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Sample records for absorption spectrometry samples

  1. Determination of arsenic and selenium in environmental and agricultural samples by hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Hershey, J.W.; Oostdyk, T.S.; Keliher, P.N.

    1988-11-01

    Agricultural and environmental samples are digested with acid, and arsenic and selenium are determined using hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometry. Interelement interferences are eliminated by high acid concentrations or cation-exchange resins. Agreement with standard reference material is excellent. The technique is also applied to actual samples.

  2. Automation of preparation of nonmetallic samples for analysis by atomic absorption and inductively coupled plasma spectrometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wittmann, A.; Willay, G.

    1986-01-01

    For a rapid preparation of solutions intended for analysis by inductively coupled plasma emission spectrometry or atomic absorption spectrometry, an automatic device called Plasmasol was developed. This apparatus used the property of nonwettability of glassy C to fuse the sample in an appropriate flux. The sample-flux mixture is placed in a composite crucible, then heated at high temperature, swirled until full dissolution is achieved, and then poured into a water-filled beaker. After acid addition, dissolution of the melt, and filling to the mark, the solution is ready for analysis. The analytical results obtained, either for oxide samples or for prereduced iron ores show that the solutions prepared with this device are undistinguished from those obtained by manual dissolutions done by acid digestion or by high temperature fusion. Preparation reproducibility and analytical tests illustrate the performance of Plasmasol.

  3. Stabilizing Agents for Calibration in the Determination of Mercury Using Solid Sampling Electrothermal Atomic Absorption Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Zelinková, Hana; Červenka, Rostislav; Komárek, Josef

    2012-01-01

    Tetramethylene dithiocarbamate (TMDTC), diethyldithiocarbamate (DEDTC), and thiourea were investigated as stabilizing agents for calibration purposes in the determination of mercury using solid sampling electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (SS-ETAAS). These agents were used for complexation of mercury in calibration solutions and its thermal stabilization in a solid sampling platform. The calibration solutions had the form of methyl isobutyl ketone (MIBK) extracts or MIBK-methanol solutions with the TMDTC and DEDTC chelates and aqueous solutions with thiourea complexes. The best results were obtained for MIBK-methanol solutions in the presence of 2.5 g L−1 TMDTC. The surface of graphite platforms for solid sampling was modified with palladium or rhenium by using electrodeposition from a drop of solutions. The Re modifier is preferable due to a higher lifetime of platform coating. A new SS-ETAAS procedure using the direct sampling of solid samples into a platform with an Re modified graphite surface and the calibration against MIBK-methanol solutions in the presence of TMDTC is proposed for the determination of mercury content in solid environmental samples, such as soil and plants. PMID:22654606

  4. Stabilizing agents for calibration in the determination of mercury using solid sampling electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Zelinková, Hana; Červenka, Rostislav; Komárek, Josef

    2012-01-01

    Tetramethylene dithiocarbamate (TMDTC), diethyldithiocarbamate (DEDTC), and thiourea were investigated as stabilizing agents for calibration purposes in the determination of mercury using solid sampling electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (SS-ETAAS). These agents were used for complexation of mercury in calibration solutions and its thermal stabilization in a solid sampling platform. The calibration solutions had the form of methyl isobutyl ketone (MIBK) extracts or MIBK-methanol solutions with the TMDTC and DEDTC chelates and aqueous solutions with thiourea complexes. The best results were obtained for MIBK-methanol solutions in the presence of 2.5 g L(-1) TMDTC. The surface of graphite platforms for solid sampling was modified with palladium or rhenium by using electrodeposition from a drop of solutions. The Re modifier is preferable due to a higher lifetime of platform coating. A new SS-ETAAS procedure using the direct sampling of solid samples into a platform with an Re modified graphite surface and the calibration against MIBK-methanol solutions in the presence of TMDTC is proposed for the determination of mercury content in solid environmental samples, such as soil and plants. PMID:22654606

  5. Evaluation of metal contents of household detergent samples from Turkey by flame atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Soylak, Mustafa; Unsal, Yunus Emre; Tuzen, Mustafa

    2013-11-01

    The concentrations of cadmium, copper, chromium, cobalt, iron, lead, manganese, nickel, and zinc in detergent samples from Kayseri, Turkey were determined by flame atomic absorption spectrometry. HClO₄ (10 mL)/HNO₃ (10 mL) mixture was used for the digestion of household detergent samples. The correctness of the analytical procedures was checked with standard addition-recovery tests in different detergent samples for the investigated metal ions. The concentration ranges of the elements in the detergent samples were found as 17.2-60.1, 11.1-40.1, 2.5-32.3, 8.1-10.5, 7.2-21.6, 9.8-17.9, 1.7-3.8, 12.5-22.5, and 2.0-5.8 μg/g for iron, manganese, zinc, copper, lead, cobalt, cadmium, nickel, and chromium, respectively. The values found in this work were compared with some other studies around the world conducted on detergent samples. PMID:23722641

  6. Methylmercury determination in biological samples using electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry after acid leaching extraction.

    PubMed

    Saber-Tehrani, Mohammad; Hashemi-Moghaddam, Hamid; Givianrad, Mohammad Hadi; Abroomand-Azar, Parviz

    2006-11-01

    An efficient and sensitive method for the determination of methylmercury in biological samples was developed based on acid leaching extraction of methylmercury into toluene. Methylmercury in the organic phase was determined by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS). The methylmercury signal was enhanced and the reproducibility increased by formation of certain complexes and addition of Pd-DDC modifier. The complex of methylmercury with DDC produced the optimum analytical signal in terms of sensitivity and reproducibility compared to complexes with dithizone, cysteine, 1,10-phenanthroline, and diethyldithiocarbamate. Method performance was optimized by modifying parameters such as temperature of mineralization, atomization, and gas flow rate. The limit of detection for methylmercury determination was 0.015 mug g(-1) and the RSD of the whole procedure was 12% for human teeth samples (n=5) and 15.8% for hair samples (n=5). The method's accuracy was investigated by using NIES-13 and by spiking the samples with different amounts of methylmercury. The results were in good agreement with the certified values and the recoveries were 88-95%. PMID:16896613

  7. Determination of arsenic and cadmium in crude oil by direct sampling graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Jesus, Alexandre; Zmozinski, Ariane Vanessa; Damin, Isabel Cristina Ferreira; Silva, Márcia Messias; Vale, Maria Goreti Rodrigues

    2012-05-01

    In this work, a direct sampling graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry method has been developed for the determination of arsenic and cadmium in crude oil samples. The samples were weighed directly on the solid sampling platforms and introduced into the graphite tube for analysis. The chemical modifier used for both analytes was a mixture of 0.1% Pd + 0.06% Mg + 0.06% Triton X-100. Pyrolysis and atomization curves were obtained for both analytes using standards and samples. Calibration curves with aqueous standards could be used for both analytes. The limits of detection obtained were 5.1 μg kg- 1 for arsenic and 0.2 μg kg- 1 for cadmium, calculated for the maximum amount of sample that can be analyzed (8 mg and 10 mg) for arsenic and cadmium, respectively. Relative standard deviations lower than 20% were obtained. For validation purposes, a calibration curve was constructed with the SRM 1634c and aqueous standards for arsenic and the results obtained for several crude oil samples were in agreement according to paired t-test. The result obtained for the determination of arsenic in the SRM against aqueous standards was also in agreement with the certificate value. As there is no crude oil or similar reference material available with a certified value for cadmium, a digestion in an open vessel under reflux using a "cold finger" was adopted for validation purposes. The use of paired t-test showed that the results obtained by direct sampling and digestion were in agreement at a 95% confidence level. Recovery tests were carried out with inorganic and organic standards and the results were between 88% and 109%. The proposed method is simple, fast and reliable, being appropriated for routine analysis.

  8. Direct analysis of silica by means of solid sampling graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Resano, M.; Mozas, E.; Crespo, C.; Pérez, J.; García-Ruiz, E.; Belarra, M. A.

    2012-05-01

    This paper reports on the use of solid sampling-graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry for the direct analysis of synthetic amorphous silica. In particular, determination of hazardous elements such As, Cd, Cr, Cu, Pb and Sb is investigated, as required by regulations of the food industry. The conclusion of the work is that, after proper optimization of the working conditions, paying particular attention to the atomization temperature and the use of proper modifiers (graphite powder, HNO3 or Pd), it is possible to develop suitable procedures that rely on the use of aqueous standard solutions to construct the calibration curves for all the elements investigated. The proposed method shows important benefits for the cost-effective analysis of such difficult samples in routine labs, permitting fast screening of those elements that are very rarely present in this type of sample, but also accurate quantification of those often found, while offering low limits of detection (always below 0.1 mg g- 1) that comply well with legal requirements, and precision levels that are fit for the purpose (approx. 6-9% R.S.D.).

  9. Preconcentration and determination of tellurium in garlic samples by hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, Marcos M; Cerutti, Soledad; Salonia, José A; Gásquez, José A; Martinez, Luis D

    2005-01-01

    A procedure for the determination of traces of total tellurium (Te) in garlic (Allium sativa) is described that combines hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometry with preconcentration of the analyte by coprecipitation. The samples, each spiked with lanthanum nitrate (20 mg/L), are introduced into an Amberlite XAD-4 resin and mixed with ammonium buffer (pH 9.1). Te is preconcentrated by coprecipitation with the generated lanthanum hydroxide precipitate. The precipitate is quantitatively collected in the resin, eluted with hydrochloric acid, and then transferred into the atomizer device. Considering a sample consumption of 25 mL, an enrichment factor of 10 was obtained. The detection limit (3sigma) was 0.03 microg/L, and the precision (relative standard deviation) was 3.5% (n = 10) at the 10 microg/L level. The calibration graph using the preconcentration system for Te was linear with a correlation coefficient of 0.9993. Satisfactory results were obtained for the analysis of Te in garlic samples. PMID:16152948

  10. Determination of gold in geological materials by carbon slurry sampling graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Dobrowolski, Ryszard; Kuryło, Michał; Otto, Magdalena; Mróz, Agnieszka

    2012-09-15

    A simple and cost effective preconcentration method on modified activated carbons is described for the determination of traces of gold (Au) in geological samples by carbon slurry sampling graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GFAAS). The basic parameters affecting the adsorption capacity of Au(III) ions on modified activated carbons were studied in detail and the effect of activated carbons modification has been determined by studying the initial runs of adsorption isotherms. The influence of chlorides and nitrates on adsorption ability of Au(III) ions onto the modified activated carbons for diluted aqueous solution was also studied in detail in respect to the determination of gold in solid materials after digestion steps in the analytical procedure, which usually involves the application of aqua regia. SEM-EDX and XPS studies confirmed that the surface reduction of Au(III) ions to Au(0) is the main gold adsorption mechanism on the activated carbon. Determination of gold after its preconcentration on the modified activated carbon was validated by applying certified reference materials. The experimental results are in good agreement with the certified values. The proposed method has been successfully applied for the determination of Au in real samples using aqueous standards. PMID:22967620

  11. Direct determination of Cd, Pb and Cr in honey by slurry sampling electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    de Andrade, Camila Kulek; dos Anjos, Vanessa Egéa; Felsner, Maria Lurdes; Torres, Yohandra Reyes; Quináia, Sueli Pércio

    2014-03-01

    Slurry sampling electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry was used for direct determination of Cr, Pb and Cd in honey without sample pretreatment. The honey slurries were prepared in aqueous solution containing hydrogen peroxide and nitric acid. The slurries were directly introduced in the pyrolytic graphite tubes. Pd-Mg was used as a chemical modifier only for Cd determination. Analytical curves were performed with aqueous standards for Pb and Cr and with addition of fructose for Cd. The quantification limits for Cd, Pb and Cr were 2.0, 5.4 and 9.4ngg(-1), respectively. Acceptable precision of the methodology was obtained through repeatability and intermediate precision. In the accuracy study, recoveries were satisfactory (94-101%) for the three elements. The methodology was applied in honey from Paraná (Brazil). The concentrations of Pb, Cd and Cr ranged from 141 to 228ngg(-1), <2.0 to 8ngg(-1) and 83 to 94ngg(-1), respectively. PMID:24176328

  12. Slurry sampling hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometry for the determination of extractable/soluble As in sediment samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mierzwa, Jerzy; Dobrowolski, Ryszard

    1998-01-01

    A method combining the sampling of slurry pretreated by ultrasonic agitation and microwave assisted extraction with hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometry (HGAAS) for the determination of arsenic in sediment samples is proposed and evaluated. The pretreatment of slurried samples by ultrasonication enabled the extraction of (approximately) up to 85% of arsenic from the studied sediment samples. The further (slight) improvement of the efficiency of extraction was accomplished by the introduction of a short microwave-accelerated treatment. L-cysteine was used as an efficient pre-reduction reagent. The accuracy and precision of the slurry sampling HGAAS method were studied using the certified reference materials: Sediment GBW 30043 (NRCCRM, People's Republic of China), Sediment NIST 2704 (NIST, USA) and Marine Sediment BCSS-1 (NRCC, Canada). The relative standard deviation of the full (overall) analytical procedure was 8.5% and an absolute limit of detection of 2.75 ng was achieved. Factors which influence the reliability of this method are, for example, the choice of slurry liquid phase (extraction medium), sample homogeneity and, in particular, very effective mixing of slurries.

  13. Determination of Hg, Cd, Mn, Pb and Sn in seafood by solid sampling Zeeman atomic absorption spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Detcheva, A.; Grobecker, K. H.

    2006-04-01

    Direct solid sampling Zeeman atomic absorption spectrometric methods were developed and applied to the determination of mercury, cadmium, manganese, lead and tin in seafood. All elements but mercury were measured by a third generation Zeeman atomic absorption spectrometry combined with an automatic solid sampler. In 3-field- and dynamic mode the calibrations concentration range was substantially extended and high amounts of analyte were detectable without laborious dilution of solid samples. The measurements were based on calibrations using certified reference materials of organic matrices. In case solid certified reference materials were not available calibration by aqueous standard solutions was proved to be an alternative. No matrix effects were observed under the optimized conditions. Results obtained were in good agreement with the certified values. Solid sampling Zeeman atomic absorption spectrometry proved to be a reliable, rapid and low-cost method for the control of trace elements in seafood.

  14. Methods of calibration in the direct analysis of solid samples by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berglund, M.; Baxter, D. C.

    1992-12-01

    One of the major problems involved in the direct analysis of solid samples by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS) lies in the calibration step because non-spectral interference effects are often pronounced. Three standardization techniques have been described and used in solid sampling-ETAAS: (i) standard additions method; (ii) calibration relative to a certified reference material; and (iii) calibration curve technique. However, an adequate statistical evaluation of the uncertainty in the analyte concentration in the solid sample is most frequently neglected, and reported errors may be seriously underestimated. This can be attributed directly to the complexity of the statistical expressions required to accurately account for errors in each of the calibration techniques mentioned above, and the general lack of relevant reference literature. The object of this work has been to develop a computer package which will perform the necessary statistical analyses of solid sampling-ETAAS data; the result is the program "SOLIDS" described here in the form of an electronic publication in Spectrochimica Acta Electronica, the electronic section of Spectrochimica Acta Part B. The program could also be useful in other analytical fields where similar calibration methods are used. The hard copy text, outlining the calibration models and their associated errors, is accompanied by a diskette containing the program, some data files, and a manual. Use of the program is exemplified in the text, with some of the data files discussed included on the diskette which, together with the manual, should enable the reader to become familiarized with the operation of the program, and the results generated.

  15. Determination of bismuth in environmental samples by slurry sampling graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry using combined chemical modifiers.

    PubMed

    Dobrowolski, Ryszard; Dobrzyńska, Joanna; Gawrońska, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    Slurry sampling graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry technique was applied for the determination of Bi in environmental samples. The study focused on the effect of Zr, Ti, Nb and W carbides, as permanent modifiers, on the Bi signal. Because of its highest thermal and chemical stability and ability to substantially increase Bi signal, NbC was chosen as the most effective modifier. The temperature programme applied for Bi determination was optimized based on the pyrolysis and atomization curves obtained for slurries prepared from certified reference materials (CRMs) of the soil and sediments. To overcome interferences caused by sulfur compounds, Ba(NO₃)₂ was used as a chemical modifier. Calibration was performed using the aqueous standard solutions. The analysis of the CRMs confirmed the reliability of the proposed analytical method. The characteristic mass for Bi was determined to be 16 pg with the detection limit of 50 ng/g for the optimized procedure at the 5% (w/v) slurry concentration. PMID:25384374

  16. Determination of cobalt in biological samples by line-source and high-resolution continuum source graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry using solid sampling or alkaline treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ribeiro, Anderson Schwingel; Vieira, Mariana Antunes; da Silva, Alessandra Furtado; Borges, Daniel L. Gallindo; Welz, Bernhard; Heitmann, Uwe; Curtius, Adilson José

    2005-06-01

    Two procedures for the determination of Co in biological samples by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GF AAS) were compared: solid sampling (SS) and alkaline treatment with tetramethylammonium hydroxide (TMAH) using two different instruments for the investigation: a conventional line-source (LS) atomic absorption spectrometer and a prototype high-resolution continuum source atomic absorption spectrometer. For the direct introduction of the solid samples, certified reference materials (CRM) were ground to a particle size ≤50 μm. Alkaline treatment was carried out by placing about 250 mg of the sample in polypropylene flasks, adding 2 mL of 25% m/v tetramethylammonium hydroxide and de-ionized water. Due to its unique capacity of providing a 3-D spectral plot, a high-resolution continuum source (HR-CS) graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry was used as a tool to evaluate potential spectral interferences, including background absorption for both sample introduction procedures, revealing that a continuous background preceded the atomic signal for pyrolysis temperatures lower than 700 °C. Molecular absorption bands with pronounced rotational fine structure appeared for atomization temperatures >1800 °C probably as a consequence of the formation of PO. After optimization had been carried out using high resolution continuum source atomic absorption spectrometry, the optimized conditions were adopted also for line-source atomic absorption spectrometry. Six biological certified reference materials were analyzed, with calibration against aqueous standards, resulting in agreement with the certified values (according to the t-test for a 95% confidence level) and in detection limits as low as 5 ng g -1.

  17. Mercury in Environmental and Biological Samples Using Online Combustion with Sequential Atomic Absorption and Fluorescence Measurements: A Direct Comparison of Two Fundamental Techniques in Spectrometry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cizdziel, James V.

    2011-01-01

    In this laboratory experiment, students quantitatively determine the concentration of an element (mercury) in an environmental or biological sample while comparing and contrasting the fundamental techniques of atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS) and atomic fluorescence spectrometry (AFS). A mercury analyzer based on sample combustion,…

  18. Determination of sulphur in various vegetables by solid sampling high-resolution electrothermal molecular absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Gunduz, Sema; Akman, Suleyman

    2015-04-01

    Sulphur was determined in various vegetables via molecular absorption of carbon monosulphide (CS) at 258.056 nm using a solid sampling high resolution continuum source electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometer (SS HR-CS ETAAS). Samples were dried, ground and directly introduced into the ruthenium coated graphite furnace as 0.05 to 0.50mg. All determinations were performed using palladium+citric acid modifier and applying a pyrolysis temperature of 1000 °C and a volatilisation temperature of 2400 °C. The results were in good agreement with certified sulphur concentrations of various vegetal CRM samples applying linear calibration technique prepared from thioacetamide. The limit of detection and characteristic mass of the method were 7.5 and 8.7 ng of S, respectively. The concentrations of S in various spinach, leek, lettuce, radish, Brussels sprouts, zucchini and chard samples were determined. It was showed that distribution of sulphur in CRM and grinded food samples were homogeneous even in micro-scale. PMID:25442545

  19. Determination of some trace elements in food and soil samples by atomic absorption spectrometry after coprecipitation with holmium hydroxide.

    PubMed

    Saracoglu, Sibel; Soylak, Mustafa; Cabuk, Dilek; Topalak, Zeynep; Karagozlu, Yasemin

    2012-01-01

    The determination of trace elements in food and soil samples by atomic absorption spectrometry was investigated. A coprecipitation procedure with holmium hydroxide was used for separation-preconcentration of trace elements. Trace amounts of copper(II), manganese(II), cobalt(II), nickel(ll), chromium(lll), iron(Ill), cadmium(ll), and lead(ll) ions were coprecipitated with holmium hydroxide in 2.0 M NaOH medium. The optimum conditions for the coprecipitation process were investigated for several commonly tested experimental parameters, such as amount of coprecipitant, effect of standing time, centrifugation rate and time, and sample volume. The precision, based on replicate analysis, was lower than 10% for the analytes. In order to verify the accuracy of the method, the certified reference materials BCR 141 R calcareous loam soil and CRM 025-050 soil were analyzed. The procedure was successfully applied for separation and preconcentration of the investigated ions in various food and soil samples. An amount of the solid samples was decomposed with 15 mL concentrated hydrochloric acid-concentrated nitric acid (3 + 1). The preconcentration procedure was then applied to the final solutions. The concentration of trace elements in samples was determined by atomic absorption spectrometry. PMID:22816279

  20. Determination of mercury in soils and sediments by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry with slurry sampling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López-García, Ignacio; Sánchez-Merlos, Mateo; Hernández-Córdoba, Manuel

    1997-12-01

    A graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometric procedure for the determination of mercury is presented, in which the samples are suspended in a solution containing hydrofluoric and nitric acids. Silver nitrate (4% m/v) and potassium permanganate (3%) are incorporated, in the order specified, and aliquots are directly introduced into the graphite furnace. A fast heating programme with no conventional pyrolysis step is used. The detection limit for mercury in a 125 mg ml -1 suspension is 0.1 μg g -1. Calibration is performed by using aqueous standards. The reliability of the procedure is proved by analysing certified reference materials.

  1. Slurry sampling graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry: determination of trace metals in mineral coal.

    PubMed

    Silva, M M; Goreti, M; Vale, R; Caramão, E B

    1999-12-01

    A procedure for lead, cadmium and copper determination in coal samples based on slurry sampling using an atomic absorption spectrometer equipped with a transversely heated graphite tube atomizer is proposed. The slurries were prepared by weighing the samples directly into autosampler cups (5-30 mg) and adding a 1.5 ml aliquot of a diluent mixture of 5% v/v HNO(3), 0.05% Triton X-100 and 10% ethanol. The slurry was homogenized by manual stirring before measurement. Slurry homogenization using ultrasonic agitation was also investigated for comparison. The effect of particle size and the use of different diluent compositions on the slurry preparation were investigated. The temperature programmes were optimized on the basis of pyrolysis and atomization curves. Absorbance characteristics with and without the addition of a palladium-magnesium modifier were compared. The use of 0.05% m/v Pd and 0.03% m/v Mg was found satisfactory for stabilizing Cd and Pb. The calibration was performed with aqueous standards. In addition, a conventional acid digestion procedure was applied to verify the efficiency of the slurry sampling. Better recoveries of the analytes were obtained when the particle size was reduced to <37 mum. Several certified coal reference materials (BCR Nos. 40, 180, and 181) were analyzed, and good agreement was obtained between the results from the proposed slurry sampling method and the certificate values. PMID:18967798

  2. Determination of cobalt in samples containing cobalt and tungsten carbide by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Firriolo, J.M.; Kutzman, R.S.

    1985-09-01

    A method has been developed to determine the amount of cobalt (Co) in atmospheric dust samples which include free and sintered Co. Cobalt and tungsten carbide (WC) mixtures ranging from 0-100% Co were prepared for atomic absorption analysis by dissolving the Co in aqua regia. Using this method, the amount of Co in the samples assayed ranged from 90.9-100.1% of that gravimetrically added to the mixtures. The results of this aqua regia dissolution procedure for Co were compared to a hydrofluoric acid method which solubilized both the Co and the WC. Application of the aqua regia dissolution method to samples of sintered WC and Co dust resulted in complete recovery of the Co from these materials. These results were supported by x-ray analysis of the samples before and after dissolution of the Co with aqua regia. The described procedure is advantageous because it avoids the use of highly-caustic hydrofluoric acid and the results are quickly available.

  3. Investigation of lead contents in lipsticks by solid sampling high resolution continuum source electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Gunduz, Sema; Akman, Suleyman

    2013-02-01

    In this study, the lead contents of different kinds of lipsticks were determined by solid sampling high resolution continuum source electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (SS-HR-CS ET AAS) and the results were compared with those obtained after microwave-assisted acid digestion of the samples. The experimental parameters for solid sampling such as the maximum amount of sample on the platforms of solid autosampler, graphite furnace program were optimized. Samples were directly loaded on the platforms of solid autosampler between 0.25 and 2.0mg and lead was determined applying 800 °C for pyrolysis and 2100 °C for atomization. Under optimized conditions, interference-free determination could be performed using aqueous standards. The LOD and the characteristic mass were 21.3 and 12.6 pg, respectively. The lead in the same lipstick samples was determined after microwave-assisted acid digestion and compared with those found by solid sampling. Mostly, there was no significant difference between the lead concentrations found by the two techniques. The lead in 25 lipstick samples with different properties were 0.11-4.48 ng mg(-1) which were not significantly different from those (<0.026-7.19 ng mg(-1)) reported by FDA for around 400 samples. PMID:23099440

  4. Detection of silver nanoparticles in parsley by solid sampling high-resolution-continuum source atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Feichtmeier, Nadine S; Leopold, Kerstin

    2014-06-01

    In this work, we present a fast and simple approach for detection of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) in biological material (parsley) by solid sampling high-resolution-continuum source atomic absorption spectrometry (HR-CS AAS). A novel evaluation strategy was developed in order to distinguish AgNPs from ionic silver and for sizing of AgNPs. For this purpose, atomisation delay was introduced as significant indication of AgNPs, whereas atomisation rates allow distinction of 20-, 60-, and 80-nm AgNPs. Atomisation delays were found to be higher for samples containing silver ions than for samples containing silver nanoparticles. A maximum difference in atomisation delay normalised by the sample weight of 6.27 ± 0.96 s mg(-1) was obtained after optimisation of the furnace program of the AAS. For this purpose, a multivariate experimental design was used varying atomisation temperature, atomisation heating rate and pyrolysis temperature. Atomisation rates were calculated as the slope of the first inflection point of the absorbance signals and correlated with the size of the AgNPs in the biological sample. Hence, solid sampling HR-CS AAS was proved to be a promising tool for identifying and distinguishing silver nanoparticles from ionic silver directly in solid biological samples. PMID:24292434

  5. Fluorine determination in coal using high-resolution graphite furnace molecular absorption spectrometry and direct solid sample analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Machado, Patrícia M.; Morés, Silvane; Pereira, Éderson R.; Welz, Bernhard; Carasek, Eduardo; de Andrade, Jailson B.

    2015-03-01

    The absorption of the calcium mono-fluoride (CaF) molecule has been employed in this study for the determination of fluorine in coal using direct solid sample analysis and high-resolution continuum source graphite furnace molecular absorption spectrometry (HR-CS GF MAS). The rotational line at 606.440 nm was used for measuring the molecular absorption in the gas phase. The pyrolysis and vaporization temperatures were 700 °C and 2100 °C, respectively. Different chemical modifiers have been studied, such as Pd and Ir as permanent modifiers, and Pd and the mixed Pd/Mg modifier in solution. The limit of detection and the characteristic mass were 0.3 and 0.1 ng F, respectively. One certified reference material (CRM) of coal (NIST 1635) and four CRMs with a non-certified value for F (SARM 18, SARM 20, BCR 40, BCR 180) were used to evaluate the accuracy and precision of the method, obtaining good agreement (104%) with the certified value and with the informed values (ranging from 90 to 103%).

  6. Simultaneous preconcentration of cadmium and lead in water samples with silica gel and determination by flame atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Xu, Hongbo; Wu, Yun; Wang, Jian; Shang, Xuewei; Jiang, Xiaojun

    2013-12-01

    A new method that utilizes pretreated silica gel as an adsorbent has been developed for simultaneous preconcentration of trace Cd(II) and Pb(II) prior to the measurement by flame atomic absorption spectrometry. The effects of pH, the shaking time, the elution condition and the coexisting ions on the separation/preconcentration conditions of analytes were investigated. Under optimized conditions, the static adsorption capacity of Cd(II) and Pb(II) were 45.5 and 27.1mg/g, the relative standard deviations were 3.2% and 1.7% (for n = 11), and the limits of detection obtained were 4.25 and 0.60 ng/mL, respectively. The method was validated by analyzing the certified reference materials GBW 07304a (stream sediment) and successfully applied to the analysis of various treated wastewater samples with satisfactory results. PMID:25078838

  7. Determination of total mercury in environmental and biological samples by flow injection cold vapour atomic absorption spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, James; Jones, Phil; Hill, Steve J.

    1996-12-01

    A simple and accurate method has been developed for the determination of total mercury in environmental and biological samples. The method utilises an off-line microwave digestion stage followed by analysis using a flow injection system with detection by cold vapour atomic absorption spectrometry. The method has been validated using two certified reference materials (DORM-1 dogfish and MESS-2 estuarine sediment) and the results agreed well with the certified values. A detection limit of 0.2 ng g -1 Hg was obtained and no significant interference was observed. The method was finally applied to the determination of mercury in river sediments and canned tuna fish, and gave results in the range 0.1-3.0 mg kg -1.

  8. Evaluation of four sample treatments for determination of platinum in automotive catalytic converters by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puig, Ana I.; Alvarado, José I.

    2006-09-01

    Conventional and microwave assisted digestion, both using aqua regia, alkaline fusion with lithium metaborate and aqueous slurries were evaluated as sample treatments for determination of Pt in automotive catalytic converters by Graphite Furnace Atomic Absorption Spectrometry (GF-AAS). Determination of platinum by GF-AAS in samples of the catalytic converter's substrates, prepared by the four methods described, indicates that the highest platinum concentration i.e. maximum Pt extraction in the range of 748 ± 15-998 ± 10 μg mL - 1 , is obtained for samples dissolved by alkaline fusion, closely followed by analysis of aqueous plus Triton X-100 slurries 708 ± 14-958 ± 10 μg mL - 1 , while neither one of the acid digestion procedures achieved total dissolution of the samples. Slurry analysis is thus shown to be a viable alternative and is recommended, based on its speed and ease of implementation. Aqueous standards calibration curves and the standard addition methods were also compared. The results showed that no appreciable matrix effects are present, regardless of the sample preparation procedure used. Precision of the measurements, expressed as percentage relative standard deviation, ranged between 2.5 to 4.9%. Accuracy of the results was assessed by recovery tests which rendered values between 98.9 and 100.9%.

  9. Restricted access carbon nanotubes for direct extraction of cadmium from human serum samples followed by atomic absorption spectrometry analysis.

    PubMed

    Barbosa, Adriano F; Barbosa, Valéria M P; Bettini, Jefferson; Luccas, Pedro O; Figueiredo, Eduardo C

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a new sorbent that is able to extract metal ions directly from untreated biological fluids, simultaneously excluding all proteins from these samples. The sorbent was obtained through the modification of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) with an external bovine serum albumin (BSA) layer, resulting in restricted access carbon nanotubes (RACNTs). The BSA layer was fixed through the interconnection between the amine groups of the BSA using glutaraldehyde as cross-linker. When a protein sample is percolated through a cartridge containing RACNTs and the sample pH is higher than the isoelectric point of the proteins, both proteins from the sample and the BSA layer are negatively ionized. Thus, an electrostatic repulsion prevents the interaction between the proteins from the sample on the RACNTs surface. At the same time, metal ions are adsorbed in the CNTs (core) after their passage through the chains of proteins. The Cd(2+) ion was selected for a proof-of-principle case to test the suitability of the RACNTs due to its toxicological relevance. RACNTs were able to extract Cd(2+) and exclude almost 100% of the proteins from the human serum samples in an online solid-phase extraction system coupled with thermospray flame furnace atomic absorption spectrometry. The limits of detection and quantification were 0.24 and 0.80 μg L(-1), respectively. The sampling frequency was 8.6h(-1), and the intra- and inter-day precisions at the 0.80, 15.0, and 30.0 μg L(-1) Cd(2+) levels were all lower than 10.1% (RSD). The recoveries obtained for human blood serum samples fortified with Cd(2+) ranged from 85.0% to 112.0%. The method was successfully applied to analyze Cd(2+) directly from six human blood serum samples without any pretreatment, and the observed concentrations ranged from

  10. In-situ suspended aggregate microextraction of gold nanoparticles from water samples and determination by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Choleva, Tatiana G; Kappi, Foteini A; Tsogas, George Z; Vlessidis, Athanasios G; Giokas, Dimosthenis L

    2016-05-01

    This work describes a new method for the extraction and determination of gold nanoparticles in environmental samples by means of in-situ suspended aggregate microextraction and electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry. The method relies on the in-situ formation of a supramolecular aggregate phase through ion-association between a cationic surfactant and a benzene sulfonic acid derivative. Gold nanoparticles are physically entrapped into the aggregate phase which is separated from the bulk aqueous solution by vacuum filtration on the surface of a cellulose filter in the form of a thin film. The film is removed from the filter surface and is dissociated into an acidified methanolic solution which is used for analysis. Under the optimized experimental conditions, gold nanoparticles can be efficiently extracted from water samples with recovery rates between 81.0-93.3%, precision 5.4-12.0% and detection limits as low as 75femtomolL(-1) using only 20mL of sample volume. The satisfactory analytical features of the method along with the simplicity indicate the efficiency of this new approach to adequately collect and extract gold nanoparticle species from water samples. PMID:26946014

  11. Determination of Trace Silver in Water Samples by Online Column Preconcentration Flame Atomic Absorption Spectrometry Using Termite Digestion Product

    PubMed Central

    Bianchin, Joyce Nunes; Martendal, Edmar; Carasek, Eduardo

    2011-01-01

    A new method for Ag determination in water samples using solid phase extraction (SPE) coupled to a flow injection system and flame atomic absorption spectrometry was developed. The sorbent used for Ag preconcentration and extraction was the termite digestion product. Flow and chemical variables of the system were optimized through a multivariate procedure. The factors selected were adsorbent mass, buffer type and concentration, sample pH, and sample flow rate. The detection limit and precision were 3.4 μg L−1 and 3.8% (n = 6, 15 μg L−1), respectively. The enrichment factor and the linear working range were, respectively, 21 and 10–50 μg L−1. Results for recovery tests using different water samples were between 96 and 107%. The proposed methodology was applied with success for the determination of Ag in water used to wash clothes impregnated with silver nanoparticles, supplied by a factory located in Santa Catarina, Brazil. PMID:21804766

  12. Evaluation of ammonia as diluent for serum sample preparation and determination of selenium by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry*1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernández-Caraballo, Edwin A.; Burguera, Marcela; Burguera, José L.

    2002-12-01

    A method for the determination of total selenium in serum samples by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry was evaluated. The method involved direct introduction of 1:5 diluted serum samples (1% v/v NH 4OH+0.05% w/v Triton X-100 ®) into transversely heated graphite tubes, and the use of 10 μg Pd+3 μg Mg(NO 3) 2 as chemical modifier. Optimization of the modifier mass and the atomization temperature was conducted by simultaneously varying such parameters and evaluating both the integrated absorbance and the peak height/peak area ratio. The latter allowed the selection of compromise conditions rendering good sensitivity and adequate analyte peak profiles. A characteristic mass of 49 pg and a detection limit (3s) of 6 μg 1 -1 Se, corresponding to 30 μg l -1 Se in the serum sample, were obtained. The analyte addition technique was used for calibration. The accuracy was assessed by the determination of total selenium in Seronorm™ Trace Elements Serum Batch 116 (Nycomed Pharma AS). The method was applied for the determination of total selenium in ten serum samples taken from individuals with no known physical affection. The selenium concentration ranged between 79 and 147 μg l -1, with a mean value of 114±22 μg l -1.

  13. Determination of vanadium in soils and sediments by the slurry sampling graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry using permanent modifiers.

    PubMed

    Dobrowolski, Ryszard; Adamczyk, Agnieszka; Otto, Magdalena

    2013-09-15

    A new analytical procedure for vanadium (V) determination in soils and sediments by the slurry sampling graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (slurry sampling GFAAS) using the mixed permanent modifiers is described. Moreover, the comparison of action of the modifiers based on the iridium (Ir) and carbide-forming elements: tungsten (W) and niobium (Nb) deposited on the graphite tubes is studied, especially in terms of their analytical utility and determination sensitivity. The mechanism of their action was investigated using an X-ray diffraction technique (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) equipped with an energy dispersive X-ray detector (EDX). Finally, the mixture of 0.3 μg of Ir and 0.04 μg of Nb was used for the graphite tube permanent modification. The analytical procedure was optimized on the basis of the data from pyrolysis and atomization temperature curves studies. The results obtained for the four certified reference materials (marine sediments: PACS-1 and MESS-1, lake sediment: SL-1, soil: San Joaquin Soil SRM 2709), using the slurry sampling GFAAS and the standard calibration method, were in good agreement with the certified values. The detection and quantification limits and characteristic mass calculated for the proposed procedure were 0.04 µg/g, 0.16 µg/g and 11.9 pg, respectively. The precision (RSD% less than 8%) and the accuracy of vanadium determination in the soil and sediment samples were acceptable. PMID:23708618

  14. Direct determination of cadmium in Orujo spirit samples by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry: comparative study of different chemical modifiers.

    PubMed

    Vilar Fariñas, M; Barciela García, J; García Martín, S; Peña Crecente, R; Herrero Latorre, C

    2007-05-22

    In this work, several analytical methods are proposed for cadmium determination in Orujo spirit samples using electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS). Permanent chemical modifiers thermally coated on the platforms inserted in pyrolytic graphite tubes (such as W, Ir, Ru, W-Ir and W-Ru) were comparatively studied in relation to common chemical modifier mixtures [Pd-Mg(NO3)2 and (NH4)H2PO4-Mg(NO3)2] for cadmium stabilization. Different ETAAS Cd determination methods based on the indicated modifiers have been developed. In each case, pyrolysis and atomization temperatures, atomization shapes, characteristic masses and detection limits as well as other analytical characteristics have been determined. All the assayed modifiers (permanent and conventional) were capable of achieving the appropriate stabilization of the analyte, with the exception of Ru and W-Ru. Moreover, for all developed methods, recoveries (99-102%) and precision (R.S.D. lower than 10%) were acceptable. Taking into account the analytical performance (best detection limit LOD = 0.01 microg L(-1)), the ETAAS method based on the use of W as a permanent modifier was selected for further direct Cd determinations in Orujo samples from Galicia (NW Spain). The chosen method was applied in the determination of the Cd content in 38 representative Galician samples. The cadmium concentrations ranged

  15. Dispersive Liquid-Liquid Microextraction of Bismuth in Various Samples and Determination by Flame Atomic Absorption Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Daşbaşı, Teslima; Kartal, Şenol; Saçmacı, Şerife; Ülgen, Ahmet

    2016-01-01

    A dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction method for the determination of bismuth in various samples by flame atomic absorption spectrometry is described. In this method, crystal violet was used as counter positive ion for BiCl4 (-) complex ion, chloroform as extraction solvent, and ethanol as disperser solvent. The analytical parameters that may affect the extraction efficiency like acidity of sample, type and amount of extraction and disperser solvents, amount of ligand, and extraction time were studied in detail. The effect of interfering ions on the analyte recovery was also investigated. The calibration graph was linear in the range of 0.040-1.00 mg L(-1) with detection limit of 4.0 μg L(-1) (n = 13). The precision as relative standard deviation was 3% (n = 11, 0.20 mg L(-1)) and the enrichment factor was 74. The developed method was applied successfully for the determination of bismuth in various water, pharmaceutical, and cosmetic samples and the certified reference material (TMDA-64 lake water). PMID:26881186

  16. Dispersive Liquid-Liquid Microextraction of Bismuth in Various Samples and Determination by Flame Atomic Absorption Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Daşbaşı, Teslima; Kartal, Şenol; Saçmacı, Şerife; Ülgen, Ahmet

    2016-01-01

    A dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction method for the determination of bismuth in various samples by flame atomic absorption spectrometry is described. In this method, crystal violet was used as counter positive ion for BiCl4− complex ion, chloroform as extraction solvent, and ethanol as disperser solvent. The analytical parameters that may affect the extraction efficiency like acidity of sample, type and amount of extraction and disperser solvents, amount of ligand, and extraction time were studied in detail. The effect of interfering ions on the analyte recovery was also investigated. The calibration graph was linear in the range of 0.040–1.00 mg L−1 with detection limit of 4.0 μg L−1 (n = 13). The precision as relative standard deviation was 3% (n = 11, 0.20 mg L−1) and the enrichment factor was 74. The developed method was applied successfully for the determination of bismuth in various water, pharmaceutical, and cosmetic samples and the certified reference material (TMDA-64 lake water). PMID:26881186

  17. Determination of manganese in diesel, gasoline and naphtha by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry using microemulsion medium for sample stabilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandão, Geisamanda Pedrini; de Campos, Reinaldo Calixto; de Castro, Eustáquio Vinicius Ribeiro; de Jesus, Honério Coutinho

    2008-08-01

    The determination of Mn in diesel, gasoline and naphtha samples at µg L - 1 level by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry, after sample stabilization in a three-component medium (microemulsion) was investigated. Microemulsions were prepared by mixing appropriate volumes of sample, propan-1-ol and nitric acid aqueous solution, and a stable system was immediately and spontaneously formed. After multivariate optimization by central composite design the optimum microemulsion composition as well as the temperature program was defined. In this way, calibration using aqueous analytical solution was possible, since the same sensitivity was observed in the optimized microemulsion media and 0.2% v/v HNO 3. The use of modifier was not necessary. Recoveries at the 3 µg L - 1 level using both inorganic and organic Mn standards spiked solutions ranged from 98 to 107% and the limits of detection were 0.6, 0.5 and 0.3 µg L - 1 in the original diesel, gasoline and naphtha samples, respectively. The Mn characteristic mass 3.4 pg. Typical relative standard deviation ( n = 5) of 8, 6 and 7% were found for the samples prepared as microemulsions at concentration levels of 1.3, 0.8, and 1.5 µg L - 1 , respectively. The total determination cycle lasted 4 min for diesel and 3 min for gasoline and naphtha, equivalent to a sample throughput of 7 h - 1 for duplicate determinations in diesel and 10 h - 1 for duplicate determinations in gasoline and naphtha. Accuracy was also assessed by using other method of analysis (ASTM D 3831-90). No statistically significant differences were found between the results obtained with the proposed method and the reference method in the analysis of real samples.

  18. Determination of total mercury for marine environmental monitoring studies by solid sampling continuum source high resolution atomic absorption spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandjukov, Petko; Orani, Anna Maria; Han, Eunmi; Vassileva, Emilia

    2015-01-01

    The most critical step in almost all commonly used analytical procedures for Hg determination is the sample preparation due to its extreme volatility. One of the possible solutions of this problem is the application of methods for direct analysis of solid samples. The possibilities for solid sampling high resolution continuum source atomic absorption spectrometry (HR CS AAS) determination of total mercury in various marine environmental samples e.g. sediments and biota are object of the present study. The instrumental parameters were optimized in order to obtain reproducible and interference free analytical signal. A calibration technique based on the use of solid standard certified reference materials similar to the nature of the analyzed sample was developed and applied to various CRMs and real samples. This technique allows simple and reliable evaluation of the uncertainty of the result and the metrological characteristics of the method. A validation approach in line with the requirements of ISO 17025 standard and Eurachem guidelines was followed. With this in mind, selectivity, working range (0.06 to 25 ng for biota and 0.025 to 4 ng for sediment samples, expressed as total Hg) linearity (confirmed by Student's t-test), bias (1.6-4.3%), repeatability (4-9%), reproducibility (9-11%), and absolute limit of detection (0.025 ng for sediment, 0.096 ng for marine biota) were systematically assessed using solid CRMs. The relative expanded uncertainty was estimated at 15% for sediment sample and 8.5% for marine biota sample (k = 2). Demonstration of traceability of measurement results is also presented. The potential of the proposed analytical procedure, based on solid sampling HR CS AAS technique was demonstrated by direct analysis of sea sediments form the Caribbean region and various CRMs. Overall, the use of solid sampling HR CS AAS permits obtaining significant advantages for the determination of this complex analyte in marine samples, such as straightforward

  19. Measurement of copper in biological samples by flame or electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Evenson, M A

    1988-01-01

    Guidelines presented here allow for copper analysis of biological materials by methods that are very sensitive, that require little sample preparation, that have few chemical or spectral interferences, that are inexpensive, and that require only usual care in contamination control. The commercial instruments for FAAS and ETAAS from Perkin-Elmer, from Varian, and from Instrumentation Laboratories Inc. (Allied Analytical Systems) all work well in either the flame or the flameless mode. Background correction techniques are not essential for copper analysis if care is taken with the sample preparation to minimize the background signals. Different types of burners will work adequately if one makes certain that the viscosity of the sample and the control products are similar to the calibration standards. Further, dilution of samples is preferred over increasing the viscosity of the calibration standards by the addition of a protein containing solution or a substance such as glycerol. A 1:10 dilution of blood plasma or serum with dilute nitric acid or water is all that is necessary for copper analysis by the FFAS methods. Cation and anion effects should be tested by bracketing the concentrations of the ions found in the sample with known amounts of ions in the sample solutions. Increasing the concentrations of the ions thought to interfere while keeping the copper concentration constant is another way to test for ion interferences.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:3374386

  20. Method development for the determination of manganese, cobalt and copper in green coffee comparing direct solid sampling electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry and inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Oleszczuk, Nédio; Castro, Jacira T; da Silva, Márcia M; Korn, Maria das Graças A; Welz, Bernhard; Vale, Maria Goreti R

    2007-10-31

    A method has been developed for the determination of cobalt, copper and manganese in green coffee using direct solid sampling electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (SS-ET AAS). The motivation for the study was that only a few elements might be suitable to determine the origin of green coffee so that the multi-element techniques usually applied for this purpose might not be necessary. The three elements have been chosen as test elements as they were found to be significant in previous investigations. A number of botanical certified reference materials (CRM) and pre-analyzed samples of green coffee have been used for method validation, and inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP OES) after microwave-assisted acid digestion of the samples as reference method. Calibration against aqueous standards could be used for the determination of Mn and Co by SS-ET AAS, but calibration against solid CRM was necessary for the determination of Cu. No significant difference was found between the results obtained with the proposed method and certified or independently determined values. The limits of detection for Mn, Cu and Co were 0.012, 0.006 and 0.004mugg(-1) using SS-ET AAS and 0.015, 0.13 and 0.10mugg(-1) using ICP OES. Seven samples of Brazilian green coffee have been analyzed, and there was no significant difference between the values obtained with SS-ET AAS and ICP OES for Mn and Cu. ICP OES could not be used as a reference method for Co, as essentially all values were below the limit of quantification of this technique. PMID:19073113

  1. Solid sampling determination of total fluorine in baby food samples by high-resolution continuum source graphite furnace molecular absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ozbek, Nil; Akman, Suleyman

    2016-11-15

    This study describes the applicability of solid sampling technique for the determination of fluorine in various baby foods via molecular absorption of calcium monofluoride generated in a graphite furnace of high-resolution continuum source atomic absorption spectrometry. Fluorine was determined at CaF wavelength, 606.440nm in a graphite tube applying a pyrolysis temperature of 1000°C and a molecule forming temperature of 2200°C. The limit of detection and characteristic mass of the method were 0.20ng and 0.17ng of fluorine, respectively. The fluorine concentrations determined in standard reference sample (bush branches and leaves) were in good agreement with the certified values. By applying the optimized parameters, the concentration of fluorine in various baby foods were determined. The fluorine concentrations were ranged from sample amounts used in solid sampling analysis, micro-scale distribution of fluorine in the samples was also determined. PMID:27283621

  2. Monitoring of Pd in airborne particulates by solid sampling high-resolution continuum source electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atilgan, Semin; Akman, Suleyman; Baysal, Asli; Bakircioglu, Yasemin; Szigeti, Tamás; Óvári, Mihály; Záray, Gyula

    2012-04-01

    An analytical method has been developed for determination of palladium in PM2.5 fractions of urban airborne particulate matter by solid sampling high-resolution continuum source electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry. For the optimization of the experimental conditions, a road dust certified reference material (BCR-723) was used. The influence of pyrolysis and atomization temperatures, the amount of sample introduced into the graphite furnace and the addition of acids, surfactants and modifiers on the analytical signal of Pd were investigated. The limit of detection, calculated based on three times the standard deviations of analytical signals obtained during the atomization of 10 blank filter pieces, was 0.07 pg/m3. Since the amount of solid certified reference material introduced into the graphite furnace was about 50-2000 times lower than those required in order to obtain the certified value, the precision was relatively poor. This analytical method was applied for investigation of urban airborne particulate matter collected onto quartz fiber filters by high-volume aerosol samplers in the city center of Istanbul (Turkey) and Budapest (Hungary). The measured Pd concentrations changed in the range of 0.22-0.64 and 0.25-0.86 pg/m3 in Istanbul and Budapest, respectively.

  3. Cloud point extraction and flame atomic absorption spectrometry determination of lead (II) in environmental and food samples.

    PubMed

    Soylak, Mustafa; Yilmaz, Erkan; Ghaedi, Mehrorang; Montazerozohori, Mortaza; Sheibani, Marjan

    2012-01-01

    A cloud point extraction procedure for the preconcentration of Pb2+ in various samples following complexation with 2,2'-(1E,1'E)-1,1'-(2,2'-azanediylbis(ethane-2,1-diyl)bis(azan-1-yl-1-ylidene)) bis(ethan-1-yl-1-ylidene)diphenol in Triton X-114 after centrifugation is reported. A 0.5 mL portion of methanol acidified with 1.0 M HNO3 was added to the surfactant-rich phase prior to analysis by flame atomic absorption spectrometry. The influence of analytical parameters--including pH, concentrations of ligand, Triton X-114, and HNO3, bath temperature, heating time, and centrifugation rate and time--were optimized, and the effect of the matrix ions on the recovery of Pb2+ was investigated. An LOD of 1.9 ng/mL along with a preconcentration factor of 50 with RSD of 1.0% for Pb2+ were achieved. The proposed procedure was applied to the analysis of various real samples. PMID:23451399

  4. Arsenic speciation in environmental samples by hydride generation and electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Anawar, Hossain Md

    2012-01-15

    For the past few years many studies have been performed to determine arsenic (As) speciation in drinking water, food chain and other environmental samples due to its well-recognized carcinogenic and toxic effects relating to its chemical forms and oxidation states. This review provides an overview of analytical methods, preconcentration and separation techniques, developed up to now, using HGAAS and ETAAS for the determination of inorganic As and organoarsenic species in environmental samples. Specific advantages, disadvantages, selectivity, sensitivity, efficiency, rapidity, detection limit (DL), and some aspects of recent improvements and modifications for different analytical and separation techniques, that can define their application for a particular sample analysis, are highlighted. HG-AAS has high sensitivity, selectivity and low DL using suitable separation techniques; and it is a more suitable, affordable and much less expensive technique than other detectors. The concentrations of HCl and NaBH(4) have a critical effect on the HG response of As species. Use of l-cysteine as pre-reductant is advantageous over KI to obtain the same signal response for different As species under the same, optimum and mild acid concentration, and to reduce the interference of transition metals on the arsine generation. Use of different pretreatment, digestion, separation techniques and surfactants can determine As species with DL from ngL(-1) to μgL(-1). Out of all the chromatographic techniques coupled with HGAAS/ETAAS, ion-pair reversed-phase chromatography (IP-RP) is the most popular due to its higher separation efficiency, resolution selectivity, simplicity, and ability to separate up to seven As species for both non-ionic and ionic compounds in a signal run using the same column and short time. However, a combination of anion- and cation-exchange chromatography seems the most promising for complete resolution up to eight As species. The ETAAS method using different

  5. Multi-element determination of Cu, Fe, Ni and Zn content in vegetable oils samples by high-resolution continuum source atomic absorption spectrometry and microemulsion sample preparation.

    PubMed

    Nunes, Luana S; Barbosa, José T P; Fernandes, Andréa P; Lemos, Valfredo A; Santos, Walter N L Dos; Korn, Maria Graças A; Teixeira, Leonardo S G

    2011-07-15

    The aim of this work was to evaluate the microemulsification as sample preparation procedure for determination of Cu, Fe, Ni and Zn in vegetable oils samples by High-Resolution Continuum Source Flame Atomic Absorption Spectrometry (HR-CS FAAS). Microemulsions were prepared by mixing samples with propan-1-ol and aqueous acid solution, which allowed the use of inorganic aqueous standards for the calibration. To a sample mass of 0.5g, 100μL of hydrochloric acid and propan-1-ol were added and the resulting mixture diluted to a final volume of 10mL. The sample was manually shaken resulting in a visually homogeneous system. The main lines were selected for all studied metals and the detection limits (3σ, n=10) were 0.12, 0.62, 0.58 and 0.12mgkg(-1) for Cu, Fe, Ni and Zn, respectively. The relative standard deviation (RSD) ranged from 5% to 11 % in samples spiked with 0.25 and 1.5μgmL(-1) of each metal, respectively. Recoveries varied from 89% to 102%. The proposed method was applied to the determination of Cu, Fe, Ni and Zn in soybean, olive and sunflower oils. PMID:23140735

  6. Dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction combined with graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry: ultra trace determination of cadmium in water samples.

    PubMed

    Zeini Jahromi, Elham; Bidari, Araz; Assadi, Yaghoub; Milani Hosseini, Mohammad Reza; Jamali, Mohammad Reza

    2007-03-01

    Dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (DLLME) technique was successfully used as a sample preparation method for graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GF AAS). In this extraction method, 500 microL methanol (disperser solvent) containing 34 microL carbon tetrachloride (extraction solvent) and 0.00010 g ammonium pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (chelating agent) was rapidly injected by syringe into the water sample containing cadmium ions (interest analyte). Thereby, a cloudy solution formed. The cloudy state resulted from the formation of fine droplets of carbon tetrachloride, which have been dispersed, in bulk aqueous sample. At this stage, cadmium reacts with ammonium pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate, and therefore, hydrophobic complex forms which is extracted into the fine droplets of carbon tetrachloride. After centrifugation (2 min at 5000 rpm), these droplets were sedimented at the bottom of the conical test tube (25+/-1 microL). Then a 20 microL of sedimented phase containing enriched analyte was determined by GF AAS. Some effective parameters on extraction and complex formation, such as extraction and disperser solvent type and their volume, extraction time, salt effect, pH and concentration of the chelating agent have been optimized. Under the optimum conditions, the enrichment factor 125 was obtained from only 5.00 mL of water sample. The calibration graph was linear in the rage of 2-20 ng L(-1) with detection limit of 0.6 ng L(-1). The relative standard deviation (R.S.D.s) for ten replicate measurements of 20 ng L(-1) of cadmium was 3.5%. The relative recoveries of cadmium in tap, sea and rivers water samples at spiking level of 5 and 10 ng L(-1) are 108, 95, 87 and 98%, respectively. The characteristics of the proposed method have been compared with cloud point extraction (CPE), on-line liquid-liquid extraction, single drop microextraction (SDME), on-line solid phase extraction (SPE) and co-precipitation based on bibliographic data. Therefore, DLLME

  7. Cloud point extraction for the determination of cadmium and lead in biological samples by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maranhão, Tatiane De A.; Borges, Daniel L. G.; da Veiga, Márcia A. M. S.; Curtius, Adilson J.

    2005-06-01

    The phase-separation phenomenon of non-ionic surfactants occurring in aqueous solution was used for the extraction of Cd and Pb from digested biological samples. After complexation with O,O-diethyldithiophosphate (DDTP) in hydrochloric acid medium, the analytes are quantitatively extracted to the phase rich in the non-ionic surfactant octylphenoxypolyethoxyethanol (Triton X-114) after centrifugation. Methanol acidified with 0.1 mol L-1 HNO3 was added to the surfactant-rich phase prior to its analysis by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ET AAS). The adopted concentrations for DDTP, Triton X-114 and hydrochloric acid were all optimized. Pyrolysis and atomization temperatures were optimized using the extracts and pyrolysis temperatures of 700 °C for both elements and atomization temperatures of 1400 and 1600 °C for cadmium and lead, respectively, were used without adding any modifier, which shows that considerable analyte stabilization is provided by the medium itself. A more detailed investigation was carried out to determine which components of the extract were responsible for the high thermal stability achieved and it revealed that the amount of DDTP added and the phosphorus content of the digested samples contributed significantly to this phenomenon. Detection limits (3σB) of 6 and 40 ng g-1, along with enrichment factors of 129 and 18 for Cd and Pb, respectively, were achieved. The proposed procedure was applied to the analysis of five certified biological reference materials after microwave-assisted acid digestion in a mixture of H2O2 and HNO3. Comparison with certified values was performed for accuracy evaluation, resulting in good agreement according to the t-test for a 95% confidence level. The high efficiency of cloud point extraction to carry out the determination of the studied analytes in complex matrices was, therefore, demonstrated.

  8. Direct determination of phosphorus in different food samples by means of solid sampling electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry using Pd+Ca chemical modifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coşkun, Nihat; Akman, Süleyman

    2005-03-01

    In this study, direct determination of phosphorus in different food samples (milk powder, banana, and dried banana) and in various standard reference materials (apple leaves, bovine liver, pine needles) using solid sampling electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry was investigated. Aqueous standards were used for all determinations. 5 μg Pd+5 μg Ca modifier mixture was used in all experiments. Pyrolysis temperature and atomization temperature were 1100 °C and 2500 °C, respectively. High background was reduced by applying a cool-down step in the furnace program. The accuracy of solid sampling results was checked by determination of the phosphorus content after dissolving samples. There was no significant error between results found by solid sampling and solution techniques. In addition solid certified materials were investigated. There were no significant differences between the phosphorus content of CRM and results obtained. The limit of detection, based on three times the standard deviation was 0.018 μg P.

  9. Rapid determination of lead in water samples by dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction coupled with electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Naseri, Mohammad Taghi; Hosseini, Mohammad Reza Milani; Assadi, Yaghoub; Kiani, Armin

    2008-03-15

    The need for highly reliable methods for the determination of trace and ultratrace elements has been recognized in analytical chemistry and environmental science. A simple and powerful microextraction technique was used for the detection of the lead ultratrace amounts in water samples using the dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (DLLME), followed by the electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ET AAS). In this microextraction technique, a mixture of 0.50 mL acetone (disperser solvent), containing 35 microL carbon tetrachloride (extraction solvent) and 5 microL diethyldithiophosphoric acid (chelating agent), was rapidly injected by syringe into the 5.00 mL water sample, spiked with lead. In this process, the lead ions reacted with the chelating agent and were extracted into the fine droplets of CCl(4). After centrifugation (2 min at 5000 rpm), the fine CCl4 droplets were sedimented at the bottom of the conical test tube (25+/-1 microL). Then, 20 microL from the sedimented phase, containing the enriched analyte, was determined by ET AAS. The next step was the optimization of various experimental conditions, affecting DLLME, such as the type and the volume of the extraction solvent, the type and the volume of the disperser solvent, the extraction time, the salt effect, pH and the chelating agent amount. Moreover, the effect of the interfering ions on the analytes recovery was also investigated. Under the optimum conditions, the enrichment factor of 150 was obtained from only a 5.00 mL water sample. The calibration graph was linear in the range of 0.05-1 microg L(-1) with the detection limit of 0.02 microg L(-1). The relative standard deviation (R.S.D.) for seven replicate measurements of 0.50 microg L(-1) of lead was 2.5%. The relative lead recoveries in mineral, tap, well and sea water samples at the spiking level of 0.20 and 0.40 microg L(-1) varied from 93.5 to 105.0. The characteristics of the proposed method were compared with the cloud point

  10. Determination of copper in airborne particulate matter using slurry sampling and chemical vapor generation atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Silva, Laiana O B; Leao, Danilo J; dos Santos, Debora C; Matos, Geraldo D; de Andrade, Jailson B; Ferreira, Sergio L C

    2014-09-01

    The present paper describes the development of a method for the determination of copper in airborne particulate matter using slurry sampling and chemical vapor generation atomic absorption spectrometry (CVG AAS). Chemometric tools were employed to characterize the influence of several factors on the generation of volatile copper species. First, a two-level full factorial design was performed that included the following chemical variables: hydrochloric acid concentration, tetrahydroborate concentration, sulfanilamide concentration and tetrahydroborate volume, using absorbance as the response. Under the established experimental conditions, the hydrochloric acid concentration had the greatest influence on the generation of volatile copper species. Subsequently, a Box-Behnken design was performed to determine the optimum conditions for these parameters. A second chemometric study employing a two-level full factorial design was performed to evaluate the following physical factors: tetrahydroborate flow rate, flame composition, alcohol volume and sample volume. The results of this study demonstrated that the tetrahydroborate flow rate was critical for the process. The chemometric experiments determined the following experimental conditions for the method: hydrochloric acid concentration, 0.208 M; tetrahydroborate concentration, 4.59%; sulfanilamide concentration, 0.79%; tetrahydroborate volume, 2.50 mL; tetrahydroborate flow rate, 6.50 mL min(-1); alcohol volume, 200 µL; and sample volume, 7.0 mL. Thus, this method, using a slurry volume of 500 µL and a final dilution of 7 mL, allowed for the determination of copper with limits of detection and quantification of 0.30 and 0.99 µg L(-1), respectively. Precisions, expressed as RSD%, of 4.6 and 2.8% were obtained using copper solutions at concentrations of 5.0 and 50.0 µg L(-1), respectively. The accuracy was evaluated by the analysis of a certified reference material of urban particulate matter. The copper concentration

  11. Ultraviolet and Light Absorption Spectrometry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hargis, L. G.; Howell, J. A.

    1984-01-01

    Reviews developments in ultraviolet and light absorption spectrometry from December 1981 through November 1983, focusing on the chemistry involved in developing suitable reagents, absorbing systems, and methods of determination, and on physical aspects of the procedures. Includes lists of spectrophotometric methods for metals, non-metals, and…

  12. Calculations of an effective solid angle including self-absorption correction applied to gamma-ray spectrometry analysis of natural samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fraczkiewicz, R.; Walkowiak, W.

    1992-09-01

    A new method is presented for determination of uranium and thorium contents in solid samples by gamma-ray spectrometry. The analytical procedure involved determination of uranium via the 63.288 keV gamma emission of its daughter 234Th and thorium on the basis of 238.578 keV 212Pb peak. The radiochemical equilibrium was assumed. Geometry effects and exact self-absorption were taken into account by measurements of sample linear absorption coefficients and calculation of effective solid angle. IAEA standards were used for determination of detector efficiency. The method provides reliable analytical measurements even for samples much different from standard reference materials in density and gamma absorption.

  13. Method validation for control determination of mercury in fresh fish and shrimp samples by solid sampling thermal decomposition/amalgamation atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Torres, Daiane Placido; Martins-Teixeira, Maristela Braga; Cadore, Solange; Queiroz, Helena Müller

    2015-01-01

    A method for the determination of total mercury in fresh fish and shrimp samples by solid sampling thermal decomposition/amalgamation atomic absorption spectrometry (TDA AAS) has been validated following international foodstuff protocols in order to fulfill the Brazilian National Residue Control Plan. The experimental parameters have been previously studied and optimized according to specific legislation on validation and inorganic contaminants in foodstuff. Linearity, sensitivity, specificity, detection and quantification limits, precision (repeatability and within-laboratory reproducibility), robustness as well as accuracy of the method have been evaluated. Linearity of response was satisfactory for the two range concentrations available on the TDA AAS equipment, between approximately 25.0 and 200.0 μg kg(-1) (square regression) and 250.0 and 2000.0 μg kg(-1) (linear regression) of mercury. The residues for both ranges were homoscedastic and independent, with normal distribution. Correlation coefficients obtained for these ranges were higher than 0.995. Limits of quantification (LOQ) and of detection of the method (LDM), based on signal standard deviation (SD) for a low-in-mercury sample, were 3.0 and 1.0 μg kg(-1), respectively. Repeatability of the method was better than 4%. Within-laboratory reproducibility achieved a relative SD better than 6%. Robustness of the current method was evaluated and pointed sample mass as a significant factor. Accuracy (assessed as the analyte recovery) was calculated on basis of the repeatability, and ranged from 89% to 99%. The obtained results showed the suitability of the present method for direct mercury measurement in fresh fish and shrimp samples and the importance of monitoring the analysis conditions for food control purposes. Additionally, the competence of this method was recognized by accreditation under the standard ISO/IEC 17025. PMID:25996815

  14. Determination of total tin in environmental biological and water samples by atomic absorption spectrometry with graphite furnace.

    PubMed

    Dogan, S; Haerdi, W

    1980-01-01

    Analysis of traces of tin using several analytical techniques (X-ray fluorescence, neutron activation, polarographic techniques and atomic absorption) have been tested. Parameters such as simplicity, rapidity, sensitivity and interferences are compared in order to choose the most useful method for practical purpose. Finally, flameless atomic absorption was chosen for the determination of total tin concentration in different natural samples. Digestion of biological samples (plant, plankton, fish, etc.) was achieved by using Lumatom (a trade organic chemical). Thus, the digested sample is directly injected into the graphite furnace. This digestion technique is suitable and rapid with a minimum of error (contamination and losses). For tin analysis in water samples, a preconcentration of tin is carried out by coprecipitation with 1, 10-phenanthroline and tetraphenyl boron. The precipitate is separated and dissolved in alcohol or in Lumatom. The sensitivity of this method is 0.1 ng absolute tin. PMID:7451013

  15. Direct determination of fluorine in niobium oxide using slurry sampling electrothermal high-resolution continuum source molecular absorption spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Mao Dong; Becker-Ross, Helmut; Okruss, Michael; Geisler, Sebastian; Florek, Stefan; Richter, Silke; Meckelburg, Angela

    Aiming for a round-robin test, a new method for the direct determination of fluorine in niobium oxide has been developed. It is based on the use of high-resolution molecular absorption spectra of calcium mono-fluoride (CaF) generated in the graphite tube, combined with the slurry sampling technique. The absorption measurement was performed at the 606.44 nm CaF rotational line. By using graphite tubes with zirconium carbide (ZrC) modified platform, the molecular absorption sensitivity of CaF has been improved by a factor of 20, and no additional chemical modifier was necessary. Generally, non-spectral interferences were observed in the presence of HCl, H2SO4, and H3PO4. For HCl, additional spectral interference occurred due to an overlap of the absorption spectra of CaF and CaCl. However, due to the absence of these mentioned substances in the current material, such interferences do not exist for this application. The characteristic mass found for the CaF 606.44 nm line was 0.1 ng; the limit of detection was 5 mg fluorine per kg solid sample (3σ criterion). The results obtained by the method were within the range of certified values. Comparing to the classical method such as the pyrohydrolysis-photometric method, the developed new method showed clear advantages regarding sensitivity and specificity. The time requirement for one sample analysis was strongly shortened from several hours to only some minutes.

  16. Determination of macro- and micronutrients in plant leaves by high-resolution continuum source flame atomic absorption spectrometry combining instrumental and sample preparation strategies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveira, Silvana R.; Gomes Neto, José A.; Nóbrega, Joaquim A.; Jones, Bradley T.

    2010-04-01

    A method for determination of B, Ca, Cu, Fe, K, Mg, Mn, Mo, P, S and Zn in plant tissues by high-resolution continuum source flame atomic absorption spectrometry (HR-CS FAAS) is proposed. This method is based on special features of HR-CS-AAS, such as side pixel registration, wavelength integrated absorbance, and molecular absorption bands, for determining macro- and micronutrients in foliar analysis without requiring several different strategies for sample preparation and adjustment of the analytes concentration ranges. Plant samples were analyzed and results for certified materials were in agreement at a 95% confidence level (paired t-test) with reference values. Recoveries of analytes added to plant digests varied within the 82-112% interval. Relative standard deviations ( n = 12) were lower than or equal to 5.7% for all analytes in all concentration ranges.

  17. Mesoporous Silica Nanoparticles as an Adsorbent for Preconcentration and Determination of Trace Amount of Nickel in Environmental Samples by Atom Trap Flame Atomic Absorption Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirkhanloo, H.; Falahnejad, M.; Zavvar Mousavi, H.

    2016-01-01

    A rapid enrichment method based on solid-phase extraction (SPE) has been established for preconcentration and separation of trace Ni(II) ions in water samples prior to their determination by atom trap flame atomic absorption spectrometry. A column filled with bulky NH2-UVM7 was used as the novel adsorbent. Under optimal conditions, the linear range, limit of detection (LOD), and preconcentration factor (PF) were 3-92 μg/L, 0.8 μg/L, and 100, respectively. The validity of the method was checked by the standard reference material.

  18. Investigating effects of sample pretreatment on protein stability using size-exclusion chromatography and high-resolution continuum source atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Rakow, Tobias; El Deeb, Sami; Hahne, Thomas; El-Hady, Deia Abd; AlBishri, Hassan M; Wätzig, Hermann

    2014-09-01

    In this study, size-exclusion chromatography and high-resolution atomic absorption spectrometry methods have been developed and evaluated to test the stability of proteins during sample pretreatment. This especially includes different storage conditions but also adsorption before or even during the chromatographic process. For the development of the size exclusion method, a Biosep S3000 5 μm column was used for investigating a series of representative model proteins, namely bovine serum albumin, ovalbumin, monoclonal immunoglobulin G antibody, and myoglobin. Ambient temperature storage was found to be harmful to all model proteins, whereas short-term storage up to 14 days could be done in an ordinary refrigerator. Freezing the protein solutions was always complicated and had to be evaluated for each protein in the corresponding solvent. To keep the proteins in their native state a gentle freezing temperature should be chosen, hence liquid nitrogen should be avoided. Furthermore, a high-resolution continuum source atomic absorption spectrometry method was developed to observe the adsorption of proteins on container material and chromatographic columns. Adsorption to any container led to a sample loss and lowered the recovery rates. During the pretreatment and high-performance size-exclusion chromatography, adsorption caused sample losses of up to 33%. PMID:24964383

  19. Fast determination of phosphorus in honey, milk and infant formulas by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry using a slurry sampling procedure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López-García, I.; Viñas, P.; Romero-Romero, R.; Hernández-Córdoba, M.

    2007-01-01

    A procedure for the electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometric determination of phosphorus in honey, milk and infant formulas using slurried samples is described. Suspensions prepared in a medium containing 50% v/v concentrated hydrogen peroxide, 1% v/v concentrated nitric acid, 10% m/v glucose, 5% m/v sucrose and 100 mg l - 1 of potassium were introduced directly into the furnace. For the honey samples, multiple injection of the sample was necessary. The modifier selected was a mixture of 20 μg palladium and 5 μg magnesium nitrate, which was injected after the sample and before proceeding with the drying and calcination steps. Calibration was performed using aqueous standards prepared in the same suspension medium and the graph was linear between 5 and 80 mg l - 1 of phosphorus. The reliability of the procedure was checked by comparing the results obtained by the new developed method with those found when using a reference spectrophotometric method after a mineralization step, and by analyzing several certified reference materials.

  20. The application of atomic absorption spectrometry for the determination of residual active pharmaceutical ingredients in cleaning validation samples.

    PubMed

    Bubnič, Zoran; Urleb, Uroš; Kreft, Katjuša; Veber, Marjan

    2011-03-01

    The objective of this work was the development and validation of atomic absorption spectrometric (AAS) methods for the determination of residual active pharmaceutical ingredients (API) in rinse samples for cleaning validation. AAS as an indirect method for the determination of API in rinse samples can be applied when it is in the form of salt with metal ions or when the metal ion is a part of the API's structure. The electrothermal AAS methods (aqueous and ethanol medium) for the determination of magnesium in esomeprazole magnesium and the flame AAS method for the determination of lithium in lithium carbonate in rinse samples were developed. Various combinations of solvents were tested and a combination of 1% aqueous or ethanol solution of nitric acid for esomeprazole magnesium and 0.1% aqueous solution of nitric acid for lithium carbonate were found to be the most suitable. The atomization conditions in the graphite furnace and in the flame were carefully studied to avoid losses of analyte and to achieve suitable sensitivity. The cleaning verification methods were validated with respect to accuracy, precision, linearity, limit of detection, and quantification. In all the cases, the limits of detection were at the microgram level. The methods were successfully applied for the determination of esomeprazole magnesium and lithium carbonate in rinse samples from cleaning procedures. PMID:20923390

  1. Investigation of spectral interferences in the determination of lead in fertilizers and limestone samples using high-resolution continuum source graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borges, Aline R.; Becker, Emilene M.; François, Luciane L.; de Jesus, Alexandre; Vale, Maria Goreti R.; Welz, Bernhard; Dessuy, Morgana B.; de Andrade, Jailson B.

    2014-11-01

    In the present work, spectral interferences on the determination of lead in fertilizer and limestone samples were investigated using high-resolution continuum source graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry at the main analytical lines: 217.001 and 283.306 nm. For these investigations, samples were introduced into the furnace as slurry together with a mixture of Pd and Mg as chemical modifier. Spectral interferences were observed for some samples at both analytical lines. In order to verify whether a wet digestion procedure would avoid these interferences, a reference method for wet digestion of fertilizers was employed as an alternative sample preparation procedure. However, the same interferences were also observed in the digested samples. In order to identify and eliminate the fine-structured background using a least-squares background correction, reference spectra were generated using the combination of different species. The use of the latter technique allowed the elimination of spectral interferences for most of the investigated samples, making possible the determination of lead in fertilizer and limestone samples free of interferences. The best results were found using a reference spectrum of NH4H2PO4 at 217.001 nm, and a mixture of H2SO4 + Ca and HNO3 + Ca at the 283.306 nm line. The accuracy of the method was evaluated using a certified reference material “Trace Elements in Multi-Nutrient Fertilizer”. Similar results were obtained using line source graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry with Zeeman-effect background correction, indicating that the latter technique was also capable to correct the spectral interferences, at least in part.

  2. Method development for the determination of bromine in coal using high-resolution continuum source graphite furnace molecular absorption spectrometry and direct solid sample analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pereira, Éderson R.; Castilho, Ivan N. B.; Welz, Bernhard; Gois, Jefferson S.; Borges, Daniel L. G.; Carasek, Eduardo; de Andrade, Jailson B.

