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Sample records for absorption spectral measurements

  1. Plasma absorption evidence via chirped pulse spectral transmission measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Jedrkiewicz, Ottavia; Minardi, Stefano; Couairon, Arnaud; Jukna, Vytautas; Selva, Marco; Di Trapani, Paolo

    2015-06-08

    This work aims at highlighting the plasma generation dynamics and absorption when a Bessel beam propagates in glass. We developed a simple diagnostics allowing us to retrieve clear indications of the formation of the plasma in the material, thanks to transmission measurements in the angular and wavelength domains. This technique featured by the use of a single chirped pulse having the role of pump and probe simultaneously leads to results showing the plasma nonlinear absorption effect on the trailing part of the pulse, thanks to the spectral-temporal correspondence in the measured signal, which is also confirmed by numerical simulations.

  2. Experimental measurements of the spectral absorption coefficient of pure fused silica optical fibers.

    PubMed

    Moore, Travis J; Jones, Matthew R

    2015-02-20

    Knowledge of the spectral absorption coefficient of fused silica optical fibers is important in modeling heat transfer in the processes and applications in which these fibers are used. An experimental method used to measure the spectral absorption coefficient of optical fibers is presented. Radiative energy from a blackbody radiator set at different temperatures is directed through the optical fibers and into an FTIR spectrometer. Spectral instrument response functions are calculated for different fiber lengths. The ratios of the slopes of the instrument response functions for the different lengths of fibers are used to solve for the spectral absorption coefficient of the fibers. The spectral absorption coefficient of low OH pure fused silica optical fibers is measured between the wavelengths 1.5 and 2.5 μm. PMID:25968202

  3. Effect of differential spectral reflectance on DIAL measurements using topographic targets. [Differential Absorption Lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grant, W. B.

    1982-01-01

    Differential absorption lidar (DIAL) measurements of atmospheric gases and temperature made using topographic targets to provide the backscattered signal are subject to errors from the differential spectral reflectance of the target materials. The magnitude of this effect is estimated for a number of DIAL measurements reported in the literature. Calculations are presented for several topographic targets. In general the effect on a DIAL measurement increases directly with increasing wavelength and laser line separation, and inversely with differential absorption coefficient and distance to the target. The effect can be minimized by using tunable or isotope lasers to reduce the laser line separation or by using additional reference wavelengths to determine the surface differential spectral reflectance.

  4. [Measurement of Mole Ratio for Alkali Metal Mixture by Using Spectral Absorption Method].

    PubMed

    Zou, Sheng; Zhang, Hong; Chen, Yao; Chen, Xi-yuan

    2015-08-01

    The ratio of alkali metal mixture is one of the most important parameters in gauge head belonging to the ultra-sensitivity inertial measurement equipment, which is required to detect precisely. According to the feature that ratio of alkali metal is related to alkali metal vapor density, the theory of optical depth is used to detect the ratio of alkali metal in the present article. The result shows that the data got by the theory of optical depth compared with empirical formula differs at three orders of magnitude, which can't ensure the accuracy. By changing the data processing method, model between spectral absorption rate and temperature in cell is established. The temperature in alkali metal cell is calibrated by spectral absorption rate. The ratio of alkali metal atoms in the cell is analyzed by calculating the alkali density with empirical formula. The computational error is less than 10%. PMID:26672309

  5. High Spectral Resolution Lidar Measurements Using an I2 Absorption Filter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eloranta, E. W.; Piironen, P.

    1996-01-01

    The University of Wisconsin high spectral resolution lidar (HSRL) measures optical properties of the atmosphere by separating the Doppler-broadened molecular backscatter return from the unbroadened aerosol return. The HSRL was modified to use an I2 absorption cell The modified HSRL transmitter uses a continuously pumped, Q-switched, injection seeded, frequency doubled Nd:YAG laser operating at a 4 kHz pulse repetition rate. This laser is tunable over a 124 GHz frequency range by temperature tuning the seed laser under computer control.

  6. Absolute high spectral resolution measurements of surface solar radiation for detection of water vapour continuum absorption.

    PubMed

    Gardiner, T D; Coleman, M; Browning, H; Tallis, L; Ptashnik, I V; Shine, K P

    2012-06-13

    Solar-pointing Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy offers the capability to measure both the fine scale and broadband spectral structure of atmospheric transmission simultaneously across wide spectral regions. It is therefore suited to the study of both water vapour monomer and continuum absorption behaviours. However, in order to properly address this issue, it is necessary to radiatively calibrate the FTIR instrument response. A solar-pointing high-resolution FTIR spectrometer was deployed as part of the 'Continuum Absorption by Visible and Infrared radiation and its Atmospheric Relevance' (CAVIAR) consortium project. This paper describes the radiative calibration process using an ultra-high-temperature blackbody and the consideration of the related influence factors. The result is a radiatively calibrated measurement of the solar irradiation at the ground across the IR region from 2000 to 10 000 cm(-1) with an uncertainty of between 3.3 and 5.9 per cent. This measurement is shown to be in good general agreement with a radiative-transfer model. The results from the CAVIAR field measurements are being used in ongoing studies of atmospheric absorbers, in particular the water vapour continuum. PMID:22547234

  7. Collisional Induced Absorption (CIA) bands measured in the IR spectral range .

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stefani, S.; Piccioni, G.; Snels, M.; Adriani, A.; Grassi, D.

    In this work we present two experimental setup able to characterize the optical properties of gases, in particular CO_2 and H_2, at typically planetary conditions. The apparatus consists of a Fourier Transform InfraRed (FT-IT) interferometer able to work in a wide spectral range, from 350 to 25000 cm-1 (0.4 to 29 mu m ) with a relatively high spectral resolution, from 10 to 0.07 cm-1. Two dedicated gas cells have been integrated with the FT-IR. The first, called High Pressure High Temperature (HP-HT), can support pressures up to 300 bar, temperatures up to 300oC and is characterized by an optical path of 2 cm. The second one, a Multi Pass (MP) absorption gas cell, is designed to have a variable optical path, from 2.5 to 30 m, can be heated up to 200o and operate at pressures up to 10 bar. In this paper, measurements of Collision-Induced Absorption (CIA) bands in carbon dioxide and hydrogen recorded in the InfraRed spectral range will be presented. In principle, linear symmetric molecules such as CO_2 and H_2 possess no dipole moment, but, even when the pressure is only a few bar, we have observed the Collisional Induced Absorption (CIA) bands. This absorption results from a short-time collisional interaction between molecules. The band integrated intensity shows a quadratic dependence versus density opposed to the absorption by isolated molecules, which follows Beer's law \\citep{Beer's}. This behaviour suggests an absorption by pairs rather than by individual molecules. The bands integrated intensities show a linear dependence vs square density according to \\citep {CIA Shape} and \\citep{CIA posi}. For what concerns the H_2 CIA bands, a preliminary comparison between simulated data obtained with the model described in \\citep{CIA H2}and measured, shows a good agreement. These processes are very relevant in the dense atmospheres of planets, such as those of Venus and Jupiter and also in extrasolar planets. A detailed knowledge of these contributions is very

  8. Spectral fluorescence signature techniques and absorption measurements for continuous monitoring of biofuel-producing microalgae cultures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martín de la Cruz, M. C.; Gonzalez Vilas, L.; Yarovenko, N.; Spyrakos, E.; Torres Palenzuela, J. M.

    2013-08-01

    Biofuel production from microalgae can be both sustainable and economically viable. Particularly in the case of algal growth in wastewater an extra benefit is the removal or biotransformation of pollutants from these types of waters. A continuous monitoring system of the microalgae status and the concentration of different wastewater contaminants could be of great help in the biomass production and the water characterisation. In this study we present a system where spectral fluorescence signature (SFS) techniques are used along with absorption measurements to monitor microalgae cultures in wastewater and other mediums. This system aims to optimise the microalgae production for biofuel applications or other uses and was developed and tested in prototype indoor photo-bioreactors at the University of Vigo. SFS techniques were applied using the fluorescence analyser INSTAND-SCREENER developed by Laser Diagnostic Instruments AS. INSTAND-SCREENER permits wavelength scanning in two modes, one in UV and another in VIS. In parallel, it permits the on-line monitoring and rapid analysis of both water quality and phytoplankton status without prior treatment of the sample. Considering that different contaminants and microalgae features (density, status etc.) have different spectral signatures of fluorescence and absorption properties, it is possible to characterise them developing classification libraries. Several algorithms were used for the classification. The implementation of this system in an outdoor raceway reactor in a Spanish wastewater treatment plant is also discussed. This study was part of the Project EnerBioAlgae (http://www.enerbioalgae.com/), which was funded by the Interreg SUDOE and led by the University of Vigo.

  9. Methane Absorption Coefficients in the 750-940 nm region derived from Intracavity Laser Absorption Spectral Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Brien, J. J.

    2002-09-01

    The absorption spectrum of methane has been recorded in the visible to near-IR region using the intracavity laser spectroscopy technique. Spectra are recorded at high spectral resolution for narrow overlapping intervals in the region for room and 77 K temperature methane samples. After spectra are deconvolved for the instrument function, absorption coefficients are derived. These will be presented (750-940 nm for room temperature methane; 850-920 nm for 77 K methane) and compared with results reported by other workers. Future work in this area also will be indicated. Support from NASA's Planetary Atmospheres Program (NAG5-6091 and a Major Equipment Grant) is gratefully acknowledged.

  10. Measurement of the Spectral Absorption of Liquid Water in Melting Snow With an Imaging Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, Robert O.; Dozier, Jeff

    1995-01-01

    Melting of the snowpack is a critical parameter that drives aspects of the hydrology in regions of the Earth where snow accumulates seasonally. New techniques for measurement of snow melt over regional scales offer the potential to improve monitoring and modeling of snow-driven hydrological processes. In this paper we present the results of measuring the spectral absorption of liquid water in a melting snowpack with the Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS). AVIRIS data were acquired over Mammoth Mountain, in east central California on 21 May 1994 at 18:35 UTC. The air temperature at 2926 m on Mammoth Mountain at site A was measured at 15-minute intervals during the day preceding the AVIRIS data acquisition. At this elevation. the air temperature did not drop below freezing the night of the May 20 and had risen to 6 degrees Celsius by the time of the overflight on May 21. These temperature conditions support the presence of melting snow at the surface as the AVIRIS data were acquired.

  11. Measurement of the spectral absorption of liquid water in melting snow with an imaging spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, Robert O.; Dozier, Jeff

    1995-01-01

    Melting of the snowpack is a critical parameter that drives aspects of the hydrology in regions of the earth where snow accumulates seasonally. New techniques for measurement of snow melt over regional scales offer the potential to improve monitoring and modeling of snow-driven hydrological processes. We present the results of measuring the spectral absorption of liquid water in a melting snowpack with the Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS). AVIRIS data were acquired over Mammoth Mountain, in east central California on 21 May 1994 at 18:35 UTC. The air temperature at 2926 m on Mammoth Mountain at site A was measured at 15-minute intervals during the day preceding the AVIRIS data acquisition. At this elevation, the air temperature did not drop below freezing the night of May 20 and had risen to 6 degrees Celsius by the time of the overflight on May 21. These temperature conditions support the presence of melting snow at the surface as the AVIRIS data were acquired.

  12. Characterization of Cirrus Cloud Properties by Airborne Differential Absorption and High Spectral Resolution Lidar Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehret, G.; Gross, S.; Schäfler, A.; Wirth, M.; Fix, A.; Kiemle, C.

    2014-12-01

    Despite the large impact of cirrus clouds on the Earth's climate system, their effects are still only poorly understood. Our knowledge of the climate effect of cirrus clouds is mainly based on theoretical simulations using idealized cloud structure and microphysics, as well as radiative transfer approximations. To improve the representation of cirrus clouds in idealized simulations and circulation models, we need a better understanding of the micro- and macrophysical properties of cirrus clouds. Airborne lidar measurements provide two-dimensional information of the atmospheric structure, and are thus a suitable tool to study the fine-structure of cirrus clouds, as well as their macrophysical properties. Aerosol and water vapor was measured with the airborne high spectral resolution lidar (HSRL) and differential absorption lidar (DIAL) system WALES of the German Aerospace Center (DLR), Oberpfaffenhofen. The system was operated onboard the German high altitude and long range research aircraft HALO during the Next-generation remote sensing for validation studies campaign (NARVAL) in December 2013 over the tropical North-Atlantic and in January 2014 out of Iceland, and during the ML-Cirrus campaign in March/April 2014 over Central and Southern Europe. During NARVAL 18 flights with more than 110 flight hours were performed providing a large number of cirrus cloud overpasses with combined lidar and radar instrumentation. In the framework of the ML-Cirrus campaign 17 flights with more than 80 flight hours were performed to characterize cirrus cloud properties in different environmental conditions using a combination of remote sensing (e.g. lidar) and in-situ observations. In our presentation we will give a general overview of the campaigns and of the WALES measurements. We will show first results from the aerosol and water vapor lidar measurements with focus on the structure of cirrus clouds, the humidity distribution within and outside the cloud and on the impact of the

  13. Anomalous atmospheric spectral features between 300 and 310 nm interpreted in light or new ozone absorption coefficient measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcpeters, R. D.; Bass, A. M.

    1982-01-01

    Real structure is revealed, by an analysis of continuous scan data from the solar backscattered UV instrument on Nimbus 7, in the backscattered atmospheric albedo region between 300 and 310 nm where spectral anomalies have been reported in ground-based observation. The spectral anomalies are explainable as structure at the 1-5% level in the ozone absorption coefficient, as measured by Bass and Paur (1981). The new absorption coefficient measurements are judged to approach the 1%-level of accuracy in atmospheric radiation calculation, which should resolve discrepancies between different Dobson wavelength pairs and between different instruments and permit the more accurate analysis of such second-order effects as NO emission, SO2 absorption in polluted atmospheres, and Raman scattering effects.

  14. Analytical algorithm to determine the spherical particle size distribution from spectral absorption measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Jian-Qi; Li, Jiangnan

    2015-11-01

    A modified anomalous diffraction theory (MADT) by including the effects of reflection and refraction is proposed. With respect to MADT, an analytical technique for retrieval of spherical particle size distribution (PSD), based on absorption was developed. Also, an MADT transform pair between the size distribution and the absorption spectrum was constructed. This provides a new tool to study the related particle optical properties. By Gaver-Stehfest inversion method, the derived complex-inversion formula is finally converted into the new real-inversion formula so that the measured absorption data can be applied directly. The inversion experiments show that the use of extended precision instead of double precision arithmetic can produce more reliable results at the expense of CPU time. The effects of complex refractive index on retrieval of PSD were examined. Also it was found that an appropriate reduction of the truncation number with the smoothing technique improved the anti-noise ability for the algorithm.

  15. Quantitative filter technique measurements of spectral light absorption by aquatic particles using a portable integrating cavity absorption meter (QFT-ICAM).

    PubMed

    Röttgers, Rüdiger; Doxaran, David; Dupouy, Cecile

    2016-01-25

    The accurate determination of light absorption coefficients of particles in water, especially in very oligotrophic oceanic areas, is still a challenging task. Concentrating aquatic particles on a glass fiber filter and using the Quantitative Filter Technique (QFT) is a common practice. Its routine application is limited by the necessary use of high performance spectrophotometers, distinct problems induced by the strong scattering of the filters and artifacts induced by freezing and storing samples. Measurements of the sample inside a large integrating sphere reduce scattering effects and direct field measurements avoid artifacts due to sample preservation. A small, portable, Integrating Cavity Absorption Meter setup (QFT-ICAM) is presented, that allows rapid measurements of a sample filter. The measurement technique takes into account artifacts due to chlorophyll-a fluorescence. The QFT-ICAM is shown to be highly comparable to similar measurements in laboratory spectrophotometers, in terms of accuracy, precision, and path length amplification effects. No spectral artifacts were observed when compared to measurement of samples in suspension, whereas freezing and storing of sample filters induced small losses of water-soluble pigments (probably phycoerythrins). Remaining problems in determining the particulate absorption coefficient with the QFT-ICAM are strong sample-to-sample variations of the path length amplification, as well as fluorescence by pigments that is emitted in a different spectral region than that of chlorophyll-a. PMID:26832563

  16. Spectral Signature of Column Solar Radiation Absorption During the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Enhanced Shortwave Experiment (ARESE). Revision

    SciTech Connect

    O'Hirok, William; Gautier, Catherine; Ricchiazzi, Paul

    1999-11-01

    Spectral and broadband shortwave radiative flux data obtained from the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Enhanced Shortwave Experiment (ARESE) are compared with 3-D radiative transfer computations for the cloud field of October 30, 1995. Because the absorption of broadband solar radiation in the cloudy atmosphere deduced from observations and modeled differ by 135 Wm{sup -2}, we performed a consistency analysis using spectral observations and the model to integrate for wavelengths between the spectral observations. To match spectral measurements, aerosols need a reduction in both single scattering albedo (from 0.938 to 0.82) and asymmetry factor (from 0.67 to 0.61), and cloud droplets require a three-fold increase in co-albedo. Even after modifying the model inputs and microphysics the difference in total broadband absorption is still of the order of 75Wm{sup -2}. Finally, an unexplained absorber centered around 1.06 {micro}m appears in the comparison that is much too large to be explained by dimers.

  17. Effect of radiometric errors on accuracy of temperature-profile measurement by spectral scanning using absorption-emission pyrometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buchele, D. R.

    1972-01-01

    The spectral-scanning method may be used to determine the temperature profile of a jet- or rocket-engine exhaust stream by measurements of gas radiation and transmittance, at two or more wavelengths. A single, fixed line of sight is used, using immobile radiators outside of the gas stream, and there is no interference with the flow. At least two sets of measurements are made, each set consisting of the conventional three radiometric measurements of absorption-emission pyrometry, but each set is taken over a different spectral interval that gives different weight to the radiation from a different portion of the optical path. Thereby, discrimination is obtained with respect to location along the path. A given radiometric error causes an error in computed temperatures. The ratio between temperature error and radiometric error depends on profile shape, path length, temperature level, and strength of line absorption, and the absorption coefficient and its temperature dependency. These influence the choice of wavelengths, for any given gas. Conditions for minimum temperature error are derived. Numerical results are presented for a two-wavelength measurement on a family of profiles that may be expected in a practical case of hydrogen-oxygen combustion. Under favorable conditions, the fractional error in temperature approximates the fractional error in radiant-flux measurement.

  18. Broadband cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopy in the ultraviolet spectral region for measurements of nitrogen dioxide and formaldehyde

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Washenfelder, R. A.; Attwood, A. R.; Flores, J. M.; Zarzana, K. J.; Rudich, Y.; Brown, S. S.

    2016-01-01

    Formaldehyde (CH2O) is the most abundant aldehyde in the atmosphere, and it strongly affects photochemistry through its photolysis. We describe simultaneous measurements of CH2O and nitrogen dioxide (NO2) using broadband cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopy in the ultraviolet spectral region. The light source consists of a continuous-wave diode laser focused into a Xenon bulb to produce a plasma that emits high-intensity, broadband light. The plasma discharge is optically filtered and coupled into a 1 m optical cavity. The reflectivity of the cavity mirrors is 0.99930 ± 0.00003 (1- reflectivity = 700 ppm loss) at 338 nm, as determined from the known Rayleigh scattering of He and zero air. This mirror reflectivity corresponds to an effective path length of 1.43 km within the 1 m cell. We measure the cavity output over the 315-350 nm spectral region using a grating monochromator and charge-coupled device array detector. We use published reference spectra with spectral fitting software to simultaneously retrieve CH2O and NO2 concentrations. Independent measurements of NO2 standard additions by broadband cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopy and cavity ring-down spectroscopy agree within 2 % (slope for linear fit = 1.02 ± 0.03 with r2 = 0.998). Standard additions of CH2O measured by broadband cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopy and calculated based on flow dilution are also well correlated, with r2 = 0.9998. During constant mixed additions of NO2 and CH2O, the 30 s measurement precisions (1σ) of the current configuration were 140 and 210 pptv, respectively. The current 1 min detection limit for extinction measurements at 315-350 nm provides sufficient sensitivity for measurement of trace gases in laboratory experiments and ground-based field experiments. Additionally, the instrument provides highly accurate, spectroscopically based trace gas detection that may complement higher precision techniques based on non

  19. High-accuracy measurement of low-water-content in liquid using NIR spectral absorption method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Bao-Jin; Wan, Xu; Jin, Hong-Zhen; Zhao, Yong; Mao, He-Fa

    2005-01-01

    Water content measurement technologies are very important for quality inspection of food, medicine products, chemical products and many other industry fields. In recent years, requests for accurate low-water-content measurement in liquid are more and more exigent, and great interests have been shown from the research and experimental work. With the development and advancement of modern production and control technologies, more accurate water content technology is needed. In this paper, a novel experimental setup based on near-infrared (NIR) spectral technology and fiber-optic sensor (OFS) is presented. It has a good measurement accuracy about -/+ 0.01%, which is better, to our knowledge, than most other methods published until now. It has a high measurement resolution of 0.001% in the measurement range from zero to 0.05% for water-in-alcohol measurement, and the water-in-oil measurement is carried out as well. In addition, the advantages of this method also include pollution-free to the measured liquid, fast measurement and so on.

  20. Precise methane absorption measurements in the 1.64 μm spectral region for the MERLIN mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delahaye, T.; Maxwell, S. E.; Reed, Z. D.; Lin, H.; Hodges, J. T.; Sung, K.; Devi, V. M.; Warneke, T.; Spietz, P.; Tran, H.

    2016-06-01

    In this article we describe a high-precision laboratory measurement targeting the R(6) manifold of the 2ν3 band of 12CH4. High-fidelity modeling of this absorption spectrum for atmospheric temperature and pressure conditions will be required by the Franco-German, Methane Remote Sensing LIDAR (MERLIN) space mission for retrievals of atmospheric methane. The analysis uses the Hartmann-Tran profile for modeling line shape and also includes line-mixing effects. To this end, six high-resolution and high signal-to-noise ratio absorption spectra of air-broadened methane were recorded using a frequency-stabilized cavity ring-down spectroscopy apparatus. Sample conditions corresponded to room temperature and spanned total sample pressures of 40 hPa-1013 hPa with methane molar fractions between 1 µmol mol-1 and 12 µmol mol-1. All spectroscopic model parameters were simultaneously adjusted in a multispectrum nonlinear least squares fit to the six measured spectra. Comparison of the fitted model to the measured spectra reveals the ability to calculate the room temperature, methane absorption coefficient to better than 0.1% at the online position of the MERLIN mission. This is the first time that such fidelity has been reached in modeling methane absorption in the investigated spectral region, fulfilling the accuracy requirements of the MERLIN mission. We also found excellent agreement when comparing the present results with measurements obtained over different pressure conditions and using other laboratory techniques. Finally, we also evaluated the impact of these new spectral parameters on atmospheric transmissions spectra calculations.

  1. Spectral Absorption Properties of Atmospheric Aerosols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bergstrom, R. W.; Pilewskie, P.; Russell, P. B.; Redemann, J.; Bond, T. C.; Quinn, P. K.; Sierau, B.

    2007-01-01

    We have determined the solar spectral absorption optical depth of atmospheric aerosols for specific case studies during several field programs (three cases have been reported previously; two are new results). We combined airborne measurements of the solar net radiant flux density and the aerosol optical depth with a detailed radiative transfer model for all but one of the cases. The field programs (SAFARI 2000, ACE Asia, PRIDE, TARFOX, INTEX-A) contained aerosols representing the major absorbing aerosol types: pollution, biomass burning, desert dust and mixtures. In all cases the spectral absorption optical depth decreases with wavelength and can be approximated with a power-law wavelength dependence (Absorption Angstrom Exponent or AAE). We compare our results with other recent spectral absorption measurements and attempt to briefly summarize the state of knowledge of aerosol absorption spectra in the atmosphere. We discuss the limitations in using the AAE for calculating the solar absorption. We also discuss the resulting spectral single scattering albedo for these cases.

  2. A critical review of measurements of water vapor absorption in the 840 to 1100 cm(-1) spectral region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grant, William B.

    1987-01-01

    A set of eleven measurements of the water vapor continuum absorption in the 840 to 1100 sq cm spectral region is reviewed and compared with spectral models maintained by the Air Force Geophysics Laboratory. The measurements were made in four different ways: spectrometer with a White cell, CO2 laser with a White cell, CO2 laser with a spectrophone, and broadband radiation source over a long atmospheric path. Where possible, the data were selected at a water vapor partial pressure of ten torr buffered to 760 torr with N2 or synthetic air and a temperature of between 296 and 300 K. The intercomparison of the data leads to several observations and conclusions. First, there are four sets of laboratory data taken with nitrogen as the buffer gas which generally agree well mutually and with AFGL's HITRAN code. Second, there is one set of laboratory data that shows that using air as the buffer gas gives a few percent decrease in the water vapor continuum compared with using nitrogen as the buffer gas. Third, the atmospheric long-path measurements for water vapor partial pressure below about 12 torr are roughly grouped within 20 percent of the HITRAN values. Fourth, there are three sets of spectrophone data for water vapor in synthetic air which are significantly higher than any of the other measurements. This discrepancy is attributed to the effects of impurity gases in the cell.

  3. Measurements of mesospheric water vapour, aerosols and temperatures with the Spectral Absorption Line Imager (SALI-AT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shepherd, M. G.; Mullins, M.; Brown, S.; Sargoytchev, S. I.

    2001-08-01

    Water vapour concentration is one of the most important, yet one of the least known quantities of the mesosphere. Knowledge of water vapour concentration is the key to understanding many mesospheric processes, including the one that is primary focus of our investigation, mesospheric clouds (MC). The processes of formation and occurrence parameters of MC constitute an interesting problem in their own right, but recently evidence has been provided which suggests that they are a critical indicator of atmospheric change. The aim of the SALI-AT experiment is to make simultaneous (although not strictly collocated) measurements of water vapour, aerosols and temperature in the mesosphere and the mesopause region under twilight condition in the presence of mesospheric clouds. The water vapour will be measured in the regime of solar occultation utilizing a water vapour absorption band at 936 nm wavelength employing the SALI (Spectral Absorption Line Imager) instrument concept. A three-channel zenith photometer, AT-3, with wavelengths of 385 nm, 525 nm, and 1040 nm will measure Mie and Rayleigh scattering giving both mesospheric temperature profiles and the particle size distribution. Both instruments are small, low cost and low mass. It is envisioned that the SALI-AT experiment be flown on a small rocket - the Improved Orion/Hotel payload configuration, from the Andoya Rocket range, Norway. Alternatively the instrument can be flown as a "passenger" on larger rocket carrying other experiments. In either case flight costs are relatively low. Some performance simulations are presented showing that the instrument we have designed will be sufficiently sensitive to measure water vapor in concentrations that are expected at the summer mesopause, about 85 km height.

  4. In Situ Measurements of Aerosol Mass Concentration and Spectral Absorption at Three Location in and Around Mexico City

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaudhry, Z.; Martins, V.; Li, Z.

    2006-12-01

    As a result of population growth and increasing industrialization, air pollution in heavily populated urban areas is one of the central environmental problems of the century. As a part of the MILAGRO (Megacity Initiative: Local and Global Research Observations) study, Nuclepore filters were collected in two size ranges (PM10 and PM2.5) at 12 hour intervals at three location in Mexico during March, 2006. Sampling stations were located at the Instituto Mexicano del Petroleo (T0), at the Rancho La Bisnago in the State of Hidalgo (T2) and along the Gulf Coast in Tampico (Tam). Each filter was analyzed for mass concentration, aerosol scattering and absorption efficiencies. Mass concentrations at T0 ranged from 47 to 179 μg/m3 for PM10 with an average concentration of 96 μg/m3, and from 20 to 93 μg/m3 for PM2.5 with an average concentration of 41 μg/m3. Mass concentrations at T2 ranged from 12 to 154 μg/m3 for PM10 with an average concentration of 51 μg/m3, and from 7 to 50 μg/m3 for PM2.5 with an average concentration of 25 μg/m3. Mass concentrations at Tam ranged from 34 to 80 μg/m3 for PM10 with an average concentration of 52 μg/m3, and from 8 to 23 μg/m3 for PM2.5 with an average concentration of 13 μg/m3. While some of the extreme values are likely linked to local emissions, regional air pollution episodes also played important roles. Each of the sampling stations experienced a unique atmospheric condition. The site at T0 was influenced by urban air pollution and dust storms, the site at T2 was significantly less affected by air pollution but more affected by regional dust storms and local dust devils while Tam was influenced by air pollution, dust storms and the natural marine environment. The spectral mass absorption efficiency was measured from 350 to 2500 nm and shows large differences between the absorption properties of soil dust, black carbon, and organic aerosols. The strong spectral differences observed can be related to differences in

  5. Airborne Differential Absorption and High Spectral Resolution Lidar Measurements for Cirrus Cloud Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gross, Silke; Schaefler, Andreas; Wirth, Martin; Fix, Andreas

    2016-06-01

    Aerosol and water vapor measurements were performed with the lidar system WALES of the German Aerospace Center (DLR) onboard the German research aircraft G550-HALO during the HALO Techno-Mission in October and November 2010 and during the ML-Cirrus mission in March and April 2014 over Central Europe and the North Atlantic region. Curtains composed of lidar profiles beneath the aircraft show the water vapor mixing ratio and the backscatter ratio. Temperature data from ECMWF model analysis are used to calculate the relative humidity above ice (RHi) in the 2-D field along the flight track to study the RHi distribution inside and outside of cirrus clouds at different stages of cloud evolution.

  6. SPECTRAL RELATIVE ABSORPTION DIFFERENCE METHOD

    SciTech Connect

    Salaymeh, S.

    2010-06-17

    When analyzing field data, the uncertainty in the background continuum emission produces the majority of error in the final gamma-source analysis. The background emission typically dominates an observed spectrum in terms of counts and is highly variable spatially and temporally. The majority of the spectral shape of the background continuum is produced by combinations of cosmic rays, {sup 40}K, {sup 235}U, and {sup 220}Rn, and the continuum is similar in shape to the 15%-20% level for most field observations. However, the goal of spectroscopy analysis is to pick up subtle peaks (<%5) upon this large background. Because the continuum is falling off as energy increases, peak detection algorithms must first define the background surrounding the peak. This definition is difficult when the range of background shapes is considered. The full spectral template matching algorithms are heavily weighted to solving for the background continuum as it produces significant counts over much of the energy range. The most appropriate background mitigation technique is to take a separate background observation without the source of interest. But, it is frequently not possible to record a background observation in the exact location before (or after) a source has been detected. Thus, one uses approximate backgrounds that rely on spatially nearby locations or similar environments. Since the error in many field observations is dominated by the background, a technique that is less sensitive to the background would be quite beneficial. We report the result of an initial investigation into a novel observation scheme for gamma-emission detection in high background environments. Employing low resolution, NaI, detectors, we examine the different between the direct emission and the 'spectral-shadow' that the gamma emission produces when passed through a thin absorber. For this detection scheme to be competitive, it is required to count and analyze individual gamma-events. We describe the

  7. Frequency-domain method for measuring spectral properties in multiple-scattering media: methemoglobin absorption spectrum in a tissuelike phantom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fishkin, Joshua B.; So, Peter T. C.; Cerussi, Albert E.; Gratton, Enrico; Fantini, Sergio; Franceschini, Maria Angela

    1995-03-01

    We have measured the optical absorption and scattering coefficient spectra of a multiple-scattering medium (i.e., a biological tissue-simulating phantom comprising a lipid colloid) containing methemoglobin by using frequency-domain techniques. The methemoglobin absorption spectrum determined in the multiple-scattering medium is in excellent agreement with a corrected methemoglobin absorption spectrum obtained from a steady-state spectrophotometer measurement of the optical density of a minimally scattering medium. The determination of the corrected methemoglobin absorption spectrum takes into account the scattering from impurities in the methemoglobin solution containing no lipid colloid. Frequency-domain techniques allow for the separation of the absorbing from the scattering properties of multiple-scattering media, and these techniques thus provide an absolute

  8. Collisional Induced Absorption (CIA) bands of CO2 and H2 measured in the IR spectral range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stefani, S.; Piccioni, G.; Snels, M.; Adriani, A.; Grassi, D.

    2015-10-01

    In this paper we present the results on the Collisional Induced Absorption (CIA) bands of CO2 and H2 measured employing two different experimental setup. Each of them allows us to reproduce typical planetary conditions, at a pressure and temperature from 1 up to 50 bar and from 298 up to 500 K respectively. A detailed study on the temperature dependence of the CO2 CIA absorption bands will be presented.

  9. Wavelength-resolved optical extinction measurements of aerosols using broad-band cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopy over the spectral range of 445-480 nm.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Weixiong; Dong, Meili; Chen, Weidong; Gu, Xuejun; Hu, Changjin; Gao, Xiaoming; Huang, Wei; Zhang, Weijun

    2013-02-19

    Despite the significant progress in the measurements of aerosol extinction and absorption using spectroscopy approaches such as cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS) and photoacoustic spectroscopy (PAS), the widely used single-wavelength instruments may suffer from the interferences of gases absorption present in the real environment. A second instrument for simultaneous measurement of absorbing gases is required to characterize the effect of light extinction resulted from gases absorption. We present in this paper the development of a blue light-emitting diode (LED)-based incoherent broad-band cavity-enhanced spectroscopy (IBBCEAS) approach for broad-band measurements of wavelength-resolved aerosol extinction over the spectral range of 445-480 nm. This method also allows for simultaneous measurement of trace gases absorption present in the air sample using the same instrument. On the basis of the measured wavelength-dependent aerosol extinction cross section, the real part of the refractive index (RI) can be directly retrieved in a case where the RI does not vary strongly with the wavelength over the relevant spectral region. Laboratory-generated monodispersed aerosols, polystyrene latex spheres (PSL) and ammonium sulfate (AS), were employed for validation of the RI determination by IBBCEAS measurements. On the basis of a Mie scattering model, the real parts of the aerosol RI were retrieved from the measured wavelength-resolved extinction cross sections for both aerosol samples, which are in good agreement with the reported values. The developed IBBCEAS instrument was deployed for simultaneous measurements of aerosol extinction coefficient and NO(2) concentration in ambient air in a suburban site during two representative days. PMID:23320530

  10. Spectral dependence of aerosol light absorption over the Amazon Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rizzo, L. V.; Correia, A. L.; Artaxo, P.; Procópio, A. S.; Andreae, M. O.

    2011-09-01

    In this study, we examine the spectral dependence of aerosol absorption at different sites and seasons in the Amazon Basin. The analysis is based on measurements performed during three intensive field experiments at a pasture site (Fazenda Nossa Senhora, Rondônia) and at a primary forest site (Cuieiras Reserve, Amazonas), from 1999 to 2004. Aerosol absorption spectra were measured using two Aethalometers: a 7-wavelength Aethalometer (AE30) that covers the visible (VIS) to near-infrared (NIR) spectral range, and a 2-wavelength Aethalometer (AE20) that measures absorption in the UV and in the NIR. As a consequence of biomass burning emissions, about 10 times greater absorption values were observed in the dry season in comparison to the wet season. Power law expressions were fitted to the measurements in order to derive the absorption Ångström exponent, defined as the negative slope of absorption versus wavelength in a log-log plot. At the pasture site, about 70 % of the absorption Ångström exponents fell between 1.5 and 2.5 during the dry season, indicating that biomass burning aerosols have a stronger spectral dependence than soot carbon particles. Ångström exponents decreased from the dry to the wet season, in agreement with the shift from biomass burning aerosols, predominant in the fine mode, to biogenic and dust aerosols, predominant in the coarse mode. The lowest absorption Ångström exponents (90 % of data below 1.5) were observed at the forest site during the dry season. Also, results indicate that low absorption coefficients were associated with low Ångström exponents. This finding suggests that biogenic aerosols from Amazonia have a weaker spectral dependence for absorption than biomass burning aerosols, contradicting our expectations of biogenic particles behaving as brown carbon. In a first order assessment, results indicate a small (<1 %) effect of variations in absorption Ångström exponents on 24-h aerosol forcings, at least in the spectral

  11. Spectral dependence of aerosol light absorption over the Amazon Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rizzo, L. V.; Correia, A. L.; Artaxo, P.; Procópio, A. S.; Andreae, M. O.

    2011-04-01

    In this study, we examine the spectral dependence of aerosol absorption at different sites and seasons in the Amazon Basin. The analysis is based on measurements performed during three intensive field experiments at a pasture site (Fazenda Nossa Senhora, Rondônia) and at a primary forest site (Cuieiras Reserve, Amazonas), from 1999 to 2004. Aerosol absorption spectra were measured using two Aethalometers: a 7-wavelength Aethalometer (AE30) that covers the visible (VIS) to near-infrared (NIR) spectral range, and a 2-wavelength Aethalometer (AE20) that measures absorption in the UV and in the visible. As a consequence of biomass burning emissions, about 10 times greater absorption values were observed in the dry season in comparison to the wet season. Power law expressions were fitted to the measurements in order to derive the Ångström exponent for absorption, defined as the negative slope of absorption vs. wavelength in a log-log plot. At the pasture site, about 70% of the Ångström exponents fell between 1.5 and 2.5 during the dry season, indicating that biomass burning aerosols have a stronger spectral dependence than soot carbon particles. Ångström exponents decreased from the dry to the wet season, in agreement with the shift from biomass burning aerosols, predominant in the fine mode, to biogenic and dust aerosols, predominant in the coarse mode. The lowest Ångström exponents (90% of data below 1.5) were observed at the forest site during the dry season. Also, results indicate that low absorption coefficients were associated with Ångström exponents below 1.0. This finding suggests that biogenic aerosols from Amazonia may have a weak spectral dependence for absorption, contradicting our expectations of biogenic particles behaving as brown carbon. Nevertheless, additional measurements should be taken in the future, to provide a complete picture of biogenic aerosol absorption spectral characteristics from different seasons and geographic locations. The

  12. Photovoltaic spectral responsivity measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Emery, K.; Dunlavy, D.; Field, H.; Moriarty, T.

    1998-09-01

    This paper discusses the various elemental random and nonrandom error sources in typical spectral responsivity measurement systems. The authors focus specifically on the filter and grating monochrometer-based spectral responsivity measurement systems used by the Photovoltaic (PV) performance characterization team at NREL. A variety of subtle measurement errors can occur that arise from a finite photo-current response time, bandwidth of the monochromatic light, waveform of the monochromatic light, and spatial uniformity of the monochromatic and bias lights; the errors depend on the light source, PV technology, and measurement system. The quantum efficiency can be a function of he voltage bias, light bias level, and, for some structures, the spectral content of the bias light or location on the PV device. This paper compares the advantages and problems associated with semiconductor-detector-based calibrations and pyroelectric-detector-based calibrations. Different current-to-voltage conversion and ac photo-current detection strategies employed at NREL are compared and contrasted.

  13. Optical absorption measurement system

    DOEpatents

    Draggoo, Vaughn G.; Morton, Richard G.; Sawicki, Richard H.; Bissinger, Horst D.

    1989-01-01

    The system of the present invention contemplates a non-intrusive method for measuring the temperature rise of optical elements under high laser power optical loading to determine the absorption coefficient. The method comprises irradiating the optical element with a high average power laser beam, viewing the optical element with an infrared camera to determine the temperature across the optical element and calculating the absorption of the optical element from the temperature.

  14. Characterization of Spectral Absorption Properties of Aerosols Using Satellite Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Torres, O.; Jethva, H.; Bhartia, P. K.; Ahn, C.

    2012-01-01

    The wavelength-dependence of aerosol absorption optical depth (AAOD) is generally represented in terms of the Angstrom Absorption Exponent (AAE), a parameter that describes the dependence of AAOD with wavelength. The AAE parameter is closely related to aerosol composition. Black carbon (BC) containing aerosols yield AAE values near unity whereas Organic carbon (OC) aerosol particles are associated with values larger than 2. Even larger AAE values have been reported for desert dust aerosol particles. Knowledge of spectral AAOD is necessary for the calculation of direct radiative forcing effect of aerosols and for inferring aerosol composition. We have developed a satellitebased method of determining the spectral AAOD of absorbing aerosols. The technique uses high spectral resolution measurements of upwelling radiation from scenes where absorbing aerosols lie above clouds as indicated by the UV Aerosol Index. For those conditions, the satellite measured reflectance (rho lambda) is approximately given by Beer's law rho lambda = rho (sub 0 lambda) e (exp -mtau (sub abs lambda)) where rho(sub 0 lambda) is the cloud reflectance, m is the geometric slant path and tau (sub abs lambda) is the spectral AAOD. The rho (sub 0 lambda) term is determined by means of radiative transfer calculations using as input the cloud optical depth derived as described in Torres et al. [JAS, 2012] that accounts for the effects of aerosol absorption. In the second step, corrections for molecular and aerosol scattering effects are applied to the cloud reflectance term, and the spectral AAOD is then derived by inverting the equation above. The proposed technique will be discussed in detail and application results will be presented. The technique can be easily applied to hyper-spectral satellite measurements that include UV such as OMI, GOME and SCIAMACHY, or to multi-spectral visible measurements by other sensors provided that the aerosol-above-cloud events are easily identified.

  15. A wide spectral range photoacoustic aerosol absorption spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Haisch, C; Menzenbach, P; Bladt, H; Niessner, R

    2012-11-01

    A photoacoustic spectrometer for the measurement of aerosol absorption spectra, based on the excitation of a pulsed nanosecond optical parametrical oscillator (OPO), will be introduced. This spectrometer is working at ambient pressure and can be used to detect and characterize different classes of aerosols. The spectrometer features a spectral range of 410 to 2500 nm and a sensitivity of 2.5 × 10(-7) m(-1) at 550 nm. A full characterization of the system in the visible spectral range is demonstrated, and the potential of the system for near IR measurement is discussed. In the example of different kinds of soot particles, the performance of the spectrometer was assessed. As we demonstrate, it is possible to determine a specific optical absorption per particle by a combination of the new spectrometer with an aerosol particle counter. PMID:23035870

  16. Aerosol Absorption Measurements in MILAGRO.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaffney, J. S.; Marley, N. A.; Arnott, W. P.; Paredes-Miranda, L.; Barnard, J. C.

    2007-12-01

    During the month of March 2006, a number of instruments were used to determine the absorption characteristics of aerosols found in the Mexico City Megacity and nearby Valley of Mexico. These measurements were taken as part of the Department of Energy's Megacity Aerosol Experiment - Mexico City (MAX-Mex) that was carried out in collaboration with the Megacity Interactions: Local and Global Research Observations (MILAGRO) campaign. MILAGRO was a joint effort between the DOE, NSF, NASA, and Mexican agencies aimed at understanding the impacts of a megacity on the urban and regional scale. A super-site was operated at the Instituto Mexicano de Petroleo in Mexico City (designated T-0) and at the Universidad Technologica de Tecamac (designated T-1) that was located about 35 km to the north east of the T-0 site in the State of Mexico. A third site was located at a private rancho in the State of Hidalgo approximately another 35 km to the northeast (designated T-2). Aerosol absorption measurements were taken in real time using a number of instruments at the T-0 and T-1 sites. These included a seven wavelength aethalometer, a multi-angle absorption photometer (MAAP), and a photo-acoustic spectrometer. Aerosol absorption was also derived from spectral radiometers including a multi-filter rotating band spectral radiometer (MFRSR). The results clearly indicate that there is significant aerosol absorption by the aerosols in the Mexico City megacity region. The absorption can lead to single scattering albedo reduction leading to values below 0.5 under some circumstances. The absorption is also found to deviate from that expected for a "well-behaved" soot anticipated from diesel engine emissions, i.e. from a simple 1/lambda wavelength dependence for absorption. Indeed, enhanced absorption is seen in the region of 300-450 nm in many cases, particularly in the afternoon periods indicating that secondary organic aerosols are contributing to the aerosol absorption. This is likely due

  17. A High Spectral Resolution Lidar Based on Absorption Filter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Piironen, Paivi

    1996-01-01

    A High Spectral Resolution Lidar (HSRL) that uses an iodine absorption filter and a tunable, narrow bandwidth Nd:YAG laser is demonstrated. The iodine absorption filter provides better performance than the Fabry-Perot etalon that it replaces. This study presents an instrument design that can be used a the basis for a design of a simple and robust lidar for the measurement of the optical properties of the atmosphere. The HSRL provides calibrated measurements of the optical properties of the atmospheric aerosols. These observations include measurements of aerosol backscatter cross sections, optical depth, backscatter phase function depolarization, and multiple scattering. The errors in the HSRL data are discussed and the effects of different errors on the measured optical parameters are shown.

  18. Vegetation species composition and canopy architecture information expressed in leaf water absorption measured in the 1000 nm and 2200 spectral region by an imaging spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, Robert O.; Roberts, Dar A.

    1995-01-01

    Plant species composition and plant architectural attributes are critical parameters required for the measuring, monitoring, and modeling of terrestrial ecosystems. Remote sensing is commonly cited as an important tool for deriving vegetation properties at an appropriate scale for ecosystem studies, ranging from local to regional and even synoptic scales. Classical approaches rely on vegetation indices such as the normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) to estimate biophysical parameters such as leaf area index or intercepted photosynthetically active radiation (IPAR). Another approach is to apply a variety of classification schemes to map vegetation and thus extrapolate fine-scale information about specific sites to larger areas of similar composition. Imaging spectrometry provides additional information that is not obtainable through broad-band sensors and that may provide improved inputs both to direct biophysical estimates as well as classification schemes. Some of this capability has been demonstrated through improved discrimination of vegetation, estimates of canopy biochemistry, and liquid water estimates from vegetation. We investigate further the potential of leaf water absorption estimated from Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) data as a means for discriminating vegetation types and deriving canopy architectural information. We expand our analysis to incorporate liquid water estimates from two spectral regions, the 1000-nm region and the 2200-nm region. The study was conducted in the vicinity of Jasper Ridge, California, which is located on the San Francisco peninsula to the west of the Stanford University campus. AVIRIS data were acquired over Jasper Ridge, CA, on June 2, 1992, at 19:31 UTC. Spectra from three sites in this image were analyzed. These data are from an area of healthy grass, oak woodland, and redwood forest, respectively. For these analyses, the AVIRIS-measured upwelling radiance spectra for the entire Jasper

  19. CCN Spectral Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Hudson, James G.

    2009-02-27

    Detailed aircraft measurements were made of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) spectra associated with extensive cloud systems off the central California coast in the July 2005 MASE project. These measurements include the wide supersaturation (S) range (2-0.01%) that is important for these polluted stratus clouds. Concentrations were usually characteristic of continental/anthropogenic air masses. The most notable feature was the consistently higher concentrations above the clouds than below. CCN measurements are so important because they provide a link between atmospheric chemistry and cloud-climate effects, which are the largest climate uncertainty. Extensive comparisons throughout the eleven flights between two CCN spectrometers operated at different but overlapping S ranges displayed the precision and accuracy of these difficult spectral determinations. There are enough channels of resolution in these instruments to provide differential spectra, which produce more rigorous and precise comparisons than traditional cumulative presentations of CCN concentrations. Differential spectra are also more revealing than cumulative spectra. Only one of the eleven flights exhibited typical maritime concentrations. Average below cloud concentrations over the two hours furthest from the coast for the 8 flights with low polluted stratus was 614?233 at 1% S, 149?60 at 0.1% S and 57?33 at 0.04% S cm-3. Immediately above cloud average concentrations were respectively 74%, 55%, and 18% higher. Concentration variability among those 8 flights was a factor of two. Variability within each flight excluding distances close to the coast ranged from 15-56% at 1% S. However, CN and probably CCN concentrations sometimes varied by less than 1% over distances of more than a km. Volatility and size-critical S measurements indicated that the air masses were very polluted throughout MASE. The aerosol above the clouds was more polluted than the below cloud aerosol. These high CCN concentrations from

  20. [Spectral calibration for space-borne differential optical absorption spectrometer].

    PubMed

    Zhou, Hai-Jin; Liu, Wen-Qing; Si, Fu-Qi; Zhao, Min-Jie; Jiang, Yu; Xue, Hui

    2012-11-01

    Space-borne differential optical absorption spectrometer is used for remote sensing of atmospheric trace gas global distribution. This instrument acquires high accuracy UV/Vis radiation scattered or reflected by air or earth surface, and can monitor distribution and variation of trace gases based on differential optical absorption spectrum algorithm. Spectral calibration is the premise and base of quantification of remote sensing data of the instrument, and the precision of calibration directly decides the level of development and application of the instrument. Considering the characteristic of large field, wide wavelength range, high spatial and spectral resolution of the space-borne differential optical absorption spectrometer, a spectral calibration method is presented, a calibration device was built, the equation of spectral calibration was calculated through peak searching and regression analysis, and finally the full field spectral calibration of the instrument was realized. The precision of spectral calibration was verified with Fraunhofer lines of solar light. PMID:23387142

  1. OH measurement by laser light absorption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perner, D.

    1986-01-01

    Since the first attempt to measure atmospheric hydroxyl radicals by optical absorption in 1975 (Perner et al., 1976) this method has been continuously developed further and its major obstacles and limitations are known today. The laser beam needs to be expanded in order to reduce the beam divergence. At the same time the energy density of the laser beam which produces OH via ozone photolysis is reduced to such an extent that the self-produced OH concentration ranges well below the atmospheric value. Atmospheric absorptions should be observed over a wide spectral range so that not only the OH radicals are properly identified by several rotational lines but their absorption can be corrected for interfering absorptions from other air constituents as SO2, CH2O, CS2, etc., which can be identified in a wide spectral range with more confidence. Air turbulence demands fast spectral scanning or probing on and off the absorption line. Energy requirements should be kept small in field operations. In the experiment frequency doubled dye laser pulses at 308 nm are produced. The picosecond light pulses are expected to show a smooth profile (light intensity against wavelength) which will be broadened to the required spectral width according to the uncertainty principle. The pump laser will be an optoacoustically modulated Nd:YAG laser.

  2. Determination of the in-flight spectral calibration of AVIRIS using atmospheric absorption features

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, Robert O.

    1995-01-01

    Spectral calibration of the Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) as data are acquired in flight is essential to quantitative analysis of the measured upwelling spectral radiance. In each spectrum measured by AVIRIS in flight, there are numerous atmospheric gas absorption bands that drive this requirement for accurate spectral calibration. If the surface and atmospheric properties are measured independently, these atmospheric absorption bands may be used to deduce the in-flight spectral calibration of an imaging spectrometer. Both the surface and atmospheric characteristics were measured for a calibration target during an in-flight calibration experiment held at Lunar Lake, Nevada on April 5, 1994. This paper uses upwelling spectral radiance predicted for the calibration target with the MODTRAN radiative transfer code to validate the spectral calibration of AVIRIS in flight.

  3. Validation of H2O Continuum Absorption Models in the Wave Number Range 180-600 cm-1 with Atmospheric Emitted Spectral Radiance Measured at the Antarctica Dome-C Site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liuzzi, Giuliano; Masiello, Guido; Serio, Carmine; Venafra, Sara; Blasi, Maria Grazia; Palchetti, Luca; Bianchini, Giovanni

    2014-06-01

    We present the results concerning the analysis of a set of atmospheric emitted (down welling) spectral radiance observations in the spectral range 180 to 1100 cm-1 acquired at the Dome-C site in Antarctica during an extensive field campaign in 2011-2012. The work has been mainly focused on retrieving and validating the coefficients of the foreign contribution to the water vapour continuum absorption, within a spectral range overlapping the water vapour rotational band. Retrievals have been performed by using a simultaneous physical retrieval procedure for atmospheric and spectroscopic parameters. Both day (summer) and night (winter) spectra have been used in our analysis. This new set of observations in the far infrared range has allowed us to extend validation and verification of state-of-the-art water vapour continuum absorption models down to 180 cm-1. The results show that discrepancies between measurements and models are less than 10% in the interval 350-590 cm-1, while they are slightly larger at wave numbers below 350 cm-1. Overall, our study shows a good consistency between observations and state-of-the-art models and gives evidence for the need of also adjusting line absorption as done in Delamere et al. (2010). Finally, it has been found that there is a good agreement between the coefficients retrieved using either summer or winter spectra, which are acquired in far different meteorological conditions.

  4. Multi-decade Measurements of the Long-Term Trends of Atmospheric Species by High-Spectral-Resolution Infrared Solar Absorption Spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rinsland, Curtis P.; Chiou, Linda; Goldman, Aaron; Hannigan, James W.

    2010-01-01

    Solar absorption spectra were recorded for the first time in 5 years with the McMath Fourier transform spectrometer at the US National solar Observatory on Kitt Peak in southern Arizona, USA (31.91 N latitude, 111.61 W longitude, 2.09 km altitude). The solar absorption spectra cover 750-1300 and 1850-5000 cm(sup -1) and were recorded on 20 days during March-June 2009. The measurements mark the continuation of a long-term record of atmospheric chemical composition measurements that have been used to quantify seasonal cycles and long-term trends of both tropospheric and stratospheric species from observations that began i 1977. Fits to the measured spectra have been performed, and they indicate the spectra obtained since return to operational status are nearly free of channeling and the instrument line shape function is well reproduced taking into account the measurement parameters. We report updated time series measurements of total columns for six atmospheric species and their analysis for seasonal cycles and long-term trends. An sn example, the time series fit shows a decrease in the annual increase rate i Montreal-Protocol-regulated chlorofluorocarbon CCL2F2 from 1.51 plus or minus 0.38% yr(sup -1) at the beginning of the time span to -1.54 plus or minus 1.28 yr(sup -1) at the end of the time span, 1 sigma, and hence provides evidence for the impact of those regulations on the trend.

  5. Cirrus cloud optical and microphysical property retrievals from eMAS during SEAC4RS using bi-spectral reflectance measurements within the 1.88 µm water vapor absorption band

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, Kerry; Platnick, Steven; Arnold, G. Thomas; Holz, Robert E.; Veglio, Paolo; Yorks, John; Wang, Chenxi

    2016-04-01

    Previous bi-spectral imager retrievals of cloud optical thickness (COT) and effective particle radius (CER) based on the Nakajima and King (1990) approach, such as those of the operational MODIS cloud optical property retrieval product (MOD06), have typically paired a non-absorbing visible or near-infrared wavelength, sensitive to COT, with an absorbing shortwave or mid-wave infrared wavelength sensitive to CER. However, in practice it is only necessary to select two spectral channels that exhibit a strong contrast in cloud particle absorption. Here it is shown, using eMAS observations obtained during NASA's SEAC4RS field campaign, that selecting two absorbing wavelength channels within the broader 1.88 µm water vapor absorption band, namely the 1.83 and 1.93 µm channels that have sufficient differences in ice crystal single scattering albedo, can yield COT and CER retrievals for thin to moderately thick single-layer cirrus that are reasonably consistent with other solar and IR imager-based and lidar-based retrievals. A distinct advantage of this channel selection for cirrus cloud retrievals is that the below-cloud water vapor absorption minimizes the surface contribution to measured cloudy top-of-atmosphere reflectance, in particular compared to the solar window channels used in heritage retrievals such as MOD06. This reduces retrieval uncertainty resulting from errors in the surface reflectance assumption and reduces the frequency of retrieval failures for thin cirrus clouds.

  6. Diagnostics of Carbon Nanotube Formation in a Laser Produced Plume: Spectroscopic in situ nanotube detection using spectral absorption and surface temperature measurements by black body emission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeBoer, Gary D.

    2005-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes hold great promise for material advancements in the areas of composites and electronics. The advancement of research in these areas is dependent upon the availability of carbon nanotubes to a broad spectrum of academic and industrial researchers. Although there has been much progress made in reducing the costs of carbon nanotubes and increasing the quality and purity of the products, an increase in demand for still less expensive and specific nanotubes types has also grown. This summer's work has involved two experiments that have been designed to further the understanding of the dynamics and chemical mechanisms of carbon nanotube formation. It is expected that a better understanding of the process of formation of nanotubes will aid current production designs and stimulate ideas for future production designs increasing the quantity, quality, and production control of carbon nanotubes. The first experiment involved the measurement of surface temperature of the target as a function of time with respect to the ablation lasers. A peak surface temperature of 5000 K was determined from spectral analysis of black body emission from the target surface. The surface temperature as a function of various changes in operating parameters was also obtained. This data is expected to aid the modeling of ablation and plume dynamics. The second experiment involved a time and spatial measurement of the spectrally resolved absorbance of the laser produced plume. This experiment explored the possibility of developing absorbance and fluorescence to detect carbon nanotubes during production. To attain control over the production of nanotubes with specific properties and reduce costs, a real time in situ diagnostics method would be very beneficial. Results from this summer's work indicate that detection of nanotubes during production may possibly be used for production feed back control.

  7. Inherent optical properties of the ocean: retrieval of the absorption coefficient of chromophoric dissolved organic matter from airborne laser spectral fluorescence measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoge, Frank E.; Vodacek, Anthony; Swift, Robert N.; Yungel, James K.; Blough, Neil V.

    1995-10-01

    The absorption coefficient of chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM) at 355 nm has been retrieved from airborne laser-induced and water Raman-normalized CDOM fluorescence. Four combined airborne and ship field experiments have demonstrated that (1) the airborne CDOM fluorescence-to--water Raman ratio is linearly related to concurrent quinine-sulfate-standardized CDOM shipboard fluorescence measurements over a wide range of water masses (coastal to blue water); (2) the vicarious calibration of the airborne fluorosensor in units traceable to a fluorescence standard can be established and then maintained over an extended time period by tungsten lamp calibration; (3) the vicariously calibrated airborne CDOM fluorescence-to-water Raman ratio can be directly applied to previously developed

  8. Automating spectral measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldstein, Fred T.

    2008-09-01

    This paper discusses the architecture of software utilized in spectroscopic measurements. As optical coatings become more sophisticated, there is mounting need to automate data acquisition (DAQ) from spectrophotometers. Such need is exacerbated when 100% inspection is required, ancillary devices are utilized, cost reduction is crucial, or security is vital. While instrument manufacturers normally provide point-and-click DAQ software, an application programming interface (API) may be missing. In such cases automation is impossible or expensive. An API is typically provided in libraries (*.dll, *.ocx) which may be embedded in user-developed applications. Users can thereby implement DAQ automation in several Windows languages. Another possibility, developed by FTG as an alternative to instrument manufacturers' software, is the ActiveX application (*.exe). ActiveX, a component of many Windows applications, provides means for programming and interoperability. This architecture permits a point-and-click program to act as automation client and server. Excel, for example, can control and be controlled by DAQ applications. Most importantly, ActiveX permits ancillary devices such as barcode readers and XY-stages to be easily and economically integrated into scanning procedures. Since an ActiveX application has its own user-interface, it can be independently tested. The ActiveX application then runs (visibly or invisibly) under DAQ software control. Automation capabilities are accessed via a built-in spectro-BASIC language with industry-standard (VBA-compatible) syntax. Supplementing ActiveX, spectro-BASIC also includes auxiliary serial port commands for interfacing programmable logic controllers (PLC). A typical application is automatic filter handling.

  9. Measurement Of Spectral Power Distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, J. R.

    1980-11-01

    The majority of spectroradiometers make measurements at a number of discrete wavelength settings spaced evenly across the spectrum. Many modern light sources such as fluorescent or metal halide lamps have complex line spectra which may not be properly evaluated by this method. An automated spectroradiometer system involving a non-stop spectral scan with continuous integration of the output signal from the detector is described. The method is designed to make accurate measurements of all types of spectral power distribution whether made up of lines or continuum or any mixture of the two.

  10. Guided-wave approaches to spectrally selective energy absorption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stegeman, G. I.; Burke, J. J.

    1987-01-01

    Results of experiments designed to demonstrate spectrally selective absorption in dielectric waveguides on semiconductor substrates are reported. These experiments were conducted with three waveguides formed by sputtering films of PSK2 glass onto silicon-oxide layers grown on silicon substrates. The three waveguide samples were studied at 633 and 532 nm. The samples differed only in the thickness of the silicon-oxide layer, specifically 256 nm, 506 nm, and 740 nm. Agreement between theoretical predictions and measurements of propagation constants (mode angles) of the six or seven modes supported by these samples was excellent. However, the loss measurements were inconclusive because of high scattering losses in the structures fabricated (in excess of 10 dB/cm). Theoretical calculations indicated that the power distribution among all the modes supported by these structures will reach its steady state value after a propagation length of only 1 mm. Accordingly, the measured loss rates were found to be almost independent of which mode was initially excited. The excellent agreement between theory and experiment leads to the conclusion that low loss waveguides confirm the predicted loss rates.

  11. Multivariate Analysis of Solar Spectral Irradiance Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pilewskie, P.; Rabbette, M.

    2001-01-01

    Principal component analysis is used to characterize approximately 7000 downwelling solar irradiance spectra retrieved at the Southern Great Plains site during an Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) shortwave intensive operating period. This analysis technique has proven to be very effective in reducing a large set of variables into a much smaller set of independent variables while retaining the information content. It is used to determine the minimum number of parameters necessary to characterize atmospheric spectral irradiance or the dimensionality of atmospheric variability. It was found that well over 99% of the spectral information was contained in the first six mutually orthogonal linear combinations of the observed variables (flux at various wavelengths). Rotation of the principal components was effective in separating various components by their independent physical influences. The majority of the variability in the downwelling solar irradiance (380-1000 nm) was explained by the following fundamental atmospheric parameters (in order of their importance): cloud scattering, water vapor absorption, molecular scattering, and ozone absorption. In contrast to what has been proposed as a resolution to a clear-sky absorption anomaly, no unexpected gaseous absorption signature was found in any of the significant components.

  12. Spectral absorption coefficients and imaginary parts of refractive indices of Saharan dust during SAMUM-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, T.; Schladitz, A.; Massling, A.; Kaaden, N.; Kandler, K.; Wiedensohler, A.

    2009-02-01

    ABSTRACT During the SAMUM-1 experiment, absorption coefficients and imaginary parts of refractive indices of mineral dust particles were investigated in southern Morocco. Main absorbing constituents of airborne samples were identified to be iron oxide and soot. Spectral absorption coefficients were measured using a spectral optical absorption photometer (SOAP) in the wavelength range from 300 to 800 nm with a resolution of 50 nm. A new method that accounts for a loading-dependent correction of fibre filter based absorption photometers, was developed. The imaginary part of the refractive index was determined using Mie calculations from 350 to 800 nm. The spectral absorption coefficient allowed a separation between dust and soot absorption. A correlation analysis showed that the dust absorption coefficient is correlated (R2 up to 0.55) with the particle number concentration for particle diameters larger than 0.5 μm, whereas the coefficient of determination R2 for smaller particles is below 0.1. Refractive indices were derived for both the total aerosol and a dust aerosol that was corrected for soot absorption. Average imaginary parts of refractive indices of the entire aerosol are 7.4 × 10-3, 3.4 × 10-3 and 2.0 × 10-3 at wavelengths of 450, 550 and 650 nm. After a correction for the soot absorption, imaginary parts of refractive indices are 5.1 × 10-3, 1.6 × 10-3 and 4.5 × 10-4.

  13. Absorption spectroscopy in the ultraviolet and visible spectral range of hexavalent chromium aqueous solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mignani, Anna G.; Spadoni, Lorenzo

    1999-09-01

    In order to demonstrate the possibility of performing direct absorption spectroscopy of Hexavalent Chromium aqueous solutions, absorption measurements were performed at the dual- beam spectrophotometer in the 250 - 850 nm spectral range, with 10 mm and 100 mm path lengths. Low concentration (26 - 520 (mu) g/l) (and high concentration (2.6 - 52 mg/l) solutions were analyzed, showing that it is possible to implement a basic instrumentation for risk condition monitoring and a more advanced instrumentation for quantitative measurements.

  14. Radar spectral measurements of vegetation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ulaby, F. T.; Moore, R. K.

    1973-01-01

    Spectral data of 4-8 GHz radar backscatter were gathered during the 1972 growing season at look angles between 0 and 70 deg and for all four possible polarization linear combinations. The data covers four crop types (corn, milo, alfalfa, and soybeans) and a wide range of soil moisture content. To insure statistical representation of the results, measurements were conducted over 128 fields corresponding to a total of about 40,000 data points. The use of spectral response signatures to separate different crop types and to separate healthy corn from blighted corn was investigated.

  15. Assessing multiple quality attributes of peaches using spectral absorption and scattering properties

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of this research was to measure the spectral absorption and reduced scattering coefficients of peaches, using a hyperspectral imaging-based spatially-resolved method, for maturity/quality assessment. A newly developed optical property measuring instrument was used for acquiring hypersp...

  16. Spectral response from blackbody measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, W. J.

    1981-07-01

    Far-infrared and submillimeter detector responsivity and spectral response measurements can be performed simultaneously by sweeping the temperature of a cooled blackbody. Such measurements yield n simultaneous linear equations for n blackbody temperatures. Matrix inversion solutions are observed to fail due to a matrix ill-conditioned for inversion. However, an unconditionally convergent iterative solution can be performed. Results for a gallium-doped germanium detector are described.

  17. Spectral effects on direct-insolation absorptance of five collector coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hotchkiss, G. B.; Simon, F. F.; Burmeister, L. C.

    1979-01-01

    Absorptances for direct insolation of black chrome, black nickel, copper oxide, and two black zinc conversion selective coatings were calculated for a number of typical solar spectrums. Measured spectral reflectances were used while the effects of atmospheric ozone density, turbidity, and air mass were incorporated in calculated direct solar spectrums. Absorptance variation for direct insolation was found to be of the order of 1 percent for a typical range of clear-sky atmospheric conditions.

  18. Multi-spectral optical absorption in substrate-free nanowire arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Junpeng; Chia, Andrew; Boulanger, Jonathan; LaPierre, Ray; Dhindsa, Navneet; Khodadad, Iman; Saini, Simarjeet

    2014-09-22

    A method is presented of fabricating gallium arsenide (GaAs) nanowire arrays of controlled diameter and period by reactive ion etching of a GaAs substrate containing an indium gallium arsenide (InGaP) etch stop layer, allowing the precise nanowire length to be controlled. The substrate is subsequently removed by selective etching, using the same InGaP etch stop layer, to create a substrate-free GaAs nanowire array. The optical absorptance of the nanowire array was then directly measured without absorption from a substrate. We directly observe absorptance spectra that can be tuned by the nanowire diameter, as explained with rigorous coupled wave analysis. These results illustrate strong optical absorption suitable for nanowire-based solar cells and multi-spectral absorption for wavelength discriminating photodetectors. The solar-weighted absorptance above the bandgap of GaAs was 94% for a nanowire surface coverage of only 15%.

  19. Spectral properties of molecular iodine in absorption cells filled to specified saturation pressure.

    PubMed

    Hrabina, Jan; Šarbort, Martin; Acef, Ouali; Burck, Frédéric Du; Chiodo, Nicola; Holá, Miroslava; Číp, Ondřej; Lazar, Josef

    2014-11-01

    We present the results of measurement and evaluation of spectral properties of iodine absorption cells filled at certain saturation pressure. A set of cells made of borosilicate glass instead of common fused silica was tested for their spectral properties in greater detail with special care for the long-term development of the absorption media purity. The results were compared with standard fused silica cells and the high quality of iodine was verified. A measurement method based on an approach relying on measurement of linewidth of the hyperfine transitions is proposed as a novel technique for iodine cell absorption media purity evaluation. A potential application in laser metrology of length is also discussed. PMID:25402909

  20. Spectral absorption coefficients of argon and silicon and spectral reflectivity of aluminum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krascella, N. L.

    1972-01-01

    A theoretical investigation was conducted to estimate the spectral properties of argon as a function of pressure, temperature, and wave number. The spectral characteristics of the argon buffer gas exert a strong influence on radiative energy transfer in the in-reactor test configuration of the nuclear light bulb engine. An existing computer program was modified and used to calculate the spectral absorption coefficients of argon at total pressures of 50, 100, 250, 500, 750 and 1000 atm in the temperature interval between 1000 and 30,000 K. At each pressure and temperature, spectral properties were calculated for forty-seven wave numbers in the interval between 1000 and 1,000,000 cm/1. Estimates of the spectral absorption coefficients of silicon were made as part of an evaluation of silicon vapor as a possible buffer-gas seeding agent for the reference nuclear light bulb engine. Existing cross-section data were used to calculate the spectral characteristics of silicon at twenty-four temperatures in the interval between 2000 and 10,000 K.

