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Sample records for absorption spectrometer doas

  1. Initial investigation of the wavelength dependence of optical properties measured with a new multi-pass Aerosol Extinction Differential Optical Absorption Spectrometer (AE-DOAS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chartier, R. T.; Greenslade, M. E.

    2012-04-01

    Atmospheric aerosols directly affect climate by scattering and absorbing radiation. The magnitude of the impact is dependent upon the wavelength of light, but is often estimated near 550 nm. When light scattering and absorption by aerosols is approximated, the wavelength dependence of the refractive index for specific components is lost. As a result, climate models would have inherent uncertainties for aerosol contributions to radiative forcing when considering the entire solar spectrum. An aerosol extinction differential optical absorption spectrometer has been developed to directly measure aerosol extinction at mid-ultraviolet to near infrared wavelengths. The instrument consists of a spectrometer coupled to a closed White-type multi-pass gas cell with an adjustable path length of up to approximately 20 m. Laboratory measurements of various gases are compared with known absorption cross sections. Additionally, the extinction of monodisperse samples of polystyrene latex spheres are measured and compared to Mie theory generated with refractive index values from the literature to validate the new instrument. The polystyrene experiments also emphasize the ability of the new instrument to retrieve the wavelength dependent refractive index, especially in the ultraviolet wavelength regions where variability is expected. The spectrometer will be a significant advancement for determining wavelength dependent complex refractive indices in future laboratory studies as well as provide the ability to monitor ambient aerosol light extinction.

  2. Initial investigation of the wavelength dependence of optical properties measured with a new multi-pass aerosol extinction differential optical absorption spectrometer (AE-DOAS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chartier, R. T.; Greenslade, M. E.

    2011-10-01

    Atmospheric aerosols directly affect climate by scattering and absorbing radiation. The magnitude of the impact is dependent upon the wavelength of light, but is often estimated near 550 nm. When light scattering and absorption by aerosols is approximated, the wavelength dependence of the refractive index for specific components is lost. As a result, climate models would have inherent uncertainties for aerosol contributions to radiative forcing when considering the entire solar spectrum. An aerosol extinction differential optical absorption spectrometer has been developed to directly measure aerosol extinction at mid-ultraviolet to near infrared wavelengths. The instrument consists of a spectrometer coupled to a closed White-type multi-pass gas cell with an adjustable path length of up to approximately 20 m. Laboratory measurements of various gases are compared with known absorption cross sections. Additionally, the extinction of monodisperse samples of polystyrene latex spheres are measured and compared to Mie theory generated with refractive index values from the literature to validate the new instrument. The polystyrene experiments also emphasize the ability of the new instrument to retrieve the wavelength dependent refractive index, especially in the ultraviolet wavelength regions where variability is expected. The spectrometer will be a significant advancement for determining wavelength dependent complex refractive indices in future laboratory studies as well as provide the ability to monitor ambient aerosol light extinction.

  3. Retrieval of Aerosol Profiles using Multi Axis Differential Absorption Spectroscopy (MAX-DOAS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yilmaz, S.; Friess, U.; Apituley, A.; de Leeuw, G.; Platt, U.

    2009-04-01

    Multi Axis Differential Absorption Spectroscopy (MAX-DOAS) is a well established measurement technique to derive atmospheric trace gas profiles. Using MAX-DOAS measurements of trace gases with a known vertical profile, like the oxygen-dimer O4, it is possible to retrieve information on atmospheric aerosols. Based on the optimal estimation method, we have developed an algorithm which fits simultaneously measured O4 optical densities at several wavelengths and elevation angles to values simulated by a radiative transfer model. Retrieval parameters are aerosol extinction profile and optical properties like single scattering albedo, phase function and Angström exponent. In the scope of a joint research activity of the EU funded project EUSAAR (European Supersites for Atmospheric Aerosol Research) we have developed a new kind of DOAS instrument, which uses three miniature spectrometers to cover the near-ultraviolet to visible wavelength range (290-790nm), enabling to capture all absorption bands of the oxygen-dimer O4. Additionally, it is possible to point to any direction in the sky with a 2D telescope unit which is connected to the spectrometers via fiber optics. In May 2008, an intercomparison campaign with established aerosol measurement techniques took place in Cabauw/Netherlands, where simultaneous DOAS, LIDAR, Sun photometer and Nephelometer measurements were performed. We present first results of selected days from this period. The optical properties of aerosols retrieved by the DOAS measurement technique show very promising qualitative agreement with the established measurement techniques demonstrating the progress towards our goal of establishing the MAX-DOAS technique for retrieving optical properties of atmospheric aerosols. Quantitative comparison is ongoing.

  4. NO2 tropospheric profiles with spatially scanning DOAS spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masieri, Samuele; Giovanelli, Giorgio; Petritoli, Andrea; Kostadinov, Ivan; Premuda, Margherita; Bortoli, Daniele; Ravegnani, Fabrizio

    2010-05-01

    A simple algorithm, developed at ISAC Institute, to retrieve gas concentration's profiles by means of Tropospheric Gas Analyser Spectrometer (TropoGAS), adopting Off-Axis DOAS methodology is presented. Combining previously selected measurements obtained at different line of sight, we calculate the concentration along the first 2 km of troposphere. The first step is aimed to evaluate in the same spectral region (from 430nm to 495nm) by means of our DOAS processor the slant columns of NO2 and O4, and to separate the tropospheric part from the total one. Measurements are performed in the subsequent angles of sight: a=1,2,4,8,16,32° above the horizon and one measurement is taken along the sun direction. The second step consists of the use of measured O4 slant column to evaluate the correct optical path needed to calculate NO2 concentration form measured NO2 tropospheric slant column. Profiles of NO2 and other gases absorbing in this spectral range (such as CHOCHO) are shown and compared with the ground value obtained from ARPA in-situ analyser network. Finally we discuss the applicability of this technique in urban air quality monitoring and future possible improvements of the method.

  5. Modular total absorption spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karny, M.; Rykaczewski, K. P.; Fijałkowska, A.; Rasco, B. C.; Wolińska-Cichocka, M.; Grzywacz, R. K.; Goetz, K. C.; Miller, D.; Zganjar, E. F.

    2016-11-01

    The design and performance of the Modular Total Absorption Spectrometer built and commissioned at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory is presented. The active volume of the detector is approximately one ton of NaI(Tl), which results in very high full γ energy peak efficiency of 71% at 6 MeV and nearly flat efficiency of around 81.5% for low energy γ-rays between 300 keV and 1 MeV. In addition to the high peak efficiency, the modular construction of the detector permits the use of a γ-coincidence technique in data analysis as well as β-delayed neutron observation.

  6. Remote sensing of stratospheric O3 and NO2 using a portable and compact DOAS spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raponi, M. M.; Jiménez, R.; Wolfram, E.; Tocho, J. O.; Quel, E. J.

    2011-01-01

    The use of passive and active remote sensing systems has largely contributed to advance our understanding of important atmospheric phenomena. Here we present a compact and portable passive DOAS (Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy) system, developed for measuring the vertical column density (VCD) of multiple atmospheric trace gases. We highlight the main characteristics of the system components: a mini-spectrometer (HR4000, Ocean Optics), two optical fibers (400 μm of core, 6 m and 25 cm of longitude), an external shutter and the control/data processing software. Nitrogen dioxide (NO2) and ozone (O3) VCDs are derived from solar spectra acquired during twilights (87° - 91° zenithal angles) using the DOAS technique. The analysis is carried out by solving the Beer-Lambert-Bouger (BLB) law for the main atmospheric absorbers at selected wavelength ranges. The algorithm minimizes the fitting residuals to the BLB law, having as unknown the slant column density (SCD) of the species to determine. We present measurements carried out at the Marambio Antarctic Base (64° 14' 25'' S; 56° 37' 21'' W, 197 m asl) during January - February 2008. In addition, we compare our results with co-located measurements performed with EVA, a visible absorption spectrometer of Instituto Nacional de Técnica Aeroespacial (INTA, Spain), a Dobson spectrophotometer of Servicio Meteorológico Nacional (SMN, Argentine) and the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI), on board AURA satellite.

  7. Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (DOAS) using Targets: SO2 and NO2 Measurements in Montevideo City

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Louban, Ilia; Píriz, Gustavo; Platt, Ulrich; Frins, Erna

    2008-04-01

    SO2 and NO2 were remotely measured in a main street of Montevideo city using Multiaxis-Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (MAX-DOAS) combined with on-field selected targets. Target-based measurements are the basis of a new experimental procedure called Topographic Target Light scattering-DOAS (TOTAL-DOAS) that provides a well define absorption path to measure the near surface distribution of trace gases in the boundary layer. It combines the measurement principles of the long-path DOAS and zenith-scattered sunlight DOAS, within the near UV and VIS spectral range. We give a general description of the procedure and present first results of the 2006 campaign at Montevideo.

  8. Multiple Axis Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (MAX-DOAS) Observations of Bromine Monoxide (BrO) at Barrow, Alaska: An Instrumental Inter-Comparison

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlson, D. A.; Donohoue, D.; Simpson, W. R.; Friess, U.; Sihler, H.; Platt, U.

    2009-12-01

    Differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS) measures atmospheric slant column densities of gases by fitting ambient skylight spectra, referenced to a zenith spectrum, to laboratory-measured molecular absorption cross sections. In the Multiple-Axis (MAX)-DOAS method, measurement spectra are recorded with a narrow-field telescope aimed at low elevation angles to enhance sensitivity to boundary-layer trace gases. MAX-DOAS instruments are particularly well suited for low-power measurements at remote sites because the calibration relies on well-established absorption cross sections and the sun is used as the light source (saving power). For example, MAX-DOAS has proven very useful for observing bromine monoxide (BrO) in the Arctic springtime troposphere, when unique chemistry leads to relatively high mixing ratios (tens of pptv) in the boundary layer. Although MAX-DOAS has been successful in many studies, there has seldom been a chance to intercompare multiple MAX-DOAS instruments to discern the overall data quality, in particular not for tropospheric BrO. This data quality can be affected by instrumental differences within the various spectrometers as well as radiative-transfer differences between the skylight in the various view directions of the different instruments. To evaluate the agreement and underlying causes for differences between different MAX-DOAS systems, concurrent observations of BrO slant column densities from multiple instruments were compared. Observations are from the spring of 2009 at Barrow, Alaska. The resulting correlation plots show good general agreement in BrO slant column densities (slopes within error of unity) and attest to the quality of each of the MAX-DOAS systems. The oxygen collisional dimer, O4, and the fit residual RMS were also examined to understand light path differences and spectral fitting issues, respectively.

  9. Retrieval of Aerosol Profiles using Multi-Axis Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (MAX-DOAS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yilmaz, Selami; Frieß, Udo; Apituley, Arnoud; Henzing, Bas; Baars, Holger; Heese, Birgit; Althausen, Dietrich; Adam, Mariana; Putaud, Jean-Philippe; Zieger, Paul; Platt, Ulrich

    2010-05-01

    Multi Axis Differential Absorption Spectroscopy (MAX-DOAS) is a well established measurement technique to derive atmospheric trace gas profiles. Using MAX-DOAS measurements of trace gases with a known vertical profile, like the oxygen-dimer O4, it is possible to retrieve information on atmospheric aerosols. Based on the optimal estimation method, we have developed an algorithm which fits simultaneously measured O4 optical densities and relative intensities at several wavelengths and elevation angles to values simulated by a radiative transfer model. Retrieval parameters are aerosol extinction profile and optical properties such as single scattering albedo, phase function and Angström exponent. In 2008 and 2009 several intercomparison campaigns with established aerosol measurement techniques took place in Cabauw/Netherlands, Melpitz/Germany, Ispra/Italy and Leipzig/Germany, where simultaneous DOAS, lidar, Sun photometer and Nephelometer measurements were performed. Here we present results of the intercomparisons for cloud free conditions. The correlation of the aerosol optical thickness retrieved by the DOAS technique and the Sun photometer shows coefficients of determination from 0.96 to 0.98 and slopes from 0.94 to 1.07. The vertical structure of the DOAS retrieved aerosol extinction profiles compare favourably with the structures seen by the backscatter lidar. However, the vertical spatial development of the boundary layer is reproduced with a lower resolution by the DOAS technique. Strategies for the near real-time retrieval of trace gas profiles, aerosol profiles and optical properties will be discussed as well.

  10. Two instruments based on differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS) to measure accurate ammonia concentrations in the atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volten, H.; Bergwerff, J. B.; Haaima, M.; Lolkema, D. E.; Berkhout, A. J. C.; van der Hoff, G. R.; Potma, C. J. M.; Wichink Kruit, R. J.; van Pul, W. A. J.; Swart, D. P. J.

    2012-02-01

    We present two Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (DOAS) instruments built at RIVM: the RIVM DOAS and the miniDOAS. Both instruments provide virtually interference-free measurements of NH3 concentrations in the atmosphere, since they measure over an open path, without suffering from inlet problems or interference problems by ammonium aerosols dissociating on tubes or filters. They measure concentrations up to at least 200 μg m-3, have a fast response, low maintenance demands, and a high up-time. The RIVM DOAS has a high accuracy of typically 0.15 μg m-3 for ammonia for 5-min averages and over a total light path of 100 m. The miniDOAS has been developed for application in measurement networks such as the Dutch National Air Quality Monitoring Network (LML). Compared to the RIVM DOAS it has a similar accuracy, but is significantly reduced in size, costs, and handling complexity. The RIVM DOAS and miniDOAS results showed excellent agreement (R2 = 0.996) during a field measurement campaign in Vredepeel, the Netherlands. This measurement site is located in an agricultural area and is characterized by highly variable, but on average high ammonia concentrations in the air. The RIVM-DOAS and miniDOAS results were compared to the results of the AMOR instrument, a continuous-flow wet denuder system, which is currently used in the LML. Averaged over longer time spans of typically a day, the (mini)DOAS and AMOR results agree reasonably well, although an offset of the AMOR values compared to the (mini)DOAS results exists. On short time scales, the (mini)DOAS shows a faster response and does not show the memory effects due to inlet tubing and transport of absorption fluids encountered by the AMOR. Due to its high accuracy, high uptime, low maintenance and its open path, the (mini)DOAS shows a good potential for flux measurements by using two (or more) systems in a gradient set-up and applying the aerodynamic gradient technique.

  11. Two instruments based on differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS) to measure accurate ammonia concentrations in the atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volten, H.; Bergwerff, J. B.; Haaima, M.; Lolkema, D. E.; Berkhout, A. J. C.; van der Hoff, G. R.; Potma, C. J. M.; Wichink Kruit, R. J.; van Pul, W. A. J.; Swart, D. P. J.

    2011-08-01

    We present two Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (DOAS) instruments built at RIVM, the RIVM DOAS and the miniDOAS. Both instruments provide virtually interference free measurements of NH3 concentrations in the atmosphere, since they measure over an open path, without suffering from inlet problems or interference problems by ammonium aerosols dissociating on tubes or filters. They measure concentrations up to at least 200 μg m-3, have a fast response, low maintenance demands, and a high up-time. The RIVM DOAS has a high accuracy of typically 0.15 μg m-3 for ammonia over 5-min averages and over a total light path of 100 m. The miniDOAS has been developed for application in measurement networks such as the Dutch National Air Quality Monitoring Network (LML). Compared to the RIVM DOAS it has a similar accuracy, but is significantly reduced in size, costs, and handling complexity. The RIVM DOAS and miniDOAS results showed excellent agreement (R2 = 0.996) during a field measurement campaign in Vredepeel, the Netherlands. This measurement site is located in an agricultural area and is characterized by highly variable, but on average high ammonia concentrations in the air. The RIVM-DOAS and miniDOAS results were compared to the results of the AMOR instrument, a continuous-flow wet denuder system, which is currently used in the LML. Averaged over longer time spans of typically a day the (mini)DOAS and AMOR results agree reasonably well, although an offset of the AMOR values compared to the (mini)DOAS results exists. On short time scales the (mini)DOAS shows a faster response and does not show the memory effects due to inlet tubing and transport of absorption fluids encountered by the AMOR. Due to its high accuracy, high uptime, low maintenance and its open path, the (mini)DOAS shows a good potential for flux measurements by using two (or more) systems in a gradient set-up and applying the aerodynamic gradient technique.

  12. Ozone monitoring using differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS) and UV photometry instruments in Sohar, Oman.

    PubMed

    Nawahda, Amin

    2015-08-01

    Ground level ozone (O3) concentrations were measured across Sohar highway in Oman during a four-month period from September to December 2014 by using an open-path deferential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS) instrument. The monthly average concentrations of O3 varied from 19.6 to 29.4 ppb. The measurements of O3 are compared with the measurements of a non-open-path UV photometry analyzer (UVP). The percent difference (PD) concept and linear regression methods were used to compare the readings of the two instruments. The findings show high correlation coefficients between the measurements of the DOAS and UVP instruments. The DOAS measurements of O3 are found to be less than those measured by the UVP instrument; the correlation coefficients between absolute PD values and meteorological parameters and PM2.5 were very low indicating a minor effect; therefore, titrations of O3 by traffic emissions and difference in elevation could be the reason for the difference in the measurements of the two instruments.

  13. Detection of water vapour absorption around 363nm in measured atmospheric absorption spectra and its effect on DOAS evaluations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lampel, Johannes; Polyansky, Oleg. L.; Kyuberis, Alexandra A.; Zobov, Nikolai F.; Tennyson, Jonathan; Lodi, Lorenzo; Pöhler, Denis; Frieß, Udo; Platt, Ulrich; Beirle, Steffen; Wagner, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    Water vapour is known to absorb light from the microwave region to the blue part of the visible spectrum at a decreasing magnitude. Ab-initio approaches to model individual absorption lines of the gaseous water molecule predict absorption lines until its dissociation limit at 243 nm. We present first evidence of water vapour absorption at 363 nm from field measurements based on the POKAZATEL absorption line list by Polyansky et al. (2016) using data from Multi-Axis differential optical absorption spectroscopy (MAX-DOAS) and Longpath (LP)-DOAS measurements. The predicted absorptions contribute significantly to the observed optical depths with up to 2 × 10-3. Their magnitude correlates well (R2 = 0.89) to simultaneously measured well-established water vapour absorptions in the blue spectral range from 452-499 nm, but is underestimated by a factor of 2.6 ± 0.6 in the ab-initio model. At a spectral resolution of 0.5nm this leads to a maximum absorption cross-section value of 5.4 × 10-27 cm2/molec at 362.3nm. The results are independent of the employed cross-section data to compensate for the overlayed absorption of the oxygen dimer O4. The newly found absorption can have a significant impact on the spectral retrieval of absorbing trace-gas species in the spectral range around 363 nm. Its effect on the spectral analysis of O4, HONO and OClO are discussed.

  14. Differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS) and air mass factor concept for a multiply scattering vertically inhomogeneous medium: theoretical consideration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rozanov, V. V.; Rozanov, A. V.

    2010-06-01

    The Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (DOAS) technique is widely used to retrieve amounts of atmospheric species from measurements of the direct solar light transmitted through the Earth's atmosphere as well as of the solar light scattered in the atmosphere or reflected from the Earth's surface. For the transmitted direct solar light the theoretical basis of the DOAS technique represented by the Beer-Lambert law is well studied. In contrast, scarcely investigated is the theoretical basis and validity range of the DOAS method for those cases where the contribution of the multiple scattering processes is not negligible. Our study is intended to fill this gap by means of a theoretical investigation of the applicability of the DOAS technique for the retrieval of amounts of atmospheric species from observations of the scattered solar light with a non-negligible contribution of the multiple scattering. Starting from the expansion of the intensity logarithm in the functional Taylor series we formulate the general form of the DOAS equation. The thereby introduced variational derivative of the intensity logarithm with respect to the variation of the gaseous absorption coefficient, which is often referred to as the weighting function, is demonstrated to be closely related to the air mass factor. Employing some approximations we show that the general DOAS equation can be rewritten in the form of the weighting function (WFDOAS), the modified (MDOAS), and the standard DOAS equations. For each of these forms a specific equation for the air mass factor follows which, in general, is not suitable for other forms of the DOAS equation. Furthermore, the validity range of the standard DOAS equation is quantitatively investigated using a suggested criterion of a weak absorption. The results presented in this study are intended to provide a basis for a better understanding of the applicability range of different forms of the DOAS equation as well as of the relationship between

  15. Differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS) and air mass factor concept for a multiply scattering vertically inhomogeneous medium: theoretical consideration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rozanov, V. V.; Rozanov, A. V.

    2010-02-01

    The Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (DOAS) technique is widely used to retrieve amounts of atmospheric species from measurements of the direct solar light transmitted through the Earth's atmosphere as well as of the solar light scattered in the atmosphere or reflected from the Earth's surface. For the transmitted direct solar light the theoretical basis of the DOAS technique represented by the Beer-Lambert law is well studied. In contrast, scarcely investigated is the theoretical basis and validity range of the DOAS method for those cases where the contribution of the multiple scattering processes is not negligible. Our study is intended to fill this gap by means of a theoretical investigation of the applicability of the DOAS technique for the retrieval of amounts of atmospheric species from observations of the scattered solar light with a non-negligible contribution of the multiple scattering. Starting from the expansion of the intensity logarithm in the functional Taylor series we formulate the general form of the DOAS equation. The thereby introduced variational derivative of the intensity logarithm with respect to the variation of the gaseous absorption coefficient, which is often referred to as the weighting function, is demonstrated to be closely related to the air mass factor. Employing some approximations we show that the general DOAS equation can be rewritten in the form of the weighting function (WFDOAS), the modified (MDOAS), and the standard DOAS equations. For each of these forms a specific equation for the air mass factor follows which, in general, is not suitable for other forms of the DOAS equation. Furthermore, the validity range of the standard DOAS equation is quantitatively investigated using a suggested criterion of a weak absorption. The results presented in this study are intended to provide a basis for a better understanding of the applicability range of different forms of the DOAS equation as well as of the relationship between

  16. MAX-DOAS measurements in southern China: 1. automated aerosol profile retrieval using oxygen dimers absorptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, X.; Brauers, T.; Shao, M.; Garland, R. M.; Wagner, T.; Deutschmann, T.; Wahner, A.

    2008-09-01

    We performed MAX-DOAS measurements during the PRiDe-PRD2006 campaign in the Pearl River Delta region 50 km north of Guangzhou, China, for 4 weeks in June 2006. We used an instrument which simultaneously sampled the wavelength range from 292 nm to 443 nm at 7 different elevation angles between 3° and 90°. Here we show that the O4 (O2 dimer) absorption at 360 nm can be used to retrieve the aerosol extinction and the height of the boundary layer. A comparison with simultaneously recorded, ground based nephelometer data shows an excellent agreement.

  17. Microwave spectrometer for saturated absorption experiments.

    PubMed

    Legrand, J; Ségard, B; Krosta, A; Macke, B

    1978-04-01

    A spectrometer has been built to perform Doppler-free saturated absorption experiments in the millimeter range (30-300 GHz); a plane-cylindrical resonator between Stark plates has been used. With that device, inverted Lamb-dips have been observed at 115 GHz with a width 25 times below the Doppler width. However, the essential feature of this apparatus is to allow the application of Stark field typically of 2500 V/cm, leading to such specific uses as the Stark tuned Lamb-dip, level-crossing, and mode-crossing experiments. Typical examples are given and other applications are proposed.

  18. Measurements of the absorption cross section of (13)CHO(13)CHO at visible wavelengths and application to DOAS retrievals.

    PubMed

    Goss, Natasha R; Waxman, Eleanor M; Coburn, Sean C; Koenig, Theodore K; Thalman, Ryan; Dommen, Josef; Hannigan, James W; Tyndall, Geoffrey S; Volkamer, Rainer

    2015-05-14

    The trace gas glyoxal (CHOCHO) forms from the atmospheric oxidation of hydrocarbons and is a precursor to secondary organic aerosol. We have measured the absorption cross section of disubstituted (13)CHO(13)CHO ((13)C glyoxal) at moderately high (1 cm(-1)) optical resolution between 21 280 and 23 260 cm(-1) (430-470 nm). The isotopic shifts in the position of absorption features were found to be largest near 455 nm (Δν = 14 cm(-1); Δλ = 0.29 nm), whereas no significant shifts were observed near 440 nm (Δν < 0.5 cm(-1); Δλ < 0.01 nm). These shifts are used to investigate the selective detection of (12)C glyoxal (natural isotope abundance) and (13)C glyoxal by in situ cavity enhanced differential optical absorption spectroscopy (CE-DOAS) in a series of sensitivity tests using synthetic spectra, and laboratory measurements of mixtures containing (12)C and (13)C glyoxal, nitrogen dioxide, and other interfering absorbers. We find the changes in apparent spectral band shapes remain significant at the moderately high optical resolution typical of CE-DOAS (0.55 nm fwhm). CE-DOAS allows for the selective online detection of both isotopes with detection limits of ∼200 pptv (1 pptv = 10(-12) volume mixing ratio), and sensitivity toward total glyoxal of few pptv. The (13)C absorption cross section is available for download from the Supporting Information.

  19. NO2 column amounts from ground-based Pandora and MFDOAS spectrometers using the direct-sun DOAS technique: Intercomparisons and application to OMI validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herman, Jay; Cede, Alexander; Spinei, Elena; Mount, George; Tzortziou, Maria; Abuhassan, Nader

    2009-07-01

    Vertical column amounts of nitrogen dioxide, C(NO2), are derived from ground-based direct solar irradiance measurements using two new and independently developed spectrometer systems, Pandora (Goddard Space Flight Center) and MFDOAS (Washington State University). We discuss the advantages of C(NO2) retrievals based on Direct Sun - Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (DS-DOAS). The C(NO2) data are presented from field campaigns using Pandora at Aristotle University (AUTH), Thessaloniki, Greece; a second field campaign involving both new instruments at Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC), Greenbelt, Maryland; a Pandora time series from December 2006 to October 2008 at GSFC; and a MFDOAS time series for spring 2008 at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, Washington. Pandora and MFDOAS were compared at GFSC and found to closely agree, with both instruments having a clear-sky precision of 0.01 DU (1 DU = 2.67 × 1016 molecules/cm2) and a nominal accuracy of 0.1 DU. The high precision is obtained from careful laboratory characterization of the spectrometers (temperature sensitivity, slit function, pixel to pixel radiometric calibration, and wavelength calibration), and from sufficient measurement averaging to reduce instrument noise. The accuracy achieved depends on laboratory-measured absorption cross sections and on spectrometer laboratory and field calibration techniques used at each measurement site. The 0.01 DU precision is sufficient to track minute-by-minute changes in C(NO2) throughout each day with typical daytime values ranging from 0.2 to 2 DU. The MFDOAS instrument has better noise characteristics for a single measurement, which permits MFDOAS to operate at higher time resolution than Pandora for the same precision. Because Pandora and MFDOAS direct-sun measurements can be made in the presence of light to moderate clouds, but with reduced precision (˜0.2 DU for moderate cloud cover), a nearly continuous record can be obtained

  20. Elevated aerosol layers modify the O2–O2 absorption measured by ground-based MAX-DOAS

    SciTech Connect

    Ortega, Ivan; Berg, Larry K.; Ferrare, Richard A.; Hair, Johnathan W.; Hostetler, Chris A.; Volkamer, Rainer

    2016-06-01

    The oxygen collisional complex (O2-O2, or O4) is a greenhouse gas, and a calibration trace gas used to infer aerosol and cloud properties by Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (DOAS). Recent reports suggest the need for an O4 correction factor (CFO4) when comparing simulated and measured O4 differential slant column densities (dSCD) by passive DOAS. We investigate the sensitivity of O4 dSCD simulations at ultraviolet (360 nm) and visible (477 nm) wavelengths towards separately measured aerosol extinction profiles. Measurements were conducted by the University of Colorado 2D-MAX-DOAS instrument and NASA’s multispectral High Spectral Resolution Lidar (HSRL-2) during the Two Column Aerosol Project (TCAP) at Cape Cod, MA in July 2012. During two case study days with (1) high aerosol load (17 July, AOD ~ 0.35 at 477 nm), and (2) near molecular scattering conditions (22 July, AOD < 0.10 at 477 nm) the measured and calculated O4 dSCDs agreed within 6.4±0.4% (360 nm) and 4.7±0.6% (477 nm) if the HSRL-2 profiles were used as input to the calculations. However, if in the calculations the aerosol is confined to the surface layer (while keeping AOD constant) we find 0.53DOAS. Opportunities to identify and better characterize these layers are also discussed.

  1. DOAS on Board: Trace Gas Measurements on CARIBIC Flights With Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dix, B.; Brenninkmeijer, C.; Friess, U.; Wagner, T.; Platt, U.

    2006-12-01

    Within the framework of CARIBIC (Civil Aircraft for the Regular Investigation of the atmosphere Based on an Instrument Container), a new DOAS instrument has been built. It measures UV-visible scattered sun light from three different viewing directions to detect various trace gases. With this multi-axis technique the separation of boundary layer, free tropospheric and stratospheric columns of BrO, HCHO, NO2, O3, and O4 is possible. Thus for example anthropogenic and natural sources of NO2 , such as industry and (natural) forest fires can be studied. Besides the measurement of stratospheric O3 and BrO columns, the CARIBIC DOAS can also detect elevated levels of BrO in the free troposphere, which would impact on tropospheric ozone. The oxygen dimer O4 has a known vertical profile, therefore it can be used to determine light paths through the atmosphere and to investigate the influence of clouds and aerosols on the radiative transfer. This DOAS system is the only remote sensing instrument in the CARIBIC container, which comprises 21 instruments of 11 European institutions. It was successfully put into operation on a new long-range Airbus (A340-600) of Deutsche Lufthansa in December 2004. Since May 2005 monthly flights with fully automated measurements are performed. We will present selected results from several flights and show the potential of this unique DOAS data set.

  2. Absorption spectrometer balloon flight and iodine investigations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1970-01-01

    A high altitude balloon flight experiment to determine the technical feasibility of employing absorption spectroscopy to measure SO2 and NO2 gases in the earth's atmosphere from above the atmospheric ozone layer is discussed. In addition to the balloon experiment the contract includes a ground-based survey of natural I emissions from geological sources and studies of the feasibility of mapping I2 from spacecraft. This report is divided into three major sections as follows: (1) the planning engineering and execution of the balloon experiment, (2) data reduction and analysis of the balloon data, and (3) the results of the I2 phase of the contract.

  3. Global Yearly Observation of Different Phytoplankton Groups Using PhytoDOAS on SCIMANCHY Data: Validation and First Application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bracher, A.; Dinter, T.; Schmitt, B.; Sadeghi, A.; Peeken, I.; Rottgers, R.; Vontas, M.; Ye, Y.

    2010-12-01

    Global information on the quantitative distribution of major functional phytoplankton types (PFTs) of the world ocean is important for understanding the marine phytoplankton's role in the global marine ecosystem. This study shows global biomass distributions from 2008 of different dominant PFTs analysed with PhytoDOAS, a method of Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (DOAS) currently specialized for diatoms and cyanobacteria [1] from satellite data of SCIAMACHY (Scanning Imaging Absorption Spectrometer for Atmospheric Cartography) on ENVISAT. PhytoDOAS global maps of phytoplankton distribution are validated with collocated pigment water samples analyzed via HPLC. The global PFT satellite data sets are used as input data for and for validation of a biogeochemical model.

  4. Satellite monitoring of different vegetation types by differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS) in the red spectral range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, T.; Beirle, S.; Deutschmann, T.; Grzegorski, M.; Platt, U.

    2007-01-01

    A new method for the satellite remote sensing of different types of vegetation and ocean colour is presented. In contrast to existing algorithms relying on the strong change of the reflectivity in the red and near infrared spectral region, our method analyses weak narrow-band (few nm) reflectance structures (i.e. "fingerprint" structures) of vegetation in the red spectral range. It is based on differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS), which is usually applied for the analysis of atmospheric trace gas absorptions. Since the spectra of atmospheric absorption and vegetation reflectance are simultaneously included in the analysis, the effects of atmospheric absorptions are automatically corrected (in contrast to other algorithms). The inclusion of the vegetation spectra also significantly improves the results of the trace gas retrieval. The global maps of the results illustrate the seasonal cycles of different vegetation types. In addition to the vegetation distribution on land, they also show patterns of biological activity in the oceans. Our results indicate that improved sets of vegetation spectra might lead to more accurate and more specific identification of vegetation type in the future.

  5. Shipborne solar absorption measurements of CO2, CH4, N2O and CO and comparison with SCIAMACHY WFM-DOAS retrievals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warneke, T.; de Beek, R.; Buchwitz, M.; Notholt, J.; Schulz, A.; Velazco, V.; Schrems, O.

    2005-02-01

    CO, CH4, N2O and CO2 were retrieved from high resolution solar absorption spectra obtained during a ship cruise from Capetown to Bremerhaven in January/February 2003 by Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. Precisions of better than 0.5% for the column averaged volume mixing ratios (VMR) of CH4 and CO2 are achieved using of O2 as a reference gas. Shipborne FTIR-measurements of CO and data from SCIAMACHY/ENVISAT retrieved by the Weighting Function Modified Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (WFM-DOAS) retrieval algorithm show qualitatively the same latitudinal variations. WFM-DOAS data of CH4, N2O and CO2 measured over sea exhibit a great spread. The spread is significantly reduced for satellite measurements over land and a reasonable agreement can be obtained if the shipborne data is compared with the closest SCIAMACHY measurements over land. The number of comparisons is too small to draw conclusions. However, by including only WFM-DOAS data with small errors the shipborne and WFM-DOAS data compare within 5% for CH4 and CO2 and within 30% for N2O.

  6. Shipborne solar absorption measurements of CO2, CH4, N2O and CO and comparison with SCIAMACHY WFM-DOAS retrievals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warneke, T.; de Beek, R.; Buchwitz, M.; Notholt, J.; Schulz, A.; Velazco, V.; Schrems, O.

    2005-08-01

    CO, CH4, N2O and CO2 were retrieved from high resolution solar absorption spectra obtained during a ship cruise from Capetown to Bremerhaven in January/February 2003 by Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. Precisions of better than 0.5% for the column averaged volume mixing ratios (VMR) of CH4 and CO2 are achieved using of O2 as a reference gas. Shipborne FTIR-measurements of CO and data from SCIAMACHY/ENVISAT retrieved by the Weighting Function Modified Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (WFM-DOAS) retrieval algorithm show qualitatively the same latitudinal variations. WFM-DOAS data of CH4, N2O and CO2 measured over sea exhibit a great spread. The spread is significantly reduced for satellite measurements over land and a reasonable agreement can be obtained if the shipborne data are compared with the closest SCIAMACHY measurements over land. The number of comparisons is too small to draw conclusions. However, by including only WFM-DOAS data with small errors the shipborne and WFM-DOAS data compare within 5% for CH4 and CO2 and within 30% for N2O.

  7. A decay total absorption spectrometer for DESPEC at FAIR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tain, J. L.; Algora, A.; Agramunt, J.; Guadilla, V.; Jordan, M. D.; Montaner-Pizá, A.; Rubio, B.; Valencia, E.; Cano-Ott, D.; Gelletly, W.; Martinez, T.; Mendoza, E.; Podolyák, Zs.; Regan, P.; Simpson, J.; Smith, A. J.; Strachan, J.

    2015-12-01

    This paper presents the design of a total absorption γ-ray spectrometer for the determination of β-decay intensity distributions of exotic nuclear species at the focal plane of the FAIR-NUSTAR Super Fragment Separator. The spectrometer is a key instrument in the DESPEC experiment and the proposed implementation follows extensive design studies and prototype tests. Two options were contemplated, based on NaI(Tl) and LaBr3:Ce inorganic scintillation crystals respectively. Monte Carlo simulations and technical considerations determined the optimal configurations consisting of sixteen 15 × 15 × 25cm3 crystals for the NaI(Tl) option and one hundred and twenty-eight 5.5 × 5.5 × 11cm3 crystals for the LaBr3:Ce option. Minimization of dead material was crucial for maximizing the spectrometer full-energy peak efficiency. Module prototypes were build to verify constructional details and characterize their performance. The measured energy and timing resolution was found to agree rather well with estimates based on simulations of scintillation light transport and collection. The neutron sensitivity of the spectrometer, important when measuring β-delayed neutron emitters, was investigated by means of Monte Carlo simulations.

  8. Comparison of ground-based Multi-Axis Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (MAX-DOAS) and satellite DOAS measurements of NO2 distribution over Ulaanbaatar (Mongolia) during summer 2013

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Böhnke, Sebastian; Behrendt, Thomas; Bruse, Michael; Meixner, Franz X.; Mamtimin, Buhalqem

    2014-05-01

    Cities are immense sources of air pollutants; however, emission inventories in many of them still are highly uncertain, particularly in developing countries. Ulaanbaatar is the most populous and polluted area in Mongolia. Tropospheric NO2 is proved to be harmful to both, the atmospheric environment and human health. It might be meaningful and important to observe pollutant concentrations in an area-integrated form (satellite observations) to create a sound data basis for air quality control measures. In our study, we preliminary present the results of both satellite and ground-based Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (DOAS) measurements of vertical column densities (VCDs) of NO2 in Ulaanbaatar (urban area). As a ground validation tool, the MAX-DOAS measurements carried out in Ulaanbaatar (Mongolia) summer 2013 and are applied at 3 different sites in the west of Ulaanbaatar (106.73° E / 47.83° N), the city center (106.92° E / 47.92° N) and in the east (107.12° E / 47.87° N). Additionally, Automatic Weather Stations (AWS) have been set up and ozone was measured by UV absorption technique also at the 3 sites. Preliminary results show that the NO2 column densities increase during sunset and decrease after sunrise, which is most likely caused by a longer light path resulting from high solar zenith angles (SZA). The maximum DSCDs (Differential Slant Column Densities) are observed around sunset and sunrise (up to 10^17 molec cm-², mainly a measurement effect as stated above). The daily minima of the vertical column densities (VCD) appear in the morning and in the afternoon (DSCD ~2×10^15 molec cm-²) while, around noon, a second maximum can be observed (DSCD ~4×10^16 molec cm-²). Satellite data show mean VCDs of about 3×10^15 molec cm-² in July and a varying agreement with MAX-DOAS measurements.

  9. Effect of Water Vapor Absorption on Measurements of Atmospheric Nitrate Radical by LP-DOAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Su-wen; Liu, Wen-qing; Xie, Pin-hua; Yang, Yi-jun; Chen, De-bao; Li, Zheng

    2008-10-01

    During the measurement of atmospheric nitrate radical by long-path differential optical absorption spec-troscopy, water vapor strong absorption could affect the measurement of nitrate radical and detection limits of system. Under the tropospheric condition, the optical density of water vapor absorption is non-linearly dependent on column density. An effective method was developed to eliminate the effect of water vapor absorption. Reference spectra of water vapor based on the daytime atmospheric absorption spectra, when fitted together with change of cross section with water vapor column densities, gave a more accurate fitting of water vapor absorptions, thus its effect on the measurements of nitrate radical could be restricted to a minimum and detection limits of system reached 3.6 ppt. The modified method was applied during an intensive field campaign in the Pearl River Delta, China. The NO3 concentration in polluted air masses varied from 3.6 ppt to 82.5 ppt with an average level of 23.6±1.8 ppt.

  10. New detector array - the HRIBF Modular Total Absorption Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolinska-Cichocka, Marzena; Rykaczewski, Krzysztof; Karny, Marek; Kuzniak, Aleksandra; Grzywacz, Robert; Rasco, Charlie; Miller, David; Gross, Carl J.; Johnson, Jim

    2011-10-01

    The construction of a new Modular Total Absorption Spectrometer (MTAS) at the Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility (HRIBF) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory will be presented. The total absorption gamma spectra measured with MTAS will be used to derive a true beta-feeding pattern and resulting beta strength function for fission products. In particular, the measurements of decay heat released by radioactive nuclei produced in nuclear fuels at power reactors will be performed. MTAS is made up of 19 large NaI(Tl) crystals each encapsulated with a 0.8-mm-thick carbon fiber. There are also two 1-mm- thick Silicon Strip Detectors surrounding a moving tape collector that count beta-energy loss signals. The structure is shielded by more than 1-inch of lead around MTAS which reduces background radiation significantly. MTAS efficiency for full energy deposition of gamma ray approaches nearly 90% for 300 keV gammas and over 75% for a 5 MeV gamma transition. Research supported by the DOE Office of Nuclear Physics.

  11. Commissioning of the High Efficiency Total Absorption Spectrometer (HECTOR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reingold, C. S.; Simon, A.; Spyrou, A.; Naqvi, F.; Dombos, A.; Palmisano, A.; Anderson, T.; Henderson, S. L.; Moylan, S.; Seymour, C.; Skulski, M. A.; Smith, M. K.; Strauss, S. Y.; Vande Kolk, B.

    2016-09-01

    P-process nucleosynthesis occurs in supernovae where the s-process seeds are present, and is responsible for the production of proton-rich nuclei. Photons from SN explosions induce characteristic (γ,n), (γ,p), and (γ , α) reactions. These reactions are typically studied via the inverse reactions. For this purpose, the High Efficiency Total Absorption Spectrometer (HECTOR), a NaI(Tl) summing detector at the University of Notre Dame, was built. The array is designed to make precision cross section measurements for (p, γ) and (α , γ) reactions. HECTOR is composed of 16 separate NaI(Tl) crystals and 32 photomultiplier tubes read by a digital data acquisition system, with gain-matching and summing done offline. The efficiency of HECTOR is about 52.7 (2.0)% for a 60Co source. The commissioning run for HECTOR was performed via measurements of known resonances in the 27Al(p, γ)28Si reaction to determine the efficiency of the array. The first results from HECTOR will be presented, as well as future plans with the array. This work was supported by the National Science Foundation under Grants No. PHY1614442 and PHY1430152 (JINA-CEE).

  12. Improvements to Phyto-DOAS method for identification of major Phytoplankton groups using high spectrally-resolved satellite data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadeghi, Alireza; Dinter, Tilman; Vountas, Marco; Schmitt, Bettina; Peeken, Ilka; Burrows, John P.; Bracher, Astrid

    The goal of this study is to improve Phyto-DOAS, the retrieval method of identification of major Phytoplankton Functional Types (PFTs) using ocean-color data provided by a high spectrally-resolved satellite sensor, SCIAMACHY (Scanning Imaging Absorption Spectrometer for Atmospheric Cartography) on board ENVISAT. Phyto-DOAS is an extension of DOAS (Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy), originally developed to retrieve atmospheric trace gases, for remote identification of oceanic phytoplankton. So far Phyto-DOAS has been successfully exploited to identify Cyanobacteria and Diatom over global ocean (Bracher et al. 2009). The main challenge for retrieving more PFTs by Phyto-DOAS is to overcome the overlapping effects of different PFTs absorption spectra. Different PFTs are composed of different types and concentrations of pigments, but also have pigments in common, e.g. Chl-a, which cause correlation effects in the standard Phyto-DOAS retrieval. In this study two ideas have been implemented to overcome this limitation of Phyto-DOAS: Firstly, using the method of fourth-derivative spectroscopy (Aguirre-Gomez et al. 1995) the peak positions of the main pigment components in each absorption spectrum have been derived. After comparing the corresponding results of major PFTs, the optimized fit-window for DOAS-retrieval of each PFT is determined. Secondly, the simultaneous fitting of different PFTs has been implemented (over the year 2008) to include the real oceanic situation in the retrieval. Within this step the provided optimized fit-windows have been tested to produce higher fit quality. Validation of the global PFTs biomass distribution has been performed using in-situ data sets obtained during several transatlantic cruises in the year 2008.

  13. A miniDOAS instrument optimised for ammonia field measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sintermann, Jörg; Dietrich, Klaus; Häni, Christoph; Bell, Michael; Jocher, Markus; Neftel, Albrecht

    2016-06-01

    We present a differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS) instrument, called "miniDOAS", optimised for optical open-path field-measurements of ambient ammonia (NH3) alongside nitrogen oxide (NO) and sulfur dioxide (SO2). The instrument is a further development of the miniDOAS presented by Volten et al. (2012). We use a temperature-controlled spectrometer, a deuterium light source and a modified optical arrangement. The system was set up in a robust, field-deployable, temperature-regulated housing. For the evaluation of light spectra we use a new high-pass filter routine based upon robust baseline extraction with local regression. Multiple linear regression including terms of an autoregressive-moving-average model is used to determine concentrations. For NH3 the random uncertainty is about 1.4 % of the concentration, and not better than 0.2 µg m-3. Potential biases for the slope of the calibration are given by the precision of the differential absorption cross sections (±3 %) and for the offset by the precision of the estimation of concentration offsets (cref) introduced by the reference spectrum Iref. Comparisons of miniDOAS measurements to those by NH3 acid trap devices showed good agreement. The miniDOAS can be flexibly used for a wide range of field trials, such as micrometeorological NH3 flux measurements with approaches based upon horizontal or vertical concentration differences. Results from such applications covering concentration dynamics of less than one up to several hundreds of µg m-3 are presented.

  14. A compact DOAS instrument optimised for ammonia field-measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neftel, Albrecht; Sintermann, Joerg; Dietrich, Klaus; Häni, Christoph; Jocher, Markus

    2016-04-01

    Accurate, high time-resolution measurements of NH3 in ambient air are still a challenge due to the stickiness of this molecule and its interactions with inlet or instrument surfaces. Differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS) with open-path arrangement offers a contact-free in-situ approach to determine ambient NH3. We present a DOAS instrument, optimised for open-path field-measurements of ambient ammonia (NH3) alongside nitrogen oxide (NO) and sulphur dioxide (SO2). This device, operating in the UV range over paths of up to 100 m, is a further development of the miniDOAS presented by Volten et al. (2012). We use a temperature-controlled spectrometer, a deuterium light source and a modified optical arrangement. The system was set up in a robust, field-deployable, temperature-regulated housing. For the evaluation of light spectra a new high-pass filter routine based upon robust baseline extraction with local regression was used. In order to fit differential absorption cross-sections to the measurements, multiple linear regression is performed including terms of an autoregressive-moving-average model. In this presentation we discuss the influence of filter and fit procedure on the precision and accuracy of the system with examples of field measurements with artificial NH3 sources. Volten, H., Bergwerff, J. B., Haaima, M., Lolkema, D. E., Berkhout, A. J. C., van der Hoff, G. R., Potma, C. J. M., Wichink Kruit, R. J., van Pul, W. A. J. and Swart, D. P. J.: Two instruments based on differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS) to measure accurate ammonia concentrations in the atmosphere, Atmospheric Meas. Tech., 5(2), 413-427, doi:10.5194/amt-5-413-2012, 2012.

  15. DUVAS (derivative uv-absorption spectrometer): instrument description and operating manual

    SciTech Connect

    Hawthorne, A.R.; Dougherty, J.M.; Metcalfe, C.E.

    1980-11-01

    DUVAS is a real-time, field-portable spectrometer capable of monitoring a variety of aromatic organic vapors and inorganic gases at sub-ppM concentrations. The instrument is a prototype, microcomputer-controlled, derivative ultraviolet (UV) absorption spectrometer (DUVAS) developed primarily for area monitoring at coal conversion facilities, although other important occupational and environmental monitoring applications for compounds such as SO/sub 2/, NO/sub x/, NH/sub 3/, and HCHO are also being pursued.

  16. Data processing and calibration for tunable diode laser harmonic absorption spectrometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    May, Randy D.; Webster, Christopher R.

    1993-01-01

    Data processing and calibration methods are described for tunable diode laser absorption spectrometers which produce harmonic absorption spectra as raw data for measuring gas mixing ratios down to parts-per-trillion levels at a variety of pressures. The methods, which take advantage of modern computer speed, memory, and data storage capabilities, are applicable to the detection of weakly absorbing gases in quantitative industrial monitoring, in addition to aircraft and balloon atmospheric measurements for which they were designed. Algorithms for calibration and data analysis, including rejection of erroneous spectra, variation of effective integration time, spectral alignment prior to averaging, and plotting and archiving of results, have been tested on actual stratospheric laser spectra recorded by the Aircraft Laser Infrared Absorption Spectrometer (ALIAS) spectrometer in numerous flights of NASA's ER-2 aircraft.

  17. A Fourier transform spectrometer for visible and near ultra-violet measurements of atmospheric absorption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parsons, C. L.; Gerlach, J. C.; Whitehurst, M.

    1982-01-01

    The development of a prototype, ground-based, Sun-pointed Michelson interferometric spectrometer is described. Its intended use is to measure the atmospheric amount of various gases which absorb in the near-infrared, visible, and near-ultraviolet portions of the electromagnetic spectrum. Preliminary spectra which contain the alpha, 0.8 micrometer, and rho sigma tau water vapor absorption bands in the near-infrared are presented to indicate the present capability of the system. Ultimately, the spectrometer can be used to explore the feasible applications of Fourier transform spectroscopy in the ultraviolet where grating spectrometers were used exclusively.

  18. FTIR-spectrometer-determined absorption coefficients of seven hydrazine fuel gases - Implications for laser remote sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Molina, L. T.; Grant, W. B.

    1984-01-01

    The absorption spectra of three hydrazines and four of their air-oxidation products were measured in the 9-12-micron spectral region with a Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectrometer with a 0.05-kayser resolution to determine absorption coefficients at CO2 and tunable diode laser wavelengths. The measurements agreed well with published CO2 laser determinations for many of the absorption coefficients, except where the published values are thought to be in error. The coefficients were then used to estimate the sensitivity for remote detection of these gases using CO2 and tunable diode lasers in long-path differential absorption measurements.

  19. Optical microresonators as single-particle absorption spectrometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heylman, Kevin D.; Thakkar, Niket; Horak, Erik H.; Quillin, Steven C.; Cherqui, Charles; Knapper, Kassandra A.; Masiello, David J.; Goldsmith, Randall H.

    2016-12-01

    Optical measurements of nanoscale objects offer major insights into fundamental biological, material and photonic properties. In absorption spectroscopy, sensitivity limits applications at the nanoscale. Here, we present a new single-particle double-modulation photothermal absorption spectroscopy method that employs on-chip optical whispering-gallery-mode (WGM) microresonators as ultrasensitive thermometers. Optical excitation of a nanoscale object on the microresonator produces increased local temperatures that are proportional to the absorption cross-section of the object. We resolve photothermal shifts in the resonance frequency of the microresonator that are smaller than 100 Hz, orders of magnitude smaller than previous WGM sensing schemes. The application of our new technique to single gold nanorods reveals a dense array of sharp Fano resonances arising from the coupling between the localized surface plasmon of the gold nanorod and the WGMs of the resonator, allowing for the exploration of plasmonic-photonic hybridization. In terms of the wider applicability, our approach adds label-free spectroscopic identification to microresonator-based detection schemes.

  20. The laser absorption spectrometer - A new remote sensing instrument for atmospheric pollution monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shumate, M. S.

    1974-01-01

    An instrument capable of remotely monitoring trace atmospheric constituents is described. The instrument, called a laser absorption spectrometer, can be operated from an aircraft or spacecraft to measure the concentration of selected gases in three dimensions. This device will be particularly useful for rapid determination of pollutant levels in urban areas.

  1. Trace gas absorption spectroscopy using laser difference-frequency spectrometer for environmental application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, W.; Cazier, F.; Boucher, D.; Tittel, F. K.; Davies, P. B.

    2001-01-01

    A widely tunable infrared spectrometer based on difference frequency generation (DFG) has been developed for organic trace gas detection by laser absorption spectroscopy. On-line measurements of concentration of various hydrocarbons, such as acetylene, benzene, and ethylene, were investigated using high-resolution DFG trace gas spectroscopy for highly sensitive detection.

  2. Photoacoustic absorption spectrometer for highly transparent dielectrics with parts-per-million sensitivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waasem, Niklas; Fieberg, Stephan; Hauser, Janosch; Gomes, Gregory; Haertle, Daniel; Kühnemann, Frank; Buse, Karsten

    2013-02-01

    A sensitive photoacoustic absorption spectrometer for highly transparent solids has been built and tested. As the light source an optical parametrical oscillator pumped by a nanosecond pulse laser with 10 Hz repetition rate is employed, covering the complete wavelength range from 407 to 2600 nm. A second-harmonic-generation unit extends the range of accessible wavelengths down to 212 nm. A lead-zirconate-titanate piezo transducer, directly coupled to the sample, detects the photoacoustically generated sound waves. Absorption spectra of lithium triborate, lithium niobate, and alpha barium borate crystals with absorption coefficients down to 10-5 cm-1 are presented.

  3. Photoacoustic absorption spectrometer for highly transparent dielectrics with parts-per-million sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Waasem, Niklas; Fieberg, Stephan; Hauser, Janosch; Gomes, Gregory; Haertle, Daniel; Kühnemann, Frank; Buse, Karsten

    2013-02-01

    A sensitive photoacoustic absorption spectrometer for highly transparent solids has been built and tested. As the light source an optical parametrical oscillator pumped by a nanosecond pulse laser with 10 Hz repetition rate is employed, covering the complete wavelength range from 407 to 2600 nm. A second-harmonic-generation unit extends the range of accessible wavelengths down to 212 nm. A lead-zirconate-titanate piezo transducer, directly coupled to the sample, detects the photoacoustically generated sound waves. Absorption spectra of lithium triborate, lithium niobate, and alpha barium borate crystals with absorption coefficients down to 10(-5) cm(-1) are presented.

  4. Search for molecular absorptions with the Fourier Transform Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knacke, Roger F.

    1995-01-01

    The objective of this research was a search for water molecules in the gas phase in molecular clouds. Water should be among the most abundant gases in the clouds and is of fundamental importance in gas chemistry, cloud cooling, shock wave chemistry, and gas-grain interactions of interstellar dust. Detection of water in Comet Halley in the 2.7 micron v(3) band in 1986 had shown that airborne H2O observations are feasible (ground-based observations of H2O are impossible because of the massive water content of the atmosphere). We planned to observe the v(3) band in interstellar clouds where a number of lines of this band should be in absorption. The search for H2O commenced in 1988 with a two flight program on the KAO. this resulted in a detection of interstellar H2O with S/N of 2-4 in the v(3) 1(01)-2(02) line at 3801.42/cm. A subsequent flight series of two flights in 1989 resulted in confirmation to the 3801.42/cm line detection and the detection of altogether four strong lines in the 000-001 v(3) vibration-rotation band of H2O.

  5. Airborne Carbon Dioxide Laser Absorption Spectrometer for IPDA Measurements of Tropospheric CO2: Recent Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spiers, Gary D.; Menzies, Robert T.

    2008-01-01

    The National Research Council's decadal survey on Earth Science and Applications from Space[1] recommended the Active Sensing of CO2 Emissions over Nights, Days, and Seasons (ASCENDS) mission for launch in 2013-2016 as a logical follow-on to the Orbiting Carbon Observatory (OCO) which is scheduled for launch in late 2008 [2]. The use of a laser absorption measurement technique provides the required ability to make day and night measurements of CO2 over all latitudes and seasons. As a demonstrator for an approach to meeting the instrument needs for the ASCENDS mission we have developed the airborne Carbon Dioxide Laser Absorption Spectrometer (CO2LAS) which uses the Integrated Path Differential Absorption (IPDA) Spectrometer [3] technique operating in the 2 micron wavelength region.. During 2006 a short engineering checkout flight of the CO2LAS was conducted and the results presented previously [4]. Several short flight campaigns were conducted during 2007 and we report results from these campaigns.

  6. Note: A flexible light emitting diode-based broadband transient-absorption spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gottlieb, Sean M.; Corley, Scott C.; Madsen, Dorte; Larsen, Delmar S.

    2012-05-01

    This Note presents a simple and flexible ns-to-ms transient absorption spectrometer based on pulsed light emitting diode (LED) technology that can be incorporated into existing ultrafast transient absorption spectrometers or operate as a stand-alone instrument with fixed-wavelength laser sources. The LED probe pulses from this instrument exhibit excellent stability (˜0.5%) and are capable of producing high signal-to-noise long-time (>100 ns) transient absorption signals either in a broadband multiplexed (spanning 250 nm) or in tunable narrowband (20 ns) operation. The utility of the instrument is demonstrated by measuring the photoinduced ns-to-ms photodynamics of the red/green absorbing fourth GMP phosphodiesterase/adenylyl cyclase/FhlA domain of the NpR6012 locus of the nitrogen-fixing cyanobacterium Nostoc punctiforme.

  7. Studies of Reactive Halogen Species in the Troposphere by Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (DOAS) in the Framework of AFO2000

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peters, C.; Hönninger, G.; Platt, U.

    2003-04-01

    Reactive Halogen Species (RHS) play an important role as trace gases in the tropospheric chemistry in polar regions. Bromine Oxide (BrO) is a key species for the periodically occurring complete depletion of surface ozone during polar sunrise. The dramatic increase and large amounts of reactive bromine species correlated with fast destruction of surface ozone can be explained by autocatlytic release processes of bromine compounds from sea salt surfaces ("bromine explosion"-mechanism). The detection of Iodine Monoxide (IO) and Iodine Dioxide (OIO) has been reported from various coastal sites (Ireland, Canary Islands, Tasmania), which indicates that RHS also play a role in mid-latitudes. In the Framework of the AFO2000 project detailed investigations on Sources, Distribution and Effects of RHS in the Troposphere are performed. Studies on appearance, distribution and time variations of halogen oxide concentrations in coastal areas and other related species are performed by DOAS longpath measurements during three ground based measurement campaigns at different geographical regions. At the German North Sea coast, at Hudson Bay the Canadian low arctic and at the French Atlantic coast. The first intensive field campaign took place in April/Mai 2002 in Dagebüll at the German North Sea. The North Sea coast represents a measurement site with a large intertidal zone and a moderately polluted area with NO_2 levels in the 0.5 to several ppb range. In situ measurements have shown the abundance of several iodinated hydrocarbons, which are most likely emitted by marine algae and represent possible precursors of IO. The results of the IO measurements will be presented. A complementary discussion of the NO_x levels measured, with respect to the IO abundances is also presented.

  8. Characterization of a new modular decay total absorption gamma-ray spectrometer (DTAS) for FAIR

    SciTech Connect

    Montaner Piza, A.; Tain, J. L.; Agramunt, J.; Algora, A.; Guadilla, V.; Marin, E.; Rice, S.; Rubio, B.

    2013-06-10

    Beta-decay studies are one of the main goals of the DEcay SPECtroscopy experiment (DESPEC) to be installed at the future Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR). DESPEC aims at the study of nuclear structure of exotic nuclei. A new modular Decay Total Absorption gamma-ray Spectrometer (DTAS) is being built at IFIC and is specially adapted to studies at fragmentation facilities such as the Super Fragment Separator (Super-FRS) at FAIR. The designed spectrometer is composed of 16 identical NaI(Tl) scintillation crystals. This work focuses on the characterization of these independent modules, as an initial step for the characterization of the full spectrometer. Monte Carlo simulations have been performed in order to understand the detector response.

  9. Capillary absorption spectrometer and process for isotopic analysis of small samples

    SciTech Connect

    Alexander, M. Lizabeth; Kelly, James F.; Sams, Robert L.; Moran, James J.; Newburn, Matthew K.; Blake, Thomas A.

    2016-03-29

    A capillary absorption spectrometer and process are described that provide highly sensitive and accurate stable absorption measurements of analytes in a sample gas that may include isotopologues of carbon and oxygen obtained from gas and biological samples. It further provides isotopic images of microbial communities that allow tracking of nutrients at the single cell level. It further targets naturally occurring variations in carbon and oxygen isotopes that avoids need for expensive isotopically labeled mixtures which allows study of samples taken from the field without modification. The method also permits sampling in vivo permitting real-time ambient studies of microbial communities.

  10. JPL Carbon Dioxide Laser Absorption Spectrometer Data Processing Results for the 2010 Flight Campaign

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacob, Joseph C.; Spiers, Gary D.; Menzie, Robert T.; Christensen, Lance E.

    2011-01-01

    As a precursor to and validation of the core technology necessary for NASA's Active Sensing of CO2 Emissions over Nights, Days,and Seasons (ASCENDS) mission, we flew JPL's Carbon Dioxide Laser Absorption Spectrometer (CO2LAS) in a campaign of five flights onboard NASA's DC-8 Airborne Laboratory in July 2010. This is the latest in a series of annual flight campaigns that began in 2006, and our first on the DC-8 aircraft.

  11. Convenient determination of luminescence quantum yield using a combined electronic absorption and emission spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Prakash, John; Mishra, Ashok Kumar

    2016-01-15

    It is possible to measure luminescence quantum yield in a facile way, by designing an optical spectrometer capable of obtaining electronic absorption as well as luminescence spectra, with a setup that uses the same light source and detector for both the spectral measurements. Employment of a single light source and single detector enables use of the same correction factor profile for spectral corrections. A suitable instrumental scaling factor is used for adjusting spectral losses.

  12. Portable 4.6 Micrometers Laser Absorption Spectrometer for Carbon Monoxide Monitoring and Fire Detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Briggs, Ryan M.; Frez, Clifford; Forouhar, Siamak; May, Randy D.; Ruff, Gary A.

    2013-01-01

    The air quality aboard manned spacecraft must be continuously monitored to ensure crew safety and identify equipment malfunctions. In particular, accurate real-time monitoring of carbon monoxide (CO) levels helps to prevent chronic exposure and can also provide early detection of combustion-related hazards. For long-duration missions, environmental monitoring grows in importance, but the mass and volume of monitoring instruments must be minimized. Furthermore, environmental analysis beyond low-Earth orbit must be performed in-situ, as sample return becomes impractical. Due to their small size, low power draw, and performance reliability, semiconductor-laser-based absorption spectrometers are viable candidates for this purpose. To reduce instrument form factor and complexity, the emission wavelength of the laser source should coincide with strong fundamental absorption lines of the target gases, which occur in the 3 to 5 micrometers wavelength range for most combustion products of interest, thereby reducing the absorption path length required for low-level concentration measurements. To address the needs of current and future NASA missions, we have developed a prototype absorption spectrometer using a semiconductor quantum cascade laser source operating near 4.6 micrometers that can be used to detect low concentrations of CO with a compact single-pass absorption cell. In this study, we present the design of the prototype instrument and report on measurements of CO emissions from the combustion of a variety of aerospace plastics.

  13. A split imaging spectrometer for temporally and spatially resolved titanium absorption spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Hager, J. D. Lanier, N. E.; Kline, J. L.; Flippo, K. A.; Bruns, H. C.; Schneider, M.; Saculla, M.; McCarville, T.

    2014-11-15

    We present a temporally and a spatially resolved spectrometer for titanium x-ray absorption spectroscopy along 2 axial symmetric lines-of-sight. Each line-of-sight of the instrument uses an elliptical crystal to acquire both the 2p and 3p Ti absorption lines on a single, time gated channel of the instrument. The 2 axial symmetric lines-of-sight allow the 2p and 3p absorption features to be measured through the same point in space using both channels of the instrument. The spatially dependent material temperature can be inferred by observing the 2p and the 3p Ti absorption features. The data are recorded on a two strip framing camera with each strip collecting data from a single line-of-sight. The design is compatible for use at both the OMEGA laser and the National Ignition Facility. The spectrometer is intended to measure the material temperature behind a Marshak wave in a radiatively driven SiO{sub 2} foam with a Ti foam tracer. In this configuration, a broad band CsI backlighter will be used for a source and the Ti absorption spectrum measured.

  14. NOx emissions of various sources in Romania and the Rhein-Main region in Germany based on mobile MAX-DOAS measurements of NO2.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riffel, Katharina; Sebastian, Donner; Shaiganfar, Reza; Wagner, Thomas; Dörner, Steffen

    2016-04-01

    The MAX DOAS-Method (Multi-AXis Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy) is used to analyze different trace gases (e.g. NO2, SO2, HCHO) at the same time and to determine the trace gas vertical column density (vertically integrated concentration). In summer 2015 we performed car-MAX-DOAS measurements in Romania during the AROMAT2 campaign. We encircled Bucharest at different weather situations and different times of the day. Afterwards the total NOx emissions were derived from the mobile MAX-DOAS observations in combination with wind data. In Germany we performed the same measurement procedure in fall/ winter/ spring 2015 /2016 by encircling the cities Mainz and Frankfurt. For the setting we mounted two MAX-DOAS instruments with different viewing directions (forward and backward) on the roof of a car. One instrument is a commercial mini MAX-DOAS that is built by the German company Hoffmann Messtechnik. The second one was built at the MPI in Mainz. This so-called Tube MAX-DOAS uses an AVANTES spectrometer with better optical characteristics than Hoffmann's mini MAX-DOAS. The advantage of two instruments working at the same time is (besides redundancy) that localized emission plumes can be measured from different directions at different locations. Thus, especially for emission plumes from power plants, tomographic methods can be applied to derive information about the plume altitude. Car-MAX-DOAS observations can cover large areas at a short time with reasonable resolution (depending on the speed of the car and the instruments integration time). Thus these measurements are well suited to validate satellites observations. This work will show the first AROMAT2 results of NOx emissions derived in Romania and in the Rhein-Main region, which is one of the most polluted area in Germany.

  15. Five-Channel Infrared Laser Absorption Spectrometer for Combustion Product Monitoring Aboard Manned Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Briggs, Ryan M.; Frez, Clifford; Borgentun, Carl E.; Bagheri, Mahmood; Forouhar, Siamak; May, Randy D.

    2014-01-01

    Continuous combustion product monitoring aboard manned spacecraft can prevent chronic exposure to hazardous compounds and also provides early detection of combustion events. As future missions extend beyond low-Earth orbit, analysis of returned environmental samples becomes impractical and safety monitoring should be performed in situ. Here, we describe initial designs of a five-channel tunable laser absorption spectrometer to continuously monitor combustion products with the goal of minimal maintenance and calibration over long-duration missions. The instrument incorporates dedicated laser channels to simultaneously target strong mid-infrared absorption lines of CO, HCl, HCN, HF, and CO2. The availability of low-power-consumption semiconductor lasers operating in the 2 to 5 micron wavelength range affords the flexibility to select absorption lines for each gas with maximum interaction strength and minimal interference from other gases, which enables the design of a compact and mechanically robust spectrometer with low-level sensitivity. In this paper, we focus primarily on absorption line selection based on the availability of low-power single-mode semiconductor laser sources designed specifically for the target wavelength range.

  16. Cruise ships flow rate emission evaluated by means of a passive DOAS instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masieri, S.; Premuda, M.; Bortoli, D.; Kostadinov, I.; Petritoli, A.; Ravegnani, F.; Giovanelli, G.

    2009-09-01

    The emissions of the cruise ships, in terms of nitrogen dioxide (NO2) and sulphur dioxide (SO2), are evaluated with the DOAS scanning spectrometer TropoGAS (Tropospheric Gas Analyser Spectrometer) developed at ISAC CNR in close collaboration with the CGE-UE. The slant columns amounts of the above mentioned compounds are obtained with the application of the Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (DOAS) technique to the spectral measurements carried out with the TropoGAS instrument. This last is linked with an optical fibre to a simple scanning optical system allowing for measurements in multiple axis configurations. The measurements are carried out across the Giudecca Channel in Venice, during two field campaigns performed in July and in October 2007. The instrumental setup, the DOAS method and the technique for the evaluation of the ships emissions, are described. The results of flow rate emissions for NO2 and SO2 are presented and discussed. Their mean values are about 12g/s and 4 g/s for NO2 and SO2 respectively.

  17. Automated extraction of absorption features from Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) and Geophysical and Environmental Research Imaging Spectrometer (GERIS) data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kruse, Fred A.; Calvin, Wendy M.; Seznec, Olivier

    1988-01-01

    Automated techniques were developed for the extraction and characterization of absorption features from reflectance spectra. The absorption feature extraction algorithms were successfully tested on laboratory, field, and aircraft imaging spectrometer data. A suite of laboratory spectra of the most common minerals was analyzed and absorption band characteristics tabulated. A prototype expert system was designed, implemented, and successfully tested to allow identification of minerals based on the extracted absorption band characteristics. AVIRIS spectra for a site in the northern Grapevine Mountains, Nevada, have been characterized and the minerals sericite (fine grained muscovite) and dolomite were identified. The minerals kaolinite, alunite, and buddingtonite were identified and mapped for a site at Cuprite, Nevada, using the feature extraction algorithms on the new Geophysical and Environmental Research 64 channel imaging spectrometer (GERIS) data. The feature extraction routines (written in FORTRAN and C) were interfaced to the expert system (written in PROLOG) to allow both efficient processing of numerical data and logical spectrum analysis.

  18. Supercontinuum based absorption spectrometer for cycle-resolved multiparameter measurements in a rapid compression machine.

    PubMed

    Werblinski, Thomas; Kleindienst, Stefan; Engelbrecht, Rainer; Zigan, Lars; Will, Stefan

    2016-06-10

    A broadband supercontinuum (SC) based absorption spectrometer capable of cycle-resolved multiparameter measurements at internal combustion (IC) engine conditions is presented. Three parameters, temperature, pressure and water mole fraction, were extracted from broadband near-infrared H2O absorption spectra, spanning the wavelength-range from 1340 to 1405.5 nm, which exhibits a large number of specific H2O transitions. The spectrometer is based on spatial domain detection and features a near-infrared line scan camera as a detector. Measurements were performed during a compression cycle of a rapid compression machine comprising a pressure and temperature range from 2.5 to 65 bar and 300 to 900 K, respectively. With the new spectrometer, we are for the first time, based on the authors' knowledge, able to perform measurements based on SC radiation over a complete compression and expansion stroke at measurement rates up to 50 kHz. A detailed overview is provided about the best match algorithm between theory and experiments, including parameters from two different spectral databases, namely the Barber-Tennyson database (BT2) and HITRAN2012. The results indicate that spectral broadening effects are not properly described by theory, especially at pressure levels exceeding 20 bar, which culminates in a clear underestimation of the derived pressure data by SC absorption spectroscopy. Nevertheless, temperature can be determined accurately by performing a three-parameter fit based on water mole fraction, temperature, and pressure. In contrast, making use of pressure transducer data as look-up values and varying only temperature and H2O mole fraction to find the best match leads to a clear overestimation of temperature at elevated pressures.

  19. [Research on the NO2 mean concentration measurement with target differential optical absorption spectroscopy technology].

    PubMed

    Liu, Jin; Si, Fu-Qi; Zhou, Hai-Jin; Zhao, Min-Jie; Dou, Ke; Liu, Wen-Qing

    2013-04-01

    A new monitoring method of NO2 concentration near ground with the target difference absorption spectrum technology (Target DOAS) is introduced in the present paper. This method is based on the passive difference absorption spectrum technology. The instrument collects solar reflection spectrum of remote objectives, such as wall of building and mountain, and a specific reference spectrum is chosen to subtract the influence of trace gases from the target to atmospheric top, then integrated concentration of NO2 along the path between the target and instrument can be calculated through the differential absorption spectra inversion algorithm. Since the distance between the instrument and target is given, the mean concentration of NO2 can be derived. With developed Target DOAS instrument, NO2 concentration measurement was carried out in Hefei. And comparison was made between the target DOAS and long path difference absorption spectrometer. Good consistency was presented, proving the feasibility of this method.

  20. Carbon Dioxide Laser Absorption Spectrometer (CO2LAS) Aircraft Measurements of CO2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christensen, Lance E.; Spiers, Gary D.; Menzies, Robert T.; Jacob, Joseph C.; Hyon, Jason

    2011-01-01

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory Carbon Dioxide Laser Absorption Spectrometer (CO2LAS) utilizes Integrated Path Differential Absorption (IPDA) at 2.05 microns to obtain CO2 column mixing ratios weighted heavily in the boundary layer. CO2LAS employs a coherent detection receiver and continuous-wave Th:Ho:YLF laser transmitters with output powers around 100 milliwatts. An offset frequency-locking scheme coupled to an absolute frequency reference enables the frequencies of the online and offline lasers to be held to within 200 kHz of desired values. We describe results from 2009 field campaigns when CO2LAS flew on the Twin Otter. We also describe spectroscopic studies aimed at uncovering potential biases in lidar CO2 retrievals at 2.05 microns.

  1. The use of selected neutron absorption resonance filters to suppress spurious events on hot neutron spectrometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lançon, D.; Ewings, R. A.; Stewart, J. R.; Jiménez-Ruiz, M.; Rønnow, H. M.

    2015-04-01

    Resonant absorption can be used as a filter for high energy neutron spectroscopy. Here we report the transmission of eight thin foil filters: erbium, indium, iridium, dysprosium, hafnium, gadolinium, cadmium and samarium, measured using neutron time-of-flight techniques over a range of energies (1 meV to 10 eV). Measured transmission is converted into energy-dependent absorption cross-section which compares closely to tabulated values. Each resonance is characterized from 91 meV (samarium) to 2815 meV (gadolinium) by Lorentzian fits. Possibilities for the use of neutron filters depending on the type of spurious background are discussed and the performance is simulated for a specific example of a hot neutron triple axis spectrometer experiment.

  2. A broadband absorption spectrometer using light emitting diodes for ultrasensitive, in situ trace gas detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langridge, Justin M.; Ball, Stephen M.; Shillings, Alexander J. L.; Jones, Roderic L.

    2008-12-01

    A broadband absorption spectrometer has been developed for highly sensitive and target-selective in situ trace gas measurements. The instrument employs two distinct modes of operation: (i) broadband cavity enhanced absorption spectroscopy (BBCEAS) is used to quantify the concentration of gases in sample mixtures from their characteristic absorption features, and (ii) periodic measurements of the cavity mirrors' reflectivity are made using step-scan phase shift cavity ringdown spectroscopy (PSCRDS). The latter PSCRDS method provides a stand-alone alternative to the more usual method of determining mirror reflectivities by measuring BBCEAS absorption spectra for calibration samples of known composition. Moreover, the instrument's two modes of operation use light from the same light emitting diode transmitted through the cavity in the same optical alignment, hence minimizing the potential for systematic errors between mirror reflectivity determinations and concentration measurements. The ability of the instrument to quantify absorber concentrations is tested in instrument intercomparison exercises for NO2 (versus a laser broadband cavity ringdown spectrometer) and for H2O (versus a commercial hygrometer). A method is also proposed for calculating effective absorption cross sections for fitting the differential structure in BBCEAS spectra due to strong, narrow absorption lines that are under-resolved and hence exhibit non-Beer-Lambert law behavior at the resolution of the BBCEAS measurements. This approach is tested on BBCEAS spectra of water vapor's 4v+δ absorption bands around 650 nm. The most immediate analytical application of the present instrument is in quantifying the concentration of reactive trace gases in the ambient atmosphere. The instrument's detection limits for NO3 as a function of integration time are considered in detail using an Allan variance analysis. Experiments under laboratory conditions produce a 1σ detection limit of 0.25 pptv for a 10 s

  3. A table-top femtosecond time-resolved soft x-ray transient absorption spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Leone, Stephen; Loh, Zhi-Heng; Khalil, Munira; Correa, Raoul E.; Leone, Stephen R.

    2008-05-21

    A laser-based, table-top instrument is constructed to perform femtosecond soft x-ray transient absorption spectroscopy. Ultrashort soft x-ray pulses produced via high-order harmonic generation of the amplified output of a femtosecond Ti:sapphire laser system are used to probe atomic core-level transient absorptions in atoms and molecules. The results provide chemically specific, time-resolved dynamics with sub-50-fs time resolution. In this setup, high-order harmonics generated in a Ne-filled capillary waveguide are refocused by a gold-coated toroidal mirror into the sample gas cell, where the soft x-ray light intersects with an optical pump pulse. The transmitted high-order harmonics are spectrally dispersed with a home-built soft x-ray spectrometer, which consists of a gold-coated toroidal mirror, a uniform-line spaced plane grating, and a soft x-ray CCD camera. The optical layout of the instrument, design of the soft x-ray spectrometer, and spatial and temporal characterization of the high-order harmonics are described. Examples of static and time-resolved photoabsorption spectra collected on this apparatus are presented.

  4. DOAS, Radiant Cooling Revisited

    SciTech Connect

    Hastbacka, Mildred; Dieckmann, John; Bouza, Antonio

    2012-12-01

    The article discusses dedicated outdoor air systems (DOAS) and radiant cooling technologies. Both of these topics were covered in previous ASHRAE Journal columns. This article reviews the technologies and their increasing acceptance. The two steps that ASHRAE is taking to disseminate DOAS information to the design community, available energy savings and the market potential of radiant cooling systems are addressed as well.

