Science.gov

Sample records for absorption spectrometry analysis

  1. COMPREHENSIVE ANALYSIS OF BIOLOGICALLY RELEVANT ARSENICALS BY PH-SELECTIVE HYDRIDE GENERATION-ATOMIC ABSORPTION SPECTROMETRY

    EPA Science Inventory


    A method based on pH-selective generation and separation of arsines is commonly used for analysis of inorganic, methylated, and dimethylated trivalent and pentavalent arsenicals by hydride generation-atomic absorption spectrometry (HG-AAS). We have optimized this method to pe...

  2. Laboratory verification of on-line lithium analysis using ultraviolet absorption spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Beemster, B.J.; Schlager, K.J.; Schloegel, K.M.; Kahle, S.J.; Fredrichs, T.L.

    1992-12-31

    Several laboratory experiments were performed to evaluate the capability of absorption spectrometry in the ultraviolet-visible wavelength range with the objective of developing methods for on-line analysis of lithium directly in the primary coolant of Pressurized Water Reactors using optical probes. Although initial laboratory tests seemed to indicate that lithium could be detected using primary absorption (detection of natural spectra unassisted by reagents), subsequent field tests demonstrated that no primary absorption spectra existed for lithium in the ultraviolet-visible wavelength range. A second series of tests that were recently conducted did, however, confirm results reported in the literature to the effect that reagents were available that will react with lithium to form chelates that possess detectable absorption and fluorescent signatures. These results point to the possible use of secondary techniques for on-line analysis of lithium.

  3. Automation of preparation of nonmetallic samples for analysis by atomic absorption and inductively coupled plasma spectrometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wittmann, A.; Willay, G.

    1986-01-01

    For a rapid preparation of solutions intended for analysis by inductively coupled plasma emission spectrometry or atomic absorption spectrometry, an automatic device called Plasmasol was developed. This apparatus used the property of nonwettability of glassy C to fuse the sample in an appropriate flux. The sample-flux mixture is placed in a composite crucible, then heated at high temperature, swirled until full dissolution is achieved, and then poured into a water-filled beaker. After acid addition, dissolution of the melt, and filling to the mark, the solution is ready for analysis. The analytical results obtained, either for oxide samples or for prereduced iron ores show that the solutions prepared with this device are undistinguished from those obtained by manual dissolutions done by acid digestion or by high temperature fusion. Preparation reproducibility and analytical tests illustrate the performance of Plasmasol.

  4. Ultraviolet and Light Absorption Spectrometry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hargis, L. G.; Howell, J. A.

    1984-01-01

    Reviews developments in ultraviolet and light absorption spectrometry from December 1981 through November 1983, focusing on the chemistry involved in developing suitable reagents, absorbing systems, and methods of determination, and on physical aspects of the procedures. Includes lists of spectrophotometric methods for metals, non-metals, and…

  5. Direct analysis of silica by means of solid sampling graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Resano, M.; Mozas, E.; Crespo, C.; Pérez, J.; García-Ruiz, E.; Belarra, M. A.

    2012-05-01

    This paper reports on the use of solid sampling-graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry for the direct analysis of synthetic amorphous silica. In particular, determination of hazardous elements such As, Cd, Cr, Cu, Pb and Sb is investigated, as required by regulations of the food industry. The conclusion of the work is that, after proper optimization of the working conditions, paying particular attention to the atomization temperature and the use of proper modifiers (graphite powder, HNO3 or Pd), it is possible to develop suitable procedures that rely on the use of aqueous standard solutions to construct the calibration curves for all the elements investigated. The proposed method shows important benefits for the cost-effective analysis of such difficult samples in routine labs, permitting fast screening of those elements that are very rarely present in this type of sample, but also accurate quantification of those often found, while offering low limits of detection (always below 0.1 mg g- 1) that comply well with legal requirements, and precision levels that are fit for the purpose (approx. 6-9% R.S.D.).

  6. Atomic Absorption Spectrometry Analysis of Trace Elements in Degenerated Intervertebral Disc Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Kubaszewski, Łukasz; Zioła-Frankowska, Anetta; Frankowski, Marcin; Nowakowski, Andrzej; Czabak-Garbacz, Róża; Kaczmarczyk, Jacek; Gasik, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Background Few studies have investigated trace elements (TE) in human intervertebral disc (IVD) tissue. Trace element presence can have diverse meanings: essential TE show the metabolic modalities of the tissue, while environmentally-related TE indicate pollution and tissue-specific absorption and accumulation. IVD is a highly specific compartment with impaired communication with adjacent bone. Analysis of TE in IVD provides new insights regarding tissue metabolism and IVD communication with other tissues. Material/Methods Thirty intervertebral discs were acquired from 22 patients during surgical treatment for degenerative disease. Atomic absorption spectrometry was used to evaluate the concentrations of Al, Cd, Pb, Cu, Ni, Mo, Mg, and Zn. Results Al, Pb, Cu, Mg, and Zn were detected in all samples. Pb was significantly positively correlated with age, and Ni concentration was weakly correlated with population count in the patient’s place of residence. Only Cu was observed in higher concentrations in IVD compared to in other tissues. Significant positive correlations were observed between the following pairs: Mg/Zn, Mg/Al, Mg/Pb, Zn/Al, Zn/Pb, and Al/Pb. Negative correlations were observed between Mg/Cd, Zn/Cd, Mg/Mo, and Mo/Pb. Conclusions This study is one of few to profile the elements in intervertebral discs in patients with degenerative changes. We report significant differences between trace element concentrations in intervertebral discs compared to in other tissues. Knowledge of the TE accumulation pattern is vital for better understanding intervertebral disc nutrition and metabolism. PMID:25366266

  7. Fraunhofer effect atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Rust, Jennifer A; Nóbrega, Joaquim A; Calloway, Clifton P; Jones, Bradley T

    2005-02-15

    The dark lines in the solar spectrum were discovered by Wollaston and cataloged by Fraunhofer in the early days of the 19th century. Some years later, Kirchhoff explained the appearance of the dark lines: the sun was acting as a continuum light source and metals in the ground state in its atmosphere were absorbing characteristic narrow regions of the spectrum. This discovery eventually spawned atomic absorption spectrometry, which became a routine technique for chemical analysis in the mid-20th century. Laboratory-based atomic absorption spectrometers differ from the original observation of the Fraunhofer lines because they have always employed a separate light source and atomizer. This article describes a novel atomic absorption device that employs a single source, the tungsten coil, as both the generator of continuum radiation and the atomizer of the analytes. A 25-microL aliquot of sample is placed on the tungsten filament removed from a commercially available 150-W light bulb. The solution is dried and ashed by applying low currents to the coil in a three-step procedure. Full power is then applied to the coil for a brief period. During this time, the coil produces white light, which may be absorbed by any metals present in the atomization cloud produced by the sample. A high-resolution spectrometer with a charge-coupled device detector monitors the emission spectrum of the coil, which includes the dark lines from the metals. Detection limits are reported for seven elements: 5 pg of Ca (422.7 nm); 2 ng of Co (352.7 nm); 200 pg of Cr (425.4 nm); 7 pg of Sr (460.7 nm); 100 pg of Yb (398.8 nm); 500 pg of Mn (403.1 nm); and 500 pg of K (404.4 nm). Simultaneous multielement analyses are possible within a 4-nm spectral window. The relative standard deviations for the seven metals are below 8% for all metals except for Ca (10.7%), which was present in the blank at measurable levels. Analysis of a standard reference material (drinking water) resulted in a mean percent

  8. Simple analysis of total mercury and methylmercury in seafood using heating vaporization atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Yoshimoto, Keisuke; Anh, Hoang Thi Van; Yamamoto, Atsushi; Koriyama, Chihaya; Ishibashi, Yasuhiro; Tabata, Masaaki; Nakano, Atsuhiro; Yamamoto, Megumi

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to develop a simpler method for determining total mercury (T-Hg) and methylmercury (MeHg) in biological samples by using methyl isobutyl ketone (MIBK) in the degreasing step. The fat in the samples was extracted by MIBK to the upper phase. T-Hg transferred into the water phase. This was followed by the extraction of MeHg from the water phase using HBr, CuCl2 and toluene. The MeHg fraction was reverse-extracted into L-cysteine-sodium acetate solution from toluene. The concentrations of T-Hg and MeHg were determined by heating vaporization atomic absorption spectrometry. Certified reference materials for T-Hg and MeHg in hair and fish were accurately measured using this method. This method was then applied to determine T-Hg and MeHg concentrations in the muscle, liver and gonads of seafood for the risk assessment of MeHg exposure. The mean T-Hg and MeHg concentrations in squid eggs were 0.023 and 0.022 µg/g, and in squid nidamental glands 0.052 and 0.049 µg/g, respectively. The MeHg/T-Hg ratios in the eggs and nidamental glands of squid were 94.4% and 96.5%, respectively. The mean T-Hg and MeHg concentrations in the gonads of sea urchins were 0.043 and 0.001 µg/g, respectively, with a MeHg/T-Hg ratio of 3.5%. We developed an efficient analytical method for T-Hg and MeHg using MIBK in the degreasing step. The new information on MeHg concentration and MeHg/T-Hg ratios in the egg or nidamental glands of squid and gonads of sea urchin will also be useful for risk assessment of mercury in seafood. PMID:27432235

  9. Simple analysis of total mercury and methylmercury in seafood using heating vaporization atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Yoshimoto, Keisuke; Anh, Hoang Thi Van; Yamamoto, Atsushi; Koriyama, Chihaya; Ishibashi, Yasuhiro; Tabata, Masaaki; Nakano, Atsuhiro; Yamamoto, Megumi

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to develop a simpler method for determining total mercury (T-Hg) and methylmercury (MeHg) in biological samples by using methyl isobutyl ketone (MIBK) in the degreasing step. The fat in the samples was extracted by MIBK to the upper phase. T-Hg transferred into the water phase. This was followed by the extraction of MeHg from the water phase using HBr, CuCl2 and toluene. The MeHg fraction was reverse-extracted into L-cysteine-sodium acetate solution from toluene. The concentrations of T-Hg and MeHg were determined by heating vaporization atomic absorption spectrometry. Certified reference materials for T-Hg and MeHg in hair and fish were accurately measured using this method. This method was then applied to determine T-Hg and MeHg concentrations in the muscle, liver and gonads of seafood for the risk assessment of MeHg exposure. The mean T-Hg and MeHg concentrations in squid eggs were 0.023 and 0.022 µg/g, and in squid nidamental glands 0.052 and 0.049 µg/g, respectively. The MeHg/T-Hg ratios in the eggs and nidamental glands of squid were 94.4% and 96.5%, respectively. The mean T-Hg and MeHg concentrations in the gonads of sea urchins were 0.043 and 0.001 µg/g, respectively, with a MeHg/T-Hg ratio of 3.5%. We developed an efficient analytical method for T-Hg and MeHg using MIBK in the degreasing step. The new information on MeHg concentration and MeHg/T-Hg ratios in the egg or nidamental glands of squid and gonads of sea urchin will also be useful for risk assessment of mercury in seafood.

  10. Direct analysis of solids by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry using a second surface atomizer

    SciTech Connect

    Rettberg, T.M.; Holcombe, J.A.

    1986-06-01

    The direct graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometric analysis of solids using the second surface atomizer has been investigated. The atomizer features a gas-cooled Ta insert within the graphite furnace onto which the analyte can be condensed, after which atomization is performed by raising the furnace to a higher temperature and shutting off the coolant gas. The analyses were conducted on standard reference material fly ash, river sediment, and citrus leaves, in addition to filter paper samples. All analyses were conducted without sample pretreatment or use of matrix modifiers. Quantitation was done by using simple aqueous standards. By use of peak heights, the recoveries varied from 81% to 127%, although several determinations were within the certified concentration range. The procedures typically gave low background absorbances and peak shapes that were relatively independent of the original sample matrix.

  11. Fluorine determination in coal using high-resolution graphite furnace molecular absorption spectrometry and direct solid sample analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Machado, Patrícia M.; Morés, Silvane; Pereira, Éderson R.; Welz, Bernhard; Carasek, Eduardo; de Andrade, Jailson B.

    2015-03-01

    The absorption of the calcium mono-fluoride (CaF) molecule has been employed in this study for the determination of fluorine in coal using direct solid sample analysis and high-resolution continuum source graphite furnace molecular absorption spectrometry (HR-CS GF MAS). The rotational line at 606.440 nm was used for measuring the molecular absorption in the gas phase. The pyrolysis and vaporization temperatures were 700 °C and 2100 °C, respectively. Different chemical modifiers have been studied, such as Pd and Ir as permanent modifiers, and Pd and the mixed Pd/Mg modifier in solution. The limit of detection and the characteristic mass were 0.3 and 0.1 ng F, respectively. One certified reference material (CRM) of coal (NIST 1635) and four CRMs with a non-certified value for F (SARM 18, SARM 20, BCR 40, BCR 180) were used to evaluate the accuracy and precision of the method, obtaining good agreement (104%) with the certified value and with the informed values (ranging from 90 to 103%).

  12. Multi-element analysis of manganese nodules by atomic absorption spectrometry without chemical separation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kane, J.S.; Harnly, J.M.

    1982-01-01

    Five manganese nodules, including the USGS reference nodules A-1 and P-1, were analyzed for Co, Cu, Fe, K, Mg, Mn, Na, Ni and Zn without prior chemical separation by using a simultaneous multi-element atomic absorption spectrometer with an air-cetylene flame. The nodules were prepared in three digestion matrices. One of these solutions was measured using sixteen different combinations of burner height and air/acetylene ratios. Results for A-1 and P-1 are compared to recommended values and results for all nodules are compared to those obtained with an inductively coupled plasma. The elements Co, Cu, Fe, K, Mg, Mn, Na, Ni, and Zn are simultaneously determined with a composite recovery for all elements of 100 ?? 7%, independent of the digestion matrices, heights in the flame, or flame stoichiometries examined. Individual recoveries for Co, K, and Ni are considerably poorer in two digests than this composite figure, however. The optimum individual recoveries of 100 ?? 5% and imprecisions of 1-4%, except for zinc, are obtained when Co, K, Mn, Na and Ni are determined simultaneously in a concentrated digest, and in another analytical sequence, when Cu, Fe, Mg, Mn and Zn are measured simultaneously after dilution. Determination of manganese is equally accurate in the two sequences; its measurement in both assures internal consistency between the two measurement sequences. This approach improves analytical efficiency over that for conventional atomic absorption methods, while minimizing loss of accuracy or precision for individual elements. ?? 1982.

  13. Determination of lead in hair and its segmental analysis by solid sampling electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baysal, Asli; Akman, Suleyman

    2010-04-01

    A rapid and practical solid sampling electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometric method was described for the determination of lead in scalp hair. Hair samples were washed once with acetone; thrice with distilled-deionized water and again once with acetone and dried at 75 °C. Typically 0.05 to 1.0 mg of dried samples were inserted on the platforms of solid sampling autosampler. The effects of pyrolysis temperature, atomization temperature, the amount of sample as well as addition of a modifier (Pd/Mg) and/or auxiliary digesting agents (hydrogen peroxide and nitric acid) and/or a surfactant (Triton X-100) on the recovery of lead were investigated. Hair samples were washed once with acetone; thrice with distilled-deionized water and again once with acetone and dried at 75 °C. Typically 0.05 to 1.0 mg of dried samples were inserted on the platforms of solid sampling autosampler. The limit of detection for lead (3 σ, N = 10) was 0.3 ng/g The addition of modifier, acids, oxidant and surfactant hardly improved the results. Due to the risk of contamination and relatively high blank values, the lead in hair were determined directly without adding any reagent(s). Finally, the method was applied for the segmental determination of lead concentrations in hair of different persons which is important to know when and how much a person was exposed to the analyte. For this purpose, 0.5 cm of pieces were cut along the one or a few close strands and analyzed by solid sampling.

  14. Analysis of zinc in biological samples by flame atomic absorption spectrometry: use of addition calibration technique.

    PubMed

    Dutra, Rosilene L; Cantos, Geny A; Carasek, Eduardo

    2006-01-01

    The quantification of target analytes in complex matrices requires special calibration approaches to compensate for additional capacity or activity in the matrix samples. The standard addition is one of the most important calibration procedures for quantification of analytes in such matrices. However, this technique requires a great number of reagents and material, and it consumes a considerable amount of time throughout the analysis. In this work, a new calibration procedure to analyze biological samples is proposed. The proposed calibration, called the addition calibration technique, was used for the determination of zinc (Zn) in blood serum and erythrocyte samples. The results obtained were compared with those obtained using conventional calibration techniques (standard addition and standard calibration). The proposed addition calibration was validated by recovery tests using blood samples spiked with Zn. The range of recovery for blood serum and erythrocyte samples were 90-132% and 76-112%, respectively. Statistical studies among results obtained by the addition technique and conventional techniques, using a paired two-tailed Student's t-test and linear regression, demonstrated good agreement among them. PMID:16943611

  15. Absorption mode FTICR mass spectrometry imaging.

    PubMed

    Smith, Donald F; Kilgour, David P A; Konijnenburg, Marco; O'Connor, Peter B; Heeren, Ron M A

    2013-12-01

    Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry offers the highest mass resolving power for molecular imaging experiments. This high mass resolving power ensures that closely spaced peaks at the same nominal mass are resolved for proper image generation. Typically higher magnetic fields are used to increase mass resolving power. However, a gain in mass resolving power can also be realized by phase correction of the data for absorption mode display. In addition to mass resolving power, absorption mode offers higher mass accuracy and signal-to-noise ratio over the conventional magnitude mode. Here, we present the first use of absorption mode for Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry imaging. The Autophaser algorithm is used to phase correct each spectrum (pixel) in the image, and then, these parameters are used by the Chameleon work-flow based data processing software to generate absorption mode "Datacubes" for image and spectral viewing. Absorption mode reveals new mass and spatial features that are not resolved in magnitude mode and results in improved selected ion image contrast.

  16. Speciation analysis of arsenic in biological matrices by automated hydride generation-cryotrapping-atomic absorption spectrometry with multiple microflame quartz tube atomizer (multiatomizer).

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper describes an automated system for the oxidation state specific speciation of inorganic and methylated arsenicals by selective hydride generation - cryotrapping- gas chromatography - atomic absorption spectrometry with the multiatomizer. The corresponding arsines are ge...

  17. The use of a sequential extraction procedure for heavy metal analysis of house dusts by atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Altundag, Huseyin; Dundar, Mustafa Sahin; Doganci, Secil; Celik, Muhammed; Tuzen, Mustafa

    2013-01-01

    In general, dust is considered as house or street dust. Indoor dust, as a contamination source, has been studied for many years. In this work, the original Community Bureau of Reference of the European Commission (BCR) three-stage sequential extraction procedure was applied to the fractionation of Cr, Cu, Fe, Mn, Pb, and Zn in 20 house dust samples from five different areas of Sakarya, Turkey. Acetic acid, hydroxylammonium chloride, and hydrogen peroxide plus ammonium acetate were used for the first, second, and third steps of the BCR method, respectively. The extracts were analyzed for the studied heavy metals using flame atomic absorption spectrometry. Validation of the results was performed by using a standard reference material (BCR 701 Sediment) to certify the experimental results obtained and to evaluate the reliability of the method used. The elemental loadings typically increased in magnitude according to the area order: Izmit Caddesi>Ankara Caddesi >Erenler>Karaman>Korucuk. The results were in agreement with values reported in the literature.

  18. Restricted access carbon nanotubes for direct extraction of cadmium from human serum samples followed by atomic absorption spectrometry analysis.

    PubMed

    Barbosa, Adriano F; Barbosa, Valéria M P; Bettini, Jefferson; Luccas, Pedro O; Figueiredo, Eduardo C

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a new sorbent that is able to extract metal ions directly from untreated biological fluids, simultaneously excluding all proteins from these samples. The sorbent was obtained through the modification of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) with an external bovine serum albumin (BSA) layer, resulting in restricted access carbon nanotubes (RACNTs). The BSA layer was fixed through the interconnection between the amine groups of the BSA using glutaraldehyde as cross-linker. When a protein sample is percolated through a cartridge containing RACNTs and the sample pH is higher than the isoelectric point of the proteins, both proteins from the sample and the BSA layer are negatively ionized. Thus, an electrostatic repulsion prevents the interaction between the proteins from the sample on the RACNTs surface. At the same time, metal ions are adsorbed in the CNTs (core) after their passage through the chains of proteins. The Cd(2+) ion was selected for a proof-of-principle case to test the suitability of the RACNTs due to its toxicological relevance. RACNTs were able to extract Cd(2+) and exclude almost 100% of the proteins from the human serum samples in an online solid-phase extraction system coupled with thermospray flame furnace atomic absorption spectrometry. The limits of detection and quantification were 0.24 and 0.80 μg L(-1), respectively. The sampling frequency was 8.6h(-1), and the intra- and inter-day precisions at the 0.80, 15.0, and 30.0 μg L(-1) Cd(2+) levels were all lower than 10.1% (RSD). The recoveries obtained for human blood serum samples fortified with Cd(2+) ranged from 85.0% to 112.0%. The method was successfully applied to analyze Cd(2+) directly from six human blood serum samples without any pretreatment, and the observed concentrations ranged from

  19. Assessment of the Halogen Content of Brazilian Inhalable Particulate Matter (PM10) Using High Resolution Molecular Absorption Spectrometry and Electrothermal Vaporization Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry, with Direct Solid Sample Analysis.

    PubMed

    de Gois, Jefferson S; Almeida, Tarcisio S; Alves, Jeferson C; Araujo, Rennan G O; Borges, Daniel L G

    2016-03-15

    Halogens in the atmosphere play an important role in climate change and also represent a potential health hazard. However, quantification of halogens is not a trivial task, and methods that require minimum sample preparation are interesting alternatives. Hence, the aim of this work was to evaluate the feasibility of direct solid sample analysis using high-resolution continuum source molecular absorption spectrometry (HR-CS MAS) for F determination and electrothermal vaporization-inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ETV-ICP-MS) for simultaneous Cl, Br, and I determination in airborne inhalable particulate matter (PM10) collected in the metropolitan area of Aracaju, Sergipe, Brazil. Analysis using HR-CS MAS was accomplished by monitoring the CaF molecule, which was generated at high temperatures in the graphite furnace after the addition of Ca. Analysis using ETV-ICP-MS was carried out using Ca as chemical modifier/aerosol carrier in order to avoid losses of Cl, Br, and I during the pyrolysis step, with concomitant use of Pd as a permanent modifier. The direct analysis approach resulted in LODs that were proven adequate for halogen determination in PM10, using either standard addition calibration or calibration against a certified reference material. The method allowed the quantification of the halogens in 14 PM10 samples collected in a northeastern coastal city in Brazil. The results demonstrated variations of halogen content according to meteorological conditions, particularly related to rainfall, humidity, and sunlight irradiation.

  20. Molecular absorption spectrometry in flames and furnaces: a review.

    PubMed

    Butcher, David J

    2013-12-01

    Molecular absorption spectrometry (MAS), originally developed in the 1970s, is a technique to determine non-metals in flames and graphite furnaces by monitoring the absorbance of diatomic molecules. Early studies employed low resolution instruments designed for line source atomic absorption, which provided a limited choice of analytical wavelengths, insufficient spectral resolution, and spectral interferences. However, the development of high-resolution continuum source atomic absorption spectrometry (HR-CS AAS) instrumentation has allowed the analysis of challenging samples for non-metals as well as some difficult elements to determine by AAS, such as aluminum and phosphorus. In this review, theory and analytical considerations for MAS are discussed. The principles and limitations of low resolution MAS are described, along with its applications. HR-CS AAS instrumentation is reviewed, emphasizing performance characteristics most relevant for MAS. Applications of flame and HR-CS GFMAS are reviewed, highlighting the most significant work to date. The paper concludes with an evaluation of the enhanced analytical capabilities provided by HR-CS MAS.

  1. Isotope Enrichment Detection by Laser Ablation - Laser Absorption Spectrometry: Automated Environmental Sampling and Laser-Based Analysis for HEU Detection

    SciTech Connect

    Anheier, Norman C.; Bushaw, Bruce A.

    2010-01-01

    The global expansion of nuclear power, and consequently the uranium enrichment industry, requires the development of new safeguards technology to mitigate proliferation risks. Current enrichment monitoring instruments exist that provide only yes/no detection of highly enriched uranium (HEU) production. More accurate accountancy measurements are typically restricted to gamma-ray and weight measurements taken in cylinder storage yards. Analysis of environmental and cylinder content samples have much higher effectiveness, but this approach requires onsite sampling, shipping, and time-consuming laboratory analysis and reporting. Given that large modern gaseous centrifuge enrichment plants (GCEPs) can quickly produce a significant quantity (SQ ) of HEU, these limitations in verification suggest the need for more timely detection of potential facility misuse. The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is developing an unattended safeguards instrument concept, combining continuous aerosol particulate collection with uranium isotope assay, to provide timely analysis of enrichment levels within low enriched uranium facilities. This approach is based on laser vaporization of aerosol particulate samples, followed by wavelength tuned laser diode spectroscopy to characterize the uranium isotopic ratio through subtle differences in atomic absorption wavelengths. Environmental sampling (ES) media from an integrated aerosol collector is introduced into a small, reduced pressure chamber, where a focused pulsed laser vaporizes material from a 10 to 20-µm diameter spot of the surface of the sampling media. The plume of ejected material begins as high-temperature plasma that yields ions and atoms, as well as molecules and molecular ions. We concentrate on the plume of atomic vapor that remains after the plasma has expanded and then cooled by the surrounding cover gas. Tunable diode lasers are directed through this plume and each isotope is detected by monitoring absorbance

  2. Determination of chlorine in coal via the SrCl molecule using high-resolution graphite furnace molecular absorption spectrometry and direct solid sample analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pereira, Éderson R.; Rocha, Lucas M.; Cadorim, Heloisa R.; Silva, Vanessa D.; Welz, Bernhard; Carasek, Eduardo; de Andrade, Jailson B.

    2015-12-01

    In this study, the determination of chlorine in coal is described via molecular absorption of the strontium mono-chloride (SrCl) molecule at 635.862 nm using high-resolution continuum source graphite furnace molecular absorption spectrometry (HR-CS GF MAS) and direct solid sample analysis. The pyrolysis and vaporization temperatures were optimized and the measurements are accomplished with a platform coated with zirconium as a permanent chemical modifier in order to increase the sensitivity of the gaseous SrCl molecule generated in the graphite furnace. The optimum pyrolysis and vaporization temperatures were 700 °C and 2100 °C, respectively. Under optimized conditions, the limit of detection and characteristic mass of the method were 0.85 and 0.24 ng, respectively. The accuracy of the method has been verified using four certified reference materials and one not certified reference material of coal, and the results were in good agreement with the certified or reference values.

  3. Atomic Absorption, Atomic Fluorescence, and Flame Emission Spectrometry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horlick, Gary

    1984-01-01

    This review is presented in six sections. Sections focus on literature related to: (1) developments in instrumentation, measurement techniques, and procedures; (2) performance studies of flames and electrothermal atomizers; (3) applications of atomic absorption spectrometry; (4) analytical comparisons; (5) atomic fluorescence spectrometry; and (6)…

  4. Correlation of skin blanching and percutaneous absorption for glucocorticoid receptor agonists by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry imaging and liquid extraction surface analysis with nanoelectrospray ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Marshall, Peter; Toteu-Djomte, Valerie; Bareille, Philippe; Perry, Hayley; Brown, Gillian; Baumert, Mark; Biggadike, Keith

    2010-09-15

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-mass spectrometry imaging (MALDI-MSI) and liquid extraction surface analysis (LESA) with nanoelectrospray ionization mass spectrometry (nESI-MS) have both been successfully employed to determine the degree of percutaneous absorption of three novel nonsteroid glucocorticoid receptor (GR) agonists in porcine ear sections. Historically, the ability of a glucocorticoid to elicit a skin blanching response when applied at low dose in ethanol solution to the forearms of healthy human volunteers has been a reliable predictor of their topical anti-inflammatory activity. While all three nonsteroidal GR agonists under investigation caused a skin blanching effect, the responses did not correlate with in vitro GR agonist potencies and different time courses were also observed for the skin blanching responses. MALDI MSI and LESA with nESI-MS were used to investigate and understand these different responses. The findings of the investigation was that the depth of porcine skin penetration correlates to the degree of skin blanching obtained for the same three compounds in human volunteers.

  5. Tandem focused ultrasound (TFU) combined with fast furnace analysis as an improved methodology for total mercury determination in human urine by electrothermal-atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Capelo, J L; Dos Reis, C D; Maduro, C; Mota, A

    2004-09-01

    A new sample preparation procedure based on tandem (that is, different diameter probe sonicators used in the same sample treatment) focused ultrasound (TFU) for mercury separation, preconcentration and back-extraction in aqueous solution from human urine has been developed. The urine is first oxidized with KMnO(4)/HCl/focused ultrasound (6mm probe). Secondly, the mercury is extracted and preconcentrated with dithizone and cyclohexane. Finally, the mercury is back-extracted and preconcentrated again with the aid of focused ultrasound (3mm probe). The procedure allows determining mercury by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry with fast furnace analysis and calibration against aqueous standards. Matrix modification is provided by the chemicals used in the sample treatment. The procedure is accomplished with low sample volume (8.5ml). Low volume and low concentration reagents are used. The sample treatment is rapid (less than 3min per sample) and avoids the use of organic phase in the graphite furnace. The preconcentration factor used in this work was 14. The limit of detection and the limit of quantification in urine were, respectively, 0.27 and 0.9mugl(-1). The relative standard deviation of aqueous standards (n=10) was 4% for a concentration of 100mugl(-1) and 5% for a concentration of 400mugl(-1). Recoveries from spiked urine with inorganic mercury, methyl-mercury, phenyl-mercury and diphenyl-mercury ranged from 86 to 98%.

  6. Sequential determination of Cd and Cr in biomass samples and their ashes using high-resolution continuum source graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry and direct solid sample analysis.

    PubMed

    Duarte, Alvaro T; Dessuy, Morgana B; Vale, Maria Goreti R; Welz, Bernhard; de Andrade, Jailson B

    2013-10-15

    High-resolution continuum source graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry, because of the use of only one radiation source for all elements, offers the possibility of sequential determination of two or more elements from the same sample aliquot if their volatilities are significantly different. Cd and Cr were determined sequentially in samples of biomass and biomass ashes employing direct solid sample analysis. The use of a chemical modifier was found to be not necessary, and calibration could be carried out using aqueous standard solutions. A pyrolysis temperature of 400°C and an atomization temperature of 1500°C were used for the determination of Cd; no losses of Cr were observed at this temperature. After the atomization of Cd the wavelength was changed and Cr atomized at 2600°C. The limits of detection (LOD) and quantification (LOQ) were 1.1 μg kg(-1) and 3.7 μg kg(-1), respectively, for Cd and 21 μg kg(-1) and 70 μg kg(-1), respectively, for Cr using the most sensitive line at 357.869 nm, or 90 μg kg(-1) and 300 μg kg(-1), respectively, using the less sensitive line at 428.972 nm. The precision, expressed as relative standard deviation was around 10%, which is typical for direct solid sample analysis. The values found for Cd in biomass samples were between <1.1 µg kg(-1) and 789 µg kg(-1), whereas those for Cr were between 7.9 mg kg(-1) and 89 mg kg(-1); the values found in the ashes were significantly lower for Cd, between <1.1 µg kg(-1) and 6.3 µg kg(-1), whereas the trend was not so clear for Cr, where the values were between 3.4 mg kg(-1) and 28 mg kg(-1).

  7. Direct determination of chromium in infant formulas employing high-resolution continuum source electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry and solid sample analysis.

    PubMed

    Silva, Arlene S; Brandao, Geovani C; Matos, Geraldo D; Ferreira, Sergio L C

    2015-11-01

    The present work proposed an analytical method for the direct determination of chromium in infant formulas employing the high-resolution continuum source electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry combined with the solid sample analysis (SS-HR-CS ET AAS). Sample masses up to 2.0mg were directly weighted on a solid sampling platform and introduced into the graphite tube. In order to minimize the formation of carbonaceous residues and to improve the contact of the modifier solution with the solid sample, a volume of 10 µL of a solution containing 6% (v/v) H2O2, 20% (v/v) ethanol and 1% (v/v) HNO3 was added. The pyrolysis and atomization temperatures established were 1600 and 2400 °C, respectively, using magnesium as chemical modifier. The calibration technique was evaluated by comparing the slopes of calibration curves established using aqueous and solid standards. This test revealed that chromium can be determined employing the external calibration technique using aqueous standards. Under these conditions, the method developed allows the direct determination of chromium with limit of quantification of 11.5 ng g(-1), precision expressed as relative standard deviation (RSD) in the range of 4.0-17.9% (n=3) and a characteristic mass of 1.2 pg of chromium. The accuracy was confirmed by analysis of a certified reference material of tomato leaves furnished by National Institute of Standards and Technology. The method proposed was applied for the determination of chromium in five different infant formula samples. The chromium content found varied in the range of 33.9-58.1 ng g(-1) (n=3). These samples were also analyzed employing ICP-MS. A statistical test demonstrated that there is no significant difference between the results found by two methods. The chromium concentrations achieved are lower than the maximum limit permissible for chromium in foods by Brazilian Legislation. PMID:26452789

  8. Direct determination of chromium in infant formulas employing high-resolution continuum source electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry and solid sample analysis.

    PubMed

    Silva, Arlene S; Brandao, Geovani C; Matos, Geraldo D; Ferreira, Sergio L C

    2015-11-01

    The present work proposed an analytical method for the direct determination of chromium in infant formulas employing the high-resolution continuum source electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry combined with the solid sample analysis (SS-HR-CS ET AAS). Sample masses up to 2.0mg were directly weighted on a solid sampling platform and introduced into the graphite tube. In order to minimize the formation of carbonaceous residues and to improve the contact of the modifier solution with the solid sample, a volume of 10 µL of a solution containing 6% (v/v) H2O2, 20% (v/v) ethanol and 1% (v/v) HNO3 was added. The pyrolysis and atomization temperatures established were 1600 and 2400 °C, respectively, using magnesium as chemical modifier. The calibration technique was evaluated by comparing the slopes of calibration curves established using aqueous and solid standards. This test revealed that chromium can be determined employing the external calibration technique using aqueous standards. Under these conditions, the method developed allows the direct determination of chromium with limit of quantification of 11.5 ng g(-1), precision expressed as relative standard deviation (RSD) in the range of 4.0-17.9% (n=3) and a characteristic mass of 1.2 pg of chromium. The accuracy was confirmed by analysis of a certified reference material of tomato leaves furnished by National Institute of Standards and Technology. The method proposed was applied for the determination of chromium in five different infant formula samples. The chromium content found varied in the range of 33.9-58.1 ng g(-1) (n=3). These samples were also analyzed employing ICP-MS. A statistical test demonstrated that there is no significant difference between the results found by two methods. The chromium concentrations achieved are lower than the maximum limit permissible for chromium in foods by Brazilian Legislation.

  9. Determination of copper and mercury in phosphate fertilizers employing direct solid sampling analysis and high resolution continuum source graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Oliveira Souza, Sidnei; François, Luciane Luiza; Borges, Aline Rocha; Vale, Maria Goreti Rodrigues; Araujo, Rennan Geovanny Oliveira

    2015-12-01

    The present study proposes the determination of copper and mercury in phosphate fertilizers by direct solid sampling analysis (SS) employing high resolution continuum source graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (HR-CS GF AAS). For Cu determination, two analytical lines were used: 327.3960 nm and 249.2146 nm. Hg determination was carried out on the line 253.6521 nm and 100 μg KMnO4 was used as chemical modifier. The optimal pyrolysis temperature for Cu determination was 1300 °C. Atomization temperatures for Cu and Hg were 2400 and 1100 °C, respectively. External calibration with aqueous standard solutions was adopted for both elements. The limits of quantification (LoQs) and characteristic mass (m0) obtained for Cu determination were 0.4 μg g- 1 and 1.12 ng, respectively, on line 249.2146 nm, and 64 μg g- 1 and 25 pg on 327.3960 nm. For mercury, LoQ and m0 were 4.8 ng g- 1 and 39 pg, respectively. The accuracy of the proposed methods was confirmed by the analysis of standard reference material (SRM) of Trace Elements in Multi-Nutrient Fertilizer (SRM NIST 695). The precision expressed as relative standard deviation (RSD), was better than 8.2% for Hg and 7.7% for the Cu (n = 5), considered satisfactory for microanalysis in solid sample. Four fertilizer samples acquired in commercial establishments in the city of Salvador, Bahia, Brazil, were analyzed. The optimized analytical methods were simple, fast, accurate, precise and free of spectral interferences for the determination of Cu and Hg in phosphate fertilizer samples by SS-HR-CS GF AAS, avoiding the dissolution of the sample, the use of harmful reagents and the generation of residues.

  10. Differentiation and classification of beers with flame atomic spectrometry and molecular absorption spectrometry and sample preparation assisted by microwaves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellido-Milla, Dolores; Moreno-Perez, Juana M.; Hernández-Artiga, María. P.

    2000-07-01

    The characterization of beer samples has a lot of interest because their composition can affect the taste and stability of beer and consumer health. Flame atomic absorption spectrometry was used to determine Fe, Mn, Zn, Cu, Mg, Ca and Al. Sodium and K were determined by flame atomic emission spectrometry. A sample preparation method was developed, based on treatment with HNO 3 and H 2O 2 in a microwave oven. This has many advantages over the methods found in the literature. The combination of the results of atomic spectrometry and the spectrum obtained by molecular absorption spectrometry provides information on the inorganic and organic components of the samples. The application of chemometric techniques to chemical composition data could be extremely useful for food quality control. The metal concentrations, the molecular absorption spectrum, the pH and conductivity of each sample were subject to analysis of variance and linear discriminant analysis. Twenty-five different beer samples were used to differentiate and classify different types of beers.

  11. Metallomics approach to trace element analysis in ustilago maydis using cellular fractionation, atomic absorption spectrometry, and size exclusion chromatography with ICP-MS detection.

    PubMed

    Muñoz, Alma Hortensia Serafin; Kubachka, Kevin; Wrobel, Kazimierz; Corona, Felix Gutierrez; Yathavakilla, Santha K V; Caruso, Joseph A; Wrobel, Katarzyna

    2005-06-29

    Huitlacoche is the ethnic name of the young fruiting bodies of Ustilago maydis, a common parasite of maize. In Mexico and other Latin American countries, this fungus has been traditionally appreciated as a local delicacy. In this work a metallomics approach was used with the determination of eight elements in huitlacoche by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry as one facet of this approach. The results obtained indicated relatively lower concentrations of commonly analyzed metals, as referred to the data reported for other mushroom types. This effect was ascribed to different accessibilities of elements, depending on fungus substrate (lower from plant than from soil). Subcellular fractionation was accomplished by centrifugation of cell homogenates suspended in Tris-HCl buffer. Recoveries of the fractionation procedure were in the range of 71-103%. For six elements (Cr, Cu, Fe, Mn, Ni, and Pb), the mean relative contributions in cytosol, cell walls, and mixed membrane fraction were 50.7, 48.2, and 1.1% respectively. To attain the molecular weight distribution of compounds containing target elements as an additional aspect of the metallomics approach, the fungus extract (1% sodium dodecyl sulfate in Tris-HCl, 30 mmol L(-)(1), pH 7.0) was analyzed by size exclusion chromatography with UV and ICP-MS detection. With spectrophotometric detection (280 nm), the elution of high molecular weight compounds was observed in the form of one peak (MW > 10 kDa), and several lower peaks appeared at higher retention times (MW < 10 kDa). On ICP-MS chromatograms, a coelution of (59)Co, (63)Cu, (57)Fe, (202)Hg, (60)Ni, and (80)Se with the first peak on the UV chromatogram was clearly observed, indicating that a fraction of each element incorporated with high molecular weight compounds (12.7, 19.8, 33.7, 100, 19.4, and 45.8%, respectively, based on the peak area measurements). From a comparison of (80)Se and (33)S chromatograms (for sulfur analysis, the extract was obtained in

  12. Absorption Mode FT-ICR Mass Spectrometry Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Donald F.; Kilgour, David P.; Konijnenburg, Marco; O'Connor, Peter B.; Heeren, Ronald M.

    2013-12-03

    Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry offers the highest mass resolving power for molecular imaging experiments. This high mass resolving power ensures that closely spaced peaks at the same nominal mass are resolved for proper image generation. Typically higher magnetic fields are used to increase mass resolving power. However, a gain in mass resolving power can also be realized by phase correction of the data for absorption mode display. In addition to mass resolving power, absorption mode offers higher mass accuracy and signal-to-noise ratio over the conventional magnitude mode. Here we present the first use of absorption mode for Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry imaging. The Autophaser algorithm is used to phase correct each spectrum (pixel) in the image and then these parameters are used by the Chameleon work-flow based data processing software to generate absorption mode ?Datacubes? for image and spectral viewing. Absorption mode reveals new mass and spatial features that are not resolved in magnitude mode and results in improved selected ion image contrast.

  13. Absorption mode Fourier transform electrostatic linear ion trap mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Hilger, Ryan T; Wyss, Phillip J; Santini, Robert E; McLuckey, Scott A

    2013-09-01

    In Fourier transform mass spectrometry, it is well-known that plotting the spectrum in absorption mode rather than magnitude mode has several advantages. However, magnitude spectra remain commonplace due to difficulties associated with determining the phase of each frequency at the onset of data acquisition, which is required for generating absorption spectra. The phasing problem for electrostatic traps is much simpler than for Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FTICR) instruments, which greatly simplifies the generation of absorption spectra. Here, we present a simple method for generating absorption spectra from a Fourier transform electrostatic linear ion trap mass spectrometer. The method involves time shifting the data prior to Fourier transformation in order to synchronize the onset of data acquisition with the moment of ion acceleration into the electrostatic trap. Under these conditions, the initial phase of each frequency at the onset of data acquisition is zero. We demonstrate that absorption mode provides a 1.7-fold increase in resolution (full width at half maximum, fwhm) as well as reduced peak tailing. We also discuss methodology that may be applied to unsynchronized data in order to determine the time shift required to generate an absorption spectrum.

  14. A technique coupling the analyte electrodeposition followed by in-situ stripping with electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry for analysis of samples with high NaCl contents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Čánský, Zdeněk; Rychlovský, Petr; Petrová, Zuzana; Matousek, J. P.

    2007-03-01

    A technique coupling the analyte electrodeposition followed by in-situ stripping with electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry has been developed for determination of lead and cadmium in samples with high salt contents. To separate the analyte from the sample matrix, the analyte was in-situ quantitatively electrodeposited on a platinum sampling capillary serving as the cathode (sample volume, 20 μL). The spent electrolyte containing the sample matrix was then withdrawn, the capillary with the analyte deposited was washed with deionized water and the analyte was stripped into a chemically simple electrolyte (5 g/L NH 4H 2PO 4) by reversing the polarity of the electrodeposition circuit. Electrothermal atomization using a suitable optimized temperature program followed. A fully automated manifold was designed for this coupled technique and the appropriate control software was developed. The operating conditions for determination of Pb and Cd in samples with high contents of inorganic salts were optimized, the determination was characterized by principal analytical parameters and its applicability was verified on analyses of urine reference samples. The absolute limits of detection for lead and cadmium (3 σ criterion) in a sample containing 30 g/L NaCl were 8.5 pg and 2.3 pg, respectively (peak absorbance) and the RSD values amounted to 1.6% and 1.9% for lead (at the 40 ng mL - 1 level) and cadmium (at the 4.0 ng mL - 1 level), respectively. These values (and also the measuring sensitivity) are superior to the results attained in conventional electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometric determination of Pb and Cd in pure solutions (5 g/L NH 4H 2PO 4). The sensitivity of the Pb and Cd determination is not affected by the NaCl concentration up to a value of 100 g/L, demonstrating an efficient matrix removal during the electrodeposition step.

  15. Investigation of chemical modifiers for sulfur determination in diesel fuel samples by high-resolution continuum source graphite furnace molecular absorption spectrometry using direct analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huber, Charles S.; Vale, Maria Goreti R.; Welz, Bernhard; Andrade, Jailson B.; Dessuy, Morgana B.

    2015-06-01

    High-resolution continuum source graphite furnace molecular absorption spectrometry has been applied for sulfur determination in diesel fuel. The sharp rotational lines of the carbon monosulfide molecule (formed during the vaporization step) were used to measure the absorbance. The analytical line at 258.056 nm was monitored using the sum of three pixels. Different chemical modifiers were investigated and the mixture of palladium and magnesium was used as chemical modifier in combination with iridium as permanent modifier. L-Cysteine was chosen as sulfur standard and the calibration was done against aqueous standard solutions. The proposed method was applied for the analyses of four diesel samples: two S10 samples and two S500 samples. The trueness of the method was checked with a certified reference material (CRM) of sulfur in diesel fuel (NIST 2724b). Accurate results, for samples and CRM, were achieved after a dilution with propan-1-ol. The following figures of merit were obtained: characteristic mass of 17 ± 3 ng, limit of detection and limit of quantification of 1.4 mg kg- 1 and 4.7 mg kg- 1, respectively.

  16. Simultaneous Atomic Absorption Spectrometry for Cadmium and Lead Determination in Wastewater: A Laboratory Exercise

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Correia, Paulo R. M.; Oliveira, Pedro V.

    2004-01-01

    The simultaneous determination of cadmium and lead by multi-element atomic absorption spectrometry with electrochemical atomization is proposed by employing a problem-based approach. The reports indicate that the students assimilated the principles of the simultaneous atomic absorption spectrometry (SIMAAS), the role of the chemical modifier, the…

  17. The role of atomic absorption spectrometry in geochemical exploration

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Viets, J.G.; O'Leary, R. M.

    1992-01-01

    In this paper we briefly describe the principles of atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS) and the basic hardware components necessary to make measurements of analyte concentrations. Then we discuss a variety of methods that have been developed for the introduction of analyte atoms into the light path of the spectrophotometer. This section deals with sample digestion, elimination of interferences, and optimum production of ground-state atoms, all critical considerations when choosing an AAS method. Other critical considerations are cost, speed, simplicity, precision, and applicability of the method to the wide range of materials sampled in geochemical exploration. We cannot attempt to review all of the AAS methods developed for geological materials but instead will restrict our discussion to some of those appropriate for geochemical exploration. Our background and familiarity are reflected in the methods we discuss, and we have no doubt overlooked many good methods. Our discussion should therefore be considered a starting point in finding the right method for the problem, rather than the end of the search. Finally, we discuss the future of AAS relative to other instrumental techniques and the promising new directions for AAS in geochemical exploration. ?? 1992.

  18. Cobalt internal standard for Ni to assist the simultaneous determination of Mo and Ni in plant materials by high-resolution continuum source graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry employing direct solid sample analysis.

    PubMed

    de Babos, Diego Victor; Bechlin, Marcos André; Barros, Ariane Isis; Ferreira, Edilene Cristina; Gomes Neto, José Anchieta; de Oliveira, Silvana Ruella

    2016-05-15

    A new method is proposed for the simultaneous determination of Mo and Ni in plant materials by high-resolution continuum source graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (HR-CS GFAAS), employing direct solid sample analysis (DSS) and internal standardization (IS). Cobalt was used as internal standard to minimize matrix effects during Ni determinations, enabling the use of aqueous standards for calibration. Correlation coefficients for the calibration curves were typically better than 0.9937. The performance of the method was checked by analysis of six plant certified reference materials, and the results for Mo and Ni were in agreement with the certified values (95% confidence level, t-test). Analysis was made of different types of plant materials used as renewable sources of energy, including sugarcane leaves, banana tree fiber, soybean straw, coffee pods, orange bagasse, peanut hulls, and sugarcane bagasse. The concentrations found for Mo and Ni ranged from 0.08 to 0.63 ng mg(-1) and from 0.41 to 6.92 ng mg(-1), respectively. Precision (RSD) varied from 2.1% to 11% for Mo and from 3.7% to 10% for Ni. Limits of quantification of 0.055 and 0.074 ng were obtained for Mo and Ni, respectively.

  19. Measurements of sulfur compounds in CO 2 by diode laser atomic absorption spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franzke, J.; Stancu, D. G.; Niemax, K.

    2003-07-01

    Two simple methods for the analysis of the total concentration of sulfur in CO 2 by diode laser atomic absorption spectrometry of excited, metastable sulfur atoms in a direct current discharge are presented. In the first method, the CO 2 sample gas is mixed with the plasma gas (Ar or He) while the second is based on reproducible measurements of the sulfur released from the walls in a helium discharge after being deposited as a result of operating the discharge in pure CO 2 sample gas. The detection limits obtained satisfy the requirements for the control of sulfur compounds in CO 2 used in the food and beverage industry.

  20. A thin-walled metallic hollow cathode as an atomizer for Zeeman atomic absorption spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganeyev, A. A.; Sholupov, S. E.

    1998-03-01

    A new kind of glow discharge atomizer, a thin-walled metallic hollow cathode (TMHC) combined with Zeeman atomic absorption spectrometry using high frequency modulated light polarization (ZAAS-HFM), is studied. A theoretically suggested, and experimentally confirmed, model of the atom confinement in the TMHC yields the appearance of the diffusion traps for atoms at both ends of the cathode, which increases the residence time of the analyte atoms in the analysis volume. The high atomization efficiency in the glow discharge atomizer (caused by the ionic-thermal mechanism of sputtering) and the high selectivity of ZAAS-HFM are demonstrated in the analysis of complex matrix samples such as whole blood and urine. The analytical system TMHC + ZAAS-HFM is characterized by low detection limits, which are comparable to those of graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GFAAS). Owing to its rather low average power consumption (30-50 W) the TMHC can be used in a portable and mobile spectrometer, and is therefore suitable for the in situ analysis of various sample materials.

  1. Determination of tetraalkyllead compounds in gasoline by liquid chromatography-atomic absorption spectrometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Messman, J.D.; Rains, T.C.

    1981-01-01

    A liquid chromatography-atomic absorption spectrometry (LC-AAS) hybrid analytical technique is presented for metal speciation measurements on complex liquid samples. The versatility and inherent metal selectivity of the technique are Illustrated by the rapid determination of five tetraalkyllead compounds in commercial gasoline. Separation of the individual tetraalkyllead species is achieved by reversed-phase liquid chromatography using an acetonitrile/water mobile phase. The effluent from the liquid Chromatograph Is introduced directly into the aspiration uptake capillary of the nebulizer of an air/acetylene flame atomic absorption spectrometer. Spectral interferences due to coeluting hydrocarbon matrix constituents were not observed at the 283.3-nm resonance line of lead used for analysis. Detection limits of this LC-AAS hydrid analytical technique, based on a 20-??L injection, are approximately 10 ng Pb for each tetraalkyllead compound.

  2. DETERMINATION OF TOTAL MERCURY IN FISH TISSUES USING PYROLYSIS ATOMIC ABSORPTION SPECTROMETRY WITH GOLD AMALGAMATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    A simple and rapid procedure for measuring total mercury in fish tissues is evaluated and
    compared with conventional techniques. Using an automated instrument incorporating combustion, preconcentration by amalgamation with gold, and atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS), mill...

  3. Redox speciation analysis of dissolved iron in estuarine and coastal waters with on-line solid phase extraction and graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry detection.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yaojin; Feng, Sichao; Huang, Yongming; Yuan, Dongxing

    2015-05-01

    An automatic on-line solid phase extraction (SPE) system employing the flow injection (FI) technique directly coupled to a graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometer (GFAAS) was established for speciation and determination of dissolved iron in estuarine and coastal waters. Fe(II) was mixed with ferrozine solution in a sample stream to form the Fe(II)-ferrozine complex which was extracted onto a C18 SPE cartridge, eluted with eluent and detected with GFAAS. In a parallel flow channel, Fe(III) was reduced to Fe(II) with ascorbic acid and then detected in the same way as Fe(II). The home-made interface between FI-SPE and GFAAS efficiently realized the sample introduction to the furnace in a semi-automated way. Parameters of the FI-SPE system and graphite furnace program were optimized based on a univariate experimental design and an orthogonal array design. The salinity effect on the method sensitivity was investigated. The proposed method provided a detection limit of 1.38 nmol L(-1) for Fe(II) and 1.87 nmol L(-1) for Fe(II+III). With variation of the sample loading volume, a broadened determination range of 2.5-200 nmol L(-1) iron could be obtained. The proposed method was successfully applied to analyze iron species in samples collected from the Jiulongjiang Estuary, Fujian, China. With the 2-cartridge FI-SPE system developed, on-line simultaneous determination of Fe species with GFAAS was achieved for the first time.

  4. Redox speciation analysis of dissolved iron in estuarine and coastal waters with on-line solid phase extraction and graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry detection.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yaojin; Feng, Sichao; Huang, Yongming; Yuan, Dongxing

    2015-05-01

    An automatic on-line solid phase extraction (SPE) system employing the flow injection (FI) technique directly coupled to a graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometer (GFAAS) was established for speciation and determination of dissolved iron in estuarine and coastal waters. Fe(II) was mixed with ferrozine solution in a sample stream to form the Fe(II)-ferrozine complex which was extracted onto a C18 SPE cartridge, eluted with eluent and detected with GFAAS. In a parallel flow channel, Fe(III) was reduced to Fe(II) with ascorbic acid and then detected in the same way as Fe(II). The home-made interface between FI-SPE and GFAAS efficiently realized the sample introduction to the furnace in a semi-automated way. Parameters of the FI-SPE system and graphite furnace program were optimized based on a univariate experimental design and an orthogonal array design. The salinity effect on the method sensitivity was investigated. The proposed method provided a detection limit of 1.38 nmol L(-1) for Fe(II) and 1.87 nmol L(-1) for Fe(II+III). With variation of the sample loading volume, a broadened determination range of 2.5-200 nmol L(-1) iron could be obtained. The proposed method was successfully applied to analyze iron species in samples collected from the Jiulongjiang Estuary, Fujian, China. With the 2-cartridge FI-SPE system developed, on-line simultaneous determination of Fe species with GFAAS was achieved for the first time. PMID:25770602

  5. Determination of palladium, platinum and rhodium in used automobile catalysts and active pharmaceutical ingredients using high-resolution continuum source graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry and direct solid sample analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Resano, Martín; Flórez, María del Rosario; Queralt, Ignasi; Marguí, Eva

    2015-03-01

    This work investigates the potential of high-resolution continuum source graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry for the direct determination of Pd, Pt and Rh in two samples of very different nature. While analysis of active pharmaceutical ingredients is straightforward and it is feasible to minimize matrix effects, to the point that calibration can be carried out against aqueous standard solutions, the analysis of used automobile catalysts is more challenging requiring the addition of a chemical modifier (NH4F·HF) to help in releasing the analytes, a more vigorous temperature program and the use of a solid standard (CRM ERM®-EB504) for calibration. However, in both cases it was possible to obtain accurate results and precision values typically better than 10% RSD in a fast and simple way, while only two determinations are needed for the three analytes, since Pt and Rh can be simultaneously monitored in both types of samples. Overall, the methods proposed seem suited for the determination of these analytes in such types of samples, offering a greener and faster alternative that circumvents the traditional problems associated with sample digestion, requiring a small amount of sample only (0.05 mg per replicate for catalysts, and a few milligrams for the pharmaceuticals) and providing sufficient sensitivity to easily comply with regulations. The LODs achieved were 6.5 μg g- 1 (Pd), 8.3 μg g- 1 (Pt) and 9.3 μg g- 1 (Rh) for catalysts, which decreased to 0.08 μg g- 1 (Pd), 0.15 μg g- 1 (Pt) and 0.10 μg g- 1 (Rh) for pharmaceuticals.

  6. Methods of analysis by the U.S. Geological Survey National Water Quality Laboratory; determination of arsenic and selenium in water and sediment by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jones, Sandra R.; Garbarino, John R.

    1999-01-01

    Graphite furnace-atomic absorption spectrometry (GF-AAS) is a sensitive, precise, and accurate technique that can be used to determine arsenic and selenium in samples of water and sediment. The GF-AAS method has been developed to replace the hydride generation-atomic absorption spectrometry (HG-AAS) methods because the method detection limits are similar, bias and variability are comparable, and interferences are minimal. Advantages of the GF-AAS method include shorter sample preparation time, increased sample throughput from simultaneous multielement analysis, reduced amount of chemical waste, reduced sample volume requirements, increased linear concentration range, and the use of a more accurate digestion procedure. The linear concentration range for arsenic and selenium is 1 to 50 micrograms per liter in solution; the current method detection limit for arsenic in solution is 0.9 microgram per liter; the method detection limit for selenium in solution is 1 microgram per liter. This report describes results that were obtained using stop-flow and low-flow conditions during atomization. The bias and variability of the simultaneous determination of arsenic and selenium by GF-AAS under both conditions are supported with results from standard reference materials--water and sediment, real water samples, and spike recovery measurements. Arsenic and selenium results for all Standard Reference Water Samples analyzed were within one standard deviation of the most probable values. Long-term spike recoveries at 6.25, 25.0, 37.5 micrograms per liter in reagent-, ground-, and surface-water samples for arsenic averaged 103 plus or minus 2 percent using low-flow conditions and 104 plus or minus 4 percent using stop-flow conditions. Corresponding recoveries for selenium were 98 plus or minus 13 percent using low-flow conditions and 87 plus or minus 24 percent using stop-flow conditions. Spike recoveries at 25 micrograms per liter in 120 water samples ranged from 97 to 99 percent

  7. Liquid-phase microextraction combined with graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry: A review.

    PubMed

    de la Calle, Inmaculada; Pena-Pereira, Francisco; Lavilla, Isela; Bendicho, Carlos

    2016-09-14

    An overview of the combination of liquid-phase microextraction (LPME) techniques with graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GFAAS) is reported herein. The high sensitivity of GFAAS is significantly enhanced by its association with a variety of miniaturized solvent extraction approaches. LPME-GFAAS thus represents a powerful combination for determination of metals, metalloids and organometallic compounds at (ultra)trace level. Different LPME modes used with GFAAS are briefly described, and the experimental parameters that show an impact in those microextraction processes are discussed. Special attention is paid to those parameters affecting GFAAS analysis. Main issues found when coupling LPME and GFAAS, as well as those strategies reported in the literature to solve them, are summarized. Relevant applications published on the topic so far are included.

  8. Liquid-phase microextraction combined with graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry: A review.

    PubMed

    de la Calle, Inmaculada; Pena-Pereira, Francisco; Lavilla, Isela; Bendicho, Carlos

    2016-09-14

    An overview of the combination of liquid-phase microextraction (LPME) techniques with graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GFAAS) is reported herein. The high sensitivity of GFAAS is significantly enhanced by its association with a variety of miniaturized solvent extraction approaches. LPME-GFAAS thus represents a powerful combination for determination of metals, metalloids and organometallic compounds at (ultra)trace level. Different LPME modes used with GFAAS are briefly described, and the experimental parameters that show an impact in those microextraction processes are discussed. Special attention is paid to those parameters affecting GFAAS analysis. Main issues found when coupling LPME and GFAAS, as well as those strategies reported in the literature to solve them, are summarized. Relevant applications published on the topic so far are included. PMID:27566338

  9. Piezoelectric-tuned microwave cavity for absorption spectrometry

    DOEpatents

    Leskovar, Branko; Buscher, Harold T.; Kolbe, William F.

    1978-01-01

    Gas samples are analyzed for pollutants in a microwave cavity that is provided with two highly polished walls. One wall of the cavity is mechanically driven with a piezoelectric transducer at a low frequency to tune the cavity over a band of microwave frequencies in synchronism with frequency modulated microwave energy applied to the cavity. Absorption of microwave energy over the tuned frequencies is detected, and energy absorption at a particular microwave frequency is an indication of a particular pollutant in the gas sample.

  10. Fractionation and speciation of Cu, Zn and Fe in wine samples by atomic absorption spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karadjova, Irina; Izgi, Belgin; Gucer, Seref

    2002-03-01

    A scheme is presented for fractionation of wine components and Fe, Cu and Zn determination in different fractions. The charge of the metal species was established using cation and anion exchange separation based on solid phase extraction. The resin XAD-8 was used for the separation of wine polyphenols in complexes with wine proteins and polysaccharides. Dowex ion exchange resins were used for the separation of cationic and anionic species of Fe, Cu and Zn. Flame atomic absorption spectrometry and electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry were used off-line for the quantitative determination of metals in the different fractions obtained.

  11. Determination of mercury by cold vapor atomic absorption spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Chou, H.N.; Naleway, C.A.

    1984-08-01

    An atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS) method for determining mercury levels in liquid samples to the parts per billion range was determined. The method is attractive because of the ease of application and the accuracy and precision of the results. Liquid samples may be analyzed that are as small as one milliliter. 6 references, 1 figure.

  12. Total mercury in the hair of children by combustion atomic absorption spectrometry (Comb-AAS).

    PubMed

    Díez, Sergi; Montuori, Paolo; Querol, Xavier; Bayona, Josep M

    2007-04-01

    A simple and rapid procedure for measuring total mercury in human hair was evaluated and compared with a conventional technique. An Advanced Mercury Analyzer (AMA-254) based on sample catalytic combustion, preconcentration by gold amalgamation, thermal desorption, and atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS) (Comb-AAS) was assessed for the direct determination of milligram quantities of human hair. Precision (% relative standard deviation) was < 7% and accuracy was determined by using two human hair reference materials (i.e., NIES No. 13 and IAEA-086) that were within the certified range. In comparison to conventional graphite-furnace atomic absorption spectrophotometry (GF-AAS), we found that our method obtained statistically equivalent results. Because total analysis time per sample was less than 10 min, the Comb-AAS method was in fact much faster than the GF-AAS method. In addition, Comb-AAS does not generate waste products and could be mainly useful for the analysis of a large amount of samples. Then, the authors suggest that this quick method could be useful for measuring mercury in human hair. Therefore, the mercury content in hair for a non-exposed group of children (n=40) living in Spain was evaluated. The mean and median hair mercury levels for the subjects under study were found to be lower than the value of 1 microg/g, corresponding to the reference dose of 0.1 microg of methylmercury per kilogram body weight set by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency.

  13. Cadmium, copper, lead, and zinc determination in precipitation: A comparison of inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry and graphite furnace atomization atomic absorption spectrometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reddy, M.M.; Benefiel, M.A.; Claassen, H.C.

    1987-01-01

    Selected trace element analysis for cadmium, copper, lead, and zinc in precipitation samples by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission Spectrometry (ICP) and by atomic absorption spectrometry with graphite furnace atomization (AAGF) have been evaluated. This task was conducted in conjunction with a longterm study of precipitation chemistry at high altitude sites located in remote areas of the southwestern United States. Coefficients of variation and recovery values were determined for a standard reference water sample for all metals examined for both techniques. At concentration levels less than 10 micrograms per liter AAGF analyses exhibited better precision and accuracy than ICP. Both methods appear to offer the potential for cost-effective analysis of trace metal ions in precipitation. ?? 1987 Springer-Verlag.

  14. Cinchocaine hydrochloride determination by atomic absorption spectrometry and spectrophotometry.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Ghani, Nour T; Youssef, Ahmed F A; Awady, Mohamed A

    2005-05-01

    Two sensitive spectrophotometric and atomic absorption spectrometric procedures have been developed for determination of cinchocaine hydrochloride (Cin.Cl) in pure form and in pharmaceutical formulation. The spectrophotometric method was based on formation of an insoluble colored ion-associate between the cited drug and tetrathiocyanatocobaltate (CoTC) or hexathiocyanatochromate (CrTC) which dissolved and extracted in an organic solvent. The optimal experimental conditions for quantitative extraction such as pH, concentration of the reagents and solvent were studied. Toluene and iso-butyl alcohol proved to be the most suitable solvents for quantitative extraction of Cin-CoTC and Cin-CrTC ion-associates with maximum absorbance at 620 and 555 nm, respectively. The optimum concentration ranges, molar absorptivities, Ringbom ranges and Sandell sensitivities were also evaluated. The atomic absorption spectrometric method is based on measuring of the excess cobalt or chromium in the aqueous solution, after precipitation of the drug, at 240.7 and 357.9 nm, respectively. Linear application ranges, characteristic masses and detection limits were 57.99-361.9, 50.40 and 4.22 microg ml(-1) of Cin.Cl, in case of CoTC, while 37.99-379.9, 18.94 and 0.81 microg ml(-1) in case of CrTC. PMID:15910814

  15. Cinchocaine hydrochloride determination by atomic absorption spectrometry and spectrophotometry.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Ghani, Nour T; Youssef, Ahmed F A; Awady, Mohamed A

    2005-05-01

    Two sensitive spectrophotometric and atomic absorption spectrometric procedures have been developed for determination of cinchocaine hydrochloride (Cin.Cl) in pure form and in pharmaceutical formulation. The spectrophotometric method was based on formation of an insoluble colored ion-associate between the cited drug and tetrathiocyanatocobaltate (CoTC) or hexathiocyanatochromate (CrTC) which dissolved and extracted in an organic solvent. The optimal experimental conditions for quantitative extraction such as pH, concentration of the reagents and solvent were studied. Toluene and iso-butyl alcohol proved to be the most suitable solvents for quantitative extraction of Cin-CoTC and Cin-CrTC ion-associates with maximum absorbance at 620 and 555 nm, respectively. The optimum concentration ranges, molar absorptivities, Ringbom ranges and Sandell sensitivities were also evaluated. The atomic absorption spectrometric method is based on measuring of the excess cobalt or chromium in the aqueous solution, after precipitation of the drug, at 240.7 and 357.9 nm, respectively. Linear application ranges, characteristic masses and detection limits were 57.99-361.9, 50.40 and 4.22 microg ml(-1) of Cin.Cl, in case of CoTC, while 37.99-379.9, 18.94 and 0.81 microg ml(-1) in case of CrTC.

  16. Determination of arsenic and selenium in environmental and agricultural samples by hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Hershey, J.W.; Oostdyk, T.S.; Keliher, P.N.

    1988-11-01

    Agricultural and environmental samples are digested with acid, and arsenic and selenium are determined using hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometry. Interelement interferences are eliminated by high acid concentrations or cation-exchange resins. Agreement with standard reference material is excellent. The technique is also applied to actual samples.

  17. Atomic absorption spectrometry with a flame emission source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calloway, Clifton P.; Jones, Bradley T.

    1994-12-01

    An atomic absorption spectrometer with flame atomization and a flame emission light source is described. The light source is prepared by aspirating a solution containing a high concentration of analyte into the emission flame. Two different source flames (air/acetylene and nitrous oxide/acetylene) have been evaluated, with the N 2O flame providing better signal to noise ratios ( S/N) in most cases. Source S/N values as high as 5900 (Cr) have been observed. Experimental parameters have been optimized for nine test elements to give limits of detection obtained with this system that are in some cases as good as those obtained with the traditional hollow cathode lamp source; for example, Cu (4 ng/ml), Mn (3 ng/ml) and Ni (5 ng/ml). Linear dynamic ranges typically span 2-3 orders of magnitude. This system offers an inexpensive emission source with the ability to quickly change the setup to accommodate different analytes.

  18. Determination of sulfur in food by high resolution continuum source flame molecular absorption spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zambrzycka, Elżbieta; Godlewska-Żyłkiewicz, Beata

    2014-11-01

    In the present work, a fast, simple and sensitive analytical method for determination of sulfur in food and beverages by high resolution continuum source flame molecular absorption spectrometry was developed. The determination was performed via molecular absorption of carbon monosulfide, CS. Different CS rotational lines (257.959 nm, 258.033 nm, 258.055 nm), number of pixels and types of standard solution of sulfur, namely: sulfuric acid, sodium sulfate, ammonium sulfate, sodium sulfite, sodium sulfide, DL-cysteine, and L-cystine, were studied in terms of sensitivity, repeatability of results as well as limit of detection and limit of quantification. The best results were obtained for measurements of absorption of the CS molecule at 258.055 nm at the wavelength range covering 3 pixels and DL-cysteine in 0.2 mol L- 1 HNO3 solution as a calibration standard. Under optimized conditions the limit of detection and the limit of quantification achieved for sulfur were 10.9 mg L- 1 and 36.4 mg L- 1, respectively. The repeatability of the results expressed as relative standard deviation was typically < 5%. The accuracy of the method was tested by analysis of digested biological certified reference materials (soya bean flour, corn flour and herbs) and recovery experiment for beverage samples with added known amount of sulfur standard. The recovery of analyte from such samples was in the range of 93-105% with the repeatability in the range of 4.1-5.0%. The developed method was applied for the determination of sulfur in milk (194 ± 10 mg kg- 1), egg white (2188 ± 29 mg kg- 1), mineral water (31.0 ± 0.9 mg L- 1), white wine (260 ± 4 mg L- 1) and red wine (82 ± 2 mg L- 1), as well as in sample rich in ions, such as bitter mineral water (6900 ± 100 mg L- 1).

  19. A direct solid sampling electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry method for the determination of silicon in biological materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, M. D.; Krivan, V.

    2007-03-01

    A solid sampling electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry method for direct determination of trace silicon in biological materials was developed and applied to analysis of pork liver, bovine liver SRM 1577b and pure cellulose. The organic matrix was destroyed and expelled from the furnace in the pyrolysis stage involving a step-wise increasing the temperature from 160 °C to 1200 °C. The mixed Pd/Mg(NO 3) 2 modifier has proved to be the optimum one with respect to the achievement of maximum sensitivity, elimination of the effect of the remaining inorganic substances and the possibility of using calibration curves measured with aqueous standard solutions for quantification. For the maximum applicable sample amount of 6 mg, the limit of detection was found to be 30 ng g - 1 . The results were compared with those obtained by different spectrometric methods involving sample digestion, by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry using slurry sampling, by wavelength dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometry and by radiochemical neutron activation analysis. The method seems to be a promising one for analysis of biological materials containing no significant fraction of silicon in form of not naturally occurring volatile organosilicon compounds. The still incessant serious limitations and uncertainties in the determination of trace silicon in solid biological materials are discussed.

  20. Near edge X-ray absorption mass spectrometry on coronene

    SciTech Connect

    Reitsma, G.; Deuzeman, M. J.; Hoekstra, R.; Schlathölter, T.; Boschman, L.; Hoekstra, S.

    2015-01-14

    We have investigated the photoionization and photodissociation of free coronene cations C{sub 24}H{sub 12}{sup +} upon soft X-ray photoabsorption in the carbon K-edge region by means of a time-of-flight mass spectrometry approach. Core excitation into an unoccupied molecular orbital (below threshold) and core ionization into the continuum both leave a C 1s vacancy, that is subsequently filled in an Auger-type process. The resulting coronene dications and trications are internally excited and cool down predominantly by means of hydrogen emission. Density functional theory was employed to determine the dissociation energies for subsequent neutral hydrogen loss. A statistical cascade model incorporating these dissociation energies agrees well with the experimentally observed dehydrogenation. For double ionization, i.e., formation of intermediate C{sub 24}H{sub 12}{sup 3+⋆}trications, the experimental data hint at loss of H{sup +} ions. This asymmetric fission channel is associated with hot intermediates, whereas colder intermediates predominantly decay via neutral H loss.

  1. Simultaneous multielement atomic absorption spectrometry with graphite furnace atomization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harnly, James M.; Miller-Ihli, Nancy J.; O'Haver, Thomas C.

    The extended analytical range capability of a simultaneous multielement atomic absorption continuum source spectrometer (SIMAAC) was tested for furnace atomization with respect to the signal measurement mode (peak height and area), the atomization mode (from the wall or from a platform), and the temperature program mode (stepped or ramped atomization). These parameters were evaluated with respect to the shapes of the analytical curves, the detection limits, carry-over contamination and accuracy. Peak area measurements gave more linear calibration curves. Methods for slowing the atomization step heating rate, the use of a ramped temperature program or a platform, produced similar calibration curves and longer linear ranges than atomization with a stepped temperature program. Peak height detection limits were best using stepped atomization from the wall. Peak area detection limits for all atomization modes were similar. Carry-over contamination was worse for peak area than peak height, worse for ramped atomization than stepped atomization, and worse for atomization from a platform than from the wall. Accurate determinations (100 ± 12% for Ca, Cu, Fe, Mn, and Zn in National Bureau of Standards' Standard Reference Materials Bovine Liver 1577 and Rice Flour 1568 were obtained using peak area measurements with ramped atomization from the wall and stepped atomization from a platform. Only stepped atomization from a platform gave accurate recoveries for K. Accurate recoveries, 100 ± 10%, with precisions ranging from 1 to 36 % (standard deviation), were obtained for the determination of Al, Co, Cr, Fe, Mn, Mo, Ni. Pb, V and Zn in Acidified Waters (NBS SRM 1643 and 1643a) using stepped atomization from a platform.

  2. Differential mobility spectrometry-mass spectrometry for atomic analysis.

    PubMed

    Sinatra, Francy L; Wu, Tianpeng; Manolakos, Spiros; Wang, Jing; Evans-Nguyen, Theresa G

    2015-02-01

    Analysis and separation of atomic ions within a portable setting are studied in forensic applications of radiological debris analysis. Ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) may be used to show separation of atomic ions, while the related method of differential mobility spectrometry (DMS) has focused on fractionation of primarily molecular components. We set out to investigate DMS as a means for separating atomic ions. We initially derived the differential ion mobility parameter, alpha, from classic empirical IMS data of atomic ions, cesium and potassium, each showing its own distinct form of alpha. These alpha functions were applied to DMS simulations and supported by analytical treatment that suggested a means for a rapid disambiguation of atomic ions using DMS. We validated this hypothesis through the prototype cesium-potassium system investigated experimentally by DMS coupled to mass spectrometry (MS). Such a feature would be advantageous in a field portable instrument for rapid atomic analyses especially in the case of isobaric ions that cannot be distinguished by MS. Herein, we first report this novel method for the derivation of alpha from existing field dependent drift tube ion mobility data. Further, we translate experimental DMS data into alpha parameters by expanding upon existing methods. Refining the alpha parameter in this manner helps convey the interpretation of the alpha parameter particularly for those new to the DMS field.

  3. Determination of mercury in phosphate fertilizers by cold vapor atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    de Jesus, Robson M; Silva, Laiana O B; Castro, Jacira T; de Azevedo Neto, Andre D; de Jesus, Raildo M; Ferreira, Sergio L C

    2013-03-15

    In this paper, a method for the determination of mercury in phosphate fertilizers using slurry sampling and cold vapor atomic absorption spectrometry (CV QT AAS) is proposed. Because mercury (II) ions form strong complexes with phosphor compounds, the formation of metallic mercury vapor requires the presence of lanthanum chloride as a release agent. Thiourea increases the amount of mercury that is extracted from the solid sample to the liquid phase of the slurry. The method is established using two steps. First, the slurry is prepared using the sample, lanthanum chloride, hydrochloric acid solution and thiourea solution and is sonicated for 20 min. Afterward, mercury vapor is generated using an aliquot of the slurry in the presence of the hydrochloric acid solution and isoamylic alcohol with sodium tetrahydroborate solution as the reducing agent. The experimental conditions for slurry preparation were optimized using two-level full factorial design involving the factors: thiourea and lanthanum chloride concentrations and the duration of sonication. The method allows the determination of mercury by external calibration using aqueous standards with limits of detection and quantification of 2.4 and 8.2 μg kg(-1), respectively, and precision, expressed as relative standard deviation, of 6.36 and 5.81% for two phosphate fertilizer samples with mercury concentrations of 0.24 and 0.57 mg kg(-1), respectively. The accuracy was confirmed by the analysis of a certified reference material of phosphate fertilizer that was provided by the National Institute of Standards & Technology (NIST). The method was applied to determine mercury in six commercial samples of phosphate fertilizers. The mercury content varied from 33.97 to 209.28 μg kg(-1). These samples were also analyzed employing inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). The ICP-MS results were consistent with the results from our proposed method.