    2014-06-01

    This work reports a simple approach for Br determination in coal using direct solid sample analysis in a graphite tube furnace and high-resolution continuum source molecular absorption spectrometry. The molecular absorbance of the calcium mono-bromide (CaBr) molecule has been measured using the rotational line at 625.315 nm. Different chemical modifiers (zirconium, ruthenium, palladium and a mixture of palladium and magnesium nitrates) have been evaluated in order to increase the sensitivity of the CaBr absorption, and Zr showed the best overall performance. The pyrolysis and vaporization temperatures were 800 °C and 2200 °C, respectively. Accuracy and precision of the method have been evaluated using certified coal reference materials (BCR 181, BCR 182, NIST 1630a, and NIST 1632b) with good agreement (between 98 and 103%) with the informed values for Br. The detection limit was around 4 ng Br, which corresponds to about 1.5 μg g- 1 Br in coal, based on a sample mass of 3 mg. In addition, the results were in agreement with those obtained using electrothermal vaporization inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry, based on a Student t-test at a 95% confidence level. A mechanism for the formation of the CaBr molecule is proposed, which might be considered for other diatomic molecules as well.

  3. Determination of nickel in water, food, and biological samples by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry after preconcentration on modified carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Taher, Mohammad Ali; Mazaheri, Lida; Ashkenani, Hamid; Mohadesi, Alireza; Afzali, Daryoush

    2014-01-01

    A new and sensitive SPE method using modified carbon nanotubes for extraction and preconcentration, and electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometric determination of nickel (Ni) in real samples at ng/L levels was investigated. First, multiwalled carbon nanotubes were oxidized with concentrated HNO3, then modified with 2-(5-bormo-2-pyridylazo)-5-diethylaminophenol reagent. The adsorption was achieved quantitatively on a modified carbon nanotubes column in a pH range of 6.5 to 8.5; the adsorbed Ni(II) ions were then desorbed by passing 5.0 mL of 1 M HNO3. The effects of analytical parameters, including pH of the solution, eluent type and volume, sample volume, flow rate of the eluent, and matrix ions, were investigated for optimization of the presented procedure. The enrichment factor was 180, and the LOD for Ni was 4.9 ng/L. The method was applied to the determination of Ni in water, food, and biological samples, and reproducible results were obtained. PMID:24672882

  4. Automatic microemulsion preparation for metals determination in fuel samples using a flow-batch analyzer and graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Cunha, Francisco Antônio S; Sousa, Rafael A; Harding, David P; Cadore, Solange; Almeida, Luciano F; Araújo, Mário César U

    2012-05-21

    The principal thermodynamic advantages of using microemulsions over standard emulsions for flow metal analysis are the greatly increased analyte stability and emulsive homogeneity that improve both the ease of sample preparation, and the analytical result. In this study a piston propelled flow-batch analyzer (PFBA) for the determination of Cu, Cr and Pb in gasoline and naphtha by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GF AAS) was explored. Investigative phase modeling for low dilution was conducted both for gasoline and naphtha microemulsions. Rheological considerations were also explored including a mathematical flow derivation to fine tune the system's operational parameters, and the GF AAS coupling. Both manual and automated procedures for microemulsion preparation were compared. The results of the paired t test at a 95% confidence level showed no significant differences between them. Further recovery test results confirmed a negligible matrix effect of the sample on the analyte absorption signals and an efficient stabilization of the samples (with metals) submitted to microemulsion treatment. The accuracy of the developed procedure was attested by good recovery percentages in the ranges of 100.0±3.5% for Pb in the naphtha samples, and 100.2±3.4% and 100.7±4.6% for Cu and Cr, respectively in gasoline samples. PMID:22541820

  5. Isotope Enrichment Detection by Laser Ablation - Laser Absorption Spectrometry: Automated Environmental Sampling and Laser-Based Analysis for HEU Detection

    SciTech Connect

    Anheier, Norman C.; Bushaw, Bruce A.

    2010-01-01

    The global expansion of nuclear power, and consequently the uranium enrichment industry, requires the development of new safeguards technology to mitigate proliferation risks. Current enrichment monitoring instruments exist that provide only yes/no detection of highly enriched uranium (HEU) production. More accurate accountancy measurements are typically restricted to gamma-ray and weight measurements taken in cylinder storage yards. Analysis of environmental and cylinder content samples have much higher effectiveness, but this approach requires onsite sampling, shipping, and time-consuming laboratory analysis and reporting. Given that large modern gaseous centrifuge enrichment plants (GCEPs) can quickly produce a significant quantity (SQ ) of HEU, these limitations in verification suggest the need for more timely detection of potential facility misuse. The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is developing an unattended safeguards instrument concept, combining continuous aerosol particulate collection with uranium isotope assay, to provide timely analysis of enrichment levels within low enriched uranium facilities. This approach is based on laser vaporization of aerosol particulate samples, followed by wavelength tuned laser diode spectroscopy to characterize the uranium isotopic ratio through subtle differences in atomic absorption wavelengths. Environmental sampling (ES) media from an integrated aerosol collector is introduced into a small, reduced pressure chamber, where a focused pulsed laser vaporizes material from a 10 to 20-µm diameter spot of the surface of the sampling media. The plume of ejected material begins as high-temperature plasma that yields ions and atoms, as well as molecules and molecular ions. We concentrate on the plume of atomic vapor that remains after the plasma has expanded and then cooled by the surrounding cover gas. Tunable diode lasers are directed through this plume and each isotope is detected by monitoring absorbance

  6. Dithizone chloroform single drop microextraction system combined with electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry using Ir as permanent modifier for the determination of Cd in water and biological samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Zhefeng; Zhou, Wei

    2006-07-01

    A simple and sensitive method using dithizone-chloroform single drop microextraction has been developed for separation and preconcentration of trace Cd prior to its determination by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry with Ir as permanent modifier. Parameters, such as pyrolysis and atomization temperature, solvent type, pH, dithizone concentration, extraction time, organic drop volume, stirring rate and sample volume were investigated. Under the optimized conditions, a detection limit (3 σ) of 0.7 ng/l and enrichment factor of 65 were achieved. The relative standard deviation was 7.4% ( c = 0.2 μg/l, n = 5). The developed method has been applied to the determination of trace Cd in water samples and biological reference materials with satisfactory results.

  7. Solvent microextraction-flame atomic absorption spectrometry (SME-FAAS) for determination of ultratrace amounts of cadmium in meat and fish samples.

    PubMed

    Goudarzi, Nasser

    2009-02-11

    A simple, low cost and highly sensitive method based on solvent microextraction (SME) for separation/preconcentration and flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS) was proposed for the determination of ultratrace amounts of cadmium in meat and fish samples. The analytical procedure involved the formation of a hydrophobic complex by mixing the analyte solution with an ammonium pyrrolidinedithiocarbamate (APDC) solution. In suitable conditions, the complex of cadmium-APDC entered the micro organic phase, and thus, separation of the analyte from the matrix was achieved. Under optimal chemical and instrumental conditions, a detection limit (3 sigma) of 0.8 ng L(-1) and an enrichment factor of 93 were achieved. The relative standard deviation for the method was found to be 2.2% for Cd. The interference effects of some anions and cations were also investigated. The developed method has been applied to the determination of trace Cd in meat and fish samples. PMID:19138082

  8. Graphite filter atomizer in atomic absorption spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katskov, Dmitri A.

    2007-09-01

    Graphite filter atomizers (GFA) for electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS) show substantial advantages over commonly employed electrothermal vaporizers and atomizers, tube and platform furnaces, for direct determination of high and medium volatility elements in matrices associated with strong spectral and chemical interferences. Two factors provide lower limits of detection and shorter determination cycles with the GFA: the vaporization area in the GFA is separated from the absorption volume by a porous graphite partition; the sample is distributed over a large surface of a collector in the vaporization area. These factors convert the GFA into an efficient chemical reactor. The research concerning the GFA concept, technique and analytical methodology, carried out mainly in the author's laboratory in Russia and South Africa, is reviewed. Examples of analytical applications of the GFA in AAS for analysis of organic liquids and slurries, bio-samples and food products are given. Future prospects for the GFA are discussed in connection with analyses by fast multi-element AAS.

  9. Solid sampling determination of lithium and sodium additives in microsamples of yttrium oxyorthosilicate by high-resolution continuum source graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laczai, Nikoletta; Kovács, László; Péter, Ágnes; Bencs, László

    2016-03-01

    Solid sampling high resolution continuum source graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (SS-HR-CS-GFAAS) methods were developed and studied for the fast and sensitive quantitation of Li and Na additives in microsamples of cerium-doped yttrium oxyorthosilicate (Y2SiO5:Ce) scintillator materials. The methods were optimized for solid samples by studying a set of GFAAS conditions (i.e., the sample mass, sensitivity of the analytical lines, and graphite furnace heating programs). Powdered samples in the mass range of 0.099-0.422 mg were dispensed onto graphite sample insertion boats, weighed and analyzed. Pyrolysis and atomization temperatures were optimized by the use of single-element standard solutions of Li and Na (acidified with 0.144 mol/L HNO3) at the Li I 610.353 nm and Na I 285.3013 nm analytical lines. For calibration purposes, the method of standard addition with Li and Na solutions was applied. The correlation coefficients (R values) of the calibration graphs were not worse than 0.9678. The limit of detection for oxyorthosilicate samples was 20 μg/g and 80 μg/g for Li and Na, respectively. The alkaline content of the solid samples were found to be in the range of 0.89 and 8.4 mg/g, respectively. The accuracy of the results was verified by means of analyzing certified reference samples, using methods of standard (solution) addition calibration.

  10. A technique coupling the analyte electrodeposition followed by in-situ stripping with electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry for analysis of samples with high NaCl contents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Čánský, Zdeněk; Rychlovský, Petr; Petrová, Zuzana; Matousek, J. P.

    2007-03-01

    A technique coupling the analyte electrodeposition followed by in-situ stripping with electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry has been developed for determination of lead and cadmium in samples with high salt contents. To separate the analyte from the sample matrix, the analyte was in-situ quantitatively electrodeposited on a platinum sampling capillary serving as the cathode (sample volume, 20 μL). The spent electrolyte containing the sample matrix was then withdrawn, the capillary with the analyte deposited was washed with deionized water and the analyte was stripped into a chemically simple electrolyte (5 g/L NH 4H 2PO 4) by reversing the polarity of the electrodeposition circuit. Electrothermal atomization using a suitable optimized temperature program followed. A fully automated manifold was designed for this coupled technique and the appropriate control software was developed. The operating conditions for determination of Pb and Cd in samples with high contents of inorganic salts were optimized, the determination was characterized by principal analytical parameters and its applicability was verified on analyses of urine reference samples. The absolute limits of detection for lead and cadmium (3 σ criterion) in a sample containing 30 g/L NaCl were 8.5 pg and 2.3 pg, respectively (peak absorbance) and the RSD values amounted to 1.6% and 1.9% for lead (at the 40 ng mL - 1 level) and cadmium (at the 4.0 ng mL - 1 level), respectively. These values (and also the measuring sensitivity) are superior to the results attained in conventional electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometric determination of Pb and Cd in pure solutions (5 g/L NH 4H 2PO 4). The sensitivity of the Pb and Cd determination is not affected by the NaCl concentration up to a value of 100 g/L, demonstrating an efficient matrix removal during the electrodeposition step.

  11. Use of High-Resolution Continuum Source Flame Atomic Absorption Spectrometry (HR-CS FAAS) for Sequential Multi-Element Determination of Metals in Seawater and Wastewater Samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peña-Vázquez, E.; Barciela-Alonso, M. C.; Pita-Calvo, C.; Domínguez-González, R.; Bermejo-Barrera, P.

    2015-09-01

    The objective of this work is to develop a method for the determination of metals in saline matrices using high-resolution continuum source flame atomic absorption spectrometry (HR-CS FAAS). Module SFS 6 for sample injection was used in the manual mode, and flame operating conditions were selected. The main absorption lines were used for all the elements, and the number of selected analytical pixels were 5 (CP±2) for Cd, Cu, Fe, Ni, Pb and Zn, and 3 pixels for Mn (CP±1). Samples were acidified (0.5% (v/v) nitric acid), and the standard addition method was used for the sequential determination of the analytes in diluted samples (1:2). The method showed good precision (RSD(%) < 4%, except for Pb (6.5%)) and good recoveries. Accuracy was checked after the analysis of an SPS-WW2 wastewater reference material diluted with synthetic seawater (dilution 1:2), showing a good agreement between certified and experimental results.

  12. Element-selective trace detection of toxic species in environmental samples using chromatographic techniques and derivative diode laser absorption spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koch, J.; Zybin, A.; Niemax, K.

    1998-10-01

    Very sensitive laser absorption techniques based on a double-beam scheme with logarithmic processing of the detector signals and wavelength modulation of laser diodes are presented. Detection limits equivalent to 10-7 absorption per square root of detection bandwidth are obtained if sufficient laser power is available and if the absorption is also subject to additional modulation. The analytical versatility of these techniques is demonstrated by quantitative analysis of very low concentrations of (i) Cr(VI) species in tap water and (ii) chlorinated poly-aromatics (chlorophenols) in plant extracts, both after chromatographic separation. The atomic absorption measurements were performed in an air-acetylene flame (Cr) and in a low-pressure microwave-induced plasma (chlorophenols).

  13. Fast sequential multi-element determination of major and minor elements in environmental samples and drinking waters by high-resolution continuum source flame atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Nieto, Beatriz; Gismera, Ma Jesús; Sevilla, Ma Teresa; Procopio, Jesús R

    2015-01-01

    The fast sequential multi-element determination of 11 elements present at different concentration levels in environmental samples and drinking waters has been investigated using high-resolution continuum source flame atomic absorption spectrometry. The main lines for Cu (324.754 nm), Zn (213.857 nm), Cd (228.802 nm), Ni (232.003 nm) and Pb (217.001 nm), main and secondary absorption lines for Mn (279.482 and 279.827 nm), Fe (248.327, 248.514 and 302.064 nm) and Ca (422.673 and 239.856 nm), secondary lines with different sensitivities for Na (589.592 and 330.237 nm) and K (769.897 and 404.414 nm) and a secondary line for Mg (202.582 nm) have been chosen to perform the analysis. A flow injection system has been used for sample introduction so sample consumption has been reduced up to less than 1 mL per element, measured in triplicate. Furthermore, the use of multiplets for Fe and the side pixel registration approach for Mg have been studied in order to reduce sensitivity and extend the linear working range. The figures of merit have been calculated and the proposed method was applied to determine these elements in a pine needles reference material (SRM 1575a), drinking and natural waters and soil extracts. Recoveries of analytes added at different concentration levels to water samples and extracts of soils were within 88-115% interval. In this way, the fast sequential multi-element determination of major and minor elements can be carried out, in triplicate, with successful results without requiring additional dilutions of samples or several different strategies for sample preparation using about 8-9 mL of sample. PMID:25479863

  14. Determination of chlorine in food samples via the AlCl molecule using high-resolution continuum source molecular absorption spectrometry in a graphite furnace

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fechetia, Miriam; Tognon, André Luiz; da Veiga, Márcia A. M. S.

    2012-05-01

    Determination of chlorine using the molecular absorption of aluminum mono-chloride (AlCl) at the 261.418 nm wavelength was accomplished by high-resolution continuum source molecular absorption spectrometry using a transversely heated graphite tube furnace with an integrated platform. For the analysis, 10 μL of the sample followed by 10 μL of a solution containing Al-Ag-Sr modifier, (1 g L- 1 each), were directly injected onto the platform. A spectral interference due to the use of Al-Ag-Sr as mixed modifier was easily corrected by the least-squares algorithm present in the spectrometer software. The pyrolysis and vaporization temperatures were 500 °C and 2200 °C, respectively. To evaluate the feasibility of a simple procedure for the determination of chlorine in food samples present in our daily lives, two different digestion methods were applied, namely (A) an acid digestion method using HNO3 only at room temperature, and (B) a digestion method with Ag, HNO3 and H2O2, where chlorine is precipitated as a low-solubility salt (AgCl), which is then dissolved with ammonia solution. The experimental results obtained with method B were in good agreement with the certified values and demonstrated that the proposed method is more accurate than method A. This is because the formation of silver chloride prevented analyte losses by volatilization. The limit of detection (LOD, 3σ/s) for Cl in methods A and B was 18 μg g- 1 and 9 μg g- 1, respectively, 1.7 and 3.3 times lower compared to published work using inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry, and absolute LODs were 2.4 and 1.2 ng, respectively.

  15. Influence of citric acid as chemical modifier for lead determination in dietary calcium supplement samples by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cezar Paz de Mattos, Julio; Medeiros Nunes, Adriane; Figueiredo Martins, Ayrton; Luiz Dressler, Valderi; Marlon de Moraes Flores, Érico

    2005-06-01

    Citric acid was used as a chemical modifier for Pb determination by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry in dietary supplement samples (calcium carbonate, dolomite and oyster shell samples) and its efficiency was compared to the use of palladium. Pyrolysis and atomization curves were established without use of chemical modifier, with the addition of 20, 100 and 200 μg of citric acid, and with 3 μg of palladium. The citric acid modifier made possible the interference-free Pb determination in the presence of high concentrations of Ca and Mg nitrates. Acid sample digestion involving closed vessels (microwave-assisted and conventional heating) and acid attack using polypropylene vessels at room temperature were compared. All digestion procedures presented similar results for calcium carbonate and dolomite samples. However, for oyster shell samples accurate results were obtained only with the use of closed vessel systems. Analyte addition and matrix-matched standards were used for calibration. The characteristic mass for Pb using citric acid and palladium were 16 and 25 pg, respectively. The relative standard deviation (RSD) was always less than 5% when citric acid was used. The relative and absolute limits of detection were 0.02 μg g - 1 and 8 pg with citric acid and 0.1 μg g - 1 and 44 pg with the Pd modifier, respectively ( n = 10, 3σ). The recovery of Pb in spiked calcium supplement samples (10 μg l - 1 ) was between 98% and 105%. With the use of 100 μg of citric acid as chemical modifier, problems such as high background absorption and high RSD values were minimized in comparison to the addition of 3 μg of palladium.

  16. Simultaneous determination of iron and nickel in fluoropolymers by solid sampling high-resolution continuum source graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Soares, Bruno M; Santos, Rafael F; Bolzan, Rodrigo C; Muller, Edson I; Primel, Ednei G; Duarte, Fabio A

    2016-11-01

    This paper reports the development of a method of simultaneous determination of iron and nickel in fluoropolymers by high-resolution continuum source graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (HR-CS GF AAS) with direct solid sampling. In order to carry out simultaneous measurements, both the main resonance line of nickel (232.003nm) and the adjacent secondary line of iron (232.036nm) were monitored in the same spectral window. The proposed method was optimized with a perfluoroalkoxy (PFA) sample and was applied to the determination of iron and nickel in fluorinated ethylene propylene (FEP) and modified polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE-TFM) samples. Pyrolysis and atomization temperatures, as well as the use of Pd and H2 (during pyrolysis) as chemical modifiers, were carefully investigated. Compromise temperatures for pyrolysis and atomization of both analytes were achieved at 800 and 2300°C, respectively, using only 0.5Lmin(-1) H2 as chemical modifier during pyrolysis. Calibration curves were performed with aqueous standards by using a single solution which contained both analytes. Limits of detection were 221 and 9.6ngg(-1) for iron and nickel, respectively. Analyte concentrations in all samples ranged from 3.53 to 12.4µgg(-1) for iron and from 37 to 78ngg(-1) for nickel, with relative standard deviation less than 19%. Accuracy was evaluated by comparing these results with those obtained by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry after sample digestion by microwave-induced combustion and no significant statistical difference was observed. PMID:27591638

  17. Synthesis of a new molecularly imprinted polymer for sorption of the silver ions from geological and antiseptic samples for determination by flame atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Hashemi-Moghaddam, Hamid; Yahyazadeh, Faegheh; Vardini, Mohammad Taghi

    2014-01-01

    A new molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) was synthesized using methacrylic acid (functional monomer), ethylene glycol dimethacrylate (crosslinker), 2,2'-azobisisobutironitril (initiator), silver (Ag) dithizone complex (template), and chloroform (porogenic solvent). This process was a noncovalent, bulk, thermal radical-polymerization. To compare the performance of this polymer, control polymer (nonimprinted polymer) was prepared under well-defined conditions without the use of a template. Extraction experiments were performed on the MIP and a nonimprinted polymer. Then, various parameters were optimized, such as pH, time, concentration of sample, and type of eluent for elution of Ag from polymer. In addition, interfering effects were investigated on the absorption of Ag by the MIP. This polymer was used for the rapid extraction and preconcentration of Ag from an antiseptic and geological sample. Finally, the amount of Ag was measured by flame atomic absorption spectrometry after preconcentration by the synthesized MIP, and results were compared with a direct inductively coupled plasma method. The results showed high performance of this method in preconcentration of Ag. PMID:25902996

  18. Determination of Cd, Cr, Cu, Pb and Zn in human semen by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry after microwave sample dissolution.

    PubMed

    Alvarado, J; Moreno, R; Cristiano, A R

    1991-09-01

    Human semen samples were analyzed by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry, using L'vov platforms and the method of standard additions, to determine their Cd, Cr, Cu, Pb and Zn content. The samples were analyzed directly and after conventional and microwave wet acid dissolution. Matrix modification, using magnesium and palladium nitrates and ammonium biphosphate solutions, was evaluated for the analysis of the microwave-digested samples. The best results were obtained for Cr, Cu and Zn using Pd(NO3)2, and a mixture of Mg(NO3)2 and Pd(NO3)2 solutions. The direct analysis of water-diluted semen produced inaccurate results with unacceptably high standard deviations. The results obtained for the microwave-dissolved samples showed relative standard deviation values within the range 0.63-8.4%. The analysis of spiked semen solutions showed recoveries of the added analytes ranging from 96 to 104%. The accuracy of the measurements was checked against the NIST 1,577a, bovine liver, standard reference material. Sample dissolution time was drastically reduced from 3-4 hours, using the conventional method, to approximately 8 minutes using the microwave-assisted wet acid digestion procedure. PMID:1821719

  19. Solid phase chelating extraction and separation of inorganic antimony species in pharmaceutical and water samples for graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zih-Perényi, Katalin; Jankovics, Péter; Sugár, Éva; Lásztity, Alexandra

    2008-03-01

    A separation procedure for antimony(III) and antimony(V) was developed with the use of chelating celluloses. Sb(III) was separately pre-concentrated on imino diacetic acid-ethyl cellulose in the acidic pH range, in which the uptake of Sb(V) was negligible in the μg L - 1 concentration range. On the other hand, both Sb species Sb(V) and Sb(III) were pre-concentrated on a chloride form of 2,2'-diaminodiethylamine-cellulose. These solid phase extraction procedures were combined with graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (SPE-GFAAS) for Sb detection. Pharmaceutical compounds of organic and inorganic types (ten compounds), as well as mineral water samples (twelve types) were analyzed. Detection limits of 0.18 µg L - 1 Sb(III) and 0.25 µg L - 1 Sb(V) were found in aqueous sample solutions and water samples, respectively, considering a 25-fold pre-concentration. The total Sb, mostly in the form of Sb(V), could be determined in phosphate-containing pharmaceuticals, while in phosphoric acid, Sb(III) was the dominant form. In all other types of samples the Sb content was below the detection threshold, and therefore, the potential suitability of the SPE-GFAAS method for the determination of Sb(III) species was proven by recovery tests of spiked samples. This method ensures the required detection power with regard to the allowable Sb limits established by international organizations.

  20. Determination of cadmium, chromium, copper and lead in sediments and soil samples by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry using zirconium containing chemical modifiers.

    PubMed

    Acar, Orhan

    2006-05-01

    A method for direct determination of cadmium, chromium, copper and lead in sediments and soil samples by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry using Zr, Ir, etylenediamine acetic acid (EDTA), Zr + EDTA, Ir + EDTA, Zr + Ir and Zr + Ir + EDTA as chemical modifiers in 0.5% (v/v) Triton X-100 plus 0.2% (v/v) nitric acid mixture used as diluent was developed. The effects of mass and mass ratio of modifiers on analytes in sample solutions were studied. The optimum masses and mass ratios of modifiers: 20 microg of Zr, 4 microg of Ir, 100 microg of EDTA and 20 microg of Zr + 4 microg of Ir + 100 microg of EDTA, were used to enhance the analyte signals. Pyrolysis and atomization temperatures, atomization and background absorption profiles, characteristic masses, and detection limits of analytes in samples were compared in the presence or absence of a modifier. The detection limits and characteristic masses of analytes in a 0.5% (m/v) dissolved sample (dilution factor of 200 ml g(-1)) obtained with Zr + Ir + EDTA are 8.0 ng g(-1) and 1.2 pg for Cd, 61 ng g(-1) and 4.3 pg for Cr, 32 ng g(-1) and 23 pg for Cu, and 3.4 ng g(-1) and 19 pg for Pb, respectively. The Zr + Ir + EDTA modifier mixture was found to be preferable for the determination of analytes in sediment and soil-certified and standard reference materials. Depending on the sample type, the percent recoveries of analytes were increased from 81 to 103% by using the proposed modifier mixture; the results obtained are in good agreement with the certified values. PMID:16770053

  1. Determination of trace amounts of gold in acid-attacked environmental samples by atomic absorption spectrometry with electrothermal atomization after preconcentration.

    PubMed

    Medved, Ján; Bujdos, Marek; Matús, Peter; Kubová, Jana

    2004-05-01

    A method for determination of trace amounts of gold in environmental samples (rocks, soils, sediments, and waters) by atomic absorption spectrometry with electrothermal atomization (ETAAS) after preconcentration using a chelating sorbent Spheron Thiol 1000 is described. The method accurately determines gold between 0.001 and several tens of grams per ton in samples having complex variations in mineralogy. Pulverized samples are roasted at 650 degrees C to oxidize any sulfide and/or carbonaceous material. Samples are then subjected to a series of acid treatments to eliminate any silica matrix and to dissolve the sample. The Spheron Thiol 1000 is added to the sample solution, and then with sorbed gold is filtered out, washed, and ignited at 550 degrees C. The residue is dissolved in aqua regia, evaporated, dissolved in distilled water, transferred to a volumetric flask, and analyzed by ETAAS. The limits of detection of gold, based on the 3 sigma definition, were 0.5 ng g(-1) for 10-g samples (rocks, sediments, soils) and 0.05 ng mL(-1) for 1-L water samples. Precision of determination expressed by the relative standard deviation varied from 2.9% to 16.4%. The accuracy of the method is verified by analysis of certified reference materials. The obtained analytical results are in good agreement with attested values. The developed method was applied for gold determination in environmental samples affected by the acidification (acid mine drainage which is mainly a product of pyrite oxidation) from an open quartzite mine in the Sobov region situated NE of the city of Banská Stiavnica (Slovakia). PMID:14997262

  2. Investigation of chemical modifiers for sulfur determination in diesel fuel samples by high-resolution continuum source graphite furnace molecular absorption spectrometry using direct analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huber, Charles S.; Vale, Maria Goreti R.; Welz, Bernhard; Andrade, Jailson B.; Dessuy, Morgana B.

    2015-06-01

    High-resolution continuum source graphite furnace molecular absorption spectrometry has been applied for sulfur determination in diesel fuel. The sharp rotational lines of the carbon monosulfide molecule (formed during the vaporization step) were used to measure the absorbance. The analytical line at 258.056 nm was monitored using the sum of three pixels. Different chemical modifiers were investigated and the mixture of palladium and magnesium was used as chemical modifier in combination with iridium as permanent modifier. L-Cysteine was chosen as sulfur standard and the calibration was done against aqueous standard solutions. The proposed method was applied for the analyses of four diesel samples: two S10 samples and two S500 samples. The trueness of the method was checked with a certified reference material (CRM) of sulfur in diesel fuel (NIST 2724b). Accurate results, for samples and CRM, were achieved after a dilution with propan-1-ol. The following figures of merit were obtained: characteristic mass of 17 ± 3 ng, limit of detection and limit of quantification of 1.4 mg kg- 1 and 4.7 mg kg- 1, respectively.

  3. A Green Preconcentration Method for Determination of Cobalt and Lead in Fresh Surface and Waste Water Samples Prior to Flame Atomic Absorption Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Naeemullah; Kazi, Tasneem Gul; Shah, Faheem; Afridi, Hassan Imran; Khan, Sumaira; Arian, Sadaf Sadia; Brahman, Kapil Dev

    2012-01-01

    Cloud point extraction (CPE) has been used for the preconcentration and simultaneous determination of cobalt (Co) and lead (Pb) in fresh and wastewater samples. The extraction of analytes from aqueous samples was performed in the presence of 8-hydroxyquinoline (oxine) as a chelating agent and Triton X-114 as a nonionic surfactant. Experiments were conducted to assess the effect of different chemical variables such as pH, amounts of reagents (oxine and Triton X-114), temperature, incubation time, and sample volume. After phase separation, based on the cloud point, the surfactant-rich phase was diluted with acidic ethanol prior to its analysis by the flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS). The enhancement factors 70 and 50 with detection limits of 0.26 μg L−1 and 0.44 μg L−1 were obtained for Co and Pb, respectively. In order to validate the developed method, a certified reference material (SRM 1643e) was analyzed and the determined values obtained were in a good agreement with the certified values. The proposed method was applied successfully to the determination of Co and Pb in a fresh surface and waste water sample. PMID:23227429

  4. Direct determination of bromine in plastic materials by means of solid sampling high-resolution continuum source graphite furnace molecular absorption spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flórez, M. R.; Resano, M.

    2013-10-01

    This work investigates the potential of high-resolution continuum source graphite furnace molecular absorption spectrometry for the direct determination of bromine in polymers, which could be interesting in view of the current regulations restricting the use of organobrominated compounds. The method developed is based on the addition of Ca (300 μg) and Pd (30 μg) to favor the formation of CaBr, which is monitored at the main molecular “lines” (rotational spectra) found in the vicinity of 625.315 nm. It was found that accurate results could be obtained for all the samples investigated (polyethylene, polypropylene and acrylonitrile butadiene styrene certified reference materials) using any of the lines studied and constructing the calibration curve with aqueous standards. Furthermore, the combined use of the main four CaBr lines available in the spectral area simultaneously monitored permits to easily expand the linear range up to 2000 ng, provides a limit of detection of 1.8 ng (1.8 μg g- 1 for a mass of 1 mg) and further improves precision to values between 3-7% RSD. Overall, the method proposed seems suited for the fast and simple control of these types of samples (approximately 10 min for sample are required), circumventing the traditional problems associated with sample digestion (e.g., losses of volatile compounds), and providing sufficient sensitivity to easily comply with regulations.

  5. Dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction for the determination of copper in cereals and vegetable food samples using flame atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Shrivas, Kamlesh; Jaiswal, Nitin Kumar

    2013-12-01

    Dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (DLLME) is applied for the determination of copper in cereals and vegetable food samples using flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS). The maximum extraction efficiency of copper was obtained after the optimisation of parameters such as extraction and dispersing solvents, pH, concentration of 2,9-dimethyl-1,10-phenanothroline (DPT), N-phenylbenzimidoyl thiourea (PBITU) and salt. The optimised methodology exhibited a good linearity in the range of 0.2-20 ng/mL copper with relative standard deviations percentage (RSD,%) from ±1.5% to 3.5%. The method is found to be simple and rapid for the analysis of copper in food samples with the limit of detection (LOD) and quantitation (LOQ) were 0.05 and 0.16 ng/mL, respectively. Good recoveries of copper were obtained in the range of 93.5-98.0% in food samples as well as in Certified Reference Material (99.1%). The application of the proposed method has been successfully tested for the determination of copper in cereals (maize, millet, rice, wheat, gram, lentils, kidney beans and green beans) and vegetable (potato, cauliflower, tomato, spinach, green beans, lettuce, egg plants and bitter gourd) food samples. PMID:23870956

  6. Evaluation of solid sampling high-resolution continuum source graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry for direct determination of chromium in medicinal plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Virgilio, Alex; Nóbrega, Joaquim A.; Rêgo, Jardes F.; Neto, José A. Gomes

    2012-12-01

    A method for Cr determination in medicinal plants using direct solid sampling graphite furnace high-resolution continuum source atomic absorption spectrometry was developed. Modifiers were dispensable. Pyrolysis and atomization temperatures were 1500 °C and 2400 °C, respectively. Slopes of calibration curves (50-750 pg Cr, R2 > 0.999) using aqueous and solid standards coincides in 96%, indicated feasibility of aqueous calibration for solid sampling of medicinal plants. Accuracy was checked by analysis of four plant certified reference materials. Results were in agreement at 95% confidence level with certified and non-certified values. Ten samples of medicinal plants were analyzed and Cr contents were in the 1.3-17.7 μg g- 1 Cr range. The highest RSD (n = 5) was 15.4% for the sample Melissa officinalis containing 13.9 ± 2.1 μg g- 1 Cr. The limit of detection was 3.3 ng g- 1 Cr.

  7. Determination of sulfur in coal using direct solid sampling and high-resolution continuum source molecular absorption spectrometry of the CS molecule in a graphite furnace.

    PubMed

    Mior, Renata; Morés, Silvane; Welz, Bernhard; Carasek, Eduardo; de Andrade, Jailson B

    2013-03-15

    An analytical method has been developed for the determination of sulfur in coal using direct solid sample analysis in a graphite tube furnace and high-resolution continuum source molecular absorption spectrometry (HR-CS GF MAS). The molecular absorbance of the carbon monosulfide molecule (CS), which is formed in the vaporization stage, has been measured using the rotational line at 258.033 nm. Several chemical modifiers were tested and Ru, applied as permanent modifier was chosen, because it exhibited the best performance. The optimum pyrolysis and vaporization temperatures were found to be 500 °C and 2200 °C, respectively. Aqueous standard solutions prepared from l-cysteine were used for calibration, as the linear regression obtained for this standard was not significantly different from that for a certified coal reference material (CRM) according to a Student t-test. The results obtained for sulfur in three coal CRM and six additional samples also showed no significant difference for the two calibration techniques according to the same statistical test. The sulfur concentration in the coal samples was found between 3.5 mg g(-1) and 33.7 mg g(-1) with a typical repeatability around 10%. The limit of detection for the direct analysis of solid coal samples was better than 0.1 μg S. PMID:23598139

  8. Synthesis, characterization and application of a new chelating resin for solid phase extraction, preconcentration and determination of trace metals in some dairy samples by flame atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Daşbaşı, Teslima; Saçmacı, Şerife; Çankaya, Nevin; Soykan, Cengiz

    2016-11-15

    In this study, a simple and rapid solid phase extraction/preconcentration procedure was developed for determination of Cd(II), Co(II), Cr(III), Cu(II), Fe(III), Mn(II), Pb(II), and Zn(II) trace metals by flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS). A new chelating resin, poly(N-cyclohexylacrylamide-co-divinylbenzene-co-2-acrylamido-2-methyl-1-propanesulfonic acid) (NCA-co-DVB-co-AMPS) (hereafter CDAP) was synthesized and characterized. The influences of the analytical parameters such as pH of the sample solution, type and concentration of eluent, flow rates of the sample and eluent, volume of the sample and eluent, amount of chelating resin, and interference of ions were examined. The limit of detection (LOD) of analytes were found (3s) to be in the range of 0.65-1.90μgL(-1). Preconcentration factor (PF) of 200 and the relative standard deviation (RSD) of ⩽2% were achieved (n=11). The developed method was applied for determination of analytes in some dairy samples and certified reference materials. PMID:27283608

  9. Separation and Enrichment of Gold in Water, Geological and Environmental Samples by Solid Phase Extraction on Multiwalled Carbon Nanotubes Prior to its Determination by Flame Atomic Absorption Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Duran, Ali; Tuzen, Mustafa; Soylak, Mustafa

    2015-01-01

    This study proposes the application of multi-walled carbon nanotubes as a solid sorbent for the preconcentration of gold prior to its flame atomic absorption spectrometry determination. Extraction was achieved by using a glass column (15.0 cm in length and 1.0 cm in diameter). Quantitative recoveries were obtained in the pH range of 2.5-4.0; the elution step was carried out with 5.0 ml of 1.0 mol/L HNO3 in acetone. In the ligand-free study, variables such as pH, eluent type, sample volume, flow rates, and matrix effect were examined for the optimum recovery of gold ions. The gold ions were able to be pre-concentrated by a factor of 150 and their LOD was determined to be 1.71 μg/L. In order to evaluate the accuracy of the developed method, addition-recovery tests were applied for the tap water, mineral water, and sea water samples. Gold recovery studies were implemented using a wet digestion technique for mine and soil samples taken from various media, and this method was also applied for anodic slime samples taken from the factories located in the Kayseri Industrial Zone of Turkey. PMID:26651587

  10. Chemometric evaluation of Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Ni (inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry) and Pb (graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry) concentrations in lipstick samples intended to be used by adults and children.

    PubMed

    Batista, Érica Ferreira; Augusto, Amanda dos Santos; Pereira-Filho, Edenir Rodrigues

    2016-04-01

    A method was developed for determining the concentrations of Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Ni and Pb in lipstick samples intended to be used by adults and children using inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP OES) and graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GF AAS) after treatment with dilute HNO3 and hot block. The combination of fractional factorial design and Desirability function was used to evaluate the ICP OES operational parameters and the regression models using Central Composite and Doehlert designs were calculated to stablish the best working condition for all analytes. Seventeen lipstick samples manufactured in different countries with different colors and brands were analyzed. Some samples contained high concentrations of toxic elements, such as Cr and Pb, which are carcinogenic and cause allergic and eczematous dermatitis. The maximum concentration detected was higher than the permissible safe limits for human use, and the samples containing these high metal concentrations were intended for use by children. Principal component analysis (PCA) was used as a chemometrics tool for exploratory analysis to observe the similarities between samples relative to the metal concentrations (a correlation between Cd and Pb was observed). PMID:26838401

  11. Determination of chlorine in coal via the SrCl molecule using high-resolution graphite furnace molecular absorption spectrometry and direct solid sample analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pereira, Éderson R.; Rocha, Lucas M.; Cadorim, Heloisa R.; Silva, Vanessa D.; Welz, Bernhard; Carasek, Eduardo; de Andrade, Jailson B.

    2015-12-01

    In this study, the determination of chlorine in coal is described via molecular absorption of the strontium mono-chloride (SrCl) molecule at 635.862 nm using high-resolution continuum source graphite furnace molecular absorption spectrometry (HR-CS GF MAS) and direct solid sample analysis. The pyrolysis and vaporization temperatures were optimized and the measurements are accomplished with a platform coated with zirconium as a permanent chemical modifier in order to increase the sensitivity of the gaseous SrCl molecule generated in the graphite furnace. The optimum pyrolysis and vaporization temperatures were 700 °C and 2100 °C, respectively. Under optimized conditions, the limit of detection and characteristic mass of the method were 0.85 and 0.24 ng, respectively. The accuracy of the method has been verified using four certified reference materials and one not certified reference material of coal, and the results were in good agreement with the certified or reference values.

  12. Determination of Lead in Water Samples Using a New Vortex-Assisted, Surfactant-Enhanced Emulsification Liquid-Liquid Microextraction Combined with Graphite Furnace Atomic Absorption Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Peng, Guilong; He, Qiang; Lu, Ying; Mmereki, Daniel; Pan, Weiliang; Tang, Xiaohui; Zhou, Guangming; Mao, Yufeng; Su, Xaioxuan

    2016-04-01

    A low toxic solvent-based vortex-assisted surfactant-enhanced emulsification liquid-liquid microextraction (LT-VSLLME) combined with graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry was developed for the extraction and determination of lead (Pb) in water samples. In the LT-VSLLME method, the extraction solvent was dispersed into the aqueous samples by the assistance of vortex agitator. Meanwhile, the addition of a surfactant, which acted as an emulsifier, could enhance the speed of the mass-transfer from aqueous samples to the extraction solvent. The influences of analytical parameters, including extraction solvent type and its volume, surfactant type and its volume, pH, concentration of chelating agent, salt effect and extraction time were investigated. Under the optimized conditions, a good relative standard deviation of 3.69% at 10 ng L(-1) was obtained. The calibration graph showed a linear pattern in the ranges of 5-30 ngL(-1), with a limit of detection of 0.76 ng L(-1). The linearity was obtained by five points in the concentration range of 5-30 ngL(-1). The enrichment factor was 320. The procedure was applied to wastewater and river water, and the accuracy was assessed through the analysis of the recovery experiments. PMID:26614355

  13. One-step displacement dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction coupled with graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry for the selective determination of methylmercury in environmental samples.

    PubMed

    Liang, Pei; Kang, Caiyan; Mo, Yajun

    2016-03-01

    A novel method for the selective determination of methylmercury (MeHg) was developed by one-step displacement dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (D-DLLME) coupled with graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry. In the proposed method, Cu(II) reacted with diethyldithiocarbamate (DDTC) to form Cu-DDTC complex, which was used as the chelating agent instead of DDTC for the dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (DLLME) of MeHg. Because the stability of MeHg-DDTC is higher than that of Cu-DDTC, MeHg can displace Cu from the Cu-DDTC complex and be preconcentrated in a single DLLME procedure. MeHg could be extracted into the extraction solvent phase at pH 6 while Hg(II) remained in the sample solution. Potential interference from co-existing metal ions with lower DDTC complex stability was largely eliminated without the need of any masking reagent. Under the optimal conditions, the limit of detection of this method was 13.6ngL(-1) (as Hg), and an enhancement factor of 81 was achieved with a sample volume of 5.0mL. The proposed method was successfully applied for the determination of trace MeHg in some environmental samples with satisfactory results. PMID:26717807

  14. Determination of macro and trace elements in multivitamin dietary supplements by high-resolution continuum source graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry with slurry sampling.

    PubMed

    Krawczyk, Magdalena

    2014-01-01

    In this research, three different commercially available multivitamin dietary supplements were analyzed by high-resolution continuum source graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (HR-CS GFAAS) with slurry sampling. The concentrations of Cr, Cu, Fe, Mn, and Se were determined and compared to the amounts stated by producers. The safety of multivitamin dietary supplements depends on various factors including the manufacturing process and the purity and origins of the raw ingredients. For this reason, this research determined concentrations of several toxic elements (As, Cd, and Pb). Microwave-assisted high pressure Teflon bomb digestion was used to determine total amounts of elements in samples. Samples were prepared as slurries at a concentration of 0.1% (m/v) for macro elements (Cr, Cu, Fe, Mn, and Se) and at a concentration of % (m/v) for trace elements (As, Cd, and Pb) in acidic media (3M HNO3). The influence of acid concentration, Triton X-100 addition, sonication time, and sonication power on absorbance was investigated. The accuracy of this method was validated by analyses of NRCC LUTS-1 (Lobster hepatopancreas), NRCC DORM-1 (Dogfish Muscle), NRCC DOLT-2 (Dogfish Liver), NBS SRM 1570 (Spinach Leaves) and NBS SRM 1573 (Tomato Leaves) certified reference materials. The measured elements contents in these reference materials (except NRCC DOLT-2) were in satisfactory agreement with the certified values according to the t-test for a 95% confidence level. PMID:24176741

  15. Development of an ultrasonic slurry sampling method for the determination of Cu and Mn in antibiotic tablets by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    de Paula, Carlos Eduardo R; Caldas, Luiz Fernando S; Brum, Daniel M; Cassella, Ricardo J

    2012-07-01

    A new method is described for simple, efficient and rapid determination of Cu and Mn in tablets of antibiotics (ciprofloxacin and cephalexin) by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS) using slurry sampling. In order to optimize the procedure, several variables that could affect the performance of the method were investigated. In the best conditions, the tablets could be analyzed by introducing into the graphite tube 20 μl of a slurry prepared with approximately 90-100mg of the sample and 2 ml of a solution containing 5% m/v of Triton X-114 and 2.8 M of HNO(3). Before the introduction, the slurries were sonicated for 15 min at 40% of amplitude (130 W maximum power) with an ultrasonic probe. The developed method was applied in the determination of Cu and Mn in four samples, and the results were compared with those obtained by focused microwave acid digestion with aqua regia (1:3 mixture of HNO(3):HCl). There was no statistical difference between the obtained values at 95% confidence level when a paired Student t-test was applied. PMID:22542826

  16. Separation and preconcentration of trace level of lead in one drop of blood sample by using graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Shrivas, Kamlesh; Patel, Devesh Kumar

    2010-04-15

    Drop-to-drop solvent microextraction (DDSME) assisted with ultrasonication is applied for the determination of lead in one drop (30 microL) of blood sample by using graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GF-AAS). The optimum extraction efficiency of lead was observed for 10 min extraction time at pH 5.0 with 2 microL of organic solvent that containing 0.5 M of Cyanex-302. The optimized methodology exhibited good linearity in the range of 0.3-30.0 ng mL(-1) lead with relative standard deviations (RSD) from 2.5 to 4.4%. The method is found to be simple and rapid for the analysis of lead in micro amount of blood sample with the limit of detection (LOD) of 0.08 ng mL(-1). The application of the proposed method has been successfully tested for the determination of lead in blood samples. The results showed that under the optimized experimental conditions, the method showed good sensitivity and recovery %, as well as advantages such as linearity, simplicity, low cost and high feasibility. PMID:20004520

  17. Green Preconcentration of Trace Amounts of Copper from Water and Food Samples onto Novel Organo-Nanoclay Prior to Flame Atomic Absorption Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Beyki, Mostafa Hossein; Shemirani, Farzaneh; Khani, Rouhollah

    2014-01-01

    In this work, the nanoclay was intercalated with acyclovir (9-[(2-hydroxyethoxy) methyl] guanine), the toxicity of which to mammalian cells is very low. We used no organic solvents for preparation of modified clay and desorption of Cu ions from the sorbent. Batch and column methods were used, and sorption of Cu was quantitative (>98%) in the pH range of 7.5 to 10.0. Quantitative desorption occurred with 5.0 mL of 3.0 M HCl, and the amount of Cu(II) was measured by using flame atomic absorption spectrometry. In the initial solution the linear dynamic range and the LOD were 3.0-1000.0 and 0.58 μg/L, respectively. With 500.0 mL of sample, an enrichment factor of 100 was obtained. The RSD was 2.0% (n = 8, concentration = 0.5 mg/L), and the maximum capacity of the sorbent was 45.0 mg/g. The influence of experimental parameters including sample pH, ionic strength, type and volume of the eluent, and interference of some ions on the recoveries of Cu was investigated. The proposed method using a new and easier prepared solid sorbent was applied to the determination of Cu in different real samples with satisfactory results. PMID:25902995

  18. Determination of nickel in blood and serum samples of oropharyngeal cancer patients consumed smokeless tobacco products by cloud point extraction coupled with flame atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Arain, Sadaf Sadia; Kazi, Tasneem Gul; Arain, Jamshed Bashir; Afridi, Hassan Imran; Kazi, Atif Gul; Nasreen, Syeda; Brahman, Kapil Dev

    2014-10-01

    Oropharyngeal cancer is a significant public health issue in the world. The incidence of oropharyngeal cancer has been increased among people who have habit of chewing smokeless tobacco (SLT) in Pakistan. The aim of present study was to evaluate the concentration of nickel (Ni) in biological samples (whole blood, serum) of oral (n = 95) and pharyngeal (n = 84) male cancer patients. For comparison purposes, the biological samples of healthy age-matched referents (n = 150), who consumed and did not consumed SLT products, were also analyzed for Ni levels. As the Ni level is very low in biological samples, a preconcentration procedure has been developed, prior to analysis of analyte by flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS). The Ni in acid-digested biological samples was complexed with ammonium pyrrolidinedithio carbamate (APDC), and a resulted complex was extracted in a surfactant Triton X-114. Acidic ethanol was added to the surfactant-rich phase prior to its analysis by FAAS. The chemical variables, such as pH, amounts of reagents (APDC, Triton X-114), temperature, incubation time, and sample volume were optimized. The resulted data indicated that concentration of Ni was higher in blood and serum samples of cancer patients as compared to that of referents who have or have not consumed different SLT products (p = 0.012-0.001). It was also observed that healthy referents who consumed SLT products have two to threefold higher levels of Ni in both biological samples as compared to those who were not chewing SLT products (p < 0.01). PMID:24920259

  19. Direct determination of chromium in infant formulas employing high-resolution continuum source electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry and solid sample analysis.

    PubMed

    Silva, Arlene S; Brandao, Geovani C; Matos, Geraldo D; Ferreira, Sergio L C

    2015-11-01

    The present work proposed an analytical method for the direct determination of chromium in infant formulas employing the high-resolution continuum source electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry combined with the solid sample analysis (SS-HR-CS ET AAS). Sample masses up to 2.0mg were directly weighted on a solid sampling platform and introduced into the graphite tube. In order to minimize the formation of carbonaceous residues and to improve the contact of the modifier solution with the solid sample, a volume of 10 µL of a solution containing 6% (v/v) H2O2, 20% (v/v) ethanol and 1% (v/v) HNO3 was added. The pyrolysis and atomization temperatures established were 1600 and 2400 °C, respectively, using magnesium as chemical modifier. The calibration technique was evaluated by comparing the slopes of calibration curves established using aqueous and solid standards. This test revealed that chromium can be determined employing the external calibration technique using aqueous standards. Under these conditions, the method developed allows the direct determination of chromium with limit of quantification of 11.5 ng g(-1), precision expressed as relative standard deviation (RSD) in the range of 4.0-17.9% (n=3) and a characteristic mass of 1.2 pg of chromium. The accuracy was confirmed by analysis of a certified reference material of tomato leaves furnished by National Institute of Standards and Technology. The method proposed was applied for the determination of chromium in five different infant formula samples. The chromium content found varied in the range of 33.9-58.1 ng g(-1) (n=3). These samples were also analyzed employing ICP-MS. A statistical test demonstrated that there is no significant difference between the results found by two methods. The chromium concentrations achieved are lower than the maximum limit permissible for chromium in foods by Brazilian Legislation. PMID:26452789

  20. Graphene-based solid-phase extraction combined with flame atomic absorption spectrometry for a sensitive determination of trace amounts of lead in environmental water and vegetable samples.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yukun; Gao, Shutao; Zang, Xiaohuan; Li, Jingci; Ma, Jingjun

    2012-02-24

    Graphene, a novel class of carbon nanostructures, has great promise for use as sorbent materials because of its ultrahigh specific surface area. A new method using a column packed with graphene as sorbent was developed for the preconcentration of trace amounts of lead (Pb) using dithizone as chelating reagent prior to its determination by flame atomic absorption spectrometry. Some effective parameters on the extraction and complex formation were selected and optimized. Under optimum conditions, the calibration graph was linear in the concentration range of 10.0-600.0 μg L(-1) with a detection limit of 0.61 μg L(-1). The relative standard deviation for ten replicate measurements of 20.0 and 400.0 μg L(-1) of Pb were 3.56 and 3.25%, respectively. Comparative studies showed that graphene is superior to other adsorbents including C18 silica, graphitic carbon, and single- and multi-walled carbon nanotubes for the extraction of Pb. The proposed method was successfully applied in the analysis of environmental water and vegetable samples. Good spiked recoveries over the range of 95.3-100.4% were obtained. This work not only proposes a useful method for sample preconcentration, but also reveals the great potential of graphene as an excellent sorbent material in analytical processes. PMID:22284885

  1. A dispersive liquid--liquid microextraction methodology for copper (II) in environmental samples prior to determination using microsample injection flame atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Alothman, Zeid A; Habila, Mohamed; Yilmaz, Erkan; Soylak, Mustafa

    2013-01-01

    A simple, environmentally friendly, and efficient dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction method combined with microsample injection flame atomic absorption spectrometry was developed for the separation and preconcentration of Cu(II). 2-(5-Bromo-2-pyridylazo)-5-(diethylamino)phenol (5-Br-PADAP) was used to form a hydrophobic complex of Cu(II) ions in the aqueous phase before extraction. To extract the Cu(II)-5-Br-PADAP complex from the aqueous phase to the organic phase, 2.0 mL of acetone as a disperser solvent and 200 microL of chloroform as an extraction solvent were used. The influences of important analytical parameters, such as the pH, types and volumes of the extraction and disperser solvents, amount of chelating agent, sample volume, and matrix effects, on the microextraction procedure were evaluated and optimized. Using the optimal conditions, the LOD, LOQ, preconcentration factor, and RSD were determined to be 1.4 microg/L, 4.7 microg/L, 120, and 6.5%, respectively. The accuracy of the proposed method was investigated using standard addition/recovery tests. The analysis of certified reference materials produced satisfactory analytical results. The developed method was applied for the determination of Cu in real samples. PMID:24645524

  2. Ultrasound-assisted ion-pair dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction of trace amounts of lead in water samples prior to graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry determination.

    PubMed

    Afzali, Daryoush; Mohadesi, Ali Reza; Falahnejad, Masoumeh; Bahadori, Behnoosh

    2013-01-01

    A new ion-pair dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction method is described for separation and preconcentration of trace amounts of lead in different water samples. Graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry was used for determination of lead. The ion association complex between lead and iodide ions that forms is PbI4(-2)-tetradecyl-dimethylbenzylammonium, which is extracted into fine droplets of chlorobenzene. In order to reach the optimized experimental conditions, the influence of different parameters, such as concentration of KI, nature and volume of extraction solvents, pH effect, extraction time, and the period and speed of sonication and centrifugation, were optimized. The LOD was 0.08 ng/mL and the linear dynamic range was 0.20-8.0 ng/mL in initial solution with a correlation coefficient of 0.9985. Under the optimum conditions, the enrichment factor was 555.5. The proposed method was successfully applied for separation and determination of lead in sea, rain, river, and drinking water samples. PMID:23513972

  3. Assessment of the Halogen Content of Brazilian Inhalable Particulate Matter (PM10) Using High Resolution Molecular Absorption Spectrometry and Electrothermal Vaporization Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry, with Direct Solid Sample Analysis.

    PubMed

    de Gois, Jefferson S; Almeida, Tarcisio S; Alves, Jeferson C; Araujo, Rennan G O; Borges, Daniel L G

    2016-03-15

    Halogens in the atmosphere play an important role in climate change and also represent a potential health hazard. However, quantification of halogens is not a trivial task, and methods that require minimum sample preparation are interesting alternatives. Hence, the aim of this work was to evaluate the feasibility of direct solid sample analysis using high-resolution continuum source molecular absorption spectrometry (HR-CS MAS) for F determination and electrothermal vaporization-inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ETV-ICP-MS) for simultaneous Cl, Br, and I determination in airborne inhalable particulate matter (PM10) collected in the metropolitan area of Aracaju, Sergipe, Brazil. Analysis using HR-CS MAS was accomplished by monitoring the CaF molecule, which was generated at high temperatures in the graphite furnace after the addition of Ca. Analysis using ETV-ICP-MS was carried out using Ca as chemical modifier/aerosol carrier in order to avoid losses of Cl, Br, and I during the pyrolysis step, with concomitant use of Pd as a permanent modifier. The direct analysis approach resulted in LODs that were proven adequate for halogen determination in PM10, using either standard addition calibration or calibration against a certified reference material. The method allowed the quantification of the halogens in 14 PM10 samples collected in a northeastern coastal city in Brazil. The results demonstrated variations of halogen content according to meteorological conditions, particularly related to rainfall, humidity, and sunlight irradiation. PMID:26192198

  4. Monte Carlo simulation of the self-absorption corrections for natural samples in gamma-ray spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Vargas, M Jurado; Timón, A Fernández; Díaz, N Cornejo; Sánchez, D Pérez

    2002-12-01

    Gamma-ray self-attenuation corrections in the energy range 60-2000 keV were evaluated by means of Monte Carlo calculations for environmental samples in a cylindrical measuring geometry. The dependence of the full-energy peak efficiency on the sample density was obtained for some particular photon energies and, as a result, the corresponding self-attenuation correction factors were obtained. The calculations were performed by assuming that natural materials have mass attenuation coefficients very similar to those of water in the energy range studied. Three different HpGe coaxial detectors were considered: an n-type detector with 44.3% relative efficiency and two p-type detectors of relative efficiencies 20.0% and 30.5%. Our calculations were in very good agreement with the self-attenuation correction factors obtained experimentally by other workers for environmental samples of different densities. This work demonstrates the reliability of Monte Carlo calculations for correcting photon self-attenuation in natural samples. The results also show that the corresponding correction factors are essentially unaffected by the specific coaxial detector used. PMID:12406634

  5. In situ metathesis ionic liquid formation dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction for copper determination in water samples by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Stanisz, Ewa; Zgoła-Grześkowiak, Agnieszka

    2013-10-15

    In situ synthesis of ionic liquid extractant for dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (in situ IL DLLME) combined with electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ET AAS) for determination of copper in water samples was developed. Analytical signals were obtained without the back-extraction of copper from the IL phase prior to its determination by AAS. Some essential parameters of the microextraction and detection techniques such as the pH of sample solution, volume of components for in situ synthesis, matrix interferences and main parameters of graphite furnace atomizer have been studied. Under optimal conditions, high extraction efficiency for copper was achieved for the extraction of 0.7 µg L(-1) in 10.0 mL of sample solution employing 8 μL of 1-hexyl-3-methylimidazolium bis[(trifluoromethyl)sulfonyl]imide (HmimNTf2) as the extraction solvent. The detection limit was found as 0.004 µg L(-1) with an enrichment factor of 200. The relative standard deviation (RSD) for seven replicate measurements of 0.7 µg L(-1) in sample solution was 4%. The accuracy of the proposed method was evaluated by analysis of the Certified Reference Materials: NIST SRM 2709 (San Joaquin Soil), NBS SRM 2704 (Buffalo River Sediment), NRCC DOLT-2 (Dogfish Liver) and NIST SRM 1643e (Trace Element in Water). The measured copper contents in the reference materials were in satisfactory agreement with the certified values. The method was successfully applied to analysis of the tap, lake and mineral water samples. PMID:24054576

  6. Determination of copper and mercury in phosphate fertilizers employing direct solid sampling analysis and high resolution continuum source graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Oliveira Souza, Sidnei; François, Luciane Luiza; Borges, Aline Rocha; Vale, Maria Goreti Rodrigues; Araujo, Rennan Geovanny Oliveira

    2015-12-01

    The present study proposes the determination of copper and mercury in phosphate fertilizers by direct solid sampling analysis (SS) employing high resolution continuum source graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (HR-CS GF AAS). For Cu determination, two analytical lines were used: 327.3960 nm and 249.2146 nm. Hg determination was carried out on the line 253.6521 nm and 100 μg KMnO4 was used as chemical modifier. The optimal pyrolysis temperature for Cu determination was 1300 °C. Atomization temperatures for Cu and Hg were 2400 and 1100 °C, respectively. External calibration with aqueous standard solutions was adopted for both elements. The limits of quantification (LoQs) and characteristic mass (m0) obtained for Cu determination were 0.4 μg g- 1 and 1.12 ng, respectively, on line 249.2146 nm, and 64 μg g- 1 and 25 pg on 327.3960 nm. For mercury, LoQ and m0 were 4.8 ng g- 1 and 39 pg, respectively. The accuracy of the proposed methods was confirmed by the analysis of standard reference material (SRM) of Trace Elements in Multi-Nutrient Fertilizer (SRM NIST 695). The precision expressed as relative standard deviation (RSD), was better than 8.2% for Hg and 7.7% for the Cu (n = 5), considered satisfactory for microanalysis in solid sample. Four fertilizer samples acquired in commercial establishments in the city of Salvador, Bahia, Brazil, were analyzed. The optimized analytical methods were simple, fast, accurate, precise and free of spectral interferences for the determination of Cu and Hg in phosphate fertilizer samples by SS-HR-CS GF AAS, avoiding the dissolution of the sample, the use of harmful reagents and the generation of residues.

  7. In situ emulsification microextraction using a dicationic ionic liquid followed by magnetic assisted physisorption for determination of lead prior to micro-sampling flame atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Shokri, Masood; Beiraghi, Asadollah; Seidi, Shahram

    2015-08-19

    For the first time, a simple and efficient in situ emulsification microextraction method using a dicationic ionic liquid followed by magnetic assisted physisorption was presented to determine trace amounts of lead. In this method, 400 μL of 1.0 mol L(-1) lithium bis (trifluoromethylsulfonyl) imide aqueous solution, Li[NTf2], was added into the sample solution containing 100 μL of 1.0 mol L(-1) 1,3-(propyl-1,3-diyl) bis (3-methylimidazolium) chloride, [pbmim]Cl2, to form a water immiscible ionic liquid, [pbmim][NTf2]2. This new in situ formed dicationic ionic liquid was applied as the acceptor phase to extract the lead-ammonium pyrrolidinedithiocarbamate (Pb-APDC) complexes from the sample solution. Subsequently, 30 mg of Fe3O4 magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) were added into the sample solution to collect the fine droplets of [pbmim][NTf2]2, physisorptively. Finally, MNPs were eluted by acetonitrile, separated by an external magnetic field and the obtained eluent was subjected to micro-sampling flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS) for further analysis. Comparing with other microextraction methods, no special devices and centrifugation step are required. Parameters influencing the extraction efficiency such as extraction time, pH, concentration of chelating agent, amount of MNPs and coexisting interferences were studied. Under the optimized conditions, this method showed high extraction recovery of 93% with low LOD of 0.7 μg L(-1). Good linearity was obtained in the range of 2.5-150 μg L(-1) with determination coefficient (r(2)) of 0.9921. Relative standard deviation (RSD%) for seven repeated measurements at the concentration of 10 μg L(-1) was 4.1%. Finally, this method was successfully applied for determination of lead in some water and plant samples. PMID:26343434

  8. A dried urine spot test to simultaneously monitor Mo and Ti levels using solid sampling high-resolution continuum source graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rello, L.; Lapeña, A. C.; Aramendía, M.; Belarra, M. A.; Resano, M.

    2013-03-01

    Home-based collection protocols for clinical specimens are actively pursued as a means of improving life quality of patients that require frequent controls, such as patients with metallic prosthesis, for whom monitoring the evolution of Mo and Ti in biological fluids may play a decisive role to detect prosthesis mal-functioning. The collection of biological fluids on clinical filter papers provides a simple way to implement these protocols. This work explores the potential of solid sampling high-resolution continuum source graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry for the simultaneous and direct determination of Mo and Ti in urine, after its deposition onto clinical filter paper, giving rise to a dried urine spot. The approach used for depositing the sample was found crucial to develop a quantitative method, since the filter paper acts as a chromatographic support and produces a differential distribution of the target analytes. Furthermore, the high spreading of urine onto a filter paper results in a small amount of urine per surface unit, and thus, ultimately, in lack of sensitivity. In order to circumvent these problems, the use of an alternative approach based on the use of pre-cut 17 × 19 mm filter paper pieces onto which larger amounts of sample (500 μL) can be retained by single deposition was proposed and evaluated. In this way, an approximately 12-fold increase in sensitivity and a more homogeneous distribution of the target analytes were obtained, permitting the development of a quantification strategy based on the use of matrix-matched urine samples of known analyte concentrations, which were subjected to the same procedure as the samples. Accuracy of this method, which provides LODs of 1.5 μg L- 1 for Mo and 6.5 μg L- 1 for Ti, was demonstrated after analysis of urine reference materials. Overall, the performance of the method developed is promising, being likely suitable for determination of other analytes in dried urine spots.

  9. Slurry sampling graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry: a preliminary examination of results from an international collaborative study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller-Ihli, N. J.

    1995-06-01

    An international collaborative study was initiated to evaluate the current state-of-the-art for solid sampling. Samples were sent to 28 laboratories and data were received from 18 collaborators, 16 of which reported slurry results. A preliminary check of performance using NIST SRM 1643c acidified water, showed that at least 13 laboratories were able to provide accurate results within ±10% of the mean certified Pb and Cr concentrations. The focus of this work was slurry analytical data reported by collaborators. Average performance by collaborators for the determination of Pb in NIST SRM 2704 Buffalo River Sediment was 103% recovery based on the mean certified reference value and was 84% recovery based on the mean certified reference value for NRCC PACS-1, a marine estuarine sediment, which was identified to collaborators as an unknown sediment. Average performance by collaborators for Cr in SRM 2704 was 96% based on the mean certified reference value and was 78% recovery based on the mean certified reference value for PACS-1. The use of secondary wavelengths and the importance of analysis of a representative subsample are highlighted. Possible problems leading to inaccurate results being reported by collaborators are discussed including the use of mini-flows, matrix modifiers, low atomization temperatures, short atomization times, and expulsion losses.

  10. Ionic liquid-based ultrasound-assisted dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction combined with electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry for a sensitive determination of cadmium in water samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shengqing; Cai, Shun; Hu, Wei; Chen, Hao; Liu, Hanlan

    2009-07-01

    A new method was developed for the determination of cadmium in water samples using ionic liquid-based ultrasound-assisted dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (IL-based USA-DLLME) followed by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS). The IL-based USA-DLLME procedure is free of volatile organic solvents, and there is no need for a dispersive solvent, in contrast to conventional DLLME. The ionic liquid, 1-hexyl-3-methylimidazolium hexafluorophosphate (HMIMPF 6), was quickly disrupted by an ultrasonic probe for 1 min and dispersed in water samples like a cloud. At this stage, a hydrophobic cadmium-DDTC complex was formed and extracted into the fine droplets of HMIMPF 6. After centrifugation, the concentration of the enriched cadmium in the sedimented phase was determined by ETAAS. Some effective parameters of the complex formation and microextraction, such as the concentration of the chelating agent, the pH, the volume of the extraction solvent, the extraction time, and the salt effect, have been optimized. Under optimal conditions, a high extraction efficiency and selectivity were reached for the extraction of 1.0 ng of cadmium in 10.0 mL of water solution employing 73 µL of HMIMPF 6 as the extraction solvent. The enrichment factor of the method is 67. The detection limit was 7.4 ng L - 1 , and the characteristic mass ( m0, 0.0044 absorbance) of the proposed method was 0.02 pg for cadmium (Cd). The relative standard deviation (RSD) for 11 replicates of 50 ng L - 1 Cd was 3.3%. The method was applied to the analysis of tap, well, river, and lake water samples and the Environmental Water Reference Material GSBZ 50009-88 (200921). The recoveries of spiked samples were in the range of 87.2-106%.

  11. Investigation of chemical modifiers for the determination of lead in fertilizers and limestone using graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry with Zeeman-effect background correction and slurry sampling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borges, Aline R.; Becker, Emilene M.; Dessuy, Morgana B.; Vale, Maria Goreti R.; Welz, Bernhard

    2014-02-01

    In this work, chemical modifiers in solution (Pd/Mg, NH4H2PO4 and NH4NO3/Pd) were compared with permanent modifiers (Ir and Ru) for the determination of lead in fertilizer and limestone samples using slurry sampling and graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry with Zeeman-effect background correction. The analytical line at 283.3 nm was used due to some spectral interference observed at 217.0 nm. The NH4H2PO4 was abandoned due to severe spectral interference even at the 283.3-nm line. For Pd/Mg and NH4NO3/Pd the optimum pyrolysis and atomization temperatures were 900 °C and 1900 °C, respectively. For Ru and Ir, the integrated absorbance signal was stable up to pyrolysis temperatures of 700 °C and 900 °C, respectively, and up to atomization temperature of 1700 °C. The limit of detection (LOD) was 17 ng g- 1 using Pd/Mg and 29 ng g- 1 using NH4NO3/Pd. Among the permanent modifiers investigated, the LOD was 22 ng g- 1 Pb for Ir and 10 ng g- 1 Pb for Ru. The accuracy of the method was evaluated using the certified reference material NIST SRM 695. Although Ru provided lower LOD, which can be attributed to a lower blank signal, only the modifiers in solution showed concordant values of Pb concentration for the NIST SRM 695 and the most of analyzed samples. Moreover, the Pd/Mg modifier provided the highest sensitivity and for this reason it is more suitable for the determination of Pb in fertilizers samples in slurry; besides this it presented a better signal-to-noise ratio than NH4NO3/Pd.

  12. Hollow fiber liquid phase microextraction combined with graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry for the determination of methylmercury in human hair and sludge samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Hongmei; Hu, Bin; Chen, Beibei; Zu, Wanqing

    2008-07-01

    Two methods, based on hollow fiber liquid-liquid-liquid (three phase) microextraction (HF-LLLME) and hollow fiber liquid phase (two phase) microextraction (HF-LPME), have been developed and critically compared for the determination of methylmercury content in human hair and sludge by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GFAAS). In HF-LPME, methylmercury was extracted into the organic phase (toluene) prior to its determination by GFAAS, while inorganic mercury remained as a free species in the sample solution. In HF-LLLME, methylmercury was first extracted into the organic phase (toluene) and then into the acceptor phase (4% thiourea in 1 mol L - 1 HCl) prior to its determination by GFAAS, while inorganic mercury remained in the sample solution. The total mercury was determined by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS), and the levels of inorganic mercury in both HF-LLLME and HF-LPME were obtained by subtracting methylmercury from total mercury. The factors affecting the microextraction of methylmercury, including organic solvent, extraction time, stirring rate and ionic strength, were investigated and the optimal extraction conditions were established for both HF-LLLPME and HF-LPME. With a consumption of 3.0 mL of the sample solution, the enrichment factors were 204 and 55 for HF-LLLPME and HF-LPME, respectively. The limits of detection (LODs) for methylmercury were 0.1 μg L - 1 and 0.4 μg L - 1 (as Hg) with precisions (RSDs (%), c = 5 μg L - 1 (as Hg), n = 5) of 13% and 11% for HF-LLLPME-GFAAS and HF-LPME-GFAAS, respectively. For ICP-MS determination of total mercury, a limit of detection of 39 ng L - 1 was obtained. Finally, HF-LLLME-GFAAS was applied to the determination of methylmercury content in human hair and sludge, and the recoveries for the spiked samples were in the range of 99-113%. In order to validate the method, HF-LLLME-GFAAS was also applied to the analysis of a certified reference material of NRCC DORM-2 dogfish

  13. Marine sediments monitoring studies for trace elements with the application of fast temperature programs and solid sampling high resolution continuum source atomic absorption spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orani, Anna Maria; Han, Eunmi; Mandjukov, Petko; Vassileva, Emilia

    2015-01-01

    Analytical procedure for the determination of As, Cd, Cu, Ni, Co and Cr in marine sediment samples using high-resolution continuum source graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (HR CS AAS) and direct solid sample analysis has been developed. The application of fast programs in combination with direct solid sampling allows to eliminate the drying and pretreatment steps, however makes impossible the use of liquid standards for calibration. Iridium treated platforms were applied throughout the present study. Calibration technique based on the use of solid certified reference materials (marine sediments) similar to the nature of the analyzed sample and statistics of regression analysis were applied to the real sediment samples. The instrumental parameters were optimized in order to obtain reproducible and interference free analytical signals. The ISO-17025 requirements and Eurachem guidelines were followed in the validation of the proposed analytical procedure. Accordingly, blanks, selectivity, calibration, linearity, working range, trueness, repeatability reproducibility, limits of detection and quantification and expanded uncertainty (k = 2) for all investigated elements were assessed. Two different approaches for the estimation of measurement uncertainty were applied and obtained results compared. The major contributors to the combined uncertainty of the analyte mass fraction were found to be the homogeneity of the samples and the microbalance precision. The influence of sample particle sizes on the total combined uncertainty was also evaluated. Traceability to SI system of units of the obtained by the proposed analytical procedure results was demonstrated. Additionally, validation of the methodology developed was effectuated by the comparison of the obtained results with independent method e.g. ICP-MS with external calibration. The use of solid sampling HR CS AAS for the determination of trace elements in marine sediment matrix gives significant advantages

  14. Ligandless dispersive liquid--liquid microextraction of iron in biological and foodstuff samples and its determination by Electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Madadizadeh, Mohadeseh; Taher, Mohammad Ali; Ashkenani, Hamid

    2013-01-01

    A new, simple, and efficient method comprising ligandless dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction combined with electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry is reported for the preconcentration and determination of ultratrace amounts of Fe(III). Carbon tetrachloride and acetone were used as the extraction and disperser solvents, respectively. Some effective parameters of the microextraction such as choice of extraction and disperser solvents, their volume, extraction time and temperature, salt and surfactant effect, and pH were optimized. Under the optimum conditions, the calibration curve was linear in the range of 0.02 to 0.46 microg/L of Fe(III), with LOD and LOQ of 5.2 and 17.4 ng/L, respectively. The RSD for seven replicated determinations of Fe(IIl) ion at 0.1 microg/L concentration level was 5.2%. Operational simplicity, rapidity, low cost, good repeatability, and low consumption of extraction solvent are the main advantages of the proposed method. The method was successfully applied to the determination of iron in biological, food, and certified reference samples. PMID:24645530

  15. Ultra-trace determination of lead in water and food samples by using ionic liquid-based single drop microextraction-electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Manzoori, Jamshid L; Amjadi, Mohammad; Abulhassani, Jafar

    2009-06-30

    An improved single drop microextraction procedure was developed for the preconcentration of lead prior to its determination by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry. Ionic liquid, 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium hexafluorophosphate [C4MIM][PF6], was used as an alternative to volatile organic solvents for extraction. Lead was complexed with ammonium pyrroldinedithiocarbamate (APDC) and extracted into a 7-microL ionic liquid drop. The extracted complex was directly injected into the graphite furnace. Several variables affecting microextraction efficiency and ETAAS signal, such as pyrolysis and atomization temperature, pH, APDC concentration, extraction time, drop volume and stirring rate were investigated and optimized. In the optimum experimental conditions, the limit of detection (3s) and the enhancement factor were 0.015 microg L(-1) and 76, respectively. The relative standard deviation (RSD) for five replicate determinations of 0.2 microg L(-1) Pb was 5.2%. The developed method was validated by the analysis of certified reference materials and applied successfully to the determination of lead in several real samples. PMID:19463561

  16. Ionic liquid-based single drop microextraction combined with electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry for the determination of manganese in water samples.

