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Sample records for absorption spectroscopic analyses

  1. Characterization of copper atoms in bilirubin oxidase by spectroscopic analyses.

    PubMed

    Gotoh, Y; Kondo, Y; Kaji, H; Takeda, A; Samejima, T

    1989-10-01

    Bilirubin oxidase [EC 1.3.3.5], purified from the culture medium of Myrothecium verrucaria, was found to contain two blue copper atoms per protein molecule with a molecular weight of ca. 52 kDa. The two copper atoms were estimated to be in the all cupric state by the cuproine colorimetric method and also atomic absorption analysis. We could remove the reduce cuprous ions from the holo enzyme by adding ascorbate, followed by a KCN solution, yielding an apo-enzyme with no activity. The apo-enzyme can be reconstituted with Cu or other divalent cations such as Co, Fe, and Cd, with accompanying recovery of the enzyme activity. The activity recovery depended upon the species of cation employed; Cu being most effective, an almost 100% recovery, and Cd the least, only a 25% recovery. We could obtain information on the copper ions and their coordination structure by spectroscopic analyses of the apo- and reconstituted enzymes, obtaining such as absorption, CD, MCD, and XPS spectra. The bilirubin oxidase catalyzed-reaction was a second order reaction with respect to copper bound with protein. The donor set was of the CuSS*N2 (S = Cys, S* = Met, N = His) type, i.e., the same as in the case of blue copper proteins. On studying the Co-substituted enzyme, it was revealed that the copper site of the enzyme had a 4-coordinated structure.

  2. Ultraviolet-Absorption Spectroscopic Biofilm Monitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Micheels, Ronald H.

    2004-01-01

    An ultraviolet-absorption spectrometer system has been developed as a prototype instrument to be used in continuous, real-time monitoring to detect the growth of biofilms. Such monitoring is desirable because biofilms are often harmful. For example, biofilms in potable-water and hydroponic systems act as both sources of pathogenic bacteria that resist biocides and as a mechanism for deterioration (including corrosion) of pipes. Biofilms formed from several types of hazardous bacteria can thrive in both plant-growth solutions and low-nutrient media like distilled water. Biofilms can also form in condensate tanks in air-conditioning systems and in industrial heat exchangers. At present, bacteria in potable-water and plant-growth systems aboard the space shuttle (and previously on the Mir space station) are monitored by culture-plate counting, which entails an incubation period of 24 to 48 hours for each sample. At present, there are no commercially available instruments for continuous monitoring of biofilms in terrestrial or spaceborne settings.

  3. Martian dunite NWA 2737: Integrated spectroscopic analyses of brown olivine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pieters, Carle M.; Klima, Rachel L.; Hiroi, Takahiro; Dyar, M. Darby; Lane, Melissa D.; Treiman, Allan H.; Noble, Sarah K.; Sunshine, Jessica M.; Bishop, Janice L.

    2008-06-01

    A second Martian meteorite has been identified that is composed primarily of heavily shocked dunite, Northwest Africa (NWA) 2737. This meteorite has several similarities to the Chassigny dunite cumulate, but the olivine is more Mg rich and, most notably, is very dark and visually brown. Carefully coordinated analyses of NWA 2737 whole-rock and olivine separates were undertaken using visible and near-infrared reflectance, midinfrared emission and reflectance, and Mössbauer spectroscopic studies of the same samples along with detailed petrography, chemistry, scanning electron microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy analyses. Midinfrared spectra of this sample indicate that the olivine is fully crystalline and that its molecular structure remains intact. The unusual color and spectral properties that extend from the visible through the near-infrared part of the spectrum are shown to be due to nanophase metallic iron particles dispersed throughout the olivine during a major shock event on Mars. Although a minor amount of Fe3+ is present, it cannot account for the well-documented unusual optical properties of Martian meteorite NWA 2737. Perhaps unique to the Martian environment, this ``brown'' olivine exhibits spectral properties that can potentially be used to remotely explore the pressure-temperature history of surface geology as well as assess surface composition.

  4. In vivo low-coherence spectroscopic measurements of local hemoglobin absorption spectra in human skin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bosschaart, Nienke; Faber, Dirk J.; van Leeuwen, Ton G.; Aalders, Maurice C. G.

    2011-10-01

    Localized spectroscopic measurements of optical properties are invaluable for diagnostic applications that involve layered tissue structures, but conventional spectroscopic techniques lack exact control over the size and depth of the probed tissue volume. We show that low-coherence spectroscopy (LCS) overcomes these limitations by measuring local attenuation and absorption coefficient spectra in layered phantoms. In addition, we demonstrate the first in vivo LCS measurements of the human epidermis and dermis only. From the measured absorption in two distinct regions of the dermal microcirculation, we determine total hemoglobin concentration (3.0+/-0.5 g/l and 7.8+/-1.2 g/l) and oxygen saturation.

  5. In vivo low-coherence spectroscopic measurements of local hemoglobin absorption spectra in human skin.

    PubMed

    Bosschaart, Nienke; Faber, Dirk J; van Leeuwen, Ton G; Aalders, Maurice C G

    2011-10-01

    Localized spectroscopic measurements of optical properties are invaluable for diagnostic applications that involve layered tissue structures, but conventional spectroscopic techniques lack exact control over the size and depth of the probed tissue volume. We show that low-coherence spectroscopy (LCS) overcomes these limitations by measuring local attenuation and absorption coefficient spectra in layered phantoms. In addition, we demonstrate the first in vivo LCS measurements of the human epidermis and dermis only. From the measured absorption in two distinct regions of the dermal microcirculation, we determine total hemoglobin concentration (3.0±0.5 g∕l and 7.8±1.2 g∕l) and oxygen saturation.

  6. Chemical and spectroscopic analyses of organic matter transformation in warming tundra soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herndon, E.; Roy Chowdhury, T.; Mann, B. F.; Graham, D. E.; Bargar, J.; Gu, B.; Liang, L.

    2013-12-01

    Many tundra soils are currently major carbon sinks; however, an increase in temperature may shift these systems to C sources and create a positive feedback for warming. In order to predict future C release from tundra soils, it is necessary to quantify rates of SOM degradation and to identify the reactants and products of microbial decomposition reactions. In this study, multiple spectroscopic techniques are used to investigate SOM during laboratory incubations of tundra soils. We aim to characterize the chemical transformation of organic matter during decomposition as a function of temperature and geochemistry. Frozen soil cores were obtained from the Barrow Environmental Observatory (BEO) in northern Alaska as part of the Next Generation Ecosystem Experiment Arctic project. To investigate the influence of temperature on organic matter degradation and compositional changes, soil horizons from each core were homogenized and soil material was incubated at -2°C, +4°C, or +8°C. Samples were sacrificed periodically over 100 days, and chemical and physical extractions were used to separate SOM into operationally-defined pools, including light (density < 1.6 g cm-2) and mineral-bound, and water-, acid-, base-, and non-soluble fractions. A suite of wet-chemical and spectroscopic analyses was used to measure CO2 and CH4 formation and soil C compositional changes, including techniques such as Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), high resolution mass spectrometry, and X-ray absorption spectroscopy. Detailed chemical and spectroscopic analyses reveal significant differences amongst extracts and with depth in the soil. In general, more organic C was extracted in the base than in the acid and water fractions, and mineral-bound organic C increased with depth. The water-soluble C fraction showed the lowest molar absorptivity of the three extracts and consisted of mostly lower-molecular weight organics. Acid-soluble C increased

  7. Spectroscopic study of low-temperature hydrogen absorption in palladium

    SciTech Connect

    Ienaga, K. Takata, H.; Onishi, Y.; Inagaki, Y.; Kawae, T.; Tsujii, H.; Kimura, T.

    2015-01-12

    We report real-time detection of hydrogen (H) absorption in metallic palladium (Pd) nano-contacts immersed in liquid H{sub 2} using inelastic electron spectroscopy (IES). After introduction of liquid H{sub 2}, the spectra exhibit the time evolution from the pure Pd to the Pd hydride, indicating that H atoms are absorbed in Pd nano-contacts even at the temperature where the thermal process is not expected. The IES time and bias voltage dependences show that H absorption develops by applying bias voltage 30 ∼ 50 mV, which can be explained by quantum tunneling. The results represent that IES is a powerful method to study the kinetics of high density H on solid surface.

  8. 60 Kelvin Absorption Cell for Planetary Spectroscopic Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chackerian, Charles, Jr.; McGee, James; Gore, Warren I. Y. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    We will describe a 30 cm long absorption cell which has been in operation for about two years. The cell is designed for use with sensitive-wide-spectral-coverage Fourier transform spectrometers. A helium compressor refrigerator allows temperatures to be achieved down to about 57 K. Heaters allow above-ambient temperatures as well. A unique vibration isolation system effectively quenches the transfer of vibration of the compressor unit to the spectrometer. An acid-resistant stainless steel liner in the copper body of the call permits the use of corrosive gases.

  9. Spectroscopic analysis of Pr^3+ (4f^2) absorption intensities in a plastic host (HEMA).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stonestreet, David; Nash, Kelly; Dee, Doug; Yow, Raylon; Gruber, John; Sardar, Dhiraj

    2006-10-01

    A spectroscopic investigation has been performed on the Pr^3+ ions embedded in 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA) solid plastic host. The standard Judd-Ofelt analysis was applied to the room temperature absorption intensities of Pr^3+ transitions to determine three phenomenological intensity parameters: φ2, φ4 and φ6. Values of the intensity parameters were subsequently used to determine the decay rates (emission probabilities), radiative lifetimes, and branching ratios of the principal intermanifold transitions of Pr^3+ from the ^3P2, ^1D2, and ^3P0 manifold states to the lower-lying manifolds. The spectroscopic properties Pr^3+ in HEMA will be compared with those in glasses.

  10. Spectroscopic and Geochemical Analyses of Ferrihydrite from Hydrothermal Springs in Iceland and Applications to Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bishop, Janice; Murad, E.; DeVincenzi, Donald L. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Ferrihydrite samples were collected from a thermal spring and a cold stream in the Landmannalaugar region of Iceland. Chemical and spectroscopic analyses have been performed on the air-dried and fine-grained fractions of these samples. The ferrihydrite from the cold stream is a pure sample, containing small amounts of Ca, P and Si, which do not form minerals detectable with X-ray diffraction (XRD) or reflectance and transmittance spectroscopy. The ferrihydrite from the thermal pool is a less pure sample, containing larger amounts of amorphous Si and P. The XRD and spectral features for this sample are also consistent with a less crystalline structure. Some of the Si is incorporated in the structure of the ferrihydrite. The Ca, P and possibly some of the Si may be biogenic. The spectral character of these Icelandic ferrihydrites is compared with those of synthetic ferrihydrites and other iron oxide/oxyhydroxide minerals. Ferrihydrite is characterized by a broad Fe3+ excitation band near 0.92 microns (approx. 10900/cm) and a strong Fe-O absorption feature near 475/cm (approx. 21 microns) in transmittance spectra. Multiple bands due to H2O and OH are also present for ferrihydrite. Natural ferrihydrites frequently exhibit a band near 950-1050/cm (approx. 10 microns) that is typically not observed for synthetic ferrihydrites and may be due to some Si in the structure. An additional pair of spectral bands near 1400 and 1500/cm (approx. 7 microns) are characteristic of pure ferrihydrites from natural and synthetic sources. Hydrothermal springs may have been present at one time on Mars in association with volcanic activity. Ferrihydrite formation in such an environment may have contributed to the ferric oxide-rich surface material on Mars.

  11. [Using Fourier transform to analyse differential optical absorption spectrum].

    PubMed

    Liu, Qian-Lin; Wang, Li-Shi; Huang, Xin-Jian

    2008-05-01

    According to the theory of differential optical absorption spectral technique, the differential optical absorption spectral monitoring equipment was designed. Aiming at two kinds of main pollutants, SO2 and NO2, in the atmosphere, this technique was used to monitor them. The present article puts forward the signal analysis method of Fourier transformation to process the above-mentioned two kinds of absorption spectra. The two approaches contain the removeal of noise and the fitting of the slow variety. On the frequency chart after the spectrum was transformed, the low frequency corresponded to the slow variety part and the high frequency corresponded to the noise part of the original spectrum, so through intercepting a certain frequency segment and using inverse Fourier transformation the slow variety part of the low frequency and the noise part of the high frequency of the absorption spectrum could be subtracted. After farther processing we can get a higher resolution differential absorption spectrum of the gas. According to the strength of the spectrum, we can calculate the concentration of the gas. After analysis and comparison with the conventional method, it is considered a new processing method of differential optical absorption spectral technique, and the method can fit the slow variety much better.

  12. The Impact of Radiative Atmospheres on Spectroscopic and Photometric Analyses of Cool White Dwarfs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lecavalier-Hurtubise, É.; Bergeron, P.

    2017-03-01

    It has been recently suggested in the literature that convective energy transport can be seriously impeded by magnetic fields, in particular in the photosphere of white dwarf stars. We push this idea to the extreme and explore the consequences of using purely radiative atmosphere models for the spectroscopic and photometric analyses of cool (Teff<12,000 K) DA white dwarfs. We also perform a similar analysis for known magnetic DA stars with weak sub-megagauss magnetic fields.

  13. No microplastics in benthic eelpout (Zoarces viviparus): An urgent need for spectroscopic analyses in microplastic detection.

    PubMed

    Wesch, Charlotte; Barthel, Anne-Kathrin; Braun, Ulrike; Klein, Roland; Paulus, Martin

    2016-07-01

    Monitoring the ingestion of microplastics is challenging and suitable detection techniques are insufficiently used. Thus, misidentifying natural for synthetic microfibres cannot be avoided. As part of a framework to monitor the ingestion of microplastics in eelpout, this short report addresses the accurate identification of microfibres. We show that, following visual inspections, putatively synthetic microfibres are indeed of natural origin, as ascertained by spectrometric analyses. Consequently, we call for an inclusion of spectroscopic techniques in standardized microplastic monitoring schemes.

  14. Analyzing absorption and scattering spectra of micro-scale structures with spectroscopic optical coherence tomography.

    PubMed

    Yi, Ji; Gong, Jianmin; Li, Xu

    2009-07-20

    We demonstrate the feasibility of characterizing the absorption and scattering spectra of micron-scale structures in a turbid medium using a spectroscopic optical coherence tomography (SOCT) system with a bandwidth of 430-650 nm. SOCT measurements are taken from phantoms composed of fluorescent microspheres. The absorption and scattering spectra are recovered with proper selections of spatial window width in the post processing step. Furthermore, we present an analysis using numerical OCT simulation based on full-wave solutions of the Maxwell's Equation to elucidate the origination of the multiple peaks in the OCT image for a single microsphere. Finally, we demonstrate the possibility of identifying contrast agents concentrated in micron-sized scale in an SOCT image. Two different types of microspheres in gel phantom are discriminated based on their distinguished absorbent feature.

  15. Correction: Spectroscopic characteristics of the OSIRIS near-backscattering crystal analyser spectrometer on the ISIS pulsed neutron source.

    PubMed

    Telling, Mark T F; Campbell, Stuart I; Engberg, Dennis; Martín Y Marero, David; Andersen, Ken H

    2016-03-21

    Correction for 'Spectroscopic characteristics of the OSIRIS near-backscattering crystal analyser spectrometer on the ISIS pulsed neutron source' by Mark T. F. Telling et al., Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys., 2005, 7, 1255-1261.

  16. X-ray absorption spectroscopic investigation of the electronic structure differences in solution and crystalline oxyhemoglobin

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Samuel A.; Green, Evan; Mathews, Irimpan I.; Benfatto, Maurizio; Hodgson, Keith O.; Hedman, Britt; Sarangi, Ritimukta

    2013-01-01

    Hemoglobin (Hb) is the heme-containing O2 transport protein essential for life in all vertebrates. The resting high-spin (S = 2) ferrous form, deoxy-Hb, combines with triplet O2, forming diamagnetic (S = 0) oxy-Hb. Understanding this electronic structure is the key first step in understanding transition metal–O2 interaction. However, despite intense spectroscopic and theoretical studies, the electronic structure description of oxy-Hb remains elusive, with at least three different descriptions proposed by Pauling, Weiss, and McClure-Goddard, based on theory, spectroscopy, and crystallography. Here, a combination of X-ray absorption spectroscopy and extended X-ray absorption fine structure, supported by density functional theory calculations, help resolve this debate. X-ray absorption spectroscopy data on solution and crystalline oxy-Hb indicate both geometric and electronic structure differences suggesting that two of the previous descriptions are correct for the Fe–O2 center in oxy-Hb. These results support the multiconfigurational nature of the ground state developed by theoretical results. Additionally, it is shown here that small differences in hydrogen bonding and solvation effects can tune the ground state, tipping it into one of the two probable configurations. These data underscore the importance of solution spectroscopy and show that the electronic structure in the crystalline form may not always reflect the true ground-state description in solution. PMID:24062465

  17. Spectroscopic analyses of the biofuels-critical phytochemical coniferyl alcohol and its enzyme-catalyzed oxidation products.

    PubMed

    Achyuthan, Komandoor Elayavalli; Adams, Paul David; Simmons, Blake Alexander; Singh, Anup Kumar

    2009-11-23

    Lignin composition (monolignol types of coniferyl, sinapyl or p-coumaryl alcohol) is causally related to biomass recalcitrance. We describe multiwavelength (220, 228, 240, 250, 260, 290, 295, 300, 310 or 320 nm) absorption spectroscopy of coniferyl alcohol and its laccase- or peroxidase-catalyzed products during real time kinetic, pseudokinetic and endpoint analyses, in optical turn on or turn off modes, under acidic or basic conditions. Reactions in microwell plates and 100 microL volumes demonstrated assay miniaturization and high throughput screening capabilities. Bathochromic and hypsochromic shifts along with hyperchromicity or hypochromicity accompanied enzymatic oxidations by laccase or peroxidase. The limits of detection and quantitation of coniferyl alcohol averaged 2.4 and 7.1 muM respectively, with linear trend lines over 3 to 4 orders of magnitude. Coniferyl alcohol oxidation was evident within 10 minutes or with 0.01 microg/mL laccase and 2 minutes or 0.001 microg/mL peroxidase. Detection limit improved to 1.0 microM coniferyl alcohol with Km of 978.7 +/- 150.7 microM when examined at 260 nm following 30 minutes oxidation with 1.0 microg/mL laccase. Our assays utilized the intrinsic spectroscopic properties of coniferyl alcohol or its oxidation products for enabling detection, without requiring chemical synthesis or modification of the substrate or product(s). These studies facilitate lignin compositional analyses and augment pretreatment strategies for reducing biomass recalcitrance.

  18. Spectroscopic Analyses of the Biofuels-Critical Phytochemical Coniferyl Alcohol and Its Enzyme-Catalyzed Oxidation Products

    SciTech Connect

    Achyuthan, Komandoor; Adams, Paul; Simmons, Blake; Singh, Anup

    2011-07-13

    Lignin composition (monolignol types of coniferyl, sinapyl or p-coumaryl alcohol) is causally related to biomass recalcitrance. We describe multiwavelength (220, 228, 240, 250, 260, 290, 295, 300, 310 or 320 nm) absorption spectroscopy of coniferyl alcohol and its laccase- or peroxidase-catalyzed products during real time kinetic, pseudo-kinetic and endpoint analyses, in optical turn on or turn off modes, under acidic or basic conditions. Reactions in microwell plates and 100 mu L volumes demonstrated assay miniaturization and high throughput screening capabilities. Bathochromic and hypsochromic shifts along with hyperchromicity or hypochromicity accompanied enzymatic oxidations by laccase or peroxidase. The limits of detection and quantitation of coniferyl alcohol averaged 2.4 and 7.1 mu M respectively, with linear trend lines over 3 to 4 orders of magnitude. Coniferyl alcohol oxidation was evident within 10 minutes or with 0.01 mu g/mL laccase and 2 minutes or 0.001 mu g/mL peroxidase. Detection limit improved to 1.0 mu M coniferyl alcohol with Km of 978.7 +/- 150.7 mu M when examined at 260 nm following 30 minutes oxidation with 1.0 mu g/mL laccase. Our assays utilized the intrinsic spectroscopic properties of coniferyl alcohol or its oxidation products for enabling detection, without requiring chemical synthesis or modification of the substrate or product(s). These studies facilitate lignin compositional analyses and augment pretreatment strategies for reducing biomass recalcitrance.

  19. In vivo endoscopic tissue diagnostics based on spectroscopic absorption, scattering, and phase function properties.

    PubMed

    Thueler, Philippe; Charvet, Igor; Bevilacqua, Frederic; St Ghislain, M; Ory, G; Marquet, Pierre; Meda, Paolo; Vermeulen, Ben; Depeursinge, Christian

    2003-07-01

    A fast spectroscopic system for superficial and local determination of the absorption and scattering properties of tissue (480 to 950 nm) is described. The probe can be used in the working channel of an endoscope. The scattering properties include the reduced scattering coefficient and a parameter of the phase function called gamma, which depends on its first two moments. The inverse problem algorithm is based on the fit of absolute reflectance measurements to cubic B-spline functions derived from the interpolation of a set of Monte Carlo simulations. The algorithm's robustness was tested with simulations altered with various amounts of noise. The method was also assessed on tissue phantoms of known optical properties. Finally, clinical measurements performed endoscopically in vivo in the stomach of human subjects are presented. The absorption and scattering properties were found to be significantly different in the antrum and in the fundus and are correlated with histopathologic observations. The method and the instrument show promise for noninvasive tissue diagnostics of various epithelia.

  20. Near-infrared diode laser based spectroscopic detection of ammonia: a comparative study of photoacoustic and direct optical absorption methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bozoki, Zoltan; Mohacsi, Arpad; Szabo, Gabor; Bor, Zsolt; Erdelyi, Miklos; Chen, Weidong; Tittel, Frank K.

    2002-01-01

    A photoacoustic spectroscopic (PAS) and a direct optical absorption spectroscopic (OAS) gas sensor, both using continuous-wave room-temperature diode lasers operating at 1531.8 nm, were compared on the basis of ammonia detection. Excellent linear correlation between the detector signals of the two systems was found. Although the physical properties and the mode of operation of both sensors were significantly different, their performances were found to be remarkably similar, with a sub-ppm level minimum detectable concentration of ammonia and a fast response time in the range of a few minutes.

  1. X-ray absorption spectroscopic studies of mononuclear non-heme iron enzymes

    SciTech Connect

    Westre, Tami E.

    1996-01-01

    Fe-K-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) has been used to investigate the electronic and geometric structure of the iron active site in non-heme iron enzymes. A new theoretical extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) analysis approach, called GNXAS, has been tested on data for iron model complexes to evaluate the utility and reliability of this new technique, especially with respect to the effects of multiple-scattering. In addition, a detailed analysis of the 1s→3d pre-edge feature has been developed as a tool for investigating the oxidation state, spin state, and geometry of iron sites. Edge and EXAFS analyses have then been applied to the study of non-heme iron enzyme active sites.

  2. Galactic Soft X-ray Emission Revealed with Spectroscopic Study of Absorption and Emission Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamasaki, Noriko Y.; Mitsuda, K.; Takei, Y.; Hagihara, T.; Yoshino, T.; Wang, Q. D.; Yao, Y.; McCammon, D.

    2010-03-01

    Spectroscopic study of Oxygen emission/absorption lines is a new tool to investigate the nature of the soft X-ray background. We investigated the emission spectra of 14 fields obtained by Suzaku, and detected OVII and OVIII lines separately. There is an almost isotropic OVII line emission with 2 LU intensity. As the attenuation length in the Galactic plane for that energy is short, that OVII emission should arise within 300 pc of our neighborhood. In comparison with the estimated emission measure for the local bubble, the most plausible origin of this component is the solar wind charge exchange with local interstellar materials. Another component presented from the correlation between the OVII and OVIII line intensity is a thermal emission with an apparent temperature of 0.2 keV with a field-to-field fluctuation of 10% in temperature, while the intensity varies about a factor of 4. By the combination analysis of the emission and the absorption spectra, we can investigate the density and the scale length of intervening plasma separately. We analyzed the Chanrdra grating spectra of LMC X-3 and PKS 2155-304, and emission spectra toward the line of sight by Suzaku. In both cases, the combined analysis showed that the hot plasma is not iso-thermal nor uniform. Assuming an exponential disk distribution, the thickness of the disk is as large as a few kpc. It suggests that there is a thick hot disk or hot halo surrounding our Galaxy, which is similar to X-ray hot haloes around several spiral galaxies.

  3. Analyzing cell structure and dynamics with confocal light scattering and absorption spectroscopic microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Le; Vitkin, Edward; Fang, Hui; Zaman, Munir M.; Andersson, Charlotte; Salahuddin, Saira; Modell, Mark D.; Freedman, Steven D.; Hanlon, Eugene B.; Itzkan, Irving; Perelman, Lev T.

    2007-02-01

    We recently developed a new microscopic optical technique capable of noninvasive analysis of cell structure and cell dynamics on the submicron scale [1]. It combines confocal microscopy, a well-established high-resolution microscopic technique, with light scattering spectroscopy (LSS) and is called confocal light absorption and scattering spectroscopic (CLASS) microscopy. CLASS microscopy requires no exogenous labels and is capable of imaging and continuously monitoring individual viable cells, enabling the observation of cell and organelle functioning at scales on the order of 100 nm. To test the ability of CLASS microscopy to monitor cellular dynamics in vivo we performed experiments with human bronchial epithelial cells treated with DHA and undergoing apoptosis. The treated and untreated cells show not only clear differences in organelle spatial distribution but time sequencing experiments on a single cell show disappearance of certain types of organelles and change of the nuclear shape and density with the progression of apoptosis. In summary, CLASS microscopy provides an insight into metabolic processes within the cell and opens doors for the noninvasive real-time assessment of cellular dynamics. Noninvasive monitoring of cellular dynamics with CLASS microscopy can be used for a real-time dosimetry in a wide variety of medical and environmental applications that have no immediate observable outcome, such as photodynamic therapy, drug screening, and monitoring of toxins.

  4. X-Ray Absorption Spectroscopic Characterization of the Molybdenum Site of 'Escherichia Coli' Dimethyl Sulfoxide Reductase

    SciTech Connect

    George, G.N.; Doonan, C.J.; Rothery, R.A.; Boroumand, N.; Weiner, J.H.; /Saskatchewan U. /Alberta U.

    2007-07-09

    Structural studies of dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) reductases were hampered by modification of the active site during purification. We report an X-ray absorption spectroscopic analysis of the molybdenum active site of Escherichia coli DMSO reductase contained within its native membranes. The enzyme in these preparations is expected to be very close to the form found in vivo. The oxidized active site was found to have four Mo-S ligands at 2.43 angstroms, one Mo=O at 1.71 angstroms, and a longer Mo-O at 1.90 angstroms. We conclude that the oxidized enzyme is a monooxomolybdenum(VI) species coordinated by two molybdopterin dithiolenes and a serine. The bond lengths determined for E. coli DMSO reductase are very similar to those determined for the well-characterized Rhodobacter sphaeroides DMSO reductase, suggesting similar active site structures for the two enzymes. Furthermore, our results suggest that the form found in vivo is the monooxobis(molybdopterin) species.

  5. Confocal Light Absorption and Scattering Spectroscopic (CLASS) imaging: From cancer detection to sub-cellular function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Le

    Light scattering spectroscopy (LSS), an optical technique that relates the spectroscopic properties of light elastically scattered by small particles to their size, refractive index and shape, has been recently successfully employed for sensing morphological and biochemical properties of epithelial tissues and cells in vivo. LSS does not require exogenous markers, is non-invasive, and, due to its multispectral nature, can sense biological structures well beyond the diffraction limit. All that makes LSS be a very good candidate to be used both in clinical medicine for in vivo detection of disease and in cell biology to monitor cell function on the organelle scale. Recently we developed two LSS-based imaging modalities: clinical Polarized LSS (PLSS) Endoscopic Technique for locating early pre-cancerous changes in GI tract and Confocal Light Absorption and Scattering Spectroscopic (CLASS) Microscopy for studying cells in vivo without exogenous markers. One important application of the clinical PLSS endoscopic instrument, a noncontact scanning imaging device compatible with the standard clinical endoscopes and capable of detecting dysplastic changes, is to serve as a guide for biopsy in Barrett's esophagus (BE). The instrument detects parallel and perpendicular components of the polarized light, backscattered from epithelial tissues, and determines characteristics of epithelial nuclei from the residual spectra. It also can find tissue oxygenation, hemoglobin content and other properties from the diffuse light component. By rapidly scanning esophagus the PLSS endoscopic instrument makes sure the entire BE portion is scanned and examined for the presence of dysplasia. CLASS microscopy, on the other hand, combines principles of light scattering spectroscopy (LSS) with confocal microscopy. Its main purpose is to image cells on organelle scale in vivo without the use of exogenous labels which may affect the cell function. The confocal geometry selects specific region and

  6. Spectroscopic, microchemical and petrographic analyses of plasters from ancient buildings in Lamezia Terme (Calabria, Southern Italy).

    PubMed

    De Luca, Raffaella; Gigliotti, Valentina; Panarello, Mario; Bloise, Andrea; Crisci, Gino M; Miriello, Domenico

    2016-01-15

    This work shows the results of the spectroscopic, microchemical and petrographic study carried out on six plasters coming from three important residential buildings of the 18th century, located in Lamezia Terme (Catanzaro, Southern Italy). To study the provenance of the raw materials used to make the plasters, one sample of limestone and two samples of sand were also collected from the quarries near Lamezia Terme and compared with the historical plasters. Samples were studied by polarized optical microscopy (OM), X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) and Raman spectroscopy. The results of these analyses allowed to determine the mineralogical, petrographical and chemical characteristics of the plasters, identify the pigments used for their coloration and provide useful information about the building techniques, the raw materials employed and the production technology of plasters during the 18th century in Lamezia Terme. SEM-EDS microanalysis also revealed the presence of gold and silver on the surface of two samples.

  7. Spectroscopic, microchemical and petrographic analyses of plasters from ancient buildings in Lamezia Terme (Calabria, Southern Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Luca, Raffaella; Gigliotti, Valentina; Panarello, Mario; Bloise, Andrea; Crisci, Gino M.; Miriello, Domenico

    2016-01-01

    This work shows the results of the spectroscopic, microchemical and petrographic study carried out on six plasters coming from three important residential buildings of the 18th century, located in Lamezia Terme (Catanzaro, Southern Italy). To study the provenance of the raw materials used to make the plasters, one sample of limestone and two samples of sand were also collected from the quarries near Lamezia Terme and compared with the historical plasters. Samples were studied by polarized optical microscopy (OM), X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) and Raman spectroscopy. The results of these analyses allowed to determine the mineralogical, petrographical and chemical characteristics of the plasters, identify the pigments used for their coloration and provide useful information about the building techniques, the raw materials employed and the production technology of plasters during the 18th century in Lamezia Terme. SEM-EDS microanalysis also revealed the presence of gold and silver on the surface of two samples.

  8. Theoretical modeling of the spectroscopic absorption properties of luciferin and oxyluciferin: A critical comparison with recent experimental studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anselmi, Massimiliano; Marocchi, Simone; Aschi, Massimiliano; Amadei, Andrea

    2012-01-01

    Firefly luciferin and its oxidated form, oxyluciferin, are two heterocyclic compounds involved in the enzymatic reaction, catalyzed by redox proteins called luciferases, which provides the bioluminescence in a wide group of arthropods. Whereas the electronic absorption spectra of D-luciferin in water at different pHs are known since 1960s, only recently reliable experimental electronic spectra of oxyluciferin have become available. In addition oxyluciferin is involved in a triple chemical equilibria (deprotonation of the two hydroxyl groups and keto-enol tautomerism of the 4-hydroxythiazole ring), that obligates to select during an experiment a predominant species, tuning pH or solvent polarity besides introducing chemical modifications. In this study we report the absorption spectra of luciferin and oxyluciferin in each principal chemical form, calculated by means of perturbed matrix method (PMM), which allowed us to successfully introduce the effect of the solvent on the spectroscopic absorption properties, and compare the result with available experimental data.

  9. Reactivity of Chromium(III) Nutritional Supplements in Biological Media: An X-Ray Absorption Spectroscopic Study

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, A.; Mulyani, I.; Levina, A.; Lay, P.A.

    2009-05-22

    Chromium(III) nutritional supplements are widely used due to their purported ability to enhance glucose metabolism, despite growing evidence on low activity and the potential genotoxicity of these compounds. Reactivities of Cr(III) complexes used in nutritional formulations, including [Cr3O(OCOEt)6(OH2)3]+ (A), [Cr(pic)3] (pic) = 2-pyridinecarboxylato(-) (B), and trans-[CrCl2(OH2)4]+ (CrCl3 {center_dot} 6H2O; C), in a range of natural and simulated biological media (artificial digestion systems, blood and its components, cell culture media, and intact L6 rat skeletal muscle cells) were studied by X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy. The XANES spectroscopic data were processed by multiple linear-regression analyses with the use of a library of model Cr(III) compounds, and the results were corroborated by the results of X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy and electrospray mass spectrometry. Complexes A and B underwent extensive ligand-exchange reactions under conditions of combined gastric and intestinal digestion (in the presence of a semisynthetic meal, 3 h at 310 K), as well as in blood serum and in a cell culture medium (1-24 h at 310 K), with the formation of Cr(III) complexes with hydroxo and amino acid/protein ligands. Reactions of compounds A-C with cultured muscle cells led to similar ligand-exchange products, with at least part of Cr(III) bound to the surface of the cells. The reactions of B with serum greatly enhanced its propensity to be converted to Cr(VI) by biological oxidants (H2O2 or glucose oxidase system), which is proposed to be a major cause of both the insulin-enhancing activity and toxicity of Cr(III) compounds (Mulyani, I.; Levina, A.; Lay, P. A. Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 2004, 43, 4504-4507). This finding enhances the current concern over the safety of consumption of large doses of Cr(III) supplements, particularly [Cr(pic)3].

  10. Reactivity of chromium(III) nutritional supplements in biological media: an X-ray absorption spectroscopic study.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Annie; Mulyani, Irma; Levina, Aviva; Lay, Peter A

    2008-05-19

    Chromium(III) nutritional supplements are widely used due to their purported ability to enhance glucose metabolism, despite growing evidence on low activity and the potential genotoxicity of these compounds. Reactivities of Cr(III) complexes used in nutritional formulations, including [Cr3O(OCOEt)6(OH2)3](+) (A), [Cr(pic)3] (pic=2-pyridinecarboxylato(-) (B), and trans-[CrCl2(OH2)4](+) (CrCl3.6H2O; C), in a range of natural and simulated biological media (artificial digestion systems, blood and its components, cell culture media, and intact L6 rat skeletal muscle cells) were studied by X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy. The XANES spectroscopic data were processed by multiple linear-regression analyses with the use of a library of model Cr(III) compounds, and the results were corroborated by the results of X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy and electrospray mass spectrometry. Complexes A and B underwent extensive ligand-exchange reactions under conditions of combined gastric and intestinal digestion (in the presence of a semisynthetic meal, 3 h at 310 K), as well as in blood serum and in a cell culture medium (1-24 h at 310 K), with the formation of Cr(III) complexes with hydroxo and amino acid/protein ligands. Reactions of compounds A-C with cultured muscle cells led to similar ligand-exchange products, with at least part of Cr(III) bound to the surface of the cells. The reactions of B with serum greatly enhanced its propensity to be converted to Cr(VI) by biological oxidants (H2O2 or glucose oxidase system), which is proposed to be a major cause of both the insulin-enhancing activity and toxicity of Cr(III) compounds (Mulyani, I.; Levina, A.; Lay, P. A. Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 2004, 43, 4504-4507). This finding enhances the current concern over the safety of consumption of large doses of Cr(III) supplements, particularly [Cr(pic)3].

  11. Absorption properties of type-II InAs/InAsSb superlattices measured by spectroscopic ellipsometry

    SciTech Connect

    Webster, P. T.; Riordan, N. A.; Liu, S.; Zhang, Y.-H.; Johnson, S. R.; Steenbergen, E. H.

    2015-02-09

    Strain-balanced InAs/InAsSb superlattices offer access to the mid- to long-wavelength infrared region with what is essentially a ternary material system at the GaSb lattice constant. The absorption coefficients of InAs/InAsSb superlattices grown by molecular beam epitaxy on (100)-oriented GaSb substrates are measured at room temperature over the 30 to 800 meV photon energy range using spectroscopic ellipsometry, and the miniband structure of each superlattice is calculated using a Kronig-Penney model. The InAs/InAsSb conduction band offset is used as a fitting parameter to align the calculated superlattice ground state transition energy to the measured absorption onset at room temperature and to the photoluminescence peak energy at low temperature. It is observed that the ground state absorption coefficient and transition strength are proportional to the square of the wavefunction overlap and the ground state absorption coefficient approaches a maximum value of around 5780 cm{sup −1} as the wavefunction overlap approaches 100%. The absorption analysis of these samples indicates that the optical joint density of states is weakly dependent on the period thickness and Sb content of the superlattice, and that wavefunction overlap is the principal design parameter in terms of obtaining strong absorption in these structures.

  12. Operando soft X-ray absorption spectroscopic study on a solid oxide fuel cell cathode during electrochemical oxygen reduction.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Takashi; Oike, Ryo; Kimura, Yuta; Tamenori, Yusuke; Kawada, Tatsuya; Amezawa, Koji

    2017-03-16

    Operando soft X-ray absorption spectroscopic technique, which could analyze electronic structures of the electrode materials at elevated temperature and controlled atmosphere under electrochemical polarization, was established and its availability was demonstrated by investigating electronic structural changes of an La2NiO4+d dense film electrode during electrochemical oxygen reduction reaction. Clear O K-edge and Ni L-edge X-ray absorption spectra could be obtained below 773 K in fully atmospheric pressure of 100 ppm O2-He, 0.1% O2-He and 1% O2-He gas mixtures. By the PO2 change and the application of electrical potential, considerable spectral changes were observed in O K-edge X-ray absorption spectra while only small spectral changes were observed in Ni L-edge X-ray absorption spectra. Pre-edge peak of the O K-edge X-ray absorption spectra, which reflects the unoccupied pDOS of Ni3d-O2p hybridization, increased/deceased with cathodic/anodic polarization, respectively. The electronic structural changes of the outermost orbital of the electrode material due to electrochemical polarization were successfully confirmed by the operando X-ray absorption spectroscopy developed in this study.

  13. Development of surface thermal lensing technique in absorption and defect analyses of optical coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Hongbo; Li, Xia; Fan, Shuhai; Shao, Jianda; Zhao, Yuanan; Fan, Zhengxiu

    2005-12-01

    Absorption is one of the main factors which cause damage to optical coatings, under the radiation of high power lasers. Surface thermal lensing (STL) technique was developed into a practical high-sensitivity apparatus for the weak absorption analysis of optical coatings. A 20 W continuous-wave 1064 nm Nd:YAG laser and a 30 mW He-Ne laser were employed as pump source and probe source, respectively. Low noise photoelectrical components and an SR830 DSP lock-in amplifier were used for photo-thermal deformation signal detection. In order to improve sensitivity, the configuration of the apparatus was optimized through choosing appropriate parameters, that including pump beam spot size, chopper frequency, detection distance, waist radius and position of probe beam. Coating samples were mounted on an x-y stage which was driven by high precision stepper motors. Different processes of absorption measurements, including single spot, linear scan and 2-dimension area scan, could be performed manually or automatically under the control of PC program. Various optical coatings were prepared by both electron beam evaporation and ion beam sputtering deposition. High sensitivity was obtained and low to 10 ppb absorption could be measured by surface thermal lensing technique. And a spatial resolution of 25 micron was proved according to the area scanning which traced out the profile of photo-thermal defects inside optical coatings. The system was employed in the analyses of optical absorption, absorption uniformity and defect distribution, and revealed the relationship between laser-induced damage and absorption of optical coatings.

  14. X-ray diffraction and absorption spectroscopic studies of copper mixed ligand complexes with aminophenol as one of the ligands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, A.; Jain, Garima; Patil, H.

    2012-05-01

    X-ray diffraction (XRD) and X-ray absorption spectroscopic (XAS) studies have been conducted on two copper complexes, i.e., copper macrocyclic complex of succinic acid and ortho aminophenol (complex-1) and copper macrocyclic complex of pthalic acid and ortho aminophenol (complex-2). The diffraction pattern of the complexes have been recorded using Rigaku RINT-2000 X-ray diffractometer equipped with rotating anode X-ray tube operated at 40 kV and 100 mA. The X-ray absorption spectra of the complexes have been recorded at the K-edge of copper on Cauchois type bent crystal spectrograph having radius 0.4 m employing a mica crystal, oriented to reflect from (100) planes, for dispersion. The X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) parameters, viz., chemical shift, energy position of the principal absorption maximum and edge-width have been determined and discussed. From the extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) data, the bond lengths have been calculated using three methods, namely, Levy's method, Lytle, Sayers and Stern's (LSS) method and Fourier transformation method. The results obtained have been compared with each other and discussed.