  4. [Determination of copper, magnesium and zinc in mononuclear leukocytes by flame atomic absorption spectrometry].

    PubMed

    Rahn-Chique, Kareem; Carrión, Nereida; Murillo, Miguel

    2012-12-01

    In this paper we evaluated a new micro-flow injector for the determination of the concentrations of Cu, Mg and Zn in mononuclear blood cells. This device analyzed sample volumes in the order of microliters by flame atomic absorption spectrometry; it is inexpensive, and easy to build and to adapt to the conventional injector of the atomic absorption spectrophotometer. Detection limits of 106, 65 and 37 microg L(-1) for Cu, Mg and Zn were obtained, respectively. The percentages of recovery tests were found between 98 and 110%. PMID:23513485

  5. Metal content monitoring in Hypericum perforatum pharmaceutical derivatives by atomic absorption and emission spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Gomez, María R; Soledad, Cerutti; Olsina, Roberto A; Silva, María F; Martínez, Luis D

    2004-02-18

    Metals have been investigated in different plant materials in order to establish their normal concentration range and consider their role in plants as part of human medicinal treatment. Metal monitoring as a pattern recognition method is a promising tool in the characterization and/or standardization of phytomedicines. In the present work measurable amounts of Ca, Cu, K, Li, Mg, Mn, Na, Ni, and Zn were detected in phytopharmaceutical derivatives of Hypericum perforatum by atomic techniques. Atomic methodologies like flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS) and electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS) allow reliable determination of mineral content in pharmaceutical quality control of medicinal plants. Additionally, capillary electrophoresis (CE) patterns of characteristic components (fingerprints) have been performed for the search of adulterants in phytopharmaceutical products. PMID:15127813

  6. [Atom-absorption spectrometry in studying of Vipera lebetina obtusa venom].

    PubMed

    Babaev, E T; Abiev, G A; Topchieva, Sh A; Chumburidze, T B; Nemsitsveridze, N G

    2009-09-01

    The aim of the investigation was to work out the atom-absorption spectrometry method for definition of elementary structure of snake venom. The investigation was conducted on venom vipers, caught in the Gobustan district. Determination of heavy metals in venom vipers, was conducted by means of atom-absorption spectrometry (Perkin-Elmer AAS-300). The concentration of the following metals in samples of Vipera Lebetina obtusa venom was defined: Cd (0,012%), (1,234%), Fe (0,487%), Cr (0,171%), Zn (0,78%). The obtained data by means of proposed method of definition of heavy metals in samples of snake venom can be applied to standardize the snake venom, to establish the authenticity in a forensic medical examination, in analyses of medication on the basis of snake venom.

  7. Determination of elements by atomic absorption spectrometry in medicinal plants employed to alleviate common cold symptoms.

    PubMed

    Küçükbay, F Zehra; Kuyumcu, Ebru

    2014-09-01

    Eleven important medicinal plants generally used by the people of Turkey for the treatment of common cold have been studied for their mineral contents. Eleven minor and major elements (essential, non-essential and toxic) were identified in the Asplenium adiantum-nigrum L. , Althaea officinalis L. , Verbascum phlomoides L., Euphorbia chamaesyce L., Zizyphus jujube Miller, Peganum harmala L., Arum dioscoridis Sm., Sambucus nigra L., Piperlongum L., Tussilago farfara L. and Elettaria cardamomum Maton by employing flame atomic absorption and emission spectrometry and electro-thermal atomic absorption spectrometry. Microwave digestion procedure for total concentration was applied under optimized conditions for dissolution of medicinal plants. Plant based biological certified reference materials (CRMs) served as standards for quantification. These elements are found to be present in varying concentrations in the studied plants. The baseline data presented in this work can be used in understanding the role of essential, non-essential and toxic elements in nutritive, preventive and therapeutic properties of medicinal plants.

  8. Application of flow injection on-line electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry to the determination of rhodium.

    PubMed

    Sanchez Rojas, Fuensanta; Bosch Ojeda, Catalina; Cano Pavón, José Manuel

    2005-06-01

    A fully automated procedure for the determination of rhodium has been developed using flow injection (FI) on-line microcolumn preconcentration coupled with electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS). The proposed FI manifold and its operation make possible the introduction of the total eluate volume into the graphite atomizer, avoiding the necessity for optimisation of subsampling the eluate. Rhodium is adsorbed on a microcolumn packed with 1,5-bis(di-2-pyridyl)methylene thiocarbohydrazide immobilized on silica gel (DPTH-gel). Under the optimum conditions, using a 60 s preconcentration time, a sample flow rate of 3.5 mL min(-1) and an injection volume of eluent of 50 microL, a linear calibration graph was obtained from 1 to at least 40 ng mL(-1) and the detection limit was 1 ng mL(-1). The proposed method has been successfully applied to the analysis of samples. Its performance was investigated against certified reference catalyst sample SRM-2557 and by recovery measurements on spiked samples (soil, foods and beverages).

  9. Optimization of electrothermal atomization parameters for simultaneous multielement atomic absorption spectrometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Harnly, J.M.; Kane, J.S.

    1984-01-01

    The effect of the acid matrix, the measurement mode (height or area), the atomizer surface (unpyrolyzed and pyrolyzed graphite), the atomization mode (from the wall or from a platform), and the atomization temperature on the simultaneous electrothermal atomization of Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mn, Mo, Ni, V, and Zn was examined. The 5% HNO3 matrix gave rise to severe irreproducibility using a pyrolyzed tube unless the tube was properly "prepared". The 5% HCl matrix did not exhibit this problem, and no problems were observed with either matrix using an unpyrolized tube or a pyrolyzed platform. The 5% HCl matrix gave better sensitivities with a pyrolyzed tube but the two matrices were comparable for atomization from a platform. If Mo and V are to be analyzed with the other seven elements, a high atomization temperature (2700??C or greater) is necessary regardless of the matrix, the measurement mode, the atomization mode, or the atomizer surface. Simultaneous detection limits (peak height with pyrolyzed tube atomization) were comparable to those of conventional atomic absorption spectrometry using electrothermal atomization above 280 nm. Accuracies and precisions of ??10-15% were found in the 10 to 120 ng mL-1 range for the analysis of NBS acidified water standards.

  10. Broadband Analysis of Bioagents by Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fenselau, Catherine; Wynne, Colin; Edwards, Nathan

    Mass spectrometry was first reported to provide analysis of intact metabolite biomarkers from whole cells in 1975.1 Since then advances in ionization techniques have extended our capabilities to polar lipids and, eventually, to proteins.2, 3 Mass spectrometry provides a broadband detection system, which, however, has great specificity. Bioinformatics plays an important role in providing flexible and rapid characterization of species, based on protein and peptide mass spectra collected in the field.

  11. Inorganic trace analysis by mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, Johanna Sabine; Dietze, Hans-Joachim

    1998-10-01

    Mass spectrometric methods for the trace analysis of inorganic materials with their ability to provide a very sensitive multielemental analysis have been established for the determination of trace and ultratrace elements in high-purity materials (metals, semiconductors and insulators), in different technical samples (e.g. alloys, pure chemicals, ceramics, thin films, ion-implanted semiconductors), in environmental samples (waters, soils, biological and medical materials) and geological samples. Whereas such techniques as spark source mass spectrometry (SSMS), laser ionization mass spectrometry (LIMS), laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS), glow discharge mass spectrometry (GDMS), secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) have multielemental capability, other methods such as thermal ionization mass spectrometry (TIMS), accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) and resonance ionization mass spectrometry (RIMS) have been used for sensitive mono- or oligoelemental ultratrace analysis (and precise determination of isotopic ratios) in solid samples. The limits of detection for chemical elements using these mass spectrometric techniques are in the low ng g -1 concentration range. The quantification of the analytical results of mass spectrometric methods is sometimes difficult due to a lack of matrix-fitted multielement standard reference materials (SRMs) for many solid samples. Therefore, owing to the simple quantification procedure of the aqueous solution, inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) is being increasingly used for the characterization of solid samples after sample dissolution. ICP-MS is often combined with special sample introduction equipment (e.g. flow injection, hydride generation, high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) or electrothermal vaporization) or an off-line matrix separation and enrichment of trace impurities (especially for characterization of

  12. Total Absorption Gamma-ray Spectrometer (TAGS) Intensity Distributions from INL's Gamma-Ray Spectrometry Center

    DOE Data Explorer

    Greenwood, R. E.

    A 252Cf fission-product source and the INL on-line isotope separator were used to supply isotope-separated fission-product nuclides to a total absorption -ray spectrometer. This spectrometer consisted of a large (25.4-cm diameter x 30.5-cm long) NaI(Tl) detector with a 20.3-cm deep axial well in which is placed a 300-mm2 x 1.0-mm Si detector. The spectra from the NaI(Tl) detector are collected both in the singles mode and in coincidence with the B-events detected in the Si detector. Ideally, this detector would sum all the energy of the B- rays in each cascade following the population of daughter level by B- decay, so that the event could be directly associated with a particular daughter level. However, there are losses of energy from attenuation of the rays before they reach the detector, transmission of rays through the detector, escape of secondary photons from Compton scattering, escape of rays through the detector well, internal conversion, etc., and the measured spectra are thus more complicated than the ideal case and the analysis is more complex. Analysis methods have been developed to simulate all of these processes and thus provide a direct measure of the B- intensity distribution as a function of the excitation energy in the daughter nucleus. These data yield more accurate information on the B- distribution than conventional decay-scheme studies for complex decay schemes with large decay energies, because in the latter there are generally many unobserved and observed but unplaced rays. The TAGS data have been analyzed and published [R. E. Greenwood et al., Nucl Instr. and metho. A390(1997)] for 40 fission product-nuclides to determine the B- intensity distributions. [Copied from the TAGS page at http://www.inl.gov/gammaray/spectrometry/tags.shtml]. Those values are listed on this page for quick reference.

  13. Optimized determination of iron in grape juice, wines, and other alcoholic beverages by atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Olalla, M; Cruz González, M; Cabrera, C; López, M C

    2000-01-01

    This paper describes a study of the different methods of sample preparation for the determination of iron in grape juice, wines, and other alcoholic beverages by atomic absorption spectrometry with electrothermal atomization; results are also reported for the practical application of these methods to the analysis of commercial samples produced in Spain. The methods examined include dealcoholization and dry and wet mineralization treatment using different acids and/or mixtures of them, both with and without heating. The sensitivity, detection limit, accuracy, precision, and selectivity of each method were established. The best results were obtained for wet mineralization with heated acid (HNO3-H2SO4); the results for table wines had an accuracy of 97.5-101.6%, a relative standard deviation of 3.51%, a detection limit of 19.2 micrograms/L, and a determination limit of 32.0 micrograms/L. The method was also sufficiently sensitive and selective. It was applied to the determination of iron in grape juice, different types of wines, and beverages with high alcoholic content, all of which are produced and widely consumed in Spain. The values obtained ranged from 3.394 +/- 2.15 mg/L for the juice, 2.938 +/- 1.47 mg/L for the white wines, 19.470 +/- 5.43 mg/L for the sweet wines, 0.311 +/- 0.07 mg/L for the brandies, and 0.564 +/- 0.12 mg/L for the anisettes. Thus, the method is useful for routine analysis in the quality control of these beverages. PMID:10693020

  14. Determination of trace elements in paints by direct sampling graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Bentlin, Fabrina R S; Pozebon, Dirce; Mello, Paola A; Flores, Erico M M

    2007-10-17

    A direct sampling graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometric (DS-GFAAS) method for the determination of Cd, Pb, Cr, Ni, Co and Cu in paints has been developed. Serigraphy, acrylic and tattoo paints were analysed. Approaches like pyrolysis and atomization temperatures, modifiers and sample mass introduced in the atomizer were studied. Quantification was performed using calibration curves measured with aqueous standard solutions pipetted onto the platform. The sample mass introduced in the graphite tube ranged from 0.02 to 8.0 mg. Palladium was used as modifier for Cd, Pb and Cu, while Mg(NO3)2 was used for Co. For Ni determination, the graphite platform was covered with carbon powder. The characteristic masses of Cd, Pb, Cr, Ni, Co and Cu were 1.4, 22.5, 7.9, 11.0, 9.6 and 12.5 pg, while the limits of detection were 0.0004, 0.001, 0.03, 0.22, 0.11 and 0.05 microg g(-1) of Cd, Pb, Cr, Ni, Co and Cu, respectively. The accuracy was determined by comparison of the results with those obtained by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) and graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GFAAS), using liquid sampling of digests. For matrix characterization, major and minor elements (Al, Mg, Ba, Ca, Cr, Cu, Pb, Sr, Ti and Mg) were determined by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP OES).

  15. Lead concentrations and isotope ratios in street dust determined by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Nageotte, S M; Day, J P

    1998-01-01

    A major source of environmental lead, particularly in urban areas, has been from the combustion of leaded petrol. Street dust has previously been used to assess urban lead contamination, and the dust itself can also be a potential source of lead ingestion, particularly to children. The progressive reduction of lead in petrol, in recent years, would be expected to have been reflected in a reduction of lead in urban dust. We have tested this hypothesis by repeating an earlier survey of Manchester street dust and carrying out a comparable survey in Paris. Samples were collected from streets and parks, lead was extracted by digestion with concentrated nitric acid and determined by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry. Lead isotope ratios were measured by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. Results for Manchester show that lead concentrations have fallen by about 40% (street dust averages, 941 micrograms g-1 (ppm) in 1975 down to 569 ppm in 1997). In Paris, the lead levels in street dust are much higher and significant differences were observed between types of street (not seen in Manchester). Additionally, lead levels in parks were much lower than in Manchester. Samples collected under the Eiffel Tower had very high concentrations and lead isotope ratios showed that this was unlikely to be fallout from motor vehicles but could be due to the paint used on the tower. Isotope ratios measurements also revealed that lead additives used in France and the UK come from different sources.

  16. Paleodiet characterisation of an Etrurian population of Pontecagnano (Italy) by Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometry (IRMS) and Atomic Absorption Spectrometry (AAS)(#).

    PubMed

    Scarabino, Carla; Lubritto, Carmine; Proto, Antonio; Rubino, Mauro; Fiengo, Gilda; Marzaioli, Fabio; Passariello, Isabella; Busiello, Gaetano; Fortunato, Antonietta; Alfano, Davide; Sabbarese, Carlo; Rogalla, Detlef; De Cesare, Nicola; d'Onofrio, Antonio; Terrasi, Filippo

    2006-06-01

    Human bones recovered from the archaeological site of Pontecagnano (Salerno, Italy) have been studied to reconstruct the diet of an Etrurian population. Two different areas were investigated, named Library and Sant' Antonio, with a total of 44 tombs containing human skeletal remains, ranging in age from the 8th to the 3rd century B.C. This time span was confirmed by 14C dating obtained using Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) on one bone sample from each site. Atomic Absorption Spectrometry (AAS) was used to extract information about the concentration of Sr, Zn, Ca elements in the bone inorganic fraction, whilst stable isotope ratio measurements (IRMS) were carried out on bone collagen to obtain the delta13C and delta15N. A reliable technique has been used to extract and separate the inorganic and organic fractions of the bone remains. Both IRMS and AAS results suggest a mixed diet including C3 plant food and herbivore animals, consistent with archaeological indications. PMID:16707316

  17. Ultrasensitive determination of cadmium in seawater by hollow fiber supported liquid membrane extraction coupled with graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Jin-feng; Liu, Rui; Liu, Jing-fu; He, Bin; Hu, Xia-lin; Jiang, Gui-bin

    2007-05-01

    A new procedure, based on hollow fiber supported liquid membrane preconcentration coupled with graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GFAAS) detection, was developed for the determination of trace Cd in seawater samples. With 1-octanol that contained a mixture of dithizone (carrier) and oleic acid immobilized in the pores of the polypropylene hollow fiber as a liquid membrane, Cd was selectively extracted from water samples into 0.05 M HNO 3 that filled the lumen of the hollow fiber as a stripping solution. The main extraction related parameters were optimized, and the effects of salinity and some coexisting interferants were also evaluated. Under the optimum extraction conditions, an enrichment factor of 387 was obtained for a 100-mL sample solution. In combination with graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry, a very low detection limit (0.8 ng L - 1 ) and a relative standard deviation (2.5% at 50 ng L - 1 level) were achieved. Five seawater samples were analyzed by the proposed method without dilution, with detected Cd concentration in the range of 56.4-264.8 ng L - 1 and the relative spiked recoveries over 89%. For comparison, these samples were also analyzed by the Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry (ICP-MS) method after a 10-fold dilution for matrix effect elimination. Statistical analysis with a one-way ANOVA shows no significant differences (at 0.05 level) between the results obtained by the proposed and ICP-MS methods. Additionally, analysis of certified reference materials (GBW (E) 080040) shows good agreement with the certified value. These results indicate that this present method is very sensitive and reliable, and can effectively eliminate complex matrix interferences in seawater samples.

  18. Determination of some trace elements in food and soil samples by atomic absorption spectrometry after coprecipitation with holmium hydroxide.

    PubMed

    Saracoglu, Sibel; Soylak, Mustafa; Cabuk, Dilek; Topalak, Zeynep; Karagozlu, Yasemin

    2012-01-01

    The determination of trace elements in food and soil samples by atomic absorption spectrometry was investigated. A coprecipitation procedure with holmium hydroxide was used for separation-preconcentration of trace elements. Trace amounts of copper(II), manganese(II), cobalt(II), nickel(ll), chromium(lll), iron(Ill), cadmium(ll), and lead(ll) ions were coprecipitated with holmium hydroxide in 2.0 M NaOH medium. The optimum conditions for the coprecipitation process were investigated for several commonly tested experimental parameters, such as amount of coprecipitant, effect of standing time, centrifugation rate and time, and sample volume. The precision, based on replicate analysis, was lower than 10% for the analytes. In order to verify the accuracy of the method, the certified reference materials BCR 141 R calcareous loam soil and CRM 025-050 soil were analyzed. The procedure was successfully applied for separation and preconcentration of the investigated ions in various food and soil samples. An amount of the solid samples was decomposed with 15 mL concentrated hydrochloric acid-concentrated nitric acid (3 + 1). The preconcentration procedure was then applied to the final solutions. The concentration of trace elements in samples was determined by atomic absorption spectrometry.

  19. Determination and interference studies of bismuth by tungsten trap hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Kula, Ibrahim; Arslan, Yasin; Bakirdere, Sezgin; Titretir, Serap; Kendüzler, Erdal; Ataman, O Yavuz

    2009-11-15

    The determination of bismuth requires sufficiently sensitive procedures for detection at the microg L(-1) level or lower. W-coil was used for on-line trapping of volatile bismuth species using HGAAS (hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometry); atom trapping using a W-coil consists of three steps. Initially BiH(3) gas is formed by hydride generation procedure. The analyte species in vapor form are transported through the W-coil trap held at 289 degrees C where trapping takes place. Following the preconcentration step, the W-coil is heated to 1348 degrees C; analyte species are released and transported to flame-heated quartz atom cell where the atomic signal is formed. In our study, interferences have been investigated in detail during Bi determination by hydride generation, both with and without trap in the same HGAAS system. Interferent/analyte (mass/mass) ratio was kept at 1, 10 and 100. Experiments were designed for carrier solutions having 1.0M HNO(3). Interferents such as Fe, Mn, Zn, Ni, Cu, As, Se, Cd, Pb, Au, Na, Mg, Ca, chloride, sulfate and phosphate were examined. The calibration plot for an 8.0 mL sampling volume was linear between 0.10 microg L(-1) and 10.0 microg L(-1) of Bi. The detection limit (3s/m) was 25 ng L(-1). The enhancement factor for the characteristic concentration (C(o)) was found to be 21 when compared with the regular system without trap, by using peak height values. The validation of the procedure was performed by the analysis of the certified water reference material and the result was found to be in good agreement with the certified values at the 95% confidence level.

  20. Gas chromatography coupled with atomic absorption spectrometry — a sensitive instrumentation for mercury speciation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emteborg, Håkan; Sinemus, Hans-Werner; Radziuk, Bernard; Baxter, Douglas C.; Frech, Wolfgang

    1996-07-01

    New instrumentation for the speciation of mercury is described, and is applied to the analysis of natural water samples. The separation of mercury species is effected using gas chromatography of derivatized mercury species on a widebore capillary column. The solvent is vented using a bypass valve and the separated mercury species are pyrolysed on-line at 800°C for production of mercury atoms. These are then detected by atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS) at the 253.7 and 184.9 nm lines simultaneously in a quartz cuvette. The use of the 184.9 nm line provides a more than five-fold increase in sensitivity compared with the conventional 253.7 nm line and an absolute detection limit of 0.5 pg of mercury. The dynamic range of the combined analytical lines provides a linear response over more than three orders of magnitude. A number of organic compounds not containing mercury are also detected following pyrolysis, especially at the 184.9 nm line. These background species must not co-elute at the retention times for methyl- and inorganic mercury, as otherwise a positive interference would result. By maximizing the chromatographic resolution and minimizing the band broadening in the cuvette by use of a make-up gas, the retention times of interest are freed from co-eluting background peaks. The instrumentation has been applied to the determination of ng l -1 concentrations of methyl- and inorganic mercury in Lake Constance, Germany and within the Lake Constance drinking water supply organization, Bodenseewasserversorgung (BWV). The accuracy for the sum of methyl- and inorganic mercury has been assessed by comparison with an independent method for total mercury based on AAS detection implemented at BWV. Relative detection limits using 1 litre water samples and 15 ml injections of the final hexane extract were 0.03 ng l -1 for methylmercury and 0.4 ng l -1 for inorganic mercury based on the 3j criterion.

  1. Direct determination of lead in sweet fruit-flavored powder drinks by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lima, Éder C.; Krug, Francisco José; Arruda, Marco A. Z.

    1998-04-01

    A simplified method for direct determination of lead in sweet fruit-flavored powder drinks, syrups and honeys by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry without sample digestion is proposed. Samples were dissolved in water, acidified to 0.2% (v/v) HNO 3, and directly injected into an end-capped transversely heated graphite atomizer (THGA). Building up of carbonaceous residue inside the atomizer was effectively precluded for sugar solutions not exceeding 8.0% (m/v) when a heating program with two pyrolysis steps (600 and 1000°C) was carried out without air-ashing. Under these conditions one atomizer supported about 250 firings. Among various chemical modifiers tested, better recovery and repeatability results were obtained with a 5 μg Pd + 3 μg Mg(NO 3) 2 mixture. Tests carried out with individual concomitants containing up to 1.0 μg Na, K, Ca or Cl, and up to 10.0 μg phosphate or sulphate, and several mixtures of these six concomitants, did not reveal significant interferences on lead atomization. Characteristic mass and detection limit based on integrated absorbance were 15 and 11 pg Pb, respectively. The relative standard deviation based on 10 measurements for typical samples (20-60 ng g -1 Pb) was always lower than 5.5%. The detection limit of 7.0 ng g -1 Pb attained the Codex recommendation for the maximum allowed lead contents in the sugar samples. Application of t-test to the results obtained by the proposed direct analysis, and the official method adopted by Food Chemical Codex, demonstrated that there were no significant differences at the 5% probability level.

  2. The electrical resistivity of some graphite types as used in electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rademeyer, C. J.; Human, H. G. C.; Faure, P. K.

    This paper describes the measurement of the electrical resistivity of four types of graphite as used in electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS). Results are presented for temperatures in a range between 140 and 1800°C. From 1200°C on the resistivity was found to depend linearly on temperature. The regression coefficients for the corresponding straight portions of the experimental curves are given to provide data for extrapolating the resistivity values to 2500°C and to calculate the dynamic temperature characteristics of the graphite tubes in ETAAS.

  3. Determination of nanogram amounts of bismuth in rocks by atomic absorption spectrometry with electrothermal atomization

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kane, J.S.

    1979-01-01

    Bismuth concentrations as low as 10 ng g-1 in 100-mg samples of geological materials can be determined by atomic absorption spectrometry with electrothermal atomization. After HF-HClO4 decomposition of the sample, bismuth is extracted as the iodide into methyl isobutyl ketone and is then stripped with ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid into the aqueous phase. Aliquots of this solution are pipetted into the graphite furnace and dried, charred, and atomized in an automated sequence. Atomic absorbance at the Bi 223.1-nm line provides a measure of the amount of bismuth present. Results are presented for 14 U.S. Geological Survey standard rocks. ?? 1979.

  4. Determination of mercury in sewage sludge by direct slurry sampling graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baralkiewicz, Danuta; Gramowska, Hanka; Kózka, Małgorzata; Kanecka, Anetta

    2005-03-01

    Ultrasonic slurry sampling electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS) method was elaborated to the determination of Hg in sewage sludge samples with the use of KMnO 4+Pd modifier. The minimum sample amount required for slurry preparation with respect to sample homogeneity was evaluated by weighting masses between 3 and 30 mg directly into the autosampler cups. Validation of the proposed method was performed with the use of Certified Reference Materials of sewage sludge, CRM 007-040 and CRM 144R. Two sewage sludge samples from Poznañ (Poland) city were analysed using the present direct method and a method with sample digestion, resulting in no difference within statistical error.

  5. Alternative approaches to correct interferences in the determination of boron in shrimps by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasias, I. N.; Pappa, Ch.; Katsarou, V.; Τhomaidis, N. S.; Piperaki, E. A.

    2014-02-01

    The aim of this study is to propose alternative techniques and methods in combination with the classical chemical modification to correct the major matrix interferences in the determination of boron in shrimps. The performance of an internal standard (Ge) for the determination of boron by the simultaneous multi-element atomic absorption spectrometry was tested. The use of internal standardization increased the recovery from 85.9% to 101% and allowed a simple correction of errors during sampling preparation and heating process. Furthermore, a new preparation procedure based on the use of citric acid during digestion and dilution steps improved the sensitivity of the method and decreased the limit of detection. Finally, a comparative study between the simultaneous multi-element atomic absorption spectrometry with a longitudinal Zeeman-effect background correction system, equipped with a transversely-heated graphite atomizer and the single element atomic absorption spectrometry with a D2 background correction system, equipped with an end-heated graphite atomizer was undertaken to investigate the different behavior of boron in both techniques. Different chemical modifiers for the determination of boron were tested with both techniques. Ni-citric acid and Ca were the optimal chemical modifiers when simultaneous multi-element atomic absorption spectrometry and single-element atomic absorption spectrometry were used, respectively. By using the single-element atomic absorption spectrometry, the calculated characteristic mass was 220 pg and the calculated limit of detection was 370 μg/kg. On the contrary, with simultaneous multi-element atomic absorption spectrometry, the characteristic mass was 2200 pg and the limit of detection was 5.5 mg/kg.

  6. Analysis of Electroblotted Proteins by Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Luque-Garcia, Jose L.; Neubert, Thomas A.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Identification of proteins by mass spectrometry is crucial for better understanding of many biological, biochemical, and biomedical processes. Here we describe two methods for the identification of electroblotted proteins by on-membrane digestion prior to analysis by mass spectrometry. These on-membrane methods take approximately half the time of in-gel digestion and provide better digestion efficiency, due to the better accessibility of the protease to the proteins adsorbed onto the nitrocellulose, and better protein sequence coverage, especially for membrane proteins where large and hydrophobic peptides are commonly present. PMID:26139272

  7. Mass spectrometry for pectin structure analysis.

    PubMed

    Ralet, Marie-Christine; Lerouge, Patrice; Quéméner, Bernard

    2009-09-28

    Pectin are extremely complex biopolymers made up of different structural domains. Enzymatic degradation followed by purification and structural analysis of the degradation products proved to be efficient tools for the understanding of pectin fine structure, including covalent interactions between pectic structural domains or with other cell wall polysaccharides. Due to its high sensitivity, high throughput and capacity to analyze mixtures, mass spectrometry has gained more and more importance as a tool for oligosaccharides structural characterization in the past 10 years. This review will focus on the combined use of mass spectrometry and enzymatic digestion for pectins structural characterization. PMID:19058795

  8. Determination of selected elements in whole coal and in coal ash from the eight argonne premium coal samples by atomic absorption spectrometry, atomic emission spectrometry, and ion-selective electrode

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Doughten, M.W.; Gillison, J.R.

    1990-01-01

    Methods for the determination of 24 elements in whole coal and coal ash by inductively coupled argon plasma-atomic emission spectrometry, flame, graphite furnace, and cold vapor atomic absorption spectrometry, and by ion-selective electrode are described. Coal ashes were analyzed in triplicate to determine the precision of the methods. Results of the analyses of NBS Standard Reference Materials 1633, 1633a, 1632a, and 1635 are reported. Accuracy of the methods is determined by comparison of the analysis of standard reference materials to their certified values as well as other values in the literature.

  9. [Imaging Mass Spectrometry in Histopathologic Analysis].

    PubMed

    Yamazaki, Fumiyoshi; Seto, Mitsutoshi

    2015-04-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI)-imaging mass spectrometry (IMS) enables visualization of the distribution of a range of biomolecules by integrating biochemical information from mass spectrometry with positional information from microscopy. IMS identifies a target molecule. In addition, IMS enables global analysis of biomolecules containing unknown molecules by detecting the ratio of the molecular weight to electric charge without any target, which makes it possible to identify novel molecules. IMS generates data on the distribution of lipids and small molecules in tissues, which is difficult to visualize with either conventional counter-staining or immunohistochemistry. In this review, we firstly introduce the principle of imaging mass spectrometry and recent advances in the sample preparation method. Secondly, we present findings regarding biological samples, especially pathological ones. Finally, we discuss the limitations and problems of the IMS technique and clinical application, such as in drug development. PMID:26536781

  10. Electrothermal atomization atomic absorption spectrometry for the determination of lead in urine: results of an interlaboratory study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parsons, Patrick J.; Slavin, Walter

    1999-05-01

    Results of an interlaboratory study are reported for the determination of lead in urine. Two levels of a lyophilized material containing biologically-bound lead were prepared using pooled urine obtained from lead-poisoned children undergoing the CaNa 2EDTA mobilization test. The materials were circulated to a group of reference laboratories that participate in the `New York State Proficiency Testing Program for Blood Lead'. Results of the initial round-robin gave all-method consensus target values of 145±22 μg/l (S.D.) for lot 17 and 449±43 μg/l (S.D.) for lot 20. The interlaboratory exercise was repeated some 5 years later and consensus target values were re-calculated using the grand mean (excluding outliers) of results reported by laboratories using electrothermal atomization atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS). The re-calculated target values were 139±10 μg/l (S.D.) and 433±12 μg/l (S.D.). The urine reference materials were also analyzed for lead by several laboratories using other instrumental techniques including isotope dilution (ID), inductively coupled plasma (ICP) mass spectrometry (MS), flame atomic absorption with extraction, ICP-atomic emission spectrometry, ID-gas chromatography MS and flow injection-hydride generation AAS, thus providing a rich source of analytical data with which to characterize them. The materials were also used in a long-term validation study of an ETAAS method developed originally for blood lead determinations that has since been used unmodified for the determination of lead in urine also. Recently, urine lead method performance has been tracked in a proficiency testing program specifically for this analysis. In addition, a number of commercial control materials have been analyzed and evaluated.

  11. [The application of atomic absorption spectrometry in automatic transmission fault detection].

    PubMed

    Chen, Li-dan; Chen, Kai-kao

    2012-01-01

    The authors studied the innovative applications of atomic absorption spectrometry in the automatic transmission fault detection. After the authors have determined Fe, Cu and Cr contents in the five groups of Audi A6 main metal in automatic transmission fluid whose travel course is respectively 10-15 thousand kilometers, 20-26 thousand kilometers, 32-38 thousand kilometers, 43-49 thousand kilometers, and 52-58 thousand kilometers by atomic absorption spectrometry, the authors founded the database of primary metal content in the Audi A6 different mileage automatic transmission fluid (ATF). The research discovered that the main metal content in the automatic transmission fluid increased with the vehicles mileage and its normal metal content level in the automatic transmission fluid is between the two trend lines. The authors determined the main metal content of automatic transmission fluid which had faulty symptoms and compared it with its database value. Those can not only judge the wear condition of the automatic transmission which had faulty symptoms but also help the automobile detection and maintenance personnel to diagnose automatic transmission failure reasons without disintegration. This reduced automobile maintenance costs, and improved the quality of automobile maintenance.

  12. Determination of elements by atomic absorption spectrometry in medicinal plants employed to alleviate common cold symptoms.

    PubMed

    Küçükbay, F Zehra; Kuyumcu, Ebru

    2014-09-01

    Eleven important medicinal plants generally used by the people of Turkey for the treatment of common cold have been studied for their mineral contents. Eleven minor and major elements (essential, non-essential and toxic) were identified in the Asplenium adiantum-nigrum L. , Althaea officinalis L. , Verbascum phlomoides L., Euphorbia chamaesyce L., Zizyphus jujube Miller, Peganum harmala L., Arum dioscoridis Sm., Sambucus nigra L., Piperlongum L., Tussilago farfara L. and Elettaria cardamomum Maton by employing flame atomic absorption and emission spectrometry and electro-thermal atomic absorption spectrometry. Microwave digestion procedure for total concentration was applied under optimized conditions for dissolution of medicinal plants. Plant based biological certified reference materials (CRMs) served as standards for quantification. These elements are found to be present in varying concentrations in the studied plants. The baseline data presented in this work can be used in understanding the role of essential, non-essential and toxic elements in nutritive, preventive and therapeutic properties of medicinal plants. PMID:25532362

  13. Optimized determination of calcium in grape juice, wines, and other alcoholic beverages by atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Olalla, Manuel; González, Maria Cruz; Cabrera, Carmen; Gimenez, Rafael; López, Maria Carmen

    2002-01-01

    This paper describes a study of the different methods of sample preparation for the determination of calcium in grape juice, wines, and other alcoholic beverages by flame atomic absorption spectrometry; results are also reported for the practical application of these methods to the analysis of commercial samples produced in Spain. The methods tested included dealcoholization, dry mineralization, and wet mineralization with heating by using different acids and/or mixtures of acids. The sensitivity, detection limit, accuracy, precision, and selectiviy of each method were established. Such research is necessary because of the better analytical indexes obtained after acid digestion of the sample, as recommended by the European Union, which advocates the direct method. In addition, although high-temperature mineralization with an HNO3-HCIO4 mixture gave the best analytical results, mineralization with nitric acid at 80 degrees C for 15 min gave the most satisfactory results in all cases, including those for wines with high levels of sugar and beverages with high alcoholic content. The results for table wines subjected to the latter treatment had an accuracy of 98.70-99.90%, a relative standard deviation of 2.46%, a detection limit of 19.0 microg/L, and a determination limit of 31.7 microg/L. The method was found to be sufficiently sensitive and selective. It was applied to the determination of Ca in grape juice, different types of wines, and beverages with high alcoholic content, all of which are produced and widely consumed in Spain. The values obtained for Ca were 90.00 +/- 20.40 mg/L in the grape juices, 82.30 +/- 23.80 mg/L in the white wines, 85.00 +/- 30.25 mg/L in the sweet wines, 84.92 +/- 23.11 mg/L in the red wines, 85.75 +/- 27.65 mg/L in the rosé wines, 9.51 +/- 6.65 mg/L in the brandies, 11.53 +/- 6.55 mg/L in the gin, 7.3 +/- 6.32 mg/L in the pacharán, and 8.41 +/- 4.85 mg/L in the anisettes. The method is therefore useful for routine analysis in the

  14. Determination of total mercury in environmental and biological samples by flow injection cold vapour atomic absorption spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, James; Jones, Phil; Hill, Steve J.

    1996-12-01

    A simple and accurate method has been developed for the determination of total mercury in environmental and biological samples. The method utilises an off-line microwave digestion stage followed by analysis using a flow injection system with detection by cold vapour atomic absorption spectrometry. The method has been validated using two certified reference materials (DORM-1 dogfish and MESS-2 estuarine sediment) and the results agreed well with the certified values. A detection limit of 0.2 ng g -1 Hg was obtained and no significant interference was observed. The method was finally applied to the determination of mercury in river sediments and canned tuna fish, and gave results in the range 0.1-3.0 mg kg -1.

  15. Simultaneous preconcentration of cadmium and lead in water samples with silica gel and determination by flame atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Xu, Hongbo; Wu, Yun; Wang, Jian; Shang, Xuewei; Jiang, Xiaojun

    2013-12-01

    A new method that utilizes pretreated silica gel as an adsorbent has been developed for simultaneous preconcentration of trace Cd(II) and Pb(II) prior to the measurement by flame atomic absorption spectrometry. The effects of pH, the shaking time, the elution condition and the coexisting ions on the separation/preconcentration conditions of analytes were investigated. Under optimized conditions, the static adsorption capacity of Cd(II) and Pb(II) were 45.5 and 27.1mg/g, the relative standard deviations were 3.2% and 1.7% (for n = 11), and the limits of detection obtained were 4.25 and 0.60 ng/mL, respectively. The method was validated by analyzing the certified reference materials GBW 07304a (stream sediment) and successfully applied to the analysis of various treated wastewater samples with satisfactory results.

  16. Determination of bismuth in environmental samples by slurry sampling graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry using combined chemical modifiers.

    PubMed

    Dobrowolski, Ryszard; Dobrzyńska, Joanna; Gawrońska, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    Slurry sampling graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry technique was applied for the determination of Bi in environmental samples. The study focused on the effect of Zr, Ti, Nb and W carbides, as permanent modifiers, on the Bi signal. Because of its highest thermal and chemical stability and ability to substantially increase Bi signal, NbC was chosen as the most effective modifier. The temperature programme applied for Bi determination was optimized based on the pyrolysis and atomization curves obtained for slurries prepared from certified reference materials (CRMs) of the soil and sediments. To overcome interferences caused by sulfur compounds, Ba(NO₃)₂ was used as a chemical modifier. Calibration was performed using the aqueous standard solutions. The analysis of the CRMs confirmed the reliability of the proposed analytical method. The characteristic mass for Bi was determined to be 16 pg with the detection limit of 50 ng/g for the optimized procedure at the 5% (w/v) slurry concentration.

  17. Impact of the analytical blank in the uncertainty evaluation of the copper content in waters by flame atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Elcio Cruz; Monteiro, Maria Inês Couto; Pontes, Fernanda Veronesi Marinho; de Almeida, Marcelo Dominguez; Carneiro, Manuel Castro; da Silva, Lílian Irene Dias; Alcover Neto, Arnaldo

    2012-01-01

    Chemical analysts use analytical blanks in their analyses, but seldom is this source of uncertainty evaluated. Generally, there is great confusion. Although the numerical value of the blank, in some situations, can be negligible, its source of uncertainty cannot be. This article discusses the uncertainty contribution of the analytical blank using a numerical example of the copper content in waters by flame atomic absorption spectrometry. The results indicate that the uncertainties of the analytical blank can contribute up to 50% when the blank sample is considered in this analysis, confirming its high impact. This effect can be primarily observed where the analyte concentration approaches the lower range of the analytical curve. Even so, the blank is not always computed. Therefore, the relevance of the analytical blank can be confirmed by uncertainty evaluation.

  18. Simultaneous preconcentration of cadmium and lead in water samples with silica gel and determination by flame atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Xu, Hongbo; Wu, Yun; Wang, Jian; Shang, Xuewei; Jiang, Xiaojun

    2013-12-01

    A new method that utilizes pretreated silica gel as an adsorbent has been developed for simultaneous preconcentration of trace Cd(II) and Pb(II) prior to the measurement by flame atomic absorption spectrometry. The effects of pH, the shaking time, the elution condition and the coexisting ions on the separation/preconcentration conditions of analytes were investigated. Under optimized conditions, the static adsorption capacity of Cd(II) and Pb(II) were 45.5 and 27.1mg/g, the relative standard deviations were 3.2% and 1.7% (for n = 11), and the limits of detection obtained were 4.25 and 0.60 ng/mL, respectively. The method was validated by analyzing the certified reference materials GBW 07304a (stream sediment) and successfully applied to the analysis of various treated wastewater samples with satisfactory results. PMID:25078838

  19. Determination of boron in silicon-doped gallium arsenide by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry and ultraviolet-visible spectrophotometry.

    PubMed

    Taddia, Marco; Cerroni, Maria Grazia; Morelli, Elio; Musiani, Andrea

    2002-01-01

    Two methods have been developed for the determination of boron impurities in silicon-doped gallium arsenide (GaAs) for electronics. The first method employs the electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS), the second, the UV-Vis molecular absorption spectrophotomety. In both cases the GaAs sample is decomposed with aqua regia (1+1). To prevent Ga(III) interference on the ETAAS determination of boron, a double extraction of the chlorogallic acid (HGaCl4) in diethyl ether is performed. To improve the overall ETAAS performance, the graphite tubes were pre-treated with iridium(III) and tungsten(IV). A mixed chemical modifier containing Ni(II), Sr(II) and citric acid was also used. The characteristic mass (m0) is 301 +/- 47 pg and the detection limit (3sB) is 2.4 microg g(-1). The classic UV-Vis spectrophotometric procedure using curcumin was also extended to the determination of boron in GaAs. By masking Ga(III) with EDTA and a preliminary extraction of boron with 2-ethyl-hexane 1,3-diol, performed on a semi-micro scale, a detection limit of 0.6 microg g(-1) was achieved. Both methods were applied to the analysis of two Si-doped GaAs samples which were suspected of being boron-contaminated. Results are compared with those obtained by direct analysis of the decomposed sample solution using the inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES).

  20. Multielement plant tissue analysis using ICP spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Hansen, T H; de Bang, T C; Laursen, K H; Pedas, P; Husted, S; Schjoerring, J K

    2013-01-01

    Plant tissue analysis is a valuable tool for evaluating the nutritional status and quality of crops and is widely used for scientific and commercial purposes. The majority of plant analyzes are now performed by techniques based on ICP spectrometry such as inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectroscopy (ICP-OES) or ICP-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). These techniques enable fast and accurate measurements of multielement profiles when combined with appropriate methods for sample preparation and digestion. This chapter presents state-of-the-art methods for digestion of plant tissues and subsequent analysis of their multielement composition by ICP spectrometry. Details on upcoming techniques, expected to gain importance within the field of multielement plant tissue analysis over the coming years, are also provided. Finally, attention is given to laser ablation ICP-MS (LA-ICP-MS) for multielement bioimaging of plant tissues. The presentation of the methods covers instructions on all steps from sampling and sample preparation to data interpretation. PMID:23073880

  1. Slurry sampling techniques for the determination of lead in Bangladeshi fish samples by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry with a metal tube atomizer.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Mohammad Arifur; Kaneco, Satoshi; Suzuki, Tohru; Katsumata, Hideyuki; Ohta, Kiyohisa

    2005-05-01

    Ultrasonic slurry sampling electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry with a metal tube atomizer has been applied to the determination of lead in Bangladeshi fish samples. The slurry sampling conditions, such as slurry stabilizing agent, slurry concentration, pyrolysis temperature for the slurried fish samples, particle size and ultrasonic agitation time, were optimized for electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry with the Mo tube atomizer. Thiourea was used as the chemical modifier for the interference of matrix elements. The detection limit was 53 fg (3S/N). The determined amount of lead in Bangladeshi fish samples was consistent with those measured in the dissolved acid-digested samples. The advantages of the proposed methods are easy calibration, simplicity, low cost and rapid analysis.

  2. Noise-Immune Cavity-Enhanced Optical Heterodyne Molecular Spectrometry Modelling Under Saturated Absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dupré, Patrick

    2015-06-01

    The Noise-Immune Cavity-Enhanced Optical Heterodyne Molecular Spectrometry (NICE-OHMS) is a modern technique renowned for its ultimate sensitivity, because it combines long equivalent absorption length provided by a high finesse cavity, and a detection theoretically limited by the sole photon-shot-noise. One fallout of the high finesse is the possibility to accumulating strong intracavity electromagnetic fields (EMF). Under this condition, molecular transitions can be easy saturated giving rise to the usual Lamb dips (or hole burning). However, the unusual shape of the basically trichromatic EMF (due to the RF lateral sidebands) induces nonlinear couplings, i.e., new crossover transitions. An analytical methodology will be presented to calculate spectra provided by NICE-OHMS experiments. It is based on the solutions of the equations of motion of an open two-blocked-level system performed in the frequency-domain (optically thin medium). Knowing the transition dipole moment, the NICE-OHMS signals (``absorption-like'' and ``dispersion-like'') can be simulated by integration over the Doppler shifts and by paying attention to the molecular Zeeman sublevels and to the EMF polarization The approach has been validated by discussion experimental data obtained on two transitions of {C2H2} in the near-infrared under moderated saturation. One of the applications of the saturated absorption is to be able to simultaneously determine the transition intensity and the density number while only one these 2 quantities can only be assessed in nonlinear absorption. J. Opt. Soc. Am. B 32, 838 (2015) Optics Express 16, 14689 (2008)

  3. Micelle mediated extraction of magnesium from water samples with trizma-chloranilate and determination by flame atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Giokas, Dimosthenis L; Paleologos, Evangelos K; Veltsistas, Panayotis G; Karayannis, Miltiades I

    2002-03-01

    This article describes an analytical method for the determination of magnesium taking advantage of the cloud point phenomenon employing a suitable chelating agent (chloranilate) for Mg analysis. The method encompasses pre-concentration of the metal chelate followed by flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS) analysis. The chelating agent chosen for this task is a newly synthesised salt of chloranilic acid, trizma-chloranilate, which reacts with Mg but at the same time has a very low affinity for other metallic cations like silicon, aluminium and sodium, which interfere with the determination of Mg in FAAS. The condensed surfactant phase with the metal chelate(s) is introduced into the flame of an atomic absorption spectrometer after its treatment with an acidified methanolic solution. In this way, complex and time-consuming steps for sample treatment are avoided while increased sensitivity is achieved by the presence of both methanol and surfactant in the aspirated sample. The analytical curve was rectilinear in the range of 5-220 mugl(-1) and the limit of detection was as low as 0.75 mugl(-1) with a standard deviation of 5.2%. The method was applied for the determination of Mg in natural and mineral waters with satisfactory results and recoveries in the range of 97-102%. PMID:18968513

  4. Alpha particle analysis using PEARLS spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    McKlveen, J.W.; Klingler, G.W.; McDowell, W.J.; Case, G.N.

    1984-01-01

    Alpha particle assay by conventional plate-counting methods is difficult because chemical separation, tracer techniques, and/or self-absorption losses in the final sample may cause either non-reproducible results or create unacceptable errors. PEARLS (Photon-Electron Rejecting Alpha Liquid Scintillation) Spectrometry is an attractive alternative since radionuclides may be extracted into a scintillator in which there would be no self-absorption or geometry problems and in which up to 100% chemical recovery and counting efficiency is possible. Sample preparation may include extraction of the alpha emitter of interest by a specific organic-phase-soluble compound directly into the liquid scintillator. Detection electronics use energy and pulse-shape discrimination to provide discrete alpha spectra and virtual absence of beta and gamma backgrounds. Backgrounds on the order of 0.01 cpm are readily achievable. Accuracy and reproducibility are typically in the 100 +-1% range. Specific procedures have been developed for gross alpha, uranium, plutonium, thorium, and polonium assay. This paper will review liquid scintillation alpha counting methods and reference some of the specific applications. 8 refs., 1 fig.

  5. Determination of magnesium in alumina ceramics by atomic absorption spectrometry after separation by cation exchange chromatography

    SciTech Connect

    van der Walt, T.N.; Strelow, F.W.E.

    1985-12-01

    A method is presented for the determination of traces of magnesium in alumina ceramics. After dissolution in an orthophosphoric acid-sulfuric acid mixture the magnesium is separated from the large excess of aluminum by cation exchange chromatography, using a 4% cross-linked resin and 0.50 M oxalic acid as eluting agent. Magnesium is finally determined by atomic absorption spectrometry using an acetylene-nitrous oxide flame. By use of Suprapur reagents and beakers made of Teflon, contamination can be reduced to ca. 2..mu..g with a variation between multiple blank runs of ca. 0.4 ..mu..g. About 3 ppm of magnesium in 1-g samples can be determined with approximately the same variation while larger amounts of magnesium (200-300 ppm in the alumina ceramics) show a variation of only +/- 1 ppm. 12 references, 1 table.

  6. The direct determination of HgS by thermal desorption coupled with atomic absorption spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coufalík, Pavel; Zvěřina, Ondřej; Komárek, Josef

    2016-04-01

    This research was aimed at the direct determination of HgS in environmental samples by means of thermal desorption coupled with atomic absorption spectrometry. Operating parameters of the apparatus used for thermal desorption (including a prototype desorption unit) are described in this work, as well as the procedure for measuring mercury release curves together with an evaluation of the analytical signal including two methods of peak integration. The results of thermal desorption were compared with HgS contents obtained by sequential extraction. The limits of quantification of the proposed method for the selective determination of the black and red forms of HgS were 4 μg kg- 1 and 5 μg kg- 1, respectively. The limit of quantification of red HgS in soils was 35 μg kg- 1. The developed analytical procedure was applied to soil and sediment samples from historical mining areas.

  7. Expressing self-absorption in the analytical function of inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kántor, Tibor; Bartha, András

    2015-11-01

    The self-absorption of spectral lines was studied with up to date multi-element inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES) instrumentation using radial and axial viewing of the plasma, as well, performing line peak height and line peak area measurements. Two resonance atomic and ionic lines of Cd and Mg were studied, the concentration range was extended up to 2000 mg/L. At the varying analyte concentration, constant matrix concentration of 10,000 mg/L Ca was ensured in the pneumatically nebulized solutions. The physical and the phenomenological formulation of the emission analytical function is overviewed and as the continuity of the earlier results the following equation is offered:

  8. Cloud point preconcentration of germanium and determination by hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Böyükbayram, A. Elif; Volkan, Mürvet

    2000-07-01

    Cloud point methodology has been successfully employed for the preconcentration of germanium at trace levels from aqueous samples prior to hydride generation flame atomic absorption spectrometry (HGAAS). Germanium was taken into complex with quercetin in aqueous non-ionic surfactant (Triton X-114) medium and concentrated in the surfactant rich phase by bringing the solution to the cloud point temperature (19°C). The preconcentration of only 50 ml of solution with 0.1% Triton X-114 and 2×10 -5 M quercetin at pH 6.4 gives a preconcentration factor of 200. Under these conditions, the detection limit (3 s) and the sensitivity of the cloud-point extraction-HGAAS system were 0.59 and 0.0620 μg l -1, respectively. The extraction efficiency was investigated at low germanium concentrations (10-30 μg l -1) and satisfactory recoveries (93-105%) were obtained.

  9. Mercury speciation in hair by headspace injection-gas chromatography-atomic fluorescence spectrometry (methylmercury) and combustion-atomic absorption spectrometry (total Hg).

    PubMed

    Gao, Y; De Galan, S; De Brauwere, A; Baeyens, W; Leermakers, M

    2010-10-15

    The speciation of Hg in human hair was carried out with combustion-atomic absorption spectrometry for total Hg (THg) and headspace-gas chromatography-atomic fluorescence spectrometry (HS-GC-AFS) for methylmercury (MMHg). The determination of total Hg in hair was carried out with the AMA analyzer (Advanced Mercury Analyser 254). Accuracy and reproducibility were assessed on a Certified Reference hair sample (IAEA-086 CRM), yielding, respectively, a recovery of 97.5% and a RSD of 3.2%. Analyses of 10 blank measurements resulted in a detection limit of 1.5 ng g(-1) of THg for a 20mg sample of human hair. MMHg concentrations in hair were assessed with HS-GC-AFS in a single analysis step. Either acid or alkaline extraction can be applied because they yielded very similar results on a IAEA-086 CRM: we observed a recovery of 103% and a RSD of 7% with acid extraction and a recovery of 110% and a RSD of 9% with alkaline extraction. Optimization of the headspace vial, injection and GC parameters is described. The detection limit of the MMHg determination in human hair, which amounts to 0.04 ng g(-1) for a 20mg sample, is far below the concentrations observed in natural samples. The number of samples that can be analyzed per hour, respectively, amounts to 8 for THg and 4 for MMHg. Finally, Hg speciation in natural human hair samples was carried out by combining both AMA and HS-GC-AFS analysis methods. THg levels were at the μg g(-1), level, with an average MMHg fraction of about 70%.

  10. An automated microtechnique for selenium determination in human body fluids by flow injection hydride atomic absorption spectrometry (FI-HAAS).

    PubMed

    Negretti de Brätter, V E; Brätter, P; Tomiak, A

    1990-03-01

    The automation of a flow injection system for the hydride generation of selenium and its subsequent determination by atomic absorption spectrometry (FI-HAAS) is described. Pre-treatment of the sample and the details of the automated equipment are reviewed. For the FI-HAAS selenium analysis a volume of 350 microL of acid-digested sample solution is injected. The on-line generated hydride is delivery by the gas-liquid separator and is transported together with an Ar stream to the heated quartz cell for the atomic absorption determination. The absolute detection limit is 35 pg Se; the relative detection limit 0.10 micrograms/L Se. The absolute determination limit in real biological samples is 110 pg Se; the relative detection limit 0.31 micrograms/L Se. The accuracy of the method was evaluated via analysis of certified standard reference materials. Quality control was made by comparing FI-HAAS and instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA), as an independent analytical method. Two acid-digestion procedures (in open vessels at atmospheric pressure and bomb-digestion in pressure vessels) were experimentally tested. To determine the effectiveness of the selenium reduction and the completeness of the selenium hydride formation a parallel selenium determination was carried out by means of ICP-AES and FI-HAAS analysis. FI-HAAS was applied for blood serum analysis of children undergoing long-term total parenteral nutrition, as well as of persons with high dietary selenium intake, and for human milk analysis. PMID:2135957

  11. Antibiotic Toxicity and Absorption in Zebrafish Using Liquid Chromatography-Tandem Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Fan; Qin, Wei; Zhang, Jing-Pu; Hu, Chang-Qin

    2015-01-01

    Evaluation of drug toxicity is necessary for drug safety, but in vivo drug absorption is varied; therefore, a rapid, sensitive and reliable method for measuring drugs is needed. Zebrafish are acceptable drug toxicity screening models; we used these animals with a liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) method in a multiple reaction monitoring mode to quantify drug uptake in zebrafish to better estimate drug toxicity. Analytes were recovered from zebrafish homogenate by collecting supernatant. Measurements were confirmed for drugs in the range of 10–1,000 ng/mL. Four antibiotics with different polarities were tested to explore any correlation of drug polarity, absorption, and toxicity. Zebrafish at 3 days post-fertilization (dpf) absorbed more drug than those at 6 h post-fertilization (hpf), and different developmental periods appeared to be differentially sensitive to the same compound. By observing abnormal embryos and LD50 values, zebrafish embryos at 6 hpf were considered to be suitable for evaluating embryotoxicity. Also, larvae at 3 dpf were adapted to measure acute drug toxicity in adult mammals. Thus, we can exploit zebrafish to study drug toxicity and can reliably quantify drug uptake with LC-MS/MS. This approach will be helpful for future studies of toxicology in zebrafish. PMID:25938774

  12. Automatic determination of nickel in foods by flame atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Yebra, M C; Cancela, S; Cespón, R M

    2008-05-15

    A new sensitive and low cost flow injection method that combines acid extraction, preconcentration and flame atomic absorption spectrometric determination of nickel in food samples at μg/g levels is described. The dynamic acid extraction step was carried out by using a continuous ultrasound-assisted extraction system. The acid extract was preconcentrated on-line on a minicolumn packed with a chelating resin (Serdolit Che, with iminodiacetic groups) and nickel was eluted with diluted hydrochloric acid, being continuously monitored by flame atomic absorption spectrometry. An experimental design (Plackett-Burman 2(6)×3/16) is used to optimise the methodology proposed. The method allowed a total sampling frequency of 13-28 samples per hour. Good precision of the whole procedure (1.9-3.6% expressed as relative standard deviation) and a detection limit of 0.12μg/g, for 60mg of sample were achieved. The method was successfully applied to the determination of trace amounts of nickel in food samples.

  13. Determination of ytterbium in animal faeces by tungsten coil electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Lima, E C; Krug, F J; Nóbrega, J A; Nogueira, A R

    1998-11-01

    A method for ytterbium determination in animal faeces by tungsten coil electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (TCAAS) was developed. Faeces were dry-ashed in a muffle furnace, the ashes were treated with hydrochloric acid, and 10 mul of sample solution were delivered into 150-W tungsten coil atomizer. A matrix-matching procedure employing a 66-s heating program proved to be efficient for obtaining accurate results. Characteristic mass and detection limit were 7.1 pg and 0.35 mug g(-1) Yb, respectively. The tungsten coil atomizer lifetime exceeded 300 firings with digested solutions and R.S.D. of measurements was 1.9% after ten consecutive injections of 10.0 mug l(-1) Yb. Accuracy of the proposed method was assessed by employing a graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometric procedure. Application of the paired t-test did not reveal any significant difference for ytterbium contents determined by both methods at 95% confidence level. It was demonstrated that the proposed procedure can successfully be used for evaluation of kinetic passage rate of feed through digestive tract of animals. PMID:18967363

  14. A highly sensitive method for the determination of mercury using vapor generation gold wire microextraction and electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashemi, Payman; Rahimi, Akram

    2007-04-01

    The study introduces a new simple and highly sensitive method for headspace solid phase microextraction (HS-SPME) coupled with electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometric determination of mercury. In the proposed method, a gold wire, mounted in the headspace of a sample solution in a sealed bottle, is used for collection of mercury vapor generated by addition of sodium tetrahydroborate. The gold wire is then simply inserted in the sample introduction hole of a graphite furnace of an electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry instrument. By applying an atomization temperature of 600 °C, mercury is rapidly desorbed from the wire and determined with high sensitivity. Factorial design and response surface analysis methods were used for optimization of the effect of five different variables in order to maximize the mercury signal. By using a 0.75 mm diameter gold wire, a sample volume of about 8 ml and an extraction time of 11 min, the sensitivity of mercury determination was enhanced up to 10 4 times in comparison to its ordinary ETAAS determination with direct injection of 10 μl sample solutions. A detection limit of 0.006 ng ml - 1 and a precision better than 4.6% (relative standard deviation) were obtained. The method was successfully applied to the determination of mercury in industrial wastewaters and tuna fish samples.

  15. Thermal lens spectrometry in biochemical analysis.

    PubMed

    Martín-Biosca, Y; García-Alvarez-Coque, M C; Ramis-Ramos, G

    1994-07-01

    The photothermal spectroscopic techniques, with special emphasis on the thermal lens spectrometry (TLS), are introduced to the non-specialist in laser spectroscopy. The following topics are treated on an elementary basis: fundamentals and analytical characteristics, instrumentation, selectivity and multi-wavelength capability, the models describing the signal-concentration relationship, the sensitivity, background noise and limits of detection, the influence of light scattering and flow. Applications related to the fields of clinical and biochemical analysis and organic pollution are given. The thermal lens circular dichroism and the infrared TLS are also briefly outlined.

  16. Spectrometric analysis of process etching solutions of the photovoltaic industry--determination of HNO3, HF, and H2SiF6 using high-resolution continuum source absorption spectrometry of diatomic molecules and atoms.

    PubMed

    Bücker, Stefan; Acker, Jörg

    2012-05-30

    The surface of raw multicrystalline silicon wafers is treated with HF-HNO(3) mixtures in order to remove the saw damage and to obtain a well-like structured surface of low reflectivity, the so-called texture. The industrial production of solar cells requires a consistent level of texturization for tens of thousands of wafers. Therefore, knowing the actual composition of the etch bath is a key element in process control in order to maintain a certain etch rate through replenishment of the consumed acids. The present paper describes a novel approach to quantify nitric acid (HNO(3)), hydrofluoric acid (HF), and hexafluosilicic acid (H(2)SiF(6)) using a high-resolution continuum source graphite furnace absorption spectrometer. The concentrations of Si (via Si atom absorption at the wavelength 251.611 nm, m(0),(Si)=130 pg), of nitrate (via molecular absorption of NO at the wavelength 214.803 nm, [Formula: see text] ), and of total fluoride (via molecular absorption of AlF at the wavelength 227.46 nm, m(0,F)=13 pg) were measured against aqueous standard solutions. The concentrations of H(2)SiF(6) and HNO(3) are directly obtained from the measurements. The HF concentration is calculated from the difference between the total fluoride content, and the amount of fluoride bound as H(2)SiF(6). H(2)SiF(6) and HNO(3) can be determined with a relative uncertainty of less than 5% and recoveries of 97-103% and 96-105%, respectively. With regards to HF, acceptable results in terms of recovery and uncertainty are obtained for HF concentrations that are typical for the photovoltaic industry. The presented procedure has the unique advantage that the concentration of both, acids and metal impurities in etch solutions, can be routinely determined by a single analytical instrument. PMID:22608457

  17. Arsenic in marine tissues — The challenging problems to electrothermal and hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karadjova, Irina B.; Petrov, Panayot K.; Serafimovski, Ivan; Stafilov, Trajče; Tsalev, Dimiter L.

    2007-03-01

    Analytical problems in determination of arsenic in marine tissues are addressed. Procedures for the determination of total As in solubilized or extracted tissues with tetramethylammonium hydroxide and methanol have been elaborated. Several typical lyophilized tissues were used: NIST SRM 1566a 'Oyster Tissue', BCR-60 CRM 'Trace Elements in an Aquatic Plant ( Lagarosiphon major)', BCR-627 'Forms of As in Tuna Fish Tissue', IAEA-140/TM 'Sea Plant Homogenate', NRCC DOLT-1 'Dogfish Liver' and two representatives of the Black Sea biota, Mediterranean mussel ( Mytilus galloprovincialis) and Brown algae ( Cystoseira barbata). Tissues (nominal 0.3 g) were extracted in tetramethylammonium hydroxide (TMAH) 1 ml of 25% m/v TMAH and 2 ml of water) or 5 ml of aqueous 80% v/v methanol (MeOH) in closed vessels in a microwave oven at 50 °C for 30 min. Arsenic in solubilized or extracted tissues was determined by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS) after appropriate dilution (nominally to 25 ml, with further dilution as required) under optimal instrumental parameters (pyrolysis temperature 900 °C and atomization temperature 2100 °C) with 1.5 μg Pd as modifier on Zr-Ir treated platform. Platforms have been pre-treated with 2.7 μmol of zirconium and then with 0.10 μmol of iridium which served as a permanent chemical modifier in direct ETAAS measurements and as an efficient hydride sequestration medium in flow injection hydride generation (FI-HG)-ETAAS. TMAH and methanol extract 96-108% and 51-100% of As from CRMs. Various calibration approaches have been considered and critically evaluated. The effect of species-dependent slope of calibration graph or standard additions plot for total As determination in a sample comprising of several individual As species with different ETAAS behavior has been considered as a kind of 'intrinsic element speciation interference' that cannot be completely overcome by standard additions technique. Calibration by means of CRMs has

  18. Quantitative mass spectrometry methods for pharmaceutical analysis.

    PubMed

    Loos, Glenn; Van Schepdael, Ann; Cabooter, Deirdre

    2016-10-28

    Quantitative pharmaceutical analysis is nowadays frequently executed using mass spectrometry. Electrospray ionization coupled to a (hybrid) triple quadrupole mass spectrometer is generally used in combination with solid-phase extraction and liquid chromatography. Furthermore, isotopically labelled standards are often used to correct for ion suppression. The challenges in producing sensitive but reliable quantitative data depend on the instrumentation, sample preparation and hyphenated techniques. In this contribution, different approaches to enhance the ionization efficiencies using modified source geometries and improved ion guidance are provided. Furthermore, possibilities to minimize, assess and correct for matrix interferences caused by co-eluting substances are described. With the focus on pharmaceuticals in the environment and bioanalysis, different separation techniques, trends in liquid chromatography and sample preparation methods to minimize matrix effects and increase sensitivity are discussed. Although highly sensitive methods are generally aimed for to provide automated multi-residue analysis, (less sensitive) miniaturized set-ups have a great potential due to their ability for in-field usage.This article is part of the themed issue 'Quantitative mass spectrometry'.

  19. [Determination of nine mineral elements in hulless barley by ultraviolet spectrophotometry and flame atomic absorption spectrometry].

    PubMed

    Liu, Jin; Zhang, Huai-Gang

    2010-04-01

    The contents of nine mineral elements, including sulphur, zinc, calcium, magnesium, potassium, sodium, iron, copper and manganese in five hulless barley (Hordeum vulgare L. var. nudum Hook. f.) lines were determined by ultraviolet spectrophotometry and flames atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS). For the determination of sulphur, the samples were dissolved by magnesia and anhydrous sodium carbonate at 250 degrees C for 0. 5 h and at 550 degrees C for 3 h in the muffle furnace, and then a certain amount of barium chloride was put into the sample solution for colorimetry of the UV-Vs spectrophotometer. For the determination of other eight mineral elements, all of the samples were dissolved by a kind of incinerating method: first, the sample was put into the muffle furnace at 250 degrees C for 0. 5 h and at 550 degrees C for 2.5 h, then two droplets of 50%HNO3 were distributed into each sample, and the last step was putting the sample into the muffle furnace at 550 degrees C for 0.5 h. And then all of the ash was dissolved by 50%HNO3 to 50 milliliter and determined by flames atomic absorption spectrometry. The precision, accuracy, repeatability and stability of the method were discussed too. The results showed that the relative standard deviations (RSD) were between 1.2% and 3.7%; The average recoveries were 97.44%-101.52% and the relative standard deviations (RSD) of sample determination were 1.3%-3.8%. The repeatability experiment showed that the relative standard deviations (RSD) were 2.6%-6.1%. And the content of each mineral element was the same after 24 hours; All these showed that the method has a good precision, accuracy, repeatability and stability. In all the hulless barley samples, the average contents were in the order of K > S > Mg > Ca > Fe > Na > Zn > Mn > Cu, and the contents of zinc, iron and manganese closely related to people's health were relatively higher than other crops. The data of the experiment could provide an accurate and credible evidence

  20. Determination of mercury in gasoline by cold vapor atomic absorption spectrometry with direct reduction in microemulsion media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandão, Geisamanda Pedrini; de Campos, Reinaldo Calixto; Luna, Aderval Severino

    2005-06-01

    The determination of Hg in gasoline by cold vapor atomic absorption spectrometry, after direct aqueous NaBH 4 reduction in a three-component (microemulsion) medium, was investigated. Microemulsions were prepared by mixing gasoline with propan-1-ol and 50% v / v HNO 3 at a 20 : 15 : 1 volume ratio. A long-term homogeneous system was immediately formed this way. After reduction, the Hg vapor generated in a reaction flask was transported to an intermediate K 2Cr 2O 7/H 2SO 4 trap solution in order to avoid poisoning of the Au-Pt trap by the gasoline vapors. A second reduction step was then conducted and the generated Hg vapor transported to the Au-Pt trap, followed by thermal release of Hg 0 and atomic absorption measurement. Purified N 2 was used as purge and transport gas. After multivariate optimization by central composite design calibration graphs showed coefficients of correlation of 0.9999 and a characteristic mass of 2 ng was obtained. Typical coefficients of variation of 5% and 6% were found for ten consecutive measurements at concentration levels of 1 and 8 μg L -1 of Hg 2+, respectively. The limit of detection was 0.10 μg L -1 (0.14 μg kg -1) in the original sample. A total measurement cycle took 11 min, permitting duplicate analysis of 3 samples per hour. The results obtained with the proposed procedure in the analysis of commercial gasoline samples were in agreement with those obtained by a comparative procedure. Gasoline samples of the Rio de Janeiro city have shown Hg concentrations below 0.27 μg L -1.

  1. Investigation on binding of nitric oxide to horseradish peroxidase by absorption spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiang, Li; Zhu, Shuhua; Ma, Hongmei; Zhou, Jie

    2010-01-01

    Binding of nitric oxide to horseradish peroxidase (HRP) has been investigated by absorption spectrometry in 0.2 M anaerobic phosphate buffer solution (pH 7.4). Based on this binding equilibrium, a model equation for evaluating the binding constant of nitric oxide to HRP is developed and the binding constant is calculated to be (1.55 ± 0.06) × 10 4 M -1, indicating that HRP can form a stable complex with nitric oxide. The type of inhibition by nitric oxide is validated on the basis of studying initial reaction rates of HRP-catalyzed oxidation of guaiacol in the presence of hydrogen peroxide and nitric oxide. The inhibition mechanism is found to follow an apparent non-competitive inhibition by Lineweaver-Burk method. Based on this kinetic mechanism, the binding constant is also calculated to be (5.22 ± 0.06) × 10 4 M -1. The values of the binding constant determined by the two methods are almost identical. The non-competitive inhibition model is also applicable to studying the effect of nitric oxide on other metalloenzymes, which catalyze the two-substrate reaction with the "ping-pong" mechanism.

  2. Determination of rhodium: Since the origins until today Atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Bosch Ojeda, C; Sánchez Rojas, F

    2006-02-28

    Rhodium is present at about 0.001ppm in the earths crust. Rhodium metal is known for its stability in corrosive environments, physical beauty and unique physical and chemical properties. Recent interest in the medical and industrial significance of platinum and to a lesser extent palladium and rhodium has been accompanied by an increasing interest in their determination at low levels. Platinum group elements (PGEs: Pt, Pd, Rh, Ru, Ir and Os) play a decisive role in the performance of catalytic converters, world-wide applied in vehicles and in some household utensils, to reduce the emission of gaseous pollutants, such as carbon monoxide, nitrogen oxides and hydrocarbons. Since then, approximately 73% of the world production of rhodium is consumed in the production of autocatalyst. However, the hot exhaust gases flowing through the converter cause abrasion of these units, leading to the emission of these elements to the environment. The concentration level of rhodium (also platinum and palladium) is still very low in the nature; accordingly, their determination in environmental samples specially appears to be a challenging task for analytical chemists. In recent years, the development of analytical methods for the determination of rhodium has increased. The aim of the present review is to evaluate the utility of atomic absorption spectrometry, applied for the quantification of rhodium in different materials, such as environmental, biological, metallurgical and geological samples. PMID:18970480

  3. Evaluation of metal contents of household detergent samples from Turkey by flame atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Soylak, Mustafa; Unsal, Yunus Emre; Tuzen, Mustafa

    2013-11-01

    The concentrations of cadmium, copper, chromium, cobalt, iron, lead, manganese, nickel, and zinc in detergent samples from Kayseri, Turkey were determined by flame atomic absorption spectrometry. HClO₄ (10 mL)/HNO₃ (10 mL) mixture was used for the digestion of household detergent samples. The correctness of the analytical procedures was checked with standard addition-recovery tests in different detergent samples for the investigated metal ions. The concentration ranges of the elements in the detergent samples were found as 17.2-60.1, 11.1-40.1, 2.5-32.3, 8.1-10.5, 7.2-21.6, 9.8-17.9, 1.7-3.8, 12.5-22.5, and 2.0-5.8 μg/g for iron, manganese, zinc, copper, lead, cobalt, cadmium, nickel, and chromium, respectively. The values found in this work were compared with some other studies around the world conducted on detergent samples. PMID:23722641

  4. Organic solvents as interferents in arsenic determination by hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometry with flame atomization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karadjova, Irina B.; Lampugnani, Leonardo; Dědina, Jiri; D'Ulivo, Alessandro; Onor, Massimo; Tsalev, Dimiter L.

    2006-05-01

    Interference effects of various organic solvents miscible with water on arsenic determination by hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometry have been studied. Arsine was chemically generated in continuous flow hydride generation system and atomized by using a flame atomizer able to operate in two modes: miniature diffusion flame and flame-in-flame. The effects of experimental variables and atomization mode were investigated: tetrahydroborate and hydrochloric acid concentrations, argon, hydrogen and oxygen supply rates for the microflame, and the distance from the atomization region to the observation zone. The nature of the species formed in the flame due to the pyrolysis of organic solvent vapors entering the flame volume together with arsine is discussed. The observed signal depression in the presence of organic solvents has been mainly attributed to the atomization interference due to heterogeneous gas-solid reaction between the free arsenic atoms and finely dispersed carbon particles formed by carbon radicals recombination. The best tolerance to interferences was obtained by using flame-in-flame atomization (5-10 ml min - 1 of oxygen flow rate), together with higher argon and hydrogen supply rates and elevated observation heights.

  5. Methylmercury determination in biological samples using electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry after acid leaching extraction.

    PubMed

    Saber-Tehrani, Mohammad; Hashemi-Moghaddam, Hamid; Givianrad, Mohammad Hadi; Abroomand-Azar, Parviz

    2006-11-01

    An efficient and sensitive method for the determination of methylmercury in biological samples was developed based on acid leaching extraction of methylmercury into toluene. Methylmercury in the organic phase was determined by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS). The methylmercury signal was enhanced and the reproducibility increased by formation of certain complexes and addition of Pd-DDC modifier. The complex of methylmercury with DDC produced the optimum analytical signal in terms of sensitivity and reproducibility compared to complexes with dithizone, cysteine, 1,10-phenanthroline, and diethyldithiocarbamate. Method performance was optimized by modifying parameters such as temperature of mineralization, atomization, and gas flow rate. The limit of detection for methylmercury determination was 0.015 mug g(-1) and the RSD of the whole procedure was 12% for human teeth samples (n=5) and 15.8% for hair samples (n=5). The method's accuracy was investigated by using NIES-13 and by spiking the samples with different amounts of methylmercury. The results were in good agreement with the certified values and the recoveries were 88-95%. PMID:16896613

  6. Determination of arsenic in a nickel alloy by flow injection hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanna, C. P.; Tyson, J. F.; Offley, S. G.

    1992-08-01

    The development of a method for the direct determination of trace arsenic quantities in nickel alloy digests, by flow injection hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometry, is described. An optimization study of the manifold and chemical parameters produced system performance, in terms of tolerance of the nickel matrix and sensitivity, such that matrix removal and pre-reduction of As(V) to As (III) prior to arsine generation were eliminated. Full recovery of the As(V) signal from a solution containing 5 ng ml -1 in the presence of 60 μg ml -1 nickel was obtained. Validation of the method was achieved by analyzing a British Chemical Standard (BCS) Certified Reference Material (CRM) #346 IN nickel alloy containing arsenic at a concentration of 50 μg g -1. Following dissolution in nitric and hydrofluoric acids by a microwave assisted procedure, the only subsequent preparation required was dilution by the appropriate factor. Up to 60 injections h -1 may be made, with a detection limit of 0.5 ng ml -1 arsenic (250 pg absolute) as As(V) in a 500 μl sample. The peak height characteristic concentration is 0.46 ng ml -1, with a relative standard deviation of 3.5% for a 10 ng ml -1 As(V) standard ( n = 6).

  7. Determination of silicon in serum and urine by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Zhuo-er

    1995-09-01

    A sensitive, simple and accurate method for the routine determination of trace silicon in serum and urine by Zeeman electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry is described. The samples are directly determined after 20-fold dilution of serum and 100-fold dilution of urine. No L'vov platform is used. The signal enhancement of silicon atomization in pyrolytic graphite coated graphite tubes is achieved by using a mixture of calcium chloride and lanthanum nitrate as chemical modifier. The interferences arising from the biological matrices have been eliminated by the addition of ammonium dihydrogenphosphate in the sample solutions. The aqueous calibration curve is linear to at least 300 μg l -1, the characteristic mass is 37 pg (integrated absorbance signal), whereas the detection limit (3SD) is 1.5 μg l -1 for silicon in both diluted serum and urine samples. The recoveries of silicon added to the diluted samples are 101 ± 1.8% for sera and 98.2 ± 3.5% for the urine specimens, independent of the dilution ratio. The silicon measurement results for the serum and urine from healthy adults and for the serum from the patients with chronic renal failure on hemodialysis are presented.