  5. Aerosol absorption measurement at SWIR with water vapor interference using a differential photoacoustic spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Wenyue; Liu, Qiang; Wu, Yi

    2015-09-07

    Atmospheric aerosol plays an important role in atmospheric radiation balance through absorbing and scattering the solar radiation, which changes local weather and global climate. Accurate measurement is highly requested to estimate the radiative effects and climate effects of atmospheric aerosol. Photoacoustic spectroscopy (PAS) technique, which observes the aerosols on their natural suspended state and is insensitive to light scattering, is commonly recognized as one of the best candidates to measure the optical absorption coefficient (OAC) of aerosols. In the present work, a method of measuring aerosol OAC at the wavelength where could also be absorbed by water vapor was proposed and corresponding measurements of the absorption properties of the atmospheric aerosol at the short wave infrared (SWIR, 1342 nm) wavelength were carried out. The spectrometer was made up of two high performance homemade photoacoustic cells. To improve the sensitivity, several methods were presented to control the noise derived from gas flow and vibration from the sampling pump. Calibration of the OAC and properties of the system were also studied in detail. Using the established PAS instrument, measurement of the optical absorption properties of the atmospheric aerosol were carried out in laboratory and field environment.

  6. Cavity ring-down spectrometer for high-fidelity molecular absorption measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, H.; Reed, Z. D.; Sironneau, V. T.; Hodges, J. T.

    2015-08-01

    We present a cavity ring-down spectrometer which was developed for near-infrared measurements of laser absorption by atmospheric greenhouse gases. This system has several important attributes that make it possible to conduct broad spectral surveys and to determine line-by-line parameters with wide dynamic range, and high spectral resolution, sensitivity and accuracy. We demonstrate a noise-equivalent absorption coefficient of 4×10-12 cm-1 Hz-1/2 and a signal-to-noise ratio of 1.5×106:1 in an absorption spectrum of carbon monoxide. We also present high-resolution measurements of trace methane in air spanning more than 1.2 THz and having a frequency axing with an uncertainty less than 100 kHz. Finally, we discuss how this system enables stringent tests of advanced line shape models. To illustrate, we measured an air-broadened carbon dioxide transition over a wide pressure range and analyzed these data with a multi-spectrum fit of the partially correlated, quadratic speed-dependent Nelkin-Ghatak profile. We obtained a quality-of-fit parameter in the multispectrum fit equal to 36,000, thus quantifying small-but-measurable limitations of the model profile. This analysis showed that the line shape depends upon collisional narrowing, speed dependent effects and partial correlations between velocity- and phase-changing collisions.

  7. Optimisation of external cavity parameters of a weak absorption laser spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Korolenko, P V; Lagunov, V V; Nikolaev, I V; Ochkin, V N; Tskhai, S N; Yatskevich, A N

    2016-03-31

    We consider some peculiar features of the optimisation procedure of external optical cavity parameters of a laser spectrometer, caused by the use of a three-beam measurement scheme and the presence of losses in the mirrors. It is found that the maximum sensitivity to the absorption of an intracavity medium can be achieved only at a certain choice of the value and the ratio of the reflection coefficients of the mirrors. For example, registration of the spectra of the methane impurity in the atmosphere shows that in accordance with the calculation model, for the same resonator Q-factor the use of an input mirror with a smaller reflection coefficient allows the measurement sensitivity to be increased by approximately two times. (laser spectroscopy)

  8. A Near-Infrared Spectrometer to Measure Zodiacal Light Absorption Spectrum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kutyrev, A. S.; Arendt, R.; Dwek, E.; Kimble, R.; Moseley, S. H.; Rapchun, D.; Silverberg, R. F.

    2010-01-01

    We have developed a high throughput infrared spectrometer for zodiacal light fraunhofer lines measurements. The instrument is based on a cryogenic dual silicon Fabry-Perot etalon which is designed to achieve high signal to noise Fraunhofer line profile measurements. Very large aperture silicon Fabry-Perot etalons and fast camera optics make these measurements possible. The results of the absorption line profile measurements will provide a model free measure of the zodiacal Light intensity in the near infrared. The knowledge of the zodiacal light brightness is crucial for accurate subtraction of zodiacal light foreground for accurate measure of the extragalactic background light after the subtraction of zodiacal light foreground. We present the final design of the instrument and the first results of its performance.

  9. Cavity-Enhanced Near-Infrared Laser Absorption Spectrometer for the Measurement of Acetonitrile in Breath.

    PubMed

    Gianella, Michele; Ritchie, Grant A D

    2015-07-07

    Elevated concentrations of acetonitrile have been found in the exhaled breath of patients with cystic fibrosis1 and may indicate the severity of their condition or the presence of an accompanying bacterial infection of the airways. There is therefore interest in detecting acetonitrile in exhaled breath. For this purpose, a cavity-enhanced laser absorption spectrometer (λ = 1.65 μm) with a preconcentration stage was built and is described here. The spectrometer has a limit of detection of 72 ppbv and 114 ppbv of acetonitrile in nitrogen and breath, respectively, with a measurement duration of just under 5 min. The preconcentration stage, which employs a carbon molecular sieve and an adsorption/thermal desorption cycle, can increase the acetonitrile concentration by up to a factor 93, thus, lowering the overall limit of detection to approximately 1 ppbv. The suitability of the system for acetonitrile measurements in breath is demonstrated with breath samples taken from the authors, which yielded acetonitrile concentrations of 23 ± 3 ppbv and 29 ± 3 ppbv, respectively.

  10. The nonlinear light output of NaI(Tl) detectors in the Modular Total Absorption Spectrometer

    DOE PAGES

    Rasco, B. C.; Fijałkowska, A.; Karny, M.; ...

    2015-04-08

    New detector array, the Modular Total Absorption Spectrometer (MTAS),was commissioned at the Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility (HRIBF) at Oak Ridge National Lab(ORNL).Total absorption gamma spectra measured with MTAS are expected to improve beta-feeding patterns and beta strength functions in fission products.MTAS is constructed out of hexagonal NaI(Tl) detectors with a unique central module surrounded by 18 identical crystals assembled in three rings. The total NaI(Tl) mass of MTAS is over1000 kg.The response of the central and other 18 MTAS modules to -radiation was simulated using the GEANT4 tool kit modified to analyze the nonlinear light output of NaI(Tl).A detailedmore » description oftheGEANT4modifications madeisdiscussed.SimulatedenergyresolutionofMTAS modules is found to agree well with the measurements for single transitions of 662keV (137Cs) with 8.2% full width half maximum (FWHM),835keV (54Mn) with FWHM of 7.5% FWHM, and 1115keV (65Zn) with FWHM of 6.5%.Simulations of single and multiple -rays from 60Co are also discussed.« less

  11. The airborne Laser Absorption Spectrometer - A new instrument of remote measurement of atmospheric trace gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shumate, M. S.; Menzies, R. T.

    1978-01-01

    The Laser Absorption Spectrometer is a portable instrument developed by JPL for remote measurement of trace gases from an aircraft platform. It contains two carbon dioxide lasers, two optical heterodyne receivers, appropriate optics to aim the lasers at the ground and detect the backscattered energy, and signal processing and recording electronics. Operating in the differential-absorption mode, it is possible to monitor one atmospheric gas at a time and record the data in real time. The system can presently measure ozone, ethylene, water vapor, and chlorofluoromethanes with high sensitivity. Airborne measurements were made in early 1977 from the NASA/JPL twin-engine Beechcraft and in May 1977 from the NASA Convair 990 during the ASSESS-II Shuttle Simulation Study. These flights resulted in measurements of ozone concentrations in the lower troposphere which were compared with ground-based values provided by the Air Pollution Control District. This paper describes the details of the instrument and results of the airborne measurements.

  12. The nonlinear light output of NaI(Tl) detectors in the Modular Total Absorption Spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Rasco, B. C.; Fijałkowska, A.; Karny, M.; Rykaczewski, K. P.; Wolińska-Cichocka, M.; Grzywacz, R.; Goetz, K. C.

    2015-04-08

    New detector array, the Modular Total Absorption Spectrometer (MTAS),was commissioned at the Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility (HRIBF) at Oak Ridge National Lab(ORNL).Total absorption gamma spectra measured with MTAS are expected to improve beta-feeding patterns and beta strength functions in fission products.MTAS is constructed out of hexagonal NaI(Tl) detectors with a unique central module surrounded by 18 identical crystals assembled in three rings. The total NaI(Tl) mass of MTAS is over1000 kg.The response of the central and other 18 MTAS modules to -radiation was simulated using the GEANT4 tool kit modified to analyze the nonlinear light output of NaI(Tl).A detailed description oftheGEANT4modifications madeisdiscussed.SimulatedenergyresolutionofMTAS modules is found to agree well with the measurements for single transitions of 662keV (137Cs) with 8.2% full width half maximum (FWHM),835keV (54Mn) with FWHM of 7.5% FWHM, and 1115keV (65Zn) with FWHM of 6.5%.Simulations of single and multiple -rays from 60Co are also discussed.

  13. Simulations of an airborne laser absorption spectrometer for atmospheric CO2 measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, B.; Ismail, S.; Harrison, F. W.; Browell, E. V.; Dobler, J. T.; Refaat, T.; Kooi, S. A.

    2012-12-01

    Atmospheric column amount of carbon dioxide (CO2), a major greenhouse gas of the atmosphere, has significantly increased from a preindustrial value of about 280 parts per million (ppm) to more than 390 ppm at present. Our knowledge about the spatiotemporal change and variability of the greenhouse gas, however, is limited. Thus, a near-term space mission of the Active Sensing of CO2 Emissions over Nights, Days, and Seasons (ASCENDS) is crucial to increase our understanding of global sources and sinks of CO2. Currently, NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) and ITT Exelis are jointly developing and testing an airborne laser absorption spectrometer (LAS) as a prototype instrument for the mission. To assess the space capability of accurate atmospheric CO2 measurements, accurate modeling of the instrument and practical evaluation of space applications are the keys for the success of the ASCENDS mission. This study discusses the simulations of the performance of the airborne instrument and its CO2 measurements. The LAS is a multi-wavelength spectrometer operating on a 1.57 um CO2 absorption line. The Intensity-Modulated Continuous-Wave (IM-CW) approach is implemented in the instrument. To reach accurate CO2 measurements, transmitted signals are monitored internally as reference channels. A model of this kind of instrument includes all major components of the spectrometer, such as modulation generator, fiber amplifier, telescope, detector, transimpedance amplifier, matched filter, and other signal processors. The characteristics of these components are based on actual laboratory tests, product specifications, and general understanding of the functionality of the components. For simulations of atmospheric CO2 measurements, environmental conditions related to surface reflection, atmospheric CO2 and H2O profiles, thin clouds, and aerosol layers, are introduced into the model. Furthermore, all major noise sources such as those from detectors, background radiation, speckle, and

  14. Total Absorption Gamma-ray Spectrometer (TAGS) Intensity Distributions from INL's Gamma-Ray Spectrometry Center

    DOE Data Explorer

    Greenwood, R. E.

    A 252Cf fission-product source and the INL on-line isotope separator were used to supply isotope-separated fission-product nuclides to a total absorption -ray spectrometer. This spectrometer consisted of a large (25.4-cm diameter x 30.5-cm long) NaI(Tl) detector with a 20.3-cm deep axial well in which is placed a 300-mm2 x 1.0-mm Si detector. The spectra from the NaI(Tl) detector are collected both in the singles mode and in coincidence with the B-events detected in the Si detector. Ideally, this detector would sum all the energy of the B- rays in each cascade following the population of daughter level by B- decay, so that the event could be directly associated with a particular daughter level. However, there are losses of energy from attenuation of the rays before they reach the detector, transmission of rays through the detector, escape of secondary photons from Compton scattering, escape of rays through the detector well, internal conversion, etc., and the measured spectra are thus more complicated than the ideal case and the analysis is more complex. Analysis methods have been developed to simulate all of these processes and thus provide a direct measure of the B- intensity distribution as a function of the excitation energy in the daughter nucleus. These data yield more accurate information on the B- distribution than conventional decay-scheme studies for complex decay schemes with large decay energies, because in the latter there are generally many unobserved and observed but unplaced rays. The TAGS data have been analyzed and published [R. E. Greenwood et al., Nucl Instr. and metho. A390(1997)] for 40 fission product-nuclides to determine the B- intensity distributions. [Copied from the TAGS page at http://www.inl.gov/gammaray/spectrometry/tags.shtml]. Those values are listed on this page for quick reference.

  15. An off Axis Cavity Enhanced Absorption Spectrometer and a Rapid Scan Spectrometer with a Room-Temperature External Cavity Quantum Cascade Laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xunchen; Kang, Cheolhwa; Xu, Yunjie

    2009-06-01

    Quantum cascade laser (QCL) is a new type of mid-infrared tunable diode lasers with superior output power and mode quality. Recent developments, such as room temperature operation, wide frequency tunability, and narrow line width, make QCLs an ideal light source for high resolution spectroscopy. Two slit jet infrared spectrometers, namely an off-axis cavity enhanced absorption (CEA) spectrometer and a rapid scan spectrometer with an astigmatic multi-pass cell assembly, have been coupled with a newly purchased room temperature tunable mod-hop-free QCL with a frequency coverage from 1592 cm^{-1} to 1698 cm^{-1} and a scan rate of 0.1 cm^{-1}/ms. Our aim is to utilize these two sensitive spectrometers, that are equipped with a molecular jet expansion, to investigate the chiral molecules-(water)_n clusters. To demonstrate the resolution and sensitivity achieved, the rovibrational transitions of the static N_2O gas and the bending rovibrational transitions of the Ar-water complex, a test system, at 1634 cm^{-1} have been measured. D. Hofstetter and J. Faist in High performance quantum cascade lasers and their applications, Vol.89 Springer-Verlag Berlin & Heidelberg, 2003, pp. 61-98. Y. Xu, X. Liu, Z. Su, R. M. Kulkarni, W. S. Tam, C. Kang, I. Leonov and L. D'Agostino, Proc. Spie, 2009, 722208 (1-11). M. J. Weida and D. J. Nesbitt, J. Chem. Phys. 1997, 106, 3078-3089.

  16. Imaging DOAS detection of primary formaldehyde and sulfur dioxide emissions from petrochemical flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pikelnaya, Olga; Flynn, James H.; Tsai, Catalina; Stutz, Jochen

    2013-08-01

    areas with a high number of petrochemical facilities are often struggling to meet current and future air quality standards. The Houston-Galveston area, for example, continues to be in noncompliance with the U.S. federal air quality standard of ozone, despite significant progress in mitigating air pollution. In recent years, the magnitude and role of primary emissions of ozone-forming chemicals, and in particular formaldehyde, from flares in petrochemical facilities have been discussed as a potential factor contributing to ozone formation. However, no direct observations of flare emissions of formaldehyde have thus far been reported. Here we present observations of formaldehyde and sulfur dioxide emissions from petrochemical flares in the Houston-Galveston area during the 2009 Formaldehyde and Olefin from Large Industrial Sources campaign using a new imaging differential optical absorption spectrometer (I-DOAS). Formaldehyde emissions from burning flares were observed directly above the flare stack and ranged from 0.2 to 8.5 kg/h. Unlit flares were found not to emit formaldehyde. SO2 emission rates from a burning acid gas flare ranged between 2 and 4 kg/h. None of the sampled flares coemitted HCHO and SO2. Comparison of the emission fluxes measured by the I-DOAS instrument with those from emission inventories and with fluxes calculated from plumes detected by the long-path DOAS over downtown Houston shows that the flares observed by the I-DOAS were relatively small. While burning flares clearly emit HCHO, a larger observational database is needed to assess the importance of flare emissions for ozone formation.

  17. A doubly curved elliptical crystal spectrometer for the study of localized x-ray absorption in hot plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Cahill, Adam D. Hoyt, Cad L.; Pikuz, Sergei A.; Shelkovenko, Tania; Hammer, David A.

    2014-10-15

    X-ray absorption spectroscopy is a powerful tool for the diagnosis of plasmas over a wide range of both temperature and density. However, such a measurement is often limited to probing plasmas with temperatures well below that of the x-ray source in order to avoid object plasma emission lines from obscuring important features of the absorption spectrum. This has excluded many plasmas from being investigated by this technique. We have developed an x-ray spectrometer that provides the ability to record absorption spectra from higher temperature plasmas than the usual approach allows without the risk of data contamination by line radiation emitted by the plasma under study. This is accomplished using a doubly curved mica crystal which is bent both elliptically and cylindrically. We present here the foundational work in the design and development of this spectrometer along with initial results obtained with an aluminum x-pinch as the object plasma.

  18. Measurement of the Spectral Absorption of Liquid Water in Melting Snow With an Imaging Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, Robert O.; Dozier, Jeff

    1995-01-01

    Melting of the snowpack is a critical parameter that drives aspects of the hydrology in regions of the Earth where snow accumulates seasonally. New techniques for measurement of snow melt over regional scales offer the potential to improve monitoring and modeling of snow-driven hydrological processes. In this paper we present the results of measuring the spectral absorption of liquid water in a melting snowpack with the Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS). AVIRIS data were acquired over Mammoth Mountain, in east central California on 21 May 1994 at 18:35 UTC. The air temperature at 2926 m on Mammoth Mountain at site A was measured at 15-minute intervals during the day preceding the AVIRIS data acquisition. At this elevation. the air temperature did not drop below freezing the night of the May 20 and had risen to 6 degrees Celsius by the time of the overflight on May 21. These temperature conditions support the presence of melting snow at the surface as the AVIRIS data were acquired.

  19. Measurement of the spectral absorption of liquid water in melting snow with an imaging spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, Robert O.; Dozier, Jeff

    1995-01-01

    Melting of the snowpack is a critical parameter that drives aspects of the hydrology in regions of the earth where snow accumulates seasonally. New techniques for measurement of snow melt over regional scales offer the potential to improve monitoring and modeling of snow-driven hydrological processes. We present the results of measuring the spectral absorption of liquid water in a melting snowpack with the Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS). AVIRIS data were acquired over Mammoth Mountain, in east central California on 21 May 1994 at 18:35 UTC. The air temperature at 2926 m on Mammoth Mountain at site A was measured at 15-minute intervals during the day preceding the AVIRIS data acquisition. At this elevation, the air temperature did not drop below freezing the night of May 20 and had risen to 6 degrees Celsius by the time of the overflight on May 21. These temperature conditions support the presence of melting snow at the surface as the AVIRIS data were acquired.

  20. MAX-DOAS Measurements of Nitrogen Dioxide and Aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendolia, Deanna

    Multi-axis differential optical absorption spectroscopy (MAX-DOAS) was applied to retrieve tropospheric NO2 and aerosol vertical profiles from downtown Toronto, and King City, Ontario during select periods in 2006 - 2010. Linear regression of MAX-DOAS NO2 vertical column density (VCD) versus OMI (satellite) VCD yielded a good correlation (R = 0.88) and MAX-DOAS negative bias of 20%, which was within the reported uncertainty of the MAX-DOAS and OMI VCD. The average regional Toronto VCD (remotely-sensed via MAX-DOAS and OMI) was half of the near-road VCD obtained in-situ (2.4 x 1016 ± 1.2 x 1016 molec/cm2 ). MAX-DOAS measurements of O4 were coupled with radiative transfer modeling to obtain vertical aerosol extinction profiles and aerosol optical depth (AOD). A strong linear agreement was observed between PM 2.5 concentration and aerosol extinction coefficient (R = 0.92), and MAX-DOAS versus sun photometer AOD (slope = 0.94; R= 0.90).

  1. Detection of atmospheric trace gas species by DOAS gas-analyzer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geiko, Pavel P.; Smirnov, Sergey S.; Samokhvalov, Ignatii V.

    2014-11-01

    A differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS) gas-analyzer was successfully tested. A high pressure 150-W Xe arc lamp was employed as a light source This system consisted of a coaxial telescope, a spectrometer, an analyzer and retroreflector. In order to record the spectra, a monochrometer with a grating and photodiode array was adopted. Gas analyzer spectral data bank includes more than 30 moleculas absorbed in UV spectral region. The measured absorption spectra were evaluated by using a least-squares fit to determine the average mixing ratio of each species in the atmosphere. A number of air pollutants concentrations: SO2, NO2, O3, etc were trace measured. Minimally detected concentration on pathlength 400 m is the unit of ppb at the time of accumulation of 2 min. The results of the field test measurements of pollutants in Tomsk are presented.

  2. A broadband cavity enhanced absorption spectrometer for aircraft measurements of glyoxal, methylglyoxal, nitrous acid, nitrogen dioxide, and water vapor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Min, K.-E.; Washenfelder, R. A.; Dubé, W. P.; Langford, A. O.; Edwards, P. M.; Zarzana, K. J.; Stutz, J.; Lu, K.; Rohrer, F.; Zhang, Y.; Brown, S. S.

    2016-02-01

    We describe a two-channel broadband cavity enhanced absorption spectrometer (BBCEAS) for aircraft measurements of glyoxal (CHOCHO), methylglyoxal (CH3COCHO), nitrous acid (HONO), nitrogen dioxide (NO2), and water (H2O). The instrument spans 361-389 and 438-468 nm, using two light-emitting diodes (LEDs) and a single grating spectrometer with a charge-coupled device (CCD) detector. Robust performance is achieved using a custom optical mounting system, high-power LEDs with electronic on/off modulation, high-reflectivity cavity mirrors, and materials that minimize analyte surface losses. We have successfully deployed this instrument during two aircraft and two ground-based field campaigns to date. The demonstrated precision (2σ) for retrievals of CHOCHO, HONO and NO2 are 34, 350, and 80 parts per trillion (pptv) in 5 s. The accuracy is 5.8, 9.0, and 5.0 %, limited mainly by the available absorption cross sections.

  3. A broadband cavity enhanced absorption spectrometer for aircraft measurements of glyoxal, methylglyoxal, nitrous acid, nitrogen dioxide, and water vapor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Min, K.-E.; Washenfelder, R. A.; Dubé, W. P.; Langford, A. O.; Edwards, P. M.; Zarzana, K. J.; Stutz, J.; Lu, K.; Rohrer, F.; Zhang, Y.; Brown, S. S.

    2015-10-01

    We describe a two-channel broadband cavity enhanced absorption spectrometer (BBCEAS) for aircraft measurements of glyoxal (CHOCHO), methylglyoxal (CH3COCHO), nitrous acid (HONO), nitrogen dioxide (NO2), and water (H2O). The instrument spans 361-389 and 438-468 nm, using two light emitting diodes (LEDs) and a grating spectrometer with a charge-coupled device (CCD) detector. Robust performance is achieved using a custom optical mounting system, high power LEDs with electronic on/off modulation, state-of-the-art cavity mirrors, and materials that minimize analyte surface losses. We have successfully deployed this instrument during two aircraft and two ground-based field campaigns to date. The demonstrated precision (2σ) for retrievals of CHOCHO, HONO and NO2 are 34, 350 and 80 pptv in 5 s. The accuracy is 5.8, 9.0 and 5.0 % limited mainly by the available absorption cross sections.

  4. Total ozone column distribution over peninsular Malaysia from scanning imaging absorption spectrometer for atmospheric cartography (SCIAMACHY)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, K. C.; Lim, H. S.; MatJafri, M. Z.

    2012-10-01

    Increasing of atmospheric ozone concentrations have received great attention around the whole because of its characteristic, in order to degrade air quality and brings hazard to human health and ecosystems. Ozone, one of the most pollutants source and brings a variety of adverse effects on plant life and human being. Continuous monitoring on ozone concentrations at atmosphere provide information and precautions for the high ozone level, which we need to be established. Satellite observation of ozone has been identified that it can provide the precise and accurate data globally, which sensitive to the small regional biases. We present measurements from Scanning Imaging Absorption Spectrometer for Atmospheric Cartography (SCIAMACHY) included on the European environmental satellite ENVISAT, launched on 1st of March 2002. Main objective of this study is to examine the ozone distribution over Peninsular Malaysia using SCIAMACHY level-2 of total ozone column WFMD version 1.0 with spatial resolution 1° x 1.25°. Maps of time averaged (yearly, tri-monthly) ozone was generated and analyzed over Peninsular Malaysia for the year 2003 using PCI Geomatica 10.3 image processing software. It was retrieved using the interpolation technique. The concentration changes within boundary layer at all altitude levels are equally sensitive through the SCIAMACHY nearinfrared nadir observations. Hence, we can make observation of ozone at surface source region. The results successfully identify the area with highest and lowest concentration of ozone at Peninsular Malaysia using SCIAMACHY data. Therefore, the study is suitable to examine the distribution of ozone at tropical region.

  5. Development of a cavity enhanced absorption spectrometer for airborne measurements of CH4 and CO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Shea, S. J.; Bauguitte, S. J.-B.; Gallagher, M. W.; Lowry, D.; Percival, C. J.

    2013-01-01

    High-resolution CH4 and CO2 measurements were made onboard the FAAM BAe 146 UK atmospheric research aircraft during a number of field campaigns. The system was based on an infrared spectrometer using the cavity enhanced absorption spectroscopy technique. Correction functions to convert the mole fractions retrieved from the spectroscopy to dry air mole fractions were derived using laboratory experiments and over a 3 month period showed good stability. Long-term performance of the system was monitored using WMO traceable calibration gases. During the first year of operation (29 flights) analysis of the system's in-flight calibrations suggest that its measurements are accurate to -0.07 ppbv (1 σ precision at 1 Hz = 2.48 ppbv) for CH4 and -0.06 ppmv (1 σ precision at 1 Hz = 0.66 ppmv) for CO2. The system was found to be very robust, no major motion or altitude dependency could be detected in the measurements. An inter-comparison between whole air samples that were analysed post-flight for CH4 and CO2 by cavity ring down spectroscopy showed a mean difference between the two techniques of -2.4 ppbv (1 σ = 2.3 ppbv) for CH4 and -0.22 ppmv (1 σ = 0.45 ppmv) for CO2. In September 2012, the system was used to sample biomass burning plumes in Brazil as part of the SAMBBA project (South American biomass burning analysis). From these and simultaneous CO measurements, emission factors for savannah fires were calculated. These were found to be 2.2 ± 0.2 g (kg dry matter)-1 for CH4 and 1710 ± 171 g (kg dry matter)-1 for CO2, which are in excellent agreement with previous estimates in the literature.

  6. Method for the determination of cobalt from biological products with graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zamfir, Oana-Liliana; Ionicǎ, Mihai; Caragea, Genica; Radu, Simona; Vlǎdescu, Marian

    2016-12-01

    Cobalt is a chemical element with symbol Co and atomic number 27 and atomic weight 58.93. 59 Co is the only stable cobalt isotope and the only isotope to exist naturally on Earth. Cobalt is the active center of coenzymes called cobalamin or cyanocobalamin the most common example of which is vitamin B12. Vitamin B12 deficiency can potentially cause severe and irreversible damage, especially to the brain and nervous system in the form of fatigue, depression and poor memory or even mania and psychosis. In order to study the degree of deficiency of the population with Co or the correctness of treatment with vitamin B12, a modern optoelectronic method for the determination of metals and metalloids from biological samples has been developed, Graphite Furnace - Atomic Absorption Spectrometer (GF- AAS) method is recommended. The technique is based on the fact that free atoms will absorb light at wavelengths characteristic of the element of interest. Free atoms of the chemical element can be produced from samples by the application of high temperatures. The system GF-AAS Varian used as biological samples, blood or urine that followed the digest of the organic matrix. For the investigations was used a high - performance GF-AAS with D2 - background correction system and a transversely heated graphite atomizer. As result of the use of the method are presented the concentration of Co in the blood or urine of a group of patient in Bucharest. The method is sensitive, reproducible relatively easy to apply, with a moderately costs.

  7. Eddy covariance carbonyl sulfide flux measurements with a quantum cascade laser absorption spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerdel, Katharina; Spielmann, Felix M.; Hammerle, Albin; Wohlfahrt, Georg

    2016-04-01

    Carbonyl sulfide (COS) is the most abundant sulfur containing trace gas present in the troposphere at concentrations of around 500 ppt. Recent interest in COS by the ecosystem-physiological community has been sparked by the fact that COS co-diffuses into plant leaves pretty much the same way as carbon dioxide (CO2) does, but in contrast to CO2, COS is not known to be emitted by plants. Thus uptake of COS by vegetation has the potential to be used as a tracer for canopy gross photosynthesis, which cannot be measured directly, however represents a key term in the global carbon cycle. Since a few years, quantum cascade laser absorption spectrometers (QCLAS) are commercially available with the precision, sensitivity and time response suitable for eddy covariance (EC) flux measurements. While there exist a handful of published reports on EC flux measurements in the recent literature, no rigorous investigation of the applicability of QCLAS for EC COS flux measurements has been carried out so far, nor have been EC processing and QA/QC steps developed for carbon dioxide and water vapor flux measurements within FLUXNET been assessed for COS. The aim of this study is to close this knowledge gap, to discuss critical steps in the post-processing chain of COS EC flux measurements and to devise best-practice guidelines for COS EC flux data processing. To this end we collected EC COS (and CO2, H2O and CO) flux measurements above a temperate mountain grassland in Austria over the vegetation period 2015 with a commercially available QCLAS. We discuss various aspects of EC data post-processing, in particular issues with the time-lag estimation between sonic anemometer and QCLAS signals and QCLAS time series detrending, as well as QA/QC, in particular flux detection limits, random flux uncertainty, the interaction of various processing steps with common EC QA/QC filters (e.g. detrending and stationarity tests), u*-filtering, etc.

  8. MAX-DOAS measurements of aerosol, HCHO, and NO2 over Los Angeles from an elevated mountaintop site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheung, Ross

    MAX-DOAS measurements of aerosol, HCHO, and NO2 over Los Angeles from an elevated mountaintop site. By. Ross Cheung. Doctor of Philosophy in Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences. University of California, Los Angeles, 2016. Professor Jochen Stutz, Chair. Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (DOAS) has become a popular technique for measuring atmospheric trace gases using UV/Vis narrow-band absorption features along a light path through the atmosphere. The UCLA Multi-Axis DOAS instrument (MAX-DOAS) is a ground-based spectrometer currently located at Mt. Wilson, California (1700 meters above sea level) that measures solar scattered light at various viewing elevation angles. Since May of 2010, it has been taking regular measurements of atmospheric pollutants in the boundary layer of the atmosphere in and above the Los Angeles Basin. This thesis presents the experimental setup and spectral retrievals, as well as results of our observations of measurements of NO2 and HCHO from Mt. Wilson. Radiative transfer modeling efforts of the deployment at Mt. Wilson will be presented, as well as our efforts to model and account for the effects of clouds and aerosols on MAX-DOAS measurements. Because of the unique challenges presented by aerosols in the ultraviolet and visible light region in a polluted urban boundary layer, new techniques were developed to account for and quantify these effects. Observations of path-integrated NO2 and HCHO, some of the primary precursors to ozone formation in the lower troposphere, as well as aerosol extinctions using the UCLA MAX-DOAS will be presented, and the advantages of a mountaintop measurement strategy will be discussed in light of the amount of vertical information that can be retrieved from this approach. The techniques developed to improve the optimal estimation of vertical aerosol extinction profiles and trace gas concentration profiles will be discussed. Finally, an application of these observations uses the ratio of HCHO/NO2 to

  9. Capillary Absorption Spectrometer for 13C Isotopic Composition of Pico to Subpico Molar Sample Quantities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moran, J.; Kelly, J.; Sams, R.; Newburn, M.; Kreuzer, H.; Alexander, M.

    2011-12-01

    Quick incorporation of IR spectroscopy based isotope measurements into cutting edge research in biogeochemical cycling attests to the advantages of a spectroscopy versus mass spectrometry method for making some 13C measurements. The simple principles of optical spectroscopy allow field portability and provide a more robust general platform for isotope measurements. We present results with a new capillary absorption spectrometer (CAS) with the capability of reducing the sample size required for high precision isotopic measurements to the picomolar level and potentially the sub-picomolar level. This work was motivated by the minute sample size requirements for laser ablation isotopic studies of carbon cycling in microbial communities but has potential to be a valuable tool in other areas of biological and geological research. The CAS instrument utilizes a capillary waveguide as a sample chamber for interrogating CO2 via near IR laser absorption spectroscopy. The capillary's small volume (~ 0.5 mL) combined with propagation and interaction of the laser mode with the entire sample reduces sample size requirements to a fraction of that accessible with commercially available IR absorption including those with multi-pass or ring-down cavity systems. Using a continuous quantum cascade laser system to probe nearly adjacent rovibrational transitions of different isotopologues of CO2 near 2307 cm-1 permits sample measurement at low analyte pressures (as low as 2 Torr) for further sensitivity improvement. A novel method to reduce cw-fringing noise in the hollow waveguide is presented, which allows weak absorbance features to be studied at the few ppm level after averaging 1,000 scans in 10 seconds. Detection limits down to the 20 picomoles have been observed, a concentration of approximately 400 ppm at 2 Torr in the waveguide with precision and accuracy at or better than 1 %. Improvements in detection and signal averaging electronics and laser power and mode quality are

  10. Comparison of stratospheric NO2 profiles above Kiruna, Sweden retrieved from ground-based zenith sky DOAS measurements, SAOZ balloon measurements and SCIAMACHY limb observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Myojeong; Enell, Carl-Fredrik; Hendrick, François; Pukite, Janis; Van Roozendael, Michel; Platt, Ulrich; Raffalski, Uwe; Wagner, Thomas

    2015-04-01

    Stratospheric NO2 not only destroys ozone but acts as a buffer against halogen catalyzed ozone loss by converting halogen species into stable nitrates. These two roles of stratospheric NO2 depend on the altitude. Hence, the objective of this study is to investigate the vertical distribution of stratospheric NO2. We compare the NO2 profiles derived from the zenith sky DOAS with those obtained from, SAOZ balloon measurements and satellite limb observations. Vertical profiles of stratospheric NO2 are retrieved from ground-based zenith sky DOAS observations operated at Kiruna, Sweden (68.84°N, 20.41°E) since 1996. To determine the profile of stratospheric NO2 measured from ground-based zenith sky DOAS, we apply the Optimal Estimation Method (OEM) to retrieval of vertical profiles of stratospheric NO2 which has been developed by IASB-BIRA. The basic principle behind this profiling approach is the dependence of the mean scattering height on solar zenith angle (SZA). We compare the retrieved profiles to two additional datasets of stratospheric NO2 profile. The first one is derived from satellite limb observations by SCIAMACHY (Scanning Imaging Absorption spectrometer for Atmospheric CHartographY) on EnviSAT. The second is derived from the SAOZ balloon measurements (using a UV/Visible spectrometer) performed at Kiruna in Sweden.

  11. Intercomparison of stratospheric nitrogen dioxide columns retrieved from ground-based DOAS and FTIR and satellite DOAS instruments over the subtropical Izana station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robles-Gonzalez, Cristina; Navarro-Comas, Mónica; Puentedura, Olga; Schneider, Matthias; Hase, Frank; Garcia, Omaira; Blumenstock, Thomas; Gil-Ojeda, Manuel

    2016-09-01

    A 13-year analysis (2000-2012) of the NO2 vertical column densities derived from ground-based (GB) instruments and satellites has been carried out over the Izaña NDACC (Network for the Detection of the Atmospheric Composition Change) subtropical site. Ground-based DOAS (differential optical absorption spectroscopy) and FTIR (Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy) instruments are intercompared to test mutual consistency and then used for validation of stratospheric NO2 from OMI (Ozone Monitoring Instrument) and SCIAMACHY (SCanning Imaging Absorption spectroMeter for Atmospheric CHartographY). The intercomparison has been carried out taking into account the various differences existing in instruments, namely temporal coincidence, collocation, sensitivity, field of view, etc. The paper highlights the importance of considering an "effective solar zenith angle" instead of the actual one when comparing direct-sun instruments with zenith sky ones for a proper photochemical correction. Results show that NO2 vertical column densities mean relative difference between FTIR and DOAS instruments is 2.8 ± 10.7 % for a.m. data. Both instruments properly reproduce the NO2 seasonal and the interannual variation. Mean relative difference of the stratospheric NO2 derived from OMI and DOAS is -0.2 ± 8.7 % and from OMI and FTIR is -1.6 ± 6.7 %. SCIAMACHY mean relative difference is of 3.7 ± 11.7 and -5.7 ± 11.0 % for DOAS and FTIR, respectively. Note that the days used for the intercomparison are not the same for all the pairs of instruments since it depends on the availability of data. The discrepancies are found to be seasonally dependent with largest differences in winter and excellent agreement in the spring months (AMJ). A preliminary analysis of NO2 trends has been carried out with the available data series. Results show increases in stratospheric NO2 columns in all instruments but larger values in those that are GB than that expected by nitrous oxide oxidation. The

  12. Laser Absorption spectrometer instrument for tomographic 2D-measurement of climate gas emission from soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seidel, Anne; Wagner, Steven; Dreizler, Andreas; Ebert, Volker

    2014-05-01

    One of the most intricate effects in climate modelling is the role of permafrost thawing during the global warming process. Soil that has formerly never totally lost its ice cover now emits climate gases due to melting processes[1]. For a better prediction of climate development and possible feedback mechanisms, insights into physical procedures (like e.g. gas emission from underground reservoirs) are required[2]. Therefore, a long-term quantification of greenhouse gas concentrations (and further on fluxes) is necessary and the related structures that are responsible for emission need to be identified. In particular the spatial heterogeneity of soils caused by soil internal structures (e.g. soil composition changes or surface cracks) or by surface modifications (e.g. by plant growth) generate considerable complexities and difficulties for local measurements, for example with soil chambers. For such situations, which often cannot be avoided, a spatially resolved 2D-measurement to identify and quantify the gas emission from the structured soil would be needed, to better understand the influence of the soil sub-structures on the emission behavior. Thus we designed a spatially scanning laser absorption spectrometer setup to determine a 2D-gas concentration map in the soil-air boundary layer. The setup is designed to cover the surfaces in the range of square meters in a horizontal plane above the soil to be investigated. Existing field instruments for gas concentration or flux measurements are based on point-wise measurements, so structure identification is very tedious or even impossible. For this reason, we have developed a tomographic in-situ instrument based on TDLAS ('tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy') that delivers absolute gas concentration distributions of areas with 0.8m × 0.8m size, without any need for reference measurements with a calibration gas. It is a simple and robust device based on a combination of scanning mirrors and reflecting foils, so

  13. Retrieval and molecule sensitivity studies for the global ozone monitoring experiment and the scanning imaging absorption spectrometer for atmospheric chartography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chance, Kelly V.; Burrows, John P.; Schneider, Wolfgang

    1991-01-01

    The Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment (GOME) and the SCanning Imaging Absorption spectroMeter for Atmospheric CHartographY (SCIAMACHY) are diode based spectrometers that will make atmospheric constituent and aerosol measurements from European satellite platforms beginning in the mid 1990's. GOME measures the atmosphere in the UV and visible in nadir scanning, while SCIAMACHY performs a combination of nadir, limb, and occultation measurements in the UV, visible, and infrared. A summary is presented of the sensitivity studies that were performed for SCIAMACHY measurements. As the GOME measurement capability is a subset of the SCIAMACHY measurement capability, the nadir, UV, and visible portion of the studies is shown to apply to GOME as well.

  14. Inhomogeneity of NO2 over Yokosuka, an urban site in Japan observed by MAX-DOAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takashima, H.; Irie, H.; Kanaya, Y.

    2010-12-01

    Since April 2007, continuous NO2 profile observations have been performed using ground-based Multi-Axis Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (MAX-DOAS) at Yokosuka (35.32°N, 139.65°E), an urban site in Japan. MAX-DOAS is a passive remote sensing technique using scatted visible and ultraviolet solar radiation at several elevation angles. It has been suggested that MAX-DOAS can allow us to retrieve vertical information on not only NO2 but also aerosol, H2 O, HCHO, and CHOCHO. In this study, we compare mean NO2 concentrations for 0-1 km layer derived from MAX-DOAS and surface values taken by in-situ measurements near the source region. Comparisons showed generally good agreement on seasonal, intraseasonal and diurnal time scales. However, MAX-DOAS NO2 was less than that of in-situ (surface) values particularly at higher surface values. Since the MAX-DOAS telescope used in this study was set in the azimuth direction of sea, it is expected that MAX-DOAS shows low values when the measured air masses contain information over ocean. To confirm this, MAX-DOAS NO2 was generally low when air was advected from sea. Also, for air masses measured by MAX-DOAS, the horizontal distance (depth) was estimated from the box air mass factor. We find that the concentration was generally higher when the horizontal distance was shorter, as expected. On the other hand, particularly low NO2 concentration was sometimes observed only in MAX-DOAS NO2 . For these cases, the air mass was likely vertically well mixed and the horizontal distance was long. Attention should be paid to consider such inhomogeneity to compare the MAX-DOAS measurement with in-situ surface measurement as well as to validate satellite-derived NO2 column amounts by MAX-DOAS over urban areas.

  15. NO2 and HCHO variability in Mexico City from MAX-DOAS measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grutter, M.; Friedrich, M. M.; Rivera, C. I.; Arellano, E. J.; Stremme, W.

    2015-12-01

    Atmospheric studies in large cities are of great relevance since pollution affects air quality and human health. A network of Multi Axis Differential Optical Absorption Spectrometers (MAX-DOAS) has been established in strategic sites within the Mexico City metropolitan area. Four instruments are now in operation with the aim to study the variability and spatial distribution of key pollutants, providing results of O4, NO2 and HCHO slant column densities (SCD). A numerical code has been written to retrieve gas profiles of NO2 and HCHO using radiative transfer simulations. We present the first results of the variability of these trace gases which will bring new insight in the current knowledge of transport patterns, emissions as well as frequency and origin of extraordinary events. Results of the vertical column densities (VCD) valiability of NO2 and HCHO in Mexico City are presented. These studies are useful to validate current and future satellite observatopns such as OMI, TROPOMI and TEMPO.

  16. LED-CE-DOAS and MAX-DOAS measurements of glyoxal and NO2 at Milliken Library during CalNEX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thalman, R. M.; Waxman, E.; Coburn, S.; Ortega, I.; Volkamer, R.

    2010-12-01

    The University of Colorado Light Emitting Diode Cavity Enhanced Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (CU LED-CE-DOAS) and a CU Ground based MAX-DOAS instrument were deployed on top of Milliken Library at the CalNex-LA site (May.June 2010). The CU LED-CE-DOAS is a novel instrument that was deployed for the first time in the field to measure in-situ concentrations of nitrogen dioxide (NO2) and glyoxal (CHOCHO) at roof top level. The CU Ground MAX-DOAS measured vertical column integral amounts of the same gases, along with formaldehyde (HCHO) among other gases. For a period of time two CE-DOAS instruments were operated simultaneously with one in closed and one in open cavity mode. Open cavity mode allows air to flow between the mirrors of the cavity and does not utilize an inlet or aerosol filter. NO2 measurements by the two instruments are compared. Here we present the diurnal profiles for glyoxal and NO2 measured by CE-DOAS for the duration of the Cal-NEX campaign. The temporal evolution of in situ CE-DOAS measurements of NO2 and glyoxal is used in combination with that of the vertical column density measured by MAX-DOAS to assess transport to the site, as well as to estimate the boundary layer height.

  17. Cloud detection and classification based on MAX-DOAS observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, T.; Beirle, S.; Dörner, S.; Friess, U.; Remmers, J.; Shaiganfar, R.

    2013-12-01

    Multi-AXis-Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (MAX-DOAS) observations of aerosols and trace gases can be strongly influenced by clouds. Thus it is important to identify clouds and characterise their properties. In this study we investigate the effects of clouds on several quantities which can be derived from MAX-DOAS observations, like the radiance, the colour index (radiance ratio at two selected wavelengths), the absorption of the oxygen dimer O4 and the fraction of inelastically scattered light (Ring effect). To identify clouds, these quantities can be either compared to their corresponding clear sky reference values, or their dependencies on time or viewing direction can be analysed. From the investigation of the temporal variability the influence of clouds can be identified even for individual measurements. Based on our investigations we developed a cloud classification scheme, which can be applied in a flexible way to MAX-DOAS or zenith DOAS observations: in its simplest version, zenith observations of the colour index are used to identify the presence of clouds (or high aerosol load). In more sophisticated versions, also other quantities and viewing directions are considered, which allows sub-classifications like e.g. thin or thick clouds, or fog. We applied our cloud classification scheme to MAX-DOAS observations during the CINDI campaign in the Netherlands in Summer 2009 and found very good agreement with sky images taken from ground.

  18. Cloud detection and classification based on MAX-DOAS observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, T.; Apituley, A.; Beirle, S.; Dörner, S.; Friess, U.; Remmers, J.; Shaiganfar, R.

    2014-05-01

    Multi-axis differential optical absorption spectroscopy (MAX-DOAS) observations of aerosols and trace gases can be strongly influenced by clouds. Thus, it is important to identify clouds and characterise their properties. In this study we investigate the effects of clouds on several quantities which can be derived from MAX-DOAS observations, like radiance, the colour index (radiance ratio at two selected wavelengths), the absorption of the oxygen dimer O4 and the fraction of inelastically scattered light (Ring effect). To identify clouds, these quantities can be either compared to their corresponding clear-sky reference values, or their dependencies on time or viewing direction can be analysed. From the investigation of the temporal variability the influence of clouds can be identified even for individual measurements. Based on our investigations we developed a cloud classification scheme, which can be applied in a flexible way to MAX-DOAS or zenith DOAS observations: in its simplest version, zenith observations of the colour index are used to identify the presence of clouds (or high aerosol load). In more sophisticated versions, other quantities and viewing directions are also considered, which allows subclassifications like, e.g., thin or thick clouds, or fog. We applied our cloud classification scheme to MAX-DOAS observations during the Cabauw intercomparison campaign of Nitrogen Dioxide measuring instruments (CINDI) campaign in the Netherlands in summer 2009 and found very good agreement with sky images taken from the ground and backscatter profiles from a lidar.

  19. Methods for Retrievals of CO2 Mixing Ratios from JPL Laser Absorption Spectrometer Flights During a Summer 2011 Campaign

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Menzies, Robert T.; Spiers, Gary D.; Jacob, Joseph C.

    2013-01-01

    The JPL airborne Laser Absorption Spectrometer instrument has been flown several times in the 2007-2011 time frame for the purpose of measuring CO2 mixing ratios in the lower atmosphere. This instrument employs CW laser transmitters and coherent detection receivers in the 2.05- micro m spectral region. The Integrated Path Differential Absorption (IPDA) method is used to retrieve weighted CO2 column mixing ratios. We present key features of the evolving LAS signal processing and data analysis algorithms and the calibration/validation methodology. Results from 2011 flights in various U.S. locations include observed mid-day CO2 drawdown in the Midwest and high spatial resolution plume detection during a leg downwind of the Four Corners power plant in New Mexico.

  20. Airborne Laser Absorption Spectrometer Measurements of CO2 Column Mixing Ratios: Source and Sink Detection in the Atmospheric Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menzies, Robert T.; Spiers, Gary D.; Jacob, Joseph C.

    2016-06-01

    The JPL airborne Laser Absorption Spectrometer instrument has been flown several times in the 2007-2011 time frame for the purpose of measuring CO2 mixing ratios in the lower atmosphere. The four most recent flight campaigns were on the NASA DC-8 research aircraft, in support of the NASA ASCENDS (Active Sensing of CO2 Emissions over Nights, Days, and Seasons) mission formulation studies. This instrument operates in the 2.05-μm spectral region. The Integrated Path Differential Absorption (IPDA) method is used to retrieve weighted CO2 column mixing ratios. We present key features of the CO2LAS signal processing, data analysis, and the calibration/validation methodology. Results from flights in various U.S. locations during the past three years include observed mid-day CO2 drawdown in the Midwest, also cases of point-source and regional plume detection that enable the calculation of emission rates.

  1. Instrumentation and key elements of the dispersive x-ray absorption spectrometer for accurate measurements (invited) (abstract)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fontaine, A.; Baudelet, F.; Dartyge, E.; Dubuisson, J. M.; Giorgetti, C.; Pizzini, Stefania; Andrault, D.; Farges, F.; Fiquet, G.; Itié, J. P.; Polian, A.; Miguel, A. San; Tolentino, H.

    1995-02-01

    Measurement of very small differences of the total cross section is the current demand for the spectrometers dedicated to time-dependent experiments carried out under various time-ramped parameters. The dispersive optics and more precisely the full x-ray-absorption spectrometer is mechanically movement-free during data collection which can last over 12 h at LURE-DCI to be sensitive to relative change of the absorption of the order of 10-5. In this range, artefacts due to the drift of silicon lattice spacing under temperature change of the crystal, and drifts of the detector position because of liquid-nitrogen evaporation contained in the cryostat, are sources of errors which have been identified and cured or ... by-passed. The accuracy in difference measurements is now of the order of 10-5 for a total cross section measured equal to 1. In term of optics stability a difference signal of 10-4 out of 1 can be generated by an absorption edge shift caused by a 0.05 K drift of the temperature of the silicon crystal at 7 keV. These performances are essential for the measurement of XMCD in the hard-x-ray range. Water cooling of the dynamically bent crystal reduces dramatically the change of the Si temperature. Adequate geometry makes the spatial drift of the position of the photodiode array much less concerning. The focusing efficiency is also a key parameter to push high-pressure x-ray-absorption spectroscopy (55 GPa), and high-temperature XAS (2000 K), and the combination (15 GPa, 800 K). Simple devices, taking advantage of the focusing geometry, have been successfully tested these last two years.

  2. A broadband ultrafast transient absorption spectrometer covering the range from near-infrared (NIR) down to green.

    PubMed

    Schmidhammer, Uli; Jeunesse, Pierre; Stresing, Gerhard; Mostafavi, Mehran

    2014-01-01

    We present a new development for pump-probe absorption spectroscopy that allows the simultaneous measurement from the green part of the visible spectrum (510 nm) over the whole near-infrared range to >1600 nm, corresponding to 0.77-2.40 eV. The system is based on a sub-picosecond supercontinuum generated in bulk material used as a broadband probe that is dispersed with a custom-made prism spectrometer and detected by an InGaAs array with extended sensitivity to the visible. Two versions, with and without probe referencing, are implemented for operation at laser repetition rates of a few hertz and kilohertz, respectively. After presentation of the optical configuration of the spectrometer, its performance is characterized and further illustrated on two time scales, with the ultrafast radiolysis of isopropanol induced by a picosecond electron pulse and with the instantaneous response of a BK7 plate to a femtosecond light pulse. The photophysics of the dye IR-140 is resolved from the femto- to picosecond regime. Stable and easy day-to-day routine use of the spectrometer also can be achieved in non-optical laboratory surroundings. For operation in a hazardous environment, the optical probe beams can be transported to the detector unit by optical fibers.

  3. Airborne imaging spectrometer data of the Ruby Mountains, Montana: Mineral discrimination using relative absorption band-depth images

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Crowley, J.K.; Brickey, D.W.; Rowan, L.C.

    1989-01-01

    Airborne imaging spectrometer data collected in the near-infrared (1.2-2.4 ??m) wavelength range were used to study the spectral expression of metamorphic minerals and rocks in the Ruby Mountains of southwestern Montana. The data were analyzed by using a new data enhancement procedure-the construction of relative absorption band-depth (RBD) images. RBD images, like bandratio images, are designed to detect diagnostic mineral absorption features, while minimizing reflectance variations related to topographic slope and albedo differences. To produce an RBD image, several data channels near an absorption band shoulder are summed and then divided by the sum of several channels located near the band minimum. RBD images are both highly specific and sensitive to the presence of particular mineral absorption features. Further, the technique does not distort or subdue spectral features as sometimes occurs when using other data normalization methods. By using RBD images, a number of rock and soil units were distinguished in the Ruby Mountains including weathered quartz - feldspar pegmatites, marbles of several compositions, and soils developed over poorly exposed mica schists. The RBD technique is especially well suited for detecting weak near-infrared spectral features produced by soils, which may permit improved mapping of subtle lithologic and structural details in semiarid terrains. The observation of soils rich in talc, an important industrial commodity in the study area, also indicates that RBD images may be useful for mineral exploration. ?? 1989.

  4. Comparison of Aromatic Hydrocarbon Measurements made by PTR-MS, DOAS and GC-FID during the MCMA 2003 Field Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Jobson, Bertram T.; Volkamer, Rainer M.; Velasco, E.; Allwine, Gene; Westberg, Halvor H.; Lamb, Brian K.; Alexander, M. L.; Berkowitz, Carl M.; Molina, Luisa T.

    2010-02-15

    A comparison of aromatic hydrocarbon measurements is reported for the CENICA upersite in the district of Iztapalapa during the Mexico City Metropolitan Area field experiment in April 2003 (MCMA 2003). Data from three different measurement methods were compared: a Proton Transfer Reaction Mass Spectrometer (PTR-MS), long path measurements using a UV Differential Optical Absorption Spectrometer (DOAS), and Gas Chromatography-Flame Ionization analysis (GC-FID) of canister samples. The principle focus was on the comparison between PTR-MS and DOAS data. Lab tests established that the PTR-MS and DOAS calibrations were consistent for a suite of aromatic compounds including benzene, toluene, p-xylene, ethylbenzene, 1,2,4-trimethylbenzene, phenol and styrene. The point sampling measurements by the PTR-MS and GC-FID showed good correlations (r=0.6), and were in reasonable agreement for toluene, C₂-alkylbenzenes and C3-alkylbenzenes. The PTR-MS benzene data were consistently high, indicating interference from ethylbenzene fragmentation for the 145 Td drift field intensity used in the experiment. Correlations between the open-path data measured at 16-m height over a 860-m path length (retroreflector in 430m distance), and the point measurements collected at 37-m sampling height were best for benzene (r=0.61), and reasonably good for toluene, C2-alkylbenzenes, naphthalene, styrene, cresols and phenol (r>0.5). There was good agreement between DOAS and PTR-MS measurements of benzene after correction for the PTR-MS ethylbenzene interference. Mixing ratios easured by DOAS were on average a factor of 1.7 times greater than the PTR-MS data for toluene, C2-alkylbenzenes, naphthalene and styrene. The level of agreement for the toluene data displayed a modest dependence on wind direction, establishing that spatial gradients - horizontal, vertical, or both – in toluene mixing ratios were significant, and up to a factor of 2 despite the fact that all measurements were conducted above

  5. An atomic-absorption spectrometer with an electrothermal atomizer in a magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Eristavi, V.D; Ivanov, V.K.; Sadagov, Y.M.; Sharashidze, P.A.

    1986-08-01

    This paper describes a system for correcting unselective interference. The system enables one to amplify the preparation of specimens of complicated composition, and it increases the accuracy at the expense of only a very slight sensitivity loss. The Zeeman AA spectrometer with electrothermal atomizer is shown and is based on the optical system of an S-302 AA spectrometer. The resonant-radiation sources were VSB-2 electrodeless high-frequency lamps or 1SP-1 hollow-cathode ones supplied with dc. The system for correcting for unselective interference enables one to simplify the preparation of specimens of complicated composition and it increases the accuracy at the expense of only a very slight sensitivity loss.

  6. Characterisation of cloud properties from MAX-DOAS observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, Thomas; Remmers, Julia; Beirle, Steffen; Dörner, Steffen; Shaiganfar, Reza; Ziegler, Marc

    2013-04-01

    Multi AXis (MAX-) DOAS observations observe the scattered sun light a various, mostly slant, elevation angles. From MAX-DOAS observations it is possible to retrieve the vertical column density of several important trace gases like NO2, HCHO, SO2, H2O, BrO, and also aerosol extinction. Usually, limited profile information for the lowest atmospheric layers (below about 5 km) can be obtained. Clouds strongly affect the atmospheric radiation transport. Thus they also have a strong effect on the interpretation of MAX-DOAS results. In many cases, especially for high clouds, it is still possible to retrieve reasonable trace gas and aerosol results in the presence of clouds. However, for low clouds and in particular for optically thick and vertically extended clouds, usually no meaningful MAX-DOAS retrievals are possible. Thus accurate information on cloud properties is crucial for the characterisation of the uncertainties of MAX-DOAS observations. In this study we investigate the suitability of several cloud-sensitive quantities, which can be retrieved from the MAX-DOAS observations themselves. Besides the measured radiance, we also analyse the so called colour index (intensity ratio at selected wavelengths), the absorption of the oxygen molecule (O2) and the oxygen dimer (O4) as well as the Ring effect. The effects of clouds on these quantities is investigated in detail and the respective results are related to cloud information based on sky images taken from ground and satellite. In addition also radiative transfer simulations are performed. As a main result of our studies we present recommendations for robust and effective cloud classification schemes based on MAX-DOAS observations.

  7. CH4 and N2O Measurement Performance with Novel Mid-Infrared Tunable Laser Absorption Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, A. O.; Kita, D.

    2011-12-01

    Ongoing activities in the greenhouse gas (GHG) monitoring community have called for greater precision and accuracy in greenhouse gas (GHG) measurements, including CO2, CH4, and N2O. In past years this need has been served by Tunable Diode Laser Absorption Spectroscopy (TDLAS) that accesses near-infrared (NIR) single absorption transitions. We present the results of novel and commercial ready TDLAS spectrometers (the IRIS Series) utilizing mid-infrared (MIR) measurement of CH4 and N2O. Order-of-magnitude higher absorption transition strengths in the MIR compared to the NIR, combined with unique capabilities and selectivity of TDLAS, result in sub-ppb measurement noise for CH4 and N2O. The MIR laser output is generated by a small and rugged difference frequency generation (DFG) platform that uses semiconductor NIR lasers delivered fiber optically into a PPLN crystal. The spectrometer utilizes a multiple pass Herriott cell through which gas is drawn (< 0.5 LPM) by a small internal pump, with a resultant speed of response due to volumetric turnover of < 30 sec. Multiple inlet ports provide ability to sample from multiple points and/or run automated calibration routines. Optical surfaces in contact with the gas are passive and thus tolerant to aging/weathering. Data is presented for cylinder-sourced CH4 and N2O for assessing instrumental precision/variation in real time, and to independently assess the impact of ambient temperature variation on performance stability. Real ambient monitoring scenarios and results are also presented.

  8. High resolution spectrometer for extended x-ray absorption fine structure measurements in the 6 keV to 15 keV energy range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seely, J. F.; Hudson, L. T.; Henins, Albert; Feldman, U.

    2016-11-01

    A Cauchois transmission-crystal spectrometer has been developed with high crystal resolving power in the 6 keV-15 keV energy range and sufficient sensitivity to record single-shot spectra from the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) Titan laser and other comparable or more energetic lasers. The spectrometer capabilities were tested by recording the W L transitions from a laboratory source and the extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectrum through a Cu foil.

  9. High energy resolution five-crystal spectrometer for high quality fluorescence and absorption measurements on an x-ray absorption spectroscopy beamline

    SciTech Connect

    Llorens, Isabelle; Lahera, Eric; Delnet, William; Proux, Olivier; Dermigny, Quentin; Gelebart, Frederic; Morand, Marc; Shukla, Abhay; Bardou, Nathalie; Ulrich, Olivier; and others

    2012-06-15

    Fluorescence detection is classically achieved with a solid state detector (SSD) on x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) beamlines. This kind of detection however presents some limitations related to the limited energy resolution and saturation. Crystal analyzer spectrometers (CAS) based on a Johann-type geometry have been developed to overcome these limitations. We have tested and installed such a system on the BM30B/CRG-FAME XAS beamline at the ESRF dedicated to the structural investigation of very dilute systems in environmental, material and biological sciences. The spectrometer has been designed to be a mobile device for easy integration in multi-purpose hard x-ray synchrotron beamlines or even with a laboratory x-ray source. The CAS allows to collect x-ray photons from a large solid angle with five spherically bent crystals. It will cover a large energy range allowing to probe fluorescence lines characteristic of all the elements from Ca (Z = 20) to U (Z = 92). It provides an energy resolution of 1-2 eV. XAS spectroscopy is the main application of this device even if other spectroscopic techniques (RIXS, XES, XRS, etc.) can be also achieved with it. The performances of the CAS are illustrated by two experiments that are difficult or impossible to perform with SSD and the complementarity of the CAS vs SSD detectors is discussed.

  10. A novel dual-LED based long-path DOAS instrument for the measurement of aromatic hydrocarbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stutz, Jochen; Hurlock, Stephen C.; Colosimo, Santo F.; Tsai, Catalina; Cheung, Ross; Festa, James; Pikelnaya, Olga; Alvarez, Sergio; Flynn, James H.; Erickson, Matthew H.; Olaguer, Eduardo P.

    2016-12-01

    Aromatic hydrocarbons are well known air toxics which are regulated by the US EPA and other air quality agencies. Accurate, long-term monitoring of these compounds at low part-per-billion levels, as well as identifying emission point sources is therefore crucial to protect human health in neighborhoods near large emission sources. Here we present a new long-path differential optical absorption spectroscopy (LP-DOAS) instrument specifically designed to monitor aromatic hydrocarbons. The system is based on a novel dual - light emitting diode (LED) light source, which eliminates the requirement to suppress spectrometer stray light. This light source, together with a high stability fiber-based sending/receiving telescope, allows the measurement of aromatic hydrocarbons on once-folded absorptions paths of 200-1200 m length. The new instrument shows very good agreement with simultaneous in-situ measurements if inhomogeneities of the trace gas spatial distributions are considered. The new instrument performed well during a three-month field test as an automated fence-line monitor at a refinery, successfully distinguishing upwind background levels of ∼1 ppb from emissions reflected in elevated mixing ratios of 3-4 ppb. A two-dimensional measurement network based on two identical LP-DOAS instruments operating on seven crossed light paths was operated successfully in Houston, TX. Qualitative and quantitative analysis of two events with toluene and xylene plumes demonstrate how this setup can be used to derive the spatial distribution of aromatic hydrocarbons, and identify point sources.

  11. Mass specific optical absorption coefficients of mineral dust components measured by a multi wavelength photoacoustic spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Utry, N.; Ajtai, T.; Pintér, M.; Tombácz, E.; Illés, E.; Bozóki, Z.; Szabó, G.

    2014-09-01

    Mass specific optical absorption coefficients of various mineral dust components including silicate clays (illite, kaolin and bentonite), oxides (quartz, hematite and rutile), and carbonate (limestone) were determined at wavelengths of 1064, 532, 355 and 266 nm. These values were calculated from aerosol optical absorption coefficients measured by a multi-wavelength photoacoustic (PA) instrument, the mass concentration and the number size distribution of the generated aerosol samples as well as the size transfer functions of the measuring instruments. These results are expected to have considerable importance in global radiative forcing calculations. They can also serve as reference for validating calculated wavelength dependent imaginary parts (κ) of complex refractive indices which up to now have been typically deduced from bulk phase measurements by using indirect measurement methods. Accordingly, the presented comparison of the measured and calculated aerosol optical absorption spectra revealed the strong need for standardized sample preparation and measurement methodology in case of bulk phase measurements.

  12. Emission Flux Measurement Error with a Mobile DOAS System and Application to NOx Flux Observations.

    PubMed

    Wu, Fengcheng; Li, Ang; Xie, Pinhua; Chen, Hao; Hu, Zhaokun; Zhang, Qiong; Liu, Jianguo; Liu, Wenqing

    2017-01-25

    Mobile differential optical absorption spectroscopy (mobile DOAS) is an optical remote sensing method that can rapidly measure trace gas emission flux from air pollution sources (such as power plants, industrial areas, and cities) in real time. Generally, mobile DOAS is influenced by wind, drive velocity, and other factors, especially in the usage of wind field when the emission flux in a mobile DOAS system is observed. This paper presents a detailed error analysis and NOx emission with mobile DOAS system from a power plant in Shijiazhuang city, China. Comparison of the SO₂ emission flux from mobile DOAS observations with continuous emission monitoring system (CEMS) under different drive speeds and wind fields revealed that the optimal drive velocity is 30-40 km/h, and the wind field at plume height is selected when mobile DOAS observations are performed. In addition, the total errors of SO₂ and NO₂ emissions with mobile DOAS measurements are 32% and 30%, respectively, combined with the analysis of the uncertainties of column density, wind field, and drive velocity. Furthermore, the NOx emission of 0.15 ± 0.06 kg/s from the power plant is estimated, which is in good agreement with that from CEMS observations of 0.17 ± 0.07 kg/s. This study has significantly contributed to the measurement of the mobile DOAS system on emission from air pollution sources, thus improving estimation accuracy.

  13. Emission Flux Measurement Error with a Mobile DOAS System and Application to NOx Flux Observations

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Fengcheng; Li, Ang; Xie, Pinhua; Chen, Hao; Hu, Zhaokun; Zhang, Qiong; Liu, Jianguo; Liu, Wenqing

    2017-01-01

    Mobile differential optical absorption spectroscopy (mobile DOAS) is an optical remote sensing method that can rapidly measure trace gas emission flux from air pollution sources (such as power plants, industrial areas, and cities) in real time. Generally, mobile DOAS is influenced by wind, drive velocity, and other factors, especially in the usage of wind field when the emission flux in a mobile DOAS system is observed. This paper presents a detailed error analysis and NOx emission with mobile DOAS system from a power plant in Shijiazhuang city, China. Comparison of the SO2 emission flux from mobile DOAS observations with continuous emission monitoring system (CEMS) under different drive speeds and wind fields revealed that the optimal drive velocity is 30–40 km/h, and the wind field at plume height is selected when mobile DOAS observations are performed. In addition, the total errors of SO2 and NO2 emissions with mobile DOAS measurements are 32% and 30%, respectively, combined with the analysis of the uncertainties of column density, wind field, and drive velocity. Furthermore, the NOx emission of 0.15 ± 0.06 kg/s from the power plant is estimated, which is in good agreement with that from CEMS observations of 0.17 ± 0.07 kg/s. This study has significantly contributed to the measurement of the mobile DOAS system on emission from air pollution sources, thus improving estimation accuracy. PMID:28125054

  14. Atmospheric CO2 measurements with a 2 μm airborne laser absorption spectrometer employing coherent detection.

    PubMed

    Spiers, Gary D; Menzies, Robert T; Jacob, Joseph; Christensen, Lance E; Phillips, Mark W; Choi, Yonghoon; Browell, Edward V

    2011-05-10

    We report airborne measurements of CO(2) column abundance conducted during two 2009 campaigns using a 2.05 μm laser absorption spectrometer. The two flight campaigns took place in the California Mojave desert and in Oklahoma. The integrated path differential absorption (IPDA) method is used for the CO(2) column mixing ratio retrievals. This instrument and the data analysis methodology provide insight into the capabilities of the IPDA method for both airborne measurements and future global-scale CO(2) measurements from low Earth orbit pertinent to the NASA Active Sensing of CO(2) Emissions over Nights, Days, and Seasons mission. The use of a favorable absorption line in the CO(2) 2 μm band allows the on-line frequency to be displaced two (surface pressure) half-widths from line center, providing high sensitivity to the lower tropospheric CO(2). The measurement repeatability and measurement precision are in good agreement with predicted estimates. We also report comparisons with airborne in situ measurements conducted during the Oklahoma campaign.

  15. NO2 Vertical Column Density at the Marambio Antarctic Station as Retrieved by DOAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raponi, Marcelo M.; Jiménez, Rodrigo; Tocho, Jorge O.; Quel, Eduardo J.

    2009-03-01

    A number of chemical species present in the stratosphere in very small concentrations (parts per billion and even smaller) contribute significantly to its chemical balance. One of the main stratospheric trace gases is nitrogen dioxide (NO2). This species acts as a restrictive agent for stratospheric ozone destruction (due to the chlorine monoxide), hence the importance of its study. We present a preliminary analysis of passive remote sensing measurements carry out at the Marambio Argentinean Antarctic Base (64.233° S; 56.616° W; 197 m amsl) during the months of January—February of 2008. The spectroscopy system consists of an optical fiber (400 μm core diameter and 6 m of longitude) and a portable spectral analyzer (spectrometer HR4000, Ocean Optics). The device analyzes diffuse solar spectral irradiance in the UV-visible range (290-650 nm), collected and transferred by a zenith-pointing optical fiber. The NO2 vertical column density (VCD) is derived from the radiance spectra using the DOAS (Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy) technique. The system and technique allow for simultaneous measurements of different species of interest on a variety of meteorological conditions. The vertical columns obtained are compared with co-located measurements performed with EVA, a visible absorption spectrometer operated by the Instituto Nacional de Técnica Aeroespacial (INTA), Spain.

  16. Analysis of airborne imaging spectrometer data for the Ruby Mountains, Montana, by use of absorption-band-depth images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brickey, David W.; Crowley, James K.; Rowan, Lawrence C.

    1987-01-01

    Airborne Imaging Spectrometer-1 (AIS-1) data were obtained for an area of amphibolite grade metamorphic rocks that have moderate rangeland vegetation cover. Although rock exposures are sparse and patchy at this site, soils are visible through the vegetation and typically comprise 20 to 30 percent of the surface area. Channel averaged low band depth images for diagnostic soil rock absorption bands. Sets of three such images were combined to produce color composite band depth images. This relative simple approach did not require extensive calibration efforts and was effective for discerning a number of spectrally distinctive rocks and soils, including soils having high talc concentrations. The results show that the high spectral and spatial resolution of AIS-1 and future sensors hold considerable promise for mapping mineral variations in soil, even in moderately vegetated areas.

  17. Measurement of acetaldehyde in exhaled breath using a laser absorption spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamat, Pratyuma C.; Roller, Chad B.; Namjou, Khosrow; Jeffers, James D.; Faramarzalian, Ali; Salas, Rodolfo; McCann, Patrick J.

    2007-07-01

    A high-resolution liquid-nitrogen-free mid-infrared tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (TDLAS) system was used to perform real-time measurement of acetaldehyde concentrations in human exhaled breath following ingestion of an alcoholic beverage. Acetaldehyde absorption features were measured near 5.79 μm (1727 cm-1) using a IV-VI semiconductor laser, a 100 m long path optical gas cell, and second- harmonic detection coupled with wavelength modulation. Acetaldehyde levels were measured with a minimum detection limit of 80 ppb for 5 s integration time. The variations in exhaled acetaldehyde levels over time were analyzed prior to and following ingestion of two different amounts of white wine. A method to calibrate acetaldehyde measurements internally using water vapor absorption lines was investigated to eliminate the need for system calibration with gas standards. The potential of a TDLAS system to be used as a noninvasive clinical tool for measurements of large volatile compounds with possible applications in cancer detection is demonstrated.

  18. A prototype stationary Fourier transform spectrometer for near-infrared absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Li, Jinyang; Lu, Dan-feng; Qi, Zhi-mei

    2015-09-01

    A prototype stationary Fourier transform spectrometer (FTS) was constructed with a fiber-coupled lithium niobate (LiNbO3) waveguide Mach-Zehnder interferometer (MZI) for the purpose of rapid on-site spectroscopy of biological and chemical measurands. The MZI contains push-pull electrodes for electro-optic modulation, and its interferogram as a plot of intensity against voltage was obtained by scanning the modulating voltage from -60 to +60 V in 50 ms. The power spectrum of input signal was retrieved by Fourier transform processing of the interferogram combined with the wavelength dispersion of half-wave voltage determined for the MZI used. The prototype FTS operates in the single-mode wavelength range from 1200 to 1700 nm and allows for reproducible spectroscopy. A linear concentration dependence of the absorbance at λmax = 1451 nm for water in ethanolic solution was obtained using the prototype FTS. The near-infrared spectroscopy of solid samples was also implemented, and the different spectra obtained with different materials evidenced the chemical recognition capability of the prototype FTS. To make this prototype FTS practically applicable, work on improving its spectral resolution by increasing the maximum optical path length difference is in progress.

  19. Light absorption coefficient measurement of SOA using a UV-Visible spectrometer connected with an integrating sphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Min; Jang, Myoseon

    2011-08-01

    A method for measuring an aerosol light absorption coefficient ( B a) has been developed using a conventional UV-visible spectrometer equipped with an integrating sphere covering a wide range of wavelengths (280-800 nm). The feasibility of the proposed method was evaluated in both the transmittance mode (TUV-IS) and the reflective mode (RUV-IS) using the reference aerosol known for the cross-sectional area. The aerosol was collected on a conventional filter and measured for B a values. The resulting RUV-IS method was applied to measure light absorption of secondary organic aerosol (SOA). SOA was produced through photooxidation of different precursor hydrocarbons such as toluene, d-limonene and α-pinene in the presence of NO x (60-70 ppb) and inorganic seed aerosol using a 2-m 3 indoor Teflon film chamber. Of the three precursor hydrocarbons, the B a value of toluene SOA (0.574 m 2 g -1 at 350 nm) was the highest compared with B a values for α-pinene SOA (0.029 m 2 g -1) and d-limonene SOA (0.038 m 2 g -1). When d-limonene SOA or toluene SOA was internally mixed with neutral [(NH 4) 2SO 4] or acidic inorganic seed (NH 4HSO 4:H 2SO 4 = 1:1 by mole), the SOA showed 2-3 times greater B a values at 350 nm than the SOA with no seed. Aerosol aging with a light source for this study reduced B a values of SOA (e.g., on average 10% for toluene SOA and 30% for d-limonene SOA within 4 h). Overall, weak absorption appeared for chamber-generated SOA over wavelengths ranging from 280 to 550 nm, which fall into the sunlight spectrum.

  20. Airborne Measurements of Formaldehyde Employing a Tunable Diode Laser Absorption Spectrometer During TRACE-P

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fried, Alan; Drummond, James

    2003-01-01

    This final report summarizes the progress achieved over the entire 3-year proposal period including two extensions spanning 1 year. These activities include: 1) Preparation for and participation in the NASA 2001 TRACE-P campaign using our airborne tunable diode laser system to acquire measurements of formaldehyde (CH2O); 2) Comprehensive data analysis and data submittal to the NASA archive; 3) Follow up data interpretation working with NASA modelers to place our ambient CH2O measurements into a broader photochemical context; 4) Publication of numerous JGR papers using this data; 5) Extensive follow up laboratory tests on the selectivity and efficiency of our CH20 scrubbing system; and 6) An extensive follow up effort to assess and study the mechanical stability of our entire optical system, particularly the multipass absorption cell, with aircraft changes in cabin pressure.

  1. Monitoring vegetation using DOAS satellite observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eigemeier, E.; Beirle, S.; Marbach, T.; Platt, U.; Wagner, T.

    2009-12-01

    Vegetation-cycles are of general interest for many applications. Be it for harvest-predictions, global monitoring of climate-change or as input to atmospheric models. From novel spectrally resolving UV/vis satellite instruments (like GOME or SCIAMACHY) the spectral signatures of different types of vegetation can be identified and analysed. Although the spatial resolution of GOME and SCIAMACHY observations is much coarser than those of conventional satellite instruments for vegetation monitoring, our data sets on different vegetation types add new and useful information, not obtainable from other sources. Common vegetation indices are based on the fact that the difference between Red and Near Infrared reflection is higher than in any other material on Earth’s surface. This gives a very high degree of confidence for vegetation-detection. The spectrally resolving data from GOME and SCIAMACHY provide the chance to concentrate on finer spectral features throughout the red and near infrared spectrum. We look at these features using a technique known as Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (DOAS). Although originally developed to retrieve information on trace gases, it can also be used to gain information on vegetation. Another advantage is that this method automatically corrects for atmospheric effects. This renders the vegetation-information easily comparable over long time-spans. In addition, high-frequency-structures from vegetation also effect the retrieval of tropospheric trace-gases and aerosols. To optimize vegetation monitoring with DOAS we produce spectrally resolved reference spectra from different vegetation types using our own instrumentation. We analyze the effect of different Pigments on high-frequency-structures of the DOAS Retrieval. Applying these results we investigate how well we can distinguish vegetation types from space.

  2. Monitoring vegetation using DOAS satellite observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eigemeier, Ellen; Beirle, Steffen; Marbach, Thierry; Platt, Ulrich; Wagner, Thomas

    2010-05-01

    Vegetation-cycles are of general interest for many applications. Be it for harvest-predictions, global monitoring of climate-change or as input to atmospheric models. From novel spectrally resolving UV/vis satellite instruments (like GOME or SCIAMACHY) the spectral signatures of different types of vegetation can be identified and analysed. Although the spatial resolution of GOME and SCIAMACHY observations is much coarser than those of conventional satellite instruments for vegetation monitoring, our data sets on different vegetation types add new and useful information, not obtainable from other sources. Common vegetation indices are based on the fact that the difference between Red and Near Infrared reflection is higher than in any other material on Earth's surface. This gives a very high degree of confidence for vegetation-detection. The spectrally resolving data from GOME and SCIAMACHY provide the chance to concentrate on finer spectral features throughout the red and near infrared spectrum. We look at these features using a technique known as Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (DOAS). Although originally developed to retrieve information on trace gases, it can also be used to gain information on vegetation. Another advantage is that this method automatically corrects for atmospheric effects. This renders the vegetation-information easily comparable over long time-spans. In addition, high-frequency-structures from vegetation also effect the retrieval of tropospheric trace-gases and aerosols. To optimize vegetation monitoring with DOAS we produce spectrally resolved reference spectra from different vegetation types using our own instrumentation. We analyze the effect of different Pigments on high-frequency-structures of the DOAS Retrieval. Applying these results we investigate how well we can distinguish vegetation types from space.