  15. White-light continuum probed femtosecond time-resolved absorption spectroscopic measurement of β-carotene under high pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Wei-Long; Zheng, Zhi-Ren; Zhang, Jian-Ping; Wu, Wen-Zhi; Li, Ai-Hua; Zhang, Wei; Huo, Ming-Ming; Liu, Zhi-Guo; Zhu, Rui-Bin; Zhao, Lian-Cheng; Su, Wen-Hui

    2012-04-01

    We have performed a femtosecond time-resolved absorption spectroscopic experiment of β-carotene in n-hexane solution under high pressure up to ˜1.0 GPa. Using white-light continuum in the visible spectral region as probe light, we found that the energy level of S1 state descends, whereas its lifetime becomes longer with the rising pressure. We ascribe this tendency deviating from the energy gap law to the viscosity effects on the Cdbnd C stretching vibrations, which is fully consistent with the microviscosity theory. This Letter may provide some insights on the light harvesting and photoprotection functions of carotenoids in photosynthetic organisms.

  16. Absorption and emission spectroscopic characterisation of combined wildtype LOV1-LOV2 domain of phot from Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Song, S-H; Dick, B; Zirak, P; Penzkofer, A; Schiereis, T; Hegemann, P

    2005-10-03

    An absorption and emission spectroscopic characterisation of the combined wild-type LOV1-LOV2 domain string (abbreviated LOV1/2) of phot from the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii is carried out at pH 8. A LOV1/2-MBP fusion protein (MBP=maltose binding protein) and LOV1/2 with a His-tag at the C-terminus (LOV1/2-His) expressed in an Escherichia coli strain are investigated. Blue-light photo-excitation generates a non-fluorescent intermediate photoproduct (flavin-C(4a)-cysteinyl adduct with absorption peak at 390 nm). The photo-cycle dynamics is studied by dark-state absorption and fluorescence measurement, by following the temporal absorption and emission changes under blue and violet light exposure, and by measuring the temporal absorption and fluorescence recovery after light exposure. The fluorescence quantum yield, phi(F), of the dark adapted samples is phi(F)(LOV1/2-His) approximately 0.15 and phi(F)(LOV1/2-MBP) approximately 0.17. A bi-exponential absorption recovery after light exposure with a fast (in the several 10-s range) and a slow component (in the near 10-min range) are resolved. The quantum yield of photo-adduct formation, phi(Ad), is extracted from excitation intensity dependent absorption measurements. It decreases somewhat with rising excitation intensity. The behaviour of the combined wildtype LOV1-LOV2 double domains is compared with the behaviour of the separate LOV1 and LOV2 domains.

  17. Time-resolved spectroscopic fluorescence imaging, transient absorption and vibrational spectroscopy of intact and photo-inhibited photosynthetic tissue.

    PubMed

    Lukins, Philip B; Rehman, Shakil; Stevens, Gregory B; George, Doaa

    2005-01-01

    Fluorescence, absorption and vibrational spectroscopic techniques were used to study spinach at the photosystem II (PS II), chloroplast and cellular levels and to determine the effects and mechanisms of ultraviolet-B (UV-B) photoinhibition of these structures. Two-photon fluorescence spectroscopic imaging of intact chloroplasts shows significant spatial variations in the component fluorescence spectra in the range 640-740 nm, indicating that the type and distribution of chlorophylls vary markedly with position in the chloroplast. The chlorophyll distributions and excitonic behaviour in chloroplasts and whole plant tissue were studied using picosecond time-gated fluorescence imaging, which also showed UV-induced kinetic changes that clearly indicate that UV-B induces both structural and excitonic uncoupling of chlorophylls within the light-harvesting complexes. Transient absorption measurements and low-frequency infrared and Raman spectroscopy show that the predominant sites of UV-B damage in PS II are at the oxygen-evolving centre (OEC) itself, as well as at specific locations near the OEC-binding sites.

  18. Absorption spectroscopic probe to investigate the interaction between Nd(III) and calf-thymus DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devi, Ch. Victory; Singh, N. Rajmuhon

    2011-03-01

    The interaction between Nd(III) and Calf Thymus DNA (CT-DNA) in physiological buffer (pH 7.4) has been studied using absorption spectroscopy involving 4f-4f transition spectra in different aquated organic solvents. Complexation with CT-DNA is indicated by the changes in absorption intensity following the subsequent changes in the oscillator strengths of different 4f-4f bands and Judd-Ofelt intensity ( Tλ) parameters. The other spectral parameters namely Slator-Condon ( Fk's), nephelauxetic effect ( β), bonding ( b1/2) and percent covalency ( δ) parameters are computed to correlate with the binding of Nd(III) with DNA. The absorption spectra of Nd(III) exhibited hyperchromism and red shift in the presence of DNA. The binding constant, Kb has been determined by absorption measurement. The relative viscosity of DNA decreased with the addition of Nd(III). Thermodynamic parameters have been calculated according to relevant absorption data and Van't Hoff equation. The characterisation of bonding mode has been studied in detail. The results suggested that the major interaction mode between Nd(III) and DNA was external electrostatic binding.

  19. THERMAL AND SPECTROSCOPIC ANALYSES OF CAUSTIC LIDE SOLVENT EXTRACTION SOLVENT CONTACTED WITH 16 MOLAR AND 8 MOLAR NITRIC ACID

    SciTech Connect

    Fondeur, F; David Hobbs, D; Samuel Fink, S

    2007-07-12

    Thermal and spectroscopic analyses were performed on multiple layers formed from contacting Caustic Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX) solvent with 1 M or 3 M nitric acid. A slow chemical reaction occurs (i.e., over several weeks) between the solvent and 1 M or 3 M nitric acid as evidenced by color changes and the detection of nitro groups in the infrared spectrum of the aged samples. Thermal analysis revealed that decomposition of the resulting mixture does not meet the definition of explosive or deflagrating material.

  20. THERMAL AND SPECTROSCOPIC ANALYSES OF CAUSTIC SIDE SOLVENT EXTRACTION SOLVENT CONTACTED WITH 1 MOLARAND 3 MOLAR NITRIC ACID

    SciTech Connect

    Fondeur, F; David Hobbs, D; Samuel Fink, S

    2007-07-23

    Thermal and spectroscopic analyses were performed on multiple layers formed from contacting Caustic Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX) solvent with 1 M or 3 M nitric acid. A slow chemical reaction occurs (i.e., over several weeks) between the solvent and 1 M or 3 M nitric acid as evidenced by color changes and the detection of nitro groups in the infrared spectrum of the aged samples. Thermal analysis revealed that decomposition of the resulting mixture does not meet the definition of explosive or deflagrating material.

  1. Interaction between indium tin oxide nanoparticles and cytochrome c: A surface-enhanced Raman scattering and absorption spectroscopic study

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Yimin E-mail: tqiu@seu.edu.cn; Du, Deyang; Fan, Jiyang; Qiu, Teng E-mail: tqiu@seu.edu.cn; Kong, Fan

    2015-06-28

    Indium-tin-oxide (ITO) nanoparticles were annealed in vacuum or reducing atmosphere to obtain different surface structures and investigate their influence on the adsorptive character and conformation of cytochrome c (Cyt c) molecule. Annealing-induced morphometric or structural changes of ITO nanoparticles were characterized by instruments of transmission electron microscopy, x-ray diffraction, and Raman scattering. Semiconductor ITO nanoparticle-enhanced Raman scattering of Cyt c was observed and the enhanced efficiency was found to closely depend on the surface structures which control the adsorbance of buffer anions needed for Cyt c loading. Direct electron transfer between Cyt c and ITO surface at the moment of molecular elastic collision was found and a reverse electron transfer process for O-terminated surface and metal-terminated surface was observed, according to absorption spectroscopic measurement on the residual solution.

  2. Spectroscopic analyses of Fe and water in clays: A Martian surface weathering study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bishop, J. L.; Pieters, Carle M.; Edwards, J. O.; Coyne, L. M.; Chang, S.

    1991-01-01

    Martian surface morphology suggests the presence of liquid H2O on Mars in the past. Reflectance spectra of the Martian surface include features which correspond to the crystal field transitions of iron, as well as features supporting the presence of ice and minerals containing structural OH and surface water. Researchers initiated further spectroscopic studies of surface iron and water and structural OH in clays in order to determine what remotely obtained spectra can indicate about the presence of clays on Mars based on a clearer understanding of the factors influencing the spectral features. Current technology allows researchers to better correlate the low frequency fundamental stretching and bending vibrations of O-H bonds with the diagnostic near infrared overtone and combination bands used in mineral characterization and identification.

  3. Electron Spin Resonance and optical absorption spectroscopic studies of manganese centers in aluminium lead borate glasses.

    PubMed

    SivaRamaiah, G; LakshmanaRao, J

    2012-12-01

    Electron Spin Resonance (ESR) and optical absorption studies of 5Al(2)O(3)+75H(3)BO(3)+(20-x)PbO+xMnSO(4) (where x=0.5, 1,1.5 and 2 mol% of MnSO(4)) glasses at room temperature have been studied. The ESR spectrum of all the glasses exhibits resonance signals with effective isotropic g values at ≈2.0, 3.3 and 4.3. The ESR resonance signal at isotropic g≈2.0 has been attributed to Mn(2+) centers in an octahedral symmetry. The ESR resonance signals at isotropic g≈3.3 and 4.3 have been attributed to the rhombic symmetry of the Mn(2+) ions. The zero-field splitting parameter (zfs) has been calculated from the intensities of the allowed hyperfine lines. The optical absorption spectrum exhibits an intense band in the visible region and it has been attributed to (5)E(g)→(5)T(2g) transition of Mn(3+)centers in an octahedral environment. The optical band gap and the Urbach energies have been calculated from the ultraviolet absorption edges.

  4. Evaluation of laser absorption spectroscopic techniques for eddy covariance flux measurements of ammonia.

    PubMed

    Whitehead, James D; Twigg, Marsailidh; Famulari, Daniela; Nemitz, Eiko; Sutton, Mark A; Gallagher, Martin W; Fowler, David

    2008-03-15

    An intercomparison was made between eddy covariance flux measurements of ammonia by a quantum cascade laser absorption spectrometer (QCLAS) and a lead-salt tunable diode laser absorption spectrometer (TDLAS). The measurements took place in September 2004 and again in April 2005 over a managed grassland site in Southern Scotland, U.K. These were also compared with a flux estimate derived from an "Ammonia Measurement by ANnular Denuder with online Analysis" (AMANDA), using the aerodynamic gradient method (AGM). The concentration and flux measurements from the QCLAS correlated well with those of the TDLAS and the AGM systems when emissions were high, following slurry application to the field. Both the QCLAS and TDLAS, however, underestimated the flux when compared with the AMANDA system, by 64%. A flux loss of 41% due to chemical reaction of ammonia in the QCLAS (and 37% in the TDLAS) sample tube walls was identified and characterized using laboratory tests but did not fully accountforthis difference. Recognizing these uncertainties, the agreement between the systems was nevertheless very close (R2 = 0.95 between the QCLAS and the TDLAS; R2 = 0.84 between the QCLAS and the AMANDA) demonstrating the suitability of the laser absorption methods for quantifying the temporal dynamics of ammonia fluxes.

  5. CDSpecTech: A single software suite for multiple chiroptical spectroscopic analyses.

    PubMed

    Covington, Cody L; Polavarapu, Prasad L

    2017-04-12

    The program CDSpecTech was developed to facilitate the analysis of chiroptical spectra, which include the following: vibrational circular dichroism (VCD) and corresponding vibrational absorption (VA) spectra; vibrational Raman optical activity (VROA) and corresponding vibrational Raman spectra; electronic circular dichroism (ECD) and corresponding electronic absorption (EA) spectra. In addition, the program allows for generating optical rotatory dispersion (ORD) as the Kramers-Kronig transform of ECD spectra. The simulation of theoretical spectra from transition strengths can be achieved using different bandshape profiles. The experimental and simulated theoretical spectra can be visually compared by displaying them together. A unique feature of CDSpecTech is performing spectral analysis using the ratio spectra; i.e., the dimensionless dissymmetry factor (DF) spectrum, which is the ratio of CD to absorption spectra, and the dimensionless circular intensity difference (CID) spectrum, which is the ratio of VROA to vibrational Raman spectra. The quantitative agreement between experimental and simulated theoretical spectra can also be assessed from the numerical similarity overlap between them. Two different similarity overlap methods are available. The program uses a graphical user interface which allows for ease of use and facilitates the analysis. All these features make CDSpecTech a valuable tool for the analysis of chiroptical spectra. The program is freely available on the World Wide Web.

  6. Spectroscopic Diagnostics of Symbiotic Stars III. Radial Velocity Analyses of HBV 475

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikeda, Yuji; Tamura, Shin'ichi

    2000-08-01

    We present highly resolved spectroscopic data of HBV 475 (= V 1329 Cyg) in the optical region, which have been obtained during the past 10 years at the Okayama Astrophysical Observatory. We analyzed line profiles of Hα , Hγ , He II lambda 4686, [O III] lambda 5007, and [Fe VII] lambda 6086 using Gaussian de-convolution method, and investigated the variation of individual components of the profiles as a function of the orbital phase. We revised the mass function obtained from the orbital elements of the hot star as f_h(M) ~ 1.2 +/- 0.3 MO . It differs considerably from previously published values, which were larger than 20 MO . However, our new mass function is more reasonable for a symbiotic system consisting of a red giant and a hot star, which is currently presumed to be a white dwarf. Finally, we suggest a descriptive model of line-emitting regions in the HBV 475 binary, which explains the basic variation in the line profiles and agrees with the main features of the HST image.

  7. LOCAL HELIOSEISMIC AND SPECTROSCOPIC ANALYSES OF INTERACTIONS BETWEEN ACOUSTIC WAVES AND A SUNSPOT

    SciTech Connect

    Rajaguru, S. P.; Wachter, R.; Couvidat, S.; Sankarasubramanian, K.

    2010-10-01

    Using a high-cadence imaging spectropolarimetric observation of a sunspot and its surroundings in magnetically sensitive (Fe I 6173 A) and insensitive (Fe I 7090 A) upper photospheric absorption lines, we map the instantaneous wave phases and helioseismic travel times as a function of observation height and inclination of magnetic field to the vertical. We confirm the magnetic inclination-angle-dependent transmission of incident acoustic waves into upward propagating waves and derive (1) proof that helioseismic travel times receive direction-dependent contributions from such waves and hence cause errors in conventional flow inferences, (2) evidences for acoustic wave sources beneath the umbral photosphere, and (3) significant differences in travel times measured from the chosen magnetically sensitive and insensitive spectral lines.

  8. Spectroscopic and x-ray diffraction analyses of asbestos in the World Trade Center dust:

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Swayze, Gregg A.; Clark, Roger N.; Sutley, Stephen J.; Hoefen, Todd M.; Plumlee, Geoffrey S.; Meeker, Gregory P.; Brownfield, Isabelle; Livo, Keith E.; Morath, Laurie C.

    2009-01-01

    On September 17 and 18, 2001, samples of settled dust and airfall debris were collected from 34 sites within a 1-km radius of the WTC collapse site, including a sample from an indoor location unaffected by rainfall, and samples of insulation from two steel beams at Ground Zero. Laboratory spectral and x-ray diffraction analyses of the field samples detected trace levels of serpentine minerals, including chrysotile asbestos, in about two-thirds of the dust samples at concentrations at or below ~1 wt%. One sample of a beam coating material contained up to 20 wt% chrysotile asbestos. Analyses indicate that trace levels of chrysotile were distributed with the dust radially to distances greater than 0.75 km from Ground Zero. The chrysotile content of the dust is variable and may indicate that chrysotile asbestos was not distributed uniformly during the three collapse events.

  9. Spectroscopic analyses of subluminous B stars: observational constraints for the theory of stellar evolution, pulsation, and diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edelmann, Heinz

    2003-06-01

    This thesis deals with quantitative spectroscopic analyses of large samples of subluminous B stars in order to find constraints the theory of stellar evolution, pulsation, and diffusion. Subluminous B stars, also known as subdwarf B (sdB) stars, are very important in several respects: They dominate the population of faint blue stars in high galactic latitudes, and are found both in the field and in globular clusters. Therefore, sdB stars are important to understand the structure and evolution of our galaxy. From the cosmological point of view, they are candidate progenitors of supernovae of type Ia due to their membership in close binary systems. In the context of stellar astrophysics, subdwarf B stars play an important role because several of them are discovered to show non-radial pulsations, which allows to probe their interior by asteroseismology. Last but not least, sdB stars show very peculiar element abundance patterns, probably caused by diffusion processes. Subluminous B stars are generally considered to be core helium-burning stars with extremely thin hydrogen envelopes (< 0.02M) and masses around 0.5M. In the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram they populate a very narrow area which lies on a blue-ward extension of the horizontal branch (HB), the so called "Extreme Horizontal Branch" (EHB). Due to their thin hydrogen-rich envelope, they cannot sustain a hydrogen-burning shell. This means that the sdB stars cannot ascend the asymptotic giant branch after the end of the helium-core burning, but should evolve directly to the white dwarf graveyard. However, according to standard stellar evolution theory, subdwarf B stars should not exist. Their evolution is still unclear and several scenarios are under debate. For all these investigations, knowledge of the stellar parameters (effective temperature, gravity and chemical composition) is very important to verify or discard theoretical models and predictions. Numerous observing runs have been performed mostly by myself

  10. Biochemical, mechanical, and spectroscopic analyses of genetically engineered flax fibers producing bioplastic (poly-beta-hydroxybutyrate).

    PubMed

    Wróbel-Kwiatkowska, Magdalena; Skórkowska-Telichowska, Katarzyna; Dymińska, Lucyna; Maczka, Mirosław; Hanuza, Jerzy; Szopa, Jan

    2009-01-01

    The interest in biofibers has grown in recent years due to their expanding range of applications in fields as diverse as biomedical science and the automotive industry. Their low production costs, biodegradability, physical properties, and perceived eco-friendliness allow for their extensive use as composite components, a role in which they could replace petroleum-based synthetic polymers. We performed biochemical, mechanical, and structural analyses of flax stems and fibers derived from field-grown transgenic flax enriched with PHB (poly-beta-hydroxybutyrate). The analyses of the plant stems revealed an increase in the cellulose content and a decrease in the lignin and pectin contents relative to the control plants. However, the contents of the fibers' major components (cellulose, lignin, pectin) remain unchanged. An FT-IR study confirmed the results of the biochemical analyses of the flax fibers. However, the arrangement of the cellulose polymer in the transgenic fibers differed from that in the control, and a significant increase in the number of hydrogen bonds was detected. The mechanical properties of the transgenic flax stems were significantly improved, reflecting the cellulose content increase. However, the mechanical properties of the fibers did not change in comparison with the control, with the exception of the fibers from transgenic line M13. The generated transgenic flax plants, which produce both components of the flax/PHB composites (i.e., fibers and thermoplastic matrix in the same plant organ) are a source of an attractive and ecologically safe material for industry and medicine.

  11. Spectrum of excess partial molar absorptivity. I. Near infrared spectroscopic study of aqueous acetonitrile and acetone.

    PubMed

    Koga, Yoshikata; Sebe, Fumie; Minami, Takamasa; Otake, Keiko; Saitow, Ken-ichi; Nishikawa, Keiko

    2009-09-03

    We study the mixing schemes or the molecular processes occurring in aqueous acetonitrile (ACN) and acetone (ACT) by near-infrared spectroscopy (NIR). Both solutions (any other aqueous solutions) are not free from strong and complex intermolecular interactions. To tackle such a many-body problem, we first use the concept of the excess molar absorptivity, epsilonE, which is a function of solute mole fraction in addition to that of wavenumber, nu. The plots of epsilonE calculated from NIR spectra for both aqueous solutions against nu showed two clearly separated bands at 5020 and 5230 cm(-1); the former showed negative and the latter positive peaks. At zero and unity mole fractions of solute, epsilonE is identically zero independent of nu. Similar to the thermodynamic excess functions, both negative and positive bands grow in size from zero to the minimum (or the maximum) and back to zero, as the mole fraction varies from 0 to 1. Since the negative band's nu-locus coincides with the NIR spectrum of ice, and the positive with that of liquid H(2)O, we suggest that on addition of solute the "ice-likeness" decreases and the "liquid-likeness" increases, reminiscent of the two-mixture model for liquid H(2)O. The modes of these variations, however, are qualitatively different between ACN-H(2)O and ACT-H(2)O. The former ACN is known to act as a hydrophobe and ACT as a hydrophile from our previous thermodynamic studies. To see the difference more clearly, we introduced and calculated the excess partial molar absorptivity of ACN and ACT, epsilon(E)(N) and epsilon(E)(T), respectively. The mole fraction dependences of epsilon(E)(N) and epsilon(E)(T) show qualitatively different behavior and are consistent with the detailed mixing schemes elucidated by our earlier differential thermodynamic studies. Furthermore, we found in the H(2)O-rich region that the effect of hydrophobic ACN is acted on the negative band at 5020 cm(-1), while that of hydrophilic ACT is on the positive high

  12. Optical absorption, Mössbauer, and FTIR spectroscopic studies of two blue bazzites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taran, Michail N.; Dyar, M. Darby; Khomenko, Vladimir M.; Boesenberg, Joseph S.

    2017-02-01

    Two samples of bazzite, a very rare Sc analog of beryl, from Tørdal, Telemark, Norway and Kent, Central Kazakhstan were studied by electron microprobe, optical absorption, and Mössbauer spectroscopies; the latter sample was also studied by FTIR. Electron microprobe results show that the Norway bazzite is composed of two bazzites with slightly different FeO contents, viz. 5.66 and 5.43 wt%. The Kazakhstan sample consists of several varieties of bazzite displaying strong differences in iron, manganese, magnesium, and aluminum contents (in wt%): FeO from 2.02 to 6.73, MnO from 0.89 to 2.98, MgO from 0.37 to 1.86, and Al2O3 from 0.30 to 1.30. Mössbauer spectroscopy shows different degrees of iron oxidation. The Norway bazzite is completely Fe2+, while the Kazakhstan sample contains roughly equivalent Fe3+ and Fe2+ accommodated in the octahedral site. The difference in iron oxidation causes strong variations in the intensity of the broad optical absorption band around 13,850 cm-1, which is assigned to Fe2+ → Fe3+ IVCT; as a result, there are strong differences in the intensity of blue color. Dichroism (E||c ≫ E⊥c) is much stronger in the Kazakhstan sample than in the Norway one. Intensities of the electronic spin-allowed bands of [6]Fe2+ at 8900 and 10,400 cm-1 are somewhat higher in the latter than in the former. FTIR spectra of the sample from Kent show the presence of only water type II molecules with the H-H vector perpendicular to the c-axis, in contrast to more typical beryls that always show at least weak minor bands of H2O I. This result shows that trapped water molecules in structural channels of studied bazzite occupy only sites next to or between six-membered rings centered by Na atoms. Definite structure can be observed in the vicinities of ν2 and ν3 peaks. Peaks at 1621 and 3663 cm-1 are assigned to "doubly coordinated" H2O (IId), whereas maximums at 1633 and 3643 cm-1 likely represent "singly coordinated" H2O (IIs). Interpretation of the third

  13. Absorption and fluorescence spectroscopic characterization of BLUF domain of AppA from Rhodobacter sphaeroides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zirak, P.; Penzkofer, A.; Schiereis, T.; Hegemann, P.; Jung, A.; Schlichting, I.

    2005-08-01

    The BLUF domain of the transcriptional anti-repressor protein AppA from the non-sulfur anoxyphototrophic purple bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides was characterized by absorption and emission spectroscopy. The BLUF domain constructs AppA 148 (consisting of amino-acid residues 1-148) and AppA 126 (amino-acid residues 1-126) are investigated. The cofactor of the investigated domains is found to consist of a mixture of the flavins riboflavin, FMN, and FAD. The dark-adapted domains exist in two different active receptor conformations (receptor states) with different sub-nanosecond fluorescence lifetimes (BLUF r,f and BLUF r,sl) and a small non-interacting conformation (BLUF nc). The active receptor conformations are transformed to putative signalling states (BLUF s,f and BLUF s,sl) of low fluorescence efficiency and picosecond fluorescence lifetime by blue-light excitation (light-adapted domains). In the dark at room temperature both signalling states recover back to the initial receptor states with a time constant of about 17 min. A quantum yield of signalling state formation of about 25% was determined by intensity dependent transmission measurements. A photo-cycle scheme is presented including photo-induced charge transfer complex formation, charge recombination, and protein binding pocket reorganisation.

  14. Spectroscopic analyses of the noncovalent self-assembly of cyanines upon various nucleic acid scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Achyuthan, Komandoor E; McClain, Jaime L; Zhou, Zhijun; Whitten, David G; Branch, Darren W

    2009-04-01

    We utilized self-assembly of cyanine chromophores to study the conformational changes in various types of nucleic acid scaffolds: single and double stranded DNA, linear or circular DNA and RNA. We identified a chromophore that became highly fluorescent after aggregating upon nucleic acids. Fluorescence from the aggregate was instantaneous after self-assembly. Temporal emission profiles displayed a biphasic trend demonstrating kinetic dependence for assembly and disassembly. Absorption spectra of the aggregate showed a red-shifted "shoulder" peak indicative of J-aggregate. Fluorescence from J-aggregates was also red-shifted. We utilized cyanine self-assembly to quantize various nucleic acids. The limits of detection and quantization for psiX174 DNA were 3 and 9 fmol, respectively. We similarly determined the sensitivity for various nucleic acids and established the optimum conditions for self-assembly. Collectively, the effects of methanol, salt, and full width at half maximum for cyanine fluorescence on DNA or carboxymethylamylose scaffolds, all suggested noncovalent, electrostatic, and hydrophobic forces were involved in supramolecular self-assembly. Our results facilitate a better understanding of supramolecular self-assembly.

  15. Absorption spectroscopic study of synergistic extraction of praseodymium with benzoyl acetone in presence of crown ether.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Shrabanti; Bhattacharya, Sumanta; Basu, Sukalyan

    2005-04-01

    The extraction behaviour of Pr(III) from aqueous nitric acid medium employing benzoylacetone has been studied in presence of two crown ethers, viz., 15-crown-5 and benzo-15-crown-5 in chloroform medium using UV-vis absorption spectroscopy. The binary equilibrium constant (logk(ex)) for the complex [Pr(benzoylacetonate)(NO3(-))2(H(2)O)] in organic phase was found to be 1.170. The overall equilibrium constants (logK) for the ternary species [Pr(benzoylacetonate)(crown ether)(NO3(-))(2)] were estimated to be 4.01 and 4.41 for 15-crown-5 and benzo-15-crown-5, respectively. The trend in the equilibrium constant values were very much in accordance with the nature of substitution of the donor moiety. The extraction of Pr(III) by the benzoylacetone-crown ether combination was maximum at pH 3.0 and extraction decreases with increase in pH. It has been found that the extent of extraction of Pr(III) in organic phase as the binary as well as ternary complex [Pr(benzoylacetonate)(NO3(-))(2)(H(2)O)] and [Pr(benzoylacetonate)(crown ether)(NO3(-))(2)] increases with increase in concentration of the ligand. Similar trend is observed in the extraction by only donors. Enthalpies and entropies of formation for the ternary extraction process have been estimated. In addition, the effect of NaNO(3) as foreign salt was also studied and it was observed that with increase in ionic strength, percentage extraction increases.

  16. Vibrational spectroscopic analyses of unique yellow feather pigments (spheniscins) in penguins

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Daniel B.; McGoverin, Cushla M.; McGraw, Kevin J.; James, Helen F.; Madden, Odile

    2013-01-01

    Many animals extract, synthesize and refine chemicals for colour display, where a range of compounds and structures can produce a diverse colour palette. Feather colours, for example, span the visible spectrum and mostly result from pigments in five chemical classes (carotenoids, melanins, porphyrins, psittacofulvins and metal oxides). However, the pigment that generates the yellow colour of penguin feathers appears to represent a sixth, poorly characterized class of feather pigments. This pigment class, here termed ‘spheniscin’, is displayed by half of the living penguin genera; the larger and richer colour displays of the pigment are highly attractive. Using Raman and mid-infrared spectroscopies, we analysed yellow feathers from two penguin species (king penguin, Aptenodytes patagonicus; macaroni penguin, Eudyptes chrysolophus) to further characterize spheniscin pigments. The Raman spectrum of spheniscin is distinct from spectra of other feather pigments and exhibits 17 distinctive spectral bands between 300 and 1700 cm−1. Spectral bands from the yellow pigment are assigned to aromatically bound carbon atoms, and to skeletal modes in an aromatic, heterocyclic ring. It has been suggested that the penguin pigment is a pterin compound; Raman spectra from yellow penguin feathers are broadly consistent with previously reported pterin spectra, although we have not matched it to any known compound. Raman spectroscopy can provide a rapid and non-destructive method for surveying the distribution of different classes of feather pigments in the avian family tree, and for correlating the chemistry of spheniscin with compounds analysed elsewhere. We suggest that the sixth class of feather pigments may have evolved in a stem-lineage penguin and endowed modern penguins with a costly plumage trait that appears to be chemically unique among birds. PMID:23516063

  17. Distinct circular dichroism spectroscopic signatures of polyproline II and unordered secondary structures: applications in secondary structure analyses.

    PubMed

    Lopes, Jose L S; Miles, Andrew J; Whitmore, Lee; Wallace, B A

    2014-12-01

    Circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy is a valuable method for defining canonical secondary structure contents of proteins based on empirically-defined spectroscopic signatures derived from proteins with known three-dimensional structures. Many proteins identified as being "Intrinsically Disordered Proteins" have a significant amount of their structure that is neither sheet, helix, nor turn; this type of structure is often classified by CD as "other", "random coil", "unordered", or "disordered". However the "other" category can also include polyproline II (PPII)-type structures, whose spectral properties have not been well-distinguished from those of unordered structures. In this study, synchrotron radiation circular dichroism spectroscopy was used to investigate the spectral properties of collagen and polyproline, which both contain PPII-type structures. Their native spectra were compared as representatives of PPII structures. In addition, their spectra before and after treatment with various conditions to produce unfolded or denatured structures were also compared, with the aim of defining the differences between CD spectra of PPII and disordered structures. We conclude that the spectral features of collagen are more appropriate than those of polyproline for use as the representative spectrum for PPII structures present in typical amino acid-containing proteins, and that the single most characteristic spectroscopic feature distinguishing a PPII structure from a disordered structure is the presence of a positive peak around 220nm in the former but not in the latter. These spectra are now available for inclusion in new reference data sets used for CD analyses of the secondary structures of soluble proteins.

  18. Combined Quantum Chemical/Raman Spectroscopic Analyses of Li+ Cation Solvation: Cyclic Carbonate Solvents - Ethylene Carbonate and Propylene Earbonate

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, Joshua L.; Borodin, Oleg; Seo, D. M.; Henderson, Wesley A.

    2014-12-01

    Combined computational/Raman spectroscopic analyses of ethylene carbonate (EC) and propylene carbonate (PC) solvation interactions with lithium salts are reported. It is proposed that previously reported Raman analyses of (EC)n-LiX mixtures have utilized faulty assumptions. In the present studies, density functional theory (DFT) calculations have provided corrections in terms of both the scaling factors for the solvent's Raman band intensity variations and information about band overlap. By accounting for these factors, the solvation numbers obtained from two different EC solvent bands are in excellent agreement with one another. The same analysis for PC, however, was found to be quite challenging. Commercially available PC is a racemic mixture of (S)- and (R)-PC isomers. Based upon the quantum chemistry calculations, each of these solvent isomers may exist as multiple conformers due to a low energy barrier for ring inversion, making deconvolution of the Raman bands daunting and inherently prone to significant error. Thus, Raman spectroscopy is able to accurately determine the extent of the EC...Li+ cation solvation interactions using the provided methodology, but a similar analysis of PC...Li+ cation solvation results in a significant underestimation of the actual solvation numbers.

  19. Vibrational, electronic absorption, thermal and mechanical analyses of organic nonlinear optical material guanidinium phthalate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devi, T. Uma; Prabha, A. Josephine; Meenakshi, R.; Kalpana, G.; Dilip, C. Surendra

    2017-02-01

    The FTIR and UV spectroscopic analysis have been carried out on guanidinium phthalate (GUP) crystal, an organic nonlinear optical material. The spectra are interpreted with the aid of normal coordinate analysis following structure optimizations and force field calculations based on density functional theory (DFT). The thermogravimetric (TG) and differential thermal analysis (DTA) ensures the thermal stability of the compound. Vickers microhardness values reveals the mechanical strength of the crystal.

  20. Spectroscopic analyses of manganese ions effects on the conformational changes of inorganic pyrophosphatase from psychrophilic Shewanella sp. AS-11.

    PubMed

    Ginting, Elvy Like; Maeganeku, Chihiro; Motoshima, Hiroyuki; Watanabe, Keiichi

    2014-02-01

    Mn²⁺ ions influence the activity, temperature dependence, and thermostability of the psychrophilic Shewanella-PPase (Sh-PPase), and are required to function in cold environments. The functional characteristics of Sh-PPase on activation with Mn²⁺ ions are possibly related to conformational changes in the molecule. In this study, conformational changes of Sh-PPase on activation with Mn²⁺ ions were analyzed in solution by fluorescence spectroscopy analysis of intrinsic tryptophan residues, 1-anilino-8-naphthalene sulfonate fluorescence, and circular dichroism spectroscopy. For Sh-PPase, Mn²⁺ ions did not affect the flexibility of the tryptophan residues and secondary structure of the enzyme. However, the microenvironment of the tryptophan residues and surface area of Sh-PPase were more hydrophilic on activation with Mn²⁺ ions. These results indicate that activation with Mn²⁺ ions causes conformational changes around the aromatic amino acid residues and affects the hydrophobicity of the enzyme surface, which results in conformational changes. Substrate-induced conformational changes reflect that metal-free Sh-PPase in solution indicated an open structure and will be a close structure when binding substrate. In combination of our spectroscopic analyses on Sh-PPase, it can be concluded that activation with Mn²⁺ ions changes some conformation of Sh-PPase molecule in solution.

  1. A nearly on-axis spectroscopic system for simultaneously measuring UV-visible absorption and X-ray diffraction in the SPring-8 structural genomics beamline.

    PubMed

    Sakaguchi, Miyuki; Kimura, Tetsunari; Nishida, Takuma; Tosha, Takehiko; Sugimoto, Hiroshi; Yamaguchi, Yoshihiro; Yanagisawa, Sachiko; Ueno, Go; Murakami, Hironori; Ago, Hideo; Yamamoto, Masaki; Ogura, Takashi; Shiro, Yoshitsugu; Kubo, Minoru

    2016-01-01

    UV-visible absorption spectroscopy is useful for probing the electronic and structural changes of protein active sites, and thus the on-line combination of X-ray diffraction and spectroscopic analysis is increasingly being applied. Herein, a novel absorption spectrometer was developed at SPring-8 BL26B2 with a nearly on-axis geometry between the X-ray and optical axes. A small prism mirror was placed near the X-ray beamstop to pass the light only 2° off the X-ray beam, enabling spectroscopic analysis of the X-ray-exposed volume of a crystal during X-ray diffraction data collection. The spectrometer was applied to NO reductase, a heme enzyme that catalyzes NO reduction to N2O. Radiation damage to the heme was monitored in real time during X-ray irradiation by evaluating the absorption spectral changes. Moreover, NO binding to the heme was probed via caged NO photolysis with UV light, demonstrating the extended capability of the spectrometer for intermediate analysis.

  2. Novel Molecular Spectroscopic Multimethod Approach for Monitoring Water Absorption/Desorption Kinetics of CAD/CAM Poly(Methyl Methacrylate) Prosthodontics.

    PubMed

    Wiedemair, Verena; Mayr, Sophia; Wimmer, Daniel S; Köck, Eva Maria; Penner, Simon; Kerstan, Andreas; Steinmassl, Patricia-Anca; Dumfahrt, Herbert; Huck, Christian W

    2016-12-12

    Water absorbed to poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA)-based CAD/CAM (computer-assisted design/computer-assisted manufacturing) prosthodontics can alter their properties including hardness and stability. In the present contribution, water absorption and desorption kinetics under defined experimental conditions were monitored employing several supplementary and advanced Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopic techniques in combination with multivariate analysis (MVA). In this synergistic vibrational spectroscopic multimethod approach, first a novel near-infrared (NIR) diffuse fiber optic probe reflection spectroscopic method was established for time-resolved analysis of water uptake within seven days under controlled conditions. Near-infrared water absorbance spectra in a wavenumber range between 5288-5100 cm(-1) (combination band) and 5424-5352 cm(-1) (second overtone) were used establishing corresponding calibration and validation models to quantify the amount of water in the milligram range. Therefore, 14 well-defined samples exposed to prior optimized experimental conditions were taken into consideration. The average daily water uptake conducting reference analysis was calculated as 22 mg/day for one week. Additionally, in this study for the first time NIR two-dimensional correlation spectroscopy (2D-COS) was conducted to monitor and interpret the spectral dynamics of water absorption on the prosthodontics in a wavenumber range of 5100-5300 cm(-1) For sensitive time-resolved recording of water desorption, a recently developed high-temperature, high-pressure FT-IR reaction cell with water-free ultra-dry in situ and operando operation was applied. The reaction cell, as well as the sample holder, was fully made of quartz glass, with no hot metal or ceramic parts in the vicinity of the high temperature zone. Applying a temperature gradient in the range of 25-150 ℃, mid-infrared (MIR) 2D-COS was successfully conducted to get insights into the dynamic

  3. Spectroscopic properties of Bi2ZnOB2O6 single crystals doped with Pr3+ ions: Absorption and luminescence investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasprowicz, D.; Brik, M. G.; Jaroszewski, K.; Pedzinski, T.; Bursa, B.; Głuchowski, P.; Majchrowski, A.; Michalski, E.

    2015-09-01

    Nonlinear optical Bi2ZnOB2O6 single crystals doped with Pr3+ ions were grown using the Kyropoulos method. The absorption and luminescence properties of these new systems were investigated for the first time. The crystals are characterized by the large values of nonlinear optical coefficients. Effective luminescence of the Pr3+ ions makes this system an excellent candidate for the near-infrared (NIR) and/or ultraviolet (UV) to visible (VIS) laser converters. Based on the obtained experimental spectroscopic data, detailed analysis of the absorption and luminescence spectra was performed using the conventional Judd-Ofelt theory. Those transitions, which can be potentially used for laser applications of the Pr3+ ion, have been identified. In addition to the intensity parameters Ω2, Ω4, Ω6 the branching ratios and radiative lifetimes were estimated for all possible transitions in the studied spectral region.

  4. Effect of steric hindrance on carbon dioxide absorption into new amine solutions: thermodynamic and spectroscopic verification through solubility and NMR analysis.

    PubMed

    Park, Jung-Yeon; Yoon, Sang Jun; Lee, Huen

    2003-04-15

    Acid gas absorption technology is of great importance in these days for the prevention of global warming and the resulting worldwide climate change. More efficient process design and development for the removal of acid gases has become important, together with the development of new absorbents as one of urgent areas of research in addressing global-warming problems. In the present work, aqueous solutions of 2-amino-2-hydroxymethyl-1,3-propanediol (AHPD), a sterically hindered amine, has been examined as a potential CO2 absorbent and compared with the most commonly used absorbent, monoethanolamine (MEA) solution, through equilibrium solubility measurements and 13C NMR spectroscopic analyses. The solubilities of CO2 in aqueous 10 mass % AHPD solutions were higher than those in aqueous 10 mass % MEA solutions above 4 kPa at 298.15 K, but below 4 kPa, the solubility behavior appeared to be the opposite. The solubility difference between these two solutions increased with the CO2 partial pressures above the crossover pressure. Equilibrated CO2-MEA-H2O and CO2-AHPD-H2O solutions at various CO2 partal pressures ranging from 0.01 to 3000 kPa were analyzed by 13C NMR spectroscopy to provide a more microscopic understanding of the reaction mechanisms in the two solutions. In the CO2-amine-H2O solutions, amine reacted with CO2 to form mainly the protonated amine (AMH+), bicarbonate ion (HCO3-), and carbamate anion (AMCO2-), where the quantitative ratio of bicarbonate ion to carbamate anion strongly influenced the CO2 loading in the amine solutions. A profusion of bicarbonate ions, but a very small amount of carbamate anions, was identified in the CO2-AHPD-H2O solution, whereas a considerable amount of carbamate anions was formed in the CO2-MEA-H2O solution. AHPD contains more hydroxyl groups than nonhindered MEA, and hence, the chemical shifts in its 13C NMR spectra were strongly influenced by the solution pH values. In contrast, MEA appeared to be insensitive to pH. The

  5. X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) analyses of Ni species trapped in graphene sheet of carbon nanofibers

    SciTech Connect

    Ushiro, Mayuko; Uno, Kanae; Fujikawa, Takashi; Sato, Yoshinori; Tohji, Kazuyuki; Watari, Fumio; Chun, W.-J.; Koike, Yuichiro; Asakura, Kiyotaka

    2006-04-01

    Metal impurities in the carbon nanotubes and carbon nanofibers play an important role in understanding their physical and chemical properties. We apply the Ni K-edge x-ray absorption fine structure analyses to the local electronic and geometric structures around embedded Ni impurities used as catalysts in a carbon nanofiber in combination with multiple scattering analyses. We find almost Ni catalysts as metal particles are removed by the purification treatment. Even after the purification, residual 100 ppm Ni species are still absorbed; most of them are in monomer structure with Ni-C bond length 1.83 A, and each of them is substituted for a carbon atom in a graphene sheet.

  6. Titanium density analysed by optical absorption and emission spectroscopy in a dc magnetron discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaillard, M.; Britun, N.; Kim, Yong M.; Han, Jeon G.