  8. Determination of copper levels in serum of healthy subjects by atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Terrés-Martos, C; Navarro-Alarcón, M; Martín-Lagos, F; López-G de la Serrana, H; López-Martínez, M C

    1997-05-01

    Copper levels in serum samples of 84 healthy subjects living in southeastern Spain were determined using the flame atomic absorption spectrometry technique. Mineralization of samples was carried out with an HNO3/HClO4 (4:1) mixture in a thermostated mineralization block. The accuracy of the method was tested by using a standard reference material. A mean recovery percentage of 104.70% was obtained. The relative standard deviation (R.S.D.) as a measurement of the precision of the method was lower than 5% in the concentration range considered. Mean copper concentrations were 1.092 +/- 0.365 mg/l (with the range 0.304-2.000 mg/l) and 1.113 +/- 0.253 mg/l (corresponding to an interval of 0.648-1.760 mg/l) for women and men, respectively. There are no significant differences between the copper levels in serum according to either sex or geography zone (P > 0.05). For example, there were no differences of copper levels in serum of subjects from coastal and mountainous zones. Estimated daily dietary intakes on copper in women and men were 1.38 and 2.10 mg Cu/day respectively.

  9. Acid effects on the measurement of mercury by cold vapor atomic absorption spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Adeloju, S.B.; Mann, T.F.

    1987-07-01

    The influence of nitric, hydrochloric and sulfuric acids on the measurement of mercury by cold vapor atomic absorption spectrometry has been investigated. Small pre-reduction peaks associated with the instability of mercury were observed in solutions containing less than or equal to 12.5, < 2 and less than or equal to 12.5% v/v of each acid, respectively. Mercury was found to be most stable in greater than or equal to 2% v/v hydrochloric acid and the measured absorbance was not greatly influenced by varying concentration of the acid. The mercury absorbance measurements were more sensitive in solutions containing less than or equal to 6.3% v/v hydrochloric acid than in similar concentrations of nitric and sulfuric acids. The use of the three acids as a digestion mixture result in serious interference from nitrogen oxides. The interference was removed by use of expelling agents such as urea and sulfamic acid or overcome by use of excess stannous chloride, prior to the reduction of mercury(II) ions. The determination of mercury in NBS albacore tuna using both of these approaches to overcome the interference problem proved to be successful.

  10. Determination of mercury distribution inside spent compact fluorescent lamps by atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Rey-Raap, Natalia; Gallardo, Antonio

    2012-05-01

    In this study, spent compact fluorescent lamps were characterized to determine the distribution of mercury. The procedure used in this research allowed mercury to be extracted in the vapor phase, from the phosphor powder, and the glass matrix. Mercury concentration in the three phases was determined by the method known as cold vapor atomic absorption spectrometry. Median values obtained in the study showed that a compact fluorescent lamp contained 24.52±0.4ppb of mercury in the vapor phase, 204.16±8.9ppb of mercury in the phosphor powder, and 18.74±0.5ppb of mercury in the glass matrix. There are differences in mercury concentration between the lamps since the year of manufacture or the hours of operation affect both mercury content and its distribution. The 85.76% of the mercury introduced into a compact fluorescent lamp becomes a component of the phosphor powder, while more than 13.66% is diffused through the glass matrix. By washing and eliminating all phosphor powder attached to the glass surface it is possible to classified the glass as a non-hazardous waste.

  11. Stabilizing agents for calibration in the determination of mercury using solid sampling electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Zelinková, Hana; Červenka, Rostislav; Komárek, Josef

    2012-01-01

    Tetramethylene dithiocarbamate (TMDTC), diethyldithiocarbamate (DEDTC), and thiourea were investigated as stabilizing agents for calibration purposes in the determination of mercury using solid sampling electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (SS-ETAAS). These agents were used for complexation of mercury in calibration solutions and its thermal stabilization in a solid sampling platform. The calibration solutions had the form of methyl isobutyl ketone (MIBK) extracts or MIBK-methanol solutions with the TMDTC and DEDTC chelates and aqueous solutions with thiourea complexes. The best results were obtained for MIBK-methanol solutions in the presence of 2.5 g L(-1) TMDTC. The surface of graphite platforms for solid sampling was modified with palladium or rhenium by using electrodeposition from a drop of solutions. The Re modifier is preferable due to a higher lifetime of platform coating. A new SS-ETAAS procedure using the direct sampling of solid samples into a platform with an Re modified graphite surface and the calibration against MIBK-methanol solutions in the presence of TMDTC is proposed for the determination of mercury content in solid environmental samples, such as soil and plants.

  12. Use of atomic absorption spectrometry in assessment of biomonitor plants for lead, cadmium and copper pollution.

    PubMed

    Gokce, Kaya; Mehmet, Yaman

    2012-01-01

    Eleven plant species were collected from the vicinity of lead-battery plant in the city of Gaziantep, Turkey. Lead, cadmium and copper concentrations in the soil and leaves of plants were determined by atomic absorption spectrometry. Lead, Cd and Cu concentrations in the soil samples taken from battery area were found to be in the ranges of 304-602, 0.4-0.44 and 31-37 mg x kg(-1), respectively. Significantly increased lead concentration up to 2 750 mg x kg(-1) was found in the leaves of Eleagnus angustifolia L. plant. The lead concentrations in the other plant leaves taken from 50 m around battery factory followed the order Ailanthus altissima > Morus sp. > Juglans regia L. > Ficus carica L. > Cydonia oblonga Miller > Prunus x domestica L. The plants, Populus nigra L. , Eleagnus angustifolia L. and Salix sp. were found useful for Cd, and the plant, Eleagnus angusti folia L. for Pb, to be considered as potential biomonitor. Especially, leaves of trees and plants taken from the distance of 50 m from battery plant have relatively higher Pb concentrations. Therefore, people who and animals which live in this area and benefit from these soil and plants have vital risks.

  13. Crux: rapid open source protein tandem mass spectrometry analysis.

    PubMed

    McIlwain, Sean; Tamura, Kaipo; Kertesz-Farkas, Attila; Grant, Charles E; Diament, Benjamin; Frewen, Barbara; Howbert, J Jeffry; Hoopmann, Michael R; Käll, Lukas; Eng, Jimmy K; MacCoss, Michael J; Noble, William Stafford

    2014-10-01

    Efficiently and accurately analyzing big protein tandem mass spectrometry data sets requires robust software that incorporates state-of-the-art computational, machine learning, and statistical methods. The Crux mass spectrometry analysis software toolkit ( http://cruxtoolkit.sourceforge.net ) is an open source project that aims to provide users with a cross-platform suite of analysis tools for interpreting protein mass spectrometry data. PMID:25182276

  14. Cloud point extraction and flame atomic absorption spectrometry determination of lead (II) in environmental and food samples.

    PubMed

    Soylak, Mustafa; Yilmaz, Erkan; Ghaedi, Mehrorang; Montazerozohori, Mortaza; Sheibani, Marjan

    2012-01-01

    A cloud point extraction procedure for the preconcentration of Pb2+ in various samples following complexation with 2,2'-(1E,1'E)-1,1'-(2,2'-azanediylbis(ethane-2,1-diyl)bis(azan-1-yl-1-ylidene)) bis(ethan-1-yl-1-ylidene)diphenol in Triton X-114 after centrifugation is reported. A 0.5 mL portion of methanol acidified with 1.0 M HNO3 was added to the surfactant-rich phase prior to analysis by flame atomic absorption spectrometry. The influence of analytical parameters--including pH, concentrations of ligand, Triton X-114, and HNO3, bath temperature, heating time, and centrifugation rate and time--were optimized, and the effect of the matrix ions on the recovery of Pb2+ was investigated. An LOD of 1.9 ng/mL along with a preconcentration factor of 50 with RSD of 1.0% for Pb2+ were achieved. The proposed procedure was applied to the analysis of various real samples.

  15. Ultrasonic-assisted cloud point extraction for determination of nickel in water samples by flame atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Song, Jun; Zhen, Wei; Li, Zonghao; Lian, Yuanpei; Yang, Yaling

    2012-01-01

    A novel method for the determination of nickel was established by ultrasonic-assisted cloud point extraction (UA-CPE) prior to flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS) analysis. The nickel reacted with N,N'-bis(salicylidene)-1,2-ethanediamine (BSE) to form hydrophobic chelates, which were extracted into the micelles of alpha-[3,5-dimethyl-1-(2-methylpropyl)hexyl]-omega- poly(oxy-2-ethanediyl) (Tergitol TMN-6). Tergitol TMN-6 was used as green nonionic surfactant. BSE was synthesized and checked by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra. The phase diagrams of the binary system, water-surfactant (Tergitol TMN-6), and the ternary systems, water-surfactant-salt, were determined. The effects of experimental conditions including pH of sample solution, concentration of chelating agent and surfactant, ultrasonic power, equilibration temperature and incubation time were evaluated in order to enhance sensitivity of the method. Under the optimal conditions, the calibration graph was linear in the range of 10-500 μg L(-1). The values obtained for the limit of detection and enrichment factor were 1.0 μg L(-1) and 30, respectively. The method was successfully applied to the analysis of nickel in water samples. PMID:22766868

  16. Development of high-temperature pulsed slit nozzle and its application to supersonic jet absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Kawamura, S; Lin, C H; Imasaka, T

    1994-11-01

    A high-temperature pulsed slit nozzle, consisting of a circular pulsed nozzle and an interface to convert a circular flow into a slit flow has been constructed. The absorption spectrum is measured by scanning the wavelength of the monochromator equipped with a xenon arc lamp and by detecting the transmitted light through a jet with a photomultiplier. A rotationally cooled spectrum is clearly observed for aniline only when a long slit nozzle is employed. The absorptivity increases proportionally to the slit length at least up to 6 cm. The time for recording a spectrum is 3.5 min, which is reduced to several seconds by transmitting a white light through a jet and by measuring the spectrum with an optical multichannel analyzer. The detection limit is estimated to a partial vapor pressure of 0.4 torr for aniline. The present system can be conveniently used in routine analysis, because of a wide spectral coverage of the lamp source.

  17. Process analysis using ion mobility spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Baumbach, J I

    2006-03-01

    Ion mobility spectrometry, originally used to detect chemical warfare agents, explosives and illegal drugs, is now frequently applied in the field of process analytics. The method combines both high sensitivity (detection limits down to the ng to pg per liter and ppb(v)/ppt(v) ranges) and relatively low technical expenditure with a high-speed data acquisition. In this paper, the working principles of IMS are summarized with respect to the advantages and disadvantages of the technique. Different ionization techniques, sample introduction methods and preseparation methods are considered. Proven applications of different types of ion mobility spectrometer (IMS) used at ISAS will be discussed in detail: monitoring of gas insulated substations, contamination in water, odoration of natural gas, human breath composition and metabolites of bacteria. The example applications discussed relate to purity (gas insulated substations), ecology (contamination of water resources), plants and person safety (odoration of natural gas), food quality control (molds and bacteria) and human health (breath analysis).

  18. In situ secondary ion mass spectrometry analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Groenewold, G.S.; Applehans, A.D.; Ingram, J.C.; Delmore, J.E.; Dahl, D.A.

    1993-01-01

    The direct detection of tributyl phosphate (TBP) on rocks using molecular beam surface analysis [MBSA or in situ secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS)] is demonstrated. Quantities as low as 250 ng were detected on basalt and sandstone with little or no sample preparation. Detection of TBP on soil has proven to be more problematic and requires further study. Ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) is more difficult to detect because it is very reactive with surfaces of interest. Nevertheless, it is possible to detect EDTA if the acidity of the surface is controlled. The detection of EDTA-metal complexes is currently an open question, but evidence is presented for the detection of ions arising from a EDTA-lead complex. Carboxylic acids (i.e., citric, ascorbic, malic, succinic, malonic, and oxalic) give characteristic SIM spectra, but their detection on sample surfaces awaits evaluation.

  19. Biological particle analysis by mass spectrometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vilker, V. L.; Platz, R. M.

    1983-01-01

    An instrument that analyzes the chemical composition of biological particles in aerosol or hydrosol form was developed. Efforts were directed toward the acquisition of mass spectra from aerosols of biomolecules and bacteria. The filament ion source was installed on the particle analysis by mass spectrometry system. Modifications of the vacuum system improved the sensitivity of the mass spectrometer. After the modifications were incorporated, detailed mass spectra of simple compounds from the three major classes of biomolecules, proteins, nucleic acids, and carbohydrates were obtained. A method of generating bacterial aerosols was developed. The aerosols generated were collected and examined in the scanning electron microscope to insure that the bacteria delivered to the mass spectrometer were intact and free from debris.

  20. Process analysis using ion mobility spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Baumbach, J I

    2006-03-01

    Ion mobility spectrometry, originally used to detect chemical warfare agents, explosives and illegal drugs, is now frequently applied in the field of process analytics. The method combines both high sensitivity (detection limits down to the ng to pg per liter and ppb(v)/ppt(v) ranges) and relatively low technical expenditure with a high-speed data acquisition. In this paper, the working principles of IMS are summarized with respect to the advantages and disadvantages of the technique. Different ionization techniques, sample introduction methods and preseparation methods are considered. Proven applications of different types of ion mobility spectrometer (IMS) used at ISAS will be discussed in detail: monitoring of gas insulated substations, contamination in water, odoration of natural gas, human breath composition and metabolites of bacteria. The example applications discussed relate to purity (gas insulated substations), ecology (contamination of water resources), plants and person safety (odoration of natural gas), food quality control (molds and bacteria) and human health (breath analysis). PMID:16132133

  1. Monolayers of long-chain alcohols, fatty acids, and fatty acid esters at the air/water interface: a comparison by external infrared reflection-absorption spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gericke, Arne; Huehnerfuss, Heinrich

    1994-01-01

    The properties of C15, C16, C18 and C20-alcohols, fatty acids and fatty acid esters are investigated by external infrared reflection-absorption spectrometry in the range 3000 - 1000 cm-1. Analysis of the methylene stretching vibration shows that an increasing space requirement of the hydrophilic headgroup (fatty acid ester > fatty acid >= alcohol) for the same chain length leads to higher chain disorder (i.e., more gauche conformers). However, for a given headgroup the prolongation of the alkyl-chain generally results in an increased hydrophobic interaction and thus in a higher chain-order, i.e., the molecules attain a more transconformation.

  2. Investigations on Freon-assisted atomization of refractory analytes (Cr, Mo, Ti, V) in multielement electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinrich, Hans-Joachim; Matschat, Ralf

    2007-08-01

    Premixed 1% Freon in argon inner gas of various composition (CCl 2F 2, CHClF 2, CHF 3) was applied to graphite furnace atomizer to minimize unfavorable effects of carbide formation, such as signal tailing and memory effects in the simultaneous determination of Cr, Mo, Ti and V refractory analytes by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry using a multielement atomic absorption spectrometer. The effect of these gaseous additives was investigated when applied separately in atomization, pyrolysis and clean-out steps. The halogenation effects were analytically useful only under the precondition of using Ar-H 2 outer gas to the furnace to all heating steps, and also using this gas in the pre-atomization (drying, pyrolysis) steps. Optimum analytical performance was obtained when mixtures of 1% Freon in argon were applied just before and during the atomization step at a flow rate of 50 mL min - 1 and 2% hydrogen was used as purge gas. Using optimum conditions, signal tailings and carry-over contamination were reduced effectively and good precision (relative standard deviation below 1%) could be attained. Applying 1% CHClF 2 and an atomization temperature of 2550 °C, the characteristic masses obtained for simple aqueous solutions were 8.8 pg for Cr, 17 pg for Mo, 160 pg for Ti, and 74 pg for V. The limits of detection were 0.05, 0.2, 2.3 and 0.5 μg L - 1 for Cr, Mo, Ti and V, respectively. The developed method was applied to the analysis of digests of advanced ceramics. The accuracy of the procedure was confirmed by analyzing the certified reference material ERM-ED 102 (Boron Carbide Powder) and a silicon nitride powder distributed in the inter-laboratory comparison CCQM-P74.

  3. Determination of cadmium in biodiesel using microemulsion and electrothermal atomization atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Lima, Adriana S; Silva, Deise G; Teixeira, Leonardo S G

    2015-01-01

    This work aimed to prepare biodiesel microemulsions for the subsequent quantification of cadmium via graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GFAAS). The biodiesel samples were prepared using n-propanol as an emulsifier, 10% (v/v) nitric acid as the aqueous phase, and biodiesel. Pseudoternary phase diagrams were constructed to determine the microemulsion region with the specified components. The optimized conditions for microemulsion formation were 57.6% (v/v) n-propanol, 21.2% (v/v) biodiesel, and 21.2% (v/v) nitric acid solution. The stability of the microemulsified system was investigated using aqueous and organic standards, and the system was found to be stable for at least 240 min. The applied pyrolysis and atomization temperatures were 800 and 2000 °C, respectively, and 5 μg of aluminum was used as the chemical modifier. The obtained limits of detection and quantification were 0.2 and 0.5 μg kg(-1), respectively, and the characteristic mass was 1.6 pg. The precision, expressed as the relative standard deviation (% R.S.D., n = 10), was 2.5% for a sample with a cadmium concentration of 6.5 μg kg(-1). The accuracy was determined from addition and recovery experiments, with results varying from 93 to 108% recovery. This study demonstrates that the proposed method based on the use of a microemulsion formation in sample preparation can be applied as an efficient alternative for the determination of cadmium in biodiesel by GFAAS. Cadmium determination in biodiesel samples of different origins (soybean, corn, cotton, and sunflower) was evaluated after acid digestion using the inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) technique, and the obtained results were compared to the results obtained using the proposed method. The paired t test (95% confidence level) did not show significant differences. The concentrations of cadmium found ranged from 5.3 to 8.0 μg kg(-1).

  4. Determination of cadmium in biodiesel using microemulsion and electrothermal atomization atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Lima, Adriana S; Silva, Deise G; Teixeira, Leonardo S G

    2015-01-01

    This work aimed to prepare biodiesel microemulsions for the subsequent quantification of cadmium via graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GFAAS). The biodiesel samples were prepared using n-propanol as an emulsifier, 10% (v/v) nitric acid as the aqueous phase, and biodiesel. Pseudoternary phase diagrams were constructed to determine the microemulsion region with the specified components. The optimized conditions for microemulsion formation were 57.6% (v/v) n-propanol, 21.2% (v/v) biodiesel, and 21.2% (v/v) nitric acid solution. The stability of the microemulsified system was investigated using aqueous and organic standards, and the system was found to be stable for at least 240 min. The applied pyrolysis and atomization temperatures were 800 and 2000 °C, respectively, and 5 μg of aluminum was used as the chemical modifier. The obtained limits of detection and quantification were 0.2 and 0.5 μg kg(-1), respectively, and the characteristic mass was 1.6 pg. The precision, expressed as the relative standard deviation (% R.S.D., n = 10), was 2.5% for a sample with a cadmium concentration of 6.5 μg kg(-1). The accuracy was determined from addition and recovery experiments, with results varying from 93 to 108% recovery. This study demonstrates that the proposed method based on the use of a microemulsion formation in sample preparation can be applied as an efficient alternative for the determination of cadmium in biodiesel by GFAAS. Cadmium determination in biodiesel samples of different origins (soybean, corn, cotton, and sunflower) was evaluated after acid digestion using the inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) technique, and the obtained results were compared to the results obtained using the proposed method. The paired t test (95% confidence level) did not show significant differences. The concentrations of cadmium found ranged from 5.3 to 8.0 μg kg(-1). PMID:25381584

  5. Determination of Low Levels of Lead in Beer Using Solid-Phase Extraction and Detection by Flame Atomic Absorption Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Alves, Vanessa N.; Borges, Simone S. O.; Neto, Waldomiro B.; Coelho, Nívia M. M.

    2011-01-01

    In this study, a method for the determination of low concentrations of lead in beer samples using solid-phase extraction with a flow injection analysis system and detection by flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS) was developed. Moringa oleifera seeds were used as a biosorbent material. Chemical and flow variables of the online preconcentration system, such as sample pH, preconcentration flow rate, eluent flow rate, eluent concentration, particle size, and sorbent mass, were studied. The optimum extraction conditions were obtained using a sample pH of 6.0, sample flow rate of 6.0 mL min−1, 63.0 mg of sorbent mass, and 2.0 mol L−1 HNO3 at a flow rate of 2.0 mL min−1 as the eluent. With the optimized conditions, the preconcentration factor, precision, detection limit, consumption index, and sample throughput were estimated as 93, 0.3% (10.0 μg L−1, n = 7), 7.5 μg L−1, 0.11 mL, and 23 samples per hour, respectively. The method developed was successfully applied to beer samples and recovery tests, with recovery ranging from 80% to 100%. PMID:22013389

  6. Determination of trace nickel in hydrogenated cottonseed oil by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry after microwave-assisted digestion.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Gai

    2012-01-01

    Microwave digestion of hydrogenated cottonseed oil prior to trace nickel determination by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS) is proposed here for the first time. Currently, the methods outlined in U.S. Pharmacopeia 28 (USP28) or British Pharmacopeia (BP2003) are recommended as the official methods for analyzing nickel in hydrogenated cottonseed oil. With these methods the samples may be pre-treated by a silica or a platinum crucible. However, the samples were easily tarnished during sample pretreatment when using a silica crucible. In contrast, when using a platinum crucible, hydrogenated cottonseed oil acting as a reducing material may react with the platinum and destroy the crucible. The proposed microwave-assisted digestion avoided tarnishing of sample in the process of sample pretreatment and also reduced the cycle of analysis. The programs of microwave digestion and the parameters of ETAAS were optimized. The accuracy of the proposed method was investigated by analyzing real samples. The results were compared with the ones by pressurized-PTFE-bomb acid digestion and ones obtained by the U.S. Pharmacopeia 28 (USP28) method. The new method involves a relatively rapid matrix destruction technique compared with other present methods for the quantification of metals in oil. PMID:22133102

  7. Determination of cadmium and lead in beverages after leaching from pewter cups using graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Dessuy, Morgana B; Vale, Maria Goreti R; Welz, Bernhard; Borges, Aline R; Silva, Márcia M; Martelli, Patrícia B

    2011-07-15

    Two simple methods have been developed to determine cadmium and lead in different kinds of beverages and vinegar leached from pewter cups produced in Brazil. Leaching experiments have been carried out with different solutions: beer, sugar cane spirit, red and white wine, vinegar and a 3% acetic acid solution. The solutions were kept in cups with and without solder for 24h. Lead and cadmium have been determined using graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry with deuterium background correction. The limits of detection were 0.05 and 1.4 μg L(-1), and the characteristic mass was 1.0 pg and 19 pg for Cd and Pb, respectively. With the developed methods it was possible to determine accurately cadmium and lead by direct analysis in these liquids and to evaluate the leaching of these metals from pewter cups. The results presented in this work show that pewter cups are not cadmium- and lead-free; this point goes against the manufacturers' declaration that their products are lead-free.

  8. Method development for Cd and Hg determination in biodiesel by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry with emulsion sample introduction.

    PubMed

    Aranda, Pedro R; Gásquez, José A; Olsina, Roberto A; Martinez, Luis D; Gil, Raúl A

    2012-11-15

    A novel method for analysis of biodiesel by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry is described. This analytical strategy involves sample preparation as emulsions for routine and reliable determination of Cd and Hg. Several experimental conditions were investigated, including emulsion stability and composition, furnace temperature program and matrix modification. Different calibration strategies were also evaluated, being the analyte addition method preferred both for Cd and Hg. The accuracy was verified through comparison with an acid digestion in a microwave closed system. The injection repeatability was evaluated as the average relative standard deviation (R.S.D %) for five successive firings and was better than 4.4% for Cd and 5.4% Hg respectively. The detection limits, evaluated by the 3σ concept of calculation (n=10), were of 10.2 μg kg(-1) (0.9 μg L(-1)) for Hg and 0.3 μg kg(-1) (0.04 μg L(-1)) for Cd. This method was successfully applied to the determination of Cd and Hg in biodiesel samples obtained from local vendors.

  9. Determination of cadmium and lead in beverages after leaching from pewter cups using graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Dessuy, Morgana B; Vale, Maria Goreti R; Welz, Bernhard; Borges, Aline R; Silva, Márcia M; Martelli, Patrícia B

    2011-07-15

    Two simple methods have been developed to determine cadmium and lead in different kinds of beverages and vinegar leached from pewter cups produced in Brazil. Leaching experiments have been carried out with different solutions: beer, sugar cane spirit, red and white wine, vinegar and a 3% acetic acid solution. The solutions were kept in cups with and without solder for 24h. Lead and cadmium have been determined using graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry with deuterium background correction. The limits of detection were 0.05 and 1.4 μg L(-1), and the characteristic mass was 1.0 pg and 19 pg for Cd and Pb, respectively. With the developed methods it was possible to determine accurately cadmium and lead by direct analysis in these liquids and to evaluate the leaching of these metals from pewter cups. The results presented in this work show that pewter cups are not cadmium- and lead-free; this point goes against the manufacturers' declaration that their products are lead-free. PMID:21645758

  10. Determination of trace nickel in hydrogenated cottonseed oil by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry after microwave-assisted digestion.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Gai

    2012-01-01

    Microwave digestion of hydrogenated cottonseed oil prior to trace nickel determination by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS) is proposed here for the first time. Currently, the methods outlined in U.S. Pharmacopeia 28 (USP28) or British Pharmacopeia (BP2003) are recommended as the official methods for analyzing nickel in hydrogenated cottonseed oil. With these methods the samples may be pre-treated by a silica or a platinum crucible. However, the samples were easily tarnished during sample pretreatment when using a silica crucible. In contrast, when using a platinum crucible, hydrogenated cottonseed oil acting as a reducing material may react with the platinum and destroy the crucible. The proposed microwave-assisted digestion avoided tarnishing of sample in the process of sample pretreatment and also reduced the cycle of analysis. The programs of microwave digestion and the parameters of ETAAS were optimized. The accuracy of the proposed method was investigated by analyzing real samples. The results were compared with the ones by pressurized-PTFE-bomb acid digestion and ones obtained by the U.S. Pharmacopeia 28 (USP28) method. The new method involves a relatively rapid matrix destruction technique compared with other present methods for the quantification of metals in oil.

  11. Preconcentration of lead using solidification of floating organic drop and its determination by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Chamsaz, Mahmoud; Akhoundzadeh, Jeiran; Arbab-zavar, Mohammad Hossein

    2012-01-01

    A simple microextraction method based on solidification of a floating organic drop (SFOD) was developed for preconcentration of lead prior to its determination by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS). Ammonium pyrolidinedithiocarbamate (APDC) was used as complexing agent, and the formed complex was extracted into a 20 μL of 1-undecanol. The extracted complex was diluted with ethanol and injected into a graphite furnace. An orthogonal array design (OAD) with OA16 (45) matrix was employed to study the effects of different parameters such as pH, APDC concentration, stirring rate, sample solution temperature and the exposure time on the extraction efficiency. Under the optimized experimental conditions the limit of detection (based on 3 s) and the enhancement factor were 0.058 μg L−1 and 113, respectively. The relative standard deviation (RSD) for 8 replicate determinations of 1 μg L−1 of Pb was 8.8%. The developed method was validated by the analysis of certified reference materials and was successfully applied to the determination of lead in water and infant formula base powder samples. PMID:25685441

  12. Determination of nickel in saliva by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry using various chemical modifiers with Zeeman-effect background correction.

    PubMed

    Burguera, E; Sanchez de Briceño, A; Rondon, C E; Burguera, J L; Burguera, M; Carrero, P

    1998-07-01

    The profile of nickel signal using electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry with deuterium and Zeeman-effect background correction is presented. The Zeeman effect system of background correction offered definitive advantages and therefore was used for the determination of nickel in saliva in the presence of various isomorphous metals. The highest nickel absorbance values corresponded at 200, 300, 300, 300, 600, and 200 ng of Tb, Mg, Sm, Lu, Tm, and Pd, respectively. On the other hand, the addition of Eu, Er, and Ho decreased the nickel signal. The presence on each modifier alone does not eliminate the matrix interference. However, the use of 200 ng of Pd in conjuction with 300 ng of Lu has a higher sensitivity, offers an advantage against interference from the background of saliva matrix and produces good recoveries (98 to 102% from unspiked and spiked saliva samples). The limit of detection was 0.11 micrograms/L for a characteristic mass of 16.6 pg of nickel using Pd-Lu as modifier. The within-batch precision varied between 0.8 and 1.5% relative standard deviations. The analysis of thirty samples of whole saliva gave an average of 0.81 +/- 0.30 of micrograms/L of Ni (range from 0.5 to 2.0 micrograms/L of Ni). The agreement between the observed and certified values obtained from a Seronorm Blood Serum Standard Reference Material was good.

  13. [Determination of Iodine and Iodate in Brine and Seafood Simultaneously by Ultraviolet Absorption Spectrometry].

    PubMed

    Tan, Jun; Zhu, Xia-ping; Liu, Miao-miao; Wei, Zhi-cheng; Sang, Shi-hua

    2015-06-01

    The iodide in samples was oxidized to iodate by bromine water, which could be removed by formic acid, and iodate could be transformed to I3- with excess of I- in phosphoric acid, the iodate in samples could be transformed directly to I3- with excess of I- in phosphoric acid. The I3- solution had strong absorption at 350 and 288 nm, and the absorbance had a linear relationship to the concentration of I3- in a certain range. Total content of iodide and iodate had been detected after samples were oxidized by bromine water and the content of iodate had been detected directly, and the content of iodide was obtained by difference of the two results. Based on this, the method had been established to detect iodide and iodate in brine and seafood simultaneously by ultraviolet absorption spectrometry. The volumes of bromine water, formic acid, phosphoric acid and potassium iodide had been optimized. The effect of illumination, temperature and time also had been discussed. The optional reagents condition for iodide was: 2 drops of 3% bromine water, 0.5 mL of 10% formic acid, 4 mL of 20% phosphoric acid and 1 mL of 100 g x L(-1 KI. The optional reagents condition for iodate was: 0. 2 mL of 20% phosphoric acid and 1 mL of 100 g x L(-1) KI. The absorbance were determined after reacting for 30 min at room temperature and natural light conditions. Under the optimized conditions, the concentration of iodide and iodate in the range of 0 - 1.2 and 0 -1.5 mg x L(-1) were well agreed with Lambert Beer law. The sample blank was detected for twelve times and the detection limit of iodide and iodate were 1.54 and 14.8 μg x L(-1) respectively. The RSD of twelve times determination of 0.8 mg x L(-1) of iodide and iodate were 0.097% and 0.067%, respectively. The iodide and iodate in Zhabuye brine, Hong Feng underground brine, kelp, seaweed and sea cabbage had been detected, the recovery experiments also had been conducted at the same time, the recovery of iodide and iodate were between 80

  14. Determination of tellurium by hydride generation with in situ trapping flame atomic absorption spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matusiewicz, Henryk; Krawczyk, Magdalena

    2007-03-01

    The analytical performance of coupled hydride generation — integrated atom trap (HG-IAT) atomizer flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS) system was evaluated for determination of Te in reference material (GBW 07302 Stream Sediment), coal fly ash and garlic. Tellurium, using formation of H 2Te vapors, is atomized in air-acetylene flame-heated IAT. A new design HG-IAT-FAAS hyphenated technique that would exceed the operational capabilities of existing arrangements (a water-cooled single silica tube, double-slotted quartz tube or an "integrated trap") was investigated. An improvement in detection limit was achieved compared with using either of the above atom trapping techniques separately. The concentration detection limit, defined as 3 times the blank standard deviation (3 σ), was 0.9 ng mL - 1 for Te. For a 2 min in situ pre-concentration time (sample volume of 2 mL), sensitivity enhancement compared to flame AAS, was 222 fold, using the hydride generation — atom trapping technique. The sensitivity can be further improved by increasing the collection time. The precision, expressed as RSD, was 7.0% ( n = 6) for Te. The designs studied include slotted tube, single silica tube and integrated atom trap-cooled atom traps. The accuracy of the method was verified using a certified reference material (GBW 07302 Stream Sediment) by aqueous standard calibration curves. The measured Te contents of the reference material was in agreement with the information value. The method was successfully applied to the determination of tellurium in coal fly ash and garlic.

  15. Determination of trace impurities in titanium dioxide by direct solid sampling electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dočekal, Bohumil; Vojtková, Blanka

    2007-03-01

    A true direct solid sampling electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry method with Zeeman-effect background correction (Analytik Jena ZEEnit 60 AAS) was developed for the determination of As, Cd, Hg, Pb, Sb and Zn in powdered titanium dioxide of pharmaceutical, food and cosmetics grade. The interaction of the titanium matrix and graphite surface of the sample carrier boat in a transversely heated graphite tube atomizer was investigated. Conversion of titanium dioxide to interfering TiO 2-TiC-liquid phase, running out the sampling boat, was observed at temperatures above 2000 °C. The temperature program was optimized accordingly for these volatile analytes in atomization and cleaning steps in order to prevent this interference and to prolong significantly the analytical lifetime of the boat to more than one thousand runs. For all elements, calibration by aqueous standard addition method, by wet-chemically analyzed samples with different content of analytes and/or by dosing one sample in different amounts, were proved as adequate quantification procedures. Linear dynamic calibration working ranges can be considerably expanded up to two orders of magnitude within one measurement run by applying three-field dynamic mode of the Zeeman background correction system. The results obtained by true direct solid sampling technique are compared with those of other independent, mostly wet-chemical methods. Very low limits of detection (3 σ criterion) of true solid sampling technique of 21, 0.27, 24, 3.9, 6.3 and 0.9 ng g - 1 were achieved for As, Cd, Hg, Pb, Sb and Zn, respectively.

  16. Determination of mercury distribution inside spent compact fluorescent lamps by atomic absorption spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Rey-Raap, Natalia

    2012-05-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer New treatments for CFL are required considering the aim of Directive 202/96/CE. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer It is shown that most of the mercury introduced into a CFL is in the phosphor powder. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Experimental conditions for microwave-assisted sample digestion followed by AAS measurements are described. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer By washing the glass it is possible to reduce the concentration below legal limits. - Abstract: In this study, spent compact fluorescent lamps were characterized to determine the distribution of mercury. The procedure used in this research allowed mercury to be extracted in the vapor phase, from the phosphor powder, and the glass matrix. Mercury concentration in the three phases was determined by the method known as cold vapor atomic absorption spectrometry. Median values obtained in the study showed that a compact fluorescent lamp contained 24.52 {+-} 0.4 ppb of mercury in the vapor phase, 204.16 {+-} 8.9 ppb of mercury in the phosphor powder, and 18.74 {+-} 0.5 ppb of mercury in the glass matrix. There are differences in mercury concentration between the lamps since the year of manufacture or the hours of operation affect both mercury content and its distribution. The 85.76% of the mercury introduced into a compact fluorescent lamp becomes a component of the phosphor powder, while more than 13.66% is diffused through the glass matrix. By washing and eliminating all phosphor powder attached to the glass surface it is possible to classified the glass as a non-hazardous waste.

  17. Preconcentration and Atomization of Arsane in a Dielectric Barrier Discharge with Detection by Atomic Absorption Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Novák, Petr; Dědina, Jiří; Kratzer, Jan

    2016-06-01

    Atomization of arsane in a 17 W planar quartz dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) atomizer was optimized, and its performance was compared to that of a multiple microflame quartz tube atomizer (MMQTA) for atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS). Argon, at a flow rate of 60 mL min(-1), was the best DBD discharge gas. Free As atoms were also observed in the DBD with nitrogen, hydrogen, and helium discharge gases but not in air. A dryer tube filled with NaOH beads placed downstream from the gas-liquid separator to prevent residual aerosol and moisture transport to the atomizer was found to improve the response by 25%. Analytical figures of merit were comparable, reaching an identical sensitivity of 0.48 s ng (-1) As in both atomizers and limits of detection (LOD) of 0.15 ng mL(-1) As in MMQTA and 0.16 ng mL(-1) As in DBD, respectively. Compared to MMQTA, DBD provided 1 order of magnitude better resistance to interference from other hydride-forming elements (Sb, Se, and Bi). Atomization efficiency in DBD was estimated to be 100% of that reached in the MMQTA. A simple procedure of lossless in situ preconcentration of arsane was developed. Addition of 7 mL min(-1) O2 to the Ar plasma discharge resulted in a quantitative retention of arsane in the optical arm of the DBD atomizer. Complete analyte release and atomization was reached as soon as oxygen was switched off. Preconcentration efficiency of 100% was observed, allowing a decrease of the LOD to 0.01 ng mL(-1) As employing a 300 s preconcentration period. PMID:27159266

  18. Mercury in Environmental and Biological Samples Using Online Combustion with Sequential Atomic Absorption and Fluorescence Measurements: A Direct Comparison of Two Fundamental Techniques in Spectrometry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cizdziel, James V.

    2011-01-01

    In this laboratory experiment, students quantitatively determine the concentration of an element (mercury) in an environmental or biological sample while comparing and contrasting the fundamental techniques of atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS) and atomic fluorescence spectrometry (AFS). A mercury analyzer based on sample combustion,…

  19. Cloud point extraction for the determination of cadmium and lead in biological samples by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maranhão, Tatiane De A.; Borges, Daniel L. G.; da Veiga, Márcia A. M. S.; Curtius, Adilson J.

    2005-06-01

    The phase-separation phenomenon of non-ionic surfactants occurring in aqueous solution was used for the extraction of Cd and Pb from digested biological samples. After complexation with O,O-diethyldithiophosphate (DDTP) in hydrochloric acid medium, the analytes are quantitatively extracted to the phase rich in the non-ionic surfactant octylphenoxypolyethoxyethanol (Triton X-114) after centrifugation. Methanol acidified with 0.1 mol L-1 HNO3 was added to the surfactant-rich phase prior to its analysis by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ET AAS). The adopted concentrations for DDTP, Triton X-114 and hydrochloric acid were all optimized. Pyrolysis and atomization temperatures were optimized using the extracts and pyrolysis temperatures of 700 °C for both elements and atomization temperatures of 1400 and 1600 °C for cadmium and lead, respectively, were used without adding any modifier, which shows that considerable analyte stabilization is provided by the medium itself. A more detailed investigation was carried out to determine which components of the extract were responsible for the high thermal stability achieved and it revealed that the amount of DDTP added and the phosphorus content of the digested samples contributed significantly to this phenomenon. Detection limits (3σB) of 6 and 40 ng g-1, along with enrichment factors of 129 and 18 for Cd and Pb, respectively, were achieved. The proposed procedure was applied to the analysis of five certified biological reference materials after microwave-assisted acid digestion in a mixture of H2O2 and HNO3. Comparison with certified values was performed for accuracy evaluation, resulting in good agreement according to the t-test for a 95% confidence level. The high efficiency of cloud point extraction to carry out the determination of the studied analytes in complex matrices was, therefore, demonstrated.

  20. Determination of manganese in diesel, gasoline and naphtha by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry using microemulsion medium for sample stabilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandão, Geisamanda Pedrini; de Campos, Reinaldo Calixto; de Castro, Eustáquio Vinicius Ribeiro; de Jesus, Honério Coutinho

    2008-08-01

    The determination of Mn in diesel, gasoline and naphtha samples at µg L - 1 level by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry, after sample stabilization in a three-component medium (microemulsion) was investigated. Microemulsions were prepared by mixing appropriate volumes of sample, propan-1-ol and nitric acid aqueous solution, and a stable system was immediately and spontaneously formed. After multivariate optimization by central composite design the optimum microemulsion composition as well as the temperature program was defined. In this way, calibration using aqueous analytical solution was possible, since the same sensitivity was observed in the optimized microemulsion media and 0.2% v/v HNO 3. The use of modifier was not necessary. Recoveries at the 3 µg L - 1 level using both inorganic and organic Mn standards spiked solutions ranged from 98 to 107% and the limits of detection were 0.6, 0.5 and 0.3 µg L - 1 in the original diesel, gasoline and naphtha samples, respectively. The Mn characteristic mass 3.4 pg. Typical relative standard deviation ( n = 5) of 8, 6 and 7% were found for the samples prepared as microemulsions at concentration levels of 1.3, 0.8, and 1.5 µg L - 1 , respectively. The total determination cycle lasted 4 min for diesel and 3 min for gasoline and naphtha, equivalent to a sample throughput of 7 h - 1 for duplicate determinations in diesel and 10 h - 1 for duplicate determinations in gasoline and naphtha. Accuracy was also assessed by using other method of analysis (ASTM D 3831-90). No statistically significant differences were found between the results obtained with the proposed method and the reference method in the analysis of real samples.

  1. Determination of Anionic Surfactants Using Atomic Absorption Spectrometry and Anodic Stripping Voltammetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    John, Richard; Lord, Daniel

    1999-09-01

    An experiment has been developed for our undergraduate analytical chemistry course that demonstrates the indirect analysis of anionic surfactants by techniques normally associated with metal ion determination; that is, atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS) and anodic stripping voltammetry (ASV). The method involves the formation of an extractable complex between the synthetic surfactant anion and the bis(ethylenediamine)diaqua copper(II) cation. This complex is extracted into chloroform and then back-extracted into dilute acid. The resulting Cu(II) ions are determined by AAS and ASV. Students are required to determine the concentration of a pre-prepared "unknown" anionic surfactant solution and to collect and analyze a real sample of their choice. After the two extraction processes, students typically obtain close to 100% analytical recovery. Correlation between student AAS and ASV results is very good, indicating that any errors that occur probably result from their technique (dilutions, extractions, preparation of standards, etc.) rather than from the end analyses. The experiment is a valuable demonstration of the following analytical principles: indirect analysis; compleximetric analysis; liquid-liquid (solvent) extraction; back-extraction (into dilute acid); analytical recovery; and metal ion analysis using flame-AAS and ASV.

  2. Maintenance of the slope of linearized calibration curves in Zeeman graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuzefovsky, Alexander I.; Lonardo, Robert F.; Zhou, Jack X.; Michel, Robert G.; Koltracht, Israel

    1996-06-01

    L'vov and co-workers developed a theoretical model and computational procedure (B.V. L'vov, L.K. Polzik and N.V. Kocharova, Spectrochim. Acta Part B, 47 (1992) 889 and B.V. L'vov, L.K. Polzik, N.V. Kocharova, Yu.A. Nemets and A.V. Novichikhin, Spectrochim. Acta Part B, 47 (1992) 1187) that linearized calibration curves in Zeeman graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry by taking into account the presence of stray light. The calculations of L'vov and co-workers were based on three parameters: the rollover absorbance Ar, Zeeman sensitivity ratio R, and the original background corrected peak absorbance values Az. In order to simplify the calculations, R was assumed to be unity. In the studies reported here, this simplification is shown to be unsatisfactory because the slope obtained in the upper portion of the calibration curve, after linearization, is found to be different from the slope obtained in the normal linear region. Deviations between these slopes were found to be as high as 30%. The present work also shows that the theoretical model of L'vov and co-workers does not have a mathematical solution at high values of Az. This failure of the model prevents its use at high Az values. The physical nature of this failure is still unclear, which points to the necessity for further work to understand the inadequacies of the present theory. In the present studies, calculations based on the Newton method of successive approximations (A.I. Yuzefovsky, E.G. Su, R.G. Michel, W. Slavin and J.T. McCaffrey, Spectrochim. Acta Part B, 49 (1994) 1643), allow incorporation of the experimental value of R at the rollover point R', which better linearizes the calibration curves. By use of this approach, a satisfactory result is obtained for lead ( R' = 0.67) up to the point of failure of the model at high values of Az.

  3. Determination of lithium isotopes at natural abundance levels by atomic absorption spectrometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Meier, A.L.

    1982-01-01

    The relationships of the absorption of 6Li and 7Li hollow cathode lamp emissions are used to determine lithium isotopic composition in the natural abundance range of geologic materials. Absorption was found to have a nonlinear dependence upon total lithium concentration and isotopic composition. A method using nonlinear equations to describe the relationship of the absorption of 6Li and 7Li lamp radiation is proposed as a means of calculating isotopic composition that is independent of total lithium concentration.

  4. Application of dual-cloud point extraction for the trace levels of copper in serum of different viral hepatitis patients by flame atomic absorption spectrometry: A multivariate study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arain, Salma Aslam; Kazi, Tasneem G.; Afridi, Hassan Imran; Abbasi, Abdul Rasool; Panhwar, Abdul Haleem; Naeemullah; Shanker, Bhawani; Arain, Mohammad Balal

    2014-12-01

    An efficient, innovative preconcentration method, dual-cloud point extraction (d-CPE) has been developed for the extraction and preconcentration of copper (Cu2+) in serum samples of different viral hepatitis patients prior to couple with flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS). The d-CPE procedure was based on forming complexes of elemental ions with complexing reagent 1-(2-pyridylazo)-2-naphthol (PAN), and subsequent entrapping the complexes in nonionic surfactant (Triton X-114). Then the surfactant rich phase containing the metal complexes was treated with aqueous nitric acid solution, and metal ions were back extracted into the aqueous phase, as second cloud point extraction stage, and finally determined by flame atomic absorption spectrometry using conventional nebulization. The multivariate strategy was applied to estimate the optimum values of experimental variables for the recovery of Cu2+ using d-CPE. In optimum experimental conditions, the limit of detection and the enrichment factor were 0.046 μg L-1 and 78, respectively. The validity and accuracy of proposed method were checked by analysis of Cu2+ in certified sample of serum (CRM) by d-CPE and conventional CPE procedure on same CRM. The proposed method was successfully applied to the determination of Cu2+ in serum samples of different viral hepatitis patients and healthy controls.

  5. Application of dual-cloud point extraction for the trace levels of copper in serum of different viral hepatitis patients by flame atomic absorption spectrometry: a multivariate study.

    PubMed

    Arain, Salma Aslam; Kazi, Tasneem G; Afridi, Hassan Imran; Abbasi, Abdul Rasool; Panhwar, Abdul Haleem; Naeemullah; Shanker, Bhawani; Arain, Mohammad Balal

    2014-12-10

    An efficient, innovative preconcentration method, dual-cloud point extraction (d-CPE) has been developed for the extraction and preconcentration of copper (Cu(2+)) in serum samples of different viral hepatitis patients prior to couple with flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS). The d-CPE procedure was based on forming complexes of elemental ions with complexing reagent 1-(2-pyridylazo)-2-naphthol (PAN), and subsequent entrapping the complexes in nonionic surfactant (Triton X-114). Then the surfactant rich phase containing the metal complexes was treated with aqueous nitric acid solution, and metal ions were back extracted into the aqueous phase, as second cloud point extraction stage, and finally determined by flame atomic absorption spectrometry using conventional nebulization. The multivariate strategy was applied to estimate the optimum values of experimental variables for the recovery of Cu(2+) using d-CPE. In optimum experimental conditions, the limit of detection and the enrichment factor were 0.046μgL(-1) and 78, respectively. The validity and accuracy of proposed method were checked by analysis of Cu(2+) in certified sample of serum (CRM) by d-CPE and conventional CPE procedure on same CRM. The proposed method was successfully applied to the determination of Cu(2+) in serum samples of different viral hepatitis patients and healthy controls.

  6. Feasibility of using direct determination of cadmium and lead in fresh meat by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry for screening purposes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Damin, Isabel C. F.; Silva, Márcia M.; Vale, Maria Goreti R.; Welz, Bernhard

    2007-09-01

    A method for the direct determination of cadmium and lead in fresh meat for screening purposes is proposed using electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry. The fresh meat samples were homogenized, weighed directly onto solid sampling platforms and introduced into a transversely heated solid sampling graphite tube. The main challenges associated with this procedure, such as weighing errors and optimization of the temperature program were investigated in detail. Calibration was performed against aqueous standards and two modifiers were investigated: 0.05% Pd + 0.03% Mg + 0.05% Triton X-100 and 0.01% Pd + 10% NH4NO3 + 0.05% Triton X-100. The former one is recommended due to the higher pyrolysis temperature obtained for cadmium and the better limits of detection of 1.9 μg kg- 1 for lead and 0.13 μg kg- 1 for cadmium, based on 10 mg of sample mass. The results obtained for cadmium and lead in two certified reference materials were statistically not different from the certified values on a 95% confidence level, indicating that calibration against aqueous standards is suitable for this application. In order to evaluate weighing errors the fresh samples were dried (at 60 °C) to constant weight; the results obtained with fresh and dried samples were in agreement, taking the loss of weight into consideration for the latter ones. The average relative standard deviation of 14% is in concordance with the results of others using fresh meat. Comparison with the digestion method adopted by the Brazilian Ministry of Agriculture shows no significant differences between the results at the 95% confidence level. This study shows that direct analysis of fresh meet can be applied as a rapid routine screening procedure for residue control in products of animal origin, helping the implementation and maintenance of sanitary control.

  7. Coacervative extraction of trace lead from natural waters prior to its determination by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagarová, Ingrid; Bujdoš, Marek; Matúš, Peter; Kubová, Jana

    2013-10-01

    In this work, a relatively simple and sensitive method for separation/preconcentration of trace lead from natural waters prior to its determination by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry has been proposed. The method is based on the extraction of Pb-dithizone chelate with coacervates made up of lauric acid in the presence of potassium ions and methanol. Several important factors affecting extraction efficiency such as pH, concentration of lauric acid and dithizone, ionic strength, incubation and centrifugation time were investigated and optimized. After separation of aqueous bulk solution from surfactant-rich phase, the final extract was redissolved by using 500 μl of methanol acidified with 0.2 mol l- 1 HNO3. Under the optimized conditions (using initial sample volume of 10 ml), enrichment factor of 17.0, detection limit of 0.12 μg l- 1, quantification limit of 0.38 μg l- 1, relative standard deviation of 4.2% (for 2 μg l- 1 of Pb; n = 26), linearity of the calibration graph in the range of 0.5-4.0 μg l- 1 (with correlation coefficient better than 0.995) were achieved. The method was validated by the analysis of certified reference material (TMDA-61). Extraction recoveries for the CRM, spiked model solutions and spiked natural water samples were in the range of 91-96%. Finally, the method was applied to the separation/preconcentration and determination of trace lead in natural waters.

  8. In-situ diagnostics of hydrocarbon dusty plasmas using quantum cascade laser absorption spectroscopy and mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouaras, K.; Delacqua, L. Colina; Lombardi, G.; Röpcke, J.; Wartel, M.; Bonnin, X.; Redolfi, M.; Hassouni, K.; Hassouni

    2014-12-01

    The formation of carbon nanoparticles in low pressure magnetized H2/CH4 and H2/C2H2 plasmas is investigated using infrared quantum cascade laser absorption, mass spectrometry, and electrostatic probe measurements. Results showed that dust formation is correlated to the presence of a significant amount of large positively charged hydrocarbon ions. Large negative ions or neutral hydrocarbon were not observed. These results, along with a qualitative comparison of diffusion and reaction characteristic, suggest that a positive ion may contribute to the growth of nanoparticles in hydrocarbon magnetized plasmas.

  9. Selenium concentration levels in whole blood of Belgian blood bank donors, as determined by direct graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Van Cauwenbergh, R; Robberecht, H; Deelstra, H

    1990-12-01

    Direct graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry after appropriate sample dilution is applied to whole blood of Belgian blood bank donors from different geographical areas. Highest values were obtained for the northern part of the country (Flanders). Different consumption habits may explain the significant difference in selenium level found for the two cultural communities (Flemish and Walloon). No sex difference was obtained in both parts of the country and no influence of age was observed for the two communities. Values obtained are compared with literature data on whole blood selenium content for other European countries.

  10. 2. VIEW IN ROOM 111, ATOMIC ABSORPTION BERYLLIUM ANALYSIS LABORATORY. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. VIEW IN ROOM 111, ATOMIC ABSORPTION BERYLLIUM ANALYSIS LABORATORY. AIR FILTERS AND SWIPES ARE DISSOLVED WITH ACIDS AND THE REMAINING RESIDUES ARE SUSPENDED IN NITRIC ACID SOLUTION. THE SOLUTION IS PROCESSED THROUGH THE ATOMIC ABSORPTION SPECTROPHOTOMETER TO DETECT THE PRESENCE AND LEVELS OF BERYLLIUM. - Rocky Flats Plant, Health Physics Laboratory, On Central Avenue between Third & Fourth Streets, Golden, Jefferson County, CO

  11. Determination of gold in geologic materials by solvent extraction and atomic-absorption spectrometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Huffman, Claude; Mensik, J.D.; Riley, L.B.

    1967-01-01

    The two methods presented for the determination of traces of gold in geologic materials are the cyanide atomic-absorption method and the fire-assay atomic-absorption method. In the cyanide method gold is leached with a sodium-cyanide solution. The monovalent gold is then oxidized to the trivalent state and concentrated by extracting into methyl isobutyl ketone prior to estimation by atomic absorption. In the fire-assay atomic-absorption method, the gold-silver bead obtained from fire assay is dissolved in nitric and hydrochloric acids. Gold is then concentrated by extracting into methyl isobutyl ketone prior to determination by atomic absorption. By either method concentrations as low as 50 parts per billion of gold can be determined in a 15-gram sample.

  12. Organic, inorganic and total mercury determination in fish by chemical vapor generation with collection on a gold gauze and electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duarte, Fábio Andrei; Bizzi, Cezar Augusto; Antes, Fabiane Goldschmidt; Dressler, Valderi Luiz; Flores, Érico Marlon de Moraes

    2009-06-01

    A method for organic, inorganic and total mercury determination in fish tissue has been developed using chemical vapor generation and collection of mercury vapor on a gold gauze inside a graphite tube and further atomization by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry. After drying and cryogenic grinding, potassium bromide and hydrochloric acid solution (1 mol L - 1 KBr in 6 mol L - 1 HCl) was added to the samples. After centrifugation, total mercury was determined in the supernatant. Organomercury compounds were selectively extracted from KBr solution using chloroform and the resultant solution was back extracted with 1% m/v L-cysteine. This solution was used for organic Hg determination. Inorganic Hg remaining in KBr solution was directly determined by chemical vapor generation electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry. Mercury vapor generation from extracts was performed using 1 mol L - 1 HCl and 2.5% m/v NaBH 4 solutions and a batch chemical vapor generation system. Mercury vapor was collected on the gold gauze heated resistively at 80 °C and the atomization temperature was set at 650 °C. The selectivity of extraction was evaluated using liquid chromatography coupled to chemical vapor generation and determination by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. The proposed method was applied for mercury analysis in shark, croaker and tuna fish tissues. Certified reference materials were used to check accuracy and the agreement was better than 95%. The characteristic mass was 60 pg and method limits of detection were 5, 1 and 1 ng g - 1 for organic, inorganic and total mercury, respectively. With the proposed method it was possible to analyze up to 2, 2 and 6 samples per hour for organic, inorganic and total Hg determination, respectively.

  13. Application of High Resolution-Continuum Source Flame Atomic Absorption Spectrometry (HR-CS FAAS): determination of trace elements in tea and tisanes.

    PubMed

    Paz-Rodríguez, Beatriz; Domínguez-González, María Raquel; Aboal-Somoza, Manuel; Bermejo-Barrera, Pilar

    2015-03-01

    A new application of HR-CS FAAS (High Resolution-Continuum Source Flame Atomic Absorption Spectrometry) has been developed for the determination of several trace elements (Ca, Co, Cu, Fe, Mn, Ni, Na and Zn) in infusions made from tea, rooibos and tea with seaweed samples. The proposed methods are fast, inexpensive and show good performances: the mean analytical recovery was approximately 100%. The mean limit of detection was 29.4 μg/l, and the mean limit of quantification was 98.0 μg/l (both limits refer to the brewed samples). Due to the matrix effect observed, the standard addition method had to be applied. Preliminary classification (based on metal contents) using chemometric techniques such as PCA (Principal Component Analysis) and CA (Cluster Analysis), was successful for infusions made from rooibos and tea with seaweed, but inconclusive for black and green teas.

  14. Application of High Resolution-Continuum Source Flame Atomic Absorption Spectrometry (HR-CS FAAS): determination of trace elements in tea and tisanes.

    PubMed

    Paz-Rodríguez, Beatriz; Domínguez-González, María Raquel; Aboal-Somoza, Manuel; Bermejo-Barrera, Pilar

    2015-03-01

    A new application of HR-CS FAAS (High Resolution-Continuum Source Flame Atomic Absorption Spectrometry) has been developed for the determination of several trace elements (Ca, Co, Cu, Fe, Mn, Ni, Na and Zn) in infusions made from tea, rooibos and tea with seaweed samples. The proposed methods are fast, inexpensive and show good performances: the mean analytical recovery was approximately 100%. The mean limit of detection was 29.4 μg/l, and the mean limit of quantification was 98.0 μg/l (both limits refer to the brewed samples). Due to the matrix effect observed, the standard addition method had to be applied. Preliminary classification (based on metal contents) using chemometric techniques such as PCA (Principal Component Analysis) and CA (Cluster Analysis), was successful for infusions made from rooibos and tea with seaweed, but inconclusive for black and green teas. PMID:25306375

  15. Germanium determination by flame atomic absorption spectrometry: an increased vapor pressure-chloride generation system.

    PubMed

    Kaya, Murat; Volkan, Mürvet

    2011-03-15

    A new chloride generation system was designed for the direct, sensitive, rapid and accurate determination of the total germanium in complex matrices. It was aimed to improve the detection limit of chloride generation technique by increasing the vapor pressure of germanium tetrachloride (GeCl(4)). In order to do so, a novel joint vapor production and gas-liquid separation unit equipped with a home-made oven was incorporated to an ordinary nitrous oxide-acetylene flame atomic absorption spectrometer. Several variables such as reaction time, temperature and acid concentration have been investigated. The linear range for germanium determination was 0.1-10 ng mL(-1) for 1 mL sampling volume with a detection limit (3s) of 0.01 ng mL(-1). The relative standard deviation (RSD) was 2.4% for nine replicates of a 1 ng mL(-1) germanium solution. The method was validated by the analysis of one non-certified and two certified geochemical reference materials, respectively, CRM GSJ-JR-2 (Rhyolite), and GSJ-JR-1 (Rhyolite), and GBW 07107 (Chinese Rock). Selectivity of the method was investigated for Cd(2+), Co(2+), Cu(2+), Fe(3+), Ga(3+), Hg(2+), Ni(2+), Pb(2+), Sn(2+), and Zn(2+) ions and ionic species of As(III), Sb(III), Te(IV), and Se(IV). PMID:21315908

  16. Germanium determination by flame atomic absorption spectrometry: an increased vapor pressure-chloride generation system.

    PubMed

    Kaya, Murat; Volkan, Mürvet

    2011-03-15

    A new chloride generation system was designed for the direct, sensitive, rapid and accurate determination of the total germanium in complex matrices. It was aimed to improve the detection limit of chloride generation technique by increasing the vapor pressure of germanium tetrachloride (GeCl(4)). In order to do so, a novel joint vapor production and gas-liquid separation unit equipped with a home-made oven was incorporated to an ordinary nitrous oxide-acetylene flame atomic absorption spectrometer. Several variables such as reaction time, temperature and acid concentration have been investigated. The linear range for germanium determination was 0.1-10 ng mL(-1) for 1 mL sampling volume with a detection limit (3s) of 0.01 ng mL(-1). The relative standard deviation (RSD) was 2.4% for nine replicates of a 1 ng mL(-1) germanium solution. The method was validated by the analysis of one non-certified and two certified geochemical reference materials, respectively, CRM GSJ-JR-2 (Rhyolite), and GSJ-JR-1 (Rhyolite), and GBW 07107 (Chinese Rock). Selectivity of the method was investigated for Cd(2+), Co(2+), Cu(2+), Fe(3+), Ga(3+), Hg(2+), Ni(2+), Pb(2+), Sn(2+), and Zn(2+) ions and ionic species of As(III), Sb(III), Te(IV), and Se(IV).

  17. Permanent modification in electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry — advances, anticipations and reality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsalev, Dimiter L.; Slaveykova, Vera I.; Lampugnani, Leonardo; D'Ulivo, Alessandro; Georgieva, Rositsa

    2000-05-01

    Permanent modification is an important recent development in chemical modification techniques which is promising in view of increasing sample throughput with 'fast' programs, reducing reagent blanks, preliminary elimination of unwanted modifier components, compatibility with on-line and in situ enrichment, etc. An overview of this approach based on the authors' recent research and scarce literature data is given, revealing both success and failure in studies with permanently modified surfaces (carbides, non-volatile noble metals, noble metals on carbide coatings, etc.), as demonstrated in examples of direct electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometric (ETAAS) applications to biological and environmental matrices and vapor generation (VG)-ETAAS coupling with in-atomizer trapping of hydrides and other analyte vapors. Permanent modifiers exhibit certain drawbacks and limitations such as: poorly reproducible treatment technologies — eventually resulting in poor tube-to-tube repeatability and double or multiple peaks; impaired efficiency compared with modifier addition to each sample aliquot; relatively short lifetimes; limitations imposed on temperature programs, the pyrolysis, atomization and cleaning temperatures being set somewhat lower to avoid excessive loss of modifier; applicability to relatively simple sample solutions rather than to high-salt matrices and acidic digests; side effects of overstabilization, etc. The most important niches of application appear to be the utilization of permanently modified surfaces in coupled VG-ETAAS techniques, analysis of organic solvents and extracts, concentrates and fractions obtained after enrichment and/or speciation separations and direct ETAAS determinations of highly volatile analytes in relatively simple sample matrices.

  18. Speciation of mercury in fish samples by flow injection catalytic cold vapour atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yanlin; Adeloju, Samuel B

    2012-04-01

    A rapid flow injection catalytic cold vapour atomic absorption spectrometric (FI-CCV-AAS) method is described for speciation and determination of mercury in biological samples. Varying concentrations of NaBH(4) were employed for mercury vapour generation from inorganic and mixture of inorganic and organic (total) Hg. The presence of Fe(3+), Cu(2+) and thiourea had catalytic effect on mercury vapour generation from methylmercury (MeHg) and, when together, Cu(2+) and thiourea had synergistic catalytic effect on the vapour generation. Of the two metal ions, Fe(3+) gave the best sensitivity enhancement, achieving the same sensitivity for MeHg and inorganic Hg(2+). Due to similarity of resulting sensitivity, Hg(2+) was used successfully as a primary standard for quantification of inorganic and total Hg. The catalysis was homogeneous in nature, and it was assumed that the breaking of the C-Hg bond was facilitated by the delocalization of the 5d electron pairs in Hg atom. The extraction of MeHg and inorganic mercury (In-Hg) in fish samples were achieved quantitatively with hydrochloric acid in the presence of thiourea and determined by FI-CCV-AAS. The application of the method to the quantification of mercury species in a fish liver reference material DOLT-4 gave 91.5% and 102.3% recoveries for total and methyl mercury, respectively. The use of flow injection enabled rapid analysis with a sample throughput of 180 h(-1).

  19. Contents of cadmium, mercury and lead in fish from the Atlantic sea (Morocco) determined by atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Chahid, Adil; Hilali, Mustapha; Benlhachimi, Abdeljalil; Bouzid, Taoufiq

    2014-03-15

    As a part of a specific monitoring program, lead (Pb) cadmium (Cd) and mercury (Hg) concentrations in important species of fish from various fishing ports of the southern Kingdom of Morocco (Sardina pilchardus, Scomber scombrus, Plectorhinchus mediterraneus, Trachurus trachurus, Octopus vulgaris, Boops boops, Sarda sarda, Trisopterus capelanus, and Conger conger) were investigated by the Moroccan Reference Laboratory (NRL) for trace elements in foodstuffs of animal origin. The samples were analysed for lead and cadmium by a graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GFAAS); and for mercury by cold vapour atomic absorption spectrometry (CVAAS). The results were expressed as μg/g of wet weight (w/w). The levels of Cd, Pb and Hg in muscles of fish were 0.009-0.036, 0.013-0.114 and 0.049-0.194 μg/g, respectively. The present study showed that different metals were present in the sample at different levels but within the maximum residual levels prescribed by the EU for the fish and shellfish from these areas, in general, should cause no health problems for consumers.

  20. Determination of total selenium in pharmaceutical and herbal supplements by hydride generation and graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Kazi, Tasneem G; Kolachi, Nida F; Afridi, Hassan I; Brahman, Kapil Dev; Shah, Faheem

    2014-01-01

    The total selenium (Se) was determined in herbal and pharmaceutical supplements used for liver diseases. The total Se contents were determined in different pharmaceutical and herbal supplements by hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometry (HGAAS) and graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GFAAS) after microwave-assisted acid digestion. The accuracy of the techniques was evaluated by using certified reference material and the standard addition method. The recoveries of total Se were 99.4 and 99.0% for HGAAS and GFAAS, respectively. The precision of the techniques expressed as RSD were 2.34 and 4.54% for HGAAS and GFAAS measurements, respectively. The LOD values for HGAAS and GFAAS were 0.025 and 0.052 pglg, respectively. The concentrations of Se in pharmaceutical and herbal supplements were found in the range of 19.2-53.8 and 25.0-42.5 pg/g, respectively, corresponding to 35-76% and 45-76% of the total recommended dose of Se for adults.

  1. Determination of total selenium in pharmaceutical and herbal supplements by hydride generation and graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Kazi, Tasneem G; Kolachi, Nida F; Afridi, Hassan I; Brahman, Kapil Dev; Shah, Faheem

    2014-01-01

    The total selenium (Se) was determined in herbal and pharmaceutical supplements used for liver diseases. The total Se contents were determined in different pharmaceutical and herbal supplements by hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometry (HGAAS) and graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GFAAS) after microwave-assisted acid digestion. The accuracy of the techniques was evaluated by using certified reference material and the standard addition method. The recoveries of total Se were 99.4 and 99.0% for HGAAS and GFAAS, respectively. The precision of the techniques expressed as RSD were 2.34 and 4.54% for HGAAS and GFAAS measurements, respectively. The LOD values for HGAAS and GFAAS were 0.025 and 0.052 pglg, respectively. The concentrations of Se in pharmaceutical and herbal supplements were found in the range of 19.2-53.8 and 25.0-42.5 pg/g, respectively, corresponding to 35-76% and 45-76% of the total recommended dose of Se for adults. PMID:25632445

  2. Determination of Chlorine in Milk via Molecular Absorption of SrCl Using High-Resolution Continuum Source Graphite Furnace Atomic Absorption Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ozbek, Nil; Akman, Suleyman

    2016-07-20

    Total chlorine in milk was determined via the molecular absorption of diatomic strontium monochloride at 635.862 nm using high-resolution continuum source graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry. The effects of coating the graphite furnace, using different modifiers, amount of molecule-forming element, and different calibrants were investigated and optimized. Chlorine concentrations in milk samples were determined in a Zr-coated graphite furnace using 25 μg of Sr as the molecule-forming reagent and applying a pyrolysis temperature of 600 °C and a molecule-forming temperature of 2300 °C. Linearity was maintained up to 500 μg mL(-1) of Cl. The method was tested by analyzing a certified reference wastewater. The results were in the uncertainty limits of the certified value. The limit of detection of the method was 1.76 μg mL(-1). The chlorine concentrations in various cow milk samples taken from the market were found in the range of 588-1472 mg L(-1).

  3. Determination of Chlorine in Milk via Molecular Absorption of SrCl Using High-Resolution Continuum Source Graphite Furnace Atomic Absorption Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ozbek, Nil; Akman, Suleyman

    2016-07-20

    Total chlorine in milk was determined via the molecular absorption of diatomic strontium monochloride at 635.862 nm using high-resolution continuum source graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry. The effects of coating the graphite furnace, using different modifiers, amount of molecule-forming element, and different calibrants were investigated and optimized. Chlorine concentrations in milk samples were determined in a Zr-coated graphite furnace using 25 μg of Sr as the molecule-forming reagent and applying a pyrolysis temperature of 600 °C and a molecule-forming temperature of 2300 °C. Linearity was maintained up to 500 μg mL(-1) of Cl. The method was tested by analyzing a certified reference wastewater. The results were in the uncertainty limits of the certified value. The limit of detection of the method was 1.76 μg mL(-1). The chlorine concentrations in various cow milk samples taken from the market were found in the range of 588-1472 mg L(-1). PMID:27345208

  4. Chromium determination in pharmaceutical grade barium sulfate by solid sampling electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry with Zeeman-effect background correction.

    PubMed

    Bolzan, Rodrigo Cordeiro; Rodrigues, Luis Frederico; Mattos, Júlio Cezar Paz de; Dressler, Valderi Luiz; Flores, Erico Marlon de Moraes

    2007-11-15

    A procedure for chromium (Cr) determination in pharmaceutical grade barium sulfate by direct solid sampling electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (DSS-ET AAS) with Zeeman-effect background correction was developed. Operational conditions for the proposed procedure and the use of citric acid, ammonium phosphate, palladium and magnesium nitrate as chemical modifiers were evaluated. Pyrolysis and atomization temperatures were set at 1500 and 2400 degrees C, respectively and the use of matrix modifiers did not improve these conditions. Graphite platform presented high degradation rate, but minima changes were observed in the sensitivity or signal profile. Samples (0.3-1 mg) were weighted and introduced into the furnace using a manual solid sampling system. The linear concentration range of the calibration curve was from 100 to 1800 pg (R(2)>0.995). The characteristic mass was 7.7 pg and the limit of detection was 2.4 pg. Chromium concentration in commercial samples ranged from 0.45 to 1.06 microg g(-1) and these results were confirmed by standard addition method. The mean reproducibility was 12% (n=20 in a 3-day period) and repeatability was less than 9%. Results obtained using inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry and conventional electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry after extraction with HNO3 were around 20% lower than those obtained by the proposed procedure. It was assumed that the low results were due to incomplete extraction even using hard conditions related to temperature and pressure. The proposed procedure by DSS-ET AAS provided some advantages related to recommended pharmacopoeias methodology, as lower risks of contamination and analyte losses, higher specificity, accuracy and sensitivity, no toxic or unstable reagents are required, and calibration with aqueous standards was feasible.

  5. DNA sequence analysis by MALDI mass spectrometry.

    PubMed Central

    Kirpekar, F; Nordhoff, E; Larsen, L K; Kristiansen, K; Roepstorff, P; Hillenkamp, F

    1998-01-01

    Conventional DNA sequencing is based on gel electrophoretic separation of the sequencing products. Gel casting and electrophoresis are the time limiting steps, and the gel separation is occasionally imperfect due to aberrant mobility of certain fragments, leading to erroneous sequence determination. Furthermore, illegitimately terminated products frequently cannot be distinguished from correctly terminated ones, a phenomenon that also obscures data interpretation. In the present work the use of MALDI mass spectrometry for sequencing of DNA amplified from clinical samples is implemented. The unambiguous and fast identification of deletions and substitutions in DNA amplified from heterozygous carriers realistically suggest MALDI mass spectrometry as a future alternative to conventional sequencing procedures for high throughput screening for mutations. Unique features of the method are demonstrated by sequencing a DNA fragment that could not be sequenced conventionally because of gel electrophoretic band compression and the presence of multiple non-specific termination products. Taking advantage of the accurate mass information provided by MALDI mass spectrometry, the sequence was deduced, and the nature of the non-specific termination could be determined. The method described here increases the fidelity in DNA sequencing, is fast, compatible with standard DNA sequencing procedures, and amenable to automation. PMID:9592136

  6. Determination of total mercury for marine environmental monitoring studies by solid sampling continuum source high resolution atomic absorption spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandjukov, Petko; Orani, Anna Maria; Han, Eunmi; Vassileva, Emilia

    2015-01-01

    The most critical step in almost all commonly used analytical procedures for Hg determination is the sample preparation due to its extreme volatility. One of the possible solutions of this problem is the application of methods for direct analysis of solid samples. The possibilities for solid sampling high resolution continuum source atomic absorption spectrometry (HR CS AAS) determination of total mercury in various marine environmental samples e.g. sediments and biota are object of the present study. The instrumental parameters were optimized in order to obtain reproducible and interference free analytical signal. A calibration technique based on the use of solid standard certified reference materials similar to the nature of the analyzed sample was developed and applied to various CRMs and real samples. This technique allows simple and reliable evaluation of the uncertainty of the result and the metrological characteristics of the method. A validation approach in line with the requirements of ISO 17025 standard and Eurachem guidelines was followed. With this in mind, selectivity, working range (0.06 to 25 ng for biota and 0.025 to 4 ng for sediment samples, expressed as total Hg) linearity (confirmed by Student's t-test), bias (1.6-4.3%), repeatability (4-9%), reproducibility (9-11%), and absolute limit of detection (0.025 ng for sediment, 0.096 ng for marine biota) were systematically assessed using solid CRMs. The relative expanded uncertainty was estimated at 15% for sediment sample and 8.5% for marine biota sample (k = 2). Demonstration of traceability of measurement results is also presented. The potential of the proposed analytical procedure, based on solid sampling HR CS AAS technique was demonstrated by direct analysis of sea sediments form the Caribbean region and various CRMs. Overall, the use of solid sampling HR CS AAS permits obtaining significant advantages for the determination of this complex analyte in marine samples, such as straightforward

  7. Diamond nanowires for highly sensitive matrix-free mass spectrometry analysis of small molecules.

    PubMed

    Coffinier, Yannick; Szunerits, Sabine; Drobecq, Hervé; Melnyk, Oleg; Boukherroub, Rabah

    2012-01-01

    This paper reports on the use of boron-doped diamond nanowires (BDD NWs) as an inorganic substrate for matrix-free laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (LDI-MS) analysis of small molecules. The diamond nanowires are prepared by reactive ion etching (RIE) with oxygen plasma of highly boron-doped (the boron level is 10(19) B cm(-3)) or undoped nanocrystalline diamond substrates. The resulting diamond nanowires are coated with a thin silicon oxide layer that confers a superhydrophilic character to the surface. To minimize droplet spreading, the nanowires were chemically functionalized with octadecyltrichlorosilane (OTS) and then UV/ozone treated to reach a final water contact angle of 120°. The sub-bandgap absorption under UV laser irradiation and the heat confinement inside the nanowires allowed desorption/ionization, most likely via a thermal mechanism, and mass spectrometry analysis of small molecules. A detection limit of 200 zeptomole for verapamil was demonstrated.

  8. High-resolution continuum source electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry: Linearization of the calibration curves within a broad concentration range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katskov, Dmitri; Hlongwane, Miranda; Heitmann, Uwe; Florek, Stefan

    2012-05-01

    The calculation algorithm suggested provides linearization of the calibration curves in high-resolution continuum source electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry. The algorithm is based on the modification of the function wavelength-integrated absorbance vs. concentration of analyte vapor in the absorption volume. According to the suggested approach, the absorption line is represented by a triangle for low and trapezium for high analyte vapor concentration in the absorption volume. The respective semi-empirical formulas include two linearization parameters, which depend on properties of the absorption line and characteristics of the atomizer and spectrometer. The parameters can be approximately evaluated from the theory and determined in practice from the original broad-range calibration curve. The parameters were found and the proposed calculation algorithm verified in the experiments on direct determination of Ag, Cd, Cu, Fe, Mn and Pb in the solutions within a concentration ranges from 0.15 to 625 μg·L- 1 using tube, platform tube and filter furnace atomizers. The use of various atomizers, lines, elements and atomization temperatures made possible the simulation of various practical analytical conditions. It was found that the algorithm and optimal linearization parameters made it possible to obtain for each line and atomizer linear approximations of the calibration curves within 3-4 orders of magnitude with correlation coefficients close to 0.999. The algorithm makes possible to employ a single line for the direct element determination over a broad concentration range. The sources of errors and the possibility of a priori theoretical evaluation of the linearization parameters are discussed.