  1. Evolution of macromolecular dust: Far-ultraviolet spectral dust extinction and gas absorption of stellar light as measured with the Hopkins Ultraviolet Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buss, Richard H., Jr.; Allen, Marsha; Mccandliss, Stephan; Kruk, Jeffrey; Liu, Ji-Cheng; Brown, Tom

    1994-01-01

    From far-ultraviolet (FUV) spectra of B stars taken with the Hopkins Ultraviolet Telescope (HUT) and Voyager space observations, we determine the far-ultraviolet extinction by Galactic dust and hydrogen absorption in the local spiral-arm clouds towards HD 25443 (B0.5 III), HD 37903 (B1.5 V), and HD 200775 (B3 Ve). We find that the (n (H)) = 1.3 cu cm and number fraction (f = 0.31) of H atoms in molecular hydrogen relative to the total hydrogen indicates a mostly diffuse medium toward HD 25443. We also determine f = 0.56 for the gas in the photodissociation region (PDR) in front of HD 37903 and f approximately equals 0.36 for the HD 200775 PDR. The inferred ratios of N(H2)/I(CO) = 2.4 to 2.8 x 10(exp 20)/K(km/s)/sq cm for cool gas in dark clouds agree with previous canonical estimates of N(H2)/I(CO) = 2 to 3 x 10(exp 20)/K(km/s)/sq cm and support the use of the ratio for determining masses of molecular clouds. We find that the shape and strength of the HD 25443 FUV extinction is the same as a diffuse-medium mean extinction (R(sub nu) = 2.95) extrapolated from mid-UV wavelengths (normal). The HD 37903 FUV extinction through a bright H2 photodissociation region is higher than a mean FUV extinction(R(sub nu) = 4.11), as is the HD 200775 extinction. Another star from the literature rho Oph, probes the dense medium and exhibits an FUV extinction of normal mean strength (R(sub nu) = 4.55) but steeper shape. The normal FUV -extinction of HD 25443 implies that the small FUV-extinction dust in the diffuse medium forms in p art from larger grains as the grains shatter under shocks. The normal strength of the rho Oph FUV-extinction indicates that the minute dust condenses onto or coagulates into larger grains in the dense medium. The high extinction deviation of the HD 37903 PDR (and HD 200775 PDR) shows that FUV radiation from hot stars with T(sub eff) approximately equals 20,000 to 23,000 K in PDRs can evaporate some of the FUV-extinction dust from grain surfaces. In

  2. Spectral calibration of hyperspectral imagery using atmospheric absorption features.

    PubMed

    Guanter, Luis; Richter, Rudolf; Moreno, José

    2006-04-01

    One of the initial steps in the preprocessing of remote sensing data is the atmospheric correction of the at-sensor radiance images, i.e., radiances recorded at the sensor aperture. Apart from the accuracy in the estimation of the concentrations of the main atmospheric species, the retrieved surface reflectance is also influenced by the spectral calibration of the sensor, especially in those wavelengths mostly affected by gaseous absorptions. In particular, errors in the surface reflectance appear when a systematic shift in the nominal channel positions occurs. A method to assess the spectral calibration of hyperspectral imaging spectrometers from the acquired imagery is presented in this paper. The fundamental basis of the method is the calculation of the value of the spectral shift that minimizes the error in the estimates of surface reflectance. This is performed by an optimization procedure that minimizes the deviation between a surface reflectance spectrum and a smoothed one resulting from the application of a low-pass filter. A sensitivity analysis was performed using synthetic data generated with the MODTRAN4 radiative transfer code for several values of the spectral shift and the water vapor column content. The error detected in the retrieval is less than +/- 0.2 nm for spectral shifts smaller than 2 nm, and less than +/- 1.0 nm for extreme spectral shifts of 5 nm. A low sensitivity to uncertainties in the estimation of water vapor content was found, which reinforces the robustness of the algorithm. The method was successfully applied to data acquired by different hyperspectral sensors. PMID:16608005

  3. Spectral broadening of interacting pigments: polarized absorption by photosynthetic proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Somsen, O J; van Grondelle, R; van Amerongen, H

    1996-01-01

    Excitonic interaction between pigment molecules is largely responsible for the static and dynamic spectroscopic properties of photosynthetic pigment-proteins. This paper provides a new description of its effect on polarized absorption spectroscopy, in particular on circular dichroism (CD). We investigate excitonic spectra of finite width and use "spectral moments" to compare 1) inhomogeneously broadened excitonic spectra, 2) spectra that are (homogeneously broadened by vibrations or electron-phonon interaction, and 3) spectra that are simulated by applying convolution after the interaction has been evaluated. Two cases are distinguished. If the excitonic splitting is smaller than the width of the interacting absorption bands, the broadening of the excitonic spectrum can be approximated by a convolution approach, although a correction is necessary for CD spectra. If the excitonic splitting exceeds the bandwidth, the well-known exchange narrowing occurs. We demonstrate that this is accompanied by redistribution of dipole strength and spectral shifts. The magnitude of a CD spectrum is conveniently expressed by its first spectral moment. As will be shown, this is independent of spectral broadening as well as dispersive shifts induced by pigment-protein interactions. Consequently, it provides a simple tool to relate the experimental CD spectrum of a pigment complex to the excitonic interactions from which it originates. To illustrate the potential of the presented framework, the spectroscopy of the LH2 pigment-protein complex from purple bacteria is analyzed and compared for dimer-like and ring-like structures. Furthermore, it is demonstrated that the variability of the CD of chlorosomes from green bacteria can be explained by small changes in the structure of their cylindrical bacteriochlorophyll c subunits. Images FIGURE 3 FIGURE 4 PMID:8889168

  4. Characterizing Quasar Outflows I: Sample, Spectral Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganguly, Rajib; Christenson, D. H.; Richmond, J. M.; Derseweh, J. A.; Robbins, J. M.; Townsend, S. L.; Stark, M. A.

    2012-05-01

    Galaxy evolution models have shown that quasars are a crucial ingredient in the evolution of massive galaxies. Outflows play a key role in the story of quasars and their host galaxies, by helping regulate the accretion process, the star-formation rate and mass of the host galaxy (i.e., feedback). The prescription for modeling outflows as a contributor to feedback requires knowledge of the outflow velocity, geometry, and column density. In particular, we need to understand how these depend on physical parameters and how much is determined stochastically (and with what distribution). For this purpose, we are examining a sample of 11000 z=1.7-2.0 quasars from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. This redshift range permits the following from the SDSS spectra: (1) separation of objects that do and do not exhibit outflows; (2) classification/measurement of outflow properties (ionization, velocity, velocity width); and (3) measurements of UV emission line and continuum parameters. In this poster, we subjectively divide these quasars into four categories: broad absorption-line quasars (2700 objects), associated absorption-line quasars (1700 objects), reddened quasars (160 objects), and unabsorbed/unreddened quasars (6300 objects). We present measurements of the absorption (velocities, velocity widths, equivalent widths), composite spectral profiles of outflows as a function of velocity, as well as measurements of the continuum and CIV, MgII, and FeII emission-line properties. In accompanying posters, we add photometry from the rest-frame X-ray (ROSAT and Chandra), EUV (GALEX), optical (2MASS), and infrared (WISE) bands to complete the SED. The continuum and emission-line measurements from the SDSS spectra and accompanying photometry provides estimates on the black hole masses, bolometric luminsosities, and SED. We consider empirically how these affect the outflow properties. This material is based upon work supported by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration under

  5. In situ correlative measurements for the ultraviolet differential absorption lidar and the high spectral resolution lidar air quality remote sensors: 1980 PEPE/NEROS program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregory, G. L.; Beck, S. M.; Mathis, J. J., Jr.

    1981-01-01

    In situ correlative measurements were obtained with a NASA aircraft in support of two NASA airborne remote sensors participating in the Environmental Protection Agency's 1980persistent elevated pollution episode (PEPE) and Northeast regional oxidant study (NEROS) field program in order to provide data for evaluating the capability of two remote sensors for measuring mixing layer height, and ozone and aerosol concentrations in the troposphere during the 1980 PEPE/NEROS program. The in situ aircraft was instrumented to measure temperature, dewpoint temperature, ozone concentrations, and light scattering coefficient. In situ measurements for ten correlative missions are given and discussed. Each data set is presented in graphical and tabular format aircraft flight plans are included.

  6. Absorption coefficients and frequency shifts measurement in the spectral range of 1071.88-1084.62 cm-1 vs. pressure for chlorodifluoromethane (CHClF2) using tunable CW CO2 laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Hawat, Sharif

    2013-02-01

    Infrared (IR) absorption in the spectral range of (1071.88-1084.62 cm-1) vs. pressure in chlorodifluoromethane (CFC-22, F-22, and CHClF2) was studied using a tunable continuous wave (CW) CO2 laser radiation on 9R branch lines with a maximum output power of about 2.12 W, provided with an absorber cell located outside the laser cavity. The absorption coefficients were determined vs. the gas pressure between 0.2 mbar and 170 mbar at lines from 9R branch for CFC-22. The frequency shifts of the absorption lines of CFC-22 in relative to the central frequencies of laser lines were calculated vs. the pressure on the basis of these absorption coefficients. The chosen lines were selected according to IR spectrum of the studied gas given by HITRAN cross section database. So the absorption was achieved for CFC-22 at the spectral lines of 9R branch situated from 9R (10) to 9R (30) emitted by a tunable CW CO2 laser. The absorption cross sections of CFC-22 determined in this work were compared with the relevant data given by HITRAN cross section database and a reasonable agreement was observed.

  7. Vegetation Species Composition and Canopy Architecture Information Expressed in Leaf Water Absorption Measured in the 1000nm and 2200 nm Spectral Region by an Imaging Spectometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, R. O.; Roberts, D. A.

    1994-01-01

    Plant species composition and plant architectural attributes are critical parameters required for the measuring, monitoring and modeling of terrestrial ecosystems. Remote sensing is commonly cited as an important tool for deriving vegetation properties at an appropriate scale for ecosystem studies, ranging from local, to regional and even synoptic scales (e.g. Wessman 1992).

  8. Water vapor absorption coefficients in the 8-13-micron spectral region - A critical review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grant, William B.

    1990-01-01

    Measurements of water vapor absorption coefficients in the thermal IR atmospheric window (8-13 microns) during the past 20 years obtained by a variety of techniques are reviewed for consistency and compared with computed values based on the AFGL spectral data tapes. The methods of data collection considered were atmospheric long path absorption with a CO2 laser or a broadband source and filters, a White cell and a CO2 laser or a broadband source and a spectrometer, and a spectrophone with a CO2 laser. Advantages and disadvantages of each measurement approach are given as a guide to further research. Continuum absorption has apparently been measured accurately to about the 5-10 percent level in five of the measurements reported.

  9. Spectral control of an alexandrite laser for an airborne water-vapor differential absorption lidar system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ponsardin, Patrick; Grossmann, Benoist E.; Browell, Edward V.

    1994-01-01

    A narrow-linewidth pulsed alexandrite laser has been greatly modified for improved spectral stability in an aircraft environment, and its operation has been evaluated in the laboratory for making water-vapor differential absorption lidar measurements. An alignment technique is described to achieve the optimum free spectral range ratio for the two etalons inserted in the alexandrite laser cavity, and the sensitivity of this ratio is analyzed. This technique drastically decreases the occurrence of mode hopping, which is commonly observed in a tunable, two-intracavity-etalon laser system. High spectral purity (greater than 99.85%) at 730 nm is demonstrated by the use of a water-vapor absorption line as a notch filter. The effective cross sections of 760-nm oxygen and 730-nm water-vapor absorption lines are measured at different pressures by using this laser, which has a finite linewidth of 0.02 cm(exp -1) (FWHM). It is found that for water-vapor absorption linewidths greater than 0.04 cm(exp -1) (HWHM), or for altitudes below 10 km, the laser line can be considered monochromatic because the measured effective absorption cross section is within 1% of the calculated monochromatic cross section. An analysis of the environmental sensitivity of the two intracavity etalons is presented, and a closed-loop computer control for active stabilization of the two intracavity etalons in the alexandrite laser is described. Using a water-vapor absorption line as a wavelength reference, we measure a long-term frequency drift (approximately 1.5 h) of less than 0.7 pm in the laboratory.

  10. Diode laser-based sensor system for long-path absorption measurements of atmospheric concentration and near-IR molecular spectral parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Goldstein, N.; Lee, J.; Adler-Golden, S.M.; Bien, F.

    1993-12-31

    Line-locked near-IR diode lasers and a simple retroreflector/telescope system were used for remote sensing of atmospheric constituents over long atmospheric paths. The experimental configuration used in preliminary measurements of atmospheric water vapor and oxygen with AlGaAs diode lasers is presented. A prototype field sensor system currently under development shares the same basic configuration but incorporates interchangeable AlGaAs and InGaAsP diode-laser modules for monitoring a variety of atmospheric gases.

  11. [Laser induced breakdown spectra of coal sample and self-absorption of the spectral line].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Gui-yin; Ji, Hui; Jin, Yi-dong

    2014-12-01

    The LIBS of one kind of household fuel coal was obtained with the first harmonic output 532 nm of an Nd·YAG laser as radiation source. With the assignment of the spectral lines, it was found that besides the elements C, Si, Mg, Fe, Al, Ca, Ti, Na and K, which are reported to be contained in coal, the presented sample also contains trace elements, such as Cd, Co, Hf, Ir, Li, Mn, Ni, Rb, Sr, V, W, Zn, Zr etc, but the spectral lines corresponding to O and H elements did not appear in the spectra. This is owing to the facts that the transition probability of H and O atoms is small and the energy of the upper level for transition is higher. The results of measurement also show that the intensity of spectral line increases with the laser pulse energy and self-absorption of the spectral lines K766.493 nm and K769.921 nm will appear to some extent. Increasing laser energy further will make self-absorption more obvious. The presence of self-absorption can be attributed to two factors. One is the higher transition rate of K atoms, and the other is that the increase in laser intensity induces the enhancement of the particle number density in the plasma. PMID:25881446

  12. Light fluence correction for quantitative determination of tissue absorption coefficient using multi-spectral optoacoustic tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brochu, Frederic M.; Joseph, James; Tomaszewski, Michal; Bohndiek, Sarah E.

    2015-07-01

    MultiSpectral Optoacoustic Tomography (MSOT) is a fast developing imaging modality, combining the high resolution and penetration depth of ultrasound with the excellent contrast from optical imaging of tissue. Absorption and scattering of the near infrared excitation light modulates the spectral profile of light as it propagates deep into biological tissue, meaning the images obtained provide only qualitative insight into the distribution of tissue chromophores. The goal of this work is to accurately recover the spectral profile of excitation light by modelling light fluence in the data reconstruction, to enable quantitative imaging. We worked with a commercial small animal MSOT scanner and developed our light fluence correction for its' cylindrical geometry. Optoacoustic image reconstruction pinpoints the sources of acoustic waves detected by the transducers and returns the initial pressure amplitude at these points. This pressure is the product of the dimensionless Grüneisen parameter, the absorption coefficient and the light fluence. Under the condition of constant Grüneisen parameter and well modelled light fluence, there is a linear relationship between the initial pressure amplitude measured in the optoacoustic image and the absorption coefficient. We were able to reproduce this linear relationship in different physical regions of an agarose gel phantom containing targets of known optical absorption coefficient, demonstrating that our light fluence model was working. We also demonstrate promising results of light fluence correction effects on in vivo data.

  13. Absorption spectroscopy setup for determination of whole human blood and blood-derived materials spectral characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wróbel, M. S.; Gnyba, M.; Milewska, D.; Mitura, K.; Karpienko, K.

    2015-09-01

    A dedicated absorption spectroscopy system was set up using tungsten-halogen broadband source, optical fibers, sample holder, and a commercial spectrometer with CCD array. Analysis of noise present in the setup was carried out. Data processing was applied to the absorption spectra to reduce spectral noise, and improve the quality of the spectra and to remove the baseline level. The absorption spectra were measured for whole blood samples, separated components: plasma, saline, washed erythrocytes in saline and human whole blood with biomarkers - biocompatible nanodiamonds (ND). Blood samples had been derived from a number of healthy donors. The results prove a correct setup arrangement, with adequate preprocessing of the data. The results of blood-ND mixtures measurements show no toxic effect on blood cells, which proves the NDs as a potential biocompatible biomarkers.

  14. Absorption Measure Distribution in Mrk 509

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adhikari, T. P.; Różańska, A.; Sobolewska, M.; Czerny, B.

    2015-12-01

    In this paper we model the observed absorption measure distribution (AMD) in Mrk 509, which spans three orders of magnitude in ionization level with a single-zone absorber in pressure equilibrium. AMD is usually constructed from observations of narrow absorption lines in radio-quiet active galaxies with warm absorbers. We study the properties of the warm absorber in Mrk 509 using recently published broadband spectral energy distribution observed with different instruments. This spectrum is an input in radiative transfer computations with full photoionization treatment using the titan code. We show that the simplest way to fully reproduce the shape of AMD is to assume that the warm absorber is a single zone under constant total pressure. With this assumption, we found theoretical AMD that matches the observed AMD determined on the basis of the 600 ks reflection grating spectrometer XMM-Newton spectrum of Mrk 509. The softness of the source spectrum and the important role of the free-free emission breaks the usual degeneracy in the ionization state calculations, and the explicit dependence of the depths of AMD dips on density open a new path to the density diagnostic for the warm absorber. In Mrk 509, the implied density is of the order of 108 cm-3.

  15. Spectral Measurements of Pulse Solar Simulators

    SciTech Connect

    Cannon, T. W.

    1998-11-12

    Spectral measurements of pulse solar simulators are used to quantify the wavelength-dependant characteristics of the light. Because every PV device has a unique spectral response, it is important to know the spectral irradiance and to periodically monitor the spectra for changes. Measurements are made at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) using several different techniques including the NREL-developed Pulse Analysis Spectroradiometer System (PASS).

  16. Remote and Ground Truth Spectral Measurement Comparisons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abercromby, Kira Jorgensen; Hamada, Kris; Guyote, Michael; Okada, Jennifer; Barker, Edwin

    2007-01-01

    FORMOSAT III are a set of six research satellites from Taiwan that were launched in April 2006. The satellites are in 800 km, 71 degree inclination orbits and separated by 24 degrees in ascending node. Ground truth spectral measurements were taken of outer surface materials on FORMOSAT III. From those measurements, a computer model was built to predict the spectral reflectance, which included phase angle and orientation of the spacecraft relative to the observer. However, materials exposed to the space environment have exhibited spectral changes including a darkening and a reddening of the spectra. This reddening was seen as an increase in slope of the reflectance as the wavelength increases. Therefore, the model of pristine materials was augmented to include the space weathering effects. Remote data were collected on two of the six FORMOSAT satellites using the 1.6 meter telescope at AMOS (Air Force Maui Optical and Supercomputing) site with the Spica spectrometer. Due to the separation in ascending node, observations were made on whichever one of the six satellites was visible on that specific night. Three nights of data were collected using the red (6000 9500 angstroms) filter and two nights of data were collected using the blue (3200 -6600 angstroms) filter. A comparison of the data showed a good match to the pristine model for the blue filter region. The absorption feature near 5500 angstroms due to the copper colored Kapton multi-layer insulation (MLI) was very apparent in the remote samples and a good fit to the data was seen in both satellites observed. The features in the red filter regime agreed with the pristine model up through 7000 angstroms where the reddening begins and the slope of the remote sample increases. A comparison of the two satellites showed similar features in the red and blue filter regions, i.e. the satellites were aging at the same rate. A comparison of the pristine model to the first month of remote measurements showed the amount by

  17. Spectral Absorption By Particulate Impurities in Snow Determined By Photometric Analysis Of Filters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grenfell, T. C.; Doherty, S. J.; Clarke, A. D.

    2009-12-01

    Our work is motivated by the 1983-84 survey by Clarke and Noone (Atmos. Environ., 1985) of soot in Arctic snow. Our objective is to resurvey the original area they covered and to extend the observations around the entire Arctic Basin under the auspices of the IPY program. We use the filtering and integrating sandwich techniques developed by Clarke and Noone to process the snow samples. Among the advantages of this method are that (a) it provides a direct measure of light absorption and the result is closely related to the actual absorption of sunlight in the snow or ice, (b) processing and filtering of the snow samples can be carried out in remote locations and (c) it is not necessary to transport large quantities of snow back to our home laboratory. Here we describe the construction, calibration, and some applications of an integrating sphere spectrophotometer system designed to take advantage of recent advances in instrumentation to improve the accuracy of measurements of absorption by particulate impurities collected on nuclepore filters used in our survey. Filter loading in terms of effective black carbon (BC) amount is determined together with the ratio of non-BC to BC concentrations using a set of reference filters with known loadings of Monarch 71 BC prepared by A. D. Clarke. The new spectrophotometer system has (a) system stability of approximately 0.5%; (b) precision relative to ADC standards of 3-4% for filter loadings greater than about 0.5 microgm Carbon/cm2. (c) We can distinguish BC from non-BC from relative spectral shapes of the energy absorption curves with an accuracy that depends on our knowledge of the spectral absorption curves of the non-BC components; and (d) by-eye estimates are consistent with spectrophotometric results. The major outstanding uncertainty is the appropriate value to use for the mass absorption efficiency for BC.

  18. Atmospheric Measurements by Cavity Enhanced Absorption Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Hongming; Wu, Tao; Coeur-Tourneur, Cécile; Fertein, Eric; Gao, Xiaoming; Zhao, Weixiong; Zhang, Weijun; Chen, Weidong

    2015-04-01

    Since the last decade, atmospheric environmental monitoring has benefited from the development of novel spectroscopic measurement techniques owing to the significant breakthroughs in photonic technology from the UV to the infrared spectral domain [1]. In this presentation, we will overview our recent development and applications of cavity enhanced absorption spectroscopy techniques for in situ optical monitoring of chemically reactive atmospheric species (such as HONO, NO3, NO2, N2O5) in intensive campaigns [2] and/or in smog chamber studies [3]. These field deployments demonstrated that modern photonic technologies (newly emergent light sources combined with high sensitivity spectroscopic techniques) can provide a useful tool to improve our understanding of tropospheric chemical processes which affect climate, air quality, and the spread of pollution. Experimental detail and preliminary results will be presented. Acknowledgements. The financial support from the French Agence Nationale de la Recherche (ANR) under the NexCILAS (ANR-11-NS09-0002) and the CaPPA (ANR-10-LABX-005) contracts is acknowledged. References [1] X. Cui, C. Lengignon, T. Wu, W. Zhao, G. Wysocki, E. Fertein, C. Coeur, A. Cassez,L. Croisé, W. Chen, et al., "Photonic Sensing of the Atmosphere by absorption spectroscopy", J. Quant. Spectrosc. Rad. Transfer 113 (2012) 1300-1316 [2] T. Wu, Q. Zha, W. Chen, Z. XU, T. Wang, X. He, "Development and deployment of a cavity enhanced UV-LED spectrometer for measurements of atmospheric HONO and NO2 in Hong Kong", Atmos. Environ. 95 (2014) 544-551 [3] T. Wu, C. Coeur-Tourneur, G. Dhont,A. Cassez, E. Fertein, X. He, W. Chen,"Application of IBBCEAS to kinetic study of NO3 radical formation from O3 + NO2 reaction in an atmospheric simulation chamber", J. Quant. Spectrosc. Rad. Transfer 133 (2014)199-205

  19. Detection of water vapour absorption around 363nm in measured atmospheric absorption spectra and its effect on DOAS evaluations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lampel, Johannes; Polyansky, Oleg. L.; Kyuberis, Alexandra A.; Zobov, Nikolai F.; Tennyson, Jonathan; Lodi, Lorenzo; Pöhler, Denis; Frieß, Udo; Platt, Ulrich; Beirle, Steffen; Wagner, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    Water vapour is known to absorb light from the microwave region to the blue part of the visible spectrum at a decreasing magnitude. Ab-initio approaches to model individual absorption lines of the gaseous water molecule predict absorption lines until its dissociation limit at 243 nm. We present first evidence of water vapour absorption at 363 nm from field measurements based on the POKAZATEL absorption line list by Polyansky et al. (2016) using data from Multi-Axis differential optical absorption spectroscopy (MAX-DOAS) and Longpath (LP)-DOAS measurements. The predicted absorptions contribute significantly to the observed optical depths with up to 2 × 10‑3. Their magnitude correlates well (R2 = 0.89) to simultaneously measured well-established water vapour absorptions in the blue spectral range from 452-499 nm, but is underestimated by a factor of 2.6 ± 0.6 in the ab-initio model. At a spectral resolution of 0.5nm this leads to a maximum absorption cross-section value of 5.4 × 10‑27 cm2/molec at 362.3nm. The results are independent of the employed cross-section data to compensate for the overlayed absorption of the oxygen dimer O4. The newly found absorption can have a significant impact on the spectral retrieval of absorbing trace-gas species in the spectral range around 363 nm. Its effect on the spectral analysis of O4, HONO and OClO are discussed.

  20. Limits of spectral resolution in optical measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marques, Manuel B.

    2014-08-01

    Nowadays a growing number of scientists relies on optical spectral measurements for their research. The market is full of new plug-and-play equipment for spectral analysis that take the fuss out of the measurements. As with other instruments (computers, lasers, etc.) the researcher doesńt need any longer to work with someone with a post-graduate formation on the technology to be able to do excellent research. But, as in every instrument, there are limitations on the instrument use that affect its precision and resolution. Currently there is in the market a large variety of equipment for spectral measurements. They range from the huge long focal length double pass monochromators to the small pocket size USB connected array spectrometers. The different configurations have different sensitivities on the light input system, light intensity, coherence, polarization, etc. In this talk we will discuss a few of the limitations in spectral measurements that can be found in experimental setups.

  1. Photoadaptation in marine phytoplankton: changes in spectral absorption and excitation of chlorophyll a fluorescence

    SciTech Connect

    Neori, A.; Holm-Hansen, O.; Mitchell, B.G.; Kiefer, D.A.

    1984-10-01

    The optical properties of marine phytoplankton were examined by measuring the absorption spectra and fluorescence excitation spectra of chlorophyll a for natural marine particles collected on glass fiber filters. Samples were collected at different depths from stations in temperate waters of the Southern California Bight and in polar waters of the Scotia and Ross Seas. At all stations, phytoplankton fluorescence excitation and absorption spectra changed systematically with depth and vertical stability of the water columns. In samples from deeper waters, both absorption and chlorophyll a fluorescence excitation spectra showed enhancement in the blue-to-green portion of the spectrum (470-560 nm) relative to that at 440 nm. Since similar changes in absorption and excitation were induced by incubating sea water samples at different light intensities, the changes in optical properties can be attributed to photoadaptation of the phytoplankton. The data indicate that in the natural populations studied, shade adaptation caused increases in the concentration of photosynthetic accessory pigments relative to chlorophyll a. These changes in cellular pigment composition were detectable within less than 1 day. Comparisons of absorption spectra with fluorescence excitation spectra indicate an apparent increase in the efficiency of sensitization of chlorophyll a fluorescence in the blue and green spectral regions for low light populations. 30 references, 6 figures.

  2. Spectral response measurements with white light bias

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Devaney, W.; Lorenz, S.; Meakin, J. D.

    1976-01-01

    The spectral response of solar cells such as the CdS/Cu2S cell is non-linear with distinct quenching and enhancement bands. One possible technique to produce standardized solar efficiencies is to fold in spectral response with a standard solar spectrum. The spectral response of a cell was measured in a way which matched cell behavior under white light illumination. A technique was developed to measure the response of a cell to low intensity chopped monochromatic light while the cell is also illuminated with a white light bias corresponding to AMI.

  3. A new method to retrieve spectral absorption coefficient of highly-scattering and weakly-absorbing materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dombrovsky, Leonid A.

    2016-03-01

    A significant uncertainty in the absorption coefficient of highly scattering dispersed materials is typical in the spectral ranges of very weak absorption. The traditional way to identify the main absorption and scattering characteristics of semi-transparent materials is based on spectral measurements of normal-hemispherical reflectance and transmittance for the material sample. Unfortunately this way cannot be used in the case of in vivo measurements of optical properties of biological tissues. A method suggested in the present paper is based on thermal response to the periodic radiative heating of the open surface of a semi-transparent material. It is shown that the period of a variation of the surface temperature is sensitive to the value of an average absorption coefficient in the surface layer. As a result, the monochromatic external irradiation combined with the surface temperature measurements can be used to retrieve the spectral values of absorption coefficient. Possible application of this method to porous semi-transparent ceramics is considered. An example problem is also solved to illustrate the applicability of this method to human skin. The approach suggested enables one to estimate an average absorption coefficient of human skin of a patient just before the thermal processing.

  4. Spectral Absorption of Solar Radiation by Aerosols during ACE-Asia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bergstrom, R. W.; Pilewskie, P.; Pommier, J.; Rabbette, M.; Russell, P. B.; Schmid, B.; Redermann, J.; Higurashi, A.; Nakajima, T.; Quinn, P. K.

    2004-01-01

    As part of the Asian Pacific Regional Aerosol Characterization Experiment (ACE-Asia), the upward and downward spectral solar radiant fluxes were measured with the Spectral Solar Flux Radiometer (SSFR), and the aerosol optical depth was measured with the Ames Airborne Tracking Sunphotometer (AATS-14) aboard the Center for INterdisciplinary Remotely-Piloted Aircraft Studies (CIRPAS) Twin Otter aircraft. IN this paper, we examine the data obtained for two cases: a moderately thick aerosol layer, 12 April, and a relatively thin aerosol case, 16 April 2001. ON both days, the Twin Otter flew vertical profiles in the Korean Strait southeast of Gosan Island. For both days we determine the aerosol spectral absorption of the layer and estimate the spectral aerosol absorption optical depth and single-scattering albedo. The results for 12 April show that the single-scattering albedo increases with wavelength from 0.8 at 400 nm to 0.95 at 900 nm and remains essentially constant from 950 to 1700 nm. On 16 April the amount of aerosol absorption was very low; however, the aerosol single-scattering albedo appears to decrease slightly with wavelength in the visible region. We interpret these results in light of the two absorbing aerosol species observed during the ACE-asia study: mineral dust and black carbon. The results for 12 April are indicative of a mineral dust-black carbon mixture. The 16 April results are possibly caused by black carbon mixed with nonabsorbing pollution aerosols. For the 12 April case we attempt to estimate the relative contributions of the black carbon particles and the mineral dust particles. We compare our results with other estimates of the aerosol properties from a Sea-Viewing Wide Field-of-View Sensor (SeaWiFS) satellite analysis and aerosol measurements made aboard the Twin Otter, aboard the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Ronald H Brown ship, and at ground sites in Gosan and Japan. The results indicate a relatively complicated aerosol

  5. Differential optical absorption spectrometer for measurement of tropospheric pollutants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evangelisti, F.; Baroncelli, A.; Bonasoni, P.; Giovanelli, G.; Ravegnani, F.

    1995-05-01

    Our institute has recently developed a differential optical absorption spectrometry system called the gas analyzer spectrometer correlating optical absorption differences (GASCOAD), which features as a detector a linear image sensor that uses an artificial light source for long-path tropospheric-pollution monitoring. The GASCOAD, its method of eliminating interference from background sky light, and subsequent spectral analysis are reported and discussed. The spectrometer was used from 7 to 22 February 1993 in Milan, a heavily polluted metropolitan area, to measure the concentrations of SO2, NO2, O3, and HNO2 averaged over a 1.7-km horizontal light path. The findings are reported and briefly discussed.

  6. Spectral reflectance measurements in the genus Sphagnum

    SciTech Connect

    Vogelmann, J.E.; Moss, D.M. . Complex Systems/Institute for the Study of Earth Oceans and Space)

    1993-09-01

    High-spectral resolution reflectance data were acquired in the laboratory for four species of Sphagnum (peat moss): S. cuspidatum, S. papillosum, S. fallax, and S. capillifolium. All four species had different spectral reflectance properties. Species differences were noted especially in the visible portion of the spectrum from 0.45 [mu]m to 0.70 [mu]m; some major spectral differences were also noted in the near infrared. Samples analyzed had much lower reflectance than typical green vegetation in the midinfrared region of the spectrum from 1.30 [mu]m to 2.40 [mu]m. In addition, Sphagnum had very pronounced water-related absorption features at about 1.00m [mu] and 1.20 [mu]m, unlike typical green vegetation. Spectral data acquired as samples were dried indicated large spectral increases with increasing dryness, especially in the midinfrared. Simulated Landsat Thematic Mapper 5/4 band ratio data were linearly related to the log of wet weight/dry weight. Reflectance from vegetation in the midinfrared region of the electromagnetic spectrum is strongly modified by water content. Peatlands are major sources of global methane and it has been found that methane evolution within these peatlands is related to water status within these peatlands is related to water status within the wetland. It may be possible to indirectly estimate methane flux using remote sensing data.

  7. Differences in spectral absorption properties between active neovascular macular degeneration and mild age related maculopathy.

    PubMed

    Balaskas, Konstantinos; Nourrit, Vincent; Dinsdale, Michelle; Henson, David B; Aslam, Tariq

    2013-05-01

    This study examines the differences in spectral absorption properties between the maculae of patients with active neovascular macular degeneration and those with early age related maculopathy (ARM). Patients attending for management of neovascular age related macular degeneration (AMD) underwent multispectral imaging with a system comprising of a modified digital fundus camera coupled with a 250-W tungsten-halogen lamp and a liquid crystal fast-tuneable filter. Images were obtained at 8 wavelengths between 496 and 700 nm. Aligned images were used to generate a DLA (differential light absorption, a measure of spectral absorption properties) map of the macular area. DLA maps were generated for both eyes of 10 sequential patients attending for anti-vascular endothelial growth factor injections. Each of these patients had active leaking neovascular AMD in one eye and early ARM or milder disease in the fellow eye. Eyes with neovascular AMD demonstrated lower average levels of DLA compared with their fellow eyes with early ARM (p=0.037, t test). The significant difference in DLA demonstrates the potential of multispectral imaging for differentiating the two pathologies non-invasively. PMID:23137662

  8. Study on the Relationship between the Depth of Spectral Absorption and the Content of the Mineral Composition of Biotite.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chang-bao; Zhang, Chen-xi; Liu, Fang; Jiang, Qi-gang

    2015-09-01

    The mineral composition of rock is one of the main factors affecting the spectral reflectance characteristics, and it's an important reason for generating various rock characteristic spectra. This study choose the rock samples provided by Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) (including all kinds of mineral percentage of rocks, and spectral reflectances range from 0.35 to 2.50 μm wavelength measured by ASD spectrometer), and the various types of mineral spectral reflectances contained within the rocks are the essential data. Using the spectral linear mixture model of rocks and their minerals, firstly, a simulation study on the mixture of rock and mineral composition is achieved, the experimental results indicate that rock spectral curves using the model which based on the theory of the linear mixture are able to simulate better and preserve the absorption characteristics of various mineral components well. Then, 8 samples which contain biotite mineral are picked from the rock spectra of igneous, biotite contents and the absorption depth characteristics of spectral reflection at 2.332 μm, furthermore, a variety of linear and nonlinear normal statistical models are used to fit the relationship between the depth of absorption spectra and the content of the mineral composition of biotite, finally, a new simulation model is build up with the Growth and the Exponential curve model, and a statistical response relationship between the spectral absorption depth and the rock mineral contents is simulated by using the new model, the fitting results show that the correlation coefficient reaches 0.9984 and the standard deviation is 0.572, although the standard deviation using Growth and Exponential model is less than the two model combined with the new model fitting the standard deviation, the correlation coefficient of the new model had significantly increased, which suggesting that the, new model fitting effect is closer to the measured values of samples, it proves that the

  9. Identification of key aerosol populations through their size and composition resolved spectral scattering and absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costabile, F.; Barnaba, F.; Angelini, F.; Gobbi, G. P.

    2013-03-01

    Characterizing chemical and physical aerosol properties is important to understand their sources, effects, and feedback mechanisms in the atmosphere. This study proposes a scheme to classify aerosol populations based on their spectral optical properties (absorption and scattering). The scheme is obtained thanks to the outstanding set of information on particle size and composition these properties contain. The spectral variability of the aerosol single scattering albedo (dSSA), and the extinction, scattering and absorption Angstrom exponents (EAE, SAE and AAE, respectively) were observed on the basis of two-year measurements of aerosol optical properties (scattering and absorption coefficients at blue, green and red wavelengths) performed in the suburbs of Rome (Italy). Optical measurements of various aerosol types were coupled to measurements of particle number size distributions and relevant optical properties simulations (Mie theory). These latter allowed the investigation of the role of the particle size and composition in the bulk aerosol properties observed. The combination of simulations and measurements suggested a general "paradigm" built on dSSA, SAE and AAE to optically classify aerosols. The paradigm proved suitable to identify the presence of key aerosol populations, including soot, biomass burning, organics, dust and marine particles. The work highlights that (i) aerosol populations show distinctive combinations of SAE and dSSA times AAE, these variables being linked by a linear inverse relation varying with varying SSA; (ii) fine particles show EAE > 1.5, whilst EAE < 2 is found for both coarse particles and ultrafine soot-rich aerosols; (iii) fine and coarse particles both show SSA > 0.8, whilst ultrafine urban Aitken mode and soot particles show SSA < 0.8. The proposed paradigm agrees with aerosol observations performed during past major field campaigns, this indicating that relations concerning the paradigm have a general validity.

  10. Glue Film Thickness Measurements by Spectral Reflectance

    SciTech Connect

    B. R. Marshall

    2010-09-20

    Spectral reflectance was used to determine the thickness of thin glue layers in a study of the effect of the glue on radiance and reflectance measurements of shocked-tin substrates attached to lithium fluoride windows. Measurements based on profilometry of the components were found to be inaccurate due to flatness variations and deformation of the tin substrate under pressure during the gluing process. The accuracy of the spectral reflectance measurements were estimated to be ±0.5 μm, which was sufficient to demonstrate a convincing correlation between glue thickness and shock-generated light.

  11. Measurement and modeling of terahertz spectral signatures from layered material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kniffin, G. P.; Schecklman, S.,; Chen, J.; Henry, S. C.; Zurk, L. M.; Pejcinovic, B.; Timchenko, A. I.

    2010-04-01

    Many materials such as drugs and explosives have characteristic spectral signatures in the terahertz (THz) band. These unique signatures hold great promise for potential detection utilizing THz radiation. While such spectral features are most easily observed in transmission,real life imaging systems will need to identify materials of interest from reflection measurements,often in non-ideal geometries. In this work we investigate the interference effects introduced by layered materials,whic h are commonly encountered in realistic sensing geometries. A model for reflection from a layer of material is presented,along with reflection measurements of single layers of sample material. Reflection measurements were made to compare the response of two materials; α-lactose monohydrate which has sharp absorption features,and polyethylene which does not. Finally,the model is inverted numerically to extract material parameters from the measured data as well as simulated reflection responses from the explosive C4.

  12. Directional spectral emissivity measurement system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halyo, Nesim (Inventor); Pandey, Dhirendra K. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    Apparatus and process for determining the emissivity of a test specimen including an integrated sphere having two concentric walls with a coolant circulating therebetween, and disposed within a chamber which may be under ambient, vacuum or inert gas conditions. A reference sample is disposed within the sphere with a monochromatic light source in optical alignment therewith. A pyrometer is in optical alignment with the test sample for obtaining continuous test sample temperature measurements during a test. An arcuate slit port is provided through the spaced concentric walls of the integrating sphere with a movable monochromatic light source extending through and movable along the arcuate slit port. A detector system extends through the integrating sphere for continuously detecting an integrated signal indicative of all radiation within its field of view, as a function of the emissivity of the test specimen at various temperatures and various angle position of the monochromatic light source. A furnace for heating the test sample to approximately 3000 K. and control mechanism for transferring the heated sample from the furnace to the test sample port in the integrating sphere is also contained within the chamber.

  13. Spectral absorption index in hyperspectral image analysis for predicting moisture contents in pork longissimus dorsi muscles.

    PubMed

    Ma, Ji; Sun, Da-Wen; Pu, Hongbin

    2016-04-15

    Spectral absorption index was proposed to extract the morphological features of the spectral curves in pork meat samples (longissimus dorsi) under the conditions including fresh, frozen-thawed, heated-dehydrated and brined-dehydrated. Savitzky-Golay (SG) smoothing and multiplicative scatter correction (MSC) were used for calibrating both the spectral reflectance and absorbance values. The absorption values were better than the reflectance values and the calibrated spectra by MSC were better than the raw and SG smoothing corrected spectra in building moisture content predictive models. The optimized partial least square regression (PLSR) model attained good results with the MSC calibrated spectral absorption values based on the spectral absorption index features (R(2)P=0.952, RMSEP=1.396) and the optimal wavelengths selected by regression coefficients (R(2)P=0.966, RMSEP=0.855), respectively. The models proved spectral absorption index was promising in spectral analysis to predict moisture content in pork samples using HSI techniques for the first time. PMID:26617026

  14. High temperature measurement of water vapor absorption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keefer, Dennis; Lewis, J. W. L.; Eskridge, Richard

    1985-01-01

    An investigation was undertaken to measure the absorption coefficient, at a wavelength of 10.6 microns, for mixtures of water vapor and a diluent gas at high temperature and pressure. The experimental concept was to create the desired conditions of temperature and pressure in a laser absorption wave, similar to that which would be created in a laser propulsion system. A simplified numerical model was developed to predict the characteristics of the absorption wave and to estimate the laser intensity threshold for initiation. A non-intrusive method for temperature measurement utilizing optical laser-beam deflection (OLD) and optical spark breakdown produced by an excimer laser, was thoroughly investigated and found suitable for the non-equilibrium conditions expected in the wave. Experiments were performed to verify the temperature measurement technique, to screen possible materials for surface initiation of the laser absorption wave and to attempt to initiate an absorption wave using the 1.5 kW carbon dioxide laser. The OLD technique was proven for air and for argon, but spark breakdown could not be produced in helium. It was not possible to initiate a laser absorption wave in mixtures of water and helium or water and argon using the 1.5 kW laser, a result which was consistent with the model prediction.

  15. Spectral absorption-coefficient data on HCFC-22 and SF6 for remote-sensing applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Varanasi, P.; Li, Z.; Nemtchinov, V.; Cherukuri, A.

    1994-01-01

    Spectral absorption-coefficients (cross-sections) kappa(sub nu) (/cm/atm) have been measured in the 7.62, 8.97, and 12.3 micrometer bands of HCFC-22 (CHClF2) and the 10.6 micrometer bands of SF6 employing a high-resolution Fourier-transform spectrometer. Temperature and total pressure have been varied to simulate conditions corresponding to tropospheric and stratospheric layers in the atmosphere. The kappa(sub nu) are compared with values measured by us previously using a tunable diode laser spectrometer and with the appropriate entries in HITRAN and GEISA, two of the databases known to the atmospheric scientist. The measured absolute intensities of the bands are compared with previously published values.

  16. Atmospheric solar absorption measurements in the 9-11 micron region using a diode laser heterodyne spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harward, C. N.; Hoell, J. M., Jr.

    1980-01-01

    A tunable diode laser heterodyne radiometer was developed for ground based measurements of atmospheric solar absorption spectra in the 9 to 12 micron spectral range. The performance and operating characteristics of this tunable infrared heterodyne radiometer (TIHR) is discussed along with recently measured heterodyne solar absorption spectra in the 10 to 11 micron spectral region.

  17. Atmospheric Temperature Profile Measurements Using Mobile High Spectral Resolution Lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Razenkov, Ilya I.; Eloranta, Edwin W.

    2016-06-01

    The High Spectral Resolution Lidar (HSRL) designed at the University of Wisconsin-Madison discriminates between Mie and Rayleigh backscattering [1]. It exploits the Doppler effect caused by thermal motion of molecules, which broadens the spectrum of the transmitted laser light. That allows for absolute calibration of the lidar and measurements of the aerosol volume backscatter coefficient. Two iodine absorption filters with different absorption line widths (a regular iodine vapor filter and Argon buffered iodine filter) allow for atmospheric temperature profile measurements. The sensitivity of the measured signal-to-air temperature ratio is around 0.14%/K. The instrument uses a shared telescope transmitter-receiver design and operates in eyesafe mode (the product of laser average power and telescope aperture equals 0.1 Wm2 at 532 nm).

  18. Spectral interferometric microscopy reveals absorption by individual optical nanoantennas from extinction phase.

    PubMed

    Gennaro, Sylvain D; Sonnefraud, Yannick; Verellen, Niels; Van Dorpe, Pol; Moshchalkov, Victor V; Maier, Stefan A; Oulton, Rupert F

    2014-01-01

    Optical antennas transform light from freely propagating waves into highly localized excitations that interact strongly with matter. Unlike their radio frequency counterparts, optical antennas are nanoscopic and high frequency, making amplitude and phase measurements challenging and leaving some information hidden. Here we report a novel spectral interferometric microscopy technique to expose the amplitude and phase response of individual optical antennas across an octave of the visible to near-infrared spectrum. Although it is a far-field technique, we show that knowledge of the extinction phase allows quantitative estimation of nanoantenna absorption, which is a near-field quantity. To verify our method we characterize gold ring-disk dimers exhibiting Fano interference. Our results reveal that Fano interference only cancels a bright mode's scattering, leaving residual extinction dominated by absorption. Spectral interference microscopy has the potential for real-time and single-shot phase and amplitude investigations of isolated quantum and classical antennas with applications across the physical and life sciences. PMID:24781663

  19. Relative spectral absorption of solar radiation by water vapor and cloud droplets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davies, R.; Ridgway, W. L.

    1983-01-01

    A moderate (20/cm) spectral resolution model which accounts for both the highly variable spectral transmission of solar radiation through water vapor within and above cloud, as well as the more slowly varying features of absorption and anisotropic multiple scattering by the cloud droplets, is presented. Results from this model as applied to the case of a typical 1 km thick stratus cloud in a standard atmosphere, with cloud top altitude of 2 km and overhead sun, are discussed, showing the relative importance of water vapor above the cloud, water vapor within the cloud, and cloud droplets on the spectral absorption of solar radiation.

  20. Recovery of x-ray absorption spectral profile in etched TiO{sub 2} thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Sano, Keiji; Niibe, Masahito; Kawakami, Retsuo; Nakano, Yoshitaka

    2015-05-15

    Near edge x-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectra of plasma-etched TiO{sub 2} thin films were observed using the total fluorescence yield method involving visible emission. The disrupted spectrum recovered its as-grown (nonetched) profile, upon soft x-ray (SX) irradiation. This recovery was investigated by ultraviolet (UV) irradiation, spatial distribution measurements, exposing recovered samples to air, and NEXAFS measurements of ultrafine TiO{sub 2} particles. The spectral profile recovered upon UV irradiation, and at sample positions outside of the SX irradiation site. The recovered spectral profiles were disrupted again, upon exposure to air. Nonetched ultrafine TiO{sub 2} particles also exhibited a disrupted spectral profile, which was recovered upon SX irradiation. The spectral recovery is explained by a model involving electrons trapped in oxygen vacancies generated by etching.

  1. 47 CFR 2.1515 - Spectral measurements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Spectral measurements. 2.1515 Section 2.1515 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL FREQUENCY ALLOCATIONS AND RADIO TREATY MATTERS; GENERAL RULES AND REGULATIONS FCC Procedure for Testing Class A, B and S Emergency Position Indicating Radiobeacons (EPIRBs) Environmental...

  2. Tunable diode laser measurements of HO2NO2 absorption coefficients near 12.5 microns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    May, R. D.; Molina, L. T.; Webster, C. R.

    1988-01-01

    A tunable diode laser spectrometer has been used to measure absorption coefficients of peroxynitric acid (HO2NO2) near the 803/cm Q branch. HO2NO2 concentrations in a low-pressure flowing gas mixture were determined from chemical titration procedures and UV absorption spectroscopy. The diode laser measured absorption coefficients, at a spectral resolution of better than 0.001/cm, are about 10 percent larger than previous Fourier transform infrared measurements made at a spectral resolution of 0.06/cm.

  3. Sensitivity analysis of oxygen absorption lines in the 1.26-1.27 micron spectral band

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edwards, W. C.; Prasad, N.; Browell, E. V.

    2009-12-01

    In the Decadal Survey prepared by the National Research Council (Reference: Earth Science and Applications from Space: National Imperatives for the Next Decade and Beyond), the ASCENDS mission (Active Sensing of CO2 Emissions over Nights, Days and Seasons), requires simultaneous laser remote sensing of CO2 and O2 in order to convert CO2 atmospheric concentrations to mixing ratios. As the mission is envisioned, the CO2 mixing ratio needs to be measured to a precision of 0.5 percent of background or better (slightly less than 2 ppm) at 100-km horizontal length scale overland and at 200-km scale over open oceans. While the O2 measurement could be made at 0.765 µm (the oxygen A band), the absorption cross section is substantially higher and the scattering is lower in the 1.26-1.27 µm wavelength band, and as such it is anticipated that better accuracies could be accomplished. Hence, NASA Langley Research Center is developing oxygen lidar technology in the 1.26-1.27 micron band for surface pressure measurements. One or more wavelengths for differential absorption lidar operation have to be carefully chosen to eliminate ambient influences on them. The model optical depth calculation is very sensitive to knowledge of the transmitted wavelengths and to the choice of Voigt input parameters. Uncertainties in atmospheric profiles of temperature, pressure and relative humidity can cause ~0.5 % errors in model optical depths. In order to select candidate wavelengths in the 1.26 micron spectral band, wavelength uncertainties due to temperature and pressure have to be determined. Uncertainties at line center and offset wavelengths have to be known precisely to reduce uncertainties in oxygen concentration measurements from airborne and space based platforms. In this paper, based on HITRAN database and absorption line measurements, we evaluate systematic relative errors and their sources of pressure shift and atmospheric temperature influences for selected O2 lines suitable for

  4. Aerosol optical absorption measurements with photoacoustic spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Kun; Wang, Lei; Liu, Qiang; Wang, Guishi; Tan, Tu; Zhang, Weijun; Chen, Weidong; Gao, Xiaoming

    2015-04-01

    Many parameters related to radiative forcing in climate research are known only with large uncertainties. And one of the largest uncertainties in global radiative forcing is the contribution from aerosols. Aerosols can scatter or absorb the electromagnetic radiation, thus may have negative or positive effects on the radiative forcing of the atmosphere, respectively [1]. And the magnitude of the effect is directly related to the quantity of light absorbed by aerosols [2,3]. Thus, sensitivity and precision measurement of aerosol optical absorption is crucial for climate research. Photoacoustic spectroscopy (PAS) is commonly recognized as one of the best candidates to measure the light absorption of aerosols [4]. A PAS based sensor for aerosol optical absorption measurement was developed. A 532 nm semiconductor laser with an effective power of 160 mW was used as a light source of the PAS sensor. The PAS sensor was calibrated by using known concentration NO2. The minimum detectable optical absorption coefficient (OAC) of aerosol was determined to be 1 Mm-1. 24 hours continues measurement of OAC of aerosol in the ambient air was carried out. And a novel three wavelength PAS aerosol OAC sensor is in development for analysis of aerosol wavelength-dependent absorption Angstrom coefficient. Reference [1] U. Lohmann and J. Feichter, Global indirect aerosol effects: a review, Atmos. Chem. Phys. 5, 715-737 (2005) [2] M. Z. Jacobson, Strong radiative heating due to the mixing state of black carbon in atmospheric aerosols, Nature 409, 695-697 (2001) [3] V. Ramanathan and G. Carmichae, Global and regional climate changes due to black carbon, nature geoscience 1, 221-227 (2008) [4] W.P Arnott, H. Moosmuller, C. F. Rogers, T. Jin, and R. Bruch, Photoacoustic spectrometer for measuring light absorption by aerosol: instrument description. Atmos. Environ. 33, 2845-2852 (1999).

  5. Hydrogen sulfide absorption spectrum in the 5700-6600 cm-1 spectral region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, L. R.; Naumenko, O. V.; Polovtseva, E. R.; Sinitsa, Leonid N.

    2004-01-01

    High resolution FT absorption spectrum of H2S from 5700 to 6600 cm-1 was experimentally recorded and theoretically treated. As a result of the spectrum assignment 1100 precise energy levels were derived for the 2nd hexad interacting states of H232S, H233S, and H234S isotope species including the highly excited (050) state. These energy levels were modeled using Watson-type rotational Hamiltonian and taking into account Coriolis, Darling-Dennison and weak Fermi-resonance interactions inside polyad of interacting states. An average accuracy of the energy levels fitting is of 0.0019 cm-1 for the main isotope species. New evaluation of the band origin of the dark (012) state Ev = 6385.299cm-1 is obtained from the fitting process which agrees well with recent prediction by Naumenko et al. (J. Mol. Spectrosc. 50, 100-110 (2001)). Precise line intensity measurements were performed for more than 1200 absorption lines with accuracy varying from 1 to 7%. These intensities were modeled within 3.3% using wavefunctions derived in the process of the energy levels fitting. The transformed transition moment expansion with 29 terms for 1088 intensities was used. Detailed and accurate H2S absorption line list was generated in the HITRAN format for the analyzed spectral region.

  6. Remote estimation of phytoplankton size fractions using the spectral shape of light absorption.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shengqiang; Ishizaka, Joji; Hirawake, Toru; Watanabe, Yuji; Zhu, Yuanli; Hayashi, Masataka; Yoo, Sinjae

    2015-04-20

    Phytoplankton size structure plays an important role in ocean biogeochemical processes. The light absorption spectra of phytoplankton provide a great potential for retrieving phytoplankton size structure because of the strong dependence on the packaging effect caused by phytoplankton cell size and on different pigment compositions related to phytoplankton taxonomy. In this study, we investigated the variability in light absorption spectra of phytoplankton in relation to the size structure. Based on this, a new approach was proposed for estimating phytoplankton size fractions. Our approach use the spectral shape of the normalized phytoplankton absorption coefficient (a(ph)(λ)) through principal component analysis (PCA). Values of a(ph)(λ) were normalized to remove biomass effects, and PCA was conducted to separate the spectral variance of normalized a(ph)(λ) into uncorrelated principal components (PCs). Spectral variations captured by the first four PC modes were used to build relationships with phytoplankton size fractions. The results showed that PCA had powerful ability to capture spectral variations in normalized a(ph)(λ), which were significantly related to phytoplankton size fractions. For both hyperspectral a(ph)(λ) and multiband a(ph)(λ), our approach is applicable. We evaluated our approach using wide in situ data collected from coastal waters and the global ocean, and the results demonstrated a good and robust performance in estimating phytoplankton size fractions in various regions. The model performance was further evaluated by a(ph)(λ) derived from in situ remote sensing reflectance (R(rs)(λ)) with a quasi-analytical algorithm. Using R(rs)(λ) only at six bands, accurate estimations of phytoplankton size fractions were obtained, with R(2) values of 0.85, 0.61, and 0.76, and root mean-square errors of 0.130, 0.126, and 0.112 for micro-, nano-, and picophytoplankton, respectively. Our approach provides practical basis for remote estimation of

  7. Electron paramagnetic resonance and optical absorption spectral studies on chalcocite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reddy, S. Lakshmi; Fayazuddin, Md.; Frost, Ray L.; Endo, Tamio

    2007-11-01

    A chalcocite mineral sample of Shaha, Congo is used in the present study. An electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) study on powdered sample confirms the presence of Mn(II), Fe(III) and Cu(II). Optical absorption spectrum indicates that Fe(III) impurity is present in octahedral structure whereas Cu(II) is present in rhombically distorted octahedral environment. Mid-infrared results are due to water and sulphate fundamentals.

  8. Electron paramagnetic resonance and optical absorption spectral studies on chalcocite.

    PubMed

    Reddy, S Lakshmi; Fayazuddin, Md; Frost, Ray L; Endo, Tamio

    2007-11-01

    A chalcocite mineral sample of Shaha, Congo is used in the present study. An electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) study on powdered sample confirms the presence of Mn(II), Fe(III) and Cu(II). Optical absorption spectrum indicates that Fe(III) impurity is present in octahedral structure whereas Cu(II) is present in rhombically distorted octahedral environment. Mid-infrared results are due to water and sulphate fundamentals. PMID:17324611

  9. Measurement and modelling of spectral solar radiation.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dehne, K.; Czeplak, G.

    1996-03-01

    Small band measurements of spectral solar radiation by means of commercially available spectral radiometers, which are generally designed for laboratory work, require thorough aptitude tests and mostly special fitting measures. For the already available DM 150, first of all an entrance optics to correct cosine errors, a thermostatted weathercasing, as well as a special control lamp device for field use were developped. An international IEA-field intercomparison of 12 spectral radiometers in the Oberpfaffenhofen area of DLR showed deviations between the global radiation spectra of (+/-)15% and (+/-)40% for the best and the worst case, resp. The latter was caused by the operational requirements in the field and the mechanical instabilities of some radiometers (including the DM 150). Generally a remarkable portion of the deviations belongs to calibration uncertainties and imperfect cosine corrections. With regard to the summarized experience only principal recommendations on the use of spectral radiometers are given. Measured data of atmospheric heat radiation A and other meteorological data of 16 IEA stations were compiled in a data base at MOH to facilitate the fast uniform validation of 30 formulae for parametrization of A. For the case of sky clouded in 3 layers a parametrization formula was improved and successfully validated. A special reliable A-formula could be developped from the sufficiently high number of data of station Schleswig for the case of low cloudiness only.

  10. Uncertainty Calculation for Spectral-Responsivity Measurements

    PubMed Central

    Lehman, John H; Wang, CM; Dowell, Marla L; Hadler, Joshua A

    2009-01-01

    This paper discusses a procedure for measuring the absolute spectral responsivity of optical-fiber power meters and computation of the calibration uncertainty. The procedure reconciles measurement results associated with a monochromator-based measurement system with those obtained with laser sources coupled with optical fiber. Relative expanded uncertainties based on the methods from the Guide to the Expression of Uncertainty in Measurement and from Supplement 1 to the “Guide to the Expression of Uncertainty in Measurement”-Propagation of Distributions using a Monte Carlo Method are derived and compared. An example is used to illustrate the procedures and calculation of uncertainties.

  11. [The effect of spectral range on the measurement of ozone in the atmosphere by DOAS].

    PubMed

    Fu, Qiang; Peng, Fu-Min; Liu, Wen-Qing; Xie, Pin-Hua; Luo, Tao; Si, Fu-Qi; Li, Su-Wen

    2009-08-01

    Ozone (O3) often serves as the benchmark for the overall pollution level of a given airshed and it is critical that the measurement technique be accurate and precise, In the DOAS measurement, the accuracy of O3 concentration is determined by the selected spectral range. The present paper focuses on the effect of spectral range on the detected characteristic absorption structure of O3, and the variation of differential cross section of O3 with the change in spectral range and the source of interference in different spectral range. The effect of practical atmospheric light extinction on the light intensities of different spectral ranges was deduced; the effect of spectral range on the accuracy was determined by detecting the standard gases at different concentration and different spectral resolution. The optimized spectral range was determined for O3, which can yield high sensitivity, good selectivity and a reasonable time resolution for the accurate qualitative and quantitative analysis of O3. PMID:19839323

  12. [Spectral absorption properties of the water constituents in the estuary of Zhujiang River].

    PubMed

    Wang, Shan-shan; Wang, Yong-bo; Fu, Qing-hua; Yin, Bin; Li, Yun-mei

    2014-12-01

    Spectral absorption properties of the water constituents is the main factor affecting the light field under the surface of the water and the spectrum above the surface of the water. Thus, the study is useful for understanding of the water spectral property and the remote reversing of water quality parameters. Absorption properties of total suspended particles, non-algal particles, phytoplankton and CDOM were analyzed using the 30 samples collected in July 2013 in the estuary of Zhujiang River. The results indicated that: (1) the non-algal particles absorption dominated the absorption of the total suspended particles; (2) the absorption coefficient of the non-algal particles, which mainly came from the terrigenous deposits, decreased exponentially from short to long wavelength. In addition, the average value and spatial variation of the slope S(d) were higher than those in inland case- II waters; (3) the absorption coefficient of phytoplankton in 440 nm showed a better polynomial relationship with chlorophyll a concentration, while the absorption coefficient of phytoplankton in 675 nm linearly related with the chlorophyll a concentration. Moreover, the influence of accessory pigments on phytoplankton absorption coefficient mainly existed in the range of short wavelength, and Chlorophyll a was the main influencing factor for phytoplankton absorption in long wavelength. The specific absorption coefficient of phytoplankton decreased the power exponentially with the increase of the chlorophyll a concentration; (4) CDOM mainly came from the terrigenous sources and its spectral curve had an absorption shoulder between 250-290 nm. Thus, a piecewise S(g) fitting function could effectively express CDOM absorption properties, i.e., M value and S(g) value in period A (240-260 nm) showed a strong positive correlation. The M value was low, and the humic acid had a high proportion in CDOM; (5) the non-algal particles absorption dominated the total absorption in the estuary of

  13. Absorption technique for OH measurements and calibration

    SciTech Connect

    Bakalyar, D.M.; James, J.V.; Wang, C.C.

    1982-08-15

    An absorption technique is described which utilizes a stabilized frequency-doubled tunable dye laser and a long-path White cell with high mirror reflectivities both in the red and UV. In laboratory conditions we have been able to obtain routinely a detection sensitivity of 3 parts in 10/sup 6/ over absorption paths <1 m in length and a detection sensitivity of approx.6 parts in 10/sup 5/ over an absorption path of the order of 1 km. The latter number corresponds to 3 x 10/sup 6/ OH molecules/cm/sup 3/, and therefore the technique should be particularly useful for calibration of our fluorescence instrument for OH measurements. However, the presence of atmospheric fluctuations coupled with intensity variation accompanying frequency scanning appears to degrade the detection sensitivity in outdoor ambient conditions, thus making it unlikely that this technique can be employed for direct OH monitoring.

  14. Absorption technique for OH measurements and calibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bakalyar, D. M.; James, J. V.; Wang, C. C.

    1982-01-01

    An absorption technique is described which utilizes a stabilized frequency-doubled tunable dye laser and a long-path White cell with high mirror reflectivities both in the red and UV. In laboratory conditions it has been possible to routinely obtain a detection sensitivity of 3 parts in 1,000,000 over absorption paths less than 1 m in length and a detection sensitivity of approximately 6 parts in 100,000 over an absorption path of the order of 1 km. The latter number corresponds to 3,000,000 OH molecules/cu cm, and therefore the technique should be particularly useful for calibration the fluorescence instrument for OH measurements. However, the presence of atmospheric fluctuations coupled with intensity variation accompanying frequency scanning appears to degrade the detection sensitivity in outdoor ambient conditions, thus making it unlikely that this technique can be employed for direct OH monitoring.

  15. Detector absorptivity measuring method and apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheets, R. E. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    A method and apparatus for measuring the absorptivity of a radiation detector by making the detector an integral part of a cavity radiometer are described. By substituting the detector for the surface of the cavity upon which the radiation first impinges a comparison is made between the quantity of radiation incident upon the detector and the quantity reflected from the detector. The difference between the two is a measurement of the amount of radiation absorbed by the detector.

  16. Measurements of spectral attenuation coefficients in the lower Chesapeake Bay

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houghton, W. M.

    1983-01-01

    The spectral transmission was measured for water samples taken in the lower Chesapeake Bay to allow characterization of several optical properties. The coefficients of total attenuation, particle attenuation, and absorption by dissolved organic matter were determined over a wavelength range from 3500 A to 8000 A. The data were taken over a 3 year period and at a number of sites so that an indication of spatial and temporal variations could be obtained. The attenuations determined in this work are, on the average, 10 times greater than those obtained by Hulburt in 1944, which are commonly accepted in the literature for Chesapeake Bay attenuation.

  17. Revealing spectral features in two-photon absorption spectrum of Hoechst 33342: a combined experimental and quantum-chemical study.

    PubMed

    Olesiak-Banska, Joanna; Matczyszyn, Katarzyna; Zaleśny, Robert; Murugan, N Arul; Kongsted, Jacob; Ågren, Hans; Bartkowiak, Wojciech; Samoc, Marek

    2013-10-10

    We present the results of wide spectral range Z-scan measurements of the two-photon absorption (2PA) spectrum of the Hoechst 33342 dye. The strongest 2PA of the dye in aqueous solution is found at 575 nm, and the associated two-photon absorption cross section is 245 GM. A weak but clearly visible 2PA band at ∼850 nm is also observed, a feature that could not be anticipated from the one-photon absorption spectrum. On the basis of the results of hybrid quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics calculations, we put forward a notion that the long-wavelength feature observed in the two-photon absorption spectrum of Hoechst 33342 is due to the formation of dye aggregates. PMID:24016295

  18. Fiberoptic probe and system for spectral measurements

    DOEpatents

    Dai, S.; Young, J.P.

    1998-10-13

    A fused fiberoptic probe, a system, method and embodiments thereof for conducting spectral measurements are disclosed. The fused fiberoptic probe comprises a probe tip having a specific geometrical configuration, an exciting optical fiber and at least one collection optical fiber fused within a housing, preferably silica. The specific geometrical configurations in which the probe tip can be shaped include a slanted probe tip with an angle greater than 0{degree}, an inverted cone-shaped probe tip, and a lens head. 12 figs.

  19. Fiberoptic probe and system for spectral measurements

    DOEpatents

    Dai, Sheng; Young, Jack P.

    1998-01-01

    A fused fiberoptic probe, a system, method and embodiments thereof for conducting spectral measurements are disclosed. The fused fiberoptic probe comprises a probe tip having a specific geometrical configuration, an exciting optical fiber and at least one collection optical fiber fused within a housing, preferrably silica. The specific geometrical configurations in which the probe tip can be shaped include a slanted probe tip with an angle greater than 0.degree., an inverted cone-shaped probe tip, and a lens head.

  20. Absorption and fluorescent spectral studies of imidazophenazine derivatives.

    PubMed

    Ryazanova, O A; Zozulya, V N; Voloshin, I M; Karachevtsev, V A; Makitruk, V L; Stepanian, S G

    2004-07-01

    Absorption and fluorescent spectra as well as fluorescence polarization degree of imidazo-[4,5-d]-phenazine (F1) and its two modified derivatives, 2-trifluoridemethylimidazo-[4,5-d]-phenazine (F2) and 1,2,3-triazole-[4,5-d]-phenazine (F3), were investigated in organic solvents of various polarities and hydrogen bonding abilities. Extinction coefficients of F2 and F3 are increased, their fluorescence Stokes shifts are reduced in comparison with those for unmodified imidazophenazine. For F3 a red shift of the longwave absorption band is observed by 15-20 nm. Modifications of imidazophenazine have led to a sufficient increase of fluorescence polarization degrees that enables to use F2 and F3 as promising fluorescent probes with polarization method application. The configuration, atomic charge distribution and dipole moments of the isolated dye molecules in the ground state were calculated by the DFT method. The computation has revealed that ground state dipole moments of F1, F2, and F3 differ slightly and are equal to 3.5, 3.2, and 3.7D, respectively. The changes in dipole moments upon the optical excitation for all derivatives estimated using Lippert equation were found to be Deltamu = 9 D. The energies of the electronic S1<--S0 transition in solvents of different proton donor abilities were determined, and energetic diagram illustrating the substituent effect was plotted. For nucleoside analogs of these compounds, covalently incorporated into a nucleotide chain, we have considered a possibility to use them as fluorescent reporters of hybridization of antisense oligonucleotides, as well as molecular anchors for its stabilization. PMID:15248979

  1. Spectral slopes of the absorption coefficient of colored dissolved and detrital material inverted from UV-visible remote sensing reflectance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Jianwei; Lee, Zhongping; Ondrusek, Michael; Mannino, Antonio; Tzortziou, Maria; Armstrong, Roy

    2016-03-01

    The spectral slope of the absorption coefficient of colored dissolved and detrital material (CDM), Scdm (units: nm-1), is an important optical parameter for characterizing the absorption spectral shape of CDM. Although highly variable in natural waters, in most remote sensing algorithms, this slope is either kept as a constant or empirically modeled with multiband ocean color in the visible domain. In this study, we explore the potential of semianalytically retrieving Scdm with added ocean color information in the ultraviolet (UV) range between 360 and 400 nm. Unique features of hyperspectral remote sensing reflectance in the UV-visible wavelengths (360-500 nm) have been observed in various waters across a range of coastal and open ocean environments. Our data and analyses indicate that ocean color in the UV domain is particularly sensitive to the variation of the CDM spectral slope. Here, we used a synthesized dataset to show that adding UV wavelengths to the ocean color measurements will improve the retrieval of Scdm from remote sensing reflectance considerably, while the spectral band settings of past and current satellite ocean color sensors cannot fully account for the spectral variation of remote sensing reflectance. Results of this effort support the concept to include UV wavelengths in the next generation of satellite ocean color sensors.

  2. Re-evaluation of pulsed photothermal radiometric profiling in samples with spectrally varied infrared absorption coefficient.

    PubMed

    Majaron, Boris; Milanic, Matija

    2007-02-21

    Spectral variation of the sample absorption coefficient in mid-infrared (muIR) demands caution in photothermal radiometric measurements, because a constant muIR is regularly assumed in inverse analysis of the acquired signals. Adverse effects of such approximation were recently demonstrated in numerical simulations of pulsed photothermal radiometric (PPTR) temperature profiling in soft biological tissues, utilizing a general-purpose optimization code in the reconstruction process. We present here an original reconstruction code, which combines a conjugate gradient minimization algorithm with non-negativity constraint to the sought temperature vector. For the same test examples as in the former report (hyper-Gaussian temperature profiles, InSb detector with 3-5 microm acquisition band, signal-to-noise ratio SNR=300) we obtain markedly improved reconstruction results, both when using a constant value mueff and when the spectral variation muIR(lambda) is accounted for in the analysis. By comparing the results, we find that the former approach introduces observable artefacts, especially in the superficial part of the profile (z<100 microm). However, the artefacts are much less severe than previously reported and are almost absent in the case of a deeper, single-lobed test profile. We demonstrate that the observed artefacts do not result from sub-optimal selection of mueff, and that they vary with specific realizations of white noise added to the simulated signals. The same holds also for a two-lobed test profile. PMID:17264372

  3. Linking CDOM spectral absorption to dissolved organic carbon concentrations and loadings in boreal estuaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asmala, Eero; Stedmon, Colin A.; Thomas, David N.

    2012-10-01

    The quantity of chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM) and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) in three Finnish estuaries (Karjaanjoki, Kyrönjoki and Kiiminkijoki) was investigated, with respect to predicting DOC concentrations and loadings from spectral CDOM absorption measurements. Altogether 87 samples were collected from three estuarine transects which were studied in three seasons, covering a salinity range between 0 and 6.8, and DOC concentrations from 1572 μmol l-1 in freshwater to 222 μmol l-1 in coastal waters. CDOM absorption coefficient, aCDOM(375) values followed the trend in DOC concentrations across the salinity gradient and ranged from 1.67 to 33.4 m-1. The link between DOC and CDOM was studied using a range of wavelengths and algorithms. Wavelengths between 250 and 270 nm gave the best predictions with single linear regression. Total dissolved iron was found to influence the prediction in wavelengths above 520 nm. Despite significant seasonal and spatial differences in DOC-CDOM models, a universal relationship was tested with an independent data set and found to be robust. DOC and CDOM yields (loading/catchment area) from the catchments ranged from 1.98 to 5.44 g C m-2 yr-1, and 1.67 to 11.5 aCDOM(375) yr-1, respectively.

  4. Retrieval interval mapping, a tool to optimize the spectral retrieval range in differential optical absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogel, L.; Sihler, H.; Lampel, J.; Wagner, T.; Platt, U.

    2012-06-01

    Remote sensing via differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS) has become a standard technique to identify and quantify trace gases in the atmosphere. The technique is applied in a variety of configurations, commonly classified into active and passive instruments using artificial and natural light sources, respectively. Platforms range from ground based to satellite instruments and trace-gases are studied in all kinds of different environments. Due to the wide range of measurement conditions, atmospheric compositions and instruments used, a specific challenge of a DOAS retrieval is to optimize the parameters for each specific case and particular trace gas of interest. This becomes especially important when measuring close to the detection limit. A well chosen evaluation wavelength range is crucial to the DOAS technique. It should encompass strong absorption bands of the trace gas of interest in order to maximize the sensitivity of the retrieval, while at the same time minimizing absorption structures of other trace gases and thus potential interferences. Also, instrumental limitations and wavelength depending sources of errors (e.g. insufficient corrections for the Ring effect and cross correlations between trace gas cross sections) need to be taken into account. Most often, not all of these requirements can be fulfilled simultaneously and a compromise needs to be found depending on the conditions at hand. Although for many trace gases the overall dependence of common DOAS retrieval on the evaluation wavelength interval is known, a systematic approach to find the optimal retrieval wavelength range and qualitative assessment is missing. Here we present a novel tool to determine the optimal evaluation wavelength range. It is based on mapping retrieved values in the retrieval wavelength space and thus visualize the consequence of different choices of retrieval spectral ranges, e.g. caused by slightly erroneous absorption cross sections, cross correlations and

  5. Ultrafast transient absorption measurements of heme proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Xiong; Demidov, Andrey; Wang, Wei; Christian, James; Champion, Paul

    1998-03-01

    Transient absorption spectra reveal the dynamics and intermediate states of the heme active site after ligand photodissociation, which helps clarify the physical process of ligand dissociation and geminate recombination. To measure the transient absorption spectra, we apply a femtosecond pump-probe technique with frequency resolved detection using a multichannel diode array. The femtosecond pulse output from a regenerative laser amplifier system is split in two; one beam pumps the optical parametric amplifier to produce a tunable wavelength pump pulse, the other beam generates a white light continuum that is varied in time with respect to pump pulse and probe the transient absorbance of the sample. We make a comparative study of myoglobin with different ligands, mutants and pH conditions.

