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Sample records for absorption spectrophotometry faas

  1. Computer programs for absorption spectrophotometry.

    PubMed

    Jones, R N

    1969-03-01

    Brief descriptions are given of twenty-two modular computer programs for performing the basic numerical computations of absorption spectrophotometry. The programs, written in Fortran IV for card input and output, are available from the National Research Council of Canada. The input and output formats are standardized to permit easy interfacing to yield more complex data processing systems. Though these programs were developed for ir spectrophotometry, they are readily modified for use with digitized visual and uv spectrophotometers. The operations covered include ordinate and abscissal unit and scale interconversions, ordinate addition and subtraction, location of band maxima and minima, smoothing and differentiation, slit function convolution and deconvolution, band profile analysis and asymmetry quantification, Fourier transformation to time correlation curves, multiple overlapping band separation in terms of Cauchy (Lorentz), Gauss, Cauchy-Gauss product, and Cauchy-Gauss sum functions and cell path length determination from fringe spacing analysis.

  2. Spectrophotometry of six broad absorption line QSOs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Junkkarinen, Vesa T.; Burbidge, E. Margaret; Smith, Harding E.

    1987-01-01

    Spectrophotometric observations of six broad absorption-line QSOs (BALQSOs) are presented. The continua and emission lines are compared with those in the spectra of QSOs without BALs. A statistically significant difference is found in the emission-line intensity ratio for (N V 1240-A)/(C IV 1549-A). The median value of (N V)/(C IV) for the BALQSOs is two to three times the median for QSOs without BALs. The absorption features of the BALQSOs are described, and the column densities and limits on the ionization structure of the BAL region are discussed. If the dominant ionization mechanism is photoionization, then it is likely that either the ionizing spectrum is steep or the abundances are considerably different from solar. Collisional ionization may be a significant factor, but it cannot totally dominate the ionization rate.

  3. Analysis of cement by atomic absorption spectrophotometry and volumetric method.

    PubMed

    Choi, K K; Lam, L; Luk, S F

    1994-01-01

    A new method to determine the composition of cement raw mix and cement is devised. The sample was fused with a mixture of sodium carbonate and lithium tetraborate (3:1) at 925 degrees C for 10 min. The fusion cake was dissolved in hydrochloric acid. The concentration of analyte in solution was either determined by atomic absorption spectrophotometry or titrimetry. The proposed method is quick and the analysis for interested oxides (SiO(2), Al(2)O(3), Fe(2)O(3), and CaO) can be completed within 1 hr. The accuracy and precision are comparable to that of X-ray fluorescence spectrometry.

  4. [Determination of trace elements in new food sources by flame atomic absorption spectrophotometry].

    PubMed

    Liu, Li E; Ding, Li; Qi, Min; Han, Xiu Li; Zhang, Hong-Quan

    2007-07-01

    Samples were digested by HNO3 + HClO4. Flame atomic absorption spectrophotometry (FAAS) was successfully used to determine copper, zinc and iron in new resource food. Under our experimental conditions, the recovery ratio was 94.66%-108.80%; the precision was 0.71%-4.78%. This method of measuring elements is convenient, rapid and accurate. The results showed that there are profitable elements, such as copper, zinc and iron in new resourse food in Henan province. By F test and SNK test, the content sequence of metal elements was found as follows: copper, Chrysanthemum morifolium Ramat = Silkworm pupa > flowers of Pueraria lobata Ohwin = Wheat germ = Codonopsis lanceolata = roots of Pueraria lobata Ohwi > Opuntia dillenii Haw. Zinc, Opuntia dillenii Haw > Silkworm pupa = flowers of Pueraria lobata Ohwi = roots of Pueraria lobata Ohwi = Wheat germ = Codonopsis lanceolata = Chrysanthemum morifolium Ramat. Iron, Silkworm pupa = C hrysanthemum morifolium Ramat = roots of Pueraria lobata Ohwi > flowers of Pueraria lobata Ohwi = Wheat germ = Codonopis lanceolata = Opuntia dillenii Haw.

  5. Electrothermal atomic absorption spectrophotometry of nickel in tissue homogenates

    SciTech Connect

    Sunderman, F.W. Jr.; Marzouk, A.; Crisostomo, M.C.; Weatherby, D.R.

    1985-01-01

    A method for analysis of Ni concentrations in tissues is described, which involves (a) tissue dissection with metal-free obsidian knives, (b) tissue homogenization in polyethylene bags by use by a Stomacher blender, (c) oxidative digestion with mixed nitric, sulfuric, and perchloric acids, and (d) quantitation of Ni by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrophotometry with Zeeman background correction. The detection limit for Ni in tissues is 10 ng per g, dry weight; the coefficient of variation ranges from 7 to 15%, depending on the tissue Ni concentration; the recovery of Ni added in concentration of 20 ng per g, dry weight, to kidney homogenates averages 101 +/- 8% (mean +/-SD). In control rats, Ni concentrations are highest in lung (102 +/- 39 ng per g, dry weight) and lowest in spleen (35 +/- 16 ng per g, dry wt.). In descending order of Ni concentrations, the tissues of control rats rank as follows: lung > heart > bone > kidney > brain > testis > fat > liver > spleen. In rats killed 24 h after sc injection of NiCl/sub 2/ (0.125 mmol per kg, body weight) Ni concentrations are highest in kidney (17.7 +/- 2.5 ..mu..g per g, dry weight) and lowest in brain (0.38 +/- 0.14 ..mu..g per g, dry weight). In descending order of Ni concentrations, the tissues of NiCl/sub 2/-treated rats rank as follows: kidney >> lung > spleen > testis > heart > fat > liver > bone > brain. The present method fills the need for an accurate, sensitive, and practical technique to determine tissue Ni concentrations, with stringent precautions to minimize Ni contamination during tissue sampling and processing. 35 references, 5 figures, 1 table.

  6. Studies of selected transuranium and lanthanide triiodides under pressure using absorption spectrophotometry

    SciTech Connect

    Haire, R.G.; Young, J.P.; Peterson, J.R.; Benedict, U.

    1986-01-01

    The anhydrous triiodides of plutonium, americium, and curium under pressure have been investigated using absorption spectrophotometry. These initial studies on plutonium and curium triiodides together with the published data for americium triiodide show that the rhombohedral (BiI/sub 3/-type structure) form of these compounds can be converted to the same orthorhombic (PuBr/sub 3/-type structure) form by applying pressure at room temperature. Absorption spectrophotometry can often differentiate between two crystallographic forms of materials and has been used in the present high pressure studies to monitor the effects of pressure on the triiodides. A complication in these studies of the triiodides is a significant shift of their absorption edges from the near uv to the visible spectral region with pressure. With curium triiodide this shift causes interference with the major f-f absorption peaks and precludes identification by absorption spectrophotometry of the high pressure phase of CmI/sub 3/. 21 refs., 2 figs.

  7. Teaching Beer's Law and Absorption Spectrophotometry with a Smart Phone: A Substantially Simplified Protocol

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuntzleman, Thomas S.; Jacobson, Erik C.

    2016-01-01

    A very simple protocol for teaching Beer's Law and absorption spectrophotometry using a smart phone is described. Materials commonly found in high school chemistry laboratories or even around the house may be used. Data collection and analysis is quick and easy. Despite the simple nature of the experiment, excellent results can be achieved.

  8. Uranium isotopes quantitatively determined by modified method of atomic absorption spectrophotometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, G. H.

    1967-01-01

    Hollow-cathode discharge tubes determine the quantities of uranium isotopes in a sample by using atomic absorption spectrophotometry. Dissociation of the uranium atoms allows a large number of ground state atoms to be produced, absorbing the incident radiation that is different for the two major isotopes.

  9. Cinchocaine hydrochloride determination by atomic absorption spectrometry and spectrophotometry.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Ghani, Nour T; Youssef, Ahmed F A; Awady, Mohamed A

    2005-05-01

    Two sensitive spectrophotometric and atomic absorption spectrometric procedures have been developed for determination of cinchocaine hydrochloride (Cin.Cl) in pure form and in pharmaceutical formulation. The spectrophotometric method was based on formation of an insoluble colored ion-associate between the cited drug and tetrathiocyanatocobaltate (CoTC) or hexathiocyanatochromate (CrTC) which dissolved and extracted in an organic solvent. The optimal experimental conditions for quantitative extraction such as pH, concentration of the reagents and solvent were studied. Toluene and iso-butyl alcohol proved to be the most suitable solvents for quantitative extraction of Cin-CoTC and Cin-CrTC ion-associates with maximum absorbance at 620 and 555 nm, respectively. The optimum concentration ranges, molar absorptivities, Ringbom ranges and Sandell sensitivities were also evaluated. The atomic absorption spectrometric method is based on measuring of the excess cobalt or chromium in the aqueous solution, after precipitation of the drug, at 240.7 and 357.9 nm, respectively. Linear application ranges, characteristic masses and detection limits were 57.99-361.9, 50.40 and 4.22 microg ml(-1) of Cin.Cl, in case of CoTC, while 37.99-379.9, 18.94 and 0.81 microg ml(-1) in case of CrTC.

  10. Using high spectral resolution spectrophotometry to study broad mineral absorption features on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blaney, D. L.; Crisp, D.

    1993-01-01

    Traditionally telescopic measurements of mineralogic absorption features have been made using relatively low to moderate (R=30-300) spectral resolution. Mineralogic absorption features tend to be broad so high resolution spectroscopy (R greater than 10,000) does not provide significant additional compositional information. Low to moderate resolution spectroscopy allows an observer to obtain data over a wide wavelength range (hundreds to thousands of wavenumbers) compared to the several wavenumber intervals that are collected using high resolution spectrometers. However, spectrophotometry at high resolution has major advantages over lower resolution spectroscopy in situations that are applicable to studies of the Martian surface, i.e., at wavelengths where relatively weak surface absorption features and atmospheric gas absorption features both occur.

  11. Determination of traces of silver in waters by anion exchange and atomic absorption spectrophotometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chao, T.T.; Fishman, M. J.; Ball, J.W.

    1969-01-01

    A method has been developed for the accurate determination of 0.1-1 ??g of silver per liter of water. The method permits stabilization of silver in water without loss to container walls. Optimum conditions have been established for the complete recovery of silver from water with an anion-exchange column, for quantitative elution of silver from the resin, and for measurement of silver by atomic absorption spectrophotometry after chelation with ammonium pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate and extraction of the chelate with MIBK. Silver in the 1-10 ??g 1 range can be determined by extraction without pre-concentration on an ion-exchange resin. ?? 1969.

  12. [Determination of trace Rh in organic residue by flame atomic absorption spectrophotometry].

    PubMed

    Han, Mei; Cheng, Fang; Gu, Shi-fang; Cui, Li-jun; Xiao, Guang; Xu, Song-yun

    2003-02-01

    The catalytic organic residue contained Rh was digested with HNO3 at 130 degrees C for 12 h. Trace noble metal Rh in catalytic organic residue was determined by flame atomic absorption spectrophotometry. Rh was atomized by air-acetylene flame at lamp Current of 7 mA. The methods of sample pretreatment for Rh in residue were compared in this paper. The recovery rates of this method were 95.3%-105.5% and the relative standard derivation was 0.9%. The method was applied to the analysis of some practical samples and the results obtained were satisfactory.

  13. Determination of beryllium in urine by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrophotometry

    SciTech Connect

    Thorat, D.D.; Bhat, P.N.; Mahadevan, T.N.

    1995-08-01

    A method for the determination of beryllium in urine samples by Graphite Furnace Atomic Absorption Spectrophotometry (GFAAS) has been developed. The background correction problem due to the sample matrix was overcome by solvent extraction step. Urine samples were digested with a mixture of concentrated nitric and sulphuric acids. Beryllium in solution was complexed with acetylacetone, extracted in chloroform at pH 8.5 and back extracted in 2%(v/v) nitric acid for final analysis by AAS. The range of concentrations of beryllium observed in urine samples covering both occupational and control subject was 0.03 - 0.37 ng Be/ml.

  14. Analysis of lithium in deep basalt groundwaters using graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrophotometry

    SciTech Connect

    Dill, J.A.; Marcy, A.D.

    1986-05-01

    Lithium is under consideration for use as a reactive (sorptive) tracer in experiments designed to provide information regarding natural attenuation processes in a basalt-groundwater environment. In support of these activities, background lithium concentrations in samples obtained from a variety of test horizons have been determined using graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrophotometry. Significant interference was observed in these determinations and was found to be due to the presence of silicate in the samples. It was found that these problems could be circumvented through the use of alkaline silicate or synthetic groundwater matrix modifiers. This matrix effect was examined in some detail. Results obtained using the graphite furnace were compared to results obtained using inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy.

  15. Removal of iron interferences by solvent extraction for geochemical analysis by atomic-absorption spectrophotometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zhou, L.; Chao, T.T.; Sanzolone, R.F.

    1985-01-01

    Iron is a common interferent in the determination of many elements in geochemical samples. Two approaches for its removal have been taken. The first involves removal of iron by extraction with methyl isobutyl ketone (MIBK) from hydrochloric acid medium, leaving the analytes in the aqueous phase. The second consists of reduction of iron(III) to iron(II) by ascorbic acid to minimize its extraction into MIBK, so that the analytes may be isolated by extraction. Elements of interest can then be determined using the aqueous solution or the organic extract, as appropriate. Operating factors such as the concentration of hydrochloric acid, amounts of iron present, number of extractions, the presence or absence of a salting-out agent, and the optimum ratio of ascorbic acid to iron have been determined. These factors have general applications in geochemical analysis by atomic-absorption spectrophotometry. ?? 1985.

  16. Determination of nickel by flame atomic-absorption spectrophotometry after separation by adsorption of its nioxime complex on microcrystalline naphthalene.

    PubMed

    Nagahiro, T; Puri, B K; Katyal, M; Satake, M

    1984-11-01

    A method has been developed for the determination of nickel in alloys by flame atomic-absorption spectrophotometry after formation of a water-insoluble complex, its adsorption on microcrystalline naphthalene, and dissolution of the complex and naphthalene in nitric acid and xylene.

  17. Determination of Fe Content of Some Food Items by Flame Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy (FAAS): A Guided-Inquiry Learning Experience in Instrumental Analysis Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fakayode, Sayo O.; King, Angela G.; Yakubu, Mamudu; Mohammed, Abdul K.; Pollard, David A.

    2012-01-01

    This article presents a guided-inquiry (GI) hands-on determination of Fe in food samples including plantains, spinach, lima beans, oatmeal, Frosted Flakes cereal (generic), tilapia fish, and chicken using flame atomic absorption spectroscopy (FAAS). The utility of the GI experiment, which is part of an instrumental analysis laboratory course,…

  18. Stability of low concentration calibration standards for graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrophotometry

    SciTech Connect

    Bass, D A; TenKate, L B

    1993-11-01

    Graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrophotometry (GFAAS) is used for determination of ultra-trace metals in environmentally important samples. In the generation of GFAAS calibration curves for many environmental applications, low concentration calibration standards must be prepared dally, as required by the Statement of Work (SOW) for the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Contract Laboratory Program (CLP). This results in significant time and work for the analyst and significant cost to the Analytical Chemistry Laboratory (ACL) for chemicals and waste management. While EPA SW 846 is less prescriptive than the CLP SOW, ACL has been following the CLP guidelines because in-house criteria regarding the stability of GFAAS standards have not been established. A study was conducted to determine the stability of GFAAS standards for analytes commonly used in the ACL (single and mixed) as a function of time. Data were collected over nine months. The results show that GFAAS standards for Sb, Pb, Se, Ag, and TI are stable for a longer period of time than currently assumed by the CLP SOW. Reducing the frequency of preparing these standards will increase efficiency, decrease the handling of hazardous the quantity of hazardous waste generated, and decrease the quantity of hazardous substances to be ordered and stocked by the laboratory. These benefits will improve GFAAS analysis quality, reduce costs, enhance safety, and lower environmental concerns.

  19. Separation and quantitation of metallothioneins by high-performance liquid chromatography coupled with atomic absorption spectrophotometry

    SciTech Connect

    Lehman, L.D.; Klaassen, C.D.

    1986-03-01

    A rapid, reproducible, and sensitive high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) method for the determination of the concentrations of metallothionein-I (MT-I) and metallothionein-II (MT-II) in rat liver has been developed. Metallothioneins (MTs) were separated and quantitated by anion-exchange high-performance liquid chromatography coupled with atomic absorption spectrophotometry (AAS). Purified rat liver MT-I and MT-II, used as standards for developing the method, were easily resolved, eluting at 7.5 and 10.4 min, respectively. To establish standard curves, protein concentrations of solutions of the purified MTs were determined by the Kjeldahl method for the determination of nitrogen, after which the standards were saturated with Cd (final concentration of 50 ppm Cd). Rat liver cytosols obtained from untreated and Cd- or Zn-treated rats were prepared for HPLC-AAS analysis by saturation with Cd (50 ppm Cd) followed by heat denaturation (placing in a boiling water bath for 1 min). Based on the method of standard additions, recovery of MTs exceeded 95% and repeated injection of a sample yielded a coefficient of variance of approximately 2%. A detection limit of 5 ..mu..g MT/g liver was established for the method. Only MT-II was detected in untreated rats, whereas following exposure to Cd or Zn, both forms of MTs were detected. Concentrations of total MTs in liver of untreated and Cd- or Zn-treated rats were also determined by the Cd/hemoglobin radioassay (which fails to distinguish MT-I from MT-II) and indicated that results obtained with the HPLC-AAS method compared favorably to the Cd/hemoglobin radioassay.

  20. Determination of trace chromium in water by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrophotometry after preconcentration on a soluble membrane filter

    SciTech Connect

    Gao Piying; Feng Ruolan; Zhang Huaizhu; Li Zhiqiang

    1998-04-01

    A new concentration and determination method has been described for the determination of lower than 0.1 {micro}g L{sup {minus}1} levels of chromium (VI) in water, based on the reaction between chromium (VI) and phenylfluorone (PF) to form an anionic chelate and the collection of the ternary ion-associate of the chelate with cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTMAB) (a cationic surfactant) on an organic solvent-soluble membrane filter. Determination of the solution obtained after dissolving the membrane and analyte in a suitable solvent is achieved using graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrophotometry. The ternary complex (Cr(VI)-PF-CTMAB = 1:2:2) is collected on a 0.45 {micro}m nitrocellulose filter and the filter and analyte are dissolved in a small volume of 2-methoxyethanol acidified with dilute sulfuric acid. The chromium is determined by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrophotometry under optimum experimental conditions. A good linear relationship exists in the range 0.05--0.30 {micro}g chromium in 5.0 ml, with satisfactory reproducibility. The detection limit, defined as three times the standard deviation of the blank, is 0.06 {micro}g L{sup {minus}1} with 20 fold preconcentration. The ions normally present in water do not interfere under the experimental conditions used. The proposed method has been applied to the concentration and determination of chromium (VI) in water samples from several sources by means of direct graphic furnace atomic absorption spectrophotometry; the recoveries of chromium (VI) added to the samples are quantitative, and results found are satisfactory.

  1. Determination of silver in soils, sediments, and rocks by organic-chelate extraction and atomic absorption spectrophotometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chao, T.T.; Ball, J.W.; Nakagawa, H.M.

    1971-01-01

    A useful method for the determination of silver in soil, sediment, and rock samples in geochemical exploration has been developed. The sample is digested with concentrated nitric acid, and the silver extracted with triisooctyl thiophosphate (TOTP) in methyl isobutyl ketone (MIBK) after dilution of the acid digest to approximately 6 M. The extraction of silver into the organic extractant is quantitative and not affected by the nitric acid concentration from 4 M to 8 M, or by different volumes of TOTP-MIBK. The extracted silver is stable and remains in the organic phase up to several days. The silver concentration is determined by atomic absorption spectrophotometry. ?? 1971.

  2. [Study on determination of trace nitrite and reaction mechanism by two-wavelength negative absorption-catalytic spectrophotometry].

    PubMed

    Zi, Yan-qin; Lu, Hao-miao

    2006-01-01

    A new method was proposed for the determination of trace nitrite by two wavelength negative absorption catalytic spectrophotometry based on the catalysis of nitrite on the oxidation fading reaction of acridine orange by potassium bromate in phosphoricacid medium. The additive value of negative absorbances at two wavelengths was linear to the nitrite concentration in the range of 1.0 x 10(-5)-5.0 x 10(-7) mol x L(1). The method has been used to the determination of nitrite in environment water sample with satisfactory

  3. Rapid and simultaneous determination of essential minerals and trace elements in human milk by improved flame atomic absorption spectroscopy (FAAS) with microwave digestion.

    PubMed

    Luo, Yang; Zhang, Bo; Chen, Ming; Wang, Jue; Zhang, Xue; Gao, Wei-Yin; Huang, Jun-Fu; Fu, Wei-Ling

    2010-09-08

    A method for the simultaneous and economical determination of many trace elements in human milk is developed. Two multi-element hollow cathode lamps (HCLs) were used instead of single-element HCLs to improve the sample throughput of flame atomic absorption spectroscopy (FAAS). The microwave digestion of milk is optimized prior to detection, and the performance characteristics of the improved analysis method are identified. Clinical samples are detected by both FAAS and inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectroscopy (ICP-OES) for methodology evaluation. Results reveal that the proposed FAAS with multi-element HCLs could determine six essential minerals and trace elements within 15 min. This method provides a linear analytical range of 0.01-10 mg L(-1). For Ca, Cu, Fe, Mg, Mn, and Zn, the limits of determination are 1.5, 3, 1.8, 2.2, 2.1, and 1.3 microg L(-1), respectively. The mean relative standard deviations (RSDs) of intra- and interassays are lower than 7%. Excellent operational characteristics of rapidity, simplicity, and economy make the proposed method a promising one for the quantification of trace elements in human milk in clinics of underdeveloped areas.

  4. Determination of Pb in Biological Samples by Graphite Furnace Atomic Absorption Spectrophotometry: An Exercise in Common Interferences and Fundamental Practices in Trace Element Determination

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spudich, Thomas M.; Herrmann, Jennifer K.; Fietkau, Ronald; Edwards, Grant A.

    2004-01-01

    An experiment is conducted to ascertain trace-level Pb in samples of bovine liver or muscle by applying graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrophotometry (GFAAS). The primary objective is to display the effects of physical and spectral intrusions in determining trace elements, and project the usual methods employed to minimize accuracy errors…

  5. Application of High Resolution-Continuum Source Flame Atomic Absorption Spectrometry (HR-CS FAAS): determination of trace elements in tea and tisanes.

    PubMed

    Paz-Rodríguez, Beatriz; Domínguez-González, María Raquel; Aboal-Somoza, Manuel; Bermejo-Barrera, Pilar

    2015-03-01

    A new application of HR-CS FAAS (High Resolution-Continuum Source Flame Atomic Absorption Spectrometry) has been developed for the determination of several trace elements (Ca, Co, Cu, Fe, Mn, Ni, Na and Zn) in infusions made from tea, rooibos and tea with seaweed samples. The proposed methods are fast, inexpensive and show good performances: the mean analytical recovery was approximately 100%. The mean limit of detection was 29.4 μg/l, and the mean limit of quantification was 98.0 μg/l (both limits refer to the brewed samples). Due to the matrix effect observed, the standard addition method had to be applied. Preliminary classification (based on metal contents) using chemometric techniques such as PCA (Principal Component Analysis) and CA (Cluster Analysis), was successful for infusions made from rooibos and tea with seaweed, but inconclusive for black and green teas.

  6. Solvent microextraction-flame atomic absorption spectrometry (SME-FAAS) for determination of ultratrace amounts of cadmium in meat and fish samples.

    PubMed

    Goudarzi, Nasser

    2009-02-11

    A simple, low cost and highly sensitive method based on solvent microextraction (SME) for separation/preconcentration and flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS) was proposed for the determination of ultratrace amounts of cadmium in meat and fish samples. The analytical procedure involved the formation of a hydrophobic complex by mixing the analyte solution with an ammonium pyrrolidinedithiocarbamate (APDC) solution. In suitable conditions, the complex of cadmium-APDC entered the micro organic phase, and thus, separation of the analyte from the matrix was achieved. Under optimal chemical and instrumental conditions, a detection limit (3 sigma) of 0.8 ng L(-1) and an enrichment factor of 93 were achieved. The relative standard deviation for the method was found to be 2.2% for Cd. The interference effects of some anions and cations were also investigated. The developed method has been applied to the determination of trace Cd in meat and fish samples.

  7. An international evaluation of holmium oxide solution reference materials for wavelength calibration in molecular absorption spectrophotometry.

    PubMed

    Travis, John C; Zwinkels, Joanne C; Mercader, Flora; Ruíz, Arquímedes; Early, Edward A; Smith, Melody V; Noël, Mario; Maley, Marissa; Kramer, Gary W; Eckerle, Kenneth L; Duewer, David L

    2002-07-15

    Commercial spectrophotometers typically use absorption-based wavelength calibration reference materials to provide wavelength accuracy for their applications. Low-mass fractions of holmium oxide (Ho2O3) in dilute acidic aqueous solution and in glass matrixes have been favored for use as wavelength calibration materials on the basis of spectral coverage and absorption band shape. Both aqueous and glass Ho2O3 reference materials are available commercially and through various National Metrology Institutes (NMIs). Three NMIs of the North American Cooperation in Metrology (NORAMET) have evaluated the performance of Ho3-(aq)-based Certified Reference Materials (CRMs) under "routine" operating conditions using commercial instrumentation. The study was not intended to intercompare national wavelength scales but to demonstrate comparability of wavelength measurements among the participants and between two versions of the CRMs. It was also designed to acquire data from a variety of spectrophotometers for use in a NIST study of wavelength assignment algorithms and to provide a basis for a possible reassessment of NIST-certified Ho3+(aq) band locations. The resulting data show a substantial level of agreement among laboratories, instruments, CRM preparations, and peak-location algorithms. At the same time, it is demonstrated that the wavelength comparability of the five participating instruments can actually be improved by calibrating all of the instruments to the consensus Ho3+(aq) band locations. This finding supports the value of absorption-based wavelength standards for calibrating absorption spectrophotometers. Coupled with the demonstrated robustness of the band position values with respect to preparation and measurement conditions, it also supports the concept of extending the present approach to additional NMIs in order to certify properly prepared dilute acidic Ho2O3 solution as an intrinsic wavelength standard.

  8. Use of High-Resolution Continuum Source Flame Atomic Absorption Spectrometry (HR-CS FAAS) for Sequential Multi-Element Determination of Metals in Seawater and Wastewater Samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peña-Vázquez, E.; Barciela-Alonso, M. C.; Pita-Calvo, C.; Domínguez-González, R.; Bermejo-Barrera, P.

    2015-09-01

    The objective of this work is to develop a method for the determination of metals in saline matrices using high-resolution continuum source flame atomic absorption spectrometry (HR-CS FAAS). Module SFS 6 for sample injection was used in the manual mode, and flame operating conditions were selected. The main absorption lines were used for all the elements, and the number of selected analytical pixels were 5 (CP±2) for Cd, Cu, Fe, Ni, Pb and Zn, and 3 pixels for Mn (CP±1). Samples were acidified (0.5% (v/v) nitric acid), and the standard addition method was used for the sequential determination of the analytes in diluted samples (1:2). The method showed good precision (RSD(%) < 4%, except for Pb (6.5%)) and good recoveries. Accuracy was checked after the analysis of an SPS-WW2 wastewater reference material diluted with synthetic seawater (dilution 1:2), showing a good agreement between certified and experimental results.

  9. Quantification of minerals and trace elements in raw caprine milk using flame atomic absorption spectrophotometry and flame photometry.

    PubMed

    Singh, Mahavir; Yadav, Poonam; Garg, V K; Sharma, Anshu; Singh, Balvinder; Sharma, Himanshu

    2015-08-01

    This study reports minerals and trace elements quantification in raw caprine milk of Beetal breed, reared in Northern India and their feed, fodder & water using flame atomic absorption spectrophotometry and flame photometry. The mineral and trace elements' concentration in the milk was in the order: K > Ca > Na > Fe > Zn > Cu. The results showed that minerals concentration in caprine milk was lesser than reference values. But trace elements concentration (Fe and Zn) was higher than reference values. Multivariate statistical techniques, viz., Pearsons' correlation, Cluster analysis (CA) and Principal component analysis (PCA) were applied to analyze the interdependences within studied variables in caprine milk. Significantly positive correlations were observed between Fe - Zn, Zn - K, Ca - Na and Ca - pH. The results of correlation matrix were further supported by Cluster analysis and Principal component analysis as primary cluster pairs were found for Ca - pH, Ca - Na and Fe - Zn in the raw milk. No correlation was found between mineral & trace elements content of the milk and feed.

  10. [Simultaneous determination of cobalt and nickel in catalyst by microwave digestion-dual wavelength equal absorption spectrophotometry].

    PubMed

    Li, L; Zhang, J; Gao, C

    2001-08-01

    Catalyst samples are digested in a microwave digestion system. The optimum parameters for microwave digestion are selected. Cobalt and nickel in the mixture of Co2+ and Ni2+ with 4-(2-pyridylazo) resorcinol (PAR) can be determined simultaneously by dual-wavelength equal absorption spectrophotometry. By means of the combination of two methods, Co2+ and Ni2+ in catalyst can be determined rapidly, accurately, and contamination problems avoided. The linear ranges are 0-30 micrograms.25 mL-1 for Co2+ and 0-25 micrograms.25 mL-1 for Ni2+. The recoveries of Co2+ and Ni2+ in synthetic samples are between 98.2%-103.6% and between 97.9%-103.7%, respectively. The relative standard deviations of analytical results in catalyst samples are less than 2.2% for Co2+ and less than 1.8% for Ni2+, and relative errors are less than +/- 2.5% for Co2+ and Ni2+.

  11. Methods of analysis by the U.S. Geological Survey National Water Quality Laboratory; determination of antimony by automated-hydride atomic absorption spectrophotometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brown, G.E.; McLain, B.J.

    1994-01-01

    The analysis of natural-water samples for antimony by automated-hydride atomic absorption spectrophotometry is described. Samples are prepared for analysis by addition of potassium and hydrochloric acid followed by an autoclave digestion. After the digestion, potassium iodide and sodium borohydride are added automatically. Antimony hydride (stibine) gas is generated, then swept into a heated quartz cell for determination of antimony by atomic absorption spectrophotometry. Precision and accuracy data are presented. Results obtained on standard reference water samples agree with means established by interlaboratory studies. Spike recoveries for actual samples range from 90 to 114 percent. Replicate analyses of water samples of varying matrices give relative standard deviations from 3 to 10 percent.

  12. Simultaneous Determination of Ofloxacin and Flavoxate Hydrochloride by Absorption Ratio and Second Derivative UV Spectrophotometry

    PubMed Central

    Attimarad, Mahesh

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this study was to develop simple, precise, accurate and sensitive UV spectrophotometric methods for the simultaneous determination of ofloxacin (OFX) and flavoxate HCl (FLX) in pharmaceutical formulations. The first method is based on absorption ratio method, by formation of Q absorbance equation at 289 nm (λmax of OFX) and 322.4 nm (isoabsorptive point). The linearity range was found to be 1 to 30 μg/ml for FLX and OFX. In the method-II second derivative absorption at 311.4 nm for OFX (zero crossing for FLX) and at 246.2 nm for FLX (zero crossing for OFX) was used for the determination of the drugs and the linearity range was found to be 2 to 30 μg/ml for OFX and 2-75 μg /ml for FLX. The accuracy and precision of the methods were determined and validated statistically. Both the methods showed good reproducibility and recovery with % RSD less than 1.5%. Both the methods were found to be rapid, specific, precise and accurate and can be successfully applied for the routine analysis of OFX and FLX in combined dosage form PMID:24826003

  13. Development of mixed-waste analysis capability for graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrophotometry

    SciTech Connect

    Bass, D.A.; TenKate, L.B.; Wroblewski, A.

    1995-03-01

    Graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrophotometer (GFAAS) are typically configured with ventilation to capture potentially toxic and corrosive gases emitted from the vaporization of sample aliquots. When radioactive elements are present, additional concerns (such as meeting safety guidelines and ALARA principles) must be addressed. This report describes a modification to a GFAAS that provides additional containment of vaporized sample aliquots. The modification was found to increase containment by a factor of 80, given expected operating conditions. The use of the modification allows more mixed-waste samples to be analyzed, permits higher levels of radioactive samples to be analyzed, or exposes the analyst to less airborne radioactivity. The containment apparatus was attached to a Perkin-Elmer Zeeman 5000 spectrophotometer for analysis of mixed-waste samples; however, it could also be used on other systems and in other applications where greater containment of vaporized material is desired.

  14. Determination of soluble aluminium concentration in alkaline humic water using atomic absorption spectrophotometry.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, K L; Lewis, D M; Jolly, M; Robinson, J

    2004-11-01

    The steps of the standard method to determine soluble aluminium concentration are filtering, followed by acidifying, then analysing with the atomic absorption spectrophotometer (AAS). When applied to alkaline humic water, acidification gives rise to the formation of humic acid as a brown particulate matter. Of the total soluble aluminium in the original water, 49-61% forms complexes with the particulate humic acid upon acidification. Although the AAS is capable of detecting the binding aluminium, the particulate nature of humic acid easily induces inaccurate readings as a result of the non-uniform distribution of the particulate matter. A more precise analysis of soluble aluminium concentration of alkaline humic water is shown to be achievable in basicified solutions instead. Basicified solutions keep humic acid in the soluble form; hence maintain the homogeneity of the sample.

  15. Measurement of aluminum in neuronal tissues using electrothermal atomization atomic absorption spectrophotometry

    SciTech Connect

    Pierson, K.B.; Evenson, M.A.

    1986-07-01

    Studies characterizing aluminum complexes isolated from neuronal tissues require accurate and precise techniques for aluminum measurement. A solution of 0.01 M nitric acid containing 0.2% Triton X-100 was the optimal diluent for aluminum measurement under the experimental conditions used. Three National Bureau of Standards Standard Reference Materials (SRM) were digested, and the aluminum concentration of each was measured with a Perkin-Elmer 503 atomic absorption spectrophotometer equipped with a Perkin-Elmer HGA 2100 controller. The calculated detection limit of aluminum was 120 pg using 15-..mu..L sample injections (8 ..mu..g/L). Aluminum concentrations present in citrus leaves (SRM 1572), pine needles (SRM 1575), and tomato leaves (SRM 1573) were 100 +- 12 (certified value, 92 +- 15), 522 +- 45 (certified value, 454 +- 30), and 1273 +- 112 (provisional value, 1200) ..mu..g/g, respectively. The within- and between-day precision had coefficients of variation for citrus leaves, pine needles, and tomato leaves of 18 and 12%, 6.3 and 8.6%, and 3.7 and 8.7%, respectively. Aluminum absorbance was enhanced at high pH values and by zinc.

  16. Determination of selenium in human spermatozoa and prostasomes using base digestion and electrothermal atomic absorption spectrophotometry.

    PubMed

    Suistomaa, U; Saaranen, M; Vanha-Perttula, T

    1987-10-15

    A method for the determination of selenium in human spermatozoa and prostasomes is described. The samples were digested with 25% (w/v) tetramethylammonium hydroxide (TMAH) in methanol and analyzed by atomic absorption spectrometry with electrothermal atomization and Zeeman background correction (ET-AAS). Nickel was used as a matrix modifier. Calibration was performed using the matrix-based calibration curve. The TMAH-digestion method agreed well with a conventional digestion procedure using concentrated nitric acid. The TMAH-digestion does not require heating or strong acids and it was suitable for small biological samples. The average recovery of added selenium in spermatozoan digests was 95.1 +/- 5.2% (n = 5). The coefficient of variation was 9.1% (n = 21). The accuracy of the method tested with the NBS standard 1577 (bovine liver, certified at 1.1 +/- 0.1 micrograms Se/g) resulted in a value of 0.98 +/- 0.10 micrograms Se/g (n = 16). The method was further tested in an interlaboratory comparison study.

  17. Methods of analysis by the U.S. Geological Survey National Water Quality Laboratory; determination of chromium in water by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrophotometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McLain, B.J.

    1993-01-01

    Graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrophotometry is a sensitive, precise, and accurate method for the determination of chromium in natural water samples. The detection limit for this analytical method is 0.4 microg/L with a working linear limit of 25.0 microg/L. The precision at the detection limit ranges from 20 to 57 percent relative standard deviation (RSD) with an improvement to 4.6 percent RSD for concentrations more than 3 microg/L. Accuracy of this method was determined for a variety of reference standards that was representative of the analytical range. The results were within the established standard deviations. Samples were spiked with known concentrations of chromium with recoveries ranging from 84 to 122 percent. In addition, a comparison of data between graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrophotometry and direct-current plasma atomic emission spectrometry resulted in suitable agreement between the two methods, with an average deviation of +/- 2.0 microg/L throughout the analytical range.

  18. Determination of Iron in Milk Powdermicrowave Digestion and Flame Atomicabsorption Spectrophotometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Guangyuan; Li, Bo

    To investigate the conditions of microwave digestion for determining Iron in milk powder by flame atomic absorption spectrophotometry(FAAS), the content of iron in milk powder was determined by flame atomic absorption spectrophotometry after the samples were microwavely digested under different conditions. The optimum parameters for microwave digestion were obtained by the orthogonal test at last. The best optimum parameters for microwave digestion was that, the volume of digestion solution was 8mL, the reagent proportion for HNO3 and H2O2 was 4:1, the digestion time was 8min, the digestion pressure was 2.6 Mpa and the digestion power was 1000 W. The content of Iron in assayed milk powder was 0.0560mg/g. Microwave digestion was a time-saving and practical pretreatment of samples.

  19. Optothermistor as a breakthrough in the quantification of lycopene content of thermally processed tomato-based foods: verification versus absorption spectrophotometry and high-performance liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Bicanic, Dane; Swarts, Jan; Luterotti, Svjetlana; Helander, Per; Fogliano, Vincenzo; Anese, Monica

    2005-05-04

    This study reports on the first use of the "optothermistor" as a novel, precise, fast, and low-cost detector of lycopene in a wide range of commercially available processed-tomato products. The quantitative performance of the new device was evaluated by comparing data obtained to that acquired by conventional methods, namely, absorption spectrophotometry and high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC); the linear correlation was high (R = 0.98). The variation of data obtained with the optothermistor in a series of consecutive measurements performed with the same loading of the sample was better than 1%. However, the repeatability (RSD 0.5-9.0%, n = 3-5) achieved with the optothermistor by independent analyses (multiple loading) is comparable to that of HPLC and spectrophotometry. Results of the studies performed on the 19 products derived from tomatoes demonstrated that the optothermistor is suitable for selective, accurate, precise, and simple determination of lycopene (range = 7-75 mg/100 g of product weight) without the need for a sample pretreatment step. The estimated sensitivity of the present optothermistor is 2 mg of lycopene/100 g of product.

  20. Extraction and preconcentration of selenium from aqueous solutions and its determination in water and hair samples by atomic-absorption spectrophotometry.

    PubMed

    Ejaz, M; Qureshi, M A

    1987-03-01

    Several organic solvents, including benzene, xylene, toluene, nitrobenzene, chloroform, carbon tetrachloride, chlorobenzene and high molecular-weight pyridines such as 4-(5-nonyl)pyridine, 2-hexyl-pyridine and benzylpyridine have been investigated as components of systems for the extraction and preconcentration of selenium from nitric acid solutions containing iodide. The results are discussed in terms of choice of reagents and the acid and iodide concentrations, and of several other parameters affecting the extraction. The utility of the method for separation of selenium from aqueous solution has been evaluated. The method has been used for preconcentration of trace levels of selenium from water and hair samples for determination by atomic-absorption spectrophotometry.

  1. Determination of molybdenum in ores, iron and steel by atomic-absorption spectrophotometry after separation by alpha-benzoinoxime extraction or further xanthate extraction.

    PubMed

    Donaldson, E M

    1980-02-01

    A simple and moderately rapid method for determining 0.001% or more of molybdenum in ores, iron and steel is described. After sample decomposition, molybdenum is separated from the matrix elements, except tungsten, by chloroform extraction of its alpha-benzoinoxime complex from a 1.75 M hydrochloric-0.13 M tartaric acid medium. Depending on the amount of tungsten present, molybdenum, if necessary, is back-extracted into concentrated ammonia solution and subsequently separated from coextracted tungsten by chloroform extraction of its xanthate complex from a 1.5M hydrochloric-0.13M tartaric acid medium. It is ultimately determined by atomic-absorption spectrophotometry, at 313.3 nm, in a 15% v/v hydrochloric acid medium containing 1,000 microg/ml of aluminium as the chloride, after evaporation of either extract to dryness with nitric, perchloric and sulphuric acids and dissolution of the salts in dilute ammonia solution.

  2. [Microanalysis of serum iron by atomatic absorption spectrophotometry in a graphite oven: improvement and evaluation of this method].

    PubMed

    Favier, A; Maljournal, B; Decoux, G; Ruffieux, D

    1983-01-01

    We describe a method of micro-assay of serum iron by atomic absorption without flame, after deproteinisation of the serum by molar hydrochloric acid. In this way, we can assay the serum iron in 10 microliters of serum by injection of the supernatant into a graphite oven. The results show a good correlation with those obtained by conventional techniques of atomic absorption and colorimetric assays using ferrozine and bathophenanthroline. However, great care must be taken in the cleaning of plastic test tubes.

  3. Determination of Copper by Graphite Furnace Atomic Absorption Spectrophotometry: A Student Exercise in Instrumental Methods of Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williamson, Mark A.

    1989-01-01

    Discusses a student exercise which requires the optimizing of the charring and atomization temperatures by producing a plot of absorbance versus temperature for each temperature parameter. Notes that although the graphite furnace atomic absorption spectroscopy technique has widespread industrial use, there are no published, structured experiments…

  4. Matrix effects on the determination of manganese in geological materials by atomic-absorption spectrophotometry under different flame conditions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sanzolone, R.F.; Chao, T.T.

    1978-01-01

    Suppression caused by five of the seven matrix elements studied (Si, Al, Fe, Ca and Mg) was observed in the atomic-absorption determination of manganese in geological materials, when synthetic solutions and the recommended oxidizing air-acetylene flame were used. The magnitude of the suppression effects depends on (1) the kind and concentration of the interfering elements, (2) the type of acid medium, and (3) the concentration of manganese to be determined. All interferences noted are removed or alleviated by using a reducing nitrous oxide-acetylene flame. The atomic-absorption method using this flame can be applied to the determination of total and extractable manganese in a wide range of geological materials without interferences. Analyses of six U.S. Geological Survey rock standards for manganese gave results in agreement with the reported values. ?? 1978.

  5. FAA Aviation Forecasts

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-02-01

    General Aviation .... ....... 110 General Economic Growth .......... .................. 110 Cost Factors ..................................... 110...General Aviation Aircraft Cost Indices ......... .. 261 -ii i Table of Contents (Continued) Page Appendix H: FAA Towered Airports...to GNP Growth (Constant Dollars) ..... 22 Commercial Air Carriers U.S. Air Carrier Revenue and Cost Trends .... ............... .28 Industry Operating

  6. Determination of tin in ores, iron, steel and non-ferrous alloys by atomic-absorption spectrophotometry after separation by extraction as the iodide.

    PubMed

    Donaldson, E M

    1980-06-01

    A simple and moderately rapid method for determining 0.001% or more of tin in ores, concentrates and tailings, iron, steel and copper-, zinc-, aluminium-, titanium- and zirconium-base alloys is described. After sample decomposition, tin is separated from the matrix elements, except arsenic, by toluene extraction of its iodide from a 3M sulphuric acid-1.5M potassium iodide medium containing tartaric and ascorbic acids. It is finally back-extracted into a nitric-sulphuric acid solution containing hydrochloric acid to prevent the formation of an insoluble tin-arsenic compound and the resultant solution is evaporated to dryness. Tin is subsequently determined by atomic-absorption spectrophotometry in a nitrous oxide-acetylene flame, at 235.4 nm in a 10% hydrochloric-0.5% tartaric acid medium containing 250 mug of potassium per ml. Co-extracted arsenic does not interfere. Results obtained by this method are compared with those obtained spectrophotometrically with gallein after the separation of tin by iodide extraction.

  7. Does the prior application of the field kit bullet hole testing kit 3 on a suspected bullet hole bias the analysis of atomic absorption spectrophotometry?

    PubMed

    Seltenhammer, Monika H; Fitzl, Christine; Wieser, Ingo; Binder, Reinhard; Paula, Pia; Risser, Daniele U

    2014-09-01

    Forensic ballistics is the study of bullet trajectory and consists of determining gunshot residue (GSR) to identify bullet holes. Among several highly sensitive methods, atomic absorption spectrophotometry (AAS) is employed to analyze GSR in the laboratory. However, it is sometimes necessary to identify bullet holes immediately at a crime scene. The purpose of this examination was to determine whether the use of the field test Bullet Hole Testing Kit 3 (BTK3) on a suspected bullet hole would influence the outcome of AAS-analysis: Three commonly encountered firearms (Glock17, Tokarev, and Colt) were fired at skin, wood, and cloth. AAS-analysis was performed with and without previous BTK3 application. The results clearly indicate that there is no significant interaction on the grounds of BTK3 use (BTK3 vs. no-BTK3 [kit_nokit] [Pb: p = 0.1309; Sb: p = 0.9111], material*kit_nokit [Pb: p = 0.5960; Sb: p = 0.9930], distance*kit_nokit [Pb: p = 0.4014; Sb: p = 0.9184], and firearm type*kit_nokit [Pb: p = 0.9662; Sb: p = 0.9885]); hence, applying this field kit does not falsify later AAS outcomes.

  8. Optimisation of Direct Copper Determination in Human Breast Milk Without Digestion by Zeeman Graphite Furnace Atomic Absorption Spectrophotometry with Two Chemical Modifiers.

    PubMed

    Pineau, Alain; Fauconneau, Bernard; Marrauld, Annie; Lebeau, Alexandra; Hankard, Regis; Guillard, Olivier

    2015-08-01

    Milk is an important food in the human diet, and copper (Cu) in human milk is indispensable to children's normal growth and development. It is consequently important that Cu deficiency, occurring in malnourished women or in malabsorption following bariatric surgery, be prevented. The objective of this work is to provide hospital-based paediatricians with a tool enabling rapid measurement of Cu in human breast milk through a technique that biology laboratories can easily apply. Using electrothermal atomic absorption spectrophotometry with Zeeman correction, we have optimized this method with two chemical modifiers and without digestion for analytical procedure. Detection limits and quantification limits for Cu in human milk were found to be 0.077 and 0.26 μmol/L, respectively. Within-run (n = 30) and between-run (n = 15) variations in a pool of human milk samples were 1.50 and 3.62%, respectively. Average recoveries ranged from 98.67 to 100.61%. The reliability of this method was also confirmed by analysing certified reference material (10%). In breast milk samples collected from 100 lactating mothers, Cu mean (±1 SD) was 7.09 ± 1.60 μmol/L. In conclusion, with minimal preparation and quick determination, the method proposed is suitable for measurement of Cu in human breast milk.

  9. Rapid determination of zinc and iron in foods by flow-injection analysis with flame atomic-absorption spectrophotometry and slurry nebulization.

    PubMed

    de Andrade, J C; Strong, F C; Martin, N J

    1990-07-01

    A rapid method of determining zinc and iron in food by flame atomic-absorption spectrophotometry with slurry nebulization into an air-acetylene flame has been developed. A V-groove, clog-free Babington-type nebulizer, coupled to a single-line flow-injection analysis (FIA) system, was employed to introduce the slurry into the spray chamber. Under the FIA conditions described, an injection frequency of 120/hr is possible, with negligible carry-over and memory effects. The calibration graphs were obtained by using various concentrations (up to 0.1 g/ml) of white bean homogenate as standards, rather than solutions. The method has been applied to various kinds of foods, including grains, vegetables, fruits and sausage. Homogenization of semi-prepared samples to form slurries took only 4 min. Relative deviations between results by the slurry and solution methods for both elements averaged 2-3%. Detection limits by the slurry method were 0.3 mug/ml Zn and 0.6 mug/ml Fe.

  10. Determination of chromium in ores, rocks and related materials, iron, steel and non-ferrous alloys by atomic-absorption spectrophotometry after separation by tribenzylamine-chloroform extraction.

    PubMed

    Donaldson, E M

    1980-10-01

    A method for determining trace and moderate amounts of chromium in ores, concentrates, rocks, soils and clays is described. After fusion of the sample with sodium peroxide, the melt is dissolved in dilute sulphuric acid. The chromium(III) produced by the hydrogen peroxide formed is co-precipitated with hydrous ferric oxide. The precipitate is dissolved in 0.7M sulphuric acid and chromium oxidized to chromium(VI) with ceric ammonium sulphate. The chromium(VI) is extracted as an ion-association complex into chloroform containing tribenzylamine and stripped with ammoniacal hydrogen peroxide. This solution is acidified with perchloric acid and chromium determined by atomic-absorption spectrophotometry in an air-acetylene flame, at 357.9 nm. Barium and strontium do not interfere. The procedure is also applicable to iron and steel, and nickel-copper, aluminium and zirconium alloys. Up to 5 mg of manganese and 10 mg each of molybdenum and vanadium will not interfere. In the absence of vanadium, up to 10 mg of tungsten will not interfere. In the presence of 1 mg of vanadium, up to 1 mg of tungsten will not interfere.

  11. Graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrophotometry--a novel method to quantify blood volume in experimental models of intracerebral hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Kashefiolasl, Sepide; Foerch, Christian; Pfeilschifter, Waltraud

    2013-02-15

    Intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) accounts for 10% of all strokes and has a significantly higher mortality than cerebral ischemia. For decades, ICH has been neglected by experimental stroke researchers. Recently, however, clinical trials on acute blood pressure lowering or hyperacute supplementation of coagulation factors in ICH have spurred an interest to also design and improve translational animal models of spontaneous and anticoagulant-associated ICH. Hematoma volume is a substantial outcome parameter of most experimental ICH studies. We present graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrophotometric analysis (AAS) as a suitable method to precisely quantify hematoma volumes in rodent models of ICH.

  12. Comparison of Adsorbed Mercury Screening Method With Cold-Vapor Atomic Absorption Spectrophotometry for Determination of Mercury in Soil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Easterling, Donald F.; Hovanitz, Edward S.; Street, Kenneth W.

    2000-01-01

    A field screening method for the determination of elemental mercury in environmental soil samples involves the thermal desorption of the mercury from the sample onto gold and then the thermal desorption from the gold to a gold-film mercury vapor analyzer. This field screening method contains a large number of conditions that could be optimized for the various types of soils encountered. In this study, the conditions were optimized for the determination of mercury in silty clay materials, and the results were comparable to the cold-vapor atomic absorption spectrophotometric method of determination. This paper discusses the benefits and disadvantages of employing the field screening method and provides the sequence of conditions that must be optimized to employ this method of determination on other soil types.

  13. Determination of boron in silicon-doped gallium arsenide by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry and ultraviolet-visible spectrophotometry.

    PubMed

    Taddia, Marco; Cerroni, Maria Grazia; Morelli, Elio; Musiani, Andrea

    2002-01-01

    Two methods have been developed for the determination of boron impurities in silicon-doped gallium arsenide (GaAs) for electronics. The first method employs the electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS), the second, the UV-Vis molecular absorption spectrophotomety. In both cases the GaAs sample is decomposed with aqua regia (1+1). To prevent Ga(III) interference on the ETAAS determination of boron, a double extraction of the chlorogallic acid (HGaCl4) in diethyl ether is performed. To improve the overall ETAAS performance, the graphite tubes were pre-treated with iridium(III) and tungsten(IV). A mixed chemical modifier containing Ni(II), Sr(II) and citric acid was also used. The characteristic mass (m0) is 301 +/- 47 pg and the detection limit (3sB) is 2.4 microg g(-1). The classic UV-Vis spectrophotometric procedure using curcumin was also extended to the determination of boron in GaAs. By masking Ga(III) with EDTA and a preliminary extraction of boron with 2-ethyl-hexane 1,3-diol, performed on a semi-micro scale, a detection limit of 0.6 microg g(-1) was achieved. Both methods were applied to the analysis of two Si-doped GaAs samples which were suspected of being boron-contaminated. Results are compared with those obtained by direct analysis of the decomposed sample solution using the inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES).

  14. Future FAA Telecommunications Plan

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-08-01

    Equipment at the Position Each position will have identical ICSS modules. The quantities of modules available at each position will depend upon the...connectivity will be provided by FAA-owned cable at some locations and leased services (on-airport) at others, depending on local conditions. 16.6 DIVERSITY...others, depending on local conditions. Specific protocol, transmission, and hardware requirements will be provided in a future edition of this document

  15. Determination of total tin in geological materials by electrothermal atomic-absorption spectrophotometry using a tungsten-impregnated graphite furnace

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zhou, L.; Chao, T.T.; Meier, A.L.

    1984-01-01

    An electrothermal atomic-absorption spectrophotometric method is described for the determination of total tin in geological materials, with use of a tungsten-impregnated graphite furnace. The sample is decomposed by fusion with lithium metaborate and the melt is dissolved in 10% hydrochloric acid. Tin is then extracted into trioctylphosphine oxide-methyl isobutyl ketone prior to atomization. Impregnation of the furnace with a sodium tungstate solution increases the sensitivity of the determination and improves the precision of the results. The limits of determination are 0.5-20 ppm of tin in the sample. Higher tin values can be determined by dilution of the extract. Replicate analyses of eighteen geological reference samples with diverse matrices gave relative standard deviations ranging from 2.0 to 10.8% with an average of 4.6%. Average tin values for reference samples were in general agreement with, but more precise than, those reported by others. Apparent recoveries of tin added to various samples ranged from 95 to 111% with an average of 102%. ?? 1984.

  16. Ultrasound-assisted pseudodigestion for toxic metals determination in fish muscles followed by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrophotometry: multivariate strategy.

