnthrough target, as well as with the use of four channels and the heating by the radiation from two cylindrical targets with internal input of laser radiation. The X-ray radiation absorption coefficients were studied by way of transmission absorption spectroscopy using backlighting X-ray radiation from a point source. The results of investigation of X-ray spectral absorption coefficients on the 1s — 2p transitions in Al atoms and the 2p — 3d transitions in Ge atoms are presented.

  14. Temperature dependence of aggregated structure of β-carotene by absorption spectral experiment and simulation.

    PubMed

    Lu, Liping; Wu, Jie; Wei, Liangshu; Wu, Fang

    2016-12-01

    β-carotene can self-assemble to form J- or H-type aggregate in hydrophilic environments, which is crucial for the proper functioning of biological system. Although several ways controlling the formation of the two types of aggregate in hydrated ethanol have been investigated in recent years, our study provided another way to control whether J- or H- β-carotene was formed and presented a method to investigate the aggregated structure. For this purpose, the aggregates of β-carotene formed at different temperatures were studied by UV-Vis spectra and a computational method based on Frenkel exciton was applied to simulate the absorption spectra to obtain the aggregated structure of the β-carotene. The analysis showed that β-carotene formed weakly coupled H-aggregate at 15°C in 1:1 ethanol-water solvent, and with the increase of temperature it tended to form J-type of aggregate. The absorption spectral simulation based on one-dimensional Frenkel exciton model revealed that good fit with the experiment was obtained with distance between neighbor molecules r=0.82nm, disorder of the system D=1500cm(-1) for H-type and r=1.04nm, D=1800cm(-1) for J-type. PMID:27348046

  15. Temperature dependence of aggregated structure of β-carotene by absorption spectral experiment and simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Liping; Wu, Jie; Wei, Liangshu; Wu, Fang

    2016-12-01

    β-carotene can self-assemble to form J- or H-type aggregate in hydrophilic environments, which is crucial for the proper functioning of biological system. Although several ways controlling the formation of the two types of aggregate in hydrated ethanol have been investigated in recent years, our study provided another way to control whether J- or H- β-carotene was formed and presented a method to investigate the aggregated structure. For this purpose, the aggregates of β-carotene formed at different temperatures were studied by UV-Vis spectra and a computational method based on Frenkel exciton was applied to simulate the absorption spectra to obtain the aggregated structure of the β-carotene. The analysis showed that β-carotene formed weakly coupled H-aggregate at 15 °C in 1:1 ethanol-water solvent, and with the increase of temperature it tended to form J-type of aggregate. The absorption spectral simulation based on one-dimensional Frenkel exciton model revealed that good fit with the experiment was obtained with distance between neighbor molecules r = 0.82 nm, disorder of the system D = 1500 cm- 1 for H-type and r = 1.04 nm, D = 1800 cm- 1 for J-type.

  16. Linking CDOM spectral absorption to dissolved organic carbon concentrations and loadings in boreal estuaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asmala, Eero; Stedmon, Colin A.; Thomas, David N.

    2012-10-01

    The quantity of chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM) and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) in three Finnish estuaries (Karjaanjoki, Kyrönjoki and Kiiminkijoki) was investigated, with respect to predicting DOC concentrations and loadings from spectral CDOM absorption measurements. Altogether 87 samples were collected from three estuarine transects which were studied in three seasons, covering a salinity range between 0 and 6.8, and DOC concentrations from 1572 μmol l-1 in freshwater to 222 μmol l-1 in coastal waters. CDOM absorption coefficient, aCDOM(375) values followed the trend in DOC concentrations across the salinity gradient and ranged from 1.67 to 33.4 m-1. The link between DOC and CDOM was studied using a range of wavelengths and algorithms. Wavelengths between 250 and 270 nm gave the best predictions with single linear regression. Total dissolved iron was found to influence the prediction in wavelengths above 520 nm. Despite significant seasonal and spatial differences in DOC-CDOM models, a universal relationship was tested with an independent data set and found to be robust. DOC and CDOM yields (loading/catchment area) from the catchments ranged from 1.98 to 5.44 g C m-2 yr-1, and 1.67 to 11.5 aCDOM(375) yr-1, respectively.

  17. Development of a quantitative basis for selection of spectral features in a vegetation monitoring system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phinney, D. E.; Smith, J. H.; Trichel, M. C.

    1984-01-01

    The development of an objective methodology for evaluation of alternative Landsat data preprocessing options, spectral transform features for monitoring vegetation, and feature summarization algorithms is presented. Based on estimates of spectral separability between a target class and its confusion classes, analysis of variance techniques are used to evaluate potential design options for large scale vegetation monitoring systems. Case studies are presented for early season and through the season spring small grains separation and for barley/other spring small grains separation. It is concluded that a basis for efficient, objective selection among alternative feature extraction approaches has been established for the large scale vegetation mapping/inventory problem. Although the approach has been demonstrated for the unitemporal class separability case, extensions to the multitemporal case are under development.

  18. [Classification of hyperspectral imagery based on ant colony compositely optimizing SVM in spatial and spectral features].

    PubMed

    Chen, Shan-Jing; Hu, Yi-Hua; Shi, Liang; Wang, Lei; Sun, Du-Juan; Xu, Shi-Long

    2013-08-01

    A novel classification algorithm of hyperspectral imagery based on ant colony compositely optimizing support vector machine in spatial and spectral features was proposed. Two types of virtual ants searched for the bands combination with the maximum class separation distance and heterogeneous samples in spatial and spectral features alternately. The optimal characteristic bands were extracted, and bands redundancy of hyperspectral imagery decreased. The heterogeneous samples were eliminated form the training samples, and the distribution of samples was optimized in feature space. The hyperspectral imagery and training samples which had been optimized were used in classification algorithm of support vector machine, so that the class separation distance was extended and the accuracy of classification was improved. Experimental results demonstrate that the proposed algorithm, which acquires an overall accuracy 95.45% and Kappa coefficient 0.925 2, can obtain greater accuracy than traditional hyperspectral image classification algorithms.

  19. Preliminary study of spectral features of normal and malignant cell cultures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atif, M.; Farooq, W. A.; Siddiqui, Maqsood A.; Al-Khedhairy, Abdulaziz A.

    2016-04-01

    In this study the fluorescence emission spectra of normal and malignant cell cultures were recorded at an excitation wavelength of 290 nm, corresponding to the higher fluorescence intensity at 350 nm (due to tryptophan) of three malignant cells and normal cells. Similarly, Stokes shift spectra were recorded for normal and malignant cell cultures with a shift, Δλ, of 70 nm. The Stokes shift shows the existence of discriminating features between normal and carcinoma cell lines due to the higher concentration of phenylalanine and tryptophan in carcinoma cell lines which are completely absent in normal cell lines. Hence, both the emission spectra and the Stokes shift spectra showed considerably different spectral features between the normal and malignant cells. The preliminary studies indicate the potential application of fluorescence spectroscopy for cancer detection using the spectral features of biofluorophores.

  20. A new method to retrieve spectral absorption coefficient of highly-scattering and weakly-absorbing materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dombrovsky, Leonid A.

    2016-03-01

    A significant uncertainty in the absorption coefficient of highly scattering dispersed materials is typical in the spectral ranges of very weak absorption. The traditional way to identify the main absorption and scattering characteristics of semi-transparent materials is based on spectral measurements of normal-hemispherical reflectance and transmittance for the material sample. Unfortunately this way cannot be used in the case of in vivo measurements of optical properties of biological tissues. A method suggested in the present paper is based on thermal response to the periodic radiative heating of the open surface of a semi-transparent material. It is shown that the period of a variation of the surface temperature is sensitive to the value of an average absorption coefficient in the surface layer. As a result, the monochromatic external irradiation combined with the surface temperature measurements can be used to retrieve the spectral values of absorption coefficient. Possible application of this method to porous semi-transparent ceramics is considered. An example problem is also solved to illustrate the applicability of this method to human skin. The approach suggested enables one to estimate an average absorption coefficient of human skin of a patient just before the thermal processing.

  1. Linking Spectral Features with Composition, Crystallinity, and Roughness Properties of Silica and Implications for Candidate Hydrothermal Systems on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamilton, V. E.; McDowell, M. L.; Berger, J. A.; Cady, S. L.; Knauth, L. P.

    2011-12-01

    We have collected visible to near infrared reflectance (VNIR, ~0.4 - 2.5 um), thermal infrared emissivity (TIR, ~5 - 45 um), SEM, XRD, surface roughness, and petrographic data for 18 silica samples. These rocks (e.g., replacement chert, geyserite, opal-A/-CT) represent a variety of geologic formation environments, including hydrothermal, and have XRD-determined crystallinities ranging from <1 to >10 according to the quartz crystallinity index. Our findings are relevant to the interpretation of orbital and in situ spectral observations of crystalline or amorphous silica on the Martian surface, some of which may have formed in hydrothermal systems. Almost all of our samples' VNIR spectra contain discernible bands. The most common features are related to hydration (H2O and/or OH) of silica (e.g., at ~1.4, 1.9, and 2.2 um). The visibility and strength of these bands is not always constant between spectra from different areas of a sample. Other features include those of carbonate, phyllosilicate, and iron oxide impurities. All of our amorphous silica samples have hydration features in the VNIR, but we note that the absorptions around ~2.2 um can be very weak in amorphous samples relative to features at other wavelengths and relative to ~2.2-um features observed in Martian data, suggesting that some amorphous silica on Mars could go undetected. Deposits containing significant anhydrous, crystalline silica (chert) may be assumed to lack features in the VNIR, but many of our cherts have spectral features and could be misidentified as materials dominated by what is a minor contaminant. Thermal infrared spectra of chert and opaline silica differ from each other as a result of the loss of long-range Si-O order in increasingly amorphous samples. Our samples display a clear trend in TIR band shapes where features attributable to crystalline quartz and amorphous silica are blended in samples with intermediate crystallinities. Most diagnostic TIR spectral features observable in

  2. Spectral Absorption Depth Profile: A Step Forward to Plasmonic Solar Cell Design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hossain, Mohammad K.; Mukhaimer, Ayman W.; Drmosh, Qasem A.

    2016-11-01

    Absorption depth profile, a deterministic and key factor that defines the quality of excitons generation rate in optoelectronic devices, is numerically predicted using finite different time domain analysis. A typical model, nanoparticles array on silicon slab, was devised considering the concept of plasmonic solar cell design. The trend of spectral absorption depth profile distributions at various wavelengths of the solar spectrum, 460 nm, 540 nm, 650 nm, 815 nm, and 1100 nm, was obtained. A stronger and well-distributed absorption profile was obtained at ˜650 nm of the solar spectrum (i.e. ˜1.85 eV, c-Si bandgap), although the absorbing layer was affected more than a half micron depth at shorter wavelengths. Considering the observations obtained from this simulation, we have shown a simple two-step method in fabricating ultra-pure silver (Ag) nanoparticles that can be used as plasmonic nanoscatterers in a thin film solar cell. The morphology and elemental analysis of as-fabricated Ag nanoparticles was confirmed by field emission scanning electron microscope (FESEM) and FESEM-coupled electron diffraction spectroscopy. The size of the as-fabricated Ag nanoparticles was found to range from 50 nm to 150 nm in diameter. Further investigations on structural and optical properties of the as-fabricated specimen were carried out using ultraviolet-visible (UV-Vis) absorption, photoluminesce, and x-ray diffraction (XRD). Preferential growth of ZnO along {002} was confirmed by XRD pattern that was more intense and broadened at increasing annealing temperatures. The lattice parameter c was found to increase, whereas grain size increased with increasing annealing temperature. The optical bandgap was also observed to decrease from 3.31 eV to 3.25 eV at increasing annealing temperatures through UV-Vis measurements. This parallel investigation on optical properties by simulation is in line with experimental studies and, in fact, facilitates devising optimum process cost for

  3. Spectral Absorption Depth Profile: A Step Forward to Plasmonic Solar Cell Design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hossain, Mohammad K.; Mukhaimer, Ayman W.; Drmosh, Qasem A.

    2016-07-01

    Absorption depth profile, a deterministic and key factor that defines the quality of excitons generation rate in optoelectronic devices, is numerically predicted using finite different time domain analysis. A typical model, nanoparticles array on silicon slab, was devised considering the concept of plasmonic solar cell design. The trend of spectral absorption depth profile distributions at various wavelengths of the solar spectrum, 460 nm, 540 nm, 650 nm, 815 nm, and 1100 nm, was obtained. A stronger and well-distributed absorption profile was obtained at ˜650 nm of the solar spectrum (i.e. ˜1.85 eV, c-Si bandgap), although the absorbing layer was affected more than a half micron depth at shorter wavelengths. Considering the observations obtained from this simulation, we have shown a simple two-step method in fabricating ultra-pure silver (Ag) nanoparticles that can be used as plasmonic nanoscatterers in a thin film solar cell. The morphology and elemental analysis of as-fabricated Ag nanoparticles was confirmed by field emission scanning electron microscope (FESEM) and FESEM-coupled electron diffraction spectroscopy. The size of the as-fabricated Ag nanoparticles was found to range from 50 nm to 150 nm in diameter. Further investigations on structural and optical properties of the as-fabricated specimen were carried out using ultraviolet-visible (UV-Vis) absorption, photoluminesce, and x-ray diffraction (XRD). Preferential growth of ZnO along {002} was confirmed by XRD pattern that was more intense and broadened at increasing annealing temperatures. The lattice parameter c was found to increase, whereas grain size increased with increasing annealing temperature. The optical bandgap was also observed to decrease from 3.31 eV to 3.25 eV at increasing annealing temperatures through UV-Vis measurements. This parallel investigation on optical properties by simulation is in line with experimental studies and, in fact, facilitates devising optimum process cost for

  4. Study on the Relationship between the Depth of Spectral Absorption and the Content of the Mineral Composition of Biotite.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chang-bao; Zhang, Chen-xi; Liu, Fang; Jiang, Qi-gang

    2015-09-01

    The mineral composition of rock is one of the main factors affecting the spectral reflectance characteristics, and it's an important reason for generating various rock characteristic spectra. This study choose the rock samples provided by Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) (including all kinds of mineral percentage of rocks, and spectral reflectances range from 0.35 to 2.50 μm wavelength measured by ASD spectrometer), and the various types of mineral spectral reflectances contained within the rocks are the essential data. Using the spectral linear mixture model of rocks and their minerals, firstly, a simulation study on the mixture of rock and mineral composition is achieved, the experimental results indicate that rock spectral curves using the model which based on the theory of the linear mixture are able to simulate better and preserve the absorption characteristics of various mineral components well. Then, 8 samples which contain biotite mineral are picked from the rock spectra of igneous, biotite contents and the absorption depth characteristics of spectral reflection at 2.332 μm, furthermore, a variety of linear and nonlinear normal statistical models are used to fit the relationship between the depth of absorption spectra and the content of the mineral composition of biotite, finally, a new simulation model is build up with the Growth and the Exponential curve model, and a statistical response relationship between the spectral absorption depth and the rock mineral contents is simulated by using the new model, the fitting results show that the correlation coefficient reaches 0.9984 and the standard deviation is 0.572, although the standard deviation using Growth and Exponential model is less than the two model combined with the new model fitting the standard deviation, the correlation coefficient of the new model had significantly increased, which suggesting that the, new model fitting effect is closer to the measured values of samples, it proves that the

  5. Study on the Relationship between the Depth of Spectral Absorption and the Content of the Mineral Composition of Biotite.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chang-bao; Zhang, Chen-xi; Liu, Fang; Jiang, Qi-gang

    2015-09-01

    The mineral composition of rock is one of the main factors affecting the spectral reflectance characteristics, and it's an important reason for generating various rock characteristic spectra. This study choose the rock samples provided by Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) (including all kinds of mineral percentage of rocks, and spectral reflectances range from 0.35 to 2.50 μm wavelength measured by ASD spectrometer), and the various types of mineral spectral reflectances contained within the rocks are the essential data. Using the spectral linear mixture model of rocks and their minerals, firstly, a simulation study on the mixture of rock and mineral composition is achieved, the experimental results indicate that rock spectral curves using the model which based on the theory of the linear mixture are able to simulate better and preserve the absorption characteristics of various mineral components well. Then, 8 samples which contain biotite mineral are picked from the rock spectra of igneous, biotite contents and the absorption depth characteristics of spectral reflection at 2.332 μm, furthermore, a variety of linear and nonlinear normal statistical models are used to fit the relationship between the depth of absorption spectra and the content of the mineral composition of biotite, finally, a new simulation model is build up with the Growth and the Exponential curve model, and a statistical response relationship between the spectral absorption depth and the rock mineral contents is simulated by using the new model, the fitting results show that the correlation coefficient reaches 0.9984 and the standard deviation is 0.572, although the standard deviation using Growth and Exponential model is less than the two model combined with the new model fitting the standard deviation, the correlation coefficient of the new model had significantly increased, which suggesting that the, new model fitting effect is closer to the measured values of samples, it proves that the

  6. Feature reduction using a singular value decomposition for the iterative guided spectral class rejection hybrid classifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, Rhonda D.; Watson, Layne T.; Wynne, Randolph H.; Blinn, Christine E.

    Feature reduction in a remote sensing dataset is often desirable to decrease the processing time required to perform a classification and improve overall classification accuracy. This paper introduces a feature reduction method based on the singular value decomposition (SVD). This SVD-based feature reduction method reduces the storage and processing requirements of the SVD by utilizing a training dataset. This feature reduction technique was applied to training data from two multitemporal datasets of Landsat TM/ETM+ imagery acquired over a forested area in Virginia, USA and Rondônia, Brazil. Subsequent parallel iterative guided spectral class rejection (pIGSCR) forest/non-forest classifications were performed to determine the quality of the feature reduction. The classifications of the Virginia data were five times faster using SVD-based feature reduction without affecting the classification accuracy. Feature reduction using the SVD was also compared to feature reduction using principal components analysis (PCA). The highest average accuracies for the Virginia dataset (88.34%) and for the Rondônia dataset (93.31%) were achieved using the SVD. The results presented here indicate that SVD-based feature reduction can produce statistically significantly better classifications than PCA.

  7. A high spectral resolution VLA search for H I absorption towards A496, A1795, and A2584

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    O'Dea, Christopher P.; Gallimore, Jack F.; Baum, Stefi A.

    1995-01-01

    In this paper, we present the results of a Very Large Array (VLA) search for H I absorption with high spectral resolution (1.6 km/s) towards A496, A1795, A2584, and A2597. These observations are well matched to the properties of cold, optically thick H I clouds, where the line width is given by the width of an individual cloud rather than the dispersion in an ensemble of clouds. We do not detect any H I absorption with narrow linewidths in these clusters. Our limits mainly apply to clouds which are larger than a few tenths parsec-i.e., if the clouds are much smaller than the background radio source and have a low covering factor in velocity space, they could still escape detection. The estimated limits on column density (for clouds in this regime of parameter space) are 2-3 orders of magnitude less than the 10(exp 21)/sq cm required to explain the x-ray absorption seen in some cooling flow clusters. The combination of our high spectral resolution H I absorption searches with the existing lower spectral resolution H I absorption searches and the searches for H I emission makes it unlikely that atomic hydrogen is the dominant component of the cold x-ray absorbing gas in the inter-cloud medium (ICM).

  8. Application of spatial features to satellite land-use analysis. [spectral signature variations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, J.; Hornung, R.; Berry, J.

    1975-01-01

    A Level I land-use analysis of selected training areas of the Colorado Front Range was carried out using digital ERTS-A satellite imagery. Level I land-use categories included urban, agriculture (irrigated and dryland farming), rangeland, and forests. The spatial variations in spectral response for these land-use classes were analyzed using discrete two-dimensional Fourier transforms to isolate and extract spatial features. Analysis was performed on ERTS frame 1352-17134 (July 10, 1973) and frame number 1388-17131 (August 15, 1973). On training sets, spatial features yielded 80 to 100 percent classification accuracies with commission errors ranging from 0 to 20 percent.

  9. Adaptive spectral window sizes for extraction of diagnostic features from optical spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kan, Chih-Wen; Lee, Andy Y.; Nieman, Linda T.; Sokolov, Konstantin; Markey, Mia K.

    2010-07-01

    We present an approach to adaptively adjust the spectral window sizes for optical spectra feature extraction. Previous studies extracted features from spectral windows of a fixed width. In our algorithm, piecewise linear regression is used to adaptively adjust the window sizes to find the maximum window size with reasonable linear fit with the spectrum. This adaptive windowing technique ensures the signal linearity in defined windows; hence, the adaptive windowing technique retains more diagnostic information while using fewer windows. This method was tested on a data set of diffuse reflectance spectra of oral mucosa lesions. Eight features were extracted from each window. We performed classifications using linear discriminant analysis with cross-validation. Using windowing techniques results in better classification performance than not using windowing. The area under the receiver-operating-characteristics curve for windowing techniques was greater than a nonwindowing technique for both normal versus mild dysplasia (MD) plus severe high-grade dysplasia or carcinama (SD) (MD+SD) and benign versus MD+SD. Although adaptive and fixed-size windowing perform similarly, adaptive windowing utilizes significantly fewer windows than fixed-size windows (number of windows per spectrum: 8 versus 16). Because adaptive windows retain most diagnostic information while reducing the number of windows needed for feature extraction, our results suggest that it isolates unique diagnostic features in optical spectra.

  10. Origin of additional spectral features in modulated reflectance spectra of 2-dimensional semiconductor systems

    SciTech Connect

    Mukherjee, Amlan; Ghosh, Sandip

    2014-03-28

    High resolution photoreflectance (PR) spectroscopy study on a single GaAs/AlGaAs quantum well representing a two-dimensional (2D) system, shows additional distinct spectral features on the high energy side of the first confined heavy-hole and light-hole exciton transitions. The PR experiments involved a special dual detection technique which significantly improved the measurement sensitivity. Photoluminescence excitation spectroscopy data on the sample showed broadened step-like features around these energies. A detailed lineshape analysis, including first principles simulations, was performed to understand the origins of these additional PR spectral features. They are shown to arise primarily from inhomogeneously broadened first excited state transition of the excitons, rather than from a change in the joint density of states at the exciton continuum edge. The analysis suggests that such features are more likely in the case of 2D excitons as compared to 3D excitons in bulk material. Apart from its significance for post-growth characterization, identification of these additional PR features enables direct estimation of the exciton binding energy.

  11. The Physical Nature of the Sharp Spectral Feature at 7 keV Detected in 1H0707-495

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brandt, Niel

    2005-01-01

    XMM-Newton acquired data on the accepted target, 1H0707-495, on 2002 October 13 during revolution 0521. The observation was successful, with only about 5% data loss due to background flaring. We compared the data from this observation with earlier data taken on this Narrow-Line Seyfert 1 about two years before, performing interpretation studies in the context of the partial-covering model. Our second longer observation once again displays a sharp (< 200 eV) spectral drop above 7 keV. However, in comparison to the first observation, the edge depth and energy have changed significantly. In addition to changes in the edge parameters, the high-energy spectrum appears steeper. The changes in the high-energy spectrum can be adequately explained in terms of a partial-covering absorber out-flowing from the central region. The low-energy spectrum also shows significant long-term spectral variability, including (1) a substantial increase in the disk temperature, (2) detection of an approx. 0.9 keV emission feature, and (3) the presence of ionized absorption that was detected during the ASCA mission. The large increase in disk temperature, and the more modest rise in luminosity, can be understood if we consider a slim-disk model for 1H0707-495. In addition, the higher disk luminosity could be the driving force behind the outflow and the re-appearance of an ionized medium during the second XMM-Newton observation.

  12. Retrieval Using Texture Features in High Resolution Multi-spectral Satellite Imagery

    SciTech Connect

    Newsam, S D; Kamath, C

    2004-01-22

    Texture features have long been used in remote sensing applications to represent and retrieve image regions similar to a query region. Various representations of texture have been proposed based on the Fourier power spectrum, spatial co-occurrence, wavelets, Gabor filters, etc. These representations vary in their computational complexity and their suitability for representing different region types. Much of the work done thus far has focused on panchromatic imagery at low to moderate spatial resolutions, such as images from Landsat 1-7 which have a resolution of 15-30 m/pixel, and from SPOT 1-5 which have a resolution of 2.5-20 m/pixel. However, it is not clear which texture representation works best for the new classes of high resolution panchromatic (60-100 cm/pixel) and multi-spectral (4 bands for red, green, blue, and near infra-red at 2.4-4 m/pixel) imagery. It is also not clear how the different spectral bands should be combined. In this paper, we investigate the retrieval performance of several different texture representations using multi-spectral satellite images from IKONOS. A query-by-example framework, along with a manually chosen ground truth dataset, allows different combinations of texture representations and spectral bands to be compared. We focus on the specific problem of retrieving inhabited regions from images of urban and rural scenes. Preliminary results show that (1) the use of all spectral bands improves the retrieval performance, and (2) co-occurrence, wavelet and Gabor texture features perform comparably.

  13. Measurement of the Spectral Absorption of Liquid Water in Melting Snow With an Imaging Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, Robert O.; Dozier, Jeff

    1995-01-01

    Melting of the snowpack is a critical parameter that drives aspects of the hydrology in regions of the Earth where snow accumulates seasonally. New techniques for measurement of snow melt over regional scales offer the potential to improve monitoring and modeling of snow-driven hydrological processes. In this paper we present the results of measuring the spectral absorption of liquid water in a melting snowpack with the Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS). AVIRIS data were acquired over Mammoth Mountain, in east central California on 21 May 1994 at 18:35 UTC. The air temperature at 2926 m on Mammoth Mountain at site A was measured at 15-minute intervals during the day preceding the AVIRIS data acquisition. At this elevation. the air temperature did not drop below freezing the night of the May 20 and had risen to 6 degrees Celsius by the time of the overflight on May 21. These temperature conditions support the presence of melting snow at the surface as the AVIRIS data were acquired.

  14. Measurement of the spectral absorption of liquid water in melting snow with an imaging spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, Robert O.; Dozier, Jeff

    1995-01-01

    Melting of the snowpack is a critical parameter that drives aspects of the hydrology in regions of the earth where snow accumulates seasonally. New techniques for measurement of snow melt over regional scales offer the potential to improve monitoring and modeling of snow-driven hydrological processes. We present the results of measuring the spectral absorption of liquid water in a melting snowpack with the Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS). AVIRIS data were acquired over Mammoth Mountain, in east central California on 21 May 1994 at 18:35 UTC. The air temperature at 2926 m on Mammoth Mountain at site A was measured at 15-minute intervals during the day preceding the AVIRIS data acquisition. At this elevation, the air temperature did not drop below freezing the night of May 20 and had risen to 6 degrees Celsius by the time of the overflight on May 21. These temperature conditions support the presence of melting snow at the surface as the AVIRIS data were acquired.

  15. Temporal features of spectral integration in the inferior colliculus: effects of stimulus duration and rise time.

    PubMed

    Gans, Donald; Sheykholeslami, Kianoush; Peterson, Diana Coomes; Wenstrup, Jeffrey

    2009-07-01

    This report examines temporal features of facilitation and suppression that underlie spectrally integrative responses to complex vocal signals. Auditory responses were recorded from 160 neurons in the inferior colliculus (IC) of awake mustached bats. Sixty-two neurons showed combination-sensitive facilitation: responses to best frequency (BF) signals were facilitated by well-timed signals at least an octave lower in frequency, in the range 16-31 kHz. Temporal features and strength of facilitation were generally unaffected by changes in duration of facilitating signals from 4 to 31 ms. Changes in stimulus rise time from 0.5 to 5.0 ms had little effect on facilitatory strength. These results suggest that low frequency facilitating inputs to high BF neurons have phasic-on temporal patterns and are responsive to stimulus rise times over the tested range. We also recorded from 98 neurons showing low-frequency (11-32 kHz) suppression of higher BF responses. Effects of changing duration were related to the frequency of suppressive signals. Signals<23 kHz usually evoked suppression sustained throughout signal duration. This and other features of such suppression are consistent with a cochlear origin that results in masking of responses to higher, near-BF signal frequencies. Signals in the 23- to 30-kHz range-frequencies in the first sonar harmonic-generally evoked phasic suppression of BF responses. This may result from neural inhibitory interactions within and below IC. In many neurons, we observed two or more forms of the spectral interactions described here. Thus IC neurons display temporally and spectrally complex responses to sound that result from multiple spectral interactions at different levels of the ascending auditory pathway.

  16. Absorption features in the 5-8 micron spectra of protostars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tielens, A. G. G. M.; Allamandola, L. J.; Bregman, J.; Goebel, J.; Witteborn, F. C.; Dhendecourt, L. B.

    1984-01-01

    High signal-to-noise ratio spectra in the range of 5-8 microns of four sources embedded in molecular clouds are examined using low-temperature laboratory measurements of the 5-8-micron spectra of simple molecules and their mixtures. The absorption, apparent in all four sources, is characterized by highly distinct features ranging from two relatively narrow bands at 6.0 and 6.8 microns in W33A to a broad, shallow, and partially structured feature extending from 5.2 to 7.8 microns in Mon R2-IRS2, BN, and NGC2264. The first feature (W33A) is explained by the OH bending mode in H2O and the CH deformation modes in saturated hydrocarbons; while the second feature (Mon R2-IRS2-type) is explained by the presence of a mixture of saturated and unsaturated hydrocarbons possibly containing strongly electronegative groups.

  17. First-principles calculation of spectral features, chemical shift and absolute threshold of ELNES and XANES using a plane wave pseudopotential method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizoguchi, Teruyasu; Tanaka, Isao; Gao, Shang-Peng; Pickard, Chris J.

    2009-03-01

    Spectral features, chemical shifts, and absolute thresholds of electron energy loss near-edge structure (ELNES) and x-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) for selected compounds, i.e. TiO2 (rutile), TiO2 (anatase), SrTiO3, Ti2O3, Al2O3, AlN and β-Ga2O3, were calculated by a plane wave pseudopotential method. Experimental ELNES/XANES of those compounds were well reproduced when an excited pseudopotential, which includes a core hole, was used. In addition to the spectral features, it was found that chemical shifts among different compounds were also reproduced by correcting the contribution of the excited pseudopotentials to the energy of the core orbital.

  18. Recovery of x-ray absorption spectral profile in etched TiO{sub 2} thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Sano, Keiji; Niibe, Masahito; Kawakami, Retsuo; Nakano, Yoshitaka

    2015-05-15

    Near edge x-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectra of plasma-etched TiO{sub 2} thin films were observed using the total fluorescence yield method involving visible emission. The disrupted spectrum recovered its as-grown (nonetched) profile, upon soft x-ray (SX) irradiation. This recovery was investigated by ultraviolet (UV) irradiation, spatial distribution measurements, exposing recovered samples to air, and NEXAFS measurements of ultrafine TiO{sub 2} particles. The spectral profile recovered upon UV irradiation, and at sample positions outside of the SX irradiation site. The recovered spectral profiles were disrupted again, upon exposure to air. Nonetched ultrafine TiO{sub 2} particles also exhibited a disrupted spectral profile, which was recovered upon SX irradiation. The spectral recovery is explained by a model involving electrons trapped in oxygen vacancies generated by etching.

  19. Iron K Features in the Quasar E 1821+643: Evidence for Gravitationally Redshifted Absorption?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yaqoob, Tahir; Serlemitsos, Peter

    2005-01-01

    We report a Chandra high-energy grating detection of a narrow, redshifted absorption line superimposed on the red wing of a broad Fe K line in the z = 0.297 quasar E 1821+643. The absorption line is detected at a confidence level, estimated by two different methods, in the range approx. 2 - 3 sigma. Although the detection significance is not high enough to exclude a non-astrophysical origin, accounting for the absorption feature when modeling the X-ray spectrum implies that the Fe-K emission line is broad, and consistent with an origin in a relativistic accretion disk. Ignoring the apparent absorption feature leads to the conclusion that the Fe-K emission line is narrower, and also affects the inferred peak energy of the line (and hence the inferred ionization state of Fe). If the absorption line (at approx. 6.2 keV in the quasar frame) is real, we argue that it could be due to gravitationally redshifted Fe XXV or Fe XXVI resonance absorption within approx. 10 - 20 gravitational radii of the putative central black hole. The absorption line is not detected in earlier ASCA and Chandra low-energy grating observations, but the absorption line is not unequivocally ruled out by these data. The Chandra high-energy grating Fe-K emission line is consistent with an origin predominantly in Fe I-XVII or so. In an ASCA observation eight years earlier, the Fe-K line peaked at approx. 6.6 keV, closer to the energies of He-like Fe triplet lines. Further, in a Chandra low-energy grating observation the Fe-K line profile was double-peaked, one peak corresponding to Fe I-XVII or so, the other peak to Fe XXVI Ly alpha. Such a wide range in ionization state of Fe is not ruled out by the HEG and ASCA data either, and is suggestive of a complex structure for the line-emitter.

  20. Detection of Variable Gaseous Absorption Features in the Debris Disks Around Young A-type Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montgomery, Sharon L.; Welsh, Barry Y.

    2012-10-01

    We present medium resolution (R = 60,000) absorption measurements of the interstellar Ca II K line observed towards five nearby A-type stars (49 Ceti, 5 Vul, ι Cyg, 2 And, and HD 223884) suspected of possessing circumstellar gas debris disks. The stars were observed on a nightly basis during a six night observing run on the 2.1-meter Otto Struve telescope at the McDonald Observatory, Texas. We have detected nightly changes in the absorption strength of the Ca II K line observed near the stellar radial velocity in three of the stars (49 Ceti, i Cyg and HD 223884). Such changes in absorption suggest the presence of a circumstellar (atomic) gas disk around these stars. In addition to the absorption changes in the main Ca II K line profile, we have also observed weak transient absorption features that randomly appear at redshifted velocities in the spectra of 49 Ceti, 5 Vul, and 2 And. These absorption features are most probably associated with the presence of falling evaporated bodies (exo-comets) that liberate evaporating gas on their approach to the central star. This now brings the total number of systems in which exocomet activity has been observed at Ca II or Na I wavelengths on a nightly basis to seven (β Pic, HR 10, HD 85905, β Car, 49 Ceti, 5 Vul, and 2 And), with 2 And exhibiting weaker and less frequent changes. All of the disk systems presently known to exhibit either type of short-term variability in Ca II K line absorption are rapidly rotating A-type stars (V sin i > 120 km s-1). Most exhibit mid-IR excesses, and many of them are very young (< 20 Myr), thus supporting the argument that many of them are transitional objects between Herbig Ae and "Vega-like" A-type stars with more tenuous circumstellar disks. No mid-IR excess (due to the presence of a dust disk) has yet been detected around either 2 And or HD 223884, both of which have been classified as λ Boötis-type stars. This may indicate that the observed changes in gas absorption for these two

  1. Efficient integration of spectral features for vehicle tracking utilizing an adaptive sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uzkent, Burak; Hoffman, Matthew J.; Vodacek, Anthony

    2015-03-01

    Object tracking in urban environments is an important and challenging problem that is traditionally tackled using visible and near infrared wavelengths. By inserting extended data such as spectral features of the objects one can improve the reliability of the identification process. However, huge increase in data created by hyperspectral imaging is usually prohibitive. To overcome the complexity problem, we propose a persistent air-to-ground target tracking system inspired by a state-of-the-art, adaptive, multi-modal sensor. The adaptive sensor is capable of providing panchromatic images as well as the spectra of desired pixels. This addresses the data challenge of hyperspectral tracking by only recording spectral data as needed. Spectral likelihoods are integrated into a data association algorithm in a Bayesian fashion to minimize the likelihood of misidentification. A framework for controlling spectral data collection is developed by incorporating motion segmentation information and prior information from a Gaussian Sum filter (GSF) movement predictions from a multi-model forecasting set. An intersection mask of the surveillance area is extracted from OpenStreetMap source and incorporated into the tracking algorithm to perform online refinement of multiple model set. The proposed system is tested using challenging and realistic scenarios generated in an adverse environment.

  2. On the Putative Detection of z > 0 X-Ray Absorption Features in the Spectrum of Mrk 421

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasmussen, Andrew P.; Kahn, Steven M.; Paerels, Frits; Herder, Jan Willem den; Kaastra, Jelle; de Vries, Cor

    2007-02-01

    In a series of papers, Nicastro et al. have reported the detection of z>0 O VII absorption features in the spectrum of Mrk 421 obtained with the Chandra Low Energy Transmission Grating Spectrometer (LETGS). We evaluate this result in the context of a high-quality spectrum of the same source obtained with the Reflection Grating Spectrometer (RGS) on XMM-Newton. The data comprise over 955 ks of usable exposure time and more than 2.6×104 counts per 50 mÅ at 21.6 Å. We concentrate on the spectrally clean region (21.3 <λ<22.5 ), where sharp features due to the astrophysically abundant O VII may reveal an intervening, warm-hot intergalactic medium (WHIM). We do not confirm detection of any of the intervening systems claimed to date. Rather, we detect only three unsurprising, astrophysically expected features down to the log(Ni)~14.6 (3 σ) sensitivity level. Each of the two purported WHIM features is rejected with a statistical confidence that exceeds that reported for its initial detection. While we cannot rule out the existence of fainter, WHIM related features in these spectra, we suggest that previous discovery claims were premature. A more recent paper by Williams et al. claims to have demonstrated that the RGS data we analyze here do not have the resolution or statistical quality required to confirm or deny the LETGS detections. We show that our analysis resolves the issues encountered by Williams et al. and recovers the full resolution and statistical quality of the RGS data. We highlight the differences between our analysis and those published by Williams et al. as this may explain our disparate conclusions.

  3. Absorption cross-sections of ozone in the ultraviolet and visible spectral regions: Status report 2015

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orphal, Johannes; Staehelin, Johannes; Tamminen, Johanna; Braathen, Geir; De Backer, Marie-Renée; Bais, Alkiviadis; Balis, Dimitris; Barbe, Alain; Bhartia, Pawan K.; Birk, Manfred; Burkholder, James B.; Chance, Kelly; von Clarmann, Thomas; Cox, Anthony; Degenstein, Doug; Evans, Robert; Flaud, Jean-Marie; Flittner, David; Godin-Beekmann, Sophie; Gorshelev, Viktor; Gratien, Aline; Hare, Edward; Janssen, Christof; Kyrölä, Erkki; McElroy, Thomas; McPeters, Richard; Pastel, Maud; Petersen, Michael; Petropavlovskikh, Irina; Picquet-Varrault, Benedicte; Pitts, Michael; Labow, Gordon; Rotger-Languereau, Maud; Leblanc, Thierry; Lerot, Christophe; Liu, Xiong; Moussay, Philippe; Redondas, Alberto; Van Roozendael, Michel; Sander, Stanley P.; Schneider, Matthias; Serdyuchenko, Anna; Veefkind, Pepijn; Viallon, Joële; Viatte, Camille; Wagner, Georg; Weber, Mark; Wielgosz, Robert I.; Zehner, Claus

    2016-09-01

    The activity "Absorption Cross-Sections of Ozone" (ACSO) started in 2008 as a joint initiative of the International Ozone Commission (IO3C), the World Meteorological Organization (WMO) and the IGACO ("Integrated Global Atmospheric Chemistry Observations") O3/UV subgroup to study, evaluate, and recommend the most suitable ozone absorption cross-section laboratory data to be used in atmospheric ozone measurements. The evaluation was basically restricted to ozone absorption cross-sections in the UV range with particular focus on the Huggins band. Up until now, the data of Bass and Paur published in 1985 (BP, 1985) are still officially recommended for such measurements. During the last decade it became obvious that BP (1985) cross-section data have deficits for use in advanced space-borne ozone measurements. At the same time, it was recognized that the origin of systematic differences in ground-based measurements of ozone required further investigation, in particular whether the BP (1985) cross-section data might contribute to these differences. In ACSO, different sets of laboratory ozone absorption cross-section data (including their dependence on temperature) of the group of Reims (France) (Brion et al., 1993, 1998, 1992, 1995, abbreviated as BDM, 1995) and those of Serdyuchenko et al. (2014), and Gorshelev et al. (2014), (abbreviated as SER, 2014) were examined for use in atmospheric ozone measurements in the Huggins band. In conclusion, ACSO recommends: The spectroscopic data of BP (1985) should no longer be used for retrieval of atmospheric ozone measurements. For retrieval of ground-based instruments of total ozone and ozone profile measurements by the Umkehr method performed by Brewer and Dobson instruments data of SER (2014) are recommended to be used. When SER (2014) is used, the difference between total ozone measurements of Brewer and Dobson instruments are very small and the difference between Dobson measurements at AD and CD wavelength pairs are diminished

  4. Stellar parameters of early-M dwarfs from ratios of spectral features at optical wavelengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maldonado, J.; Affer, L.; Micela, G.; Scandariato, G.; Damasso, M.; Stelzer, B.; Barbieri, M.; Bedin, L. R.; Biazzo, K.; Bignamini, A.; Borsa, F.; Claudi, R. U.; Covino, E.; Desidera, S.; Esposito, M.; Gratton, R.; González Hernández, J. I.; Lanza, A. F.; Maggio, A.; Molinari, E.; Pagano, I.; Perger, M.; Pillitteri, I.; Piotto, G.; Poretti, E.; Prisinzano, L.; Rebolo, R.; Ribas, I.; Shkolnik, E.; Southworth, J.; Sozzetti, A.; Suárez Mascareño, A.

    2015-05-01

    Context. Low-mass stars have been recognised as promising targets in the search for rocky, small planets with the potential of supporting life. As a consequence, Doppler search programmes using high-resolution spectrographs like HARPS or HARPS-N are providing huge quantities of optical spectra of M dwarfs. However, determining the stellar parameters of M dwarfs using optical spectra has proven to be challenging. Aims: We aim to calibrate empirical relationships to determine accurate stellar parameters for early-M dwarfs (spectral types M0-M4.5) using the same spectra as those that are used for radial velocity determinations, without the necessity of acquiring IR spectra or relying on atmospheric models and/or photometric calibrations. Methods: Our methodology consists of using ratios of pseudo-equivalent widths of spectral features as a temperature diagnostic, a technique frequently used in solar-type stars. Stars with effective temperatures obtained from interferometric estimates of their radii are used as calibrators. Empirical calibrations for the spectral type are also provided. Combinations of features and ratios of features are used to derive calibrations for the stellar metallicity. Our methods are then applied to a large sample of M dwarfs that are currently being observed in the framework of the HARPS GTO search for extrasolar planets. The derived temperatures and metallicities are used together with photometric estimates of mass, radius, and surface gravity to calibrate empirical relationships for these parameters. Results: A long list of spectral features in the optical spectra of early-M dwarfs was identified. This list shows that the pseudo-equivalent width of roughly 43% of the features is strongly anticorrelated with the effective temperature. The correlation with the stellar metallicity is weaker. A total of 112 temperature sensitive ratios were identified and calibrated over the range 3100-3950 K, providing effective temperatures with typical

  5. AFREET: HUMAN-INSPIRED SPATIO-SPECTRAL FEATURE CONSTRUCTION FOR IMAGE CLASSIFICATION WITH SUPPORT VECTOR MACHINES

    SciTech Connect

    S. PERKINS; N. HARVEY

    2001-02-01

    The authors examine the task of pixel-by-pixel classification of the multispectral and grayscale images typically found in remote-sensing and medical applications. Simple machine learning techniques have long been applied to remote-sensed image classification, but almost always using purely spectral information about each pixel. Humans can often outperform these systems, and make extensive use of spatial context to make classification decisions. They present AFREET: an SVM-based learning system which attempts to automatically construct and refine spatio-spectral features in a somewhat human-inspired fashion. Comparisons with traditionally used machine learning techniques show that AFREET achieves significantly higher performance. The use of spatial context is particularly useful for medical imagery, where multispectral images are still rare.

  6. Absorption and scattering imaging of tissue with steady-state second-differential spectral-analysis tomography.

    PubMed

    Xu, Heng; Pogue, Brian W; Dehghani, Hamid; Paulsen, Keith D

    2004-09-01

    A novel approach to reconstructing both the absorption and the scattering properties of a turbid medium simultaneously from steady-state broadband spectral measurements is presented that utilizes second-differential fitting to the water spectrum to estimate the optical path length in tissue. Theoretical and experimental evidence is provided to demonstrate the robust accuracy of the spectroscopy approach and reconstructed absorption images. The steady-state broadband CCD system has the potential to provide accurate chromophore imaging without the technological complexity of time- or frequency-domain systems.

  7. Spectral analysis of water samples using modulated resonance features for monitoring of public water resources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lambrakos, S. G.; Yapijakis, C.; Aiken, D.; Shabaev, A.; Ramsey, S.; Peak, J.

    2015-05-01

    Hyperspectral analysis of water samples taken from public water resources in the New York City metro area has demonstrated the potential application of this type of analysis for water monitoring, treatment and evaluation prior to filtration. Hyperspectral monitoring of contaminants with respect to types and relative concentrations requires tracking statistical profiles of water contaminants in terms of spatial-temporal distributions of electromagnetic absorption spectra ranging from the ultraviolet to infrared, which are associated with specific water resources. To achieve this, it is necessary to establish correlation between hyperspectral signatures and types of contaminants to be found within specific water resources. Correlation between absorption spectra and changes in chemical and physical characteristics of contaminants requires sufficient sensitivity. The present study examines the sensitivity of modulated resonance features with respect to characteristics of water contaminants for hyperspectral analysis of water samples.

  8. Changes on image texture features of breakfast flakes cereals during water absorption.

    PubMed

    Medina, Wenceslao T; Quevedo, Roberto A; Aguilera, José M

    2013-02-01

    Normally breakfast cereal flakes are consumed by pouring them into a bowl and covering them with fresh or cold milk. During this process the liquid uptake causes changes in the surface and internal matrix of breakfast cereals that influence texture and integrity. Some breakfast cereal as flakes have a translucent structure that could provide information about the solid matrix and air cells and how they change during liquid absorption. The objective of the study was to assess the image texture changes of corn flakes and frosted flakes during water absorption at 5, 15 and 25 °C, employing 11 image feature textures extracted from grey-level co-occurrence matrix and grey-level run length matrix (at three directions) and to relate the fractal dimension (FD) of images with rupture force (RF) reduction during soaking of both flakes at 5 °C. The most relevant result from principal component analysis calculated with a matrix of 54 (soaking times) × 22 (texture features), shows that it was possible to distinguish an isolated group consisting of different soaking times at the same water temperature in each breakfast cereal flakes evaluated, corroborating that superficial liquid imbibition is important during the liquid absorption process when flakes are soaked. Furthermore, standardized FD could be related to RF in the period when samples tend to search for an equilibrium state.

  9. Changes on image texture features of breakfast flakes cereals during water absorption.

    PubMed

    Medina, Wenceslao T; Quevedo, Roberto A; Aguilera, José M

    2013-02-01

    Normally breakfast cereal flakes are consumed by pouring them into a bowl and covering them with fresh or cold milk. During this process the liquid uptake causes changes in the surface and internal matrix of breakfast cereals that influence texture and integrity. Some breakfast cereal as flakes have a translucent structure that could provide information about the solid matrix and air cells and how they change during liquid absorption. The objective of the study was to assess the image texture changes of corn flakes and frosted flakes during water absorption at 5, 15 and 25 °C, employing 11 image feature textures extracted from grey-level co-occurrence matrix and grey-level run length matrix (at three directions) and to relate the fractal dimension (FD) of images with rupture force (RF) reduction during soaking of both flakes at 5 °C. The most relevant result from principal component analysis calculated with a matrix of 54 (soaking times) × 22 (texture features), shows that it was possible to distinguish an isolated group consisting of different soaking times at the same water temperature in each breakfast cereal flakes evaluated, corroborating that superficial liquid imbibition is important during the liquid absorption process when flakes are soaked. Furthermore, standardized FD could be related to RF in the period when samples tend to search for an equilibrium state. PMID:23345324

  10. Quantitative filter technique measurements of spectral light absorption by aquatic particles using a portable integrating cavity absorption meter (QFT-ICAM).

    PubMed

    Röttgers, Rüdiger; Doxaran, David; Dupouy, Cecile

    2016-01-25

    The accurate determination of light absorption coefficients of particles in water, especially in very oligotrophic oceanic areas, is still a challenging task. Concentrating aquatic particles on a glass fiber filter and using the Quantitative Filter Technique (QFT) is a common practice. Its routine application is limited by the necessary use of high performance spectrophotometers, distinct problems induced by the strong scattering of the filters and artifacts induced by freezing and storing samples. Measurements of the sample inside a large integrating sphere reduce scattering effects and direct field measurements avoid artifacts due to sample preservation. A small, portable, Integrating Cavity Absorption Meter setup (QFT-ICAM) is presented, that allows rapid measurements of a sample filter. The measurement technique takes into account artifacts due to chlorophyll-a fluorescence. The QFT-ICAM is shown to be highly comparable to similar measurements in laboratory spectrophotometers, in terms of accuracy, precision, and path length amplification effects. No spectral artifacts were observed when compared to measurement of samples in suspension, whereas freezing and storing of sample filters induced small losses of water-soluble pigments (probably phycoerythrins). Remaining problems in determining the particulate absorption coefficient with the QFT-ICAM are strong sample-to-sample variations of the path length amplification, as well as fluorescence by pigments that is emitted in a different spectral region than that of chlorophyll-a.