  6. [Carbon monoxide gas detection system based on mid-infrared spectral absorption technique].

    PubMed

    Li, Guo-Lin; Dong, Ming; Song, Nan; Song, Fang; Zheng, Chuan-Tao; Wang, Yi-Ding

    2014-10-01

    Based on infrared spectral absorption technique, a carbon monoxide (CO) detection system was developed using the fundamental absorption band at the wavelength of 4.6 μm of CO molecule and adopting pulse-modulated wideband incandescence and dual-channel detector. The detection system consists of pulse-modulated wideband incandescence, open ellipsoid light-collec- tor gas-cell, dual-channel detector, main-control and signal-processing module. By optimizing open ellipsoid light-collector gas- cell, the optical path of the gas absorption reaches 40 cm, and the amplitude of the electrical signal from the detector is 2 to 3 times larger than the original signal. Therefore, by using the ellipsoidal condenser, the signal-to-noise ratio of the system will be to some extent increased to improve performance of the system. With the prepared standard CO gas sample, sensing characteris- tics on CO gas were investigated. Experimental results reveal that, the limit of detection (LOD) is about 10 ppm; the relative er- ror at the LOD point is less than 14%, and that is less than 7. 8% within the low concentration range of 20~180 ppm; the maxi- mum absolute error of 50 min long-term measurement concentration on the 0 ppm gas sample is about 3 ppm, and the standard deviation is as small as 0. 18 ppm. Compared with the CO detection systems utilizing quantum cascaded lasers (QCLs) and dis- tributed feedback lasers (DFBLs), the proposed sensor shows potential applications in CO detection under the circumstances of coal-mine and environmental protection, by virtue of high performance-cost ratio, simple optical-path structure, etc. PMID:25739235

  7. Spectral Absorption and Scattering Properties of Normal and Bruised Apple Tissue

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Knowledge of the spectral absorption and scattering properties of apple tissue, especially bruised tissue, can help us develop an effective method for detecting bruises during postharvest sorting and grading. This research was intended to determine the optical properties of normal and bruised apple ...

  8. Modeling optical absorption for thermoreflectance measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jia; Ziade, Elbara; Schmidt, Aaron J.

    2016-03-01

    Optical pump-probe techniques based on thermoreflectance, such as time domain thermoreflectance and frequency domain thermoreflectance (FDTR), have been widely used to characterize the thermal conductivity of thin films and the thermal conductance across interfaces. These techniques typically use a transducer layer to absorb the pump light and improve the thermoreflectance signal. The transducer, however, complicates the interpretation of the measured signal because the approximation that all the energy from the pump beam is deposited at the transducer surface is not always accurate. In this paper, we consider the effect of laser absorption in the top layer of a multilayer sample, and derive an analytical solution for the thermoreflectance signal in the diffusion regime based on volumetric heating. We analyze the measurement sensitivity to the pump absorption depth for transducers with different thermal conductivities, and investigate the additional effect of probe laser penetration depth on the measured signal. We validate our model using FDTR measurements on 490 nm thick amorphous silicon films deposited on fused silica and silicon substrates.

  9. Extreme ultraviolet spectral irradiance measurements since 1946

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidtke, G.

    2015-03-01

    In the physics of the upper atmosphere the solar extreme ultraviolet (EUV) radiation plays a dominant role controlling most of the thermospheric/ionospheric (T/I) processes. Since this part of the solar spectrum is absorbed in the thermosphere, platforms to measure the EUV fluxes became only available with the development of rockets reaching altitude levels exceeding 80 km. With the availability of V2 rockets used in space research, recording of EUV spectra started in 1946 using photographic films. The development of pointing devices to accurately orient the spectrographs toward the sun initiated intense activities in solar-terrestrial research. The application of photoelectric recording technology enabled the scientists placing EUV spectrometers aboard satellites observing qualitatively strong variability of the solar EUV irradiance on short-, medium-, and long-term scales. However, as more measurements were performed more radiometric EUV data diverged due to the inherent degradation of the EUV instruments with time. Also, continuous recording of the EUV energy input to the T/I system was not achieved. It is only at the end of the last century that there was progress made in solving the serious problem of degradation enabling to monitore solar EUV fluxes with sufficient radiometric accuracy. The data sets available allow composing the data available to the first set of EUV data covering a period of 11 years for the first time. Based on the sophisticated instrumentation verified in space, future EUV measurements of the solar spectral irradiance (SSI) are promising accuracy levels of about 5% and less. With added low-cost equipment, real-time measurements will allow providing data needed in ionospheric modeling, e.g., for correcting propagation delays of navigation signals from space to earth. Adding EUV airglow and auroral emission monitoring by airglow cameras, the impact of space weather on the terrestrial T/I system can be studied with a spectral terrestrial

  10. Infrared spectral measurement of space shuttle glow

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmadijian, M.

    1992-01-01

    Infrared spectral measurements of the space shuttle glow were successfully conducted during the STS-39 space shuttle mission. Analysis indicates that NO, NO[sup +], OH, and CO are among the molecules associated with the infrared glow phenomenon. During orbiter thruster firings the glow intensities in the infrared are enhanced by factors of 10x to 100x with significant changes in spectral distribution. These measurements were obtained with the Spacecraft Kinetic Infrared Test (SKIRT) payload which included a cryogenic infrared circular variable filter (CVF) spectrometer (0.6 [mu]m to 5.4 [mu]) and a number of infrared, visible, and ultraviolet radiometers (0.2 [mu]m to 5.4 [mu]m and 9.9 [mu]m to 10.4 [mu]m). In addition, glow measurements were unsuccessfully attempted with the Cryogenic Infrared Radiance Instrumentation for Shuttle (CIRRIS-1A) with its 2.5 [mu]m to 25 [mu]m Fourier transform interferometer. SKIRT CVF obtained over 14,000 spectra of quiescent shuttle glow, thruster enhanced shuttle glow, upper atmosphere airglow, aurora, orbiter environment, and deep space non-glow backgrounds during its eight day mission. The SKIRT radiometers operated almost continuously throughout the mission to provide a detailed history of the IR/VIS/UV optical environment associated with the operation of large spacecraft structures in low earth orbit. This dissertation will primarily address those measurements conducted by the SKIRT spectrometer as they relate to space shuttle glow in the infrared. The STS-39 Space Shuttle Discovery was launched from the NASA Kennedy Space Center on 28 April 1991 into a 57 degree inclination circular orbit at an altitude of 260 km.

  11. Conditional-likelihood approach to material decomposition in spectral absorption-based or phase-contrast CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baturin, Pavlo

    2015-03-01

    Material decomposition in absorption-based X-ray CT imaging suffers certain inefficiencies when differentiating among soft tissue materials. To address this problem, decomposition techniques turn to spectral CT, which has gained popularity over the last few years. Although proven to be more effective, such techniques are primarily limited to the identification of contrast agents and soft and bone-like materials. In this work, we introduce a novel conditional likelihood, material-decomposition method capable of identifying any type of material objects scanned by spectral CT. The method takes advantage of the statistical independence of spectral data to assign likelihood values to each of the materials on a pixel-by-pixel basis. It results in likelihood images for each material, which can be further processed by setting certain conditions or thresholds, to yield a final material-diagnostic image. The method can also utilize phase-contrast CT (PCI) data, where measured absorption and phase-shift information can be treated as statistically independent datasets. In this method, the following cases were simulated: (i) single-scan PCI CT, (ii) spectral PCI CT, (iii) absorption-based spectral CT, and (iv) single-scan PCI CT with an added tumor mass. All cases were analyzed using a digital breast phantom; although, any other objects or materials could be used instead. As a result, all materials were identified, as expected, according to their assignment in the digital phantom. Materials with similar attenuation or phase-shift values (e.g., glandular tissue, skin, and tumor masses) were especially successfully when differentiated by the likelihood approach.

  12. [The linearity analysis of ultrahigh temperature FTIR spectral emissivity measurement system].

    PubMed

    Wang, Zong-wei; Dai, Jing-min; He, Xiao-wa; Yang, Chun-ling

    2012-02-01

    To study thermal radiation properties of special materials at high temperature in aerospace fields, the ultrahigh temperature spectral emissivity measurement system with Fourier spectrometer has been established. The linearity of system is the guarantee of emissivity measurement precision. Through measuring spectral radiation signals of a blackbody source at different temperatures, the function relations between spectral signal values and blackbody spectral radiation luminance of every spectrum points were calculated with the method of multi-temperature and multi-spectrum linear fitting. The spectral radiation signals of blackbody were measured between 1 000 degrees C and 2 000 degrees C in the spectral region from 3 to 20 microm. The linear relations between spectral signal and theory line at wavelength of 4 microm were calculated and introduced. The spectral response is well good between 4 and 18 microm, the spectral linearity are less than 1% except CO2 strong absorption spectrum regions. The results show that when the errors of measured spectrum radiation and linear fitting theory lines are certain, the higher the temperature, the smaller the spectral errors on emissivity. The linearity analysis of spectrum response is good at eliminating errors caused by individual temperature' disturbance to the spectra. PMID:22512159

  13. Spectral Absorption Depth Profile: A Step Forward to Plasmonic Solar Cell Design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hossain, Mohammad K.; Mukhaimer, Ayman W.; Drmosh, Qasem A.

    2016-07-01

    Absorption depth profile, a deterministic and key factor that defines the quality of excitons generation rate in optoelectronic devices, is numerically predicted using finite different time domain analysis. A typical model, nanoparticles array on silicon slab, was devised considering the concept of plasmonic solar cell design. The trend of spectral absorption depth profile distributions at various wavelengths of the solar spectrum, 460 nm, 540 nm, 650 nm, 815 nm, and 1100 nm, was obtained. A stronger and well-distributed absorption profile was obtained at ˜650 nm of the solar spectrum (i.e. ˜1.85 eV, c-Si bandgap), although the absorbing layer was affected more than a half micron depth at shorter wavelengths. Considering the observations obtained from this simulation, we have shown a simple two-step method in fabricating ultra-pure silver (Ag) nanoparticles that can be used as plasmonic nanoscatterers in a thin film solar cell. The morphology and elemental analysis of as-fabricated Ag nanoparticles was confirmed by field emission scanning electron microscope (FESEM) and FESEM-coupled electron diffraction spectroscopy. The size of the as-fabricated Ag nanoparticles was found to range from 50 nm to 150 nm in diameter. Further investigations on structural and optical properties of the as-fabricated specimen were carried out using ultraviolet-visible (UV-Vis) absorption, photoluminesce, and x-ray diffraction (XRD). Preferential growth of ZnO along {002} was confirmed by XRD pattern that was more intense and broadened at increasing annealing temperatures. The lattice parameter c was found to increase, whereas grain size increased with increasing annealing temperature. The optical bandgap was also observed to decrease from 3.31 eV to 3.25 eV at increasing annealing temperatures through UV-Vis measurements. This parallel investigation on optical properties by simulation is in line with experimental studies and, in fact, facilitates devising optimum process cost for

  14. Fourier transform techniques for measuring absorption of transient species in optical limiting materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Yanong; Sonnenberg, Wendi; Short, Kurt W.; Spangler, Lee H.

    1999-10-01

    We have developed methods of measuring absorption of transient species utilizing stepped-scan Fourier transform interferometry that allows a combination of broad spectral coverage (10,000 - 15,000 cm-1 per spectrum), good spectral resolution, and up to ns temporal resolution with possibilities of extension to the ps domain. Nanosecond, psec or fsec laser systems, tunable from UV to IR can be used as the pump source to prepare the transient species. The absorption of that species is measured with broadband, incoherent light and can be simultaneously time and frequency resolved.

  15. Modelling the Absorption Measurement Distribution (AMD) for Mrk 509

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adhikari, T.; Rozanska, A.; Sobolewska, M.; Czerny, B.

    2015-07-01

    Absorption Measurement Distribution (AMD) measures the distribution of absorbing column over a range of ionization parameters of the X-ray absorbers in Seyfert galaxies. In this work, we modeled the AMD in Mrk 509 using its recently published broad band Spectral Energy Distribution (SED). This SED is used as an input for radiative transfer computations with full photoionization treatment using the photoionization codes Titan and Cloudy. Assuming a photoionized medium with a uniform total pressure (gas+radiation), we reproduced the discontunity in the observed AMD distribution which is usually described as the region of thermal instability of the absorber. We also studied the structure and properties of the warm absorber in Mrk 509.

  16. Airborne Spectral Measurements of Ocean Directional Reflectance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gatebe, Charles K.; King, Michael D.; Lyapustin, Alexei; Arnold, G. Thomas; Redemann, Jens

    2004-01-01

    During summer of 2001 NASA's Cloud Absorption Radiometer (CAR) obtained measurement of ocean angular distribution of reflected radiation or BRDF (bidirectional reflectance distribution function) aboard the University of Washington Convair CV-580 research aircraft under cloud-free conditions. The measurements took place aver the Atlantic Ocean off the eastern seaboard of the U.S. in the vicinity of the Chesapeake Light Tower and at nearby National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Buoy Stations. The measurements were in support of CLAMS, Chesapeake Lighthouse and Aircraft Measurements for Satellites, field campaign that was primarily designed to validate and improve NASA's Earth Observing System (EOS) satellite data products being derived from three sensors: MODIS (MODerate Resolution Imaging Spectro-Radiometer), MISR (Multi-angle Imaging Spectro-Radiometer) and CERES (Clouds and Earth s Radiant Energy System). Because of the high resolution of the CAR measurements and its high sensitivity to detect weak ocean signals against a noisy background, results of radiance field above the ocean are seen in unprecedented detail. The study also attempts to validate the widely used Cox-Munk model for predicting reflectance from a rough ocean surface.

  17. Near-infrared spectral methods for noninvasively measuring blood glucose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fei, Sun; Kong, Deyi; Mei, Tao; Tao, Yongchun

    2004-05-01

    Determination of blood glucose concentrations in diabetic patients is a frequently occurring procedure and an important tool for diabetes management. Use of noninvasive detection techniques can relieve patients from the pain of frequent finger pokes and avoid the infection of disease via blood. This thesis discusses current research and analyzes the advantages and shortages of different measurement methods, including: optical methods (Transmission, Polarimetry and scattering), then, we give emphasis to analyze the technology of near-infrared (NIR) spectra. NIR spectral range 700 nm ~2300 nm was used because of its good transparency for biological tissue and presence of glucose absorption band. In this work, we present an outline of noninvasive blood glucose measurement. A near-infrared light beam is passed through the finger, and the spectral components of the emergent beam are measured using spectroscopic techniques. The device includes light sources having the wavelengths of 600 nm - 1800 nm to illuminate the tissue. Receptors associated with the light sources for receiving light and generating a transmission signal representing the light transmitted are also provided. Once a transmission signal is received by receptors, and the high and low values from each of the signals are stored in the device. The averaged values are then analyzed to determine the glucose concentration, which is displayed on the device.

  18. Spectral density measurements of gyro noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Truncale, A.; Koenigsberg, W.; Harris, R.

    1972-01-01

    Power spectral density (PSD) was used to analyze the outputs of several gyros in the frequency range from 0.01 to 200 Hz. Data were accumulated on eight inertial quality instruments. The results are described in terms of input angle noise (arcsec 2/Hz) and are presented on log-log plots of PSD. These data show that the standard deviation of measurement noise was 0.01 arcsec or less for some gyros in the passband from 1 Hz down 10 0.01 Hz and probably down to 0.001 Hz for at least one gyro. For the passband between 1 and 100 Hz, uncertainties in the 0.01 and 0.05 arcsec region were observed.

  19. Gas-phase absorption cross sections of 24 monocyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in the UV and IR spectral ranges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Etzkorn, Thomas; Klotz, Björn; Sørensen, Søren; Patroescu, Iulia V.; Barnes, Ian; Becker, Karl H.; Platt, Ulrich

    Absorption cross sections of 24 volatile and non-volatile derivatives of benzene in the ultraviolet (UV) and the infrared (IR) regions of the electromagnetic spectrum have been determined using a 1080 l quartz cell. For the UV a 0.5 m Czerny-Turner spectrometer coupled with a photodiode array detector (spectral resolution 0.15 nm) was used. IR spectra were recorded with an FT-IR spectrometer (Bruker IFS-88, spectral resolution 1 cm -1). Absolute absorption cross sections and the instrument function are given for the UV, while for the IR, absorption cross sections and integrated band intensities are reported. The study focused primarily on the atmospherically relevant methylated benzenes (benzene, toluene, o-xylene, m-xylene, p-xylene, 1,2,4-trimethylbenzene, 1,3,5-trimethylbenzene, ethylbenzene, styrene) and their ring retaining oxidation products (benzaldehyde, o-tolualdehyde, m-tolualdehyde, p-tolualdehyde, phenol, o-cresol, m-cresol, p-cresol, 2,3-dimethylphenol, 2,4-dimethylphenol, 2,5-dimethylphenol, 2,6-dimethylphenol, 3,4-dimethylphenol, 3,5-dimethylphenol, 2,4,6-trimethylphenol and ( E,Z)- and ( E,E)-2,4-hexadienedial). The UV absorption cross sections reported here can be used for the evaluation of DOAS spectra (Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy) for measurements of the above compounds in the atmosphere and in reaction chambers, while the IR absorption cross sections will primarily be useful in laboratory studies on atmospheric chemistry, where FT-IR spectrometry is an important tool.

  20. Spectral signatures of fluorescence and light absorption to identify crude oils found in the marine environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baszanowska, E.; Otremba, Z.

    2014-08-01

    To protect the natural marine ecosystem, it is necessary to continuously enhance knowledge of environmental contamination, including oil pollution. Therefore, to properly track the qualitative and quantitative changes in the natural components of seawater, a description of the essential spectral features describing petroleum products is necessary. This study characterises two optically-different types of crude oils (Petrobaltic and Romashkino) - substances belonging to multi-fluorophoric systems. To obtain the spectral features of crude oils, the excitation-emission spectroscopy technique was applied. The fluorescence and light absorption properties for various concentrations of oils at a stabilised temperature are described. Both excitation-emission spectra (EEMs) and absorption spectra of crude oils are discussed. Based on the EEM spectra, both excitation end emission peaks for the wavelengthindependent fluorescence maximum (Exmax/ Emmax) - characteristic points for each type of oil - were identified and compared with the literature data concerning typical marine chemical structures.

  1. Determination of The Inflight Spectral Calibration of AVIRIS Using Atmospheric Absorption Features

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, Robert O.

    1995-01-01

    Both the surface and atmospheric characteistics were measured for a calibration target during an inflight calibration experiment held at Lunar Lake, Nevada on April 5, 1994 (Green, et al., 1995). This paper uses upwelling spectral radiance predicted for the calibration target with the MODTRAN radiative transfer code (Berk, et al., 1986) to validage the spectral calibration of AVIRIS inflight.

  2. An isotope technique for measuring lactose absorption

    PubMed Central

    Salmon, P. R.; Read, A. E.; McCarthy, C. F.

    1969-01-01

    Expired radiocarbon dioxide has been collected by a simple autotitration method following the ingestion of lactose-1-14C. With this method, which is suitable for clinical use, 12 subjects with alactasia have been readily separated from 24 normals, both groups being defined by strict criteria. This test, which may be used to measure the absorption of other sugars, is especially suitable for population surveys and may be used to investigate the distribution of disaccharidase deficiency. A further advantage is that false low readings resulting from rapid plasma clearance of absorbed sugar do not occur with this method although they may do so in up to one in three lactose tolerance tests, thereby overestimating the prevalence of alactasia. PMID:5810982

  3. Infrared Spectroscopy of Explosives Residues: Measurement Techniques and Spectral Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, Mark C.; Bernacki, Bruce E.

    2015-03-11

    Infrared laser spectroscopy of explosives is a promising technique for standoff and non-contact detection applications. However, the interpretation of spectra obtained in typical standoff measurement configurations presents numerous challenges. Understanding the variability in observed spectra from explosives residues and particles is crucial for design and implementation of detection algorithms with high detection confidence and low false alarm probability. We discuss a series of infrared spectroscopic techniques applied toward measuring and interpreting the reflectance spectra obtained from explosives particles and residues. These techniques utilize the high spectral radiance, broad tuning range, rapid wavelength tuning, high scan reproducibility, and low noise of an external cavity quantum cascade laser (ECQCL) system developed at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. The ECQCL source permits measurements in configurations which would be either impractical or overly time-consuming with broadband, incoherent infrared sources, and enables a combination of rapid measurement speed and high detection sensitivity. The spectroscopic methods employed include standoff hyperspectral reflectance imaging, quantitative measurements of diffuse reflectance spectra, reflection-absorption infrared spectroscopy, microscopic imaging and spectroscopy, and nano-scale imaging and spectroscopy. Measurements of explosives particles and residues reveal important factors affecting observed reflectance spectra, including measurement geometry, substrate on which the explosives are deposited, and morphological effects such as particle shape, size, orientation, and crystal structure.

  4. Shock tube measurements of the optical absorption of triatomic carbon, C3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, J. J.

    1977-01-01

    The spectral absorption of C3 has been measured in a shock tube using a test gas mixture of acetylene diluted with argon. The absorption of a pulsed xenon light source was measured by means of eight photomultiplier channels to a spectrograph and an accompanying drum camera. The postshock test gas temperature and pressure were varied over the range 3300-4300 K and 0.36 to 2.13 atmospheres, respectively. The results showed appreciable absorption from C3 for the wavelength range 300 to 540 nanometers. The computed electronic oscillator strength varied from 0.12 to 0.06 as a function of temperature.

  5. Estimation of plant water content by spectral absorption features centered at 1,450 nm and 1,940 nm regions.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jie; Xu, Ruisong; Yang, Shilun

    2009-10-01

    Vegetation water content could possibly provide widespread utility in agriculture, forestry and hydrology. In this article, three species leaves were measured radiometrically in order to determine a relationship between leaf water status and the spectral feature centered at 1,450 and 1,940 nm where there are strong water absorptions. The first step of our research is to measure leaf spectra with a FieldSpec-FR. After the spectral analysis using the continuum removal technique, the spectral absorption feature parameters: absorption band depth (D (1450), D (1940)), the normalized band depth of absorption in 1,450 and 1,940 nm (BNA(1450), BNA(1940)), the ratio of the two reflectance of continuum line (R (1450i )/R (1940i )), the ratio of the two band depth (D (1450)/D (1940)) and the ratio of the two absorption areas (A (1450)/A (1940)) in the two wavebands were extracted from each leaf spectrum. The fuel moisture content (FMC), specific leaf weight (SLW), equivalent water thickness (EWT) were measured for each leaf sample. A correlation analysis was conducted between the spectral absorption feature parameters and corresponding FMC, SLW and EWT. In addition, some existing indices for assessing water status such as WI (water index), WI/NDVI (water index/normalized difference vegetation index), MSI (moisture stress index), NDWI (normalized difference water index)were calculated and the correlation between them and water status were analyzed too. The results by comparing the correlations indicated that the spectral absorption feature indices we proposed were better. The indexes BNA(1940), D (1450)/D (1940), and A (1450)/A (1940) were well correlated with FMC, and the correlation between the indexes D (1450,) D (1940), R (1450i )/R (1940i ) and EWT were strong. The index A (1450)/A (1940) was tested to be a good indictor for evaluating plant water content, because there was strongest positive correlation between it and FMC than other indices. PMID:18853268

  6. Spectral Fingerprinting of Individual Cells Visualized by Cavity-Reflection-Enhanced Light-Absorption Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Arai, Yoshiyuki; Yamamoto, Takayuki; Minamikawa, Takeo; Takamatsu, Tetsuro; Nagai, Takeharu

    2015-01-01

    The absorption spectrum of light is known to be a “molecular fingerprint” that enables analysis of the molecular type and its amount. It would be useful to measure the absorption spectrum in single cell in order to investigate the cellular status. However, cells are too thin for their absorption spectrum to be measured. In this study, we developed an optical-cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopic microscopy method for two-dimensional absorption imaging. The light absorption is enhanced by an optical cavity system, which allows the detection of the absorption spectrum with samples having an optical path length as small as 10 μm, at a subcellular spatial resolution. Principal component analysis of various types of cultured mammalian cells indicates absorption-based cellular diversity. Interestingly, this diversity is observed among not only different species but also identical cell types. Furthermore, this microscopy technique allows us to observe frozen sections of tissue samples without any staining and is capable of label-free biopsy. Thus, our microscopy method opens the door for imaging the absorption spectra of biological samples and thereby detecting the individuality of cells. PMID:25950513

  7. Measurement dimensions compressed spectral imaging with a single point detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xue-Feng; Yu, Wen-Kai; Yao, Xu-Ri; Dai, Bin; Li, Long-Zhen; Wang, Chao; Zhai, Guang-Jie

    2016-04-01

    An experimental demonstration of spectral imaging with measurement dimensions compressed has been performed. With the method of dual compressed sensing (CS) we derive, the spectral image of a colored object can be obtained with only a single point detector, and sub-sampling is achieved in both spatial and spectral domains. The performances of dual CS spectral imaging are analyzed, including the effects of dual modulation numbers and measurement noise on the imaging quality. Our scheme provides a stable, high-flux measurement approach of spectral imaging.

  8. Multi-wavelength differential absorption measurements of chemical species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, David M.

    The probability of accurate detection and quantification of airborne species is enhanced when several optical wavelengths are used to measure the differential absorption of molecular spectral features. Characterization of minor atmospheric constituents, biological hazards, and chemical plumes containing multiple species is difficult when using current approaches because of weak signatures and the use of a limited number of wavelengths used for identification. Current broadband systems such as Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (DOAS) have either limitations for long-range propagation, or require transmitter power levels that are unsafe for operation in urban environments. Passive hyperspectral imaging systems that utilize absorption of solar scatter at visible and infrared wavelengths, or use absorption of background thermal emission, have been employed routinely for detection of airborne chemical species. Passive approaches have operational limitations at various ranges, or under adverse atmospheric conditions because the source intensity and spectrum is often an unknown variable. The work presented here describes a measurement approach that uses a known source of a low transmitted power level for an active system, while retaining the benefits of broadband and extremely long-path absorption operations. An optimized passive imaging system also is described that operates in the 3 to 4 mum window of the mid-infrared. Such active and passive instruments can be configured to optimize the detection of several hydrocarbon gases, as well as many other species of interest. Measurements have provided the incentive to develop algorithms for the calculations of atmospheric species concentrations using multiple wavelengths. These algorithms are used to prepare simulations and make comparisons with experimental results from absorption data of a supercontinuum laser source. The MODTRAN model is used in preparing the simulations, and also in developing additional

  9. Quantitative Measurement of Protease-Activity with Correction of Probe Delivery and Tissue Absorption Effects

    PubMed Central

    Salthouse, Christopher D.; Reynolds, Fred; Tam, Jenny M.; Josephson, Lee; Mahmood, Umar

    2009-01-01

    Proteases play important roles in a variety of pathologies from heart disease to cancer. Quantitative measurement of protease activity is possible using a novel spectrally matched dual fluorophore probe and a small animal lifetime imager. The recorded fluorescence from an activatable fluorophore, one that changes its fluorescent amplitude after biological target interaction, is also influenced by other factors including imaging probe delivery and optical tissue absorption of excitation and emission light. Fluorescence from a second spectrally matched constant (non-activatable) fluorophore on each nanoparticle platform can be used to correct for both probe delivery and tissue absorption. The fluorescence from each fluorophore is separated using fluorescence lifetime methods. PMID:20161242

  10. Absorption-line measurements of AGN outflows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fields, Dale L.

    Investigations into the elemental abundances in two nearby active galaxies, the narrow-line Seyfert 1 Markarian 1044 and the Seyfert 1 Markarian 279, are reported. Spectra from three space-based observatories HST, FUSE, and CHANDRA, are used to measure absorption lines in material outflowing from the nucleus. I make multi-wavelength comparisons to better convert the ionic column densities into elemental column densities which can then be used to determine abundances (metallicities). Narrow-line Seyfert 1 galaxies are known to have extreme values of a number of properties compared to active galactic nuclei (AGNs) as a class. In particular, emission-line studies have suggested that NLS1s are unusually metal-rich compared to broad-line AGNs of comparable luminosity. To test these suggestions I perform absorption-line studies on the NLS1 Markarian 1044, a nearby and bright AGN. I use lines of H I, C IV, N V, and O VI to properly make the photoionization correction through the software Cloudy and determine abundances of Carbon, Nitrogen and Oxygen. I find two results. The first is that Markarian 1044 has a bulk metallicity greater than five times solar. The second is that the N/C ratio in Markarian 1044 is consistent with a solar mixture. This is in direct contradiction of extrapolations from local H II regions which state N/ C should scale with bulk metallicity. This implies a different enrichment history in Markarian 1044 than in the Galactic disk. I also report discovery of three new low-redshift Lya forest lines with log N HI >= 12:77 in the spectrum of Markarian 1044. This number is consistent with the 2.6 expected Lya forest lines in the path length to Markarian 1044. I also investigate the CHANDRA X-ray spectrum of Markarian 279, a broad-line Seyfert 1. I use a new code, PHASE, to self-consistently model the entire absorption spectrum simultaneously. Using solely the X-ray spectrum I am able to determine the physical parameters of this absorber to a degree only

  11. Spectral ratio method for measuring emissivity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Watson, K.

    1992-01-01

    The spectral ratio method is based on the concept that although the spectral radiances are very sensitive to small changes in temperature the ratios are not. Only an approximate estimate of temperature is required thus, for example, we can determine the emissivity ratio to an accuracy of 1% with a temperature estimate that is only accurate to 12.5 K. Selecting the maximum value of the channel brightness temperatures is an unbiased estimate. Laboratory and field spectral data are easily converted into spectral ratio plots. The ratio method is limited by system signal:noise and spectral band-width. The images can appear quite noisy because ratios enhance high frequencies and may require spatial filtering. Atmospheric effects tend to rescale the ratios and require using an atmospheric model or a calibration site. ?? 1992.

  12. Airborne Spectral Measurements of Ocean Anisotropy during CLAMS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gatebe, C. K.; King, M. D.; Arnold, G. T.; Lau, William K. M. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The Cloud Absorption Radiometer (CAR) aboard the University of Washington Convair CV-580 research aircraft obtained bidirectional reflectance-distribution function (BRDF) of Atlantic Ocean and Dismal Swamp between July 10 and August 2, 2001. The BRDF measurements (15 in total, 8 uncontaminated by clouds) obtained under a variety of sun angles and wind conditions, will be used to characterize ocean anisotropy in support of Chesapeake Lighthouse and Aircraft Measurements for Satellites (CLAMS) science objectives principally to validate products from NASA's EOS satellites, and to parameterize and validate BRDF models of the ocean. In this paper we present results of BRDF of the Ocean under different sun angles and wind conditions. The CAR is capable of measuring scattered light in fourteen spectral bands. The scan mirror, rotating at 100 rpm, directs the light into a Dall-Kirkham telescope where the beam is split into nine paths. Eight light beams pass through beam splitters, dichroics, and lenses to individual detectors (0.34-1.27 micron), and finally are registered by eight data channels. They are sampled simultaneously and continuously. The ninth beam passes through a spinning filter wheel to an InSb detector cooled by a Stirling cycle cooler. Signals registered by the ninth data channel are selected from among six spectral channels (1.55-2.30 micron). The filter wheel can either cycle through all six spectral bands at a prescribed interval (usually changing filter every fifth scan line), or lock onto any one of the six spectral bands and sample it continuously. To measure the BRF of the surface-atmosphere system, the University of Washington CV-580 had to fly in a circle about 3 km in diameter above the surface for roughly two minutes. Replicated observations (multiple circular orbits) were acquired over selected surfaces so that average BRF smooth out small-scale surface and atmospheric inhomogeneities. At an altitude of 600 m above the targeted surface area and

  13. High Spectral Resolution Lidar Measurements of Multiple Scattering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eloranta, E. W.; Piironen, P.

    1996-01-01

    The University of Wisconsin High Spectral Resolution Lidar (HSRL) provides unambiguous measurements of backscatter cross section, backscatter phase function, depolarization, and optical depth. This is accomplished by dividing the lidar return into separate particulate and molecular contributions. The molecular return is then used as a calibration target. We have modified the HSRL to use an I2 molecular absorption filter to separate aerosol and molecular signals. This allows measurement in dense clouds. Useful profiles extend above the cloud base until the two way optical depth reaches values between 5 and 6; beyond this, photon counting errors become large. In order to observe multiple scattering, the HSRL includes a channel which records the combined aerosol and molecular lidar return simultaneously with the spectrometer channel measurements of optical properties. This paper describes HSRL multiple scattering measurements from both water and ice clouds. These include signal strengths and depolarizations as a function of receiver field of view. All observations include profiles of extinction and backscatter cross sections. Measurements are also compared to predictions of a multiple scattering model based on small angle approximations.

  14. [Analyses of spectral emissivity in radiation temperature measurement].

    PubMed

    Fu, Tai-Ran; Cheng, Xiao-Fang; Zhong, Mao-Hua; Yang, Zang-Jian

    2008-01-01

    The complexity of the spectral emissivity of actual surfaces is the key point in the research and applications of radiation temperature measurement, resulting in the difficulty in the achievement of the temperature measurement. In the present paper, based on the discussions of the Taylor expansion, the non-dimension wavelength and the exponent, the authors describe the mathematical expression of the spectral emissivity of actual surfaces, and establish the general spectral emissivity function. Through the fitting of experimental data of the spectral emissivities of different metals at different temperatures, the applicability of the spectral emissivity function is verified which especially becomes the fundamental in the research of primary spectrum pyrometry. PMID:18422106

  15. Measurements of self-broadening of infrared absorption lines of ozone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, M. A. H.; Rinsland, C. P.; Devi, V. M.

    1991-01-01

    Lorentz self-broadening coefficients have been determined for 355 spectral lines belonging to five different infrared vibration-rotation bands of O3 in the spectral region from 4.8 to 17 microns. Six ozone absorption spectra, recorded at room temperature using a Fourier transform spectrometer, were analyzed. The half-width values were obtained through a nonlinear least-squares spectral fitting procedure. The results are compared with previous measurements, and the vibration of the half-widths with vibrational and rotational quantum numbers is examined.

  16. Atmospheric solar absorption measurements in the 9 to 11 mu m region using a diode laser heterodyne spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harward, C. N.; Hoell, J. M., Jr.

    1980-01-01

    A tunable diode laser heterodyne radiometer was developed for ground-based measurements of atmospheric solar absorption spectra in the 8 to 12 microns spectral range. The performance and operating characteristics of this Tunable Infrared Heterodyne Radiometer (TIHR) are discussed along with atmospheric solar absorption spectra of HNO3, O3, CO2, and H2O in the 9 to 11 microns spectral region.

  17. SPECTRAL MEASUREMENTS OF GASEOUS SULFURIC ACID USING TUNABLE DIODE LASERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Using a tunable diode laser spectrometer with a spectral resolution of about 10 to the -4 power/cm, the important central portions of the two infrared absorption bands of H2SO4 at 8.2 micrometers (1222/cm) and 11.3 micrometers (880/cm) have been scanned at low pressure (approxima...

  18. [Study on exploring for gas based on analysis of spectral absorption features].

    PubMed

    Xu, Da-Qi; Ni, Guo-Qiang; Jiang, Li-Li; Li, Ting; Ge, Shu-Le; Shu, Xian-Biao

    2007-11-01

    Reflectance spectra in the visible and near-infrared wavelength region provide a rapid and inexpensive means for determining the mineralogy of samples and obtaining information on chemical composition. Hydrocarbon microseepage theory establishes a cause-and-effect relation between oil and gas reservoirs and some special surface anomalies. Therefore the authors can explore for oil and gas by determining the reflectance spectra of surface anomalies. This determination can be fulfilled by means of field work and hyperspectral remote sensing. In the present paper, based on the analysis of reflectance spectra determined in the field of Qinghai X X area, firstly, a macroscopic feature of the reflectance spectra of typical observation points in the gas fields is presented. Secondly, absorption-band parameters of spectra such as the position, depth, width, and asymmetry are extracted. Based on the spectral absorption features of the spectra of 144 samples collected from the field, a spectral library for the Qinghai X X area is built to make the detection of the mineral alterations more rapid and reliable. Thirdly, two methods are improved and proposed to detect hydrocarbon microseepage using hydrocarbon absorption bands of reflectance spectra determined from the field. Finally, a linear unmixing model is studied based on the spectra of 144 samples so as to semi-quantitatively determine the abundance fractions of main minerals in the authors' studied area. PMID:18260381

  19. ON NEUTRAL ABSORPTION AND SPECTRAL EVOLUTION IN X-RAY BINARIES

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, J. M.; Cackett, E. M.; Reis, R. C.

    2009-12-10

    Current X-ray observatories make it possible to follow the evolution of transient and variable X-ray binaries across a broad range in luminosity and source behavior. In such studies, it can be unclear whether evolution in the low-energy portion of the spectrum should be attributed to evolution in the source, or instead to evolution in neutral photoelectric absorption. Dispersive spectrometers make it possible to address this problem. We have analyzed a small but diverse set of X-ray binaries observed with the Chandra High Energy Transmission Grating Spectrometer across a range in luminosity and different spectral states. The column density in individual photoelectric absorption edges remains constant with luminosity, both within and across source spectral states. This finding suggests that absorption in the interstellar medium strongly dominates the neutral column density observed in spectra of X-ray binaries. Consequently, evolution in the low-energy spectrum of X-ray binaries should properly be attributed to evolution in the source spectrum. We discuss our results in the context of X-ray binary spectroscopy with current and future X-ray missions.

  20. Absorption of Solar Radiation by the Cloudy Atmosphere Interpretations of Collocated Aircraft Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Valero, Francisco P. J.; Cess, Robert D.; Zhang, Minghua; Pope, Shelly K.; Bucholtz, Anthony; Bush, Brett; Vitko, John, Jr.

    1997-01-01

    As part of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Enhanced Shortwave Experiment (ARESE), we have obtained and analyzed measurements made from collocated aircraft of the absorption of solar radiation within the atmospheric column between the two aircraft. The measurements were taken during October 1995 at the ARM site in Oklahoma. Relative to a theoretical radiative transfer model, we find no evidence for excess solar absorption in the clear atmosphere and significant evidence for its existence in the cloudy atmosphere. This excess cloud solar absorption appears to occur in both visible (0.224-0.68 microns) and near-infrared (0.68-3.30 microns) spectral regions, although not at 0.5 microns for the visible contribution, and it is shown to be true absorption rather than an artifact of sampling errors caused by measuring three-dimensional clouds.

  1. Spectral-based inferential measurement of grey-body's temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Feng; Liu, Liying; Zhu, Lingxi; Huan, Kewei; Li, Ye; Shi, Xiaoguang

    2015-11-01

    Aiming at the problems of temperature measurement and the defects of radiance thermometry theory, one method of spectral-based inferential measurement is proposed, which adopts the Empirical Risk Minimization (ERM) functional model as the temperature measurement model. Then, the radiance thermometry theory and inferential measurement technology are discussed comparatively. Temperatures of some targets, such and tungsten lamp and solar surface, are measured by spectral-based inferential measurement.

  2. Modeling ocean primary production: Sensitivity to spectral resolution of attenuation and absorption of light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kettle, Helen; Merchant, Chris J.

    2008-08-01

    Modeling the vertical penetration of photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) through the ocean, and its utilization by phytoplankton, is fundamental to simulating marine primary production. The variation of attenuation and absorption of light with wavelength suggests that photosynthesis should be modeled at high spectral resolution, but this is computationally expensive. To model primary production in global 3d models, a balance between computer time and accuracy is necessary. We investigate the effects of varying the spectral resolution of the underwater light field and the photosynthetic efficiency of phytoplankton ( α∗), on primary production using a 1d coupled ecosystem ocean turbulence model. The model is applied at three sites in the Atlantic Ocean (CIS (∼60°N), PAP (∼50°N) and ESTOC (∼30°N)) to include the effect of different meteorological forcing and parameter sets. We also investigate three different methods for modeling α∗ - as a fixed constant, varying with both wavelength and chlorophyll concentration [Bricaud, A., Morel, A., Babin, M., Allali, K., Claustre, H., 1998. Variations of light absorption by suspended particles with chlorophyll a concentration in oceanic (case 1) waters. Analysis and implications for bio-optical models. J. Geophys. Res. 103, 31033-31044], and using a non-spectral parameterization [Anderson, T.R., 1993. A spectrally averaged model of light penetration and photosynthesis. Limnol. Oceanogr. 38, 1403-1419]. After selecting the appropriate ecosystem parameters for each of the three sites we vary the spectral resolution of light and α∗ from 1 to 61 wavebands and study the results in conjunction with the three different α∗ estimation methods. The results show modeled estimates of ocean primary productivity are highly sensitive to the degree of spectral resolution and α∗. For accurate simulations of primary production and chlorophyll distribution we recommend a spectral resolution of at least six wavebands

  3. Sensitive absorption measurements in bulk material and coatings using a photothermal and a photoacoustic spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fieberg, S.; Waasem, N.; Kühnemann, F.; Buse, K.

    2014-02-01

    Bulk and surface absorption in lithium triborate (LBO) and lithium niobate (LiNbO3) are measured using two sensitive measurement techniques, a photoacoustic spectrometer (PAS) and a photothermal common-path interferometer (PCI). As pump light sources, optical parametric oscillators are employed, covering the wavelength ranges 212 - 2500 nm (PAS) and 1460 - 1900 nm and 2460 - 3900 nm (PCI). The spectrometers are used to measure absorption spectra of optical materials across this wide spectral range and to compare the methods in the shared wavelength regime.

  4. Absorption cross-section measurements of methane, ethane, ethylene and methanol at high temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alrefae, Majed; Es-sebbar, Et-touhami; Farooq, Aamir

    2014-09-01

    Mid-IR absorption cross-sections are measured for methane, ethane, ethylene and methanol over 2800-3400 cm-1 (2.9-3.6 μm) spectral region. Measurements are carried out using a Fourier-Transform-Infrared (FTIR) spectrometer with temperatures ranging 296-1100 K and pressures near atmospheric. As temperature increases, the peak cross-sections decrease but the wings of the bands increase as higher rotational lines appear. Integrated band intensity is also calculated over the measured spectral region and is found to be a very weak function of temperature. The absorption cross-sections of the relatively small fuels studied here show dependence on the bath gas. This effect is investigated by studying the variation of absorption cross-sections at 3.392 μm using a HeNe laser in mixtures of fuel and nitrogen, argon, or helium. Mixtures of fuel with He have the highest value of absorption cross-sections followed by Ar and N2. Molecules with narrow absorption lines, such as methane and methanol, show strong dependence on bath gas than molecules with relatively broader absorption features i.e. ethane and ethylene.

  5. Accurate Measurements of Spectral Reflectance in Picasso's Guernica Painting.

    PubMed

    de Luna, Javier Muñoz; Fernandez-Balbuena, Antonio Alvarez; Vázquez, Daniel; Melgosa, Manuel; Durán, Humberto; García, Jorge; Muro, Carmen

    2016-01-01

    The use of non-invasive spectral measurements to control the conservation status is a part of the preventive conservation of artworks which nowadays is becoming increasingly interesting. This paper describes how to use a spectral measuring device and an illumination system specifically designed for such a task in a very large dimension artwork painting (7.8 m wide × 3.5 m high). The system, controlled by a Cartesian robot, allows spectral measurements in a spectral range of 400-780 nm. The measured data array has a total of 2201 circular regions with 5.5 mm spot diameter placed on a square grid. Colorimetric calculations performed from these spectral measurements may be used to characterize color shifts related to reflectance changes in specific areas of the paint. A color shifting from the expected gray has been shown. PMID:26767640

  6. Remote and Ground Truth Spectral Measurement Comparisons of FORMOSAT III

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abercromby, Kira Jorgensen; Hamada, Kris; Guyote, Michael; Okada, Jennifer; Barker, Edwin

    2007-01-01

    FORMOSAT III are a set of six research satellites from Taiwan that were launched in April 2006. The satellites are in 800 km, 71 degree inclination orbits and separated by 24 degrees in ascending node. Laboratory spectral measurements were taken of outer surface materials on FORMOSAT III. From those measurements, a computer model was built to predict the spectral reflectance accounting for both solar phase angle and orientation of the spacecraft relative to the observer. However, materials exposed to the space environment have exhibited spectral changes including a darkening and a "reddening" of the spectra. This "reddening" is characterized by an increase in slope of the reflectance as the wavelength increases. Therefore, the model of pre-flight materials was augmented to include the presumed causative agent: space weathering effects. Remote data were collected on two of the six FORMOSAT satellites using the 1.6 meter telescope at the AMOS (Air Force Maui Optical and Supercomputing) site with the Spica spectrometer. Due to the separation in ascending node, observations were acquired of whichever one of the six satellites was visible on that specific night. Three nights of data were collected using the red (6000 - 9500 angstroms) filter and five nights of data were collected using the blue (3200 - 6600 angstroms) filter. A comparison of the data showed a good match to the pre-flight models for the blue filter region. The absorption feature near 5500 angstroms due to the copper colored Kapton multi-layer insulation (MLI) was very apparent in the remote samples and a good fit to the data was seen in all satellites observed. The features in the red filter regime agreed with the pre-flight model up through 7000 angstroms where the reddening begins and the slope of the remote sample increases. A comparison of the satellites showed similar features in the red and blue filter regions, i.e. the satellite surfaces were aging at the same rate. A comparison of the pre

  7. Absolute Rovibrational Intensities of C-12O2-16 Absorption Bands in the 3090-3850/ CM Spectral Region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Devi, V. Malathy; Benner, D. Chris; Rinsland, Curtis P.; Smith, Mary Ann H.

    1998-01-01

    A multispectrum nonlinear least-squares fitting technique has been used to determine the absolute intensities for approximately 1500 spectral lines in 36 vibration - rotation bands Of C-12O2-16 between 3090 and 3850/ cm. A total of six absorption spectra of a high- purity (99.995% minimum) natural sample of carbon dioxide were used in the analysis. The spectral data (0.01/cm resolution) were recorded at room temperature and low pressure (1 to 10 Torr) using the McMath-Pierce Fourier transform spectrometer of the National Solar Observatory (NSO) on Kitt Peak. The absorption path lengths for these spectra varied between 24.86 and 385.76 m. The first experimental determination of the intensity of the theoretically predicted 2(nu)(sub 2, sup 2) + nu(sub 3) "forbidden" band has been made. The measured line intensities obtained for each band have been analyzed to determine the vibrational band intensity, S(sub nu), in /cm/( molecule/sq cm) at 296 K, square of the rotationless transition dipole moment |R|(exp 2) in Debye, as well as the nonrigid rotor coefficients. The results are compared to the values listed in the 1996 HITRAN database which are obtained using the direct numerical diagonalization (DND) technique as well as to other published values where available.

  8. Measuring black carbon spectral extinction in the visible and infrared

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, A. J. A.; Peters, D. M.; McPheat, R.; Lukanihins, S.; Grainger, R. G.

    2015-09-01

    This work presents measurements of the spectral extinction of black carbon aerosol from 400 nm to 15 μm. The aerosol was generated using a Miniature Combustion Aerosol Standard soot generator and then allowed to circulate in an aerosol cell where its extinction was measured using a grating spectrometer in the visible and a Fourier transform spectrometer in the infrared. Size distribution, number concentration, and mass extinction cross sections have also been obtained using single-particle aerosol samplers. A mean mass extinction cross section at 550 nm of 8.3 ± 1.6 m2 g-1 is found which, assuming a reasonable single scatter albedo of 0.2, corresponds to a mass absorption cross section of 6.6 ± 1.3 m2 g-1. This compares well with previously reported literature values. Computer analysis of electron microscope images of the particles provides independent confirmation of the size distribution as well as fractal parameters of the black carbon aerosol. The aerosol properties presented in this work are representative of very fresh, uncoated black carbon aerosol. After atmospheric processing of such aerosols (which could include mixing with other constituents and structural changes), different optical properties would be expected.

  9. On the absorption and electromagnetic field spectral shifts in plasmonic nanotriangle arrays.

    PubMed

    Vedraine, Sylvain; Hou, Renjie; Norton, Peter R; Lagugné-Labarthet, François

    2014-06-01

    The behavior of the electromagnetic field interaction with gold nanotriangles organized in bow-tie arrays is investigated. A side-by-side comparison between the measured absorbance of the array and the modelled integrated electric field resonances confined around the gold structures is presented and discussed to explain the spectral shift between both parameters. Finite difference time domain calculations and Raman measurements of gold triangles of different sizes and periodicity are systematically performed. Numerical calculations show that the spectral maximum of the electric field varies in distinct areas over the metallic structures. PMID:24921524

  10. Variability of light absorption by aquatic particles in the near-infrared spectral region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tassan, Stelvio; Ferrari, Giovanni M.

    2003-08-01

    We have measured the light absorption of a set of particle suspensions of varying nature (pure minerals, particulate standards, aquatic particles) using a double-beam spectrophotometer with a 15-cm-diameter integrating sphere. The sample was located inside the sphere so as to minimize the effect of light scattering by the particles. The results obtained showed highly variable absorption in the near-IR region of the wavelength spectrum. The same particle samples were deposited on glass-fiber filters, and their absorption was measured by the transmittance-reflectance method, based on a theoretical model that corrects for the effect of light scattering. The good agreement found between the results of the measurements carried out inside the sphere and by the transmittance-reflectance method confirms the validity of the scattering correction included in the above method.

  11. Spectral variation of the infrared absorption coefficient in pulsed photothermal profiling of biological samples.

    PubMed

    Majaron, Boris; Verkruysse, Wim; Tanenbaum, B Samuel; Milner, Thomas E; Nelson, J Stuart

    2002-06-01

    Pulsed photothermal radiometry can be used for non-invasive depth profiling of optically scattering samples, including biological tissues such as human skin. Computational reconstruction of the laser-induced temperature profile from recorded radiometric signals is sensitive to the value of the tissue absorption coefficient in the infrared detection band (muIR). While assumed constant in reported reconstruction algorithms, muIR of human skin varies by two orders of magnitude in the commonly used 3-5 microm detection band. We analyse the problem of selecting the effective absorption coefficient value to be used with such algorithms. In a numerical simulation of photothermal profiling we demonstrate that results can be markedly impaired, unless the reconstruction algorithm is augmented by accounting for spectral variation muIR(lambda). Alternatively, narrowing the detection band to 4.5-5 microm reduces the spectral variation muIR(lambda) to a level that permits the use of the simpler, unaugmented algorithm. Implementation of the latter approach for depth profiling of port wine stain birthmarks in vivo is presented and discussed. PMID:12108776

  12. Effective infrared absorption coefficient for photothermal radiometric measurements in biological tissues.

    PubMed

    Majaron, Boris; Milanic, Matija

    2008-01-01

    Although photothermal radiometric (PTR) measurements commonly employ broad-band signal acquisition to increase the signal-to-noise ratio, all reported studies apply a fixed infrared (IR) absorption coefficient to simplify the involved signal analysis. In samples with large spectral variation of micro(lambda) in mid-IR, which includes most biological tissues, the selection of the effective IR absorption coefficient value (micro(eff)) can strongly affect the accuracy of the result. We present a novel analytical approach for the determination of optimal micro(eff) from spectral properties of the sample and radiation detector. In extensive numerical simulations of pulsed PTR temperature profiling in human skin using three common IR radiation detectors and several acquisition spectral bands, we demonstrate that our approach produces viable values micro(eff). Two previously used analytical estimations perform much worse in the same comparison. PMID:18182701

  13. Communication: On the difficulty of reproducibly measuring PbCl2 X-ray absorption spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwartz, Craig P.; Prendergast, David

    2015-09-01

    Previous measurements of the X-ray absorption spectra of PbCl2 at the chlorine K-edge have shown significant variation between different studies. Herein, using first principles simulations of X-ray absorption spectroscopy, we show that the observed spectral variations are due to the generation of Cl2 gas and depletion of chlorine from PbCl2, consistent with what is observed during ultraviolet absorption for the same compound. We note that Cl2 gas generation can also be initiated using higher resonant X-ray energies, including Pb X-ray absorption edges. While this casts doubt on previous interpretations of certain measurements, it does indicate a means of generating chlorine gas during in situ experiments by passing high energy x-rays through a hard x-ray transparent medium and onto PbCl2.

  14. Communication: On the difficulty of reproducibly measuring PbCl2 X-ray absorption spectra.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Craig P; Prendergast, David

    2015-09-21

    Previous measurements of the X-ray absorption spectra of PbCl2 at the chlorine K-edge have shown significant variation between different studies. Herein, using first principles simulations of X-ray absorption spectroscopy, we show that the observed spectral variations are due to the generation of Cl2 gas and depletion of chlorine from PbCl2, consistent with what is observed during ultraviolet absorption for the same compound. We note that Cl2 gas generation can also be initiated using higher resonant X-ray energies, including Pb X-ray absorption edges. While this casts doubt on previous interpretations of certain measurements, it does indicate a means of generating chlorine gas during in situ experiments by passing high energy x-rays through a hard x-ray transparent medium and onto PbCl2. PMID:26395677

  15. Optoacoustic measurements of water vapor absorption at selected CO laser wavelengths in the 5-micron region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Menzies, R. T.; Shumate, M. S.

    1976-01-01

    Measurements of water vapor absorption were taken with a resonant optoacoustical detector (cylindrical pyrex detector, two BaF2 windows fitted into end plates at slight tilt to suppress Fabry-Perot resonances), for lack of confidence in existing spectral tabular data for the 5-7 micron region, as line shapes in the wing regions of water vapor lines are difficult to characterize. The measurements are required for air pollution studies using a CO laser, to find the differential absorption at the wavelengths in question due to atmospheric constituents other than water vapor. The design and performance of the optoacoustical detector are presented. Effects of absorption by ambient NO are considered, and the fixed-frequency discretely tunable CO laser is found suitable for monitoring urban NO concentrations in a fairly dry climate, using the water vapor absorption data obtained in the study.

  16. Pressure Measurements Using an Airborne Differential Absorption Lidar. Part 1; Analysis of the Systematic Error Sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flamant, Cyrille N.; Schwemmer, Geary K.; Korb, C. Laurence; Evans, Keith D.; Palm, Stephen P.

    1999-01-01

    Remote airborne measurements of the vertical and horizontal structure of the atmospheric pressure field in the lower troposphere are made with an oxygen differential absorption lidar (DIAL). A detailed analysis of this measurement technique is provided which includes corrections for imprecise knowledge of the detector background level, the oxygen absorption fine parameters, and variations in the laser output energy. In addition, we analyze other possible sources of systematic errors including spectral effects related to aerosol and molecular scattering interference by rotational Raman scattering and interference by isotopic oxygen fines.

  17. The temperature measurement research for high-speed flow based on tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di, Yue; Jin, Yi; Jiang, Hong-liang; Zhai, Chao

    2013-09-01

    Due to the particularity of the high-speed flow, in order to accurately obtain its' temperature, the measurement system should has some characteristics of not interfereing with the flow, non-contact measurement and high time resolution. The traditional measurement method cannot meet the above requirements, however the measurement method based on tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (TDLAS) technology can meet the requirements for high-speed flow temperature measurement. When the near-infared light of a specific frequency is through the media to be measured, it will be absorbed by the water vapor molecules and then the transmission light intensity is detected by the detector. The temperature of the water vapor which is also the high-speed flow temperature, can be accurately obtained by the Beer-Lambert law. This paper focused on the research of absorption spectrum method for high speed flow temperature measurement with the scope of 250K-500K. Firstly, spectral line selection method for low temperature measurement of high-speed flow is discussed. Selected absorption lines should be isolated and have a high peak absorption within the range of 250-500K, at the same time the interference of the other lines should be avoided, so that a high measurement accuracy can be obtained. According to the near-infrared absorption spectra characteristics of water vapor, four absorption lines at the near 1395 nm and 1409 nm are selected. Secondly, a system for the temperature measurement of the water vapor in the high-speed flow is established. Room temperature are measured through two methods, direct absorption spectroscopy (DAS) and wavelength modulation spectroscopy (WMS) ,the results show that this system can realize on-line measurement of the temperature and the measurement error is about 3%. Finally, the system will be used for temperature measurement of the high-speed flow in the shock tunnel, its feasibility of measurement is analyzed.

  18. Ultrafast transient absorption revisited: Phase-flips, spectral fingers, and other dynamical features.

    PubMed

    Cina, Jeffrey A; Kovac, Philip A; Jumper, Chanelle C; Dean, Jacob C; Scholes, Gregory D

    2016-05-01

    We rebuild the theory of ultrafast transient-absorption/transmission spectroscopy starting from the optical response of an individual molecule to incident femtosecond pump and probe pulses. The resulting description makes use of pulse propagators and free molecular evolution operators to arrive at compact expressions for the several contributions to a transient-absorption signal. In this alternative description, which is physically equivalent to the conventional response-function formalism, these signal contributions are conveniently expressed as quantum mechanical overlaps between nuclear wave packets that have undergone different sequences of pulse-driven optical transitions and time-evolution on different electronic potential-energy surfaces. Using this setup in application to a simple, multimode model of the light-harvesting chromophores of PC577, we develop wave-packet pictures of certain generic features of ultrafast transient-absorption signals related to the probed-frequency dependence of vibrational quantum beats. These include a Stokes-shifting node at the time-evolving peak emission frequency, antiphasing between vibrational oscillations on opposite sides (i.e., to the red or blue) of this node, and spectral fingering due to vibrational overtones and combinations. Our calculations make a vibrationally abrupt approximation for the incident pump and probe pulses, but properly account for temporal pulse overlap and signal turn-on, rather than neglecting pulse overlap or assuming delta-function excitations, as are sometimes done. PMID:27155654

  19. Ultrafast transient absorption revisited: Phase-flips, spectral fingers, and other dynamical features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cina, Jeffrey A.; Kovac, Philip A.; Jumper, Chanelle C.; Dean, Jacob C.; Scholes, Gregory D.

    2016-05-01

    We rebuild the theory of ultrafast transient-absorption/transmission spectroscopy starting from the optical response of an individual molecule to incident femtosecond pump and probe pulses. The resulting description makes use of pulse propagators and free molecular evolution operators to arrive at compact expressions for the several contributions to a transient-absorption signal. In this alternative description, which is physically equivalent to the conventional response-function formalism, these signal contributions are conveniently expressed as quantum mechanical overlaps between nuclear wave packets that have undergone different sequences of pulse-driven optical transitions and time-evolution on different electronic potential-energy surfaces. Using this setup in application to a simple, multimode model of the light-harvesting chromophores of PC577, we develop wave-packet pictures of certain generic features of ultrafast transient-absorption signals related to the probed-frequency dependence of vibrational quantum beats. These include a Stokes-shifting node at the time-evolving peak emission frequency, antiphasing between vibrational oscillations on opposite sides (i.e., to the red or blue) of this node, and spectral fingering due to vibrational overtones and combinations. Our calculations make a vibrationally abrupt approximation for the incident pump and probe pulses, but properly account for temporal pulse overlap and signal turn-on, rather than neglecting pulse overlap or assuming delta-function excitations, as are sometimes done.

  20. Intergrating cavity absorption meter measurements of dissolved substances and suspended particles in ocean water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pope, Robin M.; Weidemann, Alan D.; Fry, Edward S.

    2000-01-01

    We have developed a new device to measure the separate contributions to the spectral absorption coefficient due to a pure liquid, due to the particles suspended in it, and due to the substances dissolved in it. This device, the Integrating Cavity Absorption Meter (ICAM), is essentially independent of scattering effects in the sample. In April 1993, a prototype of the ICAM was field tested on board the research vessel USNS Bartlett. A major part of the cruise track included criss-crossing the area where the Mississippi flows into the Gulf of Mexico at various ranges from the mouth of the river; thus samples were collected from areas of blue, green, and brown/black water. We evaluated 35 seawater samples collected with 5-l Niskin bottles from 22 locations to determine absorption spectra (380-700 nm) of suspended particles and dissolved substances (gelbstoff). Results validate the ICAM as a viable tool for marine optical absorption research. Gelbstoff absorption at 432.5 nm ranged from 0.024 to 0.603 m -1. Over the spectral region 380→560 nm, gelbstoff absorption by each of the samples could be accurately fit to a decaying exponential. The particle absorption spectra are generally characteristic of those of phytoplankton and exhibit a local maximum at 430-440 nm. Absorption values at 432.5 nm ranged from ˜zero to ˜1.0 m -1. Some samples with moderate particulate absorption, however, did not show the characteristic local maximum of phytoplankton in the blue and instead resembled the characteristic decaying exponential of detritus with a shape similar to that observed in the gelbstoff. The ratio of gelbstoff to particulate absorption at 432.5 nm ranged from 0.46 to 152.

  1. Spectral infrared hemispherical reflectance measurements for LDEF tray clamps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, Bobby E.; Cromwell, Brian K.; Pender, Charles W.; Shepherd, Seth D.

    1992-01-01

    This paper describes infrared hemispherical reflectance measurements (2-15 microns) that were made on 58 chromic acid anodized tray clamps retrieved from the LDEF spacecraft. These clamps were used for maintaining the experiments in place and were located at various locations about the spacecraft. Changes in reflectance of the tray clamps at these locations were compared with atomic oxygen fluxes at the same locations. A decrease in absorption band depth was seen for the surfaces exposed to space indicating that there was some surface layer erosion. In all of the surfaces measured, little evidence of contamination was observed and none of the samples showed evidence of the brown nicotine stain that was so prominent in other experiments. Total emissivity values were calculated for both exposed and unexposed tray clamp surfaces. Only small differences, usually less than 1 percent, were observed. The spectral reflectances were measured using a hemi-ellipsoidal mirror reflectometer matched with an interferometer spectrometer. The rapid scanning capability of the interferometer allowed the reflectance measurements to be made in a timely fashion. The ellipsoidal mirror has its two foci separated by 2 inches and located on the major axis. A blackbody source was located at one focus while the tray clamp samples were located at the conjugate focus. The blackbody radiation was modulated and then focused by the ellipsoid onto the tray clamps. Radiation reflected from the tray clamp was sampled by the interferometer by viewing through a hole in the ellipsoid. A gold mirror (reflectance approximately 98 percent) was used as the reference surface.

  2. An optical system for measuring nitric oxide using spectral separation techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Y. G.; Somesfalean, G.; Guo, W.; Wang, H. S.; Wu, S. H.; Qin, Y. K.; Zhang, Z. G.

    2012-05-01

    An optical sensor based on differential absorption spectroscopy for real-time monitoring of industrial nitric oxide (NO) gas emission is described. The influence of gas absorption interference from sulfur dioxide (SO2) in the environment was considered and a spectral separation technique was developed in order to eliminate this interference effect. The absorption spectrum of SO2 around 226 nm was evaluated by the SO2 concentration obtained using the experimentally recorded absorption spectrum around 300 nm. The absorption spectrum of NO around 226 nm was obtained by subtracting the absorption of SO2 from the integral absorption spectrum of SO2 and NO. The concentration measurements were performed at atmospheric pressure. The technique was found to have a lower detection limit of 0.8 ppm for NO per meter path length (SNR=2) and be immune from the influence from SO2 on the NO measurement. The sensor based on this technique was successfully employed for in situ measurement of SO2 and NO concentrations in the flue gas emitted from an industrial coal-fired boiler.

  3. Long-path supercontinuum absorption spectroscopy for measurement of atmospheric constituents.

    PubMed

    Brown, David M; Shi, Kebin; Liu, Zhiwen; Philbrick, C R

    2008-06-01

    A supercontinuum source has been proposed as a new tool for measurement of minor species concentrations on long paths through the atmosphere. The present work describes results from recent experiments that demonstrate the potential for Differential Absorption Spectroscopy (DAS) and Spectral Pattern Recognition Differential Absorption Lidar (SPR-DIAL) measurements utilizing a supercontinuum source. As an initial example of this measurement approach, the results include the quantification of water vapor concentration through indoor and outdoor path absorption measurements using a collimated supercontinuum source. Experimental spectra are compared with equivalent simulations from MODTRAN??? versions 4 and 5 to examine the water vapor band between 1300 and 1500 nm to demonstrate the feasibility of the approach. PMID:18545560

  4. Internal quality evaluation of apples using spectral absorption and scattering properties

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of this research was to measure the absorption and reduced scattering coefficients of apples via a spatially-resolved hyperspectral imaging technique and relate them to fruit firmness and soluble solids content (SSC). Spatially-resolved hyperspectral images were acquired from 600 ‘Gold...

  5. Prediction of apple internal quality using spectral absorption and scattering properties

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This paper reports on the measurement of the absorption and reduced scattering coefficients of apples via a new spatially-resolved hyperspectral imaging technique and their correlation with fruit firmness and soluble solids content (SSC). Spatially-resolved hyperspectral scattering profiles were acq...

  6. Examination of the Measurement of Absorption Using the Reverberant Room Method for Highly Absorptive Acoustic Foam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes, William O.; McNelis, Anne M.; Chris Nottoli; Eric Wolfram

    2015-01-01

    The absorption coefficient for material specimens are needed to quantify the expected acoustic performance of that material in its actual usage and environment. The ASTM C423-09a standard, "Standard Test Method for Sound Absorption and Sound Absorption Coefficients by the Reverberant Room Method" is often used to measure the absorption coefficient of material test specimens. This method has its basics in the Sabine formula. Although widely used, the interpretation of these measurements are a topic of interest. For example, in certain cases the measured Sabine absorption coefficients are greater than 1.0 for highly absorptive materials. This is often attributed to the diffraction edge effect phenomenon. An investigative test program to measure the absorption properties of highly absorbent melamine foam has been performed at the Riverbank Acoustical Laboratories. This paper will present and discuss the test results relating to the effect of the test materials' surface area, thickness and edge sealing conditions. A follow-on paper is envisioned that will present and discuss the results relating to the spacing between multiple piece specimens, and the mounting condition of the test specimen.

  7. Infrared Absorption Spectroscopy Measurement of SOx using Tunable Infrared Laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukuchi, Tetsuo

    The absorption characteristics of sulfur dioxide (SO2) and sulfur trioxide (SO3) in the infrared region were measured using a quantum cascade laser and an absorption cell of length 1 m heated to 150°C. The laser was scanned over the wavelength range 6.9-7.4 μm, which included the absorption bands of SO2 and SO3. Measurement results showed that the absorption bands of SO2 and SO3 partially overlapped, with peaks at 7.28 μm and 7.35 μm for SO2 and 7.14 μm and 7.25 μm for SO3. These results showed the possbility of using infrared laser absorption spectroscopy for measurement of sulfur oxides (SOx) in flue gas. For SO3 measurement, infrared absorption spectroscopy was shown to be more suitable than ultraviolet absorption spectroscopy. The absorption characteristics of open air in the same wavelength region showed that the interference due to water vapor must be efficiently removed to perform SOx measurement in flue gas.

  8. One Moon, Many Measurements 3: Spectral reflectance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohtake, M.; Pieters, C. M.; Isaacson, P.; Besse, S.; Yokota, Y.; Matsunaga, T.; Boardman, J.; Yamomoto, S.; Haruyama, J.; Staid, M.; Mall, U.; Green, R. O.

    2013-09-01

    Remote-sensing datasets obtained by each instrument aboard Selenological and Engineering Explorer (SELENE) and Chandrayaan-1 have not been compared directly, and the characteristics of each instrument’s data, which may reflect the observation conditions of each instrument and/or residual error in instrument calibration, are unknown. This paper describes the basic characteristics of the data derived by each instrument, briefly describes the data-processing conversion from radiance to reflectance, and demonstrates what we can achieve by combining data obtained by different instruments on different missions (five remote-sensing instruments and an Earth-based telescope). The results clearly demonstrate that the spectral shapes of the instruments are comparable and thus enable us to estimate the composition of each geologic unit, although absolute reflectances differ slightly in some cases.

  9. Spectral calibration for infrared hyperspectral imaging Fourier transform spectrometer based on absorption peaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, YaSheng; Chen, Yan; Liao, Ningfang; Lyu, Hang; He, Shufang; Wan, Lifang

    2015-08-01

    A new calibration method for infrared hyperspectral imaging Fourier transform spectrometer is presented. Two kinds of common materials as Polypropylene (PP) and Polyethylene Terephthalate (PET) films which have special absorption peaks in the infrared band were used in the calibration experiment. As the wavelengths at the sharp absorption peaks of the films are known, an infrared imaging spectrometer can be calibrated on spectra with two or three peaks. With high precision and stability, this method simplifies the calibration work. It is especially appropriate for the measuring condition with a lack of calibration equipment or with inconvenience to calibrate the multiple light sources outdoors.

  10. Atmospheric-water absorption features near 2.2 micrometers and their importance in high spectral resolution remote sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kruse, F. A.; Clark, R. N.

    1986-01-01

    Selective absorption of electromagnetic radiation by atmospheric gases and water vapor is an accepted fact in terrestrial remote sensing. Until recently, only a general knowledge of atmospheric effects was required for analysis of remote sensing data; however, with the advent of high spectral resolution imaging devices, detailed knowledge of atmospheric absorption bands has become increasingly important for accurate analysis. Detailed study of high spectral resolution aircraft data at the U.S. Geological Survey has disclosed narrow absorption features centered at approximately 2.17 and 2.20 micrometers not caused by surface mineralogy. Published atmospheric transmission spectra and atmospheric spectra derived using the LOWTRAN-5 computer model indicate that these absorption features are probably water vapor. Spectral modeling indicates that the effects of atmospheric absorption in this region are most pronounced in spectrally flat materials with only weak absorption bands. Without correction and detailed knowledge of the atmospheric effects, accurate mapping of surface mineralogy (particularly at low mineral concentrations) is not possible.