    PubMed

    Arain, Mohammad B; Kazi, Tasneem G; Jamali, Mohammad K; Afridi, Hassan I; Jalbani, Nusrat; Memon, Attique R

    2007-01-01

    A simple and efficient procedure for the determination of arsenic (As), cadmium (Cd), and lead (Pb) in the edible parts of freshwater fish by ultrasonic-assisted acid pseudodigestion (USD) was developed. A Plackett-Burman experimental design was used as a multivariate strategy for the evaluation of the effects of several variables at once. Five variables--sonication time, sample mass of muscle tissue, temperature of the ultrasonic bath, mL of nitric acid, and mL of a mixture of acid and oxidant--were regarded as factors. From these studies, certain variables showed up as significant, and they were optimized by a 23+star central composite design, which involved 16 experiments. Optimum values of the variables were selected for the development of USD to determine the contents of As, Cd, and Pb in fish muscles used as pollution bioindicators from Lake Manchar (Sindh, Pakistan). The determination of the 3 toxic metals under study was performed by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry. The accuracy of the optimized procedure was evaluated by analysis of certified reference materials BCR 185R bovine liver and by comparison with conventional wet acid digestion methodology. The result obtained by the optimized method showed good agreement with the certified values and sufficiently high recovery. No significant differences were observed for P = 0.05. Relative standard deviation values (average of 10 separate determinations) were 1.21, 5.52, and 5.32% for As, Cd, and Pb, respectively.

  17. Methods of analysis by the U.S. Geological Survey National Water Quality Laboratory; determination of low-level silver by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrophotometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Damrau, D.L.

    1993-01-01

    Increased awareness of the quality of water in the United States has led to the development of a method for determining low levels (0.2-5.0 microg/L) of silver in water samples. Use of graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrophotometry provides a sensitive, precise, and accurate method for determining low-level silver in samples of low ionic-strength water, precipitation water, and natural water. The minimum detection limit determined for low-level silver is 0.2 microg/L. Precision data were collected on natural-water samples and SRWS (Standard Reference Water Samples). The overall percent relative standard deviation for natural-water samples with silver concentrations more than 0.2 microg/L was less than 40 percent throughout the analytical range. For the SRWS with concentrations more than 0.2 microg/L, the overall percent relative standard deviation was less than 25 percent throughout the analytical range. The accuracy of the results was determined by spiking 6 natural-water samples with different known concentrations of the silver standard. The recoveries ranged from 61 to 119 percent at the 0.5-microg/L spike level. At the 1.25-microg/L spike level, the recoveries ranged from 92 to 106 percent. For the high spike level at 3.0 microg/L, the recoveries ranged from 65 to 113 percent. The measured concentrations of silver obtained from known samples were within the Branch of Quality Assurance accepted limits of 1 1/2 standard deviations on the basis of the SRWS program for Inter-Laboratory studies.

  18. FAA Smoke Transport Code

    SciTech Connect

    Domino, Stefan; Luketa-Hanlin, Anay; Gallegos, Carlos

    2006-10-27

    FAA Smoke Transport Code, a physics-based Computational Fluid Dynamics tool, which couples heat, mass, and momentum transfer, has been developed to provide information on smoke transport in cargo compartments with various geometries and flight conditions. The software package contains a graphical user interface for specification of geometry and boundary conditions, analysis module for solving the governing equations, and a post-processing tool. The current code was produced by making substantial improvements and additions to a code obtained from a university. The original code was able to compute steady, uniform, isothermal turbulent pressurization. In addition, a preprocessor and postprocessor were added to arrive at the current software package.

  19. A simple and fast ultrasound-assisted extraction procedure for Fe and Zn determination in milk-based infant formulas using flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS).

    PubMed

    Machado, Ignacio; Bergmann, Gabriela; Pistón, Mariela

    2016-03-01

    A simple and fast ultrasound-assisted procedure for the determination of iron and zinc in infant formulas is presented. The analytical determinations were carried out by flame atomic absorption spectrometry. Multivariate experiments were performed for optimization; in addition, a comparative study was carried out using two ultrasonic devices. A method using an ultrasonic bath was selected because several samples can be prepared simultaneously, and there is less contamination risk. Analytical precision (sr(%)) was 3.3% and 4.1% for iron and zinc, respectively. Trueness was assessed using a reference material and by comparison of the results obtained analyzing commercial samples using a reference method. The results were statistically equivalent to the certified values and in good agreement with those obtained using the reference method. The proposed method can be easily implemented in laboratories for routine analysis with the advantage of being rapid and in agreement with green chemistry.

  20. Solid-phase extraction of Mn(II), Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II), Cd(II) and Pb(II) ions from environmental samples by flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS).

    PubMed

    Duran, Celal; Gundogdu, Ali; Bulut, Volkan Numan; Soylak, Mustafa; Elci, Latif; Sentürk, Hasan Basri; Tüfekci, Mehmet

    2007-07-19

    A new method using a column packed with Amberlite XAD-2010 resin as a solid-phase extractant has been developed for the multi-element preconcentration of Mn(II), Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II), Cd(II), and Pb(II) ions based on their complex formation with the sodium diethyldithiocarbamate (Na-DDTC) prior to flame atomic absorption spectrometric (FAAS) determinations. Metal complexes sorbed on the resin were eluted by 1 mol L(-1) HNO3 in acetone. Effects of the analytical conditions over the preconcentration yields of the metal ions, such as pH, quantity of Na-DDTC, eluent type, sample volume and flow rate, foreign ions etc. have been investigated. The limits of detection (LOD) of the analytes were found in the range 0.08-0.26 microg L(-1). The method was validated by analyzing three certified reference materials. The method has been applied for the determination of trace elements in some environmental samples.

  1. Measuring Cation Transport by Na,K- and H,K-ATPase in Xenopus Oocytes by Atomic Absorption Spectrophotometry: An Alternative to Radioisotope Assays

    PubMed Central

    Dürr, Katharina L.; Tavraz, Neslihan N.; Spiller, Susan; Friedrich, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Whereas cation transport by the electrogenic membrane transporter Na+,K+-ATPase can be measured by electrophysiology, the electroneutrally operating gastric H+,K+-ATPase is more difficult to investigate. Many transport assays utilize radioisotopes to achieve a sufficient signal-to-noise ratio, however, the necessary security measures impose severe restrictions regarding human exposure or assay design. Furthermore, ion transport across cell membranes is critically influenced by the membrane potential, which is not straightforwardly controlled in cell culture or in proteoliposome preparations. Here, we make use of the outstanding sensitivity of atomic absorption spectrophotometry (AAS) towards trace amounts of chemical elements to measure Rb+ or Li+ transport by Na+,K+- or gastric H+,K+-ATPase in single cells. Using Xenopus oocytes as expression system, we determine the amount of Rb+ (Li+) transported into the cells by measuring samples of single-oocyte homogenates in an AAS device equipped with a transversely heated graphite atomizer (THGA) furnace, which is loaded from an autosampler. Since the background of unspecific Rb+ uptake into control oocytes or during application of ATPase-specific inhibitors is very small, it is possible to implement complex kinetic assay schemes involving a large number of experimental conditions simultaneously, or to compare the transport capacity and kinetics of site-specifically mutated transporters with high precision. Furthermore, since cation uptake is determined on single cells, the flux experiments can be carried out in combination with two-electrode voltage-clamping (TEVC) to achieve accurate control of the membrane potential and current. This allowed e.g. to quantitatively determine the 3Na+/2K+ transport stoichiometry of the Na+,K+-ATPase and enabled for the first time to investigate the voltage dependence of cation transport by the electroneutrally operating gastric H+,K+-ATPase. In principle, the assay is not limited to K

  2. FAA navigation program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blake, N. A.

    1978-01-01

    The FAA navigation program, which includes two major activity areas: those associated with certification of navigation systems to meet current requirements and those associated with building the data base needed to define future system improvements is examined. The near term activities, including the VORTAC upgrading program, the development of the technical data base needed for certification of LORAN C and OMEGA as a part of the current air navigation system, and the development of area navigation standards are examined in regard to cost factors and user requirements. Future system activities discussed include analysis of alternative system configurations made up of system elements including VORTAC VOR-DME, OMEGA and differential OMEGA, LORAN C, and GPS. The interrelationships between the near and far term programs are discussed. A helicopter IFR program which includes an assessment of the operational suitability of several navigation system alternatives for meeting helicopter navigation requirements for CONUS and offshore operations is reported.

  3. Data quality improvements for FAA

    SciTech Connect

    Perry, R.; Marlman, K.; Olson, D.; Werner, P.

    1997-09-01

    Effective communication among air safety professionals is only as good as the information being communicated. Data sharing cannot be effective unless the data are relevant to aviation safety problems, and decisions based on faulty data are likely to be invalid. The validity of aviation safety data depends on satisfying two primary characteristics. Data must accurately represent or conform to the real world (conformance), and it must be relevant or useful to addressing the problems at hand (utility). The FAA, in efforts to implement the Safety Performance Analysis System (SPAS), identified significant problems in the quality of the data which SPAS and FAA air safety professionals would use in defining the state of aviation safety in the US. These finding were reinforced by Department of Transportation Inspector General and General Accounting Office investigations into FAA surveillance of air transport operations. Many recent efforts to improve data quality have been centered on technological solutions to the problems. They concentrate on reducing errors in the data (conformance), but they cannot adequately address the relationship of data to need (utility). Sandia National Laboratories, working with the FAA`s Airport and Aircraft Safety Research and Development Division and the Flight Standards Service, has been involved in four programs to assist FAA in addressing their data quality problems. The Sandia approach has been data-driven rather than technology-driven. In other words, the focus has been on first establishing the data requirements by analyzing the FAA`s surveillance and decision-making processes. This process analysis looked at both the data requirements and the methods used to gather the data in order to address both the conformance and utility problems inherent in existing FAA data systems. This paper discusses Sandia`s data quality programs and their potential improvements to the safety analysis processes and surveillance programs of the FAA.

  4. FAA Vertical Flight Bibliography, 1962 - 1994

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-08-01

    Angeles Area (Bernhart V. Dinerman) (NTIS: AD-735399) FAA-RD-71-105 Heliport Beacon Design, Construction, and Testing ( Fred Walter) (NTIS: AD-745514...Shollenberger) (NTIS: AD-A214085) FAA-RD-71-105 Heliport Beacon Design, Construction, and Testing ( Fred Walter) (NTIS: AD-745514) FAA/CT-TN86/64 Heliport...of Technology) FAA-AEE-92-03 FISHER, F.A. (Lightning Technologies Inc.) FAA/CT-89/22 PIXLER, RICHARD S. ( Hoyle Tanner and Associates) FAA/RD-93/2

  5. Determination of aluminium in iron, steel and ferrous and non-ferrous alloys by atomic-absorption spectrophotometry after a mercury-cathode separation and extraction of the aluminium-acetylacetone complex.

    PubMed

    Donaldson, E M

    1981-07-01

    A method for determining 0.0005% or more of total aluminium in high- and low-alloy steels, iron and ferrovanadium is described. Iron, chromium and other matrix elements are separated from aluminium by electrolysis with a mercury cathode and aluminium is separated from tungsten, titanium, vanadium and phosphate by chloroform extraction of its acetylacetone complex at pH 6.5 from an ammonium acetate-hydrogen peroxide medium. The extract is evaporated to dryness and organic material is destroyed with nitric and perchloric acids. Aluminium is determined by atomic-absorption spectrophotometry in a nitrous oxide-acetylene flame, at 309.3 nm, in a 5% v/v perchloric acid medium containing 1000 mug of sodium per ml. Acid-soluble and acid-insoluble aluminium can also be determined. The method is also applicable to copper- and nickel-base alloys. Results obtained by this method are compared with those obtained spectrophotometrically with Pyrocatechol Violet, after the separations described above followed by the separation of the residual co-extracted iron and copper by a combined ammonium pyrrolidinedithiocarbamate-cupferron-chloroform extraction from 10% v/v hydrochloric acid medium.

  6. Differential determination of arsenic(III) and arsenic(V), and antimony(III) and antimony-(V) by hydride generation-atomic absorption spectrophotometry, and its application to the determination of these species in sea water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Manabu; Urata, Keiji; Murashige, Kiyoto; Yamamoto, Yuroku

    A method is described for the differential determination of As(III) and As(V). and Sb(III) and Sb(V) by hydride generation-atomic absorption spectrophotometry with hydrogen-nitrogen flame using sodium borohydride solution as a reductant. For the determination of As(III) and Sb(III), most of the elements, other than Ag +, Cu 2+, Sn 2+, Se 4+ and Te 4+, do not interfere in an at least 30,000 fold excess with respect to As(III) or Sb(III). This method was applied to the determination of these species in sea water and it was found that a sample size of only 100 ml is enough to determine them with a precision of 1.5-2.5%. Analytical results for surface sea water of Hiroshima Bay were 0.72 μgl -1, 0.27 μgl -1 and 0.22 μgl -1 for As(total), As(III) and Sb(total), respectively, but Sb(III) was not detected in the present sample. The effect of acidification on storage was also examined.

  7. Towards FAA Certification of UAVs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, Stacy

    2003-01-01

    As of June 30, 2003, all Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAV), no matter how small, must adhere to the same FAA regulations as human-piloted aircraft. These regulations include certification for flying in controlled airspace and certification of flight software based on RTCA DO-178B. This paper provides an overview of the steps necessary to obtain certification, as well as a discussion about the challenges UAV's face when trying to meet these requirements. It is divided into two parts: 1) Certifications for Flying in Controlled Airspace; 2) Certification of Flight Software per RTCA DO-178B.

  8. Determination of sub-microgram amounts of selenium in geological materials by atomic-absorption spectrophotometry with electrothermal atomisation after solvent extraction

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sanzolone, R.F.; Chao, T.T.

    1981-01-01

    An atomic-absorption spectrophotometric method with electrothermal atomisation has been developed for the determination of selenium in geological materials. The sample is decomposed with a mixture of nitric, perchloric and hydrofluoric acids and heated with hydrochloric acid to reduce selenium to selenium (IV). Selenium is then extracted into toluene from a hydrochloric acid - hydrobromic acid medium containing iron. A few microlitres of the toluene extract are injected into a carbon rod atomiser, using a nickel solution as a matrix modifier. The limits of determination are 0.2-200 p.p.m. of selenium in a geological sample. For concentrations between 0.05 and 0.2 p.p.m., back-extraction of the selenium into dilute hydrochloric acid is employed before atomisation. Selenium values for reference samples obtained by replicate analysis are in general agreement with those reported by other workers, with relative standard deviations ranging from 4.1 to 8.8%. Recoveries of selenium spiked at two levels were 98-108%. Major and trace elements commonly encountered in geological materials do not interfere. Arsenic has a suppressing effect on the selenium signals, but only when its concentration is greater than 1000 p.p.m. Nitric acid interferes seriously with the extraction of selenium and must be removed by evaporation in the sample-digestion step.

  9. [Determination of six mineral elements in roots, stems, leaves, flowers and seeds of Scutellaria baicalensis by FAAS].

    PubMed

    Sheng, Ji-Ping; Chen, Hai-Rong; Shen, Lin

    2009-02-01

    A study was carried out on the contents of six trace elements, Ca, Cu, Fe, Mn, Zn and K, in roots, stems, leaves, flowers and seeds of planted Scutellaria baicalensis, by flame atomic absorption spectrophotometry (FAAS). The results indicated that Scutellaria baicalensis was rich in trace elements, meaning that it has a relatively high nutritive value. In stems of Scutellaria baicalensis, the content sequence of the six trace elements was found to be Fe > Mn > Zn = Cu > K > Ca. In leaves, the content sequence of the six trace elements was Fe> Mn > Zn > Cu > K > Ca. In flowers and seeds it was Ca > Fe > Mn > Zn > Cu > K, and Ca > Fe > Zn > Mn > Cu >K, separately, and in roots it was Ca > Fe > Cu > Mn > Zn > K. The stems, leaves, flowers and seeds are rich in Fe, whose content is higher than that in pork liver, Mn and Zn, but lower in Ca. The flowers, seeds and roots are especially rich in Ca, whose content is higher than that in bone, indicating that different parts of Scutellaria baicalensis may accumulate different mineral element. This study, for the first time, researched into Ca, Cu, Fe, Mn, Zn and K contents in different parts of Scutellaria baicalensis, which helps explain the multifunction of Scutellaria baicalensis and provides theoretical basis for further developing its medical and edible value.

  10. 14 CFR 157.7 - FAA determinations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false FAA determinations. 157.7 Section 157.7 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIRPORTS.... (a) The FAA will conduct an aeronautical study of an airport proposal and, after consultations...

  11. 14 CFR 145.223 - FAA inspections.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false FAA inspections. 145.223 Section 145.223 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) SCHOOLS AND OTHER CERTIFICATED AGENCIES REPAIR STATIONS Operating Rules § 145.223 FAA inspections. (a)...

  12. [Determination of palladium in automobile exhaust catalysts by FAAS method].

    PubMed

    Wei, Xiao-Feng; Cai, Guo-Hui; Xiao, Yi-Hong; Zhan, Ying-Ying; Xie, Zeng-Hong; Wei, Ke-Mei

    2009-12-01

    Palladium in automotive exhaust catalyst was determined by flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS). The analytical conditions and the coexisting elements interference were studied. The catalyst was dissolved by the mixture of H2O2 and HCl. Pd in the solution was directly determined by FAAS method. The linearity of working curve ranges from 0.1 to 15 microg x mL(-1); the detection limit is 0.029 microg x mL(-1); the relative standard deviation (RSD) range is from 0.8% to 2.5%; and the recovery rate range is from 99.6% to 101.2%. It is a simple and convenient method for accurate analysis of Pd in the exhaust catalysts.

  13. FAA Air Traffic Activity. Fiscal Year 1991

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-01-01

    74 0 0 74 0 UHUE ............................................................................. HI M ZHN 1683 1395 62 41 185 LIMA ALLEN COUNTY...1560433 TABLE 24- FISCAL YEAR 1991 FAA CONTRACTOR-OPERATED TRAFIC CONTROL TOWERS BY RANK ORDER OF

  14. FAA Training. Continued Improvements Needed in FAA's Controller Field Training Program. Report to Congressional Requesters.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    General Accounting Office, Washington, DC. Resources, Community, and Economic Development Div.

    Having examined the Federal Aviation Administration's (FAA) current program for providing field training to developmental and full-performance-level air traffic controllers, the General Accounting Office (GAO) recommends ensuring that FAA and contractor personnel are providing training consistently and uniformly. Further changes needed to ensure…

  15. 14 CFR 21.615 - FAA inspection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false FAA inspection. 21.615 Section 21.615 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT CERTIFICATION... quality control system; (c) Witness any tests; (d) Inspect the manufacturing facilities; and (e)...

  16. FAA Air Traffic Activity: Fiscal Year 1989

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-11-01

    H I M ZH N 178b 1487 49 52 200 LIMA ALLEN COUNTY ...................... ................. OH N ZID 610 0 12 589 9 LIN C H FIE LD...1937 GRAND TOTAL ................................................. 1229508 174 TABLE 24 - FISCAL YEAR 1989 FAA CONTRACTOR-OPERATED TRAFIC CONTROL

  17. FAA Air Traffic Activity: FY 1990. Addendum.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-01-01

    HI M ZHN 1896 1578 59 55 204 LIMA ALLEN COUNTY.................................... OH N ZID 607 0 22 576 9 LINCOLN LOGAN COUNTY...GA N 24 2011 GRAND TOTAL ...................................... .... 1494614 TABLE 24- FISCAL YEAR 1990 FAA CONTRACTOR-OPERATED TRAFIC CONTROL

  18. High-Sensitivity Spectrophotometry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, T. D.

    1982-01-01

    Selected high-sensitivity spectrophotometric methods are examined, and comparisons are made of their relative strengths and weaknesses and the circumstances for which each can best be applied. Methods include long path cells, noise reduction, laser intracavity absorption, thermocouple calorimetry, photoacoustic methods, and thermo-optical methods.…

  19. Potassium determinations using SEM, FAAS and XRF: some experimental notes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liritzis, I.; Mavrikis, D.; Zacharias, N.; Sakalis, A.; Tsirliganis, N.; Polymeris, G.S.

    The calibration of Scanning Electron Microscopy coupled with Energy Dispersive X- Rays Spec-trometry (SEM-EDS) for elemental quantitative analysis is an important task for characterization, provenance and absolute dating purposes. In particular the potassium determination is an im-portant contributor to dose rate assessments in luminescence and Electron Spin Resonance (ESR) dating. Here a SEM-EDX is calibrated on different archaeological and geoarchaeological materials against standard laboratory samples as well as measured by micro X-Rays Fluorescence (μXRF) and flame atomic absorption spectroscopy (FAAS) techniques. A common linear relationship is obtained for most elements and certain rock types used and two clear linear regressions for two types of rocks; one for granite, diorite, microgranite and sediments and another ceramic sherds, soils, marble schists, breccia. Such linear regressions become readily available for a future fast, efficient and accu-rate way of potassium determination.

  20. NASA/FAA helicopter simulator workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larsen, William E. (Editor); Randle, Robert J., Jr. (Editor); Bray, Richard S. (Editor); Zuk, John (Editor)

    1992-01-01

    A workshop was convened by the FAA and NASA for the purpose of providing a forum at which leading designers, manufacturers, and users of helicopter simulators could initiate and participate in a development process that would facilitate the formulation of qualification standards by the regulatory agency. Formal papers were presented, special topics were discussed in breakout sessions, and a draft FAA advisory circular defining specifications for helicopter simulators was presented and discussed. A working group of volunteers was formed to work with the National Simulator Program Office to develop a final version of the circular. The workshop attracted 90 individuals from a constituency of simulator manufacturers, training organizations, the military, civil regulators, research scientists, and five foreign countries.

  1. FAA Air Traffic Activity, Fiscal Year 1980,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-26

    instrument flight rules ( IFR ) at ARTC centers by aviation category, center, and region. Chapter II includes summaries of aircraft operations at FAA...and secondary airports. Data for FSSs, CS/Ts, and IFSSs appear in Chapter V. This information includes total flight services, IFR -DVFR and VFR aircraft...contacted, IFR -DVFR and VFR flight plans originated, pilot briefs and airport advisories by facility, state, and region. Rank order tables are

  2. Multi-filter spectrophotometry simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Callaghan, Kim A. S.; Gibson, Brad K.; Hickson, Paul

    1993-01-01

    To complement both the multi-filter observations of quasar environments described in these proceedings, as well as the proposed UBC 2.7 m Liquid Mirror Telescope (LMT) redshift survey, we have initiated a program of simulated multi-filter spectrophotometry. The goal of this work, still very much in progress, is a better quantitative assessment of the multiband technique as a viable mechanism for obtaining useful redshift and morphological class information from large scale multi-filter surveys.

  3. Implementation of the FAA research and development electromagnetic database

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcdowall, R. L.; Grush, D. J.; Cook, D. M.; Glynn, M. S.

    1991-01-01

    The Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) has been assisting the FAA in developing a database of information about lightning. The FAA Research and Development Electromagnetic Database (FRED) will ultimately contain data from a variety of airborne and ground-based lightning research projects. An outline of the data currently available in FRED is presented. The data sources which the FAA intends to incorporate into FRED are listed. In addition, it describes how the researchers may access and use the FRED menu system.

  4. PRECISION SPECTROPHOTOMETRY AT THE LEVEL OF 0.1%

    SciTech Connect

    Yan Renbin

    2011-11-15

    Accurate relative spectrophotometry is critical for many science applications. Small wavelength-scale residuals in the flux calibration can significantly impact the measurements of weak emission and absorption features in the spectra. Using Sloan Digital Sky Survey data, we demonstrate that the average spectra of carefully selected red-sequence galaxies can be used as a spectroscopic standard to improve the relative spectrophotometry precision to 0.1% on small wavelength scales (from a few to hundreds of Angstroms). We achieve this precision by comparing stacked spectra across tiny redshift intervals. The redshift intervals must be small enough that any systematic stellar population evolution is minimized and is less than the spectrophotometric uncertainty. This purely empirical technique does not require any theoretical knowledge of true galaxy spectra. It can be applied to all large spectroscopic galaxy redshift surveys that sample a large number of galaxies in a uniform population.

  5. FAA/NASA En Route Noise Symposium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powell, Clemans A. (Compiler)

    1990-01-01

    Aircraft community noise annoyance is traditionally a concern only in localities near airports. The proposed introduction of large commercial airplanes with advanced turboprop propulsion systems with supersonic propellers has given rise to concerns of noise annoyance in areas previously considered not to be impacted by aircraft noise. A symposium was held to assess the current knowledge of factors important to the impact of en route noise and to aid in the formulation of FAA and NASA programs in the area. Papers were invited on human response to aircraft noise in areas with low ambient noise levels, aircraft noise heard indoors and outdoors, aircraft noise in recreational areas, detection of propeller and jet aircraft noise, and methodological issues relevant to the design of future studies.

  6. 14 CFR 11.25 - How does FAA issue rules?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false How does FAA issue rules? 11.25 Section 11.25 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION PROCEDURAL RULES GENERAL RULEMAKING PROCEDURES Rulemaking Procedures General § 11.25 How does FAA issue rules?...

  7. 32 CFR 728.58 - Federal Aviation Agency (FAA) beneficiaries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Federal Aviation Agency (FAA) beneficiaries. 728.58 Section 728.58 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY PERSONNEL... Federal Agencies § 728.58 Federal Aviation Agency (FAA) beneficiaries. (a) Beneficiaries. Air...

  8. 32 CFR 728.58 - Federal Aviation Agency (FAA) beneficiaries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Federal Aviation Agency (FAA) beneficiaries. 728.58 Section 728.58 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY PERSONNEL... Federal Agencies § 728.58 Federal Aviation Agency (FAA) beneficiaries. (a) Beneficiaries. Air...

  9. 32 CFR 728.58 - Federal Aviation Agency (FAA) beneficiaries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Federal Aviation Agency (FAA) beneficiaries. 728.58 Section 728.58 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY PERSONNEL... Federal Agencies § 728.58 Federal Aviation Agency (FAA) beneficiaries. (a) Beneficiaries. Air...

  10. 32 CFR 728.58 - Federal Aviation Agency (FAA) beneficiaries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Federal Aviation Agency (FAA) beneficiaries. 728.58 Section 728.58 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY PERSONNEL... Federal Agencies § 728.58 Federal Aviation Agency (FAA) beneficiaries. (a) Beneficiaries. Air...

  11. 32 CFR 728.58 - Federal Aviation Agency (FAA) beneficiaries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Federal Aviation Agency (FAA) beneficiaries. 728.58 Section 728.58 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY PERSONNEL... Federal Agencies § 728.58 Federal Aviation Agency (FAA) beneficiaries. (a) Beneficiaries. Air...

  12. 14 CFR 49.11 - FAA Aircraft Registry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false FAA Aircraft Registry. 49.11 Section 49.11 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT RECORDING OF AIRCRAFT TITLES AND SECURITY DOCUMENTS General § 49.11 FAA Aircraft Registry. To be eligible for...

  13. 14 CFR 49.11 - FAA Aircraft Registry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false FAA Aircraft Registry. 49.11 Section 49.11 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT RECORDING OF AIRCRAFT TITLES AND SECURITY DOCUMENTS General § 49.11 FAA Aircraft Registry. To be eligible for...

  14. 14 CFR 49.11 - FAA Aircraft Registry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false FAA Aircraft Registry. 49.11 Section 49.11 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT RECORDING OF AIRCRAFT TITLES AND SECURITY DOCUMENTS General § 49.11 FAA Aircraft Registry. To be eligible for...

  15. 14 CFR 49.11 - FAA Aircraft Registry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false FAA Aircraft Registry. 49.11 Section 49.11 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT RECORDING OF AIRCRAFT TITLES AND SECURITY DOCUMENTS General § 49.11 FAA Aircraft Registry. To be eligible for...

  16. 14 CFR 49.11 - FAA Aircraft Registry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false FAA Aircraft Registry. 49.11 Section 49.11 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT RECORDING OF AIRCRAFT TITLES AND SECURITY DOCUMENTS General § 49.11 FAA Aircraft Registry. To be eligible for...

  17. 14 CFR 47.19 - FAA Aircraft Registry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false FAA Aircraft Registry. 47.19 Section 47.19 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRCRAFT REGISTRATION General § 47.19 FAA Aircraft Registry. Each application, request, notification, or...

  18. FAA Pilot Knowledge Tests: Learning or Rote Memorization?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Casner, Stephen M.; Jones, Karen M.; Puentes, Antonio; Irani, Homi

    2004-01-01

    The FAA pilot knowledge test is a multiple-choice assessment tool designed to measure the extent to which applicants for FAA pilot certificates and ratings have mastered a corpus of required aeronautical knowledge. All questions that appear on the test are drawn from a database of questions that is made available to the public. The FAA and others are concerned that releasing test questions may encourage students to focus their study on memorizing test questions. To investigate this concern, we created our own database of questions that differed from FAA questions in four different ways. Our first three question types were derived by modifying existing FAA questions: (1) rewording questions and answers; (2) shuffling answers; and (3) substituting different figures for problems that used figures. Our last question type posed a question about required knowledge for which no FAA question currently exists. Forty-eight student pilots completed one of two paper-and-pencil knowledge tests that contained a mix of these experimental questions. The results indicate significantly lower scores for some question types when compared to unaltered FAA questions to which participants had prior access.

  19. Absolute spectrophotometry of Neptune - 3390 to 7800 A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergstralh, J. T.; Neff, J. S.

    1983-07-01

    Absolute spectrophotometry of Neptune from 3390 to 7800 Å, with spectral resolution of 10 Å in the interval 3390 - 6055 and 20 Å in the interval 6055 - 7800 Å, is reported. The results are compared with filter photometry (Appleby, 1973; Wamsteker, 1973; Savage et al., 1980) and with synthetic spectra computed on the basis of a parameterization proposed by Podolak and Danielson (1977) for aerosol scattering and absorption. A CH4/H2 ratio is derived for the convectively mixed part of Neptune's atmosphere, and constrains optical properties of hypothetical aerosol layers.

  20. [Quantitative determination of total flavonoids in sea-buckthorn fruit juice by three wavelength spectrophotometry].

    PubMed

    Hui, Rui-hua; Hou, Dong-yan; Guan, Chong-xin; Liu, Xiao-yuan

    2005-02-01

    Numerous studies dealing with the quantitative determination of total flavonoids in sea-buckthorn fruit juice by spectrophotometry are presented. The flavonoids in sea-buckthorn fruit juice and aluminate produce stable complex whose absorption occurred at longer wavelength. To determine the total flavonoids in sea-buckthorn fruit juice by traditional spectrophotometry method, baseline shift and asymmetric absorption peak occurred on the absorption curve. Quantitative determination of flavonoids in sea-buckthorn fruit juice by three wavelength spectrophotometry method can eliminate the absorbance error caused interfering components in turbid solution and the scattering effect. Background changing with the concentration change and asymmetric absorption peak problems can also be solved. The regression equation of concentration vs deltaA was obtained: deltaA = - 0.00703 + 0.00048c with a relation coefficient gamma = 0.9991. The experimental results demostrate the total flavonoids concentrations in 0-800 microg x mL(-1) with deltaA obeying linear relation when the absorbance was measured at wavelength lambda1 = 495 nm, lambda2 = 415 nm and lambda3 = 368 nm. The recovery is 97.0%-101.0% and the coefficient of variation is 0.058% (n = 9). The method is more advantageous than tranditional spectrophotometry method.

  1. FAA certification requirements for future fuels, fuel systems and powerplants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horeff, T. C.

    1983-01-01

    The current FAA procedures for approving fuels, along with a comment or two as to what might be done relative to assuring the safety of using these alternative fuels, whatever they may be are addressed.

  2. The FAA aging airplane program plan for transport aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curtis, Dayton; Lewis, Jess

    1992-01-01

    The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) Aging Airplane Program is focused on five program areas: maintenance, transport airplanes, commuter airplanes, airplane engines, and research. These programs are complementary and concurrent, and have been in effect since 1988. The programs address the aging airplane challenge through different methods, including policies, procedures, and hardware development. Each program is carefully monitored and its progress tracked to ensure that the needs of the FAA, the industry, and the flying public are being met.

  3. Evaluation of Proposed Cab Glass Coating for FAA Control Towers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-12-01

    wear vision correction? None Contacts Glasses Both If required, which correction do you use: Monofocal Bifocal Trifocal Color perception results...i AFRL-RH-WP-TR-2013-0123 Evaluation of Proposed Cab Glass Coating for FAA Control Towers Eric E. Geiselman Alan R. Pinkus, Ph.D...COVERED (From - To) 30-12-2013 Final Jun 2012 – Jun 2013 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Evaluation of Proposed Cab Glass Coating for FAA Control

  4. Aviation Safety: FAA and DOD Response to Similar Safety Concerns

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-01-01

    General Accounting Office GAO January 2002 AVIATION SAFETY FAA and DOD Response to Similar Safety Concerns GAO-02-77 Report Documentation Page Report...Date 00JAN2002 Report Type N/A Dates Covered (from... to) - Title and Subtitle AVIATION SAFETY FAA and DOD: Response to Similar Safety Concerns ...public release, distribution unlimited Supplementary Notes Abstract Safety of aircraft is a paramount concern in both civilian and military aviation

  5. FAA Rotorcraft Research, Engineering, and Development Bibliography 1962-1989

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-05-01

    81-4 Comprehensive Bibliography of Literature on Helicopter Noise Technology (A.M. Carter, Jr.) (NTIS: ADA 103 331) FAA-RD-75-79 Comprehensive Review...Engineering and Development Program Plan, Aircraft Icing FAA-CT-81-180 Engineering and Development Program Plan, Helicopter Icing Technology Research (NTIS: ADA...of Various NASA CR-177408 Simulation Technology Options for Terminal Instrument Procedures (TERPS) Enhancements (Anil V. Phatak, John A. Sorensen

  6. Simultaneous determination of iron and copper in children's sera by FAAS.

    PubMed

    Luterotti, Svjetlana; Kordić, Tončica Vukman; Dodig, Slavica

    2011-03-01

    A new and simple flame atomic-absorption spectrometric (FAAS) method is proposed for simultaneous determination of iron and copper in children's sera. It is based on single-step sample pretreatment (deproteinization with 3 mol L-1 HCl, ratio 1:1) and single-step calibration using 1.5 mol L-1 HCl standard. During method's optimization a short multifactorial design experiment was used. The proposed method assures accuracy, sensitivity and precision comparable to that of the reference methods. The new approach is simple and time-, labour- and serum-saving, the latter being especially important in pediatric diagnostics.

  7. Study of Biological Pigments by Single Specimen Derivative Spectrophotometry

    PubMed Central

    Goldstein, Jack M.

    1970-01-01

    The single specimen derivative (SSD) method provides an absolute absorption spectrum of a substance in the absence of a suitable reference. Both a reference and a measuring monochromatic beam pass through a single sample, and the specimen itself acts as its own reference. The two monochromatic beams maintain a fixed wavelength difference upon scanning, and the difference in absorbance of the two beams is determined. Thus, the resulting spectrum represents the first derivative of the conventional type absorption spectrum. Tissues and cell fractions have been examined at room and liquid N2 temperature and chromophoric molecules such as the mitochondrial cytochromes and blood pigments have been detectable in low concentrations. In the case of isolated cellular components, the observed effects of substrates and inhibitors confirm similar studies by conventional spectrophotometry. The extension of the SSD concept to the microscopic level has permitted the study of the tissue compartmentalization and function of cytochromes and other pigments within layered tissue. PMID:4392452

  8. Upgraded FAA Airfield Capacity Model Compiled from the Following Reports: FAA-RD-76-128 and FAA-EM-81-1-VOL-1

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-05-01

    mental User’s Guide," provides a general overview of the major changes that have been made to the program and includes revised versions of the...Arrival-Arrival Separations: DLTAIJ: 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 103 ** FAA CAPACITY MODEL - REVISED JANUARY, 1980 ** "t AIRFIELD HOURLY CAPACITY MODELO

  9. The Role of the FAA in US Commercial Space Transportation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Patricia Grace

    2002-01-01

    The Commercial Space Launch Act of 1984 granted the United States (U.S.) Secretary of Transportation authority to regulate launch and launch site operations conducted by U.S. citizens or from the U.S. This authority is exercised only to the extent necessary to protect public health and safety, protect property, and preserve U.S. national security and foreign policy interests. The Secretary of Transportation has delegated this responsibility to the U.S. Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), and the FAA Associate Administrator for Commercial Space Transportation carries out activities associated with this responsibility. Since 1984, the Commercial Space Launch Act has been amended several times and the FAA's responsibilities regarding U.S. commercial space transportation activities have been expanded to include regulation of reentry activities and operation of reentry sites by U.S. citizens. Additionally, the FAA can determine safety approval criteria for vehicles, safety systems, processes, services and personnel. Since 1984, there have been no fatalities or injuries suffered by the public resulting from U.S. commercial space launch activities. While public safety is its primary focus, the FAA also promotes launches by U.S. commercial space transportation entities in order to support U.S. competitiveness in the global marketplace.

  10. Assessment of Proposed Cab Glass Coating for FAA Control Towers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-11-16

    ABSTRACT AFRL assessed the effects of an "after- market " coating that could possibly be applied to FAA air traffic control tower (ATCT) windows...Force Research Laboratory (AFRL) for help in assessing the effects of an "after- market " glass coating/treatment that could possibly be applied to FAA...Cleared 01/17/2014; 88ABW-2014-0142. Report contains color. 14. ABSTRACT AFRL assessed the effects of an "after- market " coating that could possibly be

  11. FAA Information Technology: Complete Cost Data not Provided to OMB

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-01-01

    and use of information technology . However, FAA has not provided required data on information technology supporting the air traffic control system...decisionmakers in the Department of Transportation, OMB, and the Congress to focus needed attention on information technology and understates the level

  12. FAA Aviation Forecasts, Fiscal Years 1994-2005

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-03-01

    Concord, CA (CCR) Santa Barbara, CA (SBA) El Monte, CA (EMT) Santa Maria Public, CA (SMX) H-1 FAA TOWERED AIRPORTS Santa Monica, CA (SMO) Sanford, Fl...Juan Isla Grande, PR (SIG) Kwajalein AAF, WK (KWA) Pago Pago International, AS (TUT) H-6 APPENDIX I CONTRACT TOWERS 1. Flagstaff, Arizona (FLG) 2

  13. A Low-Cost Quantitative Absorption Spectrophotometer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Albert, Daniel R.; Todt, Michael A.; Davis, H. Floyd

    2012-01-01

    In an effort to make absorption spectrophotometry available to high school chemistry and physics classes, we have designed an inexpensive visible light absorption spectrophotometer. The spectrophotometer was constructed using LEGO blocks, a light emitting diode, optical elements (including a lens), a slide-mounted diffraction grating, and a…

  14. Infrared Spectrophotometry of NEAR Target Asteroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivkin, A. S.; Clark, B. E.; Lebofsky, L. A.

    1996-09-01

    Water and the OH radical, both in free and bound forms, have strong absorption features near 3 mu m, observed on many asteroids since the late 1970's (Lebofsky 1978, Feierberg et al. 1985). A knowledge of which asteroids have hydration and where hydrated asteroids are located gives important insights into the conditions prevailing near the beginning of solar system history. We have performed spectrophotometry of the NEAR target asteroids 253 Mathilde and 433 Eros using 5 filters from 1.25--3.35 mu m. Our observations were made at the Infrared Telescope Facility (IRTF) on Mauna Kea, Hawaii in December 1995 and May 1996. We find 253 Mathilde to have a spectrum consistent with C-class asteroids in the near-IR, although without the 3-mu m water-of-hydration feature commonly seen on asteroids of this class ( ~ 60% of Cs are hydrated). The upper limit on a feature for Mathilde is 10%. Our JHK colors of 433 Eros are consistent with previous observations (Chapman and Morrison 1976, Icarus 28), and our 3-mu m data indicate no water of hydration, as expected for an S-class asteroid. No variability in colors was seen on these bodies within our uncertainty, although it is worth noting that 433 Eros was close to pole-on when observed, and that our observing run was short compared to the long rotation period (17.4 days) of 253 Mathilde (Mottola et al. 1995, Planet. Space Sci. 43). Binzel et al. (1996) compared 253 Mathilde to plausible meteorite analogs and found the best spectral matches to be unusual thermally metamorphosed carbonaceous chondrites or the shocked ``black'' ordinary chondrites (Hiroi et al. 1993, Science 261, Britt and Pieters 1989, LPSC 20). We too find the black chondrites to be acceptable spectral analogs, as well as samples of Murchison heated by Hiroi et al. (1993). This suggests that the surface of 253 Mathilde may be composed of either thermally metamorphosed carbonaceous chondrite or shock-darkened ordinary chondrite. Combining our data with the data of

  15. Determination of zinc in edible oils by flow injection FAAS after extraction induced by emulsion breaking procedure.

    PubMed

    Bakircioglu, Dilek; Topraksever, Nukte; Kurtulus, Yasemin Bakircioglu

    2014-05-15

    A new procedure using extraction induced by emulsion breaking (EIEB) procedure has been developed for extraction/preconcentration of zinc in various edible oils (canola oil, corn oil, hazelnut oil, olive oil, and sunflower oil) prior to its determination by the single line flow injection (FI) flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS). Several parameters affecting the extraction efficiency of the procedure were investigated including the type and concentrations of surfactant, the concentration of HNO3, and the other operational conditions (emulsion breaking time and temperature). The limits of detection of 1.1 and 1.0 μg L(-1) were observed for zinc when aqueous standard and oil-based standards were added to the emulsions for calibration, respectively. The proposed procedure of combining EIEB and single line FI-FAAS can be regarded as a new procedure for the determination of zinc in edible oil samples.

  16. 4-8 micron spectrophotometry of OH 0739-14

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soifer, B. T.; Willner, S. P.; Rudy, R. J.; Capps, R. W.

    1981-01-01

    Spectrophotometry of the dust-embedded late-type star OH 0739-14 shows an absorption feature at 6.0 microns characteristic of H2O ice at temperatures significantly lower than 150 K, confirming the identification of H2O ice in the circumstellar shell in this source. The differences in the infrared spectra of HO 0739-14 and embedded molecular cloud sources are attributed to the different cloud lifetimes and temperature regimes in which the molecules are formed. A lower limit to the mass loss rate of 0.0001 solar mass per year is derived, based on the column density of ice and the size and the expansion velocity of the circumstellar cloud.

  17. Determination of Ca, K, Mg and Fe in four fish species by FAAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Xiaoli; Wang, Yijun; She, Xilin

    2010-09-01

    A method for determining calcium (Ca), potassium (K), magnesium (Mg) and iron (Fe) in four fish species was optimized and validated. It included microwave mineralization of the samples and subsequent quantification by flame atomic absorption spectroscopy (FAAS) with Zeeman-effect background correction. Using HNO3 (65%) and H2O2 (33%) as extraction solutions, the optimal conditions of extraction were established as follows: 0.5 g of sample mass; microwave time program of 300 W/5 min and 600 W/5 min. The method was free of matrix interferences. The linear correlation coefficients were ⩾0.9991, the recovery percentage of analytes was from 99.31% to 103.70% and the RSD (relative standard deviation) was lower than 2.06%. The detection limits obtained were 32.3, 43.2, 14.0 and 68.6 ng mL-1 for Ca, K, Mg and Fe in FAAS respectively. It is shown that the method is rapid, simple, sensitive and accurate. The method was applied to the studies of digestibility and measurement of these nutrients in samples of fish collected from Norway, Japan and China.

  18. Absolute Spectrophotometry of 237 Open Cluster Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clampitt, L.; Burstein, D.

    1994-12-01

    We present absolute spectrophotometry of 237 stars in 7 nearby open clusters: Hyades, Pleiades, Alpha Persei, Praesepe, Coma Berenices, IC 4665, and M 39. The observations were taken using the Wampler single-channel scanner (Wampler 1966) on the Crossley 0.9m telescope at Lick Observatory from July 1973 through December 1974. 21 bandpasses spanning the spectral range 3500 Angstroms to 7780 Angstroms were observed for each star, with bandwiths ranging from 32Angstroms to 64 Angstroms. Data are standardized to the Hayes--Latham (1975) system. Our measurements are compared to filter colors on the Johnson BV, Stromgren ubvy, and Geneva U V B_1 B_2 V_1 G systems, as well as to spectrophotometry of a few stars published by Gunn, Stryker & Tinsley and in the Spectrophotometric Standards Catalog (Adelman; as distributed by the NSSDC). Both internal and external comparisons to the filter systems indicate a formal statistical accuracy per bandpass of 0.01 to 0.02 mag, with apparent larger ( ~ 0.03 mag) differences in absolute calibration between this data set and existing spectrophotometry. These data will comprise part of the spectrophotometry that will be used to calibrate the Beijing-Arizona-Taipei-Connecticut Color Survey of the Sky (see separate paper by Burstein et al. at this meeting).

  19. 14 CFR 39.5 - When does FAA issue airworthiness directives?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false When does FAA issue airworthiness directives? 39.5 Section 39.5 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS DIRECTIVES § 39.5 When does FAA issue airworthiness directives? FAA...

  20. 76 FR 44978 - Notice of FAA Intent To Carry Over Airport Improvement Program (AIP) Entitlement Funds

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-27

    ...-0786] Notice of FAA Intent To Carry Over Airport Improvement Program (AIP) Entitlement Funds AGENCY... Program (AIP) must notify, in writing, the designated representative in the appropriate FAA Regional or... grants to the following year. In such cases, the FAA converts the current-year funds to AIP...

  1. 77 FR 4219 - FAA-Approved Portable Oxygen Concentrators; Technical Amendment

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-27

    ... Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Part 121 FAA-Approved Portable Oxygen Concentrators; Technical...: The FAA is amending regulations relating to operating rules for FAA approved portable oxygen... Certain Portable Oxygen Concentrator Devices Onboard Aircraft'' (70 FR 40156). SFAR 106 permits...

  2. GIS and RDBMS Used with Offline FAA Airspace Databases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, J.; Simmons, J.; Scofield, E.; Talbott, B.

    1994-01-01

    A geographic information system (GIS) and relational database management system (RDBMS) were used in a Macintosh environment to access, manipulate, and display off-line FAA databases of airport and navigational aid locations, airways, and airspace boundaries. This proof-of-concept effort used data available from the Adaptation Controlled Environment System (ACES) and Digital Aeronautical Chart Supplement (DACS) databases to allow FAA cartographers and others to create computer-assisted charts and overlays as reference material for air traffic controllers. These products were created on an engineering model of the future GRASP (GRaphics Adaptation Support Position) workstation that will be used to make graphics and text products for the Advanced Automation System (AAS), which will upgrade and replace the current air traffic control system. Techniques developed during the prototyping effort have shown the viability of using databases to create graphical products without the need for an intervening data entry step.

  3. First Annual FAA General Aviation Forecast Conference Proceedings

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-03-01

    pilot’s perspective. I have a 30-year background as an executive in communications, principally in television , but I am also an aircraft owner and have...contrasting this with the business I came from -- television , which is gauged and governed by the TV rating business, which includes overnight ratings. We...ago following the Ceritos, California midair collision between a general aviation aircraft and a Mexicana airliner, the FAA released a study calling for

  4. FAA Weather Surveillance Requirements in the Context on NEXRAD.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-11-19

    7 AD-A123 876 AA WEATHER SUR VE" ANCE REQUIMENTS. HE CONTE T ON i/ NEXRAD (U) MASSACHUSETTS NST OF TECH EXINGTO N LINCO N JD LAS B G LAIRD ET 1 9 NOV...identified technical uncertainties in the NEXRAD atrawman design for FAA applications. The suggested research and development program includes an...automated display and short term prediction of hazardotus weather regions for use by ATC controllers. 17. Kam Wattl is. OlsatdaW sast NEXRAD

  5. Infrared spectrophotometry of OH 231.8 + 4.2 identified with OH 0739-14

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gillett, F. C.; Soifer, B. T.

    1976-01-01

    Infrared spectrophotometry from 2.1 to 4.1 microns and from 7.7 to 13.3 microns of the peculiar OH maser source OH 231.8 + 4.2 identified with OH 0739-14 is reported. Deep absorption features are found at 3.1 microns and from 8 to 13 microns, and are identified with absorption by cold ices and silicates in the line of sight to the infrared source. The infrared flux is also found to vary. These infrared observations present new difficulties in understanding the nature of the object. Several possibly useful observations of OH 231.8 + 4.2 are suggested.

  6. Ultraviolet spectrophotometry of three LINERs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodrich, R. W.; Keel, W. C.

    1986-01-01

    Three galaxies known to be LINERs were observed spectroscopically in the ultraviolet in an attempt to detect the presumed nonthermal continuum source thought to be the source of photoionization in the nuclei. NGC 4501 was found to be too faint for study with the IUE spectrographs, while NGC 5005 had an extended ultraviolet light profile. Comparison with the optical light profile of NGC 5005 indicates that the ultraviolet source is distributed spatially in the same manner as the optical starlight, probably indicating that the ultraviolet excess is due to a component of hot stars in the nucleus. These stars contribute detectable absorption features longward of 2500 A; together with optical data, the IUE spectra suggest a burst of star formation about 1 billion yr ago, with a lower rate continuing to produce a few OB stars. In NGC 4579, a point source contributing most of the ultraviolet excess is found that is much different than the optical light distribution. Furthermore, the ultraviolet to X-ray spectral index in NGC 4579 is 1.4, compatible with the UV to X-ray indices found for samples of Seyfert galaxies. This provides compelling evidence for the detection of the photoionizing continuum in NGC 4579 and draws the research fields of normal galaxies and active galactic nuclei closer together. The emission-line spectrum of NGC 4579 is compared with calculations from a photoionization code, CLOUDY, and several shock models. The photoionization code is found to give superior results, adding to the increasing weight of evidence that the LINER phenomenon is essentially a scaled-down version of the Seyfert phenomenon.

  7. Surface composition of Mercury from reflectance spectrophotometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vilas, Faith

    1988-01-01

    The controversies surrounding the existing spectra of Mercury are discussed together with the various implications for interpretations of Mercury's surface composition. Special attention is given to the basic procedure used for reducing reflectance spectrophotometry data, the factors that must be accounted for in the reduction of these data, and the methodology for defining the portion of the surface contributing the greatest amount of light to an individual spectrum. The application of these methodologies to Mercury's spectra is presented.

  8. Combined spectrophotometry and tensile measurements of human connective tissues: potentials and limitations.

    PubMed

    Ernstberger, Markus; Sichting, Freddy; Baselt, Tobias; Hartmann, Peter; Aust, Gabriela; Hammer, Niels

    2013-06-01

    Strain-dependent transmission data of nine iliotibial tract specimens are determined using a custom-built optical setup with a halogen light source and an industrial norm material testing machine. Polarized light microscopy and hematoxylin-eosin staining indicated that lateral contraction of collagen structures is responsible for total intensity variations during a 20-cycle preconditioning and a 5-cycle tensile test. Tensile force progress is opposite to total transmission progress. Due to dehydration, wavelength-specific radiation intensity shifting is determined during the test, primarily noticeable in a water absorption band between 1400 and 1500 nm. The results show the capability of integrating spectrophotometry technology into biomechanics for determining structural alterations of human collagen due to applied strain. Being more sensitive to drying, spectrophotometry may likely serve as a quality control in stress-strain testing of biological structures.

  9. FAA (Federal Aviation Administration) Air Traffic Activity FY 1986.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-09-30

    AIRPORTS WITH FAA-3PSRATEO TRAFIC CONTROL TVWERS RY STATE (CONTINUED) STAT? AND LOCATION U AIR AI6 GENERAL LOCATION NAME IENTIFIPR 8 TOTAL CARRISR...0 0 0 LINUE "I 1 ZM4 3497 1273 99 74 251 LIMA ALLEN COUNTY 31 N ZI0 17 0 2 15 3LINCNFIELO IL N iC 4 0 0 4 2 LINCOLN LOGAN COUNTY IL S I S*I 9 0 0 9 0...VIRGINIA LENISBURG GREENBRIER ELWIS N 2100. %v TABLE n FISCAL YEAR 196 OPEIRATIONS AT AtFPORTS WITN CONTIRACTOR-3PERATED TRAFIC C0N11)L VtflERS BY STATE

  10. Tunable Diode Laser Heterodyne Spectrophotometry of Ozone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fogal, P. F.; McElroy, C. T.; Goldman, A.; Murcray, D. G.

    1988-01-01

    Tunable diode laser heterodyne spectrophotometry (TDLHS) has been used to make extremely high resolution (less than 0.0005/ cm) solar spectra in the 9.6 micron ozone band. Observations have shown that a signal-to-noise ratio of 95 : 1 (35% of theoretical) for an integration time of 1/8 second can be achieved at a resolution of 0.0005 wavenumbers. The spectral data have been inverted to yield a total column amount of ozone, in good agreement with that. measured at the nearby National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) ozone monitoring facility in Boulder, Colorado.

  11. Evaluation of lubricating oil preparation procedures for the determination of Al, Ba, Mo, Si and V by high-resolution continuum source FAAS.

    PubMed

    Amorim Filho, Volnei Resta; Gomes Neto, José Anchieta

    2009-01-01

    Microwave-assisted acid decomposition and oil-in-water emulsification were evaluated as sample pretreatment procedures to determine Al, Ba, Mo, Si and V in lubricating oils by high-resolution continuum source flame atomic absorption spectrometry (HR-CS FAAS). Average recoveries of Al, Ba and V in oil digests (107, 103 and 101%) were close to those obtained for emulsions prepared in kerosene medium (94, 113 and 95%). Average recoveries for Mo were close to 105 and 46% for emulsions and digests, respectively. Improved average recoveries (101%) were obtained for Mo in digests using the analyte addition technique. Silicon was successfully quantified only in digested samples. Limits of quantification for Al, Ba, Mo and V were 1.4, 31.5, 1.5 and 11.4-fold lower than those obtained by line-source FAAS. Enhanced sensitivity, multi-elemental capability, and high sample throughput are among the main advantages of HR-CS FAAS in comparison with the line-source FAAS technique.

  12. FAA center for aviation systems reliability: an overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brasche, Lisa J. H.

    1996-11-01

    The FAA Center for Aviation Systems Reliability has as its objectives: to develop quantitative nondestructive evaluation (NDE) methods for aircraft structures and materials, including prototype instrumentation, software, techniques and procedures; and to develop and maintain comprehensive education and training programs specific to the inspection of aviation structures. The program, which includes contributions from Iowa State University, Northwestern University, Wayne State University, Tuskegee University, AlliedSignal Propulsion Engines, General Electric Aircraft Engines and Pratt and Whitney, has been in existence since 1990. Efforts under way include: development of inspection for adhesively bonded structures; detection of corrosion; development of advanced NDE concepts that form the basis for an inspection simulator; improvements of titanium inspection as part of the Engine Titanium Consortium; development of education and training program. An overview of the efforts underway will be provided with focus on those technologies closest to technology transfer.