  3. Vertical profiles of pollutant gases measured with passive DOAS in the Po Valley devoted to satellite and chemical model data comparison

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masieri, S.; Petritoli, A.; Kostadinov, I.; Bortoli, D.; Premuda, M.; Ravegnani, F.; Giovanelli, G.

    2009-04-01

    In the frame of QUITSAT Italian pilot project (Air QUality with InTegration of ground-based and SAtellite measurement and chemical Transport model), two field campaigns were made in S.Pietro Capofiume (44.65˚ N; 11.37˚ E) and Bologna (44.52˚ N; 11.34˚ E) to provide concentration of ground particular matter and gaseous pollutants, namely nitrogen dioxide (NO2), formaldehyde (HCHO), sulphur dioxide (SO2) and ozone (O3). The aim of the campaigns was to provide experimental data need for tests and improvement of algorithms developed for integration of satellite and ground-based data together with chemical transport model data in order to retrieve air quality in the QUITSAT domain. Ground based measurements were carried out within a network of in-situ analyser in the Po Valley and with a scanning multi-axis DOAS (Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy) spectrometer system developed at ISAC-CNR institute [1], in collaboration with Geophysics Center of Evora [2]. TropoGAS (TROPOspheric Gas Analyser Spectrometer) spectrometer permits active and passive DOAS measurements at the chosen angles: α =1,2,3,6,10,15,20,90 and another measurement was taken along the sun direction. A Xenon lamp installed at 1km of distance from spectrometer was used as a reference concentration measured in the same place, and these values shows good agreement with in-situ analyser concentration. Gas spectral absorption was evaluated with DOAS [3] algorithms from 430 to 500 nm in two different windows: first from 436 to 460 nm for NO2 retrieval; second from 460 to 500 nm for O4 (best line at 477 nm) and NO2. Air Mass Factor (AMF) was calculated using PROMSAR (PROcessing of Multi-Scattered Atmospheric Radiation) model [4], that is a backward Montecarlo Radiative Transfer Model (RTM). An apposite inversion method [5][6], was applied to retrieve profiles of the target gases from their Slant Column Densities (SCD), using advanced approaches involving measurement of the atmospheric O4

  4. A Comparison of MODIS and DOAS Sulfur Dioxide Measurements of the April 24, 2004 Eruption of Anatahan Volcano, Mariana Islands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meier, V. L.; Scuderi, L.; Fischer, T.; Realmuto, V.; Hilton, D.

    2006-12-01

    Measurements of volcanic SO2 emissions provide insight into the processes working below a volcano, which can presage volcanic events. Being able to measure SO2 in near real-time is invaluable for the planning and response of hazard mitigation teams. Currently, there are several methods used to quantify the SO2 output of degassing volcanoes. Ground and aerial-based measurements using the differential optical absorption spectrometer (mini-DOAS) provide real-time estimates of SO2 output. Satellite-based measurements, which can provide similar estimates in near real-time, have increasingly been used as a tool for volcanic monitoring. Direct Broadcast (DB) real-time processing of remotely sensed data from NASA's Earth Observing System (EOS) satellites (MODIS Terra and Aqua) presents volcanologists with a range of spectral bands and processing options for the study of volcanic emissions. While the spatial resolution of MODIS is 1 km in the Very Near Infrared (VNIR) and Thermal Infrared (TIR), a high temporal resolution and a wide range of radiance measurements in 32 channels between VNIR and TIR combine to provide a versatile space borne platform to monitor SO2 emissions from volcanoes. An important question remaining to be answered is how well do MODIS SO2 estimates compare with DOAS estimates? In 2004 ground-based plume measurements were collected on April 24th and 25th at Anatahan volcano in the Mariana Islands using a mini-DOAS (Fischer and Hilton). SO2 measurements for these same dates have also been calculated using MODIS images and SO2 mapping software (Realmuto). A comparison of these different approaches to the measurement of SO2 for the same plume is presented. Differences in these observations are used to better quantify SO2 emissions, to assess the current mismatch between ground based and remotely sensed retrievals, and to develop an approach to continuously and accurately monitor volcanic activity from space in near real-time.

  5. A Novel Experimental Setup for Determination of Atmospheric Ammonia Fluxes Using a Tunable Diode Laser Absorption Spectrometer.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Haarlem, R.; Pattey, E.; Ellis, R.; Murphy, J. G.

    2009-05-01

    Characterizing area-source volatilization of ammonia has presented many challenges using fast-response techniques such as eddy covariance due to the adhesive and reactive nature of NH3 within the measuring system. A series of laboratory experiments were conducted to determine the optimal setup using a tunable diode laser absorption spectrometer (TDLAS). The series of experiments were performed concomitantly between the TDLAS and a quantum cascade tunable infrared laser differential absorption spectrometer and results are presented in a companion paper. These experiments consisted of a range of standard additions (10-1000ppbv) using both perfluoroalkoxy (PFA) and polyethylene (PE) inlet tubing ranging in lengths between 3.9 and 8.9m. To address the issue of NH3 adsorption, a test using a heated (40oC) 5-m PE sample line was used in one test series. The standard NH3 additions were mixed with either pre-purified N2 or ambient room air to mimic ambient field conditions. A novel sample inlet, provided by University of Toronto and based on the design of Aerodyne Inc., was employed for the test duration. This inlet was designed to relinquish the use of a filter on the inlet, which may pose attenuation and sample flow issues. The responses to concentration changes using these various configurations demonstrated that the response to the [NH3] changes exhibited a double exponential decay. On average, the primary decay curve represented 88% of the total change in concentration and the average decay coefficient was 0.24s. However, the secondary decay coefficient was much larger (35.2s). The optimal response of the TDLAS was obtained using the shortest length of PFA tubing (3.9m) where the primary decay responses were all greater than 90% of the total change in 0.17s on average and the remaining decay occurred over a period of 0.12s. Surprisingly, the test using the heated PE tubing did not produce any discernible improvements to the instrument response. The optimal

  6. Tropospheric nitrogen dioxide column retrieval from ground-based zenith-sky DOAS observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tack, F.; Hendrick, F.; Goutail, F.; Fayt, C.; Merlaud, A.; Pinardi, G.; Hermans, C.; Pommereau, J.-P.; Van Roozendael, M.

    2015-01-01

    We present an algorithm for retrieving tropospheric nitrogen dioxide (NO2) vertical column densities (VCDs) from ground-based zenith-sky (ZS) measurements of scattered sunlight. The method is based on a four-step approach consisting of (1) the Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (DOAS) analysis of ZS radiance spectra using a fixed reference spectrum corresponding to low NO2 absorption, (2) the determination of the residual amount in the reference spectrum using a Langley-plot-type method, (3) the removal of the stratospheric content from the daytime total measured slant column based on stratospheric VCDs measured at sunrise and sunset, and simulation of the rapid NO2 diurnal variation, (4) the retrieval of tropospheric VCDs by dividing the resulting tropospheric slant columns by appropriate air mass factors (AMFs). These steps are fully characterized and recommendations are given for each of them. The retrieval algorithm is applied on a ZS dataset acquired with a Multi-AXis (MAX-) DOAS instrument during the Cabauw (51.97° N, 4.93° E, sea level) Intercomparison campaign for Nitrogen Dioxide measuring Instruments (CINDI) held from the 10 June to the 21 July 2009 in the Netherlands. A median value of 7.9 × 1015 molec cm-2 is found for the retrieved tropospheric NO2 VCDs, with maxima up to 6.0 × 1016 molec cm-2. The error budget assessment indicates that the overall error σTVCD on the column values is less than 28%. In case of low tropospheric contribution, σTVCD is estimated to be around 39% and is dominated by uncertainties in the determination of the residual amount in the reference spectrum. For strong tropospheric pollution events, σTVCD drops to approximately 22% with the largest uncertainties on the determination of the stratospheric NO2 abundance and tropospheric AMFs. The tropospheric VCD amounts derived from ZS observations are compared to VCDs retrieved from off-axis and direct-sun measurements of the same MAX-DOAS instrument as well as to

  7. Tropospheric nitrogen dioxide column retrieval from ground-based zenith-sky DOAS observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tack, F.; Hendrick, F.; Goutail, F.; Fayt, C.; Merlaud, A.; Pinardi, G.; Hermans, C.; Pommereau, J.-P.; Van Roozendael, M.

    2015-06-01

    We present an algorithm for retrieving tropospheric nitrogen dioxide (NO2) vertical column densities (VCDs) from ground-based zenith-sky (ZS) measurements of scattered sunlight. The method is based on a four-step approach consisting of (1) the differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS) analysis of ZS radiance spectra using a fixed reference spectrum corresponding to low NO2 absorption, (2) the determination of the residual amount in the reference spectrum using a Langley-plot-type method, (3) the removal of the stratospheric content from the daytime total measured slant column based on stratospheric VCDs measured at sunrise and sunset, and simulation of the rapid NO2 diurnal variation, (4) the retrieval of tropospheric VCDs by dividing the resulting tropospheric slant columns by appropriate air mass factors (AMFs). These steps are fully characterized and recommendations are given for each of them. The retrieval algorithm is applied on a ZS data set acquired with a multi-axis (MAX-) DOAS instrument during the Cabauw (51.97° N, 4.93° E, sea level) Intercomparison campaign for Nitrogen Dioxide measuring Instruments (CINDI) held from 10 June to 21 July 2009 in the Netherlands. A median value of 7.9 × 1015 molec cm-2 is found for the retrieved tropospheric NO2 VCDs, with maxima up to 6.0 × 1016 molec cm-2. The error budget assessment indicates that the overall error σTVCD on the column values is less than 28%. In the case of low tropospheric contribution, σTVCD is estimated to be around 39% and is dominated by uncertainties in the determination of the residual amount in the reference spectrum. For strong tropospheric pollution events, σTVCD drops to approximately 22% with the largest uncertainties on the determination of the stratospheric NO2 abundance and tropospheric AMFs. The tropospheric VCD amounts derived from ZS observations are compared to VCDs retrieved from off-axis and direct-sun measurements of the same MAX-DOAS instrument as well as to data

  8. Wet/dry film thickness measurement of paint by absorption spectroscopy with acousto-optic tunable filter spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinha, Pranay G.; Xiong, Xiangchun; Jin, Feng; Trivedi, Sudhir; Prasad, Narashima S.

    2005-08-01

    Controlling/monitoring the thickness of applied paint in real time is important to many situations including painting ship and submarine hulls in dry docks for maintaining health of ships and submarines against the harshness of the sea, in automobile and aerospace industries, and in a variety of other industries as a control sensor that plays significant role in product quality, process control, and cost control. Insufficient thickness results to inadequate protection while overspray leads to waste and pollution of the environment. A rugged instrumentation for the real time non-contact accurate measurement of wet and dry paint film thickness measurement will be immensely valuable. As paint is applied with several layers of the same or different type, thickness of each newly sprayed wet layer is of most interest, but measurement on dry paint is also useful. In this study, we use acousto-optic tunable filter-based near infrared spectrometer to obtain the absorption spectrum of layers of paint sprayed on sand blasted steel surface and thus measure the thickness of coating under both wet and dry situations. NIR spectra are obtained from 1100 to 2300 nm on four sample of different thickness of paint up to 127 micron. Partial least squares model built with the spectra shows good correlation with standard error of prediction within ~ 0.7 micron. Results indicate that the spectra also respond to the amount of organic solvent in the wet paint and can be used to monitor the degree of dryness of the paint in real time.

  9. Intensity-Modulated Continuous-Wave Laser Absorption Spectrometer at 1.57 Micrometer for Atmospheric CO2 Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Bing

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the earth's carbon cycle is essential for diagnosing current and predicting future climates, which requires precise global measurements of atmospheric CO2 through space missions. The Active Sensing of CO2 Emissions over Nights, Days, and Seasons (ASCENDS) space mission will provide accurate global atmospheric CO2 measurements to meet carbon science requirements. The joint team of NASA Langley Research Center and ITT Exelis, Inc. proposes to use the intensity-modulated, continuous-wave (IM-CW) laser absorption spectrometer (LAS) approach for the ASCENDS mission. Prototype LAS instruments have been developed and used to demonstrate the power, signal-to-noise ratio, precision and accuracy, spectral purity, and stability of the measurement and the instrument needed for atmospheric CO2 observations from space. The ranging capability from laser platform to ground surfaces or intermediate backscatter layers is achieved by transmitted range-encoded IM laser signals. Based on the prototype instruments and current lidar technologies, space LAS systems and their CO2 column measurements are analyzed. These studies exhibit a great potential of using IM-CW LAS system for the active space CO2 mission ASCENDS.

  10. A capillary absorption spectrometer for stable carbon isotope ratio (13C/12C) analysis in very small samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelly, J. F.; Sams, R. L.; Blake, T. A.; Newburn, M.; Moran, J.; Alexander, M. L.; Kreuzer, H.

    2012-02-01

    A capillary absorption spectrometer (CAS) suitable for IR laser isotope analysis of small CO2 samples is presented. The system employs a continuous-wave (cw) quantum cascade laser to study nearly adjacent rovibrational transitions of different isotopologues of CO2 near 2307 cm-1 (4.34 μm). This initial CAS system can achieve relative isotopic precision of about 10 ppm 13C, or ˜1‰ (per mil in delta notation relative to Vienna Pee Dee Belemnite) with 20-100 picomoles of entrained sample within the hollow waveguide for CO2 concentrations ˜400-750 ppm. Isotopic analyses of such gas fills in a 1-mm ID hollow waveguide of 0.8 m overall physical path length can be carried out down to ˜2 Torr. Overall 13C/12C ratios can be calibrated to ˜2‰ accuracy with diluted CO2 standards. A novel, low-cost method to reduce cw-fringing noise resulting from multipath distortions in the hollow waveguide is presented, which allows weak absorbance features to be studied at the few ppm level (peak-to-rms) after 1000 scans are co-added in ˜10 s. The CAS is meant to work directly with converted CO2 samples from a laser ablation-catalytic combustion micro-sampler to provide 13C/12C ratios of small biological isolates currently operating with spatial resolutions ˜50 μm.

  11. Car MAX-DOAS measurements of the tropospheric Formaldehyde (HCHO) column around Bucharest (Romania) and in the Rhein-Main area (Germany)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donner, Sebastian; Shaiganfar, Reza; Riffel, Katharina; Dörner, Steffen; Lampel, Johannes; Remmers, Julia; Wagner, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    The DOAS (differential optical absorption spectroscopy)-method analyses the absorptions of atmospheric trace gases in spectra of scattered sun light. It is an excellent way to determine the concentrations of different trace gases (e.g. NO2, SO2, HCHO…) simultaneously. MAX (Multi-AXis)-DOAS measurements observe scattered sun light under different elevation angles. From such measurements tropospheric vertical column densities (VCDs) or even vertical profiles of the measured trace gases and aerosols can be determined. We performed mobile MAX-DOAS measurements using two instruments on the roof of a car in summer 2015 in Romania during the AROMAT2 campaign and in the Winter/Spring 2016 in the Rhein-Main area (Germany). The latter is one of the densest populated areas in Germany. One instrument is a commercial Mini-MAX-DOAS instrument from the Hoffmann company, the other a self-built instrument using an AVANTES spectrometer with better optical characteristics. The instruments were looking in two different directions (one forward and one backward). Mobile MAX-DOAS measurements cover a quite large area in a short period of time. This enables to map existing gradients of concentrations of tropospheric trace gases, e.g. NO2 and HCHO. The results of those measurements then can be used to validate satellite measurements or can be compared to model results. In this study we focus on formaldehyde (HCHO). In small amounts it is emitted directly by industries and other anthropogenic and biogenic activities. Large amounts are mostly secondary produced. As it is an intermediate product of basic oxidation cycles of other hydrocarbons its concentrations are determined by the abundances of other hydrocarbons. Therefore it can be used as an indicator for volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Furthermore HCHO plays an important role in photochemical smog chemistry and tropospheric O3 chemistry. In this work we present the measurement setup and preliminary HCHO results of the AROMAT2

  12. Bromine Explosions In Smog Chamber Experiments: A comparison of Cavity-Enhanced (CE) and White-cell DOAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buxmann, J.; Hoch, D. J.; Sihler, H.; Pöhler, D.; Platt, U.; Bleicher, S.; Balzer, N.; Zetzsch, C.

    2011-12-01

    Reactive halogen species (RHS), such as Cl, Br or BrO, can significantly influence chemical processes in the troposphere, including the destruction of ozone, change in the chemical balance of hydrogen radicals (OH, HO2), increased deposition of toxic compounds (like mercury) with potential consequences for the global climate. Previous studies have shown that salt lakes can be significant sources for gaseous RHS. Environmental conditions such as salt composition, relative humidity (RH), pH, and temperature (T) can strongly influence reactive bromine levels, but are difficult to quantify in the field. Therefore, we conducted laboratory experiments by exposing NaCl salt containing 0.33% (by weight) NaBr to simulated sunlight in a Teflon smog-chamber under various conditions of RH and ozone concentrations. BrO levels were observed by a Differential-Optical-Absorption-Spectrometer (DOAS) in combination with a multi-reflection cell (White-cell). The concentrations of OH- and Cl- radicals were quantified by the radical clock method. We present the first direct observation of BrO from the "Bromine Explosion" (auto catalytic release of reactive bromine from salt surfaces - key to ozone destruction) in the laboratory above a simulated salt pan. The maximum BrO mixing ratio of 6419±71 ppt at 60% RH was observed to be one order of magnitude higher than at 37% RH and 2% RH. The release of RHS from the salt pan is possibly controlled by the thickness of the quasi liquid layer, covering the reactive surface of the halide crystals, as the layer thickness strongly depends on RH. Furthermore, a new cavity enhanced DOAS (CE-DOAS) instrument was designed and successfully used in chamber experiments. For the first time, such an instrument uses a spectral interval in the UV - wavelength range (325-365 nm) to identify BrO. We show a comparison of the CE-DOAS and White-cell DOAS instrument in a series of experiments, where e.g. a peak BrO mixing ratio up to 380 ppt within the first

  13. A miniaturised ultraviolet spectrometer for remote sensing of SO 2 fluxes: a new tool for volcano surveillance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galle, Bo; Oppenheimer, Clive; Geyer, Andreas; McGonigle, Andrew J. S.; Edmonds, Marie; Horrocks, Lisa

    2003-01-01

    For 30 years, the correlation spectrometer (COSPEC) has been the principal tool for remote monitoring of volcanic SO 2 fluxes. During this time, the instrument has played a prominent role in volcanic hazard assessment. COSPEC data also underpin estimates of the global volcanic SO 2 flux to the atmosphere. Though innovative for its time, COSPEC is now outdated in several respects. Here we report the first measurements with a potential replacement, using a low cost, miniature, ultraviolet fibre-optic differential optical absorption spectrometer (mini-DOAS). Field experiments were conducted at Masaya Volcano (Nicaragua) and Soufrière Hills Volcano (Montserrat). The mini-DOAS was operated from a road vehicle and helicopter, and from a fixed position on the ground, indicating fluxes of ˜4 and 1 kg s -1 at Masaya Volcano and Soufrière Hills Volcano, respectively. Side-by-side observations with a COSPEC on Montserrat indicate a comparable sensitivity but the mini-DOAS offers several advantages, including the collection of broadband ultraviolet spectra. It has immense potential for geochemical surveillance at volcanoes worldwide.

  14. Five years of NO2 Mobile-DOAS measurements in Europe: an overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merlaud, Alexis; Fayt, Caroline; Pinardi, Gaia; Tack, Frederik; Hendrick, François; Le Roux, Anabel-Lise; Constantin, Daniel-Eduard; Voiculescu, Mirela; Shaiganfar, Reza; Wagner, Thomas; Van Roozendael, Michel

    2014-05-01

    Since the CINDI campaign held in the Netherlands in July 2009, BIRA-IASB has been operating a car-based mobile-DOAS system, primarily dedicated to tropospheric NO2 measurements. The instrument is based on two similar compact spectrometers and records scattered light spectra simultaneously in the zenith direction and 30° above the horizon, following the MAX-DOAS approach. After CINDI, Mobile-DOAS measurements were performed on a routine basis between March 2010 and August 2011, mostly across Belgium, but also in Luxembourg, France, and Germany. From 2011, another BIRA-IASB mobile-DOAS instrument, using a single zenith channel, was operated in Romania through a collaboration with the University of Galati. In June 2013, these two mobile-DOAS instruments took part in the MADCAT campaign in Mainz, Germany, together with the MPIC mobile-DOAS system, based on a mini MAX-DOAS. We describe the BIRA-IASB instruments, our strategy to retrieve the NO2 tropospheric column, and the large database that was constituted. The latter is particularly interesting for its size: it covers some 500 hours of measurements and 20 000 km, including rural, periurban and urban areas with different air quality conditions. A 2011 cloud-free subset of the measurements is compared with OMI data. We also present preliminary results of an intercomparison between the three mobile-DOAS instruments operated during MADCAT. The high spatial frequency of the measurements (around 100 m) makes them valuable to study the NO2 horizontal gradients in polluted areas. This has implications in the context of air quality satellite validation studies, in which the variability of NO2 inside a satellite pixel must be taken into account.

  15. Total Ozone from the Ozone Monitoring System (OMI) using TOMS and DOAS Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Veefkind, J. P.; Bhartia, P. K.; Gleason, J.; deHaan, J. F.; Wellemeyer, C.; Levelt, P. F.

    2003-01-01

    The Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) is the Dutch-Finnish contribution to NASA's EOS-Aura satellite scheduled for launch in January 2004. OMI is an imaging spectrometer that will measure the back-scattered Solar radiance in the wavelength range of 270 to 500 nm. The instrument provides near global coverage in one day with a spatial resolution of 13x24 square kilometers. OMI is a new instrument, with a heritage from TOMS, SBW, GOME, GOMOS and SCIAMACHY. OMI'S unique capabilities for measuring important trace gases and aerosols with a small footprint and daily global coverage, in conjunction with the other Aura instruments, will make a major contribution to our understanding of stratospheric and tropospheric chemistry and climate change. OMI will provide data continuity with the 23-year ozone record of TOMS. There are three ozone products planned for OMI: total column ozone, ozone profile and tropospheric column ozone. We are developing two different algorithms for total column ozone: one similar to the algorithm currently being used to process the TOMS data, and the other an improved version of the differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS) method, which has been applied to GOME and SCIAMACHY data. The main reasons for starting with two algorithms for total ozone have to do with heritage and past experience; our long-term goal is to combine the two to develop a more accurate and reliable total ozone product for OMI. We will compare the performance of these two algorithms by applying both of them to the GOME data. We will examine where and how the results differ, and use the extensive TOMS-Dobson comparison studies to assess the performance of the DOAS algorithm.

  16. Intercomparison of MAX-DOAS NO2 retrieval algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peters, Enno; Pinardi, Gaia; Bösch, Tim; Wittrock, Folkard; Richter, Andreas; Burrows, John P.; Van Roozendael, Michel; Piters, Ankie; Wagner, Thomas; Drosoglou, Theano; Bais, Alkis; Wang, Shanshan; Saiz-Lopez, Alfonso

    2016-04-01

    Ground-based Multi-Axis Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (MAX-DOAS) measurements are a powerful method for monitoring of atmospheric composition in an automated way. The number of instruments and sites operated has been rapidly increasing over the last years. However, integrating the measurements from all these instruments into a consistent data set necessitates careful homogenization of measurements and data retrieval procedures. For this reason, several MAX-DOAS intercomparison campaigns have been carried out in the last years. Mostly, slant columns measured by different instruments and retrieved by different software were intercompared, i.e. observed differences were potentially caused by both, the instrument and/or the retrieval. In contrast, the approach presented here is a pure intercomparison of MAX-DOAS retrievals. In total, 16 international groups and institutes working in the field of MAX-DOAS participated. The work was performed as part of the EU-funded QA4ECV project. The intercomparison exercise is based on data recorded by the IUP-Bremen MAX-DOAS instrument during the MAD-CAT campaign (Multi-Axis DOAS comparison campaign for Aerosols and Trace gases), which was carried out at the Max-Planck-Institute of Chemistry in Mainz, Germany, in summer 2013. Each group participating in the exercise presented here performed MAX-DOAS fits using their own retrieval software but common input (IUP-Bremen spectra, same cross-sections, and same fit settings). The resulting slant columns show in general an excellent agreement (correlation coefficient > 99.9%). Surprisingly, the correlation is substantially smaller when using sequential Fraunhofer reference spectra instead of a noon reference indicating that groups calculate the sequential reference differently. Further differences were found to arise from treatment of the slit function and subsequent convolution of cross-sections as well as from wavelength calibration. The results indicate overall a high

  17. Development of a cavity-enhanced absorption spectrometer for airborne measurements of CH4 and CO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Shea, S. J.; Bauguitte, S. J.-B.; Gallagher, M. W.; Lowry, D.; Percival, C. J.

    2013-05-01

    High-resolution CH4 and CO2 measurements were made on board the FAAM BAe-146 UK (Facility for Airborne Atmospheric Measurements, British Aerospace-146) atmospheric research aircraft during a number of field campaigns. The system was based on an infrared spectrometer using the cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopy technique. Correction functions to convert the mole fractions retrieved from the spectroscopy to dry-air mole fractions were derived using laboratory experiments and over a 3 month period showed good stability. Long-term performance of the system was monitored using WMO (World Meteorological Office) traceable calibration gases. During the first year of operation (29 flights) analysis of the system's in-flight calibrations suggest that its measurements are accurate to 1.28 ppb (1σ repeatability at 1 Hz = 2.48 ppb) for CH4 and 0.17 ppm (1σ repeatability at 1 Hz = 0.66 ppm) for CO2. The system was found to be robust, no major motion or altitude dependency could be detected in the measurements. An inter-comparison between whole-air samples that were analysed post-flight for CH4 and CO2 by cavity ring-down spectroscopy showed a mean difference between the two techniques of -2.4 ppb (1σ = 2.3 ppb) for CH4 and -0.22 ppm (1σ = 0.45 ppm) for CO2. In September 2012, the system was used to sample biomass-burning plumes in Brazil as part of the SAMBBA project (South AMerican Biomass Burning Analysis). From these and simultaneous CO measurements, emission factors for savannah fires were calculated. These were found to be 2.2 ± 0.2 g (kg dry matter)-1 for CH4 and 1710 ± 171 g (kg dry matter)-1 for CO2, which are in excellent agreement with previous estimates in the literature.

  18. A passive DOAS instrument for trace gas measurements on medium sized UAS: Instrumental design and first measurements.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horbanski, Martin; Pöhler, Denis; Mahr, Tobias; Wagner, Thomas; Keleshis, Christos; Ioannou, Stelios; Lange, Manfred A.; Lelieveld, Jos; Platt, Ulrich

    2013-04-01

    Unmanned Aerial Systems (UAS) are a new powerful tool for observations in the atmospheric boundary layer. Recent developments in measuring technology allow the construction of compact and sensitive active and passive DOAS instruments which can fit the space and weight constraints on UAS. This opens new possibilities for trace gas measurements in the lower troposphere, especially in areas which are not accessible to manned aviation e.g. volcanic plumes or which should be monitored regularly (e.g. industrial emissions of a stack). We present a new developed passive DOAS instrument for the APAESO Platform of the Cyprus Institute, a medium size UAS. It is equipped with two telescopes for observations in downward (nadir) and horizontal (limb) viewing direction, respectively. Thus it allows determining height profiles and the horizontal distribution of trace gases. This is accomplished by analyzing the radiation collected by the telescopes with compact spectrometers, which cover the UV-blue spectral range allowing to measure a broad variety of atmospheric trace gases (e.g. NO2, SO2, BrO, IO, H2O ...) as well as aerosol properties via O4 absorption. Additionally, the nadir direction is equipped with a VIS-NIR spectrometer. It is used to measure reflection spectra of different types of vegetation. These will serve as references for satellite measurements to create global maps. First measurements on the APAESO platform were performed in October 2012 on Cyprus in a rural area south of Nicosia. The instrument is shown to work reliably and was able to detect NO2, H2O and O4 at atmospheric column densities. The instrumental design and first measurements will be presented and discussed.

  19. Modeling of intensity-modulated continuous-wave laser absorption spectrometer systems for atmospheric CO(2) column measurements.

    PubMed

    Lin, Bing; Ismail, Syed; Wallace Harrison, F; Browell, Edward V; Nehrir, Amin R; Dobler, Jeremy; Moore, Berrien; Refaat, Tamer; Kooi, Susan A

    2013-10-10

    The focus of this study is to model and validate the performance of intensity-modulated continuous-wave (IM-CW) CO(2) laser absorption spectrometer (LAS) systems and their CO(2) column measurements from airborne and satellite platforms. The model accounts for all fundamental physics of the instruments and their related CO(2) measurement environments, and the modeling results are presented statistically from simulation ensembles that include noise sources and uncertainties related to the LAS instruments and the measurement environments. The characteristics of simulated LAS systems are based on existing technologies and their implementation in existing systems. The modeled instruments are specifically assumed to be IM-CW LAS systems such as the Exelis' airborne multifunctional fiber laser lidar (MFLL) operating in the 1.57 μm CO(2) absorption band. Atmospheric effects due to variations in CO(2), solar radiation, and thin clouds, are also included in the model. Model results are shown to agree well with LAS atmospheric CO(2) measurement performance. For example, the relative bias errors of both MFLL simulated and measured CO(2) differential optical depths were found to agree to within a few tenths of a percent when compared to the in situ observations from the flight of 3 August 2011 over Railroad Valley (RRV), Nevada, during the summer 2011 flight campaign. In addition, the horizontal variations in the model CO(2) differential optical depths were also found to be consistent with those from MFLL measurements. In general, the modeled and measured signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs) of the CO(2) column differential optical depths (τd) agreed to within about 30%. Model simulations of a spaceborne IM-CW LAS system in a 390 km dawn/dusk orbit for CO(2) column measurements showed that with a total of 42 W of transmitted power for one offline and two different sideline channels (placed at different locations on the side of the CO(2) absorption line), the accuracy of the

  20. Resonator spectrometer for precise broadband investigations of atmospheric absorption in discrete lines and water vapor related continuum in millimeter wave range.

    PubMed

    Tretyakov, M Yu; Krupnov, A F; Koshelev, M A; Makarov, D S; Serov, E A; Parshin, V V

    2009-09-01

    The instrument and methods for measuring spectral parameters of discrete atmospheric lines and water-related continuum absorption in the millimeter wave range are described. The instrument is based on measurements of the Fabry-Pérot resonance response width using fast phase continuous scanning of the frequency-synthesized radiation. The instrument allows measurement of gas absorptions at the cavity eigenfrequencies ranging from 45 to 370 GHz with the highest to date absorption variation sensitivity of 4x10(-9) cm(-1). The use of a module of two rigidly bounded maximum identical resonators differing in length by exactly a factor of two allows accurate separation of the studied gas absorption and spectrometer baseline, in particular, the absorption by water adsorbed on the resonator elements. The module is placed in a chamber with temperature controlled between -30 and +60 degrees C, which permits investigation of temperature dependence of absorption. It is shown that systematic measurement error of discrete atmospheric line parameters does not exceed the statistical one and the achieved accuracy satisfies modern demands for the atmospheric remote sensing data retrieval. Potential systematic error arising from the neglect of the effect of water adsorption on mirror surfaces is discussed. Examples of studies of water and oxygen spectral line parameters as well as continuum absorption in wet nitrogen are given.

  1. Monitoring vegetation using DOAS satellite observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eigemeier, E.; Beirle, S.; Marbach, T.; Platt, U.; Wagner, T.

    2009-04-01

    Vegetation-cycles are of general interest for many applications. Be it for harvest-predictions, global monitoring of climate-change or as input to atmospheric models. From novel spectrally resolving UV/vis satellite instruments (like GOME of SCIAMACHY) the spectral signatures of different types of vegetation can be identified and analysed. Although the spatial resolution of GOME and SCIAMACHY observations is much coarser than those of conventional satellite instruments for vegetation monitoring, our data sets on different vegetation types add new and useful information, not obtainable from other sources. Common Vegetation Indices use the fact that the difference between Red and Near Infrared reflection is higher than in any other material on Earth's surface. This gives a very high degree of confidence for vegetation-detection. The spectrally resolving data from GOME and SCIAMACHY provide the chance to concentrate on finer spectral features throughout the Red and Near Infrared spectrum. We look at these using a technique known as Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (DOAS). Although originally developed to retrieve information on trace gases, it can also be used to gain information on vegetation. Another advantage is that this method automatically corrects for changes in the atmosphere. This renders the vegetation-information easily comparable over long time-spans. In addition, high-frequency-structures from vegetation also effect the retrieval of tropospheric trace-gases and aerosols. To optimize vegetation monitoring with DOAS we produce spectrally resolved reference spectra from different vegetation types. We investigate how well we will be able to distinguish vegetation types from space. This will also be valuable for monitoring global vegetation-cycles over long time spans. Preliminary results will be presented here.

  2. Measurement of Urban Air Quality by an Open-Path Quantum Cascade Laser Absorption Spectrometer in Beijing During Summer 2008

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michel, A. P.; Liu, P. Q.; Yeung, J. K.; Zhang, Y.; Baeck, M. L.; Pan, X.; Dong, H.; Wang, Z.; Smith, J. A.; Gmachl, C. F.

    2009-05-01

    The 2008 Olympic Games focused attention on the air quality of Beijing, China and served as an important test-bed for developing, deploying, and testing new technologies for analysis of air quality and regional climate in urban environments. Poor air quality in urban locations has a significant detrimental effect on the health of residents while also impacting both regional and global climate change. As a result, there exists a great need for highly sensitive trace gas sensors for studying the atmosphere of the urban environment. Open-path remote sensors are of particular interest as they can obtain data on spatial scales similar to those used in regional climate models. Quantum cascade lasers (QCLs) can be designed for operation in the mid-infrared (mid-IR) with a central wavelength anywhere between 3 to 24 μm and made tunable over a wavelength interval of over 0.1 μm. The Quantum Cascade Laser Open-Path System (QCLOPS) is a mid-infrared laser absorption spectrometer that uses a tunable, thermoelectrically cooled, pulsed Daylight Solutions Inc. QCL for measurement of trace gases. The system is aimed at applications with path lengths ranging from approximately 0.1 to 1.0 km. The system is designed to continuously monitor multiple trace gases [water vapor (H2O), ozone (O3), ammonia (NH3), and carbon dioxide (CO2)] in the lower atmosphere. A field campaign from July to September 2008 in Beijing used QCLOPS to study trace gas concentrations before, during, and after the Olympic Games in an effort to capture changes induced by emissions reduction methods. QCLOPS was deployed at the Institute of Atmospheric Physics - Chinese Academy of Sciences on the roof of a two-story building, at an approximate distance of 2 miles from the Olympic National Stadium ("The Bird's Nest.") QCLOPS operated with an open-path round trip distance of approximately 75 m. The system ran with minimal human interference, twenty-four hours per day for the full campaign period. In order to

  3. Development of a space-borne spectrometer to monitor atmospheric ozone.

    PubMed

    Dobrolenskiy, Yury S; Ionov, Dmitry V; Korablev, Oleg I; Fedorova, Anna A; Zherebtsov, Evgeny A; Shatalov, Andrey E; Mantsevich, Sergey N; Belyaev, Denis A; Vyazovetskiy, Nikita A; Moiseev, Pavel P; Tchikov, Konstantin N; Krasavtsev, Valery M; Savushkin, Alexander V; Rumyantsev, Dmitry M; Kananykhin, Igor V; Viktorov, Alexey I; Kozyura, Alexey V; Moryakin, Sergey A; Poberovskii, Anatoly V

    2015-04-10

    A new compact satellite spectrometer dedicated to monitoring terrestrial atmospheric ozone (ozonometer) is in preparation for the Russian Geophysics Program. Four instruments at four satellites (Ionosphere) are intended to monitor the total ozone content by measuring spectra of scattered solar radiation in nadir. The spectrometer is based on the Rowland scheme with a concave holographic diffraction grating. It covers the near UV and visible range of the spectrum, 300-500 nm, with a spectral resolution of ∼0.3  nm. At present, a qualification model has been manufactured and tested. We introduce the description of the instrument and the results of laboratory and ground-based atmospheric calibrations. The ozone amount retrieved from atmospheric measurements using the differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS) method is in good agreement with that measured by the collocated Brewer spectrophotometer and ozone monitoring instrument on board the Aura satellite.

  4. A Compact Tunable Diode Laser Absorption Spectrometer to Monitor CO2 at 2.7 μm Wavelength in Hypersonic Flows

    PubMed Central

    Vallon, Raphäel; Soutadé, Jacques; Vérant, Jean-Luc; Meyers, Jason; Paris, Sébastien; Mohamed, Ajmal

    2010-01-01

    Since the beginning of the Mars planet exploration, the characterization of carbon dioxide hypersonic flows to simulate a spaceship’s Mars atmosphere entry conditions has been an important issue. We have developed a Tunable Diode Laser Absorption Spectrometer with a new room-temperature operating antimony-based distributed feedback laser (DFB) diode laser to characterize the velocity, the temperature and the density of such flows. This instrument has been tested during two measurement campaigns in a free piston tunnel cold hypersonic facility and in a high enthalpy arc jet wind tunnel. These tests also demonstrate the feasibility of mid-infrared fiber optics coupling of the spectrometer to a wind tunnel for integrated or local flow characterization with an optical probe placed in the flow. PMID:22219703

  5. Time-resolved near-edge x-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy on photo-induced phase transitions using a tabletop soft-x-ray spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grossmann, P.; Rajkovic, I.; Moré, R.; Norpoth, J.; Techert, S.; Jooss, C.; Mann, Klaus

    2012-05-01

    We present a table-top soft-x-ray spectrometer for the wavelength range λ = 1-5 nm based on a stable laser-driven x-ray source, making use of a gas-puff target. With this setup, optical light-pump/soft-x-ray probe near-edge x-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) experiments with a temporal resolution of about 230 ps are feasible. Pump-probe NEXAFS measurements were carried out in the "water-window" region (2.28 nm-4.36 nm) on the manganite Pr0.7Ca0.3MnO3, investigating diminutive changes of the oxygen K edge that derive from an optically induced phase transition. The results show the practicability of the table-top soft-x-ray spectrometer on demanding investigations so far exclusively conducted at synchrotron radiation sources.

  6. Two-channel opto-acoustic diode laser spectrometer and fine structure of methane absorption spectra in 6070-6180 cm-1 region.

    PubMed

    Kapitanov, V A; Ponomarev, Yu N; Tyryshkin, I S; Rostov, A P

    2007-04-01

    We describe the hardware and software of the high-sensitive two-channel opto-acoustic spectrometer with a near infrared diode laser. A semiconductor TEC-100 laser with outer resonator generates a continuous single-frequency radiation in the range of 6040-6300 cm-1 with spectral resolution better that 10 MHz. The newly designed model of photo-acoustic cells in the form of a ring type resonator was used in the spectrometer, and the system allows the measurement of a weak absorption coefficient equal to 1.4x10(-7) cm-1 Hz-1/2 with a laser radiation power of 0.003 W. The methane absorption spectra within a range of 6080-6180 cm-1 were measured with a spectral resolution of 10 MHz and the signal to noise ratio more than 10(3). Six hundred absorption lines were recorded, which is twice as many as in HITRAN-2004. The accurate measurements of the half-width and shift of methane unresolved triplet R3 of 2nu3 band permit us to determine values of the broadening and shift coefficients for CH4-air, CH4-N2, and CH4-SF6 mixtures.

  7. Correlation between the Gas Temperature and the Atomization Behavior of Analyte Elements in Flame Atomic Absorption Spectrometry Estimated with a Continuum-light-source Spectrometer System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toya, Yusuke; Itagaki, Toshiko; Wagatsuma, Kazuaki

    2016-11-01

    In flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS), the gas temperature for two types of the gas compositions, which was estimated based on a two-line method by using a simultaneous multi-wavelength spectrometer, on which a line pair of ruthenium, Ru I 372.692 nm and Ru I 372.803 nm having different excitation energies, was measured at the same time. Also using the spectrometer system, the absorption signals of both iron and ruthenium, whose oxides had different thermodynamic properties: the latter oxide was decomposed much more easily than the former one, were investigated with a nitrous oxide - acetylene flame, in comparison with an air - acetylene flame. The fuel/oxidant ratio of both the flames as well as the height of the optical path was varied as an experimental parameter. The atomization behavior of iron and ruthenium, which could be deduced from a variation in their absorption signals, was considered to be dependent not only on the gas temperature but on reducing atmosphere of the flame gas, which might be attributed to reducing radicals in a fuel-excess flame consisting of nitrous oxide. In the nitrous oxide - acetylene flame, a broader optical path having a constant and higher temperature was obtained, thus contributing to formation of analyte atoms with a stable atomization efficiency and eventually to better precision in the analytical result in FAAS.

  8. DOAS evaluation of volcanic SO2 using a modeled background spectrum: Examples from the NOVAC stations at Nevado del Ruiz (Colombia) and Tungurahua (Ecuador)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lübcke, Peter; Lampel, Johannes; Bobrowski, Nicole; Arellano, Santiago; Galle, Bo; Garzón, Gustavo; Hidalgo, Silvana; Vogel, Leif; Warnach, Simon; Platt, Ulrich

    2015-04-01

    SO2 emission rates are monitored using Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (DOAS) in the UV at an increasing number of volcano observatories. The Network for Observation of Volcanic and Atmospheric Change (NOVAC) has currently installed 80 scanning DOAS instruments at 30 volcanoes world-wide. One important question for the evaluation of spectra using DOAS is the availability of background spectra that are not influenced by volcanic gas emissions. An SO2 contaminated background spectrum would lead to a negative offset of the retrieved SO2 column densities, and thus to an underestimation of the volcanic SO2 emission rate. In NOVAC this problem is approached by performing a scan, e.g. through a plane from one horizon to the other horizon, and defining the average of the 20% spectra with the lowest SO2 content as the zero-baseline value, which is assumed to be gas free. To verify this assumption we revisit the idea of evaluating spectra using the DOAS method with a modeled background spectrum based on a high-resolution solar atlas. One challenge when evaluating spectra with a modeled background spectrum is properly accounting for instrumental effects that are usually removed when calculating the measured optical density relative to a measured background spectrum. We present our approach to handle these instrumental effects, showing that we gain a similar fit quality to the method using a measured reference spectrum. For example, wavelength dependent structures in the spectrum due to the spectrometer (e.g., quantum efficiency of the detector and grating efficiency) were identified with help of a principal component analysis of an SO2 free subset of the residual spectra. These structures were included in a second iteration of the fit in order to improve the evaluation. We further discuss influences like strong ozone absorption and the instrument temperature on the quality of the SO2 fit using a modeled background spectrum. The new evaluation scheme was applied

  9. A new approach for the determination of sulphur in food samples by high-resolution continuum source flame atomic absorption spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Ozbek, N; Baysal, A

    2015-02-01

    The new approach for the determination of sulphur in foods was developed, and the sulphur concentrations of various fresh and dried food samples determined using a high-resolution continuum source flame atomic absorption spectrometer with an air/acetylene flame. The proposed method was optimised and the validated using standard reference materials, and certified values were found to be within the 95% confidence interval. The sulphur content of foods ranged from less than the LOD to 1.5mgg(-1). The method is accurate, fast, simple and sensitive.

  10. Development and application of a low-cost, portable DOAS system for stratospheric composition monitoring over the Argentinean Patagonia and Antarctic stations.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raponi, Marcelo; Jiménez, Rodrigo; Ristori, Pablo; Wolfram, Elian; Tocho, Jorge; Quel, Eduardo

    2010-05-01

    challenge. Also, we present measurements carry out at the Marambio Antarctic Base (64° 14' S; 56° 37' W, 197 m asl) during the months of January - February of 2008, using the ERO-DOAS. The NO2 and O3 VCD are derived from solar spectra acquired during the twilights (zenithal angles between 87° - 92° ), using the DOAS (Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy) technique. The biggest contribution to these spectra comes from the stratosphere, atmosphere layer that we want to study. The analysis is carried out by solving the Beer-Lambert-Bouger (BLB) law for all the atmospheric absorbers and a quasi-continuous wavelength range. The algorithm minimizes the fitting residuals to the BLB law, having as unknown the slant column density of the species to determine. The effects of Rayleigh and Mie scattering, fluorescence and most of the Raman scattering are accounted for and subtracted out using a high-pass polynomial filter. We compare the data acquired by our DOAS system with co-located measurements performed with EVA, a visible absorption spectrometer operated by the Instituto Nacional de Técnica Aeroespacial (INTA), Spain. Additionally, a comparative study is presented among the ground-based signals and those obtained by the instrument OMI (AURA satellite). The bigger mistake sources associated with the comparison between AURA satellite observations and those carried out from earth are: a) NOx daily cycle, b) NO2 natural variability, and c) NO2 tropospheric sensibility. In the case of Marambio, it hasn't relevance since it is non polluted places and the tropospheric NO2 level is very low. We observe that the NO2 has a strong photochemical variability during the day. This variability is associated with the solar cycle, the NOx vertical distribution, the temperature in the high layers of the atmosphere and sometimes (in high latitudes) of other active species.

  11. Atmospheric solar absorption measurements in the 9-11 micron region using a diode laser heterodyne spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harward, C. N.; Hoell, J. M., Jr.

    1980-01-01

    A tunable diode laser heterodyne radiometer was developed for ground based measurements of atmospheric solar absorption spectra in the 9 to 12 micron spectral range. The performance and operating characteristics of this tunable infrared heterodyne radiometer (TIHR) is discussed along with recently measured heterodyne solar absorption spectra in the 10 to 11 micron spectral region.

  12. Retrieval columns of SO2 in industrial chimneys using DOAS passive in traverse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galicia Mejía, Rubén; de la Rosa Vázquez, José Manuel; Sosa Iglesias, Gustavo

    2011-10-01

    The optical Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (DOAS) is a technique to measure pollutant emissions like SO2, from point sources and total fluxes in the atmosphere. Passive DOAS systems use sunlight like source. Measurements with such systems can be made in situ and in real time. The goal of this work is to report the implementation of hardware and software of a portable system to evaluate the pollutants emitted in the atmosphere by industrial chimneys. We show SO2 measurements obtained around PEMEX refinerys in Tula Hidalgo that enables the identification of their pollution degree with the knowledge of speed wind.

  13. The New MAX-DOAS Network in Mexico City for Trace Gas Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arellano, E. J.; Krüger, A.; Rivera, C. I.; Stremme, W.; Friedrich, M. M.; Grutter, M.

    2014-12-01

    Atmospheric studies in large cities are of great relevance since pollution affects air quality and human health. We have designed and built instruments based on the Multi Axis Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (MAX-DOAS) technique and established a network in strategic sites within the Mexico City metropolitan area. Four instruments are now in operation with the aim to study the variability and spatial distribution of key pollutants, which will bring new insight in the current knowledge of transport patterns, emissions as well as frequency and origin of extraordinary events. The instruments measure UV/visible spectra of the sky at different elevation angles in the 280 nm to 510 nm wavelength region along one axis. Currently, 36 measurements constitute a full scan performed from west until East direction (-90 to +90°). The scanning unit, which is installed outdoors, holds a small telescope and the motor control unit. Light is transmitted via an optical fiber to the main box, which holds a compact USB spectrometer and the main control electronics. The spectrometer is accurately temperature controlled and all the spectra of each scan, together with elevation angle and other parameters, are recorded on a compact PC. Post processing of these data with the QDOAS software results in slant column densities (SCD) of the atmospheric gases. This information is then converted to vertical profiles through a process described in a companion presentation. Preliminary results will be presented for formaldehyde, fitted in the region 324-360 nm. The data obtained is useful for the comparison with satellite data for example OMI.

  14. In-operation field-of-view retrieval (IFR) for satellite and ground-based DOAS-type instruments applying coincident high-resolution imager data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sihler, Holger; Lübcke, Peter; Lang, Rüdiger; Beirle, Steffen; de Graaf, Martin; Hörmann, Christoph; Lampel, Johannes; Penning de Vries, Marloes; Remmers, Julia; Trollope, Ed; Wang, Yang; Wagner, Thomas

    2017-03-01

    Knowledge of the field of view (FOV) of a remote sensing instrument is particularly important when interpreting their data and merging them with other spatially referenced data. Especially for instruments in space, information on the actual FOV, which may change during operation, may be difficult to obtain. Also, the FOV of ground-based devices may change during transportation to the field site, where appropriate equipment for the FOV determination may be unavailable. This paper presents an independent, simple and robust method to retrieve the FOV of an instrument during operation, i.e. the two-dimensional sensitivity distribution, sampled on a discrete grid. The method relies on correlated measurements featuring a significantly higher spatial resolution, e.g. by an imaging instrument accompanying a spectrometer. The method was applied to two satellite instruments, GOME-2 and OMI, and a ground-based differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS) instrument integrated in an SO2 camera. For GOME-2, quadrangular FOVs could be retrieved, which almost perfectly match the provided FOV edges after applying a correction for spatial aliasing inherent to GOME-type instruments. More complex sensitivity distributions were found at certain scanner angles, which are probably caused by degradation of the moving parts within the instrument. For OMI, which does not feature any moving parts, retrieved sensitivity distributions were much smoother compared to GOME-2. A 2-D super-Gaussian with six parameters was found to be an appropriate model to describe the retrieved OMI FOV. The comparison with operationally provided FOV dimensions revealed small differences, which could be mostly explained by the limitations of our IFR implementation. For the ground-based DOAS instrument, the FOV retrieved using SO2-camera data was slightly smaller than the flat-disc distribution, which is assumed by the state-of-the-art correlation technique. Differences between both methods may be

  15. Validation opportunities of DOAS Network in Moscow Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borovski, Alexander; Postylyakov, Oleg; Elokhov, Alexander; Ivanov, Victor; Kanaya, Yugo

    A.M. Obukhov Institute of Atmospheric Physics (IAP) of Russian Academy of Science developed a network of atmosphere composition measurements by DOAS method. Measurements sites of the network are located in the centre of Moscow at IAP (55.74N, 37.62E) south-east part of the city at M.V. Lomonosov Moscow State University (55.70N 37.53E), and in background region at Zvenigorod Scientific Station of IAP (ZSS, 55.70N, 36.78E). Intensity of the scattered solar radiation is registered in ultra-violet and visible spectrum region. Three devices are mounted at ZSS: based on MDR-23 spectrometer (since 1990), JAMSTEC MAX-DOAS (since 2008), and based on ORIEL MS257 spectrometer (since 2008). ORIEL MS260i imaging spectrometers were mounted at city stations in 2010. Measurements are regular and continuous at all stations. Basing on performed measurements of spectral radiance, the vertical distribution at twilight, the total content and the integral content in the boundary layer (ABL) in daytime of NO2 are obtained. The quantities are obtained in clear sky and cloudy conditions. Besides that, the vertical distribution of aerosol and the total content (mainly contributed by ABL) of HCHO using MAX-DOAS are calculated. The HCHO total content is retrieved with error about 20 %. We analyzed the variability of the HCHO during clear sky conditions in 2010. The HCHO content is larger during east wind directions than during non-east wind directions. It can be associated with Moscow Megacity influence on air quality at Zvenigorod. The estimation of Moscow Megacity influence on HCHO abundance at Zvenigorod is around 2.5E14 mol/cm2 per 1 km length of trajectory path inside Moscow Ring Road. Our data show statistically significant positive temperature effect in HCHO for the background condition for temperatures from -5C to +33C. The temperature trend in HCHO data at ZSS is about (8.9±2.3)E14 mol/cm2/C. The increase of the HCHO VCD during increase of the air temperature can be explained by the

  16. Signal to Noise Ratio in Digital Lock-in Detection for Multiple Intensity-Modulated Signals in CO2 Laser Absorption Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    CHEN, S.; Lin, B.; Harrison, F. W.; Nehrir, A. R.; Campbell, J. F.; Refaat, T.; Abedin, N. M.; Obland, M. D.; Ismail, S.; Meadows, B. L.

    2013-12-01

    NASA Langley Research Center is investigating Intensity-Modulated, Continuous-Wave Laser Absorption Spectrometers (LASs) for the measurement of atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) column mixing ratio from both air- and space-borne platforms. The LAS system uses high-power fiber lasers/amplifiers in the 1.57-um CO2 absorption band and the 1.26-um O2 absorption band in the transmitters and simultaneous digital lock-in detection for the multiple intensity-modulated signals with different modulation waveforms , such as simple sinusoidal waves at different frequencies, associated with different wavelengths in the receivers. The Signal to Noise Ratio (SNR) of the simultaneous digital lock-in detection in the system is of interest for the system designs and the performance prediction of airborne and space-borne implementations in the future. This paper will discuss the properties of the signals and various noises in the LAS system, especially for the simultaneous digital lock-in detection with a single detector for the multiple intensity-modulated signals at different frequencies. The numerical simulation of the SNR for the simultaneous digital lock-in detection in terms of relative intensity of the multiple modulated signals and the integration time, and an initial experimental verification will be presented.

  17. Laser Magneto-Optic Rotation Spectrometer (LMORS)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-01-01

    traditional method of measuring atomic concentrations uses atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS), herein referred to as an AAS 15 spectrometer...MOR spectrometer of the present invention. Fig. 2 illustrates a calibration curve for a conventional 10 atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS

  18. Development of a Near-Ir Cavity Enhanced Absorption Spectrometer for the Detection of Atmospheric Oxidation Products and Organoamines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eddingsaas, Nathan C.; Jewell, Breanna; Thurnherr, Emily

    2014-06-01

    An estimated 10,000 to 100,000 different compounds have been measured in the atmosphere, each one undergoes many oxidation reactions that may or may not degrade air quality. To date, the fate of even some of the most abundant hydrocarbons in the atmosphere is poorly understood. One difficulty is the detection of atmospheric oxidation products that are very labile and decompose during analysis. To study labile species under atmospheric conditions, a highly sensitive, non-destructive technique is needed. Here we describe a near-IR incoherent broadband cavity enhanced absorption spectroscopy (IBBCEAS) setup that we are developing to meet this end. We have chosen to utilize the near-IR, where vibrational overtone absorptions are observed, due to the clean spectral windows and better spectral separation of absorption features. In one spectral window we can simultaneously and continuously monitor the composition of alcohols, hydroperoxides, and carboxylic acids in an air mass. In addition, we have used our CEAS setup to detect organoamines. The long effective path length of CEAS allows for low detection limits, even of the overtone absorption features, at ppb and ppt levels.

  19. Simple system for measuring tritium Ad/absorption using a 2. pi. counter and thermal desorption spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Miyake, H.; Matsuyama, M.; Watanabe, K. ); Cowgill, D.F. )

    1992-03-01

    In this paper, the authors develop a simple system using tritium tracer and thermal desorption techniques to measure the tritium adsorption and/or absorption on/in a material having typical surface conditions: namely, not cleaned surface. The tritium counting devices used were a 2{pi} counter and conventional proportional counter. With this system, the amounts of ad/absorption could be measured without exposing the samples to air after exposing them to tritium gas. The overall efficiency (F) of the 2{pi} counter was described at F = exp({minus}2.64h), where h is the distance from the sample to the detector. Ad/absorption measurements were carried out for several materials used for fabricating conventional vacuum systems. The results were, in the order of decreasing amounts of ad/absorption, as (fiber reinforced plastics(FRP)) {gt} (nickel(Ni), molybdenum disulfide(MoS{sub 2})) {gt} (stainless steel (SS304), iron(Fe), aluminum alloy(A2219)) {gt} (boron nitride(h-BN), silicon carbide (SiC), SS304 passivated by anodic oxidation layers(ASS) and that by boron nitride segregation layers (BSS)). The relative amounts were abut 100 for Ni and 0.1 for ASS and BSS, being normalized to Fe = 1.

  20. CU Airborne MAX-DOAS measurements over California during the CalNEx and CARES field campaigns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baidar, S.; Oetjen, H.; Coburn, S.; Ortega, I.; Dix, B. K.; Sinreich, R.; Volkamer, R.

    2010-12-01

    The University of Colorado Airborne Multi-Axis Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (CU AMAX-DOAS) instrument was deployed aboard the NOAA Optical Remote Sensing Twin Otter Research Aircraft during the CalNEx 2010 and CARES field campaigns. A total of 52 flights (48 research + 4 transfer flights) were carried out between May 19 and July 19 2010 and included flights in the South California Air Basin, the High deserts, Northern Mexico, the Central Valley, Sacramento, and the San Francisco Bay Area. A particular component of the CU AMAX-DOAS deployment was to enhance the value of ground-based super sites in Pasadena and Bakersfield, as well as the CARES T0 and T1 sites. The CU AMAX-DOAS is measuring column amounts of NO2, HCHO, CHOCHO, O4 and other gases above and below the aircraft. The focus of this deployment was to map the horizontal and vertical distribution of these gases. Here we describe the CU AMAX-DOAS instrument and give an overview of the NO2 vertical columns below the plane along the flight tracks. A first comparison of NO2 vertical columns measured by AMAX-DOAS and two CU Ground based MAX-DOAS instruments which were deployed in Pasadena and Fontana Arrows during CalNEx and at the T1 site during CARES is also presented.

  1. In situ ozone data for evaluation of the laser absorption spectrometer ozone remote sensor: 1979 southeastern Virginia urban plume study summer field program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregory, G. L.; Mcdougal, D. S.; Mathis, J. J., Jr.

    1980-01-01

    Ozone data from the 1979 Southeastern Virginia Urban Study (SEV-UPS) field program are presented. The SEV-UPS was conducted for evaluation of an ozone remote sensor, the Laser Absorption Spectrometer. During the measurement program, remote-sensor evaluation was in two areas; (1) determination of the remote sensor's accuracy, repeatability, and operational characteristics, and (2) demonstration of the application of remotely sensed ozone data in air-quality studies. Data from six experiments designed to provide in situ ozone data for evaluation of the sensor in area 1, above, are presented. Experiments consisted of overflights of a test area with the remote sensor aircraft while in situ measurements with a second aircraft and selected surface stations provided correlative ozone data within the viewing area of the remote sensor.

  2. Direct determination of cadmium and copper in seawater using a transversely heated graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometer with Zeeman-effect background corrector.

    PubMed

    Chan, M S; Huang, S D

    2000-02-07

    Methods for the direct determination of copper and cadmium in seawater were described using a graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometer (GFAAS) equipped with a transversely heated graphite atomizer (THGA) and a longitudinal Zeeman effect background corrector. Ammonium nitrate was used as the chemical modifier to determine copper. The mixture of di-ammonium hydrogen phosphate and ammonium nitrate was used as the chemical modifier to determine cadmium. The matrix interference was removed completely so that a simple calibration curve method could be applied. This work is the first one with the capability of determining cadmium in unpolluted seawater directly with GFAAS using calibration curve based on simple aqueous standards. The accuracy of the methods was confirmed by analysis of three kinds of certified reference saline waters. The detection limits (LODs), with injection of a 20-mul aliquot of seawater sample, were 0.06 mug l(-1) for copper and 0.005 mug l(-1) for cadmium.

  3. Comparison of glyoxal, BrO, and IO vertical profiles derived from both ground-based and airborne MAX-DOAS measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coburn, Sean; Volkamer, Rainer; Baidar, Sunil; Dix, Barbara; Koenig, Theodore; Ortega, Ivan; Sinreich, Roman; van Roozendael, Michel; Hendrick, Francois; Kinnison, Doug

    2015-04-01

    The information content of ground-based MAX-DOAS retrievals is assessed by collocated aircraft measurements for a ship MAX-DOAS setup over the Eastern tropical Pacific Ocean (TORERO RF17), and a mountain-top MAX-DOAS setup at Mauna Loa Observatory, Hawaii (CONTRAST RF17). During both case studies the CU airborne MAX-DOAS (AMAX-DOAS) instrument aboard the NSF/NCAR GV aircraft measured profiles of glyoxal, BrO, and IO with 12-20 degrees of freedom and up to 500 m vertical resolution. The TORERO field campaign took place in 2012, while CONTRAST in 2014; both campaigns covered the months of January and February. Additional measurements aboard the aircraft helped to provide information/validation of the AMAX-DOAS derived profiles, such as in-situ water vapor from the Vertical-Cavity Surface-Emitting Laser hygrometer (VCSEL), in-situ hydrocarbon measurements from the Trace Organic Gas Analyzer (TOGA), and aerosol information constrained by the Ultra High Sensitivity Aerosol Spectrometer (UHSAS). The AMAX-DOAS profiles are compared with ground-based MAX-DOAS inversions. The latter explores the effect of using either the measured differential slant column density (dSCD) or SCD as input to the optimal estimation inversion, where SCD = dSCD + SCD_ref. SCD_ref is the residual column amount of the trace gas contained within the reference spectrum. For the AMAX-DOAS data, the values of SCD_ref were actively minimized, while SCD_ref is usually unknown for ground-based MAX-DOAS retrievals. In absence of independent measurements to constrain SCD_ref, the current state-of-the-art with ground-based MAX-DOAS applications is to use dSCDs as input to the inversion. Here we assess the effect of uncertain SCD_ref for ground-based MAX-DOAS profiles in form of a sensitivity study. Additionally for the ground-based data, different methods are compared for the determination of SCD_ref: 1) the collocated aircraft profiles described above present the opportunity to forward calculate the SCD

  4. MAX-DOAS observation of HCHO and CHOCHO over Athens and Nairobi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alvarado, Leonardo; Richter, Andreas; Peters, Enno; Wittrock, Folkard; Burrows, John; Vrekoussis, Mihalis; Gratsea, Myrto; Gerasopoulos, Vangelis

    2014-05-01

    Formaldehyde (HCHO) is the most abundant among the carbonyls, while glyoxal (CHOCHO) is the most predominant of the alpha dicarbonyls in the atmosphere. Both species originate from a wide range of natural and anthropogenic sources. In addition, HCHO and CHOCHO are being emitted during biomass burning and the emitted amounts depending on the type of biomass burned as well as the temperatures of the fire. Due to their short lifetime, CHOCHO and HCHO are used as indicators of photochemical activity and intermediate products of the process of degradation of VOCs. While sources and chemistry of CHOCHO and HCHO are similar in many respects, the variation in production efficiency for different sources can be used to better constrain source attribution of VOCs e.g. by analysing the ratio of HCHO to CHOCHO. Atmospheric HCHO and CHOCHO columns can be determined by remote sensing using the Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (DOAS) method. The DOAS method allows the determination of atmospheric amounts of trace gases with narrow absorption bands in the ultraviolet and visible. In this study we report the first HCHO and CHOCHO results from the MAX-DOAS stations in Athens (38N, 24E) and Nairobi (1S, 36E) which are part of the Bremian DOAS Network for Atmospheric Measurements (BREDOM). The results show higher values of CHOCHO and HCHO in summer than in the winter season. Moreover, analyses of the ratio of HCHO to CHOCHO are presented as well as preliminary comparison of CHOCHO columns with satellite data from GOME-2 and OMI.

  5. MAX-DOAS retrieval of aerosol extinction properties in Madrid, Spain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shanshan; Cuevas, Carlos A.; Frieß, Udo; Saiz-Lopez, Alfonso

    2016-10-01

    Multi-axis differential optical absorption spectroscopy (MAX-DOAS) measurements were performed in the urban environment of Madrid, Spain, from March to September 2015. The O4 absorption in the ultraviolet (UV) spectral region was used to retrieve the aerosol extinction profile using an inversion algorithm. The results show a good agreement between the hourly retrieved aerosol optical depth (AOD) and the correlative Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) product, with a correlation coefficient of R = 0.87. Higher AODs are found in the summer season due to the more frequent occurrence of Saharan dust intrusions. The surface aerosol extinction coefficient as retrieved by the MAX-DOAS measurements was also compared to in situ PM2.5 concentrations. The level of agreement between both measurements indicates that the MAX-DOAS retrieval has the ability to characterize the extinction of aerosol particles near the surface. The retrieval algorithm was also used to study a case of severe dust intrusion on 12 May 2015. The capability of the MAX-DOAS retrieval to recognize the dust event including an elevated particle layer is investigated along with air mass back-trajectory analysis.

  6. Evaluation of the absorption of methotrexate on cells and its cytotoxicity assay by using an integrated microfluidic device coupled to a mass spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Gao, Dan; Li, Haifang; Wang, Niejun; Lin, Jin-Ming

    2012-11-06

    An integrated microfluidic device was developed for high-throughput drug screening with an online electrospray ionization quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometer (ESI-Q-TOF MS). The multiple gradient generator followed by an array of microscale cell culture chambers and on-chip solid-phase extraction (SPE) columns for sample pretreatment prior to mass analysis was integrated in the device which was fabricated in one single step. By using the combination system, the process for characterization of drug absorption and evaluation of cytotoxicity could be simultaneously realized. To validate the feasibility, the absorption of methotrexate and its effects on HepG2 and Caco-2 cells were investigated. With the increasing concentration of drugs, the percentage of apoptotic cells appeared in a dose-dependent fashion. By comparison with the results obtained from ESI-Q-TOF MS analysis and cytotoxicity assay, we found that higher intracellular drug concentration resulted in increased cell cytotoxicity. The technique presented herein provides an easy protocol to screen drugs rapidly with low drug consumption, high throughput, and high sensitivity.

  7. Inter-comparison of 2 microm Heterodyne Differential Absorption Lidar, Laser Diode Spectrometer, LICOR NDIR analyzer and flasks measurements of near-ground atmospheric CO2 mixing ratio.

    PubMed

    Gibert, Fabien; Joly, Lilian; Xuéref-Rémy, Irène; Schmidt, Martina; Royer, Adrien; Flamant, Pierre H; Ramonet, Michel; Parvitte, Bertrand; Durry, Georges; Zéninari, Virginie

    2009-01-01

    Remote sensing and in situ instruments are presented and compared in the same location for accurate CO(2) mixing ratio measurements in the atmosphere: (1) a 2.064 microm Heterodyne DIfferential Absorption Lidar (HDIAL), (2) a field deployable infrared Laser Diode Spectrometer (LDS) using new commercial diode laser technology at 2.68 microm, (3) LICOR NDIR analyzer and (4) flasks. LDS, LICOR and flasks measurements were made in the same location, LICOR and flasks being taken as reference. Horizontal HDIAL measurements of CO(2) absorption using aerosol backscatter signal are reported. Using new spectroscopic data in the 2 microm band and meteorological sensor measurements, a mean CO(2) mixing ratio is inferred by the HDIAL in a 1 km long path above the 15m height location of the CO(2) in situ sensors. We compare HDIAL and LDS measurements with the LICOR data for 30 min of time averaging. The mean standard deviation of the HDIAL and the LDS CO(2) mixing ratio results are 3.3 ppm and 0.89 ppm, respectively. The bias of the HDIAL and the LDS measurements are -0.54 ppm and -0.99 ppm, respectively.

  8. Fast time response measurements of gaseous nitrous acid using a tunable diode laser absorption spectrometer: HONO emission source from vehicle exhausts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yongquan Q.; Schwab, James J.; Demerjian, Kenneth L.

    2008-02-01

    We present the measurement of gaseous nitrous acid (HONO) using a tunable diode laser absorption spectrometer. This method utilizes one strong absorption feature at 1713.511cm-1, which is free of interference and suitable for ambient HONO measurements. The detection limit for a 1-second integration time is determined to be better than 200 pptv. The measurement method has been demonstrated by sampling room air over an 11-day period. HONO mixing ratios ranged from below the detection limit (<=200 pptv) to 4.8 ppbv, with a mean value of 0.73 ppbv. A number of elevated HONO events lasting from several seconds up to hours were observed and have been associated with roadway traffic adjacent to the building where the measurements were performed. The variation in the ratio of HONO/NOx and its anti-correlation with ambient NOx measurements indicate that the source of HONO in this measurement study is mainly from the direct emission of traffic exhausts and local heterogeneous reactions. The demonstrated application of TDLAS fast response measurement technology is capable of providing new information on the sources and sinks of HONO in the environment.

  9. Atmospheric aerosol characterization combining multi-wavelength Raman lidar and MAX-DOAS measurements in Gwanjgu

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chong, Jihyo; Shin, Dong Ho; Kim, Kwang Chul; Lee, Kwon-Ho; Shin, Sungkyun; Noh, Young M.; Müller, Detlef; Kim, Young J.

    2011-11-01

    Integrated approach has been adopted at the ADvanced Environmental Research Center (ADEMRC), Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology (GIST), Korea for effective monitoring of atmospheric aerosol. Various active and passive optical remote sensing techniques such as multi-wavelength (3β+2α+1δ) Raman LIDAR, sun-photometry, MAX-DOAS, and satellite retrieval have been utilized. This integrated monitoring system approach combined with in-situ surface measurement is to allow better characterization of physical and optical properties of atmospheric aerosol. Information on the vertical distribution and microphysical properties of atmospheric aerosol is important for understanding its transport characteristics as well as radiative effect. The GIST multi-wavelength (3β + 2α+1δ) Raman lidar system can measure vertical profiles of optical properties of atmospheric aerosols such as extinction coefficients at 355 and 532nm, particle backscatter coefficients at 355, 532 and 1064 nm, and depolarization ratio at 532nm. The incomplete overlap between the telescope field-of-view and beam divergence of the transmitting laser significantly affects lidar measurement, resulting in higher uncertainty near the surface where atmospheric aerosols of interest are concentrated. Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (DOAS) technique is applied as a complementary tool for the detection of atmospheric aerosols near the surface. The passive Multi-Axis DOAS (MAX-DOAS) technique uses scattered sunlight as a light source from several viewing directions. Recently developed aerosol retrieval algorithm based on O4 slant column densities (SCDs) measured at UV and visible wavelengths has been utilized to derive aerosol information (e.g., aerosol optical depth (AOD) and aerosol extinction coefficients (AECs)) in the lower troposphere. The aerosol extinction coefficient at 356 nm was retrieved for the 0-1 and 1-2 km layers based on the MAX-DOAS measurements using the retrieval algorithm

  10. A Tale of Two Cities - HSI-DOAS Measurements of Air Quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graves, Rosemarie; Leigh, Roland; Anand, Jasdeep; McNally, Michael; Lawrence, James; Monks, Paul

    2013-04-01

    Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy is now commonly used as an air quality measuring system; primarily through the measurements of nitrogen dioxide (NO2) both as a ground-based and satellite technique. CityScan is a Hemispherical Scanning Imaging Differential Optical Absorption Spectrometer (HSI-DOAS) which has been optimised to measure concentrations of nitrogen dioxide. CityScan has a 95˚ field of view (FOV) between the zenith and 5˚ below the horizon. Across this FOV there are 128 resolved elements which are measured concurrently, the spectrometer is rotated azimuthally 1˚ per second providing full hemispherical coverage every 6 minutes. CityScan measures concentrations of nitrogen dioxide over specific lines of sight and due to the extensive field of view of the instrument this produces measurements which are representative over city-wide scales. Nitrogen dioxide is an important air pollutant which is produced in all combustion processes and can reduce lung function; especially in sensitised individuals. These instruments aim to bridge the gap in spatial scales between point source measurements of air quality and satellite measurements of air quality offering additional information on emissions, transport and the chemistry of nitrogen dioxide. More information regarding the CityScan technique can be found at http://www.leos.le.ac.uk/aq/index.html. CityScan has been deployed in both London and Bologna, Italy during 2012. The London deployment took place as part of the large NERC funded ClearfLo project in January and July/August. CityScan was deployed in Bologna in June as part of the large EU project PEGASOS. Analysis of both of these campaigns of data will be used to give unprecedented levels of spatial information to air quality measurements whilst also showing the difference in air quality between a relatively isolated mega city and a smaller city situated in a very polluted region; in this case the Po Valley. Results from multiple City

  11. BrO/SO2 molar ratios from scanning DOAS measurements in the NOVAC network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lübcke, P.; Bobrowski, N.; Arellano, S.; Galle, B.; Garzón, G.; Vogel, L.; Platt, U.

    2013-11-01

    The molar ratio of BrO to SO2 is, like other halogen/sulphur ratios, a~possible precursor for dynamic changes in the shallow part of a volcanic system. While the predictive significance of the BrO/SO2 ratio has not been well constrained yet, it has the major advantage that this ratio can be readily measured using the remote-sensing technique Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (DOAS) in the UV. While BrO/SO2 ratios have been measured during several short-term field campaigns this article presents an algorithm that can be used to obtain long-term time series of BrO/SO2 ratios from the scanning DOAS instruments of the Network for Observation of Volcanic and Atmospheric Change (NOVAC) or comparable networks. Parameters of the DOAS retrieval of both trace gases are given and the influence of co-adding spectra on the retrieval error will be investigated. Difficulties in the evaluation of spectroscopic data from monitoring instruments in volcanic environments and possible solutions are discussed. The new algorithm is demonstrated by evaluating data from the NOVAC scanning DOAS systems at Nevado del Ruiz, Colombia encompassing almost four years of measurements between November 2009 and end of June 2013. This dataset shows variations of the BrO/SO2 ratio several weeks prior to the eruption on 30 June 2012.

  12. BrO/SO2 molar ratios from scanning DOAS measurements in the NOVAC network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lübcke, P.; Bobrowski, N.; Arellano, S.; Galle, B.; Garzón, G.; Vogel, L.; Platt, U.

    2014-06-01

    The molar ratio of BrO to SO2 is, like other halogen/sulfur ratios, a possible precursor for dynamic changes in the shallow part of a volcanic system. While the predictive significance of the BrO/SO2 ratio has not been well constrained yet, it has the major advantage that this ratio can be readily measured using the remote-sensing technique differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS) in the UV. While BrO/SO2 ratios have been measured during several short-term field campaigns, this article presents an algorithm that can be used to obtain long-term time series of BrO/SO2 ratios from the scanning DOAS instruments of the Network for Observation of Volcanic and Atmospheric Change (NOVAC) or comparable networks. Parameters of the DOAS retrieval of both trace gases are given. The influence of co-adding spectra on the retrieval error and influences of radiative transfer will be investigated. Difficulties in the evaluation of spectroscopic data from monitoring instruments in volcanic environments and possible solutions are discussed. The new algorithm is demonstrated by evaluating data from the NOVAC scanning DOAS systems at Nevado del Ruiz, Colombia, encompassing almost 4 years of measurements between November 2009 and end of June 2013. This data set shows variations of the BrO/SO2 ratio several weeks prior to the eruption on 30 June 2012.

  13. Scanning and mobile multi-axis DOAS measurements of SO2 and NO2 emissions from an electric power plant in Montevideo, Uruguay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frins, E.; Bobrowski, N.; Osorio, M.; Casaballe, N.; Belsterli, G.; Wagner, T.; Platt, U.

    2014-12-01

    In March 2012 the emissions of NO2 and SO2 from a power station located on the east side of Montevideo Bay (34° 53‧ 10″ S, 56° 11‧ 49″ W) were quantified by simultaneously using mobile and scanning multi-axis differential optical absorption spectroscopy (in the following mobile DOAS and scanning DOAS, respectively). The facility produces electricity by means of two technologies: internal combustion motors and steam generators. The motors are powered with centrifuged heavy oil and produce a maximum power of 80 MW approximately. The steam generators produce approximately 305 MW and are powered with heavy fuel oil. We compare the emissions obtained from the measured slant column densities (mobile DOAS and scanning DOAS) with the emissions estimated from fuel mass balance. On one occasion it was possible to distinguish between the two types of sources, observing two plumes with different SO2 and NO2 emission rates. During the period of the campaign the mean SO2 emission flux was determined to be 0.36 (±0.12) kg s-1 and 0.26 (±0.09) kg s-1 retrieved from mobile and scanning DOAS respectively, while the calculated SO2 flux from the sulphur content of the fuel was 0.34 (±0.03) kg s-1. The average NO2 flux calculated from mobile DOAS was determined to be 11 (±3) × 10-3 kg s-1. Using the scanning DOAS approach a mean NO2 flux of 5.4 (±1.7) × 10-3 kg s-1 was obtained, which is significantly lower than by the mobile measurements. The differences between the results of mobile MAX-DOAS measurements and scanning DOAS measurements are most probably caused by the variability and the limited knowledge of the wind speed and direction.

  14. Parameterizing radiative transfer to convert MAX-DOAS dSCDs into near-surface box-averaged mixing ratios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinreich, R.; Merten, A.; Molina, L.; Volkamer, R.