  11. Features of the spectral dependences of transmittance of organic semiconductors based on tert-butyl substituted lutetium phthalocyanine molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Belogorokhov, I. A.; Tikhonov, E. V.; Dronov, M. A.; Belogorokhova, L. I.; Ryabchikov, Yu. V.; Tomilova, L. G.; Khokhlov, D. R.

    2011-11-15

    Vibronic properties of organic semiconductors based on tert-butyl substituted phthalocyanine lutetium diphthalocyanine molecules are studied by IR and Raman spectroscopy. It is shown that substitution of several carbon atoms in initial phthalocyanine (Pc) ligands with {sup 13}C isotope atoms causes a spectral shift in the main absorption lines attributed to benzene, isoindol, and peripheral C-H groups. A comparison of spectral characteristics showed that the shift can vary from 3 to 1 cm{sup -1}.

  12. A simulation of remote sensor systems and data processing algorithms for spectral feature classification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arduini, R. F.; Aherron, R. M.; Samms, R. W.

    1984-01-01

    A computational model of the deterministic and stochastic processes involved in multispectral remote sensing was designed to evaluate the performance of sensor systems and data processing algorithms for spectral feature classification. Accuracy in distinguishing between categories of surfaces or between specific types is developed as a means to compare sensor systems and data processing algorithms. The model allows studies to be made of the effects of variability of the atmosphere and of surface reflectance, as well as the effects of channel selection and sensor noise. Examples of these effects are shown.

  13. Correction of multi-spectral MRI intensity non-uniformity via spatially regularized feature condensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vovk, Uros; Pernus, Franjo; Likar, Bostjan

    2003-05-01

    In MRI, image intensity non-uniformity is an adverse phenomenon that increases inter-tissue overlapping. The aim of this study was to provide a novel general framework, named regularized feature condensing (RFC), for condensing the distribution of image features and apply it to correct intensity non-uniformity via spatial regularization. The proposed RCF method is an iterative procedure, which consists of four basic steps. First, creation of a feature space, which consists of multi-spectral image intensities and corresponding second derivatives. Second, estimation of the intensity condensing map in feature space, i.e. the estimation of the increase of feature probability densities by a well-established mean shift procedure. Third, regularization of intensity condensing map in image space, which yields the estimation of intensity non-uniformity. Fourth, applying the estimation of non-uniformity correction to the input image. In this way, the intensity distributions of distinct tissues are gradually condensed via spatial regularization. The method was tested on simulated and real MR brain images for which gold standard segmentations were available. The results showed that the method did not induce additional intensity variations in simulated uniform images and efficiently removed intensity non-uniformity in real MR brain images. The proposed RCF method is a powerful fully automated intensity non-uniformity correction method that makes no a prior assumptions on the image intensity distribution and provides non-parametric non-uniformity correction.

  14. Measurement of atmospheric NO3 1. Improved removal of water vapour absorption features in the analysis for NO3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aliwell, S. R.; Jones, R. L.

    Atmospheric measurements of the nitrate radical generally detect its absorption of visible radiation in the band near 662 nm. This band is negatively correlated with strong absorptions due to tropospheric water vapour which must therefore be fitted in the spectral analysis to reduce the spectral residual to the level at which sufficient sensitivity to NO3 can be obtained. Previously this had been fitted using a cross-section typically derived from spectra obtained just before sunset or just after sunrise which took no account of the diurnal variation in temperature and water vapour column amounts. An improved method of accounting for water vapour absorptions is presented here. When fitted together with their temperature dependence, water vapour cross-sections calculated using a line-by-line approach gave a more accurate fitting of water vapour absorptions, thus improving the analysis for NO3.

  15. Absorption spectral change of peripheral-light harvesting complexes 2 induced by magnesium protoporphyrin IX monomethyl ester association.

    PubMed

    Yue, Huiying; Zhao, Chungui; Li, Kai; Yang, Suping

    2015-02-25

    Several spectrally different types of peripheral light harvesting complexes (LH) have been reported in anoxygenic phototrophic bacteria in response to environmental changes. In this study, two spectral forms of LH2 (T-LH2 and U-LH2) were isolated from Rhodobacter azotoformans. The absorption of T-LH2 was extremely similar to the LH2 isolated from Rhodobacter sphaeroides. U-LH2 showed an extra peak at ∼423 nm in the carotenoid region. To explore the spectral origin of this absorption peak, the difference in pigment compositions of two LH2 was analyzed. Spheroidene and bacteriochlorophyll aP were both contained in the two LH2. And magnesium protoporphyrin IX monomethyl ester (MPE) was only contained in U-LH2. It is known that spheroidene and bacteriochlorophyll aP do not produce ∼423 nm absorption peak either in vivo or in vitro. Whether MPE accumulation was mainly responsible for the formation of the ∼423 nm peak? The interactions between MPE and different proteins were further studied. The results showed that the maximum absorption of MPE was red-shifted from ∼415 nm to ∼423 nm when it was mixed with T-LH2 and its apoproteins, nevertheless, the Qy transitions of the bound bacteriochlorophylls in LH2 were almost unaffected, which indicated that the formation of the ∼423 nm peak was related to MPE-LH2 protein interaction. MPE did not bind to sites involved in the spectral tuning of BChls, but the conformation of integral LH2 was affected by MPE association, the alkaline stability of U-LH2 was lower than T-LH2, and the fluorescence intensity at 860 nm was decreased after MPE combination.

  16. Beyond intensity: Spectral features effectively predict music-induced subjective arousal.

    PubMed

    Gingras, Bruno; Marin, Manuela M; Fitch, W Tecumseh

    2014-01-01

    Emotions in music are conveyed by a variety of acoustic cues. Notably, the positive association between sound intensity and arousal has particular biological relevance. However, although amplitude normalization is a common procedure used to control for intensity in music psychology research, direct comparisons between emotional ratings of original and amplitude-normalized musical excerpts are lacking. In this study, 30 nonmusicians retrospectively rated the subjective arousal and pleasantness induced by 84 six-second classical music excerpts, and an additional 30 nonmusicians rated the same excerpts normalized for amplitude. Following the cue-redundancy and Brunswik lens models of acoustic communication, we hypothesized that arousal and pleasantness ratings would be similar for both versions of the excerpts, and that arousal could be predicted effectively by other acoustic cues besides intensity. Although the difference in mean arousal and pleasantness ratings between original and amplitude-normalized excerpts correlated significantly with the amplitude adjustment, ratings for both sets of excerpts were highly correlated and shared a similar range of values, thus validating the use of amplitude normalization in music emotion research. Two acoustic parameters, spectral flux and spectral entropy, accounted for 65% of the variance in arousal ratings for both sets, indicating that spectral features can effectively predict arousal. Additionally, we confirmed that amplitude-normalized excerpts were adequately matched for loudness. Overall, the results corroborate our hypotheses and support the cue-redundancy and Brunswik lens models.

  17. Beyond intensity: Spectral features effectively predict music-induced subjective arousal.

    PubMed

    Gingras, Bruno; Marin, Manuela M; Fitch, W Tecumseh

    2014-01-01

    Emotions in music are conveyed by a variety of acoustic cues. Notably, the positive association between sound intensity and arousal has particular biological relevance. However, although amplitude normalization is a common procedure used to control for intensity in music psychology research, direct comparisons between emotional ratings of original and amplitude-normalized musical excerpts are lacking. In this study, 30 nonmusicians retrospectively rated the subjective arousal and pleasantness induced by 84 six-second classical music excerpts, and an additional 30 nonmusicians rated the same excerpts normalized for amplitude. Following the cue-redundancy and Brunswik lens models of acoustic communication, we hypothesized that arousal and pleasantness ratings would be similar for both versions of the excerpts, and that arousal could be predicted effectively by other acoustic cues besides intensity. Although the difference in mean arousal and pleasantness ratings between original and amplitude-normalized excerpts correlated significantly with the amplitude adjustment, ratings for both sets of excerpts were highly correlated and shared a similar range of values, thus validating the use of amplitude normalization in music emotion research. Two acoustic parameters, spectral flux and spectral entropy, accounted for 65% of the variance in arousal ratings for both sets, indicating that spectral features can effectively predict arousal. Additionally, we confirmed that amplitude-normalized excerpts were adequately matched for loudness. Overall, the results corroborate our hypotheses and support the cue-redundancy and Brunswik lens models. PMID:24215647

  18. A Comparison of Raman Spectral Features of Frozen and Deparaffinized Tissues in Neuroblastoma and Ganglioneuroma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devpura, Suneetha; Thakur, Jagdish S.; Poulik, Janet M.; Rabah, Raja; Naik, Vaman M.; Naik, Ratna

    2012-02-01

    We have investigated the cellular regions in neuroblastoma and ganglioneuroma using Raman spectroscopy and compared their spectral characteristics with those of normal adrenal gland. Thin sections from both frozen and deparaffinized tissues, obtained from the same tissue specimen, were studied in conjunction with the pathological examination of the tissues. We found a significant difference in the spectral features of frozen sections of normal adrenal gland, neuroblastoma, and ganglioneuroma when compared to deparaffinized tissues. The quantitative analysis of the Raman data using chemometric methods of principal component analysis and discriminant function analysis obtained from the frozen tissues show a sensitivity and specificity of 100% each. The biochemical identification based on the spectral differences shows that the normal adrenal gland tissues have higher levels of carotenoids, lipids, and cholesterol compared to the neuroblastoma and ganglioneuroma frozen tissues. However, deparaffinized tissues show complete removal of these biochemicals in adrenal tissues. This study demonstrates that Raman spectroscopy combined with chemometric methods can successfully distinguish neuroblastoma and ganglioneuroma at cellular level.

  19. Low-energy spectral features of supernova (anti)neutrinos in inverted hierarchy

    SciTech Connect

    Fogli, G. L.; Marrone, A.; Tamborra, I.; Lisi, E.; Mirizzi, A.

    2008-11-01

    In the dense supernova core, self-interactions may align the flavor polarization vectors of {nu} and {nu} and induce collective flavor transformations. Different alignment Ansaetze are known to describe approximately the phenomena of synchronized or bipolar oscillations and the split of {nu} energy spectra. We discuss another phenomenon observed in some numerical experiments in inverted hierarchy, showing features akin to a low-energy split of {nu} spectra. The phenomenon appears to be approximately described by another alignment Ansatz which, in the considered scenario, reduces the (nonadiabatic) dynamics of all energy modes to only two {nu} plus two {nu} modes. The associated spectral features, however, appear to be fragile when passing from single to multiangle simulations.

  20. Organic Carbon: Correlating UV-Vis Absorption Spectral Patterns to Hygroscopicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanu, A. M.; Bond, T. C.

    2005-12-01

    The complex composition of organic aerosols (OC) in the atmosphere results from an array of sources. Thousands of individual organic compounds within these aerosols are difficult to identify: however, studies suggest these mixtures affect the radiative balance of Earth's atmosphere. Therefore, it is at least as vital to study the absorption and scattering of incoming solar radiation by aerosols as it is to distinguish and quantify the myriad compounds. OC can represent significant fractions of atmospheric aerosol and can play a prominent role in atmospheric radiative forcing. My research focuses on identifying organic carbon with different hygroscopic and optical properties--both of which are affected by composition. We use gradient chromatographic elution with reverse-phase and ion-exchange chromatography columns. We examine aerosols from wood combustion generated within strict temperature regimes. Results demonstrate distinct clusters according to different water affinities. Furthermore, each cluster absorbs in staggered regimes of ultraviolet and visible light, depending on the combustion temperature at which the OC fraction is generated. The association between various absorbing features and hygroscopic properties may imply distinct climate forcing potentials for different fractions of the organic carbon.

  1. Intrinsic fluorescence excitation-emission matrix spectral features of cottonseed protein fractions and the effects of denaturants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To better understand the functional and physicochemical properties of cottonseed protein, we investigated the intrinsic fluorescence excitation-emission matrix (EEM) spectral features of cottonseed protein isolate (CSPI) and sequentially extracted water (CSPw) and alkali (CSPa) protein fractions, an...

  2. Spectral Signature of Column Solar Radiation Absorption During the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Enhanced Shortwave Experiment (ARESE). Revision

    SciTech Connect

    O'Hirok, William; Gautier, Catherine; Ricchiazzi, Paul

    1999-11-01

    Spectral and broadband shortwave radiative flux data obtained from the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Enhanced Shortwave Experiment (ARESE) are compared with 3-D radiative transfer computations for the cloud field of October 30, 1995. Because the absorption of broadband solar radiation in the cloudy atmosphere deduced from observations and modeled differ by 135 Wm{sup -2}, we performed a consistency analysis using spectral observations and the model to integrate for wavelengths between the spectral observations. To match spectral measurements, aerosols need a reduction in both single scattering albedo (from 0.938 to 0.82) and asymmetry factor (from 0.67 to 0.61), and cloud droplets require a three-fold increase in co-albedo. Even after modifying the model inputs and microphysics the difference in total broadband absorption is still of the order of 75Wm{sup -2}. Finally, an unexplained absorber centered around 1.06 {micro}m appears in the comparison that is much too large to be explained by dimers.

  3. Charge balancing and identification of prominent spectral features of M-shell W plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osborne, G. C.; Safronova, A. S.; Safronova, U. I.; Kantsyrev, V. L.; Williamson, K. M.; Shrestha, I.; Beiersdorfer, P.

    2008-11-01

    Charge balancing and identification of prominent spectral features in M-shell tungsten between 3 and 9 å has been performed for LLNL EBIT data collected at varying electron beam energies between 2.3 and 4.2 keV. Previous research [G.C. Osborne et al, RSI (2008, in press)] focused on the analysis of spectra corresponding to beam energies of 2.9 and 4.1 keV, while this paper mainly focuses on lower beam energy configurations. Diagnostic of these spectra is challenging due to numerous lower than Ni-like ionization stages within a relatively narrow region, so a procedure was developed utilizing a theoretical model for charge state balancing. Atomic data was calculated separately for transitions 3->4 and 3->5 from each ionization stage, including Co-Ge-like W ions using the HULLAC code. The synthetic spectra calculated at higher electron density as well as identified EBIT spectra then are used to identify spectral features and to determine charge balance of M-shell W spectra from Z-pinch plasmas produced on 1 MA Zebra generator at UNR. Work was supported by DOE under grant DE-FG02-08ER54951 and NNSA Coop. Agr. DE-FC52-06NA27588 and DE-FC52-06NA27586. Work at LLNL was performed under auspices of the DOE under contract DE-AC52-07NA2344.

  4. The optical transmission spectrum of the hot Jupiter HAT-P-32b: clouds explain the absence of broad spectral features?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibson, N. P.; Aigrain, S.; Barstow, J. K.; Evans, T. M.; Fletcher, L. N.; Irwin, P. G. J.

    2013-12-01

    We report Gemini-North Gemini Multi-Object Spectrograph observations of the inflated hot Jupiter HAT-P-32b during two primary transits. We simultaneously observed two comparison stars and used differential spectrophotometry to produce multiwavelength light curves. `White' light curves and 29 `spectral' light curves were extracted for each transit and analysed to refine the system parameters and produce transmission spectra from 520 to 930 nm in ≈14 nm bins. The light curves contain time-varying white noise as well as time-correlated noise, and we used a Gaussian process model to fit this complex noise model. Common mode corrections derived from the white light-curve fits were applied to the spectral light curves which significantly improved our precision, reaching typical uncertainties in the transit depth of ˜2 × 10-4, corresponding to about half a pressure scale height. The low-resolution transmission spectra are consistent with a featureless model, and we can confidently rule out broad features larger than about one scale height. The absence of Na/K wings or prominent TiO/VO features is most easily explained by grey absorption from clouds in the upper atmosphere, masking the spectral features. However, we cannot confidently rule out clear atmosphere models with low abundances (˜10-3 solar) of TiO, VO or even metal hydrides masking the Na and K wings. A smaller scale height or ionization could also contribute to muted spectral features, but alone are unable to account for the absence of features reported here.

  5. Temperature and salinity correction coefficients for light absorption by water in the visible to infrared spectral region.

    PubMed

    Röttgers, Rüdiger; McKee, David; Utschig, Christian

    2014-10-20

    The light absorption coefficient of water is dependent on temperature and concentration of ions, i.e. the salinity in seawater. Accurate knowledge of the water absorption coefficient, a, and/or its temperature and salinity correction coefficients, Ψ(T) and Ψ(S), respectively, is essential for a wide range of optical applications. Values are available from published data only at specific narrow wavelength ranges or at single wavelengths in the visible and infrared regions. Ψ(T) and Ψ(S) were therefore spectrophotometrically measured throughout the visible, near, and short wavelength infrared spectral region (400 to ~2700 nm). Additionally, they were derived from more precise measurements with a point-source integrating-cavity absorption meter (PSICAM) for 400 to 700 nm. When combined with earlier measurements from the literature in the range of 2600 - 14000 nm (wavenumber: 3800 - 700 cm(-1)), the coefficients are provided for 400 to 14000 nm (wavenumber: 25000 to 700 cm(-1)).

  6. Characterizing the evolving X-ray spectral features during a superburst from 4U 1636-536

    SciTech Connect

    Keek, L.; Ballantyne, D. R.; Kuulkers, E.; Strohmayer, T. E.

    2014-07-10

    Recent studies have shown that runaway thermonuclear burning of material accreted onto neutron stars, i.e., Type I X-ray bursts, may affect the accretion disk. We investigate this by performing a detailed time-resolved spectral analysis of the superburst from 4U 1636-536 observed in 2001 with the Rossi X-Ray Timing Explorer. Superbursts are attributed to the thermonuclear burning of carbon, and are approximately 1000 times more energetic than the regular short Type I bursts. This allows us to study detailed spectra for over 11 ks, compared to, at most, 100 s for regular bursts. A feature is present in the superburst spectra around 6.4 keV that is well fit with an emission line and an absorption edge, suggestive of reflection of the superburst off the accretion disk. The line and edge parameters evolve over time: the edge energy decreases from 9.4 keV at the peak to 8.1 keV in the tail, and both features become weaker in the tail. This is only the second superburst for which this has been detected and shows that this behavior is present even without strong radius expansion. Furthermore, we find the persistent flux more than doubles during the superburst and returns to the pre-superburst value in the tail. The combination of reflection features and increased persistent emission indicates that the superburst had a strong impact on the inner accretion disk and it emphasizes that X-ray bursts provide a unique probe of accretion physics.

  7. Gas-phase absorption cross sections of 24 monocyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in the UV and IR spectral ranges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Etzkorn, Thomas; Klotz, Björn; Sørensen, Søren; Patroescu, Iulia V.; Barnes, Ian; Becker, Karl H.; Platt, Ulrich

    Absorption cross sections of 24 volatile and non-volatile derivatives of benzene in the ultraviolet (UV) and the infrared (IR) regions of the electromagnetic spectrum have been determined using a 1080 l quartz cell. For the UV a 0.5 m Czerny-Turner spectrometer coupled with a photodiode array detector (spectral resolution 0.15 nm) was used. IR spectra were recorded with an FT-IR spectrometer (Bruker IFS-88, spectral resolution 1 cm -1). Absolute absorption cross sections and the instrument function are given for the UV, while for the IR, absorption cross sections and integrated band intensities are reported. The study focused primarily on the atmospherically relevant methylated benzenes (benzene, toluene, o-xylene, m-xylene, p-xylene, 1,2,4-trimethylbenzene, 1,3,5-trimethylbenzene, ethylbenzene, styrene) and their ring retaining oxidation products (benzaldehyde, o-tolualdehyde, m-tolualdehyde, p-tolualdehyde, phenol, o-cresol, m-cresol, p-cresol, 2,3-dimethylphenol, 2,4-dimethylphenol, 2,5-dimethylphenol, 2,6-dimethylphenol, 3,4-dimethylphenol, 3,5-dimethylphenol, 2,4,6-trimethylphenol and ( E,Z)- and ( E,E)-2,4-hexadienedial). The UV absorption cross sections reported here can be used for the evaluation of DOAS spectra (Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy) for measurements of the above compounds in the atmosphere and in reaction chambers, while the IR absorption cross sections will primarily be useful in laboratory studies on atmospheric chemistry, where FT-IR spectrometry is an important tool.

  8. Spectral Fingerprinting of Individual Cells Visualized by Cavity-Reflection-Enhanced Light-Absorption Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Arai, Yoshiyuki; Yamamoto, Takayuki; Minamikawa, Takeo; Takamatsu, Tetsuro; Nagai, Takeharu

    2015-01-01

    The absorption spectrum of light is known to be a “molecular fingerprint” that enables analysis of the molecular type and its amount. It would be useful to measure the absorption spectrum in single cell in order to investigate the cellular status. However, cells are too thin for their absorption spectrum to be measured. In this study, we developed an optical-cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopic microscopy method for two-dimensional absorption imaging. The light absorption is enhanced by an optical cavity system, which allows the detection of the absorption spectrum with samples having an optical path length as small as 10 μm, at a subcellular spatial resolution. Principal component analysis of various types of cultured mammalian cells indicates absorption-based cellular diversity. Interestingly, this diversity is observed among not only different species but also identical cell types. Furthermore, this microscopy technique allows us to observe frozen sections of tissue samples without any staining and is capable of label-free biopsy. Thus, our microscopy method opens the door for imaging the absorption spectra of biological samples and thereby detecting the individuality of cells. PMID:25950513

  9. Spectral fingerprinting of individual cells visualized by cavity-reflection-enhanced light-absorption microscopy.

    PubMed

    Arai, Yoshiyuki; Yamamoto, Takayuki; Minamikawa, Takeo; Takamatsu, Tetsuro; Nagai, Takeharu

    2015-01-01

    The absorption spectrum of light is known to be a "molecular fingerprint" that enables analysis of the molecular type and its amount. It would be useful to measure the absorption spectrum in single cell in order to investigate the cellular status. However, cells are too thin for their absorption spectrum to be measured. In this study, we developed an optical-cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopic microscopy method for two-dimensional absorption imaging. The light absorption is enhanced by an optical cavity system, which allows the detection of the absorption spectrum with samples having an optical path length as small as 10 μm, at a subcellular spatial resolution. Principal component analysis of various types of cultured mammalian cells indicates absorption-based cellular diversity. Interestingly, this diversity is observed among not only different species but also identical cell types. Furthermore, this microscopy technique allows us to observe frozen sections of tissue samples without any staining and is capable of label-free biopsy. Thus, our microscopy method opens the door for imaging the absorption spectra of biological samples and thereby detecting the individuality of cells.

  10. Radial Trends in IMF-sensitive Absorption Features in Two Early-type Galaxies: Evidence for Abundance-driven Gradients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McConnell, Nicholas J.; Lu, Jessica R.; Mann, Andrew W.

    2016-04-01

    Samples of early-type galaxies show a correlation between stellar velocity dispersion and the stellar initial mass function (IMF) as inferred from gravity-sensitive absorption lines in the galaxies’ central regions. To search for spatial variations in the IMF, we have observed two early-type galaxies with Keck/LRIS and measured radial gradients in the strengths of absorption features from 4000-5500 Å and 8000-10000 Å. We present spatially resolved measurements of the dwarf-sensitive spectral indices {Na} {{I}} (8190 Å) and Wing-Ford {{FeH}} (9915 Å), as well as indices for species of H, C2, CN, Mg, Ca, {{TiO}}, and Fe. Our measurements show a metallicity gradient in both objects, and Mg/Fe consistent with a shallow gradient in α-enhancement, matching widely observed trends for massive early-type galaxies. The {Na} {{I}} index and the CN1 index at 4160 Å exhibit significantly steeper gradients, with a break at r˜ 0.1 {r}{{eff}} (r˜ 300 pc). Inside this radius, {Na} {{I}} strength increases sharply toward the galaxy center, consistent with a rapid central rise in [Na/Fe]. In contrast, the ratio of the {{FeH}} to Fe index strength decreases toward the galaxy center. This behavior cannot be reproduced by a steepening IMF inside of 0.1 {r}{{eff}} if the IMF is a single power law. While gradients in the mass function above ˜ 0.4 {M}⊙ may occur, exceptional care is required to disentangle these IMF variations from the extreme variations in individual element abundances near the galaxies’ centers.

  11. FIRST ULTRAVIOLET REFLECTANCE SPECTRA OF PLUTO AND CHARON BY THE HUBBLE SPACE TELESCOPE COSMIC ORIGINS SPECTROGRAPH: DETECTION OF ABSORPTION FEATURES AND EVIDENCE FOR TEMPORAL CHANGE

    SciTech Connect

    Stern, S. A.; Spencer, J. R.; Shinn, A.; Cunningham, N. J.; Hain, M. J.

    2012-01-15

    We have observed the mid-UV spectra of both Pluto and its large satellite, Charon, at two rotational epochs using the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Cosmic Origins Spectrograph (COS) in 2010. These are the first HST/COS measurements of Pluto and Charon. Here we describe the observations and our reduction of them, and present the albedo spectra, average mid-UV albedos, and albedo slopes we derive from these data. These data reveal evidence for a strong absorption feature in the mid-UV spectrum of Pluto; evidence for temporal change in Pluto's spectrum since the 1990s is reported, and indirect evidence for a near-UV spectral absorption on Charon is also reported.

  12. Registration of 3D spectral OCT volumes using 3D SIFT feature point matching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niemeijer, Meindert; Garvin, Mona K.; Lee, Kyungmoo; van Ginneken, Bram; Abràmoff, Michael D.; Sonka, Milan

    2009-02-01

    The recent introduction of next generation spectral OCT scanners has enabled routine acquisition of high resolution, 3D cross-sectional volumetric images of the retina. 3D OCT is used in the detection and management of serious eye diseases such as glaucoma and age-related macular degeneration. For follow-up studies, image registration is a vital tool to enable more precise, quantitative comparison of disease states. This work presents a registration method based on a recently introduced extension of the 2D Scale-Invariant Feature Transform (SIFT) framework1 to 3D.2 The SIFT feature extractor locates minima and maxima in the difference of Gaussian scale space to find salient feature points. It then uses histograms of the local gradient directions around each found extremum in 3D to characterize them in a 4096 element feature vector. Matching points are found by comparing the distance between feature vectors. We apply this method to the rigid registration of optic nerve head- (ONH) and macula-centered 3D OCT scans of the same patient that have only limited overlap. Three OCT data set pairs with known deformation were used for quantitative assessment of the method's robustness and accuracy when deformations of rotation and scaling were considered. Three-dimensional registration accuracy of 2.0+/-3.3 voxels was observed. The accuracy was assessed as average voxel distance error in N=1572 matched locations. The registration method was applied to 12 3D OCT scans (200 x 200 x 1024 voxels) of 6 normal eyes imaged in vivo to demonstrate the clinical utility and robustness of the method in a real-world environment.

  13. Nonlinear optical absorption and fluorescence of phosphine-substituted bithiophenes in the violet-blue spectral region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jianwei; Zhao, Qun; Lawson, Christopher M.; Gray, Gary M.

    2011-06-01

    The nonlinear optical absorptions of two 5,5‧-bis(diphenylphosphino)-2,2‧-bithiophene derivatives, Ph2(X)P(C4H2S)2P(X)Ph2 (X = O, 1; S, 2), have been investigated by direct transmission measurement with both picosecond and nanosecond laser pulses from 420 nm to 480 nm. Saturated dichloromethane solutions of 1 and 2 exhibit strong nonlinear optical absorptions in this violet-blue spectral region with that of 2 being stronger at all wavelengths. In the picosecond regime, at 420 nm, the transmittance rapidly falls to 50% when the incident fluence is 0.22 J/cm2 for 1 and 0.11 J/cm2 for 2. Two-photon absorption appears to be the primary mechanism for this nonlinear absorption. The two-photon absorption coefficients β for 1 (2.1 cm/GW) and 2 (4.4 cm/GM) were obtained by fitting the measurement of transmittance as the function of incident beam intensity at 420 nm. These β values are comparable with some of the best results obtained for organic materials in the green, red and infrared spectral region. Both compounds also show fluorescence with an emission peak at 390 nm for 1 and 400 nm for 2. The fluorescence of 1 is considerably stronger than is that of 2. The combination of the wide band gap and strong fluorescence emission of 1 makes it a promising candidate as a host material for blue organic light emitting diodes.

  14. An Exercise on Calibration: DRIFTS Study of Binary Mixtures of Calcite and Dolomite with Partially Overlapping Spectral Features

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De Lorenzi Pezzolo, Alessandra

    2013-01-01

    Unlike most spectroscopic calibrations that are based on the study of well-separated features ascribable to the different components, this laboratory experience is especially designed to exploit spectral features that are nearly overlapping. The investigated system consists of a binary mixture of two commonly occurring minerals, calcite and…

  15. Tandem Polymer Solar Cells Featuring a Spectrally Matched Low-Bandgap Polymer

    SciTech Connect

    Dou, L.; You, J.; Yang, J.; Chen, C. C.; He, Y.; Murase, S.; Moriarty, T.; Emery, K.; Li, G.; Yang, Y.

    2012-03-01

    Tandem solar cells provide an effective way to harvest a broader spectrum of solar radiation by combining two or more solar cells with different absorption bands. However, for polymer solar cells, the performance of tandem devices lags behind single-layer solar cells mainly due to the lack of a suitable low-bandgap polymer. Here, we demonstrate highly efficient single and tandem polymer solar cells featuring a low-bandgap conjugated polymer (PBDTT-DPP: bandgap, {approx}1.44 eV). A single-layer device based on the polymer provides a power conversion efficiency of {approx}6%. When the polymer is applied to tandem solar cells, a power conversion efficiency of 8.62% is achieved, which is, to the best of our knowledge, the highest certified efficiency for a polymer solar cell to date.

  16. Dark Hearts in the Perseus Cluster Galaxies: A Study of Dust Absorption Features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hooper, Eric Jon; Wojtaszek, M.; Gallagher, J. S.

    2013-01-01

    Indicators of a cool interstellar medium, such as dust features and HI emission, are more prevalent in early type galaxies than once thought. Yet it is still difficult to understand their presence in the cores of massive clusters. The hot intracluster medium can strip low-density gas from infalling galaxies via ram pressure or can heat the gas past its escape velocity. Nevertheless, galaxies with cool ISM in the form of dust do exist in the Coma Cluster. Here we report on several such systems observed near the core of the Perseus Cluster, the nearest massive cluster of galaxies (D = 70 Mpc). Perseus is an optically unrelaxed cluster with an extensive hot ICM. It also contains several high-velocity galaxies, including a system infalling towards NGC 1275 at a relative speed of ~3000 km/sec, which suggests a continued accretion of systems from the cluster's surroundings. We detect dust features in early-type galaxies through the presence of optical absorption, visible in the form of very circular rings, dark spiral arms and disk systems, or both. These features range in size from 50 to 1700 parsecs. We suggest that these components may be remnants of evolutionary pre-processing in groups that occurs as objects fall into the Perseus cluster. We also discuss their existence in terms of survival time scales for cold ISM in the early-type members of a rich galaxy cluster.

  17. Structural and Spectral Features of Selenium Nanospheres Produced by Se-Respiring Bacteria

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Oremland, R.S.; Herbel, M.J.; Blum, J.S.; Langley, S.; Beveridge, T.J.; Ajayan, P.M.; Sutto, T.; Ellis, A.V.; Curran, S.

    2004-01-01

    Certain anaerobic bacteria respire toxic selenium oxyanions and in doing so produce extracellular accumulations of elemental selenium [Se(0)]. We examined three physiologically and phylogenetically diverse species of selenate- and selenite-respiring bacteria, Sulfurospirillum barnesii, Bacillus selenitireducens, and Selenihalanaerobacter shriftii, for the occurrence of this phenomenon. When grown with selenium oxyanions as the electron acceptor, all of these organisms formed extracellular granules consisting of stable, uniform nanospheres (diameter, ???300 nm) of Se(0) having monoclinic crystalline structures. Intracellular packets of Se(0) were also noted. The number of intracellular Se(0) packets could be reduced by first growing cells with nitrate as the electron acceptor and then adding selenite ions to washed suspensions of the nitrate-grown cells. This resulted in the formation of primarily extracellular Se nanospheres. After harvesting and cleansing of cellular debris, we observed large differences in the optical properties (UV-visible absorption and Raman spectra) of purified extracellular nanospheres produced in this manner by the three different bacterial species. The spectral properties in turn differed substantially from those of amorphous Se(0) formed by chemical oxidation of H2Se and of black, vitreous Se(0) formed chemically by reduction of selenite with ascorbate. The microbial synthesis of Se(0) nanospheres results in unique, complex, compacted nanostructural arrangements of Se atoms. These arrangements probably reflect a diversity of enzymes involved in the dissimilatory reduction that are subtly different in different microbes. Remarkably, these conditions cannot be achieved by current methods of chemical synthesis.

  18. Transient absorption microscopy of gold nanorods as spectrally orthogonal labels in live cells†

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Tao; Chen, Shouhui; Zhou, Jihan; Liang, Dehai

    2015-01-01

    Gold nanorods (AuNRs) have shown great potential as bio-compatible imaging probes in various biological applications. Probing nanomaterials in live cells is essential to reveal the interaction between them. In this study, we used a transient absorption microscope to selectively image AuNRs in live cells. The transient absorption signals were monitored through lock-in amplification. This provides a new way of observing AuNRs with no interference from background autofluorescence. PMID:25098209

  19. Transient absorption microscopy of gold nanorods as spectrally orthogonal labels in live cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Tao; Chen, Shouhui; Zhou, Jihan; Liang, Dehai; Chen, Xiaoyuan; Huang, Yanyi

    2014-09-21

    Gold nanorods (AuNRs) have shown great potential as bio-compatible imaging probes in various biological applications. Probing nanomaterials in live cells is essential to reveal the interaction between them. In this study, we used a transient absorption microscope to selectively image AuNRs in live cells. The transient absorption signals were monitored through lock-in amplification. This provides a new way of observing AuNRs with no interference from background autofluorescence.

  20. FE K EMISSION AND ABSORPTION FEATURES IN THE XMM-EPIC SPECTRUM OF THE SEYFERT GALAXY IC 4329A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Markowitz, A.; Reeves, J. N.; Braito, V.

    2001-01-01

    We present a re-analysis of the XMM-Newton long-look of the X-ray bright Seyfert galaxy IC 4329a. The Fe K bandpass is dominated by two peaks, consistent with emission from neutral or near-neutral Fe Ka and KP. A relativistic diskline model whereby both peaks are the result of one doubly-peaked diskline profile is found to be a poor description of the data. Models using two relativistic disklines are found to describe the emission profile well. A low-inclination, moderately-relativistic dual-diskline model is possible if the contribution from narrow components, due to distant material, is small or absent. A high-inclination, moderately relativistic profile for each peak is possible if there are roughly equal contributions from both the broad and narrow components. Upper limits on Fe XXV and Fe XXVI emission and absorption at the systemic velocity of IC 4329a are obtained. We also present the results of RXTE monitoring of this source obtained so far; the combined XMM-Newton and RXTE data sets allow us to explore the time-resolved spectral behavior of this source on time scales ranging from hours to 2 years. We find no strong evidence for variability of the Fe Ka emission line on any time scale probed, likely due to the minimal level of continuum variability. We detect a narrow absorption line, at a energy of 7.68 keV in the rest frame of the source; its significance has been confirmed using Monte Carlo simulations. This feature is most likely due to absorption from Fe XXVI blueshifted to approximately 0.1c relative to the systemic velocity, making IC 4329a the lowest-redshift AGN known with a high-velocity, highly-ionized outflow component. As is often the case with similar outflows seen in high-luminosity quasars, the estimated mass outflow rate is larger than the inflow accretion rate, signaling that the outflow represents a substantial portion of the total energy budget of the AGN. The outflow could arise from a radiatively-driven disk wind, or it may be in the

  1. Effect of cell-size on the energy absorption features of closed-cell aluminium foams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nammi, S. K.; Edwards, G.; Shirvani, H.

    2016-11-01

    The effect of cell-size on the compressive response and energy absorption features of closed-cell aluminium (Al) foam were investigated by finite element method. Micromechanical models were constructed with a repeating unit-cell (RUC) which was sectioned from tetrakaidecahedra structure. Using this RUC, three Al foam models with different cell-sizes (large, medium and small) and all of same density, were built. These three different cell-size pieces of foam occupy the same volume and their domains contained 8, 27 and 64 RUCs respectively. However, the smaller cell-size foam has larger surface area to volume ratio compared to other two. Mechanical behaviour was modelled under uniaxial loading. All three aggregates (3D arrays of RUCs) of different cell-sizes showed an elastic region at the initial stage, then followed by a plateau, and finally, a densification region. The smaller cell size foam exhibited a higher peak-stress and a greater densification strain comparing other two cell-sizes investigated. It was demonstrated that energy absorption capabilities of smaller cell-size foams was higher compared to the larger cell-sizes examined.

  2. Old stellar populations. 5: Absorption feature indices for the complete LICK/IDS sample of stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Worthey, Guy; Faber, S. M.; Gonzalez, J. Jesus; Burstein, D.

    1994-01-01

    Twenty-one optical absorption features, 11 of which have been previously defined, are automatically measured in a sample of 460 stars. Following Gorgas et al., the indices are summarized in fitting functions that give index strengths as functions of stellar temperature, gravity, and (Fe/H). This project was carried out with the purpose of predicting index strengths in the integrated light of stellar populations of different ages and metallicities, but the data should be valuable for stellar studies in the Galaxy as well. Several of the new indices appear to be promising indicators of metallicity for old stellar populations. A complete list of index data and atmospheric parameters is available in computer-readable form.

  3. Detection of a deep 3-microm absorption feature in the spectrum of Amalthea (JV).

    PubMed

    Takato, Naruhisa; Bus, Schelte J; Terada, Hiroshi; Pyo, Tae-Soo; Kobayashi, Naoto

    2004-12-24

    Near-infrared spectra of Jupiter's small inner satellites Amalthea and Thebe are similar to those of D-type asteroids in the 0.8- to 2.5-micrometer wavelength range. A deep absorption feature is detected at 3 micrometers in the spectra of the trailing side of Amalthea, which is similar to that of the non-ice components of Callisto and can be attributed to hydrous minerals. These surface materials cannot be explained if the satellite formed at its present orbit by accreting from a circumjovian nebula. Amalthea and Thebe may be the remnants of Jupiter's inflowing building blocks that formed in the outer part or outside of the circumjovian nebula.

  4. Detection of a Deep 3-μm Absorption Feature in the Spectrum of Amalthea (JV)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takato, Naruhisa; Bus, Schelte J.; Terada, Hiroshi; Pyo, Tae-Soo; Kobayashi, Naoto

    2004-12-01

    Near-infrared spectra of Jupiter's small inner satellites Amalthea and Thebe are similar to those of D-type asteroids in the 0.8- to 2.5-micrometer wavelength range. A deep absorption feature is detected at 3 micrometers in the spectra of the trailing side of Amalthea, which is similar to that of the non-ice components of Callisto and can be attributed to hydrous minerals. These surface materials cannot be explained if the satellite formed at its present orbit by accreting from a circumjovian nebula. Amalthea and Thebe may be the remnants of Jupiter's inflowing building blocks that formed in the outer part or outside of the circumjovian nebula.

  5. Detection of a deep 3-microm absorption feature in the spectrum of Amalthea (JV).

    PubMed

    Takato, Naruhisa; Bus, Schelte J; Terada, Hiroshi; Pyo, Tae-Soo; Kobayashi, Naoto

    2004-12-24

    Near-infrared spectra of Jupiter's small inner satellites Amalthea and Thebe are similar to those of D-type asteroids in the 0.8- to 2.5-micrometer wavelength range. A deep absorption feature is detected at 3 micrometers in the spectra of the trailing side of Amalthea, which is similar to that of the non-ice components of Callisto and can be attributed to hydrous minerals. These surface materials cannot be explained if the satellite formed at its present orbit by accreting from a circumjovian nebula. Amalthea and Thebe may be the remnants of Jupiter's inflowing building blocks that formed in the outer part or outside of the circumjovian nebula. PMID:15618511

  6. Towards photodetection with high efficiency and tunable spectral selectivity: graphene plasmonics for light trapping and absorption engineering.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jianfa; Zhu, Zhihong; Liu, Wei; Yuan, Xiaodong; Qin, Shiqiao

    2015-08-28

    Plasmonics can be used to improve absorption in optoelectronic devices and has been intensively studied for solar cells and photodetectors. Graphene has recently emerged as a powerful plasmonic material. It shows significantly less loss compared to traditional plasmonic materials such as gold and silver and its plasmons can be tuned by changing the Fermi energy with chemical or electrical doping. Here we propose the use of graphene plasmonics for light trapping in optoelectronic devices and show that the excitation of localized plasmons in doped, nanostructured graphene can enhance optical absorption in its surrounding medium including both bulky and two-dimensional materials by tens of times, which may lead to a new generation of photodetectors with high efficiency and tunable spectral selectivity in the mid-infrared and THz ranges.

  7. Broadband cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopy in the ultraviolet spectral region for measurements of nitrogen dioxide and formaldehyde

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Washenfelder, R. A.; Attwood, A. R.; Flores, J. M.; Zarzana, K. J.; Rudich, Y.; Brown, S. S.

    2016-01-01

    Formaldehyde (CH2O) is the most abundant aldehyde in the atmosphere, and it strongly affects photochemistry through its photolysis. We describe simultaneous measurements of CH2O and nitrogen dioxide (NO2) using broadband cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopy in the ultraviolet spectral region. The light source consists of a continuous-wave diode laser focused into a Xenon bulb to produce a plasma that emits high-intensity, broadband light. The plasma discharge is optically filtered and coupled into a 1 m optical cavity. The reflectivity of the cavity mirrors is 0.99930 ± 0.00003 (1- reflectivity = 700 ppm loss) at 338 nm, as determined from the known Rayleigh scattering of He and zero air. This mirror reflectivity corresponds to an effective path length of 1.43 km within the 1 m cell. We measure the cavity output over the 315-350 nm spectral region using a grating monochromator and charge-coupled device array detector. We use published reference spectra with spectral fitting software to simultaneously retrieve CH2O and NO2 concentrations. Independent measurements of NO2 standard additions by broadband cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopy and cavity ring-down spectroscopy agree within 2 % (slope for linear fit = 1.02 ± 0.03 with r2 = 0.998). Standard additions of CH2O measured by broadband cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopy and calculated based on flow dilution are also well correlated, with r2 = 0.9998. During constant mixed additions of NO2 and CH2O, the 30 s measurement precisions (1σ) of the current configuration were 140 and 210 pptv, respectively. The current 1 min detection limit for extinction measurements at 315-350 nm provides sufficient sensitivity for measurement of trace gases in laboratory experiments and ground-based field experiments. Additionally, the instrument provides highly accurate, spectroscopically based trace gas detection that may complement higher precision techniques based on non

  8. Precise methane absorption measurements in the 1.64 μm spectral region for the MERLIN mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delahaye, T.; Maxwell, S. E.; Reed, Z. D.; Lin, H.; Hodges, J. T.; Sung, K.; Devi, V. M.; Warneke, T.; Spietz, P.; Tran, H.

    2016-06-01

    In this article we describe a high-precision laboratory measurement targeting the R(6) manifold of the 2ν3 band of 12CH4. High-fidelity modeling of this absorption spectrum for atmospheric temperature and pressure conditions will be required by the Franco-German, Methane Remote Sensing LIDAR (MERLIN) space mission for retrievals of atmospheric methane. The analysis uses the Hartmann-Tran profile for modeling line shape and also includes line-mixing effects. To this end, six high-resolution and high signal-to-noise ratio absorption spectra of air-broadened methane were recorded using a frequency-stabilized cavity ring-down spectroscopy apparatus. Sample conditions corresponded to room temperature and spanned total sample pressures of 40 hPa-1013 hPa with methane molar fractions between 1 µmol mol-1 and 12 µmol mol-1. All spectroscopic model parameters were simultaneously adjusted in a multispectrum nonlinear least squares fit to the six measured spectra. Comparison of the fitted model to the measured spectra reveals the ability to calculate the room temperature, methane absorption coefficient to better than 0.1% at the online position of the MERLIN mission. This is the first time that such fidelity has been reached in modeling methane absorption in the investigated spectral region, fulfilling the accuracy requirements of the MERLIN mission. We also found excellent agreement when comparing the present results with measurements obtained over different pressure conditions and using other laboratory techniques. Finally, we also evaluated the impact of these new spectral parameters on atmospheric transmissions spectra calculations.

  9. Analysis of substrate and plant spectral features of semi-arid shrub communities in the Owens Valley, California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ustin, S. L.; Rock, B. N.; Woodward, R. A.

    1986-01-01

    Airborne Imaging Spectrometer (AIS) data were analyzed to deduce plant density and species composition in three semi-arid shrub-dominated communities of Owens Valley, CA, occurring on either a sand, granite alluvium, or basalt substrate. The high-spectral resolution AIS data were related to spectra obtained with field portable spectrometers, which in turn were related to plant and soil characteristics of the communities. Many of the dominant species have unique spectral features which permit their identification in AIS pixel images. The canopy-induced shadow may be a major factor influencing substrate spectral properties during fall and winter, because of low sun angles. Moreover, changes in spectral signatures following dormancy and leaf senescence tend to decrease contrasts between the plant community and the geologic substrate, also suggesting that fall and winter are a difficult time of year for spectral analyses.

  10. Light absorption efficiencies of photosynthetic pigments: the dependence on spectral types of central stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komatsu, Yu; Umemura, Masayuki; Shoji, Mitsuo; Kayanuma, Megumi; Yabana, Kazuhiro; Shiraishi, Kenji

    2015-07-01

    For detecting life from reflection spectra on extrasolar planets, trace of photosynthesis is one of the indicators. However, it is not yet clear what kind of radiation environments is acceptable for photosynthesis. Light absorption in photosystems on the Earth occurs using limited photosynthetic pigments such as chlorophylls (Chls) and bacteriochlorophylls (BChls). Efficiencies of light absorption for the pigments were evaluated by calculating the specific molecular absorption spectra at the high accuracy-quantum mechanical level. We used realistic stellar radiation spectra such as F, G, K and M-type stars to investigate the efficiencies. We found that the efficiencies are increased with the temperature of stars, from M to F star. Photosynthetic pigments have two types of absorption bands, the Q y and Soret. In higher temperature stars like F star, contributions from the Soret region of the pigments are dominant for the efficiency. On the other hand, in lower temperature stars like M stars, the Q y band is crucial. Therefore, differences on the absorption intensity and the wavelength between the Q y and Soret band are the most important to characterize the photosynthetic pigments. Among photosynthetic pigments, Chls tend to be efficient in higher temperature stars, while BChls are efficient for M stars. Blueward of the 4000 Å break, the efficiencies of BChls are smaller than Chls in the higher temperature stars.

  11. Use of feature extraction techniques for the texture and context information in ERTS imagery. [discrimination of land use categories in Kansas from MSS textural-spectral features

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haralick, R. M.; Kelly, G. L. (Principal Investigator); Bosley, R. J.

    1973-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. The land use category of subimage regions over Kansas within an MSS image can be identified with an accuracy of about 70% using the textural-spectral features of the multi-images from the four MSS bands.

  12. Variability of light absorption by aquatic particles in the near-infrared spectral region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tassan, Stelvio; Ferrari, Giovanni M.

    2003-08-01

    We have measured the light absorption of a set of particle suspensions of varying nature (pure minerals, particulate standards, aquatic particles) using a double-beam spectrophotometer with a 15-cm-diameter integrating sphere. The sample was located inside the sphere so as to minimize the effect of light scattering by the particles. The results obtained showed highly variable absorption in the near-IR region of the wavelength spectrum. The same particle samples were deposited on glass-fiber filters, and their absorption was measured by the transmittance-reflectance method, based on a theoretical model that corrects for the effect of light scattering. The good agreement found between the results of the measurements carried out inside the sphere and by the transmittance-reflectance method confirms the validity of the scattering correction included in the above method.