  13. NASA/FAA general aviation crash dynamics program - An update

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hayduk, R. J.; Thomson, R. G.; Carden, H. D.

    1979-01-01

    Work in progress in the NASA/FAA General Aviation Crash Dynamics Program for the development of technology for increased crash-worthiness and occupant survivability of general aviation aircraft is presented. Full-scale crash testing facilities and procedures are outlined, and a chronological summary of full-scale tests conducted and planned is presented. The Plastic and Large Deflection Analysis of Nonlinear Structures and Modified Seat Occupant Model for Light Aircraft computer programs which form part of the effort to predict nonlinear geometric and material behavior of sheet-stringer aircraft structures subjected to large deformations are described, and excellent agreement between simulations and experiments is noted. The development of structural concepts to attenuate the load transmitted to the passenger through the seats and subfloor structure is discussed, and an apparatus built to test emergency locator transmitters in a realistic environment is presented.

  14. FAA Integrated Noise Model User’s Guide,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1976-03-01

    lcsl kiport Docum .ntatioo Pog. 3 . R.cipi .nt e Catalog No. c2.~ FAA~~~~~~~ 2 J j 2. Gov .rn m.n~ Acc .,sie n No. @~ ~~~~~~~~~~~~ pg,.4 T tI. and...2.4 Flight Track Definitions 2— 3 2.5 Total Traffic Mix 2—14 2.6 Traffic Mix Allocation 2—18 2.7 User Options 2—19 3 . ALTERNATE NOISE DATA 3 —1 3.1...Background 3 —1 3.2 Specifying Alternate Noise Library Entries 3 —1 3.2.1 Library Identification 3 —2 3.2 .2 ProfIle Data 3 —2 3.2.3 Acoustic Data 3 —7 4

  15. CVF spectrophotometry of Pluto - Correlation of composition with albedo. [circularly variable filter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marcialis, Robert L.; Lebofsky, Larry A.

    1991-01-01

    The present time-resolved, 0.96-2.65-micron spectrophotometry for the Pluto-Charon system indicates night-to-night variations in the depths of the methane absorptions such that the bands' equivalent width is near minimum light. The interpretation of these data in terms of a depletion of methane in dark regions of the planet, relative to bright ones, is consistent with the Buie and Fink (1987) observations. The near-IR spectrum of Pluto seems to be dominated by surface frost. It is suggested that the dark equatorial regions of Pluto are redder than those of moderate albedo.

  16. CVF spectrophotometry of Pluto - Correlation of composition with albedo. [Circularly variable filter

    SciTech Connect

    Marcialis, R.L.; Lebofsky, L.A. Arizona Univ., Tucson )

    1991-02-01

    The present time-resolved, 0.96-2.65-micron spectrophotometry for the Pluto-Charon system indicates night-to-night variations in the depths of the methane absorptions such that the bands' equivalent width is near minimum light. The interpretation of these data in terms of a depletion of methane in dark regions of the planet, relative to bright ones, is consistent with the Buie and Fink (1987) observations. The near-IR spectrum of Pluto seems to be dominated by surface frost. It is suggested that the dark equatorial regions of Pluto are redder than those of moderate albedo. 28 refs.

  17. Optical imagery and spectrophotometry of CTB 80

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hester, J. Jeff; Kulkarni, Shrinivas R.

    1989-01-01

    Narrow-band imagery and spectrophotometry of the central region of CTB 80 are presented. The images show weak forbidden O III and ubiquitous filamentary forbidden S II and H-alpha emission from the extended radio lobes in which the core is embedded. The data indicate that the extended component is shock heated. Balmer line-dominated emission is observed around the perimeter of the core. Assuming that the volume of the radio shell is similar to the volume of the thermal shell, it is found that a magnetic field of about 600 microG and a cosmic-ray proton-to-electron ratio of about 200 are required to explain the pressure and synchrotron volume emissivity in the radio shell. It is suggested that the optical emission form the core of CTB 80 arises behind shocks which are being driven into a magnetized thermal plasma by the confined relativistic wind from PSR 1951+32.

  18. Spectrophotometry of the shell around AG Carinae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitra, P. Mila; Dufour, Reginald J.

    1990-01-01

    Spatially-resolved long-slit spectrophotometry are presented for two regions of the shell nebula around the P-Cygni variable star AG Carinae. The spectra cover the 3700-6800 A wavelength range. Emission-line diagnostics are used to derive extinction, electron temperatures, and densities for various positions in the nebula. The chemical abundances and ionization structure are calculated and compared with other types of planetary nebulae and shells around other luminous stars. It is found that the N/O and N/S ratios of Ag Car are high compared to solar neighborhood ISM values. The O/H depletion found for the AG Car shell approaches that found in the condensations of the Eta Car system.

  19. 78 FR 63276 - Interim Policy, FAA Review of Solar Energy System Projects on Federally Obligated Airports

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-23

    ... Federal Aviation Administration Interim Policy, FAA Review of Solar Energy System Projects on Federally... federally obligated airports to construct solar energy systems on airport property. FAA is adopting an... for measuring ocular impact of proposed solar energy systems which are effective upon publication....

  20. 14 CFR 11.31 - How does FAA process direct final rules?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false How does FAA process direct final rules? 11.31 Section 11.31 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION PROCEDURAL RULES GENERAL RULEMAKING PROCEDURES Rulemaking Procedures General § 11.31 How does FAA...

  1. 14 CFR Appendix A to Part 415 - FAA/USSPACECOM Launch Notification Form

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false FAA/USSPACECOM Launch Notification Form A... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION LICENSING LAUNCH LICENSE Pt. 415, App. A Appendix A to Part 415—FAA/USSPACECOM Launch Notification Form ER21AP99.001 ER21AP99.002...

  2. 14 CFR Appendix A to Part 415 - FAA/USSPACECOM Launch Notification Form

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false FAA/USSPACECOM Launch Notification Form A... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION LICENSING LAUNCH LICENSE Pt. 415, App. A Appendix A to Part 415—FAA/USSPACECOM Launch Notification Form ER21AP99.001 ER21AP99.002...

  3. NDE research efforts at the FAA Center for Aviation Systems Reliability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, Donald O.; Brasche, Lisa J. H.

    1992-01-01

    The Federal Aviation Administration-Center for Aviation Systems Reliability (FAA-CASR), a part of the Institute for Physical Research and Technology at Iowa State University, began operation in the Fall of 1990 with funding from the FAA. The mission of the FAA-CASR is to develop quantitative nondestructive evaluation (NDE) methods for aircraft structures and materials including prototype instrumentation, software, techniques, and procedures and to develop and maintain comprehensive education and training programs in aviation specific inspection procedures and practices. To accomplish this mission, FAA-CASR brings together resources from universities, government, and industry to develop a comprehensive approach to problems specific to the aviation industry. The problem areas are targeted by the FAA, aviation manufacturers, the airline industry and other members of the aviation business community. This consortium approach ensures that the focus of the efforts is on relevant problems and also facilitates effective transfer of the results to industry.

  4. Simplified multi-element analysis of ground and instant coffees by ICP-OES and FAAS.

    PubMed

    Szymczycha-Madeja, Anna; Welna, Maja; Pohl, Pawel

    2015-01-01

    A simplified alternative to the wet digestion sample preparation procedure for roasted ground and instant coffees has been developed and validated for the determination of different elements by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES) (Al, Ba, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Mn, Ni, Pb, Sr, Zn) and flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS) (Ca, Fe, K, Mg, Na). The proposed procedure, i.e. the ultrasound-assisted solubilisation in aqua regia, is quite fast and simple, requires minimal use of reagents, and demonstrated good analytical performance, i.e. accuracy from -4.7% to 1.9%, precision within 0.5-8.6% and recovery in the range 93.5-103%. Detection limits of elements were from 0.086 ng ml(-1) (Sr) to 40 ng ml(-1) (Fe). A preliminary classification of 18 samples of ground and instant coffees was successfully made based on concentrations of selected elements and using principal component analysis and hierarchic cluster analysis.

  5. Flameless Atomic Absorption Spectrophotometric Analysis for Lewisite (L).

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1978-10-01

    method that was developed for detection of Lewisite by analysis for arsenic, using flameless atomic absorption spectroscopy (FAAS). “Flameless atomic ...place in a furnace, and the flame associated with con- ventional atomic absorption spectroscopy is not needed. The procedure that was used is given along...nickel was unnecessary for the Lewisite samples. Table 1. Flameless atomic absorption spectroscopy conditions used for determination of arsenic in

  6. Fracture Analysis of the FAA/NASA Wide Stiffened Panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seshadri, B. R.; Newman, J. C., Jr.; Dawicke, D. S.; Young, R. D.

    1998-01-01

    This paper presents the fracture analyses conducted on the FAA/NASA stiffened and unstiffened panels using the STAGS (STructural Analysis of General Shells) code with the critical crack-tip-opening angle (CTOA) fracture criterion. The STAGS code with the "plane-strain" core option was used in all analyses. Previous analyses of wide, flat panels have shown that the high-constraint conditions around a crack front, like plane strain, has to be modeled in order for the critical CTOA fracture criterion to predict wide panel failures from small laboratory tests. In the present study, the critical CTOA value was determined from a wide (unstiffened) panel with anti-buckling guides. The plane-strain core size was estimated from previous fracture analyses and was equal to about the sheet thickness. Rivet flexibility and stiffener failure was based on methods and criteria, like that currently used in industry. STAGS and the CTOA criterion were used to predict load-against-crack extension for the wide panels with a single crack and multiple-site damage cracking at many adjacent rivet holes. Analyses were able to predict stable crack growth and residual strength with a few percent (5%) of stiffened panel tests results but over predicted the buckling failure load on a unstiffened panel with a single crack by 10%.

  7. Controlled impact demonstration seat/cabin restraint systems: FAA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, R. A.

    1986-01-01

    The FAA restraint system experiments consisted of 24 standard and modified seats, 2 standard galleys and 2 standard overhead compartments. Under the controlled impact demonstration (CID) program, the experimental objective was to demonstrate the effectiveness of individual restraint system designs when exposed to a survivable air-to-ground impact condition. What researchers were looking for was the performance exhibited by standard and modified designs, performance differences resulting from their installed cabin location, and interrelating performance demonstrated by test article and attaching floor and/or fuselage structure. The other restraint system experiment consisted of 2 standard overhead stowage compartments and 2 galley modules. Again, researchers were concerned with the retention of stowed equipment and carry-on articles. The overhead compartments were loaded with test weights up to their maximum capacity, and each of the galleys was filled with test articles: aft with normal galley equipment, forward with hazardous material test packages. A breakdown of instrumentation and distribution is given beginning with 11 instrumented type anthropomorphic dummies and 185 sensors which provided for acceleration and load measurements at the various experiment and associated structure locations. The onboard cameras provided additional coverage of these experiments, including the areas of cabin which were not instrumented. Test results showing the window-side leg forces versus pulse duration are given.

  8. 14 CFR 193.7 - What does it mean for the FAA to designate information as protected?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... information as protected? 193.7 Section 193.7 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION... INFORMATION § 193.7 What does it mean for the FAA to designate information as protected? (a) General. When the FAA issues an order designating information as protected under this part, the FAA does not...

  9. FAA Forecast Conference Proceedings (6th) Held at Washington, DC on 21 October 1980.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-10-01

    specialized Oper.ratilonis miarkets, i nclur~d ing ra rt icuIa rly,, those that are to a high AN Year agro the FAA prolec -ted that 25) air r . ,rrier...JO Six Annual r 4 . ~FAA Forecast Conference -... Proceedings & u /]-/ " j, Oct8iLC Table of Contents ’.7 I L Part I: Introduction 2 Proceedings...lrowl Ii in FAA workload hig.Inaito ohsrg totti ihhghe o\\ er thle ne\\t 12 years. or)i thle o rder (it 3 piercent per pri( es and othe( r (osts. genieral

  10. Near-infrared spectrophotometry of Titan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trafton, L. M.

    1975-01-01

    Several unusual features in the near-IR spectrum of Titan are examined. Observations during four apparitions establish the reality of the S(1) absorption at 8150.7 A, but the existence of the S(O) absorption at 8272.7 A will require further sightings to become definitively established. These two features are particularly important, as they bear on the abundance of H2 in Titan's atmosphere.

  11. 78 FR 6400 - Results of FAA Nitrous Oxide BLEVE Characterization Testing

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-30

    ... containing nitrous oxide stored under pressure above its normal boiling point. The FAA's Office of Commercial... commercial reusable launch vehicles. A potential hazard in nitrous oxide storage and handling is a...

  12. [Determination of trace elements of Gentiana macrophlla and Gentiana straminea by microwave digestion-FAAS].

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yu-Shan; Zhang, Xi-Ling; Wang, Rong-Bin; Xia, Qi; An, Xia

    2008-05-01

    An acid-assisted microwave digestion procedure is optimized for the determination of trace elements in traditional Chinese medicine by the use of flame atomic absorption spectrometric (FAAS) techniques. Microwave-assisted digestion has the advantages of reduced time for sample dissolution, fewer possibilities for technical errors caused by spilling of hot digestion solutions, use of less chemicals, and lower losses of volatile metals. In addition, modern microwave ovens are safer and simpler and provide more controlled and reproducible conditions than hot plate or block digesters. Flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS) is more commonly applied techniques in the de termination of trace elements. The accurate measurement of trace elements concentrations in samples of traditional Chinese medicine is an important goal in research for medical effects of traditional Chinese medicine. The purpose of this study was to determine the contents of the trace elements in Gentiana macrophlla and Gentiana straminea. In order to identify the accuracy of the procedure, the operating conditions was selected before the determination of trace elements. In order to gauge the effectiveness of digestion, the selection of digestion conditions of the technique was undertaken. The results showed HNO3-H2O2 (5 : 1) as a microwave digestion agent with suitable temperature and time was optimum choice in the digestion procedure. Analysis limits were also selected according to the low detection limits and the good precision. They were Fe(248.3 nm), Mn (279.5 nm), Ni (232.0 nm), Cu(324. 8 nm), Zn (2.139 nm), Ca (422.7 nm), Mg (285.2 nm) and Cr (357.9 nm), respectively. The working curves were obtained by using multi-elemental standard solutions and line relation was good. Under the selected conditions, the contents of trace elements Fe, Mn, Ni, Cu, Zn, Ca, Mg and Cr in Gentiana macrophlla and Gentiana straminea were directly determined using working curve methods. The relative standard

  13. Precision Departure Release Capability (PDRC): NASA to FAA Research Transition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Engelland, Shawn; Davis, Thomas J.

    2013-01-01

    departure runway assignments to the Center scheduling tool. The PDRC concept also incorporates earlier NASA and FAA research into automation-assisted CFR coordination. The PDRC concept reduces uncertainty by automatically communicating coordinated release times with seconds-level precision enabling TMCs and FLMs to work with target times rather than windows. NASA has developed a PDRC prototype system that integrates the Center's TMA system with a research prototype Tower decision support tool. A two-phase field evaluation was conducted at NASA's North Texas Research Station in Dallas-Fort Worth. The field evaluation validated the PDRC concept and demonstrated reduced release time uncertainty while being used for tactical departure scheduling of more than 230 operational flights over 29 weeks of operations.

  14. Airborne infrared spectrophotometry of Mira variables

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strecker, D. W.; Erickson, E. F.; Witteborn, F. C.

    1978-01-01

    Airborne spectrophotometric observations of R Cas near minimum and maximum light, R Leo near minimum, and NML Tau near maximum are reported which were obtained over the wavelength range from 1.2 to 4 microns with 1.5% resolution. The spectral energy distributions of the three stars at the indicated times are presented, and it is shown that the H2O bands at 1.4, 1.9, and 2.7 microns are clearly evident in all the spectra, while the absorption bands of CO at about 1.6 and 2.3 microns are probably present although they are masked by the strong water vapor features. The results indicate that water vapor is the dominant opacity source in the atmospheres of Mira variables, that R Leo and NML Tau may be fitted well over the entire spectrum by respective single temperatures of 2250 and 1800 K, and that R Cas near both minimum and maximum cannot be adequately described by one temperature over the entire wavelength range investigated. The shapes and depths of the absorption bands are determined together with the apparent angular diameter of each star and the equivalent widths of the H2O + CO absorption bands. It is concluded that water vapor absorption is more strongly correlated with color temperature than with spectral type for R Cas and R Leo.

  15. Spectrophotometry of Kuiper Belt Objects and Centaurs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lederer, S. M.; Vilas, F.

    2002-09-01

    We present an ongoing study of Kuiper Belt Objects (KBOs) and Centaurs. We acquired broadband (UBVRI) and medium band photometry with the 4m Mayall telescope at Kitt Peak and the 1.8m Perkins telescope at Lowell Observatory. We present broadband colors of these objects and discuss the results of our search for absorption bands in the visible spectral region. Vilas (Icarus, 111) demonstrated that the existence of the 0.7um absorption feature in asteroids with solar-like colors was strongly correlated with the presence of the 3.0um water of hydration feature. The broad 0.7um absorption band is attributed to a charge-transfer in Fe-bearing hydrated silicates (phyllosilicates), which are a product of aqueous alteration. For aqueous alteration to take place, one must have water ice present in an object, and an energy source to heat the water ice to a liquid water phase. Water ice has already been discovered in some Centaurs (Luu et al. ApJ, 531; Brown AJ, 119), and Durda and Stern (Icarus, 145) estimate that KBOs experience collisional processing regularly throughout their lifetimes. The estimated impact energies are high enough to induce aqueous alteration. We undertook this study to search for evidence of the 0.7um feature in KBOs and Centaurs. We employed medium band Windhorst filters, located at 0.527, 0.666, 0.705, 0.755 and 0.848 um in conjunction with the Mosaic CCD to search for this absorption band, which extends from 0.57-0.83um. Initial analysis suggests that an absorption feature exists near 0.7um in the greyer objects but not the redder objects, following the correlations observed in asteroids. These data are consistent with the absorption band detected near 0.7um by de Bergh et al. (ACM 2002, Berlin) in visible spectra of 2000 EB173 and 2000 GN171. However, further analysis is required to confirm whether the absorption we see is due to phyllosilicates or another source. We will present the results from this analysis. This research was supported through the

  16. Clinical applications of lightguide diffuse reflectance spectrophotometry in vascular disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrison, David K.; Delaney, Colin; Brown, Linda; Newton, David J.; McCollum, Peter T.

    1994-02-01

    There is enormous potential for application of lightguide tissue reflectance spectrophotometry in the diagnosis and treatment of peripheral vascular disease. In the present study, measurements were carried out in 10 such pre-amputation patients to compare the use of micro-lightguide spectrophotometry with the macro-lightguide technique. These preliminary results show excellent agreement between the new, non-invasive micro-lightguide technique and the `gold standard' skin blood flow measurements. This technique could thus provide a more functional, non-invasive assessment of healing potential than skin blood flow measurement.

  17. [Comparison of two methods for determining G, A, M immunoglobulins (spectrophotometry and radial immunodiffusion)].

    PubMed

    Gamaleia, N B; Mondrus, K A

    1994-01-01

    Blood serum levels of immunoglobulins A, G, and M were measured by two methods, spectrophotometry and radial immunodiffusion. The results were in good correlation, this permitting the authors recommend spectrophotometry as a simpler and more objective method for such measurements.

  18. Energy absorption studied to reduce aircraft crash forces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    The NASA/FAA aircraft safety reseach programs for general aviation aircraft are discussed. Energy absorption of aircraft subflooring and redesign of interior flooring are being studied. The testing of energy absorbing configurations is described. The three NASA advanced concepts performed at neary the maximum possible amount of energy absorption, and one of two minimum modifications concepts performed well. Planned full scale tests are described. Airplane seat concepts are being considered.

  19. [Studies on the interaction between RNA with neutral red and determination of RNA by spectrophotometry].

    PubMed

    Si, Wen-Hui

    2007-06-01

    An analytical method for the determination of ribonucleic acid by spectrophotometry was established. At the maximum absorption wavelength for neutral red in B-R buffer solution, and under the best conditions, the decrease in the absorbance was linear with the amount of ribonucleic acid. The linearity range was 0.0-9.0 microg x mL(-1), the detection limit was 0.52 microg x mL(-1), and the correlation coeffient was 0.999 8. This method was simple, rapid, and selective. So its application to the determination of ribonucleic acid was satisfactory. The reaction mechanism was that the electrostatic interaction leads to molecular association of RNA with neutral red, resulting in anti-ion permutation and bonding reaction.

  20. Moderate resolution spectrophotometry of high redshift quasars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneider, Donald P.; Schmidt, Maarten; Gunn, James E.

    1991-01-01

    A uniform set of photometry and high signal-to-noise moderate resolution spectroscopy of 33 quasars with redshifts larger than 3.1 is presented. The sample consists of 17 newly discovered quasars (two with redshifts in excess of 4.4) and 16 sources drawn from the literature. The objects in this sample have r magnitudes between 17.4 and 21.4; their luminosities range from -28.8 to -24.9. Three of the 33 objects are broad absorption line quasars. A number of possible high redshift damped Ly-alpha systems were found.

  1. A Computer-aided Learning Exercise in Spectrophotometry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pamula, Frederick

    1994-01-01

    Discusses the use of a computer simulation program in teaching the concepts of spectrophotometry. Introduces several parts of the program and program usage. Presents an assessment activity to evaluate students' mastery of material. Concludes with the advantages of this approach to the student and to the assessor. (ASK)

  2. Evolution of Instrumentation for UV-Visible Spectrophotometry. Part I.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Altemose, Ines R.

    1986-01-01

    Traces the development of instruments used in spectrophotometry. Discusses how spectrophotometric measurements are made. Describes the color comparator, the filter photometer, and the spectrophotometer. Outlines the evolution of optical systems, including light sources, the monochromator, the photodetector, double-beam optics, and split-beam…

  3. Ion Exchange Chromatography and Spectrophotometry: An Introductory Undergraduate Laboratory Experiment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foster, N.; And Others

    1985-01-01

    Describes an experiment in which students use ion exchange chromatography to separate a mixture of chloro complexes of transition metal ions and then use spectrophotometry to define qualitatively the efficiency of the ion exchange columns. Background information, materials needed, and procedures used are included. (JN)

  4. Technology Development, Validation, and Transfer Via the FAA Airworthiness Assurance Validation

    SciTech Connect

    Perry, R.L.

    1999-04-15

    In 1991, the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) established an Airworthiness Assurance NDI Validation Center (AANC) at Sandia National Laboratories. Its primary mission is to support technology development, validation, and transfer to industry in order to enhance the airworthiness and improve the aircraft maintenance practices of the U.S. commercial aviation industry. The Center conducts projects in a myriad of engineering disciplines. The results are placed in the public domain so that the industry at-large can reap the benefits of FAA-funded Research and Development efforts. To support the Center's goals, the FAA/AANC has set up a hangar facility at the Albuquerque International Airport which contains a collection of transport and commuter aircraft as well as other test specimens. The facility replicates a working maintenance environment by incorporating both the physical inspection difficulties as well as the environmental factors which influence maintenance reliability.

  5. A perspective on the FAA approval process: Integrating rotorcraft displays, controls and workload

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, David L.; Hart, Jake; Hwoschinsky, Peter

    1993-01-01

    The FAA is responsible for making the determination that a helicopter is safe for IFR operations in the National Airspace System (NAS). This involves objective and subjective evaluations of cockpit displays, flying qualities, procedures and human factors as they affect performance and workload. After all of the objective evaluations are completed, and all Federal Regulations have been met, FAA pilots make the final subjective judgement as to suitability for use by civil pilots in the NAS. The paper uses the flying qualities and pilot workload characteristics of a small helicopter to help examine the FAA pilot's involvement in this process. The result highlights the strengths of the process and its importance to the approval of new aircraft and equipments for civil IFR helicopter applications. The paper also identifies opportunities for improvement.

  6. A qualitative phenomenological study: Enhanced, risk-based FAA oversight on part 145 maintenance practices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheehan, Bryan G.

    The purpose of this qualitative phenomenological study was to examine the phenomenon of enhanced, risk-based Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) oversight of Part 145 repair stations that performed aircraft maintenance for Part 121 air carriers between 2007 and 2014 in Oklahoma. Specifically, this research was utilized to explore what operational changes have occurred in the domestic Part 145 repair station industry such as variations in management or hiring practices, training, recordkeeping and technical data, inventory and aircraft parts supply-chain logistics, equipment, and facilities. After interviewing 12 managers from Part 145 repair stations in Oklahoma, six major theme codes emerged from the data: quality of oversight before 2007, quality of oversight after 2007, advantages of oversight, disadvantages of oversight, status quo of oversight, and process improvement . Of those six major theme codes, 17 subthemes appeared from the data that were used to explain the phenomenon of enhanced oversight in the Part 145 repair station industry. Forty-two percent of the participants indicated a weak FAA oversight system that has hindered the continuous process improvement program in their repair stations. Some of them were financially burdened after hiring additional full-time quality assurance inspectors to specifically manage enhanced FAA oversight. Notwithstanding, the participants of the study indicated that the FAA must apply its surveillance on a more standardized and consistent basis. They want to see this standardization in how FAA inspectors interpret regulations and practice the same quality of oversight for all repair stations, particularly those that are repeat violators and fail to comply with federal aviation regulations. They believed that when the FAA enforces standardization on a consistent basis, repair stations can become more efficient and safer in the performance of their scope of work for the U.S. commercial air transportation industry.

  7. FAA/NASA Joint University Program for Air Transportation Research 1994-1995

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Remer, J. H.

    1998-01-01

    The Joint University Program for Air Transportation Research (JUP) is a coordinated set of three grants co-sponsored by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). Under JUP, three institutions: the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Princeton, and Ohio Universities receive research grants and collaborate with FAA and NASA in defining and performing civil aeronautics research in a multitude of areas. Some of these disciplines are artificial intelligence, control theory, atmospheric hazards, navigation, avionics, human factors, flight dynamics, air traffic management, and electronic communications.

  8. FAA Airworthiness Assurance NDI Validation Center (AANC) operated by Sandia National Laboratories.

    SciTech Connect

    Roach, Dennis Patrick; Hartman, Roger D.

    2010-09-01

    Airworthiness Assurance NDI Validation Center (AANC) objectives are: (1) Enhance aircraft safety and reliability; (2) Aid developing advanced aircraft designs and maintenance techniques; (3) Provide our customers with comprehensive, independent, and quantitative/qualitative evaluations of new and enhanced inspection, maintenance, and repair techniques; (4) Facilitate transferring effective technologies into the aviation industry; (5) Support FAA rulemaking process by providing guidance on content & necessary tools to meet requirements or recommendations of FARs, ADs, ACs, SBs, SSIDs, CPCP, and WFD; and (6) Coordinate with and respond to Airworthiness Assurance Working Group (AAWG) in support of FAA Aviation Rulemaking Advisory Committee (ARAC).

  9. FAA evaluation of UV technology for runway incursion prevention and low-visibility landings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norris, Victor J., Jr.

    2003-09-01

    The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) is currently evaluating a solar blind ultraviolet (UV) technology, called FogEye, that is being developed by Norris Electro Optical Systems. The technology allows for transmission and reception of low level UV signals that are free of any natural background noise. It also offers favorable atmospheric transmission characteristics. Conclusions of the FAA evaluation thus far are that the technology has considerable merit, and that applications such as preventing runway incursions and use as an Integrity Monitor during low visibility landings should be operationally assessed.

  10. Wavelength Anomalies in UV-Vis Spectrophotometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tellinghuisen, J.

    2012-06-01

    Commercial spectrophotometers are great tools for recording absorption spectra of low-to-moderate resolution and high photometic quality. However, in the case of at least one such instrument, the Shimadzu UV-2101PC (and by assumption, similar Shimadzu models), the wavelength accuracy may not match the photometric accuracy. In fact the wavelength varies with slit width, spectral sampling interval, and even the specified range, with a smoothing algorithm invoked any time the spectrum includes more than 65 sampled wavelengths. This behavior appears not to be documented anywhere, but it has been present for at least 20 years and persists even in the latest software available to run the instrument. The wavelength shifts can be as large as 1 nm, so for applications where wavelength accuracy better than this is important, wavelength calibration must be done with care to ensure that the results are valid for the parameters used to record the target spectra.

  11. Spectrophotometry of 237 Stars in 7 Open Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clampitt, Lori; Burstein, David

    1997-08-01

    Spectrophotometry is presented for 237 stars in 7 nearby open clusters: Hyades, Pleiades, Alpha Persei, Praesepe, Coma Berenices, IC 4665, and M39. The observations were taken by Lee McDonald and David Burstein using the Wampler single-channel scanner on the Crossley 0.9m telescope at Lick Observatory from July 1973 through December 1974. Sixteen bandpasses spanning the spectral range 3500 Angstroms to 7780 Angstroms were observed for each star, with bandwidths 32Angstroms, 48 Angstroms or 64 Angstroms. Data are standardized to the Hayes-Latham system to mutual accuracy of 0.016 mag per passband. The accuracy of the spectrophotometry is assessed in three ways on a star-by-star basis. First, comparisons are made with previously published spectrophotometry for 19 stars observed in common. Second, (B-V) colors and uvby colors are compared for 236 stars and 221 stars, respectively. Finally, comparsions are made for 200 main sequence stars to the spectral synthesis models of Kurucz, fixing log g = 4.0 and [Fe/H] = 0.0, and only varying effective temperature. The accuracy of tests using uvby colors and the Kurucz models are shown to track each other closely, yielding an accuracy estimate (1 sigma ) of 0.01 mag for the 13 colors formed from bandpasses longward of the Balmer jump, and 0.02 mag for the 3 colors formed from the three bandpasses below the Balmer jump. In contrast, larger scatter is found relative to the previously published spectrophotometry of Bohm-Vitense & Johnson (16 stars in common) and Gunn & Stryker (3 stars). We also show that the scatter in the fits of the spectrophotometric colors and the uvby filter colors is a reasonable way to identify the observations of which specific stars are accurate to 1 sigma , 2 sigma , .... As such, the residuals from both the filter color fits and the Kurucz model fits are tabulated for each star where it was possible to make a comparison, so users of these data can choose stars according to the accuracy of the data

  12. The genomic organization of the Fanconi anemia group A (FAA) gene

    SciTech Connect

    Ianzano, L.; Centra, M.; Savino, M.

    1997-05-01

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is a genetically heterogeneous disease involving at least five genes on the basis of complementation analysis (FAA to FAE). The FAA gene has been recently isolated by two independent approaches, positional and functional cloning. In the present study we describe the genomic structure of the FAA gene. The gene contains 43 exons spanning approximately 80 kb as determined by the alignment of four cosmids and the fine localization of the first and the last exons in restriction fragments of these clones. Exons range from 34 to 188 bp. All but three of the splice sites were consistent with the ag-gt rule. We also describe three alternative splicing events in cDNA clones that result in the loss of exon 37, a 23-bp deletion at the 5{prime} end of exon 41. Sequence analysis of the 5{prime} region upstream of the putative transcription start site showed no obvious TATA and CAAT boxes, but did show a GC-rich region, typical of housekeeping genes. Knowledge of the structure of the FAA gene will provide an invaluable resource for the discovery of mutations in the gene that accounts for about 60-66% of FA patients. 24 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  13. 14 CFR 11.38 - What public comment procedures does the FAA follow for Special Conditions?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false What public comment procedures does the FAA follow for Special Conditions? 11.38 Section 11.38 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION PROCEDURAL RULES GENERAL RULEMAKING PROCEDURES Rulemaking Procedures...

  14. 14 CFR 11.33 - How can I track FAA's rulemaking activities?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false How can I track FAA's rulemaking activities? 11.33 Section 11.33 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION PROCEDURAL RULES GENERAL RULEMAKING PROCEDURES Rulemaking Procedures General § 11.33 How can...

  15. 14 CFR 11.73 - How does FAA process petitions for rulemaking?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false How does FAA process petitions for rulemaking? 11.73 Section 11.73 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... action. (d) If we have tasked ARAC to study the general subject area of your petition, we will ask...

  16. 47 CFR 17.7 - Antenna structures requiring notification to the FAA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Antenna structures requiring notification to..., MARKING, AND LIGHTING OF ANTENNA STRUCTURES Federal Aviation Administration Notification Criteria § 17.7 Antenna structures requiring notification to the FAA. A notification to the Federal...

  17. 47 CFR 17.7 - Antenna structures requiring notification to the FAA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Antenna structures requiring notification to..., MARKING, AND LIGHTING OF ANTENNA STRUCTURES Federal Aviation Administration Notification Criteria § 17.7 Antenna structures requiring notification to the FAA. A notification to the Federal...

  18. 47 CFR 17.7 - Antenna structures requiring notification to the FAA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Antenna structures requiring notification to..., MARKING, AND LIGHTING OF ANTENNA STRUCTURES Federal Aviation Administration Notification Criteria § 17.7 Antenna structures requiring notification to the FAA. Link to an amendment published at 79 FR 56986,...

  19. 47 CFR 17.7 - Antenna structures requiring notification to the FAA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Antenna structures requiring notification to..., MARKING, AND LIGHTING OF ANTENNA STRUCTURES Federal Aviation Administration Notification Criteria § 17.7 Antenna structures requiring notification to the FAA. A notification to the Federal...

  20. 47 CFR 17.14 - Certain antenna structures exempt from notification to the FAA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Certain antenna structures exempt from... CONSTRUCTION, MARKING, AND LIGHTING OF ANTENNA STRUCTURES Federal Aviation Administration Notification Criteria § 17.14 Certain antenna structures exempt from notification to the FAA. A notification to the...

  1. 47 CFR 17.14 - Certain antenna structures exempt from notification to the FAA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Certain antenna structures exempt from... CONSTRUCTION, MARKING, AND LIGHTING OF ANTENNA STRUCTURES Federal Aviation Administration Notification Criteria § 17.14 Certain antenna structures exempt from notification to the FAA. A notification to the...

  2. 47 CFR 17.14 - Certain antenna structures exempt from notification to the FAA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Certain antenna structures exempt from... CONSTRUCTION, MARKING, AND LIGHTING OF ANTENNA STRUCTURES Federal Aviation Administration Notification Criteria § 17.14 Certain antenna structures exempt from notification to the FAA. A notification to the...

  3. 47 CFR 17.14 - Certain antenna structures exempt from notification to the FAA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Certain antenna structures exempt from... CONSTRUCTION, MARKING, AND LIGHTING OF ANTENNA STRUCTURES Federal Aviation Administration Notification Criteria § 17.14 Certain antenna structures exempt from notification to the FAA. Link to an amendment...

  4. 47 CFR 17.7 - Antenna structures requiring notification to the FAA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Antenna structures requiring notification to..., MARKING, AND LIGHTING OF ANTENNA STRUCTURES Federal Aviation Administration Notification Criteria § 17.7 Antenna structures requiring notification to the FAA. A notification to the Federal...

  5. 47 CFR 17.14 - Certain antenna structures exempt from notification to the FAA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Certain antenna structures exempt from... CONSTRUCTION, MARKING, AND LIGHTING OF ANTENNA STRUCTURES Federal Aviation Administration Notification Criteria § 17.14 Certain antenna structures exempt from notification to the FAA. A notification to the...

  6. The new FAA national automated ECG network: some aviation medical examiner experiences.

    PubMed

    Beers, K N; Mohler, S R

    1991-01-01

    The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has required, since August 1, 1987, that aviation medical examiners (AMEs) transmit by telephone all electrocardiograms (ECGs) necessary for airman "Class I" medical certification. This relatively new airman certification requirement is centralized at the Civil Aeromedical Institute (CAMI) in Oklahoma City. In calendar year 1989, the FAA received 69,000 electronically transmitted electrocardiograms. CAMI uses Marquette Electronics software to interpret the ECG signals that are received from multi-channel equipment. The single-channel transmitted ECGs are hand screened at present. The FAA "automated" screening program is unique among governmental airman medical certification programs throughout the world. This paper presents, for potential future users, the authors' experiences with the new airman automated electrocardiographic certification requirement, and covers positive and negative features involved in the implementation and operation of the program. We conclude that while the new FAA automated ECG screening program has satisfactorily replaced the former "physician-intensive" manual screening process, the new system increases the AME's equipment and operation costs. These are passed on to the airman who is seeking certification.

  7. Ninth DOD/NASA/FAA Conference on Fibrous Composites in Structural Design, volume 2

    SciTech Connect

    Soderquist, J.R.; Neri, L.M.; Bohon, H.L.

    1992-09-01

    This publication contains the proceedings of the Ninth DOD/NASA/FAA Conference on Fibrous Composites in Structural Design held at Lake Tahoe, Nevada, during 4-7 Nov. 1991. Presentations were made in the following areas of composite structural design: perspectives in composites, design methodology, design applications, design criteria, supporting technology, damage tolerance, and manufacturing.

  8. Ninth DOD/NASA/FAA Conference on Fibrous Composites in Structural Design, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soderquist, Joseph R. (Compiler); Neri, Lawrence M. (Compiler); Bohon, Herman L. (Compiler)

    1992-01-01

    This publication contains the proceedings of the Ninth DOD/NASA/FAA conference on Fibrous Composites in structural Design. Presentations were made in the following areas of composite structural design: perspectives in composites; design methodology; design applications; design criteria; supporting technology; damage tolerance; and manufacturing.

  9. Ninth DOD/NASA/FAA Conference on Fibrous Composites in Structural Design, volume 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soderquist, Joseph R. (Compiler); Neri, Lawrence M. (Compiler); Bohon, Herman L. (Compiler)

    1992-01-01

    This publication contains the proceedings of the Ninth DOD/NASA/FAA Conference on Fibrous Composites in Structural Design held at Lake Tahoe, Nevada, during 4-7 Nov. 1991. Presentations were made in the following areas of composite structural design: perspectives in composites, design methodology, design applications, design criteria, supporting technology, damage tolerance, and manufacturing.

  10. Ninth DOD/NASA/FAA Conference on Fibrous Composites in Structural Design, volume 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soderquist, Joseph R. (Compiler); Neri, Lawrence M. (Compiler); Bohon, Herman L. (Compiler)

    1992-01-01

    This publication contains the proceedings of the Ninth DOD/NASA/FAA Conference on Fibrous Composites in Structural Design held at Lake Tahoe, Nevada, during 4-7 Nov. 1991. Presentations were made in the following areas of composite structural design: perspectives in composites, design methodology, design applications, design criteria, supporting technology, damage tolerance, and manufacturing.

  11. 14 CFR Appendix A to Part 415 - FAA/USSPACECOM Launch Notification Form

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false FAA/USSPACECOM Launch Notification Form A Appendix A to Part 415 Aeronautics and Space COMMERCIAL SPACE TRANSPORTATION, FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION LICENSING LAUNCH LICENSE Pt. 415, App. A Appendix A to Part...

  12. 14 CFR Appendix A to Part 415 - FAA/USSPACECOM Launch Notification Form

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false FAA/USSPACECOM Launch Notification Form A Appendix A to Part 415 Aeronautics and Space COMMERCIAL SPACE TRANSPORTATION, FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION LICENSING LAUNCH LICENSE Pt. 415, App. A Appendix A to Part...

  13. 14 CFR Appendix A to Part 415 - FAA/USSPACECOM Launch Notification Form

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false FAA/USSPACECOM Launch Notification Form A Appendix A to Part 415 Aeronautics and Space COMMERCIAL SPACE TRANSPORTATION, FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION LICENSING LAUNCH LICENSE Pt. 415, App. A Appendix A to Part...

  14. 14 CFR 39.5 - When does FAA issue airworthiness directives?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false When does FAA issue airworthiness directives? 39.5 Section 39.5 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... an airworthiness directive addressing a product when we find that: (a) An unsafe condition exists...

  15. 14 CFR 39.5 - When does FAA issue airworthiness directives?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false When does FAA issue airworthiness directives? 39.5 Section 39.5 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... an airworthiness directive addressing a product when we find that: (a) An unsafe condition exists...

  16. 14 CFR 193.15 - What FAA officials exercise the authority of the Administrator under this part?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false What FAA officials exercise the authority of the Administrator under this part? 193.15 Section 193.15 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION... SUBMITTED INFORMATION § 193.15 What FAA officials exercise the authority of the Administrator under...

  17. 14 CFR 193.15 - What FAA officials exercise the authority of the Administrator under this part?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false What FAA officials exercise the authority of the Administrator under this part? 193.15 Section 193.15 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION... SUBMITTED INFORMATION § 193.15 What FAA officials exercise the authority of the Administrator under...

  18. 14 CFR 193.15 - What FAA officials exercise the authority of the Administrator under this part?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false What FAA officials exercise the authority of the Administrator under this part? 193.15 Section 193.15 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION... SUBMITTED INFORMATION § 193.15 What FAA officials exercise the authority of the Administrator under...

  19. 14 CFR 193.9 - Will the FAA ever disclose information that is designated as protected under this part?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... is designated as protected under this part? 193.9 Section 193.9 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL... protected under this part? The FAA discloses information that is designated as protected under this part when withholding it would not be consistent with the FAA's safety and security responsibilities,...

  20. 14 CFR 193.15 - What FAA officials exercise the authority of the Administrator under this part?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false What FAA officials exercise the authority of the Administrator under this part? 193.15 Section 193.15 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION... SUBMITTED INFORMATION § 193.15 What FAA officials exercise the authority of the Administrator under...

  1. 14 CFR 193.15 - What FAA officials exercise the authority of the Administrator under this part?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false What FAA officials exercise the authority of the Administrator under this part? 193.15 Section 193.15 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION... SUBMITTED INFORMATION § 193.15 What FAA officials exercise the authority of the Administrator under...

  2. 41 CFR 102-75.405 - What responsibilities does the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) have after receiving a copy...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false What responsibilities does the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) have after receiving a copy of the notice (and a copy of... responsibilities does the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) have after receiving a copy of the notice (and...

  3. 41 CFR 102-75.405 - What responsibilities does the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) have after receiving a copy...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false What responsibilities does the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) have after receiving a copy of the notice (and a copy of... responsibilities does the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) have after receiving a copy of the notice (and...

  4. 41 CFR 102-75.405 - What responsibilities does the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) have after receiving a copy...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false What responsibilities does the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) have after receiving a copy of the notice (and a copy of... responsibilities does the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) have after receiving a copy of the notice (and...

  5. 41 CFR 102-75.405 - What responsibilities does the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) have after receiving a copy...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false What responsibilities does the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) have after receiving a copy of the notice (and a copy of... responsibilities does the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) have after receiving a copy of the notice (and...

  6. Determination of Calcium in Cereal with Flame Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy: An Experiment for a Quantitative Methods of Analysis Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bazzi, Ali; Kreuz, Bette; Fischer, Jeffrey

    2004-01-01

    An experiment for determination of calcium in cereal using two-increment standard addition method in conjunction with flame atomic absorption spectroscopy (FAAS) is demonstrated. The experiment is intended to introduce students to the principles of atomic absorption spectroscopy giving them hands on experience using quantitative methods of…

  7. Spectrophotometry-based detection of carbapenemase producers among Enterobacteriaceae.

    PubMed

    Bernabeu, Sandrine; Poirel, Laurent; Nordmann, Patrice

    2012-09-01

    Carbapenem-hydrolyzing ß-lactamases are the most powerful ß-lactamases being able to hydrolyse almost all ß-lactams. They are mostly of the KPC, VIM, IMP, NDM, and OXA-48 type. A spectrophotometry technique based on analysis of the imipenem hydrolysis has been developed that differentiated carbapenemase- from noncarbapenemase producers. This inexpensive technique adapted to screening of carbapenemase producers may be implemented in any reference laboratory worldwide.

  8. Optimization of a cloud point extraction procedure with response surface methodology for the quantification of dissolved iron in produced water from the petroleum industry using FAAS.

    PubMed

    Gondim, Tamyris A; Guedes, Jhonyson A C; Ribeiro, Livia P D; Lopes, Gisele S; Matos, Wladiana O

    2017-01-30

    The characterization of inorganic elements in the produced water (PW) samples is a difficult task because of the complexity of the matrix. This work deals with a study of a methodology for dissolved Fe quantification in PW from oil industry by flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS) after cloud point extraction (CPE). The procedure is based on the CPE using PAN as complexing agent and Triton X-114 as surfactant. The best conditions for Fe extraction parameters were studied using a Box-Behnken design. The proposed method presented a LOQ of 0.010μgmL(-1) and LOD of 0.003μgmL(-1). The precision of the method was evaluated in terms of repeatability, obtaining a coefficient of variation of 2.54%. The accuracy of the method was assessed by recovery experiments of Fe spiked that presented recovery of 103.28%. The method was applied with satisfactory performance to determine Fe by FAAS in PW samples.

  9. Mathematical calculations of iron complex stoichiometry by direct UV-Vis spectrophotometry.

    PubMed

    Filipský, Tomáš; Říha, Michal; Hrdina, Radomír; Vávrová, Kateřina; Mladěnka, Přemysl

    2013-08-01

    The effects of iron-chelating agents on miscellaneous pathologies are currently largely tested. Due to various indications, different properties for chelators are required. A stoichiometry of the complex in relation to pH is one of the crucial factors. Moreover, the published data on the stoichiometry, especially concerning flavonoids, are equivocal. In this study, a new complementary approach was employed for the determination of stoichiometry in 10 iron-chelating agents, including clinically used drugs, by UV-Vis spectrophotometry at relevant pH conditions and compared with the standard Job's method. This study showed that the simple approach based on absorbance at the wavelength of complex absorption maximum was sufficient when the difference between absorption maximum of substance and complex was high. However, in majority of substances this difference was much lower (9-73 nm). The novel complementary approach was able to determine the stoichiometry in all tested cases. The major benefit of this method compared to the standard Job's approach seems to be its capability to reveal a reaction stoichiometry in chelators with moderate affinity to iron. In conclusion, using this complementary method may explain several previous contradictory data and lead to a better understanding of the underlying mechanisms of chelator's action.

  10. Airborne stellar spectrophotometry from 1.2 to 5.5 microns - Absolute calibration and spectra of stars earlier than M3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strecker, D. W.; Erickson, E. F.; Witteborn, F. C.

    1979-01-01

    Airborne infrared spectrophotometry (1.2-5.5 microns, 1.5% resolution) is presented for 13 stars which have been extensively used as infrared calibration objects: alpha Lyr, alpha CMA, alpha UMi, beta Dra, and mu Her; the K giants beta Gem, alpha UMa, alpha Boo, gamma-1 And, and alpha Tau; and the M giants beta And, beta Peg, and alpha Cet. These spectra, obtained using NASA's Kuiper Airborne Observatory and Lear Jet Observatory, are virtually free of the interfering effects of terrestrial absorptions. Absolute calibration of the spectrophotometry was based on the theoretical model of alpha Lyr by Schild, Peterson, and Oke (1971), which fits photometric measurements at shorter wavelengths. The resulting flux densities are compared with previous ground-based photometry.

  11. Simultaneous preconcentration of Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II), and Cd(II) from environmental samples on Amberlite XAD-2000 column and determination by FAAS.

    PubMed

    Duran, Celal; Senturk, Hasan Basri; Elci, Latif; Soylak, Mustafa; Tufekci, Mehmet

    2009-02-15

    A new method for the preconcentration of some trace metals (Co, Ni, Cu, and Cd) as complexed with ammonium pyrrolidynedithiocarbamate (APDC) was developed using a mini-column filled with Amberlite XAD-2000 resin. Metal contents were determined by flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS) after the metal complexes accumulated on the resin were eluted with 1M HNO(3) in acetone. The effects of the analytical parameters such as sample pH, quantity of complexing agent, eluent type, resin quantity, sample volume, sample flow rate, and matrix ions were investigated on the recovery of the metals from aqueous solutions. The relative standard deviation (R.S.D.) of the method was <6%. The validation of the method was confirmed using two certified reference materials (CRM TMDW-500 Drinking Water and CRM SA-C Sandy Soil C). The method was successfully applied to some stream waters and mushroom samples from Eastern Black Sea Region (Trabzon city) of Turkey.

  12. Overview of composite projects at the FAA Airworthiness Assurance Validation Center

    SciTech Connect

    Shurtleff, W.W.; Roach, D.P.; Valley, M.T.

    1997-03-01

    The Airworthiness Assurance NDI Validation Center (AANC) was established by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) William J. Hughes Technical Center at Sandia National Laboratories in 1991 to support nondestructive inspection (NDI) technology development and assessment. The evaluations are done using a variety of characterized test specimens and test beds including entire transport and commuter aircraft. Although the initial work at the Center concentrated on metallic structure, the FAA has more recently expanded the AANC`s charter to include projects directed at composite repair and inspection. The three projects briefly described in this paper are: (1) the validation and technology transfer of a thermographic techniques for composite inspection, (2) the development of generic composite laminate and honeycomb calibration reference standards, and (3) the certification of the use of boron epoxy doubler on a Lockheed L-1011.

  13. Extraction of nickel from edible oils with a complexing agent prior to determination by FAAS.

    PubMed

    Tokay, Feyzullah; Bağdat, Sema

    2016-04-15

    In the present work, a new extraction method for separation of nickel from edible oils and determination by FAAS is reported. This method is based on extraction of Ni(II) ions from the oil to aqueous phase with N,N'-bis(4-methoxysalicylidene) ethylenediamine (MSE) and determination by FAAS. Properties of the complex formed between MSE and Ni(II) were investigated spectrophotometrically. Central composite design (CCD) was utilized for optimization of MSE to oil, stirring time and temperature, which were 0.97 mL g(-1), 15.4 min, and 29.7°C, respectively. The developed method was tested with an oil-based metal standard and the recovery was 93.8±3.9%. The proposed method was applied with five different edible oils.

  14. Proceedings of the FAA-NASA Symposium on the Continued Airworthiness of Aircraft Structures. Volume 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bigelow, Catherine A. (Compiler)

    1997-01-01

    This publication contains the fifty-two technical papers presented at the FAA-NASA Symposium on the Continued Airworthiness of Aircraft Structures. The symposium, hosted by the FAA Center of Excellence for Computational Modeling of Aircraft Structures at Georgia Institute of Technology, was held to disseminate information on recent developments in advanced technologies to extend the life of high-time aircraft and design longer-life aircraft. Affiliations of the participants included 33% from government agencies and laboratories, 19% from academia, and 48% from industry; in all 240 people were in attendance. Technical papers were selected for presentation at the symposium, after a review of extended abstracts received by the Organizing Committee from a general call for papers.

  15. Proceedings of the FAA-NASA Symposium on the Continued Airworthiness of Aircraft Structures. Volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bigelow, Catherine A. (Compiler)

    1997-01-01

    This publication contains the fifty-two technical papers presented at the FAA-NASA Symposium on the Continued Airworthiness of Aircraft Structures. The symposium, hosted by the FAA Center of Excellence for Computational Modeling of Aircraft Structures at Georgia Institute of Technology, was held to disseminate information on recent developments in advanced technologies to extend the life of high-time aircraft and design longer-life aircraft. Affiliations of the participants included 33% from government agencies and laboratories, 19% from academia, and 48% from industry; in all 240 people were in attendance. Technical papers were selected for presentation at the symposium, after a review of extended abstracts received by the Organizing Committee from a general call for papers.

  16. Comparison of Intent-to-Leave with Actual Turnover within the FAA

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-12-01

    Incentives for early retirement (e.g., “buy-outs”) were offered in 1997 throughout the federal government as part of the shrinking of the federal...workforce under the Clinton administration (National Performance Review, 1993). It is possible that incentives for early retirement inflated the expressed...buy-out” as the primary reason. The FAA did not offer incentives for early retirement in 2000 through 2004. Actual turnover The actual turnover rate

  17. Ninth DOD/NASA/FAA Conference on Fibrous Composites in Structural Design, volume 3

    SciTech Connect

    Soderquist, J.R.; Neri, L.M.; Bohon, H.L.

    1992-09-01

    This publication contains the proceedings of the Ninth DOD/NASA/FAA Conference on Fibrous Composites in Structural Design held at Lake Tahoe, Nevada, during 4-7 Nov. 1991. Presentations were made in the following areas of composite structural design: perspectives in composites, design methodology, design applications, design criteria, supporting technology, damage tolerance, and manufacturing. Separate abstracts have been prepared for articles from this report.

  18. Index to FAA Office of Aerospace Medicine Reports: 1961 Through 2012

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-01-01

    Aerospace Medical Institute Federal Aviation Administration Oklahoma City, OK 73125 January 2013 Final Report DOT/FAA/AM-13/1 Office of Aerospace Medicine...Blvd. P.O. Box 25082 Norman, OK 73071 Oklahoma City, OK 73125 11. Contract or Grant No. 12. Sponsoring Agency Name and Address 13. Type of... Oklahoma City, Oklahoma , was attended by (left-right) then-Acting Administrator Michael Huerta, Associate Administrator for Aviation Safety Peggy

  19. NextGen Technologies on the FAA's Standard Terminal Automation Replacement System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Witzberger, Kevin; Swenson, Harry; Martin, Lynne; Lin, Melody; Cheng, Jinn-Hwei

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes the integration, evaluation, and results from a high-fidelity human-in-the-loop (HITL) simulation of key NASA Air Traffic Management Technology Demonstration - 1 (ATD- 1) technologies implemented in an enhanced version of the FAA's Standard Terminal Automation Replacement System (STARS) platform. These ATD-1 technologies include: (1) a NASA enhanced version of the FAA's Time-Based Flow Management, (2) a NASA ground-based automation technology known as controller-managed spacing (CMS), and (3) a NASA advanced avionics airborne technology known as flight-deck interval management (FIM). These ATD-1 technologies have been extensively tested in large-scale HITL simulations using general-purpose workstations to study air transportation technologies. These general purpose workstations perform multiple functions and are collectively referred to as the Multi-Aircraft Control System (MACS). Researchers at NASA Ames Research Center and Raytheon collaborated to augment the STARS platform by including CMS and FIM advisory tools to validate the feasibility of integrating these automation enhancements into the current FAA automation infrastructure. NASA Ames acquired three STARS terminal controller workstations, and then integrated the ATD-1 technologies. HITL simulations were conducted to evaluate the ATD-1 technologies when using the STARS platform. These results were compared with the results obtained when the ATD-1 technologies were tested in the MACS environment. Results collected from the numerical data show acceptably minor differences, and, together with the subjective controller questionnaires showing a trend towards preferring STARS, validate the ATD-1/STARS integration.