    2013-06-01

    We present a novel parameterization method to convert multi-axis differential optical absorption spectroscopy (MAX-DOAS) differential slant column densities (dSCDs) into near-surface box-averaged volume mixing ratios. The approach is applicable inside the planetary boundary layer under conditions with significant aerosol load, and builds on the increased sensitivity of MAX-DOAS near the instrument altitude. It parameterizes radiative transfer model calculations and significantly reduces the computational effort, while retrieving ~ 1 degree of freedom. The biggest benefit of this method is that the retrieval of an aerosol profile, which usually is necessary for deriving a trace gas concentration from MAX-DOAS dSCDs, is not needed. The method is applied to NO2 MAX-DOAS dSCDs recorded during the Mexico City Metropolitan Area 2006 (MCMA-2006) measurement campaign. The retrieved volume mixing ratios of two elevation angles (1° and 3°) are compared to volume mixing ratios measured by two long-path (LP)-DOAS instruments located at the same site. Measurements are found to agree well during times when vertical mixing is expected to be strong. However, inhomogeneities in the air mass above Mexico City can be detected by exploiting the different horizontal and vertical dimensions probed by the MAX-DOAS and LP-DOAS instruments. In particular, a vertical gradient in NO2 close to the ground can be observed in the afternoon, and is attributed to reduced mixing coupled with near-surface emission inside street canyons. The existence of a vertical gradient in the lower 250 m during parts of the day shows the general challenge of sampling the boundary layer in a representative way, and emphasizes the need of vertically resolved measurements.

  15. Variation of the 3-μm absorption feature on Mars: observations over eastern Valles Marineris by the mariner 6 infrared spectrometer

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Calvin, Wendy M.

    1997-01-01

    A new approach for calibration of the shortest wavelength channel (1.8 to 6.0 μm) of the Mariner 6 infrared spectrometer was derived. This calibration provides a new description of the instrument response function from 1.8 to 3.7 μm and accounts for the thermal contribution to the signal at longer wavelengths. This allows the two segments from 1.8 to 6 μm to be merged into a single spectrum. The broad water of hydration absorption spans these two segments and is examined in these merged spectra using a method of band integration. Unlike previous analyses which rely on ratios at two wavelengths, the integration method can assess the band strength independently from the albedo in the near infrared. Spectra taken over the eastern end of the Valles Marineris are examined for variations of the band-integrated value, and three distinct clusters are found. Within the estimated uncertainty, two clusters (both low and high albedo) have approximately the same integrated band depth. The third cluster (medium albedo) has an integrated band depth about 10% higher. This difference cannot be systematically attributed to either surface or atmospheric parameters and suggests variation in the amount of water either chemically or physically bound in surface materials. Approximately one-half of the high integrated band depth cluster is associated with chaotic terrain at the source of outflow channels, the other half occurs over lower inertia plains adjacent to chasmata. This suggests both surface physical properties and mineralogy as well as water in exchange with the atmosphere contribute to the 3-μm bound water absorption.

  16. Intercomparison of aerosol extinction profiles retrieved from MAX-DOAS measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frieß, U.; Klein Baltink, H.; Beirle, S.; Clémer, K.; Hendrick, F.; Henzing, B.; Irie, H.; de Leeuw, G.; Li, A.; Moerman, M. M.; van Roozendael, M.; Shaiganfar, R.; Wagner, T.; Wang, Y.; Xie, P.; Yilmaz, S.; Zieger, P.

    2016-07-01

    A first direct intercomparison of aerosol vertical profiles from Multi-Axis Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (MAX-DOAS) observations, performed during the Cabauw Intercomparison Campaign of Nitrogen Dioxide measuring Instruments (CINDI) in summer 2009, is presented. Five out of 14 participants of the CINDI campaign reported aerosol extinction profiles and aerosol optical thickness (AOT) as deduced from observations of differential slant column densities of the oxygen collision complex (O4) at different elevation angles. Aerosol extinction vertical profiles and AOT are compared to backscatter profiles from a ceilometer instrument and to sun photometer measurements, respectively. Furthermore, the near-surface aerosol extinction coefficient is compared to in situ measurements of a humidity-controlled nephelometer and dry aerosol absorption measurements. The participants of this intercomparison exercise use different approaches for the retrieval of aerosol information, including the retrieval of the full vertical profile using optimal estimation and a parametrised approach with a prescribed profile shape. Despite these large conceptual differences, and also differences in the wavelength of the observed O4 absorption band, good agreement in terms of the vertical structure of aerosols within the boundary layer is achieved between the aerosol extinction profiles retrieved by the different groups and the backscatter profiles observed by the ceilometer instrument. AOTs from MAX-DOAS and sun photometer show a good correlation (R>0.8), but all participants systematically underestimate the AOT. Substantial differences between the near-surface aerosol extinction from MAX-DOAS and from the humidified nephelometer remain largely unresolved.

  17. Light extinction by Secondary Organic Aerosol: an intercomparison of three broadband cavity spectrometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varma, R. M.; Ball, S. M.; Brauers, T.; Dorn, H.-P.; Heitmann, U.; Jones, R. L.; Platt, U.; Pöhler, D.; Ruth, A. A.; Shillings, A. J. L.; Thieser, J.; Wahner, A.; Venables, D. S.

    2013-07-01

    Broadband optical cavity spectrometers are maturing as a technology for trace gas detection, but only recently have they been used to retrieve the extinction coefficient of aerosols. Sensitive broadband extinction measurements allow explicit separation of gas and particle phase spectral contributions, as well as continuous spectral measurements of aerosol extinction in favourable cases. In this work, we report an intercomparison study of the aerosol extinction coefficients measured by three such instruments: a broadband cavity ring-down spectrometer (BBCRDS), a cavity-enhanced differential optical absorption spectrometer (CE-DOAS), and an incoherent broadband cavity-enhanced absorption spectrometer (IBBCEAS). Experiments were carried out in the SAPHIR atmospheric simulation chamber as part of the NO3Comp campaign to compare the measurement capabilities of NO3 and N2O5 instrumentation. Aerosol extinction coefficients between 655 and 690 nm are reported for secondary organic aerosols (SOA) formed by the NO3 oxidation of β-pinene under dry and humid conditions. Despite different measurement approaches and spectral analysis procedures, the three instruments retrieved aerosol extinction coefficients that were in close agreement. The refractive index of SOA formed from the β-pinene + NO3 reaction was 1.61, and was not measurably affected by the chamber humidity or by aging of the aerosol over several hours. This refractive index is significantly larger than SOA refractive indices observed in other studies of OH and ozone-initiated terpene oxidations, and may be caused by the large proportion of organic nitrates in the particle phase. In an experiment involving ammonium sulphate particles the aerosol extinction coefficients as measured by IBBCEAS were found to be in reasonable agreement with those calculated using Mie theory. The results of the study demonstrate the potential of broadband cavity spectrometers for determining the optical properties of aerosols.

  18. Light extinction by secondary organic aerosol: an intercomparison of three broadband cavity spectrometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varma, R. M.; Ball, S. M.; Brauers, T.; Dorn, H.-P.; Heitmann, U.; Jones, R. L.; Platt, U.; Pöhler, D.; Ruth, A. A.; Shillings, A. J. L.; Thieser, J.; Wahner, A.; Venables, D. S.

    2013-11-01

    Broadband optical cavity spectrometers are maturing as a technology for trace-gas detection, but only recently have they been used to retrieve the extinction coefficient of aerosols. Sensitive broadband extinction measurements allow explicit separation of gas and particle phase spectral contributions, as well as continuous spectral measurements of aerosol extinction in favourable cases. In this work, we report an intercomparison study of the aerosol extinction coefficients measured by three such instruments: a broadband cavity ring-down spectrometer (BBCRDS), a cavity-enhanced differential optical absorption spectrometer (CE-DOAS), and an incoherent broadband cavity-enhanced absorption spectrometer (IBBCEAS). Experiments were carried out in the SAPHIR atmospheric simulation chamber as part of the NO3Comp campaign to compare the measurement capabilities of NO3 and N2O5 instrumentation. Aerosol extinction coefficients between 655 and 690 nm are reported for secondary organic aerosols (SOA) formed by the NO3 oxidation of β-pinene under dry and humid conditions. Despite different measurement approaches and spectral analysis procedures, the three instruments retrieved aerosol extinction coefficients that were in close agreement. The refractive index of SOA formed from the β-pinene + NO3 reaction was 1.61, and was not measurably affected by the chamber humidity or by aging of the aerosol over several hours. This refractive index is significantly larger than SOA refractive indices observed in other studies of OH and ozone-initiated terpene oxidations, and may be caused by the large proportion of organic nitrates in the particle phase. In an experiment involving ammonium sulfate particles, the aerosol extinction coefficients as measured by IBBCEAS were found to be in reasonable agreement with those calculated using the Mie theory. The results of the study demonstrate the potential of broadband cavity spectrometers for determining the optical properties of aerosols.

  19. Sampling procedure and a radio-indicator study of mercury determination in whole blood by using an AMA 254 atomic absorption spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Spevácková, Vera; Korunová, Vlasta; Cejchanová, Mája; Vobecký, Miloslav

    2004-09-01

    A sampling procedure appropriate for the determination of mercury in whole blood was tested by using both inactive controls and a 197Hg mercury radio-indicator. To exclude the influence of the instrumental device (an AMA 254 single-purpose mercury atomic absorption spectrometer) on the determination of mercury in whole blood, the function of the instrument was checked by using rat blood with metabolised 197Hg. The measurement procedure was found to be free of errors. However, the study showed that the material used for the sampling vessels is a crucial parameter for obtaining accurate analytical results. The stability of solutions and samples was tested towards polyethylene (PE) and polypropylene (PP) vessels. PE displayed a time-dependent increase in the mercury content both in the samples and in the blood control material. The probable cause of this increase was direct contamination from the material of the vessel and/or diffusion of mercury from the environment through the vessel walls related to a strong complexing affinity of the sample matrix. This assumption was confirmed by supplying the vessels with the complexing agent Na2EDTA (0.05 mol L(-1)). Commercial PP vessels for blood sampling (Sarstedt S-Monovette Metall Analytik) did not give rise to statistically significant variations in mercury content in the samples and blood control material over a 30-day period.

  20. The development and evaluation of airborne in situ N2O and CH4 sampling using a Quantum Cascade Laser Absorption Spectrometer (QCLAS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pitt, Joseph; Le Breton, Michael; Allen, Grant; Percival, Carl; Gallagher, Martin; Bauguitte, Stephane; O'Shea, Sebastian; Muller, Jennifer; Zahniser, Mark; Pyle, John; Palmer, Paul

    2016-04-01

    Spectroscopic measurements of atmospheric N2O and CH4 mole fractions were made on board the FAAM (Facility for Airborne Atmospheric Measurements) large Atmospheric Research Aircraft. We evaluate the performance of the mid-IR continuous wave Aerodyne Research Inc. Quantum Cascade Laser Absorption Spectrometer (QCLAS) employed over 17 flights conducted during summer 2014. Two different methods of correcting for the influence of water vapour on the spectroscopic retrievals are compared and evaluated. Test flight data demonstrating the sensitivity of the instrument to changes in cabin pressure is presented, and a new in-flight calibration procedure to account for this issue is described and assessed. Total 1σ uncertainties of 1.81 ppb for CH4 and 0.35 ppb for N2O are derived. We report a mean difference in 1 Hz CH4 mole fraction of 2.05 ppb (1σ = 5.85 ppb) between in-flight measurements made using the QCLAS and simultaneous measurements using a previously characterised Los Gatos Research Fast Greenhouse Gas Analyser (FGGA).

  1. The development and evaluation of airborne in situ N2O and CH4 sampling using a Quantum Cascade Laser Absorption Spectrometer (QCLAS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pitt, J. R.; Le Breton, M.; Allen, G.; Percival, C. J.; Gallagher, M. W.; Bauguitte, S. J.-B.; O'Shea, S. J.; Muller, J. B. A.; Zahniser, M. S.; Pyle, J.; Palmer, P. I.

    2015-08-01

    Spectroscopic measurements of atmospheric N2O and CH4 mole fractions were made on board the FAAM (Facility for Airborne Atmospheric Measurements) large Atmospheric Research Aircraft. We present details of the mid-IR Aerodyne Research Inc. Quantum Cascade Laser Absorption Spectrometer (QCLAS) employed, including its configuration for airborne sampling, and evaluate its performance over 17 flights conducted during summer 2014. Two different methods of correcting for the influence of water vapour on the spectroscopic retrievals are compared and evaluated. A new in-flight calibration procedure to account for the observed sensitivity of the instrument to ambient pressure changes is described, and its impact on instrument performance is assessed. Test flight data linking this sensitivity to changes in cabin pressure is presented. Total 1σ uncertainties of 1.81 ppb for CH4 and 0.35 ppb for N2O are derived. We report a mean difference in 1 Hz CH4 mole fraction of 2.05 ppb (1σ = 5.85 ppb) between in-flight measurements made using the QCLAS and simultaneous measurements using a previously characterised Los Gatos Research Fast Greenhouse Gas Analyser (FGGA). Finally, a potential case study for the estimation of a regional N2O flux using a mass balance technique is identified, and the method for calculating such an estimate is outlined.

  2. The development and evaluation of airborne in situ N2O and CH4 sampling using a Quantum Cascade Laser Absorption Spectrometer (QCLAS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pitt, J. R.; Le Breton, M. R.; Allen, G.; Percival, C.; Gallagher, M. W.; Bauguitte, S.; O'Shea, S.; Muller, J.; Zahniser, M. S.; Pyle, J. A.; Palmer, P. I.

    2015-12-01

    Spectroscopic measurements of atmospheric N2O and CH4 mole fractions were made on board the FAAM (Facility for Airborne Atmospheric Measurements) large Atmospheric Research Aircraft. We evaluate the performance of the mid-IR continuous wave Aerodyne Research Inc. Quantum Cascade Laser Absorption Spectrometer (QCLAS) employed over 17 flights conducted during summer 2014. Two different methods of correcting for the influence of water vapour on the spectroscopic retrievals are compared and evaluated. Test flight data demonstrating the sensitivity of the instrument to changes in cabin pressure is presented, and a new in-flight calibration procedure to account for this issue is described and assessed. Total 1σ uncertainties of 1.81 ppb for CH4 and 0.35 ppb for N2O are derived. We report a mean difference in 1 Hz CH4 mole fraction of 2.05 ppb (1σ = 5.85 ppb) between in-flight measurements made using the QCLAS and simultaneous measurements using a previously characterised Los Gatos Research Fast Greenhouse Gas Analyser (FGGA).

  3. The development and evaluation of airborne in situ N2O and CH4 sampling using a quantum cascade laser absorption spectrometer (QCLAS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pitt, J. R.; Le Breton, M.; Allen, G.; Percival, C. J.; Gallagher, M. W.; Bauguitte, S. J.-B.; O'Shea, S. J.; Muller, J. B. A.; Zahniser, M. S.; Pyle, J.; Palmer, P. I.

    2016-01-01

    Spectroscopic measurements of atmospheric N2O and CH4 mole fractions were made on board the FAAM (Facility for Airborne Atmospheric Measurements) large atmospheric research aircraft. We present details of the mid-infrared quantum cascade laser absorption spectrometer (QCLAS, Aerodyne Research Inc., USA) employed, including its configuration for airborne sampling, and evaluate its performance over 17 flights conducted during summer 2014. Two different methods of correcting for the influence of water vapour on the spectroscopic retrievals are compared and evaluated. A new in-flight calibration procedure to account for the observed sensitivity of the instrument to ambient pressure changes is described, and its impact on instrument performance is assessed. Test flight data linking this sensitivity to changes in cabin pressure are presented. Total 1σ uncertainties of 2.47 ppb for CH4 and 0.54 ppb for N2O are derived. We report a mean difference in 1 Hz CH4 mole fraction of 2.05 ppb (1σ = 5.85 ppb) between in-flight measurements made using the QCLAS and simultaneous measurements using a previously characterised Fast Greenhouse Gas Analyser (FGGA, Los Gatos Research, USA). Finally, a potential case study for the estimation of a regional N2O flux using a mass balance technique is identified, and the method for calculating such an estimate is outlined.

  4. Inference of cloud altitude and optical properties from MAX-DOAS measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nasse, Jan-Marcus; Zielcke, Johannes; Frieß, Udo; Lampel, Johannes; König-Langlo, Gert; Platt, Ulrich

    2015-04-01

    Multi-Axis Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (MAX-DOAS) is a widely used technique for the detection of atmospheric trace gases, e.g. NO2, SO2, BrO, HCHO, but also for the oxygen collision complex O4. The atmospheric distribution of the latter is proportional to the square of the molecular oxygen concentration and thus well known. By comparing measured O4 differential slant column densities (dSCDs) from MAX-DOAS measurements with modeled ones, information on aerosol distributions and optical properties, as well as on clouds can be obtained using an algorithm based on optimal estimation. Here the ability of MAX-DOAS observations to detect cloud altitude and cloud optical properties of different cloud covers based on measurements of O4 will be discussed. The analysis uses measurements made by a ship-borne instrument on two cruises of the German research vessel Polarstern to the Antarctic Weddell Sea from June to October 2013. During this time a broad range of cloud and aerosol conditions was encountered, in particular persistent low cloud cover with a high optical thickness. Aerosol and particle extinction profiles were retrieved with temporal resolutions of up to 15 minutes. For clouds at altitudes up to 2000 m the results show a very good agreement with co-located measurements of a commercial ceilometer and pictures from a cloud camera. Unless visibility was very poor due to fog, even rapid changes in cloud altitude or cover could be detected by MAX-DOAS. These results indicate that under homogeneous cloud cover an accurate retrieval of trace gas vertical profiles can be possible despite the strong influence of clouds on atmospheric light paths. We will discuss advantages and limitations of cloud detection with MAX-DOAS, implications for the subsequent retrieval of trace gas profiles and the possible use of external (ceilometer) data as a priori information for the profile retrieval algorithm.

  5. Eight-component retrievals from ground-based MAX-DOAS observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irie, H.; Takashima, H.; Kanaya, Y.; Boersma, K. F.; Gast, L.; Wittrock, F.; Brunner, D.; Zhou, Y.; van Roozendael, M.

    2011-01-01

    We attempt for the first time to retrieve lower-tropospheric vertical profile information for 8 quantities from ground-based Multi-Axis Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (MAX-DOAS) observations. The components retrieved are the aerosol extinction coefficients at two wavelengths, 357 and 476 nm and NO2, HCHO, CHOCHO, H2O, SO2, and O3 volume mixing ratios. A Japanese MAX-DOAS profile retrieval algorithm, version 1 (JM1), is applied to observations performed at Cabauw, the Netherlands (51.97° N, 4.93° E), in June-July 2009 during the Cabauw Intercomparison campaign of Nitrogen Dioxide measuring Instruments (CINDI). Of the retrieved profiles, we focus here on the lowest-layer data (mean values at altitudes 0-1 km), where the sensitivity is usually highest owing to the longest light path. In support of the capability of the multi-component retrievals, we find reasonable overall agreement with independent data sets, including a regional chemical transport model (CHIMERE) and in situ observations performed at the 3 and 200 m height levels of the tall tower in Cabauw. Plumes of enhanced HCHO and SO2 were likely affected by biogenic and ship emissions, respectively, and an improvement in their emission strengths is suggested for better agreement between CHIMERE simulations and MAX-DOAS observations. Analysis of air mass factors indicates that the horizontal spatial representativeness of MAX-DOAS observations is about 3-15 km (depending mainly on aerosol extinction), comparable to or better than the spatial resolution of current UV-visible satellite observations and model calculations. These demonstrate that MAX-DOAS provides multi-component data useful for the evaluation of satellite observations and model calculations and can play an important role in bridging different data sets having different spatial resolutions.

  6. Eight-component retrievals from ground-based MAX-DOAS observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irie, H.; Takashima, H.; Kanaya, Y.; Boersma, K. F.; Gast, L.; Wittrock, F.; Brunner, D.; Zhou, Y.; van Roozendael, M.

    2011-06-01

    We attempt for the first time to retrieve lower-tropospheric vertical profile information for 8 quantities from ground-based Multi-Axis Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (MAX-DOAS) observations. The components retrieved are the aerosol extinction coefficients at two wavelengths, 357 and 476 nm, and NO2, HCHO, CHOCHO, H2O, SO2, and O3 volume mixing ratios. A Japanese MAX-DOAS profile retrieval algorithm, version 1 (JM1), is applied to observations performed at Cabauw, the Netherlands (51.97° N, 4.93° E), in June-July 2009 during the Cabauw Intercomparison campaign of Nitrogen Dioxide measuring Instruments (CINDI). Of the retrieved profiles, we focus here on the lowest-layer data (mean values at altitudes 0-1 km), where the sensitivity is usually highest owing to the longest light path. In support of the capability of the multi-component retrievals, we find reasonable overall agreement with independent data sets, including a regional chemical transport model (CHIMERE) and in situ observations performed near the surface (2-3 m) and at the 200-m height level of the tall tower in Cabauw. Plumes of enhanced HCHO and SO2 were likely affected by biogenic and ship emissions, respectively, and an improvement in their emission strengths is suggested for better agreement between CHIMERE simulations and MAX-DOAS observations. Analysis of air mass factors indicates that the horizontal spatial representativeness of MAX-DOAS observations is about 3-15 km (depending mainly on aerosol extinction), comparable to or better than the spatial resolution of current UV-visible satellite observations and model calculations. These demonstrate that MAX-DOAS provides multi-component data useful for the evaluation of satellite observations and model calculations and can play an important role in bridging different data sets having different spatial resolutions.

  7. Airborne MAX-DOAS Measurements Over California: Testing the NASA OMI Tropospheric NO2 Product

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oetjen, Hilke; Baidar, Sunil; Krotkov, Nickolay A.; Lamsal, Lok N.; Lechner, Michael; Volkamer, Rainer

    2013-01-01

    Airborne Multi-AXis Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (AMAX-DOAS) measurements of NO2 tropospheric vertical columns were performed over California for two months in summer 2010. The observations are compared to the NASA Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) tropospheric vertical columns (data product v2.1) in two ways: (1) Median data were compared for the whole time period for selected boxes, and the agreement was found to be fair (R = 0.97, slope = 1.4 +/- 0.1, N= 10). (2) A comparison was performed on the mean of coincident AMAX-DOAS measurements within the area of the corresponding OMI pixels with the tropospheric NASA OMI NO2 assigned to that pixel. The effects of different data filters were assessed. Excellent agreement and a strong correlation (R = 0.85, slope = 1.05 +/- 0.09, N= 56) was found for (2) when the data were filtered to eliminate large pixels near the edge of the OMI orbit, the cloud radiance fraction was<50%, the OMI overpass occurred within 2 h of the AMAX-DOAS measurements, the flight altitude was>2 km, and a representative sample of the footprint was taken by the AMAX-DOAS instrument. The AMAX-DOAS and OMI data sets both show a reduction of NO2 tropospheric columns on weekends by 38 +/- 24% and 33 +/- 11%, respectively. The assumptions in the tropospheric satellite air mass factor simulations were tested using independent measurements of surface albedo, aerosol extinction, and NO2 profiles for Los Angeles for July 2010 indicating an uncertainty of 12%.

  8. Vegetation species composition and canopy architecture information expressed in leaf water absorption measured in the 1000 nm and 2200 spectral region by an imaging spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, Robert O.; Roberts, Dar A.

    1995-01-01

    Plant species composition and plant architectural attributes are critical parameters required for the measuring, monitoring, and modeling of terrestrial ecosystems. Remote sensing is commonly cited as an important tool for deriving vegetation properties at an appropriate scale for ecosystem studies, ranging from local to regional and even synoptic scales. Classical approaches rely on vegetation indices such as the normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) to estimate biophysical parameters such as leaf area index or intercepted photosynthetically active radiation (IPAR). Another approach is to apply a variety of classification schemes to map vegetation and thus extrapolate fine-scale information about specific sites to larger areas of similar composition. Imaging spectrometry provides additional information that is not obtainable through broad-band sensors and that may provide improved inputs both to direct biophysical estimates as well as classification schemes. Some of this capability has been demonstrated through improved discrimination of vegetation, estimates of canopy biochemistry, and liquid water estimates from vegetation. We investigate further the potential of leaf water absorption estimated from Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) data as a means for discriminating vegetation types and deriving canopy architectural information. We expand our analysis to incorporate liquid water estimates from two spectral regions, the 1000-nm region and the 2200-nm region. The study was conducted in the vicinity of Jasper Ridge, California, which is located on the San Francisco peninsula to the west of the Stanford University campus. AVIRIS data were acquired over Jasper Ridge, CA, on June 2, 1992, at 19:31 UTC. Spectra from three sites in this image were analyzed. These data are from an area of healthy grass, oak woodland, and redwood forest, respectively. For these analyses, the AVIRIS-measured upwelling radiance spectra for the entire Jasper

  9. An injection method for measuring the carbon isotope content of soil carbon dioxide and soil respiration with a tunable diode laser absorption spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Moyes, Andrew B; Schauer, Andrew J; Siegwolf, Rolf T W; Bowling, David R

    2010-04-15

    We present a novel technique in which the carbon isotope ratio (delta(13)C) of soil CO(2) is measured from small gas samples (<5 mL) injected into a stream of CO(2)-free air flowing into a tunable diode laser absorption spectrometer (TDL). This new method extends the dynamic range of the TDL to measure CO(2) mole fractions ranging from ambient to pure CO(2), reduces the volume of sample required to a few mL, and does not require field deployment of the instrument. The measurement precision of samples stored for up to 60 days was 0.23 per thousand. The new TDL method was applied with a simple gas well sampling technique to obtain and measure gas samples from shallow soil depth increments for CO(2) mole fraction and delta(13)C analysis, and subsequent determination of the delta(13)C of soil-respired CO(2). The method was tested using an artificial soil system containing a controlled CO(2) source and compared with an independent method using the TDL and an open soil chamber. The profile and chamber estimates of delta(13)C of an artificially produced CO(2) flux were consistent and converged to the delta(13)C of the CO(2) source at steady state, indicating the accuracy of both methods under controlled conditions. The new TDL method, in which a small pulse of sample is measured on a carrier gas stream, is analogous for the TDL technique to the development of continuous-flow configurations for isotope ratio mass spectrometry. While the applications presented here are focused on soil CO(2), this new TDL method could be applied in a number of situations requiring measurement of delta(13)C of CO(2) in small gas samples with ambient to high CO(2) mole fractions.

  10. Mid-infrared laser absorption spectrometers based upon all-diode laser difference frequency generation and a room temperature quantum cascade laser for the detection of CO, N2O and NO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasyutich, V. L.; Holdsworth, R. J.; Martin, P. A.

    2008-08-01

    We describe the performance of two mid-infrared laser spectrometers for carbon monoxide, nitrous oxide and nitric oxide detection. The first spectrometer for CO and N2O detection around 2203 cm-1 is based upon all-diode laser difference frequency generation (DFG) in a quasi-phase matched periodically-poled lithium niobate (PPLN) crystal using two continuous-wave room-temperature distributed feedback diode lasers at 859 and 1059 nm. We also report on the performance of a mid-infrared spectrometer for NO detection at ˜ 1900 cm-1 based upon a thermoelectrically-cooled continuous-wave distributed feedback quantum cascade laser (QCL). Both spectrometers had a single-pass optical cell and a thermoelectrically cooled HgCdZnTe photovoltaic detector. Typical minimum detection limits of 2.8 ppmv for CO, 0.6 ppmv for N2O and 2.7 ppmv for NO have been demonstrated for a 100 averaged spectra acquired within 1.25 s and a cell base length of 21 cm at ˜ 100 Torr. Noise-equivalent absorptions of 10-5 and 10-4 Hz-1/2 are typically demonstrated for the QCL and the DFG based spectrometers, respectively.

  11. The CU Airborne MAX-DOAS instrument: vertical profiling of aerosol extinction and trace gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baidar, S.; Oetjen, H.; Coburn, S.; Dix, B.; Ortega, I.; Sinreich, R.; Volkamer, R.

    2013-03-01

    The University of Colorado Airborne Multi-Axis Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (CU AMAX-DOAS) instrument uses solar stray light to detect and quantify multiple trace gases, including nitrogen dioxide (NO2), glyoxal (CHOCHO), formaldehyde (HCHO), water vapor (H2O), nitrous acid (HONO), iodine monoxide (IO), bromine monoxide (BrO), and oxygen dimers (O4) at multiple wavelengths (absorption bands at 360, 477, 577, 632 nm) simultaneously in the open atmosphere. The instrument is unique as it (1) features a motion compensation system that decouples the telescope field of view from aircraft movements in real time (<0.35° accuracy), and (2) includes measurements of solar stray light photons from nadir, zenith, and multiple elevation angles forward and below the plane by the same spectrometer/detector system. Sets of solar stray light spectra collected from nadir to zenith scans provide some vertical profile information within 2 km above and below the aircraft altitude, and the vertical column density (VCD) below the aircraft is measured in nadir view. Maximum information about vertical profiles is derived simultaneously for trace gas concentrations and aerosol extinction coefficients over similar spatial scales and with a vertical resolution of typically 250 m during aircraft ascent/descent. The instrument is described, and data from flights over California during the CalNex (California Research at the Nexus of Air Quality and Climate Change) and CARES (Carbonaceous Aerosols and Radiative Effects Study) air quality field campaigns is presented. Horizontal distributions of NO2 VCD (below the aircraft) maps are sampled with typically 1 km resolution, and show good agreement with two ground-based MAX-DOAS instruments (slope = 0.95 ± 0.09, R2 = 0.86). As a case study vertical profiles of NO2, CHOCHO, HCHO, and H2O concentrations and aerosol extinction coefficients, ɛ, at 477 nm calculated from O4 measurements from a low approach at Brackett airfield inside the

  12. Inter-comparison of glyoxal retrievals from MAX-DOAS during the MAD-CAT campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortega, Ivan; Wagner, Thomas; Lampel, Johannes; van Roozendael, Michel; Richter, Andreas; Sinha, Vinayak; Xie, Pinhua; Volkamer, Rainer

    2015-04-01

    Over the past few years the smallest α-dicarbonyl compound glyoxal (CHOCHO) has received attention in order to inform relevant atmospheric chemistry processes such as oxidative capacity and secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation. A method to detect glyoxal in the atmosphere is through the Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (DOAS) applied to solar scattered light passive remote sensing measurements on different platforms, including ground based, aircrafts, and satellites. Although these measurements are often described still many questions about DOAS fitting parameters need to be investigated. We present results from a comprehensive Multi-AXis Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (MAX-DOAS) comparison effort during the Multi Axis DOAS-Comparison campaign for Aerosols and Trace gases (MAD-CAT) held at the Max Planck institute for Chemistry in Mainz, Germany with an intensive operation period from June to August 2013. We evaluate the comparison for glyoxal differential Slant Column Densities (dSCD) from 6 different research groups during the MAD-CAT campaign. The data analysis is performed following three retrieval common settings. In general, good agreement between different groups is found, especially for days with low cloud coverage. Based on the diurnal variability of the glyoxal-to-formaldehyde ratio we identified that Mainz is influenced mostly by anthropogenic volatile organic compounds (AVOC) emission type. Also, for most of the days glyoxal was often clearly above the respective detection limits. We will present results of sensitivity studies in order to know influence of the wavelength window, dependence of the NO2 air mass factor, cross correlation with H2O, among others. Finally, synthetic spectra created with the SCIATRAN radiative transfer model using measurement related inputs are analysed and first results are presented.

  13. Comparison of MAX-DOAS NO2 slant column densities and DOAS fit properties during MADCAT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beirle, Steffen; Remmers, Julia; Wagner, Thomas

    2014-05-01

    The 'Multi Axis Doas - Comparison campaign for Aerosols and Trace gases' (MADCAT) took place at MPI-C in Mainz/Germany in summer 2013. MAX-DOAS instruments from ten institutes were operated simultaneously in order to investigate the crucial settings of instrumental properties, calibration, and algorithms, for a) the retrieval of slant column densities (SCDs) of various trace gases (NO2, HCHO, CHOCHO, H2O) and O4 as tracer for photon path lengths and b) the retrieval of tropospheric profiles. Here we focus on the first step, i.e. the retrieval of SCDs, for NO2. The DOAS analysis for NO2 was done independently by the different groups, but based on concerted DOAS retrieval setups for the UV and vis spectral ranges. We present intercomparisons of NO2 SCDs for different elevation angles from the different instruments. A statistical analysis of the deviations of each dataset with respect to the ensemble mean was performed. In addition, further DOAS fit results, like intensity offsets, the fit coefficients for water vapour and the ring effect, etc. are compared.

  14. Retrieval of absolute SO2 column amounts from scattered-light spectra: implications for the evaluation of data from automated DOAS networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lübcke, Peter; Lampel, Johannes; Arellano, Santiago; Bobrowski, Nicole; Dinger, Florian; Galle, Bo; Garzón, Gustavo; Hidalgo, Silvana; Chacón Ortiz, Zoraida; Vogel, Leif; Warnach, Simon; Platt, Ulrich

    2016-11-01

    Scanning spectrometer networks using scattered solar radiation in the ultraviolet spectral region have become an increasingly important tool for monitoring volcanic sulfur dioxide (SO2) emissions. Often measured spectra are evaluated using the differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS) technique. In order to obtain absolute column densities (CDs), the DOAS evaluation requires a Fraunhofer reference spectrum (FRS) that is free of absorption structures of the trace gas of interest. For measurements at volcanoes such a FRS can be readily obtained if the scan (i.e. series of measurements at different elevation angles) includes viewing directions where the plume is not seen. In this case, it is possible to use these viewing directions (e.g. zenith) as FRS. Possible contaminations of the FRS by the plume can then be corrected by calculating and subtracting an SO2 offset (e.g. the lowest SO2 CD) from all viewing directions of the respective scan. This procedure is followed in the standard evaluations of data from the Network for Observation of Volcanic and Atmospheric Change (NOVAC). While this procedure is very efficient in removing Fraunhofer structures and instrumental effects it has the disadvantage that one can never be sure that there is no SO2 from the plume in the FRS. Therefore, using a modelled FRS (based on a high-resolution solar atlas) has a great advantage. We followed this approach and investigated an SO2 retrieval algorithm using a modelled FRS. In this paper, we present results from two volcanoes that are monitored by NOVAC stations and which frequently emit large volcanic plumes: Nevado del Ruiz (Colombia) recorded between January 2010 and June 2012 and from Tungurahua (Ecuador) recorded between January 2009 and December 2011. Instrumental effects were identified with help of a principal component analysis (PCA) of the residual structures of the DOAS evaluation. The SO2 retrieval performed extraordinarily well with an SO2 DOAS retrieval error of

  15. Monolithic spectrometer

    DOEpatents

    Rajic, Slobodan; Egert, Charles M.; Kahl, William K.; Snyder, Jr., William B.; Evans, III, Boyd M.; Marlar, Troy A.; Cunningham, Joseph P.

    1998-01-01

    A monolithic spectrometer is disclosed for use in spectroscopy. The spectrometer is a single body of translucent material with positioned surfaces for the transmission, reflection and spectral analysis of light rays.

  16. Monolithic spectrometer

    DOEpatents

    Rajic, S.; Egert, C.M.; Kahl, W.K.; Snyder, W.B. Jr.; Evans, B.M. III; Marlar, T.A.; Cunningham, J.P.

    1998-05-19

    A monolithic spectrometer is disclosed for use in spectroscopy. The spectrometer is a single body of translucent material with positioned surfaces for the transmission, reflection and spectral analysis of light rays. 6 figs.

  17. Measurements of ambient ammonia using a tunable diode laser absorption spectrometer: Characteristics of ambient ammonia emissions in an urban area of New York City

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yongquan; Schwab, James J.; Demerjian, Kenneth L.

    2006-05-01

    A tunable diode laser absorption spectrometer (TDLAS) was deployed during the PMTACS-NY Supersite winter 2004 intensive field campaign at Queens College in New York City to measure the ambient gaseous ammonia. For the characterization of ammonia emissions from the mobile sources, a LI-7000 CO2/H2O analyzer was also collocated with the TDLAS to measure ambient CO2 and H2O vapor. The field measurements and laboratory calibration with certified ammonia standard have been used to evaluate the performance of the TDLAS system. High time resolved TDLAS ambient ammonia measurements performed at Queens College from 10 January to 6 February showed high variability, with NH3 concentrations ranging from below the detection limit (0.1 ppb) to maxima of 197.4 ppb and a mean value of 0.8 ppb over the entire campaign. Many high-frequency NH3 spikes spanning over a less than 1-min duration were observed during the high traffic periods. The occurrence of the NH3 spikes was closely correlated with observed CO2 spikes, a good marker of traffic exhaust. This correlation yielded an NH3 emission ratio of 0.12 ppbv/ppmv, which can be used to estimate an NH3 emission factor of 35.5 mg/km. The [NH3]/[CO2] ratios over the entire field study was also obtained and added into the best NH3 emission estimates. On a snowy day, no obvious drop of NH3 and CO2 concentrations was measured as the ambient H2O vapor increased. The observed dramatic decrease in the ambient NH3 and CO2 concentrations on a rainy day resulted from a quick air mass switch. Two similar bimodal diurnal patterns associated with the rush hour traffic were observed during school holidays and school days of Queens College, New York. More NH3 emissions from cold start vehicles might contribute to a higher peak in the late afternoon hours. Such observations suggest that the NH3 emissions from the traffic exhaust could be a major source of the ambient NH3 in urban areas.

  18. Multi-component vertical profile retrievals for ground-based MAX-DOAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irie, Hitoshi; Kanaya, Yugo; Takashima, Hisahiro; van Roozendael, Michel; Wittrock, Folkard; Piters, Ankie

    2010-05-01

    We attempt to retrieve lower-tropospheric vertical profile information for 8 components from ground-based Multi-Axis Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (MAX-DOAS) measurements. The components retrieved include aerosol extinction coefficients (AEC) at two wavelengths 357 and 476 nm, NO2, HCHO, CHOCHO, H2O, SO2, and O3 volume mixing ratios (VMRs). This method was applied to MAX-DOAS observations performed at Cabauw, the Netherlands (52.0°N, 4.9°E) in June-July 2009 during the Cabauw Intercomparison campaign of Nitrogen Dioxide measuring Instruments (CINDI) campaign. For the lowest layer of retrieved profiles at 0-1 km, two channels of AEC values reveal consistent variations. NO2 showed typical diurnal variations with maximum in early morning and minimum in the afternoon. Positive correlations between HCHO and CHOCHO were often seen. H2O VMR agreed well with that derived from NCEP surface data, and was used to judge cloudy cases after conversion to relative humidity. All these results support the capability of MAX-DOAS observations applicable to various air quality studies. Similar multi-component retrievals applied to observations in Japan are also presented in this talk.

  19. Spatial and temporal variability in Athens observed by MAX-DOAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richter, Andreas; Gratsea, Myrto; Wittrock, Folkard; Burrows, John P.; Vrekoussis, Mihalis; Gerasopoulos, Evangelos

    2014-05-01

    Multi Axis Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (MAX-DOAS) observations provide valuable information on tropospheric absorber amounts and their vertical distribution by analysing measurements of scattered sun-light taken at different elevation angles. This information can be used to estimate surface mixing ratios, mixing heights, and tropospheric columns. Recent developments in instrumentation now also allow scanning in the azimuthal direction, giving some insight into the horizontal variability of trace gas distributions. This is of particular interest in the vicinity of localised sources and in cities. In this study, 18 months of MAX-DOAS observations in Athens (38.05°N, 23.9°E) have been analysed for tropospheric NO2 amounts. The instrument is operated at the NOA observatory on Penteli Hill at the outskirts of Athens in about 500 m altitude. From this point, 8 viewing directions covering various locations of interest including rural areas, the city suburbs and the city centre are scanned routinely, and strongly varying temporal and spatial variations can be observed. The data show clear signals of the weekly cycle, pollution reduction during summer break and repeating spatial patterns linked to meteorology and the build-up and transport of NO2 from the main city area. In addition to these interesting geophysical findings, the observed gradients also pose challenging questions with respect to the assumptions usually made in the analysis of MAX-DOAS measurements, and these will be discussed as well.

  20. CEMS using hot wet extractive method based on DOAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Bo; Zhang, Chi; Sun, Changku

    2011-11-01

    A continuous emission monitoring system (CEMS) using hot wet extractive method based on differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS) is designed. The developed system is applied to retrieving the concentration of SO2 and NOx in flue gas on-site. The flue gas is carried along a heated sample line into the sample pool at a constant temperature above the dew point. In this case, the adverse impact of water vapor on measurement accuracy is reduced greatly, and the on-line calibration is implemented. And then the flue gas is discharged from the sample pool after the measuring process is complete. The on-site applicability of the system is enhanced by using Programmable Logic Controller (PLC) to control each valve in the system during the measuring and on-line calibration process. The concentration retrieving method used in the system is based on the partial least squares (PLS) regression nonlinear method. The relationship between the known concentration and the differential absorption feature gathered by the PLS nonlinear method can be figured out after the on-line calibration process. Then the concentration measurement of SO2 and NOx can be easily implemented according to the definite relationship. The concentration retrieving method can identify the information and noise effectively, which improves the measuring accuracy of the system. SO2 with four different concentrations are measured by the system under laboratory conditions. The results proved that the full-scale error of this system is less than 2%FS.

  1. The CU Airborne MAX-DOAS instrument: ground based validation, and vertical profiling of aerosol extinction and trace gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baidar, S.; Oetjen, H.; Coburn, S.; Dix, B.; Ortega, I.; Sinreich, R.; Volkamer, R.

    2012-09-01

    The University of Colorado Airborne Multi Axis Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (CU AMAX-DOAS) instrument uses solar stray light remote sensing to detect and quantify multiple trace gases, including nitrogen dioxide (NO2), glyoxal (CHOCHO), formaldehyde (HCHO), water vapor (H2O), nitrous acid (HONO), iodine monoxide (IO), bromine monoxide (BrO), and oxygen dimers (O4) at multiple wavelengths (360 nm, 477 nm, 577 nm and 632 nm) simultaneously, and sensitively in the open atmosphere. The instrument is unique, in that it presents the first systematic implementation of MAX-DOAS on research aircraft, i.e. (1) includes measurements of solar stray light photons from nadir, zenith, and multiple elevation angles forward and below the plane by the same spectrometer/detector system, and (2) features a motion compensation system that decouples the telescope field of view (FOV) from aircraft movements in real-time (< 0.35° accuracy). Sets of solar stray light spectra collected from nadir to zenith scans provide some vertical profile information within 2 km above and below the aircraft altitude, and the vertical column density (VCD) below the aircraft is measured in nadir view. Maximum information about vertical profiles is derived simultaneously for trace gas concentrations and aerosol extinction coefficients over similar spatial scales and with a vertical resolution of typically 250 m during aircraft ascent/descent. The instrument is described, and data from flights over California during the CalNex and CARES air quality field campaigns is presented. Horizontal distributions of NO2 VCDs (below the aircraft) maps are sampled with typically 1 km resolution, and show good agreement with two ground based CU MAX-DOAS instruments (slope 0.95 ± 0.09, R2 = 0.86). As a case study vertical profiles of NO2, CHOCHO, HCHO, and H2O mixing ratios and aerosol extinction coefficients, ɛ, at 477nm calculated from O4 measurements from a low approach at Brackett airfield inside the

  2. Mobile MAX-DOAS observations of tropospheric trace gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, T.; Ibrahim, O.; Shaiganfar, R.; Platt, U.

    2009-11-01

    From Multi-Axis- (MAX-) DOAS observations information on tropospheric trace gases close to the surface and up to the free troposphere can be obtained. Usually MAX-DOAS observations are performed at fixed locations, which allows to retrieve the diurnal variation of tropospheric species at that location. Alternatively, MAX-DOAS observations can also be made on mobile platforms like cars, ships or aircrafts. Then, in addition to the vertical (and temporal) distribution, also the horizontal variation of tropospheric trace gases can be measured. Such information is important for the quantitative comparison with model simulations, study of transport processes, and for the validation of tropospheric trace gas products from satellite observations. However, for MAX-DOAS observations from mobile platforms, the standard analysis techniques for MAX-DOAS observations can usually not be applied, because the probed airmasses can change rapidly between successive measurements. In this study we introduce a new technique which overcomes these problems and allows the exploitation of the full information content of mobile MAX-DOAS observations. Our method can also be applied to MAX-DOAS observations made at fixed locations in order to improve the accuracy especially in cases of strong winds. We apply the new technique to MAX-DOAS observations made during an automobile trip from Brussels to Heidelberg.

  3. Mobile MAX-DOAS observations of tropospheric trace gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, T.; Ibrahim, O.; Shaiganfar, R.; Platt, U.

    2010-02-01

    From Multi-Axis- (MAX-) DOAS observations, information on tropospheric trace gases close to the surface and up to the free troposphere can be obtained. Usually MAX-DOAS observations are performed at fixed locations, which allows to retrieve the diurnal variation of tropospheric species at that location. Alternatively, MAX-DOAS observations can also be made on mobile platforms like cars, ships or aircrafts. Then, in addition to the vertical (and temporal) distribution, also the horizontal variation of tropospheric trace gases can be measured. Such information is important for the quantitative comparison with model simulations, study of transport processes, and for the validation of tropospheric trace gas products from satellite observations. However, for MAX-DOAS observations from mobile platforms, the standard analysis techniques for MAX-DOAS observations can usually not be applied, because the probed airmasses can change rapidly between successive measurements. In this study we introduce a new technique which overcomes these problems and allows the exploitation of the full information content of mobile MAX-DOAS observations. Our method can also be applied to MAX-DOAS observations made at fixed locations in order to improve the accuracy especially in cases of strong winds. We apply the new technique to MAX-DOAS observations made during an automobile trip from Brussels to Heidelberg.

  4. The 8-component retrievals from ground-based MAX-DOAS observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irie, H.; Takashima, H.; Kanaya, Y.; Boersma, F.; Gast, L.; Wittrock, F.; van Roozendael, M.

    2010-12-01

    We first attempt to retrieve lower-tropospheric vertical profile information on 8 components from ground-based Multi-Axis Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (MAX-DOAS) observations. Components retrieved are aerosol extinction coefficients (AEC) at two wavelengths 357 and 476 nm, NO2, HCHO, CHOCHO, H2O, SO2, and O3 volume mixing ratios (VMRs). A Japanese MAX-DOAS profile retrieval algorithm version 1 (JM1) is applied to observations performed at Cabauw, the Netherlands (51.97N, 4.93E) in June-July 2009 during the Cabauw Intercomparison campaign of Nitrogen Dioxide measuring Instruments (CINDI). Of retrieved profiles, we focus here on the lowest layer data (mean values at altitudes 0-1 km), where the sensitivity is usually highest owing to the longest light path. In support of the capability of the multi-component retrievals, overall we find reasonable agreement with independent data sets, including a regional chemical transport model (CHIMERE) and in situ observations performed at 3- and 200-m height levels of a tower placed in Cabauw. Enhanced HCHO and SO2 plumes were likely affected by biogenic and ship emissions, respectively, but an improvement in their emission strengths was suggested for better agreement. Analysis of air mass factors indicates that the horizontal representativeness of MAX-DOAS observation is about 3-15 km, comparable to or better than the spatial resolution of relevant UV-visible satellite observations and model calculations. These demonstrate that MAX-DOAS provides multi-component data useful for evaluation of satellite observations and model calculations and plays a role in bridging different data sets having different spatial resolutions.

  5. Investigating differences in DOAS retrieval codes using MAD-CAT campaign data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peters, Enno; Pinardi, Gaia; Seyler, André; Richter, Andreas; Wittrock, Folkard; Bösch, Tim; Van Roozendael, Michel; Hendrick, François; Drosoglou, Theano; Bais, Alkiviadis F.; Kanaya, Yugo; Zhao, Xiaoyi; Strong, Kimberly; Lampel, Johannes; Volkamer, Rainer; Koenig, Theodore; Ortega, Ivan; Puentedura, Olga; Navarro-Comas, Mónica; Gómez, Laura; Yela González, Margarita; Piters, Ankie; Remmers, Julia; Wang, Yang; Wagner, Thomas; Wang, Shanshan; Saiz-Lopez, Alfonso; García-Nieto, David; Cuevas, Carlos A.; Benavent, Nuria; Querel, Richard; Johnston, Paul; Postylyakov, Oleg; Borovski, Alexander; Elokhov, Alexander; Bruchkouski, Ilya; Liu, Haoran; Liu, Cheng; Hong, Qianqian; Rivera, Claudia; Grutter, Michel; Stremme, Wolfgang; Fahim Khokhar, M.; Khayyam, Junaid; Burrows, John P.

    2017-03-01

    The differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS) method is a well-known remote sensing technique that is nowadays widely used for measurements of atmospheric trace gases, creating the need for harmonization and characterization efforts. In this study, an intercomparison exercise of DOAS retrieval codes from 17 international groups is presented, focusing on NO2 slant columns. The study is based on data collected by one instrument during the Multi-Axis DOAS Comparison campaign for Aerosols and Trace gases (MAD-CAT) in Mainz, Germany, in summer 2013. As data from the same instrument are used by all groups, the results are free of biases due to instrumental differences, which is in contrast to previous intercomparison exercises.While in general an excellent correlation of NO2 slant columns between groups of > 99.98 % (noon reference fits) and > 99.2 % (sequential reference fits) for all elevation angles is found, differences between individual retrievals are as large as 8 % for NO2 slant columns and 100 % for rms residuals in small elevation angles above the horizon.Comprehensive sensitivity studies revealed that absolute slant column differences result predominantly from the choice of the reference spectrum while relative differences originate from the numerical approach for solving the DOAS equation as well as the treatment of the slit function. Furthermore, differences in the implementation of the intensity offset correction were found to produce disagreements for measurements close to sunrise (8-10 % for NO2, 80 % for rms residual). The largest effect of ≈ 8 % difference in NO2 was found to arise from the reference treatment; in particular for fits using a sequential reference. In terms of rms fit residual, the reference treatment has only a minor impact. In contrast, the wavelength calibration as well as the intensity offset correction were found to have the largest impact (up to 80 %) on rms residual while having only a minor impact on retrieved NO2

  6. Comparison of atmospheric nitrous acid measurements by annular denuder and differential optical absorption systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Appel, B. R.; Winer, A. M.; Tokiwa, Y.; Biermann, H. W.

    As part of the Southern California Air Quality Study (SCAQS), nitrous acid (HONO) measurements were made at Long Beach, CA during the period 11 November-12 December 1987, using two distinctly different techniqes. One of these, the annular denuder method (ADM), used two denuders in tandem, coated with an alkaline medium to obtain 4- or 6-h integrated measurements. A small FEP Tefloncoated glass cyclone preceded the denuders to exclude coarse particles while minimizing loss or artifactual formation of HONO. Nitrite recoveries from the rear denuder were used to correct for sampling artifacts. In the second method, 15 min average HONO concentrations were measured with a differential optical absorption spectrometer (DOAS) coupled to a 25 m basepath, open multiple reflection system operated at a total optical path of 800 m. Period-averaged HONO concentrations from the two techniques were highly correlated ( r = 0.94), with DOAS results averaging about 10% higher. However, ADM results were biased high at low HONO concentrations. HONO and NO concentrations showed a significant, positive correlation ( r = 0.8), consistent with a common emission source (e.g. auto exhaust) for the two pollutants.

  7. Estimation of NO2 emissions from Lahore and Rawalpindi / Islamabad using Car MAX-DOAS observations and comparison with OMI satellite data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Razi, Maria; Fahim Khokhar, Muhammad; Javed, Zeeshan; Ahmad, Noor; Wagner, Thomas

    2015-04-01

    We present results of ground-based multi-axis differential optical absorption spectroscopy (MAX-DOAS) measurements performed around the cities of Lahore and Rawalpindi / Islamabad, Pakistan and also between the cities along National Highway, N5. From the car-MAX-DOAS measurements, the tropospheric vertical column density (VCD) of NO2 is retrieved based on the so called geometric approximation. Based on observations along large circles around the cities and wind data we estimate the NO2 emissions from the cities of Lahore and Rawalpindi / Islamabad. We also compare the spatial distributions of the tropospheric NO2 VCDs observed by car MAX-DOAS with collocated results from the satellite based Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI). We discuss the influence of the observed spatial gradients on the comparison between both data sets.

  8. Estimation of sulphur dioxide emission rate from a power plant based on the remote sensing measurement with an imaging-DOAS instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chong, Jihyo; Kim, Young J.; Baek, Jongho; Lee, Hanlim

    2016-10-01

    Major anthropogenic sources of sulphur dioxide in the troposphere include point sources such as power plants and combustion-derived industrial sources. Spatially resolved remote sensing of atmospheric trace gases is desirable for better estimation and validation of emission from those sources. It has been reported that Imaging Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (I-DOAS) technique can provide the spatially resolved two-dimensional distribution measurement of atmospheric trace gases. This study presents the results of I-DOAS observations of SO2 from a large power plant. The stack plume from the Taean coal-fired power plant was remotely sensed with an I-DOAS instrument. The slant column density (SCD) of SO2 was derived by data analysis of the absorption spectra of the scattered sunlight measured by an I-DOAS over the power plant stacks. Two-dimensional distribution of SO2 SCD was obtained over the viewing window of the I-DOAS instrument. The measured SCDs were converted to mixing ratios in order to estimate the rate of SO2 emission from each stack. The maximum mixing ratio of SO2 was measured to be 28.1 ppm with a SCD value of 4.15×1017 molecules/cm2. Based on the exit velocity of the plume from the stack, the emission rate of SO2 was estimated to be 22.54 g/s. Remote sensing of SO2 with an I-DOAS instrument can be very useful for independent estimation and validation of the emission rates from major point sources as well as area sources.

  9. Multidimensional spectrometer

    DOEpatents

    Zanni, Martin Thomas; Damrauer, Niels H.

    2010-07-20

    A multidimensional spectrometer for the infrared, visible, and ultraviolet regions of the electromagnetic spectrum, and a method for making multidimensional spectroscopic measurements in the infrared, visible, and ultraviolet regions of the electromagnetic spectrum. The multidimensional spectrometer facilitates measurements of inter- and intra-molecular interactions.

  10. Development and Characterization of a High Speed Mid-IR Tunable Diode Laser Absorption Spectrometer for CO and CO2 Detection in Detonation Events

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-03-27

    expected results with approximately 10% error bounds. With this system’s proof of concept, it will be possible to analyze real combustors as well as...the intensity is normalized ac - cording to an intensity where no absorption occurs according to Beer’s Law. Furthermore, the plots now focus on the...Data for CO (top) and CO2 (bottom) in which the intensity is normalized ac - cording to an intensity where no absorption occurs according to Beer’s

  11. Cloud and aerosol classification for 2.5 years of MAX-DOAS observations in Wuxi (China) and comparison to independent data sets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Y.; Penning de Vries, M.; Xie, P. H.; Beirle, S.; Dörner, S.; Remmers, J.; Li, A.; Wagner, T.

    2015-12-01

    Multi-axis differential optical absorption spectroscopy (MAX-DOAS) observations of trace gases can be strongly influenced by clouds and aerosols. Thus it is important to identify clouds and characterize their properties. In a recent study Wagner et al. (2014) developed a cloud classification scheme based on the MAX-DOAS measurements themselves with which different "sky conditions" (e.g., clear sky, continuous clouds, broken clouds) can be distinguished. Here we apply this scheme to long-term MAX-DOAS measurements from 2011 to 2013 in Wuxi, China (31.57° N, 120.31° E). The original algorithm has been adapted to the characteristics of the Wuxi instrument, and extended towards smaller solar zenith angles (SZA). Moreover, a method for the determination and correction of instrumental degradation is developed to avoid artificial trends of the cloud classification results. We compared the results of the MAX-DOAS cloud classification scheme to several independent measurements: aerosol optical depth from a nearby Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) station and from two Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) instruments, visibility derived from a visibility meter and various cloud parameters from different satellite instruments (MODIS, the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) and the Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment (GOME-2)). Here it should be noted that no quantitative comparison between the MAX-DOAS results and the independent data sets is possible, because (a) not exactly the same quantities are measured, and (b) the spatial and temporal sampling is quite different. Thus our comparison is performed in a semi-quantitative way: the MAX-DOAS cloud classification results are studied as a function of the external quantities. The most important findings from these comparisons are as follows: (1) most cases characterized as clear sky with low or high aerosol load were associated with the respective aerosol optical depth (AOD) ranges obtained by AERONET and MODIS

  12. The impact of vibrational Raman scattering of air on DOAS measurements of atmospheric trace gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lampel, J.; Frieß, U.; Platt, U.

    2015-09-01

    In remote sensing applications, such as differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS), atmospheric scattering processes need to be considered. After inelastic scattering on N2 and O2 molecules, the scattered photons occur as additional intensity at a different wavelength, effectively leading to "filling-in" of both solar Fraunhofer lines and absorptions of atmospheric constituents, if the inelastic scattering happens after the absorption. Measured spectra in passive DOAS applications are typically corrected for rotational Raman scattering (RRS), also called Ring effect, which represents the main contribution to inelastic scattering. Inelastic scattering can also occur in liquid water, and its influence on DOAS measurements has been observed over clear ocean water. In contrast to that, vibrational Raman scattering (VRS) of N2 and O2 has often been thought to be negligible, but it also contributes. Consequences of VRS are red-shifted Fraunhofer structures in scattered light spectra and filling-in of Fraunhofer lines, additional to RRS. At 393 nm, the spectral shift is 25 and 40 nm for VRS of O2 and N2, respectively. We describe how to calculate VRS correction spectra according to the Ring spectrum. We use the VRS correction spectra in the spectral range of 420-440 nm to determine the relative magnitude of the cross-sections of VRS of O2 and N2 and RRS of air. The effect of VRS is shown for the first time in spectral evaluations of Multi-Axis DOAS data from the SOPRAN M91 campaign and the MAD-CAT MAX-DOAS intercomparison campaign. The measurements yield in agreement with calculated scattering cross-sections that the observed VRS(N2) cross-section at 393 nm amounts to 2.3 ± 0.4 % of the cross-section of RRS at 433 nm under tropospheric conditions. The contribution of VRS(O2) is also found to be in agreement with calculated scattering cross-sections. It is concluded, that this phenomenon has to be included in the spectral evaluation of weak absorbers as it

  13. Horizontal and temporal evolution of tropospheric NO2 in Vienna as inferred from car DOAS measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schreier, Stefan F.; Richter, Andreas; Li, Zheng; Burrows, John P.

    2016-04-01

    Zenith-sky measurements were performed with a car DOAS (Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy) instrument to obtain tropospheric nitrogen dioxide (NO2) distributions within the metropolitan area of Vienna, Austria, on nine days in April, September, October, and November 2015. Several single car journeys having an approximate distance of 110 km and covering known emission sources of nitrogen oxides (NOx) as well as a background region north of Vienna were carried out. The spectral measurements are analyzed using the DOAS technique applying a nonlinear least-squares fitting algorithm. The obtained NO2 differential slant column densities (DSCDs) are based on the 425-490 nm fitting window and the inclusion of relevant high resolution absorption cross-sections. Tropospheric NO2 vertical column densities (VCDs) are extracted from the NO2 DSCDs by making assumptions on the diurnal variation of stratospheric NO2 VCDs and determining a tropospheric NO2 airmass factor. Additional meteorological (wind speed and wind direction) and air quality (surface NO2 concentrations) data from nearby measurement stations is used to interpret the horizontal and temporal evolution of NO2 pollution. Our results show that elevated NO2 pollution originating from rush-hour traffic over busy highways is transported along the Danube River to the Northwest of Vienna under certain meteorological conditions.

  14. A All-Vacuum High Resolution Fourier Transform Spectrometer with Absorption Pathlengths up to 352 M: Acetylene Spectrum at 1.4-1.7 Microns.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keppler, Karen Ann

    1995-01-01

    The spectra of acetylene (C_2H _2) and of water vapor have been recorded at room temperature with Doppler- or pressure -broadening-limited resolution at pathlengths up to 352m. The spectra were obtained with the combination of a FTIR (Fourier Transform Infrared) spectrometer, evacuated transfer optics, and a multipass cell of 4m base length. The measurements were performed at the Justus-Liebig-Universitat in Giessen, Germany, using the FTIR spectrometer at that university, the multipass cell assembled at The Ohio State University, and the vacuum transfer optics designed by the author. The regions in which the spectra were recorded are 5900-7150 cm^{-1} and 1850-6600 cm^{-1}. Calibration difficulties pertaining to the determination of the absolute accuracy of the data have been resolved, and molecular parameters have been extracted for the HCCH data. These calibration problems were not documented in earlier studies using high resolution Fourier transform spectrometers. For this reason, the dissertation addresses this matter in somewhat greater detail. This work contains a description of the technology used to obtain the data, and a description of the calibration of the spectra to make them suitable for future use as secondary wavenumber calibration standards. The bands detected for the first time in this study have been reported, and updated energy level diagrams for HCCH and H^{13}CCH have been included. The molecular parameters obtained from the HCCH spectra have been presented. The appendices include, among others, the basic observational data, a spectral map and associated wavenumber lists of HCCH, and a description of the weighting scheme developed by the author for Fourier Transform spectra.

  15. SCINTILLATION SPECTROMETER

    DOEpatents

    Bell, P.R.; Francis, J.E.

    1960-06-21

    A portable scintillation spectrometer is described which is especially useful in radio-biological studies for determining the uptake and distribution of gamma -emitting substances in tissue. The spectrometer includes a collimator having a plurality of apertures that are hexagonal in cross section. Two crystals are provided: one is activated to respond to incident rays from the collimator; the other is not activated and shields the first from external radiation.

  16. Inter-comparison of MAX-DOAS Retrieved Vertical Profiles of Aerosol Extinction, SO2 and NO2 in the Alberta Oil Sands with LIDAR Data and GEM-MACH Air Quality Model.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Zoe; Friess, Udo; Strawbridge, Kevin; Whiteway, James; Aggarwal, Monika; Makar, Paul; Li, Shao-Meng; O'Brien, Jason; Baray, Sabour; Schnitzler, Elijah; Olfert, Jason S.; Osthoff, Hans D.; Lobo, Akshay; McLaren, Robert

    2016-04-01

    Understanding industrial emissions of trace gas pollutants in the Alberta oil sands is essential to maintaining air quality standards and informing public policy. Multi-Axis Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (MAX-DOAS) measurements of trace gases can improve knowledge of pollutant levels, vertical distribution and chemical transformation. During an intensive air measurement campaign to study emissions, transport, transformation and deposition of oil sands air pollutants from August to September of 2013, a MAX-DOAS instrument was deployed at a site north of Fort McMurray, Alberta to determine the vertical profiles of aerosol extinction, NO2 and SO2 through retrieval from the MAX-DOAS spectral measurements using an optimal estimation method. The large complement of data collected from multiple instruments deployed during this field campaign provides a unique opportunity to validate and characterize the performance of the MAX-DOAS vertical profile retrievals. Aerosol extinction profiles determined from two Light Detection and Ranging (LIDAR) instruments, one collocated and the other on a Twin Otter aircraft that flew over the site during the study, will be compared to the MAX-DOAS aerosol extinction profile retrievals. Vertical profiles of NO2 and SO2 retrieved from the MAX-DOAS measurements will be further compared with the composite vertical profiles measured from the flights of a second aircraft, the NRC-Convair 580, over the field site during the same measurement period. Finally, the MAX-DOAS retrieved tropospheric vertical column densities (VCDs) of SO2 and NO2 will be compared to the predicted VCDs from Environment and Climate Change Canada's Global Environmental Multi-scale - Modelling Air quality and Chemistry (GEM-MACH) air quality model over the grid cell containing the field site. Emission estimates of SO2 from the major oil mining facility Syncrude Mildred Lake using the MAX-DOAS VCD results, validated through the detailed characterization above

  17. Performance Analysis of an Improved MUSIC DoA Estimator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vallet, Pascal; Mestre, Xavier; Loubaton, Philippe

    2015-12-01

    This paper adresses the statistical performance of subspace DoA estimation using a sensor array, in the asymptotic regime where the number of samples and sensors both converge to infinity at the same rate. Improved subspace DoA estimators were derived (termed as G-MUSIC) in previous works, and were shown to be consistent and asymptotically Gaussian distributed in the case where the number of sources and their DoA remain fixed. In this case, which models widely spaced DoA scenarios, it is proved in the present paper that the traditional MUSIC method also provides DoA consistent estimates having the same asymptotic variances as the G-MUSIC estimates. The case of DoA that are spaced of the order of a beamwidth, which models closely spaced sources, is also considered. It is shown that G-MUSIC estimates are still able to consistently separate the sources, while it is no longer the case for the MUSIC ones. The asymptotic variances of G-MUSIC estimates are also evaluated.

  18. Mutual Coupling Compensation on Spectral-based DOA Algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanudin, R.

    2016-11-01

    Direction of arrival (DOA) estimation using isotropic antenna arrays are commonly being implemented without considering the mutual coupling effect in between the array elements. This paper presents an analysis of DOA estimation with mutual coupling compensation using a linear antenna array. Mutual coupling effect is represented by mutual coupling coefficients and taken into account when calculating the array output. The mutual coupling compensation technique exploits a banded mutual coupling matrix to reduce the computational complexity. The banded matrix reflects the relationship between mutual coupling effect and the element spacing in an antenna array. The analysis is being carried out using the Capon algorithm, one of spectral-based DOA algorithms, for estimating the DOA of incoming signals. Computer simulations are performed to show the performance of the mutual coupling compensation technique on DOA estimation. Simulation results show that, in term of estimation resolution, the mutual coupling compensation technique manages to obtain a comparable results compared to the case without mutual coupling consideration. However, the mutual coupling compensation technique produces significant estimation error compared to the case without mutual coupling. The study concludes that the banded matrix of mutual coupling coefficients should be properly designed to improve the performance of mutual coupling compensation technique in DOA estimation.

  19. MAX-DOAS measurements of tropospheric NO2 and SO2 during the AROMAT-campaign in Rumania in September 2014

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaiganfar, Reza; Wagner, Thomas; Riffel, Katharina; Donner, Sebastian

    2015-04-01

    The Airborne Romanian Measurements of Aerosols and Trace gases (AROMAT) campaigh took place in Rumania during September 2014. The aim of the AROMAT campaign was to measure the spatial distribution of trace gases (mainly NO2 and SO2) and aerosols. We carried out car-borne Multi-AXis Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (MAX-DOAS) measurements using two Mini-MAX-DOAS instruments covering the UV and visible spectral range. During the first week car-MAX-DOAS measurements were carried-out on circles around Bucharest. From these observations, together with information on the wind fields, we derive the total NOx emissions from the city. We also provide estimates on the SO2 emissions, but these estimates have rather large uncertainties because the SO2 measurements are close or below the detection limit. We also made measurements within the city to quantify the spatial gradients. This information is especially important for the validation of satellite observations. In the second week, the car-MAX-DOAS measurements were carried-out around large power plants at Turceni. During these measurements, very strong SO2 absorptions were observed downwind of the power plants. From these observations, we estimate the SO2 emissions. We also determine the NO2 / SO2 ratio and investigate its dependence on the distance from the power plant.

  20. Measurement of formaldehyde total content in troposphere using DOAS technique: improvements in version 1.3a of IAP retrieval algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Postylyakov, O. V.; Borovski, A. N.

    2016-05-01

    Formaldehyde (HCHO) is a significant constituent of the atmospheric chemistry involved in a lot of chemical reactions. It is directly emitted by anthropogenic and biogenic sources and, more significantly, by production during oxidation of methane and other VOCs. So HCHO is used as an indicator of local pollution by VOCs. HCHO has a sufficiently large absorption cross-section in the UV spectral region to be detected by the technique of the differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS). We present here new version 1.3a of the algorithm for retrieval of the HCHO total content in the troposphere from DOAS observations of the scattered solar radiation developed in A.M. Obukhov Institute of Atmospheric Physics (IAP). The new version has reduced retrieval error but negligible bias with respect to the previous versions. DOAS measurements of scattered solar radiation are performed at Zvenigorod Scientific Station (ZSS, 55°41'49''N, 36°46'29''E) located in 38 km west from Moscow Ring Road by a MAX-DOAS instrument since 2008. We provide preliminary results of the HCHO total content measurements in the troposphere observed in 2010-2012 obtained by the revised retrieval algorithm.

  1. Water isotope ratio (δ2H and δ18O) measurements in atmospheric moisture using an optical feedback cavity enhanced absorption laser spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iannone, Rosario Q.; Romanini, Daniele; Cattani, Olivier; Meijer, Harro A. J.; Kerstel, Erik R. Th.

    2010-05-01

    Water vapor isotopes represent an innovative and excellent tool for understanding complex mechanisms in the atmospheric water cycle over different time scales, and they can be used for a variety of applications in the fields of paleoclimatology, hydrology, oceanography, and ecology. We use an ultrasensitive near-infrared spectrometer, originally designed for use on airborne platforms in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere, to measure the water deuterium and oxygen-18 isotope ratios in situ, in ground-level tropospheric moisture, with a high temporal resolution (from 300 s down to less than 1 s). We present some examples of continuous monitoring of near-surface atmospheric moisture, demonstrating that our infrared laser spectrometer could be used successfully to record high-concentration atmospheric water vapor mixing ratios in continuous time series, with a data coverage of ˜90%, interrupted only for daily calibration to two isotope ratio mass spectrometry-calibrated local water standards. The atmospheric data show that the water vapor isotopic composition exhibits a high variability that can be related to weather conditions, especially to changes in relative humidity. Besides, the results suggest that observed spatial and temporal variations of the stable isotope content of atmospheric water vapor are strongly related to water vapor transport in the atmosphere.

  2. The Use of a Microprocessor-Controlled, Video Output Atomic Absorption Spectrometer as an Educational Tool in a Two-Year Technical Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kerfoot, Henry B.

    Based on instructional experiences at Charles County Community College, Maryland, this report examines the pedagogical advantage of teaching atomic absorption (AA) spectroscopy with an AA spectrophotometer that is equipped with a microprocessor and video output mechanism. The report first discusses the growing importance of AA spectroscopy in…

  3. Retrieval of cloud height from SCIAMACHY using oxygen absorption around 630nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grzegorski, Michael; Deutschmann, Tim; Platt, Ulrich; Wang, Ping; Wagner, Thomas

    2010-05-01

    The SCanning Imaging Absorption spectrometer for Atmospheric ChartographY (SCIAMACHY) on ENVISAT allows measurements of different atmospheric trace gases (e.g. O3, NO2, SO2, CH4, HCHO, CO, BrO, H2O, O2, O4) using the DOAS technique. The HICRU algorithm retrieves cloud height using the spectral analysis of the oxygen absorption around 630nm combined with results of the Monte-Carlo model TRACY-II and a new SCIAMACHY surface albedo database. The results are compared to: 1.) cloud height retrievals of other satellite instruments (MERIS, MODIS) 2.) ISCCP climatology 3.) SCIAMACHY cloud algorithms (SACURA, FRESCO+) 4.) LIDAR/RADAR measurements. For low clouds, the HICRU algorithm retrieves cloud heights more close to the the top, because of the assumption of an appropriate cloud model with a realistic estimation of the scattering inside the cloud. It is also demonstrated, that none the three SCIAMACHY cloud algorithms HICRU, SACURA and FRESCO+ is able to retrieve the top of high clouds because of principal characteristics of the retrieval methods based on oxygen absorption. But oxygen absorptions can provide important additional information on the vertical cloud structure and multiple cloud layers if the method is combined with cloud-top-retrieval using windows in the thermal infrared. An application of these concepts to the GOSAT instrument will be discussed.

  4. DOAS measurements of formaldehyde and glyoxal above a South-East Asian tropical rainforest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacDonald, S. M.; Oetjen, H.; Mahajan, A. S.; Whalley, L. K.; Edwards, P. M.; Heard, D. E.; Jones, C. E.; Plane, J. M. C.

    2012-02-01

    Tropical rainforests act as a huge contributor to the global emissions of biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs). Measurements of their oxidation products, such as formaldehyde (HCHO) and glyoxal (CHOCHO), provide useful indicators of fast photochemistry occurring in the lower troposphere. However, measurements of these species in tropical forest locations are extremely limited. To redress this, HCHO and CHOCHO were measured using the long-path (LP) and multi-axis (MAX) differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS) techniques above the rainforest canopy in Borneo during two campaigns in spring and summer 2008, as part of the Oxidant and Particle Photochemical Processes above a South-East Asian tropical rainforest (OP3) project. The results were compared with concurrent measurements of hydroxyl radical (OH), isoprene (C5H8) (which was the dominant organic species emitted in this forest environment), and various meteorological parameters. Formaldehyde was observed at a maximum concentration of 4.5 ppb and glyoxal at a maximum of 1.6 ppb, significantly higher than previous measurements in rural locations. A 1-D chemistry model was then used to assess the diurnal evolution of formaldehyde and glyoxal throughout the boundary layer. The results, which compare well with the LP-DOAS and MAX-DOAS observations, suggest that the majority of the glyoxal and formaldehyde is confined to the first 500 m of the boundary layer, and that the measured ratio of these species is reproduced using currently accepted product yields for the oxidation of isoprene by OH. An important conclusion is that the measured levels of glyoxal are consistent with the surprisingly high concentrations of OH measured in this environment.

  5. DOAS measurements of formaldehyde and glyoxal above a south-east Asian tropical rainforest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacDonald, S. M.; Oetjen, H.; Mahajan, A. S.; Whalley, L. K.; Edwards, P. M.; Heard, D. E.; Jones, C. E.; Plane, J. M. C.

    2012-07-01

    Tropical rainforests act as a huge contributor to the global emissions of biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs). Measurements of their oxidation products, such as formaldehyde (HCHO) and glyoxal (CHOCHO), provide useful indicators of fast photochemistry occurring in the lower troposphere. However, measurements of these species in tropical forest locations are extremely limited. To redress this, HCHO and CHOCHO were measured using the long-path (LP) and multi-axis (MAX) differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS) techniques above the rainforest canopy in Borneo during two campaigns in spring and summer 2008, as part of the Oxidant and Particle Photochemical Processes above a south-east Asian tropical rainforest (OP3) project. The results were compared with concurrent measurements of hydroxyl radical (OH), isoprene (C5H8) (which was the dominant organic species emitted in this forest environment), and various meteorological parameters. Formaldehyde was observed at a maximum concentration of 4.5 ppb and glyoxal at a maximum of 1.6 ppb, significantly higher than previous measurements in rural locations. A 1-D chemistry model was then used to assess the diurnal evolution of formaldehyde and glyoxal throughout the boundary layer. The results, which compare well with the LP-DOAS and MAX-DOAS observations, suggest that the majority of the glyoxal and formaldehyde is confined to the first 500 m of the boundary layer, and that the measured ratio of these species is reproduced using currently accepted product yields for the oxidation of isoprene by OH. An important conclusion is that the measured levels of glyoxal are consistent with the surprisingly high concentrations of OH measured in this environment.

  6. Evaluation of tropospheric SO2 retrieved from MAX-DOAS measurements in Xianghe, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, T.; Hendrick, F.; Wang, P.; Tang, G.; Clémer, K.; Yu, H.; Fayt, C.; Hermans, C.; Gielen, C.; Pinardi, G.; Theys, N.; Brenot, H.; Van Roozendael, M.

    2014-03-01

    Ground-based Multi-Axis Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (MAX-DOAS) measurements of sulfur dioxide (SO2) have been performed at the Xianghe station (39.75° N, 116.96° E) located at ~50 km southeast of Beijing from March 2010 to February 2013. Tropospheric SO2 vertical profiles and corresponding vertical column densities (VCDs), retrieved by applying the Optimal Estimation Method to the MAX-DOAS observations, have been used to study the seasonal and diurnal cycles of SO2, in combination to correlative measurements from in situ instruments, as well as meteorological data. A marked seasonality was observed in both SO2 VCD and surface concentration, with a maximum in winter (February) and a minimum in summer (July). This can be explained by the larger emissions in winter due to the domestic heating and more favorable meteorological conditions for the accumulation of SO2 close to the ground during this period. Wind speed and direction are also found to be two key factors in controlling the level of the SO2-related pollution at Xianghe. In the case of east or southwest wind, the SO2 concentration rises with the increase of the wind speed, since heavy polluting industries are located to the east and southwest of the station. In contrast, when wind comes from other directions, the stronger the wind, the less SO2 is observed. Regarding the diurnal cycle, the SO2 amount is larger in the early morning and late evening and lower at noon, in line with the diurnal variation of pollutant emissions and atmospheric stability. The observed diurnal cycles of MAX-DOAS SO2 surface concentration are also in very good agreement (correlation coefficient close to 0.9) with those from collocated in-situ data, demonstrating the reliability and robustness of our retrieval.