    PubMed

    Manzoori, Jamshid L; Amjadi, Mohammad; Abulhassani, Jafar

    2009-02-15

    Room temperature ionic liquid, 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium hexafluorophosphate [C(4)MIM][PF(6)], was used as an alternative to volatile organic solvents in single drop microextraction-electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (SDME-ETAAS). Manganese was extracted from aqueous solution into a drop of the ionic liquid after complextaion with 1-(2-thiazolylazo)-2-naphthol (TAN) and the drop was directly injected into the graphite furnace. Several variables affecting microextraction efficiency and ETAAS signal, such as pyrolysis and atomization temperature, pH, TAN concentration, extraction time, drop volume and stirring rate were investigated and optimized. In the optimum experimental conditions, the limit of detection (3s) and the enhancement factor were 0.024 microg L(-1) and 30.3, respectively. The relative standard deviation (RSD) for five replicate determinations of 0.5 microg L(-1) Mn(II) was 5.5%. The developed method was validated by the analysis of a certified reference material (NIST SRM 1643e) and applied successfully to the determination of manganese in several natural water samples. PMID:19084676

  17. Investigation of novel rapidly synergistic cloud point extraction pattern for bismuth in water and geological samples coupling with flame atomic absorption spectrometry determination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Xiaodong; Zhao, Yu; Deng, Qingwen; Ji, Shoulian; Zhao, Xia; Guo, Jie

    2012-04-01

    Rapidly synergistic cloud point extraction (RS-CPE) greatly simplified and accelerated the procedure of traditional cloud point extraction (CPE). In order to expand the application of RS-CPE, this work was carried out after the establishment of the improved extraction technique. The new established extraction method was firstly applied for bismuth extraction and determination coupled with flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS) in this work. The improved RS-CPE was accomplished in the room temperature in 1 min. Non-ionic surfactant Triton X-100 (TX-100) was used as extractant. Octanol worked as cloud point revulsant and synergic reagent. TX-100 has a relatively high cloud point temperature (CPT), which limited its application in CPE. In this work, TX-100 accomplished the RS-CPE procedure in room temperature successfully. The factors influencing RS-CPE, such as concentrations of reagents, pH, conditions of phase separation, effect of environmental temperatures, salt effect and instrumental conditions, were studied systematically. Under the optimal conditions, the limit of detection (LOD) for bismuth was 4.0 μg L-1, with sensitivity enhancement factor (EF) of 43. The proposed method greatly improved the sensitivity of FAAS for the determination of bismuth and was applied to the determination of trace bismuth in real and certified samples with satisfactory analytical results. The proposed method was rapid, simple, and sensitive.

  18. Direct determination of arsenic and antimony in naphtha by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry with microemulsion sample introduction and iridium permanent modifier.

    PubMed

    Cassella, Ricardo J; Barbosa, Bruno Alberto R S; Santelli, Ricardo E; Rangel, Alessandra T

    2004-05-01

    This paper reports the determination of arsenic and antimony in naphtha by employing electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS) as the analytical technique. In order to promote the direct determination of the analytes in the very volatile naphtha, the formation of a microemulsion with different surfactants (Triton X-100 and Brij-35) and different chemical modification strategies were tested. The results indicated that Triton X-100 is the best emulsification agent for naphtha in both As and Sb determination when it is employed at a concentration of 1% w/v in the microemulsion. Under these conditions, the microemulsion was stabile for at least 2 h. By using Brij-35 it was possible to achieve good stability only in the first 15 min. Among all chemical modification approaches investigated (Ir permanent modifier, W-Ir permanent modifier, and Pd modifier), the Ir permanent modifier provided better sensitivity for both analytes and allowed a higher pyrolysis temperature, which decreased the background signals at lower levels. Under the best conditions established in this work, an RSD of 4.6% (20 microg L(-1)) and a detection limit of 2.7 microg L(-1) were observed for arsenic. For antimony, an RSD of 4.0% (20 microg L(-1)) and a detection limit of 2.5 microg L(-1) were obtained. The accuracy of the procedure was assessed by analyzing spiked samples of naphtha from different origins. PMID:14985916

  19. Preparation of modified magnetic nanoparticles as a sorbent for the preconcentration and determination of cadmium ions in food and environmental water samples prior to flame atomic absorption spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirabi, Ali; Dalirandeh, Zeinab; Rad, Ali Shokuhi

    2015-05-01

    A new method has been developed for the separation/preconcentration of trace level cadmium ions using diphenyl carbazone/sodium dodecyl sulfate immobilized on magnetic nanoparticle Fe3O4 as a new sorbent SPE and their determination by flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS). Synthesized nanoparticle was characterized by scanning electron microscope (SEM) and transmission electron microscope (TEM). Various influencing parameters on the separation and preconcentration of trace level cadmium ions such as, pH value, amount of nanoparticles, amount of diphenyl carbazone, condition of eluting solution, the effects of matrix ions were examined. The cadmium ions can be eluted from the modified magnetic nanoparticle using 1 mol L-1 HCl as a desorption reagent. The detection limit of this method for cadmium was 3.71 ng ml-1 and the R.S.D. was 0.503% (n=6). The advantages of this new method include rapidity, easy preparation of sorbents and a high concentration factor. The proposed method has been applied to the determination of Cd ions at trace levels in real samples such as, green tea, rice, tobacco, carrot, lettuce, ginseng, spice, tap water, river water, sea water with satisfactory results.

  20. A Novel Method Using Solid-Phase Extraction with Slotted Quartz Tube Atomic Absorption Spectrometry for the Determination of Manganese in Walnut Samples.

    PubMed

    Bitirmis, Bedrana; Trak, Digdem; Arslan, Yasin; Kendüzler, Erdal

    2016-01-01

    Mn(2+) was separated and preconcentrated using both solid-phase extraction (SPE) and a slotted quartz tube (SQT), and detected by a flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS) system. Firstly, Mn(2+) was retained on a column filled with Amberlite CG-120 resin, and then retained Mn(2+) ions on the Amberlite CG-120 resin eluted with 5 mL of 4 mol/L HNO3. This part was called the "first preconcentration step". Furthermore, to determine the Mn(2+) in a walnut sample, the SQT device was also used after the separation and preconcentration of Mn(2+) from the Amberlite CG-120 resin so as to further improve the sensitivity of system. This part was called the "second preconcentration step" in this study. The enrichment factor and limit of detection values were found to be 360 fold and 0.22 μg/L, in turn, after a two-step preconcentration method. The good accuracy of method was confirmed with the use of standard reference material (spinach leaves, NIST-1570a). PMID:27302588

  1. Noble metals as permanent chemical modifiers for the determination of mercury in environmental reference materials using solid sampling graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry and calibration against aqueous standards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    da Silva, Alessandra Furtado; Welz, Bernhard; Curtius, Adilson J.

    2002-12-01

    Iridium, palladium, rhodium and ruthenium, thermally deposited on the platform, were investigated as permanent modifiers for the determination of mercury in ash, sludge, marine and river sediment reference materials, ground to a particle size of 50 μm, using solid sampling graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry. A total mass of 250 μg of each modifier was applied using 25 injections of 20 μl of modifier solution (500 mg l -1), and executing a temperature program for modifier conditioning after each injection. The performance of palladium was found to be most consistent, taking the characteristic mass as the major criterion, resulting in an excellent correlation between the measured integrated absorbance values and the certified mercury contents. Mercury was found to be lost in part from aqueous solutions during the drying stage in the presence of all the investigated permanent modifiers, as well as in the presence of the palladium and magnesium nitrates modifier added in solution. A loss-free determination of mercury in aqueous solutions could be reached only after the addition of potassium permanganate, which finally made possible the use of aqueous standards for the direct analysis of solid samples. A characteristic mass of 55-60 pg Hg was obtained for the solid samples, using Pd as a permanent modifier, and also in aqueous solutions after the addition of permanganate. The results obtained for mercury in ash, sludge and sediment reference materials, using direct solid sapling and calibration against aqueous standards, as well as the detection limit of 0.2 mg kg -1 were satisfactory for a routine procedure.

  2. Fast heating induced impulse halogenation of refractory sample components in electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry by direct injection of a liquid halogenating agent.

    PubMed

    György, Krisztina; Ajtony, Zsolt; Van Meel, Katleen; Van Grieken, René; Czitrovszky, Aladár; Bencs, László

    2011-09-15

    A novel electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS) method was developed for the halogenation of refractory sample components (Er, Nd and Nb) of lithium niobate (LiNbO(3)) and bismuth tellurite (Bi(2)TeO(5)) optical single crystals to overcome memory effects and carry-over. For this purpose, the cleaning step of a regular graphite furnace heating program was replaced with a halogenation cycle. In this cycle, after the graphite tube cooled to room temperature, a 20 μL aliquot of liquid carbon tetrachloride (CCl(4)) was dispensed with a conventional autosampler into the graphite tube. The CCl(4) was partially dried at 80°C under the mini-flow (40 cm(3) min(-1)) condition of the Ar internal furnace gas (IFG), then the residue was decomposed (pyrolyzed) by fast furnace heating at 1900-2100°C under interrupted flow of the IFG. This step was followed by a clean-out stage at 2100°C under the maximum flow of the IFG. The advantage of the present method is that it does not require any alteration to the graphite furnace gas supply system in contrast to most of the formerly introduced halogenation techniques. The effectiveness of the halogenation method was verified with the determination of Er and Nd dopants in the optical crystals. In these analyses, a sensitivity decrease was observed, which was likely due to the enhanced deterioration of the graphite tube surface. Therefore, the application of mathematical correction (resloping) of the calibration was also required. The calibration curves were linear up to 1.5 and 10 μmol L(-1) for Er and Nd, respectively. Characteristic masses of 18 and 241 pg and the limit of detection (LOD) values of 0.017 and 0.27 μmol L(-1) were found for Er and Nd, respectively. These LOD data correspond to 0.68 μmol mol(-1) Er and 11 μmol mol(-1) Nd in solid bismuth tellurite samples. The analytical results were compared with those obtained by a conventional ETAAS method and validated with X-ray fluorescence spectrometry analysis

  3. Development of an analytical method for the determination of arsenic in gasoline samples by hydride generation-graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, Emilene M.; Dessuy, Morgana B.; Boschetti, Wiliam; Vale, Maria Goreti R.; Ferreira, Sérgio L. C.; Welz, Bernhard

    2012-05-01

    The purpose of the present work was to optimize the conditions for the determination of arsenic in gasoline with hydride generation-graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry after acid digestion using a full two-level factorial design with center point. The arsine was generated in a batch system and collected in a graphite tube coated with 150 μg Ir as a permanent modifier. The sample volume, the pre-reduction conditions, the temperature program and modifier mass were kept fixed for all experiments. The estimated main effects were: reducing agent concentration (negative effect), acid concentration (negative effect) and trapping temperature (positive effect). It was observed that there were interactions between the variables. Moreover, the curvature was significant, indicating that the best conditions were at the center point. The optimized parameters for arsine generation were 2.7 mol L- 1 hydrochloric acid and 1.6% (w/v) sodium tetrahydroborate. The optimized conditions to collect arsine in the graphite furnace were a trapping temperature of 250 °C and a collection time of 30 s. The limit of detection was 6.4 ng L- 1 and the characteristic mass was 24 pg. Two different systems for acid digestion were used: a digester block with cold finger and a microwave oven. The concentration of arsenic found with the proposed method was compared with that obtained using a detergentless microemulsion and direct graphite furnace determination. The results showed that the factorial design is a simple tool that allowed establishing the appropriate conditions for sample preparation and also helped in evaluating the interaction between the factors investigated.

  4. Polymer-supported ionic liquid solid phase extraction for trace inorganic and organic mercury determination in water samples by flow injection-cold vapor atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Escudero, Leticia B; Olsina, Roberto A; Wuilloud, Rodolfo G

    2013-11-15

    A simple and green technique named polymer-supported ionic liquid solid phase extraction (PSIL-SPE) was developed for mercury (Hg) species determination. Inorganic Hg (InHg) species was complexed with chloride ions followed by its introduction into a flow injection on-line system to quantitatively retain the anionic chlorocomplex (HgCl4(2-)) in a column packed with CYPHOS(®) IL 101-impregnated resin. The trapped InHg was then reduced with stannous chloride (SnCl2) and eluted with the same flow of reducing agent followed by cold vapor atomic absorption spectrometry (CV-AAS) detection. Organic mercury species (OrgHg) did not interact with the impregnated resin and were not retained into the column. Total concentration of OrgHg was evaluated by difference between total Hg and InHg concentration. A 95% extraction efficiency was achieved for InHg when the procedure was developed under optimal experimental conditions. The limit of detection obtained for preconcentration of 40 mL of sample was 2.4 ng L(-1) InHg. The relative standard deviation (RSD) was 2.7% (at 1 µg L(-1) InHg and n=10) calculated from the peak height of absorbance signals (Gaussian-shape and reproducible peaks). This work reports the first polymer-supported IL solid phase extraction approach implemented in a flow injection on-line system for determination of Hg species in mineral, tap and river water samples. PMID:24148384

  5. Studies of ion-imprinted polymers for solid-phase extraction of ruthenium from environmental samples before its determination by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zambrzycka, Elżbieta; Roszko, Dorota; Leśniewska, Barbara; Wilczewska, Agnieszka Z.; Godlewska-Żyłkiewicz, Beata

    2011-07-01

    The examination of the effect of interfering ions on the analytical signal of ruthenium measured by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry was initially performed in this work. The complexes of ruthenium(III) with thiosemicarbazide (TSd) and acetaldehyde thiosemicarbazone (AcTSn) were prepared and imprinted in polymeric network. The ion-imprinted polymers were synthesized by copolymerization of methacrylic acid, as functional monomer and ethylene glycol dimethacrylate, as crosslinking agent in the presence of 2,2-azobisisobutyronitrile as initiator. The effects of sample volume, pH, and flow rate on the extraction of analyte were studied in dynamic mode. The optimum pH for quantitative retention of ruthenium on each of the studied sorbents was 7.5 ± 0.5. The elution of analyte was completed with 0.2 mol L -1 thiourea in 0.2 mol L -1 HCl. The effect of matrix ions on ruthenium(III) separation process was studied. The analytical performance of the Ru-TSd polymer in the presence of competing ions was better than Ru-AcTSn polymer, considering recovery of analyte, reproducibility of results, selectivity coefficients, and sorbent capacity. The detection limit of the proposed method (0.16 ng mL -1 on Ru-TSd and 0.25 ng mL -1 on Ru-AcTSn) is lower in comparison with the previously published methods. The developed separation method was successfully applied to the determination of trace amounts of ruthenium in spiked water samples, sludge, grass, and human hair.

  6. Combination of dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction with flame atomic absorption spectrometry using microsample introduction for determination of lead in water samples.

    PubMed

    Naseri, Mohammad Taghi; Hemmatkhah, Payam; Hosseini, Mohammad Reza Milani; Assadi, Yaghoub

    2008-03-01

    The dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (DLLME) was combined with the flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS) for determination of lead in the water samples. Diethyldithiophosphoric acid (DDTP), carbon tetrachloride and methanol were used as chelating agent, extraction solvent and disperser solvent, respectively. A new FAAS sample introduction system was employed for the microvolume nebulization of the non-flammable chlorinated organic extracts. Injection of 20 microL volumes of the organic extract into an air-acetylene flame provided very sensitive spike-like and reproducible signals. Some effective parameters on the microextraction and the complex formation were selected and optimized. These parameters include extraction and disperser solvent type as well as their volume, extraction time, salt effect, pH and amount of the chelating agent. Under the optimized conditions, the enrichment factor of 450 was obtained from a sample volume of 25.0 mL. The enhancement factor, calculated as the ratio of the slopes of the calibration graphs with and without preconcentration, which was about 1000. The calibration graph was linear in the range of 1-70 microgL(-1) with a detection limit of 0.5 microgL(-1). The relative standard deviation (R.S.D.) for seven replicate measurements of 5.0 and 50 microgL(-1) of lead were 3.8 and 2.0%, respectively. The relative recoveries of lead in tap, well, river and seawater samples at the spiking level of 20 microgL(-1) ranged from 93.8 to 106.2%. The characteristics of the proposed method were compared with those of the liquid-liquid extraction (LLE), cloud point extraction (CPE), on-line and off-line solid-phase extraction (SPE) as well as co-precipitation, based on bibliographic data. Operation simplicity, rapidity, low cost, high enrichment factor, good repeatability, and low consumption of the extraction solvent at a microliter level are the main advantages of the proposed method. PMID:18267150

  7. A solid phase extraction procedure for the determination of Cd(II) and Pb(II) ions in food and water samples by flame atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Daşbaşı, Teslima; Saçmacı, Şerife; Ülgen, Ahmet; Kartal, Şenol

    2015-05-01

    A relatively rapid, accurate and precise solid phase extraction method is presented for the determination of cadmium(II) and lead(II) in various food and water samples. Quantitation is carried out by flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS). The method is based on the retention of the trace metal ions on Dowex Marathon C, a strong acid cation exchange resin. Some important parameters affecting the analytical performance of the method such as pH, flow rate and volume of the sample solution; type, concentration, volume, flow rate of the eluent; and matrix effects on the retention of the metal ions were investigated. Common coexisting ions did not interfere on the separation and determination of the analytes. The detection limits (3 σb) for Cd(II) and Pb(II) were found as 0.13 and 0.18 μg L(-1), respectively, while the limit of quantification values (10 σb) were computed as 0.43 and 0.60 μg L(-1) for the same sequence of the analytes. The precision (as relative standard deviation was lower than 4% at 5 μg L(-1) Cd(II) and 10 μg L(-1) Pb(II) levels, and the preconcentration factor was found to be 250. The accuracy of the proposed procedure was verified by analysing the certified reference materials, SPS-WW2 Batch 108 wastewater level 2 and INCT-TL-1 tea leaves, with the satisfactory results. In addition, for the accuracy of the method the recovery studies (⩾ 95%) were carried out. The method was applied to the determination of the analytes in the various natural waters (lake water, tap water, waste water with boric acid, waste water with H2SO4) and food samples (pomegranate flower, organic pear, radish leaf, lamb meat, etc.), and good results were obtained. While the food samples almost do not contain cadmium, they have included lead at low levels of 0.13-1.12 μg g(-1). PMID:25529724

  8. Combining single-particle inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry and X-ray absorption spectroscopy to evaluate the release of colloidal arsenic from environmental samples.

    PubMed

    Gomez-Gonzalez, Miguel Angel; Bolea, Eduardo; O'Day, Peggy A; Garcia-Guinea, Javier; Garrido, Fernando; Laborda, Francisco

    2016-07-01

    Detection and sizing of natural colloids involved in the release and transport of toxic metals and metalloids is essential to understand and model their environmental effects. Single-particle inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (SP-ICP-MS) was applied for the detection of arsenic-bearing particles released from mine wastes. Arsenic-bearing particles were detected in leachates from mine wastes, with a mass-per-particle detection limit of 0.64 ng of arsenic. Conversion of the mass-per-particle information provided by SP-ICP-MS into size information requires knowledge of the nature of the particles; therefore, synchrotron-based X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) was used to identify scorodite (FeAsO4·2H2O) as the main species in the colloidal particles isolated by ultrafiltration. The size of the scorodite particles detected in the leachates was below 300-350 nm, in good agreement with the values obtained by TEM. The size of the particles detected by SP-ICP-MS was determined as the average edge of scorodite crystals, which show a rhombic dipyramidal form, achieving a size detection limit of 117 nm. The combined use of SP-ICP-MS and XAS allowed detection, identification, and size determination of scorodite particles released from mine wastes, suggesting their potential to transport arsenic. Graphical abstract Analytical approach for the detection and size characterization of As-bearing particles by SP-ICP-MS and XAS in environmental samples. PMID:26847190

  9. Graphene oxide-TiO2 composite solid phase extraction combined with graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry for the speciation of inorganic selenium in water samples.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yanan; Chen, Beibei; Wu, Shaowei; He, Man; Hu, Bin

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, a method of graphene oxide (GO)-TiO2 composite solid phase extraction followed by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GFAAS) detection was proposed for the speciation of inorganic selenium in environmental waters. The adsorption behavior of inorganic Se(IV) and Se(VI) on the GO-TiO2(1:1) composite was investigated. It was found that Se(IV) was quantitatively retained on the GO-TiO2 composites within a wide pH range of 0.5-10, while Se(VI) was quantitatively adsorbed on GO-TiO2(1:1) composite at pH 0.5-2, and no obvious adsorption of Se(VI) within the pH range of 4-10 was found. By selecting pH 6.0, Se(IV) could be easily determined. After reduction of Se(VI), total Se was determined by the proposed method, and Se(VI) was calculated as the difference between the total Se and Se(IV). The factors affecting the separation/preconcentration of Se(IV) and Se(VI) were studied. Under the optimum conditions, the isothermal adsorption of Se(IV) on the GO-TiO2(1:1) composite fitted Langmuir model; a linear range over 0.1-12ngmL(-1) was obtained. The limit of detection (LOD) and precision of the method for Se(IV) was 0.04ngmL(-1) and 9.4% (cSe(IV)=0.5ngmL(-1), n=7), respectively. In order to verify the accuracy of the method, a standard water sample (GSBZ50031-94) was analyzed, and the determined value was in a good agreement to the certified value. The established method was applied to inorganic Se speciation in environmental water samples and the recovery of 87.4-102% was obtained for the spiked samples. PMID:27154702

  10. Direct sample introduction of wines in graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry for the simultaneous determination of arsenic, cadmium, copper and lead content.

    PubMed

    Ajtony, Zsolt; Szoboszlai, Norbert; Suskó, Emoke Klaudia; Mezei, Pál; György, Krisztina; Bencs, László

    2008-07-30

    A multi-element graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GFAAS) method was elaborated for the simultaneous determination of As, Cd, Cu, and Pb in wine samples of various sugar contents using the transversally heated graphite atomizer (THGA) with end-capped tubes and integrated graphite platforms (IGPs). For comparative GFAAS analyses, direct injection (i.e., dispensing the sample onto the IGP) and digestion-based (i.e., adding oxidizing agents, such as HNO(3) and/or H(2)O(2) to the sample solutions) methods were optimized with the application of chemical modifiers. The mixture of 5 microg Pd (applied as nitrate) plus 3 microg Mg(NO(3))(2) chemical modifier was proven to be optimal for the present set of analytes and matrix, it allowing the optimal 600 degrees C pyrolysis and 2200 degrees C atomization temperatures, respectively. The IGP of the THGA was pre-heated at 70 degrees C to prevent the sputtering and/or foaming of sample solutions with a high organic content, dispensed together with the modifier solution, which method also improved the reproducibility of the determinations. With the digestion-based method, the recovery ranged between 87 and 122%, while with the direct injection method it was between 96 and 102% for Cd, Cu, and Pb, whereas a lower, compromise recovery of 45-85% was realized for As. The detection limits (LODs) were found to be 5.0, 0.03, 1.2, and 0.8 microg l(-1) for As, Cd, Cu, and Pb, respectively. The characteristic mass (m(0)) data were 24 pg As, 1.3 pg Cd, 13 pg Cu, and 35 pg Pb. The upper limits of the linear calibration range were 100, 2, 100, and 200 microg l(-1) for As, Cd, Cu, and Pb, respectively. The precisions were not worse than 4.8, 3.1, 3.7, and 2.3% for As, Cd, Cu, and Pb, respectively. For arsenic, a higher amount of the modifier (e.g., 20 microg Pd plus 12 microg Mg(NO(3))(2)) could be recommended to overcome the interference from the presence of sulphate and phosphate in wines. Although this method increased the

  11. Determination of selected elements in whole coal and in coal ash from the eight argonne premium coal samples by atomic absorption spectrometry, atomic emission spectrometry, and ion-selective electrode

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Doughten, M.W.; Gillison, J.R.

    1990-01-01

    Methods for the determination of 24 elements in whole coal and coal ash by inductively coupled argon plasma-atomic emission spectrometry, flame, graphite furnace, and cold vapor atomic absorption spectrometry, and by ion-selective electrode are described. Coal ashes were analyzed in triplicate to determine the precision of the methods. Results of the analyses of NBS Standard Reference Materials 1633, 1633a, 1632a, and 1635 are reported. Accuracy of the methods is determined by comparison of the analysis of standard reference materials to their certified values as well as other values in the literature.

  12. [Application of atomic absorption spectrometry in the engine knock detection].

    PubMed

    Chen, Li-Dan

    2013-02-01

    Because existing human experience diagnosis method and apparatus for auxiliary diagnosis method are difficult to diagnose quickly engine knock. Atomic absorption spectrometry was used to detect the automobile engine knock in in innovative way. After having determined Fe, Al, Cu, Cr and Pb content in the 35 groups of Audi A6 engine oil whose travel course is 2 000 -70 000 kilometers and whose sampling interval is 2 000 kilometers by atomic absorption spectrometry, the database of primary metal content in the same automobile engine at different mileage was established. The research shows that the main metal content fluctuates within a certain range. In practical engineering applications, after the determination of engine oil main metal content and comparison with its database value, it can not only help to diagnose the type and location of engine knock without the disintegration and reduce vehicle maintenance costs and improve the accuracy of engine knock fault diagnosis. PMID:23697150

  13. Solid sampling-graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry for the direct determination of trace amounts of silicon in polyamide. Comparison of the performance of platinum and palladium as chemical modifiers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Resano, M.; Aramendía, M.; Volynsky, A. B.; Belarra, M. A.

    2004-04-01

    In this paper, the use of solid sampling-graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry for the direct determination of silicon in a polyamide sample at the 10 μg g -1 level has been investigated. The performance of Pt and Pd as chemical modifiers for the reproducible atomization of this element has been compared, both for aqueous solutions and for solid samples. According to the results obtained, it can be concluded that Pt is an interesting alternative to Pd, since it is capable of providing a similar performance with the use of lower modifier amounts (1 μg of Pt vs. 20 μg of Pd for direct analysis of the sample). The method proposed shows important benefits for the determination of such a complicated element: the use of aqueous standards for calibration, low sample consumption (a few milligrams), high sample throughput (20 min per sample), low limit of detection (0.1 μg g -1) and reduced risk of analyte losses and, especially, of contamination, while precision is fit for the purpose (approx. 6% R.S.D.).

  14. Application of multiwall carbon nanotubes impregnated with 5-dodecylsalicylaldoxime for on-line copper preconcentration and determination in water samples by flame atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Tobiasz, Anna; Walas, Stanisław; Soto Hernández, Arlene; Mrowiec, Halina

    2012-07-15

    The paper presents application of multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) modified with 5-dodecylsalicylaldoxime to copper(II) flow-injection on-line preconcentration and flame atomic absorption spectrometric (FAAS) determination. Two new sorbents were obtained by impregnation of MWCNTs with Cu(II)-LIX 622(®) complex, however in the first case modification was preceded by carbon wall activation via oxidization (Cu-LIX-CNT-A sorbent), and in the second one no surface activation was performed (Cu-LIX-CNT sorbent). It was found that effective leaching of initially introduced copper and Cu(II) retained in preconcentration process could be realized with the use 7% and 5% (v/v) nitric acid, for particular sorbents. Testing the influence of loading solution pH and rate of loading on sorption it was found out that optimal range of loading solution pH was about 4.5-6.3 for activated and 6.15-6.25 for non-activated CNT. Investigation of sorption kinetics showed that the process can be described by pseudo-second order reaction model. Sorption equilibrium conditions (90% sorption) for LIX-CNT-A and LIX-CNT were obtained after 8-15min, respectively and maximum sorption capacity for the new sorbents amounted to 18.1mgg(-1) and 31.6mgg(-1), respectively. For the examined sorbents enrichment factors increased with extension of loading time up to 180s: linearly for activated and non-linearly for non-activated MWCNTs. Influence of potential interferents such as Cd(II), Zn(II), Fe(III), Mg(II) and Ca(II) ions on copper(II) sorption on the new CNT materials was examined individually and with the use of 2(5-2) factorial design. The study revealed significant interference from iron, magnesium and calcium ions at relatively high concentrations. Applicability of the proposed sorbents was tested for Cu(II) determination in various kinds of water samples and the results were compared with those obtained with the use of ICP MS as a reference technique. Copper(II) determination in two certified

  15. Atomic Absorption, Atomic Fluorescence, and Flame Emission Spectrometry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horlick, Gary

    1984-01-01

    This review is presented in six sections. Sections focus on literature related to: (1) developments in instrumentation, measurement techniques, and procedures; (2) performance studies of flames and electrothermal atomizers; (3) applications of atomic absorption spectrometry; (4) analytical comparisons; (5) atomic fluorescence spectrometry; and (6)…

  16. Application of modified nano-alumina as a solid phase extraction sorbent for the preconcentration of Cd and Pb in water and herbal samples prior to flame atomic absorption spectrometry determination.

    PubMed

    Ezoddin, M; Shemirani, F; Abdi, Kh; Saghezchi, M Khosravi; Jamali, M R

    2010-06-15

    The first study on the high efficiency of nanometer-sized gamma-alumina coated with sodium dodecyl sulfate-1-(2-pyridylazo)-2-naphthol (SDS-PAN) as a new sorbent solid phase extraction (SPE) has been reported. A microcolumn packed with modified nanometer-sized alumina was used to preconcentrate and separate Cd and Pb in water and herbal samples. The metals were eluted with 2 mL HNO(3) directly and detected with the detection system flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS). Various influencing parameters on the separation and preconcentration of trace metals, such as pH, flow rate, sample volume, amount of sorbent, and concentration of eluent, were studied. Under the optimized operating conditions, the sorption capacities of the modified nano-gamma-alumina for Cd and Pb were 11.1 and 16.4 mg g(-1) respectively. With 500.0 mL sample an enrichment factor of 250 was obtained. The detection limits of this method for Cd and Pb were 0.15 and 0.17 microg L(-1) and the R.S.D.s were 2.8 and 3.2% (n=10), respectively. The proposed method has been applied to the determination of these metal ions at trace levels in certified reference materials and real samples with satisfactory results. PMID:20303214

  17. Preconcentration by coprecipitation of arsenic and tin in natural waters with a Ni-pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate complex and their direct determination by solid-sampling atomic-absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Q; Minami, H; Imoue, S; Atsuya, I

    2001-08-01

    A method for the determination of trace amounts of arsenic and tin in natural waters is described. Trace amounts of arsenic and tin were preconcentrated by coprecipitation with a Ni-ammonium pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (APDC) complex. The coprecipitates obtained were directly analyzed by graphite-furnace atomic-absorption spectrometry (GFAAS) using the Ni-APDC complex solid-sampling technique. The coprecipitation conditions used for the trace amounts of arsenic and tin in natural water were investigated in detail. It was found that arsenic and tin at sub-ng mL(-1) levels were both coprecipitated quantitatively by Ni(PDC)2 in the pH range 2-3. The concentration factors by coprecipitation reached approximately 40,000 when 2 mg nickel was added as a carrier element to 500 mL of the water sample. The proposed method has been applied to the determination of trace amounts of arsenic and tin in river water and seawater reference materials, and the detection limits for arsenic and tin, which were calculated from three times of the standard deviation of the procedural blanks, are 0.02 ng mL(-1) and 0.04 ng mL(-1), respectively, for 500-mL volumes of water sample. PMID:11569865

  18. The use of rapidly synergistic cloud point extraction for the separation and preconcentration of trace amounts of Ni (II) ions from food and water samples coupling with flame atomic absorption spectrometry determination.

    PubMed

    Rahnama, Reyhaneh; Najafi, Marzieh

    2016-03-01

    A novel improved preconcentration method known as rapidly synergistic cloud point extraction (RS-CPE) was established for nickel preconcentration and determination prior to its determination by flame atomic absorption spectrometry. In this work, the traditional CPE pattern was changed and greatly simplified in order to be applicable in metal extraction and detection. This method was accomplished in room temperature in 1 min. Non-ionic surfactant Triton X-114 was used as extractant. Octanol worked as cloud point revulsant and synergic reagent. The various parameters affecting the extraction and preconcentration of nickel such as sample pH, 2,2'-Furildioxime concentration, amounts of octanol, amounts of Triton X-114, type of diluting solvent, extraction time, and ionic strength were investigated and optimized. Under optimal conditions, the calibration curve showed an excellent linearity in the concentration range of 2-200 μg L(-1), and the limit of detection was 0.6 μg L(-1) for nickel. The developed method was successfully applied for the determination of nickel in food and water samples. The results showed that, the proposed method can be used as a cheap, rapid, and efficient method for the extraction and preconcentration of nickel from real samples. PMID:26857255

  19. Fe3O4@ZrO2 nanoparticles magnetic solid phase extraction coupled with flame atomic absorption spectrometry for chromium(III) speciation in environmental and biological samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yi-Wei; Zhang, Jing; Liu, Jun-Feng; Chen, Lin; Deng, Zhen-Li; Han, Mu-Xian; Wei, Xiao-Shu; Yu, Ai-Min; Zhang, Hai-Li

    2012-07-01

    A new method for Cr(III) speciation in seven kinds of environmental and biological samples by Fe3O4@ZrO2 nanoparticles magnetic solid phase extraction (MSPE) and flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS) has been developed. Fe3O4@ZrO2 nanoparticles were simply prepared by sol-gel method, and the adsorptive behaviors of Cr(III) and Cr(VI) on Fe3O4@ZrO2 nanoparticles were assessed. At pH 8.0-9.0, Fe3O4@ZrO2 nanoparticles were selective towards Cr(III) but hardly Cr(VI). The retained Cr(III) was subsequently eluted with 3.0 mL of 0.5 mol L-1 HNO3 followed by magnetic decantation. Total chromium was determined after reduction of Cr(VI) to Cr(III) by ascorbic acid. Various parameters affecting Fe3O4@ZrO2 nanoparticles MSPE were optimized systematically. Under the optimum conditions, the adsorption capacity of Fe3O4@ZrO2 nanoparticles for Cr(III) is 24.5 mg g-1. With an enrichment factor (EF) of 25, detection limit of Cr(III) was 0.69 ng mL-1, and the proposed method has been successfully applied for Cr(III) speciation in seven kinds of environmental and biological samples with satisfactory results.

  20. Vortex-assisted surfactant-enhanced-emulsification liquid-liquid microextraction with solidification of floating organic droplet combined with flame atomic absorption spectrometry for the fast determination of cadmium in water samples.

    PubMed

    Peng, Guilong; Lu, Ying; He, Qiang; Mmereki, Daniel; Tang, Xiaohui; Zhong, Zhihui; Zhao, Xiaolong

    2016-01-01

    A novel vortex-assisted surfactant-enhanced-emulsification liquid-liquid microextraction with solidification of floating organic droplet (VSLLME-SFO) was developed for the fast, simple and efficient determination of cadmium (Cd) in water samples followed by flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS). In the VSLLME-SFO process, the addition of surfactant (as an emulsifier), could enhance the mass transfer from the aqueous solution into the extraction solvent. The extraction solvent could be dispersed into the aqueous phase under vigorous shaking with the vortex. In this paper, we investigated the influences of analytical parameters, including pH, extraction solvent type and its volume, surfactant type and its volume, concentration of chelating agent, salt effect and vortex time, on the extraction efficiency of Cd. Under the optimized conditions, the limit of detection was 0.16 μg/L. The analyte enrichment factor was 37.68. The relative standard deviation was 3.2% (10 μg/L, n = 10) and the calibration graph was linear, ranging from 0.5 to 30 μg/L. The proposed method was successfully applied for the analysis of ultra-trace Cd in river water and wastewater samples. PMID:27232416

  1. Synthesis and application of a nanoporous ion-imprinted polymer for the separation and preconcentration of trace amounts of vanadium from food samples before determination by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Dadfarnia, Shayessteh; Haji Shabani, Ali Mohammad; Dehghanpoor Frashah, Shahab

    2016-04-01

    A vanadium ion-imprinted polymer was synthesized in the presence of V(V) and N-benzoyl-N-phenyl hydroxyl amine using 4-vinyl pyridine as the monomer, ethylene glycol dimethacrylate as the cross linker and 2,2'-azobis(isobutyronitrile) as the initiator. The imprinted V(V) ions were completely removed by leaching the polymer with 5 mol/L nitric acid, and the polymer structure was characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy. The ion-imprinted polymer was used as the sorbent in the development of the solid-phase extraction method for V(V) prior to its determination by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry. The maximum sorption capacity for V(V) ions was 26.7 mg/g at pH 4.0. Under the optimum conditions, for a sample volume of 150.0 mL, an enrichment factor of 289.0 and a detection limit of 6.4 ng/L were obtained. The developed method was successfully applied to the determination of vanadium in parsley, zucchini, black tea, rice, and water samples. PMID:26891590

  2. Determination of palladium, platinum and rhodium in used automobile catalysts and active pharmaceutical ingredients using high-resolution continuum source graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry and direct solid sample analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Resano, Martín; Flórez, María del Rosario; Queralt, Ignasi; Marguí, Eva

    2015-03-01

    This work investigates the potential of high-resolution continuum source graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry for the direct determination of Pd, Pt and Rh in two samples of very different nature. While analysis of active pharmaceutical ingredients is straightforward and it is feasible to minimize matrix effects, to the point that calibration can be carried out against aqueous standard solutions, the analysis of used automobile catalysts is more challenging requiring the addition of a chemical modifier (NH4F·HF) to help in releasing the analytes, a more vigorous temperature program and the use of a solid standard (CRM ERM®-EB504) for calibration. However, in both cases it was possible to obtain accurate results and precision values typically better than 10% RSD in a fast and simple way, while only two determinations are needed for the three analytes, since Pt and Rh can be simultaneously monitored in both types of samples. Overall, the methods proposed seem suited for the determination of these analytes in such types of samples, offering a greener and faster alternative that circumvents the traditional problems associated with sample digestion, requiring a small amount of sample only (0.05 mg per replicate for catalysts, and a few milligrams for the pharmaceuticals) and providing sufficient sensitivity to easily comply with regulations. The LODs achieved were 6.5 μg g- 1 (Pd), 8.3 μg g- 1 (Pt) and 9.3 μg g- 1 (Rh) for catalysts, which decreased to 0.08 μg g- 1 (Pd), 0.15 μg g- 1 (Pt) and 0.10 μg g- 1 (Rh) for pharmaceuticals.

  3. Determination of thallium in cadmium and lead by graphite-furnace atomic-absorption spectrometry with sample vaporization from a platform.

    PubMed

    Fazakas, J; Marinescu, D M

    1983-11-01

    When the sample is vaporized from the wall of a graphite furnace it is not possible to determine thallium in cadmium and lead by AAS without matrix matching of the standards. In the case of a lead matrix and vaporization from the wall, the thallium signal is barely distinguishable from the base-line. When the sample is vaporized from a platform, and the peak area is used for measurement, pure aqueous standards may be used for instrument calibration. The peak heights and areas of the thallium signals are considerably enhanced by vaporization from a platform (peak height 1.7-fold and peak area 2.6-fold in pure aqueous solutions as compared to vaporization from the wall). The enhancement factors are larger in presence of the cadmium or lead matrix since here the reduced interference also makes a contribution. PMID:18963481

  4. Vortex-assisted ionic liquid microextraction coupled to flame atomic absorption spectrometry for determination of trace levels of cadmium in real samples

    PubMed Central

    Chamsaz, Mahmoud; Atarodi, Atefe; Eftekhari, Mohammad; Asadpour, Saeid; Adibi, Mina

    2012-01-01

    A simple and rapid vortex assisted ionic liquid based liquid–liquid microextraction technique (VALLME) was proposed for preconcentration of trace levels of cadmium. According to this method, the extraction solvent was dispersed into the aqueous samples by the assistance of vortex agitator. Cadmium preconcentration was mediated by chelation with the 8-hydroxyquinoline (oxine) reagent and an IL, 1-octyl-3-methylimidazolium hexafluorophosphate ([Omim][PF6]) was chosen as the extraction solvent to extract the hydrophobic complex. Several variables such as sample pH, concentration of oxine, volume of [Omim][PF6] and extraction time were investigated in details and optimum conditions were selected. Under the optimum conditions, the limit of detection (LOD) was 2.9 μg L−1 for Cd (ІІ) and relative standard deviation (RSD%) for five replicate determinations of 125 μg L−1 was 4.1%. The method was successfully applied to the determination of cadmium in tap water, apple and rice samples. PMID:25685399

  5. A photo-oxidation procedure using UV radiation/H 2O 2 for decomposition of wine samples — Determination of iron and manganese content by flame atomic absorption spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    dos Santos, Walter N. L.; Brandão, Geovani C.; Portugal, Lindomar A.; David, Jorge M.; Ferreira, Sérgio L. C.

    2009-06-01

    This paper proposes the use of photo-oxidation with UV radiation/H 2O 2 as sample pretreatment for the determination of iron and manganese in wines by flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS). The optimization involved the study of the following variables: pH and concentration of buffer solution, concentrated hydrogen peroxide volume and irradiation time. The evaluation of sample degradation was monitored by measuring the absorbance at the maximum wavelength of red wine (530 nm). Using the experimental conditions established during the optimization (irradiation time of 30 min, oxidant volume of 2.5 mL, pH 10, and a buffer concentration of 0.15 mol L - 1 ), this procedure allows the determination of iron and manganese with limits of detection of 30 and 22 μg L - 1 , respectively, for a 5 mL volume of digested sample. The precision levels, expressed as relative standard deviation (RSD), were 2.8% and 0.65% for iron and 2.7% and 0.54% for manganese for concentrations of 0.5 and 2.0 mg L - 1 , respectively. Addition/recovery tests for evaluation of the accuracy were in the ranges of 90%-111% and 95%-107% for iron and manganese, respectively. This digestion procedure has been applied for the determination of iron and manganese in six wine samples. The concentrations varied from 1.58 to 2.77 mg L - 1 for iron and from 1.30 to 1.91 mg L - 1 for manganese. The results were compared with those obtained by an acid digestion procedure and determination of the elements by FAAS. There was no significant difference between the results obtained by the two methods based on a paired t-test (at 95% confidence level).

  6. Application of Dispersive Liquid-Liquid Microextraction with Graphite Furnace Atomic Absorption Spectrometry for Determination of Trace Amounts of Zinc in Water Samples

    PubMed Central

    Mazloomifar, Ali

    2013-01-01

    A selective and simple method for separation and preconcentration of zinc ions was developed by using dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction. Parameters that have an effect on the microextraction efficiency such as volume of extraction and disperser solvent, extraction time, and adding salt were investigated. Under optimum conditions, a preconcentration factor of 250 was obtained. The limit of detection (LOD) obtained under the optimal conditions was 0.09 ng mL−1. The linearity of method was obtained in range of 0.2–50 ng mL−1 with a correlation coefficient (r) of 0.9974. The relative standard deviation for 10 replicate determinations at 1.0 ng mL−1 of zinc was 2.53%. The proposed method was successfully applied to the analysis of zinc in water sample. PMID:23737791

  7. Synthesis and application of ion-imprinted polymer nanoparticles for the extraction and preconcentration of mercury in water and food samples employing cold vapor atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Roushani, Mahmoud; Abbasi, Shahryar; Khani, Hossein

    2015-09-01

    We describe a nanosized Hg(II)-imprinted polymer that was prepared from methacrylic acid as functional monomer, ethyleneglycol dimethacrylate as cross-linker, 2,2'-azobisisobutyronitrile (AIBN) as radical initiator, 2, 2'-di pyrydyl amine as a specific ligand, and Hg (II) as the template ions by precipitation polymerization method in methanol as the progeny solvent. Batch adsorption experiments were carried out as a function of pH, Hg (II) imprinted polymer amount, adsorption and desorption time, volume, and concentration of eluent. The synthesized polymer particles were characterized physically and morphologically by using infrared spectroscopy, thermogravimetric analysis, X-ray diffraction, and scanning electron microscopic techniques. The maximum adsorption capacity of the ion-imprinted and non-imprinted sorbent was 27.96 and 7.89 mg g(-1), respectively. Under optimal conditions, the detection limit for mercury was 0.01 μg L(-1) and the relative standard deviation was 3.2 % (n = 6) at the 1.00 μg L(-1). The procedure was applied to determination of mercury in fish and water samples with satisfactory results. PMID:26318321

  8. Ionic liquid-assisted multiwalled carbon nanotube-dispersive micro-solid phase extraction for sensitive determination of inorganic As species in garlic samples by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grijalba, Alexander Castro; Escudero, Leticia B.; Wuilloud, Rodolfo G.

    2015-08-01

    A highly sensitive dispersive micro-solid phase extraction (D-μ-SPE) method combining an ionic liquid (IL) and multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) for inorganic As species (As(III) and As(V)) species separation and determination in garlic samples by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS) was developed. Trihexyl(tetradecil)phosphonium chloride IL was used to form an ion pair with the arsenomolybdate complex obtained by reaction of As(V) with molybdate ion. Afterwards, 1.0 mg of MWCNTs was dispersed for As(V) extraction and the supernatant was separated by centrifugation. MWCNTs were re-dispersed with tetradecyltrimethylammonium bromide surfactant and ultrasound followed by direct injection into the graphite furnace of ETAAS for As determination. Pyrolysis and atomization conditions were carefully studied for complete decomposition of MWCNTs and IL matrices. Under optimum conditions, an extraction efficiency of 100% and a preconcentration factor of 70 were obtained with 5 mL of garlic extract. The detection limit was 7.1 ng L- 1 and the relative standard deviations (RSDs) for six replicate measurements at 5 μg L- 1 of As were 5.4% and 4.8% for As(III) and As(V), respectively. The proposed D-μ-SPE method allowed the efficient separation and determination of inorganic As species in a complex matrix such as garlic extract.

  9. Cobalt internal standard for Ni to assist the simultaneous determination of Mo and Ni in plant materials by high-resolution continuum source graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry employing direct solid sample analysis.

    PubMed

    de Babos, Diego Victor; Bechlin, Marcos André; Barros, Ariane Isis; Ferreira, Edilene Cristina; Gomes Neto, José Anchieta; de Oliveira, Silvana Ruella

    2016-05-15

    A new method is proposed for the simultaneous determination of Mo and Ni in plant materials by high-resolution continuum source graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (HR-CS GFAAS), employing direct solid sample analysis (DSS) and internal standardization (IS). Cobalt was used as internal standard to minimize matrix effects during Ni determinations, enabling the use of aqueous standards for calibration. Correlation coefficients for the calibration curves were typically better than 0.9937. The performance of the method was checked by analysis of six plant certified reference materials, and the results for Mo and Ni were in agreement with the certified values (95% confidence level, t-test). Analysis was made of different types of plant materials used as renewable sources of energy, including sugarcane leaves, banana tree fiber, soybean straw, coffee pods, orange bagasse, peanut hulls, and sugarcane bagasse. The concentrations found for Mo and Ni ranged from 0.08 to 0.63 ng mg(-1) and from 0.41 to 6.92 ng mg(-1), respectively. Precision (RSD) varied from 2.1% to 11% for Mo and from 3.7% to 10% for Ni. Limits of quantification of 0.055 and 0.074 ng were obtained for Mo and Ni, respectively. PMID:26992542

  10. Can sample treatments based on advanced oxidation processes assisted by high-intensity focused ultrasound be used for toxic arsenic determination in human urine by flow-injection hydride-generation atomic absorption spectrometry?

    PubMed

    Correia, A; Galesio, M; Santos, H; Rial-Otero, R; Lodeiro, C; Oehmen, A; Conceição, Antonio C L; Capelo, J L

    2007-05-15

    Two advanced oxidation processes (AOPs), based on high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU), namely, KMnO(4)/HCl/HIFU and H(2)O(2)/HCl/HIFU are studied and compared for the determination of toxic arsenic in human urine [As(III)+As(V)+MMA+DMA] by flow-injection hydride-generation atomic absorption spectrometry (FI-HG-AAS). The KMnO(4)/HCl/HIFU procedure was found to be adequate for organic matter degradation in human urine. l-cysteine (letra minuscula) was used for As reduction to the trivalent state. The new procedure was assessed with seven urines certified in different As species. Results revealed that with KMnO(4)/HCl/HIFU plus l-cysteine the toxic arsenic can be accurately measured in human urine whilst the H(2)O(2)/HCl/HIFU procedure underestimates toxic As. DMA and MMA degradation in urine were observed, due to the effects of the ultrasonic field. Recoveries for As(III), As(V), MMA and DMA were within the certified ranges. Arsenobetaine was not degraded by the AOPs. The new procedure adheres well to the principles of analytical minimalism: (i) low reagent consumption, (ii) low reagent concentration, (iii) low waste production and (iv) low amount of time required for sample preparation and analysis. PMID:19071711

  11. Chlorine analysis by diode laser atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Koch, J; Zybin, A; Niemax, K

    2000-04-01

    The general characteristics of Diode Laser Absorption Spectrometry (DLAAS) in low pressure plasmas particularly with respect to the detection of non-metals are comprehensively recapitulated and discussed. Furthermore, a detector, which is based on DLAAS in a microwave-induced low pressure plasma as an alternative technique for halogene-specific analysis of volatile compounds and polymeric matrices is described. The analytical capability of the technique is demonstrated on the chlorine-specific analysis of ablated polymer fragments as well as gas chromatographically separated hydrocarbons. Since the measurements were carried out by means of a balanced-heterodyne detection scheme, different technical noise contributions, such as laser excess and RAM noise could efficiently be suppressed and the registered absorption was limited only by the principal shot noise. Thus, in the case of the polymer analysis a chlorine-specific absolute detection limit of 10 pg could be achieved. Furthermore, fundamental investigations concerning the influence of hydrocarbons on the dissociation capability of the microwave induced plasma were performed. For this purpose, the carbon-, chlorine- and hydrogen-specific stoichiometry of the compounds were empirically determined. Deviations from the expected proportions were found to be insignificant, implying the possibility of internal standardization relative to the response of a reference sample. PMID:12953476

  12. Speciation of As(III) and As(V) in water samples by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry after solid phase extraction combined with dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction based on the solidification of floating organic drop.

    PubMed

    Shamsipur, Mojtaba; Fattahi, Nazir; Assadi, Yaghoub; Sadeghi, Marzieh; Sharafi, Kiomars

    2014-12-01

    A solid phase extraction (SPE) coupled with dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction based on the solidification of floating organic drop (DLLME-SFO) method, using diethyldithiphosphate (DDTP) as a proper chelating agent, has been developed as an ultra preconcentration technique for the determination of inorganic arsenic in water samples prior to graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GFAAS). Variables affecting the performance of both steps were thoroughly investigated. Under optimized conditions, 100mL of As(ΙΙΙ) solution was first concentrated using a solid phase sorbent. The extract was collected in 2.0 mL of acetone and 60.0 µL of 1-undecanol was added into the collecting solvent. The mixture was then injected rapidly into 5.0 mL of pure water for further DLLME-SFO. Total inorganic As(III, V) was extracted similarly after reduction of As(V) to As(III) with potassium iodide and sodium thiosulfate and As(V) concentration was calculated by difference. A mixture of Pd(NO3)2 and Mg(NO3)2 was used as a chemical modifier in GFAAS. The analytical characteristics of the method were determined. The calibration graph was linear in the rage of 10-100 ng L(-1) with detection limit of 2.5 ng L(-1). Repeatability (intra-day) and reproducibility (inter-day) of method based on seven replicate measurements of 80 ng L(-1) of As(ΙΙΙ) were 6.8% and 7.5%, respectively. The method was successfully applied to speciation of As(III), As(V) and determination of the total amount of As in water samples and in a certified reference material (NIST RSM 1643e). PMID:25159375

  13. AIR MONITORING BY DIFFERENTIAL OPTICAL ABSORPTION SPECTROMETRY IN BAYTOWN, TEXAS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report documents the results of a field study carried out in Baytown, Texas in August 1993. ne goal of the field study was to evaluate calibration and audit procedures for a differential optical absorption spectrometry (DOAS) system. he other major goal of the study was to c...

  14. [Determination of lead in beard hair by atomic absorption spectrometry (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Graef, V

    1976-04-01

    The lead content of hair from the electric razor can be determined by atomic absorption spectrometry, using the micro-sampling technique of Delves. 1--5 mg of the washed and dried hair are partially oxidized with hydrogen peroxide prior to analysis. The method is simple and quick and therefore suited for the serial investigation of persons exposed to lead. PMID:1271019

  15. The role of atomic absorption spectrometry in geochemical exploration

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Viets, J.G.; O'Leary, R. M.

    1992-01-01

    In this paper we briefly describe the principles of atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS) and the basic hardware components necessary to make measurements of analyte concentrations. Then we discuss a variety of methods that have been developed for the introduction of analyte atoms into the light path of the spectrophotometer. This section deals with sample digestion, elimination of interferences, and optimum production of ground-state atoms, all critical considerations when choosing an AAS method. Other critical considerations are cost, speed, simplicity, precision, and applicability of the method to the wide range of materials sampled in geochemical exploration. We cannot attempt to review all of the AAS methods developed for geological materials but instead will restrict our discussion to some of those appropriate for geochemical exploration. Our background and familiarity are reflected in the methods we discuss, and we have no doubt overlooked many good methods. Our discussion should therefore be considered a starting point in finding the right method for the problem, rather than the end of the search. Finally, we discuss the future of AAS relative to other instrumental techniques and the promising new directions for AAS in geochemical exploration. ?? 1992.

  16. Absorption Mode FT-ICR Mass Spectrometry Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Donald F.; Kilgour, David P.; Konijnenburg, Marco; O'Connor, Peter B.; Heeren, Ronald M.

    2013-12-03

    Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry offers the highest mass resolving power for molecular imaging experiments. This high mass resolving power ensures that closely spaced peaks at the same nominal mass are resolved for proper image generation. Typically higher magnetic fields are used to increase mass resolving power. However, a gain in mass resolving power can also be realized by phase correction of the data for absorption mode display. In addition to mass resolving power, absorption mode offers higher mass accuracy and signal-to-noise ratio over the conventional magnitude mode. Here we present the first use of absorption mode for Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry imaging. The Autophaser algorithm is used to phase correct each spectrum (pixel) in the image and then these parameters are used by the Chameleon work-flow based data processing software to generate absorption mode ?Datacubes? for image and spectral viewing. Absorption mode reveals new mass and spatial features that are not resolved in magnitude mode and results in improved selected ion image contrast.

  17. Electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry determination of molybdenum in whole blood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burguera, J. L.; Rondón, C.; Burguera, M.; Roa, M. E.; Petit de Peña, Y.

    2002-03-01

    A method for the determination of molybdenum in whole blood by atomic absorption spectrometry with electrothermal atomization was developed and evaluated. Erbium (25 μg) was chosen from several potential chemical modifiers (Sm, Lu, Ho, Eu and Pd+Mg) as the most appropriate for the sensitive and reliable determination of molybdenum in such sample. The process used was direct dilution of the sample in a ratio 1:2 with a 0.1% (v/v) Triton X-100 solution. The injection of 20 μl of a solution of 15% (w/v) hydrogen peroxide and running the temperature program after 5 firings greatly reduced the effect of build-up of carbonaceous residues within the atomizer. The limit of detection and working ranges, respectively, were 0.6 and 2.0-100.0 μg l -1, and the characteristic mass was 7.2 pg. The relative standard deviation varied from 0.8 to 1.5% for within and between batch determinations, respectively. The determination of molybdenum in Seronorm™ Trace Elements in Whole Blood with known added amounts of the analyte was performed to asses the accuracy. The optimized procedure has been applied to the determination of molybdenum in whole blood specimens of 20 subjects taken before and 10-12 h after receiving an over-supply of 1 mg of molybdenum. The molybdenum concentrations (±S.D.) were 10.9±0.4 μg Mo l -1 (range 9.9-11.6 μg Mo l -1) and 15.4±0.4 μg Mo l -1 (range 13.1-16.9 μg Mo l -1) for the individuals before and after the administration of molybdenum.

  18. Alpha spectrometry applications with mass separated samples.

    PubMed

    Dion, M P; Eiden, Gregory C; Farmer, Orville T; Liezers, Martin; Robinson, John W

    2016-01-01

    (241)Am has been deposited using a novel technique that employs a commercial inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer. This work presents results of high-resolution alpha spectrometry on the (241)Am samples using a small area passivated implanted planar silicon detector. We have also investigated the mass-based separation capability by developing a (238)Pu sample, present as a minor constituent in a (244)Pu standard, and performed subsequent radiometric counting. With this new sample development method, the (241)Am samples achieved the intrinsic energy resolution of the detector used for these measurements. There was no detectable trace of any other isotopes contained in the (238)Pu implant demonstrating the mass-based separation (or enhancement) attainable with this technique. PMID:26583262

  19. Millimeter wave absorption spectra of biological samples

    SciTech Connect

    Gandhi, O.P.; Hagmann, M.J.; Hill, D.W.; Partlow, L.M.; Bush, L.

    1980-01-01

    A solid-state computer-controlled system has been used to make swept-frequency measurements of absorption of biological specimens from 26.5 to 90.0 GHz. A wide range of samples was used, including solutions of DNA and RNA, and suspensions of BHK-21/C13 cells, Candida albicans, C krusei, and Escherichia coli. Sharp spectra reported by other workers were not observed. The strong absorbance of water (10--30 dB/mm) caused the absorbance of all aqueous preparations that we examined to have a water-like dependence on frequency. Reduction of incident power (to below 1.0 microW), elimination of modulation, and control of temperature to assure cell viability were not found to significantly alter the water-dominated absorbance. Frozen samples of BHK-21/C13 cells tested at dry ice and liquid nitrogen temperatures were found to have average insertion loss reduced to 0.2 dB/cm but still showed no reproducible peaks that could be attributed to absorption spectra. It is concluded that the special resonances reported by others are likely to be in error.

  20. Piezoelectric-tuned microwave cavity for absorption spectrometry

    DOEpatents

    Leskovar, Branko; Buscher, Harold T.; Kolbe, William F.

    1978-01-01

    Gas samples are analyzed for pollutants in a microwave cavity that is provided with two highly polished walls. One wall of the cavity is mechanically driven with a piezoelectric transducer at a low frequency to tune the cavity over a band of microwave frequencies in synchronism with frequency modulated microwave energy applied to the cavity. Absorption of microwave energy over the tuned frequencies is detected, and energy absorption at a particular microwave frequency is an indication of a particular pollutant in the gas sample.

  1. Accelerator mass spectrometry analysis of aroma compound absorption in plastic packaging materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stenström, Kristina; Erlandsson, Bengt; Hellborg, Ragnar; Wiebert, Anders; Skog, Göran; Nielsen, Tim

    1994-05-01

    Absorption of aroma compounds in plastic packaging materials may affect the taste of the packaged food and it may also change the quality of the packaging material. A method to determine the aroma compound absorption in polymers by accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) is being developed at the Lund Pelletron AMS facility. The high sensitivity of the AMS method makes it possible to study these phenomena under realistic conditions. As a first test low density polyethylene exposed to 14C-doped ethyl acetate is examined. After converting the polymer samples with the absorbed aroma compounds to graphite, the {14C }/{13C } ratio of the samples is measured by the AMS system and the degree of aroma compound absorption is established. The results are compared with those obtained by supercritical fluid extraction coupled to gas chromatography (SFE-GC).

  2. Alternative approaches to correct interferences in the determination of boron in shrimps by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasias, I. N.; Pappa, Ch.; Katsarou, V.; Τhomaidis, N. S.; Piperaki, E. A.

    2014-02-01

    The aim of this study is to propose alternative techniques and methods in combination with the classical chemical modification to correct the major matrix interferences in the determination of boron in shrimps. The performance of an internal standard (Ge) for the determination of boron by the simultaneous multi-element atomic absorption spectrometry was tested. The use of internal standardization increased the recovery from 85.9% to 101% and allowed a simple correction of errors during sampling preparation and heating process. Furthermore, a new preparation procedure based on the use of citric acid during digestion and dilution steps improved the sensitivity of the method and decreased the limit of detection. Finally, a comparative study between the simultaneous multi-element atomic absorption spectrometry with a longitudinal Zeeman-effect background correction system, equipped with a transversely-heated graphite atomizer and the single element atomic absorption spectrometry with a D2 background correction system, equipped with an end-heated graphite atomizer was undertaken to investigate the different behavior of boron in both techniques. Different chemical modifiers for the determination of boron were tested with both techniques. Ni-citric acid and Ca were the optimal chemical modifiers when simultaneous multi-element atomic absorption spectrometry and single-element atomic absorption spectrometry were used, respectively. By using the single-element atomic absorption spectrometry, the calculated characteristic mass was 220 pg and the calculated limit of detection was 370 μg/kg. On the contrary, with simultaneous multi-element atomic absorption spectrometry, the characteristic mass was 2200 pg and the limit of detection was 5.5 mg/kg.

  3. Determination of nanogram amounts of bismuth in rocks by atomic absorption spectrometry with electrothermal atomization

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kane, J.S.

    1979-01-01

    Bismuth concentrations as low as 10 ng g-1 in 100-mg samples of geological materials can be determined by atomic absorption spectrometry with electrothermal atomization. After HF-HClO4 decomposition of the sample, bismuth is extracted as the iodide into methyl isobutyl ketone and is then stripped with ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid into the aqueous phase. Aliquots of this solution are pipetted into the graphite furnace and dried, charred, and atomized in an automated sequence. Atomic absorbance at the Bi 223.1-nm line provides a measure of the amount of bismuth present. Results are presented for 14 U.S. Geological Survey standard rocks. ?? 1979.

  4. Evaluation of Graphene as a Solid-Phase Extraction Sorbent for the Preconcentration and Determination of Trace Amounts of Nickel in Food Samples Prior to Flame Atomic Absorption Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ebrahimi, Bahram; Bahar, Soleiman; Moedi, Seyde Elham

    2015-01-01

    A sensitive and low cost SPE method for the extraction, preconcentration, and flame atomic absorption spectrometric determination of nickel at ng/mL levels is described. Parameters governing the extraction efficiency including pH of the solution, eluent type, sample volume, and matrix ions were investigated for optimization of the presented procedure. The enhancement factor was calculated as 96.5. The calibration curve was linear with R2 of 0.999 in the concentration range from 2 to 200 ng/mL. The RSD was 5.35% (n=7), the LOD was 0.588 ng/mL, and relative recoveries from vegetable samples ranged between 99 and 109.5%. PMID:26086262

  5. Effective Sample Size in Diffuse Reflectance Near-IR Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Berntsson, O; Burger, T; Folestad, S; Danielsson, L G; Kuhn, J; Fricke, J

    1999-02-01

    Two independent methods for determination of the effectively sampled mass per unit area are presented and compared. The first method combines directional-hemispherical transmittance and reflectance measurements. A three-flux approximation of the equation of radiative transfer is used, to separately determine the specific absorption and scattering coefficients of the powder material, which subsequently are used to determine the effective sample size. The second method uses a number of diffuse reflectance measurements on layers of controlled powder thickness in an empirical approach. The two methods are shown to agree well and thus confirm each other. From the determination of the effective sample size at each measured wavelength in the visible-NIR region for two different model powder materials, large differences was found, both between the two analyzed powders and between different wavelengths. As an example, the effective sample size ranges between 15 and 70 mg/cm(2) for microcrystalline cellulose and between 70 and 300 mg/cm(2) for film-coated pellets. However, the contribution to the spectral information obtained from a certain layer decreases rapidly with increasing distance from the powder surface. With both methods, the extent of contribution from various depths of a powder sample to the visible-NIR diffuse reflection signal is characterized. This information is valuable for validation of analytical applications of diffuse reflectance visible-NIR spectrometry. PMID:21662719

  6. Preparation and characterization of magnetic nanocomposite of Schiff base/silica/magnetite as a preconcentration phase for the trace determination of heavy metal ions in water, food and biological samples using atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Bagheri, Hasan; Afkhami, Abbas; Saber-Tehrani, Mohammad; Khoshsafar, Hosein

    2012-08-15

    A versatile and robust solid phase with both magnetic property and a very high adsorption capacity is presented on the basis of modification of iron oxide-silica magnetic particles with a newly synthesized Schiff base (Fe(3)O(4)/SiO(2)/L). The structure of the resulting product was confirmed by Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectra, X-ray diffraction (XRD) spectrometry and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). We developed an efficient and cost-effective method for the preconcentration of trace amounts of Pb(II), Cd(II) and Cu(II) in environmental and biological samples using this novel magnetic solid phase. Prepared magnetic solid phase is an ideal support because it has a large surface area, good selectivity and can be easily retrieved from large volumes of aqueous solutions. The possible parameters affecting the enrichment were optimized. Under the optimal conditions, the method detection limit was 0.14, 0.19 and 0.12 μg L(-1) for Pb(II), Cd(II) and Cu(II) ions, respectively. The established method has been successfully applied to analyze real samples, and satisfactory results were obtained. All these indicated that this magnetic phase had a great potential in environmental and biological fields. PMID:22841051

  7. Simultaneous Atomic Absorption Spectrometry for Cadmium and Lead Determination in Wastewater: A Laboratory Exercise

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Correia, Paulo R. M.; Oliveira, Pedro V.

    2004-01-01

    The simultaneous determination of cadmium and lead by multi-element atomic absorption spectrometry with electrochemical atomization is proposed by employing a problem-based approach. The reports indicate that the students assimilated the principles of the simultaneous atomic absorption spectrometry (SIMAAS), the role of the chemical modifier, the…

  8. Ultrasound assisted-deep eutectic solvent based on emulsification liquid phase microextraction combined with microsample injection flame atomic absorption spectrometry for valence speciation of chromium(III/VI) in environmental samples.

    PubMed

    Yilmaz, Erkan; Soylak, Mustafa

    2016-11-01

    A new type of deep eutectic solvents (DESs) have been prepared and used as extraction solvents for ultrasound assisted-deep eutectic solvent based emulsification liquid phase microextraction method (UA-DES-ELPME) for the determination and speciation of total chromium, chromium(III) and chromium(VI). The chromium concentration in DES rich phase (extraction phase) was determined by using microsample injection flame atomic absorption spectrometer (FAAS). The detection limit (LOD), the quantification limit (LOQ), preconcentration factor and relative standard deviation were found as 5.5µgL(-1), 18.2µgL(-1), 20 and 6%, respectively. The accuracy of the developed method was evaluated by the analysis of water the certified reference materials (TMDA-53.3 Fortified environmental water and TMDA-54.4 Fortified Lake Water) and addition-recovery tests for water samples. PMID:27591663

  9. Solid-phase extraction of copper(II) in water and food samples using silica gel modified with bis(3-aminopropyl)amine and determination by flame atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Cagirdi, Duygu; Altundag, Hüseyin; Imamoglu, Mustafa; Tuzen, Mustafa

    2014-01-01

    A simple and selective separation and preconcentration method was developed for the determination of Cu(ll) ions. This method is based on adsorption of Cu(ll) ions from aqueous solution on a bis(3-aminopropyl)amine modified silica gel column and flame atomic absorption spectrometric determination after desorption. Various analytical parameters such as pH, type of eluent solution and its volume, flow rate of sample and eluent, and sample volume were optimized. Effects of some cation, anion, and transition metal ions on the recoveries of Cu(ll) ions were also investigated. Cu(ll) ions were quantitatively recovered at pH 6; 5.0 mL of 2 M HCI was used as the eluent. The preconcentration factor was found to be 150. The LOD was 0.12 microg/L for Cu(ll). The accuracy of the method was confirmed by analysis of Tea Leaves (INCT-TL-1) and Fish Protein (DORM-3) certified reference materials. The optimized method was applied to various water and food samples for the determination of Cu(ll). PMID:25145149

  10. Preparation and characterization of magnetic nanoparticles for the on-line determination of gold, palladium, and platinum in mine samples based on flow injection micro-column preconcentration coupled with graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ye, Juanjuan; Liu, Shuxia; Tian, Miaomiao; Li, Wanjun; Hu, Bin; Zhou, Weihong; Jia, Qiong

    2014-01-01

    A simple and highly selective procedure for on-line determination of trace levels of Au, Pd, and Pt in mine samples has been developed using flow injection-column adsorption preconcentration coupled with graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrophotometry (FI-column-GFAAS). The precious metals were adsorbed on the as-synthesized magnetic nanoparticles functionalized with 4'-aminobenzo-15-crown-5-ether packed into a micro-column and then eluted with 2% thiourea + 0.1 mol L(-1) HCl solution prior to the determination by GFAAS. The properties of the magnetic adsorbents were investigated by scanning electron microscope (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM). Various experimental parameters affecting the preconcentration of Au, Pd, and Pt were investigated and optimized. Under the optimal experimental conditions, the detection limits of the developed technique were 0.16 ng mL(-1) for Au, 0.28 ng mL(-1) for Pd, and 1.01 ng mL(-1) for Pt, with enrichment factors of 24.3, 13.9, and 17.8, respectively. Precisions, evaluated as repeatability of results, were 1.1%, 3.9%, and 4.4% respectively for Au, Pd, and Pt. The developed method was validated by the analysis of Au, Pd, and Pt in certified reference materials and mine samples with satisfactory results. PMID:24274293

  11. Advances in imaging secondary ion mass spectrometry for biological samples

    SciTech Connect

    Boxer, Steven G.; Kraft, Mary L.; Weber, Peter K.

    2008-12-16

    Imaging mass spectrometry combines the power of mass spectrometry to identify complex molecules based on mass with sample imaging. Recent advances in secondary ion mass spectrometry have improved sensitivity and spatial resolution, so that these methods have the potential to bridge between high-resolution structures obtained by X-ray crystallography and cyro-electron microscopy and ultrastructure visualized by conventional light microscopy. Following background information on the method and instrumentation, we address the key issue of sample preparation. Because mass spectrometry is performed in high vacuum, it is essential to preserve the lateral organization of the sample while removing bulk water, and this has been a major barrier for applications to biological systems. Furthermore, recent applications of imaging mass spectrometry to cell biology, microbial communities, and biosynthetic pathways are summarized briefly, and studies of biological membrane organization are described in greater depth.

  12. Advances in imaging secondary ion mass spectrometry for biological samples

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Boxer, Steven G.; Kraft, Mary L.; Weber, Peter K.

    2008-12-16

    Imaging mass spectrometry combines the power of mass spectrometry to identify complex molecules based on mass with sample imaging. Recent advances in secondary ion mass spectrometry have improved sensitivity and spatial resolution, so that these methods have the potential to bridge between high-resolution structures obtained by X-ray crystallography and cyro-electron microscopy and ultrastructure visualized by conventional light microscopy. Following background information on the method and instrumentation, we address the key issue of sample preparation. Because mass spectrometry is performed in high vacuum, it is essential to preserve the lateral organization of the sample while removing bulk water, and this hasmore » been a major barrier for applications to biological systems. Furthermore, recent applications of imaging mass spectrometry to cell biology, microbial communities, and biosynthetic pathways are summarized briefly, and studies of biological membrane organization are described in greater depth.« less

  13. Determination of total mercury in human hair and animal fur by combustion atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Cizdziel, J V; Gerstenberger, Shawn

    2004-11-15

    A commercially available mercury (Hg) analyzer based on sample combustion, gold amalgamation, and atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS) was evaluated for the direct determination of Hg in composites of human hair and individual samples of horse fur. Results for human hair reference material (NIES No. 13) were within the certified range. Analyses of "blind" samples from an international interlaboratory (n>16) comparison study produced results within 1S.D. of the consensus means. Precision (%R.S.D.) was found to be <5% and total analyses time per sample was <10min. This study demonstrated that analyzers based on combustion-AAS are suitable for wide-scale monitoring of Hg in human hair and animal fur. PMID:18969690

  14. Determination of tetraalkyllead compounds in gasoline by liquid chromatography-atomic absorption spectrometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Messman, J.D.; Rains, T.C.

    1981-01-01

    A liquid chromatography-atomic absorption spectrometry (LC-AAS) hybrid analytical technique is presented for metal speciation measurements on complex liquid samples. The versatility and inherent metal selectivity of the technique are Illustrated by the rapid determination of five tetraalkyllead compounds in commercial gasoline. Separation of the individual tetraalkyllead species is achieved by reversed-phase liquid chromatography using an acetonitrile/water mobile phase. The effluent from the liquid Chromatograph Is introduced directly into the aspiration uptake capillary of the nebulizer of an air/acetylene flame atomic absorption spectrometer. Spectral interferences due to coeluting hydrocarbon matrix constituents were not observed at the 283.3-nm resonance line of lead used for analysis. Detection limits of this LC-AAS hydrid analytical technique, based on a 20-??L injection, are approximately 10 ng Pb for each tetraalkyllead compound.

  15. A thin-walled metallic hollow cathode as an atomizer for Zeeman atomic absorption spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganeyev, A. A.; Sholupov, S. E.

    1998-03-01

    A new kind of glow discharge atomizer, a thin-walled metallic hollow cathode (TMHC) combined with Zeeman atomic absorption spectrometry using high frequency modulated light polarization (ZAAS-HFM), is studied. A theoretically suggested, and experimentally confirmed, model of the atom confinement in the TMHC yields the appearance of the diffusion traps for atoms at both ends of the cathode, which increases the residence time of the analyte atoms in the analysis volume. The high atomization efficiency in the glow discharge atomizer (caused by the ionic-thermal mechanism of sputtering) and the high selectivity of ZAAS-HFM are demonstrated in the analysis of complex matrix samples such as whole blood and urine. The analytical system TMHC + ZAAS-HFM is characterized by low detection limits, which are comparable to those of graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GFAAS). Owing to its rather low average power consumption (30-50 W) the TMHC can be used in a portable and mobile spectrometer, and is therefore suitable for the in situ analysis of various sample materials.

  16. DETERMINATION OF TOTAL MERCURY IN FISH TISSUES USING PYROLYSIS ATOMIC ABSORPTION SPECTROMETRY WITH GOLD AMALGAMATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    A simple and rapid procedure for measuring total mercury in fish tissues is evaluated and
    compared with conventional techniques. Using an automated instrument incorporating combustion, preconcentration by amalgamation with gold, and atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS), mill...

  17. Gamma-ray spectrometry of LDEF samples

    SciTech Connect

    Winn, W.G.