  20. Determination of niobium in rocks, ores and alloys by atomic-absorption spectrophotometry.

    PubMed

    Husler, J

    1972-07-01

    Niobium, in concentrations as low as 0.02% Nb(2)O(5), is determined in a variety of materials without separation or enrichment. Chemical and ionization interferences are controlled, and sensitivity is increased, by maintaining the iron, aluminium, hydrofluoric acid and potassium content within certain broad concentration limits. There is close agreement with the results of analyses by emission spectrographic, electron microprobe and X-ray fluorescence methods.

  1. Determination of Trace Elements in Nickel Base Alloys by Atomic Absorption Spectrophotometry.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    elements such as silver (Ag), bismuth (Bi), cadmium (Cd), lead ( Pb ), phosphorus (P), and arsenic (As) in nickel alloys such as Udimet 500 without interference of other constituent elements. (Author)

  2. Sample preparation in determination of lead in garden vegetables by flame atomic absorption spectrophotometry.

    PubMed

    Preer, J R; Stephens, B R; Bland, C W

    1982-07-01

    Dry and wet ashing methods have been used in the analysis of garden vegetables for Pb. The reliability of wet ashing has been verified by the method of standard additions. Comparison of dry and wet ashing showed good agreement for a variety of garden vegetables. Sample size was more strictly limited for the wet-ashed samples, which led to lower sensitivity. Vegetable samples are commonly analyzed for a number of trace elements, which introduces additional constraints on sample preparation, notably because of Cd loss on dry ashing. Pretreatment with HNO3/H2SO4 ash aid eliminated Cd loss. Reliability of dry ashing with pretreatment was shown with NBS SRM Orchard Leaves, Pine Needles, Spinach, and Tomato Leaves. The analysis was insensitive to ashing temperature in the range 480-625 degrees C. A practical detection limit for the method is about 2 ppm Pb, dry weight basis (DWB). Care must be exercised to avoid contamination of the sample with lead at this level by improper handling. Segregation and acid washing of glassware and protection of the sample from contact with any object not demonstrably clean was necessary. No evidence was found of Pb contamination at this level from tap water washing of fresh vegetables, forced-air oven drying, or grinding with mortar and pestle. No special clean room facilities or laboratory air purification measures were used. Sensitivity was increased 3-fold by extraction with dithizone in CHCl3 followed by back-extraction into dilute HCl. Detection limits were not improved, however, because of variation in the extraction results. The instrumental method for assessing effective correction for back-ground absorbance showed adequate compensation, although comparison of direct and extractive determinations showed a small but significant difference between the methods of about 1 ppm Pb (DWB).

  3. Determination of Trace Elements in Nickel Base Gas Turbine Parts by Atomic Absorption Spectrophotometry.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    elements such as silver (Ag), bismuth (Bi), cadmium (Cd), and lead (Pb) in nickel base alloys such as IN100, B1900 and 713C , without interference from...the constituent elements. Failed and nonfailed gas turbine parts made of the above alloys were tested to ascertain whether trace amounts of these

  4. FAA Perspective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bond, Tom

    2009-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation describes the Federal Aviation Administration's perspective on improvements on aircraft icing. The most important areas that are discussed include: 1) Improvements in SLD engineering tools to meet concerns about means of compliance (MOC); and 2) 3-D iced aerodynamics.

  5. Ultraviolet spectrophotometry from Gemini 11 of stars in Orion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, T. H.; Spear, G. G.; Kondo, Y.; Henize, K. G.

    1975-01-01

    Ultraviolet spectrophotometry in the wavelength region 2600-3600 A is reported for the bright early-type stars beta, eta, gamma, delta, iota, epsilon, sigma, zeta, and kappa Ori. The results are in good agreement with other observations, and, with the possible exception of the supergiants, are in good agreement with recent line-blanketed model atmospheres. There is evidence that the supergiants possess a small ultraviolet deficiency shortward of 3000 A relative to main-sequence stars of similar spectral type. The most extreme example of this phenomenon is the star kappa Ori.

  6. Spectrophotometry of 2 complete samples of flat radio spectrum quasars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wampler, E. J.; Gaskell, C. M.; Burke, W. L.; Baldwin, J. A.

    1983-01-01

    Spectrophotometry of two complete samples of flat-spectrum radio quasars show that for these objects there is a strong correlation between the equivalent width of the CIV wavelength 1550 emission line and the luminosity of the underlying continuum. Assuming Friedmann cosmologies, the scatter in this correlation is a minimum for q (sub o) is approximately 1. Alternatively, luminosity evolution can be invoked to give compact distributions for q (sub o) is approximately 0 models. A sample of Seyfert galaxies observed with IUE shows that despite some dispersion the average equivalent width of CIV wavelength 1550 in Seyfert galaxies is independent of the underlying continuum luminosity. New redshifts for 4 quasars are given.

  7. The Use of Erythrosin B in Undergraduate Spectrophotometry Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stock, L. James, III

    1995-10-01

    The CMU chemistry department has met regulatory and waste disposal concerns by using a non-toxic food color in a general chemistry experiment. Erythrosin B was found to be a suitable alternative to Sodium Dichromate when teaching solution preparation and the principles of spectrophotometry. Students weigh a small mass of Erythrosin B and prepare several solutions that are measured in a spectrophotometer. From these a Beer's Law plot is constructed. Finally, concentrations of unknown solutions are determined using the spectrophotometer and the Beer's Law plot.

  8. Quantitation of heparosan with heparin lyase III and spectrophotometry.

    PubMed

    Huang, Haichan; Zhao, Yingying; Lv, Shencong; Zhong, Weihong; Zhang, Fuming; Linhardt, Robert J

    2014-02-15

    Heparosan is Escherichia coli K5 capsule polysaccharide, which is the key precursor for preparing bioengineered heparin. A rapid and effective quantitative method for detecting heparosan is important in the large-scale production of heparosan. Heparin lyase III (Hep III) effectively catalyzes the heparosan depolymerization, forming unsaturated disaccharides that are measurable using a spectrophotometer at 232 nm. We report a new method for the quantitative detection of heparosan with heparin lyase III and spectrophotometry that is safer and more specific than the traditional carbazole assay. In an optimized detection system, heparosan at a minimum concentration of 0.60 g/L in fermentation broth can be detected.

  9. A sensitive, spatially uniform photodetector for broadband infrared spectrophotometry

    SciTech Connect

    Iglesias, Enrique J.; Smith, Allan W.; Kaplan, Simon G

    2008-05-01

    We describe the design and performance of a liquid helium-cooled As:Si blocked-impurity-band photodetector system intended for spectrophotometry in the thermal infrared (2 to 30 {mu}m) spectral region. The system has been characterized for spectral sensitivity, noise, thermal stability, and spatial uniformity, and optimized for use with a Fourier-transform infrared spectrophotometer source for absolute goniometric reflectance measurements. Its performance is evaluated and compared to more common detector systems used in this spectral region, including room-temperature pyroelectric and liquid-N2-cooled photoconductive devices.

  10. Method for rapidly determining a pulp kappa number using spectrophotometry

    DOEpatents

    Chai, Xin-Sheng; Zhu, Jun Yong

    2002-01-01

    A system and method for rapidly determining the pulp kappa number through direct measurement of the potassium permanganate concentration in a pulp-permanganate solution using spectrophotometry. Specifically, the present invention uses strong acidification to carry out the pulp-permanganate oxidation reaction in the pulp-permanganate solution to prevent the precipitation of manganese dioxide (MnO.sub.2). Consequently, spectral interference from the precipitated MnO.sub.2 is eliminated and the oxidation reaction becomes dominant. The spectral intensity of the oxidation reaction is then analyzed to determine the pulp kappa number.

  11. Low resolution ultraviolet and optical spectrophotometry of symbiotic stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slovak, M. H.

    1982-01-01

    Low resolution International Ultraviolet Explorer spectra combined with optical spectrophotometry provide absolute flux distributions for seven symbiotic variables from 1200 to 6450 A. For five stars (EG And, BF Cyg, CI Cyg, AG Peg, and Z And) the data are representative of the quiescent/out-of-eclipse energy distributions; for CH Cyg and AX Per, the observations were obtained following their atest outburst in 1977 and 1978, respectively. The de-reddened distributions reveal a remarkable diversity of both line spectra and continua. While the optical and near infrared regions lambda = 5500 A) are well represented by single component stellar models, multicomponent flux distributions are required to reproduce the ultraviolet continua.

  12. 14 CFR 406.105 - Separation of functions for prosecuting civil penalties and advising the FAA decisionmaker.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...; the Assistant Chief Counsel for Regulations; the Assistant Chief Counsel for Europe, Africa, and... the administrative law judge or by the FAA decisionmaker on appeal, except as counsel or a witness...

  13. 14 CFR 406.105 - Separation of functions for prosecuting civil penalties and advising the FAA decisionmaker.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... COMMERCIAL SPACE TRANSPORTATION, FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION PROCEDURE INVESTIGATIONS, ENFORCEMENT, AND ADMINISTRATIVE REVIEW Rules of Practice in FAA Space Transportation... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Separation of functions for...

  14. 14 CFR 406.105 - Separation of functions for prosecuting civil penalties and advising the FAA decisionmaker.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... COMMERCIAL SPACE TRANSPORTATION, FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION PROCEDURE INVESTIGATIONS, ENFORCEMENT, AND ADMINISTRATIVE REVIEW Rules of Practice in FAA Space Transportation... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Separation of functions for...

  15. 14 CFR 406.105 - Separation of functions for prosecuting civil penalties and advising the FAA decisionmaker.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... COMMERCIAL SPACE TRANSPORTATION, FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION PROCEDURE INVESTIGATIONS, ENFORCEMENT, AND ADMINISTRATIVE REVIEW Rules of Practice in FAA Space Transportation... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Separation of functions for...

  16. 14 CFR 406.105 - Separation of functions for prosecuting civil penalties and advising the FAA decisionmaker.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... COMMERCIAL SPACE TRANSPORTATION, FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION PROCEDURE INVESTIGATIONS, ENFORCEMENT, AND ADMINISTRATIVE REVIEW Rules of Practice in FAA Space Transportation... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Separation of functions for...

  17. Flow injection spectrophotometry using natural reagent from Morinda citrifolia root for determination of aluminium in tea.

    PubMed

    Tontrong, Sopa; Khonyoung, Supada; Jakmunee, Jaroon

    2012-05-01

    A flow injection (FI) spectrophotometric method with using natural reagent extracted from Morinda citrifolia root has been developed for determination of aluminium. The extract contained anthraquinone compounds which could react with Al(3+) to form reddish complexes which had maximum absorption wavelength at 499.0nm. The extract could be used as a reagent in FI system without further purification to obtain pure compound. A sensitive method for determination of aluminium in concentration range of 0.1-1.0mgL(-1), with detection limit of 0.05mgL(-1) was achieved. Relative standard deviations of 1.2% and 1.7% were obtained for the determination of 0.1 and 0.6mgL(-1) Al(3+) (n=11). Sample throughput of 35h(-1) was achieved with the consumption of 3mL each of carrier and reagent solutions per injection. The developed method was successfully applied to tea samples, validated by the FAAS standard method. The method is simple, fast, economical and could be classified as a greener analytical method.

  18. Partitioning of organophosphorus pesticides into phosphatidylcholine small unilamellar vesicles studied by second-derivative spectrophotometry.

    PubMed

    Takegami, Shigehiko; Kitamura, Keisuke; Ohsugi, Mayuko; Ito, Aya; Kitade, Tatsuya

    2015-06-15

    In order to quantitatively examine the lipophilicity of the widely used organophosphorus pesticides (OPs) chlorfenvinphos (CFVP), chlorpyrifos-methyl (CPFM), diazinon (DZN), fenitrothion (FNT), fenthion (FT), isofenphos (IFP), profenofos (PFF) and pyraclofos (PCF), their partition coefficient (Kp) values between phosphatidylcholine (PC) small unilamellar vesicles (SUVs) and water (liposome-water system) were determined by second-derivative spectrophotometry. The second-derivative spectra of these OPs in the presence of PC SUV showed a bathochromic shift according to the increase in PC concentration and distinct derivative isosbestic points, demonstrating the complete elimination of the residual background signal effects that were observed in the absorption spectra. The Kp values were calculated from the second-derivative intensity change induced by addition of PC SUV and obtained with a good precision of R.S.D. below 10%. The Kp values were in the order of CPFM>FT>PFF>PCF>IFP>CFVP>FNT⩾DZN and did not show a linear correlation relationship with the reported partition coefficients obtained using an n-octanol-water system (R(2)=0.530). Also, the results quantitatively clarified the effect of chemical-group substitution in OPs on their lipophilicity. Since the partition coefficient for the liposome-water system is more effective for modeling the quantitative structure-activity relationship than that for the n-octanol-water system, the obtained results are toxicologically important for estimating the accumulation of these OPs in human cell membranes.

  19. Partitioning of organophosphorus pesticides into phosphatidylcholine small unilamellar vesicles studied by second-derivative spectrophotometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takegami, Shigehiko; Kitamura, Keisuke; Ohsugi, Mayuko; Ito, Aya; Kitade, Tatsuya

    2015-06-01

    In order to quantitatively examine the lipophilicity of the widely used organophosphorus pesticides (OPs) chlorfenvinphos (CFVP), chlorpyrifos-methyl (CPFM), diazinon (DZN), fenitrothion (FNT), fenthion (FT), isofenphos (IFP), profenofos (PFF) and pyraclofos (PCF), their partition coefficient (Kp) values between phosphatidylcholine (PC) small unilamellar vesicles (SUVs) and water (liposome-water system) were determined by second-derivative spectrophotometry. The second-derivative spectra of these OPs in the presence of PC SUV showed a bathochromic shift according to the increase in PC concentration and distinct derivative isosbestic points, demonstrating the complete elimination of the residual background signal effects that were observed in the absorption spectra. The Kp values were calculated from the second-derivative intensity change induced by addition of PC SUV and obtained with a good precision of R.S.D. below 10%. The Kp values were in the order of CPFM > FT > PFF > PCF > IFP > CFVP > FNT ⩾ DZN and did not show a linear correlation relationship with the reported partition coefficients obtained using an n-octanol-water system (R2 = 0.530). Also, the results quantitatively clarified the effect of chemical-group substitution in OPs on their lipophilicity. Since the partition coefficient for the liposome-water system is more effective for modeling the quantitative structure-activity relationship than that for the n-octanol-water system, the obtained results are toxicologically important for estimating the accumulation of these OPs in human cell membranes.

  20. Determination of thiamazole in pharmaceutical samples by phosphorus molybdenum blue spectrophotometry.

    PubMed

    Huo, Jing'e; Li, Quanmin

    2012-02-15

    A novel method is established to determine thiamazole by phosphorus molybdenum blue spectrophotometry. The experiment indicates that PO(4)(3-) reacts with Mo(7)O(24)(6-) in 0.30mol/L H(2)SO(4) solution to form a product with phosphorus-molybdenum heteropoly acid ([H(2)PMo(12)O(40)](-)). Then [H(2)PMo(12)O(40)](-) is deoxidized to form phosphorus molybdenum blue (H(3)PO(4)·10MoO(3)·Mo(2)O(5)) by thiamazole. The amount of thiamazole can be determined based on the absorbance of phosphorus molybdenum blue (λ(max)=710nm). A good linear relationship is obtained between the absorbance and the concentration of thiamazole in the range of 0.035-70μg/mL. The equation of the linear regression is A=0.03384+0.00834c (μg/mL), with a linear correlation coefficient of 0.9990. The apparent molar absorption coefficient is 1.0×10(3)L/(molcm). The method has been successfully applied to the determination of thiamazole in pharmaceutical samples with satisfactory results, and recoveries are in the range of 99.6-100.6%.

  1. Optical and infrared spectrophotometry of the symbiotic system V1016 Cygni

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rudy, Richard J.; Rossano, George S.; Cohen, Ross D.; Puetter, R. C.

    1990-01-01

    Spectrophotometry from 0.46 to 1.3 micron of the peculiar emission-line object V1016 Cyg is presented. The optical region displays a weak continuum underlying the rich emission-line spectrum detailed in past studies. The infrared spectrum consists of prominent emission lines of H I, He I, He II, forbidden Ni, O I, and forbidden S III overlying a strong stellar continuum. The latter displays bands at 0.94 micron and 1.13 micron characteristic of a late-type, oxygen-rich giant as well as an absorption at 1.05 micron which is due to VO. The presence of these molecular features indicates a spectral class of M6 or later for the cool secondary. The reddening of the secondary does not appear to be much different from that of the emission lines. Among the infrared emission features is the rarely seen permitted transition of neutral oxygen at 1.1287 micron. Its presence at a strength comparable to O I 8446 A, together with the absence of O I 13164 A, confirms the result of Strafella that the strong O I lines arise primarily from fluorescent excitation by Ly-beta.

  2. Determination of boron in uranium aluminum silicon alloy by spectrophotometry and estimation of expanded uncertainty in measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramanjaneyulu, P. S.; Sayi, Y. S.; Ramakumar, K. L.

    2008-08-01

    Quantification of boron in diverse materials of relevance in nuclear technology is essential in view of its high thermal neutron absorption cross section. A simple and sensitive method has been developed for the determination of boron in uranium-aluminum-silicon alloy, based on leaching of boron with 6 M HCl and H 2O 2, its selective separation by solvent extraction with 2-ethyl hexane 1,3-diol and quantification by spectrophotometry using curcumin. The method has been evaluated by standard addition method and validated by inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy. Relative standard deviation and absolute detection limit of the method are 3.0% (at 1 σ level) and 12 ng, respectively. All possible sources of uncertainties in the methodology have been individually assessed, following the International Organization for Standardization guidelines. The combined uncertainty is calculated employing uncertainty propagation formulae. The expanded uncertainty in the measurement at 95% confidence level (coverage factor 2) is 8.840%.

  3. Spectrophotometry of comets Giacobini-Zinner and Halley

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tegler, Stephen C.; O'Dell, C. R.

    1987-01-01

    Optical window spectrophotometry was performed on comets Giacobini-Zinner and Halley over the interval 300-1000 nm. Band and band-sequence fluxes were obtained for the brightest features of OH, CN, NH, and C2, special care having been given to determinations of extinction, instrumental sensitivities, and corrections for Fraunhofer lines. C2 Swan band-sequence flux ratios were determined with unprecedented accuracy and compared with the predictions of the detailed equilibrium models of Krishna Swamy et al. (1977, 1979, 1981, and 1987). It is found that these band sequences do not agree with the predictions, which calls into question the assumptions made in deriving the model, namely resonance fluorescence statistical equilibrium. Suggestions are made as to how to resolve this discrepancy.

  4. Airborne spectrophotometry of Comet Halley from 5 to 9 microns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campins, H.; Bregman, J. D.; Witteborn, F. C.; Wooden, D. H.; Rank, D. M.; Cohen, M.; Allamandola, Louis J.; Tielens, Alexander G. G. M.

    1986-01-01

    Spectrophotometry from 5 to 9 microns (resolution = 0.02) of comet Halley was obtained from the Kuiper Airborne Observatory on 1985 Dec. 12.1 and 1986 April 8.6 and 10.5 UT. Two spectral features are apparent in all the observations, one from 5.24 to 5.6 microns, and the silicate emission feature which has an onset between 7 and 8 microns. There is no evidence for the 7.5 microns feature observed by the Vega 1 spacecraft; the large difference between the areal coverage viewed from the spacecraft and the airplane may explain the discrepancy. Color temperatures significantly higher than a blackbody indicate that small particles are abundant in the coma. Significant spatial and temporal variations in the spectrum show trends similar to those observed from the ground.

  5. Evaluating the compliance of Keck's LGSAO automated aircraft protection system with FAA adopted criteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stomski, Paul J.; Campbell, Randy; Murphy, Thomas W.

    2014-07-01

    The W. M. Keck Observatory (WMKO) applied for and received a determination of no-objection from the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) for laser guide star adaptive optics (LGS-AO) operations using an automated aircraft protection system (APS) in late 2013. WMKO's APS, named AIRSAFE, uses transponder based aircraft detection (TBAD) to replace human aircraft spotters. The FAA required WMKO to self-certify AIRSAFE compliance with SAE Aerospace Standard 6029A: "Performance Criteria for Laser Control Measures Used for Aviation Safety"[1] (AS- 6029A). AS-6029A prescribes performance and administrative criteria for an APS; essentially, requiring AIRSAFE to adequately protect all types of aircraft, traveling at any speed, altitude, distance and direction reasonably expected in the operating environment. A description of the analysis that comprises this compliance evaluation is the main focus of this paper. Also discussed is the AIRSAFE compliance with AS-6029A administrative criteria that includes characterization of site specific air traffic, failure modes, limitations, operating procedures, preventative maintenance procedures, and periodic system test procedures.

  6. The FAA's postmortem forensic toxicology self-evaluated proficiency test program: the second seven years.

    PubMed

    Chaturvedi, Arvind K; Craft, Kristi J; Cardona, Patrick S; Rogers, Paul B; Canfield, Dennis V

    2009-05-01

    During toxicological evaluations of samples from fatally injured pilots involved in civil aviation accidents, a high degree of quality control/quality assurance (QC/QA) is maintained. Under this philosophy, the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) started a forensic toxicology proficiency-testing (PT) program in July 1991. In continuation of the first seven years of the PT findings reported earlier, PT findings of the next seven years are summarized herein. Twenty-eight survey samples (12 urine, 9 blood, and 7 tissue homogenate) with/without alcohols/volatiles, drugs, and/or putrefactive amine(s) were submitted to an average of 31 laboratories, of which an average of 25 participants returned their results. Analytes in survey samples were correctly identified and quantitated by a large number of participants, but some false positives of concern were reported. It is anticipated that the FAA's PT program will continue to serve the forensic toxicology community through this important part of the QC/QA for laboratory accreditations.

  7. Magnetic resonance cell-tracking studies: spectrophotometry-based method for the quantification of cellular iron content after loading with superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Böhm, Ingrid

    2011-08-01

    The purpose of this article is to present a user-friendly tool for quantifying the iron content of superparamagnetic labeled cells before cell tracking by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Iron quantification was evaluated by using Prussian blue staining and spectrophotometry. White blood cells were labeled with superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) nanoparticles. Labeling was confirmed by light microscopy. Subsequently, the cells were embedded in a phantom and scanned on a 3 T magnetic resonance tomography (MRT) whole-body system. Mean peak wavelengths λ(peak) was determined at A(720 nm) (range 719-722 nm). Linearity was proven for the measuring range 0.5 to 10 μg Fe/mL (r  =  .9958; p  =  2.2 × 10(-12)). The limit of detection was 0.01 μg Fe/mL (0.1785 mM), and the limit of quantification was 0.04 μg Fe/mL (0.714 mM). Accuracy was demonstrated by comparison with atomic absorption spectrometry. Precision and robustness were also proven. On T(2)-weighted images, signal intensity varied according to the iron concentration of SPIO-labeled cells. Absorption spectrophotometry is both a highly sensitive and user-friendly technique that is feasible for quantifying the iron content of magnetically labeled cells. The presented data suggest that spectrophotometry is a promising tool for promoting the implementation of magnetic resonance-based cell tracking in routine clinical applications (from bench to bedside).

  8. View from My Classroom: A Spectrophotometry Unit for Advanced Chemistry Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Diehl-Jones, Susan M.

    1983-01-01

    Rationale, objectives, and instructional strategies for a directed study course on spectrophotometry are provided. Descriptions of three experiments and four student research projects are also provided. Objectives, laboratory procedures, advantages, and disadvantages for the experiments and projects are included. (JN)

  9. PERITONEAL ABSORPTION

    PubMed Central

    Hahn, P. F.; Miller, L. L.; Robscheit-Robbins, F. S.; Bale, W. F.; Whipple, G. H.

    1944-01-01

    The absorption of red cells from the normal peritoneum of the dog can be demonstrated by means of red cells labeled with radio-iron incorporated in the hemoglobin of these red cells. Absorption in normal dogs runs from 20 to 100 per cent of the amount given within 24 hours. Dogs rendered anemic by bleeding absorb red cells a little less rapidly—ranging from 5 to 80 per cent of the injected red cells. Doubly depleted dogs (anemic and hypoproteinemic) absorb even less in the three experiments recorded. This peritoneal absorption varies widely in different dogs and even in the same dog at different times. We do not know the factors responsible for these variations but there is no question about active peritoneal absorption. The intact red cells pass readily from the peritoneal cavity into lymph spaces in diaphragm and other areas of the peritoneum. The red cells move along the lymphatics and through the lymph glands with little or no phagocytosis and eventually into the large veins through the thoracic ducts. PMID:19871404

  10. Nutrient absorption.

    PubMed

    Rubin, Deborah C

    2004-03-01

    Our understanding of nutrient absorption continues to grow, from the development of unique animal models and from studies in which cutting-edge molecular and cellular biologic approaches have been used to analyze the structure and function of relevant molecules. Studies of the molecular genetics of inherited disorders have also provided many new insights into these processes. A major advance in lipid absorption has been the cloning and characterization of several intestinal acyl CoA:monoacylglycerol acyltransferases; these may provide new targets for antiobesity drug therapy. Studies of intestinal cholesterol absorption and reverse cholesterol transport have encouraged the development of novel potential treatments for hyperlipidemia. Observations in genetically modified mice and in humans with mutations in glucose transporter 2 suggest the importance of a separate microsomal membrane transport pathway for glucose transport. The study of iron metabolism has advanced greatly with the identification of the hemochromatosis gene and the continued examination of the genetic regulation of iron absorptive pathways. Several human thiamine transporters have been identified, and their specific roles in different tissues are being explored.

  11. An overview of the joint FAA/NASA aircraft/ground runway friction program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yager, Thomas J.

    1989-01-01

    There is a need for information on runways which may become slippery due to various forms and types of contaminants. Experience has shown that since the beginning of all weather aircraft operations, there have been landing and aborted takeoff incidents and/or accidents each year where aircraft have either run off the end or veered off the shoulder of low friction runways. NASA Langley's Landing and Impact Dynamics Branch is involved in several research programs directed towards obtaining a better understanding of how different tire properties interact with varying pavement surface characteristics to produce acceptable performance for aircraft ground handling requirements. One such effort, which was jointly supported by not only NASA and the FAA but by several aviation industry groups including the Flight Safety Foundation, is described.

  12. NASA,FAA,ONERA Swept-Wing Icing and Aerodynamics: Summary of Research and Current Status

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Broeren, Andy

    2015-01-01

    NASA, FAA, ONERA, and other partner organizations have embarked on a significant, collaborative research effort to address the technical challenges associated with icing on large scale, three-dimensional swept wings. These are extremely complex phenomena important to the design, certification and safe operation of small and large transport aircraft. There is increasing demand to balance trade-offs in aircraft efficiency, cost and noise that tend to compete directly with allowable performance degradations over an increasing range of icing conditions. Computational fluid dynamics codes have reached a level of maturity that they are being proposed by manufacturers for use in certification of aircraft for flight in icing. However, sufficient high-quality data to evaluate their performance on iced swept wings are not currently available in the public domain and significant knowledge gaps remain.

  13. NASA/FAA Helicopter ATC simulation investigation of RNAV/MLS instrument approaches

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peach, L. L., Jr.; Tobias, L.; Lee, H. Q.

    1982-01-01

    The NASA/FAA Helicopter Air Traffic Control (ATC) simulation investigations to determine the feasibility of simultaneous, independent instrument approach procedures for helicopters at major terminal areas, using Area Navigation/Microwave Landing System (RNAV/MLS) guidance, was conducted at several levels of helicopter display sophistication, up to that of a Cockpit Display of Traffic Information (CDTI) system. Test objectives included the determination of pilot acceptability and the tracking performance of the RNAV/MLS's noninterfering rotorcraft approach path structure, along with the evaluation of the effect on controller workload of multiroute structures combining conventional and rotorcraft approaches at various arrival rates and traffic separations. The utility of electronic area maps and CDTI displays was also investigated. Participating pilots flew 127 simulated instrument approaches in an ATC simulation laboratory.

  14. CSLAA and FAA'S Rules: Incorporating a 'Risk Management Framework' to Minimise Human Space Flight Risks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaddha, S.

    2012-01-01

    th This year marks the 50 anniversary of a landmark victory for humankind in its endeavour of entering and exploring the final frontier. During these years of space activity, we have witnessed a number of cumulative successes. One of which is the emergence of the commercial human space flight, or "space tourism", market. Commercial companies have the aim of travelling people into space safely and affordably. This paper shall consider the U.S. regulatory framework governing the space tourism market. It scrutinises the adequacy of the Commercial Space Launch and Amendment Act of 2004 (CSLAA), as bolstered by the FAA's requirements, to protect launching passengers to an acceptable standard of safety from the inherent risks associated with human space flights. It is argued that the legislative regime embeds a three-limb "risk management framework" as an appropriate response to address the concern over the safety of public space travel.

  15. NASA-FAA helicopter Microwave Landing System curved path flight test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swenson, H. N.; Hamlin, J. R.; Wilson, G. W.

    1983-01-01

    An ongoing series of joint NASA/FAA helicopter Microwave Landing System (MLS) flight tests was conducted at Ames Research Center. This paper deals with tests done from the spring through the fall of 1983. This flight test investigated and developed solutions to the problem of manually flying curved-path and steep glide slope approaches into the terminal area using the MLS and flight director guidance. An MLS-equipped Bell UH-1H helicopter flown by NASA test pilots was used to develop approaches and procedures for flying these approaches. The approaches took the form of Straight-in, U-turn, and S-turn flightpaths with glide slopes of 6 deg, 9 deg, and 12 deg. These procedures were evaluated by 18 pilots from various elements of the helicopter community, flying a total of 221 hooded instrument approaches. Flying these curved path and steep glide slopes was found to be operationally acceptable with flight director guidance using the MLS.

  16. HEMP (High-Altitude Electromagnetic Pulse) validation of FAA (Federal Aviation Administration) radio facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanders, Stephen C.

    1989-05-01

    The Harry Diamond Lab. provided high-altitude electromagnetic pulse (HEMP) and partial lightning hardness verification testing to a high-frequency radio facility for the FAA. The facility consisted of a shielded enclosure with antennas and cables connected through protective devices at the shield to dummy loads within the shield. It was exposed to low-level radiation with measurements of internal fields extrapolated to threat levels and compared to specific criteria. Each typical penetration was injected with a simulated lightning source, and internal measurements were compared to specific criteria. Although criteria were not always met, it was judged with confidence that the facility would protect radio equipment. It was noted that the ac power spark gap would remain shorted until ac power shut down, resulting in system upset.

  17. FAA/NASA Joint University Program for Air Transportation Research, 1992-1993

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrell, Frederick R. (Compiler)

    1994-01-01

    The research conducted during the academic year 1992-1993 under the FAA/NASA sponsored Joint University Program for Air Transportation Research is summarized. The year end review was held at Ohio University, Athens, Ohio, 17-18 June 1993. The Joint University Program is a coordinated set of three grants sponsored by the Federal Aviation Administration and NASA Langley Research Center, one each with the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Ohio University, and Princeton University. Completed works, status reports, and annotated bibliographies are presented for research topics, which include navigation, guidance, and control theory and practice, aircraft performance, human factors and air traffic management. An overview of the year's activities for each university is also presented.

  18. FAA/NASA Joint University Program for Air Transportation Research: 1993-1994

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hueschen, Richard M. (Compiler)

    1995-01-01

    This report summarizes the research conducted during the academic year 1993-1994 under the NASA/FAA sponsored Joint University Program for Air Transportation Research. The year end review was held at Ohio University, Athens, Ohio, July 14-15, 1994. The Joint University Program is a coordinated set of three grants sponsored by NASA Langley Research Center and the Federal Aviation Administration, one each with the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (NGL-22-009-640), Ohio University (NGR-36-009-017), and Princeton University (NGL-31-001-252). Completed works, status reports, and annotated bibliographies are presented for research topics which include navigation, guidance and control theory and practice, aircraft performance, human factors, and expert systems concepts applied to aircraft and airport operations. An overview of the year's activities for each university is also presented.

  19. Precision Departure Release Capability (PDRC) Overview and Results: NASA to FAA Research Transition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Engelland, Shawn; Davis, Tom.

    2013-01-01

    NASA researchers developed the Precision Departure Release Capability (PDRC) concept to improve the tactical departure scheduling process. The PDRC system is comprised of: 1) a surface automation system that computes ready time predictions and departure runway assignments, 2) an en route scheduling automation tool that uses this information to estimate ascent trajectories to the merge point and computes release times and, 3) an interface that provides two-way communication between the two systems. To minimize technology transfer issues and facilitate its adoption by TMCs and Frontline Managers (FLM), NASA developed the PDRC prototype using the Surface Decision Support System (SDSS) for the Tower surface automation tool, a research version of the FAA TMA (RTMA) for en route automation tool and a digital interface between the two DSTs to facilitate coordination.

  20. Automating test case generation for coverages required by FAA standard DO-178B

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Voas, Jeffrey M.; Payne, Jeffery E.; Miller, Keith W.

    1993-01-01

    Coverage testing techniques are required by the FAA for various levels of subsystem criticality at the unit testing level. Higher levels of criticality require coverage schemes that frequently require more and more test cases, particularly when the number of conditions in a decision grows. For example, if we have a decision with n conditions of the form: if (/ci/ or /c2/ or .... or /cn/) then there are 2(n) possible combinations of condition outcomes. Given the enormous number of inputs that may be required to satisfy different coverages, and given that there are no automated tools for determining these inputs (to our knowledge), we will show how one alternative testing technique, mutation testing, can be coerced into generating inputs that satisfy a code coverage scheme X, i.e., if we modify the rules for mutant generation during mutation testing, this technique will provide test cases that satisfy X.

  1. Use of Ground Penetrating Radar at the FAA's National Airport Pavement Test Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Injun, Song

    2015-04-01

    The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) in the United States has used a ground-coupled Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) at the National Airport Pavement Test Facility (NAPTF) since 2005. One of the primary objectives of the testing at the facility is to provide full-scale pavement response and failure information for use in airplane landing gear design and configuration studies. During the traffic testing at the facility, a GSSI GPR system was used to develop new procedures for monitoring Hot Mix Asphalt (HMA) pavement density changes that is directly related to pavement failure. After reviewing current setups for data acquisition software and procedures for identifying different pavement layers, dielectric constant and pavement thickness were selected as dominant parameters controlling HMA properties provided by GPR. A new methodology showing HMA density changes in terms of dielectric constant variations, called dielectric sweep test, was developed and applied in full-scale pavement test. The dielectric constant changes were successfully monitored with increasing airplane traffic numbers. The changes were compared to pavement performance data (permanent deformation). The measured dielectric constants based on the known HMA thicknesses were also compared with computed dielectric constants using an equation from ASTM D4748-98 Standard Test Method for Determining the Thickness of Bound Pavement Layers Using Short-Pulse Radar. Six inches diameter cylindrical cores were taken after construction and traffic testing for the HMA layer bulk specific gravity. The measured bulk specific gravity was also compared to monitor HMA density changes caused by aircraft traffic conditions. Additionally this presentation will review the applications of the FAA's ground-coupled GPR on embedded rebar identification in concrete pavement, sewer pipes in soil, and gage identifications in 3D plots.

  2. Simultaneous determination of titanium and molybdenum in steel samples using derivative spectrophotometry in neutral micellar medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varghese, Anitha; Khadar, A. M. A.; Kalluraya, Balakrishna

    2006-05-01

    A simple, selective and sensitive spectrophotometric method has been developed for the individual and simultaneous determination of Ti(IV) and Mo(VI) using resacetophenone p-hydroxybenzoylhydrazone (RAPHBH) in presence of Triton X-100, without any prior separation. Beer's law is obeyed between 0.13-1.2 μg mL -1 and 0.18-1.90 μg mL -1 concentration of Ti(IV) and Mo(VI) at 455 nm and 405 nm, respectively. The molar absorptivity and Sandell's sensitivity of the coloured complexes at pH 3.0 are 3.1 × 10 4 L mol -1 cm -1, 4.2 × 10 4 L mol -1 cm -1, and 1.6 ng cm -2, 2.3 ng cm -2 for Ti(IV) and Mo(VI), respectively. The stoichiometry of the complexes were found to be 1:2 and 1:1 (metal:ligand) for Ti(IV) and Mo(VI), respectively. These metal ions interfere with the determination of each other in zero-order spectrophotometry. The first derivative spectra of these complexes permitted a simultaneous determination of Ti(IV) and Mo(VI) at zero crossing wavelengths of 500.0 nm and 455.0 nm, respectively. The effect of foreign ions in the determination of Ti(IV) and Mo(VI) were investigated. The proposed method has been successfully applied for the determination of titanium and molybdenum in standard alloy steel, mineral and soil samples.

  3. Simultaneous determination of titanium and molybdenum in steel samples using derivative spectrophotometry in neutral micellar medium.

    PubMed

    Varghese, Anitha; Khadar, A M A; Kalluraya, Balakrishna

    2006-05-15

    A simple, selective and sensitive spectrophotometric method has been developed for the individual and simultaneous determination of Ti(IV) and Mo(VI) using resacetophenone p-hydroxybenzoylhydrazone (RAPHBH) in presence of Triton X-100, without any prior separation. Beer's law is obeyed between 0.13-1.2 microg mL-1 and 0.18-1.90 microg mL-1 concentration of Ti(IV) and Mo(VI) at 455 nm and 405 nm, respectively. The molar absorptivity and Sandell's sensitivity of the coloured complexes at pH 3.0 are 3.1x10(4) L mol-1 cm-1, 4.2x10(4) L mol-1 cm-1, and 1.6 ng cm-2, 2.3 ng cm-2 for Ti(IV) and Mo(VI), respectively. The stoichiometry of the complexes were found to be 1:2 and 1:1 (metal:ligand) for Ti(IV) and Mo(VI), respectively. These metal ions interfere with the determination of each other in zero-order spectrophotometry. The first derivative spectra of these complexes permitted a simultaneous determination of Ti(IV) and Mo(VI) at zero crossing wavelengths of 500.0 nm and 455.0 nm, respectively. The effect of foreign ions in the determination of Ti(IV) and Mo(VI) were investigated. The proposed method has been successfully applied for the determination of titanium and molybdenum in standard alloy steel, mineral and soil samples.

  4. Direct DOC and nitrate determination in water using dual pathlength and second derivative UV spectrophotometry.

    PubMed

    Causse, Jean; Thomas, Olivier; Jung, Aude-Valérie; Thomas, Marie-Florence

    2017-01-01

    UV spectrophotometry is largely used for water and wastewater quality monitoring. The measurement/estimation of specific and aggregate parameters such as nitrate and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) is possible with UV spectra exploitation, from 2 to multi wavelengths calibration. However, if nitrate determination from UV absorbance is known, major optical interferences linked to the presence of suspended solids, colloids or dissolved organic matter limit the relevance of UV measurement for DOC assessment. A new method based on UV spectrophotometric measurement of raw samples (without filtration) coupling a dual pathlength for spectra acquisition and the second derivative exploitation of the signal is proposed in this work. The determination of nitrate concentration is carried out from the second derivative of the absorbance at 226 nm corresponding at the inflexion point of nitrate signal decrease. A short optical pathlength can be used considering the strong absorption of nitrate ion around 210 nm. For DOC concentration determination the second derivative absorbance at 295 nm is proposed after nitrate correction. Organic matter absorbing slightly in the 270-330 nm window, a long optical pathlength must be selected in order to increase the sensitivity. The method was tested on several hundred of samples from small rivers of two agricultural watersheds located in Brittany, France, taken during dry and wet periods. The comparison between the proposed method and the standardised procedures for nitrate and DOC measurement gave a good adjustment for both parameters for ranges of 2-100 mg/L NO3 and 1-30 mg/L DOC.

  5. Measurement of carboxyhaemoglobin by spectrophotometry and gas chromatography.

    PubMed

    Johansson, M B; Wollmer, P

    1989-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate state-of-the-art spectrophotometry for measurement of carboxyhaemoglobin (COHb). We measured the fractional concentration of COHb in 109 blood samples from patients under investigation of anaemia or with exposure to carbon monoxide (smokers) with the OSM3 Hemoximeter and by gas chromatography. Duplicate measurements were made with both methods in 42 samples. We found only a trivial systematic difference between the two methods. There was, however, a considerable scatter of the measurements, the limits of agreement (95% confidence limits for the difference between the two methods) being -0.98 and 0.86% COHb. The poor agreement between the methods was largely explained by a large random scatter in duplicate spectrophotometric measurements, whereas the method based on gas chromatography was highly reproducible. We conclude that the low accuracy of spectrophotometric measurements of COHb precludes its use for assessment of the endogenous production of CO, but that it may be useful for assessment of exposure to exogenous CO.

  6. Liquid standards utilization for metrological ensuring of spectrophotometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mogilnaya, L. G.; Sayapin, A. I.; Solov'ev, Victor A.

    1993-12-01

    At the present time the testing of spectrophotometrical measuring means (spectrophotometers) in the ultraviolet and visible spectrum in accordance with the existing USSR verification scheme carried out by means of glass light filters, types KS-100, KS-102 certified with standard instruments. The main shortage of these light filters when using them as the standard measures is the necessity to certify them for transmission coefficient. To solve the problem, it seems reasonable to develop and use the liquid standard samples of optical density (LS) as highly efficient and economical means ensuring the unity of measurements in the spectrophotometry. In this report the possibility of utilization of the set of LS of optical density is considered. The set of LS represents acid and water solutions of organic compounds of five types (LS 04-1, LS 04-2, LS 04-3, LS 04-4, LS 04-5) having two levels of optical density in the wave band of 220 - 720 nm.

  7. HUBBLE SPACE TELESCOPE SPECTROPHOTOMETRY AND MODELS FOR SOLAR ANALOGS

    SciTech Connect

    Bohlin, R. C.

    2010-04-15

    Absolute flux distributions for seven solar analog stars are measured from 0.3 to 2.5 {mu}m by Hubble Space Telescope (HST) spectrophotometry. In order to predict the longer wavelength mid-IR fluxes that are required for James Webb Space Telescope calibration, the HST spectral energy distributions are fit with Castelli and Kurucz model atmospheres; and the results are compared with fits from the MARCS model grid. The rms residuals in 10 broadband bins are all <0.5% for the best fits from both model grids. However, the fits differ systematically: the MARCS fits are 40-100 K hotter in T {sub eff}, 0.25-0.80 higher in log g, 0.01-0.10 higher in log z, and 0.008-0.021 higher in the reddening E(B - V), probably because their specifications include different metal abundances. Despite these differences in the parameters of the fits, the predicted mid-IR fluxes differ by only {approx}1%; and the modeled flux distributions of these G stars have an estimated ensemble accuracy of 2% out to 30 {mu}m.

  8. Automated measurement of urinary creatinine by multichannel kinetic spectrophotometry.

    PubMed

    Ohira, Shin-Ichi; Kirk, Andrea B; Dasgupta, Purnendu K

    2009-01-15

    Urinary creatinine analysis is required for clinical diagnosis, especially for evaluation of renal function. Creatinine adjustment is also widely used to estimate 24-h excretion from spot samples. Few convenient validated approaches are available for in-house creatinine measurement for small- to medium-scale studies. Here we apply the Jáffe reaction to creatinine determination with zone fluidic multichannel kinetic spectrophotometry. Diluted urine sample and reagent, alkaline picric acid, were mixed by a computer-programmed dispenser and rapidly delivered to a four-channel detection cell. The absorbance change was monitored by a flow-through light-emitting diode-photodiode-based detector. Validation results against high-performance liquid chromatography-ultraviolet (HPLC-UV)/mass spectrometry (MS) are presented. Responses for 10-fold diluted samples were linear within clinically relevant ranges (0-250 mg/L after dilution). The system can analyze 70 samples per hour with a limit of detection of 0.76 mg/L. The relative standard deviation was 1.29% at 100 mg/L creatinine (n=225). Correlation with the HPLC (UV quantitation/MS confirmation) system was excellent (linear, r2=0.9906). The developed system allows rapid, simple, cost-effective, and robust creatinine analysis and is suitable for the analysis of large numbers of urine samples.

  9. Noninvasive detection of plant nutrient stress using fiber optic spectrophotometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jun-Wei; Asundi, Anand K.; Liew, Oi Wah; Boey, William S. L.

    2001-05-01

    In a previous paper, we described the use of fiber optic spectrophotometry as a non-destructive and sensitive method to detect early symptoms of plant nutrient deficiency. We report further developments of our work on Brassica chinensis var parachinensis (Bailey) showing reproducibility of our data collected at a different seasonal period. Plants at the mid-log growth phase were subjected to nutrient stress by transferring them to nitrate- and calcium- deficient nutrient solution in a standing aerated hydroponic system. After tracking changes in leaf reflectance by FOSpectr for nine days, the plants were returned to complete nutrient solution and their recovery was monitored for a further nine days. The responses of nutrient stressed plants were compared with those grown under complete nutrient solution over the 18-day trial period. We also compared the sensitivity of FOSpectr detection against plant growth measurements vis-a-vis average leaf number and leaf width and show that the former method gave an indication of nutrient stress much earlier than the latter. In addition, this work indicated that while normal and nutrient-stressed plants could not be distinguished within the first 7 days by tracking plant growth indicators, stressed plants did show a clear decline in average leaf number and leaf width in later stages of growth even after the plants were returned to complete nutrient solution. The results further reinforce the need for early detection of nutrient stress, as late remedial action could not reverse the loss in plant growth in later stages of plant development.

  10. Infrared spectrophotometry of three Seyfert galaxies and 3C 273

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cutri, R. M.; Puetter, R. C.; Rudy, R. J.; Willner, S. P.; Aitken, D. K.; Jones, B.; Merrill, K. M.; Roche, P. F.; Russell, R. W.; Soifer, B. T.

    1981-01-01

    Spectrophotometry in the range 2.1-4.0 microns is presented for the Seyfert galaxies NGC 1068, NGC 4151 and Mrk 231 and the quasar 3C 273, together with broadband and narrowband observations of the Seyfert galaxies in the range 8-13 microns. The spectra of NGC 1068 and NGC 4151 are found to contain a significant component due to starlight, especially at shorter wavelengths. The nonstellar component in NGC 1068 is observed to fall off rapidly at wavelengths shorter than 4 microns, consistent with the interpretation of the excess beyond 5 microns as thermal reradiation by dust. Observations confirm the variability of NGC 4151, and indicate the presence of two components of the flux other than starlight: a nonthermal variable component predominant at shorter wavelengths and a constant, probably thermal component at wavelengths greater than 3 microns. Mrk 231 and 3C 273 exhibit no discernable stellar component and were not observed to vary by more than 10%. Evidence is obtained for a broad minimum in the 8 to 13 micron spectrum of Mrk 231, as well as possible structure between rest wavelengths of 2.8 and 2.9 microns, and the spectrum is not a power law. The spectrum of 3C 273 is consistent with a power law from 1.2 to 10 microns, with small but significant deviations.

  11. Aluminum complexation by catechol as determined by ultraviolet spectrophotometry

    SciTech Connect

    Sikora, F.J.; McBride, M.B.

    1989-03-01

    Methods of ultraviolet (UV) spectrophotometry were used to determine the stoichiometry and association constant for the Al-catechol complex from pH 3.8 to 4.6. Job's method of continuous variation indicated the Al-catechol complex had a 1:1 stoichiometry in the pH range studied. Aluminum titrations of catechol and pH titrations of catechol plus Al resulted in a shift in the UV spectra due to the formation of an Al-catechol complex absorbing UV radiation uniquely different than that of free catechol. General equations were developed for the determination of association constants assuming an organic and Al-organic complex absorb UV radiation. Aluminum titrations with constant catechol concentration yielded a log k/sub 0.1//sup c/ of 16.22 for a 1:1 Al-catechol complex. Calculated absorbance as a function of pH agree dwell with experimental pH titrations of solutions containing catechol plus Al. The fact that Al can be complexed by catechol at low pH indicates the o-hydroxy group provides a potential source for Al complexation in soil and surface waters.

  12. Band gap states in nanocrystalline WO3 thin films studied by soft x-ray spectroscopy and optical spectrophotometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johansson, M. B.; Kristiansen, P. T.; Duda, L.; Niklasson, G. A.; Österlund, L.

    2016-11-01

    Nanocrystalline tungsten trioxide (WO3) thin films prepared by DC magnetron sputtering have been studied using soft x-ray spectroscopy and optical spectrophotometry. Resonant inelastic x-ray scattering (RIXS) measurements reveal band gap states in sub-stoichiometric γ-WO3-x with x  =  0.001-0.005. The energy positions of these states are in good agreement with recently reported density functional calculations. The results were compared with optical absorption measurements in the near infrared spectral region. An optical absorption peak at 0.74 eV is assigned to intervalence transfer of polarons between W sites. A less prominent peak at energies between 0.96 and 1.16 eV is assigned to electron excitation of oxygen vacancies. The latter results are supported by RIXS measurements, where an energy loss in this energy range was observed, and this suggests that electron transfer processes involving transitions from oxygen vacancy states can be observed in RIXS. Our results have implications for the interpretation of optical properties of WO3, and the optical transitions close to the band gap, which are important in photocatalytic and photoelectrochemical applications.

  13. 14 CFR 39.21 - Where can I get information about FAA-approved alternative methods of compliance?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Where can I get information about FAA-approved alternative methods of compliance? 39.21 Section 39.21 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS DIRECTIVES § 39.21 Where can I...

  14. 14 CFR 11.21 - What are the most common kinds of rulemaking actions for which FAA follows the Administrative...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false What are the most common kinds of rulemaking actions for which FAA follows the Administrative Procedure Act? 11.21 Section 11.21 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION PROCEDURAL RULES...

  15. 14 CFR 11.27 - Are there other ways FAA collects specific rulemaking recommendations before we issue an NPRM?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Are there other ways FAA collects specific rulemaking recommendations before we issue an NPRM? 11.27 Section 11.27 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION PROCEDURAL RULES GENERAL RULEMAKING...

  16. 14 CFR 11.29 - May FAA change its regulations without first issuing an ANPRM or NPRM?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false May FAA change its regulations without first issuing an ANPRM or NPRM? 11.29 Section 11.29 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION PROCEDURAL RULES GENERAL RULEMAKING PROCEDURES Rulemaking...

  17. 14 CFR 11.23 - Does FAA follow the same procedures in issuing all types of rules?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Does FAA follow the same procedures in issuing all types of rules? 11.23 Section 11.23 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION PROCEDURAL RULES GENERAL RULEMAKING PROCEDURES Rulemaking Procedures...

  18. 49 CFR 1540.117 - Threat assessments regarding aliens holding or applying for FAA certificates, ratings, or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 9 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Threat assessments regarding aliens holding or applying for FAA certificates, ratings, or authorizations. 1540.117 Section 1540.117 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) TRANSPORTATION SECURITY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY CIVIL AVIATION...

  19. 49 CFR 1540.117 - Threat assessments regarding aliens holding or applying for FAA certificates, ratings, or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 9 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Threat assessments regarding aliens holding or applying for FAA certificates, ratings, or authorizations. 1540.117 Section 1540.117 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) TRANSPORTATION SECURITY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY CIVIL AVIATION...

  20. 14 CFR 11.35 - Does FAA include sensitive security information and proprietary information in the Federal Docket...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... information and proprietary information in the Federal Docket Management System (FDMS)? 11.35 Section 11.35... RULEMAKING PROCEDURES Rulemaking Procedures General § 11.35 Does FAA include sensitive security information and proprietary information in the Federal Docket Management System (FDMS)? (a) Sensitive...

  1. 14 CFR 11.35 - Does FAA include sensitive security information and proprietary information in the Federal Docket...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... information and proprietary information in the Federal Docket Management System (FDMS)? 11.35 Section 11.35... RULEMAKING PROCEDURES Rulemaking Procedures General § 11.35 Does FAA include sensitive security information and proprietary information in the Federal Docket Management System (FDMS)? (a) Sensitive...

  2. 14 CFR 11.35 - Does FAA include sensitive security information and proprietary information in the Federal Docket...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... information and proprietary information in the Federal Docket Management System (FDMS)? 11.35 Section 11.35... RULEMAKING PROCEDURES Rulemaking Procedures General § 11.35 Does FAA include sensitive security information and proprietary information in the Federal Docket Management System (FDMS)? (a) Sensitive...

  3. 14 CFR 11.35 - Does FAA include sensitive security information and proprietary information in the Federal Docket...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... information and proprietary information in the Federal Docket Management System (FDMS)? 11.35 Section 11.35... RULEMAKING PROCEDURES Rulemaking Procedures General § 11.35 Does FAA include sensitive security information and proprietary information in the Federal Docket Management System (FDMS)? (a) Sensitive...

  4. 49 CFR 1540.117 - Threat assessments regarding aliens holding or applying for FAA certificates, ratings, or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 9 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Threat assessments regarding aliens holding or applying for FAA certificates, ratings, or authorizations. 1540.117 Section 1540.117 Transportation Other... Passengers and Other Individuals and Persons § 1540.117 Threat assessments regarding aliens holding...

  5. 41 CFR 102-37.530 - What are FAA's responsibilities in the donation of surplus property to public airports?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... responsibilities in the donation of surplus property to public airports? 102-37.530 Section 102-37.530 Public... MANAGEMENT REGULATION PERSONAL PROPERTY 37-DONATION OF SURPLUS PERSONAL PROPERTY Donations to Public Airports § 102-37.530 What are FAA's responsibilities in the donation of surplus property to public airports?...

  6. 14 CFR 11.35 - Does FAA include sensitive security information and proprietary information in the Federal Docket...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... information and proprietary information in the Federal Docket Management System (FDMS)? 11.35 Section 11.35... RULEMAKING PROCEDURES Rulemaking Procedures General § 11.35 Does FAA include sensitive security information and proprietary information in the Federal Docket Management System (FDMS)? (a) Sensitive...