    2007-02-01

    This paper presents an optical diagnostic examination of dc planar magnetron discharge used for titanium deposition at 30 mTorr in argon bulk gas. The results were obtained by optical absorption (OAS) and emission (OES) spectroscopy for two distances from the target without substrate. The absolute density of titanium in the ground and metastable states at 4 cm from the target ranged, respectively, between 8 × 1010 cm-3 and 1012 cm-3 and between 6 × 1010 cm-3 and 3 × 1011 cm-3, in the range 0.2-1.0 A. OES results were used to prepare an assumed interpretation in terms of differences in loss mechanisms, mainly by either diffusion towards the walls for all particles at 8 cm from the target or collision losses for non-radiative species at 4 cm from the target, except for the titanium ground state. This was confirmed by our results of the argon metastable density measurement at 4 cm which was constant at around 7 × 1010 cm-3 with discharge current.

  7. Continuous measurements of nitrous oxide, carbon monoxide, methane and carbon dioxide in the surface ocean with novel laser-absorption analysers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaiser, Jan; Grefe, Imke; Wager, Natalie; Bakker, Dorothee C. E.; Lee, Gareth A.

    2013-04-01

    In recent years, improvements in spectroscopic technology have revolutionised atmospheric trace gas research. In particular, cavity-based optical absorption analysers allow determination of gas concentrations with high frequency, repeatability, reproducibility and long-term stability. These qualities make them particularly suitable for autonomous measurements on voluntary observing ships (VOS). Here, we present results from three of the first deployments of such analysers on research ships, as a first step towards VOS installations. Los Gatos off-axis ICOS (Integrated Cavity Output Spectroscopy) analysers were used to measure nitrous oxide (N2O), carbon monoxide (CO), methane (CH4) and carbon dioxide (CO2) mixing ratios in ocean surface water during research cruises in 2010, 2011 and 2012. The analysers were coupled to an equilibrator fed by the scientific seawater supply in the ship's laboratories. The equilibrator measurements were alternated with regular measurements of marine air and calibrated standard gases. Short-term precision for 10 s-average N2O mole fractions at an acquisition rate of 1 Hz was better than 0.2 nmol mol-1. The same value was achieved for duplicate measurements of a standard gas analysed within 1 hour of each other. The response time to concentration changes in water was 142-203 s, depending on the headspace flow rate. During the first deployment on the AMT20 cruise (Atlantic Meridional Transect, Southampton to Punta Arenas, 12 October to 25 November 2010), we unexpectedly found the subtropical gyres to be slightly undersaturated in N2O, implying that this region acted as a sink for this greenhouse gas. In contrast, the equatorial region was supersaturated and a source of nitrous oxide to the atmosphere. Mean sea-to-air fluxes were overall small and ranged between -1.6 and 0.11 μmol m-2 d-1 (negative fluxes imply an net uptake by the ocean). Despite the good short-term repeatability, significant calibration drift occurred between the six

  8. Raman spectroscopic analyses of preserved historical specimens of human hair attributed to Robert Stephenson and Sir Isaac Newton.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Howell G M; Hassan, Nik F N; Wilson, Andrew S

    2004-10-01

    The Raman spectra of two historical specimens of human hair attributed to the engineer Robert Stephenson and scientist Sir Isaac Newton, preserved in private collections are reported. Comparisons are made with the Raman spectra of modern hair specimens and with hair from archaeological excavations. The hair spectra collected with a laser excitation of 785 nm are of a better quality than those collected using 1064 nm. The historical hair specimens are remarkably well-defined spectroscopically in terms of the amide I vibrational mode and the [small nu](SS), ascribed to a predominantly gauche-gauche-gauche CSSC conformation. The contrast with degraded hair specimens recovered from archaeological excavations is striking. The presence of a weak feature near 2590 cm(-1) in the hair samples attributed to a [small nu](SH) vibration could be indicative of a reduction process operative on the CSSC cystine keratotic linkages and a possible origin of this is bacterial biodegradation identified histologically. This study demonstrates the molecular information available from non-destructive Raman spectroscopic analysis from single hair shafts or small bundles of fibres which complements information available from histological and destructive analytical techniques for rare biological specimens subjected to conservation or curation procedures in museums or private collections.

  9. Gamma-irradiation and UV-C light-induced lipid peroxidation: a Fourier transform-infrared absorption spectroscopic study.

    PubMed

    Kinder, R; Ziegler, C; Wessels, J M

    1997-05-01

    Fourier transform-infrared spectroscopy of dry, multibilayer films has been used to study gamma-radiation and UV-C light induced lipid peroxidation in 1,2-dilinoleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine liposomes. The observed spectral changes were compared with the results obtained from measurement of hydroperoxides, conjugated dienes and to the formation of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances, such as malondialdehyde (MDA) or MDA-like substances. Upon irradiation a decrease in intensity of the asymmetric C - H stretching vibration (va(CH2)) of the isolated cis C = C - H groups (3010 cm-1) was observed. Directly correlated with the decrease of the va(CH2) absorption was a shift of the asymmetric phosphate ester stretching vibration (va(P = O)) towards smaller wavenumbers (1260-->1244 cm-1), indicating that the lipid peroxidation induced molecular alterations in the fatty acid chains influence the packing of the phospholipids in dry multibilayer films. In addition, the formation of a new absorption band at 1693 cm-1 could be detected, the intensity of which was comparable with the formation of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances and, therefore, attributed to the (C = O) stretching of alpha, beta unsaturated aldehydes. Dose-dependent studies using ionizing radiation showed that the decrease of va(CH2) was directly correlated with an increase in absorption of the conjugated dienes at 234 nm and with the formation of hydroperoxides suggesting that the absorption at 3010 cm-1 is solely due to isolated cis C = C - H groups and hence subject to the early stages of the radical chain reaction. UV-C light induced lipid peroxidation revealed a non-linear decrease of I3010, which was directly correlated with the formation of hydroperoxides. The observed early saturation of the conjugated dienes was attributed to an early photodecomposition of the conjugated double bonds.

  10. X-ray absorption spectroscopic studies of the active sites of nickel- and copper-containing metalloproteins

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, G.O.

    1993-06-01

    X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) is a useful tool for obtaining structural and chemical information about the active sites of metalloproteins and metalloenzymes. Information may be obtained from both the edge region and the extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) or post-edge region of the K-edge X-ray absorption spectrum of a metal center in a compound. The edge contains information about the valence electronic structure of the atom that absorbs the X-rays. It is possible in some systems to infer the redox state of the metal atom in question, as well as the geometry and nature of ligands connected to it, from the features in the edge in a straightforward manner. The EXAFS modulations, being produced by the backscattering of the ejected photoelectron from the atoms surrounding the metal atom, provide, when analyzed, information about the number and type of neighbouring atoms, and the distances at which they occur. In this thesis, analysis of both the edge and EXAFS regions has been used to gain information about the active sites of various metalloproteins. The metalloproteins studied were plastocyanin (Pc), laccase and nickel carbon monoxide dehydrogenase (Ni CODH). Studies of Cu(I)-imidazole compounds, related to the protein hemocyanin, are also reported here.

  11. X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopic determination of plutonium speciation at the Rocky Flats environmental technology

    SciTech Connect

    Lezama-pacheco, Juan S; Conradson, Steven D; Clark, David L

    2008-01-01

    X-ray Absorption Fine Structure spectroscopy was used to probe the speciation of the ppm level Pu in thirteen soil and concrete samples from the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site in support of the site remediation effort that has been successfully completed since these measurements. In addition to X-ray Absorption Near Edge Spectra, two of the samples yielded Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure spectra that could be analyzed by curve-fits. Most of these spectra exhibited features consistent with PU(IV), and more specificaJly, PuO{sub 2+x}-type speciation. Two were ambiguous, possibly indicating that Pu that was originally present in a different form was transforming into PuO{sub 2+x}, and one was interpreted as demonstrating the presence of an unusual Pu(VI) compound, consistent with its source being spills from a PUREX purification line onto a concrete floor and the resultant extreme conditions. These experimental results therefore validated models that predicted that insoluble PuO{sub 2+x} would be the most stable form of Pu in equilibrium with air and water even when the source terms were most likely Pu metal with organic compounds or a Pu fire. A corollary of these models' predictions and other in situ observations is therefore that the minimal transport of Pu that occurred on the site was via the resuspension and mobilization of colloidal particles. Under these conditions, the small amounts of diffusely distributed Pu that were left on the site after its remediation pose only a negligible hazard.

  12. Analysing Atmospheric CO2/CH4 Variability to Derive a Prior Covariance Matrices for CO2 Retrieval From Spectroscopic Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eguchi, N.; Nakatsuka, Y.; Saito, R.; Maksyutov, S.

    2008-12-01

    We report derivation of the prior error covariance matrices for use in gas concentration retrieval from GOSAT spectroscopic data. Concentration profiles of CO2 and CH4 simulated with forward tracer transport model are used for retrieval, so the estimate of model error will be used as uncertainty of the retrieval prior. The error estimate for the single shot simulated concentration is composed of three components: (1) interannual variability, (2) seasonal cycle bias in the model, (3) synoptic scale variability. We processed available observation data at limited number of available sites at surface and in free troposphere to construct the fields of the seasonal and interannual error components. For obtaining components (2) and (3), we simulated CO2 and CH4 concentration for troposphere by running a transport model for 2 years at 1 by 1 degree horizontal resolution and 15 vertical levels. Error of the estimated concentration (i.e. component (2) above) is estimated as a mean misfit between observed concentration and simulated one where the observations are available and extrapolated value is used where there are no observations. To obtain component (3), short time variations were extracted from the simulated concentrations with high pass filter with 14-day window. From this short-term variability, seasonally varying monthly mean covariance matrices of the concentration profile were derived. Combined uncertainty at level of several ppm's for CO2 will provide relatively weak constrain to retrieved concentration.

  13. PROBING THE FERMI BUBBLES IN ULTRAVIOLET ABSORPTION: A SPECTROSCOPIC SIGNATURE OF THE MILKY WAY'S BICONICAL NUCLEAR OUTFLOW

    SciTech Connect

    Fox, Andrew J.; Bordoloi, Rongmon; Hernandez, Svea; Tumlinson, Jason; Savage, Blair D.; Wakker, Bart P.; Lockman, Felix J.; Bland-Hawthorn, Joss; Kim, Tae-Sun; Benjamin, Robert A.

    2015-01-20

    Giant lobes of plasma extend ≈55° above and below the Galactic center, glowing in emission from gamma rays (the Fermi Bubbles) to microwaves and polarized radio waves. We use ultraviolet absorption-line spectra from the Hubble Space Telescope to constrain the velocity of the outflowing gas within these regions, targeting the quasar PDS 456 (ℓ, b = 10.°4, +11.°2). This sightline passes through a clear biconical structure seen in hard X-ray and gamma-ray emission near the base of the northern Fermi Bubble. We report two high-velocity metal absorption components, at v {sub LSR} = –235 and +250 km s{sup –1}, which cannot be explained by co-rotating gas in the Galactic disk or halo. Their velocities are suggestive of an origin on the front and back side of an expanding biconical outflow emanating from the Galactic center. We develop simple kinematic biconical outflow models that can explain the observed profiles with an outflow velocity of ≳900 km s{sup –1} and a full opening angle of ≈110° (matching the X-ray bicone). This indicates Galactic center activity over the last ≈2.5-4.0 Myr, in line with age estimates of the Fermi Bubbles. The observations illustrate the use of UV spectroscopy to probe the properties of swept-up gas venting into the Fermi Bubbles.

  14. Absorption and fluorescence spectroscopic characterisation of the circadian blue-light photoreceptor cryptochrome from Drosophila melanogaster (dCry)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirdel, J.; Zirak, P.; Penzkofer, A.; Breitkreuz, H.; Wolf, E.

    2008-09-01

    The absorption and fluorescence behaviour of the circadian blue-light photoreceptor cryptochrome from Drosophila melanogaster (dCry) in a pH 8 aqueous buffer solution is studied. The flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) cofactor of dCry is identified to be present in its oxidized form (FAD ox), and the 5,10-methenyltetrahydrofolate (MTHF) cofactor is found to be hydrolyzed and oxidized to 10-formyldihydrofolate (10-FDHF). The absorption and the fluorescence behaviour of dCry is investigated in the dark-adapted (receptor) state, the light-adapted (signalling) state, and under long-time violet light exposure. Photo-excitation of FAD ox in dCry causes a reductive electron transfer to the formation of anionic FAD semiquinone (FAD rad - ), and photo-excitation of the generated FAD rad - causes an oxidative electron transfer to the back formation of FAD ox. In light adapted dCry a photo-induced equilibrium between FAD ox and FAD rad - exists. The photo-cycle dynamics of signalling state formation and recovery is discussed. Quantum yields of photo-induced signalling state formation of about 0.2 and of photo-induced back-conversion of about 0.2 are determined. A recovery of FAD rad - to FAD ox in the dark with a time constant of 1.6 min at room temperature is found.

  15. Spectroscopic and DFT study of solvent effects on the electronic absorption spectra of sulfamethoxazole in neat and binary solvent mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almandoz, M. C.; Sancho, M. I.; Blanco, S. E.

    2014-01-01

    The solvatochromic behavior of sulfamethoxazole (SMX) was investigated using UV-vis spectroscopy and DFT methods in neat and binary solvent mixtures. The spectral shifts of this solute were correlated with the Kamlet and Taft parameters (α, β and π*). Multiple lineal regression analysis indicates that both specific hydrogen-bond interaction and non specific dipolar interaction play an important role in the position of the absorption maxima in neat solvents. The simulated absorption spectra using TD-DFT methods were in good agreement with the experimental ones. Binary mixtures consist of cyclohexane (Cy)-ethanol (EtOH), acetonitrile (ACN)-dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO), ACN-dimethylformamide (DMF), and aqueous mixtures containing as co-solvents DMSO, ACN, EtOH and MeOH. Index of preferential solvation was calculated as a function of solvent composition and non-ideal characteristics are observed in all binary mixtures. In ACN-DMSO and ACN-DMF mixtures, the results show that the solvents with higher polarity and hydrogen bond donor ability interact preferentially with the solute. In binary mixtures containing water, the SMX molecules are solvated by the organic co-solvent (DMSO or EtOH) over the whole composition range. Synergistic effect is observed in the case of ACN-H2O and MeOH-H2O, indicating that at certain concentrations solvents interact to form association complexes, which should be more polar than the individual solvents of the mixture.

  16. Spectroscopic and DFT study of solvent effects on the electronic absorption spectra of sulfamethoxazole in neat and binary solvent mixtures.

    PubMed

    Almandoz, M C; Sancho, M I; Blanco, S E

    2014-01-24

    The solvatochromic behavior of sulfamethoxazole (SMX) was investigated using UV-vis spectroscopy and DFT methods in neat and binary solvent mixtures. The spectral shifts of this solute were correlated with the Kamlet and Taft parameters (α, β and π(*)). Multiple lineal regression analysis indicates that both specific hydrogen-bond interaction and non specific dipolar interaction play an important role in the position of the absorption maxima in neat solvents. The simulated absorption spectra using TD-DFT methods were in good agreement with the experimental ones. Binary mixtures consist of cyclohexane (Cy)-ethanol (EtOH), acetonitrile (ACN)-dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO), ACN-dimethylformamide (DMF), and aqueous mixtures containing as co-solvents DMSO, ACN, EtOH and MeOH. Index of preferential solvation was calculated as a function of solvent composition and non-ideal characteristics are observed in all binary mixtures. In ACN-DMSO and ACN-DMF mixtures, the results show that the solvents with higher polarity and hydrogen bond donor ability interact preferentially with the solute. In binary mixtures containing water, the SMX molecules are solvated by the organic co-solvent (DMSO or EtOH) over the whole composition range. Synergistic effect is observed in the case of ACN-H2O and MeOH-H2O, indicating that at certain concentrations solvents interact to form association complexes, which should be more polar than the individual solvents of the mixture.

  17. In situ spectroscopic and solution analyses of the reductive dissolution of Mn02 by Fe(II)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Villinski, John E.; O'Day, Peggy A.; Corley, Timothy L.; Conklin, Martha H.

    2001-01-01

    The reductive dissolution of MnO2 by Fe(II) under conditions simulating acid mine drainage (pH 3, 100 mM SO42-) was investigated by utilizing a flow-through reaction cell and synchrotron X-ray absorption spectroscopy. This configuration allows collection of in situ, real-time X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectra and bulk solution samples. Analysis of the solution chemistry suggests that the reaction mechanism changed (decreased reaction rate) as MnO2 was reduced and Fe(III) precipitated, primarily as ferrihydrite. Simultaneously, we observed an additional phase, with the local structure of jacobsite (MnFe2O4), in the Mn XANES spectra of reactants and products. The X-ray absorbance of this intermediate phase increased during the experiment, implying an increase in concentration. The presence of this phase, which probably formed as a surface coating, helps to explain the reduced rate of dissolution of manganese(IV) oxide. In natural environments affected by acid mine drainage, the formation of complex intermediate solid phases on mineral surfaces undergoing reductive dissolution may likewise influence the rate of release of metals to solution.

  18. The joined use of n.i. spectroscopic analyses FTIR, Raman, visible reflectance spectrometry and EDXRF to study drawings and illuminated manuscripts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruni, S.; Caglio, S.; Guglielmi, V.; Poldi, G.

    2008-07-01

    Some art objects being small and very precious prevents conservators and conservation scientists from whatever kind of sampling, so that only completely non-invasive (n.i.) studies are permitted. Besides, also moving the object is sometimes forbidden: this happens for jewels as well as for manuscripts, illuminated codices, drawings and paintings. Some important physical n.i. analyses, such as PIXE and PIGE, therefore cannot be used in many cases. With these limitations, only imaging techniques in X, UV, Visible and IR bands, and a few spectroscopic methods that can be carried out with portable instruments can be applied, i.e. molecular spectroscopies like Fourier transform infrared (FTIR), Raman, UV visible and near IR reflectance spectrometry (UV-Vis-NIR RS) and atomic spectroscopy like energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence (EDXRF). The use of only one or two of these techniques is usually far from giving all the information required to achieve a full characterization of materials used by the artist or during restorations, and to understand some conservative problems of the object. On the contrary, a joined use of n.i. analyses can supply a larger set of data, allowing for cross checks. With this aim we show a fully integrated spectroscopic approach to polychrome objects, and, in particular, to drawings and illuminated manuscripts, using portable instruments, specifically μ-FTIR, μ-Raman, Vis-RS and EDXRF, where also the Raman signal does not suffer fluorescence caused by varnish coating and from binder. We propose the joined use of all these four physical analyses to characterize materials support, pigments, dyes, binders, etc. on a complex case: a painted and drawn parchment of the late 15th century, or the beginning of the 16th, partly attributed to Andrea Mantegna. The collected spectroscopic data have been compared to proper spectral databases, some of which specifically realized in our laboratories. Also, mixtures of pigments and their stratigraphical

  19. X-ray absorption spectroscopic studies of sputter-deposited LaNiO3 thin films on Si substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hsin-Yi; Wu, Tai-Bor; Lee, Jyh-Fu

    1996-08-01

    X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) was applied to investigate the growth behavior of LaNiO3 thin films on Si substrate deposited via radio frequency magnetron sputtering at high temperature. The thickness of deposited film was always proportional to the sputtering time. However, the Ni-to-La ratio in the film was found to decrease with increasing substrate temperature. It is due to a loss of Ni on high-temperature deposition which lowers the film growth rate and leads to a gradual structural change. Nevertheless, the oxidation states of both Ni atom and La atom in the thin films were not influenced by the substrate temperature or sputtering time. All the XAS evidence was consistent with the results from x-ray reflectivity, x-ray diffraction, and chemical analysis.

  20. Spectroscopic determination of leaf biochemistry using band-depth analysis of absorption features and stepwise multiple linear regression

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kokaly, R.F.; Clark, R.N.

    1999-01-01

    We develop a new method for estimating the biochemistry of plant material using spectroscopy. Normalized band depths calculated from the continuum-removed reflectance spectra of dried and ground leaves were used to estimate their concentrations of nitrogen, lignin, and cellulose. Stepwise multiple linear regression was used to select wavelengths in the broad absorption features centered at 1.73 ??m, 2.10 ??m, and 2.30 ??m that were highly correlated with the chemistry of samples from eastern U.S. forests. Band depths of absorption features at these wavelengths were found to also be highly correlated with the chemistry of four other sites. A subset of data from the eastern U.S. forest sites was used to derive linear equations that were applied to the remaining data to successfully estimate their nitrogen, lignin, and cellulose concentrations. Correlations were highest for nitrogen (R2 from 0.75 to 0.94). The consistent results indicate the possibility of establishing a single equation capable of estimating the chemical concentrations in a wide variety of species from the reflectance spectra of dried leaves. The extension of this method to remote sensing was investigated. The effects of leaf water content, sensor signal-to-noise and bandpass, atmospheric effects, and background soil exposure were examined. Leaf water was found to be the greatest challenge to extending this empirical method to the analysis of fresh whole leaves and complete vegetation canopies. The influence of leaf water on reflectance spectra must be removed to within 10%. Other effects were reduced by continuum removal and normalization of band depths. If the effects of leaf water can be compensated for, it might be possible to extend this method to remote sensing data acquired by imaging spectrometers to give estimates of nitrogen, lignin, and cellulose concentrations over large areas for use in ecosystem studies.We develop a new method for estimating the biochemistry of plant material using

  1. Probing the Fermi Bubbles in Ultraviolet Absorption: A Spectroscopic Signature of the Milky Way's Biconical Nuclear Outflow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fox, Andrew J.; Bordoloi, Rongmon; Savage, Blair D.; Lockman, Felix J.; Jenkins, Edward B.; Wakker, Bart P.; Bland-Hawthorn, Joss; Hernandez, Svea; Kim, Tae-Sun; Benjamin, Robert A.; Bowen, David V.; Tumlinson, Jason

    2015-01-01

    Giant lobes of plasma extend ≈55° above and below the Galactic center, glowing in emission from gamma rays (the Fermi Bubbles) to microwaves and polarized radio waves. We use ultraviolet absorption-line spectra from the Hubble Space Telescope to constrain the velocity of the outflowing gas within these regions, targeting the quasar PDS 456 (l, b = 10.°4, +11.°2). This sightline passes through a clear biconical structure seen in hard X-ray and gamma-ray emission near the base of the northern Fermi Bubble. We report two high-velocity metal absorption components, at v LSR = -235 and +250 km s-1, which cannot be explained by co-rotating gas in the Galactic disk or halo. Their velocities are suggestive of an origin on the front and back side of an expanding biconical outflow emanating from the Galactic center. We develop simple kinematic biconical outflow models that can explain the observed profiles with an outflow velocity of gsim900 km s-1 and a full opening angle of ≈110° (matching the X-ray bicone). This indicates Galactic center activity over the last ≈2.5-4.0 Myr, in line with age estimates of the Fermi Bubbles. The observations illustrate the use of UV spectroscopy to probe the properties of swept-up gas venting into the Fermi Bubbles. Based on observations taken under program 13448 of the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained at the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under NASA contract NAS 5-26555, and under program 14B-299 of the NRAO Green Bank Telescope, which is a facility of the National Science Foundation operated under cooperative agreement by Associated Universities, Inc.

  2. Spectrum of excess partial molar absorptivity. Part II: a near infrared spectroscopic study of aqueous Na-halides.

    PubMed

    Sebe, Fumie; Nishikawa, Keiko; Koga, Yoshikata

    2012-04-07

    Our earlier thermodynamic studies suggested that F(-) and Cl(-) form hydration shells with the hydration number 14 ± 2 and 2.3 ± 0.6, respectively, and leave the bulk H(2)O away from hydration shells unperturbed. Br(-) and I(-), on the other hand, form hydrogen bonds directly with the momentarily existing hydrogen bond network of H(2)O, and retard the degree of entropy-volume cross fluctuation inherent in liquid H(2)O. The effect of the latter is stronger for I(-) than Br(-). Here we seek additional information about this qualitative difference between Cl(-) and (Br(-) and I(-)) pair by near infrared (NIR) spectroscopy. We analyze the ν(2) + ν(3) band of H(2)O in the range 4600-5500 cm(-1) of aqueous solutions of NaCl, NaBr and NaI, by a new approach. From observed absorbance, we calculate excess molar absorptivity, ε(E), excess over the additive contributions of solute and solvent. ε(E) thus contains information about the effect of inter-molecular interactions in the ν(2) + ν(3) spectrum. The spectrum of ε(E) shows three bands; two negative ones at 5263 and 4873 cm(-1), and the positive band at 5123 cm(-1). We then define and calculate the excess partial molar absorptivity of each salt, ε(E)(salt). From the behaviour of ε(E)(salt) we suggest that the negative band at 5263 cm(-1) represents free H(2)O without much hydrogen bonding under the influence of local electric field of ions. Furthermore, from a sudden change in the x(salt) (mole fraction of salt) dependence of ε(E)(salt), we suggest that there is an ion-pairing in x(salt) > 0.032, 0.036, and 0.04 for NaCl, NaBr and NaI respectively. The positive band of ε(E) at 5123 cm(-1) is attributed to a modestly organized hydrogen bond network of H(2)O (or liquid-likeness), and the x(salt) dependence of ε indicated a qualitative difference in the effect of Cl(-) from those of Br(-) and I(-). Namely, the values of ε(E)(salt) stay constant for Cl(-) but those for Br(-) and I(-) decrease smoothly on

  3. Different speciation for bromine in brown and red algae, revealed by in vivo X-ray absorption spectroscopic studies.

    PubMed

    Küpper, Frithjof C; Leblanc, Catherine; Meyer-Klaucke, Wolfram; Potin, Philippe; Feiters, Martin C

    2014-08-01

    Members of various algal lineages are known to be strong producers of atmospherically relevant halogen emissions, that is a consequence of their capability to store and metabolize halogens. This study uses a noninvasive, synchrotron-based technique, X-ray absorption spectroscopy, for addressing in vivo bromine speciation in the brown algae Ectocarpus siliculosus, Ascophyllum nodosum, and Fucus serratus, the red algae Gracilaria dura, G. gracilis, Chondrus crispus, Osmundea pinnatifida, Asparagopsis armata, Polysiphonia elongata, and Corallina officinalis, the diatom Thalassiosira rotula, the dinoflagellate Lingulodinium polyedrum and a natural phytoplankton sample. The results highlight a diversity of fundamentally different bromine storage modes: while most of the stramenopile representatives and the dinoflagellate store mostly bromide, there is evidence for Br incorporated in nonaromatic hydrocarbons in Thalassiosira. Red algae operate various organic bromine stores - including a possible precursor (by the haloform reaction) for bromoform in Asparagopsis and aromatically bound Br in Polysiphonia and Corallina. Large fractions of the bromine in the red algae G. dura and C. crispus and the brown alga F. serratus are present as Br(-) defects in solid KCl, similar to what was reported earlier for Laminaria parts. These results are discussed according to different defensive strategies that are used within algal taxa to cope with biotic or abiotic stresses.

  4. In situ infrared reflection absorption spectroscopic characterization of sustained kinetic oscillations in the Pt(100)/NO+CO system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magtoto, Noel P.; Richardson, Hugh H.

    1998-11-01

    We have excited kinetic oscillations in the Pt(100)/NO+CO system at 470 K and pressure region around 2×10 -4 Torr. These oscillations are sustained and they arise by simply adjusting the partial pressures of NO and CO while holding the surface temperature at 470 K. However, they can only be induced if the partial pressure of CO is greater than that of NO (i.e., 1.4±0.05< pCO/ pNO<1.7±0.04). Infrared reflection-absorption spectra (IRAS) collected during the oscillation showed that the periodic growth and decay of the CO band are counterphase to the reaction-rate oscillations. Infrared bands due to molecularly adsorbed NO were not found during the early stages of the temporal evolution of the system into the upper reaction-rate branch. However, during the later stages of the evolution, a single IR band due to chemisorbed NO was observed. This band eventually disappeared as the reaction rate finally reached its maximum value. With the use of the model by Fink et al., we were able to rationalize the occurrence of oscillations under the present experimental conditions. Oscillations are caused by the periodic change in the level of adsorbate coverages that controls the dissociation of NO.

  5. The chemical environment of iron in mineral fibres. A combined X-ray absorption and Mössbauer spectroscopic study.

    PubMed

    Pollastri, Simone; D'Acapito, Francesco; Trapananti, Angela; Colantoni, Ivan; Andreozzi, Giovanni B; Gualtieri, Alessandro F

    2015-11-15

    Although asbestos represents today one of the most harmful contaminant on Earth, in 72% of the countries worldwide only amphiboles are banned while controlled use of chrysotile is allowed. Uncertainty on the potential toxicity of chrysotile is due to the fact that the mechanisms by which mineral fibres induces cyto- and geno-toxic damage are still unclear. We have recently started a long term project aimed at the systematic investigation of the crystal-chemistry, bio-interaction and toxicity of the mineral fibres. This work presents a systematic structural investigation of iron in asbestos and erionite (considered the most relevant mineral fibres of social and/or economic-industrial importance) using synchrotron X-ray absorption and Mössbauer spectroscopy. In all investigated mineral fibres, iron in the bulk structure is found in octahedral sites and can be made available at the surface via fibre dissolution. We postulate that the amount of hydroxyl radicals released by the fibers depends, among other factors, upon their dissolution rate; in relation to this, a ranking of ability of asbestos fibres to generate hydroxyl radicals, resulting from available surface iron, is advanced: amosite > crocidolite ≈ chrysotile > anthophyllite > tremolite. Erionite, with a fairly high toxicity potential, contains only octahedrally coordinated Fe(3+). Although it needs further experimental evidence, such available surface iron may be present as oxide nanoparticles coating and can be a direct cause of generation of hydroxyl radicals when such coating dissolves.

  6. X-ray absorption and photoelectron spectroscopic study of plasma-nitrided SiO{sub 2} film

    SciTech Connect

    Song, H.J.; Shin, H.J.; Chung, Youngsu; Lee, J.C.; Lee, M.K.

    2005-06-01

    Plasma-nitrided SiO{sub 2} thin film has been analyzed by synchrotron-radiation-based x-ray absorption and photoelectron spectroscopies (XAS and XPS). High-resolution N 1s XAS and N 1s, O 1s, and Si 2p XPS spectral changes were obtained for different annealing temperatures. N 1s XPS and XAS spectra show that at room temperature, besides the main species of N[Si(O-){sub 3-x}]{sub 3}, there exist free moleculelike N{sub 2} and HN[Si(O-){sub 3}]{sub 2}, H{sub 2}NSi(O-){sub 3}, and N-Si{sub 2}O species with surface contaminants. The spectral intensities of the N{sub 2} and the HN[Si(O-){sub 3}]{sub 2}, H{sub 2}NSi(O-){sub 3}, and N-Si{sub 2}O species decrease as the annealing temperature increases, and finally the nitrogen exists dominantly in the form of N[Si(O){sub 3}]{sub 3} species above 820 K, indicating out-diffusion of molecular N{sub 2} and structural reconstruction to form a stable structure upon annealing. The Si 2p and O 1s XPS spectra show that Si{sup >4+} 2p peak and O 1s peak appear at 103.7 and 534.0 eV, respectively, which are higher binding energies than those of thermally grown oxynitride films with lower coverage on silicon. Upon annealing the sample, these peaks shift towards lower binding energy; {approx}0.3 eV for Si{sup >4+} and 0.4 eV for O 1s. The causes of the peaks appearance at relatively higher binding energy and the peak shift upon annealing are discussed.

  7. Absorption and emission spectroscopic characterization of photo-dynamics of photoactivated adenylyl cyclase mutant bPAC-Y7F of Beggiatoa sp.

    PubMed

    Penzkofer, Alfons; Stierl, Manuela; Mathes, Tilo; Hegemann, Peter

    2014-11-01

    The photoactivated cyclase bPAC of the microbial mats bacterium Beggiatoa sp. consists of a BLUF domain and an adenylyl cyclase domain. It has strong activity of photo-induced cyclic adenylyl monophosphate (cAMP) formation and is therefore an important optogenetic tool in neuroscience applications. The SUMO-bPAC-Y7F mutant where Tyr-7 is replaced by Phe-7 in the BLUF domain has lost the typical BLUF domain photo-cycle dynamics. Instead, the investigated SUMO-bPAC-Y7F mutant consisted of three protein conformations with different triplet based photo-dynamics: (i) reversible flavin quinone (Fl) cofactor reduction to flavin semiquinone (FlH), (ii) reversible violet/near ultraviolet absorbing flavin photoproduct (FlA) formation, and (iii) irreversible red absorbing flavin photoproduct (FlC) formation. Absorption and emission spectroscopic measurements on SUMO-bPAC-Y7F were carried out before, during and after light exposure. Flavin photo-dynamics schemes are developed for the SUMO-bPAC-Y7F fractions performing photo-induced FlH, FlA, and FlC formation. Quantitative parameters of the flavin cofactor excitation, relaxation and recovery dynamics in SUMO-bPAC-Y7F are determined.

  8. The absorption spectrum of water vapor in the 2.2 μm transparency window: High sensitivity measurements and spectroscopic database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campargue, A.; Mikhailenko, S. N.; Vasilchenko, S.; Reynaud, C.; Béguier, S.; Čermák, P.; Mondelain, D.; Kassi, S.; Romanini, D.

    2017-03-01

    The weak absorption spectrum of water vapor in the important 2.2 μm transparency window is investigated with very high sensitivity. Overall, about 400 absorption lines were measured by Cavity Ring Down Spectroscopy (CRDS) and Optical-Feedback-Cavity Enhanced Laser Spectroscopy (OF-CEAS) in five spectral intervals: 4248.2-4257.3, 4298.4-4302.6, 4336.8.5-4367.5, 4422.4-4441.2 and 4514.6-4533.7 cm-1. The achieved sensitivity of the recordings (noise equivalent absorption, αmin, on the order of 2×10-10 cm-1) allowed detecting transitions with intensity values down to 1×10-28 cm/molecule, more than one order of magnitude better than previous studies by Fourier Transform spectroscopy. The rovibrational assignment was performed on the basis of variational calculations and of previously determined empirical energy values. Most of the newly assigned lines correspond to transitions of the ν1, ν3 and 3ν2 bands of H217O in natural isotopic abundance. Fourteen energy levels of H217O, H218O and HD18O are newly determined. An accurate and complete spectroscopic database is constructed for natural water in the 4190-4550 cm-1 region (2.39-2.20 μm). The list includes about 4500 transitions with intensity greater than 1×10-29 cm/molecule, for the six most abundant isotopologues in natural isotopic abundance. Line positions were obtained by difference of empirical energy values determined from literature data and complemented with the present CRDS results. The list is made mostly complete by including weak transitions not yet detected, with positions calculated from empirical levels and variational intensities. The variational intensities computed by a collaboration between the University College London and the Institute of Applied Physics in Nizhny Novgorod are found to improve significantly previous results by Schwenke and Partridge. Examples of comparison of the constructed line list to CRDS spectra and to simulations based on the HITRAN2012 list illustrate the advantages

  9. Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer and Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph Observations of Intervening O VI Absorption Line Systems in the Spectrum of PG 0953+415

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savage, B. D.; Sembach, K. R.; Tripp, T. M.; Richter, P.

    2002-01-01

    We present Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer (FUSE) and Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (STIS) observations of the intergalactic medium toward the bright QSO PG 0953+415 (zem=0.239). The FUSE spectra extend from 905 to 1187 Å and have a resolution of 25 km s-1, while the STIS spectra cover 1150-1730 Å and have a resolution of 7 km s-1. Additional STIS observations at 30 km s-1 are obtained in selected wavelength ranges. An O VI system at z=0.06807 is detected in H I Lyα, Lyβ, Lyγ, O VI λλ1031.93, 1037.62, N V λλ1238.82, 1242.80, C IV λλ1548.20, 1550.77, and C III λ977.02. The observed column densities can be modeled as a low-density intervening gas with a metallicity of 0.4+0.6-0.2 times solar in photoionization equilibrium with the ionizing extragalactic background radiation. The best fit is achieved with an ionization parameter, logU=-1.35, which implies nH~10-5 cm-3 and a path length of ~80 kpc through the absorbing gas. H I Lyα absorption at z=0.14232 spans a velocity range of 410 km s-1 with the strongest components near 0 and 80 km s-1 in the z=0.14232 rest frame. In this system, O VI λλ1031.93, 1037.62 absorption is strong near 0 km s-1 and not detected at 80 km s-1. C III λ977.02 absorption is marginally detected at 80 km s-1 but is not detected at 0 km s-1. The observations place constraints on the properties of the z=0.14232 system but do not discriminate between collisional ionization in hot gas versus photoionization in a very low density medium with an ionization parameter logU>-0.74. The z=0.06807 and 0.14232 O VI systems occur at redshifts where there are peaks in the number density of intervening galaxies along the line of sight determined from WIYN redshift measurements of galaxies in the ~1° field centered on PG 0953+415. We combine our observations of PG 0953+415 with those for other QSOs to update the estimate of the low-redshift number density of intervening O VI systems. Over a total unobscured redshift path of Δz=0

  10. X-Ray Absorption And EPR Spectroscopic Studies of the Biotransformations of Chromium(Vi) in Mammalian Cells. Is Chromodulin An Artifact of Isolation Methods?

    SciTech Connect

    Levina, A.; Harris, H.H.; Lay, P.A.; /Sydney U.

    2007-07-10

    Very different biological activities are usually ascribed to Cr(VI) (a toxin and carcinogen) and Cr(III) (an antidiabetic agent), although recent evidence suggests that both these types of actions are likely to arise from cellular uptake of varying concentrations of Cr(VI). The first systematic study of XANES spectra of Cr(III) complexes formed in Cr(VI)-treated mammalian cells (A549, HepG2, V79, and C2C12 cell lines), and in subcellular fractions of A549 cells, has been performed using a library of XANES spectra of model Cr(III) complexes. The results of multiple linear regression analyses of XANES spectra, in combination with multiple-scattering fits of XAFS spectra, indicate that Cr(III) formed in Cr(VI)-treated cells is most likely to bind to carboxylato, amine, and imidazole residues of amino acids, and to a lesser extent to hydroxo or aqua ligands. A combination of XANES and EPR spectroscopic data for Cr(VI)-treated cells indicates that the main component of Cr(III) formed in such cells is bound to high-molecular-mass ligands (>30 kDa, probably proteins), but significant redistribution of Cr(III) occurs during the cell lysis, which leads to the formation of a low-molecular-mass (<30 kDa) Cr(III)-containing fraction. The spectroscopic (XANES, XAFS, and EPR) properties of this fraction were strikingly similar to those of the purported natural Cr(III)-containing factor, chromodulin, that was reported to be isolated from the reaction of Cr(VI) with liver. These data support the hypothesis that a chromodulin-like species, which is formed from such a reaction, is an artifact of the reported isolation procedure.

  11. Sorption of selenium(IV) and selenium(VI) onto synthetic pyrite (FeS2): spectroscopic and microscopic analyses.

    PubMed

    Han, Dong Suk; Batchelor, Bill; Abdel-Wahab, Ahmed

    2012-02-15

    Pyrite was hydrothermally synthesized and used to remove Se(IV) and Se(VI) selectively from solution. Surface analyses of pyrite before and after contact with Se(IV) and Se(VI) were conducted using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and atomic force microscopy (AFM). All solid samples were acquired by allowing 3.1 mmol/L of Se(IV) or Se(VI) to react with 1 g/L of pyrite for 1, 15, or 30 days. The XPS spectra were fitted using the XPSPEAK program that applies a Gaussian Lorentzian function. The fitted spectra indicate that Se(IV) more strongly reacts with the surface-bound S than with the surface-bound Fe of pyrite. However, there is no apparent evidence of surface reaction with Se(VI). Specifically, fitted XPS spectra showed the presence of sulfide and tetrathionate on the surface, indicating that sulfur (S(2)(2-)) at the surface of pyrite can be both oxidized and reduced after contact with Se(IV). This occurs via surface disproportionation, possibly resulting in the formation of surface precipitates. Evidence for the formation of precipitates was seen in SEM and AFM images that showed rod-like particles and a phase image with higher voltage. In contrast, there were no important changes in the pyrite after contact with Se(VI) over a period of 30 days.

  12. Spectroscopic Analyses of the "Blue Hook" Stars in Omega Centauri: A Test of the Late Hot Flasher Scenario

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moehler, S.; Sweigart, Allan V.; Landsman, W. B.; Dreizler, S.; Rabin, Douglas M. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    (Omega) Cen contains the largest population of very hot horizontal branch (HB) stars known in a globular cluster. Recent UV observations (Whitney et al. 1998; D'Cruz et al. 2000) show a significant population of hot stars below the zero-age horizontal branch ("blue hook" stars), which cannot be explained by canonical stellar evolution. Stars which suffer unusually large mass loss on the red giant branch and thus experience the helium core flash while descending the white dwarf cooling curve could populate this region. Theory predicts that these "late hot flashers" should show higher temperatures than the hottest canonical HB stars and should have helium- and carbon-rich atmospheres. We obtained and analysed medium resolution spectra of a sample of blue hook stars to derive their atmospheric parameters. The blue hook stars are indeed both hotter (T(sub eff)>35,000 K) and more helium-rich than classical extreme HB stars. In addition we find indications for a large enhancement of the carbon abundance relative to the cluster abundance.

  13. Innovative tribometer for in situ spectroscopic analyses of wear mechanisms and phase transformation in ceramic femoral heads.