  11. Method and apparatus for measuring film spectral properties

    DOEpatents

    Forrest, Stephen R.; Burrows, Paul E.; Garbuzov, Dmitri Z.; Bulovic, Vladimir

    1999-12-21

    Film spectral properties are measured by projecting chopped monochromatic light onto a luminescent film sample deposited on a substrate, and coupling through use of immersion oil the reflection of light therefrom to a light detector.

  12. Solar absorption by elemental and brown carbon determined from spectral observations

    PubMed Central

    Bahadur, Ranjit; Praveen, Puppala S.; Xu, Yangyang; Ramanathan, V.

    2012-01-01

    Black carbon (BC) is functionally defined as the absorbing component of atmospheric total carbonaceous aerosols (TC) and is typically dominated by soot-like elemental carbon (EC). However, organic carbon (OC) has also been shown to absorb strongly at visible to UV wavelengths and the absorbing organics are referred to as brown carbon (BrC), which is typically not represented in climate models. We propose an observationally based analytical method for rigorously partitioning measured absorption aerosol optical depths (AAOD) and single scattering albedo (SSA) among EC and BrC, using multiwavelength measurements of total (EC, OC, and dust) absorption. EC is found to be strongly absorbing (SSA of 0.38) whereas the BrC SSA varies globally between 0.77 and 0.85. The method is applied to the California region. We find TC (EC + BrC) contributes 81% of the total absorption at 675 nm and 84% at 440 nm. The BrC absorption at 440 nm is about 40% of the EC, whereas at 675 nm it is less than 10% of EC. We find an enhanced absorption due to OC in the summer months and in southern California (related to forest fires and secondary OC). The fractions and trends are broadly consistent with aerosol chemical-transport models as well as with regional emission inventories, implying that we have obtained a representative estimate for BrC absorption. The results demonstrate that current climate models that treat OC as nonabsorbing are underestimating the total warming effect of carbonaceous aerosols by neglecting part of the atmospheric heating, particularly over biomass-burning regions that emit BrC. PMID:23045698

  13. Spectral x-ray phase contrast imaging for single-shot retrieval of absorption, phase, and differential-phase imagery.

    PubMed

    Das, Mini; Liang, Zhihua

    2014-11-01

    In this Letter, we propose the first single-shot, noninterferometric x-ray imaging method for simultaneous retrieval of absorption, phase, and differential-phase imagery with quantitative accuracy. Our method utilizes a photon-counting spectral x-ray detector in conjunction with a simplified transport-of-intensity equation for coded-aperture phase-contrast imaging to efficiently solve the retrieval problem. This method can utilize an incoherent and polychromatic (clinical or laboratory) x-ray tube and can enable retrieval for a wide range and composition of material properties. The proposed method has been validated via computer simulations and is expected to significantly benefit applications that are sensitive to complexity of measurement, radiation dose and imaging time. PMID:25361350

  14. Spectral absorptions on Phobos and Deimos in the visible/near infrared wavelengths and their compositional constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fraeman, A. A.; Murchie, S. L.; Arvidson, R. E.; Clark, R. N.; Morris, R. V.; Rivkin, A. S.; Vilas, F.

    2014-02-01

    Absorption features on Phobos and Deimos in the visible/near infrared wavelength region (0.4-3.9 μm) are mapped using observations from the Compact Reconnaissance Imaging Spectrometer for Mars (CRISM). Fe2+ electronic absorptions diagnostic of olivine and pyroxene are not detected. A broad absorption centered around 0.65 μm within the red spectral units of both moons is detected, and this feature is also evident in telescopic, Pathfinder, and Phobos-2 observations of Phobos. A 2.8 μm metal-OH combination absorption on both moons is also detected in the CRISM data, and this absorption is shallower in the Phobos blue unit than in the Phobos red unit and Deimos. The strength, position, and shape of both of the 0.65 μm and 2.8 μm absorptions are similar to features seen on red-sloped, low-albedo primitive asteroids. Two end-member hypotheses are presented to explain the spectral features on Phobos and Deimos. The first invokes the presence of highly desiccated Fe-phyllosilicate minerals indigenous to the bodies, and the second invokes Rayleigh scattering and absorption of small iron particles formed by exogenic space weathering processing, coupled with implantation of H from solar wind. Both end-member hypotheses may play a role, and in situ exploration will be needed to ultimately determine the underlying causes for the pair of spectral features observed on Phobos and Deimos.

  15. Indoor and Outdoor Spectroradiometer Intercomparison for Spectral Irradiance Measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Habte, A.; Andreas, A.; Ottoson, L.; Gueymard, C.; Fedor, G.; Fowler, S.; Peterson, J.; Naranen, R.; Kobashi, T.; Akiyama, A.; Takagi, S.

    2014-05-01

    This report details the global spectral irradiance intercomparison using spectroradiometers that was organized by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's Solar Radiation Research Laboratory. The intercomparison was performed both indoors and outdoors on September 17, 2013. Five laboratories participated in the intercomparison using 10 spectroradiometers, and a coordinated measurement setup and a common platform were employed to compare spectral irradiances under both indoor and outdoor conditions. The intercomparison aimed to understand the performance of the different spectroradiometers and to share knowledge in making spectral irradiance measurements. This intercomparison was the first of its kind in the United States.

  16. Temporal spectral measurements of corn and soybean crops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tucker, C. J.; Elgin, J. H., Jr.; Mcmurtrey, J. E., III

    1979-01-01

    A ground-based, hand-held radiometer, configured to measure red and photographic infrared spectral radiances, was successfully used to collect in situ temporal spectral measurements of corn and soybean crops. Significant relationships were found between the radiance data and the biomass, plant height, percentage crop cover, percentage crop chlorosis, and percentage leaf loss. The results of this experiment show conclusively that hand-held radiometers can be used to collect spectral data that are highly correlated to several agronomic variables. These findings suggest approaches for agronomic research, and confirm the value of remote sensing of agricultural targets.

  17. Numerical calculations of spectral turnover and synchrotron self-absorption in CSS and GPS radio sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeyakumar, S.

    2016-06-01

    The dependence of the turnover frequency on the linear size is presented for a sample of Giga-hertz Peaked Spectrum and Compact Steep Spectrum radio sources derived from complete samples. The dependence of the luminosity of the emission at the peak frequency with the linear size and the peak frequency is also presented for the galaxies in the sample. The luminosity of the smaller sources evolve strongly with the linear size. Optical depth effects have been included to the 3D model for the radio source of Kaiser to study the spectral turnover. Using this model, the observed trend can be explained by synchrotron self-absorption. The observed trend in the peak-frequency-linear-size plane is not affected by the luminosity evolution of the sources.

  18. Oscillator strength measurements of atomic absorption lines from stellar spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lobel, Alex

    2011-05-01

    Herein we develop a new method to determine oscillator strength values of atomic absorption lines with state-of-the-art detailed spectral synthesis calculations of the optical spectrum of the Sun and of standard spectral reference stars. We update the log(gf) values of 911 neutral lines observed in the KPNO-FTS flux spectrum of the Sun and high-resolution echelle spectra (R = 80 000) of Procyon (F5 IV-V) and Eps Eri (K2 V) observed with large signal-to-noise (S/N) ratios of 2000 using the new Mercator-Hermes spectrograph at La Palma Observatory (Spain). We find for 483 Fe I, 85 Ni I, and 51 Si I absorption lines in the sample a systematic overestimation of the literature log(gf) values with central line depths below 15%. We employ a curve-of-growth analysis technique to test the accuracy of the new oscillator strength values and compare calculated equivalent line widths to the Moore, Minnaert, and Houtgast atlas of the Sun. The online SpectroWeb database at http://spectra.freeshell.org interactively displays the observed and synthetic spectra and provides the new log(gf) values together with important atomic line data. The graphical database is under development for stellar reference spectra of every spectral sub-class observed with large spectral resolution and S/N ratios.

  19. [Gas Concentration Measurement Based on the Integral Value of Absorptance Spectrum].

    PubMed

    Liu, Hui-jun; Tao, Shao-hua; Yang, Bing-chu; Deng, Hong-gui

    2015-12-01

    The absorptance spectrum of a gas is the basis for the qualitative and quantitative analysis of the gas by the law of the Lambert-Beer. The integral value of the absorptance spectrum is an important parameter to describe the characteristics of the gas absorption. Based on the measured absorptance spectrum of a gas, we collected the required data from the database of HIT-RAN, and chose one of the spectral lines and calculated the integral value of the absorptance spectrum in the frequency domain, and then substituted the integral value into Lambert-Beer's law to obtain the concentration of the detected gas. By calculating the integral value of the absorptance spectrum we can avoid the more complicated calculation of the spectral line function and a series of standard gases for calibration, so the gas concentration measurement will be simpler and faster. We studied the changing trends of the integral values of the absorptance spectrums versus temperature. Since temperature variation would cause the corresponding variation in pressure, we studied the changing trends of the integral values of the absorptance spectrums versus both the pressure not changed with temperature and changed with the temperature variation. Based on the two cases, we found that the integral values of the absorptance spectrums both would firstly increase, then decrease, and finally stabilize with temperature increasing, but the ranges of specific changing trend were different in the two cases. In the experiments, we found that the relative errors of the integrated values of the absorptance spectrum were much higher than 1% and still increased with temperature when we only considered the change of temperature and completely ignored the pressure affected by the temperature variation, and the relative errors of the integrated values of the absorptance spectrum were almost constant at about only 1% when we considered that the pressure were affected by the temperature variation. As the integral value

  20. High Spectral Resolution Lidar Measurements of Extinction and Particle Size in Clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eloranta, E. W.; Piirronen, P.

    1996-01-01

    The University of Wisconsin High Spectral Resolution Lidar (HSRL) measures optical properties of the atmosphere by separating the Doppler broadened molecular backscatter return from the unbroadened aerosol return. In the past, the HSRL employed a 150 mm diameter Fabry-Perot etalon to separate the aerosol and molecular signals. The replacement of the etalon with an I2 absorption filter significantly improved the ability of the HSRL to separate weak molecular signals inside dense clouds.

  1. Measurements of Soot Mass Absorption Coefficients from 300 to 660 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renbaum-Wolff, Lindsay; Fisher, Al; Helgestad, Taylor; Lambe, Andrew; Sedlacek, Arthur; Smith, Geoffrey; Cappa, Christopher; Davidovits, Paul; Onasch, Timothy; Freedman, Andrew

    2016-04-01

    Soot, a product of incomplete combustion, plays an important role in the earth's climate system through the absorption and scattering of solar radiation. In particular, the assumed mass absorption coefficient (MAC) of soot and its variation with wavelength presents a significant uncertainty in the calculation of radiative forcing in global climate change models. As part of the fourth Boston College/Aerodyne soot properties measurement campaign, we have measured the mass absorption coefficient of soot produced by an inverted methane diffusion flame over a spectral range of 300-660 nm using a variety of optical absorption techniques. Extinction and absorption were measured using a dual cavity ringdown photoacoustic spectrometer (CRD-PAS, UC Davis) at 405 nm and 532 nm. Scattering and extinction were measured using a CAPS PMssa single scattering albedo monitor (Aerodyne) at 630 nm; the absorption coefficient was determined by subtraction. In addition, the absorption coefficients in 8 wavelength bands from 300 to 660 nm were measured using a new broadband photoacoustic absorption monitor (UGA). Soot particle mass was quantified using a centrifugal particle mass analyzer (CPMA, Cambustion), mobility size with a scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS, TSI) and soot concentration with a CPC (Brechtel). The contribution of doubly charged particles to the sample mass was determined using a Single Particle Soot Photometer (DMT). Over a mass range of 1-8 fg, corresponding to differential mobility diameters of ~150 nm to 550 nm, the value of the soot MAC proved to be independent of mass for all wavelengths. The wavelength dependence of the MAC was best fit to a power law with an Absorption Ångstrom Coefficient slightly greater than 1.

  2. Error Reduction Methods for Integrated-path Differential-absorption Lidar Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Jeffrey R.; Numata, Kenji; Wu, Stewart T.

    2012-01-01

    We report new modeling and error reduction methods for differential-absorption optical-depth (DAOD) measurements of atmospheric constituents using direct-detection integrated-path differential-absorption lidars. Errors from laser frequency noise are quantified in terms of the line center fluctuation and spectral line shape of the laser pulses, revealing relationships verified experimentally. A significant DAOD bias is removed by introducing a correction factor. Errors from surface height and reflectance variations can be reduced to tolerable levels by incorporating altimetry knowledge and "log after averaging", or by pointing the laser and receiver to a fixed surface spot during each wavelength cycle to shorten the time of "averaging before log".

  3. Gas concentration measurement by optical similitude absorption spectroscopy: methodology and experimental demonstration.

    PubMed

    Anselmo, Christophe; Welschinger, Jean-Yves; Cariou, Jean-Pierre; Miffre, Alain; Rairoux, Patrick

    2016-06-13

    We propose a new methodology to measure gas concentration by light-absorption spectroscopy when the light source spectrum is larger than the spectral width of one or several molecular gas absorption lines. We named it optical similitude absorption spectroscopy (OSAS), as the gas concentration is derived from a similitude between the light source and the target gas spectra. The main OSAS-novelty lies in the development of a robust inversion methodology, based on the Newton-Raphson algorithm, which allows retrieving the target gas concentration from spectrally-integrated differential light-absorption measurements. As a proof, OSAS is applied in laboratory to the 2ν3 methane absorption band at 1.66 µm with uncertainties revealed by the Allan variance. OSAS has also been applied to non-dispersive infra-red and the optical correlation spectroscopy arrangements. This all-optics gas concentration retrieval does not require the use of a gas calibration cell and opens new tracks to atmospheric gas pollution and greenhouse gases sources monitoring. PMID:27410280

  4. Minute Concentration Measurements of Simple Hydrocarbon Species Using Supercontinuum Laser Absorption Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Jihyung; Traina, Nicholas; Halloran, Michael; Lee, Tonghun

    2016-06-01

    Minute concentration measurements of simple hydrocarbon gases are demonstrated using near-infrared supercontinuum laser absorption spectroscopy. Absorption-based gas sensors, particularly when combined with optical fiber components, can significantly enhance diagnostic capabilities to unprecedented levels. However, these diagnostic techniques are subject to limitations under certain gas sensing applications where interference and harsh conditions dominate. Supercontinuum laser absorption spectroscopy is a novel laser-based diagnostic technique that can exceed the above-mentioned limitations and provide accurate and quantitative concentration measurement of simple hydrocarbon species while maintaining compatibility with telecommunications-grade optical fiber components. Supercontinuum radiation generated using a highly nonlinear photonic crystal fiber is used to probe rovibrational absorption bands of four hydrocarbon species using full-spectral absorption diagnostics. Absorption spectra of methane (CH4), acetylene (C2H2), and ethylene (C2H4) were measured in the near-infrared spectrum at various pressures and concentrations to determine the accuracy and feasibility of the diagnostic strategy. Absorption spectra of propane (C3H8) were subsequently probed between 1650 nm and 1700 nm, to demonstrate the applicability of the strategy. Measurements agreed very well with simulated spectra generated using the HITRAN database as well as with previous experimental results. Absorption spectra of CH4, C2H2, and C2H4 were then analyzed to determine their respective measurement accuracy and detection limit. Concentration measurements integrated from experimental results were in very good agreement with independent concentration measurements. Calculated detection limits of CH4, C2H2, and C2H4 at room temperature and atmospheric pressure are 0.1%, 0.09%, and 0.17%, respectively. PMID:27091905

  5. Spectrally-resolved measurements of aerosol extinction at ultraviolet and visible wavelengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flores, M.; Washenfelder, R. A.; Brock, C. A.; Brown, S. S.; Rudich, Y.

    2012-12-01

    Aerosols play an important role in the Earth's radiative budget. Aerosol extinction includes both the scattering and absorption of light, and these vary with wavelength, aerosol diameter, and aerosol composition. Historically, aerosol absorption has been measured using filter-based or extraction methods that are prone to artifacts. There have been few investigations of ambient aerosol optical properties at the blue end of the visible spectrum and into the ultraviolet. Brown carbon is particularly important in this spectral region, because it both absorbs and scatters light, and encompasses a large and variable group of organic compounds from biomass burning and secondary organic aerosol. We have developed a laboratory instrument that combines new, high-power LED light sources with high-finesse optical cavities to achieve sensitive measurements of aerosol optical extinction. This instrument contains two broadband channels, with spectral coverage from 360 - 390 nm and 385 - 420 nm. Using this instrument, we report aerosol extinction in the ultraviolet and near-visible spectral region as a function of chemical composition and structure. We have measured the extinction cross-sections between 360 - 420 nm with 0.5 nm resolution using different sizes and concentrations of polystyrene latex spheres, ammonium sulfate, and Suwannee River fulvic acid. Fitting the real and imaginary part of the refractive index allows the absorption and scattering to be determined.

  6. Molar absorptivity (ε) and spectral characteristics of cyanidin-based anthocyanins from red cabbage.

    PubMed

    Ahmadiani, Neda; Robbins, Rebecca J; Collins, Thomas M; Giusti, M Monica

    2016-04-15

    Red cabbage extract contains mono and di-acylated cyanidin (Cy) anthocyanins and is often used as food colorants. Our objectives were to determine the molar absorptivity (ε) of different red cabbage Cy-derivatives and to evaluate their spectral behaviors in acidified methanol (MeOH) and buffers pH 1-9. Major red cabbage anthocyanins were isolated using a semi-preparatory HPLC, dried and weighed. Pigments were dissolved in MeOH and diluted with either MeOH (0.1% HCl) or buffers to obtain final concentrations between 5×10(-5) and 1×10(-3) mol/L. Spectra were recorded and ε calculated using Lambert-Beer's law. The ε in acidified MeOH and buffer pH 1 ranged between ~16,000-30,000 and ~13,000-26,000 L/mol cm, respectively. Most pigments showed higher ε in pH 8 than pH 2, and lowest ε between pH 4 and 6. There were bathochromic shifts (81-105 nm) from pH 1 to 8 and hypsochromic shifts from pH 8 to 9 (2-19 nm). Anthocyanins molecular structures and the media were important variables which greatly influenced their ε and spectral behaviors. PMID:26617032

  7. Temperature dependence of aggregated structure of β-carotene by absorption spectral experiment and simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Liping; Wu, Jie; Wei, Liangshu; Wu, Fang

    2016-12-01

    β-carotene can self-assemble to form J- or H-type aggregate in hydrophilic environments, which is crucial for the proper functioning of biological system. Although several ways controlling the formation of the two types of aggregate in hydrated ethanol have been investigated in recent years, our study provided another way to control whether J- or H- β-carotene was formed and presented a method to investigate the aggregated structure. For this purpose, the aggregates of β-carotene formed at different temperatures were studied by UV-Vis spectra and a computational method based on Frenkel exciton was applied to simulate the absorption spectra to obtain the aggregated structure of the β-carotene. The analysis showed that β-carotene formed weakly coupled H-aggregate at 15 °C in 1:1 ethanol-water solvent, and with the increase of temperature it tended to form J-type of aggregate. The absorption spectral simulation based on one-dimensional Frenkel exciton model revealed that good fit with the experiment was obtained with distance between neighbor molecules r = 0.82 nm, disorder of the system D = 1500 cm- 1 for H-type and r = 1.04 nm, D = 1800 cm- 1 for J-type.

  8. Temperature dependence of aggregated structure of β-carotene by absorption spectral experiment and simulation.

    PubMed

    Lu, Liping; Wu, Jie; Wei, Liangshu; Wu, Fang

    2016-12-01

    β-carotene can self-assemble to form J- or H-type aggregate in hydrophilic environments, which is crucial for the proper functioning of biological system. Although several ways controlling the formation of the two types of aggregate in hydrated ethanol have been investigated in recent years, our study provided another way to control whether J- or H- β-carotene was formed and presented a method to investigate the aggregated structure. For this purpose, the aggregates of β-carotene formed at different temperatures were studied by UV-Vis spectra and a computational method based on Frenkel exciton was applied to simulate the absorption spectra to obtain the aggregated structure of the β-carotene. The analysis showed that β-carotene formed weakly coupled H-aggregate at 15°C in 1:1 ethanol-water solvent, and with the increase of temperature it tended to form J-type of aggregate. The absorption spectral simulation based on one-dimensional Frenkel exciton model revealed that good fit with the experiment was obtained with distance between neighbor molecules r=0.82nm, disorder of the system D=1500cm(-1) for H-type and r=1.04nm, D=1800cm(-1) for J-type. PMID:27348046

  9. Hepatic extraction fraction of hepatobiliary radiopharmaceuticals measured using spectral analysis.

    PubMed

    Murase, K; Tsuda, T; Mochizuki, T; Ikezoe, J

    1999-11-01

    Measuring the hepatic extraction fraction (HEF) of a hepatobiliary radiopharmaceutical helps to differentiate hepatocyte from biliary tract diseases, and it is generally performed using deconvolution analysis. In this study, we measured HEF using spectral analysis. With spectral analysis, HEF was calculated from (the sum of the spectral data obtained by spectral analysis--the highest frequency component of the spectrum) divided by (the sum of the spectral data) x 100 (%). We applied this method to dynamic liver scintigraphic data obtained from six healthy volunteers and from 46 patients with various liver diseases, using 99Tcm-N-pyridoxyl-5-methyltryptophan (PMT). We also measured HEF using deconvolution analysis, in which the modified Fourier transform technique was employed. The HEF values obtained by spectral analysis correlated closely with those obtained by deconvolution analysis (r = 0.925), suggesting our method is valid. The HEF values obtained by spectral analysis decreased as the severity of liver disease progressed. The values were 100.0 +/- 0.0%, 94.7 +/- 13.6%, 76.2 +/- 27.4%, 45.7 +/- 15.6%, 82.7 +/- 24.2% and 95.2 +/- 11.8% (mean +/- S.D.) for the normal controls (n = 6), mild liver cirrhosis (n = 16), moderate liver cirrhosis (n = 11), severe liver cirrhosis (n = 5), acute hepatitis (n = 8) and chronic hepatitis groups (n = 6), respectively. The HEF was obtained more simply and rapidly by spectral analysis than by deconvolution analysis. The results suggest that our method using spectral analysis can be used as an alternative to the conventional procedure using deconvolution analysis for measuring HEF. PMID:10572914

  10. Spectral Similarity Assessment Based on a Spectrum Reflectance-Absorption Index and Simplified Curve Patterns for Hyperspectral Remote Sensing.

    PubMed

    Ma, Dan; Liu, Jun; Huang, Junyi; Li, Huali; Liu, Ping; Chen, Huijuan; Qian, Jing

    2016-01-01

    Hyperspectral images possess properties such as rich spectral information, narrow bandwidth, and large numbers of bands. Finding effective methods to retrieve land features from an image by using similarity assessment indices with specific spectral characteristics is an important research question. This paper reports a novel hyperspectral image similarity assessment index based on spectral curve patterns and a reflection-absorption index. First, some spectral reflection-absorption features are extracted to restrict the subsequent curve simplification. Then, the improved Douglas-Peucker algorithm is employed to simplify all spectral curves without setting the thresholds. Finally, the simplified curves with the feature points are matched, and the similarities among the spectral curves are calculated using the matched points. The Airborne Visible Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) and Reflective Optics System Imaging Spectrometer (ROSIS) hyperspectral image datasets are then selected to test the effect of the proposed index. The practical experiments indicate that the proposed index can achieve higher precision and fewer points than the traditional spectral information divergence and spectral angle match. PMID:26821030

  11. Spectral Similarity Assessment Based on a Spectrum Reflectance-Absorption Index and Simplified Curve Patterns for Hyperspectral Remote Sensing

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Dan; Liu, Jun; Huang, Junyi; Li, Huali; Liu, Ping; Chen, Huijuan; Qian, Jing

    2016-01-01

    Hyperspectral images possess properties such as rich spectral information, narrow bandwidth, and large numbers of bands. Finding effective methods to retrieve land features from an image by using similarity assessment indices with specific spectral characteristics is an important research question. This paper reports a novel hyperspectral image similarity assessment index based on spectral curve patterns and a reflection-absorption index. First, some spectral reflection-absorption features are extracted to restrict the subsequent curve simplification. Then, the improved Douglas-Peucker algorithm is employed to simplify all spectral curves without setting the thresholds. Finally, the simplified curves with the feature points are matched, and the similarities among the spectral curves are calculated using the matched points. The Airborne Visible Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) and Reflective Optics System Imaging Spectrometer (ROSIS) hyperspectral image datasets are then selected to test the effect of the proposed index. The practical experiments indicate that the proposed index can achieve higher precision and fewer points than the traditional spectral information divergence and spectral angle match. PMID:26821030

  12. Experimental investigation of X-ray spectral absorption coefficients in heated Al and Ge on the Iskra-5 laser facility

    SciTech Connect

    Bondarenko, S V; Garanin, Sergey G; Zhidkov, N V; Pinegin, A V; Suslov, N A

    2012-01-31

    We set forth the data of experimental investigation of X-ray spectral absorption coefficients in the 1.1 - 1.6 keV photon energy range for Al and Ge specimens bulk heated by soft X-ray radiation. Two experimental techniques are described: with the use of one facility channel and the heating of specimens by the X-ray radiation from a plane burnthrough target, as well as with the use of four channels and the heating by the radiation from two cylindrical targets with internal input of laser radiation. The X-ray radiation absorption coefficients were studied by way of transmission absorption spectroscopy using backlighting X-ray radiation from a point source. The results of investigation of X-ray spectral absorption coefficients on the 1s - 2p transitions in Al atoms and the 2p - 3d transitions in Ge atoms are presented.

  13. Spectral measurements of the cosmic microwave background

    SciTech Connect

    Kogut, A.J.

    1989-04-01

    Three experiments have measured the intensity of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) at wavelengths 4.0, 3.0, and 0.21 cm. The measurement at 4.0 cm used a direct-gain total-power radiometer to measure the difference in power between the zenith sky and a large cryogenic reference target. Foreground signals are measured with the same instrument and subtracted from the zenith signal, leaving the CMB as the residual. The reference target consists of a large open-mouth cryostat with a microwave absorber submerged in liquid helium; thin windows block the radiative heat load and prevent condensation atmospheric gases within the cryostat. The thermodynamic temperature of the CMB at 4.0 cm is 2.59 +- 0.07 K. The measurement at 3.0 cm used a superheterodyne Dicke-switched radiometer with a similar reference target to measure the zenith sky temperature. A rotating mirror allowed one of the antenna beams to be redirected to a series of zenith angles, permitting automated atmospheric measurements without moving the radiometer. A weighted average of 5 years of data provided the thermodynamic temperature of the CMB at 3.0 cm of 2.62 +- 0.06 K. The measurement at 0.21 cm used Very Large Array observations of interstellar ortho-formaldehyde to determine the CMB intensity in molecular clouds toward the giant HII region W51A (G49.5-0.4). Solutions of the radiative transfer problem in the context of a large velocity gradient model provided estimates of the CMB temperature within the foreground clouds. Collisional excitation from neutral hydrogen molecules within the clouds limited the precision of the result. The thermodynamic temperature of the CMB at 0.21 cm is 3.2 +- 0.9 K. 72 refs., 27 figs., 38 tabs.

  14. An absorption origin for the X-ray spectral variability of MCG-6-30-15

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, L.; Turner, T. J.; Reeves, J. N.

    2008-05-01

    Context: The Seyfert I galaxy MCG-6-30-15 shows one of the best examples of a broad “red wing” of emission in its X-ray spectrum at energies 2 < E < 6.4 keV, commonly interpreted as being caused by relativistically-blurred reflection close to the event horizon of the black hole. Aims: We aim to test an alternative model in which absorption creates the observed spectral shape, explains the puzzling lack of variability of the red wing and reduces the high reflection albedo, substantially greater than unity, that is otherwise inferred at energies E > 20 keV. Methods: We compiled all the available long-exposure, high-quality data for MCG-6-30-15: 522 ks of Chandra hetgs, 282 ks of XMM-Newton pn/rgs and 253 ks of Suzaku xis/pin data. This is the first analysis of this full dataset. We investigated the spectral variability on timescales >20 ks using principal components analysis and fitted spectral models to “flux state” and mean spectra over the energy range 0.5-45 keV (depending on detector). The absorber model was based on the zones previously identified in the high-resolution grating data. Joint fits were carried out to any data that were simultaneous. Results: Multiple absorbing zones covering a wide range of ionisation are required by the grating data, including a highly ionised outflowing zone. A variable partial-covering zone plus absorbed low-ionisation reflection, distant from the source, provides a complete description of the variable X-ray spectrum. A single model fits all the data. We conclude that these zones are responsible for the red wing, its apparent lack of variability, the absorption structure around the Fe Kα line, the soft-band “excess” and the high flux seen in the hard X-ray band. A relativistically-blurred Fe line is not required in this model. We suggest the partial covering zone is a clumpy wind from the accretion disk.

  15. Inferring brown carbon content from UV aerosol absorption measurements during biomass burning season

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mok, J.; Krotkov, N. A.; Arola, A. T.; Torres, O.; Jethva, H. T.; Andrade, M.; Labow, G. J.; Eck, T. F.; Li, Z.; Dickerson, R. R.; Stenchikov, G. L.; Osipov, S.

    2015-12-01

    Measuring spectral dependence of light absorption by colored organic or "brown" carbon (BrC) is important, because of its effects on photolysis rates of ozone and surface ultraviolet (UV) radiation. Enhanced UV spectral absorption by BrC can in turn be exploited for simultaneous retrievals of BrC and black carbon (BC) column amounts in field campaigns. We present an innovative ground-based retrieval of BC and BrC volume fractions and their mass absorption efficiencies during the biomass burning season in Santa Cruz, Bolivia in September-October 2007. Our method combines retrieval of BC volume fraction using AERONET inversion in visible wavelengths with the inversion of total BC+BrC absorption (i.e., column effective imaginary refractive index, kmeas) using Diffuse/Direct irradiance measurements in UV wavelengths. First, we retrieve BrC volume fraction by fitting kmeas at 368nm using Maxwell-Garnett (MG) mixing rules assuming: (1) flat spectral dependence of kBC, (2) known value of kBrC at 368nm from laboratory absorption measurements or smoke chamber experiments, and (3) known BC volume fraction from AERONET inversion. Next, we derive kBrC in short UVB wavelengths by fitting kmeas at 305nm, 311nm, 317nm, 325nm, and 332nm using MG mixing rules and fixed volume fractions of BC and BrC. Our retrievals show larger than expected spectral dependence of kBrC in UVB wavelengths, implying reduced surface UVB irradiance and inhibited photolysis rates of surface ozone destruction. We use a one-dimensional chemical box model to show that the observed strong wavelength dependence of BrC absorption leads to inhibited photolysis of ozone to O(1D), a loss mechanism, while having little impact or even accelerating photolysis of NO2, an ozone production mechanism. Although BC only absorption in biomass burning aerosols is important for climate radiative forcing in the visible wavelengths, additional absorption by BrC is important because of its impact on surface UVB radiation

  16. Depolarization Measurements with the High Spectral Resolution Lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eloranta, E. W.; Piironen, P.

    1996-01-01

    This paper describes modifications to the University of Wisconsin High Spectral Resolution Lidar (HSRL) which permit very precise depolarization measurements in addition to optical depth, backscatter cross section, and extinction cross section measurements. Because HSRL separates the lidar return into aerosol and molecular contributions, they can be measured separately.

  17. Measurement of Absorption and Scattering With an Integrating Sphere Detector: Application to Microalgae

    PubMed Central

    Gaigalas, A. K.; He, Hua-Jun; Wang, Lili

    2009-01-01

    A spectrometer with an integrating sphere (IS) detector was used to measure the absorbance due to scattering and absorption. Analysis of the measurement process showed that two measurements of the absorbance, one with the cuvette placed in the normal spectrometer position, and the second with the cuvette placed next to the entrance aperture of the IS detector, provide enough information to separate the contributions from scattering and molecular absorption. Measurements were carried out with mixtures of microsphere and chromophore solutions. Two cases were examined: microspheres suspended in an aqueous fluorescein solution, and microspheres suspended in an aqueous holmium oxide solution. In both cases, the proposed measurement model gave results which were in good agreement with the expected response. Measurements on microalgae suspensions yielded a molecular absorption contribution and a scattering contribution. The scattering contribution had significant spectral structure which was inversely related to the molecular absorption contribution. The absorption and scattering contributions may provide independent information on the status of chlorophyll molecules and the structure of chloroplasts in microalgae. PMID:27504214

  18. Measures of Spectral Slope Using an Excised Larynx Model

    PubMed Central

    Alipour, Fariborz; Scherer, Ronald C.; Finnegan, Eileen

    2011-01-01

    Spectral measures of the glottal source were investigated using an excised canine larynx model for various aerodynamic and phonatory conditions. These measures included spectral harmonic difference H1-H2 and spectral slope that are highly correlated with voice quality but not reported in a systematic manner using an excised larynx model. It was hypothesized that the acoustic spectra of the glottal source were significantly influenced by the subglottal pressure, glottal adduction, and vocal fold elongation, and the resulting vibration pattern. Canine larynges were prepared, mounted on the bench with and without false vocal folds, and made to oscillate with flow of heated and humidified air. Major control parameters were subglottal pressure, adduction, and elongation. Electroglottograph (EGG), subglottal pressure, flowrate, and audio signals were analyzed using custom software. Results suggest that an increase in subglottal pressure and glottal adduction may change the energy balance between harmonics by increasing the spectral energy of the first few harmonics in an unpredictable manner. It is suggested that changes in the dynamics of vocal fold motion may be responsible for different spectral patterns. The finding that the spectral harmonics do not conform to previous findings was demonstrated through various cases. Results of this study may shed light on phonatory spectral control when the larynx is part of a complete vocal tract system. PMID:22056893

  19. Tomographic retrieval for scattered light limb measurements: multiple spectral fit windows to improve the spatial resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pukite, Janis; Dörner, Steffen; Wagner, Thomas

    2015-04-01

    The Scanning Imaging Absorption spectroMeter for Atmospheric CHartographY (SCIAMACHY) on the ENVISAT satellite probed the atmosphere at the day side of Earth in alternating sequences of nadir and limb measurements from August 2002 to April 2012. Limb measurements allow the retrieval of stratospheric profiles of various trace gases on a global scale. It has been shown that combining measurements of the same air volume from different viewing positions along the orbit, 2D distribution fields of stratospheric trace gases can be acquired in one inversion step. Since the atmospheric scattering and absorption processes are wavelength dependent, the spatial sensitivity for limb observations also varies with wavelength. In general, for longer wavelengths, photons from more remote areas along the line of sight are contributing stronger to the measurement than for shorter wavelengths because of the lower probability of Rayleigh scattering. In addition, the radiative transfer is modified by the ozone absorption structures making longer light paths less probable within strong ozone absorption bands. In this study, additional information on the spatial distribution of NO2 is investigated by analysing results obtained by Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (DOAS) in various spectral fit windows. Combing the fit results in one profile retrieval algorithm helps to improve the spatial sensitivity and resolution of the measurements. The largest improvements for the spatial resolution and sensitivity are expected for the upper troposphere/ lower stratosphere (UTLS) region where the variation of the spatial sensitivity with wavelength is strongest.

  20. Modified thermal-optical analysis using spectral absorption selectivity to distinguish black carbon from pyrolized organic carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Hadley, Odelle; Hadley, O.L.; Corrigan, C.E.; Kirchstetter, T.W.

    2008-04-14

    Black carbon (BC), a main component of combustion-generated soot, is a strong absorber of sunlight and contributes to climate change. Measurement methods for BC are uncertain, however. This study presents a method for analyzing the BC mass loading on a quartz fiber filter using a modified thermal-optical analysis method, wherein light transmitted through the sample is measured over a spectral region instead of at a single wavelength as the sample is heated. Evolution of the spectral light transmission signal depends on the relative amounts of light-absorbing BC and char, the latter of which forms when organic carbon in the sample pyrolyzes during heating. Absorption selectivities of BC and char are found to be distinct and are used to apportion the amount of light attenuated by each component in the sample. Light attenuation is converted to mass concentration based on derived mass attenuation efficiencies (MAE) of BC and char. The fraction of attenuation due to each component are scaled by their individual MAE values and added together as the total mass of light absorbing carbon (LAC). An iterative algorithm is used to find the MAE values for both BC and char that provide the best fit to the carbon mass remaining on the filter (derived from direct measurements of thermally evolved CO{sub 2}) at temperatures higher than 480 C. This method was applied to measure the BC concentration in precipitation samples collected from coastal and mountain sites in Northern California. The uncertainty in measured BC concentration of samples that contained a high concentration of organics susceptible to char ranged from 12 to 100 percent, depending on the mass loading of BC on the filter. The lower detection limit for this method was approximately 0.35 {micro}g BC and uncertainty approached 20 percent for BC mass loading greater than 1.0 {micro}g BC.

  1. Information Retrieval from SAGE II and MFRSR Multi-Spectral Extinction Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lacis, Andrew A.; Hansen, James E. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Direct beam spectral extinction measurements of solar radiation contain important information on atmospheric composition in a form that is essentially free from multiple scattering contributions that otherwise tend to complicate the data analysis and information retrieval. Such direct beam extinction measurements are available from the solar occultation satellite-based measurements made by the Stratospheric and Aerosol Gas Experiment (SAGE II) instrument and by ground-based Multi-Filter Shadowband Radiometers (MFRSRs). The SAGE II data provide cross-sectional slices of the atmosphere twice per orbit at seven wavelengths between 385 and 1020 nm with approximately 1 km vertical resolution, while the MFRSR data provide atmospheric column measurements at six wavelengths between 415 and 940 nm but at one minute time intervals. We apply the same retrieval technique of simultaneous least-squares fit to the observed spectral extinctions to retrieve aerosol optical depth, effective radius and variance, and ozone, nitrogen dioxide, and water vapor amounts from the SAGE II and MFRSR measurements. The retrieval technique utilizes a physical model approach based on laboratory measurements of ozone and nitrogen dioxide extinction, line-by-line and numerical k-distribution calculations for water vapor absorption, and Mie scattering constraints on aerosol spectral extinction properties. The SAGE II measurements have the advantage of being self-calibrating in that deep space provides an effective zero point for the relative spectral extinctions. The MFRSR measurements require periodic clear-day Langley regression calibration events to maintain accurate knowledge of instrument calibration.

  2. Towards photodetection with high efficiency and tunable spectral selectivity: graphene plasmonics for light trapping and absorption engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jianfa; Zhu, Zhihong; Liu, Wei; Yuan, Xiaodong; Qin, Shiqiao

    2015-08-01

    Plasmonics can be used to improve absorption in optoelectronic devices and has been intensively studied for solar cells and photodetectors. Graphene has recently emerged as a powerful plasmonic material. It shows significantly less loss compared to traditional plasmonic materials such as gold and silver and its plasmons can be tuned by changing the Fermi energy with chemical or electrical doping. Here we propose the use of graphene plasmonics for light trapping in optoelectronic devices and show that the excitation of localized plasmons in doped, nanostructured graphene can enhance optical absorption in its surrounding medium including both bulky and two-dimensional materials by tens of times, which may lead to a new generation of photodetectors with high efficiency and tunable spectral selectivity in the mid-infrared and THz ranges.Plasmonics can be used to improve absorption in optoelectronic devices and has been intensively studied for solar cells and photodetectors. Graphene has recently emerged as a powerful plasmonic material. It shows significantly less loss compared to traditional plasmonic materials such as gold and silver and its plasmons can be tuned by changing the Fermi energy with chemical or electrical doping. Here we propose the use of graphene plasmonics for light trapping in optoelectronic devices and show that the excitation of localized plasmons in doped, nanostructured graphene can enhance optical absorption in its surrounding medium including both bulky and two-dimensional materials by tens of times, which may lead to a new generation of photodetectors with high efficiency and tunable spectral selectivity in the mid-infrared and THz ranges. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Spectral tuning of absorption by changing the diameter of graphene nanodisks. Perfect light absorption in the whole structure and further enhancement of absorption in the underlying absorptive layer with a back mirror. Light trapping and enhancement of

  3. Marine fluorescence from high spectrally resolved satellite measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolanin, Aleksandra; Dinter, Tilman; Rozanov, Vladimir; Noël, Stefan; Vountas, Marco; Burrows, John P.; Bracher, Astrid

    2014-05-01

    When chlorophyll molecules absorb light, most of this energy is transformed into chemical energy in a process of photosynthesis. However, a fraction of the energy absorbed is reemitted as fluorescence. As a result of its relationship to photosynthetic e?ciency, information about chlorophyll fluorescence can be used to assess the physiological state of phytoplankton (Falkowski and Kolber,1995). In-situ measurements of chlorophyll fluorescence are widespread in physiological and ecophysiological studies. When retrieved from space, chlorophyll fluorescence can improve our knowledge of global biogeochemical cycles and phytoplankton productivity (Behrenfeld et al., 2009; Huot et al., 2013) by providing high coverage and periodicity. So far, the only satellite retrieval of sun-induced marine fluorescence, Fluorescence Line Height (FLH), was designed for MODIS (Abbott and Letelier, 1999), and later also applied to the similar sensor MERIS (Gower et al., 2004). However, it could so far not be evaluated on global scale. Here, we present a different approach to observe marine chlorophyll fluorescence, based on the Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (DOAS) technique (Perner and Platt, 1979) applied to the hyperspectral data from Scanning Imaging Absorption Spectrometer for Atmospheric Chartography (SCIAMACHY) and Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment-2 (GOME-2). Since fluorescence, as a trans-spectral process, leads to the shift of the wavelength of the radiation, it can be observed in the filling-in of Fraunhofer lines. In our retrieval, we evaluate the filling-in of the Zeeman triplet Fraunhofer line FeI at 684.3 nm, which is located very close to the emission peak of marine fluorescence (~685 nm). In order to conduct the chlorophyll fluorescence retrieval with the DOAS method, we calculated the reference spectra for chlorophyll fluorescence, based on simulations performed with the coupled ocean-atmosphere radiative transfer model SCIATRAN (Rozanov et al., 2014

  4. Localization of subsurface fluorescent lesions using surface spectral measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolste, Kolbein

    Localization of Subsurface Fluorescent Lesions using Surface Spectral Measurements Sponsored by the National Institute of Health, Bethesda, Maryland Kolbein Kolste, Ph.D. Keith Paulsen In neurosurgical tumor resection, maximizing extent of resection plays a major role in the care of cancer patients. To date, ALA is being researched as a technique to guide tumor resection by inducing the accumulation of the endogenous fluorophore PpIX. Most research has focused on the use of blue light excitation of PpIX to visual the tumor. However, due to the high attenuation of blue light by in vivo chromophores, such as oxy- and deoxy-hemoglobin, the source of collected fluorescence emissions is confined to the top layer of cells, and the signal is subject to masking by blood on the surface of the surgical field of view. This issue is particularly a problem at the end of the resection, when the surgeon is evaluating the margin for remaining tumor, but the blue-signal is insensitive to residual tumor that may be located several millimeters beneath the surface. PpIX has an absorption band in the near infrared (NIR), where the absorption due to blood is orders of magnitude lower, enabling the excitation of a fluorophore at depth. In this work, we created a hyperspectral imaging system that attaches to a neurosurgical microscope and is capable of detecting PpIX fluorescence that has been excited at 635 nm. We utilize a dual-waveband technique from the hyperspectral to estimate depth of fluorescence origin and characterize the inherent limitations of the estimated depth. One of the major benefits of this technique is that the estimation is independent of the concentration and size of the fluorophore. This is first demonstrated in phantom studies, where the depths of multiple separate inclusions at various depths are accurately estimated. The technique is verified in animal tumor models and translated into the clinical theater, with pilot data showing the first estimation of depth of

  5. Approach for determining the contributions of phytoplankton, colored organic material, and nonalgal particles to the total spectral absorption in marine waters.

    PubMed

    Lin, Junfang; Cao, Wenxi; Wang, Guifeng; Hu, Shuibo

    2013-06-20

    Using a data set of 1333 samples, we assess the spectral absorption relationships of different wave bands for phytoplankton (ph) and particles. We find that a nonlinear model (second-order quadratic equations) delivers good performance in describing their spectral characteristics. Based on these spectral relationships, we develop a method for partitioning the total absorption coefficient into the contributions attributable to phytoplankton [a(ph)(λ)], colored dissolved organic material [CDOM; a(CDOM)(λ)], and nonalgal particles [NAP; a(NAP)(λ)]. This method is validated using a data set that contains 550 simultaneous measurements of phytoplankton, CDOM, and NAP from the NASA bio-Optical Marine Algorithm Dataset. We find that our method is highly efficient and robust, with significant accuracy: the relative root-mean-square errors (RMSEs) are 25.96%, 38.30%, and 19.96% for a(ph)(443), a(CDOM)(443), and the CDOM exponential slope, respectively. The performance is still satisfactory when the method is applied to water samples from the northern South China Sea as a regional case. The computed and measured absorption coefficients (167 samples) agree well with the RMSEs, i.e., 18.50%, 32.82%, and 10.21% for a(ph)(443), a(CDOM)(443), and the CDOM exponential slope, respectively. Finally, the partitioning method is applied directly to an independent data set (1160 samples) derived from the Bermuda Bio-Optics Project that contains relatively low absorption values, and we also obtain good inversion accuracy [RMSEs of 32.37%, 32.57%, and 11.52% for a(ph)(443), a(CDOM)(443), and the CDOM exponential slope, respectively]. Our results indicate that this partitioning method delivers satisfactory performance for the retrieval of a(ph), a(CDOM), and a(NAP). Therefore, this may be a useful tool for extracting absorption coefficients from in situ measurements or remotely sensed ocean-color data. PMID:23842167

  6. Optical reflectance of pyrheliometer absorption cavities: progress toward SI-traceable measurements of solar irradiance.

    PubMed

    Patrick, Heather J; Germer, Thomas A; Zarobila, Clarence J; Cooksey, Catherine C; Yoon, Howard W

    2016-08-10

    We have accurately determined the absorptance of three pyrheliometer cavities at 532 nm by measuring the residual reflectance using an angle-resolved bidirectional reflectometer. Measurements were performed at a normal incidence as a function of the viewing angle and position on the cavity cone. By numerically integrating the measured angle-resolved scatter over both the direction and position and accounting for an obstructed view of the cavity, we determined that the effective cavity reflectance was between 8×10-4 and 9×10-4. Thus, the absorptance of the three cavities ranged from 0.99909±0.00014 to 0.99922±0.00012 (k=2 combined expanded uncertainties). These measurements, when extended over the spectral range of operation of the pyrheliometer, are required to establish SI traceability for absolute solar irradiance measurements. PMID:27534478

  7. Modified thermal-optical analysis using spectral absorption selectivity to distinguish black carbon from pyrolized organic carbon.

    PubMed

    Hadley, Odelle L; Corrigan, Craig E; Kirchstetter, Thomas W

    2008-11-15

    This study presents a method for analyzing the black carbon (BC) mass loading on a quartz fiber filter using a modified thermal-optical analysis method, wherein light transmitted through the sample is measured over a spectral region instead of at a single wavelength. Evolution of the spectral light transmission signal depends on the relative amounts of light-absorbing BC and char, the latter of which forms when organic carbon in the sample pyrolyzes during heating. Absorption selectivities of BC and char are found to be distinct and are used to apportion the amount of light attenuated by each component in the sample. Light attenuation is converted to mass concentration on the basis of derived mass attenuation efficiencies (MAEs) of BC and char. The fractions of attenuation due to each component are scaled by their individual MAE values and added together as the total mass of light absorbing carbon (LAC). An iterative algorithm is used to find the MAE values for both BC and char that provide the best fit to the carbon mass remaining on the filter (derived from direct measurements of thermally evolved CO2) at temperatures higher than 480 degrees C. This method was applied to measure the BC concentration in precipitation samples collected in northern California. The uncertainty in the measured BC concentration of samples that contained a high concentration of organics susceptible to char ranged from 12% to 100%, depending on the mass loading of BC on the filter. The lower detection limit for this method was approximately 0.35 microg of BC, and the uncertainty approached 20% for BC mass loading greater than 1.0 microg of BC. PMID:19068832

  8. Prototype simulates remote sensing spectral measurements on fruits and vegetables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hahn, Federico

    1998-09-01

    A prototype was designed to simulate spectral packinghouse measurements in order to simplify fruit and vegetable damage assessment. A computerized spectrometer is used together with lenses and an externally controlled illumination in order to have a remote sensing simulator. A laser is introduced between the spectrometer and the lenses in order to mark the zone where the measurement is being taken. This facilitates further correlation work and can assure that the physical and remote sensing measurements are taken in the same place. Tomato ripening and mango anthracnose spectral signatures are shown.

  9. Testing tripartite Mermin inequalities by spectral joint measurements of qubits

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, J. S.; Oh, C. H.; Wei, L. F.

    2011-06-15

    Using spectral joint measurements of the qubits, we propose a scheme to test the tripartite Mermin inequality with three qubits dispersively coupled to a driven cavity. First, we show how to generate a three-qubit Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger (GHZ) state by only one-step quantum operation. Then spectral joint measurements are introduced to directly confirm such tripartite entanglement. Assisted by a series of single-qubit operations, these measurements are further utilized to test the Mermin inequality. The feasibility of the proposal is robustly demonstrated by the present numerical experiments.

  10. Orthogonal spectra and cross sections: Application to optimization of multi-spectral absorption and fluorescence lidar

    SciTech Connect

    Shokair, I.R.

    1997-09-01

    This report addresses the problem of selection of lidar parameters, namely wavelengths for absorption lidar and excitation fluorescence pairs for fluorescence lidar, for optimal detection of species. Orthogonal spectra and cross sections are used as mathematical representations which provide a quantitative measure of species distinguishability in mixtures. Using these quantities, a simple expression for the absolute error in calculated species concentration is derived and optimization is accomplished by variation of lidar parameters to minimize this error. It is shown that the optimum number of wavelengths for detection of a species using absorption lidar (excitation fluorescence pairs for fluorescence lidar) is the same as the number of species in the mixture. Each species present in the mixture has its own set of optimum wavelengths. There is usually some overlap in these sets. The optimization method is applied to two examples, one using absorption and the other using fluorescence lidar, for analyzing mixtures of four organic compounds. The effect of atmospheric attenuation is included in the optimization process. Although the number of optimum wavelengths might be small, it is essential to do large numbers of measurements at these wavelengths in order to maximize canceling of statistical errors.

  11. Variability, absorption features, and parent body searches in "spectrally featureless" meteorite reflectance spectra: Case study - Tagish Lake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izawa, M. R. M.; Craig, M. A.; Applin, D. M.; Sanchez, J. A.; Reddy, V.; Le Corre, L.; Mann, P.; Cloutis, E. A.

    2015-07-01

    Reflectance spectra of many asteroids and other Solar System bodies are commonly reported as "featureless". Here, we show that weak but consistently detectable absorption bands are observable in 200-2500 nm spectra of the Tagish Lake meteorite, a likely compositional and spectral analogue for low-albedo, "spectrally-featureless" asteroids. Tagish Lake presents a rare opportunity to study multiple lithologies within a single meteorite. Reflectance spectra of Tagish Lake display significant variation between different lithologies. The spectral variations are due in part to mineralogical variations between different Tagish Lake lithologies. Ultraviolet reflectance spectra (200-400 nm), few of which have been reported in the literature to date, reveal albedo and spectral ratio variations as a function of mineralogy. Similarly visible-near infrared reflectance spectra reveal variations in albedo, spectral slope, and the presence of weak absorption features that persist across different lithologies and can be attributed to various phases present in Tagish Lake. These observations demonstrate that significant spectral variability may exist between different lithologies of Tagish Lake, which may affect the interpretation of potential source body spectra. It is also important to consider the spectral variability within the meteorite before excluding compositional links between possible parent bodies in the main belt and Tagish Lake. Tagish Lake materials may also be spectral-compositional analogues for materials on the surfaces of other dark asteroids, including some that are targets of upcoming spacecraft missions. Tagish Lake has been proposed as a spectral match for 'ultra-primitive' D or P-type asteroids, and the variability reported here may be reflected in spatially or rotationally-resolved spectra of possible Tagish Lake parent bodies and source objects in the Near-Earth Asteroid population. A search for objects with spectra similar to Tagish Lake has been carried

  12. A New Measurement of the Absolute Spectral Reflectance of the Moon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawrence, S. J.; Lau, E.; Steutel, D.; Stopar, J. D.; Wilcox, B. B.; Lucey, P. G.

    2003-01-01

    The spectral reflectance of the Moon is an important property for studies of lunar geology, quantitative physical modeling of the moon, and in-flight calibration of spacecraft sensors. Previous studies have claimed that telescopic absolute reflectance values for the Moon are greater than laboratory reflectance measurements by a factor of two. In order to confirm these results, we performed ground-based observations of the lunar surface using a visible/near-infrared spectroradiometer and compared the measured lunar surface radiance to solar radiance corrected for atmospheric scattering and absorption. These data were compared to previously obtained laboratory reflectance measurements from Apollo soil samples.

  13. Relationships between Visual Field Sensitivity and Spectral Absorption Properties of the Neuroretinal Rim in Glaucoma by Multispectral Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Denniss, Jonathan; Schiessl, Ingo; Nourrit, Vincent; Fenerty, Cecilia H.; Gautam, Ramesh; Henson, David B.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose. To investigate the relationship between neuroretinal rim (NRR) differential light absorption (DLA, a measure of spectral absorption properties) and visual field (VF) sensitivity in primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG). Methods. Patients diagnosed with (n = 22) or suspected of having (n = 7) POAG were imaged with a multispectral system incorporating a modified digital fundus camera, 250-W tungsten-halogen lamp, and fast-tuneable liquid crystal filter. Five images were captured sequentially within 1.0 second at wavelengths selected according to absorption properties of hemoglobin (range, 570–610 nm), and a Beer-Lambert law model was used to produce DLA maps of residual NRR from the images. Patients also underwent VF testing. Differences in NRR DLA in vertically opposing 180° and 45° sectors either side of the horizontal midline were compared with corresponding differences in VF sensitivity on both decibel and linear scales by Spearman's rank correlation. Results. The decibel VF sensitivity scale showed significant relationships between superior–inferior NRR DLA difference and sensitivity differences between corresponding VF areas in 180° NRR sectors (Spearman ρ = 0.68; P < 0.0001), superior-/inferior-temporal 45° NRR sectors (ρ = 0.57; P < 0.002), and superior-/inferior-nasal 45° NRR sectors (ρ = 0.59; P < 0.001). Using the linear VF sensitivity scale significant relationships were found for 180° NRR sectors (ρ = 0.62; P < 0.0002) and superior–inferior–nasal 45° NRR sectors (ρ = 0.53; P < 0.002). No significant difference was found between correlations using the linear or decibel VF sensitivity scales. Conclusions. Residual NRR DLA is related to VF sensitivity in POAG. Multispectral imaging may provide clinically important information for the assessment and management of POAG. PMID:21980002

  14. Drizzle Measurements Using High Spectral Resolution Lidar and Radar Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eloranta, Edwin W.

    2016-06-01

    The ratio of millimeter radar and High Spectral Resolution Lidar (HSRL) backscatter are used to determine drizzle rates which are compared to conventional ground based measurements. The robustly calibrated HSRL backscatter cross section provides advantages over measurements made with traditional lidars.

  15. Spectral Measurements of Meteorite Powders: Implications for 433 Eros

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burbine, T. H.; McCoy, T. J.; Jarosewich, E.; Sunshine, J. M.

    2002-01-01

    We are re-examining the regions defined by different meteorite classes in Band Area Ratio plots by measuring more meteorite samples. These data will allow us to better determine asteroid compositions from spectral measurements. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  16. High reflector absorptance measurements by the surface thermal lensing technique

    SciTech Connect

    Chow, R.; Taylor, J.R.; Wu, Z.L.; Krupka, R.; Yang, T.

    1996-11-01

    Surface thermal lensing is an alternate configuration of a photothermal deflection system that was used to measure low levels of optical absorption. The thermal lensing configuration facilitated the alignment of the pump and probe laser beams by using a larger diameter probe beam. This technique was applied to high performance optical coatings, specifically high reflectors at 511 nm, zero degrees angle of incidence. The absorptance of these coatings was previously measured using a high power copper vapor laser system. A high power copper laser beam is focused onto a -2 mm diameter spot. A thermal camera senses the temperature rise with respect to the rest of the coating. The temperature change, power density and beam diameter were used with an empirical formula that yields optical absorption. The surface thermal lensing technique was able to resolve absorption levels lower than that achieved with the copper laser method.

  17. Field measurements of the spectral response of natural waters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bartolucci, L. A.; Robinson, B. F.; Silva, L. F.

    1977-01-01

    The spectral response (air-water interface reflectance and water-volume scattering) of turbid river water (99 mg/liter suspended solids) and relatively clear lake water (10 mg/liter suspended solids) was measured in situ with a field spectroradiometer. The influence of the river bottom on the spectral response of the water also was determined by using a modified Secchi disc approach. The results indicated that turbid river water had a higher spectral response than clear lake water (about 6 percent) in the red (0.6-0.7 micron) and near-infrared (0.7-0.9 micron) portions of the spectrum. Also, the reflectance characteristics of the river bottom did not influence the spectral response of the turbid river water when the water was deeper than 30 cm

  18. [The measurement and analysis of visible-absorption spectrum and fluorescence spectrum of lycopene].

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiao-zhan; Li, Ping; Dai, Song-hui; Wu, Da-cheng; Li, Rui-xia; Yang, Jian-hui; Xiao, Hai-bo

    2005-11-01

    Using ICCD spectral detection system, the absorbency of lycopene-carbon bisulfide solution with different concentration was measured, and the result shows that in a specified range the absorption rule of lycopene solution agrees with Lambert-Beer Law. Absorption spectral wavelength shifts were measured respectively when lycopene was dissolved in acetone, normal hexane, petroleum ether, benzene, ethyl acetate, and carbon bisulfide, and comparing to acetone, different red-shift appeared when lycopene was dissolved in benzene, ethyl acetate, and carbon bisulfide when water was added in lycopene-acetone solution, t he absorbency of lycopene dropped, the fine structure of absorption spectrum became indistinct, and a new absorption peak appeared in UV. The reason for these phenomena is that the solvent molecule had different effect on lycopene molecule when lycopene was dissolved in different solvent. Using fluorecence spectrophotometer, fluorescence spectra of lycopene in different concentrations were collected, and the results show that the fluorescence spectra of lycopene were mainly in 500-680 nm. When concentration was lower than 50 microg x mL(-1), the fluorescence intensity linearly increased with increasing concentration, and when concentration was higher than 60 microg x mL(-1), the fluorescence intensity dropped because of the interaction between lycopene molecules. PMID:16499057

  19. Accurate diffuse reflection measurements in the infrared spectral range.

    PubMed

    Richter, W; Erb, W

    1987-11-01

    A sphere arrangement for directional-hemispherical reflectance measurements in the 1-15-microm wavelength range is tested for its accuracy. Comparative measurements with the fundamental PTB sphere reflectometer in the overlapping spectral range between 1.0 and 1.1 microm indicate no systematic measurement uncertainties of the new device. The uncertainty of the reflectance measured by it is therefrom deduced to be +/-0.01 for the 1-5.6-microm wavelength range. PMID:20523415

  20. Spectroradiometer with wedge interference filters (SWIF): measurements of the spectral optical depths at Mauna Loa Observatory.

    PubMed

    Vasilyev, O B; Leyva, A; Muhila, A; Valdes, M; Peralta, R; Kovalenko, A P; Welch, R M; Berendes, T A; Isakov, V Y; Kulikovskiy, Y P; Sokolov, S S; Strepanov, N N; Gulidov, S S; von Hoyningen-Huene, W

    1995-07-20

    A spectroradiometer with wedge interference filters (SWIF) (the filters were produced by Carl Zeiss, Jena, Germany) and a CCD matrix (which was of Russian production) that functions as the sensor has been designed and built for use in ground-based optical sensing of the atmosphere and the Earth's surface in the spectral range of 0.35-1.15 µm. Absolute calibration of this instrument was performed through a series of observations of direct solar radiation at Mauna Loa Observatory (MLO) in Hawaii in May and June 1993. Spectral optical depth (SOD) measurements that were made during these field experiments provided detailed spectral information about both aerosol extinction (scattering plus absorption) and molecular absorption in the atmosphere above the site at MLO. The aerosol-SOD measurements were compared with narrow-band radiometer measurements at wavelengths of 380, 500, and 778 nm The SWIF and narrow-band radiometer measurements are in agreement to within the experimental error. At a wavelength of 500 nm, the aerosol SOD was found to be approximately 0.045. Adescription of the SWIF instrument, its absolute calibration, and the determination of atmospheric SOD's at MLO are presented. PMID:21052277

  1. Spectral Measurements of Meteorite Powders: Implications for 433 Eros

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burbine, T. H.; McCoy, T. J.; Jarosewich, E.; Sunshine, J. M.

    2001-01-01

    One of the goals of the NEAR-Shoemaker mission to 433 Eros was to determine if it has a meteoritic analog. The primary means of making such a link are the X-ray/gamma-ray spectrometers, which measure elemental compositions of the surface, and the multi-spectral imager (MSI) and near-infrared spectrometer (NIS), which measure spectral reflectance. For determining meteoritic analogs using the X-ray/gamma-ray spectrometer data, the primary data used for comparison is the set of bulk chemical analyses of meteorites done by Jarosewich. These bulk chemical analyses were done on samples now found in the Smithsonian's Analyzed Meteorite Powder collection (USNM 7073). For determining meteoritic analogs using MSI/NIS spectral data, the primary data used for comparison is the set of meteoritic spectra compiled by Gaffey. To expand the set of meteoritic spectra available to the scientific community, we have initiated a spectral study of over 70 samples (primarily ordinary chondrites) found in the Smithsonian's Analyzed Meteorite Powder collection and an electron microprobe study of their corresponding thin sections. This set of spectral and compositional data should allow for better constraints on the distribution of meteorites in plots of band area ratios versus Band I centers and the usefulness of equations for deriving mineralogic compositions from band parameters. These spectral data can also be combined with previous spectral studies of other meteorite types such as the primitive achondrites, eucrites, and angrites to determine how useful the derived band parameters are for differentiating between different meteorite classes. These spectral data can also be used for testing the Modified Gaussian Model (MGM) for determining modal abundances and mafic mineral chemistries from reflectance spectra.

  2. Dual-peak dose measurement for radiochromic films by a newly developed spectral microdensitometer

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, K.Y.; Fung, K.K.L.; Kwok, C.S.

    2005-06-15

    Radiochromic film (RCF) dosimetry is usually based on densitometric methods which use an analyzing light source of a fixed or a broad spectrum of wavelengths. These methods have not exploited the sensitivity of the dose response of the RCF otherwise attainable by using a light source with wavelengths peaked at the two absorption peaks in the absorption spectrum of the RCF. A new algorithm of dual-peak dose measurement for the RCF has been proposed in this paper to make use of these dual absorption peaks to achieve the maximum attainable sensitivity. This technique relies on the measurement of the transmittance of the RCF at the wavelength of the major and minor absorption peaks, respectively. The dual-peak dose measurement is accomplished with the aid of a novel spectral microdensitometer developed in our Institute. The microdensitometer utilizes a monochromator to provide a light source of which the wavelength can be matched precisely to the wavelength of the absorption peaks of the RCF. The doses obtained at these wavelengths are fed into a weighted objective function and an optimum dose is searched by minimizing the objective function to give the best estimate of the dose deposited on the film. An initial test shows that there is a good agreement between the estimated and actual dose deposited; and the maximum discrepancy was found to be less than 1%.

  3. Spectral measurements of ocean-dumped wastes tested in the marine upwelled spectral signature laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Witte, W. G.; Usry, J. W.; Whitlock, C. H.; Gurganus, E. A.

    1979-01-01

    Transmission and inherent upwelled radiance measurements were made of various mixtures of three ocean-dumped industrial plant wastes in artificial seawater. Laboratory analyses were made of the physical and chemical properties of the various mixtures. These results and the laboratory measurements of beam attenuation and inherent upwelled radiance indicate a variety of chemical and spectral responses when industrial wastes are added to artificial seawater. In particular, increased levels of turbidity did not always cause increased levels of inherent reflectance.

  4. Inferring surface solar absorption from broadband satellite measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cess, Robert D.; Vulis, Inna L.

    1989-01-01

    An atmospheric solar radiation model and surface albedo models that include wavelength dependence and surface anisotropy are combined to study the possibility of inferring the surface solar absorption from satellite measurements. The model includes ocean, desert, pasture land, savannah, and bog surface categories. Problems associated with converting narrowband measurements to broadband quantities are discussed, suggesting that it would be easier to infer surface solar absorption from broadband measurements directly. The practice of adopting a linear relationship between planetary and surface albedo to estimate surface albedos from satellite measurements is examined, showing that the linear conversion between broadband planetary and surface albedos is strongly dependent on vegetation type. It is suggested that there is a linear slope-offset relationship between surface and surface-atmosphere solar absorption.

  5. Measurement of plasma temperature and density using laser absorption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Billman, K. W.; Stallcop, J. R.

    1973-01-01

    A laser radiation absorption technique, suitable for temporal measurement of the electron density, the temperature, or a simultaneous determination of both, in an LTE plasma, is discussed. The theoretical calculation of the absorption coefficient for a hydrogen plasma is outlined; some results are presented for visible wavelengths. Measurements of electron density and temperature are presented and shown to be in good agreement with those values obtained by other methods. Finally, the possible use of the argon ion laser for simultaneous electron density and temperature measurement is discussed, and the theoretical curves necessary for its application to hydrogen plasma diagnostics are shown.

  6. Stabilization and spectral characterization of an alexandrite laser for water vapor lidar measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ponsardin, Patrick; Higdon, Noah S.; Grossman, Benoist E.; Browell, Edward V.

    1991-01-01

    A description of an optical system used to lock the alexandrite laser frequency on a water vapor absorption line is presented. The laser spectral characteristics, which include the spectral purity, the effect of the laser linewidth on the absorption, and the laser wavelength stability, are evaluated.

  7. Rapid microscopy measurement of very large spectral images.

    PubMed

    Lindner, Moshe; Shotan, Zav; Garini, Yuval

    2016-05-01

    The spectral content of a sample provides important information that cannot be detected by the human eye or by using an ordinary RGB camera. The spectrum is typically a fingerprint of the chemical compound, its environmental conditions, phase and geometry. Thus measuring the spectrum at each point of a sample is important for a large range of applications from art preservation through forensics to pathological analysis of a tissue section. To date, however, there is no system that can measure the spectral image of a large sample in a reasonable time. Here we present a novel method for scanning very large spectral images of microscopy samples even if they cannot be viewed in a single field of view of the camera. The system is based on capturing information while the sample is being scanned continuously 'on the fly'. Spectral separation implements Fourier spectroscopy by using an interferometer mounted along the optical axis. High spectral resolution of ~5 nm at 500 nm could be achieved with a diffraction-limited spatial resolution. The acquisition time is fairly high and takes 6-8 minutes for a sample size of 10mm x 10mm measured under a bright-field microscope using a 20X magnification. PMID:27137565

  8. Toward improved spectral measures of /s/: Results from adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Koenig, Laura L.; Shadle, Christine H.; Preston, Jonathan L.; Mooshammer, Christine R.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To introduce theoretically-driven acoustic measures of /s/ that reflect aerodynamic and articulatory conditions. The measures were evaluated by assessing whether they revealed expected changes over time and labiality effects, along with possible gender differences suggested by past work. Method Productions of /s/ were extracted from various speaking tasks from typically-speaking adolescents (6 boys; 6 girls). Measures were made of relative spectral energies in low- (550–3000 Hz), mid- (3000–7000 Hz), and high-frequency regions (7000–11025 Hz); the mid-frequency amplitude peak; and temporal changes in these parameters. Spectral moments were also obtained to permit comparison with existing work. Results Spectral balance measures in low–mid and mid–high frequency bands varied over the time course of /s/, capturing the development of sibilance at mid-fricative along with showing some effects of gender and labiality. The mid-frequency spectral peak was significantly higher in non-labial contexts, and in girls. Temporal variation in the mid-frequency peak differentiated ±labial contexts while normalizing over gender. Discussion The measures showed expected patterns, supporting their validity. Comparison of these data with studies of adults suggests some developmental patterns that call for further study. The measures may also serve to differentiate some cases of typical and misarticulated /s/. PMID:23785194

  9. Cavity ring-down spectrometer for high-fidelity molecular absorption measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, H.; Reed, Z. D.; Sironneau, V. T.; Hodges, J. T.

    2015-08-01

    We present a cavity ring-down spectrometer which was developed for near-infrared measurements of laser absorption by atmospheric greenhouse gases. This system has several important attributes that make it possible to conduct broad spectral surveys and to determine line-by-line parameters with wide dynamic range, and high spectral resolution, sensitivity and accuracy. We demonstrate a noise-equivalent absorption coefficient of 4×10-12 cm-1 Hz-1/2 and a signal-to-noise ratio of 1.5×106:1 in an absorption spectrum of carbon monoxide. We also present high-resolution measurements of trace methane in air spanning more than 1.2 THz and having a frequency axing with an uncertainty less than 100 kHz. Finally, we discuss how this system enables stringent tests of advanced line shape models. To illustrate, we measured an air-broadened carbon dioxide transition over a wide pressure range and analyzed these data with a multi-spectrum fit of the partially correlated, quadratic speed-dependent Nelkin-Ghatak profile. We obtained a quality-of-fit parameter in the multispectrum fit equal to 36,000, thus quantifying small-but-measurable limitations of the model profile. This analysis showed that the line shape depends upon collisional narrowing, speed dependent effects and partial correlations between velocity- and phase-changing collisions.

  10. Confirmation of uncontrolled flow dynamics in clinical simulated multi-infusion setups using absorption spectral photometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timmerman, Anna M.; Riphagen, Brechtje; Klaessens, John H.; Verdaasdonk, Rudolf M.

    2010-02-01

    Multi-infusion systems are used frequently at intensive care units to administer several liquid therapeutic agents to patients simultaneously. By passively combining the separate infusion lines in one central line, the number of punctures needed to access the patient's body, is reduced. So far, the mutual influence between the different infusion lines is unknown. Although the flow properties of single infusion systems have been investigated extensively, only a few research groups have investigated the flow properties of multi-infusion systems. We showed in a previous study that applying multi-infusion can lead to fluctuations in syringe pump infusions, resulting in uncontrolled and inaccurate drug administration. This study presents a performance analysis of multi-infusion systems as used in the Neonatology Intensive Care Unit. The dynamics between multiple infusion lines in multi-infusion systems were investigated by simulation experiments of clinical conditions. A newly developed real-time spectral-photometric method was used for the quantitative determination of concentration and outflow volume using a deconvolution method of absorption spectra of mixed fluids. The effects for common clinical interventions were studied in detail. Results showed mutual influence between the different infusion lines following these interventions. This mutual influence led to significant volume fluctuations up to 50%. These deviations could result in clinically dangerous situations. A complete analysis of the multiinfusion system characteristics is recommended in further research to estimate both the presence and severity of potential risks in clinical use.