  7. AVIATION SECURITY: FAA’s Actions to Study Responsibilities and Funding for Airport Security and to Certify Screening Companies

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1999-02-01

    Actions to Study Responsibilities and Funding for Airport Security and to Certify Screening Companies DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A Approved for...local law enforcement support relating to air carrier and airport security measures. The funding of the security operations is divided among FAA, the...generally agreed with the current division of airport security responsibilities. These officials stated that the continuity of screening would be

  8. 41 CFR 102-37.535 - What information must FAA provide to GSA on its administration of the public airport donation...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... FAA provide to GSA on its administration of the public airport donation program? 102-37.535 Section... (Continued) FEDERAL MANAGEMENT REGULATION PERSONAL PROPERTY 37-DONATION OF SURPLUS PERSONAL PROPERTY Donations to Public Airports § 102-37.535 What information must FAA provide to GSA on its administration...

  9. 14 CFR 11.101 - May I ask FAA to reconsider my petition for rulemaking or petition for exemption if it is denied?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... rulemaking or petition for exemption if it is denied? 11.101 Section 11.101 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL... petition for rulemaking or petition for exemption if it is denied? Yes, you may petition FAA to reconsider... petition, and FAA must receive it within 60 days after we issued the denial. For us to accept your...

  10. Sensitive determination of bismuth by flame atomic absorption spectrometry using atom trapping in a slotted quartz tube and revolatilization with organic solvent pulse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kılınç, Ersin; Bakırdere, Sezgin; Aydın, Fırat; Ataman, O. Yavuz

    2012-07-01

    Sensitivity of flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS) for Bi determination was improved by slotted quartz tube (SQT) that was used also for atom trapping (AT). The trapped analyte was released by aspirating a small volume of organic solvent after a reasonable analyte collection time. Sensitivity was improved by 2.9 times by SQT-FAAS and 256 times by SQT-AT-FAAS with respect to FAAS. Optimum trapping period was found to be 6.0 min (36.0 mL of solution). Limit of detection (LOD) for SQT-AT-FAAS was found to be 1.6 ng mL- 1. %RSD was calculated as 4.0% for five replicate measurements of 7.5 ng mL- 1 Bi by SQT-AT-FAAS. Accuracy of the method developed was checked by analyzing a standard reference material of simulated fresh water (NIST 1643e) and result found was in good agreement with the certified one. The method can be applied in any laboratory equipped with a flame AA spectrometer. The consumption of time and sample volume is fairly low and application is simple and easy.

  11. Limitation of fluorescence spectrophotometry in the measurement of naphthenic acids in oil sands process water.

    PubMed

    Lu, Weibing; Ewanchuk, Andrea; Perez-Estrada, Leonidas; Sego, Dave; Ulrich, Ania

    2013-01-01

    Fluorescence spectrophotometry has been proposed as a quick screening technique for the measurement of naphthenic acids (NAs). To evaluate the feasibility of this application, the fluorescence emission spectra of NAs extracted from three oil sands process water sources were compared with that of commercial NAs. The NAs resulting from the bitumen extraction process cannot be differentiated because of the similarity of the fluorescence spectra. Separation of the fluorescent species in NAs using high performance liquid chromatography with fluorescence detector proved unsuccessful. The acidic fraction of NAs is fluorescent but the basic fraction of NAs is not fluorescent, implying that aromatic acids in NAs give rise to the fluorescent signals. The concentrations of NAs in oil sands process water were measured by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), fluorescence spectrophotometry and ultra high performance liquid chromatography-time of flight/mass spectrometry (UPLC-TOF/MS). Commercial Merichem and Kodak NAs are the best standards to use when measuring NAs concentration with FTIR and fluorescence spectrophotometry. In addition, the NAs concentrations measured by fluorescence spectrophotometry are about 30 times higher than those measured by FTIR and UPLC-TOF/MS. The findings in this study underscore the limitation of fluorescence spectrophotometry in the measurement of NAs.

  12. NASA/FAA flight-test investigation of helicopter microwave landing system approaches

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peach, I. L., Jr.; Bull, J. S.; Anderson, D. J.; Dugan, D. C.; Ross, V. L.; Hunting, A. W.; Pate, D. P.; Savage, J. C.

    1980-01-01

    The helicopter Microwave Landing System flight-test investigations, conducted by a joint NASA/FAA effort in order to gather statistical data for establishing terminal instrument procedures criteria, and to provide a performance data base for developing advanced MLS guidance concepts, are presented. The specific flight-test objectives were to: (1) develop acceptable angle-only MLS approach profiles; (2) determine tracking errors; (3) determine altitude loss during missed approach; (4) evaluate guidance display sensitivities; and (5) evaluate pilot acceptability. Fourteen pilots flew 140 manual (without stability augmentation) dual-pilot simulated instrument approaches in a UH-1H helicopter. The flight profiles flown included 3-, 6-, and 9-degree glideslope, centerline approaches to decision heights of 50, 100, and 150 ft, respectively. The angular guidance display sensitivities and the data acquisition system are also described. Eight major conclusions are made, and include the following: (1) the use of pitch attitude to control airspeed and collective to control glideslope was the preferred pilot technique for the steep glideslope approaches, and (2) angular guidance deviation indicator sensitivity requirements for helicopter MLS approaches to STOLports and heliports have been found to be significantly different from standard ILS sensitivities.

  13. [Determination of eight metal elements in Cichorium glandulosum Boiss et Huet by microwave digestion-FAAS].

    PubMed

    Pei, Ling-Peng; Zhou, Xiao-Ying; Cui, Jian; Pang, Zong-Ran; Liu, Hong-Bing; Ge, Liang

    2009-12-01

    The Cichorium glandulosum Boiss et Huet is a traditional Uighur natural herbal medicine, but has not been analyzed and studied in terms of its metal elements. In the experiment, the Cichorium glandulosum Boiss et Huet powder was digested with HNO3 by microwave digestion before determination. The eight metal elements, potassium, nickel, calcium, magnesium, iron, manganese, copper and zinc, in Cichorium glandulosum Boiss et Huet were determined by FAAS. The working conditions, accuracy and precision of the method were studied. The linear correlations of standard curves are good (r = 0.999 1-0.999 9). The recovery (n = 6) is 92.25%-110.5%, and the RSD (n = 6) is 0.7%-3.88%. The results showed that there were comparatively rich metal elements, among which are comparatively high calcium (65.84 mg x g(-1)), iron (24.38 mg x g(-1)), magnesium (278.17 mg x g(-1)) and potassium (18.50 mg x g(-1)), in Cichorium glandulosum Boiss et Huet, and the contents of other elements are nickel of 0.004 38 mg x g(-1), manganese of 0.52 mg x g(-1), copper of 0.016 5 mg x g(-1) and zinc of 0.18 mg x g(-1). This provided useful data for discussing the relationship between the content of the metal elements in Cichorium glandulosum Boiss et Huet and its clinical application in cardiovascular and osteoporosis disease.

  14. Summary of the industry/NASA/FAA workshop on philosophy of automation: Promises and realities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norman, Susan D.

    1990-01-01

    Issues of flight deck automation are multi-faceted and complex. The rapid introduction of advanced computer based technology on to the flight deck of transport category aircraft has had considerable impact on both aircraft operations and the flight crew. As part of NASA's responsibility to facilitate an active exchange of ideas and information between members of the aviation community, an Industry/NASA/FAA workshop was conducted in August 1988. One of the most important conclusions to emerge from the workshop was that the introduction of automation has clearly benefited aviation and has substantially improved the operational safety and efficiency of our air transport system. For example, one carrier stated that they have been flying the Boeing 767 (one of the first aircraft to employ substantial automation) since 1982, and they have never had an accident or incident resulting in damage to the aircraft. Notwithstanding its benefits, many issues associated with the design, certification, and operation of automated aircraft were identified. For example two key conceptual issues were the need for the crew to have a thorough understanding of the system and the importance of defining the pilot's role. With respect to certification, a fundamental issue is the lack of comprehensive human factors requirements in the current regulations. Operational considerations, which have been a factor in incidents involving automation, were also cited. Viewgraphs used in the presentation are given.

  15. Methane absorption variations in the spectrum of Pluto

    SciTech Connect

    Buie, M.W.; Fink, U.

    1987-06-01

    The lightcurve phases of 0.18, 0.35, 0.49, and 0.98 covered by 5600-10,500 A absolute spectrophotometry of Pluto during four nights include minimum (0.98) light and one near-maximum (0.49) light. The spectra are noted to exhibit significant methane band absorption depth variations at 6200, 7200, 7900, 8400, 8600, 8900, and 10,000 A, with the minimum absorption occurring at minimum light and thereby indicating a 30-percent change in the methane column abundance in the course of three days. An attempt is made to model this absorption strength variation with rotational phase terms of an isotropic surface distribution of methane frost and a clear layer of CH4 gas. 34 references.

  16. White LEDs as broad spectrum light sources for spectrophotometry: demonstration in the visible spectrum range in a diode-array spectrophotometric detector.

    PubMed

    Piasecki, Tomasz; Breadmore, Michael C; Macka, Mirek

    2010-11-01

    Although traditional lamps, such as deuterium lamps, are suitable for bench-top instrumentation, their compatibility with the requirements of modern miniaturized instrumentation is limited. This study investigates the option of utilizing solid-state light source technology, namely white LEDs, as a broad band spectrum source for spectrophotometry. Several white light LEDs of both RGB and white phosphorus have been characterized in terms of their emission spectra and energy output and a white phosphorus Luxeon LED was then chosen for demonstration as a light source for visible-spectrum spectrophotometry conducted in CE. The Luxeon LED was fixed onto the base of a dismounted deuterium (D(2) ) lamp so that the light-emitting spot was geometrically positioned exactly where the light-emitting spot of the original D(2) lamp is placed. In this manner, the detector of a commercial CE instrument equipped with a DAD was not modified in any way. As the detector hardware and electronics remained the same, the change of the deuterium lamp for the Luxeon white LED allowed a direct comparison of their performances. Several anionic dyes as model analytes with absorption maxima between 450 and 600 nm were separated by CE in an electrolyte of 0.01 mol/L sodium tetraborate. The absorbance baseline noise as the key parameter was 5 × lower for the white LED lamp, showing clearly superior performance to the deuterium lamp in the available, i.e. visible part of the spectrum.

  17. PHASES: A Project to Perform Absolute Spectrophotometry from Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    del Burgo, C.; Vather, D.; Allende Prieto, C.; Murphy, N.

    2013-04-01

    This paper presents the current status of the opto-mechanical design of PHASES (Planet Hunting and AsteroSeismology Explorer Spectrophotometer), which is a project to develop a space-borne telescope to obtain absolute flux calibrated spectra of bright stars. The science payload is intended to be housed in a micro-satellite launched into a low-earth Sun-synchronous orbit with an inclination to the equator of 98.7° and a local time ascending node LTAN of 6:00 AM. PHASES will be able to measure micromagnitude photometric variations due to stellar oscillations/activity and planet/moon transits. It consists of a 20 cm aperture modified Baker telescope feeding two detectors: the tracking detector provides the fine telescope guidance system with a required pointing stability of 0.2″, and the science detector performs spectrophotometry in the wavelength range 370-960 nm with a resolving power between 200 and 900. The spectrograph is designed to provide 1% RMS flux calibrated spectra with signal-to-noise ratios > 100 for stars with V < 10 in short integration times. Our strategy to calibrate the system using A type stars is explained. From comparison with model atmospheres it would be possible to determine the stellar angular diameters with an uncertainty of approximately 0.5%. In the case of a star hosting a transiting planet it would be possible to derive its light curve, and then the planet to stellar radius ratio. Bright stars have high precision Hipparcos parallaxes and the expected level of accuracy for their fluxes will be propagated to the stellar radii, and more significantly to the planetary radii. The scientific drivers for PHASES give rise to some design challenges, which are particularly related to the opto-mechanics for extreme environmental conditions. The optical design has been developed with the primary goal of avoiding stray light reaching the science detector. Three different proposals for the opto-mechanical design are under investigation.

  18. ABSORPTION ANALYZER

    DOEpatents

    Brooksbank, W.A. Jr.; Leddicotte, G.W.; Strain, J.E.; Hendon, H.H. Jr.

    1961-11-14

    A means was developed for continuously computing and indicating the isotopic assay of a process solution and for automatically controlling the process output of isotope separation equipment to provide a continuous output of the desired isotopic ratio. A counter tube is surrounded with a sample to be analyzed so that the tube is exactly in the center of the sample. A source of fast neutrons is provided and is spaced from the sample. The neutrons from the source are thermalized by causing them to pass through a neutron moderator, and the neutrons are allowed to diffuse radially through the sample to actuate the counter. A reference counter in a known sample of pure solvent is also actuated by the thermal neutrons from the neutron source. The number of neutrons which actuate the detectors is a function of a concentration of the elements in solution and their neutron absorption cross sections. The pulses produced by the detectors responsive to each neu tron passing therethrough are amplified and counted. The respective times required to accumulate a selected number of counts are measured by associated timing devices. The concentration of a particular element in solution may be determined by utilizing the following relation: T2/Ti = BCR, where B is a constant proportional to the absorption cross sections, T2 is the time of count collection for the unknown solution, Ti is the time of count collection for the pure solvent, R is the isotopic ratlo, and C is the molar concentration of the element to be determined. Knowing the slope constant B for any element and when the chemical concentration is known, the isotopic concentration may be readily determined, and conversely when the isotopic ratio is known, the chemical concentrations may be determined. (AEC)

  19. Runways at small airports are deteriorating because of deferred maintenance: Action needed by FAA and the Congress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1982-09-01

    Runways at many small airports are deteriorating faster than necessary because airport owners--usually local governments--have deferred critical maintenance. The result is damage to the runways' basic structure and a shortened useful life if they are not repaired. Based on GAO's review of 46 airports, studies by others, and the views of FAA officials, deferred maintenance is apparently a longstanding nationwide problem. Lack of funds is cited by airport owners as the primary reason for not performing needed maintenance; however, the Federal Aviation Administration's apathy to bring about satisfactory maintenance is a contributing cause. GAO is recommending actions that FAA can take to help ensure that runways at small airports are properly maintained. The Congress should recognize the airport owners' lack of resources to properly maintain airports when considering future revisions to the Airport Improvement Program.

  20. C3 and infrared spectrophotometry of Y Canum Venaticorum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goebel, J. H.; Bregman, J. D.; Strecker, D. W.; Witteborn, F. C.; Erickson, E. F.

    1978-01-01

    The 1.2- to 5.6-micron spectrum of the carbon star Y CVn is presented and discussed. The observations were made from the Kuiper Airborne Observatory at an altitude of 12.5 km, thereby avoiding most of the absorption due to terrestrial water vapor. Comparison of Y CVn near 5 microns with laboratory spectra provides possible evidence for the presence of the linear triatomic molecule C3. For the first time in a carbon star the clearly formed band heads of the CN red system between 1.2 and 2.3 microns are observed. Corroborative evidence for the presence of the molecules HCN and C2H2 is presented, and the relative contributions of C3, HCN, and C2H2 to the 3.1-micron absorption band are discussed. Spectra of two other carbon stars, TX Psc and S Cep, are presented for comparison.

  1. Spectral aspects of the determination of Si in organic and aqueous solutions using high-resolution continuum source or line source flame atomic absorption spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kowalewska, Zofia; Pilarczyk, Janusz; Gościniak, Łukasz

    2016-06-01

    High-resolution continuum source flame atomic absorption spectrometry (HR-CS FAAS) was applied to reveal and investigate spectral interference in the determination of Si. An intensive structured background was observed in the analysis of both aqueous and xylene solutions containing S compounds. This background was attributed to absorption by the CS molecule formed in the N2O-C2H2 flame. The lines of the CS spectrum at least partially overlap all five of the most sensitive Si lines investigated. The 251.611 nm Si line was demonstrated to be the most advantageous. The intensity of the structured background caused by the CS molecule significantly depends on the chemical form of S in the solution and is the highest for the most-volatile CS2. The presence of O atoms in an initial S molecule can diminish the formation of CS. To overcome this S effect, various modes of baseline fitting and background correction were evaluated, including iterative background correction (IBC) and utilization of correction pixels (WRC). These modes were used either independently or in conjunction with least squares background correction (LSBC). The IBC + LSBC mode can correct the extremely strong interference caused by CS2 at an S concentration of 5% w:w in the investigated solution. However, the efficiency of this mode depends on the similarity of the processed spectra and the correction spectra in terms of intensity and in additional effects, such as a sloping baseline. In the vicinity of the Si line, three lines of V were recorded. These lines are well-separated in the HR-CS FAAS spectrum, but they could be a potential source of overcorrection when using line source flame atomic absorption spectrometry (LS FAAS). The expected signal for the 251.625 nm Fe line was not registered at 200 mg L- 1 Fe concentration in the solution, probably due to the diminished population of Fe atoms in the high-temperature flame used. The observations made using HR-CS FAAS helped to establish a "safe" level

  2. 3 micron spectrophotometry of Comet Halley - Evidence for water ice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bregman, Jesse D.; Tielens, A. G. G. M.; Witteborn, Fred C.; Rank, David M.; Wooden, Diane

    1988-01-01

    Structure has been observed in the 3-3.6 micron preperihelion spectrum of Comet Halley consistent with either an absorption band near 3.1 microns or emission near 3.3 microns. The results suggest that a large fraction of the water molecules lost by the comet are initially ejected in the form of small ice particles rather than in the gas phase.

  3. FAA Air Traffic Control Operations Concepts. Volume 3. ISSS (Initial Sector Suite System) En Route Controllers. Change 1

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-07-29

    series of ope-rations concepts for the FAA’s Advanced Automation System (AAS). It describes how en route controllers in Air Route Traffic Control Center...facilities may perform their operational jobs in the Initial Stector Suite System (ISSS) enviroinment- ISSS functionality is assumed to be as described...in the AAS System Level Specification, 28 August 1987. Included here are: Composition Graphs, showing the logizal flow of operational tasks performed

  4. Biomimetic FAA-certifiable, artificial muscle structures for commercial aircraft wings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrett, Ronald M.; Barrett, Cassandra M.

    2014-07-01

    This paper is centered on a new form of adaptive material which functions much in the same way as skeletal muscle tissue, is structurally modeled on plant actuator cells and capable of rapidly expanding or shrinking by as much as an order of magnitude in prescribed directions. Rapid changes of plant cell shape and sizes are often initiated via ion-transport driven fluid migration and resulting turgor pressure variation. Certain plant cellular structures like those in Mimosa pudica (sensitive plant), Albizia julibrissin (Mimosa tree), or Dionaea muscipula (Venus Flytrap) all exhibit actuation physiology which employs such turgor pressure manipulation. The paper begins with dynamic micrographs of a sectioned basal articulation joint from A. julibrissin. These figures show large cellular dimensional changes as the structure undergoes foliage articulation. By mimicking such structures in aircraft flight control mechanisms, extremely lightweight pneumatic control surface actuators can be designed. This paper shows several fundamental layouts of such surfaces with actuator elements made exclusively from FAA-certifiable materials, summarizes their structural mechanics and shows actuator power and energy densities that are higher than nearly all classes of conventional adaptive materials available today. A sample flap structure is shown to possess the ability to change its shape and structural stiffness as its cell pressures are manipulated, which in turn changes the surface lift-curve slope when exposed to airflows. Because the structural stiffness can be altered, it is also shown that the commanded section lift-curve slope can be similarly controlled between 1.2 and 6.2 rad-1. Several aircraft weight reduction principles are also shown to come into play as the need to concentrate loads to pass through point actuators is eliminated. The paper concludes with a summary of interrelated performance and airframe-level improvements including enhanced gust rejection, load

  5. Use of β-correction spectrophotometry to improve the determination of copper solution with eriochrome black T

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Hong-Wen

    1995-07-01

    Copper has been determined by β-correction spectrophotometry with eriochrome black T (EBT). This reaction is selective in the presence of EDTA to mask other metal ions. A non-ionic surfactant, polyethyleneglycol n-octanoic phenylether (emulsifying agent, OP), was found to increase the sensitivity. The β-correction method can completely eliminate the effect of excess EBT in its Cu 11 colored solution to give out the real absorpance of chelate produced. The sensitivity, precision and accuracy are increased. By means of the β-correction principle, the complex ratio of Cu 11 to EBT can be calculated as 1/2. Beer's law is obeyed over the range 0-2.0 mg l -1 copper at 550 nm and the true molar absorptivity of Cu-EBT chelate equals 2.61 × 10 4 l mol -1 cm -1. The detection limit of copper is 0.03 mg l -1 and the results show that the relative standard deviation was less than 4.5% with the recovery between 92.0 and 109%.

  6. Determination of thallium at ultra-trace levels in water and biological samples using solid phase spectrophotometry.

    PubMed

    Amin, Alaa S; El-Sharjawy, Abdel-Azeem M; Kassem, Mohammed A

    2013-06-01

    A new simple, very sensitive, selective and accurate procedure for the determination of trace amounts of thallium(III) by solid-phase spectrophotometry (SPS) has been developed. The procedure is based on fixation of Tl(III) as quinalizarin ion associate on a styrene-divinylbenzene anion-exchange resin. The absorbance of resin sorbed Tl(III) ion associate is measured directly at 636 and 830 nm. Thallium(I) was determined by difference measurements after oxidation of Tl(I) to Tl(III) with bromine. Calibration is linear over the range 0.5-12.0 μg L(-1) of Tl(III) with relative standard deviation (RSD) of 1.40% (n=10). The detection and quantification limits are 150 and 495 ng L(-1) using 0.6 g of the exchanger. The molar absorptivity and Sandell sensitivity are also calculated and found to be 1.31×10(7) L mol(-1)cm(-1) and 0.00156 ng cm(-2), respectively. The proposed procedure has been successfully applied to determine thallium in water, urine and serum samples.

  7. Spectrophotometry of peculiar B and A stars. XVIII - The helium rich variable stars HR 1890, Sigma Orionis E, and HD 37776

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adelman, S. J.; Pyper, D. M.

    1985-01-01

    Optical region spectrophotometry at 3300-7850 A has been obtained for three helium rich stars, HR 1890, Sigma Ori E, and HD 37776, of the Orion OB1 Association. New uvby-beta photometry of HR 1890 and HD 37776 as well as published data are also used to investigate the variability of these stars. A new period of 1.53862 days was determined for HD 37776. For all three stars H-beta varies in antiphase with strong He I lines. The spectrophotometric bandpass containing the strong He I line at 4471 A varies in phase with the R index of Pedersen and Thomsen (1977). Evidence is found for weak absorption features which appear to be an extension of the 5200 A feature seen in cooler CP stars.

  8. Intestinal absorption of berberine and 8-hydroxy dihydroberberine and their effects on sugar absorption in rat small intestine.

    PubMed

    Wei, Shi-chao; Dong, Su; Xu, Li-jun; Zhang, Chen-yu

    2014-04-01

    The intestinal absorption of berberine (Ber) and its structural modified compound 8-hydroxy dihydroberberine (Hdber) was compared, and their effects on the intestinal absorption of sugar by perfusion experiment were investigated in order to reveal the mechanism of low dose and high activity of Hdber in the treatment of hyperglycemia. The absorption of Hdber and Ber in rat small intestine was measured by in situ perfusion. High performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) was used to determine the concentrations of Hdber and Ber. In situ perfusion method was also used to study the effects of Hdber and Ber on sugar intestinal absorption. Glucose oxidase method and UV spectrophotometry were applied to examine the concentrations of glucose and sucrose in the perfusion fluid. The results showed that the absorption rate of Ber in the small intestine was lower than 10%, but that of Hdber was larger than 70%. Both Hdber and Ber inhibited the absorption of glucose and sucrose at the doses of 10 and 20 μg/mL. However, Hdber presented stronger activity than Ber (P<0.01). It is suggested that Hdber is absorbed easily in rat small intestine and that its inhibitory effect on the absorption of sugar is better than Ber.

  9. Rapid and sensitive ultrasonic-assisted derivatisation microextraction (UDME) technique for bitter taste-free amino acids (FAA) study by HPLC-FLD.

    PubMed

    Chen, Guang; Li, Jun; Sun, Zhiwei; Zhang, Shijuan; Li, Guoliang; Song, Cuihua; Suo, Yourui; You, Jinmao

    2014-01-15

    Amino acids, as the main contributors to taste, are usually found in relatively high levels in bitter foods. In this work, we focused on seeking a rapid, sensitive and simple method to determine FAA for large batches of micro-samples and to explore the relationship between FAA and bitterness. Overall condition optimisation indicated that the new UDME technique offered higher derivatisation yields and extraction efficiencies than traditional methods. Only 35min was needed in the whole operation process. Very low LLOQ (Lower limit of quantification: 0.21-5.43nmol/L) for FAA in twelve bitter foods was obtained, with which BTT (bitter taste thresholds) and CABT (content of FAA at BTT level) were newly determined. The ratio of CABT to BTT increased with decreasing of BTT. This work provided powerful potential for the high-throughput trace analysis of micro-sample and also a methodology to study the relationship between the chemical constituents and the taste.

  10. Determination of astaxanthin in Haematococcus pluvialis by first-order derivative spectrophotometry.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiao Juan; Juan, Liu Xiao; Wu, Ying Hua; Hua, Wu Ying; Zhao, Li Chao; Chao, Zhao Li; Xiao, Su Yao; Yao, Xiao Su; Zhou, Ai Mei; Mei, Zhou Ai; Liu, Xin; Xin, Liu

    2011-01-01

    A highly selective, convenient, and precise method, first-order derivative spectrophotometry, was applied for the determination of astaxanthin in Haematococcus pluvialis. Ethyl acetate and ethanol (1:1, v/v) were found to be the best extraction solvent tested due to their high efficiency and low toxicity compared with nine other organic solvents. Astaxanthin coexisting with chlorophyll and beta-carotene was analyzed by first-order derivative spectrophotometry in order to optimize the conditions for the determination of astaxanthin. The results show that when detected at 432 nm, the interfering substances could be eliminated. The dynamic linear range was 2.0-8.0 microg/mL, with a correlation coefficient of 0.9916. The detection threshold was 0.41 microg/mL. The RSD for the determination of astaxanthin was in the range of 0.01-0.06%; the results of recovery test were 98.1-108.0%. The statistical analysis between first-order derivative spectrophotometry and HPLC by T-testing did not exceed their critical values, revealing no significant differences between these two methods. It was proved that first-order derivative spectrophotometry is a rapid and convenient method for the determination of astaxanthin in H. pluvialis that can eliminate the negative effect resulting from the coexistence of astaxanthin with chlorophyll and beta-carotene.

  11. Identification of Organic Colorants in Art Objects by Solution Spectrophotometry: Pigments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Billmeyer, Fred W., Jr.; And Others

    1981-01-01

    Describes solution spectrophotometry as a simple, rapid identification technique for organic paint pigments. Reports research which includes analytical schemes for the extraction and separation of organic pigments based on their solubilities, and the preparation of an extensive reference collection of spectral curves allowing their identification.…

  12. Near-Infrared Spectrophotometry of Phobos and Deimos

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rivkin, A. S.; Brown, R. H.; Trilling, D. E.; Bell, J. F., III; Plassmann, J. H.

    2002-01-01

    We have observed the leading and trailing hemispheres of Phobos from 1.65 to 3.5 microns and Deimos from 1.65 to 3.12 microns near opposition. We find the trailing hemisphere of Phobos to be brighter than its leading hemisphere by 0.24 +/- 0.06 magnitude at 1.65 microns and brighter than Deimos by 0.98 +/- 0.07 magnitude at 1.65 microns. We see no difference larger than observational uncertainties in spectral slope between the leading and trailing hemispheres when the spectra are normalized to 1.65 microns. We find no 3-micron absorption feature due to hydrated minerals on either hemisphere to a level of approx. 5-10% on Phobos and approx. 20% on Deimos. When the infrared data are joined to visible and near-IR data obtained by previous workers, our data suggest the leading (Stickney-dominated) side of Phobos is best matched by T-class asteroids. The spectral slope of the trailing side of Phobos and leading side of Deimos are bracketed by the D-class asteroids. The best laboratory spectral matches to these parts of Phobos are mature lunar soils and heated carbonaceous chondrites. The lack of 3-micron absorption features on either side of Phobos argues against the presence of a large interior reservoir of water ice according to current models of Phobos' interior.

  13. Near-Infrared Spectrophotometry of Phobos and Deimos

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rivkin, A. S.; Brown, R. H.; Trilling, D. E.; Bell, J. F., III; Plassmann, J. H.

    2002-01-01

    We have observed the leading and trailing hemispheres of Phobos from 1.65 to 3.5 micrometers and Deimos from 1.65 to 3.12 micrometers near opposition. We find the trailing hemisphere of Phobos to be brighter than its leading hemisphere by 0.24 plus or minus 0.06 magnitude at 1.65 micrometers and brighter than Deimos by 0.98 plus or minus 0.07 magnitude at 1.65 micrometers. We see no difference larger than observational uncertainties in spectral slope between the leading and trailing hemispheres when the spectra are normalized to 1.65 micrometers. We find no 3-micrometer absorption feature due to hydrated minerals on either hemisphere to a level of approximately 5-10% on Phobos and approximately 20% on Deimos. When the infrared data are joined to visible and nearby data obtained by previous workers, our data suggest the leading (Stickney-dominated) side of Phobos is best matched by T-class asteroids. The spectral slope of the trailing side of Phobos and leading side of Deimos are bracketed by the D-class asteroids. The best laboratory spectral matches to these parts of Phobos are mature lunar soils and heated carbonaceous chondrites. The lack of 3-micrometer absorption features on either side of Phobos argues against the presence of a large interior reservoir of water ice according to current models of Phobos' interior.

  14. Near-Infrared Spectrophotometry of Phobos and Deimos

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rivkin, A. S.; Brown, R. H.; Trilling, D. E.; Bell, J. F., III; Plassmann, J. H.

    2002-01-01

    We have observed the leading and trailing hemispheres of Phobos from 1.65 to 3.5 microns and Deimos from 1.65 to 3.12 microns near opposition. We find the trailing hemisphere of Phobos to be brighter than its leading hemisphere by 0.24 +/- 0.06 magnitude at 1.65 microns and brighter than Deimos by 0.98 +/- 0.07 magnitude at 1.65 microns. We see no difference larger than observational uncertainties in spectral slope between the leading and trailing hemispheres when the spectra are normalized to 1.65 microns. We find no 3-microns absorption feature due to hydrated minerals on either hemisphere to a level of approx. 5 - 10% on Phobos and approx. 20% on Deimos. When the infrared data are joined to visible and near-IR data obtained by previous workers, our data suggest the leading (Stickney-dominated) side of Phobos is best matched by T-class asteroids. The spectral slope of the trailing side of Phobos and leading side of Deimos are bracketed by the D-class asteroids. The best laboratory spectral matches to these parts of Phobos are mature lunar soils and heated carbonaceous chondrites. The lack of 3-microns absorption features on either side of Phobos argues against the presence of a large interior reservoir of water ice according to current models of Phobos' interior.

  15. Dietary amino acids fed in free form or as protein do differently affect amino acid absorption in a rat everted sac model.

    PubMed

    Nolles, J A; Peeters, I G S; Bremer, B I; Moorman, R; Koopmanschap, R E; Verstegen, M W A; Schreurs, V V A M

    2008-10-01

    In the present study, the effect of free amino acid (FAA) diets on the intestinal absorption rate of methionine and leucine was studied 'ex vivo' with rats adapted for different periods of time to the diets, using the everted sac method. The adaptation period to the 21% FAA diet with an amino acid content based on casein was either, 0 (no adaptation, N-ADA), 5 (short-term adaptation, ST-ADA), or 26-33 days (long-term adaptation, LT-ADA). Within the ST-ADA and the LT-ADA groups, three different levels of methionine were included: 50%, 100% and 200% of the level normally present in casein. All diets were iso-nitrogenous and iso-caloric. After the adaptation period (0, 5, or 26-33 days), intestinal everted sacs were prepared. Methionine or leucine was added to the medium as transport substrate. The methionine absorption rate of the rats of the LT-ADA groups was higher than that of the N-ADA groups. Furthermore, adaptation to 200% dietary methionine levels caused a significantly slower leucine absorption compared to the 100%, and 50% group. Methionine absorption was similar in the 100% and 200% groups, but the absorption of methionine in the 50% group was enhanced in the distal part of the intestines. We concluded that in response diets with 21% FAAs as only amino acid source, amino acid absorption is decreased to avoid toxic effects of high levels of methionine in the circulation.

  16. Selective determination of the holmium in rare earth mixtures by second derivative spectrophotometry with 2-isobutylformyl-1,3-dione-indan and octylphenol poly-(ethyleneglycol)ether

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Naixing; Si Zhikun; Jiang Wei

    1996-09-01

    In this paper the absorption spectra of 4f electron transitions of the system of holmium with 2-isobutylformyl-1,3-dione-indan and TX-100 have been studied by normal and derivative spectrophotometry. The molar absorptivities are 98 (at 450 nm) and 21 (at 460 nm) 1 {center_dot} mol{sup -1} {center_dot} cm{sup -1}, respectively. The use of the second derivative spectra, eliminates the interference by other lanthanides and improves the sensitivity for holmium determination. The derivative molar absorptivity is 558 1 {center_dot} mol{sup -1} {center_dot} cm{sup -1}. The calibration graph was linear up to 25{mu}g/ml of holmium. The relative standard deviation evaluated from ten independent determinations of 8.0 {mu}g/ml holmium is 1.0%. The detection limit, obtained from the sensitivity of the calibration graph and for 3 S{sub b} (S{sub b} = standard deviation of a blank without holmium, n = 11), was found to be 0.31 {mu}g/ml of holmium. The quantification limit, obtained for 10 S{sub b}, was 1.0 {mu}g/ml of holmium. A method has been developed for determining holmium in a mixture of lanthanides by means of the second derivative spectra and the analytical results obtained are satisfactory.

  17. Spectrophotometry of Thin Films of Light-Absorbing Particles.

    PubMed

    Binks, Bernard P; Fletcher, Paul D I; Johnson, Andrew J; Marinopoulos, Ioannis; Crowther, Jonathan M; Thompson, Michael A

    2017-04-06

    Thin films of dispersions of light-absorbing solid particles or emulsions containing a light-absorbing solute all have a nonuniform distribution of light-absorbing species throughout the sample volume. This results in nonuniform light absorption over the illuminated area, which causes the optical absorbance, as measured using a conventional specular UV-vis spectrophotometer, to deviate from the Beer-Lambert relationship. We have developed a theoretical model to account for the absorbance properties of such films, which are shown to depend on the size and volume fraction of the light-absorbing particles plus other sample variables. We have compared model predictions with measured spectra for samples consisting of emulsions containing a dissolved light-absorbing solute. Using no adjustable parameters, the model successfully predicts the behavior of nonuniform, light-absorbing emulsion films with varying values of droplet size, volume fraction, and other parameters.

  18. Spectrophotometry of emission-line stars in the magellanic clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bohannan, Bruce

    1990-01-01

    The strong emission lines in the most luminous stars in the Magellanic Clouds indicate that these stars have such strong stellar winds that their photospheres are so masked that optical absorption lines do not provide an accurate measure of photospheric conditions. In the research funded by this grant, temperatures and gravities of emission-line stars both in the Large (LMC) and Small Magellanic Clouds (SMC) have been measured by fitting of continuum ultraviolet-optical fluxes observed with IUE with theoretical model atmospheres. Preliminary results from this work formed a major part of an invited review 'The Distribution of Types of Luminous Blue Variables'. Interpretation of the IUE observations obtained in this grant and archive data were also included in a talk at the First Boulder-Munich Hot Stars Workshop. Final results of these studies are now being completed for publication in refereed journals.

  19. Atomic absorption spectrophotometric method for determination of polydimethylsiloxane residues in pineapple juice: collaborative study.

    PubMed

    Parker, R D

    1990-01-01

    An atomic absorption spectrophotometric method for determination of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) residues in pineapple juice was collaboratively studied by 9 laboratories. PDMS residues are extracted from pineapple juice with 4-methyl-2-pentanone and the extracted silicone is measured by atomic absorption spectrophotometry using a nitrous oxide/acetylene flame. Collaborators analyzed 5 samples including 1 blind duplicate. Reproducibility relative standard deviations (RSDR) were 13.1% at 31 ppm, 6.9% at 18 ppm, 14.8% at 7.9 ppm, and 16.1% at 4.9 ppm PDMS. The method has been approved interim official first action by AOAC.

  20. Solubility of Lead Sulfate in Water and in Sodium Sulfate Solutions: An Experiment in Atomic Absorption Spectrophotometry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lehman, Thomas A.; Everett, Wayne W.

    1982-01-01

    Describes a set of undergraduate laboratory experiments which provide experience in deuteration and derivatization procedures applied to infrared spectroscopy. Basic skills in vacuum-line technique are also taught while measuring infrared spectra of deuterated solid samples and demonstrating the value of derivatization as an aid to interpreting…

  1. Nickel absorption and kinetics in human volunteers

    SciTech Connect

    Sunderman, F.W. Jr.; Hopfer, S.M. ); Sweeney, K.R. ); Marcus, A.H.; Creason, J. ); Most, B.M. )

    1989-05-01

    Mathematical modeling of the kinetics of nickel absorption, distribution, and elimination was performed in healthy human volunteers who ingested NiSO{sub 4} drinking water (Experiment 1) or added to food (Experiment 2). Nickel was analyzed by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrophotometry in serum, urine, and feces collected during 2 days before and 4 days after a specified NiSO{sub 4} dose (12 {mu}g of nickel/kg, n = 4; 18 {mu}g of nickel/kg, n = 4; or 50 {mu}g of nickel/kg, n = 1). Absorbed nickel averaged 27 {plus minus} 17% (mean {plus minus} SD) of the dose ingested in water vs. 0.7 {plus minus} 0.4% of the same dose ingested in food (a 40-fold difference); rate constants for nickel absorption, transfer, and elimination were not significantly influenced by the oral vehicle. The elimination half-time for absorbed nickel averaged 28 {plus minus} 9 hr. Renal clearance of nickel averaged 8.3 {plus minus} 2.0 ml/min/1.73 m{sup 2} in Experiment 1 and 5.8 {plus minus} 4.3 ml/min/1.73 m{sub 2} in Experiment 2. This study confirms that dietary constituents profoundly reduce the bioavailability of Ni{sup 2+} for alimentary absorption; approximately one-quarter of nickel ingested in drinking water after an over-night fast is absorbed from the human intestine and excreted in urine, compared with only 1% of nickel ingested in food. The compartmental model and kinetic parameters provided by this study will reduce the uncertainty of toxicologic risk assessments of human exposures to nickel in drinking water and food.

  2. Delta bilirubin: absorption spectra, molar absorptivity, and reactivity in the diazo reaction.

    PubMed

    Doumas, B T; Wu, T W; Jendrzejczak, B

    1987-06-01

    Delta bilirubin (B delta), isolated from serum, has an absorption maximum near 440 nm and a molar absorptivity of 72,000 L mol-1cm-1 in either Tris HCl (0.1 mol/L, pH 8.5) or phosphate (0.13 mol/L, pH 7.4) buffer. This absorptivity exceeds by approximately 50% and 59%, respectively, that of unconjugated bilirubin in the same buffers. This finding suggests that substantial errors can be incurred in direct spectrophotometry of bilirubins in serum. In the total diazo (TBIL) assay (Clin Chem 1985;31:1779-89), the color yield from B delta increases by 10% as the final diazo concentration is increased from 0.27 to 0.81 mmol/L. In the direct (DBIL) assay, if done in HCl (50 mmol/L), B delta yields approximately 15% more color as the diazo concentration is increased from 0.51 to 1.53 mmol/L, whereas in acetate buffer (0.4 mol/L, pH 4.7) the corresponding color yield is 25% greater. However, the absolute color yield for the reaction in HCl exceeds that in acetate buffer. In both the TBIL and the DBIL assay, B delta reacts slowly, nearly complete reaction requiring 10 min. Thus, B delta may be seriously underestimated in diazo (especially DBIL) methods in which short reaction times (20 s to 1 min) are used.

  3. Airborne 20-65 micron spectrophotometry of Comet Halley

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glaccum, William; Moseley, S. H.; Campins, Humberto C.; Loewenstein, R. F.

    1988-01-01

    Observations of Comet Halley with a grating spectrometer on board the Kuiper Airborne Observatory on four nights in Dec. 1985 to Apr. 1986 are reported. Low resolution 20 to 65 micrometer spectra of the nucleus with a 40 arcsec FWHM beam was obtained on 17 Dec. 1985, and on 15 and 17 Apr. 1986. On 20 Dec. 1985, only a 20 to 35 micrometer spectrum was obtained. Most of the data have been discussed in a paper where the continuum was dealt with. In that paper, models were fit to the continuum that showed that more micron sized particles of grain similar to amorphous carbon were needed to fit the spectrum than were allowed by the Vega SP-2 mass distribution, or that a fraction of the grains had to be made out of a material whose absorption efficiency fell steeper than lambda sup -1 for lambda greater than 20 micrometers. Spectra was also presented taken at several points on the coma on 15 Apr. which showed that the overall shape to the spectrum is the same in the coma. Tabulated values of the data and calibration curves are available. The spectral features are discussed.

  4. Spectrophotometry of Pluto from 3500 to 7350 A

    SciTech Connect

    Barker, E.S.; Cochran, W.D.; Cochran, A.L.

    1980-01-01

    Spectra of Pluto have been obtained on six nights during February 1979 by the use of the Cassegrain Digicon spectrograph on the 2.1-m Struve reflector and the IDS spectrograph on the 2.7-m reflector of McDonald Observatory. These spectra, with nominal resolution of 6-7 A, have been reduced to relative fluxes. Relative albedos were then calculated using the solar irradiances of Arvesen et al. (1969). The spectra taken in the blue show no indication of the upturn in albedo at wavelengths less than 3800 A previously reported by Fix, et al. (1970). The lack of a UV upturn cannot be interpreted in terms of a Rayleigh scattering atmosphere unless the albedo of the underlying surface is known. From the lack of methane absorption at the wavelength of the 6190- or 7270-A methane bands, an upper limit of 1-3 m-am of gaseous CH4 is derived. The albedo curve has a constant slope between 3500 and 7300 A. The only other solar system body which has this feature is an S-type asteroid.

  5. Spectrophotometry of Wolf-Rayet stars. I - Continuum energy distributions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, Patrick W.; Brownsberger, Kenneth R.; Conti, Peter S.; Massey, Philip; Vacca, William D.

    1993-01-01

    All available low-resolution IUE spectra are assembled for Galactic, LMC, and SMC W-R stars and are merged with ground-based optical and NIR spectra in order to collate in a systematic fashion the shapes of these energy distributions over the wavelength range 0.1-1 micron. They can be consistently fitted by a power law of the form F(lambda) is approximately equal to lambda exp -alpha over the range 1500-9000 A to derive color excesses E(B-V) and spectral indices by removing the 2175-A interstellar absorption feature. The WN star color excesses derived are found to be in good agreement with those of Schmutz and Vacca (1991) and Koesterke et al. (1991). Significant heterogeneity in spectral index values was generally seen with any given subtype, but the groups consisting of the combined set of Galactic and LMC W-R stars, the separate WN and WC sequences, and the Galactic and LMC W-R stars all showed a striking and consistent Gaussian-like frequency distribution of values.

  6. [Light absorption by suspended particulate matter in Chagan Lake, Jilin].

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuan-Dong; Liu, Dian-Wei; Song, Kai-Shan; Zhang, Bai; Wang, Zong-Ming; Jiang, Guang-Ji; Tang, Xu-Guang; Lei, Xiao-Chun; Wu, Yan-Qing

    2011-01-01

    Spectral characteristics and the magnitudes of light absorption by suspended particulate matter were determined by spectrophotometry in this optically complex Lake Chagan waters for the purpose of surveying the natural variability of the absorption coefficients to parameterize the bio-optical models for converting satellite or in-situ water reflectance signatures into water quality information. Experiments were carried out on seasonal frozen Lake Chagan, one representative inland case-2 water body in Northeast of China. Particulate absorption properties analyzed using the field data on July 15th and October 12th 2009 were measured using the quantitative filter technique to produce absorption spectra containing several fractions that could be attributed to two main optical active constituents (OACs) phytoplankton pigments and non-algal particulates (mineral sediments, and organic detritus). Results suggested that the suspended particulate matter (SPM) concentration was higher while phytoplankton biomass (chlorophyll-a concentration) was lower in July and that in October. The spectral shape of total suspended particulate matter resembled that of non-algal particulates which contributed greater than phytoplankton in total particulate absorption during both periods. An obvious absorption peak occurring at around 440 nm exhibited an increase in phytoplankton contribution in October. Non-algal particulate absorption at 440 nm (a(NAP) (440)) had better correlation with total suspended particulate matter concentration than that with chlorophyll-a over the two periods. Light absorption by phytoplankton pigments in the Chagan lake region was generally lower than that of non-algal components. Chl. a dominating phytoplankton pigment composition functioned exponentially with its absorption coefficients at 440 and 675 nm specifically, the average values of which in July were 0.146 8 m2 x mg(-1) and 0.050 3 respectively while in October they were 0.153 3 and 0.013 2 m2 x mg(-1

  7. The Uranian satellites and Hyperion - New spectrophotometry and compositional implications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, R. H.

    1983-01-01

    New reflectance spectra at 3.5 percent resolution have been obtained for Ariel, Titania, Oberon, and Hyperion in the 0.8 to 1.6-micron spectrum region. The new spectra show no absorptions other than the 1.5 micron water-ice feature (within the precision of the data), and demonstrate extension into the 0.8- to 1.6 micron region of the 1.5- to 2.5 micron spectral similarity ofo Ariel to Hyperion (Brown and Cruikshank, 1983). The new data confirm the presence of a dark, spectrally bland component on/in the water-ice surfaces of the Uranian satellites, which, with some reservations, has spectral similarities to the dark substance on the leading side of lapetus and the dark material on/in the surface of Hyperion, as well as other dark, spectrally neutral substances such as charcoal. Attempts were made to match the spectra of Ariel, Titania, and Oberon with additive reflectance mixes (aeral coverage) of fine-grained water frost and various dark components such as charcoal, lampblack, and charcoal-water-ice mixtures. The results were broad limits on the amounts of possible areal coverage of a charcoal-like spectral component on the surfaces of the Uranian satellites, but the data are not of sufficient precision to conclusively determine whether the dominant mode of contaminant dispersal is areal or voluminal. The effect of highly variegated albedos on the diameters derived by Brown, Cruikshank, and Morrison (1982) is found to be small.

  8. Miniaturization of spectrophotometry based on micro flow analysis using norfloxacin as less-toxic reagent for iron determination.

    PubMed

    Prasertboonyai, Kanyarak; Arqueropanyo, Orn-Anong; Liawraungrath, Boonsom; Liawraungrath, Saisunee; Pojanakaroon, Teraboon

    2015-01-01

    A micro flow analysis (μFA) system has been designed and fabricated for determination of total iron. The system consists of a microchannels fabricated by etching the polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) by using laser ablation techniques and a sealed polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) as top plate. The PMMA micro-flow was topped with a home-made polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) micro-flow through cell, which was integrated with light emitting diode (LED) as light source and a USB 2000 spectrometer as detector. The proposed μFA system was applied to determination of Fe(III) using norfloxacin as a less-toxic complexing agent in an acetate buffer solution pH 4.0, resulting in a yellow colored complex which gave the maximum absorption at 430nm. Under the optimum conditions, a linear calibration graph was obtained in the concentration range of 0.20-5.00mgL(-1). The limit of detection (LOD, defined as 3σ) and limit of quantification (LOQ, defined as 10σ) were 0.12 and 0.45mgL(-1), respectively. The relative standard deviation (R.S.D.) for repeatability and reproducibility were less than 1.50% and 1.24% (n=11) for 0.2mgL(-1) and 1.0mgL(-1) Fe(III), respectively. The proposed method was successfully applied to the determination of total iron in water samples, validated by the FAAS standard method after digestion by HNO3 and H2O2.

  9. An overview of liquid phase microextraction approaches combined with UV-Vis spectrophotometry.

    PubMed

    Dehghani Mohammad Abadi, Malihe; Ashraf, Narges; Chamsaz, Mahmoud; Shemirani, Farzaneh

    2012-09-15

    Ultraviolet and visible spectrophotometer has become a popular analytical instrument in the modern day laboratories. However, the low concentrations of many analytes in samples make it difficult to directly measure them by UV-Vis spectrophotometry. This overview focuses on the combinations of microvolume UV-Vis spectrophotometry with miniaturized approaches to sample preparation, namely, single drop microextraction (SDME), dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (DLLME), cold induced aggregation microextraction (CIAME), in situ solvent formation microextraction (ISSFME), ultrasound assisted emulsification microextraction (USAEME), solidified floating organic drop microextraction (SFODME), and hollow fiber based liquid phase microextraction (HF-LPME) to improve both the selectivity and sensitivity. Integration of these techniques provides unique advantages which include availability, simplicity of operation, low cost, speed, precision and accuracy; hence making them a powerful tool in chemical analysis.

  10. Monitoring of monosaccharides, oligosaccharides, ethanol and glycerol during wort fermentation by biosensors, HPLC and spectrophotometry.

    PubMed

    Monošík, Rastislav; Magdolen, Peter; Stredanský, Miroslav; Šturdík, Ernest

    2013-05-01

    The aim of the present study was to analyze sugar levels (namely maltose, maltotriose, glucose and fructose) and alcohols (ethanol and glycerol) during the fermentation process in wort samples by amperometric enzymatic biosensors developed by our research group for industrial application, HPLC and spectrophotometry, and to compare the suitability of the presented methods for determination of individual analytes. We can conclude that for the specific monitoring of maltose or maltotriose only the HPLC method was suitable. On the other hand, biosensors and spectrophotometry reflected a decrease in total sugar concentration better and were able to detect both glucose and fructose in the later stages of fermentation, while HPLC was not. This can be attributed to the low detection limits and good sensitivity of the proposed methods. For the ethanol and glycerol analysis all methods proved to be suitable. However, concerning the cost expenses and time analysis, biosensors represented the best option.

  11. [Noninvasive total hemoglobin monitoring based on multiwave spectrophotometry in obstetrics and gynecology].

    PubMed

    Pyregov, A V; Ovechkin, A Iu; Petrov, S V

    2012-01-01

    Results of prospective randomized comparative research of 2 total hemoglobin estimation methods are presented. There were laboratory tests and continuous noninvasive technique with multiwave spectrophotometry on the Masimo Rainbow SET. Research was carried out in two stages. At the 1st stage (gynecology)--67 patients were included and in second stage (obstetrics)--44 patients during and after Cesarean section. The standard deviation of noninvasive total hemoglobin estimation from absolute values (invasive) was 7.2 and 4.1%, an standard deviation in a sample--5.2 and 2.7 % in gynecologic operations and surgical delivery respectively, that confirms lack of reliable indicators differences. The method of continuous noninvasive total hemoglobin estimation with multiwave spectrophotometry on the Masimo Rainbow SET technology can be recommended for use in obstetrics and gynecology.

  12. APM Z >=4 QSO Survey: Spectra and Intervening Absorption Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Storrie-Lombardi, L. J.; McMahon, R. G.; Irwin, M. J.; Hazard, C.

    1996-09-01

    The APM multicolor survey for bright z > 4 objects, covering 2500 deg^2^ of sky to m_r_ ~ 19, resulted in the discovery of 31 quasars with z ~> 4. High signal-to-noise optical spectrophotometry at 5 A resolution has been obtained for the 28 quasars easily accessible from the northern hemisphere. These spectra have been surveyed to create new samples of high-redshift Lyman-limit systems, damped Lyα absorbers, and metal absorption systems (e.g., C IV and Mg II). In this paper we present the spectra, together with line lists of the detected absorption systems. The QSOs display a wide variety of emission- and absorption-line characteristics, with five exhibiting broad absorption lines and one with extremely strong emission lines (BR 2248 - 1242). Eleven candidate damped Lyα absorption systems have been identified covering the redshift range 2.8 <= z <= 4.4 (eight with z > 3.5). An analysis of the measured redshifts of the high-ionization emission lines with the low-ionization lines shows them to be blueshifted by 430 +/- 60 km s^-1^. In a previous paper (by Storrie-Lombardi et al.) we discussed the redshift evolution of the Lyman limit systems cataloged here. In subsequent papers we will discuss the properties of the Lyα forest absorbers and the redshift and column density evolution of the damped Lyα absorbers.

  13. A comparison of photon counting and current measuring techniques in spectrophotometry of faint sources.

    PubMed

    Tull, R G

    1968-10-01

    The component of dark noise produced by Cerenkov pulses in photomultipliers due to cosmic ray mu mesons is discussed. It is shown by integration of pulse height spectra that this source of noise can be the limiting factor in de measuring spectrophotometry of faint astronomical sources. Direct current methods of photometry are compared with photon counting, and the advantage of photon counting is demonstrated under various operating conditions.

  14. Determination of acidity constants of acid-base indicators by second-derivative spectrophotometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kara, Derya; Alkan, Mahir

    2000-12-01

    A method for calculation of acid-base dissociation constants of monoprotic weak organic acids whose acid and base species have overlapping spectra from absorptiometric and pH measurements is described. It has been shown that the second-derivative spectrophotometry can effectively be used for determining the dissociation constants, when dissociation constants obtained for methyl orange and bromothymol blue were compared with the values given in the literature.

  15. A comparison of hair colour measurement by digital image analysis with reflective spectrophotometry.

    PubMed

    Vaughn, Michelle R; van Oorschot, Roland A H; Baindur-Hudson, Swati

    2009-01-10

    While reflective spectrophotometry is an established method for measuring macroscopic hair colour, it can be cumbersome to use on a large number of individuals and not all reflective spectrophotometry instruments are easily portable. This study investigates the use of digital photographs to measure hair colour and compares its use to reflective spectrophotometry. An understanding of the accuracy of colour determination by these methods is of relevance when undertaking specific investigations, such as those on the genetics of hair colour. Measurements of hair colour may also be of assistance in cases where a photograph is the only evidence of hair colour available (e.g. surveillance). Using the CIE L(*)a(*)b(*) colour space, the hair colour of 134 individuals of European ancestry was measured by both reflective spectrophotometry and by digital image analysis (in V++). A moderate correlation was found along all three colour axes, with Pearson correlation coefficients of 0.625, 0.593 and 0.513 for L(*), a(*) and b(*) respectively (p-values=0.000), with means being significantly overestimated by digital image analysis for all three colour components (by an average of 33.42, 3.38 and 8.00 for L(*), a(*) and b(*) respectively). When using digital image data to group individuals into clusters previously determined by reflective spectrophotometric analysis using a discriminant analysis, individuals were classified into the correct clusters 85.8% of the time when there were two clusters. The percentage of cases correctly classified decreases as the number of clusters increases. It is concluded that, although more convenient, hair colour measurement from digital images has limited use in situations requiring accurate and consistent measurements.