    1991-01-01

    A total of 31 samples from the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF), including materials of aluminum, vanadium, and steel trunnions were analyzed by ultra-low-level gamma spectroscopy. The study quantified particle induced activations of (sup 22)Na, {sup 46}Sc, {sup 51}Cr, {sup 54}Mn, {sup 56}Co, {sup 57}Co, {sup 58}Co, and {sup 60}Co. The samples of trunnion sections exhibited increasing activity toward the outer end of the trunnion and decreasing activity toward its radial center. The trunnion sections did not include end pieces, which have been reported to collect noticeable {sup 7}Be on their leading surfaces. No significant {sup 7}Be was detected in the samples analyzed. The Underground Counting Facility at Savannah River Laboratory (SRL) was used in this work. The facility is 50 ft. underground, constructed with low-background shielding materials, and operated as a clean room. The most sensitive analyses were performed with a 90%-efficient HPGe gamma-ray detector, which is enclosed in a purged active/passive shield. Each sample was counted for one to six days in two orientations to yield more representative average activities for the sample. The non-standard geometries of the LDEF samples prompted the development of a novel calibration method, whereby the efficiency about the samples surfaces (measured with point sources) predicted the efficiency for the bulk sample.

  18. Determination of vanadium in mussels by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry without chemical modifiers.

    PubMed

    Saavedra, Y; Fernández, P; González, A

    2004-05-01

    A method was developed for the quantitative determination of total vanadium concentration in mussels via electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS). After the microwave digestion of the samples, a program using temperatures of 1600 degrees C and 2600 degrees C for ashing and atomization respectively, without any matrix modifiers, allowed us to obtain results that were satisfactory since they agreed closely with certified reference material values. The detection limit was 0.03 mg kg(-1) (dry weight), indicating that the method is suitable for the analysis of mussel samples. This determination was compared with matrix modifiers that have been reported previously. The method was applied to various cultivated and wild mussels from the Galician coast, yielding levels below 1 mg kg(-1) (wet weight). PMID:14745471

  19. The direct determination of HgS by thermal desorption coupled with atomic absorption spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coufalík, Pavel; Zvěřina, Ondřej; Komárek, Josef

    2016-04-01

    This research was aimed at the direct determination of HgS in environmental samples by means of thermal desorption coupled with atomic absorption spectrometry. Operating parameters of the apparatus used for thermal desorption (including a prototype desorption unit) are described in this work, as well as the procedure for measuring mercury release curves together with an evaluation of the analytical signal including two methods of peak integration. The results of thermal desorption were compared with HgS contents obtained by sequential extraction. The limits of quantification of the proposed method for the selective determination of the black and red forms of HgS were 4 μg kg- 1 and 5 μg kg- 1, respectively. The limit of quantification of red HgS in soils was 35 μg kg- 1. The developed analytical procedure was applied to soil and sediment samples from historical mining areas.

  20. Overcoming Matrix Effects in a Complex Sample: Analysis of Multiple Elements in Multivitamins by Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arnold, Randy J.; Arndt, Brett; Blaser, Emilia; Blosser, Chris; Caulton, Dana; Chung, Won Sog; Fiorenza, Garrett; Heath, Wyatt; Jacobs, Alex; Kahng, Eunice; Koh, Eun; Le, Thao; Mandla, Kyle; McCory, Chelsey; Newman, Laura; Pithadia, Amit; Reckelhoff, Anna; Rheinhardt, Joseph; Skljarevski, Sonja; Stuart, Jordyn; Taylor, Cassie; Thomas, Scott; Tse, Kyle; Wall, Rachel; Warkentien, Chad

    2011-01-01

    A multivitamin tablet and liquid are analyzed for the elements calcium, magnesium, iron, zinc, copper, and manganese using atomic absorption spectrometry. Linear calibration and standard addition are used for all elements except calcium, allowing for an estimate of the matrix effects encountered for this complex sample. Sample preparation using…

  1. Some interferences in atomic-absorption spectrometry and extraction of iron and copper.

    PubMed

    Yanagisawa, M; Kihara, H; Suzuki, M; Takeuchi, T

    1970-09-01

    The effect of complexing agents on the atomic-absorption spectrometry of iron and copper extracts was investigated Thiocyanate complexes gave a marked depression of absorption by iron and copper, especially in fuel-rich flames. Chloride, diethyldithiocarbamate and hydroxyquinoline complexes of iron behaved alike, but differently from the thiocyanate complex. PMID:18960816

  2. Synthesis/characterization of a new chelating resin and on-line solid phase extraction for the determination of Ag(I) and Pd(II) from water, cream, anode slime and converter samples by flow injection flame atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Çetin, Tülin; Tokalioğlu, Serife; Ülgen, Ahmet; Sahan, Serkan; Özentürk, Ismail; Soykan, Cengiz

    2013-02-15

    On-line preconcentration procedures for the determination of Ag(I) and Pd(II) by flame atomic absorption spectrometry have been described. A new chelating resin, poly (N,N'-dipropionitrilemethacrylamide-co-divinylbenzene-co-2-acrylamido-2-methyl-1-propane sulfonic acid) was synthesized and used as a new adsorbent material. The resin was characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and elemental analysis. Ag(I) was adsorbed on the chelating resin at pH 5.0 and eluted with 1.0 mol L(-1) HNO3. Pd(II) was retained at pH 9.5 and eluted with 1.5 mol L(-1) HCl. The experimental parameters (pH, type and concentration of eluent, flow rates of sample and eluent solutions, elution time and the effect of interfering ions) for both Ag(I) and Pd(II) were investigated in detail. The detection limit for Ag(I) was 2.4 μg L(-1) and the relative standard deviation was 2.9% for 0.2 μg mL(-1) Ag(I). The detection limit for Pd(II) was 1.7 μg L(-1) and the relative standard deviation was 2.8% for 0.3 μg mL(-1) Pd(II). Accuracy was confirmed by analyzing a certified reference material (TMDA-70), recovery studies on real samples and comparison with electrothermal atomic absorption analysis. The proposed methods were successfully applied to the on-line determination of Ag(I) in bottled water, pharmaceutical cream and anode slime samples and Pd(II) in bottled water and catalytic converter samples. PMID:23598028

  3. High throughput liquid absorption preconcentrator sampling instrument

    DOEpatents

    Zaromb, Solomon; Bozen, Ralph M.

    1992-01-01

    A system for detecting trace concentrations of an analyte in air includes a preconcentrator for the analyte and an analyte detector. The preconcentrator includes an elongated tubular container comprising a wettable material. The wettable material is continuously wetted with an analyte-sorbing liquid which flows from one part of the container to a lower end. Sampled air flows through the container in contact with the wetted material with a swirling motion which results in efficient transfer of analyte vapors or aerosol particles to the sorbing liquid and preconcentration of traces of analyte in the liquid. The preconcentrated traces of analyte may be either detected within the container or removed therefrom for injection into a separate detection means or for subsequent analysis.

  4. Determination of trace elements in automotive fuels by filter furnace atomic absorption spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anselmi, Anna; Tittarelli, Paolo; Katskov, Dmitri A.

    2002-03-01

    The determination of Cd, Cr, Cu, Pb and Ni was performed in gasoline and diesel fuel samples by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry using the Transverse Heated Filter Atomizer (THFA). Thermal conditions were experimentally defined for the investigated elements. The elements were analyzed without addition of chemical modifiers, using organometallic standards for the calibration. Forty-microliter samples were injected into the THFA. Gasoline samples were analyzed directly, while diesel fuel samples were diluted 1:4 with n-heptane. The following characteristic masses were obtained: 0.8 pg Cd, 6.4 pg Cr, 12 pg Cu, 17 pg Pb and 27 pg Ni. The limits of determination for gasoline samples were 0.13 μg/kg Cd, 0.4 μg/kg Cr, 0.9 μg/kg Cu, 1.5 μg/kg Pb and 2.5 μg/kg Ni. The corresponding limit of determination for diesel fuel samples was approximately four times higher for all elements. The element recovery was performed using the addition of organometallic compounds to gasoline and diesel fuel samples and was between 85 and 105% for all elements investigated.

  5. Determination of nickel in active pharmaceutical ingredients by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Bubnič, Zoran; Urleb, Uroš; Kreft, Katjuša; Veber, Marjan

    2010-03-01

    An electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometric procedure for the determination of nickel in active pharmaceutical ingredients was developed. Since the recoveries of nickel by the direct dissolution of samples in diluted nitric acid were low and caused errors in the determination of Ni in pharmaceutical samples, different approaches for sample pre-treatment were examined. It was found that the microwave digestion was the most suitable way for sample preparation. Various combinations of digestion agents and different microwave conditions were tested. The combination of nitric acid and hydrogen peroxide was found to be the most appropriate. The validity of the method was evaluated by recovery studies of spiked samples and by the comparison of the results obtained by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). The recovery ranged from 87.5 to 104.0% and a good agreement was achieved between both methods. The detection limit and the limit of quantification were 0.6 and 2.1 µg g-1 respectively. The precision of the method was confirmed by the determination of Ni in the spiked samples and was below 4%, expressed in terms of a relative standard deviation. The method was applied to the determination of nickel in production samples of active pharmaceutical ingredients and intermediates. PMID:24061653

  6. Liquid-absorption preconcentrator sampling instrument

    DOEpatents

    Zaromb, S.

    1990-12-11

    A system is described for detecting trace concentrations of an analyte in air and includes a preconcentrator for the analyte and an analyte detector. The preconcentrator includes an elongated tubular container in which is disposed a wettable material extending substantially the entire length of the container. One end of the wettable material is continuously wetted with an analyte-sorbing liquid, which flows to the other end of the container. Sample air is flowed through the container in contact with the wetted material for trapping and preconcentrating the traces of analyte in the sorbing liquid, which is then collected at the other end of the container and discharged to the detector. The wetted material may be a wick comprising a bundle of fibers, one end of which is immersed in a reservoir of the analyte-sorbing liquid, or may be a liner disposed on the inner surface of the container, with the sorbing liquid being centrifugally dispersed onto the liner at one end thereof. The container is preferably vertically oriented so that gravity effects the liquid flow. 4 figs.

  7. Liquid-absorption preconcentrator sampling instrument

    DOEpatents

    Zaromb, Solomon

    1990-01-01

    A system for detecting trace concentrations of an analyte in air and includes a preconcentrator for the analyte and an analyte detector. The preconcentrator includes an elongated tubular container in which is disposed a wettable material extending substantially the entire length of the container. One end of the wettable material is continuously wetted with an analyte-sorbing liquid, which flows to the other end of the container. Sample air is flowed through the container in contact with the wetted material for trapping and preconcentrating the traces of analyte in the sorbing liquid, which is then collected at the other end of the container and discharged to the detector. The wetted material may be a wick comprising a bundle of fibers, one end of which is immersed in a reservoir of the analyte-sorbing liquid, or may be a liner disposed on the inner surface of the container, with the sorbing liquid being centrifugally dispersed onto the liner at one end thereof. The container is preferably vertically oriented so that gravity effects the liquid flow.

  8. Determination of mercury in phosphate fertilizers by cold vapor atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    de Jesus, Robson M; Silva, Laiana O B; Castro, Jacira T; de Azevedo Neto, Andre D; de Jesus, Raildo M; Ferreira, Sergio L C

    2013-03-15

    In this paper, a method for the determination of mercury in phosphate fertilizers using slurry sampling and cold vapor atomic absorption spectrometry (CV QT AAS) is proposed. Because mercury (II) ions form strong complexes with phosphor compounds, the formation of metallic mercury vapor requires the presence of lanthanum chloride as a release agent. Thiourea increases the amount of mercury that is extracted from the solid sample to the liquid phase of the slurry. The method is established using two steps. First, the slurry is prepared using the sample, lanthanum chloride, hydrochloric acid solution and thiourea solution and is sonicated for 20 min. Afterward, mercury vapor is generated using an aliquot of the slurry in the presence of the hydrochloric acid solution and isoamylic alcohol with sodium tetrahydroborate solution as the reducing agent. The experimental conditions for slurry preparation were optimized using two-level full factorial design involving the factors: thiourea and lanthanum chloride concentrations and the duration of sonication. The method allows the determination of mercury by external calibration using aqueous standards with limits of detection and quantification of 2.4 and 8.2 μg kg(-1), respectively, and precision, expressed as relative standard deviation, of 6.36 and 5.81% for two phosphate fertilizer samples with mercury concentrations of 0.24 and 0.57 mg kg(-1), respectively. The accuracy was confirmed by the analysis of a certified reference material of phosphate fertilizer that was provided by the National Institute of Standards & Technology (NIST). The method was applied to determine mercury in six commercial samples of phosphate fertilizers. The mercury content varied from 33.97 to 209.28 μg kg(-1). These samples were also analyzed employing inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). The ICP-MS results were consistent with the results from our proposed method. PMID:23598130

  9. [Determination of nine mineral elements in hulless barley by ultraviolet spectrophotometry and flame atomic absorption spectrometry].

    PubMed

    Liu, Jin; Zhang, Huai-Gang

    2010-04-01

    The contents of nine mineral elements, including sulphur, zinc, calcium, magnesium, potassium, sodium, iron, copper and manganese in five hulless barley (Hordeum vulgare L. var. nudum Hook. f.) lines were determined by ultraviolet spectrophotometry and flames atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS). For the determination of sulphur, the samples were dissolved by magnesia and anhydrous sodium carbonate at 250 degrees C for 0. 5 h and at 550 degrees C for 3 h in the muffle furnace, and then a certain amount of barium chloride was put into the sample solution for colorimetry of the UV-Vs spectrophotometer. For the determination of other eight mineral elements, all of the samples were dissolved by a kind of incinerating method: first, the sample was put into the muffle furnace at 250 degrees C for 0. 5 h and at 550 degrees C for 2.5 h, then two droplets of 50%HNO3 were distributed into each sample, and the last step was putting the sample into the muffle furnace at 550 degrees C for 0.5 h. And then all of the ash was dissolved by 50%HNO3 to 50 milliliter and determined by flames atomic absorption spectrometry. The precision, accuracy, repeatability and stability of the method were discussed too. The results showed that the relative standard deviations (RSD) were between 1.2% and 3.7%; The average recoveries were 97.44%-101.52% and the relative standard deviations (RSD) of sample determination were 1.3%-3.8%. The repeatability experiment showed that the relative standard deviations (RSD) were 2.6%-6.1%. And the content of each mineral element was the same after 24 hours; All these showed that the method has a good precision, accuracy, repeatability and stability. In all the hulless barley samples, the average contents were in the order of K > S > Mg > Ca > Fe > Na > Zn > Mn > Cu, and the contents of zinc, iron and manganese closely related to people's health were relatively higher than other crops. The data of the experiment could provide an accurate and credible evidence

  10. Cadmium, copper, lead, and zinc determination in precipitation: A comparison of inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry and graphite furnace atomization atomic absorption spectrometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reddy, M.M.; Benefiel, M.A.; Claassen, H.C.

    1987-01-01

    Selected trace element analysis for cadmium, copper, lead, and zinc in precipitation samples by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission Spectrometry (ICP) and by atomic absorption spectrometry with graphite furnace atomization (AAGF) have been evaluated. This task was conducted in conjunction with a longterm study of precipitation chemistry at high altitude sites located in remote areas of the southwestern United States. Coefficients of variation and recovery values were determined for a standard reference water sample for all metals examined for both techniques. At concentration levels less than 10 micrograms per liter AAGF analyses exhibited better precision and accuracy than ICP. Both methods appear to offer the potential for cost-effective analysis of trace metal ions in precipitation. ?? 1987 Springer-Verlag.

  11. Determination of sulfur in food by high resolution continuum source flame molecular absorption spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zambrzycka, Elżbieta; Godlewska-Żyłkiewicz, Beata

    2014-11-01

    In the present work, a fast, simple and sensitive analytical method for determination of sulfur in food and beverages by high resolution continuum source flame molecular absorption spectrometry was developed. The determination was performed via molecular absorption of carbon monosulfide, CS. Different CS rotational lines (257.959 nm, 258.033 nm, 258.055 nm), number of pixels and types of standard solution of sulfur, namely: sulfuric acid, sodium sulfate, ammonium sulfate, sodium sulfite, sodium sulfide, DL-cysteine, and L-cystine, were studied in terms of sensitivity, repeatability of results as well as limit of detection and limit of quantification. The best results were obtained for measurements of absorption of the CS molecule at 258.055 nm at the wavelength range covering 3 pixels and DL-cysteine in 0.2 mol L- 1 HNO3 solution as a calibration standard. Under optimized conditions the limit of detection and the limit of quantification achieved for sulfur were 10.9 mg L- 1 and 36.4 mg L- 1, respectively. The repeatability of the results expressed as relative standard deviation was typically < 5%. The accuracy of the method was tested by analysis of digested biological certified reference materials (soya bean flour, corn flour and herbs) and recovery experiment for beverage samples with added known amount of sulfur standard. The recovery of analyte from such samples was in the range of 93-105% with the repeatability in the range of 4.1-5.0%. The developed method was applied for the determination of sulfur in milk (194 ± 10 mg kg- 1), egg white (2188 ± 29 mg kg- 1), mineral water (31.0 ± 0.9 mg L- 1), white wine (260 ± 4 mg L- 1) and red wine (82 ± 2 mg L- 1), as well as in sample rich in ions, such as bitter mineral water (6900 ± 100 mg L- 1).

  12. Small sample Accelerator Mass Spectrometry for biomedical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salehpour, M.; Håkansson, K.; Possnert, G.

    2015-10-01

    The Accelerator Mass Spectrometry activities at Uppsala University include a group dedicated to the biomedical applications, involving natural level samples, as well as 14C-labeled substances requiring separate handling and preparation. For most applications sufficient sample amounts are available but many applications are limited to samples sizes in the μg-range. We have developed a preparation procedure for small samples biomedical applications, where a few μg C can be analyzed, albeit with compromised precision. The latest results for the small sample AMS method are shown and some of the biomedical activities at our laboratory are presented.

  13. Determination of inorganic mercury and total mercury in biological and environmental samples by flow injection-cold vapor-atomic absorption spectrometry using sodium borohydride as the sole reducing agent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Río Segade, Susana; Tyson, Julian F.

    2003-05-01

    A simple, fast, precise and accurate method to determine inorganic mercury and total mercury in biological and environmental samples was developed. The optimized flow-injection mercury system permitted the separate determination of inorganic mercury and total mercury using sodium borohydride as reducing agent. Inorganic mercury was selectively determined after reduction with 10 -4% w/v sodium borohydride, while total mercury was determined after reduction with 0.75% w/v sodium borohydride. The calibration graphs were linear up to 30 ng ml -1. The detection limits of the method based on three times the standard deviation of the blank were 24 and 3.9 ng l -1 for total mercury and inorganic mercury determination, respectively. The relative standard deviation was less than 1.5% for a 10 ng ml -1 mercury standard. As a means of checking method performance, deionized water and pond water samples were spiked with methylmercury and inorganic mercury; quantitative recovery for total mercury and inorganic mercury was obtained. The accuracy of the method was verified by analyzing alkaline and acid extracts of five biological and sediment reference materials. Microwave-assisted extraction procedures resulted in higher concentrations of recovered mercury species, lower matrix interference with mercury determination and less time involved in sample treatment than conventional extraction procedures. The standard addition method was only needed for calibration when biological samples were analyzed. The detection limits were in the range of 1.2-19 and 6.6-18 ng g -1 in biological and sediment samples for inorganic mercury and total mercury determination, respectively.

  14. Electron Transfer Dissociation Mass Spectrometry of Hemoglobin on Clinical Samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coelho Graça, Didia; Lescuyer, Pierre; Clerici, Lorella; Tsybin, Yury O.; Hartmer, Ralf; Meyer, Markus; Samii, Kaveh; Hochstrasser, Denis F.; Scherl, Alexander

    2012-10-01

    A mass spectrometry-based assay combining the specificity of selected reaction monitoring and the protein ion activation capabilities of electron transfer dissociation was developed and employed for the rapid identification of hemoglobin variants from whole blood without previous proteolytic cleavage. The analysis was performed in a robust ion trap mass spectrometer operating at nominal mass accuracy and resolution. Subtle differences in globin sequences, resulting with mass shifts of about one Da, can be unambiguously identified. These results suggest that mass spectrometry analysis of entire proteins using electron transfer dissociation can be employed on clinical samples in a workflow compatible with diagnostic applications.

  15. Direct Liquid Sampling for Corona Discharge Ion Mobility Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Sabo, Martin; Malásková, Michaela; Harmathová, Olga; Hradski, Jasna; Masár, Marián; Radjenovic, Branislav; Matejčík, Štefan

    2015-07-21

    We present a new technique suitable for direct liquid sampling and analysis by ion mobility spectrometry (IMS). The technique is based on introduction of a droplet stream to the IMS reaction region. The technique was successfully used to detect explosives dissolved in methanol and oil as well as to analyze amino acids and dipeptides. One of the main advantages of this technique is its ability to analyze liquid samples without the requirement of any special solution. PMID:26154532

  16. Determination of silicon in serum and urine by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Zhuo-er

    1995-09-01

    A sensitive, simple and accurate method for the routine determination of trace silicon in serum and urine by Zeeman electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry is described. The samples are directly determined after 20-fold dilution of serum and 100-fold dilution of urine. No L'vov platform is used. The signal enhancement of silicon atomization in pyrolytic graphite coated graphite tubes is achieved by using a mixture of calcium chloride and lanthanum nitrate as chemical modifier. The interferences arising from the biological matrices have been eliminated by the addition of ammonium dihydrogenphosphate in the sample solutions. The aqueous calibration curve is linear to at least 300 μg l -1, the characteristic mass is 37 pg (integrated absorbance signal), whereas the detection limit (3SD) is 1.5 μg l -1 for silicon in both diluted serum and urine samples. The recoveries of silicon added to the diluted samples are 101 ± 1.8% for sera and 98.2 ± 3.5% for the urine specimens, independent of the dilution ratio. The silicon measurement results for the serum and urine from healthy adults and for the serum from the patients with chronic renal failure on hemodialysis are presented.

  17. Determination of ytterbium in animal faeces by tungsten coil electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Lima, E C; Krug, F J; Nóbrega, J A; Nogueira, A R

    1998-11-01

    A method for ytterbium determination in animal faeces by tungsten coil electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (TCAAS) was developed. Faeces were dry-ashed in a muffle furnace, the ashes were treated with hydrochloric acid, and 10 mul of sample solution were delivered into 150-W tungsten coil atomizer. A matrix-matching procedure employing a 66-s heating program proved to be efficient for obtaining accurate results. Characteristic mass and detection limit were 7.1 pg and 0.35 mug g(-1) Yb, respectively. The tungsten coil atomizer lifetime exceeded 300 firings with digested solutions and R.S.D. of measurements was 1.9% after ten consecutive injections of 10.0 mug l(-1) Yb. Accuracy of the proposed method was assessed by employing a graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometric procedure. Application of the paired t-test did not reveal any significant difference for ytterbium contents determined by both methods at 95% confidence level. It was demonstrated that the proposed procedure can successfully be used for evaluation of kinetic passage rate of feed through digestive tract of animals. PMID:18967363

  18. Chromium speciation by solid phase extraction on Dowex M 4195 chelating resin and determination by atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Saygi, Kadriye Ozlem; Tuzen, Mustafa; Soylak, Mustafa; Elci, Latif

    2008-05-30

    A solid phase extraction procedure has been established for chromium speciation in natural water samples prior to determination by atomic absorption spectrometry. The procedure is based on the solid phase extraction of the Cr(VI)- Dowex M 4195 chelating resin. After oxidation of Cr(III) to Cr(VI) by using H2O2, the presented method was applied to the determination of the total chromium. The level of Cr(III) is calculated by difference of total chromium and Cr(VI) levels. The procedure was optimized for some analytical parameters including pH, eluent type, flow rates of sample and eluent, matrix effects, etc. The presented method was applied for the speciation of chromium in natural water samples with satisfactory results (recoveries >95%, RSDs <10%). In the determinations of chromium species, flame atomic absorption spectrometer was used. The results were checked by using NIST SRM 2711 Montana soil and GBW 07603 Bush branched and leaves. PMID:17951001

  19. Cinchocaine hydrochloride determination by atomic absorption spectrometry and spectrophotometry.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Ghani, Nour T; Youssef, Ahmed F A; Awady, Mohamed A

    2005-05-01

    Two sensitive spectrophotometric and atomic absorption spectrometric procedures have been developed for determination of cinchocaine hydrochloride (Cin.Cl) in pure form and in pharmaceutical formulation. The spectrophotometric method was based on formation of an insoluble colored ion-associate between the cited drug and tetrathiocyanatocobaltate (CoTC) or hexathiocyanatochromate (CrTC) which dissolved and extracted in an organic solvent. The optimal experimental conditions for quantitative extraction such as pH, concentration of the reagents and solvent were studied. Toluene and iso-butyl alcohol proved to be the most suitable solvents for quantitative extraction of Cin-CoTC and Cin-CrTC ion-associates with maximum absorbance at 620 and 555 nm, respectively. The optimum concentration ranges, molar absorptivities, Ringbom ranges and Sandell sensitivities were also evaluated. The atomic absorption spectrometric method is based on measuring of the excess cobalt or chromium in the aqueous solution, after precipitation of the drug, at 240.7 and 357.9 nm, respectively. Linear application ranges, characteristic masses and detection limits were 57.99-361.9, 50.40 and 4.22 microg ml(-1) of Cin.Cl, in case of CoTC, while 37.99-379.9, 18.94 and 0.81 microg ml(-1) in case of CrTC. PMID:15910814

  20. Gamma ray spectrometry of LDEF samples at SRL

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winn, Willard G.

    1992-01-01

    A total of 31 samples from the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF), including materials of aluminum, vanadium, and steel trunnions were analyzed by ultra-low-level gamma spectrometry. The study quantified particle induced activations of Na-22, Sc-46, Cr-51, Mn-54, Co-56, Co-57, Co-58, and Co-60. The samples of trunnion sections exhibited increasing activity toward the outer end of the trunnion and decreasing activity toward its radial center. The trunnion sections did not include end pieces, which were reported to collect noticeable Be-7 on their leading surfaces. No significant Be-7 was detected in the samples analyzed.

  1. Analysis of the Release Characteristics of Cu-Treated Antimicrobial Implant Surfaces Using Atomic Absorption Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Zietz, Carmen; Fritsche, Andreas; Finke, Birgit; Stranak, Vitezslav; Haenle, Maximilian; Hippler, Rainer; Mittelmeier, Wolfram; Bader, Rainer

    2012-01-01

    New developments of antimicrobial implant surfaces doped with copper (Cu) ions may minimize the risk of implant-associated infections. However, experimental evaluation of the Cu release is influenced by various test parameters. The aim of our study was to evaluate the Cu release characteristics in vitro according to the storage fluid and surface roughness. Plasma immersion ion implantation of Cu (Cu-PIII) and pulsed magnetron sputtering process of a titanium copper film (Ti-Cu) were applied to titanium alloy (Ti6Al4V) samples with different surface finishing of the implant material (polished, hydroxyapatite and corundum blasted). The samples were submersed into either double-distilled water, human serum, or cell culture medium. Subsequently, the Cu concentration in the supernatant was measured using atomic absorption spectrometry. The test fluid as well as the surface roughness can alter the Cu release significantly, whereby the highest Cu release was determined for samples with corundum-blasted surfaces stored in cell medium. PMID:22162672

  2. Analysis of the release characteristics of cu-treated antimicrobial implant surfaces using atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Zietz, Carmen; Fritsche, Andreas; Finke, Birgit; Stranak, Vitezslav; Haenle, Maximilian; Hippler, Rainer; Mittelmeier, Wolfram; Bader, Rainer

    2012-01-01

    New developments of antimicrobial implant surfaces doped with copper (Cu) ions may minimize the risk of implant-associated infections. However, experimental evaluation of the Cu release is influenced by various test parameters. The aim of our study was to evaluate the Cu release characteristics in vitro according to the storage fluid and surface roughness. Plasma immersion ion implantation of Cu (Cu-PIII) and pulsed magnetron sputtering process of a titanium copper film (Ti-Cu) were applied to titanium alloy (Ti6Al4V) samples with different surface finishing of the implant material (polished, hydroxyapatite and corundum blasted). The samples were submersed into either double-distilled water, human serum, or cell culture medium. Subsequently, the Cu concentration in the supernatant was measured using atomic absorption spectrometry. The test fluid as well as the surface roughness can alter the Cu release significantly, whereby the highest Cu release was determined for samples with corundum-blasted surfaces stored in cell medium. PMID:22162672

  3. Consistency of ARESE II Cloud Absorption Estimates and Sampling Issues

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oreopoulos, L.; Marshak, A.; Cahalan, R. F.; Lau, William K. M. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Data from three cloudy days (March 3, 21, 29, 2000) of the ARM Enhanced Shortwave Experiment II (ARESE II) were analyzed. Grand averages of broadband absorptance among three sets of instruments were compared. Fractional solar absorptances were approx. 0.21-0.22 with the exception of March 3 when two sets of instruments gave values smaller by approx. 0.03-0.04. The robustness of these values was investigated by looking into possible sampling problems with the aid of 500 nm spectral fluxes. Grand averages of 500 nm apparent absorptance cover a wide range of values for these three days, namely from a large positive (approx. 0.011) average for March 3, to a small negative (approximately -0.03) for March 21, to near zero (approx. 0.01) for March 29. We present evidence suggesting that a large part of the discrepancies among the three days is due to the different nature of clouds and their non-uniform sampling. Hence, corrections to the grand average broadband absorptance values may be necessary. However, application of the known correction techniques may be precarious due to the sparsity of collocated flux measurements above and below the clouds. Our analysis leads to the conclusion that only March 29 fulfills all requirements for reliable estimates of cloud absorption, that is, the presence of thick, overcast, homogeneous clouds.

  4. COMPREHENSIVE ANALYSIS OF BIOLOGICALLY RELEVANT ARSENICALS BY PH-SELECTIVE HYDRIDE GENERATION-ATOMIC ABSORPTION SPECTROMETRY

    EPA Science Inventory


    A method based on pH-selective generation and separation of arsines is commonly used for analysis of inorganic, methylated, and dimethylated trivalent and pentavalent arsenicals by hydride generation-atomic absorption spectrometry (HG-AAS). We have optimized this method to pe...

  5. Analytical control of wollastonite for biomedical applications by use of atomic absorption spectrometry and inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry.

    PubMed

    De Aza, P N; Guitián, F; De Aza, S; Valle, F J

    1998-04-01

    Preliminary in vitro experiments revealed that wollastonite (CaSiO3) is a potentially highly bioactive material that forms a hyroxyapatite (HA) surface layer on exposure to simulated body fluid with an ion concentration, pH and temperature virtually identical with those of human blood plasma. The formation of the HA layer is an essential requirement for an artificial material to be used as bioactive bone substitute. This finding opens up a wide field for biomedical applications of wollastonite. Biomaterials used as implants in the human body require strict control of trace elements and of the toxic species specified in American Society for Testing and Materials F-1185-88 (As, Cd, Hg and Pb) in ceramic hydroxyapatite for surgical implantation. In this work, two types of pseudowollastonite, the high temperature form of wollastonite, were analysed by using cold vapour atomic absorption spectrometry and hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometry, in order to determine the elements stated in the above-mentioned norm, and inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry to establish the SiO2/CaO ratio of the two materials and analyse for all other impurities introduced by the raw materials and by the processes of synthesis, sintering and grinding. Barium and Mg were especially prominent in raw materials, and Zr, Y, Mg, W, Co and Ni come mainly from the processing. PMID:9684401

  6. Determination of tellurium in indium antimonide semiconductor material by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Shiue, M Y; Sun, Y C; Yang, M H

    2001-08-01

    A method for the determination of the dopant concentration of tellurium in dissolved indium antimonide semiconductor material by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS) was developed. Efforts were made to investigate the optimal conditions of the furnace heating program and the effect of palladium modifier on the variation of tellurium and the background absorbance. According to the results obtained, the presence of palladium chemical modifier in the analysis of indium antimonide allowed the successful retention of tellurium in the graphite tube, and the optimum mass of palladium modifier was found to be dependent on the sample matrix concentration. The absorbance profile of tellurium and the background level were significantly improved when a pyrolysis temperature of 1100 degrees C and an atomization temperature of 2200 degrees C were employed in the optimized heating program. With the use of this method, a detection limit of 0.8 microg g(-1) tellurium in indium antimonide could be achieved. The applicability of the proposed method was evaluated by comparison with two independent methods, i.e. slurry sampling-ETAAS and ICP-MS. From the good agreement between the results, it was demonstrated that the proposed method is suitable for the determination of typical dopant concentrations of tellurium in indium antimonide. PMID:11534624

  7. Determination of rhodium: Since the origins until today Atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Bosch Ojeda, C; Sánchez Rojas, F

    2006-02-28

    Rhodium is present at about 0.001ppm in the earths crust. Rhodium metal is known for its stability in corrosive environments, physical beauty and unique physical and chemical properties. Recent interest in the medical and industrial significance of platinum and to a lesser extent palladium and rhodium has been accompanied by an increasing interest in their determination at low levels. Platinum group elements (PGEs: Pt, Pd, Rh, Ru, Ir and Os) play a decisive role in the performance of catalytic converters, world-wide applied in vehicles and in some household utensils, to reduce the emission of gaseous pollutants, such as carbon monoxide, nitrogen oxides and hydrocarbons. Since then, approximately 73% of the world production of rhodium is consumed in the production of autocatalyst. However, the hot exhaust gases flowing through the converter cause abrasion of these units, leading to the emission of these elements to the environment. The concentration level of rhodium (also platinum and palladium) is still very low in the nature; accordingly, their determination in environmental samples specially appears to be a challenging task for analytical chemists. In recent years, the development of analytical methods for the determination of rhodium has increased. The aim of the present review is to evaluate the utility of atomic absorption spectrometry, applied for the quantification of rhodium in different materials, such as environmental, biological, metallurgical and geological samples. PMID:18970480

  8. Near edge X-ray absorption mass spectrometry on coronene

    SciTech Connect

    Reitsma, G.; Deuzeman, M. J.; Hoekstra, R.; Schlathölter, T.; Boschman, L.; Hoekstra, S.

    2015-01-14

    We have investigated the photoionization and photodissociation of free coronene cations C{sub 24}H{sub 12}{sup +} upon soft X-ray photoabsorption in the carbon K-edge region by means of a time-of-flight mass spectrometry approach. Core excitation into an unoccupied molecular orbital (below threshold) and core ionization into the continuum both leave a C 1s vacancy, that is subsequently filled in an Auger-type process. The resulting coronene dications and trications are internally excited and cool down predominantly by means of hydrogen emission. Density functional theory was employed to determine the dissociation energies for subsequent neutral hydrogen loss. A statistical cascade model incorporating these dissociation energies agrees well with the experimentally observed dehydrogenation. For double ionization, i.e., formation of intermediate C{sub 24}H{sub 12}{sup 3+⋆}trications, the experimental data hint at loss of H{sup +} ions. This asymmetric fission channel is associated with hot intermediates, whereas colder intermediates predominantly decay via neutral H loss.

  9. Ultrasensitive determination of cadmium in seawater by hollow fiber supported liquid membrane extraction coupled with graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Jin-feng; Liu, Rui; Liu, Jing-fu; He, Bin; Hu, Xia-lin; Jiang, Gui-bin

    2007-05-01

    A new procedure, based on hollow fiber supported liquid membrane preconcentration coupled with graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GFAAS) detection, was developed for the determination of trace Cd in seawater samples. With 1-octanol that contained a mixture of dithizone (carrier) and oleic acid immobilized in the pores of the polypropylene hollow fiber as a liquid membrane, Cd was selectively extracted from water samples into 0.05 M HNO 3 that filled the lumen of the hollow fiber as a stripping solution. The main extraction related parameters were optimized, and the effects of salinity and some coexisting interferants were also evaluated. Under the optimum extraction conditions, an enrichment factor of 387 was obtained for a 100-mL sample solution. In combination with graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry, a very low detection limit (0.8 ng L - 1 ) and a relative standard deviation (2.5% at 50 ng L - 1 level) were achieved. Five seawater samples were analyzed by the proposed method without dilution, with detected Cd concentration in the range of 56.4-264.8 ng L - 1 and the relative spiked recoveries over 89%. For comparison, these samples were also analyzed by the Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry (ICP-MS) method after a 10-fold dilution for matrix effect elimination. Statistical analysis with a one-way ANOVA shows no significant differences (at 0.05 level) between the results obtained by the proposed and ICP-MS methods. Additionally, analysis of certified reference materials (GBW (E) 080040) shows good agreement with the certified value. These results indicate that this present method is very sensitive and reliable, and can effectively eliminate complex matrix interferences in seawater samples.

  10. Atomic absorption spectrometry for the automatic indirect determination of ascorbic acid based on-the reduction of manganese dioxide.

    PubMed

    Noroozifar, Meissam; Khorasani-Motlagh, Mozhgan; Akhavan, Kambiz

    2005-06-01

    A new and simple flow injection method followed by atomic absorption spectrometry has been developed for the indirect determination of ascorbic acid. The proposed method is based on oxidation of ascorbic acid to dehydroascorbic acid using a solid-phase manganese dioxide (30% m/m suspended on silica gel beads) reactor. The flow of the sample through the column reduces the MnO2 to Mn(II) in an acidic carrier stream of 6.3 mM HNO3 (pH 2.2) with flow rate of 4.0 ml/min at room temperature; Mn(II) is measured by atomic absorption spectrometry. The absorbance of Mn(II) is proportional to the concentration of ascorbic acid in the sample. The calibration curve was linear up to 30 mg/L, with a detection limit of 0.2 mg/L for a 220 microL injected sample volume. The developed procedure was found to be suitable for the determination of AsA in pharmaceuticals and foods with a relative standard deviation better than 1.09% and a sampling rate of about 95 h(-1). The results exhibit no interference from the presence of large amounts of organic compounds. The reliability of the method was established by parallel determination against the 2,6-dichlorophenol-indophenol methods. PMID:15984201

  11. On-line ion-exchange preconcentration and determination of traces of platinum by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    González García, M M; Sánchez Rojas, F; Bosch Ojeda, C; García de Torres, A; Cano Pavón, J M

    2003-04-01

    A method to determine trace amounts of platinum in different samples based on electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry is described. The preconcentration step is performed on a chelating resin microcolumn [1,5-bis(2-pyridyl)-3-sulfophenyl methylene thiocarbonohydrazide (PSTH) immobilized on an anion-exchange resin (Dowex 1x8-200)] placed in the autosampler arm. The combination of a peristaltic pump for sample loading and the atomic absorption spectrometer pumps for elution through a selection valve simplifies the hardware. The peristaltic pump and the selection valve are easily controlled electronically with two switches placed in the autosampler, which are activated when the autosampler arm is down. Thus, the process is fully automated without any modification of the software of the atomic absorption spectrometer. Under the optimum conditions with a 60-s preconcentration time, a sample flow rate of 2.4 mL min(-1), and an injection volume of eluent of 40 microL, a linear calibration graph was obtained in the range 0-100 ng mL(-1). The enrichment factor was 14. The detection limit under these conditions is 1 ng mL(-1), and the relative standard deviation (RSD) is 1.6% for 10 ng mL(-1) of Pt. The method has been applied to the determination of platinum in catalyst, vegetation, soil, and natural water samples. The results showed good agreement with the certified value and the recoveries of Pt added to samples were 98-105%. PMID:12733043

  12. Direct determination of lead in sweet fruit-flavored powder drinks by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lima, Éder C.; Krug, Francisco José; Arruda, Marco A. Z.

    1998-04-01

    A simplified method for direct determination of lead in sweet fruit-flavored powder drinks, syrups and honeys by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry without sample digestion is proposed. Samples were dissolved in water, acidified to 0.2% (v/v) HNO 3, and directly injected into an end-capped transversely heated graphite atomizer (THGA). Building up of carbonaceous residue inside the atomizer was effectively precluded for sugar solutions not exceeding 8.0% (m/v) when a heating program with two pyrolysis steps (600 and 1000°C) was carried out without air-ashing. Under these conditions one atomizer supported about 250 firings. Among various chemical modifiers tested, better recovery and repeatability results were obtained with a 5 μg Pd + 3 μg Mg(NO 3) 2 mixture. Tests carried out with individual concomitants containing up to 1.0 μg Na, K, Ca or Cl, and up to 10.0 μg phosphate or sulphate, and several mixtures of these six concomitants, did not reveal significant interferences on lead atomization. Characteristic mass and detection limit based on integrated absorbance were 15 and 11 pg Pb, respectively. The relative standard deviation based on 10 measurements for typical samples (20-60 ng g -1 Pb) was always lower than 5.5%. The detection limit of 7.0 ng g -1 Pb attained the Codex recommendation for the maximum allowed lead contents in the sugar samples. Application of t-test to the results obtained by the proposed direct analysis, and the official method adopted by Food Chemical Codex, demonstrated that there were no significant differences at the 5% probability level.

  13. Simultaneous multielement atomic absorption spectrometry with graphite furnace atomization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harnly, James M.; Miller-Ihli, Nancy J.; O'Haver, Thomas C.

    The extended analytical range capability of a simultaneous multielement atomic absorption continuum source spectrometer (SIMAAC) was tested for furnace atomization with respect to the signal measurement mode (peak height and area), the atomization mode (from the wall or from a platform), and the temperature program mode (stepped or ramped atomization). These parameters were evaluated with respect to the shapes of the analytical curves, the detection limits, carry-over contamination and accuracy. Peak area measurements gave more linear calibration curves. Methods for slowing the atomization step heating rate, the use of a ramped temperature program or a platform, produced similar calibration curves and longer linear ranges than atomization with a stepped temperature program. Peak height detection limits were best using stepped atomization from the wall. Peak area detection limits for all atomization modes were similar. Carry-over contamination was worse for peak area than peak height, worse for ramped atomization than stepped atomization, and worse for atomization from a platform than from the wall. Accurate determinations (100 ± 12% for Ca, Cu, Fe, Mn, and Zn in National Bureau of Standards' Standard Reference Materials Bovine Liver 1577 and Rice Flour 1568 were obtained using peak area measurements with ramped atomization from the wall and stepped atomization from a platform. Only stepped atomization from a platform gave accurate recoveries for K. Accurate recoveries, 100 ± 10%, with precisions ranging from 1 to 36 % (standard deviation), were obtained for the determination of Al, Co, Cr, Fe, Mn, Mo, Ni. Pb, V and Zn in Acidified Waters (NBS SRM 1643 and 1643a) using stepped atomization from a platform.

  14. Determination of cadmium in biodiesel using microemulsion and electrothermal atomization atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Lima, Adriana S; Silva, Deise G; Teixeira, Leonardo S G

    2015-01-01

    This work aimed to prepare biodiesel microemulsions for the subsequent quantification of cadmium via graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GFAAS). The biodiesel samples were prepared using n-propanol as an emulsifier, 10% (v/v) nitric acid as the aqueous phase, and biodiesel. Pseudoternary phase diagrams were constructed to determine the microemulsion region with the specified components. The optimized conditions for microemulsion formation were 57.6% (v/v) n-propanol, 21.2% (v/v) biodiesel, and 21.2% (v/v) nitric acid solution. The stability of the microemulsified system was investigated using aqueous and organic standards, and the system was found to be stable for at least 240 min. The applied pyrolysis and atomization temperatures were 800 and 2000 °C, respectively, and 5 μg of aluminum was used as the chemical modifier. The obtained limits of detection and quantification were 0.2 and 0.5 μg kg(-1), respectively, and the characteristic mass was 1.6 pg. The precision, expressed as the relative standard deviation (% R.S.D., n = 10), was 2.5% for a sample with a cadmium concentration of 6.5 μg kg(-1). The accuracy was determined from addition and recovery experiments, with results varying from 93 to 108% recovery. This study demonstrates that the proposed method based on the use of a microemulsion formation in sample preparation can be applied as an efficient alternative for the determination of cadmium in biodiesel by GFAAS. Cadmium determination in biodiesel samples of different origins (soybean, corn, cotton, and sunflower) was evaluated after acid digestion using the inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) technique, and the obtained results were compared to the results obtained using the proposed method. The paired t test (95% confidence level) did not show significant differences. The concentrations of cadmium found ranged from 5.3 to 8.0 μg kg(-1). PMID:25381584

  15. Atomic Absorption Spectrometry Analysis of Trace Elements in Degenerated Intervertebral Disc Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Kubaszewski, Łukasz; Zioła-Frankowska, Anetta; Frankowski, Marcin; Nowakowski, Andrzej; Czabak-Garbacz, Róża; Kaczmarczyk, Jacek; Gasik, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Background Few studies have investigated trace elements (TE) in human intervertebral disc (IVD) tissue. Trace element presence can have diverse meanings: essential TE show the metabolic modalities of the tissue, while environmentally-related TE indicate pollution and tissue-specific absorption and accumulation. IVD is a highly specific compartment with impaired communication with adjacent bone. Analysis of TE in IVD provides new insights regarding tissue metabolism and IVD communication with other tissues. Material/Methods Thirty intervertebral discs were acquired from 22 patients during surgical treatment for degenerative disease. Atomic absorption spectrometry was used to evaluate the concentrations of Al, Cd, Pb, Cu, Ni, Mo, Mg, and Zn. Results Al, Pb, Cu, Mg, and Zn were detected in all samples. Pb was significantly positively correlated with age, and Ni concentration was weakly correlated with population count in the patient’s place of residence. Only Cu was observed in higher concentrations in IVD compared to in other tissues. Significant positive correlations were observed between the following pairs: Mg/Zn, Mg/Al, Mg/Pb, Zn/Al, Zn/Pb, and Al/Pb. Negative correlations were observed between Mg/Cd, Zn/Cd, Mg/Mo, and Mo/Pb. Conclusions This study is one of few to profile the elements in intervertebral discs in patients with degenerative changes. We report significant differences between trace element concentrations in intervertebral discs compared to in other tissues. Knowledge of the TE accumulation pattern is vital for better understanding intervertebral disc nutrition and metabolism. PMID:25366266

  16. Direct and Convenient Mass Spectrometry Sampling with Ambient Flame Ionization

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiao-Pan; Wang, Hao-Yang; Zhang, Jun-Ting; Wu, Meng-Xi; Qi, Wan-Shu; Zhu, Hui; Guo, Yin-Long

    2015-01-01

    Recent innovations in ambient ionization technology for the direct analysis of various samples in their native environment facilitate the development and applications of mass spectrometry in natural science. Presented here is a novel, convenient and flame-based ambient ionization method for mass spectrometric analysis of organic compounds, termed as the ambient flame ionization (AFI) ion source. The key features of AFI ion source were no requirement of (high) voltages, laser beams and spray gases, but just using small size of n-butane flame (height approximately 1 cm, about 500 oC) to accomplish the rapid desorption and ionization for direct analysis of gaseous-, liquid- and solid-phase organic compounds, as well as real-world samples. This method has high sensitivity with a limit of detection of 1 picogram for propyphenazone, which allows consuming trace amount of samples. Compared to previous ionization methods, this ion source device is extremely simple, maintain-free, low-cost, user–friendly so that even an ordinary lighter (with n-butane as fuel) can achieve efficient ionization. A new orientation to mass spectrometry ion source exploitation might emerge from such a convenient, easy and inexpensive AFI ion source. PMID:26582511

  17. Direct and Convenient Mass Spectrometry Sampling with Ambient Flame Ionization.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiao-Pan; Wang, Hao-Yang; Zhang, Jun-Ting; Wu, Meng-Xi; Qi, Wan-Shu; Zhu, Hui; Guo, Yin-Long

    2015-01-01

    Recent innovations in ambient ionization technology for the direct analysis of various samples in their native environment facilitate the development and applications of mass spectrometry in natural science. Presented here is a novel, convenient and flame-based ambient ionization method for mass spectrometric analysis of organic compounds, termed as the ambient flame ionization (AFI) ion source. The key features of AFI ion source were no requirement of (high) voltages, laser beams and spray gases, but just using small size of n-butane flame (height approximately 1 cm, about 500 (o)C) to accomplish the rapid desorption and ionization for direct analysis of gaseous-, liquid- and solid-phase organic compounds, as well as real-world samples. This method has high sensitivity with a limit of detection of 1 picogram for propyphenazone, which allows consuming trace amount of samples. Compared to previous ionization methods, this ion source device is extremely simple, maintain-free, low-cost, user-friendly so that even an ordinary lighter (with n-butane as fuel) can achieve efficient ionization. A new orientation to mass spectrometry ion source exploitation might emerge from such a convenient, easy and inexpensive AFI ion source. PMID:26582511

  18. Direct and Convenient Mass Spectrometry Sampling with Ambient Flame Ionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiao-Pan; Wang, Hao-Yang; Zhang, Jun-Ting; Wu, Meng-Xi; Qi, Wan-Shu; Zhu, Hui; Guo, Yin-Long

    2015-11-01

    Recent innovations in ambient ionization technology for the direct analysis of various samples in their native environment facilitate the development and applications of mass spectrometry in natural science. Presented here is a novel, convenient and flame-based ambient ionization method for mass spectrometric analysis of organic compounds, termed as the ambient flame ionization (AFI) ion source. The key features of AFI ion source were no requirement of (high) voltages, laser beams and spray gases, but just using small size of n-butane flame (height approximately 1 cm, about 500 oC) to accomplish the rapid desorption and ionization for direct analysis of gaseous-, liquid- and solid-phase organic compounds, as well as real-world samples. This method has high sensitivity with a limit of detection of 1 picogram for propyphenazone, which allows consuming trace amount of samples. Compared to previous ionization methods, this ion source device is extremely simple, maintain-free, low-cost, user-friendly so that even an ordinary lighter (with n-butane as fuel) can achieve efficient ionization. A new orientation to mass spectrometry ion source exploitation might emerge from such a convenient, easy and inexpensive AFI ion source.

  19. Gamma ray spectrometry of LDEF samples at SRS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winn, Willard G.

    1991-01-01

    A total of 31 samples from Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF), including materials of Al, V, and steel trunnions were analyzed by ultralow level gamma spectrometry. The study quantified particle induced activations of Na-22, Sc-46, Cr-51, Mn-54, Co-56, Co-57, Co-58, and Co-60. The samples of trunnion sections exhibited increasing activity toward the outer end of the trunnion and decreasing activity toward its radial center. The trunnion sections did not include an end piece that collects noticeable Be-7 on its leading surface. No significant Be-7 was detected in the samples analyzed. The most sensitive analyses were performed with a 90 pct. efficient HPGe gamma ray detector, which is enclosed in a purged active/passive active shield.

  20. Evaluation of electrochemical generation of volatile zinc hydride by heated quartz tube atomizer atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Arbab-Zavar, Mohammad-Hossein; Chamsaz, Mahmoud; Youssefi, Abbas; Aliakbari, Mostafa

    2012-01-01

    Electrochemical hydride generation (EcHG) as a sample introduction system for determination of zinc was developed. It was directly coupled to an electrically heated quartz tube atomizer (QTA) atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS) system. The hydride generator is a laboratory-made semi-batch electrolytic cell that consists of a lead-tin alloy cathode and a platinum anode. The effects of typical parameters on the generation efficiency of the technique, such as types of cathode material and catholyte and anolyte solutions, were studied. The influences of numerical experimental operating parameters on the analytical signal were evaluated in detail and optimum conditions were obtained. The analytical figures of merit for the developed method were determined. The calibration curve was linear up to 300 ng mL(-1) of Zn. A concentration detection limit (3σ, n = 9) of 11 ng mL(-1) Zn and a relative standard deviation of 5.0% (RSD, n = 9) for 200 ng mL(-1) Zn were accessed. In addition, the susceptibility of interference from various ions was evaluated. The accuracy of the method was verified by determination of Zn in a certified reference material and in tap water. The achieved concentrations were found to be in good agreement with both the certified value and the data obtained using flame AAS. PMID:22790376

  1. Determination of arsenic in a nickel alloy by flow injection hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanna, C. P.; Tyson, J. F.; Offley, S. G.

    1992-08-01

    The development of a method for the direct determination of trace arsenic quantities in nickel alloy digests, by flow injection hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometry, is described. An optimization study of the manifold and chemical parameters produced system performance, in terms of tolerance of the nickel matrix and sensitivity, such that matrix removal and pre-reduction of As(V) to As (III) prior to arsine generation were eliminated. Full recovery of the As(V) signal from a solution containing 5 ng ml -1 in the presence of 60 μg ml -1 nickel was obtained. Validation of the method was achieved by analyzing a British Chemical Standard (BCS) Certified Reference Material (CRM) #346 IN nickel alloy containing arsenic at a concentration of 50 μg g -1. Following dissolution in nitric and hydrofluoric acids by a microwave assisted procedure, the only subsequent preparation required was dilution by the appropriate factor. Up to 60 injections h -1 may be made, with a detection limit of 0.5 ng ml -1 arsenic (250 pg absolute) as As(V) in a 500 μl sample. The peak height characteristic concentration is 0.46 ng ml -1, with a relative standard deviation of 3.5% for a 10 ng ml -1 As(V) standard ( n = 6).

  2. Use of atomic absorption spectrometry in assessment of biomonitor plants for lead, cadmium and copper pollution.

    PubMed

    Gokce, Kaya; Mehmet, Yaman

    2012-01-01

    Eleven plant species were collected from the vicinity of lead-battery plant in the city of Gaziantep, Turkey. Lead, cadmium and copper concentrations in the soil and leaves of plants were determined by atomic absorption spectrometry. Lead, Cd and Cu concentrations in the soil samples taken from battery area were found to be in the ranges of 304-602, 0.4-0.44 and 31-37 mg x kg(-1), respectively. Significantly increased lead concentration up to 2 750 mg x kg(-1) was found in the leaves of Eleagnus angustifolia L. plant. The lead concentrations in the other plant leaves taken from 50 m around battery factory followed the order Ailanthus altissima > Morus sp. > Juglans regia L. > Ficus carica L. > Cydonia oblonga Miller > Prunus x domestica L. The plants, Populus nigra L. , Eleagnus angustifolia L. and Salix sp. were found useful for Cd, and the plant, Eleagnus angusti folia L. for Pb, to be considered as potential biomonitor. Especially, leaves of trees and plants taken from the distance of 50 m from battery plant have relatively higher Pb concentrations. Therefore, people who and animals which live in this area and benefit from these soil and plants have vital risks. PMID:22497165

  3. Laboratory verification of on-line lithium analysis using ultraviolet absorption spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Beemster, B.J.; Schlager, K.J.; Schloegel, K.M.; Kahle, S.J.; Fredrichs, T.L.

    1992-12-31

    Several laboratory experiments were performed to evaluate the capability of absorption spectrometry in the ultraviolet-visible wavelength range with the objective of developing methods for on-line analysis of lithium directly in the primary coolant of Pressurized Water Reactors using optical probes. Although initial laboratory tests seemed to indicate that lithium could be detected using primary absorption (detection of natural spectra unassisted by reagents), subsequent field tests demonstrated that no primary absorption spectra existed for lithium in the ultraviolet-visible wavelength range. A second series of tests that were recently conducted did, however, confirm results reported in the literature to the effect that reagents were available that will react with lithium to form chelates that possess detectable absorption and fluorescent signatures. These results point to the possible use of secondary techniques for on-line analysis of lithium.

  4. [Determination of Iodine and Iodate in Brine and Seafood Simultaneously by Ultraviolet Absorption Spectrometry].

    PubMed

    Tan, Jun; Zhu, Xia-ping; Liu, Miao-miao; Wei, Zhi-cheng; Sang, Shi-hua

    2015-06-01

    The iodide in samples was oxidized to iodate by bromine water, which could be removed by formic acid, and iodate could be transformed to I3- with excess of I- in phosphoric acid, the iodate in samples could be transformed directly to I3- with excess of I- in phosphoric acid. The I3- solution had strong absorption at 350 and 288 nm, and the absorbance had a linear relationship to the concentration of I3- in a certain range. Total content of iodide and iodate had been detected after samples were oxidized by bromine water and the content of iodate had been detected directly, and the content of iodide was obtained by difference of the two results. Based on this, the method had been established to detect iodide and iodate in brine and seafood simultaneously by ultraviolet absorption spectrometry. The volumes of bromine water, formic acid, phosphoric acid and potassium iodide had been optimized. The effect of illumination, temperature and time also had been discussed. The optional reagents condition for iodide was: 2 drops of 3% bromine water, 0.5 mL of 10% formic acid, 4 mL of 20% phosphoric acid and 1 mL of 100 g x L(-1 KI. The optional reagents condition for iodate was: 0. 2 mL of 20% phosphoric acid and 1 mL of 100 g x L(-1) KI. The absorbance were determined after reacting for 30 min at room temperature and natural light conditions. Under the optimized conditions, the concentration of iodide and iodate in the range of 0 - 1.2 and 0 -1.5 mg x L(-1) were well agreed with Lambert Beer law. The sample blank was detected for twelve times and the detection limit of iodide and iodate were 1.54 and 14.8 μg x L(-1) respectively. The RSD of twelve times determination of 0.8 mg x L(-1) of iodide and iodate were 0.097% and 0.067%, respectively. The iodide and iodate in Zhabuye brine, Hong Feng underground brine, kelp, seaweed and sea cabbage had been detected, the recovery experiments also had been conducted at the same time, the recovery of iodide and iodate were between 80

  5. Determining photon energy absorption parameters for different soil samples.

    PubMed

    Kucuk, Nil; Tumsavas, Zeynal; Cakir, Merve

    2013-05-01

    The mass attenuation coefficients (μs) for five different soil samples were measured at 661.6, 1173.2 and 1332.5 keV photon energies. The soil samples were separately irradiated with (137)Cs and (60)Co (370 kBq) radioactive point gamma sources. The measurements were made by performing transmission experiments with a 2″ × 2″ NaI(Tl) scintillation detector, which had an energy resolution of 7% at 0.662 MeV for the gamma-rays from the decay of (137)Cs. The effective atomic numbers (Zeff) and the effective electron densities (Neff) were determined experimentally and theoretically using the obtained μs values for the soil samples. Furthermore, the Zeff and Neff values of the soil samples were computed for the total photon interaction cross-sections using theoretical data over a wide energy region ranging from 1 keV to 15 MeV. The experimental values of the soils were found to be in good agreement with the theoretical values. Sandy loam and sandy clay loam soils demonstrated poor photon energy absorption characteristics. However, clay loam and clay soils had good photon energy absorption characteristics. PMID:23179375

  6. Determining photon energy absorption parameters for different soil samples

    PubMed Central

    Kucuk, Nil; Tumsavas, Zeynal; Cakir, Merve

    2013-01-01

    The mass attenuation coefficients (μs) for five different soil samples were measured at 661.6, 1173.2 and 1332.5 keV photon energies. The soil samples were separately irradiated with 137Cs and 60Co (370 kBq) radioactive point gamma sources. The measurements were made by performing transmission experiments with a 2″ × 2″ NaI(Tl) scintillation detector, which had an energy resolution of 7% at 0.662 MeV for the gamma-rays from the decay of 137Cs. The effective atomic numbers (Zeff) and the effective electron densities (Neff) were determined experimentally and theoretically using the obtained μs values for the soil samples. Furthermore, the Zeff and Neff values of the soil samples were computed for the total photon interaction cross-sections using theoretical data over a wide energy region ranging from 1 keV to 15 MeV. The experimental values of the soils were found to be in good agreement with the theoretical values. Sandy loam and sandy clay loam soils demonstrated poor photon energy absorption characteristics. However, clay loam and clay soils had good photon energy absorption characteristics. PMID:23179375

  7. Determination of trace amounts of molybdenum in plant tissue by solvent extraction-atomic-absorption and direct-current plasma emission spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Lajunen, L H; Kubin, A

    1986-03-01

    Methods are presented for determination of molybdenum in plant tissue by flame and graphite-furnace atomic-absorption spectrometry and direct-current argon-plasma emission spectrometry. The samples are digested in HNO(3)-H(2)SO(4)-HC1O(4) mixture, and Mo is separated and concentrated by chelation and extraction. Three organic solvents (methyl isobutyl ketone, di-isobutyl ketone and isoamyl alcohol) and two ligands (8-hydroxyquinoline and toluene-3,4-dithiol) were studied. The procedure were tested on pine needle and birch leaf samples. PMID:18964076

  8. Sample preparation for quantitation of tritium by accelerator mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Chiarappa-Zucca, Marina L; Dingley, Karen H; Roberts, Mark L; Velsko, Carol A; Love, Adam H

    2002-12-15

    The capability to prepare samples accurately and reproducibly for analysis of tritium (3H) content by accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) greatly facilitates isotopic tracer studies in which attomole levels of 3H can be measured in milligram-sized samples. A method has been developed to convert the hydrogen of organic samples to a solid, titanium hydride, which can be analyzed by AMS. Using a two-step process, the sample is first oxidized to carbon dioxide and water. In the second step, the water is transferred within a heated manifold into a quartz tube, reduced to hydrogen gas using zinc, and reacted with titanium powder. The 3H/1H ratio of the titanium hydride is measured by AMS and normalized to standards whose ratios were determined by decay counting to calculate the amount of 3H in the original sample. Water, organic compounds, and biological samples with 3H activities measured by liquid scintillation counting were utilized to develop and validate the method. The 3H/1H ratios were quantified in samples that spanned 5 orders of magnitude, from 10(-10) to 10(-15), with a detection limit of 3.0 x 10(-15), which is equivalent to 0.02 dpm tritium/mg of material. Samples smaller than 2 mg were analyzed following addition of 2 mg of a tritium-free-hydrogen carrier. Preparation of organic standards containing both 14C and 3H in 2-mg organic samples demonstrated that this sample preparation methodology can also be applied to quantify both of these isotopes from a single sample. PMID:12510750

  9. Cloud point extraction thermospray flame quartz furnace atomic absorption spectrometry for determination of ultratrace cadmium in water and urine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Peng; Zhang, Yunchang; Lv, Yi; Hou, Xiandeng

    2006-12-01

    A simple, low cost and highly sensitive method based on cloud point extraction (CPE) for separation/preconcentration and thermospray flame quartz furnace atomic absorption spectrometry was proposed for the determination of ultratrace cadmium in water and urine samples. The analytical procedure involved the formation of analyte-entrapped surfactant micelles by mixing the analyte solution with an ammonium pyrrolidinedithiocarbamate (APDC) solution and a Triton X-114 solution. When the temperature of the system was higher than the cloud point of Triton X-114, the complex of cadmium-PDC entered the surfactant-rich phase and thus separation of the analyte from the matrix was achieved. Under optimal chemical and instrumental conditions, the limit of detection was 0.04 μg/L for cadmium with a sample volume of 10 mL. The analytical results of cadmium in water and urine samples agreed well with those by ICP-MS.

  10. Simple analysis of total mercury and methylmercury in seafood using heating vaporization atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Yoshimoto, Keisuke; Anh, Hoang Thi Van; Yamamoto, Atsushi; Koriyama, Chihaya; Ishibashi, Yasuhiro; Tabata, Masaaki; Nakano, Atsuhiro; Yamamoto, Megumi

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to develop a simpler method for determining total mercury (T-Hg) and methylmercury (MeHg) in biological samples by using methyl isobutyl ketone (MIBK) in the degreasing step. The fat in the samples was extracted by MIBK to the upper phase. T-Hg transferred into the water phase. This was followed by the extraction of MeHg from the water phase using HBr, CuCl2 and toluene. The MeHg fraction was reverse-extracted into L-cysteine-sodium acetate solution from toluene. The concentrations of T-Hg and MeHg were determined by heating vaporization atomic absorption spectrometry. Certified reference materials for T-Hg and MeHg in hair and fish were accurately measured using this method. This method was then applied to determine T-Hg and MeHg concentrations in the muscle, liver and gonads of seafood for the risk assessment of MeHg exposure. The mean T-Hg and MeHg concentrations in squid eggs were 0.023 and 0.022 µg/g, and in squid nidamental glands 0.052 and 0.049 µg/g, respectively. The MeHg/T-Hg ratios in the eggs and nidamental glands of squid were 94.4% and 96.5%, respectively. The mean T-Hg and MeHg concentrations in the gonads of sea urchins were 0.043 and 0.001 µg/g, respectively, with a MeHg/T-Hg ratio of 3.5%. We developed an efficient analytical method for T-Hg and MeHg using MIBK in the degreasing step. The new information on MeHg concentration and MeHg/T-Hg ratios in the egg or nidamental glands of squid and gonads of sea urchin will also be useful for risk assessment of mercury in seafood. PMID:27432235

  11. Ultra sound absorption measurements in rock samples at low temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herminghaus, C.; Berckhemer, H.

    1974-01-01

    A new technique, comparable with the reverberation method in room acoustics, is described. It allows Q-measurements at rock samples of arbitrary shape in the frequency range of 50 to 600 kHz in vacuum (.1 mtorr) and at low temperatures (+20 to -180 C). The method was developed in particular to investigate rock samples under lunar conditions. Ultrasound absorption has been measured at volcanics, breccia, gabbros, feldspar and quartz of different grain size and texture yielding the following results: evacuation raises Q mainly through lowering the humidity in the rock. In a dry compact rock, the effect of evacuation is small. With decreasing temperature, Q generally increases. Between +20 and -30 C, Q does not change much. With further decrease of temperature in many cases distinct anomalies appear, where Q becomes frequency dependent.

  12. A highly sensitive method for the determination of mercury using vapor generation gold wire microextraction and electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashemi, Payman; Rahimi, Akram

    2007-04-01

    The study introduces a new simple and highly sensitive method for headspace solid phase microextraction (HS-SPME) coupled with electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometric determination of mercury. In the proposed method, a gold wire, mounted in the headspace of a sample solution in a sealed bottle, is used for collection of mercury vapor generated by addition of sodium tetrahydroborate. The gold wire is then simply inserted in the sample introduction hole of a graphite furnace of an electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry instrument. By applying an atomization temperature of 600 °C, mercury is rapidly desorbed from the wire and determined with high sensitivity. Factorial design and response surface analysis methods were used for optimization of the effect of five different variables in order to maximize the mercury signal. By using a 0.75 mm diameter gold wire, a sample volume of about 8 ml and an extraction time of 11 min, the sensitivity of mercury determination was enhanced up to 10 4 times in comparison to its ordinary ETAAS determination with direct injection of 10 μl sample solutions. A detection limit of 0.006 ng ml - 1 and a precision better than 4.6% (relative standard deviation) were obtained. The method was successfully applied to the determination of mercury in industrial wastewaters and tuna fish samples.

  13. Determination of Chlorine in Milk via Molecular Absorption of SrCl Using High-Resolution Continuum Source Graphite Furnace Atomic Absorption Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ozbek, Nil; Akman, Suleyman

    2016-07-20

    Total chlorine in milk was determined via the molecular absorption of diatomic strontium monochloride at 635.862 nm using high-resolution continuum source graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry. The effects of coating the graphite furnace, using different modifiers, amount of molecule-forming element, and different calibrants were investigated and optimized. Chlorine concentrations in milk samples were determined in a Zr-coated graphite furnace using 25 μg of Sr as the molecule-forming reagent and applying a pyrolysis temperature of 600 °C and a molecule-forming temperature of 2300 °C. Linearity was maintained up to 500 μg mL(-1) of Cl. The method was tested by analyzing a certified reference wastewater. The results were in the uncertainty limits of the certified value. The limit of detection of the method was 1.76 μg mL(-1). The chlorine concentrations in various cow milk samples taken from the market were found in the range of 588-1472 mg L(-1). PMID:27345208

  14. Mass Spectrometry Imaging Using the Stretched Sample Approach

    PubMed Central

    Zimmerman, Tyler A.; Rubakhin, Stanislav S.; Sweedler, Jonathan V.

    2011-01-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) can determine tissue localization for a variety of analytes with high sensitivity, chemical specificity, and spatial resolution. MS image quality typically depends on the MALDI matrix application method used, particularly when the matrix solution or powder is applied directly to the tissue surface. Improper matrix application results in spatial redistribution of analytes and reduced MS signal quality. Here we present a stretched sample imaging protocol that removes the dependence of MS image quality on the matrix application process and improves analyte extraction and sample desalting. First, the tissue sample is placed on a monolayer of solid support beads that are embedded in a hydrophobic membrane. Stretching the membrane fragments the tissue into thousands of nearly single-cell sized islands, with the pieces physically isolated from each other by the membrane. This spatial isolation prevents analyte transfer between beads, allowing for longer exposure of the tissue fragments to the MALDI matrix, thereby improving detectability of small analyte quantities without sacrificing spatial resolution. When using this method to reconstruct chemical images, complications result from non-uniform stretching of the supporting membrane. Addressing this concern, several computational tools enable automated data acquisition at individual bead locations and allow reconstruction of ion images corresponding to the original spatial conformation of the tissue section. Using mouse pituitary, we demonstrate the utility of this stretched imaging technique for characterizing peptide distributions in heterogeneous tissues at nearly single-cell resolution. PMID:20680608

  15. Determination of mercury distribution inside spent compact fluorescent lamps by atomic absorption spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Rey-Raap, Natalia

    2012-05-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer New treatments for CFL are required considering the aim of Directive 202/96/CE. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer It is shown that most of the mercury introduced into a CFL is in the phosphor powder. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Experimental conditions for microwave-assisted sample digestion followed by AAS measurements are described. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer By washing the glass it is possible to reduce the concentration below legal limits. - Abstract: In this study, spent compact fluorescent lamps were characterized to determine the distribution of mercury. The procedure used in this research allowed mercury to be extracted in the vapor phase, from the phosphor powder, and the glass matrix. Mercury concentration in the three phases was determined by the method known as cold vapor atomic absorption spectrometry. Median values obtained in the study showed that a compact fluorescent lamp contained 24.52 {+-} 0.4 ppb of mercury in the vapor phase, 204.16 {+-} 8.9 ppb of mercury in the phosphor powder, and 18.74 {+-} 0.5 ppb of mercury in the glass matrix. There are differences in mercury concentration between the lamps since the year of manufacture or the hours of operation affect both mercury content and its distribution. The 85.76% of the mercury introduced into a compact fluorescent lamp becomes a component of the phosphor powder, while more than 13.66% is diffused through the glass matrix. By washing and eliminating all phosphor powder attached to the glass surface it is possible to classified the glass as a non-hazardous waste.

  16. Determination of tellurium by hydride generation with in situ trapping flame atomic absorption spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matusiewicz, Henryk; Krawczyk, Magdalena

    2007-03-01

    The analytical performance of coupled hydride generation — integrated atom trap (HG-IAT) atomizer flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS) system was evaluated for determination of Te in reference material (GBW 07302 Stream Sediment), coal fly ash and garlic. Tellurium, using formation of H 2Te vapors, is atomized in air-acetylene flame-heated IAT. A new design HG-IAT-FAAS hyphenated technique that would exceed the operational capabilities of existing arrangements (a water-cooled single silica tube, double-slotted quartz tube or an "integrated trap") was investigated. An improvement in detection limit was achieved compared with using either of the above atom trapping techniques separately. The concentration detection limit, defined as 3 times the blank standard deviation (3 σ), was 0.9 ng mL - 1 for Te. For a 2 min in situ pre-concentration time (sample volume of 2 mL), sensitivity enhancement compared to flame AAS, was 222 fold, using the hydride generation — atom trapping technique. The sensitivity can be further improved by increasing the collection time. The precision, expressed as RSD, was 7.0% ( n = 6) for Te. The designs studied include slotted tube, single silica tube and integrated atom trap-cooled atom traps. The accuracy of the method was verified using a certified reference material (GBW 07302 Stream Sediment) by aqueous standard calibration curves. The measured Te contents of the reference material was in agreement with the information value. The method was successfully applied to the determination of tellurium in coal fly ash and garlic.

  17. Determination of calcium, magnesium and strontium in soils by flow injection flame atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Arslan, Z; Tyson, J F

    1999-12-01

    Several procedures for the determination of Ca, Mg and Sr in soils have been compared on the basis of the accuracy of analysis of two NIST reference materials (Montana Soils SRM 2710 and SRM 2711). Samples were dissolved in a mixture of hydrofluoric and nitric acids in sealed vessels in a microwave oven and in teflon beakers on a hot plate. The digests obtained from both dissolution methods were evaporated to dryness in an attempt to remove silicon. Boric acid was added to prevent the precipitation of the lanthanum releasing agent (as lanthanum fluoride) and potassium was added as an ionization buffer. Determinations were made by flame atomic absorption spectrometry with both the nitrous oxide-acetylene flame and the air-acetylene flame, with calibration either by standard additions or against external standards matrix matched with respect to nitric acid, boric acid, lanthanum and potassium. The silicon remaining in the solution was also determined by external calibration. A single-line flow injection manifold was used to overcome any problems due to the presence of high dissolved solids. A volume of 300 mul was injected into a water carrier stream flowing at 8 ml min(-1). To determine Ca in the air-acetylene flame, it was necessary to remove silicon. Magnesium was determined in either flame without complete removal of the silicon, however, for the determination of Sr, it was necessary to remove the silicon and use the nitrous oxide-acetylene flame. The indicative value for Sr in SRM 2710 was too low: the value determined was 360+/-30 mug g(-1). PMID:18967785

  18. Direct determination of Cu, Mn, Pb, and Zn in beer by thermospray flame furnace atomic absorption spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nascentes, Clésia C.; Kamogawa, Marcos Y.; Fernandes, Kelly G.; Arruda, Marco A. Z.; Nogueira, Ana Rita A.; Nóbrega, Joaquim A.

    2005-06-01

    In this work, thermospray flame furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (TS-FF-AAS) was employed for Cu, Mn, Pb, and Zn determination in beer without any sample digestion. The system was optimized and calibration was based on the analyte addition technique. A sample volume of 300 μl was introduced into the hot Ni tube at a flow-rate of 0.4 ml min -1 using 0.14 mol l -1 nitric acid solution or air as carrier. Different Brazilian beers were directly analyzed after ultrasonic degasification. Results were compared with those obtained by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GFAAS). The detection limits obtained for Cu, Mn, Pb, and Zn in aqueous solution were 2.2, 18, 1.6, and 0.9 μg l -1, respectively. The relative standard deviations varied from 2.7% to 7.3% ( n=8) for solutions containing the analytes in the 25-50 μg l -1 range. The concentration ranges obtained for analytes in beer samples were: Cu: 38.0-155 μg l -1; Mn: 110-348 μg l -1, Pb: 13.0-32.9 μg l -1, and Zn: 52.7-226 μg l -1. Results obtained by TS-FF-AAS and GFAAS were in agreement at a 95% confidence level. The proposed method is fast and simple, since sample digestion is not required and sensitivity can be improved without using expensive devices. The TS-FF-AAS presented suitable sensitivity for determination of Cu, Mn, Pb, and Zn in the quality control of a brewery.