    PubMed

    Puppulin, Leonardo; Leto, Andrea; Wenliang, Zhu; Sugano, Nobuhiko; Pezzotti, Giuseppe

    2014-03-01

    The literature on tribological assessments of artificial hip joints usually focuses on correlations between joint composition, size, and specific wear rates, but conspicuously ignores the physical aspects behind the occurrence of degradation mechanisms of friction and wear. Surface degradation in artificial joints occurs because of increases in temperature and local exacerbation of contact stresses inside the moving contact as a consequence of physical and chemical modifications of the sliding surfaces. This article reports about the development of a new pin-on-ball spectroscopy-assisted tribometer device that enables investigating also physical rather than merely engineering aspects of wear processes using in situ Raman and fluorescence techniques. This innovative tribometer is designed to bring about, in addition to conventional tribological parameters, also information of temperature, stress and phase transformations in the femoral heads as received from the manufacturer. Raman and fluorescence spectra at the point of sliding contact are recorded durilng reciprocating hard-on-hard dry-sliding tests. Preliminary results were collected on two different commercially available ceramic-on-ceramic hip joint bearing couples, made of monolithic alumina and alumina-zirconia composites. Although the composite couple showed direct evidence of tetragonal-to-monoclinic phase transformation, which enhanced the coefficient of friction, the specific wear rate was significantly lower than that of the monolithic one (i.e., by a factor 2.63 and 4.48 on the pin and head side, respectively). In situ collected data compared to ex situ analyses elucidated the surface degradation processes and clarified the origin for the higher wear resistance of the composite as compared to the monolithic couple.

  14. Compressed shell conditions extracted from spectroscopic analysis of Ti K-shell absorption spectra with evaluation of line self-emission

    SciTech Connect

    Johns, H. M.; Mancini, R. C.; Hakel, P.; Nagayama, T.; Smalyuk, V. A.; Regan, S. P.; Delettrez, J.

    2014-08-15

    Ti-doped tracer layers embedded in the shell at varying distances from the fuel-shell interface serve as a spectroscopic diagnostic for direct-drive experiments conducted at OMEGA. Detailed modeling of Ti K-shell absorption spectra produced in the tracer layer considers n = 1–2 transitions in F- through Li-like Ti ions in the 4400–4800 eV range, both including and excluding line self-emission. Testing the model on synthetic spectra generated from 1-D LILAC hydrodynamic simulations reveals that the model including self-emission best reproduces the simulation, while the model excluding self-emission overestimates electron temperature T{sub e} and density N{sub e} to a higher degree for layers closer to the core. The prediction of the simulation that the magnitude of T{sub e} and duration of Ti absorption will be strongly tied to the distance of the layer from the core is consistent with the idea that regions of the shell close to the core are more significantly heated by thermal transport out of the hot dense core, but more distant regions are less affected by it. The simulation predicts more time variation in the observed T{sub e}, N{sub e} conditions in the compressed shell than is observed in the experiment, analysis of which reveals conditions remain in the range T{sub e} = 400–600 eV and N{sub e} = 3.0–10.0 × 10{sup 24} cm{sup −3} for all but the most distant Ti-doped layer, with error bars ∼5% T{sub e} value and ∼10% N{sub e} on average. The T{sub e}, N{sub e} conditions of the simulation lead to a greater degree of ionization for zones close to the core than occurs experimentally, and less ionization for zones far from the core.

  15. Synthesis, spectroscopic studies, thermal analyses, biological activity of tridentate coordinated transition metal complexes of bi(pyridyl-2-ylmethyl)amine]ligand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abd El-Halim, Hanan F.; Mohamed, Gehad G.

    2016-01-01

    A new tridentate acyclic pincer ligand, [bi(pyridin-2-methyl)amine] (bpma, HL), was synthesized and reacted to form complexes with copper(II), nickel(II), iron(II), cobalt(II) and zinc(II) ions. Both the ligand and its complexes were characterized using elemental analysis, molar conductance, infrared, 1H-NMR-spectroscopy, mass and thermal analyses. According to the spectroscopic data, all of the complexes share the same coordination environment around the metal atoms, consisting two nitrogen-pyridine entities, one nitrogen-methylamine entity, one/two water molecules and/or one/two chloride or bromide ions. Complexes also showed molar conductivity according to the presence of two halide anions outer the coordination sphere except Co(II) and Zn(II) complexes are non electrolytes. Analysis indicates that the metal ions have trigonal bipyramidal structure. Cu(II), Ni(II), Fe(II), Co(II), and Zn(II) metal complexes were screened for their antibacterial activity against Bacillus subtilis, Staphylococcus aureus (G+) and Escherichia coli, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa (G-) bacteria. They showed remarkable antimicrobial activity.

  16. X-ray absorption spectroscopic studies of iron framework-substituted and exchanged zeolites: Characterization and quantification of incorporated iron species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanfel, Christine Marie

    X-ray absorption spectroscopic (XAS) analysis methods were derived which allowed iron species within iron substituted and exchanged zeolites to be characterized, and the fractional contribution of each species to the zeolite iron population to be quantified. Framework (T-site occupant) and non-framework iron species simultaneously present within zeolites were differentiated. Non-framework iron was segregated further into phases respectively exhibiting and lacking long range order. The former was described as precipitate iron. Zeolitic precipitate iron was found to occur either as an ordered Goethite-type phase, or a disordered aggregate. Iron species lacking long range order were found to be approximated by hydrated ferric ions (Fe(Hsb2O)sb6sp{3+}). XAS methods allowed determination of the fractional contribution of each iron phase; framework, precipitate, and low long range order, to the zeolite. XAS analysis methods were applied to an iron framework-substituted LTL zeolite (Fe LTL2) and two ferric exchanged analogs of Fe LTL2 (Fesp{3+} exchanged Fe LTL2). Fesp{3+} exchanged Fe LTL2 zeolites differed according to ferric salt and acid exposure length. Fe LTL2 was found to contain 20% disordered aggregate precipitate iron, and 80% framework iron. Fesp{3+} exchanged Fe LTL2 zeolites contained three iron species; framework, precipitate, and low long range order. Exchange left Fe LTL2 precipitate type and quantity unchanged, while framework iron decreased. Elemental analysis indicated composition changes arose from framework iron removal by acid exposure. Iron lacking long range order served a charge-balancing function as increased levels correlated with decreased Ksp+/(Al + Fesbframework) ratios. XAS methods were additionally applied to six iron framework-substituted faujasites (Fe FAU) with Si/Al ratios consistent with zeolites X, Y, and ECR-32. Two iron substitution levels, low and high, were synthesized for each isotype. Iron within each faujasite partitioned into

  17. Analytical procedure for the simultaneous voltammetric determination of trace metals in food and environmental matrices. Critical comparison with atomic absorption spectroscopic measurements.

    PubMed

    Melucci, Dora; Torsi, Giancarlo; Locatelli, Clinio

    2007-01-01

    An analytical procedure fit for the simultaneous determination of copper (II), chromium(VI), thallium(I), lead(II), tin(II), antimony(III), and zinc(II) by square wave anodic stripping voltammetry (SWASV) in three interdependent environmental matrices involved in foods and food chain as meals, cereal plants and soils is described. The digestion of each matrix was carried out using a concentrated HCl-HNO3-H2SO4 (meals and cereal plants) and HCl-HNO3 (soils) acidic attack mixtures. 0.1 mol/L dibasic ammonium citrate pH 8.5 was employed as the supporting electrolyte. The voltammetric measurements were carried out using, as working electrode, a stationary hanging mercury drop electrode (HMDE) and a platinum electrode and an Ag/AgCl/KClsat electrode as auxiliary and reference electrodes, respectively. The analytical procedure was verified by the analyses of the standard reference materials: Wholemeal BCR-CRM 189, Tomato Leaves NIST-SRM 1573a and Montana Soil Moderately Elevated Traces NIST-SRM 2711. For all the elements in the certified matrix, the precision as repeatability, expressed as relative standard deviation (Sr %) was lower than 5%. The accuracy, expressed as percentage relative error (e %) was of the order of 3-7%, while the detection limits were in the range 0.015-0.103 microg/g. Once set up on the standard reference materials, the analytical procedure was transferred and applied to commercial meal samples, cereal plants and soils samples drawn in sites devoted to agricultural practice. A critical comparison with spectroscopic measurements is also discussed.

  18. Pigment analyses of a portrait and paint box of Turkish artist Feyhaman Duran (1886-1970): The EDXRF, FT-IR and micro Raman spectroscopic studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akyuz, Sevim; Akyuz, Tanil; Emre, Gulder; Gulec, Ahmet; Basaran, Sait

    2012-04-01

    The samples obtained from nine different places of Ataturk portrait (oil on canvas, 86 cm × 136 cm) by Feyhaman Duran (1886-1970), one of the famous Turkish painters of the 20th century, together with five pigment samples (two different white, two different yellow and blue), obtained as powders from artist's paint box, were analysed by EDXRF, FT-IR and micro-Raman spectroscopic methods, in order to characterise the pigments used by the artist. Informative Raman signals were not obtained from most of the samples of the portrait, due to huge fluorescence caused by the presence of impurities and organic materials in the samples, however the Raman spectrum of the sample from skin coloured part of the portrait and the pigment samples obtained from the paint box of the artist were found to be very informative to shed light on the determination of the pigments used. Analysis revealed the presences of chrome yellow (PbCrO4), strontium yellow (SrCrO4) and Cadmium yellow (CdS) as yellow, chromium oxides (Cr2O3 and Cr2O3·2H2O) as green, natural red ochre as red, brown ochre as brown and ivory black or bone black (C + Ca3(PO4)2) and manganese oxides (Mn2O3 and MnO2) as black pigments, in the composition of the Ataturk portrait. Lead white (2PbCO3·Pb(OH)2), calcite (CaCO3), barite (BaSO4), zinc white (ZnO) and titanium white (TiO2) were used as extenders to lighten the colours and/or as for ground level painting. Powder pigment samples, obtained from the paint box of artist, were found to be mixed pigments rather than pure ones.

  19. Pigment analyses of a portrait and paint box of Turkish artist Feyhaman Duran (1886-1970): the EDXRF, FT-IR and micro Raman spectroscopic studies.

    PubMed

    Akyuz, Sevim; Akyuz, Tanil; Emre, Gulder; Gulec, Ahmet; Basaran, Sait

    2012-04-01

    The samples obtained from nine different places of Ataturk portrait (oil on canvas, 86 cm×136 cm) by Feyhaman Duran (1886-1970), one of the famous Turkish painters of the 20th century, together with five pigment samples (two different white, two different yellow and blue), obtained as powders from artist's paint box, were analysed by EDXRF, FT-IR and micro-Raman spectroscopic methods, in order to characterise the pigments used by the artist. Informative Raman signals were not obtained from most of the samples of the portrait, due to huge fluorescence caused by the presence of impurities and organic materials in the samples, however the Raman spectrum of the sample from skin coloured part of the portrait and the pigment samples obtained from the paint box of the artist were found to be very informative to shed light on the determination of the pigments used. Analysis revealed the presences of chrome yellow (PbCrO4), strontium yellow (SrCrO4) and Cadmium yellow (CdS) as yellow, chromium oxides (Cr2O3 and Cr2O3·2H2O) as green, natural red ochre as red, brown ochre as brown and ivory black or bone black (C+Ca3(PO4)2) and manganese oxides (Mn2O3 and MnO2) as black pigments, in the composition of the Ataturk portrait. Lead white (2PbCO3·Pb(OH)2), calcite (CaCO3), barite (BaSO4), zinc white (ZnO) and titanium white (TiO2) were used as extenders to lighten the colours and/or as for ground level painting. Powder pigment samples, obtained from the paint box of artist, were found to be mixed pigments rather than pure ones.

  20. Synthetic spinels in the (Mg, Fe2+)(Cr, Fe3+)2O4 join: Mossbauer, optical absorption, single crystal XRD and electron microprobe analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lenaz, D.; Skogby, H.; Princivalle, F.; Halenius, U.

    2003-04-01

    Single crystals along the Mg-chromite -- Mg-ferrite and Mg-chromite -- chromite joins were synthesized using a flux-growth method (24 hours at 1200^oC and 4^oC/h cooling rate to 900^oC in air and gas-controlled atmosphere) in order to evaluate the influence of composition on structure and cation distribution using optical absorption (OAS), Mössbauer (MS), single-crystal X-ray diffraction (XRD) and microprobe analyses (EPMA). At present, most of the analyses were carried out on the (Mg,Fe2+)Cr_2O_4 series. MgCr_2O_4 end-member: OAS shows prominent absorption bands at 23,700 and 17,300 cm-1. XRD analyses on three single crystals show a_0 equal to 8.3329 (1) Å and u (oxygen positional parameter) equal to 0.2612 (1), close to the values reported by O'Neill and Dollase (1994) as determined by powder diffraction on samples annealed at 900 to 1400^oC. The T-O and M-O calculated bond distances are equal to 1.965 and 1.995, respectively. These results are consistent with the set of optimised bond distances for Mg and Cr proposed by Lavina et al. (2002). (Mg,Fe2+)Cr_2O_4 series: Mössbauer spectra were measured at room temperature on different samples with nominal chromite components in the 10 to 70 mol % range. All the spectra show a single absorption line. For compositions close to the Mg-chromite end-member the line is narrow, however, for intermediate compositions the line broadens progressively and is best fitted with a quadrupole doublet (dq=0.22 for 50 mol % chromite). Towards the chromite end-member the peak becomes narrower again. XRD data shows that there is a linear positive correlation between a_0 and u with increasing Fe2+.

  1. Exponential Sum Absorption Coefficients of Phosphine from 2750 to 3550/cm for Application to Radiative Transfer Analyses on Jupiter and Saturn

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Temma, T.; Baines, K. H.; Butler, R. A. H.; Brown, L. R.; Sagui, L.; Kleiner, I.

    2006-01-01

    PH3 exponential sum k coefficients were computed between 2750 and 3550/cm (2.82-3.64 (microns), in view of future application to radiative transfer analyses of Jupiter and Saturn in a phosphine absorption band near 3 microns. The temperature and pressure of this data set cover the ranges from 80 to 350 K and from 10 (exp -3)to 10(exp 1) bars, respectively. Transmission uncertainty incurred by the use of the k coefficients is smaller than a few percent as long as the radiation is confined above an altitude of a few bars in the giant planets. In spectral regions of weak absorption at high pressures close to 10 bars, contributions from far wings of strong absorption lines must be carefully taken into account. Our data set helps map the three-dimensional distribution of PH3 on the giant planets, revealing their global atmospheric dynamics extending down to the deep interior. The complete k coefficient data set of this work is available at the Web site of the NASA Planetary Data System Atmospheres Node.

  2. Spectroscopic remote sensing of plant stress at leaf and canopy levels using the chlorophyll 680 nm absorption feature with continuum removal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanches, Ieda Del'Arco; Souza Filho, Carlos Roberto; Kokaly, Raymond Floyd

    2014-11-01

    This paper explores the use of spectral feature analysis to detect plant stress in visible/near infrared wavelengths. A time series of close range leaf and canopy reflectance data of two plant species grown in hydrocarbon-contaminated soil was acquired with a portable spectrometer. The ProSpecTIR-VS airborne imaging spectrometer was used to obtain far range hyperspectral remote sensing data over the field experiment. Parameters describing the chlorophyll 680 nm absorption feature (depth, width, and area) were derived using continuum removal applied to the spectra. A new index, the Plant Stress Detection Index (PSDI), was calculated using continuum-removed values near the chlorophyll feature centre (680 nm) and on the green-edge (560 and 575 nm). Chlorophyll feature's depth, width and area, the PSDI and a narrow-band normalised difference vegetation index were evaluated for their ability to detect stressed plants. The objective was to analyse how the parameters/indices were affected by increasing degrees of plant stress and to examine their utility as plant stress indicators at the remote sensing level (e.g. airborne sensor). For leaf data, PSDI and the chlorophyll feature area revealed the highest percentage (67-70%) of stressed plants. The PSDI also proved to be the best constraint for detecting the stress in hydrocarbon-impacted plants with field canopy spectra and airborne imaging spectroscopy data. This was particularly true using thresholds based on the ASD canopy data and considering the combination of higher percentage of stressed plants detected (across the thresholds) and fewer false-positives.

  3. Reactivity-activity relationships of oral anti-diabetic vanadium complexes in gastrointestinal media: an X-ray absorption spectroscopic study.

    PubMed

    Levina, Aviva; McLeod, Andrew I; Kremer, Lauren E; Aitken, Jade B; Glover, Christopher J; Johannessen, Bernt; Lay, Peter A

    2014-10-01

    The reactions of oral V(V/IV) anti-diabetic drugs within the gastrointestinal environment (particularly in the presence of food) are a crucial factor that affects their biological activities, but to date these have been poorly understood. In order to build up reactivity-activity relationships, the first detailed study of the reactivities of typical V-based anti-diabetics, Na3V(V)O4 (A), [V(IV)O(OH2)5](SO4) (B), [V(IV)O(ma)2] (C, ma = maltolato(-)) and (NH4)[V(V)(O)2(dipic)] (D, dipic = pyridine-2,5-dicarboxylato(2-)) with simulated gastrointestinal (GI) media in the presence or absence of food components has been performed by the use of XANES (X-ray absorption near edge structure) spectroscopy. Changes in speciation under conditions that simulate interactions in the GI tract have been discerned using correlations of XANES parameters that were based on a library of model V(V), V(IV), and V(III) complexes for preliminary assessment of the oxidation states and coordination numbers. More detailed speciation analyses were performed using multiple linear regression fits of XANES from the model complexes to XANES obtained from the reaction products from interactions with the GI media. Compounds B and D were relatively stable in the gastric environment (pH ∼ 2) in the absence of food, while C was mostly dissociated, and A was converted to [V10O28](6-). Sequential gastric and intestinal digestion in the absence of food converted A, B and D to poorly absorbed tetrahedral vanadates, while C formed five- or six-coordinate V(V) species where the maltolato ligands were likely to be partially retained. XANES obtained from gastric digestion of A-D in the presence of typical food components converged to that of a mixture of V(IV)-aqua, V(IV)-amino acid and V(III)-aqua complexes. Subsequent intestinal digestion led predominantly to V(IV) complexes that were assigned as citrato or complexes with 2-hydroxyacidato donor groups from other organic compounds, including certain

  4. Description of the Role of Shot Noise in Spectroscopic Absorption and Emission Measurements with Photodiode and Photomultiplier Tube Detectors: Information for an Instrumental Analysis Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McClain, Robert L.; Wright, John C.

    2014-01-01

    A description of shot noise and the role it plays in absorption and emission measurements using photodiode and photomultiplier tube detection systems is presented. This description includes derivations of useful forms of the shot noise equation based on Poisson counting statistics. This approach can deepen student understanding of a fundamental…

  5. Infrared and X-ray Absorption Near Edge Structure Spectroscopy Analyses of the Titan Haze Simulation (THS) Aerosols Produced at Low Temperature (200 K)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sciamma-O'Brien, Ella; Salama, Farid

    2016-10-01

    We present our latest results on the Titan Haze Simulation (THS) experiment developed on the COSmIC simulation chamber at NASA Ames. In Titan's atmosphere, a complex organic chemistry induced by UV radiation and electron bombardment occurs between N2 and CH4 and leads to the production of larger molecules and solid aerosols. In the THS, Titan's chemistry is simulated by pulsed plasma in the stream of a supersonic expansion, at Titan-like temperature (200 K). The residence time of the gas in the pulsed plasma discharge is ~3 µs, hence the chemistry is truncated allowing us to probe the first and intermediate steps of the chemistry, by adding heavier precursors into the initial N2-CH4 gas mixture. Experiments have been performed in different gas mixtures from the simpler N2-CH4 (98:2 and 95:5), to more complex mixtures: N2-CH4-C2H2 (91:5:4 and 94.5:5:0.5), N2-CH4-C6H6 (90:5:5) and N2-CH4-C2H2-C6H6 (86:5:4:5). Both the gas and solid phases have been analyzed using a combination of in situ and ex situ diagnostics.A recent mass spectrometry analysis of the gas phase demonstrated that the THS is a unique tool to monitor the different steps of the N2-CH4 chemistry [1]. The results of the solid phase study are consistent with the chemical growth evolution observed in the gas phase. The solid phase products are in the form of grains produced in volume and not from interaction on the substrate's surface. Scanning Electron Microscopy images have shown that more complex mixtures produce larger aggregates (100-500 nm in N2-CH4, up to 5 µm in N2-CH4-C2H2-C6H6). Moreover, the morphology of the grains seems to depend on the precursors, a finding that could have an impact on Titan haze microphysical models. We will present the latest results of the infrared and x-ray absorption near edge structure spectroscopic measurements that have been performed on all four mixtures. These results provide information on the nature of the different functional groups present in our samples as

  6. Infrared Spectroscopic Analyses of Sulfate, Nitrate, and Carbonate-bearing Atacama Desert Soils: Analogs for the Interpretation of Infrared Spectra from the Martian Surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dalton, J. B.; Dalton, J. B.; Ewing, S. A.; Amundson, R.; McKay, C. P.

    2005-01-01

    The Atacama Desert of northern Chile is the driest desert on Earth, receiving only a few mm of rain per decade. The Mars climate may, in the past, have been punctuated by short-lived episodes of aqueous activity. The paleo-Martian environment may have had aqueous conditions similar to the current conditions that exist in the Atacama, and Mars soils may have formed with soil chemistry and mineralogy similar to those found in the Atacama. Remote and in-situ analysis of the Martian surface using infrared technology has a long heritage. Future investigations of the subsurface mineralogy are likely to build upon this heritage, and will benefit from real life lessons to be learned from terrestrial analog studies. To that end, preliminary results from a near- and mid-infrared spectroscopic study of Atacama soil profiled at a range of depths are presented.

  7. Synthesis, Spectroscopic and Thermal Characterization of Copper(II) and Iron(III) Complexes of Folic Acid and Their Absorption Efficiency in the Blood

    PubMed Central

    Hamed, E.; Attia, M. S.; Bassiouny, K.

    2009-01-01

    The absorption efficiency of any drug in blood is of prime importance. Compounds having the general formula: Kn[M(FO)2(H2O)2] · xH2O, where (M = Cu(II) or Fe(III), n = 2 or 1, FO = folate anion, x = 2 or 3 with respect), were prepared, and their absorption efficiency in rodent's blood was determined. The obtained compounds were characterized by elemental analysis, infrared as well as thermogravimetric analysis and polarization of light. The results suggest that the two folate complexes were formed in 1 : 2 molar ratio (metal : folic acid) which acted as a bidentate ligand through both carboxylic groups. Polarization of light proved that the folate complexes have symmetric geometry. Biological application proved that Cu(II) and Fe(III) complexes were absorbed more efficiently in rodent blood than folic acid itself. PMID:19746175

  8. Characterization of the physico-chemical properties of polymeric materials for aerospace flight. [differential thermal and atomic absorption spectroscopic analysis of nickel cadmium batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rock, M.

    1981-01-01

    Electrodes and electrolytes of nickel cadmium sealed batteries were analyzed. Different thermal analysis of negative and positive battery electrodes was conducted and the temperature ranges of occurrence of endotherms indicating decomposition of cadmium hydroxide and nickel hydroxide are identified. Atomic absorption spectroscopy was used to analyze electrodes and electrolytes for traces of nickel, cadmium, cobalt, and potassium. Calibration curves and data are given for each sample analyzed. Instrumentation and analytical procedures used for each method are described.

  9. Color change of tourmaline by heat treatment and electron beam irradiation: UV-Visible, EPR, and Mid-IR spectroscopic analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maneewong, Apichate; Seong, Baek Seok; Shin, Eun Joo; Kim, Jeong Seog; Kajornrith, Varavuth

    2016-01-01

    The color of pink tourmaline gemstone changed to colorless when heating at temperature of 600 °C in air. This colorless tourmaline recovered its pink color when irradiated with an electron beam (e-beam) of 800 kGy. The origin of the color change was investigated in three types of tourmaline gemstones, two pink are from Afghanistan and one green are from Nigeria, by using Ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy (UV-Vis), Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR), and Energy Dispersive X-ray Fluorescence (EDXRF). The UV-Vis absorption spectrum of the pink tourmaline with higher Mn concentration (T2, 0.24 wt%) showed characteristic absorption peaks originating from the Mn3+ color center: two absorption bands centered at wavelength of 396 and 520 nm, respectively. Both absorption bands disappeared when heated in air at 600 °C and then reappeared when irradiated with an e-beam at 800 kGy. EPR T2 spectra showed that the color change was related to the valence change of Mn3+ to Mn2+ and vice versa. The pink tourmaline of lower MnO content (T1, 0.08 wt%) also became colorless when heated, but the color was not recovered when the gemstone underwent e-beam irradiation. Instead, a yellow color was obtained. UV-Vis and FTIR spectra indicated that this yellow color originated from a decomposition of the hydroxyl group (-OH) into O- and Ho by the e-beam irradiation. Green tourmaline did not show any color change with either heat treatment or e-beam irradiation.

  10. Time-dependent X-ray absorption spectroscopic (XAS) study on the transformation of zinc basic salt into bis(N-oxopyridine-2-thionato) zinc (II).

    PubMed

    Paek, Seung-Min; Jo, Won-Young; Park, Man; Choy, Jin-Ho

    2007-11-01

    Solid transchelation reaction was established for the synthesis of bis(N-oxopyridine-2-thionato) zinc (II), commonly known as zinc pyrithione (ZPT), to control particle size using zinc basic salt (ZBS) and aqueous sodium pyrithione solution. Distinguished from ZPT particles prepared by usual precipitation reaction, the obtained ZPT nanoparticles exhibited very narrow size distribution. X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) at Zn K-edge was systematically examined to elucidate time-dependent local structural evolution during solid transchelation reaction. X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) analysis clearly revealed that local environment around zinc atoms transformed into pentahedron as reaction proceeded. Based on quantitative X-ray diffraction and XANES analysis, we made structural models. Theoretical XAS spectrum calculated with FEFF code could reproduce experimental one, suggesting that XAS analysis could be very powerful tool to probe phase transformation. Furthermore, according to extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) fitting results, Zn-O distance in reaction products gradually increased from 1.96 to 2.07 angstroms, suggesting that zinc atoms bounded with oxygen ones in ZBS were transchelated with pyrithione ligands. This study could be a strong evidence for the usefulness of XAS to study time-dependent structural transformation of nanocrystalline materials.

  11. Studies on monolayers. Part 1. Surface tension and absorption spectroscopic measurements of monolayers of surface-active azo and stilbene dyes

    SciTech Connect

    Heesemann, J.

    1980-03-26

    In order to develop new molecules as function components of monolayer assemblies, a series of 9 surface-active azo and stilbene compounds are synthesized. Their monolayer properties at the air-water interface are studied by surface pressure-surface area measurements and spectroscopic techniques. The results show that small changes in the molecular structure of the surfactants (such as, length of the fatty acid chain and type of the chromphore) have an immense influence on the monolayer properties. For monolayers of compounds I and III-VIII, van der Walls-like isotherms are obtained, which show a liquid expanded state, a phase transition region, and a condensed state. From monolayer absorbance spectra it is found that in the liquid expanded state at 100 to 110 sq angstroms/molecule the chromphores lie flatly on the water surface, forming monomers. The phase transition region of the isotherms can be assigned to a change of orientation of the chromophore axis (horizontal to vertical) and an aggregation process of the chromophores (monomers to H aggregates). 20 references.

  12. In-Situ Spectroscopic Analyses of the Dye Uptake on ZnO and TiO2 Photoanodes for Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Shahzad, Nadia; Pugliese, Diego; Shahzad, Muhammad Imran; Tresso, Elena

    2015-08-01

    UV-Vis spectroscopic measurements have been performed on Dye-Sensitized Solar Cell (DSSC) photoanodes at different dye impregnation times ranging from few minutes to 24 hours. In addition to the traditional absorbance experiments, based on diffuse and specular reflectance of dye impregnated thin films and on the desorption of dye molecules from the photoanodes by means of a basic solution, an alternative in-situ solution depletion measurement, which enables fast and continuous evaluation of dye uptake, has been employed. Two different nanostructured semiconducting oxide films (mesoporous TiO2 and sponge-like ZnO) and two different dyes, the traditional Ruthenizer 535-bisTBA (N719) and a newly introduced metal-free organic dye based on a hemi-squaraine molecule (CT1), have been analyzed. DSSCs have been fabricated with the dye-impregnated photoanodes using a customized microfluidic architecture. The dye adsorption results are discussed and correlated to the obtained DSSC electrical performances such as photovoltaic conversion efficiencies and Incident Photon-to-electron Conversion Efficiency (IPCE) spectra. It is shown that simple UV-Vis measurements can give useful insights on the dye adsorption mechanisms and on the evaluation of the optimal impregnation times.

  13. Spectroscopic (FT-IR and FT-Raman) studies, NBO, HOMO-LUMO, NMR analyses and thermodynamics functions of 5-bromo-2-methoxybenzaldehyde

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balachandran, V.; Santhi, G.; Karpagam, V.

    2013-04-01

    The (FT-IR and FT-Raman) spectral properties of 5-bromo-2-methoxybenzaldehyde (BMB) are studied using density functional theory (DFT) employing B3LYP/6-311++G (d) and B3LYP/6-311++G (d, p) levels of theory. There are four conformers, C1, C2, C3, and C4 for this molecule. The computational results diagnose the most stable conformer of BMB as the C1 form. The optimized geometrical parameters obtained by B3LYP/6-311++G (d, p) method show good agreement with experimental X-ray data. A study on the electronic properties, such as HOMO and LUMO energies, is performed. The isotropic chemical shift computed by 1H and 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) chemical shifts of the BMB calculated using the gauge invariant atomic orbital (GIAO) method also shows good agreement with experimental observations. The MEP surface reflects the chemical reactivity of a molecule. The thermodynamic functions (heat capacity, internal heat energy, Gibbs energy and entropy) from spectroscopic data by statistical methods were obtained for the range of temperature 100-1000 K. The energetic behavior of the compound in different solvent medium (water, ethanol, and methanol) was examined by applying polarizable continuum model (PCM). The complete molecular orbital simulations and theoretical UV-visible spectra carried out in this study yield better understanding of charge delocalization pattern and stability of the title molecules to a greater extent.

  14. Absolute Configuration and Conformation of Two Fráter-Seebach Alkylation Reaction Products by Film VCD and ECD Spectroscopic Analyses.

    PubMed

    Poopari, Mohammad Reza; Dezhahang, Zahra; Shen, Ke; Wang, Lei; Lowary, Todd L; Xu, Yunjie

    2015-01-02

    Two chiroptical spectroscopic techniques, namely, electronic and vibrational circular dichroism (ECD and VCD), as well as NMR spectroscopy have been utilized to determine the absolute configurations and geometries of two Fráter-Seebach alkylation reaction products with long hydrocarbon chains. The experimental studies have been complemented with density functional theory calculations. Strong characteristic bisignate VCD signatures in the carbonyl stretching region have been observed for both compounds in film state. Truncated models, i.e., without the long CH2 chains, have been utilized to examine different hydrogen-bonding topologies between two monomeric moieties and to simulate the corresponding IR and VCD spectra of the dimers. In addition, the exciton coupling model has also been applied to the -C═O groups of the two monomeric moieties, which can be coupled through intermolecular hydrogen-bonding. On the basis of these simplified approaches, the absolute configurations of the compounds have been unambiguously assigned using VCD and ECD spectroscopy. Spectral simulations in the IR and UV-vis regions have also been carried out with the full dimers to validate the fitness of the truncated model. The study shows that the combination of the film VCD and ECD techniques is a relatively straightforward method to determine the absolution configurations of such synthetic compounds.

  15. A femtosecond transient absorption spectroscopic study on a carbonyl-containing carotenoid analogue, 2-(all-trans-retinylidene)-indan-1,3-dione

    PubMed Central

    Kusumoto, Toshiyuki; Kosumi, Daisuke; Uragami, Chiasa; Frank, Harry A.; Birge, Robert R.; Cogdell, Richard J.; Hashimoto, Hideki

    2011-01-01

    The photophysical properties of a carbonyl-containing carotenoid analogue in an s-cis configuration, relative to the conjugated π system, 2-(all-trans-retinylidene)-indan-1,3-dione (C20Ind), were investigated by femtosecond time-resolved spectroscopy in various solvents. The lifetime of the optically forbidden S1 state of C20Ind becomes long as solvent polarity increases. This trend is completely opposite to the situation of S1-ICT dynamics of carbonyl-containing carotenoids, such as peridinin and fucoxanthin. Excitation energy dependence of the transient absorption measurements shows that the transient absorption spectra in non-polar solvents were originated from two distinct transient species, while those in polar and protic solvents are due to a single transient species. By referring to the results of MNDO-PSDCI (modified neglect of differential overlap with partial single- and double-configuration interaction) calculations, we conclude: (1) In polar and protic solvents, the S1 state is generated following excitation up to the S2 state; (2) In non-polar solvents, however, both the S1 and 1nπ* states are generated; and (3) C20Ind does not generate the S1-ICT state, despite the fact that it has two conjugated carbonyl groups. PMID:21361262

  16. Absorption and emission spectroscopic characterisation of the LOV2-domain of phot from Chlamydomonas reinhardtii fused to a maltose binding protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holzer, W.; Penzkofer, A.; Susdorf, T.; Álvarez, M.; Islam, Sh. D. M.; Hegemann, P.

    2004-07-01

    The absorption and emission behaviour of flavin mononucleotide (FMN) in the wild-type light, oxygen and voltage-sensitive (LOV) domain LOV2 of the photoreceptor phot from the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii is studied at pH 8. Actually a LOV2-MBP-fusion protein (MBP=maltose binding protein) expressed in an Escherichia coli strain is investigated. For fresh samples stored in the dark an initial fluorescence quantum yield of φF=0.08±0.01 is determined. Blue-light photo-excitation generates a non-fluorescent intermediate photoproduct (flavin-C(4a)-cysteinyl adduct with absorption peak at 390 nm). In the aqueous solutions studied approximately seven percent of the FMN molecules are not bound to the protein (free FMN in oxidized form) and about seven percent of the non-covalently bound FMN are not convertible to an adduct. Approximately two thirds of the intermediate photoproduct recovers with a time constant of 41 ± 1 s, while approximately one third recovers with a time constant of about 7 min. The photo-adduct formation is thought to proceed via singlet excited-state electron transfer and triplet formation.

  17. Electrochemical, HPLC and electrospray ionization mass spectroscopic analyses of peroxycitric acid coexisting with citric acid and hydrogen peroxide in aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Ferdousi, Begum Nadira; Islam, Md Mominul; Okajima, Takeyoshi; Ohsaka, Takeo

    2008-02-15

    We successfully determined the molecular structure of peroxycitric acid (PCA) coexisting in the aqueous equilibrium mixture with citric acid (CA; 1,2,3-tricarboxylic-2-hydroxy propane) and hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) by a combined use of reversed-phase HPLC (RP-HPLC), potentiometric, hydrodynamic chronocoulometric (HCC) and electrospray ionization mass spectroscopic (ESI-MS) methods. Firstly, the RP-HPLC was employed to separate CA, PCA and H(2)O(2) coexisting in the equilibrium mixture and the concentration of CA consumed (DeltaC(CA)) in the formation of PCA that was evidenced to be fairly stable during the RP-HPLC measurement was quantitatively measured based on the standard calibration curve of CA. Secondly, the total oxidant concentration (C(Ox)) corresponding to peroxycarboxylic (-COOOH) group in PCA in the equilibrium mixture was determined using potentiometric measurement. The ratio of C(Ox)/DeltaC(CA) was found to be 1.07, which indicates that only one -COOH group in CA molecule is oxidized to the corresponding -COOOH group in PCA molecule. Thirdly, using the HCC technique the diffusion coefficient of PCA, which could be electroreduced at a more positive potential by 1.0 V than the coexisting H(2)O(2), was independently measured as 0.3 x 10(-5)cm(2)s(-1) and at the same time, by considering DeltaC(CA) as the concentration of PCA, the number of electrons (n) required for the reduction of PCA was determined to be 2. The result obtained from RP-HPLC and HCC, i.e., n=2 which is equivalent to one -COOOH group in PCA, is in agreement with that obtained from the combination of RP-HPLC and potentiometric measurements. Finally, the structure of PCA was proposed to contain one -COOOH group with a molecular mass of 208 confirmed by negative ion ESI-MS method. A probable molecular structure of PCA was discussed.

  18. Characterization of Phyllanthus amarus herb by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometric (ICP-MS) analysis, optical absorption and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopic methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reddy, S. Lakshmi; Reddy, N. C. Gangi; Reddy, R. Rama Subba; Reddy, G. Siva; Rao, P. Sambasiva; Reddy, B. Jagannatha; Frost, R. L.

    A powdered sample of Phyllanthus amarus herb of Kadapa district of Andhra Pradesh, India, is used in the present study. ICP-MS analysis indicates that copper is present in higher concentration when compared to other elements. Although the Pb is toxic, it is within the permissible limit. The evaluated soil and herb physico-chemical parameters indicate that the sample is acidic in nature in comparison with the soil. An EPR study on powdered sample confirms the presence of Fe(III), Mn(II) and Cu(II). Optical absorption spectrum indicates that Fe(III) impurity is present in octahedral structure whereas Cu(II) is present in rhombically distorted octahedral environment. MIR results are due to carbonate fundamentals.

  19. X-ray absorption spectroscopic studies of the dinuclear iron center in methane monooxygenase and the sulfure and chlorine centers in photographic materials

    SciTech Connect

    DeWitt, J.G.

    1992-12-01

    The dinuclear iron center of the hydroxylase component of soluble methane monooxygenase (MMO) from Methylococcus capsulatus and Methylosinus trichosporiwn has been studied by X-ray absorption spectroscopy. Analysis of the Fe K-edge EXAFS revealed that the first shell coordination of the Fe(HI)Fe(IH) oxidized state of the hydroxylase from M. capsulatus consists of approximately 6 N and 0 atoms at an average distance of 2.04 [Angstrom]. The Fe-Fe distance was determined to be 3.4 [Angstrom]. No evidence for the presence of a short oxo bridge in the iron center of the oxidized hydroxylase was found, suggesting that the active site of MMO is significantly different from the active sites of the dinuclear iron proteins hemery and ribonucleotide reductase. In addition, the results of the first shell fits suggest that there are more oxygen than nitrogen donor ligands.

  20. X-ray absorption spectroscopic studies of the dinuclear iron center in methane monooxygenase and the sulfure and chlorine centers in photographic materials

    SciTech Connect

    DeWitt, Jane G.

    1992-12-01

    The dinuclear iron center of the hydroxylase component of soluble methane monooxygenase (MMO) from Methylococcus capsulatus and Methylosinus trichosporiwn has been studied by X-ray absorption spectroscopy. Analysis of the Fe K-edge EXAFS revealed that the first shell coordination of the Fe(HI)Fe(IH) oxidized state of the hydroxylase from M. capsulatus consists of approximately 6 N and 0 atoms at an average distance of 2.04 Å. The Fe-Fe distance was determined to be 3.4 Å. No evidence for the presence of a short oxo bridge in the iron center of the oxidized hydroxylase was found, suggesting that the active site of MMO is significantly different from the active sites of the dinuclear iron proteins hemery and ribonucleotide reductase. In addition, the results of the first shell fits suggest that there are more oxygen than nitrogen donor ligands.

  1. In situ X-ray Absorption Spectroscopic Investigation of the Electrochemical Conversion Reactions of CuF2-MoO3 Nanocomposite

    SciTech Connect

    A Mansour; F Badway; W Yoon; K Chung; G Amatucci

    2011-12-31

    We have used X-ray absorption spectroscopy at the Cu K-edge to investigate the electrochemical conversion reaction of 20 nm size 85 wt% CuF{sub 2}-15 wt% MoO{sub 3} nanocomposite under in situ conditions. The nanocomposite was prepared by high energy milling. Upon discharge, the lithiation reaction with the nanocomposite resulted in the formation of nanophase metallic Cu, which is consistent with the conversion of CuF{sub 2} into Cu and LiF. Based on XANES and Fourier transforms of EXAFS spectra, we show that the discharge process proceeded via the formation of highly dispersed Cu particles. Based on the coordination number of the first shell of Cu, the average size of the Cu particles was estimated to be in the 1-3 nm range in the fully discharged state.

  2. X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopic studies of Octakis(DMSO)lanthanoid(III) complexes in solution and in the solid iodides.

    PubMed

    Persson, Ingmar; Risberg, Emiliana Damian; D'Angelo, Paola; De Panfilis, Simone; Sandström, Magnus; Abbasi, Alireza

    2007-09-17

    Octakis(DMSO)lanthanoid(III) iodides (DMSO = dimethylsulfoxide), [Ln(OS(CH3)2)8]I3, of most lanthanoid(III) ions in the series from La to Lu have been studied in the solid state and in DMSO solution by extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy. L3-edge and also some K-edge spectra were recorded, which provided mean Ln-O bond distances for the octakis(DMSO)lanthanoid(III) complexes. The agreement with the average of the Ln-O bond distances obtained in a separate study by X-ray crystallography was quite satisfactory. The crystalline octakis(DMSO)lanthanoid(III) iodide salts have a fairly broad distribution of Ln-O bond distances, ca. 0.1 A, with a few disordered DMSO ligands. Their EXAFS spectra are in excellent agreement with those obtained for the solvated lanthanoid(III) ions in DMSO solution, both of which show slightly asymmetric distributions of the Ln-O bond distances. Hence, all lanthanoid(III) ions are present as octakis(DMSO)lanthanoid(III) complexes in DMSO solution, with the mean Ln-O distances centered at 2.50 (La), 2.45 (Pr), 2.43 (Nd), 2.41 (Sm), 2.40 (Eu), 2.39 (Gd), 2.37 (Tb), 2.36 (Dy), 2.34 (Ho), 2.33 (Er), 2.31 (Tm), and 2.29 A (Lu). This decrease in the Ln-O bond distances is larger than expected from the previously established ionic radii for octa-coordination. This indicates increasing polarization of the LnIII-O(DMSO) bonds with increasing atomic number. However, the S(1s) electron transition energies in the sulfur K-edge X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectra, probing the unoccupied molecular orbitals of lowest energy of the DMSO ligands for the [Ln(OS(CH3)2)8](3+) complexes, change only insignificantly from Ln = La to Lu. This indicates that there is no appreciable change in the sigma-contribution to the S-O bond, probably due to a corresponding increase in the contribution from the sulfur lone pair to the bonding.