  11. Airborne differential absorption lidar system for measurements of atmospheric water vapor and aerosols.

    PubMed

    Higdon, N S; Browell, E V; Ponsardin, P; Grossmann, B E; Butler, C F; Chyba, T H; Mayo, M N; Allen, R J; Heuser, A W; Grant, W B; Ismail, S; Mayor, S D; Carter, A F

    1994-09-20

    An airborne differential absorption lidar (DIAL) system has been developed at the NASA Langley Research Center for remote measurements of atmospheric water vapor (H(2)O) and aerosols. A solid-state alexandrite laser with a 1-pm linewidth and > 99.85% spectral purity was used as the on-line transmitter. Solid-state avalanche photodiode detector technology has replaced photomultiplier tubes in the receiver system, providing an average increase by a factor of 1.5-2.5 in the signal-to-noise ratio of the H(2)O measurement. By incorporating advanced diagnostic and data-acquisition instrumentation into other subsystems, we achieved additional improvements in system operational reliability and measurement accuracy. Laboratory spectroscopic measurements of H(2)O absorption-line parameters were perfo med to reduce the uncertainties in our knowledge of the absorption cross sections. Line-center H(2)O absorption cross sections were determined, with errors of 3-6%, for more than 120 lines in the 720-nm region. Flight tests of the system were conducted during 1989-1991 on the NASA Wallops Flight Facility Electra aircraft, and extensive intercomparison measurements were performed with dew-point hygrometers and H(2)O radiosondes. The H(2)O distributions measured with the DIAL system differed by ≤ 10% from the profiles determined with the in situ probes in a variety of atmospheric conditions. PMID:20941181

  12. Airborne differential absorption lidar system for measurements of atmospheric water vapor and aerosols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carter, Arlen F.; Allen, Robert J.; Mayo, M. Neale; Butler, Carolyn F.; Grossman, Benoist E.; Ismail, Syed; Grant, William B.; Browell, Edward V.; Higdon, Noah S.; Mayor, Shane D.; Ponsardin, Patrick; Hueser, Alene W.

    1994-01-01

    An airborne differential absorption lidar (DIAL) system has been developed at the NASA Langley Research Center for remote measurements of atmospheric water vapor (H2O) and aerosols. A solid-state alexandrite laser with a 1-pm linewidth and greater than 99.85% spectral purity was used as the on-line transmitter. Solid-state avalanche photodiode detector technology has replaced photomultiplier tubes in the receiver system, providing an average increase by a factor of 1.5-2.5 in the signal-to-noise ratio of the H2O measurement. By incorporating advanced diagnostic and data-acquisition instrumentation into other subsystems, we achieved additional improvements in system operational reliability and measurement accuracy. Laboratory spectroscopic measurements of H2O absorption-line parameters were performed to reduce the uncertainties in our knowledge of the absorption cross sections. Line-center H2O absorption cross sections were determined, with errors of 3-6%, for more than 120 lines in the 720-nm region. Flight tests of the system were conducted during 1989-1991 on the NASA Wallops Flight Facility Electra aircraft, and extensive intercomparison measurements were performed with dew-point hygrometers and H2O radiosondes. The H2O distributions measured with the DIAL system differed by less than 10% from the profiles determined with the in situ probes in a variety of atmospheric conditions.

  13. Water vapor spectroscopy in the 815-nm wavelength region for Differential Absorption Lidar measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ponsardin, Patrick; Browell, Edward V.

    1995-01-01

    The differential absorption lidar (DIAL) technique was first applied to the remote measurement of atmospheric water vapor profiles from airborne platforms in 1981. The successful interpretation of the lidar profiles relies strongly on an accurate knowledge of specific water vapor absorption line parameters: line strength, pressure broadening coefficient, pressure-induced shift coefficient and the respective temperature-dependence factors. NASA Langley Research Center has developed and is currently testing an autonomous airborne water vapor lidar system: LASE (Lidar Atmospheric Sensing Experiment). This DIAL system uses a Nd:YAG-pumped Ti:Sapphire laser seeded by a diode laser as a lidar transmitter. The tunable diode has been selected to operate in the 813-818 nm wavelength region. This 5-nm spectral interval offers a large distribution of strengths for temperature-insensitive water vapor absorption lines. In support of the LASE project, a series of spectroscopic measurements were conducted for the 16 absorption lines that have been identified for use in the LASE measurements. Prior to this work, the experimental data for this water vapor absorption band were limited - to our knowledge - to the line strengths and to the line positions.

  14. Precise Measurement of Lunar Spectral Irradiance at Visible Wavelengths

    PubMed Central

    Cramer, CE; Lykke, KR; Woodward, JT; Smith, AW

    2013-01-01

    We report a measurement of lunar spectral irradiance with an uncertainty below 1 % from 420 nm to 1000 nm. This measurement uncertainty meets the stability requirement for many climate data records derived from satellite images, including those for vegetation, aerosols, and snow and ice albedo. It therefore opens the possibility of using the Moon as a calibration standard to bridge gaps in satellite coverage and validate atmospheric retrieval algorithms. Our measurement technique also yields detailed information about the atmosphere at the measurement site, suggesting that lunar observations are a possible solution for aerosol monitoring during the polar winter and can provide nighttime measurements to complement aerosol data collected with sun photometers. Our measurement, made with a novel apparatus, is an order of magnitude more accurate than the previous state-of-the-art and has continuous spectral coverage, removing the need to interpolate between filter passbands. PMID:26401440

  15. Measurements of scattering and absorption in mammalian cell suspensions

    SciTech Connect

    Mourant, J.R.; Johnson, T.M.; Freyer, J.P.

    1996-03-01

    During the past several years a range of spectroscopies, including fluorescence and elastic-scatter spectroscopy, have been investigated for optically based detection of cancer and other tissue pathologies. Both elastic-scatter and fluorescence signals depend, in part, on scattering and absorption properties of the cells in the tissue. Therefore an understanding of the scattering and absorption properties of cells is a necessary prerequisite for understanding and developing these techniques. Cell suspensions provide a simple model with which to begin studying the absorption and scattering properties of cells. In this study we have made preliminary measurements of the scattering and absorption properties of suspensions of mouse mammary carcinoma cells (EMT6) over a broad wavelength range (380 nm to 800 nm).

  16. Spectral induced polarization measurements on New Zealand sands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jospeh, S.; Ingham, M.; Gouws, G.

    2012-12-01

    Because of the dependence of the ac electrical conductivity of granular materials on surface effects related to pore geometry, spectral induced polarization measurements (SIP) have the potential to provide a geophysical technique which can be used to estimate aquifer properties such as hydraulic conductivity. We present the results of laboratory SIP measurements on a variety of sand samples typical of aquifers in the coastal areas of New Zealand and relate these to the measured hydraulic conductivity.

  17. Novel Cross-Band Relative Absorption (CoBRA) technique For Measuring Atmospheric Species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasad, N. S.; Pliutau, D.

    2013-12-01

    We describe a methodology called Cross-Band Relative Absorption (CoBRA) we have implemented to significantly reduce interferences due to variations in atmospheric temperature and pressure in molecular mixing ration measurements [1-4]. The interference reduction is achieved through automatic compensation based on selecting spectral line pairs exhibiting similar evolution behavior under varying atmospheric conditions. The method is applicable to a wide range of molecules including CO2 and CH4 which can be matched with O2 or any other well-mixed atmospheric molecule. Such matching results in automatic simultaneous adjustments of the spectral line shapes at all times with a high precision under varying atmospheric conditions of temperature and pressure. We present the results of our selected CoBRA analysis based on line-by-line calculations and the Modern Era Retrospective Analysis for Research and Applications (MERRA) dataset including more recent evaluation of the error contributions due to water vapor interference effects. References: 1) N. S. Prasad, D. Pliutau, 'Cross-band relative absorption technique for the measurement of molecular mixing ratios.', Optics Express, Vol. 21, Issue 11, pp. 13279-13292 (2013) 2) D. Pliutau and N. S. Prasad, "Cross-band Relative Absorption Technique for Molecular Mixing Ratio Determination," in CLEO: 2013, OSA Technical Digest (online) (Optical Society of America, 2013), paper CW3L.4. 3) Denis Pliutau; Narasimha S. Prasad; 'Semi-empirical validation of the cross-band relative absorption technique for the measurement of molecular mixing ratios',.Proc. SPIE 8731, Laser Radar Technology and Applications XVIII, 87310L (May 20, 2013); doi:10.1117/12.2016661. 4) Denis Pliutau,; Narasimha S. Prasad; 'Comparative analysis of alternative spectral bands of CO2 and O2 for the sensing of CO2 mixing ratios' Proc. SPIE 8718, Advanced Environmental, Chemical, and Biological Sensing Technologies X, 87180L (May 31, 2013); doi:10.1117/12.2016337.

  18. Calorimetric support of directional-hemispherical reflection measurements in the infrared spectral range.

    PubMed

    Richter, W; Sarge, S M; Kämmer, F

    1994-03-01

    Measurements of the directional-hemispherical reflectance ρ with the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt IR sphere reflectometer have been confirmed by calorimetric determination of the absorptance α in the same geometrical conditions (irradiation at 10°, hemispherical reflection). The good agreement of ρ with (1 - α) on both highly reflecting and low-reflecting surfaces indicates that in the mid-IR spectral range the integrating sphere reflectometer is capable of essentially correct reflectance measurements of diffusely reflecting surfaces, with an estimated uncertainty of 0.01 after correction for a small systematic deviation. This capability opens up the possibility of developing IR reflectance standards. PMID:20862150

  19. Measurement of temperature profiles in flames by emission-absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simmons, F. S.; Arnold, C. B.; Lindquist, G. H.

    1972-01-01

    An investigation was conducted to explore the use of infrared and ultraviolet emission-absorption spectroscopy for determination of temperature profiles in flames. Spectral radiances and absorptances were measured in the 2.7-micron H2O band and the 3064-A OH band in H2/O2 flames for several temperature profiles which were directly measured by a sodium line-reversal technique. The temperature profiles, determined by inversion of the infrared and ultraviolet spectra, showed an average disagreement with line-reversal measurements of 50 K for the infrared and 200 K for the ultraviolet at a temperature of 2600 K. The reasons for these discrepancies are discussed in some detail.

  20. Estimation of Canopy Foliar Biomass with Spectral Reflectance Measurements

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Canopy foliar biomass, defined as the product of leaf dry matter content and leaf area index, is an important measurement for global biogeochemical cycles. This study explores the potential for retrieving foliar biomass in green canopies using a spectral index, the Normalized Dry Matter Index (NDMI)...

  1. [Influencing factors in measuring absorption coefficient of suspended particulate matters].

    PubMed

    Yu, Xiao-long; Shen, Fang; Zhang, Jin-fang

    2013-05-01

    Absorption coefficient of suspended particulate matters in natural water is one of the key parameters in ocean color remote sensing. In order to study the influencing factors that affect the measurement, a series of experiments were designed to measure samples using transmittance method (T method), transmittance-reflectance method (T-R method) and absorptance method (A method). The results shows that absorption coefficient measured by the A method has a much lower error compared to the T method and T-R method due to influencing factors,such as filter-to-filter variations, water content of the filter, and homogeneity of filter load and so on. Another factor influence absorption coefficient is path-length amplification induced by multiple scattering inside the filter. To determine the path-length amplification, the true absorption was measured by AC-s (WetLabs). The linear fitting result shows that the mean path-length amplification is much higher for the A method than that of the T-R method and the T method (4.01 versus 2.20 and 2.32), and the corresponding correlation coefficient are 0.90, 0.87 and 0.80. For the A method and the T-R method, higher correlation coefficients are calculated when using polynomial fitting, and the value are 0.95 and 0.94. Analysis of the mean relative error caused by different influencing factors indicates that path-length amplification is the largest error source in measuring the absorption coefficient. PMID:23914523

  2. Pulsed Airborne Lidar Measurements of C02 Column Absorption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abshire, James B.; Riris, Haris; Allan, Graham R.; Weaver, Clark J.; Mao, Jianping; Sun, Xiaoli; Hasselbrack, William E.; Rodriquez, Michael; Browell, Edward V.

    2011-01-01

    We report on airborne lidar measurements of atmospheric CO2 column density for an approach being developed as a candidate for NASA's ASCENDS mission. It uses a pulsed dual-wavelength lidar measurement based on the integrated path differential absorption (IPDA) technique. We demonstrated the approach using the CO2 measurement from aircraft in July and August 2009 over four locations. The results show clear CO2 line shape and absorption signals, which follow the expected changes with aircraft altitude from 3 to 13 km. The 2009 measurements have been analyzed in detail and the results show approx.1 ppm random errors for 8-10 km altitudes and approx.30 sec averaging times. Airborne measurements were also made in 2010 with stronger signals and initial analysis shows approx. 0.3 ppm random errors for 80 sec averaging times for measurements at altitudes> 6 km.

  3. Spectrally resolved white light interferometry to measure material dispersion over a wide spectral band in a single acquisition.

    PubMed

    Arosa, Yago; Lago, Elena López; Varela, Luis Miguel; de la Fuente, Raúl

    2016-07-25

    In this paper we apply spectrally resolved white light interferometry to measure refractive and group index over a wide spectral band from 400 to 1000 nm. The output of a Michelson interferometer is spectrally decomposed by a homemade prism spectrometer with a high resolution camera. The group index is determined directly from the phase extracted from the spectral interferogram while the refractive index is estimated once its value at a given wavelength is known. PMID:27464179

  4. A comparison of methods for the measurement of the absorption coefficient in natural waters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pegau, W. Scott; Cleveland, Joan S.; Doss, W.; Kennedy, C. Dan; Maffione, Robert A.; Mueller, James L.; Stone, R.; Trees, Charles C.; Weidemann, Alan D.; Wells, Willard H.

    1995-01-01

    In the spring of 1992 an optical closure experiment was conducted at Lake Pend Orielle, Idaho. A primary objective of the experiment was to compare techniques for the measurement of the spectral absorption coefficent and other inherent optical properties of natural waters. Daily averages of absorption coefficents measured using six methods are compared at wavelengths of 456, 488, and 532 nm. Overall agreement was within 40% at 456 nm and improved with increasing wavelength to 25% at 532 nm. These absorption measurements were distributed over the final 9 days of the experiement, when bio-optical conditions in Lake Pend Oreille (as indexed by the beam attenuation coefficent c(sub p)(660) and chlorophyll a fluorescence profiles) were representative of those observed throughout the experiment. However, profiles of stimulated chlorophyll a fluorescence and beam transmission showed that bio-optical properties in the lake varied strongly on all time and space scales. Therefore environmental variabilty contributed significantly to deviations between daily mean absorption coefficients measured using the different techniques.

  5. Terahertz spectral signatures :measurement and detection LDRD project 86361 final report.

    SciTech Connect

    Wanke, Michael Clement; Brener, Igal; Lee, Mark

    2005-11-01

    LDRD Project 86361 provided support to upgrade the chemical and material spectral signature measurement and detection capabilities of Sandia National Laboratories using the terahertz (THz) portion of the electromagnetic spectrum, which includes frequencies between 0.1 to 10 THz. Under this project, a THz time-domain spectrometer was completed. This instrument measures sample absorption spectra coherently, obtaining both magnitude and phase of the absorption signal, and has shown an operating signal-to-noise ratio of 10{sub 4}. Additionally, various gas cells and a reflectometer were added to an existing high-resolution THz Fourier transform spectrometer, which greatly extend the functionality of this spectrometer. Finally, preliminary efforts to design an integrated THz transceiver based on a quantum cascade laser were begun.

  6. Survey of spectral response measurements for photovoltaic devices

    SciTech Connect

    Hartman, J.S.; Lind, M.A.

    1981-11-01

    A survey of the photovoltaic community was conducted to ascertain the present state-of-the-art for PV spectral response measurements. Specific topics explored included measurement system designs, good and bad features of the systems, and problems encountered in the evaluation of specific cell structures and materials. The survey showed that most spectral response data are used in diagnostic analysis for the optimization of developmental solar cells. Measurement systems commonly utilize a chopped narrowband source in conjunction with a constant bias illumination which simulates the ambient end use environment. Researchers emphasized the importance of bias illumination for all types of cells in order to minimize the effects of nonlinearities in cell response. Not surprisingly single crystal silicon cells present the fewest measurement problems to the researcher and have been studied more thoroughly than any other type of solar cell. But, the accurate characterization of silicon cells is still difficult and laboratory intercomparison studies have yielded data scatter ranging from +-5% to +-15%. The measurement experience with other types of cells is less extensive. The development of reliable data bases for some solar cells is complicated by problems of cell nonuniformity, environmental instability, nonlinearity, etc. Cascade cells present new problems associated with their structue (multiple cells in series) which are just beginning to be understood. In addition, the importance of many measurement parameters (spectral content of bias light, bias light intensity, bias voltage, chopping frequency, etc.) are not fully understood for most types of solar cells.

  7. Cloud retrieval using ship-based spectral transmissivity measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brueckner, M.; Macke, A.; Wendisch, M.; Kanitz, T.; Pospichal, B.

    2013-05-01

    Within the scope of the OCEANET-Project (autonomous measurement platforms for energy and material exchange between ocean and atmosphere) on board of the research vessel Polarstern clouds have been investigated over the Atlantic Ocean under different atmospheric conditions and climate zones by active and passive remote sensing. An existing measurement platform, including lidar, microwave radiometer, all sky camera and broadband radiation sensors, has been extended by spectral radiation measurements with the COmpact RAdiation measurements System (CORAS). CORAS measures spectral downward radiances and irradiances in the visible to near-infrared wavelength region. The data were corrected to consider the movements of the ship and with it the misalignment of the sensor plane from earth's horizon. Using observed and modeled spectral transmitted radiances cloud properties such as cloud optical thickness (τ) and effective radius (reff) were retrieved. The vertical cloud structure with limitations for thick clouds is obtained from lidar and microwave radiometer measurements. The all sky camera provides information on the horizontal cloud variability. Cloud optical thickness and effective radius, will be retrieved by using a plane parallel radiative transfer model.

  8. Komatiites as Mercury surface analogues: Spectral measurements at PEL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maturilli, Alessandro; Helbert, Jörn; St. John, James M.; Head, James W.; Vaughan, William M.; D'Amore, Mario; Gottschalk, Matthias; Ferrari, Sabrina

    2014-07-01

    The elemental composition of Mercury's surface, which has been recently measured by the NASA MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) spacecraft, suggests a mineralogy dominated by magnesium-rich orthopyroxene and feldspar. The most magnesium-rich and aluminium-poor regions of Mercury's surface (which are presumably orthopyroxene-rich) have compositions, and possibly mineralogies, analogous to terrestrial boninites and basaltic komatiites. Unfortunately, little is known about the spectral properties of komatiites, especially at the high surface temperatures of Mercury. We therefore have collected three terrestrial komatiites with different compositions plus a synthetic komatiitic sample, and measured their reflectances in the visible and thermal infrared spectral ranges. Samples divided into four grain size ranges (when enough material was available) were measured fresh and after thermal processing in vacuum (10 Pa) at 500 °C, comparable to Mercury peak surface temperatures. Our measurements show that spectral changes between fresh and thermally processed samples occur in both spectral channels, but are stronger in the visible range, with reddening affecting all the samples, while darkening is more selective. It is important to note that darkening and reddening after thermally processing the samples are independent of the komatiites ferrous iron content. In fact the synthetic sample which is nearly iron-free is most strongly affected. From our study it turns out that thermally processing the samples in vacuum at Mercury surface temperature produces the removal of samples' colour centres. The results of our study show also that the Mercury Atmospheric and Surface Composition Spectrometer (MASCS) instrument on MESSENGER orbiting Mercury currently cannot distinguish between different compositions of komatiites, while the future MErcury Radiometer and Thermal infrared Imaging Spectrometer (MERTIS) on the upcoming ESA Bepi

  9. Temperature and pressure measurement based on tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy with gas absorption linewidth detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Yunxia; Liu, Tiegen; Liu, Kun; Jiang, Junfeng; Wang, Tao; Wang, Ranran

    2014-11-01

    A gas temperature and pressure measurement method based on Tunable Diode Laser Absorption Spectroscopy (TDLAS) detecting linewidth of gas absorption line was proposed in this paper. Combined with Lambert-Beer Law and ideal gas law, the relationship between temperature, pressure and gas linewidth with Lorentzian line shape was investigated in theory. Taking carbon monoxide (CO) at 1567.32 nm for example, the linewidths of gas absorption line in different temperatures and pressures were obtained by simulation. The relationship between the linewidth of second harmonic and temperature, pressure with the coefficient 0.025 pm/K and 0.0645 pm/kPa respectively. According to the relationship of simulation results and detected linewidth, the undefined temperature and pressure of CO gas were measured. The gas temperature and pressure measurement based on linewidth detection, avoiding the influence of laser intensity, is an effective temperature and pressure measurement method. This method also has the ability to detect temperature and pressure of other gases with Lorentzian line shape.

  10. Imaging spectrometer measurement of water vapor in the 400 to 2500 nm spectral region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, Robert O.; Roberts, Dar A.; Conel, James E.; Dozier, Jeff

    1995-01-01

    The Airborne Visible-Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) measures the total upwelling spectral radiance from 400 to 2500 nm sampled at 10 nm intervals. The instrument acquires spectral data at an altitude of 20 km above sea level, as images of 11 by up to 100 km at 17x17 meter spatial sampling. We have developed a nonlinear spectral fitting algorithm coupled with a radiative transfer code to derive the total path water vapor from the spectrum, measured for each spatial element in an AVIRIS image. The algorithm compensates for variation in the surface spectral reflectance and atmospheric aerosols. It uses water vapor absorption bands centered at 940 nm, 1040 nm, and 1380 nm. We analyze data sets with water vapor abundances ranging from 1 to 40 perceptible millimeters. In one data set, the total path water vapor varies from 7 to 21 mm over a distance of less than 10 km. We have analyzed a time series of five images acquired at 12 minute intervals; these show spatially heterogeneous changes of advocated water vapor of 25 percent over 1 hour. The algorithm determines water vapor for images with a range of ground covers, including bare rock and soil, sparse to dense vegetation, snow and ice, open water, and clouds. The precision of the water vapor determination approaches one percent. However, the precision is sensitive to the absolute abundance and the absorption strength of the atmospheric water vapor band analyzed. We have evaluated the accuracy of the algorithm by comparing several surface-based determinations of water vapor at the time of the AVIRIS data acquisition. The agreement between the AVIRIS measured water vapor and the in situ surface radiometer and surface interferometer measured water vapor is 5 to 10 percent.

  11. Fine-structure Constancy Measurements in QSO Absorption Lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitmore, Jonathan B.

    2013-01-01

    The ESO Large Programme 185.A-0745 has awarded 10 nights on the VLT-UVES spectrograph for the study of the possible variation in the fine structure constant. We will present the fine-structure measurements from two lines of sight and several absorption systems. We will also present updated systematic error analyses.

  12. Tone-burst technique measures high-intensity sound absorption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powell, J. G.; Van Houten, J. J.

    1971-01-01

    Tone-burst technique, in which narrow-bandwidth, short-duration sonic pulse is propagated down a standing-wave tube, measures sound absorbing capacity of materials used in jet engine noise abatement. Technique eliminates effects of tube losses and yields normal-incidence absorption coefficient of specimen.

  13. [Measurement and retrieval of indicators for fast VOCs atmospheric photochemistry with differential optical absorption spectroscopy].

    PubMed

    Peng, Fu-Min; Xie, Pin-Hua; Shao, Shi-Yong; Li, Yu-Jin; Lin, Yi-Hui; Li, Su-Wen; Qin, Min; Liu, Wen-Qing

    2008-03-01

    Featuring excellent response characteristics and detection sensitivity and with much lower operational cost, differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS) can be a powerful tool to trace concentration variation of trace indicators -O3, Ox (O3 + NO2) and HCHO for fast VOCs atmospheric photochemistry. But it's difficult to measure those gases accurately because of trace concentration. Here using a self-made DOAS system, the accurate measurement of those indicators was achieved through improving the ratio of signal to noise ratio and correcting the background scattering light; the retrieving method of those indicators was developed through eliminating the temperature effect of absorption cross section, accurately removing the intrinsic structure and lamp structure of spectrum. The preference of different spectral windows that could be used for the concentration retrieval of those indicators was analyzed and compared including interfering factors, results retrieved and the accuracy. PMID:18536400

  14. Spectral and lifetime domain measurements of rat brain tumours

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abi Haidar, D.; Leh, B.; Allaoua, K.; Genoux, A.; Siebert, R.; Steffenhagen, M.; Peyrot, D.; Sandeau, N.; Vever-Bizet, C.; Bourg-Heckly, G.; Chebbi, I.; Collado-Hilly, M.

    2012-02-01

    During glioblastoma surgery, delineation of the brain tumour margins remains difficult especially since infiltrated and normal tissues have the same visual appearance. This problematic constitutes our research interest. We developed a fibre-optical fluorescence probe for spectroscopic and time domain measurements. First measurements of endogenous tissue fluorescence were performed on fresh and fixed rat tumour brain slices. Spectral characteristics, fluorescence redox ratios and fluorescence lifetime measurements were analysed. Fluorescence information collected from both, lifetime and spectroscopic experiments, appeared promising for tumour tissue discrimination. Two photon measurements were performed on the same fixed tissue. Different wavelengths are used to acquire two-photon excitation-fluorescence of tumorous and healthy sites.

  15. Measurements of Scattering and Absorption Changes in Muscle and Brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gratton, Enrico; Fantini, Sergio; Franceschini, Maria Angela; Gratton, Gabriele; Fabiani, Monica

    1997-06-01

    Non-invasive techniques for the study of human brain function based on changes of the haemoglobin content or on changes of haemoglobin saturation have recently been proposed. Among the new methods, near-infrared transmission and reflection measurements may have significant advantages and complement well-established methods such as functional magnetic resonance imaging and positron emission tomography. Near-infrared measurements can be very fast, comparable in speed to electrophysiological measurements, but are better localized. We will present the demonstration of measurements of millisecond signals due to brain activity in humans following stimulation of the visual cortex. However, major unresolved questions remain about the origin of the signals observed. Optical measurements on exposed cortex in animals show that both the absorption and the scattering coefficient are affected by neural activity. Model calculations show that the signals we detected may originate from rapid changes of the scattering coefficient in a region about 1 to 2 cm below the scalp. We discuss our measurement protocol, which is based on a frequency-domain instrument, and the algorithm to separate the absorption from the scattering contribution in the overall optical response. Our method produces excellent separation between scattering and absorption in relatively homogeneous masses such as large muscles. The extrapolation of our measurement protocol to a complex structure such as the human head is critically evaluated.

  16. Water vapour foreign-continuum absorption in near-infrared windows from laboratory measurements.

    PubMed

    Ptashnik, Igor V; McPheat, Robert A; Shine, Keith P; Smith, Kevin M; Williams, R Gary

    2012-06-13

    For a long time, it has been believed that atmospheric absorption of radiation within wavelength regions of relatively high infrared transmittance (so-called 'windows') was dominated by the water vapour self-continuum, that is, spectrally smooth absorption caused by H(2)O--H(2)O pair interaction. Absorption due to the foreign continuum (i.e. caused mostly by H(2)O--N(2) bimolecular absorption in the Earth's atmosphere) was considered to be negligible in the windows. We report new retrievals of the water vapour foreign continuum from high-resolution laboratory measurements at temperatures between 350 and 430 K in four near-infrared windows between 1.1 and 5 μm (9000-2000 cm(-1)). Our results indicate that the foreign continuum in these windows has a very weak temperature dependence and is typically between one and two orders of magnitude stronger than that given in representations of the continuum currently used in many climate and weather prediction models. This indicates that absorption owing to the foreign continuum may be comparable to the self-continuum under atmospheric conditions in the investigated windows. The calculated global-average clear-sky atmospheric absorption of solar radiation is increased by approximately 0.46 W m(-2) (or 0.6% of the total clear-sky absorption) by using these new measurements when compared with calculations applying the widely used MTCKD (Mlawer-Tobin-Clough-Kneizys-Davies) foreign-continuum model. PMID:22547232

  17. Absolute spectral response measurements of different photodiodes useful for applications in the UV spectral region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pelizzo, Maria G.; Ceccherini, Paolo; Garoli, Denis; Masut, Pietro; Nicolosi, Piergiorgio

    2004-09-01

    Long UV radiation exposure can result in damages of biological tissues, as burns, skin aging, erythema and even melanoma cancer. In the past years an increase of melanoma cancer has been observed and associated to the atmospheric ozone deployment. Attendance of sun tanning unit centers has become a huge social phenomena, and the maximum UV radiation dose that a human being can receive is regulated by law. On the other side, UV radiation is largely used for therapeutic and germicidal purposes. In all these areas, spectroradiometer and radiomenter are needed for monitoring UVA (315-400 nm), UVB (280-315 nm) and UVC (100-280 nm) irradiance. We have selected some commercial photodiodes which can be used as solid state detectors in these instruments. We have characterized them by measuring their absolute spectral response in the 200 - 400 nm spectral range.

  18. Material Spectral Emissivity Measurement Based on Two Reference Blackbodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Jing; Yang, Yongjun; Liao, Li; Lyu, Guoyi

    2015-12-01

    Spectral emissivity is one of the important physical properties of materials. Emissivity measurement is critical for accurate temperature measurements and the evaluation of the stealth performance for materials. In this paper, a Fourier transform infrared spectrometer and an energy comparison method are used to study material emissivity measurements. Two reference blackbodies are employed for real-time measurement and correction of the spectrometer background function to enhance the emissivity measurement accuracy, to improve the design of a three-parabolic-mirror optical system, and to enlarge the optical field of view to meet the measurement requirements. The linearity of the system is measured using a mercury cadmium telluride detector and a deuterated triglycine sulfate detector. The results indicate that the linear range of the system meets the emissivity measurement requirements for the temperature range from 50°C to 1000° C. The effective radiation surface is introduced as a parameter of the reference blackbodies to reduce the influence of the measurement distance. The Fourier transform infrared spectrometer is used to measure the spectral emissivity of a conductive silica film and SiC, respectively, at different temperatures in the wavelength range of 1 \\upmu m to 25 \\upmu m. The expanded uncertainty is less than 5 %.

  19. Single-tone and two-tone AM-FM spectral calculations for tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chou, Nee-Yin; Sachse, Glen W.

    1987-01-01

    A generalized theory for optical heterodyne spectroscopy with phase modulated laser radiation is used which allows the calculation of signal line shapes for frequency modulation spectroscopy of Lorentzian gas absorption lines. In particular, synthetic spectral line shapes for both single-tone and two-tone modulation of lead-salt diode lasers are presented in which the contributions from both amplitude and frequency modulations are included.

  20. Towards higher stability of resonant absorption measurements in pulsed plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Britun, Nikolay; Michiels, Matthieu; Snyders, Rony

    2015-12-01

    Possible ways to increase the reliability of time-resolved particle density measurements in pulsed gaseous discharges using resonant absorption spectroscopy are proposed. A special synchronization, called "dynamic source triggering," between a gated detector and two pulsed discharges, one representing the discharge of interest and another being used as a reference source, is developed. An internal digital delay generator in the intensified charge coupled device camera, used at the same time as a detector, is utilized for this purpose. According to the proposed scheme, the light pulses from the reference source follow the gates of detector, passing through the discharge of interest only when necessary. This allows for the utilization of short-pulse plasmas as reference sources, which is critical for time-resolved absorption analysis of strongly emitting pulsed discharges. In addition to dynamic source triggering, the reliability of absorption measurements can be further increased using simultaneous detection of spectra relevant for absorption method, which is also demonstrated in this work. The proposed methods are illustrated by the time-resolved measurements of the metal atom density in a high-power impulse magnetron sputtering (HiPIMS) discharge, using either a hollow cathode lamp or another HiPIMS discharge as a pulsed reference source.

  1. Towards higher stability of resonant absorption measurements in pulsed plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Britun, Nikolay; Michiels, Matthieu; Snyders, Rony

    2015-12-15

    Possible ways to increase the reliability of time-resolved particle density measurements in pulsed gaseous discharges using resonant absorption spectroscopy are proposed. A special synchronization, called “dynamic source triggering,” between a gated detector and two pulsed discharges, one representing the discharge of interest and another being used as a reference source, is developed. An internal digital delay generator in the intensified charge coupled device camera, used at the same time as a detector, is utilized for this purpose. According to the proposed scheme, the light pulses from the reference source follow the gates of detector, passing through the discharge of interest only when necessary. This allows for the utilization of short-pulse plasmas as reference sources, which is critical for time-resolved absorption analysis of strongly emitting pulsed discharges. In addition to dynamic source triggering, the reliability of absorption measurements can be further increased using simultaneous detection of spectra relevant for absorption method, which is also demonstrated in this work. The proposed methods are illustrated by the time-resolved measurements of the metal atom density in a high-power impulse magnetron sputtering (HiPIMS) discharge, using either a hollow cathode lamp or another HiPIMS discharge as a pulsed reference source.

  2. Towards higher stability of resonant absorption measurements in pulsed plasmas.

    PubMed

    Britun, Nikolay; Michiels, Matthieu; Snyders, Rony

    2015-12-01

    Possible ways to increase the reliability of time-resolved particle density measurements in pulsed gaseous discharges using resonant absorption spectroscopy are proposed. A special synchronization, called "dynamic source triggering," between a gated detector and two pulsed discharges, one representing the discharge of interest and another being used as a reference source, is developed. An internal digital delay generator in the intensified charge coupled device camera, used at the same time as a detector, is utilized for this purpose. According to the proposed scheme, the light pulses from the reference source follow the gates of detector, passing through the discharge of interest only when necessary. This allows for the utilization of short-pulse plasmas as reference sources, which is critical for time-resolved absorption analysis of strongly emitting pulsed discharges. In addition to dynamic source triggering, the reliability of absorption measurements can be further increased using simultaneous detection of spectra relevant for absorption method, which is also demonstrated in this work. The proposed methods are illustrated by the time-resolved measurements of the metal atom density in a high-power impulse magnetron sputtering (HiPIMS) discharge, using either a hollow cathode lamp or another HiPIMS discharge as a pulsed reference source. PMID:26724013

  3. Quantum cascade laser absorption spectroscopy of UF6 at 7.74 μm for analytical uranium enrichment measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewicki, Rafal; Kosterev, Anatoliy A.; Toor, Fatima; Yao, Yu; Gmachl, Claire; Tsai, Tracy; Wysocki, Gerard; Wang, Xiaojun; Troccoli, Mariano; Fong, Mary; Tittel, Frank K.

    2010-01-01

    The ν1+ν3 combination band of uranium hexafluoride (UF6) is targeted to perform analytical enrichment measurements using laser absorption spectroscopy. A high performance widely tunable EC-QCL sources emitting radiation at 7.74 μm (1291 cm-1) is employed as an UF6-LAS optical source to measure the unresolved rotational-vibrational spectral structure of several tens of wavenumbers (cm-1). A preliminary spectroscopic measurement based on a direct laser absorption spectroscopy of methane (CH4) as an appropriate UF6 analyte simulant, was demonstrated.

  4. Short term X-ray spectral variability of the strong iron-k absorption feature in PDS 456

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matzeu, G.; Reeves, J.; Gofford, J.; Nardini, E.; Costa, M.; Braito, V.; O'Brien, P.; Ward, M.; Turner, J.; Miller, L.

    2014-07-01

    We present a recent 500 ks Suzaku and a simultaneous 500 ks XMM-Newton & NuSTAR observations, carried out in 2013, of the nearby (z=0.184) luminous (L_{bol}˜10^{47} erg s^{-1}) quasar PDS 456. Short term X-ray spectral variability, including the presence of a strong and rapidly variable iron-K absorption feature, is observed and subsequently investigated. Here, our attention is focused on the physical interpretation of the short term variability where two models are adopted in the spectral analysis (partial covering vs coronal changes), leading to two valid interpretations. In the partial covering scenario, rapidly varying absorption is due to inhomogeneous dense material and such short timescale changes also entail that that the absorption is due to gas located in the vicinity of the black hole possibly shielding part of the outflow. In the second scenario, the complex spectral variability is due to variations in the intrinsic continuum observed as changes in the soft X-ray spectrum leading subsequent changes in the hard X-ray power-law, possibly induced by Comptonisation in the disc corona. Furthermore it was possible to extrapolate the size and the location of the absorber, its outflowing velocity and a direct estimation of the size of the X-ray emitting region ˜20 R_{g}.

  5. Low-frequency sound absorption measurements in air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zuckerwar, A. J.; Meredith, R. W.

    1984-01-01

    Thirty sets of sound absorption measurements in air at a pressure of 1 atmosphere are presented at temperatures from 10 C to 50 C, relative humidities from 0 to 100 percent, and frequencies from 10 to 2500 Hz. The measurements were conducted by the method of free decay in a resonant tube having a length of 18.261 m and bore diameter of 0.152 m. Background measurements in a gas consisting of 89.5 percent N2 and 10.5 percent Ar, a mixture which has the same sound velocity as air, permitted the wall and structural losses of the tube to be separated from the constituent absorption, consisting of classical rotational and vibrational absorption, in the air samples. The data were used to evaluate the vibrational relaxation frequencies of N2 and/or O2 for each of the 30 sets of meteorological parameters. Over the full range of humidity, the measured relaxation frequencies of N2 in air lie between those specified by ANSI Standard S1.26-1978 and those measured earlier in binary N2H2O mixtures. The measured relaxation frequencies could be determined only at very low values of humidity, reveal a significant trend away from the ANSI standard, in agreement with a prior investigation.

  6. Scalar spectral measures associated with an operator-fractal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jorgensen, Palle E. T.; Kornelson, Keri A.; Shuman, Karen L.

    2014-02-01

    We study a spectral-theoretic model on a Hilbert space L2(μ) where μ is a fixed Cantor measure. In addition to μ, we also consider an independent scaling operator U acting in L2(μ). To make our model concrete, we focus on explicit formulas: We take μ to be the Bernoulli infinite-convolution measure corresponding to scale number 1/4. We then define the unitary operator U in L2(μ) from a scale-by-5 operation. The spectral-theoretic and geometric properties we have previously established for U are as follows: (i) U acts as an ergodic operator; (ii) the action of U is not spatial; and finally, (iii) U is fractal in the sense that it is unitarily equivalent to a countable infinite direct sum of (twisted) copies of itself. In this paper, we prove new results about the projection-valued measures and scalar spectral measures associated to U and its constituent parts. Our techniques make use of the representations of the Cuntz algebra O_2 on L2(μ).

  7. High Resolution Spectral Measurements of Electrical Propulsion Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Celik, Murat; Batishchev, Oleg; Martinez-Sanchez, Manuel

    2007-11-01

    Among various diagnostics methods in studying the EP thrusters' plasma, emission spectroscopy provides a non-invasive, fast and economical diagnostics allowing also the ability to access hard to reach locations. This study presents the spectral measurement results of SPT (BHT-200) and TAL (MHT-9) Hall Effect thrusters and mini-Helicon (mHTX@MIT) thruster plasmas. The measurements were conducted using a 750mm focal length spectrometer with a spectral resolution of up to ˜0.01 nm in the UV-VIS-NIR wavelength range, 200-1000nm. For one set of the measurements, collection optics was placed on a portable optical shelf attached to the window port of the vacuum chamber. For another set of measurements the thruster plasma radiation emission was collected using a collimating lens inside the vacuum chamber and the signal was brought out of the chamber to the spectrometer by the use of UV-rated optical fibers. Accurate spectral characterization was done for Xe and Ar plasma in a broad operational range. Additionally, emission spectroscopy was used to detect line radiation due to wall erosion products in SPT, to study the effect of thruster operational parameters on the ceramic lining erosion rate, subsequently of the thruster's lifetime.

  8. Scalar spectral measures associated with an operator-fractal

    SciTech Connect

    Jorgensen, Palle E. T.; Kornelson, Keri A.; Shuman, Karen L.

    2014-02-15

    We study a spectral-theoretic model on a Hilbert space L{sup 2}(μ) where μ is a fixed Cantor measure. In addition to μ, we also consider an independent scaling operator U acting in L{sup 2}(μ). To make our model concrete, we focus on explicit formulas: We take μ to be the Bernoulli infinite-convolution measure corresponding to scale number 1/4 . We then define the unitary operator U in L{sup 2}(μ) from a scale-by-5 operation. The spectral-theoretic and geometric properties we have previously established for U are as follows: (i) U acts as an ergodic operator; (ii) the action of U is not spatial; and finally, (iii) U is fractal in the sense that it is unitarily equivalent to a countable infinite direct sum of (twisted) copies of itself. In this paper, we prove new results about the projection-valued measures and scalar spectral measures associated to U and its constituent parts. Our techniques make use of the representations of the Cuntz algebra O{sub 2} on L{sup 2}(μ)

  9. Atmospheric effect on spectral signature - Measurements and corrections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, Yoram J.

    1988-01-01

    Measurements of the atmospheric effect on the spectral signature of surface cover were conducted during hazy conditions over the Chesapeake Bay and its eastern shore. In the experiment the upward radiance was measured by an airborne scanning radiometer in nine spectral bands between 465 and 773 nm, above and below the haze layer. Simultaneous measurements of the aerosol optical thickness and its vertical distribution were conducted. The results of the measurements are used to study the spectral dependence of the atmospheric effect on remote sensing of water bodies and vegetated fields (forest, corn field, and pasture), and to verify theoretical predictions. It is suggested that the radiances over dark areas (e.g., water in the near IR and forest in the visible) can be used to derive the aerosol optical thickness as is done over oceans with the CZCS satellite images. Combined with climatological information, the derived optical thickness can be used to perform corrections of the atmospheric effect. Examples of the derivation of the aerosol optical thickness and correction of the upward radiances are given.

  10. Quantitative Spectral Radiance Measurements in the HYMETS Arc Jet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danehy, Paul M.; Hires, Drew V.; Johansen, Craig T.; Bathel, Brett F.; Jones, Stephen B.; Gragg, Jeffrey G.; Splinter, Scott C.

    2012-01-01

    Calibrated spectral radiance measurements of gaseous emission spectra have been obtained from the HYMETS (Hypersonic Materials Environmental Test System) 400 kW arc-heated wind tunnel at NASA Langley Research Center. A fiber-optic coupled spectrometer collected natural luminosity from the flow. Spectral radiance measurements are reported between 340 and 1000 nm. Both Silicon Carbide (SiC) and Phenolic Impregnated Carbon Ablator (PICA) samples were placed in the flow. Test gases studied included a mostly-N2 atmosphere (95% nitrogen, 5% argon), a simulated Earth Air atmosphere (75% nitrogen, 20% oxygen, 5% argon) and a simulated Martian atmosphere (71% carbon dioxide, 24% nitrogen, 5% argon). The bulk enthalpy of the flow was varied as was the location of the measurement. For the intermediate flow enthalpy tested (20 MJ/kg), emission from the Mars simulant gas was about 10 times higher than the Air flow and 15 times higher than the mostly-N2 atmosphere. Shock standoff distances were estimated from the spectral radiance measurements. Within-run, run-to-run and day-to-day repeatability of the emission were studied, with significant variations (15-100%) noted.

  11. High spectral resolution measurements for the ARM Program

    SciTech Connect

    Revercomb, H.E.

    1992-05-22

    This report focuses on the design and fabrication of high spectral resolution FTIR (Fourier Transform Infrared) instrumentation for the CART sites of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program. The ultimate objective of this grant is to develop three different types of instruments, named the AERI, AERI-X, and SORT. The Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer (AERI) is the simplest. It will be available for early deployment at the first ARM site and will be deployable at several locations in the extended network to give horizontal coverage. The AERI will be an 0.5 cm{sup {minus}1} resolution instrument, which measures accurately calibrated radiance spectra for radiation studies and for remote sensing of atmospheric state variables. The AERI-X and the SORTI are higher spectral resolution instruments for obtaining the highest practical resolution for spectroscopy at the ARM central sites. The AERI-X, like the AERI will measure atmospheric emitted radiance, but with resolutions as high as 0.1 cm{sup {minus}1}. The Solar Radiance Transmission Interferometer will measure the total transmission of the atmosphere by tracking the sun through changes in atmospheric air mass. The large solar signal makes it practical for this instrument to offer the ultimate in spectral resolution, about 0.002 cm{sup {minus}1}.

  12. The infrared optical constants of sulfuric acid at 250 K. [spectral reflectance measurement of aqueous solutions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinkley, L. W.; Williams, D.

    1976-01-01

    Results are presented for measurements of the IR spectral reflectance at near-normal incidence of aqueous solutions of sulfuric acid with acid concentrations of 75% and 95.6% by weight. Kramers-Kronig analyses of the reflectance data are employed to obtain values of the optical constants n(nu) and k(nu) in the spectral range from 400 to 6000 cm to the -1 power. The optical constants of these solutions at 250 K and 300 K are compared. It is found that in spectral regions remote from strong absorption bands, the values of the n(nu) indices obtained at 250 K agree with the values given by Lorentz-Lorenz correction of the same indices at 300 K. All absorption bands observed at 300 K are found to be present at 250 K with slight shifts in frequency and with significant differences in the k(nu) indices at the band maxima. Based on these results, it is concluded that the clouds of Venus probably consist of droplets of aqueous solutions of sulfuric acid with acid concentrations of about 75% by weight.

  13. Direct Measurement of Aerosol Absorption Using Photothermal Interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sedlacek, A. J.; Lee, J. A.

    2007-12-01

    Efforts to bound the contribution of light absorption in aerosol radiative forcing is still very much an active area of research in large part because aerosol extinction is dominated by light scattering. In response to this and other technical issues, the aerosol community has actively pursued the development of new instruments to measure aerosol absorption (e.g., photoacoustic spectroscopy (PAS) and multi-angle absorption photometer (MAAP)). In this poster, we introduce the technique of photothermal interferometry (PTI), which combines the direct measurement capabilities of photothermal spectroscopy (PTS) with high-sensitivity detection of the localized heating brought about by the PT process through interferometry. At its most fundamental level, the PTI technique measures the optical pathlength change that one arm of an interferometer (referred to as the 'probe' arm) experiences relative to the other arm of the interferometer (called the 'reference' arm). When the two arms are recombined at a beamsplitter, an interference pattern is created. If the optical pathlength in one arm of the interferometer changes, a commensurate shift in the interference pattern will take place. For the specific application of measuring light absorption, the heating of air surrounding the light- absorbing aerosol following laser illumination induces the optical pathlength change. This localized heating creates a refractive index gradient causing the probe arm of the interferometer to take a slightly different optical pathlength relative to the unperturbed reference arm. This effect is analogous to solar heating of a road causing mirages. As discussed above, this altered optical pathlength results in a shift in the interference pattern that is then detected as a change in the signal intensity by a single element detector. The current optical arrangement utilizes a folded Jamin interferometer design (Sedlacek, 2006) that provides a platform that is robust with respect to sensitivity

  14. IRCM spectral signature measurements instrumentation featuring enhanced radiometric accuracy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lantagne, Stéphane; Prel, Florent; Moreau, Louis; Roy, Claude; Willers, Cornelius J.

    2015-10-01

    Hyperspectral Infrared (IR) signature measurements are performed in military applications including aircraft- and -naval vessel stealth characterization, detection/lock-on ranges, and flares efficiency characterization. Numerous military applications require high precision measurement of infrared signature characterization. For instance, Infrared Countermeasure (IRCM) systems and Infrared Counter-Countermeasure (IRCCM) system are continuously evolving. Infrared flares defeated IR guided seekers, IR flares became defeated by intelligent IR guided seekers and Jammers defeated the intelligent IR guided seekers [7]. A precise knowledge of the target infrared signature phenomenology is crucial for the development and improvement of countermeasure and counter-countermeasure systems and so precise quantification of the infrared energy emitted from the targets requires accurate spectral signature measurements. Errors in infrared characterization measurements can lead to weakness in the safety of the countermeasure system and errors in the determination of detection/lock-on range of an aircraft. The infrared signatures are analyzed, modeled, and simulated to provide a good understanding of the signature phenomenology to improve the IRCM and IRCCM technologies efficiency [7,8,9]. There is a growing need for infrared spectral signature measurement technology in order to further improve and validate infrared-based models and simulations. The addition of imagery to Spectroradiometers is improving the measurement capability of complex targets and scenes because all elements in the scene can now be measured simultaneously. However, the limited dynamic range of the Focal Plane Array (FPA) sensors used in these instruments confines the ranges of measurable radiance intensities. This ultimately affects the radiometric accuracy of these complex signatures. We will describe and demonstrate how the ABB hyperspectral imaging spectroradiometer features enhanced the radiometric accuracy

  15. Measurements of light absorption efficiency in InSb nanowires

    PubMed Central

    Jurgilaitis, A.; Enquist, H.; Harb, M.; Dick, K. A.; Borg, B. M.; Nüske, R.; Wernersson, L.-E.; Larsson, J.

    2013-01-01

    We report on measurements of the light absorption efficiency of InSb nanowires. The absorbed 70 fs light pulse generates carriers, which equilibrate with the lattice via electron-phonon coupling. The increase in lattice temperature is manifested as a strain that can be measured with X-ray diffraction. The diffracted X-ray signal from the excited sample was measured using a streak camera. The amount of absorbed light was deduced by comparing X-ray diffraction measurements with simulations. It was found that 3.0(6)% of the radiation incident on the sample was absorbed by the nanowires, which cover 2.5% of the sample. PMID:26913673

  16. Solar spectral irradiance model validation using Solar Spectral Irradiance and Solar Radius measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thuillier, Gérard; Zhu, Ping; Shapiro, Alexander; Sofia, Sabatino; Tagirov, Rinat; Van Ruymbeke, Michel; Schmutz, Werner

    2016-04-01

    The importance of the reliable solar spectral irradiance (SSI) data for solar and climate physics is now well acknowledged. In particular, the irradiance time series are necessary for most of the current studies concerning climate evolution. However, space instruments are vulnerable to the degradation due to the environment while ground based measurements are limited in wavelength range and need atmospheric effects corrections. This is why SSI modeling is necessary to understand the mechanism of the solar irradiance variability and to provide long and uninterrupted irradiance records to climate and Earth atmosphere scientists. Here we present COSI (COde for Solar Irradiance) model of the SSI variability. The COSI model is based on the Non local thermodynamic Equilibrium Spectral SYnthesis Code (NESSY). We validate NESSY by two independent datasets: - The SSI at solar minimum occurring in 2008, - The radius variation with wavelength and absolute values determined from PREMOS and BOS instruments onboard the PICARD spacecraft. Comparisons between modeling and measured SSI will be shown. However, since SSI measurements have an accuracy estimated between 2 to 3%, the comparison with the solar radius data provides a very important additional constrains on model. For that, 17 partial solar occultations by the Moon are used providing solar radii clearly showing the dependence of the solar radius with wavelength. These results are compared with the NESSY predictions. The agreement between NESSY and observations is within the model and measurements accuracy.

  17. Comparison of spectral colorimetric measurements vs. color pictures in dermatology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blain, P.; Michel, F.; Moreau, V.,; Vanhooteghem, O.; Renotte, Y.; Habraken, S.

    2010-04-01

    We studied scars and wounds depths and surfaces thanks to our interferometric fringes projector 3D scanner1, 2. Color information of a wound indicates its deterioration level. That's why the visual color restitution, as realistic as possible, is a highly important parameter. Firstly our acquired 3D pictures were color mapped with an image recorded by a RGB camera. The results were not efficient enough. In order to improve our technique and provide more precise information, we add a spectral characterization to the set-up. Before adding the spectral information and a realistic color mapping to the 3D measurements, we evaluate the performances of colorimetric measurements. The tests have been made on mice with scars on their back.

  18. Spectral analysis of sinus arrhythmia - A measure of mental effort

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vicente, Kim J.; Craig Thornton, D.; Moray, Neville

    1987-01-01

    The validity of the spectral analysis of sinus arrhythmia as a measure of mental effort was investigated using a computer simulation of a hovercraft piloted along a river as the experimental task. Strong correlation was observed between the subjective effort-ratings and the heart-rate variability (HRV) power spectrum between 0.06 and 0.14 Hz. Significant correlations were observed not only between subjects but, more importantly, within subjects as well, indicating that the spectral analysis of HRV is an accurate measure of the amount of effort being invested by a subject. Results also indicate that the intensity of effort invested by subjects cannot be inferred from the objective ratings of task difficulty or from performance.

  19. AVIRIS Measurements of Spectral Reflectance Characteristics of Whitecaps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frouin, Robert; Deschamps, Pierre-Yves

    2000-01-01

    The spectral reflectance of oceanic whitecaps in the visible and near infrared was investigated using high-altitude, 20 m resolution Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) measurements off the Southern California coast. The whitecap effect on surface reflectance was expressed as a function of the difference between the reflectance of pixels contaminated by whitecaps and of adjacent pixels free of whitecaps. Whitecap reflectance was found to decrease substantially in the near infrared, by about 40% at 850 nm and 80% at 1,600 nm, in agreement with previous measurements in the coastal zone and the open ocean. The spectral dependence of whitecap reflectance appears to be fairly independent of environmental conditions, making it easy to take into account the resulting and significant effects in ocean color and aerosol remote sensing algorithms.

  20. Photothermal method for absorption measurements in anisotropic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stubenvoll, M.; Schäfer, B.; Mann, K.; Novak, O.

    2016-02-01

    A measurement system for quantitative determination of both surface and bulk contributions to the photo-thermal absorption has been extended to anisotropic optical media. It bases upon a highly sensitive Hartmann-Shack wavefront sensor, accomplishing precise on-line monitoring of wavefront deformations of a collimated test beam transmitted perpendicularly through the laser-irradiated side of a cuboid sample. Caused by the temperature dependence of the refractive index as well as thermal expansion, the initially plane wavefront of the test beam is distorted. Sign and magnitude depend on index change and expansion. By comparison with thermal theory, a calibration of the measurement is possible, yielding a quantitative absolute measure of bulk and surface absorption losses from the transient wavefront distortion. Results for KTP and BBO single crystals are presented.

  1. Absorptance Measurements of Optical Coatings - A Round Robin

    SciTech Connect

    Chow, R; Taylor, J R; Wu, Z L; Boccara, C A; Broulik, U; Commandre, M; DiJon, J; Fleig, C; Giesen, A; Fan, Z X; Kuo, P K; Lalezari, R; Moncur, K; Obramski, H-J; Reicher, D; Ristau, D; Roche, P; Steiger, B; Thomsen, M; von Gunten, M

    2000-10-26

    An international round robin study was conducted on the absorption measurement of laser-quality coatings. Sets of optically coated samples were made by a ''reactive DC magnetron'' sputtering and an ion beam sputtering deposition process. The sample set included a high reflector at 514 nm and a high reflector for the near infrared (1030 to 1318 nm), single layers of silicon dioxide, tantalum pentoxide, and hafnium dioxide. For calibration purposes, a sample metalized with hafnium and an uncoated, superpolished fused silica substrate were also included. The set was sent to laboratory groups for absorptance measurement of these coatings. Whenever possible, each group was to measure a common, central area and another area specifically assigned to the respective group. Specific test protocols were also suggested in regards to the laser exposure time, power density, and surface preparation.

  2. Measurement of krypton-85 in water by absorption in polycarbonates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitev, K.; Pressyanov, D.; Dimitrova, I.; Georgiev, S.; Boshkova, T.; Zhivkova, V.

    2009-05-01

    This article describes a method for quantitative measurements of Kr85 in water by absorption in polycarbonates. The method is based on exposure of polycarbonate samples in water and uses the high absorption ability to noble gases of some polycarbonates like Makrofol® and Makrolon® for sampling Kr85 from the water. After the exposure, the radiation emitted from the samples is measured by gross beta counting or gamma spectrometry. The results from the conducted experiments demonstrate a very good linear correlation between the measured signal and the activity concentration of Kr85 in the water. A possible practical application of the method is to monitor Kr85 concentration in water in at-reactor pools and wet spent fuel storage facilities.

  3. Cloud absorption properties as derived from airborne measurements of scattered radiation within clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    King, Michael D.; Nakajima, Teruyuki; Radke, Lawrence F.; Hobbs, Peter V.

    1990-01-01

    Researchers briefly review the diffusion domain method for deriving the cloud similarity parameter and present preliminary analyses of the results thus far obtained. The presentation concentrates on the following points: (1) intercomparison of calibrated reflected intensities between the cloud absorption radiometer and the U.K. multispectral cloud radiometer; (2) quality control tests required to select those portions of an aircraft flight for which measurements are obtained within the diffusion domain; (3) case studies of the spectral similarity parameter of marine stratocumulus clouds; and comparisons of the experimentally-derived similarity parameter spectrum with that expected theoretically from the cloud droplet size distribution obtained from in situ observations.

  4. Earth formation density measurement from natural gamma ray spectral logs

    SciTech Connect

    Smith Jr., H. D.

    1985-07-02

    Naturally occurring gamma radiations from earth formations in the vicinity of a well borehole are detected and spectrally separated into six energy regions or bands. Borehole compensation techniques are applied to the gamma ray spectra and the attenuation coefficient /eta/ is determined as a result thereof. The attenuation coefficient is used along with predetermined borehole, casing and cement parameters to derive a measure of the density of the earth formations.

  5. Mapping vegetation types with the multiple spectral feature mapping algorithm in both emission and absorption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, Roger N.; Swayze, Gregg A.; Koch, Christopher; Ager, Cathy

    1992-01-01

    Vegetation covers a large portion of the Earth's land surface. Remotely sensing quantitative information from vegetation has proven difficult because in a broad sense, all vegetation is similar from a chemical viewpoint, and most healthy plants are green. Plant species are generally characterized by the leaf and flower or fruit morphology, not by remote sensing spectral signatures. But to the human eye, many plants show varying shades of green, so there is direct evidence for spectral differences between plant types. Quantifying these changes in a predictable manner has not been easy. The Clark spectral features mapping algorithm was applied to mapping spectral features in vegetation species.

  6. Applicability of light-emitting diodes as light sources for active differential optical absorption spectroscopy measurements.

    PubMed

    Kern, Christoph; Trick, Sebastian; Rippel, Bernhard; Platt, Ulrich

    2006-03-20

    We present what is to our knowledge the first use of light-emitting diodes (LEDs) as light sources for long-path differential optical absorption spectroscopy (LP-DOAS) measurements of trace gases in the open atmosphere. Modern LEDs represent a potentially advantageous alternative to thermal light sources, in particular to xenon arc lamps, which are the most common active DOAS light sources. The radiative properties of a variety of LEDs were characterized, and parameters such as spectral shape, spectral range, spectral stability, and ways in which they can be influenced by environmental factors were analyzed. The spectra of several LEDs were found to contain Fabry-Perot etalon-induced spectral structures that interfered with the DOAS evaluation, in particular when a constant temperature was not maintained. It was shown that LEDs can be used successfully as light sources in active DOAS experiments that measure NO2 and NO3 near 450 and 630 nm, respectively. Average detection limits of 0.3 parts in 10(9) and 16 parts in 10(12) respectively, were obtained by use of a 6 km light path in the open atmosphere. PMID:16579579

  7. Optoelectronic set for measuring the absorption spectrum of the thin biological media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gryko, Lukasz; Zajac, Andrzej; Gilewski, Marian

    2013-10-01

    In the paper the authors present the developed optoelectronic system for controlled, repetitive exposure by electromagnetic radiation of biological structures in the Low Level Laser (LED) Therapy procedures. The set allows for objective selection and control of the irradiation parameters by light from spectral range of the tissues transmission window. Measurements of optical parameters of thin biological medium - spectral absorption coefficient and the amount of absorbed energy - can be implemented in the measuring chamber during irradiation treatment. The radiation source is the broadband illuminator consists of set of selected high power LEDs. The maximum optical power of single source is from 80 mW to 800 mW. Illuminator is controlled and powered by the multi-channel prototype control system, which allows independently control a current of each emitter. This control allows shaping spectral emission characteristic of broadband source in range 600-1000 nm. Illuminator allows providing in the working area of 700 cm2 a uniform distribution of optical power density, of 10 mW/cm2 for maximum. Set ensure uniform distribution of the spectral power density of up to 40 mW/nm.

  8. Detecting Climate Signatures with High Spectral Resolution Infrared Satellite Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deslover, D. H.; Tobin, D.; Knuteson, R. O.; Revercomb, H. E.

    2013-12-01

    Upwelling atmospheric infrared radiances can be accurately monitored from high spectral resolution satellite observations. The high spectral resolution nature of these measurements affords the ability to track various climate relevant parameters such as window channels sensitive to surface temperature and clouds, channels with higher sensitivity to trace gases including CO2, CH4, SO2, HNO3, as well as channels sensitive only to upper tropospheric or lower stratospheric temperature. NASA's Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) provides a data record that extends from its 2002 launch to the present. The Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI) onboard Metop- (A launched in 2006, B in 2012), as well as the Joint Polar Satellite System (JPSS) Cross-track Infrared Sounder (CrIS) launched in 2011, complement this data record. Future infrared sounders with similar capabilities will augment these measurements into the distant future. We have created a global data set from the aforementioned satellite observations. Our analysis yields a channel dependent approach that can be further constrained in terms of diurnal, seasonal and geographic limits, with measurement accuracies of better than a few tenths of degree Kelvin. In this study, we have applied this concept to obtain a better understanding of long-term stratospheric temperature trends. We will present a survey of temperature trends for spectral channels that were chosen to be sensitive to stratospheric emission. Results will be shown for tropical, mid-latitude and polar stratospheric observations.

  9. A model for the spectral dependence of optically induced absorption in amorphous silicon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawandy, N. M.

    1990-01-01

    A model based on transitions from localized band tail states to states above the mobility edge is used to explain the broad band induced absorptions observed in recent pump-probe experiments. The model gives the observed decrease of absorption with frequency at subband gap photo energies and high carrier densities (of about 10 to the 20th/cu cm). At lower carrier densities, the absorption has a maximun which is sensitive to the spatial extent of the band tail states.

  10. Visible spectral dependence of the scattering and absorption coefficients of pigmented coatings from inversion of diffuse reflectance spectra.

    PubMed

    Curiel, Fernando; Vargas, William E; Barrera, Rubén G

    2002-10-01

    A spectral-projected gradient method and an extension of the Kubelka-Munk theory are applied to obtain the relevant parameters of the theory from measured diffuse reflectance spectra of pigmented samples illuminated with visible diffuse radiation. The initial estimate of the spectral dependence of the parameters, required by a recursive spectral-projected gradient method, was obtained by use of direct measurements and up-to-date theoretical estimates. We then tested the consistency of the Kubelka-Munk theory by repeating the procedure with samples of different thicknesses. PMID:12371558

  11. Infrared spectral emittance profiles of spectrally selective solar absorbing layers at elevated temperatures.

    PubMed

    Soule, D E; Smith, D W

    1977-11-01

    A study was made to characterize parametrically the spectrally selective absorptance profiles of typical interference, bulk absorption, and mixed-type absorbing layers for solar-thermal conversion at temperatures to 500 degrees C. A five parameter empirical Fermi function was used to model the spectral absorptance converted from the measured spectral reflectance. An alternative method using the Fermi model is presented for defining the ir spectral emittance profile, as scaled to the measured hemispherical total emittahce. PMID:20174248

  12. Amplified spontaneous emission measurement of a line-narrowed, tunable, Ti:Al2O3 amplifier using rubidium absorption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnes, James C.; Barnes, Norman P.; Lockard, George E.; Cross, Patricia L.

    1989-01-01

    Amplified spontaneous emission, ASE, generated by a Ti:Al2O3 laser amplifier has been measured as a function of pump energy, and thus gain, using the atomic absorption of rubidium, Rb, gas at 0.780 micron. By tuning the Ti:Al2O3 laser, the Rb cell could selectively absorb the narrow spectral bandwidth laser radiation while transmitting the wide spectral bandwidth ASE. Transmission of laser amplifier pulses through a Rb absorption cell, measured at various temperatures, thus allows the measurement of the weak ASE in the vicinity of the strong laser pulse. A model for the transmission of Rb as a function of temperature and wavelength has been developed. The measured transmissions are in good agreement with the transmission model predictions.

  13. Error reduction methods for integrated-path differential-absorption lidar measurements.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jeffrey R; Numata, Kenji; Wu, Stewart T

    2012-07-01

    We report new modeling and error reduction methods for differential-absorption optical-depth (DAOD) measurements of atmospheric constituents using direct-detection integrated-path differential-absorption lidars. Errors from laser frequency noise are quantified in terms of the line center fluctuation and spectral line shape of the laser pulses, revealing relationships verified experimentally. A significant DAOD bias is removed by introducing a correction factor. Errors from surface height and reflectance variations can be reduced to tolerable levels by incorporating altimetry knowledge and "log after averaging", or by pointing the laser and receiver to a fixed surface spot during each wavelength cycle to shorten the time of "averaging before log". PMID:22772254

  14. On the interpretation of zenith sky absorption measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solomon, Susan; Schmeltekopf, Arthur L.; Sanders, Ryan W.

    1987-07-01

    Observations of several atmospheric species can be performed by measuring the absorption of visible and near-ultraviolet light scattered from the zenith sky. The determination of vertical column abundances of molecules such as ozone and NO2 from such measurements is briefly reviewed. It is shown that the conversion of NO to NO2 can be of significance in the interpretation of measurements made near twilight. On the other hand, multiple scattering from the atmosphere or by clouds is likely to be a very small effect.

  15. Atmospheric Solar Absorption measurements in the lowest 3-km of the atmosphere with small UAVs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramana, M. V.; Ramanathan, V.; Roberts, G.; Corrigan, C.; Nguyen, H. V.; McFarquhar, G.

    2007-12-01

    This paper reports unique measurements of atmospheric solar absorption and heating rates in the visible (0.4- 0.7 Ým) and broadband (0.3-2.8 Ým) spectral regions using vertically stacked multiple light weight autonomous unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) during the Maldives autonomous UAV campaign (MAC). The UAVs and ground based remote sensing instruments determined most of the parameters required for calculating the albedo and vertical distribution of solar fluxes. Measured fluxes have been compared with those derived from a Monte-Carlo radiative transfer algorithm which can incorporate both gaseous and aerosol components. The analysis focuses on a cloud-free day when the air was polluted due to long range transport from India, and the mean aerosol optical depth (AOD) was 0.31 and mean single scattering albedo was 0.92. The UAV measured absorption AOD was 0.019 which agreed within 20% of the value of 0.024 reported by a ground based instrument. The observed and simulated solar absorption agreed within 5% above 1.0 km and aerosol absorption accounted for 30% to 50% of the absorption depending upon the altitude and solar zenith angle. Thus there was no need to invoke anomalous or excess absorption or unknown physics in clear skies, provided we account for aerosol black carbon. The diurnal mean absorption values for altitudes between 0.5 and 3.0 km msl were observed to be 41¡Ó3 Wm-2 (1.5 K/day) in the broadband region and 8¡Ó2 Wm-2 (0.3 K/day) in the visible region. Future investigations into the atmospheric absorption in cloudy skies will characterize the spatial and temporal variation of the cloudy atmosphere in sufficient detail to simulate the vertical distribution of net solar fluxes to permit comparison with the collected radiative observations. This next phase will utilize 4 stacked UAVs to observe the extended cloud decks off the coast of California. A combination of observations and models will then be used to assess if the amount of solar absorption

  16. Direct measurement of interstellar extinction toward young stars using atomic hydrogen Lyα absorption

    SciTech Connect

    McJunkin, Matthew; France, Kevin; Brown, Alexander; Schneider, P. C.; Herczeg, Gregory J.; Hillenbrand, Lynne; Schindhelm, Eric; Edwards, Suzan

    2014-01-10

    Interstellar reddening corrections are necessary to reconstruct the intrinsic spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of accreting protostellar systems. The stellar SED determines the heating and chemical processes that can occur in circumstellar disks. Measurement of neutral hydrogen absorption against broad Lyα emission profiles in young stars can be used to obtain the total H I column density (N(H I)) along the line of sight. We measure N(H I) with new and archival ultraviolet observations from the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) of 31 classical T Tauri and Herbig Ae/Be stars. The H I column densities range from log{sub 10}(N(H I)) ≈19.6-21.1, with corresponding visual extinctions of A{sub V} =0.02-0.72 mag, assuming an R{sub V} of 3.1. We find that the majority of the H I absorption along the line of sight likely comes from interstellar rather than circumstellar material. Extinctions derived from new HST blue-optical spectral analyses, previous IR and optical measurements, and new X-ray column densities on average overestimate the interstellar extinction toward young stars compared to the N(H I) values by ∼0.6 mag. We discuss possible explanations for this discrepancy in the context of a protoplanetary disk geometry.

  17. Water-vapor absorption line measurements in the 940-nm band by using a Raman-shifted dye laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chu, Zhiping; Wilkerson, Thomas D.; Singh, Upendra N.

    1993-01-01

    We report water-vapor absorption line measurements that are made by using the first Stokes radiation (930-982 nm) with HWHM 0.015/cm generated by a narrow-linewidth, tunable dye laser. Forty-five absorption line strengths are measured with an uncertainty of 6 percent and among them are fourteen strong lines that are compared with previous measurements for the assessment of spectral purity of the light source. Thirty air-broadened linewidths are measured with 8 percent uncertainty at ambient atmospheric pressure with an average of 0.101/cm. The lines are selected for the purpose of temperature-sensitive or temperature-insensitive lidar measurements. Results for these line strengths and linewidths are corrected for broadband radiation and finite laser linewidth broadening effects and compared with the high-resolution transmission molecular absorption.

  18. Planck/LFI measures of Planets Spectral Energy Distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maris, Michele; Romelli, Erik; Gregorio, Anna; Zacchei, Andrea; Tomasi, Maurizio; Vassallo, Thomas; Sandri, Maura

    2015-08-01

    The spectral energy distribution at millimetric wavelengths of planets is an important benchmark to inter-calibrate different CMB experiments and a source of information on the atmospheric structure of planets. Planck/LFI observed Mars, Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus and Neptune from three to eight times during its mission. In particular, as a calibrator Jupiter allows accurate comparison due to its high S/N ratio. Since planets are moving objects, the measure must account for their proper motion as well as a number of second order effects. Here we present the results of accurate measurements of brightness temperature Tb of planets, and we compare them with WMAP.