  7. Evaluation of tropospheric SO2 retrieved from MAX-DOAS measurements in Xianghe, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ting; Hendrick, Francois; Wang, Pucai; Tang, Guiqian; Clémer, Katrijn; Yu, Huan; Fayt, Caroline; Hermans, Christian; Gielen, Clio; Pinardi, Gaia; Theys, Nicolas; Brenot, Hugues; Van Roozendael, Michel

    2014-05-01

    Ground-based Multi-Axis Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (MAX-DOAS) measurements of sulfur dioxide (SO2) have been performed at the Xianghe station (39.77°N, 117.0°E) located at ~50 km South-East of Beijing from March 2010 to February 2013. Tropospheric SO2 vertical profiles and corresponding vertical column densities (VCDs), retrieved by applying the Optimal Estimation Method to the MAX-DOAS observations, have been used to study the seasonal and diurnal cycles of SO2, in combination to correlative measurements from in situ instruments, as well as meteorological data. A marked seasonality is observed in both SO2 VCD and surface concentration, with a maximum in winter (February) and a minimum in summer (July). This can be explained by the larger emissions in winter due to the domestic heating and more favorable meteorological conditions for the accumulation of SO2 close to the ground during this period. Wind speed and direction are also found to be two key parameters in controlling the level of the SO2-related pollution at Xianghe. In the case of east or southwest wind, the SO2 concentration rises with the increase of the wind speed, since heavy polluting industries are located to the east and southwest of the station. In contrast, when wind comes from other directions, the stronger the wind, the less SO2 is observed. Regarding the diurnal cycle, the SO2 amount is larger in the early morning and late evening and lower at noon, in line with the diurnal variation of pollutant emissions and atmospheric stability. The observed diurnal cycles of MAX-DOAS SO2 surface concentration are also in very good agreement (correlation coefficient close to 0.9) with those from collocated in-situ data, demonstrating the reliability and robustness of our retrieval.

  8. Long-term MAX-DOAS measurement of trace gases and aerosol in the Environmental Research Station Schneefernerhaus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhuoru; Hao, Nan; Hendrick, François; Van Roozendael, Michel; Holla, Robert; Valks, Pieter

    2016-04-01

    The Environmental Research Station Schneefernerhaus (Umwelt Forschungsstation Schneefernerhaus, UFS) is located immediately under the summit of Zugspitze (2962 m), the highest mountain of Germany, at a height of 2650 m. The UFS is a rare observation site in Germany with mostly clean and unpolluted air. It is ideal for both stratospheric composition measurements and trace gas measurements in the free-troposphere. It is optimal for detecting pollution events in the free-troposphere, which are indications of short- or long-range transport of air pollutants. A MAX-DOAS instrument has been working in the UFS since February 2011. With the zenith spectrum of each cycle used as the reference, the differential slant column densities (DSCDs) of trace gases are calculated from the spectra with Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (DOAS) method. The DSCDs of both O4 and NO2 are calculated in two different wavelength intervals, 338-370 nm in the UV region and 440-490 nm in the VIS region. For HCHO and HONO, optimal fitting windows have been determined in the UV region. A retrieval algorithm, based on the radiative transfer model LIDORT and the optimal estimation technique, is used to provide information on the vertical profiles and vertical column densities (VCDs) of aerosol and trace gases. Meanwhile, zenith-sky radiance spectra during twilight hours are analyzed using DOAS method to derive the total vertical column densities (VCDs) of O3 and NO2. A zenith spectrum measured in the noon of a summer day was chosen as the reference spectrum. The slant column densities (SCDs) of O3 and NO2, which are the direct product of the DOAS analysis, are then converted into VCDs using the air mass factors (AMFs) derived by radiative transfer calculations. This work presents the results of the MAX-DOAS measurement in the UFS from 2012 to 2015, including aerosol (derived from O4 measurement), NO2, HCHO, and HONO, etc. The vertical profiles as well as the seasonal and diurnal variation

  9. Mass-specific optical absorption coefficients and imaginary part of the complex refractive indices of mineral dust components measured by a multi-wavelength photoacoustic spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Utry, N.; Ajtai, T.; Pintér, M.; Tombácz, E.; Illés, E.; Bozóki, Z.; Szabó, G.

    2015-01-01

    Mass-specific optical absorption coefficients (MACs) and the imaginary part (κ) of the refractive indices of various mineral dust components including silicate clays (illite, kaolin and bentonite), oxides (quartz, hematite and rutile), and carbonate (limestone) were determined at the wavelengths of 1064, 532, 355 and 266 nm. The MAC values were calculated from aerosol optical absorption coefficients measured by a multi-wavelength photoacoustic (PA) instrument, the mass concentration and the number size distribution of the generated aerosol samples as well as the size transfer functions of the measuring instruments. Values of κ were calculated from the measured and particle-loss-corrected data by using a Mie-theory-based retrieval algorithm. The determined values could be used for comparisons with calculated wavelength-dependent κ values typically deduced from bulk-phase measurements by using indirect measurement methods. Accordingly, the presented comparison of the measured and calculated aerosol optical absorption spectra revealed the strong need for standardized sample preparation and measurement methodology in case of bulk-phase measurements.

  10. Ground based MAX-DOAS measurements of the total water vapor column and comparison with model results and satellite observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, T.; Mies, K.; Beirle, S.

    2012-04-01

    Multi-AXis- (MAX-) DOAS instruments observe scattered sun light under different, mostly slant elevation angles. From such measurements the tropospheric profile or column density of many atmospheric trace gases like e.g. NO2 or HCHO can be derived. Here we analyse the total atmospheric column density of water vapor from MAX-DOAS measurements made at Mainz, Germany in 2011. We performed measurements in the red spectral range, where water vapor shows some very characteristic and strong absorption features. The determination of the atmospheric water vapor column density (the so called vertical column density, VCD) is performed in three steps: first the slant column density of H2O is analysed from the measured spectra of scattered sun light. Second, a correction for the saturation of the H2O absorption is performed, which arises from the fact that the narrow H2O absorption lines are not resolved by our instrument. Third, the geometric approximation is applied to deterine the H2O VCD from the retrieved H2O slant column densities. In contrast to observations at shorter wavelengths, the application of the geometric approximation should lead to smaller errors because of the much weaker Rayleigh-scattering by air moilecules in the red spectral range. Also the effects of clouds are expected to be relatively mall, at least for mid and high level clouds. Information on the cloud properties can be derived from the simultaneously measured absorption of the oxygen molecule (O2) and oxygen dimer (O4). We compare our MAX-DOAS H2O VCD to indepenent data sets like satellite observations and model simulations.

  11. Spectrometer gun

    DOEpatents

    Waechter, David A.; Wolf, Michael A.; Umbarger, C. John

    1985-01-01

    A hand-holdable, battery-operated, microprocessor-based spectrometer gun includes a low-power matrix display and sufficient memory to permit both real-time observation and extended analysis of detected radiation pulses. Universality of the incorporated signal processing circuitry permits operation with various detectors having differing pulse detection and sensitivity parameters.

  12. Spectrometer gun

    DOEpatents

    Waechter, D.A.; Wolf, M.A.; Umbarger, C.J.

    1981-11-03

    A hand-holdable, battery-operated, microprocessor-based spectrometer gun is described that includes a low-power matrix display and sufficient memory to permit both real-time observation and extended analysis of detected radiation pulses. Universality of the incorporated signal processing circuitry permits operation with various detectors having differing pulse detection and sensitivity parameters.

  13. HISS spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Greiner, D.E.

    1984-11-01

    This talk describes the Heavy Ion Spectrometer System (HISS) facility at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory's Bevalac. Three completed experiments and their results are illustrated. The second half of the talk is a detailed discussion of the response of drift chambers to heavy ions. The limitations of trajectory measurement over a large range in incident particle charge are presented.

  14. A new direct absorption tunable diode laser spectrometer for high precision measurement of water vapor in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sargent, M. R.; Sayres, D. S.; Smith, J. B.; Witinski, M.; Allen, N. T.; Demusz, J. N.; Rivero, M.; Tuozzolo, C.; Anderson, J. G.

    2013-07-01

    We present a new instrument for the measurement of water vapor in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere (UT/LS), the Harvard Herriott Hygrometer (HHH). HHH employs a tunable diode near-IR laser to measure water vapor via direct absorption in a Herriott cell. The direct absorption technique provides a direct link between the depth of the observed absorption line and the measured water vapor concentration, which is calculated based on spectroscopic parameters in the HITRAN database. While several other tunable diode laser (TDL) instruments have been used to measure water vapor in the UT/LS, HHH is set apart by its use of an optical cell an order of magnitude smaller than those of other direct absorption TDLs in operation, allowing for a more compact, lightweight instrument. HHH is also unique in its integration into a common duct with the Harvard Lyman-α hygrometer, an independent photo-fragment fluorescence instrument which has been thoroughly validated over 19 years of flight measurements. The instrument was flown for the first time in the Mid-latitude Airborne Cirrus Properties Experiment (MACPEX) on NASA's WB-57 aircraft in spring, 2011, during which it demonstrated in-flight precision of 0.1 ppmv (1 s) with 1-sigma uncertainty of 5% ± 0.7 ppmv. Since the campaign, changes to the instrument have lead to improved accuracy of 5% ± 0.2 ppmv as demonstrated in the laboratory. During MACPEX, HHH successfully measured water vapor at concentrations from 3.5 to 600 ppmv in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere. HHH and Lyman-α, measuring independently but under the same sampling conditions, agreed on average to within 1% at water vapor mixing ratios above 20 ppmv and to within 0.3 ppmv at lower mixing ratios. HHH also agreed with a number of other in situ water vapor instruments on the WB-57 to within their stated uncertainties, and to within 0.7 ppmv at low water. This agreement constitutes a significant improvement over past in situ comparisons, in

  15. A new direct absorption tunable diode laser spectrometer for high precision measurement of water vapor in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere.

    PubMed

    Sargent, M R; Sayres, D S; Smith, J B; Witinski, M; Allen, N T; Demusz, J N; Rivero, M; Tuozzolo, C; Anderson, J G

    2013-07-01

    We present a new instrument for the measurement of water vapor in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere (UT∕LS), the Harvard Herriott Hygrometer (HHH). HHH employs a tunable diode near-IR laser to measure water vapor via direct absorption in a Herriott cell. The direct absorption technique provides a direct link between the depth of the observed absorption line and the measured water vapor concentration, which is calculated based on spectroscopic parameters in the HITRAN database. While several other tunable diode laser (TDL) instruments have been used to measure water vapor in the UT∕LS, HHH is set apart by its use of an optical cell an order of magnitude smaller than those of other direct absorption TDLs in operation, allowing for a more compact, lightweight instrument. HHH is also unique in its integration into a common duct with the Harvard Lyman-α hygrometer, an independent photo-fragment fluorescence instrument which has been thoroughly validated over 19 years of flight measurements. The instrument was flown for the first time in the Mid-latitude Airborne Cirrus Properties Experiment (MACPEX) on NASA's WB-57 aircraft in spring, 2011, during which it demonstrated in-flight precision of 0.1 ppmv (1 s) with 1-sigma uncertainty of 5% ± 0.7 ppmv. Since the campaign, changes to the instrument have lead to improved accuracy of 5% ± 0.2 ppmv as demonstrated in the laboratory. During MACPEX, HHH successfully measured water vapor at concentrations from 3.5 to 600 ppmv in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere. HHH and Lyman-α, measuring independently but under the same sampling conditions, agreed on average to within 1% at water vapor mixing ratios above 20 ppmv and to within 0.3 ppmv at lower mixing ratios. HHH also agreed with a number of other in situ water vapor instruments on the WB-57 to within their stated uncertainties, and to within 0.7 ppmv at low water. This agreement constitutes a significant improvement over past in situ comparisons

  16. Development of 2-D-MAX-DOAS and retrievals of trace gases and aerosols optical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortega, Ivan

    Air pollution is a major problem worldwide that adversely a_ects human health, impacts ecosystems and climate. In the atmosphere, there are hundreds of important compounds participating in complex atmospheric reactions linked to air quality and climate. Aerosols are relevant because they modify the radiation balance, a_ect clouds, and thus Earth albedo. The amount of aerosol is often characterized by the vertical integral through the entire height of the atmosphere of the logarithm fraction of incident light that is extinguished called Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD). The AOD at 550 nm (AOD550) over land is 0.19 (multi annual global mean), and that over oceans is 0.13. About 43 % of the Earth surface shows AOD550 smaller than 0.1. There is a need for measurement techniques that are optimized to measure aerosol optical properties under low AOD conditions, sample spatial scales that resemble satellite ground-pixels and atmospheric models, and help integrate remote sensing and in-situ observations to obtain optical closure on the effects of aerosols and trace gases in our changing environment. In this work, I present the recent development of the University of Colorado two dimensional (2-D) Multi-AXis Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (2-D-MAX-DOAS) instrument to measure the azimuth and altitude distribution of trace gases and aerosol optical properties simultaneously with a single instrument. The instrument measures solar scattered light from any direction in the sky, including direct sun light in the hyperspectral domain. In Chapter 2, I describe the capabilities of 2-D measurements in the context of retrievals of azimuth distributions of nitrogen dioxide (NO2), formaldehyde (HCHO), and glyoxal (CHOCHO), which are precursors for tropospheric O3 and aerosols. The measurements were carried out during the Multi-Axis DOAS Comparison campaign for Aerosols and Trace gases (MAD-CAT) campaign in Mainz, Germany and show the ability to bridge spatial scales to

  17. Underdetermined DOA Estimation Using MVDR-Weighted LASSO

    PubMed Central

    Salama, Amgad A.; Ahmad, M. Omair; Swamy, M. N. S.

    2016-01-01

    The direction of arrival (DOA) estimation problem is formulated in a compressive sensing (CS) framework, and an extended array aperture is presented to increase the number of degrees of freedom of the array. The ordinary least square adaptable least absolute shrinkage and selection operator (OLS A-LASSO) is applied for the first time for DOA estimation. Furthermore, a new LASSO algorithm, the minimum variance distortionless response (MVDR) A-LASSO, which solves the DOA problem in the CS framework, is presented. The proposed algorithm does not depend on the singular value decomposition nor on the orthogonality of the signal and the noise subspaces. Hence, the DOA estimation can be done without a priori knowledge of the number of sources. The proposed algorithm can estimate up to ((M2−2)/2+M−1)/2 sources using M sensors without any constraints or assumptions about the nature of the signal sources. Furthermore, the proposed algorithm exhibits performance that is superior compared to that of the classical DOA estimation methods, especially for low signal to noise ratios (SNR), spatially-closed sources and coherent scenarios. PMID:27657080

  18. Observations of atmospheric trace gases by MAX-DOAS in the coastal boundary layer over Jiaozhou Bay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xianxin; Wang, Zhangjun; Meng, Xiangqian; Zhou, Haijin; Du, Libin; Qu, Junle; Chen, Chao; An, Quan; Wu, Chengxuan; Wang, Xiufen

    2014-11-01

    Atmospheric trace gases exist in the atmosphere of the earth rarely. But the atmospheric trace gases play an important role in the global atmospheric environment and ecological balance by participating in the global atmospheric cycle. And many environmental problems are caused by the atmospheric trace gases such as photochemical smog, acid rain, greenhouse effect, ozone depletion, etc. So observations of atmospheric trace gases become very important. Multi Axis Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (MAX-DOAS) developed recently is a kind of promising passive remote sensing technology which can utilize scattered sunlight received from multiple viewing directions to derive vertical column density of lower tropospheric trace gases like ozone, sulfur dioxide and nitrogen dioxide. It has advantages of simple structure, stable running, passive remote sensing and real-time online monitoring automatically. A MAX-DOAS has been developed at Shandong Academy of Sciences Institute of Oceanographic Instrumentation (SDIOI) for remote measurements of lower tropospheric trace gases (NO2, SO2, and O3). In this paper, we mainly introduce the stucture of the instrument, calibration and results. Detailed performance analysis and calibration of the instrument were made at Qingdao. We present the results of NO2, SO2 and O3 vertical column density measured in the coastal boundary layer over Jiaozhou Bay. The diurnal variation and the daily average value comparison of vertical column density during a long-trem observation are presented. The vertical column density of NO2 and SO2 measured during Qingdao oil pipeline explosion on November 22, 2013 by MAX-DOAS is also presented. The vertical column density of NO2 reached to a high value after the explosion. Finally, the following job and the outlook for future possible improvements are given. Experimental calibration and results show that the developed MAX-DOAS system is reliable and credible.

  19. Surface Plasmon Based Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wig, Andrew; Passian, Ali; Boudreaux, Philip; Ferrell, Tom

    2008-03-01

    A spectrometer that uses surface plasmon excitation in thin metal films to separate light into its component wavelengths is described. The use of surface plasmons as a dispersive medium sets this spectrometer apart from prism, grating, and interference based variants and allows for the miniaturization of this device. Theoretical and experimental results are presented for two different operation models. In the first case surface plasmon tunneling in the near field is used to provide transmission spectra of different broad band-pass, glass filters across the visible wavelength range with high stray-light rejection at low resolution as well as absorption spectra of chlorophyll extracted from a spinach leaf. The second model looks at the far field components of surface plasmon scattering.

  20. Kerbside DOAS measurements of air pollutants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schäfer, Klaus; Ling, Hong; Legelli, Stefan; Münkel, Christoph; Emeis, Stefan

    2014-10-01

    Emission sources as well as wind speed and direction and MLH are important factors which influence high air pollutant concentrations. This is generally known (Schäfer et al., 2006) but the detailed understanding of processes directing certain air pollutant concentrations like HCHO is not complete. To study these processes a long-term campaign in Augsburg, Germany, was performed since March 2012. The concentrations of NO, NO2, O3 and HCHO, which were measured with a DOAS from OPSIS across a main traffic road and a nearby park area, are analysed. A ceilometer CL31 from Vaisala which is an eye-safe commercial mini-lidar system is applied to detect layering of the lower atmosphere continuously. Special software for this ceilometer with MATLAB provides routine retrievals of lower atmosphere layering from vertical profiles of laser backscatter data. Meteorological data were measured by a ground-based weather station at the measurement site as well as taken from monitoring data archives of the German National Meteorological Service (DWD), which are measured by radiosondes (Oberschleißheim). Correlation analyses are applied to show the coupling of temporal variations of NO, NO2, O3 and HCHO concentrations with temperature, mixing layer height and wind speed. HCHO which is emitted from both anthropogenic and biogenic sources is studied especially.

  1. Long path DOAS measurements of atmospheric pollutants concentration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geiko, Pavel P.; Smirnov, Sergey S.; Samokhvalov, Ignatii V.

    2015-11-01

    A differential optical absorption spectroscopy gas-analyzer consisted of a coaxial telescope, a spectrometer, an analyzer and retroreflector was successfully tested. A high pressure 150-W Xe arc lamp was employed as a light source. In order to record the spectra, a monochrometer with a grating and photodiode array was used. Gas analyzer spectral data bank includes more than 35 moleculas absorbed in UV spectral region. The measured absorption spectra were evaluated by using a least-squares fit to determine the average mixing ratio of each species in the atmosphere. As a result of experiments time series of concentrations of gases polluting the atmosphere were trace measured. Minimally detected concentration on pathlength 480 m is the unit of ppb at the time of accumulation of 2 min. The results of the field test measurements of pollutants in Tomsk city are presented.

  2. 3-DoF MAX-DOAS: A new method for deriving free tropospheric columns of marine trace gases from ground

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coburn, S.; Baidar, S.; Ortega, I.; Sinreich, R.; Volkamer, R.

    2013-12-01

    Current retrievals of Multi-AXis Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (MAX-DOAS) measurements from the surface focus on retrieving boundary layer vertical profiles and vertical column amounts of atmospheric trace gases in the lower atmosphere. We have expanded these retrievals, and combine a high signal-to-noise MAX-DOAS instrument with an in-depth treatment of radiative transfer modeling of the suns movement to show that we can decouple the partial vertical column of trace gases located in the free troposphere from that in the boundary layer. The approach is demonstrated using our long-term (9 months) of MAX-DOAS observations of iodine oxide (IO), bromine oxide (BrO), glyoxal (CHOCHO) and formaldehyde (HCHO) near Pensacola, FL. Boundary layer profiles are derived from measurements at shallow looking elevation angles. In a second inversion we utilize MAX-DOAS angles still containing information above the boundary layer in order to assess total tropospheric columns (up to ~13km). The free tropospheric column is then derived by difference of the total column minus the boundary layer partial column. We apply this technique to several trace gases measured in the coastal marine troposphere including IO, BrO, CHOCHO, and HCHO, and discuss implications of our findings in context with recent aircraft observations by the TORERO project.

  3. FINGERPRINTING INORGANIC ARSENIC AND ORGANOARSENIC COMPOUNDS IN IN SITU OIL SHALE RETORT AND PROCESS VOTERS USING A LIQUID CHROMATOGRAPH COUPLED WITH AN ATOMIC ABSORPTION SPECTROMETER AS A DETECTOR

    SciTech Connect

    Fish, Richard H.; Brinckman, Frederick E.; Jewett, Kenneth L.

    1981-07-01

    Inorganic arsenic and organoarsenic compounds were speciated in seven oil shale retort and process waters, including samples from simulated, true and modified in situ processes, using a high performance liquid chromatograph automatically coupled to a graphite furnace atomic absorption detector. The molecular forms of arsenic at ppm levels (({micro}g/mL) in these waters are identified for the first time, and shown to include arsenate, methylarsonic acid and phenylarsonic acid. An arsenic-specific fingerprint chromatogram of each retort or process water studied has significant impliestions regarding those arsenical species found and those marginally detected, such as dimethylarsinic acid and the suspected carcinogen arsenite. The method demonstrated suggests future means for quantifying environmental impacts of bioactive organometal species involved in oil shale retorting technology.

  4. Lidar reflectance from snow at 2.05  μm wavelength as measured by the JPL Airborne Laser Absorption Spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Spiers, Gary D; Menzies, Robert T; Jacob, Joseph C

    2016-03-10

    We report airborne measurements of lidar directional reflectance (backscatter) from land surfaces at a wavelength in the 2.05 μm CO₂ absorption band, with emphasis on snow-covered surfaces in various natural environments. Lidar backscatter measurements using this instrument provide insight into the capabilities of lidar for both airborne and future global-scale CO₂ measurements from low Earth orbit pertinent to the NASA Active Sensing of CO₂ Emissions over Nights, Days, and Seasons mission. Lidar measurement capability is particularly useful when the use of solar scattering spectroscopy is not feasible for high-accuracy atmospheric CO₂ measurements. Consequently, performance in high-latitude and winter season environments is an emphasis. Snow-covered surfaces are known to be dark in the CO₂ band spectral regions. The quantitative backscatter data from these field measurements help to elucidate the range of backscatter values that can be expected in natural environments.

  5. The Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenslade, Thomas B.

    2012-03-01

    In the fall of 1999 I was shown an Ocean Optics spectrometer-in-the-computer at St. Patricks College at Maynooth, Ireland, and thought that I had seen heaven. Of course, it could not resolve the sodium D-lines (I had done that many years before with a homemade wire diffraction grating ), and I began to realize that inside was some familiar old technology. In this paper I would like to discuss its ancestors.

  6. The Spectrometer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenslade, Thomas B., Jr.

    2012-01-01

    In the fall of 1999 I was shown an Ocean Optics spectrometer-in-the-computer at St. Patricks College at Maynooth, Ireland, and thought that I had seen heaven. Of course, it could not resolve the sodium D-lines (I had done that many years before with a homemade wire diffraction grating), and I began to realize that inside was some familiar old…

  7. Comparison of Semidistributed Multinode TOA-DOA Fusion Localization and GPS-Aided TOA (DOA) Fusion Localization for MANETs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhonghai; Zekavat, Seyed

    2008-12-01

    This paper evaluates the performance of a semidistributed multinode time-of-arrival (TOA) and direction-of-arrival (DOA) fusion localization technique in terms of localization circular error probability (CEP). The localization technique is applicable in mobile ad hoc networks (MANETs) when global positioning system (GPS) is not available (GPS denied environments). The localization CEP of the technique is derived theoretically and verified via simulations. In addition, we theoretically derive the localization CEP of GPS-aided TOA fusion and GPS-aided DOA fusion techniques, which are also applicable in MANETs. Finally, we compare these three localization techniques theoretically and via simulations. The comparison confirms that in moderate scale MANETs, the multinode TOA-DOA fusion localization technique achieves the best performance; while in large scale MANETs, GPS-aided TOA fusion leads to the best performance.

  8. MAX-DOAS measurements of shipping emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seyler, André; Wittrock, Folkard; Kattner, Lisa; Mathieu-Üffing, Barbara; Peters, Enno; Richter, Andreas; Schmolke, Stefan; Theobald, Norbert; Burrows, John P.

    2015-04-01

    Air pollution from ships contributes to overall air quality problems and it has direct health effects on the population in particular in coastal regions, and in harbor cities. In order to reduce the emissions the International Maritime Organisation (IMO) have tightened the regulations for air pollution. E.g. Sulfur Emission Control Areas (SECA) have been introduced where the sulfur content of marine fuel is limited. Recently, on the 1st of January 2015, the allowed sulfur content of marine fuels inside Sulfur Emission Control Areas has been significantly decreased from 1.0% to 0.1%. However, up to now there is no regular monitoring system available to verify that ships are complying with the new regulations. Furthermore measurements of reactive trace gases in marine environments are in general sparse. The project MeSMarT (Measurements of shipping emissions in the marine troposphere, www.mesmart.de) has been established as a cooperation between the University of Bremen and the German Bundesamt für Seeschifffahrt und Hydrographie (Federal Maritime and Hydrographic Agency) with support of the Helmholtz Research Centre Geesthacht to estimate the influence of ship emissions on the chemistry of the atmospheric boundary layer and to establish a monitoring system for main shipping routes. Here we present MAX-DOAS observations of NO2 and SO2 carried out from two permanent sites close to the Elbe river (Wedel, Germany) and on the island Neuwerk close to the mouths of Elbe and Weser river since the year 2013. Mixing ratios of both trace gases have been retrieved using different approaches (pure geometric and taking into account the radiative transfer) and compared to in situ observations (see Kattner et al., Monitoring shipping fuel sulfur content regulations with in-situ measurements of shipping emissions). Furthermore, simple approaches have been used to calculate emission factors of NOx and SO2 for single ships.

  9. Tropospheric nitrogen dioxide column retrieval based on ground-based zenith-sky DOAS observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tack, Frederik; Hendrick, Francois; Goutail, Florence; Fayt, Caroline; Merlaud, Alexis; Pinardi, Gaia; Pommereau, Jean-Pierre; Van Roozendael, Michel

    2014-05-01

    Nitrogen dioxide (NO2) is one of the most important chemically active trace gases in the troposphere. Listed as primary pollutant, it is also a key precursor in the formation of tropospheric ozone, aerosols, and acid rain, and can contribute locally to radiative forcing. The long-term monitoring of this species is therefore of great relevance. Here we present a new method to retrieve tropospheric NO2 vertical column amounts from ground-based zenith-sky measurements of scattered sunlight. It is based on a four-step approach consisting of (1) the DOAS analysis of zenith radiance spectra using a fixed reference spectrum corresponding to low tropospheric NO2 content, (2) the determination of the residual amount in the reference spectrum using a Langley-plot-type method, (3) the removal of the stratospheric content from the daytime total slant column using stratospheric vertical columns measured at twilight and simulated stratospheric NO2 diurnal variation, (4) estimation of the tropospheric vertical columns by dividing the resulting tropospheric slant columns by appropriate air mass factors. The retrieval algorithm is tested on a 2 month dataset acquired from June to July 2009 by the BIRA MAX-DOAS instrument in the framework of the Cabauw (51.97° N, 4.93° E) Intercomparison campaign for Nitrogen Dioxide measuring Instruments (CINDI). The tropospheric vertical column amounts derived from zenith-sky observations are compared to the vertical columns retrieved from the off-axis and direct-sun measurements of the same MAX-DOAS instrument as well as to data of a co-located SAOZ (Système d'Analyse par Observations Zénithales) spectrometer operated by LATMOS. First results show a good agreement between the different data sets with correlation coefficients and slopes close to or larger than 0.85. We observe that the main error sources arise from the uncertainties in the determination of the residual NO2 amount in the reference spectrum, the stratospheric NO2 abundance and

  10. Infrared absorption of methanethiol clusters (CH3SH)n, n = 2-5, recorded with a time-of-flight mass spectrometer using IR depletion and VUV ionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Lung; Han, Hui-Ling; Lee, Yuan-Pern

    2012-12-01

    We investigated IR spectra in the CH- and SH-stretching regions of size-selected methanethiol clusters, (CH3SH)n with n = 2-5, in a pulsed supersonic jet using infrared (IR)-vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) ionization. VUV emission at 132.50 nm served as the source of ionization in a time-of-flight mass spectrometer. Clusters were dissociated with light from a tunable IR laser before ionization. The variations in intensity of methanethiol cluster ions (CH3SH)n+ were monitored as the IR laser light was tuned across the range 2470-3100 cm-1. In the SH-stretching region, the spectrum of (CH3SH)2 shows a weak band near 2601 cm-1, red-shifted only 7 cm-1 from that of the monomer. In contrast, all spectra of (CH3SH)n, n = 3-5, show a broad band near 2567 cm-1 with much greater intensity. In the CH-stretching region, absorption bands of (CH3SH)2 are located near 2865, 2890, 2944, and 3010 cm-1, red-shifted by 3-5 cm-1 from those of CH3SH. These red shifts increase slightly for larger clusters and bands near 2856, 2884, 2938, and 3005 cm-1 were observed for (CH3SH)5. These spectral results indicate that the S-H...S hydrogen bond plays an important role in clusters with n = 3-5, but not in (CH3SH)2, in agreement with theoretical predictions. The absence of a band near 2608 cm-1 that corresponds to absorption of the non-hydrogen-bonded SH moiety and the large width of observed feature near 2567 cm-1 indicate that the dominant stable structures of (CH3SH)n, n = 3-5, have a cyclic hydrogen-bonded framework.

  11. Infrared absorption of methanethiol clusters (CH3SH)n, n = 2-5, recorded with a time-of-flight mass spectrometer using IR depletion and VUV ionization.

    PubMed

    Fu, Lung; Han, Hui-Ling; Lee, Yuan-Pern

    2012-12-21

    We investigated IR spectra in the CH- and SH-stretching regions of size-selected methanethiol clusters, (CH(3)SH)(n) with n = 2-5, in a pulsed supersonic jet using infrared (IR)-vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) ionization. VUV emission at 132.50 nm served as the source of ionization in a time-of-flight mass spectrometer. Clusters were dissociated with light from a tunable IR laser before ionization. The variations in intensity of methanethiol cluster ions (CH(3)SH)(n)(+) were monitored as the IR laser light was tuned across the range 2470-3100 cm(-1). In the SH-stretching region, the spectrum of (CH(3)SH)(2) shows a weak band near 2601 cm(-1), red-shifted only 7 cm(-1) from that of the monomer. In contrast, all spectra of (CH(3)SH)(n), n = 3-5, show a broad band near 2567 cm(-1) with much greater intensity. In the CH-stretching region, absorption bands of (CH(3)SH)(2) are located near 2865, 2890, 2944, and 3010 cm(-1), red-shifted by 3-5 cm(-1) from those of CH(3)SH. These red shifts increase slightly for larger clusters and bands near 2856, 2884, 2938, and 3005 cm(-1) were observed for (CH(3)SH)(5). These spectral results indicate that the S-H[middle dot][middle dot][middle dot]S hydrogen bond plays an important role in clusters with n = 3-5, but not in (CH(3)SH)(2), in agreement with theoretical predictions. The absence of a band near 2608 cm(-1) that corresponds to absorption of the non-hydrogen-bonded SH moiety and the large width of observed feature near 2567 cm(-1) indicate that the dominant stable structures of (CH(3)SH)(n), n = 3-5, have a cyclic hydrogen-bonded framework.

  12. MASS SPECTROMETER

    DOEpatents

    White, F.A.

    1960-08-23

    A mass spectrometer is designed with a first adjustable magnetic field for resolving an ion beam into beams of selected masses, a second adjustable magnetic field for further resolving the ion beam from the first field into beams of selected masses, a thin foil disposed in the path of the beam between the first and second magnets to dissociate molecular ions incident thereon, an electrostatic field for further resolving the ion beam from the second field into beams of selected masses, and a detector disposed adjacent to the electrostatic field to receive the ion beam.

  13. Measurements of formaldehyde total content in troposphere using DOAS technique in Moscow Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borovski, A. N.; Dzhola, A. V.; Grechko, E. I.; Postylyakov, O. V.; Ivanov, V. A.; Kanaya, Y.

    2015-11-01

    Formaldehyde (HCHO) in the atmosphere is a product of oxidation of methane and other volatile organic compounds (VOCs), and so its content is an important index of air pollution by VOCs. HCHO has strong absorption cross-section in the UV spectral region and, hence, HCHO vertical column density (VCD) can be measured by remote optical methods including differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS). Spectral measurements of scattered solar radiation are performed at Zvenigorod Scientific Station (ZSS, 55°41'49''N, 36°46'29''E) located in 38 km west from Moscow Ring Road by MAX-DOAS instrument since 2008. For analysis of the HCHO variability we selected spectra taken in cloud free conditions. Version 1.2 of retrieval algorithm is used. It uses information on the surface albedo and the height of the atmospheric boundary layer inferred from a model. Data screening using color index was implemented. The obtained data quantify the Moscow megapolis influence on air quality at Zvenigorod by comparison of HCHO VCD for east and west wind directions. HCHO VCD for east winds is grater one for west winds for 0.5×1016 mol×cm-2 in average. Strong dependence of HCHO VCD on air temperature is noticeable in our data for air temperatures from +5 to +35°C. In different conditions of the atmosphere gradient of the temperature effect is about 1.1-1.2×1015 mol×cm-2×°C-1. The increase of the formaldehyde content with the increase of the air temperature can be caused by the HCHO formation from non-methane biogenic volatile organic compounds for which more emission is expected at higher temperatures.

  14. Azimuth DOA Estimation in Y-bend Antenna Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanudin, R.

    2016-11-01

    In smart antenna system, it is extremely crucial to estimate the direction of incoming signals in order to achieve better reception. Reliability of DOA estimation depends on several factors such as the choice of DOA algorithm, size of antenna array as well as array geometry. Therefore, it is particularly desirable to have a configuration of antenna array that could produce an accurate azimuth estimation. In this work, a new planar array is proposed to address the problem of azimuth estimation. This is achieved by having a flexible element position on the x- y plane that improves the steering vector, hence significantly enhances the accuracy of DOA estimation. Besides, a fair distribution of the antenna elements on the x-y plane also helps to eliminates estimation failure in the azimuth range between 240° and 360°. A comparison study between the proposed array and V-shape array is performed in order to gauge the performance of the proposed array in DOA estimation. Simulation results show that the proposed array has acquired better estimation resolution than V-shape array. On top of that, the proposed array has reduced estimation error in V-shape array. It is concluded that the proposed array has shown potential as an excellent choice of antenna array geometry for smart antenna system.

  15. Mini MAX-DOAS Measurements of Air Pollutants over China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staadt, Steffen; Hao, Nan; Trautmann, Thomas

    2016-08-01

    This study continues the work of Clémer et al., (2010) and is aimed to improve trace gas retrievals with mini MAX-DOAS measurements in Nanjing. Based on that work, aerosol extinction vertical profiles are retrieved using the bePRO inversion algorithm developed by the Royal Belgian Institute for Space Aeronomy (BIRA- IASB). Afterwards, the tropospheric trace gas vertical profiles and vertical column densities (VCDs) are retrieved by applying the optimal estimation method to the O4 MAX-DOAS measurements. The Profiles for N O2 , S O2 , glyoxal, formaldehyde and nitrous acid are obtained with different results and different settings for the DOAS measurement. The AODs show small positive correlation against the AERONET values. For NO2, the retrieval shows reasonable concentrations in winter as opposed to summer and has small positive correlations with GOME-2 data. The SO2 VCDs are not correlated with the GOME-2 data, due to high uncertainties from MAX-DOAS and satellite retrievals, while the vertical mixing ratios (VMR) show good agreement with in-situ data (SORPES) at Nanjing. Nitrous acid shows a maximum in winter and a minimum in summer, while glyoxal has its maximum in August and September.

  16. Observation of phycoerythrin-containing cyanobacteria and other phytoplankton groups from space using Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy on SCIAMACHY data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bracher, Astrid; Dinter, Tilman; Burrows, John P.; Vountas, Marco; Röttgers, Rüdiger; Peeken, Ilka

    In order to understand the marine phytoplankton's role in the global marine ecosystem and biogeochemical cycles it is necessary to derive global information on the distribution of major functional phytoplankton types (PFT) in the world oceans. In our study we use instead of the common ocean color sensors such as CZCS, SeaWiFS, MODIS, MERIS, with rather low spectral resolution, the Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (DOAS) to study the retrieval of phytoplankton distribution and absorption with the satellite sensor Scanning Imaging Absorption Spectrometer for Atmospheric Chartography (SCIAMACHY). SCIAMACHY measures back scattered solar radiation in the UV-Vis-NIR spectral region with a high spectral resolution (0.2 to 1.5 nm). We used in-situ measured phytoplankton absorption spectra from two different RV Polarstern expeditions where different phytoplankton groups were representing or dominating the phytoplankton composition in order to identify these characteristic absorption spectra in SCIAMACHY data in the range of 430 to 500 nm and also to identify absorption from cyanobacterial photosynthetic pigment phycoerythrin. Our results show clearly these absorptions in the SCIAMACHY data. The conversion of these differential absorptions by including the information of the light penetration depth (according to Vountas et al., Ocean Science, 2007) globally distributed pigment concentrations for these characteristic phytoplankton groups for two monthly periods (Feb-March 2004, Oct-Nov 2005 and Oct-Nov 2007) are derived. The satellite retrieved information on cyanobacteria (Synechococcus sp. and Prochlorococcus sp.) and diatoms distribution matches well with the concentration measured from collocated water samples with HPLC technique and also to global model analysis with the NASA Ocean Biogeochemical Model (NOBM from http://reason.gsfc.nasa.gov/OPS/Giovanni/) according to Gregg and Casey 2006 and Gregg 2006. Results are of great importance for global modelling of

  17. Measurements of stable isotope ratios ({sup 13}CH{sub 4}/{sup 12}CH{sub 4}; {sup 12}CH{sub 3}/{sup 12}CH{sub 3}) in landfill methane using a tunable diode laser absorption spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Bergmaschi, P.; Harris, G.W.

    1995-12-01

    Experiments were conducted to measure variations in the isotopic composition of methane (CH{sub 4}) produced by a municipal solid waste landfill in Germany. A tunable diode laser absorption spectrometer was used to determine isotopic ratios of {sup 13}CH{sub 4}/{sup 12}CH{sub 4} and {sup 12}CH{sub 3}D/{sup 12}CH{sub 4} in biogas samples taken directly from various branches of the gas collection system. The {delta}{sup 13} values for CH{sub 4} showed very small variations; however, the {delta}{sup 13} values for carbon dioxide C0{sub 2} were substantially larger. The {delta}D values of CH{sub 4} exhibited variations corresponding to samples taken from sections filled at different time periods. Oxygen consumption was correlated with the {delta}{sup 13}C and {delta}D of CH{sub 4} and the {delta}{sup 13}C of CO{sub 2} consistent with partial bacterial oxidation of methane. A negative correlation between {delta}D and {delta}{sup 13}C(CH{sub 4}) and between {delta}{sup 13}C(CO{sub 2}) and {delta}{sup 13}C(CH{sub 4}) in samples showing no oxidation was attributed to slightly varying contributions of CO{sub 2} reduction and acetate fermentation. 22 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  18. Galileo Ultraviolet Spectrometer experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hord, C. W.; Mcclintock, W. E.; Stewart, A. I. F.; Barth, C. A.; Esposito, L. W.; Thomas, G. E.; Sandel, B. R.; Hunten, D. M.; Broadfoot, A. L.; Shemansky, D. E.

    1992-01-01

    The Galileo ultraviolet spectrometer experiment uses data obtained by the Ultraviolet Spectrometer (UVS) mounted on the pointed orbiter scan platform and from the Extreme Ultraviolet Spectrometer (EUVS) mounted on the spinning part of the orbiter with the field of view perpendicular to the spin axis. The UVS is a Ebert-Fastie design that covers the range 113-432 nm with a wavelength resolution of 0.7 nm below 190 and 1.3 nm at longer wavelengths. The UVS spatial resolution is 0.4 deg x 0.1 deg for illuminated disk observations and 1 deg x 0.1 deg for limb geometries. The EUVS is a Voyager design objective grating spectrometer, modified to cover the wavelength range from 54 to 128 nm with wavelength resolution 3.5 nm for extended sources and 1.5 nm for point sources and spatial resolution of 0.87 deg x 0.17 deg. The EUVS instrument will follow up on the many Voyager UVS discoveries, particularly the sulfur and oxygen ion emissions in the Io torus and molecular and atomic hydrogen auroral and airglow emissions from Jupiter. The UVS will obtain spectra of emission, absorption, and scattering features in the unexplored, by spacecraft, 170-432 nm wavelength region. The UVS and EUVS instruments will provide a powerful instrument complement to investigate volatile escape and surface composition of the Galilean satellites, the Io plasma torus, micro- and macro-properties of the Jupiter clouds, and the composition structure and evolution of the Jupiter upper atmosphere.

  19. Vertical Profiles of SO2 and NO2 in the Alberta Oil Sands: MAX-DOAS Measurements and Comparison to in-situ Instrumentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Zoe; Lobo, Akshay; McLaren, Robert

    2015-04-01

    Understanding the levels of industrially emitted gas pollutants in the Alberta oil sands is essential to making quality environmental management decisions but is currently limited due to scarcity of top-down quantification studies. Multi-Axis Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (MAX-DOAS) measurements of nitrogen dioxide (NO2) and sulfur dioxide (SO2) , important tropospheric trace gas pollutants, contributes to improved knowledge of these pollutants' levels, vertical distributions and chemical transformations. A mini-MAX-DOAS instrument measured spectra at multiple viewing elevation angles in order to retrieve NO2 and SO2 differential slant column densities (dSCDs) at an Environment Canada research site north of Fort McMurray, Alberta in the fall of 2013. For the first time in the oil sands, tropospheric vertical profiles of NO2 and SO2 were retrieved by applying the optimal estimation technique to the MAX-DOAS measurements. The DOAS fit retrievals of SO2 dSCDs were validated by comparison with retrievals obtained with a quartz calibration cell with known SO2 SCD placed in front of the MAX-DOAS telescope at multiple elevation angles on a clean day. Retrieved SO2 dSCDs varied significantly from the true value depending on the chosen wavelength fitting interval. At the lowest wavelength intervals, interference by stray light and O3 differential structures significantly reduced dSCDs and caused an elevation angle dependence. These results indicate that MAX-DOAS dSCD retrieval settings, particularly for weak absorbers with differential absorption structures in low-intensity spectral regions, must be chosen carefully in order to achieve the most accurate results. Tropospheric vertical column densities (VCDs) and vertical profile retrievals of NO2, SO2 and aerosol extinction during significant pollution events will be illustrated. Trace gas vertical profiles exhibited significant variability between days and at different times of day and were often spatially

  20. A Low-Complexity ESPRIT-Based DOA Estimation Method for Co-Prime Linear Arrays

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Fenggang; Gao, Bin; Chen, Lizhen; Lan, Peng

    2016-01-01

    The problem of direction-of-arrival (DOA) estimation is investigated for co-prime array, where the co-prime array consists of two uniform sparse linear subarrays with extended inter-element spacing. For each sparse subarray, true DOAs are mapped into several equivalent angles impinging on the traditional uniform linear array with half-wavelength spacing. Then, by applying the estimation of signal parameters via rotational invariance technique (ESPRIT), the equivalent DOAs are estimated, and the candidate DOAs are recovered according to the relationship among equivalent and true DOAs. Finally, the true DOAs are estimated by combining the results of the two subarrays. The proposed method achieves a better complexity–performance tradeoff as compared to other existing methods. PMID:27571079

  1. Evaluation of tropospheric SO2 retrieved from MAX-DOAS measurements in Xianghe, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, T.; Hendrick, F.; Wang, P.; Tang, G.; Clémer, K.; Yu, H.; Fayt, C.; Hermans, C.; Gielen, C.; Müller, J.-F.; Pinardi, G.; Theys, N.; Brenot, H.; Van Roozendael, M.

    2014-10-01

    Ground-based multi-axis differential optical absorption spectroscopy (MAX-DOAS) measurements of sulfur dioxide (SO2) have been performed at the Xianghe station (39.8° N, 117.0° E) located at ~ 50 km southeast of Beijing from March 2010 to February 2013. Tropospheric SO2 vertical profiles and corresponding vertical column densities (VCDs), retrieved by applying the optimal estimation method to the MAX-DOAS observations, have been used to study the seasonal and diurnal cycles of SO2, in combination with correlative measurements from in situ instruments, as well as meteorological data. A marked seasonality was observed in both SO2 VCD and surface concentration, with a maximum in winter (February) and a minimum in summer (July). This can be explained by the larger emissions in winter due to the domestic heating and, in case of surface concentration, by more favorable meteorological conditions for the accumulation of SO2 close to the ground during this period. Wind speed and direction are also found to be two key factors in controlling the level of the SO2-related pollution at Xianghe. In the case of east or southwest wind, the SO2 concentration does not change significantly with the wind speed, since the city of Tangshan and heavy polluting industries are located to the east and southwest of the station, respectively. In contrast, when wind comes from other directions, the stronger the wind, the less SO2 is observed due to a more effective dispersion. Regarding the diurnal cycle, the SO2 amount is larger in the early morning and late evening and lower at noon, in line with the diurnal variation of pollutant emissions and atmospheric stability. A strong correlation with correlation coefficients between 0.6 and 0.9 is also found between SO2 and aerosols in winter, suggesting that anthropogenic SO2, through the formation of sulfate aerosols, contributes significantly to the total aerosol content during this season. The observed diurnal cycles of MAX-DOAS SO2 surface

  2. Study of the CH2I + O2 Reaction with a Step-Scan Fourier-Transform Infrared Absorption Spectrometer: Spectra of the Criegee Intermediate CH2OO and DIOXIRANE(?)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yu-Hsuan; Lee, Yuan-Pern

    2014-06-01

    The Criegee intermediates are carbonyl oxides that play key roles in ozonolysis of unsaturated organic compounds. This mechanism was first proposed by Criegee in 1949, but the first direct observation of the simplest Criegee intermediate CH2OO in the gaseous phase has been reported only recently using photoionization mass spectrometry. Our group has reported the low-resolution IR spectra of CH2OO, produced from the reaction of CH2I + O2, with a second-generation step-scan Fourier-transfom IR absorption spectrometer. The spectral assignments were based on comparison of observed vibrational wavenumbers and rotational contours with theoretical predictions. Here, we report the IR absorption spectra of CH2OO at a resolution of 0.32 wn, showing partially rotationally-resolved structures. The origins of the νb{3}, νb{4}, νb{6}, and νb{8} vibrational modes of CH2OO are determined to be 1434.1, 1285.7, 909.2, and 847.3 wn, respectively. With the analysis of the vibration-rotational spectra, we provide a definitive assignment of these bands to CH2OO. The observed vibrational wavenumbers indicate a zwitterionic contribution to this singlet biradical showing a strengthened C-O bond and a weakened O-O bond. This zwitterionic character results to an extremely rapid self reaction via a cyclic dimer to form 2H2CO + O2 (1Δg). Another group of weak transient IR bands centered at 1231.5, 1213.3, and 899.8 wn are also observed. These bands might be contributed from dioxirane, which was postulated to be another important intermediate that might be isomerized from the Criegee intermediate in the reaction of O3 with 1-alkenes. O. Welz, J. D. Savee, D. L. Osborn, S. S.Vasu, C. J. Percival, D. E. Shallcross, and C. A. Taatjes, Science 335, 204 (2012). Y.-T. Su, Y.-H. Huang, H. A.Witek, and Y.-P. Lee, Science 340, 174 (2013).

  3. Tracing of recently assimilated carbon in respiration at high temporal resolution in the field with a tuneable diode laser absorption spectrometer after in situ 13CO2 pulse labelling of 20-year-old beech trees.

    PubMed

    Plain, Caroline; Gerant, Dominique; Maillard, Pascale; Dannoura, Masako; Dong, Yanwen; Zeller, Bernd; Priault, Pierrick; Parent, Florian; Epron, Daniel

    2009-11-01

    The study of the fate of assimilated carbon in respiratory fluxes in the field is needed to resolve the residence and transfer times of carbon in the atmosphere-plant-soil system in forest ecosystems, but it requires high frequency measurements of the isotopic composition of evolved CO2. We developed a closed transparent chamber to label the whole crown of a tree and a labelling system capable of delivering a 3-h pulse of 99% 13CO2 in the field. The isotopic compositions of trunk and soil CO2 effluxes were recorded continuously on two labelled and one control trees by a tuneable diode laser absorption spectrometer during a 2-month chase period following the late summer labelling. The lag times for trunk CO2 effluxes are consistent with a phloem sap velocity of about 1 m h(-1). The isotopic composition (delta13C) of CO2 efflux from the trunk was maximal 2-3 days after labelling and declined thereafter following two exponential decays with a half-life of 2-8 days for the first and a half-life of 15-16 days for the second. The isotopic composition of the soil CO2 efflux was maximal 3-4 days after labelling and the decline was also well fitted with a sum of two exponential functions with a half-life of 3-5 days for the first exponential and a half-life of 16-18 days for the second. The amount of label recovered in CO2 efflux was around 10-15% of the assimilated 13CO2 for soil and 5-13% for trunks. As labelling occurred late in the growing season, substantial allocation to storage is expected.

  4. Evaluation of vessel emissions in a lagoon area with ground based Multi axis DOAS measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Premuda, Margherita; Masieri, Samuele; Bortoli, Daniele; Kostadinov, Ivan; Petritoli, Andrea; Giovanelli, Giorgio

    2011-09-01

    The environmental impact of large vessel exhaust gases on port and coastal areas is a subject of great interest due both to increasing maritime traffic and the vicinity to highly populated urban zones. In lagoon cities the pollution from maritime traffic is greater than in other coastal areas. Therefore monitoring and evaluation of pollutants produced by ships navigating through the principal transport channels become necessary. In the case of Venice, the Giudecca Channel, crossing the city centre, is used both by urban maritime traffic and by large vessels docking in the port. In this work, the FRE-DOAS (Flow Rate Emission with Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy) methodology developed to evaluate gaseous pollutant flow rates from moving sources is presented. This methodology is applied to a set of spectral measurements performed with a Multi axis DOAS remote sensing system, allowing a determination of vessel emissions and evaluation of their impact on pollution in Venice. Two one-month measurement campaigns were carried out: from June 12 2007 to July 12 2007 and from September 12 2007 to October 12 2007. The individual flow rates released by large and medium-sized vessels and the total flow rate emissions due to the total traffic along the Giudecca Channel for every day with appropriate meteo conditions during the campaigns are estimated. The average daily mass of gas emitted by large and medium-sized ships during their passage through the Channel was evaluated as about 205 kg for SO 2 and 284 kg for NO 2. These values make up only about 30% of total daily traffic emission. These results are extremely interesting, because they demonstrate inequivocably the effectiveness of the proposed system for remote measurements, opening a new frontier in maritime traffic emission control in harbour areas or in those coastal zones subject to heavy maritime traffic. Moreover, the low values obtained for some large modern cruise ships indicate the use of Low Sulphur

  5. DOAS measurements of NO2 from an ultralight aircraft during the Earth Challenge expedition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merlaud, A.; van Roozendael, M.; van Gent, J.; Fayt, C.; Maes, J.; Toledo, X.; Ronveaux, O.; de Mazière, M.

    2012-02-01

    We report on airborne Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (DOAS) measurements of NO2 tropospheric columns above South Asia, Arabic peninsula, North Africa, and Italy in November and December 2009. The DOAS instrument was installed on an ultralight aircraft involved in the Earth Challenge project, an expedition of seven pilots flying on four ultralight aircraft between Australia and Belgium. The instrument recorded spectra in limb geometry with a large field-of-view, a set-up which provides a high sensitivity to the boundary layer NO2 while minimizing the uncertainties related to the attitude variations. We compare our measurements with OMI and GOME-2 tropospheric NO2 products when the latter are available. Above Rajasthan and the Po Valley, two areas where the NO2 field is homogeneous, data sets agree very well. Our measurements in this areas are respectively 0.1 ± 0.1 to 2.8 ± 1 × 1015 molec cm-2 and 2.5 ± 0.5 × 1016 molec cm-2. Flying downwind of Riyadh, our NO2 measurements show with a higher spatial resolution than OMI the structure of the megacities'exhaust plume. Moreover, our measurements indicate larger columns (up to 70%) than the one seen by satellites. We also derived tropopsheric columns when no satellite data was available, if it was possible to get information on the visibility from satellite measurements of aerosol optical thickness. The maximum column we measured was above Benghazi, with 5.7 ± 2 × 1016 molec cm-2. This experiment also provides a confirmation for the recent finding of a soil signature above desert.

  6. DOAS measurements of NO2 from an ultralight aircraft during the Earth Challenge expedition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merlaud, A.; Van Roozendael, M.; van Gent, J.; Fayt, C.; Maes, J.; Toledo-Fuentes, X.; Ronveaux, O.; De Mazière, M.

    2012-08-01

    We report on airborne Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (DOAS) measurements of NO2 tropospheric columns above South Asia, the Arabic peninsula, North Africa, and Italy in November and December 2009. The DOAS instrument was installed on an ultralight aircraft involved in the Earth Challenge project, an expedition of seven pilots flying on four ultralight aircraft between Australia and Belgium. The instrument recorded spectra in limb geometry with a large field of view, a set-up which provides a high sensitivity to the boundary layer NO2 while minimizing the uncertainties related to the attitude variations. We compare our measurements with OMI (Ozone Monitoring Instrument) and GOME-2 (Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment 2) tropospheric NO2 products when the latter are available. Above Rajasthan and the Po Valley, two areas where the NO2 field is homogeneous, data sets agree very well. Our measurements in these areas are 0.1 ± 0.1 to 3 ± 1 × 1015 molec cm-2 and 2.6 ± 0.8 × 1016 molec cm-2, respectively. Flying downwind of Riyadh, our NO2 measurements show the structure of the megacity's exhaust plume with a higher spatial resolution than OMI. Moreover, our measurements are larger (up to 40%) than those seen by satellites. We also derived tropospheric columns when no satellite data were available if it was possible to get information on the visibility from satellite measurements of aerosol optical thickness. This experiment also provides a confirmation for the recent finding of a soil signature above desert.

  7. Sparse Bayesian Learning for DOA Estimation with Mutual Coupling

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Jisheng; Hu, Nan; Xu, Weichao; Chang, Chunqi

    2015-01-01

    Sparse Bayesian learning (SBL) has given renewed interest to the problem of direction-of-arrival (DOA) estimation. It is generally assumed that the measurement matrix in SBL is precisely known. Unfortunately, this assumption may be invalid in practice due to the imperfect manifold caused by unknown or misspecified mutual coupling. This paper describes a modified SBL method for joint estimation of DOAs and mutual coupling coefficients with uniform linear arrays (ULAs). Unlike the existing method that only uses stationary priors, our new approach utilizes a hierarchical form of the Student t prior to enforce the sparsity of the unknown signal more heavily. We also provide a distinct Bayesian inference for the expectation-maximization (EM) algorithm, which can update the mutual coupling coefficients more efficiently. Another difference is that our method uses an additional singular value decomposition (SVD) to reduce the computational complexity of the signal reconstruction process and the sensitivity to the measurement noise. PMID:26501284

  8. Root Sparse Bayesian Learning for Off-Grid DOA Estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Jisheng; Bao, Xu; Xu, Weichao; Chang, Chunqi

    2017-01-01

    The performance of the existing sparse Bayesian learning (SBL) methods for off-gird DOA estimation is dependent on the trade off between the accuracy and the computational workload. To speed up the off-grid SBL method while remain a reasonable accuracy, this letter describes a computationally efficient root SBL method for off-grid DOA estimation, where a coarse refinable grid, whose sampled locations are viewed as the adjustable parameters, is adopted. We utilize an expectation-maximization (EM) algorithm to iteratively refine this coarse grid, and illustrate that each updated grid point can be simply achieved by the root of a certain polynomial. Simulation results demonstrate that the computational complexity is significantly reduced and the modeling error can be almost eliminated.

  9. Bolometers as particle spectrometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stroke, H. H.; Artzner, G.; Coron, N.; Dambier, G.; Hansen, P. G.

    1986-02-01

    A spectrometer based on low-temperature calorimetry has been under development since 1983. The present detector, capable of recording individual alpha and beta particles and X-ray photons, is based on a composite diamond-germanium bolometer. The advantage of a composite bolometer is that it separates the absorption and detection functions. Diamond, as an absorber, is of particular advantage because of its low heat capacity and high thermal diffusivity. The goal is a theoretical energy resolution of a few eV at 0.1 K. Initial experiments at 1.3 K and 0.9 K, which give resolutions in the keV range, are still noise-limited. High-resolution applications, such as in X-ray astronomy and nuclear physics (in particular, neutron mass measurements) are foreseen.

  10. Analysis of DOA estimation spatial resolution using MUSIC algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Yue; Wang, Hongyuan; Luo, Bin

    2005-11-01

    This paper presents a performance analysis of the spatial resolution of the direction of arrival (DOA) estimates attained by the multiple signal classification (MUSIC) algorithm for uncorrelated sources. The confidence interval of estimation angle which is much more intuitionistic will be considered as the new evaluation standard for the spatial resolution. Then, based on the statistic method, the qualitative analysis reveals the factors influencing the performance of the MUSIC algorithm. At last, quantitative simulations prove the theoretical analysis result exactly.

  11. Ozone distributions over southern Lake Michigan: comparisons between ferry-based observations, shoreline-based DOAS observations and model forecasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cleary, P. A.; Fuhrman, N.; Schulz, L.; Schafer, J.; Fillingham, J.; Bootsma, H.; McQueen, J.; Tang, Y.; Langel, T.; McKeen, S.; Williams, E. J.; Brown, S. S.

    2015-05-01

    Air quality forecast models typically predict large summertime ozone abundances over water relative to land in the Great Lakes region. While each state bordering Lake Michigan has dedicated monitoring systems, offshore measurements have been sparse, mainly executed through specific short-term campaigns. This study examines ozone abundances over Lake Michigan as measured on the Lake Express ferry, by shoreline differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS) observations in southeastern Wisconsin and as predicted by the Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) model. From 2008 to 2009 measurements of O3, SO2, NO2 and formaldehyde were made in the summertime by DOAS at a shoreline site in Kenosha, WI. From 2008 to 2010 measurements of ambient ozone were conducted on the Lake Express, a high-speed ferry that travels between Milwaukee, WI, and Muskegon, MI, up to six times daily from spring to fall. Ferry ozone observations over Lake Michigan were an average of 3.8 ppb higher than those measured at shoreline in Kenosha, with little dependence on position of the ferry or temperature and with greatest differences during evening and night. Concurrent 1-48 h forecasts from the CMAQ model in the upper Midwestern region surrounding Lake Michigan were compared to ferry ozone measurements, shoreline DOAS measurements and Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) station measurements. The bias of the model O3 forecast was computed and evaluated with respect to ferry-based measurements. Trends in the bias with respect to location and time of day were explored showing non-uniformity in model bias over the lake. Model ozone bias was consistently high over the lake in comparison to land-based measurements, with highest biases for 25-48 h after initialization.

  12. Ultra Compact Imaging Spectrometer (UCIS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blaney, Diana L.; Green, Robert; Mouroulis, Pantazis; Cable, Morgan; Ehlmann, Bethany; Haag, Justin; Lamborn, Andrew; McKinley, Ian; Rodriguez, Jose; van Gorp, Byron

    2016-10-01

    The Ultra Compact Imaging Spectrometer (UCIS) is a modular visible to short wavelength infrared imaging spectrometer architecture which could be adapted to a variety of mission concepts requiring low mass and low power. Imaging spectroscopy is an established technique to address complex questions of geologic evolution by mapping diagnostic absorption features due to minerals, organics, and volatiles throughout our solar system. At the core of UCIS is an Offner imaging spectrometer using M3 heritage and a miniature pulse tube cryo-cooler developed under the NASA Maturation of Instruments for Solar System Exploration (MatISSE) program to cool the focal plane array. The TRL 6 integrated spectrometer and cryo-cooler provide a basic imaging spectrometer capability that is used with a variety of fore optics to address lunar, mars, and small body science goals. Potential configurations include: remote sensing from small orbiters and flyby spacecraft; in situ panoramic imaging spectroscopy; and in situ micro-spectroscopy. A micro-spectroscopy front end is being developed using MatISSE funding with integration and testing planned this summer.

  13. A Channelization-Based DOA Estimation Method for Wideband Signals

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Rui; Zhang, Yue; Lin, Qianqiang; Chen, Zengping

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a novel direction of arrival (DOA) estimation method for wideband signals with sensor arrays. The proposed method splits the wideband array output into multiple frequency sub-channels and estimates the signal parameters using a digital channelization receiver. Based on the output sub-channels, a channelization-based incoherent signal subspace method (Channelization-ISM) and a channelization-based test of orthogonality of projected subspaces method (Channelization-TOPS) are proposed. Channelization-ISM applies narrowband signal subspace methods on each sub-channel independently. Then the arithmetic mean or geometric mean of the estimated DOAs from each sub-channel gives the final result. Channelization-TOPS measures the orthogonality between the signal and the noise subspaces of the output sub-channels to estimate DOAs. The proposed channelization-based method isolates signals in different bandwidths reasonably and improves the output SNR. It outperforms the conventional ISM and TOPS methods on estimation accuracy and dynamic range, especially in real environments. Besides, the parallel processing architecture makes it easy to implement on hardware. A wideband digital array radar (DAR) using direct wideband radio frequency (RF) digitization is presented. Experiments carried out in a microwave anechoic chamber with the wideband DAR are presented to demonstrate the performance. The results verify the effectiveness of the proposed method. PMID:27384566

  14. Inter-Comparison of Nitrogen Dioxide Column Densities Retrieved by Ground-Based Max-Doas Under Different Instrumental Conditions Over Mainz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruchkouski, I.; Dziomin, V.; Ortega, I.; Volkamer, R.; Krasouski, A.

    2013-12-01

    This study is dedicated to the instrumental differences between ground-based MAX-DOAS measurement devices. Our MAX-DOAS instrument, which has been developed at the National Ozone Monitoring Research & Education Center of the Belarusian State University for the purpose of nitrogen dioxide and other atmospheric trace gases monitoring over Belarus, features a rotating mirror and a telescope directly connected to the spectrometer with a two-dimensional CCD detector. Using a mirror instead of an optical fibre makes it possible to change the field of view of the telescope, and the whole instrument is rather compact and all its components are placed outdoors in the open air. However, this makes it quite difficult to ensure a top-quality thermostabilization. In the course of the MAX-DOAS campaign, which took place in the Max Planck Institute for Chemistry in Mainz, Germany in summer of 2013, we had a great opportunity to compare our instrument with other devices of different types. In the present study we make a comparison of nitrogen dioxide slant column densities (SCDs) during several days obtained by our instrument with that measured by the device from the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Colorado (Boulder), which has a thermostabilization level of about 0.01 degrees Celsius. We investigate the influence of the spectrometer parts thermostabilization on nitrogen dioxide SCDs retrieval. Furthermore, it was possible to modify the telescope field of view for our instrument from 0.005 to 1.3 degrees, so we performed nitrogen dioxide SCDs retrieval for different fields of view at the same angle of elevation. We analyze these measurement results and obtain an optimal field of view with the aim to achieve the highest possible signal to noise ratio.

  15. Development and characterization of the CU ground MAX-DOAS instrument: lowering RMS noise and first measurements of BrO, IO, and CHOCHO near Pensacola, FL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coburn, S.; Dix, B.; Sinreich, R.; Volkamer, R.

    2011-01-01

    We designed and assembled the University of Colorado Ground Multi AXis Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (CU GMAX-DOAS) instrument to retrieve bromine oxide (BrO), iodine oxide (IO), formaldehyde (HCHO), glyoxal (CHOCHO), nitrogen dioxide (NO2) and the oxygen dimer O4 in the coastal atmosphere of the Gulf of Mexico. The detection sensitivity of DOAS measurements is directly proportional to the root mean square (RMS) of the residual spectrum that remains after all absorbers have been subtracted. Here we describe the CU GMAX-DOAS instrument and demonstrate that the hardware is capable of attaining RMS values of ~6 × 10-6 without apparent limitations other than photon shot noise. Laboratory tests revealed two factors that, in practice, limit the RMS: (1) detector non-linearity noise, RMSNLin, and (2) temperature fluctuations that cause variations in optical resolution (full width at half the maximum, FWHM, of atomic emission lines) and give rise to optical resolution noise, RMSFWHM. The non-linearity of our detector is low (~10-3) yet - unless actively controlled - is sufficiently large to create a RMSNLin limit of up to 1.4 × 10-4. The optical resolution is sensitive to temperature changes (0.03 detector pixels/°C at 334 nm), and temperature variations of 0.1 °C can cause residual RMSFWHM of ~1 × 10-4. Both factors were actively addressed in the design of the CU GMAX-DOAS instrument. The CU GMAX-DOAS was set up at a coastal site near Pensacola, FL, where we detected BrO, IO and CHOCHO in the marine boundary layer (MBL), with daytime average tropospheric vertical column densities, VCDs, of ~2 × 1013 molec cm-2, 8 × 1012 molec cm-2 and 4 × 1014 molec cm-2, respectively. HCHO and NO2 were also detected with typical MBL VCDs of 1 × 1016 and 3 × 1015. These are the first measurements of BrO, IO and CHOCHO over the Gulf of Mexico. The atmospheric implications of these observations for elevated mercury wet deposition rates in this area are briefly

  16. Comparison of OH concentration measurements by DOAS and LIF during SAPHIR chamber experiments at high OH reactivity and low NO concentration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuchs, H.; Dorn, H.-P.; Bachner, M.; Bohn, B.; Brauers, T.; Gomm, S.; Hofzumahaus, A.; Holland, F.; Nehr, S.; Rohrer, F.; Tillmann, R.; Wahner, A.

    2012-07-01

    During recent field campaigns, hydroxyl radical (OH) concentrations that were measured by laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) were up to a factor of ten larger than predicted by current chemical models for conditions of high OH reactivity and low NO concentration. These discrepancies, which were observed in forests and urban-influenced rural environments, are so far not entirely understood. In summer 2011, a series of experiments was carried out in the atmosphere simulation chamber SAPHIR in Jülich, Germany, in order to investigate the photochemical degradation of isoprene, methyl-vinyl ketone (MVK), methacrolein (MACR) and aromatic compounds by OH. Conditions were similar to those experienced during the PRIDE-PRD2006 campaign in the Pearl River Delta (PRD), China, in 2006, where a large difference between OH measurements and model predictions was found. During experiments in SAPHIR, OH was simultaneously detected by two independent instruments: LIF and differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS). Because DOAS is an inherently calibration-free technique, DOAS measurements are regarded as a reference standard. The comparison of the two techniques was used to investigate potential artifacts in the LIF measurements for PRD-like conditions of OH reactivities of 10 to 30 s-1 and NO mixing ratios of 0.1 to 0.3 ppbv. The analysis of twenty experiment days shows good agreement. The linear regression of the combined data set (averaged to the DOAS time resolution, 2495 data points) yields a slope of 1.02 ± 0.01 with an intercept of (0.10 ± 0.03) × 106 cm-3 and a linear correlation coefficient of R2 = 0.86. This indicates that the sensitivity of the LIF instrument is well-defined by its calibration procedure. No hints for artifacts are observed for isoprene, MACR, and different aromatic compounds. LIF measurements were approximately 30-40% (median) larger than those by DOAS after MVK (20 ppbv) and toluene (90 ppbv) had been added. However, this discrepancy has a

  17. Multibeam long-path differential optical absorption spectroscopy instrument: a device for simultaneous measurements along multiple light paths.

    PubMed

    Pundt, Irene; Mettendorf, Kai Uwe

    2005-08-10

    A novel long-path differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS) apparatus for measuring tropospheric trace gases and the first results from its use are presented: We call it the multibeam instrument. It is the first active DOAS device that emits several light beams simultaneously through only one telescope and with only one lamp as a light source, allowing simultaneous measurement along multiple light paths. In contrast to conventional DOAS instruments, several small mirrors are positioned near the lamp, creating multiple virtual light sources that emit one light beam each in one specific direction. The possibility of error due to scattering between the light beams is negligible. The trace-gas detection limits of NO2, SO2, O3, and H2CO are similar to those of the traditional long-path DOAS instrument.

  18. Accounting for surface reflectance in the derivation of vertical column densities of NO2 from airborne imaging DOAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meier, Andreas Carlos; Schönhardt, Anja; Richter, Andreas; Bösch, Tim; Seyler, André; Constantin, Daniel Eduard; Shaiganfar, Reza; Merlaud, Alexis; Ruhtz, Thomas; Wagner, Thomas; van Roozendael, Michel; Burrows, John. P.

    2016-04-01

    Nitrogen oxides, NOx (NOx = NO + NO2) play a key role in tropospheric chemistry. In addition to their directly harmful effects on the respiratory system of living organisms, they influence the levels of tropospheric ozone and contribute to acid rain and eutrophication of ecosystems. As they are produced in combustion processes, they can serve as an indicator for anthropogenic air pollution. In the late summers of 2014 and 2015, two extensive measurement campaigns were conducted in Romania by several European research institutes, with financial support from ESA. The AROMAT / AROMAT-2 campaigns (Airborne ROmanian Measurements of Aerosols and Trace gases) were dedicated to measurements of air quality parameters utilizing newly developed instrumentation at state-of-the-art. The experiences gained will help to calibrate and validate the measurements taken by the upcoming Sentinel-S5p mission scheduled for launch in 2016. The IUP Bremen contributed to these campaigns with its airborne imaging DOAS (Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy) instrument AirMAP (Airborne imaging DOAS instrument for Measurements of Atmospheric Pollution). AirMAP allows retrieving spatial distributions of trace gas columns densities in a stripe below the aircraft. The measurements have a high spatial resolution of approximately 30 x 80 m2 (along x across track) at a typical flight altitude of 3000 m. Supported by the instrumental setup and the large swath, gapless maps of trace gas distributions above a large city, like Bucharest or Berlin, can be acquired within a time window of approximately two hours. These properties make AirMAP a valuable tool for the validation of trace gas measurements from space. DOAS retrievals yield the density of absorbers integrated along the light path of the measurement. The light path is altered with a changing surface reflectance, leading to enhanced / reduced slant column densities of NO2 depending on surface properties. This effect must be considered in

  19. MAX-DOAS measurements of nitrogen dioxide at the high altitude sites Zugspitze (2964 m) and Pico Espejo (4765 m)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schreier, Stefan F.; Richter, Andreas; Wittrock, Folkard; Burrows, John P.

    2015-04-01

    Spectral measurements at two mountain sites were performed with a MAX-DOAS (Multi AXis Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy) instrument from February to July 2003 (Zugspitze, Germany) and from March 2004 to November 2008 (Pico Espejo, Venezuela). Here, these measurements are used for the retrieval of slant column densities (SCDs) of nitrogen dioxide (NO2). While at the altitude of observations the NO2 levels are usually small, uplifting of anthropogenic emissions from the valley and in Venezuela also transport of emissions from biomass burning can lead to significant enhancements. Daily, weekly, and seasonal cycles of NO2 SCDs are shown for the two stations, linked to different meteorological conditions and compared between the two sites. In a next step, a preliminary approach to derive vertical column densities (VCDs) is presented. VCDs of NO2 from ground-based MAX-DOAS instruments provide useful information for the validation of satellite instruments such as SCIAMACHY, OMI, and GOME-2. Comparisons between ground-based and satellite-based NO2 VCDs are shown for selected periods.

  20. Molecular determinants of the interaction between Doa1 and Hse1 involved in endosomal sorting.

    PubMed

    Han, Seungsu; Shin, Donghyuk; Choi, Hoon; Lee, Sangho

    2014-03-28

    Yeast Doa1/Ufd3 is an adaptor protein for Cdc48 (p97 in mammal), an AAA type ATPase associated with endoplasmic reticulum-associated protein degradation pathway and endosomal sorting into multivesicular bodies. Doa1 functions in the endosomal sorting by its association with Hse1, a component of endosomal sorting complex required for transport (ESCRT) system. The association of Doa1 with Hse1 was previously reported to be mediated between PFU domain of Doa1 and SH3 of Hse1. However, it remains unclear which residues are specifically involved in the interaction. Here we report that Doa1/PFU interacts with Hse1/SH3 with a moderate affinity of 5 μM. Asn-438 of Doa1/PFU and Trp-254 of Hse1/SH3 are found to be critical in the interaction while Phe-434, implicated in ubiquitin binding via a hydrophobic interaction, is not. Small-angle X-ray scattering measurements combined with molecular docking and biochemical analysis yield the solution structure of the Doa1/PFU:Hse1/SH3 complex. Taken together, our results suggest that hydrogen bonding is a major determinant in the interaction of Doa1/PFU with Hse1/SH3.

  1. Retrievals of formaldehyde from ground-based FTIR and MAX-DOAS observations at the Jungfraujoch station and comparisons with GEOS-Chem and IMAGES model simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franco, B.; Hendrick, F.; Van Roozendael, M.; Müller, J.-F.; Stavrakou, T.; Marais, E. A.; Bovy, B.; Bader, W.; Fayt, C.; Hermans, C.; Lejeune, B.; Pinardi, G.; Servais, C.; Mahieu, E.

    2015-04-01

    As an ubiquitous product of the oxidation of many volatile organic compounds (VOCs), formaldehyde (HCHO) plays a key role as a short-lived and reactive intermediate in the atmospheric photo-oxidation pathways leading to the formation of tropospheric ozone and secondary organic aerosols. In this study, HCHO profiles have been successfully retrieved from ground-based Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) solar spectra and UV-visible Multi-AXis Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (MAX-DOAS) scans recorded during the July 2010-December 2012 time period at the Jungfraujoch station (Swiss Alps, 46.5° N, 8.0° E, 3580 m a.s.l.). Analysis of the retrieved products has revealed different vertical sensitivity between both remote sensing techniques. Furthermore, HCHO amounts simulated by two state-of-the-art chemical transport models (CTMs), GEOS-Chem and IMAGES v2, have been compared to FTIR total columns and MAX-DOAS 3.6-8 km partial columns, accounting for the respective vertical resolution of each ground-based instrument. Using the CTM outputs as the intermediate, FTIR and MAX-DOAS retrievals have shown consistent seasonal modulations of HCHO throughout the investigated period, characterized by summertime maximum and wintertime minimum. Such comparisons have also highlighted that FTIR and MAX-DOAS provide complementary products for the HCHO retrieval above the Jungfraujoch station. Finally, tests have revealed that the updated IR parameters from the HITRAN 2012 database have a cumulative effect and significantly decrease the retrieved HCHO columns with respect to the use of the HITRAN 2008 compilation.

  2. A Sum-of-Squares and Semidefinite Programming Approach for Maximum Likelihood DOA Estimation

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Shu; Zhou, Quan; Zhu, Hongbo

    2016-01-01

    Direction of arrival (DOA) estimation using a uniform linear array (ULA) is a classical problem in array signal processing. In this paper, we focus on DOA estimation based on the maximum likelihood (ML) criterion, transform the estimation problem into a novel formulation, named as sum-of-squares (SOS), and then solve it using semidefinite programming (SDP). We first derive the SOS and SDP method for DOA estimation in the scenario of a single source and then extend it under the framework of alternating projection for multiple DOA estimation. The simulations demonstrate that the SOS- and SDP-based algorithms can provide stable and accurate DOA estimation when the number of snapshots is small and the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) is low. Moveover, it has a higher spatial resolution compared to existing methods based on the ML criterion. PMID:27999397

  3. Novel two-dimensional DOA estimation with L-shaped array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiaofei, Zhang; Jianfeng, Li; Lingyun, Xu

    2011-12-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) direction-of-arrival (DOA) estimation has played an important role in array signal processing. In this article, we address a problem of bind 2D-DOA estimation with L-shaped array. This article links the 2D-DOA estimation problem to the trilinear model. To exploit this link, we derive a trilinear decomposition-based 2D-DOA estimation algorithm in L-shaped array. Without spectral peak searching and pairing, the proposed algorithm employs well. Moreover, our algorithm has much better 2D-DOA estimation performance than the estimation of signal parameters via rotational invariance technique algorithms and propagator method. Simulation results illustrate validity of the algorithm.