  13. Solar absorption by elemental and brown carbon determined from spectral observations

    PubMed Central

    Bahadur, Ranjit; Praveen, Puppala S.; Xu, Yangyang; Ramanathan, V.

    2012-01-01

    Black carbon (BC) is functionally defined as the absorbing component of atmospheric total carbonaceous aerosols (TC) and is typically dominated by soot-like elemental carbon (EC). However, organic carbon (OC) has also been shown to absorb strongly at visible to UV wavelengths and the absorbing organics are referred to as brown carbon (BrC), which is typically not represented in climate models. We propose an observationally based analytical method for rigorously partitioning measured absorption aerosol optical depths (AAOD) and single scattering albedo (SSA) among EC and BrC, using multiwavelength measurements of total (EC, OC, and dust) absorption. EC is found to be strongly absorbing (SSA of 0.38) whereas the BrC SSA varies globally between 0.77 and 0.85. The method is applied to the California region. We find TC (EC + BrC) contributes 81% of the total absorption at 675 nm and 84% at 440 nm. The BrC absorption at 440 nm is about 40% of the EC, whereas at 675 nm it is less than 10% of EC. We find an enhanced absorption due to OC in the summer months and in southern California (related to forest fires and secondary OC). The fractions and trends are broadly consistent with aerosol chemical-transport models as well as with regional emission inventories, implying that we have obtained a representative estimate for BrC absorption. The results demonstrate that current climate models that treat OC as nonabsorbing are underestimating the total warming effect of carbonaceous aerosols by neglecting part of the atmospheric heating, particularly over biomass-burning regions that emit BrC. PMID:23045698

  14. Inversion of the volume scattering function and spectral absorption in coastal waters with biogeochemical implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, X.; Huot, Y.; Gray, D. J.; Weidemann, A.; Rhea, W. J.

    2013-06-01

    In the aquatic environment, particles can be broadly separated into phytoplankton (PHY), non-algal particle (NAP) and dissolved (or very small particle, VSP) fractions. Typically, absorption spectra are inverted to quantify these fractions, but volume scattering functions (VSFs) can also be used. Both absorption spectra and VSFs were used to calculate particle fractions for an experiment in Chesapeake Bay. A complete set of water inherent optical properties was measured using a suite of commercial instruments and a prototype Multispectral Volume Scattering Meter (MVSM); the chlorophyll concentration, [Chl] was determined using the HPLC method. The total scattering coefficient (measured by an ac-s) and the VSF (at a few backward angles, measured by a HydroScat 6 and an ECO-VSF) agreed with the LISST and MVSM data within 5%, thus indicating inter-instrument consistency. The size distribution and scattering parameters for PHY, NAP and VSP were inverted from measured VSFs. For the absorption inversion, the "dissolved" absorption spectra were measured for filtrate passing through a 0.2 μm filter, whereas [Chl] and NAP absorption spectra were inverted from the particulate fraction. Even though the total scattering coefficient showed no correlation with [Chl], estimates of [Chl] from the VSF-inversion agreed well with the HPLC measurements (r = 0.68, mean relative error s = -20%). The scattering associated with NAP and VSP both correlated well with the NAP and "dissolved" absorption coefficients, respectively. While NAP dominated forward, and hence total, scattering, our results also suggest that the scattering by VSP was far from negligible and dominated backscattering.

  15. Solar absorption by elemental and brown carbon determined from spectral observations.

    PubMed

    Bahadur, Ranjit; Praveen, Puppala S; Xu, Yangyang; Ramanathan, V

    2012-10-23

    Black carbon (BC) is functionally defined as the absorbing component of atmospheric total carbonaceous aerosols (TC) and is typically dominated by soot-like elemental carbon (EC). However, organic carbon (OC) has also been shown to absorb strongly at visible to UV wavelengths and the absorbing organics are referred to as brown carbon (BrC), which is typically not represented in climate models. We propose an observationally based analytical method for rigorously partitioning measured absorption aerosol optical depths (AAOD) and single scattering albedo (SSA) among EC and BrC, using multiwavelength measurements of total (EC, OC, and dust) absorption. EC is found to be strongly absorbing (SSA of 0.38) whereas the BrC SSA varies globally between 0.77 and 0.85. The method is applied to the California region. We find TC (EC + BrC) contributes 81% of the total absorption at 675 nm and 84% at 440 nm. The BrC absorption at 440 nm is about 40% of the EC, whereas at 675 nm it is less than 10% of EC. We find an enhanced absorption due to OC in the summer months and in southern California (related to forest fires and secondary OC). The fractions and trends are broadly consistent with aerosol chemical-transport models as well as with regional emission inventories, implying that we have obtained a representative estimate for BrC absorption. The results demonstrate that current climate models that treat OC as nonabsorbing are underestimating the total warming effect of carbonaceous aerosols by neglecting part of the atmospheric heating, particularly over biomass-burning regions that emit BrC.

  16. X-ray absorption spectral studies of copper (II) mixed ligand complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soni, B.; Dar, Davood Ah; Shrivastava, B. D.; Prasad, J.; Srivastava, K.

    2014-09-01

    X-ray absorption spectra at the K-edge of copper have been studied in two copper mixed ligand complexes, one having tetramethyethylenediamine (tmen) and the other having tetraethyethylenediamine (teen) as one of the ligands. The spectra have been recorded at BL-8 dispersive extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) beamline at the 2.5 GeV INDUS- 2 synchrotron, RRCAT, Indore, India. The data obtained has been processed using the data analysis program Athena. The energy of the K-absorption edge, chemical shift, edge-width and shift of the principal absorption maximum in the complexes have been determined and discussed. The values of these parameters have been found to be approximately the same in both the complexes indicating that the two complexes possess similar chemical environment around the copper metal atom. The chemical shift has been utilized to estimate effective nuclear charge on the absorbing atom. The normalized EXAFS spectra have been Fourier transformed. The position of the first peak in the Fourier transform gives the value of first shell bond length, which is shorter than the actual bond length because of energy dependence of the phase factors in the sine function of the EXAFS equation. This distance is thus the phase- uncorrected bond length. Bond length has also been determined by Levy's, Lytle's and Lytle, Sayers and Stern's (LSS) methods. The results obtained from LSS and the Fourier transformation methods are comparable with each other, since both are phase uncorrected bond lengths.

  17. Absolute Rovibrational Intensities of C-12O2-16 Absorption Bands in the 3090-3850/ CM Spectral Region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Devi, V. Malathy; Benner, D. Chris; Rinsland, Curtis P.; Smith, Mary Ann H.

    1998-01-01

    A multispectrum nonlinear least-squares fitting technique has been used to determine the absolute intensities for approximately 1500 spectral lines in 36 vibration - rotation bands Of C-12O2-16 between 3090 and 3850/ cm. A total of six absorption spectra of a high- purity (99.995% minimum) natural sample of carbon dioxide were used in the analysis. The spectral data (0.01/cm resolution) were recorded at room temperature and low pressure (1 to 10 Torr) using the McMath-Pierce Fourier transform spectrometer of the National Solar Observatory (NSO) on Kitt Peak. The absorption path lengths for these spectra varied between 24.86 and 385.76 m. The first experimental determination of the intensity of the theoretically predicted 2(nu)(sub 2, sup 2) + nu(sub 3) "forbidden" band has been made. The measured line intensities obtained for each band have been analyzed to determine the vibrational band intensity, S(sub nu), in /cm/( molecule/sq cm) at 296 K, square of the rotationless transition dipole moment |R|(exp 2) in Debye, as well as the nonrigid rotor coefficients. The results are compared to the values listed in the 1996 HITRAN database which are obtained using the direct numerical diagonalization (DND) technique as well as to other published values where available.

  18. A universal feature in the optical absorption spectrum associated with hydrogenated amorphous silicon: A dimensionless joint density of states analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thevaril, Jasmin J.; O'Leary, Stephen K.

    2016-10-01

    Using a dimensionless joint density of states formalism for the quantitative characterization of the optical response associated with hydrogenated amorphous silicon, a critical comparative analysis of a large number of different optical absorption data sets is considered. When these data sets are cast into this dimensionless framework, we observe a trend that is almost completely coincident for all of the data sets considered. This suggests that there is a universal feature associated with the optical absorption spectrum of hydrogenated amorphous silicon.

  19. A spectral-structural bag-of-features scene classifier for very high spatial resolution remote sensing imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Bei; Zhong, Yanfei; Zhang, Liangpei

    2016-06-01

    Land-use classification of very high spatial resolution remote sensing (VHSR) imagery is one of the most challenging tasks in the field of remote sensing image processing. However, the land-use classification is hard to be addressed by the land-cover classification techniques, due to the complexity of the land-use scenes. Scene classification is considered to be one of the expected ways to address the land-use classification issue. The commonly used scene classification methods of VHSR imagery are all derived from the computer vision community that mainly deal with terrestrial image recognition. Differing from terrestrial images, VHSR images are taken by looking down with airborne and spaceborne sensors, which leads to the distinct light conditions and spatial configuration of land cover in VHSR imagery. Considering the distinct characteristics, two questions should be answered: (1) Which type or combination of information is suitable for the VHSR imagery scene classification? (2) Which scene classification algorithm is best for VHSR imagery? In this paper, an efficient spectral-structural bag-of-features scene classifier (SSBFC) is proposed to combine the spectral and structural information of VHSR imagery. SSBFC utilizes the first- and second-order statistics (the mean and standard deviation values, MeanStd) as the statistical spectral descriptor for the spectral information of the VHSR imagery, and uses dense scale-invariant feature transform (SIFT) as the structural feature descriptor. From the experimental results, the spectral information works better than the structural information, while the combination of the spectral and structural information is better than any single type of information. Taking the characteristic of the spatial configuration into consideration, SSBFC uses the whole image scene as the scope of the pooling operator, instead of the scope generated by a spatial pyramid (SP) commonly used in terrestrial image classification. The experimental

  20. Sub-millisecond Transient Absorption Frequency Comb Spectroscopy in the Mid-Infrared Spectral Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bjork, Bryce; Fleisher, Adam; Bui, Thinh; Cossel, Kevin; Okumura, Mitchio; Ye, Jun

    2013-05-01

    The study of highly-reactive transient reaction intermediates is fundamental to understanding chemical dynamics and is particularly relevant to applications such as atmospheric chemistry. Their study often poses a significant challenge for traditional spectrometers, which typically provide broad bandwidth or fast temporal resolution, but not both without long acquisition times. We introduce a cavity-enhanced frequency-comb solution that allows for high-resolution, sensitive spectra to be captured at millisecond intervals in the mid-infrared spectral region using a VIPA dispersive etalon. Once individual comb teeth are resolved, the spectral resolution of the system is limited by the comb linewidth (<40 kHz) while the temporal resolution is limited by the minimum integration time of the InSb detector array (10 μs). In this presentation, I will present the application of this real-time spectroscopic system to small molecule photodissociation.

  1. Recognition of viruses by electron microscopy using higher order spectral features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ong, C. L. H.; Chandran, Vinod

    2003-05-01

    A limitation of using electron microscopy as a diagnostic tool in virology is the expertise required in analysing and interpreting the images. EM images of different viruses can be very similar in shape. An automated recognition method is proposed in this paper. It is based on radial spectra of higher-order spectral parameters robust to translation, scaling and noise. These features are also roation invariant and can be averaged for a population of viral particles without the need to normalize and align them. They extract symmetry information and are sensitive enough to distinguish viruses that appear nearly circular to the human eye. The method was tested using three such viruses with very similar morphologies - the Adeno, the HAV and the Astro. 70 viral particles of each class from three images were used for training. In the first test, random unseen sets of viral particles form the same images were chosen. In the second test, images of viruses from other sources, where the specimen preparation and the microscope are different, were used to determine the reliability of the system. Both tests have shown high classification accuracy improving rapidly to 100% as the test ensemble grew to 20 particles.

  2. Observational Signatures of Black Holes: Spectral and Temporal Features of XTE J1550-564

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Titarchuk, Lev; Shrader, C. R.; White, Nicholas E. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The theoretical predictions of the converging inflow, or Bulk-Motion Comptonization model are discussed and some predictions are compared to X- and gamma-ray observations of the high-soft state of Galactic black hole candidate XTE J1550+564. The approx. 10(exp 2)-Hz QPO phenomenon tends to be detected in the high-state at times when the bolometric luminosity surges and the hard-powerlaw spectral component is dominant. Furthermore, the power in these features increases with energy. We offer interpretation of this phenomenon, as oscillations of the innermost part of the accretion disk, which in turn supplies the seed photons for the converging inflow where the hard power-law is formed through Bulk Motion Comptonization (BMC). We further argue that the noted lack of coherence between intensity variations of the high-soft-state low and high energy bands is a natural consequence of our model, and that a natural explanation for the observed hard and soft lag phenomenon is offered. In addition, we address some criticisms of the BMC model supporting our claims with observational results.

  3. The origin of blueshifted absorption features in the X-ray spectrum of PG 1211+143: outflow or disc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallo, L. C.; Fabian, A. C.

    2013-07-01

    In some radio-quiet active galactic nuclei (AGN), high-energy absorption features in the X-ray spectra have been interpreted as ultrafast outflows (UFOs) - highly ionized material (e.g. Fe XXV and Fe XXVI) ejected at mildly relativistic velocities. In some cases, these outflows can carry energy in excess of the binding energy of the host galaxy. Needless to say, these features demand our attention as they are strong signatures of AGN feedback and will influence galaxy evolution. For the same reason, alternative models need to be discussed and refuted or confirmed. Gallo and Fabian proposed that some of these features could arise from resonance absorption of the reflected spectrum in a layer of ionized material located above and corotating with the accretion disc. Therefore, the absorbing medium would be subjected to similar blurring effects as seen in the disc. A priori, the existence of such plasma above the disc is as plausible as a fast wind. In this work, we highlight the ambiguity by demonstrating that the absorption model can describe the ˜7.6 keV absorption feature (and possibly other features) in the quasar PG 1211+143, an AGN that is often described as a classic example of a UFO. In this model, the 2-10 keV spectrum would be largely reflection dominated (as opposed to power law dominated in the wind models) and the resonance absorption would be originating in a layer between about 6 and 60 gravitational radii. The studies of such features constitute a cornerstone for future X-ray observatories like Astro-H and Athena+. Should our model prove correct, or at least important in some cases, then absorption will provide another diagnostic tool with which to probe the inner accretion flow with future missions.

  4. Application of Video Spectral Comparator (absorption spectra) for establishing the chronological order of intersecting printed strokes and writing pen strokes.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Ridamjeet; Saini, Komal; Sood, N C

    2013-06-01

    The sequence of intersecting strokes of laser printers (black, blue, red and green) and typewriter ink (black) with the strokes of gel pen ink, ballpoint pen ink and fountain pen ink (black, blue, red and green) has been determined by studying their absorption spectra. The absorption spectra have been generated for each of the two pure inks (i.e. A and B) and points of their intersections (i.e. A over B and B over A) by using Video Spectral Comparator (VSC-2000-HR). The study was carried out with an assumption that the peak characteristics of spectra from the point of intersection should correspond to the peak characteristics of pure ink which was executed later. It was observed that the absorption spectrum of intersection corresponds with either the laser printer or the typewriter ink stroke, whether these strokes were executed earlier or later than the writing instrument strokes. As the results obtained from the study were negative, the FDEs are advised against the practice of this technique in the examination of the sequence of intersecting strokes for these specified inks. PMID:23601731

  5. Application of Video Spectral Comparator (absorption spectra) for establishing the chronological order of intersecting printed strokes and writing pen strokes.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Ridamjeet; Saini, Komal; Sood, N C

    2013-06-01

    The sequence of intersecting strokes of laser printers (black, blue, red and green) and typewriter ink (black) with the strokes of gel pen ink, ballpoint pen ink and fountain pen ink (black, blue, red and green) has been determined by studying their absorption spectra. The absorption spectra have been generated for each of the two pure inks (i.e. A and B) and points of their intersections (i.e. A over B and B over A) by using Video Spectral Comparator (VSC-2000-HR). The study was carried out with an assumption that the peak characteristics of spectra from the point of intersection should correspond to the peak characteristics of pure ink which was executed later. It was observed that the absorption spectrum of intersection corresponds with either the laser printer or the typewriter ink stroke, whether these strokes were executed earlier or later than the writing instrument strokes. As the results obtained from the study were negative, the FDEs are advised against the practice of this technique in the examination of the sequence of intersecting strokes for these specified inks.

  6. Orthogonal spectra and cross sections: Application to optimization of multi-spectral absorption and fluorescence lidar

    SciTech Connect

    Shokair, I.R.

    1997-09-01

    This report addresses the problem of selection of lidar parameters, namely wavelengths for absorption lidar and excitation fluorescence pairs for fluorescence lidar, for optimal detection of species. Orthogonal spectra and cross sections are used as mathematical representations which provide a quantitative measure of species distinguishability in mixtures. Using these quantities, a simple expression for the absolute error in calculated species concentration is derived and optimization is accomplished by variation of lidar parameters to minimize this error. It is shown that the optimum number of wavelengths for detection of a species using absorption lidar (excitation fluorescence pairs for fluorescence lidar) is the same as the number of species in the mixture. Each species present in the mixture has its own set of optimum wavelengths. There is usually some overlap in these sets. The optimization method is applied to two examples, one using absorption and the other using fluorescence lidar, for analyzing mixtures of four organic compounds. The effect of atmospheric attenuation is included in the optimization process. Although the number of optimum wavelengths might be small, it is essential to do large numbers of measurements at these wavelengths in order to maximize canceling of statistical errors.

  7. A search for ultraviolet circumstellar gas absorption features in alpha Piscis Austrinus (Fomalhaut), a possible Beta Pictoris-like system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheng, K.-P.; Bruhweiler, Fred C.; Kondo, Yoji

    1994-01-01

    Archival high-dispersion International Ultraviolet Explorer (IUE) spectra have been used to search for circumstellar gas absorption features in alpha PsA (A3 V), a nearby (6.7 pc) proto-planetary system candidate. Recent sub-millimeter mapping observations around the region of alpha PsA indicate a spatially resolved dust disk like the one seen around Beta Pic. To determine how closely this putative disk resembles that of Beta Pic, we have searched for signatures of circumstellar gaseous absorption in all the available IUE high-dispersion data of alpha PsA. Examination of co-added IUE spectra shows weak circumstellar absorptions from excited levels in the resonance multiplet of Fe II near 2600 A. We also conclude that the sharp C I feature near 1657 A, previously identified as interstellar absorption toward alpha PsA, likely has a circumstellar origin. However, because the weakness of these absorption features, we will consider the presence of circumstellar gas as tentative and should be verified by using the Goddard High-Resolution Spectrograph aboard the Hubble Space Telescope. No corresponding circumstellar absorption is detected in higher ionization Fe III and Al III. Since the collisionally ionized nonphotospheric Al III resonance absorption seen in Beta Pic is likely formed close to the stellar surface, its absence in the UV spectra of alpha PsA could imply that, in contrast with Beta Pic, there is no active gaseous disk infall onto the central star. In the alpha PsA gaseous disk, if we assume a solar abundance for iron and all the iron is in the form of Fe II, plus a disk temperature of 5000 K, the Fe II UV1 absorption at 2611.8743 A infers a total hydrogen column density along the line of sight through the circumstellar disk of N(H) approximately equals 3.8 x 10(exp 17)/cm.

  8. A search for absorption features in the afterglow of the unusual GRB 130925A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellm, Eric

    2012-09-01

    GRB 130925A produced several emission episodes triggering Swift-BAT, Fermi-GBM, and MAXI. The extraordinary length of this emission--over 10^4 seconds--would give GRB 130925A one of the highest total durations ever observed for a gamma-ray burst. While the initial bursting phase was similar to that of the the relativistic tidal disruption event Swift J1644+57, starting at 10^4 seconds after the trigger this event has entered a steady decay phase without new bursts (www.swift.ac.uk/xrt_curves/00571830/). Its classification is thus uncertain, as neither the long GRB class nor Swift J1644 provide direct parallels. Our NuSTAR spectroscopy during the decay phase has revealed evidence for a broad absorption feature never previously observed for either GRB afterglows or for tidal disruption events. Chandra observations will enable searches for lower-energy lines which may constrain the ionization state of this unprecedented event.

  9. A variable absorption feature in the X-ray spectrum of a magnetar.

    PubMed

    Tiengo, Andrea; Esposito, Paolo; Mereghetti, Sandro; Turolla, Roberto; Nobili, Luciano; Gastaldello, Fabio; Götz, Diego; Israel, Gian Luca; Rea, Nanda; Stella, Luigi; Zane, Silvia; Bignami, Giovanni F

    2013-08-15

    Soft-γ-ray repeaters (SGRs) and anomalous X-ray pulsars (AXPs) are slowly rotating, isolated neutron stars that sporadically undergo episodes of long-term flux enhancement (outbursts) generally accompanied by the emission of short bursts of hard X-rays. This behaviour can be understood in the magnetar model, according to which these sources are mainly powered by their own magnetic energy. This is supported by the fact that the magnetic fields inferred from several observed properties of SGRs and AXPs are greater than-or at the high end of the range of-those of radio pulsars. In the peculiar case of SGR 0418+5729, a weak dipole magnetic moment is derived from its timing parameters, whereas a strong field has been proposed to reside in the stellar interior and in multipole components on the surface. Here we show that the X-ray spectrum of SGR 0418+5729 has an absorption line, the properties of which depend strongly on the star's rotational phase. This line is interpreted as a proton cyclotron feature and its energy implies a magnetic field ranging from 2 × 10(14) gauss to more than 10(15) gauss. PMID:23955229

  10. A variable absorption feature in the X-ray spectrum of a magnetar.

    PubMed

    Tiengo, Andrea; Esposito, Paolo; Mereghetti, Sandro; Turolla, Roberto; Nobili, Luciano; Gastaldello, Fabio; Götz, Diego; Israel, Gian Luca; Rea, Nanda; Stella, Luigi; Zane, Silvia; Bignami, Giovanni F

    2013-08-15

    Soft-γ-ray repeaters (SGRs) and anomalous X-ray pulsars (AXPs) are slowly rotating, isolated neutron stars that sporadically undergo episodes of long-term flux enhancement (outbursts) generally accompanied by the emission of short bursts of hard X-rays. This behaviour can be understood in the magnetar model, according to which these sources are mainly powered by their own magnetic energy. This is supported by the fact that the magnetic fields inferred from several observed properties of SGRs and AXPs are greater than-or at the high end of the range of-those of radio pulsars. In the peculiar case of SGR 0418+5729, a weak dipole magnetic moment is derived from its timing parameters, whereas a strong field has been proposed to reside in the stellar interior and in multipole components on the surface. Here we show that the X-ray spectrum of SGR 0418+5729 has an absorption line, the properties of which depend strongly on the star's rotational phase. This line is interpreted as a proton cyclotron feature and its energy implies a magnetic field ranging from 2 × 10(14) gauss to more than 10(15) gauss.

  11. Spectral Feature Analysis for Quantitative Estimation of Cyanobacteria Chlorophyll-A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Yi; Ye, Zhanglin; Zhang, Yugan; Yu, Jie

    2016-06-01

    In recent years, lake eutrophication caused a large of Cyanobacteria bloom which not only brought serious ecological disaster but also restricted the sustainable development of regional economy in our country. Chlorophyll-a is a very important environmental factor to monitor water quality, especially for lake eutrophication. Remote sensed technique has been widely utilized in estimating the concentration of chlorophyll-a by different kind of vegetation indices and monitoring its distribution in lakes, rivers or along coastline. For each vegetation index, its quantitative estimation accuracy for different satellite data might change since there might be a discrepancy of spectral resolution and channel center between different satellites. The purpose this paper is to analyze the spectral feature of chlorophyll-a with hyperspectral data (totally 651 bands) and use the result to choose the optimal band combination for different satellites. The analysis method developed here in this study could be useful to recognize and monitor cyanobacteria bloom automatically and accrately. In our experiment, the reflectance (from 350nm to 1000nm) of wild cyanobacteria in different consistency (from 0 to 1362.11ug/L) and the corresponding chlorophyll-a concentration were measured simultaneously. Two kinds of hyperspectral vegetation indices were applied in this study: simple ratio (SR) and narrow band normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI), both of which consists of any two bands in the entire 651 narrow bands. Then multivariate statistical analysis was used to construct the linear, power and exponential models. After analyzing the correlation between chlorophyll-a and single band reflectance, SR, NDVI respetively, the optimal spectral index for quantitative estimation of cyanobacteria chlorophyll-a, as well corresponding central wavelength and band width were extracted. Results show that: Under the condition of water disturbance, SR and NDVI are both suitable for quantitative

  12. Investigation of the formaldehyde differential absorption cross section at high and low spectral resolution in the simulation chamber SAPHIR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brauers, T.; Bossmeyer, J.; Dorn, H.-P.; Schlosser, E.; Tillmann, R.; Wegener, R.; Wahner, A.

    2007-07-01

    The results from a simulation chamber study on the formaldehyde (HCHO) absorption cross section in the UV spectral region are presented. We performed 4 experiments at ambient HCHO concentrations with simultaneous measurements of two DOAS instruments in the atmosphere simulation chamber SAPHIR in Jülich. The two instruments differ in their spectral resolution, one working at 0.2 nm (broad-band, BB-DOAS), the other at 2.7 pm (high-resolution, HR-DOAS). Both instruments use dedicated multi reflection cells to achieve long light path lengths of 960 m and 2240 m, respectively, inside the chamber. During two experiments HCHO was injected into the clean chamber by thermolysis of well defined amounts of para-formaldehyde reaching mixing rations of 30 ppbV at maximum. The HCHO concentration calculated from the injection and the chamber volume agrees with the BB-DOAS measured value when the absorption cross section of Meller and Moortgat (2000) and the temperature coefficient of Cantrell (1990) were used for data evaluation. In two further experiments we produced HCHO in-situ from the ozone + ethene reaction which was intended to provide an independent way of HCHO calibration through the measurements of ozone and ethene. However, we found an unexpected deviation from the current understanding of the ozone + ethene reaction when CO was added to suppress possible oxidation of ethene by OH radicals. The reaction of the Criegee intermediate with CO could be 240 times slower than currently assumed. Based on the BB-DOAS measurements we could deduce a high-resolution cross section for HCHO which was not measured directly so far.

  13. A critical review of measurements of water vapor absorption in the 840 to 1100 cm(-1) spectral region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grant, William B.

    1987-01-01

    A set of eleven measurements of the water vapor continuum absorption in the 840 to 1100 sq cm spectral region is reviewed and compared with spectral models maintained by the Air Force Geophysics Laboratory. The measurements were made in four different ways: spectrometer with a White cell, CO2 laser with a White cell, CO2 laser with a spectrophone, and broadband radiation source over a long atmospheric path. Where possible, the data were selected at a water vapor partial pressure of ten torr buffered to 760 torr with N2 or synthetic air and a temperature of between 296 and 300 K. The intercomparison of the data leads to several observations and conclusions. First, there are four sets of laboratory data taken with nitrogen as the buffer gas which generally agree well mutually and with AFGL's HITRAN code. Second, there is one set of laboratory data that shows that using air as the buffer gas gives a few percent decrease in the water vapor continuum compared with using nitrogen as the buffer gas. Third, the atmospheric long-path measurements for water vapor partial pressure below about 12 torr are roughly grouped within 20 percent of the HITRAN values. Fourth, there are three sets of spectrophone data for water vapor in synthetic air which are significantly higher than any of the other measurements. This discrepancy is attributed to the effects of impurity gases in the cell.

  14. Spectral Moments of Collision-Induced Absorption of CO2 Pairs: The Role of the Intermolecular Potential

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gruszka, Marcin; Borysow, Aleksandra

    1994-01-01

    In this paper we examine the role of the anisotropy of the intermolecular potential in the rototranslational collision-induced absorption of the CO2 pairs. Using newly developed formulas that include the effects of anisotropy of the potential to all orders, we calculate the two lowest spectral moments gamma(prime), and alpha(prime), for four different classes of C02 pair potentials and compare the results with the experimental values. We assumed only multipolar induction in the process of forming the induced dipole, with the second-order contributions included. Using a site-site LJ and a site-site semi-ab initio intermolecular potentials we were able to reproduce the experimental values of gamma(prime), and alpha(prime) moments over entire temperature range from 230 to 330 K. Also, the role of an electrostatic interaction between two C02 molecules and its impact on the spectral moments is thoroughly investigated. An isotropic core with a point quadrupole centered at each molecule is shown to be an inadequate representation of the C02-CO2 potential. Additionally, we show the results obtained with the first- and second-order perturbation theory to be more than twice too small.

  15. The initial mass functions of M31 and M32 through far red stellar absorption features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zieleniewski, Simon; Houghton, Ryan C. W.; Thatte, Niranjan; Davies, Roger L.

    2015-09-01

    Using the Oxford Short Wavelength Integral Field specTrograph, we investigate radial variations of several initial mass function (IMF) dependent absorption features in M31 and M32. We obtain high signal-to-noise spectra at six pointings along the major axis of M31 out to ˜700 arcsec (2.7 kpc) and a single pointing of the central 10 pc for M32. In M31 the sodium Na I λ8190 index shows a flat equivalent width profile at ˜0.4 Å through the majority of the bulge, with a strong gradient up to 0.8 Å in the central 10 arcsec (38 pc); the Wing-Ford FeH λ9916 index is measured to be constant at 0.4 Å for all radii; and calcium triplet CaT λλ8498, 8542, 8662 shows a gradual increase through the bulge towards the centre. M32 displays flat profiles for all three indices, with FeH at ˜0.5 Å, very high CaT at ˜0.8 Å and low Na I at ˜0.1 Å. We analyse these data using stellar population models. We find that M31 is well described on all scales by a Chabrier IMF, with a gradient in sodium enhancement of [Na/Fe] ˜ +0.3 dex in the outer bulge, rising within the central 10 arcsec to perhaps [Na/Fe] ˜ +1.0 dex in the nuclear region. We find M32 is described by a Chabrier IMF and young stellar age in line with other studies. Models show that CaT is much more sensitive to metallicity and [α/Fe] than to IMF. We note that the centres of M31 and M32 have very high stellar densities and yet we measure Chabrier IMFs in these regions.

  16. In Situ Measurements of Aerosol Mass Concentration and Spectral Absorption at Three Location in and Around Mexico City

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaudhry, Z.; Martins, V.; Li, Z.

    2006-12-01

    As a result of population growth and increasing industrialization, air pollution in heavily populated urban areas is one of the central environmental problems of the century. As a part of the MILAGRO (Megacity Initiative: Local and Global Research Observations) study, Nuclepore filters were collected in two size ranges (PM10 and PM2.5) at 12 hour intervals at three location in Mexico during March, 2006. Sampling stations were located at the Instituto Mexicano del Petroleo (T0), at the Rancho La Bisnago in the State of Hidalgo (T2) and along the Gulf Coast in Tampico (Tam). Each filter was analyzed for mass concentration, aerosol scattering and absorption efficiencies. Mass concentrations at T0 ranged from 47 to 179 μg/m3 for PM10 with an average concentration of 96 μg/m3, and from 20 to 93 μg/m3 for PM2.5 with an average concentration of 41 μg/m3. Mass concentrations at T2 ranged from 12 to 154 μg/m3 for PM10 with an average concentration of 51 μg/m3, and from 7 to 50 μg/m3 for PM2.5 with an average concentration of 25 μg/m3. Mass concentrations at Tam ranged from 34 to 80 μg/m3 for PM10 with an average concentration of 52 μg/m3, and from 8 to 23 μg/m3 for PM2.5 with an average concentration of 13 μg/m3. While some of the extreme values are likely linked to local emissions, regional air pollution episodes also played important roles. Each of the sampling stations experienced a unique atmospheric condition. The site at T0 was influenced by urban air pollution and dust storms, the site at T2 was significantly less affected by air pollution but more affected by regional dust storms and local dust devils while Tam was influenced by air pollution, dust storms and the natural marine environment. The spectral mass absorption efficiency was measured from 350 to 2500 nm and shows large differences between the absorption properties of soil dust, black carbon, and organic aerosols. The strong spectral differences observed can be related to differences in

  17. High-accuracy measurement of low-water-content in liquid using NIR spectral absorption method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Bao-Jin; Wan, Xu; Jin, Hong-Zhen; Zhao, Yong; Mao, He-Fa

    2005-01-01

    Water content measurement technologies are very important for quality inspection of food, medicine products, chemical products and many other industry fields. In recent years, requests for accurate low-water-content measurement in liquid are more and more exigent, and great interests have been shown from the research and experimental work. With the development and advancement of modern production and control technologies, more accurate water content technology is needed. In this paper, a novel experimental setup based on near-infrared (NIR) spectral technology and fiber-optic sensor (OFS) is presented. It has a good measurement accuracy about -/+ 0.01%, which is better, to our knowledge, than most other methods published until now. It has a high measurement resolution of 0.001% in the measurement range from zero to 0.05% for water-in-alcohol measurement, and the water-in-oil measurement is carried out as well. In addition, the advantages of this method also include pollution-free to the measured liquid, fast measurement and so on.

  18. Examination of the spectral features of vegetation in 1987 AVIRIS data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elvidge, Christopher D.

    1988-01-01

    Equations for converting AVIRIS digital numbers to percent reflectance were developed using a set of three calibration targets. AVIRIS reflectance spectra from five plant communities exhibit distinct spectral differences.

  19. Correlation of Coal Calorific Value and Sulphur Content with 57Fe Mössbauer Spectral Absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wynter, C. I.; May, L.; Oliver, F. W.; Hall, J. A.; Hoffman, E. J.; Kumar, A.; Christopher, L.

    Coal is the most abundant, most economical and widely distributed fossil fuel in the world today. It is also the principal form of reductant in the iron and steel industry. This study was undertaken to not only add to the growing use of Mössbauer spectroscopy application in industry but also to increase the chemistry and physics knowledge base of coal. Coal is 40 to 80 percent carbon with small amounts of sulphur and iron as pyrite and ferrous sulphate. The environmental concern associated with mining and burning of coal has long been a subject of investigation with emphasis on the sulphur content. We examined five ranks of coal: anthracite, Eastern bituminous, bituminous, sub-bituminous, and lignite. Relationships were investigated between the Calorific Value (CV) of coal and inorganic sulphur content, 57Fe Mössbauer absorption, and ratio of pyrite (FeS2) to FeSO4. Twenty-eight samples of the five different types of coal had CVs ranging from 32,403 to 16,100 kJ/kg and sulphur concentrations ranging from 0.28 to 2.5 percent. CV appeared to be positively correlated with concentrations of sulphur and of iron-sulphur salts, although there appears to be little connection with the distribution of their oxidation states.

  20. Comparison of Aerosol Classification from Airborne High Spectral Resolution Lidar and the CALIPSO Vertical Feature Mask

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burton, S. P.; Ferrare, R. A.; Omar, A. H.; Hostetler, C. A.; Hair, J. W.; Rogers, R.; Obland, M. D.; Butler, C. F.; Cook, A. L.; Harper, D. B.

    2012-12-01

    The NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) airborne High Spectral Resolution Lidar (HSRL-1) on the NASA B200 aircraft has acquired large datasets of aerosol extinction (532nm), backscatter (532 and 1064nm), and depolarization (532 and 1064nm) profiles during 349 science flights in 19 field missions across North America since 2006. The extinction-to-backscatter ratio ("lidar ratio"), aerosol depolarization ratios, and backscatter color ratio measurements from HSRL-1 are scale-invariant parameters that depend on aerosol type but not concentration. These four aerosol intensive parameters are combined to qualitatively classify HSRL aerosol measurements into eight separate composition types. The classification methodology uses models formed from "training cases" with known aerosol type. The remaining measurements are then compared with these models using the Mahalanobis distance. Aerosol products from the CALIPSO satellite include aerosol type information as well, which is used as input to the CALIPSO aerosol retrieval. CALIPSO aerosol types are inferred using a mix of aerosol loading-dependent parameters, estimated aerosol depolarization, and location, altitude, and surface type information. The HSRL instrument flies beneath the CALIPSO satellite orbit track, presenting the opportunity for comparisons between the HSRL aerosol typing and the CALIPSO Vertical Feature Mask Aerosol Subtype product, giving insight into the performance of the CALIPSO aerosol type algorithm. We find that the aerosol classification from the two instruments frequently agree for marine aerosols and pure dust, and somewhat less frequently for pollution and smoke. In addition, the comparison suggests that the CALIPSO polluted dust type is overly inclusive, encompassing cases of dust combined with marine aerosol as well as cases without much evidence of dust. Qualitative classification of aerosol type combined with quantitative profile measurements of aerosol backscatter and extinction has many useful

  1. [Study on intestinal absorption features of oligosaccharides in Morinda officinalis How. with sigle-pass perfusion].

    PubMed

    Deng, Shao-Dong; Zhang, Peng; Lin, Li; Xiao, Feng-Xia; Lin, Jing-Ran

    2015-01-01

    To study the in situ intestinal absorption of five oligosaccharides contained in Morinda officinalis How. (sucrose, kestose, nystose, 1F-Fructofuranosyinystose and Bajijiasu). The absorption of the five oligosaccharides in small intestine (duodenum, jejunum and ileum) and colon of rats and their contents were investigated by using in situ single-pass perfusion model and HPLC-ELSD. The effects of drug concentration, pH in perfusate and P-glycoprotein inhibitor on the intestinal absorption were investigated to define the intestinal absorption mechanism of the five oligosaccharides in rats. According to the results, all of the five oligosaccharides were absorbed in the whole intestine, and their absorption rates were affected by the pH of the perfusion solution, drug concentration and intestinal segments. Verapamil Hydrochloride could significantly increase the absorptive amount of sucrose and Bajijiasu, suggesting sucrose and Bajijiasu are P-gp's substrate. The five oligosaccharides are absorbed mainly through passive diffusion in the intestinal segments, without saturated absorption. They are absorbed well in all intestines and mainly in duodenum and jejunum.

  2. A SENSITIVE SPECTRAL SURVEY OF INTERSTELLAR FEATURES IN THE NEAR-UV [3050-3700 Å

    SciTech Connect

    Bhatt, N. H.; Cami, J. E-mail: jcami@uwo.ca

    2015-02-01

    We present a comprehensive and sensitive unbiased survey of interstellar features in the near-UV range (3050-3700 Å). We combined a large number of VLT/UVES archival observations of a sample of highly reddened early-type stars—typical diffuse interstellar band targets—and unreddened standards. We stacked the individual observations to obtain a reddened ''superspectrum'' in the interstellar rest frame with a signal-to-noise ratio exceeding 1500. We compared this to the analogous geocentric and stellar rest frame superspectra as well as to an unreddened superspectrum to find interstellar absorption features. We find 30 known features (11 atomic and 19 molecular) and tentatively detect up to 7 new interstellar absorption lines of unknown origin. Our survey is sensitive to narrow and weak features; telluric residuals preclude us from detecting broader features. For each sightline, we measured fundamental parameters (radial velocities, line widths, and equivalent widths) of the detected interstellar features. We also revisit upper limits for the column densities of small, neutral polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon molecules that have strong transitions in this wavelength range.

  3. Spectral particle absorption coefficients, single scattering albedos and imaginary parts of refractive indices from ground based in situ measurements at Cape Verde Island during SAMUM-2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, T.; Schladitz, A.; Kandler, K.; Wiedensohler, A.

    2011-09-01

    During the SAMUM-2 experiment, spectral absorption coefficients, single scattering albedos and imaginary parts of refractive indices of mineral dust particles were investigated at the Cape Verde Islands. Main absorbing constituents of airborne samples were mineral dust and soot. PM10 spectral absorption coefficients were measured using a Spectral Optical Absorption Photometer (SOAP) covering the wavelength range from 300 to 960 nm with a resolution of 25 nm. From SOAP, also information on the particle scattering coefficients could be retrieved. Spectral single scattering albedos were obtained in the wavelength range from 350 to 960 nm. Imaginary parts of the refractive index were inferred from measured particle number size distributions and absorption coefficients using Mie scattering theory. Imaginary parts for a dust case were 0.012, 0.0047 and 0.0019 at the wavelengths 450, 550 and 950 nm, respectively, and the single scattering albedos were 0.91, 0.96 and 0.98 at the same wavelengths. During a marine case, the imaginary parts of the refractive indices were 0.0045, 0.0040 and 0.0036 and single scattering albedos were 0.93, 0.95 and 0.96 at the wavelengths given above.

  4. The spectral variability of the GHZ-Peaked spectrum radio source PKS 1718-649 and a comparison of absorption models

    SciTech Connect

    Tingay, S. J.; Macquart, J.-P.; Wayth, R. B.; Trott, C. M.; Emrich, D.; Collier, J. D.; Wong, G. F.; Rees, G.; Stevens, J.; Carretti, E.; Callingham, J. R.; Gaensler, B. M.; McKinley, B.; Briggs, F.; Bernardi, G.; Bowman, J. D.; Cappallo, R. J.; Corey, B. E.; Deshpande, A. A.; Goeke, R.; and others

    2015-02-01

    Using the new wideband capabilities of the ATCA, we obtain spectra for PKS 1718-649, a well-known gigahertz-peaked spectrum radio source. The observations, between approximately 1 and 10 GHz over 3 epochs spanning approximately 21 months, reveal variability both above the spectral peak at ∼3 GHz and below the peak. The combination of the low- and high-frequency variability cannot be easily explained using a single absorption mechanism, such as free–free absorption or synchrotron self-absorption. We find that the PKS 1718-649 spectrum and its variability are best explained by variations in the free–free optical depth on our line of sight to the radio source at low frequencies (below the spectral peak) and the adiabatic expansion of the radio source itself at high frequencies (above the spectral peak). The optical depth variations are found to be plausible when X-ray continuum absorption variability seen in samples of active galactic nuclei is considered. We find that the cause of the peaked spectrum in PKS 1718-649 is most likely due to free–free absorption. In agreement with previous studies, we find that the spectrum at each epoch of observation is best fit by a free–free absorption model characterized by a power-law distribution of free–free absorbing clouds. This agreement is extended to frequencies below the 1 GHz lower limit of the ATCA by considering new observations with Parkes at 725 MHz and 199 MHz observations with the newly operational Murchison Widefield Array. These lower frequency observations argue against families of absorption models (both free–free and synchrotron self-absorption) that are based on simple homogenous structures.

  5. Spectral features of Earth-like planets and their detectability at different orbital distances around F, G, and K-type stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hedelt, P.; von Paris, P.; Godolt, M.; Gebauer, S.; Grenfell, J. L.; Rauer, H.; Schreier, F.; Selsis, F.; Trautmann, T.

    2013-05-01

    Context. In recent years, more and more transiting terrestrial extrasolar planets have been found. Spectroscopy already yielded the detection of molecular absorption bands in the atmospheres of Jupiter and Neptune-sized exoplanets. Detecting spectral features in the atmosphere of terrestrial planets is the next great challenge for exoplanet characterization. Aims: We investigate the spectral appearance of Earth-like exoplanets in the habitable zone (HZ) of different main sequence (F, G, and K-type) stars at different orbital distances. We furthermore discuss for which of these scenarios biomarker absorption bands and related compounds may be detected during primary or secondary transit with near-future telescopes and instruments. Methods: Atmospheric profiles from a 1D cloud-free atmospheric climate-photochemistry model were used to compute primary and secondary eclipse infrared spectra. The spectra were analyzed taking into account different filter bandpasses of two photometric instruments planned to be mounted to the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST). We analyzed in which filters and for which scenarios molecular absorption bands are detectable when using the space-borne JWST or the ground-based European Extremely Large Telescope (E-ELT). Results: Absorption bands of carbon dioxide (CO2), water (H2O), methane (CH4) and ozone (O3) are clearly visible in both high-resolution spectra as well as in the filters of photometric instruments. However, only during primary eclipse absorption bands of CO2, H2O and O3 are detectable for all scenarios when using photometric instruments and an E-ELT-like telescope setup. CH4 is only detectable at the outer HZ of the K-type star since here the atmospheric modeling results in very high abundances. Since the detectable CO2 and H2O absorption bands overlap, separate bands need to be observed to prove their existence in the planetary atmosphere. In order to detect H2O in a separate band, a ratio S/N > 7 needs to be achieved for E

  6. Modified thermal-optical analysis using spectral absorption selectivity to distinguish black carbon from pyrolized organic carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Hadley, Odelle; Hadley, O.L.; Corrigan, C.E.; Kirchstetter, T.W.

    2008-04-14

    Black carbon (BC), a main component of combustion-generated soot, is a strong absorber of sunlight and contributes to climate change. Measurement methods for BC are uncertain, however. This study presents a method for analyzing the BC mass loading on a quartz fiber filter using a modified thermal-optical analysis method, wherein light transmitted through the sample is measured over a spectral region instead of at a single wavelength as the sample is heated. Evolution of the spectral light transmission signal depends on the relative amounts of light-absorbing BC and char, the latter of which forms when organic carbon in the sample pyrolyzes during heating. Absorption selectivities of BC and char are found to be distinct and are used to apportion the amount of light attenuated by each component in the sample. Light attenuation is converted to mass concentration based on derived mass attenuation efficiencies (MAE) of BC and char. The fraction of attenuation due to each component are scaled by their individual MAE values and added together as the total mass of light absorbing carbon (LAC). An iterative algorithm is used to find the MAE values for both BC and char that provide the best fit to the carbon mass remaining on the filter (derived from direct measurements of thermally evolved CO{sub 2}) at temperatures higher than 480 C. This method was applied to measure the BC concentration in precipitation samples collected from coastal and mountain sites in Northern California. The uncertainty in measured BC concentration of samples that contained a high concentration of organics susceptible to char ranged from 12 to 100 percent, depending on the mass loading of BC on the filter. The lower detection limit for this method was approximately 0.35 {micro}g BC and uncertainty approached 20 percent for BC mass loading greater than 1.0 {micro}g BC.

  7. Measurements of mesospheric water vapour, aerosols and temperatures with the Spectral Absorption Line Imager (SALI-AT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shepherd, M. G.; Mullins, M.; Brown, S.; Sargoytchev, S. I.

    2001-08-01

    Water vapour concentration is one of the most important, yet one of the least known quantities of the mesosphere. Knowledge of water vapour concentration is the key to understanding many mesospheric processes, including the one that is primary focus of our investigation, mesospheric clouds (MC). The processes of formation and occurrence parameters of MC constitute an interesting problem in their own right, but recently evidence has been provided which suggests that they are a critical indicator of atmospheric change. The aim of the SALI-AT experiment is to make simultaneous (although not strictly collocated) measurements of water vapour, aerosols and temperature in the mesosphere and the mesopause region under twilight condition in the presence of mesospheric clouds. The water vapour will be measured in the regime of solar occultation utilizing a water vapour absorption band at 936 nm wavelength employing the SALI (Spectral Absorption Line Imager) instrument concept. A three-channel zenith photometer, AT-3, with wavelengths of 385 nm, 525 nm, and 1040 nm will measure Mie and Rayleigh scattering giving both mesospheric temperature profiles and the particle size distribution. Both instruments are small, low cost and low mass. It is envisioned that the SALI-AT experiment be flown on a small rocket - the Improved Orion/Hotel payload configuration, from the Andoya Rocket range, Norway. Alternatively the instrument can be flown as a "passenger" on larger rocket carrying other experiments. In either case flight costs are relatively low. Some performance simulations are presented showing that the instrument we have designed will be sufficiently sensitive to measure water vapor in concentrations that are expected at the summer mesopause, about 85 km height.

  8. Spectrally Consistent Scattering, Absorption, and Polarization Properties of Atmospheric Ice Crystals at Wavelengths from 0.2 to 100 um

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, Ping; Bi, Lei; Baum, Bryan A.; Liou, Kuo-Nan; Kattawar, George W.; Mishchenko, Michael I.; Cole, Benjamin

    2013-01-01

    A data library is developed containing the scattering, absorption, and polarization properties of ice particles in the spectral range from 0.2 to 100 microns. The properties are computed based on a combination of the Amsterdam discrete dipole approximation (ADDA), the T-matrix method, and the improved geometric optics method (IGOM). The electromagnetic edge effect is incorporated into the extinction and absorption efficiencies computed from the IGOM. A full set of single-scattering properties is provided by considering three-dimensional random orientations for 11 ice crystal habits: droxtals, prolate spheroids, oblate spheroids, solid and hollow columns, compact aggregates composed of eight solid columns, hexagonal plates, small spatial aggregates composed of 5 plates, large spatial aggregates composed of 10 plates, and solid and hollow bullet rosettes. The maximum dimension of each habit ranges from 2 to 10,000 microns in 189 discrete sizes. For each ice crystal habit, three surface roughness conditions (i.e., smooth, moderately roughened, and severely roughened) are considered to account for the surface texture of large particles in the IGOM applicable domain. The data library contains the extinction efficiency, single-scattering albedo, asymmetry parameter, six independent nonzero elements of the phase matrix (P11, P12, P22, P33, P43, and P44), particle projected area, and particle volume to provide the basic single-scattering properties for remote sensing applications and radiative transfer simulations involving ice clouds. Furthermore, a comparison of satellite observations and theoretical simulations for the polarization characteristics of ice clouds demonstrates that ice cloud optical models assuming severely roughened ice crystals significantly outperform their counterparts assuming smooth ice crystals.