  19. [Research on New Type of Spectral Modulation Polarization Measurement Technology].

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jia; Zhou, Feng; Li, Huan; Zhao, Hai-bo

    2015-10-01

    Spectral Modulation Polarization Measurement technology (SMPM) is a new type of polarization modulation technology, with an achromatic /4 retarder, a multiple-order retarder and a polarizer the polarization information of incident light can be encoded into the spectral dimension, sinusoidal which amplitude scales with the degree of the linear polarization and phase scales with the angle of the linear polarization can be acquired directly. With a dedicated algorithm for the modulated spectrum, we can get degree and angle of the linear polarization, spectral information and radiation information of the target. This paper expounds the basic principle of SMPM and concrete implementation scheme is proposed. Demodulation algorithm is designed before experimental platform are set up. Experiment which verified the correctness on the SMPM has carried on. The experimental results show the correctness and feasibility of SMPM. Compared with traditional polarization modulate techniques no moving parts and electronic components are including in this scheme. It's also has the advantages of compact and low mass. We can get all the polarization information through one single measurement rather than get Stokes parameters for further calculations. This study provides a new kind of technological approaches for the development of new space polarization detecting sensor. PMID:26904842

  20. Shortgrass prairie spectral measurements. [for terrain analysis and photomapping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tucker, C. J.; Miller, L. D.; Pearson, R. L.

    1975-01-01

    The spectral methods of vegetation analysis not only measure herbage biomass on a nondestructive basis but also can be adapted to aircraft and satellite devices to map the spatial distribution over an area in an efficient and economical fashion. This study reviews the ground-based in situ field spectrometry in the 0.350-0.800 micron region of the spectrum. A statistical analysis of in situ spectroreflectance data from sample plots of the shortgrass prairie shows that green biomass, chlorophyll concentration, and leaf water content are directly interrelated to that composite property of the plot which is called functioning green biomass. Spectrocorrelation data indicate the spectral regions of optimum sensitivity for a remote estimation of the green biomass, chlorophyll, and leaf water content. The near-infrared region of the spectrum shows a high positive spectrocorrelation to these three sample parameters, regardless of the amount of standing dead vegetation.

  1. Measuring Agarwood Formation Ratio Quantitatively by Fluorescence Spectral Imaging Technique.

    PubMed

    Huang, Botao; Nguyen, Duykien; Liu, Tianyi; Jiang, Kaibin; Tan, Jinfen; Liu, Chunxin; Zhao, Jing; Huang, Shaowei

    2015-01-01

    Agarwood is a kind of important and precious traditional Chinese medicine. With the decreasing of natural agarwood, artificial cultivation has become more and more important in recent years. Quantifying the formation of agarwood is an essential work which could provide information for guiding cultivation and controlling quality. But people only can judge the amount of agarwood qualitatively by experience before. Fluorescence multispectral imaging method is presented to measure the agarwood quantitatively in this paper. A spectral cube from 450 nm to 800 nm was captured under the 365 nm excitation sources. The nonagarwood, agarwood, and rotten wood in the same sample were distinguished based on analyzing the spectral cube. Then the area ratio of agarwood to the whole sample was worked out, which is the quantitative information of agarwood area percentage. To our knowledge, this is the first time that the formation of agarwood was quantified accurately and nondestructively. PMID:26089935

  2. Measurement of microresonator frequency comb coherence by spectral interferometry.

    PubMed

    Webb, K E; Jang, J K; Anthony, J; Coen, S; Erkintalo, M; Murdoch, S G

    2016-01-15

    We experimentally investigate the spectral coherence of microresonator optical frequency combs. Specifically, we use a spectral interference method, typically used in the context of supercontinuum generation, to explore the variation of the magnitude of the complex degree of first-order coherence across the full comb bandwidth. We measure the coherence of two different frequency combs and observe wholly different coherence characteristics. In particular, we find that the observed dynamical regimes are similar to the stable and unstable modulation instability regimes reported in previous theoretical studies. Results from numerical simulations are found to be in good agreement with experimental observations. In addition to demonstrating a new technique to assess comb stability, our results provide strong experimental support for previous theoretical analyses. PMID:26766693

  3. Airborne high spectral resolution lidar for measuring aerosol extinction and backscatter coefficients.

    PubMed

    Esselborn, Michael; Wirth, Martin; Fix, Andreas; Tesche, Matthias; Ehret, Gerhard

    2008-01-20

    An airborne high spectral resolution lidar (HSRL) based on an iodine absorption filter and a high-power frequency-doubled Nd:YAG laser has been developed to measure backscatter and extinction coefficients of aerosols and clouds. The instrument was operated aboard the Falcon 20 research aircraft of the German Aerospace Center (DLR) during the Saharan Mineral Dust Experiment in May-June 2006 to measure optical properties of Saharan dust. A detailed description of the lidar system, the analysis of its data products, and measurements of backscatter and extinction coefficients of Saharan dust are presented. The system errors are discussed and airborne HSRL results are compared to ground-based Raman lidar and sunphotometer measurements. PMID:18204721

  4. Direct solar spectral irradiance and transmittance measurements from 350 to 2500 nm.

    PubMed

    Kindel, B C; Qu, Z; Goetz, A F

    2001-07-20

    A radiometrically stable, commercially available spectroradiometer was used in conjunction with a simple, custom-designed telescope to make spectrally continuous measurements of solar spectral transmittance and directly transmitted solar spectral irradiance. The wavelength range of the instrument is 350-2500 nm and the resolution is 3-11.7 nm. Laboratory radiometric calibrations show the instrument to be stable to better than 1.0% over a nine-month period. The instrument and telescope are highly portable, can be set up in a matter of minutes, and can be operated by one person. A method of absolute radiometric calibration that can be tied to published top-of-the-atmosphere (TOA) solar spectra in valid Langley channels as well as regions of strong molecular absorption is also presented. High-altitude Langley plot calibration experiments indicate that this technique is limited ultimately by the current uncertainties in the TOA solar spectra, approximately 2-3%. Example comparisons of measured and modtran-modeled direct solar irradiance show that the model can be parameterized to agree with measurements over the large majority of the wavelength range to the 3% level for the two example cases shown. Side-by-side comparisons with a filter-based solar radiometer are in excellent agreement, with a mean absolute difference of tau = 0.0036 for eight overlapping wavelengths over three experiment days. PMID:18360373

  5. Spectral optical layer properties of cirrus from collocated airborne measurements and simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finger, Fanny; Werner, Frank; Klingebiel, Marcus; Ehrlich, André; Jäkel, Evelyn; Voigt, Matthias; Borrmann, Stephan; Spichtinger, Peter; Wendisch, Manfred

    2016-06-01

    Spectral upward and downward solar irradiances from vertically collocated measurements above and below a cirrus layer are used to derive cirrus optical layer properties such as spectral transmissivity, absorptivity, reflectivity, and cloud top albedo. The radiation measurements are complemented by in situ cirrus crystal size distribution measurements and radiative transfer simulations based on the microphysical data. The close collocation of the radiative and microphysical measurements, above, beneath, and inside the cirrus, is accomplished by using a research aircraft (Learjet 35A) in tandem with the towed sensor platform AIRTOSS (AIRcraft TOwed Sensor Shuttle). AIRTOSS can be released from and retracted back to the research aircraft by means of a cable up to a distance of 4 km. Data were collected from two field campaigns over the North Sea and the Baltic Sea in spring and late summer 2013. One measurement flight over the North Sea proved to be exemplary, and as such the results are used to illustrate the benefits of collocated sampling. The radiative transfer simulations were applied to quantify the impact of cloud particle properties such as crystal shape, effective radius reff, and optical thickness τ on cirrus spectral optical layer properties. Furthermore, the radiative effects of low-level, liquid water (warm) clouds as frequently observed beneath the cirrus are evaluated. They may cause changes in the radiative forcing of the cirrus by a factor of 2. When low-level clouds below the cirrus are not taken into account, the radiative cooling effect (caused by reflection of solar radiation) due to the cirrus in the solar (shortwave) spectral range is significantly overestimated.

  6. Concurrent multiaxis differential optical absorption spectroscopy system for the measurement of tropospheric nitrogen dioxide.

    PubMed

    Leigh, Roland J; Corlett, Gary K; Friess, Udo; Monks, Paul S

    2006-10-01

    The development of a new concurrent multiaxis (CMAX) sky viewing spectrometer to monitor rapidly changing urban concentrations of nitrogen dioxide is detailed. The CMAX differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS) technique involves simultaneous spectral imaging of the zenith and off-axis measurements of spatially resolved scattered sunlight. Trace-gas amounts are retrieved from the measured spectra using the established DOAS technique. The potential of the CMAX DOAS technique to derive information on rapidly changing concentrations and the spatial distribution of NO2 in an urban environment is demonstrated. Three example data sets are presented from measurements during 2004 of tropospheric NO2 over Leicester, UK (52.62 degrees N, 1.12 degrees W). The data demonstrate the current capabilities and future potential of the CMAX DOAS method in terms of the ability to measure real-time spatially disaggregated urban NO2. PMID:16983440

  7. Elementary reaction rate measurements at high temperatures by tunable-laser flash-absorption

    SciTech Connect

    Hessler, J.P.

    1993-12-01

    The major objective of this program is to measure thermal rate coefficients and branching ratios of elementary reactions. To perform these measurements, the authors constructed an ultrahigh-purity shock tube to generate temperatures between 1000 and 5500 K. The tunable-laser flash-absorption technique is used to measure the rate of change of the concentration of species which absorb below 50,000 cm{sup {minus}1} e.g.: OH, CH, and CH{sub 3}. This technique is being extended into the vacuum-ultraviolet spectral region where one can measure atomic species e.g.: H, D, C, O, and N; and diatomic species e.g.: O{sub 2}, CO, and OH.

  8. Supercontinuum based absorption spectrometer for cycle-resolved multiparameter measurements in a rapid compression machine.

    PubMed

    Werblinski, Thomas; Kleindienst, Stefan; Engelbrecht, Rainer; Zigan, Lars; Will, Stefan

    2016-06-10

    A broadband supercontinuum (SC) based absorption spectrometer capable of cycle-resolved multiparameter measurements at internal combustion (IC) engine conditions is presented. Three parameters, temperature, pressure and water mole fraction, were extracted from broadband near-infrared H2O absorption spectra, spanning the wavelength-range from 1340 to 1405.5 nm, which exhibits a large number of specific H2O transitions. The spectrometer is based on spatial domain detection and features a near-infrared line scan camera as a detector. Measurements were performed during a compression cycle of a rapid compression machine comprising a pressure and temperature range from 2.5 to 65 bar and 300 to 900 K, respectively. With the new spectrometer, we are for the first time, based on the authors' knowledge, able to perform measurements based on SC radiation over a complete compression and expansion stroke at measurement rates up to 50 kHz. A detailed overview is provided about the best match algorithm between theory and experiments, including parameters from two different spectral databases, namely the Barber-Tennyson database (BT2) and HITRAN2012. The results indicate that spectral broadening effects are not properly described by theory, especially at pressure levels exceeding 20 bar, which culminates in a clear underestimation of the derived pressure data by SC absorption spectroscopy. Nevertheless, temperature can be determined accurately by performing a three-parameter fit based on water mole fraction, temperature, and pressure. In contrast, making use of pressure transducer data as look-up values and varying only temperature and H2O mole fraction to find the best match leads to a clear overestimation of temperature at elevated pressures. PMID:27409013

  9. Pulsed airborne lidar measurements of atmospheric CO2 column absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abshire, James B.; Riris, Haris; Allan, Graham R.; Weaver, Clark J.; Mao, Jianping; Sun, Xiaoli; Hasselbrack, William E.; Kawa, S. Randoph; Biraud, Sebastien

    2010-11-01

    ABSTRACT We report initial measurements of atmospheric CO2 column density using a pulsed airborne lidar operating at 1572 nm. It uses a lidar measurement technique being developed at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center as a candidate for the CO2 measurement in the Active Sensing of CO2 Emissions over Nights, Days and Seasons (ASCENDS) space mission. The pulsed multiple-wavelength lidar approach offers several new capabilities with respect to passive spectrometer and other lidar techniques for high-precision CO2 column density measurements. We developed an airborne lidar using a fibre laser transmitter and photon counting detector, and conducted initial measurements of the CO2 column absorption during flights over Oklahoma in December 2008. The results show clear CO2 line shape and absorption signals. These follow the expected changes with aircraft altitude from 1.5 to 7.1 km, and are in good agreement with column number density estimates calculated from nearly coincident airborne in-situ measurements.

  10. Extensive goniometric spectral measurements at desert sites for military engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berry, T. E.; Morgan, J. C.; Furey, J. S.; DeMoss, T. A.; Kelley, J. R.; McKenna, J. R.

    2012-10-01

    Remote-sensing technology designed to exploit disturbed earth signatures has become extremely useful in the detection of disturbed soil in military areas of operation. Soil reflectance can be exploited for this purpose and is dependent on atmospheric conditions. An understanding of the in situ soil background is vital to any type of change detection. Researchers from the Engineering Research and Development Center (ERDC) conducted OCONUS soil spectral measurements at ten sites in Afghanistan from July to November, 2011. Sampling sites were chosen on the basis of geomorphic setting, surface-soil characteristics, and field-expedient conditions. Goniometric spectral measurements at these sites have provided high quality bi-directional reflectance data, and their analyses are presented in the context of threat recognition and discrimination. These data can also provide the basis for BDRF model validation. Most spectral data were acquired under ambient solar lighting, but other data were collected at night and under artificial illumination conditions. Bidirectional measurements of soil reflectance in the VIS/NIR and SWIR were taken using the University of Lethbridge Goniometer System (ULGS) at dawn, mid-day, dusk and after sunset with a light. Soil surface roughness and reflectance varied, depending on the presence of desert varnish and desert pavement at some sites. Sun angle and dust and smoke in the atmosphere impacted soil reflectance and noise in the SWIR part of the light spectrum, in particular. The presence of minerals such as calcium carbonate, gypsum, and oxidized iron in the subsurface directly impacted reflectance measurements in disturbed soil.

  11. Clay composition and swelling potential estimation of soils using depth of absorption bands in the SWIR (1100-2500 nm) spectral domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dufréchou, Grégory; Granjean, Gilles; Bourguignon, Anne

    2014-05-01

    Swelling soils contain clay minerals that change volume with water content and cause extensive and expensive damage on infrastructures. Presence of clay minerals is traditionally a good estimator of soils swelling and shrinking behavior. Montmorillonite (i.e. smectite group), illite, kaolinite are the most common minerals in soils and are usually associated to high, moderate, and low swelling potential when they are present in significant amount. Characterization of swelling potential and identification of clay minerals of soils using conventional analysis are slow, expensive, and does not permit integrated measurements. SWIR (1100-2500 nm) spectral domain are characterized by significant spectral absorption bands related to clay content that can be used to recognize main clay minerals. Hyperspectral laboratory using an ASD Fieldspec Pro spectrometer provides thus a rapid and less expensive field surface sensing that permits to measure soil spectral properties. This study presents a new laboratory reflectance spectroscopy method that used depth of clay diagnostic absorption bands (1400 nm, 1900 nm, and 2200 nm) to compare natural soils to synthetic montmorillonite-illite-kaolinite mixtures. We observe in mixtures that illite, montmorillonite, and kaolinite content respectively strongly influence the depth of absorption bands at 1400 nm (D1400), 1900 nm (D1900), and 2200 nm (D2200). To attenuate or removed effects of abundance and grain size, depth of absorption bands ratios were thus used to performed (i) 3D (using D1900/D2200, D1400/D1900, and D2200/D1400 as axis), and (ii) 2D (using D1400/D1900 and D1900/D2200 as axis) diagrams of synthetic mixtures. In this case we supposed that the overall reduction or growth of depth absorption bands should be similarly affected by the abundance and grain size of materials in soil. In 3D and 2D diagrams, the mixtures define a triangular shape formed by two clay minerals as external envelop and the three clay minerals mixtures

  12. The measurement of absolute absorption of millimeter radiation in gases - The absorption of CO and O2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Read, William G.; Cohen, Edward A.; Pickett, Herbert M.; Hillig, Kurt W., II

    1988-01-01

    An apparatus is described that will measure absolute absorption of millimeter radiation in gases. The method measures the change in the quality factor of a Fabry-Perot resonator with and without gas present. The magnitude of the change is interpreted in terms of the absorption of the lossy medium inside the resonator. Experiments have been performed on the 115-GHz CO line and the 119-GHz O2 line at two different temperatures to determine the linewidth parameter and the peak absorption value. These numbers can be combined to give the integrated intensity which can be accurately calculated from results of spectroscopy measurements. The CO results are within 2 percent percent of theoretically predicted valves. Measurements on O2 have shown that absorption can be measured as accurately as 0.5 dB/km with this technique. Results have been obtained for oxygen absolute absorption in the 60-80-GHz region.

  13. Transient Infrared Measurement of Laser Absorption Properties of Porous Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marynowicz, Andrzej

    2016-06-01

    The infrared thermography measurements of porous building materials have become more frequent in recent years. Many accompanying techniques for the thermal field generation have been developed, including one based on laser radiation. This work presents a simple optimization technique for estimation of the laser beam absorption for selected porous building materials, namely clinker brick and cement mortar. The transient temperature measurements were performed with the use of infrared camera during laser-induced heating-up of the samples' surfaces. As the results, the absorbed fractions of the incident laser beam together with its shape parameter are reported.

  14. Spatially resolved concentration measurements based on backscatter absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ze; Sanders, Scott T.; Robinson, Michael A.

    2016-06-01

    We demonstrate the feasibility of spatially resolved measurements of gas properties using direct absorption spectroscopy in conjunction with backscattered signals. We report a 1-D distribution of H2O mole fraction with a spatial resolution of 5 mm. The peak and average discrepancy between the measured and expected mole fraction are 21.1 and 8.0 %, respectively. The demonstration experiment is related to a diesel aftertreatment system; a selective catalytic reduction brick made of cordierite is used. The brick causes volume scattering interference; advanced baseline fitting based on a genetic algorithm is used to reduce the effects of this interference by a factor of 2.3.

  15. Interpreting measurements obtained with the cloud absorption radiometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    The software developed for the analysis of data from the Cloud Absorption Radiometer (CAR) is discussed. The CAR is a multichannel radiometer designed to measure the radiation field in the middle of an optically thick cloud (the diffusion domain). It can also measure the surface albedo and escape function. The instrument currently flies on a C-131A aircraft operated by the University of Washington. Most of this data was collected during the First International satellite cloud climatology project Regional Experiment (FIRE) Marine Stratocumulus Intensive Field Observation program off San Diego during July 1987. Earlier flights of the CAR have also been studied.

  16. The Importance of Optical Pathlength Control for Plasma Absorption Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cruden, Brett A.; Rao, M. V. V. S.; Sharma, Surendra P.; Meyyappan, M.; Partridge, Harry (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    An inductively coupled GEC Cell with modified viewing ports has been used to measure in-situ absorption in CF4 plasmas via Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy, and the results compared to those obtained in a standard viewport configuration. The viewing ports were modified so that the window boundary is inside, rather than outside, of the GEC cell. Because the absorption obtained is a spatially integrated absorption, measurements made represent an averaging of absorbing species inside and outside of the plasma. This modification is made to reduce this spatial averaging and thus allow a more accurate estimation of neutral species concentrations and temperatures within the plasmas. By reducing this pathlength, we find that the apparent CF4 consumption increases from 65% to 95% and the apparent vibrational temperature of CF4 rises by 50-75 K. The apparent fraction of etch product SiF4 decreases from 4% to 2%. The data suggests that these density changes may be due to significant temperature gradients between the plasma and chamber viewports.

  17. Kr II transition probability measurements for the UV spectral region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belmonte, M. T.; Gavanski, L.; Peláez, R. J.; Aparicio, J. A.; Djurović, S.; Mar, S.

    2016-02-01

    The determination of radiative transition probabilities or oscillator strengths is of common interest in astrophysics. The analysis of the high-resolution stellar spectra is now available in order to estimate the stellar abundances. In this paper, 93 experimentally obtained transition probability values (Aki) for singly ionized krypton spectral lines belonging to the ultraviolet (UV) wavelength region (208-360) nm are presented. These data, expressed in absolute units, were derived from the measurements of relative spectral line intensities and the values of transition probability data taken from the literature. The results obtained extend considerably the transition probability data base. As a light source, a plasma from a low-pressure pulsed arc was used. Its electron density was in the range of (1.5-3.4) × 1022 m-3, while the temperature was between 28 000 and 35 000 K. A detailed analysis of the results is also given. Only a few relative and a few absolute transition probabilities from other authors, for the mentioned spectral region, are available in the literature.

  18. NO_2 Trace Measurements by Optical-Feedback Cavity-Enhanced Absorption Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ventrillard-Courtillot, I.; Desbois, Th.; Foldes, T.; Romanini, D.

    2009-06-01

    In order to reach the sub-ppb NO_2 detection level required for environmental applications in remote areas, we develop a spectrometer based on a technique introduced a few years ago, named Optical-Feedback Cavity-Enhanced Absorption Spectroscopy (OF-CEAS) [1]. It allows very sensitive and selective measurements, together with the realization of compact and robust set-ups as was subsequently demonstrated during measurements campaigns in harsh environments [2]. OF-CEAS benefits from the optical feedback to efficiently inject a cw-laser in a V-shaped high finesse cavity (typically 10 000). Cavity-enhanced absorption spectra are acquired on a small spectral region (˜1 cm^{-1}) that enables selective and quantitative measurements at a fast acquisition rate with a detection limit of several 10^{-10} cm^{-1} as reported in this work. Spectra are obtained with high spectral definition (150 MHz highly precisely spaced data points) and are self calibrated by cavity rind-down measurements regularly performed (typically every second). NO_2 measurements are performed with a commercial extended cavity diode laser around 411 nm, spectral region where intense electronic transitions occur. We will describe the set-up developed for in-situ measurements allowing real time concentration measurements at typically 5 Hz; and then report on the measurements performed with calibrated NO_2 reference samples to evaluate the linearity of the apparatus. The minimum detectable absorption loss is estimated by considering the standard deviation of the residual of one spectrum. We achieved 2x10^{-10} cm^{-1} for a single spectrum recorded in less than 100 ms at 100 mbar. It leads to a potential detection limit of 3x10^8 molecules/cm^3, corresponding to about 150 pptv at this pressure. [1] J. Morville, S. Kassi, M. Chenevier, and D. Romanini, Appl. Phys. B, 80, 1027 (2005). [2] D. Romanini, M. Chenevrier, S. Kassi, M. Schmidt, C. Valant, M. Ramonet, J. Lopez, and H.-J. Jost, Appl. Phys. B, 83, 659

  19. Spectro web: oscillator strength measurements of atomic absorption lines in the sun and procyon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lobel, A.

    2008-10-01

    We update the online SpectroWeb database of spectral standard reference stars with 1178 oscillator strength values of atomic absorption lines observed in the optical spectrum of the Sun and Procyon (α CMi A). The updated line oscillator strengths are measured with best fits to the disk-integrated KPNO-FTS spectrum of the Sun observed between 4000 Å and 6800 Å using state-of-the-art detailed spectral synthesis calculations. A subset of 660 line oscillator strengths is validated with synthetic spectrum calculations of Procyon observed with ESO-UVES between 4700 Å and 6800 Å. The new log(gf)-values in SpectroWeb are improvements upon the values offered in the online Vienna Atomic Line Database (VALD). We find for neutral iron-group elements, such as Fe I, Ni I, Cr I, and Ti I, a statistically significant over-estimation of the VALD log((gf)-values for weak absorption lines with normalized central line depths below 15 %. For abundant lighter elements (e.g. Mg I and Ca I) this trend is statistically not significantly detectable, with the exception of Si I for which the log(gf)-values of 60 weak and medium-strong lines are substantially decreased to best fit the observed spectra. The newly measured log(gf)-values are available in the SpectroWeb database at http://spectra.freeshell.org, which interactively displays the observed and computed stellar spectra, together with corresponding atomic line data.

  20. Cryogenic far-infrared laser absorptivity measurements of the Herschel Space Observatory telescope mirror coatings.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Jacqueline; Klaassen, Tjeerd; Hovenier, Niels; Jakob, Gerd; Poglitsch, Albrecht; Sternberg, Oren

    2004-07-01

    Far-infrared laser calorimetry was used to measure the absorptivity, and thus the emissivity, of aluminum-coated silicon carbide mirror samples produced during the coating qualification run of the Herschel Space Observatory telescope to be launched by the European Space Agency in 2007. The samples were measured at 77 K to simulate the operating temperature of the telescope in its planned orbit about the second Lagrangian point, L2, of the Earth-Sun system. Together, the telescope's equilibrium temperature in space and the emissivity of the mirror surfaces will determine the far-infrared-submillimeter background and thus the sensitivity of two of the three astronomical instruments aboard the observatory if stray-light levels can be kept low relative to the mirror emission. Absorptivities of both clean and dust-contaminated samples were measured at 70, 118, 184, and 496 microm. Theoretical fits to the data predict absorptivities of 0.2-0.4% for the clean sample and 0.2-0.8% for the dusty sample, over the spectral range of the Herschel Space Observatory instruments. PMID:15250543

  1. Ultrashort coherence times in partially polarized stationary optical beams measured by two-photon absorption.

    PubMed

    Shevchenko, Andriy; Roussey, Matthieu; Friberg, Ari T; Setälä, Tero

    2015-11-30

    We measure the recently introduced electromagnetic temporal degree of coherence of a stationary, partially polarized, classical optical beam. Instead of recording the visibility of intensity fringes, the spectrum, or the polarization characteristics, we introduce a novel technique based on two-photon absorption. Using a Michelson interferometer equipped with polarizers and a specific GaAs photocount tube, we obtain the two fundamental quantities pertaining to the fluctuations of light: the degree of coherence and the degree of polarization. We also show that the electromagnetic intensity-correlation measurements with two-photon absorption require that the polarization dynamics, i.e., the time evolution of the instantaneous polarization state, is properly taken into account. We apply the technique to unpolarized and polarized sources of amplified spontaneous emission (Gaussian statistics) and to a superposition of two independent, narrow-band laser beams of different mid frequencies (non-Gaussian statistics). For these two sources femtosecond-range coherence times are found that are in good agreement with the traditional spectral measurements. Although previously employed for laser pulses, two-photon absorption provides a new physical principle to study electromagnetic coherence phenomena in classical and quantum continuous-wave light at extremely short time scales. PMID:26698754

  2. Validity Assessment of Pixel Linear Spectral Mixing Through Laboratory Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mobasheri, M. R.; Dehnavi, S.; Maghsoudi, Y.

    2015-12-01

    In order to understand the characteristics of the data collected by hyperspectral imaging systems, it is important to discuss the physics behind the scene radiance field incident on the imaging system. A dominant effect in hyperspectral remote sensing is the mixing of radiant energies contributed from different materials present in a given pixel. The basic assumption of mixture modelling is that within a given scene, the surface is covered by a small number of distinct materials that have relatively constant spectral properties. It is most common to assume that the radiance reflected by different materials in a pixel can spectrally combine in a linear additive manner to produce the pixel radiance/reflectance, even when that might not be the case e.g. where the mixing process leads to nonlinear combinations of the radiance and where the linear assumption fails to hold. This can occur where there is significant relative three-dimensional structure within a given pixel. Without detailed knowledge of the dimensional structure, it can be very difficult to correctly ``un-mix'' the contributions of the various materials. This work aims to evaluate the correctness of the linear assumption in the mixture modelling using some laboratory measurements. Study was conducted using some sheets made of cellulose materials of different colours in 400-800 nm spectral range. Experimental results have shown that a correction term must be applied to the gains and offsets in the linear model. The obtained results can be extended to satellite sensors that acquire images in the above mentioned spectral range.

  3. Determining the Uncertainty of X-Ray Absorption Measurements

    PubMed Central

    Wojcik, Gary S.

    2004-01-01

    X-ray absorption (or more properly, x-ray attenuation) techniques have been applied to study the moisture movement in and moisture content of materials like cement paste, mortar, and wood. An increase in the number of x-ray counts with time at a location in a specimen may indicate a decrease in moisture content. The uncertainty of measurements from an x-ray absorption system, which must be known to properly interpret the data, is often assumed to be the square root of the number of counts, as in a Poisson process. No detailed studies have heretofore been conducted to determine the uncertainty of x-ray absorption measurements or the effect of averaging data on the uncertainty. In this study, the Poisson estimate was found to adequately approximate normalized root mean square errors (a measure of uncertainty) of counts for point measurements and profile measurements of water specimens. The Poisson estimate, however, was not reliable in approximating the magnitude of the uncertainty when averaging data from paste and mortar specimens. Changes in uncertainty from differing averaging procedures were well-approximated by a Poisson process. The normalized root mean square errors decreased when the x-ray source intensity, integration time, collimator size, and number of scanning repetitions increased. Uncertainties in mean paste and mortar count profiles were kept below 2 % by averaging vertical profiles at horizontal spacings of 1 mm or larger with counts per point above 4000. Maximum normalized root mean square errors did not exceed 10 % in any of the tests conducted. PMID:27366627

  4. Atmospheric extinction in solar tower plants: the Absorption and Broadband Correction for MOR measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanrieder, N.; Wilbert, S.; Pitz-Paal, R.; Emde, C.; Gasteiger, J.; Mayer, B.; Polo, J.

    2015-05-01

    Losses of reflected Direct Normal Irradiance due to atmospheric extinction in concentrating solar tower plants can vary significantly with site and time. The losses of the direct normal irradiance between the heliostat field and receiver in a solar tower plant are mainly caused by atmospheric scattering and absorption by aerosol and water vapor concentration in the atmospheric boundary layer. Due to a high aerosol particle number, radiation losses can be significantly larger in desert environments compared to the standard atmospheric conditions which are usually considered in raytracing or plant optimization tools. Information about on-site atmospheric extinction is only rarely available. To measure these radiation losses, two different commercially available instruments were tested and more than 19 months of measurements were collected at the Plataforma Solar de Almería and compared. Both instruments are primarily used to determine the meteorological optical range (MOR). The Vaisala FS11 scatterometer is based on a monochromatic near-infrared light source emission and measures the strength of scattering processes in a small air volume mainly caused by aerosol particles. The Optec LPV4 long-path visibility transmissometer determines the monochromatic attenuation between a light-emitting diode (LED) light source at 532 nm and a receiver and therefore also accounts for absorption processes. As the broadband solar attenuation is of interest for solar resource assessment for Concentrating Solar Power (CSP), a correction procedure for these two instruments is developed and tested. This procedure includes a spectral correction of both instruments from monochromatic to broadband attenuation. That means the attenuation is corrected for the actual, time-dependent by the collector reflected solar spectrum. Further, an absorption correction for the Vaisala FS11 scatterometer is implemented. To optimize the Absorption and Broadband Correction (ABC) procedure, additional

  5. Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL) Measurements from Air and Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Browell, E. V.; Ismail, S.; Grant, W. B.

    1998-01-01

    Differential absorption lidar (DIAL) systems have been used for the measurement of ozone, water vapor, and aerosols from aircraft platforms for over 18 years, yielding new insights into atmospheric chemistry, composition, and dynamics in large-scale field experiments conducted all over the world. The successful deployment of the lidar in-space technology experiment (LITE) in September 1994 demonstrated that space-based lidars can also collect valuable information on the global atmosphere. This paper reviews some of the contributions of the NASA Langley Research Center's airborne ozone and water vapor DIAL systems and space-based LITE system to the understanding of the atmosphere and discusses the feasibility and advantages of putting DIAL systems in space for routine atmospheric measurements of ozone and/or water vapor and aerosols and clouds. The technology and applications of the differential absorption lidar (DIAL) technique have progressed significantly since the first DIAL measurements of Schotland, and airborne DIAL measurements of ozone and water vapor are frequently being made in a wide range of field experiments. In addition, plans are underway to develop DIAL systems for use on satellites for continuous global measurements. This paper will highlight the history of airborne lidar and DIAL systems, summarize the major accomplishments of the NASA Langley DIAL program, and discuss specifications and goals for DIAL systems in space.

  6. Low Temperature Measurements of HCN Broadened by N2 in the 14-micron Spectral Region

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, M.A.H.; Rinsland, Curtis P.; Blake, Thomas A.; Sams, Robert L.; Benner, D. C.; Devi, V. M.

    2008-04-01

    N2-broadening and N2-pressure-induced shift coefficients; and the temperature dependence exponent of the N2-broadening and the temperature dependent coefficients of N2-pressure-induced shifts have been measured for transitions in the v2 band of HCN from analysis of high-resolution absorption spectra recorded with two different Fourier transform spectrometers. A total of 34 laboratory spectra recorded at 0.002-0.005 cm-1 resolution and at temperatures ranging from 211 to 300 K were used in the determination of various spectral line parameters. A multispectrum nonlinear least squares curve fitting technique employing a modified Voigt line profile including speed dependence was used in the P- and R-branch measurements. In analyzing the Q branch transitions, the off-diagonal relaxation matrix element coefficients were included in analysis to fit the data. Present results are compared to previous measurements reported in the literature.

  7. Smearing of Observables and Spectral Measures on Quantum Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dvurečenskij, Anatolij

    2013-02-01

    An observable on a quantum structure is any σ-homomorphism of quantum structures from the Borel σ-algebra of the real line into the quantum structure which is in our case a monotone σ-complete effect algebra with the Riesz Decomposition Property. We show that every observable is a smearing of a sharp observable which takes values from a Boolean σ-subalgebra of the effect algebra, and we prove that for every element of the effect algebra there corresponds a spectral measure.

  8. Retrieval of Aerosol Properties from Multi-Spectral Extinction Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lacis, Andrew A.

    1999-01-01

    The direct-beam spectral extinction of solar radiation contains information on atmospheric composition in a form that is essentially free from the data analysis complexities that often arise from multiple scattering. Ground based Multi-Filter Shadowband Radiometer (MFRSR) measurements provide such information for the vertical atmospheric column path, while solar occultation measurements from a satellite platform provide horizontal slices through the atmosphere. We describe application of a Multi-Spectral Atmospheric Column Extinction (MACE) analysis technique used to analyze MFRSR data also to occultation measurements made by SAGE II. For analysis, we select the 1985 Nevado del Ruiz volcanic eruption period to retrieve atmospheric profiles of ozone and NO2, and changes in the stratospheric aerosol size and optical depth. The time evolution of volcanic aerosol serves as a passive tracer to study stratospheric dynamics, and changes in particle size put constraints on the sulfur chemistry modeling of volcanic aerosols. Paper presented at The '99 Kyoto Aerosol-Cloud Workshop, held Dec 1-3, 1999, Kyoto, Japan

  9. Measurement and modeling of longwave infrared directional downwelling spectral radiance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wurst, Nathan P.; Meola, Joseph; Perry, David L.

    2015-09-01

    Exploitation of longwave infrared hyperspectral imagery often requires atmospheric compensation in order to retrieve intrinsic material emissivity properties. For materials possessing subtle spectral features and those with lower emissivity, downwelling radiance plays an important role in the atmospheric compensation process. Most atmospheric compensation algorithms use an estimate of the total downwelling radiance integrated over the hemisphere. However, for tilted surfaces and non-nadir imaging scenarios, directional downwelling radiance information may be required. This work examines collection of directional downwelling radiance measurements using a Fourier transform infrared spectrometer. Specifically, work is done to determine a minimum number of sky angles to measure for which the remainder of the directional sky measurements can be estimated with minimal error through the use of simple data fitting models.

  10. Doping evolution of Zhang-Rice singlet spectral weight: A comprehensive examination by x-ray absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Y.-J.; Jiang, M. G.; Luo, C. W.; Lin, J.-Y.; Wu, K. H.; Lee, J. M.; Chen, J. M.; Kuo, Y. K.; Juang, J. Y.; Mou, Chung-Yu

    2013-10-01

    The total spectral weight S of the emergent low-energy quasiparticles in high-temperature superconductors (HTSCs) is explored by x-ray absorption spectroscopy. In order to examine the applicability of the Hubbard model, regimes that cover from zero doping to overdoping are investigated. In contrast to results of mean-field theory, we found that S deviates from linear dependence on the doping level p. The slope of S versus p changes continuously throughout the whole doping range with no sign of saturation up to p=0.23. Therefore, the picture of the Zhang-Rice singlet remains intact within the most prominent doping regimes of HTSCs.

  11. Concentration measurement of NO using self-absorption spectroscopy of the γ band system in a pulsed corona discharge.

    PubMed

    Zhai, Xiaodong; Ding, Yanjun; Peng, Zhimin; Luo, Rui

    2012-07-10

    Nitric oxide (NO) concentrations were measured using the γ band system spectrum based on the strong self-absorption effect of NO in pulsed corona discharges. The radiative transitional intensities of the NO γ band were simulated based on the theory of molecular spectroscopy. The intensities of some bands, especially γ(0,0) and γ(1,0), are weakened by the self-absorption. The correlations between the spectral self-absorption intensities and NO concentration were validated using a modified Beer-Lambert law with a combined factor K relating the branching ratio and the NO concentration, and a nonlinear index α that is applicable to the broadband system. Optical emissive spectra in pulsed corona discharges in NO and N2/He mixtures were used to evaluate the two parameters for various conditions. Good agreement between the experimental and theoretical results verifies the self-absorption behavior seen in the UV spectra of the NO γ bands. PMID:22781235

  12. X-ray Spectral Measurements of a Dense Plasma Focus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitlock, Robert R.; Dozier, Charles M.; Newman, Daniel A.; Petr, Rodney A.; Freshman, Jay; Hoey, David W.; Heaton, John

    2002-10-01

    Absolute intensities of spectra in a dense-plasma-focus (DPF) source have been recorded and analyzed. This DPF source has been identified as one of the more promising sources for X-ray lithography. The source, developed by Science Research Laboratory, Inc., is currently undergoing testing and further development at BAE Systems, Inc. The DPF operates at 60 Hz and produces an average output pulse of ~5 J of X rays into 4π steradians in a continuous operation mode. In all runs, there was an initial number of pulses, typically between 30 to 40, during which the X-ray output increased and the DPF appeared to be undergoing a conditioning process, and after which a "steady-state" mode was achieved where the average X-ray power was relatively constant. Each spectral run was exposed to ~600 J of output, as measured by the PIN. The X-ray spectral region between 0.8 and 3 keV was recorded on Kodak DEF film in a potassium acid phthalate (KAP) convex curved-crystal spectrograph. The source emits neon line radiation from Ne IX and Ne X ionization stages in the 900 to 1300 eV region, suitable for lithographic exposures of photoresist. Two helium-like neon lines contribute more than 50% of the total energy. From continuum shape, plasma temperatures were found to be approximately 170-200 eV. The absolute, integrated spectral outputs were verified to within 30% by comparison with measurements by a PIN detector and a radiachromic X-ray dosimeter.

  13. Light absorption efficiencies of photosynthetic pigments: the dependence on spectral types of central stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komatsu, Yu; Umemura, Masayuki; Shoji, Mitsuo; Kayanuma, Megumi; Yabana, Kazuhiro; Shiraishi, Kenji

    2015-07-01

    For detecting life from reflection spectra on extrasolar planets, trace of photosynthesis is one of the indicators. However, it is not yet clear what kind of radiation environments is acceptable for photosynthesis. Light absorption in photosystems on the Earth occurs using limited photosynthetic pigments such as chlorophylls (Chls) and bacteriochlorophylls (BChls). Efficiencies of light absorption for the pigments were evaluated by calculating the specific molecular absorption spectra at the high accuracy-quantum mechanical level. We used realistic stellar radiation spectra such as F, G, K and M-type stars to investigate the efficiencies. We found that the efficiencies are increased with the temperature of stars, from M to F star. Photosynthetic pigments have two types of absorption bands, the Q y and Soret. In higher temperature stars like F star, contributions from the Soret region of the pigments are dominant for the efficiency. On the other hand, in lower temperature stars like M stars, the Q y band is crucial. Therefore, differences on the absorption intensity and the wavelength between the Q y and Soret band are the most important to characterize the photosynthetic pigments. Among photosynthetic pigments, Chls tend to be efficient in higher temperature stars, while BChls are efficient for M stars. Blueward of the 4000 Å break, the efficiencies of BChls are smaller than Chls in the higher temperature stars.

  14. Absorption spectroscopy characterization measurements of a laser-produced Na atomic beam

    SciTech Connect

    Ching, C.H.; Bailey, J.E.; Lake, P.W.; Filuk, A.B.; Adams, R.G.; McKenney, J.

    1996-06-01

    This work describes a pulsed Na atomic beam source developed for spectroscopic diagnosis of a high-power ion diode on the Particle Beam Fusion Accelerator II. The goal is to produce a {approximately} 10{sup 12}-cm{sup {minus}3}-density Na atomic beam that can be injected into the diode acceleration gap to measure electric and magnetic fields from the Stark and Zeeman effects through laser-induced-fluorescence or absorption spectroscopy. A {approximately} 10 ns fwhm, 1.06 {micro}m, 0.6 J/cm{sup 2} laser incident through a glass slide heats a Na-bearing thin film, creating a plasma that generates a sodium vapor plume. A {approximately} 1 {micro}sec fwhm dye laser beam tuned to 5,890 {angstrom} is used for absorption measurement of the Na I resonant doublet by viewing parallel to the film surface. The dye laser light is coupled through a fiber to a spectrograph with a time-integrated CCD camera. A two-dimensional mapping of the Na vapor density is obtained through absorption measurements at different spatial locations. Time-of-flight and Doppler broadening of the absorption with {approximately} 0.1 {angstrom} spectral resolution indicate that the Na neutral vapor temperature is about 0.5 to 2 eV. Laser-induced-fluorescence from {approximately} 1 {times} 10{sup 12}-cm{sup {minus}3} Na I 3s-3p lines observed with a streaked spectrograph provides a signal level sufficient for {approximately} 0.06 {angstrom} wavelength shift measurements in a mock-up of an ion diode experiment.

  15. Microplasmas as vacuum ultraviolet source for Cl-atom density measurements by resonance absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Virginie; Bauville, Gérard; Sadeghi, Nader; Puech, Vincent

    2011-11-01

    A micro-hollow cathode discharge was used to generate radiation on the chlorine atom resonance lines. Such radiation could be used to measure, by resonance absorption spectroscopy, the density of chlorine atoms in either ground state (3p5 2P3/2) or in the fine structure metastable state (3p5 2P1/2), which is located at 882.35 cm-1. Among the nine analysed lines in the 132-142 nm spectral region, only those at 137.953 and 139.653 nm, which are strong enough and are not affected by the self-absorption, can be used for the resonance absorption diagnostic of the ground state and the metastable state, respectively. The best operating conditions of the lamp source are 0.5% of Cl2 in argon at 150 mbar and 4 mA discharge current. The measured 800 ± 30 K gas temperature of the microplasma, indicates that under these specific conditions, these two lines are dominantly Doppler broadened. So their profile is Gaussian shaped with full widths at half maximum of (4.7 ± 0.1) × 10-4 nm.

  16. Decay Heat Measurements Using Total Absorption Gamma-ray Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rice, S.; Valencia, E.; Algora, A.; Taín, J. L.; Regan, P. H.; Podolyák, Z.; Agramunt, J.; Gelletly, W.; Nichols, A. L.

    2012-09-01

    A knowledge of the decay heat emitted by thermal neutron-irradiated nuclear fuel is an important factor in ensuring safe reactor design and operation, spent fuel removal from the core, and subsequent storage prior to and after reprocessing, and waste disposal. Decay heat can be readily calculated from the nuclear decay properties of the fission products, actinides and their decay products as generated within the irradiated fuel. Much of the information comes from experiments performed with HPGe detectors, which often underestimate the beta feeding to states at high excitation energies. This inability to detect high-energy gamma emissions effectively results in the derivation of decay schemes that suffer from the pandemonium effect, although such a serious problem can be avoided through application of total absorption γ-ray spectroscopy (TAS). The beta decay of key radionuclei produced as a consequence of the neutron-induced fission of 235U and 239Pu are being re-assessed by means of this spectroscopic technique. A brief synopsis is given of the Valencia-Surrey (BaF2) TAS detector, and their method of operation, calibration and spectral analysis.

  17. Aerosol properties derived from spectral actinic flux measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stark, H.; Schmidt, K. S.; Pilewskie, P.; Cozic, J.; Wollny, A. G.; Brock, C. A.; Baynard, T.; Lack, D.; Parrish, D. D.; Fehsenfeld, F. C.

    2008-12-01

    Measurement of aerosol properties is very important for understanding climate change. Aerosol optical properties influence solar radiation throughout the troposphere. According to the Working Group I report of the intergovernmental panel for climate change [IPCC, 2007], aerosols have a direct radiative forcing of - 0.5±0.4 W/m2 with a medium to low level of scientific understanding. This relatively large uncertainty indicates the need for more frequent and precise measurements of aerosol properties. We will show how actinic flux measurements can be used to derive important optical aerosol parameters such as aerosol optical thickness and depth, surface albedo, angstrom exponent, radiative forcing by clouds and aerosols, aerosol extinction, and others. The instrument used for this study is a combination of two spectroradiometers measuring actinic flux in the ultraviolet and visible radiation range from 280 to 690 nm with a resolution of 1 nm. Actinic flux is measured as the radiation incident on a spherical surface with sensitivity independent of direction. In contrast, irradiance is measured as the radiation incident on a plane surface, which depends on the cosine of the incident angle. Our goal is to assess the capabilities of using spectral actinic flux measurements to derive various aerosol properties. Here we will compare 1) actinic flux measurements to irradiance measurements from the spectral solar flux radiometer (SSFR), 2) derived aerosol size distributions with measurements from a white light optical particle counter (WLOPC) and ultra high sensitivity aerosol size spectrometer (UHSAS), and 3) derived aerosol optical extinction with measurements from a cavity ringdown aerosol extinction spectrometer (CRD-AES). These comparisons will utilize data from three recent field campaigns over New England and the Atlantic Ocean (ICARTT 2004), Texas and the Gulf of Mexico during (TexAQS/GoMACCS 2006), and Alaska and the Arctic Ocean (ARCPAC 2008) when the instruments

  18. Multiyear in-situ measurements of atmospheric aerosol absorption properties at an urban coastal site in western Mediterranean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Segura, S.; Estellés, V.; Esteve, A. R.; Marcos, C. R.; Utrillas, M. P.; Martínez-Lozano, J. A.

    2016-03-01

    In-situ aerosol absorption properties measured in Valencia (Spain) for four years, from February 2011 to February 2015, have been analysed. Spectral absorption properties have been obtained using a seven-wavelength Aethalometer AE-31 which covers the range from UV (370 nm) to IR (950 nm). In order to obtain the absorption coefficients, compensation parameters have been calculated for the Aethalometer considering seasonal and spectral differences. For this multiyear measurement period, seasonal site-specific calibration parameters have been obtained. Furthermore, estimations of the absorption Ångström Exponent (αabs) have been calculated using the seven Aethalometer wavelengths. The averaged absorption coefficients (plus/minus the standard deviation) obtained for the seven channels range between 9 ± 4 Mm-1 at 950 nm and 33 ± 18 Mm-1 at 370 nm. These results are typical of a moderate polluted environment. The obtained absorption Ångström Exponent (plus/minus the standard deviation) is 1.42 ± 0.08, which suggests the presence of brown carbon or black carbon coated by non-absorbing particles in our site. Seasonal and daily variations, together with the effect of both the boundary layer height and traffic, have been also studied. Strong seasonal differences in the absorption coefficient are found, mainly due to seasonal variation of the mixing layer height. On the opposite, the study of the diurnal variations of the absorption Ångström Exponent proves that this parameter is more affected by traffic emissions than by the evolution of the mixing layer height.

  19. IMPROVED AND QUALITY-ASSESSED EMISSION AND ABSORPTION LINE MEASUREMENTS IN SLOAN DIGITAL SKY SURVEY GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Oh, Kyuseok; Yi, Sukyoung K.; Sarzi, Marc; Schawinski, Kevin

    2011-08-01

    We present a new database of absorption and emission-line measurements based on the entire spectral atlas from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) 7th data release of galaxies within a redshift of 0.2. Our work makes use of the publicly available penalized pixel-fitting (pPXF) and gas and absorption line fitting (gandalf) IDL codes, aiming to improve the existing measurements for stellar kinematics, the strength of various absorption-line features, and the flux and width of the emissions from different species of ionized gas. Our fit to the stellar continuum uses both standard stellar population models and empirical templates obtained by combining a large number of stellar spectra in order to fit a subsample of high-quality SDSS spectra for quiescent galaxies. Furthermore, our fit to the nebular spectrum includes an exhaustive list of both recombination and forbidden lines. Foreground Galactic extinction is implicitly treated in our models, whereas reddening in the SDSS galaxies is included in the form of a simple dust screen component affecting the entire spectrum that is accompanied by a second reddening component affecting only the ionized gas emission. In order to check for systematic departures from the rather standard set of assumptions that enters our models, we provide a quality assessment for our fit to the SDSS spectra in our sample, for both the stellar continuum and the nebular emissions and across different wavelength regions. This quality assessment also allows the identification of objects with either problematic data or peculiar features. We hope to foster the discovery potential of our database; therefore, our spectral fit is available to the community. For example, based on the quality assessment around the H{alpha} and [N II] {lambda}6584 lines, approximately 1% of the SDSS spectra classified as 'galaxies' by the SDSS pipeline do in fact require additional broad lines to be matched, even though they do not show a strong continuum from an active

  20. Improved and Quality-assessed Emission and Absorption Line Measurements in Sloan Digital Sky Survey Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, Kyuseok; Sarzi, Marc; Schawinski, Kevin; Yi, Sukyoung K.

    2011-08-01

    We present a new database of absorption and emission-line measurements based on the entire spectral atlas from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) 7th data release of galaxies within a redshift of 0.2. Our work makes use of the publicly available penalized pixel-fitting (pPXF) and gas and absorption line fitting (gandalf) IDL codes, aiming to improve the existing measurements for stellar kinematics, the strength of various absorption-line features, and the flux and width of the emissions from different species of ionized gas. Our fit to the stellar continuum uses both standard stellar population models and empirical templates obtained by combining a large number of stellar spectra in order to fit a subsample of high-quality SDSS spectra for quiescent galaxies. Furthermore, our fit to the nebular spectrum includes an exhaustive list of both recombination and forbidden lines. Foreground Galactic extinction is implicitly treated in our models, whereas reddening in the SDSS galaxies is included in the form of a simple dust screen component affecting the entire spectrum that is accompanied by a second reddening component affecting only the ionized gas emission. In order to check for systematic departures from the rather standard set of assumptions that enters our models, we provide a quality assessment for our fit to the SDSS spectra in our sample, for both the stellar continuum and the nebular emissions and across different wavelength regions. This quality assessment also allows the identification of objects with either problematic data or peculiar features. We hope to foster the discovery potential of our database; therefore, our spectral fit is available to the community. For example, based on the quality assessment around the Hα and [N II] λ6584 lines, approximately 1% of the SDSS spectra classified as "galaxies" by the SDSS pipeline do in fact require additional broad lines to be matched, even though they do not show a strong continuum from an active nucleus, as

  1. Absorption spectral analysis of proteins and free amino acids in Pleurotus ostreatus fruiting body extracts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kostyshyn, S.; Gorshynska, I.; Guminetsky, S. G.

    2002-02-01

    The paper deals with the results of spectrophotometric studies of the extracts of Pleurotus ostreatus fruiting bodies, grown in natural conditions in different habitats of Chernivtsy region, in the spectral interval of 215 - 340 nm. It is shown that the samples reveal considerable difference both in free amino acid content and reserved protein content of albumins, globulins, prolamins, glutelins.

  2. Absorption of laser radiation in a H-He plasma. II - Experimental measurement of the absorption coefficient

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Billman, K. W.; Rowley, P. D.; Stallcop, J. R.; Presley, L.

    1974-01-01

    The absorption coefficients of 0.633-, 1.15-, and 3.39-micron laser radiation for a homogeneous H-He plasma have been measured in the temperature range from 12.2 to 21.7 (x 1000 K) and in the electron number density range 0.45 to 6.5 (x 10 to the 17th power per cu cm). Good agreement is found between the experimentally determined total absorption for each of the wavelengths and that calculated from theory. Furthermore, because the 3.39-micron absorption is dominated by inverse bremsstrahlung, while the 0.633-micron absorption is dominated by photoionization and resonance absorption, the experiment indicates a correct assessment by the theory of these individual absorption mechanisms.

  3. Electron Bunch Shape Measurements Using Electro-optical Spectral Decoding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borysenko, A.; Hiller, N.; Müller, A.-S.; Steffen, B.; Peier, P.; Ivanisenko, Y.; Ischebeck, R.; Schlott, V.

    Longitudinal diagnostics of the electron bunch shapes play a crucial role in the operation of linac-based light sources. Electro-optical techniques allow us to measure the longitudinal electron bunch profiles non-destructively on a shot-by-shot basis. Here we present results from measurements of electron bunches with a length of 200-900 fs rms at the Swiss FEL Injector Test Facility. All the measurements were done using an Yb-doped fibre laser system (with a central wavelength of a 1050 nm) and a GaP crystal. The technique of electro-optical spectral decoding (EOSD) was applied and showed great capabilities to measure bunch shapes down to around 370 fs rms. Measurements were performed for different electron energies to study the expected distortions of the measured bunch profile due to the energy-dependent widening of the electric field, which plays a role for low beam energies below and around 40 MeV. The studies provide valuable input for the design of the EOSD monitors for the compact linear accelerator FLUTE that is currently under commissioning at the Karslruhe Institute of Technology (KIT).

  4. Boundary layer stratus clouds - Inferred from satellite infrared spectral measurements over oceans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prabhakara, C.; Yoo, J.-M.; Kratz, D. P.; Dalu, G.

    1993-01-01

    A method to remotely sense marine stratus clouds, that are underneath the boundary layer inversion produced by strong subsidence, is developed with the help of the measurements made by the Infrared Interferometer Spectrometer (IRIS) on board the Nimbus 4 satellite. These measurements, which had a spectral resolution of 2.8/cm and a field view of about 100 km in the region 870-980/cm, allow one to compare the weak absorption due to water vapor lines with that of the weak nu3-nu1 band of CO2. From such a comparison it is possible to sense the presence of these boundary layer stratus clouds. Maps of these clouds over subsidence regions of the tropical and subtropical oceans deduced from IRIS data show the usefulness of the technique to climatological studies.

  5. Mercury - Spectral reflectance measurements /0.33-1.06 microns/ 1974/75

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vilas, F.; Mccord, T. B.

    1976-01-01

    The spectral reflectance (0.32-1.06 microns) of Mercury was measured during two elongations, September-October 1974 and March 1975. The spectra are much improved over the previously available measurements. The reflectance increases almost linearly with wavelength, and no electronic transition absorption bands are evident to the precision of the data. The new spectra agree very well with the reflectance of mature lunar mare and upland soils and are not similar to those of any other observed solar system object. This suggests that the surface materials and the weathering processes controlling their optical properties are similar for both the moon and Mercury. Differences between the spectra for the two-observation periods may indicate differences in the average composition for the different regions of Mercury observed.

  6. X-ray absorption spectral studies of copper (II) mixed ligand complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soni, B.; Dar, Davood Ah; Shrivastava, B. D.; Prasad, J.; Srivastava, K.

    2014-09-01

    X-ray absorption spectra at the K-edge of copper have been studied in two copper mixed ligand complexes, one having tetramethyethylenediamine (tmen) and the other having tetraethyethylenediamine (teen) as one of the ligands. The spectra have been recorded at BL-8 dispersive extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) beamline at the 2.5 GeV INDUS- 2 synchrotron, RRCAT, Indore, India. The data obtained has been processed using the data analysis program Athena. The energy of the K-absorption edge, chemical shift, edge-width and shift of the principal absorption maximum in the complexes have been determined and discussed. The values of these parameters have been found to be approximately the same in both the complexes indicating that the two complexes possess similar chemical environment around the copper metal atom. The chemical shift has been utilized to estimate effective nuclear charge on the absorbing atom. The normalized EXAFS spectra have been Fourier transformed. The position of the first peak in the Fourier transform gives the value of first shell bond length, which is shorter than the actual bond length because of energy dependence of the phase factors in the sine function of the EXAFS equation. This distance is thus the phase- uncorrected bond length. Bond length has also been determined by Levy's, Lytle's and Lytle, Sayers and Stern's (LSS) methods. The results obtained from LSS and the Fourier transformation methods are comparable with each other, since both are phase uncorrected bond lengths.

  7. Spectral Measurements of PMCs from SBUV/2 Instruments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeLand, Matthew T.; Shettle, Eric P.; Thomas, Gary E.; Olivero, John J.

    2006-01-01

    The SBUV/2 (Solar Backscattered Ultraviolet, model 2) instrument is designed to monitor ozone stratospheric profile and total column ozone using measurements of the Earth's backscattered ultraviolet albedo. We have previously demonstrated that the normal radiance measurements from SBUV/2 instruments, which sample 12 discrete wavelengths between 252 and 340 nm during each scan, can be used to identify polar mesospheric clouds (PMCs). Some SBUV/2 instruments also periodically view the earth in continuous scan mode, covering the wavelength range 160-400 nm with 0.15 nm sampling. Analysis of these data show PMC occurrence rates similar to the normal discrete scan results, although the observation technique reduces the number of daily measurements by a factor of six. PMC observed by SBUV/2 instruments show a monotonic variation in the residual spectral albedo over the wavelength range 250 300 nm, with maximum enhancements of 10 15% at 250 nm. This result is consistent with microphysical model predictions from Jensen [1989. A numerical model of polar mesospheric cloud formation and evolution, Ph. D. Thesis, University of Colorado]. We find no evidence for a systematic localized increase in PMC residual albedo for wavelengths near 260 nm, in contrast to the recently reported results from the MSX UVISI instrument [Carbary J.F., et al., 2004. Evidence for bimodal particle distribution from the spectra of polar mesospheric clouds. Geophysics Research. Letters 31, L13108]. This result is observed for three different SBUV/2 instruments in both Northern and Southern Hemisphere data over a 13-year span. Our Mie scattering calculations show that the location and magnitude of the 260 nm hump feature is dependent upon the specific scattering angles appropriate to the MSX measurements. Although it explains the MSX spectrum, the bimodal size distribution proposed by Carbary et al. (2004), cannot explain the lack of scattering angle dependence of the SBUV/2 spectral shapes. The

  8. SPECTRAL POLARIZATION OF THE REDSHIFTED 21 cm ABSORPTION LINE TOWARD 3C 286

    SciTech Connect

    Wolfe, Arthur M.; Jorgenson, Regina A.; Robishaw, Timothy; Heiles, Carl; Xavier Prochaska, J. E-mail: raj@ast.cam.ac.uk E-mail: heiles@astro.berkeley.edu

    2011-05-20

    A reanalysis of the Stokes-parameter spectra obtained of the z = 0.692 21 cm absorption line toward 3C 286 shows that our original claimed detection of Zeeman splitting by a line-of-sight magnetic field, B{sub los} = 87 {mu}G, is incorrect. Because of an insidious software error, what we reported as Stokes V is actually Stokes U: the revised Stokes V spectrum indicates a 3{sigma} upper limit of B{sub los}< 17 {mu}G. The correct analysis reveals an absorption feature in fractional polarization that is offset in velocity from the Stokes I spectrum by -1.9 km s{sup -1}. The polarization position-angle spectrum shows a dip that is also significantly offset from the Stokes I feature, but at a velocity that differs slightly from the absorption feature in fractional polarization. We model the absorption feature with three velocity components against the core-jet structure of 3C 286. Our {chi}{sup 2} minimization fitting results in components with differing (1) ratios of H I column density to spin temperature, (2) velocity centroids, and (3) velocity dispersions. The change in polarization position angle with frequency implies incomplete coverage of the background jet source by the absorber. It also implies a spatial variation of the polarization position angle across the jet source, which is observed at frequencies higher than the 839.4 MHz absorption frequency. The multi-component structure of the gas is best understood in terms of components with spatial scales of {approx}100 pc comprised of hundreds of low-temperature (T {<=} 200 K) clouds with linear dimensions of <<100 pc. We conclude that previous attempts to model the foreground gas with a single uniform cloud are incorrect.

  9. Measurements of the absorption coefficient of stratospheric aerosols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ogren, J. A.; Ahlquist, N. C.; Clarke, A. D.; Charlson, R. J.

    1981-01-01

    The absorption coefficients of stratospheric aerosols are measured using a variation on the integrating plate method. The technique is based on the decrease in the transparency of a substrate when an absorbing aerosol is deposited on it. A Lambert scatterer is placed behind the substrate to integrate forward scattered light and minimize the effect of scattering on the measurement. The low pressure in the stratosphere is used for the direct impaction of particles onto a narrow strip of opal glass. The eight samples collected had a median value of 4 x 10 to the -9th m with an uncertainty of + or - 5 x 10 to the -9th m. If this absorption is due to graphitic carbon, then its concentration is estimated at about 0.4 ng/cu m, or about 0.25% of the total aerosol mass concentration. Estimates of the aerosol scattering coefficients based on satellite extinction inversions result in an aerosol single-scattering albedo in the range of 0.96-1.0.

  10. Measurement of solutes in dialysate using UV absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fridolin, Ivo; Magnusson, Martin; Lindberg, Lars-Goeran

    2001-06-01

    The aim of this work was to describe a new method for optical monitoring of solutes in a spent dialysate. The method utilizes UV light absorption employing a commercially available spectrophotometer. Measurements were performed both on collected dialysate samples and on-line. The concentration of several removed solutes and electrolytes in the serum and in the dialysate was determined simultaneously using standard laboratory techniques. During on-line monitoring the spectrophotometer was connected to the fluid outlet of the dialysis machine. On-line measurements during a single hemodialysis session demonstrated a possibility to monitor deviations in the dialysator performance (e.g. dialysator in by-pass). The experimental results indicated a good correlation between UV absorption and several removed solutes (urea, creatinine) in the spent dialysate. The correlation coefficient for urea and creatinine concentrations in the dialysate was very high for every individual treatment. The UV absorbance correlates well to the concentrations of several solutes thought to be uremic toxins. The results indicate that the technique can be used as a continuous, on-line method for monitoring deviations in the dialysator performance and may estimate the removal of the overall toxins. In the future, the new method will be used to evaluate parameters describing delivery of the prescribed treatment dose such as KT/V and Urea Reduction Rate (URR).

  11. X-ray absorption spectroscopy measurements of thin foil heating by Z-pinch radiation.

    PubMed

    MacFarlane, J J; Bailey, J E; Chandler, G A; Deeney, C; Douglas, M R; Jobe, D; Lake, P; Nash, T J; Nielsen, D S; Spielman, R B; Wang, P; Woodruff, P

    2002-10-01

    Absorption spectroscopy measurements of the time-dependent heating of thin foils exposed to intense z-pinch radiation sources are presented. These measurements and their analysis provide valuable benchmarks for, and insights into, the radiative heating of matter by x-ray sources. Z-pinch radiation sources with peak powers of up to 160 TW radiatively heated thin plastic-tamped aluminum foils to temperatures approximately 60 eV. The foils were located in open slots at the boundary of z-pinch hohlraums surrounding the pinch. Time-resolved Kalpha satellite absorption spectroscopy was used to measure the evolution of the Al ionization distribution, using a geometry in which the pinch served as the backlighter. The time-dependent pinch radius and x-ray power were monitored using framing camera, x-ray diode array, and bolometer measurements. A three-dimensional view factor code, within which one-dimensional (1D) radiation-hydrodynamics calculations were performed for each surface element in the view factor grid, was used to compute the incident and reemitted radiation flux distribution throughout the hohlraum and across the foil surface. Simulated absorption spectra were then generated by postprocessing radiation-hydrodynamics results for the foil heating using a 1D collisional-radiative code. Our simulated results were found to be in good general agreement with experimental x-ray spectra, indicating that the spectral measurements are consistent with independent measurements of the pinch power. We also discuss the sensitivity of our results to the spectrum of the radiation field incident on the foil, and the role of nonlocal thermodynamic equilibrium atomic kinetics in affecting the spectra. PMID:12443339

  12. Clinical measurements analysis of multi-spectral photoplethysmograph biosensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asare, Lasma; Kviesis-Kipge, Edgars; Spigulis, Janis

    2014-05-01

    The developed portable multi-spectral photoplethysmograph (MS-PPG) optical biosensor device, intended for analysis of peripheral blood volume pulsations at different vascular depths, has been clinically verified. Multi-spectral monitoring was performed by means of a four - wavelengths (454 nm, 519 nm, 632 nm and 888 nm) light emitted diodes and photodiode with multi-channel signal output processing. Two such sensors can be operated in parallel and imposed on the patient's skin. The clinical measurements confirmed ability to detect PPG signals at four wavelengths simultaneously and to record temporal differences in the signal shapes (corresponding to different penetration depths) in normal and pathological skin. This study analyzed wavelengths relations between systole and diastole peak difference at various tissue depths in normal and pathological skin. The difference between parameters of healthy and pathological skin at various skin depths could be explain by oxy- and deoxyhemoglobin dominance at different wavelengths operated in sensor. The proposed methodology and potential clinical applications in dermatology for skin assessment are discussed.

  13. Red edge spectral measurements from sugar maple leaves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vogelmann, J. E.; Rock, B. N.; Moss, D. M.

    1993-01-01

    Many sugar maple stands in the northeastern United States experienced extensive insect damage during the 1988 growing season. Chlorophyll data and high spectral resolution spectrometer laboratory reflectance data were acquired for multiple collections of single detached sugar maple leaves variously affected by the insect over the 1988 growing season. Reflectance data indicated consistent and diagnostic differences in the red edge portion (680-750 nm) of the spectrum among the various samples and populations of leaves. These included differences in the red edge inflection point (REIP), a ratio of reflectance at 740-720 nm (RE3/RE2), and a ratio of first derivative values at 715-705 nm (D715/D705). All three red edge parameters were highly correlated with variation in total chlorophyll content. Other spectral measures, including the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) and the Simple Vegetation Index Ratio (VI), also varied among populations and over the growing season, but did not correlate well with total chlorophyll content. Leaf stacking studies on light and dark backgrounds indicated REIP, RE3/RE2 and D715/D705 to be much less influenced by differences in green leaf biomass and background condition than either NDVI or VI.

  14. Neutron spectral measurements in the D0 collision hall

    SciTech Connect

    Yurista, P.M.; Elwyn, A.J.; Salsbury, W.C.

    1989-05-03

    The characterization of radiation fields is important to many applications. For example, in operational health physics, the choice of instrumentation for monitoring and of a personnel dosimeter for use by radiation workers depend on both the type and spectral characteristics of the radiation. Furthermore, the spectral distribution of the fluence affects radiation damage estimates for materials for new or replacement equipment within the radiation environment. At the same time, knowledge of the character of the radiation fields at a high-energy accelerator leads to a better theoretical understanding of its nature, and is important to the specification of civil construction requirements for future upgrades of the accelerator. At Fermilab as at many high-energy accelerators neutrons dominate the radiation fields outside of beam pipes within enclosures. In a continuing effort to characterize as completely as possible the fields at various locations around the site, we have measured the neutron spectrum within the DO collision hall. Both the fluence and dose-equivalent energy distributions are summarized in this note. 12 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  15. Spectral surface albedo derived from GOME-2/Metop measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pflug, Bringfried; Loyola, Diego

    2009-09-01

    Spectral surface albedo is an important input for GOME-2 trace gas retrievals. An algorithm was developed for estimation of spectral surface albedo from top-of-atmosphere (TOA)-radiances measured by the Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment GOME-2 flying on-board MetOp-A. The climatologically version of this algorithm estimates Minimum Lambert-Equivalent Reflectivity (MLER) for a fixed time window and can use data of many years in contrast to the Near-real time version. Accuracy of surface albedo estimated by MLER-computation increases with the amount of available data. Unfortunately, most of the large GOME pixels are partly covered by clouds, which enhance the LER-data. A plot of LER-values over cloud fraction is used within this presentation to account for this influence of clouds. This "cloud fraction plot" can be applied over all surface types. Surface albedo obtained using the "cloud fraction plot" is compared with reference surface albedo spectra and with the FRESCO climatology. There is a general good agreement; however there are also large differences for some pixels.

  16. Novel single-beam optical spectrophotometer for fast luminescence, absorption, and reflection measurements of turbid materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Werner

    1995-02-01

    A novel spectrophotometer based on the deflection of a secondary element for measuring clear and highly turbid materials within the millisecond time range is developed. The number of optical components of the monochromator is reduced to the absolute minimum. This results in excellent light throughput and a low stray-light level. The spectrophotometer has been designed allowing spectral measurements of absorption, transmission, reflection, and luminescence in a single-beam mode, as documented by various examples. Its design is highly flexible and the price/quality relation might be adopted to the envisaged purpose. The main philosophy is to relocate as many functions as possible form the hardware to the software part of the spectrophotometer. Several novel procedures based on old concepts are proposed. An appropriate computer program providing data acquisition, control functions as well as numerous analytical capabilities is developed on the basis of the compiler language power basic and indispensably 'fast' routines are written in assembler language.

  17. Broadband measurements of aerosol extinction in the ultraviolet spectral region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Washenfelder, R. A.; Flores, J. M.; Brock, C. A.; Brown, S. S.; Rudich, Y.

    2013-01-01

    Aerosols influence the Earth's radiative budget by scattering and absorbing incoming solar radiation. The optical properties of aerosols vary as a function of wavelength, but few measurements have reported the wavelength dependence of aerosol extinction cross-sections and complex refractive indices. We describe a new laboratory instrument to measure aerosol optical extinction as a function of wavelength, using cavity enhanced spectroscopy with a broadband light source. The instrument consists of two broadband channels which span the 360-390 and 385-420 nm spectral regions using two light emitting diodes (LED) and a grating spectrometer with charge-coupled device (CCD) detector. We determined aerosol extinction cross-sections and directly observed Mie scattering resonances for aerosols that are purely scattering (polystyrene latex spheres and ammonium sulfate), slightly absorbing (Suwannee River fulvic acid), and strongly absorbing (nigrosin dye). We describe an approach for retrieving refractive indices as a function of wavelength from the measured extinction cross-sections over the 360-420 nm wavelength region. The retrieved refractive indices for PSL and ammonium sulfate agree within uncertainty with literature values for this spectral region. The refractive index determined for nigrosin is 1.78 (±0.03) + 0.19 (±0.08) i at 360 nm and 1.53 (±0.03) + 0.21 (±0.05) i at 420 nm. The refractive index determined for Suwannee River fulvic acid is 1.71 (±0.02) + 0.07 (±0.06) i at 360 nm and 1.66 (±0.02) + 0.06 (±0.04) i at 420 nm. These laboratory results support the potential for a field instrument capable of determining ambient aerosol optical extinction, average aerosol extinction cross-section, and complex refractive index as a function of wavelength.