  9. Applications of Mass Spectrometry to Structural Analysis of Marine Oligosaccharides

    PubMed Central

    Lang, Yinzhi; Zhao, Xia; Liu, Lili; Yu, Guangli

    2014-01-01

    Marine oligosaccharides have attracted increasing attention recently in developing potential drugs and biomaterials for their particular physical and chemical properties. However, the composition and sequence analysis of marine oligosaccharides are very challenging for their structural complexity and heterogeneity. Mass spectrometry (MS) has become an important technique for carbohydrate analysis by providing more detailed structural information, including molecular mass, sugar constituent, sequence, inter-residue linkage position and substitution pattern. This paper provides an overview of the structural analysis based on MS approaches in marine oligosaccharides, which are derived from some biologically important marine polysaccharides, including agaran, carrageenan, alginate, sulfated fucan, chitosan, glycosaminoglycan (GAG) and GAG-like polysaccharides. Applications of electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) are mainly presented and the general applications of matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS) are also outlined. Some technical challenges in the structural analysis of marine oligosaccharides by MS have also been pointed out. PMID:24983643

  10. Chemometric evaluation of Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Ni (inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry) and Pb (graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry) concentrations in lipstick samples intended to be used by adults and children.

    PubMed

    Batista, Érica Ferreira; Augusto, Amanda dos Santos; Pereira-Filho, Edenir Rodrigues

    2016-04-01

    A method was developed for determining the concentrations of Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Ni and Pb in lipstick samples intended to be used by adults and children using inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP OES) and graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GF AAS) after treatment with dilute HNO3 and hot block. The combination of fractional factorial design and Desirability function was used to evaluate the ICP OES operational parameters and the regression models using Central Composite and Doehlert designs were calculated to stablish the best working condition for all analytes. Seventeen lipstick samples manufactured in different countries with different colors and brands were analyzed. Some samples contained high concentrations of toxic elements, such as Cr and Pb, which are carcinogenic and cause allergic and eczematous dermatitis. The maximum concentration detected was higher than the permissible safe limits for human use, and the samples containing these high metal concentrations were intended for use by children. Principal component analysis (PCA) was used as a chemometrics tool for exploratory analysis to observe the similarities between samples relative to the metal concentrations (a correlation between Cd and Pb was observed).

  11. Chemometric evaluation of Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Ni (inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry) and Pb (graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry) concentrations in lipstick samples intended to be used by adults and children.

    PubMed

    Batista, Érica Ferreira; Augusto, Amanda dos Santos; Pereira-Filho, Edenir Rodrigues

    2016-04-01

    A method was developed for determining the concentrations of Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Ni and Pb in lipstick samples intended to be used by adults and children using inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP OES) and graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GF AAS) after treatment with dilute HNO3 and hot block. The combination of fractional factorial design and Desirability function was used to evaluate the ICP OES operational parameters and the regression models using Central Composite and Doehlert designs were calculated to stablish the best working condition for all analytes. Seventeen lipstick samples manufactured in different countries with different colors and brands were analyzed. Some samples contained high concentrations of toxic elements, such as Cr and Pb, which are carcinogenic and cause allergic and eczematous dermatitis. The maximum concentration detected was higher than the permissible safe limits for human use, and the samples containing these high metal concentrations were intended for use by children. Principal component analysis (PCA) was used as a chemometrics tool for exploratory analysis to observe the similarities between samples relative to the metal concentrations (a correlation between Cd and Pb was observed). PMID:26838401

  12. A simple and fast ultrasound-assisted extraction procedure for Fe and Zn determination in milk-based infant formulas using flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS).

    PubMed

    Machado, Ignacio; Bergmann, Gabriela; Pistón, Mariela

    2016-03-01

    A simple and fast ultrasound-assisted procedure for the determination of iron and zinc in infant formulas is presented. The analytical determinations were carried out by flame atomic absorption spectrometry. Multivariate experiments were performed for optimization; in addition, a comparative study was carried out using two ultrasonic devices. A method using an ultrasonic bath was selected because several samples can be prepared simultaneously, and there is less contamination risk. Analytical precision (sr(%)) was 3.3% and 4.1% for iron and zinc, respectively. Trueness was assessed using a reference material and by comparison of the results obtained analyzing commercial samples using a reference method. The results were statistically equivalent to the certified values and in good agreement with those obtained using the reference method. The proposed method can be easily implemented in laboratories for routine analysis with the advantage of being rapid and in agreement with green chemistry. PMID:26471568

  13. Validation of a hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometry methodology for determination of mercury in fish designed for application in the Brazilian national residue control plan.

    PubMed

    Damin, Isabel C F; Santo, Maria A E; Hennigen, Rosmari; Vargas, Denise M

    2013-01-01

    In the present study, a method for the determination of mercury (Hg) in fish was validated according to ISO/IEC 17025, INMETRO (Brazil), and more recent European recommendations (Commission Decision 2007/333/EC and 2002/657/EC) for implementation in the Brazilian Residue Control Plan (NRCP) in routine applications. The parameters evaluated in the validation were investigated in detail. The results obtained for limit of detection and quantification were respectively, 2.36 and 7.88 μg kg(-1) of Hg. While the recovery varies between 90-96%. The coefficient of variation was of 4.06-8.94% for the repeatability. Furthermore, a comparison using an external proficiency testing scheme was realized. The results of method validated for the determination of the mercury in fish by Hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometry were considered suitable for implementation in routine analysis. PMID:24007488

  14. Element-selective trace detection of toxic species in environmental samples using chromatographic techniques and derivative diode laser absorption spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koch, J.; Zybin, A.; Niemax, K.

    1998-10-01

    Very sensitive laser absorption techniques based on a double-beam scheme with logarithmic processing of the detector signals and wavelength modulation of laser diodes are presented. Detection limits equivalent to 10-7 absorption per square root of detection bandwidth are obtained if sufficient laser power is available and if the absorption is also subject to additional modulation. The analytical versatility of these techniques is demonstrated by quantitative analysis of very low concentrations of (i) Cr(VI) species in tap water and (ii) chlorinated poly-aromatics (chlorophenols) in plant extracts, both after chromatographic separation. The atomic absorption measurements were performed in an air-acetylene flame (Cr) and in a low-pressure microwave-induced plasma (chlorophenols).

  15. Investigation of artifacts caused by deuterium background correction in the determination of phosphorus by electrothermal atomization using high-resolution continuum source atomic absorption spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dessuy, Morgana B.; Vale, Maria Goreti R.; Lepri, Fábio G.; Borges, Daniel L. G.; Welz, Bernhard; Silva, Márcia M.; Heitmann, Uwe

    2008-02-01

    The artifacts created in the measurement of phosphorus at the 213.6-nm non-resonance line by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry using line source atomic absorption spectrometry (LS AAS) and deuterium lamp background correction (D 2 BC) have been investigated using high-resolution continuum source atomic absorption spectrometry (HR-CS AAS). The absorbance signals and the analytical curves obtained by LS AAS without and with D 2 BC, and with HR-CS AAS without and with automatic correction for continuous background absorption, and also with least-squares background correction for molecular absorption with rotational fine structure were compared. The molecular absorption due to the suboxide PO that exhibits pronounced fine structure could not be corrected by the D 2 BC system, causing significant overcorrection. Among the investigated chemical modifiers, NaF, La, Pd and Pd + Ca, the Pd modifier resulted in the best agreement of the results obtained with LS AAS and HR-CS AAS. However, a 15% to 100% higher sensitivity, expressed as slope of the analytical curve, was obtained for LS AAS compared to HR-CS AAS, depending on the modifier. Although no final proof could be found, the most likely explanation is that this artifact is caused by a yet unidentified phosphorus species that causes a spectrally continuous absorption, which is corrected without problems by HR-CS AAS, but which is not recognized and corrected by the D 2 BC system of LS AAS.

  16. Determination of cadmium in the livers and kidneys of puffins by carbon furnace atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ottaway, J M; Campbell, W C

    1976-01-01

    A carbon furnace atomic absorption procedure is described for the determination of cadmium in the livers and kidneys of puffins, fratercula arctica. Samples are dried and weighed and 2 to 100 mg are dissolved in sulphuric and nitric acids. These solutions are analysed directly in the carbon furnace against aqueous standards and provide accurate results in the range 0-1 to 100 micrograms/g dry weight. The method is simple and rapid and requires much less of the small total sample than would be required for flame atomic absorption. PMID:1030692

  17. Biomolecule Analysis by Ion Mobility Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Bohrer, Brian C.; Merenbloom, Samuel I.; Koeniger, Stormy L.; Hilderbrand, Amy E.; Clemmer, David E.

    2013-01-01

    Although nonnative protein conformations, including intermediates along the folding pathway and kinetically trapped misfolded species that disfavor the native state, are rarely isolated in the solution phase, they are often stable in the gas phase, where macromolecular ions from electrospray ionization can exist in varying charge states. Differences in the structures of nonnative conformations in the gas phase are often large enough to allow different shapes and charge states to be separated because of differences in their mobilities through a gas. Moreover, gentle collisional activation can be used to induce structural transformations. These new structures often have different mobilities. Thus, there is the possibility of developing a multidimensional separation that takes advantage of structural differences of multiple stable states. This review discusses how nonnative states differ in the gas phase compared with solution and presents an overview of early attempts to utilize and manipulate structures in order to develop ion mobility spectrometry as a rapid and sensitive technique for separating complex mixtures of biomolecules prior to mass spectrometry. PMID:20636082

  18. Determination of copper in airborne particulate matter using slurry sampling and chemical vapor generation atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Silva, Laiana O B; Leao, Danilo J; dos Santos, Debora C; Matos, Geraldo D; de Andrade, Jailson B; Ferreira, Sergio L C

    2014-09-01

    The present paper describes the development of a method for the determination of copper in airborne particulate matter using slurry sampling and chemical vapor generation atomic absorption spectrometry (CVG AAS). Chemometric tools were employed to characterize the influence of several factors on the generation of volatile copper species. First, a two-level full factorial design was performed that included the following chemical variables: hydrochloric acid concentration, tetrahydroborate concentration, sulfanilamide concentration and tetrahydroborate volume, using absorbance as the response. Under the established experimental conditions, the hydrochloric acid concentration had the greatest influence on the generation of volatile copper species. Subsequently, a Box-Behnken design was performed to determine the optimum conditions for these parameters. A second chemometric study employing a two-level full factorial design was performed to evaluate the following physical factors: tetrahydroborate flow rate, flame composition, alcohol volume and sample volume. The results of this study demonstrated that the tetrahydroborate flow rate was critical for the process. The chemometric experiments determined the following experimental conditions for the method: hydrochloric acid concentration, 0.208 M; tetrahydroborate concentration, 4.59%; sulfanilamide concentration, 0.79%; tetrahydroborate volume, 2.50 mL; tetrahydroborate flow rate, 6.50 mL min(-1); alcohol volume, 200 µL; and sample volume, 7.0 mL. Thus, this method, using a slurry volume of 500 µL and a final dilution of 7 mL, allowed for the determination of copper with limits of detection and quantification of 0.30 and 0.99 µg L(-1), respectively. Precisions, expressed as RSD%, of 4.6 and 2.8% were obtained using copper solutions at concentrations of 5.0 and 50.0 µg L(-1), respectively. The accuracy was evaluated by the analysis of a certified reference material of urban particulate matter. The copper concentration

  19. Determination of copper in airborne particulate matter using slurry sampling and chemical vapor generation atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Silva, Laiana O B; Leao, Danilo J; dos Santos, Debora C; Matos, Geraldo D; de Andrade, Jailson B; Ferreira, Sergio L C

    2014-09-01

    The present paper describes the development of a method for the determination of copper in airborne particulate matter using slurry sampling and chemical vapor generation atomic absorption spectrometry (CVG AAS). Chemometric tools were employed to characterize the influence of several factors on the generation of volatile copper species. First, a two-level full factorial design was performed that included the following chemical variables: hydrochloric acid concentration, tetrahydroborate concentration, sulfanilamide concentration and tetrahydroborate volume, using absorbance as the response. Under the established experimental conditions, the hydrochloric acid concentration had the greatest influence on the generation of volatile copper species. Subsequently, a Box-Behnken design was performed to determine the optimum conditions for these parameters. A second chemometric study employing a two-level full factorial design was performed to evaluate the following physical factors: tetrahydroborate flow rate, flame composition, alcohol volume and sample volume. The results of this study demonstrated that the tetrahydroborate flow rate was critical for the process. The chemometric experiments determined the following experimental conditions for the method: hydrochloric acid concentration, 0.208 M; tetrahydroborate concentration, 4.59%; sulfanilamide concentration, 0.79%; tetrahydroborate volume, 2.50 mL; tetrahydroborate flow rate, 6.50 mL min(-1); alcohol volume, 200 µL; and sample volume, 7.0 mL. Thus, this method, using a slurry volume of 500 µL and a final dilution of 7 mL, allowed for the determination of copper with limits of detection and quantification of 0.30 and 0.99 µg L(-1), respectively. Precisions, expressed as RSD%, of 4.6 and 2.8% were obtained using copper solutions at concentrations of 5.0 and 50.0 µg L(-1), respectively. The accuracy was evaluated by the analysis of a certified reference material of urban particulate matter. The copper concentration

  20. Determination of serum aluminum by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry: A comparison between Zeeman and continuum background correction systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kruger, Pamela C.; Parsons, Patrick J.

    2007-03-01

    Excessive exposure to aluminum (Al) can produce serious health consequences in people with impaired renal function, especially those undergoing hemodialysis. Al can accumulate in the brain and in bone, causing dialysis-related encephalopathy and renal osteodystrophy. Thus, dialysis patients are routinely monitored for Al overload, through measurement of their serum Al. Electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS) is widely used for serum Al determination. Here, we assess the analytical performances of three ETAAS instruments, equipped with different background correction systems and heating arrangements, for the determination of serum Al. Specifically, we compare (1) a Perkin Elmer (PE) Model 3110 AAS, equipped with a longitudinally (end) heated graphite atomizer (HGA) and continuum-source (deuterium) background correction, with (2) a PE Model 4100ZL AAS equipped with a transversely heated graphite atomizer (THGA) and longitudinal Zeeman background correction, and (3) a PE Model Z5100 AAS equipped with a HGA and transverse Zeeman background correction. We were able to transfer the method for serum Al previously established for the Z5100 and 4100ZL instruments to the 3110, with only minor modifications. As with the Zeeman instruments, matrix-matched calibration was not required for the 3110 and, thus, aqueous calibration standards were used. However, the 309.3-nm line was chosen for analysis on the 3110 due to failure of the continuum background correction system at the 396.2-nm line. A small, seemingly insignificant overcorrection error was observed in the background channel on the 3110 instrument at the 309.3-nm line. On the 4100ZL, signal oscillation was observed in the atomization profile. The sensitivity, or characteristic mass ( m0), for Al at the 309.3-nm line on the 3110 AAS was found to be 12.1 ± 0.6 pg, compared to 16.1 ± 0.7 pg for the Z5100, and 23.3 ± 1.3 pg for the 4100ZL at the 396.2-nm line. However, the instrumental detection limits (3

  1. Serum and tissue selenium contents related to renal disease and colon cancer as determined by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Marchante-Gayón, J M; Sánchez-Uría, J E; Sanz-Medel, A

    1996-12-01

    Microwave digestion with nitric acid and hydrogen peroxide was applied to the determination of selenium in biological tissues by Electrothermal Atomic Absorption Spectrometry (ETAAS). Validation of this method is presented in terms of adequate recovery of selenium from standard reference materials and the method is applied to carcinogen human colon tissue. Ultramicrofiltration was used to study selenium protein binding and its fractionation and speciation in blood serum. These studies showed that 95% of the total selenium in serum seems to be bonded to high-molecular-weight proteins. Experiments with renal failure patients showed lower selenium levels than in the health population (0.57 +/- 0.23 mM versus 0.81 +/- 0.11 mM). A wider distribution pattern of total serum selenium concentration (from 0.1 to 1 mM) was clearly observed in renal failure patients. However, the ultramicrofiltrable selenium fraction was always constant, even in the presence of desferrioxamine (DFO).

  2. On-line precipitation/dissolution system for the preconcentration and determination of manganese traces by atomic absorption spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dittfurth, Carola; Ballesteros, Evaristo; Gallego, Mercedes; Valcárcel, Miguel

    1996-12-01

    Flame atomic absorption spectrometry was used for the determination of Mn in biological material following preconcentration by precipitation. The proposed preconcentration method is based on the continuous precipitation of Mn(II) as hydrated Mn(IV) oxide in ammonia buffer and dissolution of the precipitate with hydrogen oxalate or dilute nitric acid. The sensitivity of the Mn determination is increased by the presence of hydrogen peroxide, which raises the rate of oxidation of Mn(II) to Mn(IV). By using a time-based technique (at a sample loading rate of 4 ml min -1) a concentration factor of up to 55 was obtained using 24 ml of sample. The effect of concurrent cations was investigated; the most adverse effect was exerted by Fe(III), which interfered at concentrations 50 times higher than that of Mn(II).

  3. Fractionation of calcium and magnesium in honeys, juices and tea infusions by ion exchange and flame atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Pohl, P; Prusisz, B

    2006-07-15

    An analytical procedure was proposed to study the operational fractionation of Ca and Mg in bee honeys, fruit juices and tea infusions. The protocol devised was based on the solid phase extraction of distinct metal fractions on different sorbents, namely strong acidic cation exchanger Dowex 50W x 4, weak acidic cation exchanger Diaion WT01S and strong basic anion exchange resin Dowex 1 x 4. For the evaluation of the amounts of the metal fractions distinguished, a flame atomic absorption spectrometry was used off-line prior to the determination of Ca and Mg concentrations in the effluents obtained. It was established that Ca and Mg are mostly present in the analysed samples in the form of cationic species (96-100%). The accuracy of the entire fractionation scheme and sample preparation procedures involved was verified by the performance of the recovery tests. PMID:18970707

  4. Cloud point extraction thermospray flame quartz furnace atomic absorption spectrometry for determination of ultratrace cadmium in water and urine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Peng; Zhang, Yunchang; Lv, Yi; Hou, Xiandeng

    2006-12-01

    A simple, low cost and highly sensitive method based on cloud point extraction (CPE) for separation/preconcentration and thermospray flame quartz furnace atomic absorption spectrometry was proposed for the determination of ultratrace cadmium in water and urine samples. The analytical procedure involved the formation of analyte-entrapped surfactant micelles by mixing the analyte solution with an ammonium pyrrolidinedithiocarbamate (APDC) solution and a Triton X-114 solution. When the temperature of the system was higher than the cloud point of Triton X-114, the complex of cadmium-PDC entered the surfactant-rich phase and thus separation of the analyte from the matrix was achieved. Under optimal chemical and instrumental conditions, the limit of detection was 0.04 μg/L for cadmium with a sample volume of 10 mL. The analytical results of cadmium in water and urine samples agreed well with those by ICP-MS.

  5. Diagnostics of reactive pulsed plasmas by UV and VUV absorption spectroscopy and by modulated beam Mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cunge, Gilles

    2011-10-01

    Pulsed plasmas are promising for etching applications in the microelectronic industry. However, many new phenomena are involved when a high density discharge is pulsed. To better understand these processes it is necessary to probe the radicals' kinetics with a microsecond resolution. We have developed several diagnostics to reach this goal including broad band absorption spectroscopy with UV LEDs to detect small polyatomic radicals and with a deuterium VUV source to detect larger closed shell molecules and the modulated mass spectrometry to monitor atomic species. We will discuss the impact of the plasma pulsing frequency and duty cycle on the radical densities in Cl2 based plasmas, and the consequences on plasma processes. Work done in collaboration with Paul Bodart, Melisa Brihoum, Maxime Darnon, Erwin Pargon, Olivier Joubert, and Nader Sadeghi, CNRS/LTM.

  6. Determination of cadmium in spring water by graphite-furnace atomic absorption spectrometry after coprecipitation with ytterbium hydroxide.

    PubMed

    Atsumi, Kousuke; Minami, Tomoharu; Ueda, Joichi

    2005-06-01

    A coprecipitation method with ytterbium hydroxide was studied for the determination of cadmium in water samples by graphite-furnace atomic absorption spectrometry. Up to 40 ng of cadmium in water samples was quantitatively coprecipitated with ytterbium hydroxide at pH 8.0-11.2. The concentration factor was 100 fold. The coprecipitated cadmium was sensitively determined without any influence of ytterbium and the calibration curve was linear from 0.1 to 4 ng/mL of cadmium. The detection limit (signal/noise = 2) was 2.9 pg/mL in 100 mL of the initial sample solution. Twenty-nine diverse ions tested did not interfere with the determination in at least a 10000-fold mass ratio to cadmium. The proposed method was successfully applied to the determination of cadmium in spring water.

  7. Determination of silver, bismuth, cadmium, copper, lead, and zinc in geologic materials by atomic absorption spectrometry with tricaprylylmethylammonium chloride

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Viets, J.G.

    1978-01-01

    Interferences commonly encountered in the determination of silver, bismuth, cadmium, copper, lead, and zinc at crustal abundance levels are effectively eliminated using a rapid, sensitive, organic extraction technique. A potassium chlorate-hydrochloric acid digestion solubilizes the metals not tightly bound in the silicate lattice of rocks, soils, and stream sediments. The six metals are selectively extracted into a 10% Aliquat 336-MIBK organic phase in the presence of ascorbic acid and potassium iodide. Metals in the organic extract are determined by flame atomic absorption spectrometry to the 0.02-ppm level for silver, cadmium, copper, and zinc and to the 0.2-ppm level for bismuth and lead with a maximum relative standard deviation of 18.8% for known reference samples. An additional hydrofluoric acid digestion may be used to determine metals substituted in the silicate lattice.

  8. Determination of arsenic, antimony, bismuth, cadmium, copper, lead, molybdenum, silver and zinc in geological materials by atomic-absorption spectrometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Viets, J.G.; O'Leary, R. M.; Clark, Robert J.

    1984-01-01

    Arsenic, antimony, bismuth, cadmium, copper, lead, molybdenum, silver and zinc are very useful elements in geochemical exploration. In the proposed method, geological samples are fused with potassium pyrosulphate and the fusate is dissolved in a solution of hydrochloric acid, ascorbic acid and potassium iodide. When this solution is shaken with a 10% V/V Aliquat 336 - isobutyl methyl ketone organic phase, the nine elements of interest are selectively partitioned in the organic phase. All nine elements can then be determined in the organic phase using flame atomic-absorption spectrometry. The method is rapid and allows the determination of Ag and Cd at levels down to 0.1 p.p.m., Cu, Mo, and Zn down to 0.5 p.p.m., Pb, Bi and Sb down to 1 p.p.m. and As down to 5 p.p.m. in geological materials.

  9. Pre-concentration of trace metals from sea-water for determination by graphite-furnace atomic-absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Sturgeon, R E; Berman, S S; Desaulniers, A; Russell, D S

    1980-02-01

    Determination of Cd, Zn, Pb, Cu, Fe, Mn, Co, Cr and Ni in coastal sea-water by graphite-furnace atomic-absorption spectrometry after preconcentration by solvent extraction and use of a chelating ion-exchange resin is described. Following the extraction of the pyrrolidine-N-carbodithioate and oxinate complexes into methyl isobutyl ketone, the trace metals are further preconcentrated by back-extraction into 1.5M nitric acid. Preconcentration on the chelating resin is effected by a combined column and batch technique, allowing greater preconcentration factors to be obtained. Provided samples are appropriately treated to release non-labile metal species prior to preconcentration, both methods yield comparable analytical results with respect to the mean concentrations determined as well as to mean relative standard deviations. Control and treatment of the analytical blank is also described. PMID:18962623

  10. Determination of trace amount of cobalt in feed grains and forages by solvent extraction and graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Blanchflower, W J; Cannavan, A; Kennedy, D G

    1990-10-01

    A method is described for the determination of trace amounts of cobalt in feed grains and forages with a detection limit of 1 ng g-1. Samples are ashed in a muffle furnace and complexed with 2-nitroso-1-naphthol. Following solvent extraction, cobalt is determined using graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry. The assay can be carried out in a normal analytical laboratory without the need for special "clean" rooms. Reagents have been selected to keep reagent blank values at low levels, and heptan-2-one is used as extracting solvent to avoid problems with evaporation. The assay has been used for diagnostic purposes and to formulate special low cobalt diets for sheep for experimental purposes. PMID:2270874

  11. Determination of cobalt in biological samples by line-source and high-resolution continuum source graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry using solid sampling or alkaline treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ribeiro, Anderson Schwingel; Vieira, Mariana Antunes; da Silva, Alessandra Furtado; Borges, Daniel L. Gallindo; Welz, Bernhard; Heitmann, Uwe; Curtius, Adilson José

    2005-06-01

    Two procedures for the determination of Co in biological samples by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GF AAS) were compared: solid sampling (SS) and alkaline treatment with tetramethylammonium hydroxide (TMAH) using two different instruments for the investigation: a conventional line-source (LS) atomic absorption spectrometer and a prototype high-resolution continuum source atomic absorption spectrometer. For the direct introduction of the solid samples, certified reference materials (CRM) were ground to a particle size ≤50 μm. Alkaline treatment was carried out by placing about 250 mg of the sample in polypropylene flasks, adding 2 mL of 25% m/v tetramethylammonium hydroxide and de-ionized water. Due to its unique capacity of providing a 3-D spectral plot, a high-resolution continuum source (HR-CS) graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry was used as a tool to evaluate potential spectral interferences, including background absorption for both sample introduction procedures, revealing that a continuous background preceded the atomic signal for pyrolysis temperatures lower than 700 °C. Molecular absorption bands with pronounced rotational fine structure appeared for atomization temperatures >1800 °C probably as a consequence of the formation of PO. After optimization had been carried out using high resolution continuum source atomic absorption spectrometry, the optimized conditions were adopted also for line-source atomic absorption spectrometry. Six biological certified reference materials were analyzed, with calibration against aqueous standards, resulting in agreement with the certified values (according to the t-test for a 95% confidence level) and in detection limits as low as 5 ng g -1.

  12. Direct determination of Cu, Mn, Pb, and Zn in beer by thermospray flame furnace atomic absorption spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nascentes, Clésia C.; Kamogawa, Marcos Y.; Fernandes, Kelly G.; Arruda, Marco A. Z.; Nogueira, Ana Rita A.; Nóbrega, Joaquim A.

    2005-06-01

    In this work, thermospray flame furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (TS-FF-AAS) was employed for Cu, Mn, Pb, and Zn determination in beer without any sample digestion. The system was optimized and calibration was based on the analyte addition technique. A sample volume of 300 μl was introduced into the hot Ni tube at a flow-rate of 0.4 ml min -1 using 0.14 mol l -1 nitric acid solution or air as carrier. Different Brazilian beers were directly analyzed after ultrasonic degasification. Results were compared with those obtained by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GFAAS). The detection limits obtained for Cu, Mn, Pb, and Zn in aqueous solution were 2.2, 18, 1.6, and 0.9 μg l -1, respectively. The relative standard deviations varied from 2.7% to 7.3% ( n=8) for solutions containing the analytes in the 25-50 μg l -1 range. The concentration ranges obtained for analytes in beer samples were: Cu: 38.0-155 μg l -1; Mn: 110-348 μg l -1, Pb: 13.0-32.9 μg l -1, and Zn: 52.7-226 μg l -1. Results obtained by TS-FF-AAS and GFAAS were in agreement at a 95% confidence level. The proposed method is fast and simple, since sample digestion is not required and sensitivity can be improved without using expensive devices. The TS-FF-AAS presented suitable sensitivity for determination of Cu, Mn, Pb, and Zn in the quality control of a brewery.

  13. Evaluation of quartz tubes as atomization cells for gold determination by thermospray flame furnace atomic absorption spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morzan, Ezequiel; Piano, Ornela; Stripeikis, Jorge; Tudino, Mabel

    2012-11-01

    This work describes the development of a new analytical procedure able to determine gold by thermospray flame furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (TS-FF-AAS) using nickel tubes (NiT) and quartz tubes (QT) as atomization cells. Experiments involving changes in the flow injection operational parameters, reagent concentrations and sizes of the QT were performed in order to optimize sensitivity. Under the same operational conditions, it was observed that the employment of QT increases the sensitivity of gold determination when compared to the nickel tube. Since solutions of highly concentrated hydrochloric acid showed the best performance as carriers, quartz tubes were also preferred due to its greater tolerance to corrosion by mineral acids in comparison to NiT. In addition, changes in the internal diameter of the QT revealed an important improvement in sensitivity for smaller tubes. Under optimized conditions the main figures of merit showed values close to that of graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry with the addition of an excellent improvement of the sample throughput. They are: LOD (3 s): 0.004 μg mL- 1, sensitivity: 0.306 (μg mL- 1)- 1, RSD% (n = 10, 1 μg mL- 1): 2.5, linear range: 0.01-4 μg mL- 1 and sample throughput: 72 h- 1. This new method was employed for the determination of gold in homeopathic medicines with no need of sample digestion. Validation of the analytical results will be shown. A full discussion of the most relevant findings regarding the role of the atomization cell as a strategic key for improving sensitivity will be also provided.

  14. Multiwalled carbon nanotubes as a sorbent material for the solid phase extraction of lead from urine and subsequent determination by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peña Crecente, Rosa M.; Lovera, Carlha Gutiérrez; García, Julia Barciela; Méndez, Jennifer Álvarez; Martín, Sagrario García; Latorre, Carlos Herrero

    2014-11-01

    The determination of lead in urine is a way of monitoring the chemical exposure to this metal. In the present paper, a new method for the Pb determination by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS) in urine at low levels has been developed. Lead was separated from the undesirable urine matrix by means of a solid phase extraction (SPE) procedure. Oxidized multiwalled carbon nanotubes have been used as a sorbent material. Lead from urine was retained at pH 4.0 and was quantitatively eluted using a 0.7 M nitric acid solution and was subsequently measured by ETAAS. The effects of parameters that influence the adsorption-elution process (such as pH, eluent volume and concentration, sampling and elution flow rates) and the atomic spectrometry conditions have been studied by means of different factorial design strategies. Under the optimized conditions, the detection and quantification limits obtained were 0.08 and 0.26 μg Pb L- 1, respectively. The results demonstrate the absence of a urine matrix effect and this is the consequence of the SPE process carried out. Therefore, the developed method is useful for the analysis of Pb at low levels in real samples without the influence of other urine components. The proposed method was applied to the determination of lead in urine samples of unexposed healthy people and satisfactory results were obtained (in the range 3.64-22.9 μg Pb L- 1).

  15. Fast sequential determination of antimony and lead in pewter alloys using high-resolution continuum source flame atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Dessuy, Morgana B; de Jesus, Robson M; Brandao, Geovani C; Ferreira, Sergio L C; Vale, Maria Goreti R; Welz, Bernhard

    2013-01-01

    A simple method has been developed to determine antimony and lead in pewter alloy cups produced in Brazil, using fast sequential determination by high-resolution continuum source flame atomic absorption spectrometry. The samples were dissolved in HCl and H(2)O(2), employing a cold finger system in order to avoid analyte losses. The main resonance line of lead at 217.001 nm and a secondary line of antimony at 212.739 nm were used. The limits of detection for lead and antimony were 0.02 and 5.7 mg L(-1), respectively. The trueness of the method was established by recovery tests and comparing the results obtained by the proposed method with those obtained by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry. The results were compared using a student's t-test and there was no significant difference at a 95% confidence interval. With the developed methods, it was possible to determine accurately antimony and lead in pewter samples. The lead concentration found in the analysed samples was around 1 mg g(-1), which means that they are not lead free; however, the content was below the maximum allowed level of 5 mg g(-1). The antimony content, which was found to be between 40 and 46 mg g(-1), is actually of greater concern, as antimony is known to be potentially toxic already at very low concentrations, although there is no legislation yet for this element.

  16. Fast sequential determination of antimony and lead in pewter alloys using high-resolution continuum source flame atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Dessuy, Morgana B; de Jesus, Robson M; Brandao, Geovani C; Ferreira, Sergio L C; Vale, Maria Goreti R; Welz, Bernhard

    2013-01-01

    A simple method has been developed to determine antimony and lead in pewter alloy cups produced in Brazil, using fast sequential determination by high-resolution continuum source flame atomic absorption spectrometry. The samples were dissolved in HCl and H(2)O(2), employing a cold finger system in order to avoid analyte losses. The main resonance line of lead at 217.001 nm and a secondary line of antimony at 212.739 nm were used. The limits of detection for lead and antimony were 0.02 and 5.7 mg L(-1), respectively. The trueness of the method was established by recovery tests and comparing the results obtained by the proposed method with those obtained by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry. The results were compared using a student's t-test and there was no significant difference at a 95% confidence interval. With the developed methods, it was possible to determine accurately antimony and lead in pewter samples. The lead concentration found in the analysed samples was around 1 mg g(-1), which means that they are not lead free; however, the content was below the maximum allowed level of 5 mg g(-1). The antimony content, which was found to be between 40 and 46 mg g(-1), is actually of greater concern, as antimony is known to be potentially toxic already at very low concentrations, although there is no legislation yet for this element. PMID:23046152

  17. Estimation of boron isotope ratios using high resolution continuum source atomic absorption spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiltsche, Helmar; Prattes, Karl; Zischka, Michael; Knapp, Günter

    2009-04-01

    In the production of 10B enriched steels, the production-recycling process needs to be closely monitored for inadvertent mix-up of materials with different B isotope levels. A quick and simple method for the estimation of boron isotope ratios in high alloyed steels using high resolution continuum source flame AAS (HR-CS-FAAS) was developed. On the 208.9 nm B line the wavelength of the peak absorption of 10B and 11B differs by 2.5 pm. The wavelength of the peak absorption of boron was determined by fitting a Gauss function through spectra simultaneously recorded by HR-CS-FAAS. It was shown that a linear correlation between the wavelength of the peak absorption and the isotope ratio exists and that this correlation is independent of the total boron concentration. Internal spectroscopic standards were used to compensate for monochromator drift and monochromator resolution changes. Accuracy and precision of the analyzed samples were thereby increased by a factor of up to 1.3. Three steel reference materials and one boric acid CRM, each certified for the boron isotope ratio were used to validate the procedure.

  18. Surfactant/oil/water system for the determination of selenium in eggs by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ieggli, C. V. S.; Bohrer, D.; Noremberg, S.; do Nascimento, P. C.; de Carvalho, L. M.; Vieira, S. L.; Reis, R. N.

    2009-06-01

    An oil-in-water formulation has been optimized to determine trace levels of selenium in whole hen eggs by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry. This method is simpler and requires fewer reagents when compared with other sample pre-treatment procedures. Graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometric (GF AAS) measurement was carried out using standard addition calibration and Pd as a modifier. The precision, expressed as relative standard deviation, was better than 5% and the limit of detection was 1 µg L - 1 . The validation of the method was performed against a standard reference material Whole Egg Powder (RM 8415), and the measured Se corresponded to 95.2% of the certified value. The method was used for the determination of the Se level in eggs from hens treated with Se dietary supplements. Inorganic and organic Se sources were added to hen feed. The Se content of eggs was higher when hens were fed with organic Se compared to the other treatments. The proposed method, including sample emulsification for subsequent Se determination by GF AAS has proved to be sensitive, reproducible, simple and economical.

  19. On-Line Synthesis and Analysis by Mass Spectrometry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bain, Ryan M.; Pulliam, Christopher J.; Raab, Shannon A.; Cooks, R. Graham

    2015-01-01

    In this laboratory experiment, students learn how to use ESI to accelerate chemical synthesis and to couple it with on-line mass spectrometry for structural analysis. The Hantzsch synthesis of symmetric 1,4-dihydropyridines is a classic example of a one-pot reaction in which multiple intermediates can serve to indicate the progress of the reaction…

  20. Multiple parallel mass spectrometry for lipid and vitamin D analysis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Liquid chromatography (LC) coupled to mass spectrometry (MS) has become the method of choice for analysis of complex lipid samples. Two types of ionization sources have emerged as the most commonly used to couple LC to MS: atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) and electrospray ionization ...

  1. Rapid Analysis of Isobaric Exogenous Metabolites by Differential Mobility Spectrometry Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Parson, Whitney B; Schneider, Bradley B; Kertesz, Vilmos; Corr, Jay; Covey, Thomas R.; Van Berkel, Gary J

    2011-01-01

    The direct separation of isobaric glucuronide metabolites from propranolol dosed tissue extracts by differential mobility spectrometry mass spectrometry (DMS-MS) with the use of a polar gas-phase chemical modifier was demonstrated. The DMS gas-phase separation was able to resolve the isobaric metabolites with separation times on the order of ms instead of mins to hrs typically required when using pre-ionization chromatographic separation methods. Direct separation of isobaric metabolites from the complex tissue extract was validated using standards as well as implementing an HPLC separation prior to the DMS-MS analysis to pre-separate the species of interest. The ability to separate isobaric exogenous metabolites directly from a complex tissue extract is expected to facilitate the drug development process by increasing analytical throughput without the requirement for pre-ionization cleanup or separation strategies.

  2. Solid sampling determination of total fluorine in baby food samples by high-resolution continuum source graphite furnace molecular absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ozbek, Nil; Akman, Suleyman

    2016-11-15

    This study describes the applicability of solid sampling technique for the determination of fluorine in various baby foods via molecular absorption of calcium monofluoride generated in a graphite furnace of high-resolution continuum source atomic absorption spectrometry. Fluorine was determined at CaF wavelength, 606.440nm in a graphite tube applying a pyrolysis temperature of 1000°C and a molecule forming temperature of 2200°C. The limit of detection and characteristic mass of the method were 0.20ng and 0.17ng of fluorine, respectively. The fluorine concentrations determined in standard reference sample (bush branches and leaves) were in good agreement with the certified values. By applying the optimized parameters, the concentration of fluorine in various baby foods were determined. The fluorine concentrations were ranged from analysis, micro-scale distribution of fluorine in the samples was also determined.

  3. Solid sampling determination of total fluorine in baby food samples by high-resolution continuum source graphite furnace molecular absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ozbek, Nil; Akman, Suleyman

    2016-11-15

    This study describes the applicability of solid sampling technique for the determination of fluorine in various baby foods via molecular absorption of calcium monofluoride generated in a graphite furnace of high-resolution continuum source atomic absorption spectrometry. Fluorine was determined at CaF wavelength, 606.440nm in a graphite tube applying a pyrolysis temperature of 1000°C and a molecule forming temperature of 2200°C. The limit of detection and characteristic mass of the method were 0.20ng and 0.17ng of fluorine, respectively. The fluorine concentrations determined in standard reference sample (bush branches and leaves) were in good agreement with the certified values. By applying the optimized parameters, the concentration of fluorine in various baby foods were determined. The fluorine concentrations were ranged from analysis, micro-scale distribution of fluorine in the samples was also determined. PMID:27283621

  4. Automatic microemulsion preparation for metals determination in fuel samples using a flow-batch analyzer and graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Cunha, Francisco Antônio S; Sousa, Rafael A; Harding, David P; Cadore, Solange; Almeida, Luciano F; Araújo, Mário César U

    2012-05-21

    The principal thermodynamic advantages of using microemulsions over standard emulsions for flow metal analysis are the greatly increased analyte stability and emulsive homogeneity that improve both the ease of sample preparation, and the analytical result. In this study a piston propelled flow-batch analyzer (PFBA) for the determination of Cu, Cr and Pb in gasoline and naphtha by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GF AAS) was explored. Investigative phase modeling for low dilution was conducted both for gasoline and naphtha microemulsions. Rheological considerations were also explored including a mathematical flow derivation to fine tune the system's operational parameters, and the GF AAS coupling. Both manual and automated procedures for microemulsion preparation were compared. The results of the paired t test at a 95% confidence level showed no significant differences between them. Further recovery test results confirmed a negligible matrix effect of the sample on the analyte absorption signals and an efficient stabilization of the samples (with metals) submitted to microemulsion treatment. The accuracy of the developed procedure was attested by good recovery percentages in the ranges of 100.0±3.5% for Pb in the naphtha samples, and 100.2±3.4% and 100.7±4.6% for Cu and Cr, respectively in gasoline samples. PMID:22541820

  5. Use of High-Resolution Continuum Source Flame Atomic Absorption Spectrometry (HR-CS FAAS) for Sequential Multi-Element Determination of Metals in Seawater and Wastewater Samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peña-Vázquez, E.; Barciela-Alonso, M. C.; Pita-Calvo, C.; Domínguez-González, R.; Bermejo-Barrera, P.

    2015-09-01

    The objective of this work is to develop a method for the determination of metals in saline matrices using high-resolution continuum source flame atomic absorption spectrometry (HR-CS FAAS). Module SFS 6 for sample injection was used in the manual mode, and flame operating conditions were selected. The main absorption lines were used for all the elements, and the number of selected analytical pixels were 5 (CP±2) for Cd, Cu, Fe, Ni, Pb and Zn, and 3 pixels for Mn (CP±1). Samples were acidified (0.5% (v/v) nitric acid), and the standard addition method was used for the sequential determination of the analytes in diluted samples (1:2). The method showed good precision (RSD(%) < 4%, except for Pb (6.5%)) and good recoveries. Accuracy was checked after the analysis of an SPS-WW2 wastewater reference material diluted with synthetic seawater (dilution 1:2), showing a good agreement between certified and experimental results.

  6. Speciation of arsenic(III)/arsenic(V) and selenium(IV)/ selenium(VI) using coupled ion chromatography - hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometry

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Simple analytical methods have been developed to speciate inorganic arsenic and selenium in the ppb range using coupled ion chromatography-hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometry. Because of the differences in toxicity and adsorption behavior, determinations of the redox states arsenite A...

  7. Direct determination of particulate elements in edible oils and fats using an ultrasonic slurry sampler with graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Dalen, Gerard; de Galan, Leo

    1994-12-01

    Through the use of an ultrasonic slurry mixer, graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GFAAS) can be applied for the fully automated determination of particulate iron and nickel in edible oils and fats. The unsupervised ultrasonic slurry autosampler yields the same accuracy and somewhat better precision than the much more laborious manual GFAAS method.

  8. Determination of sulphur in various vegetables by solid sampling high-resolution electrothermal molecular absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Gunduz, Sema; Akman, Suleyman

    2015-04-01

    Sulphur was determined in various vegetables via molecular absorption of carbon monosulphide (CS) at 258.056 nm using a solid sampling high resolution continuum source electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometer (SS HR-CS ETAAS). Samples were dried, ground and directly introduced into the ruthenium coated graphite furnace as 0.05 to 0.50mg. All determinations were performed using palladium+citric acid modifier and applying a pyrolysis temperature of 1000 °C and a volatilisation temperature of 2400 °C. The results were in good agreement with certified sulphur concentrations of various vegetal CRM samples applying linear calibration technique prepared from thioacetamide. The limit of detection and characteristic mass of the method were 7.5 and 8.7 ng of S, respectively. The concentrations of S in various spinach, leek, lettuce, radish, Brussels sprouts, zucchini and chard samples were determined. It was showed that distribution of sulphur in CRM and grinded food samples were homogeneous even in micro-scale. PMID:25442545

  9. Determination of sulphur in various vegetables by solid sampling high-resolution electrothermal molecular absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Gunduz, Sema; Akman, Suleyman

    2015-04-01

    Sulphur was determined in various vegetables via molecular absorption of carbon monosulphide (CS) at 258.056 nm using a solid sampling high resolution continuum source electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometer (SS HR-CS ETAAS). Samples were dried, ground and directly introduced into the ruthenium coated graphite furnace as 0.05 to 0.50mg. All determinations were performed using palladium+citric acid modifier and applying a pyrolysis temperature of 1000 °C and a volatilisation temperature of 2400 °C. The results were in good agreement with certified sulphur concentrations of various vegetal CRM samples applying linear calibration technique prepared from thioacetamide. The limit of detection and characteristic mass of the method were 7.5 and 8.7 ng of S, respectively. The concentrations of S in various spinach, leek, lettuce, radish, Brussels sprouts, zucchini and chard samples were determined. It was showed that distribution of sulphur in CRM and grinded food samples were homogeneous even in micro-scale.

  10. Flow injection on-line dilution for zinc determination in human saliva with electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry detection.

    PubMed

    Burguera-Pascu, Margarita; Rodríguez-Archilla, Alberto; Burguera, José Luis; Burguera, Marcela; Rondón, Carlos; Carrero, Pablo

    2007-09-26

    An automated method is described for the determination of zinc in human saliva by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ET AAS) after on-line dilution of samples with a significant reduction of sample consumption per analysis (<0.4 mL including the dead volume of the system). In order to fulfill this aim without changing the sample transport conduits during the experiments, a flow injection (FI) dilution system was constructed. Its principal parts are: one propulsion device (peristaltic pump, PP) for either samples, standards or washing solution all located in an autosampler tray and for the surfactant solution (Triton X-100) used as diluent, and a two-position time based solenoid injector (TBSI(1)) which allowed the introduction of 10 microL of either solution in the diluent stream. To avoid unnecessary waste of samples, the TBSI(1) also permitted the recirculation of the solutions to their respective autosampler cups. The downstream diluted solution fills a home made sampling arm assembly. The sequential deposition of 20 microL aliquots of samples or standards on the graphite tube platform was carried out by air displacement with a similar time based solenoid injector (TBSI(2)). The dilution procedure and the injection of solutions into the atomizer are computer controlled and synchronized with the operation of the temperature program. Samples or standards solutions were submitted to two drying steps (at 90 and 130 degrees C), followed by pyrolysis and atomization at 700 and 1700 degrees C, respectively. The aqueous calibration was linear up to 120.0 microgL(-1) for diluted standard solutions/samples and its slope was similar (p>0.05) to the standard addition curve, indicating lack of matrix effect. The precision tested by repeated analysis of real saliva samples was less than 3% and the detection limit (3sigma) was of 0.35 microgL(-1). To test the accuracy of the proposed procedure, recovery tests were performed, obtaining mean recovery of added zinc of

  11. Applications of Mass Spectrometry for Cellular Lipid Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chunyan; Wang, Miao; Han, Xianlin

    2015-01-01

    Mass spectrometric analysis of cellular lipids is an enabling technology for lipidomics, which is a rapidly-developing research field. In this review, we briefly discuss the principles, advantages, and possible limitations of electrospray ionization (ESI) and matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) mass spectrometry-based methodologies for the analysis of lipid species. The applications of these methodologies to lipidomic research are also summarized. PMID:25598407

  12. Determination of methane emission rates on a biogas plant using data from laser absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Groth, Angela; Maurer, Claudia; Reiser, Martin; Kranert, Martin

    2015-02-01

    The aim of the work was to establish a method for emission control of biogas plants especially the observation of fugitive methane emissions. The used method is in a developmental stage but the topic is crucial to environmental and economic issues. A remote sensing measurement method was adopted to determine methane emission rates of a biogas plant in Rhineland-Palatinate, Germany. An inverse dispersion model was used to deduce emission rates. This technique required one concentration measurement with an open path tunable diode laser absorption spectrometer (TDLAS) downwind and upwind the source and basic wind information, like wind speed and direction. Different operating conditions of the biogas plant occurring on the measuring day (December 2013) could be represented roughly in the results. During undisturbed operational modes the methane emission rate averaged 2.8 g/s, which corresponds to 4% of the methane gas production rate of the biogas plant.

  13. Arsenic Speciation of Waters from the Aegean Region, Turkey by Hydride Generation: Atomic Absorption Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Çiftçi, Tülin Deniz; Henden, Emur

    2016-08-01

    Arsenic in drinking water is a serious problem for human health. Since the toxicity of arsenic species As(III) and As(V) is different, it is important to determine the concentrations separately. Therefore, it is necessary to develop an accurate and sensitive method for the speciation of arsenic. It was intended with this work to determine the concentrations of arsenic species in water samples collected from Izmir, Manisa and nearby areas. A batch type hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometer was used. As(V) gave no signal under the optimal measurement conditions of As(III). A certified reference drinking water was analyzed by the method and the results showed excellent agreement with the reported values. The procedure was applied to 34 water samples. Eleven tap water, two spring water, 19 artesian well water and two thermal water samples were analyzed under the optimal conditions.

  14. Arsenic Speciation of Waters from the Aegean Region, Turkey by Hydride Generation: Atomic Absorption Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Çiftçi, Tülin Deniz; Henden, Emur

    2016-08-01

    Arsenic in drinking water is a serious problem for human health. Since the toxicity of arsenic species As(III) and As(V) is different, it is important to determine the concentrations separately. Therefore, it is necessary to develop an accurate and sensitive method for the speciation of arsenic. It was intended with this work to determine the concentrations of arsenic species in water samples collected from Izmir, Manisa and nearby areas. A batch type hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometer was used. As(V) gave no signal under the optimal measurement conditions of As(III). A certified reference drinking water was analyzed by the method and the results showed excellent agreement with the reported values. The procedure was applied to 34 water samples. Eleven tap water, two spring water, 19 artesian well water and two thermal water samples were analyzed under the optimal conditions. PMID:27236436

  15. Determination of trace amounts of tin in geological materials by atomic absorption spectrometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Welsch, E.P.; Chao, T.T.

    1976-01-01

    An atomic absorption method is described for the determination of traces of tin in rocks, soils, and stream sediments. A dried mixture of the sample and ammonium iodide is heated to volatilize tin tetraiodide -which is then dissolved in 5 % hydrochloric acid, extracted into TOPO-MIBK, and aspirated into a nitrous oxide-acetylene flame. The limit of determination is 2 p.p.m. tin and the relative standard deviation ranges from 2 to 14 %. Up to 20 % iron and 1000 p.p.m. Cu, Pb, Zn, Mn, Hg, Mo, V, or W in the sample do not interfere. As many as 50 samples can be easily analyzed per man-day. ?? 1976.

  16. Analysis of proteins and proteomes by mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Mann, M; Hendrickson, R C; Pandey, A

    2001-01-01

    A decade after the discovery of electrospray and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI), methods that finally allowed gentle ionization of large biomolecules, mass spectrometry has become a powerful tool in protein analysis and the key technology in the emerging field of proteomics. The success of mass spectrometry is driven both by innovative instrumentation designs, especially those operating on the time-of-flight or ion-trapping principles, and by large-scale biochemical strategies, which use mass spectrometry to detect the isolated proteins. Any human protein can now be identified directly from genome databases on the basis of minimal data derived by mass spectrometry. As has already happened in genomics, increased automation of sample handling, analysis, and the interpretation of results will generate an avalanche of qualitative and quantitative proteomic data. Protein-protein interactions can be analyzed directly by precipitation of a tagged bait followed by mass spectrometric identification of its binding partners. By these and similar strategies, entire protein complexes, signaling pathways, and whole organelles are being characterized. Posttranslational modifications remain difficult to analyze but are starting to yield to generic strategies.

  17. Spectral aspects of the determination of Si in organic and aqueous solutions using high-resolution continuum source or line source flame atomic absorption spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kowalewska, Zofia; Pilarczyk, Janusz; Gościniak, Łukasz

    2016-06-01

    High-resolution continuum source flame atomic absorption spectrometry (HR-CS FAAS) was applied to reveal and investigate spectral interference in the determination of Si. An intensive structured background was observed in the analysis of both aqueous and xylene solutions containing S compounds. This background was attributed to absorption by the CS molecule formed in the N2O-C2H2 flame. The lines of the CS spectrum at least partially overlap all five of the most sensitive Si lines investigated. The 251.611 nm Si line was demonstrated to be the most advantageous. The intensity of the structured background caused by the CS molecule significantly depends on the chemical form of S in the solution and is the highest for the most-volatile CS2. The presence of O atoms in an initial S molecule can diminish the formation of CS. To overcome this S effect, various modes of baseline fitting and background correction were evaluated, including iterative background correction (IBC) and utilization of correction pixels (WRC). These modes were used either independently or in conjunction with least squares background correction (LSBC). The IBC + LSBC mode can correct the extremely strong interference caused by CS2 at an S concentration of 5% w:w in the investigated solution. However, the efficiency of this mode depends on the similarity of the processed spectra and the correction spectra in terms of intensity and in additional effects, such as a sloping baseline. In the vicinity of the Si line, three lines of V were recorded. These lines are well-separated in the HR-CS FAAS spectrum, but they could be a potential source of overcorrection when using line source flame atomic absorption spectrometry (LS FAAS). The expected signal for the 251.625 nm Fe line was not registered at 200 mg L- 1 Fe concentration in the solution, probably due to the diminished population of Fe atoms in the high-temperature flame used. The observations made using HR-CS FAAS helped to establish a "safe" level

  18. New Applications of Mass Spectrometry in Lipid Analysis*

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Robert C.; Gaskell, Simon J.

    2011-01-01

    Mass spectrometry has emerged as a powerful tool for the analysis of all lipids. Lipidomic analysis of biological systems using various approaches is now possible with a quantitative measurement of hundreds of lipid molecular species. Although availability of reference and internal standards lags behind the field, approaches using stable isotope-labeled derivative tagging permit precise determination of specific phospholipids in an experimental series. The use of reactivity of ozone has enabled assessment of double bond positions in fatty acyl groups even when species remain in complex lipid mixtures. Rapid scanning tandem mass spectrometers are capable of quantitative analysis of hundreds of targeted lipids at high sensitivity in a single on-line chromatographic separation. Imaging mass spectrometry of lipids in tissues has opened new insights into the distribution of lipid molecular species with promising application to study pathophysiological events and diseases. PMID:21632539

  19. Crosslinked poly (4-vinylpyridine-ethylene glycol dimethacrylate) used for preconcentration of Cd(II) and its determination by flow injection flame atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Tarley, César Ricardo Teixeira; Farias, Natália Cristina Botteon; Lima, Giovana de Fátima; de Oliveira, Fernanda Midori; Bonfílio, Rudy; Dragunski, Douglas Cardoso; Clausen, Débora Nobile; Segatelli, Mariana Gava

    2014-01-01

    The main purpose of this research was to synthesize crosslinked poly(4-vinylpyridine-ethylene glycol dimethacrylate) and evaluate its feasibility for highly sensitive and selective determination of Cd in water samples by using flow injection flame atomic absorption spectrometry. The crosslinked polymer, prepared by bulk polymerization, was characterized by FTIR spectrometry and scanning electron microscopy. The flow injection solid-phase method was based on preconcentration of 20.0 mL of sample through 100 mg of the polymer packed into a minicolumn at pH 8.25 using a flow rate of 6.0 mL/min, followed by elution with 1.0 M HNO3. The sample solution parameters influencing the preconcentration behavior of Cd ions, such as pH, buffer concentration, and flow rate, were simultaneously studied and optimized using a Doehlert matrix. Values of 0.10 microg/L, 2.0-210 microg/L, 32.3, 18/h, 9.7/min, and 0.62 mL were obtained for LOD, linear range, preconcentration factor, sample throughput, concentration efficiency, and consumption index, respectively. The effect of the presence of the inorganic cations Pb(II), U(IV), Co(II), Hg(II), Cu(II), As(II), Mg(II), Sb(III), Ni(II), Th(IV), Ba(II), and Ca(II) on the method was studied, and the preconcentration of Cd was observed to have no interference. The accuracy of the method was assessed by analysis of natural water samples using addition and recovery tests and inductively coupled plasma/MS as a reference technique, as well as by analysis of a standard reference material of trace elements in water. PMID:24830174

  20. Ion-exchange preconcentration and determination of vanadium in milk samples by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    López-García, Ignacio; Viñas, Pilar; Romero-Romero, Rafael; Hernández-Córdoba, Manuel

    2009-06-15

    A new method for the electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometric determination of vanadium in milk and infant formulas using suspensions to avoid the need for previous dissolution of samples is described. Sensitivity is improved by a procedure based on preconcentration and removal of the matrix, using ion-exchange (Dowex 1X8-100). Suspensions of 15% (m/v) infant formula samples were prepared in a medium containing 0.05M sodium citrate (pH 7.2) and passed through the ion exchange column. Vanadium was eluted from the column using 1M hydrochloric acid and injected in the graphite furnace using a mixture of hydrofluoric acid plus magnesium nitrate as chemical modifiers. Calibration was carried out using multiple injection and aqueous standards prepared in the same medium. Detection limits were 0.2 ng g(-1) for infant formulas and 0.02 microg L(-1) for cow milk samples. The reliability of the procedure was checked by comparing the results obtained with those found using a previous mineralization stage and by analyzing five certified reference materials.

  1. Determination of total tin in silicate rocks by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Elsheimer, H.N.; Fries, T.L.

    1990-01-01

    A method is described for the determination of total tin in silicate rocks utilizing a graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometer with a stabilized-temperature platform furnace and Zeeman-effect background correction. The sample is decomposed by lithium metaborate fusion (3 + 1) in graphite crucibles with the melt being dissolved in 7.5% hydrochloric acid. Tin extractions (4 + 1 or 8 + 1) are executed on portions of the acid solutions using a 4% solution of tricotylphosphine oxide in methyl isobutyl ketone (MIBK). Ascorbic acid is added as a reducing agent prior to extraction. A solution of diammonium hydrogenphosphate and magnesium nitrate is used as a matrix modifier in the graphite furnace determination. The limit of detection is > 10 pg, equivalent to > 1 ??g l-1 of tin in the MIBK solution or 0.2-0.3 ??g g-61 in the rock. The concentration range is linear between 2.5 and 500 ??g l-1 tin in solution. The precision, measured as relative standard deviation, is < 20% at the 2.5 ??g l-1 level and < 7% at the 10-30 ??g l-1 level of tin. Excellent agreement with recommended literature values was found when the method was applied to the international silicate rock standards BCR-1, PCC-1, GSP-1, AGV-1, STM-1, JGb-1 and Mica-Fe. Application was made to the determination of tin in geological core samples with total tin concentrations of the order of 1 ??g g-1 or less.

  2. An Exergy Analysis of LiBr-Water Absorption Refrigerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asano, Hitoshi; Fujii, Terushige; Wang, Xiao; Origane, Takafumi; Katayama, Masatoshi; Inoue, Umeo

    Absorption refrigerators are very efficient as a heat recovery unit in a co-generation system.In order to design an absorption refrigerator for an arbitrary heat source properly, it is important to consider not only quantity but also quality of heat flow. The evaluation of exergy loss in each component is also effective for the improvement of system. This paper deals with the exergy analysis on a LiBr-water absorption refrigerator consisted of a single-and a double-effect cycle driven by the exhaust gas of the micro gas turbine with the output power of about 30 kW. Moreover, exergy loss in absorption process was eva1uated. As a result, it was shown that 80% of the exergy loss in an absorber was caused in absorption process, and the exergy loss decreased with decreasing the change in solution concentration in absorber. In these calculated results,the maximum cooling load of 77.8 kW was obtained from the exhaust gas with the temperature of 2900°C by utilizing both a single-and a double-effect cycles in combination. The energy and exergy efficiency of the system was 88.0% and 25.6%, respectively.

  3. Direct determination of fluorine in niobium oxide using slurry sampling electrothermal high-resolution continuum source molecular absorption spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Mao Dong; Becker-Ross, Helmut; Okruss, Michael; Geisler, Sebastian; Florek, Stefan; Richter, Silke; Meckelburg, Angela

    Aiming for a round-robin test, a new method for the direct determination of fluorine in niobium oxide has been developed. It is based on the use of high-resolution molecular absorption spectra of calcium mono-fluoride (CaF) generated in the graphite tube, combined with the slurry sampling technique. The absorption measurement was performed at the 606.44 nm CaF rotational line. By using graphite tubes with zirconium carbide (ZrC) modified platform, the molecular absorption sensitivity of CaF has been improved by a factor of 20, and no additional chemical modifier was necessary. Generally, non-spectral interferences were observed in the presence of HCl, H2SO4, and H3PO4. For HCl, additional spectral interference occurred due to an overlap of the absorption spectra of CaF and CaCl. However, due to the absence of these mentioned substances in the current material, such interferences do not exist for this application. The characteristic mass found for the CaF 606.44 nm line was 0.1 ng; the limit of detection was 5 mg fluorine per kg solid sample (3σ criterion). The results obtained by the method were within the range of certified values. Comparing to the classical method such as the pyrohydrolysis-photometric method, the developed new method showed clear advantages regarding sensitivity and specificity. The time requirement for one sample analysis was strongly shortened from several hours to only some minutes.

  4. Mass spectrometry-based quantitative analysis and biomarker discovery.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Naoto

    2011-01-01

      Mass spectrometry-based quantitative analysis and biomarker discovery using metabolomics approach represent one of the major platforms in clinical fields including for the prognosis or diagnosis, assessment of severity and response to therapy in a number of clinical disease states as well as therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM). This review first summarizes our mass spectrometry-based research strategy and some results on relationship between cysteinyl leukotriene (cysLT), thromboxane (TX), 12-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (12-HETE) and other metabolites of arachidonic acid and diseases such as atopic dermatitis, rheumatoid arthritis and diabetes mellitus. For the purpose of evaluating the role of these metabolites of arachidonic acid in disease status, we have developed sensitive determination methods with simple solid-phase extraction and applied in clinical settings. In addition to these endogenous compounds, using mass spectrometry, we have developed actually applicable quantitative methods for TDM. Representative example was a method of TDM for sirolimus, one of the immunosuppressant agents for a recipient of organ transplant, which requires rigorous monitoring of blood level. As we recognized great potential in mass spectrometry during these researches, we have become interested in metabolomics as the non-targeted analysis of metabolites. Now, established strategy for the metabolomics investigation applies to samples from cells, animals and humans to separate groups based on altered patterns of metabolites in biological fluids and to identify metabolites as potential biomarkers discriminating groups. We would be honored if our research using mass spectrometry would contribute to provide useful information in the field of medical pharmacy. PMID:21881303

  5. Human Vitamin B12 Absorption and Metabolism are Measured by Accelerator Mass Spectrometry Using Specifically Labeled 14C-Cobalamin

    SciTech Connect

    Carkeet, C; Dueker, S R; Lango, J; Buchholz, B A; Miller, J W; Green, R; Hammock, B D; Roth, J R; Anderson, P J

    2006-01-26

    There is need for an improved test of human ability to assimilate dietary vitamin B{sub 12}. Assaying and understanding absorption and uptake of B{sub 12} is important because defects can lead to hematological and neurological complications. Accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) is uniquely suited for assessing absorption and kinetics of {sup 14}C-labeled substances after oral ingestion because it is more sensitive than decay counting and can measure levels of carbon-14 ({sup 14}C) in microliter volumes of biological samples, with negligible exposure of subjects to radioactivity. The test we describe employs amounts of B{sub 12} in the range of normal dietary intake. The B{sub 12} used was quantitatively labeled with {sup 14}C at one particular atom of the DMB moiety by exploiting idiosyncrasies of Salmonellametabolism. In order to grow aerobically on ethanolamine, S. entericamust be provided with either pre-formed B{sub 12} or two of its precursors: cobinamide and dimethylbenzimidazole (DMB). When provided with {sup 14}C-DMB specifically labeled in the C2 position, cells produced {sup 14}C-B{sub 12} of high specific activity (2.1 GBq/mmol, 58 mCi/mmol) and no detectable dilution of label from endogenous DMB synthesis. In a human kinetic study, a physiological dose (1.5 mg, 2.2 KBq/59 nCi) of purified {sup 14}C-B{sub 12} was administered and showed plasma appearance and clearance curves consistent with the predicted behavior of the pure vitamin. This method opens new avenues for study of B{sub 12} assimilation.

  6. Application of wavelet transforms to determine peak shape parameters for interference detection in graphite-furnace atomic absorption spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadler, D. A.; Littlejohn, D.; Boulo, P. R.; Soraghan, J. S.

    1998-08-01

    A procedure to quantify the shape of the absorbance-time profile, obtained during graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry, has been used to detect interference effects caused by the presence of a concomitant salt. The quantification of the absorption profile is achieved through the use of the Lipschitz regularity, α0, obtained from the wavelet transform of the absorbance-time profile. The temporal position of certain features and their associated values of α0 provide a unique description of the shape of the absorbance-time profile. Changes to the position or values of α0 between standard and sample atomizations may be indicative of uncorrected interference effects. A weak, but linear, dependence was found of the value of α0 upon the analyte concentration for Cr and Cu. The ability of the Lipschitz regularity to detect interference effects was illustrated for Pb, Se and Cu. For Pb, the lowest concentration of NaCl added, 0.005% m/v, changed both the values of α0 and the peak height absorbance. For Se, no change in the peak height and peak area absorbance signals was detected up to a NaCl concentration of 0.25% m/v. The values of the associated Lipschitz regularities were found to be invariant to NaCl concentration up to this value. For Cu, a concentration of 0.05% m/v NaCl reduced the peak height and peak area absorbance signals by approximately 25% and significantly altered the values of α0.

  7. Correlation between ultra-high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry and reversed-phase thin-layer chromatography hydrophobicity data for evaluation of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors absorption.

    PubMed

    Odovic, Jadranka V; Markovic, Bojan D; Injac, Rade D; Vladimirov, Sote M; Karljikovic-Rajic, Katarina D

    2012-10-01

    In this research seven ACE inhibitors (enalapril, quinapril, fosinopril, lisinopril, cilazapril, ramipril, benazepril) were studied to evaluate the correlation between their absorption and ultra-high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (UHPLC-MS) and reversed-phase thin-layer chromatography (RP-TLC) hydrophobicity data (φ(0) or C(0) parameters, respectively). Their absorption values were in the range of 25-60%, while calculated KOWWIN logP values were from -0.94 to 6.61. Additionally, perindopril (absorption 70%, KOWWIN logP 2.59) and moexipril (absorption 22%, KOWWIN logP 3.36) were introduced for the theoretical considerations due to their high/low absorption values which were on the opposite sites in comparison with the majority of ACE inhibitors (25-60%). In the theoretical considerations it was shown that the solubility data (logS) must be considered, as independent variable, simultaneously with KOWWIN logP to obtain reliable correlation (r(2)=0.7208) between absorption and ACE inhibitors lipophilicity. As the main topic of this study, the relationships between literature available and absorption data predicted by multiple linear regression (MLR) using logS values besides chromatographically obtained hydrophobicity parameters C(0) (r(2)=0.6424) or φ(0) (r(2)=0.6762) were studied proving that these parameters could be used in ACE inhibitors absorption evaluation. The UHPLC-MS method provides the direct application of experimentally obtained φ(0) values that is the advantage of this method. For better MLR correlation of ACE inhibitors absorption with C(0) parameters (RP-TLC) and logS, mathematical conversion of C(0) parameters to logC(0) values was necessary based on requisite for probability value of regression analysis (P<0.05). The accordance and differences between hydrophobicity parameters obtained by UHPLC-MS and RP-TLC were defined.

  8. Matrix elimination method for the determination of precious metals in ores using electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Salih, Bekir; Celikbiçak, Omür; Döker, Serhat; Doğan, Mehmet

    2007-03-28

    Poly(N-(hydroxymethyl)methacrylamide)-1-allyl-2-thiourea) hydrogels, poly(NHMMA-ATU), were synthesized by gamma radiation using (60)Co gamma source in the ternary mixture of NHMMA-ATU-H(2)O. These hydrogels were used for the specific gold, silver, platinum and palladium recovery, pre-concentration and matrix elimination from the solutions containing trace amounts of precious metal ions. Elimination of inorganic matrices such as different transition and heavy metal ions, and anions was performed by adjusting the solution pH to 0.5 that was the selective adsorption pH of the precious metal ions. Desorption of the precious metal ions was performed by using 0.8 M thiourea in 3M HCl as the most efficient desorbing agent with recovery values more than 95%. In the desorption medium, thiourea effect on the atomic signal was eliminated by selecting proper pyrolysis and atomization temperatures for all precious metal ions. Precision and the accuracy of the results were improved in the graphite furnace-atomic absorption spectrometer (GFAAS) measurements by applying the developed matrix elimination method performing the adsorption at pH 0.5. Pre-concentration factors of the studied precious metal ions were found to be at least 1000-fold. Detection limits of the precious metal ions were found to be less than 10 ng L(-1) of the all studied precious metal ions by using the proposed pre-concentration method. Determination of trace levels of the precious metals in the sea-water, anode slime, geological samples and photographic fixer solutions were performed using GFAAS clearly after applying the adsorption-desorption cycle onto the poly(NHMMA-UTU) hydrogels. PMID:17386783

  9. Determination of trace amounts of molybdenum in plant tissue by solvent extraction-atomic-absorption and direct-current plasma emission spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Lajunen, L H; Kubin, A

    1986-03-01

    Methods are presented for determination of molybdenum in plant tissue by flame and graphite-furnace atomic-absorption spectrometry and direct-current argon-plasma emission spectrometry. The samples are digested in HNO(3)-H(2)SO(4)-HC1O(4) mixture, and Mo is separated and concentrated by chelation and extraction. Three organic solvents (methyl isobutyl ketone, di-isobutyl ketone and isoamyl alcohol) and two ligands (8-hydroxyquinoline and toluene-3,4-dithiol) were studied. The procedure were tested on pine needle and birch leaf samples. PMID:18964076

  10. Peat as a natural solid-phase for copper preconcentration and determination in a multicommuted flow system coupled to flame atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Gonzáles, A P S; Firmino, M A; Nomura, C S; Rocha, F R P; Oliveira, P V; Gaubeur, I

    2009-03-23

    The physical and chemical characteristics of peat were assessed through measurement of pH, percentage of organic matter, cationic exchange capacity (CEC), elemental analysis, infrared spectroscopy and quantitative analysis of metals by ICP OES. Despite the material showed to be very acid in view of the percentage of organic matter, its CEC was significant, showing potential for retention of metal ions. This characteristic was exploited by coupling a peat mini-column to a flow system based on the multicommutation approach for the in-line copper concentration prior to flame atomic absorption spectrometric determination. Cu(II) ions were adsorbed at pH 4.5 and eluted with 0.50 molL(-1) HNO(3). The influence of chemical and hydrodynamic parameters, such as sample pH, buffer concentration, eluent type and concentration, sample flow-rate and preconcentration time were investigated. Under the optimized conditions, a linear response was observed between 16 and 100 microgL(-1), with a detection limit estimated as 3 microgL(-1) at the 99.7% confidence level and an enrichment factor of 16. The relative standard deviation was estimated as 3.3% (n=20). The mini-column was used for at least 100 sampling cycles without significant variation in the analytical response. Recoveries from copper spiked to lake water or groundwater as well as concentrates used in hemodialysis were in the 97.3-111% range. The results obtained for copper determination in these samples agreed with those achieved by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GFAAS) at the 95% confidence level. PMID:19264168

  11. Investigation of lead contents in lipsticks by solid sampling high resolution continuum source electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Gunduz, Sema; Akman, Suleyman

    2013-02-01

    In this study, the lead contents of different kinds of lipsticks were determined by solid sampling high resolution continuum source electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (SS-HR-CS ET AAS) and the results were compared with those obtained after microwave-assisted acid digestion of the samples. The experimental parameters for solid sampling such as the maximum amount of sample on the platforms of solid autosampler, graphite furnace program were optimized. Samples were directly loaded on the platforms of solid autosampler between 0.25 and 2.0mg and lead was determined applying 800 °C for pyrolysis and 2100 °C for atomization. Under optimized conditions, interference-free determination could be performed using aqueous standards. The LOD and the characteristic mass were 21.3 and 12.6 pg, respectively. The lead in the same lipstick samples was determined after microwave-assisted acid digestion and compared with those found by solid sampling. Mostly, there was no significant difference between the lead concentrations found by the two techniques. The lead in 25 lipstick samples with different properties were 0.11-4.48 ng mg(-1) which were not significantly different from those (<0.026-7.19 ng mg(-1)) reported by FDA for around 400 samples.

  12. Total mercury determination in different tissues of broiler chicken by using cloud point extraction and cold vapor atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Shah, A Q; Kazi, T G; Baig, J A; Afridi, H I; Kandhro, G A; Arain, M B; Kolachi, N F; Wadhwa, S K

    2010-01-01

    A cloud point extraction (CPE) method has been developed for the determination of total mercury (Hg) in different tissues of broiler chicken by cold vapor atomic absorption spectrometry (CVAAS). The broiler chicken tissues (leg, breast, liver and heart) were subjected to microwave assisted digestion in a mixture of nitric acid and hydrogen peroxide (2:1 ratio), prior to preconcentration by CPE. Various parameters such as the amount of ammonium O,O-diethyldithiophosphate (DDTP), concentrations of Triton X-114, equilibrium temperature, time and centrifugation have been studied in order to find the best conditions for the determination of mercury. For validation of proposed method a certified reference material, DORM-2 was used. No significant difference p>0.05 was observed between the experimental results and the certified values of CRM (paired t-test). The limit of detection and quantitation obtained under the optimal conditions were 0.117 and 0.382 microg/kg, respectively. The accumulation of Hg in different tissues were found in the order of, liver>muscles>heart. The concentration of Hg in chicken tissues were found in the range of 1.57-2.75, 1.40-2.27, 1.55-4.22, and 1.39-2.61 microg/kg in leg, breast, liver and heart, respectively.

  13. Ultratrace determination of cadmium by cold vapor atomic absorption spectrometry after preconcentration with a simplified cloud point extraction methodology.

    PubMed

    Manzoori, Jamshid L; Abdolmohammad-Zadeh, Hossein; Amjadi, Mohammad

    2007-02-15

    A simplified micelle-mediated extraction methodology for the preconcentration of ultratrace levels of cadmium as a prior step to its determination by cold vapor atomic absorption spectrometry (CV-AAS) has been developed. The methodology is based on the cloud point extraction (CPE) of cadmium at pH 8 by using the non-ionic surfactant polyethyleneglycolmono-p-nonylphenylether (PONPE 7.5) without adding any chelating agent. Cadmium cold vapor was generated from 2ml of the extracted surfactant-rich phase by means of sodium tetrahydroborate (3%, w/v) as a reducing agent and hydrochloric acid (0.2mol l(-1)) as a carrier solution. Several important variables that affect the cloud point extraction and cold vapor cadmium generation efficiency were investigated and optimized. The preconcentration of only 50ml of solution in the presence of 0.06% (v/v) PONPE 7.5 gives an enhancement factor of 62. The calibration graph using the preconcentration system was linear in the range of 4-100ng l(-1) with a correlation coefficient of 0.9992. Detection limit (3s) obtained in the optimal conditions was 0.56ng l(-1). The relative standard deviation (R.S.D.) for six replicate determinations at 20ng l(-1) Cd level was 3.2%. The proposed method was successfully applied to the ultratrace determination of cadmium in water samples.

  14. Determination of methylmercury by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry using headspace single-drop microextraction with in situ hydride generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gil, Sandra; Fragueiro, Sandra; Lavilla, Isela; Bendicho, Carlos

    2005-01-01

    A new method is proposed for preconcentration and matrix separation of methylmercury prior to its determination by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS). Generation of methylmercury hydride (MeHgH) from a 5-ml solution is carried out in a closed vial and trapped onto an aqueous single drop (3-μl volume) containing Pd(II) or Pt(IV) (50 and 10 mg/l, respectively). The hydrogen evolved in the headspace (HS) after decomposition of sodium tetrahydroborate (III) injected for hydride generation caused the formation of finely dispersed Pd(0) or Pt(0) in the drop, which in turn, were responsible for the sequestration of MeHgH. A preconcentration factor of ca. 40 is achieved with both noble metals used as trapping agents. The limit of detection of methylmercury was 5 and 4 ng/ml (as Hg) with Pd(II) or Pt(IV) as trapping agents, and the precision expressed as relative standard deviation was about 7%. The preconcentration system was fully characterised through optimisation of the following variables: Pd(II) or Pt(IV) concentration in the drop, extraction time, pH of the medium, temperatures of both sample solution and drop, concentration of salt in the sample solution, sodium tetrahydroborate (III) concentration in the drop and stirring rate. The method has been successfully validated against two fish certified reference materials (CRM 464 tuna fish and CRM DORM-2 dogfish muscle) following selective extraction of methylmercury in 2 mol/l HCl medium.