  16. Simultaneous determination of Cu 2+, Zn 2+, Cd 2+, Hg 2+ and Pb 2+ by using second-derivative spectrophotometry method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Yanyan; Li, Yan; Si, Wei; Wei, Dong; Yao, Zhenxing; Zheng, Xianpeng; Du, Bin; Wei, Qin

    2011-09-01

    A new method of simultaneous determination of Cu 2+, Zn 2+, Cd 2+, Hg 2+ and Pb 2+ is proposed here by using the second-derivative spectrophotometry method. In pH = 10.35 Borax-NaOH buffer, using meso-tetra (3-methoxyl-4-hydroxylphenyl) porphyrin ([T-(3-MO-4-HP)P]) as chromomeric reagent, micelle solution was formed after Tween-80 surfactant was added into the solution containing Cu 2+, Zn 2+, Cd 2+, Hg 2+ and Pb 2+ ions. The original absorption spectrum of the above complexes was obtained after heating in the boiling water for 25 min. The second-derivative absorption peaks of five metal-porphyrin complexes can be separated from the original absorption spectrum by using chemometric tool. In this way, Cu 2+, Zn 2+, Cd 2+, Hg 2+ and Pb 2+ ions can be determined simultaneously. Under the optimal conditions, the linear ranges of the calibration curve were 0-0.60, 0-0.60, 0-0.40, 0-0.80 and 0-0.48 μg mL -1 for Cu 2+, Zn 2+, Cd 2+, Hg 2+ and Pb 2+, respectively. The molar absorptivity of these color systems were 1.38 × 10 5, 1.01 × 10 5, 3.24 × 10 5, 1.07 × 10 5 and 1.29 × 10 5 L mol -1 cm -1. The method developed in this paper has advantages in selectivity, sensitivity, operation and can effectively resolve spectra overlapping problem. This method has been applied to determine the real samples with satisfactory results.

  17. [Determination of eight trace elements in the flowers of Hylocereus undatus by FAAS].

    PubMed

    Wang, Xin-ping

    2005-02-01

    The effects of different sample digestives for the flowers of Hylocereus undatus are compared. Eight trace elements in the flowers of Hylocereus undatus were determined by flame atomic absorption spectrophotometer. The result shows that the RSD and recovery are better if the flowers of Hylocereus undatus was digested with HNO3-HClO4 (5:1) mixed acid, and the flowers of Hylocereus undatus contains many essential elements among which the contents of Fe, Mn and Zn are higher than those of Ni and Cu. Co and Cd were not determined, but Pb was determined. The experimental results showed that the detection limits were all smaller than 0.086 microg x mL(-1), the RSDs (n = 8) all smaller than 8.37%, and the addition standard recovery (ASR) (n = 8) was 79.69%-118.6% for all elements.

  18. FirstAidAssistanceSystem (FAAS): improvement of first aid measures using Car2Car-communication technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuchscheerer, Sven; Hoppe, Tobias; Krätzer, Christian; Dittmann, Jana

    2011-01-01

    This work's goal is the enhancement of first aid measures directly after car accidents by calling suited first aiders via Car-to-Car (C2C) communication and to assist them providing detailed multimedia support instructions. Our concept combines upcoming C2C communication technologies with established technology, in particular GPS and GSM. After a collision, the proposed FirstAidAssistanceSystem (FAAS) sends a broadcast message using C2C technology according to the IEEE 802.11p standard. All nearby cars (as potential first aiders) are located and at least one nearest candidate (we suggest 3-5) driving towards the accident scene is chosen and notified as first aider. A support guide on his multipurpose display (e.g. the navigation system) provides first aiders with detailed instructions and illustrative tutorials. The paper presents our concept in detail with a discussion of practical evaluation criteria and an introduction of a first test implementation.

  19. Effects of Solution Physical Properties on Copper and Chromium Signals in Flame Atomic Absorption Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rocha, Fàbio R. P.; Nòbrega, Joaquim A.

    1996-10-01

    Instrumental techniques, such as flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS), are frequently used in chemical analysis. Independently of the technique used, the chemical principles must be considered to assure that the analytical results are correct. In FAAS, the most critical step is the sample introduction, since solutions need to be converted in an aerosol (nebulization process) that should contain drops with suitable size to attain the flame. Solution physical properties, such as viscosity and surface tension, can severely affect the analytical signals. Solutions with high viscosity are less easily aspirated and the analyte mass that reach the flame is reduced. The surface tension of the solution affects the size of the drops generated by the nebulization process and can modify the quantity of analyte that attain the flame. This work describes an experiment that allow demonstrating the effects of viscosity and surface tension on analytical signals, using a set of copper solutions prepared in different concentrations of ethanol and chromium solutions prepared in surfactant (tetrapropylammonium bromide) medium. The experiment can be carried out in a 4 h laboratory class and is useful to demonstrate to undergraduate students the effects of samples physical properties on the analytical signals in FAAS.

  20. [Digestion-flame atomic absorption spectroscopy].

    PubMed

    Xu, Liang; Hu, Jian-Guo; Liu, Rui-Ping; Wang, Zhi-Min; Narenhua

    2008-01-01

    A microwave digestion-flame atomic absorption spectroscopy (FAAS) method was developed for the determination of metal elements Na, Zn, Cu, Fe, Mn, Ca and Mg in Mongolian patents. The instrument parameters for the determination were optimized, and the appropriate digestion solvent was selected. The recovery of the method was between 95.8% and 104.3%, and the RSD was between 1.6% and 4.2%. The accuracy and precision of the method was tested by comparing the values obtained from the determination of the standard sample, bush twigs and leaves (GSV-1) by this method with the reference values of GSV-1. The determination results were found to be basically consistent with the reference values. The microwave digestion technique was applied to process the samples, and the experimental results showed that compared to the traditional wet method, the present method has the merits of simplicity, saving agents, rapidness, and non-polluting. The method was accurate and reliable, and could be used to determine the contents of seven kinds of metal elements in mongolian patents.

  1. Atmospheric absorption cell characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1982-06-01

    The measurement capability of the Avionics Laboratory IR Facility was used to evaluate an absorption cell that will be used to simulate atmospheric absorption over horizontal paths of 1 - 10 km in length. Band models were used to characterize the transmittance of carbon dioxide (CO2), nitrogen (N2), and nitrous oxide (N2O) in the cell. The measured transmittance was compared to the calculated values. Nitrous oxide is important in the 4 - 4.5 micron range in shaping the weak line absorption of carbon dioxide. The absorption cell is adequate for simulating atmospheric absorption over these paths.

  2. Study of the analytical methods for iron determination in complex organic liquids by atomic absorption spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Torre, M.; Gonzalez, M.C.; Jimenez, O.; Rodriquez, A.R. )

    1990-01-01

    In the determination of iron in complex organic liquids by atomic absorption spectrometry (A.A.S.), methods of sample preparation, such as dilution with an organic solvent and sample pretreatment to destroy organic material, are investigated. Moreover, methods of analysis using calibration curve and standard additions are presented. The possible cause of error associated with iron determination in organic samples by flame (F-A.A.S.) and graphite furnace (GF-A.A.S.) atomic absorption spectrometry are discussed. From all of these studies, the use of graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry after sample dilution with methyl isobutyl ketone, and the use of the method of standard additions are advised for iron determination.

  3. The quantification of spermatozoa by real-time quantitative PCR, spectrophotometry, and spermatophore cap size.

    PubMed

    Doyle, Jacqueline M; McCormick, Cory R; DeWoody, J Andrew

    2011-01-01

    Many animals, such as crustaceans, insects, and salamanders, package their sperm into spermatophores, and the number of spermatozoa contained in a spermatophore is relevant to studies of sexual selection and sperm competition. We used two molecular methods, real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) and spectrophotometry, to estimate sperm numbers from spermatophores. First, we designed gene-specific primers that produced a single amplicon in four species of ambystomatid salamanders. A standard curve generated from cloned amplicons revealed a strong positive relationship between template DNA quantity and cycle threshold, suggesting that RT-qPCR could be used to quantify sperm in a given sample. We then extracted DNA from multiple Ambystoma maculatum spermatophores, performed RT-qPCR on each sample, and estimated template copy numbers (i.e. sperm number) using the standard curve. Second, we used spectrophotometry to determine the number of sperm per spermatophore by measuring DNA concentration relative to the genome size. We documented a significant positive relationship between the estimates of sperm number based on RT-qPCR and those based on spectrophotometry. When these molecular estimates were compared to spermatophore cap size, which in principle could predict the number of sperm contained in the spermatophore, we also found a significant positive relationship between sperm number and spermatophore cap size. This linear model allows estimates of sperm number strictly from cap size, an approach which could greatly simplify the estimation of sperm number in future studies. These methods may help explain variation in fertilization success where sperm competition is mediated by sperm quantity.

  4. 14 CFR 406.177 - Petition to reconsider or modify a final decision and order of the FAA decisionmaker on appeal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... COMMERCIAL SPACE TRANSPORTATION, FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION PROCEDURE INVESTIGATIONS, ENFORCEMENT, AND ADMINISTRATIVE REVIEW Rules of Practice in FAA Space Transportation... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Petition to reconsider or modify a...

  5. 14 CFR 406.177 - Petition to reconsider or modify a final decision and order of the FAA decisionmaker on appeal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... COMMERCIAL SPACE TRANSPORTATION, FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION PROCEDURE INVESTIGATIONS, ENFORCEMENT, AND ADMINISTRATIVE REVIEW Rules of Practice in FAA Space Transportation... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Petition to reconsider or modify a...

  6. 14 CFR 406.177 - Petition to reconsider or modify a final decision and order of the FAA decisionmaker on appeal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... COMMERCIAL SPACE TRANSPORTATION, FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION PROCEDURE INVESTIGATIONS, ENFORCEMENT, AND ADMINISTRATIVE REVIEW Rules of Practice in FAA Space Transportation... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Petition to reconsider or modify a...

  7. 14 CFR 406.177 - Petition to reconsider or modify a final decision and order of the FAA decisionmaker on appeal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... COMMERCIAL SPACE TRANSPORTATION, FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION PROCEDURE INVESTIGATIONS, ENFORCEMENT, AND ADMINISTRATIVE REVIEW Rules of Practice in FAA Space Transportation... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Petition to reconsider or modify a...

  8. 14 CFR 406.177 - Petition to reconsider or modify a final decision and order of the FAA decisionmaker on appeal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... COMMERCIAL SPACE TRANSPORTATION, FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION PROCEDURE INVESTIGATIONS, ENFORCEMENT, AND ADMINISTRATIVE REVIEW Rules of Practice in FAA Space Transportation... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Petition to reconsider or modify a...

  9. 41 CFR 102-33.230 - May we use military FSCAP on non-military FAA-type certificated Government aircraft?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... FSCAP on non-military FAA-type certificated Government aircraft? 102-33.230 Section 102-33.230 Public... certificated Government aircraft? You may use dual-use military FSCAP on non-military aircraft operated under... MANAGEMENT REGULATION PERSONAL PROPERTY 33-MANAGEMENT OF GOVERNMENT AIRCRAFT Managing Government......

  10. 41 CFR 102-33.230 - May we use military FSCAP on non-military FAA-type certificated Government aircraft?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... FSCAP on non-military FAA-type certificated Government aircraft? 102-33.230 Section 102-33.230 Public... certificated Government aircraft? You may use dual-use military FSCAP on non-military aircraft operated under... MANAGEMENT REGULATION PERSONAL PROPERTY 33-MANAGEMENT OF GOVERNMENT AIRCRAFT Managing Government......

  11. 41 CFR 102-33.230 - May we use military FSCAP on non-military FAA-type certificated Government aircraft?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... FSCAP on non-military FAA-type certificated Government aircraft? 102-33.230 Section 102-33.230 Public... certificated Government aircraft? You may use dual-use military FSCAP on non-military aircraft operated under... MANAGEMENT REGULATION PERSONAL PROPERTY 33-MANAGEMENT OF GOVERNMENT AIRCRAFT Managing Government......

  12. 41 CFR 102-33.230 - May we use military FSCAP on non-military FAA-type certificated Government aircraft?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... FSCAP on non-military FAA-type certificated Government aircraft? 102-33.230 Section 102-33.230 Public... certificated Government aircraft? You may use dual-use military FSCAP on non-military aircraft operated under... MANAGEMENT REGULATION PERSONAL PROPERTY 33-MANAGEMENT OF GOVERNMENT AIRCRAFT Managing Government......

  13. 41 CFR 102-33.230 - May we use military FSCAP on non-military FAA-type certificated Government aircraft?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... FSCAP on non-military FAA-type certificated Government aircraft? 102-33.230 Section 102-33.230 Public... certificated Government aircraft? You may use dual-use military FSCAP on non-military aircraft operated under... MANAGEMENT REGULATION PERSONAL PROPERTY 33-MANAGEMENT OF GOVERNMENT AIRCRAFT Managing Government......

  14. Aircraft and ground vehicle friction correlation test results obtained under winter runway conditions during joint FAA/NASA Runway Friction Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yager, Thomas J.; Vogler, William A.; Baldasare, Paul

    1988-01-01

    Aircraft and ground vehicle friction data collected during the Joint FAA/NASA Runway Friction Program under winter runway conditions are discussed and test results are summarized. The relationship between the different ground vehicle friction measurements obtained on compacted snow- and ice-covered conditions is defined together with the correlation to aircraft tire friction performance under similar runway conditions.

  15. Isolation of a Saccharomyces cerevisiae long chain fatty acyl:CoA synthetase gene (FAA1) and assessment of its role in protein N- myristoylation

    PubMed Central

    1992-01-01

    Regulation of myristoylCoA pools in Saccharomyces cerevisiae plays an important role in modulating the activity of myristoylCoA:protein N- myristoyltransferase (NMT), an essential enzyme with an ordered Bi Bi reaction that catalyzes the transfer of myristate from myristoylCoA to greater than or equal to 12 cellular proteins. At least two pathways are available for generating myristoylCoA: de novo synthesis by the multifunctional, multisubunit fatty acid synthetase complex (FAS) and activation of exogenous myristate by acylCoA synthetase. The FAA1 (fatty acid activation) gene has been isolated by genetic complementation of a faal mutant. This single copy gene, which maps to the right arm of chromosome XV, specifies a long chain acylCoA synthetase of 700 amino acids. Analyses of strains containing NMT1 and a faal null mutation indicated that FAA1 is not essential for vegetative growth when an active de novo pathway for fatty acid synthesis is present. The role of FAA1 in cellular lipid metabolism and protein N-myristoylation was therefore assessed in strains subjected to biochemical or genetic blockade of FAS. At 36 degrees C, FAA1 is required for the utilization of exogenous myristate by NMT and for the synthesis of several phospholipid species. This requirement is not apparent at 24 or 30 degrees C, suggesting that S. cerevisiae contains another acylCoA synthetase activity whose chain length and/or temperature optima may differ from Faalp. PMID:1572893

  16. Self-scanned photodiode array - High performance operation in high dispersion astronomical spectrophotometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vogt, S. S.; Tull, R. G.; Kelton, P.

    1978-01-01

    A multichannel spectrophotometric detector system has been developed using a 1024 element self-scanned silicon photodiode array, which is now in routine operation with the high-dispersion coude spectrograph of the University of Texas McDonald Observatory 2.7-m telescope. Operational considerations in the use of such arrays for high precision and low light level spectrophotometry are discussed. A detailed description of the system is presented. Performance of the detector as measured in the laboratory and on astronomical program objects is described, and it is shown that these arrays are highly effective detectors for high dispersion astronomical spectroscopy.

  17. The spectrophotometry and chemical composition of the oxygen-poor bipolar nebula NGC 6164-5

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dufour, Reginald J.; Parker, Robert A. R.; Henize, Karl G.

    1988-01-01

    The paper presents new ground-based and IUE spectrophotometry of several positions in NGC 6164-5 surrounding the Population I Of star HD 148937. Electron temperatures, densities, and abundances are derived for the various positions in the nebula using spectral line information. For all of the regions observed, Ne/H is depleted by an amount comparable to O/H, while S/H and Ar/H have normal values. The results suggest that the nebula consists partly of material ejected from inner shell-burning regions of the Of star. In effect, HD 148937 is older and more advanced than what was previously thought.

  18. A straightforward ninhydrin-based method for collagenase activity and inhibitor screening of collagenase using spectrophotometry.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yanfang; Fu, Yun; Zhou, Sufeng; Kang, Lixia; Li, Changzheng

    2013-06-01

    Currently protease assay kits, requiring substrate that is either radiolabeled or fluorescence labeled and specialized instruments, are all expensive. A simple, reliable assay of protease activity and its inhibitor screening for general laboratory is rare. Here we demonstrated a straightforward ninhydrin-based method for assay of collagenase activity and its inhibitor screening using spectrophotometry. In the method, without multistep sample treatments and substrate labeling, the hydrolytic products were directly traced by ninhydrin. The method is expected to be suitable for not only the assay of collagenase activity but also the others matrix metalloproteinases activities, and can be used for kinetic study.

  19. Study of the impact of mechanical treatments on wastewater solids by UV spectrophotometry.

    PubMed

    Berho, C; Pouet, M F; Thomas, O

    2003-12-01

    The aim of this paper is, from the perspective of improvement of Total Suspended Solids (TSS) measurement by UV spectrophotometry, to study the influence of two pretreatments on the UV responses of urban wastewater (sonication and mechanical grinding). The study of optical properties evolution the different phenomena involved and show mechanical grinding as a potential pre-treatment is prosed. Mechanical grinding is applied to samples characterised by different TSS concentration and particle size distributions in order to test its feasability. Results show the limit of the pretreatment and the difficulty of exploiting the UV response of urban wastewater for TSS characterization and estimation.

  20. Near-infrared and ultraviolet spectrophotometry of the young planetary nebula Hubble 12

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rudy, Richard J.; Rossano, George S.; Erwin, Peter; Puetter, R. C.; Feibelman, Walter A.

    1993-01-01

    The young planetary nebula Hubble 12 is observed using near-IR and UV spectrophotometry. The brightness of the O I lines, which is greater than in any other planetary nebula yet measured, indicates that fluorescent excitation by stellar continuum is the principal mechanism generating these lines. Extinction, electron density, and electron temperature are determined using infrared measurements combined with UV data and published optical observations. The range in extinction, density, and temperature implies that, within the ionized region, pockets of emission with distinctly different conditions exist. Logarithmic abundances for helium, oxygen, and sulfur are presented.

  1. 8- to 13-micron spectrophotometry of Comet IRAS-Araki-Alcock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feierberg, M. A.; Witteborn, F. C.; Johnson, J. R.; Campins, H.

    1984-01-01

    Spectrophotometry between 8.0 and 13.0 microns at 2 percent spectral resolution is presented for areas in and near the nuclear condensation of Comet IRAS-Araki-Alcock (1983d) on May 11 and 12, 1983. All the spectra can be fit very well by blackbody curves, and no 10-micron silicate emissions are seen. The temperature structure of the coma suggests the presence of small (radii less than 5 microns) dust particles within 150 km of the nucleus and larger ones further out. The change in the spatial distribution of the infrared flux between the two nights suggests that an outburst may have occurred sometime on May 11.

  2. Documentation for the machine-readable version of the Absolute Calibration of Stellar Spectrophotometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warren, W. H., Jr.

    1982-01-01

    The machine-readable data file of The Absolute Calibration of Stellar Spectrophotometry as distributed by the Astronomical Data Center is described. The data file contains the absolute fluxes for 16 stars published in Tables 1 and 2 of Johnson (1980). The absolute calibrations were accomplished by combining the 13-color photometry calibrations of Johnson and Mitchell (1975) with spectra obtained with a Michelson spectrophotometer and covering the wavelength range 4000 to 10300 A (Johnson 1977). The agreement between this absolute calibration and another recent one based upon data for a Lyr and 109 Vir by Tug, White and Lockwood (1977) is shown by Johnson (1980) to be quite good.

  3. A comparative study of UV-spectrophotometry and first-order derivative UV-spectrophotometry methods for the estimation of diazepam in presence of Tween-20 and propylene glycol.

    PubMed

    Dastidar, Debabrata Ghosh; Sa, Biswanath

    2009-01-01

    Nonionic surfactants like polysorbates (Tweens) and co-surfactant like propylene glycol are used in pharmaceutical dosage forms, like microemulsion of diazepam. These additives interfere significantly with the estimation of diazepam by UV spectrophotomery method. The aim of this work was to develop a first-order derivative UV-spectrophotometry method that can estimate diazepam in presence of Tween-20 and propylene glycol. The experimental results clearly suggested that, in comparison with the UV-spectrophotometry method, the first-order derivative UV-spectrophotometry is a simple method to estimate diazepam with sufficient accuracy, specificity, and precision even in the presence of 282-times Tween-20 and 2,072-times propylene glycol.

  4. Combination of solid phase extraction and dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction for separation/preconcentration of ultra trace amounts of uranium prior to its fiber optic-linear array spectrophotometry determination.

    PubMed

    Dadfarnia, Shayessteh; Shabani, Ali Mohammad Haji; Shakerian, Farid; Shiralian Esfahani, Golnaz

    2013-12-15

    A simple and sensitive method for the separation and preconcentration of the ultra trace amounts of uranium and its determination by spectrophotometry was developed. The method is based on the combination of solid phase extraction and dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction. Thus, by passing the sample through the basic alumina column, the uranyl ion and some cations are separated from the sample matrix. The retained uranyl ion along with the cations are eluted with 5 mL of nitric acid (2 mol L(-1)) and after neutralization of the eluent, the extracted uranyl ion is converted to its anionic benzoate complex and is separated from other cations by extraction of its ion pair with malachite green into small volume of chloroform using dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction. The amount of uranium is then determined by the absorption measurement of the extracted ion pair at 621 nm using flow injection spectrophotometry. Under the optimum conditions, with 500 mL of the sample, a preconcentration factor of 1980, a detection limit of 40 ng L(-1), and a relative standard deviation of 4.1% (n=6) at 400 ng L(-1) were obtained. The method was successfully applied to the determination of uranium in mineral water, river water, well water, spring water and sea water samples.

  5. Spatial variability of absorption properties in Lake Balaton, Hungary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riddick, C. A.; Hunter, P. D.; Tyler, A. N.; Vicente, V. M.; Groom, S.; Horváth, H.; Kovacs, A.; Preston, T.; Presing, M.

    2013-12-01

    In order to improve robustness of current remote sensing algorithms for lake monitoring, it is vital to understand the variability of inherent optical properties (IOPs) within a lake. In this study, absorption coefficients were measured in situ at 38 stations in Lake Balaton, Hungary, using a WET Labs AC-S and AC-9 and compared to concurrent absorption measurements by dual beam spectrophotometry in the laboratory. The spatial variability of bulk and chlorophyll-specific absorption coefficients was examined across 5 basins, demonstrating a gradient in total absorption corresponding to the trophic gradient. Our data suggests that sampling conditions had an impact on particulate absorption, affecting the proportion attributed to non-algal particles (aNAP), phytoplankton (aph) or color dissolved organic matter (aCDOM). The specific absorption of phytoplankton (a*ph) spectra showed a distinct peak in the UV portion of the spectra in Basins 3 and 4 (east), which may be due to the presence of phytoplankton photoprotective pigments to compensate for lower CDOM levels in these basins. In contrast to oceans, particulate attenuation (cp) had a weaker relationship to chlorophyll-a (R2=0.15) than to total suspended matter (R2=0.84), particularly the inorganic fraction. Additionally, the relative contribution of particulate scattering (bp) to attenuation was significantly higher in Lake Balaton (up to 85-99%) than that found in previous lacustrine studies. bp also demonstrated a gradient across the lake, where values increased as the water progressed from phytoplankton-dominated to mineral-dominated. These results provide knowledge of the heterogeneity of the IOPs within Lake Balaton, which is to be considered for the future improvement of bio-optical algorithms for constituent retrieval in inland waters.

  6. Optical Absorption, Stability and Structure of NpO2+ Complexeswith Dicarboxylic Acids

    SciTech Connect

    Guoxin Tian; Linfeng Rao

    2006-01-04

    Complexation of NpO2+ with oxalic acid (OX),2,2'-oxydiacetic acid (ODA), 2,2'-iminodiacetic acid (IDA) and 2,2'-thiodiacetic acid (TDA), has been studied using spectrophotometry in1 M NaClO4. Both the position and the intensity of the absorption band of NpO2+ at 980 nm are affected by the formation of NpO2+/dicarboxylate complexes, providing useful information on the complexation strength, the coordination mode and the structure of the complexes.

  7. Technical note: comparing von Luschan skin color tiles and modern spectrophotometry for measuring human skin pigmentation.

    PubMed

    Swiatoniowski, Anna K; Quillen, Ellen E; Shriver, Mark D; Jablonski, Nina G

    2013-06-01

    Prior to the introduction of reflectance spectrophotometry into anthropological field research during the 1950s, human skin color was most commonly classified by visual skin color matching using the von Luschan tiles, a set of 36 standardized, opaque glass tiles arranged in a chromatic scale. Our goal was to establish a conversion formula between the tile-based color matching method and modern reflectance spectrophotometry to make historical and contemporary data comparable. Skin pigmentation measurements were taken on the forehead, inner upper arms, and backs of the hands using both the tiles and a spectrophotometer on 246 participants showing a broad range of skin pigmentation. From these data, a second-order polynomial conversion formula was derived by jackknife analysis to estimate melanin index (M-index) based on tile values. This conversion formula provides a means for comparing modern data to von Luschan tile measurements recorded in historical reports. This is particularly important for populations now extinct, extirpated, or admixed for which tile-based measures of skin pigmentation are the only data available.

  8. Use of reflectance spectrophotometry to predict the response of port wine stains to pulsed dye laser.

    PubMed

    Halachmi, Shlomit; Azaria, Ron; Inbar, Roy; Ad-El, Dean; Lapidoth, Moshe

    2014-01-01

    Reflectance spectroscopy can be used to quantitate subtle differences in color. We applied a portable reflectance spectrometer to determine its utility in the evaluation of pulsed dye laser treatment of port wine stains (PWS) and in prediction of clinical outcome, in a prospective study. Forty-eight patients with PWS underwent one to nine pulsed dye laser treatments. Patient age and skin color as well as PWS surface area, anatomic location, and color were recorded. Pretreatment spectrophotometric measurements were performed. The subjective clinical results of treatment and the quantitative spectrophotometry results were evaluated by two independent teams, and the findings were correlated. The impact of the clinical characteristics on the response to treatment was assessed as well. Patients with excellent to good clinical results of laser treatments had pretreatment spectrophotometric measurements which differed by more than 10%, whereas patients with fair to poor results had spectrophotometric measurements with a difference of of less than 10%. The correlation between the spectrophotometric results and the clinical outcome was 73% (p < 0.01). The impact of the other clinical variables on outcome agreed with the findings in the literature. Spectrophotometry has a higher correlation with clinical outcome and a better predictive value than other nonmeasurable, nonquantitative, dependent variables.

  9. Chemometrics-assisted spectrophotometry method for the determination of chemical oxygen demand in pulping effluent.

    PubMed

    Chen, Honglei; Chen, Yuancai; Zhan, Huaiyu; Fu, Shiyu

    2011-04-01

    A new method has been developed for the determination of chemical oxygen demand (COD) in pulping effluent using chemometrics-assisted spectrophotometry. Two calibration models were established by inducing UV-visible spectroscopy (model 1) and derivative spectroscopy (model 2), combined with the chemometrics software Smica-P. Correlation coefficients of the two models are 0.9954 (model 1) and 0.9963 (model 2) when COD of samples is in the range of 0 to 405 mg/L. Sensitivities of the two models are 0.0061 (model 1) and 0.0056 (model 2) and method detection limits are 2.02-2.45 mg/L (model 1) and 2.13-2.51 mg/L (model 2). Validation experiment showed that the average standard deviation of model 2 was 1.11 and that of model 1 was 1.54. Similarly, average relative error of model 2 (4.25%) was lower than model 1 (5.00%), which indicated that the predictability of model 2 was better than that of model 1. Chemometrics-assisted spectrophotometry method did not need chemical reagents and digestion which were required in the conventional methods, and the testing time of the new method was significantly shorter than the conventional ones. The proposed method can be used to measure COD in pulping effluent as an environmentally friendly approach with satisfactory results.

  10. Preparation of Ion Exchange Films for Solid-Phase Spectrophotometry and Solid-Phase Fluorometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, Carol M.; Street, Kenneth W.; Tanner, Stephen P.; Philipp, Warren H.

    2000-01-01

    Atomic spectroscopy has dominated the field of trace inorganic analysis because of its high sensitivity and selectivity. The advantages gained by the atomic spectroscopies come with the disadvantage of expensive and often complicated instrumentation. Solid-phase spectroscopy, in which the analyte is preconcentrated on a solid medium followed by conventional spectrophotometry or fluorometry, requires less expensive instrumentation and has considerable sensitivity and selectivity. The sensitivity gains come from preconcentration and the use of chromophore (or fluorophore) developers and the selectivity is achieved by use of ion exchange conditions that favor the analyte in combination with speciative chromophores. Little work has been done to optimize the ion exchange medium (IEM) associated with these techniques. In this report we present a method for making ion exchange polymer films, which considerably simplify the solid-phase spectroscopic techniques. The polymer consists of formaldehyde-crosslinked polyvinyl alcohol with polyacrylic acid entrapped therein. The films are a carboxylate weak cation exchanger in the calcium form. They are mechanically sturdy and optically transparent in the ultraviolet and visible portion of the spectrum, which makes them suitable for spectrophotometry and fluorometry.

  11. [A specific feature of the procedure for determination of optical properties of turbid biological tissues and media in calculation tasks of medical noninvasive spectrophotometry].

    PubMed

    Rogatkin, D A

    2007-01-01

    The goal of this work is to discuss the problems of accuracy and reliability of the procedure for determination of optical per-unit-length properties of light-scattering biological tissues and media in medical noninvasive spectrophotometry. The determination procedure is based on the two-flux Kubelka-Munk approach. A simple one-dimensional model problem is formulated. The accurate solution of this problem is compared to its solution based on the Kubelka-Munk approach in various approximations. It is shown that in the general case of light-scattering and absorbing medium use of two independent transport coefficients (for scattering and absorption processes), as suggested in the conventional Kubelka-Munk approach, leads to errors of direct calculation of properties of backscattered and transmitted radiation in biological tissues. More valid and accurate expressions for transport coefficients can be obtained on the basis of a particular solution of the problem for a surface element of the model medium with known photometrical properties. This method makes it possible to determine accurately the radiation flux at the external boundary of the medium using the Kubelka-Munk approach. It is expected that solution of the inverse problem would make it possible to reconstruct accurately the optical properties of biological tissues from the experimental data.

  12. Comparative study between univariate spectrophotometry and multivariate calibration as analytical tools for quantitation of Benazepril alone and in combination with Amlodipine.

    PubMed

    Farouk, M; Elaziz, Omar Abd; Tawakkol, Shereen M; Hemdan, A; Shehata, Mostafa A

    2014-04-05

    Four simple, accurate, reproducible, and selective methods have been developed and subsequently validated for the determination of Benazepril (BENZ) alone and in combination with Amlodipine (AML) in pharmaceutical dosage form. The first method is pH induced difference spectrophotometry, where BENZ can be measured in presence of AML as it showed maximum absorption at 237nm and 241nm in 0.1N HCl and 0.1N NaOH, respectively, while AML has no wavelength shift in both solvents. The second method is the new Extended Ratio Subtraction Method (EXRSM) coupled to Ratio Subtraction Method (RSM) for determination of both drugs in commercial dosage form. The third and fourth methods are multivariate calibration which include Principal Component Regression (PCR) and Partial Least Squares (PLSs). A detailed validation of the methods was performed following the ICH guidelines and the standard curves were found to be linear in the range of 2-30μg/mL for BENZ in difference and extended ratio subtraction spectrophotometric method, and 5-30 for AML in EXRSM method, with well accepted mean correlation coefficient for each analyte. The intra-day and inter-day precision and accuracy results were well within the acceptable limits.

  13. Simple and fast method for iron determination in white and red wines using dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction and ultraviolet-visible spectrophotometry.

    PubMed

    Maciel, Juliana V; Soares, Bruno M; Mandlate, Jaime S; Picoloto, Rochele S; Bizzi, Cezar A; Flores, Erico M M; Duarte, Fabio A

    2014-08-20

    This work reports the development of a method for Fe extraction in white and red wines using dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (DLLME) and determination by ultraviolet-visible spectrophotometry. For optimization of the DLLME method, the following parameters were evaluated: type and volume of dispersive (1300 μL of acetonitrile) and extraction (80 μL of C(2)Cl(4)) solvents, pH (3.0), concentration of ammonium pyrrolidinedithiocarbamate (APDC, 500 μL of 1% m/v APDC solution), NaCl concentration (not added), and extraction time. The calibration curve was performed using the analyte addition method, and the limit of detection and relative standard deviation were 0.2 mg L(-1) and below 7%, respectively. The accuracy was evaluated by comparison of results obtained after Fe determination by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry, with agreement ranging from 94 to 105%. The proposed method was applied for Fe determination in white and red wines with concentrations ranging from 1.3 to 4.7 mg L(-1).

  14. Speciation of selenium in environmental samples by solid-phase spectrophotometry using 2,3-dichloro-6-(2,7-dihydroxy-naphthylazo)quinoxaline.

    PubMed

    Amin, Alaa S

    2014-01-01

    Solid-phase spectrophotometry was applied to determination of trace amounts of selenium (Se) in water, soil, plant materials, human hair, and a cosmetic preparation (lipstick). Se(IV) was sorbed in a dextran type lipophilic gel as a complex with 2,3-dichloro-6-(2,7-dihydroxy-naphthylazo)quinoxaline (DCDHNAQ), whereas Se(VI) was determined after boiling in HCI for 10 min to convert Se(VI) to Se(IV). Resin phase absorbances at 588 and 800 nm were measured directly, which allowed the determination of Se in the range of 0.2-3.3 microg/L with an RSD of 1.22%. The influences of analytical parameters including pH of the aqueous solution, amounts of DCDHNAQ, and sample volume were investigated. The molar absorptivities were found to be 1.09 x 10(6), 4.60 x 10(6), and 1.23 x 10(7) L/mol cm for 100, 500, and 1000 mL, respectively. The LOD and LOQ of the 500 mL sample method were 110 and 360 ng/L, respectively, when using 50 mg dextran type lipophilic gel. For a 1000 mL sample, the LOD and LOQ were 60 and 200 ng/L, respectively, using 50 mg of the exchanger. Increasing the sample volume enhanced the sensitivity. No considerable interferences were observed from other investigated anions and cations on the Se determination.

  15. Complex Refractive Index Spectra of CH3NH3PbI3 Perovskite Thin Films Determined by Spectroscopic Ellipsometry and Spectrophotometry.

    PubMed

    Löper, Philipp; Stuckelberger, Michael; Niesen, Bjoern; Werner, Jérémie; Filipič, Miha; Moon, Soo-Jin; Yum, Jun-Ho; Topič, Marko; De Wolf, Stefaan; Ballif, Christophe

    2015-01-02

    The complex refractive index (dielectric function) of planar CH3NH3PbI3 thin films at room temperature is investigated by variable angle spectroscopic ellipsometry and spectrophotometry. Knowledge of the complex refractive index is essential for designing photonic devices based on CH3NH3PbI3 thin films such as solar cells, light-emitting diodes, or lasers. Because the directly measured quantities (reflectance, transmittance, and ellipsometric spectra) are inherently affected by multiple reflections, the complex refractive index has to be determined indirectly by fitting a model dielectric function to the experimental spectra. We model the dielectric function according to the Forouhi-Bloomer formulation with oscillators positioned at 1.597, 2.418, and 3.392 eV and achieve excellent agreement with the experimental spectra. Our results agree well with previously reported data of the absorption coefficient and are consistent with Kramers-Kronig transformations. The real part of the refractive index assumes a value of 2.611 at 633 nm, implying that CH3NH3PbI3-based solar cells are ideally suited for the top cell in monolithic silicon-based tandem solar cells.

  16. Resting eggs as new biosorbent for preconcentration of trace elements in various samples prior to their determination by FAAS.

    PubMed

    Saçmacı, Serife; Yılmaz, Yakup; Kartal, Senol; Kaya, Murat; Duman, Fatih

    2014-06-01

    In this study, the resting eggs of aquatic creatures living in freshwater (Daphnia, Cladocera, Crustacean) ecosystems were used as a novel biosorbent extractant for synchronous preconcentration of trace Cd(II), Co(II), Cu(II), Mn(II), and Ni(II) previous to measurement by flame atomic absorpiton spectrometry (FAAS). Using column procedures, optimization studies were conducted to realize the effective adsorption of the analyte ions such as the solution pH, amount of the biosorbent, volume of the sample, interfering ions, etc. A high preconcentration factor of 67 and low relative standard deflection of ≤4.1% (n=8) were obtained. The invention constrains based on the 3 s/b criterion were 2.4 for Cd(II), 41.4 for Co(II), 4.2 for Cu(II), 3.0 for Mn(II), and 9.6 μg L(-1) for Ni(II). The accuracy of the method was verified by analysis of a certified standard reference material. The used procedure was applied to the definition of the analytes in diverse environmental samples with convincing results. Consequently, the resting eggs of Daphnia can be used as a biosorbent for preconcentration and biosorption studies.

  17. NASA/FAA/NCAR Supercooled Large Droplet Icing Flight Research: Summary of Winter 1996-1997 Flight Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Dean; Ratvasky, Thomas; Bernstein, Ben; McDonough, Frank; Strapp, J. Walter

    1998-01-01

    During the winter of 1996-1997, a flight research program was conducted at the NASA-Lewis Research Center to study the characteristics of Supercooled Large Droplets (SLD) within the Great Lakes region. This flight program was a joint effort between the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR), and the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA). Based on weather forecasts and real-time in-flight guidance provided by NCAR, the NASA-Lewis Icing Research Aircraft was flown to locations where conditions were believed to be conducive to the formation of Supercooled Large Droplets aloft. Onboard instrumentation was then used to record meteorological, ice accretion, and aero-performance characteristics encountered during the flight. A total of 29 icing research flights were conducted, during which "conventional" small droplet icing, SLD, and mixed phase conditions were encountered aloft. This paper will describe how flight operations were conducted, provide an operational summary of the flights, present selected experimental results from one typical research flight, and conclude with practical "lessons learned" from this first year of operation.

  18. Charlotte - EDC Evaluation and Demonstration (CEED) Human-in-the-Loop Results Briefing to ATD-2 FAA Partners

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chevalley, Eric

    2016-01-01

    The Charlotte EDC Evaluation and Demonstration (CEED) was the first Human-In-The-Loop experiment under the Air Traffic Management Technology Demonstration-2 (ATD-2) project. The purpose of the study was fourfold: 1) to establish a simulation environment (Charlotte) for airspace operations for ATD-2 technology, 2) to simulate current-day departures and arrival operations, 3) to assess the impact of current Traffic Management Initiatives (TMI) on Charlotte (CLT) departure flows and en route operations in Washington (ZDC) and Atlanta Centers (ZTL), and 4) to assess the impact of departure takeoff time compliance on airspace operations. The experimental design compared 3 TMIs and 2 compliance levels. Fourteen FAA retired controllers participated in the simulation. In addition, two Traffic Management Coordinators from ZTL and ZDC managed traffic flows. Surface and airborne delays, control efficiency, throughput, realism, workload, and acceptability were assessed and will be compared across the experimental conditions. Participants rated the simulation as very realistic. Results indicate that different TMIs have different impacts on surface and airspace delay. Departure compliance indicates partial benefits to sector complexity and controller workload. This simulation will provide an initial assessment of the tactical scheduling problems that the ATD-2 technology will address in the near term.

  19. Solar absorption surface panel

    DOEpatents

    Santala, Teuvo J.

    1978-01-01

    A composite metal of aluminum and nickel is used to form an economical solar absorption surface for a collector plate wherein an intermetallic compound of the aluminum and nickel provides a surface morphology with high absorptance and relatively low infrared emittance along with good durability.

  20. Rectal absorption of propylthiouracil.

    PubMed

    Bartle, W R; Walker, S E; Silverberg, J D

    1988-06-01

    The rectal absorption of propylthiouracil (PTU) was studied and compared to oral absorption in normal volunteers. Plasma levels of PTU after administration of suppositories of PTU base and PTU diethanolamine were significantly lower compared to the oral route. Elevated plasma reverse T3 levels were demonstrated after each treatment, however, suggesting a desirable therapeutic effect at this dosage level for all preparations.

  1. Petawatt laser absorption bounded

    PubMed Central

    Levy, Matthew C.; Wilks, Scott C.; Tabak, Max; Libby, Stephen B.; Baring, Matthew G.

    2014-01-01

    The interaction of petawatt (1015 W) lasers with solid matter forms the basis for advanced scientific applications such as table-top particle accelerators, ultrafast imaging systems and laser fusion. Key metrics for these applications relate to absorption, yet conditions in this regime are so nonlinear that it is often impossible to know the fraction of absorbed light f, and even the range of f is unknown. Here using a relativistic Rankine-Hugoniot-like analysis, we show for the first time that f exhibits a theoretical maximum and minimum. These bounds constrain nonlinear absorption mechanisms across the petawatt regime, forbidding high absorption values at low laser power and low absorption values at high laser power. For applications needing to circumvent the absorption bounds, these results will accelerate a shift from solid targets, towards structured and multilayer targets, and lead the development of new materials. PMID:24938656

  2. Determination of losartan potassium, quinapril hydrochloride and hydrochlorothiazide in pharmaceutical preparations using derivative spectrophotometry and chromatographic-densitometric method.

    PubMed

    Stolarczyk, Mariusz; Maślanka, Anna; Apola, Anna; Krzek, Jan

    2013-01-01

    Two methods, spectrophotometric and chromatographic-densitometric ones, were developed for determination of losartan potassium, quinapril hydrochloride and hydrochlorothiazide in pharmaceutical preparations. Spectrophotometric method involved derivative spectrophotometry and zero order spectrophotometry. The measurements were carried out at lambda = 224.0 nm for quinapril, lambda = 261.0 nm for hydrochlorothiazide and lambda = 270.0 nm for losartan when the derivative spectrophotometry was applied and lambda = 317.0 nm when zero order spectrophotometry was applied for the determination of hydrochlorothiazide. In chromatographic-densitometric studies high performance thin layer chromatography (HPTLC) plates were used as stationary phase and a mixture of solvents n-butanol : acetic acid : water (15 : 5 : 1, v/v/v) as mobile phase. Under the established conditions good resolution of examined constituents was obtained. Retardation factor for quinapril hydrochloride was R(f) - 0.70, for losartan potassium R(f) - 0.85 and for hydrochlorothiazide R(f) - 0.78. The developed methods are characterized by high sensitivity and accuracy. For quantitative analysis, densitometric measurements were carried out at lambda = 218.0 nm for quinapril, lambda = 275.0 nm for hydrochlorothiazide and = 232.0 nm for losartan.

  3. Quasar Absorption Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mushotzky, Richard (Technical Monitor); Elvis, Martin

    2004-01-01

    The aim of the proposal is to investigate the absorption properties of a sample of inter-mediate redshift quasars. The main goals of the project are: Measure the redshift and the column density of the X-ray absorbers; test the correlation between absorption and redshift suggested by ROSAT and ASCA data; constrain the absorber ionization status and metallicity; constrain the absorber dust content and composition through the comparison between the amount of X-ray absorption and optical dust extinction. Unanticipated low energy cut-offs where discovered in ROSAT spectra of quasars and confirmed by ASCA, BeppoSAX and Chandra. In most cases it was not possible to constrain adequately the redshift of the absorber from the X-ray data alone. Two possibilities remain open: a) absorption at the quasar redshift; and b) intervening absorption. The evidences in favour of intrinsic absorption are all indirect. Sensitive XMM observations can discriminate between these different scenarios. If the absorption is at the quasar redshift we can study whether the quasar environment evolves with the Cosmic time.

  4. Fiber optic spectrophotometry monitoring of plant nutrient deficiency under hydroponic culture conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liew, Oi Wah; Boey, William S. L.; Asundi, Anand K.; Chen, Jun-Wei; He, Duo-Min

    1999-05-01

    In this paper, fiber optic spectrophotometry (FOSpectr) was adapted to provide early detection of plant nutrient deficiency by measuring leaf spectral reflectance variation resulting from nutrient stress. Leaf reflectance data were obtained form a local vegetable crop, Brassica chinensis var parachinensis (Bailey), grown in nitrate-nitrogen (N)- and calcium (Ca)- deficient hydroponics nutrient solution. FOSpectr analysis showed significant differences in leaf reflectance within the first four days after subjecting plants to nutrient-deficient media. Recovery of the nutrient-stressed plants could also be detected after transferring them back to complete nutrient solution. In contrast to FOSpectr, plant response to nitrogen and calcium deficiency in terms of reduced growth and tissue elemental levels was slower and less pronounced. Thus, this study demonstrated the feasibility of using FOSpectr methodology as a non-destructive alternative to augment current methods of plant nutrient analysis.

  5. Determination of glucosinolates in 19 Chinese medicinal plants with spectrophotometry and high-pressure liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Hu, Ye; Liang, Hao; Yuan, Qipeng; Hong, Yuancheng

    2010-08-01

    Glucosinolates were evaluated in 19 traditional Chinese medicinal plants involved in seven different families: Brassicaceae, Capparaceae, Euphorbiaceae, Phytolaccaceae, Tropaeolaceae, Caricaceae and Rubiaceae. The total glucosinolate contents were determined by spectrophotometry. Results showed that the high contents of total glucosinolates were found in some herbs of Brassicaceae, Capparaceae and Euphorbiaceae families, while low total glucosinolate contents were observed in two Rubiaceae herbs. In addition, eight glucosinolates (glucoraphanin, glucoraphenin, sinalbin, sinigrin, progoitrin, 4-hydroglucobrassicin, glucoiberin and glucoibervirin) in these herbs were measured using HPLC, and the data showed that individual glucosinolates and their contents varied at different degrees among the distinct species. The highest contents of cancer-protective compounds were found in the seeds of Raphanus sativus L. (glucoraphenin), Sinapis alba (sinalbin) and Phyllanthus emblica L. (sinigrin).

  6. Spectrophotometry of Wolf-Rayet stars - Intrinsic colors and absolute magnitudes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Torres-Dodgen, Ana V.; Massey, Philip

    1988-01-01

    Absolute spectrophotometry of about 10-A resolution in the range 3400-7300 A have been obtained for southern Wolf-Rayet stars, and line-free magnitudes and colors have been constructed. The emission-line contamination in the narrow-band ubvr systems of Westerlund (1966) and Smith (1968) is shown to be small for most WN stars, but to be quite significant for WC stars. It is suggested that the more severe differences in intrinsic color from star to star of the same spectral subtype noted at shorter wavelengths are due to differences in atmospheric extent. True continuum absolute visual magnitudes and intrinsic colors are obtained for the LMC WR stars. The most visually luminous WN6-WN7 stars are found to be located in the core of the 30 Doradus region.

  7. Far-ultraviolet and optical spectrophotometry of X-ray selected Seyfert galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clarke, J. T.; Bowyer, S.; Grewing, M.

    1986-01-01

    Five X-ray selected Seyfert galaxies were examined via near-simultaneous far-ultraviolet and optical spectrophotometry in an effort to test models for excitation of emission lines by X-ray and ultraviolet continuum photoionization. The observed Ly-alpha/H-beta ratio in the present sample averages 22, with an increase found toward the high-velocity wings of the H lines in the spectrum of at least one of the Seyfert I nuclei. It is suggested that Seyfert galaxies with the most high-velocity gas exhibit the highest Ly-alpha/H-beta ratios at all velocities in the line profiles, and that sometimes this ratio may be highest for the highest velocity material in the broad-line clouds. Since broad-lined objects are least affected by Ly-alpha trapping effects, they have Ly-alpha/H-beta ratios much closer to those predicted by early photoionization calculations.

  8. Ultraviolet spectrophotometry of comet Giacobini-Zinner during the ICE encounter. [International Cometary Explorer (ICE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahearn, Michael F.; Mcfadden, Lucy A.; Feldman, Paul D.; Boehnhardt, Hermann; Rahe, Juergen; Festou, Michael; Brandt, John C.; Maran, Stephen P.; Niedner, Malcom B.; Smith, Andrew M.

    1986-01-01

    The IUE spectrophotometry of Comet P/Giacobini-Zinner was acquired in support of the International Cometary Explorer (ICE) mission. The abundances (or upper limits) of UV-active species were calculated. During the ICE encounter the H2O production rate was 3 times 10 to the 28th power/sec, + or - 50%, consistent with values derived from the ICE experiments. Comparison of the abundance of CO2(+) ions with the total electron density measured by the plasma electron experiment on ICE indicates a deficiency of ions relative to electrons indicating a population of ions not detected by remote sensing. The absence of detectable Mg(+) rules out this species as a possible ion of M/Q = 24 detected by the Ion Composition Instrument, part of the ICE complement of instruments.

  9. Antioxidant study of quercetin and their metal complex and determination of stability constant by spectrophotometry method.

    PubMed

    Ravichandran, R; Rajendran, M; Devapiriam, D

    2014-03-01

    Quercetin found chelate cadmium ions, scavenge free radicals produced by cadmium. Hence new complex, quercetin with cadmium was synthesised, and the synthesised complex structures were determined by UV-vis spectrophotometry, infrared spectroscopy, thermogravimetry and differential thermal analysis techniques (UV-vis, IR, TGA and DTA). The equilibrium stability constants of quercetin-cadmium complex were determined by Job's method. The determined stability constant value of quercetin-cadminum complex at pH 4.4 is 2.27×10(6) and at pH 7.4 is 7.80×10(6). It was found that the quercetin and cadmium ion form 1:1 complex in both pH 4.4 and pH 7.4. The structure of the compounds was elucidated on the basis of obtained results. Furthermore, the antioxidant activity of the free quercetin and quercetin-cadmium complexes were determined by DPPH and ABTS assays.

  10. Heterodyne spectrophotometry of ozone in the 9.6-micron band using a tunable diode laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcelroy, C. T.; Goldman, A.; Fogal, P. F.; Murcray, D. G.

    1990-01-01

    Tunable diode laser heterodyne spectrophotometry (TDLHS) has been used to make extremely high resolution (0.0003/cm) solar spectra in the 9.6-micron ozone band. Observations have shown that a signal-to-noise ratio of 120:1 (about 30 percent of theoretical) for an integration time of 1/8 s can be achieved at a resolution of 0.0013 wave numbers. The spectral data have been inverted to yield a total column amount of ozone, in good agreement with that measured at the nearby NOAA ozone monitoring facility in Boulder, Colorado. Line positions for several ozone lines in the spectral region 996-997/cm are reported. Recent improvements have produced a signal-to-noise ratio of 95:1 (about 40 percent of theoretical) at 0.0003/cm and extended the range of wavelengths which can be observed.

  11. Airborne and groundbased spectrophotometry of comet P/Halley from 5-13 micrometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bregman, J. D.; Witteborn, F. C.; Allamandola, L. J.; Campins, H.; Wooden, D. H.; Rank, D. M.; Cohen, M.; Tielens, A. G. G. M.

    1987-01-01

    Spectrophotometry of comet Halley from 5-13 microns was obtained from the Kuiper Airborne Observatory and from the Lick Observatory Nickel Telescope, revealing a strong broad emission band at 10 microns and a weak feature at 6.8 microns. The 10-micron band is identified with silicate materials, and the primary component of the silicate emission is suggested to be due to olivine. The 6.8 micron feature may be due either to carbonates or the C-H deformation mode in organic molecules. The data indicate that small particles are abundant in the coma and that the dust contains at least two physically separate components. Significant spatial and temporal variations are also noted in the spectrum.

  12. A high-throughput screening strategy for nitrile-hydrolyzing enzymes based on ferric hydroxamate spectrophotometry.

    PubMed

    He, Yu-Cai; Ma, Cui-Luan; Xu, Jian-He; Zhou, Li

    2011-02-01

    Nitrile-hydrolyzing enzymes (nitrilase or nitrile hydratase/amidase) have been widely used in the pharmaceutical industry for the production of carboxylic acids and their derivatives, and it is important to build a method for screening for nitrile-hydrolyzing enzymes. In this paper, a simple, rapid, and high-throughput screening method based on the ferric hydroxamate spectrophotometry has been proposed. To validate the accuracy of this screening strategy, the nitrilases from Rhodococcus erythropolis CGMCC 1.2362 and Alcaligenes sp. ECU0401 were used for evaluating the method. As a result, the accuracy for assaying aliphatic and aromatic carboxylic acids was as high as the HPLC-based method. Therefore, the method may be potentially used in the selection of microorganisms or engineered proteins with nitrile-hydrolyzing enzymes.

  13. Near-infrared spectrophotometry of the satellites and rings of Uranus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soifer, B. T.; Neugebauer, G.; Matthews, K.

    1981-03-01

    New spectrophotometry from 1.5 to 2.5 microns is reported for the Uranian satellites Titania, Oberon, and Umbriel. A spectrum of the rings of Uranus from 2.0 to 2.4 microns is also reported. No evidence is found for frost covering the surface of the ring material, consistent with the low albedo of the rings previously reported by Nicholson and Jones (1980). The surfaces of the satellites are found to be covered by dirty water frost. Assuming albedos of the frost and gray components covering the Uranian satellites to be the same as the light and dark faces of Iapetus, radii are derived that are roughly twice those inferred from the assumption of a visual albedo of 0.5.