  18. Broadband measurements of aerosol extinction in the ultraviolet spectral region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Washenfelder, R. A.; Flores, J. M.; Brock, C. A.; Brown, S. S.; Rudich, Y.

    2013-04-01

    Aerosols influence the Earth's radiative budget by scattering and absorbing incoming solar radiation. The optical properties of aerosols vary as a function of wavelength, but few measurements have reported the wavelength dependence of aerosol extinction cross sections and complex refractive indices. We describe a new laboratory instrument to measure aerosol optical extinction as a function of wavelength, using cavity enhanced spectroscopy with a broadband light source. The instrument consists of two broadband channels which span the 360-390 and 385-420 nm spectral regions using two light emitting diodes (LED) and a grating spectrometer with charge-coupled device (CCD) detector. We determined aerosol extinction cross sections and directly observed Mie scattering resonances for aerosols that are purely scattering (polystyrene latex spheres and ammonium sulfate), slightly absorbing (Suwannee River fulvic acid), and strongly absorbing (nigrosin dye). We describe an approach for retrieving refractive indices as a function of wavelength from the measured extinction cross sections over the 360-420 nm wavelength region. The retrieved refractive indices for PSL and ammonium sulfate agree within uncertainty with the literature values for this spectral region. The refractive index determined for nigrosin is 1.78 (± 0.03) + 0.19 (± 0.08)i at 360 nm and 1.63 (± 0.03) + 0.21 (± 0.05)i at 420 nm. The refractive index determined for Suwannee River fulvic acid is 1.71 (± 0.02) + 0.07 (± 0.06)i at 360 nm and 1.66 (± 0.02) + 0.06 (± 0.04)i at 420 nm. These laboratory results support the potential for a field instrument capable of determining ambient aerosol optical extinction, average aerosol extinction cross section, and complex refractive index as a function of wavelength.

  19. Measurement of iron absorption from meals contaminated with iron

    SciTech Connect

    Hallberg, L.; Bjoern-Rasmussen, E.

    1981-12-01

    A method is described to measure in vitro the extent of isotopic exchange between the native nonheme food iron and added inorganic reduction to radioiron tracer. The food is digested with pepsin and trypsin in the presence of radioiron. The exchangeability of food iron is calculated from the specific activity in the food and in an extract of bathophenantroline in isoamyl alcohol obtained after digesting this food. The precision and accuracy of the method is illustrated by two kinds of studies, those in which different amounts of contamination iron are added to a meal and those evaluating contamination iron in natural meals. The present method will make it possible to measure validly iron absorption from meals contaminated with unknown amounts of iron of unknown exchangeability with the extrinsic radioiron tracer.

  20. Ultra sound absorption measurements in rock samples at low temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herminghaus, C.; Berckhemer, H.

    1974-01-01

    A new technique, comparable with the reverberation method in room acoustics, is described. It allows Q-measurements at rock samples of arbitrary shape in the frequency range of 50 to 600 kHz in vacuum (.1 mtorr) and at low temperatures (+20 to -180 C). The method was developed in particular to investigate rock samples under lunar conditions. Ultrasound absorption has been measured at volcanics, breccia, gabbros, feldspar and quartz of different grain size and texture yielding the following results: evacuation raises Q mainly through lowering the humidity in the rock. In a dry compact rock, the effect of evacuation is small. With decreasing temperature, Q generally increases. Between +20 and -30 C, Q does not change much. With further decrease of temperature in many cases distinct anomalies appear, where Q becomes frequency dependent.

  1. Phase measurement of fast light pulse in electromagnetically induced absorption.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yoon-Seok; Lee, Hee Jung; Moon, Han Seb

    2013-09-23

    We report the phase measurement of a fast light pulse in electromagnetically induced absorption (EIA) of the 5S₁/₂ (F = 2)-5P₃/₂ (F' = 3) transition of ⁸⁷Rb atoms. Using a beat-note interferometer method, a stable measurement without phase dithering of the phase of the probe pulse before and after it has passed through the EIA medium was achieved. Comparing the phases of the light pulse in air and that of the fast light pulse though the EIA medium, the phase of the fast light pulse at EIA resonance was not shifted and maintained to be the same as that of the free-space light pulse. The classical fidelity of the fast light pulse according to the advancement of the group velocity by adjusting the atomic density was estimated to be more than 97%. PMID:24104135

  2. Absorption and related optical dispersion effects on the spectral response of a surface plasmon resonance sensor

    SciTech Connect

    Nakkach, Mohamed; Lecaruyer, Pierre; Bardin, Fabrice; Sakly, Jaouhar; Lakhdar, Zohra Ben; Canva, Michael

    2008-11-20

    Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) sensing is an optical technique that allows real time detection of small changes in the physical properties, in particular in the refractive index, of a dielectric medium near a metal film surface. One way to increase the SPR signal shift is then to incorporate a substance possessing a strong dispersive refractive index in the range of the plasmon resonance band. In this paper, we investigate the impact of materials possessing a strong dispersive index integrated to the dielectric medium on the SPR reflectivity profile. We present theoretical results based on chromophore absorption spectra and on their associated refractive index obtained from the Lorentz approach and Kramers-Kroenig equations. As predicted by the theory, the experimental results show an enhancement of the SPR response, maximized when the chromophore absorption band coincides with the plasmon resonant wavelength. This shows that chromophores labeling can provide a potential way for SPR response enhancement.

  3. [Synchronous measurement of concentrations of nitric oxide and nitric dioxide in flue gas by ultraviolet absorption analysis].

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jie; Zhang, Shi-Liang

    2008-04-01

    Ultraviolet absorption optical depths of NO and NO2 gas mixture with different concentrations were measured, using a high resolution grating monochromator. By correlating fast-varying discrete absorption and slow-varying continuous absorption with NO and NO2 contributions respectively, the mole concentrations of NO and NO2 were derived synchronously. The study results indicated that, when the total pressure of gas mixture approached to one atmospheric pressure, a strong tendency that two moles of NO2 were combined into one mole of N2O4 was found. The maximum conversion rate from NO2 to N2O4 was roughly 22.5%, resulting in the fact that the effective absorption cross-section of NO2-N2O4 mixture mainly depended on that of N2O4, which exhibited continuous characteristics in its absorption spectrum. The discrete absorption cross-section spectrum was broadened with the increase in the partial pressure of NO. It was shown that the integral of absorption cross-sections within a discrete absorption band had better linear correlation with NO concentration than the discrete absorption cross-section peak The measurement and derivation results indicated that, when the partial pressure of NO2 varied within 17-100 Pa, the average relative error for the derived NO2 concentration was 11.7%. When the partial pressure of NO varied within 63.8-181.62 Pa, the maximum and average relative error for the derivation of NO concentration was 16.9% and 9.6% respectively by using the spectrum integral method, while the corresponding data rose to 38.2% and 14.4% by using the spectral peak method. The technique can be applied to synchronous monitoring of NO and NO2 concentration with relatively simple measurement hardware. PMID:18619318

  4. Spectrally resolved motional Stark effect measurements on ASDEX Upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Reimer, R.; Dinklage, A.; Wolf, R.; Fischer, R.; Hobirk, J.; Löbhard, T.; Mlynek, A.; Reich, M.; Sawyer, L.; Collaboration: ASDEX Upgrade

    2013-11-15

    A spectrally resolved Motional Stark Effect (MSE) diagnostic has been installed at ASDEX Upgrade. The MSE data have been fitted by a forward model providing access to information about the magnetic field in the plasma interior [R. Reimer, A. Dinklage, J. Geiger et al., Contrib. Plasma Phys. 50, 731–735 (2010)]. The forward model for the beam emission spectra comprises also the fast ion D{sub α} signal [W. W. Heidbrink and G. J. Sadler, Nucl. Fusion 34, 535–615 (1994)] and the smearing on the CCD-chip. The calculated magnetic field data as well as the revealed (dia)magnetic effects are consistent with the results from equilibrium reconstruction solver. Measurements of the direction of the magnetic field are affected by unknown and varying polarization effects in the observation.

  5. Determination of alloy content from plume spectral measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Madzsar, George C.

    1991-01-01

    The mathematical derivation for a method to determine the identities and amounts of alloys present in a flame where numerous alloys may be present is described. This method is applicable if the total number of elemental species from all alloys that may be in the flame is greater than or equal to the total number of alloys. Arranging the atomic spectral line emission equations for the elemental species as a series of simultaneous equations enables solution for identity and amount of the alloy present in the flame. This technique is intended for identification and quantification of alloy content in the plume of a rocket engine. Spectroscopic measurements reveal the atomic species entrained in the plume. Identification of eroding alloys may lead to the identification of the eroding component.

  6. Automatic spectral transmittance measurement system for DWDM filters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Gao-Wei; Heish, Ming-Yu

    2003-08-01

    For many years, fiber-optics communication has become an essential part of the development of our modern society. For example, its significance comes from the increasing demands on real-time image transmission, multimedia communication, distance learning, video-conferencing, video telephone, and cable TV, etc. This paper is to develop an automatic transmittance measurement system for a DWDM (dense wavelength division multiplexing) filter. In this system, a grating-based monochromators is devised to generate a collection of monochromatic light with various wavelengths, instead of using an expensive tunable laser. From this approach, the cost of the proposed system will be much lower than that of those having the same functions, by one order. In addition, we simulate the spectral filtering to investigate the resolving power of the system. It appears that our simulations give quite satisfactory results.

  7. Spectral reflectance measurements of a virus host model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toler, R. W.; Shankar, N. K.

    1972-01-01

    A technique has been developed to detect the characteristic spectral signatures of healthy and infected St. Augustine grass. It is possible to predict the coverage of the infected area provided ground truth coverage shows positive St. Augustine grass turf. Qualitative measurements from photographs of plants in the blue and red regions with polarization show that light reflected from healthy plants is more strongly polarized than that from diseased plants. Photographs taken through the blue Wratten 47 filter in conjuction with a polarizer show an excellent differentiation. A large photographic difference also appears in the red region. Much smaller differences were noted in the 540 to 550 nm region. Although the intensity in the near-IR region is much higher than the visible region of the spectrum, differences in the healthy and diseased plants' reflectance were quite small.

  8. Innovative Mobile Smart Photonic Dimensional, Color and Spectral Measurement Engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofmann, Dr Dietrich, Prof; Dittrich (B. Eng. , Paul-Gerald; Höfner (B. Eng. , Dieter; Kraus, Daniel

    2015-02-01

    Aim of the paper is the demonstration of a paradigm shift in dimensional, color and spectral measurements in industry, biology/medicine, farming/environmental protection and security, as well as in education and training: Measurement engineering and quality assurance become mobile, modular and smart. Smartpads, smartphones and smartwatches (smartcomps) in combination with innovative hardware apps (hwapps) and conventional software apps (swapps) are fundamental enablers for the transformation from conventional stationary working places towards innovative mobile working places with in-field measurements and point-of-care (POC) diagnostics. Furthermore mobile open online courses (MOOCs) are transforming the study habits. Practical examples for the application of innovative photonic micro dimensiometers, colorimeters and spectrometers will be given. The innovative approach opens so far untapped enormous markets for measurement science, engineering, applications, education and training. These innovative working conditions will be fast accepted due to their convenience, reliability and affordability. A highly visible advantage of smartcomps is the huge number of their real distribution, their worldwide connectivity via Internet and cloud services, the standardized interfaces like USB and HDMI and the experienced capabilities of their users for practical operations, obtained with their private smartcomps.

  9. Laboratory Measurements of the 940, 1130, and 1370 nm Water Vapor Absorption Band Profiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giver, Lawrence P.; Gore, Warren J.; Pilewskie, P.; Freedman, R. S.; Chackerian, C., Jr.; Varanasi, P.

    2001-01-01

    We have used the solar spectral flux radiometer (SSFR) flight instrument with the Ames 25 meter base-path White cell to obtain about 20 moderate resolution (8 nm) pure water vapor spectra from 650 to 1650 nm, with absorbing paths from 806 to 1506 meters and pressures up to 14 torr. We also obtained a set at 806 meters with several different air-broadening pressures. Model simulations were made for the 940, 1130, and 1370 nm absorption bands for some of these laboratory conditions using the Rothman, et al HITRAN-2000 linelist. This new compilation of HITRAN includes new intensity measurements for the 940 nm region. We compared simulations for our spectra of this band using HITRAN-2000 with simulations using the prior HITRAN-1996. The simulations of the 1130 nm band show about 10% less absorption than we measured. There is some evidence that the total intensity of this band is about 38% stronger than the sum of the HITRAN line intensities in this region. In our laboratory conditions the absorption depends approximately on the square root of the intensity. Thus, our measurements agree that the band is stronger than tabulated in HITRAN, but by about 20%, substantially less than the published value. Significant differences have been shown between Doppler-limited resolution spectra of the 1370 nm band obtained at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and HITRAN simulations. Additional new intensity measurements in this region are continuing to be made. We expect the simulations of our SSFR lab data of this band will show the relative importance of improving the HITRAN line intensities of this band for atmospheric measurements.

  10. Broadband cavity enhanced spectroscopy in the ultraviolet spectral region for measurements of nitrogen dioxide and formaldehyde

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Washenfelder, R. A.; Attwood, A. R.; Flores, J. M.; Rudich, Y.; Brown, S. S.

    2015-09-01

    measurements of aerosol extinction in ambient air, and this spectral region is important for characterizing the strong ultraviolet absorption by brown carbon aerosol.

  11. Measuring Microwaves via Absorption and Dispersion in Rydberg Atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stack, Daniel; Kunz, Paul; Meyer, David; Solmeyer, Neal

    2016-05-01

    Weak microwave frequency electromagnetic fields can be difficult to detect and fully characterize with traditional methods. However it is possible to transduce the measurement of these fields from the microwave domain to the optical domain via resonant transitions between Rydberg levels in atomic vapors using electromagnetically-induced transparency and the Autler-Townes effect. This technique allows for sensitive measurements of the microwave field amplitude, polarization, and spatial waveform (via the position of the probe and coupling laser beams) as compared to measurements performed with dipole antennas. We are able to obtain these quantities by monitoring the properties of a probe laser beam as it passes through a rubidium vapor cell. Previous experiments using Rydberg spectroscopy have typically relied on measuring the absorption of the probe laser as it passed through the atomic system. We report on progress to use the polarization rotation of the probe as it passes through the atoms in a static magnetic field, which corresponds to the real part of the susceptibility of the atomic medium, for measuring the characteristics of a microwave frequency signal. This effect is known as Nonlinear Magneto Optical Rotation (NMOR) and has been used for sensitive magnetometry.

  12. Spectral characterization of dielectric materials using terahertz measurement systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seligman, Jeffrey M.

    The performance of modern high frequency components and electronic systems are often limited by the properties of the materials from which they are made. Over the past decade, there has been an increased emphasis on the development of new, high performance dielectrics for use in high frequency systems. The development of these materials requires novel broadband characterization, instrumentation, and extraction techniques, from which models can be formulated. For this project several types of dielectric sheets were characterized at terahertz (THz) frequencies using quasi-optical (free-space) techniques. These measurement systems included a Fourier Transform Spectrometer (FTS, scalar), a Time Domain Spectrometer (TDS, vector), a Scalar Network Analyzer (SNA), and a THz Vector Network Analyzer (VNA). Using these instruments the THz spectral characteristics of dielectric samples were obtained. Polarization based anisotropy was observed in many of the materials measured using vector systems. The TDS was the most informative and flexible instrument for dielectric characterization at THz frequencies. To our knowledge, this is the first such comprehensive study to be performed. Anisotropy effects within materials that do not come into play at microwave frequencies (e.g. ~10 GHz) were found, in many cases, to increase measured losses at THz frequencies by up to an order of magnitude. The frequency dependent properties obtained during the course of this study included loss tangent, permittivity (index of refraction), and dielectric constant. The results were largely consistent between all the different systems and correlated closely to manufacturer specifications over a wide frequency range (325 GHz-1.5 THz). Anisotropic behavior was observed for some of the materials. Non-destructive evaluation and testing (NDE/NDT) techniques were used throughout. A precision test fixture was developed to accomplish these measurements. Time delay, insertion loss, and S-parameters were

  13. Differential absorption lidar measurements of atmospheric water vapor using a pseudonoise code modulated AlGaAs laser. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rall, Jonathan A. R.

    1994-01-01

    Lidar measurements using pseudonoise code modulated AlGaAs lasers are reported. Horizontal path lidar measurements were made at night to terrestrial targets at ranges of 5 and 13 km with 35 mW of average power and integration times of one second. Cloud and aerosol lidar measurements were made to thin cirrus clouds at 13 km altitude with Rayleigh (molecular) backscatter evident up to 9 km. Average transmitter power was 35 mW and measurement integration time was 20 minutes. An AlGaAs laser was used to characterize spectral properties of water vapor absorption lines at 811.617, 816.024, and 815.769 nm in a multipass absorption cell using derivative spectroscopy techniques. Frequency locking of an AlGaAs laser to a water vapor absorption line was achieved with a laser center frequency stability measured to better than one-fifth of the water vapor Doppler linewidth over several minutes. Differential absorption lidar measurements of atmospheric water vapor were made in both integrated path and range-resolved modes using an externally modulated AlGaAs laser. Mean water vapor number density was estimated from both integrated path and range-resolved DIAL measurements and agreed with measured humidity values to within 6.5 percent and 20 percent, respectively. Error sources were identified and their effects on estimates of water vapor number density calculated.

  14. absorption sensor for sensitive temperature and species measurements in high-temperature gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spearrin, R. M.; Ren, W.; Jeffries, J. B.; Hanson, R. K.

    2014-09-01

    A continuous-wave laser absorption diagnostic, based on the infrared CO2 bands near 4.2 and 2.7 μm, was developed for sensitive temperature and concentration measurements in high-temperature gas systems using fixed-wavelength methods. Transitions in the respective R-branches of both the fundamental υ 3 band (~2,350 cm-1) and combination υ 1 + υ 3 band (~3,610 cm-1) were chosen based on absorption line-strength, spectral isolation, and temperature sensitivity. The R(76) line near 2,390.52 cm-1 was selected for sensitive CO2 concentration measurements, and a detection limit of <5 ppm was achieved in shock tube kinetics experiments (~1,300 K). A cross-band, two-line thermometry technique was also established utilizing the R(96) line near 2,395.14 cm-1, paired with the R(28) line near 3,633.08 cm-1. This combination yields high temperature sensitivity (ΔE" = 3,305 cm-1) and expanded range compared with previous intra-band CO2 sensors. Thermometry performance was validated in a shock tube over a range of temperatures (600-1,800 K) important for combustion. Measured temperature accuracy was demonstrated to be better than 1 % over the entire range of conditions, with a standard error of ~0.5 % and µs temporal resolution.

  15. Measurements of liquid film thickness, concentration, and temperature of aqueous urea solution by NIR absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, R.; Jeffries, J. B.; Dreier, T.; Schulz, C.

    2016-01-01

    A multi-wavelength near-infrared (NIR) diode laser absorption sensor has been developed and demonstrated for real-time monitoring of the thickness, solute concentration, and temperature of thin films of urea-water solutions. The sensor monitors the transmittance of three near-infrared diode lasers through the thin liquid film. Film thickness, urea mass fraction, and liquid temperature were determined from measured transmittance ratios of suitable combinations of lasers. Available laser wavelengths were selected depending on the variation of the NIR absorption spectrum of the solution with temperature and solute concentration. The spectral database was measured by a Fourier transform infrared spectrometer in the range 5500-8000 cm-1 for urea solutions between 5 and 40 wt% and temperatures between 298 and 338 K. A prototype sensor was constructed, and the sensor concept was first validated with measurements using a calibration cell providing liquid layers of variable thickness (200-1500 µm), urea mass fraction (5-40 wt%) and temperature (298-318 K). Temporal variations of film thickness and urea concentration were captured during the constant-temperature evaporation of a liquid film deposited on an optically polished heated quartz flat.

  16. Electron paramagnetic resonance, optical absorption and Raman spectral studies on a pyrite/chalcopyrite mineral

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Udayabhaskar Reddy, G.; Seshamaheswaramma, K.; Nakamura, Yoshinobu; Lakshmi Reddy, S.; Frost, Ray L.; Endo, Tamio

    2012-10-01

    Pyrite and chalcopyrite mineral samples from Mangampet barite mine, Kadapa, Andhra Pradesh, India are used in the present study. XRD data indicate that the pyrite mineral has a face centered cubic lattice structure with lattice constant 5.4179 Å. Also it possesses an average particle size of 91.9 nm. An EPR study on the powdered samples confirms the presence of iron in pyrite and iron and Mn(II) in chalcopyrite. The optical absorption spectrum of chalcopyrite indicates presence of copper which is in a distorted octahedral environment. NIR results confirm the presence of water fundamentals and Raman spectrum reveals the presence of water and sulfate ions.

  17. Airborne Multi-Angle Hyper-Spectral Measurements of White Caps on the Open Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laveigne, J.; Cairns, B.; Diner, D. J.

    2004-05-01

    The influence of whitecaps on the atmospheric correction of ocean color measurements is highly dependent on the spectral variation of albedo that is assumed for the whitecaps. Field measurements of breaking waves in the surf zone indicate a strong spectral variation in whitecap reflectance with the reflectance at 1650 nm nm decreasing by 95% relative to that at 440 nm. The cause of this spectral variation is thought to be the strong absorption by water at longer wavelengths that attenuates light reflected from submerged bubbles. Measurements made during an ocean cruise suggest that the magnitude of this decrease is typically less in the open ocean where the wave breaking is less violent and bubbles are not injected as deep into the water. Nonetheless, even in the open ocean, when whitecaps are large and bright similar decreases in reflectance from 440 nm to 860 nm to those observed in the surf zone are seen. Unfortunately, although measurements in the vicinity of 1600 and 2200 nm are important for remote sensing of aerosols and the atmospheric correction of ocean color measurements, the longest wavelength used for the open ocean measurements was 860 nm. Information about typical reflectance decreases from 440 nm to these longer wavelengths is therefore missing. One approach to remedying this absence of information about the spectral variation of white cap albedo across the solar spectrum is to use an airborne imaging spectrometer. However, a significant difficulty in using airborne, or ship-borne, instrumentation to measure the spectral albedo of whitecaps is the contamination of data by sun glitter. It is usually much more difficult than anticipated to filter data to reject glitter, even for ship-borne measurements with a television camera that provides a visual reference. This means that most data that is reported is obtained under overcast conditions. One approach to alleviating the problems caused by sun glitter is to using multi-angle remote sensing. If

  18. Calibration of AIS Data Using Ground-based Spectral Reflectance Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conel, J. E.

    1985-01-01

    Present methods of correcting airborne imaging spectrometer (AIS) data for instrumental and atmospheric effects include the flat- or curved-field correction and a deviation-from-the-average adjustment performed on a line-by-line basis throughout the image. Both methods eliminate the atmospheric absorptions, but remove the possibility of studying the atmosphere for its own sake, or of using the atmospheric information present as a possible basis for theoretical modeling. The method discussed here relies on use of ground-based measurements of the surface spectral reflectance in comparison with scanner data to fix in a least-squares sense parameters in a simplified model of the atmosphere on a wavelength-by-wavelength basis. The model parameters (for optically thin conditions) are interpretable in terms of optical depth and scattering phase function, and thus, in principle, provide an approximate description of the atmosphere as a homogeneous body intervening between the sensor and the ground.

  19. The spectral irradiance of some solar simulators and its effect on cell measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Seaman, C.H.; Anspaugh, B.E.; Downing, R.G.; Estey, R.S.

    1980-01-01

    Moderate resolution spectral irradiance measurements in the range 300 nm to 1100 nm have been made of eight radiant sources which are currently being used as solar simulators. Spectral irradiance data are presented in graphical form. To demonstrate the interplay of source spectral distribution and cell spectral response, measurements of short circuit current of five cells of differing response characteristics have been made with these sources. These results are presented in tabular and graphical form.

  20. Temperature variable long path cell for absorption measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shetter, R. E.; Davidson, J. A.; Cantrell, C. A.; Calvert, J. G.

    1987-01-01

    The design and construction of a long path cell for absorption measurements at temperatures ranging from 215-470 K and at pressures from vacuum to 10 atm are described. The cell consists of three concentric stainless-steel tubes; the innermost tube is 6.5-in. in internal diameter, has a volume of about 47 l, and contains White-type optics, six thermocouples, and a gas input tube; and the outermost tube provides a vacuum Dewar around the inner assembly. The optical design and temperature control system for the long path temperature variable cell are examined. The long path cell is applicable for analyzing temperature and pressure dependence of spectra and reaction rates of gases, and the cell has flow and photolysis capabilities for studying transient species and photochemically initiated reactions. A diagram of the cell is provided.

  1. An experimental study of the electronic absorption and fluorescence spectral properties of new p-substituted-N-phenylpyrroles and their electrosynthesized polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diaw, A. K. D.; Gningue-Sall, D.; Yassar, A.; Brochon, J.-C.; Henry, E.; Aaron, J.-J.

    2015-01-01

    Electronic absorption and fluorescence spectral properties of new p-substituted-N-phenylpyrroles (N-PhPys), including HOPhPy, MeOPhPy, ThPhPy, PhDPy, DPhDPy, PyPhThThPhPy, and their available, electrosynthesized polymers were investigated. Electronic absorption spectra, fluorescence excitation and emission spectra, fluorescence quantum yields (ΦF) and lifetimes (τF), and other photophysical parameters of these N-PhPy derivatives and their polymers were measured in DMF, DMSO diluted solutions and/or solid state at room temperature. The electronic absorption spectra of N-PhPy derivatives and their polymers included one to several bands, located in the 270-395 nm region, according to the p-phenyl substituent electron-donating effect and conjugated heteroaromatic system length. The fluorescence excitation spectra were characterized by one broad main peak, with, in most cases, one (or more) poorly resolved shoulder (s), appearing in the 270-405 nm region, and their emission spectra were generally constituted of several bands located in the 330-480 nm region. No significant shift of the absorption, fluorescence excitation and emission spectra wavelengths was found upon going from the monomers to the corresponding polymers. ΦF values were high, varying between 0.11 and 0.63, according to the nature of substituents(s) and to the conjugated system extension. Fluorescence decays were mono-exponential for the monomers and poly-exponential for PyPhThThPhPy and for polymers. τF values were relatively short (0.35-5.17 ns), and markedly decreased with the electron-donor character of the phenyl group p-substituent and the conjugated system extension.

  2. An experimental study of the electronic absorption and fluorescence spectral properties of new p-substituted-N-phenylpyrroles and their electrosynthesized polymers.

    PubMed

    Diaw, A K D; Gningue-Sall, D; Yassar, A; Brochon, J-C; Henry, E; Aaron, J-J

    2015-01-25

    Electronic absorption and fluorescence spectral properties of new p-substituted-N-phenylpyrroles (N-PhPys), including HOPhPy, MeOPhPy, ThPhPy, PhDPy, DPhDPy, PyPhThThPhPy, and their available, electrosynthesized polymers were investigated. Electronic absorption spectra, fluorescence excitation and emission spectra, fluorescence quantum yields (ΦF) and lifetimes (τF), and other photophysical parameters of these N-PhPy derivatives and their polymers were measured in DMF, DMSO diluted solutions and/or solid state at room temperature. The electronic absorption spectra of N-PhPy derivatives and their polymers included one to several bands, located in the 270-395 nm region, according to the p-phenyl substituent electron-donating effect and conjugated heteroaromatic system length. The fluorescence excitation spectra were characterized by one broad main peak, with, in most cases, one (or more) poorly resolved shoulder (s), appearing in the 270-405 nm region, and their emission spectra were generally constituted of several bands located in the 330-480 nm region. No significant shift of the absorption, fluorescence excitation and emission spectra wavelengths was found upon going from the monomers to the corresponding polymers. ΦF values were high, varying between 0.11 and 0.63, according to the nature of substituents(s) and to the conjugated system extension. Fluorescence decays were mono-exponential for the monomers and poly-exponential for PyPhThThPhPy and for polymers. τF values were relatively short (0.35-5.17 ns), and markedly decreased with the electron-donor character of the phenyl group p-substituent and the conjugated system extension. PMID:25173528

  3. Contact sponge water absorption test implemented for in situ measures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaggero, Laura; Scrivano, Simona

    2016-04-01

    The contact sponge method is a non-destructive in-situ methodology used to estimate a water uptake coefficient. The procedure, unlike other in-situ measurement was proven to be directly comparable to the water uptake laboratory measurements, and was registered as UNI 11432:2011. The UNI Normal procedure requires to use a sponge with known density, soaked in water, weighed, placed on the material for 1 minute (UNI 11432, 2011; Pardini & Tiano, 2004), then weighed again. Difficulties arise in operating on test samples or on materials with porosity varied for decay. While carrying on the test, fluctuations in the bearing of the environmental parameters were negligible, but not the pressure applied to the surface, that induced the release of different water amounts towards the material. For this reason we designed a metal piece of the same diameter of the plate carrying the sponge, to be screwed at the tip of a pocket penetrometer. With this instrument the sponge was kept in contact with the surface for 1 minute applying two different loads, at first pushed with 0.3 kg/cm2 in order to press the sponge, but not its holder, against the surface. Then, a load of 1.1 kg/ cm2 was applied, still avoiding deviating the load to the sponge holder. We applied both the current and our implemented method to determine the water absorption by contact sponge on 5 fresh rock types (4 limestones: Fine - and Coarse grained Pietra di Vicenza, Rosso Verona, Breccia Aurora, and the silicoclastic Macigno sandstone). The results show that 1) the current methodology imply manual skill and experience to produce a coherent set of data; the variable involved are in fact not only the imposed pressure but also the compression mechanics. 2) The control on the applied pressure allowed reproducible measurements. Moreover, 3) the use of a thicker sponge enabled to apply the method even on rougher surfaces, as the device holding the sponge is not in contact with the tested object. Finally, 4) the

  4. OBSERVATION AND SPECTRAL MEASUREMENTS OF THE CRAB NEBULA WITH MILAGRO

    SciTech Connect

    Abdo, A. A.; Allen, B. T.; Chen, C.; Atkins, R.; Aune, T.; Benbow, W.; Coyne, D. G.; Dorfan, D. E.; Berley, D.; Blaufuss, E.; Bussons, J.; Bonamente, E.; Galbraith-Frew, J.; Christopher, G. E.; Fleysher, L.; Fleysher, R.; DeYoung, T.; Falcone, A.; Dingus, B. L.; Ellsworth, R. W.; and others

    2012-05-01

    The Crab Nebula was detected with the Milagro experiment at a statistical significance of 17 standard deviations over the lifetime of the experiment. The experiment was sensitive to approximately 100 GeV-100 TeV gamma-ray air showers by observing the particle footprint reaching the ground. The fraction of detectors recording signals from photons at the ground is a suitable proxy for the energy of the primary particle and has been used to measure the photon energy spectrum of the Crab Nebula between {approx}1 and {approx}100 TeV. The TeV emission is believed to be caused by inverse-Compton upscattering of ambient photons by an energetic electron population. The location of a TeV steepening or cutoff in the energy spectrum reveals important details about the underlying electron population. We describe the experiment and the technique for distinguishing gamma-ray events from the much more-abundant hadronic events. We describe the calculation of the significance of the excess from the Crab and how the energy spectrum is fitted. The differential photon energy spectrum, including the statistical errors from the fit, obtained using a simple power-law hypothesis for data between 2005 September and 2008 March is (6.5 {+-} 0.4) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -14}(E/10 TeV){sup -3.1{+-}0.1}(cm{sup 2} s TeV ){sup -1} between {approx}1 TeV and {approx}100 TeV. Allowing for a possible exponential cutoff, the photon energy spectrum is fitted as (2.5{sup +0.7}{sub -0.4}) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -12}(E/3 TeV){sup -2.5{+-}0.4}exp (- E/32{sup +39}{sub -18} TeV) (cm{sup 2} s TeV){sup -1}. The results are subject to an {approx}30% systematic uncertainty in the overall flux and an {approx}0.1 systematic uncertainty in the power-law indices quoted. Uncertainty in the overall energy scale has been absorbed into these errors. Fixing the spectral index to values that have been measured below 1 TeV by IACT experiments (2.4-2.6), the fit to the Milagro data suggests that Crab exhibits a

  5. Measuring Food Intake and Nutrient Absorption in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Gomez-Amaro, Rafael L.; Valentine, Elizabeth R.; Carretero, Maria; LeBoeuf, Sarah E.; Rangaraju, Sunitha; Broaddus, Caroline D.; Solis, Gregory M.; Williamson, James R.; Petrascheck, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Caenorhabditis elegans has emerged as a powerful model to study the genetics of feeding, food-related behaviors, and metabolism. Despite the many advantages of C. elegans as a model organism, direct measurement of its bacterial food intake remains challenging. Here, we describe two complementary methods that measure the food intake of C. elegans. The first method is a microtiter plate-based bacterial clearing assay that measures food intake by quantifying the change in the optical density of bacteria over time. The second method, termed pulse feeding, measures the absorption of food by tracking de novo protein synthesis using a novel metabolic pulse-labeling strategy. Using the bacterial clearance assay, we compare the bacterial food intake of various C. elegans strains and show that long-lived eat mutants eat substantially more than previous estimates. To demonstrate the applicability of the pulse-feeding assay, we compare the assimilation of food for two C. elegans strains in response to serotonin. We show that serotonin-increased feeding leads to increased protein synthesis in a SER-7-dependent manner, including proteins known to promote aging. Protein content in the food has recently emerged as critical factor in determining how food composition affects aging and health. The pulse-feeding assay, by measuring de novo protein synthesis, represents an ideal method to unequivocally establish how the composition of food dictates protein synthesis. In combination, these two assays provide new and powerful tools for C. elegans research to investigate feeding and how food intake affects the proteome and thus the physiology and health of an organism. PMID:25903497

  6. Airborne Spectral Measurements of Surface-Atmosphere Anisotropy for Skukuza and Mongu Sites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gatebe, C. K.; King, Michael D.; Arnold, G. T.; Li, J. Y.

    2001-01-01

    The Cloud Absorption Radiometer (CAR) was flown aboard the University of Washington Convair CV-580 research aircraft and took measurements on 23 flights between August 15 and September 16. On 12 of those flights, BRF (bidirectional reflection function) measurements were obtained over different natural surfaces and ecosystems in southern Africa. The BRF measurements were done to characterize surface anisotropy in support of SAFARI 2000 science objectives principally to validate products from NASA's EOS (Earth Observing System) satellites, and to parameterize and validate BRF models. In this paper we present results of BRFs taken over two EOS validation sites: Skukuza tower, South Africa (25.0 S, 31.5 E) and Mongu tower, Zambia (15.4 S, 23.3 E). The CAR is capable of measuring scattered light in fourteen spectral bands. The scan mirror, rotating at 100 rpm, directs the light into a Dall-Kirkham telescope where the beam is split into nine paths. Eight light beams pass through beam splitters, dichroics, and lenses to individual detectors (0.34-1.27 microns), and finally are registered by eight data channels. They are sampled simultaneously and continuously. The ninth beam passes through a spinning filter wheel to an InSb detector cooled by a Stirling cycle cooler. Signals registered by the ninth data channel are selected from among six spectral channels (1.55-2.30 microns). The filter wheel can either cycle through all six spectral bands at a prescribed interval (usually changing filter every fifth scan line), or lock onto any one of the six spectral bands and sample it continuously. To measure the BRF of the surface-atmosphere system, the University of Washington CV-580 had to bank at a comfortable roll angle of approximately 20 degrees and fly in a circle about 3 km in diameter above the surface for roughly two minutes. Replicated observations (multiple circular orbits) were acquired over selected surfaces so that average BRF smooth out small-scale surface and

  7. Airborne spectral Measurements of Surface-Atmosphere Anisotropy for Several Surfaces and Ecosystem over Southern Africa

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gatebe, Charles K.; King, M. D.; Arnold, G. T.; Li, J. Y.; Lau, William K. M. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The Cloud Absorption Radiometer (CAR) was flown aboard the University of Washington Convair CV-580 research aircraft and took measurements on 23 flights between August 15 and September 16. On 12 of those flights, BRF measurements were obtained over different natural surfaces and ecosystem in southern Africa. The BRF measurements were done to characterize surface anisotropy in support of SAFARI 2000 science objectives principally to validate products from NASA's EOS satellites, and to parameterize and validate BRF models. In this paper we present results of BRFs taken over two EOS validation sites: Skukuza tower, South Africa (25.0 deg S, 31.5 deg E) and Mongu tower, Zambia (15.4 deg S, 23.3 deg E). Additional sites are also considered and include, Maun tower, Botswana (20.0 deg S, 23.5 deg E), Sowa Pan, Botswana (20.6 deg S, 26.2 deg E) and Etosha Pan, Namibia (19.0 deg S, 16.0 deg E). The CAR is capable of measuring scattered light in fourteen spectral bands. The scan mirror, rotating at 100 rpm, directs the light into a Dall-Kirkham telescope where the beam is split into nine paths. Eight light beams pass through beam splitters, dichroics, and lenses to individual detectors (0.34-1.27 micrometers), and finally are registered by eight data channels. They are sampled simultaneously and continuously. The ninth beam passes through a spinning filter wheel to an InSb detector cooled by a Stirling cycle cooler. Signals registered by the ninth data channel are selected from among six spectral channels (1.55-2.30 micrometers). The filter wheel can either cycle through all six spectral bands at a prescribed interval (usually changing filter every fifth scan line), or lock onto any one of the six spectral bands and sample it continuously. To measure the BRF of the surface-atmosphere system, the University of Washington CV-580 had to bank at a comfortable roll angle of approximately 20 degrees and fly in a circle about 3 km in diameter above the surface for roughly two

  8. Spectral Moments of Collision-Induced Absorption of CO2 Pairs: The Role of the Intermolecular Potential

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gruszka, Marcin; Borysow, Aleksandra

    1994-01-01

    In this paper we examine the role of the anisotropy of the intermolecular potential in the rototranslational collision-induced absorption of the CO2 pairs. Using newly developed formulas that include the effects of anisotropy of the potential to all orders, we calculate the two lowest spectral moments gamma(prime), and alpha(prime), for four different classes of C02 pair potentials and compare the results with the experimental values. We assumed only multipolar induction in the process of forming the induced dipole, with the second-order contributions included. Using a site-site LJ and a site-site semi-ab initio intermolecular potentials we were able to reproduce the experimental values of gamma(prime), and alpha(prime) moments over entire temperature range from 230 to 330 K. Also, the role of an electrostatic interaction between two C02 molecules and its impact on the spectral moments is thoroughly investigated. An isotropic core with a point quadrupole centered at each molecule is shown to be an inadequate representation of the C02-CO2 potential. Additionally, we show the results obtained with the first- and second-order perturbation theory to be more than twice too small.

  9. Three-Dimensional Complete Cloud Condensation Nuclei Spectral Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hudson, J. G.; Mishra, S.

    2005-12-01

    Most previous cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) measurements have been limited to supersaturations (S) above 0.1%. This means that S discrimination is confined to the Aitken size range (diameter < 0.1 um). However, the S range of the Desert Research Institute (DRI) CCN spectrometers extends down to 0.01%, which thus usually includes most of the Large Nuclei (LN) size range (0.1-1 um diameter). The S range needs this extension because: 1) many clouds form at S less than 0.1%; 2) LN may be precipitation embryos; 3) cloud droplet spectral width, which is important for precipitation, may depend on full CCN spectra; 4) concentrations of more massive (lower S nuclei) need to be considered for static CCN closure (comparisons of particle size and composition with CCN); 5) since the lower S nuclei condense the most water they need to be considered for dynamic CCN closure (comparisons of predicted cloud droplet concentrations from CCN and updraft with measured cloud droplet concentrations); 6) wide CCN spectra are needed to determine CCN sizes. The two DRI CCN spectrometers operated at different S ranges in order to accurately cover the entire CCN range from 1-0.01% S in three recent aircraft projects. Extensive agreement in an overlapping S range increased confidence in these measurements. The AIRS2 project was conducted in November-December 2003 over the Great Lakes region and eastern Canada with supercooled and mixed clouds. RICO project was conducted in December-January 2004-05 over the eastern Atlantic with warm convective clouds. The MASE project was conducted off the northern California coast in July 2005 with warm stratus clouds. Clean maritime air was encountered in RICO. Considerably modified maritime air was encountered in MASE. Wide variations in CCN and CN concentrations (3 orders of magnitude) were encountered in AIRS2. In both maritime environments--RICO and MASE-concentrations were higher above than below the clouds. Clouds seemed to have considerable effects

  10. Combined High Spectral Resolution Lidar and Radar Measurement of Drizzle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eloranta, Edwin

    2015-04-01

    Marine stratus clouds are an important feature of the global climate system. Cloud lifetime is sensitive to drizzle rates. Drizzle not only removes water from the cloud but it's evaporation cools the sub-cloud layer acting to suppress convection. Accurate measurements of drizzle rates will improve our understanding of cloud maintenance. Simultaneous lidar measurements of extinction and radar backscatter allow determination of drizzle droplet particle size, liquid water content, fall velocity and water flux. However, drizzle measurements with conventional lidar are hampered by: 1)changes in the transmission of the output window caused by water accumulation on the lidar output window, 2)the difficulty of correcting the backscatter signal for atmospheric extinction and, 3)the effects of multiple scattering. High spectral resolution lidar avoids problems with window transmission and atmospheric attenuation because the backscatter is referenced to the known molecular scattering cross section at each point in the profile. Although multiple scattering degrades the direct measurement of extinction with the HSRL, it has little effect the HSRL measurement of backscatter cross section. We have developed an iterative solution that begins by estimating the extinction cross in drizzle using an assumed lidar ratio and the backscatter measurement. This is combined with the radar backscatter to make a first estimate of the particle size distribution. Mie scattering theory is then used to compute an improved lidar ratio for this particle size distribution and the new lidar ratio provides an improved extinction cross section. The calculation assumes a modified gamma distribution of sizes. The mode diameter of the distribution is fixed by the lidar-radar cross section ratio, while the width of the distribution is determined by matching the computed fall velocity of the drizzle with the observed radar Doppler velocity. The strengths and limitations of the this approach are examined

  11. Interference effects in angular and spectral distributions of X-ray Transition Radiation from Relativistic Heavy Ions crossing a radiator: Influence of absorption and slowing-down

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiks, E. I.; Pivovarov, Yu. L.

    2015-07-01

    Theoretical analysis and representative calculations of angular and spectral distributions of X-ray Transition Radiation (XTR) by Relativistic Heavy Ions (RHI) crossing a radiator are presented taking into account both XTR absorption and RHI slowing-down. The calculations are performed for RHI energies of GSI, FAIR, CERN SPS and LHC and demonstrate the influence of XTR photon absorption as well as RHI slowing-down in a radiator on the appearance/disappearance of interference effects in both angular and spectral distributions of XTR.

  12. [Correction method for infrared spectral emissivity measurement system based on integrating sphere reflectometer].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yu-Feng; Dai, Jing-Min; Zhang, Yu; Pan, Wei-Dong; Zhang, Lei

    2013-08-01

    In view of the influence of non-ideal reference standard on spectral emissivity measurement, by analyzing the principle of infrared emissivity measurement system based on integrating sphere reflectometer, a calibration method suitable for measuring spectral emissivity system using the reflection measurement was proposed. By fitting a spectral reflectance curve of the reference standard sample to the given reflectance data, the correction coefficient of measurement system was computed. Then the output voltage curve of reference standard sample was corrected by this coefficient. The system error caused by the imperfection of reference standard was eliminated. The correction method was applied to the spectral emissivity measurement system based on integrating sphere reflectometer. The results measured by the corrected system and the results measured by energy comparison measurement were compared to verify the feasibility and effectivity of this correction method in improving the accuracy of spectral emissivity measurement. PMID:24159891

  13. COMPENSATIONAL THREE-WAVELENGTH DIFFERENTIAL-ABSORPTION LIDAR TECHNIQUE FOR REDUCING THE INFLUENCE OF DIFFERENTIAL SCATTERING ON OZONE-CONCENTRATION MEASUREMENTS.

    EPA Science Inventory

    A three-wavelength differential-absorption lidar (DIAL) technique for the UV spectral region is presented that reduces the influence of aerosol differential scattering on measured O3-concentration profiles. The principal advantage of this approach is that, to a good first approxi...

  14. Correlation of Coal Calorific Value and Sulphur Content with 57Fe Mössbauer Spectral Absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wynter, C. I.; May, L.; Oliver, F. W.; Hall, J. A.; Hoffman, E. J.; Kumar, A.; Christopher, L.

    Coal is the most abundant, most economical and widely distributed fossil fuel in the world today. It is also the principal form of reductant in the iron and steel industry. This study was undertaken to not only add to the growing use of Mössbauer spectroscopy application in industry but also to increase the chemistry and physics knowledge base of coal. Coal is 40 to 80 percent carbon with small amounts of sulphur and iron as pyrite and ferrous sulphate. The environmental concern associated with mining and burning of coal has long been a subject of investigation with emphasis on the sulphur content. We examined five ranks of coal: anthracite, Eastern bituminous, bituminous, sub-bituminous, and lignite. Relationships were investigated between the Calorific Value (CV) of coal and inorganic sulphur content, 57Fe Mössbauer absorption, and ratio of pyrite (FeS2) to FeSO4. Twenty-eight samples of the five different types of coal had CVs ranging from 32,403 to 16,100 kJ/kg and sulphur concentrations ranging from 0.28 to 2.5 percent. CV appeared to be positively correlated with concentrations of sulphur and of iron-sulphur salts, although there appears to be little connection with the distribution of their oxidation states.

  15. Spectral measurements of the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benson, Bradford Adam

    2004-12-01

    This thesis describes spectral measurements of the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) effect from clusters of galaxies using the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich Infrared Experiment (SuZIE II). SuZIE II is a 12 element 300 mK bolometer array which observes in three frequency bands between 150 and 350 GHz. Simultaneous multi- frequency measurements have been used to distinguish between thermal and kinematic components of the SZ effect, and to significantly reduce the effects of variations in atmospheric emission which can otherwise dominate the noise. We report significant detections of the SZ effect in 15 clusters of galaxies. For a sub-sample of these clusters we have set limits to their peculiar velocities with respect to the Hubble flow, and have used the cluster sample to set a 95% confidence limit of <1260 km s -1 to the bulk flow of the intermediate-redshift universe in the direction of the CMB dipole. This is the first time that SZ measurements have been used to constrain bulk flows. We show that systematic uncertainties in peculiar velocity determinations from the SZ effect are likely to be dominated by sub-millimeter point sources and we discuss the level of this contamination. We also calculate the central Comptonization, yo, the integrated SZ flux decrement, S, and the gas mass, M gas , of each cluster. We use these measurements to construct y 0 - T, S-T , and M gas - T scaling relations, where T is the X-ray temperature of the intra-cluster (IC) gas. The y 0 - T scaling relation is inconsistent with what we would expect for self-similar clusters; however this result is questionable because of a large systematic uncertainty in y 0 due to the spatial modelling of the IC gas. In general, this systematic uncertainty makes the y 0 - T relation difficult to measure. The S-T scaling relation has a slope and redshift evolution consistent with what we expect for self-similar clusters with a characteristic density that scales with the mean density of the universe. We rule out zero

  16. Design and measurements of the absorption section of an up-conversion device based on PbSe quantum-dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hechster, Elad; Sarusi, Gabby

    2015-12-01

    The absorption section of quantum dots (QD) based night vision devices consists of the OQ sensitizing layer which absorbs the Infrared radiation, the substrate on which the QD are placed, the electrode and, in several cases, a blocking layer that prevents the flow of charge carriers toward the inverse direction. The absorption section plays a dominant role in determining the absorption spectral ranges and the signal-to-noise ratios of the devices. In this work, we show the design of the absorption section of a short wavelength infrared (SWIR) to visible direct up-conversion device. The growth was 300 nm thick PbSe quantum dots (QD) separated by PbSe grain boundaries layer on intrinsic GaAs substrate. Photo-luminescence and absorption measurements suggested that the quantum dots spectral response is blue-shifted to the spectral range in which the up-conversion device is operated i.e., SWIR. We preformed sheet resistance measurements in dark and under illumination that showed that the device exhibits an improvement in the signal-to-noise ratio after annealing ion chloride atmosphere compare with annealing in oxygen atmosphere. These samples have great potential for the use as the absorption section of low-cost, compact, low power consumption, and cooler free up-conversion devices.

  17. Atmospheric extinction in solar tower plants: absorption and broadband correction for MOR measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanrieder, N.; Wilbert, S.; Pitz-Paal, R.; Emde, C.; Gasteiger, J.; Mayer, B.; Polo, J.

    2015-08-01

    Losses of reflected Direct Normal Irradiance due to atmospheric extinction in concentrated solar tower plants can vary significantly with site and time. The losses of the direct normal irradiance between the heliostat field and receiver in a solar tower plant are mainly caused by atmospheric scattering and absorption by aerosol and water vapor concentration in the atmospheric boundary layer. Due to a high aerosol particle number, radiation losses can be significantly larger in desert environments compared to the standard atmospheric conditions which are usually considered in ray-tracing or plant optimization tools. Information about on-site atmospheric extinction is only rarely available. To measure these radiation losses, two different commercially available instruments were tested, and more than 19 months of measurements were collected and compared at the Plataforma Solar de Almería. Both instruments are primarily used to determine the meteorological optical range (MOR). The Vaisala FS11 scatterometer is based on a monochromatic near-infrared light source emission and measures the strength of scattering processes in a small air volume mainly caused by aerosol particles. The Optec LPV4 long-path visibility transmissometer determines the monochromatic attenuation between a light-emitting diode (LED) light source at 532 nm and a receiver and therefore also accounts for absorption processes. As the broadband solar attenuation is of interest for solar resource assessment for concentrated solar power (CSP), a correction procedure for these two instruments is developed and tested. This procedure includes a spectral correction of both instruments from monochromatic to broadband attenuation. That means the attenuation is corrected for the time-dependent solar spectrum which is reflected by the collector. Further, an absorption correction for the Vaisala FS11 scatterometer is implemented. To optimize the absorption and broadband correction (ABC) procedure, additional

  18. Spectral emission measurement of igneous rocks using a spectroradiometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunton, W. D.

    1970-01-01

    Spectroradiometer is used for either close or remote identification of rocks not heated to high temperatures. Instrument yields reproducible data spectra with excellent signal-to-noise ratios and readily identifiable spectral details, including differences in subclasses.

  19. Spectral broadening measurements of the ionospheres of Jupiter and Saturn

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woo, R.; Armstrong, J. W.

    1980-01-01

    Using data obtained from radio occultation experiments of Pioneer 10 and 11, the theory for spectral broadening is compared with the theory of weak intensity scintillation. This comparison is possible because Pioneer's observed spectral broadening occurred when the intensity scintillations were weak. Good agreement is found, and the inferred characteristics of the electron density irregularities for the ionospheres of both Jupiter and Saturn are presented.

  20. CO total column retrieval from SCIAMACHY and TROPOMI Earthshine measurements in the shortwave infrared spectral range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borsdorff, Tobias; Landgraf, Jochen; Aben Aben, Ilse; Williams, Jason; de Laat, Jos

    2015-04-01

    ESA's Scanning Imaging Absorption Spectrometer for Atmospheric Chartography (SCIAMACHY) was operational from 2002 until April 2012 when the contact to its host ENVISAT was finally lost. In this period, an almost continuous long-term record of 10 years Shortwave Infrared (SWIR) measurements of the 2.3 μm spectral range from space has been recorded. Beginning of 2016, this dataset will be continued with the launch of ESA's Sentinel 5 Precursor (S5-P) mission with the Tropospheric Monitoring Instrument (TROPOMI) on board measuring also the 2.3 μm spectral range but with improved radiometric performance and spatial resolution. For the S5-P mission, the highly efficient Infrared CO Retrieval algorithm (SICOR) is developed as part of the operational data processor. Using a common retrieval approach for the two satellite instruments is desirable to ensure comparability and consistency of a long-term CO dataset. For this study, we processed the entire SCIAMACHY dataset with the SICOR algorithm and by that derived a new SCIAMACHY CO dataset for the entire ENVISAT mission, preliminary limited to land and cloud free scenes. For the SCIAMACHY dataset, it is necessary to account for the time dependent instrument degradation due to a growing ice layer on the detector array and a considerable loss of detector pixels due to radiation damage in the later years of the mission. For this purpose, we use cloud-free measurements over the Sahara region as a natural calibration target to identify the time dependence of detector male functions and the loss of radiometric accuracy. The 10-year CO dataset is validated with on-ground TCCON and NDACC measurements at 10 sites. To demonstrate the ability of the new SCIAMACHY CO dataset, we compare the spatial and temporal variation of SCIAMACHY CO fields over biomass burning areas with model fields of a global chemistry transport model (TM5).

  1. A Stellar Occultation Sensor Using Absorption and Refraction of Starlight for Atmospheric Profile Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgan, F.; Yee, J.; Murphy, G.; Swartz, W.; Demajistre, R.; Vervack, R.; Morrison, D.

    2008-12-01

    The Self-Calibrating H2O and O3 Nighttime Environmental Remote Sensor (SCHOONERS) is a compact, integrated UV-IR imaging spectrograph and imager for spaceborne stellar occultation measurements, developed under the NASA Instrument Incubator Program and based on the measurement technique and retrieval demonstrated by the MSX/UVISI instrument. The imaging spectrograph, covering a spectral range between 300 and 900 nm, measures the varying absorption of starlight as a star sets through the Earth's atmosphere to determine vertical profiles of atmospheric constituents. The relative star position measured by the co-aligned imager not only provides position feedback to the active-tracking loop but also measures the star refraction angle for determining the atmospheric density and temperature profiles. The instrument has a 25-cm-diameter aperture and employs a two-axis gimbaled telescope to provide acquisition and tracking of the star. It also uses a two-axis high-precision vernier mirror to correct for spacecraft jitter and maintain the star within the field-of-view. SCHOONERS' hardware and accompanying software have been demonstrated in end-to-end laboratory tests. SCHOONERS' built-in image tracking and motion compensation mechanism, coupled with its small size and limited spacecraft resource requirements, makes it suitable for deployment on existing and future spacecraft platforms as an instrument-of-opportunity. In this paper, stellar occultation sensing technique, experiment requirements, and SCHOONERS design and expected performance will be presented.

  2. In situ measurements of the optical absorption of dioxythiophene-based conjugated polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, J.; Schwendeman, I.; Ihas, B. C.; Clark, R. J.; Cornick, M.; Nikolou, M.; Argun, A.; Reynolds, J. R.; Tanner, D. B.

    2011-05-01

    Conjugated polymers can be reversibly doped by electrochemical means. This doping introduces new subband-gap optical absorption bands in the polymer while decreasing the band-gap absorption. To study this behavior, we have prepared an electrochemical cell allowing in situ measurements of the optical properties of the polymer. The cell consists of a thin polymer film deposited on gold-coated Mylar behind which is another polymer that serves as a counterelectrode. An infrared transparent window protects the upper polymer from ambient air. By adding a gel electrolyte and making electrical connections to the polymer-on-gold films, one may study electrochromism in a wide spectral range. As the cell voltage (the potential difference between the two electrodes) changes, the doping level of the conjugated polymer films is changed reversibly. Our experiments address electrochromism in poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT) and poly(3,4-dimethylpropylenedioxythiophene) (PProDOT-Me2). This closed electrochemical cell allows the study of the doping induced subband-gap features (polaronic and bipolaronic modes) in these easily oxidized and highly redox switchable polymers. We also study the changes in cell spectra as a function of polymer thickness and investigate strategies to obtain cleaner spectra, minimizing the contributions of water and gel electrolyte features.

  3. Improved self-absorption correction for extended x-ray absorption fine-structure measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Booth, C.H.; Bridges, F.

    2003-06-04

    Extended x-ray absorption fine-structure (EXAFS) data collected in the fluorescence mode are susceptible to an apparent amplitude reduction due to the self-absorption of the fluorescing photon by the sample before it reaches a detector. Previous treatments have made the simplifying assumption that the effect of the EXAFS on the correction term is negligible, and that the samples are in the thick limit. We present a nearly exact treatment that can be applied for any sample thickness or concentration, and retains the EXAFS oscillations in the correction term.

  4. Accurate modeling of spectral fine-structure in Earth radiance spectra measured with the Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment.

    PubMed

    van Deelen, Rutger; Hasekamp, Otto P; Landgraf, Jochen

    2007-01-10

    We present what we believe to be a novel approach to simulating the spectral fine structure (<1 nm) in measurements of spectrometers such as the Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment (GOME). GOME measures the Earth's radiance spectra and daily solar irradiance spectra from which a reflectivity spectrum is commonly extracted. The high-frequency structures contained in such a spectrum are, apart from atmospheric absorption, caused by Raman scattering and by a shift between the solar irradiance and the Earth's radiance spectrum. Normally, an a priori high-resolution solar spectrum is used to simulate these structures. We present an alternative method in which all the required information on the solar spectrum is retrieved from the GOME measurements. We investigate two approaches for the spectral range of 390-400 nm. First, a solar spectrum is reconstructed on a fine spectral grid from the GOME solar measurement. This approach leads to undersampling errors of up to 0.5% in the modeling of the Earth's radiance spectra. Second, a combination of the solar measurement and one of the Earth's radiance measurement is used to retrieve a solar spectrum. This approach effectively removes the undersampling error and results in residuals close to the GOME measurement noise of 0.1%. PMID:17268571

  5. Statistical Estimation of the Atmospheric Aerosol Absorption Coefficient Based on the Data of Optical Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Uzhegov, V.N.; Kozlov, V.S.; Panchenko, M.V.; Pkhalagov, Yu.A.; Pol'kin, V.V.; Terpugova, S.A.; Shmargunov, V.P.; Yausheva, E.P.

    2005-03-18

    The problem of the choice of the aerosol optical constants and, in particular, imaginary part of the refractive index of particles in visible and infrared (IR) wavelength ranges is very important for calculation of the global albedo of the atmosphere in climatic models. The available models of the aerosol optical constants obtained for the prescribed chemical composition of particles (see, for example, Ivlev et al. 1973; Ivlev 1982; Volz 1972), often are far from real aerosol. It is shown in (Krekov et al. 1982) that model estimates of the optical characteristics of the atmosphere depending on the correctness of real and imaginary parts of the aerosol complex refractive index can differ by some hundreds percent. It is known that the aerosol extinction coefficient {alpha}({lambda}) obtained from measurements on a long horizontal path can be represented as {alpha}({lambda})={sigma}({lambda})+{beta}({lambda}), where {sigma} is the directed light scattering coefficient, and {beta} is the aerosol absorption coefficient. The coefficient {sigma}({lambda}) is measured by means of a nephelometer. Seemingly, if measure the values {alpha}({lambda}) and {sigma}({lambda}), it is easy to determine the value {beta}({lambda}). However, in practice it is almost impossible for a number of reasons. Firstly, the real values {alpha}({lambda}) and {sigma}({lambda}) are very close to each other, and the estimate of the parameter {beta}({lambda}) is concealed by the errors of measurements. Secondly, the aerosol optical characteristics on the long path and in the local volume of nephelometer can be different, that also leads to the errors in estimating {beta}({lambda}). Besides, there are serious difficulties in performing spectral measurements of {sigma}({lambda}) in infrared wavelength range. Taking into account these circumstances, in this paper we consider the statistical technique, which makes it possible to estimate the absorption coefficient of real aerosol on the basis of analysis

  6. Spectral Invariance Principles Observed in Spectral Radiation Measurements of the Transition Zone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marshak, Alexander

    2011-01-01

    The main theme for our research is the understanding and closure of the surface spectral shortwave radiation problem in fully 3D cloud situations by combining the new ARM scanning radars, shortwave spectrometers, and microwave radiometers with the arsenal of radiative transfer tools developed by our group. In particular, we define first a large number of cloudy test cases spanning all 3D possibilities not just the customary uniform-overcast ones. Second, for each case, we define a "Best Estimate of Clouds That Affect Shortwave Radiation" using all relevant ARM instruments, notably the new scanning radars, and contribute this to the ARM Archive. Third, we test the ASR-signature radiative transfer model RRTMG_SW for those cases, focusing on the near-IR because of long-standing problems in this spectral region, and work with the developers to improve RRTMG_SW in order to increase its penetration into the modeling community.

  7. Rapid and accurate broadband absorption cross-section measurement of human bodies in a reverberation chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flintoft, Ian D.; Melia, Gregory C. R.; Robinson, Martin P.; Dawson, John F.; Marvin, Andy C.

    2015-06-01

    A measurement methodology for polarization and angle of incidence averaged electromagnetic absorption cross-section using a reverberation chamber is presented. The method is optimized for simultaneous rapid and accurate determination of average absorption cross-section over the frequency range 1-15 GHz, making it suitable for use in human absorption and exposure studies. The typical measurement time of the subject is about 8 min with a corresponding statistical uncertainty of about 3% in the measured absorption cross-section. The method is validated by comparing measurements on a spherical phantom with Mie series calculations. The efficacy of the method is demonstrated with measurements of the posture dependence of the absorption cross-section of a human subject and an investigation of the effects of clothing on the measured absorption which are important considerations for the practical design of experiments for studies on human subjects.

  8. Tunable acousto-optic spectral imager for atmospheric composition measurements in the visible spectral domain.

    PubMed

    Dekemper, Emmanuel; Loodts, Nicolas; Van Opstal, Bert; Maes, Jeroen; Vanhellemont, Filip; Mateshvili, Nina; Franssens, Ghislain; Pieroux, Didier; Bingen, Christine; Robert, Charles; De Vos, Lieve; Aballea, Ludovic; Fussen, Didier

    2012-09-01

    We describe a new spectral imaging instrument using a TeO(2) acousto-optical tunable filter (AOTF) operating in the visible domain (450-900 nm). It allows for fast (~1 second), monochromatic (FWHM ranges from 0.6 nm at 450 nm to 3.5 nm at 800 nm) picture acquisition with good spatial resolution. This instrument was designed as a breadboard of the visible channel of a new satellite-borne atmospheric limb spectral imager, named the Atmospheric Limb Tracker for the Investigation of the Upcoming Stratosphere (ALTIUS), that is currently being developed. We tested its remote sensing capabilities by observing the dense, turbulent plume exhausted by a waste incinerator stack at two wavelengths sensitive to NO(2). An average value of 6.0±0.4×10(17) molecules cm(-2) has been obtained for the NO(2) slant column density within the plume, close to the stack outlet. Although this result was obtained with a rather low accuracy, it demonstrates the potential of spectral imaging by using AOTFs in remote sensing. PMID:22945175

  9. Enhanced joint spectral and time domain optical coherence tomography for quantitative flow velocity measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walther, Julia; Koch, Edmund

    2011-06-01

    Recently, a new method called joint spectral and time domain optical coherence tomography (STdOCT) for flow velocity measurement in spectral domain OCT (SD OCT) was presented. This method analyzes the detected timeresolved interference fringe spectra by using a two-dimensional fast Fourier transformation (2D FFT) to determine directly the Doppler frequency shift instead of calculating the phase difference at each depth position of adjacent A-scans. There, it was found that STdOCT is more robust for measurements with low signal to noise ratio than the classic phase-resolved Doppler OCT (DOCT) making it attractive first for imaging fast flow velocities at which a strong Doppler angle dependent signal damping occurs due to interference fringe washout and second for investigating large blood vessels with a big diameter and a highly damped signal of blood with increasing depth due to strong scattering and absorption in the near-infrared wavelength range. In the present study, we would like to introduce an enhanced algorithm for STdOCT permitting a more precise flow velocity measurement in comparison to the conventional STdOCT. The new method determines the amplitude of the broadened Doppler frequency shift by calculating the center of gravity via the complex analytical signal as a result of the second FFT instead of detecting the maximum intensity signal. Furthermore, the comparison with phase-resolved DOCT was done experimentally by using a flow phantom consisting of a 1% Intralipid emulsion and a 320 μm glass capillary. As a result, the enhanced STdOCT and DOCT processed data are completely equivalent.

  10. Characterization and measurement results of fluorescence in absorption optical filter glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reichel, S.; Biertümpfel, R.; Engel, A.

    2015-09-01

    Optical filter glasses (absorption filters) are for example used for spectroscopy. The filter glass absorbs the unwanted light and has a nearly angle independent spectral characteristic. The absorbed light can lead to (self-) fluorescence, i. e. the filter glass itself re-emits fluorescence light at a different wavelength - compared to the incident (excitation) light. This fluorescence light can disturb the measurement signal. In order to obtain an optimized optical design the fluorescence properties of the glasses must be known. By knowing fluorescence properties one can design a system with a good signal-to-noise ratio. We will present our measurement set-up for fluorescence measurements of optical filter glass. This set-up was used to obtain fluorescence measurement results for different optical filter glasses. For the first time we present results on the fluorescence level for different optical filter glasses. In addition the effect of excitation wavelength on the fluorescence level will be studied. Besides other factors, fluorescence depends on impurities of the raw material of the glass melt. Due to small fluctuations of the raw material used for the glass production the fluorescence of the same filter glass type can fluctuate from melt-to-melt. Thus, results from different melts will be shown for the same filter glass type.

  11. Measuring and Modeling the Effect of Surface Moisture on the Spectral Reflectance of Coastal Beach Sand

    PubMed Central

    Nolet, Corjan; Poortinga, Ate; Roosjen, Peter; Bartholomeus, Harm; Ruessink, Gerben

    2014-01-01

    Surface moisture is an important supply limiting factor for aeolian sand transport, which is the primary driver of coastal dune development. As such, it is critical to account for the control of surface moisture on available sand for dune building. Optical remote sensing has the potential to measure surface moisture at a high spatio-temporal resolution. It is based on the principle that wet sand appears darker than dry sand: it is less reflective. The goals of this study are (1) to measure and model reflectance under controlled laboratory conditions as function of wavelength () and surface moisture () over the optical domain of 350–2500 nm, and (2) to explore the implications of our laboratory findings for accurately mapping the distribution of surface moisture under natural conditions. A laboratory spectroscopy experiment was conducted to measure spectral reflectance (1 nm interval) under different surface moisture conditions using beach sand. A non-linear increase of reflectance upon drying was observed over the full range of wavelengths. Two models were developed and tested. The first model is grounded in optics and describes the proportional contribution of scattering and absorption of light by pore water in an unsaturated sand matrix. The second model is grounded in soil physics and links the hydraulic behaviour of pore water in an unsaturated sand matrix to its optical properties. The optical model performed well for volumetric moisture content 24% ( 0.97), but underestimated reflectance for between 24–30% ( 0.92), most notable around the 1940 nm water absorption peak. The soil-physical model performed very well ( 0.99) but is limited to 4% 24%. Results from a field experiment show that a short-wave infrared terrestrial laser scanner ( = 1550 nm) can accurately relate surface moisture to reflectance (standard error 2.6%), demonstrating its potential to derive spatially extensive surface moisture maps of a natural coastal beach. PMID:25383709

  12. Spectral Irradiance Measurements of Simulated Lightning in Planetary Atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borucki, W. J.; McKay, C. P.; Jebbens, D.; Lakkaraju, H. S.; Vanajakshi, C. T.; Cuzzi, Jeffrey (Technical Monitor)

    1996-01-01

    Optical emissions from lightning provide information to estimate the altitude, latitude and longitude of lightning storms, the energy of the discharges, and the production of important trace species such as HCN and C2H2. Knowledge of the spectra of planetary lightning is needed to deduce the total energy dissipated by lightning (and thereby, the production of trace gases) and to help design experiments to detect and track lightning storms. Measurements of the spectral irradiance from approximately 380 to 820 nm are reported for laboratory simulations of lightning in the atmospheres of Venus, Jupiter, and Titan. In our laboratory, laser-induced plasmas (LIP) are used to simulate lightning discharges. This technique avoids contamination of the spectra by elect-ode material and maintains a safe environment while allowing the use of flammable gases, such as hydrogen and methane, found in outer planet atmospheres. The observations were made at I and 5 bars pressure for Venus and Jupiter and at 1 bar for the Titan mixture. At a pressure of one bar, our results show prominent lines from H(sub alpha), H(sub beta), H(sub gamma), and H(sub delta) lines of the Balmer Series of atomic hydrogen, a single line from Helium at 588 nm and strong continuum radiation. At pressures of 5 bars, the H(sub alpha) and H(sub beta) lines are wider, the H(sub gamma), and H(sub delta) lines merge into the continuum because of pressure broadening, and the helium line at 588 nm is no longer visible. The observed spectra of simulated lightning in the venusian atmosphere at 1 and 5 bars shows that the OI multiplet at 777.7 nm dominates the spectra, but weak features due to atomic carbon and singly excited and singly ionized oxygen atoms are also visible. Although lightning has not yet been observed on Titan, it conceivable that some form of lightning discharge could be occurring. Therefore experiments on a Titan atmosphere mixture were conducted. The most prominent features seen in the simulated

  13. The spectral variability of the GHZ-Peaked spectrum radio source PKS 1718-649 and a comparison of absorption models

    SciTech Connect

    Tingay, S. J.; Macquart, J.-P.; Wayth, R. B.; Trott, C. M.; Emrich, D.; Collier, J. D.; Wong, G. F.; Rees, G.; Stevens, J.; Carretti, E.; Callingham, J. R.; Gaensler, B. M.; McKinley, B.; Briggs, F.; Bernardi, G.; Bowman, J. D.; Cappallo, R. J.; Corey, B. E.; Deshpande, A. A.; Goeke, R.; and others

    2015-02-01

    Using the new wideband capabilities of the ATCA, we obtain spectra for PKS 1718-649, a well-known gigahertz-peaked spectrum radio source. The observations, between approximately 1 and 10 GHz over 3 epochs spanning approximately 21 months, reveal variability both above the spectral peak at ∼3 GHz and below the peak. The combination of the low- and high-frequency variability cannot be easily explained using a single absorption mechanism, such as free–free absorption or synchrotron self-absorption. We find that the PKS 1718-649 spectrum and its variability are best explained by variations in the free–free optical depth on our line of sight to the radio source at low frequencies (below the spectral peak) and the adiabatic expansion of the radio source itself at high frequencies (above the spectral peak). The optical depth variations are found to be plausible when X-ray continuum absorption variability seen in samples of active galactic nuclei is considered. We find that the cause of the peaked spectrum in PKS 1718-649 is most likely due to free–free absorption. In agreement with previous studies, we find that the spectrum at each epoch of observation is best fit by a free–free absorption model characterized by a power-law distribution of free–free absorbing clouds. This agreement is extended to frequencies below the 1 GHz lower limit of the ATCA by considering new observations with Parkes at 725 MHz and 199 MHz observations with the newly operational Murchison Widefield Array. These lower frequency observations argue against families of absorption models (both free–free and synchrotron self-absorption) that are based on simple homogenous structures.