  9. Measurement and feature analysis of absorption spectra of four algal species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Jianhua; Zhou, Hongli; Han, Bing; Li, Tongji

    2016-04-01

    Two methods for particulate pigments (i.e., quantitative filter technique, QFT, and in vivo measurement, InVivo, respectively) and two methods for dissolved pigments (i.e., Acetone Extracts, AceEx, and high-performance liquid chromatography, HPLC, respectively) were used to obtain the optical absorption coefficient spectra for cultures of four typical algal species. Through normalization and analysis of the spectra, it is shown that (1) the four methods are able to measure optical absorption spectra of particulate and/or dissolved pigments; (2) that the optical absorption spectra of particulate and dissolved pigments were consistent in terms of the peak position in the blue wavelength, and the difference of the peak position in the near infrared wavelength was ~10 nm between each other; and (3) that the leveling effect of the absorption spectra of particulate pigments was significant. These four methods can all effectively measure the absorption coefficients of phytoplankton pigments, while each one has its unique advantages in different applications. Therefore, appropriate method should be carefully selected for various application due to their intrinsic difference.

  10. Analysis of Unresolved Spectral Infrared Signature for the Extraction of Invariant Features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaudhary, A.; Payne, T.; Wilhelm, S.; Gregory, S.; Skinner, M.; Rudy, R.; Russell, R.; Brown, J.; Dao, P.

    2010-09-01

    This paper demonstrates a simple analytical technique for extraction of spectral radiance values for the solar panel and body from an unresolved spectral infrared signature of 3-axis stabilized low-earth orbit (LEO) satellites. It uses data collected by The Aerospace Corporation’s Broad-band Array Spectrograph System (BASS) instrument at the Air Force Maui Optical and Supercomputing (AMOS) site. The observation conditions were such that the signatures were due to the emissive phenomenology and contribution of earthshine was negligible. The analysis is based on a two-facet orientation model of the satellite. This model captures the basic, known behavior of the satellite body and its solar panels. One facet points to nadir and the second facet tracks the sun. The facet areas are unknown. Special conditions are determined on the basis of observational geometry that allows separation of the spectral radiance values of the solar panel and body. These values remain unchanged (i.e., are invariant) under steady illumination conditions even if the signature appears different from one observation to another. In addition, they provide information on the individual spectral makeup of the satellite solar panel and body materials.

  11. Application of independent component analysis method in real-time spectral analysis of gaseous mixtures for acousto-optical spectrometers based on differential optical absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fadeyev, A. V.; Pozhar, V. E.

    2012-10-01

    It is discussed the reliability problem of time-optimized method for remote optical spectral analysis of gas-polluted ambient air. The method based on differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS) enables fragmentary spectrum registration (FSR) and is suitable for random-spectral-access (RSA) optical spectrometers like acousto-optical (AO) ones. Here, it is proposed the algorithm based on statistical method of independent component analysis (ICA) for estimation of a correctness of absorption spectral lines selection for FSR-method. Implementations of ICA method for RSA-based real-time adaptive systems are considered. Numerical simulations are presented with use of real spectra detected by the trace gas monitoring system GAOS based on AO spectrometer.

  12. Spectral investigations of 2,5-difluoroaniline by using mass, electronic absorption, NMR, and vibrational spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kose, Etem; Karabacak, Mehmet; Bardak, Fehmi; Atac, Ahmet

    2016-11-01

    One of the most significant aromatic amines is aniline, a primary aromatic amine replacing one hydrogen atom of a benzene molecule with an amino group (NH2). This study reports experimental and theoretical investigation of 2,5-difluoroaniline molecule (2,5-DFA) by using mass, ultraviolet-visible (UV-vis), 1H and 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), Fourier transform infrared and Raman (FT-IR and FT-Raman) spectra, and supported with theoretical calculations. Mass spectrum (MS) of 2,5-DFA is presented with their stabilities. The UV-vis spectra of the molecule are recorded in the range of 190-400 nm in water and ethanol solvents. The 1H and 13C NMR chemical shifts are recorded in CDCl3 solution. The vibrational spectra are recorded in the region 4000-400 cm-1 (FT-IR) and 4000-10 cm-1 (FT-Raman), respectively. Theoretical studies are underpinned the experimental results as described below; 2,5-DFA molecule is optimized by using B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p) basis set. The mass spectrum is evaluated and possible fragmentations are proposed based on the stable structure. The electronic properties, such as excitation energies, oscillator strengths, wavelengths, frontier molecular orbitals (FMO), HOMO and LUMO energies, are determined by time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT). The electrostatic potential surface (ESPs), density of state (DOS) diagrams are also prepared and evaluated. In addition to these, reduced density gradient (RDG) analysis is performed, and thermodynamic features are carried out theoretically. The NMR spectra (1H and 13C) are calculated by using the gauge-invariant atomic orbital (GIAO) method. The vibrational spectra of 2,5-DFA molecule are obtained by using DFT/B3LYP method with 6-311++G(d,p) basis set. Fundamental vibrations are assigned based on the potential energy distribution (PED) of the vibrational modes. The nonlinear optical properties (NLO) are also investigated. The theoretical and experimental results give a detailed description of

  13. Experimental recovery of intrinsic fluorescence and fluorophore concentration in the presence of hemoglobin: spectral effect of scattering and absorption on fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du Le, Vinh Nguyen; Patterson, Michael S.; Farrell, Thomas J.; Hayward, Joseph E.; Fang, Qiyin

    2015-12-01

    The ability to recover the intrinsic fluorescence of biological fluorophores is crucial to accurately identify the fluorophores and quantify their concentrations in the media. Although some studies have successfully retrieved the fluorescence spectral shape of known fluorophores, the techniques usually came with heavy computation costs and did not apply for strongly absorptive media, and the intrinsic fluorescence intensity and fluorophore concentration were not recovered. In this communication, an experimental approach was presented to recover intrinsic fluorescence and concentration of fluorescein in the presence of hemoglobin (Hb). The results indicated that the method was efficient in recovering the intrinsic fluorescence peak and fluorophore concentration with an error of 3% and 10%, respectively. The results also suggested that chromophores with irregular absorption spectra (e.g., Hb) have more profound effects on fluorescence spectral shape than chromophores with monotonic absorption and scattering spectra (e.g., black India ink and polystyrene microspheres).

  14. 4.6 micron absorption features due to solid phase CO and cyano group molecules toward compact infrared sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lacy, J. H.; Baas, F.; Allamandola, L. J.; Van De Bult, C. E. P.; Persson, S. E.; Mcgregor, P. J.; Lonsdale, C. J.; Geballe, T. R.

    1984-01-01

    Spectra obtained at a resolving power of 840, for seven protostellar sources in the region of the 4.67-micron fundamental vibrational band of CO, indicate that the deep absorption feature in W33A near 4.61 microns consists of three features which are seen in other sources, but with varying relative strength. UV-irradiation laboratory experiments with 'dirty ice' temperature cycling allow the identification of two of the features cited with solid CO and CO complexed to other molecules. Cyano group-containing molecules have a lower vapor pressure than CO, and can therefore survive in much warmer environments. The formation and location of the CO- and CN-bearing grain mantles and sources of UV irradiation in cold molecular clouds are discussed. Plausible UV light sources can produce the observed cyano group features, but only under conditions in which local heat sources do not cause evaporation of the CO molecules prior to their photoprocessing.

  15. A Bayes optimal matrix-variate LDA for extraction of spatio-spectral features from EEG signals.

    PubMed

    Mahanta, Mohammad Shahin; Aghaei, Amirhossein S; Plataniotis, Konstantinos N

    2012-01-01

    Classification of mental states from electroencephalogram (EEG) signals is used for many applications in areas such as brain-computer interfacing (BCI). When represented in the frequency domain, the multichannel EEG signal can be considered as a two-directional spatio-spectral data of high dimensionality. Extraction of salient features using feature extractors such as the commonly used linear discriminant analysis (LDA) is an essential step for the classification of these signals. However, multichannel EEG is naturally in matrix-variate format, while LDA and other traditional feature extractors are designed for vector-variate input. Consequently, these methods require a prior vectorization of the EEG signals, which ignores the inherent matrix-variate structure in the data and leads to high computational complexity. A matrix-variate formulation of LDA have previously been proposed. However, this heuristic formulation does not provide the Bayes optimality benefits of LDA. The current paper proposes a Bayes optimal matrix-variate formulation of LDA based on a matrix-variate model for the spatio-spectral EEG patterns. The proposed formulation also provides a strategy to select the most significant features among the different rows and columns.

  16. Spectral features of the quasielastic line in amorphous solids and supercooled liquids: a detailed low-frequency Raman scattering study.

    PubMed

    Yannopoulos, S N; Kastrissios, D Th

    2002-02-01

    The spectral features of the quasielastic light scattering in amorphous solids and supercooled liquids are investigated through a combined Stokes and antiStokes low-frequency Raman scattering study. Emphasis is given on the specific spectral details of the quasielastic line rather than on elucidating its microscopic origin. Our approach is quite general since it includes glass formers with a strong, an intermediate, and a fragile dynamic character. The results suggest that the quasielastic contribution is a symmetric spectral feature around the laser line. This finding makes possible the separation of the quasielastic line and the Boson peak. It further raises certain skepticism concerning reduction schemes followed up in the literature for the analysis of low-frequency Raman data and for models that combine these two contributions. The limiting (omega-->0) behavior of the product of the vibrational density of states and the Raman coupling coefficient has also been extracted. The validity of some phenomenological approaches is also discussed in light of the experimental facts presented in this paper and some suggestions are being advanced. PMID:11863533

  17. Optical filter for highlighting spectral features part I: design and development of the filter for discrimination of human skin with and without an application of cosmetic foundation.

    PubMed

    Nishino, Ken; Nakamura, Mutsuko; Matsumoto, Masayuki; Tanno, Osamu; Nakauchi, Shigeki

    2011-03-28

    Light reflected from an object's surface contains much information about its physical and chemical properties. Changes in the physical properties of an object are barely detectable in spectra. Conventional trichromatic systems, on the other hand, cannot detect most spectral features because spectral information is compressively represented as trichromatic signals forming a three-dimensional subspace. We propose a method for designing a filter that optically modulates a camera's spectral sensitivity to find an alternative subspace highlighting an object's spectral features more effectively than the original trichromatic space. We designed and developed a filter that detects cosmetic foundations on human face. Results confirmed that the filter can visualize and nondestructively inspect the foundation distribution.

  18. Preparation of Honeycomb SnO₂ Foams and Configuration-Dependent Microwave Absorption Features.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Biao; Fan, Bingbing; Xu, Yawei; Shao, Gang; Wang, Xiaodong; Zhao, Wanyu; Zhang, Rui

    2015-12-01

    Ordered honeycomb-like SnO2 foams were successfully synthesized by means of a template method. The honeycomb SnO2 foams were analyzed by X-ray diffraction (XRD), thermogravimetric and differential scanning calorimetry (TG-DSC), laser Raman spectra, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR). It can be found that the SnO2 foam configurations were determined by the size of polystyrene templates. The electromagnetic properties of ordered SnO2 foams were also investigated by a network analyzer. The results reveal that the microwave absorption properties of SnO2 foams were dependent on their configuration. The microwave absorption capabilities of SnO2 foams were increased by increasing the size of pores in the foam configuration. Furthermore, the electromagnetic wave absorption was also correlated with the pore contents in SnO2 foams. The large and high amounts pores can bring about more interfacial polarization and corresponding relaxation. Thus, the perfect ordered honeycomb-like SnO2 foams obtained in the existence of large amounts of 322 nm polystyrene spheres showed the outstanding electromagnetic wave absorption properties. The minimal reflection loss (RL) is -37.6 dB at 17.1 GHz, and RL less than -10 dB reaches 5.6 GHz (12.4-18.0 GHz) with thin thickness of 2.0 mm. The bandwidth (<-10 dB, 90% microwave dissipation) can be monitored in the frequency regime of 4.0-18.0 GHz with absorber thickness of 2.0-5.0 mm. The results indicate that these ordered honeycomb SnO2 foams show the superiorities of wide-band, high-efficiency absorption, multiple reflection and scatting, high antioxidation, lightweight, and thin thickness.

  19. Features in optical absorption and photocurrent spectra of organic solar cells due to organic/organic interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ismail, Yasser A. M.; Soga, Tetsuo; Jimbo, Takashi

    2011-05-01

    We surprisingly found that, organic/organic interface had a direct and pronounced impact on optical absorption and photocurrent spectra of organic solar cell at a favorable wavelength region of the visible solar spectrum. The organic/organic interface was formed as a result of connection between coumarin 6 (C6): [6,6]-phenyl-C61 butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM) blend films and indium-tin oxide (ITO)/poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) doped with poly(styrene sulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS) electrode. Optical absorption measurement was carried out for ITO/PEDOT:PSS/C6:PCBM films, while external quantum efficiency measurement was carried out for ITO/PEDOT:PSS/C6:PCBM/Al solar cells, with varying C6:PCBM blend concentration. We found that, the C6:PCBM blend in the ITO/PEDOT:PSS/C6:PCBM films had an additional feature in the absorption spectra at the wavelength range of 520-800 nm, at which the C6 dye, PCBM, PEDOT:PSS, and ITO were transparent. An additional feature, also, appeared in photocurrent spectra of the C6:PCBM films in the ITO/PEDOT:PSS/C6:PCBM/Al solar cells at the same wavelength range. The new features in the optical absorption and photocurrent spectra of the investigated solar cells originated, in all probability, due to optically induced sup-band transitions in the C6:PCBM blend films at the interface with ITO/PEDOT:PSS electrode. Thus, the C6:PCBM blend films produced a charge carrier generation interface due to connection with ITO/PEDOT:PSS electrode. As a result of this charge carrier generation interface, the power conversion efficiency of the corresponding solar cell is improved. Taking into consideration these new findings, the high-band-gap organic materials will take more importance as sensitizers in organic optoelectronic applications.

  20. Spectral features of stimulated electromagnetic emission, measured in the 4.3-9.5 MHz pump wave frequency range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frolov, V. L.; Sergeev, E. N.; Ermakova, E. N.; Komrakov, G. P.; Stubbe, P.

    Steady state spectral features of stimulated electromagnetic emissions (SEEs) for their major emission components (DM, NC, BC, BUM, and BUS) are studied in a wide pump wave frequency range, from 4.3 to 9.5 MHz, i.e., from slightly above the 3rd to slightly above the 7th gyroharmonic frequency. Based on these systematic experimental data, new peculiarities in the behaviour of the SEE intensity and of the spectral properties, in relation to the gyroharmonic mode number, have been found. The experimental results, discussed in the paper, were collected during the years 1996-2000 at the Sura heating facility in Russia by modification of the ionospheric F region, using ordinary mode HF pump waves.

  1. Robust identification/fingerprinting of audio signals using spectral flatness features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herre, Juergen; Allamanche, Eric; Hellmuth, Oliver; Kastner, Thorsten

    2002-05-01

    Recently, the problem of content-based identification material has received increased attention as an important technique for managing the ever-increasing amount of multimedia assets available to users today. This talk discusses the problem of robust identification of audio signals by comparing them to a known reference (``fingerprint'') in the feature domain. Desirable properties of the underlying features include robustness with respect to common signal distortions and compactness of representation. A family of suitable features with favorable properties is described and evaluated for their recognition performance. Some applications of signal identification are discussed, including MPEG-7 Audio.

  2. Selective ensemble modeling load parameters of ball mill based on multi-scale frequency spectral features and sphere criterion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Jian; Yu, Wen; Chai, Tianyou; Liu, Zhuo; Zhou, Xiaojie

    2016-01-01

    It is difficult to model multi-frequency signal, such as mechanical vibration and acoustic signals of wet ball mill in the mineral grinding process. In this paper, these signals are decomposed into multi-scale intrinsic mode functions (IMFs) by the empirical mode decomposition (EMD) technique. A new adaptive multi-scale spectral features selection approach based on sphere criterion (SC) is applied to these IMFs frequency spectra. The candidate sub-models are constructed by the partial least squares (PLS) with the selected features. Finally, the branch and bound based selective ensemble (BBSEN) algorithm is applied to select and combine these ensemble sub-models. This method can be easily extended to regression and classification problems with multi-time scale signal. We successfully apply this approach to a laboratory-scale ball mill. The shell vibration and acoustic signals are used to model mill load parameters. The experimental results demonstrate that this novel approach is more effective than the other modeling methods based on multi-scale frequency spectral features.

  3. Specific features of optical absorption in rare-earth orthoaluminate DyAlO3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valiev, U. V.; Gruber, J. B.; Rakhimov, Sh. A.

    2003-04-01

    Polarization spectra of optical absorption of the 4 f-4 f transition 6 H 15/2 → 6 F 3/2 in the rare-earth orthoaluminate DyAlO3 are theoretically and experimentally studied at the temperature T=78 K. It is shown that the nontrivial character of the anisotropy of the polarization absorption spectra at low temperatures can be explained by the J-J mixing of excited multiplets of the 4 f 9 configuration of Dy3+ ions in a low-symmetry crystal field of the orthoaluminate structure. The energy and wave functions of the Stark sublevels within the excited 6 F 5/2 multiplet in the 4 f 9 configuration of the Dy3+ rare-earth ion in the crystal field of C s symmetry are numerically calculated.

  4. Depth-resolved water column spectral absorption of sunlight by phytoplankon during the Southern Ocean Gas Exchange (SOGasEx) Lagrangian tracer experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hargreaves, B. R.

    2008-12-01

    Optical measurements made during gas exchange tracer experiments in the Southern Ocean, Atlantic sector near 51°S, 38°W from March-April 2008 (SOGasEx) were used to develop daily integrated depth- resolved PAR absorbed by phytoplankton. Particulate and phytoplankton pigment spectral absorption coefficients (ap and aph), and methanol-extracted chlorophyll-a concentrations (chl-a) from discrete samples within and below the upper mixed layer (40 stations) were combined with data from optical casts where chlorophyll-a and cdom fluorescence and PAR scalar irradiance were measured (11 stations), PAR Kd was measured from a buoy free of ship shadow for 0-5m (11 stations), and Wetlabs AC-9 whole water absorption coefficients to 150m were measured (14 stations, with 3 in common with fluorescence data) to estimate depth-resolved values for both total spectral absorption and spectral PAR irradiance. By combining depth-adjusted spectral absorption of phytoplankton pigments (aph) with depth-adjusted PAR spectral irradiance we estimated depth-resolved daily PAR irradiance absorbed by photosynthetic pigments. These data can be compared with time-integrated primary production measurements conducted on deck where solar exposure or lamp exposure was modified to simulate a range of depths. Such a synthesis should improve our estimates of depth-integrated daily primary production, and ultimately contribute to refining estimates of carbon export rates to be incorporated into a carbon budget and CO2 air-sea flux models for the SOGasEx experiments.

  5. Strength of mineral absorption features in the transmitted component of near-infrared reflected light - First results from RELAB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pieters, C. M.

    1983-11-01

    Bidirectional reflectance measurements are the only type of reflectance data available to the remote observer. For compositional interpretations, data are desired not only for identification of possible mineral components but also for modal abundance. The latter requires detailed information about the strength of absorption features. Using a new laboratory facility, the RELAB, laboratory data in the near infrared are presented that document effects of particle size, mineral mixtures, and viewing geometry for selected materials with well-developed absorption bands. The commonly observed increase in reflectance with decrease in particle size is also observed for absorption bands as well as a related decrease in absorption strength. For small particles in parts of the spectrum of maximum reflectance, however, a minor decrease in reflectance with a decrese in particle size is sometimes observed. Small particles dominate the observed characteristics of particulate surfaces, which contain a range of particle sizes. The mean optical path length (transmission through particles) of reflected radiation measured for a variety of particle sizes has an apparent upper limit of about 2 mm for particles of less than 250 microns. The typical number of particles involved in the optical path is less than 50.

  6. High-velocity ultraviolet iron, silicon, oxygen, and sulfur absorption features associated with the remnant of SN 1006

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fesen, Robert A.; Wu, Chi-Chao; Leventhal, Marvin; Hamilton, Andrew J. S.

    1988-01-01

    New low-dispersion IUE spectra of a faint sdOb star located in a direction near the center of the SN 1006 remnant are presented. The UV spectrum of the star exhibits several strong absorption features which are uncharacteristic of its optical sdOB star classification. The identification by Wu et al. (1983) of very broad absorption features at 1610, 2370, 2600 A as Fe II gas associated with the SN 1006 remnant is supported. The observed Fe II line profiles indicate a concentration of Fe(+) toward the remnant's center with a radial velocity range on the order of + or - 5000 km/s. Strong absorption lines at 1281, 1331, and 1420 A are interpreted as originating from clumps of O-, Si- and S-rich ejecta with central radial velocities in the range 5000-6500 km/s. The presence in the SN 1006 remnant of an expanding sphere of iron-rich ejecta interior to O-, Si-, and S-rich clumps of ejecta having velocities over the maximum seen for the Fe II absorbing gas is consistent with type Ia Sn observations and carbon deflagration models.

  7. Features of Pc5 pulsations in the geomagnetic field, auroral luminosity, and Riometer absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belakhovsky, V. B.; Pilipenko, V. A.; Samsonov, S. N.; Lorentsen, D.

    2016-01-01

    Simultaneous morning Pc5 pulsations ( f ~ 3-5 mHz) in the geomagnetic field, aurora intensities (in the 557.7 and 630.0 nm oxygen emissions and the 471.0 nm nitrogen emission), and riometer absorption, were studied based on the CARISMA, CANMOS, and NORSTAR network data for the event of January 1, 2000. According to the GOES-8 satellite observations, these Pc5 geomagnetic pulsations are observed as incompressible Alfvén waves with toroidal polarization in the magnetosphere. Although the Pc5 pulsation frequencies in auroras, the geomagnetic field, and riometer absorption are close to one another, stable phase relationships are not observed between them. Far from all trains of geomagnetic Pc5 pulsations are accompanied by corresponding auroral pulsations; consequently, geomagnetic pulsations are primary with respect to auroral pulsations. Both geomagnetic and auroral pulsations propagate poleward, and the frequency decreases with increasing geomagnetic latitude. When auroral Pc5 pulsations appear, the ratio of the 557.7/630.0 nm emission intensity sharply increases, which indicates that auroral pulsations result from not simply modulated particle precipitation but also an additional periodic acceleration of auroral electrons by the wave field. A high correlation is not observed between Pc5 pulsations in auroras and the riometer absorption, which indicates that these pulsations have a common source but different generation mechanisms. Auroral luminosity modulation is supposedly related to the interaction between Alfvén waves and the region with the field-aligned potential drop above the auroral ionosphere, and riometer absorption modulation is caused by the scattering of energetic electrons by VLF noise pulsations.

  8. Cryptography based on the absorption/emission features of multicolor semiconductor nanocrystal quantum dots.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Ming; Chang, Shoude; Grover, Chander

    2004-06-28

    Further to the optical coding based on fluorescent semiconductor quantum dots (QDs), a concept of using mixtures of multiple single-color QDs for creating highly secret cryptograms based on their absorption/emission properties was demonstrated. The key to readout of the optical codes is a group of excitation lights with the predetermined wavelengths programmed in a secret manner. The cryptograms can be printed on the surfaces of different objects such as valuable documents for security purposes.

  9. The Copernicus ultraviolet spectral atlas of Sirius

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogerson, John B., Jr.

    1987-01-01

    A near-ultraviolet spectral atlas for the A1 V star Alpha CMa (Sirius) has been prepared from data taken by the Princeton spectrometer aboard the Copernicus satellite. The spectral region from 1649 to 3170 A has been scanned with a resolution of 0.1 A. The atlas is presented in graphs, and line identifications for the absorption features have been tabulated.

  10. Combining Spectral and Texture Features Using Random Forest Algorithm: Extracting Impervious Surface Area in Wuhan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Zhenfeng; Zhang, Yuan; Zhang, Lei; Song, Yang; Peng, Minjun

    2016-06-01

    Impervious surface area (ISA) is one of the most important indicators of urban environments. At present, based on multi-resolution remote sensing images, numerous approaches have been proposed to extract impervious surface, using statistical estimation, sub-pixel classification and spectral mixture analysis method of sub-pixel analysis. Through these methods, impervious surfaces can be effectively applied to regional-scale planning and management. However, for the large scale region, high resolution remote sensing images can provide more details, and therefore they will be more conducive to analysis environmental monitoring and urban management. Since the purpose of this study is to map impervious surfaces more effectively, three classification algorithms (random forests, decision trees, and artificial neural networks) were tested for their ability to map impervious surface. Random forests outperformed the decision trees, and artificial neural networks in precision. Combining the spectral indices and texture, random forests is applied to impervious surface extraction with a producer's accuracy of 0.98, a user's accuracy of 0.97, and an overall accuracy of 0.98 and a kappa coefficient of 0.97.

  11. Confocal absorption spectral imaging of MoS2: optical transitions depending on the atomic thickness of intrinsic and chemically doped MoS2.

    PubMed

    Dhakal, Krishna P; Duong, Dinh Loc; Lee, Jubok; Nam, Honggi; Kim, Minsu; Kan, Min; Lee, Young Hee; Kim, Jeongyong

    2014-11-01

    We performed a nanoscale confocal absorption spectral imaging to obtain the full absorption spectra (over the range 1.5-3.2 eV) within regions having different numbers of layers and studied the variation of optical transition depending on the atomic thickness of the MoS2 film. Three distinct absorption bands corresponding to A and B excitons and a high-energy background (BG) peak at 2.84 eV displayed a gradual redshift as the MoS2 film thickness increased from the monolayer, to the bilayer, to the bulk MoS2 and this shift was attributed to the reduction of the gap energy in the Brillouin zone at the K-point as the atomic thickness increased. We also performed n-type chemical doping of MoS2 films using reduced benzyl viologen (BV) and the confocal absorption spectra modified by the doping showed a strong dependence on the atomic thickness: A and B exciton peaks were greatly quenched in the monolayer MoS2 while much less effect was shown in larger thickness and the BG peak either showed very small quenching for 1 L MoS2 or remained constant for larger thicknesses. Our results indicate that confocal absorption spectral imaging can provide comprehensive information on optical transitions of microscopic size intrinsic and doped two-dimensional layered materials.

  12. Spectral features and thermal resistance of 976-nm cw laser diodes with a power up to 15 W

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bezotosnyi, V. V.; Krokhin, O. N.; Oleshchenko, V. A.; Pevtsov, V. F.; Popov, Yu M.; Cheshev, E. A.

    2016-08-01

    The spectral characteristics of cw laser diodes with a maximum reliable power of 15 W mounted on F-mount heat sinks are studied. It is found that the spectrum envelopes have features at emission powers exceeding 5 - 7 W. A method for determining the maximum of a spectrum envelope under the conditions of its broadening and appearance of features is discussed. The thermal resistance of diodes is determined experimentally at pump currents from threshold to maximum (14 A) and is found to be 2.25 K W-1 at a current of 10 A and 1.5 K W-1 at a current of 4 A. The results obtained are compared with the literature data. The adequacy of using the thermal resistance parameter for comparing and estimating thermal characteristics of laser diodes is considered.

  13. Correlations of Power-law Spectral and QPO Features In Black Hole Candidate Sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fiorito, Ralph; Titarchuk, Lev

    2004-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that strong correlations are observed between low frequency QPO s and the spectral power law index for a number of black hole candidate sources (BHCs), when these sources exhibit quasi-steady hard x-ray emission states. The dominant long standing interpretation of QPO's is that they are produced in and are the signature of the thermal accretion disk. Paradoxically, strong QPO's are present even in the cases where the thermal component is negligible. We present a model which identifies the origin of the QPO's and relates them directly to the properties of a compact coronal region which is bounded by the adjustment from Kepleriaa to sub-Kelperian inflow into the BH, and is primarily responsible for the observed power law spectrum. The model also predicts the relationship between high and low frequency QPO's and shows how BH's can be unique identified from observations of the soft states of NS's and BHC's.

  14. Spatial and spectral features of soft diffuse X ray background seen by the Einstein observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Micela, G.; Harnden, F. R.; Rosner, R., Jr.; Sciortino, S.; Vaiana, G. S.

    1989-01-01

    A survey of the diffuse soft X-ray background as seen directly by the Einstein Observatory Imaging Proportional Counter (IPC) is presented. A source free region of the detector 1 by 1 degree field is used. The background in the 0.16 to 3.5 keV spectral region is viewed. The data covers roughly 5 percent of the sky, with some bias in coverage towards the galactic plane. The moderate energy resolution of the IPC enables the characterization and the production of maps of the background as a function of energy within the Einstein passband. The results are compared with previous observations of the diffuse X-ray background. The implications for galactic structure and for the soft component of the extragalactic X-ray background are discussed.

  15. Spectral Domain Optical Coherence Tomography Features and Classification Systems for Diabetic Macular Edema: A Review.

    PubMed

    Ruia, Surabhi; Saxena, Sandeep; Gemmy Cheung, Chui Ming; Gilhotra, Jagjit S; Lai, Timothy Y Y

    2016-01-01

    Spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) is fast becoming the current standard of care for the detection and assessment of diabetic macular edema. With the application of SD-OCT for imaging of retinal microstructure and measurement of retinal thickness, new information regarding disease characteristics has been gathered, which was unrecognized previously. Retinal thickness measurements on SD-OCT have also been used for deciding the management and monitoring of the disease. Since its development, OCT has enhanced the understanding of retinal anatomical changes in diabetic retinopathy. Several authors have used SD-OCT to classify diabetic macular edema with the purpose of correlating the pathophysiology with disease severity. The classification systems have helped monitor the treatment efficacy and provide prognostic information on the treatment outcome. The following review article summarizes these classifications. PMID:27632028

  16. Preparation and Absorption Spectral Property of a Multifunctional Water-Soluble Azo Compound with D-π-A Structure, 4-(4- Hydroxy-1-Naphthylazo)Benzoic Acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, L.; Lv, H.; Xie, C. G.; Chang, W. G.; Yan, Z. Q.

    2015-07-01

    A multifunctional water-soluble azo dye with the D-π-A conjugated structure, 4-(4-hydroxy-1-naphthylazo) benzoic acid ( HNBA), was designed and synthesized using 1-naphanol as the electron donator, benzoic acid as the electron acceptor, and -N=N- as the bridging group. After its structure was characterized by FTIR, 1H NMR, and element analysis, the UV-Vis absorption spectral performance of the target dye was studied in detail. The results showed that the dye, combining hydroxyl group, azo group, and carboxyl group, possessed excellent absorption spectral properties (ɛ = 1.2·104 l·mol-1·cm-1) changing with pH and solvents. In particular, in polar and protonic water, it had excellent optical response to some metal ions, i.e., Fe3+ and Pb2+, which might make it a latent colorimetric sensor for detecting heavy metal ions.

  17. Design of the typical altered mineral spectral feature database system on the area of oil and gas migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xing; Chen, Xiaomei; Li, Qianqian; Ni, Guoqiang

    2011-11-01

    According to the abnormal spectrum produced by Oil micro-leakage in China's Gobi and sparse vegetated region, six types of spectrum data, which were used as the reference spectrum, were established for the database of exploring oil and gas. The USGS and JPL spectrum data, the spectrum data of alteration mineral in the gas field, the carbonation and clay mineral spectrum data and the hyperspectral spectrum data were contained in the database. The spectral characteristic information was extracted and integrated into the database. A series of interfaces were provided to users to allow the users to add their own spectrum features of the oil and gas areas, which will enhance the scalability of the feature database. The typical altered mineral spectrums produced by oil micro-leakage in China's Gobi and sparse vegetated regions were comprehensively covered in the database, which will enrich China's spectral library and is with the guidance of the oil and gas exploration by aerospace and aviation hyperspectral remote sensing.

  18. A comparison of random forest and its Gini importance with standard chemometric methods for the feature selection and classification of spectral data

    PubMed Central

    Menze, Bjoern H; Kelm, B Michael; Masuch, Ralf; Himmelreich, Uwe; Bachert, Peter; Petrich, Wolfgang; Hamprecht, Fred A

    2009-01-01

    Background Regularized regression methods such as principal component or partial least squares regression perform well in learning tasks on high dimensional spectral data, but cannot explicitly eliminate irrelevant features. The random forest classifier with its associated Gini feature importance, on the other hand, allows for an explicit feature elimination, but may not be optimally adapted to spectral data due to the topology of its constituent classification trees which are based on orthogonal splits in feature space. Results We propose to combine the best of both approaches, and evaluated the joint use of a feature selection based on a recursive feature elimination using the Gini importance of random forests' together with regularized classification methods on spectral data sets from medical diagnostics, chemotaxonomy, biomedical analytics, food science, and synthetically modified spectral data. Here, a feature selection using the Gini feature importance with a regularized classification by discriminant partial least squares regression performed as well as or better than a filtering according to different univariate statistical tests, or using regression coefficients in a backward feature elimination. It outperformed the direct application of the random forest classifier, or the direct application of the regularized classifiers on the full set of features. Conclusion The Gini importance of the random forest provided superior means for measuring feature relevance on spectral data, but – on an optimal subset of features – the regularized classifiers might be preferable over the random forest classifier, in spite of their limitation to model linear dependencies only. A feature selection based on Gini importance, however, may precede a regularized linear classification to identify this optimal subset of features, and to earn a double benefit of both dimensionality reduction and the elimination of noise from the classification task. PMID:19591666

  19. SDSS/SEGUE spectral feature analysis for stellar atmospheric parameter estimation

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Xiangru; Lu, Yu; Yang, Tan; Wang, Yongjun; Wu, Q. M. Jonathan; Luo, Ali; Zhao, Yongheng; Zuo, Fang

    2014-08-01

    Large-scale and deep sky survey missions are rapidly collecting a large amount of stellar spectra, which necessitate the estimation of atmospheric parameters directly from spectra and make it feasible to statistically investigate latent principles in a large data set. We present a technique for estimating parameters T{sub eff}, log g, and [Fe/H] from stellar spectra. With this technique, we first extract features from stellar spectra using the LASSO algorithm; then, the parameters are estimated from the extracted features using the support vector regression. On a subsample of 20,000 stellar spectra from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) with reference parameters provided by the SDSS/SEGUE Spectroscopic Parameter Pipeline, estimation consistency are 0.007458 dex for log T{sub eff} (101.609921 K for T{sub eff}), 0.189557 dex for log g, and 0.182060 for [Fe/H], where the consistency is evaluated by mean absolute error. Prominent characteristics of the proposed scheme are sparseness, locality, and physical interpretability. In this work, each spectrum consists of 3821 fluxes, and 10, 19, and 14 typical wavelength positions are detected, respectively, for estimating T{sub eff}, log g, and [Fe/H]. It is shown that the positions are related to typical lines of stellar spectra. This characteristic is important in investigating physical indications from analysis results. Then, stellar spectra can be described by the individual fluxes on the detected positions (PD) or local integration of fluxes near them (LI). The aforementioned consistency is the result based on features described by LI. If features are described by PD, consistency is 0.009092 dex for log T{sub eff} (124.545075 K for T{sub eff}), 0.198928 dex for log g, and 0.206814 dex for [Fe/H].

  20. Spectral feature of 31 December 1981 gamma-ray burst not confirmed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nolan, P. L.; Share, G. H.; Chupp, E. L.; Forrest, D. J.; Matz, S. M.

    1984-01-01

    Measurements of a gamma ray burst at 01:37 UT on December 31, 1981 using the SMM gamma ray spectrometer (GRS) are compared with those made by the Konus instruments on Veneras 11-14. Burst time profiles, photon spectra, and detector energy loss spectra for three time intervals are compared for the GRS and the Konus instruments. It is concluded that the SMM spectra exhibit no evidence for the presence of emission features reported by the Konus group.

  1. SDSS/SEGUE Spectral Feature Analysis for Stellar Atmospheric Parameter Estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiangru; Wu, Q. M. Jonathan; Luo, Ali; Zhao, Yongheng; Lu, Yu; Zuo, Fang; Yang, Tan; Wang, Yongjun

    2014-08-01

    Large-scale and deep sky survey missions are rapidly collecting a large amount of stellar spectra, which necessitate the estimation of atmospheric parameters directly from spectra and make it feasible to statistically investigate latent principles in a large data set. We present a technique for estimating parameters T eff, log g, and [Fe/H] from stellar spectra. With this technique, we first extract features from stellar spectra using the LASSO algorithm; then, the parameters are estimated from the extracted features using the support vector regression. On a subsample of 20,000 stellar spectra from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) with reference parameters provided by the SDSS/SEGUE Spectroscopic Parameter Pipeline, estimation consistency are 0.007458 dex for log T eff (101.609921 K for T eff), 0.189557 dex for log g, and 0.182060 for [Fe/H], where the consistency is evaluated by mean absolute error. Prominent characteristics of the proposed scheme are sparseness, locality, and physical interpretability. In this work, each spectrum consists of 3821 fluxes, and 10, 19, and 14 typical wavelength positions are detected, respectively, for estimating T eff, log g, and [Fe/H]. It is shown that the positions are related to typical lines of stellar spectra. This characteristic is important in investigating physical indications from analysis results. Then, stellar spectra can be described by the individual fluxes on the detected positions (PD) or local integration of fluxes near them (LI). The aforementioned consistency is the result based on features described by LI. If features are described by PD, consistency is 0.009092 dex for log T eff (124.545075 K for T eff), 0.198928 dex for log g, and 0.206814 dex for [Fe/H].

  2. Approach for determining the contributions of phytoplankton, colored organic material, and nonalgal particles to the total spectral absorption in marine waters.

    PubMed

    Lin, Junfang; Cao, Wenxi; Wang, Guifeng; Hu, Shuibo

    2013-06-20

    Using a data set of 1333 samples, we assess the spectral absorption relationships of different wave bands for phytoplankton (ph) and particles. We find that a nonlinear model (second-order quadratic equations) delivers good performance in describing their spectral characteristics. Based on these spectral relationships, we develop a method for partitioning the total absorption coefficient into the contributions attributable to phytoplankton [a(ph)(λ)], colored dissolved organic material [CDOM; a(CDOM)(λ)], and nonalgal particles [NAP; a(NAP)(λ)]. This method is validated using a data set that contains 550 simultaneous measurements of phytoplankton, CDOM, and NAP from the NASA bio-Optical Marine Algorithm Dataset. We find that our method is highly efficient and robust, with significant accuracy: the relative root-mean-square errors (RMSEs) are 25.96%, 38.30%, and 19.96% for a(ph)(443), a(CDOM)(443), and the CDOM exponential slope, respectively. The performance is still satisfactory when the method is applied to water samples from the northern South China Sea as a regional case. The computed and measured absorption coefficients (167 samples) agree well with the RMSEs, i.e., 18.50%, 32.82%, and 10.21% for a(ph)(443), a(CDOM)(443), and the CDOM exponential slope, respectively. Finally, the partitioning method is applied directly to an independent data set (1160 samples) derived from the Bermuda Bio-Optics Project that contains relatively low absorption values, and we also obtain good inversion accuracy [RMSEs of 32.37%, 32.57%, and 11.52% for a(ph)(443), a(CDOM)(443), and the CDOM exponential slope, respectively]. Our results indicate that this partitioning method delivers satisfactory performance for the retrieval of a(ph), a(CDOM), and a(NAP). Therefore, this may be a useful tool for extracting absorption coefficients from in situ measurements or remotely sensed ocean-color data. PMID:23842167

  3. Approach for determining the contributions of phytoplankton, colored organic material, and nonalgal particles to the total spectral absorption in marine waters.

    PubMed

    Lin, Junfang; Cao, Wenxi; Wang, Guifeng; Hu, Shuibo

    2013-06-20

    Using a data set of 1333 samples, we assess the spectral absorption relationships of different wave bands for phytoplankton (ph) and particles. We find that a nonlinear model (second-order quadratic equations) delivers good performance in describing their spectral characteristics. Based on these spectral relationships, we develop a method for partitioning the total absorption coefficient into the contributions attributable to phytoplankton [a(ph)(λ)], colored dissolved organic material [CDOM; a(CDOM)(λ)], and nonalgal particles [NAP; a(NAP)(λ)]. This method is validated using a data set that contains 550 simultaneous measurements of phytoplankton, CDOM, and NAP from the NASA bio-Optical Marine Algorithm Dataset. We find that our method is highly efficient and robust, with significant accuracy: the relative root-mean-square errors (RMSEs) are 25.96%, 38.30%, and 19.96% for a(ph)(443), a(CDOM)(443), and the CDOM exponential slope, respectively. The performance is still satisfactory when the method is applied to water samples from the northern South China Sea as a regional case. The computed and measured absorption coefficients (167 samples) agree well with the RMSEs, i.e., 18.50%, 32.82%, and 10.21% for a(ph)(443), a(CDOM)(443), and the CDOM exponential slope, respectively. Finally, the partitioning method is applied directly to an independent data set (1160 samples) derived from the Bermuda Bio-Optics Project that contains relatively low absorption values, and we also obtain good inversion accuracy [RMSEs of 32.37%, 32.57%, and 11.52% for a(ph)(443), a(CDOM)(443), and the CDOM exponential slope, respectively]. Our results indicate that this partitioning method delivers satisfactory performance for the retrieval of a(ph), a(CDOM), and a(NAP). Therefore, this may be a useful tool for extracting absorption coefficients from in situ measurements or remotely sensed ocean-color data.

  4. Magnetic feature and near-infrared absorption of a [Pt(mnt)2]--based H-bond supramolecular crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Cui-Ping; Nie, Li; Pei, Wen-Bo; Li, Li; Tian, Zheng-Fang; Liu, Jian-Lan; Gao, Xu-Sheng; Ren, Xiao-Ming

    2016-11-01

    A new salt [H2DABCO][Pt(mnt)2]2 (1) (mnt2-=maleonitriledithiolate and H2DABCO2+ is diprotonated 1,4-diazabicyclo[2.2.2]octane) has been synthesized; its crystal structure, magnetic and near-IR absorption properties have been investigated. Two different [Pt(mnt)2]- anions form the strong π-dimers, labeled as Pt(1)-dimer and Pt(2)-dimer, with quite shorter Pt…Pt and S…S distances and molecular plane-to-plane distance (<3.5 Å) within a dimer. The [Pt(mnt)2]22- π-dimers are connected through the cations in the strong H-bond manner to form three-dimensional H-bond supramolecular crystal. The salt shows weak paramagnetism in 1.99-300 K and this is due to the existence of strong antiferromagnetic coupling within a π-dimer. In addition, a small thermal hysteresis loop is observed at ca. 120 K, indicating that a phase transition probably occurs that is further confirmed by variable-temperature IR spectra. Another fascinating functionality of 1 is the intense near-IR absorption in the region of 750-2500 nm, and this near-IR absorption feature makes it to be a promising optical material.

  5. Spectral response of the intrinsic region of a GaAs-InAs quantum dot solar cell considering the absorption spectra of ideal cubic dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biswas, Sayantan; Chatterjee, Avigyan; Biswas, Ashim Kumar; Sinha, Amitabha

    2016-10-01

    Recently, attempts have been made by some researchers to improve the efficiency of quantum dot solar cells by incorporating different types of quantum dots. In this paper, the photocurrent density has been obtained considering the absorption spectra of ideal cubic dots. The effects of quantum dot size dispersion on the spectral response of the intrinsic region of a GaAs-InAs quantum dot solar cell have been studied. The dependence of the spectral response of this region on the size of quantum dots of such solar cell has also been investigated. The investigation shows that for smaller quantum dot size dispersion, the spectral response of the intrinsic region of the cell increases significantly. It is further observed that by enlarging the quantum dot size it is possible to enhance the spectral response of such solar cells as it causes better match between absorption spectra of the quantum dots and the solar spectrum. These facts indicate the significant role of quantum dot size and size dispersion on the performance of such devices. Also, the power conversion efficiency of such solar cell has been studied under 1 sun, AM 1.5 condition.

  6. Spectral and structural features of Lu1 - x RE x BO3 compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shmurak, S. Z.; Kedrov, V. V.; Kiselev, A. P.; Fursova, T. N.; Shmyt'ko, I. M.

    2015-08-01

    The luminescence spectra, luminescence excitation spectra, IR absorption spectra, and crystal structure of orthoborates Lu1 - x RE x BO3 ( RE = Eu, Gd, Tb, Y, Dy) have been investigated. It has been found that the solid solution consisting of a LuBO3 orthoborate, which has two stable structural modifications (calcite and vaterite), and an REBO3 orthoborate, which has one structural modification (vaterite), crystallizes only in the vaterite structure when the concentration of a rare-earth ion substituting for lutetium exceeds 15-20 at %. The investigation of the photoluminescence spectra has demonstrated that, for rare-earth ions Lu3+, Eu3+, Y3+, and Gd3+ in the vaterite modification of Lu1 - x RE x BO3 orthoborates, there are at least two positions that are not equivalent in the symmetry of the local environment. It has been established that the maximum intensity of the luminescence of the vaterite modification of Lu1 - x Tb x BO3 compounds synthesized at 970°C, which is observed at a terbium concentration of 15 at %, is several times higher than the maximum intensity of the luminescence of the calcite modification.

  7. Automated extraction of absorption features from Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) and Geophysical and Environmental Research Imaging Spectrometer (GERIS) data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kruse, Fred A.; Calvin, Wendy M.; Seznec, Olivier

    1988-01-01

    Automated techniques were developed for the extraction and characterization of absorption features from reflectance spectra. The absorption feature extraction algorithms were successfully tested on laboratory, field, and aircraft imaging spectrometer data. A suite of laboratory spectra of the most common minerals was analyzed and absorption band characteristics tabulated. A prototype expert system was designed, implemented, and successfully tested to allow identification of minerals based on the extracted absorption band characteristics. AVIRIS spectra for a site in the northern Grapevine Mountains, Nevada, have been characterized and the minerals sericite (fine grained muscovite) and dolomite were identified. The minerals kaolinite, alunite, and buddingtonite were identified and mapped for a site at Cuprite, Nevada, using the feature extraction algorithms on the new Geophysical and Environmental Research 64 channel imaging spectrometer (GERIS) data. The feature extraction routines (written in FORTRAN and C) were interfaced to the expert system (written in PROLOG) to allow both efficient processing of numerical data and logical spectrum analysis.

  8. Striatal dopamine modulates song spectral but not temporal features through D1 receptors

    PubMed Central

    Leblois, Arthur; Perkel, David J

    2012-01-01

    The activity of midbrain dopaminergic neurons and their projection to the basal ganglia (BG) are thought to play a critical role in the acquisition of motor skills through reinforcement learning, as well as in the expression of learned motor behaviors. The precise role of BG dopamine in mediating and modulating motor performance and learning, however, remains unclear. In songbirds, a specialized portion of the BG is responsible for song learning and plasticity. Previously we found that dopamine acts on D1 receptors in Area X to modulate the BG output signal and thereby trigger changes in song variability. Here, we investigate the effect of D1 receptor blockade in the BG on song behavior in the zebra finch. We report that this manipulation abolishes social context-dependent changes in variability not only in harmonic stacks, but also in other types of syllables. However, song timing seems not to be modulated by this BG dopamine signal. Indeed, injections of a D1 antagonist in the BG altered neither song duration, nor the change of song duration with social context. Finally, D1 receptor activation in the BG was not necessary for the modulation of other features of song such as the number of introductory notes or motif repetitions. Together, our results suggest that activation of D1 receptors in the BG is necessary for the modulation of fine acoustic features of song with social context while it is not involved in the regulation of song timing and structure at a larger time scale. PMID:22594943

  9. Joint spatial-spectral feature space clustering for speech activity detection from ECoG signals.

    PubMed

    Kanas, Vasileios G; Mporas, Iosif; Benz, Heather L; Sgarbas, Kyriakos N; Bezerianos, Anastasios; Crone, Nathan E

    2014-04-01

    Brain-machine interfaces for speech restoration have been extensively studied for more than two decades. The success of such a system will depend in part on selecting the best brain recording sites and signal features corresponding to speech production. The purpose of this study was to detect speech activity automatically from electrocorticographic signals based on joint spatial-frequency clustering of the ECoG feature space. For this study, the ECoG signals were recorded while a subject performed two different syllable repetition tasks. We found that the optimal frequency resolution to detect speech activity from ECoG signals was 8 Hz, achieving 98.8% accuracy by employing support vector machines as a classifier. We also defined the cortical areas that held the most information about the discrimination of speech and nonspeech time intervals. Additionally, the results shed light on the distinct cortical areas associated with the two syllables repetition tasks and may contribute to the development of portable ECoG-based communication.