  3. X-Ray Absorption Fine Structure Spectroscopic Studies of Octakis(DMSO)Lanthanoid(III) Complexes in Solution And in the Solid Iodides

    SciTech Connect

    Persson, I.; Risberg, E.Damian; D'Angelo, P.; Panfilis, S.De; Sandstrom, M.; Abbasi, A.

    2009-06-04

    Octakis(DMSO)lanthanoid(III) iodides (DMSO = dimethylsulfoxide), [Ln(OS(CH{sub 3}){sub 2}){sub 8}]I{sub 3}, of most lanthanoid(III) ions in the series from La to Lu have been studied in the solid state and in DMSO solution by extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy. L{sub 3}-edge and also some K-edge spectra were recorded, which provided mean Ln-O bond distances for the octakis(DMSO)lanthanoid(III) complexes. The agreement with the average of the Ln-O bond distances obtained in a separate study by X-ray crystallography was quite satisfactory. The crystalline octakis(DMSO)lanthanoid(III) iodide salts have a fairly broad distribution of Ln-O bond distances, ca. 0.1 {angstrom}, with a few disordered DMSO ligands. Their EXAFS spectra are in excellent agreement with those obtained for the solvated lanthanoid(III) ions in DMSO solution, both of which show slightly asymmetric distributions of the Ln-O bond distances. Hence, all lanthanoid(III) ions are present as octakis(DMSO)lanthanoid(III) complexes in DMSO solution, with the mean Ln-O distances centered at 2.50 (La), 2.45 (Pr), 2.43 (Nd), 2.41 (Sm), 2.40 (Eu), 2.39 (Gd), 2.37 (Tb), 2.36 (Dy), 2.34 (Ho), 2.33 (Er), 2.31 (Tm), and 2.29 {angstrom} (Lu). This decrease in the Ln-O bond distances is larger than expected from the previously established ionic radii for octa-coordination. This indicates increasing polarization of the Ln{sup III}-O(DMSO) bonds with increasing atomic number. However, the S(1s) electron transition energies in the sulfur K-edge X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectra, probing the unoccupied molecular orbitals of lowest energy of the DMSO ligands for the [Ln(OS(CH{sub 3}){sub 2}){sub 8}]{sup 3+} complexes, change only insignificantly from Ln = La to Lu. This indicates that there is no appreciable change in the ?-contribution to the S-O bond, probably due to a corresponding increase in the contribution from the sulfur lone pair to the bonding.

  4. Detailed transient heme structures of Mb-CO in solution after CO dissociation: an X-ray transient absorption spectroscopic study.

    PubMed

    Stickrath, Andrew B; Mara, Michael W; Lockard, Jenny V; Harpham, Michael R; Huang, Jier; Zhang, Xiaoyi; Attenkofer, Klaus; Chen, Lin X

    2013-04-25

    Although understanding the structural dynamics associated with ligand photodissociation is necessary in order to correlate structure and function in biological systems, few techniques are capable of measuring the ultrafast dynamics of these systems in solution-phase at room temperature. We present here a detailed X-ray transient absorption (XTA) study of the photodissociation of CO-bound myoglobin (Fe(II)CO-Mb) in room-temperature aqueous buffer solution with a time resolution of 80 ps, along with a general procedure for handling biological samples under the harsh experimental conditions that transient X-ray experiments entail. The XTA spectra of (Fe(II)CO-Mb) exhibit significant XANES and XAFS alterations following 527 nm excitation, which remain unchanged for >47 μs. These spectral changes indicate loss of the CO ligand, resulting in a five-coordinate, domed heme, and significant energetic reorganization of the 3d orbitals of the Fe center. With the current experimental setup, each X-ray pulse in the pulse train, separated by ~153 ns, can be separately discriminated, yielding snapshots of the myoglobin evolution over time. These methods can be easily applied to other biological systems, allowing for simultaneous structural and electronic measurements of any biological system with both ultrafast and slow time resolutions, effectively mapping out all of the samples' relevant physiological processes.

  5. Quantitative spectroscopic and theoretical study of the optical absorption spectra of H2O, HOD, and D2O in the 125-145 nm region.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Bing-Ming; Chung, Chao-Yu; Bahou, Mohammed; Lee, Yuan-Pern; Lee, L C; van Harrevelt, Rob; van Hemert, Marc C

    2004-01-01

    The room temperature absorption spectra of water and its isotopomers D2O and HOD have been determined in absolute cross section units in the 125 to 145 nm wavelength region using synchrotron radiation. The experimental results for these B band spectra are compared with results from quantum mechanical calculations using accurate diabatic ab initio potentials. A Monte Carlo sampling over the initial rotational states of the molecules is applied in order to calculate the cross sections at a temperature of 300 K. The overall rotation of the water molecule is treated exactly. Both for the experimental and for the theoretical spectrum an analysis is made in terms of a component attributed to rapid direct dissociation processes and a component attributed to longer-lived resonances. The agreement between the results from experiment and theory is excellent for H2O and D2O. In the case of HOD in the results of theory two more resonances are found at low energy. It is demonstrated that the width of the resonances of 0.04 eV is the result of overlapping and somewhat narrower resonances in the spectra of molecules differing in rotational ground state.

  6. Absorption spectroscopic and FTIR studies on EDA complexes between TNT (2,4,6-trinitrotoluene) with amines in DMSO and determination of the vertical electron affinity of TNT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, S. P.; Lahiri, S. C.

    2008-06-01

    TNT (2,4,6-trinitrotoluene) formed deep red 1:1 CT complexes with chromogenic agents like isopropylamine, ethylenediamine, bis(3-aminopropyl)amine and tetraethylenepentamine in DMSO. The complexes were also observed in solvents like methanol, acetone, etc. when the amines were present in large excess. The isopropylamine, complex showed three absorption peaks (at 378, 532 and 629 nm) whereas higher amines showed four peaks (at 370, 463, 532 and 629 nm). The peak at 463 nm vanished rapidly. The peak of the complexes near 530 nm required about 8-10 min to develop and the complexes were stable for about an hour but the peak slowly shifted towards 500 nm and the complexes were found to be stable for more than 24 h. The evidence of complex formation was obtained from distinct spots in HPTLC plates and from the shifts in frequencies and formation of new peaks in FTIR spectra. The peaks near 460 nm (transient) and 530 nm may be due to Janovsky reaction but could not be established. The extinction coefficients of the complexes were determined directly which enabled the accurate determination of the association constants KDA with TNT and amines in stoichiometric ratios. The results were verified using iterative method. The quantfication of TNT was made using ɛ value of the complex with ethylenediamine. The vertical electron affinity ( EA) of TNT was calculated using the method suggested by Mulliken.

  7. A novel surface-sensitive X-ray absorption spectroscopic detector to study the thermal decomposition of cathode materials for Li-ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nonaka, Takamasa; Okuda, Chikaaki; Oka, Hideaki; Nishimura, Yusaku F.; Makimura, Yoshinari; Kondo, Yasuhito; Dohmae, Kazuhiko; Takeuchi, Yoji

    2016-09-01

    A surface-sensitive conversion-electron-yield X-ray absorption fine structure (CEY-XAFS) detector that operates at elevated temperatures is developed to investigate the thermal decomposition of cathode materials for Li-ion batteries. The detector enables measurements with the sample temperature controlled from room temperature up to 450 °C. The detector is applied to the LiNi0.75Co0.15Al0.05Mg0.05O2 cathode material at 0% state of charge (SOC) and 50% SOC to examine the chemical changes that occur during heating in the absence of an electrolyte. The combination of surface-sensitive CEY-XAFS and bulk-sensitive transmission-mode XAFS shows that the reduction of Ni and Co ions begins at the surface of the cathode particles at around 150 °C, and propagates inside the particle upon further heating. These changes with heating are irreversible and are more obvious at 50% SOC than at 0% SOC. The fraction of reduced Ni ions is larger than that of reduced Co ions. These results demonstrate the capability of the developed detector to obtain important information for the safe employment of this cathode material in Li-ion batteries.

  8. Spectroscopic verification of zinc absorption and distribution in the desert plant Prosopis juliflora-velutina (velvet mesquite) treated with ZnO nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Hernandez-Viezcas, J.A.; Castillo-Michel, H.; Servin, A.D.; Peralta-Videa, J.R.; Gardea-Torresdey, J.L.

    2012-01-01

    The impact of metal nanoparticles (NPs) on biological systems, especially plants, is still not well understood. The aim of this research was to determine the effects of zinc oxide (ZnO) NPs in velvet mesquite (Prosopis juliflora-velutina). Mesquite seedlings were grown for 15 days in hydroponics with ZnO NPs (10 nm) at concentrations varying from 500 to 4000 mg L−1. Zinc concentrations in roots, stems and leaves were determined by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy (ICP-OES). Plant stress was examined by the specific activity of catalase (CAT) and ascorbate peroxidase (APOX); while the biotransformation of ZnO NPs and Zn distribution in tissues was determined by X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) and micro X-ray fluorescence (μXRF), respectively. ICP-OES results showed that Zn concentrations in tissues (2102 ± 87, 1135 ± 56, and 628 ± 130 mg kg−1 d wt in roots, stems, and leaves, respectively) were found at 2000 mg ZnO NPs L−1. Stress tests showed that ZnO NPs increased CAT in roots, stems, and leaves, while APOX increased only in stems and leaves. XANES spectra demonstrated that ZnO NPs were not present in mesquite tissues, while Zn was found as Zn(II), resembling the spectra of Zn(NO3)2. The μXRF analysis confirmed the presence of Zn in the vascular system of roots and leaves in ZnO NP treated plants. PMID:22820414

  9. Infrared absorption spectroscopic and DFT calculation studies on the adsorption structures of nitromethane on the single crystals of Cu and Ag

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itoh, K.; Iwa, A.; Uriu, Y.; Kadokura, K.

    2008-07-01

    The adsorption structures of nitromethane on Ag(1 1 0), Ag(1 1 1), Cu(1 1 0) and Cu(1 1 1) at 80 K were studied by using infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy (IRAS) and non-local density functional theory (DFT) calculation performed on nitromethane/Cu(1 1 0) and nitromethane/Cu(1 1 1) cluster models. Upon increasing exposure levels, the adsorbate on each substrate exhibits discrete spectral changes, characterizing sub-monolayer and/or monolayer, amorphous and multilayer (crystalline) states. The DFT calculation successively simulated the IRA spectra of nitromethane on the copper substrates, suggesting that nitromethane adsorbs on Cu(1 1 0) through an on-top coordination with one of the oxygen atom of the NO 2 group to the Cu atom and that nitromethane adsorbs on Cu(1 1 1) through a bridging coordination of the oxygen atom. In both states nitromethane takes an eclipsed form with the molecular plane perpendicular to the substrates surface and the hydrogen atom pointing to the surface in the molecular plane plays an important role in stabilizing the adsorption states in addition to the coordination interaction.

  10. Absorption spectroscopic and FTIR studies on EDA complexes between TNT (2,4,6-trinitrotoluene) with amines in DMSO and determination of the vertical electron affinity of TNT.

    PubMed

    Sharma, S P; Lahiri, S C

    2008-06-01

    TNT (2,4,6-trinitrotoluene) formed deep red 1:1 CT complexes with chromogenic agents like isopropylamine, ethylenediamine, bis(3-aminopropyl)amine and tetraethylenepentamine in DMSO. The complexes were also observed in solvents like methanol, acetone, etc. when the amines were present in large excess. The isopropylamine, complex showed three absorption peaks (at 378, 532 and 629 nm) whereas higher amines showed four peaks (at 370, 463, 532 and 629 nm). The peak at 463 nm vanished rapidly. The peak of the complexes near 530 nm required about 8-10 min to develop and the complexes were stable for about an hour but the peak slowly shifted towards 500 nm and the complexes were found to be stable for more than 24 h. The evidence of complex formation was obtained from distinct spots in HPTLC plates and from the shifts in frequencies and formation of new peaks in FTIR spectra. The peaks near 460 nm (transient) and 530 nm may be due to Janovsky reaction but could not be established. The extinction coefficients of the complexes were determined directly which enabled the accurate determination of the association constants KDA with TNT and amines in stoichiometric ratios. The results were verified using iterative method. The quantification of TNT was made using epsilon value of the complex with ethylenediamine. The vertical electron affinity (EA) of TNT was calculated using the method suggested by Mulliken.

  11. An infrared reflection-absorption spectroscopic (IRRAS) study of the interaction of lipid A and lipopolysaccharide Re with endotoxin-binding proteins.

    PubMed

    Kerth, Andreas; Garidel, Patrick; Howe, Jörg; Alexander, Christian; Mach, Jean-Pierre; Waelli, Thierry; Blume, Alfred; Th Rietschel, Ernst; Brandenburg, K

    2009-11-01

    Lipopolysaccharides (LPS, endotoxins) are main constituents of the outer membranes of Gram-negative bacteria, with the 'endotoxic principle' lipid A anchoring LPS into the membrane. When LPS is removed from the bacteria by the action of the immune system or simply by cell dividing, it may interact strongly with immunocompetent cells such as mononuclear cells. This interaction may lead, depending on the LPS concentration, to beneficial (at low) or pathophysiological (at high concentrations) reactions, the latter frequently causing the septic shock syndrome. There is a variety of endogenous LPS-binding proteins. To this class belong lactoferrin (LF) and hemoglobin (Hb), which have been shown to suppress and enhance the LPS-induced cytokine secretion in mononuclear cells, respectively. To elucidate the interaction mechanisms of endotoxins with these proteins, we have investigated in an infrared reflection-absorption spectroscopy (IRRAS) study the interaction of LPS or lipid A monolayers at the air/water interface with LF and Hb proteins, injected into the aqueous subphase. The data are clearly indicative of completely different interaction mechanisms of the endotoxins with the proteins, with the LF acting only at the LPS backbone, whereas Hb incorporates into the lipid monolayer. These data allow an understanding of the different reactivities in the biomedicinal systems.

  12. Quantification of zinc-porphyrin in dry-cured ham products by spectroscopic methods Comparison of absorption, fluorescence and X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Laursen, Kristoffer; Adamsen, Christina E; Laursen, Jens; Olsen, Karsten; Møller, Jens K S

    2008-03-01

    Zinc-protoporphyrin (Zn-pp), which has been identified as the major pigment in certain dry-cured meat products, was extracted with acetone/water (75%) and isolated from the following meat products: Parma ham, Iberian ham and dry-cured ham with added nitrite. The quantification of Zn-pp by electron absorption, fluorescence and X-ray fluorescence (XRF) spectroscopy was compared (concentration range used [Zn-pp]=0.8-9.7μM). All three hams were found to contain Zn-pp, and the results show no significant difference among the content of Zn-pp quantified by fluorescence, absorbance and X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy for Parma ham and Iberian ham. All three methods can be used for quantification of Zn-pp in acetone/water extracts of different ham types if the content is higher than 1.0ppm. For dry-cured ham with added nitrite, XRF was not applicable due to the low content of Zn-pp (<0.1ppm). In addition, XRF spectroscopy provides further information regarding other trace elements and can therefore be advantageous in this aspect. This study also focused on XRF determination of Fe in the extracts and as no detectable Fe was found in the three types of ham extracts investigated (limit of detection; Fe⩽1.8ppm), it allows the conclusion that iron containing pigments, e.g., heme, do not contribute to the noticeable red colour observed in some of the extracts.

  13. X-ray Absorption Spectroscopic and Computational Investigation of a Possible S···S Interaction in the [Cu3S2]3+ Core

    PubMed Central

    Sarangi, Ritimukta; Yang, Lei; Winikoff, Stuart G.; Gagliardi, Laura; Cramer, Christopher J.; Tolman, William B.; Solomon, Edward I.

    2011-01-01

    The electronic structure of the [Cu3S2]3+ core of [(LCu)3(S)2]3+ (L = N,N,N′,N′-tetramethyl-2R,3R-cyclohexanediamine) is investigated using a combination of Cu and S K-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy and calculations at the density functional and multireference second-order perturbation levels of theory. The results show that the [Cu3S2]3+ core is best described as having all copper centers close to, but more oxidized than, Cu2+, while the charge on the S2 fragment is between that of a sulfide (S2−) and a subsulfide (S23−) species. The [Cu3S2]3+ core thus is different from a previously described, analogous [Cu3O2]3+ core, which has a localized [(Cu3+Cu2+Cu2+)(O2−)2]3+ electronic structure. The difference in electronic structure between the two analogues is attributed to increased covalent overlap between the Cu 3d and S 3p orbitals and the increased radial distribution function of the S 3p orbital (relative to O 2p). These features result in donation of electron density from the S-S σ* to the Cu and result in some bonding interaction between the two S atoms at ~ 2.69 Å in [Cu3S2]3+, stabilizing a delocalized S=1 ground state. PMID:21923178

  14. Nuclear magnetic resonance and optical absorption spectroscopic studies on paramagnetic praseodymium(III) complexes with beta-diketone and heterocyclic amines.

    PubMed

    Ansari, A A; Ahmed, Zubair; Iftikhar, K

    2007-09-01

    The optical absorption spectra of [Pr(acac)(3)(H(2)O)(2)].H(2)O, [Pr(acac)(3)phen.H(2)O] and [Pr(acac)(3)bpy] (where acac is the anion of acetylacetone, phen is 1,10-phenanthroline and bpy is 2,2'-bipyridyl) have been analyzed in the visible region in a series of non-aqueous solvents (methanol, ethanol, isopropanol, chloroform, acetonitrile and pyridine). The complexes display four non-hypersensitive 4f-4f transitions ((3)P(2), (3)P(1)+(1)I(6), (3)P(0) and (1)D(2)) from the (3)H(4) ground state. The band shape of the transitions shows remarkable changes upon dissolving in different solvents. Distinctively different band shapes have been observed for phen and bpy complexes. The phen is more effective in producing changes and the splitting of the bands is more pronounced in phen complex since it is a stronger ligand and leads to stronger Pr-N(phen) bond. The splitting of the bands is indicative of partaking of f-orbitals in bonding. The NMR signals of heterocyclic amines have been shifted to high fields while the resonances due to acetylacetone moiety have moved to low fields which is the consequence of change in geometry of the complexes upon coordination of the heterocyclic amines and reflects the importance of geometric factor (3cos(2)theta-1) in changing sign of the shift and to a good approximation the shifts arise predominantly from the dipolar mechanism. The phen complexes have narrower line width than bpy complexes. The line broadening in the case of bpy complexes is suggestive of exchange between inter-converting forms. The bpy possesses some degree of rotational freedom about C(6)-C(6') bond and the two pyridine rings undergo scissoring motion with respect to each other.

  15. Spectroscopic analysis of small organic molecules: A comprehensive near-edge x-ray-absorption fine-structure study of C{sub 6}-ring-containing molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Kolczewski, C.; Puettner, R.; Martins, M.; Schlachter, A.S.; Snell, G.; Sant'Anna, M.M.; Hermann, K.; Kaindl, G.

    2006-01-21

    We report high-resolution C 1s near-edge x-ray-absorption fine-structure (NEXAFS) spectra of the C{sub 6}-ring-containing molecules benzene (C{sub 6}H{sub 6}), 1,3- and 1,4-cyclohexadiene (C{sub 6}H{sub 8}), cyclohexene (C{sub 6}H{sub 10}), cyclohexane (C{sub 6}H{sub 12}), styrene (C{sub 8}H{sub 8}), and ethylbenzene (C{sub 8}H{sub 10}) which allow us to examine the gradual development of delocalization of the corresponding {pi} electron systems. Due to the high experimental resolution, vibrational progressions can be partly resolved in the spectra. The experimental spectra are compared with theoretical NEXAFS spectra obtained from density-functional theory calculations where electronic final-state relaxation is accounted for. The comparison yields very good agreement between theoretical spectra and experimental results. In all cases, the spectra can be described by excitations to {pi}*- and {sigma}*-type final-state orbitals with valence character, while final-state orbitals of Rydberg character make only minor contributions. The lowest C 1s{yields}1{pi}* excitation energy is found to agree in the (experimental and theoretical) spectra of all molecules except for 1,3-cyclohexadiene (C{sub 6}H{sub 8}) where an energy smaller by about 0.6 eV is obtained. The theoretical analysis can explain this result by different binding properties of this molecule compared to the others.

  16. Spectroscopic Low Coherence Interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bosschaart, Nienke; van Leeuwen, T. G.; Aalders, Maurice C.; Hermann, Boris; Drexler, Wolfgang; Faber, Dirk J.

    Low-coherence interferometry (LCI) allows high-resolution volumetric imaging of tissue morphology and provides localized optical properties that can be related to the physiological status of tissue. This chapter discusses the combination of spatial and spectroscopic information by means of spectroscopic OCT (sOCT) and low-coherence spectroscopy (LCS). We describe the theory behind these modalities for the assessment of spatially resolved optical absorption and (back)scattering coefficient spectra. These spectra can be used for the highly localized quantification of chromophore concentrations and assessment of tissue organization on (sub)cellular scales. This leads to a wealth of potential clinical applications, ranging from neonatology for the determination of billibrubin concentrations, to oncology for the optical assessment of the aggressiveness of a cancerous lesion.

  17. Infrared reflection absorption spectroscopic studies on the adsorption structures of dimethyl sulfide and methyl ethyl sulfide on Ag(1 1 0) and Cu(1 1 0)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasahara, T.; Shinohara, H.; Oshima, Y.; Kadokura, K.; Uriu, Y.; Ohe, C.; Itoh, K.

    2004-06-01

    Infrared reflection absorption (IRA) spectra were measured for dimethyl sulfide (CH 3SCH 3, DMS) and methyl ethyl sulfide (CH 3SCH 2CH 3, MES) with increasing exposure to metal substrates, Ag(1 1 0) and Cu(1 1 0), at 80 K. The spectral simulations performed by using the DFT calculation at the B3LYP/6-311++G** level indicated that (i) DMS adsorbs on the substrates with the CSC plane appreciably tilted from the surface normal, the tilt angle being about 80° for the adsorbate on Ag(1 1 0) and about 60° for the adsorbate on Cu(1 1 0), (ii) MES on Ag(1 1 0) at a submonolayer coverage state takes on the trans form with the molecular plane tilted from the surface normal by about 60°, and (iii) MES on Cu(1 1 0) takes the gauche form with the CSC plane almost perpendicular to the surface. The tilting of DMS is contrasted to dimethyl ether (DME) adsorbs on Ag(1 1 0) and Cu(1 1 0), where the molecular plane is perpendicular to the substrate surfaces [J. Phys. Chem. B 106 (2002) 3469]. The adsorption structures of DMS and DME are mainly determined by the coordination of the sulfur and oxygen atoms, the sulfur atom tending to coordinate to the Ag and Cu atoms through one of the 3p lone pairs (atop coordination) and the oxygen atom to the metal atoms through both of the 2p lone pairs (bridging coordination). It has been known that methyl ethyl ether (MEE) on Ag(1 1 0) takes on the trans form with the molecular plane tilted by about 45° and MEE on Cu(1 1 0) the gauche form with the COC plane almost perpendicular to the surface [J. Phys. Chem. B 107 (2003) 5008]. These results suggest that an attractive van der Waals interaction between the ethyl group of the adsorbates and the substrate surfaces play an important role in addition to the coordination of the sulfur and oxygen atoms in determining the rotational isomerism and orientation of MES and MEE on Ag(1 1 0) and Cu(1 1 0).

  18. Infrared reflection absorption spectroscopic study of the adsorption structures of dimethyl ether and methyl ethyl ether on Cu(1 1 1) and Ag(1 1 1)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasahara, Takahiro; Itoh, Koichi

    2007-02-01

    Infrared reflection absorption (IRA) spectra measured for dimethyl ether (DME) adsorbed at 80 K on Cu(1 1 1) and Ag(1 1 1) give IR bands belonging only to the A 1 and B 2 species, indicating that the adsorbate takes on an orientation in which the C2 axis bisecting the COC bond angle tilts away from the surface normal within the plane perpendicular to the substrates. The DFT method was applied to simulate the IRA spectra, indicating that the tilt angles of DME on Cu(1 1 1) and Ag(1 1 1) are about 50° and 55°, respectively, at submonolayer coverages. The results are in contrast to the case of DME on Cu(1 1 0) and Ag(1 1 0), where the C2 axis is perpendicular to the substrates [T. Kiyohara et al., J. Phys. Chem. A 106 (2002) 3469]. Methyl ethyl ether (MEE) adsorbed at 80 K on Cu(1 1 1) gives IRA bands mainly ascribable to the gauche ( G) form, whereas the IRA spectra measured for MEE on Ag(1 1 1) are characterized by the trans ( T) form. The rotational isomers are identical with those on Cu(1 1 0) and Ag(1 1 0); i.e., MEE on Cu(1 1 0) takes the G form and the adsorbate on Ag(1 1 0) the T form [T. Kiyohara et al., J. Phys. Chem. B 107 (2003) 5008]. The simulation of the IRA spectra indicated that (i) the G form adsorbate on Cu(1 1 1) takes an orientation, in which the axis bisecting the COC bond angle tilts away from the surface normal by ca. 30° within the plane perpendicular to the surface to make the CH 3-CH 2 bond almost parallel to the surface, and (ii) the T form adsorbate on Ag(1 1 1) takes an orientation, in which the bisecting axis tilts away by ca. 60° from the surface normal within the perpendicular plane. Comparison of these adsorption structures of MEE on the (1 1 1) substrates with those of MEE on Cu(1 1 0) and Ag(1 1 0) indicates that the structures are mainly determined by a coordination interaction of the oxygen atom to the surface metals and an attractive van der Waals interaction between the ethyl group of MEE and the substrate surfaces. The

  19. Spectroscopic studies, thermal analyses and biological evaluation of new V(IV), Zr(IV) and U(VI) moxifloxacin complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadeek, Sadeek A.; El-Shwiniy, Walaa H.; Zordok, Wael A.; Kotb, Essam

    2011-12-01

    The synthesis and characterization of the new solid complexes [VO(MOX) 2H 2O]SO 4·11H 2O, [ZrO(MOX) 2Cl]Cl·15H 2O and [UO 2(MOX) 3](NO 3) 2·3H 2O formed in the interaction of moxifloxacin (MOX) with VOSO 4·H 2O, ZrOCl 2·8H 2O and UO 2(NO 3) 2·6H 2O in methanol and acetone as a solvents at room temperature were reported. The isolated solid complexes have been characterized with melting points, elemental analysis, molar conductance, magnetic moments studies, spectral (UV-Visible, IR and 1HNMR) as well as thermal analyses (TGA and DTG). The results support the formation of the complexes and indicate that moxifloxacin reacts as a bidentate ligand chelate to the metal ion through the pyridone oxygen and one carboxylato oxygen. The kinetic parameters of thermogravimetric (TGA) and its differential (DTG), such as activation energies, E*, enthalpies, Δ H*, entropies, Δ S* and Gibbs free energies, Δ G*, have been evaluated by using Coats-Redfern (CR) and Horowitz-Metzeger (HM) methods. The proposed structure of the ligand and their complexes were detected by using the density functional theory (DFT) at the B3LYP/CEP-31G level of theory. The bond stretching force constant and length of the U dbnd O for the [UO 2(MOX) 3](NO 3) 2·3H 2O complex were calculated. The antibacterial activity of the free moxifloxacin ligand and their metal complexes have been tested against some selected bacterial strains such as: Streptococcus aureus K1, Bacillus subtilis K22, Brevibacterium otitidis K76, Escherichia coli K32, Pseudomonas aeruginosa SW1 and Klebsiella oxytoca K42. The complexes showed good antibacterial effect to the selected bacterial strains as compared to the free ligand and Zr(IV) complex is very highly significant compared with the other two complexes.

  20. X-ray Absorption and Emission Spectroscopic Studies of [L2Fe2S2]n Model Complexes: Implications for the Experimental Evaluation of Redox States in Iron–Sulfur Clusters

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Herein, a systematic study of [L2Fe2S2]n model complexes (where L = bis(benzimidazolato) and n = 2-, 3-, 4-) has been carried out using iron and sulfur K-edge X-ray absorption (XAS) and iron Kβ and valence-to-core X-ray emission spectroscopies (XES). These data are used as a test set to evaluate the relative strengths and weaknesses of X-ray core level spectroscopies in assessing redox changes in iron–sulfur clusters. The results are correlated to density functional theory (DFT) calculations of the spectra in order to further support the quantitative information that can be extracted from the experimental data. It is demonstrated that due to canceling effects of covalency and spin state, the information that can be extracted from Fe Kβ XES mainlines is limited. However, a careful analysis of the Fe K-edge XAS data shows that localized valence vs delocalized valence species may be differentiated on the basis of the pre-edge and K-edge energies. These findings are then applied to existing literature Fe K-edge XAS data on the iron protein, P-cluster, and FeMoco sites of nitrogenase. The ability to assess the extent of delocalization in the iron protein vs the P-cluster is highlighted. In addition, possible charge states for FeMoco on the basis of Fe K-edge XAS data are discussed. This study provides an important reference for future X-ray spectroscopic studies of iron–sulfur clusters. PMID:27097289

  1. Absorption and Magnetic Circular Dichroism Analyses of Giant Zeeman Splittings in Diffusion-Doped Colloidal Cd(1-x)Mn(x)Se Quantum Dots.

    PubMed

    Barrows, Charles J; Vlaskin, Vladimir A; Gamelin, Daniel R

    2015-08-06

    Impurity ions can transform the electronic, magnetic, or optical properties of colloidal quantum dots. Magnetic impurities introduce strong dopant-carrier exchange coupling that generates giant Zeeman splittings (ΔEZ) of excitonic excited states. To date, ΔEZ in colloidal doped quantum dots has primarily been quantified by analysis of magnetic circular dichroism (MCD) intensities and absorption line widths (σ). Here, we report ΔEZ values detected directly by absorption spectroscopy for the first time in such materials, using colloidal Cd(1-x)Mn(x)Se quantum dots prepared by diffusion doping. A convenient method for decomposing MCD and absorption data into circularly polarized absorption spectra is presented. These data confirm the widely applied MCD analysis in the low-field, high-temperature regime, but also reveal a breakdown at low temperatures and high fields when ΔEZ/σ approaches unity, a situation not previously encountered in doped quantum dots. This breakdown is apparent for the first time here because of the extraordinarily large ΔEZ and small σ achieved by nanocrystal diffusion doping.

  2. Interaction of vanadium (IV) solvates (L) with second-generation fluoroquinolone antibacterial drug ciprofloxacin: Spectroscopic, structure, thermal analyses, kinetics and biological evaluation (L = An, DMF, Py and Et3N)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zordok, Wael A.

    2014-08-01

    The preparation and characterization of the new solid complexes [VO(CIP)2L]SO4ṡnH2O, where L = aniline (An), dimethylformamide (DMF), pyridine (Py) and triethylamine (Et3N) in the reaction of ciprofloxacin (CIP) with VO(SO4)2·2H2O in ethanol. The isolated complexes have been characterized with their melting points, elemental analysis, IR spectroscopy, magnetic properties, conductance measurements, UV-Vis. and 1H NMR spectroscopic methods and thermal analyses. The results supported the formation of the complexes and indicated that ciprofloxacin reacts as a bidentate ligand bound to the vanadium ion through the pyridone oxygen and one carboxylato oxygen. The activation energies, E*; entropies, ΔS*; enthalpies, ΔH*; Gibbs free energies, ΔG*, of the thermal decomposition reactions have been derived from thermo gravimetric (TGA) and differential thermo gravimetric (DTG) curves, using Coats-Redfern and Horowitz-Metzeger methods. The lowest energy model structure of each complex has been proposed by using the density functional theory (DFT) at the B3LYP/CEP-31G level of theory. The ligand and their metal complexes were also evaluated for their antibacterial activity against several bacterial species, such as Bacillus Subtilis (B. Subtilis), Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus), Nesseria Gonorrhoeae (N. Gonorrhoeae), Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa) and Escherichia coli (E. coli).

  3. Interaction of vanadium (IV) solvates (L) with second-generation fluoroquinolone antibacterial drug ciprofloxacin: spectroscopic, structure, thermal analyses, kinetics and biological evaluation (L=An, DMF, Py and Et3N).

    PubMed

    Zordok, Wael A

    2014-08-14

    The preparation and characterization of the new solid complexes [VO(CIP)2L]SO4⋅nH2O, where L=aniline (An), dimethylformamide (DMF), pyridine (Py) and triethylamine (Et3N) in the reaction of ciprofloxacin (CIP) with VO(SO4)2·2H2O in ethanol. The isolated complexes have been characterized with their melting points, elemental analysis, IR spectroscopy, magnetic properties, conductance measurements, UV-Vis. and (1)H NMR spectroscopic methods and thermal analyses. The results supported the formation of the complexes and indicated that ciprofloxacin reacts as a bidentate ligand bound to the vanadium ion through the pyridone oxygen and one carboxylato oxygen. The activation energies, E(*); entropies, ΔS(*); enthalpies, ΔH(*); Gibbs free energies, ΔG(*), of the thermal decomposition reactions have been derived from thermo gravimetric (TGA) and differential thermo gravimetric (DTG) curves, using Coats-Redfern and Horowitz-Metzeger methods. The lowest energy model structure of each complex has been proposed by using the density functional theory (DFT) at the B3LYP/CEP-31G level of theory. The ligand and their metal complexes were also evaluated for their antibacterial activity against several bacterial species, such as Bacillus Subtilis (B. Subtilis), Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus), Nesseria Gonorrhoeae (N. Gonorrhoeae), Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa) and Escherichia coli (E. coli).

  4. Pharmaceutical applications of separation of absorption and scattering in near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS).

    PubMed

    Shi, Zhenqi; Anderson, Carl A

    2010-12-01

    The number of near-infrared (NIR) spectroscopic applications in the pharmaceutical sciences has grown significantly in the last decade. Despite its widespread application, the fundamental interaction between NIR radiation and pharmaceutical materials is often not mechanistically well understood. Separation of absorption and scattering in near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) is intended to extract absorption and scattering spectra (i.e., absorption and reduced scattering coefficients) from reflectance/transmittance NIR measurements. The purpose of the separation is twofold: (1) to enhance the understanding of the individual roles played by absorption and scattering in NIRS and (2) to apply the separated absorption and scattering spectra for practical spectroscopic analyses. This review paper surveys the multiple techniques reported to date on the separation of NIR absorption and scattering within pharmaceutical applications, focusing on the instrumentations, mathematical approaches used to separate absorption and scattering and related pharmaceutical applications. This literature review is expected to enhance the understanding and thereby the utility of NIRS in pharmaceutical science. Further, the measurement and subsequent understanding of the separation of absorption and scattering is expected to increase not only the number of NIRS applications, but also their robustness.

  5. Multiconfigurational and DFT analyses of the electromeric formulation and UV-vis absorption spectra of the superoxide adduct of ferrous superoxide reductase.

    PubMed

    Attia, Amr A A; Cioloboc, Daniela; Lupan, Alexandru; Silaghi-Dumitrescu, Radu

    2016-12-01

    The putative initial adduct of ferrous superoxide reductase (SOR) with superoxide has been alternatively formulated as ferric-peroxo or ferrous-superoxo. The ~600-nm UV-vis absorption band proposed to be assigned to this adduct (either as sole intermediate in the SOR catalytic cycle, or as one of the two intermediates) has recently been interpreted as due to a ligand-to-metal charge transfer, involving thiolate and superoxide in a ferrous complex, contrary to an alternative assignment as a predominantly cysteine thiolate-to-ferric charge transfer in a ferric-peroxo electromer. In an attempt to clarify the electromeric formulation of this adduct, we report a computational study using a multiconfigurational complete active space self-consistent field (MC-CASSCF) wave function approach as well as modelling the UV-vis absorption spectra with time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT). The MC-CASSCF calculations disclose a weak interaction between iron and the dioxygenic ligand and a dominant configuration with an essentially ferrous-superoxo character. The computed UV-vis absorption spectra reveal a marked dependence on the choice of density functional - both in terms of location of bands and in terms of orbital contributors. For the main band in the visible region, besides the recently reported thiolate-to-superoxide charge transfer, a more salient, and less functional-dependent, feature is a thiolate-to-ferric iron charge transfer, consistent with a ferric-peroxo electromer. By contrast, the computed UV-vis spectra of a ferric-hydroperoxo SOR model match distinctly better (and with no qualitative dependence on the DFT methodology) the 600-nm band as due to a mainly thiolate-to-ferric character - supporting the assignment of the SOR "600-nm intermediate" as a S=5/2 ferric-hydroperoxo species.

  6. Galaxy And Mass Assembly (GAMA): spectroscopic analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hopkins, A. M.; Driver, S. P.; Brough, S.; Owers, M. S.; Bauer, A. E.; Gunawardhana, M. L. P.; Cluver, M. E.; Colless, M.; Foster, C.; Lara-López, M. A.; Roseboom, I.; Sharp, R.; Steele, O.; Thomas, D.; Baldry, I. K.; Brown, M. J. I.; Liske, J.; Norberg, P.; Robotham, A. S. G.; Bamford, S.; Bland-Hawthorn, J.; Drinkwater, M. J.; Loveday, J.; Meyer, M.; Peacock, J. A.; Tuffs, R.; Agius, N.; Alpaslan, M.; Andrae, E.; Cameron, E.; Cole, S.; Ching, J. H. Y.; Christodoulou, L.; Conselice, C.; Croom, S.; Cross, N. J. G.; De Propris, R.; Delhaize, J.; Dunne, L.; Eales, S.; Ellis, S.; Frenk, C. S.; Graham, Alister W.; Grootes, M. W.; Häußler, B.; Heymans, C.; Hill, D.; Hoyle, B.; Hudson, M.; Jarvis, M.; Johansson, J.; Jones, D. H.; van Kampen, E.; Kelvin, L.; Kuijken, K.; López-Sánchez, Á.; Maddox, S.; Madore, B.; Maraston, C.; McNaught-Roberts, T.; Nichol, R. C.; Oliver, S.; Parkinson, H.; Penny, S.; Phillipps, S.; Pimbblet, K. A.; Ponman, T.; Popescu, C. C.; Prescott, M.; Proctor, R.; Sadler, E. M.; Sansom, A. E.; Seibert, M.; Staveley-Smith, L.; Sutherland, W.; Taylor, E.; Van Waerbeke, L.; Vázquez-Mata, J. A.; Warren, S.; Wijesinghe, D. B.; Wild, V.; Wilkins, S.

    2013-04-01

    The Galaxy And Mass Assembly (GAMA) survey is a multiwavelength photometric and spectroscopic survey, using the AAOmega spectrograph on the Anglo-Australian Telescope to obtain spectra for up to ˜300 000 galaxies over 280 deg2, to a limiting magnitude of rpet < 19.8 mag. The target galaxies are distributed over 0 < z ≲ 0.5 with a median redshift of z ≈ 0.2, although the redshift distribution includes a small number of systems, primarily quasars, at higher redshifts, up to and beyond z = 1. The redshift accuracy ranges from σv ≈ 50 km s-1 to σv ≈ 100 km s-1 depending on the signal-to-noise ratio of the spectrum. Here we describe the GAMA spectroscopic reduction and analysis pipeline. We present the steps involved in taking the raw two-dimensional spectroscopic images through to flux-calibrated one-dimensional spectra. The resulting GAMA spectra cover an observed wavelength range of 3750 ≲ λ ≲ 8850 Å at a resolution of R ≈ 1300. The final flux calibration is typically accurate to 10-20 per cent, although the reliability is worse at the extreme wavelength ends, and poorer in the blue than the red. We present details of the measurement of emission and absorption features in the GAMA spectra. These measurements are characterized through a variety of quality control analyses detailing the robustness and reliability of the measurements. We illustrate the quality of the measurements with a brief exploration of elementary emission line properties of the galaxies in the GAMA sample. We demonstrate the luminosity dependence of the Balmer decrement, consistent with previously published results, and explore further how Balmer decrement varies with galaxy mass and redshift. We also investigate the mass and redshift dependencies of the [N II]/Hα versus [O III]/Hβ spectral diagnostic diagram, commonly used to discriminate between star forming and nuclear activity in galaxies.

  7. Spectroscopic detection

    DOEpatents

    Woskov, Paul P.; Hadidi, Kamal

    2003-01-01

    In embodiments, spectroscopic monitor monitors modulated light signals to detect low levels of contaminants and other compounds in the presence of background interference. The monitor uses a spectrometer that includes a transmissive modulator capable of causing different frequency ranges to move onto and off of the detector. The different ranges can include those with the desired signal and those selected to subtract background contributions from those with the desired signal. Embodiments of the system are particularly useful for monitoring metal concentrations in combustion effluent.