  19. Fast sequential determination of antimony and lead in pewter alloys using high-resolution continuum source flame atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Dessuy, Morgana B; de Jesus, Robson M; Brandao, Geovani C; Ferreira, Sergio L C; Vale, Maria Goreti R; Welz, Bernhard

    2013-01-01

    A simple method has been developed to determine antimony and lead in pewter alloy cups produced in Brazil, using fast sequential determination by high-resolution continuum source flame atomic absorption spectrometry. The samples were dissolved in HCl and H(2)O(2), employing a cold finger system in order to avoid analyte losses. The main resonance line of lead at 217.001 nm and a secondary line of antimony at 212.739 nm were used. The limits of detection for lead and antimony were 0.02 and 5.7 mg L(-1), respectively. The trueness of the method was established by recovery tests and comparing the results obtained by the proposed method with those obtained by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry. The results were compared using a student's t-test and there was no significant difference at a 95% confidence interval. With the developed methods, it was possible to determine accurately antimony and lead in pewter samples. The lead concentration found in the analysed samples was around 1 mg g(-1), which means that they are not lead free; however, the content was below the maximum allowed level of 5 mg g(-1). The antimony content, which was found to be between 40 and 46 mg g(-1), is actually of greater concern, as antimony is known to be potentially toxic already at very low concentrations, although there is no legislation yet for this element. PMID:23046152

  20. Determination of gold in geologic materials by solvent extraction and atomic-absorption spectrometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Huffman, Claude; Mensik, J.D.; Riley, L.B.

    1967-01-01

    The two methods presented for the determination of traces of gold in geologic materials are the cyanide atomic-absorption method and the fire-assay atomic-absorption method. In the cyanide method gold is leached with a sodium-cyanide solution. The monovalent gold is then oxidized to the trivalent state and concentrated by extracting into methyl isobutyl ketone prior to estimation by atomic absorption. In the fire-assay atomic-absorption method, the gold-silver bead obtained from fire assay is dissolved in nitric and hydrochloric acids. Gold is then concentrated by extracting into methyl isobutyl ketone prior to determination by atomic absorption. By either method concentrations as low as 50 parts per billion of gold can be determined in a 15-gram sample.

  1. Evaluation of quartz tubes as atomization cells for gold determination by thermospray flame furnace atomic absorption spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morzan, Ezequiel; Piano, Ornela; Stripeikis, Jorge; Tudino, Mabel

    2012-11-01

    This work describes the development of a new analytical procedure able to determine gold by thermospray flame furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (TS-FF-AAS) using nickel tubes (NiT) and quartz tubes (QT) as atomization cells. Experiments involving changes in the flow injection operational parameters, reagent concentrations and sizes of the QT were performed in order to optimize sensitivity. Under the same operational conditions, it was observed that the employment of QT increases the sensitivity of gold determination when compared to the nickel tube. Since solutions of highly concentrated hydrochloric acid showed the best performance as carriers, quartz tubes were also preferred due to its greater tolerance to corrosion by mineral acids in comparison to NiT. In addition, changes in the internal diameter of the QT revealed an important improvement in sensitivity for smaller tubes. Under optimized conditions the main figures of merit showed values close to that of graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry with the addition of an excellent improvement of the sample throughput. They are: LOD (3 s): 0.004 μg mL- 1, sensitivity: 0.306 (μg mL- 1)- 1, RSD% (n = 10, 1 μg mL- 1): 2.5, linear range: 0.01-4 μg mL- 1 and sample throughput: 72 h- 1. This new method was employed for the determination of gold in homeopathic medicines with no need of sample digestion. Validation of the analytical results will be shown. A full discussion of the most relevant findings regarding the role of the atomization cell as a strategic key for improving sensitivity will be also provided.

  2. Determination of Low Levels of Lead in Beer Using Solid-Phase Extraction and Detection by Flame Atomic Absorption Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Alves, Vanessa N.; Borges, Simone S. O.; Neto, Waldomiro B.; Coelho, Nívia M. M.

    2011-01-01

    In this study, a method for the determination of low concentrations of lead in beer samples using solid-phase extraction with a flow injection analysis system and detection by flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS) was developed. Moringa oleifera seeds were used as a biosorbent material. Chemical and flow variables of the online preconcentration system, such as sample pH, preconcentration flow rate, eluent flow rate, eluent concentration, particle size, and sorbent mass, were studied. The optimum extraction conditions were obtained using a sample pH of 6.0, sample flow rate of 6.0 mL min−1, 63.0 mg of sorbent mass, and 2.0 mol L−1 HNO3 at a flow rate of 2.0 mL min−1 as the eluent. With the optimized conditions, the preconcentration factor, precision, detection limit, consumption index, and sample throughput were estimated as 93, 0.3% (10.0 μg L−1, n = 7), 7.5 μg L−1, 0.11 mL, and 23 samples per hour, respectively. The method developed was successfully applied to beer samples and recovery tests, with recovery ranging from 80% to 100%. PMID:22013389

  3. Multielement continuum-source atomic-absorption spectrometry with an echelle-spectrometer/image-dissector system.

    PubMed

    Masters, R; Hsiech, C; Pardue, H L

    1989-01-01

    The continued development of the echelle-spectrometer/image-dissector system for multielement determination by continuum-source atomic-absorption spectrometry is presented. Modifications of the instruments include the use of a 20-groove/mm echelle grating blazed at 76 degrees , and the removal of the magnetic shield from the image dissector. The spectral range is from 300 to 430 nm and the observed resolution is better than 0.005 nm at 400 nm. Calibration curves are linear up to an absorbance of 0.2, and absorption sensitivities are up to 4-fold better than with the previous design. Fundamental characteristics of the detector limit the application of the instrument to sequential single-element quantifications with the electrothermal atomizer, and to sequential multielement quantification with the flame atomizer. The further development of the instrument for simultaneous multielement qualification is discussed. PMID:18964682

  4. Identification of Unknown Contaminants in Water Samples from ISS Employing Liquid Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry/Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rutz, Jeffrey A.; Schultz, John R.

    2008-01-01

    Mass Spectrometry/Mass Spectrometry (MS/MS) is a powerful technique for identifying unknown organic compounds. For non-volatile or thermally unstable unknowns dissolved in liquids, liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry/mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS) is often the variety of MS/MS used for the identification. One type of LC/MS/MS that is rapidly becoming popular is time-of-flight (TOF) mass spectrometry. This technique is now in use at the Johnson Space Center for identification of unknown nonvolatile organics in water samples from the space program. An example of the successful identification of one unknown is reviewed in detail in this paper. The advantages of time-of-flight instrumentation are demonstrated through this example as well as the strategy employed in using time-of-flight data to identify unknowns.

  5. Oxygen bomb combustion of biological samples for inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Souza, Gilberto B.; Carrilho, Elma Neide V. M.; Oliveira, Camila V.; Nogueira, Ana Rita A.; Nóbrega, Joaquim A.

    2002-12-01

    A rapid sample preparation method is proposed for decomposition of milk powder, corn bran, bovine and fish tissues, containing certified contents of the analytes. The procedure involves sample combustion in a commercial stainless steel oxygen bomb operating at 25 bar. Most of the samples were decomposed within 5 min. Diluted nitric acid or water-soluble tertiary amines 10% v/v were used as absorption solutions. Calcium, Cu, K, Mg, Na, P, S and Zn were recovered with the bomb washings and determined by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES). Ethanol mixed with paraffin was used as a combustion aid to allow complete combustion. A cooling step prior releasing of the bomb valve was employed to increase the efficiency of sample combustion. Iodine was also determined in milk samples spiked with potassium iodide to evaluate the volatilization and collection of iodine in amine CFA-C medium and the feasibility of its determination by ICP-OES with axial view configuration. Most of the element recoveries in the samples were between 91 and 105% and the certified and found contents exhibited a fair agreement at a 95% confidence level.

  6. Simultaneous determination of cadmium and lead in wine by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freschi, Gian P. G.; Dakuzaku, Carolina S.; de Moraes, Mercedes; Nóbrega, Joaquim A.; Gomes Neto, José A.

    2001-10-01

    A method has been developed for the direct simultaneous determination of Cd and Pb in white and red wine by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ET-AAS) using a transversely heated graphite tube atomizer (THGA) with longitudinal Zeeman-effect background correction. The thermal behavior of both analytes during pyrolysis and atomization stages were investigated in 0.028 mol l -1 HNO 3 and in 1+1 v/v diluted wine using mixtures of Pd(NO 3) 2+Mg(NO 3) 2 and NH 4H 2PO 4+Mg(NO 3) 2 as chemical modifiers. With 5 μg Pd+3 μg Mg as the modifiers and a two-step pyrolysis (10 s at 400°C and 10 s at 600°C), the formation of carbonaceous residues inside the atomizer was avoided. For 20 μl of sample (wine+0.056 mol l -1 HNO 3, 1+1, v/v) dispensed into the graphite tube, analytical curves in the 0.10-1.0 μg l -1 Cd and 5.0-50 μg l -1 Pb ranges were established. The characteristic mass was approximately 0.6 pg for Cd and 33 pg for Pb, and the lifetime of the tube was approximately 400 firings. The limits of detection (LOD) based on integrated absorbance (0.03 μg l -1 for Cd, 0.8 μg l -1 for Pb) exceeded the requirements of Brazilian Food Regulations (decree #55871 from Health Department), which establish the maximum permissible level for Cd at 200 μg l -1 and for Pb at 500 μg l -1. The relative standard deviations ( n=12) were typically <8% for Cd and <6% for Pb. The recoveries of Cd and Pb added to wine samples varied from 88 to 107% and 93 to 103%, respectively. The accuracy of the direct determination of Cd and Pb was checked for 10 table wines by comparing the results with those obtained for digested wine using single-element ET-AAS, which were in agreement at the 95% confidence level.

  7. The determination of wear metals in used lubricating oils by flame atomic absorption spectrometry using sulphanilic acid as ashing agent.

    PubMed

    Ekanem, E J; Lori, J A; Thomas, S A

    1997-11-01

    A simple and reliable ashing procedure is proposed for the preparation of used lubricating oil samples for the determination of calcium, magnesium, zinc, iron, chromium and nickel by flame atomic absorption spectrometry. Sulphanilic acid was added to oil samples and the mixture coked and the coke ashed at 550 degrees C. The solutions of the ash were analysed by flame AAS for the metals. The release of calcium, zinc, iron and chromium was improved by the addition of sulphanilic acid to samples. The relative standard deviations of metal concentration results in the initial oil samples were 1.5% for Ca (1500 mg l(-1) level), 0.3% for Mg (100 mg l(-1) level), 3.1% for Zn (1500 mg l(-1) level), 0.7% for Fe (500 mg l(-1) level), 0.02% for Cr (50 mg l(-1) level) and 0.002% for Ni (10 mg l(-1) level). The optimum sample size for efficient metal release was 20 g while the optimum sulphanilic acid to oil ratio was 0.05 g per gram of oil for Zn and Cr and 0.10 g for Ca and Fe. Results obtained by this procedure were highly reproducible and comparable with those obtained for the same samples using standard procedures. PMID:18966959

  8. Determination of trace nickel in hydrogenated cottonseed oil by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry after microwave-assisted digestion.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Gai

    2012-01-01

    Microwave digestion of hydrogenated cottonseed oil prior to trace nickel determination by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS) is proposed here for the first time. Currently, the methods outlined in U.S. Pharmacopeia 28 (USP28) or British Pharmacopeia (BP2003) are recommended as the official methods for analyzing nickel in hydrogenated cottonseed oil. With these methods the samples may be pre-treated by a silica or a platinum crucible. However, the samples were easily tarnished during sample pretreatment when using a silica crucible. In contrast, when using a platinum crucible, hydrogenated cottonseed oil acting as a reducing material may react with the platinum and destroy the crucible. The proposed microwave-assisted digestion avoided tarnishing of sample in the process of sample pretreatment and also reduced the cycle of analysis. The programs of microwave digestion and the parameters of ETAAS were optimized. The accuracy of the proposed method was investigated by analyzing real samples. The results were compared with the ones by pressurized-PTFE-bomb acid digestion and ones obtained by the U.S. Pharmacopeia 28 (USP28) method. The new method involves a relatively rapid matrix destruction technique compared with other present methods for the quantification of metals in oil. PMID:22133102

  9. Impact of the analytical blank in the uncertainty evaluation of the copper content in waters by flame atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Elcio Cruz; Monteiro, Maria Inês Couto; Pontes, Fernanda Veronesi Marinho; de Almeida, Marcelo Dominguez; Carneiro, Manuel Castro; da Silva, Lílian Irene Dias; Alcover Neto, Arnaldo

    2012-01-01

    Chemical analysts use analytical blanks in their analyses, but seldom is this source of uncertainty evaluated. Generally, there is great confusion. Although the numerical value of the blank, in some situations, can be negligible, its source of uncertainty cannot be. This article discusses the uncertainty contribution of the analytical blank using a numerical example of the copper content in waters by flame atomic absorption spectrometry. The results indicate that the uncertainties of the analytical blank can contribute up to 50% when the blank sample is considered in this analysis, confirming its high impact. This effect can be primarily observed where the analyte concentration approaches the lower range of the analytical curve. Even so, the blank is not always computed. Therefore, the relevance of the analytical blank can be confirmed by uncertainty evaluation. PMID:22649945

  10. Determination of silver, bismuth, cadmium, copper, lead, and zinc in geologic materials by atomic absorption spectrometry with tricaprylylmethylammonium chloride

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Viets, J.G.

    1978-01-01

    Interferences commonly encountered in the determination of silver, bismuth, cadmium, copper, lead, and zinc at crustal abundance levels are effectively eliminated using a rapid, sensitive, organic extraction technique. A potassium chlorate-hydrochloric acid digestion solubilizes the metals not tightly bound in the silicate lattice of rocks, soils, and stream sediments. The six metals are selectively extracted into a 10% Aliquat 336-MIBK organic phase in the presence of ascorbic acid and potassium iodide. Metals in the organic extract are determined by flame atomic absorption spectrometry to the 0.02-ppm level for silver, cadmium, copper, and zinc and to the 0.2-ppm level for bismuth and lead with a maximum relative standard deviation of 18.8% for known reference samples. An additional hydrofluoric acid digestion may be used to determine metals substituted in the silicate lattice.

  11. Determination of arsenic, antimony, bismuth, cadmium, copper, lead, molybdenum, silver and zinc in geological materials by atomic-absorption spectrometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Viets, J.G.; O'Leary, R. M.; Clark, Robert J.

    1984-01-01

    Arsenic, antimony, bismuth, cadmium, copper, lead, molybdenum, silver and zinc are very useful elements in geochemical exploration. In the proposed method, geological samples are fused with potassium pyrosulphate and the fusate is dissolved in a solution of hydrochloric acid, ascorbic acid and potassium iodide. When this solution is shaken with a 10% V/V Aliquat 336 - isobutyl methyl ketone organic phase, the nine elements of interest are selectively partitioned in the organic phase. All nine elements can then be determined in the organic phase using flame atomic-absorption spectrometry. The method is rapid and allows the determination of Ag and Cd at levels down to 0.1 p.p.m., Cu, Mo, and Zn down to 0.5 p.p.m., Pb, Bi and Sb down to 1 p.p.m. and As down to 5 p.p.m. in geological materials.

  12. Speciation determination of chromium(III) and (VI) using preconcentration cloud point extraction with flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS).

    PubMed

    Kiran, K; Kumar, K Suresh; Prasad, B; Suvardhan, K; Lekkala, Ramesh Babu; Janardhanam, K

    2008-02-11

    bis-[2-Hydroxy-1-naphthaldehyde] thiourea was synthesized and preconcentration cloud point extraction (CPE) for speciation determination of chromium(III) and (VI) in various environmental samples with flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS) has been developed. Chromium(III) complexes with bis-[2-hydroxynaphthaldehyde] thiourea is subsequently entrapped in the surfactant micelles. After complexation of chromium(III) with reagent, the analyte was quantitatively extracted to the surfactant-rich phase in the non-ionic surfactant Triton X-100 after centrifugation. The effect of pH, concentration of chelating agent, surfactant, equilibration temperature and time on CPE was studied. The relative standard deviation was 2.13% and the limits of detection were around 0.18 microg L(-1). PMID:17583423

  13. Determination of trace amount of cobalt in feed grains and forages by solvent extraction and graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Blanchflower, W J; Cannavan, A; Kennedy, D G

    1990-10-01

    A method is described for the determination of trace amounts of cobalt in feed grains and forages with a detection limit of 1 ng g-1. Samples are ashed in a muffle furnace and complexed with 2-nitroso-1-naphthol. Following solvent extraction, cobalt is determined using graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry. The assay can be carried out in a normal analytical laboratory without the need for special "clean" rooms. Reagents have been selected to keep reagent blank values at low levels, and heptan-2-one is used as extracting solvent to avoid problems with evaporation. The assay has been used for diagnostic purposes and to formulate special low cobalt diets for sheep for experimental purposes. PMID:2270874

  14. Determination of elements by atomic absorption spectrometry in medicinal plants employed to alleviate common cold symptoms.

    PubMed

    Küçükbay, F Zehra; Kuyumcu, Ebru

    2014-09-01

    Eleven important medicinal plants generally used by the people of Turkey for the treatment of common cold have been studied for their mineral contents. Eleven minor and major elements (essential, non-essential and toxic) were identified in the Asplenium adiantum-nigrum L. , Althaea officinalis L. , Verbascum phlomoides L., Euphorbia chamaesyce L., Zizyphus jujube Miller, Peganum harmala L., Arum dioscoridis Sm., Sambucus nigra L., Piperlongum L., Tussilago farfara L. and Elettaria cardamomum Maton by employing flame atomic absorption and emission spectrometry and electro-thermal atomic absorption spectrometry. Microwave digestion procedure for total concentration was applied under optimized conditions for dissolution of medicinal plants. Plant based biological certified reference materials (CRMs) served as standards for quantification. These elements are found to be present in varying concentrations in the studied plants. The baseline data presented in this work can be used in understanding the role of essential, non-essential and toxic elements in nutritive, preventive and therapeutic properties of medicinal plants. PMID:25532362

  15. [The application of atomic absorption spectrometry in automatic transmission fault detection].

    PubMed

    Chen, Li-dan; Chen, Kai-kao

    2012-01-01

    The authors studied the innovative applications of atomic absorption spectrometry in the automatic transmission fault detection. After the authors have determined Fe, Cu and Cr contents in the five groups of Audi A6 main metal in automatic transmission fluid whose travel course is respectively 10-15 thousand kilometers, 20-26 thousand kilometers, 32-38 thousand kilometers, 43-49 thousand kilometers, and 52-58 thousand kilometers by atomic absorption spectrometry, the authors founded the database of primary metal content in the Audi A6 different mileage automatic transmission fluid (ATF). The research discovered that the main metal content in the automatic transmission fluid increased with the vehicles mileage and its normal metal content level in the automatic transmission fluid is between the two trend lines. The authors determined the main metal content of automatic transmission fluid which had faulty symptoms and compared it with its database value. Those can not only judge the wear condition of the automatic transmission which had faulty symptoms but also help the automobile detection and maintenance personnel to diagnose automatic transmission failure reasons without disintegration. This reduced automobile maintenance costs, and improved the quality of automobile maintenance. PMID:22497168

  16. Determination of mercury in fish samples by slurry sampling electrothermal vaporization inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liaw, Ming-Jyh; Jiang, Shiuh-Jen; Li, Yi-Ching

    1997-06-01

    Ultrasonic slurry sampling electrothermal vaporization inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (USS-ETV-ICP-MS) has been applied to the determination of mercury in several fish samples. The effects of instrument operating conditions and slurry preparation on the ion signals are reported. Palladium was used as modifier to delay the vaporization of mercury in this study. As the vaporization behavior of mercury in fish slurry and aqueous solution is quite different, the standard addition method was used for the determination of mercury in reference materials. The detection limit of mercury estimated from the standard addition curve was in the range 0.002-0.004 μg g -1 for different samples. This method has been applied to the determination of mercury in dogfish muscle reference material (DORM-1 and DORM-2) and dogfish liver reference material (DOLT-1). Accuracy was better than 4% and precision was better than 7% with the USS-ETV-ICP-MS method.

  17. On-line microdialysis sample cleanup for electrospray ionization mass spectrometry of nucleic acid samples

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, C.; Wu, Q.; Harms, A.C.; Smith, R.D.

    1996-09-15

    A major limitation of electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) for oligonucleotide analysis arises due to sodium adduction, a problem that increases with molecular weight. Sodium adduction can preclude useful measurements when limited sample sizes prevent off-line cleanup. A novel and generally useful on-line microdialysis technique is described for the rapid (nearly 1-5 min) DNA sample cleanup for ESI-MS. Mass spectra of oligonucleotides of different size and sequence showing no significant sodium adduct peaks were obtained using the on-line microdialysis system with sodium chloride concentrations as high as 250 mM. Signal-to-noise ratios were also greatly enhanced compared to direct infusion of the original samples. By using ammonium acetate as the dialysis buffer, it was also found that the noncovalent association of double-stranded oligonucleotides could be preserved during the microdialysis process, allowing analysis by ESI-MS. 33 refs., 6 figs.

  18. Determination of cadmium in the livers and kidneys of puffins by carbon furnace atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ottaway, J M; Campbell, W C

    1976-01-01

    A carbon furnace atomic absorption procedure is described for the determination of cadmium in the livers and kidneys of puffins, fratercula arctica. Samples are dried and weighed and 2 to 100 mg are dissolved in sulphuric and nitric acids. These solutions are analysed directly in the carbon furnace against aqueous standards and provide accurate results in the range 0-1 to 100 micrograms/g dry weight. The method is simple and rapid and requires much less of the small total sample than would be required for flame atomic absorption. PMID:1030692

  19. Surfactant/oil/water system for the determination of selenium in eggs by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ieggli, C. V. S.; Bohrer, D.; Noremberg, S.; do Nascimento, P. C.; de Carvalho, L. M.; Vieira, S. L.; Reis, R. N.

    2009-06-01

    An oil-in-water formulation has been optimized to determine trace levels of selenium in whole hen eggs by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry. This method is simpler and requires fewer reagents when compared with other sample pre-treatment procedures. Graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometric (GF AAS) measurement was carried out using standard addition calibration and Pd as a modifier. The precision, expressed as relative standard deviation, was better than 5% and the limit of detection was 1 µg L - 1 . The validation of the method was performed against a standard reference material Whole Egg Powder (RM 8415), and the measured Se corresponded to 95.2% of the certified value. The method was used for the determination of the Se level in eggs from hens treated with Se dietary supplements. Inorganic and organic Se sources were added to hen feed. The Se content of eggs was higher when hens were fed with organic Se compared to the other treatments. The proposed method, including sample emulsification for subsequent Se determination by GF AAS has proved to be sensitive, reproducible, simple and economical.

  20. Comparison of sampling methods for radiocarbon dating of carbonyls in air samples via accelerator mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schindler, Matthias; Kretschmer, Wolfgang; Scharf, Andreas; Tschekalinskij, Alexander

    2016-05-01

    Three new methods to sample and prepare various carbonyl compounds for radiocarbon measurements were developed and tested. Two of these procedures utilized the Strecker synthetic method to form amino acids from carbonyl compounds with either sodium cyanide or trimethylsilyl cyanide. The third procedure used semicarbazide to form crystalline carbazones with the carbonyl compounds. The resulting amino acids and semicarbazones were then separated and purified using thin layer chromatography. The separated compounds were then combusted to CO2 and reduced to graphite to determine 14C content by accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS). All of these methods were also compared with the standard carbonyl compound sampling method wherein a compound is derivatized with 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazine and then separated by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC).

  1. Fourier transform infrared spectrometry: a versatile technique for real world samples.

    PubMed

    Rintoul, L; Panayiotou, H; Kokot, S; George, G; Cash, G; Frost, R; Bui, T; Fredericks, P

    1998-04-01

    The versatility of FTIR spectrometry was explored by considering a variety of samples drawn from industrial applications, materials science and biomedical research. These samples included polymeric insulators, bauxite ore, clay, human hair and human skin. A range of sampling techniques suitable for these samples is discussed, in particular FTIR microscopy, FTIR emission spectroscopy, attenuated total reflectance and photoacoustic FTIR spectrometry. The power of modern data processing techniques, particularly multivariate analysis, to extract useful information from spectral data is also illustrated. PMID:9684399

  2. Miniaturized King furnace permits absorption spectroscopy of small samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ercoli, B.; Tompkins, F. S.

    1968-01-01

    Miniature King-type furnace, consisting of an inductively heated, small diameter tantalum tube supported in a radiation shield eliminates the disadvantages of the conventional furnace in obtaining absorption spectra of metal vapors.

  3. Slurry sampling electrothermal vaporization inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry for steelmaking flue dust analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coedo, A. G.; Dorado, T.; Padilla, I.; Maibusch, R.; Kuss, H.-M.

    2000-02-01

    A commercial atomic absorption graphite furnace (AAGF), with a self-made adapter and valve system, was used as a slurry sampling cell for electrothermal vaporization inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ETV-ICP-MS). The system was applied to the determination of As, Sn, Sb, Se, Te, Bi, Cd, V, Ti and Mo in steelmaking flue dusts. Experimental conditions with respect to ETV and ICP-MS operating parameters were optimized. Compared to aqueous solutions, slurry samples were found to present better analyte transport. Microgram amounts of Rh were used to reduce the difference in analyte response in sensitivity for aqueous solutions of the tested analytes. No such increasing effect was observed for slurry samples and aqueous standards. An added quantity of Rh acting as modifier/carrier resulted in an increase for the same analytes in matrix-slurry solutions, even the addition of an extra Rh quantity has resulted in a decrease in the signals. The effect of Triton X-100 (used as a dispersant agent) on analyte intensity and precision was also studied. External calibration from aqueous standards spiked with 100 μg ml -1 Rh was performed to quantified 0.010 g/100 ml slurry samples. Results are presented for a certified reference electrical arc furnace flue dust (EAF): CRM-876-1 (Bureau of Analysis Samples Ltd., Cleveland, UK), a reference sample of coke ashes X-3705 (from AG der Dillinger Hüttenwerke, Germany), and a representative sample of EAF flue dust from a Spanish steelmaking company (CENIM-1). For the two reference materials an acceptable agreement with certificate values was achieved, and the results for the CENIM sample matched with those obtained from conventional nebulization solution.

  4. Determination of cadmium, aluminium, and copper in beer and products used in its manufacture by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Viñas, Pilar; Aguinaga, Nerea; López-García, Ignacio; Hernandez-Córdoba, Manuel

    2002-01-01

    Procedures were developed for determining cadmium, aluminium, and copper in beer and the products used in its manufacture by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry. Beer samples were injected into the furnace and solid samples were introduced as suspensions after preparation in a medium containing hydrogen peroxide, nitric acid, and ammonium dihydrogen phosphate for cadmium atomization. Calibration was performed with aqueous standards, and characteristic masses and detection limits were, respectively, 1 and 0.3 pg for cadmium, 18 and 5.4 pg for aluminium, and 5.6 and 6.8 pg for copper. Different samples of beer, wort, brewer's yeast, malt, raw grain, and hops were analyzed by the proposed procedures. Cadmium was found in low concentrations (0.001-0.08 microg/g and 0-1.3 ng/mL); copper (3-13 microg/g and 25-137 ng/mL) and aluminium (0.6-9 microg/g and 0.1-2 microg/mL) were found at higher levels. The reliability of the procedure was confirmed by comparing the results obtained with others based on microwave oven sample digestion, and by analyzing several certified reference materials. PMID:12083268

  5. Direct determination of selenium in rat blood plasma by Zeeman atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Kabirov, K K; Kapetanovic, I M; Lyubimov, A V

    2008-01-30

    The method was developed to be applied for direct determination of selenium in rat plasma by graphite-furnace atomic absorption spectrometry with Zeeman background correction. Blood was obtained from CD rats of both sexes 2h after dosing in weeks 7 and 13 in order to acquire data on the levels of selenium in these animals during 13-week gavage administration of l-seleno-methylselenocysteine (SeMC), a new candidate chemopreventive agent under development. Application of the commonly used method of standard addition was found to be unsuitable to calculate the selenium content in rat plasma (within-run and between-run accuracy and precision parameters were less than 85%). Therefore, a new analytical method was developed. In this method, samples of rat plasma (50 microL) were diluted 10-fold with a reducing agent containing l-ascorbic acid, a modifier solution containing palladium chloride and Triton X-100. Samples were atomized in pyrolytically coated graphite tubes and peak height signals were measured. Selenium concentrations were determined by linear least squares regression analysis based on the standard curve generated in pooled rat blank plasma. Since selenium is normally present in plasma, a three-step approach was used to calculate selenium plasma levels. Initially selenium levels were determined based on the standard curve with selenium-spiked pool plasma. In the second step, background selenium levels in the pooled plasma were determined based on the same standard curve. In the third step, background level was added to the previously derived number. The relative errors were in the range from -4.6 to 11.4% (intra-day assay) and from -0.4 to 8.8% (inter-day assay) which proved good accuracy. The relative standard deviations were in the range from 1.88 to 4.70% (intra-day precision) and from 3.28 to 5.38% (inter-day precision). In rat plasma, the following dose-dependent selenium levels (mean+/-S.D.) in males and females, respectively, were observed at 13 weeks

  6. Determination of mercury in gasoline by cold vapor atomic absorption spectrometry with direct reduction in microemulsion media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandão, Geisamanda Pedrini; de Campos, Reinaldo Calixto; Luna, Aderval Severino

    2005-06-01

    The determination of Hg in gasoline by cold vapor atomic absorption spectrometry, after direct aqueous NaBH 4 reduction in a three-component (microemulsion) medium, was investigated. Microemulsions were prepared by mixing gasoline with propan-1-ol and 50% v / v HNO 3 at a 20 : 15 : 1 volume ratio. A long-term homogeneous system was immediately formed this way. After reduction, the Hg vapor generated in a reaction flask was transported to an intermediate K 2Cr 2O 7/H 2SO 4 trap solution in order to avoid poisoning of the Au-Pt trap by the gasoline vapors. A second reduction step was then conducted and the generated Hg vapor transported to the Au-Pt trap, followed by thermal release of Hg 0 and atomic absorption measurement. Purified N 2 was used as purge and transport gas. After multivariate optimization by central composite design calibration graphs showed coefficients of correlation of 0.9999 and a characteristic mass of 2 ng was obtained. Typical coefficients of variation of 5% and 6% were found for ten consecutive measurements at concentration levels of 1 and 8 μg L -1 of Hg 2+, respectively. The limit of detection was 0.10 μg L -1 (0.14 μg kg -1) in the original sample. A total measurement cycle took 11 min, permitting duplicate analysis of 3 samples per hour. The results obtained with the proposed procedure in the analysis of commercial gasoline samples were in agreement with those obtained by a comparative procedure. Gasoline samples of the Rio de Janeiro city have shown Hg concentrations below 0.27 μg L -1.

  7. High-resolution continuum source electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry — An analytical and diagnostic tool for trace analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welz, Bernhard; Borges, Daniel L. G.; Lepri, Fábio G.; Vale, Maria Goreti R.; Heitmann, Uwe

    2007-09-01

    The literature about applications of high-resolution continuum source atomic absorption spectrometry (HR-CS AAS) with electrothermal atomization is reviewed. The historic development of HR-CS AAS is briefly summarized and the main advantages of this technique, mainly the 'visibility' of the spectral environment around the analytical line at high resolution and the unequaled simultaneous background correction are discussed. Simultaneous multielement CS AAS has been realized only in a very limited number of cases. The direct analysis of solid samples appears to have gained a lot from the special features of HR-CS AAS, and the examples from the literature suggest that calibration can be carried out against aqueous standards. Low-temperature losses of nickel and vanadyl porphyrins could be detected and avoided in the analysis of crude oil due to the superior background correction system. The visibility of the spectral environment around the analytical line revealed that the absorbance signal measured for phosphorus at the 213.6 nm non-resonance line without a modifier is mostly due to the PO molecule, and not to atomic phosphorus. The future possibility to apply high-resolution continuum source molecular absorption for the determination of non-metals is discussed.

  8. Determination of sulfur in coal and ash slurry by high-resolution continuum source electrothermal molecular absorption spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakadi, Flávio V.; Rosa, Lilian R.; da Veiga, Márcia A. M. S.

    2013-10-01

    We propose a procedure for the determination of sulfur in coal slurries by high resolution continuum source electrothermal molecular absorption spectrometry. The slurry, whose concentration is 1 mg mL- 1, was prepared by mixing 50 mg of the sample with 5% v/v nitric acid and 0.04% m/v Triton X-100 and was homogenized manually. It sustained good stability. The determination was performed via CS molecular absorption at 257.592 nm, and the optimized vaporization temperature was 2500 °C. The accuracy of the method was ensured by analysis of certified reference materials SRM 1632b (trace elements in coal) and SRM 1633b (coal fly ash) from the National Institute of Standards and Technology, using external calibration with aqueous standards prepared in the same medium and used as slurry. We achieved good agreement with the certified reference materials within 95% confidence interval, LOD of 0.01% w/w, and RSD of 6%, which confirms the potential of the proposed method.

  9. Liquid-phase microextraction combined with graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry: A review.

    PubMed

    de la Calle, Inmaculada; Pena-Pereira, Francisco; Lavilla, Isela; Bendicho, Carlos

    2016-09-14

    An overview of the combination of liquid-phase microextraction (LPME) techniques with graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GFAAS) is reported herein. The high sensitivity of GFAAS is significantly enhanced by its association with a variety of miniaturized solvent extraction approaches. LPME-GFAAS thus represents a powerful combination for determination of metals, metalloids and organometallic compounds at (ultra)trace level. Different LPME modes used with GFAAS are briefly described, and the experimental parameters that show an impact in those microextraction processes are discussed. Special attention is paid to those parameters affecting GFAAS analysis. Main issues found when coupling LPME and GFAAS, as well as those strategies reported in the literature to solve them, are summarized. Relevant applications published on the topic so far are included. PMID:27566338

  10. Expressing self-absorption in the analytical function of inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kántor, Tibor; Bartha, András

    2015-11-01

    The self-absorption of spectral lines was studied with up to date multi-element inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES) instrumentation using radial and axial viewing of the plasma, as well, performing line peak height and line peak area measurements. Two resonance atomic and ionic lines of Cd and Mg were studied, the concentration range was extended up to 2000 mg/L. At the varying analyte concentration, constant matrix concentration of 10,000 mg/L Ca was ensured in the pneumatically nebulized solutions. The physical and the phenomenological formulation of the emission analytical function is overviewed and as the continuity of the earlier results the following equation is offered:

  11. Arsenic in marine tissues — The challenging problems to electrothermal and hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karadjova, Irina B.; Petrov, Panayot K.; Serafimovski, Ivan; Stafilov, Trajče; Tsalev, Dimiter L.

    2007-03-01

    Analytical problems in determination of arsenic in marine tissues are addressed. Procedures for the determination of total As in solubilized or extracted tissues with tetramethylammonium hydroxide and methanol have been elaborated. Several typical lyophilized tissues were used: NIST SRM 1566a 'Oyster Tissue', BCR-60 CRM 'Trace Elements in an Aquatic Plant ( Lagarosiphon major)', BCR-627 'Forms of As in Tuna Fish Tissue', IAEA-140/TM 'Sea Plant Homogenate', NRCC DOLT-1 'Dogfish Liver' and two representatives of the Black Sea biota, Mediterranean mussel ( Mytilus galloprovincialis) and Brown algae ( Cystoseira barbata). Tissues (nominal 0.3 g) were extracted in tetramethylammonium hydroxide (TMAH) 1 ml of 25% m/v TMAH and 2 ml of water) or 5 ml of aqueous 80% v/v methanol (MeOH) in closed vessels in a microwave oven at 50 °C for 30 min. Arsenic in solubilized or extracted tissues was determined by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS) after appropriate dilution (nominally to 25 ml, with further dilution as required) under optimal instrumental parameters (pyrolysis temperature 900 °C and atomization temperature 2100 °C) with 1.5 μg Pd as modifier on Zr-Ir treated platform. Platforms have been pre-treated with 2.7 μmol of zirconium and then with 0.10 μmol of iridium which served as a permanent chemical modifier in direct ETAAS measurements and as an efficient hydride sequestration medium in flow injection hydride generation (FI-HG)-ETAAS. TMAH and methanol extract 96-108% and 51-100% of As from CRMs. Various calibration approaches have been considered and critically evaluated. The effect of species-dependent slope of calibration graph or standard additions plot for total As determination in a sample comprising of several individual As species with different ETAAS behavior has been considered as a kind of 'intrinsic element speciation interference' that cannot be completely overcome by standard additions technique. Calibration by means of CRMs has

  12. Determination of platinum and palladium in road dust after their separation on immobilized fungus by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woińska, Sylwia; Godlewska-Żyłkiewicz, Beata

    2011-07-01

    A flow solid phase extraction procedure based on biosorption of Pt(IV) and Pd(II) on Aspergillus sp. immobilized on cellulose resin Cellex-T was proposed for the separation and preconcentration of Pt and Pd before their determination by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS). The analytical conditions including sample pH, eluent type, flow rates of sample and eluent solutions were examined. The analytes were selectively retained on the biosorbent in acidic medium (pH 1) and subsequently eluted from the column with 1 mL of thiourea solution (0.25 mol L - 1 thiourea in 0.3 mol L - 1 HCl). The reproducibility of the procedure was below 5%. The limit of detection of the method was 0.020 ng mL - 1 for Pt and 0.012 ng mL - 1 for Pd. The method validation was performed by analysis of certified reference materials BCR-723 (tunnel dust) and SARM-76 (platinum ore). The developed separation procedure was applied to the determination of Pt and Pd in road dust samples by ETAAS. The applied biosorbent is characterized by high sorption capacity: 0.47 mg g - 1 for Pt and 1.24 mg g - 1 for Pd.

  13. Species selective preconcentration and quantification of gold nanoparticles using cloud point extraction and electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Hartmann, Georg; Schuster, Michael

    2013-01-25

    The determination of metallic nanoparticles in environmental samples requires sample pretreatment that ideally combines pre-concentration and species selectivity. With cloud point extraction (CPE) using the surfactant Triton X-114 we present a simple and cost effective separation technique that meets both criteria. Effective separation of ionic gold species and Au nanoparticles (Au-NPs) is achieved by using sodium thiosulphate as a complexing agent. The extraction efficiency for Au-NP ranged from 1.01 ± 0.06 (particle size 2 nm) to 0.52 ± 0.16 (particle size 150 nm). An enrichment factor of 80 and a low limit of detection of 5 ng L(-1) is achieved using electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ET-AAS) for quantification. TEM measurements showed that the particle size is not affected by the CPE process. Natural organic matter (NOM) is tolerated up to a concentration of 10 mg L(-1). The precision of the method expressed as the standard deviation of 12 replicates at an Au-NP concentration of 100 ng L(-1) is 9.5%. A relation between particle concentration and the extraction efficiency was not observed. Spiking experiments showed a recovery higher than 91% for environmental water samples. PMID:23312311

  14. An automatic countercurrent liquid-liquid micro-extraction system coupled with atomic absorption spectrometry for metal determination.

    PubMed

    Mitani, Constantina; Anthemidis, Aristidis N

    2015-02-01

    A novel and versatile automatic sequential injection countercurrent liquid-liquid microextraction (SI-CC-LLME) system coupled with atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS) is presented for metal determination. The extraction procedure was based on the countercurrent flow of aqueous and organic phases which takes place into a newly designed lab made microextraction chamber. A noteworthy feature of the extraction chamber is that it can be utilized for organic solvents heavier or lighter than water. The proposed method was successfully demonstrated for on-line lead determination and applied in environmental water samples using an amount of 120 μL of chloroform as extractant and ammonium diethyldithiophosphate as chelating reagent. The effect of the major experimental parameters including the volume of extractant, as well as the flow rate of aqueous and organic phases were studied and optimized. Under the optimum conditions for 6 mL sample consumption an enhancement factor of 130 was obtained. The detection limit was 1.5 μg L(-1) and the precision of the method, expressed as relative standard deviation (RSD) was 2.7% at 40.0 μg L(-1) Pb(II) concentration level. The proposed method was evaluated by analyzing certified reference materials and spiked environmental water samples. PMID:25435230

  15. Improvements in cobalt determination by thermospray flame furnace atomic absorption spectrometry using an on-line derivatization strategy.

    PubMed

    Matos, Geraldo Domingues; Arruda, Marco Aurélio Zezzi

    2008-07-15

    An on-line derivatization strategy was developed for improving cobalt sensitivity using thermospray flame furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (TS-FF-AAS) as the analytical technique. This strategy involves the generation of a volatile cobalt compound, providing better sample vaporization efficiency. The effect of sodium diethyldithiocarbamate (DDTC) as complexing agent on the integrated absorbance signal was evaluated. Parameters including the pH of complex formation, complex concentration and volume, sample volume, flame gas composition and tube atomization configuration were optimized. A wide linear range (from 23 microg L(-1) to 3 mg L(-1); r(2)=0.9786) was obtained, with the best one (r(2)=0.9992) attained from 23 to 400 microg L(-1) with a sample throughput of 30 h(-1). The improvement in the detection power was 17-fold when compared to FAAS, which provides 7 microg L(-1) as the limit of detection when considered TS-FF-AAS technique. A relative standard deviation (n=10) of 4% for a cobalt solution containing 50 microg L(-1) was attained, and the accuracy of the procedure was evaluated through certified reference materials (IAEA-SL-1, lake sediment; and ISS-MURST-A1, Antarctic marine sediment). Good agreement between the results at the 95% confidence level was observed. PMID:18585309

  16. Antibiotic toxicity and absorption in zebrafish using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Fan; Qin, Wei; Zhang, Jing-Pu; Hu, Chang-Qin

    2015-01-01

    Evaluation of drug toxicity is necessary for drug safety, but in vivo drug absorption is varied; therefore, a rapid, sensitive and reliable method for measuring drugs is needed. Zebrafish are acceptable drug toxicity screening models; we used these animals with a liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) method in a multiple reaction monitoring mode to quantify drug uptake in zebrafish to better estimate drug toxicity. Analytes were recovered from zebrafish homogenate by collecting supernatant. Measurements were confirmed for drugs in the range of 10-1,000 ng/mL. Four antibiotics with different polarities were tested to explore any correlation of drug polarity, absorption, and toxicity. Zebrafish at 3 days post-fertilization (dpf) absorbed more drug than those at 6 h post-fertilization (hpf), and different developmental periods appeared to be differentially sensitive to the same compound. By observing abnormal embryos and LD50 values, zebrafish embryos at 6 hpf were considered to be suitable for evaluating embryotoxicity. Also, larvae at 3 dpf were adapted to measure acute drug toxicity in adult mammals. Thus, we can exploit zebrafish to study drug toxicity and can reliably quantify drug uptake with LC-MS/MS. This approach will be helpful for future studies of toxicology in zebrafish. PMID:25938774

  17. Antibiotic Toxicity and Absorption in Zebrafish Using Liquid Chromatography-Tandem Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Fan; Qin, Wei; Zhang, Jing-Pu; Hu, Chang-Qin

    2015-01-01

    Evaluation of drug toxicity is necessary for drug safety, but in vivo drug absorption is varied; therefore, a rapid, sensitive and reliable method for measuring drugs is needed. Zebrafish are acceptable drug toxicity screening models; we used these animals with a liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) method in a multiple reaction monitoring mode to quantify drug uptake in zebrafish to better estimate drug toxicity. Analytes were recovered from zebrafish homogenate by collecting supernatant. Measurements were confirmed for drugs in the range of 10–1,000 ng/mL. Four antibiotics with different polarities were tested to explore any correlation of drug polarity, absorption, and toxicity. Zebrafish at 3 days post-fertilization (dpf) absorbed more drug than those at 6 h post-fertilization (hpf), and different developmental periods appeared to be differentially sensitive to the same compound. By observing abnormal embryos and LD50 values, zebrafish embryos at 6 hpf were considered to be suitable for evaluating embryotoxicity. Also, larvae at 3 dpf were adapted to measure acute drug toxicity in adult mammals. Thus, we can exploit zebrafish to study drug toxicity and can reliably quantify drug uptake with LC-MS/MS. This approach will be helpful for future studies of toxicology in zebrafish. PMID:25938774

  18. Determination of plutonium in environmental samples by AMS and alpha spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Hrnecek, E; Steier, P; Wallner, A

    2005-01-01

    Environmental samples from nuclear weapons test sites at the atolls of Mururoa and Fangataufa (French Polynesia, south Pacific) have been analyzed for their content of plutonium isotopes by applying the independent techniques of decay counting (Alpha Spectrometry) and accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS). Here, we propose the combination of both techniques which results in a maximum of information on the isotopic signature of Pu in environmental samples. Plutonium was chemically separated from the bulk material by anion exchange. (242)Pu was used as an internal standard for both AMS and alpha spectrometry. The samples for alpha spectrometry were prepared by micro-precipitation with NdF(3). After alpha spectrometry, the samples were reprocessed for AMS. Pu was co-precipitated with Fe(OH)(3) and finally, solid samples were prepared. At the VERA (Vienna Environmental Research Accelerator) facility, the various Pu isotopes were separated by their isotopic masses and quantified by the AMS technique. A good agreement of the results obtained from the AMS measurements was found with those obtained from Alpha Spectrometry. Overall, the data agree on average within 10% of each other. Isotope ratios for (238)Pu, (239)Pu and (240)Pu can be extracted from our investigations. Alpha spectrometry delivers data for the (238)Pu and the combination of ((239+240))Pu concentrations in those samples. In addition, the AMS technique provides information on the individual concentrations of (240)Pu and (239)Pu. PMID:15982894

  19. SPECIATION OF SELENIUM(IV) AND SELENIUM(VI) USING COUPLED ION CHROMATOGRAPHY: HYDRIDE GENERATION ATOMIC ABSORPTION SPECTROMETRY

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A simple method was developed to speciate inorganic selenium in the microgram per liter range using coupled ion chromatography-hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometry. Because of the differences in toxicity and adsorption behavior, determination of the redox states selenite, Se(IV), and s...

  20. Determination of cadmium and lead at low levels by using preconcentration at fullerene coupled to thermospray flame furnace atomic absorption spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pereira, M. G.; Pereira-Filho, E. R.; Berndt, H.; Arruda, M. A. Z.

    2004-04-01

    A new and sensitive method for Cd and Pb determinations, based on the coupling of thermospray flame furnace atomic absorption spectrometry and a preconcentrator system, was developed. The procedure comprised the chelating of Cd and Pb with ammonium pyrrolidinedithiocarbamate with posterior adsorption of the chelates on a mixture (40 mg) of C 60 and C 70 at a flow rate of 2.0 ml min -1. These chelates were eluted from the adsorbent by passing a continuous flow of ethanol (80% v/v) at 0.9 ml min -1 to a nickel tube placed in an air/acetylene flame. After sample introduction into the tube by using a ceramic capillary (0.5 mm i.d.), the analytical signals were registered as peak height. Under these conditions, improvement factors in detectability of 675 and 200 were obtained for Cd and Pb, respectively, when compared to conventional flame atomic absorption spectrometry. Spiked samples (mineral and tap waters) and drinking water containing natural concentrations of Cd were employed for evaluating accuracy by comparing the results obtained from the proposed methodology with those using electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry. In addition, certified reference materials (rye grass, CRM 281 and pig kidney, CRM 186) were also adopted for the accuracy tests. Due to the good linearity ranges for Cd (0.5-5.0 μg l -1) and Pb (10-250 μg l -1), samples with different concentrations could be analyzed. Detection limits of 0.1 and 2.4 μg l -1 were obtained for Cd and Pb, respectively, and RSD values <4.5% were observed ( n=10). Finally, a sample throughput of 24 determinations per hour was possible.

  1. Determination of some metal ions in various meat and baby food samples by atomic spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Daşbaşı, Teslima; Saçmacı, Şerife; Ülgen, Ahmet; Kartal, Şenol

    2016-04-15

    In this paper, we report a simple and rapid solid phase extraction system for the separation/preconcentration and determination of Cd(II), Co(II), Cu(II), Fe(III), Cr(III), Pb(II), and Zn(II) ions by flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS). This method is based upon the retention of metal ions on a column packed with poly[N-(3-methyl-1H-indole-1-yl)]-2-methacrylamide-co-2-acrylamido-2-methyl-1-propane sulphonic acid-co divinylbenzene] (MMAD) resin as a solid-phase extraction (SPE) sorbent at pH 8. At the optimized conditions, the limits of detection (3 s/b) between 0.12 and 1.6 μg L(-1), preconcentration factor of 100, and the relative standard deviation of ⩽1.8% were achieved (n=10). The accuracy of the method was verified by analyzing certified reference materials (CRMs) and performing recovery experiments. The developed method was successfully applied to the various natural water, meat products and baby food samples. The recoveries of analyte ions were found in added real samples and CRMs from 95% to 102%. PMID:26616930

  2. Automated continuous monitoring of inorganic and total mercury in wastewater and other waters by flow-injection analysis and cold-vapour atomic absorption spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Birnie, S. E.

    1988-01-01

    An automated continuous monitoring system for the determination of inorganic and total mercury by flow-injection analysis followed by cold-vapour atomic absorption spectrometry is described. The method uses a typical flow-injection manifold where digestion and reduction of the injected sample takes place. Mercury is removed by aeration from the flowing stream in a specially designed air-liquid separator and swept into a silica cell for absorption measurement at a wavelength of 253.7 nm. A calibration curve up to 10 μg Hg ml-1 using three different path length cells is obtained with a detection limit of 0.02 μg Hg ml-1. The sampling rate of an injection every 3 min produces 20 results per hour from a flowing stream. PMID:18925201

  3. Preconcentration of lead using solidification of floating organic drop and its determination by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Chamsaz, Mahmoud; Akhoundzadeh, Jeiran; Arbab-zavar, Mohammad Hossein

    2012-01-01

    A simple microextraction method based on solidification of a floating organic drop (SFOD) was developed for preconcentration of lead prior to its determination by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS). Ammonium pyrolidinedithiocarbamate (APDC) was used as complexing agent, and the formed complex was extracted into a 20 μL of 1-undecanol. The extracted complex was diluted with ethanol and injected into a graphite furnace. An orthogonal array design (OAD) with OA16 (45) matrix was employed to study the effects of different parameters such as pH, APDC concentration, stirring rate, sample solution temperature and the exposure time on the extraction efficiency. Under the optimized experimental conditions the limit of detection (based on 3 s) and the enhancement factor were 0.058 μg L−1 and 113, respectively. The relative standard deviation (RSD) for 8 replicate determinations of 1 μg L−1 of Pb was 8.8%. The developed method was validated by the analysis of certified reference materials and was successfully applied to the determination of lead in water and infant formula base powder samples. PMID:25685441

  4. [Determination of aluminum in wheat flour food by microwave digestion-high resolution continuum source graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry].

    PubMed

    Ren, Ting; Zhao, Li-jiao; Zhong, Ru-gang

    2011-12-01

    The contents of aluminum (Al) in four kinds of wheat flour food (noodle, dumpling wrapper, twisted cruller and soda biscuit) were determined by high resolution continuum source graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (HR-CS GFAAS) combined with microwave digestion. The samples were completely digested by the mixture of HNO3 and H2O2 in closed polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) vessels. The conditions for microwave digestion, pyrolysis temperature and atomization temperature were optimized. The optimum experimental conditions were determined as follows. The microwave digestion was performed with HNO3/H2O2 7:1 (volume ratio), microwave power 1000 W and 190 degrees C for 40 minutes. The optimum pyrolysis temperature was 1350 degrees C and the optimum atomization temperature was 2400 degrees C. Magnesium nitrate solution with the concentration of 1 g x L(-1) was used as the matrix modifier. The correlation coefficient for the standard curve was 0.9999, the relative standard deviation (RSD) was from 1.7% to 2.4%, and the recovery for the samples was from 98.16% to 102.67%. The assay method for the determination of Al in wheat flour food established in this study has referential importance for the constituent of the correlated food standards. PMID:22295801

  5. A new coupling of ionic liquid based-single drop microextraction with tungsten coil electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Xiaodong; Deng, Qingwen; Wang, Jiwei; Yang, Shengchun; Zhao, Xia

    2013-03-01

    In this work, an improved method of ionic liquid based-single drop microextraction (IL-SDME) preconcentration was firstly coupled with tungsten coil electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (W-coil ET-AAS) detection. The new coupling was developed and applied for the determination of ultra-trace cadmium. Experimental parameters influencing the performance of IL-SDME as well as instrumental conditions were studied systematically, including IL-drop volume, chelating agent concentration, pH, stirring rate and time, heating program of W-coil ET-AAS, flow rate of carrier gas. Under the optimal conditions, the limit of detection (LOD) for cadmium was 0.015 μg L-1 (sampling amount on W-coil was 10 μL). The sensitivity enhancement factor was 42, while the improvement factor of LOD was 33. The established method was applied to determine cadmium in standard reference materials of rice and real water samples successfully. The developed IL-SDME-W-coil ET-AAS coupling represents a simple, green and highly sensitive method for cadmium determination.

  6. Determination of molybdenum in plants by vortex-assisted emulsification solidified floating organic drop microextraction and flame atomic absorption spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oviedo, Jenny A.; Fialho, Lucimar L.; Nóbrega, Joaquim A.

    2013-08-01

    A fast and sensitive procedure for extraction and preconcentration of molybdenum in plant samples based on solidified floating organic drop microextraction combined with flame atomic absorption spectrometry and discrete nebulization was developed. 8-Hydroxyquinoline (8-HQ) was used as complexing agent. The experimental conditions established were: 0.5% m v- 1 of 8-HQ, 60 μL of 1-undecanol as the extractant phase, 2 min vortex extraction time, centrifugation for 2 min at 2000 rpm, 10 min into an ice bath and discrete nebulization by introducing 200 μL of solution. The calibration curve was linear from 0.02 to 4.0 mg L- 1 with a limit of detection of 4.9 μg L- 1 and an enhancement factor of 67. The relative standard deviations for ten replicate measurements of 0.05 and 1.0 mg L- 1 Mo were 6.0 and 14.5%, respectively. The developed procedure was applied for determining molybdenum in corn samples and accuracy was proved using certified reference materials.

  7. Determination of methylmercury by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry using headspace single-drop microextraction with in situ hydride generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gil, Sandra; Fragueiro, Sandra; Lavilla, Isela; Bendicho, Carlos

    2005-01-01

    A new method is proposed for preconcentration and matrix separation of methylmercury prior to its determination by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS). Generation of methylmercury hydride (MeHgH) from a 5-ml solution is carried out in a closed vial and trapped onto an aqueous single drop (3-μl volume) containing Pd(II) or Pt(IV) (50 and 10 mg/l, respectively). The hydrogen evolved in the headspace (HS) after decomposition of sodium tetrahydroborate (III) injected for hydride generation caused the formation of finely dispersed Pd(0) or Pt(0) in the drop, which in turn, were responsible for the sequestration of MeHgH. A preconcentration factor of ca. 40 is achieved with both noble metals used as trapping agents. The limit of detection of methylmercury was 5 and 4 ng/ml (as Hg) with Pd(II) or Pt(IV) as trapping agents, and the precision expressed as relative standard deviation was about 7%. The preconcentration system was fully characterised through optimisation of the following variables: Pd(II) or Pt(IV) concentration in the drop, extraction time, pH of the medium, temperatures of both sample solution and drop, concentration of salt in the sample solution, sodium tetrahydroborate (III) concentration in the drop and stirring rate. The method has been successfully validated against two fish certified reference materials (CRM 464 tuna fish and CRM DORM-2 dogfish muscle) following selective extraction of methylmercury in 2 mol/l HCl medium.

  8. Capillary Absorption Spectrometer for 13C Isotopic Composition of Pico to Subpico Molar Sample Quantities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moran, J.; Kelly, J.; Sams, R.; Newburn, M.; Kreuzer, H.; Alexander, M.

    2011-12-01

    Quick incorporation of IR spectroscopy based isotope measurements into cutting edge research in biogeochemical cycling attests to the advantages of a spectroscopy versus mass spectrometry method for making some 13C measurements. The simple principles of optical spectroscopy allow field portability and provide a more robust general platform for isotope measurements. We present results with a new capillary absorption spectrometer (CAS) with the capability of reducing the sample size required for high precision isotopic measurements to the picomolar level and potentially the sub-picomolar level. This work was motivated by the minute sample size requirements for laser ablation isotopic studies of carbon cycling in microbial communities but has potential to be a valuable tool in other areas of biological and geological research. The CAS instrument utilizes a capillary waveguide as a sample chamber for interrogating CO2 via near IR laser absorption spectroscopy. The capillary's small volume (~ 0.5 mL) combined with propagation and interaction of the laser mode with the entire sample reduces sample size requirements to a fraction of that accessible with commercially available IR absorption including those with multi-pass or ring-down cavity systems. Using a continuous quantum cascade laser system to probe nearly adjacent rovibrational transitions of different isotopologues of CO2 near 2307 cm-1 permits sample measurement at low analyte pressures (as low as 2 Torr) for further sensitivity improvement. A novel method to reduce cw-fringing noise in the hollow waveguide is presented, which allows weak absorbance features to be studied at the few ppm level after averaging 1,000 scans in 10 seconds. Detection limits down to the 20 picomoles have been observed, a concentration of approximately 400 ppm at 2 Torr in the waveguide with precision and accuracy at or better than 1 %. Improvements in detection and signal averaging electronics and laser power and mode quality are

  9. GAS CHROMATOGRAPHY/MATRIX ISOLATION - INFRARED SPECTROMETRY FOR AIR SAMPLE ANALYSIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report describes the application of gas chromatography/matrix- solation infrared (GC/MI-IR) spectrometry to the analysIs of environmental air sample extracts. Samples that were analyzed include extracts from woodsmoke-impacted air, XAD-2 blanks, indoor air, and carpet sample...

  10. Determination of inorganic and total mercury by vapor generation atomic absorption spectrometry using different temperatures of the measurement cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaercher, Luiz Eduardo; Goldschmidt, Fabiane; Paniz, José Neri Gottfried; de Moraes Flores, Érico Marlon; Dressler, Valderi Luiz

    2005-06-01

    A simple and inexpensive laboratory-built flow injection vapor generation system coupled to atomic absorption spectrometry (FI-VG AAS) for inorganic and total mercury determination has been developed. It is based on the vapor generation of total mercury and a selective detection of Hg 2 + or total mercury by varying the temperature of the measurement cell. Only the inorganic mercury is measured when the quartz cell is at room temperature, and when the cell is heated to 650 °C or higher the total Hg concentration is measured. The organic Hg concentration in the sample is calculated from the difference between the total Hg and Hg 2 + concentrations. Parameters such as the type of acid (HCl or HNO 3) and its concentration, reductant (NaBH 4) concentration, carrier solution (HCl) flow rate, carrier gas flow rate, sample volume and quartz cell temperature, which influence FI-VG AAS system performance, were systematically investigated. The optimized conditions for Hg 2 + and total Hg determinations were: 1.0 mol l - 1 HCl as carrier solution, carrier flow rate of 3.5 ml min - 1 , 0.1% (m/v) NaBH 4, reductant flow rate of 1.0 ml min - 1 and carrier gas flow rate of 200 ml min - 1 . The relative standard deviation (RSD) is lower than 5.0% for a 1.0 μg l - 1 Hg solution and the limit of quantification (LOQ, 10 s) is 55 ng g - 1 . Certified samples of dogfish muscle (DORM-1 and DORM-2) and non-certified fish samples were analyzed, using a 6.0 mol l - 1 HCl solution for analyte extraction. The Hg 2 + and CH 3Hg + concentrations found were in agreement with certified ones.

  11. Characterization of Interlayer Cs+ in Clay Samples Using Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry with Laser Sample Modification

    SciTech Connect

    G. S. Groenewold; R. Avci; C. Karahan; K. Lefebre; R. V. Fox; M. M. Cortez; A. K. Gianotto; J. Sunner; W. L. Manner

    2004-04-01

    Ultraviolet laser irradiation was used to greatly enhance the secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) detection of Cs+ adsorbed to soil consisting of clay and quartz. Imaging SIMS showed that the enhancement of the Cs+ signal was spatially heterogeneous: the intensity of the Cs+ peak was increased by factors up to 100 for some particles but not at all for others. Analysis of standard clay samples exposed to Cs+ showed a variable response to laser irradiation depending on the type of clay analyzed. The Cs+ abundance was significantly enhanced when Cs+-exposed montmorillonite was irradiated and then analyzed using SIMS, which contrasted with the behavior of Cs+-exposed kaolinite, which displayed no Cs+ enhancement. Exposed illitic clays displayed modest enhancement of Cs+ upon laser irradiation, intermediate between that of kaolinite and montmorillonite. The results for Cs+ were rationalized in terms of adsorption to interlayer sites within the montmorillonite, which is an expandable phyllosilicate. In these locations, Cs+ was not initially detectable using SIMS. Upon irradiation, Cs+ was thermally redistributed, which enabled detection using SIMS. Since neither the illite nor the kaolinite is an expandable clay, adsorption to inner-layer sites does not occur, and either modest or no laser enhancement of the Cs+ signal is observed. Laser irradiation also produced unexpected enhancement of Ti+ from illite and kaolinite clays that contained small quantities of Ti, which indicates the presence of microscopic titanium oxide phases in the clay materials.

  12. The microwave induced plasma with optical emission spectrometry (MIP-OES) in 23 elements determination in geological samples.

    PubMed

    Niedzielski, P; Kozak, L; Wachelka, M; Jakubowski, K; Wybieralska, J

    2015-01-01

    The article presents the optimisation, validation and application of the microwave induced plasma optical emission spectrometry (MIP-OES) dedicated for a routine determination of Ag, Al, B, Ba, Bi, Ca, Cd, Cr, Cu, Fe, Ga, In, K, Li, Mg, Mn, Mo, Na, Ni, Pb, Sr, Tl, Zn, in the geological samples. The three procedures of sample preparation has been proposed: sample digestion with the use of hydrofluoric acid for determination of total concentration of elements, extraction by aqua regia for determination of the quasi-total element concentration and extraction by hydrochloric acid solution to determine contents of the elements in acid leachable fraction. The detection limits were on the level 0.001-0.121 mg L(-1) (from 0.010-0.10 to 1.2-12 mg kg(-1) depend on the samples preparation procedure); the precision: 0.20-1.37%; accuracy 85-115% (for recovery for certified standards materials analysis and parallel analysis by independent analytical techniques: X-ray fluorescence (XRF) and flame absorption spectrometry (FAAS)). The conformity of the results obtained by MIP-OES analytical procedures with the results obtained by XRF and FAAS analysis allows to propose the procedures for studies of elemental composition of the fraction of the geological samples. Additionally, the MIP-OES technique is much less expensive than ICP techniques and much less time-consuming than AAS techniques. PMID:25476349

  13. Determination of 226Ra in urine samples by alpha spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Kehagia, K; Potiriadis, C; Bratakos, S; Koukouliou, V; Drikos, G

    2007-01-01

    A radiation protection system to assess the internal contamination of workers during decontamination activities in an abounded fertilizer industry in the region of Attika, Greece, has been implemented. This system concerns, among other radionuclides, 226Ra. Because of the low 226Ra activities in urine, alpha spectrometry was used as the determination method after radiochemical separation. Radium was co precipitated with lead sulphate and purified using anion and cation exchange techniques. The source for the alpha spectrometric measurement was prepared by the electrodeposition of radium, from an aqueous/ethanol solution, onto stainless steel. The tracer used was 229Th. The chemical yield and the activity concentration were calculated via its daughter radionuclide 217At. Using the time-evolution formulas to calculate the 217At growth from its parent radionuclide 225Ra, a computer software was developed. This software was incorporated in a database, which automatically calculates and stores the results. PMID:17827131

  14. Arsenic Speciation of Waters from the Aegean Region, Turkey by Hydride Generation: Atomic Absorption Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Çiftçi, Tülin Deniz; Henden, Emur

    2016-08-01

    Arsenic in drinking water is a serious problem for human health. Since the toxicity of arsenic species As(III) and As(V) is different, it is important to determine the concentrations separately. Therefore, it is necessary to develop an accurate and sensitive method for the speciation of arsenic. It was intended with this work to determine the concentrations of arsenic species in water samples collected from Izmir, Manisa and nearby areas. A batch type hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometer was used. As(V) gave no signal under the optimal measurement conditions of As(III). A certified reference drinking water was analyzed by the method and the results showed excellent agreement with the reported values. The procedure was applied to 34 water samples. Eleven tap water, two spring water, 19 artesian well water and two thermal water samples were analyzed under the optimal conditions. PMID:27236436

  15. Determination of trace amounts of tin in geological materials by atomic absorption spectrometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Welsch, E.P.; Chao, T.T.

    1976-01-01

    An atomic absorption method is described for the determination of traces of tin in rocks, soils, and stream sediments. A dried mixture of the sample and ammonium iodide is heated to volatilize tin tetraiodide -which is then dissolved in 5 % hydrochloric acid, extracted into TOPO-MIBK, and aspirated into a nitrous oxide-acetylene flame. The limit of determination is 2 p.p.m. tin and the relative standard deviation ranges from 2 to 14 %. Up to 20 % iron and 1000 p.p.m. Cu, Pb, Zn, Mn, Hg, Mo, V, or W in the sample do not interfere. As many as 50 samples can be easily analyzed per man-day. ?? 1976.

  16. Direct analysis of solids by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry using a second surface atomizer

    SciTech Connect

    Rettberg, T.M.; Holcombe, J.A.

    1986-06-01

    The direct graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometric analysis of solids using the second surface atomizer has been investigated. The atomizer features a gas-cooled Ta insert within the graphite furnace onto which the analyte can be condensed, after which atomization is performed by raising the furnace to a higher temperature and shutting off the coolant gas. The analyses were conducted on standard reference material fly ash, river sediment, and citrus leaves, in addition to filter paper samples. All analyses were conducted without sample pretreatment or use of matrix modifiers. Quantitation was done by using simple aqueous standards. By use of peak heights, the recoveries varied from 81% to 127%, although several determinations were within the certified concentration range. The procedures typically gave low background absorbances and peak shapes that were relatively independent of the original sample matrix.

  17. Direct analysis of samples by mass spectrometry: From elements to bio-molecules using laser ablation inductively couple plasma mass spectrometry and laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Perdian, David C.

    2009-01-01

    Mass spectrometric methods that are able to analyze solid samples or biological materials with little or no sample preparation are invaluable to science as well as society. Fundamental research that has discovered experimental and instrumental parameters that inhibit fractionation effects that occur during the quantification of elemental species in solid samples by laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry is described. Research that determines the effectiveness of novel laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometric methods for the molecular analysis of biological tissues at atmospheric pressure and at high spatial resolution is also described. A spatial resolution is achieved that is able to analyze samples at the single cell level.

  18. Application of dual-cloud point extraction for the trace levels of copper in serum of different viral hepatitis patients by flame atomic absorption spectrometry: A multivariate study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arain, Salma Aslam; Kazi, Tasneem G.; Afridi, Hassan Imran; Abbasi, Abdul Rasool; Panhwar, Abdul Haleem; Naeemullah; Shanker, Bhawani; Arain, Mohammad Balal

    2014-12-01

    An efficient, innovative preconcentration method, dual-cloud point extraction (d-CPE) has been developed for the extraction and preconcentration of copper (Cu2+) in serum samples of different viral hepatitis patients prior to couple with flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS). The d-CPE procedure was based on forming complexes of elemental ions with complexing reagent 1-(2-pyridylazo)-2-naphthol (PAN), and subsequent entrapping the complexes in nonionic surfactant (Triton X-114). Then the surfactant rich phase containing the metal complexes was treated with aqueous nitric acid solution, and metal ions were back extracted into the aqueous phase, as second cloud point extraction stage, and finally determined by flame atomic absorption spectrometry using conventional nebulization. The multivariate strategy was applied to estimate the optimum values of experimental variables for the recovery of Cu2+ using d-CPE. In optimum experimental conditions, the limit of detection and the enrichment factor were 0.046 μg L-1 and 78, respectively. The validity and accuracy of proposed method were checked by analysis of Cu2+ in certified sample of serum (CRM) by d-CPE and conventional CPE procedure on same CRM. The proposed method was successfully applied to the determination of Cu2+ in serum samples of different viral hepatitis patients and healthy controls.

  19. Investigation on binding of nitric oxide to horseradish peroxidase by absorption spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiang, Li; Zhu, Shuhua; Ma, Hongmei; Zhou, Jie

    2010-01-01

    Binding of nitric oxide to horseradish peroxidase (HRP) has been investigated by absorption spectrometry in 0.2 M anaerobic phosphate buffer solution (pH 7.4). Based on this binding equilibrium, a model equation for evaluating the binding constant of nitric oxide to HRP is developed and the binding constant is calculated to be (1.55 ± 0.06) × 10 4 M -1, indicating that HRP can form a stable complex with nitric oxide. The type of inhibition by nitric oxide is validated on the basis of studying initial reaction rates of HRP-catalyzed oxidation of guaiacol in the presence of hydrogen peroxide and nitric oxide. The inhibition mechanism is found to follow an apparent non-competitive inhibition by Lineweaver-Burk method. Based on this kinetic mechanism, the binding constant is also calculated to be (5.22 ± 0.06) × 10 4 M -1. The values of the binding constant determined by the two methods are almost identical. The non-competitive inhibition model is also applicable to studying the effect of nitric oxide on other metalloenzymes, which catalyze the two-substrate reaction with the "ping-pong" mechanism.

  20. Modular L-design of hydride atomizers for atomic absorption spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Řezáčová, Olga; Dědina, Jiří

    2009-07-01

    A novel modular L-shaped design of hydride atomizer for atomic absorption spectrometry is described. It makes it possible to replace the optical tube of the atomizer and, mainly, to employ optical tubes made also from other materials than fused quartz. The design is useful mainly for further improvement of hydride atomizers based on the multiatomizer concept. Employing selenium hydride as the analyte and arsine as the interferent, a preliminary evaluation of performance of three types of L-shaped multiatomizers based on various optical tubes in terms of sensitivity, linearity of calibration graph and resistance to atomization interferences is made. The "classical" T-shaped multiatomizer was employed as a reference. The L-shaped multiatomizer with the optical tube analogous to that employed in the "classical" T-shaped multiatomizer offers virtually the same performance as the reference multiatomizer. Optical tube made of fused quartz with holes with smaller diameters does not offer significantly better performance compared to the reference T-shaped multiatomizer. However, the L-shaped multiatomizer with optical tube fabricated from porous quartz glass overpowers all the other multiatomizers substantially in terms of the resistance against interferences: even the maximum As interferent concentration of 5 µg ml - 1 does not significantly influence the observed signal. This should be compared with multiatomizers based on plain fused quartz tubes with holes: tolerance limit around 0.5 µg ml - 1 ; interferent concentration of 1 µg ml - 1 causing 20% signal depression.

  1. Acid effects on the measurement of mercury by cold vapor atomic absorption spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Adeloju, S.B.; Mann, T.F.

    1987-07-01

    The influence of nitric, hydrochloric and sulfuric acids on the measurement of mercury by cold vapor atomic absorption spectrometry has been investigated. Small pre-reduction peaks associated with the instability of mercury were observed in solutions containing less than or equal to 12.5, < 2 and less than or equal to 12.5% v/v of each acid, respectively. Mercury was found to be most stable in greater than or equal to 2% v/v hydrochloric acid and the measured absorbance was not greatly influenced by varying concentration of the acid. The mercury absorbance measurements were more sensitive in solutions containing less than or equal to 6.3% v/v hydrochloric acid than in similar concentrations of nitric and sulfuric acids. The use of the three acids as a digestion mixture result in serious interference from nitrogen oxides. The interference was removed by use of expelling agents such as urea and sulfamic acid or overcome by use of excess stannous chloride, prior to the reduction of mercury(II) ions. The determination of mercury in NBS albacore tuna using both of these approaches to overcome the interference problem proved to be successful.

  2. Organic solvents as interferents in arsenic determination by hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometry with flame atomization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karadjova, Irina B.; Lampugnani, Leonardo; Dědina, Jiri; D'Ulivo, Alessandro; Onor, Massimo; Tsalev, Dimiter L.

    2006-05-01

    Interference effects of various organic solvents miscible with water on arsenic determination by hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometry have been studied. Arsine was chemically generated in continuous flow hydride generation system and atomized by using a flame atomizer able to operate in two modes: miniature diffusion flame and flame-in-flame. The effects of experimental variables and atomization mode were investigated: tetrahydroborate and hydrochloric acid concentrations, argon, hydrogen and oxygen supply rates for the microflame, and the distance from the atomization region to the observation zone. The nature of the species formed in the flame due to the pyrolysis of organic solvent vapors entering the flame volume together with arsine is discussed. The observed signal depression in the presence of organic solvents has been mainly attributed to the atomization interference due to heterogeneous gas-solid reaction between the free arsenic atoms and finely dispersed carbon particles formed by carbon radicals recombination. The best tolerance to interferences was obtained by using flame-in-flame atomization (5-10 ml min - 1 of oxygen flow rate), together with higher argon and hydrogen supply rates and elevated observation heights.

  3. Optimization of electrothermal atomization parameters for simultaneous multielement atomic absorption spectrometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Harnly, J.M.; Kane, J.S.