  10. Long-period spectral features of the Sumatra-Andaman 2004 earthquake rupture process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clévédé, E.; Bukchin, B.; Favreau, P.; Mostinskiy, A.; Aoudia, A.; Panza, G. F.

    2012-12-01

    The goal of this study is to investigate the spatial variability of the seismic radiation spectral content of the Sumatra-Andaman 2004 earthquake. We determine the integral estimates of source geometry, duration and rupture propagation given by the stress glut moments of total degree 2 of different source models. These models are constructed from a single or a joint use of different observations including seismology, geodesy, altimetry and tide gauge data. The comparative analysis shows coherency among the different models and no strong contradictions are found between the integral estimates of geodetic and altimetric models, and those retrieved from very long period seismic records (up to 2000-3000 s). The comparison between these results and the integral estimates derived from observed surface wave spectra in period band from 500 to 650 s suggests that the northern part of the fault (to the north of 8°N near Nicobar Islands) did not radiate long period seismic waves, that is, period shorter than 650 s at least. This conclusion is consistent with the existing composite short and long rise time tsunami model: with short rise time of slip in the southern part of the fault and very long rise time of slip at the northern part. This complex space-time slip evolution can be reproduced by a simple dynamic model of the rupture assuming a crude phenomenological mechanical behaviour of the rupture interface at the fault scales combining an effective slip-controlled exponential weakening effect, related to possible friction and damage breakdown processes of the fault zone, and an effective linear viscous strengthening effect, related to possible interface lubrication processes. While the rupture front speed remains unperturbed with initial short slip duration, a slow creep wave propagates behind the rupture front in the case of viscous effects accounting for the long slip duration and the radiation characteristics in the northern segment.

  11. Morfology of SEE spectral features in a wide pump wave frequency range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sergeev, E. N.; Frolov, V. L.; Grach, S. M.; Kotov, P. V.

    Systematic study of stimulated electromagnetic emission (SEE) stationary spectrum dependence on the pump wave (PW) frequency f_0 was continued. Investigations were performed at the SURA facility for the PW frequency range 4.3≤ f_0 ≤ 9.5 MHz with stepping of ≈ 5-50 kHz including the vicinities of the electron gyroharmonics nfce from n=4 to n=7 for most prominent SEE features like downshifted maximum (DM) and its satellites, narrow and broad continua (NC and BC), upshifted maximum (UM), broad upshifted maximum (BUM), and broad upshifted structure (BUS) (for references see, e.g., Leyser et al., J. Geophys. Res., 1993, v. 98, p. 17597, 1994, Frolov et al., Geophys. Res. Lett., 2001, v. 28, p. 3103). Main attention was paid to maximal and integral intensities of the SEE features and their frequency shifts Δ f from f_0. The results can be summarized as follows. (i) While the SEE qualitative behaviour periodically repeats between successive gyroharmonics, maximal intensity for all of the SEE features is observed for 4fce5fce (except of narrow range below 6 and 7fce) the BC is replaced by a set of DM satellites in the SEE spectrum. (iii) DM intensity decreases with f_0 and DM peak frequency shift increases with f_0 as Δ fDM ˜ 2 f_0\\cdot10-3 across the whole f_0 frequency range, except of narrow ranges near f_0 ≃ nfce, where the DM intensity falls up to the noise level, and Δ fDM decreases up to ≈ 9 kHz. (iv) The UM behaviour is similar for the DM one, but for f_0≃ nfce the maximal UM and minimal DM intensities occur for the same f_0, while the minimal UM is observed for f_0 less by 10-20 kHz in comparison with f_0 for the minimal DM. (v) Maximal BUM intensity is observed for f_0 just above nfce where the frequency shift of BUM peak Δ fBUM ≃ 20 kHz; for f_0 ≳ nfce+30 kHz Δ f

  12. EEG Spectral Features Discriminate between Alzheimer’s and Vascular Dementia

    PubMed Central

    Neto, Emanuel; Allen, Elena A.; Aurlien, Harald; Nordby, Helge; Eichele, Tom

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and vascular dementia (VaD) present with similar clinical symptoms of cognitive decline, but the underlying pathophysiological mechanisms differ. To determine whether clinical electroencephalography (EEG) can provide information relevant to discriminate between these diagnoses, we used quantitative EEG analysis to compare the spectra between non-medicated patients with AD (n = 77) and VaD (n = 77) and healthy elderly normal controls (NC) (n = 77). We use curve-fitting with a combination of a power loss and Gaussian function to model the averaged resting-state spectra of each EEG channel extracting six parameters. We assessed the performance of our model and tested the extracted parameters for group differentiation. We performed regression analysis in a multivariate analysis of covariance with group, age, gender, and number of epochs as predictors and further explored the topographical group differences with pair-wise contrasts. Significant topographical differences between the groups were found in several of the extracted features. Both AD and VaD groups showed increased delta power when compared to NC, whereas the AD patients showed a decrease in alpha power for occipital and temporal regions when compared with NC. The VaD patients had higher alpha power than NC and AD. The AD and VaD groups showed slowing of the alpha rhythm. Variability of the alpha frequency was wider for both AD and VaD groups. There was a general decrease in beta power for both AD and VaD. The proposed model is useful to parameterize spectra, which allowed extracting relevant clinical EEG key features that move toward simple and interpretable diagnostic criteria. PMID:25762978

  13. Far-IR Absorption Features of Titan Aerosol Analogs Produced from Aromatic Precursors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sebree, Joshua; Trainer, M. G.; Anderson, C. M.; Loeffler, M. J.

    2012-10-01

    The arrival of the Cassini spacecraft in orbit around Saturn has led to the discovery of benzene (C6H6) at ppm levels, as well as large positive ions in Titan’s atmosphere, tentatively identified as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs).[1] The presence of aromatic molecules, which are photolytically active in the ultraviolet, may be an important part of the formation of aerosol particles in Titan’s haze layers, even at these low concentrations. To date, there have been no laboratory experiments in the literature exploring this area of study. The analysis of data from the Composite Infrared Spectrometer (CIRS) on-board Cassini has recently uncovered a broad emission feature centered at 140 cm-1 in the far-IR that is unique to the aerosol layers of Titan’s atmosphere.[2] Current optical constants from laboratory-generated aerosol analogs have been unable to reproduce this feature.[3,4] From the broadness of this feature, we speculate that the emission is a blended composite of low-energy vibrations of large molecules such as PAHs and their nitrogen containing counterparts, polycyclic aromatic nitrogen heterocycles (PANHs). We hypothesize that the inclusion of trace amounts of aromatic precursors will aid in the production of these large structures in the laboratory-generated aerosols. In this study, we perform UV irradiation of several aromatic precursors, both with and without nitrogen heteroatoms, to understand their influence on the observable characteristics of the aerosol. Measured optical and chemical properties will be compared to those formed from CH4/N2 mixtures [5,6] as well as to those from Cassini observations. [1] Waite, J. H., et al. (2007) Science 316 870-875. [2] Anderson, C.M, et al. (2011) Icarus 212 762-778. [3] Khare, B.N., et al. (1984) Icarus 60 127-137. [4] Imanaka, H., et al. (2012) Icarus 218 247-261. [5] Trainer, M.G., et al. (2006) PNAS 103 18035-18042. [6] Trainer, M.G., et al. (2012) Astrobiology 12 315-326.

  14. Classifying spatially heterogeneous wetland communities using machine learning algorithms and spectral and textural features.

    PubMed

    Szantoi, Zoltan; Escobedo, Francisco J; Abd-Elrahman, Amr; Pearlstine, Leonard; Dewitt, Bon; Smith, Scot

    2015-05-01

    Mapping of wetlands (marsh vs. swamp vs. upland) is a common remote sensing application.Yet, discriminating between similar freshwater communities such as graminoid/sedge fromremotely sensed imagery is more difficult. Most of this activity has been performed using medium to low resolution imagery. There are only a few studies using highspatial resolutionimagery and machine learning image classification algorithms for mapping heterogeneouswetland plantcommunities. This study addresses this void by analyzing whether machine learning classifierssuch as decisiontrees (DT) and artificial neural networks (ANN) can accurately classify graminoid/sedgecommunities usinghigh resolution aerial imagery and image texture data in the Everglades National Park, Florida.In addition tospectral bands, the normalized difference vegetation index, and first- and second-order texturefeatures derivedfrom the near-infrared band were analyzed. Classifier accuracies were assessed using confusiontablesand the calculated kappa coefficients of the resulting maps. The results indicated that an ANN(multilayerperceptron based on backpropagation) algorithm produced a statistically significantly higheraccuracy(82.04%) than the DT (QUEST) algorithm (80.48%) or the maximum likelihood (80.56%)classifier (α<0.05). Findings show that using multiple window sizes provided the best results. First-ordertexture featuresalso provided computational advantages and results that were not significantly different fromthose usingsecond-order texture features.

  15. Spectral features of lightning-induced ion cyclotron waves at low latitudes: DEMETER observations and simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shklyar, D. R.; Storey, L. R. O.; Chum, J.; JiříčEk, F.; NěMec, F.; Parrot, M.; Santolik, O.; Titova, E. E.

    2012-12-01

    We use a comprehensive analysis of 6-component ELF wave data from the DEMETER satellite to study proton whistlers, placing emphasis on low-latitude events originating from lightning strokes in the hemisphere opposite to the hemisphere of observation. In this case, the formation of proton whistlers does not involve mode conversion caused by a strong mode coupling at a crossover frequency, although a polarization reversal remains an important element in formation of the phenomenon. DEMETER measurements of the six electromagnetic field components in the frequency band below 1000 Hz make it possible to determine not only the dynamic spectrum, but also the wave polarization, the wave normal angle, and the normalized parallel component of the Poynting vector. This permits us to address fine features of proton whistlers, in particular, we show that the deviation of the upper cutoff frequency from the equatorial cyclotron frequency is related to the Doppler shift. Experimental study of proton whistlers is supplemented by an investigation of ion cyclotron wave propagation in a multicomponent magnetoplasma and by numerical modeling of spectrograms, both in the frame of geometrical optics.

  16. Spectral features of the diffusive shock acceleration of electrons at the termination shock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prinsloo, Phillip; Toit Strauss, Du; Potgieter, Marius

    2016-07-01

    Following the revelation that the source of the anomalous cosmic rays was, contrary to expectation, not located at the termination shock, the diffusive shock acceleration mechanism came under increased criticism. With regards to galactic cosmic rays, however, its involvement in their re-acceleration is less disputed, but the extent of this involvement had to be reaffirmed given the new parameter constraints provided by the Voyager spacecraft. Hence, the features of diffusive shock acceleration, studied in the context of the transport of galactic electrons, are investigated using a numerical cosmic-ray modulation model that makes provision for the effects of this acceleration mechanism. The imprint of diffusive shock acceleration on the energy distributions of galactic electrons arriving at the termination shock is studied, along with the interplay between this acceleration mechanism and transport processes such as drift and diffusion. An important overarching set of results is that if the energy distribution of electrons incident at the termination shock is softer than the power law associated with the shock compression ratio, the latter is adopted by the accelerated particles, while if the converse is true, the incident distribution's intensity is raised uniformly. This intensity increase is in turn dependent on how similar the incident spectrum is to the power law associated with the compression ratio. The influence of other transport processes on cosmic-ray re-acceleration hence hinges on how they alter energy distributions incident at the termination shock.

  17. On the nature of spectral features in peculiar DQ white dwarfs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmidt, Gary D.; Bergeron, P.; Fegley, Bruce

    1995-01-01

    Spectropolarimetric measurements are presented for the DQ white dwarfs ESO 439-162, LHS 1126, and G225-68, whose spectroscopic features in the optical have been interpreted in the past as pressure-shifted or magnetically shifted C2 Swan bands. The results convincingly demonstrate that none of these objects is strongly magnetic, with upper limits of 30, 3, and 2 MG respectively. Since Bergeron et al. (B 94) have recently ruled out the pressure-shift interpretation for LHS 1126 as well, we discuss alternative physical mechanisms for displacing the Swan bands. Although possibilities for explaining the observed shifts may exist, a comparison of the optical spectra (and that of a similar DQ star, LP 77-57) indicates that the locations and shapes of the profiles in all four objects are virtually identical. This last result suggests instead that a different molecular species could be responsible. A detailed chemical equilibrium analysis of H/He/C mixtures under the physical conditions encountered in the atmospheres of these peculiar objects reveals that C2H is a molecule preferentially formed in the photospheric regions. The nature and evolution of these objects are discussed.

  18. Features of spectral properties of Sm(3+) complexes with dithia- and diselenophosphinate ligands.

    PubMed

    Pushkarev, A P; Yablonskiy, A N; Yunin, P A; Burin, M E; Andreev, B A; Bochkarev, M N

    2016-06-15

    The samarium complexes Sm(S2PPh2)3(THF)2 (1) and Sm(Se2PPh2)3(THF)2 (2) with soft-donor dithia- and diselenophosphinate ligands were synthesized and their photophysical properties were studied in detail. Both complexes displayed the metal-centered photoluminescence (PL) in visible and NIR regions corresponding to (4)G5/2→(6)HJ (J=5/2, 7/2, 9/2, 11/2, 13/2, 15/2), (6)FJ (J=1/2, 3/2, 5/2, 7/2, 9/2, 11/2) f-f transitions of Sm(3+). Luminescence decay curves exhibit an initial short build-up region and can be described by double or triple exponential function owing to multiphonon relaxation from the (4)F3/2 energy level to the (4)G5/2 one and reversible energy transfer from the Sm(3+) excited states to the triplet ((3)T1) state of phosphinate ligand. A Judd-Ofelt analysis was performed to estimate PL quantum efficiency (QE), branching ratios (β) and induced-emission cross section (σem) of the compounds obtained. It was found that the Judd-Ofelt parameter Ω2 of 1 is significantly greater than that of 2. This feature is responsible for large values of β (50.98%) and σem (4.29×10(-21)cm(2)) which suggest 1 as a good candidate for the development of samarium doped polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) laser medium acting on the (4)G5/2→(6)H9/2 transition at 645nm. The estimated room-temperature PL QE of 1 and 2 equals to 1.9 and 0.17%, respectively.

  19. Visible spectral dependence of the scattering and absorption coefficients of pigmented coatings from inversion of diffuse reflectance spectra.

    PubMed

    Curiel, Fernando; Vargas, William E; Barrera, Rubén G

    2002-10-01

    A spectral-projected gradient method and an extension of the Kubelka-Munk theory are applied to obtain the relevant parameters of the theory from measured diffuse reflectance spectra of pigmented samples illuminated with visible diffuse radiation. The initial estimate of the spectral dependence of the parameters, required by a recursive spectral-projected gradient method, was obtained by use of direct measurements and up-to-date theoretical estimates. We then tested the consistency of the Kubelka-Munk theory by repeating the procedure with samples of different thicknesses.

  20. Determining surface magnetic susceptibility of loess-paleosol sections based on spectral features: Application to a UHD 185 hyperspectral image

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Jing; Zhang, Shimin; Zhang, Jingfa; Liu, Xudong; Ding, Rui; Liu, Hanyong

    2016-08-01

    Magnetic susceptibility (MS) records of loess-paleosol sequences have been considered a measure of the degree of pedogenic activity and are considered to be excellent proxies for terrestrial climatic fluctuations. However, the MS of single (vertical) path variations occasionally represents site-specific influences rather than monsoonal changes (depending on the position of the path). Few studies have used remote sensing techniques to map the surface MS information of loess-paleosol sections. Hyperspectral techniques provide an efficient, economical and quantitative alternative. In this study, stepwise regression was used to build MS estimation models based on spectral features. Six MS models based on spectral features were established. Test datasets indicated that our models are very successful, all resulting in R2 > 0.92 and RMSEs ranging from 4.5736 to 6.80475. The slope change between 810 nm and 880 nm (b880/b810) observed in all models played an important role in MS estimation. Models 5 and 6 have higher RMSEs and relatively lower SAM values, although the R2 values are both above 0.95. The RMSEs of the first four models are similar. Therefore, the first four models were thought to be more stable and useful. UHD 185, a new generation of commercial hyperspectral imaging sensor, was used for surface MS mapping of a loess-paleosol section by model 1 and model 2. The MS map corresponded well to the loess sequences. The MS values obtained from the UHD 185 data are convincing and consistent with the measured data (R2 > 0.85). The trend in changing MS values is clear, suggesting that model 1 and model 2 could produce reasonable loess-paleosol section surface maps from the UHD 185 image, although there is a linear offset between the estimated MS and the measured MS. The methodology proposed here can be used to map MS on a much larger scale. Because of the limit of the spectral range, the performances of model 3 and model 4 with the image were not discussed. However

  1. Absorption bands in the spectrum of Io

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cruikshank, D. P.; Jones, T. J.; Pilcher, C. B.

    1978-01-01

    Near-infrared spectra of Io in the region from 2.8 to 4.2 microns are reported which show distinct absorption features, the most notable at 4.1 microns. Frozen volatiles or atmospheric gases cannot account for these absorptions, nor do they resemble those seen in common silicate rocks. Several candidate substances, most notably nitrate and carbonate salts, show absorption features in this spectral region; the deepest band in the spectrum may be a nitrate absorption. The satellite surface is shown to be anhydrous, as indicated by the absence of the 3-micron bound water band.

  2. Broadband absorption and reduced scattering spectra of in-vivo skin can be noninvasively determined using δ-P1 approximation based spectral analysis

    PubMed Central

    Hung, Cheng-Hung; Chou, Ting-Chun; Hsu, Chao-Kai; Tseng, Sheng-Hao

    2015-01-01

    Previously, we revealed that a linear gradient line source illumination (LGLSI) geometry could work with advanced diffusion models to recover the sample optical properties at wavelengths where sample absorption and reduced scattering were comparable. In this study, we employed the LGLSI geometry with a broadband light source and utilized the spectral analysis to determine the broadband absorption and scattering spectra of turbid samples in the wavelength range from 650 to 1350 nm. The performance of the LGLSI δ-P1 diffusion model based spectral analysis was evaluated using liquid phantoms, and it was found that the sample optical properties could be properly recovered even at wavelengths above 1000 nm where μs' to μa ratios were in the range between 1 to 20. Finally, we will demonstrate the use of our system for recovering the 650 to 1350 nm absorption and scattering spectra of in-vivo human skin. We expect this system can be applied to study deep vessel dilation induced hemoglobin concentration variation and determine the water and lipid concentrations of in-vivo skin in clinical settings in the future. PMID:25780735

  3. Detection of narrow C 4 and Si 4 absorption features in spectra of stars within 200 pc f the Sun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Molaro, P.; Beckman, J. E.; Franco, M.; Morossi, C.; Ramella, M.

    1984-01-01

    Detection of narrow (Beta lambda 0.5 A) absorption features in C 4 at lambda lambda 1548 and 1550 have been made in the spectra of 4 late B dwarfs within 200 pc of the Sun; the Si4 doublet at lambda lambda 1393 and 1403 shows up in two of them. It is argued that it is difficult to account for the strengths, widths, shapes, and C IV/Si IV ratios in terms consistent with a circumstellar origin except possibly for an asymmetric C IV component in one star (HD 185037). The most probable source is semi-torrid gas in the 50,000 K range forming the interfaces between cooler H 1 clouds and the ambient medium at coronal temperatures. Late B rapid rotators are used for local interstellar medium probing of this kind.

  4. Spectroscopic determination of leaf biochemistry using band-depth analysis of absorption features and stepwise multiple linear regression

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kokaly, R.F.; Clark, R.N.

    1999-01-01

    We develop a new method for estimating the biochemistry of plant material using spectroscopy. Normalized band depths calculated from the continuum-removed reflectance spectra of dried and ground leaves were used to estimate their concentrations of nitrogen, lignin, and cellulose. Stepwise multiple linear regression was used to select wavelengths in the broad absorption features centered at 1.73 ??m, 2.10 ??m, and 2.30 ??m that were highly correlated with the chemistry of samples from eastern U.S. forests. Band depths of absorption features at these wavelengths were found to also be highly correlated with the chemistry of four other sites. A subset of data from the eastern U.S. forest sites was used to derive linear equations that were applied to the remaining data to successfully estimate their nitrogen, lignin, and cellulose concentrations. Correlations were highest for nitrogen (R2 from 0.75 to 0.94). The consistent results indicate the possibility of establishing a single equation capable of estimating the chemical concentrations in a wide variety of species from the reflectance spectra of dried leaves. The extension of this method to remote sensing was investigated. The effects of leaf water content, sensor signal-to-noise and bandpass, atmospheric effects, and background soil exposure were examined. Leaf water was found to be the greatest challenge to extending this empirical method to the analysis of fresh whole leaves and complete vegetation canopies. The influence of leaf water on reflectance spectra must be removed to within 10%. Other effects were reduced by continuum removal and normalization of band depths. If the effects of leaf water can be compensated for, it might be possible to extend this method to remote sensing data acquired by imaging spectrometers to give estimates of nitrogen, lignin, and cellulose concentrations over large areas for use in ecosystem studies.We develop a new method for estimating the biochemistry of plant material using

  5. Frequency-domain method for measuring spectral properties in multiple-scattering media: methemoglobin absorption spectrum in a tissuelike phantom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fishkin, Joshua B.; So, Peter T. C.; Cerussi, Albert E.; Gratton, Enrico; Fantini, Sergio; Franceschini, Maria Angela

    1995-03-01

    We have measured the optical absorption and scattering coefficient spectra of a multiple-scattering medium (i.e., a biological tissue-simulating phantom comprising a lipid colloid) containing methemoglobin by using frequency-domain techniques. The methemoglobin absorption spectrum determined in the multiple-scattering medium is in excellent agreement with a corrected methemoglobin absorption spectrum obtained from a steady-state spectrophotometer measurement of the optical density of a minimally scattering medium. The determination of the corrected methemoglobin absorption spectrum takes into account the scattering from impurities in the methemoglobin solution containing no lipid colloid. Frequency-domain techniques allow for the separation of the absorbing from the scattering properties of multiple-scattering media, and these techniques thus provide an absolute

  6. Combining the absorptive and radiative loss in metasurfaces for multi-spectral shaping of the electromagnetic scattering

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Wenbo; Huang, Cheng; Pu, Mingbo; Ma, Xiaoliang; Cui, Jianhua; Zhao, Bo; Luo, Xiangang

    2016-01-01

    The absorptive and radiative losses are two fundamental aspects of the electromagnetic responses, which are widely occurring in many different systems such as waveguides, solar cells, and antennas. Here we proposed a metasurface to realize the control of the absorptive and radiative loss and to reduce the radar cross section (RCS) in multi-frequency bands. The anti-phase gradient and absorptive metasurfaces were designed that consists of metallic square patch and square loop structure inserted with resistors, acting as an phase gradient material in the X and Ku band, while behaving as an absorber in the S band. The simulation and experiment results verified the double-band, wideband and polarization-independent RCS reduction by the absorptive and anti-phase gradient metasurfaces. PMID:26891773

  7. Combining the absorptive and radiative loss in metasurfaces for multi-spectral shaping of the electromagnetic scattering.

    PubMed

    Pan, Wenbo; Huang, Cheng; Pu, Mingbo; Ma, Xiaoliang; Cui, Jianhua; Zhao, Bo; Luo, Xiangang

    2016-01-01

    The absorptive and radiative losses are two fundamental aspects of the electromagnetic responses, which are widely occurring in many different systems such as waveguides, solar cells, and antennas. Here we proposed a metasurface to realize the control of the absorptive and radiative loss and to reduce the radar cross section (RCS) in multi-frequency bands. The anti-phase gradient and absorptive metasurfaces were designed that consists of metallic square patch and square loop structure inserted with resistors, acting as an phase gradient material in the X and Ku band, while behaving as an absorber in the S band. The simulation and experiment results verified the double-band, wideband and polarization-independent RCS reduction by the absorptive and anti-phase gradient metasurfaces. PMID:26891773

  8. Combining the absorptive and radiative loss in metasurfaces for multi-spectral shaping of the electromagnetic scattering.

    PubMed

    Pan, Wenbo; Huang, Cheng; Pu, Mingbo; Ma, Xiaoliang; Cui, Jianhua; Zhao, Bo; Luo, Xiangang

    2016-02-19

    The absorptive and radiative losses are two fundamental aspects of the electromagnetic responses, which are widely occurring in many different systems such as waveguides, solar cells, and antennas. Here we proposed a metasurface to realize the control of the absorptive and radiative loss and to reduce the radar cross section (RCS) in multi-frequency bands. The anti-phase gradient and absorptive metasurfaces were designed that consists of metallic square patch and square loop structure inserted with resistors, acting as an phase gradient material in the X and Ku band, while behaving as an absorber in the S band. The simulation and experiment results verified the double-band, wideband and polarization-independent RCS reduction by the absorptive and anti-phase gradient metasurfaces.

  9. Combining the absorptive and radiative loss in metasurfaces for multi-spectral shaping of the electromagnetic scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Wenbo; Huang, Cheng; Pu, Mingbo; Ma, Xiaoliang; Cui, Jianhua; Zhao, Bo; Luo, Xiangang

    2016-02-01

    The absorptive and radiative losses are two fundamental aspects of the electromagnetic responses, which are widely occurring in many different systems such as waveguides, solar cells, and antennas. Here we proposed a metasurface to realize the control of the absorptive and radiative loss and to reduce the radar cross section (RCS) in multi-frequency bands. The anti-phase gradient and absorptive metasurfaces were designed that consists of metallic square patch and square loop structure inserted with resistors, acting as an phase gradient material in the X and Ku band, while behaving as an absorber in the S band. The simulation and experiment results verified the double-band, wideband and polarization-independent RCS reduction by the absorptive and anti-phase gradient metasurfaces.

  10. Collisional Induced Absorption (CIA) bands of CO2 and H2 measured in the IR spectral range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stefani, S.; Piccioni, G.; Snels, M.; Adriani, A.; Grassi, D.

    2015-10-01

    In this paper we present the results on the Collisional Induced Absorption (CIA) bands of CO2 and H2 measured employing two different experimental setup. Each of them allows us to reproduce typical planetary conditions, at a pressure and temperature from 1 up to 50 bar and from 298 up to 500 K respectively. A detailed study on the temperature dependence of the CO2 CIA absorption bands will be presented.

  11. Temperature profile retrieval in axisymmetric combustion plumes using multilayer perceptron modeling and spectral feature selection in the infrared CO2 emission band.

    PubMed

    García-Cuesta, Esteban; de Castro, Antonio J; Galván, Inés M; López, Fernando

    2014-01-01

    In this work, a methodology based on the combined use of a multilayer perceptron model fed using selected spectral information is presented to invert the radiative transfer equation (RTE) and to recover the spatial temperature profile inside an axisymmetric flame. The spectral information is provided by the measurement of the infrared CO2 emission band in the 3-5 μm spectral region. A guided spectral feature selection was carried out using a joint criterion of principal component analysis and a priori physical knowledge of the radiative problem. After applying this guided feature selection, a subset of 17 wavenumbers was selected. The proposed methodology was applied over synthetic scenarios. Also, an experimental validation was carried out by measuring the spectral emission of the exhaust hot gas plume in a microjet engine with a Fourier transform-based spectroradiometer. Temperatures retrieved using the proposed methodology were compared with classical thermocouple measurements, showing a good agreement between them. Results obtained using the proposed methodology are very promising and can encourage the use of sensor systems based on the spectral measurement of the CO2 emission band in the 3-5 μm spectral window to monitor combustion processes in a nonintrusive way.

  12. Evaluation of intensity and energy interaction parameters for the complexation of Pr(III) with selected nucleoside and nucleotide through absorption spectral studies.

    PubMed

    Bendangsenla, N; Moaienla, T; David Singh, Th; Sumitra, Ch; Rajmuhon Singh, N; Indira Devi, M

    2013-02-15

    The interactions of Pr(III) with nucleosides and nucleotides have been studied in different organic solvents employing absorption difference and comparative absorption spectrophotometry. The magnitudes of the variations in both energy and intensity interaction parameters were used to explore the degree of outer and inner sphere co-ordination, incidence of covalency and the extent of metal 4f-orbital involvement in chemical bonding. Various electronic spectral parameters like Slater-Condon (F(k)), Racah (E(k)), Lande parameter (ξ(4f)), Nephelauxatic ratio (β), bonding (b(1/2)), percentage covalency (δ) and intensity parameters like oscillator strength (P) and Judd Ofelt electronic dipole intensity parameter (T(λ), λ=2,4,6) have been evaluated. The variation of these evaluated parameters were employed to interpret the nature of binding of Pr(III) with different ligands i.e. Adenosine/ATP in presence and absence of Ca(2+).

  13. Wavelength-resolved optical extinction measurements of aerosols using broad-band cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopy over the spectral range of 445-480 nm.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Weixiong; Dong, Meili; Chen, Weidong; Gu, Xuejun; Hu, Changjin; Gao, Xiaoming; Huang, Wei; Zhang, Weijun

    2013-02-19

    Despite the significant progress in the measurements of aerosol extinction and absorption using spectroscopy approaches such as cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS) and photoacoustic spectroscopy (PAS), the widely used single-wavelength instruments may suffer from the interferences of gases absorption present in the real environment. A second instrument for simultaneous measurement of absorbing gases is required to characterize the effect of light extinction resulted from gases absorption. We present in this paper the development of a blue light-emitting diode (LED)-based incoherent broad-band cavity-enhanced spectroscopy (IBBCEAS) approach for broad-band measurements of wavelength-resolved aerosol extinction over the spectral range of 445-480 nm. This method also allows for simultaneous measurement of trace gases absorption present in the air sample using the same instrument. On the basis of the measured wavelength-dependent aerosol extinction cross section, the real part of the refractive index (RI) can be directly retrieved in a case where the RI does not vary strongly with the wavelength over the relevant spectral region. Laboratory-generated monodispersed aerosols, polystyrene latex spheres (PSL) and ammonium sulfate (AS), were employed for validation of the RI determination by IBBCEAS measurements. On the basis of a Mie scattering model, the real parts of the aerosol RI were retrieved from the measured wavelength-resolved extinction cross sections for both aerosol samples, which are in good agreement with the reported values. The developed IBBCEAS instrument was deployed for simultaneous measurements of aerosol extinction coefficient and NO(2) concentration in ambient air in a suburban site during two representative days. PMID:23320530

  14. Clay composition and swelling potential estimation of soils using depth of absorption bands in the SWIR (1100-2500 nm) spectral domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dufréchou, Grégory; Granjean, Gilles; Bourguignon, Anne

    2014-05-01

    Swelling soils contain clay minerals that change volume with water content and cause extensive and expensive damage on infrastructures. Presence of clay minerals is traditionally a good estimator of soils swelling and shrinking behavior. Montmorillonite (i.e. smectite group), illite, kaolinite are the most common minerals in soils and are usually associated to high, moderate, and low swelling potential when they are present in significant amount. Characterization of swelling potential and identification of clay minerals of soils using conventional analysis are slow, expensive, and does not permit integrated measurements. SWIR (1100-2500 nm) spectral domain are characterized by significant spectral absorption bands related to clay content that can be used to recognize main clay minerals. Hyperspectral laboratory using an ASD Fieldspec Pro spectrometer provides thus a rapid and less expensive field surface sensing that permits to measure soil spectral properties. This study presents a new laboratory reflectance spectroscopy method that used depth of clay diagnostic absorption bands (1400 nm, 1900 nm, and 2200 nm) to compare natural soils to synthetic montmorillonite-illite-kaolinite mixtures. We observe in mixtures that illite, montmorillonite, and kaolinite content respectively strongly influence the depth of absorption bands at 1400 nm (D1400), 1900 nm (D1900), and 2200 nm (D2200). To attenuate or removed effects of abundance and grain size, depth of absorption bands ratios were thus used to performed (i) 3D (using D1900/D2200, D1400/D1900, and D2200/D1400 as axis), and (ii) 2D (using D1400/D1900 and D1900/D2200 as axis) diagrams of synthetic mixtures. In this case we supposed that the overall reduction or growth of depth absorption bands should be similarly affected by the abundance and grain size of materials in soil. In 3D and 2D diagrams, the mixtures define a triangular shape formed by two clay minerals as external envelop and the three clay minerals mixtures

  15. Use of feature extraction techniques for the texture and context information in ERTS imagery: Spectral and textural processing of ERTS imagery. [classification of Kansas land use

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haralick, R. H. (Principal Investigator); Bosley, R. J.

    1974-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. A procedure was developed to extract cross-band textural features from ERTS MSS imagery. Evolving from a single image texture extraction procedure which uses spatial dependence matrices to measure relative co-occurrence of nearest neighbor grey tones, the cross-band texture procedure uses the distribution of neighboring grey tone N-tuple differences to measure the spatial interrelationships, or co-occurrences, of the grey tone N-tuples present in a texture pattern. In both procedures, texture is characterized in such a way as to be invariant under linear grey tone transformations. However, the cross-band procedure complements the single image procedure by extracting texture information and spectral information contained in ERTS multi-images. Classification experiments show that when used alone, without spectral processing, the cross-band texture procedure extracts more information than the single image texture analysis. Results show an improvement in average correct classification from 86.2% to 88.8% for ERTS image no. 1021-16333 with the cross-band texture procedure. However, when used together with spectral features, the single image texture plus spectral features perform better than the cross-band texture plus spectral features, with an average correct classification of 93.8% and 91.6%, respectively.

  16. Biogeochemical origins of particles obtained from the inversion of the volume scattering function and spectral absorption in coastal waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, X.; Huot, Y.; Gray, D. J.; Weidemann, A.; Rhea, W. J.

    2013-09-01

    In the aquatic environment, particles can be broadly separated into phytoplankton (PHY), non-algal particle (NAP) and dissolved (or very small particle, VSP) fractions. Typically, absorption spectra are inverted to quantify these fractions, but volume scattering functions (VSFs) can also be used. Both absorption spectra and VSFs were used to estimate particle fractions for an experiment in the Chesapeake Bay. A complete set of water inherent optical properties was measured using a suite of commercial instruments and a prototype Multispectral Volume Scattering Meter (MVSM); the chlorophyll concentration, [Chl] was determined using the HPLC method. The total scattering coefficient measured by an ac-s and the VSF at a few backward angles measured by a HydroScat-6 and an ECO-VSF agreed with the LISST and MVSM data within 5%, thus indicating inter-instrument consistency. The size distribution and scattering parameters for PHY, NAP and VSP were inverted from measured VSFs. For the absorption inversion, the "dissolved" absorption spectra were measured for filtrate passing through a 0.2 μm filter, whereas [Chl] and NAP absorption spectra were inverted from the particulate fraction. Even though the total scattering coefficient showed no correlation with [Chl], estimates of [Chl] from the VSF-inversion agreed well with the HPLC measurements (r = 0.68, mean relative errors = -20%). The scattering associated with NAP and VSP both correlated well with the NAP and "dissolved" absorption coefficients, respectively. While NAP dominated forward, and hence total, scattering, our results also suggest that the scattering by VSP was far from negligible and dominated backscattering. Since the sizes of VSP range from 0.02 to 0.2 μm, covering (a portion of) the operationally defined "dissolved" matter, the typical assumption that colored dissolved organic matter (i.e., CDOM) does not scatter may not hold, particularly in a coastal or estuarine environment.

  17. Absorption features in the quasar HS 1603 + 3820 II. Distance to the absorber obtained from photoionisation modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Różańska, A.; Nikołajuk, M.; Czerny, B.; Dobrzycki, A.; Hryniewicz, K.; Bechtold, J.; Ebeling, H.

    2014-04-01

    We present the photoionisation modelling of the intrinsic absorber in the bright quasar HS 1603 + 3820. We constructed the broad-band spectral energy distribution using the optical/UV/X-ray observations from different instruments as inputs for the photoionisation calculations. The spectra from the Keck telescope show extremely high CIV to HI ratios, for the first absorber in system A, named A1. This value, together with high column density of CIV ion, place strong constraints on the photoionisation model. We used two photoionisation codes to derive the hydrogen number density at the cloud illuminated surface. By estimating bolometric luminosity of HS 1603 + 3820 using the typical formula for quasars, we calculated the distance to A1. We could find one photoionization solution, by assuming either a constant density cloud (which was modelled using CLOUDY), or a stratified cloud (which was modelled using TITAN), as well as the solar abundances. This model explained both the ionic column density of CIV and the high CIV to HI ratio. The location of A1 is 0.1 pc, and it is situated even closer to the nucleus than the possible location of the Broad Line Region in this object. The upper limit of the distance is sensitive to the adopted covering factor and the carbon abundance. Photoionisation modelling always prefers dense clouds with the number density n0 = 1010 - 1012 cm-3, which explains intrinsic absorption in HS 1603 + 3820. This number density is of the same order as that in the disk atmosphere at the implied distance of A1. Therefore, our results show that the disk wind that escapes from the outermost accretion disk atmosphere can build up dense absorber in quasars.

  18. Modelling the Emission And/or Absorption Features in the High Resolution Spectra of the Southern Binary System: HH Car

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koseoglu, Dogan; Bakış, Hicran

    2016-07-01

    High-resolution spectra (R=48000) of the southern close binary system, HH Car, has been analyzed with modern analysis techniques. Precise absolute parameters were derived from the simultaneous solution of the radial velocity, produced in this study and the light curves, published. According to the results of these analyses, the primary component is an O9 type main sequence star while the secondary component is a giant/subgiant star with a spectral type of B0. Hα emissions can be seen explicitly in the spectra of HH Car. These features were modelled using the absolute parameters of the components. Since components of HH Car are massive early-type stars, mass loss through stellar winds can be expected. This study revealed that the components of HH Car have stellar winds and the secondary component loses mass to the primary. Stellar winds and the gas stream between the components were modelled as a hot shell around the system. It is determined that the interaction between the winds and the gas stream leads to formation of a high temperature impact region.

  19. Spectral reflectance and emissivity features of broad leaf plants: Prospects for remote sensing in the thermal infrared (8.0-14.0 μm)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ribeiro da Luz, Beatriz; Crowley, James K.

    2007-01-01

    In contrast to visible and short-wave infrared data, thermal infrared spectra of broad leaf plants show considerable spectral diversity, suggesting that such data eventually could be utilized to map vegetation composition. However, remotely measuring the subtle emissivity features of leaves still presents major challenges. To be successful, sensors operating in the 8–14 μm atmospheric window must have high signal-to-noise and a small enough instantaneous field of view to allow measurements of only a few leaf surfaces. Methods for atmospheric compensation, temperature–emissivity separation, and spectral feature analysis also will need to be refined to allow the recognition, and perhaps, exploitation of leaf thermal infrared spectral properties.

  20. [The Change Detection of High Spatial Resolution Remotely Sensed Imagery Based on OB-HMAD Algorithm and Spectral Features].

    PubMed

    Chen, Qiang; Chen, Yun-hao; Jiang, Wei-guo

    2015-06-01

    The high spatial resolution remotely sensed imagery has abundant detailed information of earth surface, and the multi-temporal change detection for the high resolution remotely sensed imagery can realize the variations of geographical unit. In terms of the high spatial resolution remotely sensed imagery, the traditional remote sensing change detection algorithms have obvious defects. In this paper, learning from the object-based image analysis idea, we proposed a semi-automatic threshold selection algorithm named OB-HMAD (object-based-hybrid-MAD), on the basis of object-based image analysis and multivariate alternative detection algorithm (MAD), which used the spectral features of remotely sensed imagery into the field of object-based change detection. Additionally, OB-HMAD algorithm has been compared with other the threshold segmentation algorithms by the change detection experiment. Firstly, we obtained the image object by the multi-solution segmentation algorithm. Secondly, we got the object-based difference image object using MAD and minimum noise fraction rotation (MNF) for improving the SNR of the image object. Then, the change objects or area are classified using histogram curvature analysis (HCA) method for the semi-automatic threshold selection, which determined the threshold by calculated the maximum value of curvature of the histogram, so the HCA algorithm has better automation than other threshold segmentation algorithms. Finally, the change detection results are validated using confusion matrix with the field sample data. Worldview-2 imagery of 2012 and 2013 in case study of Beijing were used to validate the proposed OB-HMAD algorithm. The experiment results indicated that OB-HMAD algorithm which integrated the multi-channel spectral information could be effectively used in multi-temporal high resolution remotely sensed imagery change detection, and it has basically solved the "salt and pepper" problem which always exists in the pixel-based change

  1. Identifying Planetary Biosignature Impostors: Spectral Features of CO and O4 Resulting from Abiotic O2/O3 Production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwieterman, Edward W.; Meadows, Victoria S.; Domagal-Goldman, Shawn D.; Deming, Drake; Arney, Giada N.; Luger, Rodrigo; Harman, Chester E.; Misra, Amit; Barnes, Rory

    2016-03-01

    O2 and O3 have been long considered the most robust individual biosignature gases in a planetary atmosphere, yet multiple mechanisms that may produce them in the absence of life have been described. However, these abiotic planetary mechanisms modify the environment in potentially identifiable ways. Here we briefly discuss two of the most detectable spectral discriminants for abiotic O2/O3: CO and O4. We produce the first explicit self-consistent simulations of these spectral discriminants as they may be seen by James Webb Space Telescope (JWST). If JWST-NIRISS and/or NIRSpec observe CO (2.35, 4.6 μm) in conjunction with CO2 (1.6, 2.0, 4.3 μm) in the transmission spectrum of a terrestrial planet it could indicate robust CO2 photolysis and suggest that a future detection of O2 or O3 might not be biogenic. Strong O4 bands seen in transmission at 1.06 and 1.27 μm could be diagnostic of a post-runaway O2-dominated atmosphere from massive H-escape. We find that for these false positive scenarios, CO at 2.35 μm, CO2 at 2.0 and 4.3 μm, and O4 at 1.27 μm are all stronger features in transmission than O2/O3 and could be detected with S/Ns ≳ 3 for an Earth-size planet orbiting a nearby M dwarf star with as few as 10 transits, assuming photon-limited noise. O4 bands could also be sought in UV/VIS/NIR reflected light (at 0.345, 0.36, 0.38, 0.445, 0.475, 0.53, 0.57, 0.63, 1.06, and 1.27 μm) by a next generation direct-imaging telescope such as LUVOIR/HDST or HabEx and would indicate an oxygen atmosphere too massive to be biologically produced.

  2. Identifying Planetary Biosignature Impostors: Spectral Features of CO and O4 Resulting from Abiotic O2/O3 Production

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwieterman, Edward W.; Meadows, Victoria S.; Domagal-Goldman, Shawn D.; Deming, Drake; Arney, Giada N.; Luger, Rodrigo; Harman, Chester E.; Misra, Amit; Barnes, Rory

    2016-01-01

    O2 and O3 have been long considered the most robust individual biosignature gases in a planetary atmosphere, yet multiple mechanisms that may produce them in the absence of life have been described. However, these abiotic planetary mechanisms modify the environment in potentially identifiable ways. Here we briefly discuss two of the most detectable spectral discriminants for abiotic O2/O3: CO and O4. We produce the first explicit self-consistent simulations of these spectral discriminants as they may be seen by James Webb Space Telescope (JWST). If JWST-NIRISS (Near InfraRed Imager and Slitless Spectrograph) and/or NIRSpec (Near InfraRed Spectograph) observe CO (2.35, 4.6 micrometers) in conjunction with CO2 (1.6, 2.0, 4.3 micrometers) in the transmission spectrum of a terrestrial planet it could indicate robust CO2 photolysis and suggest that a future detection of O2 or O3 might not be biogenic. Strong O4 bands seen in transmission at 1.06 and 1.27 micrometers could be diagnostic of a post-runaway O2-dominated atmosphere from massive H-escape. We find that for these false positive scenarios, CO at 2.35 micrometers, CO2 at 2.0 and 4.3 micrometers, and O4 at 1.27 micrometers are all stronger features in transmission than O2/O3 and could be detected with sigal to noise ratios greater than or approximately 3 for an Earth-size planet orbiting a nearby M dwarf star with as few as 10 transits, assuming photon-limited noise. O4 bands could also be sought in UV/VIS/NIR reflected light (at 0.345, 0.36, 0.38, 0.445, 0.475, 0.53, 0.57, 0.63, 1.06, and 1.27 micrometers) by a next generation direct imaging telescope such as LUVOIR (Large Ultraviolet Visible Infrared)/HDST (High-Definition Space Telescope) or HabEx (Habitable-Exoplanet Imaging Mission) and would indicate an oxygen atmosphere too massive to be biologically produced.

  3. [The Change Detection of High Spatial Resolution Remotely Sensed Imagery Based on OB-HMAD Algorithm and Spectral Features].

    PubMed

    Chen, Qiang; Chen, Yun-hao; Jiang, Wei-guo

    2015-06-01

    The high spatial resolution remotely sensed imagery has abundant detailed information of earth surface, and the multi-temporal change detection for the high resolution remotely sensed imagery can realize the variations of geographical unit. In terms of the high spatial resolution remotely sensed imagery, the traditional remote sensing change detection algorithms have obvious defects. In this paper, learning from the object-based image analysis idea, we proposed a semi-automatic threshold selection algorithm named OB-HMAD (object-based-hybrid-MAD), on the basis of object-based image analysis and multivariate alternative detection algorithm (MAD), which used the spectral features of remotely sensed imagery into the field of object-based change detection. Additionally, OB-HMAD algorithm has been compared with other the threshold segmentation algorithms by the change detection experiment. Firstly, we obtained the image object by the multi-solution segmentation algorithm. Secondly, we got the object-based difference image object using MAD and minimum noise fraction rotation (MNF) for improving the SNR of the image object. Then, the change objects or area are classified using histogram curvature analysis (HCA) method for the semi-automatic threshold selection, which determined the threshold by calculated the maximum value of curvature of the histogram, so the HCA algorithm has better automation than other threshold segmentation algorithms. Finally, the change detection results are validated using confusion matrix with the field sample data. Worldview-2 imagery of 2012 and 2013 in case study of Beijing were used to validate the proposed OB-HMAD algorithm. The experiment results indicated that OB-HMAD algorithm which integrated the multi-channel spectral information could be effectively used in multi-temporal high resolution remotely sensed imagery change detection, and it has basically solved the "salt and pepper" problem which always exists in the pixel-based change

  4. SPIDER VIII - constraints on the stellar initial mass function of early-type galaxies from a variety of spectral features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    La Barbera, F.; Ferreras, I.; Vazdekis, A.; de la Rosa, I. G.; de Carvalho, R. R.; Trevisan, M.; Falcón-Barroso, J.; Ricciardelli, E.

    2013-08-01

    We perform a spectroscopic study to constrain the stellar initial mass function (IMF) by using a large sample of 24 781 early-type galaxies from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey-based Spheroids Panchromatic Investigation in Different Environmental Regions survey. Clear evidence is found of a trend between IMF and central velocity dispersion (σ0), evolving from a standard Kroupa/Chabrier IMF at σ0 ˜ 100 km s-1 towards a more bottom-heavy IMF with increasing σ0, becoming steeper than the Salpeter function at σ0 ≳ 220 km s-1. We analyse a variety of spectral indices, combining gravity-sensitive features, with age- and metallicity-sensitive indices, and we also consider the effect of non-solar abundance variations. The indices, corrected to solar scale by means of semi-empirical correlations, are fitted simultaneously with the (nearly solar-scaled) extended MILES (MIUSCAT) stellar population models. Similar conclusions are reached when analysing the spectra with a hybrid approach, combining constraints from direct spectral fitting in the optical with those from IMF-sensitive indices. Our analysis suggests that σ0, rather than [α/Fe], drives the variation of the IMF. Although our analysis cannot discriminate between a single power-law (unimodal) IMF and a low-mass (≲0.5 M⊙) tapered (bimodal) IMF, robust constraints can be inferred for the fraction in low-mass stars at birth. This fraction (by mass) is found to increase from ˜20 per cent at σ0 ˜ 100 km s-1, up to ˜80 per cent at σ0 ˜ 300 km s-1. However, additional constraints can be provided with stellar mass-to-light (M/L) ratios: unimodal models predict M/L significantly larger than dynamical M/L, across the whole σ0 range, whereas a bimodal IMF is compatible. Our results are robust against individual abundance variations. No significant variation is found in Na and Ca in addition to the expected change from the correlation between [α/Fe] and σ0.