  4. A Sum-of-Squares and Semidefinite Programming Approach for Maximum Likelihood DOA Estimation.

    PubMed

    Cai, Shu; Zhou, Quan; Zhu, Hongbo

    2016-12-20

    Direction of arrival (DOA) estimation using a uniform linear array (ULA) is a classical problem in array signal processing. In this paper, we focus on DOA estimation based on the maximum likelihood (ML) criterion, transform the estimation problem into a novel formulation, named as sum-of-squares (SOS), and then solve it using semidefinite programming (SDP). We first derive the SOS and SDP method for DOA estimation in the scenario of a single source and then extend it under the framework of alternating projection for multiple DOA estimation. The simulations demonstrate that the SOS- and SDP-based algorithms can provide stable and accurate DOA estimation when the number of snapshots is small and the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) is low. Moveover, it has a higher spatial resolution compared to existing methods based on the ML criterion.

  5. Inherent calibration of a blue LED-CE-DOAS instrument to measure iodine oxide, glyoxal, methyl glyoxal, nitrogen dioxide, water vapour and aerosol extinction in open cavity mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thalman, R.; Volkamer, R.

    2010-12-01

    The combination of Cavity Enhanced Absorption Spectroscopy (CEAS) with broad-band light sources (e.g. Light-Emitting Diodes, LEDs) lends itself to the application of cavity enhanced Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (CE-DOAS) to perform sensitive and selective point measurements of multiple trace gases and aerosol extinction with a single instrument. In contrast to other broad-band CEAS techniques, CE-DOAS relies only on the measurement of relative intensity changes, i.e. does not require knowledge of the light intensity in the absence of trace gases and aerosols (I0). We have built a prototype LED-CE-DOAS instrument in the blue spectral range (420-490 nm) to measure nitrogen dioxide (NO2), glyoxal (CHOCHO), methyl glyoxal (CH3COCHO), iodine oxide (IO), water vapour (H2O) and oxygen dimers (O4). We demonstrate the first direct detection of methyl glyoxal, and the first CE-DOAS detection of CHOCHO and IO. The instrument is further inherently calibrated for light extinction from the cavity by observing O4 or H2O (at 477 nm and 443 nm) and measuring the pressure, relative humidity and temperature independently. This approach is demonstrated by experiments where laboratory aerosols of known size and refractive index were generated and their extinction measured. The measured extinctions were then compared to the theoretical extinctions calculated using Mie theory (3-7 × 10-7cm-1). Excellent agreement is found from both the O4 and H2O retrievals. This enables the first inherently calibrated CEAS measurement at blue wavelengths in open cavity mode, and eliminates the need for sampling lines to supply air to the cavity, i.e., keep the cavity enclosed and/or aerosol free. Measurements in open cavity mode are demonstrated for CHOCHO, CH3COCHO, NO2, H2O and aerosol extinction. Our prototype LED-CE-DOAS provides a low cost, yet research grade innovative instrument for applications in simulation chambers and in the open atmosphere.

  6. Inherent calibration of a novel LED-CE-DOAS instrument to measure iodine oxide, glyoxal, methyl glyoxal, nitrogen dioxide, water vapour and aerosol extinction in open cavity mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thalman, R.; Volkamer, R.

    2010-06-01

    The combination of Cavity Enhanced Absorption Spectroscopy (CEAS) with broad-band light sources (e.g. Light-Emitting Diodes, LEDs) lends itself to the application of cavity enhanced Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (CE-DOAS) to perform sensitive and selective point measurements of multiple trace gases and aerosol extinction with a single instrument. In contrast to other broad-band CEAS techniques, CE-DOAS relies only on the measurement of relative intensity changes, i.e. does not require knowledge of the light intensity in the absence of trace gases and aerosols (I0). We have built a prototype LED-CE-DOAS instrument in the blue spectral range (420-490 nm) to measure nitrogen dioxide (NO2), glyoxal (CHOCHO), methyl glyoxal (CH3COCHO), iodine oxide (IO), water vapour (H2O) and oxygen dimers (O4). We demonstrate the first CEAS detection of methyl glyoxal, and the first CE-DOAS detection of CHOCHO and IO. A further innovation consists in the measurement of extinction losses from the cavity, e.g. due to aerosols, at two wavelengths by observing O4 (477 nm) and H2O (443 nm) and measuring the pressure, relative humidity and temperature independently. This approach is demonstrated by experiments where laboratory aerosols of known size and refractive index were generated and their extinction measured. The measured extinctions were then compared to the theoretical extinctions calculated using Mie theory (3-7×10-7 cm-1). Excellent agreement is found from both the O4 and H2O retrievals. This enables the first inherently calibrated CEAS measurement in open cavity mode (mirrors facing the open atmosphere), and eliminates the need for sampling lines to supply air to the cavity, and/or keep the cavity enclosed and aerosol free. Measurements in open cavity mode are demonstrated for CHOCHO, CH3COCHO, NO2, H2O and aerosol extinction at 477 nm and 443 nm. Our prototype LED-CE-DOAS provides a low cost, yet research grade innovative instrument for applications in simulation

  7. Mid infrared MEMS FTIR spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erfan, Mazen; Sabry, Yasser M.; Mortada, Bassem; Sharaf, Khaled; Khalil, Diaa

    2016-03-01

    In this work we report, for the first time to the best of our knowledge, a bulk-micromachined wideband MEMS-based spectrometer covering both the NIR and the MIR ranges and working from 1200 nm to 4800 nm. The core engine of the spectrometer is a scanning Michelson interferometer micro-fabricated using deep reactive ion etching (DRIE) technology. The spectrum is obtained using the Fourier Transform techniques that allows covering a very wide spectral range limited by the detector responsivity. The moving mirror of the interferometer is driven by a relatively large stroke electrostatic comb-drive actuator. Zirconium fluoride (ZrF4) multimode optical fibers are used to connect light between the white light source and the interferometer input, as well as the interferometer output to a PbSe photoconductive detector. The recorded signal-to-noise ratio is 25 dB at the wavelength of 3350 nm. The spectrometer is successfully used in measuring the absorption spectra of methylene chloride, quartz glass and polystyrene film. The presented solution provides a low cost method for producing miniaturized spectrometers in the near-/mid-infrared.

  8. Retrieval of absolute SO2 column amounts from scattered-light spectra - Implications for the evaluation of data from automated DOAS Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lübcke, Peter; Lampel, Johannes; Arellano, Santiago; Bobrowski, Nicole; Dinger, Florian; Galle, Bo; Garzón, Gustavo; Hidalgo, Silvana; Chacón Ortiz, Zoraida; Vogel, Leif; Warnach, Simon; Platt, Ulrich

    2016-04-01

    Remote sensing of gas emissions is an important tool for monitoring volcanoes. The Network for Observation of Volcanic and Atmospheric Chance (NOVAC) comprises approximately 80 scanning Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (DOAS) instruments installed at 30 volcanoes world-wide. The DOAS evaluation requires a Fraunhofer Reference Spectrum (FRS) that is free of the trace-gas of interest, however, for scanning DOAS instruments at volcanoes this requirement can be formulated in a weaker form. The spectra from one scan (e.g. from horizon to horizon) are evaluated using the DOAS approach employing one spectrum of the respective scan as FRS (for example a zenith-looking spectrum). Possible SO2 contamination of the FRS is corrected for by calculating an SO2 offset value for each scan that is then subtracted from the results of all encompassing. The SO2 offset can, for example, be defined as the average SO2 column density (CD) of the 20% of spectra with lowest SO2 content in one scan (the standard NOVAC method) or simply as the lowest SO2 CD that can be found in each scan. This approach is based on the assumption that at least one spectrum is recorded at a viewing direction with negligible absorption signature of volcanic SO2. We investigated an alternative approach for the DOAS evaluation using a modelled FRS which is based on a high-resolution Solar Atlas spectrum. We analyzed spectra from two volcanoes that are part of NOVAC - Nevado del Ruiz (Colombia) and Tungurahua (Ecuador) during January 2010-June 2012 and during January 2009- December 2011, respectively. Instrumental effects were identified with help of a Principal Component Analysis (PCA) of the residual structures of the DOAS evaluation. The major advantage of a retrieval based on a modelled FRS is that it yields absolute CDs of SO2 and other molecules included in the spectral retrieval. We investigated how frequently all viewing directions of each scan are contaminated with SO2. The results are compared

  9. Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer and Airborne Emission Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glavich, T.; Beer, R.

    1996-01-01

    The Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer (TES) is an instrument being developed for the NASA Earth Observing System Chemistry Platform. TES will measure the distribution of ozone and its precursors in the lower atmosphere. The Airborne Emission Spectrometer (AES) is an aircraft precursor to TES. Applicable descriptions are given of instrument design, technology challenges, implementation and operations for both.

  10. Compact Infrared Spectrometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mouroulis, Pantazis

    2009-01-01

    Concentric spectrometer forms are advantageous for constructing a variety of systems spanning the entire visible to infrared range. Spectrometer examples are given, including broadband or high resolution forms. Some issues associated with the Dyson catadioptric type are also discussed.

  11. Multipath Separation-Direction of Arrival (MS-DOA) with Genetic Search Algorithm for HF channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arikan, Feza; Koroglu, Ozan; Fidan, Serdar; Arikan, Orhan; Guldogan, Mehmet B.

    2009-09-01

    Direction-of-Arrival (DOA) defines the estimation of arrival angles of an electromagnetic wave impinging on a set of sensors. For dispersive and time-varying HF channels, where the propagating wave also suffers from the multipath phenomena, estimation of DOA is a very challenging problem. Multipath Separation-Direction of Arrival (MS-DOA), that is developed to estimate both the arrival angles in elevation and azimuth and the incoming signals at the output of the reference antenna with very high accuracy, proves itself as a strong alternative in DOA estimation for HF channels. In MS-DOA, a linear system of equations is formed using the coefficients of the basis vector for the array output vector, the incoming signal vector and the array manifold. The angles of arrival in elevation and azimuth are obtained as the maximizers of the sum of the magnitude squares of the projection of the signal coefficients on the column space of the array manifold. In this study, alternative Genetic Search Algorithms (GA) for the maximizers of the projection sum are investigated using simulated and experimental ionospheric channel data. It is observed that GA combined with MS-DOA is a powerful alternative in online DOA estimation and can be further developed according to the channel characteristics of a specific HF link.

  12. Divergent Nod-Containing Bradyrhizobium sp. DOA9 with a Megaplasmid and its Host Range

    PubMed Central

    Teamtisong, Kamonluck; Songwattana, Pongpan; Noisangiam, Rujirek; Piromyou, Pongdet; Boonkerd, Nantakorn; Tittabutr, Panlada; Minamisawa, Kiwamu; Nantagij, Achara; Okazaki, Shin; Abe, Mikiko; Uchiumi, Toshiki; Teaumroong, Neung

    2014-01-01

    Bradyrhizobium sp. DOA9, a non-photosynthetic bacterial strain originally isolated from the root nodules of the legume Aeschynomene americana, is a divergent nod-containing strain. It exhibits a broad host range, being able to colonize and efficiently nodulate the roots of most plants from the Dalbergioid, Millettioid, and Robinioid tribes (7 species of Papilionoideae). In all cases, nodulation was determinate. The morphology and size of DOA9 bacteroids isolated from the nodules of various species of Papilionoideae were indistinguishable from the free-living form. However, they were spherical in Arachis hypogaea nodules. GusA-tagged DOA9 also colonized rice roots as endophytes. Since broad-host-range legume symbionts often carry multiple replicons in their genome, we analyzed the replicons for symbiosis genes by electrophoresis. DOA9 carried two replicons, a chromosome (cDOA9) and single megaplasmid (pDOA9) larger than 352 kb. The genes for nodulation (nodA, B, C) and nitrogen fixation (nifH) were localized on the megaplasmid. Southern blot hybridization revealed two copies of nodA on the megaplasmid, single copies of nodB and C on the megaplasmid, and one copy each of nifH on the chromosome and megaplasmid. These results suggested that Bradyrhizobium sp. DOA9 may have the unusual combination of a broad host range, bacteroid differentiation, and symbiosis-mediating replicons. PMID:25283477

  13. High Resolution DOA Estimation Using Unwrapped Phase Information of MUSIC-Based Noise Subspace

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ichige, Koichi; Saito, Kazuhiko; Arai, Hiroyuki

    This paper presents a high resolution Direction-Of-Arrival (DOA) estimation method using unwrapped phase information of MUSIC-based noise subspace. Superresolution DOA estimation methods such as MUSIC, Root-MUSIC and ESPRIT methods are paid great attention because of their brilliant properties in estimating DOAs of incident signals. Those methods achieve high accuracy in estimating DOAs in a good propagation environment, but would fail to estimate DOAs in severe environments like low Signal-to-Noise Ratio (SNR), small number of snapshots, or when incident waves are coming from close angles. In MUSIC method, its spectrum is calculated based on the absolute value of the inner product between array response and noise eigenvectors, means that MUSIC employs only the amplitude characteristics and does not use any phase characteristics. Recalling that phase characteristics plays an important role in signal and image processing, we expect that DOA estimation accuracy could be further improved using phase information in addition to MUSIC spectrum. This paper develops a procedure to obtain an accurate spectrum for DOA estimation using unwrapped and differentiated phase information of MUSIC-based noise subspace. Performance of the proposed method is evaluated through computer simulation in comparison with some conventional estimation methods.

  14. ARO Research Instrumentation Program - IR Spectrometer Procurement

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-11-01

    via simultaneous electrochemical and spectroscopic studies. These studies are enabling us to understanding the microscopic (molecular and ionic...program. The instrument is being utilized to characterize ionic liquid-based (IL-based) electrolyte systems via simultaneous electrochemical and...spectrometer has been synchronized with a potentiostat to perform surface enhanced infrared absorption (SEIRA) spectroscopy during electrochemical

  15. New concepts for the comparison of tropospheric NO2 column densities derived from car-MAX-DOAS observations, OMI satellite observations and the regional model CHIMERE during two MEGAPOLI campaigns in Paris 2009/10

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaiganfar, R.; Beirle, S.; Petetin, H.; Zhang, Q.; Beekmann, M.; Wagner, T.

    2015-07-01

    We compare tropospheric column densities (vertically integrated concentrations) of NO2 from three data sets for the metropolitan area of Paris during two extensive measurement campaigns (25 days in summer 2009 and 29 days in winter 2010) within the European research project MEGAPOLI. The selected data sets comprise a regional chemical transport model (CHIMERE) as well as two observational data sets: ground-based mobile Multi-AXis-Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (car-MAX-DOAS) measurements and satellite measurements from the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI). On most days, car-MAX-DOAS measurements were carried out along large circles (diameter ~ 35 km) around Paris. The car-MAX-DOAS results are compared to coincident data from CHIMERE and OMI. All three data sets have their specific strengths and weaknesses, especially with respect to their spatiotemporal resolution and coverage as well as their uncertainties. Thus we compare them in two different ways: first, we simply consider the original data sets. Second, we compare modified versions making synergistic use of the complementary information from different data sets. For example, profile information from the regional model is used to improve the satellite data, observations of the horizontal trace gas distribution are used to adjust the respective spatial patterns of the model simulations, or the model is used as a transfer tool to bridge the spatial scales between car-MAX-DOAS and satellite observations. Using the modified versions of the data sets, the comparison results substantially improve compared to the original versions. In general, good agreement between the data sets is found outside the emission plume, but inside the emission plumes the tropospheric NO2 vertical column densities (VCDs). are systematically underestimated by the CHIMERE model and the satellite observations (compared to the car-MAX-DOAS observations). One major result from our study is that for satellite validation close to

  16. New concepts for the comparison of tropospheric NO2 column densities derived from car-MAX-DOAS observations, OMI satellite observations and the regional model CHIMERE during two MEGAPOLI campaigns in Paris 2009/10

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaiganfar, R.; Beirle, S.; Petetin, H.; Zhang, Q.; Beekmann, M.; Wagner, T.

    2015-03-01

    We compare tropospheric column densities (vertically integrated concentrations) of NO2 from three data sets for the metropolitan area of Paris during two extensive measurement campaigns (25 days in summer 2009 and 29 days in winter 2010) within the European research project MEGAPOLI. The selected data sets comprise a regional chemical transport model (CHIMERE) as well as two observational data sets: ground based mobile Multi-AXis-Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (car-MAX-DOAS) measurements and satellite measurements from the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI). On most days, car-MAX-DOAS measurements were carried out along large circles (diameter ~35 km) around Paris. The car-MAX-DOAS results are compared to coincident data from CHIMERE and OMI. All three data sets have their specific strengths and weaknesses, especially with respect to their spatio-temporal resolution and coverage as well as their uncertainties. Thus we compare them in two different ways: first, we simply consider the original data sets. Second, we compare modified versions making synergistic use of the complementary information from different data sets. For example, profile information from the regional model is used to improve the satellite data, observations of the horizontal trace gas distribution are used to adjust the respective spatial patterns of the model simulations, or the model is used as a transfer tool to bridge the spatial scales between car-MAX-DOAS and satellite observations. Using the modified versions of the data sets, the comparison results substantially improve compared to the original versions. In general, good agreement between the data sets is found outside the emission plume, but inside the emission plumes the tropospheric NO2 VCDs are systematically underestimated by the CHIMERE model and the satellite observations (compared to the car-MAX-DOAS observations). One major result from our study is that for satellite validation close to strong emission sources (like

  17. MAX-DOAS measurements of BrO and NO2 in the marine boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leser, H.; Hönninger, G.; Platt, U.

    2003-05-01

    During a cruise of the German research vessel Polarstern from Bremerhaven, Germany to Capetown, South Africa in October 2000 mid latitude tropospheric bromine oxide (BrO) and nitrogen dioxide (NO2) abundances were investigated by ground-based MAX-DOAS (scattered light Multi Axis Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy). By comparing the slant column densities of absorbers measured at different elevation angles above the horizon (5° to 90°) it is possible to draw conclusions regarding the vertical distribution of the investigated absorbers (i.e., BrO and NO2). During a period of 2 days in the region north of the Canary Islands (around 35°N, 13°W) significant boundary layer BrO in the 1 ppt range was found. For the remaining time all data points ranged below the detection limit. Boundary layer NO2 was found near Europe and the Canary Islands with mixing ratios in the range of several ppb. In the remote marine air south west of Africa upper limits were derived.

  18. Modular multichannel surface plasmon spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neuert, G.; Kufer, S.; Benoit, M.; Gaub, H. E.

    2005-05-01

    We have developed a modular multichannel surface plasmon resonance (SPR) spectrometer on the basis of a commercially available hybrid sensor chip. Due to its modularity this inexpensive and easy to use setup can readily be adapted to different experimental environments. High temperature stability is achieved through efficient thermal coupling of individual SPR units. With standard systems the performance of the multichannel instrument was evaluated. The absorption kinetics of a cysteamine monolayer, as well as the concentration dependence of the specific receptor-ligand interaction between biotin and streptavidin was measured.

  19. Variation of temporal and spatial patterns of NO2 in Beijing using mobile DOAS during the APEC in 2014 and the Victory Day Parade in 2015

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ang; Xie, Pinhua; Wu, Fengcheng; Hu, Zhaokun; Xu, Jin; Qin, Min

    2016-04-01

    Recently Chinese cities have suffered severe haze events, especially in North China Plain (NCP). It has the characteristics of regional scale and complex components with high concentration level. In order to learn the haze formation, it is necessary to investigate temporal and spatial distribution of pollutants, emissions and pollution transport for better understanding of the impact of various sources on air quality. Control policies such as "odd-and-even license plate rule" were implemented by the Chinese government to restrict traffic and suspend factory production in Beijing and neighboring cities during the Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation summit (APEC) in 2014 and Victory Parade in 2015. We use mobile differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS) and multi-axis differential optical absorption spectroscopy (MAX-DOAS) to measure the variation of the spatial and temporal patterns of NO2 column densities from October 24, 2014 to December 31, 2014 and from August 25, 2015 to September 7, 2015. It is found that the NO2 column densities during the episode of control policies are significantly lower than those during other periods, and the emission flux of NO2 calculated by mobile DOAS is also lower than the results from other periods. There was a further 45.5% decline of the emission flux of NO2 in Beijing fifth ring road during the Victory Day Parade in 2015 than during APEC period. The low NO2 column densities that occur during the episode of control policies are affected by the control policies as well as meteorological conditions.

  20. Retrieval of vertical profiles of multiple trace gases from MAX-DOAS observations during the MADCAT Campaign in Mainz, Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yang; Xie, Pinhua; Wagner, Thomas; Li, Ang; Luo, Yuhan; Remmers, Julia; Horbanski, Martin; Friess, Udo

    2014-05-01

    In order to promote the development of passive DOAS technique and solve some critical problems including e.g. accurate retrievals of trace gas slant column densities (SCD), profile retrievals of trace gases and aerosol, and the effects of cloud, the Multi Axis DOAS-Comparison campaign for Aerosols and Trace gases (MAD-CAT) was held at the Max-Planck institute for Chemistry in Mainz, Germany from June to August 2013. Within this campaign, spectra of scattered sun light were taken by our two-dimensional scanning MAX-DOAS (2D-MAX-DOAS) instrument and a Mini-MAX-DOAS instrument from the Anhui Institute of Optics and Fine Mechanics, Chinese Academy of Sciences. In this presentation, firstly we show the retrieved differential SCDs of O4, NO2, HCHO, HONO and CHOCHO based on the observations of the 2D-MAX-DOAS. Based on these dSCDs we acquired the vertical profiles of these trace gases and aerosol extinction using optimal estimation method. We compare the aerosol optical depth (AOD) from MAX-DOAS with simultaneous observations from an AERONET instrument as well as the near surface volume mixing ratio (VMR) of NO2 from MAX-DOAS with those from a CE-DOAS instrument from the IUP Heidelberg group and found in general good agreement. In addition we apply a cloud classification scheme based on our MAX-DOAS observations to identify different kinds of weather during the MAD-CAT campaign.

  1. External-cavity diode laser spectrometer for measuring the concentration ratio 13CO2/12CO2 by absorption in the range of 1.6 μm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaytsev, A. A.; Nikolaev, I. V.; Ochkin, V. N.; Tskhai, S. N.

    2015-07-01

    The method for determining the carbon isotopic ratio from CO2 absorption spectra in the optical cavity containing atmospheric air with the natural contents of carbon dioxide ~0.03% is described. The measurements are performed at atmospheric pressure in the conditions of overlapping absorption lines. The measurement accuracy is 0.3‰.

  2. DOA Estimation Based on Real-Valued Cross Correlation Matrix of Coprime Arrays

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jianfeng; Wang, Feng; Jiang, Defu

    2017-01-01

    A fast direction of arrival (DOA) estimation method using a real-valued cross-correlation matrix (CCM) of coprime subarrays is proposed. Firstly, real-valued CCM with extended aperture is constructed to obtain the signal subspaces corresponding to the two subarrays. By analysing the relationship between the two subspaces, DOA estimations from the two subarrays are simultaneously obtained with automatic pairing. Finally, unique DOA is determined based on the common results from the two subarrays. Compared to partial spectral search (PSS) method and estimation of signal parameter via rotational invariance (ESPRIT) based method for coprime arrays, the proposed algorithm has lower complexity but achieves better DOA estimation performance and handles more sources. Simulation results verify the effectiveness of the approach. PMID:28335536

  3. Hardware design and implementation of fast DOA estimation method based on multicore DSP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Rui; Zhao, Yingxiao; Zhang, Yue; Lin, Qianqiang; Chen, Zengping

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, we present a high-speed real-time signal processing hardware platform based on multicore digital signal processor (DSP). The real-time signal processing platform shows several excellent characteristics including high performance computing, low power consumption, large-capacity data storage and high speed data transmission, which make it able to meet the constraint of real-time direction of arrival (DOA) estimation. To reduce the high computational complexity of DOA estimation algorithm, a novel real-valued MUSIC estimator is used. The algorithm is decomposed into several independent steps and the time consumption of each step is counted. Based on the statistics of the time consumption, we present a new parallel processing strategy to distribute the task of DOA estimation to different cores of the real-time signal processing hardware platform. Experimental results demonstrate that the high processing capability of the signal processing platform meets the constraint of real-time direction of arrival (DOA) estimation.

  4. Spherical grating spectrometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Donoghue, Darragh; Clemens, J. Christopher

    2014-07-01

    We describe designs for spectrometers employing convex dispersers. The Offner spectrometer was the first such instrument; it has almost exclusively been employed on satellite platforms, and has had little impact on ground-based instruments. We have learned how to fabricate curved Volume Phase Holographic (VPH) gratings and, in contrast to the planar gratings of traditional spectrometers, describe how such devices can be used in optical/infrared spectrometers designed specifically for curved diffraction gratings. Volume Phase Holographic gratings are highly efficient compared to conventional surface relief gratings; they have become the disperser of choice in optical / NIR spectrometers. The advantage of spectrometers with curved VPH dispersers is the very small number of optical elements used (the simplest comprising a grating and a spherical mirror), as well as illumination of mirrors off axis, resulting in greater efficiency and reduction in size. We describe a "Half Offner" spectrometer, an even simpler version of the Offner spectrometer. We present an entirely novel design, the Spherical Transmission Grating Spectrometer (STGS), and discuss exemplary applications, including a design for a double-beam spectrometer without any requirement for a dichroic. This paradigm change in spectrometer design offers an alternative to all-refractive astronomical spectrometer designs, using expensive, fragile lens elements fabricated from CaF2 or even more exotic materials. The unobscured mirror layout avoids a major drawback of the previous generation of catadioptric spectrometer designs. We describe laboratory measurements of the efficiency and image quality of a curved VPH grating in a STGS design, demonstrating, simultaneously, efficiency comparable to planar VPH gratings along with good image quality. The stage is now set for construction of a prototype instrument with impressive performance.

  5. Estimation of damped oscillation associated spectra from ultrafast transient absorption spectra.

    PubMed

    van Stokkum, Ivo H M; Jumper, Chanelle C; Snellenburg, Joris J; Scholes, Gregory D; van Grondelle, Rienk; Malý, Pavel

    2016-11-07

    When exciting a complex molecular system with a short optical pulse, all chromophores present in the system can be excited. The resulting superposition of electronically and vibrationally excited states evolves in time, which is monitored with transient absorption spectroscopy. We present a methodology to resolve simultaneously the contributions of the different electronically and vibrationally excited states from the complete data. The evolution of the excited states is described with a superposition of damped oscillations. The amplitude of a damped oscillation cos(ωnt)exp(-γnt) as a function of the detection wavelength constitutes a damped oscillation associated spectrum DOASn(λ) with an accompanying phase characteristic φn(λ). In a case study, the cryptophyte photosynthetic antenna complex PC612 which contains eight bilin chromophores was excited by a broadband optical pulse. Difference absorption spectra from 525 to 715 nm were measured until 1 ns. The population dynamics is described by four lifetimes, with interchromophore equilibration in 0.8 and 7.5 ps. We have resolved 24 DOAS with frequencies between 130 and 1649 cm(-1) and with damping rates between 0.9 and 12 ps(-1). In addition, 11 more DOAS with faster damping rates were necessary to describe the "coherent artefact." The DOAS contains both ground and excited state features. Their interpretation is aided by DOAS analysis of simulated transient absorption signals resulting from stimulated emission and ground state bleach.

  6. Estimation of damped oscillation associated spectra from ultrafast transient absorption spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Stokkum, Ivo H. M.; Jumper, Chanelle C.; Snellenburg, Joris J.; Scholes, Gregory D.; van Grondelle, Rienk; Malý, Pavel

    2016-11-01

    When exciting a complex molecular system with a short optical pulse, all chromophores present in the system can be excited. The resulting superposition of electronically and vibrationally excited states evolves in time, which is monitored with transient absorption spectroscopy. We present a methodology to resolve simultaneously the contributions of the different electronically and vibrationally excited states from the complete data. The evolution of the excited states is described with a superposition of damped oscillations. The amplitude of a damped oscillation cos(ωnt)exp(-γnt) as a function of the detection wavelength constitutes a damped oscillation associated spectrum DOASn(λ) with an accompanying phase characteristic φn(λ). In a case study, the cryptophyte photosynthetic antenna complex PC612 which contains eight bilin chromophores was excited by a broadband optical pulse. Difference absorption spectra from 525 to 715 nm were measured until 1 ns. The population dynamics is described by four lifetimes, with interchromophore equilibration in 0.8 and 7.5 ps. We have resolved 24 DOAS with frequencies between 130 and 1649 cm-1 and with damping rates between 0.9 and 12 ps-1. In addition, 11 more DOAS with faster damping rates were necessary to describe the "coherent artefact." The DOAS contains both ground and excited state features. Their interpretation is aided by DOAS analysis of simulated transient absorption signals resulting from stimulated emission and ground state bleach.

  7. Joint DOD/DOA Estimation in MIMO Radar Exploiting Time-Frequency Signal Representations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-05-08

    direction-of-departure (DOD) and direction-of- arrival (DOA) information of maneuvering targets in a bistatic multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO) radar...CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT Same as Report ( SAR ) 18. NUMBER OF PAGES 21 19a. NAME OF RESPONSIBLE PERSON a. REPORT unclassified b...departure (DOD) and direction-of- arrival (DOA) information of maneuvering targets in a bistatic multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO) radar system

  8. CAST-10-2/DOA 2 Airfoil Studies Workshop Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ray, Edward J. (Compiler); Hill, Acquilla S. (Compiler)

    1989-01-01

    During the period of September 23 through 27, 1988, the Transonic Aerodynamics Division at the Langely Research Center hosted an International Workshop on CAST-10-2/DOA 2 Airfoil Studies. The CAST-10 studies were the outgrowth of several cooperative study agreements among the NASA, the NAE of Canada, the DLR of West Germany, and the ONERA of France. Both theoretical and experimental CAST-10 airfoil results that were obtained form an extensive series of tests and studies, were reviewed. These results provided an opportunity to make direct comparisons of adaptive wall test section (AWTS) results from the NASA 0.3-meter Transonic Cryogenic Tunnel and ONERA T-2 AWTS facilities with conventional ventilated wall wind tunnel results from the Canadian high Reynolds number two-dimensional test facility. Individual papers presented during the workshop are included.

  9. NO2 DOAS Measurements of Traffic Emissions by Chasing Cars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Ying; Lipkowitsch, Ivo; Chan, Ka Lok; Bräu, Melanie; Wenig, Mark

    2016-04-01

    On this poster we present NO2 measurements using a Cavity-Enhanced DOAS on a measurement bus which we used to chase other vehicles to measure their NO2 emissions. Emissions of nitrogen oxides from on-road vehicles have received highly attention recently due to the increasing trend of ambient NOx level. It is particularly important to identify and quantify the direct emission and secondary formation of NO2 contributed by traffic emissions, in order to study the impact to the local air quality. We sampled on-road emissions in different environments and different driving conditions (e.g. urban, highway, different speeds). We analyse the data set in terms of spatial and temporal variability to search for temporal and spatial patterns. We present mean values sorted for different vehicle types, distance to the target car and travelling speeds to provide an emission data base from this measurement study.

  10. Precise DOA Estimation Using SAGE Algorithm with a Cylindrical Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takanashi, Masaki; Nishimura, Toshihiko; Ogawa, Yasutaka; Ohgane, Takeo

    A uniform circular array (UCA) is a well-known array configuration which can accomplish estimation of 360° field of view with identical accuracy. However, a UCA cannot estimate coherent signals because we cannot apply the SSP owing to the structure of UCA. Although a variety of studies on UCA in coherent multipath environments have been done, it is impossible to estimate the DOA of coherent signals with different incident polar angles. Then, we have proposed Root-MUSIC algorithm with a cylindrical array. However, the estimation performance is degraded when incident signals arrive with close polar angles. To solve this problem, in the letter, we propose to use SAGE algorithm with a cylindrical array. Here, we adopt a CLA Root-MUSIC for the initial estimation and decompose two-dimensional search to double one-dimensional search to reduce the calculation load. The results show that the proposal achieves high resolution with low complexity.

  11. Assessing the need for a O4 scaling factor for MAX-DOAS measurements during the MAD-CAT campaign in Mainz Germany, Summer 2013

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, Thomas; Remmers, Julia; Shaiganfar, Reza; Lampel, Johannes; Wang, Yang; Beirle, Steffen; Dörner, Steffen

    2016-04-01

    MAX-DOAS measurements of the atmospheric absorption of the oxygen dimer O4 are often used to derive information about the tropospheric aerosol distribution. For that purpose measured absorptions are compared to results of a forward model based on radiative transfer simulations and assumptions about the atmospheric state. Many studies demonstrated good agreement of the derived aerosol results with independent observations. Nevertheless, in some studies also systematic differences between the measurements and the forward model were found. E.g. measured O4 absorptions on clear days were found to be even larger than the forward model results for an assumed aerosol-free atmosphere. These discrepancies motivated the use of a scaling factor for the retrieved O4 absorptions. Reported values of this scaling factor range from about 0.7 to 0.9. On the other hand, several studies found excellent agreement between measurements and forward model without the need of a scaling factor. So far, there is no convincing explanation for these conflicting findings. In this study we compare measurements and forward model results for two clear days during the MAD-CAT (Multi Axis DOAS - Comparison campaign of Aerosols and Trace gases) campaign in Mainz, Germany in Summer 2013. On these days the aerosol extinction profiles were well constraint by measurements of a ceilometer and a sun photometer. For almost all of these measurements (made in 4 azimuth directions) we find a systematic underestimation of the measured O4 absorptions by the forward model indicating the need for a scaling factor of about 0.65 to 0.9. We investigate several potential reasons for the observed discrepancy including the influence of the profiles of temperature, pressure and aerosol extinction as well as the aerosol optical properties.

  12. Measurements of Tropospheric NO2 in Romania Using a Zenith-Sky Mobile DOAS System and Comparisons with Satellite Observations

    PubMed Central

    Constantin, Daniel-Eduard; Merlaud, Alexis; Van Roozendael, Michel; Voiculescu, Mirela; Fayt, Caroline; Hendrick, François; Pinardi, Gaia; Georgescu, Lucian

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we present a new method for retrieving tropospheric NO2 Vertical Column Density (VCD) from zenith-sky Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (DOAS) measurements using mobile observations. This method was used during three days in the summer of 2011 in Romania, being to our knowledge the first mobile DOAS measurements peformed in this country. The measurements were carried out over large and different areas using a mobile DOAS system installed in a car. We present here a step-by-step retrieval of tropospheric VCD using complementary observations from ground and space which take into account the stratospheric contribution, which is a step forward compared to other similar studies. The detailed error budget indicates that the typical uncertainty on the retrieved NO2tropospheric VCD is less than 25%. The resulting ground-based data set is compared to satellite measurements from the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) and the Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment-2 (GOME-2). For instance, on 18 July 2011, in an industrial area located at 47.03°N, 22.45°E, GOME-2 observes a tropospheric VCD value of (3.4 ± 1.9) × 1015 molec./cm2, while average mobile measurements in the same area give a value of (3.4 ± 0.7) × 1015 molec./cm2. On 22 August 2011, around Ploiesti city (44.99°N, 26.1°E), the tropospheric VCD observed by satellites is (3.3 ± 1.9) × 1015 molec./cm2 (GOME-2) and (3.2 ± 3.2) × 1015 molec./cm2 (OMI), while average mobile measurements give (3.8 ± 0.8) × 1015 molec./cm2. Average ground measurements over “clean areas”, on 18 July 2011, give (2.5 ± 0.6) × 1015 molec./cm2 while the satellite observes a value of (1.8 ± 1.3) × 1015 molec./cm2. PMID:23519349

  13. Autonomous Long-Path DOAS Measurements of Tropospheric Trace Gases at Neumayer Station III, Antarctica: First Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nasse, Jan-Marcus; Frieß, Udo; Pöhler, Denis; Weller, Rolf; Platt, Ulrich

    2016-04-01

    Reactive Halogen Species (RHS, like IO, BrO, ClO, etc.) have an important impact on atmospheric chemistry. In Polar Regions, the role of halogen radical chemistry has been subject of intensive research for more than two decades. Among the most prominent effects of RHS on the Polar atmosphere are the change of the oxidative capacity of the troposphere including wide-spread and frequently virtually complete destruction of tropospheric ozone, in particular during springtime, as well as the oxidation and subsequent deposition of gaseous elemental mercury. The number of field observations and the understanding of the underlying processes varies greatly between bromine, iodine and chlorine compounds. While elevated BrO concentrations resulting from autocatalytic processes (the so-called bromine explosion mechanism) are frequently observed, the abundance and influence of iodine is still subject to discussions and available observations give no consistent picture. With only a few direct observations of chlorine compounds, such as ClO and OClO, the role of tropospheric chlorine chemistry remains poorly understood to date, despite strong evidence for its relevance. The lack of observations of chlorine radicals is mainly due to the challenging detection, particularly in the case of ClO. Scattered sunlight DOAS measurements, which are available from a number of Polar locations, are not sensitive for ClO, due to insufficient radiation intensity in the UV spectral region (<308nm) where this molecule is absorbing. Here we present the overall design and first results of a novel Long Path DOAS (Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy) instrument with an active light source suitable for the detection of ClO. It has been set up at the German Research Station Neumayer III in coastal Antarctica during the summer season 2015/16 and is planned to operate autonomously for at least one year. The instrument is able to detect - in addition to ClO - many trace gases absorbing in the UV

  14. External-cavity diode laser spectrometer for measuring the concentration ratio {sup 13}CO{sub 2}/{sup 12}CO{sub 2} by absorption in the range of 1.6 μm

    SciTech Connect

    Zaytsev, A A; Nikolaev, I V; Ochkin, V N; Tskhai, S N

    2015-07-31

    The method for determining the carbon isotopic ratio from CO{sub 2} absorption spectra in the optical cavity containing atmospheric air with the natural contents of carbon dioxide ∼0.03% is described. The measurements are performed at atmospheric pressure in the conditions of overlapping absorption lines. The measurement accuracy is 0.3‰. (laser applications and other topics in quantum electronics)

  15. Spectrometer Baseline Control Via Spatial Filtering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burleigh, M. R.; Richey, C. R.; Rinehart, S. A.; Quijada, M. A.; Wollack, E. J.

    2016-01-01

    An absorptive half-moon aperture mask is experimentally explored as a broad-bandwidth means of eliminating spurious spectral features arising from reprocessed radiation in an infrared Fourier transform spectrometer. In the presence of the spatial filter, an order of magnitude improvement in the fidelity of the spectrometer baseline is observed. The method is readily accommodated within the context of commonly employed instrument configurations and leads to a factor of two reduction in optical throughput. A detailed discussion of the underlying mechanism and limitations of the method are provided.

  16. Transport of gaseous NO2 and SO2 by MAX-DOAS in Beijing and surrounding area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Jin; Li, Ang; Xie, Pinhua; Liu, Jianguo; Liu, Wenqing

    2016-04-01

    With the development of industry and urbanization, regional pollution is increasing seriously, and the cross influence between cities is becoming more frequently. Multi Axis Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (MAX-DOAS) has been successfully applied in the remote sensing of gaseous pollutants during the past decade, it is based on scattered light of the sun, and can measure spectral in different directions, measure tropospheric and the whole atmospheric column densities of trace gases combining with radiative transfer model (RTM). This approach is very useful for the investigation of the main path of air pollution transportation. Fifteen MAX-DOAS stations which are in urban and in the path of pollution transport are set up in Beijing and surrounding area including Tianjin and Hebei province to observe the spatial and temporal distributions and regional transport of gaseous NO2 and SO2. The NO2 VCDs and profiles and SO2 VCDs are obtained. The results show that the NO2 column densities in urban are higher than surroundings, it shows that the NO2 in Beijing is mainly from the local; The SO2 column densities in other cities to the south of Beijing are obviously higher than in Beijing, so regional transport from the south of Hebei province will have a significant impact on Beijing. From the results of NO2 and SO2, the whole pollution process including incubation, generation, duration, and dispersion was observed. The vertical distribution show that NO2 concentration is mainly near the surface from 0 to 400m, and SO2 is higher in the transport process.

  17. Five Years of Ground-Based MAX-DOAS Observations of CHOCHO and HCHO in the Beijing Area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hendrick, F.; Lerot, C.; De Smedt, I.; Stavrakou, T.; Fayt, C.; Gielen, C.; Hermans, C.; Muller, J. F.; Pinardi, G.; Van Roozendael, M.

    2015-12-01

    Glyoxal (CHOCHO) and formaldehyde (HCHO) are among the most important carbonyl compounds in the atmosphere. Given their short lifetime (typically a few hours) and since they are mainly produced by the oxidation of biogenic and anthropogenic volatile organic compounds (VOCs), they are very good proxy for detecting active VOCs chemistry which can be responsible for the formation of pollutants such as tropospheric ozone and secondary organic aerosols. Both CHOCHO and HCHO are also directly released by biomass burning and fossil fuel combustion. Measuring these species is therefore of major importance for air quality monitoring, especially given the scarcity of available observational data sets. In this presentation, CHOCHO and HCHO vertical profiles and corresponding column densities are retrieved from ground-based MAX-DOAS (Multi-AXis Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy) measurements in the Beijing city center and at the suburban site of Xianghe located at 60km East of Beijing. The periods covered by the observations are June 2008-April 2009 in Beijing and March 2010-December 2014 in Xianghe. We first investigate the capability of the MAX-DOAS technique to measure these species in such highly-polluted environment. Then the diurnal and seasonal cycles of CHOCHO and HCHO near-surface concentrations and vertical column densities as well as the corresponding CHOCHO/HCHO ratios (RGF) are examined on a long-term basis at both locations. This RGF ratio is often used as an indicator of changes in the atmospheric VOC mixture. Finally, these diurnal and seasonal cycles are further assessed using simulations from the 3D chemistry transport model IMAGES and observations from the OMI and GOME-2 satellite nadir sensors.

  18. High-resolution NO2 maps of Rotterdam and Zürich retrieved from the APEX imaging spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuhlmann, Gerrit; Hueni, Andreas; Brunner, Dominik

    2016-04-01

    In urban areas, nitrogen dioxide (NO_2) concentrations have high spatial and temporal variability making high-resolution NO2 maps an important tool for air pollution assessment and epidemiological studies. We retrieved high-resolution NO2 maps from the Airborne Prism Experiment (APEX) imaging spectrometer measured over Zürich on 30. August 2013 (11:24--12:05 UTC) and Rotterdam on 17. September 2014 (8:53--10:18 UTC). Our updated retrieval fits NO_2, O_3, O_4, H_2O and the Ring effect between 440 and 510 nm using Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (DOAS). The radiance spectra were spectrally calibrated using a high-resolution solar reference spectrum to correct spectral shifts in across- and along-track direction. Air mass factors were computed using the SCIATRAN radiative transfer model. The retrieved NO2 maps have 50×50m2 resolution and cover an area of 10×26 km2 for Zürich and 10×50 km2 for Rotterdam. The maps show enhanced NO2 values in populated areas and at least three strong plumes from oil refineries in Rotterdam. A comparison with ground measurements in Rotterdam shows only weak correlation, because most of the NO2 is found in elevated plumes. In conclusion, airborne observations allow mapping of the NO2 distribution in urban areas providing a different perspective on urban air quality which cannot be acquired by ground-based observations. The obtained maps will be used for further analysis such as estimating NOX emissions from oil refineries and comparison with urban-scale chemistry transport modelling.

  19. Measurements of volcanic SO2 and CO2 fluxes by combined DOAS, Multi-GAS and FTIR observations: a case study from Turrialba and Telica volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conde, Vladimir; Robidoux, Philippe; Avard, Geoffroy; Galle, Bo; Aiuppa, Alessandro; Muñoz, Angélica; Giudice, Gaetano

    2014-11-01

    Over the past few decades, substantial progress has been made to overcome the technical difficulties of continuously measuring volcanic SO2 emissions. However, measurements of CO2 emissions still present many difficulties, partly due to the lack of instruments that can directly measure CO2 emissions and partly due to its strong atmospheric background. In order to overcome these difficulties, a commonly taken approach is to combine differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS) by using NOVAC scan-DOAS instruments for continuous measurements of crateric SO2 emissions, and electrochemical/NDIR multi-component gas analyser system (multi-GAS) instruments for measuring CO2/SO2 ratios of excerpts of the volcanic plume. This study aims to quantify the representativeness of excerpts of CO2/SO2 ratios measured by Multi-GAS as a fraction of the whole plume composition, by comparison with simultaneously measured CO2/SO2 ratios using cross-crater Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). Two study cases are presented: Telica volcano (Nicaragua), with a homogenous plume, quiescent degassing from a deep source and ambient temperature, and Turrialba volcano (Costa Rica), which has a non-homogeneous plume from three main sources with different compositions and temperatures. Our comparison shows that in our "easier case" (Telica), FTIR and Multi-GAS CO2/SO2 ratios agree within a factor about 3 %. In our "complicated case" (Turrialba), Multi-GAS and FTIR yield CO2/SO2 ratios differing by approximately 13-25 % at most. These results suggest that a fair estimation of volcanic CO2 emissions can be provided by the combination of DOAS and Multi-GAS instruments for volcanoes with similar degassing conditions as Telica or Turrialba. Based on the results of this comparison, we report that by the time our measurements were made, Telica and Turrialba were emitting approximately 100 and 1,000 t day-1 of CO2, respectively.

  20. Genome analysis of a novel Bradyrhizobium sp. DOA9 carrying a symbiotic plasmid.

    PubMed

    Okazaki, Shin; Noisangiam, Rujirek; Okubo, Takashi; Kaneko, Takakazu; Oshima, Kenshiro; Hattori, Masahira; Teamtisong, Kamonluck; Songwattana, Pongpan; Tittabutr, Panlada; Boonkerd, Nantakorn; Saeki, Kazuhiko; Sato, Shusei; Uchiumi, Toshiki; Minamisawa, Kiwamu; Teaumroong, Neung

    2015-01-01

    Bradyrhizobium sp. DOA9 isolated from the legume Aeschynomene americana exhibited a broad host range and divergent nodulation (nod) genes compared with other members of the Bradyrhizobiaceae. Genome analysis of DOA9 revealed that its genome comprised a single chromosome of 7.1 Mbp and a plasmid of 0.7 Mbp. The chromosome showed highest similarity with that of the nod gene-harboring soybean symbiont B. japonicum USDA110, whereas the plasmid showed highest similarity with pBBta01 of the nod gene-lacking photosynthetic strain BTAi1, which nodulates Aeschynomene species. Unlike in other bradyrhizobia, the plasmid of DOA9 encodes genes related to symbiotic functions including nodulation, nitrogen fixation, and type III/IV protein secretion systems. The plasmid has also a lower GC content (60.1%) than the chromosome (64.4%). These features suggest that the plasmid could be the origin of the symbiosis island that is found in the genome of other bradyrhizobia. The nod genes of DOA9 exhibited low similarity with those of other strains. The nif gene cluster of DOA9 showed greatest similarity to those of photosynthetic bradyrhizobia. The type III/IV protein secretion systems of DOA9 are similar to those of nod gene-harboring B. elkanii and photosynthetic BTAi1. The DOA9 genome exhibited intermediate characteristics between nod gene-harboring bradyrhizobia and nod gene-lacking photosynthetic bradyrhizobia, thus providing the evidence for the evolution of the Bradyrhizobiaceae during ecological adaptation. Bradyrhizobium sp. DOA9 isolated from the legume Aeschynomene americana exhibited a broad host range and divergent nodulation (nod) genes compared with other members of the Bradyrhizobiaceae. Genome analysis of DOA9 revealed that its genome comprised a single chromosome of 7.1 Mbp and a plasmid of 0.7 Mbp. The chromosome showed highest similarity with that of the nod gene-harboring soybean symbiont B. japonicum USDA110, whereas the plasmid showed highest similarity with p

  1. NO2 measurements in Hong Kong using LED based long path differential optical absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, K. L.; Pöhler, D.; Kuhlmann, G.; Hartl, A.; Platt, U.; Wenig, M. O.

    2012-05-01

    In this study we present the first long term measurements of atmospheric nitrogen dioxide (NO2) using a LED based Long Path Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (LP-DOAS) instrument. This instrument is measuring continuously in Hong Kong since December 2009, first in a setup with a 550 m absorption path and then with a 3820 m path at about 30 m to 50 m above street level. The instrument is using a high power blue light LED with peak intensity at 450 nm coupled into the telescope using a Y-fibre bundle. The LP-DOAS instrument measures NO2 levels in the Kowloon Tong and Mongkok district of Hong Kong and we compare the measurement results to mixing ratios reported by monitoring stations operated by the Hong Kong Environmental Protection Department in that area. Hourly averages of coinciding measurements are in reasonable agreement (R = 0.74). Furthermore, we used the long-term data set to validate the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) NO2 data product. Monthly averaged LP-DOAS and OMI measurements correlate well (R = 0.84) when comparing the data for the OMI overpass time. We analyzed weekly patterns in both data sets and found that the LP-DOAS detects a clear weekly cycle with a reduction on weekends during rush hour peaks, whereas OMI is not able to observe this weekly cycle due to its fix overpass time (13:30-14:30 LT - local time).

  2. PROMSAR: A backward Monte Carlo spherical RTM for the analysis of DOAS remote sensing measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palazzi, E.; Petritoli, A.; Giovanelli, G.; Kostadinov, I.; Bortoli, D.; Ravegnani, F.; Sackey, S. S.

    A correct interpretation of diffuse solar radiation measurements made by Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (DOAS) remote sensors require the use of radiative transfer models of the atmosphere. The simplest models consider radiation scattering in the atmosphere as a single scattering process. More realistic atmospheric models are those which consider multiple scattering and their application is useful and essential for the analysis of zenith and off-axis measurements regarding the lowest layers of the atmosphere, such as the boundary layer. These are characterized by the highest values of air density and quantities of particles and aerosols acting as scattering nuclei. A new atmospheric model, PROcessing of Multi-Scattered Atmospheric Radiation (PROMSAR), which includes multiple Rayleigh and Mie scattering, has recently been developed at ISAC-CNR. It is based on a backward Monte Carlo technique which is very suitable for studying the various interactions taking place in a complex and non-homogeneous system like the terrestrial atmosphere. PROMSAR code calculates the mean path of the radiation within each layer in which the atmosphere is sub-divided taking into account the large variety of processes that solar radiation undergoes during propagation through the atmosphere. This quantity is then employed to work out the Air Mass Factor (AMF) of several trace gases, to simulate in zenith and off-axis configurations their slant column amounts and to calculate the weighting functions from which informations about the gas vertical distribution is obtained using inversion methods. Results from the model, simulations and comparisons with actual slant column measurements are presented and discussed.

  3. A photoacoustic spectrometer for trace gas detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Telles, E. M.; Bezerra, E.; Scalabrin, A.

    2005-06-01

    A high-resolution external laser photoacoustic spectrometer has been developed for trace gas detection with absorption transitions in coincidence with CO2 laser emission lines (9,2-10,9 μm: 920-1086 cm-1). The CO2 laser operates in 90 CW lines with power of up to 15 W. A PC-controlled step motor can tune the laser lines. The resonance frequency of first longitudinal mode of the photoacoustic cell is at 1600 Hz. The cell Q-factor and cell constant are measured close to 50 and 28 mVcmW-1, respectively. The spectrometer has been tested in preliminary studies to analyze the absorption transitions of ozone (O_3). The ethylene (C_2H_4) from papaya fruit is also investigated using N2 as carrier gas at a constant flow rate.

  4. Temporal variations of aerosol, glyoxal, and formaldehyde at urban sites of Japan as observed by MAX-DOAS based on detailed error analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irie, H.; Chin, S.; Ni, W.; Nakayama, T.; Shimizu, A.; Yamazaki, A.; Nagai, T.; Takamura, T.; Khatri, P.

    2014-12-01

    The degradation of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) results in the formation of ozone (O3) and secondary organic aerosols (SOA) in the troposphere. This process consists of the oxidation of VOCs by hydroxyl radical (OH), O3, and nitrate radical (NO3). Detailed understanding of the VOC degradation mechanism is challenged by the co-existence of vast variety of VOC species in the atmosphere. However, investigations on ubiquitous oxidation intermediates, e.g., formaldehyde (HCHO) and glyoxal (CHOCHO), can help us improve the current knowledge of the VOC sources and degradation pathways. We installed one ground-based Multi-Axis Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (MAX-DOAS) system in Meteorological Research Institute (MRI) located at Tsukuba, Japan (36.06N, 130.13E) in June 2010. In addition, two more systems were installed in Chiba University at Chiba, Japan (35.63N, 140.10E) in June and December 2012, respectively. Since then, we have retrieved lower-tropospheric vertical profile information for eight components; aerosol extinction coefficients at two wavelengths, 357 and 476 nm, and NO2, HCHO, CHOCHO, H2O, SO2, and O3 concentrations. For a detailed evaluation for the aerosol retrieval, which is a key step in the MAX-DOAS eight-component retrieval, simultaneous aerosol observations with the Cavity Ring-Down Spectroscopy (CRDS), lidar, and sky radiometer were conducted at Tsukuba on October 5-18, 2010. At Chiba, in addition to the comparison with sky radiometer data, a self-consistency test was performed by comparing results obtained from two MAX-DOAS systems operated at the same place. Through these detailed evaluations, our retrieval method was improved significantly, attaining excellent agreement with CRDS, lidar, and sky radiometer data. On the basis of these efforts, we find clear seasonal and diurnal temporal variations in HCHO and CHOCHO concentrations and their ratios (RGF) retrieved from MAX-DOAS systems. Using NO2 retrieved together with HCHO and

  5. Ground-based MAX-DOAS observations of tropospheric aerosols, NO2, SO2 and HCHO in Wuxi, China, from 2011 to 2014

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yang; Lampel, Johannes; Xie, Pinhua; Beirle, Steffen; Li, Ang; Wu, Dexia; Wagner, Thomas

    2017-02-01

    We characterize the temporal variation and vertical distribution of nitrogen dioxide (NO2), sulfur dioxide (SO2), formaldehyde (HCHO) and aerosol extinction based on long-term multi-axis differential optical absorption spectroscopy (MAX-DOAS) observations from May 2011 to November 2014 in Wuxi, China. A new inversion algorithm (PriAM) is implemented to retrieve profiles of the trace gases (TGs) and aerosol extinction (AE) from the UV spectra of scattered sunlight recorded by the MAX-DOAS instrument. We investigated two important aspects of the retrieval process. We found that the systematic seasonal variation of temperature and pressure (which is regularly observed in Wuxi) can lead to a systematic bias of the retrieved aerosol profiles (e.g. up to 20 % for the AOD) if it is not explicitly considered. In this study we take this effect into account for the first time. We also investigated in detail the reason for the differences of tropospheric vertical column densities derived from either the geometric approximation or by the integration of the retrieved profiles, which were reported by earlier studies. We found that these differences are almost entirely caused by the limitations of the geometric approximation (especially for high aerosol loads). The results retrieved from the MAX-DOAS observations are compared with independent techniques not only under cloud-free sky conditions, but also under various cloud scenarios. Under most cloudy conditions (except fog and optically thick clouds), the trace gas results still show good agreements. In contrast, for the aerosol results, only near-surface AE could be still well retrieved under cloudy situations. After applying a quality control procedure, the MAX-DOAS data are used to characterize the seasonal, diurnal and weekly variations of NO2, SO2, HCHO and aerosols. A regular seasonality of the three trace gases is found, but not for aerosols. Similar annual variations of the profiles of the trace gases appear in different

  6. Estimates of free-tropospheric NO2 and HCHO mixing ratios derived from high-altitude mountain MAX-DOAS observations in the mid-latitudes and tropics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schreier, S. F.; Richter, A.; Wittrock, F.; Burrows, J. P.

    2015-11-01

    In this study, mixing ratios of NO2 (XNO2) and HCHO (XHCHO) in the free troposphere are derived from two Multi-AXis Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (MAX-DOAS) data sets collected at Zugspitze (2650 m a.s.l., Germany) and Pico Espejo (4765 m a.s.l., Venezuela). The estimation of NO2 and HCHO mixing ratios is based on the modified geometrical approach, which assumes a single-scattering geometry and a scattering point altitude close to the instrument. Firstly, the horizontal optical path length (hOPL) is obtained from O4 differential slant column densities (DSCDs) in the horizontal (0°) and vertical (90°) viewing directions. Secondly, XNO2 and XHCHO are estimated from the NO2 and HCHO DSCDs at the 0 and 90° viewing directions and averaged along the obtained hOPLs. As the MAX-DOAS instrument was performing measurements in the ultraviolet region, wavelength ranges of 346-372 and 338-357 nm are selected for the DOAS analysis to retrieve NO2 and HCHO DSCDs, respectively. In order to compare the measured O4 DSCDs and moreover to perform some sensitivity tests, the radiative transfer model SCIATRAN with adapted altitude settings for mountainous terrain is operated to simulate synthetic spectra, on which the DOAS analysis is also applied. The overall agreement between measured and synthetic O4 DSCDs is better for the higher Pico Espejo station than for Zugspitze. Further sensitivity analysis shows that a change in surface albedo (from 0.05 to 0.7) can influence the O4 DSCDs, with a larger absolute difference observed for the horizontal viewing direction. Consequently, the hOPL can vary by about 5 % throughout the season, for example when winter snow cover fully disappears in summer. Typical values of hOPLs during clear sky conditions are 19 km (14 km) at Zugspitze and 34 km (26.5 km) at Pico Espejo when using the 346-372 nm (338-357 nm) fitting window. The estimated monthly values of XNO2 (XHCHO), averaged over these hOPLs during clear sky conditions, are in

  7. Estimates of free-tropospheric NO2 and HCHO mixing ratios derived from high-altitude mountain MAX-DOAS observations at midlatitudes and in the tropics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schreier, Stefan F.; Richter, Andreas; Wittrock, Folkard; Burrows, John P.

    2016-03-01

    In this study, mixing ratios of NO2 (XNO2) and HCHO (XHCHO) in the free troposphere are derived from two multi-axis differential optical absorption spectroscopy (MAX-DOAS) data sets collected at Zugspitze (2650 m a.s.l., Germany) and Pico Espejo (4765 m a.s.l., Venezuela). The estimation of NO2 and HCHO mixing ratios is based on the modified geometrical approach, which assumes a single-scattering geometry and a scattering point altitude close to the instrument altitude. Firstly, the horizontal optical path length (hOPL) is obtained from O4 differential slant column densities (DSCDs) in the horizontal (0°) and vertical (90°) viewing directions. Secondly, XNO2 and XHCHO are estimated from the NO2 and HCHO DSCDs at the 0° and 90° viewing directions and averaged along the obtained hOPLs. As the MAX-DOAS instrument was performing measurements in the ultraviolet region, wavelength ranges of 346-372 and 338-357 nm are selected for the DOAS analysis to retrieve NO2 and HCHO DSCDs, respectively. In order to compare the measured O4 DSCDs and moreover to perform some sensitivity tests, the radiative transfer model SCIATRAN with adapted altitude settings for mountainous terrain is operated to simulate synthetic spectra, on which the DOAS analysis is also applied. The overall agreement between measured and synthetic O4 DSCDs is better for the higher Pico Espejo station than for Zugspitze. Further sensitivity analysis shows that a change in surface albedo (from 0.05 to 0.7) can influence the O4 DSCDs, with a larger absolute difference observed for the horizontal viewing direction. Consequently, the hOPL can vary by about 5 % throughout the season, for example when winter snow cover fully disappears in summer. Typical values of hOPLs during clear-sky conditions are 19 km (14 km) at Zugspitze and 34 km (26.5 km) at Pico Espejo when using the 346-372 (338-357 nm) fitting window. The estimated monthly values of XNO2 (XHCHO), averaged over these hOPLs during clear-sky conditions

  8. The Berkeley tunable far infrared laser spectrometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blake, G. A.; Laughlin, K. B.; Cohen, R. C.; Busarow, K. L.; Gwo, D.-H.

    1991-01-01

    A detailed description is presented for a tunable far infrared laser spectrometer based on frequency mixing of an optically pumped molecular gas laser with tunable microwave radiation in a Schottky point contact diode. The system has been operated on over 30 laser lines in the range 10-100/cm and exhibits a maximum absorption sensitivity near one part in a million. Each laser line can be tuned by + or - 110 GHz with first-order sidebands.

  9. The CU ground MAX-DOAS instrument: characterization of RMS noise limitations and first measurements near Pensacola, FL of BrO, IO, and CHOCHO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coburn, S.; Dix, B.; Sinreich, R.; Volkamer, R.

    2011-11-01

    We designed and assembled the University of Colorado Ground Multi AXis Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (CU GMAX-DOAS) instrument to retrieve bromine oxide (BrO), iodine oxide (IO), formaldehyde (HCHO), glyoxal (CHOCHO), nitrogen dioxide (NO2) and the oxygen dimer (O4) in the coastal atmosphere of the Gulf of Mexico. The detection sensitivity of DOAS measurements is proportional to the root mean square (RMS) of the residual spectrum that remains after all absorbers have been subtracted. Here we describe the CU GMAX-DOAS instrument and demonstrate that the hardware is capable of attaining RMS of ∼6 × 10-6 from solar stray light noise tests using high photon count spectra (compatible within a factor of two with photon shot noise). Laboratory tests revealed two critical instrument properties that, in practice, can limit the RMS: (1) detector non-linearity noise, RMSNLin, and (2) temperature fluctuations that cause variations in optical resolution (full width at half the maximum, FWHM, of atomic emission lines) and give rise to optical resolution noise, RMSFWHM. The non-linearity of our detector is low (∼10-2) yet - unless actively controlled - is sufficiently large to create RMSNLin of up to 2 × 10-4. The optical resolution is sensitive to temperature changes (0.03 detector pixels °C-1 at 334 nm), and temperature variations of 0.1°C can cause RMSFWHM of ~1 × 10-4. Both factors were actively addressed in the design of the CU GMAX-DOAS instrument. With an integration time of 60 s the instrument can reach RMS noise of 3 × 10-5, and typical RMS in field measurements ranged from 6 × 10-5 to 1.4 × 10-4. The CU GMAX-DOAS was set up at a coastal site near Pensacola, Florida, where we detected BrO, IO and CHOCHO in the marine boundary layer (MBL), with daytime average tropospheric vertical column densities (average of data above the detection limit), VCDs, of ∼2 × 1013 molec cm-2, 8 × 1012 molec cm-2 and 4 × 1014 molec cm-2, respectively

  10. Determination of the NO2 concentration and its distribution with different DOAS techniques - a study in the metropolitan area of Hong Kong

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horbanski, M.; Chan, K. L.; Pöhler, D.; Wenig, M. O.; Platt, U.

    2012-04-01

    In Hong Kong, like in other urban areas, nitrogen dioxide (NO2) emissions still remain one of the most problematic pollutions. Even though a lot of effort has already been made towards their reduction, concentrations are often much above the recommended limits. Therefore, the Hong Kong Environmental Protection Department continuously monitors the NO2 concentration levels. These stations only give in-situ information at a few fixed locations, which are unable to capture the strong spatial gradients that are present in urban areas. These gradients are mainly caused by differences in automobile traffic, the population densities and industries that are found in the individual city areas. The gradients are further enhanced by street canyon effects. Hence, it can be assumed that there are areas with much higher pollution compared to the values at the official measuring sites. At present the uncertainties about the spatial NO2 distribution place a limitation on the assessment of health risks and on the quality of chemical model calculations. We applied a new Cavity Enhanced (CE-) DOAS instrument to car based measurements in the city of Hong Kong for eight days in December 2010. Measurements on mobile platforms like cars give the opportunity to create a map of the NO2 for a whole city area with high spatial resolution. The CE-DOAS instrument is distinguished by its compact and robust setup. It directly measures NO2 by its optical absorption and therefore it does not have interferences with other trace gas species like O3 or NOy. This is a great advantage over other NO2 instruments (e.g. solid state detectors or chemiluminescence instruments which have such known problems). For our measurements a van travels along carefully selected tracks to give a representative coverage of the area of interest. The mobile measurements are corrected for the varying meteorological conditions and traffic variations during the different measurements by comparing them to a fixed measurement

  11. CU AMAX-DOAS applications in cloud-free and cloudy atmospheres: innovative Scattered Sun Light observations of trace gases and aerosol extinction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volkamer, R.; Baidar, S.; Coburn, S.; Dix, B. K.; Oetjen, H.; Ortega, I.; Sinreich, R.; Atmospeclab

    2011-12-01

    An innovative airborne scanning multi-axis differential optical absorption spectroscopy (CU AMAX-DOAS) instrument has been developed at the University of Colorado, Boulder. The instrument collects scattered sunlight spectra in a sequence of discrete viewing angles, and employs the DOAS method (inherently calibrated, and selective) to simultaneously retrieve multiple trace gases, e.g., nitrogen dioxide (NO2), nitrous acid (HONO), formaldehyde (HCHO), glyoxal (CHOCHO), bromine oxide (BrO), iodine oxide (IO), chlorine dioxide (OClO), water vapor (H2O), and oxygen dimers (O4, at 360nm, 477nm, and 632nm) differential slant column densities (dSCD). Vertical profiles of these gases and multi-spectral aerosol extinction are inferred by combining Monte-Carlo Radiative Transfer Modelling (RTM) and optimal estimation techniques to construct a model atmosphere that can in principle represent 3D clouds and aerosols. The atmospheric state of this model atmosphere is constrained by observations of O4 dSCDs, Raman Scattering Probability (RSP), and intensity ratios, i.e., quantities that depend solely on relative intensity changes, without need for a direct sun view, or absolute radiance calibration. We show results from ongoing validation efforts (NOAA TwinOtter aircraft during CalNex and CARES), and demonstrate vertical profile retrievals (NSF/NCAR GV over the tropical Pacific Ocean) in both cloud-free and cloudy atmospheres.

  12. Doa4 function in ILV budding is restricted through its interaction with the Vps20 subunit of ESCRT-III

    PubMed Central

    Richter, Caleb M.; West, Matthew; Odorizzi, Greg

    2013-01-01

    Summary Assembly of the endosomal sorting complex required for transport (ESCRT)-III executes the formation of intralumenal vesicles (ILVs) at endosomes. Repeated cycles of ESCRT-III function requires disassembly of the complex by Vps4, an ATPase with a microtubule interaction and trafficking (MIT) domain that binds MIT-interacting motifs (MIM1 or MIM2) in ESCRT-III subunits. We identified a putative MIT domain at the N-terminus of Doa4, which is the ubiquitin (Ub) hydrolase in Saccharomyces cerevisiae that deubiquitinates ILV cargo proteins. The Doa4 N-terminus is predicted to have the α-helical structure common to MIT domains, and it binds directly to a MIM1-like sequence in the Vps20 subunit of ESCRT-III. Disrupting this interaction does not prevent endosomal localization of Doa4 but enhances the defect in ILV cargo protein deubiquitination observed in cells lacking Bro1, which is an ESCRT-III effector protein that stimulates Doa4 catalytic activity. Deletion of the BRO1 gene (bro1Δ) blocks ILV budding, but ILV budding was rescued upon disrupting the interaction between Vps20 and Doa4. This rescue in ILV biogenesis requires Doa4 expression but is independent of its Ub hydrolase activity. Thus, binding of Vps20 to the Doa4 N-terminus inhibits a non-catalytic function of Doa4 that promotes ILV formation. PMID:23444383

  13. Single-snapshot DOA estimation by using Compressed Sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fortunati, Stefano; Grasso, Raffaele; Gini, Fulvio; Greco, Maria S.; LePage, Kevin

    2014-12-01

    This paper deals with the problem of estimating the directions of arrival (DOA) of multiple source signals from a single observation vector of an array data. In particular, four estimation algorithms based on the theory of compressed sensing (CS), i.e., the classical ℓ 1 minimization (or Least Absolute Shrinkage and Selection Operator, LASSO), the fast smooth ℓ 0 minimization, and the Sparse Iterative Covariance-Based Estimator, SPICE and the Iterative Adaptive Approach for Amplitude and Phase Estimation, IAA-APES algorithms, are analyzed, and their statistical properties are investigated and compared with the classical Fourier beamformer (FB) in different simulated scenarios. We show that unlike the classical FB, a CS-based beamformer (CSB) has some desirable properties typical of the adaptive algorithms (e.g., Capon and MUSIC) even in the single snapshot case. Particular attention is devoted to the super-resolution property. Theoretical arguments and simulation analysis provide evidence that a CS-based beamformer can achieve resolution beyond the classical Rayleigh limit. Finally, the theoretical findings are validated by processing a real sonar dataset.

  14. A colloidal quantum dot spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bao, Jie; Bawendi, Moungi G.

    2015-07-01

    Spectroscopy is carried out in almost every field of science, whenever light interacts with matter. Although sophisticated instruments with impressive performance characteristics are available, much effort continues to be invested in the development of miniaturized, cheap and easy-to-use systems. Current microspectrometer designs mostly use interference filters and interferometric optics that limit their photon efficiency, resolution and spectral range. Here we show that many of these limitations can be overcome by replacing interferometric optics with a two-dimensional absorptive filter array composed of colloidal quantum dots. Instead of measuring different bands of a spectrum individually after introducing temporal or spatial separations with gratings or interference-based narrowband filters, a colloidal quantum dot spectrometer measures a light spectrum based on the wavelength multiplexing principle: multiple spectral bands are encoded and detected simultaneously with one filter and one detector, respectively, with the array format allowing the process to be efficiently repeated many times using different filters with different encoding so that sufficient information is obtained to enable computational reconstruction of the target spectrum. We illustrate the performance of such a quantum dot microspectrometer, made from 195 different types of quantum dots with absorption features that cover a spectral range of 300 nanometres, by measuring shifts in spectral peak positions as small as one nanometre. Given this performance, demonstrable avenues for further improvement, the ease with which quantum dots can be processed and integrated, and their numerous finely tuneable bandgaps that cover a broad spectral range, we expect that quantum dot microspectrometers will be useful in applications where minimizing size, weight, cost and complexity of the spectrometer are critical.

  15. A Simple Raman Spectrometer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blond, J. P.; Boggett, D. M.

    1980-01-01

    Discusses some basic physical ideas about light scattering and describes a simple Raman spectrometer, a single prism monochromator and a multiplier detector. This discussion is intended for British undergraduate physics students. (HM)

  16. Composite Spectrometer Prisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Breckinridge, J. B.; Page, N. A.; Rodgers, J. M.

    1985-01-01

    Efficient linear dispersive element for spectrometer instruments achieved using several different glasses in multiple-element prism. Good results obtained in both two-and three-element prisms using variety of different glass materials.

  17. Fourier Transform Spectrometer System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, Joel F. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    A Fourier transform spectrometer (FTS) data acquisition system includes an FTS spectrometer that receives a spectral signal and a laser signal. The system further includes a wideband detector, which is in communication with the FTS spectrometer and receives the spectral signal and laser signal from the FTS spectrometer. The wideband detector produces a composite signal comprising the laser signal and the spectral signal. The system further comprises a converter in communication with the wideband detector to receive and digitize the composite signal. The system further includes a signal processing unit that receives the composite signal from the converter. The signal processing unit further filters the laser signal and the spectral signal from the composite signal and demodulates the laser signal, to produce velocity corrected spectral data.

  18. DOA Estimation under Unknown Mutual Coupling and Multipath with Improved Effective Array Aperture

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yuexian; Trinkle, Matthew; Ng, Brian W.-H.

    2015-01-01

    Subspace-based high-resolution direction of arrival (DOA) estimation significantly deteriorates under array manifold perturbation and rank deficiency of the covariance matrix due to mutual coupling and multipath propagation, respectively. In this correspondence, the unknown mutual coupling can be circumvented by the proposed method without any passive or active calibration process, and the DOA of the coherent signals can be accurately estimated accordingly. With a newly constructed matrix, the deficient rank can be restored, and the effective array aperture can be extended compared with conventional spatial smoothing. The proposed method achieves a good robustness and DOA estimation accuracy with unknown mutual coupling. The simulation results demonstrate the validity and efficiency of the proposed method. PMID:26670235

  19. Sparsity-Aware DOA Estimation Scheme for Noncircular Source in MIMO Radar

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xianpeng; Wang, Wei; Li, Xin; Liu, Qi; Liu, Jing

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, a novel sparsity-aware direction of arrival (DOA) estimation scheme for a noncircular source is proposed in multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO) radar. In the proposed method, the reduced-dimensional transformation technique is adopted to eliminate the redundant elements. Then, exploiting the noncircularity of signals, a joint sparsity-aware scheme based on the reweighted l1 norm penalty is formulated for DOA estimation, in which the diagonal elements of the weight matrix are the coefficients of the noncircular MUSIC-like (NC MUSIC-like) spectrum. Compared to the existing l1 norm penalty-based methods, the proposed scheme provides higher angular resolution and better DOA estimation performance. Results from numerical experiments are used to show the effectiveness of our proposed method. PMID:27089345

  20. Off-Grid DOA Estimation Using Alternating Block Coordinate Descent in Compressed Sensing

    PubMed Central

    Si, Weijian; Qu, Xinggen; Qu, Zhiyu

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a novel off-grid direction of arrival (DOA) estimation method to achieve the superior performance in compressed sensing (CS), in which DOA estimation problem is cast as a sparse reconstruction. By minimizing the mixed k-l norm, the proposed method can reconstruct the sparse source and estimate grid error caused by mismatch. An iterative process that minimizes the mixed k-l norm alternately over two sparse vectors is employed so that the nonconvex problem is solved by alternating convex optimization. In order to yield the better reconstruction properties, the block sparse source is exploited for off-grid DOA estimation. A block selection criterion is engaged to reduce the computational complexity. In addition, the proposed method is proved to have the global convergence. Simulation results show that the proposed method has the superior performance in comparisons to existing methods. PMID:26343658

  1. Computer-controlled Cauchois-type x-ray spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    André, J. M.; Kefi, M.; Avila, A.; Couillaux, P.; Bonnelle, C.

    1987-03-01

    A laboratory x-ray spectrometer designed for routine analysis in the 15-60-keV spectral range is described. It consists of a 40-cm bent-crystal transmission spectrometer in the Cauchois geometry, controlled by a microcomputer. The choice of the crystal analyzer and of the detection system is discussed. The instrument is well suited for large spectral range x-ray absorption and emission spectroscopy (XAS, XES) and x-ray source diagnostics.

  2. Parameterization retrieval of trace gas volume mixing ratios from Airborne MAX-DOAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dix, Barbara; Koenig, Theodore K.; Volkamer, Rainer

    2016-11-01

    We present a parameterization retrieval of volume mixing ratios (VMRs) from differential slant column density (dSCD) measurements by Airborne Multi-AXis Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (AMAX-DOAS). The method makes use of the fact that horizontally recorded limb spectra (elevation angle 0°) are strongly sensitive to the atmospheric layer at instrument altitude. These limb spectra are analyzed using reference spectra that largely cancel out column contributions from above and below the instrument, so that the resulting limb dSCDs, i.e., the column integrated concentration with respect to a reference spectrum, are almost exclusively sensitive to the atmospheric layers around instrument altitude. The conversion of limb dSCDs into VMRs is then realized by calculating box air mass factors (Box-AMFs) for a Rayleigh atmosphere and applying a scaling factor constrained by O4 dSCDs to account for aerosol extinction. An iterative VMR retrieval scheme corrects for trace gas profile shape effects. Benefits of this method are (1) a fast conversion that only requires the computation of Box-AMFs in a Rayleigh atmosphere; (2) neither local aerosol extinction nor the slant column density in the DOAS reference (SCDref) needs to be known; and (3) VMRs can be retrieved for every measurement point along a flight track, thus increasing statistics and adding flexibility to capture concentration gradients. Sensitivity studies are performed for bromine monoxide (BrO), iodine monoxide (IO) and nitrogen dioxide (NO2), using (1) simulated dSCD data for different trace gas and aerosol profiles and (2) field measurements from the Tropical Ocean tRoposphere Exchange of Reactive halogen species and Oxygenated VOC (TORERO) field experiment. For simulated data in a Rayleigh atmosphere, the agreement between the VMR from the parameterization method (VMRpara) and the true VMR (VMRtrue) is excellent for all trace gases. Offsets, slopes and R2 values for the linear fit of VMRpara over

  3. Capon-based single-snapshot DOA estimation in monostatic MIMO radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassanien, Aboulnasr; Amin, Moeness G.; Zhang, Yimin D.; Ahmad, Fauzia

    2015-05-01

    We consider the problem of single snapshot direction-of-arrival (DOA) estimation of multiple targets in monostatic multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO) radar. When only a single snapshot is used, the sample covariance matrix of the data becomes non-invertible and, therefore, does not permit application of Capon-based DOA estimation techniques. On the other hand, low-resolution techniques, such as the conventional beamformer, suffer from biased estimation and fail to resolve closely spaced sources. In this paper, we propose a new Capon-based method for DOA estimation in MIMO radar using a single radar pulse. Assuming that the angular locations of the sources are known a priori to be located within a certain spatial sector, we employ multiple transmit beams to focus the transmit energy of multiple orthogonal waveforms within the desired sector. The transmit weight vectors are carefully designed such that they have the same transmit power distribution pattern. As compared to the standard MIMO radar, the proposed approach enables transmitting an arbitrary number of orthogonal waveforms. By using matched-filtering at the receiver, the data associated with each beam is extracted yielding a virtual data snapshot. The total number of virtual snapshots is equal to the number of transmit beams. By choosing the number of transmit beams to be larger than the number of receive elements, it becomes possible to form a full-rank sample covariance matrix. The Capon beamformer is then applied to estimate the DOAs of the targets of interest. The proposed method is shown to have improved DOA estimation performance as compared to conventional single-snapshot DOA estimation methods.