  14. (21) Lutetia spectrophotometry from Rosetta-OSIRIS images and comparison to ground-based observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magrin, S.; La Forgia, F.; Pajola, M.; Lazzarin, M.; Massironi, M.; Ferri, F.; da Deppo, V.; Barbieri, C.; Sierks, H.; Osiris Team

    2012-06-01

    Here we present some preliminary results on surface variegation found on (21) Lutetia from ROSETTA-OSIRIS images acquired on 2010-07-10. The spectrophotometry obtained by means of the two cameras NAC and WAC (Narrow and Wide Angle Cameras) is consistent with ground based observations, and does not show surface diversity above the data error bars. The blue and UV images (shortward 500 nm) may, however, indicate a variegation of the optical properties of the asteroid surface on the Baetica region (Sierks et al., 2011). We also speculate on the contribution due to different illumination and to different ground properties (composition or, more probably, grain size diversity). In particular a correlation with geologic units independently defined by Massironi et al. (2012) is evident, suggesting that the variegation of the ground optical properties is likely to be real.

  15. Near-infrared spectrophotometry of the satellites and rings of Uranus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soifer, B. T.; Neugebauer, G.; Matthews, K.

    1981-01-01

    New spectrophotometry from 1.5 to 2.5 microns is reported for the Uranian satellites Titania, Oberon, and Umbriel. A spectrum of the rings of Uranus from 2.0 to 2.4 microns is also reported. No evidence is found for frost covering the surface of the ring material, consistent with the low albedo of the rings previously reported by Nicholson and Jones (1980). The surfaces of the satellites are found to be covered by dirty water frost. Assuming albedos of the frost and gray components covering the Uranian satellites to be the same as the light and dark faces of Iapetus, radii are derived that are roughly twice those inferred from the assumption of a visual albedo of 0.5.

  16. Spectrophotometry of Twenty of the Brightest Stars in the Southern Sky

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krisciunas, Kevin; Suntzeff, Nicholas B.; Kelarek, Bethany; Bonar, Kyle; Stenzel, Joshua

    2017-01-01

    We have obtained spectra of 20 bright southern stars (including Sirius, Canopus, Betelgeuse, Rigel, and Procyon) using the CTIO 1.5-m telescope and its grating spectrograph RCSPEC. The brightness of the targets required the use of a 7.5 magnitude neutral density filter. Given a Kurucz model spectrum of Sirius (t = 9850 K, log g = 4.30, [Fe/H] = +0.4) with an appropriate spectral resolution, we can place the spectrophotometry on the system of Sirius, which is much less problematic than basing the ultimate calibration on Vega. The resulting B- and V-band synthetic photometry compares well with that of Cousins, with minimal color terms. Our synthetic R- and I-band photometry indicates non-zero offsets and color-terms with respect to Cousins' data.

  17. Spatially Multiplexed Micro-Spectrophotometry in Bright Field Mode for Thin Film Characterization

    PubMed Central

    Pini, Valerio; Kosaka, Priscila M.; Ruz, Jose J.; Malvar, Oscar; Encinar, Mario; Tamayo, Javier; Calleja, Montserrat

    2016-01-01

    Thickness characterization of thin films is of primary importance in a variety of nanotechnology applications, either in the semiconductor industry, quality control in nanofabrication processes or engineering of nanoelectromechanical systems (NEMS) because small thickness variability can strongly compromise the device performance. Here, we present an alternative optical method in bright field mode called Spatially Multiplexed Micro-Spectrophotometry that allows rapid and non-destructive characterization of thin films over areas of mm2 and with 1 μm of lateral resolution. We demonstrate an accuracy of 0.1% in the thickness characterization through measurements performed on four microcantilevers that expand an area of 1.8 mm2 in one minute of analysis time. The measured thickness variation in the range of few tens of nm translates into a mechanical variability that produces an error of up to 2% in the response of the studied devices when they are used to measure surface stress variations. PMID:27338398

  18. Infrared photometry and spectrophotometry of G75.84+0.4

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pipher, J. L.; Soifer, B. T.; Krassner, J.

    1979-01-01

    Photometric mapping of G75.84+0.4 at 12.6 microns is compared with previously published radio maps of the region to deduce the relative dust/gas mass ratio for the dust responsible for the 12.6-micron emission. Spectrophotometry from 2-4 microns and 8-13 microns of the highest-emission-measure region reveals the presence of the fine structure lines of forbidden Ar III at 8.99 microns, forbidden Ne II at 12.78 microns, and forbidden S IV at 10.53 microns. Estimates of the abundance of these ions are made, and the nature of the exciting source is discussed.

  19. Can the Assessment of Spontaneous Oscillations by Near Infrared Spectrophotometry Predict Neurological Outcome of Preterm Infants?

    PubMed

    Stammwitz, André; von Siebenthal, Kurt; Bucher, Hans U; Wolf, Martin

    2016-01-01

    The aim was to assess the correlation between cerebral autoregulation and outcome. Included were 31 preterm infants, gestational age 26 1/7 to 32 2/7 and <24 h life. Coherence between cerebral total haemoglobin (tHb) or oxygenation index (OI) measured by near-infrared spectrophotometry (NIRS) and systemic heart rate (HR) or arterial blood pressure (MAP) was calculated as a measure of autoregulation. In contrast to previous studies, low coherences in the first 24 h were significantly associated with intraventricular haemorrhage, death or abnormal neurodevelopmental outcome at 18 months or later. We suggest that our results can be explained by the concept of a multi-oscillatory-functions-order.

  20. Near-infrared spectrophotometry of four Seyfert 1 galaxies and NGC 1275

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rudy, R. J.; Jones, B.; Levan, P. D.; Puetter, R. C.; Smith, H. E.; Willner, S. P.; Tokunaga, A. T.

    1982-01-01

    Low-resolution spectrophotometry from 2 to 4 microns is reported for the four Seyfert 1 galaxies Mrk 335, 3C 120, Mrk 509, NGC 7469, and the peculiar emission-line galaxy NGC 1275. The spectrum of NGC 7469 exhibits a strong 3.3-micron dust feature, indicating a thermal origin for the bulk of its considerable nonstellar infrared emission. NGC 1275 has a large stellar contribution to its infrared flux at wavelengths shortward of 3 microns. The spectrum from 3 to 4 microns fits a power law which fits the 10-micron and 20-micron broad bands, as well. A thermal model which can explain the spectrum of NGC 1275 is discussed. Mrk 335 displays a complex spectrum suggestive of thermal dust emission. 3C 120 and Mrk 509 have nonstellar infrared emission shortward of 2 microns, but the data are ambiguous as to whether this emission is thermal or nonthermal in origin.

  1. A quantitative and qualitative method to control chemotherapeutic preparations by Fourier transform infrared-ultraviolet spectrophotometry.

    PubMed

    Dziopa, Florian; Galy, Guillaume; Bauler, Stephanie; Vincent, Benoit; Crochon, Sarah; Tall, Mamadou Lamine; Pirot, Fabrice; Pivot, Christine

    2013-06-01

    Chemotherapy products in hospitals include a reconstitution step of manufactured drugs providing an adapted dosage to each patient. The administration of highly iatrogenic drugs raises the question of patients' safety and treatment efficiency. In order to reduce administration errors due to faulty preparations, we introduced a new qualitative and quantitative routine control based on Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) and UV-Visible spectrophotometry. This automated method enabled fast and specific control for 14 anticancer drugs. A 1.2 mL sample was used to assay and identify each preparation in less than 90 sec. Over a two-year period, 9370 controlled infusion bags showed a 1.49% nonconformity rate, under 15% tolerance from the theoretical concentration and 96% minimum identification matching factor. This study evaluated the reliability of the control process, as well as its accordance to chemotherapy deliverance requirements. Thus, corrective measures were defined to improve the control process.

  2. Direct determination of total serum cholesterol by use of double-wavelength spectrophotometry.

    PubMed

    Sommers, P B; Jatlow, P I; Seligson, D

    1975-05-01

    We describe a simple, accurate method for direct determination of total cholesterol in serum. Systematic investigation of a previously described modified Liebermann-Burchard reagent has indicated the necessity of accounting for both bilirubin interference and decreased specificity owing to exothermia. Double-wavelength spectrophotometry was used to optically null out bilirubin as an interfering factor, whereas adding serum to the cold reagent increases its specificity for the cholesterol color reaction. Comparison of 106 cholesterol values with those obtained by the procedure of Abell et al. [J. Biol. Chem. 195, 357 (1952)] yielded a correlation coefficient greater than 0.99; our inter-run coefficient of variation of polled laboratory serum was 1.7%.

  3. Do GSM 900MHz signals affect cerebral blood circulation? A near-infrared spectrophotometry study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolf, Martin; Haensse, Daniel; Morren, Geert; Froehlich, Juerg

    2006-06-01

    Effects of GSM 900MHz signals (EMF) typical for a handheld mobile phone on the cerebral blood circulation were investigated using near-infrared spectrophotometry (NIRS) in a three armed (12W/kg, 1.2W/kg, sham), double blind, randomized crossover trial in 16 healthy volunteers. During exposure we observed borderline significant short term responses of oxyhemoglobin and deoxyhemoglobin concentration, which correspond to a decrease of cerebral blood flow and volume and were smaller than regular physiological changes. Due to the relatively high number of statistical tests, these responses may be spurious and require further studies. There was no detectable dose-response relation or long term response within 20min. The detection limit was a fraction of the regular physiological changes elicited by functional activation. Compared to previous studies using PET, NIRS provides a much higher time resolution, which allowed investigating the short term effects efficiently, noninvasively, without the use of radioactive tracers and with high sensitivity.

  4. Remotely Operated Aircraft (ROA) Impact on the National Airspace System (NAS) Work Package, 2005: Composite Report on FAA Flight Plan and Operational Evaluation Plan. Version 7.0

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this document is to present the findings that resulted from a high-level analysis and evaluation of the following documents: (1) The OEP (Operational Evolution Plan) Version 7 -- a 10-year plan for operational improvements to increase capacity and efficiency in U.S. air travel and transport and other use of domestic airspace. The OEP is the FAA commitment to operational improvements. It is outcome driven, with clear lines of accountability within FAA organizations. The OEP concentrates on operational solutions and integrates safety, certification, procedures, staffing, equipment, avionics and research; (2) The Draft Flight Plan 2006 through 2010 -- a multi-year strategic effort, setting a course for the FAA through 2001, to provide the safest and most efficient air transportation system in the world; (3) The NAS System Architecture Version 5 -- a blueprint for modernizing the NAS and improving NAS services and capabilities through the year 2015; and (4) The NAS-SR-1000 System Requirements Specification (NASSRS) -- a compilation of requirements which describe the operational capabilities for the NAS. The analysis is particularly focused on examining the documents for relevance to existing and/or planned future UAV operations. The evaluation specifically focuses on potential factors that could materially affect the development of a commercial ROA industry, such as: (1) Design limitations of the CNS/ATM system, (2) Human limitations, The information presented was taken from program specifications or program office lead personnel.

  5. Comparison of direct (X-ray diffraction and infrared spectrophotometry) and indirect (infrared spectrophotometry) methods for the analysis of alpha-quartz in airborne dusts.

    PubMed

    Kauffer, E; Masson, A; Moulut, J C; Lecaque, T; Protois, J C

    2005-11-01

    In this study, the alpha-quartz contents measured by different analytical techniques (X-ray diffraction, direct method; and infrared spectrophotometry, direct and indirect methods) were compared. The analyses were carried out on filters sampled in an industrial setting by means of a Dorr-Oliver cyclone. To verify the methodology used, filters loaded with pure alpha-quartz were also analysed. By and large, the agreement between the two direct methods was close on average, but on the basis of a comparison of the individual results, considerable differences exist. In absolute value, the mean relative deviation between the two techniques was <25% in only 47.8% of the cases. The results obtained by the indirect method (infrared) were on average 13% lower than the results obtained by the two direct methods with a more important difference (23%) for samples where calcite was identified by X-ray diffraction in comparison with those where it was not (8%). This underestimation, which was not owing to dust losses during preparation, is probably explained by the elimination of organic compounds during dust calcinations or by the transformation of mineral compounds. The indirect method introduces additional sample handling operations with more risk of material loss. When the quantity of calcined material was <0.4 mg, the weighing operations necessary to correct any losses of material resulted in considerable variability. In terms of overall uncertainty, it would be better in this case not to carry out correction and to employ an operating mode favouring the recovery of a maximum of material while accepting a bias of about 5-7%.

  6. Solid methane on Triton and Pluto - 3- to 4-micron spectrophotometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spencer, John R.; Buie, Marc W.; Bjoraker, Gordon L.

    1990-01-01

    Methane has been identified in the Pluto/Charon system on the basis of absorption features in the reflectance spectrum at 1.5 and 2.3 microns; attention is presently given to observations of a 3.25 micron-centered deep absorption feature in Triton and Pluto/Charon system reflectance spectra. This absorption may indicate the presence of solid methane, constituting either the dominant surface species or a mixture with a highly transparent substance, such as N2 frost.

  7. Metal content monitoring in Hypericum perforatum pharmaceutical derivatives by atomic absorption and emission spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Gomez, María R; Soledad, Cerutti; Olsina, Roberto A; Silva, María F; Martínez, Luis D

    2004-02-18

    Metals have been investigated in different plant materials in order to establish their normal concentration range and consider their role in plants as part of human medicinal treatment. Metal monitoring as a pattern recognition method is a promising tool in the characterization and/or standardization of phytomedicines. In the present work measurable amounts of Ca, Cu, K, Li, Mg, Mn, Na, Ni, and Zn were detected in phytopharmaceutical derivatives of Hypericum perforatum by atomic techniques. Atomic methodologies like flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS) and electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS) allow reliable determination of mineral content in pharmaceutical quality control of medicinal plants. Additionally, capillary electrophoresis (CE) patterns of characteristic components (fingerprints) have been performed for the search of adulterants in phytopharmaceutical products.

  8. FAA Film Catalog.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Federal Aviation Administration (DOT), Washington, DC.

    Some 75 films from the U.S. Department of Transportation's Federal Aviation Administration are listed in this catalog. Topics dealt with include aerodynamics, airports, aviation history and careers, flying clubs, navigation and weather. Most of the films are 16mm sound and color productions. Filmstrips requiring a 35mm projector and phonograph or…

  9. FAA Air Traffic Activity

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-09-01

    0 MILLVILLE ........................................................................ (MIV) NJ 362 0 20 334 8 NEW FIELD...FIELD ................. AR FSS 92 69119 MILLVILLE ...................................................... NJ AFSS 13 717741 BOZEMAN...NM FSS 158 580 MILLVILLE ..... .. ... ......................... NJ AFSS 79 6920 GULKANA ... .......... .... .............. AK FSS 159 554

  10. Absorption heat pump system

    DOEpatents

    Grossman, G.

    1982-06-16

    The efficiency of an absorption heat pump system is improved by conducting liquid from a second stage evaporator thereof to an auxiliary heat exchanger positioned downstream of a primary heat exchanger in the desorber of the system.

  11. Compounds affecting cholesterol absorption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hua, Duy H. (Inventor); Koo, Sung I. (Inventor); Noh, Sang K. (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    A class of novel compounds is described for use in affecting lymphatic absorption of cholesterol. Compounds of particular interest are defined by Formula I: ##STR1## or a pharmaceutically acceptable salt thereof.

  12. Soliton absorption spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Kalashnikov, V. L.; Sorokin, E.

    2010-01-01

    We analyze optical soliton propagation in the presence of weak absorption lines with much narrower linewidths as compared to the soliton spectrum width using the novel perturbation analysis technique based on an integral representation in the spectral domain. The stable soliton acquires spectral modulation that follows the associated index of refraction of the absorber. The model can be applied to ordinary soliton propagation and to an absorber inside a passively modelocked laser. In the latter case, a comparison with water vapor absorption in a femtosecond Cr:ZnSe laser yields a very good agreement with experiment. Compared to the conventional absorption measurement in a cell of the same length, the signal is increased by an order of magnitude. The obtained analytical expressions allow further improving of the sensitivity and spectroscopic accuracy making the soliton absorption spectroscopy a promising novel measurement technique. PMID:21151755

  13. Absorption heat pump system

    DOEpatents

    Grossman, Gershon

    1984-01-01

    The efficiency of an absorption heat pump system is improved by conducting liquid from a second stage evaporator thereof to an auxiliary heat exchanger positioned downstream of a primary heat exchanger in the desorber of the system.

  14. Optical absorption measurement system

    DOEpatents

    Draggoo, Vaughn G.; Morton, Richard G.; Sawicki, Richard H.; Bissinger, Horst D.

    1989-01-01

    The system of the present invention contemplates a non-intrusive method for measuring the temperature rise of optical elements under high laser power optical loading to determine the absorption coefficient. The method comprises irradiating the optical element with a high average power laser beam, viewing the optical element with an infrared camera to determine the temperature across the optical element and calculating the absorption of the optical element from the temperature.

  15. Solar selective absorption coatings

    DOEpatents

    Mahoney, Alan R.; Reed, Scott T.; Ashley, Carol S.; Martinez, F. Edward

    2003-10-14

    A new class of solar selective absorption coatings are disclosed. These coatings comprise a structured metallic overlayer such that the overlayer has a sub-micron structure designed to efficiently absorb solar radiation, while retaining low thermal emissivity for infrared thermal radiation. A sol-gel layer protects the structured metallic overlayer from mechanical, thermal, and environmental degradation. Processes for producing such solar selective absorption coatings are also disclosed.

  16. Solar selective absorption coatings

    DOEpatents

    Mahoney, Alan R.; Reed, Scott T.; Ashley, Carol S.; Martinez, F. Edward

    2004-08-31

    A new class of solar selective absorption coatings are disclosed. These coatings comprise a structured metallic overlayer such that the overlayer has a sub-micron structure designed to efficiently absorb solar radiation, while retaining low thermal emissivity for infrared thermal radiation. A sol-gel layer protects the structured metallic overlayer from mechanical, thermal, and environmental degradation. Processes for producing such solar selective absorption coatings are also disclosed.

  17. Intranasal absorption of oxymorphone.

    PubMed

    Hussain, M A; Aungst, B J

    1997-08-01

    The nasal bioavailability of oxymorphone HCI was determined. Rats were surgically prepared to isolate the nasal cavity, into which a solution of oxymorphone was administered. A reference group of rats was administered oxymorphone HCl intravenously. Plasma oxymorphone concentrations were determined by HPLC. Nasal absorption was rapid, nasal bioavailability was 43%, and the iv and nasal elimination profiles were similar. Oxymorphone HCI appears to have the solubility, potency, and absorption properties required for efficient nasal delivery, which is an alternative to injections.

  18. Flame and graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry for trace element determination in vegetable oils, margarine and butter after sample emulsification.

    PubMed

    Ieggli, C V S; Bohrer, D; Do Nascimento, P C; De Carvalho, L M

    2011-05-01

    Trace element analysis plays an important role in oil characterisation and in the detection of oil adulteration because the quality of edible oils and fats is affected by their trace metal content. In this study, the quantification of selected metals in various oils and fats (rice oil, canola oil, sunflower oil, corn oil, soy oil, olive oil, light margarine, regular margarine and butter) was carried out using flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS) and graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GFAAS) after sample emulsification. FAAS was used to determine the Na, K, Ca, Mg, Zn and Fe levels in the samples, while GFAAS was used for quantifying Cr, Ni, As, Pb, Cd, Cu and Mn, as these elements appeared in the samples at much lower concentrations. Tween-80 and Triton X-100 were employed as surfactants, and emulsions were prepared by a conventional method that involved heating and mixing of the constituents. Complete stabilisation was achieved through magnetic stirring for 15 min at room temperature. The evaluated figures of merit were linearity, accuracy and sensitivity, which were determined by the characteristic concentration and mass. Analysis of spiked samples demonstrated accuracy, which ranged from 90% (Na) to 112% (Fe) for FAAS and from 83% (Cd) to 121% (Pb) for GFAAS measurements. Atomic absorption spectrometry proved to be a promising approach for the analysis of metals in emulsified edible oils and fats. Additionally, under appropriate emulsification conditions (formulation, stirring time and temperature), the emulsions were homogeneous, had excellent stability, and had appropriate viscosity. The proposed method has proved to be simple, sensitive, reproducible, and economical.

  19. Lead determination at ng/mL level by flame atomic absorption spectrometry using a tantalum coated slotted quartz tube atom trap.

    PubMed

    Demirtaş, İlknur; Bakırdere, Sezgin; Ataman, O Yavuz

    2015-06-01

    Flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS) still keeps its importance despite the relatively low sensitivity; because it is a simple and economical technique for determination of metals. In recent years, atom traps have been developed to increase the sensitivity of FAAS. Although the detection limit of FAAS is only at the level of µg/mL, with the use of atom traps it can reach to ng/mL. Slotted quartz tube (SQT) is one of the atom traps used to improve sensitivity. In atom trapping mode of SQT, analyte is trapped on-line in SQT for few minutes using ordinary sample aspiration, followed by the introduction of a small volume of organic solvent to effect the revolatilization and atomization of analyte species resulting in a transient signal. This system is economical, commercially available and easy to use. In this study, a sensitive analytical method was developed for the determination of lead with the help of SQT atom trapping flame atomization (SQT-AT-FAAS). 574 Fold sensitivity enhancement was obtained at a sample suction rate of 3.9 mL/min for 5.0 min trapping period with respect to FAAS. Organic solvent was selected as 40 µL of methyl isobutyl ketone (MIBK). To obtain a further sensitivity enhancement inner surface of SQT was coated with several transition metals. The best sensitivity enhancement, 1650 fold enhancement, was obtained by the Ta-coated SQT-AT-FAAS. In addition, chemical nature of Pb species trapped on quartz and Ta surface, and the chemical nature of Ta on quartz surface were investigated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Raman Spectroscopy. Raman spectrometric results indicate that tantalum is coated on SQT surface in the form of Ta2O5. XPS studies revealed that the oxidation state of Pb in species trapped on both bare and Ta coated SQT surfaces is +2. For the accuracy check, the analyses of standard reference material were performed by use of SCP SCIENCE EnviroMAT Low (EU-L-2) and results for Pb were to be in good agreement with

  20. Seven-effect absorption refrigeration

    DOEpatents

    DeVault, R.C.; Biermann, W.J.

    1989-05-09

    A seven-effect absorption refrigeration cycle is disclosed utilizing three absorption circuits. In addition, a heat exchanger is used for heating the generator of the low absorption circuit with heat rejected from the condenser and absorber of the medium absorption circuit. A heat exchanger is also provided for heating the generator of the medium absorption circuit with heat rejected from the condenser and absorber of the high absorption circuit. If desired, another heat exchanger can also be provided for heating the evaporator of the high absorption circuit with rejected heat from either the condenser or absorber of the low absorption circuit. 1 fig.

  1. Seven-effect absorption refrigeration

    DOEpatents

    DeVault, Robert C.; Biermann, Wendell J.

    1989-01-01

    A seven-effect absorption refrigeration cycle is disclosed utilizing three absorption circuits. In addition, a heat exchanger is used for heating the generator of the low absorption circuit with heat rejected from the condenser and absorber of the medium absorption circuit. A heat exchanger is also provided for heating the generator of the medium absorption circuit with heat rejected from the condenser and absorber of the high absorption circuit. If desired, another heat exchanger can also be provided for heating the evaporator of the high absorption circuit with rejected heat from either the condenser or absorber of the low absorption circuit.

  2. Synthesis, characterization and application of a novel ion-imprinted polymer for selective solid phase extraction of copper(II) ions from high salt matrices prior to its determination by FAAS.

    PubMed

    Yılmaz, Vedat; Hazer, Orhan; Kartal, Şenol

    2013-11-15

    A new Cu(II)-imprinted sorbent has been prepared by using 5-methyl-2-thiozylmethacrylamide (MTMAAm). The monomer of Cu(II)-MTMAAm complex was synthesized and copolymerized in the presence of ethyleneglycol dimethacrylate cross-linker via bulk polymerization method. The resulting Cu(II)-imprinted polymer was characterized by FT-IR spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Copper ions were removed from the polymer with 1.0 mol L(-1) HNO3 and determined by flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS). The imprinted polymer showed higher selectivity for Cu(II) in comparison to the non-imprinted polymer. Relative selectivity coefficients (k') for Cu(II)/Zn(II), Cu(II)/Ni(II) and Cu(II)/Co(II) were 9.1, 14.8 and 26.6, respectively. The imprinted polymer was examined as a column packing material for solid phase extraction of Cu(II) from various matrices. The effects of solution pH, acid eluents and interfering ions were investigated. The poylmer possesses selective extraction of Cu(II) within pH range from 5.0 to 6.5. The relative standard deviation and limit of detection (3s) of the method were evaluated as 1.4% and 0.9 µg L(-1), respectively. The accuracy of the method was verified by analysis of two certified reference materials (CWW-TM-D and SRM 3280) and then applied to the determination of Cu in seawater, lake water and tap water samples, and hemodialysis concentrates and multivitamin/multielement supplements.

  3. Novel ratio difference at coabsorptive point spectrophotometric method for determination of components with wide variation in their absorptivities.

    PubMed

    Saad, Ahmed S; Abo-Talib, Nisreen F; El-Ghobashy, Mohamed R

    2016-01-05

    Different methods have been introduced to enhance selectivity of UV-spectrophotometry thus enabling accurate determination of co-formulated components, however mixtures whose components exhibit wide variation in absorptivities has been an obstacle against application of UV-spectrophotometry. The developed ratio difference at coabsorptive point method (RDC) represents a simple effective solution for the mentioned problem, where the additive property of light absorbance enabled the consideration of the two components as multiples of the lower absorptivity component at certain wavelength (coabsorptive point), at which their total concentration multiples could be determined, whereas the other component was selectively determined by applying the ratio difference method in a single step. Mixture of perindopril arginine (PA) and amlodipine besylate (AM) figures that problem, where the low absorptivity of PA relative to AM hinders selective spectrophotometric determination of PA. The developed method successfully determined both components in the overlapped region of their spectra with accuracy 99.39±1.60 and 100.51±1.21, for PA and AM, respectively. The method was validated as per the USP guidelines and showed no significant difference upon statistical comparison with reported chromatographic method.

  4. Determination of trace amount of cadmium using dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction-slotted quartz tube-flame atomic absorption spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fırat, Merve; Bakırdere, Sezgin; Fındıkoğlu, Maral Selin; Kafa, Emine Betül; Yazıcı, Elif; Yolcu, Melda; Büyükpınar, Çağdaş; Chormey, Dotse Selali; Sel, Sabriye; Turak, Fatma

    2017-03-01

    This study was performed to develop a sensitive analytical method for the determination of cadmium by slotted quartz tube-flame atomic absorption spectrometry (SQT-FAAS) after dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (DLLME). The parameters affecting the cadmium complex formation and its extraction output were optimized to obtain high extraction efficiency. These included the pH and amount of the buffer solution, and the concentration of the ligand. The DLLME method was comprehensively optimized based on the type and amount of extraction solvent, dispersive solvent and salt. The type and period of mixing needed for a more effective extraction was also investigated. In order to further improve the sensitivity for the determination of cadmium, the flame atomic absorption spectrometry was fitted with a slotted quartz tube to increase the residence time of cadmium atoms in the pathway of incident light from a hollow cathode lamp. The limits of detection and quantitation (LOD and LOQ) for the FAAS were found to be 42 and 140 μg L- 1, respectively. Under the optimum conditions, LOD and LOQ of the FAAS after DLLME were calculated as 1.3 and 4.4 μg L- 1, respectively. Combining both optimized parameters of the DLLME and SQT-FAAS gave 0.5 and 1.5 μg L- 1 as LOD and LOQ, respectively. Accuracy of the method was also checked using a wastewater certified reference material (EU-L-2), and the result was in good agreement with the certified value.

  5. Derivative spectrophotometry in the determination of phenyl-beta-naphthylamine used as an antioxidant in rubber mixtures.

    PubMed

    Moldovan, Z; Alexandrescu, L

    2002-09-01

    A method for the determination of phenyl-beta-naphthylamine (PBN) in ternary mixtures by second-derivative spectrophotometry is described. The procedure works without any separation step of PBN from the other polymer additives. By applying the second-derivative spectrophotometry, Beer's law was valid over the range 0.25-10 micro g mL(-1). The proposed method has been applied to the determination PBN in synthetic ternary mixtures and rubber samples. A comparative study of the results obtained using the second and the third-derivative spectrophotometric methods is presented and evaluated. The derivative spectrophotometric method indicated that the amount of PBN found after extraction from the rubber samples was 0.97+/-0.02 g/100 g of sample.

  6. Detection of silver nanoparticles in seawater at ppb levels using UV-visible spectrophotometry with long path cells.

    PubMed

    Lodeiro, Pablo; Achterberg, Eric P; El-Shahawi, Mohammad S

    2017-03-01

    Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) are emerging contaminants that are difficult to detect in natural waters. UV-visible spectrophotometry is a simple technique that allows detection of AgNPs through analysis of their characteristic surface plasmon resonance band. The detection limit for nanoparticles using up to 10cm path length cuvettes with UV-visible spectrophotometry is in the 0.1-10ppm range. This detection limit is insufficiently low to observe AgNPs in natural environments. Here we show how the use of capillary cells with an optical path length up to 200cm, forms an excellent technique for rapid detection and quantification of non-aggregated AgNPs at ppb concentrations in complex natural matrices such as seawater.

  7. Absorption heat pump system

    DOEpatents

    Grossman, Gershon; Perez-Blanco, Horacio

    1984-01-01

    An improvement in an absorption heat pump cycle is obtained by adding adiabatic absorption and desorption steps to the absorber and desorber of the system. The adiabatic processes make it possible to obtain the highest temperature in the absorber before any heat is removed from it and the lowest temperature in the desorber before heat is added to it, allowing for efficient utilization of the thermodynamic availability of the heat supply stream. The improved system can operate with a larger difference between high and low working fluid concentrations, less circulation losses, and more efficient heat exchange than a conventional system.

  8. Absorption Heat Pump Cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunugi, Yoshifumi; Kashiwagi, Takao

    Various advanced absorption cycles are studied, developed and invented. In this paper, their cycles are classified and arranged using the three categories: effect, stage and loop, then an outline of the cycles are explained on the Duehring diagram. Their cycles include high COP cycles for refrigerations and heat pumps, high temperature lift cycles for heat transformer, absorption-compression hybrid cycles and heat pump transformer cycle. The highest COPi is attained by the seven effect cycle. In addition, the cycles for low temperature are invented and explained. Furthermore the power generation • refrigeration cycles are illustrated.

  9. Spectrophotometry of (32) Pomona, (145) Adeona, (704) Interamnia, (779) Nina, (330825) 2008 XE3, and 2012 QG42 and laboratory study of possible analog samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Busarev, Vladimir V.; Barabanov, Sergey I.; Rusakov, Vyacheslav S.; Puzin, Vasiliy B.; Kravtsov, Valery V.

    2015-12-01

    Six asteroids including two NEAs, one of which is PHA, accessible for observation in September 2012 were investigated using a low-resolution (R ≈ 100) spectrophotometry in the range 0.35-0.90 μm with the aim to study features of their reflectance spectra. A high-altitude position of our Terskol Observatory (3150 m above sea level) favorable for the near-UV and visible-range observations of celestial objects allowed us to probably detect some new spectral features of the asteroids. Two subtle absorption bands centered at 0.53 and 0.74 μm were found in the reflectance spectra of S-type (32) Pomona and interpreted as signs of presence of pyroxenes in the asteroid surface matter and its different oxidation. Very similar absorption bands centered at 0.38, 0.44 and 0.67-0.71 μm have been registered in the reflectance spectra of (145) Adeona, (704) Interamnia, and (779) Nina of primitive types. We performed laboratory investigations of ground samples of known carbonaceous chondrites, Orguel (CI), Mighei (CM2), Murchison (CM2), Boriskino (CM2), and seven samples of low-iron Mg serpentines as possible analogs of the primitive asteroids. In the course of this work, we discovered an intense absorption band (up to ∼25%) centered at 0.44 μm in reflectance spectra of the low-Fe serpentine samples. As it turned out, the equivalent width of the band has a high correlation with content of Fe3+ (octahedral and tetrahedral) in the samples. It may be considered as a confirmation of the previously proposed mechanism of the absorption due to electronic transitions in exchange-coupled pairs (ECP) of Fe3+ neighboring cations. It means that the absorption feature can be used as an indicator of ferric iron in oxidized and hydrated low-Fe compounds on the surface of asteroids and other atmosphereless celestial bodies. Moreover, our measurements showed that the mechanism of light absorption is partially or completely blocked in the case of intermediate to high iron contents. Therefore

  10. Solid methane on Triton and Pluto - 3- to 4-micron spectrophotometry

    SciTech Connect

    Spencer, J.R.; Buie, M.W.; Bjoraker, G.L. Space Telescope Science Institute, Baltimore, MD NASA, Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD )

    1990-12-01

    Methane has been identified in the Pluto/Charon system on the basis of absorption features in the reflectance spectrum at 1.5 and 2.3 microns; attention is presently given to observations of a 3.25 micron-centered deep absorption feature in Triton and Pluto/Charon system reflectance spectra. This absorption may indicate the presence of solid methane, constituting either the dominant surface species or a mixture with a highly transparent substance, such as N2 frost. 35 refs.

  11. Speech therapy changes blood circulation and oxygenation in the brain and muscle: a near-infrared spectrophotometry study.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Martin; von Bonin, Dietrich; Wolf, Ursula

    2011-01-01

    Recently it has been shown that artistic speech therapy (AST) has effects on heart rate variability. The aim of this pilot study was to investigate whether AST also affects hemodynamics and tissue oxygenation in the brain and skeletal muscle measured by near infrared spectrophotometry(NIRS). The results show that ATS has effects on important physiological parameters, i.e., it leads to a decrease in cerebral blood flow during recitation and to brain activation thereafter.

  12. Kinetics of pH-dependent interconversion of tryptophanase spectral forms studied by scanning stopped-flow spectrophotometry.

    PubMed

    June, D S; Suelter, C H; Dye, J L

    1981-05-12

    Morino and Snell [Morino, Y., & Snell, E. E. (1967) J. Biol. Chem. 242, 5591-5601] previously showed that the relative amplitudes of the 337- and 420-nm absorption bands of tryptophanase depended on both pH and the nature of a required monovalent cation activator. An investigation of the kinetics of interconversion of the 337- and 420-nm forms following a rapid incremental increase (jump) or decrease (drop) in pH over the range of enzyme stability in 0.2 M KCl at 24 +/- 0.3 degrees C by scanning stopped-flow spectrophotometry showed three distinct time-dependent phases. They were (1) an abrupt phase which is complete in less than 6.5 ms, (2) a fast first-order interconversion of the 420- and 337-nm absorbances, and (3) a slow first-order process involving growth at 355 nm coupled to two decays centered at 325 and 430 nm in the incremental pH jumps and decay at 355 nm with concomitant growth at 430 and 290 nm in the incremental pH-drop experiments. The results of these experiments were analyzed in terms of a scheme involving enzyme forms E alpha, E beta, E beta H+, E gamma, E gamma H+, and E delta. The E alpha form predominates in the absence of activating monovalent cations and absorbs at 420 nm. Those in the beta manifold, E beta and E beta H+, also absorb at 420 nm while those in the gamma manifold, E gamma and E gamma H+, absorb at 337 nm. The form E delta absorbs at 335 nm. E beta H+ and E gamma H+ represent the protonated form of the enzyme in each manifold. Analysis of the abrupt phase showed no significant systematic changes in absorbance above 330 nm for either the pH-jump or pH-drop experiments. The fast second phase involves the first-order interconversion of the beta and gamma manifolds while the slow third phase describes the buildup or decay of the delta manifold. Presumably conformational changes control the rate of these interconversions. The pH dependence of the fast first-order beta to gamma conversion was described and evaluated in terms of five

  13. FAA Air Traffic Control Operations Concepts. Volume 6. ARTCC (Air Route Traffic Control Center)/Host En Route Controllers. Change 1

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-07-29

    B1 12, Volume VI C. M . Hostetler, E. E. Inman, and G. W, Jones - --W~ ntN. TAS 9. Performance Organization Nam~e and Address 11...DTF-AO1-85-Y-01 034 6 NOVEMBER 1987 Prepared By: H. L. Arnz.uerman L. J. Bergen D. K. Davies C. M . Hostetler E. E. Inmrn G. W. Jones DOT/FAA/AP-87-01...Interphone, Radio, AM - Area Manager-in-Charge Direct) FS Flight Service Station TM - Traffic Management Coordinator M GI Message (unstructured text

  14. Two-Phonon Absorption

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamilton, M. W.

    2007-01-01

    A nonlinear aspect of the acousto-optic interaction that is analogous to multi-photon absorption is discussed. An experiment is described in which the second-order acousto-optically scattered intensity is measured and found to scale with the square of the acoustic intensity. This experiment using a commercially available acousto-optic modulator is…

  15. Determination of attapulgite and nifuroxazide in pharmaceutical formulations by sequential digital derivative spectrophotometry.

    PubMed

    Toral, M Inés; Paine, Maximiliano; Leyton, Patricio; Richter, Pablo

    2004-01-01

    A new method for the sequential determination of attapulgite and nifuroxazide in pharmaceutical formulations by first- and second-derivative spectrophotometry, respectively, has been developed. In order to obtain the optimal conditions for nifuroxazide stability, studies of solvent, light, and temperature effects were performed. The results show that a previous hydrolysis of 2 h in 1.0 x 10(-1)M NaOH solution is necessary in order to obtain stable compounds for analytical purposes. Subsequently, the first- and second-derivative spectra were evaluated directly in the same samples. The sequential determination of the drugs can be performed using the zero-crossing method; the attapulgite determination was carried out using the first derivative at 278.0 nm and the nifuroxazide determination, using the second derivative at 282.0 nm. The determination ranges were 5.7 x 10(-6)-1.0 x 10(-4) and 3.7 x 10(-8) -1.2 x 10(-4)M for attapulgite and nifuroxazide, respectively. Repeatability (relative standard deviation) values of 1.2 and 3.0% were observed for attapulgite and nifuroxazide, respectively. The ingredients commonly found in commercial pharmaceutical formulations do not interfere. The proposed method was applied to the determination of these drugs in tablets. Further, infrared spectroscopy and cyclic voltammetry studies were carried out in order to obtain knowledge of the decomposition products of nifuroxazide.

  16. Spectrophotometry of the Deep Impact Ejecta of Comet 9P/Tempel 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodapp, K. W.; Aldering, G.; Meech, K. J.; Cochran, A.

    We have obtained optical spectrophotometry of the evolution of comet 9P/Tempel 1 after the impact of the Deep Impact spacecraft [1], using the SNIFS Supernova Integral Field Spectrograph at the UH 2.2 m telescope. From the data-cubes, we extracted both continuum flux distributions as well as emission line fluxes of the violet CN system and of [OI].We found that the continuum brightness of the comet, i.e., scattered sunlight, started rising immediately after the impact, but that the ejecta were slightly bluer in color than the material normally released by the comet.The emission of [OI] at 630 nm, which is a tracer of water, rose similar to the scattered continuum light, but then remained nearly constant for several hours after impact.We found that CN emission at 388 nm centered on the nucleus was delayed compared to the rise of dust-scattered sunlight. This CN emission also expanded faster spatially than the cloud of scattering dust.

  17. Spectrophotometry of the galaxies and nebulosity associated with the quasar III Zw 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, R. F.; Williams, T. B.; Morton, D. C.

    1978-01-01

    Results are presented for spectrophotometry of the object III Zw 2, the faint nebulosity to the NW of its nucleus, and two associated galaxies (a normal elliptical and a more luminous late-type spiral). The object III Zw 2 is defined to be a quasar on the basis of its dominant starlike nucleus, redshift, and optical and radio variability. The spectrophotometrically measured redshifts of the two associated galaxies are shown to place III Zw 2 as a member of Zwicky Cluster 0007.7+1056, thus establishing the cosmological origin of the quasar's emission-line redshift of 0.089. It is found that the nebulosity to the NW of the quasar exhibits an emission-line spectrum at the same redshift as the nucleus with an underlying red continuum, that the strength of the forbidden lines relative to the permitted lines is 3 to 4 times greater than in the nucleus, and that the data for the nebulosity are not well fitted by a bremsstrahlung emission spectrum, but are consistent with a spectrum of starlight from an underlying galaxy at the system redshift of 0.089.

  18. Measurement of mucosal capillary hemoglobin oxygen saturation in the colon by reflectance spectrophotometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedland, Shai; Benaron, David A.; Parachikov, Ilian H.; Soetikno, Roy

    2003-06-01

    Advances in optical and computer technology have enabled the development of a device that utilizes white-light reflectance spectrophotometry to measure capillary hemoglobin saturation in intestinal mucosa during colonoscopy. Studies were performed using the colon oximeter in anesthetized animals and patients undergoing colonoscopy. Mucosal hemoglobin saturation in the normal colon (mean +/- S.D.) is 72% +/- 3.5%. In an animal model, ischemia via arterial ligation and hypoxemia via hypoxic ventilation each result in a decrease of over 40% in the mucosal saturation. In human patients with colon polyps, ischemia induced by epinephrine injection, stalk ligation using a loop, or clipping of the polyp stalk each result in a decrease of over 40% in the mucosal saturation (p<0.02). In contrast, saline injection does not decrease the mucosal saturation (p=N.S.). A patient who previously underwent partial colectomy with sacrifice of the inferior mesenteric artery had a saturation of 55% in the remaining sigmoid colon, with normal values in the superior mesenteric artery territory (p<0.05). A novel device for measuring capillary hemoglobin saturation in intestinal mucosa during colonoscopy is capable of providing reproducible measurements in normal patients and clearly detects dramatic decreases in saturation with ischemic and hypoxic insults.

  19. Direct UV Spectrophotometry and HPLC Determination of Triton X-100 in Split Virus Influenza Vaccine.

    PubMed

    Pavlović, Bojana; Cvijetić, Nataša; Dragačević, Luka; Ivković, Branka; Vujić, Zorica; Kuntić, Vesna

    2016-01-01

    One of the most commonly used surfactants in the production of split virus influenza vaccine is nonionic surfactant Triton X-100. After splitting of the virus is accomplished, Triton X-100 is removed from the vaccine by subsequent production steps. Because of toxicity of Triton X-100, which remains in the vaccine in residual amounts, a sufficiently sensitive method for its detection and quantification needs to be defined. Two methods for determination of Triton X-100 residuals were developed: the UV-spectrophotometry and HPLC methods. For both methods, preparation of vaccine samples and removal of proteins and virus particles were crucial: samples were treated with methanol (1:1) and then centrifuged at 25 000 × g for 30 min. After such treatment, the majority of vaccine components that interfered in the UV region were removed, and diluted samples could be directly measured. The chromatographic system included C18 column, step methanol gradient, and detection at 225 nm with a single peak of Triton X-100 at 12.6 min. Both methods were validated and gave satisfactory results for accuracy, precision, specificity, linearity, and robustness. LOQ was slightly lower for the HPLC method. Hence, it was shown that both methods are suitable for analysis of residual amounts of Triton X-100, with the advantages of the UV method being its simplicity and availability in most laboratories.

  20. Determination of Oxytetracycline from Salmon Muscle and Skin by Derivative Spectrophotometry.

    PubMed

    Toral, M Inés; Sabay, Tamara; Orellana, Sandra L; Richter, Pablo

    2015-01-01

    A method was developed for the identification and quantification of oxytetracycline residues present in salmon muscle and skin using UV-Vis derivative spectrophotometry. With this method, it was possible to reduce the number of steps in the procedure typically required for instrumental analysis of a sample. The spectral variables, order of the derivative, scale factor, smoothing factor, and analytical wavelength were optimized using standard solutions of oxytetracycline dissolved in 900 mg/L oxalic acid in methanol. The matrix effect was significant; therefore, quantification for oxytetracycline residues was carried out using drug-free salmon muscle and skin samples fortified with oxytetracycline. The LOD and LOQ were found to be 271 and 903 μg/kg, respectively. The precision and accuracy of the method were validated using drug-free salmon muscle and skin tissues fortified at three different concentrations (8, 16, and 32 mg/kg) on 3 different days. The recoveries at all fortified concentrations were between 90 and 105%, and RSDs in all cases were less than 6.5%. This method can be used to screen out compliant samples and thereby reduce the number of suspect positive samples that will require further confirmatory analysis.

  1. Application of response surface methodology for determination of methyl red in water samples by spectrophotometry method.

    PubMed

    Khodadoust, Saeid; Ghaedi, Mehrorang

    2014-12-10

    In this study a rapid and effective method (dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (DLLME)) was developed for extraction of methyl red (MR) prior to its determination by UV-Vis spectrophotometry. Influence variables on DLLME such as volume of chloroform (as extractant solvent) and methanol (as dispersive solvent), pH and ionic strength and extraction time were investigated. Then significant variables were optimized by using a Box-Behnken design (BBD) and desirability function (DF). The optimized conditions (100μL of chloroform, 1.3mL of ethanol, pH 4 and 4% (w/v) NaCl) resulted in a linear calibration graph in the range of 0.015-10.0mgmL(-1) of MR in initial solution with R(2)=0.995 (n=5). The limits of detection (LOD) and limit of quantification (LOQ) were 0.005 and 0.015mgmL(-1), respectively. Finally, the DLLME method was applied for determination of MR in different water samples with relative standard deviation (RSD) less than 5% (n=5).

  2. Application of response surface methodology for determination of methyl red in water samples by spectrophotometry method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khodadoust, Saeid; Ghaedi, Mehrorang

    2014-12-01

    In this study a rapid and effective method (dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (DLLME) was developed for extraction of methyl red (MR) prior to its determination by UV-Vis spectrophotometry. Influence variables on DLLME such as volume of chloroform (as extractant solvent) and methanol (as dispersive solvent), pH and ionic strength and extraction time were investigated. Then significant variables were optimized by using a Box-Behnken design (BBD) and desirability function (DF). The optimized conditions (100 μL of chloroform, 1.3 mL of ethanol, pH 4 and 4% (w/v) NaCl) resulted in a linear calibration graph in the range of 0.015-10.0 mg mL-1 of MR in initial solution with R2 = 0.995 (n = 5). The limits of detection (LOD) and limit of quantification (LOQ) were 0.005 and 0.015 mg mL-1, respectively. Finally, the DLLME method was applied for determination of MR in different water samples with relative standard deviation (RSD) less than 5% (n = 5).

  3. Endoscopic reflectance spectrophotometry and visible light spectroscopy in clinical gastrointestinal studies.

    PubMed

    Leung, Felix W

    2008-06-01

    The use of reflectance spectrophotometry (RS) for mucosal hemodynamic measurement relies on the recognition of changes in indexes of mucosal hemoglobin concentration and oxygen saturation. Endoscopic application in clinical studies has confirmed important observations demonstrated in animal experiments. The vasoconstriction induced by propranolol, vasopressin, glypressin, or somatostatin in the portal hypertensive gastric mucosa and the reduction of gastroduodenal mucosal perfusion by nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) or smoking, mesenteric venoconstriction associated with systemic hypoxia, and acid-induced duodenal hyperemia are important examples. Prognostic predictions include the development of stress-induced gastric ulcerations in patients with significant reductions in gastric perfusion after thermal or head injury, or the demonstration of delayed gastric or duodenal ulcer healing when the hyperemia at the ulcer margin fails to materialize. In mechanical-ventilator-dependent patients with sepsis, a significantly reduced gastric mucosal RS measurement portends a grave prognosis (mortality >80%). Recent advances in technology resulted in the construction and validation of instruments for visible light spectroscopy. Measurements focused on tissue oxygen saturation demonstrated epinephrine and vessel-ligation-induced vasoconstriction, the absence of ischemia in radiation-induced rectal telangiectasias, and gut ischemia responsive to revascularization treatment. Endoscopic RS and visible light spectroscopy are suitable for assessing the role of blood flow in conditions with a lesser degree of ischemia and for testing the hypothesis that functional dyspepsia and dysmotility syndromes may be due to gut ischemia.

  4. Determination of myoglobin based on its enzymatic activity by stopped-flow spectrophotometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Qi; Liu, Zhihong; Cai, Ruxiu

    2005-04-01

    A new method has been developed for the determination of myoglobin (Mb) based on its enzymatic activity for the oxidation of o-phenylenediamine (OPDA) with hydrogen peroxide. Stopped-flow spectrophotometry was used to study the kinetic behavior of the oxidation reaction. The catalytic activity of Mb was compared to other three kinds of catalyst. The time dependent absorbance of the reaction product, 2,3-diamimophenazine (DAPN), at a wavelength of 426 nm was recorded. The initial reaction rate obtained at 40 °C was found to be proportional to the concentration of Mb in the range of 1.0 × 10 -6 to 4.0 × 10 -9 mol L -1. The detection limit of Mb was found to be 9.93 × 10 -10 mol L -1. The relative standard deviations were within 5% for the determination of different concentrations of Mb. Excess of bovine serum albumin (BSA), Ca(II), Mg(II), Cu(II), glucose, caffeine, lactose and uric acid did not interfere.

  5. Fourier transform infrared spectrophotometry for thin film monitors: computer and equipment integration for enhanced capabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cox, J. Neal; Sedayao, J.; Shergill, Gurmeet S.; Villasol, R.; Haaland, David M.

    1991-03-01

    Fourier transform infrared spectrophotometry (FTIR) is a valuable technique for monitoring thin films used in semiconductor device manufacture. Determinations of the constituent contents in borophosphosilicate (BPSG) phosphosilicate (PSG) silicon oxynitride (SiON:H and spin-on-glass (SOG) thin films are a few applications. Due to the nature of the technique FTIR instrumentation is one of the most extensively computer-dependent pieces of equipment that is likely to be found in a microelectronics plant. In the role of fab monitor or reactor characterization tool FTIR instruments can rapidly generate large amounts of data. Also the drive for greater accuracy and tighter precision is leading to the development of increasingly sophisticated data processing software that tax the computing abilities of most instrument local data stations. By linking a local FTIR data station to a remote minicomputer its capabilities are greatly improved. We discuss three classes of enhancement. First the FTIR in the fab area communicates and interacts in real time with the minicomputer: transferring data segments to it instructing it to perform sophisticated processing and returning the results to the operator in the fab. Characterizations of PSG thin films by this approach are discussed. Second the spectra of large numbers of samples are processed locally. The large database is then transmitted to the minicomputer for study by statistical/graphics software. Results of CVD-reactor spatial profiling experiments for plasma SiON are presented. Third processing of calibration spectra is performed

  6. Tissue spectrophotometry and thermographic imaging applied to routine clinical prediction of amputation level viability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanson, Jon M.; Harrison, David K.; Hawthorn, Ian E.

    2002-06-01

    About 5% of British males over 50 years develop peripheral arterial occlusive disease. Of these about 2% ultimately require lower limb amputation. In 1995 we proposed a new technique using lightguide spectrophotometry to measure the oxygen saturation level of haemoglobin (SO2) in the skin as a method for predicting tissue viability. This technique, in combination with thermographic imaging, was compared with skin blood flow measurements using the I125)4- Iodoantipyrine (IAP) clearance technique. The optical techniques gave a sensitivity and selectivity of 1.0 for the prediction of successful outcome of a below knee amputation compared with a specificity of 93% using the traditional IAP technique at a below knee to above knee amputation ratio (BKA:AKA) of 75%. The present study assesses the routine clinical application of these optical techniques. The study is ongoing, but the data to date comprises 22 patients. 4 patients were recommended for above knee amputation (AKA) and 18 patients for below knee amputation on the basis of thermographic and tissue SO2 measurements. All but one of the predicted BKA amputations healed. The study to date produces evidence of 94% healing rate (specificity) for a BKA:AKA ratio of 82%. This compares favorably with the previous figures given above.

  7. [Mutual Effect on Determination of Gibberellins and Glyphosate in Groundwater by Spectrophotometry].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Li; Chen, Liang; Liu, Fei

    2015-04-01

    In the present study, a spectrophotometry method for the simultaneous determination of gibberellins (GA3) and glyphosate in groundwater was established and optimized. In addition, the mutual effect on simultaneous determination of GA3 and glyphosate was studied. Based on the experiment, good linearity (R2 > 0.99) was obtained for GA3 in the range of 0-20 and 0-100 µg and for glyphosate in the range of 0-8 and 5-15 µg. The method's detection limit (MDL) of GA3 and glyphosate was 0.48 and 0.82 µg, respectively; and the recovery rates of 15 to 150 µg GA3 and 3 to 10 µg glyphosate in all samples at a spiked level were 71.3% ± 1.9% and 98.4% ± 8.1%, respectively. No obvious influence of glyphosate (0-100 mg · L(-1)) on the recovery rates of GA3 was observed, but the presence of glyphosate could cause slight determination precision decrease of GA3. Meanwhile, adding 2 mg · L(-1) GA3 can increase the recovery rate of glyphosate.

  8. Blood oxygen saturation determined by transmission spectrophotometry of hemolyzed blood samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malik, W. M.

    1967-01-01

    Use of the Lambert-Beer Transmission Law determines blood oxygen saturation of hemolyzed blood samples. This simplified method is based on the difference in optical absorption properties of hemoglobin and oxyhemoglobin.

  9. The origin of the excess transit absorption in the HD 189733 system: planet or star?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnes, J. R.; Haswell, C. A.; Staab, D.; Anglada-Escudé, G.

    2016-10-01

    We have detected excess absorption in the emission cores of Ca II H&K during transits of HD 189733b for the first time. Using observations of three transits, we investigate the origin of the absorption, which is also seen in Hα and the Na I D lines. Applying differential spectrophotometry methods to the Ca II H and Ca II K lines combined, using respective passband widths of Δλ = 0.4 and 0.6 Å yields excess absorption of td = 0.0074 ± 0.0044 (1.7σ; Transit 1) and 0.0214 ± 0.0022 (9.8σ; Transit 2). Similarly, we detect excess Hα absorption in a passband of width Δλ = 0.7 Å, with td = 0.0084 ± 0.0016 (5.2σ) and 0.0121 ± 0.0012 (9.9σ). For both lines, Transit 2 is thus significantly deeper. Combining all three transits for the Na I D lines yields excess absorption of td = 0.0041 ± 0.0006 (6.5σ). By considering the time series observations of each line, we find that the excess apparent absorption is best recovered in the stellar reference frame. These findings lead us to postulate that the main contribution to the excess transit absorption in the differential light curves arises because the normalizing continuum bands form in the photosphere, whereas the line cores contain a chromospheric component. We cannot rule out that part of the excess absorption signature arises from the planetary atmosphere, but we present evidence which casts doubt on recent claims to have detected wind motions in the planet's atmosphere in these data.

  10. [Determination of rubidium and cesium in chloride type oilfield water by flame atomic absorption spectrometry].