    1984-01-01

    The effect of the acid matrix, the measurement mode (height or area), the atomizer surface (unpyrolyzed and pyrolyzed graphite), the atomization mode (from the wall or from a platform), and the atomization temperature on the simultaneous electrothermal atomization of Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mn, Mo, Ni, V, and Zn was examined. The 5% HNO3 matrix gave rise to severe irreproducibility using a pyrolyzed tube unless the tube was properly "prepared". The 5% HCl matrix did not exhibit this problem, and no problems were observed with either matrix using an unpyrolized tube or a pyrolyzed platform. The 5% HCl matrix gave better sensitivities with a pyrolyzed tube but the two matrices were comparable for atomization from a platform. If Mo and V are to be analyzed with the other seven elements, a high atomization temperature (2700??C or greater) is necessary regardless of the matrix, the measurement mode, the atomization mode, or the atomizer surface. Simultaneous detection limits (peak height with pyrolyzed tube atomization) were comparable to those of conventional atomic absorption spectrometry using electrothermal atomization above 280 nm. Accuracies and precisions of ??10-15% were found in the 10 to 120 ng mL-1 range for the analysis of NBS acidified water standards.

  4. Human Vitamin B12 Absorption and Metabolism are Measured by Accelerator Mass Spectrometry Using Specifically Labeled 14C-Cobalamin

    SciTech Connect

    Carkeet, C; Dueker, S R; Lango, J; Buchholz, B A; Miller, J W; Green, R; Hammock, B D; Roth, J R; Anderson, P J

    2006-01-26

    There is need for an improved test of human ability to assimilate dietary vitamin B{sub 12}. Assaying and understanding absorption and uptake of B{sub 12} is important because defects can lead to hematological and neurological complications. Accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) is uniquely suited for assessing absorption and kinetics of {sup 14}C-labeled substances after oral ingestion because it is more sensitive than decay counting and can measure levels of carbon-14 ({sup 14}C) in microliter volumes of biological samples, with negligible exposure of subjects to radioactivity. The test we describe employs amounts of B{sub 12} in the range of normal dietary intake. The B{sub 12} used was quantitatively labeled with {sup 14}C at one particular atom of the DMB moiety by exploiting idiosyncrasies of Salmonellametabolism. In order to grow aerobically on ethanolamine, S. entericamust be provided with either pre-formed B{sub 12} or two of its precursors: cobinamide and dimethylbenzimidazole (DMB). When provided with {sup 14}C-DMB specifically labeled in the C2 position, cells produced {sup 14}C-B{sub 12} of high specific activity (2.1 GBq/mmol, 58 mCi/mmol) and no detectable dilution of label from endogenous DMB synthesis. In a human kinetic study, a physiological dose (1.5 mg, 2.2 KBq/59 nCi) of purified {sup 14}C-B{sub 12} was administered and showed plasma appearance and clearance curves consistent with the predicted behavior of the pure vitamin. This method opens new avenues for study of B{sub 12} assimilation.

  5. Application of wavelet transforms to determine peak shape parameters for interference detection in graphite-furnace atomic absorption spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadler, D. A.; Littlejohn, D.; Boulo, P. R.; Soraghan, J. S.

    1998-08-01

    A procedure to quantify the shape of the absorbance-time profile, obtained during graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry, has been used to detect interference effects caused by the presence of a concomitant salt. The quantification of the absorption profile is achieved through the use of the Lipschitz regularity, α0, obtained from the wavelet transform of the absorbance-time profile. The temporal position of certain features and their associated values of α0 provide a unique description of the shape of the absorbance-time profile. Changes to the position or values of α0 between standard and sample atomizations may be indicative of uncorrected interference effects. A weak, but linear, dependence was found of the value of α0 upon the analyte concentration for Cr and Cu. The ability of the Lipschitz regularity to detect interference effects was illustrated for Pb, Se and Cu. For Pb, the lowest concentration of NaCl added, 0.005% m/v, changed both the values of α0 and the peak height absorbance. For Se, no change in the peak height and peak area absorbance signals was detected up to a NaCl concentration of 0.25% m/v. The values of the associated Lipschitz regularities were found to be invariant to NaCl concentration up to this value. For Cu, a concentration of 0.05% m/v NaCl reduced the peak height and peak area absorbance signals by approximately 25% and significantly altered the values of α0.

  6. Gamma ray spectrometry of LDEF samples: Results of 1992 analyses

    SciTech Connect

    Winn, W.G.

    1993-09-01

    In January 1990, NASA retrieved the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF), which had orbited the Earth since April 1984. The satellite had become slightly radioactive due to cosmic exposure, and the SRTC Underground Counting Facility was used to analyze LDEF samples of Al and Ta for activations of {sup 22}Na, {sup 172}Lu, and {sup 173}Lu. Background steel trunnion samples, not irradiated in space, were analyzed for {sup 60}Co. This report summarizes results for 15 samples analyzed in 1992.

  7. A highly sensitive method for in vitro testing of fluorinated drug candidates using high-resolution continuum source molecular absorption spectrometry (HR-CS MAS).

    PubMed

    Würtenberger, Irene; Gust, Ronald

    2014-05-01

    We report here the development, optimization, and evaluation of a highly sensitive method for the determination of fluorine in biological matrices employing highresolution continuum source molecular absorption spectrometry (HR-CS MAS), suitable for pharmacological testing of fluorine-containing drug candidates. For this purpose, the most important parameters were studied in detail and subsequently optimized using a multivariate approach based on experimental design methodology. We developed a new approach employing a graphite tube lined with tantalum foil, thereby significantly enhancing sensitivity, while interferences from phosphorus monoxide (PO) molecular absorption due to the complex phosphate-rich matrix were completely eliminated. The limit of detection and the characteristic mass were 5.79 and 6.08 pg F, respectively. In order to evaluate the accuracy of the procedure, a recovery test was performed using spiked samples from three bioassays (i.e., DNA binding, protein binding, and cellular uptake) and the recovery rates ranged from 97.4 to 106.4%. The proposed method is applicable for preclinical in vitro testing of fluorinated drug molecules and thereby establishes HR-CS atomic absorption spectrometry instrumentation as a universal tool in medicinal chemistry. PMID:24760395

  8. Nanoliter Segmented-Flow Sampling Mass Spectrometry with Online Compartmentalization

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    We report a microfluidic device, using segmented flow in a two-phase system of immiscible liquids, which delivers aqueous droplets into a modified commercial mass spectrometer. The interface coupling the microfluidics to the mass spectrometer achieves up to 96% sample transfer efficiency to the vacuum chamber. Sample ionization is assisted by multipass infrared laser beam in the interface. The system achieves low femtomole detection limits of several analytes ranging from drugs to proteins. Sample ionization in this segmented-flow sampling was found to be remarkably insensitive to the presence of buffer salts and other matrices. PMID:24625074

  9. Nanoliter segmented-flow sampling mass spectrometry with online compartmentalization.

    PubMed

    Volný, Michael; Rolfs, Joelle; Hakimi, Bejan; Fryčák, Petr; Schneider, Thomas; Liu, Dingsheng; Yen, Gloria; Chiu, Daniel T; Tureček, František

    2014-04-01

    We report a microfluidic device, using segmented flow in a two-phase system of immiscible liquids, which delivers aqueous droplets into a modified commercial mass spectrometer. The interface coupling the microfluidics to the mass spectrometer achieves up to 96% sample transfer efficiency to the vacuum chamber. Sample ionization is assisted by multipass infrared laser beam in the interface. The system achieves low femtomole detection limits of several analytes ranging from drugs to proteins. Sample ionization in this segmented-flow sampling was found to be remarkably insensitive to the presence of buffer salts and other matrices. PMID:24625074

  10. Estimation of boron isotope ratios using high resolution continuum source atomic absorption spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiltsche, Helmar; Prattes, Karl; Zischka, Michael; Knapp, Günter

    2009-04-01

    In the production of 10B enriched steels, the production-recycling process needs to be closely monitored for inadvertent mix-up of materials with different B isotope levels. A quick and simple method for the estimation of boron isotope ratios in high alloyed steels using high resolution continuum source flame AAS (HR-CS-FAAS) was developed. On the 208.9 nm B line the wavelength of the peak absorption of 10B and 11B differs by 2.5 pm. The wavelength of the peak absorption of boron was determined by fitting a Gauss function through spectra simultaneously recorded by HR-CS-FAAS. It was shown that a linear correlation between the wavelength of the peak absorption and the isotope ratio exists and that this correlation is independent of the total boron concentration. Internal spectroscopic standards were used to compensate for monochromator drift and monochromator resolution changes. Accuracy and precision of the analyzed samples were thereby increased by a factor of up to 1.3. Three steel reference materials and one boric acid CRM, each certified for the boron isotope ratio were used to validate the procedure.

  11. Fractionation analysis of manganese and zinc in beers by means of two sorbent column system and flame atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Pohl, Pawel; Prusisz, Bartlomiej

    2007-03-15

    In the present article, a method of operational fractionation of Mn and Zn in beer using flame atomic absorption spectrometry was developed. The proposed fractionation scheme was based on use of a hydrophobic adsorbing resin Amberlite XAD7 (first column, 2g resin bed) connected in a series with a strong cation exchanger Dowex 50Wx4 (second column, 1g resin bed). After passing the samples of beers through the columns, distinct groupings of Mn and Zn species retained on the sorbents, i.e., hydrophobic fraction of polyphenols bound metal species and cationic metal species fraction, respectively, were determined in respective eluates obtained after complete recovery of Mn and Zn species with 10ml of 2.0moll(-1) HNO(3) (first column) and 10ml of 4.0moll(-1) HCl (second column). In addition, the effluents collected were analyzed prior to the evaluation of the third, residual fraction, presumably attributed to any hydrophilic anionic and inert metal species. The established fractionation patterns for Mn and Zn were discussed in reference to likely associations of metals with endogenous food bioligands and possible availability of the distinguished metal species classes. The quality of the results was proved by the recovery experiments. PMID:19071499

  12. Analysis of lead in 55 brands of dietary calcium supplements by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry after microwave digestion.

    PubMed

    Kim, Meehye; Kim, Changmin; Song, Insang

    2003-02-01

    The lead (Pb) contents of calcium (Ca) supplements available in Korea were determined by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry using Zeeman background correction and peak area mode. All samples were microwave-digested in concentrated HNO(3). Ammonium dihydrogen phosphate and magnesium nitrate were used as matrix modifiers. Fifty-five brands of Ca supplements were classified into seven categories based on the major composite: bone, milk, oyster/clam shell, egg shell, algae, shark cartilage and chelated. The mean Pb contents of Ca supplements were 1.1 microg g(-1) (coefficient of variation 5.7%), ranging from n.d. (not detected) to 6.7 microg g(-1). Ca supplements made of bone have the highest Pb contents (2.3 microg g(-1)) with a wide range (0.1-6.7 microg g(-1)). The results were similar to those reported in other countries. The mean daily intakes of Pb from the supplement could be about 5 microg (mean Pb concentration 1.1 microg g(-1) x mean daily intake 4.5 g) taking 2% of provisional tolerable daily intake that the FAO/WHO Joint Food Additive and Contaminants Committee has set to evaluate its safety. However, measures to prevent potentials of Pb toxicity from overtaking some Ca supplements should be considered. PMID:12623663

  13. Gamma ray spectrometry of LDEF samples at SRL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winn, W. G.

    1991-07-01

    A total of 31 samples from the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF), including materials of aluminum, vanadium, and steel trunnions were analyzed by ultra-low-level gamma spectroscopy. The study quantified particle induced activations of Na-22, Sc-46, Cr-51, Mn-54, Co-56, Co-57, Co-58, and Co-60. The samples of trunnion sections exhibited increasing activity toward the outer end of the trunnion and decreasing activity toward its radial center. The trunnion sections did not include end pieces, which have been reported to collect noticeable Be-7 on their leading surfaces. No significant Be-7 was detected in the samples analyzed. The Underground Counting Facility at Savannah River Laboratory (SRL) was used in this work. The facility is 50 ft. underground, constructed with low-background shielding materials, and operated as a clean room. The most sensitive analyses were performed with a 90 percent efficient HPGe gamma-ray detector, which is enclosed in a purged active/passive shield. Each sample was counted for one to six days in two orientations to yield more representative average activities for the sample. The non-standard geometries of the LDEF samples prompted the development of a novel calibration method, whereby the efficiency about the samples surfaces (measured with point sources) predicted the efficiency for the bulk sample.

  14. Speciation of methylcyclopentadienyl manganese tricarbonyl by high-performance liquid chromatography-diode laser atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Butcher, D J; Zybin, A; Bolshov, M A; Niemax, K

    1999-12-01

    Methylcyclopentadienyl manganese tricarbonyl (MMT) is a fuel additive that has been marketed for use in unleaded gasoline since December 1995. The widespread use of this additive has been suggested to cause health risks, but limitations in data regarding its degradation products and their toxicity prevent an accurate evaluation. To monitor the organomanganese compounds, it is clearly advantageous to employ low-cost, high-sensitivity, manganese-specific instrumentation to perform speciation. In this work, instrumentation fitting these criteria was obtained by the combination of high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with diode laser atomic absorption spectrometry (DLAAS) and was used to determine MMT, its nonmethylated derivative, cyclopentadienyl manganese tricarbonyl (CMT), and inorganic manganese. DLAAS was shown to be a versatile analytical technique for total Mn determination, with a detection limit of 1 ng/mL and a linear dynamic range (LDR) of almost 5 orders of magnitude. Analytical figures of merit for HPLC-DLAAS included a detection limit of 2 ng(as Mn)/mL, a LDR of 3 orders of magnitude, and an analysis time of three minutes. The organometallic compounds are characterized by rapid photolysis in sunlight, and hence, experiments were performed to evaluate whether normal laboratory lighting is suitable for their determination. Our results showed that normal laboratory protocols may be employed except that the organomanganese compounds should be stored away from light except during sample introduction procedures. The ability of the instrumentation to selectively preconcentrate organomanganese compounds while removing inorganic manganese was demonstrated. Sufficient resolution was obtained to determine a 20-fold excess of CMT compared with MMT. The ability of the system to do practical analysis was demonstrated by the accurate determination of MMT in spiked samples of gasoline, human urine, and tap water. These results demonstrate the suitability of

  15. Simultaneous flow injection preconcentration of lead and cadmium using cloud point extraction and determination by atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Silva, Edson Luiz; Roldan, Paulo Dos Santos

    2009-01-15

    A flow injection (FI) micelle-mediated separation/preconcentration procedure for the determination of lead and cadmium by flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS) has been proposed. The analytes reacted with 1-(2-thiazolylazo)-2-naphthol (TAN) to form hydrophobic chelates, which were extracted into the micelles of 0.05% (w/v) Triton X-114 in a solution buffered at pH 8.4. In the preconcentration stage, the micellar solution was continuously injected into a flow system with four mini-columns packed with cotton, glass wool, or TNT compresses for phase separation. The analytes-containing micelles were eluted from the mini-columns by a stream of 3molL(-1) HCl solution and the analytes were determined by FAAS. Chemical and flow variables affecting the preconcentration of the analytes were studied. For 15mL of preconcentrated solution, the enhancement factors varied between 15.1 and 20.3, the limits of detection were approximately 4.5 and 0.75microgL(-1) for lead and cadmium, respectively. For a solution containing 100 and 10microgL(-1) of lead and cadmium, respectively, the R.S.D. values varied from 1.6 to 3.2% (n=7). The accuracy of the preconcentration system was evaluated by recovery measurements on spiked water samples. The method was susceptible to matrix effects, but these interferences were minimized by adding barium ions as masking agent in the sample solutions, and recoveries from spiked sample varied in the range of 95.1-107.3%. PMID:18456398

  16. Determination of silicon and aluminum in silicon carbide nanocrystals by high-resolution continuum source graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Dravecz, Gabriella; Bencs, László; Beke, Dávid; Gali, Adam

    2016-01-15

    The determination of Al contaminant and the main component Si in silicon carbide (SiC) nanocrystals with the size-distribution of 1-8nm dispersed in an aqueous solution was developed using high-resolution continuum source graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (HR-CS-GFAAS). The vaporization/atomization processes were investigated in a transversally heated graphite atomizer by evaporating solution samples of Al and Si preserved in various media (HCl, HNO3). For Si, the best results were obtained by applying a mixture of 5µg Pd plus 5µg Mg, whereas for Al, 10µg Mg (each as nitrate solution) was dispensed with the samples, but the results obtained without modifier were found to be better. This way a maximum pyrolysis temperature of 1200°C for Si and 1300°C for Al could be used, and the optimum (compromise) atomization temperature was 2400°C for both analytes. The Si and Al contents of different sized SiC nanocrystals, dispersed in aqueous solutions, were determined against aqueous (external) calibration standards. The correlation coefficients (R values) of the calibrations were found to be 0.9963 for Si and 0.9991 for Al. The upper limit of the linear calibration range was 2mg/l Si and 0.25mg/l Al. The limit of detection was 3µg/l for Si and 0.5µg/l for Al. The characteristic mass (m0) was calculated to be 389pg Si and 6.4pg Al. The Si and Al content in the solution samples were found to be in the range of 1.0-1.7mg/l and 0.1-0.25mg/l, respectively. PMID:26592606

  17. Apparatus for preparing a sample for mass spectrometry

    DOEpatents

    Villa-Aleman, Eliel

    1994-01-01

    An apparatus for preparing a sample for analysis by a mass spectrometer system. The apparatus has an entry chamber and an ionization chamber separated by a skimmer. A capacitor having two space-apart electrodes followed by one or more ion-imaging lenses is disposed in the ionization chamber. The chamber is evacuated and the capacitor is charged. A valve injects a sample gas in the form of sample pulses into the entry chamber. The pulse is collimated by the skimmer and enters the ionization chamber. When the sample pulse passes through the gap between the electrodes, it discharges the capacitor and is thereby ionized. The ions are focused by the imaging lenses and enter the mass analyzer, where their mass and charge are analyzed.

  18. Apparatus for preparing a sample for mass spectrometry

    DOEpatents

    Villa-Aleman, E.

    1994-05-10

    An apparatus is described for preparing a sample for analysis by a mass spectrometer system. The apparatus has an entry chamber and an ionization chamber separated by a skimmer. A capacitor having two space-apart electrodes followed by one or more ion-imaging lenses is disposed in the ionization chamber. The chamber is evacuated and the capacitor is charged. A valve injects a sample gas in the form of sample pulses into the entry chamber. The pulse is collimated by the skimmer and enters the ionization chamber. When the sample pulse passes through the gap between the electrodes, it discharges the capacitor and is thereby ionized. The ions are focused by the imaging lenses and enter the mass analyzer, where their mass and charge are analyzed. 1 figures.

  19. Size separation method for absorption characterization in brown carbon: Application to an aged biomass burning sample

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Lorenzo, Robert A.; Young, Cora J.

    2016-01-01

    The majority of brown carbon (BrC) in atmospheric aerosols is derived from biomass burning (BB) and is primarily composed of extremely low volatility organic carbons. We use two chromatographic methods to compare the contribution of large and small light-absorbing BrC components in aged BB aerosols with UV-vis absorbance detection: (1) size exclusion chromatography (SEC) and (2) reverse phase high-performance liquid chromatography. We observe no evidence of small molecule absorbers. Most BrC absorption arises from large molecular weight components (>1000 amu). This suggests that although small molecules may contribute to BrC absorption near the BB source, analyses of aerosol extracts should use methods selective to large molecular weight compounds because these species may be responsible for long-term BrC absorption. Further characterization with electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (MS) coupled to SEC demonstrates an underestimation of the molecular size determined through MS as compared to SEC.

  20. Selective precipitation of potassium in seawater samples for improving the sensitivity of plain γ-ray spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrante, Marco; Nisi, Stefano; Laubenstein, Matthias; De Angelis, Francesco

    2015-08-01

    An analytical method is presented to reduce the amount of 40K in sea water samples, in order to lower its interference in γ-ray analysis below 1.4 MeV due to the Compton continuum. Sodium tetraphenylborate was used to successfully precipitate 40K in the samples. A custom procedure for precipitation of potassium was developed and it was evaluated for its selectivity, reproducibility and efficiency, using conventional analytical techniques such as atomic absorption spectrophotometry and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). This work has shown that the selective precipitation of potassium with sodium tetraphenylborate has led to a decrease of detection limit of radio nuclides such as 238U, 226Ra, 228Ra, 137Cs, 134Cs, 133I, 134I, 60Co in γ-analysis. In particular, the detection limit for nuclides with emissions in the energy window energy below 1400 keV is improved by almost one order of magnitude.

  1. Porosity estimation of alumina samples based on resonant backscattering spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mokhles Gerami, F.; Kakuee, O.; Mohammadi, S.

    2016-04-01

    In this work, columnar porous alumina samples were investigated using the 16O(α,α)16O resonance scattering at 3.045 MeV. If the incident energy is slightly above the resonance energy, a resonance peak appears in the energy spectra of the backscattered ions. The position and width of this peak for non-porous samples are mainly determined by the experimental setup, whilst for porous materials, the peak position shifts towards higher energies under certain conditions. This effect can be explained by the lower amount of material which the ions encounter along the backscattered trajectories. The energy shift of the resonance peak towards higher energies was revealed experimentally and discussed theoretically. The estimated porosities of the samples based on this energy shift were compared with those evaluated from the graphical analysis of the images obtained by field emission scanning electron microscopy.

  2. Sampling probe for microarray read out using electrospray mass spectrometry

    DOEpatents

    Van Berkel, Gary J.

    2004-10-12

    An automated electrospray based sampling system and method for analysis obtains samples from surface array spots having analytes. The system includes at least one probe, the probe including an inlet for flowing at least one eluting solvent to respective ones of a plurality of spots and an outlet for directing the analyte away from the spots. An automatic positioning system is provided for translating the probe relative to the spots to permit sampling of any spot. An electrospray ion source having an input fluidicly connected to the probe receives the analyte and generates ions from the analyte. The ion source provides the generated ions to a structure for analysis to identify the analyte, preferably being a mass spectrometer. The probe can be a surface contact probe, where the probe forms an enclosing seal along the periphery of the array spot surface.

  3. Tributyl phosphate as a sensitivity-enhancing solvent for organotin in carbon furnace atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Li, H; Gong, B; Matsumoto, K

    1996-07-01

    Tributyl phosphate (TBP) has been found to be a sensitivity-enhancing solvent for organotin compounds in graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry; (C(4)H(9))(2)Sn(O(2)CCH(3))(2), (C(4)H(9))(2)Sn(O(2)CC(11)H(23))(2), (C(4)H(9))(3)SnCl, and (C(4)H(9))(4)Sn all give 1 order of magnitude higher sensitivities in TBP than in toluene or ethyl acetate. The sensitivities are enhanced further 1-2 orders of magnitude in TBP, when PdCl(2)(CH(3)CN)(2) is added as a matrix modifier in the organic solvent. Among the four organotin compounds, (C(4)H(9))(2)Sn(O(2)CCH(3))(2) and (C(4)H(9))(2)Sn(O(2)CC(11)H(23))(2) give better sensitivities than (C(4)H(9))(3)SnCl and (C(4)H(9))(4)Sn in the absence of palladium in any organic solvent, which suggests that the oxygen atom in the tin compound might form tin oxides that are resistant to volatilization loss during ashing. Scanning electron microscopic, electrothermal vaporization ICPMS, and powder X-ray diffraction studies show that the final products before atomization include phosphorus-containing compounds Sn(2)P(2)O(7), SnP(2)O(7), and Pd(9)P(2), besides tin-palladium alloys, PdSn, Pd(3)Sn, Pd(2)Sn, Pd(3)Sn(2), and PdSn(3). These phosphorus-containing compounds would more efficiently stabilize tin and suppress tin vaporization loss during ashing, to give higher sensitivity. PMID:21619315

  4. Total Absorption Gamma-ray Spectrometer (TAGS) Intensity Distributions from INL's Gamma-Ray Spectrometry Center

    DOE Data Explorer

    Greenwood, R. E.

    A 252Cf fission-product source and the INL on-line isotope separator were used to supply isotope-separated fission-product nuclides to a total absorption -ray spectrometer. This spectrometer consisted of a large (25.4-cm diameter x 30.5-cm long) NaI(Tl) detector with a 20.3-cm deep axial well in which is placed a 300-mm2 x 1.0-mm Si detector. The spectra from the NaI(Tl) detector are collected both in the singles mode and in coincidence with the B-events detected in the Si detector. Ideally, this detector would sum all the energy of the B- rays in each cascade following the population of daughter level by B- decay, so that the event could be directly associated with a particular daughter level. However, there are losses of energy from attenuation of the rays before they reach the detector, transmission of rays through the detector, escape of secondary photons from Compton scattering, escape of rays through the detector well, internal conversion, etc., and the measured spectra are thus more complicated than the ideal case and the analysis is more complex. Analysis methods have been developed to simulate all of these processes and thus provide a direct measure of the B- intensity distribution as a function of the excitation energy in the daughter nucleus. These data yield more accurate information on the B- distribution than conventional decay-scheme studies for complex decay schemes with large decay energies, because in the latter there are generally many unobserved and observed but unplaced rays. The TAGS data have been analyzed and published [R. E. Greenwood et al., Nucl Instr. and metho. A390(1997)] for 40 fission product-nuclides to determine the B- intensity distributions. [Copied from the TAGS page at http://www.inl.gov/gammaray/spectrometry/tags.shtml]. Those values are listed on this page for quick reference.

  5. Preconcentration and Atomization of Arsane in a Dielectric Barrier Discharge with Detection by Atomic Absorption Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Novák, Petr; Dědina, Jiří; Kratzer, Jan

    2016-06-01

    Atomization of arsane in a 17 W planar quartz dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) atomizer was optimized, and its performance was compared to that of a multiple microflame quartz tube atomizer (MMQTA) for atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS). Argon, at a flow rate of 60 mL min(-1), was the best DBD discharge gas. Free As atoms were also observed in the DBD with nitrogen, hydrogen, and helium discharge gases but not in air. A dryer tube filled with NaOH beads placed downstream from the gas-liquid separator to prevent residual aerosol and moisture transport to the atomizer was found to improve the response by 25%. Analytical figures of merit were comparable, reaching an identical sensitivity of 0.48 s ng (-1) As in both atomizers and limits of detection (LOD) of 0.15 ng mL(-1) As in MMQTA and 0.16 ng mL(-1) As in DBD, respectively. Compared to MMQTA, DBD provided 1 order of magnitude better resistance to interference from other hydride-forming elements (Sb, Se, and Bi). Atomization efficiency in DBD was estimated to be 100% of that reached in the MMQTA. A simple procedure of lossless in situ preconcentration of arsane was developed. Addition of 7 mL min(-1) O2 to the Ar plasma discharge resulted in a quantitative retention of arsane in the optical arm of the DBD atomizer. Complete analyte release and atomization was reached as soon as oxygen was switched off. Preconcentration efficiency of 100% was observed, allowing a decrease of the LOD to 0.01 ng mL(-1) As employing a 300 s preconcentration period. PMID:27159266

  6. High-throughput liquid-absorption preconcentrator sampling methods

    DOEpatents

    Zaromb, S.

    1994-07-12

    A system for detecting trace concentrations of an analyte in air includes a preconcentrator for the analyte and an analyte detector. The preconcentrator includes an elongated tubular container comprising a wettable material. The wettable material is continuously wetted with an analyte-sorbing liquid which flows from one part of the container to a lower end. Sampled air flows through the container in contact with the wetted material with a swirling motion which results in efficient transfer of analyte vapors or aerosol particles to the sorbing liquid and preconcentration of traces of analyte in the liquid. The preconcentrated traces of analyte may be either detected within the container or removed therefrom for injection into a separate detection means or for subsequent analysis. 12 figs.

  7. High-throughput liquid-absorption preconcentrator sampling methods

    DOEpatents

    Zaromb, Solomon

    1994-01-01

    A system for detecting trace concentrations of an analyte in air includes a preconcentrator for the analyte and an analyte detector. The preconcentrator includes an elongated tubular container comprising a wettable material. The wettable material is continuously wetted with an analyte-sorbing liquid which flows from one part of the container to a lower end. Sampled air flows through the container in contact with the wetted material with a swirling motion which results in efficient transfer of analyte vapors or aerosol particles to the sorbing liquid and preconcentration of traces of analyte in the liquid. The preconcentrated traces of analyte may be either detected within the container or removed therefrom for injection into a separate detection means or for subsequent analysis.

  8. Coacervative extraction of trace lead from natural waters prior to its determination by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagarová, Ingrid; Bujdoš, Marek; Matúš, Peter; Kubová, Jana

    2013-10-01

    In this work, a relatively simple and sensitive method for separation/preconcentration of trace lead from natural waters prior to its determination by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry has been proposed. The method is based on the extraction of Pb-dithizone chelate with coacervates made up of lauric acid in the presence of potassium ions and methanol. Several important factors affecting extraction efficiency such as pH, concentration of lauric acid and dithizone, ionic strength, incubation and centrifugation time were investigated and optimized. After separation of aqueous bulk solution from surfactant-rich phase, the final extract was redissolved by using 500 μl of methanol acidified with 0.2 mol l- 1 HNO3. Under the optimized conditions (using initial sample volume of 10 ml), enrichment factor of 17.0, detection limit of 0.12 μg l- 1, quantification limit of 0.38 μg l- 1, relative standard deviation of 4.2% (for 2 μg l- 1 of Pb; n = 26), linearity of the calibration graph in the range of 0.5-4.0 μg l- 1 (with correlation coefficient better than 0.995) were achieved. The method was validated by the analysis of certified reference material (TMDA-61). Extraction recoveries for the CRM, spiked model solutions and spiked natural water samples were in the range of 91-96%. Finally, the method was applied to the separation/preconcentration and determination of trace lead in natural waters.

  9. Permanent modification in electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry — advances, anticipations and reality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsalev, Dimiter L.; Slaveykova, Vera I.; Lampugnani, Leonardo; D'Ulivo, Alessandro; Georgieva, Rositsa

    2000-05-01

    Permanent modification is an important recent development in chemical modification techniques which is promising in view of increasing sample throughput with 'fast' programs, reducing reagent blanks, preliminary elimination of unwanted modifier components, compatibility with on-line and in situ enrichment, etc. An overview of this approach based on the authors' recent research and scarce literature data is given, revealing both success and failure in studies with permanently modified surfaces (carbides, non-volatile noble metals, noble metals on carbide coatings, etc.), as demonstrated in examples of direct electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometric (ETAAS) applications to biological and environmental matrices and vapor generation (VG)-ETAAS coupling with in-atomizer trapping of hydrides and other analyte vapors. Permanent modifiers exhibit certain drawbacks and limitations such as: poorly reproducible treatment technologies — eventually resulting in poor tube-to-tube repeatability and double or multiple peaks; impaired efficiency compared with modifier addition to each sample aliquot; relatively short lifetimes; limitations imposed on temperature programs, the pyrolysis, atomization and cleaning temperatures being set somewhat lower to avoid excessive loss of modifier; applicability to relatively simple sample solutions rather than to high-salt matrices and acidic digests; side effects of overstabilization, etc. The most important niches of application appear to be the utilization of permanently modified surfaces in coupled VG-ETAAS techniques, analysis of organic solvents and extracts, concentrates and fractions obtained after enrichment and/or speciation separations and direct ETAAS determinations of highly volatile analytes in relatively simple sample matrices.

  10. Capillary absorption spectrometer and process for isotopic analysis of small samples

    DOEpatents

    Alexander, M. Lizabeth; Kelly, James F.; Sams, Robert L.; Moran, James J.; Newburn, Matthew K.; Blake, Thomas A.

    2016-03-29

    A capillary absorption spectrometer and process are described that provide highly sensitive and accurate stable absorption measurements of analytes in a sample gas that may include isotopologues of carbon and oxygen obtained from gas and biological samples. It further provides isotopic images of microbial communities that allow tracking of nutrients at the single cell level. It further targets naturally occurring variations in carbon and oxygen isotopes that avoids need for expensive isotopically labeled mixtures which allows study of samples taken from the field without modification. The method also permits sampling in vivo permitting real-time ambient studies of microbial communities.

  11. Amount-ratio determinations of water isotopologues by dual-laser absorption spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castrillo, Antonio; Dinesan, Hemanth; Casa, Giovanni; Galzerano, Gianluca; Laporta, Paolo; Gianfrani, Livio

    2012-11-01

    We propose a method for the measurements of the 17O/16O isotope amount ratio in water, based upon the use of a pair of offset-frequency locked extended-cavity diode lasers at 1.39 μm. This method enables one to acquire absorption spectra with an extremely high fidelity, exploiting the highly accurate, absolute, and repeatable frequency axis. One of the two lasers, namely the so-called slave laser, is continuously scanned across a pair of H216O and H217O lines at 7183.5 cm-1 and it interacts with a water vapor sample inside a multiple reflections cell, thus producing absorption spectra with a signal-to-noise ratio of the order of 4000 for a detection bandwidth of 1 kHz. The determination of the isotope amount ratio is performed through a careful analysis of the acquired spectra, by using semiclassical line profiles. In this respect, the influence of the choice of the line shape model is investigated. The experimental reproducibility of the spectrometer has been carefully assessed by means of an Allan variance analysis. Finally, the application of the Kalman filtering technique has shown that a precision of 0.6‰ can be achieved, from repeated spectral acquisitions over a time span of 6000 s.

  12. Isotope Enrichment Detection by Laser Ablation - Dual Tunable Diode Laser Absorption Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Anheier, Norman C.; Bushaw, Bruce A.

    2009-07-01

    The rapid global expansion of nuclear energy is motivating the expedited development of new safeguards technology to mitigate potential proliferation threats arising from monitoring gaps within the uranium enrichment process. Current onsite enrichment level monitoring methods are limited by poor sensitivity and accuracy performance. Offsite analysis has better performance, but this approach requires onsite hand sampling followed by time-consuming and costly post analysis. These limitations make it extremely difficult to implement comprehensive safeguards accounting measures that can effectively counter enrichment facility misuse. In addition, uranium enrichment by modern centrifugation leads to a significant proliferation threat, since the centrifuge cascades can quickly produce a significant quantity of highly enriched uranium (HEU). The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is developing an engineered safeguards approach having continuous aerosol particulate collection and uranium isotope analysis to provide timely detection of HEU production in a low enriched uranium facility. This approach is based on laser vaporization of aerosol particulate samples, followed by wavelength tuned laser diode spectroscopy, to characterize the 235U/238U isotopic ratio by subtle differences in atomic absorption wavelengths arising from differences in each isotope’s nuclear mass, volume, and spin (hyperfine structure for 235U). Environmental sampling media is introduced into a small, reduced pressure chamber, where a focused pulsed laser vaporizes a 10 to 20-µm sample diameter. The ejected plasma forms a plume of atomic vapor. A plume for a sample containing uranium has atoms of the 235U and 238U isotopes present. Tunable diode lasers are directed through the plume to selectively excite each isotope and their presence is detected by monitoring absorbance signals on a shot-to-shot basis. Single-shot detection sensitivity approaching the femtogram range and abundance uncertainty

  13. Speciation analysis of arsenic in biological matrices by automated hydride generation-cryotrapping-atomic absorption spectrometry with multiple microflame quartz tube atomizer (multiatomizer).

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper describes an automated system for the oxidation state specific speciation of inorganic and methylated arsenicals by selective hydride generation - cryotrapping- gas chromatography - atomic absorption spectrometry with the multiatomizer. The corresponding arsines are ge...

  14. Qualitative and quantitative analysis of environmental samples by laser-induced breakdown spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zorov, N. B.; Popov, A. M.; Zaytsev, S. M.; Labutin, T. A.

    2015-10-01

    The key achievements in the determination of trace amounts of components in environmental samples (soils, ores, natural waters, etc.) by laser-induced breakdown spectrometry are considered. Unique capabilities of this method make it suitable for rapid analysis of metals and alloys, glasses, polymers, objects of cultural heritage, archaeological and various environmental samples. The key advantages of the method that account for its high efficiency are demonstrated, in particular, a small amount of analyzed material, the absence of sample preparation, the possibility of local and remote analysis of either one or several elements. The use of chemometrics in laser-induced breakdown spectrometry for qualitative sample classification is described in detail. Various approaches to improving the figures of merit of quantitative analysis of environmental samples are discussed. The achieved limits of detection for most elements in geochemical samples are critically evaluated. The bibliography includes 302 references.

  15. Sample Preparation for Mass Spectrometry Imaging of Plant Tissues: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Yonghui; Li, Bin; Malitsky, Sergey; Rogachev, Ilana; Aharoni, Asaph; Kaftan, Filip; Svatoš, Aleš; Franceschi, Pietro

    2016-01-01

    Mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) is a mass spectrometry based molecular ion imaging technique. It provides the means for ascertaining the spatial distribution of a large variety of analytes directly on tissue sample surfaces without any labeling or staining agents. These advantages make it an attractive molecular histology tool in medical, pharmaceutical, and biological research. Likewise, MSI has started gaining popularity in plant sciences; yet, information regarding sample preparation methods for plant tissues is still limited. Sample preparation is a crucial step that is directly associated with the quality and authenticity of the imaging results, it therefore demands in-depth studies based on the characteristics of plant samples. In this review, a sample preparation pipeline is discussed in detail and illustrated through selected practical examples. In particular, special concerns regarding sample preparation for plant imaging are critically evaluated. Finally, the applications of MSI techniques in plants are reviewed according to different classes of plant metabolites. PMID:26904042

  16. New high temperature plasmas and sample introduction systems for analytical atomic emission and mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Montaser, A.

    1992-01-01

    New high temperature plasmas and new sample introduction systems are explored for rapid elemental and isotopic analysis of gases, solutions, and solids using mass spectrometry and atomic emission spectrometry. Emphasis was placed on atmospheric pressure He inductively coupled plasmas (ICP) suitable for atomization, excitation, and ionization of elements; simulation and computer modeling of plasma sources with potential for use in spectrochemical analysis; spectroscopic imaging and diagnostic studies of high temperature plasmas, particularly He ICP discharges; and development of new, low-cost sample introduction systems, and examination of techniques for probing the aerosols over a wide range. Refs., 14 figs. (DLC)

  17. Organic, inorganic and total mercury determination in fish by chemical vapor generation with collection on a gold gauze and electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duarte, Fábio Andrei; Bizzi, Cezar Augusto; Antes, Fabiane Goldschmidt; Dressler, Valderi Luiz; Flores, Érico Marlon de Moraes

    2009-06-01

    A method for organic, inorganic and total mercury determination in fish tissue has been developed using chemical vapor generation and collection of mercury vapor on a gold gauze inside a graphite tube and further atomization by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry. After drying and cryogenic grinding, potassium bromide and hydrochloric acid solution (1 mol L - 1 KBr in 6 mol L - 1 HCl) was added to the samples. After centrifugation, total mercury was determined in the supernatant. Organomercury compounds were selectively extracted from KBr solution using chloroform and the resultant solution was back extracted with 1% m/v L-cysteine. This solution was used for organic Hg determination. Inorganic Hg remaining in KBr solution was directly determined by chemical vapor generation electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry. Mercury vapor generation from extracts was performed using 1 mol L - 1 HCl and 2.5% m/v NaBH 4 solutions and a batch chemical vapor generation system. Mercury vapor was collected on the gold gauze heated resistively at 80 °C and the atomization temperature was set at 650 °C. The selectivity of extraction was evaluated using liquid chromatography coupled to chemical vapor generation and determination by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. The proposed method was applied for mercury analysis in shark, croaker and tuna fish tissues. Certified reference materials were used to check accuracy and the agreement was better than 95%. The characteristic mass was 60 pg and method limits of detection were 5, 1 and 1 ng g - 1 for organic, inorganic and total mercury, respectively. With the proposed method it was possible to analyze up to 2, 2 and 6 samples per hour for organic, inorganic and total Hg determination, respectively.

  18. Flow injection on-line dilution for zinc determination in human saliva with electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry detection.

    PubMed

    Burguera-Pascu, Margarita; Rodríguez-Archilla, Alberto; Burguera, José Luis; Burguera, Marcela; Rondón, Carlos; Carrero, Pablo

    2007-09-26

    An automated method is described for the determination of zinc in human saliva by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ET AAS) after on-line dilution of samples with a significant reduction of sample consumption per analysis (<0.4 mL including the dead volume of the system). In order to fulfill this aim without changing the sample transport conduits during the experiments, a flow injection (FI) dilution system was constructed. Its principal parts are: one propulsion device (peristaltic pump, PP) for either samples, standards or washing solution all located in an autosampler tray and for the surfactant solution (Triton X-100) used as diluent, and a two-position time based solenoid injector (TBSI(1)) which allowed the introduction of 10 microL of either solution in the diluent stream. To avoid unnecessary waste of samples, the TBSI(1) also permitted the recirculation of the solutions to their respective autosampler cups. The downstream diluted solution fills a home made sampling arm assembly. The sequential deposition of 20 microL aliquots of samples or standards on the graphite tube platform was carried out by air displacement with a similar time based solenoid injector (TBSI(2)). The dilution procedure and the injection of solutions into the atomizer are computer controlled and synchronized with the operation of the temperature program. Samples or standards solutions were submitted to two drying steps (at 90 and 130 degrees C), followed by pyrolysis and atomization at 700 and 1700 degrees C, respectively. The aqueous calibration was linear up to 120.0 microgL(-1) for diluted standard solutions/samples and its slope was similar (p>0.05) to the standard addition curve, indicating lack of matrix effect. The precision tested by repeated analysis of real saliva samples was less than 3% and the detection limit (3sigma) was of 0.35 microgL(-1). To test the accuracy of the proposed procedure, recovery tests were performed, obtaining mean recovery of added zinc of

  19. Ultra-violet and resonant laser ablation coupled with microwave induced plasma atomic emission spectrometry and determination of tin in nickel based alloys by electrothermal atomizer atomic absorption and laser excited atomic fluorescence spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xiaodong

    Chapter 1 reviews laser ablation in analytical atomic spectrometry. Laser ablation is categorized into two functions: one is used as a sample introduction method, the other function is used as a microprobe analysis method. Both fundamental and applicational aspects are reviewed with the citations of related papers. This chapter also serves as an introduction to the work which is described in chapter 2 and chapter 3 as laser ablation is a relatively new research area for the research group. In chapter 2, instrumentation for excimer (308nm) laser ablation of samples was coupled with a microwave induced plasma (MLP), and evaluated for its potential as an approach to solid sampling for atomic emission spectrometry. Operating parameters were optimized, and the effects of laser repetition rate and number of laser shots on the emission signal were investigated. The UV excimer laser removed more material than would be expected of an infrared laser of similar energy. The chromium detection limit in the solid steel sample was estimated to be about 500 mug/g. In chapter 3, a wavelength tunable optical parametric oscillator (OPO) laser was used to ablate a steel sample into the same apparatus described in chapter 2. The emission signal for the elements was selectively enhanced when the ablation wavelength was tuned to be in resonance with any atomic transition of that element. This was the first report of the observation of resonant ablation by use of optical detection, as prior reports of resonant ablation have used mass spectrometric detectors. Chapter 4 reviews the publications in laser excited atomic fluorescence spectrometry in recent eight years. The focus of the review is on recent development on new instruments and applications of this technique. Chapter 5 studies the determination of tin in nickel-based alloys with laser excited atomic fluorescence in a graphite furnace. Zeeman electrothermal atomizer atomic absorption spectrometry and inductively coupled plasma mass

  20. Application of High Resolution-Continuum Source Flame Atomic Absorption Spectrometry (HR-CS FAAS): determination of trace elements in tea and tisanes.

    PubMed

    Paz-Rodríguez, Beatriz; Domínguez-González, María Raquel; Aboal-Somoza, Manuel; Bermejo-Barrera, Pilar

    2015-03-01

    A new application of HR-CS FAAS (High Resolution-Continuum Source Flame Atomic Absorption Spectrometry) has been developed for the determination of several trace elements (Ca, Co, Cu, Fe, Mn, Ni, Na and Zn) in infusions made from tea, rooibos and tea with seaweed samples. The proposed methods are fast, inexpensive and show good performances: the mean analytical recovery was approximately 100%. The mean limit of detection was 29.4 μg/l, and the mean limit of quantification was 98.0 μg/l (both limits refer to the brewed samples). Due to the matrix effect observed, the standard addition method had to be applied. Preliminary classification (based on metal contents) using chemometric techniques such as PCA (Principal Component Analysis) and CA (Cluster Analysis), was successful for infusions made from rooibos and tea with seaweed, but inconclusive for black and green teas. PMID:25306375

  1. Model calculation of the characteristic mass for convective and diffusive vapor transport in graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bencs, László; Laczai, Nikoletta; Ajtony, Zsolt

    2015-07-01

    A combination of former convective-diffusive vapor-transport models is described to extend the calculation scheme for sensitivity (characteristic mass - m0) in graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GFAAS). This approach encompasses the influence of forced convection of the internal furnace gas (mini-flow) combined with concentration diffusion of the analyte atoms on the residence time in a spatially isothermal furnace, i.e., the standard design of the transversely heated graphite atomizer (THGA). A couple of relationships for the diffusional and convectional residence times were studied and compared, including in factors accounting for the effects of the sample/platform dimension and the dosing hole. These model approaches were subsequently applied for the particular cases of Ag, As, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Hg, Mg, Mn, Mo, Ni, Pb, Sb, Se, Sn, V and Zn analytes. For the verification of the accuracy of the calculations, the experimental m0 values were determined with the application of a standard THGA furnace, operating either under stopped, or mini-flow (50 cm3 min- 1) of the internal sheath gas during atomization. The theoretical and experimental ratios of m0(mini-flow)-to-m0(stop-flow) were closely similar for each study analyte. Likewise, the calculated m0 data gave a fairly good agreement with the corresponding experimental m0 values for stopped and mini-flow conditions, i.e., it ranged between 0.62 and 1.8 with an average of 1.05 ± 0.27. This indicates the usability of the current model calculations for checking the operation of a given GFAAS instrument and the applied methodology.

  2. Determination of total tin in silicate rocks by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Elsheimer, H.N.; Fries, T.L.

    1990-01-01

    A method is described for the determination of total tin in silicate rocks utilizing a graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometer with a stabilized-temperature platform furnace and Zeeman-effect background correction. The sample is decomposed by lithium metaborate fusion (3 + 1) in graphite crucibles with the melt being dissolved in 7.5% hydrochloric acid. Tin extractions (4 + 1 or 8 + 1) are executed on portions of the acid solutions using a 4% solution of tricotylphosphine oxide in methyl isobutyl ketone (MIBK). Ascorbic acid is added as a reducing agent prior to extraction. A solution of diammonium hydrogenphosphate and magnesium nitrate is used as a matrix modifier in the graphite furnace determination. The limit of detection is > 10 pg, equivalent to > 1 ??g l-1 of tin in the MIBK solution or 0.2-0.3 ??g g-61 in the rock. The concentration range is linear between 2.5 and 500 ??g l-1 tin in solution. The precision, measured as relative standard deviation, is < 20% at the 2.5 ??g l-1 level and < 7% at the 10-30 ??g l-1 level of tin. Excellent agreement with recommended literature values was found when the method was applied to the international silicate rock standards BCR-1, PCC-1, GSP-1, AGV-1, STM-1, JGb-1 and Mica-Fe. Application was made to the determination of tin in geological core samples with total tin concentrations of the order of 1 ??g g-1 or less.

  3. Novel sampling methods for use with thermal desorption ion trap mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Barshick, S.A.; Buchanan, M.V.

    1994-12-31

    Novel sampling approaches have been investigated to improve the analytical utility of thermal desorption Direct Sampling Ion Trap Mass Spectrometry (DSITMS). Because DSITMS involves the direct introduction of samples into an ion trap mass spectrometer, problems with detection capabilities (sensitivity and selectivity) can often occur when performing trace analysis in complex matrices. Various sampling approaches have been evaluated to improve thermal desorption detection capabilities and to extend the utilities of DSITMS methodologies without significantly increasing analysis times or the cost-effectiveness of DSITMS methods. Three sampling approaches have been investigated including solid phase microextraction (SPME), solid phase extraction columns (SPEC), and purge and trap.

  4. New high temperature plasmas and sample introduction systems for analytical atomic emission and mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Montaser, A.

    1990-01-01

    In this project, new high temperature plasmas and new sample introduction systems are developed for rapid elemental and isotopic analysis of gases, solutions, and solids using atomic emission spectrometry (AES) and mass spectrometry (MS). These devices offer promise of solving singularly difficult analytical problems that either exist now or are likely to arise in the future in the various fields of energy generation, environmental pollution, biomedicine and nutrition. Emphasis is being placed on: generation of annular, helium inductively coupled plasmas (He ICPs) that are suitable for atomization, excitation, and ionization of elements possessing high excitation and ionization energies, with the intent of enhancing the detecting powers of a number of elements; diagnostic studies of high-temperature plasmas to quantify their fundamental properties, with the ultimate aim to improve analytical performance of atomic spectrometry; development and characterization of new sample introduction systems that consume microliter or microgram quantities of samples, and investigation of new membrane separators for striping solvent from sample aerosol to reduce various interferences and to enhance sensitivity in plasma spectrometry.

  5. Multiwalled carbon nanotubes as a sorbent material for the solid phase extraction of lead from urine and subsequent determination by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peña Crecente, Rosa M.; Lovera, Carlha Gutiérrez; García, Julia Barciela; Méndez, Jennifer Álvarez; Martín, Sagrario García; Latorre, Carlos Herrero

    2014-11-01

    The determination of lead in urine is a way of monitoring the chemical exposure to this metal. In the present paper, a new method for the Pb determination by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS) in urine at low levels has been developed. Lead was separated from the undesirable urine matrix by means of a solid phase extraction (SPE) procedure. Oxidized multiwalled carbon nanotubes have been used as a sorbent material. Lead from urine was retained at pH 4.0 and was quantitatively eluted using a 0.7 M nitric acid solution and was subsequently measured by ETAAS. The effects of parameters that influence the adsorption-elution process (such as pH, eluent volume and concentration, sampling and elution flow rates) and the atomic spectrometry conditions have been studied by means of different factorial design strategies. Under the optimized conditions, the detection and quantification limits obtained were 0.08 and 0.26 μg Pb L- 1, respectively. The results demonstrate the absence of a urine matrix effect and this is the consequence of the SPE process carried out. Therefore, the developed method is useful for the analysis of Pb at low levels in real samples without the influence of other urine components. The proposed method was applied to the determination of lead in urine samples of unexposed healthy people and satisfactory results were obtained (in the range 3.64-22.9 μg Pb L- 1).

  6. A HUPO test sample study reveals common problems in mass spectrometry-based proteomics.

    PubMed

    Bell, Alexander W; Deutsch, Eric W; Au, Catherine E; Kearney, Robert E; Beavis, Ron; Sechi, Salvatore; Nilsson, Tommy; Bergeron, John J M

    2009-06-01

    We performed a test sample study to try to identify errors leading to irreproducibility, including incompleteness of peptide sampling, in liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry-based proteomics. We distributed an equimolar test sample, comprising 20 highly purified recombinant human proteins, to 27 laboratories. Each protein contained one or more unique tryptic peptides of 1,250 Da to test for ion selection and sampling in the mass spectrometer. Of the 27 labs, members of only 7 labs initially reported all 20 proteins correctly, and members of only 1 lab reported all tryptic peptides of 1,250 Da. Centralized analysis of the raw data, however, revealed that all 20 proteins and most of the 1,250 Da peptides had been detected in all 27 labs. Our centralized analysis determined missed identifications (false negatives), environmental contamination, database matching and curation of protein identifications as sources of problems. Improved search engines and databases are needed for mass spectrometry-based proteomics. PMID:19448641

  7. Analysis of low Z elements in various environmental samples with total reflection X-ray fluorescence (TXRF) spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoefler, H.; Streli, C.; Wobrauschek, P.; Óvári, M.; Záray, Gy.

    2006-11-01

    Recently there is a growing interest in low Z elements such as carbon, oxygen up to sulphur and phosphorus in biological specimen. Total reflection X-ray fluorescence (TXRF) spectrometry is a suitable technique demanding only very small amounts of sample. On the other side, the detection of low Z elements is a critical point of this analytical technique. Besides other effects, self absorption may occur in the samples, because of the low energy of the fluorescence radiation. The calibration curves might be not linear any longer. To investigate this issue water samples and samples from human cerebrospinal fluid were used to examine absorption effects. The linearity of calibration curves in dependence of sample mass was investigated to verify the validity of the thin film approximation. The special requirements to the experimental setup for low Z energy dispersive fluorescence analysis were met by using the Atominstitute's TXRF vacuum chamber. This spectrometer is equipped with a Cr-anode X-ray tube, a multilayer monochromator and a SiLi detector with 30 mm 2 active area and with an ultrathin entrance window. Other object on this study are biofilms, living on all subaqueous surfaces, consisting of bacteria, algae and fungi embedded in their extracellular polymeric substances (EPS). Many trace elements from the water are bound in the biofilm. Thus, the biofilm is a useful indicator for polluting elements. For biomonitoring purposes not only the polluting elements but also the formation and growth rate of the biofilm are important. Biofilms were directly grown on TXRF reflectors. Their major elements and C-masses correlated to the cultivation time were investigated. These measured masses were related to the area seen by the detector, which was experimentally determined. Homogeneity of the biofilms was checked by measuring various sample positions on the reflectors.

  8. Semi-permanent lutetium modifier for the determination of beryllium in urine by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burguera, J. L.; Burguera, M.; Rondón, C.; Carrero, P.

    1999-11-01

    The determination of beryllium using electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry with deuterium background correction in the presence of various isomorphous metals and Mg(NO 3) 2 was studied. While, Eu, Ir and Sm had no effect on the transient signals, the addition of Lu and Mg(NO 3) 2 improved the sensitivity of the beryllium signal with respect to that obtained in the absence of modifier. Although, Mg(NO 3) 2 has improved the signal with respect to its sensitivity, it also increased the tail and the background (BG) signals, specially when urine samples are under study. Whereas, when Lu was used the analytical signal is virtually free of BG interference indicating that the urine matrix interference was almost eliminated. Besides, the addition of 6 μg of Lu ensured that the signals were effectively constant for five firings following the furnace program, which included: three drying, and the pyrolysis, atomization, cleaning and cooling steps. The effect of some components, likely to interfere in the accurate determination of beryllium (such as: Al, Ca, Cl, Co, Cr, Fe, Mg and Mn) were investigated. At the physiological levels, most of these elements had no effect, except in the case of chloride when Mg(NO 3) 2 was used as modifier. In this case, the tolerance limit was of 3000 mg Cl - l -1. The characteristic masses were 1.19, 0.45 and 0.48 pg, when integrated absorbance was measured for beryllium without the addition of any modifier and in the presence of Lu and Mg(NO 3) 2, respectively. The limits of detection (3σ) were 85, 19 and 58 fg, respectively. The accuracy and precision with the use of Lu and Mg(NO 3) 2 was tested for the direct determination of beryllium in urine samples. Quantification was performed with aqueous standards. The results obtained for the determination of beryllium in reference materials (Trace Elements in Urine), together with good recovery of spiked analyte, using either Lu or Mg(NO 3) 2 modification demonstrate the applicability of

  9. Sample-matrix effects in infrared laser neutral desorption, multiphoton-ionization mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beavis, R. C.; Lindner, J.; Grotemeyer, J.; Schlag, E. W.

    1988-05-01

    Sample-matrix effects in laser evaporation of intact neutral molecules (LEIM) prior to multiphoton ionization mass spectrometry (MUPI MS) are studied. The results show that a strong influence exists in adding matrix materials to the sample upon the desorption step. Using sugars as matrix leads to a suppression of pyrolysis products in small peptides by the laser desorption. As a result mass spectrometric signals due to the pyrolysis products are avoided.

  10. Determination of lithium isotopes at natural abundance levels by atomic absorption spectrometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Meier, A.L.

    1982-01-01

    The relationships of the absorption of 6Li and 7Li hollow cathode lamp emissions are used to determine lithium isotopic composition in the natural abundance range of geologic materials. Absorption was found to have a nonlinear dependence upon total lithium concentration and isotopic composition. A method using nonlinear equations to describe the relationship of the absorption of 6Li and 7Li lamp radiation is proposed as a means of calculating isotopic composition that is independent of total lithium concentration.

  11. Atmospheric sampling glow discharge ionizataion and triple quadrupole tandem mass spectrometry for explosives vapor detection

    SciTech Connect

    McLuckey, S.A.; Goeringer, D.E.; Asano, K.G.; Hart, K.J.; Glish, G.L.; Grant, B.C.; Chambers, D.M.

    1993-08-01

    The detection and identification of trace vapors of hidden high explosives is an excellent example of a targeted analysis problem. It is desirable to push to ever lower levels the quantity or concentration of explosives material that provides an analytical signal, while at the same time discriminating against all other uninteresting material. The detection system must therefore combine high sensitivity with high specificity. This report describes the philosophy behind the use of atmospheric sampling glow discharge ionization, which is a sensitive, rugged, and convenient means for forming anions from explosives molecules, with tandem mass spectrometry, which provides unparalleled specificity in the identification of explosives-related ions. Forms of tandem mass spectrometry are compared and contrasted to provide a summary of the characteristics to be expected from an explosives detector employing mass spectrometry/mass spectrometry. The instrument developed for the FAA, an atmospheric sampling glow discharge/triple quadrupole mass spectrometer, is described in detail with particular emphasis on the ion source/spectrometer interface and on the capabilities of the spectrometer. Performance characteristics of the system are also described as they pertain to explosives of interest including a description of an automated procedure for the detection and identification of specific explosives. A comparison of various tandem mass spectrometers mated with atmospheric sampling glow discharge is then described and preliminary studies with a vapor preconcentration system provided by the FAA will be described.

  12. Analysis of environmental samples for explosives and explosives degradation products by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Gates, P.M.; Furlong, E.T.; Lindley, C.E.; Burkhardt, M.R.

    1994-12-31

    Nitroaromatic explosives and their degradation products are regulated water-soluble contaminants that may pose a hazard to human health and could be important water contaminants. The reliable identification of most explosives, in particular, the identification of degradation products, is a major shortcoming in most analytical methods. As an improvement, high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) (coupled to Thermospray) mass spectrometry was used to determine compound molecular weights, and tandem-mass spectrometry was applied to confirm molecular structure. Compounds were separated isocratically using methanol-water with an octadecylsilane HPLC column. The identities of known nitroaromatic explosives were confirmed by combined ultraviolet absorbance and negative ion mass spectra. For optimal detection of known compounds, selected ion monitoring mass spectrometry was used. Calibration curves fit quadratic models, with correlation coefficients typically exceeding 0.995 over two orders of magnitude. Instrument detection limits ranged from 2.5 to 10 nanograms per injection, resulting in method-detection limits from about 100 to 400 nanograms per liter for a typical water sample. Unknown analytes (indicated by optical spectra) were identified by full scan and tandem mass spectrometry experiments on sample extracts or isolated extract fractions. This combined ultraviolet-diode array mass spectrometric approach is a superior method for analyzing soil or water samples where known explosives and unknown degradation products might be present.

  13. Metal Speciation in the ppt Range by HPLC and Diode Laser Atomic Absorption Spectrometry in a Flame.

    PubMed

    Zybin, A; Schaldach, G; Berndt, H; Niemax, K

    1998-12-01

    A simple, compact, and powerful instrument for metal speciation in the ppt range is described. The instrument includes a HPLC module for separation and a diode laser for element-selective detection by wavelength modulation absorption spectrometry in an analytical flame. The high detection power for metal species is due to a two-beam arrangement with logarithmic amplification of the normalized signal, which compensates the laser residual amplitude modulation noise, the offset, and its fluctuation. The analytical figures of merit are demonstrated by measurements of very low concentrations of Cr(VI) in tap water. PMID:21644686

  14. [Determination of trace elements in Spirulina platensis (Notdst.) Geitl. by flame atomic absorption spectrometry combined with microsampling pulse nebulization technique].

    PubMed

    Cheng, Cun-Gui; Hong, Qing-Hong; Li, Dan-Ting; Fan, Meng-Hai; Cai, Xiao-Dan

    2006-09-01

    The contents of trace elements Ni, Zn, Mn, Cu, Mg, Fe, Ca and Pb in Spirulina platensis (Notdst.) Geitl. were determined by flame atomic absorption spectrometry combined with microsampling pulse nebulization technique. The results of the determination show that Spirulina platensis (Notdst.) Geitl. are rich in the inorganic elements such as Mg, Zn, Fe, Ca and Cu. Its recovery ratio obtained by standard addition method ranged between 96.58% and 106.12%, and its RSD was lower than 4.26%. The result will provide scientific data for the study on the trace elements in Spirulina platensis (Notdst.) Geitl. and on their relativity of efficacy of medicine. PMID:17112058

  15. Determination of Cu, Fe, Mn and Zn by flame atomic absorption spectrometry in multivitamin/multimineral dosage forms or tablets after an acidic extraction.

    PubMed

    Soriano, Sílvio; Netto, Annibal D Pereira; Cassella, Ricardo J

    2007-01-01

    This work presents the development of a methodology for the determination of Cu, Fe, Mn and Zn in samples of multivitamin/multimineral tablets, by flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS), after extraction of the analytes with diluted hydrochloric acid solution. Several parameters that could influence the extraction process such as acid extraction solution concentration and nature, mixing mode (ultrasonic or magnetic stirring), extraction time and sample composition were evaluated. The obtained results showed that Fe, Mn and Zn were easily extracted with 1 mol/L HCl solution after 5 min of mixing with either ultrasonic or magnetic stirring for all studied samples. On the other hand, Cu extraction appeared to be more complex since it could only be extracted at the same conditions for silicate-free samples. For samples containing silicates the time of contact between solid sample and extraction solution presented remarkable influence, being necessary up to 12 h to achieve quantitative recovery with 1 mol/L HCl solution. The developed methodology was applied in the determination of Cu, Fe, Mn and Zn in seven commercially available multivitamin/multimineral tablets. The results obtained with the developed method were compared with those obtained after total digestion of samples using a closed-vessel microwave oven device. PMID:16842959

  16. Nuclear chemistry of returned lunar samples: Nuclide analysis by gamma-ray spectrometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Okelley, G. D.

    1975-01-01

    Primordial and cosmogenic radionuclide concentrations are determined nondestructively by gamma-ray spectrometry in soil and rock samples from the returned Apollo 17 sample collection from Taurus-Littrow and Descartes. Geochemical evidence in support of field geology speculation concerning layering of the subfloor basalt flows is demonstrated along with a possible correlation of magmatic fractionation of K/U as a function of depth. The pattern of radionuclide concentrations observed in these samples is distinct due to proton bombardment by the intense solar flares of August 4-9, 1972. Such radionuclide determinations are used in determining lunar sample orientation and characterizing solar flare activity.

  17. Germanium determination by flame atomic absorption spectrometry: an increased vapor pressure-chloride generation system.

    PubMed

    Kaya, Murat; Volkan, Mürvet

    2011-03-15

    A new chloride generation system was designed for the direct, sensitive, rapid and accurate determination of the total germanium in complex matrices. It was aimed to improve the detection limit of chloride generation technique by increasing the vapor pressure of germanium tetrachloride (GeCl(4)). In order to do so, a novel joint vapor production and gas-liquid separation unit equipped with a home-made oven was incorporated to an ordinary nitrous oxide-acetylene flame atomic absorption spectrometer. Several variables such as reaction time, temperature and acid concentration have been investigated. The linear range for germanium determination was 0.1-10 ng mL(-1) for 1 mL sampling volume with a detection limit (3s) of 0.01 ng mL(-1). The relative standard deviation (RSD) was 2.4% for nine replicates of a 1 ng mL(-1) germanium solution. The method was validated by the analysis of one non-certified and two certified geochemical reference materials, respectively, CRM GSJ-JR-2 (Rhyolite), and GSJ-JR-1 (Rhyolite), and GBW 07107 (Chinese Rock). Selectivity of the method was investigated for Cd(2+), Co(2+), Cu(2+), Fe(3+), Ga(3+), Hg(2+), Ni(2+), Pb(2+), Sn(2+), and Zn(2+) ions and ionic species of As(III), Sb(III), Te(IV), and Se(IV). PMID:21315908

  18. Quantitation of vitamin B6 in biological samples by isotope dilution mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Hachey, D.L.; Coburn, S.P.; Brown, L.T.; Erbelding, W.F.; DeMark, B.; Klein, P.D.

    1985-11-15

    Methods have been developed for the simultaneous quantitative analysis of vitamin B6 forms in biological samples by isotope dilution mass spectrometry using deuterated forms of pyridoxine, pyridoxal, pyridoxamine, and pyridoxic acid. The biological fluid or tissue sample was homogenized and then treated with a cocktail containing appropriate amounts of each deuterated vitamer, as well as the deuterated, phosphorylated vitamer forms. The individual vitamers were isolated from the homogenate by a complex high-performance liquid chromatographic procedure that provided separate fractions for each of the six vitamers found in biological samples. Aldehydic B6 vitamers were reduced to the alcohol form prior to acetylation and analysis by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). The three resulting vitamers were analyzed by electron ionization GC/MS using a silicone capillary column. The methods have been applied to analysis of vitamin B6 in liver, milk, urine, and feces at levels as low as 0.02 nmol/ml.

  19. Feasibility of dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction for extraction and preconcentration of Cu and Fe in red and white wine and determination by flame atomic absorption spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seeger, Tassia S.; Rosa, Francisco C.; Bizzi, Cezar A.; Dressler, Valderi L.; Flores, Erico M. M.; Duarte, Fabio A.

    2015-03-01

    A method for extraction and preconcentration of Cu and Fe in red and white wines using dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (DLLME) and determination by flame atomic absorption spectrometry (F AAS) was developed. Extraction was performed using sodium diethyldithiocarbamate as chelating agent and a mixture of 40 μL of 1,2-dichlorobenzene (extraction solvent) and 900 μL of methanol (dispersive solvent). Some parameters that influencing the extraction efficiency such as pH (2 to 5), concentration of chelating agent (0 to 2%), effect of salt addition (0 to 10%), number of washing steps (1 to 4) and centrifugation time (0 to 15 min) were studied. Accuracy was evaluated after microwave-assisted digestion in closed vessels and analytes were determined by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry. Agreement with the proposed method ranged from 91 to 110 and from 89 to 113% for Cu and Fe, respectively. Calibration of F AAS instrument was performed using analyte addition method and limits of detection were 6.3 and 2.4 μg L- 1 for Cu and Fe, respectively. The proposed method was applied for the determination of Cu and Fe in five samples of red wine and three samples of white wine, with concentration ranging from 21 to 178 μg L- 1 and from 1.38 to 3.74 mg L- 1, respectively.

  20. Validation of an analytical method based on the high-resolution continuum source flame atomic absorption spectrometry for the fast-sequential determination of several hazardous/priority hazardous metals in soil

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The aim of this paper was the validation of a new analytical method based on the high-resolution continuum source flame atomic absorption spectrometry for the fast-sequential determination of several hazardous/priority hazardous metals (Ag, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Ni, Pb and Zn) in soil after microwave assisted digestion in aqua regia. Determinations were performed on the ContrAA 300 (Analytik Jena) air-acetylene flame spectrometer equipped with xenon short-arc lamp as a continuum radiation source for all elements, double monochromator consisting of a prism pre-monocromator and an echelle grating monochromator, and charge coupled device as detector. For validation a method-performance study was conducted involving the establishment of the analytical performance of the new method (limits of detection and quantification, precision and accuracy). Moreover, the Bland and Altman statistical method was used in analyzing the agreement between the proposed assay and inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry as standardized method for the multielemental determination in soil. Results The limits of detection in soil sample (3σ criterion) in the high-resolution continuum source flame atomic absorption spectrometry method were (mg/kg): 0.18 (Ag), 0.14 (Cd), 0.36 (Co), 0.25 (Cr), 0.09 (Cu), 1.0 (Ni), 1.4 (Pb) and 0.18 (Zn), close to those in inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry: 0.12 (Ag), 0.05 (Cd), 0.15 (Co), 1.4 (Cr), 0.15 (Cu), 2.5 (Ni), 2.5 (Pb) and 0.04 (Zn). Accuracy was checked by analyzing 4 certified reference materials and a good agreement for 95% confidence interval was found in both methods, with recoveries in the range of 94–106% in atomic absorption and 97–103% in optical emission. Repeatability found by analyzing real soil samples was in the range 1.6–5.2% in atomic absorption, similar with that of 1.9–6.1% in optical emission spectrometry. The Bland and Altman method showed no statistical significant difference

  1. Quantitative Caffeine Analysis Using a Surface Sampling Probe Electrospray Ionization Tandem Mass Spectrometry System

    SciTech Connect

    Ford, Michael J; Deibel, Michael A.; Tomkins, Bruce A; Van Berkel, Gary J

    2005-01-01

    Quantitative determination of caffeine on reversed-phase C8 thin-layer chromatography plates using a surface sampling electrospray ionization system with tandem mass spectrometry detection is reported. The thin-layer chromatography/electrospray tandem mass spectrometry method employed a deuterium-labeled caffeine internal standard and selected reaction monitoring detection. Up to nine parallel caffeine bands on a single plate were sampled in a single surface scanning experiment requiring 35 min at a surface scan rate of 44 {mu}m/s. A reversed-phase HPLC/UV caffeine assay was developed in parallel to assess the mass spectrometry method performance. Limits of detection for the HPLC/UV and thin-layer chromatography/electrospray tandem mass spectrometry methods determined from the calibration curve statistics were 0.20 ng injected (0.50 {mu}L) and 1.0 ng spotted on the plate, respectively. Spike recoveries with standards and real samples ranged between 97 and 106% for both methods. The caffeine content of three diet soft drinks (Diet Coke, Diet Cherry Coke, Diet Pepsi) and three diet sport drinks (Diet Turbo Tea, Speed Stack Grape, Speed Stack Fruit Punch) was measured. The HPLC/UV and mass spectrometry determinations were in general agreement, and these values were consistent with the quoted values for two of the three diet colas. In the case of Diet Cherry Coke and the diet sports drinks, the determined caffeine amounts using both methods were consistently higher (by 8% or more) than the literature values.

  2. Investigation of chemical modifiers for the direct determination of arsenic in fish oil using high-resolution continuum source graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Éderson R; de Almeida, Tarcísio S; Borges, Daniel L G; Carasek, Eduardo; Welz, Bernhard; Feldmann, Jörg; Campo Menoyo, Javier Del

    2016-04-01

    High-resolution continuum source graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (HR-CS GF AAS) has been applied for the development of a method for the determination of total As in fish oil samples using direct analysis. The method does not use any sample pretreatment, besides dilution with 1-propanole, in order to decrease the oil viscosity. The stability and sensitivity of As were evaluated using ruthenium and iridium as permanent chemical modifiers and palladium added in solution over the sample. The best results were obtained with ruthenium as the permanent modifier and palladium in solution added to samples and standard solutions. Under these conditions, aqueous standard solutions could be used for calibration for the fish oil samples diluted with 1-propanole. The pyrolysis and atomization temperatures were 1400 °C and 2300 °C, respectively, and the limit of detection and characteristic mass were 30 pg and 43 pg, respectively. Accuracy and precision of the method have been evaluated using microwave-assisted acid digestion of the samples with subsequent determination by HR-CS GF AAS and ICP-MS; the results were in agreement (95% confidence level) with those of the proposed method. PMID:26838392

  3. Development of a simple method for the determination of lead in lipstick using alkaline solubilization and graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Soares, Aline Rodrigues; Nascentes, Clésia Cristina

    2013-02-15

    A simple method was developed for determining the total lead content in lipstick samples by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GFAAS) after treatment with tetramethylammonium hydroxide (TMAH). Multivariate optimization was used to establish the optimal conditions of sample preparation. The graphite furnace heating program was optimized through pyrolysis and atomization curves. An aliquot containing approximately 50mg of the sample was mixed with TMAH and heated in a water bath at 60°C for 60 min. Using Nb as the permanent modifier and Pd as the chemical modifier, the optimal temperatures were 900°C and 1800°C for pyrolysis and atomization, respectively. Under optimum conditions, the working range was from 1.73 to 50.0 μg L(-1), with detection and quantification limits of 0.20 and 0.34 μg g(-1), respectively. The precision was evaluated under conditions of repeatability and intermediate precision and showed standard deviations of 2.37%-4.61% and 4.93%-9.75%, respectively. The % recovery ranged from 96.2% to 109%, and no significant differences were found between the results obtained using the proposed method and the microwave decomposition method for real samples. Lead was detected in 21 tested lipstick samples; the lead content in these samples ranged from 0.27 to 4.54 μg g(-1). PMID:23598019

  4. A fast and accurate microwave-assisted digestion method for arsenic determination in complex mining residues by flame atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Pantuzzo, Fernando L; Silva, Julio César J; Ciminelli, Virginia S T

    2009-09-15

    A fast and accurate microwave-assisted digestion method for arsenic determination by flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS) in typical, complex residues from gold mining is presented. Three digestion methods were evaluated: an open vessel digestion using a mixture of HCl:HNO(3):HF acids (Method A) and two microwave digestion methods using a mixture of HCl:H(2)O(2):HNO(3) in high (Method B) and medium-pressure (Method C) vessels. The matrix effect was also investigated. Arsenic concentration from external and standard addition calibration curves (at a 95% confidence level) were statistically equal (p-value=0.122) using microwave digestion in high-pressure vessel. The results from the open vessel digestion were statistically different (p-value=0.007) whereas in the microwave digestion in medium-pressure vessel (Method C) the dissolution of the samples was incomplete. PMID:19345010

  5. Evaluation of cadmium in greenhouse soils and agricultural products of Jiroft (Iran) using microwave digestion prior to atomic absorption spectrometry determination.