  4. Joint Estimation of Time-Frequency Signature and DOA Based on STFD for Multicomponent Chirp Signals.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Ziyue; Liu, Congfeng

    2014-01-01

    In the study of the joint estimation of time-frequency signature and direction of arrival (DOA) for multicomponent chirp signals, an estimation method based on spatial time-frequency distributions (STFDs) is proposed in this paper. Firstly, array signal model for multicomponent chirp signals is presented and then array processing is applied in time-frequency analysis to mitigate cross-terms. According to the results of the array processing, Hough transform is performed and the estimation of time-frequency signature is obtained. Subsequently, subspace method for DOA estimation based on STFD matrix is achieved. Simulation results demonstrate the validity of the proposed method.

  5. Spectrometer technology recommendations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, William J.

    1988-01-01

    A typical heterodyne remote sensing system contains three major elements: the antenna, the radiometer, and the spectrometer. The radiometer consists of the local oscillator, the mixer, and the intermediate frequency amplifiers. This subsystem performs the function of down converting the high frequency incident thermal emission signal to a lower intermediate frequency. The spectrometer measures the power spectrum of the down-converted signal simultaneously in many contiguous frequency channels. Typical spectrum analysis requirements involve measurement of signal bandwidths of 100 to 1000 MHz with a channel resolution of 0.5 to 10 MHz. Three general approaches are used for spectrometers: (1) filter banks, (2) Acousto-Optic Spectrometers (AOS's), and (3) digital autocorrelators. In contrast to the two frequency domain techniques, an autocorrelator works in the time domain. The autocorrelation function (ACF) of the incoming signal is computed and averaged over the integration time. The averaged ACF is then Fourier transformed to obtain the signal power spectrum. Significant progress was made in the development of sub mm antennas and radiometers. It is now time to begin research in the development of low power spaceborne spectrometers and to reduce their size and weight. The near-term research goal will be to develop a prototype digital autocorrelation spectrometer, using VLSI gate array technology, which will have a small size, low power requirements, and can be used in spacecraft mm and sub mm radiometer systems. The long-range objective of this technology development is to make extremely low power, less than 10 mW/channel, small and stable wideband spectrometers which can be used in future mm and sub mm wavelength space missions such as the Large Deployable Reflector.

  6. Spectrometer technology recommendations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, William J.

    1988-08-01

    A typical heterodyne remote sensing system contains three major elements: the antenna, the radiometer, and the spectrometer. The radiometer consists of the local oscillator, the mixer, and the intermediate frequency amplifiers. This subsystem performs the function of down converting the high frequency incident thermal emission signal to a lower intermediate frequency. The spectrometer measures the power spectrum of the down-converted signal simultaneously in many contiguous frequency channels. Typical spectrum analysis requirements involve measurement of signal bandwidths of 100 to 1000 MHz with a channel resolution of 0.5 to 10 MHz. Three general approaches are used for spectrometers: (1) filter banks, (2) Acousto-Optic Spectrometers (AOS's), and (3) digital autocorrelators. In contrast to the two frequency domain techniques, an autocorrelator works in the time domain. The autocorrelation function (ACF) of the incoming signal is computed and averaged over the integration time. The averaged ACF is then Fourier transformed to obtain the signal power spectrum. Significant progress was made in the development of sub mm antennas and radiometers. It is now time to begin research in the development of low power spaceborne spectrometers and to reduce their size and weight. The near-term research goal will be to develop a prototype digital autocorrelation spectrometer, using VLSI gate array technology, which will have a small size, low power requirements, and can be used in spacecraft mm and sub mm radiometer systems. The long-range objective of this technology development is to make extremely low power, less than 10 mW/channel, small and stable wideband spectrometers which can be used in future mm and sub mm wavelength space missions such as the Large Deployable Reflector.

  7. Extending differential optical absorption spectroscopy for limb measurements in the UV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puä·Ä«Te, J.; Kühl, S.; Deutschmann, T.; Platt, U.; Wagner, T.

    2010-05-01

    Methods of UV/VIS absorption spectroscopy to determine the constituents in the Earth's atmosphere from measurements of scattered light are often based on the Beer-Lambert law, like e.g. Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (DOAS). While the Beer-Lambert law is strictly valid for a single light path only, the relation between the optical depth and the concentration of any absorber can be approximated as linear also for scattered light observations at a single wavelength if the absorption is weak. If the light path distribution is approximated not to vary with wavelength, also linearity between the optical depth and the product of the cross-section and the concentration of an absorber can be assumed. These assumptions are widely made for DOAS applications for scattered light observations. For medium and strong absorption of scattered light (e.g. along very long light-paths like in limb geometry) the relation between the optical depth and the concentration of an absorber is no longer linear. In addition, for broad wavelength intervals the differences in the travelled light-paths at different wavelengths become important, especially in the UV, where the probability for scattering increases strongly with decreasing wavelength. However, the DOAS method can be extended to cases with medium to strong absorptions and for broader wavelength intervals by the so called air mass factor modified (or extended) DOAS and the weighting function modified DOAS. These approaches take into account the wavelength dependency of the slant column densities (SCDs), but also require a priori knowledge for the air mass factor or the weighting function from radiative transfer modelling. We describe an approach that considers the fitting results obtained from DOAS, the SCDs, as a function of wavelength and vertical optical depth and expands this function into a Taylor series of both quantities. The Taylor coefficients are then applied as additional fitting parameters in the DOAS analysis

  8. Electron-proton spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winckler, J. R.

    1973-01-01

    An electron-proton spectrometer was designed to measure the geomagnetically trapped radiation in a geostationary orbit at 6.6 earth radii in the outer radiation belt. This instrument is to be flown on the Applications Technology Satellite-F (ATS-F). The electron-proton spectrometer consists of two permanent magnet surface barrier detector arrays and associated electronics capable of selecting and detecting electrons in three energy ranges: (1) 30-50 keV, (2) 150-200 keV, and (3) 500 keV and protons in three energy ranges. The electron-proton spectrometer has the capability of measuring the fluxes of electrons and protons in various directions with respect to the magnetic field lines running through the satellite. One magnet detector array system is implemented to scan between EME north and south through west, sampling the directional flux in 15 steps. The other magnet-detector array system is fixed looking toward EME east.

  9. MAX-DOAS measurements in southern China: retrieval of aerosol extinctions and validation using ground-based in-situ data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, X.; Brauers, T.; Shao, M.; Garland, R. M.; Wagner, T.; Deutschmann, T.; Wahner, A.

    2010-03-01

    We performed MAX-DOAS measurements during the PRiDe-PRD2006 campaign in the Pearl River Delta region 50 km north of Guangzhou, China, for 4 weeks in June 2006. We used an instrument sampling at 7 different elevation angles between 3° and 90°. During 9 cloud-free days, differential slant column densities (DSCDs) of O4 (O2 dimer) absorptions between 351 nm and 389 nm were evaluated for 6 elevation angles. Here, we show that radiative transfer modeling of the DSCDS can be used to retrieve the aerosol extinction and the height of the boundary layer. A comparison of the aerosol extinction with simultaneously recorded, ground based nephelometer data shows excellent agreement.

  10. [Studies on the determination of the flux of gaseous pollutant from an area by passive differential optical absorption spectroscopy].

    PubMed

    Li, Ang; Xie, Pin-Hua; Liu, Wen-Qing; Liu, Jian-Guo; Dou, Ke

    2009-01-01

    An optical remote sensing method based on passive differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS) for the determination of the flux of SO2 or other gaseous pollutants from an area (such as industrial area, city) which includes many different atmospheric pollution sources was studied in the present paper. Passive DOAS using the zenith scattered sunlight as the light source provides the column density (the integrated concentration of atmospheric absorbers along the light path) and has been successfully applied to the determination of the flux of gaseous pollutants emitted from the volcano or point source. Passive DOAS instrument installed in a car scanned the plume emitted from an area by circling around the area in this paper. Column density of each selected gaseous pollutant was retrieved from zenith scattered sunlight spectra collected by the instrument by spectral analysis method of passive DOAS in their particular absorption spectral range respectively. Combined with the meteorological (wind field) information during the period of measurement, the net flux value of gaseous pollutant from this area during the measurement could be estimated. DOAS method used to obtain the column density of gaseous pollutant in the section plane of the plume emitted from source and the method of net flux calculation of gaseous pollutant from a certain area are described. Also a passive DOAS instrument was developed and installed in a car to scan the gaseous pollutants from the area surrounded by the 5th Ring Road in Beijing city during a field campaign in the summer of 2005. The SO2 net flux 1.13 x 10(4) kg x h(-1) and NO2 net flux 9.3 x 10(3) kg x h(-1) from this area were derived separately after the passive DOAS measured the entire ring road and the wind data were roughly estimated from wind profile radar. The results indicate that this optical remote sensing method based on passive DOAS can be used to rapidly determine the flux of gaseous pollutant (such as SO2, NO2

  11. Broad band waveguide spectrometer

    DOEpatents

    Goldman, Don S.

    1995-01-01

    A spectrometer for analyzing a sample of material utilizing a broad band source of electromagnetic radiation and a detector. The spectrometer employs a waveguide possessing an entry and an exit for the electromagnetic radiation emanating from the source. The waveguide further includes a surface between the entry and exit portions which permits interaction between the electromagnetic radiation passing through the wave guide and a sample material. A tapered portion forms a part of the entry of the wave guide and couples the electromagnetic radiation emanating from the source to the waveguide. The electromagnetic radiation passing from the exit of the waveguide is captured and directed to a detector for analysis.

  12. The GRIFFIN spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svensson, C. E.; Garnsworthy, A. B.

    2014-01-01

    Gamma-Ray Infrastructure For Fundamental Investigations of Nuclei (GRIFFIN) is an advanced new high-efficiency γ-ray spectrometer being developed for use in decay spectroscopy experiments with low-energy radioactive ion beams provided by TRIUMF's Isotope Separator and Accelerator (ISAC-I) radioactive ion beam facility. GRIFFIN will be comprised of sixteen large-volume clover-type high-purity germanium (HPGe) γ-ray detectors coupled to custom digital signal processing electronics and used in conjunction with a suite of auxiliary detection systems. This article provides an overview of the GRIFFIN spectrometer and its expected performance characteristics.

  13. The Apollo Alpha Spectrometer.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jagoda, N.; Kubierschky, K.; Frank, R.; Carroll, J.

    1973-01-01

    Located in the Science Instrument Module of Apollo 15 and 16, the Alpha Particle Spectrometer was designed to detect and measure the energy of alpha particles emitted by the radon isotopes and their daughter products. The spectrometer sensor consisted of an array of totally depleted silicon surface barrier detectors. Biased amplifier and linear gate techniques were utilized to reduce resolution degradation, thereby permitting the use of a single 512 channel PHA. Sensor identification and in-flight radioactive calibration were incorporated to enhance data reduction.

  14. Comparison of imaging spectrometers

    SciTech Connect

    Bennett, C

    2000-01-09

    Realistic signal to noise performance estimates for the various types of instruments being considered for NGST are compared, based on the point source detection values quoted in the available ISIM final reports. The corresponding sensitivity of the various types of spectrometers operating in a full field imaging mode, for both emission line objects and broad spectral distribution objects, is computed and displayed. For the purpose of seeing the earliest galaxies, or the faintest possible emission line sources, the imaging Fourier transform spectrometer emerges superior to all others, by orders of magnitude in speed.

  15. Portable reflectance spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goetz, A. F. H.; Graham, R. A.; Ozawa, T. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    A portable reflectance spectrometer is disclosed. The spectrometer essentially includes an optical unit and an electronic recording unit. The optical unit includes a pair of thermoelectrically-cooled detectors, for detecting total radiance and selected radiance projected through a circular variable filter wheel, and is capable of operating to provide spectral data in the range 0.4 to 2.5 micrometers without requiring coventional substitution of filter elements. The electronic recording unit includes power supplies, amplifiers, and digital recording electronics designed to permit recordation of data on tape casettes. Both the optical unit and electronic recording unit are packaged to be manually portable.

  16. Miniaturised TOF mass spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rohner, U.; Wurz, P.; Whitby, J.

    2003-04-01

    For the BepiColombo misson of ESA to Mercury, we built a prototype of a miniaturised Time of Flight mass spectrometer with a low mass and low power consumption. Particles will be set free form the surface and ionized by short laser pluses. The mass spectrometer is dedicated to measure the elemental and isotopic composition of almost all elements of Mercurys planetary surface with an adequate dynamique range, mass range and mass resolution. We will present first results of our prototype and future designs.

  17. Infrared absorption of methanol clusters (CH3OH)n with n = 2-6 recorded with a time-of-flight mass spectrometer using infrared depletion and vacuum-ultraviolet ionization.

    PubMed

    Han, Hui-Ling; Camacho, Cristopher; Witek, Henryk A; Lee, Yuan-Pern

    2011-04-14

    We investigated IR spectra in the CH- and OH-stretching regions of size-selected methanol clusters, (CH(3)OH)(n) with n = 2-6, in a pulsed supersonic jet by using the IR-VUV (vacuum-ultraviolet) ionization technique. VUV emission at 118 nm served as the source of ionization in a time-of-flight mass spectrometer. The tunable IR laser emission served as a source of predissociation or excitation before ionization. The variations of intensity of protonated methanol cluster ions (CH(3)OH)(n)H(+) and CH(3)OH(+) and (CH(3)OH)(2)(+) were monitored as the IR laser light was tuned across the range 2650-3750 cm(-1). Careful processing of these action spectra based on photoionization efficiencies and the production and loss of each cluster due to photodissociation yielded IR spectra of the size-selected clusters. Spectra of methanol clusters in the OH region have been extensively investigated; our results are consistent with previous reports, except that the band near 3675 cm(-1) is identified as being associated with the proton acceptor of (CH(3)OH)(2). Spectra in the CH region are new. In the region 2800-3050 cm(-1), bands near 2845, 2956, and 3007 cm(-1) for CH(3)OH split into 2823, 2849, 2934, 2955, 2984, and 3006 cm(-1) for (CH(3)OH)(2) that correspond to proton donor and proton acceptor, indicating that the methanol dimer has a preferred open-chain structure. In contrast, for (CH(3)OH)(3), the splitting diminishes and the bands near 2837, 2954, and 2987 cm(-1) become narrower, indicating a preferred cyclic structure. Anharmonic vibrational wavenumbers predicted for the methanol open-chain dimer and the cyclic trimer with the B3LYP∕VPT2∕ANO1 level of theory are consistent with experimental results. For the tetramer and pentamer, the spectral pattern similar to that of the trimer but with greater widths was observed, indicating that the most stable structures are also cyclic.

  18. The vertical distribution of BrO and aerosols in the Arctic: Measurements by active and passive differential optical absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frieß, U.; Sihler, H.; Sander, R.; PöHler, D.; Yilmaz, S.; Platt, U.

    2011-07-01

    We present results from multiaxis differential optical absorption spectroscopy (MAX-DOAS) and long-path DOAS (LP-DOAS) measurements performed at the North Slope of Alaska from February to April 2009 as part of the Ocean-Atmosphere-Sea Ice-Snowpack Barrow 2009 campaign. For the first time, vertical profiles of aerosol extinction and BrO in the boundary layer were retrieved simultaneously from MAX-DOAS measurements using the method of optimal estimation. Even at very low visibility, retrieved extinction profiles and aerosol optical thickness are in good agreement with colocated ceilometer and Sun photometer measurements, respectively. BrO surface concentrations measured by MAX-DOAS and LP-DOAS are in very good agreement, and it has been found that useful information on the BrO vertical distribution can be retrieved from MAX-DOAS even in cases when blowing snow strongly reduces visibility. The retrieved BrO and extinction vertical profiles allow for a thorough characterization of the vertical structure of the boundary layer during numerous ozone depletion events observed during Barrow 2009. High BrO concentrations are usually present during the onset of ozone depletion events, and BrO disappears as ozone concentrations approach zero. The finding that elevated BrO concentrations occur mainly in the presence of high extinction near the surface strongly suggests that release of reactive bromine from airborne aerosols and/or ice particles at high wind speed plays an important role. Back trajectory calculations indicate that the particles were transported from the frozen ocean to the measurement site and that the release of reactive bromine from sea ice and/or frost flowers occurs when low temperatures (<250 K) prevail in the regions where reactive bromine is emitted.

  19. Long term NO2 measurements in Hong Kong using LED based Long Path Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, K. L.; Pöhler, D.; Kuhlmann, G.; Hartl, A.; Platt, U.; Wenig, M. O.

    2011-11-01

    In this study we present the first long term measurements of atmospheric nitrogen dioxide (NO2) using a LED based Long Path Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (LP-DOAS) instrument. This instrument is measuring continuously in Hong Kong since December 2009, first in a setup with a 550 m absorption path and then with a 3820 m path at about 30 m to 50 m above street level. The instrument is using a high power blue light LED with peak intensity at 450 nm coupled into the telescope using a Y-fibre bundle. The LP-DOAS instrument measures NO2 concentrations in the Kowloon Tong and Mong Kok district of Hong Kong and we compare the measurement results to concentrations reported by monitoring stations operated by the Hong Kong Environmental Protection Department in that area. Hourly averages of coinciding measurements are in reasonable agreement (R = 0.74). Furthermore, we used the long-term data set to validate the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) NO2 data product. Monthly averaged LP-DOAS and OMI measurements correlate well (R = 0.84) when comparing the data for the OMI overpass time. We analyzed weekly patterns in both data sets and found that the LP-DOAS detects a clear weekly cycle with a reduction on weekends during rush hour peaks, whereas OMI is not able to observe this weekly cycle due to its fix overpass time.

  20. NO2 DOAS measurements from ground and space: comparison of ground based measurements and OMI data in Mexico City

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivera, C.; Stremme, W.; Grutter, M.

    2012-04-01

    The combination of satellite data and ground based measurements can provide valuable information about atmospheric chemistry and air quality. In this work we present a comparison between measured ground based NO2 differential columns at the Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México (UNAM) in Mexico City, using the Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (DOAS) technique and NO2 total columns measured by the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) onboard the Aura satellite using the same measurement technique. From these data, distribution maps of average NO2 above the Mexico basin were constructed and hot spots inside the city could be identified. In addition, a clear footprint was detected from the Tula industrial area, ~50 km northwest of Mexico City, where a refinery, a power plant and other industries are located. A less defined footprint was identified in the Cuernavaca basin, South of Mexico City, and the nearby cities of Toluca and Puebla do not present strong enhancements in the NO2 total columns. With this study we expect to cross-validate space and ground measurements and provide useful information for future studies.

  1. Airborne DOAS observations of tropospheric NO2 using an UltraLight Trike and flux calculation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Constantin, Daniel-Eduard; Voiculescu, Mirela; Merlaud, Alexis; Dragomir, Carmelia; Georgescu, Lucian; Hendrick, Francois; Van Roozendael, Michel

    2016-04-01

    In this paper we present airborne DOAS observations of tropospheric NO2 using an Ultralight Trike (ULT) and associated flux calculation. The instrument onboard the ULT was developed for measuring the tropospheric NO2 Vertical Column Density (VCD). Measurements were performed for several days during 2011-2014, in a region SE of Romania, over the cities of Galati (45.43°N, 28.03°E) and Braila (45.26°N, 27.95°E). Measurements of the NO2 column in the same area were performed using car-DOAS observations. The correlation between the tropospheric NO2 VCD from airborne and mobile ground-based DOAS observations was used to validate the airborne observations. A specific AMF for each case was calculated using the radiative transfer model (RTM) UVspec/DISORT. We present also a comparison between SCDstrato derived from DOMINO (Dutch OMI NO2) and the SCDstrato obtained from ground and airborne measurements. Due to the mobility and flexibility of the ULT flights, this aerial platform provides a promising tool for satellite validation, especially for space observations by high resolution sensors such as the future TROPOMI instrument. A key added value of the ULT-DOAS, illustrated in this work, is the capacity to investigate the spatial variability of NO2 inside the horizontal extent of satellite pixels, e.g. above plant exhaust plumes.

  2. Extended reactance domain algorithms for DoA estimation onto an ESPAR antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harabi, F.; Akkar, S.; Gharsallah, A.

    2016-07-01

    Based on an extended reactance domain (RD) covariance matrix, this article proposes new alternatives for directions of arrival (DoAs) estimation of narrowband sources through an electronically steerable parasitic array radiator (ESPAR) antennas. Because of the centro symmetry of the classic ESPAR antennas, an unitary transformation is applied to the collected data that allow an important reduction in both computational cost and processing time and, also, an enhancement of the resolution capabilities of the proposed algorithms. Moreover, this article proposes a new approach for eigenvalues estimation through only some linear operations. The developed DoAs estimation algorithms based on this new approach has illustrated a good behaviour with less calculation cost and processing time as compared to other schemes based on the classic eigenvalues approach. The conducted simulations demonstrate that high-precision and high-resolution DoAs estimation can be reached especially in very closely sources situation and low sources power as compared to the RD-MUSIC algorithm and the RD-PM algorithm. The asymptotic behaviours of the proposed DoAs estimators are analysed in various scenarios and compared with the Cramer-Rao bound (CRB). The conducted simulations testify the high-resolution of the developed algorithms and prove the efficiently of the proposed approach.

  3. Mass Spectrometers in Space!

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brinckerhoff, William B.

    2012-01-01

    Exploration of our solar system over several decades has benefitted greatly from the sensitive chemical analyses offered by spaceflight mass spectrometers. When dealing with an unknown environment, the broadband detection capabilities of mass analyzers have proven extremely valuable in determining the composition and thereby the basic nature of space environments, including the outer reaches of Earth s atmosphere, interplanetary space, the Moon, and the planets and their satellites. Numerous mass analyzer types, including quadrupole, monopole, sector, ion trap, and time-of-flight have been incorporated in flight instruments and delivered robotically to a variety of planetary environments. All such instruments went through a rigorous process of application-specific development, often including significant miniaturization, testing, and qualification for the space environment. Upcoming missions to Mars and opportunities for missions to Venus, Europa, Saturn, Titan, asteroids, and comets provide new challenges for flight mass spectrometers that push to state of the art in fundamental analytical technique. The Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) investigation on the recently-launch Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) rover mission incorporates a quadrupole analyzer to support direct evolved gas as well as gas chromatograph-based analysis of martian rocks and atmosphere, seeking signs of a past or present habitable environment. A next-generation linear ion trap mass spectrometer, using both electron impact and laser ionization, is being incorporated into the Mars Organic Molecule Analyzer (MOMA) instrument, which will be flown to Mars in 2018. These and other mass spectrometers and mission concepts at various stages of development will be described.

  4. Ground-based & satellite DOAS measurements integration for air quality evaluation/forecast management in the frame of QUITSAT Project.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kostadinov, Ivan; Petritoli, Andrea; Giovanelli, Giorgio; Masieri, Samuele; Premuda, Margarita; Bortoli, Daniele; Ravegnani, Fabrizio; Palazzi, Elisa

    The observations of the Earth's atmosphere from space provide excellent opportunities for the exploration of the sophisticated physical-chemical processes on both global and regional scales. The major interest during the last three decades was focused mainly on the stratosphere and the ozone depletion. More recently the continuous improvements of satellite sensors have revealed new opportunities for larger applications of space observations, attracting scientific interest to the lower troposphere and air quality issues. The air quality depends strongly on the anthropogenic activity and therefore regional environmental agencies along with policy makers are in need of appropriate means for its continuous monitoring and control to ensure the adoption of the most appropriate actions. The goal of the pilot project QUITSAT, funded by the Italian Space Agency, is to develop algorithms and procedures for the evaluation and prediction of the air quality in Lombardia and Emilia-Romagna regions (Italy) by means of integrating satellite observations with ground-based in-situ and remote sensing measurements. This work presents dedicated Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (DOAS) measurements performed during the summer of 2007 and the winter of 2008. One of the DOAS instruments operate at Mt.Cimone station (2165m a.s.l) and the other two instruments conducted measurements in/near Bologna (90 m. a.s.l). Different observational geometry was adopted (zenith-sky, multi-axis and long-path) aimed to provide tropospheric NO2 columns and O3, SO2 and HCHO concentrations at ground level as an input data for QUITSAT procedures. Details of the instruments, the radiative transfer model used and the algorithms for retrieving and calculation of the target gases concentrations are presented. The obtained experimental results are correlated with the corresponding ones retrieved from SCIAMACHY /ENVISAT observations during the overpasses above the ground-based instruments. The analysis

  5. A new Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy instrument to study atmospheric chemistry from a high-altitude unmanned aircraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stutz, Jochen; Werner, Bodo; Spolaor, Max; Scalone, Lisa; Festa, James; Tsai, Catalina; Cheung, Ross; Colosimo, Santo F.; Tricoli, Ugo; Raecke, Rasmus; Hossaini, Ryan; Chipperfield, Martyn P.; Feng, Wuhu; Gao, Ru-Shan; Hintsa, Eric J.; Elkins, James W.; Moore, Fred L.; Daube, Bruce; Pittman, Jasna; Wofsy, Steven; Pfeilsticker, Klaus

    2017-03-01

    Observations of atmospheric trace gases in the tropical upper troposphere (UT), tropical tropopause layer (TTL), and lower stratosphere (LS) require dedicated measurement platforms and instrumentation. Here we present a new limb-scanning Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (DOAS) instrument developed for NASA's Global Hawk (GH) unmanned aerial system and deployed during the Airborne Tropical TRopopause EXperiment (ATTREX). The mini-DOAS system is designed for automatic operation under unpressurized and unheated conditions at 14-18 km altitude, collecting scattered sunlight in three wavelength windows: UV (301-387 nm), visible (410-525 nm), and near infrared (900-1700 nm). A telescope scanning unit allows selection of a viewing angle around the limb, as well as real-time correction of the aircraft pitch. Due to the high altitude, solar reference spectra are measured using diffusors and direct sunlight. The DOAS approach allows retrieval of slant column densities (SCDs) of O3, O4, NO2, and BrO with relative errors similar to other aircraft DOAS systems. Radiative transfer considerations show that the retrieval of trace gas mixing ratios from the observed SCD based on O4 observations, the most common approach for DOAS measurements, is inadequate for high-altitude observations. This is due to the frequent presence of low-altitude clouds, which shift the sensitivity of the O4 SCD into the lower atmosphere and make it highly dependent on cloud coverage. A newly developed technique that constrains the radiative transfer by comparing in situ and DOAS O3 observations overcomes this issue. Extensive sensitivity calculations show that the novel O3-scaling technique allows the retrieval of BrO and NO2 mixing ratios at high accuracies of 0.5 and 15 ppt, respectively. The BrO and NO2 mixing ratios and vertical profiles observed during ATTREX thus provide new insights into ozone and halogen chemistry in the UT, TTL, and LS.

  6. Aircraft-borne DOAS limb observations of iodine monoxide around Borneo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Großmann, Katja; Hossaini, Ryan; Mantle, Hannah; Chipperfield, Martyn; Wittrock, Folkard; Peters, Enno; Lampel, Johannes; Walker, Hannah; Heard, Dwayne; Krystofiak, Gisèle; Catoire, Valéry; Dorf, Marcel; Werner, Bodo; Pfeilsticker, Klaus

    2015-04-01

    Iodine monoxide (IO) has a major impact on the photochemistry of the troposphere. It can for example catalytically destroy ozone, influence the atmospheric oxidation capacity by changing the partitioning of the HOx and NOx species, or contribute to the formation of ultrafine particles. Information regarding the vertical distribution of IO is still sparse since only few vertical profiles of IO exist for the troposphere. Spectroscopic measurements were carried out from aboard the research aircraft DLR-Falcon during the SHIVA (Stratospheric ozone: Halogen Impacts in a Varying Atmosphere) campaign at Malaysian Borneo in November and December 2011 to study the abundance and transport of trace gases in the lower atmosphere. Sixteen research flights were performed covering legs near the surface in the marine boundary layer (MBL) as well as in the free troposphere (FT) up to an altitude of 13 km. The spectroscopic measurements were evaluated using the Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (DOAS) technique in limb geometry, which supports observations of UV/visible absorbing trace gases, such as O4, BrO, IO, NO2, HCHO, CHOCHO, HONO and H2O, and altitude information was gained via the O4 scaling technique and/or full inversion. The inferred vertical profiles of IO showed mixing ratios of 0.5-1.5 ppt in the MBL, which decreased to 0.1-0.3 ppt in the FT. Occasionally, the IO observed in the FT of the marine environment coincided with elevated amounts of CO, but no IO was observed over land, neither in the boundary layer, nor in the FT. This behavior strongly indicated that the major sources for IO were organic and inorganic precursor molecules emitted from the ocean, which during daytime rapidly formed a sizable amount of IO in the MBL that was occasionally transported into the FT where efficient loss processes for IO must exist. The inferred vertical profiles of IO are compared to simulations using the global 3-D chemistry transport model TOMCAT including recent fluxes

  7. SCIAMACHY WFM-DOAS XCO2: reduction of scattering related errors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heymann, J.; Bovensmann, H.; Buchwitz, M.; Burrows, J. P.; Deutscher, N. M.; Notholt, J.; Rettinger, M.; Reuter, M.; Schneising, O.; Sussmann, R.; Warneke, T.

    2012-06-01

    Global observations of column-averaged dry air mole fractions of carbon dioxide (CO2), denoted by XCO2, retrieved from passive remote sensing instruments on Earth orbiting satellites can provide important and missing global information on the distribution and magnitude of regional CO2 surface fluxes. This application has challenging precision and accuracy requirements. SCIAMACHY on-board ENVISAT is the first satellite instrument, which measures the upwelling electromagnetic radiation in the near and short wave infrared at an adequate spectral and spatial resolution to yield near-surface sensitive XCO2. In a previous publication (Heymann et al., 2012), it has been shown by analysing seven years of SCIAMACHY WFM-DOAS XCO2 (WFMDv2.1) that unaccounted thin cirrus clouds can result in significant errors. In order to enhance the quality of the SCIAMACHY XCO2 data product, we have developed a new version of the retrieval algorithm (WFMDv2.2), which is described in this manuscript. It is based on an improved cloud filtering and correction method using the 1.4 μm strong water vapour absorption and 0.76 μm O2-A bands. The new algorithm has been used to generate a SCIAMACHY XCO2 data set covering the years 2003-2009. The new XCO2 data set has been validated using ground-based observations from the Total Carbon Column Observing Network (TCCON). The validation shows a significant improvement of the new product (v2.2) in comparison to the previous product (v2.1). For example, the standard deviation of the difference to TCCON at Darwin, Australia, has been reduced from 4 ppm to 2 ppm. The monthly regional-scale scatter of the data (defined as the mean inner monthly standard deviation of all quality filtered XCO2 retrievals within a radius of 350 km around various locations) has also been reduced, typically by a factor of about 1.5. Overall, the validation of the new WFMDv2.2 XCO2 data product can be summarised by a single measurement precision of 3.8 ppm, an estimated regional

  8. SCIAMACHY WFM-DOAS XCO2: reduction of scattering related errors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heymann, J.; Bovensmann, H.; Buchwitz, M.; Burrows, J. P.; Deutscher, N. M.; Notholt, J.; Rettinger, M.; Reuter, M.; Schneising, O.; Sussmann, R.; Warneke, T.

    2012-10-01

    Global observations of column-averaged dry air mole fractions of carbon dioxide (CO2), denoted by XCO2 , retrieved from SCIAMACHY on-board ENVISAT can provide important and missing global information on the distribution and magnitude of regional CO2 surface fluxes. This application has challenging precision and accuracy requirements. In a previous publication (Heymann et al., 2012), it has been shown by analysing seven years of SCIAMACHY WFM-DOAS XCO2 (WFMDv2.1) that unaccounted thin cirrus clouds can result in significant errors. In order to enhance the quality of the SCIAMACHY XCO2 data product, we have developed a new version of the retrieval algorithm (WFMDv2.2), which is described in this manuscript. It is based on an improved cloud filtering and correction method using the 1.4 μm strong water vapour absorption and 0.76 μm O2-A bands. The new algorithm has been used to generate a SCIAMACHY XCO2 data set covering the years 2003-2009. The new XCO2 data set has been validated using ground-based observations from the Total Carbon Column Observing Network (TCCON). The validation shows a significant improvement of the new product (v2.2) in comparison to the previous product (v2.1). For example, the standard deviation of the difference to TCCON at Darwin, Australia, has been reduced from 4 ppm to 2 ppm. The monthly regional-scale scatter of the data (defined as the mean intra-monthly standard deviation of all quality filtered XCO2 retrievals within a radius of 350 km around various locations) has also been reduced, typically by a factor of about 1.5. Overall, the validation of the new WFMDv2.2 XCO2 data product can be summarised by a single measurement precision of 3.8 ppm, an estimated regional-scale (radius of 500 km) precision of monthly averages of 1.6 ppm and an estimated regional-scale relative accuracy of 0.8 ppm. In addition to the comparison with the limited number of TCCON sites, we also present a comparison with NOAA's global CO2 modelling and

  9. Ultraviolet absorption spectrum of HOCl

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burkholder, James B.

    1993-01-01

    The room temperature UV absorption spectrum of HOCl was measured over the wavelength range 200 to 380 nm with a diode array spectrometer. The absorption spectrum was identified from UV absorption spectra recorded following UV photolysis of equilibrium mixtures of Cl2O/H2O/HOCl. The HOCl spectrum is continuous with a maximum at 242 nm and a secondary peak at 304 nm. The measured absorption cross section at 242 nm was (2.1 +/- 0.3) x 10 exp -19/sq cm (2 sigma error limits). These results are in excellent agreement with the work of Knauth et al. (1979) but in poor agreement with the more recent measurements of Mishalanie et al. (1986) and Permien et al. (1988). An HOCl nu2 infrared band intensity of 230 +/- 35/sq cm atm was determined based on this UV absorption cross section. The present results are compared with these previous measurements and the discrepancies are discussed.

  10. Studies of cavity enhanced absorption spectroscopy for weak absorption gas measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Liucheng; Duo, Liping; Gong, Deyu; Ma, Yanhua; Zhang, Zhiguo; Wang, Yuanhu; Zhou, Dongjian; Jin, Yuqi

    2017-01-01

    In order to determine the concentrations of trace amount metastable species in chemical lasers, an off-axis cavity enhanced absorption spectrometer for the detection of weak absorption gases has been built with a noise equivalent absorption sensitivity of 1.6x10-8 cm-1. The absorption spectrum of trace amount gaseous ammonia and water vapor was obtained with a spectral resolution of about 78 MHz. A multiple-line absorption spectroscopic method to determine the temperature of gaseous ammonia has been developed by use of multiple lines of ammonia molecule absorption spectrum.

  11. The CU 2-D-MAX-DOAS instrument - Part 2: Raman scattering probability measurements and retrieval of aerosol optical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortega, Ivan; Coburn, Sean; Berg, Larry K.; Lantz, Kathy; Michalsky, Joseph; Ferrare, Richard A.; Hair, Johnathan W.; Hostetler, Chris A.; Volkamer, Rainer

    2016-08-01

    The multiannual global mean of aerosol optical depth at 550 nm (AOD550) over land is ˜ 0.19, and that over oceans is ˜ 0.13. About 45 % of the Earth surface shows AOD550 smaller than 0.1. There is a need for measurement techniques that are optimized to measure aerosol optical properties under low AOD conditions. We present an inherently calibrated retrieval (i.e., no need for radiance calibration) to simultaneously measure AOD and the aerosol phase function parameter, g, based on measurements of azimuth distributions of the Raman scattering probability (RSP), the near-absolute rotational Raman scattering (RRS) intensity. We employ radiative transfer model simulations to show that for solar azimuth RSP measurements at solar elevation and solar zenith angle (SZA) smaller than 80°, RSP is insensitive to the vertical distribution of aerosols and maximally sensitive to changes in AOD and g under near-molecular scattering conditions. The University of Colorado two-dimensional Multi-AXis Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (CU 2-D-MAX-DOAS) instrument was deployed as part of the Two Column Aerosol Project (TCAP) at Cape Cod, MA, during the summer of 2012 to measure direct sun spectra and RSP from scattered light spectra at solar relative azimuth angles (SRAAs) between 5 and 170°. During two case study days with (1) high aerosol load (17 July, 0.3 < AOD430 < 0.6) and (2) near-molecular scattering conditions (22 July, AOD430 < 0.13) we compare RSP-based retrievals of AOD430 and g with data from a co-located CIMEL sun photometer, Multi-Filter Rotating Shadowband Radiometer (MFRSR), and an airborne High Spectral Resolution Lidar (HSRL-2). The average difference (relative to DOAS) for AOD430 is +0.012 ± 0.023 (CIMEL), -0.012 ± 0.024 (MFRSR), -0.011 ± 0.014 (HSRL-2), and +0.023 ± 0.013 (CIMELAOD - MFRSRAOD) and yields the following expressions for correlations between different instruments

  12. Tropospheric and Airborne Emission Spectrometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glavich, Thomas; Beer, Reinhard

    1996-01-01

    X This paper describes the development of two related instruments, the Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer (TES) and the Airborne Emission Spectrometer (AES). Both instruments are infrared imaging Fourier Transform Spectrometers, used for measuring the state of the lower atmosphere, and in particular the measurement of ozone and ozone sources and sinks.

  13. Smartphone spectrometer for colorimetric biosensing.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yi; Liu, Xiaohu; Chen, Peng; Tran, Nhung Thi; Zhang, Jinling; Chia, Wei Sheng; Boujday, Souhir; Liedberg, Bo

    2016-05-23

    We report on a smartphone spectrometer for colorimetric biosensing applications. The spectrometer relies on a sample cell with an integrated grating substrate, and the smartphone's built-in light-emitting diode flash and camera. The feasibility of the smartphone spectrometer is demonstrated for detection of glucose and human cardiac troponin I, the latter in conjunction with peptide-functionalized gold nanoparticles.

  14. Studies of dry acid deposition in the South Coast Air Basin: tunable diode laser absorption spectrometer measurements of HNO/sub 3/, HCHO and NO/sub 2/ and luminol NO/sub 2/ measurements in Claremont, California, September 1985. Final report, August 1985-July 1986

    SciTech Connect

    Mackay, G.I.; Schiff, H.I.; Mayne, L.K.; Harris, G.W.

    1986-07-01

    Two Tunable Diode Laser Absorption Spectrometer (TDLAS) systems were used to measure HNO/sub 3/. One system also measured formaldehyde (HCHO) atmosphere. Nitrogen dioxide (NO/sub 2/) was measured by the second TDLAS and by the LUMINOX, LMA-3 which is a new, small, simple and extremely sensitive instrument for NO/sub 2/ measurements. The importance of these measurements is the role that NO/sub 2/ plays as the direct precursor to gas phase HNO/sub 3/. Agreement between the HNO/sub 3/ measurements obtained by the 2 TDLAS systems were within the combined experimental errors. The diurnal behavior of the HNO/sub 3/ concentrations were quite regular with a maximum occuring between 15:00 and 18:00 each day. Maximum concentrations of 18 ppbv were observed on September 14th. HCHO exhibited similar behavior with the largest measured values of 14 ppbv occurring at 15:00 on the 13th. NO/sub 2/ showed somewhat more variable behaviour generally with two maxima, one in the afternoon and one about midnight. The TDLAS and LUMINOX were in good agreement with a few interesting exceptions.

  15. Frequency calibration of terahertz time-domain spectrometers

    SciTech Connect

    Naftaly, M.; Dudley, R. A.; Bernard, F.; Thomson, C.; Tian, Z.; Fletcher, J. R.

    2009-07-15

    We present three techniques of calibrating frequency and spectral profile measurements of terahertz time-domain spectrometers. The first utilizes the etalon effect generated by multiple reflections in thin nonabsorbing samples. The second employs a CO gas cell to provide multiple narrow absorption lines at known frequencies. The third aims to use a grating monochromator to produce an independently measured comparable spectrum.

  16. Multiple-Diode-Laser Gas-Detection Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Webster, Christopher R.; Beer, Reinhard; Sander, Stanley P.

    1988-01-01

    Small concentrations of selected gases measured automatically. Proposed multiple-laser-diode spectrometer part of system for measuring automatically concentrations of selected gases at part-per-billion level. Array of laser/photodetector pairs measure infrared absorption spectrum of atmosphere along probing laser beams. Adaptable to terrestrial uses as monitoring pollution or control of industrial processes.

  17. FAST NEUTRON SPECTROMETER

    DOEpatents

    Davis, F.J.; Hurst, G.S.; Reinhardt, P.W.

    1959-08-18

    An improved proton recoil spectrometer for determining the energy spectrum of a fast neutron beam is described. Instead of discriminating against and thereby"throwing away" the many recoil protons other than those traveling parallel to the neutron beam axis as do conventional spectrometers, this device utilizes protons scattered over a very wide solid angle. An ovoidal gas-filled recoil chamber is coated on the inside with a scintillator. The ovoidal shape of the sensitive portion of the wall defining the chamber conforms to the envelope of the range of the proton recoils from the radiator disposed within the chamber. A photomultiplier monitors the output of the scintillator, and a counter counts the pulses caused by protons of energy just sufficient to reach the scintillator.

  18. The ALPHA Magnetic Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viertel, G. M.; Capell, M.

    1998-12-01

    The ALPHA Magnetic Spectrometer (AMS) will be the first large magnetic spectrometer in space. It is scheduled to be installed on the future International Space Station ALPHA (ISSA) in the year 2002 to perform measurements of the charged particle composition to answer fundamental questions in particle physics and astrophysics. Before installation on ISSA, AMS will fly on the shuttle DISCOVERY for a period of 10 days starting in May 1998. This will enable AMS to perform a test of the apparatus and first measurements. The AMS detector has five major components: A permanent NdFeB magnet, six planes of Silicon double-sided microstrip detectors, a plastic scintillator time of flight hodoscope, a plastic scintillator anticoincidence counter and an Aerogel Cherenkov threshold counter. In addition, there are electronics, support infrastructure and interfaces.

  19. Split-Doa10: a naturally split polytopic eukaryotic membrane protein generated by fission of a nuclear gene.

    PubMed

    Stuerner, Elisabeth; Kuraku, Shigehiro; Hochstrasser, Mark; Kreft, Stefan G

    2012-01-01

    Large polytopic membrane proteins often derive from duplication and fusion of genes for smaller proteins. The reverse process, splitting of a membrane protein by gene fission, is rare and has been studied mainly with artificially split proteins. Fragments of a split membrane protein may associate and reconstitute the function of the larger protein. Most examples of naturally split membrane proteins are from bacteria or eukaryotic organelles, and their exact history is usually poorly understood. Here, we describe a nuclear-encoded split membrane protein, split-Doa10, in the yeast Kluyveromyces lactis. In most species, Doa10 is encoded as a single polypeptide with 12-16 transmembrane helices (TMs), but split-KlDoa10 is encoded as two fragments, with the split occurring between TM2 and TM3. The two fragments assemble into an active ubiquitin-protein ligase. The K. lactis DOA10 locus has two ORFs separated by a 508-bp intervening sequence (IVS). A promoter within the IVS drives expression of the C-terminal KlDoa10 fragment. At least four additional Kluyveromyces species contain an IVS in the DOA10 locus, in contrast to even closely related genera, allowing dating of the fission event to the base of the genus. The upstream Kluyveromyces Doa10 fragment with its N-terminal RING-CH and two TMs resembles many metazoan MARCH (Membrane-Associated RING-CH) and related viral RING-CH proteins, suggesting that gene splitting may have contributed to MARCH enzyme diversification. Split-Doa10 is the first unequivocal case of a split membrane protein where fission occurred in a nuclear-encoded gene. Such a split may allow divergent functions for the individual protein segments.

  20. Miniaturized Ion Mobility Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaye, William J. (Inventor); Stimac, Robert M. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    By utilizing the combination of a unique electronic ion injection control circuit in conjunction with a particularly designed drift cell construction, the instantly disclosed ion mobility spectrometer achieves increased levels of sensitivity, while achieving significant reductions in size and weight. The instant IMS is of a much simpler and easy to manufacture design, rugged and hermetically sealed, capable of operation at high temperatures to at least 250.degree. C., and is uniquely sensitive, particularly to explosive chemicals.

  1. Demonstration AOTF Imaging Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chao, Tien-Hsin; Yu, Jeffrey; Cheng, Li-Jen

    1993-01-01

    Spectral images of high quality obtained. Acousto-optical-tunable-filter (AOTF) imaging spectrometer is optical system in which AOTF serves as spectrally dispersive element causing image on final focal plane to be shifted on plane by distance depending on wavelength of light emanating from scene. Useful in several applications involving identification, via characteristic spectras, of substances in observed scenes: examples include prospecting for minerals and detecting chemical pollutants.

  2. Photoacoustic Soot Spectrometer (PASS) Instrument Handbook

    SciTech Connect

    Dubey, M; Springston, S; Koontz, A; Aiken, A

    2013-01-17

    The photoacoustic soot spectrometer (PASS) measures light absorption by aerosol particles. As the particles pass through a laser beam, the absorbed energy heats the particles and in turn the surrounding air, which sets off a pressure wave that can be detected by a microphone. The PASS instruments deployed by ARM can also simultaneously measure the scattered laser light at three wavelengths and therefore provide a direct measure of the single-scattering albedo. The Operator Manual for the PASS-3100 is included here with the permission of Droplet Measurement Technologies, the instrument’s manufacturer.

  3. X-ray Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Porter, F. Scott

    2004-01-01

    The X-ray Spectrometer (XRS) instrument is a revolutionary non-dispersive spectrometer that will form the basis for the Astro-E2 observatory to be launched in 2005. We have recently installed a flight spare X R S microcalorimeter spectrometer at the EBIT-I facility at LLNL replacing the XRS from the earlier Astro-E mission and providing twice the resolution. The X R S microcalorimeter is an x-ray detector that senses the heat deposited by the incident photon. It achieves a high energy resolution by operating at 0.06K and by carefully controlling the heat capacity and thermal conductance. The XRS/EBIT instrument has 32 pixels in a square geometry and achieves an energy resolution of 6 eV at 6 keV, with a bandpass from 0.1 to 12 keV (or more at higher operating temperature). The instrument allows detailed studies of the x-ray line emission of laboratory plasmas. The XRS/EBIT also provides an extensive calibration "library" for the Astro-E2 observatory.

  4. Estimation of NOx emissions from Delhi using Car MAX-DOAS observations and comparison with OMI satellite data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaiganfar, R.; Beirle, S.; Sharma, M.; Chauhan, A.; Singh, R. P.; Wagner, T.

    2011-11-01

    We present the first Multi-Axis-(MAX-) DOAS observations in India performed during April 2010 and January 2011 in Delhi and nearby regions. The MAX-DOAS instrument was mounted on a car roof, which allowed us to perform measurements along individual driving routes. From car MAX-DOAS observations along closed circles around Delhi, together with information on wind speed and direction, the NOx emissions from the greater Delhi area were determined: our estimate of 4.4 × 1025 molecules s-1 is found to be slightly lower than the corresponding emission estimates using the EDGAR emission inventory and substantially smaller compared to a recent study by Gurjar et al. (2004). We also determined NOx emissions from Delhi using OMI satellite observations on the same days. These emissions are slightly smaller than those from the car MAX-DOAS measurements. Finally the car MAX-DOAS observations were also used for the validation of simultaneous OMI satellite measurements of the tropospheric NO2 VCD and found a good agreement of the spatial patterns. Concerning the absolute values, OMI data are, on average, higher than the car MAX-DOAS observations close to strong emission sources, and vice versa over less polluted regions. Our results indicate that OMI NO2 VCDs are biased low over strongly polluted regions, probably caused by inadequate a-priori profiles used in the OMI satellite retrieval.

  5. The CU 2-D-MAX-DOAS instrument - Part 1: Retrieval of 3-D distributions of NO2 and azimuth-dependent OVOC ratios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortega, I.; Koenig, T.; Sinreich, R.; Thomson, D.; Volkamer, R.

    2015-06-01

    We present an innovative instrument telescope and describe a retrieval method to probe three-dimensional (3-D) distributions of atmospheric trace gases that are relevant to air pollution and tropospheric chemistry. The University of Colorado (CU) two-dimensional (2-D) multi-axis differential optical absorption spectroscopy (CU 2-D-MAX-DOAS) instrument measures nitrogen dioxide (NO2), formaldehyde (HCHO), glyoxal (CHOCHO), oxygen dimer (O2-O2, or O4), and water vapor (H2O); nitrous acid (HONO), bromine monoxide (BrO), and iodine monoxide (IO) are among other gases that can in principle be measured. Information about aerosols is derived through coupling with a radiative transfer model (RTM). The 2-D telescope has three modes of operation: mode 1 measures solar scattered photons from any pair of elevation angle (-20° < EA < +90° or zenith; zero is to the horizon) and azimuth angle (-180° < AA < +180°; zero being north); mode 2 measures any set of azimuth angles (AAs) at constant elevation angle (EA) (almucantar scans); and mode 3 tracks the direct solar beam via a separate view port. Vertical profiles of trace gases are measured and used to estimate mixing layer height (MLH). Horizontal distributions are then derived using MLH and parameterization of RTM (Sinreich et al., 2013). NO2 is evaluated at different wavelengths (350, 450, and 560 nm), exploiting the fact that the effective path length varies systematically with wavelength. The area probed is constrained by O4 observations at nearby wavelengths and has a diurnal mean effective radius of 7.0 to 25 km around the instrument location; i.e., up to 1960 km2 can be sampled with high time resolution. The instrument was deployed as part of the Multi-Axis DOAS Comparison campaign for Aerosols and Trace gases (MAD-CAT) in Mainz, Germany, from 7 June to 6 July 2013. We present first measurements (modes 1 and 2 only) and describe a four-step retrieval to derive (a) boundary layer vertical profiles and MLH of NO2; (b

  6. The CU 2-dimensional MAX-DOAS instrument - Part 1: Retrieval of NO2 in 3 dimensions and azimuth dependent OVOC ratios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortega, I.; Koenig, T.; Sinreich, R.; Thomson, D.; Volkamer, R.

    2014-11-01

    We present an innovative instrument telescope, and describe a retrieval method to probe 3-D distributions of atmospheric trace gases that are relevant to air pollution and tropospheric chemistry. The University of Colorado (CU) two dimensional (2-D) Multi-AXis-Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (CU 2D-MAX-DOAS) instrument measures nitrogen dioxide (NO2), formaldehyde (HCHO), glyoxal (CHOCHO), oxygen dimer (O2-O2, or O4) and water vapor (H2O); also nitrous acid (HONO), bromine monoxide (BrO), iodine monoxide (IO) among other gases can in principle be measured. Information about aerosols is derived through coupling with a radiative transfer model (RTM). The 2-D telescope has 3 modes of operation: (mode 1) measures solar scattered photons from any pair of elevation angle (-20° < EA < +90° or zenith; zero is to the horizon) and azimuth angle (-180° < AA < +180°; zero being North), (mode 2) measures any set of AA at constant EA (almucantar scans); and (mode 3) tracks the direct solar beam via a separate view port. Vertical profiles of trace gases are measured, and used to estimate planetary boundary layer height (PBL). Horizontal distributions are then derived using PBL and parameterization of RTM (Sinreich et al., 2013). NO2 is evaluated at different wavelengths (350, 450, and 560 nm), exploiting the fact that the effective path length varies systematically with wavelength. The area probed is constrained by O4 observations at nearby wavelengths, and has an effective radius of 7.5 to 20 km around the instrument location; i.e., up to 1250 km2 can be sampled near-instantaneously, and with high time resolution. The instrument was deployed as part of the Multi Axis DOAS Comparison campaign for Aerosols and Trace gases (MAD-CAT) in Mainz, Germany from 7 June to 6 July 2013. We present first measurements (modes 1 and 2 only) and describe a four-step retrieval to derive (a) boundary layer vertical profiles of NO2 and PBL; (b) near-surface horizontal distributions

  7. Mass spectrometers: instrumentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooks, R. G.; Hoke, S. H., II; Morand, K. L.; Lammert, S. A.

    1992-09-01

    Developments in mass spectrometry instrumentation over the past three years are reviewed. The subject is characterized by an enormous diversity of designs, a high degree of competition between different laboratories working with either different or similar techniques and by extremely rapid progress in improving analytical performance. Instruments can be grouped into genealogical charts based on their physical and conceptual interrelationships. This is illustrated using mass analyzers of different types. The time course of development of particular instrumental concepts is illustrated in terms of the s-curves typical of cell growth. Examples are given of instruments which are at the exponential, linear and mature growth stages. The prime examples used are respectively: (i) hybrid instruments designed to study reactive collisions of ions with surfaces: (ii) the Paul ion trap; and (iii) the triple quadrupole mass spectrometer. In the area of ion/surface collisions, reactive collisions such as hydrogen radical abstraction from the surface by the impinging ion are studied. They are shown to depend upon the chemical nature of the surface through the use of experiments which utilize self-assembled monolayers as surfaces. The internal energy deposited during surface-induced dissociation upon collision with different surfaces in a BEEQ instrument is also discussed. Attention is also given to a second area of emerging instrumentation, namely technology which allows mass spectrometers to be used for on-line monitoring of fluid streams. A summary of recent improvements in the performance of the rapidly developing quadrupole ion trap instrument illustrates this stage of instrument development. Improvements in resolution and mass range and their application to the characterization of biomolecules are described. The interaction of theory with experiment is illustrated through the role of simulations of ion motion in the ion trap. It is emphasized that mature instruments play a

  8. Ozone distributions over southern Lake Michigan: comparisons between ferry-based observations, shoreline-based DOAS observations and air quality forecast models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cleary, P. A.; Fuhrman, N.; Schulz, L.; Schafer, J.; Fillingham, J.; Bootsma, H.; Langel, T.; Williams, E. J.; Brown, S. S.

    2014-09-01

    Air quality forecast models typically predict large ozone abundances over water relative to land in the Great Lakes region. While each state bordering Lake Michigan has dedicated monitoring systems, offshore measurements have been sparse, mainly executed through specific short-term campaigns. This study examines ozone abundances over Lake Michigan as measured on the Lake Express ferry, by shoreline Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (DOAS) observations in southeastern Wisconsin, and as predicted by the National Air Quality Forecast System. From 2008-2009 measurements of O3, SO2, NO2 and formaldehyde were made in the summertime by DOAS at a shoreline site in Kenosha, WI. From 2008-2010 measurements of ambient ozone conducted on the Lake Express, a high-speed ferry that travels between Milwaukee, WI and Muskegon, MI up to 6 times daily from spring to fall. Ferry ozone observations over Lake Michigan were an average of 3.8 ppb higher than those measured at shoreline in Kenosha with little dependence on position of the ferry or temperature but with highest differences during evening and night. Concurrent ozone forecast images from National Weather System's National Air Quality Forecast System in the upper Midwestern region surrounding Lake Michigan were saved over the ferry ozone sampling period in 2009. The bias of the model O3 forecast was computed and evaluated with respect to ferry-based measurements. The model 1 and 8 h ozone mean biases were both 12 ppb higher than observed ozone, and maximum daily 1 h ozone mean bias was 10 ppb, indicating substantial ozone over-prediction over water. Trends in the bias with respect to location and time of day or month were also explored showing non-uniformity in model bias. Extreme ozone events were predicted by the model but not observed by ferry measurements.

  9. Estimation of NOx emissions from the Megacity of Lahore, Pakistan using car MAX-DOAS observations and comparison with OMI satellite data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Razi, Maria; Shaiganfar, Reza; Fahim Khokhar, Muhammad; Dörner, Steffen; Ahmad, Noor; Donner, Sebastian; Beirle, Steffen; Wagner, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    Lahore is a metropolitan city of Pakistan with about more than 10 million inhabitants and thus a strong emission source of atmospheric pollutants. The quantification of these emission sources is usually accomplished by so-called bottom-up inventories, based on the summation of the emissions of individual emission sources for all relevant emission categories. Such inventories are subject to large errors because of uncertainties in the emission estimates for individual sources as well as their numbers and characteristics. Here we present results of a top-down emission inventory for Lahore based on car multi-axis differential optical absorption spectroscopy (car-MAX-DOAS) observations. We performed such measurements around the city on Lahore on six days in December 2015. From the measured spectra we derive the vertically integrated concentration of NO2 along the driving route (the so called tropospheric vertical column density, VCD). By combining these observations with wind data we estimate the total NO2 emissions from the city of Lahore. Since from the measured spectra only NO2 (but not NO) can be retrieved, we convert the NO2 emissions to total NOx (NO2 plus NO) emissions. We also apply corrections for the decay of NOx on the way between the emission source and the location of the measurements. We compare the derived NOx emissions to existing emission inventories. We also compare the spatial distributions of the tropospheric NO2 VCDs observed by car MAX-DOAS with collocated results from satellite observations of the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI).

  10. Frequency Scale Correction of Fourier Spectrometers in the Visible

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serdyukov, V. I.

    2016-05-01

    It has been found that when visible molecular absorption spectra are recorded with the IFS-125M Fourier spectrometer, a shift in the frequency scale is observed which increases nonlinearly toward higher frequencies. It is proposed that the frequency scale be corrected using absorption lines of iodine vapor and water, beginning with calibration of the wavelength scale where the correction function is linear to a good approximation, followed by conversion of the calibration to a wave number scale. The error in determining the wave numbers of the absorption lines does not exceed ±0.003 cm-1.

  11. Joint DOA and multi-pitch estimation based on subspace techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xi Zhang, Johan; Christensen, Mads Græsbøll; Jensen, Søren Holdt; Moonen, Marc

    2012-12-01

    In this article, we present a novel method for high-resolution joint direction-of-arrivals (DOA) and multi-pitch estimation based on subspaces decomposed from a spatio-temporal data model. The resulting estimator is termed multi-channel harmonic MUSIC (MC-HMUSIC). It is capable of resolving sources under adverse conditions, unlike traditional methods, for example when multiple sources are impinging on the array from approximately the same angle or similar pitches. The effectiveness of the method is demonstrated on a simulated an-echoic array recordings with source signals from real recorded speech and clarinet. Furthermore, statistical evaluation with synthetic signals shows the increased robustness in DOA and fundamental frequency estimation, as compared with to a state-of-the-art reference method.

  12. The GRANIT spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Baessler, Stefan; Beau, M; Kreuz, Michael; Nesvizhevsky, V.; Kurlov, V; Pignol, G; Protasov, K.; Vezzu, Francis; Voronin, Vladimir

    2011-01-01

    The existence of quantum states of matter in a gravitational field was demonstrated recently in the Institut Laue-Langevin (ILL), Grenoble, in a series of experiments with ultra cold neutrons (UCN). UCN in low quantum states is an excellent probe for fundamental physics, in particular for constraining extra short-range forces; as well as a tool in quantum optics and surface physics. The GRANIT is a follow-up project based on a second-generation spectrometer with ultra-high energy resolution, permanently installed in ILL. It has been constructed in framework of an ANR grant; and will become operational in 2011.

  13. Cassini Plasma Spectrometer Investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, D. T.; Berthelier, J. J.; Blanc, M.; Burch, J. L.; Coates, A. J.; Goldstein, R.; Grande, M.; Hill, T. W.; Johnson, R. E.; Kelha, V.; McComas, D. J.; Sittler, E. C.; Svenes, K. R.; Szegö, K.; Tanskanen, P.; Ahola, K.; Anderson, D.; Bakshi, S.; Baragiola, R. A.; Barraclough, B. L.; Black, R. K.; Bolton, S.; Booker, T.; Bowman, R.; Casey, P.; Crary, F. J.; Delapp, D.; Dirks, G.; Eaker, N.; Funsten, H.; Furman, J. D.; Gosling, J. T.; Hannula, H.; Holmlund, C.; Huomo, H.; Illiano, J. M.; Jensen, P.; Johnson, M. A.; Linder, D. R.; Luntama, T.; Maurice, S.; McCabe, K. P.; Mursula, K.; Narheim, B. T.; Nordholt, J. E.; Preece, A.; Rudzki, J.; Ruitberg, A.; Smith, K.; Szalai, S.; Thomsen, M. F.; Viherkanto, K.; Vilppola, J.; Vollmer, T.; Wahl, T. E.; Wüest, M.; Ylikorpi, T.; Zinsmeyer, C.

    2004-09-01

    The Cassini Plasma Spectrometer (CAPS) will make comprehensive three-dimensional mass-resolved measurements of the full variety of plasma phenomena found in Saturn’s magnetosphere. Our fundamental scientific goals are to understand the nature of saturnian plasmas primarily their sources of ionization, and the means by which they are accelerated, transported, and lost. In so doing the CAPS investigation will contribute to understanding Saturn’s magnetosphere and its complex interactions with Titan, the icy satellites and rings, Saturn’s ionosphere and aurora, and the solar wind. Our design approach meets these goals by emphasizing two complementary types of measurements: high-time resolution velocity distributions of electrons and all major ion species; and lower-time resolution, high-mass resolution spectra of all ion species. The CAPS instrument is made up of three sensors: the Electron Spectrometer (ELS), the Ion Beam Spectrometer (IBS), and the Ion Mass Spectrometer (IMS). The ELS measures the velocity distribution of electrons from 0.6 eV to 28,250 keV, a range that permits coverage of thermal electrons found at Titan and near the ring plane as well as more energetic trapped electrons and auroral particles. The IBS measures ion velocity distributions with very high angular and energy resolution from 1 eV to 49,800 keV. It is specially designed to measure sharply defined ion beams expected in the solar wind at 9.5 AU, highly directional rammed ion fluxes encountered in Titan’s ionosphere, and anticipated field-aligned auroral fluxes. The IMS is designed to measure the composition of hot, diffuse magnetospheric plasmas and low-concentration ion species 1 eV to 50,280 eV with an atomic resolution M/ΔM ˜70 and, for certain molecules, (such asN 2 + and CO+), effective resolution as high as ˜2500. The three sensors are mounted on a motor-driven actuator that rotates the entire instrument over approximately one-half of the sky every 3 min.

  14. Gas Chromatic Mass Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wey, Chowen

    1995-01-01

    Gas chromatograph/mass spectrometer (GC/MS) used to measure and identify combustion species present in trace concentration. Advanced extractive diagnostic method measures to parts per billion (PPB), as well as differentiates between different types of hydrocarbons. Applicable for petrochemical, waste incinerator, diesel transporation, and electric utility companies in accurately monitoring types of hydrocarbon emissions generated by fuel combustion, in order to meet stricter environmental requirements. Other potential applications include manufacturing processes requiring precise detection of toxic gaseous chemicals, biomedical applications requiring precise identification of accumulative gaseous species, and gas utility operations requiring high-sensitivity leak detection.

  15. Parallel Implementation of the Wideband DOA Algorithm on the IBM Cell BE Processor

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-05-01

    Abstract—The Multiple Signal Classification ( MUSIC ) algorithm is a powerful technique for determining the Direction of Arrival (DOA) of signals...Broadband Engine Processor (Cell BE). The process of adapting the serial based MUSIC algorithm to the Cell BE will be analyzed in terms of parallelism and...using Multiple Signal Classification MUSIC algorithm [4] • Computation of Focus matrix • Computation of number of sources • Separation of Signal

  16. Maximum Likelihood DOA Estimation of Multiple Wideband Sources in the Presence of Nonuniform Sensor Noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, C. E.; Lorenzelli, F.; Hudson, R. E.; Yao, K.

    2007-12-01

    We investigate the maximum likelihood (ML) direction-of-arrival (DOA) estimation of multiple wideband sources in the presence of unknown nonuniform sensor noise. New closed-form expression for the direction estimation Cramér-Rao-Bound (CRB) has been derived. The performance of the conventional wideband uniform ML estimator under nonuniform noise has been studied. In order to mitigate the performance degradation caused by the nonuniformity of the noise, a new deterministic wideband nonuniform ML DOA estimator is derived and two associated processing algorithms are proposed. The first algorithm is based on an iterative procedure which stepwise concentrates the log-likelihood function with respect to the DOAs and the noise nuisance parameters, while the second is a noniterative algorithm that maximizes the derived approximately concentrated log-likelihood function. The performance of the proposed algorithms is tested through extensive computer simulations. Simulation results show the stepwise-concentrated ML algorithm (SC-ML) requires only a few iterations to converge and both the SC-ML and the approximately-concentrated ML algorithm (AC-ML) attain a solution close to the derived CRB at high signal-to-noise ratio.

  17. MUSIC algorithm DoA estimation for cooperative node location in mobile ad hoc networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warty, Chirag; Yu, Richard Wai; ElMahgoub, Khaled; Spinsante, Susanna

    In recent years the technological development has encouraged several applications based on distributed communications network without any fixed infrastructure. The problem of providing a collaborative early warning system for multiple mobile nodes against a fast moving object. The solution is provided subject to system level constraints: motion of nodes, antenna sensitivity and Doppler effect at 2.4 GHz and 5.8 GHz. This approach consists of three stages. The first phase consists of detecting the incoming object using a highly directive two element antenna at 5.0 GHz band. The second phase consists of broadcasting the warning message using a low directivity broad antenna beam using 2× 2 antenna array which then in third phase will be detected by receiving nodes by using direction of arrival (DOA) estimation technique. The DOA estimation technique is used to estimate the range and bearing of the incoming nodes. The position of fast arriving object can be estimated using the MUSIC algorithm for warning beam DOA estimation. This paper is mainly intended to demonstrate the feasibility of early detection and warning system using a collaborative node to node communication links. The simulation is performed to show the behavior of detecting and broadcasting antennas as well as performance of the detection algorithm. The idea can be further expanded to implement commercial grade detection and warning system

  18. Robust group compressive sensing for DOA estimation with partially distorted observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ben; Zhang, Yimin D.; Wang, Wei

    2016-12-01

    In this paper, we propose a robust direction-of-arrival (DOA) estimation algorithm based on group sparse reconstruction algorithm utilizing signals observed at multiple frequencies. The group sparse reconstruction scheme for DOA estimation is solved through the complex multitask Bayesian compressive sensing algorithm by exploiting the group sparse property of the received multi-frequency signals. Then, we propose a robust reconstruction algorithm in the presence of distorted signals. In particular, we consider a problem where the observed data in some frequencies are distorted due to, e.g., interference contamination. In this case, the residual error will follow the impulsive Gaussian mixture distribution instead of the Gaussian distribution due to the fact that some of the estimation errors significantly depart from the mean value of the estimation error distribution. Thus, the minimum least square restriction used in the conventional sparse reconstruction algorithm may lead to a failed reconstruction result. By exploiting the maximum correntropy criterion which is inherently insensitive to the impulsive noise, a weighting vector is derived to automatically mitigate the effect of the distorted narrowband signals, and a robust group compressive sensing approach is developed to achieve reliable DOA estimation. The robustness and effectiveness of the proposed algorithm are verified using simulation results.

  19. Wss1 metalloprotease partners with Cdc48/Doa1 in processing genotoxic SUMO conjugates

    PubMed Central

    Balakirev, Maxim Y; Mullally, James E; Favier, Adrien; Assard, Nicole; Sulpice, Eric; Lindsey, David F; Rulina, Anastasia V; Gidrol, Xavier; Wilkinson, Keith D

    2015-01-01

    Sumoylation during genotoxic stress regulates the composition of DNA repair complexes. The yeast metalloprotease Wss1 clears chromatin-bound sumoylated proteins. Wss1 and its mammalian analog, DVC1/Spartan, belong to minigluzincins family of proteases. Wss1 proteolytic activity is regulated by a cysteine switch mechanism activated by chemical stress and/or DNA binding. Wss1 is required for cell survival following UV irradiation, the smt3-331 mutation and Camptothecin-induced formation of covalent topoisomerase 1 complexes (Top1cc). Wss1 forms a SUMO-specific ternary complex with the AAA ATPase Cdc48 and an adaptor, Doa1. Upon DNA damage Wss1/Cdc48/Doa1 is recruited to sumoylated targets and catalyzes SUMO chain extension through a newly recognized SUMO ligase activity. Activation of Wss1 results in metalloprotease self-cleavage and proteolysis of associated proteins. In cells lacking Tdp1, clearance of topoisomerase covalent complexes becomes SUMO and Wss1-dependent. Upon genotoxic stress, Wss1 is vacuolar, suggesting a link between genotoxic stress and autophagy involving the Doa1 adapter. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.06763.001 PMID:26349035

  20. Retrieval of CHOCHO from MAX-DOAS measurements in the Beijing area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hendrick, Francois; Lerot, Christophe; Stavrakou, Trissevgeni; De Smedt, Isabelle; Fayt, Caroline; Gielen, Clio; Hermans, Christian; Müller, Jean-Francois; Pinardi, Gaia; Van Roozendael, Michel

    2015-04-01

    Glyoxal (CHOCHO) is one of the most important carbonyl compounds in the atmosphere. It is produced mainly by the oxidation of biogenic and anthropogenic non-methane volatile organic compounds (NMVOCs) which participate to the formation of tropospheric ozone and secondary organic aerosols. CHOCHO is also directly released by biomass burning and fossil fuel combustion. Measuring this species is therefore of major importance for air quality monitoring, especially given the scarcity of available CHOCHO observational data sets. In this presentation, CHOCHO vertical profiles and corresponding column densities are retrieved from MAX-DOAS measurements in the Beijing city center and at the suburban site of Xianghe located at 60km East of Beijing. The periods covered by the observations are June 2008-April 2009 in Beijing and March 2010-December 2014 in Xianghe. We first investigate the capability of the MAX-DOAS technique to measure this species in such highly-polluted environment. Then the diurnal and seasonal cycles of CHOCHO near-surface concentrations and vertical column densities as well as the corresponding CHOCHO/HCHO ratios are examined on a long-term basis at both locations. The CHOCHO/HCHO ratios are derived from MAX-DOAS HCHO vertical profiles retrieved in parallel to the CHOCHO profiles. These diurnal and seasonal cycles are further assessed using simulations from the 3D-CTM IMAGES and observations from the OMI and GOME-2 satellite nadir instruments. The impact of these results on our knowledge about the CHOCHO budget is discussed.

  1. Wireless Sensor Array Network DoA Estimation from Compressed Array Data via Joint Sparse Representation

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Kai; Yin, Ming; Luo, Ji-An; Wang, Yingguan; Bao, Ming; Hu, Yu-Hen; Wang, Zhi

    2016-01-01

    A compressive sensing joint sparse representation direction of arrival estimation (CSJSR-DoA) approach is proposed for wireless sensor array networks (WSAN). By exploiting the joint spatial and spectral correlations of acoustic sensor array data, the CSJSR-DoA approach provides reliable DoA estimation using randomly-sampled acoustic sensor data. Since random sampling is performed at remote sensor arrays, less data need to be transmitted over lossy wireless channels to the fusion center (FC), and the expensive source coding operation at sensor nodes can be avoided. To investigate the spatial sparsity, an upper bound of the coherence of incoming sensor signals is derived assuming a linear sensor array configuration. This bound provides a theoretical constraint on the angular separation of acoustic sources to ensure the spatial sparsity of the received acoustic sensor array signals. The Crame´r–Rao bound of the CSJSR-DoA estimator that quantifies the theoretical DoA estimation performance is also derived. The potential performance of the CSJSR-DoA approach is validated using both simulations and field experiments on a prototype WSAN platform. Compared to existing compressive sensing-based DoA estimation methods, the CSJSR-DoA approach shows significant performance improvement. PMID:27223287

  2. Wireless Sensor Array Network DoA Estimation from Compressed Array Data via Joint Sparse Representation.

    PubMed

    Yu, Kai; Yin, Ming; Luo, Ji-An; Wang, Yingguan; Bao, Ming; Hu, Yu-Hen; Wang, Zhi

    2016-05-23

    A compressive sensing joint sparse representation direction of arrival estimation (CSJSR-DoA) approach is proposed for wireless sensor array networks (WSAN). By exploiting the joint spatial and spectral correlations of acoustic sensor array data, the CSJSR-DoA approach provides reliable DoA estimation using randomly-sampled acoustic sensor data. Since random sampling is performed at remote sensor arrays, less data need to be transmitted over lossy wireless channels to the fusion center (FC), and the expensive source coding operation at sensor nodes can be avoided. To investigate the spatial sparsity, an upper bound of the coherence of incoming sensor signals is derived assuming a linear sensor array configuration. This bound provides a theoretical constraint on the angular separation of acoustic sources to ensure the spatial sparsity of the received acoustic sensor array signals. The Cram e ´ r-Rao bound of the CSJSR-DoA estimator that quantifies the theoretical DoA estimation performance is also derived. The potential performance of the CSJSR-DoA approach is validated using both simulations and field experiments on a prototype WSAN platform. Compared to existing compressive sensing-based DoA estimation methods, the CSJSR-DoA approach shows significant performance improvement.

  3. Comb-locked Lamb-dip spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gatti, Davide; Gotti, Riccardo; Gambetta, Alessio; Belmonte, Michele; Galzerano, Gianluca; Laporta, Paolo; Marangoni, Marco

    2016-06-01

    Overcoming the Doppler broadening limit is a cornerstone of precision spectroscopy. Nevertheless, the achievement of a Doppler-free regime is severely hampered by the need of high field intensities to saturate absorption transitions and of a high signal-to-noise ratio to detect tiny Lamb-dip features. Here we present a novel comb-assisted spectrometer ensuring over a broad range from 1.5 to 1.63 μm intra-cavity field enhancement up to 1.5 kW/cm2, which is suitable for saturation of transitions with extremely weak electric dipole moments. Referencing to an optical frequency comb allows the spectrometer to operate with kHz-level frequency accuracy, while an extremely tight locking of the probe laser to the enhancement cavity enables a 10-11 cm-1 absorption sensitivity to be reached over 200 s in a purely dc direct-detection-mode at the cavity output. The particularly simple and robust detection and operating scheme, together with the wide tunability available, makes the system suitable to explore thousands of lines of several molecules never observed so far in a Doppler-free regime. As a demonstration, Lamb-dip spectroscopy is performed on the P(15) line of the 01120-00000 band of acetylene, featuring a line-strength below 10-23 cm/mol and an Einstein coefficient of 5 mHz, among the weakest ever observed.

  4. Comb-locked Lamb-dip spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Gatti, Davide; Gotti, Riccardo; Gambetta, Alessio; Belmonte, Michele; Galzerano, Gianluca; Laporta, Paolo; Marangoni, Marco

    2016-06-06

    Overcoming the Doppler broadening limit is a cornerstone of precision spectroscopy. Nevertheless, the achievement of a Doppler-free regime is severely hampered by the need of high field intensities to saturate absorption transitions and of a high signal-to-noise ratio to detect tiny Lamb-dip features. Here we present a novel comb-assisted spectrometer ensuring over a broad range from 1.5 to 1.63 μm intra-cavity field enhancement up to 1.5 kW/cm(2), which is suitable for saturation of transitions with extremely weak electric dipole moments. Referencing to an optical frequency comb allows the spectrometer to operate with kHz-level frequency accuracy, while an extremely tight locking of the probe laser to the enhancement cavity enables a 10(-11) cm(-1) absorption sensitivity to be reached over 200 s in a purely dc direct-detection-mode at the cavity output. The particularly simple and robust detection and operating scheme, together with the wide tunability available, makes the system suitable to explore thousands of lines of several molecules never observed so far in a Doppler-free regime. As a demonstration, Lamb-dip spectroscopy is performed on the P(15) line of the 01120-00000 band of acetylene, featuring a line-strength below 10(-23) cm/mol and an Einstein coefficient of 5 mHz, among the weakest ever observed.