  5. Effect of a progressive sound wave on the profiles of spectral lines. 2: Asymmetry of faint Fraunhofer lines. [absorption spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kostyk, R. I.

    1974-01-01

    The absorption coefficient profile was calculated for lines of different chemical elements in a medium with progressive sound waves. Calculations show that (1) the degree and direction of asymmetry depend on the atomic ionization potential and the potential of lower level excitation of the individual line; (2) the degree of asymmetry of a line decreases from the center toward the limb of the solar disc; and (3) turbulent motions 'suppress' the asymmetry.

  6. Time-dependent spectral-feature variations of stars displaying the B[e] phenomenon. III. HD 50138

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeřábková, T.; Korčáková, D.; Miroshnichenko, A.; Danford, S.; Zharikov, S. V.; Kříček, R.; Zasche, P.; Votruba, V.; Šlechta, M.; Škoda, P.; Janík, J.

    2016-02-01

    Context. B[e] stars are anomalous objects around which extended circumstellar matter is present. The observed properties of the central star are significantly affected by the surrounding material. Therefore, the use of standard synthetic spectra is disputable in this case and our capability to study these objects is limited. One of the possibilities is to analyse variations of the spectral features. Long-term spectroscopic observations are required for this, but are not found in the literature. For our study we choose the B[e] star HD 50138 of the FS CMa type because of the indication that this star is a post-main-sequence star, although still not highly evolved. Therefore, it can be a good object for testing evolutionary models. Currently, HD 50138 is the most extensively observed FS CMa star which makes it an ideal object for modelling. Our observations fill the gap in the available data. Aims: To describe the variability of HD 50138 we have monitored this star spectroscopically over the last twenty years. To search for the periodicity on short-term scales, series of night-to-night observations were also obtained. We were able to obtain 130 spectra from four different telescopes - 1.06 m at Ritter Observatory (échelle, R ~ 26 000, 32 spectra, 1994-2003), the Perek 2 m telescope at Ondřejov Observatory (slit, R ~ 12 500, 56 spectra, 2004-2013), the 2.12 m telescope at Observatorio Astronomico Nacional San Pedro Martir (échelle, R ~ 18 000, 16 spectra, 2005-2013), and the 0.81 m telescope at Three College Observatory (échelle, R ~ 12 000, 26 spectra, 2013-2014). Methods: We describe and analyse variations of the chosen lines. The measurements of the equivalent widths and radial velocities of the Hα, Hβ, and [O i] λλ 6300, 6364 Å lines are presented. The set of obtained spectra allows us to describe the changes on timescales from days to years. Results: The long-term quasi-periodic trend was found in the variations of the Hα equivalent width and confirmed

  7. Characteristic Tandem Mass Spectral Features Under Various Collision Chemistries for Site-Specific Identification of Protein S-Glutathionylation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chou, Chi-Chi; Chiang, Bing-Yu; Lin, Jason Ching-Yao; Pan, Kuan-Ting; Lin, Chun-Hung; Khoo, Kay-Hooi

    2015-01-01

    Protein S-glutathionylation is a reversible post-translational modification widely implicated in redox regulated biological functions. Conventional biochemical methods, however, often do not allow such a mixed disulfide modification to be reliably identified on specific cysteine residues or be distinguished from other related oxidized forms. To develop more efficient mass spectrometry (MS)-based analytical strategies for this purpose, we first investigated the MS/MS fragmentation pattern of S-glutathionylated peptides under various dissociation modes, including collision-induced dissociation (CID), higher-energy C-trap dissociation (HCD), and electron transfer dissociation (ETD), using synthetic peptides derived from protein tyrosine phosphatase as models. Our results indicate that a MALDI-based high energy CID MS/MS on a TOF/TOF affords the most distinctive spectral features that would facilitate rapid and unambiguous identification of site-specific S-glutathionylation. For more complex proteomic samples best tackled by LC-MS/MS approach, we demonstrate that HCD performed on an LTQ-Orbitrap hybrid instrument fairs better than trap-based CID and ETD in allowing more protein site-specific S-glutathionylation to be confidently identified by direct database searching of the generated MS/MS dataset using Mascot. Overall, HCD afforded more peptide sequence-informative fragment ions retaining the glutathionyl modification with less neutral losses of side chains to compromise scoring. In conjunction with our recently developed chemo-enzymatic tagging strategy, our nanoLC-HCD-MS/MS approach is sufficiently sensitive to identify endogenous S-glutathionylated peptides prepared from non-stressed cells. It is anticipated that future applications to global scale analysis of protein S-glutathionylation will benefit further from current advances in both speed and mass accuracy afforded by HCD MS/MS mode on the Orbitrap series.

  8. An experimental study of the electronic absorption and fluorescence spectral properties of new p-substituted-N-phenylpyrroles and their electrosynthesized polymers.

    PubMed

    Diaw, A K D; Gningue-Sall, D; Yassar, A; Brochon, J-C; Henry, E; Aaron, J-J

    2015-01-25

    Electronic absorption and fluorescence spectral properties of new p-substituted-N-phenylpyrroles (N-PhPys), including HOPhPy, MeOPhPy, ThPhPy, PhDPy, DPhDPy, PyPhThThPhPy, and their available, electrosynthesized polymers were investigated. Electronic absorption spectra, fluorescence excitation and emission spectra, fluorescence quantum yields (ΦF) and lifetimes (τF), and other photophysical parameters of these N-PhPy derivatives and their polymers were measured in DMF, DMSO diluted solutions and/or solid state at room temperature. The electronic absorption spectra of N-PhPy derivatives and their polymers included one to several bands, located in the 270-395 nm region, according to the p-phenyl substituent electron-donating effect and conjugated heteroaromatic system length. The fluorescence excitation spectra were characterized by one broad main peak, with, in most cases, one (or more) poorly resolved shoulder (s), appearing in the 270-405 nm region, and their emission spectra were generally constituted of several bands located in the 330-480 nm region. No significant shift of the absorption, fluorescence excitation and emission spectra wavelengths was found upon going from the monomers to the corresponding polymers. ΦF values were high, varying between 0.11 and 0.63, according to the nature of substituents(s) and to the conjugated system extension. Fluorescence decays were mono-exponential for the monomers and poly-exponential for PyPhThThPhPy and for polymers. τF values were relatively short (0.35-5.17 ns), and markedly decreased with the electron-donor character of the phenyl group p-substituent and the conjugated system extension.

  9. Real-time calibration of laser absorption spectrometer using spectral correlation performed with an in-line gas cell.

    PubMed

    Smith, Clinton J; Wang, Wen; Wysocki, Gerard

    2013-09-23

    A real-time drift correction and calibration method using spectral correlation based on a revolving in-line gas cell for laser-based spectroscopic trace-gas measurements has been developed and evaluated experimentally. This technique is relatively simple to implement in laser spectroscopy systems and assures long-term stability of trace-gas measurements by minimizing the effects of external sources of drift in real-time. Spectroscopic sensitivity sufficient for environmental monitoring and effective drift suppression has been achieved for long-term measurements of CO₂ with a quantum cascade laser based spectrometer.

  10. Application of Spectral Information for Investigation of Cultural Properties II—A Color Feature Extraction Based on Clustering and the Principal Component Analysis—

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyata, Kimiyoshi; Andriyashin, Alexey; Jääskeläinen, Timo; Hauta-Kasari, Markku; Parkkinen, Jussi

    In the research and investigation on the historical materials and cultural properties, not only conventional RGB digital images but also spectral reflectance images serve valuable information. However, some suitable techniques to extract effective information corresponding to the purpose of the use of the spectral reflectance images are desired because the spectral reflectance images have so huge of information. In this article, a method for investigating the historical materials and cultural properties will be described. This method can extract useful features relating to color compositions in the cultural properties. In this method, the measured spectral reflectance images of the icons, which are examples of the cultural properties, are clustered and the principal component analysis is applied in each cluster. The first principal component in each cluster is used for approximating the original spectral reflectance. The color difference caused of this approximation is calculated and used to control features to be extracted from the icons. Based on this number of clusters, results of the clustering are compared and possibilities of this method for further investigation are discussed.

  11. Theoretical study of the spectral shift of the absorption line of Rb and Cs in liquid helium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Modesto-Costa, Lucas; Mukherjee, Prasanta K.; Canuto, Sylvio

    2015-07-01

    A combined and sequential use of Monte Carlo simulation and time-dependent density functional theory is made to obtain the excitation line shifts and widths of Rb and Cs embedded in liquid 4He. In each case calculations are made on 100 statistically uncorrelated configurations with Rb (Cs) surrounded by nearly 60 He atoms treated explicitly. Different basis sets and functionals are used for obtaining the blue shifts of the absorption lines 5s → 5p of Rb and 6s → 6p of Cs. Estimate of the line broadening is also made and results for both the shift and broadening are obtained in good agreement with experiment.

  12. Preliminary assessment of dispersion versus absorption analysis of high spectral and spatial resolution magnetic resonance images in the diagnosis of breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, William A.; Medved, Milica; Karczmar, Gregory S.; Giger, Maryellen L.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract. Water resonance lineshapes observed in breast lesions imaged with high spectral and spatial resolution (HiSS) magnetic resonance imaging have been shown to contain diagnostically useful non-Lorentzian components. The purpose of this work is to update a previous method of breast lesion diagnosis by including phase-corrected absorption and dispersion spectra. This update includes information about the shape of the complex water resonance, which could improve the performance of a computer-aided diagnosis breast lesion classification scheme. The non-Lorentzian characteristics observed in complex breast lesion water resonance spectra are characterized by comparing a plot of the real versus imaginary components of the spectrum to that of a perfect complex Lorentzian spectrum, a “dispersion versus absorption” (DISPA) analysis technique. Distortion in the shape of the observed spectra indicates underlying physiologic changes, which have been shown to be correlated with malignancy. These spectral shape distortions in each lesion voxel are quantified by summing the deviations in DISPA radius from an ideal complex Lorentzian spectrum over all Fourier components, yielding a “total radial difference” (TRD). We limited our analysis to those voxels in each lesion with the largest TRD. The number of voxels considered was dependent on the lesion size. The TRD was used to classify voxels from 15 malignant and 8 benign lesions (∼2400 voxels after voxel elimination). Lesion discrimination performance was evaluated for both the average and variance of the TRD within each lesion. Area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (ROC AUC) was used to assess both the voxel- and lesion-based discrimination methods in the task of distinguishing between malignant and benign. In the task of distinguishing voxels from malignant and benign lesions, TRD yielded an AUC of 0.89 (95% confidence interval [0.84, 0.91]). In the task of distinguishing malignant from benign

  13. Scattering and absorption property database for nonspherical ice particles in the near- through far-infrared spectral region.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ping; Wei, Heli; Huang, Hung-Lung; Baum, Bryan A; Hu, Yong X; Kattawar, George W; Mishchenko, Michael I; Fu, Qiang

    2005-09-10

    The single-scattering properties of ice particles in the near- through far-infrared spectral region are computed from a composite method that is based on a combination of the finite-difference time-domain technique, the T-matrix method, an improved geometrical-optics method, and Lorenz-Mie theory. Seven nonspherical ice crystal habits (aggregates, hexagonal solid and hollow columns, hexagonal plates, bullet rosettes, spheroids, and droxtals) are considered. A database of the single-scattering properties for each of these ice particles has been developed at 49 wavelengths between 3 and 100 microm and for particle sizes ranging from 2 to 10,000 microm specified in terms of the particle maximum dimension. The spectral variations of the single-scattering properties are discussed, as well as their dependence on the particle maximum dimension and effective particle size. The comparisons show that the assumption of spherical ice particles in the near-IR through far-IR region is generally not optimal for radiative transfer computation. Furthermore, a parameterization of the bulk optical properties is developed for mid-latitude cirrus clouds based on a set of 21 particle size distributions obtained from various field campaigns.

  14. Application of an all-solid-state diode-laser-based sensor for carbon monoxide detection by optical absorption in the 4.4--4.8 mum spectral region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barron Jimenez, Rodolfo

    An all-solid-state continuous-wave (cw) laser system for mid-infrared absorption measurements of the carbon monoxide (CO) molecule has been developed and demonstrated. The single-mode, tunable output of an external-cavity diode laser (ECDL) is difference-frequency mixed (DFM) with the output of a 550-mW diode-pumped cw Nd:YAG laser in a periodically-poled lithium niobate (PPLN) crystal to produce tunable cw radiation in the mid-infrared. The wavelength of the 860-nm ECDL can be coarse tuned between 860.78 to 872.82 nm allowing the sensor to be operated in the 4.4--4.8 mum region. Results from single-pass mid-IR direct absorption experiments for CO concentration measurements are discussed. CO measurements were performed in CO/CO2/N 2 mixtures in a room temperature gas cell that allowed the evaluation of the sensor operation and data reduction procedures. Field testing was performed at two locations: in the exhaust of a well-stirred reactor (WSR) at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base and the exhaust of a gas turbine at Honeywell Engines and Systems. Field tests demonstrated the feasibility of the sensor for operation in harsh combustion environments but much improvement in the sensor design and operation was required. Experiments in near-adiabatic hydrogen/air CO2-doped flames were performed featuring two-line thermometry in the 4.8 mum spectral region. The sensor concentration measurement uncertainty was estimated at 2% for gas cell testing. CO concentration measurements agreed within 15% of conventional extractive sampling at WSR, and for the flame experiments the repeatability of the peak absorption gives a system uncertainty of 10%. The noise equivalent CO detection limit for these experiments was estimated at 2 ppm per meter, for combustion gas at 1000 K assuming a SNR ratio of 1.

  15. The Copernicus ultraviolet spectral atlas of Vega

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogerson, John B., Jr.

    1989-01-01

    A near-ultraviolet spectral atlas for the A0 V star Alpha Lyr (Vega) has been prepared from data taken by the Princeton spectrometer aboard the Copernicus satellite. The spectral region from 2000 to 3187 A has been scanned with a resolution of 0.1 A. The atlas is presented in graphs with a normalized continuum, and an identification table for the absorption features has been prepared.

  16. Spectral lineshapes of collision-induced absorption (CIA) and collision-induced light scattering (CILS) for molecular nitrogen using isotropic intermolecular potential. New insights and perspectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Kader, M. S. A.; Mostafa, S. I.; Bancewicz, T.; Maroulis, G.

    2014-08-01

    The rototranslational collision-induced absorption (CIA) at different temperatures and collision-induced light scattering (CILS) at room temperature of nitrogen gas are analyzed in terms of new isotropic intermolecular potential, multipole-induced dipole functions and interaction-induced pair polarizability models, using quantum spectral lineshape computations. The irreducible spherical form for the induced operator of light scattering mechanisms was determined. The high frequency wings are discussed in terms of the collision-induced rotational Rayleigh effect and estimates for the dipole-octopole polarizability E4, is obtained and checked with the ab initio theoretical value. The quality of the present potential has been checked by comparing between calculated and experimental thermo-physical and transport properties over a wide temperature range, which are found to be in good agreement.

  17. A TALE OF THREE MYSTERIOUS SPECTRAL FEATURES IN CARBON-RICH EVOLVED STARS: THE 21 μm, 30 μm, AND “UNIDENTIFIED INFRARED” EMISSION FEATURES

    SciTech Connect

    Mishra, Ajay; Li, Aigen; Jiang, B. W. E-mail: lia@missouri.edu

    2015-03-20

    The mysterious “21 μm” emission feature seen almost exclusively in the short-lived protoplanetary nebula (PPN) phase of stellar evolution remains unidentified since its discovery two decades ago. This feature is always accompanied by the equally mysterious, unidentified “30 μm” feature and the so-called “unidentified infrared” (UIR) features at 3.3, 6.2, 7.7, 8.6, and 11.3 μm which are generally attributed to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) molecules. The 30 μm feature is commonly observed in all stages of stellar evolution from the asymptotic giant branch through PPN to the planetary nebula phase. We explore the interrelations among the mysterious 21, 30 μm, and UIR features of the 21 μm sources. We derive the fluxes emitted in the observed UIR, 21, and 30 μm features from published Infrared Space Observatory or Spitzer/IRS spectra. We find that none of these spectral features correlate with each other. This argues against a common carrier (e.g., thiourea) for both the 21 μm feature and the 30 μm feature. This also does not support large PAH clusters as a possible carrier for the 21 μm feature.

  18. A Tale of Three Mysterious Spectral Features in Carbon-rich Evolved Stars: The 21 μm, 30 μm, and “Unidentified Infrared” Emission Features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, Ajay; Li, Aigen; Jiang, B. W.

    2015-03-01

    The mysterious “21 μm” emission feature seen almost exclusively in the short-lived protoplanetary nebula (PPN) phase of stellar evolution remains unidentified since its discovery two decades ago. This feature is always accompanied by the equally mysterious, unidentified “30 μm” feature and the so-called “unidentified infrared” (UIR) features at 3.3, 6.2, 7.7, 8.6, and 11.3 μm which are generally attributed to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) molecules. The 30 μm feature is commonly observed in all stages of stellar evolution from the asymptotic giant branch through PPN to the planetary nebula phase. We explore the interrelations among the mysterious 21, 30 μm, and UIR features of the 21 μm sources. We derive the fluxes emitted in the observed UIR, 21, and 30 μm features from published Infrared Space Observatory or Spitzer/IRS spectra. We find that none of these spectral features correlate with each other. This argues against a common carrier (e.g., thiourea) for both the 21 μm feature and the 30 μm feature. This also does not support large PAH clusters as a possible carrier for the 21 μm feature.

  19. Detection of the main stream of the Yellow River based on spectral feature and the dynamic transmission model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    She, Hong-Wei; Zhang, Yan-Ning; Liu, Xue-Gong; Zhao, Na

    2008-12-01

    The problem of Yellow River main-stream detection with multi-spectral remote sensing images is investigated in this paper. Firstly, the flow characteristic of Yellow River was analyzed. The spectral similarity of the main-stream was discussed in succession. Then, based on the principle of spatial continuity, a main-stream dynamic transmission model was proposed. Finally, a main-stream detection approach called Main-stream Spectral Correlation Dynamic Transmission Approach (MSCDEA) was presented. The experiment indicates that the proposed algorithm is effective and can be used in practice.

  20. Real-time evaluation of polyphenol oxidase (PPO) activity in lychee pericarp based on weighted combination of spectral data and image features as determined by fuzzy neural network.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yi-Chao; Sun, Da-Wen; Wang, Nan-Nan; Xie, Anguo

    2015-07-01

    A novel method of using hyperspectral imaging technique with the weighted combination of spectral data and image features by fuzzy neural network (FNN) was proposed for real-time prediction of polyphenol oxidase (PPO) activity in lychee pericarp. Lychee images were obtained by a hyperspectral reflectance imaging system operating in the range of 400-1000nm. A support vector machine-recursive feature elimination (SVM-RFE) algorithm was applied to eliminating variables with no or little information for the prediction from all bands, resulting in a reduced set of optimal wavelengths. Spectral information at the optimal wavelengths and image color features were then used respectively to develop calibration models for the prediction of PPO in pericarp during storage, and the results of two models were compared. In order to improve the prediction accuracy, a decision strategy was developed based on weighted combination of spectral data and image features, in which the weights were determined by FNN for a better estimation of PPO activity. The results showed that the combined decision model was the best among all of the calibration models, with high R(2) values of 0.9117 and 0.9072 and low RMSEs of 0.45% and 0.459% for calibration and prediction, respectively. These results demonstrate that the proposed weighted combined decision method has great potential for improving model performance. The proposed technique could be used for a better prediction of other internal and external quality attributes of fruits.

  1. A study of protein-carotenoid interactions in the astaxanthin-protein crustacyanin by absorption and Stark spectroscopy; evidence for the presence of three spectrally distinct species.

    PubMed

    Krawczyk, S; Britton, G

    2001-01-12

    Molecular mechanisms underlying the peculiar spectral properties of the carotenoid astaxanthin in alpha-crustacyanin, the blue carotenoprotein isolated from the exoskeleton of the lobster Homarus gammarus, were investigated by comparing the basic electrooptical parameters of astaxanthin free in vitro with those of astaxanthin in the complex. Absorption and electroabsorption (Stark effect) spectra were obtained for alpha-crustacyanin in low-temperature glasses to provide information about the molecular interactions that lead to the large bathochromic shift of the spectra resulting from this complexation. The low-temperature spectra reveal the presence of at least three spectral forms of alpha-crustacyanin, with vibronic (0-0) transitions at 14000 cm(-1), 13500 cm(-1) and 11600 cm(-1) (corresponding to approximately 630, 660 and 780 nm, respectively, at room temperature) and with relative aboundance 85%, 10% and 5%. The longer wavelength absorbing species have not previously been detected. The changes in polarizability and in permanent dipole moments associated with the S0-->S2 electronic transition for all these forms are about 1.5 times larger than for isolated astaxanthin. The results are discussed with reference to the symmetric polarization model for astaxanthin in alpha-crustacyanin. PMID:11341939

  2. Correction of pathlength amplification in the filter-pad technique for measurements of particulate absorption coefficient in the visible spectral region.

    PubMed

    Stramski, Dariusz; Reynolds, Rick A; Kaczmarek, Sławomir; Uitz, Julia; Zheng, Guangming

    2015-08-01

    Spectrophotometric measurement of particulate matter retained on filters is the most common and practical method for routine determination of the spectral light absorption coefficient of aquatic particles, ap(λ), at high spectral resolution over a broad spectral range. The use of differing geometrical measurement configurations and large variations in the reported correction for pathlength amplification induced by the particle/filter matrix have hindered adoption of an established measurement protocol. We describe results of dedicated laboratory experiments with a diversity of particulate sample types to examine variation in the pathlength amplification factor for three filter measurement geometries; the filter in the transmittance configuration (T), the filter in the transmittance-reflectance configuration (T-R), and the filter placed inside an integrating sphere (IS). Relationships between optical density measured on suspensions (ODs) and filters (ODf) within the visible portion of the spectrum were evaluated for the formulation of pathlength amplification correction, with power functions providing the best functional representation of the relationship for all three geometries. Whereas the largest uncertainties occur in the T method, the IS method provided the least sample-to-sample variability and the smallest uncertainties in the relationship between ODs and ODf. For six different samples measured with 1 nm resolution within the light wavelength range from 400 to 700 nm, a median error of 7.1% is observed for predicted values of ODs using the IS method. The relationships established for the three filter-pad methods are applicable to historical and ongoing measurements; for future work, the use of the IS method is recommended whenever feasible. PMID:26368092

  3. Correlation Between the Evaluation of Pigmented Lesions by a Multi-spectral Digital Skin Lesion Analysis Device and the Clinical and Histological Features of Melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Rigel, Darrell S.; Ferris, Laura; Sober, Arthur; Tucker, Natalie; Cockerell, Clay J.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To correlate Multi-spectral Digital Skin Lesion Analysis classifier scores with histopathological severity of pigmented lesions and clinical features of melanoma. Design: Classifier scores were computed for 1,632 skin lesions. Dermatologists evaluated the same lesions for Asymmetry, Border Irregularity, Color variegation, Diameter >6mm, Evolution, Patient’s Concern, Regression, and/or “Ugly Duckling” sign. Classifier scores were correlated to the number of clinical risk features and for six histopathological severity levels of pigmented lesions. Measurements: Average classifier score, Welch’s t-test, and chi-square analysis. Results: Melanomas had higher mean classifier scores (3.5) than high-grade dysplastic nevi (2.7, p=0.002), low-grade dysplastic nevi (1.7, p<0.0001), non-dysplastic nevi (1.6, p<0.0001), and benign non-melanocytic lesions (2.0, p<0.0001). Classifier score and the number of clinical risk characteristics directly correlated (Pearson coefficient 0.32, p<0.0001). Conclusion: Correlation of classifier scores to clinical and histological melanoma features supports the effectiveness of Multi-spectral Digital Skin Lesion Analysis in assessing the risk of pigmented lesions requiring biopsy. Optimizing outcomes of dermatologist decisions to biopsy suspicious pigmented lesions may be enhanced utilizing Multi-spectral Digital Skin Lesion Analysis. PMID:27354886

  4. Estimating the spectral slope of the lunar Reiner Gamma swirl feature using measurements made by the SMART-1 near-infrared spectrometer SIR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaydash, V.; Mall, U.; Vilenius, E.; SIR Collaboration

    The infrared spectrometer SIR on board the ESA SMART-1 mission is designed for the detailed remote spectral investigation of the lunar surface in the wavelength range 0.9 - 2.4 microns with high spectral (˜6 nm) resolution [1]. Data obtained by the SIR allow a comparison of the relative spectral slope for selected lunar sites. A number of lunar features were selected as "calibration targets" for SIR [2]; among these sites is the Reiner-Gamma Swirl (RGS), widely known for its unusual spectral behavior not associated with any prominent topographic features [3]. For this first study we used data taken by SIR during SMART-1 orbit number 1781 for both RGS-tracking mode (58.51o E, 7.40o N) and adjacent mare basalt areas surrounding the swirl. All spectra were calibrated to obtain spectral values proportional to the brightness of the surface. Then we performed an averaging of separate spectra into two sets corresponding to the RGS and the mare neighborhood. After this we computed the color-indices C (1.25/2.0 µm) for the two areas and finally obtained a CRGS /Cmare value of 1.07. The same ratios for the RGS spectra were calculated using the USGS Clementine NIR mosaics [4]; we found a CRGS /Cmare value of 1.06 for that case. We also found the same inclination for the relative spectral slope and a rather good agreement in the absolute CRGS /Cmare values using data from the SIR and Clementine data sets. A slight discrepancy in two values could be explained by the very different photometric conditions which existed during the two surveys. Estimating the spectral slopes from SIR data is important for discrimination the effects of the chemical composition from effects caused by the maturation processes on the spectra in the near IR (i.e. [5]). The value of CRGS /Cmare ˜1.06 which we confirmed in the present work shows the more pronounced 2-µm depression and thus support the hypothesis of the presence of more immature material in RGS relative to its surroundings [6

  5. Benefits of Red-Edge Spectral Band and Texture Features for the Object-based Classification using RapidEye sSatellite Image data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, H. O.; Yeom, J. M.

    2014-12-01

    Space-based remote sensing in agriculture is particularly relevant to issues such as global climate change, food security, and precision agriculture. Recent satellite missions have opened up new perspectives by offering high spatial resolution, various spectral properties, and fast revisit rates to the same regions. Here, we examine the utility of broadband red-edge spectral information in multispectral satellite image data for classifying paddy rice crops in South Korea. Additionally, we examine how object-based spectral features affect the classification of paddy rice growth stages. For the analysis, two seasons of RapidEye satellite image data were used. The results showed that the broadband red-edge information slightly improved the classification accuracy of the crop condition in heterogeneous paddy rice crop environments, particularly when single-season image data were used. This positive effect appeared to be offset by the multi-temporal image data. Additional texture information brought only a minor improvement or a slight decline, although it is well known to be advantageous for object-based classification in general. We conclude that broadband red-edge information derived from conventional multispectral satellite data has the potential to improve space-based crop monitoring. Because the positive or negative effects of texture features for object-based crop classification could barely be interpreted, the relationships between the textual properties and paddy rice crop parameters at the field scale should be further examined in depth.

  6. Spectral and temporal features of the pumping of rhodamine 6G by radiation from a copper vapor laser

    SciTech Connect

    Soldatov, A.N.; Sukhanov, V.B.

    1983-01-01

    An experimental investigation was made of the influence of the relative delay time tau and of the intensity ratio R/sub 21/ of the spectral components emitted by a copper vapor laser on the energy and spectral characteristics of lasing in rhodamine 6G. For certain values of tau and P/sub 21/, lasing in the dye was disrupted. A clamping effect was discovered between the rhodamine 6G laser emission spectrum and the yellow line of the copper vapor laser. The results obtained were used to determine the parameters of an interference filter for suppressing the yellow line from the copper vapor laser, and this made it possible to raise the efficiency of conversion of the pump radiation into lasing in the dye.

  7. Spectral aspects of the determination of Si in organic and aqueous solutions using high-resolution continuum source or line source flame atomic absorption spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kowalewska, Zofia; Pilarczyk, Janusz; Gościniak, Łukasz

    2016-06-01

    High-resolution continuum source flame atomic absorption spectrometry (HR-CS FAAS) was applied to reveal and investigate spectral interference in the determination of Si. An intensive structured background was observed in the analysis of both aqueous and xylene solutions containing S compounds. This background was attributed to absorption by the CS molecule formed in the N2O-C2H2 flame. The lines of the CS spectrum at least partially overlap all five of the most sensitive Si lines investigated. The 251.611 nm Si line was demonstrated to be the most advantageous. The intensity of the structured background caused by the CS molecule significantly depends on the chemical form of S in the solution and is the highest for the most-volatile CS2. The presence of O atoms in an initial S molecule can diminish the formation of CS. To overcome this S effect, various modes of baseline fitting and background correction were evaluated, including iterative background correction (IBC) and utilization of correction pixels (WRC). These modes were used either independently or in conjunction with least squares background correction (LSBC). The IBC + LSBC mode can correct the extremely strong interference caused by CS2 at an S concentration of 5% w:w in the investigated solution. However, the efficiency of this mode depends on the similarity of the processed spectra and the correction spectra in terms of intensity and in additional effects, such as a sloping baseline. In the vicinity of the Si line, three lines of V were recorded. These lines are well-separated in the HR-CS FAAS spectrum, but they could be a potential source of overcorrection when using line source flame atomic absorption spectrometry (LS FAAS). The expected signal for the 251.625 nm Fe line was not registered at 200 mg L- 1 Fe concentration in the solution, probably due to the diminished population of Fe atoms in the high-temperature flame used. The observations made using HR-CS FAAS helped to establish a "safe" level

  8. The mystery of spectral breaks: Lyman continuum absorption by photon-photon pair production in the Fermi GeV spectra of bright blazars

    SciTech Connect

    Stern, Boris E.; Poutanen, Juri E-mail: juri.poutanen@utu.fi

    2014-10-10

    We re-analyze Fermi/LAT γ-ray spectra of bright blazars using the new Pass 7 version of the detector response files and detect breaks at ∼5 GeV in the rest-frame spectra of 3C 454.3 and possibly also 4C +21.35, associated with the photon-photon pair production absorption by the He II Lyman continuum (LyC). We also detect significant breaks at ∼20 GeV associated with hydrogen LyC in both the individual spectra and the stacked redshift-corrected spectrum of several bright blazars. The detected breaks in the stacked spectra univocally prove that they are associated with atomic ultraviolet emission features of the quasar broad-line region (BLR). The dominance of the absorption by the hydrogen Ly complex over He II, a small detected optical depth, and break energy consistent with head-on collisions with LyC photons imply that the γ-ray emission site is located within the BLR, but most of the BLR emission comes from a flat disk-like structure producing little opacity. Alternatively, the LyC emission region size might be larger than the BLR size measured from reverberation mapping, and/or the γ-ray emitting region is extended. These solutions would resolve the long-standing issue of how the multi-hundred GeV photons can escape from the emission zone without being absorbed by softer photons.

  9. Evaluation of entropy and JM-distance criterions as features selection methods using spectral and spatial features derived from LANDSAT images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parada, N. D. J. (Principal Investigator); Dutra, L. V.; Mascarenhas, N. D. A.; Mitsuo, Fernando Augusta, II

    1984-01-01

    A study area near Ribeirao Preto in Sao Paulo state was selected, with predominance in sugar cane. Eight features were extracted from the 4 original bands of LANDSAT image, using low-pass and high-pass filtering to obtain spatial features. There were 5 training sites in order to acquire the necessary parameters. Two groups of four channels were selected from 12 channels using JM-distance and entropy criterions. The number of selected channels was defined by physical restrictions of the image analyzer and computacional costs. The evaluation was performed by extracting the confusion matrix for training and tests areas, with a maximum likelihood classifier, and by defining performance indexes based on those matrixes for each group of channels. Results show that in spatial features and supervised classification, the entropy criterion is better in the sense that allows a more accurate and generalized definition of class signature. On the other hand, JM-distance criterion strongly reduces the misclassification within training areas.

  10. Backscattering measurements of atmospheric aerosols at CO2 laser wavelengths: implications of aerosol spectral structure on differential-absorption lidar retrievals of molecular species.

    PubMed

    Ben-David, A

    1999-04-20

    The volume backscattering coefficients of atmospheric aerosol were measured with a tunable CO2 lidar system at various wavelengths in Utah (a desert environment) along a horizontal path a few meters above the ground. In deducing the aerosol backscattering, a deconvolution (to remove the smearing effect of the long CO2 lidar pulse and the lidar limited bandwidth) and a constrained-slope method were employed. The spectral shape beta(lambda) was similar for all the 13 measurements during a 3-day period. A mean aerosol backscattering-wavelength dependence beta(lambda) was computed from the measurements and used to estimate the error Delta(CL) (concentration-path-length product) in differential-absorption lidar measurements for various gases caused by the systematic aerosol differential backscattering and the error that is due to fluctuations in the aerosol backscattering. The water-vapor concentration-path-length product CL and the average concentration C = /L for a path length L computed from the range-resolved lidar measurements is consistently in good agreement with the water-vapor concentration measured by a meteorological station. However, I was unable to deduce, reliably, the range-resolved water-vapor concentration C(r), which is the derivative of the range-dependent product CL, because of the effect of residual noise caused mainly by errors in the deconvolved lidar measurements.

  11. Spectrally resolved intraband transitions on two-step photon absorption in InGaAs/GaAs quantum dot solar cell

    SciTech Connect

    Tamaki, Ryo Shoji, Yasushi; Okada, Yoshitaka; Miyano, Kenjiro

    2014-08-18

    Two-step photon absorption processes in a self-organized In{sub 0.4}Ga{sub 0.6}As/GaAs quantum dot (QD) solar cell have been investigated by monitoring the mid-infrared (IR) photoinduced modulation of the external quantum efficiency (ΔEQE) at low temperature. The first step interband and the second step intraband transitions were both spectrally resolved by scanning photon energies of visible to near-IR CW light and mid-IR pulse lasers, respectively. A peak centered at 0.20 eV corresponding to the transition to virtual bound states and a band above 0.42 eV probably due to photoexcitation to GaAs continuum states were observed in ΔEQE spectra, when the interband transition was above 1.4 eV, directly exciting wetting layers or GaAs spacer layers. On the other hand, resonant excitation of the ground state of QDs at 1.35 eV resulted in a reduction of EQE. The sign of ΔEQE below 1.40 eV changed from negative to positive by increasing the excitation intensity of the interband transition. We ascribe this to the filling of higher energy trap states.

  12. Absorption coefficients and frequency shifts measurement in the spectral range of 1071.88-1084.62 cm-1 vs. pressure for chlorodifluoromethane (CHClF2) using tunable CW CO2 laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Hawat, Sharif

    2013-02-01

    Infrared (IR) absorption in the spectral range of (1071.88-1084.62 cm-1) vs. pressure in chlorodifluoromethane (CFC-22, F-22, and CHClF2) was studied using a tunable continuous wave (CW) CO2 laser radiation on 9R branch lines with a maximum output power of about 2.12 W, provided with an absorber cell located outside the laser cavity. The absorption coefficients were determined vs. the gas pressure between 0.2 mbar and 170 mbar at lines from 9R branch for CFC-22. The frequency shifts of the absorption lines of CFC-22 in relative to the central frequencies of laser lines were calculated vs. the pressure on the basis of these absorption coefficients. The chosen lines were selected according to IR spectrum of the studied gas given by HITRAN cross section database. So the absorption was achieved for CFC-22 at the spectral lines of 9R branch situated from 9R (10) to 9R (30) emitted by a tunable CW CO2 laser. The absorption cross sections of CFC-22 determined in this work were compared with the relevant data given by HITRAN cross section database and a reasonable agreement was observed.

  13. Strength of mineral absorption features in the transmitted component of near-infrared reflected light - First results from RELAB. [spectrogoniometer for planetary and lunar surface composition experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pieters, C. M.

    1983-01-01

    Bidirectional reflectance measurements are the only type of reflectance data available to the remote observer. For compositional interpretations, data are desired not only for identification of possible mineral components but also for modal abundance. The latter requires detailed information about the strength of absorption features. Using a new laboratory facility, the RELAB, laboratory data in the near infrared are presented that document effects of particle size, mineral mixtures, and viewing geometry for selected materials with well-developed absorption bands. The commonly observed increase in reflectance with decrease in particle size is also observed for absorption bands as well as a related decrease in absorption strength. For small particles in parts of the spectrum of maximum reflectance, however, a minor decrease in reflectance with a decrese in particle size is sometimes observed. Small particles dominate the observed characteristics of particulate surfaces, which contain a range of particle sizes. The mean optical path length (transmission through particles) of reflected radiation measured for a variety of particle sizes has an apparent upper limit of about 2 mm for particles of less than 250 microns. The typical number of particles involved in the optical path is less than 50.

  14. Anion-controlled morphologies and spectral features of cyanine-based nanoGUMBOS - an improved photosensitizer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jordan, Atiya N.; Das, Susmita; Siraj, Noureen; de Rooy, Sergio L.; Li, Min; El-Zahab, Bilal; Chandler, Lin; Baker, Gary A.; Warner, Isiah M.

    2012-07-01

    The ability to control the morphologies and spectral properties of organic low-dimensional nanomaterials is of paramount importance. The research reported herein demonstrates a template-free approach to tailored morphological and optical properties for a novel class of pseudoisocyanine (PIC)-based fluorescent organic nanoparticles derived from a group of uniform materials based on organic salts (GUMBOS). The synthesized nanoscale PIC-based particles (termed nanoGUMBOS), [PIC][NTf2] and [PIC][BETI], exhibit interesting adaptability as a function of the associated anion. The diamond-shaped nanostructures of [PIC][NTf2] and [PIC][BETI] nanorods exhibit enhanced fluorescence quantum yields relative to the parent compound, [PIC][I]. As supported by fluorescence lifetime measurements, these enhanced spectral properties can be attributed to differences in molecular self-assembly ordering (e.g., H- vs. J-aggregation) and restricted molecular rotation leading to reduced twisted intramolecular charge transfer in the nanoGUMBOS. The electrochemical properties of the PIC-based GUMBOS suggest their potential use in dye-sensitized solar cells.The ability to control the morphologies and spectral properties of organic low-dimensional nanomaterials is of paramount importance. The research reported herein demonstrates a template-free approach to tailored morphological and optical properties for a novel class of pseudoisocyanine (PIC)-based fluorescent organic nanoparticles derived from a group of uniform materials based on organic salts (GUMBOS). The synthesized nanoscale PIC-based particles (termed nanoGUMBOS), [PIC][NTf2] and [PIC][BETI], exhibit interesting adaptability as a function of the associated anion. The diamond-shaped nanostructures of [PIC][NTf2] and [PIC][BETI] nanorods exhibit enhanced fluorescence quantum yields relative to the parent compound, [PIC][I]. As supported by fluorescence lifetime measurements, these enhanced spectral properties can be attributed to

  15. Anion-controlled morphologies and spectral features of cyanine-based nanoGUMBOS--an improved photosensitizer.

    PubMed

    Jordan, Atiya N; Das, Susmita; Siraj, Noureen; de Rooy, Sergio L; Li, Min; El-Zahab, Bilal; Chandler, Lin; Baker, Gary A; Warner, Isiah M

    2012-08-21

    The ability to control the morphologies and spectral properties of organic low-dimensional nanomaterials is of paramount importance. The research reported herein demonstrates a template-free approach to tailored morphological and optical properties for a novel class of pseudoisocyanine (PIC)-based fluorescent organic nanoparticles derived from a group of uniform materials based on organic salts (GUMBOS). The synthesized nanoscale PIC-based particles (termed nanoGUMBOS), [PIC][NTf(2)] and [PIC][BETI], exhibit interesting adaptability as a function of the associated anion. The diamond-shaped nanostructures of [PIC][NTf(2)] and [PIC][BETI] nanorods exhibit enhanced fluorescence quantum yields relative to the parent compound, [PIC][I]. As supported by fluorescence lifetime measurements, these enhanced spectral properties can be attributed to differences in molecular self-assembly ordering (e.g., H- vs. J-aggregation) and restricted molecular rotation leading to reduced twisted intramolecular charge transfer in the nanoGUMBOS. The electrochemical properties of the PIC-based GUMBOS suggest their potential use in dye-sensitized solar cells.

  16. High sensitivity liquid phase measurements using broadband cavity enhanced absorption spectroscopy (BBCEAS) featuring a low cost webcam based prism spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Qu, Zhechao; Engstrom, Julia; Wong, Donald; Islam, Meez; Kaminski, Clemens F

    2013-11-01

    Cavity enhanced techniques enable high sensitivity absorption measurements in the liquid phase but are typically more complex, and much more expensive, to perform than conventional absorption methods. The latter attributes have so far prevented a wide spread use of these methods in the analytical sciences. In this study we demonstrate a novel BBCEAS instrument that is sensitive, yet simple and economical to set up and operate. We use a prism spectrometer with a low cost webcam as the detector in conjunction with an optical cavity consisting of two R = 0.99 dielectric mirrors and a white light LED source for illumination. High sensitivity liquid phase measurements were made on samples contained in 1 cm quartz cuvettes placed at normal incidence to the light beam in the optical cavity. The cavity enhancement factor (CEF) with water as the solvent was determined directly by phase shift cavity ring down spectroscopy (PS-CRDS) and also by calibration with Rhodamine 6G solutions. Both methods yielded closely matching CEF values of ~60. The minimum detectable change in absorption (αmin) was determined to be 6.5 × 10(-5) cm(-1) at 527 nm and was limited only by the 8 bit resolution of the particular webcam detector used, thus offering scope for further improvement. The instrument was used to make representative measurements on dye solutions and in the determination of nitrite concentrations in a variation of the widely used Griess Assay. Limits of detection (LOD) were ~850 pM for Rhodamine 6G and 3.7 nM for nitrite, respectively. The sensitivity of the instrument compares favourably with previous cavity based liquid phase studies whilst being achieved at a small fraction of the cost hitherto reported, thus opening the door to widespread use in the community. Further means of improving sensitivity are discussed in the paper. PMID:24049768

  17. High sensitivity liquid phase measurements using broadband cavity enhanced absorption spectroscopy (BBCEAS) featuring a low cost webcam based prism spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Qu, Zhechao; Engstrom, Julia; Wong, Donald; Islam, Meez; Kaminski, Clemens F

    2013-11-01

    Cavity enhanced techniques enable high sensitivity absorption measurements in the liquid phase but are typically more complex, and much more expensive, to perform than conventional absorption methods. The latter attributes have so far prevented a wide spread use of these methods in the analytical sciences. In this study we demonstrate a novel BBCEAS instrument that is sensitive, yet simple and economical to set up and operate. We use a prism spectrometer with a low cost webcam as the detector in conjunction with an optical cavity consisting of two R = 0.99 dielectric mirrors and a white light LED source for illumination. High sensitivity liquid phase measurements were made on samples contained in 1 cm quartz cuvettes placed at normal incidence to the light beam in the optical cavity. The cavity enhancement factor (CEF) with water as the solvent was determined directly by phase shift cavity ring down spectroscopy (PS-CRDS) and also by calibration with Rhodamine 6G solutions. Both methods yielded closely matching CEF values of ~60. The minimum detectable change in absorption (αmin) was determined to be 6.5 × 10(-5) cm(-1) at 527 nm and was limited only by the 8 bit resolution of the particular webcam detector used, thus offering scope for further improvement. The instrument was used to make representative measurements on dye solutions and in the determination of nitrite concentrations in a variation of the widely used Griess Assay. Limits of detection (LOD) were ~850 pM for Rhodamine 6G and 3.7 nM for nitrite, respectively. The sensitivity of the instrument compares favourably with previous cavity based liquid phase studies whilst being achieved at a small fraction of the cost hitherto reported, thus opening the door to widespread use in the community. Further means of improving sensitivity are discussed in the paper.

  18. Neutral atomic-carbon quasar absorption-line systems at z> 1.5. Sample selection, H i content, reddening, and 2175 Å extinction feature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ledoux, C.; Noterdaeme, P.; Petitjean, P.; Srianand, R.

    2015-08-01

    We present the results of a search for cold gas at high redshift along quasar lines of sight carried out without any a priori assumption on the neutral atomic-hydrogen content of the absorption-line systems. To do this, we systematically looked for neutral-carbon (C i) λλ1560, 1656 transition lines in 41 696 low-resolution quasar spectra (1.5 < zem < 4.46) from the SDSS-II - Data Release 7 - database. C i absorption lines should indeed probe the shielded gas in the neutral interstellar medium of galaxies more efficiently than traditional tracers such as neutral atomic-hydrogen (H i) damped Lyman-α (DLA) and/or Mg ii systems. We built up a sample of 66 C i absorbers with redshifts in the range 1.5 < z < 3.1 and rest-frame equivalent widths 0.1 spectral energy distributions, with E(B-V) values up to ~0.3. The overall N(H i) distribution of C i systems is, however, relatively flat. As a consequence, among the C i systems classifying as DLAs, there is a probable excess of strong DLAs with log N(H i) > 21 (atoms cm-2) compared to systematic DLA surveys. Whilst the dust content

  19. O2 on ganymede: Spectral characteristics and plasma formation mechanisms

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Calvin, W.M.; Johnson, R.E.; Spencer, J.R.

    1996-01-01

    Weak absorption features in the visible reflectance spectrum of Jupiter's satellite Ganymede have been correlated to those observed in the spectrum of molecular oxygen. We examine the spectral characteristics of these absorption features in all phases of O2 and conclude that the molecular oxygen is most likely present at densities similar to the liquid or solid ??-phase. The contribution of O2 to spectral features observed on Ganymede in the near-infrared wavelength region affects the previous estimates of photon pathlength in ice. The concentration of the visible absorption features on the trailing hemisphere of Ganymede suggests an origin due to bombardment by magneto-spheric ions. We derive an approximate O2 formation rate from this mechanism and consider the state of O2 within the surface.

  20. Re-analysis of previous laboratory phase curves: 2. Connections between opposition effect morphology and spectral features of stony meteorites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Déau, Estelle; Spilker, Linda J.; Flandes, Alberto

    2016-07-01

    We investigate connections between the opposition phase curves and the spectra from ultraviolet to near infrared wavelengths of stony meteorites. We use two datasets: the reflectance dataset of Capaccioni et al. ([1990] Icarus, 83, 325), which consists of optical phase curves (from 2° to 45°) of 17 stony meteorites (three carbonaceous chondrites, 11 ordinary chondrites, and three achondrites), and the spectral dataset from the RELAB database consisting of near-ultraviolet to near-infrared spectra of the same meteorites. We re-analyzed the first dataset and fit it with two morphological models to derive the amplitude A, the angular width HWHM of the surge and the slope S of the linear part. Our re-analysis confirms that stony meteorites have a non-monotonic behavior of the surge amplitude with albedo, which is also observed in planetary surfaces (Déau et al. [2013] Icarus, 226, 1465), laboratory samples (Nelson et al. [2004] Proc. Lunar Sci. Conf., 35, p. 1089) and asteroids (Belskaya and Shevchenko [2000] Icarus, 147, 94). We find a very strong correlation between the opposition effect morphological parameters and the slope of the spectra between 0.75 μm and 0.95 μm. In particular, we found that meteorites with a positive amplitude-albedo correlation have a positive spectral slope between 0.75 μm and 0.95 μm, while meteorites with a negative amplitude-albedo correlation have a negative spectral slope between 0.75 μm and 0.95 μm. We have ruled out the role of the meteorite samples' macro-properties (grain size, porosity and macroscopic roughness) in the correlations found because these properties were constant during the preparation of the samples. If this hypothesis is correct, this implies that other properties like the composition or the micro-properties (grain inclusions, grain shape or microscopic roughness) could have a preponderant role in the non-monotonic behavior of the surge morphology with albedo at small and moderate phase angles. Further

  1. Laboratory simulation of infrared astrophysical features. [Terrestrial silicate, meteoritic and lunar soil 10-micron spectral comparisons with comets Bennet and Kohoutek

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rose, L. A.