  15. Investigation of the levels of some element in edible oil samples produced in Turkey by atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Mendil, Durali; Uluözlü, Ozgür Dogan; Tüzen, Mustafa; Soylak, Mustafa

    2009-06-15

    The element contents (Fe, Mn, Zn, Cu, Pb, Co, Cd, Na, K, Ca and Mg) in edible oils (olive oil, hazelnut oil, sunflower oil, margarine, butter and corn oil) from Turkey were determined using atomic absorption spectrometry after microwave digestion. The concentrations of trace element in the samples were found to be 291.0-52.0, 1.64-0.04, 3.08-1.03, 0.71-0.05, 0.03-0.01, 1.30-0.50, 84.0-0.90, 50.1-1.30, 174.2-20.8 and 20.8-0.60 microg/g for iron, manganese, zinc, copper, lead, cobalt, sodium, potassium, calcium, and magnesium, respectively. Cadmium was found to be 4.57-0.09 microg/kg. The high heavy metal and minerals accumulation levels in the samples were found in olive oil for Cu, Pb, Co, margarine for Fe, K, corn oil for Zn, Mn, butter for Na, Mg, sunflower oil for Ca and hazelnut oil for Cd, respectively. PMID:19036503

  16. Investigation of lead contents in lipsticks by solid sampling high resolution continuum source electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Gunduz, Sema; Akman, Suleyman

    2013-02-01

    In this study, the lead contents of different kinds of lipsticks were determined by solid sampling high resolution continuum source electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (SS-HR-CS ET AAS) and the results were compared with those obtained after microwave-assisted acid digestion of the samples. The experimental parameters for solid sampling such as the maximum amount of sample on the platforms of solid autosampler, graphite furnace program were optimized. Samples were directly loaded on the platforms of solid autosampler between 0.25 and 2.0mg and lead was determined applying 800 °C for pyrolysis and 2100 °C for atomization. Under optimized conditions, interference-free determination could be performed using aqueous standards. The LOD and the characteristic mass were 21.3 and 12.6 pg, respectively. The lead in the same lipstick samples was determined after microwave-assisted acid digestion and compared with those found by solid sampling. Mostly, there was no significant difference between the lead concentrations found by the two techniques. The lead in 25 lipstick samples with different properties were 0.11-4.48 ng mg(-1) which were not significantly different from those (<0.026-7.19 ng mg(-1)) reported by FDA for around 400 samples. PMID:23099440

  17. Detection of silver nanoparticles in parsley by solid sampling high-resolution-continuum source atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Feichtmeier, Nadine S; Leopold, Kerstin

    2014-06-01

    In this work, we present a fast and simple approach for detection of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) in biological material (parsley) by solid sampling high-resolution-continuum source atomic absorption spectrometry (HR-CS AAS). A novel evaluation strategy was developed in order to distinguish AgNPs from ionic silver and for sizing of AgNPs. For this purpose, atomisation delay was introduced as significant indication of AgNPs, whereas atomisation rates allow distinction of 20-, 60-, and 80-nm AgNPs. Atomisation delays were found to be higher for samples containing silver ions than for samples containing silver nanoparticles. A maximum difference in atomisation delay normalised by the sample weight of 6.27 ± 0.96 s mg(-1) was obtained after optimisation of the furnace program of the AAS. For this purpose, a multivariate experimental design was used varying atomisation temperature, atomisation heating rate and pyrolysis temperature. Atomisation rates were calculated as the slope of the first inflection point of the absorbance signals and correlated with the size of the AgNPs in the biological sample. Hence, solid sampling HR-CS AAS was proved to be a promising tool for identifying and distinguishing silver nanoparticles from ionic silver directly in solid biological samples.

  18. Determination of trace amounts of zinc by flame atomic absorption spectrometry after preconcentration with modified clinoptilolite zeolite.

    PubMed

    Hajialigol, Saeed; Taher, Mohammad Ali; Malekpour, Akbar

    2008-01-01

    Natural clinoptilolite was used as a sorbent material for solid-phase extraction and preconcentration of zinc. Clinoptilolite was first saturated with cadmium (II) and then modified with benzyldimethyltetradecylammonium chloride for increasing adsorption of 3-(2-arsenophenylazo)-4,5-dihydroxy-2,7-naphthalene disulfonic acid (neothorin). Zinc was quantitatively retained on the adsorbent by the column method in the pH range of 3.8-4.2 at a flow rate of 1 mL/min. It was eluted from the column with 5.0 mL 2 M nitric acid solution at a flow rate of 1 mL/min and determined by flame atomic absorption spectrometry at 213.9 nm. Zinc could be concentrated from a 0.03 microg/L solution with a preconcentration factor of 170. Relative standard deviation for 8 replicate determinations of 2.5 microg zinc in the final solution was 0.92%. The interference of a large number of anions and cations was studied in detail to optimize the conditions, and the method was successfully applied for determination of zinc in standard and real water samples. PMID:19202807

  19. Separation and preconcentration of trace manganese from various samples with Amberlyst 36 column and determination by flame atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Kendüzler, Erdal; Türker, A Rehber; Yalçınkaya, Ozcan

    2006-06-15

    This work assesses the potential of a new adsorptive material, Amberlyst 36, for the separation and preconcentration of trace manganese(II) from various media. It is based on the sorption of manganese(II) ions onto a column filled with Amberlyst 36 cation exchange resin, followed by the elution with 5mL of 3mol/L nitric acid and determination by flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS) without interference of the matrix. Different factors including pH of sample solution, sample volume, amount of resin, flow rate of sample solution, volume and concentration of eluent, and matrix effects for preconcentration were investigated. Good relative standard deviation (3%) and high recovery (>95%) at 100mug/L and high enrichment factor (200) and low analytical detection limit (0.245mug/L) were obtained. The adsorption equilibrium was described well by the Langmuir isotherm model with maximum adsorption capacity of 88mg/g of manganese on the resin. The method was applied for the manganese determination by FAAS in tap water, commercial natural drinking water, commercial treated drinking water and commercial tea bag sample. The accuracy of the method is confirmed by analyzing the certified reference material (tea leaves GBW 07605). The results demonstrated good agreement with the certified values. PMID:18970645

  20. Chromium speciation in environmental samples by solid- phase extraction using lewatit ionac SR-7 resin and flame atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Sacmaçi, Serife; Kartal, Senol; Kumsuz, Sevim

    2014-01-01

    A new method for the speciation, preconcentration, and separation of Cr(lll) and Cr(VI) species in different matrixes was developed using SPE combined with flame atomic absorption spectrometry. Theprocedure is based on the exchange of Cr(VI) ions as CrO(4)(2-) with CI- ions on Lewatit lonac SR-7 ion-exchange resin. After the oxidation of Cr(lll) to CrO(4)(2-) ions by concentrated H202 in basic medium, the procedure was applied to the determination of total Cr. Cr(lll) was calculated as the difference between the total Cr and Cr(VI) contents. The influence of the analytical parameters including the pH of the solution, amount of resin, eluent type, sample volume, and flow rates of the sample and eluent solutions were investigated. No considerable interferences were observed from: other anions and cations investigated in the Cr speciation. The preconcentration factor was found to be 500. The LOD for Cr(VI), corresponding to three times the SD of the blank, was 0.003 μg/L. The sorption capacity and binding equilibrium constant were calculated as 17.2 mg/g and 2.54 L/mg, respectively. The accuracy of the method was verified by analyzing certified reference materials. The proposed method was applied to the speciation of Cr species in real samples with satisfactory results. PMID:25632449

  1. Application of factorial design in optimization of preconcentration procedure for copper determination in soft drink by flame atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Castro, Martha T P O; Baccan, Nivaldo

    2005-03-15

    In the present paper, a procedure for preconcentration and determination of copper in soft drink using flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS) is proposed, which is based on solid-phase extraction of copper(II) ions as its ion pair of 1,10-phenanthroline complexes with the anionic surfactant sodium dodecil sulphate (SDS), by Amberlite XAD-2 resin. The optimization process was carried out using 2(4-1) factorial and 2(2) factorial with a center point designs. Four variables (XAD-2 mass, copper mass, sample flow rate and elution flow rate) were regarded as factors in the optimization. Student's t-test on the results of the 2(4-1) factorial design with eight runs for copper extraction, demonstrated that the factors XAD-2 mass and sample flow rate in the levels studied are statistically significant. The 2(2) factorial with a center point design was applied in order to determine the optimum conditions for extraction. The procedure proposed allowed the determination of copper with detection limits (3alpha/S) of 3.9mugl(-1). The precision, calculated as relative standard deviation (R.S.D.) was 1.8% for 20.0mugl(-1) of copper. The preconcentration factor was 100. The robustness of this procedure is demonstrated by the recovery achieved for determination of copper in the presence of several cations. This procedure was applied to the determination of copper in soft drink samples collected in Campinas, SP, Brazil. PMID:18969940

  2. Automated on-line preconcentration of trace aqueous mercury with gold trap focusing for cold vapor atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Puanngam, Mahitti; Dasgupta, Purnendu K; Unob, Fuangfa

    2012-09-15

    A fully automated system for the determination of trace mercury in water by cold vapor atomic absorption spectrometry (CVAAS) is reported. The system uses preconcentration on a novel sorbent followed by liberation of the mercury and focusing by a gold trap. Mercury ions were extracted from water samples by passage through a solid phase sorbent column containing 2-(3-(2-aminoethylthio)propylthio)ethanamine modified silica gel. The captured mercury is released by thiourea and then elemental Hg is liberated by sodium borohydride. The vapor phase Hg is recaptured on a gold-plated tungsten filament. This is liberated as a sharp pulse (half-width<2 s) by directly electrically heating the tungsten filament in a dry argon stream. The mercury is measured by CVAAS; no moisture removal is needed. The effects of chloride and selected interfering ions were studied. The sample loading flow rate and argon flow rates for solution purging and filament sweeping were optimized. An overall 50-fold improvement in the limit of detection was observed relative to direct measurement by CVAAS. With a relatively modest multi-user instrument we attained a limit of detection of 35 ng L(-1) with 12% RSD at 0.20 μg L(-1) Hg level. The method was successfully applied to accurately determine sub-μg L(-1) level Hg in standard reference water samples.

  3. Species selective preconcentration and quantification of gold nanoparticles using cloud point extraction and electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Hartmann, Georg; Schuster, Michael

    2013-01-25

    The determination of metallic nanoparticles in environmental samples requires sample pretreatment that ideally combines pre-concentration and species selectivity. With cloud point extraction (CPE) using the surfactant Triton X-114 we present a simple and cost effective separation technique that meets both criteria. Effective separation of ionic gold species and Au nanoparticles (Au-NPs) is achieved by using sodium thiosulphate as a complexing agent. The extraction efficiency for Au-NP ranged from 1.01 ± 0.06 (particle size 2 nm) to 0.52 ± 0.16 (particle size 150 nm). An enrichment factor of 80 and a low limit of detection of 5 ng L(-1) is achieved using electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ET-AAS) for quantification. TEM measurements showed that the particle size is not affected by the CPE process. Natural organic matter (NOM) is tolerated up to a concentration of 10 mg L(-1). The precision of the method expressed as the standard deviation of 12 replicates at an Au-NP concentration of 100 ng L(-1) is 9.5%. A relation between particle concentration and the extraction efficiency was not observed. Spiking experiments showed a recovery higher than 91% for environmental water samples. PMID:23312311

  4. An automatic countercurrent liquid-liquid micro-extraction system coupled with atomic absorption spectrometry for metal determination.

    PubMed

    Mitani, Constantina; Anthemidis, Aristidis N

    2015-02-01

    A novel and versatile automatic sequential injection countercurrent liquid-liquid microextraction (SI-CC-LLME) system coupled with atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS) is presented for metal determination. The extraction procedure was based on the countercurrent flow of aqueous and organic phases which takes place into a newly designed lab made microextraction chamber. A noteworthy feature of the extraction chamber is that it can be utilized for organic solvents heavier or lighter than water. The proposed method was successfully demonstrated for on-line lead determination and applied in environmental water samples using an amount of 120 μL of chloroform as extractant and ammonium diethyldithiophosphate as chelating reagent. The effect of the major experimental parameters including the volume of extractant, as well as the flow rate of aqueous and organic phases were studied and optimized. Under the optimum conditions for 6 mL sample consumption an enhancement factor of 130 was obtained. The detection limit was 1.5 μg L(-1) and the precision of the method, expressed as relative standard deviation (RSD) was 2.7% at 40.0 μg L(-1) Pb(II) concentration level. The proposed method was evaluated by analyzing certified reference materials and spiked environmental water samples. PMID:25435230

  5. Determination of molybdenum in plants by vortex-assisted emulsification solidified floating organic drop microextraction and flame atomic absorption spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oviedo, Jenny A.; Fialho, Lucimar L.; Nóbrega, Joaquim A.

    2013-08-01

    A fast and sensitive procedure for extraction and preconcentration of molybdenum in plant samples based on solidified floating organic drop microextraction combined with flame atomic absorption spectrometry and discrete nebulization was developed. 8-Hydroxyquinoline (8-HQ) was used as complexing agent. The experimental conditions established were: 0.5% m v- 1 of 8-HQ, 60 μL of 1-undecanol as the extractant phase, 2 min vortex extraction time, centrifugation for 2 min at 2000 rpm, 10 min into an ice bath and discrete nebulization by introducing 200 μL of solution. The calibration curve was linear from 0.02 to 4.0 mg L- 1 with a limit of detection of 4.9 μg L- 1 and an enhancement factor of 67. The relative standard deviations for ten replicate measurements of 0.05 and 1.0 mg L- 1 Mo were 6.0 and 14.5%, respectively. The developed procedure was applied for determining molybdenum in corn samples and accuracy was proved using certified reference materials.

  6. On-line preconcentration and determination of chromium in parenteral solutions by flow injection-flame atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Wuilloud, Gustavo M; Wuilloud, Rodolfo G; de Wuilloud, Jorgelina C A; Olsina, Roberto A; Martinez, Luis D

    2003-02-01

    An on-line chromium preconcentration and determination system implemented with flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS) associated to flow injection (FI) was studied. For the retention of chromium, 4-(2-Thiazolylazo)-resorcinol (TAR) and Amberlite XAD-16 were used, at pH 5.0. The Cr-TAR complex was removed from the micro-column with ethanol. An enrichment factor of 50 was obtained for the preconcentration of 50 ml of sample solution. The detection limit value for the preconcentration of 50 ml of aqueous solution of Cr was 20 ng l(-1). The precision for ten replicate determinations at the 5 microg l(-1) Cr levels was 2.9% relative standard deviation (RSD), calculated from the peak heights obtained. The calibration graph using the preconcentration system for chromium was linear with a correlation coefficient of 0.9997 at levels near the detection limits up to at least 100 microg l(-1). The method was successfully applied to the determination of chromium in parenteral solution samples.

  7. Comparative study of pretreatment methods for the determination of metals in atmospheric aerosol by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Karanasiou, A A; Thomaidis, N S; Eleftheriadis, K; Siskos, P A

    2005-03-15

    A comparative study of pretreatment methods for the determination of 10 elements (As, Cd, Pb, V, Ni, Mn, Cr, Cu, Fe, Al) in atmospheric aerosols by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS) was conducted. For the digestion of the particulates collected in filters, six methods were compared using a mixture of HNO(3) and HF with or without the addition of various oxidative agents (HClO(4) or H(2)O(2)) or acids (HCl). The comparative study was performed using loaded cellulose filter samples, which were digested in Parr bombs and heated in a conventional oven at 170 degrees C for 5h. The extraction efficiency and blanks were compared and it was proved that the digestion method using only HNO(3)-HF extracted most of the metals and gave the lowest blanks. The HNO(3)-HF mixture was selected for the development of an improved microwave digestion method specific for aerosol-loaded filters. The operating parameters were optimized, so that quantitative recovery of the reference materials NIST 1649a urban dust and NIST 1648 urban particulate matter was achieved. The blank of cellulose and teflon filters were also determined and compared. Teflon filters present the lowest blanks for all the elements. The obtained limits of detection for each type of filters were adequate for environmental monitoring purposes. ETAAS instrumental operation was also optimized for the compensation and the elimination of interferences. The temperature optimization was performed for each metal in every type of filter and optimized parameters are proposed for 10 elements.

  8. Discussion of parameters associated with the determination of arsenic by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry in slurried environmental samples.

    PubMed

    Vassileva, E; Baeten, H; Hoenig, M

    2001-01-01

    A slurry sampling-fast program procedure has been developed for the determination of arsenic in plants, soils and sediments by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry. Efficiencies of various single and mixed modifiers for thermal stabilization of arsenic and for a better removal of the matrix during pyrolysis step were compared. The influence of the slurry concentration, amounts of modifier and parameters of the pyrolysis step on the As integrated absorbance signals have been studied and a comparison between fast and conventional furnace programs was also made. The ultrasonic agitation of the slurry followed by a fast electrothermal program using an Ir/Mg modifier provides the most consistent performance in terms of precision and accuracy. The reliability of the whole procedure has been compared with results obtained after application of a wet digestion method with an HF step and validated by analyzing eleven certified reference materials. Arsenic detection and quantitation limits expressed on dry sample matter were about 30 and 100 micrograms kg-1, respectively.

  9. Cloud point extraction-flame atomic absorption spectrometry method for preconcentration and determination of trace cadmium in water samples.

    PubMed

    Ning, Jinyan; Jiao, Yang; Zhao, Jiao; Meng, Lifen; Yang, Yaling

    2014-01-01

    A method based on cloud point extraction (CPE) separation/preconcentration of trace cadmium (Cd) as a prior step to its determination by flame atomic absorption spectrometry has been developed. Cadmium reacted with 8-hydroxyquinoline to form hydrophobic chelates, which were extracted into the micelles of nonionic surfactant oligoethylene glycol monoalkyl ether (Genapol X-080) in an alkaline medium. Octanol was used to depress the cloud point of Genapol X-080 in the extraction process. The chemical variables that affect the CPE, such as pH of complexation reaction, amount of chelating agent, Genapol X-080 and octanol were evaluated and optimized. Under optimized conditions, linearity was obeyed in the range of 10-500 μg/L, with the correlation coefficient of 0.9993. For 5 mL of sample solution, the enhancement factor was about 20. The limit of detection and limit of quantification of the method were 0.21 and 0.63 μg/L, respectively. The relative standard deviations (n = 6) was 3.2% for a solution containing 100 μg/L of Cd. The accuracy of the preconcentration system was evaluated by recovery measurements on spiked water samples. Recoveries of spiked samples varied in the range of 94.1-103.8%.

  10. Preconcentration procedure using cloud point extraction in the presence of electrolyte for cadmium determination by flame atomic absorption spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coelho, Luciana Melo; Arruda, Marco Aurélio Zezzi

    2005-06-01

    This paper describes a micelle-mediated phase separation in the presence of electrolyte as a preconcentration method for cadmium determination by flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS). Cadmium was complexed with ammonium O,O-diethyldithiophosphate (DDTP) in an acidic medium (0.32 mol l- 1 HCl) using Triton X-114 as surfactant and quantitatively extracted into a small volume (about 20 μl) of the surfactant-rich phase after centrifugation. The chemical variables that affect the cloud point extraction, such as complexing time (0 20 min), Triton X114 concentration (0.043 0.87% w/v) and complexing agent concentration (0.01 0.1 mol l- 1), were investigated. The cloud point is formed in the presence of NaCl at room temperature (25 °C), and the electrolyte concentration (0.5 5% w/v) was also investigated. Under optimized conditions, only 8 ml of sample was used in the presence of 0.043% w/v Triton X-114 and 1% (w/v) NaCl. This method permitted limits of detection and quantification of 0.9 μg l- 1 and 2.9 μg l- 1 Cd, respectively, and a linear calibration range from 3 to 400 μg l- 1 Cd. The proposed method was applied to Cd determination in physiological solutions (containing 0.9% (w/v) of NaCl), mineral water, lake water and cigarette samples (tobacco).

  11. Species selective preconcentration and quantification of gold nanoparticles using cloud point extraction and electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Hartmann, Georg; Schuster, Michael

    2013-01-25

    The determination of metallic nanoparticles in environmental samples requires sample pretreatment that ideally combines pre-concentration and species selectivity. With cloud point extraction (CPE) using the surfactant Triton X-114 we present a simple and cost effective separation technique that meets both criteria. Effective separation of ionic gold species and Au nanoparticles (Au-NPs) is achieved by using sodium thiosulphate as a complexing agent. The extraction efficiency for Au-NP ranged from 1.01 ± 0.06 (particle size 2 nm) to 0.52 ± 0.16 (particle size 150 nm). An enrichment factor of 80 and a low limit of detection of 5 ng L(-1) is achieved using electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ET-AAS) for quantification. TEM measurements showed that the particle size is not affected by the CPE process. Natural organic matter (NOM) is tolerated up to a concentration of 10 mg L(-1). The precision of the method expressed as the standard deviation of 12 replicates at an Au-NP concentration of 100 ng L(-1) is 9.5%. A relation between particle concentration and the extraction efficiency was not observed. Spiking experiments showed a recovery higher than 91% for environmental water samples.

  12. [Study on adsorption behavior of crosslinked polyarylonitrile for copper, lead, cadmium and zinc ions by atomic absorption spectrometry].

    PubMed

    Shawket, Abliz; Peng, Yang; Wang, Ji-De; Ismayil, Nurulla

    2010-04-01

    The crosslinked polymer polyacrylonitrile was synthesized by suspension polymerization using acrylonitrile and divinylbenzene. It has been used as adsorbent of some toxic heavy metals in environmental waters. Its adsorption for metals and the factors which affect the adsorption capacity were studied by atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS). The experimental results showed that under the optimal adsorption conditions, the pH of adsorbate solution was 5-6, static adsorption time was 1.5-2 h, and adsorption procedure was carried out at room temperature, polyacrylonitrile as adsorbent has high adsorption capacity (mg x g(-1)) for Cu2+, Pb2+, Cd2+ and Zn2+, which can reach 26.6, 45.2, 39.7 and 32.5 separately. Adsorption rate (%) was 83.6, 87.1, 85.3 and 86.7 respectively during the 1.5-2 h static adsorption time. It will be more than five-hour static adsorption time before adsorption rate reaches more than 96%. Using 0.10 mol x L(-1) chloride acid as the best desorption solvent to desorb the adsorbates, the recovery of them reached 95%. At the same time the adsorption mechanism of polymer was studied. PMID:20545173

  13. Dispersive Liquid-Liquid Microextraction of Bismuth in Various Samples and Determination by Flame Atomic Absorption Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Daşbaşı, Teslima; Kartal, Şenol; Saçmacı, Şerife; Ülgen, Ahmet

    2016-01-01

    A dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction method for the determination of bismuth in various samples by flame atomic absorption spectrometry is described. In this method, crystal violet was used as counter positive ion for BiCl4− complex ion, chloroform as extraction solvent, and ethanol as disperser solvent. The analytical parameters that may affect the extraction efficiency like acidity of sample, type and amount of extraction and disperser solvents, amount of ligand, and extraction time were studied in detail. The effect of interfering ions on the analyte recovery was also investigated. The calibration graph was linear in the range of 0.040–1.00 mg L−1 with detection limit of 4.0 μg L−1 (n = 13). The precision as relative standard deviation was 3% (n = 11, 0.20 mg L−1) and the enrichment factor was 74. The developed method was applied successfully for the determination of bismuth in various water, pharmaceutical, and cosmetic samples and the certified reference material (TMDA-64 lake water). PMID:26881186

  14. Selective cloud point extraction for the determination of cadmium in food samples by flame atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Guoqiang; Wen, Shengping; Wu, Xiaoyun; Jiang, Xiuming; He, Lijun; Liu, Yulan

    2012-05-01

    A new cloud point extraction (CPE) procedure for preconcentration of cadmium prior to the determination by flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS) was developed. The method is based on the fact that cadmium could form hydrophobic ion-associated complex in the presence of iodide and methyl green (MG), and the hydrophobic ion-associated complex could be extracted into surfactant-rich phase. The main factors affecting CPE procedure, such as pH, concentration of KI, MG and surfactant, equilibrium temperature and incubation time, sample volume were investigated. Potential interference from co-existing ions was largely eliminated as most of co-existing ions can not form extractable ion-associated complex with iodide and MG. Under the optimum conditions, the limit of detection (3σ) and limit of quantity (10σ) were 0.90ngmL(-1) and 3.0ngmL(-1) for cadmium, respectively, and relative standard deviation was 4.2% (c=50ngmL(-1), n=7). The proposed method was successfully applied to determination of cadmium in the certified reference rice sample (GBW08510) and food samples with satisfactory results. PMID:26434327

  15. Evaluation of ammonia as diluent for serum sample preparation and determination of selenium by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry*1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernández-Caraballo, Edwin A.; Burguera, Marcela; Burguera, José L.

    2002-12-01

    A method for the determination of total selenium in serum samples by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry was evaluated. The method involved direct introduction of 1:5 diluted serum samples (1% v/v NH 4OH+0.05% w/v Triton X-100 ®) into transversely heated graphite tubes, and the use of 10 μg Pd+3 μg Mg(NO 3) 2 as chemical modifier. Optimization of the modifier mass and the atomization temperature was conducted by simultaneously varying such parameters and evaluating both the integrated absorbance and the peak height/peak area ratio. The latter allowed the selection of compromise conditions rendering good sensitivity and adequate analyte peak profiles. A characteristic mass of 49 pg and a detection limit (3s) of 6 μg 1 -1 Se, corresponding to 30 μg l -1 Se in the serum sample, were obtained. The analyte addition technique was used for calibration. The accuracy was assessed by the determination of total selenium in Seronorm™ Trace Elements Serum Batch 116 (Nycomed Pharma AS). The method was applied for the determination of total selenium in ten serum samples taken from individuals with no known physical affection. The selenium concentration ranged between 79 and 147 μg l -1, with a mean value of 114±22 μg l -1.

  16. Determination of Trace Silver in Water Samples by Online Column Preconcentration Flame Atomic Absorption Spectrometry Using Termite Digestion Product

    PubMed Central

    Bianchin, Joyce Nunes; Martendal, Edmar; Carasek, Eduardo

    2011-01-01

    A new method for Ag determination in water samples using solid phase extraction (SPE) coupled to a flow injection system and flame atomic absorption spectrometry was developed. The sorbent used for Ag preconcentration and extraction was the termite digestion product. Flow and chemical variables of the system were optimized through a multivariate procedure. The factors selected were adsorbent mass, buffer type and concentration, sample pH, and sample flow rate. The detection limit and precision were 3.4 μg L−1 and 3.8% (n = 6, 15 μg L−1), respectively. The enrichment factor and the linear working range were, respectively, 21 and 10–50 μg L−1. Results for recovery tests using different water samples were between 96 and 107%. The proposed methodology was applied with success for the determination of Ag in water used to wash clothes impregnated with silver nanoparticles, supplied by a factory located in Santa Catarina, Brazil. PMID:21804766

  17. Calcium isotope analysis by mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Boulyga, Sergei F

    2010-01-01

    The variations in the isotopic composition of calcium caused by fractionation in heterogeneous systems and by nuclear reactions can provide insight into numerous biological, geological, and cosmic processes, and therefore isotopic analysis finds a wide spectrum of applications in cosmo- and geochemistry, paleoclimatic, nutritional, and biomedical studies. The measurement of calcium isotopic abundances in natural samples has challenged the analysts for more than three decades. Practically all Ca isotopes suffer from significant isobaric interferences, whereas low-abundant isotopes can be particularly affected by neighboring major isotopes. The extent of natural variations of stable isotopes appears to be relatively limited, and highly precise techniques are required to resolve isotopic effects. Isotope fractionation during sample preparation and measurements and instrumental mass bias can significantly exceed small isotope abundance variations in samples, which have to be investigated. Not surprisingly, a TIMS procedure developed by Russell et al. (Russell et al., 1978. Geochim Cosmochim Acta 42: 1075-1090) for Ca isotope measurements was considered as revolutionary for isotopic measurements in general, and that approach is used nowadays (with small modifications) for practically all isotopic systems and with different mass spectrometric techniques. Nevertheless, despite several decades of calcium research and corresponding development of mass spectrometers, the available precision and accuracy is still not always sufficient to achieve the challenging goals. The present article discusses figures of merits of presently used analytical methods and instrumentation, and attempts to critically assess their limitations. In Sections 2 and 3, mass spectrometric methods applied to precise stable isotope analysis and to the determination of (41)Ca are described. Section 4 contains a short summary of selected applications, and includes tracer experiments and the potential use

  18. Determination of lead, cadmium and mercury in blood for assessment of environmental exposure: A comparison between inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry and atomic absorption spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmer, Christopher D.; Lewis, Miles E.; Geraghty, Ciaran M.; Barbosa, Fernando; Parsons, Patrick J.

    2006-08-01

    A biomonitoring method for the determination of Pb, Cd, and Hg at background levels in whole blood by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry is described. While this method was optimized for assessing Pb, Cd and Hg at environmental levels, it also proved suitable for assessing concentrations associated with occupational exposure. The method requires as little as 200 μl of blood that is diluted 1 + 49 for direct analysis in the inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometer. Method performance is compared to well-established AAS methods. Initial method validation was accomplished using National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) Standard Reference Material 966, Toxic Metals in Bovine Blood. Method detection limits (3s) are 0.05 μg dl - 1 for Pb, 0.09 μg l - 1 for Cd; and 0.17 μg l - 1 for Hg. Repeatability ranged from 1.4% to 2.8% for Pb; 3% to 10% for Cd; and 2.6% to 8.8% for Hg. In contrast, AAS method detection limits were 1 μg dl - 1 , 0.54 μg l - 1 , and 0.6 μg l - 1 , for Pb, Cd, and Hg, respectively. Further performance assessments were conducted over a 2-year period via participation in four international External Quality Assessment Schemes (EQAS) operated specifically for toxic metals in blood. This includes schemes operated by (a) the New York State Department of Health's Wadsworth Center, Albany, NY, USA (b) L'Institut National de Santé Publique du Québec, Centre de Toxicologie du Québec, Canada, (c) Friedrich-Alexander University, Erlangen, Germany, and (d) the University of Surrey, Guildford, UK Trace Elements scheme. The EQAS data reflect analytical performance for blind samples analyzed independently by both inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry and AAS methods.

  19. Use of factorial design and Doehlert matrix for multivariate optimisation of an on-line preconcentration system for lead determination by flame atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, S L C; dos Santos, W N L; Bezerra, M A; Lemos, V A; Bosque-Sendra, J M

    2003-02-01

    A system for on-line preconcentration and determination of lead by flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS) was proposed. It was based on the sorption of lead(II) ions on a minicolumn of polyurethane foam loaded with 2-(2-thiazolylazo)-5-dimethylaminophenol (TAM). The optimisation step was carried out using two-level full factorial and Doehlert designs for the determination of the optimum conditions for lead preconcentration. The proposed procedure allowed the determination of lead with a detection limit of 2.2 microg L(-1), and a precision, calculated as relative standard deviation (RSD), of 2.4 and 6.8 for a lead concentration of 50.0 and 10.0 microg L(-1), respectively. A preconcentration factor of 45 and a sampling frequency of 27 samples per hour were obtained. The recovery achieved for lead determination in the presence of several cations demonstrated that this procedure has enough selectivity for analysis of environmental samples. The validation was carried out by analysis of certified reference material. This procedure was applied to lead determination in natural food. PMID:12589511

  20. On-line preconcentration/determination of zinc from water, biological and food samples using synthesized chelating resin and flame atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Yılmaz, Sibel; Tokalıoğlu, Serife; Sahan, Serkan; Ulgen, Ahmet; Sahan, Ahmet; Soykan, Cengiz

    2013-04-01

    An on-line flow injection pre-concentration-flame atomic absorption spectrometry method was developed to determine trace zinc in water (tap, dam, and well water), biological (hair and nail), and liver samples. As a solid phase extractant, a synthesized new chelating resin, poly(2-thiozylmethacrylamide-co-divinylbenzene-co-2-acrylamido-2-methyl-1-propane sulfonic acid) was used. The resin was characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, elemental analysis, and surface area by nitrogen sorption. A pre-concentration factor of 40-fold for a sample volume of 12.6 mL was obtained by using the time-based technique. The detection limit for the pre-concentration method was found to be 2.2 μg L(-1). The precision (as RSD,%) for 10 replicate determinations at the 0.04 μg mL(-1) Zn concentration was 1.2%. The calibration graph using the pre-concentration system for zinc was linear with a correlation coefficient of 0.998 in the concentration range from 0.005 to 0.05 μg mL(-1). The applicability and accuracy of the developed method were estimated by the analysis spiked water, biological, liver samples (83-105%), and also certified reference material TMDA-70 (fortified lake water) and SPS-WW1 Batch 111-Wastewater. The results were in agreement with the certified values.

  1. In situ metathesis ionic liquid formation dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction for copper determination in water samples by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Stanisz, Ewa; Zgoła-Grześkowiak, Agnieszka

    2013-10-15

    In situ synthesis of ionic liquid extractant for dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (in situ IL DLLME) combined with electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ET AAS) for determination of copper in water samples was developed. Analytical signals were obtained without the back-extraction of copper from the IL phase prior to its determination by AAS. Some essential parameters of the microextraction and detection techniques such as the pH of sample solution, volume of components for in situ synthesis, matrix interferences and main parameters of graphite furnace atomizer have been studied. Under optimal conditions, high extraction efficiency for copper was achieved for the extraction of 0.7 µg L(-1) in 10.0 mL of sample solution employing 8 μL of 1-hexyl-3-methylimidazolium bis[(trifluoromethyl)sulfonyl]imide (HmimNTf2) as the extraction solvent. The detection limit was found as 0.004 µg L(-1) with an enrichment factor of 200. The relative standard deviation (RSD) for seven replicate measurements of 0.7 µg L(-1) in sample solution was 4%. The accuracy of the proposed method was evaluated by analysis of the Certified Reference Materials: NIST SRM 2709 (San Joaquin Soil), NBS SRM 2704 (Buffalo River Sediment), NRCC DOLT-2 (Dogfish Liver) and NIST SRM 1643e (Trace Element in Water). The measured copper contents in the reference materials were in satisfactory agreement with the certified values. The method was successfully applied to analysis of the tap, lake and mineral water samples.

  2. The determination of silver in silicate rocks by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Aruscavage, P. J.; Campbell, E.Y.

    1979-01-01

    Silver is extracted from a 20% tartaric acid solution by using butyl acetate and diphenylthiourea, and the organic layer is analyzed directly by the graphite-furnace technique. The precisions is ca. 8% as estimated from multiple analysis of 13 standard rocks; there are no systematic errors. The detection limit is 2.4 ppb for 250-mg samples. ?? 1979.

  3. Measurement of copper in biological samples by flame or electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Evenson, M A

    1988-01-01

    Guidelines presented here allow for copper analysis of biological materials by methods that are very sensitive, that require little sample preparation, that have few chemical or spectral interferences, that are inexpensive, and that require only usual care in contamination control. The commercial instruments for FAAS and ETAAS from Perkin-Elmer, from Varian, and from Instrumentation Laboratories Inc. (Allied Analytical Systems) all work well in either the flame or the flameless mode. Background correction techniques are not essential for copper analysis if care is taken with the sample preparation to minimize the background signals. Different types of burners will work adequately if one makes certain that the viscosity of the sample and the control products are similar to the calibration standards. Further, dilution of samples is preferred over increasing the viscosity of the calibration standards by the addition of a protein containing solution or a substance such as glycerol. A 1:10 dilution of blood plasma or serum with dilute nitric acid or water is all that is necessary for copper analysis by the FFAS methods. Cation and anion effects should be tested by bracketing the concentrations of the ions found in the sample with known amounts of ions in the sample solutions. Increasing the concentrations of the ions thought to interfere while keeping the copper concentration constant is another way to test for ion interferences.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:3374386

  4. Analysis of tear glucose concentration with electrospray ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Taormina, Christopher R; Baca, Justin T; Asher, Sanford A; Grabowski, Joseph J; Finegold, David N

    2007-02-01

    We have developed a mass spectrometry-based method that allows one to accurately determine the glucose concentration of tear fluid. We used a 1 microL micro-capillary to collect tear fluid from the tear meniscus with minimal irritation of the eye. We analyzed the 1 muL volume of collected tear fluid with liquid-chromatography electrospray ionization mass spectrometry with the use of D-glucose-6,6-d2 as an internal standard. Repeated measurements and a recovery experiment on pooled, onion-induced tears showed that the analysis of the glucose in tears was precise (4% relative standard deviation) and provided 100% recovery. We found the tear glucose concentration of one fasting nondiabetic subject to be 13 to 51 microM while the onion-induced tear glucose concentration of a different nondiabetic subject to be 211 to 256 microM. PMID:17084090

  5. Analysis of Tear Glucose Concentration with Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Taormina, Christopher R.; Baca, Justin T.; Finegold, David N.; Asher, Sanford A.; Grabowski, Joseph J.

    2007-01-01

    We have developed a mass spectrometry-based method which allows one to accurately determine the glucose concentration of tear fluid. We used a 1 μL micro-capillary to collect tear fluid from the tear meniscus with minimal irritation of the eye. We analyzed the 1 μL volume of collected tear fluid with liquid-chromatography electrospray ionization mass spectrometry with the use of D-glucose-6,6-d2 as an internal standard. Repeated measurements and a recovery experiment on pooled, onion-induced tears showed that the analysis of the glucose in tears was precise (4% relative standard deviation) and provided 100% recovery. We found the tear glucose concentration of one fasting non-diabetic subject to be 13 to 51 μM while the onion-induced tear glucose concentration of a different non-diabetic subject to be 211 to 256 μM. PMID:17084090

  6. [Investigations on ashing of animal tissues for the determinations of trace metals by means of polarography or atomic-absorption spectrometry (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Suzutani, T

    1980-01-01

    A comparison has been made of three ashing methods for animal tissues with subsequent determination of minute quantities of metals by polarography or atomic-absorption spectrometry. Wet oxidation method with many disadvantages and few advantages has been shown not to be useful for the purpose. Both dry ashing in a muffle-furnace at 530 degrees C and low-temperature ashing are equally applicable to atomic-absorption spectrometry, but dry ashing in a furnace is more excellent with polarography. For obtaining ashes with constant compositions it is far more difficult with low-temperature ashing than with dry ashing in a furnace. Hence, dry ashing in a furnace is most widely applicable. PMID:7409725

  7. ACORNS: Analysis of Correlations Used in Neutron Spectrometry

    1988-05-01

    The program ACORNS performs the complete analysis of the input covariance and/or relative covariance and/or correlation matrices, first of all used in the activation neutron spectrometry. These matrices have to be positive definite. To check the fulfillment of this requirement, the program calculates the eigenvalues and eigenvectors of those. If all the eigenvalues are positive, the program optionally performs the factor analysis. The user's input can be either made manually, or the cross section librariesmore » generated by the code X333.« less

  8. Analysis of volatile mouse pheromones by gas chromatography mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Novotny, Milos V; Soini, Helena A

    2013-01-01

    High-precision quantitative profiling of volatile organic constituents in rodent physiological fluids and glandular secretions is needed to relate olfactory signals to physiology and behavior. Whereas capillary gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analysis has become the most widely applied in such investigations, the extraction and preconcentration of volatile organics is arguably the most critical step in the overall analytical task. In this chapter, we describe technical details of two main sample extraction procedures used in our laboratory: dynamic headspace trapping, and stir bar sorptive extraction (SBSE). They have been demonstrated here for the chromatographic analysis of mouse urine, serum, saliva, and preputial gland specimens.

  9. Behaviour of the thermospray nebulizer as a system for the introduction of organic solutions in flame atomic absorption spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mora, Juan; Canals, Antonio; Hernandis, Vicente

    1996-10-01

    The results obtained in the evaluation of the thermospray nebulizer for the introduction of organic solutions in atomic spectrometry are described. To this end, the influence of the nebulization variables (i.e., liquid flow, control temperature and inner diameter of the capillary) and of the nature of the solvent on the fraction of solvent vaporized, on the drop size distribution of the primary aerosol, on the rates of analyte and solvent transport to the atomization cell and on the analytical signal has been studied. Experimental fraction of solvent vaporized values obtained under different nebulization conditions are reported for the first time. The results show that the characteristics of the aerosol generated strongly depend on the nebulization variables since they determine the amount of energy available for surface generation. The median of the volume drop size distribution of the primary aerosol decreases when the control temperature or the liquid flow is increased or when the inner diameter of the capillary is decreased. As regards the physical properties of the solvent, the so-called expansion factor (i.e., the volume of vapour produced per unit volume of liquid solvent) is the most influential. Surface tension and viscosity are much less significant here than in ordinary pneumatic nebulization. The volatility of the solvent and the characteristics of the primary aerosol determine the solvent transport efficiency which reaches values close to 100% in many cases. The analytical signal is mainly determined by the analyte transport rate, although a severe negative effect appears which is related to the high solvent load to the flame. Due to this fact, the use of organic solvents instead of water in thermospray nebulization for Flame Atomic Absorption Spectrometry does not provide clear advantages, at least without desolvation. A new modified Nukiyama-Tanasawa equation has been presented and evaluated in order to predict the Sauter mean diameter of the thermal

  10. Using Synchrotron-based X-ray Absorption Spectrometry to Identify the Arsenic Chemical Forms in Mine Waste Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Matanitobua, Vitukawalu P.; Noller, Barry N.; Chiswell, Barry; Ng, Jack C.; Bruce, Scott L.; Huang, Daphne; Riley, Mark; Harris, Hugh H.

    2007-01-19

    X-ray Absorption Near Edge Spectroscopy (XANES) gives arsenic form directly in the solid phase and has lower detection limits than extraction techniques. An important and common application of XANES is to use the shift of the edge position to determine the valence state. XANES speciation analysis is based on fitting linear combinations of known spectra from model compounds to determine the ratios of valence states and/or phases present. As(V)/As(III) ratios were determined for various Australian mine waste samples and dispersed mine waste samples from river/creek sediments in Vatukoula, Fiji.

  11. Dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction for the determination of copper in cereals and vegetable food samples using flame atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Shrivas, Kamlesh; Jaiswal, Nitin Kumar

    2013-12-01

    Dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (DLLME) is applied for the determination of copper in cereals and vegetable food samples using flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS). The maximum extraction efficiency of copper was obtained after the optimisation of parameters such as extraction and dispersing solvents, pH, concentration of 2,9-dimethyl-1,10-phenanothroline (DPT), N-phenylbenzimidoyl thiourea (PBITU) and salt. The optimised methodology exhibited a good linearity in the range of 0.2-20 ng/mL copper with relative standard deviations percentage (RSD,%) from ±1.5% to 3.5%. The method is found to be simple and rapid for the analysis of copper in food samples with the limit of detection (LOD) and quantitation (LOQ) were 0.05 and 0.16 ng/mL, respectively. Good recoveries of copper were obtained in the range of 93.5-98.0% in food samples as well as in Certified Reference Material (99.1%). The application of the proposed method has been successfully tested for the determination of copper in cereals (maize, millet, rice, wheat, gram, lentils, kidney beans and green beans) and vegetable (potato, cauliflower, tomato, spinach, green beans, lettuce, egg plants and bitter gourd) food samples.

  12. Graphene-based solid-phase extraction combined with flame atomic absorption spectrometry for a sensitive determination of trace amounts of lead in environmental water and vegetable samples.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yukun; Gao, Shutao; Zang, Xiaohuan; Li, Jingci; Ma, Jingjun

    2012-02-24

    Graphene, a novel class of carbon nanostructures, has great promise for use as sorbent materials because of its ultrahigh specific surface area. A new method using a column packed with graphene as sorbent was developed for the preconcentration of trace amounts of lead (Pb) using dithizone as chelating reagent prior to its determination by flame atomic absorption spectrometry. Some effective parameters on the extraction and complex formation were selected and optimized. Under optimum conditions, the calibration graph was linear in the concentration range of 10.0-600.0 μg L(-1) with a detection limit of 0.61 μg L(-1). The relative standard deviation for ten replicate measurements of 20.0 and 400.0 μg L(-1) of Pb were 3.56 and 3.25%, respectively. Comparative studies showed that graphene is superior to other adsorbents including C18 silica, graphitic carbon, and single- and multi-walled carbon nanotubes for the extraction of Pb. The proposed method was successfully applied in the analysis of environmental water and vegetable samples. Good spiked recoveries over the range of 95.3-100.4% were obtained. This work not only proposes a useful method for sample preconcentration, but also reveals the great potential of graphene as an excellent sorbent material in analytical processes. PMID:22284885

  13. Determination of sulfur in crude oil using high-resolution continuum source molecular absorption spectrometry of the SnS molecule in a graphite furnace.

    PubMed

    Cadorim, Heloisa R; Pereira, Éderson R; Carasek, Eduardo; Welz, Bernhard; de Andrade, Jailson B

    2016-01-01

    An analytical method for the determination of sulfur, as the tin mono-sulfide (SnS) molecule, in crude oil using high-resolution continuum source graphite furnace molecular absorption spectrometry (HR-CS GF MAS) has been developed. The molecular absorbance of the SnS has been measured using the wavelength at 271.624 nm and the crude oil samples were prepared as micro-emulsions due to their high viscosity. Several chemical modifiers (Ir, Pd, Ru, Zr) were tested and palladium was chosen, because it exhibited the best performance. The heating program was optimized by comparing the pyrolysis and vaporization curves obtained for an aqueous sulfur standard and a micro-emulsion of a crude oil certified reference material (CRM). The optimum pyrolysis and vaporization temperatures were found to be 600 and 2000°C, respectively. The limit of detection and the characteristic mass using micro-emulsion analysis of crude oil samples were 5.8 and 13.3 ng S. Accuracy and precision of the method has been evaluated using two crude oil CRM (NIST 2721 and NIST 2722), showing good agreement with the informed or certified values.

  14. Evaluation of solid sampling high-resolution continuum source graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry for direct determination of chromium in medicinal plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Virgilio, Alex; Nóbrega, Joaquim A.; Rêgo, Jardes F.; Neto, José A. Gomes

    2012-12-01

    A method for Cr determination in medicinal plants using direct solid sampling graphite furnace high-resolution continuum source atomic absorption spectrometry was developed. Modifiers were dispensable. Pyrolysis and atomization temperatures were 1500 °C and 2400 °C, respectively. Slopes of calibration curves (50-750 pg Cr, R2 > 0.999) using aqueous and solid standards coincides in 96%, indicated feasibility of aqueous calibration for solid sampling of medicinal plants. Accuracy was checked by analysis of four plant certified reference materials. Results were in agreement at 95% confidence level with certified and non-certified values. Ten samples of medicinal plants were analyzed and Cr contents were in the 1.3-17.7 μg g- 1 Cr range. The highest RSD (n = 5) was 15.4% for the sample Melissa officinalis containing 13.9 ± 2.1 μg g- 1 Cr. The limit of detection was 3.3 ng g- 1 Cr.

  15. Improved determination of manganese in hair by use of a mini-autoclave and flameless atomic absorption spectrometry with Zeeman background correction: an evaluation in unexposed subjects

    SciTech Connect

    Guillard, O.; Brugier, J.C.; Piriou, A.; Menard, M.; Gombert, J.; Reiss, D.

    1984-10-01

    Motivated by the relatively wide range of values published hitherto, we offer a new, reliable method for determination of manganese in hair from unexposed human subjects. By using a mini-autoclave, we have developed a method that obviates loss of manganese during digestion and, thanks to use of a Teflon receptacle and rigorous methodology, contamination has been minimized. We used Zeeman flameless atomic absorption spectrometry, with the method of standard additions, for quantification. Within-run CVs for concentrations of Mn of 0.26 and 0.28 microgram/g of dry hair were 3.63 and 3.93%; the day-to-day CV for a Mn concentration of 0.29 microgram/g of dry hair was 5.84%. Mean (+/- SD) analytical recovery of Mn added to samples of hair was 104% (+/- 9.2%). The mean concentration of Mn found in the hair of 15 healthy unexposed subjects was 0.26 (+/- 0.05) microgram/g dry weight. This sensitive, reproducible procedure is suitable for use in analysis for traces of Mn in hair.

  16. Determination of Lead in Water Samples Using a New Vortex-Assisted, Surfactant-Enhanced Emulsification Liquid-Liquid Microextraction Combined with Graphite Furnace Atomic Absorption Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Peng, Guilong; He, Qiang; Lu, Ying; Mmereki, Daniel; Pan, Weiliang; Tang, Xiaohui; Zhou, Guangming; Mao, Yufeng; Su, Xaioxuan

    2016-04-01

    A low toxic solvent-based vortex-assisted surfactant-enhanced emulsification liquid-liquid microextraction (LT-VSLLME) combined with graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry was developed for the extraction and determination of lead (Pb) in water samples. In the LT-VSLLME method, the extraction solvent was dispersed into the aqueous samples by the assistance of vortex agitator. Meanwhile, the addition of a surfactant, which acted as an emulsifier, could enhance the speed of the mass-transfer from aqueous samples to the extraction solvent. The influences of analytical parameters, including extraction solvent type and its volume, surfactant type and its volume, pH, concentration of chelating agent, salt effect and extraction time were investigated. Under the optimized conditions, a good relative standard deviation of 3.69% at 10 ng L(-1) was obtained. The calibration graph showed a linear pattern in the ranges of 5-30 ngL(-1), with a limit of detection of 0.76 ng L(-1). The linearity was obtained by five points in the concentration range of 5-30 ngL(-1). The enrichment factor was 320. The procedure was applied to wastewater and river water, and the accuracy was assessed through the analysis of the recovery experiments. PMID:26614355

  17. Development of a flow system for the determination of cadmium in fuel alcohol using vermicompost as biosorbent and flame atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Bianchin, Joyce Nunes; Martendal, Edmar; Mior, Renata; Alves, Vanessa Nunes; Araújo, Cleide Sandra Tavares; Coelho, Nívia Maria Melo; Carasek, Eduardo

    2009-04-30

    In this study a method for the determination of cadmium in fuel alcohol using solid-phase extraction with a flow injection analysis system and detection by flame atomic absorption spectrometry was developed. The sorbent material used was a vermicompost commonly used as a garden fertilizer. The chemical and flow variables of the on-line preconcentration system were optimized by means of a full factorial design. The selected factors were: sorbent mass, sample pH, buffer concentration and sample flow rate. The optimum extraction conditions were obtained using sample pH in the range of 7.3-8.3 buffered with tris(hydroxymethyl)aminomethane at 50 mmol L(-1), a sample flow rate of 4.5 mL min(-1) and 160 mg of sorbent mass. With the optimized conditions, the preconcentration factor, limit of detection and sample throughput were estimated as 32 (for preconcentration of 10 mL sample), 1.7 microg L(-1) and 20 samples per hour, respectively. The analytical curve was linear from 5 up to at least 50 microg L(-1), with a correlation coefficient of 0.998 and a relative standard deviation of 2.4% (35 microg L(-1), n=7). The developed method was successfully applied to spiked fuel alcohol, and accuracy was assessed through recovery tests, with recovery ranging from 94% to 100%. PMID:19203591

  18. A dispersive liquid--liquid microextraction methodology for copper (II) in environmental samples prior to determination using microsample injection flame atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Alothman, Zeid A; Habila, Mohamed; Yilmaz, Erkan; Soylak, Mustafa

    2013-01-01

    A simple, environmentally friendly, and efficient dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction method combined with microsample injection flame atomic absorption spectrometry was developed for the separation and preconcentration of Cu(II). 2-(5-Bromo-2-pyridylazo)-5-(diethylamino)phenol (5-Br-PADAP) was used to form a hydrophobic complex of Cu(II) ions in the aqueous phase before extraction. To extract the Cu(II)-5-Br-PADAP complex from the aqueous phase to the organic phase, 2.0 mL of acetone as a disperser solvent and 200 microL of chloroform as an extraction solvent were used. The influences of important analytical parameters, such as the pH, types and volumes of the extraction and disperser solvents, amount of chelating agent, sample volume, and matrix effects, on the microextraction procedure were evaluated and optimized. Using the optimal conditions, the LOD, LOQ, preconcentration factor, and RSD were determined to be 1.4 microg/L, 4.7 microg/L, 120, and 6.5%, respectively. The accuracy of the proposed method was investigated using standard addition/recovery tests. The analysis of certified reference materials produced satisfactory analytical results. The developed method was applied for the determination of Cu in real samples. PMID:24645524

  19. Development a novel supramolecular solvent microextraction procedure for copper in environmental samples and its determination by microsampling flame atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Yilmaz, Erkan; Soylak, Mustafa

    2014-08-01

    A supramolecular solvent (Ss) made up of reverse micelles of 1-decanol in tetrahydrofuran (THF): water was used for the fast and selective microextraction of Cu(II) prior to its determination by microsampling flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS). Cu(II) was complexed with dimethyl dithiocarbamate (DMDC) to obtain hydrophobic complex and extracted to supramolecular solvent phase. The influences of some analytical parameters including pH, type and volume of supramolecular solvent, amount of complexing agent, ultrasonication and centrifuge time and sample volume were investigated. The effects of matrix components were also examined. The detection limit (LOD) and the quantification limit (LOQ) were 0.52µg L(-1) and 1.71µg L(-1) respectively. An preconcentration factor was obtained as 60 and the relative standard deviation was <3%. The accuracy of the developed method was evaluated by the analysis of the certified reference materials (TMDA-64.2 water, SRM 1568A Rice Flour and 8433 Corn Bran) and addition-recovery tests. The presented supramolecular solvent based liquid-liquid microextraction (SsLLME) procedure was applied to the determination of copper in food and water samples with satisfactory results. PMID:24881552

  20. Ultratrace determination of arsenic in water samples by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry after pre-concentration with Mg-Al-Fe ternary layered double hydroxide nano-sorbent.

    PubMed

    Abdolmohammad-Zadeh, Hossein; Jouyban, Abolghasem; Amini, Roghayeh

    2013-11-15

    A selective solid phase extraction method, based on nano-structured Mg-Al-Fe(NO3(-)) ternary layered double hydroxide as a sorbent, is developed for the pre-concentration of ultra-trace levels of arsenic (As) prior to determination by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry. It is found that both As(III) and As(V) could be quantitatively retained on the sorbent within a wide pH range of 4-12. Accordingly, the presented method is applied to determination of total inorganic As in aqueous solutions. Maximum analytical signal of As is achieved when the pyrolysis and atomization temperatures are close to 900 °C and 2300 °C, respectively. Several variables affecting the extraction efficiency including pH, sample flow rate, amount of nano-sorbent, elution conditions and sample volume are optimized. Under the optimized conditions, the limit of detection (3Sb/m) and the relative standard deviation are 4.6 pg mL(-1) and 3.9%, respectively. The calibration graph is linear in the range of 15.0-650 pg mL(-1) with a correlation coefficient of 0.9979, sorption capacity and pre-concentration factor are 8.68 mg g(-1) and 300, respectively. The developed method is validated by the analysis of a standard reference material (SRM 1643e) and is successfully applied to the determination of ultra-trace amounts of As in different water samples.

  1. Investigation of chemical modifiers for the direct determination of arsenic in fish oil using high-resolution continuum source graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Éderson R; de Almeida, Tarcísio S; Borges, Daniel L G; Carasek, Eduardo; Welz, Bernhard; Feldmann, Jörg; Campo Menoyo, Javier Del

    2016-04-01

    High-resolution continuum source graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (HR-CS GF AAS) has been applied for the development of a method for the determination of total As in fish oil samples using direct analysis. The method does not use any sample pretreatment, besides dilution with 1-propanole, in order to decrease the oil viscosity. The stability and sensitivity of As were evaluated using ruthenium and iridium as permanent chemical modifiers and palladium added in solution over the sample. The best results were obtained with ruthenium as the permanent modifier and palladium in solution added to samples and standard solutions. Under these conditions, aqueous standard solutions could be used for calibration for the fish oil samples diluted with 1-propanole. The pyrolysis and atomization temperatures were 1400 °C and 2300 °C, respectively, and the limit of detection and characteristic mass were 30 pg and 43 pg, respectively. Accuracy and precision of the method have been evaluated using microwave-assisted acid digestion of the samples with subsequent determination by HR-CS GF AAS and ICP-MS; the results were in agreement (95% confidence level) with those of the proposed method.

  2. Optimization of a hydride generation metallic furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (HG-MF-AAS) method for tin determination: analytical and morphological parameters of a metallic atomizer.

    PubMed

    Moretto Galazzi, Rodrigo; Arruda, Marco Aurélio Zezzi

    2013-12-15

    The present work describes a metallic tube as hydride atomizer for atomic absorption spectrometry. Its performance is evaluated through tin determination, and the accuracy of the method assessed through the analysis of sediment and water samples. Some chemical parameters (referring to the generation of the hydride) such as acid, NaOH and THB concentrations, as well as physical parameters (referring to the transport of the hydride) such as carrier, acetylene, air flow-rates, flame composition, coil length, tube hole area, among others, are evaluated for optimization of the method. Scanning electron microscopy is used for evaluating morphological parameters in both new and used (after 150 h) tube atomizers. The method presents linear Sn concentration from 50 to 1000 µg L(-1) (r>0.9995; n=3) and the analytical frequency of ca. 40 h(-1). The limit of detection (LOD) is 7.1 µg L(-1) and the precision, expressed as RSD is less than 4% (200 µg L(-1); n=10). The accuracy is evaluated through reference materials, and the results are similar at 95% confidence level according to the t-test.

  3. Separation and determination of copper in bottled water samples by combination of dispersive liquid--liquid microextraction and microsample introduction flame atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Citak, Demirhan; Tuzen, Mustafa

    2013-01-01

    A new and simple method for the determination of trace amounts of Cu(II) was developed by combination of dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (DLLME) preconcentration and microsample introduction flame atomic absorption spectrometry. In this method, ethanol and chloroform were chosen as disperser and extraction solvents, respectively, and 1-nitroso-2-naphthol was used as the complexing agent. The factors affecting the extraction efficiency and determination of Cu(II), including extraction and disperser solvent nature and volume, concentration of the complexing agent, pH of the solution, extraction time, and matrix ions, were investigated. Under optimal conditions, the LOD for Cu(II) was 0.95 microg/L with a preconcentration factor of 70. The RSD was 1.9%. The accuracy of the developed DLLME method was verified by determination of Cu(II) in a certified reference material (NRCC-SLRS-4 river water). The relative error was -3.31%. The developed preconcentration procedure was successfully applied to the analysis of bottled drinking water samples.

  4. Determination of Lead in Water Samples Using a New Vortex-Assisted, Surfactant-Enhanced Emulsification Liquid-Liquid Microextraction Combined with Graphite Furnace Atomic Absorption Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Peng, Guilong; He, Qiang; Lu, Ying; Mmereki, Daniel; Pan, Weiliang; Tang, Xiaohui; Zhou, Guangming; Mao, Yufeng; Su, Xaioxuan

    2016-04-01

    A low toxic solvent-based vortex-assisted surfactant-enhanced emulsification liquid-liquid microextraction (LT-VSLLME) combined with graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry was developed for the extraction and determination of lead (Pb) in water samples. In the LT-VSLLME method, the extraction solvent was dispersed into the aqueous samples by the assistance of vortex agitator. Meanwhile, the addition of a surfactant, which acted as an emulsifier, could enhance the speed of the mass-transfer from aqueous samples to the extraction solvent. The influences of analytical parameters, including extraction solvent type and its volume, surfactant type and its volume, pH, concentration of chelating agent, salt effect and extraction time were investigated. Under the optimized conditions, a good relative standard deviation of 3.69% at 10 ng L(-1) was obtained. The calibration graph showed a linear pattern in the ranges of 5-30 ngL(-1), with a limit of detection of 0.76 ng L(-1). The linearity was obtained by five points in the concentration range of 5-30 ngL(-1). The enrichment factor was 320. The procedure was applied to wastewater and river water, and the accuracy was assessed through the analysis of the recovery experiments.

  5. Solidified floating organic drop microextraction (SFODME) for simultaneous separation/preconcentration and determination of cobalt and nickel by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GFAAS).

    PubMed

    Bidabadi, Mahboubeh Shirani; Dadfarnia, Shayessteh; Shabani, Ali Mohammad Haji

    2009-07-15

    Solidified floating organic drop microextraction (SFODME), combined with graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GFAAS) was proposed for simultaneous separation/enrichment and determination of trace amounts of nickel and cobalt in surface waters and sea water. 1-(2-Pyridylazo)-2-naphthol (PAN) was used as chelating agent. The main parameters affecting the performance of SFODME, such as pH, concentration of PAN, extraction time, stirring rate, extraction temperature, sample volume and nature of the solvent were optimized. Under the optimum experimental conditions, a good relative standard deviation for six determination of 20 ng l(-1) of Co(II) and Ni(II) were 4.6 and 3.6%, respectively. An enrichment factor of 502 and 497 and detection limits of 0.4 and 0.3 ng l(-1) for cobalt and nickel were obtained, respectively. The procedure was applied to tap water, well water, river water and sea water, and accuracy was assessed through the analysis of certified reference water or recovery experiments. PMID:19117672

  6. Separation and preconcentration of trace level of lead in one drop of blood sample by using graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Shrivas, Kamlesh; Patel, Devesh Kumar

    2010-04-15

    Drop-to-drop solvent microextraction (DDSME) assisted with ultrasonication is applied for the determination of lead in one drop (30 microL) of blood sample by using graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GF-AAS). The optimum extraction efficiency of lead was observed for 10 min extraction time at pH 5.0 with 2 microL of organic solvent that containing 0.5 M of Cyanex-302. The optimized methodology exhibited good linearity in the range of 0.3-30.0 ng mL(-1) lead with relative standard deviations (RSD) from 2.5 to 4.4%. The method is found to be simple and rapid for the analysis of lead in micro amount of blood sample with the limit of detection (LOD) of 0.08 ng mL(-1). The application of the proposed method has been successfully tested for the determination of lead in blood samples. The results showed that under the optimized experimental conditions, the method showed good sensitivity and recovery %, as well as advantages such as linearity, simplicity, low cost and high feasibility. PMID:20004520

  7. Ultra-trace determination of lead in water and food samples by using ionic liquid-based single drop microextraction-electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Manzoori, Jamshid L; Amjadi, Mohammad; Abulhassani, Jafar

    2009-06-30

    An improved single drop microextraction procedure was developed for the preconcentration of lead prior to its determination by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry. Ionic liquid, 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium hexafluorophosphate [C4MIM][PF6], was used as an alternative to volatile organic solvents for extraction. Lead was complexed with ammonium pyrroldinedithiocarbamate (APDC) and extracted into a 7-microL ionic liquid drop. The extracted complex was directly injected into the graphite furnace. Several variables affecting microextraction efficiency and ETAAS signal, such as pyrolysis and atomization temperature, pH, APDC concentration, extraction time, drop volume and stirring rate were investigated and optimized. In the optimum experimental conditions, the limit of detection (3s) and the enhancement factor were 0.015 microg L(-1) and 76, respectively. The relative standard deviation (RSD) for five replicate determinations of 0.2 microg L(-1) Pb was 5.2%. The developed method was validated by the analysis of certified reference materials and applied successfully to the determination of lead in several real samples. PMID:19463561

  8. Ionic liquid-based single drop microextraction combined with electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry for the determination of manganese in water samples.

    PubMed

    Manzoori, Jamshid L; Amjadi, Mohammad; Abulhassani, Jafar

    2009-02-15

    Room temperature ionic liquid, 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium hexafluorophosphate [C(4)MIM][PF(6)], was used as an alternative to volatile organic solvents in single drop microextraction-electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (SDME-ETAAS). Manganese was extracted from aqueous solution into a drop of the ionic liquid after complextaion with 1-(2-thiazolylazo)-2-naphthol (TAN) and the drop was directly injected into the graphite furnace. Several variables affecting microextraction efficiency and ETAAS signal, such as pyrolysis and atomization temperature, pH, TAN concentration, extraction time, drop volume and stirring rate were investigated and optimized. In the optimum experimental conditions, the limit of detection (3s) and the enhancement factor were 0.024 microg L(-1) and 30.3, respectively. The relative standard deviation (RSD) for five replicate determinations of 0.5 microg L(-1) Mn(II) was 5.5%. The developed method was validated by the analysis of a certified reference material (NIST SRM 1643e) and applied successfully to the determination of manganese in several natural water samples. PMID:19084676

  9. Determination of lead and cadmium using an ionic liquid and dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction followed by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    López-García, Ignacio; Vicente-Martínez, Yesica; Hernández-Córdoba, Manuel

    2013-06-15

    A procedure for the determination of ultratrace levels of lead and cadmium using dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction followed by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS) has been developed. The ionic liquid, 1-octyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide ([C8MIm][NTf2]), is formed in situ and used to extract the lead and cadmium complexes with ammonium pyrrolidinedithiocarbamate. The very fine droplets of ([C8MIm][NTf2]) allow effective dispersion without the need for organic solvents. After centrifugation, the concentrations of lead and cadmium in the sedimented phase can be determined by ETAAS. Using a 10 mL aqueous sample, the enrichment factor of the procedure was 280 and detection limits of 0.2 and 3 ng L(-1) were obtained for cadmium and lead, respectively. The relative standard deviations for 10 replicates at the 10 ng L(-1) cadmium and 0.2 μg L(-1) lead levels were 6.5 and 7.3%, respectively. The method was successfully applied to the analysis of waters as well as to lixiviates obtained from toys made of plastic materials. PMID:23618174

  10. Ionic liquid-based extraction followed by graphite-furnace atomic absorption spectrometry for the determination of trace heavy metals in high-purity iron metal.

    PubMed

    Matsumiya, Hiroaki; Kato, Tatsuya; Hiraide, Masataka

    2014-02-01

    The analysis of high-purity materials for trace impurities is an important and challenging task. The present paper describes a facile and sensitive method for the determination of trace heavy metals in high-purity iron metal. Trace heavy metals in an iron sample solution were rapidly and selectively preconcentrated by the extraction into a tiny volume of an ionic liquid [1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide] for the determination by graphite-furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GFAAS). A nitrogen-donating neutral ligand, 2,4,6-tris(2-pyridyl)-1,3,5-triazine (TPTZ), was found to be effective in the ionic liquid-based selective extraction, allowing the nearly complete (~99.8%) elimination of the iron matrix. The combination with the optimized GFAAS was successful. The detectability reached sub-μg g(-1) levels in iron metal. The novel use of TPTZ in ionic liquid-based extraction followed by GFAAS was successfully applied to the determination of traces of Co, Ni, Cu, Cd, and Pb in certified reference materials for high-purity iron metal.

  11. Development of a flow system for the determination of cadmium in fuel alcohol using vermicompost as biosorbent and flame atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Bianchin, Joyce Nunes; Martendal, Edmar; Mior, Renata; Alves, Vanessa Nunes; Araújo, Cleide Sandra Tavares; Coelho, Nívia Maria Melo; Carasek, Eduardo

    2009-04-30

    In this study a method for the determination of cadmium in fuel alcohol using solid-phase extraction with a flow injection analysis system and detection by flame atomic absorption spectrometry was developed. The sorbent material used was a vermicompost commonly used as a garden fertilizer. The chemical and flow variables of the on-line preconcentration system were optimized by means of a full factorial design. The selected factors were: sorbent mass, sample pH, buffer concentration and sample flow rate. The optimum extraction conditions were obtained using sample pH in the range of 7.3-8.3 buffered with tris(hydroxymethyl)aminomethane at 50 mmol L(-1), a sample flow rate of 4.5 mL min(-1) and 160 mg of sorbent mass. With the optimized conditions, the preconcentration factor, limit of detection and sample throughput were estimated as 32 (for preconcentration of 10 mL sample), 1.7 microg L(-1) and 20 samples per hour, respectively. The analytical curve was linear from 5 up to at least 50 microg L(-1), with a correlation coefficient of 0.998 and a relative standard deviation of 2.4% (35 microg L(-1), n=7). The developed method was successfully applied to spiked fuel alcohol, and accuracy was assessed through recovery tests, with recovery ranging from 94% to 100%.

  12. A new cloud point extraction procedure for determination of inorganic antimony species in beverages and biological samples by flame atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Altunay, Nail; Gürkan, Ramazan

    2015-05-15

    A new cloud-point extraction (CPE) for the determination of antimony species in biological and beverages samples has been established with flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS). The method is based on the fact that formation of the competitive ion-pairing complex of Sb(III) and Sb(V) with Victoria Pure Blue BO (VPB(+)) at pH 10. The antimony species were individually detected by FAAS. Under the optimized conditions, the calibration range for Sb(V) is 1-250 μg L(-1) with a detection limit of 0.25 μg L(-1) and sensitive enhancement factor of 76.3 while the calibration range for Sb(III) is 10-400 μg L(-1) with a detection limit of 5.15 μg L(-1) and sensitive enhancement factor of 48.3. The precision as a relative standard deviation is in range of 0.24-2.35%. The method was successfully applied to the speciative determination of antimony species in the samples. The validation was verified by analysis of certified reference materials (CRMs).

  13. A Green Preconcentration Method for Determination of Cobalt and Lead in Fresh Surface and Waste Water Samples Prior to Flame Atomic Absorption Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Naeemullah; Kazi, Tasneem Gul; Shah, Faheem; Afridi, Hassan Imran; Khan, Sumaira; Arian, Sadaf Sadia; Brahman, Kapil Dev

    2012-01-01

    Cloud point extraction (CPE) has been used for the preconcentration and simultaneous determination of cobalt (Co) and lead (Pb) in fresh and wastewater samples. The extraction of analytes from aqueous samples was performed in the presence of 8-hydroxyquinoline (oxine) as a chelating agent and Triton X-114 as a nonionic surfactant. Experiments were conducted to assess the effect of different chemical variables such as pH, amounts of reagents (oxine and Triton X-114), temperature, incubation time, and sample volume. After phase separation, based on the cloud point, the surfactant-rich phase was diluted with acidic ethanol prior to its analysis by the flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS). The enhancement factors 70 and 50 with detection limits of 0.26 μg L−1 and 0.44 μg L−1 were obtained for Co and Pb, respectively. In order to validate the developed method, a certified reference material (SRM 1643e) was analyzed and the determined values obtained were in a good agreement with the certified values. The proposed method was applied successfully to the determination of Co and Pb in a fresh surface and waste water sample. PMID:23227429

  14. Magnetic stirrer induced dispersive ionic-liquid microextraction for the determination of vanadium in water and food samples prior to graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Naeemullah; Kazi, Tasneem Gul; Tuzen, Mustafa

    2015-04-01

    A new dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction, magnetic stirrer induced dispersive ionic-liquid microextraction (MS-IL-DLLME) was developed to quantify the trace level of vanadium in real water and food samples by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GFAAS). In this extraction method magnetic stirrer was applied to obtained a dispersive medium of 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium hexafluorophosphate [C4MIM][PF6] in aqueous solution of (real water samples and digested food samples) to increase phase transfer ratio, which significantly enhance the recovery of vanadium - 4-(2-pyridylazo) resorcinol (PAR) chelate. Variables having vital role on desired microextraction methods were optimised to obtain the maximum recovery of study analyte. Under the optimised experimental variables, enhancement factor (EF) and limit of detection (LOD) were achieved to be 125 and 18 ng L(-1), respectively. Validity and accuracy of the desired method was checked by analysis of certified reference materials (SLRS-4 Riverine water and NIST SRM 1515 Apple leaves). The relative standard deviation (RSD) for 10 replicate determinations at 0.5 μg L(-1) of vanadium level was found to be <5.0%. This method was successfully applied to real water and acid digested food samples.

  15. Mercury(II) and methyl mercury determinations in water and fish samples by using solid phase extraction and cold vapour atomic absorption spectrometry combination.

    PubMed

    Tuzen, Mustafa; Karaman, Isa; Citak, Demirhan; Soylak, Mustafa

    2009-07-01

    A method has been developed for mercury(II) and methyl mercury speciation on Staphylococcus aureus loaded Dowex Optipore V-493 micro-column in the presented work, by using cold vapour atomic absorption spectrometry. Selective and sequential elution with 0.1 molL(-1) HCl for methyl mercury and 2 molL(-1) HCl for mercury(II) were performed at the pH range of 2-6. Optimal analytical conditions including pH, amounts of biosorbent, sample volumes were investigated. The detection limits of the analytes were 2.5 ngL(-1) for Hg(II) and 1.7 ngL(-1) for methyl mercury. The capacity of biosorbent for mercury(II) and methyl mercury was 6.5 and 5.4 mgg(-1), respectively. The validation of the presented procedure is performed by the analysis of standard reference material. The speciation procedure established was successfully applied to the speciation of mercury(II) and methyl mercury in natural water and microwave digested fish samples.

  16. High current–density anodic electrodissolution in flow–injection systems for the determination of aluminium, copper and zinc in non–ferroalloys by flame atomic absorption spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Giacomozzi, César Augusto; de Queiróz, Roldão R. U.; Souza, Ivan Gonçalves

    1999-01-01

    An automatic procedure with a high current-density anodic electrodissolution unit (HDAE) is proposed for the determination of aluminium, copper and zinc in non-ferroalloys by flame atomic absorption spectrometry, based on the direct solid analysis. It consists of solenoid valve-based commutation in a flow-injection system for on-line sample electro-dissolution and calibration with one multi-element standard, an electrolytic cell equipped with two electrodes (a silver needle acts as cathode, and sample as anode), and an intelligent unit. The latter is assembled in a PC-compatible microcomputer for instrument control, and for data acquisition and processing. General management of the process is achieved by use of software written in Pascal. Electrolyte compositions, flow rates, commutation times, applied current and electrolysis time were investigated. A 0.5 mol l-1 HN03 solution was elected as electrolyte and 300 A/cm2 as the continuous current pulse. The performance of the proposed system was evaluated by analysing aluminium in Al-alloy samples, and copper/zinc in brass and bronze samples, respectively. The system handles about 50 samples per hour. Results are precise (R.S.D. < 2%) and in agreement with those obtained by ICP-AES and spectrophotometry at a 95% confidence level. PMID:18924839

  17. Preconcentration of nickel and cadmium by TiO2 nanotubes as solid-phase extraction adsorbents coupled with flame atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Qing-Xiang; Zhao, Xin-Ning; Xiao, Jun-Ping

    2009-03-15

    TiO(2) nanotubes, a new nanomaterial, are often used in the photocatalysis. Due to its relatively large specific surface areas it should have a higher enrichment capacity. However, very few applications in the enrichment of pollutants were found. This paper described a new procedure to investigate the trapping power of TiO(2) nanotubes with cadmium and nickel in water samples as the model analytes and flame atomic absorption spectrometry for the analysis. The possible parameters influencing the enrichment were optimized. Under the optimal SPE conditions, the method detection limits and precisions (R.S.D., n=6) were 0.25 ngmL(-1) and 2.2% for cadmium, 1 ngmL(-1) and 2.6% for nickel, respectively. The established method has been successfully applied to analyze four realworld water samples, and satisfactory results were obtained. The spiked recoveries were in the range of 90.2-99.2% for them. All these indicated that TiO(2) nanotubes had great potential in environmental field.