  8. Soliton absorption spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Kalashnikov, V. L.; Sorokin, E.

    2010-01-01

    We analyze optical soliton propagation in the presence of weak absorption lines with much narrower linewidths as compared to the soliton spectrum width using the novel perturbation analysis technique based on an integral representation in the spectral domain. The stable soliton acquires spectral modulation that follows the associated index of refraction of the absorber. The model can be applied to ordinary soliton propagation and to an absorber inside a passively modelocked laser. In the latter case, a comparison with water vapor absorption in a femtosecond Cr:ZnSe laser yields a very good agreement with experiment. Compared to the conventional absorption measurement in a cell of the same length, the signal is increased by an order of magnitude. The obtained analytical expressions allow further improving of the sensitivity and spectroscopic accuracy making the soliton absorption spectroscopy a promising novel measurement technique. PMID:21151755

  9. Tables showing analyses of semiquantitative spectrometry and atomic-absorption spectrophotometry of rock samples collected in the Ugashik, Bristol Bay, and western part of the Karluk quadrangles, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wilson, Frederic H.; O'Leary, Richard M.

    1987-01-01

    The accompanying tables list chemical analyses of 337 rock samples that were collected in 1979, 1980, and 1981 in conjunction with geologic mapping in the Ugashik, Bristol Bay, and part of Karluk quadrangles. This work was conducted under the auspices of the Alaska Mineral Resource Assessment Program (AMRAP). This report is to accompany Wilson and O'Leary (1986) which inadvertently is missing most of the data tables listed here. Together the two reports contain the complete data from all samples collected for the Ugashik AMRAP.

  10. Atmospheric Absorption Parameters for Laser Propagation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    high-resolution, good photometric accuracy data for numerous bands in the 3-5 Am region, using the facility at Kitt Peak National Solar Observatory. The...L49-L52 (2001). 44. A. Castrillo, G. Gagliardi, G. Casa , and L. Gianfrani, "Combined interferometric and absorption-spectroscopic technique for...from FT visible solar absorption spectra and evaluation of spectroscopic databases," JQRST 82, 133-150 (2003). 53. D. Jacquemart, R.R. Gamache, and L.S

  11. Maps and tables showing data and analyses of semiquantitative emmission spectrometry and atomic-absorption spectrophotometry of rock samples, Ugashik, Bristol Bay, and part of Karluk quadrangles, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wilson, F.H.; O'Leary, R. M.

    1986-01-01

    The accompanying maps and tables show analytical data and data analyses from rock samples collected in conjunction with geologic mapping in the Ugashik, Bristol Bay and western Karluck quadrangles from 1979 through 1981. This work was conducted under the auspices of the Alaska Mineral Resource Assessment Program (AMRAP). A total of 337 samples were collected for analysis, primarily in areas of surficial alteration. The sample locations are shown on sheet 1: they are concentrated along the Pacific Ocean side of the area because the Bristol Bay lowlands part of the map is predominantly unconsolidated Quaternary deposits. Sample collection was by the following people, with their respective two letter identifying code shown in parentheses: W.H. Allaway (AY), J.E. Case (CE), D.P. Cox (CX), R.L. Detterman, (DT), T.G. Theodore (MK), F.H. Wilson (WS), and M.E. Yount (YB).

  12. Electronic absorption spectroscopic studies on charge-transfer interactions in a biologically important molecule: N, N'-dimethyl-4,4'-bipyridylium chloride (paraquat or methyl viologen) as an electron acceptor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murthy, A. S. N.; Bhardwaj, A. P.

    The charge-transfer spectra of N, N'-dimethyl-4,4'-bipyridylium chloride (paraquat, PQ 2+) with a wide range of electron donors has been investigated and the thermodynamic data determined. An estimate of the empirical energy parameters has been made using the spectroscopic and thermodynamic data, using Mulliken's theory.

  13. Resolving Spectral Lines with a Periscope-Type DVD Spectroscope

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wakabayashi, Fumitaka

    2008-01-01

    A new type of DVD spectroscope, the periscope type, is described and the numerical analysis of the observed emission and absorption spectra is demonstrated. A small and thin mirror is put inside and an eighth part of a DVD is used as a grating. Using this improved DVD spectroscope, one can observe and photograph visible spectra more easily and…

  14. Optical spectroscopic determination of human meniscus composition.

    PubMed

    Ala-Myllymäki, Juho; Honkanen, Juuso T J; Töyräs, Juha; Afara, Isaac O

    2016-02-01

    This study investigates the correlation between the composition of human meniscus and its absorption spectrum in the visible (VIS) and near infrared (NIR) spectral range. Meniscus samples (n = 24) were obtained from nonarthritic knees of human cadavers with no history of joint diseases. Specimens (n = 72) were obtained from three distinct sections of the meniscus, namely; anterior, center, posterior. Absorption spectra were acquired from each specimen in the VIS and NIR spectral range (400-1,100 nm). Following spectroscopic probing, the specimens were subjected to biochemical analyses to determine the matrix composition, that is water, hydroxyproline, and uronic acid contents. Multivariate analytical techniques, including principal component analysis (PCA) and partial least squares (PLS) regression, were then used to investigate the correlation between the matrix composition and it spectral response. Our results indicate that the optical absorption of meniscus matrix is related to its composition, and this relationship is optimal in the NIR spectral range (750-1,100 nm). High correlations (R(2) (uronic)  = 86.9%, R(2) (water)  = 83.8%, R(2) (hydroxyproline)  = 81.7%, p < 0.0001) were obtained between the spectral predicted and measured meniscus composition, thus suggesting that spectral data in the NIR range can be utilized for estimating the matrix composition of human meniscus. In conclusion, optical spectroscopy, particularly in the NIR spectral range, is a potential method for evaluating the composition of human meniscus. This presents a promising technique for rapid and nondestructive evaluation of meniscus integrity in real-time during arthroscopic surgery.

  15. The 1997 spectroscopic GEISA databank.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacquinet-Husson, N.; Arie, E.; Ballard, J.; Barbe, A.; Bjoraker, G.; Bonnet, B.; Brown, L. R.; Camy-Peyret, C.; Champion, J. P.; Chedin, A.; Chursin, A.; Clerbaux, C.; Duxbury, G.; Flaud, J.-M.; Fourrie, N.; Fayt, A.; Graner, G.; Gamache, R.; Goldman, A.; Golovko, V.; Guelachvili, G.; Hartmann, J. M.; Hilico, J. C.; Hillman, J.; Lefevre, G.; Lellouch, E.; Mikhailenko, S. N.; Naumenko, O. V.; Nemtchinov, V.; Newnham, D. A.; Nikitin, A.; Orphal, J.; Perrin, A.; Reuter, D. C.; Rinsland, C. P.; Rosenmann, L.; Rothman, L. S.; Scott, N. A.; Selby, J.; Sinitsa, L. N.; Sirota, J. M.; Smith, A. M.; Smith, K. M.; Tyuterev, V. G.; Tipping, R. H.; Urban, S.; Varanasi, P.; Weber, M.

    1999-05-01

    The current version GEISA-97 of the computer-accessible database system GEISA (Gestion et Etude des Informations Spectroscopiques Atmospheriques: Management and Study of Atmospheric Spectroscopic Information) is described. This catalogue contains 1,346,266 entries. These are the spectroscopic parameters required to describe adequately the individual spectral lines belonging to 42 molecules (96 isotopic species) and located between 0 and 22656 cm-1. The featured molecules are of interest in studies of the terrestrial as well as the other planetary atmospheres, especially those of the giant planets. GEISA-97 contains also a catalog of absorption cross-sections of molecules such as chlorofluorocarbons which exhibit unresolvable spectra. The modifications and improvements made to the earlier edition (GEISA-92) and the data management software are described.

  16. Spectroscopic properties of chlorophyll f.

    PubMed

    Li, Yaqiong; Cai, Zheng-Li; Chen, Min

    2013-09-26

    The absorption and fluorescence spectra of chlorophyll f (newly discovered in 2010) have been measured in acetone and methanol at different temperatures. The spectral analysis and assignment are compared with the spectra of chlorophyll a and d under the same experimental conditions. The spectroscopic properties of these chlorophylls have further been studied by the aid of density functional CAM-B3LYP and high-level symmetric adapted coupled-cluster configuration interaction calculations. The main Q and Soret bands and possible sidebands of chlorophylls have been determined. The photophysical properties of chlorophyll f are discussed.

  17. Spectroscopic Approaches for Phosphorus Speciation in Soils and other Environmental Systems

    SciTech Connect

    F Kizewski; A Morris; Y Liu; D Hesterberg

    2011-12-31

    In the past decades, environmental scientists have become increasingly involved in developing novel approaches for applying emerging spectroscopic techniques to complex environmental matrices. The objective of this review is to convey the most common chemical species of phosphorus reported for soils, sediments, model systems, and waste materials based on analyses by four spectroscopic techniques: X-ray absorption near-edge structure, nuclear magnetic resonance, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and Raman spectroscopy. Unique information is provided by each technique at a level of specificity that depends in part on matrix complexity. The X-ray absorption near-edge structure and nuclear magnetic resonance techniques reveal inorganic and organic P species in intact environmental matrices or in chemical extracts, whereas the Fourier transform infrared and Raman techniques can provide more specific bonding information about mineral or adsorbed P species in model analogs of matrix components. The most common P species in soils and sediments as indicated by spectroscopy are hydroxyapatite and octacalcium phosphate minerals, phosphate adsorbed on Fe- and Al-oxides, pyrophosphates and polyphosphates, phosphate mono- and di-esters, and phosphonates. Continued advancements in spectroscopic methods should improve speciation-based models of P mobilization and transformations in the environment.

  18. Studies of cavity enhanced absorption spectroscopy for weak absorption gas measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Liucheng; Duo, Liping; Gong, Deyu; Ma, Yanhua; Zhang, Zhiguo; Wang, Yuanhu; Zhou, Dongjian; Jin, Yuqi

    2017-01-01

    In order to determine the concentrations of trace amount metastable species in chemical lasers, an off-axis cavity enhanced absorption spectrometer for the detection of weak absorption gases has been built with a noise equivalent absorption sensitivity of 1.6x10-8 cm-1. The absorption spectrum of trace amount gaseous ammonia and water vapor was obtained with a spectral resolution of about 78 MHz. A multiple-line absorption spectroscopic method to determine the temperature of gaseous ammonia has been developed by use of multiple lines of ammonia molecule absorption spectrum.

  19. The HITRAN2012 molecular spectroscopic database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rothman, L. S.; Gordon, I. E.; Babikov, Y.; Barbe, A.; Chris Benner, D.; Bernath, P. F.; Birk, M.; Bizzocchi, L.; Boudon, V.; Brown, L. R.; Campargue, A.; Chance, K.; Cohen, E. A.; Coudert, L. H.; Devi, V. M.; Drouin, B. J.; Fayt, A.; Flaud, J.-M.; Gamache, R. R.; Harrison, J. J.; Hartmann, J.-M.; Hill, C.; Hodges, J. T.; Jacquemart, D.; Jolly, A.; Lamouroux, J.; Le Roy, R. J.; Li, G.; Long, D. A.; Lyulin, O. M.; Mackie, C. J.; Massie, S. T.; Mikhailenko, S.; Müller, H. S. P.; Naumenko, O. V.; Nikitin, A. V.; Orphal, J.; Perevalov, V.; Perrin, A.; Polovtseva, E. R.; Richard, C.; Smith, M. A. H.; Starikova, E.; Sung, K.; Tashkun, S.; Tennyson, J.; Toon, G. C.; Tyuterev, Vl. G.; Wagner, G.

    2013-11-01

    This paper describes the status of the 2012 edition of the HITRAN molecular spectroscopic compilation. The new edition replaces the previous HITRAN edition of 2008 and its updates during the intervening years. The HITRAN molecular absorption compilation is comprised of six major components structured into folders that are freely accessible on the internet. These folders consist of the traditional line-by-line spectroscopic parameters required for high-resolution radiative-transfer codes, infrared absorption cross-sections for molecules not yet amenable to representation in a line-by-line form, ultraviolet spectroscopic parameters, aerosol indices of refraction, collision-induced absorption data, and general tables such as partition sums that apply globally to the data. The new HITRAN is greatly extended in terms of accuracy, spectral coverage, additional absorption phenomena, and validity. Molecules and isotopologues have been added that address the issues of atmospheres beyond the Earth. Also discussed is a new initiative that casts HITRAN into a relational database format that offers many advantages over the long-standing sequential text-based structure that has existed since the initial release of HITRAN in the early 1970s.

  20. Determining uranium speciation in Fernald soils by molecular spectroscopic methods. FY 1993 progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, P.G.; Berg, J.M.; Crisholm-Brause, C.J.; Conradson, S.D.; Donohoe, R.J.; Morris, D.E.; Musgrave, J.A.; Tait, C.D.

    1994-07-01

    This progress report describes new experimental results and interpretations for data collected from October 1, 1992, through September 30, 1993, as part of the Characterization Task of the Uranium in Soils Integrated Demonstration of the Office of Technology Development, Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management of the US Department of Energy. X-ray absorption, optical luminescence, and Raman vibrational spectroscopies were used to determine uranium speciation in contaminated soils from the US DOE`s former uranium production facility at Fernald, Ohio. These analyses were carried out both before and after application of one of the various decontamination technologies being developed within the Integrated Demonstration. This year the program focused on characterization of the uranium speciation remaining in the soils after decontamination treatment. X-ray absorption and optical luminescence spectroscopic data were collected for approximately 40 Fernald soil samples, which were treated by one or more of the decontamination technologies.

  1. Absorption and luminescence spectroscopic analysis of tautomeric forms of protonatedN,N-dimethyl-N'-(1-nitro-9-acridinyl)-1,3-propanediamine (nitracrine) and its nitro isomers in poly(vinyl alcohol) films.

    PubMed

    Rak, J; Nowaczyk, K; Blazejowski, J; Kawski, A

    1991-03-01

    The electronic absorption, fluorescence, and phosphorescence excitation spectra, as well as the fluorescence and phosphorescence spectra, at either room or liquid nitrogen temperatures, were measured forN,N-dimethyl-N'-(1-nitro-9-acridinyl)-1,3-propanediamine and its three nitro isomers in acidified poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) film. The spectral characteristics obtained reveal the existence of the compounds studied in at least two structural forms. The results are interpreted in terms of the tautomeric phenomena which originate due to the migration of the hydrogen atom, which is bound to the nitrogen atom attached to the carbon atom (9), to the acridine ring nitrogen.

  2. The HITRAN 2008 Molecular Spectroscopic Database

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rothman, Laurence S.; Gordon, Iouli E.; Barbe, Alain; Benner, D. Chris; Bernath, Peter F.; Birk, Manfred; Boudon, V.; Brown, Linda R.; Campargue, Alain; Champion, J.-P.; Chance, Kelly V.; Coudert, L. H.; Sung, K.; Toth, R. A.

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes the status of the 2008 edition of the HITRAN molecular spectroscopic database. The new edition is the first official public release since the 2004 edition, although a number of crucial updates had been made available online since 2004. The HITRAN compilation consists of several components that serve as input for radiative-transfer calculation codes: individual line parameters for the microwave through visible spectra of molecules in the gas phase; absorption cross-sections for molecules having dense spectral features, i.e., spectra in which the individual lines are not resolved; individual line parameters and absorption cross sections for bands in the ultra-violet; refractive indices of aerosols, tables and files of general properties associated with the database; and database management software. The line-by-line portion of the database contains spectroscopic parameters for forty-two molecules including many of their isotopologues.

  3. Spectroscopic remote sensing for material identification, vegetation characterization, and mapping

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kokaly, Raymond F.; Lewis, Paul E.; Shen, Sylvia S.

    2012-01-01

    Identifying materials by measuring and analyzing their reflectance spectra has been an important procedure in analytical chemistry for decades. Airborne and space-based imaging spectrometers allow materials to be mapped across the landscape. With many existing airborne sensors and new satellite-borne sensors planned for the future, robust methods are needed to fully exploit the information content of hyperspectral remote sensing data. A method of identifying and mapping materials using spectral feature analyses of reflectance data in an expert-system framework called MICA (Material Identification and Characterization Algorithm) is described. MICA is a module of the PRISM (Processing Routines in IDL for Spectroscopic Measurements) software, available to the public from the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) at http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2011/1155/. The core concepts of MICA include continuum removal and linear regression to compare key diagnostic absorption features in reference laboratory/field spectra and the spectra being analyzed. The reference spectra, diagnostic features, and threshold constraints are defined within a user-developed MICA command file (MCF). Building on several decades of experience in mineral mapping, a broadly-applicable MCF was developed to detect a set of minerals frequently occurring on the Earth's surface and applied to map minerals in the country-wide coverage of the 2007 Afghanistan HyMap data set. MICA has also been applied to detect sub-pixel oil contamination in marshes impacted by the Deepwater Horizon incident by discriminating the C-H absorption features in oil residues from background vegetation. These two recent examples demonstrate the utility of a spectroscopic approach to remote sensing for identifying and mapping the distributions of materials in imaging spectrometer data.

  4. Spectroscopic (FT-IR, FT-Raman, UV absorption, 1H and 13C NMR) and theoretical (in B3LYP/6-311++G** level) studies on alkali metal salts of caffeic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Świsłocka, Renata

    The effect of some metals on the electronic system of benzoic and nicotinic acids has recently been investigated by IR, Raman and UV spectroscopy [1-3]. Benzoic and nicotinic acids are regarded model systems representing a wide group of aromatic ligands which are incorporated into enzymes. In this work the FT-IR (in solid state and in solution), FT-Raman, UV absorption and 1H and 13C NMR spectra of caffeic acid (3,4-dihydroxycinnamic acid) and its salts with lithium, sodium, potassium, rubidium and caesium were registered, assigned and analyzed. The effect of alkali metals on the electronic system of ligands was discussed. Studies of differences in the number and position of bands from the IR, Raman, UV absorption spectra and chemical shifts from NMR spectra allowed to conclude on the distribution of electronic charge in the molecules, the delocalization energy of π electrons and the reactivity of ligands in metal complexes. Optimized geometrical structures of studied compounds were calculated by B3LYP method using 6-311++G** basis set. Bond lengths, angles and dipole moments for the optimized structures of caffeic acid and lithium, sodium, potassium caffeinates were also calculated. The theoretical wavenumbers and intensities of IR spectra were obtained. The calculated parameters were compared to the experimental characteristics of investigated compounds. Microbial activity of studied compounds was tested against Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus and Proteus vulgaris.

  5. Picosecond flash spectroscopic studies on ultraviolet stabilizers and stabilized polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott, G. W.

    1982-01-01

    Spectroscopic and excited state decay kinetics are reported for monomeric and polymeric forms of ultraviolet stabilizers in the 2-(2'-hydroxyphenyl)-benzotriazole and 2-hydroxybenzophenone classes. For some of these molecules in various solvents at room temperature, (1) ground state absorption spectra, (2) emission spectra, (3) picosecond time-resolved transient absorption spectra, (4) ground state absorption recovery kinetics, (5) emission kinetics, and (6) transient absorption kinetics are reported. In the solid state at low temperatures, emission spectra and their temperature dependent kinetics up to approximately 200K as well as, in one case, the 12K excitation spectra of the observed dual emission are also reported.

  6. Analyzing Water's Optical Absorption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    A cooperative agreement between World Precision Instruments (WPI), Inc., and Stennis Space Center has led the UltraPath(TM) device, which provides a more efficient method for analyzing the optical absorption of water samples at sea. UltraPath is a unique, high-performance absorbance spectrophotometer with user-selectable light path lengths. It is an ideal tool for any study requiring precise and highly sensitive spectroscopic determination of analytes, either in the laboratory or the field. As a low-cost, rugged, and portable system capable of high- sensitivity measurements in widely divergent waters, UltraPath will help scientists examine the role that coastal ocean environments play in the global carbon cycle. UltraPath(TM) is a trademark of World Precision Instruments, Inc. LWCC(TM) is a trademark of World Precision Instruments, Inc.

  7. Thermodynamic Modeling of Poorly Complexing Metals in Concentrated Electrolyte Solutions: An X-Ray Absorption and UV-Vis Spectroscopic Study of Ni(II) in the NiCl2-MgCl2-H2O System

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ning; Brugger, Joël; Etschmann, Barbara; Ngothai, Yung; Zeng, Dewen

    2015-01-01

    Knowledge of the structure and speciation of aqueous Ni(II)-chloride complexes is important for understanding Ni behavior in hydrometallurgical extraction. The effect of concentration on the first-shell structure of Ni(II) in aqueous NiCl2 and NiCl2-MgCl2 solutions was investigated by Ni K edge X-ray absorption (XAS) and UV-Vis spectroscopy at ambient conditions. Both techniques show that no large structural change (e.g., transition from octahedral to tetrahedral-like configuration) occurs. Both methods confirm that the Ni(II) aqua ion (with six coordinated water molecules at RNi-O = 2.07(2) Å) is the dominant species over the whole NiCl2 concentration range. However, XANES, EXAFS and UV-Vis data show subtle changes at high salinity (> 2 mol∙kg-1 NiCl2), which are consistent with the formation of small amounts of the NiCl+ complex (up to 0.44(23) Cl at a Ni-Cl distance of 2.35(2) Å in 5.05 mol∙kg-1 NiCl2) in the pure NiCl2 solutions. At high Cl:Ni ratio in the NiCl2-MgCl2-H2O solutions, small amounts of [NiCl2]0 are also present. We developed a speciation-based mixed-solvent electrolyte (MSE) model to describe activity-composition relationships in NiCl2-MgCl2-H2O solutions, and at the same time predict Ni(II) speciation that is consistent with our XAS and UV-Vis data and with existing literature data up to the solubility limit, resolving a long-standing uncertainty about the role of chloride complexing in this system. PMID:25885410

  8. Optical absorption and NMR spectroscopic studies on paramagnetic neodymium(III) complexes with beta-diketone and heterocyclic amines. The environment effect on 4f-4f hypersensitive transitions.

    PubMed

    Ansari, A A; Irfanullah, M; Iftikhar, K

    2007-08-01

    The optical absorption spectra of [Nd(acac)3(H2O)2].H2O, [Nd(acac)3bpy] and [Nd(acac)3phen(H2O)2] (where acac=acetylacetone, bpy=2,2'-bipyridyl and phen=1,10-phenanthroline) complexes in the visible region, in a series of non-aqueous solvents (methanol, ethanol, isopropanol, chloroform, acetonitrile, pyridine, nitrobenzene and dimethylsulphoxide) have been analyzed. The transition 4G(5/2)<--4I(9/2) (Nd-VI) located near the middle of the visible region (17,500 cm(-1)) is hypersensitive. Its behavior is in sharp contrast to many other typically weak and consistently unvaried, normal 4f-4f transitions. The oscillator strength of this transition for the chelate as well as its adducts with phen and bpy in any of the solvent employed is larger than the oscillator strength of Nd3+ aqua-ion. It is most intense in pyridine for all the complexes studied and, therefore, pyridine is the most effective in promoting f-f spectral intensity. The band shape and oscillator strength of the hypersensitive transitions display pronounced changes as compared to Nd3+ aqua-ion. The band shapes of the hypersensitive transitions show remarkable changes on passing from aqueous solution to various non-aqueous solutions, which is the result of change in the environment about the Nd(III) ion in the various solutions and suggests change in the environment about the Nd(III) ion in the various solutions and suggests coordination of solvent molecule(s), in some cases. A comparative account of hypersensitivity in the present complexes with those of other adducts of Nd(beta-diketoenolate)3 with heterocyclic amines is discussed. The NMR signals of heterocyclic amines have been shifted to high fields while the resonances due to acetylacetone moiety have moved to low fields. The paramagnetic shift in the complexes is dipolar in nature.

  9. Thermodynamic modeling of poorly complexing metals in concentrated electrolyte solutions: an X-ray absorption and UV-Vis spectroscopic study of Ni(II) in the NiCl2-MgCl2-H2O system.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ning; Brugger, Joël; Etschmann, Barbara; Ngothai, Yung; Zeng, Dewen

    2015-01-01

    Knowledge of the structure and speciation of aqueous Ni(II)-chloride complexes is important for understanding Ni behavior in hydrometallurgical extraction. The effect of concentration on the first-shell structure of Ni(II) in aqueous NiCl2 and NiCl2-MgCl2 solutions was investigated by Ni K edge X-ray absorption (XAS) and UV-Vis spectroscopy at ambient conditions. Both techniques show that no large structural change (e.g., transition from octahedral to tetrahedral-like configuration) occurs. Both methods confirm that the Ni(II) aqua ion (with six coordinated water molecules at RNi-O = 2.07(2) Å) is the dominant species over the whole NiCl2 concentration range. However, XANES, EXAFS and UV-Vis data show subtle changes at high salinity (> 2 mol∙kg(-1) NiCl2), which are consistent with the formation of small amounts of the NiCl+ complex (up to 0.44(23) Cl at a Ni-Cl distance of 2.35(2) Å in 5.05 mol∙kg(-1) NiCl2) in the pure NiCl2 solutions. At high Cl:Ni ratio in the NiCl2-MgCl2-H2O solutions, small amounts of [NiCl2]0 are also present. We developed a speciation-based mixed-solvent electrolyte (MSE) model to describe activity-composition relationships in NiCl2-MgCl2-H2O solutions, and at the same time predict Ni(II) speciation that is consistent with our XAS and UV-Vis data and with existing literature data up to the solubility limit, resolving a long-standing uncertainty about the role of chloride complexing in this system.

  10. Spectroscopic and structural study of the newly synthesized heteroligand complex of copper with creatinine and urea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gangopadhyay, Debraj; Singh, Sachin Kumar; Sharma, Poornima; Mishra, Hirdyesh; Unnikrishnan, V. K.; Singh, Bachcha; Singh, Ranjan K.

    2016-02-01

    Study of copper complex of creatinine and urea is very important in life science and medicine. In this paper, spectroscopic and structural study of a newly synthesized heteroligand complex of copper with creatinine and urea has been discussed. Structural studies have been carried out using DFT calculations and spectroscopic analyses were carried out by FT-IR, Raman, UV-vis absorption and fluorescence techniques. The copper complex of creatinine and the heteroligand complex were found to have much increased water solubility as compared to pure creatinine. The analysis of FT-IR and Raman spectra helps to understand the coordination properties of the two ligands and to determine the probable structure of the heteroligand complex. The LIBS spectra of the heteroligand complex reveal that the complex is free from other metal impurities. UV-visible absorption spectra and the fluorescence emission spectra of the aqueous solution of Cu-Crn-urea heteroligand complex at different solute concentrations have been analyzed and the complex is found to be rigid and stable in its monomeric form at very low concentrations.

  11. Spectroscopic and structural study of the newly synthesized heteroligand complex of copper with creatinine and urea.

    PubMed

    Gangopadhyay, Debraj; Singh, Sachin Kumar; Sharma, Poornima; Mishra, Hirdyesh; Unnikrishnan, V K; Singh, Bachcha; Singh, Ranjan K

    2016-02-05

    Study of copper complex of creatinine and urea is very important in life science and medicine. In this paper, spectroscopic and structural study of a newly synthesized heteroligand complex of copper with creatinine and urea has been discussed. Structural studies have been carried out using DFT calculations and spectroscopic analyses were carried out by FT-IR, Raman, UV-vis absorption and fluorescence techniques. The copper complex of creatinine and the heteroligand complex were found to have much increased water solubility as compared to pure creatinine. The analysis of FT-IR and Raman spectra helps to understand the coordination properties of the two ligands and to determine the probable structure of the heteroligand complex. The LIBS spectra of the heteroligand complex reveal that the complex is free from other metal impurities. UV-visible absorption spectra and the fluorescence emission spectra of the aqueous solution of Cu-Crn-urea heteroligand complex at different solute concentrations have been analyzed and the complex is found to be rigid and stable in its monomeric form at very low concentrations.

  12. Spectroscopic properties of alexandrite crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Powell, Richard C.; Xi, Lin; Gang, Xu; Quarles, Gregory J.; Walling, John C.

    1985-09-01

    Details of the optical-spectroscopic properties of alexandrite (BeAl2O4:Cr3+) crystals were studied by different laser-spectroscopy techniques. The temperature dependences of the fluorescence lifetimes and widths of the zero-phonon lines were found to be quite different for Cr3+ ions in the mirror and inversion crystal-field sites. The results indicate that direct phonon-absorption processes dominate both thermal line broadening and lifetime quenching for ions in the mirror sites while phonon-scattering processes dominate the line broadening of inversion-site ions and leave their lifetime independent of temperature. Tunable-dye-laser site-selection methods were used to obtain the excitation spectra of the Cr3+ ions in inversion sites at low temperature and to identify six types of exchange-coupled pairs of Cr3+ ions in the lattice. Time-resolved site-selection spectroscopy was used to monitor the energy transfer between Cr3+ ions in mirror and inversion sites at both low and high temperature. Finally, high-power, picosecond pulse excitation was used to produce two-photon absorption, and the resulting emission spectrum was found to exhibit a new fluorescence band in the 400-nm spectral region.

  13. Applications of absorption spectroscopy using quantum cascade lasers.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lizhu; Tian, Guang; Li, Jingsong; Yu, Benli

    2014-01-01

    Infrared laser absorption spectroscopy (LAS) is a promising modern technique for sensing trace gases with high sensitivity, selectivity, and high time resolution. Mid-infrared quantum cascade lasers, operating in a pulsed or continuous wave mode, have potential as spectroscopic sources because of their narrow linewidths, single mode operation, tunability, high output power, reliability, low power consumption, and compactness. This paper reviews some important developments in modern laser absorption spectroscopy based on the use of quantum cascade laser (QCL) sources. Among the various laser spectroscopic methods, this review is focused on selected absorption spectroscopy applications of QCLs, with particular emphasis on molecular spectroscopy, industrial process control, combustion diagnostics, and medical breath analysis.

  14. PERITONEAL ABSORPTION

    PubMed Central

    Hahn, P. F.; Miller, L. L.; Robscheit-Robbins, F. S.; Bale, W. F.; Whipple, G. H.

    1944-01-01

    The absorption of red cells from the normal peritoneum of the dog can be demonstrated by means of red cells labeled with radio-iron incorporated in the hemoglobin of these red cells. Absorption in normal dogs runs from 20 to 100 per cent of the amount given within 24 hours. Dogs rendered anemic by bleeding absorb red cells a little less rapidly—ranging from 5 to 80 per cent of the injected red cells. Doubly depleted dogs (anemic and hypoproteinemic) absorb even less in the three experiments recorded. This peritoneal absorption varies widely in different dogs and even in the same dog at different times. We do not know the factors responsible for these variations but there is no question about active peritoneal absorption. The intact red cells pass readily from the peritoneal cavity into lymph spaces in diaphragm and other areas of the peritoneum. The red cells move along the lymphatics and through the lymph glands with little or no phagocytosis and eventually into the large veins through the thoracic ducts. PMID:19871404

  15. Nutrient absorption.

    PubMed

    Rubin, Deborah C

    2004-03-01

    Our understanding of nutrient absorption continues to grow, from the development of unique animal models and from studies in which cutting-edge molecular and cellular biologic approaches have been used to analyze the structure and function of relevant molecules. Studies of the molecular genetics of inherited disorders have also provided many new insights into these processes. A major advance in lipid absorption has been the cloning and characterization of several intestinal acyl CoA:monoacylglycerol acyltransferases; these may provide new targets for antiobesity drug therapy. Studies of intestinal cholesterol absorption and reverse cholesterol transport have encouraged the development of novel potential treatments for hyperlipidemia. Observations in genetically modified mice and in humans with mutations in glucose transporter 2 suggest the importance of a separate microsomal membrane transport pathway for glucose transport. The study of iron metabolism has advanced greatly with the identification of the hemochromatosis gene and the continued examination of the genetic regulation of iron absorptive pathways. Several human thiamine transporters have been identified, and their specific roles in different tissues are being explored.

  16. Infrared laser spectroscopic trace gas sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sigrist, Markus

    2016-04-01

    Chemical sensing and analyses of gas samples by laser spectroscopic methods are attractive owing to several advantages such as high sensitivity and specificity, large dynamic range, multi-component capability, and lack of pretreatment or preconcentration procedures. The preferred wavelength range comprises the fundamental molecular absorption range in the mid-infared between 3 and 15 μm, whereas the near-infrared range covers the (10-100 times weaker) higher harmonics and combination bands. The availability of near-infrared and, particularly, of broadly tunable mid-infrared sources like external cavity quantum cascade lasers (EC-QCLs), interband cascade lasers (ICLs), difference frequency generation (DFG), optical parametric oscillators (OPOs), recent developments of diode-pumped lead salt semiconductor lasers, of supercontinuum sources or of frequency combs have eased the implementation of laser-based sensing devices. Sensitive techniques for molecular absorption measurements include multipass absorption, various configurations of cavity-enhanced techniques such as cavity ringdown (CRD), or of photoacoustic spectroscopy (PAS) including quartz-enhanced (QEPAS) or cantilever-enhanced (CEPAS) techniques. The application requirements finally determine the optimum selection of laser source and detection scheme. In this tutorial talk I shall discuss the basic principles, present various experimental setups and illustrate the performance of selected systems for chemical sensing of selected key atmospheric species. Applications include an early example of continuous vehicle emission measurements with a mobile CO2-laser PAS system [1]. The fast analysis of C1-C4 alkanes at sub-ppm concentrations in gas mixtures is of great interest for the petrochemical industry and was recently achieved with a new type of mid-infrared diode-pumped piezoelectrically tuned lead salt vertical external cavity surface emitting laser (VECSEL) [2]. Another example concerns measurements on short

  17. LEAD SORPTION ON RUTHENIUM OXIDE: A MACROSCOPIC AND SPECTROSCOPIC STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The sorption and desorption of Pb on RuO2 xH2O were examined kinetically and thermodynamically via spectroscopic and macroscopic investigations. X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) was employed to determine the sorption mechanism with regard to identity of nearest atomic neighbo...

  18. Arsenate Adsorption On Ruthenium Oxides: A Spectroscopic And Kinetic Investigation

    EPA Science Inventory

    Arsenate adsorption on amorphous (RuO2•1.1H2O) and crystalline (RuO2) ruthenium oxides was evaluated using spectroscopic and kinetic methods to elucidate the adsorption mechanism. Extended X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (EXAFS) was ...

  19. Super-resolution spectroscopic microscopy via photon localization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Biqin; Almassalha, Luay; Urban, Ben E.; Nguyen, The-Quyen; Khuon, Satya; Chew, Teng-Leong; Backman, Vadim; Sun, Cheng; Zhang, Hao F.

    2016-07-01

    Traditional photon localization microscopy analyses only the spatial distributions of photons emitted by individual molecules to reconstruct super-resolution optical images. Unfortunately, however, the highly valuable spectroscopic information from these photons have been overlooked. Here we report a spectroscopic photon localization microscopy that is capable of capturing the inherent spectroscopic signatures of photons from individual stochastic radiation events. Spectroscopic photon localization microscopy achieved higher spatial resolution than traditional photon localization microscopy through spectral discrimination to identify the photons emitted from individual molecules. As a result, we resolved two fluorescent molecules, which were 15 nm apart, with the corresponding spatial resolution of 10 nm--a four-fold improvement over photon localization microscopy. Using spectroscopic photon localization microscopy, we further demonstrated simultaneous multi-colour super-resolution imaging of microtubules and mitochondria in COS-7 cells and showed that background autofluorescence can be identified through its distinct emission spectra.

  20. Super-resolution spectroscopic microscopy via photon localization.

    PubMed

    Dong, Biqin; Almassalha, Luay; Urban, Ben E; Nguyen, The-Quyen; Khuon, Satya; Chew, Teng-Leong; Backman, Vadim; Sun, Cheng; Zhang, Hao F

    2016-07-25

    Traditional photon localization microscopy analyses only the spatial distributions of photons emitted by individual molecules to reconstruct super-resolution optical images. Unfortunately, however, the highly valuable spectroscopic information from these photons have been overlooked. Here we report a spectroscopic photon localization microscopy that is capable of capturing the inherent spectroscopic signatures of photons from individual stochastic radiation events. Spectroscopic photon localization microscopy achieved higher spatial resolution than traditional photon localization microscopy through spectral discrimination to identify the photons emitted from individual molecules. As a result, we resolved two fluorescent molecules, which were 15 nm apart, with the corresponding spatial resolution of 10 nm-a four-fold improvement over photon localization microscopy. Using spectroscopic photon localization microscopy, we further demonstrated simultaneous multi-colour super-resolution imaging of microtubules and mitochondria in COS-7 cells and showed that background autofluorescence can be identified through its distinct emission spectra.

  1. Super-resolution spectroscopic microscopy via photon localization

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Biqin; Almassalha, Luay; Urban, Ben E.; Nguyen, The-Quyen; Khuon, Satya; Chew, Teng-Leong; Backman, Vadim; Sun, Cheng; Zhang, Hao F.

    2016-01-01

    Traditional photon localization microscopy analyses only the spatial distributions of photons emitted by individual molecules to reconstruct super-resolution optical images. Unfortunately, however, the highly valuable spectroscopic information from these photons have been overlooked. Here we report a spectroscopic photon localization microscopy that is capable of capturing the inherent spectroscopic signatures of photons from individual stochastic radiation events. Spectroscopic photon localization microscopy achieved higher spatial resolution than traditional photon localization microscopy through spectral discrimination to identify the photons emitted from individual molecules. As a result, we resolved two fluorescent molecules, which were 15 nm apart, with the corresponding spatial resolution of 10 nm—a four-fold improvement over photon localization microscopy. Using spectroscopic photon localization microscopy, we further demonstrated simultaneous multi-colour super-resolution imaging of microtubules and mitochondria in COS-7 cells and showed that background autofluorescence can be identified through its distinct emission spectra. PMID:27452975

  2. Desirable evolutions of stellar spectroscopic services in the light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lançan, A.; Prugniel, P.; Powalka, M.; Vauglin, I.

    2016-12-01

    Recent and future surveys have improved the precision and the accuracy of photometric and spectroscopic observations of remote galaxies. By examining the difficulties encountered in the modelling of these stellar populations, we identify a few key requests to future libraries of stellar spectra and to the related spectroscopic services. Beside providing data access, future services should increasingly focus on the associated on-line and off-line tools required to model and analyse galaxy spectra.

  3. Blending Bragg scattering with optical absorption: spectroscopy without a spectroscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nozières, Philippe

    2006-03-01

    A double resonance method is proposed, blending resonant X-ray Bragg scattering with an optical laser that blurs the Bragg spots. One can detect the cross signal without resolving the satellite lines from the main beam, simply modulating the laser intensity at low frequency and carrying a synchronous detection. The concept is illustrated on two simple naive examples. To cite this article: Ph. Nozières, C. R. Physique 7 (2006).

  4. Raman Spectroscopic Analyses of Jaw Periosteal Cell Mineralization

    PubMed Central

    Brauchle, Eva; Carvajal Berrio, Daniel; Rieger, Melanie; Schenke-Layland, Katja; Reinert, Siegmar

    2017-01-01

    To achieve safer patient treatments, serum-free cell culture conditions have to be established for cell therapies. In previous studies, we demonstrated that serum-free culture favored the proliferation of MSCA-1+ osteoprogenitors derived from the jaw periosteum. In this study, the in vitro formation of bone-specific matrix by MSCA-1+ jaw periosteal cells (JPCs, 3 donors) was assessed and compared under serum-free and serum-containing media conditions using the marker-free Raman spectroscopy. Based on a standard fluorescence assay, JPCs from one patient were not able to mineralize under serum-containing culture conditions, whereas the other cells showed similar mineralization levels under both conditions. Raman spectra from mineralizing MSCA-1+ JPCs revealed higher levels of hydroxyapatite formation and higher mineral to matrix ratios under serum-free culture conditions. Higher carbonate to phosphate ratios and higher crystallinity in JPCs cultured under serum-containing conditions indicated immature bone formation. Due to reduced collagen production under serum-free conditions, we obtained significant differences in collagen maturity and proline to hydroxyproline ratios compared to serum-free conditions. We conclude that Raman spectroscopy is a useful tool for the assessment and noninvasive monitoring of in vitro mineralization of osteoprogenitor cells. Further studies should extend this knowledge and improve JPC mineralization by optimizing culture conditions. PMID:28232849

  5. Interactions of thioflavin T with serum albumins: Spectroscopic analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sen, Priyankar; Fatima, Sadaf; Ahmad, Basir; Khan, Rizwan Hasan

    2009-09-01

    The interaction of thioflavin T (ThT) with serum albumins from four different mammalian species i.e. human, bovine, porcine and rabbit, has been investigated by circular dichroism (CD), fluorescence spectroscopy and ITC. The binding constant ( K) for HSA was found to be 9.9 × 10 4 M -1, 4.3 × 10 4 M -1 for RSA, 1.07 × 10 4 M -1 for PSA and 0.3 × 10 4 M -1 for BSA and the number of binding sites ( n) were 1.14, 1.06, 0.94 and 0.8, respectively, which is very significant. By using unfolding pathway of HSA in the presence of urea, domain II of HSA has been assigned to possess binding site of ThT. Its binding constant is comparable to many drugs that bind at domain II of HSA, like salicylate, warfarin, digitoxin, etc. Acting force between HSA and ThT is showing that both hydrophobic and electrostatic forces have contributed for the interaction. Δ Gbinding, Δ H and Δ S were calculated to be -28.46 kJ mol -1, -3.50 kJ mol -1 and 81.04 J K -1 mol -1, respectively. The data described here will help to increase our understanding about the interaction of ThT with native proteins. The results also indicate that care must be taken while using ThT as a probe for detecting amyloid fibrils.