    PubMed

    Afzali, Daryoush; Fathirad, Fariba; Afzali, Zahra; Majdzadeh-Kermani, Seyed Mohammad Javad

    2015-03-01

    This study determines total levels of potentially toxic trace element, Cd (II) in Jiroft (Kerman, Iran) greenhouse soil and agricultural products that are grown in these greenhouses (tomatoes and cucumbers), and the comparison with soil outside of greenhouse using microwave digestion prior to flame atomic absorption spectrometry determination. The results show that the cadmium concentration in greenhouse soil is 0.9-1.9 mg kg(-1) and out of greenhouse is 0.4-1.0 mg kg(-1). Also, cadmium concentration range in tomatoes and cucumbers is about 0.07-0.40 mg kg(-1). The obtained results show that the concentration of this metal in greenhouse soil is higher than outside soil samples and is below the safe limit. PMID:25697307

  6. Investigation of Pb species in soils, celery and duckweed by synchrotron radiation X-ray absorption near-edge structure spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Liqiang; Shen, Yating; Liu, Jian; Zeng, Yuan

    2016-08-01

    The Pb species play a key role in its translocation in biogeochemical cycles. Soils, sediments and plants were collected from farmlands around Pb mines, and the Pb species in them was identified by X-ray absorption near-edge structure spectrometry. In soils, Pb5(PO4)3Cl and Pb3(PO4)2 were detected, and in sediments, Pb-fulvic acids (FAs) complex was identified. A Pb complex with FA fragments was also detected in celery samples. We found that (1) different Pb species were present in soils and sediments; (2) the Pb species in celery, which was grown in sediments, was different from the species present in duckweed, which grew in water; and (3) a Pb-FA-like compound was present in celery roots. The newly identified Pb species, the Pb-FA-like compound, may play a key role in Pb tolerance and translocation within plants.

  7. Temperature-controlled electrothermal atomization-atomic absorption spectrometry using a pyrometric feedback system in conjunction with a background monitoring device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Deijck, W.; Roelofsen, A. M.; Pieters, H. J.; Herber, R. F. M.

    The construction of a temperature-controlled feedback system for electrothermal atomization-atomic absorption spectrometry (ETA-AAS) using an optical pyrometer applied to the atomization stage is described. The system was used in conjunction with a fast-response background monitoring device. The heating rate of the furnace amounted to 1400° s -1 with a reproducibility better than 1%. The precision of the temperature control at a steady state temperature of 2000°C was 0.1%. The analytical improvements offered by the present system have been demonstrated by the determination of cadmium and lead in blood and finally by the determination of lead in serum. Both the sensitivity and the precision of the method have been improved. The accuracy of the method was checked by determining the lead content for a number of scrum samples both by ETA-AAS and differential pulse anodic stripping voltametry (DPASV) and proved to be satisfactory.

  8. Cold vapor-solid phase microextraction using amalgamation in different Pd-based substrates combined with direct thermal desorption in a modified absorption cell for the determination of Hg by atomic absorption spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romero, Vanesa; Costas-Mora, Isabel; Lavilla, Isela; Bendicho, Carlos

    2011-02-01

    In this work, different Pd-based substrates (i.e. Pd wire, Pd-coated stainless steel wire and Pd-coated SiO 2) are tried for microextraction of Hg prior to its release into a modified quartz T-cell so as to develop a cost-effective, sensitive and easy-to-handle coupling between solid-phase microextraction (SPME) and atomic absorption spectrometry. The new design allows a direct sample injection from the SPME device into a quartz T-cell thus avoiding analyte dilution. Mercury amalgamation onto a Pd wire provided the best performance in respect to sensitivity and fiber lifetime, but Pd wires could not be implemented in the SPME device due to their poor mechanical characteristics. On the contrary, Pd-coated SiO 2 fibers could be easily adapted to the typical sampling device used for SPME. Narrow time-dependent absorption signal profiles that could be integrated within 25 s were obtained. The detection limit was 90 pg mL -1 of Hg, and the repeatability expressed as relative standard deviation was 4.3%.

  9. Minimizing technical variation during sample preparation prior to label-free quantitative mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Scheerlinck, E; Dhaenens, M; Van Soom, A; Peelman, L; De Sutter, P; Van Steendam, K; Deforce, D

    2015-12-01

    Sample preparation is the crucial starting point to obtain high-quality mass spectrometry data and can be divided into two main steps in a bottom-up proteomics approach: cell/tissue lysis with or without detergents and a(n) (in-solution) digest comprising denaturation, reduction, alkylation, and digesting of the proteins. Here, some important considerations, among others, are that the reagents used for sample preparation can inhibit the digestion enzyme (e.g., 0.1% sodium dodecyl sulfate [SDS] and 0.5 M guanidine HCl), give rise to ion suppression (e.g., polyethylene glycol [PEG]), be incompatible with liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) (e.g., SDS), and can induce additional modifications (e.g., urea). Taken together, all of these irreproducible effects are gradually becoming a problem when label-free quantitation of the samples is envisioned such as during the increasingly popular high-definition mass spectrometry (HDMS(E)) and sequential window acquisition of all theoretical fragment ion spectra (SWATH) data-independent acquisition strategies. Here, we describe the detailed validation of a reproducible method with sufficient protein yield for sample preparation without any known LC-MS/MS interfering substances by using 1% sodium deoxycholate (SDC) during both cell lysis and in-solution digest. PMID:26302362

  10. Determination of total selenium in pharmaceutical and herbal supplements by hydride generation and graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Kazi, Tasneem G; Kolachi, Nida F; Afridi, Hassan I; Brahman, Kapil Dev; Shah, Faheem

    2014-01-01

    The total selenium (Se) was determined in herbal and pharmaceutical supplements used for liver diseases. The total Se contents were determined in different pharmaceutical and herbal supplements by hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometry (HGAAS) and graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GFAAS) after microwave-assisted acid digestion. The accuracy of the techniques was evaluated by using certified reference material and the standard addition method. The recoveries of total Se were 99.4 and 99.0% for HGAAS and GFAAS, respectively. The precision of the techniques expressed as RSD were 2.34 and 4.54% for HGAAS and GFAAS measurements, respectively. The LOD values for HGAAS and GFAAS were 0.025 and 0.052 pglg, respectively. The concentrations of Se in pharmaceutical and herbal supplements were found in the range of 19.2-53.8 and 25.0-42.5 pg/g, respectively, corresponding to 35-76% and 45-76% of the total recommended dose of Se for adults. PMID:25632445

  11. Analysis of volatile organic compounds in groundwater samples by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Bernhardt, J.

    1995-08-23

    The Savannah River Site contains approximately 1500 monitoring wells from which groundwater samples are collected. Many of these samples are sent off-site for various analyses, including the determination of trace volatile organic compounds (VOCs). This report describes accomplishments that have been made during the past year which will ultimately allow VOC analysis to be performed on-site using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Through the use of the on-site approach, it is expected that there will be a substantial cost savings. This approach will also provide split-sample analysis capability which can serve as a quality control measure for off-site analysis.

  12. Matrix elimination method for the determination of precious metals in ores using electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Salih, Bekir; Celikbiçak, Omür; Döker, Serhat; Doğan, Mehmet

    2007-03-28

    Poly(N-(hydroxymethyl)methacrylamide)-1-allyl-2-thiourea) hydrogels, poly(NHMMA-ATU), were synthesized by gamma radiation using (60)Co gamma source in the ternary mixture of NHMMA-ATU-H(2)O. These hydrogels were used for the specific gold, silver, platinum and palladium recovery, pre-concentration and matrix elimination from the solutions containing trace amounts of precious metal ions. Elimination of inorganic matrices such as different transition and heavy metal ions, and anions was performed by adjusting the solution pH to 0.5 that was the selective adsorption pH of the precious metal ions. Desorption of the precious metal ions was performed by using 0.8 M thiourea in 3M HCl as the most efficient desorbing agent with recovery values more than 95%. In the desorption medium, thiourea effect on the atomic signal was eliminated by selecting proper pyrolysis and atomization temperatures for all precious metal ions. Precision and the accuracy of the results were improved in the graphite furnace-atomic absorption spectrometer (GFAAS) measurements by applying the developed matrix elimination method performing the adsorption at pH 0.5. Pre-concentration factors of the studied precious metal ions were found to be at least 1000-fold. Detection limits of the precious metal ions were found to be less than 10 ng L(-1) of the all studied precious metal ions by using the proposed pre-concentration method. Determination of trace levels of the precious metals in the sea-water, anode slime, geological samples and photographic fixer solutions were performed using GFAAS clearly after applying the adsorption-desorption cycle onto the poly(NHMMA-UTU) hydrogels. PMID:17386783

  13. Electrothermal atomization atomic absorption spectrometry for the determination of lead in urine: results of an interlaboratory study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parsons, Patrick J.; Slavin, Walter

    1999-05-01

    Results of an interlaboratory study are reported for the determination of lead in urine. Two levels of a lyophilized material containing biologically-bound lead were prepared using pooled urine obtained from lead-poisoned children undergoing the CaNa 2EDTA mobilization test. The materials were circulated to a group of reference laboratories that participate in the `New York State Proficiency Testing Program for Blood Lead'. Results of the initial round-robin gave all-method consensus target values of 145±22 μg/l (S.D.) for lot 17 and 449±43 μg/l (S.D.) for lot 20. The interlaboratory exercise was repeated some 5 years later and consensus target values were re-calculated using the grand mean (excluding outliers) of results reported by laboratories using electrothermal atomization atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS). The re-calculated target values were 139±10 μg/l (S.D.) and 433±12 μg/l (S.D.). The urine reference materials were also analyzed for lead by several laboratories using other instrumental techniques including isotope dilution (ID), inductively coupled plasma (ICP) mass spectrometry (MS), flame atomic absorption with extraction, ICP-atomic emission spectrometry, ID-gas chromatography MS and flow injection-hydride generation AAS, thus providing a rich source of analytical data with which to characterize them. The materials were also used in a long-term validation study of an ETAAS method developed originally for blood lead determinations that has since been used unmodified for the determination of lead in urine also. Recently, urine lead method performance has been tracked in a proficiency testing program specifically for this analysis. In addition, a number of commercial control materials have been analyzed and evaluated.

  14. An Open Port Sampling Interface for Liquid Introduction Atmospheric Pressure Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Van Berkel, Gary J.; Kertesz, Vilmos

    2015-08-25

    RATIONALE: A simple method to introduce unprocessed samples into a solvent for rapid characterization by liquid introduction atmospheric pressure ionization mass spectrometry has been lacking. The continuous flow, self-cleaning open port sampling interface introduced here fills this void. METHODS: The open port sampling interface used a vertically aligned, co-axial tube arrangement enabling solvent delivery to the sampling end of the device through the tubing annulus and solvent aspiration down the center tube and into the mass spectrometer ionization source via the commercial APCI emitter probe. The solvent delivery rate to the interface was set to exceed the aspiration rate creating a continuous sampling interface along with a constant, self-cleaning spillover of solvent from the top of the probe. RESULTS: Using the open port sampling interface with positive ion mode APCI and a hybrid quadrupole time of flight mass spectrometer, rapid, direct sampling and analysis possibilities are exemplified with plastics, ballpoint and felt tip ink pens, skin, and vegetable oils. These results demonstrated that the open port sampling interface could be used as a simple, versatile and self-cleaning system to rapidly introduce multiple types of unprocessed, sometimes highly concentrated and complex, samples into a solvent flow stream for subsequent ionization and analysis by mass spectrometry. The basic setup presented here could be incorporated with any self-aspirating liquid introduction ionization source (e.g., ESI, APCI, APPI, ICP, etc.) or any type of atmospheric pressure sampling ready mass spectrometer system. CONCLUSIONS: The open port sampling interface provides a means to introduce and quickly analyze unprocessed solid or liquid samples with liquid introduction atmospheric pressure ionization source without fear of sampling interface or ionization source contamination.

  15. An Open Port Sampling Interface for Liquid Introduction Atmospheric Pressure Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Van Berkel, Gary J.; Kertesz, Vilmos

    2015-01-01

    RATIONALE: A simple method to introduce unprocessed samples into a solvent for rapid characterization by liquid introduction atmospheric pressure ionization mass spectrometry has been lacking. The continuous flow, self-cleaning open port sampling interface introduced here fills this void. METHODS: The open port sampling interface used a vertically aligned, co-axial tube arrangement enabling solvent delivery to the sampling end of the device through the tubing annulus and solvent aspiration down the center tube and into the mass spectrometer ionization source via the commercial APCI emitter probe. The solvent delivery rate to the interface was set to exceed the aspiration rate creating a continuous sampling interface along with a constant, self-cleaning spillover of solvent from the top of the probe. RESULTS: Using the open port sampling interface with positive ion mode APCI and a hybrid quadrupole time of flight mass spectrometer, rapid, direct sampling and analysis possibilities are exemplified with plastics, ballpoint and felt tip ink pens, skin, and vegetable oils. These results demonstrated that the open port sampling interface could be used as a simple, versatile and self-cleaning system to rapidly introduce multiple types of unprocessed, sometimes highly concentrated and complex, samples into a solvent flow stream for subsequent ionization and analysis by mass spectrometry. The basic setup presented here could be incorporated with any self-aspirating liquid introduction ionization source (e.g., ESI, APCI, APPI, ICP, etc.) or any type of atmospheric pressure sampling ready mass spectrometer system. CONCLUSIONS: The open port sampling interface provides a means to introduce and quickly analyze unprocessed solid or liquid samples with liquid introduction atmospheric pressure ionization source without fear of sampling interface or ionization source contamination.

  16. An Open Port Sampling Interface for Liquid Introduction Atmospheric Pressure Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Van Berkel, Gary J.; Kertesz, Vilmos

    2015-01-01

    RATIONALE: A simple method to introduce unprocessed samples into a solvent for rapid characterization by liquid introduction atmospheric pressure ionization mass spectrometry has been lacking. The continuous flow, self-cleaning open port sampling interface introduced here fills this void. METHODS: The open port sampling interface used a vertically aligned, co-axial tube arrangement enabling solvent delivery to the sampling end of the device through the tubing annulus and solvent aspiration down the center tube and into the mass spectrometer ionization source via the commercial APCI emitter probe. The solvent delivery rate to the interface was set to exceed the aspiration rate creatingmore » a continuous sampling interface along with a constant, self-cleaning spillover of solvent from the top of the probe. RESULTS: Using the open port sampling interface with positive ion mode APCI and a hybrid quadrupole time of flight mass spectrometer, rapid, direct sampling and analysis possibilities are exemplified with plastics, ballpoint and felt tip ink pens, skin, and vegetable oils. These results demonstrated that the open port sampling interface could be used as a simple, versatile and self-cleaning system to rapidly introduce multiple types of unprocessed, sometimes highly concentrated and complex, samples into a solvent flow stream for subsequent ionization and analysis by mass spectrometry. The basic setup presented here could be incorporated with any self-aspirating liquid introduction ionization source (e.g., ESI, APCI, APPI, ICP, etc.) or any type of atmospheric pressure sampling ready mass spectrometer system. CONCLUSIONS: The open port sampling interface provides a means to introduce and quickly analyze unprocessed solid or liquid samples with liquid introduction atmospheric pressure ionization source without fear of sampling interface or ionization source contamination.« less

  17. Electrospray ionization mass spectrometry from discrete nanoliter-sized sample volumes.

    PubMed

    Ek, Patrik; Stjernström, Mårten; Emmer, Asa; Roeraade, Johan

    2010-09-15

    We describe a method for nanoelectrospray ionization mass spectrometry (nESI-MS) of very small sample volumes. Nanoliter-sized sample droplets were taken up by suction into a nanoelectrospray needle from a silicon microchip prior to ESI. To avoid a rapid evaporation of the small sample volumes, all manipulation steps were performed under a cover of fluorocarbon liquid. Sample volumes down to 1.5 nL were successfully analyzed, and an absolute limit of detection of 105 attomole of insulin (chain B, oxidized) was obtained. The open access to the sample droplets on the silicon chip provides the possibility to add reagents to the sample droplets and perform chemical reactions under an extended period of time. This was demonstrated in an example where we performed a tryptic digestion of cytochrome C in a nanoliter-sized sample volume for 2.5 h, followed by monitoring the outcome of the reaction with nESI-MS. The technology was also utilized for tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) sequencing analysis of a 2 nL solution of angiotensin I. PMID:20740531

  18. Determination of impurities in (124)I samples by high resolution gamma spectrometry.

    PubMed

    de Almeida, M C M; da Silva, R L; Delgado, J U; Poledna, R; de Araújo, M T F; Laranjeira, A S; de Veras, E; Braghirolli, A M S; dos Santos, G R; Lopes, R T

    2016-03-01

    (124)I is a radionuclide used in the diagnosis of tumors. The National Health Agency requires identification and activity measurement of impurities. Using gamma spectrometry with an efficiency calibrated high-purity germanium detector, impurities (125)I and (126)I in an (1)(24)I production sample were identified. Activity ratios of (125)I and (126)I to (124)I were approximately 0.5% and 98%, respectively. PMID:26653211

  19. Novel ion imprinted magnetic mesoporous silica for selective magnetic solid phase extraction of trace Cd followed by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Bingshan; He, Man; Chen, Beibei; Hu, Bin

    2015-05-01

    Determination of trace Cd in environmental, biological and food samples is of great significance to toxicological research and environmental pollution monitoring. While the direct determination of Cd in real-world samples is difficult due to its low concentration and the complex matrix. Herein, a novel Cd(II)-ion imprinted magnetic mesoporous silica (Cd(II)-II-MMS) was prepared and was employed as a selective magnetic solid-phase extraction (MSPE) material for extraction of trace Cd in real-world samples followed by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GFAAS) detection. Under the optimized conditions, the detection limit of the proposed method was 6.1 ng L- 1 for Cd with the relative standard deviation (RSD) of 4.0% (c = 50 ng L- 1, n = 7), and the enrichment factor was 50-fold. To validate the proposed method, Certified Reference Materials of GSBZ 50009-88 environmental water, ZK018-1 lyophilized human urine and NIES10-b rice flour were analyzed and the determined values were in a good agreement with the certified values. The proposed method exhibited a robust anti-interference ability due to the good selectivity of Cd(II)-II-MMS toward Cd(II). It was successfully employed for the determination of trace Cd(II) in environmental water, human urine and rice samples with recoveries of 89.3-116%, demonstrating that the proposed method has good application potential in real world samples with complex matrix.

  20. Flow injection method for the rapid determination of chemical oxygen demand based on microwave digestion and chromium speciation in flame atomic absorption spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuesta, A.; Todoli, J. L.; Canals, A.

    1996-12-01

    The present paper describes a new flow injection method for the determination of Chemical Oxygen Demand (COD). This method consists of a first digestion step, where the sample is heated by microwave radiation, a second one where an anionic exchange resin retains the Cr(VI) that has not been reduced by the organic matter of the sample and a third one where Cr(VI), after being eluted, is determined by flame atomic absorption spectrometry. The microwave power applied, the sulphuric acid concentration, the liquid flow in the digestion step and the sample volume were the variables studied. The recovery and precision obtained with this method are similar to those obtained using a standard semi-micro method, whereas the throughput is much higher (up to 50 determinations per hour). As regards sensitivity, by changing the sample loop volume and the concentration of dichromate, one can analyze samples with Chemical Oxygen Demand values between 25 and 5000 mg/l. The limit of detection is about 7 mg/l COD. An interesting feature of the new method, which is not shared by most other flow injection methods of Chemical Oxygen Demand determination, is that there is no matrix effect in the determination step.

  1. Effect of magnesium acetylacetonate on the signal of organic forms of vanadium in graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Kowalewska, Zofia; Welz, Bernhard; Castilho, Ivan N B; Carasek, Eduardo

    2013-01-15

    The aim of this work was to investigate the influence of magnesium acetylacetonate (MgA) on the signal of organic forms of vanadium in xylene solution by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry. MgA alone or mixed with palladium acetylacetonate (PdA) was considered as a chemical modifier. It has been found that MgA does not improve, but decreases significantly the integrated absorbance of V in the form of alkyl-aryl sulfonates, acetylacetonates, porphyrins and in lubricating oils, while its effect is negligible in the case of "dark products" from petroleum distillation, i.e., heavy oil fractions and residues. The decrease is also observed in the presence of Pd. The MgA (or MgA+PdA) effect on the integrated absorbance of V has been studied using the following variants: different ways of modifier application, various pyrolysis temperature, additional application of air ashing, preliminary pretreatment with iodine and methyltrioctylammonium chloride, application of various graphite furnace heating systems (longitudinal or transverse) and various optical and background correction systems (medium-resolution line source spectrometer with deuterium background correction or high-resolution continuum source spectrometer). The experiments indicate formation of more refractory compounds as a possible reason for the decrease of the integrated absorbance for some forms of V in the presence of MgA. The application of MgA as a chemical modifier in V determination is not recommended. Results of this work have general importance as, apart from the intentional use of MgA as a modifier, organic Mg compounds, present in petroleum products for other reason (e.g. as an additive), can influence the signal of V compounds and hence the accuracy in V determination. Generally, petroleum products with known amount of V are recommended as standards; however, lubricating oils can be inadequate for "dark products" from petroleum distillation. In the case of unknown samples it is

  2. High explosives vapor detection by atmospheric sampling glow discharge ionization/tandem mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    McLuckey, S.A.; Goeringer, D.E.; Asano, K.G.

    1996-02-01

    The combination of atmospheric sampling glow discharge ionization with tandem mass spectrometry for the detection of traces of high explosives is described. Particular emphasis is placed on use of the quadrupole ion trap as the type of tandem mass spectrometer. Atmospheric sampling glow discharge provides a simple, rugged, and efficient means for anion formation while the quadrupole ion trap provides for efficient tandem mass spectrometry. Mass selective ion accumulation and non-specific ion activation methods can be used to overcome deleterious effects arising from ion/ion interactions. Such interactions constitute the major potential technical barrier to the use of the ion trap for real-time monitoring of targeted compounds in uncontrolled and highly variable matrices. Tailored waveforms can be used to effect both mass selective ion accumulation and ion activation. Concatenated tailored waveforms allow for both functions in a single experiment thereby providing the capability for monitoring several targeted species simultaneously. The combination of atmospheric sampling glow discharge ionization with a state-of-the-art analytical quadrupole ion trap is a highly sensitive and specific detector for traces of high explosives. The combination is also small and inexpensive relative to virtually any other form of tandem mass spectrometry. The science and technology underlying the glow discharge/ion trap combination is sufficiently mature to form the basis for an engineering effort to make the detector portable. 85 refs.

  3. High-resolution continuum source electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry: Linearization of the calibration curves within a broad concentration range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katskov, Dmitri; Hlongwane, Miranda; Heitmann, Uwe; Florek, Stefan

    2012-05-01

    The calculation algorithm suggested provides linearization of the calibration curves in high-resolution continuum source electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry. The algorithm is based on the modification of the function wavelength-integrated absorbance vs. concentration of analyte vapor in the absorption volume. According to the suggested approach, the absorption line is represented by a triangle for low and trapezium for high analyte vapor concentration in the absorption volume. The respective semi-empirical formulas include two linearization parameters, which depend on properties of the absorption line and characteristics of the atomizer and spectrometer. The parameters can be approximately evaluated from the theory and determined in practice from the original broad-range calibration curve. The parameters were found and the proposed calculation algorithm verified in the experiments on direct determination of Ag, Cd, Cu, Fe, Mn and Pb in the solutions within a concentration ranges from 0.15 to 625 μg·L- 1 using tube, platform tube and filter furnace atomizers. The use of various atomizers, lines, elements and atomization temperatures made possible the simulation of various practical analytical conditions. It was found that the algorithm and optimal linearization parameters made it possible to obtain for each line and atomizer linear approximations of the calibration curves within 3-4 orders of magnitude with correlation coefficients close to 0.999. The algorithm makes possible to employ a single line for the direct element determination over a broad concentration range. The sources of errors and the possibility of a priori theoretical evaluation of the linearization parameters are discussed.

  4. Quantification of absorption, retention and elimination of two different oral doses of vitamin A in Zambian boys using accelerator mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Aklamati, E K; Mulenga, M; Dueker, S R; Buchholz, B A; Peerson, J M; Kafwembe, E; Brown, K H; Haskell, M J

    2009-10-12

    A recent survey indicated that high-dose vitamin A supplements (HD-VAS) had no apparent effect on vitamin A (VA) status of Zambian children <5 y of age. To explore possible reasons for the lack of response to HD-VAS among Zambian children, we quantified the absorption, retention, and urinary elimination of either a single HDVAS (60 mg) or a smaller dose of stable isotope (SI)-labeled VA (5 mg), which was used to estimate VA pool size, in 3-4 y old Zambian boys (n = 4 for each VA dose). A 25 nCi tracer dose of [{sup 14}C{sub 2}]-labeled VA was co-administered with the HD-VAS or SI-labeled VA, and 24-hr stool and urine samples were collected for 3 and 7 consecutive days, respectively, and 24-hr urine samples at 4 later time points. Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) was used to measure the cumulative excretion of {sup 14}C in stool and urine 3d after dosing to estimate, respectively, absorption and retention of the VAS and SI-labeled VA. The urinary elimination rate (UER) was estimated by plotting {sup 14}C in urine vs. time, and fitting an exponential equation to the data. Estimates of mean absorption, retention and the UER were 83.8 {+-} 7.1%, 76.3 {+-} 6.7%, and 1.9 {+-} 0.6%/d, respectively, for the HD-VAS and 76.5 {+-} 9.5%, 71.1 {+-} 9.4%, and 1.8 {+-} 1.2%/d, respectively for the smaller dose of SI-labeled VA. Estimates of absorption, retention and the UER did not differ by size of the VA dose administered (P=0.26, 0.40, 0.88, respectively). Estimated absorption and retention were negatively associated with reported fever (P=0.011) and malaria (P =0.010). HD-VAS and SI-labeled VA were adequately absorbed, retained and utilized in apparently healthy Zambian preschool-age boys, although absorption and retention may be affected by recent infections.

  5. Final LDRD report : development of sample preparation methods for ChIPMA-based imaging mass spectrometry of tissue samples.

    SciTech Connect

    Maharrey, Sean P.; Highley, Aaron M.; Behrens, Richard, Jr.; Wiese-Smith, Deneille

    2007-12-01

    The objective of this short-term LDRD project was to acquire the tools needed to use our chemical imaging precision mass analyzer (ChIPMA) instrument to analyze tissue samples. This effort was an outgrowth of discussions with oncologists on the need to find the cellular origin of signals in mass spectra of serum samples, which provide biomarkers for ovarian cancer. The ultimate goal would be to collect chemical images of biopsy samples allowing the chemical images of diseased and nondiseased sections of a sample to be compared. The equipment needed to prepare tissue samples have been acquired and built. This equipment includes an cyro-ultramicrotome for preparing thin sections of samples and a coating unit. The coating unit uses an electrospray system to deposit small droplets of a UV-photo absorbing compound on the surface of the tissue samples. Both units are operational. The tissue sample must be coated with the organic compound to enable matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) and matrix enhanced secondary ion mass spectrometry (ME-SIMS) measurements with the ChIPMA instrument Initial plans to test the sample preparation using human tissue samples required development of administrative procedures beyond the scope of this LDRD. Hence, it was decided to make two types of measurements: (1) Testing the spatial resolution of ME-SIMS by preparing a substrate coated with a mixture of an organic matrix and a bio standard and etching a defined pattern in the coating using a liquid metal ion beam, and (2) preparing and imaging C. elegans worms. Difficulties arose in sectioning the C. elegans for analysis and funds and time to overcome these difficulties were not available in this project. The facilities are now available for preparing biological samples for analysis with the ChIPMA instrument. Some further investment of time and resources in sample preparation should make this a useful tool for chemical imaging applications.

  6. White light photothermal lens spectrophotometer for the determination of absorption in scattering samples.

    PubMed

    Marcano, Aristides; Alvarado, Salvador; Meng, Junwei; Caballero, Daniel; Moares, Ernesto Marín; Edziah, Raymond

    2014-01-01

    We developed a pump-probe photothermal lens spectrophotometer that uses a broadband arc-lamp and a set of interference filters to provide tunable, nearly monochromatic radiation between 370 and 730 nm as the pump light source. This light is focused onto an absorbing sample, generating a photothermal lens of millimeter dimensions. A highly collimated monochromatic probe light from a low-power He-Ne laser interrogates the generated lens, yielding a photothermal signal proportional to the absorption of light. We measure the absorption spectra of scattering dye solutions using the device. We show that the spectra are not affected by the presence of scattering, confirming that the method only measures the absorption of light that results in generation of heat. By comparing the photothermal spectra with the usual absorption spectra determined using commercial transmission spectrophotometers, we estimate the quantum yield of scattering of the sample. We discuss applications of the device for spectroscopic characterization of samples such as blood and gold nanoparticles that exhibit a complex behavior upon interaction with light. PMID:25014724

  7. Matrix-Assisted Plasma Atomization Emission Spectrometry for Surface Sampling Elemental Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Xin; Zhan, Xuefang; Li, Xuemei; Zhao, Zhongjun; Duan, Yixiang

    2016-01-01

    An innovative technology has been developed involving a simple and sensitive optical spectrometric method termed matrix-assisted plasma atomization emission spectrometry (MAPAES) for surface sampling elemental analysis using a piece of filter paper (FP) for sample introduction. MAPAES was carried out by direct interaction of the plasma tail plume with the matrix surface. The FP absorbs energy from the plasma source and releases combustion heating to the analytes originally present on its surface, thus to promote the atomization and excitation process. The matrix-assisted plasma atomization excitation phenomenon was observed for multiple elements. The FP matrix served as the partial energy producer and also the sample substrate to adsorb sample solution. Qualitative and quantitative determinations of metal ions were achieved by atomic emission measurements for elements Ba, Cu, Eu, In, Mn, Ni, Rh and Y. The detection limits were down to pg level with linear correlation coefficients better than 0.99. The proposed MAPAES provides a new way for atomic spectrometry which offers advantages of fast analysis speed, little sample consumption, less sample pretreatment, small size, and cost-effective. PMID:26762972

  8. Matrix-Assisted Plasma Atomization Emission Spectrometry for Surface Sampling Elemental Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Xin; Zhan, Xuefang; Li, Xuemei; Zhao, Zhongjun; Duan, Yixiang

    2016-01-01

    An innovative technology has been developed involving a simple and sensitive optical spectrometric method termed matrix-assisted plasma atomization emission spectrometry (MAPAES) for surface sampling elemental analysis using a piece of filter paper (FP) for sample introduction. MAPAES was carried out by direct interaction of the plasma tail plume with the matrix surface. The FP absorbs energy from the plasma source and releases combustion heating to the analytes originally present on its surface, thus to promote the atomization and excitation process. The matrix-assisted plasma atomization excitation phenomenon was observed for multiple elements. The FP matrix served as the partial energy producer and also the sample substrate to adsorb sample solution. Qualitative and quantitative determinations of metal ions were achieved by atomic emission measurements for elements Ba, Cu, Eu, In, Mn, Ni, Rh and Y. The detection limits were down to pg level with linear correlation coefficients better than 0.99. The proposed MAPAES provides a new way for atomic spectrometry which offers advantages of fast analysis speed, little sample consumption, less sample pretreatment, small size, and cost-effective.

  9. Matrix-Assisted Plasma Atomization Emission Spectrometry for Surface Sampling Elemental Analysis.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Xin; Zhan, Xuefang; Li, Xuemei; Zhao, Zhongjun; Duan, Yixiang

    2016-01-01

    An innovative technology has been developed involving a simple and sensitive optical spectrometric method termed matrix-assisted plasma atomization emission spectrometry (MAPAES) for surface sampling elemental analysis using a piece of filter paper (FP) for sample introduction. MAPAES was carried out by direct interaction of the plasma tail plume with the matrix surface. The FP absorbs energy from the plasma source and releases combustion heating to the analytes originally present on its surface, thus to promote the atomization and excitation process. The matrix-assisted plasma atomization excitation phenomenon was observed for multiple elements. The FP matrix served as the partial energy producer and also the sample substrate to adsorb sample solution. Qualitative and quantitative determinations of metal ions were achieved by atomic emission measurements for elements Ba, Cu, Eu, In, Mn, Ni, Rh and Y. The detection limits were down to pg level with linear correlation coefficients better than 0.99. The proposed MAPAES provides a new way for atomic spectrometry which offers advantages of fast analysis speed, little sample consumption, less sample pretreatment, small size, and cost-effective. PMID:26762972

  10. Assessment of Personality and Absorption for Mediated Environments in a College Sample.

    PubMed

    Parsons, Thomas D; Barnett, Michael; Melugin, Patrick R

    2015-12-01

    While technological advancement enhances the effectiveness and versatility of mediated environments, researchers have sought to better understand how endogenous characteristics of individuals relate to the ways in which mediated environments are experienced. Although the Big Five personality traits and absorption have shown marked relations with reports of immersion, further investigation of these traits is needed. In particular, there is need for a psychometrically sound model that integrates these concepts. The aim of this study was to build upon previous research looking at the Big Five personality traits, absorption, and immersion in a large sample of college-aged individuals. Results indicate that the Big Five traits of neuroticism, openness to experience, and extraversion are positively related to immersion and that openness to experience possesses the strongest relationship with immersive tendency overall. By integrating an established measure of absorption, a more psychometrically sound model was achieved. PMID:26652674

  11. Summary of gamma spectrometry on local air samples from 1985--1995

    SciTech Connect

    Winn, W.G.

    1997-04-02

    This report summarizes the 1985--1995 results of low-level HPGe gamma spectrometry analysis of high-volume air samples collected at the Aiken Airport, which is about 25 miles north of SRS. The author began analyzing these samples with new calibrations using the newly developed GRABGAM code in 1985. The air sample collections were terminated in 1995, as the facilities at the Aiken Airport were no longer available. Air sample measurements prior to 1985 were conducted with a different analysis system (and by others prior to 1984), and the data were not readily available. The report serves to closeout this phase of local NTS air sample studies, while documenting the capabilities and accomplishments. Hopefully, the information will guide other applications for this technology, both locally and elsewhere.

  12. HIGH RESOLUTION INDUCTIVELY COUPLED PLASMA MASS SPECTROMETRY ALLOWS RAPID ASSESSMENT OF IRON ABSORPTION IN INFANTS AND CHILDREN

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Stable isotope absorption studies of iron have been limited by the high cost and limited availability of isotope ratio analysis using thermal ionization MS (TIMS). The development of high-resolution double focusing inductively coupled plasma MS (ICP-MS) may permit more cost-efficient sample analysis...

  13. Determination of femtogram quantities of protactinium in geologic samples by thermal ionization mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Pickett, D.A.; Murrell, M.T.; Williams, R.W. )

    1994-04-01

    We describe a procedure for measurement of [sup 231]Pa in geologic samples by isotope dilution thermal ionization mass spectrometry, using [sup 233]Pa as a spike isotope, which provides marked improvements in precision and sample size relative to established decay counting techniques. This method allows determination of as little as a few tens of femtograms of [sup 231]Pa (approximately 10[sup 3] atoms) with a conservative estimated uncertainty of [+-]1% (95% confidence level). Applications of [sup 231]Pa-[sup 235]U systematics to uranium-series geochemistry and geochronology should be greatly enhanced by this approach. 31 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  14. Determination of uranium in aqueous attenuating samples using gamma-ray spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Chhavi; Kalsi, P C; Mhatre, A; Goswami, A

    2007-12-01

    In the present work, a method for determination of uranium concentration in aqueous solution in standard geometry from attenuating samples has been developed based on modification of the empirical approach of Venkataraman and Croft [2003. Determination of plutonium mass using gamma-ray spectrometry. Nucl. Instrum. Methods Phys. Res. A 505, 527-530]. The method makes use of the multiple gamma (gamma)-rays emitted by 235U and depends on the empirical relation between apparent mass of the sample and gamma-ray energy. It was possible to determine uranium concentration in the range of 12-400mg/ml rapidly by this method without applying transmission corrections. PMID:17768057

  15. Investigation of artifacts caused by deuterium background correction in the determination of phosphorus by electrothermal atomization using high-resolution continuum source atomic absorption spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dessuy, Morgana B.; Vale, Maria Goreti R.; Lepri, Fábio G.; Borges, Daniel L. G.; Welz, Bernhard; Silva, Márcia M.; Heitmann, Uwe

    2008-02-01

    The artifacts created in the measurement of phosphorus at the 213.6-nm non-resonance line by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry using line source atomic absorption spectrometry (LS AAS) and deuterium lamp background correction (D 2 BC) have been investigated using high-resolution continuum source atomic absorption spectrometry (HR-CS AAS). The absorbance signals and the analytical curves obtained by LS AAS without and with D 2 BC, and with HR-CS AAS without and with automatic correction for continuous background absorption, and also with least-squares background correction for molecular absorption with rotational fine structure were compared. The molecular absorption due to the suboxide PO that exhibits pronounced fine structure could not be corrected by the D 2 BC system, causing significant overcorrection. Among the investigated chemical modifiers, NaF, La, Pd and Pd + Ca, the Pd modifier resulted in the best agreement of the results obtained with LS AAS and HR-CS AAS. However, a 15% to 100% higher sensitivity, expressed as slope of the analytical curve, was obtained for LS AAS compared to HR-CS AAS, depending on the modifier. Although no final proof could be found, the most likely explanation is that this artifact is caused by a yet unidentified phosphorus species that causes a spectrally continuous absorption, which is corrected without problems by HR-CS AAS, but which is not recognized and corrected by the D 2 BC system of LS AAS.

  16. An electrochemical flow-cell for permanent modification of graphite tube with palladium for mercury determination by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreno, Ruben G. M.; de Oliveira, Elisabeth; Pedrotti, Jairo J.; Oliveira, Pedro V.

    2002-04-01

    An electrochemical procedure for palladium deposition on the inner surface of pyrolytic graphite-coated tubes for permanent chemical modification and a cold vapor generation system for the pre-concentration and determination of mercury trace levels in rain, potable, and non-potable water and lake sediment by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry is proposed. A tubular electrochemical flow-cell was assembled on the original geometry of the graphite tube, which operated as the working electrode. A stainless steel tube, positioned downstream from the working electrode, was used as the auxiliary electrode. The applied potential was measured against a micro Ag/AgCl (sat) reference electrode inserted in the auxiliary electrode. Palladium solution in acetate buffer (100 mmol l -1, pH=4.8), flowing at 0.5 ml min -1 for 60 min was used to perform the electrodeposition. A homemade cold vapor generation system composed of a peristaltic pump, an injector-commutator, a flow meter and a disposable polyethylene gas-liquid separator flask (approx. 4.0 ml volume) were used. Volumes of 1.0 ml of reagent (2.0% w/v NaBH 4 in 0.10 mol l -1 of NaOH) and 1.0 ml of reference or sample solution in 0.25 mol l -1 of HNO 3 were carried to the gas-liquid separator using the peristaltic pump. The mercury vapor was carried out to the modified graphite tube by argon flow (200 ml min -1), and pre-concentrated for 120 s. The characteristic mass for 1.0 ml of reference solution was 26 pg (R.S.D.=0.12%, n=5). The detection limit obtained was 93 pg ( n=20, 3δ). The reliability of the entire procedure was confirmed by addition and recovery tests and cold vapor atomic absorption spectrometry.

  17. Speciation of methyl- and butyltin compounds and inorganic tin in oysters by hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Han, J.S.; Weber, J.H.

    1988-02-15

    Because of the toxicity of tributyltin originating from many antifouling marine paints, there is much concern about its effect on aquatic life and, particularly, on shellfish. This paper describes speciation of inorganic tin, methyltin compounds, and butyltin compounds from oyster samples. The authors validated the hydride generation atomic absorption spectrophotometric technique by demonstrating ca. 100% recovery from spiked samples and by the absence of any organotin decomposition products. Absolute detection limits (3sigma) are 1.1-2.5 ng for 0.1-g oyster samples (wet weight). This method is superior to published techniques because of careful validation, low limits of detection, and minimal sample manipulation.

  18. Ultrasound-assisted extraction for the determination of Cu, Mn, Ca, and Mg in alternative oilseed crops using flame atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Peronico, Vanessa Cruz Dias; Raposo, Jorge Luiz

    2016-04-01

    An ultrasound-assisted extraction procedure was evaluated for the multi-element determination of Cu, Mn, Ca, and Mg in alternative oilseed crops using flame atomic absorption spectrometry. The best results were obtained when 0.3g of samples were used to extract the mineral content using 10 mL of a 1.40 mol L(-1) HNO3 solution for 10 min at 25 °C. The accuracy and precision of the analysis were evaluated using two oilseed reference materials, and the results were in agreement with reference values at 95% confidence level (paired t-test). The method was used to analyze five oilseed samples and the results were in agreement with those obtained using a closed-vessel microwave-assisted acid digestion system for sample preparation. The relative standard deviations were 0.52-6.13% for all of the standard and sample measurements, and the limits of detection were 666.7, 416.7, 333.4 μg g(-1), and 3.5 mg g(-1) for Cu, Mn, Ca, and Mg, respectively. PMID:26593618

  19. Ultrasound-Assisted Emulsification Microextraction Based on Solidification Floating Organic Drop Trace Amounts of Manganese Prior to Graphite Furnace Atomic Absorption Spectrometry Determination

    PubMed Central

    Mohadesi, Alireza; Falahnejad, Masoumeh

    2012-01-01

    In the present study, an ultrasound-assisted emulsification microextraction based on solidification floating organic drop method is described for preconcentration of trace amounts of Mn (II). 2-(5-Bromo-2-pyridylazo)-5 diethylaminophenol was added to a solution of Mn+2 at ph = 10.0. After this, 1-undecanol was added to the solution as an extraction solvent, and solution was stirred. Several factors influencing the microextraction efficiency, such as pH, the amount of chelating agent, nature and volume of extraction solvent, the volume of sample solution, stirring rate, and extraction time were investigated and optimized. Then sample vial was cooled by inserting into an ice bath, and the solidified was transferred into a suitable vial for immediate melting. Finally the sample was injected into a graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry. Under the optimum condition the linear dynamic range was 0.50–10.0 ng mL−1 with a correlation coefficient of 0.9926, and the detection limit of 0.3 ng mL−1 was obtained. The enrichment factor was 160. The proposed method was successfully applied for separation and determination of manganese in sea, rain, tap, and river water samples. PMID:22645504

  20. Ultrasound-assisted emulsification microextraction based on solidification floating organic drop trace amounts of manganese prior to graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry determination.

    PubMed

    Mohadesi, Alireza; Falahnejad, Masoumeh

    2012-01-01

    In the present study, an ultrasound-assisted emulsification microextraction based on solidification floating organic drop method is described for preconcentration of trace amounts of Mn (II). 2-(5-Bromo-2-pyridylazo)-5 diethylaminophenol was added to a solution of Mn(+2) at ph = 10.0. After this, 1-undecanol was added to the solution as an extraction solvent, and solution was stirred. Several factors influencing the microextraction efficiency, such as pH, the amount of chelating agent, nature and volume of extraction solvent, the volume of sample solution, stirring rate, and extraction time were investigated and optimized. Then sample vial was cooled by inserting into an ice bath, and the solidified was transferred into a suitable vial for immediate melting. Finally the sample was injected into a graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry. Under the optimum condition the linear dynamic range was 0.50-10.0 ng mL(-1) with a correlation coefficient of 0.9926, and the detection limit of 0.3 ng mL(-1) was obtained. The enrichment factor was 160. The proposed method was successfully applied for separation and determination of manganese in sea, rain, tap, and river water samples. PMID:22645504

  1. Time-resolved inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry measurements with individual, monodisperse drop sample introduction.

    PubMed

    Dziewatkoski, M P; Daniels, L B; Olesik, J W

    1996-04-01

    Individual ion clouds, each produced in the ICP from a single drop of sample, were monitored using time-resolved mass spectrometry and optical emission spectrometry simultaneously. The widths of the ion clouds in the plasma as a function of distance from the point of initial desolvated particle vaporization in the ICP were estimated. The Li(+) cloud width (full width at halfmaximum) varied from 85 to 272 μs at 3 and 10 mm from the apparent vaporization point, respectively. The Sr(+) cloud width varied from 97 to 142 μs at 5 and 10 mm from the apparent vaporization point, respectively. The delays between optical and mass spectrometry signals were used to measure gas velocities in the ICP. The velocity data could then be used to convert ion cloud peak widths in time to cloud sizes in the ICP. Li(+) clouds varied from 2.1 to 6.6 mm (full width at half-maximum) and Sr(+) clouds varied from 2.4 to 3.5 mm at the locations specified above. Diffusion coefficients were estimated from experimental data to be 88, 44, and 24 cm(2)/s for Li(+), Mg(+), and Sr(+), respectively. The flight time of ions from the sampling orifice of the mass spectrometer to the detector were mass dependent and varied from 13 to 21 μs for Mg(+) to 93 to 115 μs for Pb(+). PMID:21619140

  2. Rapid drug detection in oral samples by porous silicon assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Lowe, Rachel D; Guild, Georgia E; Harpas, Peter; Kirkbride, Paul; Hoffmann, Peter; Voelcker, Nicolas H; Kobus, Hilton

    2009-11-01

    The demand for analysis of oral fluid for illicit drugs has arisen with the increased adoption of roadside testing, particularly in countries where changes in legislation allow random roadside testing of drivers for the presence of a palette of illicit drugs such as methamphetamine (MA), 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA) and Delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC). Oral samples are currently tested for such drugs at the roadside using an immunoassay-based commercial test kit. Positive roadside tests are sent for confirmatory laboratory analysis, traditionally by means of gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). We present here an alternative rapid analysis technique, porous silicon assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (pSi LDI-MS), for the high-throughput analysis of oral fluids. This technique alleviates the need for sample derivatization, requires only sub-microliter sample volumes and allows fast analysis (of the order of seconds). In this study, the application of the technique is demonstrated with real samples from actual roadside testing. The analysis of oral samples resulted in detection of MA and MDMA with no extraction and analysis of THC after ethyl acetate extraction. We propose that, subject to miniaturization of a suitable mass spectrometer, this technique is well suited to underpin the deployment of oral fluid testing in the clinic, workplace and on the roadside. PMID:19844964

  3. Paper-capillary spray for direct mass spectrometry analysis of biofluid samples.

    PubMed

    Ren, Yue; Chiang, Spencer; Zhang, Wenpeng; Wang, Xiao; Lin, Ziqing; Ouyang, Zheng

    2016-02-01

    Paper spray has been developed as an ambient ionization method for direct analysis of biological samples using mass spectrometry. While distinct advantages of paper spray have been demonstrated, especially for quantitative analysis and design of disposable sample cartridges, the need for improvement has also been recognized, especially for the use with miniature mass spectrometers. In this study, we made an improvement to the sampling and ionization by adding a capillary emitter to the paper substrate to produce a paper-capillary spray, which has been shown to have significant, positive impact on the sensitivity and reproducibility for direct mass spectrometry analysis. The paper-capillary devices were fabricated and the effects of the geometry, the treatment of the capillary emitters, as well as the sample disposition methods were characterized. The method's analytical performance was also characterized for analysis of therapeutic drugs in blood samples. Quantitation of cotinine in blood using a commercial triple quadrupole and sitagliptin (Januvia®) in blood using a desktop Mini 12 ion trap mass spectrometer was also demonstrated. PMID:26521181

  4. Interlayer spray ionization mass spectrometry for the simple direct analysis of low amounts of sample.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jin; Tang, Fei; Guo, Cheng'an; Huo, Xinming; Zhang, Sichun; Wang, Xiaohao

    2016-07-01

    Interlayer spray is proposed as a convenient ionization source for direct analysis by mass spectrometry. Two slices of non-absorbent substrate hold the liquid sample to form a sandwich structure. By applying a high voltage to the sample, spray is generated at the tip of the substrate. The sampling procedure can be operated easily in an open condition and the spray is processed in a semi-enclosed condition, which leads to a relatively stable process. An ultralow amount (<2 μL) of the liquid sample can be analyzed without dilution, which ensures that the natural concentration and properties of the target are maintained. Less influence from the substrate is achieved compared with the spray methods based on porous absorbent materials, which results in a sensitivity enhancement of large molecule samples. It is demonstrated that the interlayer spray is applicable for the analysis of various compounds, including therapeutic drugs, peptides, and proteins. Good linearity can be obtained at a concentration as low as 50 ng/mL in the quantitative analysis for imatinib. We also show the ability to identify the chemical residuals on surfaces with high sensitivity by the "wipe-spray" method, which is useful for the fast screening of illicit substances. Interlayer spray working with mass spectrometry provides a promising method for direct analysis in an ambient environment. Graphical Abstract The schematic of the interlayer spray ionization source. PMID:27173393

  5. Analysis of eight argonne premium coal samples by X-ray fluorescence spectrometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Evans, J.R.; Sellers, G.A.; Johnson, R.G.; Vivit, D.V.; Kent, J.

    1990-01-01

    X-ray fluorescence spectrometric methods were used in the analysis of eight Argonne Premium Coal Samples. Trace elements (Cr, Ni, Cu, Zn, Rb, Sr, Y, Zr, Nb, Ba, La, and Ce) in coal ash were determined by energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometry; major elements (Na, Mg, Al, Si, P, S, K, Ca, Ti, Mn, and Fe) in coal ash and trace elements (Cl and P) in whole coal were determined by wavelength-dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometry. The results of this study will be used in a geochemical database compiled for these materials from various analytical techniques. The experimental XRF methods and procedures used to determine these major and trace elements are described.

  6. Element selective detection of molecular species applying chromatographic techniques and diode laser atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Kunze, K; Zybin, A; Koch, J; Franzke, J; Miclea, M; Niemax, K

    2004-12-01

    Tunable diode laser atomic absorption spectroscopy (DLAAS) combined with separation techniques and atomization in plasmas and flames is presented as a powerful method for analysis of molecular species. The analytical figures of merit of the technique are demonstrated by the measurement of Cr(VI) and Mn compounds, as well as molecular species including halogen atoms, hydrogen, carbon and sulfur. PMID:15561625

  7. DIRECT DETERMINATION OF PHOSPHORUS IN GASOLINE BY FLAMELESS ATOMIC ABSORPTION SPECTROMETRY

    EPA Science Inventory

    A new method is presented for the determination of phosphorus in gasoline using flameless atomic absorption. Lanthanum nitrate solution is inserted in a graphite furnace prior to direct addition of gasoline. The organic matrix is charred prior to atomization of the phosphorus. Th...

  8. Peat as a natural solid-phase for copper preconcentration and determination in a multicommuted flow system coupled to flame atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Gonzáles, A P S; Firmino, M A; Nomura, C S; Rocha, F R P; Oliveira, P V; Gaubeur, I

    2009-03-23

    The physical and chemical characteristics of peat were assessed through measurement of pH, percentage of organic matter, cationic exchange capacity (CEC), elemental analysis, infrared spectroscopy and quantitative analysis of metals by ICP OES. Despite the material showed to be very acid in view of the percentage of organic matter, its CEC was significant, showing potential for retention of metal ions. This characteristic was exploited by coupling a peat mini-column to a flow system based on the multicommutation approach for the in-line copper concentration prior to flame atomic absorption spectrometric determination. Cu(II) ions were adsorbed at pH 4.5 and eluted with 0.50 molL(-1) HNO(3). The influence of chemical and hydrodynamic parameters, such as sample pH, buffer concentration, eluent type and concentration, sample flow-rate and preconcentration time were investigated. Under the optimized conditions, a linear response was observed between 16 and 100 microgL(-1), with a detection limit estimated as 3 microgL(-1) at the 99.7% confidence level and an enrichment factor of 16. The relative standard deviation was estimated as 3.3% (n=20). The mini-column was used for at least 100 sampling cycles without significant variation in the analytical response. Recoveries from copper spiked to lake water or groundwater as well as concentrates used in hemodialysis were in the 97.3-111% range. The results obtained for copper determination in these samples agreed with those achieved by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GFAAS) at the 95% confidence level. PMID:19264168

  9. Multi-elemental analysis of aqueous geological samples by inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectrometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Todorov, Todor I.; Wolf, Ruth E.; Adams, Monique

    2014-01-01

    Typically, 27 major, minor, and trace elements are determined in natural waters, acid mine drainage, extraction fluids, and leachates of geological and environmental samples by inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES). At the discretion of the analyst, additional elements may be determined after suitable method modifications and performance data are established. Samples are preserved in 1–2 percent nitric acid (HNO3) at sample collection or as soon as possible after collection. The aqueous samples are aspirated into the ICP-OES discharge, where the elemental emission signals are measured simultaneously for 27 elements. Calibration is performed with a series of matrix-matched, multi-element solution standards.

  10. Amino acid analysis in micrograms of meteorite sample by nanoliquid chromatography-high-resolution mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Callahan, Michael P; Martin, Mildred G; Burton, Aaron S; Glavin, Daniel P; Dworkin, Jason P

    2014-03-01

    Amino acids and their enantiomers in a 360 microgram sample of Murchison meteorite were unambiguously identified and quantified using chemical derivatization and nanoliquid chromatography coupled to nanoelectrospray ionization high resolution orbitrap mass spectrometry techniques. The distribution and abundance of amino acids were similar to past studies of Murchison meteorite but the samples used here were three orders of magnitude lower. The analytical method was also highly sensitive, and some amino acid reference standards were successfully detected at a level of ∼200 attomoles (on column). These results may open up the possibility for investigating other less studied, sample-limited extraterrestrial samples (e.g., micrometeorites, interplanetary dust particles, and cometary particles) for biologically-relevant organic molecules. PMID:24529954

  11. Development and Applications of Liquid Sample Desorption Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Qiuling; Chen, Hao

    2016-06-12

    Desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (DESI-MS) is a recent advance in the field of analytical chemistry. This review surveys the development of liquid sample DESI-MS (LS-DESI-MS), a variant form of DESI-MS that focuses on fast analysis of liquid samples, and its novel analy-tical applications in bioanalysis, proteomics, and reaction kinetics. Due to the capability of directly ionizing liquid samples, liquid sample DESI (LS-DESI) has been successfully used to couple MS with various analytical techniques, such as microfluidics, microextraction, electrochemistry, and chromatography. This review also covers these hyphenated techniques. In addition, several closely related ionization methods, including transmission mode DESI, thermally assisted DESI, and continuous flow-extractive DESI, are briefly discussed. The capabilities of LS-DESI extend and/or complement the utilities of traditional DESI and electrospray ionization and will find extensive and valuable analytical application in the future. PMID:27145689

  12. Development and Applications of Liquid Sample Desorption Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Qiuling; Chen, Hao

    2016-06-01

    Desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (DESI-MS) is a recent advance in the field of analytical chemistry. This review surveys the development of liquid sample DESI-MS (LS-DESI-MS), a variant form of DESI-MS that focuses on fast analysis of liquid samples, and its novel analy-tical applications in bioanalysis, proteomics, and reaction kinetics. Due to the capability of directly ionizing liquid samples, liquid sample DESI (LS-DESI) has been successfully used to couple MS with various analytical techniques, such as microfluidics, microextraction, electrochemistry, and chromatography. This review also covers these hyphenated techniques. In addition, several closely related ionization methods, including transmission mode DESI, thermally assisted DESI, and continuous flow–extractive DESI, are briefly discussed. The capabilities of LS-DESI extend and/or complement the utilities of traditional DESI and electrospray ionization and will find extensive and valuable analytical application in the future.

  13. Selective precipitation of potassium in seawater samples for improving the sensitivity of plain γ-ray spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Ferrante, Marco De Angelis, Francesco; Nisi, Stefano Laubenstein, Matthias

    2015-08-17

    An analytical method is presented to reduce the amount of {sup 40}K in sea water samples, in order to lower its interference in γ-ray analysis below 1.4 MeV due to the Compton continuum. Sodium tetraphenylborate was used to successfully precipitate {sup 40}K in the samples. A custom procedure for precipitation of potassium was developed and it was evaluated for its selectivity, reproducibility and efficiency, using conventional analytical techniques such as atomic absorption spectrophotometry and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). This work has shown that the selective precipitation of potassium with sodium tetraphenylborate has led to a decrease of detection limit of radio nuclides such as {sup 238}U, {sup 226}Ra, {sup 228}Ra, {sup 137}Cs, {sup 134}Cs, {sup 133}I, {sup 134}I, {sup 60}Co in γ-analysis. In particular, the detection limit for nuclides with emissions in the energy window energy below 1400 keV is improved by almost one order of magnitude.

  14. Diagnostics of reactive pulsed plasmas by UV and VUV absorption spectroscopy and by modulated beam Mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cunge, Gilles

    2011-10-01

    Pulsed plasmas are promising for etching applications in the microelectronic industry. However, many new phenomena are involved when a high density discharge is pulsed. To better understand these processes it is necessary to probe the radicals' kinetics with a microsecond resolution. We have developed several diagnostics to reach this goal including broad band absorption spectroscopy with UV LEDs to detect small polyatomic radicals and with a deuterium VUV source to detect larger closed shell molecules and the modulated mass spectrometry to monitor atomic species. We will discuss the impact of the plasma pulsing frequency and duty cycle on the radical densities in Cl2 based plasmas, and the consequences on plasma processes. Work done in collaboration with Paul Bodart, Melisa Brihoum, Maxime Darnon, Erwin Pargon, Olivier Joubert, and Nader Sadeghi, CNRS/LTM.

  15. Application of l-cystine modified zeolite for preconcentration and determination of ultra-trace levels of cadmium by flame atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Rezvani, Seyyed Ahmad; Soleymanpour, Ahmad

    2016-03-01

    A very convenient, sensitive and precise solid phase extraction (SPE) system was developed for enrichment and determination of ultra-trace of cadmium ion in water and plant samples. This method was based on the retention of cadmium(II) ions by l-cystine adsorbed in Y-zeolite and carry out in a packed mini-column. The retained cadmium ions then were eluted and determined by flame atomic absorption spectrometry. The scanning electron microscopy (SEM), powder X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Fourier Transform Infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy techniques were applied for the characterization of cystine modified zeolite (CMZ). Some experimental conditions affecting the analytical performance such as pH, eluent type, concentration of sample, eluent flow rate and also the presence of interfering ions were investigated. The calibration graph was linear within the range of 0.1-7.5ngmL(-1) and limit of detection was obtained 0.04ngmL(-1) with the preconcentration factor of 400. The relative standard deviation (RSD) was obtained 1.4%, indicating the excellent reproducibility of this method. The proposed method was successfully applied for the extraction and determination of cadmium(II) ion in black tea, cigarette's tobacco and also various water samples. PMID:26852265

  16. Imidazole-Modified Nanoporous Silica for Lead Ion Solid Phase Extraction Prior to Determination from Industrial Wastewaters by Flame Atomic Absorption Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Behbahani, Ali; Ardjmand, Mehdi

    2015-01-01

    A new method was applied to produce modified nanoporous silica as a novel sorbent for Pb(II) ion SPE from industrial wastewater samples. In this modified method, the produced nanoporous silica has a higher functional group loading, which leads to a higher preconcentration factor as well as a lower LOD. This modified nanoporous silica was used for preconcentration prior to subsequent determination of Pb(II) ions by flame atomic absorption spectrometry. Various parameters such as the eluent, pH of the sample solution, and flow rate were optimized during this work. Also, the effect of a variety of ions on preconcentration and recovery of Pb(II) ions was investigated. The LOD, defined as five times the SD of the blank, was determined to be lower than 0.1 mg/L with an RSD of <2%. The accuracy of the method was established by analyzing standard reference materials with certified Pb concentrations. Finally, the established method was successfully applied for determination of the Pb(II) ion concentration in industrial wastewater samples. PMID:26525261

  17. Speciation of very low amounts of arsenic and antimony in waters using dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction and electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivas, Ricardo E.; López-García, Ignacio; Hernández-Córdoba, Manuel

    2009-04-01

    A new procedure for the determination of inorganic arsenic (III,V) and antimony (III,V) in water samples by dispersive liquid-liquid micro extraction separation and electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS) is presented. At pH 1, As(III) and Sb(III) are complexed with ammonium pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate and extracted into the fine droplets formed when mixing carbon tetrachloride (extraction solvent), methanol (disperser solvent) and the sample solution. After extraction, the phases are separated by centrifugation, and As(III) and Sb(III) are determined in the organic phase. As(V) and Sb(V) remain in the aqueous layer. Total inorganic As and Sb are determined after the reduction of the pentavalent forms with sodium thiosulphate. As(V) and Sb(V) are calculated by difference. The detection limits are 0.01 and 0.05 µg L - 1 for As(III) and Sb(III), respectively, with an enrichment factor of 115. The relative standard deviation is in the 2.9-4.5% range. The procedure has been applied to the speciation of inorganic As and Sb in bottled, tap and sea water samples with satisfactory results.

  18. The determination of total Se in urine and serum by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry using Ir as permanent modifier and in situ oxidation for complete trimethylselenonium recovery.

    PubMed

    Grinberg, Patricia; Gonçalves, Rodrigo Araújo; de Campos, Reinaldo Calixto

    2005-12-01

    The present work evaluated the use of iridium (Ir) as permanent modifier for the determination of total selenium in urine and serum by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry. Concerning urine, the presence of trimethylselenonium (TMSe(+)) was especially considered. Pyrolysis and atomization temperatures of 1,000 and 2,100 degrees C, respectively, were used. For nondigested urine and serum samples, 0.2% v/v HNO(3) and Triton X-100 were used as diluents, respectively, and the same initial platform Ir treatment was effective for up to 1,100 atomization cycles. Good precision [less than 5% relative standard deviation (RSD)] can be achieved with the proposed method. Low TMSe(+) recovery was observed for nondigested urine samples. Thus, if this species is to be considered in urine analysis, a previous external mineralization step was found to be necessary. Alternatively, an in situ oxidation treatment was developed. Detection limits of 8, 10, and 7 mug l(-1) were obtained after dilution, microwave-assisted digestion, and in situ oxidation procedures, respectively. The accuracy of the method was validated by the analysis of certified reference or commercial quality control materials and spiked samples. PMID:16267645

  19. An automated flow injection system for metal determination by flame atomic absorption spectrometry involving on-line fabric disk sorptive extraction technique.

    PubMed

    Anthemidis, A; Kazantzi, V; Samanidou, V; Kabir, A; Furton, K G

    2016-08-15

    A novel flow injection-fabric disk sorptive extraction (FI-FDSE) system was developed for automated determination of trace metals. The platform was based on a minicolumn packed with sol-gel coated fabric media in the form of disks, incorporated into an on-line solid-phase extraction system, coupled with flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS). This configuration provides minor backpressure, resulting in high loading flow rates and shorter analytical cycles. The potentials of this technique were demonstrated for trace lead and cadmium determination in environmental water samples. The applicability of different sol-gel coated FPSE media was investigated. The on-line formed complex of metal with ammonium pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (APDC) was retained onto the fabric surface and methyl isobutyl ketone (MIBK) was used to elute the analytes prior to atomization. For 90s preconcentration time, enrichment factors of 140 and 38 and detection limits (3σ) of 1.8 and 0.4μgL(-1) were achieved for lead and cadmium determination, respectively, with a sampling frequency of 30h(-1). The accuracy of the proposed method was estimated by analyzing standard reference materials and spiked water samples. PMID:27260436

  20. Microfabricated modules for sample handling, sample concentration and flow mixing: application to protein analysis by tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Figeys, D; Aebersold, R

    1999-02-01

    The comprehensive analysis of biological systems requires a combination of genomic and proteomic efforts. The large-scale application of current genomic technologies provides complete genomic DNA sequences, sequence tags for expressed genes (EST's), and quantitative profiles of expressed genes at the mRNA level. In contrast, protein analytical technology lacks the sensitivity and the sample throughput for the systematic analysis of all the proteins expressed by a tissue or cell. The sensitivity of protein analysis technology is primarily limited by the loss of analytes, due to adsorption to surfaces, and sample contamination during handling. Here we summarize our work on the development and use of microfabricated fluidic systems for the manipulation of minute amounts of peptides and delivery to an electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometer. New data are also presented that further demonstrate the potential of these novel approaches. Specifically, we describe the use of microfabricated devices as modules to deliver femtomole amounts of protein digests to the mass spectrometer for protein identification. We also describe the use of a microfabricated module for the generation of solvent gradients at nl/min flow rates for gradient chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. The use of microfabricated fluidic systems reduces the risk of sample contamination and sample loss due to adsorption to wetted surfaces. The ability to assemble dedicated modular systems and to operate them automatically makes the use of microfabricated systems attractive for the sensitive and large-scale analysis of proteins. PMID:10080083

  1. Test Sample for the Spatially Resolved Quantification of Illicit Drugs on Fingerprints Using Imaging Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Muramoto, Shin; Forbes, Thomas P; van Asten, Arian C; Gillen, Greg

    2015-01-01

    A novel test sample for the spatially resolved quantification of illicit drugs on the surface of a fingerprint using time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) and desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (DESI-MS) was demonstrated. Calibration curves relating the signal intensity to the amount of drug deposited on the surface were generated from inkjet-printed arrays of cocaine, methamphetamine, and heroin with a deposited-mass ranging nominally from 10 pg to 50 ng per spot. These curves were used to construct concentration maps that visualized the spatial distribution of the drugs on top of a fingerprint, as well as being able to quantify the amount of drugs in a given area within the map. For the drugs on the fingerprint on silicon, ToF-SIMS showed great success, as it was able to generate concentration maps of all three drugs. On the fingerprint on paper, only the concentration map of cocaine could be constructed using ToF-SIMS and DESI-MS, as the signals of methamphetamine and heroin were completely suppressed by matrix and substrate effects. Spatially resolved quantification of illicit drugs using imaging mass spectrometry is possible, but the choice of substrates could significantly affect the results. PMID:25915085

  2. Direct determination of ammoniacal nitrogen in water samples using corona discharge ion mobility spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Jafari, M T; Khayamian, T

    2008-09-15

    In this study, direct determination of ammoniacal nitrogen residues in water samples using corona discharge ion mobility spectrometry (CD-IMS) was investigated. Pyridine was used as an alternate reagent gas to enhance selectivity and sensitivity of the method. The results indicate that the limit of detection (LOD) was about 9.2x10(-3)mugmL(-1) and the linear dynamic range was obtained from 0.03 to 2.00mugmL(-1). The relative standard deviation was about 11%. Furthermore, this method was successfully applied to the direct determination of ammoniacal nitrogen in river and tap water samples and the results were compared with the Nessler method. The comparison of the results validates the potential of the proposed method as an alternative technique for the analysis of the ammoniacal nitrogen in water samples. PMID:18761176

  3. Enhancing sample preparation capabilities for accelerator mass spectrometry radiocarbon and radiocalcium studies

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, R.E.

    1991-08-20

    With support provided by the LLNL Accelerator Mass Spectrometry Laboratory, the UCR Radiocarbon Laboratory continued its studies involving sample pretreatment and target preparation for both AMS radiocarbon ({sup 14}C) and radiocalcium ({sup 41}Ca) involving applications to archaeologically -- and paleoanthropologically- related samples. With regard to AMS {sup 14}C-related studies, we have extended the development of a series of procedures which have, as their initial goal, the capability to combust several hundred microgram amounts of a chemically-pretreated organic sample and convert the resultant CO{sub 2} to graphitic carbon which will consistently yield relatively high {sup 13}C{sup {minus}} ion currents and blanks which will yield, on a consistent basis, {sup 14}C count rates at or below 0.20% modern, giving an 2 sigma age limit of >50,000 yr BP.

  4. Miniaturizing sample spots for matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Tu, Tingting; Gross, Michael L.

    2009-01-01

    The trend of miniaturization in bioanalytical chemistry is shifting from technical development to practical application. In matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS), progress in miniaturizing sample spots has been driven by the needs to increase sensitivity and speed, to interface with other analytical microtechnologies, and to develop miniaturized instrumentation. We review recent developments in miniaturizing sample spots for MALDI-MS. We cover both target modification and microdispensing technologies, and we emphasize the benefits with respect to sensitivity, throughput and automation. We hope that this review will encourage further method development and application of miniaturized sample spots for MALDI-MS, so as to expand applications in analytical chemistry, protein science and molecular biology. PMID:20161086

  5. Pyrolysis-mass spectrometry/pattern recognition on a well-characterized suite of humic samples

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    MacCarthy, P.; DeLuca, S.J.; Voorhees, K.J.; Malcolm, R.L.; Thurman, E.M.

    1985-01-01

    A suite of well-characterized humic and fulvic acids of freshwater, soil and plant origin was subjected to pyrolysis-mass spectrometry and the resulting data were analyzed by pattern recognition and factor analysis. A factor analysis plot of the data shows that the humic acids and fulvic acids can be segregated into two distinct classes. Carbohydrate and phenolic components are more pronounced in the pyrolysis products of the fulvic acids, and saturated and unsaturated hydrocarbons contribute more to the humic acid pyrolysis products. A second factor analysis plot shows a separation which appears to be based primarily on whether the samples are of aquatic or soil origin. ?? 1985.

  6. Direct Mass Spectrometry Analysis of Biofluid Samples Using Slug Flow Microextraction NanoESI**

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Yue; McLuckey, Morgan N.; Liu, Jiangjiang; Ouyang, Zheng

    2015-01-01

    Direct mass spectrometry (MS) analysis of biofluids with simple procedures represents a key step in translation of MS technologies to the clinical and point-of-care applications. The current study reports the development of a single-step method using slug flow microextraction and nanoESI (electrospray ionization) for MS analysis of organic compounds in blood and urine. High sensitivity and quantitation precision have been achieved for analysis of therapeutic and illicit drugs in 5 μL samples. Real-time chemical derivatization has been incorporated for analyzing anabolic steroids. The monitoring of enzymatic functions has also been demonstrated with the cholinesterase in wet blood. PMID:25284028

  7. Results of Self-Absorption Study on the Versapor 3000 Filters for Radioactive Particulate Air Sampling

    SciTech Connect

    Barnett, J. Matthew; Cullinan, Valerie I.; Barnett, Debra S.; Trang-Le, Truc LT; Bliss, Mary; Greenwood, Lawrence R.; Ballinger, Marcel Y.

    2009-02-17

    Since the mid-1980s, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has used a value of 0.85 as the correction factor for self absorption of activity for particulate radioactive air samples collected from building exhaust for environmental monitoring. This value accounts for activity that cannot be detected by direct counting of alpha and beta particles. Emissions can be degraded or blocked by filter fibers for particles buried in the filter material or by inactive dust particles collected with the radioactive particles. These filters are used for monitoring air emissions from PNNL stacks for radioactive particles. This paper describes an effort to re-evaluate self-absorption effects in particulate radioactive air sample filters (Versapor® 3000, 47 mm diameter) used at PNNL. There were two methods used to characterize the samples. Sixty samples were selected from the archive for acid digestion to compare the radioactivity measured by direct gas-flow proportional counting of filters to the results obtained after acid digestion of the filter and counting again by gas-flow proportional detection. Thirty different sample filters were selected for visible light microscopy to evaluate filter loading and particulate characteristics. Mass-loading effects were also considered. Filter ratios were calculated by dividing the initial counts by the post-digestion counts with the expectation that post-digestion counts would be higher because digestion would expose radioactivity embedded in the filter in addition to that on top of the filter. Contrary to expectations, the post digestion readings were almost always lower than initial readings and averaged approximately half the initial readings for both alpha and beta activity. Before and after digestion readings appeared to be related to each other, but with a low coefficient of determination (R^2) value. The ratios had a wide range of values indicating that this method did not provide sufficient precision to quantify self-absorption

  8. Speciation of arsenic(III)/arsenic(V) and selenium(IV)/ selenium(VI) using coupled ion chromatography - hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometry

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Simple analytical methods have been developed to speciate inorganic arsenic and selenium in the ppb range using coupled ion chromatography-hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometry. Because of the differences in toxicity and adsorption behavior, determinations of the redox states arsenite A...

  9. Direct determination of particulate elements in edible oils and fats using an ultrasonic slurry sampler with graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Dalen, Gerard; de Galan, Leo

    1994-12-01

    Through the use of an ultrasonic slurry mixer, graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GFAAS) can be applied for the fully automated determination of particulate iron and nickel in edible oils and fats. The unsupervised ultrasonic slurry autosampler yields the same accuracy and somewhat better precision than the much more laborious manual GFAAS method.

  10. Determination of arsenic in geological materials by electrothermal atomic-absorption spectrometry after hydride generation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sanzolone, R.F.; Chao, T.T.; Welsch, E.P.

    1979-01-01

    Rock and soil samples are decomposed with HClO4-HNO3; after further treatment, arsine is generated and absorbed in a dilute silver nitrate solution. Aliquots of this solution are injected into a carbon rod atomizer. Down to 1 ppm As in samples can be determined and there are no significant interferences, even from chromium in soils. Good results were obtained for geochemical reference samples. ?? 1979.

  11. Direct solid sample analysis with graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry—a fast and reliable screening procedure for the determination of inorganic arsenic in fish and seafood.

    PubMed

    Zmozinski, Ariane V; Llorente-Mirandes, Toni; Damin, Isabel C F; López-Sánchez, José F; Vale, Maria Goreti R; Welz, Bernhard; Silva, Márcia M

    2015-03-01

    Direct solid sample analysis with graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (SS-GF AAS) was investigated initially with the intention of developing a method for the determination of total As in fish and other seafood. A mixture of 0.1% Pd+0.06% Mg+0.06% Triton X-100 was used as the chemical modifier, added in solution over the solid samples, making possible the use of pyrolysis and atomization temperatures of 1200 °C and 2400 °C, respectively. The sample mass had to be limited to 0.25 mg, as the integrated absorbance did not increase further with increasing sample mass. Nevertheless, the recovery of As from several certified reference materials was of the order of 50% lower than the certified value. Strong molecular absorption due to the phosphorus monoxide molecule (PO) was observed with high-resolution continuum source AAS (HR CS AAS), which, however, did not cause any spectral interference. A microwave-assisted digestion with HNO3/H2O2 was also investigated to solve the problem; however, the results obtained for several certified reference materials were statistically not different from those found with direct SS-GF AAS. Accurate values were obtained using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) to analyze the digested samples, which suggested that organic As compounds are responsible for the low recoveries. HPLC-ICP-MS was used to determine the arsenobetaine (AB) concentration. Accurate results that were not different from the certified values were obtained when the AB concentration was added to the As concentration found by SS-GF AAS for most certified reference materials (CRM) and samples, suggesting that SS-GF AAS could be used as a fast screening procedure for inorganic As determination in fish and seafood. PMID:25618661

  12. Multi-element analysis of manganese nodules by atomic absorption spectrometry without chemical separation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kane, J.S.; Harnly, J.M.