    1979-01-01

    Laboratory infrared emission and absorption spectra have been taken of terrestrial silicates, meteorites, and lunar soils in the form of micrometer and submicrometer grains. The emission spectra were taken in a way that imitates telescopic observations. The purpose was to see which materials best simulate the 10-micron astrophysical feature. The emission spectra of dunite, fayalite, and Allende give a good fit to the 10-micron broadband emission feature of comets Bennett and Kohoutek. A study of the effect of grain size on the presence of the 10-micron emission feature of dunite shows that for particles larger than 37 microns no feature is seen. The emission spectrum of the Murray meteorite, a Type 2 carbonaceous chrondrite, is quite similar to the intermediate-resolution spectrum of comet Kohoutek in the 10-micron region. Hydrous silicates or amorphous magnesium silicates in combination with high-temperature condensates, such as olivine or anorthite, would yield spectra that match the intermediate-resolution spectrum of comet Kohoutek in the 10-micron region. Glassy olivine and glassy anorthite in approximately equal proportions would also give a spectrum that is a good fit to the cometary 10-micron feature.

  2. Investigation of atmospheric insect wing-beat frequencies and iridescence features using a multi-spectral kHz remote detection system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gebru, Alem; Rohwer, Erich; Neethling, Pieter; Brydegaard, Mikkel

    2014-10-01

    Quantitative investigation of insect activity in their natural habitat is a challenging task for entomologist. It is difficult to address questions such as flight direction, predation strength and overall activities using the current techniques such as traps and sweep nets. A multi-spectral kHz remote detection system using sunlight as an illumination source is presented. We explore possibilities of remote optical classification of insects based on their wing-beat frequencies and iridescence features. It is shown that the wing-beat frequency of the fast insect events can be resolved by implementing high sampling frequency. The iridescence features generated from the change of color in two channels (visible and near infrared) during wing-beat cycle is presented. We show that the shape of the wing-beat trajectory is different for different insects. The flight direction of atmospheric insect is also determined using silicon quadrant detector.

  3. Recognition of wake-sleep stage 1 multichannel eeg patterns using spectral entropy features for drowsiness detection.

    PubMed

    Sriraam, N; Padma Shri, T K; Maheshwari, Uma

    2016-09-01

    Electroencephalographic (EEG) activity recorded during the entire sleep cycle reflects various complex processes associated with brain and exhibits a high degree of irregularity through various stages of sleep. The identification of transition from wakefulness to stage1 sleep is a challenging area of research for the biomedical community. In this paper, spectral entropy (SE) is used as a complexity measure to quantify irregularities in awake and stage1 sleep of 8-channel sleep EEG data from the polysomnographic recordings of ten healthy subjects. The SE measures of awake and stage1 sleep EEG data are estimated for each second and applied to a multilayer perceptron feed forward neural network (MLP-FF). The network is trained using back propagation algorithm for recognizing these two patterns. Initially, the MLP network is trained and tested for randomly chosen subject-wise combined datasets I and II and then for the combined large dataset III. In all cases, 60 % of the entire dataset is used for training while 20 % is used for testing and 20 % for validation. Results indicate that the MLP neural network learns with maximum testing accuracy of 95.9 % for dataset II. In the case of combined large dataset, the network performs with a maximum accuracy of 99.2 % with 100 hidden neurons. Results show that in channels O1, O2, F3 and F4 (A1, A2 as reference), the mean of the spectral entropy value is higher in awake state than in stage1 sleep indicating that the EEG becomes more regular and rhythmic as the subject attains stage1 sleep from wakefulness. However, in C3 and C4 the mean values of SE values are not very much discriminative of both groups. This may prove to be a very effective indicator for scoring the first two stages of sleep EEG and may be used to detect the transition from wakefulness to stage1 sleep. PMID:27550443

  4. Visible and near-IR spectral reflectance of geologically important materials: A short review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singer, R. B.

    1982-01-01

    Examples of reflectance spectra are presented and discussed for various mineral groups including pyroxenes, olivene, phylosilicates, amphiboles, feldspars, oxides and hydroxides, carbonates, and mixtures of minerals. The physical sources of some spectral features are also reviewed such as charge transfer and conduction bands, crystal field absorptions, and vibrational absorptions.

  5. Vegetation species composition and canopy architecture information expressed in leaf water absorption measured in the 1000 nm and 2200 spectral region by an imaging spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, Robert O.; Roberts, Dar A.

    1995-01-01

    Plant species composition and plant architectural attributes are critical parameters required for the measuring, monitoring, and modeling of terrestrial ecosystems. Remote sensing is commonly cited as an important tool for deriving vegetation properties at an appropriate scale for ecosystem studies, ranging from local to regional and even synoptic scales. Classical approaches rely on vegetation indices such as the normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) to estimate biophysical parameters such as leaf area index or intercepted photosynthetically active radiation (IPAR). Another approach is to apply a variety of classification schemes to map vegetation and thus extrapolate fine-scale information about specific sites to larger areas of similar composition. Imaging spectrometry provides additional information that is not obtainable through broad-band sensors and that may provide improved inputs both to direct biophysical estimates as well as classification schemes. Some of this capability has been demonstrated through improved discrimination of vegetation, estimates of canopy biochemistry, and liquid water estimates from vegetation. We investigate further the potential of leaf water absorption estimated from Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) data as a means for discriminating vegetation types and deriving canopy architectural information. We expand our analysis to incorporate liquid water estimates from two spectral regions, the 1000-nm region and the 2200-nm region. The study was conducted in the vicinity of Jasper Ridge, California, which is located on the San Francisco peninsula to the west of the Stanford University campus. AVIRIS data were acquired over Jasper Ridge, CA, on June 2, 1992, at 19:31 UTC. Spectra from three sites in this image were analyzed. These data are from an area of healthy grass, oak woodland, and redwood forest, respectively. For these analyses, the AVIRIS-measured upwelling radiance spectra for the entire Jasper

  6. L-asparagine crystals with wide gap semiconductor features: Optical absorption measurements and density functional theory computations

    SciTech Connect

    Zanatta, G.; Gottfried, C.; Silva, A. M.; Caetano, E. W. S.; Sales, F. A. M.; Freire, V. N.

    2014-03-28

    Results of optical absorption measurements are presented together with calculated structural, electronic, and optical properties for the anhydrous monoclinic L-asparagine crystal. Density functional theory (DFT) within the generalized gradient approximation (GGA) including dispersion effects (TS, Grimme) was employed to perform the calculations. The optical absorption measurements revealed that the anhydrous monoclinic L-asparagine crystal is a wide band gap material with 4.95 eV main gap energy. DFT-GGA+TS simulations, on the other hand, produced structural parameters in very good agreement with X-ray data. The lattice parameter differences Δa, Δb, Δc between theory and experiment were as small as 0.020, 0.051, and 0.022 Å, respectively. The calculated band gap energy is smaller than the experimental data by about 15%, with a 4.23 eV indirect band gap corresponding to Z → Γ and Z → β transitions. Three other indirect band gaps of 4.30 eV, 4.32 eV, and 4.36 eV are assigned to α3 → Γ, α1 → Γ, and α2 → Γ transitions, respectively. Δ-sol computations, on the other hand, predict a main band gap of 5.00 eV, just 50 meV above the experimental value. Electronic wavefunctions mainly originating from O 2p–carboxyl, C 2p–side chain, and C 2p–carboxyl orbitals contribute most significantly to the highest valence and lowest conduction energy bands, respectively. By varying the lattice parameters from their converged equilibrium values, we show that the unit cell is less stiff along the b direction than for the a and c directions. Effective mass calculations suggest that hole transport behavior is more anisotropic than electron transport, but the mass values allow for some charge mobility except along a direction perpendicular to the molecular layers of L-asparagine which form the crystal, so anhydrous monoclinic L-asparagine crystals could behave as wide gap semiconductors. Finally, the calculations point to a high degree of optical

  7. Atmospheric Profiling Combining the Features of GPS ro & Mls: Satellite to Satellite Occultations Near Water & Ozone Absorption Lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kursinski, E. R.; Ward, D.; Otarola, A. C.; McGhee, J.; Reed, H.; Erickson, D.

    2015-12-01

    Assessing climate models & their predictions requires observations that determine the state of the real climate system precisely and unambiguously, independently from models. For this purpose, we have been developing a new orbiting remote sensing system called the Active Temperature, Ozone & Moisture Microwave Spectrometer (ATOMMS) which is a cross between GPS RO and the Microwave Limb Sounder. ATOMMS actively probes water vapor, ozone & other absorption lines at cm & mm wavelengths in a satellite to satellite occultation geometry to simultaneously profile temperature, pressure, water vapor and ozone as well as other important constituents. Individual profiles of water vapor, temperature & pressure heights will extend from near the surface into the mesosphere with ~1%, 0.4K and 10 m precision respectively and still better accuracy, with 100 m vertical resolution. Ozone profiles will extend upward from the upper troposphere. Line of sight wind profiles will extend upwards from the mid-stratosphere. ATOMMS is a doubly differential absorption system which eliminates drift and both sees clouds and sees thru them, to deliver performance in clouds within a factor of 2 of the performance in clear skies. This all-weather sampling combined with insensitivity to surface emissivity avoids sampling biases that limit most existing satellite records. ATOMMS will profile slant liquid water in clouds & rain and as well as turbulence via scintillations ("twinkling of a star"). Using prototype ATOMMS instrumentation that we developed with funding from NSF, several ATOMMS ground field campaigns precisely measured water vapor, cloud amount, rainfall, turbulence and absorption line spectroscopy. ATOMMS's dynamic range was demonstrated as water vapor was derived to 1% precision in optical depths up to 17. We are developing high altitude aircraft to aircraft instrumentation to further demonstrate ATOMMS performance, refine spectroscopy & support future field campaigns. Our vision is a

  8. L-Asparagine crystals with wide gap semiconductor features: optical absorption measurements and density functional theory computations.

    PubMed

    Zanatta, G; Gottfried, C; Silva, A M; Caetano, E W S; Sales, F A M; Freire, V N

    2014-03-28

    Results of optical absorption measurements are presented together with calculated structural, electronic, and optical properties for the anhydrous monoclinic L-asparagine crystal. Density functional theory (DFT) within the generalized gradient approximation (GGA) including dispersion effects (TS, Grimme) was employed to perform the calculations. The optical absorption measurements revealed that the anhydrous monoclinic L-asparagine crystal is a wide band gap material with 4.95 eV main gap energy. DFT-GGA+TS simulations, on the other hand, produced structural parameters in very good agreement with X-ray data. The lattice parameter differences Δa, Δb, Δc between theory and experiment were as small as 0.020, 0.051, and 0.022 Å, respectively. The calculated band gap energy is smaller than the experimental data by about 15%, with a 4.23 eV indirect band gap corresponding to Z → Γ and Z → β transitions. Three other indirect band gaps of 4.30 eV, 4.32 eV, and 4.36 eV are assigned to α3 → Γ, α1 → Γ, and α2 → Γ transitions, respectively. Δ-sol computations, on the other hand, predict a main band gap of 5.00 eV, just 50 meV above the experimental value. Electronic wavefunctions mainly originating from O 2p-carboxyl, C 2p-side chain, and C 2p-carboxyl orbitals contribute most significantly to the highest valence and lowest conduction energy bands, respectively. By varying the lattice parameters from their converged equilibrium values, we show that the unit cell is less stiff along the b direction than for the a and c directions. Effective mass calculations suggest that hole transport behavior is more anisotropic than electron transport, but the mass values allow for some charge mobility except along a direction perpendicular to the molecular layers of L-asparagine which form the crystal, so anhydrous monoclinic L-asparagine crystals could behave as wide gap semiconductors. Finally, the calculations point to a high degree of optical

  9. Spectral inversion of the Hα line for a plasma feature in the upper chromosphere of the quiet sun

    SciTech Connect

    Chae, Jongchul

    2014-01-01

    We propose a generalization of Becker's cloud model (BCM): an embedded cloud model (ECM)—for the inversion of the core of the Hα line spectrum of a plasma feature either lying high above the forest of chromospheric features or partly embedded in the outermost part of this forest. The fundamental assumption of the ECM is that the background light incident on the bottom of the feature from below is equal to the ensemble-average light at the same height. This light is related to the observed ensemble-average light via the radiative transfer that is described by the four parameters newly introduced in addition to the original four parameters of the BCM. Three of these new parameters are independently determined from the observed rms contrast profile of the ensemble. We use the constrained χ{sup 2} fitting technique to determine the five free parameters. We find that the ECM leads to the fairly good fitting of the observed line profiles and the reasonable inference of physical parameters in quiet regions where the BCM cannot. Our first application of this model to a quiet region of the Sun indicates that the model can produce the complete velocity map and Doppler width map of the region.

  10. [A novel hyperspectra absorption enhancing method based on morphological top-hat transformation].

    PubMed

    Li, Hui; Lin, Qi-zhong; Wang, Qin-jun; Liu, Qing-jie; Chen, Yu

    2010-09-01

    Hyperspectral characteristics analysis of ground features is the basis for applications of high-resolution imaging technology to ground target identification and ground features classification. Based on morphological multi-scale Top-Hat transformation, a novel spectral absorption enhancing algorithms was put forward, which enhanced spectral absorption features while maintaining shape features of the absorption peak bands. Eleven reflectance spectra of different mineral groups were chosen from the mineral spectral library of the United States Geological Survey (USGS), and we used a K-means clustering analysis on both the absorption-enhanced spectra and the original reflectance spectra. Results showed that, firstly, clustering groups of the absorption-enhanced spectra (AES) had better similarity within the same clustering group, and greater difference between different groups, furthermore, they were more consistent with the geological background of these minerals compared with clustering result of the original spectra (OS). Secondly, while all the original spectra were re-sampled to their ASTER spectra and the AES clustering result was displayed in the form of ASTER spectra of the minerals, we could easily describe both the representative spectral feature of each clustering group, and the typical spectral differences between every two groups. These fully demonstrate that the absorption-enhanced spectra have enhanced absorption features of the mineral spectra, and improved the separability of hyper-spectra. Accordingly, feature analysis based on absorption enhanced spectra can be used as reference for information extracting based on multi-spectral remote sensing image data, and it is a very useful method of hyperspectral analysis. PMID:21105412

  11. THE 3-5 {mu}m SPECTRUM OF NGC 1068 AT HIGH ANGULAR RESOLUTION: DISTRIBUTION OF EMISSION AND ABSORPTION FEATURES ACROSS THE NUCLEAR CONTINUUM SOURCE

    SciTech Connect

    Geballe, T. R.; Mason, R. E.; Rodriguez-Ardila, A.; Axon, D. J.

    2009-08-20

    We report moderate resolution 3-5 {mu}m spectroscopy of the nucleus of NGC 1068 obtained at 0.''3 (20 pc) resolution with the spectrograph slit aligned approximately along the ionization cones of the active galactic nucleus. The deconvolved full width at half-maximum of the nuclear continuum source in this direction is 0.''3. Four coronal lines of widely different excitations were detected; the intensity of each peaks near radio knot C, approximately 0.''3 north of the infrared continuum peak, where the radio jet changes direction. Together with the broadened line profiles observed near that location, this suggests that shock ionization is the dominant excitation mechanism of the coronal lines. The depth of the 3.4 {mu}m hydrocarbon absorption is maximum at and just south of the continuum peak, similar to the 10 {mu}m silicate absorption. That and the similar and rapid variations of the optical depths of both features across the nucleus suggest that substantial portions of both arise in a dusty environment just in front of the continuum source(s). A new and tighter limit is set on the column density of CO. Although clumpy models of the dust screen might explain the shallowness of the silicate feature, the presence of the 3.4 {mu}m feature and the absence of CO are strongly reminiscent of Galactic diffuse cloud environments and a consistent explanation for them and the observed silicate feature is found if all three phenomena occur in such an environment, existing as close as 10 pc to the central engine.

  12. Feature Analysis of Ocean Waves in North Central Pacific Ocean Based ASAR Wave Spectral Data and Wave Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jichao; Zhang, Jie; Yang, Jungang; Meng, Junmin

    2013-01-01

    Directional Spectrum of the ocean waves could be obtained form Envisat advanced synthetic aperture radar (ASAR) wave spectral data. The wave model WAVEWATCH III (WW3) is applied to simulate the ocean wave field. Study area is 185°E-215°E and 15°N-30°N, time range is from 1 January 2008 to 31 December 2008. Based on ASAR and buoy data, the wave numerical simulation and assimilation of the north central Pacific Ocean is carried out. The validation and assessment of ASAR ocean wave spectra products is performed. The optimal interpolation (OI) algorithm is used in model WW3 for assimilating ASAR wave spectra data. Based on the result of the simulation and assimilation, mean waves direction (MWD), significant wave height (SWH) and mean wave period (MWP) are analysed. SWH and MWP are larger in winter and SWH reach to more than 2.5 meters. Seasonal change of SWH and MWP are significant.

  13. Spectral features of anti-Stokes and Stokes modes generated by stimulated Raman scattering in liquid toluene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yadav, Suchita; Kumar, Govind; Vijaya, R.

    2016-10-01

    Stimulated Raman scattering leading to the generation of four first-order Stokes modes at shifts of 862.9, 1035, 2967 and 3086 cm-1, one second-order Stokes mode at a shift of 2032.5 cm-1 and one first-order anti-Stokes mode at a shift of 946.3 cm-1 has been measured in an experiment using liquid toluene. The observed shifts are assigned to the earlier reported Raman shifts of toluene at 786, 1006, 2979, 3060 cm-1 due to ring-breathing mode, ring deformation mode, CH3 stretching mode and CH stretching mode, respectively. Simultaneous measurement of all the Raman modes, including the second-order Stokes and first-order anti-Stokes, and their correct assignment to the vibrational modes of toluene is not reported widely in earlier work. The Raman modes generated from toluene emerge as concentric rings of different diameters. The phase-matching angle for anti-Stokes generation is thus measured and compared with the expected value from calculation. The spectral broadening observed near two of the modes is explained with the help of Raman-active modes of toluene reported earlier by others. Raman shifts, threshold levels, gain and beam profile of all the modes, along with the phase matching of the anti-Stokes mode, are reported.

  14. Spectral features and antibacterial properties of Cu-doped ZnO nanoparticles prepared by sol-gel method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alireza, Samavati; A, F. Ismail; Hadi, Nur; Z, Othaman; M, K. Mustafa

    2016-07-01

    Zn1‑x Cu x O (x = 0.00, 0.01, 0.03, and 0.05) nanoparticles are synthesized via the sol-gel technique using gelatin and nitrate precursors. The impact of copper concentration on the structural, optical, and antibacterial properties of these nanoparticles is demonstrated. Powder x-ray diffraction investigations have illustrated the organized Cu doping into ZnO nanoparticles up to Cu concentration of 5% (x = 0.05). However, the peak corresponding to CuO for x = 0.01 is not distinguishable. The images of field emission scanning electron microscopy demonstrate the existence of a nearly spherical shape with a size in the range of 30–52 nm. Doping Cu creates the Cu–O–Zn on the surface and results in a decrease in the crystallite size. Photoluminescence and absorption spectra display that doping Cu causes an increment in the energy band gap. The antibacterial activities of the nanoparticles are examined against Escherichia coli (Gram negative bacteria) cultures using optical density at 600 nm and a comparison of the size of inhibition zone diameter. It is found that both pure and doped ZnO nanoparticles indicate appropriate antibacterial activity which rises with Cu doping. Project supported by the Universiti Teknologi Malaysia (UTM) (Grant No. R. J1300000.7809.4F626). Dr. Samavati is thankful to RMC for postdoctoral grants.

  15. Spectral features and antibacterial properties of Cu-doped ZnO nanoparticles prepared by sol-gel method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alireza, Samavati; A, F. Ismail; Hadi, Nur; Z, Othaman; M, K. Mustafa

    2016-07-01

    Zn1-x Cu x O (x = 0.00, 0.01, 0.03, and 0.05) nanoparticles are synthesized via the sol-gel technique using gelatin and nitrate precursors. The impact of copper concentration on the structural, optical, and antibacterial properties of these nanoparticles is demonstrated. Powder x-ray diffraction investigations have illustrated the organized Cu doping into ZnO nanoparticles up to Cu concentration of 5% (x = 0.05). However, the peak corresponding to CuO for x = 0.01 is not distinguishable. The images of field emission scanning electron microscopy demonstrate the existence of a nearly spherical shape with a size in the range of 30-52 nm. Doping Cu creates the Cu-O-Zn on the surface and results in a decrease in the crystallite size. Photoluminescence and absorption spectra display that doping Cu causes an increment in the energy band gap. The antibacterial activities of the nanoparticles are examined against Escherichia coli (Gram negative bacteria) cultures using optical density at 600 nm and a comparison of the size of inhibition zone diameter. It is found that both pure and doped ZnO nanoparticles indicate appropriate antibacterial activity which rises with Cu doping. Project supported by the Universiti Teknologi Malaysia (UTM) (Grant No. R. J1300000.7809.4F626). Dr. Samavati is thankful to RMC for postdoctoral grants.

  16. Identification of structural and spectral features of synthesized cyano-stilbene dye derivatives: a comparative experimental and DFT study.

    PubMed

    Karabacak, M; Asiri, A M; Al-Youbi, A O; Qusti, A H; Cinar, M

    2014-01-01

    The synthesized three dye derivatives of cyano-stilbene monomer were identified by experimental spectroscopic techniques and density functional approach. The optimized geometrical structure, vibrational and electronic transitions along with the nonlinear optical (NLO) properties of those compounds were presented in this study. The vibrational spectra of investigated compounds were recorded in solid state with FT-IR and FT-Raman spectrometry in the range of 4000-400 cm(-1) and 3600-50 cm(-1), respectively. The theoretical ground state equilibrium conformations and vibrational wavenumbers were carried out by using density functional method with 6-311G(d,p) basis set. Assignments of the fundamental vibrational modes were examined on the basis of the measured data and total energy distribution (TED) of the vibrational modes, calculated with scaled quantum mechanical (SQM) method. The UV absorption spectra of monomers were observed in the range of 200-600 nm in chloroform, acetonitrile and toluene, and time dependent DFT method was used to obtain the electronic properties. The linear polarizability and first hyperpolarizability of the studied molecules indicates that the title compounds can be used as a good nonlinear optical material. A detailed description of spectroscopic behaviors of compounds was given based on the comparison of experimental measurements and theoretical computations. PMID:24177881

  17. Features of the absorption of 2-to 40-TeV cosmic-ray hadrons in lead

    SciTech Connect

    Sveshnikova, L. G. Yakovlev, V. I.; Turundaevskii, A. N.; Galkin, V. I.; Nazarov, S. I.; Podorozhnyi, D. M.; Popova, N. S.; Roganova, T. M.

    2006-02-15

    For the first time, experimental data on 2-to 40-TeV hadronic cascades recorded by a lead ionization calorimeter at the Tien-Shan mountain station of the Lebedev Institute of Physics (Moscow) are compared with the results of a present-day simulation based on the GEANT 3.21 code and performed with allowance for the detection procedure. The conclusion that along-flying component appears in high-energy hadronic cascades was drawn previously on the basis of these data. Some special features of the procedure for recording TeV-range hadrons in the calorimeter are considered. It is shown that the averaged hadronic cascades and various features of single cascades having energies below 10 TeV are simulated adequately by using the QGSJET + FLUKA generators of nuclear interactions, but that they are not described by using the GHEISHA generator at lower energies. Some features of the experimentally observed cascades could not be described for cascade energies above 10 TeV.

  18. Front-end technologies for robust ASR in reverberant environments—spectral enhancement-based dereverberation and auditory modulation filterbank features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Feifei; Meyer, Bernd T.; Moritz, Niko; Rehr, Robert; Anemüller, Jörn; Gerkmann, Timo; Doclo, Simon; Goetze, Stefan

    2015-12-01

    This paper presents extended techniques aiming at the improvement of automatic speech recognition (ASR) in single-channel scenarios in the context of the REVERB (REverberant Voice Enhancement and Recognition Benchmark) challenge. The focus is laid on the development and analysis of ASR front-end technologies covering speech enhancement and feature extraction. Speech enhancement is performed using a joint noise reduction and dereverberation system in the spectral domain based on estimates of the noise and late reverberation power spectral densities (PSDs). To obtain reliable estimates of the PSDs—even in acoustic conditions with positive direct-to-reverberation energy ratios (DRRs)—we adopt the statistical model of the room impulse response explicitly incorporating DRRs, as well in combination with a novel proposed joint estimator for the reverberation time T 60 and the DRR. The feature extraction approach is inspired by processing strategies of the auditory system, where an amplitude modulation filterbank is applied to extract the temporal modulation information. These techniques were shown to improve the REVERB baseline in our previous work. Here, we investigate if similar improvements are obtained when using a state-of-the-art ASR framework, and to what extent the results depend on the specific architecture of the back-end. Apart from conventional Gaussian mixture model (GMM)-hidden Markov model (HMM) back-ends, we consider subspace GMM (SGMM)-HMMs as well as deep neural networks in a hybrid system. The speech enhancement algorithm is found to be helpful in almost all conditions, with the exception of deep learning systems in matched training-test conditions. The auditory feature type improves the baseline for all system architectures. The relative word error rate reduction achieved by combining our front-end techniques with current back-ends is 52.7% on average with the REVERB evaluation test set compared to our original REVERB result.

  19. Dust in MG II Absorption Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malhotra, S.

    The dust absorption feature at 2175 AA is detected in a composite spectrum of Mg II absorbers. The composite absorber spectrum is obtained by taking the geometric mean of 92 quasar spectra after aligning them in the rest-frame of 96 absorbers. By aligning the spectra according to absorber redshifts we reinforce the spectral features of the absorbers, and smooth over possible bumps and wiggles in the emission spectra. The width of the observed absorption feature is 200-300 AA (FWHM), or 0.4-0.6 microns^{-1} and the central wavelength is 2240 AA. The Galactic dust feature has a central wavelength of 2176 AA and FWHM = 0.8-1.25 microns^{-1}. Simulations show that this discrepancy between the properties of the 2175 AA feature in Mg II absorbers and Galactic ISM can be mostly explained by the different methods used to measure them (cf. Malhotra 1997).

  20. A graphical method to evaluate spectral preprocessing in multivariate regression calibrations: example with Savitzky-Golay filters and partial least squares regression

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In multivariate regression analysis of spectroscopy data, spectral preprocessing is often performed to reduce unwanted background information (offsets, sloped baselines) or accentuate absorption features in intrinsically overlapping bands. These procedures, also known as pretreatments, are commonly ...

  1. Origins of optical absorption characteristics of Cu(2+) complexes in aqueous solutions.

    PubMed

    Qiu, S Roger; Wood, Brandon C; Ehrmann, Paul R; Demos, Stavros G; Miller, Philip E; Schaffers, Kathleen I; Suratwala, Tayyab I; Brow, Richard K

    2015-07-15

    Many transition metal complexes exhibit infrared or visible optical absorption arising from d-d transitions that are the key to functionality in technological applications and biological processes. The observed spectral characteristics of the absorption spectra depend on several underlying physical parameters whose relative contributions are still not fully understood. Although conventional arguments based on ligand-field theory can be invoked to rationalize the peak absorption energy, they cannot describe the detailed features of the observed spectral profile such as the spectral width and shape, or unexpected correlations between the oscillator strength and absorption peak position. Here, we combine experimental observations with first-principles simulations to investigate origins of the absorption spectral profile in model systems of aqueous Cu(2+) ions with Cl(-), Br(-), NO2(-) and CH3CO2(-) ligands. The ligand identity and concentration, fine structure in the electronic d-orbitals of Cu(2+), complex geometry, and solvation environment are all found to play key roles in determining the spectral profile. Moreover, similar physiochemical origins of these factors lead to interesting and unexpected correlations in spectral features. The results provide important insights into the underlying mechanisms of the observed spectral features and offer a framework for advancing the ability of theoretical models to predict and interpret the behavior of such systems. PMID:26059193

  2. Spectral feature extraction of EEG signals and pattern recognition during mental tasks of 2-D cursor movements for BCI using SVM and ANN.

    PubMed

    Bascil, M Serdar; Tesneli, Ahmet Y; Temurtas, Feyzullah

    2016-09-01

    Brain computer interface (BCI) is a new communication way between man and machine. It identifies mental task patterns stored in electroencephalogram (EEG). So, it extracts brain electrical activities recorded by EEG and transforms them machine control commands. The main goal of BCI is to make available assistive environmental devices for paralyzed people such as computers and makes their life easier. This study deals with feature extraction and mental task pattern recognition on 2-D cursor control from EEG as offline analysis approach. The hemispherical power density changes are computed and compared on alpha-beta frequency bands with only mental imagination of cursor movements. First of all, power spectral density (PSD) features of EEG signals are extracted and high dimensional data reduced by principle component analysis (PCA) and independent component analysis (ICA) which are statistical algorithms. In the last stage, all features are classified with two types of support vector machine (SVM) which are linear and least squares (LS-SVM) and three different artificial neural network (ANN) structures which are learning vector quantization (LVQ), multilayer neural network (MLNN) and probabilistic neural network (PNN) and mental task patterns are successfully identified via k-fold cross validation technique. PMID:27376723

  3. Spectral feature extraction of EEG signals and pattern recognition during mental tasks of 2-D cursor movements for BCI using SVM and ANN.

    PubMed

    Bascil, M Serdar; Tesneli, Ahmet Y; Temurtas, Feyzullah

    2016-09-01

    Brain computer interface (BCI) is a new communication way between man and machine. It identifies mental task patterns stored in electroencephalogram (EEG). So, it extracts brain electrical activities recorded by EEG and transforms them machine control commands. The main goal of BCI is to make available assistive environmental devices for paralyzed people such as computers and makes their life easier. This study deals with feature extraction and mental task pattern recognition on 2-D cursor control from EEG as offline analysis approach. The hemispherical power density changes are computed and compared on alpha-beta frequency bands with only mental imagination of cursor movements. First of all, power spectral density (PSD) features of EEG signals are extracted and high dimensional data reduced by principle component analysis (PCA) and independent component analysis (ICA) which are statistical algorithms. In the last stage, all features are classified with two types of support vector machine (SVM) which are linear and least squares (LS-SVM) and three different artificial neural network (ANN) structures which are learning vector quantization (LVQ), multilayer neural network (MLNN) and probabilistic neural network (PNN) and mental task patterns are successfully identified via k-fold cross validation technique.

  4. The emission/absorption FE 2 spectrum of HD 45677

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stalio, R.; Selvelli, P. L.

    1981-01-01

    The complex behavior of the emission/absorption spectrum of Fe II is analyzed. The far UV spectrum is characterized almost solely by absorption lines, while, in the near UV, strong emissions are predominant. Radiative excitation from the ground to the highest levels (chi is approximately 10 eV) with re-emission in the near UV, visible and I.R. seems to be the main mechanism capable of explaining the observed spectral features.

  5. Analysis of Mg spectral features produced by irradiations of laser pulses with different contrast and pulse durations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stafford, A.; Safronova, A. S.; Safronova, U. I.; Kantsyrev, V. L.; Faenov, A. Y.; Wiewior, P.; Weller, M. E.; Shrestha, I.; Shlyaptseva, V. V.; Paudel, Y.

    2014-03-01

    Experiments performed at the Leopard Laser Facility at the Nevada Terawatt Facility of the University of Nevada, Reno have produced K-shell Mg spectra with complex satellite features. K-shell Mg spectra were collected from experiments comprised of three different conditions related to laser pulse and contrast. Two spectrometers were fielded: a survey convex spectrometer with a potassium hydrogen phthalate (KAP) crystal (R ˜ 300) and a high resolution focusing spectrometer with spatial resolution using a spherically bent mica crystal (R ˜ 3000). These spectra included dielectronic satellite (DS) lines that were investigated using the quasi-relativistic many-body perturbation theory (MZ) code for previously identified transitions from autoionizing 2lnl‧ states in He-like Mg and new transitions involving autoionizing 1s3lnl‧ states in Li-like Mg and 1s3l3l‧3l″ in Be-like Mg calculated using the Hartree-Fock-relativistic method (COWAN code). Radiative and non-radiative data are combined to obtain branching ratios, intensities and effective emission rate coefficients of DS lines. Synthetic spectra were matched to experimental data to identify strong satellite structures to the Heβ (7.8507 Å) and Lyα (8.4192 Å) resonance transitions.

  6. [Research on the spectral feature and identification of the surface vegetation stressed by stored CO2 underground leakage].

    PubMed

    Chen, Yun-Hao; Jiang, Jin-Bao; Steven, Michael D; Gong, A-Du; Li, Yi-Fan

    2012-07-01

    With the global climate warming, reducing greenhouse gas emissions becomes a focused problem for the world. The carbon capture and storage (CCS) techniques could mitigate CO2 into atmosphere, but there is a risk in case that the CO2 leaks from underground. The objective of this paper is to study the chlorophyll contents (SPAD value), relative water contents (RWC) and leaf spectra changing features of beetroot under CO2 leakage stress through field experiment. The result shows that the chlorophyll contents and RWC of beetroot under CO2 leakage stress become lower than the control beetroot', and the leaf reflectance increases in the 550 nm region and decreases in the 680nm region. A new vegetation index (R550/R680) was designed for identifying beetroot under CO2 leakage stress, and the result indicates that the vegetation index R550/R680 could identify the beetroots after CO2 leakage for 7 days. The index has strong sensitivity, stability and identification for monitoring the beetroots under CO2 stress. The result of this paper has very important meaning and application values for selecting spots of CCS project, monitoring and evaluating land-surface ecology under CO2 stress and monitoring the leakage spots by using remote sensing.

  7. The Origins and Evolutionary Status of B Stars Found Far from the Galactic Plane. I. Composition and Spectral Features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, J. C.

    2004-11-01

    The existence of faint blue stars far above the Galactic plane that have spectra that are similar to nearby Population I B stars presents several interesting questions. Among them are the following: Can a Population I B star travel from the disk to a position many kiloparsecs above the plane in a relatively short main-sequence lifetime? Is it possible that single massive star formation is occurring far from the Galactic plane? Are these objects something else masquerading as main-sequence B stars? This paper (the first of two) analyzes the abundances of a sample of these stars and reveals several that are chemically similar to nearby Population I B stars, whereas others clearly have abundance patterns more like those expected in blue horizontal-branch (BHB) or post-asymptotic giant branch stars. Several of those with old evolved star abundances also have interesting features of note in their spectra. We also consider why this sample does not have any classical Be stars and identify at least two nearby solar-metallicity BHB stars. Based on observations made at the 2.1 m Otto Struve Telescope of McDonald Observatory operated by the University of Texas at Austin.

  8. Absorption spectra of Fe I in the 1550-3215-A region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, C. M.; Ginter, M. L.; Johansson, S.; Tilford, S. G.

    1988-01-01

    The high-dispersion absorption spectrum of Fe I is reported in the 1550-3215-A region. Included are wavelengths of about 3000 observed spectral features, improved spectral assignments, 248 new energy levels, and a value for the ionization potential of 63 737/cm obtained from extrapolation of Rydberg series. Improved wavelengths for several hundred V I and Ti I spectral lines determined on the same spectrograms as the iron data also are presented.

  9. The Zugspitze radiative closure experiment for quantifying water vapor absorption over the terrestrial and solar infrared - Part 2: Accurate calibration of high spectral-resolution infrared measurements of surface solar radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reichert, Andreas; Rettinger, Markus; Sussmann, Ralf

    2016-09-01

    Quantitative knowledge of water vapor absorption is crucial for accurate climate simulations. An open science question in this context concerns the strength of the water vapor continuum in the near infrared (NIR) at atmospheric temperatures, which is still to be quantified by measurements. This issue can be addressed with radiative closure experiments using solar absorption spectra. However, the spectra used for water vapor continuum quantification have to be radiometrically calibrated. We present for the first time a method that yields sufficient calibration accuracy for NIR water vapor continuum quantification in an atmospheric closure experiment. Our method combines the Langley method with spectral radiance measurements of a high-temperature blackbody calibration source (< 2000 K). The calibration scheme is demonstrated in the spectral range 2500 to 7800 cm-1, but minor modifications to the method enable calibration also throughout the remainder of the NIR spectral range. The resulting uncertainty (2σ) excluding the contribution due to inaccuracies in the extra-atmospheric solar spectrum (ESS) is below 1 % in window regions and up to 1.7 % within absorption bands. The overall radiometric accuracy of the calibration depends on the ESS uncertainty, on which at present no firm consensus has been reached in the NIR. However, as is shown in the companion publication Reichert and Sussmann (2016), ESS uncertainty is only of minor importance for the specific aim of this study, i.e., the quantification of the water vapor continuum in a closure experiment. The calibration uncertainty estimate is substantiated by the investigation of calibration self-consistency, which yields compatible results within the estimated errors for 91.1 % of the 2500 to 7800 cm-1 range. Additionally, a comparison of a set of calibrated spectra to radiative transfer model calculations yields consistent results within the estimated errors for 97.7 % of the spectral range.

  10. Molecular hydrogen ion /H2+/ absorption in planetary nebulae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feibelman, W. A.; Boggess, A.; Mccracken, C. W.; Hobbs, R. W.

    1981-01-01

    Several IUE spectra of planetary nebulae show an absorption feature shortward of 1500 A which is believed to be due to H2(+). The nebulae are excited by stars of spectral type O3-O7 or continuum, and all but one have double-shell structure.

  11. The soft gamma-ray spectrum of A0535+26: Detection of an absorption feature at 110 keV by OSSE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grove, J. E.; Strickman, M. S.; Johnson, W. N.; Kurfess, J. D.; Kinzer, R. L.; Starr, C. H.; Jung, G. V.; Kendziorra, E.; Maisack, M.; Staubert, R.

    1995-01-01

    We present soft gamma-ray observations by the Oriented Scintillation Spectrometer Experiment (OSSE) on the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory (GRO) of the transient X-ray binary pulsar A0535+26. The observations were made 1994 February 8-17, immediately prior to the peak of a giant outburst. The phase averaged spectrum is complex and cannot be described by a single-component model. We find that structure in the spectrum above 100 keV can best be modeled by an absorption feature near 110 keV, which we interepret as the signature of cyclotron resonant scattering. Because of OSSE's 45 keV threshold, we are unable to make a definitive statement on the presence of a 55 keV absorption line; however, we can conclude that if this line does exist, it must have a smaller optical depth than the line at 110 keV. A first harmonic (=fundamental) cyclotron resonance at 110 keV corresponds to a magnetic field strength at the surface of the neutron star of approximately 1 x 10(exp 13) G (approximately 5 x 10(exp 12) G if the first harmonic is at 55 keV).

  12. Characterizing Mafic and Clay Components in Libya Montes, Mars, using Automated Gaussian Modeling of Spectral Features found in MRO/CRISM Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makarewicz, H. D.; Parente, M.; Bishop, J. L.

    2008-12-01

    Aqueous processes have been inferred at the Libya Montes rim/terrace complex of the southern Isidis Basin due to the dense concentration of valley networks [1]. Coordinated CRISM-HiRISE investigations of this region characterized discrete units of ancient phyllosilicate deposits covered by an olivine-rich material and a pyroxene caprock [2]. CRISM mapping data show minor phyllosilicate abundances widespread throughout the Southern Highlands [3], which are dominated by low-Ca pyroxene bearing material [4,5]. The layered capping materials have been suggested to be remnant eroded lavas that infiltrated the Libya Montes and Isidis Basin from Syrtis Major [6]. Our current study involves detailed characterization of the minerals present at Libya Montes through implementation of newly created data analysis tools. We have developed an automated procedure for modeling spectral features using Gaussians. This study builds on the modified Gaussian model (MGM) technique [7] that has been successfully applied to hyperspectral analyses of Mars [8]. However, these models require user-selected initial parameters. Initial efforts in automating this modeling process for CRISM hyperspectral images has been successful, but is limited to the study of pyroxene bands at 2 μm. We have extended this technique to model spectral features using Gaussians from 0.5-2.6 μm. We have developed an automatic parameter initialization step based on the features of the spectrum being modeled in order to further automate MGM modeling. Initial results have successfully yielded automatically generated starting parameters for the MGM with low residuals following optimization. This new algorithm is currently being applied towards analyses of hyperspectral images in Libya Montes. Specifically, olivine, pyroxene, and phyllosilicate deposits are being modeled and classified by composition in 13 CRISM images using the automatic parameter initialization with the MGM. We are investigating and mapping mineral

  13. Cirrus cloud optical and microphysical property retrievals from eMAS during SEAC4RS using bi-spectral reflectance measurements within the 1.88 µm water vapor absorption band

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, Kerry; Platnick, Steven; Arnold, G. Thomas; Holz, Robert E.; Veglio, Paolo; Yorks, John; Wang, Chenxi

    2016-04-01

    Previous bi-spectral imager retrievals of cloud optical thickness (COT) and effective particle radius (CER) based on the Nakajima and King (1990) approach, such as those of the operational MODIS cloud optical property retrieval product (MOD06), have typically paired a non-absorbing visible or near-infrared wavelength, sensitive to COT, with an absorbing shortwave or mid-wave infrared wavelength sensitive to CER. However, in practice it is only necessary to select two spectral channels that exhibit a strong contrast in cloud particle absorption. Here it is shown, using eMAS observations obtained during NASA's SEAC4RS field campaign, that selecting two absorbing wavelength channels within the broader 1.88 µm water vapor absorption band, namely the 1.83 and 1.93 µm channels that have sufficient differences in ice crystal single scattering albedo, can yield COT and CER retrievals for thin to moderately thick single-layer cirrus that are reasonably consistent with other solar and IR imager-based and lidar-based retrievals. A distinct advantage of this channel selection for cirrus cloud retrievals is that the below-cloud water vapor absorption minimizes the surface contribution to measured cloudy top-of-atmosphere reflectance, in particular compared to the solar window channels used in heritage retrievals such as MOD06. This reduces retrieval uncertainty resulting from errors in the surface reflectance assumption and reduces the frequency of retrieval failures for thin cirrus clouds.

  14. Spectral marker for Cα damage in beta peptides.

    PubMed

    Green, Mandy C; Stelzleni, Sarah; Francisco, Joseph S

    2013-01-24

    The work in this article describes a spectral signature for the detection of a C(α) radical damaged peptide, which should enable the use of infrared spectroscopic methods to directly monitor oxidative events. Spectra for radical damaged peptides are computed with ab initio methods. The amide bands A, I, II, and III are analyzed for trends in the damage site. The spectral signature is found in a region (i.e., 1700-1620 cm(-1)) normally void of vibrational absorption bands from stable undamaged beta peptides. An analysis of the vibrational motions of the spectral signature is described. The uniqueness of the spectral signature is explored by an examination and comparison with C(α) monoradicals and polyradicals, as well as with other bioradicals that could act as spectral interferences. The identification of unique infrared spectral features for C(α) damage could have important implications in diagnostics for beta conformational peptides damaged by oxidative stress processes. PMID:23301948

  15. Validation of maritime spectral features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hubler, Matthew J.

    In 1991 a research team led by Klaus Hasselmann developed a general technique to build synthetic aperture radar (SAR) spectra from scans of the ocean surface; however these techniques were verified on older equipment. The algorithms input a SAR spectrum from an ocean spectrum, an inversion from SAR spectrum to ocean spectrum, and determine the threshold of the azimuthal cutoff. Originally designed for platforms that have since fulfilled their missions, the question remains as to whether the algorithms are valid with newer systems such as TerraSAR-X operated by German Aerospace Centre (DLR). One of the larger differences that may skew data analysis by these algorithms is that TerraSAR-X has much finer resolution, pixels being on the scale of 5--10 meters (or less), while older satellites returned images with pixel scaling on the order of kilometers. The finer pixel scaling allows for more detail to be recovered and analyzed, specifically the individual waves on the ocean surface become visible. To that end, algorithms developed for older satellites will be employed on data collected from TerraSAR-X and compared to ground truth data in order to assess the compatibility of existing algorithms. During the course of the validation, several sets of code, written in Matlab, will be employed and discussed, each providing a different approach, more focused results. In aggregate a clearer picture will emerge describing the accuracy that older algorithms have with newer machinery. The imagery data, being satellite borne, comes with individual collection geometry that needs to be addressed in the processing as well, currently through parsing the accompanying metadata. The determination that these algorithms indeed work with newer systems and the validation of an azimuthal cutoff demonstrate that little fine tuning of older algorithms is needed at these higher resolutions. While the Hasselmann algorithms become cumbersome to use, a new approach to the algorithms yield useful quantifiable measurements. Thus combination of these new algorithms, buoy ground truth data, and more recent SAR technology deliver a powerful analytical tool. The eventual result of these algorithms could apply to meteorology, commercial shipping, disaster planning and recovery, ecology, and a vast assortment of other fields that would seek the wind patterns in open ocean scenes.

  16. Growth, structure, defects and polarized absorption spectral properties of Er:Yb:YCa4O(BO3)3 crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Degao; Teng, Bing; Kong, Weijin; Zhang, Shiming; Li, Yuyi; Li, Jianhong; Yang, Liting; Cao, Lifeng; Van Smaalen, Sander

    2016-01-01

    YCa4O(BO3)3 (YCOB) crystals co-doped with 3 at% Er3+ and 20 at% Yb3+ were successfully grown by the Czochralski method. X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD) results show that the as-grown Er:Yb:YCOB crystal belongs to the monoclinic system with space group Cm. And the lattice parameters are a=8.076(8) Å, b=16.023(7) Å, c=3.528(4) Å and β=101.15(4)°. Crystal defects were revealed by chemical etching experiments. The density of etch pits, attributed to dislocations and observed on (010) planes, was found to be not uniform along the crystal diameter. The detailed polarized absorption spectra were measured. The polarized absorption cross sections at 977 nm are 1.01×10-20, 1.22×10-20 and 1.05×10-20 cm2 for E//X, E//Y and E//Z, respectively. And the polarized absorption cross sections at 1538 nm is about 1.86×10-20 cm2 for both E//X and E//Z, but for E//Y the result is 1.03×10-20 cm2, which is much smaller. The relationship between the crystal structure and absorption spectra was discussed.

  17. USGS Digital Spectral Library splib06a

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clark, Roger N.; Swayze, Gregg A.; Wise, Richard A.; Livo, K. Eric; Hoefen, Todd M.; Kokaly, Raymond F.; Sutley, Stephen J.

    2007-01-01

    Introduction We have assembled a digital reflectance spectral library that covers the wavelength range from the ultraviolet to far infrared along with sample documentation. The library includes samples of minerals, rocks, soils, physically constructed as well as mathematically computed mixtures, plants, vegetation communities, microorganisms, and man-made materials. The samples and spectra collected were assembled for the purpose of using spectral features for the remote detection of these and similar materials. Analysis of spectroscopic data from laboratory, aircraft, and spacecraft instrumentation requires a knowledge base. The spectral library discussed here forms a knowledge base for the spectroscopy of minerals and related materials of importance to a variety of research programs being conducted at the U.S. Geological Survey. Much of this library grew out of the need for spectra to support imaging spectroscopy studies of the Earth and planets. Imaging spectrometers, such as the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Airborne Visible/Infra Red Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) or the NASA Cassini Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS) which is currently orbiting Saturn, have narrow bandwidths in many contiguous spectral channels that permit accurate definition of absorption features in spectra from a variety of materials. Identification of materials from such data requires a comprehensive spectral library of minerals, vegetation, man-made materials, and other subjects in the scene. Our research involves the use of the spectral library to identify the components in a spectrum of an unknown. Therefore, the quality of the library must be very good. However, the quality required in a spectral library to successfully perform an investigation depends on the scientific questions to be answered and the type of algorithms to be used. For example, to map a mineral using imaging spectroscopy and the mapping algorithm of Clark and others (1990a, 2003b

  18. Pixel Dynamics Analysis of Photospheric Spectral Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasca, Anthony P.; Chen, James; Pevtsov, Alexei A.

    2015-04-01

    Recent advances in solar observations have led to higher-resolution surface (photosphere) images that reveal bipolar magnetic features operating near the resolution limit during emerging flux events. Further improvements in resolution are expected to reveal even smaller dynamic features. Such photospheric features provide observable indications of what is happening before, during, and after flux emergence, eruptions in the corona, and other phenomena. Visible changes in photospheric active regions also play a major role in predicting eruptions that are responsible for geomagnetic plasma disturbances. A new method has been developed to extract physical information from photospheric data (e.g., SOLIS Stokes parameters) based on the statistics of pixel-by-pixel variations in spectral (absorption or emission) line quantities such as line profile Doppler shift, width, asymmetry, and flatness. Such properties are determined by the last interaction between detected photons and optically thick photospheric plasmas, and may contain extractable information on local plasma properties at sub-pixel scales. Applying the method to photospheric data with high spectral resolution, our pixel-by-pixel analysis is performed for various regions on the solar disk, ranging from quiet-Sun regions to active regions exhibiting eruptions, characterizing photospheric dynamics using spectral profiles. In particular, the method quantitatively characterizes the time profile of changes in spectral properties in photospheric features and provides improved physical constraints on observed quantities.