  18. Use of slurry sampling for the direct determination of zinc in yogurt by high resolution-continuum source flame atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Brandao, Geovani C; de Jesus, Raildo M; da Silva, Erik G P; Ferreira, Sergio L C

    2010-06-15

    This paper presents an analytical procedure for the direct determination of zinc in yogurt employing sampling slurry and high resolution-continuum source flame atomic absorption spectrometry (HR-CS FAAS). The step optimization established the experimental conditions of: 2.0molL(-1) hydrochloric acid, a sonication time of 20min and a sample mass of 1.0g for a slurry volume of 25mL. This method allows the determination of zinc with a limit of quantification of 0.32microgg(-1). The precision expressed as relative standard deviation (RSD) were 0.82 and 2.08% for yogurt samples containing zinc concentrations of 4.85 and 2.49microgg(-1), respectively. The accuracy was confirmed by the analysis of a certified reference material of non-fat milk powder furnished by the National Institute of Standard and Technology. The proposed method was applied for the determination of zinc in seven yogurt samples. The zinc content was varied from 2.19 to 4.85microgg(-1). These results agreed with those reported in the literature. The samples were also analyzed after acid digestion and zinc determination by FAAS. No statistical difference was observed between the results obtained by both of the procedures performed.

  19. On-line micro-volume introduction system developed for lower density than water extraction solvent and dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction coupled with flame atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Anthemidis, Aristidis N; Mitani, Constantina; Balkatzopoulou, Paschalia; Tzanavaras, Paraskevas D

    2012-07-01

    A simple and fast preconcentration/separation dispersive liquid-liquid micro extraction (DLLME) method for metal determination based on the use of extraction solvent with lower density than water has been developed. For this purpose a novel micro-volume introduction system was developed enabling the on-line injection of the organic solvent into flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS). The effectiveness and efficiency of the proposed system were demonstrated for lead and copper preconcentration in environmental water samples using di-isobutyl ketone (DBIK) as extraction solvent. Under the optimum conditions the enhancement factor for lead and copper was 187 and 310 respectively. For a sample volume of 10 mL, the detection limit (3 s) and the relative standard deviation were 1.2 μg L(-1) and 3.3% for lead and 0.12 μg L(-1) and 2.9% for copper respectively. The developed method was evaluated by analyzing certified reference material and it was applied successfully to the analysis of environmental water samples.

  20. Dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction for the determination of copper in cereals and vegetable food samples using flame atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Shrivas, Kamlesh; Jaiswal, Nitin Kumar

    2013-12-01

    Dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (DLLME) is applied for the determination of copper in cereals and vegetable food samples using flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS). The maximum extraction efficiency of copper was obtained after the optimisation of parameters such as extraction and dispersing solvents, pH, concentration of 2,9-dimethyl-1,10-phenanothroline (DPT), N-phenylbenzimidoyl thiourea (PBITU) and salt. The optimised methodology exhibited a good linearity in the range of 0.2-20 ng/mL copper with relative standard deviations percentage (RSD,%) from ±1.5% to 3.5%. The method is found to be simple and rapid for the analysis of copper in food samples with the limit of detection (LOD) and quantitation (LOQ) were 0.05 and 0.16 ng/mL, respectively. Good recoveries of copper were obtained in the range of 93.5-98.0% in food samples as well as in Certified Reference Material (99.1%). The application of the proposed method has been successfully tested for the determination of copper in cereals (maize, millet, rice, wheat, gram, lentils, kidney beans and green beans) and vegetable (potato, cauliflower, tomato, spinach, green beans, lettuce, egg plants and bitter gourd) food samples. PMID:23870956

  1. A green preconcentration method for determination of cobalt and lead in fresh surface and waste water samples prior to flame atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Naeemullah; Kazi, Tasneem Gul; Shah, Faheem; Afridi, Hassan Imran; Khan, Sumaira; Arian, Sadaf Sadia; Brahman, Kapil Dev

    2012-01-01

    Cloud point extraction (CPE) has been used for the preconcentration and simultaneous determination of cobalt (Co) and lead (Pb) in fresh and wastewater samples. The extraction of analytes from aqueous samples was performed in the presence of 8-hydroxyquinoline (oxine) as a chelating agent and Triton X-114 as a nonionic surfactant. Experiments were conducted to assess the effect of different chemical variables such as pH, amounts of reagents (oxine and Triton X-114), temperature, incubation time, and sample volume. After phase separation, based on the cloud point, the surfactant-rich phase was diluted with acidic ethanol prior to its analysis by the flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS). The enhancement factors 70 and 50 with detection limits of 0.26 μg L(-1) and 0.44 μg L(-1) were obtained for Co and Pb, respectively. In order to validate the developed method, a certified reference material (SRM 1643e) was analyzed and the determined values obtained were in a good agreement with the certified values. The proposed method was applied successfully to the determination of Co and Pb in a fresh surface and waste water sample. PMID:23227429

  2. Ultrasound-assisted extraction for the determination of Cu, Mn, Ca, and Mg in alternative oilseed crops using flame atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Peronico, Vanessa Cruz Dias; Raposo, Jorge Luiz

    2016-04-01

    An ultrasound-assisted extraction procedure was evaluated for the multi-element determination of Cu, Mn, Ca, and Mg in alternative oilseed crops using flame atomic absorption spectrometry. The best results were obtained when 0.3g of samples were used to extract the mineral content using 10 mL of a 1.40 mol L(-1) HNO3 solution for 10 min at 25 °C. The accuracy and precision of the analysis were evaluated using two oilseed reference materials, and the results were in agreement with reference values at 95% confidence level (paired t-test). The method was used to analyze five oilseed samples and the results were in agreement with those obtained using a closed-vessel microwave-assisted acid digestion system for sample preparation. The relative standard deviations were 0.52-6.13% for all of the standard and sample measurements, and the limits of detection were 666.7, 416.7, 333.4 μg g(-1), and 3.5 mg g(-1) for Cu, Mn, Ca, and Mg, respectively. PMID:26593618

  3. APPLICATION OF ABSORPTION SPECTROSCOPY TO ACTINIDE PROCESS ANALYSIS AND MONITORING

    SciTech Connect

    Lascola, R.; Sharma, V.

    2010-06-03

    The characteristic strong colors of aqueous actinide solutions form the basis of analytical techniques for actinides based on absorption spectroscopy. Colorimetric measurements of samples from processing activities have been used for at least half a century. This seemingly mature technology has been recently revitalized by developments in chemometric data analysis. Where reliable measurements could formerly only be obtained under well-defined conditions, modern methods are robust with respect to variations in acidity, concentration of complexants and spectral interferents, and temperature. This paper describes two examples of the use of process absorption spectroscopy for Pu analysis at the Savannah River Site, in Aiken, SC. In one example, custom optical filters allow accurate colorimetric measurements of Pu in a stream with rapid nitric acid variation. The second example demonstrates simultaneous measurement of Pu and U by chemometric treatment of absorption spectra. The paper concludes with a description of the use of these analyzers to supplement existing technologies in nuclear materials monitoring in processing, reprocessing, and storage facilities.

  4. Determination of silicon and aluminum in silicon carbide nanocrystals by high-resolution continuum source graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Dravecz, Gabriella; Bencs, László; Beke, Dávid; Gali, Adam

    2016-01-15

    The determination of Al contaminant and the main component Si in silicon carbide (SiC) nanocrystals with the size-distribution of 1-8nm dispersed in an aqueous solution was developed using high-resolution continuum source graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (HR-CS-GFAAS). The vaporization/atomization processes were investigated in a transversally heated graphite atomizer by evaporating solution samples of Al and Si preserved in various media (HCl, HNO3). For Si, the best results were obtained by applying a mixture of 5µg Pd plus 5µg Mg, whereas for Al, 10µg Mg (each as nitrate solution) was dispensed with the samples, but the results obtained without modifier were found to be better. This way a maximum pyrolysis temperature of 1200°C for Si and 1300°C for Al could be used, and the optimum (compromise) atomization temperature was 2400°C for both analytes. The Si and Al contents of different sized SiC nanocrystals, dispersed in aqueous solutions, were determined against aqueous (external) calibration standards. The correlation coefficients (R values) of the calibrations were found to be 0.9963 for Si and 0.9991 for Al. The upper limit of the linear calibration range was 2mg/l Si and 0.25mg/l Al. The limit of detection was 3µg/l for Si and 0.5µg/l for Al. The characteristic mass (m0) was calculated to be 389pg Si and 6.4pg Al. The Si and Al content in the solution samples were found to be in the range of 1.0-1.7mg/l and 0.1-0.25mg/l, respectively.

  5. UV-photochemical vapor generation of selenium for atomic absorption spectrometry: Optimization and 75Se radiotracer efficiency study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rybínová, Marcela; Musil, Stanislav; Červený, Václav; Vobecký, Miloslav; Rychlovský, Petr

    2016-09-01

    Volatile selenium compounds were generated UV-photochemically in the continuous flow mode using four UV-photoreactors differing in the material of the reaction coil; Teflon tubing and quartz tubes with various inner diameters and wall thicknesses were tested. Atomic absorption spectrometry with an externally heated quartz furnace atomizer was employed as the detector. The relevant experimental generation parameters were optimized and the basic analytical characteristics were determined. Using formic acid as the photochemical agent, limits of detection achieved for selenium were in the range 46-102 ng L- 1 in dependence on the type of UV-photoreactor employed. When nitric acid was also added to the photochemical agent, the limits of detection were reduced to 27-44 ng L- 1. The repeatability did not exceed 2.4% (5 μg L- 1 Se(IV), n = 10). Experiments with 75Se radiotracer have been performed for the first time to quantify the efficiency of UV-photochemical vapor generation (UV-PVG) of selenium. The highest efficiency of 67 ± 1% was obtained for a UV-photoreactor containing a quartz reaction coil (2.0 mm i.d., 4.0 mm o.d.). The generation efficiency of 61 ± 1% was obtained for a Teflon reaction coil (1.0 mm i.d., 1.4 mm o.d.). Mapping of the radiotracer distribution in the individual parts of the apparatus did not reveal substantial transport losses of the analyte in the UV-PVG system.

  6. Model calculation of the characteristic mass for convective and diffusive vapor transport in graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bencs, László; Laczai, Nikoletta; Ajtony, Zsolt

    2015-07-01

    A combination of former convective-diffusive vapor-transport models is described to extend the calculation scheme for sensitivity (characteristic mass - m0) in graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GFAAS). This approach encompasses the influence of forced convection of the internal furnace gas (mini-flow) combined with concentration diffusion of the analyte atoms on the residence time in a spatially isothermal furnace, i.e., the standard design of the transversely heated graphite atomizer (THGA). A couple of relationships for the diffusional and convectional residence times were studied and compared, including in factors accounting for the effects of the sample/platform dimension and the dosing hole. These model approaches were subsequently applied for the particular cases of Ag, As, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Hg, Mg, Mn, Mo, Ni, Pb, Sb, Se, Sn, V and Zn analytes. For the verification of the accuracy of the calculations, the experimental m0 values were determined with the application of a standard THGA furnace, operating either under stopped, or mini-flow (50 cm3 min- 1) of the internal sheath gas during atomization. The theoretical and experimental ratios of m0(mini-flow)-to-m0(stop-flow) were closely similar for each study analyte. Likewise, the calculated m0 data gave a fairly good agreement with the corresponding experimental m0 values for stopped and mini-flow conditions, i.e., it ranged between 0.62 and 1.8 with an average of 1.05 ± 0.27. This indicates the usability of the current model calculations for checking the operation of a given GFAAS instrument and the applied methodology.

  7. Determination of silicon and aluminum in silicon carbide nanocrystals by high-resolution continuum source graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Dravecz, Gabriella; Bencs, László; Beke, Dávid; Gali, Adam

    2016-01-15

    The determination of Al contaminant and the main component Si in silicon carbide (SiC) nanocrystals with the size-distribution of 1-8nm dispersed in an aqueous solution was developed using high-resolution continuum source graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (HR-CS-GFAAS). The vaporization/atomization processes were investigated in a transversally heated graphite atomizer by evaporating solution samples of Al and Si preserved in various media (HCl, HNO3). For Si, the best results were obtained by applying a mixture of 5µg Pd plus 5µg Mg, whereas for Al, 10µg Mg (each as nitrate solution) was dispensed with the samples, but the results obtained without modifier were found to be better. This way a maximum pyrolysis temperature of 1200°C for Si and 1300°C for Al could be used, and the optimum (compromise) atomization temperature was 2400°C for both analytes. The Si and Al contents of different sized SiC nanocrystals, dispersed in aqueous solutions, were determined against aqueous (external) calibration standards. The correlation coefficients (R values) of the calibrations were found to be 0.9963 for Si and 0.9991 for Al. The upper limit of the linear calibration range was 2mg/l Si and 0.25mg/l Al. The limit of detection was 3µg/l for Si and 0.5µg/l for Al. The characteristic mass (m0) was calculated to be 389pg Si and 6.4pg Al. The Si and Al content in the solution samples were found to be in the range of 1.0-1.7mg/l and 0.1-0.25mg/l, respectively. PMID:26592606

  8. Determination of calcium, magnesium and zinc in lubricating oils by flame atomic absorption spectrometry using a three-component solution.

    PubMed

    Zmozinski, Ariane V; de Jesus, Alexandre; Vale, Maria G R; Silva, Márcia M

    2010-12-15

    Lubricating oils are used to decrease wear and friction of movable parts of engines and turbines, being in that way essential for the performance and the increase of that equipment lifespan. The presence of some metals shows the addition of specific additives such as detergents, dispersals and antioxidants that improve the performance of these lubricants. In this work, a method for determination of calcium, magnesium and zinc in lubricating oil by flame atomic absorption spectrometry (F AAS) was developed. The samples were diluted with a small quantity of aviation kerosene (AVK), n-propanol and water to form a three-component solution before its introduction in the F AAS. Aqueous inorganic standards diluted in the same way have been used for calibration. To assess the accuracy of the new method, it was compared with ABNT NBR 14066 standard method, which consists in diluting the sample with AVK and in quantification by F AAS. Two other validating methods have also been used: the acid digestion and the certified reference material NIST (SRM 1084a). The proposed method provides the following advantages in relation to the standard method: significant reduction of the use of AVK, higher stability of the analytes in the medium and application of aqueous inorganic standards for calibration. The limits of detection for calcium, magnesium and zinc were 1.3 μg g(-1), 0.052 μg g(-1) and 0.41 μg g(-1), respectively. Concentrations of calcium, magnesium and zinc in six different samples obtained by the developed method did not differ significantly from the results obtained by the reference methods at the 95% confidence level (Student's t-test and ANOVA). Therefore, the proposed method becomes an efficient alternative for determination of metals in lubricating oil.

  9. Native Liquid Extraction Surface Analysis Mass Spectrometry: Analysis of Noncovalent Protein Complexes Directly from Dried Substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Nicholas J.; Griffiths, Rian L.; Edwards, Rebecca L.; Cooper, Helen J.

    2015-08-01

    Liquid extraction surface analysis (LESA) mass spectrometry is a promising tool for the analysis of intact proteins from biological substrates. Here, we demonstrate native LESA mass spectrometry of noncovalent protein complexes of myoglobin and hemoglobin from a range of surfaces. Holomyoglobin, in which apomyoglobin is noncovalently bound to the prosthetic heme group, was observed following LESA mass spectrometry of myoglobin dried onto glass and polyvinylidene fluoride surfaces. Tetrameric hemoglobin [(αβ)2 4H] was observed following LESA mass spectrometry of hemoglobin dried onto glass and polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) surfaces, and from dried blood spots (DBS) on filter paper. Heme-bound dimers and monomers were also observed. The `contact' LESA approach was particularly suitable for the analysis of hemoglobin tetramers from DBS.

  10. Transition of Iodine Analysis to Accelerator Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Watrous, Matthew George; Adamic, Mary Louise; Olson, John Eric; Baeck, D. L.; Fox, R. V.; Hahn, P. A.; Jenson, D. D.; Lister, T. E.

    2015-09-01

    The goal of the project, New Paradigms for Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometry: Raising the Scientific Profile and Improved Performance for Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) and Thermal Ionization Mass Spectrometry (TIMS), is to ensure that the ongoing isotope ratio determination capability within the U.S. Department of Energy complex is the world’s best for application to nonproliferation. This report spells out the progress of Task 4, Transition of TIMS to AMS for Iodine Analysis, of the larger project. The subtasks under Task 4 and the accomplishments throughout the three year project life cycle are presented in this report. Progress was made in optimization of chemical extraction, determination of a detection limit for 127Iodine, production of standard materials for AMS analysis quality assurance, facilitation of knowledge exchange with respect to analyzing iodine on an AMS, cross comparison with a world-leading AMS laboratory, supercritical fluid extraction of iodine for AMS analysis and electrodeposition of seawater as a direct method of preparation for iodine analysis by AMS--all with the goal of minimizing the time required to stand up an AMS capability for iodine analysis of exposed air filters at INL. An effective extraction method has been developed and demonstrated for iodine analysis of exposed air filters. Innovative techniques to accomplish the cathode preparation for AMS analysis were developed and demonstrated and published. The known gap of a lack of available materials for reference standards in the analysis of iodine by AMS was filled by the preparation of homogenous materials that were calibrated against NIST materials. A minimum limit on the amount of abundant isotope in a sample was determined for AMS analysis. The knowledge exchange occurred with fantastic success. Scientists engaged the international AMS community at conferences, as well as in their laboratories for collaborative work. The supercritical fluid extraction work has positive

  11. [Study of adsorption and desorption of behaviors of Pb2+ on thiol-modified bentonite by flame atomic absorption spectrometry].

    PubMed

    Chen, Wen; Xiong, Qiong-Xian; Pang, Xiao-Feng; Zhu, Xia-Ping; Han, Mei; Zhao, Qiu-Xiang; Liu, Wen-Hua

    2013-03-01

    A comparative analysis of the functional groups and surface structure of the Ca-bentonite (RB) and thiol-modified bentonite (TMB) were characterized by means of FTIR and SEM. The absorptive property of Pb2+ on TMB and RB and its influential factors was studied and the conditions for the adsorption were optimized by using FAAS method. Then the conditions for desorption of Pb2+ from the TMB by using simulated acid rain were studied and the contrast analysis of absorptive stability of Pb2+ on TMB and RB was given. The results showed that the adsorption rate of Pb2+ by TMB could reach more than 98%, when the initial Pb2+ concentration was 100 mg.L-1, the liquid-solid ratio was 5 g.L-1, pH was 6. 0, KNO3 ionic strength was 0. 1 mol.L-1 and adsorption period was 60min at 25 C. The saturated adsorption capacity of TMB was 67.27 mg.g-1; it's much more than that of RB (9.667 mg.g-1). The adsorption of Pb2+ on TMB follows Langmuir and Freundlich isotherm models well. Desorption experiments of Pb2+ from TMB with simulated acid rain (pH 3. 50) were done, and the desorption rate was 0. The results showed that TMB has a strong adsorption and fixation capacity for PbZ+; it is adapted to lead contaminated soil for chemical remediation. PMID:23705461

  12. [Study of adsorption and desorption of behaviors of Pb2+ on thiol-modified bentonite by flame atomic absorption spectrometry].

    PubMed

    Chen, Wen; Xiong, Qiong-Xian; Pang, Xiao-Feng; Zhu, Xia-Ping; Han, Mei; Zhao, Qiu-Xiang; Liu, Wen-Hua

    2013-03-01

    A comparative analysis of the functional groups and surface structure of the Ca-bentonite (RB) and thiol-modified bentonite (TMB) were characterized by means of FTIR and SEM. The absorptive property of Pb2+ on TMB and RB and its influential factors was studied and the conditions for the adsorption were optimized by using FAAS method. Then the conditions for desorption of Pb2+ from the TMB by using simulated acid rain were studied and the contrast analysis of absorptive stability of Pb2+ on TMB and RB was given. The results showed that the adsorption rate of Pb2+ by TMB could reach more than 98%, when the initial Pb2+ concentration was 100 mg.L-1, the liquid-solid ratio was 5 g.L-1, pH was 6. 0, KNO3 ionic strength was 0. 1 mol.L-1 and adsorption period was 60min at 25 C. The saturated adsorption capacity of TMB was 67.27 mg.g-1; it's much more than that of RB (9.667 mg.g-1). The adsorption of Pb2+ on TMB follows Langmuir and Freundlich isotherm models well. Desorption experiments of Pb2+ from TMB with simulated acid rain (pH 3. 50) were done, and the desorption rate was 0. The results showed that TMB has a strong adsorption and fixation capacity for PbZ+; it is adapted to lead contaminated soil for chemical remediation.

  13. An automated proteomic data analysis workflow for mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Mass spectrometry-based protein identification methods are fundamental to proteomics. Biological experiments are usually performed in replicates and proteomic analyses generate huge datasets which need to be integrated and quantitatively analyzed. The Sequest™ search algorithm is a commonly used algorithm for identifying peptides and proteins from two dimensional liquid chromatography electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry (2-D LC ESI MS2) data. A number of proteomic pipelines that facilitate high throughput 'post data acquisition analysis' are described in the literature. However, these pipelines need to be updated to accommodate the rapidly evolving data analysis methods. Here, we describe a proteomic data analysis pipeline that specifically addresses two main issues pertinent to protein identification and differential expression analysis: 1) estimation of the probability of peptide and protein identifications and 2) non-parametric statistics for protein differential expression analysis. Our proteomic analysis workflow analyzes replicate datasets from a single experimental paradigm to generate a list of identified proteins with their probabilities and significant changes in protein expression using parametric and non-parametric statistics. Results The input for our workflow is Bioworks™ 3.2 Sequest (or a later version, including cluster) output in XML format. We use a decoy database approach to assign probability to peptide identifications. The user has the option to select "quality thresholds" on peptide identifications based on the P value. We also estimate probability for protein identification. Proteins identified with peptides at a user-specified threshold value from biological experiments are grouped as either control or treatment for further analysis in ProtQuant. ProtQuant utilizes a parametric (ANOVA) method, for calculating differences in protein expression based on the quantitative measure ΣXcorr. Alternatively Prot

  14. Intact MicroRNA Analysis Using High Resolution Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kullolli, Majlinda; Knouf, Emily; Arampatzidou, Maria; Tewari, Muneesh; Pitteri, Sharon J.

    2014-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small single-stranded non-coding RNAs that post-transcriptionally regulate gene expression, and play key roles in the regulation of a variety of cellular processes and in disease. New tools to analyze miRNAs will add understanding of the physiological origins and biological functions of this class of molecules. In this study, we investigate the utility of high resolution mass spectrometry for the analysis of miRNAs through proof-of-concept experiments. We demonstrate the ability of mass spectrometry to resolve and separate miRNAs and corresponding 3' variants in mixtures. The mass accuracy of the monoisotopic deprotonated peaks from various miRNAs is in the low ppm range. We compare fragmentation of miRNA by collision-induced dissociation (CID) and by higher-energy collisional dissociation (HCD) which yields similar sequence coverage from both methods but additional fragmentation by HCD versus CID. We measure the linear dynamic range, limit of detection, and limit of quantitation of miRNA loaded onto a C18 column. Lastly, we explore the use of data-dependent acquisition of MS/MS spectra of miRNA during online LC-MS and demonstrate that multiple charge states can be fragmented, yielding nearly full sequence coverage of miRNA on a chromatographic time scale. We conclude that high resolution mass spectrometry allows the separation and measurement of miRNAs in mixtures and a standard LC-MS setup can be adapted for online analysis of these molecules.

  15. A novel isotope analysis of oxygen in uranium oxides: comparison of secondary ion mass spectrometry, glow discharge mass spectrometry and thermal ionization mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pajo, L.; Tamborini, G.; Rasmussen, G.; Mayer, K.; Koch, L.

    2001-05-01

    The natural variation of the oxygen isotopic composition is used among geologists to determine paleotemperatures and the origin of minerals. In recent studies, oxygen isotopic composition has been recognized as a possible tool for identification of the origin of seized uranium oxides in nuclear forensic science. In the last 10 years, great effort has been made to develop new direct and accurate n( 18O)/ n( 16O) measurements methods. Traditionally, n( 18O)/ n( 16O) analyses are performed by gas mass spectrometry. In this work, a novel oxygen isotope analysis by thermal ionization mass spectrometry (TIMS), using metal oxide ion species (UO +), is compared to the direct methods: glow discharge mass spectrometry (GDMS) and secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS). Because of the possible application of the n( 18O)/ n( 16O) ratio in nuclear forensics science, the samples were solid, pure UO 2 or U 3O 8 particles. The precision achieved using TIMS analysis was 0.04%, which is similar or even better than the one obtained using the SIMS technique (0.05%), and clearly better if compared to that of GDMS (0.5%). The samples used by TIMS are micrograms in size. The suitability of TIMS as a n( 18O)/ n( 16O) measurement method is verified by SIMS measurements. In addition, TIMS results have been confirmed by characterizing the n( 18O)/ n( 16O) ratio of UO 2 sample also by the traditional method of static vacuum mass spectrometry at the University of Chicago.

  16. On-line electrochemically controlled in-tube solid phase microextraction of inorganic selenium followed by hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Asiabi, Hamid; Yamini, Yadollah; Seidi, Shahram; Shamsayei, Maryam; Safari, Meysam; Rezaei, Fatemeh

    2016-05-30

    In this work, for the first time, a rapid, simple and sensitive microextraction procedure is demonstrated for the matrix separation, preconcentration and determination of inorganic selenium species in water samples using an electrochemically controlled in-tube solid phase microextraction (EC-in-tube SPME) followed by hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometry (HG-AAS). In this approach, in which EC-in-tube SPME and HG-AAS system were combined, the total analysis time, was decreased and the accuracy, repeatability and sensitivity were increased. In addition, to increases extraction efficiency, a novel nanostructured composite coating consisting of polypyrrole (PPy) doped with ethyleneglycol dimethacrylate (EGDMA) was prepared on the inner surface of a stainless-steel tube by a facile electrodeposition method. To evaluate the offered setup and the new PPy-EGDMA coating, it was used to extract inorganic selenium species in water samples. Extraction of inorganic selenium species was carried out by applying a positive potential through the inner surface of coated in-tube under flow conditions. Under the optimized conditions, selenium was detected in amounts as small as 4.0 parts per trillion. The method showed good linearity in the range of 0.012-200 ng mL(-1), with coefficients of determination better than 0.9996. The intra- and inter-assay precisions (RSD%, n = 5) were in the range of 2.0-2.5% and 2.7-3.2%, respectively. The validated method was successfully applied for the analysis of inorganic selenium species in some water samples and satisfactory results were obtained.

  17. Application of Doehlert designs for optimisation of an on-line preconcentration system for copper determination by flame atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Sérgio L C; Bezerra, Marcos A; Dos Santos, Walter N L; Neto, Benı X0301 Cio B

    2003-11-01

    In the present paper, a system for on-line preconcentration and determination of copper by flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS) was developed. It was based on solid phase extraction of copper(II) ions on a minicolumn of Amberlite XAD-2 loaded with 2-(2-thiazolylazo)-5-dimethylaminophenol (TAM). The optimisation process was carried out using Doehlert designs. Four variables (sampling flow rate, SR; elution flow rate, buffer concentration, BC; and pH) were regarded as factors in the optimisation. The parameter "sensitivity efficiency (SE)" proposed in this paper, and defined as the analytical signal obtained for an on-line enrichment system for a preconcentration time of 1 min was used as analytical response in the optimisation process. Using the established experimental conditions, the proposed on-line system allowed determination of copper with detection limit (3sigma/S) of 0.23 mug l(-1), and a precision (repeatability), calculated as relative standard deviation (R.S.D.) of 3.9 and 3.7% for copper concentration of 5.00 and 20.00 mug l(-1), respectively. The preconcentration factor obtained is 62. The recovery achieved for copper determination in presence of several cations demonstrated that this has enough selectivity for analysis of food samples. The robustness of the proposed system was also evaluated. The accuracy was confirmed by analysis of the following certified reference materials (CRMs): Rice flour NIES 10a, Spinach leaves NIST 1570a, Apples leaves NIST 1515 and Orchard leaves NBS 1571. This procedure was applied for copper determination in natural food samples. PMID:18969189

  18. On-line electrochemically controlled in-tube solid phase microextraction of inorganic selenium followed by hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Asiabi, Hamid; Yamini, Yadollah; Seidi, Shahram; Shamsayei, Maryam; Safari, Meysam; Rezaei, Fatemeh

    2016-05-30

    In this work, for the first time, a rapid, simple and sensitive microextraction procedure is demonstrated for the matrix separation, preconcentration and determination of inorganic selenium species in water samples using an electrochemically controlled in-tube solid phase microextraction (EC-in-tube SPME) followed by hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometry (HG-AAS). In this approach, in which EC-in-tube SPME and HG-AAS system were combined, the total analysis time, was decreased and the accuracy, repeatability and sensitivity were increased. In addition, to increases extraction efficiency, a novel nanostructured composite coating consisting of polypyrrole (PPy) doped with ethyleneglycol dimethacrylate (EGDMA) was prepared on the inner surface of a stainless-steel tube by a facile electrodeposition method. To evaluate the offered setup and the new PPy-EGDMA coating, it was used to extract inorganic selenium species in water samples. Extraction of inorganic selenium species was carried out by applying a positive potential through the inner surface of coated in-tube under flow conditions. Under the optimized conditions, selenium was detected in amounts as small as 4.0 parts per trillion. The method showed good linearity in the range of 0.012-200 ng mL(-1), with coefficients of determination better than 0.9996. The intra- and inter-assay precisions (RSD%, n = 5) were in the range of 2.0-2.5% and 2.7-3.2%, respectively. The validated method was successfully applied for the analysis of inorganic selenium species in some water samples and satisfactory results were obtained. PMID:27154830

  19. On the possibilities of high-resolution continuum source graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry for the simultaneous or sequential monitoring of multiple atomic lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Resano, M.; Rello, L.; Flórez, M.; Belarra, M. A.

    2011-05-01

    This paper explores the potential of commercially available high-resolution continuum source graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry instrumentation for the simultaneous or sequential monitoring of various atomic lines, in an attempt to highlight the analytical advantages that can be derived from this strategy. In particular, it is demonstrated how i) the monitoring of multiplets may allow for the simple expansion of the linear range, as shown for the measurement of Ni using the triplet located in the vicinity of 234.6 nm; ii) the use of a suitable internal standard may permit improving the precision and help in correcting for matrix-effects, as proved for the monitoring of Ni in different biological samples; iii) direct and multi-element analysis of solid samples may be feasible on some occasions, either by monitoring various atomic lines that are sufficiently close (truly simultaneous monitoring, as demonstrated in the determination of Co, Fe and Ni in NIST 1566a Oyster tissue) or, alternatively, by opting for a selective and sequential atomization of the elements of interest during every single replicate. Determination of Cd and Ni in BCR 679 White cabbage is attempted using both approaches, which permits confirming that both methods can offer very similar and satisfactory results. However, it is important to stress that the second approach provides more flexibility, since analysis is no longer limited to those elements that show very close atomic lines (closer than 0.3 nm in the ultraviolet region) with a sensitivity ratio similar to the concentration ratio of the analytes in the samples investigated.

  20. Determination of nickel in blood and serum samples of oropharyngeal cancer patients consumed smokeless tobacco products by cloud point extraction coupled with flame atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Arain, Sadaf Sadia; Kazi, Tasneem Gul; Arain, Jamshed Bashir; Afridi, Hassan Imran; Kazi, Atif Gul; Nasreen, Syeda; Brahman, Kapil Dev

    2014-10-01

    Oropharyngeal cancer is a significant public health issue in the world. The incidence of oropharyngeal cancer has been increased among people who have habit of chewing smokeless tobacco (SLT) in Pakistan. The aim of present study was to evaluate the concentration of nickel (Ni) in biological samples (whole blood, serum) of oral (n = 95) and pharyngeal (n = 84) male cancer patients. For comparison purposes, the biological samples of healthy age-matched referents (n = 150), who consumed and did not consumed SLT products, were also analyzed for Ni levels. As the Ni level is very low in biological samples, a preconcentration procedure has been developed, prior to analysis of analyte by flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS). The Ni in acid-digested biological samples was complexed with ammonium pyrrolidinedithio carbamate (APDC), and a resulted complex was extracted in a surfactant Triton X-114. Acidic ethanol was added to the surfactant-rich phase prior to its analysis by FAAS. The chemical variables, such as pH, amounts of reagents (APDC, Triton X-114), temperature, incubation time, and sample volume were optimized. The resulted data indicated that concentration of Ni was higher in blood and serum samples of cancer patients as compared to that of referents who have or have not consumed different SLT products (p = 0.012-0.001). It was also observed that healthy referents who consumed SLT products have two to threefold higher levels of Ni in both biological samples as compared to those who were not chewing SLT products (p < 0.01). PMID:24920259

  1. Determination of nickel in blood and serum samples of oropharyngeal cancer patients consumed smokeless tobacco products by cloud point extraction coupled with flame atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Arain, Sadaf Sadia; Kazi, Tasneem Gul; Arain, Jamshed Bashir; Afridi, Hassan Imran; Kazi, Atif Gul; Nasreen, Syeda; Brahman, Kapil Dev

    2014-10-01

    Oropharyngeal cancer is a significant public health issue in the world. The incidence of oropharyngeal cancer has been increased among people who have habit of chewing smokeless tobacco (SLT) in Pakistan. The aim of present study was to evaluate the concentration of nickel (Ni) in biological samples (whole blood, serum) of oral (n = 95) and pharyngeal (n = 84) male cancer patients. For comparison purposes, the biological samples of healthy age-matched referents (n = 150), who consumed and did not consumed SLT products, were also analyzed for Ni levels. As the Ni level is very low in biological samples, a preconcentration procedure has been developed, prior to analysis of analyte by flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS). The Ni in acid-digested biological samples was complexed with ammonium pyrrolidinedithio carbamate (APDC), and a resulted complex was extracted in a surfactant Triton X-114. Acidic ethanol was added to the surfactant-rich phase prior to its analysis by FAAS. The chemical variables, such as pH, amounts of reagents (APDC, Triton X-114), temperature, incubation time, and sample volume were optimized. The resulted data indicated that concentration of Ni was higher in blood and serum samples of cancer patients as compared to that of referents who have or have not consumed different SLT products (p = 0.012-0.001). It was also observed that healthy referents who consumed SLT products have two to threefold higher levels of Ni in both biological samples as compared to those who were not chewing SLT products (p < 0.01).

  2. Mercury speciation in sea food by flow injection cold vapor atomic absorption spectrometry using selective solid phase extraction.

    PubMed

    Vereda Alonso, E; Siles Cordero, M T; García de Torres, A; Cañada Rudner, P; Cano Pavón, J M

    2008-10-19

    An on-line inorganic and organomercury species separation, preconcentration and determination system consisting of cold vapor atomic absorption spectrometry (CV-AAS or CV-ETAAS) coupled to a flow injection (FI) method was studied. The inorganic mercury species was retained on a column (i.d., 3 mm; length 3 cm) packed to a height of 0.7 cm with a chelating resin aminopropyl-controlled pore glass (550 A) functionalized with [1,5-bis (2 pyridyl)-3-sulphophenyl methylene thiocarbonohydrazyde] placed in the injection valve of a simple flow manifold. Methylmercury is not directly determined. Previous oxidation of the organomercurial species permitted the determination of total mercury. The separation of mercury species was obtained by the selective retention of inorganic mercury on the chelating resin. The difference between total and inorganic mercury determined the organomercury content in the sample. The inorganic mercury was removed on-line from the microcolumn with 6% (m/v) thiourea. The mercury cold vapor generation was performed on-line with 0.2% (m/v) sodium tethrahydroborate and 0.05% (m/v) sodium hydroxide as reducing solution. The determination was performed using CV-AAS and CV-ETAAS, both approaches have been used and compared for the speciation of mercury in sea food. A detection limit of 10 and 6 ng l(-1) was achieved for CV-AAS and CV-ETAAS, respectively. The precision for 10 replicate determinations at the 1 microg l(-1) Hg level was 3.5% relative standard deviation (R.S.D.), calculated from the peak heights obtained. Both approaches were validated with the use of two certified reference materials and by spiking experiments. By analyzing the two biological certified materials, it was evident that the difference between the total mercury and inorganic mercury corresponds to methylmercury. The concentrations obtained by both techniques were in agreement with the certified values or with differences of the certified values for total Hg(2+) and CH(3)Hg

  3. Field gas chromatography-mass spectrometry for fast analysis.

    PubMed

    Makas, Alexei L; Troshkov, Mikhail L

    2004-02-01

    The objective of this presentation is to demonstrate the original device and procedure for fast gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analysis of gaseous and liquid samples and to discuss its features and capabilities. The concept was developed in order to expand the range of compounds suitable for GC separation and to reduce the time of analysis. Field GC-MS, consisting of original "concentrator-thermodesorber" (CTD) unit, multiple module GC system and compact magnetic mass spectrometer with powerful two-stage vacuum system and multicollector ion detector, is represented. The whole weight of the device is 90 kg. Power consumption is 250 W. The device and analytical procedures allow high speed screening of toxic substances in air and extracts within 100 s per sample. The examples of applications are described, including fast screening of tributyl phosphate (TBP) in air at low ppt level at the rate 1 sample/min.

  4. Field gas chromatography-mass spectrometry for fast analysis.

    PubMed

    Makas, Alexei L; Troshkov, Mikhail L

    2004-02-01

    The objective of this presentation is to demonstrate the original device and procedure for fast gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analysis of gaseous and liquid samples and to discuss its features and capabilities. The concept was developed in order to expand the range of compounds suitable for GC separation and to reduce the time of analysis. Field GC-MS, consisting of original "concentrator-thermodesorber" (CTD) unit, multiple module GC system and compact magnetic mass spectrometer with powerful two-stage vacuum system and multicollector ion detector, is represented. The whole weight of the device is 90 kg. Power consumption is 250 W. The device and analytical procedures allow high speed screening of toxic substances in air and extracts within 100 s per sample. The examples of applications are described, including fast screening of tributyl phosphate (TBP) in air at low ppt level at the rate 1 sample/min. PMID:14698236

  5. Laser Desorption Mass Spectrometry for DNA Sequencing and Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, C. H. Winston; Taranenko, N. I.; Golovlev, V. V.; Isola, N. R.; Allman, S. L.

    1998-03-01

    Rapid DNA sequencing and/or analysis is critically important for biomedical research. In the past, gel electrophoresis has been the primary tool to achieve DNA analysis and sequencing. However, gel electrophoresis is a time-consuming and labor-extensive process. Recently, we have developed and used laser desorption mass spectrometry (LDMS) to achieve sequencing of ss-DNA longer than 100 nucleotides. With LDMS, we succeeded in sequencing DNA in seconds instead of hours or days required by gel electrophoresis. In addition to sequencing, we also applied LDMS for the detection of DNA probes for hybridization LDMS was also used to detect short tandem repeats for forensic applications. Clinical applications for disease diagnosis such as cystic fibrosis caused by base deletion and point mutation have also been demonstrated. Experimental details will be presented in the meeting. abstract.

  6. Fast heating induced impulse halogenation of refractory sample components in electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry by direct injection of a liquid halogenating agent.

    PubMed

    György, Krisztina; Ajtony, Zsolt; Van Meel, Katleen; Van Grieken, René; Czitrovszky, Aladár; Bencs, László

    2011-09-15

    A novel electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS) method was developed for the halogenation of refractory sample components (Er, Nd and Nb) of lithium niobate (LiNbO(3)) and bismuth tellurite (Bi(2)TeO(5)) optical single crystals to overcome memory effects and carry-over. For this purpose, the cleaning step of a regular graphite furnace heating program was replaced with a halogenation cycle. In this cycle, after the graphite tube cooled to room temperature, a 20 μL aliquot of liquid carbon tetrachloride (CCl(4)) was dispensed with a conventional autosampler into the graphite tube. The CCl(4) was partially dried at 80°C under the mini-flow (40 cm(3) min(-1)) condition of the Ar internal furnace gas (IFG), then the residue was decomposed (pyrolyzed) by fast furnace heating at 1900-2100°C under interrupted flow of the IFG. This step was followed by a clean-out stage at 2100°C under the maximum flow of the IFG. The advantage of the present method is that it does not require any alteration to the graphite furnace gas supply system in contrast to most of the formerly introduced halogenation techniques. The effectiveness of the halogenation method was verified with the determination of Er and Nd dopants in the optical crystals. In these analyses, a sensitivity decrease was observed, which was likely due to the enhanced deterioration of the graphite tube surface. Therefore, the application of mathematical correction (resloping) of the calibration was also required. The calibration curves were linear up to 1.5 and 10 μmol L(-1) for Er and Nd, respectively. Characteristic masses of 18 and 241 pg and the limit of detection (LOD) values of 0.017 and 0.27 μmol L(-1) were found for Er and Nd, respectively. These LOD data correspond to 0.68 μmol mol(-1) Er and 11 μmol mol(-1) Nd in solid bismuth tellurite samples. The analytical results were compared with those obtained by a conventional ETAAS method and validated with X-ray fluorescence spectrometry analysis.

  7. Analysis of hazardous biological material by MALDI mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    KL Wahl; KH Jarman; NB Valentine; MT Kingsley; CE Petersen; ST Cebula; AJ Saenz

    2000-03-21

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS) has become a valuable tool for analyzing microorganisms. The speed with which data can be obtained from MALDI-MS makes this a potentially important tool for biological health hazard monitoring and forensic applications. The excitement in the mass spectrometry community in this potential field of application is evident by the expanding list of research laboratories pursuing development of MALDI-MS for bacterial identification. Numerous research groups have demonstrated the ability to obtain unique MALDI-MS spectra from intact bacterial cells and bacterial cell extracts. The ability to differentiate strains of the same species has been investigated. Reproducibility of MALDI-MS spectra from bacterial species under carefully controlled experimental conditions has also been demonstrated. Wang et al. have reported on interlaboratory reproducibility of the MALDI-MS analysis of several bacterial species. However, there are still issues that need to be addressed, including the careful control of experimental parameters for reproducible spectra and selection of optimal experimental parameters such as solvent and matrix.

  8. [Determination of Al, Be, Cd, Co, Cr, Mn, Ni, Pb, Se and Tl in whole blood by atomic absorption spectrometry without preliminary sample digestion].

    PubMed

    Ivanenko, N B; Ivanenko, A A; Solov'ev, N D; Navolotskiĭ, D V; Pavlova, O V; Ganeev, A A

    2014-01-01

    Methods of whole blood trace element determination by Graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (in the variant of Zeeman's modulation polarization spectrometry) have been proposed. They do not require preliminary sample digestion. Furnace programs, modifiers and blood dilution factors were optimized. Seronorm™ human whole blood reference materials were used for validation. Dynamic ranges (for undiluted blood samples) were: Al 8 ¸ 210 мg/L; Be 0.3 ¸ 50 мg/L; Cd 0.2 ¸ 75 мg/L; Сo 5 ¸ 350 мg/L; Cr 10 ¸ 100 мg/L; Mn 6 ¸ 250 мg/L; Ni 10 ¸ 350 мg/L; Pb 3 ¸ 240 мg/L; Se 10 ¸ 500 мg/L; Tl 2 ¸ 600 мg/L. Precision (RSD) for the middle of dynamic range ranged from 5% for Mn to 11 for Se.

  9. Laser desorption mass spectrometry for fast DNA analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, C.H.; Ch`ang, L.Y.; Taranenko, N.I.; Allman, S.L.; Tang, K.; Matteson, K.J.

    1995-09-01

    During the past few years, major effort has been directed toward developing mass spectrometry to measure biopolymers because of the great potential benefit to biomedical research. Hellenkamp and his co-workers were the first to report that large polypeptide molecules can be ionized and detected without significant fragmentation when a greater number of nicotinic acid molecules are used as a matrix. This method is now well known as matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI). Since then, various groups have reported measurements of very large proteins by MALDI. Reliable protein analysis by MALDI is more or less well established. However, the application of MALDI to nucleic acids analysis has been found to be much more difficult. Most research on the measurement of nucleic acid by MALDI were stimulated by the Human Genome Project. Up to now, the only method for reliable routine analysis of nucleic acid is gel electrophoresis. Different sizes of nucleic acids can be separated in gel medium when a high electric field is applied to the gel. However, the time needed to separate different sizes of DNA segments usually takes from several minutes to several hours. If MALDI can be successfully used for nucleic acids analysis, the analysis time can be reduced to less than I millisecond. In addition, no tagging with radioactive materials or chemical dyes is needed. In this work, we will review recent progress related to MALDI for DNA analysis.

  10. Transition of Iodine Analysis to Accelerator Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    M. L. Adamic; J. E. Olson; D. D. Jenson; J. G. Eisenmenger; M. G. Watrous

    2012-09-01

    This NA 22 funded research project investigated the transition of iodine isotopic analyses from thermal ionization mass spectrometry (TIMS) to an accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) system. Previous work (Fiscal Year 2010) had demonstrated comparable data from TIMS and AMS. With AMS providing comparable data with improved background levels and vastly superior sample throughput, improvement in the sample extraction from environmental sample matrices was needed to bring sample preparation throughput closer to the operation level of the instrument. Previous research used an extraction chemistry that was not optimized for yield or refined for reduced labor to prove the principle. This research was done to find an extraction with better yield using less labor per sample to produce a sample ready for the AMS instrument. An extraction method using tetramethyl ammonium hydroxide (TMAH) was developed for removal of iodine species from high volume air filters. The TMAH with gentle heating was superior to the following three extraction methods: ammonium hydroxide aided by sonication, acidic and basic extraction aided by microwave, and ethanol mixed with sodium hydroxide. Taking the iodine from the extraction solvent to being ready for AMS analysis was accomplished by a direct precipitation, as well as, using silver wool to harvest the iodine from the TMAH. Portions of the same filters processed in FY 2010 were processed again with the improved extraction scheme followed by successful analysis by AMS at the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology. The data favorably matched the data obtained in 2010. The time required for analysis has been reduced over the aqueous extraction/AMS approach developed in FY 2010. For a hypothetical batch of 30 samples, the AMS methodology is about 10 times faster than the traditional gas phase chemistry and TIMS analysis. As an additional benefit, background levels for the AMS method are about 1000 times lower than TIMS. This results from the

  11. Optimization of a microwave-pseudo-digestion procedure by experimental designs for the determination of trace elements in seafood products by atomic absorption spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bermejo-Barrera, P.; Moreda-Piñeiro, A.; Muñiz-Naveiro, O.; Gómez-Fernández, A. M. J.; Bermejo-Barrera, A.

    2000-08-01

    A Plackett-Burman 2 7×3/32 design for seven factors (nitric acid concentration, hydrochloride acid concentration, hydrogen peroxide concentration, acid solution volume, particle size, microwave power, and exposure time to microwave energy) was carried out in order to find the significant variables affecting the metals acid leaching after a pseudo-digestion procedure by microwave energy from mussel. Nitric acid concentration, hydrochloride concentration or hydrogen peroxide, and exposure time to microwave energy were the most significant variables, and a 2 3+star central composite design was used for their optimization. Nitric and hydrochloric acid concentrations between 4.1 and 5.3 M, and between 2.8 and 3.8 M, respectively, were found as optimum for many elements (Ca, Cd, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mg, Mn, Pb and Zn) yielding the acid leaching process for times in the 1.2-2.2 min range. However, As was quantitatively leached with hydrochloric acid concentrations between 4.8 and 5.3 M and an exposure time of 2.0 min, while Co and Se were extracted using nitric acid (1.0 and 5.0 M, respectively) and hydrogen peroxide (5.0 M) solution and an exposure time of 2.0 min. Finally, Hg was extracted using a hydrochloric acid/hydrogen peroxide solution at 3.5:2.0 M, and also for an optimum time of microwave radiation of 1.75 min. Trace metals were determined using flame atomic absorption spectrometry, electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry and cold vapor — atomic absorption spectrometry. The methods were finally applied to several reference materials (DORM-1, DOLT-1 and TORT-1), achieving good accuracy.

  12. Determination of cadmium and lead at low levels by using preconcentration at fullerene coupled to thermospray flame furnace atomic absorption spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pereira, M. G.; Pereira-Filho, E. R.; Berndt, H.; Arruda, M. A. Z.

    2004-04-01

    A new and sensitive method for Cd and Pb determinations, based on the coupling of thermospray flame furnace atomic absorption spectrometry and a preconcentrator system, was developed. The procedure comprised the chelating of Cd and Pb with ammonium pyrrolidinedithiocarbamate with posterior adsorption of the chelates on a mixture (40 mg) of C 60 and C 70 at a flow rate of 2.0 ml min -1. These chelates were eluted from the adsorbent by passing a continuous flow of ethanol (80% v/v) at 0.9 ml min -1 to a nickel tube placed in an air/acetylene flame. After sample introduction into the tube by using a ceramic capillary (0.5 mm i.d.), the analytical signals were registered as peak height. Under these conditions, improvement factors in detectability of 675 and 200 were obtained for Cd and Pb, respectively, when compared to conventional flame atomic absorption spectrometry. Spiked samples (mineral and tap waters) and drinking water containing natural concentrations of Cd were employed for evaluating accuracy by comparing the results obtained from the proposed methodology with those using electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry. In addition, certified reference materials (rye grass, CRM 281 and pig kidney, CRM 186) were also adopted for the accuracy tests. Due to the good linearity ranges for Cd (0.5-5.0 μg l -1) and Pb (10-250 μg l -1), samples with different concentrations could be analyzed. Detection limits of 0.1 and 2.4 μg l -1 were obtained for Cd and Pb, respectively, and RSD values <4.5% were observed ( n=10). Finally, a sample throughput of 24 determinations per hour was possible.

  13. Trace level determination of cadmium in wine by on-line preconcentration in a 5-Br-PADAP functionalized wool-packed microcolumn coupled to flame atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Monasterio, Romina P; Wuilloud, Rodolfo G

    2009-10-15

    An on-line retention and preconcentration system based on a sheep wool-packed microcolumn combined with flame atomic absorption spectrometry is proposed for trace level determination of Cd in wine. A chelating reagent 2-(5-bromo-2-pyridylazo)-5-diethylaminophenol was immobilized onto the wool before retention of the analyte. Several factors influencing the preconcentration efficiency of Cd and his subsequent determination, such as pH, eluent type, sample and eluent flow rates, interfering effects, were studied. A preconcentration factor of 39 was obtained with only 20 mL of sample. The relative standard deviation for five determinations of 1 microg L(-1) Cd was 3.4%. The calibration graph was linear with a correlation coefficient of 0.998 at levels near the detection limit and up to at least 25 microg L(-1). The limit of detection was 37 ng L(-1). The accuracy of the proposed methodology was tested by comparison of the results with those obtained by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry analysis along with a recovery study. Finally, the method was employed for evaluating Cd levels in different wines including, blank, rose, and red.

  14. Ionic liquid-based ultrasound-assisted dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction combined with electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry for a sensitive determination of cadmium in water samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shengqing; Cai, Shun; Hu, Wei; Chen, Hao; Liu, Hanlan

    2009-07-01

    A new method was developed for the determination of cadmium in water samples using ionic liquid-based ultrasound-assisted dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (IL-based USA-DLLME) followed by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS). The IL-based USA-DLLME procedure is free of volatile organic solvents, and there is no need for a dispersive solvent, in contrast to conventional DLLME. The ionic liquid, 1-hexyl-3-methylimidazolium hexafluorophosphate (HMIMPF 6), was quickly disrupted by an ultrasonic probe for 1 min and dispersed in water samples like a cloud. At this stage, a hydrophobic cadmium-DDTC complex was formed and extracted into the fine droplets of HMIMPF 6. After centrifugation, the concentration of the enriched cadmium in the sedimented phase was determined by ETAAS. Some effective parameters of the complex formation and microextraction, such as the concentration of the chelating agent, the pH, the volume of the extraction solvent, the extraction time, and the salt effect, have been optimized. Under optimal conditions, a high extraction efficiency and selectivity were reached for the extraction of 1.0 ng of cadmium in 10.0 mL of water solution employing 73 µL of HMIMPF 6 as the extraction solvent. The enrichment factor of the method is 67. The detection limit was 7.4 ng L - 1 , and the characteristic mass ( m0, 0.0044 absorbance) of the proposed method was 0.02 pg for cadmium (Cd). The relative standard deviation (RSD) for 11 replicates of 50 ng L - 1 Cd was 3.3%. The method was applied to the analysis of tap, well, river, and lake water samples and the Environmental Water Reference Material GSBZ 50009-88 (200921). The recoveries of spiked samples were in the range of 87.2-106%.

  15. Method validation for control determination of mercury in fresh fish and shrimp samples by solid sampling thermal decomposition/amalgamation atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Torres, Daiane Placido; Martins-Teixeira, Maristela Braga; Cadore, Solange; Queiroz, Helena Müller

    2015-01-01

    A method for the determination of total mercury in fresh fish and shrimp samples by solid sampling thermal decomposition/amalgamation atomic absorption spectrometry (TDA AAS) has been validated following international foodstuff protocols in order to fulfill the Brazilian National Residue Control Plan. The experimental parameters have been previously studied and optimized according to specific legislation on validation and inorganic contaminants in foodstuff. Linearity, sensitivity, specificity, detection and quantification limits, precision (repeatability and within-laboratory reproducibility), robustness as well as accuracy of the method have been evaluated. Linearity of response was satisfactory for the two range concentrations available on the TDA AAS equipment, between approximately 25.0 and 200.0 μg kg(-1) (square regression) and 250.0 and 2000.0 μg kg(-1) (linear regression) of mercury. The residues for both ranges were homoscedastic and independent, with normal distribution. Correlation coefficients obtained for these ranges were higher than 0.995. Limits of quantification (LOQ) and of detection of the method (LDM), based on signal standard deviation (SD) for a low-in-mercury sample, were 3.0 and 1.0 μg kg(-1), respectively. Repeatability of the method was better than 4%. Within-laboratory reproducibility achieved a relative SD better than 6%. Robustness of the current method was evaluated and pointed sample mass as a significant factor. Accuracy (assessed as the analyte recovery) was calculated on basis of the repeatability, and ranged from 89% to 99%. The obtained results showed the suitability of the present method for direct mercury measurement in fresh fish and shrimp samples and the importance of monitoring the analysis conditions for food control purposes. Additionally, the competence of this method was recognized by accreditation under the standard ISO/IEC 17025. PMID:25996815

  16. A dried urine spot test to simultaneously monitor Mo and Ti levels using solid sampling high-resolution continuum source graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rello, L.; Lapeña, A. C.; Aramendía, M.; Belarra, M. A.; Resano, M.

    2013-03-01

    Home-based collection protocols for clinical specimens are actively pursued as a means of improving life quality of patients that require frequent controls, such as patients with metallic prosthesis, for whom monitoring the evolution of Mo and Ti in biological fluids may play a decisive role to detect prosthesis mal-functioning. The collection of biological fluids on clinical filter papers provides a simple way to implement these protocols. This work explores the potential of solid sampling high-resolution continuum source graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry for the simultaneous and direct determination of Mo and Ti in urine, after its deposition onto clinical filter paper, giving rise to a dried urine spot. The approach used for depositing the sample was found crucial to develop a quantitative method, since the filter paper acts as a chromatographic support and produces a differential distribution of the target analytes. Furthermore, the high spreading of urine onto a filter paper results in a small amount of urine per surface unit, and thus, ultimately, in lack of sensitivity. In order to circumvent these problems, the use of an alternative approach based on the use of pre-cut 17 × 19 mm filter paper pieces onto which larger amounts of sample (500 μL) can be retained by single deposition was proposed and evaluated. In this way, an approximately 12-fold increase in sensitivity and a more homogeneous distribution of the target analytes were obtained, permitting the development of a quantification strategy based on the use of matrix-matched urine samples of known analyte concentrations, which were subjected to the same procedure as the samples. Accuracy of this method, which provides LODs of 1.5 μg L- 1 for Mo and 6.5 μg L- 1 for Ti, was demonstrated after analysis of urine reference materials. Overall, the performance of the method developed is promising, being likely suitable for determination of other analytes in dried urine spots.

  17. Development of new portable miniaturize solid phase microextraction of silver-APDC complex using micropipette tip in-syringe system couple with electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naeemullah; Kazi, Tasneem Gul; Afridi, Hassan Imran; Shah, Faheem; Arain, Sadaf Sadia; Arain, Salma Aslam; Panhwar, Abdul Haleem; Arain, Mariam Shahzadi; Samoon, Muhammad Kashif

    2016-02-01

    An innovative and simple miniaturized solid phase microextraction (M-SPME) method, was developed for preconcentration and determination of silver(I) in the fresh and waste water samples. For M-SPME, a micropipette tip packed with activated carbon cloth (ACC) as sorbent, in a syringe system. The size, morphology and elemental composition of ACC before and after adsorption of analyte have been characterized by scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive spectroscopy. The sample solution treated with a complexing reagent, ammonium pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (APDC), was drawn into the syringe filled with ACC and dispensed manually for 2 to 10 aspirating/dispensing cycle. Then the Ag- complex sorbed on the ACC in micropipette was quantitatively eluted by drawing and dispensing of different concentrations of acids for 2 to 5 aspirating/dispensing cycles. The extracted Ag ions with modifier were injected directly into the electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry for analysis. The influence of different variables on the extraction efficiency, including the concentration of ligand, pH, sample volume, eluent type, concentration and volume was investigated. Validity and accuracy of the developed method was checked by the standard addition method. Reliability of the proposed methodology was checked by the relative standard deviation (%RSD), which was found to be < 5%. Under the optimized experimental variables, the limits of detection (LOD) and enhancement factors (EF), were obtained to be 0.86 ng L- 1 and 120, respectively. The proposed method was successfully applied for the determination of trace levels of silver ions in fresh and waste water samples.

  18. A study of the distribution of aluminium in human placental tissues based on alkaline solubilization with determination by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Kruger, Pamela C; Schell, Lawrence M; Stark, Alice D; Parsons, Patrick J

    2010-09-01

    Aluminium (Al) is a nonessential element known to induce neurotoxic effects, such as dialysis dementia, in patients on hemodialysis, with compromised kidney function. The role of Al in the progression of some neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer's disease (AD), is controversial, and remains unclear. The effects of Al on other vulnerable populations, such as fetuses and infants, have been infrequently studied. In the present study, Al has been measured in human placenta samples, comprising ∼160 each of placenta bodies, placenta membranes, and umbilical cords, using electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS) after atmospheric pressure digestion with tetramethylammonium hydroxide (TMAH) and ethylenediaminetetraacidic acid (EDTA). The sensitivity, or characteristic mass (m(0)), for Al at the 309.3-nm line was found to be 30 ± 4 pg. The instrumental detection limit (IDL) (3s) for Al in solution was calculated as 0.72 μg L(-1) while the method detection limit (MDL) (3s) was 0.25 μg g(-1). Accuracy was assessed through analysis of quality control (QC) materials, including certified reference materials (CRMs), in-house reference materials (RMs), and spike recovery experiments, of varying matrices. Placental tissue analyses revealed geometric mean concentrations of approximately 0.5 μg g(-1) Al in placenta bodies (n = 165) and membranes (n = 155), while Al concentrations in umbilical cords (n = 154) were about 0.3 μg g(-1). Al was detected in 95% of placenta bodies, and 81% of placenta membranes, but only in 46% of umbilical cords.

  19. Determination of cadmium and lead in urine samples after dispersive solid-liquid extraction on multiwalled carbon nanotubes by slurry sampling electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Álvarez Méndez, J.; Barciela García, J.; García Martín, S.; Peña Crecente, R. M.; Herrero Latorre, C.

    2015-04-01

    A new method for the determination of Cd and Pb in urine samples has been developed. The method involves dispersive solid-phase extraction (DSPE), slurry sampling (SS), and subsequent electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS). Oxidized multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) were used as the sorbent material. The isolated MWCNT/analyte aggregates were treated with nitric acid to form a slurry and both metals were determined directly by injecting the slurry into the ETAAS-atomizer. The parameters that influence the adsorption of the metals on MWCNTs in the DSPE process, the formation and extraction of the slurry, and the ETAAS conditions were studied by different factorial design strategies. The detection and quantification limits obtained for Cd under optimized conditions were 9.7 and 32.3 ng L- 1, respectively, and for Pb these limits were 0.13 and 0.43 μg L- 1. The preconcentration factors achieved were 3.9 and 5.4. The RSD values (n = 10) were less than 4.1% and 5.9% for Cd and Pb, respectively. The accuracy of the method was assessed in recovery studies, with values in the range 96-102% obtained for Cd and 97-101% for Pb. In addition, the analysis of certified reference materials gave consistent results. The DSPE-SS-ETAAS method is a novel and useful strategy for the determination of Pb and Cd at low levels in human urine samples. The method is sensitive, fast, and free of matrix interferences, and it avoids the tedious and time-consuming on-column adsorption and elution steps associated with commonly used SPE procedures. The proposed method was used to determine Cd and Pb in urine samples of unexposed healthy people and satisfactory results were obtained.

  20. Ethylene hydrogenation catalysis on Pt(111) single-crystal surfaces studied by using mass spectrometry and in situ infrared absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tillekaratne, Aashani; Simonovis, Juan Pablo; Zaera, Francisco

    2016-10-01

    The catalytic hydrogenation of ethylene promoted by a Pt(111) single crystal was studied by using a ultrahigh-vacuum surface-science instrument equipped with a so-called high-pressure cell. Kinetic data were acquired continuously during the catalytic conversion of atmospheric-pressure mixtures of ethylene and hydrogen by using mass spectrometry while simultaneously characterizing the surface species in operando mode by reflection-absorption infrared spectroscopy (RAIRS). Many observations reported in previous studies of this system were corroborated, including the presence of adsorbed alkylidyne intermediates during the reaction and the zero-order dependence of the rate of hydrogenation on the pressure of ethylene. In addition, the high quality of the kinetic data, which could be recorded continuously versus time and processed to calculate time-dependent turnover frequencies (TOFs), afforded a more detailed analysis of the mechanism. Specifically, deuterium labeling could be used to estimate the extent of isotope scrambling reached with mixed-isotope-substituted reactants (C2H4 + D2 and C2D4 + H2). Perhaps the most important new observation from this work is that, although extensive H-D exchange takes place on ethylene before being fully converted to ethane, the average stoichiometry of the final product retains the expected stoichiometry of the gas mixture, that is, four regular hydrogen atoms and two deuteriums per ethane molecule in the case of the experiments with C2H4 + D2. This means that no hydrogen atoms are removed from the surface via their inter-recombination to produce X2 (X = H or D). It is concluded that, under catalytic conditions, hydrogen surface recombination is much slower than ethylene hydrogenation and H-D exchange.

  1. Fast determination of trace elements in organic fertilizers using a cup-horn reactor for ultrasound-assisted extraction and fast sequential flame atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Teixeira, Leonel Silva; Vieira, Heulla Pereira; Windmöller, Cláudia Carvalhinho; Nascentes, Clésia Cristina

    2014-02-01

    A fast and accurate method based on ultrasound-assisted extraction in a cup-horn sonoreactor was developed to determine the total content of Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Mn, Ni, Pb and Zn in organic fertilizers by fast sequential flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FS FAAS). Multivariate optimization was used to establish the optimal conditions for the extraction procedure. An aliquot containing approximately 120 mg of the sample was added to a 500 µL volume of an acid mixture (HNO3/HCl/HF, 5:3:3, v/v/v). After a few minutes, 500 µL of deionized water was added and eight samples were simultaneously sonicated for 10 min at 50% amplitude, allowing a sample throughput of 32 extractions per hour. The performance of the method was evaluated with a certified reference material of sewage sludge (CRM 029). The precision, expressed as the relative standard deviation, ranged from 0.58% to 5.6%. The recoveries of analytes were found to 100%, 109%, 96%, 92%, 101%, 104% and 102% for Cd, Cr, Cu, Mn, Ni, Pb and Zn, respectively. The linearity, limit of detection and limit of quantification were calculated and the values obtained were adequate for the quality control of organic fertilizers. The method was applied to the analysis of several commercial organic fertilizers and organic wastes used as fertilizers, and the results were compared with those obtained using the microwave digestion procedure. A good agreement was found between the results obtained by microwave and ultrasound procedures with recoveries ranging from 80.4% to 117%. Two organic waste samples were not in accordance with the Brazilian legislation regarding the acceptable levels of contaminants.

  2. Preconcentration and determination of vanadium and molybdenum in milk, vegetables and foodstuffs by ultrasonic-thermostatic-assisted cloud point extraction coupled to flame atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Gürkan, Ramazan; Korkmaz, Sema; Altunay, Nail

    2016-08-01

    A new ultrasonic-thermostatic-assisted cloud point extraction procedure (UTA-CPE) was developed for preconcentration at the trace levels of vanadium (V) and molybdenum (Mo) in milk, vegetables and foodstuffs prior to determination via flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS). The method is based on the ion-association of stable anionic oxalate complexes of V(V) and Mo(VI) with [9-(diethylamino)benzo[a]phenoxazin-5-ylidene]azanium; sulfate (Nile blue A) at pH 4.5, and then extraction of the formed ion-association complexes into micellar phase of polyoxyethylene(7.5)nonylphenyl ether (PONPE 7.5). The UTA-CPE is greatly simplified and accelerated compared to traditional cloud point extraction (CPE). The analytical parameters optimized are solution pH, the concentrations of complexing reagents (oxalate and Nile blue A), the PONPE 7.5 concentration, electrolyte concentration, sample volume, temperature and ultrasonic power. Under the optimum conditions, the calibration curves for Mo(VI) and V(V) are obtained in the concentration range of 3-340µgL(-1) and 5-250µgL(-1) with high sensitivity enhancement factors (EFs) of 145 and 115, respectively. The limits of detection (LODs) for Mo(VI) and V(V) are 0.86 and 1.55µgL(-1), respectively. The proposed method demonstrated good performances such as relative standard deviations (as RSD %) (≤3.5%) and spiked recoveries (95.7-102.3%). The accuracy of the method was assessed by analysis of two standard reference materials (SRMs) and recoveries of spiked solutions. The method was successfully applied into the determination of trace amounts of Mo(VI) and V(V) in milk, vegetables and foodstuffs with satisfactory results. PMID:27216654

  3. Fast determination of trace elements in organic fertilizers using a cup-horn reactor for ultrasound-assisted extraction and fast sequential flame atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Teixeira, Leonel Silva; Vieira, Heulla Pereira; Windmöller, Cláudia Carvalhinho; Nascentes, Clésia Cristina

    2014-02-01

    A fast and accurate method based on ultrasound-assisted extraction in a cup-horn sonoreactor was developed to determine the total content of Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Mn, Ni, Pb and Zn in organic fertilizers by fast sequential flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FS FAAS). Multivariate optimization was used to establish the optimal conditions for the extraction procedure. An aliquot containing approximately 120 mg of the sample was added to a 500 µL volume of an acid mixture (HNO3/HCl/HF, 5:3:3, v/v/v). After a few minutes, 500 µL of deionized water was added and eight samples were simultaneously sonicated for 10 min at 50% amplitude, allowing a sample throughput of 32 extractions per hour. The performance of the method was evaluated with a certified reference material of sewage sludge (CRM 029). The precision, expressed as the relative standard deviation, ranged from 0.58% to 5.6%. The recoveries of analytes were found to 100%, 109%, 96%, 92%, 101%, 104% and 102% for Cd, Cr, Cu, Mn, Ni, Pb and Zn, respectively. The linearity, limit of detection and limit of quantification were calculated and the values obtained were adequate for the quality control of organic fertilizers. The method was applied to the analysis of several commercial organic fertilizers and organic wastes used as fertilizers, and the results were compared with those obtained using the microwave digestion procedure. A good agreement was found between the results obtained by microwave and ultrasound procedures with recoveries ranging from 80.4% to 117%. Two organic waste samples were not in accordance with the Brazilian legislation regarding the acceptable levels of contaminants. PMID:24401409

  4. Preconcentration and determination of vanadium and molybdenum in milk, vegetables and foodstuffs by ultrasonic-thermostatic-assisted cloud point extraction coupled to flame atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Gürkan, Ramazan; Korkmaz, Sema; Altunay, Nail

    2016-08-01

    A new ultrasonic-thermostatic-assisted cloud point extraction procedure (UTA-CPE) was developed for preconcentration at the trace levels of vanadium (V) and molybdenum (Mo) in milk, vegetables and foodstuffs prior to determination via flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS). The method is based on the ion-association of stable anionic oxalate complexes of V(V) and Mo(VI) with [9-(diethylamino)benzo[a]phenoxazin-5-ylidene]azanium; sulfate (Nile blue A) at pH 4.5, and then extraction of the formed ion-association complexes into micellar phase of polyoxyethylene(7.5)nonylphenyl ether (PONPE 7.5). The UTA-CPE is greatly simplified and accelerated compared to traditional cloud point extraction (CPE). The analytical parameters optimized are solution pH, the concentrations of complexing reagents (oxalate and Nile blue A), the PONPE 7.5 concentration, electrolyte concentration, sample volume, temperature and ultrasonic power. Under the optimum conditions, the calibration curves for Mo(VI) and V(V) are obtained in the concentration range of 3-340µgL(-1) and 5-250µgL(-1) with high sensitivity enhancement factors (EFs) of 145 and 115, respectively. The limits of detection (LODs) for Mo(VI) and V(V) are 0.86 and 1.55µgL(-1), respectively. The proposed method demonstrated good performances such as relative standard deviations (as RSD %) (≤3.5%) and spiked recoveries (95.7-102.3%). The accuracy of the method was assessed by analysis of two standard reference materials (SRMs) and recoveries of spiked solutions. The method was successfully applied into the determination of trace amounts of Mo(VI) and V(V) in milk, vegetables and foodstuffs with satisfactory results.

  5. Development of new portable miniaturize solid phase microextraction of silver-APDC complex using micropipette tip in-syringe system couple with electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Naeemullah; Kazi, Tasneem Gul; Afridi, Hassan Imran; Shah, Faheem; Arain, Sadaf Sadia; Arain, Salma Aslam; Panhwar, Abdul Haleem; Arain, Mariam Shahzadi; Samoon, Muhammad Kashif

    2016-02-01

    An innovative and simple miniaturized solid phase microextraction (M-SPME) method, was developed for preconcentration and determination of silver(I) in the fresh and waste water samples. For M-SPME, a micropipette tip packed with activated carbon cloth (ACC) as sorbent, in a syringe system. The size, morphology and elemental composition of ACC before and after adsorption of analyte have been characterized by scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive spectroscopy. The sample solution treated with a complexing reagent, ammonium pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (APDC), was drawn into the syringe filled with ACC and dispensed manually for 2 to 10 aspirating/dispensing cycle. Then the Ag- complex sorbed on the ACC in micropipette was quantitatively eluted by drawing and dispensing of different concentrations of acids for 2 to 5 aspirating/dispensing cycles. The extracted Ag ions with modifier were injected directly into the electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry for analysis. The influence of different variables on the extraction efficiency, including the concentration of ligand, pH, sample volume, eluent type, concentration and volume was investigated. Validity and accuracy of the developed method was checked by the standard addition method. Reliability of the proposed methodology was checked by the relative standard deviation (%RSD), which was found to be <5%. Under the optimized experimental variables, the limits of detection (LOD) and enhancement factors (EF), were obtained to be 0.86 ng L(-1) and 120, respectively. The proposed method was successfully applied for the determination of trace levels of silver ions in fresh and waste water samples.

  6. Activated carbon-modified knotted reactor coupled to electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry for sensitive determination of arsenic species in medicinal herbs and tea infusions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grijalba, Alexander Castro; Martinis, Estefanía M.; Lascalea, Gustavo E.; Wuilloud, Rodolfo G.

    2015-01-01

    A flow injection system based on a modified polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) knotted reactor (KR) was developed for arsenite [As(III)] and arsenate [As(V)] species preconcentration and determination by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS). Activated carbon (AC) was immobilized on the inner walls of a PTFE KR by a thermal treatment. A significant increase in analyte retention was obtained with the AC-modified KR (100%) as compared to the regular PTFE KR (25%). The preconcentration method involved the on-line formation of As(III)-ammonium pyrrolidinedithiocarbamate (As-APDC) complex, followed by its adsorption onto the inner walls of the AC-modified KR. After analyte retention, the complex was eluted with acetone directly into the graphite furnace of ETAAS. The parameters affecting the flow injection system were evaluated with a full central composite face centered design with three center points. Under optimum conditions, a preconcentration factor of 200 was obtained with 10 ml of sample. The detection limit was 4 ng L- 1 and the relative standard deviation (RSD) for six replicate measurements at 0.2 μg L- 1 of As were 4.3% and 4.7% for As(III) and As(V), respectively. The developed methodology was highly selective towards As(III), while As(V), monomethylarsonic acid [MMA(V)] and dimethylarsinic [DMA(V)] were not retained in the AC-modified KR. The proposed method was successfully applied for As speciation analysis in infusions originated from medicinal herbs and tea.

  7. In situ emulsification microextraction using a dicationic ionic liquid followed by magnetic assisted physisorption for determination of lead prior to micro-sampling flame atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Shokri, Masood; Beiraghi, Asadollah; Seidi, Shahram

    2015-08-19

    For the first time, a simple and efficient in situ emulsification microextraction method using a dicationic ionic liquid followed by magnetic assisted physisorption was presented to determine trace amounts of lead. In this method, 400 μL of 1.0 mol L(-1) lithium bis (trifluoromethylsulfonyl) imide aqueous solution, Li[NTf2], was added into the sample solution containing 100 μL of 1.0 mol L(-1) 1,3-(propyl-1,3-diyl) bis (3-methylimidazolium) chloride, [pbmim]Cl2, to form a water immiscible ionic liquid, [pbmim][NTf2]2. This new in situ formed dicationic ionic liquid was applied as the acceptor phase to extract the lead-ammonium pyrrolidinedithiocarbamate (Pb-APDC) complexes from the sample solution. Subsequently, 30 mg of Fe3O4 magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) were added into the sample solution to collect the fine droplets of [pbmim][NTf2]2, physisorptively. Finally, MNPs were eluted by acetonitrile, separated by an external magnetic field and the obtained eluent was subjected to micro-sampling flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS) for further analysis. Comparing with other microextraction methods, no special devices and centrifugation step are required. Parameters influencing the extraction efficiency such as extraction time, pH, concentration of chelating agent, amount of MNPs and coexisting interferences were studied. Under the optimized conditions, this method showed high extraction recovery of 93% with low LOD of 0.7 μg L(-1). Good linearity was obtained in the range of 2.5-150 μg L(-1) with determination coefficient (r(2)) of 0.9921. Relative standard deviation (RSD%) for seven repeated measurements at the concentration of 10 μg L(-1) was 4.1%. Finally, this method was successfully applied for determination of lead in some water and plant samples. PMID:26343434

  8. Development of new portable miniaturize solid phase microextraction of silver-APDC complex using micropipette tip in-syringe system couple with electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Naeemullah; Kazi, Tasneem Gul; Afridi, Hassan Imran; Shah, Faheem; Arain, Sadaf Sadia; Arain, Salma Aslam; Panhwar, Abdul Haleem; Arain, Mariam Shahzadi; Samoon, Muhammad Kashif

    2016-02-01

    An innovative and simple miniaturized solid phase microextraction (M-SPME) method, was developed for preconcentration and determination of silver(I) in the fresh and waste water samples. For M-SPME, a micropipette tip packed with activated carbon cloth (ACC) as sorbent, in a syringe system. The size, morphology and elemental composition of ACC before and after adsorption of analyte have been characterized by scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive spectroscopy. The sample solution treated with a complexing reagent, ammonium pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (APDC), was drawn into the syringe filled with ACC and dispensed manually for 2 to 10 aspirating/dispensing cycle. Then the Ag- complex sorbed on the ACC in micropipette was quantitatively eluted by drawing and dispensing of different concentrations of acids for 2 to 5 aspirating/dispensing cycles. The extracted Ag ions with modifier were injected directly into the electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry for analysis. The influence of different variables on the extraction efficiency, including the concentration of ligand, pH, sample volume, eluent type, concentration and volume was investigated. Validity and accuracy of the developed method was checked by the standard addition method. Reliability of the proposed methodology was checked by the relative standard deviation (%RSD), which was found to be <5%. Under the optimized experimental variables, the limits of detection (LOD) and enhancement factors (EF), were obtained to be 0.86 ng L(-1) and 120, respectively. The proposed method was successfully applied for the determination of trace levels of silver ions in fresh and waste water samples. PMID:26520476

  9. Determination of sulfur in bovine serum albumin and L-cysteine using high-resolution continuum source molecular absorption spectrometry of the CS molecule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrade-Carpente, Eva; Peña-Vázquez, Elena; Bermejo-Barrera, Pilar

    2016-08-01

    In this study, the content of sulfur in bovine serum albumin and L-cysteine was determined using high-resolution continuum source molecular absorption spectrometry of the CS molecule, generated in a reducing air-acetylene flame. Flame conditions (height above the burner, measurement time) were optimized using a 3.0% (v/v) sulfuric acid solution. A microwave lab station (Ethos Plus MW) was used for the digestion of both compounds. During the digestion step, sulfur was converted to sulfate previous to the determination. Good repeatability (4-10%) and analytical recovery (91-106%) was obtained.