    1982-01-01

    Five manganese nodules, including the USGS reference nodules A-1 and P-1, were analyzed for Co, Cu, Fe, K, Mg, Mn, Na, Ni and Zn without prior chemical separation by using a simultaneous multi-element atomic absorption spectrometer with an air-cetylene flame. The nodules were prepared in three digestion matrices. One of these solutions was measured using sixteen different combinations of burner height and air/acetylene ratios. Results for A-1 and P-1 are compared to recommended values and results for all nodules are compared to those obtained with an inductively coupled plasma. The elements Co, Cu, Fe, K, Mg, Mn, Na, Ni, and Zn are simultaneously determined with a composite recovery for all elements of 100 ?? 7%, independent of the digestion matrices, heights in the flame, or flame stoichiometries examined. Individual recoveries for Co, K, and Ni are considerably poorer in two digests than this composite figure, however. The optimum individual recoveries of 100 ?? 5% and imprecisions of 1-4%, except for zinc, are obtained when Co, K, Mn, Na and Ni are determined simultaneously in a concentrated digest, and in another analytical sequence, when Cu, Fe, Mg, Mn and Zn are measured simultaneously after dilution. Determination of manganese is equally accurate in the two sequences; its measurement in both assures internal consistency between the two measurement sequences. This approach improves analytical efficiency over that for conventional atomic absorption methods, while minimizing loss of accuracy or precision for individual elements. ?? 1982.

  13. Measurement of Actinides in Environmental Samples at Micro-Becquerel Levels by Accelerator Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, T A; Knezovich, J P; Marchetti, A A; Hamilton, T F

    2002-09-03

    The need for ultra-sensitive actinide measurements continues to expand in the fields of environmental stewardship, nuclear isotope forensics, radiobioassay and environmental research. We have developed a heavy isotope accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) system at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's Center for Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (CAMS). The system was designed particularly for the measurement of actinide concentrations and isotopic ratios. A fast isotope switching capability has been incorporated in the system, allowing flexibility in isotope selection and for the quasi-continuous normalization to a reference isotope spike. Initially, our utilization of the system has concentrated on the measurement of Pu isotopes. Under current operating conditions, background levels equivalent to <10{sup 6} atoms are observed during routine {sup 239}Pu and {sup 240}Pu measurements. Measurements of samples containing 10{sup 13} {sup 238}U atoms demonstrate that the system provides a {sup 238}U rejection factor of >10{sup 7}. Recently, we have utilized the high dynamic range of the AMS system in measuring samples whose Pu contents ranged from <10{sup 6} (background) to >10{sup 11} Pu atoms. Measurements of known materials, combined with results from an externally organized intercomparison program, indicate that our {sup 239}Pu measurements are accurate and precise down to the {mu}Bq level ({approx}10{sup 6} atoms). The development of the heavy isotope system was undertaken with particular interest in the measurement of environmental samples, including soils, sediments, waters, air filters, tissue samples, and human urine. The high rejection of interferences, including molecular interferences, and low susceptibility to matrix components, provided by the AMS technique are of particular relevance for such complex samples. These two factors significantly reduce demands on sample preparation chemistry for Pu analyses, allowing relatively simple, cost-effective procedures

  14. Inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry in the analysis of biological samples and pharmaceutical drugs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ossipov, K.; Seregina, I. F.; Bolshov, M. A.

    2016-04-01

    Inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) is widely used in the analysis of biological samples (whole blood, serum, blood plasma, urine, tissues, etc.) and pharmaceutical drugs. The shortcomings of this method related to spectral and non-spectral interferences are manifested in full measure in determination of the target analytes in these complex samples strongly differing in composition. The spectral interferences are caused by similarity of masses of the target component and sample matrix components. Non-spectral interferences are related to the influence of sample matrix components on the physicochemical processes taking place during formation and transportation of liquid sample aerosols into the plasma, on the value and spatial distribution of plasma temperature and on the transmission of the ion beam from the interface to mass spectrometer detector. The review is devoted to analysis of different mechanisms of appearance of non-spectral interferences and to ways for their minimization or elimination. Special attention is paid to the techniques of biological sample preparation, which largely determine the mechanisms of the influence of sample composition on the results of element determination. The ways of lowering non-spectral interferences by instrumental parameter tuning and application of internal standards are considered. The bibliography includes 189 references.

  15. Accelerator mass spectrometry of ultra-small samples with applications in the biosciences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salehpour, Mehran; Håkansson, Karl; Possnert, Göran

    2013-01-01

    An overview is presented covering the biological accelerator mass spectrometry activities at Uppsala University. The research utilizes the Uppsala University Tandem laboratory facilities, including a 5 MV Pelletron tandem accelerator and two stable isotope ratio mass spectrometers. In addition, a dedicated sample preparation laboratory for biological samples with natural activity is in use, as well as another laboratory specifically for 14C-labeled samples. A variety of ongoing projects are described and presented. Examples are: (1) Ultra-small sample AMS. We routinely analyze samples with masses in the 5-10 μg C range. Data is presented regarding the sample preparation method, (2) bomb peak biological dating of ultra-small samples. A long term project is presented where purified and cell-specific DNA from various part of the human body including the heart and the brain are analyzed with the aim of extracting regeneration rate of the various human cells, (3) biological dating of various human biopsies, including atherosclerosis related plaques is presented. The average built up time of the surgically removed human carotid plaques have been measured and correlated to various data including the level of insulin in the human blood, and (4) In addition to standard microdosing type measurements using small pharmaceutical drugs, pre-clinical pharmacokinetic data from a macromolecular drug candidate are discussed.

  16. Detection of uranium in industrial and mines samples by microwave plasma torch mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Li, Yi; Yang, Meiling; Sun, Rong; Zhong, Tao; Chen, Huanwen

    2016-02-01

    Microwave plasma torch (MPT), traditionally used as the light source for atomic emission spectrophotometry, has been employed as the ambient ionization source for sensitive detection of uranium in various ground water samples with widely available ion trap mass spectrometer. In the full-scan mass spectra obtained in the negative ion detection mode, uranium signal was featured by the uranyl nitrate complexes (e.g. [UO2 (NO3 )3 ](-) ), which yielded characteristic fragments in the tandem mass spectrometry experiments, allowing confident detection of trace uranium in water samples without sample pretreatment. Under the optimal experimental conditions, the calibration curves were linearly responded within the concentration levels ranged in 10-1000 µg·l(-1) , with the limit of detection (LOD) of 31.03 ng·l(-1) . The relative standard deviations (RSD) values were 2.1-5.8% for the given samples at 100 µg·l(-1) . The newly established method has been applied to direct detection of uranium in practical mine water samples, providing reasonable recoveries 90.94-112.36% for all the samples tested. The analysis of a single sample was completed within 30 s, showing a promising potential of the method for sensitive detection of trace uranium with improved throughput. PMID:26889932

  17. Thin layer chromatography coupled with electrospray ionization mass spectrometry for direct analysis of raw samples.

    PubMed

    Hu, Bin; Xin, Gui-zhong; So, Pui-Kin; Yao, Zhong-Ping

    2015-10-01

    Conventional mass spectrometric analysis of raw samples commonly requires sample pretreatment and chromatographic separation using high performance liquid chromatography or gas chromatography, which could be time-consuming and laborious. In this study, thin layer chromatography (TLC) coupled with electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) was developed for direct analysis of raw samples. The sorbent material of the TLC plate was found to be able to retain the interfering compounds and allow interested analytes to be extracted, ionized and detected by ESI-MS with much reduced matrix interference. Our results showed that this method could be effectively applied in direct analysis of samples containing common interfering compounds, e.g., salts and detergents, and rapid detection and quantitation of target analytes in raw samples. Offline and online separation and detection of different components in mixture samples, e.g., plant extracts, using TLC-ESI-MS were also demonstrated. Overall, this study revealed that TLC-ESI-MS could be a simple, rapid and efficient method for analysis of raw samples. PMID:26362806

  18. Automated combustion accelerator mass spectrometry for the analysis of biomedical samples in the low attomole range.

    PubMed

    van Duijn, Esther; Sandman, Hugo; Grossouw, Dimitri; Mocking, Johannes A J; Coulier, Leon; Vaes, Wouter H J

    2014-08-01

    The increasing role of accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) in biomedical research necessitates modernization of the traditional sample handling process. AMS was originally developed and used for carbon dating, therefore focusing on a very high precision but with a comparably low sample throughput. Here, we describe the combination of automated sample combustion with an elemental analyzer (EA) online coupled to an AMS via a dedicated interface. This setup allows direct radiocarbon measurements for over 70 samples daily by AMS. No sample processing is required apart from the pipetting of the sample into a tin foil cup, which is placed in the carousel of the EA. In our system, up to 200 AMS analyses are performed automatically without the need for manual interventions. We present results on the direct total (14)C count measurements in <2 μL human plasma samples. The method shows linearity over a range of 0.65-821 mBq/mL, with a lower limit of quantification of 0.65 mBq/mL (corresponding to 0.67 amol for acetaminophen). At these extremely low levels of activity, it becomes important to quantify plasma specific carbon percentages. This carbon percentage is automatically generated upon combustion of a sample on the EA. Apparent advantages of the present approach include complete omission of sample preparation (reduced hands-on time) and fully automated sample analysis. These improvements clearly stimulate the standard incorporation of microtracer research in the drug development process. In combination with the particularly low sample volumes required and extreme sensitivity, AMS strongly improves its position as a bioanalysis method. PMID:25033319

  19. Determination of sulfur in crude oil using high-resolution continuum source molecular absorption spectrometry of the SnS molecule in a graphite furnace.

    PubMed

    Cadorim, Heloisa R; Pereira, Éderson R; Carasek, Eduardo; Welz, Bernhard; de Andrade, Jailson B

    2016-01-01

    An analytical method for the determination of sulfur, as the tin mono-sulfide (SnS) molecule, in crude oil using high-resolution continuum source graphite furnace molecular absorption spectrometry (HR-CS GF MAS) has been developed. The molecular absorbance of the SnS has been measured using the wavelength at 271.624 nm and the crude oil samples were prepared as micro-emulsions due to their high viscosity. Several chemical modifiers (Ir, Pd, Ru, Zr) were tested and palladium was chosen, because it exhibited the best performance. The heating program was optimized by comparing the pyrolysis and vaporization curves obtained for an aqueous sulfur standard and a micro-emulsion of a crude oil certified reference material (CRM). The optimum pyrolysis and vaporization temperatures were found to be 600 and 2000°C, respectively. The limit of detection and the characteristic mass using micro-emulsion analysis of crude oil samples were 5.8 and 13.3 ng S. Accuracy and precision of the method has been evaluated using two crude oil CRM (NIST 2721 and NIST 2722), showing good agreement with the informed or certified values. PMID:26695253

  20. Lead and cadmium in human placentas and maternal and neonatal blood (in a heavily polluted area) measured by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed Central

    Baranowska, I

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To measure the concentrations of the trace elements lead and cadmium in human placenta and in maternal and neonatal (cord) blood. To assess the influence of the strongly polluted environment on the content of metals in tissues and on the permeability of placenta to cadmium and lead. Various methods of mineralisation were tested before analysis. METHODS--Graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry was used for the determination of lead and cadmium. The samples for analysis were prepared by mineralisation under pressure in a Teflon bomb (HNO3, 110 degrees C), by wet ashing under normal pressure (HNO3 + H2O2 for 12 hours), and by microwave digestion in concentrated nitric acid. RESULTS--In analysed samples the following mean concentrations of cadmium and lead were found: in venous blood Pb = 72.50 ng/ml, Cd = 4.90 ng/ml; in placenta Pb = 0.50 microgram/g, Cd = 0.11 microgram/g; in cord blood Pb = 38.31 ng/ml, Cd = 1.13 ng/ml. CONCLUSION--High concentrations of lead and cadmium were found in placentas and in maternal blood whereas in neonatal blood there was an increased concentration of lead and only traces of cadmium. It is concluded that the placenta is a better barrier for cadmium than for lead. Among the examined methods of mineralisation, microwave digestion was the best. PMID:7795737

  1. Determination of arsenobetaine, arsenocholine, and tetramethylarsonium cations in seafoods and human urine by high-performance liquid chromatography - thermochemical hydride generation - atomic absorption spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Momplaisir, G.M.; Blais, J.S.; Quinteiro, M.; Marshall, W.D. )

    1991-08-01

    A simple method was developed for the determination of arsonium compounds in edible marine tissues (lobster tail muscle, peeled deveined shrimp, cod fillet, and cod liver oil) and human urine. The homogenized marine tissue (5-10 g (or an equivalent weight of freeze-dried powder)) was blended with methanol; the extracts were combined and flash evaporated. Alternatively, urine (5 mL) was diluted with 50 mL of ethanol and placed in a dry ice-acetone bath for 20 min. Supernatant was separated from the resulting precipitate by centrifugation and flash evaporated. Residues from either sample type were resuspended in water, filtered through an anion exchanger, and acidified. The arsonium analytes were partitioned into liquefied phenol, which was diluted with diethyl ether and back extracted with water. The combined water extracts were taken to dryness, redissolved in methanol, concentrated to 1 mL, and separated on a cyanopropyl bonded-phase column using a methanolic mobile phase containing 19% (v/v) diethyl ether, 1% (v/v) acetic acid, 0.12% (v/v) triethylamine, and pricrylsulfonic acid (0.200 g/L). Analytes were detected on-line by thermochemical hydride generation-atomic absorption spectrometry. Recoveries from tissues or from urine which had been spiked at 0.1-3.4 {mu}g of cation/g of fresh weight were 83% or greater from each of the five sample types.

  2. Modified mesoporous silica materials for on-line separation and preconcentration of hexavalent chromium using a microcolumn coupled with flame atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zheng; Fang, Dong-Mei; Li, Qing; Zhang, Ling-Xia; Qian, Rong; Zhu, Yan; Qu, Hai-Yun; Du, Yi-Ping

    2012-05-01

    A modified SBA-15 mesoporous silica material NH(2)-SBA-15 was synthesized successfully by grafting γ-aminopropyl-triethoxysilane. The material was characterized using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and Fourier transform infrared/Raman (FT-IR/Raman) spectroscopy, and used for the first time in a flow injection on-line solid phase extraction (SPE) coupled with flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS) to detect trace Cr (VI). Effective sorption of Cr (VI) was achieved at pH 2.0 with no interference from Cr (III) and other ions and 0.5 mol L(-1) NH(3)·H(2)O solution was found optimal for the complete elution of Cr (VI). An enrichment factor of 44 and was achieved under optimized experimental conditions at a sample loading of 2.0 mL min(-1) sample loading (300 s) and an elution flow rate of 2.0 mL min(-1) (24s). The precision of the 11 replicate Cr (VI) measurements was 2.1% at the 100 μg L(-1) level with a detection limit of 0.2 μg L(-1) (3s, n=10) using the FAAS. The developed method was successfully applied to trace chromium determination in waste water. The accuracy was validated using a certified reference material of riverine water (GBW08607). PMID:22502615

  3. [Preliminary study on using acousto-optic tunable filter as wavelength selector for atomic absorption spectrometry].

    PubMed

    Zhao, Li-wei; Zhang, Yi-hua; Wang, Mei-jia; Song, Da-qian; Zhang, Han-qi; Jin, Qin-han

    2002-06-01

    An acousto-optic tunable filter (AOTF) is an all-solid-state, electronic monochromator that is based on the diffraction of light by an acoustic wave in an anisotropic crystal. It is a new kind of tunable small filter with narrow band compared with traditional unicolor filter. The filter can diffract incident white light at a specific wavelength when a specific radio frequency is applied into it. An AAS experimental setup using a microwave plasma torch (MPT) as the atomizer, and a visible AOTF as the wavelength selector was developed and the analytical performance was evaluated by determination of Na. The effect on the absorption signal of some operating conditions, including the observation height, the microwave forward power and the carrier and support gas flow rates for MPT, were investigated. The detection limit for Na was shown to be 0.23 microgram.mL-1 and the relative standard deviation was 2.6% (n = 6). PMID:12938338

  4. Determination of methane emission rates on a biogas plant using data from laser absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Groth, Angela; Maurer, Claudia; Reiser, Martin; Kranert, Martin

    2015-02-01

    The aim of the work was to establish a method for emission control of biogas plants especially the observation of fugitive methane emissions. The used method is in a developmental stage but the topic is crucial to environmental and economic issues. A remote sensing measurement method was adopted to determine methane emission rates of a biogas plant in Rhineland-Palatinate, Germany. An inverse dispersion model was used to deduce emission rates. This technique required one concentration measurement with an open path tunable diode laser absorption spectrometer (TDLAS) downwind and upwind the source and basic wind information, like wind speed and direction. Different operating conditions of the biogas plant occurring on the measuring day (December 2013) could be represented roughly in the results. During undisturbed operational modes the methane emission rate averaged 2.8 g/s, which corresponds to 4% of the methane gas production rate of the biogas plant. PMID:25446786

  5. An atomic-absorption method for the determination of gold in large samples of geologic materials

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    VanSickle, Gordon H.; Lakin, Hubert William

    1968-01-01

    A laboratory method for the determination of gold in large (100-gram) samples has been developed for use in the study of the gold content of placer deposits and of trace amounts of gold in other geologic materials. In this method the sample is digested with bromine and ethyl ether, the gold is extracted into methyl isobutyl ketone, and the determination is made by atomicabsorption spectrophotometry. The lower limit of detection is 0.005 part per million in the sample. The few data obtained so far by this method agree favorably with those obtained by assay and by other atomic-absorption methods. About 25 determinations can be made per man-day.

  6. Mass Spectrometry-based characterization of endogenous peptides and metabolites in small volume samples

    PubMed Central

    Ong, Ta-Hsuan; Tillmaand, Emily G.; Makurath, Monika; Rubakhin, Stanislav S.; Sweedler, Jonathan V.

    2015-01-01

    Technologies to assay single cells and their extracellular microenvironments are valuable in elucidating biological function, but there are challenges. Sample volumes are low, the physicochemical parameters of the analytes vary widely, and the cellular environment is chemically complex. In addition, the inherent difficulty of isolating individual cells and handling small volume samples complicates many experimental protocols. Here we highlight a number of mass spectrometry (MS)-based measurement approaches for characterizing the chemical content of small volume analytes, with a focus on methods used to detect intracellular and extracellular metabolites and peptides from samples as small as individual cells. MS has become one of the most effective means for analyzing small biological samples due to its high sensitivity, low analyte consumption, compatibility with a wide array of sampling approaches, and ability to detect a large number of analytes with different properties without preselection. Having access to a flexible portfolio of MS-based methods allows quantitative, qualitative, untargeted, targeted, multiplexed, spatially resolved investigations of single cells and their similarly scaled extracellular environments. Combining MS with on-line and off-line sample conditioning tools, such as microfluidic and capillary electrophoresis systems, significantly increases the analytical coverage of the sample’s metabolome and peptidome, and improves individual analyte characterization / identification. Small volume assays help to reveal the causes and manifestations of biological and pathological variability, as well as the functional heterogeneity of individual cells within their microenvironments and within cellular populations. PMID:25617659

  7. Extractive electrospray ionization mass spectrometry toward in situ analysis without sample pretreatment.

    PubMed

    Li, Ming; Hu, Bin; Li, Jianqiang; Chen, Rong; Zhang, Xie; Chen, Huanwen

    2009-09-15

    A homemade novel nanoextractive electrospray ionization (nanoEESI) source has been characterized for in situ mass spectrometric analysis of ambient samples without sample pretreatment. The primary ions generated using a nanospray emitter interact with the neutral sample plume created by manually nebulizing liquid samples, allowing production of the analyte ions in the spatial cross section of the nanoEESI source. The performance of nanoEESI is experimentally investigated by coupling the nanoEESI source to a commercial LTQ mass spectrometer for rapid analysis of various ambient samples using positive/negative ion detection modes. Compounds of interest in actual samples such as aerosol drug preparations, beverages, milk suspensions, farmland water, and groundwater were unambiguously detected using tandem nanoEESI ion trap mass spectrometry. The limit of detection was low picogram per milliliter levels for the compounds tested. Acceptable relative standard deviation (RSD) values (5-10%) were obtained for direct measurement of analytes in complex matrixes, providing linear dynamic signal responses using manual sample introduction. A single sample analysis was completed within 1.2 s. Requiring no sheath gas for either primary ion production or neutral sample introduction, the nanoEESI has advantages including readiness for miniaturization and integration, simple maintenance, easy operation, and low cost. The experimental data demonstrate that the nanoEESI is a promising tool for high-throughput, sensitive, quantitative, in situ analysis of ambient complex samples, showing potential applications for in situ analysis in multiple disciplines including but not limited to pharmaceutical analysis, food quality control, pesticides residue detection, and homeland security. PMID:19673501

  8. Determination of uranium 238 in urine samples for workers in the phosphate industry using alpha spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kharita, M. H.; Bitar, A.; Sakhita, K.

    2013-02-01

    An alpha spectrometry method has been developed and validated to assess the internal dose from uranium isotopes for workers in phosphate mines. The method was able to measure levels down to 2 mBq/L. Though the validation results revealed that the mean relative error was about 20%, the method seems to be appropriate and suitable for the application of occupationally exposure monitoring. The method has been used for routine monitoring of workers in the Syrian phosphate mines for 2 years. The results showed that there was some high activity of uranium 238 in urine samples of the first batch which was attributed to samples contamination from the work environment. In the second batch, the results showed that the activity of uranium 238 for most workers were less than the detection limit. Nevertheless, some workers had some exposures but the calculated doses were low or within the occupational dose limit.

  9. Stable isotope dilution analysis of hydrologic samples by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Garbarino, J.R.; Taylor, H.E.

    1987-01-01

    Inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry is employed in the determination of Ni, Cu, Sr, Cd, Ba, Ti, and Pb in nonsaline, natural water samples by stable isotope dilution analysis. Hydrologic samples were directly analyzed without any unusual pretreatment. Interference effects related to overlapping isobars, formation of metal oxide and multiply charged ions, and matrix composition were identified and suitable methods of correction evaluated. A comparability study snowed that single-element isotope dilution analysis was only marginally better than sequential multielement isotope dilution analysis. Accuracy and precision of the single-element method were determined on the basis of results obtained for standard reference materials. The instrumental technique was shown to be ideally suited for programs associated with certification of standard reference materials.

  10. Established and Emerging Atmospheric Pressure Surface Sampling/Ionization Techniques for Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Van Berkel, Gary J; Pasilis, Sofie P; Ovchinnikova, Olga S

    2008-01-01

    The number and type of atmospheric pressure techniques suitable for sampling analytes from surfaces, forming ions from those analytes, and subsequently transporting those ions into vacuum for interrogation by mass spectrometry has rapidly expanded over the last several years. Moreover, the literature in this area is complicated by an explosion in acronyms for these techniques, many of which provide no information relating to the chemical or physical processes involved. In this review, we sort this vast array of techniques into a relatively few categories on the basis of the approaches used for surface sampling and ionization. For each technique, we explain, as best known, many of the underlying principles of operation, describe representative applications, and in some cases, discuss needed research or advancements and attempt to forecast their future analytical utility.

  11. Atmospheric Pressure Surface Sampling/Ionization Techniques for Direct Coupling of Planar Separations with Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Pasilis, Sofie P; Van Berkel, Gary J

    2010-01-01

    Planar separations, which include thin layer chromatography and gel electrophoresis, are in widespread use as important and powerful tools for conducting separations of complex mixtures. To increase the utility of planar separations, new methods are needed that allow in-situ characterization of the individual components of the separated mixtures. A large number of atmospheric pressure surface sampling and ionization techniques for use with mass spectrometry have emerged in the past several years, and several have been investigated as a means for mass spectrometric read-out of planar separations. In this article, we review the atmospheric pressure surface sampling and ionization techniques that have been used for the read-out of planar separation media. For each technique, we briefly explain the operational basics and discuss the analyte type for which it is appropriate and some specific applications from the literature.

  12. Specific absorption rate in electrically coupled biological samples between metal plates.

    PubMed

    Joines, W T; Blackman, C F; Spiegel, R J

    1986-01-01

    The specific absorption rate (SAR) in a biological sample irradiated by electromagnetic fields between the metal plates of a transmission line can be altered significantly by the spacing of the metal plates and the distance between neighboring samples. The SAR in spherical biological samples is calculated for a number of neighboring sample arrangements and metal-plate spacings by using the method of images and induced dipole coupling. For a decrease in metal-plate spacing, the derived equations predict an increase in SAR within a sample and a decrease in SAR with a decrease in neighboring-sample spacing. The calculations are compared with measurements made with the aid of an array of 1-in radius metal hemispheres on the lower plate of two parallel plates (thus forming an image system). The hemisphere on which measurements are taken is insulated from the metal plate and is connected via a coaxial center conductor to an HP 3582A spectrum analyzer that measures the voltage and hence the electric field intensity at the hemisphere. Measurements made at a frequency where wavelength is large compared with sample size (48 Hz) are in good agreement with calculations. PMID:3741491

  13. [Study on the solid sorbent tube for capturing mercury in the workplace air and determination by cold vapor atomic absorption spectrometry].

    PubMed

    Huang, Zhen-Nong; Sun, Yi; Ruan, Xiao-Lin; Wu, Bang-Hua; Zhang, Ai-Hua; Huang, Jun-Yi; Huang, Yan-Ling; Huang, Han-Lin

    2014-05-01

    A new KMnO4-MnO2 solid multisorbent tube for capturing mercury in workplace air was developed. Experimental conditions for solid multisorbent tube, efficiency of sampling, desorption efficiency and stability were studied. Mercury and its compounds in air were captured by solid KMnO4-MnO2 sorbent filled tube and desorbed with 0. 90 mol L-1 sulfuric acid solution. Mercury and its compounds were quantitatively analyzed according to the method of GBZ/T 160. 14-2004 cold vapor atomic absorption spectrometry. The linear range of the proposed method was 0. 000 2-0. 015 0 mg L-1 with r=0. 999 1, the average efficiency of sampling was 99. 9%-100. 0% in the concentration range of 0. 001-2. 820 mg m-3 , and the breakthrough capacity was more than 505.4 microg for 300 mg KMnO4-MnO2 solid multisorbent, the average recovery rate was 96. 4% approximately103. 8%, the intra-day and inter-day precision was 3. 0% approximately 3. 3% and 3. 5% approximately 5. 2% respectively, the limit of detection was 0. 0013 mg m-3 (7. 5 L of air ) and 0. 000 6 mg m-3 (96 L of air), after sampling, and the solid multisorbent tube could be kept at least 30 d at room temperature without significant loss. The present method was simple and suitable for capturing mercury and its compounds in the workplace air and ambient air. The solid multisorbent tube was useful for personal sampling and time weighted average sampling. PMID:25095449

  14. Ultrasound-assisted single-drop microextraction for the determination of cadmium in vegetable oils using high-resolution continuum source electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almeida, Jorge S.; Anunciação, Taiana A.; Brandão, Geovani C.; Dantas, Alailson F.; Lemos, Valfredo A.; Teixeira, Leonardo S. G.

    2015-05-01

    This work presents an ultrasound-assisted single-drop microextraction procedure for the determination of cadmium in vegetable oils using high-resolution continuum source electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry. Some initial tests showed that the best extraction efficiency was obtained when using ultrasound instead of mechanical agitation, indicating that acoustic cavitation improved the extraction process. Nitric, hydrochloric and acetic acids were evaluated for use in the extraction process, and HNO3 gave the best results. A two-level full-factorial design was applied to investigate the best conditions for the extraction of Cd from the oil samples. The influences of the sonication amplitude, time and temperature of the extraction were evaluated. The results of the design revealed that all of the variables had a significant effect on the experimental results. Afterward, a Box-Behnken design was applied to determine the optimum conditions for the determination of cadmium in vegetable oil samples. According to a multivariate study, the optimum conditions were as follows: sonication amplitude of 60%, extraction time of 15 min, extraction temperature of 46 °C and 0.1 mol L- 1 HNO3 as the extractor solution. Under optimized conditions, the developed method allows for the determination of Cd in oil samples with a limit of quantification of 7.0 ng kg- 1. Addition and recovery experiments were performed in vegetable oil samples to evaluate the accuracy of the method, and the recoveries obtained varied from 90% to 115%. The samples were also analyzed after the acid digestion procedure, and the paired t-test (95% confidence level) did not show significant differences from the proposed method.

  15. Application of the extraction induced by emulsion breaking for the determination of chromium and manganese in edible oils by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Robaina, Nicolle F; Brum, Daniel M; Cassella, Ricardo J

    2012-09-15

    This work reports the optimization of a method, based on the extraction induced by emulsion breaking, for the determination of trace concentrations of Cr and Mn in edible oils by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS). In the method, a water-in-oil emulsion was prepared by mixing the oil sample with an acid solution (HNO(3)) of Triton X-114 to allow the intense contact between the sample and the extractant acid solution. Afterwards, the emulsion was broken by heating and the acid aqueous phase deposited in the bottom of the flask was collected for the determination of the metals of interest. The method was optimized by studying the influence of several parameters such as the concentration of HNO(3) and the emulsifier agent (Triton X-100 and Triton X-114) in the extractant solution. The best results were verified when the procedure was performed with 5 mL of the sample and 1 mL of the extractant solution containing 15%m/v of Triton X-114 and 2.8 mol L(-1) of HNO(3). Also, the fastest emulsion breaking was verified when the emulsions were heated at 90°C. In these conditions, the emulsions were broken in approximately 10 min. The quantification of Cr and Mn in the extracts was carried out by external calibration with aqueous standard solutions, which simplified the procedure. The limits of detection for the determination of Cr and Mn in the oil samples were 66 and 36 ng L(-1), respectively, and the limits of quantification were 219 and 120 ng L(-1), respectively. The developed method was applied in the determination of Cr and Mn in twelve samples of edible oils produced with different oleaginous. Recovery tests were performed to attest the accuracy of the method, being observed recovery percentages in the range of 86-115%. PMID:22967528

  16. Analysis of thyreostatic drugs in thyroid samples by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry: comparison of two sample treatment strategies.

    PubMed

    Abuín, S; Companyó, R; Centrich, F; Rúbies, A; Prat, M D

    2008-10-17

    A method based on ultra-performance liquid chromatography-electrospray ionisation-tandem mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS/MS) for the determination of six thyreostatic drugs in thyroid tissue has been optimised and validated in accordance with Decision 2002/657/EC. Sample extraction was evaluated in methanol and in ethyl acetate, the latter which gave better results. Two clean-up strategies were compared: one based on silica cartridges (SPE), and the other, on gel permeation chromatography (GPC). Recoveries ranged from 40% to 79% for the SPE approach and from 80% to 109% for GPC. Quantification was performed with blank tissue samples spiked with the analytes in the range 50-500microgkg(-1). 5,6-Dimethyl-2-thiouracil and 2-mercaptobenzimidazole-d(4) were used as internal standards. Decision limit (CCalpha) and detection capability (CCbeta) ranged from 1 to 15microgkg(-1) and from 6 to 25microgkg(-1), respectively. The accuracy of the method was calculated as percent error, which was less than 10%. The relative standard deviation in reproducibility conditions ranged between 2% and 14%. PMID:18768184

  17. Sample preparation and direct electrospray ionization on a tip column for rapid mass spectrometry analysis of complex samples.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yun-Qing; You, Jin-Qing; Yuan, Bi-Feng; Feng, Yu-Qi

    2012-10-01

    A handheld pipette tip column electrospray ionization source (PTC-ESI source) was developed for rapid mass spectrometry analysis at ambient pressure. The PTC-ESI source was made up of three main component parts including a micro DC high voltage (HV) power supply, a micropipette and a disposable micropipette tip filled with a plug of adsorbent. A DC high voltage was applied to the sharp point of the micropipette tip column to induce electrospray ionization. The PTC-ESI source was successfully used for direct analysis of basic organic compounds, organic acids and peptides in a simple matrix. In the case of complex samples, micro-extraction based on the adsorbent phase filled in the pipette tip was used to remove impurities and concentrate target analytes prior to ionization. The eluting solution was not pipetted out, but directly dispersed in the form of electrospray from the pipette tip for ionization. The effectiveness of the PTC-ESI source has been further demonstrated by fast analysis of therapeutic compounds and endogenous bioactive chemicals in complex biological samples. PMID:22898704

  18. Investigation of an alternating current plasma as an element selective atomic emission detector for high-resolution capillary gas chromatography and as a source for atomic absorption and atomic emission spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Ombaba, J.M.

    1992-01-01

    This thesis deals with the construction and evaluation of an alternating current plasma (ACP) as an element-selective detector for high resolution capillary gas chromatography (GC) and as an excitation source for atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS) and atomic emission spectrometry (AES). The plasma, constrained in a quartz discharge tube at atmospheric pressure, is generated between two copper electrodes and utilizes helium as the plasma supporting gas. The alternating current plasma power source consists of a step-up transformer with a secondary output voltage of 14,000 V at a current of 23 mA. The chromatographic applications studied included the following: (1) the separation and selective detection of the organotin species, tributyltin chloride (TBT) and tetrabutyltin (TEBT), in environmental matrices including mussels (mytilus edullus) and sediment from Boston Harbor, industrial waste water and industrial sludge, and (2) the detection of methylcyclopentadienylmanganesetricarbonyl (MMT) and similar compounds used as gasoline additives. An ultrasonic nebulizer was utilized as a sample introduction device for aqueous solutions when the ACP was employed as an atomization source for atomic absorption spectrometry and as an excitation source for atomic emission spectrometry. Plasma diagnostic parameters studied include spatial electron number density across the discharge tube, electronic, excitation and ionization temperatures. Interference studies both in absorption and emission modes were considered. The evaluation of a computer-aided optimization program, Drylab GC, using spearmint oil and Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) standard mixture as probes is discussed. The program is used for separation optimization and prediction of gas chromatographic parameters. The program produces a relative resolution map (RRM) which guides the analyst in selecting the most favorable temperature programming rate for the separation.

  19. Determination of heavy metals in solid emission and immission samples using atomic absorption spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Fara, M.; Novak, F.

    1995-12-01

    Both flame and electrothermal methods of atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS) have been applied to the determination of Al, As, Be, Ca, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mn, Ni, Pb, TI, Se, V and Zn in emission and emission (deposition) samples decomposed in open PTFE test-tubes by individual fuming-off hydrofluoric, perchloroic and nitric acid. An alternative hydride technique was also used for As and Se determination and Hg was determined using a self-contained AAS analyzer. A graphite platform proved good to overcome non-spectral interferences in AAS-ETA. Methods developed were verified by reference materials (inc. NBS 1633a).

  20. [Laser induced breakdown spectra of coal sample and self-absorption of the spectral line].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Gui-yin; Ji, Hui; Jin, Yi-dong

    2014-12-01

    The LIBS of one kind of household fuel coal was obtained with the first harmonic output 532 nm of an Nd·YAG laser as radiation source. With the assignment of the spectral lines, it was found that besides the elements C, Si, Mg, Fe, Al, Ca, Ti, Na and K, which are reported to be contained in coal, the presented sample also contains trace elements, such as Cd, Co, Hf, Ir, Li, Mn, Ni, Rb, Sr, V, W, Zn, Zr etc, but the spectral lines corresponding to O and H elements did not appear in the spectra. This is owing to the facts that the transition probability of H and O atoms is small and the energy of the upper level for transition is higher. The results of measurement also show that the intensity of spectral line increases with the laser pulse energy and self-absorption of the spectral lines K766.493 nm and K769.921 nm will appear to some extent. Increasing laser energy further will make self-absorption more obvious. The presence of self-absorption can be attributed to two factors. One is the higher transition rate of K atoms, and the other is that the increase in laser intensity induces the enhancement of the particle number density in the plasma. PMID:25881446

  1. Simultaneous determination of cadmium, iron and tin in canned foods using high-resolution continuum source graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Leao, Danilo J; Junior, Mario M S; Brandao, Geovani C; Ferreira, Sergio L C

    2016-06-01

    A method was established to simultaneously determine cadmium, iron and tin in canned-food samples using high-resolution continuum source graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (HR-CS GF AAS). The quantification step has been performed using the primary line (228.802nm) for cadmium and the adjacent secondary lines (228.725nm and 228.668nm) for iron and tin, respectively. The selected chemical modifier was an acid solution that contained a mixture of 0.1% (w/v) Pd and 0.05% (w/v) Mg. The absorbance signals were measured based on the peak area using 3 pixels for cadmium and 5 pixels for iron and tin. Under these conditions, cadmium, iron and tin have been determined in canned-food samples using the external calibration technique based on aqueous standards, where the limits of quantification were 2.10ngg(-1) for cadmium, 1.95mgkg(-1) for iron and 3.00mgkg(-1) for tin, and the characteristic masses were 1.0pg for cadmium, 0.9ng for iron and 1.1ng for tin. The precision was evaluated using two solutions of each metal ion, and the results, which were expressed as the relative standard deviation (RSD%), were 3.4-6.8%. The method accuracy for cadmium and iron was confirmed by analyzing a certified reference material of apple leaves (NIST 1515), which was supplied by NIST. However, for tin, the accuracy was confirmed by comparing the results of the proposed method and another analytical technique (inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry). The proposed procedure was applied to determine cadmium, iron and tin in canned samples of peeled tomato and sardine. Eleven samples were analyzed, and the analyte concentrations were 3.57-62.9ngg(-1), 2.68-31.48mgkg(-1) and 4.06-122.0mgkg(-1) for cadmium, iron and tin, respectively. In all analyzed samples, the cadmium and tin contents were lower than the permissible maximum levels for these metals in canned foods in the Brazilian legislation. PMID:27130088

  2. Qualitative analysis of seized cocaine samples using desorption electrospray ionization- mass spectrometry (DESI-MS).

    PubMed

    Stojanovska, Natasha; Tahtouh, Mark; Kelly, Tamsin; Beavis, Alison; Fu, Shanlin

    2015-05-01

    Desorption electrospray ionization - mass spectrometry (DESI-MS) is a useful technique for the qualitative analysis of compounds found in seized drug material. In this study, DESI-MS was utilized in the screening analysis of illicit cocaine samples. The technique was also applied to the geographical origin determination of these samples. The limit of detection was determined to be 24.3 µg (or 3.47 µg/mm(2) ) and the analysis time was less than 1 minute per sample. The intra-day and inter-day precision for the detection of cocaine was 11 % and 42 %, respectively; therefore the quantitative data provided by DESI-MS was limited in its use for accurate determination of cocaine concentration in a sample. Using the quadrupole time-of-flight (QTOF) mass spectrometer, the presence of cocaine and impurities detected were confirmed by accurate tandem MS data. The qualitative chemical profiles obtained using DESI-MS were compared to two popular analysis techniques, GC-MS and LC-MS. The effects of a range of adulterants including caffeine, procaine, levamisole, lignocaine, paracetamol, and atropine on the detectability of cocaine were also investigated. It was found that the addition of these adulterants in a cocaine sample did not prevent the detection of the analyte itself (there was slight enhancement in some samples), which was useful in drug detection. The detection of truxillines in the seized samples by DESI-MS aided in the preliminary determination of geographical origin, i.e., Bolivian, Peruvian or Colombian leaf origin. The application of DESI-MS to the qualitative analysis and screening of seized cocaine samples demonstrates the potential and applicability of the technique to the fast chemical profiling of illicit samples. PMID:24943809

  3. Fully Automated Laser Ablation Liquid Capture Sample Analysis using NanoElectrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Lorenz, Matthias; Ovchinnikova, Olga S; Van Berkel, Gary J

    2014-01-01

    RATIONALE: Laser ablation provides for the possibility of sampling a large variety of surfaces with high spatial resolution. This type of sampling when employed in conjunction with liquid capture followed by nanoelectrospray ionization provides the opportunity for sensitive and prolonged interrogation of samples by mass spectrometry as well as the ability to analyze surfaces not amenable to direct liquid extraction. METHODS: A fully automated, reflection geometry, laser ablation liquid capture spot sampling system was achieved by incorporating appropriate laser fiber optics and a focusing lens into a commercially available, liquid extraction surface analysis (LESA ) ready Advion TriVersa NanoMate system. RESULTS: Under optimized conditions about 10% of laser ablated material could be captured in a droplet positioned vertically over the ablation region using the NanoMate robot controlled pipette. The sampling spot size area with this laser ablation liquid capture surface analysis (LA/LCSA) mode of operation (typically about 120 m x 160 m) was approximately 50 times smaller than that achievable by direct liquid extraction using LESA (ca. 1 mm diameter liquid extraction spot). The set-up was successfully applied for the analysis of ink on glass and paper as well as the endogenous components in Alstroemeria Yellow King flower petals. In a second mode of operation with a comparable sampling spot size, termed laser ablation/LESA , the laser system was used to drill through, penetrate, or otherwise expose material beneath a solvent resistant surface. Once drilled, LESA was effective in sampling soluble material exposed at that location on the surface. CONCLUSIONS: Incorporating the capability for different laser ablation liquid capture spot sampling modes of operation into a LESA ready Advion TriVersa NanoMate enhanced the spot sampling spatial resolution of this device and broadened the surface types amenable to analysis to include absorbent and solvent resistant

  4. Liquid sample introduction in inductively coupled plasma atomic emission and mass spectrometry - Critical review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bings, N. H.; Orlandini von Niessen, J. O.; Schaper, J. N.

    2014-10-01

    Inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy (ICP-OES) and mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) can be considered as the most important tools in inorganic analytical chemistry. Huge progress has been made since the first analytical applications of the ICP. More stable RF generators, improved spectrometers and detection systems were designed along with the achievements gained from advanced microelectronics, leading to overall greatly improved analytical performance of such instruments. In contrast, for the vast majority of cases liquid sample introduction is still based on the pneumatic principle as described in the late 19th century. High flow pneumatic nebulizers typically demand the use of spray chambers as “aerosol filters” in order to match the prerequisites of an ICP. By this, only a small fraction of the nebulized sample actually contributes to the measured signal. Hence, the development of micronebulizers was brought forward. Those systems produce fine aerosols at low sample uptake rates, but they are even more prone for blocking or clogging than conventional systems in the case of solutions containing a significant amount of total dissolved solids (TDS). Despite the high number of publications devoted to liquid sample introduction, it is still considered the Achilles' heel of atomic spectrometry and it is well accepted, that the technology used for liquid sample introduction is still far from ideal, even when applying state-of-the-art systems. Therefore, this review is devoted to offer an update on developments in the field liquid sample introduction that had been reported until the year 2013. The most recent and noteworthy contributions to this field are discussed, trends are highlighted and future directions are outlined. The first part of this review provides a brief overview on theoretical considerations regarding conventional pneumatic nebulization, the fundamentals on aerosol generation and discusses characteristics of aerosols ideally suited

  5. Determination of lead, cadmium and mercury in blood for assessment of environmental exposure: A comparison between inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry and atomic absorption spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmer, Christopher D.; Lewis, Miles E.; Geraghty, Ciaran M.; Barbosa, Fernando; Parsons, Patrick J.

    2006-08-01

    A biomonitoring method for the determination of Pb, Cd, and Hg at background levels in whole blood by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry is described. While this method was optimized for assessing Pb, Cd and Hg at environmental levels, it also proved suitable for assessing concentrations associated with occupational exposure. The method requires as little as 200 μl of blood that is diluted 1 + 49 for direct analysis in the inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometer. Method performance is compared to well-established AAS methods. Initial method validation was accomplished using National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) Standard Reference Material 966, Toxic Metals in Bovine Blood. Method detection limits (3s) are 0.05 μg dl - 1 for Pb, 0.09 μg l - 1 for Cd; and 0.17 μg l - 1 for Hg. Repeatability ranged from 1.4% to 2.8% for Pb; 3% to 10% for Cd; and 2.6% to 8.8% for Hg. In contrast, AAS method detection limits were 1 μg dl - 1 , 0.54 μg l - 1 , and 0.6 μg l - 1 , for Pb, Cd, and Hg, respectively. Further performance assessments were conducted over a 2-year period via participation in four international External Quality Assessment Schemes (EQAS) operated specifically for toxic metals in blood. This includes schemes operated by (a) the New York State Department of Health's Wadsworth Center, Albany, NY, USA (b) L'Institut National de Santé Publique du Québec, Centre de Toxicologie du Québec, Canada, (c) Friedrich-Alexander University, Erlangen, Germany, and (d) the University of Surrey, Guildford, UK Trace Elements scheme. The EQAS data reflect analytical performance for blind samples analyzed independently by both inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry and AAS methods.

  6. DNA isolation and sample preparation for quantification of adduct levels by accelerator mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Dingley, Karen H; Ubick, Esther A; Vogel, John S; Ognibene, Ted J; Malfatti, Michael A; Kulp, Kristen; Haack, Kurt W

    2014-01-01

    Accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) is a highly sensitive technique used for the quantification of adducts following exposure to carbon-14- or tritium-labeled chemicals, with detection limits in the range of one adduct per 10(11)-10(12) nucleotides. The protocol described in this chapter provides an optimal method for isolating and preparing DNA samples to measure isotope-labeled DNA adducts by AMS. When preparing samples, special precautions must be taken to avoid cross-contamination of isotope among samples and produce a sample that is compatible with AMS. The DNA isolation method described is based upon digestion of tissue with proteinase K, followed by extraction of DNA using Qiagen isolation columns. The extracted DNA is precipitated with isopropanol, washed repeatedly with 70 % ethanol to remove salt, and then dissolved in water. DNA samples are then converted to graphite or titanium hydride and the isotope content measured by AMS to quantify adduct levels. This method has been used to reliably generate good yields of uncontaminated, pure DNA from animal and human tissues for analysis of adduct levels. PMID:24623226

  7. Highly Sensitive 14C and 3H Quantification of Biochemical Samples Using Accelerator Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Ognibene, T J; Vogel, J S

    2003-10-23

    Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) is an isotope ratio mass spectrometer that quantifies low levels of rare isotopes with half-lives between 10 and 10{sup 8} years. Typical sensitivities are 10{sup 6} atoms in a milligram-sized sample. AMS was originally developed for use in the geosciences as a tool to carbon date archaeological artifacts, but has applications in many fields. In the biosciences, the extreme sensitivity of AMS is used to trace nutrients, toxins and therapeutics in humans and animals using less than {micro}g/kg doses containing between 1-100 nCi of {sup 14}C. This sensitivity is used to reduce sample size, reduce chemical exposures to environmental or physiological levels, reduce radiation exposures to subjects, and/or reduce radioactive (and ''mixed'') waste. Compared to decay counting, AMS provides for a much higher measurement throughput for low activity samples. For example, a milligram-sized sample containing 1 dpm of {sup 14}C can be measured to 3% precision in several seconds. That same sample would require approximately 1 week of decay counting to obtain similar precision.

  8. Artificially-aged cachaça samples characterised by direct infusion electrospray ionisation mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    de Souza, Patterson P; Resende, Ana M M; Augusti, Daniella V; Badotti, Fernanda; Gomes, Fátima de Cássia O; Catharino, Rodrigo R; Eberlin, Marcos N; Augusti, Rodinei

    2014-01-15

    Direct infusion electrospray ionisation mass spectrometry in the negative ion mode [ESI(-)-MS] was employed to evaluate the authenticity of aged cachaças, a traditional and valuable Brazilian alcoholic beverage prepared from the distillation of brewed sugarcane juice and aged in barrels made of common woods. Counterfeit samples were prepared by adding dyes, sawdust or essences to a freshly-distiled, much less valuable sample (white cachaça) to simulate the 1-2years long natural ageing in wooden barrels. A simple visual inspection revealed remarkable differences between the ESI(-)-MS of the authentic samples (aged in oak or amburana casks) and the artificially-aged counterfeit samples. A set of diagnostic ions were detectable in the ESI(-)-MS of the authentic samples aged in oak (m/z 197, 241, 301 and 307) and amburana (m/z 271 and 377/379). This fast and direct methodology seems useful as a routine procedure to monitor this highly profitable and common counterfeit practice. PMID:24054215

  9. Proteomic Biomarker Discovery in 1000 Human Plasma Samples with Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Cominetti, Ornella; Núñez Galindo, Antonio; Corthésy, John; Oller Moreno, Sergio; Irincheeva, Irina; Valsesia, Armand; Astrup, Arne; Saris, Wim H M; Hager, Jörg; Kussmann, Martin; Dayon, Loïc

    2016-02-01

    The overall impact of proteomics on clinical research and its translation has lagged behind expectations. One recognized caveat is the limited size (subject numbers) of (pre)clinical studies performed at the discovery stage, the findings of which fail to be replicated in larger verification/validation trials. Compromised study designs and insufficient statistical power are consequences of the to-date still limited capacity of mass spectrometry (MS)-based workflows to handle large numbers of samples in a realistic time frame, while delivering comprehensive proteome coverages. We developed a highly automated proteomic biomarker discovery workflow. Herein, we have applied this approach to analyze 1000 plasma samples from the multicentered human dietary intervention study "DiOGenes". Study design, sample randomization, tracking, and logistics were the foundations of our large-scale study. We checked the quality of the MS data and provided descriptive statistics. The data set was interrogated for proteins with most stable expression levels in that set of plasma samples. We evaluated standard clinical variables that typically impact forthcoming results and assessed body mass index-associated and gender-specific proteins at two time points. We demonstrate that analyzing a large number of human plasma samples for biomarker discovery with MS using isobaric tagging is feasible, providing robust and consistent biological results. PMID:26620284

  10. Methodology to analyse small silicon samples by glow discharge mass spectrometry using a thin wafer mask

    PubMed Central

    Modanese, C.; Arnberg, L.; Di Sabatino, M.

    2015-01-01

    Glow discharge mass spectrometry (GDMS) is widely used for trace element analysis of bulk solid samples. The geometry of the GD source limits the minimum size of the sample, which for the instrument used in this work (ThermoElementGD) is 20 mm in diameter. From time to time, there is the need to analyse smaller samples with this technique, and we present here a methodology to analyse samples of 9–20 mm diameter through the use of thin masks. Thin masks have been previously used mostly as secondary cathode for the analysis of non-conducting materials, with hole size smaller than the area of the glow discharge. The use of masks in this work includes the following customization:•The choice of highly-pure Si as mask material, to decrease the chance of interferences with the Si samples.•The use of a hole in the mask of the same size as the discharge area. This implies that the mask material is not sputtered, thus decreasing chances for contamination from the mask itself. PMID:26649274

  11. Direct sampling ion trap mass spectrometry (DSITMS). Innovative technology summary report

    SciTech Connect

    1998-12-01

    This report describes the cost, performance, and other key characteristics of an innovative technology for determining the presence or absence, and measuring the concentration, of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and semi-volatile organic compounds (SVOCs) in groundwater and soil, and in gaseous remediation process streams at hazardous waste sites. This new technology is Direct Sampling Ion Trap Mass Spectrometry (DSITMS). DSITMS introduces sample materials directly into an ion trap mass spectrometer by means of a very simple interface, such as a capillary restrictor or a polymer membrane. There is typically very little, if any, sample preparation and no chromatographic separation of the sample constituents. This means that the response of the instrument to the analytes or contaminants in a sample is nearly instantaneous, and that analytical methods based on DSITMS are fast. Analyses are typically completed in less than five minutes, and the analysis cost is generally 50% or less than the amount charged by commercial laboratories using Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) analysis methods.

  12. Open Tubular Lab-On-Column/Mass Spectrometry for Targeted Proteomics of Nanogram Sample Amounts

    PubMed Central

    Hustoft, Hanne Kolsrud; Vehus, Tore; Brandtzaeg, Ole Kristian; Krauss, Stefan; Greibrokk, Tyge; Wilson, Steven Ray; Lundanes, Elsa

    2014-01-01

    A novel open tubular nanoproteomic platform featuring accelerated on-line protein digestion and high-resolution nano liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (LC-MS) has been developed. The platform features very narrow open tubular columns, and is hence particularly suited for limited sample amounts. For enzymatic digestion of proteins, samples are passed through a 20 µm inner diameter (ID) trypsin + endoproteinase Lys-C immobilized open tubular enzyme reactor (OTER). Resulting peptides are subsequently trapped on a monolithic pre-column and transferred on-line to a 10 µm ID porous layer open tubular (PLOT) liquid chromatography LC separation column. Wnt/ß-catenein signaling pathway (Wnt-pathway) proteins of potentially diagnostic value were digested+detected in targeted-MS/MS mode in small cell samples and tumor tissues within 120 minutes. For example, a potential biomarker Axin1 was identifiable in just 10 ng of sample (protein extract of ∼1,000 HCT15 colon cancer cells). In comprehensive mode, the current OTER-PLOT set-up could be used to identify approximately 1500 proteins in HCT15 cells using a relatively short digestion+detection cycle (240 minutes), outperforming previously reported on-line digestion/separation systems. The platform is fully automated utilizing common commercial instrumentation and parts, while the reactor and columns are simple to produce and have low carry-over. These initial results point to automated solutions for fast and very sensitive MS based proteomics, especially for samples of limited size. PMID:25222838

  13. Recommended Mass Spectrometry-Based Strategies to Identify Ricin-Containing Samples

    PubMed Central

    Kalb, Suzanne R.; Schieltz, David M.; Becher, François; Astot, Crister; Fredriksson, Sten-Åke; Barr, John R.

    2015-01-01

    Ricin is a protein toxin produced by the castor bean plant (Ricinus communis) together with a related protein known as R. communis agglutinin (RCA120). Mass spectrometric (MS) assays have the capacity to unambiguously identify ricin and to detect ricin’s activity in samples with complex matrices. These qualitative and quantitative assays enable detection and differentiation of ricin from the less toxic RCA120 through determination of the amino acid sequence of the protein in question, and active ricin can be monitored by MS as the release of adenine from the depurination of a nucleic acid substrate. In this work, we describe the application of MS-based methods to detect, differentiate and quantify ricin and RCA120 in nine blinded samples supplied as part of the EQuATox proficiency test. Overall, MS-based assays successfully identified all samples containing ricin or RCA120 with the exception of the sample spiked with the lowest concentration (0.414 ng/mL). In fact, mass spectrometry was the most successful method for differentiation of ricin and RCA120 based on amino acid determination. Mass spectrometric methods were also successful at ranking the functional activities of the samples, successfully yielding semi-quantitative results. These results indicate that MS-based assays are excellent techniques to detect, differentiate, and quantify ricin and RCA120 in complex matrices. PMID:26610568

  14. Speciation of metal(loid)s in environmental samples by X-ray absorption spectroscopy: a critical review.

    PubMed

    Gräfe, Markus; Donner, Erica; Collins, Richard N; Lombi, Enzo

    2014-04-25

    Element specificity is one of the key factors underlying the widespread use and acceptance of X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) as a research tool in the environmental and geo-sciences. Independent of physical state (solid, liquid, gas), XAS analyses of metal(loid)s in complex environmental matrices over the past two decades have provided important information about speciation at environmentally relevant interfaces (e.g. solid-liquid) as well as in different media: plant tissues, rhizosphere, soils, sediments, ores, mineral process tailings, etc. Limited sample preparation requirements, the concomitant ability to preserve original physical and chemical states, and independence from crystallinity add to the advantages of using XAS in environmental investigations. Interpretations of XAS data are founded on sound physical and statistical models that can be applied to spectra of reference materials and mixed phases, respectively. For spectra collected directly from environmental matrices, abstract factor analysis and linear combination fitting provide the means to ascertain chemical, bonding, and crystalline states, and to extract quantitative information about their distribution within the data set. Through advances in optics, detectors, and data processing, X-ray fluorescence microprobes capable of focusing X-rays to micro- and nano-meter size have become competitive research venues for resolving the complexity of environmental samples at their inherent scale. The application of μ-XANES imaging, a new combinatorial approach of X-ray fluorescence spectrometry and XANES spectroscopy at the micron scale, is one of the latest technological advances allowing for lateral resolution of chemical states over wide areas due to vastly improved data processing and detector technology. PMID:24725743

  15. Slurry sampling for hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometric determination of arsenic in cigarette tobaccos.

    PubMed

    Mierzwa, J; Adeloju, S B; Dhindsa, H S

    1997-06-01

    The development of a slurry sampling hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometric (HGAAS) method for the determination of arsenic in cigarette tobacco samples is described. The method is relatively simple and has been shown to give values of total arsenic close to those obtained using methods requiring total dissolution and decomposition of all vegetable matter before analysis. Pre-treatment of samples slurried in nitric acid by ultrasonication permitted the extraction of about 90% of the total arsenic from tobacco samples. Further improvement in the recovery efficiency (up to 93-94%) was accomplished by the use of an additional step of short microwave-accelerated treatment. L-Cysteine was used as a pre-reduction agent. The accuracy and precision of the slurry sampling HGAAS method were studied using the certified reference material (CRM) CTA-OTL-1 Oriental Tobacco Leaves. Under the optimum conditions, as little as 2.6 ng of arsenic can be detected. The relative standard deviation of the overall procedure was calculated to be below 7.6% at arsenic concentration levels of 0.5-0.9 mg kg-1 and the analytical results obtained for the CRM agreed with the certified value. The main factors that influenced the reliability of the method were sample homogeneity, particle size and slurry concentration. PMID:9282401

  16. [Determination of total mercury in water samples, sediments and solids in suspension in aquatic systems by cold-vapor atomic absorption spectrophotometry].

    PubMed

    Vieira, J L; Passarelli, M M

    1996-06-01

    The use of metallic mercury in the extraction and concentration of gold causes the discarding of tons of this metal in the environment, leading to a considerable increase in the natural levels of the same and the contamination of the surrounding areas. Thus it is extremely important to monitor the presence of this metal in various sectors of the environment with a view aiming to preventing human exposure to excessive concentrations which can result in serious episodes of mercury poisoning. It is also important to estimate the possibility of river sediments becoming potential sources of contamination of human beings. The determination of total mercury was undertaken by using cold vapor atomic absorption spectrometry. River waters, as well as sediments and suspended solids were used as samples for the standardization of the analytical procedure. Later on, this method was tested on samples originating in gold mining areas for the purpose of assessing its validity. PMID:9110471

  17. Sampling and mass spectrometry approaches for the detection of drugs and foreign contaminants in breath for homeland security applications

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, Audrey Noreen

    2009-01-01

    phase microextraction (SPME) and identified using gas chromatography - mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Modifications to the sampling apparatus allowed for increased VOC collection efficiency, and reduced the time of sampling and analysis by over 25%. The VOCs are present in breath due to either endogenous production, or exposure to an external source through absorption, inhalation, or ingestion. Detection of these exogenous chemicals can provide information on the prior location and activities of the subject. Breath samples collected before and after exposure in a hardware store and nail salon were analyzed to investigate the prior location of a subject; breath samples collected before and after oral exposure to terpenes and terpenoid compounds, pseudoephedrine, and inhalation exposure to hexamine and other explosive related compounds were analyzed to investigate the prior activity of a subject. The elimination of such compounds from the body was also monitored. In application, this technique may provide an early warning system to identify persons of interest in the prevention and preemption stages of homeland security.

  18. Direct sampling ion trap mass spectrometry vs. GC/MS for monitoring VOCs in groundwater

    SciTech Connect

    Wise, M.B.; Merriweather, R.; Guerin, M.R.

    1995-12-31

    Direct Sampling Ion Trap Mass Spectrometry (DSITMS) has been under refinement and demonstration by this laboratory for several years. The general technology is applicable to a wide range of problems which would benefit from high sample throughput, fast availability of results, and relatively low cost per sample analysis when compared with conventional analytical methods. At the present time, DSITMS can be used to determine targeted analytes in air, water, soil, and other media. This is accomplished by equipping an ion trap with a direct inlet system which consists of a splitter, capillary restrictor, and a set of sample inlet modules. The capillary restrictor provides the interface between atmosphere and the vacuum in the ion trap while the splitter enables sampling modules which require high gas flow rates to be used with the system. The sampling modules consist of a purge module for analyzing VOCs in water or soil, a direct air sampling module, and a thermal desorber. These modules are designed to be easily interchanged by means of quick connect fittings and a single electrical cable. In general, the DSITMS sample inlet system works equally well on all of the commercially available ion traps with which it has been tested including the Finnigan MAT ITMS, Finnigan MAT Magnum, Varian Saturn, and the Teledyne 3D-Q. Both the Magnum and 3D-Q instruments have been utilized for field applications as well as laboratory analysis. This particular study is a comparison of DSITMS with a purge and trap GC/MS for compliance monitoring of VOC`s in groundwater.

  19. Polarization induced electrospray ionization mass spectrometry for the analysis of liquid, viscous and solid samples.

    PubMed

    Meher, Anil Kumar; Chen, Yu-Chie

    2015-03-01

    In this study, a polarization-induced electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) was developed. A micro-sized sample droplet was deposited on a naturally available dielectric substrate such as a fruit or a stone, and then placed close to (~2 mm) the orifice of a mass spectrometer applied with a high voltage. Taylor cone was observed from the sample droplet, and a spray emitted from the cone apex was generated. The analyte ion signals derived from the droplet were obtained by the mass spectrometer. The ionization process is similar to that in ESI although no direct electric contact was applied on the sample site. The sample droplet polarized by the high electric field provided by the mass spectrometer initiated the ionization process. The dielectric sample loading substrate facilitated further the polarization process, resulting in the formation of Taylor cone. The mass spectral profiles obtained via this approach resembled those obtained using ESI-MS. Multiply charged ions dominated the mass spectra of peptides and proteins, whereas singly charged ions dominated the mass spectra of small molecules such as amino acids and small organic molecules. In addition to liquid samples, this approach can be used for the analysis of solid and viscous samples. A small droplet containing suitable solvent (5-10 µl) was directly deposited on the surface of the solid (or viscous) sample, placed close the orifice of mass spectrometer applied with a high voltage. Taylor cone derived from the droplet was immediately formed followed by electrospray processes to generate gas-phase ions for MS analysis. Analyte ions derived from the main ingredients of pharmaceutical tablets and viscous ointment can be extracted into the solvent droplet in situ and observed using a mass spectrometer. PMID:25800179

  20. Biomonitoring of hair samples by laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sela, H.; Karpas, Z.; Zoriy, M.; Pickhardt, C.; Becker, J. S.

    2007-03-01

    An analytical method for determining essential elements (Zn, Fe and Cu) and toxic elements (Cr, Pb and U) on single hair strands by laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-SFMS) using a double focusing sector field mass spectrometer was developed. Results obtained directly using LA-ICP-SFMS of hair were compared with those measured by inductively coupled plasma quadrupole mass spectrometry (ICP-QMS) of solutions of digested hair samples and the analytical methods were found to agree well. Different quantification strategies for trace element determination in hair samples such as external calibration, standard addition and isotope dilution were compared and demonstrated for uranium. For uranium determination in powdered hair by LA-ICP-MS solution-based calibration was applied by coupling the laser ablation chamber to an ultrasonic nebulizer. The significance of single hair analysis by LA-ICP-SFMS was demonstrated by a case study of a person who changed living environment. Differences in the uranium content observed along the single hair strand correlated with the changes in the level of uranium in drinking water. The uranium concentration in a single hair decreased from 212 to 18 ng g-1 with a change in the uranium concentration in drinking water from 2000 to 30 ng l-1. In addition, measurements of uranium isotope ratios showed a natural isotopic composition throughout the whole period in the drinking water, as well as in the hair samples. This paper demonstrates the potential use of laser ablation ICP-MS to provide measurements on a single hair strand and its potential to become a very powerful tool in hair analysis for biological monitoring.

  1. The determination of silver in silicate rocks by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Aruscavage, P. J.; Campbell, E.Y.

    1979-01-01

    Silver is extracted from a 20% tartaric acid solution by using butyl acetate and diphenylthiourea, and the organic layer is analyzed directly by the graphite-furnace technique. The precisions is ca. 8% as estimated from multiple analysis of 13 standard rocks; there are no systematic errors. The detection limit is 2.4 ppb for 250-mg samples. ?? 1979.

  2. Investigations on Freon-assisted atomization of refractory analytes (Cr, Mo, Ti, V) in multielement electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinrich, Hans-Joachim; Matschat, Ralf

    2007-08-01

    Premixed 1% Freon in argon inner gas of various composition (CCl 2F 2, CHClF 2, CHF 3) was applied to graphite furnace atomizer to minimize unfavorable effects of carbide formation, such as signal tailing and memory effects in the simultaneous determination of Cr, Mo, Ti and V refractory analytes by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry using a multielement atomic absorption spectrometer. The effect of these gaseous additives was investigated when applied separately in atomization, pyrolysis and clean-out steps. The halogenation effects were analytically useful only under the precondition of using Ar-H 2 outer gas to the furnace to all heating steps, and also using this gas in the pre-atomization (drying, pyrolysis) steps. Optimum analytical performance was obtained when mixtures of 1% Freon in argon were applied just before and during the atomization step at a flow rate of 50 mL min - 1 and 2% hydrogen was used as purge gas. Using optimum conditions, signal tailings and carry-over contamination were reduced effectively and good precision (relative standard deviation below 1%) could be attained. Applying 1% CHClF 2 and an atomization temperature of 2550 °C, the characteristic masses obtained for simple aqueous solutions were 8.8 pg for Cr, 17 pg for Mo, 160 pg for Ti, and 74 pg for V. The limits of detection were 0.05, 0.2, 2.3 and 0.5 μg L - 1 for Cr, Mo, Ti and V, respectively. The developed method was applied to the analysis of digests of advanced ceramics. The accuracy of the procedure was confirmed by analyzing the certified reference material ERM-ED 102 (Boron Carbide Powder) and a silicon nitride powder distributed in the inter-laboratory comparison CCQM-P74.

  3. Determination of total arsenic by batch hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometry in injectable drugs containing high levels of Sb(V) as N-methylglucamine antimonate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flores, Érico Marlon de Moraes; Barcelos da Silva, Fabiana E.; Santos, Eliane Pereira dos; Paula, Fávero Reisdorfer; Barin, Juliano Smanioto; Zanella, Renato; Dressler, Valderi Luiz; Bittencourt, Celso Figueiredo

    2002-12-01

    A procedure for the determination of arsenic by batch hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometry (HG AAS) in commercial samples of injectable drugs, containing high concentrations of Sb(V), is described. The procedure is based on the complexing effect for Sb of citric, oxalic and acetic acids as reaction media. Aqua regia was used for sample digestion prior to As determination by HG AAS. The following experimental conditions for the determination of total As, as As(V), were evaluated: the acid medium and its concentration, sodium tetrahydroborate concentration, purge time, and influence of the different oxidation states of As. The effect of the delay time after mixing of sample and acid solution was also studied. Optimized conditions were: 10% (m/v) citric acid, 1.5% (m/v) sodium tetrahydroborate solution and 30 s for purge time. A delay time of 1 h was required after the digested sample had been mixed with citric acid, before As determination could be carried out. No interference on As(III) and As(V) signals was observed in the presence of up to 1 mg Sb(V). The tolerance limits for Ni(II), Cu(II) and Pb(II) were 1 mg, 100 μg and 100 μg, respectively. Recovery tests for As(III) and As(V) resulted in values between 97 and 101%. Characteristic mass and detection limit (3σ), using the recommended conditions, were 0.52 and 0.8 ng, respectively, for total As.

  4. Development of new portable miniaturize solid phase microextraction of silver-APDC complex using micropipette tip in-syringe system couple with electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Naeemullah; Kazi, Tasneem Gul; Afridi, Hassan Imran; Shah, Faheem; Arain, Sadaf Sadia; Arain, Salma Aslam; Panhwar, Abdul Haleem; Arain, Mariam Shahzadi; Samoon, Muhammad Kashif

    2016-02-01

    An innovative and simple miniaturized solid phase microextraction (M-SPME) method, was developed for preconcentration and determination of silver(I) in the fresh and waste water samples. For M-SPME, a micropipette tip packed with activated carbon cloth (ACC) as sorbent, in a syringe system. The size, morphology and elemental composition of ACC before and after adsorption of analyte have been characterized by scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive spectroscopy. The sample solution treated with a complexing reagent, ammonium pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (APDC), was drawn into the syringe filled with ACC and dispensed manually for 2 to 10 aspirating/dispensing cycle. Then the Ag- complex sorbed on the ACC in micropipette was quantitatively eluted by drawing and dispensing of different concentrations of acids for 2 to 5 aspirating/dispensing cycles. The extracted Ag ions with modifier were injected directly into the electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry for analysis. The influence of different variables on the extraction efficiency, including the concentration of ligand, pH, sample volume, eluent type, concentration and volume was investigated. Validity and accuracy of the developed method was checked by the standard addition method. Reliability of the proposed methodology was checked by the relative standard deviation (%RSD), which was found to be <5%. Under the optimized experimental variables, the limits of detection (LOD) and enhancement factors (EF), were obtained to be 0.86 ng L(-1) and 120, respectively. The proposed method was successfully applied for the determination of trace levels of silver ions in fresh and waste water samples. PMID:26520476

  5. Development of new portable miniaturize solid phase microextraction of silver-APDC complex using micropipette tip in-syringe system couple with electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naeemullah; Kazi, Tasneem Gul; Afridi, Hassan Imran; Shah, Faheem; Arain, Sadaf Sadia; Arain, Salma Aslam; Panhwar, Abdul Haleem; Arain, Mariam Shahzadi; Samoon, Muhammad Kashif

    2016-02-01

    An innovative and simple miniaturized solid phase microextraction (M-SPME) method, was developed for preconcentration and determination of silver(I) in the fresh and waste water samples. For M-SPME, a micropipette tip packed with activated carbon cloth (ACC) as sorbent, in a syringe system. The size, morphology and elemental composition of ACC before and after adsorption of analyte have been characterized by scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive spectroscopy. The sample solution treated with a complexing reagent, ammonium pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (APDC), was drawn into the syringe filled with ACC and dispensed manually for 2 to 10 aspirating/dispensing cycle. Then the Ag- complex sorbed on the ACC in micropipette was quantitatively eluted by drawing and dispensing of different concentrations of acids for 2 to 5 aspirating/dispensing cycles. The extracted Ag ions with modifier were injected directly into the electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry for analysis. The influence of different variables on the extraction efficiency, including the concentration of ligand, pH, sample volume, eluent type, concentration and volume was investigated. Validity and accuracy of the developed method was checked by the standard addition method. Reliability of the proposed methodology was checked by the relative standard deviation (%RSD), which was found to be < 5%. Under the optimized experimental variables, the limits of detection (LOD) and enhancement factors (EF), were obtained to be 0.86 ng L- 1 and 120, respectively. The proposed method was successfully applied for the determination of trace levels of silver ions in fresh and waste water samples.

  6. Fast determination of trace elements in organic fertilizers using a cup-horn reactor for ultrasound-assisted extraction and fast sequential flame atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Teixeira, Leonel Silva; Vieira, Heulla Pereira; Windmöller, Cláudia Carvalhinho; Nascentes, Clésia Cristina

    2014-02-01

    A fast and accurate method based on ultrasound-assisted extraction in a cup-horn sonoreactor was developed to determine the total content of Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Mn, Ni, Pb and Zn in organic fertilizers by fast sequential flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FS FAAS). Multivariate optimization was used to establish the optimal conditions for the extraction procedure. An aliquot containing approximately 120 mg of the sample was added to a 500 µL volume of an acid mixture (HNO3/HCl/HF, 5:3:3, v/v/v). After a few minutes, 500 µL of deionized water was added and eight samples were simultaneously sonicated for 10 min at 50% amplitude, allowing a sample throughput of 32 extractions per hour. The performance of the method was evaluated with a certified reference material of sewage sludge (CRM 029). The precision, expressed as the relative standard deviation, ranged from 0.58% to 5.6%. The recoveries of analytes were found to 100%, 109%, 96%, 92%, 101%, 104% and 102% for Cd, Cr, Cu, Mn, Ni, Pb and Zn, respectively. The linearity, limit of detection and limit of quantification were calculated and the values obtained were adequate for the quality control of organic fertilizers. The method was applied to the analysis of several commercial organic fertilizers and organic wastes used as fertilizers, and the results were compared with those obtained using the microwave digestion procedure. A good agreement was found between the results obtained by microwave and ultrasound procedures with recoveries ranging from 80.4% to 117%. Two organic waste samples were not in accordance with the Brazilian legislation regarding the acceptable levels of contaminants. PMID:24401409

  7. Molecular Surface Sampling and Chemical Imaging using Proximal Probe Thermal Desorption/Secondary Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Ovchinnikova, Olga S; Kertesz, Vilmos; Van Berkel, Gary J

    2011-01-01

    Proximal probe thermal desorption/secondary ionization mass spectrometry was studied and applied to molecular surface sampling and chemical imaging using printed patterns on photopaper as test substrates. With the use of a circular cross section proximal probe with a tip diameter of 50 m and fixed temperature (350 C), the influence of probe-to-surface distance, lane scan spacing, and surface scan speed on signal quality and spatial resolution were studied and optimized. As a compromise between signal amplitude, signal reproducibility, and data acquisition time, a surface scan speed of 100 m/s, probe-to-paper surface distance of 5 m, and lane spacing of 10 m were used for imaging. Under those conditions the proximal probe thermal desorption/secondary ionization mass spectrometry method was able to achieve a spatial resolution of about 50 m as determined by the ability to distinguish surface patterns of known dimensions that were printed on the paper substrate. It is expected that spatial resolution and chemical image quality could be further improved by using probes of smaller cross section size and by incorporating a means to maintain a fixed optimal probe-to-surface distance real time, continuously adapting to the changing topography of the surface during a lane scan.

  8. Total CMB analysis of streaker aerosol samples by PIXE, PIGE, beta- and optical-absorption analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Annegarn, H. J.; Przybylowicz, W. J.

    1993-04-01

    Multielemental analyses of aerosol samples are widely used in air pollution receptor modelling. Specifically, the chemical mass balance (CMB) model has become a powerful tool in urban air quality studies. Input data required for the CMB includes not only the traditional X-ray fluorescence (and hence PIXE) detected elements, but also total mass, organic and inorganic carbon, and other light elements including Mg, Na and F. The circular streaker sampler, in combination with PIXE analysis, has developed into a powerful tool for obtaining time-resolved, multielemental aerosol data. However, application in CMB modelling has been limited by the absence of total mass and complementary light element data. This study reports on progress in using techniques complementary to PIXE to obtain additional data from circular streaker samples, maintaining the nondestructive, instrumental approach inherent in PIXE: beta-gauging using a 147Pm source for total mass; optical absorption for inorganic carbon; and PIGE to measure the lighter elements.

  9. Self-absorption of neutron capture gamma-rays in gold samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wisshak, K.; Walter, G.; Käppeler, F.

    1984-01-01

    The self-absorption of neutron capture gamma-rays in gold samples has been