    PubMed

    Ye, Xiu-Shen; Zhang, Shan-Ying; Li, Hai-Jun; Li, Wu; Wu, Zhi-Jian

    2009-03-01

    Flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS) was applied to the determination of rubidium and cesium in chloride type oilfield water by considering the interferences of the coexistent K+, Na+, Ca2+, and Mg2+ ions, Standard curve method and standard addition method were compared in the determination of rubidium and cesium in the simulated oilfield water and the real oilfield water from the Nanyishan region in Qaidam Basin. Although rubidium and cesium have similar physical-chemical properties, they present different characters during their analyses using the FAAS technique. When the standard addition method was used for the determination of rubidium and cesium in the simulated oilfield water, the results of rubidium were very poor, whereas the results of cesium were satisfactory. When the standard curve method was used for the determination of rubidium and cesium in the simulated oilfield water, the results of both rubidium and cesium were satisfactory within the linear ranges of the standard curves. For the real oilfield water, standard addition method is also only applicable for the determination of cesium with a recovery ranging from 90% to 110%. While standard curve method is applicable for the determination of both rubidium and cesium with a recovery ranging from 90% to 110%.

  11. 69. INTERIOR VIEW OF THE ABSORPTION TOWER BUILDING, ABSORPTION TOWER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    69. INTERIOR VIEW OF THE ABSORPTION TOWER BUILDING, ABSORPTION TOWER UNDER CONSTRUCTION. (DATE UNKNOWN). - United States Nitrate Plant No. 2, Reservation Road, Muscle Shoals, Muscle Shoals, Colbert County, AL

  12. Superfund record of decision (EPA Region 2): FAA Technical Center, Atlantic County, Atlantic City International Airport, NJ. (Third remedial action), September 1992. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-09-30

    The 5,000-acre FAA Technical Center site is located 8 miles northwest of Atlantic City, Atlantic Count, New Jersey, within the Atlantic Coastal Plain. In 1942, a Naval Air Base, including most of the existing runways, was constructed over two-thirds of the property. Interest in the property was transferred to the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) in 1958 for use as research and development facilities and for the 1979 construction of the existing Technical/Administration Building. From 1978 to 1985, transformers containing PCB oil were stored on a 25- by 75-foot concrete pad, referred to as Area G, located at the lumber yard near building 125 in the western portion of the property. Some transformers are known to have leaked, contaminating the concrete pad and surrounding soil. During 1989, the entire concrete pad and contaminated soil were collected, excavated, and disposed of in an approved TSCA cell of a landfill. The ROD addresses principal threats to human health or the environment associated with PCB releases from the Area G transformer storage location. Based on the results of subsequent sampling, it is believed that Area G no longer poses a threat to human health or the environment.

  13. Quantum absorption refrigerator.

    PubMed

    Levy, Amikam; Kosloff, Ronnie

    2012-02-17

    A quantum absorption refrigerator driven by noise is studied with the purpose of determining the limitations of cooling to absolute zero. The model consists of a working medium coupled simultaneously to hot, cold, and noise baths. Explicit expressions for the cooling power are obtained for Gaussian and Poisson white noise. The quantum model is consistent with the first and second laws of thermodynamics. The third law is quantified; the cooling power J(c) vanishes as J(c) ∝ T(c)(α), when T(c)→0, where α=d+1 for dissipation by emission and absorption of quanta described by a linear coupling to a thermal bosonic field, where d is the dimension of the bath.

  14. Acoustic absorption by sunspots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Braun, D. C.; Labonte, B. J.; Duvall, T. L., Jr.

    1987-01-01

    The paper presents the initial results of a series of observations designed to probe the nature of sunspots by detecting their influence on high-degree p-mode oscillations in the surrounding photosphere. The analysis decomposes the observed oscillations into radially propagating waves described by Hankel functions in a cylindrical coordinate system centered on the sunspot. From measurements of the differences in power between waves traveling outward and inward, it is demonstrated that sunspots appear to absorb as much as 50 percent of the incoming acoustic waves. It is found that for all three sunspots observed, the amount of absorption increases linearly with horizontal wavenumber. The effect is present in p-mode oscillations with wavelengths both significantly larger and smaller than the diameter of the sunspot umbrae. Actual absorption of acoustic energy of the magnitude observed may produce measurable decreases in the power and lifetimes of high-degree p-mode oscillations during periods of high solar activity.

  15. Bioacoustic Absorption Spectroscopy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-06-07

    seas in co-operation with fisheries biologists. The first planned experiment will be in the seas off California in co-operation with the Southwest... Fisheries Science Center of NOAA’s National Marine Fisheries Service. These experiments will be designed to investigate the “signatures” of the two major...formulating environmental adaptation strategies for tactical sonars. Fisheries applications: These results suggest that bioacoustic absorptivity can be used to

  16. Vehicular impact absorption system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knoell, A. C.; Wilson, A. H. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    An improved vehicular impact absorption system characterized by a plurality of aligned crash cushions of substantially cubic configuration is described. Each consists of a plurality of voided aluminum beverage cans arranged in substantial parallelism within a plurality of superimposed tiers and a covering envelope formed of metal hardware cloth. A plurality of cables is extended through the cushions in substantial parallelism with an axis of alignment for the cushions adapted to be anchored at each of the opposite end thereof.

  17. Hydrogen Absorption by Niobium.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-04-13

    incorporate an independent means for ascertaining surface cleanliness (e.g. AES). The form of the absorption curve in Fig. 7 appears to agree with that...very interesting study and is well within the capabilities of the systen designed, if the surface cleanliness can be assured. Wire specimens have a...assessing surface cleanliness would be an important supporting technique for understanding the results of these measurements. The simple kinetic

  18. Relic Neutrino Absorption Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Eberle, b

    2004-01-28

    Resonant annihilation of extremely high-energy cosmic neutrinos on big-bang relic anti-neutrinos (and vice versa) into Z-bosons leads to sizable absorption dips in the neutrino flux to be observed at Earth. The high-energy edges of these dips are fixed, via the resonance energies, by the neutrino masses alone. Their depths are determined by the cosmic neutrino background density, by the cosmological parameters determining the expansion rate of the universe, and by the large redshift history of the cosmic neutrino sources. We investigate the possibility of determining the existence of the cosmic neutrino background within the next decade from a measurement of these absorption dips in the neutrino flux. As a by-product, we study the prospects to infer the absolute neutrino mass scale. We find that, with the presently planned neutrino detectors (ANITA, Auger, EUSO, OWL, RICE, and SalSA) operating in the relevant energy regime above 10{sup 21} eV, relic neutrino absorption spectroscopy becomes a realistic possibility. It requires, however, the existence of extremely powerful neutrino sources, which should be opaque to nucleons and high-energy photons to evade present constraints. Furthermore, the neutrino mass spectrum must be quasi-degenerate to optimize the dip, which implies m{sub {nu}} 0.1 eV for the lightest neutrino. With a second generation of neutrino detectors, these demanding requirements can be relaxed considerably.

  19. Lead Quantification in Urine Samples of Athletes by Coupling DLLME with UV-Vis Spectrophotometry.

    PubMed

    Faraji, Hakim; Helalizadeh, Masoumeh

    2017-04-01

    Urine lead level is one of the most employed measures of lead exposure and risk. The urine samples used in this study were obtained from ten healthy male cyclists. Dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction combined with ultraviolet and visible spectrophotometry was utilized for preconcentration, extraction, and determination of lead in urine samples. Optimization of the independent variables was carried out based on chemometric methods in three steps. According to the screening and optimization study, 133 μL of CCl4 (extracting solvent), 1.34 mL ethanol (dispersing solvent), pH 2.0, 0.00 % of salt, and 0.1 % O,O-diethyl dithiophosphoric (chelating agent) were used as the optimum independent variables for microextraction and determination of lead. Under the optimized conditions, R (2) was 0.9991, and linearity range was 0.01-100 μg L(-1). Precision was evaluated in terms of repeatability and intermediate precision, with relative standard deviations being <9.1 and <15.3 %, respectively. The accuracy was estimated using urine samples of cyclists as real samples and it was confirmed. The relative error of ≤5 % was considered significant in the method specificity study. The lead concentration mean for the cyclists was 3.79 μg L(-1) in urine samples. As a result, the proposed method is a robust technique to quantify lead concentrations higher than 11.6 ng L(-1) in urine samples.

  20. Use of thermal lensing spectrophotometry (TLS) for the study of mononuclear hydrolysis of uranium(IV)

    SciTech Connect

    Grenthe, I.; Bidoglio, G.; Omenetto, N.

    1989-01-11

    The possibility of using thermal lensing spectrophotometry (TLS) for the quantitative determination of chemical equilibria in very dilute (/approx/ 10/sup /minus/5/ M) aqueous solution has been explored. The hyrolysis of uranium(IV) has been used as a test case. TLS turned out to be a convenient, precise, and rapid method to obtain information about the mononuclear hydrolysis, information that is difficult to obtain with more traditional solution chemical methods. The TLS data were obtained at 25/degree/C in the concentration range of 0 /le/ /minus/log (H/sup +/) /le/ 2.8 by using a 3 M (Na,H)ClO/sub 4/ ionic medium. The data were described with the following chemical model: U/sup 4+/ + H/sub 2/O /r equilibrium/ UOH/sup 3+/ + H/sup +/, log */beta//sub 1/ = -1.65 /plus minus/ 0.05; U/sup 4+/ + 2H/sub 2/O /r equilibrium/ U(OH)/sub 2//sup 2+/ + 2H/sup +/, log */beta//sub 2/ < -4.5. Apart from its higher sensitivity, the TLS method has the same characteristics as ordinary spectrophotometric methods. The experimental results of this study and previous literature information were interpreted by using the specific ion interaction theory to give log */beta//degree//sub 1/ = -0.51 /plus minus/ 0.03 (log */beta//degree//sub 1/ is the equilibrium constant at zero ionic strength) and /Delta//epsilon/ is the ion interaction term /Delta//epsilon/ = /epsilon/(UOH/sup 3+/, ClO/sub 4//sup /minus//) + /epsilon/(H/sup +/, ClO/sub 4//sup /minus//) /minus/ /epsilon/(U/sup 4+/, ClO/sub 4//sup /minus//). 16 refs., 5 figs..

  1. Determination of crystal violet in water by direct solid phase spectrophotometry after rotating disk sorptive extraction.

    PubMed

    Manzo, Valentina; Navarro, Orielle; Honda, Luis; Sánchez, Karen; Inés Toral, M; Richter, Pablo

    2013-03-15

    The microextraction of crystal violet (CV) from water samples into polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) using the rotating disk sorptive extraction (RDSE) technique was performed. The extracting device was a small Teflon disk that had an embedded miniature magnetic stirring bar and a PDMS (560 μL) film attached to one side of the disk using double-sided tape. The extraction involves a preconcentration of CV into the PDMS, where the analyte is then directly quantified using solid phase spectrophotometry at 600 nm. Different chemical and extraction device-related variables were studied to achieve the best sensitivity for the determination. The optimum extraction was performed at pH 14 because under this condition, CV is transformed to the neutral and colorless species carbinol, which can be quantitatively transferred to the PDMS phase. Although the colorless species is the chemical form extracted in the PDMS, an intense violet coloration appeared in the phase because the -OH bond in the carbinol molecule is weakened through the formation of hydrogen bonds with the oxygen atoms of the PDMS, allowing the resonance between the three benzene rings to compensate for the charge deficit on the central carbon atom of the molecule. The accuracy and precision of the method were evaluated in river water samples spiked with 10 and 30 μg L(-1) of CV, yielding a relative standard deviation of 6.2% and 8.4% and a recovery of 98.4% and 99.4%, respectively. The method detection limit was 1.8 μg L(-1) and the limit of quantification was 5.4 μg L(-1), which can be decreased if the sample volume is increased.

  2. FTIR (Fourier Transform Infrared) spectrophotometry for thin film monitors: Computer and equipment integration for enhanced capabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cox, J. N.; Sedayao, J.; Shergill, G.; Villasol, R.; Haaland, D. M.

    Fourier transform infrared spectrophotometry (FTIR) is a valuable technique for monitoring thin films used in semiconductor device manufacture. Determinations of the constituent contents in borophosphosilicate (BPSG), phosphosilicate (PSG), silicon oxynitride (SiON:H,OH), and spin-on-glass (SOG) thin films are a few applications. Due to the nature of the technique, FTIR instrumentation is one of the most extensively computer-dependent pieces of equipment that is likely to be found in a microelectronics plant. In the role of fab monitor or reactor characterization tool, FTIR instruments can rapidly generate large amounts of data. By linking a local FTIR data station to a remote minicomputer its capabilities are greatly improved. We discuss three caused of enhancement. First, the FTIR in the fab area communicates and interacts in real time with the minicomputer: transferring data segments to it, instructing it to perform sophisticated processing, and returning the result to the operator in the fab. Characterizations of PSG thin films by this approach are discussed. Second, the spectra of large numbers of samples are processed locally. The large database is then transmitted to the minicomputer for study by statistical/graphics software. Results of CVD-reactor spatial profiling experiments for plasma SiON are presented. Third, processing of calibration spectra is performed on the minicomputer to optimize the accuracy and precision of a Partial Least Squares analysis mode. This model is then transferred to the data station in the fab. The analysis of BPSG thin films is discussed in this regard. The prospects for fully automated at-line monitoring and for real-time, in-situ monitoring will be discussed.

  3. Estimation of nitrite in source-separated nitrified urine with UV spectrophotometry.

    PubMed

    Mašić, Alma; Santos, Ana T L; Etter, Bastian; Udert, Kai M; Villez, Kris

    2015-11-15

    Monitoring of nitrite is essential for an immediate response and prevention of irreversible failure of decentralized biological urine nitrification reactors. Although a few sensors are available for nitrite measurement, none of them are suitable for applications in which both nitrite and nitrate are present in very high concentrations. Such is the case in collected source-separated urine, stabilized by nitrification for long-term storage. Ultraviolet (UV) spectrophotometry in combination with chemometrics is a promising option for monitoring of nitrite. In this study, an immersible in situ UV sensor is investigated for the first time so to establish a relationship between UV absorbance spectra and nitrite concentrations in nitrified urine. The study focuses on the effects of suspended particles and saturation on the absorbance spectra and the chemometric model performance. Detailed analysis indicates that suspended particles in nitrified urine have a negligible effect on nitrite estimation, concluding that sample filtration is not necessary as pretreatment. In contrast, saturation due to very high concentrations affects the model performance severely, suggesting dilution as an essential sample preparation step. However, this can also be mitigated by simple removal of the saturated, lower end of the UV absorbance spectra, and extraction of information from the secondary, weaker nitrite absorbance peak. This approach allows for estimation of nitrite with a simple chemometric model and without sample dilution. These results are promising for a practical application of the UV sensor as an in situ nitrite measurement in a urine nitrification reactor given the exceptional quality of the nitrite estimates in comparison to previous studies.

  4. FTIR (Fourier transform infrared) spectrophotometry for thin film monitors: Computer and equipment integration for enhanced capabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Cox, J.N.; Sedayao, J.; Shergill, G.; Villasol, R. ); Haaland, D.M. )

    1990-01-01

    Fourier transform infrared spectrophotometry (FTIR) is a valuable technique for monitoring thin films used in semiconductor device manufacture. Determinations of the constituent contents in borophosphosilicate (BPSG), phosphosilicate (PSG), silicon oxynitride (SiON:H,OH), and spin-on-glass (SOG) thin films are a few applications. Due to the nature of the technique, FTIR instrumentation is one of the most extensively computer-dependent pieces of equipment that is likely to be found in a microelectronics plant. In the role of fab monitor or reactor characterization tool, FTIR instruments can rapidly generate large amounts of data. By linking a local FTIR data station to a remote minicomputer its capabilities are greatly improved. We discuss three caused of enhancement. First, the FTIR in the fab area communicates and interacts in real time with the minicomputer: transferring data segments to it, instructing it to perform sophisticated processing, and returning the result to the operator in the fab. Characterizations of PSG thin films by this approach are discussed. Second, the spectra of large numbers of samples are processed locally. The large database is then transmitted to the minicomputer for study by statistical/graphics software. Results of CVD-reactor spatial profiling experiments for plasma SiON are presented. Third, processing of calibration spectra is performed on the minicomputer to optimize the accuracy and precision of a Partial Least Squares'' analysis mode. This model is then transferred to the data station in the fab. The analysis of BPSG thin films is discussed in this regard. The prospects for fully automated at-line monitoring and for real-time, in-situ monitoring will be discussed. 10 refs., 4 figs.

  5. Corrosion Problems in Absorption Chillers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stetson, Bruce

    1978-01-01

    Absorption chillers use a lithium bromide solution as the medium of absorption and water as the refrigerant. Discussed are corrosion and related problems, tests and remedies, and cleaning procedures. (Author/MLF)

  6. Determination of copper in tap water using solid-phase spectrophotometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, Carol M.; Street, Kenneth W.; Philipp, Warren H.; Tanner, Stephen P.

    1994-01-01

    A new application of ion exchange films is presented. The films are used in a simple analytical method of directly determining low concentrations of Cu(2+) in aqueous solutions, in particular, drinking water. The basis for this new test method is the color and absorption intensity of the ion when adsorbed onto the film. The film takes on the characteristic color of the adsorbed cation, which is concentrated on the film by many orders of magnitude. The linear relationship between absorbance (corrected for variations in film thickness) and solution concentration makes the determinations possible. These determinations agree well with flame atomic absorption determinations.

  7. Spectrophotometry of Pluto-Charon mutual events - Individual spectra of Pluto and Charon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sawyer, S. R.; Barker, E. S.; Cochran, A. L.; Cochran, W. D.

    1987-01-01

    Time-resolved spectra of the March 3 and April 4, 1987 mutual events of Pluto and Charon, obtained with spectral coverage from 5500 to 10,000 A with 25-A spectral resolution, are discussed. Charon has a featureless reflectance spectrum, with no evidence of methane absorption. Charon's reflectance appears neutral in color and corresponds to a geometric albedo of about 0.37 at 6000 A. The Pluto reflectance spectrum displays methane absorption bands at 7300, 7900, 8400, 8600, and 8900 A and is red in color, with a geometric albedo of about 0.56 at 6000 A.

  8. Acoustic Absorption Characteristics of People.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kingsbury, H. F.; Wallace, W. J.

    1968-01-01

    The acoustic absorption characteristics of informally dressed college students in typical classroom seating are shown to differ substantially from data for formally dressed audiences in upholstered seating. Absorption data, expressed as sabins per person or absorption coefficient per square foot, shows that there is considerable variation between…

  9. Determination of metals in lubricating oils by flame atomic absorption spectrometry using a single-bore high-pressure pneumatic nebulizer.

    PubMed

    Mora, J; Todolí, J L; Sempere, F J; Canals, A; Hernandis, V

    2000-12-01

    The behaviour of a single-bore high-pressure pneumatic nebulizer (SBHPPN) as a tool for the analysis of lubricating oils by flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS) was investigated. The effects of the sample oil content [from 10% to 100% (w/w) oil in 4-methylpentan-2-one, IBMK] and the carrier nature (IBMK and methanol) on the characteristics of the aerosols generated, on the analyte transport efficiency and on the analytical figures of merit in FAAS were studied. A pneumatic concentric nebulizer (PCN) was used for comparison. Increasing the oil content increases the viscosity of the sample. With the PCN this gives rise to coarser aerosols, making it impossible to nebulize samples with an oil content higher than 70% (w/w). Using the SBHPPN, the viscosity of the sample scarcely affects the characteristics of the primary aerosols. Hence, the SBHPPN is able, by using the appropriate carrier, to nebulize pure lubricating oils. Among the carriers tested, IBMK is the most advisable because it is fully miscible with all the oil samples. The SBHPPN provides higher sensitivities and lower limits of detection than the PCN. Compared with a method based on organic dilution, the use of the SBHPPN for the direct analysis of lubricating oils by FAAS makes it possible, in addition to increasing the analysis throughput, to detect elements at lower concentrations. Moreover, the SBHPPN provides similar results to those obtained using a previous acid digestion step.

  10. Sample pre-treatment methods for the trace elements determination in seafood products by atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Bermejo-Barrera, Pilar; Moreda-Piñeiro, Antonio; Bermejo-Barrera, Adela

    2002-07-03

    Different sample pre-treatments for seafood products have been compared with determine trace elements (As, Cd, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mg, Mn, Ni, Pb, Se and Zn) by flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS) and electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS). Classic pre-treatments as microwave assisted-acid digestion and the slurry sampling technique were compared with new procedures such as microwave energy or ultrasound energy assisted-acid leaching process and enzymatic hydrolysis methodologies based on the use of pronase E. The methods were applied to DORM-1 and DOLT-1 reference materials with certified contents for the studied elements. The Student-Newman-Keuls (SNK) method was used to compare with element concentration means obtained with each sample pre-treatment and also the certified concentration means in both reference materials. Multivariate techniques such as principal components analysis (PCA) was also applied to comparative purposes.

  11. Separation and extraction of Co(II) using magnetic chitosan nanoparticles grafted with β-cyclodextrin and determination by FAAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moghimi, Ali

    2014-12-01

    A novel and selective method for the fast determination of trace amounts of Co(II) ions in water samples has been developed. The procedure is based on the selective sorption of Co(II) ions using magnetic chitosan nanoparticles grafted with β-cyclodextrin at different pH followed by elution with organic eluents and determination by atomic absorption spectrometry The preconcentration factor was 100 (1 mL elution volume) for a 100 mL sample volume. The limit of detection of the proposed method is 1.0 ng mL-1. The maximum sorption capacity of sorbent under optimum conditions has been found to be 5 mg of Co per gram of sorbent. The relative standard deviation under optimum conditions was 3.0% ( n = 10). Accuracy and applicability of the method was estimated using test samples of natural and model water with different amounts of Co(II).

  12. An Investigation Into Criteria Commonly Used by the FAA to Grant Relief to Part 135 Operators Under FAR Sections: 135.213, 135.219, and/or 135.225

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Louis J.; Heck, Michael L.; Burgess, Malcolm A.; Stough, H. P. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the criteria commonly used by the FAA to grant waivers, exemptions, or deviations to FAR Part 135, Sections 135.213, 135.219, and 135.225 and the potential impact on Flight Information Services Data Link (FISDL) implementation. These aviation regulations address the requirements for the use of weather reports or forecasts when conducting operations under FAR Part 135. In this study a literature search was conducted to obtain historical records of requests for relief from the 3 FAR sections under consideration. The exemption request records were then analyzed in order to determine the reasons given by the FAA for either granting or denying the request. In addition, FAA personnel and Part 135 operators were interviewed to determine the procedures used for satisfying the requirements of the 3 FAR sections.

  13. Ultraviolet absorption hygrometer

    DOEpatents

    Gersh, Michael E.; Bien, Fritz; Bernstein, Lawrence S.

    1986-01-01

    An ultraviolet absorption hygrometer is provided including a source of pulsed ultraviolet radiation for providing radiation in a first wavelength region where water absorbs significantly and in a second proximate wavelength region where water absorbs weakly. Ultraviolet radiation in the first and second regions which has been transmitted through a sample path of atmosphere is detected. The intensity of the radiation transmitted in each of the first and second regions is compared and from this comparison the amount of water in the sample path is determined.

  14. Ultraviolet absorption hygrometer

    DOEpatents

    Gersh, M.E.; Bien, F.; Bernstein, L.S.

    1986-12-09

    An ultraviolet absorption hygrometer is provided including a source of pulsed ultraviolet radiation for providing radiation in a first wavelength region where water absorbs significantly and in a second proximate wavelength region where water absorbs weakly. Ultraviolet radiation in the first and second regions which has been transmitted through a sample path of atmosphere is detected. The intensity of the radiation transmitted in each of the first and second regions is compared and from this comparison the amount of water in the sample path is determined. 5 figs.

  15. Modular total absorption spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karny, M.; Rykaczewski, K. P.; Fijałkowska, A.; Rasco, B. C.; Wolińska-Cichocka, M.; Grzywacz, R. K.; Goetz, K. C.; Miller, D.; Zganjar, E. F.

    2016-11-01

    The design and performance of the Modular Total Absorption Spectrometer built and commissioned at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory is presented. The active volume of the detector is approximately one ton of NaI(Tl), which results in very high full γ energy peak efficiency of 71% at 6 MeV and nearly flat efficiency of around 81.5% for low energy γ-rays between 300 keV and 1 MeV. In addition to the high peak efficiency, the modular construction of the detector permits the use of a γ-coincidence technique in data analysis as well as β-delayed neutron observation.

  16. IUE spectrophotometry of the hot helium-rich PG1159 DO degenerates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sion, E. M.; Liebert, J.; Starrfield, S.; Wesemael, F.

    1984-12-01

    The PG1159 degenerates represent the hottest spectroscopic subgroup of DO stars. Their optical spectra are characterized by broad HeII (lambda 4686) absorption and several transitions of CIV, NIII and CIII. High resolution MMT scans reveal central emission reversals. The discovery of complex, non-radial pulsations in four members of the class underscores the need for accurate temperatures, gravities and abundances for these object. Low resolution IUE spectra of four PG1159 stars, PG1151-029, PG1424+535, PG1520+525 were obtained, as well as an additional image of PG1159-035 and an optical ultraviolet spectrum of PG2131+066. IUE (SWP) spectra suggest the presence of numerous metallic absorption features of CIV (lambda 1550), NV (lambda 1240) and a few unidentified features. The metal absorption lines and HEII (lambda 1640) have equivalent widths of a few angstroms. IUE/optical energy distributions are considered. Tentative identifications of CIV absorptions and possibly, weak OVI features in optical ultraviolet reticon spectra suggest a probable link to the subluminous Wolf-Rayet OV5 I planetary nuclei. The PG1159 DO degenerates are the hottest known (Te 100,000K), high gravity (log g 7 ) objects.

  17. Maps and tables showing data and analyses of semiquantitative emmission spectrometry and atomic-absorption spectrophotometry of rock samples, Ugashik, Bristol Bay, and part of Karluk quadrangles, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wilson, F.H.; O'Leary, R. M.

    1986-01-01

    The accompanying maps and tables show analytical data and data analyses from rock samples collected in conjunction with geologic mapping in the Ugashik, Bristol Bay and western Karluck quadrangles from 1979 through 1981. This work was conducted under the auspices of the Alaska Mineral Resource Assessment Program (AMRAP). A total of 337 samples were collected for analysis, primarily in areas of surficial alteration. The sample locations are shown on sheet 1: they are concentrated along the Pacific Ocean side of the area because the Bristol Bay lowlands part of the map is predominantly unconsolidated Quaternary deposits. Sample collection was by the following people, with their respective two letter identifying code shown in parentheses: W.H. Allaway (AY), J.E. Case (CE), D.P. Cox (CX), R.L. Detterman, (DT), T.G. Theodore (MK), F.H. Wilson (WS), and M.E. Yount (YB).

  18. Tables showing analyses of semiquantitative spectrometry and atomic-absorption spectrophotometry of rock samples collected in the Ugashik, Bristol Bay, and western part of the Karluk quadrangles, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wilson, Frederic H.; O'Leary, Richard M.

    1987-01-01

    The accompanying tables list chemical analyses of 337 rock samples that were collected in 1979, 1980, and 1981 in conjunction with geologic mapping in the Ugashik, Bristol Bay, and part of Karluk quadrangles. This work was conducted under the auspices of the Alaska Mineral Resource Assessment Program (AMRAP). This report is to accompany Wilson and O'Leary (1986) which inadvertently is missing most of the data tables listed here. Together the two reports contain the complete data from all samples collected for the Ugashik AMRAP.

  19. Extraction and preconcentration of copper from water, soils, lubricating oils and plant materials and its subsequent determination by atomic-absorption spectrophotometry.

    PubMed

    Ejaz, M; Shamus-Zuha; Dil, W; Akhtar, A; Chaudhri, S A

    1981-07-01

    The extraction and preconcentration of the cupric thiocyanate complex with 4-(5-nonyl)pyridine in benzene is possible from neutral or up to 2M HCl, 0.5M HNO(3) or 0.25M H(2)SO(4) solutions. The method has considerable advantages over previously recommended extraction procedures because of selectivity, completeness of extraction in a single operation, short contact period, minimum amount of complexing agents needed and wide tolerance to various solution parameters. The complex formed from as little as 1 mug of copper can be extracted quantitatively into 1 ml of the organic phase from 500 ml of natural water. An extraction method is described which in combination with AAS can be used to determine copper in water, soils, fresh and used lubricating oils and plant-ash solutions down to the ng/ml or ng/g level.

  20. Simultaneous determination of mercury and organic carbon in sediment and soils using a direct mercury analyzer based on thermal decomposition-atomic absorption spectrophotometry.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jingjing; Chakravarty, Pragya; Davidson, Gregg R; Wren, Daniel G; Locke, Martin A; Zhou, Ying; Brown, Garry; Cizdziel, James V

    2015-04-29

    The purpose of this work was to study the feasibility of using a direct mercury analyzer (DMA) to simultaneously determine mercury (Hg) and organic matter content in sediment and soils. Organic carbon was estimated by re-weighing the sample boats post analysis to obtain loss-on-ignition (LOI) data. The DMA-LOI results were statistically similar (p<0.05) to the conventional muffle furnace approach. A regression equation was developed to convert DMA-LOI data to total organic carbon (TOC), which varied between 0.2% and 13.0%. Thus, mercury analyzers based on combustion can provide accurate estimates of organic carbon content in non-calcareous sediment and soils; however, weight gain from moisture (post-analysis), measurement uncertainty, and sample representativeness should all be taken into account. Sediment cores from seasonal wetland and open water areas from six oxbow lakes in the Mississippi River alluvial flood plain were analyzed. Wetland sediments generally had higher levels of Hg than open water areas owing to a greater fraction of fine particles and higher levels of organic matter. Annual loading of Hg in open water areas was estimated at 4.3, 13.4, 19.2, 20.7, 129, and 135 ng cm(-2) yr(-1) for Beasley, Roundaway, Hampton, Washington, Wolf and Sky Lakes, respectively. Generally, the interval with the highest Hg flux was dated to the 1960s and 1970s.

  1. Use of reflectance spectrophotometry and colorimetry in a general linear model for the determination of the age of bruises.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Vanessa K; Langlois, Neil E I

    2010-12-01

    Bruises can have medicolegal significance such that the age of a bruise may be an important issue. This study sought to determine if colorimetry or reflectance spectrophotometry could be employed to objectively estimate the age of bruises. Based on a previously described method, reflectance spectrophotometric scans were obtained from bruises using a Cary 100 Bio spectrophotometer fitted with a fibre-optic reflectance probe. Measurements were taken from the bruise and a control area. Software was used to calculate the first derivative at 490 and 480 nm; the proportion of oxygenated hemoglobin was calculated using an isobestic point method and a software application converted the scan data into colorimetry data. In addition, data on factors that might be associated with the determination of the age of a bruise: subject age, subject sex, degree of trauma, bruise size, skin color, body build, and depth of bruise were recorded. From 147 subjects, 233 reflectance spectrophotometry scans were obtained for analysis. The age of the bruises ranged from 0.5 to 231.5 h. A General Linear Model analysis method was used. This revealed that colorimetric measurement of the yellowness of a bruise accounted for 13% of the bruise age. By incorporation of the other recorded data (as above), yellowness could predict up to 32% of the age of a bruise-implying that 68% of the variation was dependent on other factors. However, critical appraisal of the model revealed that the colorimetry method of determining the age of a bruise was affected by skin tone and required a measure of the proportion of oxygenated hemoglobin, which is obtained by spectrophotometric methods. Using spectrophotometry, the first derivative at 490 nm alone accounted for 18% of the bruise age estimate. When additional factors (subject sex, bruise depth and oxygenation of hemoglobin) were included in the General Linear Model this increased to 31%-implying that 69% of the variation was dependent on other factors. This

  2. Determination of vitamin B6 by means of differential spectrophotometry in pharmaceutical preparations in the presence of magnesium compounds.

    PubMed

    Muszalska, Izabela; Puchalska, Marta; Sobczak, Agnieszka

    2011-01-01

    The content of pyridoxine hydrochloride in two-component pharmaceutical preparations containing various magnesium compounds was examined. The UV differentiation spectrophotometry was devised and compared with the reference method of high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The analysis of the absorbance spectra (A) and its first (D1) and second (D2) derivatives made it possible to establish the appropriate analytical wavelengths (A: 290 nm; D1: 302 nm; D2: 308 nm). It was proved that spectrum differentiation significantly corrects errors resulting from overlapping background especially when the magnesium hydroaspartate, lactate or magnesium lactogluconate is present together with vitamin B6.

  3. [Quantitative determination of the protein content of milk by ultraviolet spectrophotometry. 3. Determination of proteins in preserved milk samples].

    PubMed

    Reichardt, W; Schüler, E; Sieber, L; Schüler, E

    1987-01-01

    It is reported upon the results of the quantitative estimation of protein content from preserved milk by means of ultraviolet spectrophotometry. In addition to the preservation by boric acid, bronopol, copper sulphate, potassium dichromate and ammonium peroxodisulphate storage at temperatures below 0 degrees C and freeze drying were tested. Besides bronopol and copper sulphate especially physical preservation methods proves fit for the protein estimation by measurements of absorbance at 210 nm, 235 and 280 nm or 210 and 220 nm. It is recommended to use solutions and filters of quartz with evaluated absorbance in daily calibrating of the spectrophotometer.

  4. Preconcentration and determination of trace silver ion using benzothiazole calix[4]arene modified silica by flow injection flame atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Waluvanaruk, Jitwilai; Aeungmaitrepirom, Wanlapa; Tuntulani, Thawatchai; Ngamukot, Passapol

    2014-01-01

    The silica gel modified with benzothiazole calix[4]arene (APS-L1) via Schiff's base reaction was applied as a sorbent in an online system for preconcentration and determination of silver ion by flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS). APS-L1 was used as an effective sorbent for solid phase extraction (SPE) of silver(I) ion in both batch and column methods. The optimum experimental parameters such as pH, eluent type, sample flow rate, eluent volume and eluent flow rate including the effect of interfering ions were investigated. Silver(I) ion was determined at pH 6-7. The capacity of APS-L1 sorbent was found to be 12.2 mg/g of sorbent. The high affinity was obtained without interference from the interfering ions. The optimum conditions of the online flow injection preconcentration coupled with the FAAS (FI-FAAS system) were evaluated. The sample flow rate was 3.0 mL min(-1) using sample volume of 5-10 mL. Elution was performed with 250 μL of 0.1 mol L(-1) thiosulfate at the flow rate of 1.5 mL min(-1). The analytical characteristics and performance of the FI-FAAS system were studied under optimum conditions using a solution spiked with standard silver(I) ion at 20 and 50 μg L(-1). The detection limit of 0.44 μg L(-1) was obtained. The accuracy of the proposed method was evaluated and percentages of recovery at 20 and 50 μg L(-1) were 100.2 and 99.5%, respectively. The percent relative standard deviations (%RSD) at 20 and 50 μg L(-1) were 6.1 and 3.3%, respectively. The developed method was successfully applied to determine trace silver(I) ion in drinking and tap water samples.

  5. Correlation between the Gas Temperature and the Atomization Behavior of Analyte Elements in Flame Atomic Absorption Spectrometry Estimated with a Continuum-light-source Spectrometer System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toya, Yusuke; Itagaki, Toshiko; Wagatsuma, Kazuaki

    2016-11-01

    In flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS), the gas temperature for two types of the gas compositions, which was estimated based on a two-line method by using a simultaneous multi-wavelength spectrometer, on which a line pair of ruthenium, Ru I 372.692 nm and Ru I 372.803 nm having different excitation energies, was measured at the same time. Also using the spectrometer system, the absorption signals of both iron and ruthenium, whose oxides had different thermodynamic properties: the latter oxide was decomposed much more easily than the former one, were investigated with a nitrous oxide - acetylene flame, in comparison with an air - acetylene flame. The fuel/oxidant ratio of both the flames as well as the height of the optical path was varied as an experimental parameter. The atomization behavior of iron and ruthenium, which could be deduced from a variation in their absorption signals, was considered to be dependent not only on the gas temperature but on reducing atmosphere of the flame gas, which might be attributed to reducing radicals in a fuel-excess flame consisting of nitrous oxide. In the nitrous oxide - acetylene flame, a broader optical path having a constant and higher temperature was obtained, thus contributing to formation of analyte atoms with a stable atomization efficiency and eventually to better precision in the analytical result in FAAS.

  6. The HI absorption "Zoo"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geréb, K.; Maccagni, F. M.; Morganti, R.; Oosterloo, T. A.

    2015-03-01

    We present an analysis of the H I 21 cm absorption in a sample of 101 flux-selected radio AGN (S1.4 GHz> 50 mJy) observed with the Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope (WSRT). We detect H I absorption in 32 objects (30% of the sample). In a previous paper, we performed a spectral stacking analysis on the radio sources, while here we characterize the absorption spectra of the individual detections using the recently presented busy function. The H I absorption spectra show a broad variety of widths, shapes, and kinematical properties. The full width half maximum (FWHM) of the busy function fits of the detected H I lines lies in the range 32 km s-1absorption (FW20) lies in the range 63 km s-1 200 km s-1). We study the kinematical and radio source properties of each group, with the goal of identifying different morphological structures of H I. Narrow lines mostly lie at the systemic velocity and are likely produced by regularly rotating H I disks or gas clouds. More H I disks can be present among galaxies with lines of intermediate widths; however, the H I in these sources is more unsettled. We study the asymmetry parameter and blueshift/redshift distribution of the lines as a function of their width. We find a trend for which narrow profiles are also symmetric, while broad lines are the most asymmetric. Among the broadest lines, more lines appear blueshifted than redshifted, similarly to what was found by previous studies. Interestingly, symmetric broad lines are absent from the sample. We argue that if a profile is broad, it is also asymmetric and shifted relative to the systemic velocity because it is tracing unsettled H I gas. In particular, besides three of the broadest (up to FW20 = 825 km s-1

  7. New methods for determination of cinnarizine in mixture with piracetam by spectrodensitometry, spectrophotometry, and liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Metwally, Fadia H; Elzeany, B A; Darwish, H W

    2005-01-01

    Four new methods were developed and validated for the determination of cinnarizine HCl in its binary mixture with piracetam in pure and pharmaceutical preparations. The first one was a densitometric analysis that provides a simple and rapid method for the separation and quantification of cinnarizine HCI. The method depends on the quantitative densitometric evaluation of thin-layer chromatograms of cinnarizine HCI at 252 nm over concentration range of 1-6 microg/spot, with a mean accuracy of 100.05 +/- 0.91%. The second method was determination of the drug using a colorimetric method that utilizes the reaction of 3-methyl-benzothiazolin-2-one in the presence of FeCl3 as an oxidant. The green color of the resulting product was measured at 630 nm over concentration range 10-40 microg/mL, with a mean accuracy of 100.10 +/- 1.13%. The third method was a direct spectrophotometric determination of cinnarizine HCI at 252 nm over the concentration range 7-20 microg/mL, while piracetam was determined by derivative ratio spectrophotometry at 221.6 nm over concentration range 5-30 microg/mL, with a mean accuracy of 100.14 +/- 0.79 and 100.26 +/- 1.24% for cinnarizine HCI and piracetam, respectively. The last method was a liquid chromatography analysis of both cinnarizine HCI and piracetam, depending on quantitative evaluation of chromatograms of cinnarizine HCI and piracetam at 252 and 212 nm, respectively, over the concentration range 10-200 microg/mL for cinnarizine HCI and 20-500 microg/mL for piracetam, with a mean accuracy of 100.03 +/- 0.89 and 100.40 +/- 0.94% for cinnarizine HCI and piracetam, respectively. The proposed procedures were checked using laboratory-prepared mixtures and successfully applied for the analysis of their pharmaceutical preparations. The validity of the proposed procedures was further assessed by applying the standard addition technique. Recoveries were quantitative, and the results obtained agreed with those obtained by other reported methods.

  8. Detecting estrogenic activity in water samples withestrogen-sensitive yeast cells using spectrophotometry and fluorescencemicroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Wozei, E.; Holman, H-Y.N.; Hermanowicz, S.W.; Borglin S.

    2006-03-15

    Environmental estrogens are environmental contaminants that can mimic the biological activities of the female hormone estrogen in the endocrine system, i.e. they act as endocrine disrupters. Several substances are reported to have estrogen-like activity or estrogenic activity. These include steroid hormones, synthetic estrogens (xenoestrogens), environmental pollutants and phytoestrogens (plant estrogens). Using the chromogenic substrate ortho-nitrophenyl-{beta}-D-galactopyranoside (ONPG) we show that an estrogen-sensitive yeast strain RMY/ER-ERE, with human estrogen receptor (hER{alpha}) gene and the lacZ gene which encodes the enzyme {beta}-galactosidase, is able to detect estrogenic activity in water samples over a wide range of spiked concentrations of the hormonal estrogen 17{beta}-estradiol (E2). Ortho-nitrophenol (ONP), the yellow product of this assay can be detected using spectrophotometry but requires cell lysis to release the enzyme and allow product formation. We improved this aspect in a fluorogenic assay by using fluorescein di-{beta}-D-galactopyranoside (FDG) as a substrate. The product was visualized using fluorescence microscopy without the need to kill, fix or lyse the cells. We show that in live yeast cells, the uptake of E2 and the subsequent production of {beta}-galactosidase enzyme occur quite rapidly, with maximum enzyme-catalyzed fluorescent product formation evident after about 30 minutes of exposure to E2. The fluorogenic assay was applied to a selection of estrogenic compounds and the Synchrotron-based Fourier transform infrared (SR-FTIR) spectra of the cells obtained to better understand the yeast whole cell response to the compounds. The fluorogenic assay is most sensitive to E2, but the SR-FTIR spectra suggest that the cells respond to all the estrogenic compounds tested even when no fluorescent response was detected. These findings are promising and may shorten the duration of environmental water screening and monitoring regimes using

  9. Development of an inexpensive and sensitive method for the determination of low quantity of arsenic species in water samples by CPE-FAAS.

    PubMed

    Ulusoy, Halil İbrahim; Akçay, Mehmet; Gürkan, Ramazan

    2011-09-15

    The simple and rapid preconcentration technique using cloud point extraction (CPE) was applied for the determination of As(V) and total inorganic arsenic (As(V) plus As(III)) in water samples by means of FAAS. As(V) has formed an ion-pairing complex with Pyronine B in the presence of cetyl pyridinium chloride (CPC) at pH 8.0 and extracted into the non-ionic surfactant Triton X-114, after centrifugation the surfactant-rich phase was separated and diluted with 1.0 mol L(-1) HNO(3) in methanol. The proposed method is very versatile and economic because it exclusively used conventional FAAS. After optimization of the CPE conditions, a preconcentration factor of 120, the detection and quantification limits of 1.67 and 5.06 μg L(-1) with a correlation coefficient of 0.9978 were obtained from the calibration curve constructed in the range of 5.0-2200 μg L(-1). The relative standard deviation, RSD as a measure of precision was less than 4.1% and the recoveries were in the range of 98.2-102.4%, 97.4-101.2% and 97.8-101.1% for As(V), As(III) and total As, respectively. The method was validated by the analysis of standard reference materials, TMDA-53.3 and NIST 1643e and applied to the determination of As(III) and As(V) in some real samples including natural drinking water and tap water samples with satisfactory results. The results obtained (34.70±1.08 μg L(-1) and 60.25±1.07 μg L(-1)) were in good agreement with the certified values (34.20±1.38 μg L(-1) and 60.45±1.78 μg L(-1)).

  10. Determination of tributyltin in tissues and sediments by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Stephenson, M.D.; Smith, D.R.

    1988-04-01

    A method for the determination of tributyltin (TBT) in tissue and sediments has been developed for environmental samples. The technique involves extraction with methylene chloride and isolation of TBT from mono- and dibutyltin with a sodium hydroxide wash. The TBT is then back extracted and converted to elemental Sn with nitric acid. Analysis is by Zeeman graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrophotometry. Recoveries of spiked samples were between 99% and 111% for mussel and fish tissues and 72% and 99% for various sediments. The limit of quantification was 0.0025 ..mu..g/g for tissue (on a wet weight basis). This technique was developed in response to their need to process large numbers of environmental samples with a minimum time investment.

  11. An atomic-absorption method for the determination of gold in large samples of geologic materials

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    VanSickle, Gordon H.; Lakin, Hubert William

    1968-01-01

    A laboratory method for the determination of gold in large (100-gram) samples has been developed for use in the study of the gold content of placer deposits and of trace amounts of gold in other geologic materials. In this method the sample is digested with bromine and ethyl ether, the gold is extracted into methyl isobutyl ketone, and the determination is made by atomicabsorption spectrophotometry. The lower limit of detection is 0.005 part per million in the sample. The few data obtained so far by this method agree favorably with those obtained by assay and by other atomic-absorption methods. About 25 determinations can be made per man-day.

  12. Determination of calcium, magnesium and zinc in unused lubricating oils by atomic absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Udoh, A P

    1995-12-01

    Varying concentrations of lanthanum and strontium were added to solutions of ashed unused lubricating oils for the determination of calcium, magnesium and zinc content using flame atomic absorption spectrophotometry. At least 3000 mug g(-1) of lanthanum or strontium was required to completely overcome the interference of the phosphate ion, PO(3-)(4), and give peak values for calcium. The presence of lanthanum or strontium did not cause an appreciable increase in the amount of magnesium and zinc obtained from the analyses. The method is fast and reproducible, and the coefficients of variation calculated for the elements using one of the samples were 1.6% for calcium, 3.5% for magnesium and 0.2% for zinc. Results obtained by this method were better than those obtained by other methods for the same samples.

  13. An on-line pre-concentration system for determination of cadmium in drinking water using FAAS.

    PubMed

    dos Santos, Walter N L; Costa, Jorge L O; Araujo, Rennan G O; de Jesus, Djane S; Costa, Antônio C S

    2006-10-11

    In the present paper, a minicolumn of polyurethane foam loaded with 4-(2-pyridylazo)-resorcinol (PAR) is proposed as pre-concentration system for cadmium determination in drinking water samples by flame atomic absorption spectrometry. The optimization step was performed using two-level full factorial design and Doehlert matrix, involving the variables: sampling flow rate, elution concentration, buffer concentration and pH. Using the established experimental conditions in the optimization step of: pH 8.2, sampling flow rate 8.5 mL min(-1), buffer concentration 0.05 mol L(-1) and elution concentration of 1.0 mol L(-1), this system allows the determination of cadmium with detection limit (LD) (3sigma/S) of 20.0 ng L(-1) and quantification limit (LQ) (10sigma/S) of 64 ng L(-1), precision expressed as relative standard deviation (R.S.D.) of 5.0 and 4.7% for cadmium concentration of 5.0 and 40.0 microg L(-1), respectively, and a pre-concentration factor of 158 for a sample volume of 20.0 mL. The accuracy was confirmed by cadmium determination in the standard reference material, NIST SRM 1643d trace elements in natural water. This procedure was applied for cadmium determination in drinking water samples collected from Salvador City, Bahia, Brazil. For five samples analyzed, the achieved concentrations varied from 0.31 to 0.86 microg L(-1).

  14. Analyzing Water's Optical Absorption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    A cooperative agreement between World Precision Instruments (WPI), Inc., and Stennis Space Center has led the UltraPath(TM) device, which provides a more efficient method for analyzing the optical absorption of water samples at sea. UltraPath is a unique, high-performance absorbance spectrophotometer with user-selectable light path lengths. It is an ideal tool for any study requiring precise and highly sensitive spectroscopic determination of analytes, either in the laboratory or the field. As a low-cost, rugged, and portable system capable of high- sensitivity measurements in widely divergent waters, UltraPath will help scientists examine the role that coastal ocean environments play in the global carbon cycle. UltraPath(TM) is a trademark of World Precision Instruments, Inc. LWCC(TM) is a trademark of World Precision Instruments, Inc.

  15. Differential optoacoustic absorption detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shumate, M. S. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    A differential optoacoustic absorption detector employed two tapered cells in tandem or in parallel. When operated in tandem, two mirrors were used at one end remote from the source of the beam of light directed into one cell back through the other, and a lens to focus the light beam into the one cell at a principal focus half way between the reflecting mirror. Each cell was tapered to conform to the shape of the beam so that the volume of one was the same as for the other, and the volume of each received maximum illumination. The axes of the cells were placed as close to each other as possible in order to connect a differential pressure detector to the cells with connecting passages of minimum length. An alternative arrangement employed a beam splitter and two lenses to operate the cells in parallel.

  16. Two absorption furosemide prodrugs.

    PubMed

    Mombrú, A W; Mariezcurrena, R A; Suescun, L; Pardo, H; Manta, E; Prandi, C

    1999-03-15

    The structures of two absorption furosemide prodrugs, hexanoyloxymethyl 4-chloro-N-furfuryl-5-sulfamoyl-anthranilate (C19H23CIN2O7S), (I), and benzoyloxymethyl 4-chloro-N-furfuryl-5-sulfamoylanthranilate (C20H17CIN2O7S), (II), are described in this paper and compared with furosemide and four other prodrugs. The molecular conformations of both compounds are similar to those of the other prodrugs; the packing and the crystal system are the primary differences. Compound (I) crystallizes in the trigonal space group R3 and compound (II) in the monoclinic space group P2(1)/n. The packing of both structures is stabilized by a three-dimensional hydrogen-bond network.

  17. Calculation of optical band gaps of a-Si:H thin films by ellipsometry and UV-Vis spectrophotometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Yijiao; Li, Wei; Wu, Maoyang; Fu, Junwei; Jiang, Yadong

    2010-10-01

    Hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) thin films doped with Phosphorus (P) and Nitrogen (N) were deposited by radio frequency plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (RF-PECVD). The optical band gaps of the thin films obtained through either changing the gas pressure (P-doped only) or adulterating nitrogen concentration (with fixed P content) were investigated by means of Ellipsometric and Ultraviolet-Visible (UV-Vis) spectroscopy, respectively. Tauc formula was used in calculating the optical band gaps of the thin films in both methods. The results show that Ellipsometry and UV-Vis spectrophotometry can be applied in the research of the optical properties of a-Si:H thin films experimentally. Both methods reflect the variation law of the optical band gaps caused by CVD process parameters, i.e., the optical band gap of the a-Si:H thin films is increased with the rise of the gas pressure or the nitrogen concentration respectively. The difference in optical band gaps of the doped a-Si:H thin films calculated by Ellipsometry or UV-Vis spectrophotometry are not so great that they both can be used to measure the optical band gaps of the thin films in practical applications.

  18. A simple and cost-effective method, as an appropriate alternative for visible spectrophotometry: development of a dopamine biosensor.

    PubMed

    Abbaspour, Abdolkarim; Khajehzadeh, Abdolreza; Ghaffarinejad, Ali

    2009-08-01

    In this study, a new, simple, fast and inexpensive method as an alternative to visible spectrophotometry is developed. In this method the cells containing the sample solution were scanned with a scanner, then the color of each cell was analyzed with software written in visual basic (VB 6) media to red, green and blue values. The cells were built by creating holes in the Plexiglas sheet. The dimensions of identical cells were examined by Cr (III) solution with known concentrations. The validity of this new method was studied by determination of dopamine (DA) without using any other reagent. The parameters which affect the system were optimized. The comparison between the current and traditional UV-Vis spectrophotometry methods was studied and the results revealed similar trends in both methods. The developed method was successfully applied to the determination of dopamine in serum and urine without using any pretreatment. Finally comparing the results obtained in the developed method showed that microwave irradiation of the solution can decrease the experimental time, increase sensitivity and improve the limit of detection.

  19. Derivative spectrophotometry for the determination of faropenem in the presence of degradation products: an application for kinetic studies.

    PubMed

    Cielecka-Piontek, Judyta

    2013-07-01

    A simple and selective derivative spectrophotometric method was developed for the quantitative determination of faropenem in pure form and in pharmaceutical dosage. The method is based on the zero-crossing effect of first-derivative spectrophotometry (λ = 324 nm), which eliminates the overlapping effect caused by the excipients present in the pharmaceutical preparation, as well as degradation products, formed during hydrolysis, oxidation, photolysis, and thermolysis. The method was linear in the concentration range 2.5-300 μg/mL (r = 0.9989) at λ = 341 nm; the limits of detection and quantitation were 0.16 and 0.46 μg/mL, respectively. The method had good precision (relative standard deviation from 0.68 to 2.13%). Recovery of faropenem ranged from 97.9 to 101.3%. The first-order rate constants of the degradation of faropenem in pure form and in pharmaceutical dosage were determined by using first-derivative spectrophotometry. A statistical comparison of the validation results and the observed rate constants for faropenem degradation with these obtained with the high-performance liquid chromatography method demonstrated that both were compatible.

  20. Measuring absorption coefficient of scattering liquids using a tube inside an integrating sphere.

    PubMed

    Villanueva, Yolanda; Veenstra, Colin; Steenbergen, Wiendelt

    2016-04-10

    A method for measuring the absorption coefficient μa of absorbing and scattering liquid samples is presented. The sample is injected into a small transparent tube mounted through an integrating sphere. Two models for determining the absorption coefficient using the relative optical output signal are described and validated using aqueous ink absorbers of 0.5 vol.% (0.3  mm-1a<1.55  mm-1) and 1.0 vol.% (1.0  mm-1a<4.0  mm-1) concentrations with 1 vol.% (μs'≈1.4  mm-1) and 10 vol.% (μs'≈14  mm-1) Intralipid dilutions. The low concentrations give μa and μs values, which are comparable with those of biological tissues. One model assumes a uniform light distribution within the sample, which is valid for low absorption. Another model considers light attenuation that obeys Lambert-Beer's law, which may be used for relatively high absorption. Measurements with low and high scattering samples are done for the wavelength range of 400-900 nm. Measured spectra of purely absorbing samples are within 15% agreement with measurements using standard transmission spectrophotometry. For 0.5 vol.% ink absorbers and at wavelengths below 700 nm, measured μa values are higher for samples with low scattering and lower for those with high scattering. At wavelengths above 700 nm, measured μa values do not vary significantly with amount of scattering. For 1.0 vol.% ink absorbers, measured spectra do not change with low scattering. These results indicate that the method can be used for measuring absorption spectra of scattering liquid samples with optical properties similar to biological absorbers, particularly at wavelengths above 700 nm, which is difficult to accomplish with standard transmission spectrophotometry.