  10. Mesoporous Silica Nanoparticles as an Adsorbent for Preconcentration and Determination of Trace Amount of Nickel in Environmental Samples by Atom Trap Flame Atomic Absorption Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirkhanloo, H.; Falahnejad, M.; Zavvar Mousavi, H.

    2016-01-01

    A rapid enrichment method based on solid-phase extraction (SPE) has been established for preconcentration and separation of trace Ni(II) ions in water samples prior to their determination by atom trap flame atomic absorption spectrometry. A column filled with bulky NH2-UVM7 was used as the novel adsorbent. Under optimal conditions, the linear range, limit of detection (LOD), and preconcentration factor (PF) were 3-92 μg/L, 0.8 μg/L, and 100, respectively. The validity of the method was checked by the standard reference material.

  11. Rapid food decomposition by H2O2-H2SO4 for determination of total mercury by flow injection cold vapor atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Zenebon, Odair; Sakuma, Alice M; Dovidauskas, Sergio; Okada, Isaura A; de, MaioFrancaD; Lichtig, Jaim

    2002-01-01

    A mixture of 50% H2O2-H2SO4 (3 + 1, v/v) was used for decomposition of food in open vessels at 80 degrees C. The treatment allowed rapid total mercury determination by flow injection cold vapor atomic absorption spectrometry. Cabbage, potatoes, peanuts paste, hazelnuts paste, oats, tomatoes and their derivatives, oysters, shrimps, prawns, shellfish, marine algae, and many kinds of fish were analyzed by the proposed methodology with a limit of quantitation of 0.86 +/- 0.08 microg/L mercury in the final solution. Reference materials tested also gave excellent recovery.

  12. Analysis of phthalate esters by ion mobility spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Giam, C.S.; Reed, G.E.; Holliday, T.L.

    1995-12-31

    Esters of phthalic acid can be detected by IMS (ion mobility spectrometry). The six phthalates in the EPA`s Priority Pollutant List can be detected in both modes--positive as well as negative mode. In the positive mode, a characteristic reduced mobility was obtained for each phthalate; thus the different esters can be distinguished, including the isomeric di-n-octyl- and di-2-ethylhexyl phthalate. Phthalates can be detected in the low nanogram range; detection sensitivity is comparable or better than those found by gas chromatography using different detectors, including by GC-ECD, GC-FID or GC-MS. Direct Monitoring of environmental phthalates by IMS possess several advantages, e.g., without the usual separation protocols for ubiquitous interferants, faster instrumental analysis time (minutes instead of hours), and lower cost. Thus, IMS of phthalates has a great potential as an environmental monitor.

  13. In situ secondary ion mass spectrometry analysis. 1992 Summary report

    SciTech Connect

    Groenewold, G.S.; Applehans, A.D.; Ingram, J.C.; Delmore, J.E.; Dahl, D.A.

    1993-01-01

    The direct detection of tributyl phosphate (TBP) on rocks using molecular beam surface analysis [MBSA or in situ secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS)] is demonstrated. Quantities as low as 250 ng were detected on basalt and sandstone with little or no sample preparation. Detection of TBP on soil has proven to be more problematic and requires further study. Ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) is more difficult to detect because it is very reactive with surfaces of interest. Nevertheless, it is possible to detect EDTA if the acidity of the surface is controlled. The detection of EDTA-metal complexes is currently an open question, but evidence is presented for the detection of ions arising from a EDTA-lead complex. Carboxylic acids (i.e., citric, ascorbic, malic, succinic, malonic, and oxalic) give characteristic SIM spectra, but their detection on sample surfaces awaits evaluation.

  14. HPLC-ICP atomic emission spectrometry in environmental analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Frame, E.M.S.

    1996-10-01

    Trace concentrations of many compounds are difficult to determine directly by traditional chromatographic techniques. Organosilicon compounds, for example, have no chromophoric groups. Size exclusion (SEC) and high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) can separate high and low molecular weight organosilicon compounds, but routinely employ detectors with insufficient sensitivity for trace concentrations in environmental samples. Elemental analysis methods such as inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP) provide excellent element sensitivity but no speciation information. Interfacing of a chromatographic method with ICP has been shown to provide quantitative determination of trace compounds while retaining the chemical speciation information. This work will describe the power of the HPLC-ICP combination for trace compounds in environmental samples to identify and determine ppm levels of organometallics.

  15. Petroleomics by Direct Analysis in Real Time-Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Romão, Wanderson; Tose, Lilian V; Vaz, Boniek G; Sama, Sara G; Lobinski, Ryszard; Giusti, Pierre; Carrier, Hervé; Bouyssiere, Brice

    2016-01-01

    The analysis of crude oil and its fractions by applying ambient ionization techniques remains underexplored in mass spectrometry (MS). Direct analysis in real time (DART) in the positive-ion mode was coupled to a linear quadrupole ion trap Orbitrap mass spectrometer (LTQ Orbitrap) to analyze crude oil, paraffin samples, and porphyrin standard compounds. The ionization parameters of DART-MS were optimized for crude oil analysis. DART-MS rendered the optimum conditions of the operation using paper as the substrate, T = 400°C, helium as the carrier gas, and a sample concentration ≥6 mg mL(-1). In the crude oils analysis, the DART(+)-Orbitrap mass spectra detected the typical N, NO, and O-containing compounds. In the paraffin samples, oxidized hydrocarbon species (Ox classes, where x = 1-4) with double-bond equivalent of 1-4 were detected, and their structures and connectivity were confirmed by collision-induced dissociation (CID) experiments. DART(+)-MS has identified the porphyrin standard compounds as [M + H](+) ions of m/z 615.2502 and 680.1763, where M = C44H30N4 and C44H28N4OV, respectively, based on the formula assignment and by phenyl losses observed on CID experiments. PMID:26432579

  16. Petroleomics by Direct Analysis in Real Time-Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romão, Wanderson; Tose, Lilian V.; Vaz, Boniek G.; Sama, Sara G.; Lobinski, Ryszard; Giusti, Pierre; Carrier, Hervé; Bouyssiere, Brice

    2016-01-01

    The analysis of crude oil and its fractions by applying ambient ionization techniques remains underexplored in mass spectrometry (MS). Direct analysis in real time (DART) in the positive-ion mode was coupled to a linear quadrupole ion trap Orbitrap mass spectrometer (LTQ Orbitrap) to analyze crude oil, paraffin samples, and porphyrin standard compounds. The ionization parameters of DART-MS were optimized for crude oil analysis. DART-MS rendered the optimum conditions of the operation using paper as the substrate, T = 400°C, helium as the carrier gas, and a sample concentration ≥6 mg mL-1. In the crude oils analysis, the DART(+)-Orbitrap mass spectra detected the typical N, NO, and O-containing compounds. In the paraffin samples, oxidized hydrocarbon species (Ox classes, where x = 1-4) with double-bond equivalent of 1-4 were detected, and their structures and connectivity were confirmed by collision-induced dissociation (CID) experiments. DART(+)-MS has identified the porphyrin standard compounds as [M + H]+ ions of m/ z 615.2502 and 680.1763, where M = C44H30N4 and C44H28N4OV, respectively, based on the formula assignment and by phenyl losses observed on CID experiments.

  17. Simultaneous assessment of cholesterol absorption and synthesis in humans using on-line gas chromatography/ combustion and gas chromatography/pyrolysis/isotope-ratio mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Gremaud, G; Piguet, C; Baumgartner, M; Pouteau, E; Decarli, B; Berger, A; Fay, L B

    2001-01-01

    A number of dietary components and drugs are known to inhibit the absorption of dietary and biliary cholesterol, but at the same time can compensate by increasing cholesterol synthesis. It is, therefore, necessary to have a convenient and accurate method to assess both parameters simultaneously. Hence, we validated such a method in humans using on-line gas chromatography(GC)/combustion and GC/pyrolysis/isotope-ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS). Cholesterol absorption was measured using the ratio of [(13)C]cholesterol (injected intravenously) to [(18)O]cholesterol (administered orally). Simultaneously, cholesterol synthesis was measured using the deuterium incorporation method. Our methodology was applied to 12 mildly hypercholesterolemic men that were given a diet providing 2685 +/- 178 Kcal/day (mean +/- SD) and 255 +/- 8 mg cholesterol per day. Cholesterol fractional synthesis rates ranged from 5.0 to 10.5% pool/day and averaged 7.36% +/- 1.78% pool/day (668 +/- 133 mg/day). Cholesterol absorption ranged from 36.5-79.9% with an average value of 50.8 +/- 15.4%. These values are in agreement with already known data obtained with mildly hypercholesterolemic Caucasian males placed on a diet similar to the one used for this study. However, our combined IRMS method has the advantage over existing methods that it enables simultaneous measurement of cholesterol absorption and synthesis in humans, and is therefore an important research tool for studying the impact of dietary treatments on cholesterol parameters.

  18. Transition of Iodine Analysis to Accelerator Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    J. E. Delmore

    2010-09-01

    Funding was received from NA-22 to investigate transitioning iodine isotopic analyses to an accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) system. The present method uses gas-phase chemistry followed by thermal ionization mass spectrometry (TIMS). It was anticipated that the AMS approach could provide comparable data, with improved background levels and superior sample throughput. An aqueous extraction method was developed for removal of iodine species from high-volume air filters. Ethanol and sodium hydroxide, plus heating and ultrasonic treatment, were used to successfully extract iodine from loaded high-volume air filters. Portions of the same filters were also processed in the traditional method and analyzed by TIMS for comparison. Aliquot parts of the aqueous extracts were analyzed by AMS at the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology. Idaho National Laboratory (INL) personnel visited several AMS laboratories in the US, Spain, and Switzerland. Experience with AMS systems from several manufacturers was gained, and relationships were developed with key personnel at the laboratories. Three batches of samples were analyzed in Switzerland, and one in Spain. Results show that the INL extraction method successfully extracted enough iodine from high-volume air filters to allow AMS analysis. Comparison of the AMS and TIMS data is very encouraging; while the TIMS showed about forty percent more atoms of 129I, the 129/127 ratios tracked each other very well between the two methods. The time required for analysis is greatly reduced for the aqueous extraction/AMS approach. For a hypothetical batch of thirty samples, the AMS methodology is about five times faster than the traditional gas-phase chemistry and TIMS analysis. As an additional benefit, background levels for the AMS method are about 1000 times lower than for TIMS. This results from the fundamental mechanisms of ionization in the AMS system and cleanup of molecular interferences. We showed that an aqueous extraction of high

  19. A new approach for the determination of silicon in airborne particulate matter using electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Mukhtar, A; Limbeck, A

    2009-07-30

    In this work a new procedure for element specific analysis of silicon in airborne particulate matter is presented. The method is based on a preliminary treatment of the aerosol samples with nitric acid and perchloric acid leading to a mineralization of the organic sampling substrate, dissolution of soluble material and a homogeneous suspension of the remaining non-soluble sample fraction. ETAAS measurement of the derived slurries was performed using a Zr-treated graphite tube which prevents the formation of stable silicon carbide during sample measurement. Losses of volatile silicon species during sample pyrolysis were overcome by using Co(II) as matrix modifier and a pyrolysis temperature of only 300 degrees C. Furthermore this low pyrolysis temperature prevents charring of organic material which enables accurate ETAAS analysis. The method including the developed pretreatment procedure was evaluated using the Standard reference material 2709 (San Joaquin Soil) from NIST (National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD, USA). Suitability for measurement of Si in airborne particulate matter with an aerodynamic diameter < or = 10 microm (PM10) was demonstrated by the analysis of selected aerosol samples and comparison of derived results with the findings obtained for the same samples after microwave digestion and subsequent ETAAS measurement. Finally the developed procedure was applied for the analysis of silicon in PM10 collected at an urban site in Vienna (Austria). Matrix matched calibration has been used for quantification of derived absorption signals. With the use of 20 microL sample injection volume for ETAAS analysis an instrumental detection limit of 52.2 microg L(-1) was obtained, which translates to method detection limits of approximately 0.52 microg m(-3) when considering the volumes of air collected per investigated aerosol sample. The reproducibility of analysis given as the relative standard deviation was 4.4% (n=12). Derived

  20. The role of ion mobility spectrometry-mass spectrometry in the analysis of protein reference standards.

    PubMed

    Pritchard, Caroline; O'Connor, Gavin; Ashcroft, Alison E

    2013-08-01

    To achieve comparability of measurement results of protein amount of substance content between clinical laboratories, suitable reference materials are required. The impact on measurement comparability of potential differences in the tertiary and quaternary structure of protein reference standards is as yet not well understood. With the use of human growth hormone as a model protein, the potential of ion mobility spectrometry-mass spectrometry as a tool to assess differences in the structure of protein reference materials and their interactions with antibodies has been investigated here.

  1. Error analysis for mesospheric temperature profiling by absorptive occultation sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rieder, M. J.; Kirchengast, G.

    2001-01-01

    An error analysis for mesospheric profiles retrieved from absorptive occultation data has been performed, starting with realistic error assumptions as would apply to intensity data collected by available high-precision UV photodiode sensors. Propagation of statistical errors was investigated through the complete retrieval chain from measured intensity profiles to atmospheric density, pressure, and temperature profiles. We assumed unbiased errors as the occultation method is essentially self-calibrating and straight-line propagation of occulted signals as we focus on heights of 50 100 km, where refractive bending of the sensed radiation is negligible. Throughout the analysis the errors were characterized at each retrieval step by their mean profile, their covariance matrix and their probability density function (pdf). This furnishes, compared to a variance-only estimation, a much improved insight into the error propagation mechanism. We applied the procedure to a baseline analysis of the performance of a recently proposed solar UV occultation sensor (SMAS Sun Monitor and Atmospheric Sounder) and provide, using a reasonable exponential atmospheric model as background, results on error standard deviations and error correlation functions of density, pressure, and temperature profiles. Two different sensor photodiode assumptions are discussed, respectively, diamond diodes (DD) with 0.03% and silicon diodes (SD) with 0.1% (unattenuated intensity) measurement noise at 10 Hz sampling rate. A factor-of-2 margin was applied to these noise values in order to roughly account for unmodeled cross section uncertainties. Within the entire height domain (50 100 km) we find temperature to be retrieved to better than 0.3 K (DD) / 1 K (SD) accuracy, respectively, at 2 km height resolution. The results indicate that absorptive occultations acquired by a SMAS-type sensor could provide mesospheric profiles of fundamental variables such as temperature with unprecedented accuracy and

  2. Automated gamma spectrometry and data analysis on radiometric neutron dosimeters

    SciTech Connect

    Matsumoto, W.Y.

    1983-01-01

    An automated gamma-ray spectrometry system was designed and implemented by the Westinghouse Hanford Company at the Hanford Engineering Development Laboratory (HEDL) to analyze radiometric neutron dosimeters. Unattended, automatic, 24 hour/day, 7 day/week operation with online data analysis and mainframe-computer compatible magnetic tape output are system features. The system was used to analyze most of the 4000-plus radiometric monitors (RM's) from extensive reactor characterization tests during startup and initial operation of th Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF). The FFTF, operated by HEDL for the Department of Energy, incorporates a 400 MW(th) sodium-cooled fast reactor. Aumomated system hardware consists of a high purity germanium detector, a computerized multichannel analyzer data acquisition system (Nuclear Data, Inc. Model 6620) with two dual 2.5 Mbyte magnetic disk drives plus two 10.5 inch reel magnetic tape units for mass storage of programs/data and an automated Sample Changer-Positioner (ASC-P) run with a programmable controller. The ASC-P has a 200 sample capacity and 12 calibrated counting (analysis) positions ranging from 6 inches (15 cm) to more than 20 feet (6.1 m) from the detector. The system software was programmed in Fortran at HEDL, except for the Nuclear Data, Inc. Peak Search and Analysis Program and Disk Operating System (MIDAS+).

  3. Marine sediments monitoring studies for trace elements with the application of fast temperature programs and solid sampling high resolution continuum source atomic absorption spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orani, Anna Maria; Han, Eunmi; Mandjukov, Petko; Vassileva, Emilia

    2015-01-01

    Analytical procedure for the determination of As, Cd, Cu, Ni, Co and Cr in marine sediment samples using high-resolution continuum source graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (HR CS AAS) and direct solid sample analysis has been developed. The application of fast programs in combination with direct solid sampling allows to eliminate the drying and pretreatment steps, however makes impossible the use of liquid standards for calibration. Iridium treated platforms were applied throughout the present study. Calibration technique based on the use of solid certified reference materials (marine sediments) similar to the nature of the analyzed sample and statistics of regression analysis were applied to the real sediment samples. The instrumental parameters were optimized in order to obtain reproducible and interference free analytical signals. The ISO-17025 requirements and Eurachem guidelines were followed in the validation of the proposed analytical procedure. Accordingly, blanks, selectivity, calibration, linearity, working range, trueness, repeatability reproducibility, limits of detection and quantification and expanded uncertainty (k = 2) for all investigated elements were assessed. Two different approaches for the estimation of measurement uncertainty were applied and obtained results compared. The major contributors to the combined uncertainty of the analyte mass fraction were found to be the homogeneity of the samples and the microbalance precision. The influence of sample particle sizes on the total combined uncertainty was also evaluated. Traceability to SI system of units of the obtained by the proposed analytical procedure results was demonstrated. Additionally, validation of the methodology developed was effectuated by the comparison of the obtained results with independent method e.g. ICP-MS with external calibration. The use of solid sampling HR CS AAS for the determination of trace elements in marine sediment matrix gives significant advantages

  4. Determination of lead in blood by chelation with ammonium pyrrolidine dithio-carbamate followed by tungsten-coil atomic absorption spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salido, Arthur; Sanford, Caryn L.; Jones, Bradley T.

    1999-08-01

    An inexpensive, bench-top blood Pb analyzer has been developed. The system is based on tungsten-coil atomic absorption spectrometry. Pb atomization occurs on W-coils extracted from commercially available slide projector bulbs. The system has minimal power requirements: 120 ACV and 15 A. A small, computer-controlled CCD spectrometer is used as the detector. A Pb hollow cathode lamp is used as the source. Blood Pb is chelated with ammonium pyrrolidine dithio-carbamate and extracted into methyl iso-butyl ketone (4-methyl 2-pentanone). Twenty-microliter volumes of the organic phase are deposited on the W-coil, dried at 1.4 A, charred at 2.3 A and atomized at 6.0 A. Graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry is used as a comparison for W-coil results. Levels 1-4 of a NIST standard reference material 955b ‘lead in bovine blood’ are used to test accuracy and precision. The analytical figures of merit for the system are: 12-pg instrument detection limit, 24-pg blood detection limit and a characteristic mass of 28 pg.

  5. Impact of comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography with mass spectrometry on food analysis.

    PubMed

    Tranchida, Peter Q; Purcaro, Giorgia; Maimone, Mariarosa; Mondello, Luigi

    2016-01-01

    Comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography with mass spectrometry has been on the separation-science scene for about 15 years. This three-dimensional method has made a great positive impact on various fields of research, and among these that related to food analysis is certainly at the forefront. The present critical review is based on the use of comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography with mass spectrometry in the untargeted (general qualitative profiling and fingerprinting) and targeted analysis of food volatiles; attention is focused not only on its potential in such applications, but also on how recent advances in comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography with mass spectrometry will potentially be important for food analysis. Additionally, emphasis is devoted to the many instances in which straightforward gas chromatography with mass spectrometry is a sufficiently-powerful analytical tool. Finally, possible future scenarios in the comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography with mass spectrometry food analysis field are discussed.

  6. Phase composition analysis of hydrous aluminium oxides by thermal analysis and infrared spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Wittmann, Z; Kántor, E; Bélafi, K; Péterfy, L; Farkas, L P

    1992-12-01

    A general method for determination of the phase composition of hydrous aluminium oxides by thermal analysis and infrared spectrometry, and determination of the transformation temperature of mixtures of Al(OH)(3) and AlOOH into alpha-Al(2)O(3) are described.

  7. UV optical absorption spectra analysis of spodumene crystals from Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isotani, Sadao; Watari, Kazunori; Mizukami, Akiyoshi; Bonventi, Waldemar; Ito, Amando Siuiti

    2007-04-01

    The spectral decomposition analysis was applied to the optical absorption spectra of spodumene crystals from the Brazilian eastern pegmatitic province. The analyzed samples were natural, treated at 400 °C for 24 h and those irradiated with γ rays of 60Co with doses up to 5 MGy. The attributions of the lines were made taking in account highly accurate quantum mechanical calculations. The heated sample had only three lines, which were not affected by irradiation. One of them at 7.58 eV was attributed to an oxygen vacancy defect and the other two at 5.07 and 4.64 eV to a peroxy-type defect. The analysis of the growth of the lines with the irradiation showed that they belong to two groups of defects. The first group of lines at 4.2, 5.3 and 5.9 eV was attributed to a silanone-type defect. The other group of lines at 1.36, 2.0, 2.6, 3.6 and 5.0 eV was attributed to a type of Mn 3+ defect. The natural and irradiated samples also showed a line at 2.3 eV, which was attributed to another type of diamagnetic Mn 3+ defect.

  8. Proteogenomic Analysis of Mycobacterium smegmatis Using High Resolution Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Potgieter, Matthys G.; Nakedi, Kehilwe C.; Ambler, Jon M.; Nel, Andrew J. M.; Garnett, Shaun; Soares, Nelson C.; Mulder, Nicola; Blackburn, Jonathan M.

    2016-01-01

    Biochemical evidence is vital for accurate genome annotation. The integration of experimental data collected at the proteome level using high resolution mass spectrometry allows for improvements in genome annotation by providing evidence for novel gene models, while validating or modifying others. Here, we report the results of a proteogenomic analysis of a reference strain of Mycobacterium smegmatis (mc2155), a fast growing model organism for the pathogenic Mycobacterium tuberculosis—the causative agent for Tuberculosis. By integrating high throughput LC/MS/MS proteomic data with genomic six frame translation and ab initio gene prediction databases, a total of 2887 ORFs were identified, including 2810 ORFs annotated to a Reference protein, and 63 ORFs not previously annotated to a Reference protein. Further, the translational start site (TSS) was validated for 558 Reference proteome gene models, while upstream translational evidence was identified for 81. In addition, N-terminus derived peptide identifications allowed for downstream TSS modification of a further 24 gene models. We validated the existence of six previously described interrupted coding sequences at the peptide level, and provide evidence for four novel frameshift positions. Analysis of peptide posterior error probability (PEP) scores indicates high-confidence novel peptide identifications and shows that the genome of M. smegmatis mc2155 is not yet fully annotated. Data are available via ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD003500. PMID:27092112

  9. Determination of phosphorus, sulfur and the halogens using high-temperature molecular absorption spectrometry in flames and furnaces--A review.

    PubMed

    Welz, Bernhard; Lepri, Fábio G; Araujo, Rennan G O; Ferreira, Sérgio L C; Huang, Mao-Dong; Okruss, Michael; Becker-Ross, Helmut

    2009-08-11

    The literature about the investigation of molecular spectra of phosphorus, sulfur and the halogens in flames and furnaces, and the use of these spectra for the determination of these non-metals has been reviewed. Most of the investigations were carried out using conventional atomic absorption spectrometers, and there were in essence two different approaches. In the first one, dual-channel spectrometers with a hydrogen or deuterium lamp were used, applying the two-line method for background correction; in the second one, a line source was used that emitted an atomic line, which overlapped with the molecular spectrum. The first approach had the advantage that any spectral interval could be accessed, but it was susceptible to spectral interference; the second one had the advantage that the conventional background correction systems could be used to minimize spectral interferences, but had the problem that an atomic line had to be found, which was overlapping sufficiently well with the maximum of the molecular absorption spectrum. More recently a variety of molecular absorption spectra were investigated using a low-resolution polychromator with a CCD array detector, but no attempt was made to use this approach for quantitative determination of non-metals. The recent introduction and commercial availability of high-resolution continuum source atomic absorption spectrometers is offering completely new possibilities for molecular absorption spectrometry and its use for the determination of non-metals. The use of a high-intensity continuum source together with a high-resolution spectrometer and a CCD array detector makes possible selecting the optimum wavelength for the determination and to exclude most spectral interferences.

  10. Validation of an analytical method for the determination of cadmium (Cd) in fish by atomic absorption spectrometry with electrothermal atomisation.

    PubMed

    Costa, L C S M; Neto, A P N; Araújo, M Q; Melo, M C C; Furtado, D M S; Kikuchi, A N S

    2012-01-01

    The validation of an analytical method was carried out for the determination of cadmium (Cd) in fish. The method was based on sample digestion in a microwave oven and subsequent reading using an atomic absorption spectrometer with a graphite furnace. The factorial design of experiments was applied to assess method ruggedness using the methodology of Box et al. [Box GEP, Hunter WG, Hunter JS. 1978. Statistics for experiments: an introduction to design, data analysis and model building. New York (NY): Wiley], studying the influence of sample mass, volume and concentration of acid used for sample digestion and the volume of modifier used. To study the possible matrix effect in the determination of Cd, the standard addition method was also performed. The results were treated using the OLS method. For the normality test a homoskedastic distribution was observed for the developed method and the results were adjusted to the statistical model proposed. F-tests and Student's t-tests indicated that there was no matrix effect on the calibration curve between the concentration range 1.0-10.0 µg Cd l(-1). Parameters such as selectivity, precision, decision limit, detection capability and limit of quantification were established by the method of standard addition to blank samples. The limit of quantification was 6.8 µg kg(-1). Accuracy, which was evaluated by using a certified reference material, was 107.0%. The recovery of the spiked analyte was 93.69% for the concentration of 50 µg kg(-1). Precision was defined by the coefficient of variation observed (Horrat value), estimated in terms of repeatability and reproducibility, and the values were below the limit, which is 2.0. The validation procedure confirmed the suitability of the method.

  11. Determination of arsenic in ores, concentrates and related materials by continuous hydride-generation atomic-absorption spectrometry after separation by xanthate extraction.

    PubMed

    Donaldson, E M; Leaver, M E

    1988-04-01

    A recent graphite-furnace atomic-absorption method for determining approximately 0.2 mug/g or more of arsenic in ores, concentrates, rocks, soils and sediments, after separation from matrix elements by cyclohexane extraction of arsenic(III) xanthate from approximately 8-10M hydrochloric acid, has been modified to include an alternative hydride-generation atomic-absorption finish. After the extract has been washed with 10M hydrochloric acid-2% thiourea solution to remove co-extracted copper and residual iron, arsenic(III) in the extract is oxidized to arsenic(V) with bromine solution in carbon tetrachloride and stripped into water. Following the removal of bromine by evaporation of the solution, arsenic is reduced to arsenic(III) with potassium iodide in approximately 4M hydrochloric acid and ultimately determined to hydride-generation atomic-absorption spectrometry at 193.7 nm, with sodium borohydride as reductant. Interference from gold, platinum and palladium, which are partly co-extracted as xanthates under the proposed conditions, is eliminated by complexing them with thiosemicarbazide before the iodide reduction step. The detection limits for ores and related materials is approximately 0.1 mug of arsenic per g. Results obtained by this method are compared with those obtained previously by the graphite-furnace method.

  12. Evaluation of a method for arsenic(III) and antimony(III) determination by vapour phase molecular absorption spectrometry using graphite furnace volati

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galban, J.; Marcos, E.; Lamana, J.; Castillo, J. R.

    1993-01-01

    This paper presents a procedure for determining As(III) and Sb(III) by vapour phase molecular absorption spectrometry (VPMAS). The chlorides of these elements are volatilized from aqueous solutions in a L'vov platform inside the graphite furnace of an atomic absorption spectrophotometer. Molecular absorption is measured at 205 nm for arsenic chloride and 220 nm for antimony chloride. Both species are formed in the sample drying stage. A study of the temperature program led to different results in each case. In the case of arsenic, a two-step program (one mixed drying and volatilization step, and another cleaning step) is found to be best, whereas in the case of antimony, three separate steps can be used (drying, volatilization and cleaning). In both cases, optimum volatilization was obtained with low HCl concentrations, and volatilization fell off sharply as HCl concentration increased. Under optimum generation and determination conditions, the linear response range is from 0.06 to 3.75 μg for As(III), and from 0.30 to 5.0 μg for Sb(III) with relative standard deviations of 2.1% for As(III) and 2.5% for Sb(III). The effect of other anions and cations on the arsenic analytical signal was studied, and other halides were found to interfere. The method was applied to arsenic determination in an arsenic ore.

  13. System Analysis on Absorption Chiller Utilizing Intermediate Wasted Heat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamada, Miki; Suzuki, Hiroshi; Usui, Hiromoto

    A system analysis has been performed for the multi-effect absorption chiller (MEAC) applied as a bottoming system of 30kW class hybrid system including micro gas turbine (MGT) and solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) hybrid system. In this paper, an intermediate wasted heat utilization (IWHU) system is suggested for lifting up the energy efficiency of the whole system and coefficient of performance (COP) of MEAC. From the results, the suggested IWHU system was found to show the very high energy efficiency compared with a terminal wasted heat utilization (TWHU) system that uses only the heat exhausted from the terminal of MGT/SOFC system. When TWHU system is applied for MEAC, the utilized heat from the MGT/SOFC system is found to remain low because the temperature difference between the high temperature generator and the wasted heat becomes small. Then, the energy efficiency does not become high in spite of high COP of MEAC. On the other hand, the IWHU system could increase the utilized heat for MEAC as performs effectively. The exergy efficiency of IWHU system is also revealed to be higher than that of a direct gas burning system of MEAC, because the wasted heat is effectively utilized in the IWHU system.

  14. Absorption-Mode Fourier Transform Mass Spectrometry: The Effects of Apodization and Phasing on Modified Protein Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Yulin; Li, Huilin; Wills, Rebecca H.; Perez-Hurtado, Pilar; Yu, Xiang; Kilgour, David P. A.; Barrow, Mark P.; Lin, Cheng; O'Connor, Peter B.

    2013-06-01

    The method of phasing broadband Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FT-ICR) spectra allows plotting the spectra in the absorption-mode; this new approach significantly improves the quality of the data at no extra cost. Herein, an internal calibration method for calculating the phase function has been developed and successfully applied to the top-down spectra of modified proteins, where the peak intensities vary by 100×. The result shows that the use of absorption-mode spectra allows more peaks to be discerned within the recorded data, and this can reveal much greater information about the protein and modifications under investigation. In addition, noise and harmonic peaks can be assigned immediately in the absorption-mode.

  15. Determination of total sulfur concentrations in different types of vinegars using high resolution flame molecular absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ozbek, Nil; Akman, Suleyman

    2016-12-15

    Total sulfur concentrations in vinegars were determined using molecular absorption of carbon monosulfide (CS) determined with a high-resolution continuum source flame atomic absorption spectrometer. The molecular absorption of CS was measured at 258.056nm in an air-acetylene flame. Due to non-spectral interference, as well as the different sensitivities to some sulfur compounds, all sulfur species were oxidized to sulfate using a HNO3 and H2O2 mixture and the analyte addition technique was applied for quantification. The limit of detection (LOD) and limit of quantification (LOQ) were 11.6 and 38.6mgL(-1), respectively. The concentrations of sulfur in various vinegars ranged from ⩽LOD to 163.6mgL(-1). PMID:27451213

  16. Absorption-mode Fourier transform mass spectrometry: the effects of apodization and phasing on modified protein spectra.

    PubMed

    Qi, Yulin; Li, Huilin; Wills, Rebecca H; Perez-Hurtado, Pilar; Yu, Xiang; Kilgour, David P A; Barrow, Mark P; Lin, Cheng; O'Connor, Peter B

    2013-06-01

    The method of phasing broadband Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FT-ICR) spectra allows plotting the spectra in the absorption-mode; this new approach significantly improves the quality of the data at no extra cost. Herein, an internal calibration method for calculating the phase function has been developed and successfully applied to the top-down spectra of modified proteins, where the peak intensities vary by 100×. The result shows that the use of absorption-mode spectra allows more peaks to be discerned within the recorded data, and this can reveal much greater information about the protein and modifications under investigation. In addition, noise and harmonic peaks can be assigned immediately in the absorption-mode.

  17. Towards metals analysis using corona discharge ionization ion mobility spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Jafari, Mohammad T; Saraji, Mohammad; Sherafatmand, Hossein

    2016-02-25

    For the first time, the capability of corona discharge ionization ion mobility spectrometry (CD-IMS) in the determination of metal complex was evaluated. The extreme simplicity of dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (DLLME) coupled to the high sensitivity of CD-IMS measurement could make this combination really useful for simple, rapid, and sensitive determination of metals in different samples. In this regard, mercury, as a model metal, was complexed with diethyldithiocarbamate (DEDTC), and then extracted into the carbon tetrachloride using DLLME. Some parameters affecting the extraction efficiency, including the type and volume of the extraction solvent, the type and volume of the disperser solvent, the concentration of the chelating agent, salt addition and, pH were exhaustively investigated. Under the optimized condition, the enrichment factor was obtained to be 142. The linear range of 0.035-10.0 μg mL(-1) with r(2) = 0.997 and the detection limit of 0.010 μg mL(-1) were obtained. The relative standard deviation values were calculated to be lower than 4% and 8% for intra-day and inter-day, respectively. Finally, the developed method was successfully applied for the extraction and determination of mercury in various real samples. The satisfactory results revealed the capability of the proposed method in trace analysis without tedious derivatization or hydride generation.

  18. Inclusion Analysis and Absorption Measurement in Nonlinear Crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, L L

    2005-08-26

    Yttrium calcium oxyborate (YCOB) is a newly developed nonlinear optical crystal used for second harmonic generation in the Mercury laser. As with any new crystal, optical characterization of the material properties needs to be fully investigated. We are developing two new techniques to detect inclusions and measure optical absorption. With the side illuminating detection examination (SIDE) method, we hope to identify and map the size, density, and the morphology of inclusions. The multi-pass absorption technique (MPAT) will be used to help determine the absorption coefficient of various finished crystalline pieces at near-infrared wavelengths.

  19. Subcellular analysis by laser ablation electrospray ionization mass spectrometry

    DOEpatents

    Vertes, Akos; Stolee, Jessica A; Shrestha, Bindesh

    2014-12-02

    In various embodiments, a method of laser ablation electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (LAESI-MS) may generally comprise micro-dissecting a cell comprising at least one of a cell wall and a cell membrane to expose at least one subcellular component therein, ablating the at least one subcellular component by an infrared laser pulse to form an ablation plume, intercepting the ablation plume by an electrospray plume to form ions, and detecting the ions by mass spectrometry.

  20. Development of a simple method for the determination of nitrite and nitrate in groundwater by high-resolution continuum source electrothermal molecular absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Brandao, Geovani C; Matos, Geraldo D; Pereira, Raimundo N; Ferreira, Sergio L C

    2014-01-01

    In this work, it was developed a method for the determination of nitrite and nitrate in groundwater by high-resolution continuum source electrothermal molecular absorption spectrometry of NO produced by thermal decomposition of nitrate in a graphite furnace. The NO line at 215.360 nm was used for all analytical measurements and the signal obtained by integrated absorbance of three pixels. A volume of 20 μL of standard solution or groundwater sample was injected into graphite furnace and 5 μL of a 1% (m/v) Ca solution was co-injected as chemical modifier. The pyrolisis and vaporization temperatures established were of 150 and 1300°C, respectively. Under these conditions, it was observed a difference of thermal stability among the two nitrogen species in the presence of hydrochloric acid co-injected. While that the nitrite signal was totally suppressed, nitrate signal remained nearly stable. This way, nitrogen can be quantified only as nitrate. The addition of hydrogen peroxide provided the oxidation of nitrite to nitrate, which allowed the total quantification of the species and nitrite obtained by difference. A volume of 5 μL of 0.3% (v/v) hydrochloric acid was co-injected for the elimination of nitrite, whereas that hydrogen peroxide in the concentration of 0.75% (v/v) was added to samples or standards for the oxidation of nitrite to nitrate. Analytical curve was established using standard solution of nitrate. The method described has limits of detection and quantification of 0.10 and 0.33 μg mL(-1) of nitrogen, respectively. The precision, estimated as relative standard deviation (RSD), was of 7.5 and 3.8% (n=10) for groundwater samples containing nitrate-N concentrations of 1.9 and 15.2 μg mL(-1), respectively. The proposed method was applied to the analysis of 10 groundwater samples and the results were compared with those obtained by ion chromatography method. In all samples analyzed, the concentration of nitrite-N was always below of the limit of

  1. [Study on Content Determination of Lead and Arsenic in Four Traditional Tibetan Medicine Prescription Preparations by Wet Digestion Flow Injection-Hydride Generation-Atomic Absorption Spectrometry].

    PubMed

    Zheng, Zhi-yuan; Du, Yu-zhi; Zhang, Ming; Yu, Ming-jie; Li, Cen; Yang, Hong-xia; Zhao, Jing; Xia, Zheng-hua; Wei, Li-xin

    2015-04-01

    Four common traditional tibetan medicine prescription preparations "Anzhijinghuasan, Dangzuo, Renqingchangjue and Rannasangpei" in tibetan areas were selected as study objects in the present study. The purpose was to try to establish a kind of wet digestion and flow injection-hydride generation-atomic absorption spectrometry (FI-HAAS) associated analysis method for the content determinations of lead and arsenic in traditional tibetan medicine under optimized digestion and measurement conditions and determine their contents accurately. Under these optimum operating conditions, experimental results were as follows. The detection limits for lead and arsenic were 0.067 and 0.012 µg · mL(-1) respectively. The quantification limits for lead and arsenic were 0.22 and 0.041 µg · mL(-1) respectively. The linear ranges for lead and arsenic were 25-1,600 ng · mL(-1) (r = 0.9995) and 12.5-800 ng · mL(-1) (r = 0.9994) respectively. The degrees of precision(RSD) for lead and arsenic were 2.0% and 3.2% respectively. The recovery rates for lead and arsenic were 98.00%-99.98% and 96.67%-99.87% respectively. The content determination results of lead and arsenic in four traditional tibetan medicine prescription preparations were as fol- lows. The contents of lead and arsenic in Anzhijinghuasan are 0.63-0.67 µg · g(-1) and 0.32-0.33 µg · g(-1) in Anzhijinghua- san, 42.92-43.36 µg · g(-1) and 24.67-25.87 µg · g(-1) in Dangzuo, 1,611. 39-1,631.36 µg · g(-1) and 926.76-956.52 µg- g(-1) in Renqing Changjue, and 1,102.28-1,119.127 µg-g(-1) and 509.96-516.87 µg · g(-1) in Rannasangpei, respectively. This study established a method for content determination of lead and arsenic in traditional tibetan medicine, and determined the content levels of lead and arsenic in four tibetan medicine-prescription preparations accurately. In addition, these results also provide the basis for the safe and effective use of those medicines in clinic.

  2. Silica gel modified with N-(3-propyl)-O-phenylenediamine: functionalization, metal sorption equilibrium studies and application to metal enrichment prior to determination by flame atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Akl, Magda Ali Abd-elAziz; Kenawy, Ibraheim Mohamed; Lasheen, Rabab Ramadan

    2005-08-01

    The use of the chemically modified silica gel N-(3-propyl)-O-phenylenediamine (SiG-NPPDA) adsorbent, for the preconcentration and separation of trace heavy metals, was described. SiG-NPPDA sorbs quantitatively (90-100% recovery) trace amounts of nine heavy metals, viz., Cd(II), Zn(II), Fe(III), Cu(II), Pb(II), Mn(II), Cr(III), Co(II) and Ni(II) at pH 7-8. The sorption capacity varies from 350 to 450 micromol g(-1). Desorption was found to be quantitative with 1-2 M HNO3 or 0.05 M Na2EDTA. The distribution coefficient, Kd and the percentage concentration of the investigated metal ions on the adsorbent at equilibrium, C(M,eqm)% (Recovery, R%), were studied as a function of experimental parameters. The logarithmic values of the distribution coefficient, log Kd, ranges between 4.0 and 6.4. Some foreign ions caused little interference in the preconcentration and determination of the investigated nine metals by flame atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS). The adsorbent and its formed metal chelates were characterized by IR (absorbance and/or reflectance), potentiometric titrations and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA and DTG). The mode of chelation between the SiG-NPPDA adsorbent and the investigated metal ions is proposed to be due to the reaction of the investigated metal ions with the two nitrogen atoms of the SiG-NPPDA adsorbent. The present adsorbent coupled with flame AAS has been used to enrich and determine the nine metal ions in natural aqueous systems and in certified reference materials (RSD < or = 5%). The copper, iron, manganese and zinc present in some pharmaceutical vitamin samples were also preconcentrated on SiG-NPPDA adsorbent and determined by flame AAS (RSD < or = 4.2%). Nanogram concentrations (0.07-0.14 ng ml(-1)) of Cd(II), Zn(II), Fe(III), Pb(II), Cr(III), Mn(II), Cu(II), Co(II) and Ni(II) can be determined reliably with a preconcentration factor of 100.

  3. Analysis of Mass Spectrometry Data for Nucleolar Proteomics Experiments.

    PubMed

    Nicolas, Armel; Bensaddek, Dalila; Lamond, Angus I

    2016-01-01

    With recent advances in experiment design, sample preparation, separation and instruments, mass spectrometry (MS)-based quantitative proteomics is becoming increasingly more popular. This has the potential to usher a new revolution in biology, in which the protein complement of cell populations can be described not only with increasing coverage, but also in all of its dimensions with unprecedented precision. Indeed, while earlier proteomics studies aimed solely at identifying as many as possible of the proteins present in the sample, newer, so-called Next Generation Proteomics studies add to this the aim of determining and quantifying the protein variants present in the sample, their mutual associations within complexes, their posttranslational modifications, their variation across the cell-cycle or in response to stimuli or perturbations, and their subcellular distribution. This has the potential to make MS proteomics much more useful for researchers, but will also mean that researchers with no background in MS will increasingly be confronted with the less-than trivial challenges of preparing samples for MS analysis, then processing and interpreting the results. In Chapter 20 , we described a workflow for isolating the protein contents of a specific SILAC-labeled organelle sample (the nucleolus) and processing it into peptides suitable for bottom-up MS analysis. Here, we complete this workflow by describing how to use the freely available MaxQuant software to convert the spectra stored in the Raw files into peptide- and protein-level information. We also briefly describe how to visualize the data using the free R scripting language.

  4. Analysis of Mass Spectrometry Data for Nucleolar Proteomics Experiments.

    PubMed

    Nicolas, Armel; Bensaddek, Dalila; Lamond, Angus I

    2016-01-01

    With recent advances in experiment design, sample preparation, separation and instruments, mass spectrometry (MS)-based quantitative proteomics is becoming increasingly more popular. This has the potential to usher a new revolution in biology, in which the protein complement of cell populations can be described not only with increasing coverage, but also in all of its dimensions with unprecedented precision. Indeed, while earlier proteomics studies aimed solely at identifying as many as possible of the proteins present in the sample, newer, so-called Next Generation Proteomics studies add to this the aim of determining and quantifying the protein variants present in the sample, their mutual associations within complexes, their posttranslational modifications, their variation across the cell-cycle or in response to stimuli or perturbations, and their subcellular distribution. This has the potential to make MS proteomics much more useful for researchers, but will also mean that researchers with no background in MS will increasingly be confronted with the less-than trivial challenges of preparing samples for MS analysis, then processing and interpreting the results. In Chapter 20 , we described a workflow for isolating the protein contents of a specific SILAC-labeled organelle sample (the nucleolus) and processing it into peptides suitable for bottom-up MS analysis. Here, we complete this workflow by describing how to use the freely available MaxQuant software to convert the spectra stored in the Raw files into peptide- and protein-level information. We also briefly describe how to visualize the data using the free R scripting language. PMID:27576726

  5. Analysis of sequential events in intestinal absorption of folylpolyglutamate

    SciTech Connect

    Darcy-Vrillon, B.; Selhub, J.; Rosenberg, I.H.

    1988-09-01

    Although it is clear that the intestinal absorption of folylpolyglutamates is associated with hydrolysis to monoglutamyl folate, the precise sequence and relative velocity of the events involved in this absorption are not fully elucidated. In the present study, we used biosynthetic, radiolabeled folylpolyglutamates purified by affinity chromatography to analyze the relationship of hydrolysis and transport in rat jejunal loops in vivo. Absorption was best described by a series of first-order processes: luminal hydrolysis to monoglutamyl folate followed by tissue uptake of the product. The rate of hydrolysis in vivo was twice as high as the rate of transport. The latter value was identical to that measured for folic acid administered separately. The relevance of this sequential model was confirmed by data obtained using inhibitors of the individual steps in absorption of ''natural'' folate. Heparin and sulfasalazine were both effective in decreasing absorption. The former affected hydrolysis solely, whereas the latter acted as a competitive inhibitor of transport of monoglutamyl folate. These studies confirm that hydrolysis is obligatory and that the product is subsequently taken up by a transport process, common to monoglutamyl folates, that is the rate-determining step in transepithelial absorption.

  6. Optical absorption analysis and optimization of gold nanoshells.

    PubMed

    Tuersun, Paerhatijiang; Han, Xiang'e

    2013-02-20

    Gold nanoshells, consisting of a nanoscale dielectric core coated with an ultrathin gold shell, have wide biomedical applications due to their strong optical absorption properties. Gold nanoshells with high absorption efficiencies can help to improve these applications. We investigate the effects of the core material, surrounding medium, core radius, and shell thickness on the absorption spectra of gold nanoshells by using the light-scattering theory of a coated sphere. Our results show that the position and intensity of the absorption peak can be tuned over a wide range by manipulating the above-mentioned parameters. We also obtain the optimal absorption efficiencies and structures of hollow gold nanoshells and gold-coated SiO(2) nanoshells embedded in water at wavelengths of 800, 820, and 1064 nm. The results show that hollow gold nanoshells possess the maximum absorption efficiency (5.42) at a wavelength of 800 nm; the corresponding shell thickness and core radius are 4.8 and 38.9 nm, respectively. They can be used as the ideal photothermal conversation particles for biomedical applications. PMID:23435006

  7. Optical absorption analysis and optimization of gold nanoshells.

    PubMed

    Tuersun, Paerhatijiang; Han, Xiang'e

    2013-02-20

    Gold nanoshells, consisting of a nanoscale dielectric core coated with an ultrathin gold shell, have wide biomedical applications due to their strong optical absorption properties. Gold nanoshells with high absorption efficiencies can help to improve these applications. We investigate the effects of the core material, surrounding medium, core radius, and shell thickness on the absorption spectra of gold nanoshells by using the light-scattering theory of a coated sphere. Our results show that the position and intensity of the absorption peak can be tuned over a wide range by manipulating the above-mentioned parameters. We also obtain the optimal absorption efficiencies and structures of hollow gold nanoshells and gold-coated SiO(2) nanoshells embedded in water at wavelengths of 800, 820, and 1064 nm. The results show that hollow gold nanoshells possess the maximum absorption efficiency (5.42) at a wavelength of 800 nm; the corresponding shell thickness and core radius are 4.8 and 38.9 nm, respectively. They can be used as the ideal photothermal conversation particles for biomedical applications.

  8. Analysis of paralytic shellfish toxins using high-field asymmetric waveform ion mobility spectrometry with liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Beach, Daniel G; Melanson, Jeremy E; Purves, Randy W

    2015-03-01

    The analysis of paralytic shellfish toxins (PSTs) by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry remains a challenge because of their high polarity, large number of analogues and the complex matrix in which they occur. Here we investigate the potential utility of high-field asymmetric waveform ion mobility spectrometry (FAIMS) as a gas-phase ion separation tool for analysis of PSTs by mass spectrometry. We investigate the separation of PSTs using FAIMS with two divergent goals: using FAIMS as a primary separation tool for rapid screening by electrospray ionization (ESI)-FAIMS-MS or combined with LC in a multidimensional LC-ESI-FAIMS-MS separation. First, a survey of the parameters that affect the sensitivity and selectivity of PST analysis by FAIMS was carried out using ESI-FAIMS-MS. In particular, the use of acetonitrile as a gas additive in the carrier gas flow offered good separation of all PST epimeric pairs. A second set of FAIMS conditions was also identified, which focussed PSTs to a relatively narrow CV range allowing development of an LC-ESI-FAIMS-MS method for analysis of PST toxins in complex mussel tissue extracts. The quantitative capabilities of this method were evaluated by analysing a PST containing mussel tissue matrix material. Results compared favourably with analysis by an established LC-post-column oxidation-fluorescence method with recoveries ranging from 70 to 106%, although sensitivity was somewhat reduced. The current work represents the first successful separation of PST isomers using ion mobility and shows the promise of FAIMS as a tool for analysis of algal biotoxins in complex samples and outlines some critical requirements for its future improvement.

  9. Dithizone chloroform single drop microextraction system combined with electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry using Ir as permanent modifier for the determination of Cd in water and biological samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Zhefeng; Zhou, Wei

    2006-07-01

    A simple and sensitive method using dithizone-chloroform single drop microextraction has been developed for separation and preconcentration of trace Cd prior to its determination by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry with Ir as permanent modifier. Parameters, such as pyrolysis and atomization temperature, solvent type, pH, dithizone concentration, extraction time, organic drop volume, stirring rate and sample volume were investigated. Under the optimized conditions, a detection limit (3 σ) of 0.7 ng/l and enrichment factor of 65 were achieved. The relative standard deviation was 7.4% ( c = 0.2 μg/l, n = 5). The developed method has been applied to the determination of trace Cd in water samples and biological reference materials with satisfactory results.

  10. Comparison of sample preparation procedures for the determination of trace heavy metals in house dust, tobacco and tea samples by atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Narin, Ibrahim; Tuzen, Mustafa; Soylak, Mustafa

    2004-11-01

    The effect of wet ashing, dry ashing and microwave procedure for the determination of trace metal levels was investigated in house dust, tobacco and tea samples by atomic absorption spectrometry. The study of sample preparation procedures showed that the microwave method was the best. The recovery of trace metals was very good and precision and accuracy were compatible with standard reference material. The relative standard deviations for all measured metal concentrations were lower than 10%. The digestions of HNO3/H2SO4/HClO4 (4: 1: 1) mixture for house dust, HNO3/H2SO4/H2O2 (2: 2: 2) mixture for tea and HNO3/H2O2 (4: 2) mixture for tobacco were very efficient.

  11. Solvent microextraction-flame atomic absorption spectrometry (SME-FAAS) for determination of ultratrace amounts of cadmium in meat and fish samples.

    PubMed

    Goudarzi, Nasser

    2009-02-11

    A simple, low cost and highly sensitive method based on solvent microextraction (SME) for separation/preconcentration and flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS) was proposed for the determination of ultratrace amounts of cadmium in meat and fish samples. The analytical procedure involved the formation of a hydrophobic complex by mixing the analyte solution with an ammonium pyrrolidinedithiocarbamate (APDC) solution. In suitable conditions, the complex of cadmium-APDC entered the micro organic phase, and thus, separation of the analyte from the matrix was achieved. Under optimal chemical and instrumental conditions, a detection limit (3 sigma) of 0.8 ng L(-1) and an enrichment factor of 93 were achieved. The relative standard deviation for the method was found to be 2.2% for Cd. The interference effects of some anions and cations were also investigated. The developed method has been applied to the determination of trace Cd in meat and fish samples. PMID:19138082

  12. Investigation of Pb species in soils, celery and duckweed by synchrotron radiation X-ray absorption near-edge structure spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Liqiang; Shen, Yating; Liu, Jian; Zeng, Yuan

    2016-08-01

    The Pb species play a key role in its translocation in biogeochemical cycles. Soils, sediments and plants were collected from farmlands around Pb mines, and the Pb species in them was identified by X-ray absorption near-edge structure spectrometry. In soils, Pb5(PO4)3Cl and Pb3(PO4)2 were detected, and in sediments, Pb-fulvic acids (FAs) complex was identified. A Pb complex with FA fragments was also detected in celery samples. We found that (1) different Pb species were present in soils and sediments; (2) the Pb species in celery, which was grown in sediments, was different from the species present in duckweed, which grew in water; and (3) a Pb-FA-like compound was present in celery roots. The newly identified Pb species, the Pb-FA-like compound, may play a key role in Pb tolerance and translocation within plants.

  13. Evaluation of cadmium in greenhouse soils and agricultural products of Jiroft (Iran) using microwave digestion prior to atomic absorption spectrometry determination.

    PubMed

    Afzali, Daryoush; Fathirad, Fariba; Afzali, Zahra; Majdzadeh-Kermani, Seyed Mohammad Javad

    2015-03-01

    This study determines total levels of potentially toxic trace element, Cd (II) in Jiroft (Kerman, Iran) greenhouse soil and agricultural products that are grown in these greenhouses (tomatoes and cucumbers), and the comparison with soil outside of greenhouse using microwave digestion prior to flame atomic absorption spectrometry determination. The results show that the cadmium concentration in greenhouse soil is 0.9-1.9 mg kg(-1) and out of greenhouse is 0.4-1.0 mg kg(-1). Also, cadmium concentration range in tomatoes and cucumbers is about 0.07-0.40 mg kg(-1). The obtained results show that the concentration of this metal in greenhouse soil is higher than outside soil samples and is below the safe limit.

  14. Continuous approach for ultrasound-assisted acid extraction-minicolumn preconcentration of chromium and cobalt from seafood samples prior to flame atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Yebra-Biurrun, Maria C; Cancela-Pérez, Sheila

    2007-08-01

    A rapid and sensitive method has been proposed for the determination of chromium and cobalt in seafood samples by flame atomic absorption spectrometry combined with a dynamic ultrasound-assisted acid extraction and an on-line minicolumn preconcentration. The use of diluted nitric acid as extractant in a continuous mode at a flow rate of 3.5 mL min(-1) and room temperature was sufficient for quantitative extraction of these trace metals from seafoods. A minicolumn containing a chelating resin was an excellent device for the quantitative preconcentration of chromium and cobalt prior to their detection. A flow-injection manifold was used as interface for coupling all analytical steps, which allowed the automation of the whole analytical process. A Plackett-Burman experimental design was used as a multivariate strategy for the optimization of both sample preparation and preconcentration steps. The method was successfully applied to the determination of chromium and cobalt in seafood samples.

  15. Speciation of organic and inorganic selenium in selenium-enriched rice by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry after cloud point extraction.

    PubMed

    Sun, Mei; Liu, Guijian; Wu, Qianghua

    2013-11-01

    A new method was developed for the determination of organic and inorganic selenium in selenium-enriched rice by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry detection after cloud point extraction. Effective separation of organic and inorganic selenium in selenium-enriched rice was achieved by sequentially extracting with water and cyclohexane. Under the optimised conditions, the limit of detection (LOD) was 0.08 μg L(-1), the relative standard deviation (RSD) was 2.1% (c=10.0 μg L(-1), n=11), and the enrichment factor for selenium was 82. Recoveries of inorganic selenium in the selenium-enriched rice samples were between 90.3% and 106.0%. The proposed method was successfully applied for the determination of organic and inorganic selenium as well as total selenium in selenium-enriched rice.

  16. Temperature-controlled electrothermal atomization-atomic absorption spectrometry using a pyrometric feedback system in conjunction with a background monitoring device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Deijck, W.; Roelofsen, A. M.; Pieters, H. J.; Herber, R. F. M.

    The construction of a temperature-controlled feedback system for electrothermal atomization-atomic absorption spectrometry (ETA-AAS) using an optical pyrometer applied to the atomization stage is described. The system was used in conjunction with a fast-response background monitoring device. The heating rate of the furnace amounted to 1400° s -1 with a reproducibility better than 1%. The precision of the temperature control at a steady state temperature of 2000°C was 0.1%. The analytical improvements offered by the present system have been demonstrated by the determination of cadmium and lead in blood and finally by the determination of lead in serum. Both the sensitivity and the precision of the method have been improved. The accuracy of the method was checked by determining the lead content for a number of scrum samples both by ETA-AAS and differential pulse anodic stripping voltametry (DPASV) and proved to be satisfactory.

  17. Polyelectrolyte multilayers on magnetic silica as a new sorbent for the separation of trace copper in food samples and determination by flame atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Guoqiang; Ma, Yulong; Jiang, Xiuming; Mao, Pu

    2014-12-01

    A novel magnetic silica sorbent with polyelectrolyte multilayers (PEMs) on its surface was prepared, and the sorbent was used for the magnetic solid phase extraction (MSPE) of trace Cu(2+) in drinking water with flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS) as the detector. The experimental parameters for the MSPE procedure, such as the pH, desorption conditions, ultrasonic time and co-existing ions effects, were investigated. The adsorption capacity of the new sorbent was 14.7 mg g(-1) for Cu(2+). The detection limit of the developed method was 0.23 ng mL(-1) for Cu(2+) with an enrichment factor of 95.7. The analytical data obtained from the certified reference water and rice samples were in good agreement with the certified values. This method was also successfully applied to the determination of trace Cu(2+) in different food samples with satisfactory results.

  18. Evaluation of a direct-current argon plasma as a primary pseudocontinuum radiation source for wavelength-modulated atomic absorption spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Messman, J.D.; O'Haver, T.C.; Epstein, M.S.

    1985-02-01

    A direct-current argon plasma (DCP) pseudocontinuum source is investigated as an alternative to a Cermax xenon arc continuum lamp (XAL) for wavelength-modulated continuum-source atomic absorption spectrometry (WM-AAC), particularly for the determination of elements in the lower ultraviolet wavelength region. The emission line from the DCP source is intentionally broadened by aspirating a large concentration of analyte solution into the plasma so that it appears as pseudocontinuum radiation over the narrow wavelength modulation interval. The DCP source significantly reduces both order overlap and far stray radiation compared to the XAL, but signal-to-noise ratios are degraded relative to the XAL source because of plasma-emission self-reversal flicker noise. 27 references, 3 figures, 4 tables.

  19. Analysis of explosives using corona discharge ionization combined with ion mobility spectrometry-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jihyeon; Park, Sehwan; Cho, Soo Gyeong; Goh, Eun Mee; Lee, Sungman; Koh, Sung-Suk; Kim, Jeongkwon

    2014-03-01

    Corona discharge ionization combined with ion mobility spectrometry-mass spectrometry (IMS-MS) was utilized to investigate five common explosives: cyclonite (RDX), trinitrotoluene (TNT), pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN), cyclotetramethylenetetranitramine (HMX), and 2,4-dinitrotoluene (DNT). The MS scan and the selected ion IMS analyses confirmed the identities of the existing ion species and their drift times. The ions observed were RDX·NO3(-), TNT(-), PETN·NO3(-), HMX·NO3(-), and DNT(-), with average drift times of 6.93 ms, 10.20 ms, 9.15 ms, 12.24 ms, 11.30 ms, and 8.89 ms, respectively. The reduced ion mobility values, determined from a standard curve calculated by linear regression of (normalized drift times)(-1) versus literature K0 values, were 2.09, 1.38, 1.55, 1.15, 1.25, and 1.60 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1), respectively. The detection limits were found to be 0.1 ng for RDX, 10 ng for TNT, 0.5 ng for PETN, 5.0 ng for HMX, and 10 ng for DNT. Simplified chromatograms were observed when nitrogen, as opposed to air, was used as the drift gas, but the detection limits were approximately 10 times worse (i.e., less sensitivity of detection).

  20. VACUUM DISTILLATION COUPLED WITH GAS CHROMATOGRAPHY/MASS SPECTROMETRY FOR THE ANALYSIS OF ENVIRONMENTAL SAMPLES

    EPA Science Inventory

    A procedure is presented that uses a vacuum distillation/gas chromatography/mass spectrometry system for analysis of problematic matrices of volatile organic compounds. The procedure compensates for matrix effects and provides both analytical results and confidence intervals from...

  1. Quantification of absorption, retention and elimination of two different oral doses of vitamin A in Zambian boys using accelerator mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Aklamati, E K; Mulenga, M; Dueker, S R; Buchholz, B A; Peerson, J M; Kafwembe, E; Brown, K H; Haskell, M J

    2009-10-12

    A recent survey indicated that high-dose vitamin A supplements (HD-VAS) had no apparent effect on vitamin A (VA) status of Zambian children <5 y of age. To explore possible reasons for the lack of response to HD-VAS among Zambian children, we quantified the absorption, retention, and urinary elimination of either a single HDVAS (60 mg) or a smaller dose of stable isotope (SI)-labeled VA (5 mg), which was used to estimate VA pool size, in 3-4 y old Zambian boys (n = 4 for each VA dose). A 25 nCi tracer dose of [{sup 14}C{sub 2}]-labeled VA was co-administered with the HD-VAS or SI-labeled VA, and 24-hr stool and urine samples were collected for 3 and 7 consecutive days, respectively, and 24-hr urine samples at 4 later time points. Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) was used to measure the cumulative excretion of {sup 14}C in stool and urine 3d after dosing to estimate, respectively, absorption and retention of the VAS and SI-labeled VA. The urinary elimination rate (UER) was estimated by plotting {sup 14}C in urine vs. time, and fitting an exponential equation to the data. Estimates of mean absorption, retention and the UER were 83.8 {+-} 7.1%, 76.3 {+-} 6.7%, and 1.9 {+-} 0.6%/d, respectively, for the HD-VAS and 76.5 {+-} 9.5%, 71.1 {+-} 9.4%, and 1.8 {+-} 1.2%/d, respectively for the smaller dose of SI-labeled VA. Estimates of absorption, retention and the UER did not differ by size of the VA dose administered (P=0.26, 0.40, 0.88, respectively). Estimated absorption and retention were negatively associated with reported fever (P=0.011) and malaria (P =0.010). HD-VAS and SI-labeled VA were adequately absorbed, retained and utilized in apparently healthy Zambian preschool-age boys, although absorption and retention may be affected by recent infections.

  2. Feasibility of dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction for extraction and preconcentration of Cu and Fe in red and white wine and determination by flame atomic absorption spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seeger, Tassia S.; Rosa, Francisco C.; Bizzi, Cezar A.; Dressler, Valderi L.; Flores, Erico M. M.; Duarte, Fabio A.

    2015-03-01

    A method for extraction and preconcentration of Cu and Fe in red and white wines using dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (DLLME) and determination by flame atomic absorption spectrometry (F AAS) was developed. Extraction was performed using sodium diethyldithiocarbamate as chelating agent and a mixture of 40 μL of 1,2-dichlorobenzene (extraction solvent) and 900 μL of methanol (dispersive solvent). Some parameters that influencing the extraction efficiency such as pH (2 to 5), concentration of chelating agent (0 to 2%), effect of salt addition (0 to 10%), number of washing steps (1 to 4) and centrifugation time (0 to 15 min) were studied. Accuracy was evaluated after microwave-assisted digestion in closed vessels and analytes were determined by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry. Agreement with the proposed method ranged from 91 to 110 and from 89 to 113% for Cu and Fe, respectively. Calibration of F AAS instrument was performed using analyte addition method and limits of detection were 6.3 and 2.4 μg L- 1 for Cu and Fe, respectively. The proposed method was applied for the determination of Cu and Fe in five samples of red wine and three samples of white wine, with concentration ranging from 21 to 178 μg L- 1 and from 1.38 to 3.74 mg L- 1, respectively.

  3. Peculiarities of data interpretation upon direct tissue analysis by Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Chagovets, Vtaliy; Kononikhin, Aleksey; Starodubtseva, Nataliia; Kostyukevich, Yury; Popov, Igor; Frankevich, Vladimir; Nikolaev, Eugene

    2016-01-01

    The importance of high-resolution mass spectrometry for the correct data interpretation of a direct tissue analysis is demonstrated with an example of its clinical application for an endometriosis study. Multivariate analysis of the data discovers lipid species differentially expressed in different tissues under investigation. High-resolution mass spectrometry allows unambiguous separation of peaks with close masses that correspond to proton and sodium adducts of phosphatidylcholines and to phosphatidylcholines differing in double bond number. PMID:27553733

  4. Direct analysis of samples by mass spectrometry: From elements to bio-molecules using laser ablation inductively couple plasma mass spectrometry and laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Perdian, David C.

    2009-01-01

    Mass spectrometric methods that are able to analyze solid samples or biological materials with little or no sample preparation are invaluable to science as well as society. Fundamental research that has discovered experimental and instrumental parameters that inhibit fractionation effects that occur during the quantification of elemental species in solid samples by laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry is described. Research that determines the effectiveness of novel laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometric methods for the molecular analysis of biological tissues at atmospheric pressure and at high spatial resolution is also described. A spatial resolution is achieved that is able to analyze samples at the single cell level.

  5. Ion Mobility Mass Spectrometry Direct Isotope Abundance Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Manuel J. Manard, Stephan Weeks, Kevin Kyle

    2010-05-27

    The nuclear forensics community is currently engaged in the analysis of illicit nuclear or radioactive material for the purposes of non-proliferations and attribution. One technique commonly employed for gathering nuclear forensics information is isotope analysis. At present, the state-of-the-art methodology for obtaining isotopic distributions is thermal ionization mass spectrometry (TIMS). Although TIMS is highly accurate at determining isotope distributions, the technique requires an elementally pure sample to perform the measurement. The required radiochemical separations give rise to sample preparation times that can be in excess of one to two weeks. Clearly, the nuclear forensics community is in need of instrumentation and methods that can expedite their decision making process in the event of a radiological release or nuclear detonation. Accordingly, we are developing instrumentation that couples a high resolution IM drift cell to the front end of a MS. The IM cell provides a means of separating ions based upon their collision cross-section and mass-to-charge ratio (m/z). Two analytes with the same m/z, but with different collision cross-sections (shapes) would exit the cell at different times, essentially enabling the cell to function in a similar manner to a gas chromatography (GC) column. Thus, molecular and atomic isobaric interferences can be effectively removed from the ion beam. The mobility selected chemical species could then be introduced to a MS for high-resolution mass analysis to generate isotopic distributions of the target analytes. The outcome would be an IM/MS system capable of accurately measuring isotopic distributions while concurrently eliminating isobaric interferences and laboratory radiochemical sample preparation. The overall objective of this project is developing instrumentation and methods to produce near real-time isotope distributions with a modular mass spectrometric system that performs the required gas-phase chemistry and

  6. Development of Fourier transform spectrometry for UV-visible differential optical absorption spectroscopy measurements of tropospheric minor constituents.

    PubMed

    Vandaele, A C; Carleer, M

    1999-04-20

    Concentration measurements of trace gases in the atmosphere require the use of highly sensitive and precise techniques. The UV-visible differential optical absorption spectroscopy technique is one that is heavily used for tropospheric measurements. To assess the advantages and drawbacks of using a Fourier transform spectrometer, we built a differential optical absorption spectroscopy optical setup based on a Bruker IFS 120M spectrometer. The characteristics and the capabilities of this setup have been studied and compared with those of the more conventional grating-based instruments. Two of the main advantages of the Fourier transform spectrometer are (1) the existence of a reproducible and precise wave-number scale, which greatly simplifies the algorithms used to analyze the atmospheric spectra, and (2) the possibility of recording large spectral regions at relatively high resolution, enabling the simultaneous detection of numerous chemical species with better discriminating properties. The main drawback, on the other hand, is due to the fact that a Fourier transform spectrometer is a scanning device for which the scanning time is small compared with the total measurement time. It does not have the signal integration capabilities of the CCD or photodiode array-based grating spectrographs. The Fourier transform spectrometer therefore needs fairly large amounts of light and is limited to short to medium absorption path lengths when working in the UV.

  7. Mass Spectrometry Analysis of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Treated With Azithromycin

    PubMed Central

    Phelan, Vanessa V.; Fang, Jinshu; Dorrestein, Pieter C.

    2015-01-01

    In microbiology, changes in specialized metabolite production (cell-to-cell signaling metabolites, virulence factors and natural products) are measured using phenotypic assays. However, advances in mass spectrometry based techniques including imaging mass spectrometry (IMS) now allow researchers to directly visualize the production of specialized metabolites from microbial colony biofilms. In this study, a combination of IMS and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) was used to visualize the effect of the macrolide antibiotic azithromycin (AZM) on colony biofilms of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. While previous research suggested that AZM may inhibit cell-to-cell signaling of P. aeruginosa and thereby reducing pathogenicity, we observed no clear decrease in specialized metabolite production. PMID:25801585

  8. Mass Spectrometry Analysis of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Treated with Azithromycin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phelan, Vanessa V.; Fang, Jinshu; Dorrestein, Pieter C.

    2015-06-01

    In microbiology, changes in specialized metabolite production (cell-to-cell signaling metabolites, virulence factors, and natural products) are measured using phenotypic assays. However, advances in mass spectrometry-based techniques including imaging mass spectrometry (IMS) now allow researchers to directly visualize the production of specialized metabolites from microbial colony biofilms. In this study, a combination of IMS and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) was used to visualize the effect of the macrolide antibiotic azithromycin (AZM) on colony biofilms of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Although previous research suggested that AZM may inhibit cell-to-cell signaling of P. aeruginosa and thereby reduce pathogenicity, we observed no clear decrease in specialized metabolite production.

  9. Synthesis of a new molecularly imprinted polymer for sorption of the silver ions from geological and antiseptic samples for determination by flame atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Hashemi-Moghaddam, Hamid; Yahyazadeh, Faegheh; Vardini, Mohammad Taghi

    2014-01-01

    A new molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) was synthesized using methacrylic acid (functional monomer), ethylene glycol dimethacrylate (crosslinker), 2,2'-azobisisobutironitril (initiator), silver (Ag) dithizone complex (template), and chloroform (porogenic solvent). This process was a noncovalent, bulk, thermal radical-polymerization. To compare the performance of this polymer, control polymer (nonimprinted polymer) was prepared under well-defined conditions without the use of a template. Extraction experiments were performed on the MIP and a nonimprinted polymer. Then, various parameters were optimized, such as pH, time, concentration of sample, and type of eluent for elution of Ag from polymer. In addition, interfering effects were investigated on the absorption of Ag by the MIP. This polymer was used for the rapid extraction and preconcentration of Ag from an antiseptic and geological sample. Finally, the amount of Ag was measured by flame atomic absorption spectrometry after preconcentration by the synthesized MIP, and results were compared with a direct inductively coupled plasma method. The results showed high performance of this method in preconcentration of Ag. PMID:25902996

  10. Simultaneous and direct determination of iron and nickel in biological solid samples by high-resolution continuum source graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Nieto, Beatriz; Gismera, Ma Jesús; Sevilla, Ma Teresa; Procopio, Jesús R

    2013-11-15

    The simultaneous and direct determination of nickel and iron in plants and lichens has been investigated using high-resolution continuum source graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry. The primary resonance line for nickel at 232.003 nm and the adjacent secondary line for iron at 232.036 nm have been used for this purpose. The optimization of the experimental conditions was performed using a pine needles certified reference material (SRM 1575a). The influence of pyrolysis and atomization temperatures, the amount of solid sample introduced into the graphite furnace and the use of aqueous or solid standard for calibration were studied. The spectral interferences caused by absorption of the concomitants of the solid sample were detected and corrected using a least square algorithm. Aliquots of 0.1-1mg of the solid samples were weighed onto the solid sampling platforms and analyzed directly, without addition of any reagents. The limits of detection were 25 µg kg(-1) for nickel and 0.40 mg kg(-1) for iron and the precision, expressed as the relative standard deviation, ranged from 7% to 12%. The proposed method was used to determine both metals in different bioindicator samples with successful results.

  11. Determination of ultra trace amounts of copper by a multi-injection technique of electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry after using solid-phase extraction.

    PubMed

    Sabermahani, Fatemeh; Taher, Mohammad Ali

    2014-01-01

    A new method using a multi-injection technique combined with SPE was developed for the determination of copper (Cu) in environmental samples. The method is based on SPE of copper ions on naphthalene as its 2-(5-bromo-2-pyridylazo)- 5-diethylaminophenol (5-Br-PADAP)-ammonium tetraphenylborate complex, in the pH range 6.0-9.5, and determined by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry. No chemical modifier is required in the graphite furnace. The detection limit can be reduced to 1.5 ng/L using an injection volume of 25.0 μL (five 5.0 μL) without interference by the matrixes. The optimum pyrolysis and atomization temperatures were 500 and 2200°C, respectively, for the concentrated solution of Cu. The sensitivity for 1% absorption was 2.6 pg Cu. Eight replicate determinations for 0.1 μg Cu in 5.0mL dimethylformamide gave an RSD of 2.3% for a single injection and 2.7% for a multi-injection. The procedure was validated with certified reference materials and successfully applied to the determination of copper in water and plant samples. PMID:25632448

  12. Thermospray flame furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (TS-FF-AAS) — a simple method for trace element determination with microsamples in the μg/l concentration range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gáspár, Attila; Berndt, Harald

    2000-06-01

    A new flame method of atomic absorption spectrometry has been developed. The liquid sample to be analyzed is transported through a very hot, simple metal capillary tip acting as a flame-heated thermospray into a glowing atomization tube (flame furnace) which is positioned into the air/acetylene flame of a standard flame-AAS burner head. Both the complete introduction of the whole sample and the extended residence time inside the absorption volume result in an improvement of detection limits from 14 to 67 for five investigated elements. The detection limits determined using 10-μl samples amount to 0.19 ng/ml (Cd), 1.3 ng/ml (Cu), 5.2 ng/ml (Tl), 13 ng/ml (Pb) and 21 ng/ml (Hg). A relative standard deviation of 1.4-3.4% ( N=12, 10 μl) was achieved. Sample volumes between 2.5 μl and 200 μl have been investigated. In the case of 10 μl the sampling frequency was three per minute. The method can also be considered as a simple, effective interface between HPLC or FIA techniques and flame AAS. The determinations can be easily automated.

  13. Simultaneous determination of cobalt and nickel in vitamin B12 samples using high-resolution continuum source atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Adolfo, Franciele Rovasi; do Nascimento, Paulo Cícero; Bohrer, Denise; de Carvalho, Leandro Machado; Viana, Carine; Guarda, Ananda; Nunes Colim, Alexsandro; Mattiazzi, Patricia

    2016-01-15

    Nickel and cobalt were simultaneously assayed in vitamin B12 formulations by using atomic spectrometry. The proposed method is based on a compromise between the proximity of specific Ni and Co spectral lines and the relative abundances of the analytes in the samples. The analytes were found in concentrations ranging from 9.48 to 26.20µg L(-1) (Ni) and from 156.90 to 279.25mg L(-1) (Co) in the commercial samples of vitamin B12. The limits of detection and quantification were 1.21 and 3.64mg L(-1) for Co and 0.39 and 1.19µg L(-1) for Ni. Sample cleanup was not necessary for the determinations, and the interferences were discussed.