  6. Spectroscopic analyses of pollutants in water, sediment and fish

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdel-Gawad, Fagr Kh.; Ibrahim, Hanan S.; Ammar, Nabila S.; Ibrahim, Medhat

    2012-11-01

    Water ways in Egypt is suffering from continual discharge without adequate treatment especially in the Delta and greater Cairo area. Accordingly water, sediments and catfishes were collected from El Mouheet El Youmna drain in Giza. Cd, Cr, Pb and Zn were determined furthermore the molecular structure of sediment and catfish were conducted with FTIR spectroscopy. Although studied metals were lower in water, higher values are recorded in sediment and catfish samples. FTIR shows possible interaction among metals and organic structures mainly proteins. The bioaccumulation of Pb and Cd proportion was significantly increased in the liver tissues of catfish. A correlation coefficient among sediment and fish liver metals accumulation exist. This infers that the waste assimilation capacity for the drain is high, a phenomena that could be ascribed to dilution, sedimentation and continual water exchange. Furthermore, the genotoxicity affect in catfish genomic corroborates the genus diagnostic markers which attributed to long pollution. This is an indication that agriculture and industrial wastes discharged into the drain has badly a significant effect on the ecological balance.

  7. Raman Spectroscopic Analyses of Jaw Periosteal Cell Mineralization.

    PubMed

    Brauchle, Eva; Carvajal Berrio, Daniel; Rieger, Melanie; Schenke-Layland, Katja; Reinert, Siegmar; Alexander, Dorothea

    2017-01-01

    To achieve safer patient treatments, serum-free cell culture conditions have to be established for cell therapies. In previous studies, we demonstrated that serum-free culture favored the proliferation of MSCA-1(+) osteoprogenitors derived from the jaw periosteum. In this study, the in vitro formation of bone-specific matrix by MSCA-1(+) jaw periosteal cells (JPCs, 3 donors) was assessed and compared under serum-free and serum-containing media conditions using the marker-free Raman spectroscopy. Based on a standard fluorescence assay, JPCs from one patient were not able to mineralize under serum-containing culture conditions, whereas the other cells showed similar mineralization levels under both conditions. Raman spectra from mineralizing MSCA-1(+) JPCs revealed higher levels of hydroxyapatite formation and higher mineral to matrix ratios under serum-free culture conditions. Higher carbonate to phosphate ratios and higher crystallinity in JPCs cultured under serum-containing conditions indicated immature bone formation. Due to reduced collagen production under serum-free conditions, we obtained significant differences in collagen maturity and proline to hydroxyproline ratios compared to serum-free conditions. We conclude that Raman spectroscopy is a useful tool for the assessment and noninvasive monitoring of in vitro mineralization of osteoprogenitor cells. Further studies should extend this knowledge and improve JPC mineralization by optimizing culture conditions.

  8. Spectroscopic analyses of soil samples outside Nile Delta of Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fakhry, Ahmed; Osman, Osama; Ezzat, Hend; Ibrahim, Medhat

    2016-11-01

    Soil in Egypt, especially around Delta is exposed to various pollutants which are affecting adversely soil fertility and stability. Humic Acids (HA) as a main part of soil organic matter (SOM) represent the heart of the interaction process of inorganic pollutants with soil. Consequently, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and Nuclear magnetic resonances (NMR) were used to characterize soil, sediment and extracted HA. Resulting data confirmed that the HA was responsible for transporting inorganic pollutants from surface to subsurface reaching the ground water, which may represent a high risk on public health. The transport process is coming as carboxyl in surface soil changed into metal carboxylate then transferred into the carboxyl in bottom soil.

  9. Laser spectroscopic measurement of helium isotope ratios.

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, L.-B.; Mueller, P.; Holt, R. J.; Lu, Z.-T.; O'Connor, T. P.; Sano, Y.; Sturchio, N.; Univ. of Illinois; Univ. of Tokyo; Univ. of Illinois at Chicago

    2003-06-13

    A sensitive laser spectroscopic method has been applied to the quantitative determination of the isotope ratio of helium at the level of {sup 3}He/{sup 4}He = 10{sup -7}--10{sup -5}. The resonant absorption of 1083 nm laser light by the metastable {sup 3}He atoms in a discharge cell was measured with the frequency modulation saturation spectroscopy technique while the abundance of {sup 4}He was measured by a direct absorption technique. The results on three different samples extracted from the atmosphere and commercial helium gas were in good agreement with values obtained with mass spectrometry. The achieved 3{sigma} detection limit of {sup 3}He in helium is 4 x 10{sup -9}. This demonstration required a 200 {mu}L STP sample of He. The sensitivity can be further improved, and the required sample size reduced, by several orders of magnitude with the addition of cavity enhanced spectroscopy.

  10. Spectroscopically Accurate Line Lists for Application in Sulphur Chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Underwood, D. S.; Azzam, A. A. A.; Yurchenko, S. N.; Tennyson, J.

    2013-09-01

    Monitoring sulphur chemistry is thought to be of great importance for exoplanets. Doing this requires detailed knowledge of the spectroscopic properties of sulphur containing molecules such as hydrogen sulphide (H2S) [1], sulphur dioxide (SO2), and sulphur trioxide (SO3). Each of these molecules can be found in terrestrial environments, produced in volcano emissions on Earth, and analysis of their spectroscopic data can prove useful to the characterisation of exoplanets, as well as the study of planets in our own solar system, with both having a possible presence on Venus. A complete, high temperature list of line positions and intensities for H32 2 S is presented. The DVR3D program suite is used to calculate the bound ro-vibration energy levels, wavefunctions, and dipole transition intensities using Radau coordinates. The calculations are based on a newly determined, spectroscopically refined potential energy surface (PES) and a new, high accuracy, ab initio dipole moment surface (DMS). Tests show that the PES enables us to calculate the line positions accurately and the DMS gives satisfactory results for line intensities. Comparisons with experiment as well as with previous theoretical spectra will be presented. The results of this study will form an important addition to the databases which are considered as sources of information for space applications; especially, in analysing the spectra of extrasolar planets, and remote sensing studies for Venus and Earth, as well as laboratory investigations and pollution studies. An ab initio line list for SO3 was previously computed using the variational nuclear motion program TROVE [2], and was suitable for modelling room temperature SO3 spectra. The calculations considered transitions in the region of 0-4000 cm-1 with rotational states up to J = 85, and includes 174,674,257 transitions. A list of 10,878 experimental transitions had relative intensities placed on an absolute scale, and were provided in a form suitable

  11. Sociopolitical Analyses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Galen, Jane, Ed.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    This theme issue of the serial "Educational Foundations" contains four articles devoted to the topic of "Sociopolitical Analyses." In "An Interview with Peter L. McLaren," Mary Leach presented the views of Peter L. McLaren on topics of local and national discourses, values, and the politics of difference. Landon E.…

  12. ABSORPTION ANALYZER

    DOEpatents

    Brooksbank, W.A. Jr.; Leddicotte, G.W.; Strain, J.E.; Hendon, H.H. Jr.

    1961-11-14

    A means was developed for continuously computing and indicating the isotopic assay of a process solution and for automatically controlling the process output of isotope separation equipment to provide a continuous output of the desired isotopic ratio. A counter tube is surrounded with a sample to be analyzed so that the tube is exactly in the center of the sample. A source of fast neutrons is provided and is spaced from the sample. The neutrons from the source are thermalized by causing them to pass through a neutron moderator, and the neutrons are allowed to diffuse radially through the sample to actuate the counter. A reference counter in a known sample of pure solvent is also actuated by the thermal neutrons from the neutron source. The number of neutrons which actuate the detectors is a function of a concentration of the elements in solution and their neutron absorption cross sections. The pulses produced by the detectors responsive to each neu tron passing therethrough are amplified and counted. The respective times required to accumulate a selected number of counts are measured by associated timing devices. The concentration of a particular element in solution may be determined by utilizing the following relation: T2/Ti = BCR, where B is a constant proportional to the absorption cross sections, T2 is the time of count collection for the unknown solution, Ti is the time of count collection for the pure solvent, R is the isotopic ratlo, and C is the molar concentration of the element to be determined. Knowing the slope constant B for any element and when the chemical concentration is known, the isotopic concentration may be readily determined, and conversely when the isotopic ratio is known, the chemical concentrations may be determined. (AEC)

  13. [Spectroscopic analysis of Er3+ in Er3+ /Yb3+ co-doped LiNbO3 crystal].

    PubMed

    Wang, Dun-Chun; Zhang, De-Long; Cui, Yu-Ming; Chen, Cai-He

    2005-12-01

    At room temperature, alpha-polarized absorption spectra of as-grown and annealed Er3+/Yb3+ co-doped, Z-cut LiNbO3 single crystals, grown by using Czochralski method, were measured in the wavelength range of 300-1 650 nm. The spectroscopic properties of Er3+ were analysed by using Judd-Ofelt theory. The experimental values of the electron transition strengths of several major transitions from the ground state to excited-state manifolds were evaluated from the measured integrated absorption coefficients of Er3+. The Judd-Ofelt parameters were determined by using least square method. According to the fitted Judd-Ofelt parameters, the spontaneous emission rates, the fluorescence branch ratios from the excited-state manifolds J to the lower-lying manifolds J', as well as the radiative lifetimes of the excited states were numerically calculated. In addition, Yb3+ co-doping and thermal anneal effects on the spectroscopic properties of Er3+ were also considered in this work.

  14. New Developments of Broadband Cavity Enhanced Spectroscopic Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walsh, A.; Zhao, D.; Linnartz, H.; Ubachs, W.

    2013-06-01

    In recent years, cavity enhanced spectroscopic techniques, such as cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS), cavity enhanced absorption spectroscopy (CEAS), and broadband cavity enhanced absorption spectroscopy (BBCEAS), have been widely employed as ultra-sensitive methods for the measurement of weak absorptions and in the real-time detection of trace species. In this contribution, we introduce two new cavity enhanced spectroscopic concepts: a) Optomechanical shutter modulated BBCEAS, a variant of BBCEAS capable of measuring optical absorption in pulsed systems with typically low duty cycles. In conventional BBCEAS applications, the latter substantially reduces the signal-to-noise ratio (S/N), consequently also reducing the detection sensitivity. To overcome this, we incorporate a fast optomechanical shutter as a time gate, modulating the detection scheme of BBCEAS and increasing the effective duty cycle reaches a value close to unity. This extends the applications of BBCEAS into pulsed samples and also in time-resolved studies. b) Cavity enhanced self-absorption spectroscopy (CESAS), a new spectroscopic concept capable of studying light emitting matter (plasma, flames, combustion samples) simultaneously in absorption and emission. In CESAS, a sample (plasma, flame or combustion source) is located in an optically stable cavity consisting of two high reflectivity mirrors, and here it acts both as light source and absorbing medium. A high detection sensitivity of weak absorption is reached without the need of an external light source, such as a laser or broadband lamp. The performance is illustrated by the first CESAS result on a supersonically expanding hydrocarbon plasma. We expect CESAS to become a generally applicable analytical tool for real time and in situ diagnostics. A. Walsh, D. Zhao, W. Ubachs, H. Linnartz, J. Phys. Chem. A, {dx.doi.org/10.1021/jp310392n}, in press, 2013. A. Walsh, D. Zhao, H. Linnartz Rev. Sci. Instrum. {84}(2), 021608 2013. A. Walsh, D. Zhao

  15. Spectroscopic Binary Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batten, A.; Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    Historically, spectroscopic binary stars were binary systems whose nature was discovered by the changing DOPPLER EFFECT or shift of the spectral lines of one or both of the component stars. The observed Doppler shift is a combination of that produced by the constant RADIAL VELOCITY (i.e. line-of-sight velocity) of the center of mass of the whole system, and the variable shift resulting from the o...

  16. Methane overtone absorption by intracavity laser spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Obrien, James J.

    1990-01-01

    Interpretation of planetary methane (CH4) visible-near IR spectra, used to develop models of planetary atmospheres, has been hampered by a lack of suitable laboratory spectroscopic data. The particular CH4 spectral bands are due to intrinsically weak, high overtone-combination transitions too complex for classical spectroscopic analysis. The traditional multipass cell approach to measuring spectra of weakly absorbing species is insufficiently sensitive to yield reliable results for some of the weakest CH4 absorption features and is difficult to apply at the temperatures of the planetary environments. A time modulated form of intracavity laser spectroscopy (ILS), has been shown to provide effective absorption pathlengths of 100 to 200 km with sample cells less than 1 m long. The optical physics governing this technique and the experimental parameters important for obtaining reliable, quantitative results are now well understood. Quantitative data for CH4 absorption obtained by ILS have been reported recently. Illustrative ILS data for CH4 absorption in the 619.7 nm and 681.9 nm bands are presented. New ILS facilities at UM-St. Louis will be used to measure CH4 absorption in the 700 to 1000 nm region under conditions appropriate to the planetary atmospheres.

  17. Reflective-tube absorption meter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaneveld, J. Ronald V.; Bartz, Robert; Kitchen, James C.

    1990-09-01

    The design and calibration of a proposed in situ spectral absorption meter is evaluated using a laboratory prototype. The design includes a silver coated (second-surface) glass tube, a tungsten light source (stabilized by means of optical feedback), a monochromator, and a solid state detector. The device measures the absorption coefficient plus a portion of the volume scattering function. Theoretical analyses and laboratory experiments which explore the magnitude and variation of the errors due to scattering and internal reflections are described. Similar analyses are performed on the Cary 1 18 Spectrophotometer to allow cross calibration. Algorithms to yield the abscrption coefficient and the zenith-sun diffuse attenuation coefficient are presented and evaluated. Simultaneous measurement of the beam attenuation or backscattering coefficient allows use of algoriThms with much narrower error bands. The various methods of obtaining absorption and diffuse attenuation values are compared. Procedures for using reverse osmosis filtration to produce a clean water calibration standard are described. An absorption spectrum for pure water is obtained. Development of the absorption meter is proceeding along two lines: 1) a two-wavelength side-by-side LED is being fabricated to allow an in situ chlorophyll a absorption meter to be constructed, and 2) scientific projects using a shipboard or laboratory flow.-through pumping system are being planned.

  18. Are your spectroscopic data being used?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordon, Iouli E.; Potterbusch, Megan R.; Bouquin, Daina; Erdmann, Christopher C.; Wilzewski, Jonas S.; Rothman, Laurence S.

    2016-09-01

    The issue of availability of data and their presentation in spectroscopic publications is discussed. Different current practices are critically reviewed from the point of view of potential users, government policies, and merit of success of the authors. Indeed, properly providing the data benefits not only users but also the authors of the spectroscopic research. We will show that this increases citations to the spectroscopy papers and visibility of the research groups. Examples based on the statistical analyses of the articles published in the Journal of Molecular Spectroscopy will be shown. We will discuss different methods including supplementary materials to the Journals, public-curated databases and also new tools that can be utilized by spectroscopists.

  19. Optical absorptions of polyfluorene transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Yvonne Y.; Sirringhaus, Henning

    2005-07-01

    Conjugated polymers are a promising class of materials for organic electronics. While the progress in device performance is impressive, the basics of charge transport still pose many open questions. Specifically, conduction at the comparatively rough polymer-polymer interface in an all-polymer field-effect transistor is expected to be different from a sharp interface with an inorganic dielectric, such as silicon dioxide. In this work, charge modulation spectroscopy (CMS) is used to study the optical absorptions in the presence of charges in situ in the transistor structure. This allows direct observation of the charge carriers in the operational device via their spectroscopic signature; the technique is by design very sensitive to the properties of the semiconductor-dielectric interface. The semiconducting copolymer poly( 9,9' -dioctyl-fluorene-co-bithiophene) (F8T2) is incorporated into a top-gate thin-film transistor structure with a polymer dielectric layer deposited by spin coating and inkjet-printed polymer electrodes. A prominent charge-induced absorption at 1.65eV is observed as well as a shoulder at 1.3eV and a tail extending toward the absorption edge. The bias dependence of the CMS signature confirms that intermixing of the polymer layers is minimal, as expected from the excellent transistor characteristics. Polarization-dependent CMS measurements on aligned transistors show that the main feature at 1.65eV is strongly polarized whereas the shoulder is unpolarized. This observation, as well as further experimental evidence, lead to the conclusion that while the main absorption is attributable to the intrinsic, polaronic absorption in F8T2, the shoulder is likely to originate from a defect state.

  20. Fine characterization of ITO layers by spectroscopic ellipsometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boher, Pierre; Defranoux, Christophe; Piel, Jean-Philippe; Stehle, Jean-Louis P.; Suzuki, Y.

    1996-08-01

    Indium tin oxide films (ITO) are characterized precisely by spectroscopic ellipsometry which determines not only the thickness of the layers but also the optical indices in a large spectral range. The quality of the ITO films is checked by the transparency of the layers in the visible range 0.4 to 0.6 micrometers . Indeed, target degradation is detected by the occurrence of an absorption band in this region. The electrical conductivity of the layer can also be deduced by the Drude model applied to the absorption in the infrared region. Moreover, spectroscopic ellipsometry can give all these information on all the surface of the panels, checking at the same time the homogeneity and the stability of the deposition process. Different experimental examples will be presented and discussed.

  1. Dissociative absorption: An empirically unique, clinically relevant, dissociative factor.

    PubMed

    Soffer-Dudek, Nirit; Lassri, Dana; Soffer-Dudek, Nir; Shahar, Golan

    2015-11-01

    Research of dissociative absorption has raised two questions: (a) Is absorption a unique dissociative factor within a three-factor structure, or a part of one general dissociative factor? Even when three factors are found, the specificity of the absorption factor is questionable. (b) Is absorption implicated in psychopathology? Although commonly viewed as "non-clinical" dissociation, absorption was recently hypothesized to be specifically associated with obsessive-compulsive symptoms. To address these questions, we conducted exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses on 679 undergraduates. Analyses supported the three-factor model, and a "purified" absorption scale was extracted from the original inclusive absorption factor. The purified scale predicted several psychopathology scales. As hypothesized, absorption was a stronger predictor of obsessive-compulsive symptoms than of general psychopathology. In addition, absorption was the only dissociative scale that longitudinally predicted obsessive-compulsive symptoms. We conclude that absorption is a unique and clinically relevant dissociative tendency that is particularly meaningful to obsessive-compulsive symptoms.

  2. Spectroscopic investigations of a novel tricyanofuran dye for nonlinear optics.

    PubMed

    Han, Likun; Jiang, Yadong; Li, Wei; Li, Yuanxun; Hao, Peng

    2008-11-01

    A novel tricyanofuran dye was synthesized and the dye-in-polymer films were fabricated by spin-coating process. The spectroscopic properties of the dye in the solutions and polymer films were investigated by the absorption spectra and fluorescence emission spectra. It is found that the absorption and fluorescence maxima are largely red-shifted along with the increase of the solvent polarity. And the low values of fluorescence quantum yield in higher polarity solvents suggest the presence of twisted intramolecular charge transfer states of the dye. Moreover, the second order polarizability value of the novel dye was estimated based on the quantum-mechanical two-level model.

  3. Spectroscopic observations of spatial and temporal variations on Venus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, A. T.; Young, L. G.; Woszczyk, A.

    1974-01-01

    Details of the Table Mountain spectroscopic patrol of Venus in September-October 1972 are given. The data indicate systematic variation over the disc, with more CO2 absorption near the terminator than at the limb, and slightly more in the southern than in the northern hemisphere. The semiregular four-day variation, reported to occur simultaneously over the disk at 8689 A by Young et al. (1973), is confirmed by observations of the 7820 A and 7883 A CO2 bands.

  4. Transition moment directions and selected spectroscopic properties of Ivabradine.

    PubMed

    Synak, A; Pikul, P; Bojarski, P; Nowakowska, J; Wiczk, W; Łukaszewicz, A; Kubicki, A A

    2013-01-15

    Based on the Kawski-Gryczynski method the value of angle β=38° between absorption and fluorescence transition moments of Ivabradine was determined. Such a high value of β is responsible for low emission anisotropy of Ivabradine in a rigid polyvinyl alcohol matrix and in anhydrous glycerol despite the elongated shape of the fluorophore. Selected steady-state and time-resolved spectroscopic results support the analysis.

  5. Transition moment directions and selected spectroscopic properties of Ivabradine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Synak, A.; Pikul, P.; Bojarski, P.; Nowakowska, J.; Wiczk, W.; Łukaszewicz, A.; Kubicki, A. A.

    2013-01-01

    Based on the Kawski-Gryczynski method the value of angle β = 38° between absorption and fluorescence transition moments of Ivabradine was determined. Such a high value of β is responsible for low emission anisotropy of Ivabradine in a rigid polyvinyl alcohol matrix and in anhydrous glycerol despite the elongated shape of the fluorophore. Selected steady-state and time-resolved spectroscopic results support the analysis.

  6. Evanescent-wave spectroscopic fiber optic pH sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egami, C.; Takeda, K.; Isai, M.; Ogita, M.

    1996-02-01

    We demonstrate a new type of fiber optic pH sensor, which is the application of evanescent-wave spectroscopic technique. A methyl red (MR)-doped-poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) film that coated as part of cladding does function as a pH sensor probe. In this system MR doped in PMMA is used as indicator dye for pH measurement. The absorption spectrum shift in wavelength of indicator dye enables us to get the pH value. The sensor probe is immersed in water solution containing a small proportion of acetic acid over the wide pH range of 5.0 to 7.0. The chemical interaction between MR in sensor probe and hydrogen ion in the water solution causes a change in the dipole moment of MR, that is, the absorption spectrum macroscopically. The evanescent-wave spectroscopic technique provides the measurement of the absorption spectrum shift over a broad range of visible wavelength. The result of experiment was that MR absorption spectrum shifted by 40 nm every increase of 1.0 in pH. The small change in the pH value can be sensed as a large wavelength shift of pH indicator absorption spectrum.

  7. INTEGRAL FIELD SPECTROSCOPY OF AGN ABSORPTION OUTFLOWS: MRK 509 AND IRAS F04250–5718

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Guilin; Arav, Nahum; Rupke, David S. N.

    2015-11-15

    Ultraviolet (UV) absorption lines provide abundant spectroscopic information enabling the probe of the physical conditions in active galactic nucleus (AGN) outflows, but the outflow radii (and the energetics consequently) can only be determined indirectly. We present the first direct test of these determinations using integral field unit (IFU) spectroscopy. We have conducted Gemini IFU mapping of the ionized gas nebulae surrounding two AGNs, whose outflow radii have been constrained by UV absorption line analyses. In Mrk 509, we find a quasi-spherical outflow with a radius of 1.2 kpc and a velocity of ∼290 km s{sup −1}, while IRAS F04250–5718 is driving a biconical outflow extending out to 2.9 kpc, with a velocity of ∼580 km s{sup −1} and an opening angle of ∼70°. The derived mass flow rate ∼5 and >1 M{sub ⊙} yr{sup −1}, respectively, and the kinetic luminosity ≳1 × 10{sup 41} erg s{sup −1} for both. Adopting the outflow radii and geometric parameters measured from IFU, absorption line analyses would yield mass flow rates and kinetic luminosities in agreement with the above results within a factor of ∼2. We conclude that the spatial locations, kinematics, and energetics revealed by this IFU emission-line study are consistent with pre-existing UV absorption line analyses, providing a long-awaited direct confirmation of the latter as an effective approach for characterizing outflow properties.

  8. Visible Spectroscopic Observation Of Asteroid 162173 (1999ju3) With The Gemini-s Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugita, Seiji; Kuroda, D.; Kameda, S.; Hasegawa, S.; Kamata, S.; Abe, M.; Ishiguro, M.; Takato, N.; Yoshikawa, M.

    2012-10-01

    Asteroid 162173 (1999JU3; hereafter JU3) is the target of the Hayabusa-2 mission. Its visible reflectance spectra have been observed a few times [1,2], and obtained spectra exhibit a wide variety of spectral patterns ranging from a spectra with absorption in the UV region (May 1999) to a flat spectrum with a faint broad absorption centered around 0.6 microns (September 2007) and that with UV absorption and strong broad absorption centered around 0.7 micron (July 2007). The apparent large spectral variation may be due to variegation on the asteroid surface. Such variegation would make a large influence on remote sensing strategy for Hayabusa-2 before its sampling operations. In order to better constraint the spectral properties of JU3, we conducted visible spectroscopic observations at the GEMINI-South observatory 8.1-m telescope with the GMOS instrument. We could obtain three different sets of data in June and July 2012. Although the JU3 rotation phases of two of the observation are close to each other, the other is about 120 degrees away from the two. Our preliminary analyses indicate that these three spectra are slightly reddish but generally flat across the observed wavelength range (0.47 - 0.89 microns). The observed flat spectra are most similar to the spectrum obtained in September 2007, which probably has the highest signal-to-noise ratio among the previous three spectra. This result suggests that material with a flat spectrum probably covers a dominant proportion of the JU3 surface and that the other two types of previously obtained spectra may not cover a very large fraction of the JU3 surface. [1] Binzel, R. P. et al. (2001) Icarus, 151, 139-149; [2] Vilas, F. (2008) AJ, 135, 1101-1105.

  9. New infrared spectroscopic database for bromine nitrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, Georg; Birk, Manfred

    2016-08-01

    Fourier transform infrared measurements of bromine nitrate have been performed in the spectral region 675-1400 cm-1 at 0.014 cm-1 spectral resolution. Absorption cross sections were derived from 38 spectra covering the temperature range from 203 to 296 K and air pressure range from 0 to 190 mbar. For line-by-line analysis, further spectra were recorded at 0.00094 cm-1 spectral resolution at 223 and 293 K. The sample was synthesized from ClONO2 and Br2. Band strengths of the bands ν3 around 803 cm-1 and ν2 around 1286 cm-1 were determined from three pure BrONO2 measurements at different temperatures and pressures. Number densities in the absorption cell were derived from pressure measurements of the purified sample taking into account small amounts of impurities determined spectroscopically. Resulting band strengths are Sν3 = 2.872(52) × 10-17 cm2 molec-1 cm-1 and Sν2 = 3.63(15) × 10-17 cm2 molec-1 cm-1. Absorption cross sections of all measurements were scaled to these band strengths. Further data reduction was achieved with an interpolation scheme based on two-dimensional polynomials in ln(pressure) and temperature. The database is well-suited for remote-sensing application and should reduce the atmospheric bromine nitrate error budget substantially.

  10. The Time Domain Spectroscopic Survey: Spectroscopic Variability Investigations Within SDSS-IV/eBOSS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, Paul J.; Anderson, Scott F.; Morganson, Eric; Eracleous, Michael; Shen, Yue; Brandt, W. Niel; Ruan, John J.; Schmidt, Sarah J.; Badenes, Carles; West, Andrew A.; Ju, Wenhua; Greene, Jenny E.; Tdss, Panstarrs-1, Sdss-Iv

    2015-01-01

    The Time Domain Spectroscopic Survey (TDSS) is an SDSS-IV subproject that began summer 2014 and will continue for 4-6 years. Besides its main program to obtain initial characterization spectra of about 220,000 optical variables selected from PanSTARRS-1, the TDSS includes 9 separate smaller programs to study spectroscopic variability. We describe each of these Few-Epoch Spectroscopy (FES) programs, which target objects with existing SDSS spectroscopy amongst classes of quasars and stars of particular astrophysical interest. These include, in approximate order of decreasing sample size: Broad Absorption Line Quasars (BALQSOs), the most photometrically variable ("HyperVariable") quasars, high S/N normal broad line quasars, quasars with double-peaked or very asymmetric broad emission line profiles, Hypervariable stars, active ultracool (late-M and L-type) dwarf stars with Halpha emission, dwarf carbon stars, white dwarf/M dwarf spectroscopic binaries with Halpha emission, and binary supermassive black hole candidates from MgII broad line velocity shift analysis. We summarize herein the unique and diverse astrophysical investigations facilitated by these TDSS FES programs.

  11. The GEISA Spectroscopic Database System in its latest Edition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacquinet-Husson, N.; Crépeau, L.; Capelle, V.; Scott, N. A.; Armante, R.; Chédin, A.

    2009-04-01

    GEISA (Gestion et Etude des Informations Spectroscopiques Atmosphériques: Management and Study of Spectroscopic Information)[1] is a computer-accessible spectroscopic database system, designed to facilitate accurate forward planetary radiative transfer calculations using a line-by-line and layer-by-layer approach. It was initiated in 1976. Currently, GEISA is involved in activities related to the assessment of the capabilities of IASI (Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer on board the METOP European satellite -http://earth-sciences.cnes.fr/IASI/)) through the GEISA/IASI database[2] derived from GEISA. Since the Metop (http://www.eumetsat.int) launch (October 19th 2006), GEISA/IASI is the reference spectroscopic database for the validation of the level-1 IASI data, using the 4A radiative transfer model[3] (4A/LMD http://ara.lmd.polytechnique.fr; 4A/OP co-developed by LMD and Noveltis with the support of CNES). Also, GEISA is involved in planetary research, i.e.: modelling of Titan's atmosphere, in the comparison with observations performed by Voyager: http://voyager.jpl.nasa.gov/, or by ground-based telescopes, and by the instruments on board the Cassini-Huygens mission: http://www.esa.int/SPECIALS/Cassini-Huygens/index.html. The updated 2008 edition of GEISA (GEISA-08), a system comprising three independent sub-databases devoted, respectively, to line transition parameters, infrared and ultraviolet/visible absorption cross-sections, microphysical and optical properties of atmospheric aerosols, will be described. Spectroscopic parameters quality requirement will be discussed in the context of comparisons between observed or simulated Earth's and other planetary atmosphere spectra. GEISA is implemented on the CNES/CNRS Ether Products and Services Centre WEB site (http://ether.ipsl.jussieu.fr), where all archived spectroscopic data can be handled through general and user friendly associated management software facilities. More than 350 researchers are

  12. Spectroscopic characterization of the Stentor photoreceptor.

    PubMed

    Walker, E B; Lee, T Y; Song, P S

    1979-09-20

    1. On the basis of chromatographic and spectroscopic (absorption, fluorescence and its polarization, fluorescence lifetime, circular dichroism) characterization of the Stentor photoreceptor (stentorin) for photophobic response, the photoreceptor chromophore released from mild acid hydrolysis has been identified as hypericin. 2. The native chromophore is apparently linked to a protein (65 K) containing Lys and several hydrophobic residues, which is soluble in acetone and n-pentane. The peptide-linked stentorin (I) chromophore exhibits circular dichroism in the visible region due to the induced optical activity provided by the peptide. 3. The sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of a 38% fraction of the sucrose density centrifugation has resolved stentorin II proteins having molecular weights of 13 000, 16 000, 65 000 and 130 000. These proteins, as well as the acetone-soluble peptide, have been spectroscopically characterized with particular emphasis on their primary photoreactivity as the photophobic receptor of Stentor coeruleus. 4. Irradiation of whole living Stentor in dilute buffer solutions induces a decrease in the pH of the medium. A strong dependence upon pH in the fluorescence spectra of both synthetic and native chromophores is also evident, showing a significant drop in the pKa of one or more hydroxyl groups in the excited state. A mechanism for the photophobic response, based on this lowering of the pKa as the primary photoprocess, has been discussed.

  13. Survey for z>3 damped Ly alpha absorption systems: the evolution of neutral gas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Storrie-Lombardi, L. J.; Wolfe, A. M.

    2000-01-01

    We have completed spectroscopic observations using LRIS on the Keck 1 telescope of 30 very high redshift quasars, 11 selected for the presence of damped Ly alpha absorption systems and 19 with redshifts z>3.5 not previously surveyed for absorption systems.

  14. Time-resolved and continuous wave spectroscopic imaging of biological media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Rubaiee, Mohammad

    Time-resolved and spectroscopic imaging approaches were developed and adapted and developed to detect and localize tumors in ex vivo breast tissue samples and tumorlike inhomogeneities breastlike phantoms. The experimental arrangement for time-sliced optical imaging used 120 fs, 1 kHz repetition-rate, 800 nm light pulses from a Ti:sapphire laser system for sample illumination and a 80 ps resolution ultrafast gated intensified camera system for recording 2-D time-sliced images. The spectroscopic imaging arrangement used 1225-1300 nm tunable output of a Cr: forsterite laser for sample illumination, a Fourier space gate to discriminate against multiple-scattered light and a near-infrared area camera to record 2-D images. Results of these direct time-resolved imaging measurements on thin (5 mm--10 mm) breast tissue specimens revealed that early-light images highlight cancerous regions of the specimens, while late arriving light accentuates the normal fibroglandular tissues. These differences are attributed to the difference in light scattering characteristics of normal and cancerous tissues. In direct spectroscopic imaging measurements, when light was tuned closer to the 1203 nm absorption resonance of adipose tissues, a marked enhancement in contrast between the images of adipose and fibro-glandular tissues was observed. A similar wavelength-dependent difference between normal and cancerous tissues was observed. These results correlate well with pathology and nuclear magnetic resonance based analyses of the samples, and indicate the diagnostic potential of optical imaging approaches. Detection and localization of targets in thick breast tissue specimens and phantoms was accomplished using independent component analysis (ICA) from information theory. The approach known as Optical Tomography using Independent Component Analysis (OPTICA) made use of multi-source probing of the samples, multi-detector transillumination signal acquisition, and analysis of resulting data

  15. Infrared Spectroscopic Imaging: The Next Generation

    PubMed Central

    Bhargava, Rohit

    2013-01-01

    Infrared (IR) spectroscopic imaging seemingly matured as a technology in the mid-2000s, with commercially successful instrumentation and reports in numerous applications. Recent developments, however, have transformed our understanding of the recorded data, provided capability for new instrumentation, and greatly enhanced the ability to extract more useful information in less time. These developments are summarized here in three broad areas— data recording, interpretation of recorded data, and information extraction—and their critical review is employed to project emerging trends. Overall, the convergence of selected components from hardware, theory, algorithms, and applications is one trend. Instead of similar, general-purpose instrumentation, another trend is likely to be diverse and application-targeted designs of instrumentation driven by emerging component technologies. The recent renaissance in both fundamental science and instrumentation will likely spur investigations at the confluence of conventional spectroscopic analyses and optical physics for improved data interpretation. While chemometrics has dominated data processing, a trend will likely lie in the development of signal processing algorithms to optimally extract spectral and spatial information prior to conventional chemometric analyses. Finally, the sum of these recent advances is likely to provide unprecedented capability in measurement and scientific insight, which will present new opportunities for the applied spectroscopist. PMID:23031693

  16. Quasar Absorption Lines and SDSS Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shoemaker, Emileigh Suzanne; Scott, Jennifer E.; Oldak, Katarzyna

    2017-01-01

    We present the results of a study of the sightlines of 45 low redshift quasars (0.06 < z < 0.85) observed with HST/COS that lie within the footprint of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. We use both the SDSS DR12 galaxy photometric data, including photometric redshifts, and the measured properties of the absorbers along with the known absorption characteristics of the intergalactic medium and the circumgalactic medium of galaxies to assign the most probable galaxy matches for each absorber in the sample, using estimated galaxy luminosities and virial radii as a discriminator. We show that the scheme can recover known galaxy-absorber matches found from spectroscopic data and thus provides a method for identifying likely pairs in photometric data sets as well as targets for spectroscopic follow up.

  17. Spectroscopic classification of supernova candidates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodgkin, S. T.; Hall, A.; Fraser, M.; Campbell, H.; Wyrzykowski, L.; Kostrzewa-Rutkowska, Z.; Pietro, N.

    2014-09-01

    We report the spectroscopic classification of four supernovae at the 2.5m Isaac Newton Telescope on La Palma, using the Intermediate Dispersion Spectrograph and the R300V grating (3500-8000 Ang; ~6 Ang resolution).

  18. Spectroscopic optical coherence elastography.

    PubMed

    Adie, Steven G; Liang, Xing; Kennedy, Brendan F; John, Renu; Sampson, David D; Boppart, Stephen A

    2010-12-06

    We present an optical technique to image the frequency-dependent complex mechanical response of a viscoelastic sample. Three-dimensional hyperspectral data, comprising two-dimensional B-mode images and a third dimension corresponding to vibration frequency, were acquired from samples undergoing external mechanical excitation in the audio-frequency range. We describe the optical coherence tomography (OCT) signal when vibration is applied to a sample and detail the processing and acquisition techniques used to extract the local complex mechanical response from three-dimensional data that, due to a wide range of vibration frequencies, possess a wide range of sample velocities. We demonstrate frequency-dependent contrast of the displacement amplitude and phase of a silicone phantom containing inclusions of higher stiffness. Measurements of an ex vivo tumor margin demonstrate distinct spectra between adipose and tumor regions, and images of displacement amplitude and phase demonstrated spatially-resolved contrast. Contrast was also observed in displacement amplitude and phase images of a rat muscle sample. These results represent the first demonstration of mechanical spectroscopy based on B-mode OCT imaging. Spectroscopic optical coherence elastography (S-OCE) provides a high-resolution imaging capability for the detection of tissue pathologies that are characterized by a frequency-dependent viscoelastic response.

  19. Spectroscopic Detection of Pathogens

    SciTech Connect

    ALAM,M. KATHLEEN; TIMLIN,JERILYN A.; MARTIN,LAURA E.; HJELLE,DRIAN; LYONS,RICK; GARRISON,KRISTIN

    2000-11-01

    The goal of this LDRD Research project was to provide a preliminary examination of the use of infrared spectroscopy as a tool to detect the changes in cell cultures upon activation by an infectious agent. Due to a late arrival of funding, only 5 months were available to transfer and setup equipment at UTTM,develop cell culture lines, test methods of in-situ activation and collect kinetic data from activated cells. Using attenuated total reflectance (ATR) as a sampling method, live cell cultures were examined prior to and after activation. Spectroscopic data were collected from cells immediately after activation in situ and, in many cases for five successive hours. Additional data were collected from cells activated within a test tube (pre-activated), in both transmission mode as well as in ATR mode. Changes in the infrared data were apparent in the transmission data collected from the pre-activated cells as well in some of the pre-activated ATR data. Changes in the in-situ activated spectral data were only occasionally present due to (1) the limited time cells were studied and (2) incomplete activation. Comparison of preliminary data to infrared bands reported in the literature suggests the primary changes seen are due an increase in ribonucleic acid (RNA) production. This work will be continued as part of a 3 year DARPA grant.

  20. Probing CuI in Homogeneous Catalysis using High-Energy-Resolution Fluorescence-Detected X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Walroth, Richard C.; Uebler, Jacob W. H.

    2015-01-01

    Metal-to-ligand charge transfer excitations in CuI X-ray absorption spectra are introduced as spectroscopic handles for the characterization of species in homogeneous catalytic reaction mixtures. Analysis is supported by correlation of a spectral library to calculations and to complementary spectroscopic parameters. PMID:25994112

  1. Quantum Entanglement Molecular Absorption Spectrum Simulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Quang-Viet; Kojima, Jun

    2006-01-01

    Quantum Entanglement Molecular Absorption Spectrum Simulator (QE-MASS) is a computer program for simulating two photon molecular-absorption spectroscopy using quantum-entangled photons. More specifically, QE-MASS simulates the molecular absorption of two quantum-entangled photons generated by the spontaneous parametric down-conversion (SPDC) of a fixed-frequency photon from a laser. The two-photon absorption process is modeled via a combination of rovibrational and electronic single-photon transitions, using a wave-function formalism. A two-photon absorption cross section as a function of the entanglement delay time between the two photons is computed, then subjected to a fast Fourier transform to produce an energy spectrum. The program then detects peaks in the Fourier spectrum and displays the energy levels of very short-lived intermediate quantum states (or virtual states) of the molecule. Such virtual states were only previously accessible using ultra-fast (femtosecond) laser systems. However, with the use of a single-frequency continuous wave laser to produce SPDC photons, and QEMASS program, these short-lived molecular states can now be studied using much simpler laser systems. QE-MASS can also show the dependence of the Fourier spectrum on the tuning range of the entanglement time of any externally introduced optical-path delay time. QE-MASS can be extended to any molecule for which an appropriate spectroscopic database is available. It is a means of performing an a priori parametric analysis of entangled photon spectroscopy for development and implementation of emerging quantum-spectroscopic sensing techniques. QE-MASS is currently implemented using the Mathcad software package.

  2. Fabrication of multi-layered absorption structure for high quantum efficiency photon detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Fujii, Go; Fukuda, Daiji; Numata, Takayuki; Yoshizawa, Akio; Tsuchida, Hidemi; Fujino, Hidetoshi; Ishii, Hiroyuki; Itatani, Taro; Zama, Tatsuya; Inoue, Shuichiro

    2009-12-16

    We report on some efforts to improve a quantum efficiency of titanium-based optical superconducting transition edge sensors using the multi-layered absorption structure for maximizing photon absorption in the Ti layer. Using complex refractive index values of each film measured by a Spectroscopic Ellipsometry, we designed and optimized by a simulation code. An absorption measurement of fabricated structure was in good agreement with the design and was higher than 99% at optimized wavelength of 1550 nm.

  3. Enhancing forensic science with spectroscopic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ricci, Camilla; Kazarian, Sergei G.