  19. Spectral Trends of Titan's Tropical Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffith, Caitlin Ann; Penteado, Paulo F.; Turner, Jake; Montiel, Nicholas; Schoenfeld, Ashley; Lopes, Rosaly M. C.; Soderblom, Laurence A.; Neish, Catherine; Radebaugh, Jani

    2016-10-01

    Titan's surface can be observed most clearly at 8 spectral regions that lie in between the strong methane bands in Titan's spectrum. Within these "windows", between 0.9 to 5 microns, the surface is nonetheless obscured by methane and haze, the latter of which is optically thick at lower wavelengths. Thus studies of Titan's surface must eliminate the effects of atmospheric extinction and extract the subtle spectral features that underlie the dominant spectral trends.To determine the subtle spectral features of Titan's tropical surface (30S--30N) we conducted a Principal Components Analysis (PCA) of the I/F at the 1.1, 1.3, 1.6 and 2.0 um wavelength windows, recorded by Cassini/VIMS. The PCA analysis identifies the spectral trend that defines the highest variance in the data (the principal component), as well as successively weaker orthogonal trends, without a priori assumptions about the surface composition, e.g. as needed in radiative transfer analyses.Our analysis derives the spectral features at the four wavelengths that describe Titan's tropical surface. We detect a large almost contiguous region that extends roughly 160 degrees in longitude and which exhibits absorption features at 1.6 and 2.0, as well as 2.8 um (characteristic of water ice). This vast and perhaps tectonic feature is, in part, associated with terrain that is hypothesized to be some of the oldest surfaces on Titan. In addition, the PCA analysis indicates at least 2 separate organic spectra signatures, potentially due to the separation of liquid and refractory sediments or to their chemically alteration over time. Here we discuss the PCA analysis and compare our derived compositional maps of Titan's surface with Radar maps of the topography and morphology, to entertain questions regarding the geology of Titan's surface the age of its atmosphere.

  20. Could the bone mineral density (T-score) be correlated with the Raman spectral features of keratin from women's nails and be used to predict osteoporosis?

    PubMed

    Mussatto, Julio Cesar; Perez, Mauro Coura; de Souza, Renato Aparecido; Pacheco, Marcos Tadeu T; Zângaro, Renato Amaro; Silveira, Landulfo

    2015-01-01

    Osteoporosis is a disease with great importance in current public health due to the associated risk of fracture; therefore, a rapid and accurate diagnosis becomes increasingly important. Recent literature has described a possible relationship between the changes in the organic phase of bone and the changes in nail keratin measured through Raman spectroscopy, aiming at the development of a standard for measuring bone quality and fracture risk both rapid and accurately. This work evaluated the correlation between the bone mineral density (BMD) scores of women with and without osteoporotic disease with the changes in the Raman spectra of the nail keratin, by assessing the intensity of the peak at 510 cm(-1) (S-S bridge) and the scores of principal component analysis (PCA), correlated with the values of BMD measured at the lumbar and hip. Raman spectra of ex vivo fingernails of 213 women were obtained by means of a dispersive Raman spectrometer (830 nm, 300 mW, in the spectral range between 400 and 1,800 cm(-1)). Peak intensities at ∼510 cm(-1) (assigned to the keratin S-S bridge) were measured, and the scores of first principal component loading vectors were calculated. Results showed no differences in the mean Raman spectra of nails of groups with and without osteoporosis. No correlation was found between the BMD scores and both the intensities of the 510 cm(-1) peak and the scores of the first four principal component vectors. Results suggest that BMD and fracture risk could not be assessed by the nail keratin features.

  1. Spectral evolution in gamma-ray bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norris, J. P.; Share, G. H.; Messina, D. C.; Matz, M.; Kouveliotou, C.; Dennis, B. R.; Desai, U. D.; Cline, T. L.

    1986-01-01

    The Hard X-ray Burst Spectrometer (HXRBS) and the Gamma-Ray Spectrometer (GRS) on NASA's Solar Maximum Mission satellite have independently monitored cosmic gamma-ray bursts since launch in February 1980. Several bursts with relatively simple pulse structure and sufficient intensity have been analyzed for evidence of spectral variability on time scales shorter than the pulse durations. In many of these bursts pulse structures are found, ranging in duration from 1 to 10 seconds, which exhibit a trend of hard-to-soft spectral evolution. No significant evidence for soft-to-hard evolution has been found. The HXRBS data above 100 keV and the GRS data above 1 MeV indicate that the spectral evolution generally is not due to time-varying absorption features at energies below 100 keV.

  2. Spectral variability on Ceres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erard, Stéphane

    2015-04-01

    Older ground-based observations are reprocessed in order to assess the spectral variability of Ceres surface before the beginning of observations by the Dawn spacecraft. Ceres was observed with NACO on the VLT in 2004 and 2005, producing resolved spectra of the disk under different attitudes. The data cover the range from 0.91-3.80 µm (J, H, K, and L bands), except in the telluric regions. They consist in spectral scans of the dayside, typically with 15 lines of 20 samples, an actual resolution of ~ 100 km, and a spectral resolution R~500 to 1500. A specific calibration scheme has been applied to preprocess the data and to evidence small compositional variations at the surface of Ceres. The major signatures observed are two bands centered at 3.06 and 3.30 µm, which exhibit significant spatial variations at this scale (5 to 10%). These features are best fit by ammoniated minerals (phyllosilicates or feldspars), although the lack of secondary hydration bands seems to rule out phyllosilicates. No significant absorption or variation is observed in J, H and K bands, consistently with [1]. No presence of ices (H2O, C02…) is detected, even at the poles. If Ceres was once rich in ices (e.g., [2]), this suggests a global resurfacing with melting of ices in the subsurface, and alteration under the influence of H2O and perhaps NH3, with reduced production of phyllosilicates. References [1] Carry et al (2012) Icarus 217, 20 [2] McCord, T. B. and C. Sotin (2005) JGR 110, 05009.

  3. The Zugspitze radiative closure experiment for quantifying water vapor absorption over the terrestrial and solar infrared - Part 3: Quantification of the mid- and near-infrared water vapor continuum in the 2500 to 7800 cm-1 spectral range under atmospheric conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reichert, Andreas; Sussmann, Ralf

    2016-09-01

    We present a first quantification of the near-infrared (NIR) water vapor continuum absorption from an atmospheric radiative closure experiment carried out at the Zugspitze (47.42° N, 10.98° E; 2964 m a.s.l.). Continuum quantification is achieved via radiative closure using radiometrically calibrated solar Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) absorption spectra covering the 2500 to 7800 cm-1 spectral range. The dry atmospheric conditions at the Zugspitze site (IWV 1.4 to 3.3 mm) enable continuum quantification even within water vapor absorption bands, while upper limits for continuum absorption can be provided in the centers of window regions. Throughout 75 % of the 2500 to 7800 cm-1 spectral range, the Zugspitze results agree within our estimated uncertainty with the widely used MT_CKD 2.5.2 model (Mlawer et al., 2012). In the wings of water vapor absorption bands, our measurements indicate about 2-5 times stronger continuum absorption than MT_CKD, namely in the 2800 to 3000 cm-1 and 4100 to 4200 cm-1 spectral ranges. The measurements are consistent with the laboratory measurements of Mondelain et al. (2015), which rely on cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CDRS), and the calorimetric-interferometric measurements of Bicknell et al. (2006). Compared to the recent FTIR laboratory studies of Ptashnik et al. (2012, 2013), our measurements are consistent within the estimated errors throughout most of the spectral range. However, in the wings of water vapor absorption bands our measurements indicate typically 2-3 times weaker continuum absorption under atmospheric conditions, namely in the 3200 to 3400, 4050 to 4200, and 6950 to 7050 cm-1 spectral regions.

  4. Probability and shape of the spectral line of a single bulk characteristic energy loss of a fast electron in a medium with electron absorption and strong spatial dispersion

    SciTech Connect

    Libenson, B. N.

    2011-10-15

    The probability of single characteristic energy loss of a fast electron in a reflection experiment has been calculated. Unlike many works concerning this subject, the bremsstrahlung of bulk plasmons in the non- Cherenkov ranges of frequencies and wavevectors of a plasmon has been taken into account. The contributions to the probability of single loss and to the shape of the spectral line from a quantum correction that is due to the interference of elastic and inelastic electron scattering events have been determined. The probability has been calculated in the kinetic approximation for the relative permittivity, where the short-wavelength range of the plasmon spectrum is correctly taken into account. In view of these circumstances, the expression for the mean free path of the electron with respect to the emission of a bulk plasmon that was obtained by Pines [D. Pines, Elementary Excitations in Solids (Benjamin, New York, 1963)] has been refined. The coherence length of the fast electron in the medium-energy range under consideration has been estimated. The shape of the spectral line of energy losses in the non-Cherenkov frequency range has been determined. It has been shown that the probability of the single emission of the bulk plasmon incompletely corresponds to the Poisson statistics.

  5. Time-dependent aggregation-induced enhanced emission, absorption spectral broadening, and aggregation morphology of a novel perylene derivative with a large D-π-A structure.

    PubMed

    Yang, Long; Yu, Yuyan; Zhang, Jin; Ge, Feijie; Zhang, Jianling; Jiang, Long; Gao, Fang; Dan, Yi

    2015-05-01

    Strong aggregation-caused quenching of perylene diimides (PDI) is changed successfully by simple chemical modification with two quinoline moieties through C=C at the bay positions to obtain aggregation-induced enhanced emission (AIEE) of a perylene derivative (Cya-PDI) with a large π-conjugation system. Cya-PDI is weakly luminescent in the well-dispersed CH(3)CN or THF solutions and exhibits an evident time-dependent AIEE and absorption spectra broadening in the aggregated state. In addition, morphological inspection demonstrates that the morphology of the aggregated form of Cya-PDI molecules changed from plate-shaped to rod-like aggregates under the co-effects of time and water. An edge-to-face arrangement of aggregation was proposed and discussed. The fact that the Cya-PDI aggregates show a broad absorption covering the whole visible-light range and strong intermolecular interaction through π-π stacking in the solid state makes them promising materials for optoelectric applications.

  6. Characterizing Mafic, Clay, and Carbonate Components found in MRO/CRISM Images in Libya Montes, Mars, using Advances in Automated Gaussian Modeling of Spectral Features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makarewicz, H. D.; Parente, M.; Perry, K. A.; McKeown, N. K.; Bishop, J. L.

    2009-12-01

    Aqueous processes have been inferred at the Libya Montes rim/terrace complex of the southern Isidis Basin due to the dense concentration of valley networks [1]. Coordinated CRISM-HiRISE investigations of this region characterized discrete units of ancient phyllosilicate deposits covered by an olivine-rich material and a pyroxene caprock [2]. CRISM mapping data show minor phyllosilicate abundances widespread throughout the Southern Highlands [3], which are dominated by low-Ca pyroxene bearing material [4,5]. The carbonate magnesite has also been located throughout this area [6] and at Libya Montes [7]. Our current study involves detailed characterization of the minerals present at Libya Montes through implementation of improved automated Gaussian modeling methods. We have developed an automated procedure for modeling spectral features using Gaussians that has been successfully applied to laboratory studies and hyperspectral analyses of Mars [8,9,10,11]. Several studies are being conducted to improve and validate these models. These include a comparison of initialization methods, continuum methods, optimization algorithms, and modeled functions. The modeled functions compared include Gaussians, saturated Gaussians, and Lorentzians. This algorithm and the modeling studies are currently being applied towards analyses of CRISM hyperspectral images of Libya Montes and laboratory spectra of mineral mixtures. Specifically, olivine, pyroxene, phyllosilicate, and carbonate deposits are being modeled and classified by composition in CRISM images. References [1]Crumpler, L. S., and K. L. Tanaka (2003) J. Geophys. Res., 108, DOI: 8010.1029/2002JE002040. [2]Bishop, J. L., et al. (2007) 7th Int'l Mars Conf. [3]Mustard, J. F., et al. (2008) Nature, 454, 07305. [4]Bibring, J.-P., et al. (2005) Science, 307,1576. [5]Mustard, J. F., et al.(2005) Science, 307, 1594. [6]Ehlmann, B. L., et al. (2008) Science, 322, 1828. [7]Perry, K., et al. (2009) AGU Fall Mtng. [8]Makarewicz, H. D., et

  7. M3 spectral analysis of lunar swirls and the link between optical maturation and surface hydroxyl formation at magnetic anomalies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kramer, G.Y.; Besse, S.; Dhingra, D.; Nettles, J.; Klima, R.; Garrick-Bethell, I.; Clark, R.N.; Combe, J.-P.; Head, J. W.; Taylor, L.A.; Pieters, C.M.; Boardman, J.; McCord, T.B.

    2011-01-01

    We examined the lunar swirls using data from the Moon Mineralogy Mapper (M3). The improved spectral and spatial resolution of M3 over previous spectral imaging data facilitates distinction of subtle spectral differences, and provides new information about the nature of these enigmatic features. We characterized spectral features of the swirls, interswirl regions (dark lanes), and surrounding terrain for each of three focus regions: Reiner Gamma, Gerasimovich, and Mare Ingenii. We used Principle Component Analysis to identify spectrally distinct surfaces at each focus region, and characterize the spectral features that distinguish them. We compared spectra from small, recent impact craters with the mature soils into which they penetrated to examine differences in maturation trends on- and off-swirl. Fresh, on-swirl crater spectra are higher albedo, exhibit a wider range in albedos and have well-preserved mafic absorption features compared with fresh off-swirl craters. Albedoand mafic absorptions are still evident in undisturbed, on-swirl surface soils, suggesting the maturation process is retarded. The spectral continuum is more concave compared with off-swirl spectra; a result of the limited spectral reddening being mostly constrained to wavelengths less than ???1500 nm. Off-swirl spectra show very little reddening or change in continuum shape across the entire M3 spectral range. Off-swirl spectra are dark, have attenuated absorption features, and the narrow range in off-swirl albedos suggests off-swirl regions mature rapidly. Spectral parameter maps depicting the relative OH surface abundance for each of our three swirl focus regions were created using the depth of the hydroxyl absorption feature at 2.82 ??m. For each of the studied regions, the 2.82 ??m absorption feature is significantly weaker on-swirl than off-swirl, indicating the swirls are depleted in OH relative to their surroundings. The spectral characteristics of the swirls and adjacent terrains from

  8. Diagnostics of Carbon Nanotube Formation in a Laser Produced Plume: Spectroscopic in situ nanotube detection using spectral absorption and surface temperature measurements by black body emission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeBoer, Gary D.

    2005-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes hold great promise for material advancements in the areas of composites and electronics. The advancement of research in these areas is dependent upon the availability of carbon nanotubes to a broad spectrum of academic and industrial researchers. Although there has been much progress made in reducing the costs of carbon nanotubes and increasing the quality and purity of the products, an increase in demand for still less expensive and specific nanotubes types has also grown. This summer's work has involved two experiments that have been designed to further the understanding of the dynamics and chemical mechanisms of carbon nanotube formation. It is expected that a better understanding of the process of formation of nanotubes will aid current production designs and stimulate ideas for future production designs increasing the quantity, quality, and production control of carbon nanotubes. The first experiment involved the measurement of surface temperature of the target as a function of time with respect to the ablation lasers. A peak surface temperature of 5000 K was determined from spectral analysis of black body emission from the target surface. The surface temperature as a function of various changes in operating parameters was also obtained. This data is expected to aid the modeling of ablation and plume dynamics. The second experiment involved a time and spatial measurement of the spectrally resolved absorbance of the laser produced plume. This experiment explored the possibility of developing absorbance and fluorescence to detect carbon nanotubes during production. To attain control over the production of nanotubes with specific properties and reduce costs, a real time in situ diagnostics method would be very beneficial. Results from this summer's work indicate that detection of nanotubes during production may possibly be used for production feed back control.

  9. Inherent optical properties of the ocean: retrieval of the absorption coefficient of chromophoric dissolved organic matter from airborne laser spectral fluorescence measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoge, Frank E.; Vodacek, Anthony; Swift, Robert N.; Yungel, James K.; Blough, Neil V.

    1995-10-01

    The absorption coefficient of chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM) at 355 nm has been retrieved from airborne laser-induced and water Raman-normalized CDOM fluorescence. Four combined airborne and ship field experiments have demonstrated that (1) the airborne CDOM fluorescence-to--water Raman ratio is linearly related to concurrent quinine-sulfate-standardized CDOM shipboard fluorescence measurements over a wide range of water masses (coastal to blue water); (2) the vicarious calibration of the airborne fluorosensor in units traceable to a fluorescence standard can be established and then maintained over an extended time period by tungsten lamp calibration; (3) the vicariously calibrated airborne CDOM fluorescence-to-water Raman ratio can be directly applied to previously developed

  10. Multi-decade Measurements of the Long-Term Trends of Atmospheric Species by High-Spectral-Resolution Infrared Solar Absorption Spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rinsland, Curtis P.; Chiou, Linda; Goldman, Aaron; Hannigan, James W.

    2010-01-01

    Solar absorption spectra were recorded for the first time in 5 years with the McMath Fourier transform spectrometer at the US National solar Observatory on Kitt Peak in southern Arizona, USA (31.91 N latitude, 111.61 W longitude, 2.09 km altitude). The solar absorption spectra cover 750-1300 and 1850-5000 cm(sup -1) and were recorded on 20 days during March-June 2009. The measurements mark the continuation of a long-term record of atmospheric chemical composition measurements that have been used to quantify seasonal cycles and long-term trends of both tropospheric and stratospheric species from observations that began i 1977. Fits to the measured spectra have been performed, and they indicate the spectra obtained since return to operational status are nearly free of channeling and the instrument line shape function is well reproduced taking into account the measurement parameters. We report updated time series measurements of total columns for six atmospheric species and their analysis for seasonal cycles and long-term trends. An sn example, the time series fit shows a decrease in the annual increase rate i Montreal-Protocol-regulated chlorofluorocarbon CCL2F2 from 1.51 plus or minus 0.38% yr(sup -1) at the beginning of the time span to -1.54 plus or minus 1.28 yr(sup -1) at the end of the time span, 1 sigma, and hence provides evidence for the impact of those regulations on the trend.

  11. Nebular Hydrogen Absorption in the Ejecta of Eta Carinae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gull, Theodore R.; Ishibashi, K.; Davidson, K.; Fisher, Richard R. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (STIS) observations of Eta Carinae and immediate ejecta reveal narrow Balmer absorption lines in addition to the nebular-scattered broad P-Cygni absorptions. The narrow absorption correlates with apparent disk structure that separates the two Homunculus lobes. We trace these features about half way up the Northern lobe until the scattered stellar Balmer line doppler-shifts redward beyond the nebular absorption feature. Three-dimensional data cubes, made by mapping the Homunculus at Balmer alpha and Balmer beta with the 52 x 0.1 arcsecond aperture and about 5000 spectral resolving power, demonstrate that the absorption feature changes slowly in velocity with nebular position. We have monitored the stellar Balmer alpha line profile of the central source over the past four years. The equivalent width of the nebular absorption feature changes considerably between observations. The changes do not correlate with measured brightness of Eta Carinae. Likely clumps of neutral hydrogen with a scale size comparable to the stellar disk diameter are passing through the intervening light path on the timescales less than several months. The excitation mechanism involves Lyman alpha radiation (possibly the Lyman series plus Lyman continuum) and collisions leading to populating the 2S metastable state. Before the electron can jump to the ground state by two photon emission (lifetime about 1/8 second), a stellar Balmer photon is absorbed and the electron shifts to an NP level. We see the absorption feature in higher Balmer lines, and but not in Paschen lines. Indeed we see narrow nebular Paschen emission lines. At present, we do not completely understand the details of the absorption. Better understanding should lead to improved insight of the unique conditions around Eta Carinae that leads to these absorptions.

  12. Resolving the Large Scale Spectral Variability of the Luminous Seyfert 1 Galaxy 1H 0419-577: Evidence for a New Emission Component and Absorption by Cold Dense Matter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pounds, K. A.; Reeves, J. N.; Page, K. L.; OBrien, P. T.

    2004-01-01

    An XMM-Newton observation of the luminous Seyfert 1 galaxy 1H 0419-577 in September 2002, when the source was in an extreme low-flux state, found a very hard X-ray spectrum at 1-10 keV with a strong soft excess below -1 keV. Comparison with an earlier XMM-Newton observation when 1H 0419-577 was X-ray bright indicated the dominant spectral variability was due to a steep power law or cool Comptonised thermal emission. Four further XMM-Newton observations, with 1H 0419-577 in intermediate flux states, now support that conclusion, while we also find the variable emission component in intermediate state difference spectra to be strongly modified by absorption in low ionisation matter. The variable soft excess then appears to be an artefact of absorption of the underlying continuum while the core soft emission can be attributed to re- combination in an extended region of more highly ionised gas. We note the wider implications of finding substantial cold dense matter overlying (or embedded in) the X-ray continuum source in a luminous Seyfert 1 galaxy.

  13. Spectral reflectance properties of carbonaceous chondrites: 2. CM chondrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cloutis, E. A.; Hudon, P.; Hiroi, T.; Gaffey, M. J.; Mann, P.

    2011-11-01

    We have examined the spectral reflectance properties and available modal mineralogies of 39 CM carbonaceous chondrites to determine their range of spectral variability and to diagnose their spectral features. We have also reviewed the published literature on CM mineralogy and subclassification, surveyed the published spectral literature and added new measurements of CM chondrites and relevant end members and mineral mixtures, and measured 11 parameters and searched pair-wise for correlations between all quantities. CM spectra are characterized by overall slopes that can range from modestly blue-sloped to red-sloped, with brighter spectra being generally more red-sloped. Spectral slopes, as measured by the 2.4:0.56 μm and 2.4 μm:visible region peak reflectance ratios, range from 0.90 to 2.32, and 0.81 to 2.24, respectively, with values <1 indicating blue-sloped spectra. Matrix-enriched CM spectra can be even more blue-sloped than bulk samples, with ratios as low as 0.85. There is no apparent correlation between spectral slope and grain size for CM chondrite spectra - both fine-grained powders and chips can exhibit blue-sloped spectra. Maximum reflectance across the 0.3-2.5 μm interval ranges from 2.9% to 20.0%, and from 2.8% to 14.0% at 0.56 μm. Matrix-enriched CM spectra can be darker than bulk samples, with maximum reflectance as low as 2.1%. CM spectra exhibit nearly ubiquitous absorption bands near 0.7, 0.9, and 1.1 μm, with depths up to 12%, and, less commonly, absorption bands in other wavelength regions (e.g., 0.4-0.5, 0.65, 2.2 μm). The depths of the 0.7, 0.9, and 1.1 μm absorption features vary largely in tandem, suggesting a single cause, specifically serpentine-group phyllosilicates. The generally high Fe content, high phyllosilicate abundance relative to mafic silicates, and dual Fe valence state in CM phyllosilicates, all suggest that the phyllosilicates will exhibit strong absorption bands in the 0.7 μm region (due to Fe 3+-Fe 2+ charge

  14. Spectral library searching in proteomics.

    PubMed

    Griss, Johannes

    2016-03-01

    Spectral library searching has become a mature method to identify tandem mass spectra in proteomics data analysis. This review provides a comprehensive overview of available spectral library search engines and highlights their distinct features. Additionally, resources providing spectral libraries are summarized and tools presented that extend experimental spectral libraries by simulating spectra. Finally, spectrum clustering algorithms are discussed that utilize the same spectrum-to-spectrum matching algorithms as spectral library search engines and allow novel methods to analyse proteomics data.

  15. Influence of the InGaAs/(Al)GaAs quantum-well heterostructure growth features on the spectral characteristics of laser diodes

    SciTech Connect

    Duraev, V P; Marmalyuk, A A; Padalitsa, A A; Petrovskii, A V; Sabitov, D R; Sumarokov, M A; Sukharev, A V

    2008-02-28

    An abrupt decrease in the lasing wavelength was observed with increasing the pump current in injection semiconductor lasers emitting in the spectral range from 1050 to 1080 nm. The consideration of segregation phenomena, which strongly distort the nominal profile of the quantum-well active region of InGaAs/(Al)GaAs laser heterostructures during their growth, made it possible to calculate the energy spectrum of these heterostructures, which agrees with the results of spectral measurements. The energy levels of dimensional quantisation involved in lasing with decreasing the laser wavelength are identified based on the calculation. (lasers. amplifiers)

  16. Spectrally nonselective holographic objective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wardosanidze, Zurab V.

    1991-10-01

    Reflection holograms and holographic optical elements fabricated by the Denisyuk method are spectrally selective. In certain applications there may be a need for the development of holographic structures that are not selective in terms of the spectral composition of the reconstructing light. This paper describes the possibility of creating spectral nonselective optical elements and reflection holograms on a dichromate gelatin layer (DGL). The essential condition for achieving nonselectivity in this case is a strong absorption of actinic radiation in the initial emulsion layer conditioning the strongly damping character of the summary field in thickness.

  17. Spectral Observations of Two Galaxies with UV Excess

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karapetyan, E. L.

    2016-09-01

    Spectral observations of two galaxies with UV-excess from Kazarian's list are reported. The spectra were obtained with the 2.6-m telescope at the Byurakan Observatory using the SCORPIO spectral camera. A grism was used to obtain spectra in the wavelength interval λλ7420-3920 Å. The spectra of Kaz 151, Kaz 153 have Sy2 features. In the spectra of the Kaz 151, and Kaz 153 galaxies absorption lines are observed along with high excitation emission lines such as HeI λ5876 Å and HeII λ4686 Å.

  18. Black Hole Scattering via Spectral Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clemente, P. C. M.; de Oliveira, H. P.; Rodrigues, E. L.

    2013-12-01

    We present an alternative method to solve the problem of scattering by a black hole by adapting the spectral code originally developed by Boyd (Comp Phys 4:83, 1990). In order to show the effectiveness and versatility of the algorithm, we solve the scattering by Schwarzschild, standard acoustic, and charged black holes. We recover the partial and total absorption cross sections and, in the case of charged black holes, the conversion factor of eletromagnetic and gravitational waves. We also study the exponential decay of the reflection coefficient, which is a general feature of any scattering problem.

  19. Differential optical absorption spectrometer for measurement of tropospheric pollutants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evangelisti, F.; Baroncelli, A.; Bonasoni, P.; Giovanelli, G.; Ravegnani, F.

    1995-05-01

    Our institute has recently developed a differential optical absorption spectrometry system called the gas analyzer spectrometer correlating optical absorption differences (GASCOAD), which features as a detector a linear image sensor that uses an artificial light source for long-path tropospheric-pollution monitoring. The GASCOAD, its method of eliminating interference from background sky light, and subsequent spectral analysis are reported and discussed. The spectrometer was used from 7 to 22 February 1993 in Milan, a heavily polluted metropolitan area, to measure the concentrations of SO2, NO2, O3, and HNO2 averaged over a 1.7-km horizontal light path. The findings are reported and briefly discussed.

  20. Feature-based and statistical methods for analyzing the Deepwater Horizon oil spill with AVIRIS imagery

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rand, R.S.; Clark, R.N.; Livo, K.E.

    2011-01-01

    The Deepwater Horizon oil spill covered a very large geographical area in the Gulf of Mexico creating potentially serious environmental impacts on both marine life and the coastal shorelines. Knowing the oil's areal extent and thickness as well as denoting different categories of the oil's physical state is important for assessing these impacts. High spectral resolution data in hyperspectral imagery (HSI) sensors such as Airborne Visible and Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) provide a valuable source of information that can be used for analysis by semi-automatic methods for tracking an oil spill's areal extent, oil thickness, and oil categories. However, the spectral behavior of oil in water is inherently a highly non-linear and variable phenomenon that changes depending on oil thickness and oil/water ratios. For certain oil thicknesses there are well-defined absorption features, whereas for very thin films sometimes there are almost no observable features. Feature-based imaging spectroscopy methods are particularly effective at classifying materials that exhibit specific well-defined spectral absorption features. Statistical methods are effective at classifying materials with spectra that exhibit a considerable amount of variability and that do not necessarily exhibit well-defined spectral absorption features. This study investigates feature-based and statistical methods for analyzing oil spills using hyperspectral imagery. The appropriate use of each approach is investigated and a combined feature-based and statistical method is proposed. ?? 2011 SPIE.

  1. Spectral reflectance measurements in the genus Sphagnum

    SciTech Connect

    Vogelmann, J.E.; Moss, D.M. . Complex Systems/Institute for the Study of Earth Oceans and Space)

    1993-09-01

    High-spectral resolution reflectance data were acquired in the laboratory for four species of Sphagnum (peat moss): S. cuspidatum, S. papillosum, S. fallax, and S. capillifolium. All four species had different spectral reflectance properties. Species differences were noted especially in the visible portion of the spectrum from 0.45 [mu]m to 0.70 [mu]m; some major spectral differences were also noted in the near infrared. Samples analyzed had much lower reflectance than typical green vegetation in the midinfrared region of the spectrum from 1.30 [mu]m to 2.40 [mu]m. In addition, Sphagnum had very pronounced water-related absorption features at about 1.00m [mu] and 1.20 [mu]m, unlike typical green vegetation. Spectral data acquired as samples were dried indicated large spectral increases with increasing dryness, especially in the midinfrared. Simulated Landsat Thematic Mapper 5/4 band ratio data were linearly related to the log of wet weight/dry weight. Reflectance from vegetation in the midinfrared region of the electromagnetic spectrum is strongly modified by water content. Peatlands are major sources of global methane and it has been found that methane evolution within these peatlands is related to water status within these peatlands is related to water status within the wetland. It may be possible to indirectly estimate methane flux using remote sensing data.

  2. Evolution of macromolecular dust: Far-ultraviolet spectral dust extinction and gas absorption of stellar light as measured with the Hopkins Ultraviolet Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buss, Richard H., Jr.; Allen, Marsha; McCandliss, Stephan; Kruk, Jeffrey; Liu, Ji-Cheng; Brown, Tom

    1994-08-01

    From far-ultraviolet (FUV) spectra of B stars taken with the Hopkins Ultraviolet Telescope (HUT) and Voyager space observations, we determine the far-ultraviolet extinction by Galactic dust and hydrogen absorption in the local spiral-arm clouds towards HD 25443 (B0.5 III), HD 37903 (B1.5 V), and HD 200775 (B3 Ve). We find that the (n (H)) = 1.3 cu cm and number fraction (f = 0.31) of H atoms in molecular hydrogen relative to the total hydrogen indicates a mostly diffuse medium toward HD 25443. We also determine f = 0.56 for the gas in the photodissociation region (PDR) in front of HD 37903 and f approximately equals 0.36 for the HD 200775 PDR. The inferred ratios of N(H2)/I(CO) = 2.4 to 2.8 x 1020/K(km/s)/sq cm for cool gas in dark clouds agree with previous canonical estimates of N(H2)/I(CO) = 2 to 3 x 1020/K(km/s)/sq cm and support the use of the ratio for determining masses of molecular clouds. We find that the shape and strength of the HD 25443 FUV extinction is the same as a diffuse-medium mean extinction (Rnu = 2.95) extrapolated from mid-UV wavelengths (normal). The HD 37903 FUV extinction through a bright H2 photodissociation region is higher than a mean FUV extinction(Rnu = 4.11), as is the HD 200775 extinction. Another star from the literature rho Oph, probes the dense medium and exhibits an FUV extinction of normal mean strength (Rnu = 4.55) but steeper shape. The normal FUV -extinction of HD 25443 implies that the small FUV-extinction dust in the diffuse medium forms in p art from larger grains as the grains shatter under shocks. The normal strength of the rho Oph FUV-extinction indicates that the minute dust condenses onto or coagulates into larger grains in the dense medium. The high extinction deviation of the HD 37903 PDR (and HD 200775 PDR) shows that FUV radiation from hot stars with Teff approximately equals 20,000 to 23,000 K in PDRs can evaporate some of the FUV-extinction dust from grain surfaces. In contrast, previously measured extinctions

  3. Evolution of macromolecular dust: Far-ultraviolet spectral dust extinction and gas absorption of stellar light as measured with the Hopkins Ultraviolet Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buss, Richard H., Jr.; Allen, Marsha; Mccandliss, Stephan; Kruk, Jeffrey; Liu, Ji-Cheng; Brown, Tom

    1994-01-01

    From far-ultraviolet (FUV) spectra of B stars taken with the Hopkins Ultraviolet Telescope (HUT) and Voyager space observations, we determine the far-ultraviolet extinction by Galactic dust and hydrogen absorption in the local spiral-arm clouds towards HD 25443 (B0.5 III), HD 37903 (B1.5 V), and HD 200775 (B3 Ve). We find that the (n (H)) = 1.3 cu cm and number fraction (f = 0.31) of H atoms in molecular hydrogen relative to the total hydrogen indicates a mostly diffuse medium toward HD 25443. We also determine f = 0.56 for the gas in the photodissociation region (PDR) in front of HD 37903 and f approximately equals 0.36 for the HD 200775 PDR. The inferred ratios of N(H2)/I(CO) = 2.4 to 2.8 x 10(exp 20)/K(km/s)/sq cm for cool gas in dark clouds agree with previous canonical estimates of N(H2)/I(CO) = 2 to 3 x 10(exp 20)/K(km/s)/sq cm and support the use of the ratio for determining masses of molecular clouds. We find that the shape and strength of the HD 25443 FUV extinction is the same as a diffuse-medium mean extinction (R(sub nu) = 2.95) extrapolated from mid-UV wavelengths (normal). The HD 37903 FUV extinction through a bright H2 photodissociation region is higher than a mean FUV extinction(R(sub nu) = 4.11), as is the HD 200775 extinction. Another star from the literature rho Oph, probes the dense medium and exhibits an FUV extinction of normal mean strength (R(sub nu) = 4.55) but steeper shape. The normal FUV -extinction of HD 25443 implies that the small FUV-extinction dust in the diffuse medium forms in p art from larger grains as the grains shatter under shocks. The normal strength of the rho Oph FUV-extinction indicates that the minute dust condenses onto or coagulates into larger grains in the dense medium. The high extinction deviation of the HD 37903 PDR (and HD 200775 PDR) shows that FUV radiation from hot stars with T(sub eff) approximately equals 20,000 to 23,000 K in PDRs can evaporate some of the FUV-extinction dust from grain surfaces. In

  4. Full Spectral Resolution Data Generation from the Cross-track Infrared Sounder on S-NPP at NOAA and its Use to Investigate Uncertainty in Methane Absorption Band Near 7.66 µm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, X.; Peischl, J.; Ryerson, T. B.; Sasakawa, M.; Han, Y.; Chen, Y.; Wang, L.; Tremblay, D.; Jin, X.; Zhou, L.; Liu, Q.; Weng, F.; Machida, T.

    2015-12-01

    The Cross-track Infrared Sounder (CrIS) on Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership Satellite (S-NPP) is a Fourier transform spectrometer for atmospheric sounding. CrIS on S-NPP started to provide measurements in 1305 channels in its normal mode since its launch on November 2011 to December 4, 2014, and after that it was switched to the full spectral resolution (FSR) mode, in which the spectral resolutions are 0.625 cm-1 in all the MWIR (1210-1750 cm-1), SWIR (2155-2550 cm-1) and the LWIR bands (650-1095 cm-1) with a total of 2211 channels. While the NOAA operational Sensor Data Record (SDR) processing (IDPS) continues to produce the normal resolution SDRs by truncating full spectrum RDR data, NOAA STAR started to process the FSR SDRs data since December 4, 2014 to present, and the data is being delivered through NOAA STAR website (ftp://ftp2.star.nesdis.noaa.gov/smcd/xxiong/). The current FSR processing algorithm was developed on basis of the CrIS Algorithm Development Library (ADL), and is the baseline of J-1 CrIS SDR algorithm. One major benefit to use the FSR data is to improve the retrieval of atmospheric trace gases, such as CH4, CO and CO2 . From our previous studies to retrieve CH4 using Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) and Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI), it was found the uncertainty in the CH4 absorption band is up to 1-2%. So, in this study we computed the radiance using the community radiative transfer model (CRTM) and line-by-line model, with the inputs of "truth" of atmospheric temperature and moisture profiles from ECMWF model (and/or RAOB sounding) and CH4 profiles from in-situ aircraft measurements, then convoluted with the response function of CrIS. The difference between the simultaed radiance and the collocated CrIS FSR data is used to exam the uncertainty in these strong absorption channels.Through the improved fitting to the transmittance in these channels, it is expected to improve the retrieval of CH4 using CrIS on S

  5. SPECTRAL REFLECTANCE OF THE CARBONATITE COMPLEXES AT MOUNTAIN PASS, CALIFORNIA AND IRON HILL, COLORADO.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rowan, Lawrence C.; Collins, Williams; Kingston, Marguerite J.; Crowley, James K.

    1984-01-01

    This paper describes the distinctive spectral reflectance of these two carbonatites and their related rocks, and also discusses the possible use of spectral reflectance measurements for exploring carbonatites. Laboratory spectra recorded in the 0. 4-2. 5 micrometer wavelength range showed absorption features discussed in the abstract. High spectral-resolution airborne radiance measurements were obtained in the 0. 4-1. 0 micrometer and 2. 0-2. 5 micrometer wavelength ranges. Preliminary analysis of the airborne measurements at Mountain Pass showed neodymium-absorption bands over the mining area and in several undisturbed areas of carbonatite. The results indicate that spectral reflectance measurements may provide a rapid laboratory method for determining the presence of anomalously high rare earth (RE) content, and possibly, for estimating relative amounts of certain RE elements.

  6. Spectrally resolved eclipse maps of the accretion disk in UX Ursae Majoris

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rutten, Rene G. M.; Dhillon, V. S.; Horne, Keith; Kuulkers, E.; Van Paradijs, J.

    1993-01-01

    An effort is made to observationally constrain accretion disks on the basis of light curves from the eclipsing cataclysmic variable UX Ursae Majoris, reconstructing the spectral energy distribution across the face of an accretion disk. The spectral resolution obtained suffices to reveal not only the radial dependence of absorption and emission line features within the disk, but also the spectral details of the bright spot that is formed where the accretion stream from the secondary star collides with the disk. The importance of such constraints for theoretical models is noted.

  7. Absorption mode FTICR mass spectrometry imaging.

    PubMed

    Smith, Donald F; Kilgour, David P A; Konijnenburg, Marco; O'Connor, Peter B; Heeren, Ron M A

    2013-12-01

    Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry offers the highest mass resolving power for molecular imaging experiments. This high mass resolving power ensures that closely spaced peaks at the same nominal mass are resolved for proper image generation. Typically higher magnetic fields are used to increase mass resolving power. However, a gain in mass resolving power can also be realized by phase correction of the data for absorption mode display. In addition to mass resolving power, absorption mode offers higher mass accuracy and signal-to-noise ratio over the conventional magnitude mode. Here, we present the first use of absorption mode for Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry imaging. The Autophaser algorithm is used to phase correct each spectrum (pixel) in the image, and then, these parameters are used by the Chameleon work-flow based data processing software to generate absorption mode "Datacubes" for image and spectral viewing. Absorption mode reveals new mass and spatial features that are not resolved in magnitude mode and results in improved selected ion image contrast.

  8. Comment on "A geometric representation of spectral and temporal vowel features: quantification of vowel overlap in three linguistic varieties" [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 119, 2334-2350 (2006)].

    PubMed

    Morrison, Geoffrey Stewart

    2008-01-01

    In a recent paper by Wassink [J. Acoust Soc. Am. 119, 2334-2350 (2006)] the spectral overlap assessment metric (SOAM) was proposed for quantifying the degree of acoustic overlap between vowels. The SOAM does not fully take account of probability densities. An alternative metric is proposed which is based on quadratic discriminant analysis and takes account of probability densities in the form of a posteriori probabilities. Unlike the SOAM, the a posteriori probability-based metric allows for a direct comparison of vowel overlaps calculated using different numbers of dimensions, e.g., three dimensions (Fl, F2, and duration) versus two dimensions (Fl and F2).

  9. Cationic vacancies and anomalous spectral-weight transfer in Ti1-xTaxO2 thin films studied via polarization-dependent near-edge x-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Dong-Chen; Barman, Arkajit Roy; Debbichi, Lamjed; Dhar, S.; Santoso, Iman; Asmara, Teguh Citra; Omer, Humair; Yang, Kesong; Krüger, Peter; Wee, Andrew T. S.; Venkatesan, T.; Rusydi, Andrivo

    2013-06-01

    We report the electronic structures of Ta-doped anatase TiO2 thin films grown by pulsed laser deposition (PLD) with varying magnetization using a combination of first-principles calculations and near-edge x-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy. The roles of Ta doping and Ti vacancies are clarified, and the observed room-temperature ferromagnetism is attributed to the localized magnetic moments at Ti vacancy sites ferromagnetically ordered by electron charge carriers. O K-edge spectra exhibit significant polarization dependence which is discussed and supported by first-principles calculations in relation to both the crystal symmetry and the formation of defects. In particular, anomalous spectral-weight transfer across the entire O K edge for the ferromagnetic thin film is associated exclusively with the occurrence of Ti vacancies and strong correlation effects, which result in the enhancement of the direct interaction between oxygen sites and of the anisotropy of the eg-pσ hybridizations in the out-of-plane component. Our results show that O K-edge NEXAFS spectra can provide reliable experimental probes capable of revealing cationic defects that are intimately related to the ferromagnetism in transition metal oxides.

  10. Comparative 4f-4f absorption spectral study for the interactions of Nd(III) with some amino acids: Preliminary thermodynamics and kinetic studies of interaction of Nd(III):glycine with Ca(II)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moaienla, T.; Bendangsenla, N.; David Singh, Th.; Sumitra, Ch.; Rajmuhon Singh, N.; Indira Devi, M.

    2012-02-01

    Spectral analysis of Nd(III) complexes with some amino acids viz.; glycine, L-alanine, L-phenylalanine and L-aspartic acid in the presence and absence of Ca 2+ was carried out in some organic solvents; CH 3OH, CH 3CN, DMF and dioxane using comparative absorption spectra of 4f-4f transitions. The study was carried out by evaluating various energy interaction parameters like Slator-Condon ( Fk), Lande factor ( ξ4f), nephelauxetic ratio ( β), bonding parameter ( b1/2), percent-covalency ( δ) by applying partial and multiple regression analysis. The values of oscillator strength ( Pobs) and Judd-Ofelt electric dipole intensity parameter Tλ ( λ = 2, 4, 6) for different 4f-4f transitions have been calculated. On analysis of the variation of the various energy interaction parameters as well as the changes in the oscillator strength ( Pobs) and Tλ values, reveal the mode of binding with the different ligands. Kinetic studies for the complexation of Nd(III):glycine:Ca(II) have also been discussed at different temperatures in DMF medium and from it the values of activation energy ( Ea) and thermodynamic parameters like Δ H°, Δ S° and Δ G° for the complexation are evaluated.

  11. Galileo 243 Ida System Spectral Observations Revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Granahan, J. C.

    2001-11-01

    On August 28, 1993 the Galileo spacecraft encountered the asteroid 243 Ida and its moon Dactyl. A variety of observations of this asteroid system were collected including visible wavelength (0.4-1.0 microns) imagery with the Solid State Imager (SSI) instrument and infrared wavelength (0.7-5.2 microns) with the Near Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (NIMS). A new analysis of these observations has been conducted using band area analysis, band center measurement, and spectral similarity value measurement using the BAE SYSTEMS Hyperspectral Tool Kit. This abstract reports the initial results of this research effort. These data indicate that 243 Ida has an orthopyroxene/(orthopyroxene + olivine) ratio of about 0.28, a value consistent with that of LL chondrites. The ratio does not vary significantly for the portions of 243 Ida observed by the Galileo NIMS instrument. 243 Ida is a SIV subtype of the S type asteroid population. At least two spectral units were identified in a combined SSI and NIMS spectral data set. The primary difference is the amount of red slope present in the two spectral units. A larger red slope corresponds to regions of 243 Ida where ejecta from the crater Azurra are present. This evidence suggests that impacts enhance the red components of the 243 Ida spectrum, perhaps enhancing the NiFe content. Dactyl has a relatively deep absorption centered approximately at 0.97 microns with no significant two micron absorption features. This is a possible indicator of clinopyroxene and suggests partial melting or fractional crystallization processes occurred on Dactyl. Dactyl appears to be an SII subtype S type asteroid and is spectrally different from 243 Ida. Dactyl may have been produced by partial melting within the Koronis parent body while the 243 Ida region escaped such igneous processing. This study was made possible through support from NASA's Planetary Geology and Geophysics program.

  12. CAN GROUND-BASED TELESCOPES DETECT THE OXYGEN 1.27 {mu}m ABSORPTION FEATURE AS A BIOMARKER IN EXOPLANETS?

    SciTech Connect

    Kawahara, Hajime; Matsuo, Taro; Takami, Michihiro; Fujii, Yuka; Kotani, Takayuki; Tamura, Motohide; Murakami, Naoshi; Guyon, Olivier

    2012-10-10

    The oxygen absorption line imprinted in the scattered light from Earth-like planets has been considered the most promising metabolic biomarker for exolife. We examine the feasibility of the detection of the 1.27 {mu}m oxygen band from habitable exoplanets, in particular, around late-type stars observed with a future instrument on a 30 m class ground-based telescope. We analyzed the night airglow around 1.27 {mu}m with the IRCS/echelle spectrometer on Subaru and found that the strong telluric emission from atmospheric oxygen molecules declines by an order of magnitude by midnight. By compiling nearby star catalogs combined with the sky background model, we estimate the detectability of the oxygen absorption band from an Earth twin, if it exists, around nearby stars. We find that the most dominant source of photon noise for the oxygen 1.27 {mu}m band detection comes from the night airglow if the contribution of the stellar point-spread function (PSF) halo is suppressed enough to detect the planet. We conclude that the future detectors, for which the detection contrast is limited by photon noise, can detect the oxygen 1.27 {mu}m absorption band of Earth twins for {approx}50 candidates of the late-type star. This paper demonstrates the importance of deploying a small inner working angle as an efficient coronagraph and extreme adaptive optics on extremely large telescopes, and clearly shows that doing so will enable the study of potentially habitable planets.

  13. SWOC: Spectral Wavelength Optimization Code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruchti, G. R.

    2016-06-01

    SWOC (Spectral Wavelength Optimization Code) determines the wavelength ranges that provide the optimal amount of information to achieve the required science goals for a spectroscopic study. It computes a figure-of-merit for different spectral configurations using a user-defined list of spectral features, and, utilizing a set of flux-calibrated spectra, determines the spectral regions showing the largest differences among the spectra.

  14. UV laser long-path absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dorn, Hans-Peter; Brauers, Theo; Neuroth, Rudolf

    1994-01-01

    Long path Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (DOAS) using a picosecond UV laser as a light source was developed in our institute. Tropospheric OH radicals are measured by their rotational absorption lines around 308 nm. The spectra are obtained using a high resolution spectrograph. The detection system has been improved over the formerly used optomechanical scanning device by application of a photodiode array which increased the observed spectral range by a factor of 6 and which utilizes the light much more effectively leading to a considerable reduction of the measurement time. This technique provides direct measurements of OH because the signal is given by the product of the absorption coefficient and the OH concentration along the light path according to Lambert-Beers law. No calibration is needed. Since the integrated absorption coefficient is well known the accuracy of the measurement essentially depends on the extent to which the OH absorption pattern can be detected in the spectra. No interference by self generated OH radicals in the detection lightpath has been observed. The large bandwidth (greater than 0.15 nm) and the high spectral resolution (1.5 pm) allows absolute determination of interferences by other trace gas absorptions. The measurement error is directly accessible from the absorption-signal to baseline-noise ratio in the spectra. The applicability of the method strongly depends on visibility. Elevated concentrations of aerosols lead to considerable attenuation of the laser light which reduces the S/N-ratio. In the moderately polluted air of Julich, where we performed a number of OH measurement spectra. In addition absorption features of unidentified species were frequently detected. A quantitative deconvolution even of the known species is not easy to achieve and can leave residual structures in the spectra. Thus interferences usually increase the noise and deteriorate the OH detection sensitivity. Using diode arrays for sensitive

  15. CONFIRMATION OF ENHANCED DWARF-SENSITIVE ABSORPTION FEATURES IN THE SPECTRA OF MASSIVE ELLIPTICAL GALAXIES: FURTHER EVIDENCE FOR A NON-UNIVERSAL INITIAL MASS FUNCTION

    SciTech Connect

    Van Dokkum, Pieter G.; Conroy, Charlie

    2011-07-01

    We recently found that massive cluster elliptical galaxies have strong Na I {lambda}8183, 8195 and FeH {lambda}9916 Wing-Ford band absorption, indicating the presence of