  14. Simultaneous determination of cobalt and nickel in vitamin B12 samples using high-resolution continuum source atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Adolfo, Franciele Rovasi; do Nascimento, Paulo Cícero; Bohrer, Denise; de Carvalho, Leandro Machado; Viana, Carine; Guarda, Ananda; Nunes Colim, Alexsandro; Mattiazzi, Patricia

    2016-01-15

    Nickel and cobalt were simultaneously assayed in vitamin B12 formulations by using atomic spectrometry. The proposed method is based on a compromise between the proximity of specific Ni and Co spectral lines and the relative abundances of the analytes in the samples. The analytes were found in concentrations ranging from 9.48 to 26.20µg L(-1) (Ni) and from 156.90 to 279.25mg L(-1) (Co) in the commercial samples of vitamin B12. The limits of detection and quantification were 1.21 and 3.64mg L(-1) for Co and 0.39 and 1.19µg L(-1) for Ni. Sample cleanup was not necessary for the determinations, and the interferences were discussed. PMID:26592602

  15. Speciation of methyl- and butyltin compounds and inorganic tin in oysters by hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Han, J.S.; Weber, J.H.

    1988-02-15

    Because of the toxicity of tributyltin originating from many antifouling marine paints, there is much concern about its effect on aquatic life and, particularly, on shellfish. This paper describes speciation of inorganic tin, methyltin compounds, and butyltin compounds from oyster samples. The authors validated the hydride generation atomic absorption spectrophotometric technique by demonstrating ca. 100% recovery from spiked samples and by the absence of any organotin decomposition products. Absolute detection limits (3sigma) are 1.1-2.5 ng for 0.1-g oyster samples (wet weight). This method is superior to published techniques because of careful validation, low limits of detection, and minimal sample manipulation.

  16. Analysis of proteins using DIGE and MALDI mass spectrometry

    EPA Science Inventory

    In this work the sensitivity of the quantitative proteomics approach 2D-DIGE/MS (twoDimensional Difference Gel Electrophoresis / Mass Spectrometry) was tested by detecting decreasing amounts of a specific protein at the low picomole and sub-picomole range. Sensitivity of the 2D-D...

  17. Analysis of intact bacteria using rapid evaporative ionisation mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Strittmatter, Nicole; Jones, Emrys A; Veselkov, Kirill A; Rebec, Monica; Bundy, Jacob G; Takats, Zoltan

    2013-07-14

    An identification system for microorganisms based on recently developed rapid evaporative ionisation mass spectrometry (REIMS) is presented. Nine bacterial species cultured on various growth media were correctly identified to family-, genus-, and species-level based on their different mass spectral fingerprints using a cross-validated maximum margin criterion model.

  18. Prediction of the furnace heat absorption by utilizing thermomechanical analysis for various kinds of coal firing

    SciTech Connect

    Ishinomori, T.; Watanabe, S.; Kiga, T.; Wall, T.F.; Gupta, R.P.; Gupta, S.K.

    1999-07-01

    In order to predict the furnace heat absorption, which is sensitive to coal properties, an attempt to make a model universally applicable for any kind of pulverized coal fired boiler is in progress. First of all, the heat absorption rates on to furnace wall were surveyed for 600MWe pulverized coal fired boiler, and they were ranked into four levels by indicating a furnace heat absorption index (FHAI). Some ash composition is relatively well related to the FHAI, while a new index from thermomechanical analysis (TMA) offers a good prediction of the furnace heat absorption.

  19. Developments in mass spectrometry for the analysis of complex protein mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Khalsa-Moyers, Gurusahai K; McDonald, W Hayes

    2006-01-01

    State-of-the-art proteomics workflows involve multiple interdependent steps: sample preparation, protein peptide separation, mass spectrometry and data analysis.While improvements in any of these steps can increase the depth and breadth of analysis, advances in mass spectrometry have catalysed many of the most important developments. We discuss common classes of mass analysers and how these analysers are put together to produce some of the most popular mass spectrometry platforms.The capabilities of these platforms determine how they can be used in a variety of common proteomic strategies and, in turn, what types of biological questions can be addressed. Moving forward, powerful new hybridmass spectrometers and application of emerging types of tandemmass spectrometry promise that our ability to analyse complex mixtures of proteins will continue to advance.

  20. Direct Plant Tissue Analysis and Imprint Imaging by Desorption Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    The ambient mass spectrometry technique, desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (DESI-MS), is applied for the rapid identification and spatially resolved relative quantification of chlorophyll degradation products in complex senescent plant tissue matrixes. Polyfunctionalized nonfluorescent chlorophyll catabolites (NCCs), the “final” products of the chlorophyll degradation pathway, are detected directly from leaf tissues within seconds and structurally characterized by tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) and reactive-DESI experiments performed in situ. The sensitivity of DESI-MS analysis of these compounds from degreening leaves is enhanced by the introduction of an imprinting technique. Porous polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) is used as a substrate for imprinting the leaves, resulting in increased signal intensities compared with those obtained from direct leaf tissue analysis. This imprinting technique is used further to perform two-dimensional (2D) imaging mass spectrometry by DESI, producing well-resolved images of the spatial distribution of NCCs in senescent leaf tissues. PMID:21675752

  1. Analysis of psilocybin and psilocin in Psilocybe subcubensis Guzmán by ion mobility spectrometry and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Keller, T; Schneider, A; Regenscheit, P; Dirnhofer, R; Rücker, T; Jaspers, J; Kisser, W

    1999-01-11

    A new method has been developed for the rapid analysis of psilocybin and/or psilocin in fungus material using ion mobility spectrometry. Quantitative analysis was performed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry after a simple one-step extraction involving homogenization of the dried fruit bodies of fungi in chloroform and derivatization with MSTFA. The proposed methods resulted in rapid procedures useful in analyzing psychotropic fungi for psilocybin and psilocin.

  2. Determination of yttrium and rare-earth elements in rocks by graphite-furnace atomic-absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Gupta, J G

    1981-01-01

    With use of synthetic solutions and several international standard reference materials a method has been developed for determining traces of Y, Pr, Nd, Sm, Eu, Gd, Tb, Dy, Ho, Er, Tm, Yb and Lu in rocks by electrothermal atomization in a pyrolytically-coated graphite furnace. Depending on the element, the sensitivity is of the order of 10(-9)-10(-12) g at 2500 degrees . To avoid matrix interferences the lanthanides are separated from the common elements by co-precipitation with calcium and iron as carriers. The data for Canadian reference rock SY-2 (syenite), U.S.G.S. reference rocks W-2 (diabase), DNC-1 (diabase) and BIR-1 (basalt), and South African reference rock NIM-18/69 (carbonatite) obtained by graphite-furnace atomization are compared with the values obtained by flame atomic-absorption. The results are in good agreement with literature values.

  3. Determination of yttrium and rare-earth elements in rocks by graphite-furnace atomic-absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Gupta, J G

    1981-01-01

    With use of synthetic solutions and several international standard reference materials a method has been developed for determining traces of Y, Pr, Nd, Sm, Eu, Gd, Tb, Dy, Ho, Er, Tm, Yb and Lu in rocks by electrothermal atomization in a pyrolytically-coated graphite furnace. Depending on the element, the sensitivity is of the order of 10(-9)-10(-12) g at 2500 degrees . To avoid matrix interferences the lanthanides are separated from the common elements by co-precipitation with calcium and iron as carriers. The data for Canadian reference rock SY-2 (syenite), U.S.G.S. reference rocks W-2 (diabase), DNC-1 (diabase) and BIR-1 (basalt), and South African reference rock NIM-18/69 (carbonatite) obtained by graphite-furnace atomization are compared with the values obtained by flame atomic-absorption. The results are in good agreement with literature values. PMID:18962852

  4. Determination of boron in blood, urine and bone by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry using zirconium and citric acid as modifiers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burguera, Marcela; Burguera, José Luis; Rondón, Carlos; Carrero, Pablo

    2001-10-01

    A comparative study of various potential chemical modifiers (Au, Ba, Be, Ca, Cr, Ir, La, Lu, Mg, Ni, Pd, Pt, Rh, Ru, Sr, V, W, and Zr), and different 'coating' treatments (Zr, W, and W+Rh) of the pyrolytic graphite platform of a longitudinally heated graphite tube atomizer for thermal stabilization and determination of boron was undertaken. The use of Au, Ba, Be, Cr, Ir, Pt, Rh, Ru, Sr and V as modifiers, and of W+Rh coating produced erratic, and noisy signals, while the addition of La, Ni and Pd as modifiers, and the W coating had positive effects, but with too high background absorption signals, rendering their use unsuitable for boron determination even in aqueous solutions. The atomic absorption signal for boron was increased and stabilized when the platform was coated with Zr, and by the addition of Ca, Mg, Lu, W or Zr as modifiers. Only the addition of 10 μg of Zr as a modifier onto Zr-treated platforms allowed the use of a higher pyrolysis temperature without analyte losses. The memory effect was minimized by incorporating a cleaning step with 10 μl of 50 g l -1 NH 4F HF after every three boron measurements. The addition of 10 μl of 15 g l -1 citric acid together with Zr onto Zr-treated platforms significantly improved the characteristic mass to m0=282 pg, which is adequate for biological samples such as urine and bone, although the sensitivity was still inadequate for the determination of boron in blood of subjects without supplementary diet. Under optimized conditions, the detection limit (3σ) was 60 μg l -1. The amount of boron found in whole blood, urine and femur head samples from patients with osteoporosis was in agreement with values previously reported in the literature.

  5. Improved limit of detection and quantitation development and validation procedure for quantification of zinc in Insulin by atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Qadir, Muhammad Abdul; Ahmed, Mahmood; Haq, Iftikharul; Ahmed, Saghir

    2015-05-01

    A simple and expeditious analytical method for determination of zinc in human insulin isophane suspension by flame atomic absorption spectrophotometer (FAAS) was validated. The method was carried out on atomic absorption spectrometer with 0.4 nm bandwidth, 1.0 filter factor on deuterium (D2) background correction. The integration time was set at 3.0 second with 5.0 mA lamp current. The parameters of method validation showed adequate linearity, efficiency and relative standard deviation values were between 0.64%-1.69% (n=7), 1.31%-1.58% (n=10) for repeatability and intermediate precision respectively. The limit of detection 0.0032 μg/mL, 0.0173 μg/mL, 0.0231 μg/mL and limit of quantitation 0.0107μg/mL, 0.0578 μg/mL, 0.0694 μg/mL based on signal to noise (SN), calibration curve method (CCM) and fortification of blank (FB) were obtained respectively. The percentages of recovery for low, medium and high spiked concentration levels of zinc in human insulin were 99.38 ± 0.04 to 100.3 ± 0.03, 98.45 ± 0.38 to 100.3 ± 0.07 and 99.42 ± 0.03 to 99.42 ± 0.08 respectively. With the use of this method, five samples from each vial of human insulin isophane suspension were analyzed and the zinc content was determined. The zinc content were 22.1 ± 0.025 μg/mL and 24.3 ± 0.028 μg/mL which compliance the British Pharmacopoeia standard. PMID:26004720

  6. Dithizone immobilized silica gel on-line preconcentration of trace copper with detection by flame atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Yu, Hong-Mei; Song, Hua; Chen, Ming-Li

    2011-07-15

    A novel adsorbent-silica gel bound dithizone (H(2)Dz-SG) was prepared and used as solid-phase extraction of copper from complex matrix. The H(2)Dz-SG is investigated by means of FT-IR spectra and the SEM images, demonstrating the bonding of dithizone. The H(2)Dz-SG quantitatively adsorb copper ions, and the retained copper is afterwards collected by elution of 10% (v/v) nitric acid. An on-line flow injection solid-phase extraction procedure was developed for trace copper separation and preconcentration with detection by flame atomic spectrometry. By loading 5.4 mL of sample solution, a liner range of 0.5-120 μg L(-1), an enrichment factor of 42.6, a detection limit of 0.2 μg L(-1) and a precision of 1.7% RSD at the 40 μg L(-1) level (n=11) were obtained, along with a sampling frequency of 47 h(-1). The dynamic sorption capacity of H(2)Dz-SG to Cu(2+) was 0.76 mg g(-1). The accuracy of the proposed procedure was evaluated by determination of copper in reference water sample. The potential applications of the procedure for extraction of trace copper were successfully accomplished in water samples (tap, rain, snow, sea and river). The spiking recoveries within 91-107% are achieved. PMID:21645750

  7. Dithizone immobilized silica gel on-line preconcentration of trace copper with detection by flame atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Yu, Hong-Mei; Song, Hua; Chen, Ming-Li

    2011-07-15

    A novel adsorbent-silica gel bound dithizone (H(2)Dz-SG) was prepared and used as solid-phase extraction of copper from complex matrix. The H(2)Dz-SG is investigated by means of FT-IR spectra and the SEM images, demonstrating the bonding of dithizone. The H(2)Dz-SG quantitatively adsorb copper ions, and the retained copper is afterwards collected by elution of 10% (v/v) nitric acid. An on-line flow injection solid-phase extraction procedure was developed for trace copper separation and preconcentration with detection by flame atomic spectrometry. By loading 5.4 mL of sample solution, a liner range of 0.5-120 μg L(-1), an enrichment factor of 42.6, a detection limit of 0.2 μg L(-1) and a precision of 1.7% RSD at the 40 μg L(-1) level (n=11) were obtained, along with a sampling frequency of 47 h(-1). The dynamic sorption capacity of H(2)Dz-SG to Cu(2+) was 0.76 mg g(-1). The accuracy of the proposed procedure was evaluated by determination of copper in reference water sample. The potential applications of the procedure for extraction of trace copper were successfully accomplished in water samples (tap, rain, snow, sea and river). The spiking recoveries within 91-107% are achieved.

  8. Computational and Statistical Analysis of Protein Mass Spectrometry Data

    PubMed Central

    Noble, William Stafford; MacCoss, Michael J.

    2012-01-01

    High-throughput proteomics experiments involving tandem mass spectrometry produce large volumes of complex data that require sophisticated computational analyses. As such, the field offers many challenges for computational biologists. In this article, we briefly introduce some of the core computational and statistical problems in the field and then describe a variety of outstanding problems that readers of PLoS Computational Biology might be able to help solve. PMID:22291580

  9. Analysis of paraffin wax oxidates by differential infrared spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Nazir, M.

    1985-05-01

    The oxidation products of paraffin waxes are estimated by isolation followed by instrumental techniques which are laborious and time-consuming. Differential infrared spectrometry has been applied to analyze the usual paraffin wax oxidates. The saponification and the solubility problems encountered in these samples were overcome by the addition of crown ethers. The technique is quicker, less time-consuming, and less expensive and only a small sample size is required. 10 references, 2 figures, 1 table.

  10. Applications of principal component analysis to breath air absorption spectra profiles classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kistenev, Yu. V.; Shapovalov, A. V.; Borisov, A. V.; Vrazhnov, D. A.; Nikolaev, V. V.; Nikiforova, O. Y.

    2015-12-01

    The results of numerical simulation of application principal component analysis to absorption spectra of breath air of patients with pulmonary diseases are presented. Various methods of experimental data preprocessing are analyzed.

  11. Simultaneous determination of iron and nickel in fluoropolymers by solid sampling high-resolution continuum source graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Soares, Bruno M; Santos, Rafael F; Bolzan, Rodrigo C; Muller, Edson I; Primel, Ednei G; Duarte, Fabio A

    2016-11-01

    This paper reports the development of a method of simultaneous determination of iron and nickel in fluoropolymers by high-resolution continuum source graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (HR-CS GF AAS) with direct solid sampling. In order to carry out simultaneous measurements, both the main resonance line of nickel (232.003nm) and the adjacent secondary line of iron (232.036nm) were monitored in the same spectral window. The proposed method was optimized with a perfluoroalkoxy (PFA) sample and was applied to the determination of iron and nickel in fluorinated ethylene propylene (FEP) and modified polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE-TFM) samples. Pyrolysis and atomization temperatures, as well as the use of Pd and H2 (during pyrolysis) as chemical modifiers, were carefully investigated. Compromise temperatures for pyrolysis and atomization of both analytes were achieved at 800 and 2300°C, respectively, using only 0.5Lmin(-1) H2 as chemical modifier during pyrolysis. Calibration curves were performed with aqueous standards by using a single solution which contained both analytes. Limits of detection were 221 and 9.6ngg(-1) for iron and nickel, respectively. Analyte concentrations in all samples ranged from 3.53 to 12.4µgg(-1) for iron and from 37 to 78ngg(-1) for nickel, with relative standard deviation less than 19%. Accuracy was evaluated by comparing these results with those obtained by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry after sample digestion by microwave-induced combustion and no significant statistical difference was observed. PMID:27591638

  12. Simultaneous determination of iron and nickel in fluoropolymers by solid sampling high-resolution continuum source graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Soares, Bruno M; Santos, Rafael F; Bolzan, Rodrigo C; Muller, Edson I; Primel, Ednei G; Duarte, Fabio A

    2016-11-01

    This paper reports the development of a method of simultaneous determination of iron and nickel in fluoropolymers by high-resolution continuum source graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (HR-CS GF AAS) with direct solid sampling. In order to carry out simultaneous measurements, both the main resonance line of nickel (232.003nm) and the adjacent secondary line of iron (232.036nm) were monitored in the same spectral window. The proposed method was optimized with a perfluoroalkoxy (PFA) sample and was applied to the determination of iron and nickel in fluorinated ethylene propylene (FEP) and modified polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE-TFM) samples. Pyrolysis and atomization temperatures, as well as the use of Pd and H2 (during pyrolysis) as chemical modifiers, were carefully investigated. Compromise temperatures for pyrolysis and atomization of both analytes were achieved at 800 and 2300°C, respectively, using only 0.5Lmin(-1) H2 as chemical modifier during pyrolysis. Calibration curves were performed with aqueous standards by using a single solution which contained both analytes. Limits of detection were 221 and 9.6ngg(-1) for iron and nickel, respectively. Analyte concentrations in all samples ranged from 3.53 to 12.4µgg(-1) for iron and from 37 to 78ngg(-1) for nickel, with relative standard deviation less than 19%. Accuracy was evaluated by comparing these results with those obtained by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry after sample digestion by microwave-induced combustion and no significant statistical difference was observed.

  13. Energy and Exergy Analysis of Vapour Absorption Refrigeration Cycle—A Review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanabar, Bhaveshkumar Kantilal; Ramani, Bharatkumar Maganbhai

    2016-07-01

    In recent years, an energy crisis and the energy consumption have become global problems which restrict the sustainable growth. In these scenarios the scientific energy recovery and the utilization of various kinds of waste heat become very important. The waste heat can be utilized in many ways and one of the best practices is to use it for vapour absorption refrigeration system. To ensure efficient working of absorption cycle and utilization of optimum heat, exergy is the best tool for analysis. This paper provides the comprehensive picture of research and development of absorption refrigeration technology, practical and theoretical analysis with different arrangements of the cycle.

  14. Fast determination of phosphorus in honey, milk and infant formulas by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry using a slurry sampling procedure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López-García, I.; Viñas, P.; Romero-Romero, R.; Hernández-Córdoba, M.

    2007-01-01

    A procedure for the electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometric determination of phosphorus in honey, milk and infant formulas using slurried samples is described. Suspensions prepared in a medium containing 50% v/v concentrated hydrogen peroxide, 1% v/v concentrated nitric acid, 10% m/v glucose, 5% m/v sucrose and 100 mg l - 1 of potassium were introduced directly into the furnace. For the honey samples, multiple injection of the sample was necessary. The modifier selected was a mixture of 20 μg palladium and 5 μg magnesium nitrate, which was injected after the sample and before proceeding with the drying and calcination steps. Calibration was performed using aqueous standards prepared in the same suspension medium and the graph was linear between 5 and 80 mg l - 1 of phosphorus. The reliability of the procedure was checked by comparing the results obtained by the new developed method with those found when using a reference spectrophotometric method after a mineralization step, and by analyzing several certified reference materials.

  15. Back-extraction of trace elements from organometallic-halide extracts for determination by flameless atomic absorption spectrometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clark, J.R.; Viets, J.G.

    1981-01-01

    The Methyl isobutyl ketone-Amine synerGistic Iodkte Complex (MAGIC) extraction system offers the advantage that a large number of trace elements can be rapidly determined with a single sample preparation procedure. However, many of the elements extracted by the MAGIC system form volatile organometallic halide salts when the organic extract is heated in the graphite furnace. High concentrations of some elements such as Cu and Zn extracted by the system from anomalous geological samples produce serious interferences when certain other elements are determined by flameless atomic absorption. Stripping systems have been developed using solutions of HNO3, H2SO4, and CH3COOH individually or combined with H2O2 in order to circumvent these problems. With these systems most of the elements in the organic extract can be sequentially stripped into an aqueous phase. Organometallic volatilization and the most serious interelement interferences, therefore, can be eliminated by stripping with various combinations of reagents in a series of steps.

  16. Speciation of inorganic lead and trialkyllead compounds by flame atomic absorption spectrometry following continuous selective preconcentration from aqueous solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baena, Josefa R.; Gallego, Mercedes; Valcárcel, Miguel

    1999-12-01

    A new method for the speciation of inorganic lead and trialkyllead compounds involving the selective separation of the analytes in a continuous system and their subsequent introduction into a flame atomic absorption spectrometer was developed. The proposed flow system consists of two units. In the first unit, total inorganic lead at concentrations from 8 to 200 ng ml -1 is continuously precipitated as lead chromate and the filtrate, containing trialkyllead cations, is collected in a vessel, the precipitate then being dissolved in diluted acid and driven to the instrument. In the second unit, trimethyllead (TML +) and triethyllead (TEL +) cations at ng ml -1 levels are complexed with sodium diethyldithiocarbamate and retained on a C 60 pre-conditioned fullerene column; the mixture of both species was resolved by conditioning the sorbent column with n-hexane or isobutyl methyl ketone solvents. Detection limits of 1-2 ng ml -1 can be achieved by using a sample volume of 50 ml. Special attention was given to the reliability and robustness of the global flow injection method in assessing its applicability to both types of organolead compounds and inorganic lead present in different proportions. Trimethyllead provides the poorest results as consequence of its low adsorption constant on C 60; however, the three different types of species (Pb 2+/TML +/TEL +) can be effectively determined in proportions from 1:1:1 to 30:12:1 with relative errors less than 10%.

  17. Radiocarbon dating of archaeological samples (sambaqui) using CO(2) absorption and liquid scintillation spectrometry of low background radiation.

    PubMed

    Mendonça, Maria Lúcia T G; Godoy, José M; da Cruz, Rosana P; Perez, Rhoneds A R

    2006-01-01

    Sambaqui means, in the Tupi language, a hill of shells. The sambaquis are archaeological sites with remains of pre-historical Brazilian occupation. Since the sambaqui sites in the Rio de Janeiro state region are older than 10,000 years, the applicability of CO(2) absorption on Carbo-sorb and (14)C determination by counting on a low background liquid scintillation counter was tested. In the present work, sambaqui shells were treated with H(3)PO(4) in a closed vessel in order to generate CO(2). The produced CO(2) was absorbed on Carbo-sorb. On saturation about 0.6g of carbon, as CO(2), was mixed with commercial liquid scintillation cocktail (Permafluor), and the (14)C activity determined by counting on a low background counter, Packard Tricarb 3170 TR/SL, for a period of 1000 mins to enable detection of a radiocarbon age of 22,400 BP. But only samples with ages up to 3500 BP were submitted to the method because the samples had been collected in the municipality of Guapimirim, in archaeological sambaqui-type sites belonging to this age range. The same samples were sent to the (14)C Laboratory of the Centro de Energia Nuclear na Agricultura (CENA/USP) where similar results were obtained.

  18. Stibine and bismuthine trapping in quartz tube atomizers for atomic absorption spectrometry — Method optimization and analytical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kratzer, Jan; Dědina, Jiří

    2008-08-01

    The compact trap-and-atomizer device was employed to trap stibine and bismuthine, and subsequently to volatilize collected analyte and atomize it for atomic absorption spectrometric detection. The device is actually the multiple microflame quartz tube atomizer (multiatomizer) with inlet arm modified to serve as the trap and to accommodate the oxygen delivery capillary employed for burning out hydrogen during the trapping step. The optimization of Sb and Bi collection in the device is presented based on a study of the influence of relevant experimental parameters on preconcentration efficiency of both analytes. The parameters studied were: (1) trap temperature during trapping and (2) hydrogen flow rate and (3) trap temperature during volatilization and (4) the stability of the trapped analyte species. Under optimized conditions, the preconcentration efficiency was 100% for both analytes. The trap-and-atomizer device can be replaced by the simple conventional externally heated quartz tube atomizer without any trap as demonstrated on the ultratrace antimony determination in groundwater reference material and mineral water samples. The interference of other hydride forming elements on Bi in-situ collection in the conventional externally heated quartz tube atomizer was investigated.

  19. Mass spectrometry-based metabolomics, analysis of metabolite-protein interactions, and imaging.

    PubMed

    Lee, Do Yup; Bowen, Benjamin P; Northen, Trent R

    2010-08-01

    Our understanding of biology has been greatly improved through recent developments in mass spectrometry, which is providing detailed information on protein and metabolite composition as well as protein-metabolite interactions. The high sensitivity and resolution of mass spectrometry achieved with liquid or gas chromatography allows for detection and quantification of hundreds to thousands of molecules in a single measurement. Where homogenization-based sample preparation and extraction methods result in a loss of spatial information, mass spectrometry imaging technologies provide the in situ distribution profiles of metabolites and proteins within tissues. Mass spectrometry-based analysis of metabolite abundance, protein-metabolite interactions, and spatial distribution of compounds facilitates the high-throughput screening of biochemical reactions, the reconstruction of metabolic networks, biomarker discovery, determination of tissue compositions, and functional annotation of both proteins and metabolites.

  20. Peptide-Centric Proteome Analysis: An Alternative Strategy for the Analysis of Tandem Mass Spectrometry Data

    SciTech Connect

    Ting, Ying S.; Egertson, Jarrett D.; Payne, Samuel H.; Kim, Sangtae; MacLean, Brendan; Kall, Lukas; Aebersold, Ruedi; Smith, Richard D.; Noble, William; MacCoss, Michael

    2015-09-01

    In mass spectrometry-based bottom-up proteomics, data-independent acquisition (DIA) is an emerging technique due to its comprehensive and unbiased sampling of precursor ions. However, current DIA methods use wide precursor isolation windows, resulting in co- fragmentation and complex mixture spectra. Thus, conventional database searching tools that identify peptides by interpreting individual MS/MS spectra are inherently limited in analyzing DIA data. Here we discuss an alternative approach, peptide-centric analysis, which tests directly for the presence and absence of query peptides. We discuss how peptide-centric analysis resolves some limitations of traditional spectrum-centric analysis, and we outline the benefits of peptide-centric analysis in general.

  1. Comparison of different serum sample extraction methods and their suitability for mass spectrometry analysis

    PubMed Central

    Alshammari, Thamir M.; Al-Hassan, Ahmed Ali; Hadda, Taibi B.; Aljofan, Mohamad

    2015-01-01

    Mass spectrometry has been widely used, particularly in pharmacokinetic investigations and for therapeutic drug monitoring purposes. Like any other analytical method some difficulties exist in employing mass spectrometry, mainly when it is used to test biological samples, such as to detect drug candidates in mammalian serum, which is rich in proteins, lipids and other contents that may interfere with the investigational drug. The complexity of the serum proteome presents challenges for efficient sample preparation and adequate sensitivity for mass spectrometry analysis of drugs. Enrichment procedures prior to the drug analysis are often needed and as a result, the study of serum or plasma components usually demands either methods of purification or depletion of one or more. Selection of the best combination of sample introduction method is a crucial determinant of the sensitivity and accuracy of mass spectrometry. The aim of this study was to determine the highest serum protein precipitation activity of five commonly used sample preparation methods and test their suitability for mass spectrometry. We spiked three small molecules into rabbit serum and applied different protein precipitation methods to determine their precipitation activity and applicability as a mass spectrometry introductory tool. PMID:26702265

  2. Differential analysis of camphor wood products by desorption atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Liang; Yan, Jianping; Zhu, Zhiqiang; Ouyang, Yongzhong; Zhang, Xinglei; Zhang, Wenjun; Dai, Ximo; Luo, Liping; Chen, Huanwen

    2013-01-23

    In the course of this study, desorption atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry (DAPCI-MS) was applied to readily acquire the mass spectral fingerprints of camphor wood and other wood samples under ambient conditions. Characteristic natural analytes, such as camphor and geraniol, were successfully detected in their protonated form and then identified by tandem mass spectrometry (MS(n)). Further principal component analysis (PCA) and cluster analysis (CA) of the mass spectrometric results allow a confident discrimination of camphor wood products from inferior/fake ones. These experimental findings demonstrate that DAPCI-MS is a valuable tool for differential analysis of untreated camphor wood products with sufficient sensitivity and high throughput.

  3. Influence of citric acid as chemical modifier for lead determination in dietary calcium supplement samples by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cezar Paz de Mattos, Julio; Medeiros Nunes, Adriane; Figueiredo Martins, Ayrton; Luiz Dressler, Valderi; Marlon de Moraes Flores, Érico

    2005-06-01

    Citric acid was used as a chemical modifier for Pb determination by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry in dietary supplement samples (calcium carbonate, dolomite and oyster shell samples) and its efficiency was compared to the use of palladium. Pyrolysis and atomization curves were established without use of chemical modifier, with the addition of 20, 100 and 200 μg of citric acid, and with 3 μg of palladium. The citric acid modifier made possible the interference-free Pb determination in the presence of high concentrations of Ca and Mg nitrates. Acid sample digestion involving closed vessels (microwave-assisted and conventional heating) and acid attack using polypropylene vessels at room temperature were compared. All digestion procedures presented similar results for calcium carbonate and dolomite samples. However, for oyster shell samples accurate results were obtained only with the use of closed vessel systems. Analyte addition and matrix-matched standards were used for calibration. The characteristic mass for Pb using citric acid and palladium were 16 and 25 pg, respectively. The relative standard deviation (RSD) was always less than 5% when citric acid was used. The relative and absolute limits of detection were 0.02 μg g - 1 and 8 pg with citric acid and 0.1 μg g - 1 and 44 pg with the Pd modifier, respectively ( n = 10, 3σ). The recovery of Pb in spiked calcium supplement samples (10 μg l - 1 ) was between 98% and 105%. With the use of 100 μg of citric acid as chemical modifier, problems such as high background absorption and high RSD values were minimized in comparison to the addition of 3 μg of palladium.

  4. Determination of antimony in ores and related materials by continuous hydride-generation atomic-absorption spectrometry after separation by xanthate extraction.

    PubMed

    Donaldson, E M

    1990-10-01

    A continuous hydride-generation atomic-absorption spectrometric method for determining approximately 0.02 mug/g or more of antimony in ores, concentrates, rocks, soils and sediments is described. The method involves the reduction of antimony(V) to antimony(III) by heating with hypophosphorous acid in a 4.5M hydrochloric acid-tartaric acid medium and its separation by filtration, if necessary, from any elemental arsenic, selenium and tellurium produced during the reduction step. Antimony is subsequently separated from iron, lead, zinc, tin and various other elements by a single cyclohexane extraction of its xanthate complex from approximately 4.5M hydrochloric acid/0.2M sulphuric acid in the presence of ascorbic acid as a reluctant for iron(III). After the extract is washed, if necessary, with 10% hydrochloric acid-2% thiourea solution to remove co-extracted copper, followed by 4.5M hydrochloric acid to remove residual iron and other elements, antimony(III) in the extract is oxidized to antimony(V) with bromine solution in carbon tetrachloride and stripped into dilute sulphuric acid containing tartaric acid. Following the removal of bromine by evaporation of the solution, antimony(V) is reduced to antimony(III) with potassium iodide in approximately 3M hydrochloric acid and finally determined by hydride-generation atomic-absorption spectrometry at 217.8 nm with sodium borohydride as reluctant. Interference from platinum and palladium, which are partly co-extracted as xanthates under the proposed conditions, is eliminated by complexing them with thiosemicarbazide during the iodide reduction step. Interference from gold is avoided by using a 3M hydrochloric acid medium for the hydride-generation step. Under these conditions gold forms a stable iodide complex.

  5. Determination by ultraviolet absorption spectrometry and theoretical calculation of dissociation constant of 1,2,3,9-tetrahydro-4H-carbazol-4-one.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shufang; Zhang, Xiaoyan; Tang, Ke; Zhou, Zhengyu

    2009-08-15

    The dissociation constant of 1,2,3,9-tetrahydro-4H-carbazol-4-one was determined by ultraviolet absorption spectrometry method based on the absorption spectra of 1,2,3,9-tetrahydro-4H-carbazol-4-one at different pH in ethanol-water mixed solvents. The results show that the pK(b) was a good linear function of the volume fraction of ethanol in the concentration range studied. The dissociation constant of 1, 2, 3,9-tetrahydro-4H-carbazol-4-one in water were determined by extrapolation to be 14.04 under the condition of this experiment. The accurate pK(b) calculations of 1,2,3,9-tetrahydro-4H-carbazol-4-one have been investigated using the combination of the extended clusters-continuum model with the polarizable continuum solvation model (PCM). The calculations are performed at the B3LYP/6-31G levels. The formation of molecular clusters by means of the 1,2,3,9-tetrahydro-4H-carbazol-4-one wrapped up with water molecules leads to the weakness of the interaction between the polar solvents and the 1,2,3,9-tetrahydro-4H-carbazol-4-one, hence, the accuracy of pK(b) has been enhanced. The dissociation constant of 1,2,3,9-tetrahydro-4H-carbazol-4-one in water were calculated to be 14.10 and agreed well with experimental data.

  6. [Novel analysis algorithms for differential optical absorption spectroscopy for pollution monitoring].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xue-Dian; Huang, Xian; Xu, Ke-Xin

    2007-11-01

    Differential optical absorption spectroscopy, or DOAS, is a widely used method to determine concentrations of atmospheric species. The principle of DOAS for measuring the concentration of air pollutants is presented in briefly. Using the linear relationship between the area of the measured differential absorbance curve and that of the differential absorption cross-section curve as taken from the literature, an alternative method for calculating the gas concentration on the basis of the proportionality between differential absorbance and differential absorption cross section of the gas under study was developed. The method can be used on its own for single-component analysis or as a complement to the standard technique in multi-component cases. The procedure can be used with differential absorption cross sections measured in the laboratory or taken from the literature. In addition, the method provides a criterion to discriminate between different species having absorption features in the same wavelength range.

  7. Determination of inorganic arsenic species by flow injection hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometry with variable sodium tetrahydroborate concentrations*1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sigrist, Mirna E.; Beldoménico, Horacio R.

    2004-07-01

    This work describes a study on the determination of inorganic arsenic species in ground water and synthetic experimental matrices, using a flow injection system with on-line hydride generation device coupled to an atomic absorption spectrometer with flame-heated quartz atomizer (FI HG AAS). Specific trivalent arsenic determination is based on the slow kinetics of As(V) on the hydride generation reaction using sufficiently low concentrations of sodium tetrahydroborate (NaBH 4) as reductant in highly acidic conditions (pH<0). Under these conditions, the efficiency of hydride generation from As(V) is much lower than that from As(III). The pentavalent form is determined by the difference between total inorganic arsenic and As(III). As(V) interferences were studied using As(III) solutions ranging from 0% to 50% of total inorganic As. The optimized NaBH 4 concentration was 0.035% (w/v). The detection limit was 1.4 μg l -1 As(III). As(V) interferences were 6% in the case of water samples with 6 μg l -1 As(III) in the presence of 54 μg l -1 As(V) (i.e. 10% As(III)). Interferences of methylated arsenic species (MMA and DMA) were evaluated. Speciation method was satisfactorily applied to 20 field arsenical water samples from Santa Fe, Argentina, with values ranging from 30 to 308 μg l -1 total As. We found from 0% to 36% As(III) in the 20 field samples. The developed methodology constitutes an economic, simple and reliable way to evaluate inorganic arsenic distribution in underground waters or similar systems with negligible or no content of organoarsenicals.

  8. Determination of trace elements in dolomite and gypsum by atomic absorption spectrometry: overcoming the matrix interference by flotation separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stafilov, Trajče; Zendelovska, Dragica; Pavlovska, Gorica; Čundeva, Katarina

    2002-05-01

    The interferences of Ca and Mg as matrix elements in dolomite and gypsum on Ag, Cd, Cr, Mn, Tl and Zn absorbances during their electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometric (ETAAS) determination are investigated. The results reveal that Ca and Mg do not interfere on Zn and Mn, tend to decrease absorbances of Ag, Cd and Cr, while Tl suffers the most significant influence. A flotation separation method is proposed to eliminate matrix interferences. Hydrated iron(III) oxide, Fe 2O 3· xH 2O, and iron(III) hexamethylenedithiocarbamate, Fe(HMDTC) 3, are applied as flotation collectors. The influence of hydrophobic dithiocarbamate anion, HMDTC, on flotation recoveries of each analyte is studied. The most suitable concentrations of dolomite and gypsum solutions for flotation are determined. To avoid flotation suppression due to the reaction of Ca 2+ and Mg 2+ with surfactant ions, a fit foaming agent was selected. The elements present in dolomite and gypsum as traces have been analyzed by ETAAS. Their ETAAS limits of detection following flotation are found to be 0.021 μg·g -1 for Ag, 0.019 μg·g -1 for Cd, 0.014 μg·g -1 for Cr and 0.11 μg·g -1 for Tl. The determination of Mn and Zn can be performed by flame AAS (FAAS). The limit of detection for Mn is 1.5 μg·g -1, while for Zn 0.8 μg·g -1.

  9. Identification of Associated Proteins by Immunoprecipitation and Mass Spectrometry Analysis.

    PubMed

    Cao, Xiumei; Yan, Jianshe

    2016-01-01

    Protein-protein interactions play central roles in intercellular and intracellular signal transduction. Impairment of protein-protein interactions causes many diseases such as cancer, cardiomyopathies, diabetes, microbial infections, and genetic and neurodegenerative disorders. Immunoprecipitation is a technique in which a target protein of interest bound by an antibody is used to pull down the protein complex out of cell lysates, which can be identified by mass spectrometry. Here, we describe the protocol to immunoprecipitate and identify the components of the protein complexes of ElmoE in Dictyostelium discoideum cells. PMID:27271899

  10. Laser Desorption Mass Spectrometry for High Throughput DNA Analysis and Its Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Allman, S.L.; Chen, C.H.; Golovlev, V.V.; Isola, N.R.; Matteson, K.J.; Potter, N.T.; Taranenko, N.I.

    1999-01-23

    Laser desorption mass spectrometry (LDMS) has been developed for DNA sequencing, disease diagnosis, and DNA Fingerprinting for forensic applications. With LDMS, the speed of DNA analysis can be much faster than conventional gel electrophoresis. No dye or radioactive tagging to DNA segments for detection is needed. LDMS is emerging as a new alternative technology for DNA analysis.

  11. Detection and analysis of polymerase chain reaction products by mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Hurst, G.B., Doktycz, M.J., Britt, P.F., Vass, A.A., Buchanan, M.V.

    1997-02-01

    This paper describes recent and ongoing efforts to overcome some of the obstacles to more routine and robust application of MALDI-TOF to analysis of polymerase chain reaction products and other information- bearing nucleic acid molecules. Methods for purifying nucleic acid samples are described, as is the application of delayed extraction TOF mass spectrometry to analysis of short oligonucleotides.

  12. Laser desorption mass spectrometry for high-throughput DNA analysis and its applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, C. H. Winston; Golovlev, Valeri V.; Taranenko, N. I.; Allman, S. L.; Isola, Narayana R.; Potter, N. T.; Matteson, K. J.; Chang, Linus Y.

    1999-05-01

    Laser desorption mass spectrometry (LDMS) has been developed for DNA sequencing, disease diagnosis, and DNA fingerprinting for forensic applications. With LDMS, the speed of DNA analysis can be much faster than conventional gel electrophoresis. No dye or radioactive tagging to DNA segments for detection is needed. LDMS is emerging as a new alternative technology for DNA analysis.

  13. Validation of an analytical method based on the high-resolution continuum source flame atomic absorption spectrometry for the fast-sequential determination of several hazardous/priority hazardous metals in soil

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The aim of this paper was the validation of a new analytical method based on the high-resolution continuum source flame atomic absorption spectrometry for the fast-sequential determination of several hazardous/priority hazardous metals (Ag, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Ni, Pb and Zn) in soil after microwave assisted digestion in aqua regia. Determinations were performed on the ContrAA 300 (Analytik Jena) air-acetylene flame spectrometer equipped with xenon short-arc lamp as a continuum radiation source for all elements, double monochromator consisting of a prism pre-monocromator and an echelle grating monochromator, and charge coupled device as detector. For validation a method-performance study was conducted involving the establishment of the analytical performance of the new method (limits of detection and quantification, precision and accuracy). Moreover, the Bland and Altman statistical method was used in analyzing the agreement between the proposed assay and inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry as standardized method for the multielemental determination in soil. Results The limits of detection in soil sample (3σ criterion) in the high-resolution continuum source flame atomic absorption spectrometry method were (mg/kg): 0.18 (Ag), 0.14 (Cd), 0.36 (Co), 0.25 (Cr), 0.09 (Cu), 1.0 (Ni), 1.4 (Pb) and 0.18 (Zn), close to those in inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry: 0.12 (Ag), 0.05 (Cd), 0.15 (Co), 1.4 (Cr), 0.15 (Cu), 2.5 (Ni), 2.5 (Pb) and 0.04 (Zn). Accuracy was checked by analyzing 4 certified reference materials and a good agreement for 95% confidence interval was found in both methods, with recoveries in the range of 94–106% in atomic absorption and 97–103% in optical emission. Repeatability found by analyzing real soil samples was in the range 1.6–5.2% in atomic absorption, similar with that of 1.9–6.1% in optical emission spectrometry. The Bland and Altman method showed no statistical significant difference

  14. Overcoming Matrix Effects in a Complex Sample: Analysis of Multiple Elements in Multivitamins by Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arnold, Randy J.; Arndt, Brett; Blaser, Emilia; Blosser, Chris; Caulton, Dana; Chung, Won Sog; Fiorenza, Garrett; Heath, Wyatt; Jacobs, Alex; Kahng, Eunice; Koh, Eun; Le, Thao; Mandla, Kyle; McCory, Chelsey; Newman, Laura; Pithadia, Amit; Reckelhoff, Anna; Rheinhardt, Joseph; Skljarevski, Sonja; Stuart, Jordyn; Taylor, Cassie; Thomas, Scott; Tse, Kyle; Wall, Rachel; Warkentien, Chad

    2011-01-01

    A multivitamin tablet and liquid are analyzed for the elements calcium, magnesium, iron, zinc, copper, and manganese using atomic absorption spectrometry. Linear calibration and standard addition are used for all elements except calcium, allowing for an estimate of the matrix effects encountered for this complex sample. Sample preparation using…

  15. Quasilinear analysis of absorption of ion Bernstein waves by electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Cardinali, A.; Paoletti, F.; Bernabei, S.; Ono, M.

    1995-01-01

    The effects induced on plasma electrons by an externally launched ion Bernstein wave (IBW), in the presence of a lower hybrid wave (LHW) in the current drive regime, are studied by analytical integration of the IBW ray-tracing equations along with the amplitude transport equation (Poynting theorem). The electric field amplitude parallel and perpendicular to the external magnetic field, the quasilinear diffusion coefficient, and the modified electron distribution function are analytically calculated in the case of IBW. The analytical calculation is compared to the numerical solution obtained by using a 2-D Fokker-Planck code for the distribution function, without any approximation for the collision operator. The synergy between the IBW and LHW can be accounted for, and the absorption of the IBW power when the electron distribution function presents a tail generated by the LHW in the current drive regime can be calculated.

  16. Quasilinear analysis of absorption of ion Bernstein waves by electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Cardinali, A.; Paoletti, F.; Bernabei, S.; Ono, M.

    1995-05-01

    The effects induced on plasma electrons by an externally launched ion Bernstein wave (IBW), in the presence of a lower hybrid wave (LHW) in the current drive regime, are studied by analytical integration of the IBW ray-tracing equations, along with the amplitude transport equation (Poynting theorem). The electric field amplitude parallel and perpendicular to the external magnetic field, the quasilinear diffusion coefficient, and the modified electron distribution function are analytically calculated in the case of IBW. The analytical calculation is compared to the numerical solution obtained by using a two-dimensional (2-D) Fokker--Planck code for the distribution function, without any approximation for the collision operator. The synergy between the IBW and LHW can be accounted for, and the absorption of the IBW power when the electron distribution function presents a tail generated by the LHW in the current drive regime can be calculated.

  17. Slurry sampling electrothermal vaporization inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry for steelmaking flue dust analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coedo, A. G.; Dorado, T.; Padilla, I.; Maibusch, R.; Kuss, H.-M.

    2000-02-01

    A commercial atomic absorption graphite furnace (AAGF), with a self-made adapter and valve system, was used as a slurry sampling cell for electrothermal vaporization inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ETV-ICP-MS). The system was applied to the determination of As, Sn, Sb, Se, Te, Bi, Cd, V, Ti and Mo in steelmaking flue dusts. Experimental conditions with respect to ETV and ICP-MS operating parameters were optimized. Compared to aqueous solutions, slurry samples were found to present better analyte transport. Microgram amounts of Rh were used to reduce the difference in analyte response in sensitivity for aqueous solutions of the tested analytes. No such increasing effect was observed for slurry samples and aqueous standards. An added quantity of Rh acting as modifier/carrier resulted in an increase for the same analytes in matrix-slurry solutions, even the addition of an extra Rh quantity has resulted in a decrease in the signals. The effect of Triton X-100 (used as a dispersant agent) on analyte intensity and precision was also studied. External calibration from aqueous standards spiked with 100 μg ml -1 Rh was performed to quantified 0.010 g/100 ml slurry samples. Results are presented for a certified reference electrical arc furnace flue dust (EAF): CRM-876-1 (Bureau of Analysis Samples Ltd., Cleveland, UK), a reference sample of coke ashes X-3705 (from AG der Dillinger Hüttenwerke, Germany), and a representative sample of EAF flue dust from a Spanish steelmaking company (CENIM-1). For the two reference materials an acceptable agreement with certificate values was achieved, and the results for the CENIM sample matched with those obtained from conventional nebulization solution.

  18. Use of Tritium Accelerator Mass Spectrometry for Tree Ring Analysis

    PubMed Central

    LOVE, ADAM H.; HUNT, JAMES R.; ROBERTS, MARK L.; SOUTHON, JOHN R.; CHIARAPPA - ZUCCA, MARINA L.; DINGLEY, KAREN H.

    2010-01-01

    Public concerns over the health effects associated with low-level and long-term exposure to tritium released from industrial point sources have generated the demand for better methods to evaluate historical tritium exposure levels for these communities. The cellulose of trees accurately reflects the tritium concentration in the source water and may contain the only historical record of tritium exposure. The tritium activity in the annual rings of a tree was measured using accelerator mass spectrometry to reconstruct historical annual averages of tritium exposure. Milligram-sized samples of the annual tree rings from a Tamarix located at the Nevada Test Site are used for validation of this methodology. The salt cedar was chosen since it had a single source of tritiated water that was well-characterized as it varied over time. The decay-corrected tritium activity of the water in which the salt cedar grew closely agrees with the organically bound tritium activity in its annual rings. This demonstrates that the milligram-sized samples used in tritium accelerator mass spectrometry are suited for reconstructing anthropogenic tritium levels in the environment. PMID:12144257

  19. Analysis of metal-EDTA complexes by electrospray mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Baron, D.; Hering, J.G.

    1998-07-01

    Solutions of the strong complexing agent ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) and Cu, Pb, Cd, Al, and Fe(III) were examined by electrospray mass spectrometry (ES/MS). Uncomplexed EDTA and metal-EDTA complexes survive the electrospray process intact and can be detected simultaneously by mass spectrometry. Best sensitivity was achieved in the positive ion mode in which EDTA and EDTA-metal complexes (present in solution as anions) were detected as protonated species with a single positive charge. Except for the protonation, the aqueous metal-EDTA complexes are preserved and neither fragmentation of complexes nor formation of clusters with more than one metal or ligand were observed in the mass spectra. Detection limits are between approximately 1 to 2 {micro}M for uncomplexed EDTA and for the Cu-EDTA and Pb-EDTA complexes, with a linear range up to 10{sup {minus}4} M. Calibrations based on solutions with equimolar concentrations of EDTA and Cu or Pb can be used to quantify EDTA-metal complexes in solutions with excess EDTA or metal, and in solutions with more than one metal present. Isotopic signatures of metals in the metal-ligand complexes are preserved, allowing the identification of the metal in a metal-ligand complex. Isotopic signatures of metals can therefore aid in the identification of metal-ligand complexes in unknown samples.

  20. Ion attachment mass spectrometry combined with infrared image furnace for thermal analysis: evolved gas analysis studies.

    PubMed

    Kitahara, Yuki; Takahashi, Seiji; Kuramoto, Noriyuki; Sala, Martin; Tsugoshi, Takahisa; Sablier, Michel; Fujii, Toshihiro

    2009-04-15

    A well-established ion attachment mass spectrometer (IAMS) is combined with an in-house single-atom infrared image furnace (IIF) specifically for thermal analysis studies. Besides the detection of many chemical species at atmospheric pressure, including free radical intermediates, the ion attachment mass spectrometer can also be used for the analysis of products emanating from temperature-programmed pyrolysis. The performance and applicability of the IIF-IAMS is illustrated with poly(tetrafluoroethylene) (PTFE) samples. The potential of the system for the analysis of oxidative pyrolysis is also considered. Temperature-programmed decomposition of PTFE gave constant slopes of the plots of temperature versus signal intensity in a defined region and provided an apparent activation energy of 28.8 kcal/mol for the PTFE decomposition product (CF(2))(3). A brief comparison with a conventional pyrolysis gas chromatography/mass spectrometry system is also given.

  1. Development of a simple method for the determination of lead in lipstick using alkaline solubilization and graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Soares, Aline Rodrigues; Nascentes, Clésia Cristina

    2013-02-15

    A simple method was developed for determining the total lead content in lipstick samples by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GFAAS) after treatment with tetramethylammonium hydroxide (TMAH). Multivariate optimization was used to establish the optimal conditions of sample preparation. The graphite furnace heating program was optimized through pyrolysis and atomization curves. An aliquot containing approximately 50mg of the sample was mixed with TMAH and heated in a water bath at 60°C for 60 min. Using Nb as the permanent modifier and Pd as the chemical modifier, the optimal temperatures were 900°C and 1800°C for pyrolysis and atomization, respectively. Under optimum conditions, the working range was from 1.73 to 50.0 μg L(-1), with detection and quantification limits of 0.20 and 0.34 μg g(-1), respectively. The precision was evaluated under conditions of repeatability and intermediate precision and showed standard deviations of 2.37%-4.61% and 4.93%-9.75%, respectively. The % recovery ranged from 96.2% to 109%, and no significant differences were found between the results obtained using the proposed method and the microwave decomposition method for real samples. Lead was detected in 21 tested lipstick samples; the lead content in these samples ranged from 0.27 to 4.54 μg g(-1).

  2. Direct extraction of lead (II) from untreated human blood serum using restricted access carbon nanotubes and its determination by atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Barbosa, Valéria Maria Pereira; Barbosa, Adriano Francisco; Bettini, Jefferson; Luccas, Pedro Orival; Figueiredo, Eduardo Costa

    2016-01-15

    Oxidized carbon nanotubes were covered with layers of bovine serum albumin to result in so-called restricted-access carbon nanotubes (RACNTs). This material can extract Pb(2+) ions directly from untreated human blood serum while excluding all the serum proteins. The RACNTs have a protein exclusion capacity of almost 100% and a maximum Pb(2+) adsorption capacity of 34.5mg g(-1). High resolution transmission electron microscopy, scanning transmission electron microscopy and energy dispersive spectroscopy were used to confirm the BSA layer and Pb(2+) adsorption sites. A mini-column filled with RACNTs was used in an on-line solid phase extraction system coupled to a thermospray flame furnace atomic absorption spectrometry. At optimized experimental conditions, the method has a detection limit as low as 2.1µg L(-1), an enrichment factor of 5.5, and inter- and intra-day precisions (expressed as relative standard deviation) of <8.1%. Recoveries of the Pb(2+) spiked samples ranged from 89.4% to 107.3% for the extraction from untreated human blood serum.

  3. Direct determination of phosphorus in different food samples by means of solid sampling electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry using Pd+Ca chemical modifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coşkun, Nihat; Akman, Süleyman

    2005-03-01

    In this study, direct determination of phosphorus in different food samples (milk powder, banana, and dried banana) and in various standard reference materials (apple leaves, bovine liver, pine needles) using solid sampling electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry was investigated. Aqueous standards were used for all determinations. 5 μg Pd+5 μg Ca modifier mixture was used in all experiments. Pyrolysis temperature and atomization temperature were 1100 °C and 2500 °C, respectively. High background was reduced by applying a cool-down step in the furnace program. The accuracy of solid sampling results was checked by determination of the phosphorus content after dissolving samples. There was no significant error between results found by solid sampling and solution techniques. In addition solid certified materials were investigated. There were no significant differences between the phosphorus content of CRM and results obtained. The limit of detection, based on three times the standard deviation was 0.018 μg P.

  4. Polymer-supported ionic liquid solid phase extraction for trace inorganic and organic mercury determination in water samples by flow injection-cold vapor atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Escudero, Leticia B; Olsina, Roberto A; Wuilloud, Rodolfo G

    2013-11-15

    A simple and green technique named polymer-supported ionic liquid solid phase extraction (PSIL-SPE) was developed for mercury (Hg) species determination. Inorganic Hg (InHg) species was complexed with chloride ions followed by its introduction into a flow injection on-line system to quantitatively retain the anionic chlorocomplex (HgCl4(2-)) in a column packed with CYPHOS(®) IL 101-impregnated resin. The trapped InHg was then reduced with stannous chloride (SnCl2) and eluted with the same flow of reducing agent followed by cold vapor atomic absorption spectrometry (CV-AAS) detection. Organic mercury species (OrgHg) did not interact with the impregnated resin and were not retained into the column. Total concentration of OrgHg was evaluated by difference between total Hg and InHg concentration. A 95% extraction efficiency was achieved for InHg when the procedure was developed under optimal experimental conditions. The limit of detection obtained for preconcentration of 40 mL of sample was 2.4 ng L(-1) InHg. The relative standard deviation (RSD) was 2.7% (at 1 µg L(-1) InHg and n=10) calculated from the peak height of absorbance signals (Gaussian-shape and reproducible peaks). This work reports the first polymer-supported IL solid phase extraction approach implemented in a flow injection on-line system for determination of Hg species in mineral, tap and river water samples.

  5. A new room temperature ionic liquid 1-butyl-3-trimethylsilylimidazolium hexafluorophosphate as a solvent for extraction and preconcentration of mercury with determination by cold vapor atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Li, Zaijun; Wei, Qin; Yuan, Rui; Zhou, Xia; Liu, Huizhen; Shan, Haixia; Song, Qijun

    2007-01-15

    A new room temperature ionic liquid 1-butyl-3-trimethylsilylimidazolium hexafluorophosphate abbreviated as [C(4)tmsim][PF(6)] was synthesized and developed as a novel medium for liquid/liquid extraction of inorganic mercury in this work. Under optimal condition, o-carboxyphenyldiazoamino-p-azobenzene abbreviated as CDAA reacted with inorganic mercury to form a neutral Hg-CDAA complex, the complex was rapidly extracted into ionic liquid phase. After back-extracting into aqueous phase with sulfide sodium solution, the mercury concentration was detected by cold vapor atomic absorption spectrometry. The extraction and back-extraction efficiencies were 99.9 and 100.1% for 5.0microg L(-1) standard mercury in 1000mL of water solution, respectively. The detection limit, calculated using three times the standard error of estimate of the calibration graph, is 0.01ng of mercury per milliliter water sample. The proposed method has been used to the determination of trace inorganic mercury in natural water with satisfactory results. Moreover, Zeta potential and surface tension of [C(4)tmsim][PF(6)] solution were measured and applied to explain the extraction mechanism of [C(4)tmsim][PF(6)] system.

  6. Determination of mercury in biological samples by cold vapor atomic absorption spectrometry following cloud point extraction with salt-induced phase separation.

    PubMed

    Dittert, Ingrid M; Maranhão, Tatiane A; Borges, Daniel L G; Vieira, Mariana A; Welz, Bernhard; Curtius, Adilson J

    2007-07-31

    Method development for the pre-concentration of mercury in human hair, dogfish liver and dogfish muscle samples using cloud-point extraction and cold vapor atomic absorption spectrometry is demonstrated. Before the extraction, the samples were submitted to microwave-assisted digestion in a mixture of H(2)O(2) and HNO(3). Cloud point extraction was carried out using 0.5% (m/v) ammonium O,O-diethyldithiophosphate (DDTP) as the chelating agent and 0.3% (m/v) Triton X-114 as the non-ionic surfactant. Phase separation was induced after the addition of Na(2)SO(4) to a final concentration of 0.2 mol L(-1). Aliquots of the final extract were transferred to PTFE tubes and NaBH(4) and HCl were added. The mercury vapor was driven to a non-heated quartz tube for measuring the absorbance. The results obtained with salt-induced phase separation were in good agreement with the certified values at a 95% confidence level. An enrichment factor of 10 allowed a detection limit of 0.4 ng g(-1) to be obtained, which demonstrates the high sensitivity of the proposed procedure for the determination of mercury at trace levels.

  7. Novel ion imprinted magnetic mesoporous silica for selective magnetic solid phase extraction of trace Cd followed by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Bingshan; He, Man; Chen, Beibei; Hu, Bin

    2015-05-01

    Determination of trace Cd in environmental, biological and food samples is of great significance to toxicological research and environmental pollution monitoring. While the direct determination of Cd in real-world samples is difficult due to its low concentration and the complex matrix. Herein, a novel Cd(II)-ion imprinted magnetic mesoporous silica (Cd(II)-II-MMS) was prepared and was employed as a selective magnetic solid-phase extraction (MSPE) material for extraction of trace Cd in real-world samples followed by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GFAAS) detection. Under the optimized conditions, the detection limit of the proposed method was 6.1 ng L- 1 for Cd with the relative standard deviation (RSD) of 4.0% (c = 50 ng L- 1, n = 7), and the enrichment factor was 50-fold. To validate the proposed method, Certified Reference Materials of GSBZ 50009-88 environmental water, ZK018-1 lyophilized human urine and NIES10-b rice flour were analyzed and the determined values were in a good agreement with the certified values. The proposed method exhibited a robust anti-interference ability due to the good selectivity of Cd(II)-II-MMS toward Cd(II). It was successfully employed for the determination of trace Cd(II) in environmental water, human urine and rice samples with recoveries of 89.3-116%, demonstrating that the proposed method has good application potential in real world samples with complex matrix.

  8. Speciation of inorganic arsenic species and total inorganic arsenic in rice using microwave-assisted dispersive liquid-liquid micro-extraction and electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ahmadi-Jouibari, Toraj; Fattahi, Nazir

    2015-01-01

    Human exposure to inorganic arsenic (iAs) via rice consumption is of increasing concern. In the present study, microwave-assisted dispersive liquid-liquid micro-extraction (MADLLME) and electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS) were developed for the speciation of iAs in rice samples. After microwave-assisted digestion, the As(III) ion reacted with diethyldithiophosphoric acid (DDTP) to form an As-DDTP complex and was extracted at the same time. Some parameters affecting digestion, complex formation, and extraction were studied and optimised. Under the optimised conditions, a detection limit of 0.2 µg kg(-1) with a correlation coefficient of 0.9901 were obtained with a calibration curve in the range of 0.5-200 µg kg(-1). Total iAs was determined after reduction of As(V) to As(III) with sodium thiosulfate and potassium iodide, and As(V) was calculated by difference. The proposed extraction procedure was successfully applied for the determination of iAs ions in certified reference materials (NIST CRM 1568a and NMIJ CRM 7503a) and 10 rice samples produced in Iran and other Asian countries.

  9. Determination of tellurium in ores, concentrates and related materials by graphite-furnace atomic-absorption spectrometry after separations by iron collection and xanthate extraction.

    PubMed

    Donaldson, E M; Leaver, M E

    1990-02-01

    A method for determining approximately 0.01 mug/g or more of tellurium in ores, concentrates, rocks, soils and sediments is described. After sample decomposition and evaporation of the solution to incipient dryness, tellurium is separated from > 300 mug of copper by co-precipitation with hydrous ferric oxide from an ammoniacal medium and the precipitate is dissolved in 10M hydrochloric acid. Alternatively, for samples containing 300 mug of copper, the salts are dissolved in 10M hydrochloric acid. Tellurium in the resultant solutions is reduced to the quadrivalent state by heating and separated from iron, lead and various other elements by a single cyclohexane extraction of its xanthate complex from approximately 9.5M hydrochloric acid in the presence of thiosemicarbazide as a complexing agent for copper. After washing with 10M hydrochloric acid followed by water to remove residual iron, chloride and soluble salts, tellurium is stripped from the extract with 16M nitric acid and finally determined, in a 2% v/v nitric acid medium, by graphite-furnace atomic-absorption spectrometry at 214.3 nm in the presence of nickel as matrix modifier. Small amounts of gold and palladium, which are partly co-extracted as xanthates if the iron-collection step is omitted, do not interfere. Co-extraction of arsenic is avoided by volatilizing it as the bromide during the decomposition step. The method is directly applicable, without the co-precipitation step, to most rocks, soils and sediments.

  10. Internal standardization combined with dilute-and-shoot preparation of distilled alcoholic beverages for Cu determination by high-resolution continuum source flame atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Raposo, Jorge Luiz; de Oliveira, Adriana Paiva; Jones, Bradley Todd; Gomes Neto, José Anchieta

    2012-04-15

    Internal standardization (IS) and dilute-and-shoot preparation of distilled alcoholic beverages were evaluated for the direct determination of Cu by high-resolution continuum source flame atomic absorption spectrometry. Among Bi, In, Sn and Te evaluated as internal standards, Bi and Te furnished best results. Calibration curves were built up by plotting A(Cu)/A(Bi) and A(Cu)/A(Te)versus Cu concentration (0.05-4.0 mg L(-1)) and linear correlation coefficients were 0.9994 and 0.9990, respectively. Contents of Cu in 22 commercial distilled beverages analyzed by the proposed method varied in the 0.029-3.608 mg L(-1) interval. These results were in agreement (paired t-test) at 95% confidence level with those obtained by line source FAAS using standard addition calibration. Recoveries improved from 77-83% (without IS) to 99-101% (with IS) intervals. The relative standard deviation (n=12) was 0.8-3.7% (IS-Bi), 0.4-4.4% (IS-Te), and 0.5-9.1% (without IS) and the limit of detection was ca. 5 μg L(-1) using Bi or Te.

  11. Development of a simple method for the determination of lead in lipstick using alkaline solubilization and graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Soares, Aline Rodrigues; Nascentes, Clésia Cristina

    2013-02-15

    A simple method was developed for determining the total lead content in lipstick samples by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GFAAS) after treatment with tetramethylammonium hydroxide (TMAH). Multivariate optimization was used to establish the optimal conditions of sample preparation. The graphite furnace heating program was optimized through pyrolysis and atomization curves. An aliquot containing approximately 50mg of the sample was mixed with TMAH and heated in a water bath at 60°C for 60 min. Using Nb as the permanent modifier and Pd as the chemical modifier, the optimal temperatures were 900°C and 1800°C for pyrolysis and atomization, respectively. Under optimum conditions, the working range was from 1.73 to 50.0 μg L(-1), with detection and quantification limits of 0.20 and 0.34 μg g(-1), respectively. The precision was evaluated under conditions of repeatability and intermediate precision and showed standard deviations of 2.37%-4.61% and 4.93%-9.75%, respectively. The % recovery ranged from 96.2% to 109%, and no significant differences were found between the results obtained using the proposed method and the microwave decomposition method for real samples. Lead was detected in 21 tested lipstick samples; the lead content in these samples ranged from 0.27 to 4.54 μg g(-1). PMID:23598019

  12. Validation and application of cavity-enhanced, near-infrared tunable diode laser absorption spectrometry for measurements of methane carbon isotopes at ambient concentrations.

    PubMed

    Mortazavi, Behzad; Wilson, Benjamin J; Dong, Feng; Gupta, Manish; Baer, Doug

    2013-10-15

    Methane is an effective greenhouse gas but has a short residence time in the atmosphere, and therefore, reductions in emissions can alleviate its greenhouse gas warming effect within a decadal time frame. Continuous and high temporal resolution measurements of methane concentrations and carbon isotopic ratios (δ(13)CH4) can inform on mechanisms of formation, provide constraints on emissions sources, and guide future mitigation efforts. We describe the development, validation, and deployment of a cavity-enhanced, near-infrared tunable diode laser absorption spectrometry system capable of quantifying δ(13)CH4 at ambient methane concentrations. Laboratory validation and testing show that the instrument is capable of operating over a wide dynamic range of methane concentration and provides a measurement precision for δ(13)CH4 of better than ± 0.5 ‰ (1σ) over 1000 s of data averaging at ambient methane concentrations. The analyzer is accurate to better than ± 0.5 ‰, as demonstrated by measurements of characterized methane/air samples with minimal dependence (<1 ‰) of measured carbon isotope ratio on methane concentration. Deployment of the instrument at a marsh over multiple days demonstrated how methane fluxes varied by an order of magnitude over 2 day deployment periods, and showed a 17 ‰ variability in δ(13)CH4 of the emitted methane during the growing season. PMID:24025121

  13. Solid phase extraction of copper (II) by sorption on octadecyl silica membrane disk modified with a new Schiff base and determination with atomic absorption spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mashhadizadeh, Mohammad Hossein; Pesteh, Mahnaz; Talakesh, Mahzad; Sheikhshoaie, Iran; Ardakani, Mohammad Mazloum; Karimi, Mohammad Ali

    2008-08-01

    A simple, selective and reliable method for rapid extraction and determination of trace amounts of Cu (II) ions from aqueous samples using octadecyl-bonded silica membrane disks modified with bis-(3-methoxy salicylaldehyde)-1,6-diaminohexane and flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS) is presented. Extraction efficiency, the influence of pH, flow rates, amount of ligand, and type and least amount of eluant were investigated. The linear dynamic range of the proposed method for Cu (II) ions was found in a wide concentration range of 1.0 (± 0.2)-150 (± 2) μg l - 1 . The detection limit and preconcentration factor of this method were found 30.0 (± 0.7) ng l - 1 and 100 respectively. The reproducibility of the procedure is at the most 2.0%. The effects of various cationic interferences on the percent recovery of copper ion were studied. The method was used to the recovery of copper ion from different synthetic, alloys and biological samples.

  14. A novel preconcentration procedure using cloud point extraction for determination of lead, cobalt and copper in water and food samples using flame atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Citak, Demirhan; Tuzen, Mustafa

    2010-05-01

    In this work, a new cloud point extraction (CPE) procedure was developed for the separation and preconcentration of lead(II), cobalt(II), and copper(II) in various water and food samples. Complexes of metal ions with 1-Phenylthiosemicarbazide (1-PTSC) were extracted into the surfactant-rich phase of octylphenoxypolyethoxyethanol (Triton X-114) from samples. After phase separation, the enriched analytes were determined by flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS). Factors affecting cloud point extraction, such as pH, reagent and surfactant concentrations, temperature, and incubation time were evaluated and optimized. The interference effect of some cations and anions was also studied. After optimization of the CPE conditions, the preconcentration factor of 25 and the limits of detection (L.O.D.) obtained for lead(II), cobalt(II), and copper(II) based on three sigma (n=20) were 3.42, 1.00, and 0.67 microg L(-1), respectively. The method presented precision (R.S.D.) between 1.7% and 4.8% (n=7). The presented preconcentration procedure was applied to the determination of metal ions in reference standard materials (SRM 1515 Apple leaves and GBW 07605 Tea) and some real samples including tap water, spring water, sea water, canned fish, black tea, green tea, tomato sauce and honey. PMID:20226223

  15. Determination of macro and trace elements in multivitamin dietary supplements by high-resolution continuum source graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry with slurry sampling.

    PubMed

    Krawczyk, Magdalena

    2014-01-01

    In this research, three different commercially available multivitamin dietary supplements were analyzed by high-resolution continuum source graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (HR-CS GFAAS) with slurry sampling. The concentrations of Cr, Cu, Fe, Mn, and Se were determined and compared to the amounts stated by producers. The safety of multivitamin dietary supplements depends on various factors including the manufacturing process and the purity and origins of the raw ingredients. For this reason, this research determined concentrations of several toxic elements (As, Cd, and Pb). Microwave-assisted high pressure Teflon bomb digestion was used to determine total amounts of elements in samples. Samples were prepared as slurries at a concentration of 0.1% (m/v) for macro elements (Cr, Cu, Fe, Mn, and Se) and at a concentration of % (m/v) for trace elements (As, Cd, and Pb) in acidic media (3M HNO3). The influence of acid concentration, Triton X-100 addition, sonication time, and sonication power on absorbance was investigated. The accuracy of this method was validated by analyses of NRCC LUTS-1 (Lobster hepatopancreas), NRCC DORM-1 (Dogfish Muscle), NRCC DOLT-2 (Dogfish Liver), NBS SRM 1570 (Spinach Leaves) and NBS SRM 1573 (Tomato Leaves) certified reference materials. The measured elements contents in these reference materials (except NRCC DOLT-2) were in satisfactory agreement with the certified values according to the t-test for a 95% confidence level.

  16. Multivariate approach in the optimization procedures for the direct determination of manganese in serum samples by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Fabrino, Henrique José Ferraz; Silveira, Josianne Nicácio; Neto, Waldomiro Borges; Goes, Alfredo Miranda; Beinner, Mark Anthony; da Silva, José Bento Borba

    2011-10-01

    A method for direct determination of manganese (Mn) in human serum by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GFAAS) was proposed in this work. The samples were only diluted 1:4 with nitric acid 1% (v/v) and Triton(®) X-100 0.1% (v/v). The optimization of the instrumental conditions was made using multivariate approach. A factorial design (2(3)) was employed to investigate the tendency of the most intense absorbance signal. The pyrolysis and atomization temperatures and the use of modifier were available and only the parameter modifier use did not have a significant effect on the response. A Center Composed Design (CCD) presented best temperatures of 430 °C and 2568 °C for pyrolysis and atomization, respectively. The method allowed the determination of manganese with a curve varying from 0.7 to 3.3 μg/L. Recovery studies in three concentration levels (n=7 for each level) presented results from 98 ± 5 to 102 ± 7 %. The detection limit was 0.2 μg/L, the quantifying limit was 0.7 μg/L, and the characteristic mass, 1.3 ± 0.2 pg. Intra- and interassay studies showed coefficients of variation of 4.7-7.0% (n=21) and 6-8%(n=63), respectively. The method was applied for the determination of manganese in 53 samples obtaining concentrations from 3.9 to 13.7 μg/L.

  17. Imidazole-Modified Nanoporous Silica for Lead Ion Solid Phase Extraction Prior to Determination from Industrial Wastewaters by Flame Atomic Absorption Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Behbahani, Ali; Ardjmand, Mehdi

    2015-01-01

    A new method was applied to produce modified nanoporous silica as a novel sorbent for Pb(II) ion SPE from industrial wastewater samples. In this modified method, the produced nanoporous silica has a higher functional group loading, which leads to a higher preconcentration factor as well as a lower LOD. This modified nanoporous silica was used for preconcentration prior to subsequent determination of Pb(II) ions by flame atomic absorption spectrometry. Various parameters such as the eluent, pH of the sample solution, and flow rate were optimized during this work. Also, the effect of a variety of ions on preconcentration and recovery of Pb(II) ions was investigated. The LOD, defined as five times the SD of the blank, was determined to be lower than 0.1 mg/L with an RSD of <2%. The accuracy of the method was established by analyzing standard reference materials with certified Pb concentrations. Finally, the established method was successfully applied for determination of the Pb(II) ion concentration in industrial wastewater samples.

  18. Ligandless dispersive liquid--liquid microextraction of iron in biological and foodstuff samples and its determination by Electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Madadizadeh, Mohadeseh; Taher, Mohammad Ali; Ashkenani, Hamid

    2013-01-01

    A new, simple, and efficient method comprising ligandless dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction combined with electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry is reported for the preconcentration and determination of ultratrace amounts of Fe(III). Carbon tetrachloride and acetone were used as the extraction and disperser solvents, respectively. Some effective parameters of the microextraction such as choice of extraction and disperser solvents, their volume, extraction time and temperature, salt and surfactant effect, and pH were optimized. Under the optimum conditions, the calibration curve was linear in the range of 0.02 to 0.46 microg/L of Fe(III), with LOD and LOQ of 5.2 and 17.4 ng/L, respectively. The RSD for seven replicated determinations of Fe(IIl) ion at 0.1 microg/L concentration level was 5.2%. Operational simplicity, rapidity, low cost, good repeatability, and low consumption of extraction solvent are the main advantages of the proposed method. The method was successfully applied to the determination of iron in biological, food, and certified reference samples.

  19. Speciation of antimony(III) and antimony(V) by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry after ultrasound-assisted emulsification of solidified floating organic drop microextraction.

    PubMed

    Wen, Shengping; Zhu, Xiashi

    2013-10-15

    A simple, sensitive and efficient method of ultrasound-assisted emulsification of solidified floating organic drop microextraction (USE-SFODME) coupled to electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry for the speciation of antimony at different oxidation state Sb(III)/Sb(V) in environmental samples was established. In this method, the hydrophobic complex of Sb(III) with sodium diethyldithiocarbamate (DDTC) is extracted by 1-undecanol at pH 9.0, while Sb(V) remains in aqueous phase. Sb(V) content can be calculated by subtracting Sb(III) from the total antimony after reducing Sb(V) to Sb(III) by l-cysteine. Various factors affecting USE-SFODME including pH, extraction solvent and its volume, concentration of DDTC, sonication time, and extraction temperature were investigated. Under the optimized conditions, the calibration curve was linear in the range from 0.05 to 10.0 ng mL(-1), with the limit of detection (3σ) 9.89 ng L(-1) for Sb(III). The relative standard deviation for Sb(III) was 4.5% (n=9, c=1.0 ng mL(-1)). This method was validated against the certified reference materials (GSB 07-1376-2001, GBW07441), and applied to the speciation of antimony in environmental samples (soil and water samples) with satisfactory results.

  20. Solid sampling determination of lithium and sodium additives in microsamples of yttrium oxyorthosilicate by high-resolution continuum source graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laczai, Nikoletta; Kovács, László; Péter, Ágnes; Bencs, László

    2016-03-01

    Solid sampling high resolution continuum source graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (SS-HR-CS-GFAAS) methods were developed and studied for the fast and sensitive quantitation of Li and Na additives in microsamples of cerium-doped yttrium oxyorthosilicate (Y2SiO5:Ce) scintillator materials. The methods were optimized for solid samples by studying a set of GFAAS conditions (i.e., the sample mass, sensitivity of the analytical lines, and graphite furnace heating programs). Powdered samples in the mass range of 0.099-0.422 mg were dispensed onto graphite sample insertion boats, weighed and analyzed. Pyrolysis and atomization temperatures were optimized by the use of single-element standard solutions of Li and Na (acidified with 0.144 mol/L HNO3) at the Li I 610.353 nm and Na I 285.3013 nm analytical lines. For calibration purposes, the method of standard addition with Li and Na solutions was applied. The correlation coefficients (R values) of the calibration graphs were not worse than 0.9678. The limit of detection for oxyorthosilicate samples was 20 μg/g and 80 μg/g for Li and Na, respectively. The alkaline content of the solid samples were found to be in the range of 0.89 and 8.4 mg/g, respectively. The accuracy of the results was verified by means of analyzing certified reference samples, using methods of standard (solution) addition calibration.