  5. Comb-locked Lamb-dip spectrometer

    PubMed Central

    Gatti, Davide; Gotti, Riccardo; Gambetta, Alessio; Belmonte, Michele; Galzerano, Gianluca; Laporta, Paolo; Marangoni, Marco

    2016-01-01

    Overcoming the Doppler broadening limit is a cornerstone of precision spectroscopy. Nevertheless, the achievement of a Doppler-free regime is severely hampered by the need of high field intensities to saturate absorption transitions and of a high signal-to-noise ratio to detect tiny Lamb-dip features. Here we present a novel comb-assisted spectrometer ensuring over a broad range from 1.5 to 1.63 μm intra-cavity field enhancement up to 1.5 kW/cm2, which is suitable for saturation of transitions with extremely weak electric dipole moments. Referencing to an optical frequency comb allows the spectrometer to operate with kHz-level frequency accuracy, while an extremely tight locking of the probe laser to the enhancement cavity enables a 10−11 cm−1 absorption sensitivity to be reached over 200 s in a purely dc direct-detection-mode at the cavity output. The particularly simple and robust detection and operating scheme, together with the wide tunability available, makes the system suitable to explore thousands of lines of several molecules never observed so far in a Doppler-free regime. As a demonstration, Lamb-dip spectroscopy is performed on the P(15) line of the 01120-00000 band of acetylene, featuring a line-strength below 10−23 cm/mol and an Einstein coefficient of 5 mHz, among the weakest ever observed. PMID:27263858

  6. Glucose determination with fiber optic spectrometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Starke, Eva; Kemper, Ulf; Barschdorff, Dieter

    1999-05-01

    Noninvasive blood glucose monitoring is the aim of research activities concerning the detection of small glucose concentrations dissolved in water and blood plasma. One approach for these measurements is the exploitation of absorption bands in the near infrared. However, the strong absorption of water represents a major difficulty. Transmission measurements of glucose dissolved in water and in blood plasma in the spectral region around 1600 nm with one- beam spectrometers and a FT-IR spectrometer are discussed. The evaluation of the data is carried out using a two-layer Lambert-Beer model and neural networks. In order to reduce the dimensions of a potential measuring device, an integrated acousto-optic tunable filter (AOTF) with an Erbium doped fiber amplifier as a radiation source is used. The fiber optic components are examined concerning their suitability. The smallest concentrations of glucose dissolved in water that can be separated are approximately 50 mg/dl. In the range of 50 mg/dl to 1000 mg/dl a correlation coefficient of 0.98 between real and estimated glucose concentrations is achieved using neural networks. In blood plasma so far glucose concentrations of about 100 mg/dl can be distinguished with good accuracy.

  7. Resonant ultrasound spectrometer

    DOEpatents

    Migliori, Albert; Visscher, William M.; Fisk, Zachary

    1990-01-01

    An ultrasound resonant spectrometer determines the resonant frequency spectrum of a rectangular parallelepiped sample of a high dissipation material over an expected resonant response frequency range. A sample holder structure grips corners of the sample between piezoelectric drive and receive transducers. Each transducer is mounted on a membrane for only weakly coupling the transducer to the holder structure and operatively contacts a material effective to remove system resonant responses at the transducer from the expected response range. i.e., either a material such as diamond to move the response frequencies above the range or a damping powder to preclude response within the range. A square-law detector amplifier receives the response signal and retransmits the signal on an isolated shield of connecting cabling to remove cabling capacitive effects. The amplifier also provides a substantially frequency independently voltage divider with the receive transducer. The spectrometer is extremely sensitive to enable low amplitude resonance to be detected for use in calculating the elastic constants of the high dissipation sample.

  8. The Athena Raman Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Alian; Haskin, Larry A.; Jolliff, Bradley; Wdowiak, Tom; Agresti, David; Lane, Arthur L.

    2000-01-01

    Raman spectroscopy provides a powerful tool for in situ mineralogy, petrology, and detection of water and carbon. The Athena Raman spectrometer is a microbeam instrument intended for close-up analyses of targets (rock or soils) selected by the Athena Pancam and Mini-TES. It will take 100 Raman spectra along a linear traverse of approximately one centimeter (point-counting procedure) in one to four hours during the Mars' night. From these spectra, the following information about the target will extracted: (1) the identities of major, minor, and trace mineral phases, organic species (e.g., PAH or kerogen-like polymers), reduced inorganic carbon, and water-bearing phases; (2) chemical features (e.g. Mg/Fe ratio) of major minerals; and (3) rock textural features (e.g., mineral clusters, amygdular filling and veins). Part of the Athena payload, the miniaturized Raman spectrometer has been under development in a highly interactive collaboration of a science team at Washington University and the University of Alabama at Birmingham, and an engineering team at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. The development has completed the brassboard stage and has produced the design for the engineering model.

  9. Metrology for terahertz time-domain spectrometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molloy, John F.; Naftaly, Mira

    2015-12-01

    In recent years the terahertz time-domain spectrometer (THz TDS) [1] has emerged as a key measurement device for spectroscopic investigations in the frequency range of 0.1-5 THz. To date, almost every type of material has been studied using THz TDS, including semiconductors, ceramics, polymers, metal films, liquid crystals, glasses, pharmaceuticals, DNA molecules, proteins, gases, composites, foams, oils, and many others. Measurements with a TDS are made in the time domain; conversion from the time domain data to a frequency spectrum is achieved by applying the Fourier Transform, calculated numerically using the Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) algorithm. As in many other types of spectrometer, THz TDS requires that the sample data be referenced to similarly acquired data with no sample present. Unlike frequency-domain spectrometers which detect light intensity and measure absorption spectra, a TDS records both amplitude and phase information, and therefore yields both the absorption coefficient and the refractive index of the sample material. The analysis of the data from THz TDS relies on the assumptions that: a) the frequency scale is accurate; b) the measurement of THz field amplitude is linear; and c) that the presence of the sample does not affect the performance characteristics of the instrument. The frequency scale of a THz TDS is derived from the displacement of the delay line; via FFT, positioning errors may give rise to frequency errors that are difficult to quantify. The measurement of the field amplitude in a THz TDS is required to be linear with a dynamic range of the order of 10 000. And attention must be given to the sample positioning and handling in order to avoid sample-related errors.

  10. IR spectrometers for Venus and Mars measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drummond, Rachel; Neefs, Eddy; Vandaele, Ann C.

    2012-07-01

    The SOIR spectrometer [1] is an infra-red spectrometer that has performed over 500 solar occultation measurements of the Venus atmosphere, profiling major and minor constituents and studying aerosol absorption, temperature and pressure effects. NOMAD is a 3-channel spectrometer for Mars occultation, limb and nadir measurements. 2 channels are infra-red, the other UV-visible. We will present the technology that enables SOIR and NOMAD to get to parts per billion mixing ratio sensitivities for trace atmospheric components and highlight the improvements made to the SOIR design to enable nadir viewing with NOMAD. Key components include the Acousto-Optical Tunable Filter with radio frequency driver that allows these spectrometers to select the wavelength domain under observation with no need for mechanical moving parts. It also allows background measurements because it is opaque when no RF is applied. The grating with 4 grooves/mm is a very hard to manufacture optical component, and suppliers were very difficult to find. The detector-cooler combination (working at 90K) is from Sofradir/Ricor and the model on board Venus Express is still working after 6 years in space (more on/off cycles that ON hour lifetime problem). The detector MCT mix is slightly altered for nadir observation, in order to reduce thermal background noise and the nadir channel spectrometer is cooled down to 173K by a large V-groove radiator. All the optical components have been enlarged to maximise signal throughput and the slit (that determines spatial and spectral resolution) has also been increased. The spacecraft attitude control system switches from yaw steering for nadir to inertial pointing for solar occultations. 1. Nevejans, D., E. Neefs, E. Van Ransbeeck, S. Berkenbosch, R. Clairquin, L. De Vos, W. Moelans, S. Glorieux, A. Baeke, O. Korablev, I. Vinogradov, Y. Kalinnikov, B. Bach, J.P. Dubois, and E. Villard, Compact high-resolution space-borne echelle grating spectrometer with AOTF based on

  11. Highly sensitive detection using Herriott cell for laser absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Chongyi; Song, Guangming; Du, Yang; Zhao, Xiaojun; Wang, Wenju; Zhong, Liujun; Hu, Mai

    2016-11-01

    The tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy combined with the long absorption path technique is a significant method to detect harmful gas. The long optical path could come true by Herriott cell reducing the size of the spectrometers. A 15 cm long Herriott cell with 28.8 m optical absorption path after 96 times reflection was designed that enhanced detection sensitivity of absorption spectroscopy. According to the theory data of calculation, Herriott cell is analyzed and simulated by softwares Matlab and Lighttools.

  12. Spatial heterodyne spectrometer for FLEX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scott, Alan; Zheng, Sheng-Hai; Brown, Stephen; Bell, Andrew

    2007-10-01

    A spatial heterodyne spectrometer (SHS) has significant advantages for high spectral resolution imaging over narrow pre-selected bands compared to traditional solutions. Given comparable optical étendue at R~6500, a field-widened SHS will have a throughput-resolution product ~170 x larger than an air-spaced etalon spectrometer, and ~1000 x larger than a standard grating spectrometer. The monolithic glass Michelson design and lack of moving parts allows maximum stability of spectral calibration over the mission life. For these reasons, SHS offers considerable advantages for the core spectrometer instrument in the European Space Agency's (ESA) Fluorescence Explorer (FLEX) mission.

  13. Measurements of stratospheric composition using a star pointing spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fish, Deb J.; Jones, Rod L.; Freshwater, Ray A.; Roscoe, Howard K.; Oldham, Derek J.

    1994-01-01

    Measurements of stratospheric composition have been made with a novel star-pointing spectrometer. The instrument consists of a telescope that focuses light from stars, planets, or the moon onto a spectrometer and two dimensional CCD array detector. Atmospheric absorptions can be measured, from which atmospheric columns of several gases can be determined. The instrument was deployed in Abisko, 69 deg N, during the European Arctic Stratospheric Ozone Experiment (EASOE). The instrument has the potential for measuring O3, OClO, NO2, and NO3. In this paper, a method for the retrieval of vertical columns is described, and some examples of ozone measurements given.

  14. Slant column MAX-DOAS measurements of nitrogen dioxide, formaldehyde, glyoxal and oxygen dimer in the urban environment of Athens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gratsea, Myrto; Vrekoussis, Mihalis; Richter, Andreas; Wittrock, Folkard; Schönhardt, Anja; Burrows, John; Kazadzis, Stelios; Mihalopoulos, Nikos; Gerasopoulos, Evangelos

    2016-06-01

    Slant column (SC) densities of nitrogen dioxide (NO2), formaldehyde (HCHO), glyoxal (CHOCHO) and oxygen dimer (O4) were successfully retrieved for the first time in Athens, by using spectral measurements from a ground-based multi-azimuth Multi-AXis Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (MAX-DOAS) system. The data span the period from October 2012 to March 2014 and measurements were conducted at NOA's (National Observatory of Athens) station in Penteli (38.0°N, 23.9°E, 527 m a.s.l.) at eight azimuth angles and eight off-axis elevation angles. The SCNO2, SCHCHO and SCCHOCHO measurements at +1ο elevation angle, pointing towards the urban area, range from 0.6 to 24·1016, 0.8-9.6·1016 and 0.3-5.2·1015 molec cm-2 (mean daily values throughout the whole period), respectively. Seasonal modulation characterised by summertime maximum and wintertime minimum was observed for HCHO and CHOCHO, while for NO2 the maximum values were recorded during winter. Changes in the diurnal variability of all trace gases with season and day of the week are investigated suggesting a strong link to primary anthropogenic sources for NO2 and a weaker one, compared to photochemistry, for HCHO and CHOCHO. In addition, the impact of the reduced anthropogenic emissions during weekends on the measured SC values was quantified and 30%-50% lower SCNO2 values were found during weekends. The contribution of local urban emissions to the overall recorded amounts of the selected species was assessed. Using meteorological data from NOA's station in Penteli, the impact of the local circulation patterns on the SC levels was estimated, and a strong relation between western wind direction, which is related to the industrial area, and enhanced SC measurements was found.

  15. Far-field DOA estimation and source localization for different scenarios in a distributed sensor network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asgari, Shadnaz

    Recent developments in the integrated circuits and wireless communications not only open up many possibilities but also introduce challenging issues for the collaborative processing of signals for source localization and beamforming in an energy-constrained distributed sensor network. In signal processing, various sensor array processing algorithms and concepts have been adopted, but must be further tailored to match the communication and computational constraints. Sometimes the constraints are such that none of the existing algorithms would be an efficient option for the defined problem and as the result; the necessity of developing a new algorithm becomes undeniable. In this dissertation, we present the theoretical and the practical issues of Direction-Of-Arrival (DOA) estimation and source localization using the Approximate-Maximum-Likelihood (AML) algorithm for different scenarios. We first investigate a robust algorithm design for coherent source DOA estimation in a limited reverberant environment. Then, we provide a least-square (LS) solution for source localization based on our newly proposed virtual array model. In another scenario, we consider the determination of the location of a disturbance source which emits both wideband acoustic and seismic signals. We devise an enhanced AML algorithm to process the data collected at the acoustic sensors. For processing the seismic signals, two distinct algorithms are investigated to determine the DOAs. Then, we consider a basic algorithm for fusion of the results yielded by the acoustic and seismic arrays. We also investigate the theoretical and practical issues of DOA estimation in a three-dimensional (3D) scenario. We show that the performance of the proposed 3D AML algorithm converges to the Cramer-Rao Bound. We use the concept of an isotropic array to reduce the complexity of the proposed algorithm by advocating a decoupled 3D version. We also explore a modified version of the decoupled 3D AML algorithm which

  16. Particle Spectrometers for FRIB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amthor, A. M.

    2014-09-01

    FRIB promises to dramatically expand the variety of nuclear systems available for direct experimental study by providing rates of many rare isotopes orders of magnitude higher than those currently available. A new generation of experimental systems, including new particle spectrometers will be critical to our ability to take full advantage of the scientific opportunities offered by FRIB. The High-Rigidity Spectrometer (HRS) will allow for experiments with the most neutron-rich and short-lived isotopes produced by in-flight fragmentation at FRIB. The bending capability of the HRS (8 Tm) matches to the rigidity for which rare isotopes are produced at the highest intensity in the FRIB fragment separator. The experimental program will be focused on nuclear structure and astrophysics, and allow for the use of other cutting-edge detection systems for gamma, neutron, and charged-particle detection. Stopped and reaccelerated beam studies will be an important compliment to in-flight techniques at FRIB, providing world-unique, high quality, intense rare isotope beams at low energies up to and beyond the Coulomb barrier--with the completion of ReA12--and serving many of the science goals of the broader facility, from nuclear structure and astrophysics to applications. Two specialized recoil spectrometers are being developed for studies with reaccelerated beams. SECAR, the Separator for Capture Reactions, will be built following ReA3, coupled to a windowless gas jet target, JENSA, and will focus on radiative capture reactions for astrophysics, particularly those needed to improve our understanding of novae and X-ray bursts. A recoil separator following ReA12 is proposed to address a variety of physics cases based on fusion-evaporation, Coulomb excitation, transfer, and deep-inelastic reactions by providing a large angular, momentum and charge state acceptance; a high mass resolving power; and the flexibility to couple to a variety of auxiliary detector systems. Two designs

  17. Thermoluminescence emission spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Prescott, J R; Fox, P J; Akber, R A; Jensen, H E

    1988-08-15

    A sensitive thermoluminescence (TL) emission spectrometer based on Fourier transform spectroscopy is described. It employs a modified scanning Twyman-Green interferometer with photomultiplier detection in a photon-counting mode. The etendue is 180pi mm(2), and it covers the 350-600-nm wavelength range. The output can be displayed either as a 3-D isometric plot of intensity vs temperature and wavelength, as a contour diagram, or as a conventional TL glow curve of intensity vs temperature. It is sufficiently sensitive to record thermoluminescence spectra of dosimeter phosphors and minerals for thermoluminescence dating at levels corresponding to those found during actual use as radiation monitors or in dating. Examples of actual spectra are given.

  18. Photo ion spectrometer

    DOEpatents

    Gruen, D.M.; Young, C.E.; Pellin, M.J.

    1989-12-26

    A charged particle spectrometer is described for performing ultrasensitive quantitative analysis of selected atomic components removed from a sample. Significant improvements in performing energy and angular refocusing spectroscopy are accomplished by means of a two dimensional structure for generating predetermined electromagnetic field boundary conditions. Both resonance and non-resonance ionization of selected neutral atomic components allow accumulation of increased chemical information. A multiplexed operation between a SIMS mode and a neutral atomic component ionization mode with EARTOF analysis enables comparison of chemical information from secondary ions and neutral atomic components removed from the sample. An electronic system is described for switching high level signals, such as SIMS signals, directly to a transient recorder and through a charge amplifier to the transient recorder for a low level signal pulse counting mode, such as for a neutral atomic component ionization mode. 12 figs.

  19. Photo ion spectrometer

    DOEpatents

    Gruen, Dieter M.; Young, Charles E.; Pellin, Michael J.

    1989-01-01

    A charged particle spectrometer for performing ultrasensitive quantitative analysis of selected atomic components removed from a sample. Significant improvements in performing energy and angular refocusing spectroscopy are accomplished by means of a two dimensional structure for generating predetermined electromagnetic field boundary conditions. Both resonance and non-resonance ionization of selected neutral atomic components allow accumulation of increased chemical information. A multiplexed operation between a SIMS mode and a neutral atomic component ionization mode with EARTOF analysis enables comparison of chemical information from secondary ions and neutral atomic components removed from the sample. An electronic system is described for switching high level signals, such as SIMS signals, directly to a transient recorder and through a charge amplifier to the transient recorder for a low level signal pulse counting mode, such as for a neutral atomic component ionization mode.

  20. Ultra-Wideband Optical Modulation Spectrometer (OMS) Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gardner, Jonathan (Technical Monitor); Tolls, Volker

    2004-01-01

    The optical modulation spectrometer (OMS) is a novel, highly efficient, low mass backend for heterodyne receiver systems. Current and future heterodyne receiver systems operating at frequencies up to a few THz require broadband spectrometer backends to achieve spectral resolutions of R approximately 10(exp 5) to 10(exp 6) to carry out many important astronomical investigations. Among these are observations of broad emission and absorption lines from extra-galactic objects at high redshifts, spectral line surveys, and observations of planetary atmospheres. Many of these lines are pressure or velocity broadened with either large half-widths or line wings extending over several GHz. Current backend systems can cover the needed bandwidth only by combining the output of several spectrometers, each with typically up to 1 GHz bandwidth, or by combining several frequency-shifted spectra taken with a single spectrometer. An ultra-wideband optical modulation spectrometer with 10 - 40 GHz bandwidth will enable broadband ob- servations without the limitations and disadvantages of hybrid spectrometers. Spectrometers like the OMS will be important for both ground-based observatories and future space missions like the Single Aperture Far-Infrared Telescope (SAFIR) which might carry IR/submm array heterodyne receiver systems requiring a spectrometer for each array pixel. Small size, low mass and small power consumption are extremely important for space missions. This report summarizes the specifications developed for the OMS and lists already identified commercial parts. The report starts with a review of the principle of operation, then describes the most important components and their specifications which were derived from theory, and finishes with a conclusion and outlook.

  1. Lunar orbital mass spectrometer experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lord, W. P.

    1971-01-01

    The design, development, manufacture, test and calibration of five lunar orbital mass spectrometers with the four associated ground support equipment test sets are discussed. A mass spectrometer was installed in the Apollo 15 and one in the Apollo 16 Scientific Instrument Module within the Service Module. The Apollo 15 mass spectrometer was operated with collection of 38 hours of mass spectra data during lunar orbit and 50 hours of data were collected during transearth coast. The Apollo 16 mass spectrometer was operated with collection of 76 hours of mass spectra data during lunar orbit. However, the Apollo 16 mass spectrometer was ejected into lunar orbit upon malfunction of spacecraft boom system just prior to transearth insection and no transearth coast data was possible.

  2. Column atmospheric water vapor retrievals from airborne imaging spectrometer data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gao, Bo-Cai; Goetz, Alexander F. H.

    1989-01-01

    High-spatial-resolution column atmospheric water vapor amounts were derived from spectral data collected by the Airborne Visible Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS). The quantitative derivation is made by curve fitting observed spectra with calculated spectra in the 1.14- and 0.94-micron water-vapor band absorption regions with a nonlinear least-squares technique. The precision of the retrieved column water vapor is approximately 5 percent. The derived column water vapor amounts are independent of the absolute surface reflectance. Curve fitting of spectra near 1 micron from areas covered with vegetation indicates that both the amount of atmospheric water vapor and the moisture content of vegetation can be retrieved simultaneously. It should be possible to measure column water vapor over land areas from satellite altitude with the proposed high-resolution imaging spectrometer or even the moderate-resolution imaging spectrometer.

  3. Lunar Prospector neutron spectrometer constraints on TiO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elphic, R. C.; Lawrence, D. J.; Feldman, W. C.; Barraclough, B. L.; Gasnault, O. M.; Maurice, S.; Lucey, P. G.; Blewett, D. T.; Binder, A. B.

    2002-04-01

    Lunar Prospector neutron spectrometer measurements of the epithermal and thermal neutron leakage fluxes are used to provide constraints on TiO2 abundances in lunar surface materials. We use FeO abundance estimates based on both Clementine spectral reflectance techniques and preliminary Lunar Prospector gamma ray spectrometer determinations to first establish a model thermal neutron absorption due to all major elements except titanium. Then we remove the additional absorbing effects due to the rare earth elements gadolinium and samarium by using Lunar Prospector gamma ray spectrometer thorium abundances as a rare earth element proxy. The result can be compared to the ratio of epithermal to thermal neutron fluxes, which point to the presence of the additional thermal neutron absorber, titanium. We can derive abundance estimates of TiO2 and compare to other estimates derived spectroscopically. Our results show a significantly lower abundance of TiO2 than has been derived using Clementine data.

  4. Four years of ground-based MAX-DOAS observations of HONO and NO2 in the Beijing area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hendrick, F.; Müller, J.-F.; Clémer, K.; Wang, P.; De Mazière, M.; Fayt, C.; Gielen, C.; Hermans, C.; Ma, J. Z.; Pinardi, G.; Stavrakou, T.; Vlemmix, T.; Van Roozendael, M.

    2014-01-01

    Ground-based Multi-Axis Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (MAX-DOAS) measurements of nitrous acid (HONO) and its precursor NO2 (nitrogen dioxide) as well as aerosols have been performed daily in Beijing city centre (39.98° N, 116.38° E) from July 2008 to April 2009 and at the suburban site of Xianghe (39.75° N, 116.96° E) located ~60 km east of Beijing from March 2010 to December 2012. This extensive dataset allowed for the first time the investigation of the seasonal cycle of HONO as well as its diurnal variation in and in the vicinity of a megacity. Our study was focused on the HONO and NO2 near-surface concentrations (0-200 m layer) and total vertical column densities (VCDs) and also aerosol optical depths (AODs) and extinction coefficients retrieved by applying the Optimal Estimation Method to the MAX-DOAS observations. Monthly averaged HONO near-surface concentrations at local noon display a strong seasonal cycle with a maximum in late fall/winter (~0.8 and 0.7 ppb at Beijing and Xianghe, respectively) and a minimum in summer (~0.1 ppb at Beijing and 0.03 ppb at Xianghe). The seasonal cycles of HONO and NO2 appear to be highly correlated, with correlation coefficients in the 0.7-0.9 and 0.5-0.8 ranges at Beijing and Xianghe, respectively. The stronger correlation of HONO with NO2 and also with aerosols observed in Beijing suggests possibly larger role of NO2 conversion into HONO in the Beijing city center than at Xianghe. The observed diurnal cycle of HONO near-surface concentration shows a maximum in the early morning (about 1 ppb at both sites) likely resulting from night-time accumulation, followed by a decrease to values of about 0.1-0.4 ppb around local noon. The HONO / NO2 ratio shows a similar pattern with a maximum in the early morning (values up to 0.08) and a decrease to ~0.01-0.02 around local noon. The seasonal and diurnal cycles of the HONO near-surface concentration are found to be similar in shape and in relative amplitude to the

  5. VEGAS: VErsatile GBT Astronomical Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bussa, Srikanth; VEGAS Development Team

    2012-01-01

    The National Science Foundation Advanced Technologies and Instrumentation (NSF-ATI) program is funding a new spectrometer backend for the Green Bank Telescope (GBT). This spectrometer is being built by the CICADA collaboration - collaboration between the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO) and the Center for Astronomy Signal Processing and Electronics Research (CASPER) at the University of California Berkeley.The backend is named as VErsatile GBT Astronomical Spectrometer (VEGAS) and will replace the capabilities of the existing spectrometers. This backend supports data processing from focal plane array systems. The spectrometer will be capable of processing up to 1.25 GHz bandwidth from 8 dual polarized beams or a bandwidth up to 10 GHz from a dual polarized beam.The spectrometer will be using 8-bit analog to digital converters (ADC), which gives a better dynamic range than existing GBT spectrometers. There will be 8 tunable digital sub-bands within the 1.25 GHz bandwidth, which will enhance the capability of simultaneous observation of multiple spectral transitions. The maximum spectral dump rate to disk will be about 0.5 msec. The vastly enhanced backend capabilities will support several science projects with the GBT. The projects include mapping temperature and density structure of molecular clouds; searches for organic molecules in the interstellar medium; determination of the fundamental constants of our evolving Universe; red-shifted spectral features from galaxies across cosmic time and survey for pulsars in the extreme gravitational environment of the Galactic Center.

  6. Neutron range spectrometer

    DOEpatents

    Manglos, Stephen H.

    1989-06-06

    A neutron range spectrometer and method for determining the neutron energy spectrum of a neutron emitting source are disclosed. Neutrons from the source are collimnated along a collimation axis and a position sensitive neutron counter is disposed in the path of the collimated neutron beam. The counter determines positions along the collimation axis of interactions between the neutrons in the neutron beam and a neutron-absorbing material in the counter. From the interaction positions, a computer analyzes the data and determines the neutron energy spectrum of the neutron beam. The counter is preferably shielded and a suitable neutron-absorbing material is He-3. The computer solves the following equation in the analysis: ##EQU1## where: N(x).DELTA.x=the number of neutron interactions measured between a position x and x+.DELTA.x, A.sub.i (E.sub.i).DELTA.E.sub.i =the number of incident neutrons with energy between E.sub.i and E.sub.i +.DELTA.E.sub.i, and C=C(E.sub.i)=N .sigma.(E.sub.i) where N=the number density of absorbing atoms in the position sensitive counter means and .sigma. (E.sub.i)=the average cross section of the absorbing interaction between E.sub.i and E.sub.i +.DELTA.E.sub.i.

  7. Photo ion spectrometer

    DOEpatents

    Gruen, Dieter M.; Young, Charles E.; Pellin, Michael J.

    1989-01-01

    A method and apparatus for extracting for quantitative analysis ions of selected atomic components of a sample. A lens system is configured to provide a slowly diminishing field region for a volume containing the selected atomic components, enabling accurate energy analysis of ions generated in the slowly diminishing field region. The lens system also enables focusing on a sample of a charged particle beam, such as an ion beam, along a path length perpendicular to the sample and extraction of the charged particles along a path length also perpendicular to the sample. Improvement of signal to noise ratio is achieved by laser excitation of ions to selected autoionization states before carrying out quantitative analysis. Accurate energy analysis of energetic charged particles is assured by using a preselected resistive thick film configuration disposed on an insulator substrate for generating predetermined electric field boundary conditions to achieve for analysis the required electric field potential. The spectrometer also is applicable in the fields of SIMS, ISS and electron spectroscopy.

  8. Photo ion spectrometer

    DOEpatents

    Gruen, D.M.; Young, C.E.; Pellin, M.J.

    1989-08-08

    A method and apparatus are described for extracting for quantitative analysis ions of selected atomic components of a sample. A lens system is configured to provide a slowly diminishing field region for a volume containing the selected atomic components, enabling accurate energy analysis of ions generated in the slowly diminishing field region. The lens system also enables focusing on a sample of a charged particle beam, such as an ion beam, along a path length perpendicular to the sample and extraction of the charged particles along a path length also perpendicular to the sample. Improvement of signal to noise ratio is achieved by laser excitation of ions to selected auto-ionization states before carrying out quantitative analysis. Accurate energy analysis of energetic charged particles is assured by using a preselected resistive thick film configuration disposed on an insulator substrate for generating predetermined electric field boundary conditions to achieve for analysis the required electric field potential. The spectrometer also is applicable in the fields of SIMS, ISS and electron spectroscopy. 8 figs.

  9. New features of an FT spectrometer using LED sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serdyukov, V. I.; Sinitsa, L. N.

    2016-07-01

    The efficiency of LED emitters in high resolution Fourier spectroscopy with a small multipass cell has been shown. Such aspects of Fourier spectroscopy as intensity of the light sources, their stability, and spectral range were considered. Using a 2.5 W LED emitter as a light source for the spectrometer with a 60-cm multipass cell during a 24-h measurement time and by optimizing a number of passes in the cell, we have achieved a signal-to-noise ratio of 1×105 which corresponds to a minimal detectable absorption coefficient of 6×10-9 cm-1. This made it possible to determine the parameters of water vapor lines with the intensity of 2×10-28 cm/molecule. The absorption spectra of H2O and CO2 isotopologues in the range of 10,000 to 23,000 cm-1 were recorded using high sensitivity Fourier spectrometer.

  10. Comparative study on three highly sensitive absorption measurement techniques characterizing lithium niobate over its entire transparent spectral range.

    PubMed

    Leidinger, M; Fieberg, S; Waasem, N; Kühnemann, F; Buse, K; Breunig, I

    2015-08-24

    We employ three highly sensitive spectrometers: a photoacoustic spectrometer, a photothermal common-path interferometer and a whispering-gallery-resonator-based absorption spectrometer, for a comparative study of measuring the absorption coefficient of nominally transparent undoped, congruently grown lithium niobate for ordinarily and extraordinarily polarized light in the wavelength range from 390 to 3800 nm. The absorption coefficient ranges from below 10(-4) cm(-1) up to 2 cm(-1). Furthermore, we measure the absorption at the Urbach tail as well as the multiphonon edge of the material by a standard grating spectrometer and a Fourier-transform infrared spectrometer, providing for the first time an absorption spectrum of the whole transparency window of lithium niobate. The absorption coefficients obtained by the three highly sensitive and independent methods show good agreement.

  11. Demonstration That Calibration of the Instrument Response to Polarizations Parallel and Perpendicular to the Object Space Projected Slit of an Imaging Spectrometer Enable Measurement of the Atmospheric Absorption Spectrum in Region of the Weak CO2 Band for the Case of Arbitrary Polarization: Implication for the Geocarb Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumer, J. B.; Rairden, R. L.; Polonsky, I. N.; O'Brien, D. M.

    2014-12-01

    The Tropospheric Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (TIMS) unit rebuilt to operate in a narrow spectral region, approximately 1603 to 1615 nm, of the weak CO2 band as described by Kumer et al. (2013, Proc. SPIE 8867, doi:10.1117/12.2022668) was used to conduct the demonstration. An integrating sphere (IS), linear polarizers and quarter wave plate were used to confirm that the instrument's spectral response to unpolarized light, to 45° linearly polarized light and to circular polarized light are identical. In all these cases the intensity components Ip = Is where Ip is the component parallel to the object space projected slit and Is is perpendicular to the slit. In the circular polarized case Ip = Is in the time averaged sense. The polarizer and IS were used to characterize the ratio Rθ of the instrument response to linearly polarized light at the angle θ relative to parallel from the slit, for increments of θ from 0 to 90°, to that of the unpolarized case. Spectra of diffusely reflected sunlight passed through the polarizer in increments of θ, and divided by the respective Rθ showed identical results, within the noise limit, for solar spectrum multiplied by the atmospheric transmission and convolved by the Instrument Line Shape (ILS). These measurements demonstrate that unknown polarization in the diffusely reflected sunlight on this small spectral range affect only the slow change across the narrow band in spectral response relative to that of unpolarized light and NOT the finely structured / high contrast spectral structure of the CO2 atmospheric absorption that is used to retrieve the atmospheric content of CO2. The latter is one of the geoCARB mission objectives (Kumer et al, 2013). The situation is similar for the other three narrow geoCARB bands; O2 A band 757.9 to 768.6 nm; strong CO2 band 2045.0 to 2085.0 nm; CH4 and CO region 2300.6 to 2345.6 nm. Polonsky et al have repeated the mission simulation study doi:10.5194/amt-7-959-2014 assuming no use of a geo

  12. A Novel Modification of PSO Algorithm for SML Estimation of DOA

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Haihua; Li, Shibao; Liu, Jianhang; Liu, Fen; Suzuki, Masakiyo

    2016-01-01

    This paper addresses the issue of reducing the computational complexity of Stochastic Maximum Likelihood (SML) estimation of Direction-of-Arrival (DOA). The SML algorithm is well-known for its high accuracy of DOA estimation in sensor array signal processing. However, its computational complexity is very high because the estimation of SML criteria is a multi-dimensional non-linear optimization problem. As a result, it is hard to apply the SML algorithm to real systems. The Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO) algorithm is considered as a rather efficient method for multi-dimensional non-linear optimization problems in DOA estimation. However, the conventional PSO algorithm suffers two defects, namely, too many particles and too many iteration times. Therefore, the computational complexity of SML estimation using conventional PSO algorithm is still a little high. To overcome these two defects and to reduce computational complexity further, this paper proposes a novel modification of the conventional PSO algorithm for SML estimation and we call it Joint-PSO algorithm. The core idea of the modification lies in that it uses the solution of Estimation of Signal Parameters via Rotational Invariance Techniques (ESPRIT) and stochastic Cramer-Rao bound (CRB) to determine a novel initialization space. Since this initialization space is already close to the solution of SML, fewer particles and fewer iteration times are needed. As a result, the computational complexity can be greatly reduced. In simulation, we compare the proposed algorithm with the conventional PSO algorithm, the classic Altering Minimization (AM) algorithm and Genetic algorithm (GA). Simulation results show that our proposed algorithm is one of the most efficient solving algorithms and it shows great potential for the application of SML in real systems. PMID:27999377

  13. A Novel Modification of PSO Algorithm for SML Estimation of DOA.

    PubMed

    Chen, Haihua; Li, Shibao; Liu, Jianhang; Liu, Fen; Suzuki, Masakiyo

    2016-12-19

    This paper addresses the issue of reducing the computational complexity of Stochastic Maximum Likelihood (SML) estimation of Direction-of-Arrival (DOA). The SML algorithm is well-known for its high accuracy of DOA estimation in sensor array signal processing. However, its computational complexity is very high because the estimation of SML criteria is a multi-dimensional non-linear optimization problem. As a result, it is hard to apply the SML algorithm to real systems. The Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO) algorithm is considered as a rather efficient method for multi-dimensional non-linear optimization problems in DOA estimation. However, the conventional PSO algorithm suffers two defects, namely, too many particles and too many iteration times. Therefore, the computational complexity of SML estimation using conventional PSO algorithm is still a little high. To overcome these two defects and to reduce computational complexity further, this paper proposes a novel modification of the conventional PSO algorithm for SML estimation and we call it Joint-PSO algorithm. The core idea of the modification lies in that it uses the solution of Estimation of Signal Parameters via Rotational Invariance Techniques (ESPRIT) and stochastic Cramer-Rao bound (CRB) to determine a novel initialization space. Since this initialization space is already close to the solution of SML, fewer particles and fewer iteration times are needed. As a result, the computational complexity can be greatly reduced. In simulation, we compare the proposed algorithm with the conventional PSO algorithm, the classic Altering Minimization (AM) algorithm and Genetic algorithm (GA). Simulation results show that our proposed algorithm is one of the most efficient solving algorithms and it shows great potential for the application of SML in real systems.

  14. Microdroplet Sample Application in Electrothermal Atomization for Atomic Absorption Spectrometry.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-03-29

    ad ideftify by Week amber) atomic absorption spectroscopy microsampl ing graphite- furnace AAS automation C> 20. AOSTRACT (Coninuhe an reveresi de It...furnace and spectrometer system as well as for partial support of this project. REFERENCES 1. J. D. Winefordner, Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy , G. F

  15. Method for calibrating mass spectrometers

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Gordon A [Benton City, WA; Brands, Michael D [Richland, WA; Bruce, James E [Schwenksville, PA; Pasa-Tolic, Ljiljana [Richland, WA; Smith, Richard D [Richland, WA

    2002-12-24

    A method whereby a mass spectra generated by a mass spectrometer is calibrated by shifting the parameters used by the spectrometer to assign masses to the spectra in a manner which reconciles the signal of ions within the spectra having equal mass but differing charge states, or by reconciling ions having known differences in mass to relative values consistent with those known differences. In this manner, the mass spectrometer is calibrated without the need for standards while allowing the generation of a highly accurate mass spectra by the instrument.

  16. Multiple order common path spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newbury, Amy B. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    The present invention relates to a dispersive spectrometer. The spectrometer allows detection of multiple orders of light on a single focal plane array by splitting the orders spatially using a dichroic assembly. A conventional dispersion mechanism such as a defraction grating disperses the light spectrally. As a result, multiple wavelength orders can be imaged on a single focal plane array of limited spectral extent, doubling (or more) the number of spectral channels as compared to a conventional spectrometer. In addition, this is achieved in a common path device.

  17. Quantification and parametrization of non-linearity effects by higher-order sensitivity terms in scattered light differential optical absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puķīte, Jānis; Wagner, Thomas

    2016-05-01

    We address the application of differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS) of scattered light observations in the presence of strong absorbers (in particular ozone), for which the absorption optical depth is a non-linear function of the trace gas concentration. This is the case because Beer-Lambert law generally does not hold for scattered light measurements due to many light paths contributing to the measurement. While in many cases linear approximation can be made, for scenarios with strong absorptions non-linear effects cannot always be neglected. This is especially the case for observation geometries, for which the light contributing to the measurement is crossing the atmosphere under spatially well-separated paths differing strongly in length and location, like in limb geometry. In these cases, often full retrieval algorithms are applied to address the non-linearities, requiring iterative forward modelling of absorption spectra involving time-consuming wavelength-by-wavelength radiative transfer modelling. In this study, we propose to describe the non-linear effects by additional sensitivity parameters that can be used e.g. to build up a lookup table. Together with widely used box air mass factors (effective light paths) describing the linear response to the increase in the trace gas amount, the higher-order sensitivity parameters eliminate the need for repeating the radiative transfer modelling when modifying the absorption scenario even in the presence of a strong absorption background. While the higher-order absorption structures can be described as separate fit parameters in the spectral analysis (so-called DOAS fit), in practice their quantitative evaluation requires good measurement quality (typically better than that available from current measurements). Therefore, we introduce an iterative retrieval algorithm correcting for the higher-order absorption structures not yet considered in the DOAS fit as well as the absorption dependence on

  18. Observation of tropospheric NO2 by airborne multi-axis differential optical absorption spectroscopy in the Pearl River Delta region, south China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Jin; Xie, Pin-Hua; Si, Fu-Qi; Li, Ang; Wu, Feng-Cheng; Wang, Yang; Liu, Jian-Guo; Liu, Wen-Qing; Andreas, Hartl; Chan, Ka Lok

    2014-09-01

    An airborne multi-axis differential optical absorption spectroscopic (AMAX-DOAS) instrument was developed and applied to measure tropospheric NO2 in the Pearl River Delta region in the south of China. By combining the measurements in nadir and zenith directions and analyzing the UV and visible spectral region using the DOAS method, information about tropospheric NO2 vertical columns was obtained. Strong tropospheric NO2 signals were detected when flying over heavilly polluted regions and point sources like plants. The AMAX-DOAS results were compared with ground-based MAX-DOAS observations in the southwest of Zhuhai city using the same parameters for radiative transport calculations. The difference in vertical column data between the two instruments is about 8%. Our data were also compared with those from OMI and fair agreement was obtained with a correlation coefficient R of 0.61. The difference between the two instruments can be attributed to the different spatial resolution and the temporal mismatch during the measurements.

  19. Real-time monitoring of benzene, toluene, and p-xylene in a photoreaction chamber with a tunable mid-infrared laser and ultraviolet differential optical absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Parsons, Matthew T; Sydoryk, Ihor; Lim, Alan; McIntyre, Thomas J; Tulip, John; Jäger, Wolfgang; McDonald, Karen

    2011-02-01

    We describe the implementation of a mid-infrared laser-based trace gas sensor with a photoreaction chamber, used for reproducing chemical transformations of benzene, toluene, and p-xylene (BTX) gases that may occur in the atmosphere. The system performance was assessed in the presence of photoreaction products including aerosol particles. A mid-infrared external cavity quantum cascade laser (EC-QCL)-tunable from 9.41-9.88 μm (1012-1063 cm(-1))-was used to monitor gas phase concentrations of BTX simultaneously and in real time during chemical processing of these compounds with hydroxyl radicals in a photoreaction chamber. Results are compared to concurrent measurements using ultraviolet differential optical absorption spectroscopy (UV DOAS). The EC-QCL based system provides quantitation limits of approximately 200, 200, and 600 parts in 10(9) (ppb) for benzene, toluene, and p-xylene, respectively, which represents a significant improvement over our previous work with this laser system. Correspondingly, we observe the best agreement between the EC-QCL measurements and the UV DOAS measurements with benzene, followed by toluene, then p-xylene. Although BTX gas-detection limits are not as low for the EC-QCL system as for UV DOAS, an unidentified by-product of the photoreactions was observed with the EC-QCL, but not with the UV DOAS system.

  20. Coastal Research Imaging Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    The Coastal Research Imaging Spectrometer (CRIS) is an airborne remote-sensing system designed specifically for research on the physical, chemical, and biological characteristics of coastal waters. The CRIS includes a visible-light hyperspectral imaging subsystem for measuring the color of water, which contains information on the biota, sediment, and nutrient contents of the water. The CRIS also includes an infrared imaging subsystem, which provides information on the temperature of the water. The combination of measurements enables investigation of biological effects of both natural and artificial flows of water from land into the ocean, including diffuse and point-source flows that may contain biological and/or chemical pollutants. Temperature is an important element of such measurements because temperature contrasts can often be used to distinguish among flows from different sources: for example, a sewage outflow could manifest itself in spectral images as a local high-temperature anomaly.anomaly. Both the visible and infrared subsystems scan in "pushbroom" mode: that is, an aircraft carrying the system moves along a ground track, the system is aimed downward, and image data are acquired in acrosstrack linear arrays of pixels. Both subsystems operate at a frame rate of 30 Hz. The infrared and visible-light optics are adjusted so that both subsystems are aimed at the same moving swath, which has across-track angular width of 15. Data from the infrared and visible imaging subsystems are stored in the same file along with aircraft-position data acquired by a Global Positioning System receiver. The combination of the three sets of data is used to construct infrared and hyperspectral maps of scanned areas shown.

  1. Development of near infrared spectrometer for gem materials study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jindata, W.; Meesiri, W.; Wongkokua, W.

    2015-07-01

    Most of gem materials can be characterized by infrared absorption spectroscopy. Normally, mid infrared absorption technique has been applied for investigating fundamental vibrational modes. However, for some gem materials, such as tourmaline, NIR is a better choice due to differentiation. Most commercial NIR spectrometers employ complicated dispersive grating or Fourier transform techniques. In this work, we developed a filter type NIR spectrometer with the availability of high efficiency and low-cost narrow bandpass NIR interference filters to be taught in a physics laboratory. The instrument was designed for transmission-mode configuration. A 50W halogen lamp was used as NIR source. There were fourteen NIR filters mounted on a rotatory wheel for wavelength selection ranging from 1000-1650 nm with steps of 50 nm. A 1.0 mm diameter of InGaAs photodiode was used as the detector for the spectrometer. Hence, transparent gem materials can be used as samples for experiment. Student can learn vibrational absorption spectroscopy as well as Beer-Lambert law from the development of this instrument.

  2. Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer (AMS) Overview

    NASA Video Gallery

    The Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer (AMS) is flying to the station on STS-134. The AMS experiment is a state-of-the-art particle physics detector being operated by an international team composed of 60 ...

  3. Fast-neutron spectrometer developments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moler, R. B.; Zagotta, W. E.; Baker, S. I.

    1973-01-01

    Li6 sandwich-type neutron spectrometer is equipped with proportional counter for particle identification. System uses current-sensitive preamplifiers to minimize pile-up of gamma-ray and particle pulses.

  4. The GRAVITY spectrometers: optical qualification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yazici, Senol; Straubmeier, Christian; Wiest, Michael; Wank, Imke; Fischer, Sebastian; Horrobin, Matthew; Eisenhauer, Frank; Perrin, Guy; Perraut, Karine; Brandner, Wolfgang; Amorim, Antonio; Schöller, Markus; Eckart, Andreas

    2014-07-01

    GRAVITY1 is a 2nd generation Very Large Telescope Interferometer (VLTI) operated in the astronomical K-band. In the Beam Combiner Instrument2 (BCI) four Fiber Couplers3 (FC) will feed the light coming from each telescope into two fibers, a reference channel for the fringe tracking spectrometer4 (FT) and a science channel for the science spectrometer4 (SC). The differential Optical Path Difference (dOPD) between the two channels will be corrected using a novel metrology concept.5 The metrology laser will keep control of the dOPD of the two channels. It is injected into the spectrometers and detected at the telescope level. Piezo-actuated fiber stretchers correct the dOPD accordingly. Fiber-fed Integrated Optics6 (IO) combine coherently the light of all six baselines and feed both spectrometers. Assisted by Infrared Wavefront Sensors7 (IWS) at each Unit Telescope (UT) and correcting the path difference between the channels with an accuracy of up to 5 nm, GRAVITY will push the limits of astrometrical accuracy to the order of 10 μas and provide phase-referenced interferometric imaging with a resolution of 4 mas. The University of Cologne developed, constructed and tested both spectrometers of the camera system. Both units are designed for the near infrared (1.95 - 2.45 μm) and are operated in a cryogenic environment. The Fringe Tracker is optimized for highest transmission with fixed spectral resolution (R = 22) realized by a double-prism.8 The Science spectrometer is more diverse and allows to choose from three different spectral resolutions8 (R = [22, 500, 4000]), where the lowest resolution is achieved with a prism and the higher resolutions are realized with grisms. A Wollaston prism in each spectrometer allows for polarimetric splitting of the light. The goal for the spectrometers is to concentrate at least 90% of the ux in 2 × 2 pixel (36 × 36 μm2) for the Science channel and in 1 pixel (24 × 24 μm) in the Fringe Tracking channel. In Section 1, we present

  5. PERITONEAL ABSORPTION

    PubMed Central

    Hahn, P. F.; Miller, L. L.; Robscheit-Robbins, F. S.; Bale, W. F.; Whipple, G. H.

    1944-01-01

    The absorption of red cells from the normal peritoneum of the dog can be demonstrated by means of red cells labeled with radio-iron incorporated in the hemoglobin of these red cells. Absorption in normal dogs runs from 20 to 100 per cent of the amount given within 24 hours. Dogs rendered anemic by bleeding absorb red cells a little less rapidly—ranging from 5 to 80 per cent of the injected red cells. Doubly depleted dogs (anemic and hypoproteinemic) absorb even less in the three experiments recorded. This peritoneal absorption varies widely in different dogs and even in the same dog at different times. We do not know the factors responsible for these variations but there is no question about active peritoneal absorption. The intact red cells pass readily from the peritoneal cavity into lymph spaces in diaphragm and other areas of the peritoneum. The red cells move along the lymphatics and through the lymph glands with little or no phagocytosis and eventually into the large veins through the thoracic ducts. PMID:19871404

  6. Nutrient absorption.

    PubMed

    Rubin, Deborah C

    2004-03-01

    Our understanding of nutrient absorption continues to grow, from the development of unique animal models and from studies in which cutting-edge molecular and cellular biologic approaches have been used to analyze the structure and function of relevant molecules. Studies of the molecular genetics of inherited disorders have also provided many new insights into these processes. A major advance in lipid absorption has been the cloning and characterization of several intestinal acyl CoA:monoacylglycerol acyltransferases; these may provide new targets for antiobesity drug therapy. Studies of intestinal cholesterol absorption and reverse cholesterol transport have encouraged the development of novel potential treatments for hyperlipidemia. Observations in genetically modified mice and in humans with mutations in glucose transporter 2 suggest the importance of a separate microsomal membrane transport pathway for glucose transport. The study of iron metabolism has advanced greatly with the identification of the hemochromatosis gene and the continued examination of the genetic regulation of iron absorptive pathways. Several human thiamine transporters have been identified, and their specific roles in different tissues are being explored.

  7. UV laser long-path absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dorn, Hans-Peter; Brauers, Theo; Neuroth, Rudolf

    1994-01-01

    Long path Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (DOAS) using a picosecond UV laser as a light source was developed in our institute. Tropospheric OH radicals are measured by their rotational absorption lines around 308 nm. The spectra are obtained using a high resolution spectrograph. The detection system has been improved over the formerly used optomechanical scanning device by application of a photodiode array which increased the observed spectral range by a factor of 6 and which utilizes the light much more effectively leading to a considerable reduction of the measurement time. This technique provides direct measurements of OH because the signal is given by the product of the absorption coefficient and the OH concentration along the light path according to Lambert-Beers law. No calibration is needed. Since the integrated absorption coefficient is well known the accuracy of the measurement essentially depends on the extent to which the OH absorption pattern can be detected in the spectra. No interference by self generated OH radicals in the detection lightpath has been observed. The large bandwidth (greater than 0.15 nm) and the high spectral resolution (1.5 pm) allows absolute determination of interferences by other trace gas absorptions. The measurement error is directly accessible from the absorption-signal to baseline-noise ratio in the spectra. The applicability of the method strongly depends on visibility. Elevated concentrations of aerosols lead to considerable attenuation of the laser light which reduces the S/N-ratio. In the moderately polluted air of Julich, where we performed a number of OH measurement spectra. In addition absorption features of unidentified species were frequently detected. A quantitative deconvolution even of the known species is not easy to achieve and can leave residual structures in the spectra. Thus interferences usually increase the noise and deteriorate the OH detection sensitivity. Using diode arrays for sensitive

  8. Mobile MAX-DOAS observation of NO2 and comparison with OMI satellite data in the western coastal areas of the Korean peninsula.

    PubMed

    Chong, Jihyo; Kim, Young J; Gu, Myojeong; Wagner, Thomas; Song, Chul H

    2016-01-01

    Ground-based MAX-DOAS measurements have been used to retrieve column densities of atmospheric absorbers such as NO2, SO2, HCHO, and O3. In this study, mobile MAX-DOAS measurements were conducted to map the 2-D distributions of atmospheric NO2 in the western coastal areas of the Korean peninsula. A Mini-MAX-DOAS instrument was mounted on the rooftop of a mobile lab vehicle with a telescope mounted parallel to the driving direction, pointing forward. The measurements were conducted from 21 to 24 December 2010 along the western coastal areas from Gomso harbor (35.59N, 126.61E) to Gunsan harbor (35.98N, 126.67E). During mobile MAX-DOAS observations, high elevation angles were used to avoid shades from nearby obstacles. For the determination of the tropospheric vertical column density (VCD), the air mass factor (AMF) was retrieved by the so-called geometric approximation. The NO2 VCDs from 20 and 45 degree elevation angles were retrieved from mobile MAX-DOAS measurements. The tropospheric NO2 VCDs derived from mobile MAX-DOAS measurements were compared directly to those retrieved by the OMI satellite observations. Mobile MAX-DOAS VCD was in good agreement with OMI tropospheric VCD on most days. However, OMI tropospheric VCD was much higher than that of mobile MAX-DOAS on 23 December 2010. One probable reason for this difference is that OMI retrieval might overestimate NO2 VCD under haze conditions, when a pollution plume was transported over the measurement site. The mobile MAX-DOAS observations reveal much finer spatial patterns of NO2 distributions, which can provide useful information for the validation of satellite observation of atmospheric trace gases.

  9. Coastal Research Imaging Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lucey, Paul G.; Williams, Timothy; Horton, Keith A.

    2004-01-01

    The Coastal Research Imaging Spectrometer (CRIS) is an airborne remote sensing system designed specifically for research on the physical, chemical, and biological characteristics of coastal waters. The CRIS includes a visible-light hyperspectral imaging subsystem for measuring the color of water, which contains information on the biota, sediment, and nutrient contents of the water. The CRIS also includes an infrared imaging subsystem, which provides information on the temperature of the water. The combination of measurements enables investigation of biological effects of both natural and artificial flows of water from land into the ocean, including diffuse and point-source flows that may contain biological and/or chemical pollutants. Temperature is an important element of such measurements because temperature contrasts can often be used to distinguish among flows from different sources: for example, a sewage outflow could manifest itself in spectral images as a local high-temperature anomaly. Both the visible and infrared subsystems scan in pushbroom mode: that is, an aircraft carrying the system moves along a ground track, the system is aimed downward, and image data are acquired in across-track linear arrays of pixels. Both subsystems operate at a frame rate of 30 Hz. The infrared and visible-light optics are adjusted so that both subsystems are aimed at the same moving swath, which has across-track angular width of 15 . Data from the infrared and visible imaging subsystems are stored in the same file along with aircraft- position data acquired by a Global Positioning System receiver. The combination of the three sets of data is used to construct infrared and hyperspectral maps of scanned areas (see figure). The visible subsystem is based on a grating spectrograph and a rapid-readout charge-coupled-device camera. Images of the swatch are acquired in 256 spectral bands at wavelengths from 400 to 800 nm. The infrared subsystem, which is sensitive in a single

  10. Regulation of yeast ESCRT-III membrane scission activity by the Doa4 ubiquitin hydrolase.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Natalie; West, Matt; Odorizzi, Greg

    2017-03-01

    ESCRT-III executes membrane scission during the budding of intralumenal vesicles (ILVs) at endosomes. The scission mechanism is unknown but appears to be linked to the cycle of assembly and disassembly of ESCRT-III complexes at membranes. Regulating this cycle is therefore expected to be important for determining the timing of ESCRT-III-mediated membrane scission. We show that in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, ESCRT-III complexes are stabilized and ILV membrane scission is delayed by Doa4, which is the ubiquitin hydrolase that deubiquitinates transmembrane proteins sorted as cargoes into ILVs. These results suggest a mechanism to delay ILV budding while cargoes undergo deubiquitination. We further show that deubiquitination of ILV cargoes is inhibited via Doa4 binding to Vps20, which is the subunit of ESCRT-III that initiates assembly of the complex. Current models suggest that ESCRT-III complexes surround ubiquitinated cargoes to trap them at the site of ILV budding while the cargoes undergo deubiquitination. Thus our results also propose a mechanism to prevent the onset of ILV cargo deubiquitination at the initiation of ESCRT-III complex assembly.

  11. Fractional difference co-array perspective for wideband signal DOA estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jian-Yan; Lu, Yi-Long; Zhang, Yan-Mei; Wang, Wei-Jiang

    2016-12-01

    In recent years, much attention has been focused on difference co-array perspective in DOA estimation field due to its ability to increase the degrees of freedom and to detect more sources than sensors. In this article, a fractional difference co-array perspective (FrDCA) is proposed by vectorizing structured second-order statistics matrices instead of conventional zero-lag covariance matrix. As a result, not only conventional virtual sensors but also the fractional ones can be utilized to further increase the degrees of freedom. In a sense, the proposed perspective can be viewed as an extended structured model to generate virtual sensors. Then, as a case study, four DOA estimation algorithms for wideband signal based on the FrDCA perspective are specifically presented. The fractional virtual sensors can be generated by dividing the wideband signal into many sub-band signals. Accordingly, the degree of freedom and the maximum number of resolvable sources are increased. The corresponding numerical simulation results validate the advantages and the effectiveness of the proposed perspective.

  12. Rheokinetic analysis on the curing process of HTPB-DOA- MDI binder system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chai, T.; Liu, Y. C.; Ma, H.; Yu, Y. W.; Yuan, J. M.; Wang, J. H.; Guo, J. H.

    2016-07-01

    Polymer bonded explosives (PBXs) are a kind of rubbery explosives, in which the explosive components are bound together by a polymeric binder. The hydroxyl terminated polybutadiene (HTPB)-based polyurethane binder systems possess a unique combination of properties, including superior adhesion, excellent mechanical properties and have been widely used in rocket propellants, PBXs and other weapons. The cure reaction between HTPB and diisocyanates in the castable PBXs plays an important role in the adjustment of process parameters as well as properties of explosive formulations. In this paper, viscosity measurements were carried out at different temperatures (15oC, 25oC, 35oC, 45oC, 55oC) to a series of systemic studies on the viscosity build-up and rheological reaction rate constant during the curing process of the of HTPB- dioctyl adipate (DOA)-diphenyl methane diisocyanate (MDI) binder system, discovered and explained the phenomenon that the pot-life of the binder system was prolonged when the curing temperature raised and the curing reaction rate was accelerated. And the rheology kinetic model of the HTPB-DOA-MDI binder system was established.

  13. Urine levels of drugs for which Triage DOA screening was positive.

    PubMed

    Moriya, Fumio

    2009-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between urine levels of target drugs of abuse for which Triage DOA gave positive results, as well as the cut-off levels for these drugs. Thirty-eight forensic urine samples positive for commonly abused drugs were involved. Of these samples, 12 were positive for barbiturates (BAR), 11 for benzodiazepines (BZO), 8 for opiates (OPI), 7 for amphetamines (AMP), and 4 for tricyclic antidepressants (TCA). In the BAR-positive urine samples, phenobarbital, amobarbital or barbital was detected at concentrations higher than cut-off levels. In the BZO-positive samples, diazepam, nordiazepam, triazolam, nitrazepam and/or midazolam was detected at concentrations lower than cut-off levels; in the triazolam-involved urine, alpha-hydroxytriazolam, a metabolite of triazolam, showed concentrations higher than cut-off level. In the AMP-positive samples, methamphetamine was detected at concentrations higher than cut-off level. Urine samples positive for OPI contained total dihydrocodeine, codeine or morphine at concentrations higher than cut-off levels. In TCA-positive samples, amitriptyline was detected at concentrations higher or lower than cut-off level, and clomipramine was detected at a concentration much lower than cut-off level. Metabolites of BZO and TCA, which are not typically analyzed by instrumental procedures, may cross-react to varying degrees with the antibodies used for Triage DOA.

  14. Modified Particle Filtering Algorithm for Single Acoustic Vector Sensor DOA Tracking

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xinbo; Sun, Haixin; Jiang, Liangxu; Shi, Yaowu; Wu, Yue

    2015-01-01

    The conventional direction of arrival (DOA) estimation algorithm with static sources assumption usually estimates the source angles of two adjacent moments independently and the correlation of the moments is not considered. In this article, we focus on the DOA estimation of moving sources and a modified particle filtering (MPF) algorithm is proposed with state space model of single acoustic vector sensor. Although the particle filtering (PF) algorithm has been introduced for acoustic vector sensor applications, it is not suitable for the case that one dimension angle of source is estimated with large deviation, the two dimension angles (pitch angle and azimuth angle) cannot be simultaneously employed to update the state through resampling processing of PF algorithm. To solve the problems mentioned above, the MPF algorithm is proposed in which the state estimation of previous moment is introduced to the particle sampling of present moment to improve the importance function. Moreover, the independent relationship of pitch angle and azimuth angle is considered and the two dimension angles are sampled and evaluated, respectively. Then, the MUSIC spectrum function is used as the “likehood” function of the MPF algorithm, and the modified PF-MUSIC (MPF-MUSIC) algorithm is proposed to improve the root mean square error (RMSE) and the probability of convergence. The theoretical analysis and the simulation results validate the effectiveness and feasibility of the two proposed algorithms. PMID:26501280

  15. Imaging Spectrometer for NEO Mission: Seta Instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Sanctis, Maria Cristina; Filacchione, Gianrico; Capaccioni, Fabrizio; Ammannito, Eleonora; Capria, Maria Teresa; Coradini, Angioletta; Migliorini, Alessandra

    NASA, ESA and JAXA have proposed NEO Sample Return Missions to a Near Earth Object. With these missions we will have the opportunity to return for study in Earth-based laboratories a direct sample of the earliest record of how our solar system formed. The landing site and sample selection will be the most important scientific decision to make during the course of the mission. For this reason, powerful on-board remote sensing science instruments are needed to support the selection. Among these instruments, the imaging spectrometer is a key instrument, being capable to: • Characterize the mineralogical composition of the entire object; • Analyze the of the landing site and the returned sample in its own native environment; • Establish the broadest possible scientific context for the target objects within our current understanding of the solar system. Scientific Objectives: Aim of SETA experiment is to perform imaging spectroscopy in the spectral range 400-3300 nm for a complete mapping of the target with a spectral sampling of at least 20 nm and a spatial resolution of the order of meters. SETA shall be able to return a detailed determination of the mineralogical composition for the different geologic units as well as the overall surface mineralogy with a spatial resolution of the order of few meters. These compositional characterizations involve the analysis of spectral parameters that are diagnostic of the presence and composition of various mineral species and materials that may be present on the target body. Most of the interesting minerals have electronic and vibrational absorption features in their VIS-NIR reflectance spectra. Identification of these related mineral phases requires a moderate spectral resolution. The presence of organic materials may be more difficult to identify. The SETA design is based on a pushbroom imaging spectrometer operating in the 400-3300 nm range, using a 2D array HgCdTe detector. This kind of instrument allows a simultaneous

  16. An intercomparison study of tropospheric NO2 columns retrieved from MAX-DOAS and simulated by regional air quality models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blechschmidt, Anne-Marlene

    2016-04-01

    Tropospheric NO2 is hazardous to human health and can lead to tropospheric ozone formation, eutrophication of ecosystems and acid rain production. It is therefore very important to accurately observe and simulate tropospheric NO2 on a regional and global scale. In the present study, MAX-DOAS tropospheric NO2 column retrievals from three European measurement stations are applied for validation of a regional model ensemble. In general, there is a good agreement between simulated and retrieved NO2 column values for individual MAX-DOAS measurements, indicating that the model ensemble does well represent the emission and tropospheric chemistry of NOx. However, the model ensemble tends to overestimate low and underestimate high tropospheric NO2 column values, respectively. Pollution transport towards the stations is on average well represented by the models. However, large differences can be found for individual pollution plumes. Seasonal cycles are overestimated by the model ensemble, which could point to problems in simulating photochemistry. While weekly cycles are reproduced well by the models, model performance is rather poor for diurnal cycles. In particular, simulated morning rush hour peaks are not confirmed by MAX-DOAS retrievals, which may result from inappropriate hourly scaling of NOx emissions, possibly combined with errors in chemistry. Our results demonstrate that a large number of validation points are available from MAX-DOAS data, which should therefore be used more extensively in future regional air quality modelling studies.

  17. Estimation of NOx emissions from Delhi using car MAX-DOAS observations and comparison with OMI satellite data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaiganfar, R.; Beirle, S.; Sharma, M.; Chauhan, A.; Singh, R. P.; Wagner, T.

    2011-07-01

    We present the first Multi-Axis- (MAX-) DOAS observations in India performed during April 2010 and January 2011 in Delhi and nearby regions. The MAX-DOAS instrument was mounted on a car roof, which allowed us to perform measurements along individual driving routes. From car MAX-DOAS observations along closed circles around Delhi, together with information on wind speed and direction, the NOx emissions from the greater Delhi area were determined: our estimate of 3.7 × 1025 molec s-1 is found to be slightly lower than the corresponding emission estimates using the EDGAR data base and substantially smaller compared to a recent study by Gurjar et al. (2004). We have also used the MAX-DOAS observations of the tropospheric NO2 VCD for validation of simultaneous satellite observations from the OMI instrument and found a good agreement of the spatial patterns. The absolute values show a reasonably good agreement. However, OMI data tends to underestimate the tropospheric NO2 VCDs in regions with high pollution levels, and tends to overestimate the tropospheric NO2 VCDs in more clean areas. These findings indicate possible discrepancies between the true vertical NO2 profiles and the profile assumptions in the OMI satellite retrieval.

  18. Evaluating Field Spectrometer Performance with Transmission Standards: Examples from the USGS Spectral Library and Research Databases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoefen, T. M.; Kokaly, R. F.; Swayze, G. A.; Livo, K. E.

    2015-12-01

    Collection of spectroscopic data has expanded with the development of field-portable spectrometers. The most commonly available spectrometers span one or several wavelength ranges: the visible (VIS) and near-infrared (NIR) region from approximately 400 to 1000 nm, and the shortwave infrared (SWIR) region from approximately 1000-2500 nm. Basic characteristics of spectrometer performance are the wavelength position and bandpass of each channel. Bandpass can vary across the wavelength coverage of an instrument, due to spectrometer design and detector materials. Spectrometer specifications can differ from one instrument to the next for a given model and between manufacturers. The USGS Spectroscopy Lab in Denver has developed a simple method to evaluate field spectrometer wavelength accuracy and bandpass values using transmission measurements of materials with intense, narrow absorption features, including Mylar* plastic, praseodymium-doped glass, and National Institute of Standards and Technology Standard Reference Material 2035. The evaluation procedure has been applied in laboratory and field settings for 19 years and used to detect deviations from cited manufacturer specifications. Tracking of USGS spectrometers with transmission standards has revealed several instances of wavelength shifts due to wear in spectrometer components. Since shifts in channel wavelengths and differences in bandpass between instruments can impact the use of field spectrometer data to calibrate and analyze imaging spectrometer data, field protocols to measure wavelength standards can limit data loss due to spectrometer degradation. In this paper, the evaluation procedure will be described and examples of observed wavelength shifts during a spectrometer field season will be presented. The impact of changing wavelength and bandpass characteristics on spectral measurements will be demonstrated and implications for spectral libraries will be discussed. *Any use of trade, firm, or product names

  19. COMPAS: Compositional mineralogy with a photoacoustic spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, W. Hayden

    1992-01-01

    There is an important need for an in situ method of mineral and rock identification and quantification that provides true absorption spectra for a wide spectral range for lunar lander/rover missions. Many common minerals such as feldspars, magnetite, ilmenite, and amorphous fine solids or glasses, can exhibit flat spectral reflectances in the 400-2500 nm spectral region that render inaccurate or difficult their spectral detection and quantitative analysis. Ideal rock and mineral spectra are, of course, pure absorption spectra that are independent of the spectral effects of scattering, particle size, and distribution that can result in a suppression or distortion of their spectral features. This ideal seldom pertains to real samples. Since sample preparation is difficult and may fundamentally alter the observed diffuse spectral reflectance, an in situ spectral measurement method for rocks and minerals on the Moon, insensitive to the sample morphology, would be invaluable. Photoacoustic spectroscopy is a well-established technique appropriate for this task that has been widely applied in condensed-phase spectral studies of complex, highly light scattering, unprepared samples of everything from coal to whole blood, including rock and mineral characterization. A Compositional Mineralogy Photoacoustic Spectrometer, or COMPAS, can enable in situ spectral measurement of rocks and minerals, bypassing the major limitations of diffuse reflectance spectroscopy. COMPAS spectral capabilities for rock and mineral samples will be incorporated into an instrument prototype specifically for lunar measurements, compatible with rover capabilities.

  20. Comparison of satellite NO2 results with mobile MAX-DOAS observations and CHIMERE model simulations for Paris

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaiganfar, Reza; Beirle, Steffen; Petetin, Herve; Zhang, Qiji; Beekmann, Matthias; Wagner, Thomas

    2013-04-01

    Megacities are localized, heterogeneous and variable sources of various air pollutants, having great impact on air quality and ultimately on climate. Within the European project MEGAPOLI we characterise and quantify the pollution levels and emissions using spectroscopic observations from satellite and ground based instruments mounted on a car. The mobile observations are conducted on circles with different radii around megacities. From the satellite observations the link from local to regional and global scales can be made. Especially the impact of important sources like megacities on the surrounding areas and also over longer distances can be studied. The combination with the mobile measurements adds information about the heterogeneity within a satellite pixel and the diurnal cycle, which are not well captured from satellite observations. The CHIMERE model is used to produce daily 3D fields of different trace gases, ozone and aerosols. We compare the CHIMERE model with mobile MAX-DOAS and OMI satellite observations. The mobile measurements are also used for validation of the satellite observations. We compare the tropospheric NO2 from OMI (TEMIS) with our mobile MAX-DOAS vertical column densities (VCDs). In general good agreement of the spatial patterns was found between differet data sets. However, the mobile MAX-DOAS measurements usually showed much finer details of the horizontal distributions than the satellite and model data. Also differences in the absolute values were found: The Chimere data are17x% lower and 45% lower than the mobile MAX-DOAS data in summer and winter, respectively. The satellite data are about 50 % lower than mobile MAX-DOAS.

  1. A wide field-of-view imaging DOAS instrument for two-dimensional trace gas mapping from aircraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schönhardt, A.; Altube, P.; Gerilowski, K.; Krautwurst, S.; Hartmann, J.; Meier, A. C.; Richter, A.; Burrows, J. P.

    2015-12-01

    The Airborne imaging differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS) instrument for Measurements of Atmospheric Pollution (AirMAP) has been developed for the purpose of trace gas measurements and pollution mapping. The instrument has been characterized and successfully operated from aircraft. Nitrogen dioxide (NO2) columns were retrieved from the AirMAP observations. A major benefit of the push-broom imaging instrument is the spatially continuous, gap-free measurement sequence independent of flight altitude, a valuable characteristic for mapping purposes. This is made possible by the use of a charge coupled device (CCD) frame-transfer detector. A broad field of view across track of around 48° is achieved with wide-angle entrance optics. This leads to a swath width of about the same size as the flight altitude. The use of fibre coupled light intake optics with sorted light fibres allows flexible instrument positioning within the aircraft and retains the very good imaging capabilities. The measurements yield ground spatial resolutions below 100 m depending on flight altitude. The number of viewing directions is chosen from a maximum of 35 individual viewing directions (lines of sight, LOS) represented by 35 individual fibres. The selection is adapted to each situation by averaging according to signal-to-noise or spatial resolution requirements. Observations at 30 m spatial resolution are obtained when flying at 1000 m altitude and making use of all 35 viewing directions. This makes the instrument a suitable tool for mapping trace gas point sources and small-scale variability. The position and aircraft attitude are taken into account for accurate spatial mapping using the Attitude and Heading Reference System of the aircraft. A first demonstration mission using AirMAP was undertaken in June 2011. AirMAP was operated on the AWI Polar-5 aircraft in the framework of the AIRMETH-2011 campaign. During a flight above a medium-sized coal-fired power plant in north

  2. Resolution-enhanced Mapping Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kumer, J. B.; Aubrun, J. N.; Rosenberg, W. J.; Roche, A. E.

    1993-01-01

    A familiar mapping spectrometer implementation utilizes two dimensional detector arrays with spectral dispersion along one direction and spatial along the other. Spectral images are formed by spatially scanning across the scene (i.e., push-broom scanning). For imaging grating and prism spectrometers, the slit is perpendicular to the spatial scan direction. For spectrometers utilizing linearly variable focal-plane-mounted filters the spatial scan direction is perpendicular to the direction of spectral variation. These spectrometers share the common limitation that the number of spectral resolution elements is given by the number of pixels along the spectral (or dispersive) direction. Resolution enhancement by first passing the light input to the spectrometer through a scanned etalon or Michelson is discussed. Thus, while a detector element is scanned through a spatial resolution element of the scene, it is also temporally sampled. The analysis for all the pixels in the dispersive direction is addressed. Several specific examples are discussed. The alternate use of a Michelson for the same enhancement purpose is also discussed. Suitable for weight constrained deep space missions, hardware systems were developed including actuators, sensor, and electronics such that low-resolution etalons with performance required for implementation would weigh less than one pound.

  3. On-chip random spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Redding, B.; Liew, S. F.; Sarma, R.; Cao, H.

    2014-05-01

    Spectrometers are widely used tools in chemical and biological sensing, material analysis, and light source characterization. The development of a high-resolution on-chip spectrometer could enable compact, low-cost spectroscopy for portable sensing as well as increasing lab-on-a-chip functionality. However, the spectral resolution of traditional grating-based spectrometers scales with the optical pathlength, which translates to the linear dimension or footprint of the system, which is limited on-chip. In this work, we utilize multiple scattering in a random photonic structure fabricated on a silicon chip to fold the optical path, making the effective pathlength much longer than the linear dimension of the system and enabling high spectral resolution with a small footprint. Of course, the random spectrometer also requires a different operating paradigm, since different wavelengths are not spatially separated by the random structure, as they would be by a grating. Instead, light transmitted through the random structure produces a wavelengthdependent speckle pattern which can be used as a fingerprint to identify the input spectra after calibration. In practice, these wavelength-dependent speckle patterns are experimentally measured and stored in a transmission matrix, which describes the spectral-to-spatial mapping of the spectrometer. After calibrating the transmission matrix, an arbitrary input spectrum can be reconstructed from its speckle pattern. We achieved sub-nm resolution with 25 nm bandwidth at a wavelength of 1500 nm using a scattering medium with largest dimension of merely 50 μm.

  4. Airborne tunable diode laser spectrometer for trace-gas measurement in the lower stratosphere.

    PubMed

    Podolske, J; Loewenstein, M

    1993-09-20

    This paper describes the airborne tunable laser absorption spectrometer, a tunable diode laser instrument designed for in situ trace-gas measurement in the lower stratosphere from an ER-2 high-altitude research aircraft. Laser-wavelength modulation and second-harmonic detection are employed to achieve the required constituent detection sensitivity. The airborne tunable laser absorption spectrometer was used in two polar ozone campaigns, the Airborne Antarctic Ozone Experiment and the Airborne Arctic Stratospheric Expedition, and measured nitrous oxide with a response time of Is and an accuracy ≤ 10%.

  5. Mini ion trap mass spectrometer

    DOEpatents

    Dietrich, D.D.; Keville, R.F.

    1995-09-19

    An ion trap is described which operates in the regime between research ion traps which can detect ions with a mass resolution of better than 1:10{sup 9} and commercial mass spectrometers requiring 10{sup 4} ions with resolutions of a few hundred. The power consumption is kept to a minimum by the use of permanent magnets and a novel electron gun design. By Fourier analyzing the ion cyclotron resonance signals induced in the trap electrodes, a complete mass spectra in a single combined structure can be detected. An attribute of the ion trap mass spectrometer is that overall system size is drastically reduced due to combining a unique electron source and mass analyzer/detector in a single device. This enables portable low power mass spectrometers for the detection of environmental pollutants or illicit substances, as well as sensors for on board diagnostics to monitor engine performance or for active feedback in any process involving exhausting waste products. 10 figs.

  6. Mini ion trap mass spectrometer

    DOEpatents

    Dietrich, Daniel D.; Keville, Robert F.

    1995-01-01

    An ion trap which operates in the regime between research ion traps which can detect ions with a mass resolution of better than 1:10.sup.9 and commercial mass spectrometers requiring 10.sup.4 ions with resolutions of a few hundred. The power consumption is kept to a minimum by the use of permanent magnets and a novel electron gun design. By Fourier analyzing the ion cyclotron resonance signals induced in the trap electrodes, a complete mass spectra in a single combined structure can be detected. An attribute of the ion trap mass spectrometer is that overall system size is drastically reduced due to combining a unique electron source and mass analyzer/detector in a single device. This enables portable low power mass spectrometers for the detection of environmental pollutants or illicit substances, as well as sensors for on board diagnostics to monitor engine performance or for active feedback in any process involving exhausting waste products.

  7. Mobile spectrometer measures radar backscatter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gogineni, S.; Moore, R. K.; Onstott, R. G.; Kim, Y. S.; Bushnell, D.

    1984-01-01

    The present article is concerned with a helicopter-borne spectrometer (Heloscat), which has been developed to permit high-quality scattering measurements from a mobile platform at remote sites. The term 'spectrometer' referes to a class of scatterometers. The term 'scatterometer' is employed to denote a specialized radar for measuring scattering coefficients as a function of angle. A spectrometer, on the other hand, is a scatterometer which can measure backscatter at several frequencies. The Heloscat system is discussed, taking into account two antennas, RF hardware, and an externally mounted pendulum for angle encoding. A dual-antenna configuration is used for cross-polarized measurements, while a single-antenna system is used for like-polarized measurements. Attention is also given to oscillator characteristics, efficient data handling, and aspects of calibration.

  8. The GRAVITY