  14. Spectrally Consistent Scattering, Absorption, and Polarization Properties of Atmospheric Ice Crystals at Wavelengths from 0.2 to 100 um

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, Ping; Bi, Lei; Baum, Bryan A.; Liou, Kuo-Nan; Kattawar, George W.; Mishchenko, Michael I.; Cole, Benjamin

    2013-01-01

    A data library is developed containing the scattering, absorption, and polarization properties of ice particles in the spectral range from 0.2 to 100 microns. The properties are computed based on a combination of the Amsterdam discrete dipole approximation (ADDA), the T-matrix method, and the improved geometric optics method (IGOM). The electromagnetic edge effect is incorporated into the extinction and absorption efficiencies computed from the IGOM. A full set of single-scattering properties is provided by considering three-dimensional random orientations for 11 ice crystal habits: droxtals, prolate spheroids, oblate spheroids, solid and hollow columns, compact aggregates composed of eight solid columns, hexagonal plates, small spatial aggregates composed of 5 plates, large spatial aggregates composed of 10 plates, and solid and hollow bullet rosettes. The maximum dimension of each habit ranges from 2 to 10,000 microns in 189 discrete sizes. For each ice crystal habit, three surface roughness conditions (i.e., smooth, moderately roughened, and severely roughened) are considered to account for the surface texture of large particles in the IGOM applicable domain. The data library contains the extinction efficiency, single-scattering albedo, asymmetry parameter, six independent nonzero elements of the phase matrix (P11, P12, P22, P33, P43, and P44), particle projected area, and particle volume to provide the basic single-scattering properties for remote sensing applications and radiative transfer simulations involving ice clouds. Furthermore, a comparison of satellite observations and theoretical simulations for the polarization characteristics of ice clouds demonstrates that ice cloud optical models assuming severely roughened ice crystals significantly outperform their counterparts assuming smooth ice crystals.

  15. Sensor for headspace pressure and H2O concentration measurements in closed vials by tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Tingdong; Wang, Guishi; Cao, Zhensong; Zhang, Weijun; Gao, Xiaoming

    2014-07-01

    The concentration of H2O and the pressure in the headspace of vials are simultaneously measured by a tunable diode laser sensor based on absorption spectroscopy techniques. The 7168.437 cm-1 spectral line of H2O is chosen as the sensing transition for its strong absorption strength and being reasonably far away from its neighboring molecular transitions. In order to prevent interference absorption by ambient water vapor in the room air, a difference between the measured signal and the referenced signal is used to calculate the pressure and H2O concentration in the headspace of vials, eliminating the need for inert gas purges and calibration with known gas. The validation of the sensor is conducted in a static vial, yielding an accuracy of 1.23% for pressure and 3.81% for H2O concentration. The sensitivity of the sensor is estimated to be about 2.5 Torr for pressure and 400 ppm for H2O concentration over a 3 cm absorption path length respectively. Accurate measurements for commercial freeze-dried products demonstrate the in-line applications of the sensor for the pharmaceutical industry.

  16. DIFFUSE MOLECULAR CLOUD DENSITIES FROM UV MEASUREMENTS OF CO ABSORPTION

    SciTech Connect

    Goldsmith, Paul F.

    2013-09-10

    We use UV measurements of interstellar CO toward nearby stars to calculate the density in the diffuse molecular clouds containing the molecules responsible for the observed absorption. Chemical models and recent calculations of the excitation rate coefficients indicate that the regions in which CO is found have hydrogen predominantly in molecular form and that collisional excitation is by collisions with H{sub 2} molecules. We carry out statistical equilibrium calculations using CO-H{sub 2} collision rates to solve for the H{sub 2} density in the observed sources without including effects of radiative trapping. We have assumed kinetic temperatures of 50 K and 100 K, finding this choice to make relatively little difference to the lowest transition. For the sources having T{sup ex}{sub 10} only for which we could determine upper and lower density limits, we find (n(H{sub 2})) = 49 cm{sup -3}. While we can find a consistent density range for a good fraction of the sources having either two or three values of the excitation temperature, there is a suggestion that the higher-J transitions are sampling clouds or regions within diffuse molecular cloud material that have higher densities than the material sampled by the J = 1-0 transition. The assumed kinetic temperature and derived H{sub 2} density are anticorrelated when the J = 2-1 transition data, the J = 3-2 transition data, or both are included. For sources with either two or three values of the excitation temperature, we find average values of the midpoint of the density range that is consistent with all of the observations equal to 68 cm{sup -3} for T{sup k} = 100 K and 92 cm{sup -3} for T{sup k} = 50 K. The data for this set of sources imply that diffuse molecular clouds are characterized by an average thermal pressure between 4600 and 6800 K cm{sup -3}.

  17. Nocturnal Measurements of HONO by Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wojtal, P.; McLaren, R.

    2011-12-01

    Differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS) was used to quantify the concentration of HONO, NO2 and SO2 in the nocturnal urban atmosphere at York University over a period of one year. These measurements form a comprehensive HONO data set, including a large range of temperatures, relative humidity, surface conditions (snow, water, dry, etc.) and NO2 concentrations. Laboratory studies and observations within the nocturnal boundary layer reported in the literature suggest heterogeneous conversion of NO2 on surface adsorbed water as the major nighttime source of HONO. HONO formation and photolysis is believed to represent a major source term in the hydroxyl radical budget in polluted continental regions. Currently, most air quality models tend to significantly underpredict HONO, caused by the lack of understanding of HONO formation processes and the parameters that affect its concentration. Recently, we reported nocturnal pseudo steady states (PSS) of HONO in an aqueous marine environment and a conceptual model for HONO formation on aqueous surfaces was proposed. The data set collected at York University is being analyzed with a view towards further understanding the nighttime HONO formation mechanism and testing several hypotheses: 1) A HONO PSS can exist during certain times at night in an urban area in which the HONO concentration is independent of NO2, given the surface contains sufficient water coverage and is saturated with nitrogen containing precursors; 2) The concentration of HONO is positively correlated with temperature during periods where a PSS exists; 3) Different conversion efficiencies of NO2 to HONO exist on dry, wet and snow surfaces; 4) HONO formation has a NO2 order dependence between 0 and 2nd order, dependant on NO2 concentration, relative humidity, etc. The data set will be presented along with statistical analysis that sheds new light on the source of HONO in urban areas at night.

  18. Application of independent component analysis method in real-time spectral analysis of gaseous mixtures for acousto-optical spectrometers based on differential optical absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fadeyev, A. V.; Pozhar, V. E.

    2012-10-01

    It is discussed the reliability problem of time-optimized method for remote optical spectral analysis of gas-polluted ambient air. The method based on differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS) enables fragmentary spectrum registration (FSR) and is suitable for random-spectral-access (RSA) optical spectrometers like acousto-optical (AO) ones. Here, it is proposed the algorithm based on statistical method of independent component analysis (ICA) for estimation of a correctness of absorption spectral lines selection for FSR-method. Implementations of ICA method for RSA-based real-time adaptive systems are considered. Numerical simulations are presented with use of real spectra detected by the trace gas monitoring system GAOS based on AO spectrometer.

  19. Broadband spectroscopy with external cavity quantum cascade lasers beyond conventional absorption measurements.

    PubMed

    Lambrecht, Armin; Pfeifer, Marcel; Konz, Werner; Herbst, Johannes; Axtmann, Felix

    2014-05-01

    Laser spectroscopy is a powerful tool for analyzing small molecules, i.e. in the gas phase. In the mid-infrared spectral region quantum cascade lasers (QCLs) have been established as the most frequently used laser radiation source. Spectroscopy of larger molecules in the gas phase, of complex mixtures, and analysis in the liquid phase requires a broader tuning range and is thus still the domain of Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. However, the development of tunable external cavity (EC) QCLs is starting to change this situation. The main advantage of QCLs is their high spectral emission power that is enhanced by a factor of 10(4) compared with thermal light sources. Obviously, transmission measurements with EC-QCLs in strongly absorbing samples are feasible, which can hardly be measured by FTIR due to detector noise limitations. We show that the high power of EC-QCLs facilitates spectroscopy beyond simple absorption measurements. Starting from QCL experiments with liquid samples, we show results of fiber evanescent field analysis (FEFA) to detect pesticides in drinking water. FEFA is a special case of attenuated total reflection spectroscopy. Furthermore, powerful CW EC-QCLs enable fast vibrational circular dichroism (VCD) spectroscopy of chiral molecules in the liquid phase - a technique which is very time consuming with standard FTIR equipment. We present results obtained for the chiral compound 1,1'-bi-2-naphthol (BINOL). Finally, powerful CW EC-QCLs enable the application of laser photothermal emission spectroscopy (LPTES). We demonstrate this for a narrowband and broadband absorber in the gas phase. All three techniques have great potential for MIR process analytical applications. PMID:24367797

  20. Experimental recovery of intrinsic fluorescence and fluorophore concentration in the presence of hemoglobin: spectral effect of scattering and absorption on fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du Le, Vinh Nguyen; Patterson, Michael S.; Farrell, Thomas J.; Hayward, Joseph E.; Fang, Qiyin

    2015-12-01

    The ability to recover the intrinsic fluorescence of biological fluorophores is crucial to accurately identify the fluorophores and quantify their concentrations in the media. Although some studies have successfully retrieved the fluorescence spectral shape of known fluorophores, the techniques usually came with heavy computation costs and did not apply for strongly absorptive media, and the intrinsic fluorescence intensity and fluorophore concentration were not recovered. In this communication, an experimental approach was presented to recover intrinsic fluorescence and concentration of fluorescein in the presence of hemoglobin (Hb). The results indicated that the method was efficient in recovering the intrinsic fluorescence peak and fluorophore concentration with an error of 3% and 10%, respectively. The results also suggested that chromophores with irregular absorption spectra (e.g., Hb) have more profound effects on fluorescence spectral shape than chromophores with monotonic absorption and scattering spectra (e.g., black India ink and polystyrene microspheres).

  1. A reconsideration of spectral width measurements in PMSE with EISCAT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rapp, Markus; Hoppe, Ulf-Peter

    2006-01-01

    Motivated by recent progress in the understanding of PMSE we have reconsidered the relation between observed echo power and spectral widths. We have analyzed data obtained with the EISCAT VHF radar operating at a vertical resolution of 300 m and a time resolution of 2 s. Considering the spatial and temporal morphology of echo power, spectral width, and vertical velocity, we have identified a dominant anti-correlation between power and spectral width. This anti-correlation has formerly been interpreted as evidence against a turbulent creation mechanism for PMSE. Taking into account state of the art direct numerical simulations and their application to the interpretation of radar backscatter from the mesopause region, we find, however, that from theory we indeed expect to find the observed anti-correlation. The main reason for this is a clear spatial separation between the maxima of turbulent kinetic energy dissipation (i.e., velocity fluctuations determining the spectral width) and the thermal dissipation (i.e., the production of fluctuations in a tracer like the electron number density) associated with turbulence being due to both Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities and gravity wave breakdown (Fritts, D.C., Bizon, C., Werne, J., Meyer, C. Layering accompanying turbulence generation due to shear instability and gravity-wave breaking. J. Geophys. Res. 108(D8), 8452, doi:10.1029/2001JD002406, 2003). This means that the observed anti-correlation between radar echo power and spectral width does not rule out a turbulence-related creation mechanisms for PMSE. In fact, the observations are in full agreement with the best available direct numerical calculations of the related physical processes.

  2. Stratospheric measurements of continuous absorption near 2400 cm(-1).

    PubMed

    Rinsland, C P; Smith, M A; Russell Iii, J M; Park, J H; Farmer, C B

    1981-12-15

    Solar occultation spectra obtained with a balloon-borne interferometer have been used to study continuous absorption by N(2) and CO(2) near 2400 cm(-1) in the lower stratosphere. Synthetic continuum transmittances, calculated from published coefficients for far-wing absorption by CO(2) lines and for pressure-induced absorption by the fundamental band of N(2), are in fair agreement with the observed stratospheric values. The continuum close to the nu(3) R-branch band head of CO(2) is sensitive to the CO(2) far-wing line shape. Therefore, given highly accurate knowledge of the N(2) continuum from laboratory data, high-resolution stratospheric spectra provide a sensitive means for in situ testing of various air-broadened CO(2) line shapes at low temperatures. PMID:20372347

  3. Measurements of the Absorption by Auditorium SEATING—A Model Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    BARRON, M.; COLEMAN, S.

    2001-01-01

    One of several problems with seat absorption is that only small numbers of seats can be tested in standard reverberation chambers. One method proposed for reverberation chamber measurements involves extrapolation when the absorption coefficient results are applied to actual auditoria. Model seat measurements in an effectively large model reverberation chamber have allowed the validity of this extrapolation to be checked. The alternative barrier method for reverberation chamber measurements was also tested and the two methods were compared. The effect on the absorption of row-row spacing as well as absorption by small numbers of seating rows was also investigated with model seats.

  4. On the errors in measuring the particle density by the light absorption method

    SciTech Connect

    Ochkin, V. N.

    2015-04-15

    The accuracy of absorption measurements of the density of particles in a given quantum state as a function of the light absorption coefficient is analyzed. Errors caused by the finite accuracy in measuring the intensity of the light passing through a medium in the presence of different types of noise in the recorded signal are considered. Optimal values of the absorption coefficient and the factors capable of multiplying errors when deviating from these values are determined.

  5. Technical progress report: Completion of spectral rotating shadowband radiometers and analysis of atmospheric radiation measurement spectral shortwave data

    SciTech Connect

    Michalsky, J.; Harrison, L.

    1996-04-01

    Our goal in the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program is the improvement of radiation models used in general circulation models (GCMs), especially in the shortwave, (1) by providing improved shortwave radiometric measurements for the testing of models and (2) by developing methods for retrieving climatologically sensitive parameters that serve as input to shortwave and longwave models. At the Atmospheric Sciences Research Center (ASRC) in Albany, New York, we are acquiring downwelling direct and diffuse spectral irradiance, at six wavelengths, plus downwelling broadband longwave, and upwelling and downwelling broadband shortwave irradiances that we combine with National Weather Service surface and upper air data from the Albany airport as a test data set for ARM modelers. We have also developed algorithms to improve shortwave measurements made at the Southern Great Plains (SGP) ARM site by standard thermopile instruments and by the multifilter rotating shadowband radiometer (MFRSR) based on these Albany data sets. Much time has been spent developing techniques to retrieve column aerosol, water vapor, and ozone from the direct beam spectral measurements of the MFRSR. Additionally, we have had success in calculating shortwave surface albedo and aerosol optical depth from the ratio of direct to diffuse spectral reflectance.

  6. Measurements of the absorption cross section of (13)CHO(13)CHO at visible wavelengths and application to DOAS retrievals.

    PubMed

    Goss, Natasha R; Waxman, Eleanor M; Coburn, Sean C; Koenig, Theodore K; Thalman, Ryan; Dommen, Josef; Hannigan, James W; Tyndall, Geoffrey S; Volkamer, Rainer

    2015-05-14

    The trace gas glyoxal (CHOCHO) forms from the atmospheric oxidation of hydrocarbons and is a precursor to secondary organic aerosol. We have measured the absorption cross section of disubstituted (13)CHO(13)CHO ((13)C glyoxal) at moderately high (1 cm(-1)) optical resolution between 21 280 and 23 260 cm(-1) (430-470 nm). The isotopic shifts in the position of absorption features were found to be largest near 455 nm (Δν = 14 cm(-1); Δλ = 0.29 nm), whereas no significant shifts were observed near 440 nm (Δν < 0.5 cm(-1); Δλ < 0.01 nm). These shifts are used to investigate the selective detection of (12)C glyoxal (natural isotope abundance) and (13)C glyoxal by in situ cavity enhanced differential optical absorption spectroscopy (CE-DOAS) in a series of sensitivity tests using synthetic spectra, and laboratory measurements of mixtures containing (12)C and (13)C glyoxal, nitrogen dioxide, and other interfering absorbers. We find the changes in apparent spectral band shapes remain significant at the moderately high optical resolution typical of CE-DOAS (0.55 nm fwhm). CE-DOAS allows for the selective online detection of both isotopes with detection limits of ∼200 pptv (1 pptv = 10(-12) volume mixing ratio), and sensitivity toward total glyoxal of few pptv. The (13)C absorption cross section is available for download from the Supporting Information. PMID:25551419

  7. Recent advances in measurement of the water vapour continuum in the far-infrared spectral region.

    PubMed

    Green, Paul D; Newman, Stuart M; Beeby, Ralph J; Murray, Jonathan E; Pickering, Juliet C; Harries, John E

    2012-06-13

    We present a new derivation of the foreign-broadened water vapour continuum in the far-infrared (far-IR) pure rotation band between 24 μm and 120 μm (85-420 cm(-1)) from field data collected in flight campaigns of the Continuum Absorption by Visible and IR radiation and Atmospheric Relevance (CAVIAR) project with Imperial College's Tropospheric Airborne Fourier Transform Spectrometer (TAFTS) far-IR spectro-radiometer instrument onboard the Facility for Airborne Atmospheric Measurement (FAAM) BAe-146 research aircraft; and compare this new derivation with those recently published in the literature in this spectral band. This new dataset validates the current Mlawer-Tobin-Clough-Kneizys-Davies (MT-CKD) 2.5 model parametrization above 300 cm(-1), but indicates the need to strengthen the parametrization below 300 cm(-1), by up to 50 per cent at 100 cm(-1). Data recorded at a number of flight altitudes have allowed measurements within a wide range of column water vapour environments, greatly increasing the sensitivity of this analysis to the continuum strength. PMID:22547236

  8. Fiber laser based high-spectral resolution lidar for earth science measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Youming; Berkoff, Timothy; Kimpel, Frank; Storm, Mark; Hoff, Raymond; Gupta, Shantanu

    2013-03-01

    We present a special high spectral resolution lidar (HSRL) by using a novel tunable fiber based transmitter. The transmitter can produce 50μJ pulse energy at 1064nm and >25μJ pulse energy at 532nm with 10 kHz repetition rate, 5ns pulse width, respectively. A key advantage of the transmitter is the frequency-tunability. The laser can be tuned over the Iodine absorption lines from 1111 to 1104. The laser has a ~130MHz linewidth at 1064nm close to the transform limit linewidth ~ 88MHz for a pulse width of 5ns. Even though it was not frequency locked, the laser has very good frequency stability, which is on the order of ~200MHz over minutes. The beam quality M2 is less than 1.5. All the preliminary transmitter parameters meet the basic requirements of a HSRL. The transmitter was implemented in UMBC's lidar lab that includes a ceiling hatch to enable vertical propagation and viewing of transmitted laser beams into the atmosphere. The atmospheric measurement demonstrates good agreement of the signal to the model Rayleigh decay over the profile range with no significant deviations. Most importantly, these results show that the measurement successfully suppresses the Mie scattering from clouds while recovering the full molecular signal as expected.

  9. Convergence of oscillator spectral estimators for counted-frequency measurements.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tausworthe, R. C.

    1972-01-01

    A common intermediary connecting frequency-noise calibration or testing of an oscillator to useful applications is the spectral density of the frequency-deviating process. In attempting to turn test data into predicts of performance characteristics, one is naturally led to estimation of statistical values by sample-mean and sample-variance techniques. However, sample means and sample variances themselves are statistical quantities that do not necessarily converge (in the mean-square sense) to actual ensemble-average means and variances, except perhaps for excessively large sample sizes. This is especially true for the flicker noise component of oscillators. This article shows, for the various types of noises found in oscillators, how sample averages converge (or do not converge) to their statistical counterparts. The convergence rate is shown to be the same for all oscillators of a given spectral type.

  10. Spectral-Domain Measurements of Birefringence and Sensing Characteristics of a Side-Hole Microstructured Fiber

    PubMed Central

    Hlubina, Petr; Martynkien, Tadeusz; Olszewski, Jacek; Mergo, Pawel; Makara, Mariusz; Poturaj, Krzysztof; Urbańczyk, Waclaw

    2013-01-01

    We experimentally characterized a birefringent side-hole microstructured fiber in the visible wavelength region. The spectral dependence of the group and phase modal birefringence was measured using the methods of spectral interferometry. The phase modal birefringence of the investigated fiber increases with wavelength, but its positive sign is opposite to the sign of the group modal birefringence. We also measured the sensing characteristics of the fiber using a method of tandem spectral interferometry. Spectral interferograms corresponding to different values of a physical parameter were processed to retrieve the spectral phase functions and to determine the spectral dependence of polarimetric sensitivity to strain, temperature and hydrostatic pressure. A negative sign of the polarimetric sensitivity was deduced from the simulation results utilizing the known modal birefringence dispersion of the fiber. Our experimental results show that the investigated fiber has a very high polarimetric sensitivity to hydrostatic pressure, reaching −200 rad × MPa−1× m−1 at 750 nm. PMID:23989824

  11. Airborne Laser Absorption Spectrometer Measurements of CO2 Column Mixing Ratios: Source and Sink Detection in the Atmospheric Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menzies, Robert T.; Spiers, Gary D.; Jacob, Joseph C.

    2016-06-01

    The JPL airborne Laser Absorption Spectrometer instrument has been flown several times in the 2007-2011 time frame for the purpose of measuring CO2 mixing ratios in the lower atmosphere. The four most recent flight campaigns were on the NASA DC-8 research aircraft, in support of the NASA ASCENDS (Active Sensing of CO2 Emissions over Nights, Days, and Seasons) mission formulation studies. This instrument operates in the 2.05-μm spectral region. The Integrated Path Differential Absorption (IPDA) method is used to retrieve weighted CO2 column mixing ratios. We present key features of the CO2LAS signal processing, data analysis, and the calibration/validation methodology. Results from flights in various U.S. locations during the past three years include observed mid-day CO2 drawdown in the Midwest, also cases of point-source and regional plume detection that enable the calculation of emission rates.

  12. Multi-wavelength measurements of aerosol optical absorption coefficients using a photoacoustic spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Qiang; Huang, Hong-Hua; Wang, Yao; Wang, Gui-Shi; Cao, Zhen-Song; Liu, Kun; Chen, Wei-Dong; Gao, Xiao-Ming

    2014-06-01

    The atmospheric aerosol absorption capacity is a critical parameter determining its direct and indirect effects on climate. Accurate measurement is highly desired for the study of the radiative budget of the Earth. A multi-wavelength (405 nm, 532 nm, 780 nm) aerosol absorption meter based on photoacoustic spectroscopy (PAS) invovling a single cylindrical acoustic resonator is developed for measuring the aerosol optical absorption coefficients (OACs). A sensitivity of 1.3 Mm-1 (at 532 nm) is demonstrated. The aerosol absorption meter is successfully tested through measuring the OACs of atmospheric nigrosin and ambient aerosols in the suburbs of Hefei city. The absorption cross section and absorption Ångström exponent (AAE) for ambient aerosol are determined for characterizing the component of the ambient aerosol.

  13. Airborne Measurements of CO2 Column Absorption and Range Using a Pulsed Direct-Detection Integrated Path Differential Absorption Lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abshire, James B.; Riris, Haris; Weaver, Clark J.; Mao, Jianping; Allan, Graham R.; Hasselbrack, William E.; Browell, Edward V.

    2013-01-01

    We report on airborne CO2 column absorption measurements made in 2009 with a pulsed direct-detection lidar operating at 1572.33 nm and utilizing the integrated path differential absorption technique. We demonstrated these at different altitudes from an aircraft in July and August in flights over four locations in the central and eastern United States. The results show clear CO2 line shape and absorption signals, which follow the expected changes with aircraft altitude from 3 to 13 km. The lidar measurement statistics were also calculated for each flight as a function of altitude. The optical depth varied nearly linearly with altitude, consistent with calculations based on atmospheric models. The scatter in the optical depth measurements varied with aircraft altitude as expected, and the median measurement precisions for the column varied from 0.9 to 1.2 ppm. The altitude range with the lowest scatter was 810 km, and the majority of measurements for the column within it had precisions between 0.2 and 0.9 ppm.

  14. Study on the key technology of spectral reflectance reconstruction based on the weighted measurement matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leihong, Zhang; Bei, Li; Dong, Liang; Xiuhua, Ma

    2016-07-01

    In order to reconstruct the spectral reflectance accurately, a new method of spectral reflectance reconstruction based on the weighted measurement matrix is proposed in this paper. By optimizing the measurement matrix between spectral reflectance and the response of a camera, the method can improve the reconstruction accuracy. The new method is a combination of three kinds of common reflectance reconstruction methods, which are the pseudo inverse method, the Wiener estimation method and the principal component analysis method. The new measurement matrix can be achieved after weighting the measurement matrices of these three methods to reconstruct the spectral reflectance. What is more, the weights of the three methods can be obtained by minimizing the color difference. Results show that the CIE1976 color difference and RMSE value of the weighted reconstructed spectra are less than that of three common reconstruction methods. The spectral matching accuracy GFC of the method is higher than 0.99 and its reconstruction accuracy is high.

  15. Autocorrelation measurement of femtosecond laser pulses based on two-photon absorption in GaP photodiode

    SciTech Connect

    Chong, E. Z.; Watson, T. F.; Festy, F.

    2014-08-11

    Semiconductor materials which exhibit two-photon absorption characteristic within a spectral region of interest can be useful in building an ultra-compact interferometric autocorrelator. In this paper, we report on the evidence of a nonlinear absorption process in GaP photodiodes which was exploited to measure the temporal profile of femtosecond Ti:sapphire laser pulses with a tunable peak wavelength above 680 nm. The two-photon mediated conductivity measurements were performed at an average laser power of less than a few tenths of milliwatts. Its suitability as a single detector in a broadband autocorrelator setup was assessed by investigating the nonlinear spectral sensitivity bandwidth of a GaP photodiode. The highly favourable nonlinear response was found to cover the entire tuning range of our Ti:sapphire laser and can potentially be extended to wavelengths below 680 nm. We also demonstrated the flexibility of GaP in determining the optimum compensation value of the group delay dispersion required to restore the positively chirped pulses inherent in our experimental optical system to the shortest pulse width possible. With the rise in the popularity of nonlinear microscopy, the broad two-photon response of GaP and the simplicity of this technique can provide an alternative way of measuring the excitation laser pulse duration at the focal point of any microscopy systems.

  16. Measuring the Spectral Expression of Carbon Dioxide in the Solar Reflected Spectrum with AVIRIS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, Robert O.

    2001-01-01

    Carbon dioxide is a low-concentration, but important, component of the Earth's atmosphere. This gas absorbs electromagnetic radiation (EMR) in several regions of the spectrum. Absorption of energy by carbon dioxide adds heat to the atmosphere. In the world today, the burning of fossil fuels and other anthropogenic processes adds carbon dioxide to the atmosphere. Other natural processes in the Earth's system both add and remove carbon dioxide. Overall, measurements of atmospheric carbon dioxide at selected sites around the globe show an increased carbon dioxide concentration in the atmosphere. A figure shows the measured carbon dioxide from Mauna Loa, Hawaii, from 1958 to 2000. Overall, the concentration has increased from 315 to 365 ppm at this site over this period. (There is also a yearly cycle to the concentration that is timed with and hypothesized to be related to the vegetation growing season in the Northern Hemisphere.) The overall expected effect of this increase of atmospheric carbon dioxide is trapping of heat in the atmosphere and global warming. While this overall relationship between carbon dioxide and global warming seems straightforward, many of the specific details relating to regional and local sources and sinks and gradients of carbon dioxide are not well understood. A remote sensing capability to measure carbon dioxide could provide important inputs for scientific research to better understand the distribution and change in atmospheric carbon dioxide at detailed spatial and temporal levels. In pursuit of this remote sensing of carbon dioxide objective, this paper analyzes the expression of carbon dioxide in the spectral range measured by the Airborne Visible/Infrared Imagery Spectrometer (AVIRIS). Based on these analyses, a spectral-fitting algorithm that uses AVIRIS measured spectra and MODTRAN radiative-transfer code modeled spectra to derive total column carbon dioxide abundance has been developed. This algorithm has been applied to an AVIRIS

  17. [Ammonia gas concentration and velocity measurement using tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy and optical signal cross-correlation method].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chun-Xiao; Wang, Fei; Li, Ning; Yan, Jian-Hua; Chi, Yong; Cen, Ke-Fa

    2009-10-01

    Simultaneous online measurement of gas concentration and velocity can be realized by tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (TDLAS) technique and optical signal cross-correlation method. The fundamental and relative factors of gas concentration and velocity measurement are described in the present paper. The spectral lines of NH3 used for gas sensing at communication band in near infrared range were selected and analyzed by the calculation based on the HITRAN database. In the verification experiment, NH3 and N2 were mixed by two mass flow meters and sent to flow through the quartz tube 0. 016 m in inner diameter and 1 m in length at normal temperature and pressure. The spectral line located at 6,548.7 cm(-1) was scanned at high frequency by the diode laser of 15 MHz linewidth and 1 cm' tunable range with no mode hoppings. The instantaneous NH3 absorbance was obtained using direct absorption method and the gas concentration was calculated. At the same time, the non-intrusive optical absorption signal cross-correlation method was utilized to obtain two concentration signals from two adjacent detectors mounted along the gas tube. The corresponding transit time of gas passing through the detectors was calculated by cross-correlation algorithm, and the average gas velocity was inferred according to the distance between the two detectors and the transit time. The relative errors were less than 7% for the gas concentration measurement, and less than 10% for the gas velocity measurement. Experimental results were proved to be of high precision and good repeatability in the lab. The feature of fast response and capacity immune to the in situ disturbance would lead to a potential in industry application for the real time measurement and control of gas pollutant emission in the future. PMID:20038016

  18. Biomass Burning Aerosol Absorption Measurements with MODIS Using the Critical Reflectance Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Li; Martins, Vanderlei J.; Remer, Lorraine A.

    2010-01-01

    This research uses the critical reflectance technique, a space-based remote sensing method, to measure the spatial distribution of aerosol absorption properties over land. Choosing two regions dominated by biomass burning aerosols, a series of sensitivity studies were undertaken to analyze the potential limitations of this method for the type of aerosol to be encountered in the selected study areas, and to show that the retrieved results are relatively insensitive to uncertainties in the assumptions used in the retrieval of smoke aerosol. The critical reflectance technique is then applied to Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MODIS) data to retrieve the spectral aerosol single scattering albedo (SSA) in South African and South American 35 biomass burning events. The retrieved results were validated with collocated Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) retrievals. One standard deviation of mean MODIS retrievals match AERONET products to within 0.03, the magnitude of the AERONET uncertainty. The overlap of the two retrievals increases to 88%, allowing for measurement variance in the MODIS retrievals as well. The ensemble average of MODIS-derived SSA for the Amazon forest station is 0.92 at 670 nm, and 0.84-0.89 for the southern African savanna stations. The critical reflectance technique allows evaluation of the spatial variability of SSA, and shows that SSA in South America exhibits higher spatial variation than in South Africa. The accuracy of the retrieved aerosol SSA from MODIS data indicates that this product can help to better understand 44 how aerosols affect the regional and global climate.

  19. Spectral emissivity measurements of land-surface materials and related radiative transfer simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wan, Z.; Ng, D.; Dozier, J.

    1994-01-01

    Spectral radiance measurements have been made in the laboratory and in the field for deriving spectral emissivities of some land cover samples with a spectroradiometer and an auxiliary radiation source in the wavelength range 2.5-14.5 micrometers. A easy and quick four-step method (four steps to measure the sample and a diffuse reflecting plate surface under sunshine and shadowing conditions, respectively) has been used for simultaneous determination of surface temperature and emissivity. We emphasized in-situ measurements in combination with radiative transfer simulations, and an error analysis for basic assumptions in deriving spectral emissivity of land-surface samples from thermal infrared measurements.

  20. Measurement of the absorption coefficient of acoustical materials using the sound intensity method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atwal, Mahabir S.; Crocker, Malcolm J.

    1987-01-01

    In this study the possibility of using the two-microphone sound intensity technique to measure the normal incidence and the random incidence sound absorption coefficient was investigated. The normal incidence absorption coefficient was determined by measuring the intensity incidence on the sample and the intensity reflected by the sample placed in an anechoic chamber. The random incidence absorption coefficient was determined by measuring the intensity incident on the sample and the intensity reflected by the sample placed in a reverberation chamber. Absorption coefficient results obtained by the sound intensity technique were compared with standard techniques, namely the reverberation chamber and the standing wave tube. The major advantages of using the sound intensity technique are that it permits 'in situ' measurements and the absorption coefficient for a large range of frequencies can be obtained from a single measurement.

  1. Potential of optical spectral transmission measurements for joint inflammation measurements in rheumatoid arthritis patients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meier, A. J. Louise; Rensen, Wouter H. J.; de Bokx, Pieter K.; de Nijs, Ron N. J.

    2012-08-01

    Frequent monitoring of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients enables timely treatment adjustments and improved outcomes. Currently this is not feasible due to a shortage of rheumatologists. An optical spectral transmission device is presented for objective assessment of joint inflammation in RA patients, while improving diagnostic accuracy and clinical workflow. A cross-sectional, nonrandomized observational study was performed with this device. In the study, 77 proximal interphalangeal (PIP) joints in 67 patients have been analyzed. Inflammation of these PIP joints was also assessed by a rheumatologist with a score varying from 1 (not inflamed) to 5 (severely inflamed). Out of 77 measurements, 27 were performed in moderate to strongly inflamed PIP joints. Comparison between the clinical assessment and an optical measurement showed a correlation coefficient r=0.63, p<0.001, 95% CI [0.47, 0.75], and a ROC curve (AUC=0.88) that shows a relative good specificity and sensitivity. Optical spectral transmission measurements in a single joint correlate with clinical assessment of joint inflammation, and therefore might be useful in monitoring joint inflammation in RA patients.

  2. Assessing soybean leaf area and leaf biomass by spectral measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holben, B. N.; Tucker, C. J.; Fan, C. J.

    1979-01-01

    Red and photographic infrared spectral radiances were correlated with soybean total leaf area index, green leaf area index, chlorotic leaf area index, green leaf biomass, chlorotic leaf biomass, and total biomass. The most significant correlations were found to exist between the IR/red radiance ratio data and green leaf area index and/or green leaf biomass (r squared equals 0.85 and 0.86, respectively). These findings demonstrate that remote sensing data can supply information basic to soybean canopy growth, development, and status by nondestructive determination of the green leaf area or green leaf biomass.

  3. An analytical approach for treating background in spectral analysis measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Ian; Holmes, Thomas W.; Gardner, Robin P.

    2015-11-01

    A method of determining the spectral shape of background radiation present in experimental spectra via a mathematical approach is presented. Elements of interest will be subtracted from an experimental spectrum using the linear correlation coefficient across a characteristic peak to determine their contribution. Once all elements of interest are removed, the remainder of the experimental spectrum should represent an approximation of the background. This approximation can then be used in conjunction with library least-squares to determine the background and elemental contributions to the unknown spectrum.

  4. Jeffries Matusita based mixed-measure for improved spectral matching in hyperspectral image analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padma, S.; Sanjeevi, S.

    2014-10-01

    This paper proposes a novel hyperspectral matching technique by integrating the Jeffries-Matusita measure (JM) and the Spectral Angle Mapper (SAM) algorithm. The deterministic Spectral Angle Mapper and stochastic Jeffries-Matusita measure are orthogonally projected using the sine and tangent functions to increase their spectral ability. The developed JM-SAM algorithm is implemented in effectively discriminating the landcover classes and cover types in the hyperspectral images acquired by PROBA/CHRIS and EO-1 Hyperion sensors. The reference spectra for different land-cover classes were derived from each of these images. The performance of the proposed measure is compared with the performance of the individual SAM and JM approaches. From the values of the relative spectral discriminatory probability (RSDPB) and relative discriminatory entropy value (RSDE), it is inferred that the hybrid JM-SAM approach results in a high spectral discriminability than the SAM and JM measures. Besides, the use of the improved JM-SAM algorithm for supervised classification of the images results in 92.9% and 91.47% accuracy compared to 73.13%, 79.41%, and 85.69% of minimum-distance, SAM and JM measures. It is also inferred that the increased spectral discriminability of JM-SAM measure is contributed by the JM distance. Further, it is seen that the proposed JM-SAM measure is compatible with varying spectral resolutions of PROBA/CHRIS (62 bands) and Hyperion (242 bands).

  5. Spectral Measurement of Watershed Coefficients in the Southern Great Plains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blanchard, B. J. (Principal Investigator); Bausch, W.

    1978-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. It was apparent that the spectra calibration of runoff curve numbers cannot be achieved on watersheds where significant areas of timber were within the drainage area. The absorption of light by wet soil conditions restricts differentiation of watersheds with regard to watershed runoff curve numbers. It appeared that the predominant factor influencing the classification of watershed runoff curve numbers was the difference in soil color and its associated reflectance when dry. In regions where vegetation grown throughout the year, where wet surface conditions prevail or where watersheds are timbered, there is little hope of classifying runoff potential with visible light alone.

  6. Measurement of the absorption coefficient using the sound-intensity technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atwal, M.; Bernhard, R.

    1984-01-01

    The possibility of using the sound intensity technique to measure the absorption coefficient of a material is investigated. This technique measures the absorption coefficient by measuring the intensity incident on the sample and the net intensity reflected by the sample. Results obtained by this technique are compared with the standard techniques of measuring the change in the reverberation time and the standing wave ratio in a tube, thereby, calculating the random incident and the normal incident adsorption coefficient.

  7. MTF formalism for measurement of spectral resolution of acousto-optical devices with synthesized transmission function.

    PubMed

    Yushkov, Konstantin B; Molchanov, Vladimir Ya

    2013-09-15

    We demonstrate use of the modulation transfer function method in the spectral domain for dynamic measurement of the spectral resolution and modulation contrast of acousto-optic light dispersive delay lines and programmable filters with synthesized transmission. The method is useful for performance characterization of acousto-optic devices for ultrafast pulse shaping and adaptive spectroscopy. PMID:24104818

  8. Preliminary measurements of spectral signatures of tropical and temperate plants in the thermal infrared

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salisbury, John W.; Milton, N. M.

    1987-01-01

    Spectral reflectance measurements of seven tropical species and six deciduous species were carried out in thermal infrared to establish the species-dependent spectral characteristics and to investigate the effect on spectral signatures of environmental variables, such as leaf maturity, drought, and metal stress. Seasonal variations of spectral signatures occurred between spring and summer leaves, but such variations were minimal during summer and early fall. Overall reflectance of senescent leaves was higher than that of young leaves, as was the reflectance of leaves from trees growing in metal-enriched soils, as compared with leaves from the control area. However, the characteristic spectral features were not changed in either case. It was also found that water stress did not have any effect on the infrared signatures: trees grown during a drought season maintained their characteristic spectral signatures.

  9. Optical absorption and scattering properties of bulk porcine muscle phantoms from interstitial radiance measurements in 650-900 nm range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grabtchak, Serge; Montgomery, Logan G.; Whelan, William M.

    2014-05-01

    We demonstrated the application of relative radiance-based continuous wave (cw) measurements for recovering absorption and scattering properties (the effective attenuation coefficient, the diffusion coefficient, the absorption coefficient and the reduced scattering coefficient) of bulk porcine muscle phantoms in the 650-900 nm spectral range. Both the side-firing fiber (the detector) and the fiber with a spherical diffuser at the end (the source) were inserted interstitially at predetermined locations in the phantom. The porcine phantoms were prostate-shaped with ˜4 cm in diameter and ˜3 cm thickness and made from porcine loin or tenderloin muscles. The described method was previously validated using the diffusion approximation on simulated and experimental radiance data obtained for homogenous Intralipid-1% liquid phantom. The approach required performing measurements in two locations in the tissue with different distances to the source. Measurements were performed on 21 porcine phantoms. Spectral dependences of the effective attenuation and absorption coefficients for the loin phantom deviated from corresponding dependences for the tenderloin phantom for wavelengths <750 nm. The diffusion constant and the reduced scattering coefficient were very close for both phantom types. To quantify chromophore presence, the plot for the absorption coefficient was matched with a synthetic absorption spectrum constructed from deoxyhemoglobin, oxyhemoglobin and water. The closest match for the porcine loin spectrum was obtained with the following concentrations: 15.5 µM (±30% s.d.) Hb, 21 µM (±30% s.d.) HbO2 and 0.3 (±30% s.d.) fractional volume of water. The tenderloin absorption spectrum was best described by 30 µM Hb (±30% s.d), 19 µM (±30% s.d.) HbO2 and 0.3 (±30% s.d.) fractional volume of water. The higher concentration of Hb in tenderloin was consistent with a dark-red appearance of the tenderloin phantom. The method can be applied to a number of biological

  10. High-resolution absorption spectroscopy of photoionized silicon plasma, a step toward measuring the efficiency of Resonant Auger Destruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loisel, Guillaume; Bailey, James; Hansen, Stephanie; Nagayama, Taisuke; Rochau, Gregory; Liedhal, Duane; Mancini, Roberto

    2013-10-01

    A remarkable opportunity to observe matter in a regime where the effects of General Relativity are significant has arisen through measurements of strongly red-shifted iron x-ray lines emitted from black hole accretion disks. A major uncertainty in the spectral formation models is the efficiency of Resonant Auger Destruction (RAD), in which fluorescent K α photons are resonantly absorbed by neighbor ions. The absorbing ion preferentially decays by Auger ionization, thus reducing the emerging K α intensity. If K α lines from L-shell ions are not observed in iron spectral emission, why are such lines observed from silicon plasma surrounding other accretion powered objects? To help answer this question, we are investigating photoionized silicon plasmas produced using intense x-rays from the Z facility. The incident spectral irradiance is determined with time-resolved absolute power measurements, multiple monochromatic gated images, and a 3-D view factor model. The charge state distribution, electron temperature, and electron density are determined using space-resolved backlit absorption spectroscopy. The measurements constrain photoionized plasma models and set the stage for future emission spectroscopy directly investigating the RAD process. Sandia is a multi-program laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, for the United States Department of Energy under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  11. Spectral resolution measurement of an x-ray imaging crystal spectrometer for KSTAR.

    PubMed

    Lee, S G; Bak, J G; Nam, U W; Moon, M K; Cheon, J K; Bitter, M; Hill, K

    2008-10-01

    A spectral resolution measurement of the x-ray imaging crystal spectrometer for the Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research machine utilizing a segmented position-sensitive detector and time-to-digital converter based delay-line readout electronics was performed by using an x-ray tube in a laboratory. The measured spectral resolution is about 12,600, which means the actual energy resolution is 0.32 eV for the x-ray tube's bremsstrahlung peak energy of 4 keV. The results from the spectral resolution measurement are described. PMID:19044479

  12. Spectral resolution measurement of an x-ray imaging crystal spectrometer for KSTAR

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S. G.; Bak, J. G.; Nam, U. W.; Moon, M. K.; Cheon, J. K.; Bitter, M.; Hill, K.

    2008-10-15

    A spectral resolution measurement of the x-ray imaging crystal spectrometer for the Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research machine utilizing a segmented position-sensitive detector and time-to-digital converter based delay-line readout electronics was performed by using an x-ray tube in a laboratory. The measured spectral resolution is about 12 600, which means the actual energy resolution is 0.32 eV for the x-ray tube's bremsstrahlung peak energy of 4 keV. The results from the spectral resolution measurement are described.

  13. Solar Absorption in Cloudy Atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harshvardhan; Ridgway, William; Ramaswamy, V.; Freidenreich, S. M.; Batey, Michael

    1996-01-01

    The theoretical computations used to compute spectral absorption of solar radiation are discussed. Radiative properties relevant to the cloud absorption problem are presented and placed in the context of radiative forcing. Implications for future measuring programs and the effect of horizontal inhomogeneities are discussed.

  14. Pseudopotential calculations and photothermal lensing measurements of two-photon absorption in solids

    SciTech Connect

    White, W.T. III

    1985-11-04

    We have studied two-photon absorption in solids theoretically and experimentally. We have shown that it is possible to use accurate band structure techniques to compute two-photon absorption spectra within 15% of measured values in a wide band-gap material, ZnS. The empirical pseudopotential technique that we used is significantly more accurate than previous models of two-photon absorption in zinc blende materials, including present tunneling theories (which are essentially parabolic-band results in disguise) and the nonparabolic-band formalism of Pidgeon et al. and Weiler. The agreement between our predictions and previous measurements allowed us to use ZnS as a reference material in order to validate a technique for measuring two-photon absorption that was previously untried in solids, pulsed dual-beam thermal lensing. With the validated technique, we examined nonlinear absorption in one other crystal (rutile) and in several glasses, including silicates, borosilicates, and one phosphate glass. Initially, we believed that the absorption edges of all the materials were comparable; however, subsequent evidence suggested that the effective band-gap energies of the glasses were above the energy of two photons in our measurement. Therefore, we attribute the nonlinear absorption that we observed in glasses to impurities or defects. The measured nonlinear absorption coefficients were of the order of a few cm/TW in the glasses and of the order of 10 cm/GW in the crystals, four orders of magnitude higher than in glasses. 292 refs.

  15. Spectral Measures Associated to Rank two Lie Groups and Finite Subgroups of {GL(2,{Z})}

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, David E.; Pugh, Mathew

    2016-05-01

    Spectral measures for fundamental representations of the rank two Lie groups SU(3), Sp(2) and G 2 have been studied. Since these groups have rank two, these spectral measures can be defined as measures over their maximal torus {{T}^2} and are invariant under an action of the corresponding Weyl group, which is a subgroup of {GL(2,{Z})}. Here we consider spectral measures invariant under an action of the other finite subgroups of {GL(2,{Z})}. These spectral measures are all associated with fundamental representations of other rank two Lie groups, namely {{T}^2=U(1) × U(1)}, {U(1) × SU(2)}, U(2), {SU(2) × SU(2)}, SO(4) and PSU(3).

  16. Preparation and Absorption Spectral Property of a Multifunctional Water-Soluble Azo Compound with D-π-A Structure, 4-(4- Hydroxy-1-Naphthylazo)Benzoic Acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, L.; Lv, H.; Xie, C. G.; Chang, W. G.; Yan, Z. Q.

    2015-07-01

    A multifunctional water-soluble azo dye with the D-π-A conjugated structure, 4-(4-hydroxy-1-naphthylazo) benzoic acid ( HNBA), was designed and synthesized using 1-naphanol as the electron donator, benzoic acid as the electron acceptor, and -N=N- as the bridging group. After its structure was characterized by FTIR, 1H NMR, and element analysis, the UV-Vis absorption spectral performance of the target dye was studied in detail. The results showed that the dye, combining hydroxyl group, azo group, and carboxyl group, possessed excellent absorption spectral properties (ɛ = 1.2·104 l·mol-1·cm-1) changing with pH and solvents. In particular, in polar and protonic water, it had excellent optical response to some metal ions, i.e., Fe3+ and Pb2+, which might make it a latent colorimetric sensor for detecting heavy metal ions.

  17. Retrieving the availability of light in the ocean utilising spectral signatures of Vibrational Raman Scattering in hyper-spectral satellite measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dinter, T.; Rozanov, V. V.; Burrows, J. P.; Bracher, A.

    2015-01-01

    The availability of light in the ocean is an important parameter for the determination of phytoplankton photosynthesis processes and primary production from satellite data. It is also a useful parameter for other applications, e.g. the determination of heat fluxes. In this study, a method was developed utilising the vibrational Raman scattering (VRS) effect of water molecules to determine the amount of photons available in the ocean water, which is expressed by the depth integrated scalar irradiance E0. Radiative transfer simulations with the fully coupled ocean-atmosphere Radiative Transfer Model (RTM) SCIATRAN show clearly the relationship of E0 to the strength of the VRS signal measured at the top of the atmosphere (TOA). Taking advantage of VRS structures in hyper-spectral satellite measurements a retrieval technique to derive E0 in the wavelength region from 390 to 444.5 nm was developed. This approach uses the Weighting Function Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (WF-DOAS) technique, applied to TOA radiances, measured by the Scanning Imaging Absorption Spectrometer for Atmospheric Chartography (SCIAMACHY). Based on the approach of Vountas et al. (2007), where the DOAS method was used to fit modelled spectra of VRS, the method was improved by using the weighting function of VRS (VRS-WF) in the DOAS fit. This was combined with a look-up table (LUT) technique, where the E0 value was obtained for each VRS satellite fit directly. The VRS-WF and the LUT were derived from calculations with the RTM SCIATRAN (Rozanov et al., 2014). RTM simulations for different chlorophyll a concentrations and illumination conditions clearly show, that low fit factors of VRS retrieval results correspond to low amounts of light in the water column and vice versa. Exemplary, one month of SCIAMACHY data were processed and

  18. Retrieving the availability of light in the ocean utilising spectral signatures of vibrational Raman scattering in hyper-spectral satellite measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dinter, T.; Rozanov, V. V.; Burrows, J. P.; Bracher, A.

    2015-05-01

    The availability of light in the ocean is an important parameter for the determination of phytoplankton photosynthesis processes and primary production from satellite data. It is also a useful parameter for other applications, e.g. the determination of heat fluxes. In this study, a method was developed utilising the vibrational Raman scattering (VRS) effect of water molecules to determine the number of photons available in the ocean water, which is expressed by the depth integrated scalar irradiance E0. Radiative transfer simulations with the SCIATRAN fully coupled ocean-atmosphere radiative transfer model (RTM) show clearly the relationship of E0 with the strength of the VRS signal measured at the top of the atmosphere (TOA). Taking advantage of VRS structures in hyper-spectral satellite measurements, a retrieval technique to derive E0 in the wavelength region from 390 to 444.5 nm was developed. This approach uses the weighting function differential optical absorption spectroscopy (WF-DOAS) technique, applied to TOA radiances, measured by the Scanning Imaging Absorption Spectrometer for Atmospheric Chartography (SCIAMACHY). Based on the approach of Vountas et al. (2007), where the DOAS method was used to fit modelled spectra of VRS, the method was improved by using the weighting function of VRS (VRS-WF) in the DOAS fit. This was combined with a look-up table (LUT) technique, where the E0 value was obtained for each VRS satellite fit directly. The VRS-WF and the LUT were derived from calculations with the SCIATRAN RTM (Rozanov et al., 2014). RTM simulations for different chlorophyll a concentrations and illumination conditions clearly show that low fit factors of VRS retrieval results correspond to low amounts of light in the water column and vice versa. Exemplarily, 1 month of SCIAMACHY data were processed and a global map of the depth integrated scalar irradiance E0 was retrieved. Spectral structures of VRS were clearly identified in the radiance measurements of

  19. Note: Near infrared spectral and transient measurements of PbS quantum dots luminescence

    SciTech Connect

    Parfenov, P. S. Litvin, A. P. Ushakova, E. V.; Fedorov, A. V.; Baranov, A. V.; Berwick, K.

    2013-11-15

    We describe an experimental setup for the characterization of luminescence from nanostructures. The setup is intended for steady-state and time-resolved luminescence measurements in the near-infrared region. The setup allows us to study spectral luminescence properties in the spectral range of 0.8–2.0 μm with high spectral resolution and kinetic luminescence properties between 0.8 and 1.7 μm with a time resolution of 3 ns. The capabilities of the system are illustrated by taking luminescence measurements from PbS quantum dots. We established the size dependencies of the optical properties of the PbS quantum dots over a wide spectral range. Finally, the energy transfer process was studied with a high temporal and spectral resolution.

  20. Spectral correlation measurements at the Hong-Ou-Mandel interference dip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerrits, T.; Marsili, F.; Verma, V. B.; Shalm, L. K.; Shaw, M.; Mirin, R. P.; Nam, S. W.

    2015-01-01

    We present an efficient tool capable of measuring the spectral correlations between photons emerging from a Hong-Ou-Mandel interferometer. We show that for our spectrally factorizable spontaneous down-conversion source, the Hong-Ou-Mandel interference visibility decreases as the photons' frequency spread is increased to a maximum of 165 nm. Unfiltered, we obtained a visibility of 92.0 %±0.2 %. The maximum visibility was 97 %±0.2 % after applying filtering. We show that the tool can be useful for the study of spectral correlations that impair high-visibility and high-fidelity multisource interference applications. The nature of this tool also allows for arbitrary post-selective spectral filtering and high-rate multiphoton spectral correlation measurements.

  1. Direct measurements of nonlinear absorption and refraction in solutions of phthalocyanines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wei, T. H.; Hagan, D. J.; Sence, M. J.; Van Stryland, E. W.; Perry, J. W.; Coulter, D. R.

    1992-01-01

    Direct measurements are reported of the excited singlet-state absorption cross section and the associated nonlinear refractive cross section using picosecond pulses at 532 nm in solutions of phthalocyanine and naphthalocyanine dyes. By monitoring the transmittance and far-field spatial beam distortion for different pulsewidths in the picosecond regime, it is shown that both the nonlinear absorption and refraction are fluence (energy-per-unit-area) rather than irradiance dependent. Thus, excited-state absorption is the dominant nonlinear absorption process, and the observed nonlinear refraction is also due to real population excitation.

  2. FTIR spectrometer with 30 m optical cell and its applications to the sensitive measurements of selective and nonselective absorption spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ponomarev, Yu. N.; Solodov, A. A.; Solodov, A. M.; Petrova, T. M.; Naumenko, O. V.

    2016-07-01

    A description of the spectroscopic complex at V.E. Zuev Institute of Atmospheric Optics, SB RAS, operating in a wide spectral range with high threshold sensitivity to the absorption coefficient is presented. Measurements of weak lines and nonselective spectra of CO2 and H2O were performed based on the built setup. As new application of this setup, positions and intensities of 152 weak lines of H2O were measured between 2400 and 2560 cm-1 with threshold sensitivity of 8.6×10-10 cm-1, and compared with available calculated and experimental data. Essential deviations between the new intensity measurements and calculated data accepted in HITRAN 2012 and GEISA 2015 forthcoming release are found.

  3. Spectral properties of agricultural crops and soils measured from space, aerial, field, and laboratory sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauer, M. E. (Principal Investigator); Vanderbilt, V. C.; Robinson, B. F.; Daughtry, C. S. T.

    1981-01-01

    Investigations of the multispectral reflectance characteristics of crops and soils as measured from laboratory, field, aerial, and satellite sensor systems are reviewed. The relationships of important biological and physical characteristics to the spectral properties of crops and soils are addressed.

  4. Raman Gain Coefficient of Barium Nitrate Measured for the Spectral Region of TI:SAPPHIRE Laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lisinetskii, V. A.; Mishkel', I. I.; Chulkov, R. V.; Grabtchikov, A. S.; Apanasevich, P. A.; Eichler, H.-J.; Orlovich, V. A.

    We report the measurements of the Raman gain coefficient for a barium nitrate crystal in the spectral region of a Ti:Sapphire laser using Raman amplification. The experimentally-obtained data are well described by the known empirical formula.

  5. Spectral measurements in critical assemblies: MCNP specifications and calculated results

    SciTech Connect

    Stephanie C. Frankle; Judith F. Briesmeister

    1999-12-01

    Recently, a suite of 86 criticality benchmarks for the Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) transport code was developed, and the results of testing the ENDF/B-V and ENDF/B-VI data (through Release 2) were published. In addition to the standard k{sub eff} measurements, other experimental measurements were performed on a number of these benchmark assemblies. In particular, the Cross Section Evaluation Working Group (CSEWG) specifications contain experimental data for neutron leakage and central-flux measurements, central-fission ratio measurements, and activation ratio measurements. Additionally, there exists another set of fission reaction-rate measurements performed at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) utilizing a {sup 252}Cf source. This report will describe the leakage and central-flux measurements and show a comparison of experimental data to MCNP simulations performed using the ENDF/B-V and B-VI (Release 2) data libraries. Central-fission and activation reaction-rate measurements will be described, and the comparison of experimental data to MCNP simulations using available data libraries for each reaction of interest will be presented. Finally, the NIST fission reaction-rate measurements will be described. A comparison of MCNP results published previously with the current MCNP simulations will be presented for the NIST measurements, and a comparison of the current MCNP simulations to the experimental measurements will be presented.

  6. Modified Sagnac interferometer for contact-free length measurement of a direct absorption cell.

    PubMed

    Elandaloussi, Hadj; Rouillé, Christian; Marie-Jeanne, Patrick; Janssen, Christof

    2016-03-10

    Accurate path length measurements in absorption cells are recurrent requirements in quantitative molecular absorption spectroscopy. A new twin path laser interferometer for length measurements in a simple direct path absorption geometry is presented, along with a full uncertainty budget. The path in an absorption cell is determined by measuring the optical path length change due to the diminution of the refractive index when the cell originally filled with nitrogen gas is evacuated. The performance of the instrument based on a stabilized HeNe laser is verified by comparison with the results of direct mechanical length measurements of a roughly 45 mm long, specially designed absorption cell. Due to a resolution of about 1/300 of a HeNe fringe, an expanded (coverage factor k=2) uncertainty of 16 μm in the length measurement is achieved, providing an expanded relative uncertainty of 3.6·10⁻⁴ for the length of our test absorption cell. This value is about 8 times lower than what has been reported previously. The instrument will be useful for precision measurements of absorption cross sections of strong absorbers which require short light paths, such as ozone, halogen oxides, sulfur dioxide, and volatile organic compounds in the UV. PMID:26974791

  7. Note: Measuring spectral response of photocells with light-emitting diodes.

    PubMed

    Tada, Kazuya; Tanaka, Hiroaki

    2015-12-01

    Although the spectral response is a key data for photocells, traditional measurement setup for it consists of expensive optical precision components including white-light source, collimator and monochromator, and has relatively large footprint. Here, it is demonstrated that a compact, portable, and low-cost device based on an array of light-emitting diodes can provide quantitatively reliable spectral response characterization of photocells. The device seems to be useful for the purpose of preliminary survey of the spectral response of novel material and/or materials system prior to precise measurement with the traditional equipment. PMID:26724087

  8. Note: Measuring spectral response of photocells with light-emitting diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tada, Kazuya; Tanaka, Hiroaki

    2015-12-01

    Although the spectral response is a key data for photocells, traditional measurement setup for it consists of expensive optical precision components including white-light source, collimator and monochromator, and has relatively large footprint. Here, it is demonstrated that a compact, portable, and low-cost device based on an array of light-emitting diodes can provide quantitatively reliable spectral response characterization of photocells. The device seems to be useful for the purpose of preliminary survey of the spectral response of novel material and/or materials system prior to precise measurement with the traditional equipment.

  9. Wavelength encoded polarization measurements for simultaneous spectral and polarimetric characterization in near field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, H. S.; Swami, M. K.; Kushwaha, P. K.; Uppal, A.; Gupta, P. K.

    2016-08-01

    We report a scheme for polarization sensitive near field imaging of nanostructured samples by making use of broadband polarized near field illumination and detection of polarization states of scattered light by a spectrally encoded analyzer. The analyzer comprising a combination of polarizer, a multi-order waveplate and a broadband quarter waveplate allows analysis of the spectrally encoded polarization states of scattered light for characterization of the polarization properties of nano structures from a single image scan. The scheme was validated by measuring the near field polarization parameters of silver nanowires. The approach allows simultaneous measurement of polarization characteristics as well as spectral features of the nano materials.

  10. Quantitative infrared absorption cross sections of isoprene for atmospheric measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Brauer, Carolyn S.; Blake, Thomas A.; Guenther, Alex B.; Sharpe, Steven W.; Sams, Robert L.; Johnson, Timothy J.

    2014-11-19

    The OH- and O3- initiated oxidations of isoprene, which is one of the primary volatile organic compounds produced by vegetation, are a major source of atmospheric formaldehyde and other oxygenated organics, yet little quantitative IR data exists for isoprene. We thus report absorption coefficients and integrated band intensities for isoprene in the 600 - 6500 cm-1 region. The pressure-broadened (1 atmosphere N2) spectra were recorded at 278, 298 and 323 K in a 19.96 cm path length cell at 0.112 cm-1 resolution, using a Bruker 66V FTIR. Composite spectra are derived from a minimum of seven pressures at each temperature.

  11. Optical properties of Mg-doped VO2: Absorption measurements and hybrid functional calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Shuanglin; Li, S.-Y.; Ahuja, R.; Granqvist, C. G.; Hermansson, K.; Niklasson, G. A.; Scheicher, R. H.

    2012-11-01

    Mg-doped VO2 thin films with thermochromic properties were made by reactive DC magnetron co-sputtering onto heated substrates, and spectral absorption was recorded at room temperature in the 0.5 < ħω < 3.5 eV energy range. Clear evidence was found for a widening of the main band gap from 1.67 to 2.32 eV as the Mg/(V + Mg) atomic ratio went from zero to 0.19, thereby significantly lowering the luminous absorption. This technologically important effect could be reconciled with spin-polarized density functional theory calculations using the Heyd-Scuseria-Ernzerhof [Heyd et al., J. Chem. Phys. 118, 8207 (2003); ibid. 124, 219906 (2006)] hybrid functional. Specifically, the calculated luminous absorptance decreased when the Mg/(V + Mg) ratio was increased from 0.125 to 0.250.

  12. Optical properties of Mg-doped VO{sub 2}: Absorption measurements and hybrid functional calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Hu Shuanglin; Li, S.-Y.; Granqvist, C. G.; Niklasson, G. A.; Ahuja, R.; Scheicher, R. H.; Hermansson, K.

    2012-11-12

    Mg-doped VO{sub 2} thin films with thermochromic properties were made by reactive DC magnetron co-sputtering onto heated substrates, and spectral absorption was recorded at room temperature in the 0.5 < h{omega} < 3.5 eV energy range. Clear evidence was found for a widening of the main band gap from 1.67 to 2.32 eV as the Mg/(V + Mg) atomic ratio went from zero to 0.19, thereby significantly lowering the luminous absorption. This technologically important effect could be reconciled with spin-polarized density functional theory calculations using the Heyd-Scuseria-Ernzerhof [Heyd et al., J. Chem. Phys. 118, 8207 (2003); ibid. 124, 219906 (2006)] hybrid functional. Specifically, the calculated luminous absorptance decreased when the Mg/(V + Mg) ratio was increased from 0.125 to 0.250.

  13. Spectral measurements of light sources with a goniophotometer with and without mirror arrangement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freitas Santos Gomes, Juliana; Antônio Ázara de Oliveira, Ivo; da Silva Sardinha, André; Viana, Domingos David; Rezende Vieira, Rafaela; Barbosa, Amanda Hang; Dornelles de Alvarenga, Ana Paula

    2016-07-01

    This paper presents a comparative study of the relative spectral radiance measurements of incandescent and LED light sources performed in two different setups with a rotating-mirror-goniophotometer. In one configuration the light is reflected by the goniophotometer mirror, while in the other the mirror is not used. This study permits to determine a spectral correction factor at each measured wavelength in order to obtain a more precise value for the Correlated Color Temperature (CCT)

  14. Set Up For Filter And Mirror Efficiencies Measurements In The UV and VUV Spectral Range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pouey, M.; Malherbe, A.

    1986-10-01

    A vacuum reflectometer for the UV and VUV spectral range was developed for qualification of optical components below 400 nm. Typical performances, in the 120-320 nm spectral range, of filters and mirrors offered by MATRA will be presented. Fitted with various gratings and sources this device allows reflecting, transmitting power as well as scattered or diffracted flux measurements (gratings efficiency measurements) until 25 nm.

  15. Temperature Independent Differential Absorption Spectroscopy (tidas) and Simplified Atmospheric Air Mass Factor (samf) Techniques For The Measurement of Ozone Vertical Content From Gome Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zehner, C.; Casadio, S.; di Sarra, A.; Putz, E.

    A simple technique for the fast retrieval of ozone vertical amount from GOME (Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment) spectra is described in detail. The TIDAS (Tempera- ture Independent Differential Absorption Spectroscopy) technique uses GOME's ca- pability of measuring atmospheric spectra over a broad wavelength range with high spectral resolution. The ozone slant columns are retrieved by applying the Beer- Lambert law to two spectral windows where the ozone absorption cross sections show similar temperature dependence. A simple geometric air mass factor is computed for a fixed height spherical atmosphere (SAMF: Simplified Atmospheric air Mass Factor) to retrieve ozone vertical amounts. Vertical ozone values are compared to the GDP (GOME Data Processor), and to ground based ozone measurements.

  16. Spectral Sensitivity Measured with Electroretinogram Using a Constant Response Method

    PubMed Central

    Rocha, Fernando Allan de Farias; Gomes, Bruno Duarte; Silveira, Luiz Carlos de Lima; Martins, Sonia Limara; Aguiar, Renata Genaro; de Souza, John Manuel; Ventura, Dora Fix

    2016-01-01

    A new method is presented to determine the retinal spectral sensitivity function S(λ) using the electroretinogram (ERG). S(λ)s were assessed in three different species of myomorph rodents, Gerbils (Meriones unguiculatus), Wistar rats (Ratus norvegicus), and mice (Mus musculus). The method, called AC Constant Method, is based on a computerized automatic feedback system that adjusts light intensity to maintain a constant-response amplitude to a flickering stimulus throughout the spectrum, as it is scanned from 300 to 700 nm, and back. The results are presented as the reciprocal of the intensity at each wavelength required to maintain a constant peak to peak response amplitude. The resulting S(λ) had two peaks in all three rodent species, corresponding to ultraviolet and M cones, respectively: 359 nm and 511 nm for mice, 362 nm and 493 nm for gerbils, and 362 nm and 502 nm for rats. Results for mouse and gerbil were similar to literature reports of S(λ) functions obtained with other methods, confirming that the ERG associated to the AC Constant-Response Method was effective to obtain reliable S(λ) functions. In addition, due to its fast data collection time, the AC Constant Response Method has the advantage of keeping the eye in a constant light adapted state. PMID:26800521

  17. Magnetoelectroluminescence of organic heterostructures: Analytical theory and spectrally resolved measurements

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Liu, Feilong; Kelley, Megan R.; Crooker, Scott A.; Nie, Wanyi; Mohite, Aditya D.; Ruden, P. Paul; Los Alamos National Lab.; Smith, Darryl L.; Los Alamos National Lab.

    2014-12-22

    The effect of a magnetic field on the electroluminescence of organic light emitting devices originates from the hyperfine interaction between the electron/hole polarons and the hydrogen nuclei of the host molecules. In this paper, we present an analytical theory of magnetoelectroluminescence for organic semiconductors. To be specific, we focus on bilayer heterostructure devices. In the case we are considering, light generation at the interface of the donor and acceptor layers results from the formation and recombination of exciplexes. The spin physics is described by a stochastic Liouville equation for the electron/hole spin density matrix. By finding the steady-state analytical solutionmore » using Bloch-Wangsness-Redfield theory, we explore how the singlet/triplet exciplex ratio is affected by the hyperfine interaction strength and by the external magnetic field. In order to validate the theory, spectrally resolved electroluminescence experiments on BPhen/m-MTDATA devices are analyzed. With increasing emission wavelength, the width of the magnetic field modulation curve of the electroluminescence increases while its depth decreases. Furthermore, these observations are consistent with the model.« less

  18. Magnetoelectroluminescence of organic heterostructures: Analytical theory and spectrally resolved measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Feilong; Kelley, Megan R.; Crooker, Scott A.; Nie, Wanyi; Mohite, Aditya D.; Ruden, P. Paul; Smith, Darryl L.

    2014-12-22

    The effect of a magnetic field on the electroluminescence of organic light emitting devices originates from the hyperfine interaction between the electron/hole polarons and the hydrogen nuclei of the host molecules. In this paper, we present an analytical theory of magnetoelectroluminescence for organic semiconductors. To be specific, we focus on bilayer heterostructure devices. In the case we are considering, light generation at the interface of the donor and acceptor layers results from the formation and recombination of exciplexes. The spin physics is described by a stochastic Liouville equation for the electron/hole spin density matrix. By finding the steady-state analytical solution using Bloch-Wangsness-Redfield theory, we explore how the singlet/triplet exciplex ratio is affected by the hyperfine interaction strength and by the external magnetic field. In order to validate the theory, spectrally resolved electroluminescence experiments on BPhen/m-MTDATA devices are analyzed. With increasing emission wavelength, the width of the magnetic field modulation curve of the electroluminescence increases while its depth decreases. Furthermore, these observations are consistent with the model.

  19. Spectral Sensitivity Measured with Electroretinogram Using a Constant Response Method.

    PubMed

    Rocha, Fernando Allan de Farias; Gomes, Bruno Duarte; Silveira, Luiz Carlos de Lima; Martins, Sonia Limara; Aguiar, Renata Genaro; de Souza, John Manuel; Ventura, Dora Fix

    2016-01-01

    A new method is presented to determine the retinal spectral sensitivity function S(λ) using the electroretinogram (ERG). S(λ)s were assessed in three different species of myomorph rodents, Gerbils (Meriones unguiculatus), Wistar rats (Ratus norvegicus), and mice (Mus musculus). The method, called AC Constant Method, is based on a computerized automatic feedback system that adjusts light intensity to maintain a constant-response amplitude to a flickering stimulus throughout the spectrum, as it is scanned from 300 to 700 nm, and back. The results are presented as the reciprocal of the intensity at each wavelength required to maintain a constant peak to peak response amplitude. The resulting S(λ) had two peaks in all three rodent species, corresponding to ultraviolet and M cones, respectively: 359 nm and 511 nm for mice, 362 nm and 493 nm for gerbils, and 362 nm and 502 nm for rats. Results for mouse and gerbil were similar to literature reports of S(λ) functions obtained with other methods, confirming that the ERG associated to the AC Constant-Response Method was effective to obtain reliable S(λ) functions. In addition, due to its fast data collection time, the AC Constant Response Method has the advantage of keeping the eye in a constant light adapted state. PMID:26800521

  20. Simultaneous Spectral Albedo Measurements Near the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Southern Great Plains (ARM SGP) Central Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Michalsky, Joseph J.; Min, Qilong; Barnard, James C.; Marchand, Roger T.; Pilewskie, Peter

    2003-04-30

    In this study, a data analysis is performed to determine the area-averaged, spectral albedo at ARM's SGP central facility site. The spectral albedo is then fed into radiation transfer models to show that the diffuse discrepancy is diminished when the spectral albedo is used (as opposed to using the broadband albedo).