    2006-09-01

    This presentation outlines the research we are developing in the area of Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopic imaging with the focus on materials of forensic interest. FTIR spectroscopic imaging has recently emerged as a powerful tool for characterisation of heterogeneous materials. FTIR imaging relies on the ability of the military-developed infrared array detector to simultaneously measure spectra from thousands of different locations in a sample. Recently developed application of FTIR imaging using an ATR (Attenuated Total Reflection) mode has demonstrated the ability of this method to achieve spatial resolution beyond the diffraction limit of infrared light in air. Chemical visualisation with enhanced spatial resolution in micro-ATR mode broadens the range of materials studied with FTIR imaging with applications to pharmaceutical formulations or biological samples. Macro-ATR imaging has also been developed for chemical imaging analysis of large surface area samples and was applied to analyse the surface of human skin (e.g. finger), counterfeit tablets, textile materials (clothing), etc. This approach demonstrated the ability of this imaging method to detect trace materials attached to the surface of the skin. This may also prove as a valuable tool in detection of traces of explosives left or trapped on the surfaces of different materials. This FTIR imaging method is substantially superior to many of the other imaging methods due to inherent chemical specificity of infrared spectroscopy and fast acquisition times of this technique. Our preliminary data demonstrated that this methodology will provide the means to non-destructive detection method that could relate evidence to its source. This will be important in a wider crime prevention programme. In summary, intrinsic chemical specificity and enhanced visualising capability of FTIR spectroscopic imaging open a window of opportunities for counter-terrorism and crime-fighting, with applications ranging

  4. EVIDENCE FOR PHOTOIONIZATION-DRIVEN BROAD ABSORPTION LINE VARIABILITY

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Tinggui; Yang, Chenwei; Wang, Huiyuan; Ferland, Gary

    2015-12-01

    We present a qualitative analysis of the variability of quasar broad absorption lines using the large multi-epoch spectroscopic data set of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 10. We confirm that variations of absorption lines are highly coordinated among different components of the same ion or the same absorption component of different ions for C iv, Si iv, and N v. Furthermore, we show that the equivalent widths (EWs) of the lines decrease or increase statistically when the continuum brightens or dims. This is further supported by the synchronized variations of emission and absorption-line EWs when the well-established intrinsic Baldwin effect for emission lines is taken into account. We find that the emergence of an absorption component is usually accompanied by the dimming of the continuum while the disappearance of an absorption-line component is accompanied by the brightening of the continuum. This suggests that the emergence or disappearance of a C iv absorption component is only the extreme case, when the ionic column density is very sensitive to continuum variations or the continuum variability the amplitude is larger. These results support the idea that absorption-line variability is driven mainly by changes in the gas ionization in response to continuum variations, that the line-absorbing gas is highly ionized, and in some extreme cases, too highly ionized to be detected in UV absorption lines. Due to uncertainties in the spectroscopic flux calibration, we cannot quantify the fraction of quasars with asynchronized continuum and absorption-line variations.

  5. Spectroscopic properties of fluorescein and rhodamine dyes attached to DNA.

    PubMed

    Delgadillo, Roberto F; Parkhurst, Lawrence J

    2010-01-01

    We report the spectroscopic properties of fluorescein, x-rhodamine, tetramethyl-rhodamine, attached to single strand, duplex DNA, and to the digestion products by DNAse I. The properties reported include: molar absorptivity, quantum yield, absorbance and fluorescence spectra, fluorescence lifetime, intrinsic lifetime (tau0), static quenching (S) and the Förster critical distances (R0) between fluorescein and x-rhodamine or tetramethyl-rhodamine (acceptors). These spectroscopic properties depend strongly on the local dye environment. Fluorescein was studied: (1) attached to biotin (BF), (2) BF bound to avidin; and attached to two positions in DNA. X-rhodamine and tetramethyl-rhodamine were studied as free dyes and attached at the 5'-end of DNA. We propose a general method to determine the molar absorptivity and tau0 of a dye attached to DNA based on the reaction of a biotinylated and dye-labeled oligomer with standardized avidin. The molar absorptivity of a second dye attached to a DNA duplex can be obtained by comparing spectra of doubly and singly labeled sequences. S, arising from dye-DNA interactions can then be determined. R0 for free and attached dyes showed differences from 1.1 to 4.2 A. We present evidence for the direct interaction of dyes attached to the termini of various single-stranded DNA sequences.

  6. Spectroscopic and photochemical properties of open-chain carotenoids.

    SciTech Connect

    Frank, H. A.; Josue, J. S.; Bautista, J. A.; van der Hoef, I.; Jansen, F. J.; Lugtenburg, J.; Wiederrecht, G.; Christensen, R. L.; Chemistry; Univ. of Connecticut; Leiden Univ.; Bowdoin College

    2002-02-28

    The spectroscopic properties of open-chain, all-trans-C{sub 30} carotenoids having seven, eight and nine {pi}-electron conjugated carbon-carbon double bonds were studied using steady-state absorption, fluorescence, fluorescence excitation and time-resolved absorption spectroscopy. These diapocarotenes were purified by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) prior to the spectroscopic experiments. The fluorescence data show a systematic crossover from dominant S{sub 1} {yields} S{sub 0} (2{sup 1}Ag{yields} 1{sup 1}Ag) emission to dominant S{sub 2} {yields} S{sub 0} (1{sup 1}Bu {yields} 1{sup 1}Ag) with increasing extent of conjugation. The low temperatures facilitated the determination of the spectral origins of the S{sub 1} {yields} S{sub 0} (2{sup 1}Ag {yields} 1{sup 1}Ag) emissions, which were assigned by Gaussian deconvolution of the experimental line shapes. The lifetimes of the S{sub 1} states of the molecules were measured by transient absorption spectroscopy and were found to decrease as the conjugated chain length increases. The energy gap law for radiationless transitions is used to correlate the S{sub 1} energies with the dynamics. These molecules provide a systematic series for understanding the structural features that control the photochemical properties of open-chain, diapocarotenoids. The implications of these results on the roles of carotenoids in photosynthetic organisms are discussed.

  7. MMT Survey for Intervening Mg II Absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nestor, Daniel B.; Turnshek, David A.; Rao, Sandhya M.

    2006-05-01

    We present the results from a spectroscopic survey for intervening Mg II absorption in the spectra of 381 background QSOs conducted at the MMT telescope. This survey complements our earlier SDSS EDR Mg II survey, extending our results to lower redshift (z~=0.15) and weaker Mg II λ2796 rest equivalent width (Wλ27960~=0.1 Å). We confirm two major results from that survey: the transition in the Wλ27960 distribution at Wλ27960~0.3 Å, and the Wλ27960-dependent evolution of the incidence of systems. The nature of ∂2N/∂z∂Wλ27960 is consistent with the idea that multiple physically distinct components/processes contribute to the incidence of Mg II absorption systems in a W0-dependent manner and evolve at different rates. A significant decrease in the total proper absorption cross section is detected in our MMT data for systems as weak as 1.0 Å<=Wλ27960<1.5 Å at z<~0.4. We discuss this W0-dependent evolution in the context of the evolution of galaxy structures, processes including superwinds and interactions, and damped-Lyα absorbers. We also consider the possibility that the observed redshift and Wλ27960 dependence of the incidence of absorption in spectroscopic surveys for low-ionization/neutral gas results from the effects of dust-induced extinction. Observations reported here were obtained at the MMT Observatory, a joint facility of the Smithsonian Institution and the University of Arizona.

  8. Atmospheric absorption cell characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1982-06-01

    The measurement capability of the Avionics Laboratory IR Facility was used to evaluate an absorption cell that will be used to simulate atmospheric absorption over horizontal paths of 1 - 10 km in length. Band models were used to characterize the transmittance of carbon dioxide (CO2), nitrogen (N2), and nitrous oxide (N2O) in the cell. The measured transmittance was compared to the calculated values. Nitrous oxide is important in the 4 - 4.5 micron range in shaping the weak line absorption of carbon dioxide. The absorption cell is adequate for simulating atmospheric absorption over these paths.

  9. Advanced laser stratospheric monitoring systems analyses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larsen, J. C.

    1984-01-01

    This report describes the software support supplied by Systems and Applied Sciences Corporation for the study of Advanced Laser Stratospheric Monitoring Systems Analyses under contract No. NAS1-15806. This report discusses improvements to the Langley spectroscopic data base, development of LHS instrument control software and data analyses and validation software. The effect of diurnal variations on the retrieved concentrations of NO, NO2 and C L O from a space and balloon borne measurement platform are discussed along with the selection of optimum IF channels for sensing stratospheric species from space.

  10. Spectroscopic properties of spheroidene analogs having different extents of {pi}-electron conjugation

    SciTech Connect

    Frank, H.A.; Desamero, R.Z.B.; Chynwat, V.; Gebhard, R.; Hoef, I. van der; Jansen, F.J.; Lugtenburg, J.; Gosztola, D.; Wasielewski, M.R. |

    1997-01-09

    Spectroscopic properties of spheroidene and a series of spheroidene analogs were studied using steady-state absorption, fluorescence, fluorescence excitation, and time-resolved absorption spectroscopy. A systematic series of molecules that control energy transfer to bacteriochlorophyll is provided. The molecules were purified by high-pressure liquid chromatographic techniques. Absorption spectra were observed to red-shift with increasing extent of {pi}-electron conjugation. The transient data of the energy gap law for radiationless transitions allow a prediction of the S{sub 1} energies of the molecules. The process of light harvesting by carotenoids in photosynthesis is discussed. 44 refs., 8 figs., 3 tabs.

  11. Structures, spectroscopic and thermodynamic properties of U₂On (n = 0 ∼ 2, 4) molecules: a density functional theory study.

    PubMed

    Li, Peng; Niu, Wen-Xia; Gao, Tao; Wang, Fan; Jia, Ting-Ting; Meng, Da-Qiao; Li, Gan

    2013-12-01

    The equilibrium structures, spectroscopic and thermodynamic parameters [entropy (S), internal energy (E), heat capacity (C p)] of U₂, U₂O, U₂O₂ and U₂O₄ uranium oxide molecules were investigated systematically using density functional theory (DFT). Our computations indicated that the ground electronic state of U₂ is the septet state and the equilibrium bond length is 2.194 Å; the ground electronic state of U₂O and U₂O₂ were found to be X³Φ and X³Σ(g) with stable C(∞v) and D(∞h) linear structures, respectively. The bridge-bonded structure with D(2h) symmetry and X³B₁(g) state is the most stable configuration for the U₂O₄ molecule. Mulliken population analyses show that U atoms always lose electrons to become the donor and O atoms always obtain electrons as the acceptor. Molecular orbital analyses demonstrated that the frontier orbitals of the title molecules were contributed mostly by 5f atomic orbitals of U atoms. Vibrational frequencies analyses indicate that the maximum absorption peaks stem from the stretching mode of U-O bonds in U₂O, U₂O₂ and U₂O₄. In addition, thermodynamic data of U₂O(n) (n = 0 ∼ 4) molecules at elevated temperatures of 293.0 K to 393.0 K was predicted.

  12. A DVD Spectroscope: A Simple, High-Resolution Classroom Spectroscope

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wakabayashi, Fumitaka; Hamada, Kiyohito

    2006-01-01

    Digital versatile disks (DVDs) have successfully made up an inexpensive but high-resolution spectroscope suitable for classroom experiments that can easily be made with common material and gives clear and fine spectra of various light sources and colored material. The observed spectra can be photographed with a digital camera, and such images can…

  13. Spectroscopic Investigation of Ce(3+) Doped Fluoride Crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reinhart, Donald H.; Armagan, Guzin; Marsh, Waverly; Barnes, James; Chai, B. H. T.

    1995-01-01

    Doping of the trivalent rare-earth cerium ion into fluoride crystals is of interest in producing turnable ultra-violet solid state lasers. These lasers are desirable for many applications in medicine, industry, and scientific research, including remote sensing. High absorption and stimulated emission cross sections of the dipole allowed 4f-5d transitions show promise in cerium as a laser ion in crystals. Several research groups have already reported the observation of stimulated emission of cerium in LiYF4, LiSrAlF6, and LiCaAlF6. However, the color center formation in the crystals due to the excited state absorption of ultra-violet pump light adds difficulty to achieving laser action. We have investigated the spectroscopic properties of cerium such as absorption and emission spectra, and lifetimes in four different fluoride crystals, including LiCaAlF6, LiSrAlF6, KyF4 and LiYF4. We have derived the polarized absorption and stimulated emission cross sections from transmission and fluorescence emission measurements for each of the host crystals. we have measured the lifetime of the lowest 5d level; moreover, investigated the temperature dependence of this lifetime and color center formation. Our results on absorption and stimulated emission cross sections for LiCaAlF6 and LiSrAlF6 are similar to the results already published.

  14. Raman spectroscopic biochemical mapping of tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stone, Nicholas; Hart Prieto, Maria C.; Kendall, Catherine A.; Shetty, Geeta; Barr, Hugh

    2006-02-01

    Advances in technologies have brought us closer to routine spectroscopic diagnosis of early malignant disease. However, there is still a poor understanding of the carcinogenesis process. For example it is not known whether many cancers follow a logical sequence from dysplasia, to carcinoma in situ, to invasion. Biochemical tissue changes, triggered by genetic mutations, precede morphological and structural changes. These can be probed using Raman or FTIR microspectroscopy and the spectra analysed for biochemical constituents. Local microscopic distribution of various constituents can then be visualised. Raman mapping has been performed on a number of tissues including oesophagus, breast, bladder and prostate. The biochemical constituents have been calculated at each point using basis spectra and least squares analysis. The residual of the least squares fit indicates any unfit spectral components. The biochemical distribution will be compared with the defined histopathological boundaries. The distribution of nucleic acids, glycogen, actin, collagen I, III, IV, lipids and others appear to follow expected patterns.

  15. Spectroscopic properties of vitamin E models in solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveira, L. B. A.; Colherinhas, G.; Fonseca, T. L.; Castro, M. A.

    2015-05-01

    We investigate the first absorption band and the 13C and 17O magnetic shieldings of vitamin E models in chloroform and in water using the S-MC/QM methodology in combination with the TD-DFT and GIAO approaches. The results show that the solvent effects on these spectroscopic properties are small but a proper description of the solvent shift for 17O magnetic shielding of the hydroxyl group in water requires the use of explicit solute-solvent hydrogen bonds. In addition, the effect of the replacement of hydrogen atoms by methyl groups in the vitamin E models only affects magnetic shieldings.

  16. Spectroscopic evidence for Davydov-like solitons in acetanilide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Careri, G.; Buontempo, U.; Galluzzi, F.; Scott, A. C.; Gratton, E.; Shyamsunder, E.

    1984-10-01

    Detailed measurements of infrared absorption and Raman scattering on crystalline acetanilide [(CH3CONHC6H5)x] at low temperature show a new band close to the conventional amide I band. Equilibrium properties and spectroscopic data rule out explanations based on a conventional assignment, crystal defects, Fermi resonance, and upon frozen kinetics between two different subsystems. Thus we cannot account for this band using the concepts of conventional molecular spectroscopy, but a soliton model, similar to that proposed by Davydov for α-helix in protein, is in satisfactory agreement with the experimental data.

  17. Water-related absorption in fibrous diamonds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zedgenizov, D. A.; Shiryaev, A. A.; Kagi, H.; Navon, O.

    2003-04-01

    Cubic and coated diamonds from several localities (Brasil, Canada, Yakutia) were investigated using spectroscopic techniques. Special emphasis was put on investigation of water-related features of transmission Infra-red and Raman spectra. Presence of molecular water is inferred from broad absorption bands in IR at 3420 and 1640 cm-1. These bands were observed in many of the investigated samples. It is likely that molecular water is present in microinclusions in liquid state, since no clear indications of solid H_2O (ice VI-VII, Kagi et al., 2000) were found. Comparison of absorption by HOH and OH vibrations shows that diamonds can be separated into two principal groups: those containing liquid water (direct proportionality of OH and HOH absorption) and those with stronger absorption by OH group. Fraction of diamonds in every group depends on their provenance. There might be positive correlation between internal pressure in microinclusions (determined using quartz barometer, Navon et al., 1988) and affiliation with diamonds containing liquid water. In many cases absorption by HOH vibration is considerably lower than absorption by hydroxyl (OH) group. This may be explained if OH groups are partially present in mineral and/or melt inclusions. This hypothesis is supported by following fact: in diamonds with strong absorption by silicates and other minerals shape and position of the OH band differs from that in diamonds with low absorption by minerals. Moreover, in Raman spectra of individual inclusions sometimes the broad band at 3100 cm-1 is observed. This band is OH-related. In some samples water distribution is not homogeneous. Central part of the diamond usually contains more water than outer parts, but this is not a general rule for all the samples. Water absorption usually correlated with absorption of other components (carbonates, silicates and others). At that fibrous diamonds with relatively high content of silicates are characterized by molecular water. OH

  18. Excitation induced spectroscopic study and quenching effect in cerium samarium codoped lithium aluminoborate glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaur, Parvinder; Kaur, Simranpreet; Singh, Gurinder Pal; Arora, Deepawali; Kumar, Sunil; Singh, D. P.

    2016-08-01

    Lithium aluminium borate host has been codoped with cerium and samarium to prepare glass by conventional melt quench technique. Their structural and spectroscopic investigation has been carried out using XRD, FTIR and density measurements. The UV-Vis absorption spectra and fluorescence spectra (λexc.=380 nm and 400 nm) have been studied for spectroscopic analysis. The amorphous nature of the prepared samples is shown by XRD. The density is increasing with addition of cerium at the expense of aluminium, keeping other components constant. FTIR study also shows the presence of compact and stable tetrahedral BO4 units thus supporting the density results. The UV- Vis absorption spectra show a shift of optical absorption edge towards longer wavelength along with an increase in intensity of peaks with rising samarium concentration. The fluorescence spectra show a blue shift and subsequent suppression of cerium peaks with addition of samarium.

  19. Characterization of minerals in air dust particles in the state of Tamilnadu, India through FTIR, XRD and SEM analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senthil Kumar, R.; Rajkumar, P.

    2014-11-01

    The abstract of this paper explains the presence of minerals in air which causes great concern regarding public health issues. The spectroscopic investigation of air dust particles of several samples in various locations in the state of Tamilnadu, India is reported. Qualitative analyses were carried out to determine the major and minor constituent minerals present in the samples based on the FTIR, XRD absorption peaks. This study also identified the minerals like quartz, asbestos, kaolinite, calcite, hematite, montmorillonite, nacrite and several other trace minerals in the air dust particles. The presents of quartz is mainly found in all the samples invariably. Hence the percentage of quartz and its crystalline nature were determined with the help of extinction co-efficient and crystallinity index respectively. The shape and size of the particulates are studied with SEM analysis.

  20. Starfish: Robust spectroscopic inference tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czekala, Ian; Andrews, Sean M.; Mandel, Kaisey S.; Hogg, David W.; Green, Gregory M.

    2015-05-01

    Starfish is a set of tools used for spectroscopic inference. It robustly determines stellar parameters using high resolution spectral models and uses Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) to explore the full posterior probability distribution of the stellar parameters. Additional potential applications include other types of spectra, such as unresolved stellar clusters or supernovae spectra.

  1. Potassium emission absorption system. Topical report 12

    SciTech Connect

    Bauman, L.E.

    1995-04-01

    The Potassium Emission Absorption System is one of the advanced optical diagnostics developed at Mississippi State University to provide support for the demonstration of prototype-scale coal-fired combustion magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) electrical power generation. Intended for application in the upstream of an MHD flow, the system directly measures gas temperature and neutral potassium atom number density through spectroscopic emission absorption techniques. From these measurements the electron density can be inferred from a statistical equilibrium calculation and the electron conductivity in the MHD channel found by use of an electron mobility model. The instrument has been utilized for field test measurements on MHD facilities for almost a decade and has been proven to provide useful measurements as designed for MHD nozzle, channel, and diffuser test sections. The theory of the measurements, a system description, its capabilities, and field test measurement results are reported here. During the development and application of the instrument several technical issues arose which when addressed advanced the state of the art in emission absorption measurement. Studies of these issues are also reported here and include: two-wavelength measurements for particle-laden flows, potassium D-line far wing absorption coefficient, bias in emission absorption measurements arising from dirty windows and misalignments, non-coincident multiwavelength emission absorption sampling errors, and lineshape fitting for boundary layer flow profile information. Although developed for NLHD application, the instrument could be applied to any high temperature flow with a resonance line in the 300 to 800 nm range, for instance other types of flames, rocket plumes or low temperature plasmas.

  2. Spectroscopic properties of holmium doped ? crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dominiak-Dzik, G.; Golab, S.; Zawadzka, J.; Ryba-Romanowski, W.; Lukasiewicz, T.; Swirkowicz, M.

    1998-11-01

    The spectroscopic properties of 0953-8984/10/45/016/img11 ions in 0953-8984/10/45/016/img12 crystals have been investigated using optical absorption, luminescence and lifetime measurements in the 5-300 K temperature range. The low temperature, polarized absorption spectra of 0953-8984/10/45/016/img11 in this matrix have allowed us to identify the Stark levels of the different multiplets up to 30 000 0953-8984/10/45/016/img14. The results are consistent with 0953-8984/10/45/016/img15 symmetry for the rare-earth ions and a singlet A character for the lowest Stark level of the 0953-8984/10/45/016/img16 ground state. Several transitions show additional structure which indicates multi-site occupancy for the 0953-8984/10/45/016/img11 ions. The measured oscillator strengths of the transitions between the J manifolds at 300 K are compared with those derived from the Judd-Ofelt theory. The radiative transition rates and radiative lifetimes have been calculated. The luminescence observed at 5 K has been attributed to 0953-8984/10/45/016/img18 (18 100 0953-8984/10/45/016/img14), 0953-8984/10/45/016/img20 (15 060 0953-8984/10/45/016/img14) and 0953-8984/10/45/016/img22 (13 150 0953-8984/10/45/016/img14) transitions. The obtained data are used to discuss the radiative properties for luminescent levels of 0953-8984/10/45/016/img11 ions in the 0953-8984/10/45/016/img25 matrix. The emission cross-section of a potential laser line at 2 0953-8984/10/45/016/img26m connected with the 0953-8984/10/45/016/img27 transition is estimated.

  3. Spectroscopic studies of microwave plasmas containing hexamethyldisiloxane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nave, A. S. C.; Mitschker, F.; Awakowicz, P.; Röpcke, J.

    2016-10-01

    Low-pressure microwave discharges containing hexamethyldisiloxane (HMDSO) with admixtures of oxygen and nitrogen, used for the deposition of silicon containing films, have been studied spectroscopically. Optical emission spectroscopy (OES) in the visible spectral range has been combined with infrared laser absorption spectroscopy (IRLAS). The experiments were carried out in order to analyze the dependence of plasma chemical phenomena on power and gas mixture at relatively low pressures, up to 50 Pa, and power values, up to 2 kW. The evolution of the concentration of the methyl radical, CH3, and of seven stable molecules, HMDSO, CH4, C2H2, C2H4, C2H6, CO and CO2, was monitored in the plasma processes by in situ IRLAS using tunable lead salt diode lasers (TDL) and external-cavity quantum cascade lasers (EC-QCL) as radiation sources. To achieve reliable values for the gas temperature inside and outside the plasma bulk as well as for the temperature in the plasma hot and colder zones, which are of great importance for calculation of species concentrations, three different methods based on emission and absorption spectroscopy data of N2, CH3 and CO have been used. In this approach line profile analysis has been combined with spectral simulation methods. The concentrations of the various species, which were found to be in the range between 1011 to 1015 cm-3, are in the focus of interest. The influence of the discharge parameters power, pressure and gas mixture on the molecular concentrations has been studied. To achieve further insight into general plasma chemical aspects the dissociation of the HMDSO precursor gas including its fragmentation and conversion to the reaction products was analyzed in detail.

  4. Investigation into Spectroscopic Techniques for Thermal Barrier Coating Spall Detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    deGroot, Wim; Opila, Beth

    2001-01-01

    Spectroscopic methods are proposed for detection of thermal barrier coating (TBC) spallation from engine hot zone components. These methods include absorption and emission of airborne marker species originally embedded in the TBC bond coat. In this study, candidate marker materials for this application were evaluated. Thermochemical analysis of candidate marker materials combined with additional constraints such as toxicity and uniqueness to engine environment, provided a short list of four potential species: platinum, copper oxide, zinc oxide. and indium. The melting point of indium was considered to be too low for serious consideration. The other three candidate marker materials, platinum, copper oxide, and zinc oxide were placed in a high temperature furnace and emission and absorption properties were measured over a temperature range from 800-1400 C and a spectral range from 250 to 18000 nm. Platinum did not provide the desired response, likely due to the low vapor Pressure of the metallic species and the low absorption of the oxide species. It was also found, however. that platinum caused a broadening of the carbon dioxide absorption at 4300 nm. The nature of this effect is not known. Absorption and emission caused by sodium and potassium impurities in the platinum were found in the platinum tests. Zinc oxide did not provide the desired response, again, most likely due to the low vapor pressure of the metallic species and the low absorption of the oxide species. Copper oxide generated two strongly temperature dependent absorption peaks at 324.8 and 327.4 nm. The melting point of copper oxide was determined to be too low for serious consideration as marker material.

  5. Spectroscopic characterisation of a quantum dot solar concentrator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallagher, S. J.; Rowan, B. C.; Doran, J.; Norton, B.

    2005-06-01

    Spectroscopic measurements have been undertaken for a range of different quantum dot (QD) types and transparent host materials for use in a novel solar energy-concentrating device, a Quantum Dot Solar Concentrator1 (QDSC). A QDSC comprises QDs seeded in materials such as plastics and glasses that are suitable for incorporation into buildings where photovoltaic cells attached to the edges convert direct and diffuse solar energy into electricity for use in the building. High transparency in the matrix material and QDs with a large Stokes shift are essential for an efficient QDSC. An optimum matrix material for a QDSC has been determined based on absorption characteristics and an optimum commercially available QD type has been chosen using steady-state absorption, photoluminescence and photoluminescence excitation spectroscopy of QDs in solution and solid matrices.

  6. Discovery of non-radial pulsations in the spectroscopic binary Herbig Ae star RS Chamaeleontis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Böhm, T.; Zima, W.; Catala, C.; Alecian, E.; Pollard, K.; Wright, D.

    2009-04-01

    Context: To understand the origin of stellar activity in pre-main-sequence Herbig Ae/Be stars and to get a deeper insight into the interior of these enigmatic stars, the pulsational instability strip of Palla and Marconi is investigated. In this article we present a first discovery of non radial pulsations in the Herbig Ae spectroscopic binary star RS Cha. Aims: The goal of the present work is to detect non-radial pulsations in a Herbig Ae star for the first time directly by spectrographic means and to identify the largest amplitude pulsation modes. Methods: The spectroscopic binary Herbig Ae star RS Cha was monitored in quasi-continuous observations during 14 observing nights (Jan. 2006) at the 1 m Mt. John (New Zealand) telescope with the Hercules high-resolution echelle spectrograph. The cumulative exposure time on the star was 44 h, corresponding to 255 individual high-resolution echelle spectra with R = 45 000. Least-square deconvolved spectra (LSD) were obtained for each spectrum, representing the effective photospheric absorption profile modified by pulsations. Difference spectra were calculated by subtracting rotationally broadened artificial profiles, these residual spectra were analysed and non-radial pulsations detected. A subsequent analysis with two complementary methods, namely Fourier Parameter Fit (FPF) and Fourier 2D (F2D) has been performed and first constraints on the pulsation modes derived. Results: For the very first time, we discovered by direct observational means using high-resolution echelle spectroscopy, non-radial oscillations in a Herbig Ae star. In fact, both components of the spectroscopic binary are Herbig Ae stars and both show NRPs. The FPF method identified 2 modes for the primary component with (degree ℓ, azimuthal order m) couples ordered by decreasing probability: f1 = 21.11 d-1 with (ℓ, m) = (11, 11), (11, 9) or (10, 6) and f2 = 30.38 d-1 with (ℓ, m) = ( 10, 6) or (9, 5). The F2D analysis indicates for f1 a degree

  7. Gold nanoparticles assisted structural and spectroscopic modification in Er3+-doped zinc sodium tellurite glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Awang, Asmahani; Ghoshal, S. K.; Sahar, M. R.; Arifin, R.

    2015-04-01

    Achieving enhanced spectroscopic properties of rare earth doped inorganic glasses by embedding metallic nanoparticles of controlled sizes is a challenging task. We report the gold (Au) NPs assisted modifications in structural and spectroscopic properties of melt-quench synthesized Er3+ doped zinc sodium tellurite glass. The growth of NPs is stimulated via time varying heat treatment at 300 °C. XRD patterns confirm the amorphous nature of glasses and TEM images manifest the growth of gold NPs with sizes between 6.1 and 10.7 nm. The heat treatment time dependent variations in physical properties are ascribed to the alteration in bonding of non-bridging oxygen ions. The UV-VIS-NIR spectra reveal six absorption peaks centered at 488, 523, 655, 800, 973 and 1533 nm corresponding to the transition from ground state of 4I15/2 to 4F7/2, 2H11/2, 4F9/2, 4I9/2,4I11/2, and 4I13/2 excited states of Er3+ ions, respectively. Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) bands are observed in the range of 618-632 nm. Judd-Ofelt analyses demonstrate a significant increase of spectroscopic quality factors (0.86-1.05) and branching ratio (0.62-92.38%). The up-conversion emission spectra of Er3+ exhibit three prominent peaks of reasonable green (502 nm), a moderate green (546 nm) and a strong red (629 nm). An enhancement in the red band luminescence intensity by a factor of 8.19 and 8.54 times are achieved for 2 and 4 h of heat treatments, respectively. This enhancement is attributed to the SPR effects of gold NPs producing an intense local field in the proximity of Er3+ ions and subsequent energy transfer between RE ions and NPs. The FTIR spectra display the presence of vibrational modes for ZnO4 bonds, Te-O bond in TeO3 (tp) and TeO4 (tbp) units and the hydroxyl groups. Excellent features of the results suggest that our method constitute a basis for tunable growth of gold NPs which is exceedingly useful for the optimization of optical and structural properties.

  8. Theoretical modeling of the absorption spectrum of aqueous riboflavin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zanetti-Polzi, Laura; Aschi, Massimiliano; Daidone, Isabella; Amadei, Andrea

    2017-02-01

    In this study we report the modeling of the absorption spectrum of riboflavin in water using a hybrid quantum/classical mechanical approach, the MD-PMM methodology. By means of MD-PMM calculations, with which the effect of riboflavin internal motions and of solvent interactions on the spectroscopic properties can be explicitly taken into account, we obtain an absorption spectrum in very good agreement with the experimental spectrum. In particular, the calculated peak maxima show a consistent improvement with respect to previous computational approaches. Moreover, the calculations show that the interaction with the environment may cause a relevant recombination of the gas-phase electronic states.

  9. In situ spectroscopic ellipsometry during electrochemical treatment of zinc in alkaline carbonate electrolyte

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Ying; Erbe, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    In situ spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE, 297-820 nm, 4.4-1.5 eV) during electrochemical oxidation/reduction of zinc in alkaline carbonate electrolyte was performed using a specially designed optical-electrochemical cell. The growth and shrinkage of the interfacial layer on Zn was analysed on the basis of Lekner's first order perturbation theory. For non-absorbing thin films on metal surfaces, an algorithm has been derived to extract the thickness of a surface film directly from ellipsometric data without the need of optical modelling. During cyclic voltammetry (CV), a rapid decrease/increase in the layer thickness in the reduction/oxidation peak has been found. In the potential regime where the surface is oxide-covered, the layer thickness increases/decreases linearly with potential in anodic/cathodic scans. The density of the interfacial region in this regime is constant. During chronoamperometric experiments, a fast correlating jump in thickness was found after potential jumps. An ageing of the films is observed in the absorption spectrum (from the ellipsometric parameter Ψ), which shows changes until ≈ 30 min after potential jumps. Analysis of the current transients points to continuous dissolution of Zn.

  10. Synthesis, structure, spectroscopic and electrochemical properties of bis(histamine-saccharinate) copper(II) complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bulut, İclal; Uçar, İbrahim; Karabulut, Bünyamin; Bulut, Ahmet

    2007-05-01

    Crystal structure of [Cu(hsm) 2(sac) 2] (hsm is histamine and sac is saccharinate) complex has been determined by X-ray diffraction analyses and its magnetic environment has been identified by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) technique. The title complex crystallizes in the monoclinic system, space group P 21/ c with a = 7.4282(4), b = 22.5034(16), c = 8.3300(5) Å, β = 106.227(4)°, V = 1336.98(14) Å 3, and Z = 2. The structure consist of discrete [Cu(hsm) 2(sac) 2] molecules in which the copper ion is centrosymmetrically coordinated by two histamine ligands forming an equatorial plane [Cu-N hsm = 2.024(2) and Cu-N hsm = 2.0338(18) Å]. Two N atoms from the saccharinate ligands coordinate on the elongated axial positions with Cu-N sac being 2.609(5) Å. The complex is also characterized by spectroscopic (IR, UV/Vis) and thermal (TG, and TDA) methods. The cyclic voltammogram of the title complex investigated in DMSO (dimethylsulfoxide) solution exhibits only metal centred electroactivity in the potential range - 1.25-1.5 V versus Ag/AgCl reference electrode. The molecular orbital bond coefficients of Cu(II) ion in d 9 state is also calculated by using EPR and optical absorption parameters.

  11. MAPPING THE DYNAMICS OF COLD GAS AROUND SGR A* THROUGH 21 cm ABSORPTION

    SciTech Connect

    Christian, Pierre; Loeb, Abraham

    2015-11-20

    The presence of a circumnuclear stellar disk around Sgr A* and megamaser systems near other black holes indicates that dense neutral disks can be found in galactic nuclei. We show that depending on their inclination angle, optical depth, and spin temperature, these disks could be observed spectroscopically through 21 cm absorption. Related spectroscopic observations of Sgr A* can determine its HI disk parameters and the possible presence of gaps in the disk. Clumps of dense gas similar to the G2 could could also be detected in 21 cm absorption against Sgr A* radio emission.

  12. Near-infrared spectroscopic photoacoustic microscopy using a multi-color fiber laser source

    PubMed Central

    Buma, Takashi; Wilkinson, Benjamin C.; Sheehan, Timothy C.

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate a simple multi-wavelength optical source suitable for spectroscopic optical resolution photoacoustic microscopy (OR-PAM) of lipid-rich tissue. 1064 nm laser pulses are converted to multiple wavelengths beyond 1300 nm via nonlinear optical propagation in a birefringent optical fiber. OR-PAM experiments with lipid phantoms clearly show the expected absorption peak near 1210 nm. We believe this simple multi-color technique is a promising cost-effective approach to spectroscopic OR-PAM of lipid-rich tissue. PMID:26309746

  13. Solar absorption surface panel

    DOEpatents

    Santala, Teuvo J.

    1978-01-01

    A composite metal of aluminum and nickel is used to form an economical solar absorption surface for a collector plate wherein an intermetallic compound of the aluminum and nickel provides a surface morphology with high absorptance and relatively low infrared emittance along with good durability.

  14. Rectal absorption of propylthiouracil.

    PubMed

    Bartle, W R; Walker, S E; Silverberg, J D

    1988-06-01

    The rectal absorption of propylthiouracil (PTU) was studied and compared to oral absorption in normal volunteers. Plasma levels of PTU after administration of suppositories of PTU base and PTU diethanolamine were significantly lower compared to the oral route. Elevated plasma reverse T3 levels were demonstrated after each treatment, however, suggesting a desirable therapeutic effect at this dosage level for all preparations.

  15. Molecular weight, polydispersity, and spectroscopic properties of aquatic humic substances

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chin, Y.-P.; Aiken, G.; O'Loughlin, E.

    1994-01-01

    The number- and weight-averaged molecular weights of a number of aquatic fulvic acids, a commercial humic acid, and unfractionated organic matter from four natural water samples were measured by high-pressure size exclusion chromatography (HPSEC). Molecular weights determined in this manner compared favorably with those values reported in the literature. Both recent literature values and our data indicate that these substances are smaller and less polydisperse than previously believed. Moreover, the molecular weights of the organic matter from three of the four natural water samples compared favorably to the fulvic acid samples extracted from similar environments. Bulk spectroscopic properties of the fulvic substances such as molar absorptivity at 280 nm and the E4/E6 ratio were also measured. A strong correlation was observed between molar absorptivity, total aromaticity, and the weight average molecular weights of all the humic substances. This observation suggests that bulk spectroscopic properties can be used to quickly estimate the size of humic substances and their aromatic contents. Both parameters are important with respect to understanding humic substance mobility and their propensity to react with both organic and inorganic pollutants. ?? 1994 American Chemical Society.

  16. Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer Measurements of Interstellar Fluorine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Federman, S. R.; Sheffer, Yaron; Lambert, David L.; Smith, V. V.

    2005-02-01

    The source of fluorine is not well understood, although core-collapse supernovae, Wolf-Rayet stars, and asymptotic giant branch stars have been suggested. A search for evidence of the ν-process during Type II supernovae is presented. Absorption from interstellar F I is seen in spectra of HD 208440 and HD 209339A acquired with the Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer. In order to extract the column density for F I from the line at 954 Å, absorption from H2 has to be modeled and then removed. Our analysis indicates that for H2 column densities less than about 3×1020 cm-2, the amount of F I can be determined from λ954. For these two sight lines, there is no clear indication for enhanced F abundances resulting from the ν-process in a region shaped by past supernovae. Based on observations made with the NASA/CNES/CSA Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer (FUSE), which is operated for NASA by the Johns Hopkins University under NASA contract NAS 5-32985.

  17. Petawatt laser absorption bounded

    PubMed Central

    Levy, Matthew C.; Wilks, Scott C.; Tabak, Max; Libby, Stephen B.; Baring, Matthew G.

    2014-01-01

    The interaction of petawatt (1015 W) lasers with solid matter forms the basis for advanced scientific applications such as table-top particle accelerators, ultrafast imaging systems and laser fusion. Key metrics for these applications relate to absorption, yet conditions in this regime are so nonlinear that it is often impossible to know the fraction of absorbed light f, and even the range of f is unknown. Here using a relativistic Rankine-Hugoniot-like analysis, we show for the first time that f exhibits a theoretical maximum and minimum. These bounds constrain nonlinear absorption mechanisms across the petawatt regime, forbidding high absorption values at low laser power and low absorption values at high laser power. For applications needing to circumvent the absorption bounds, these results will accelerate a shift from solid targets, towards structured and multilayer targets, and lead the development of new materials. PMID:24938656

  18. Spectroscopic characterizations of organic/inorganic nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Govani, Jayesh R.

    2009-12-01

    In the present study, pure and 0.3 wt%, 0.4 wt%, as well as 0.5 wt% L-arginine doped potassium dihydrogen phosphate (KDP) crystals were grown using solution growth techniques and further subjected to infrared (IR) absorption and Raman studies for confirmation of chemical group functionalization for investigating the incorporation mechanism of the L-arginine organic material into the KDP crystal structure. Infrared spectroscopic analysis suggests that structural changes are occurring for the L-arginine molecule as a result of its interaction with the KPD crystal. Infrared spectroscopic technique confirms the disturbance of the N-H, C-H and C-N bonds of the amino acid, suggesting successful incorporation of L-arginine into the KDP crystals. Raman analysis also reveals modification of the N-H, C-H and C-N bonds of the amino acid, implying successful inclusion of L-arginine into the KDP crystals. With the help of Gaussian software, a prediction of possible incorporation mechanisms of the organic material was obtained from comparison of the simulated infrared and Raman vibrational spectra with the experimental results. Furthermore, we also studied the effect of L-arginine doping on the thermal stability of the grown KDP crystal by employing Thermo gravimetric analysis (TGA). TGA suggests that increasing the level of L-arginine doping speeds the decomposition process and it weakens the KDP crystal, which indicates successful doping of the KDP crystals with L-arginine amino acid. Urinary stones are one of the oldest and most widely spread diseases in humans, animals and birds. Many remedies have been employed through the ages for the treatment of urinary stones. Recent medicinal measures reflect the modern advances, which are based on surgical removal, percutaneous techniques and extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL). Although these procedures are valuable, they are quite expensive for most people. Furthermore, recurrence of these diseases is awfully frequent with

  19. Spectroscopic characterization of polymers: report

    SciTech Connect

    Koenig, J.L.

    1987-10-01

    Polymer characterization has presented major difficulties to the analytical chemist, who has had to develop techniques to cope with the challenge. Even the elementary problem of measuring molecular weight is not easy. Yet such measurements are essential, because the physical, mechanical, and flow properties depend on the length of the polymer chain. Because of the limited solubility and high viscosity of polymers, many classical techniques have been of little use or have had to be extensively modified to measure the molecular weight of polymers. Size-exclusion chromatographic techniques such as gel permeation have been developed to measure these molecular weight distributions. Special chromatographic instruments with a range of spectroscopic detectors (including infrared and laser-light scattering) have emerged commercially to aid the analytical chemist in the fundamental endeavor to measure the length of the polymer chain and its distribution. The author describes the advantages and disadvantages and disadvantages of various spectroscopic techniques.

  20. Knockout, Transfer and Spectroscopic Factors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kemper, Kirby; Keeley, Nicholas; Rusek, Krzysztof

    2011-10-01

    As derived quantities rather than observables, spectroscopic factors extracted from fits to data are model dependent. The main source of uncertainty is the choice of binding potential, but other factors such as adequate modeling of the reaction mechanism, the Perey effect, choice of distorting nuclear potentials etc. can also play a significant role. Recently, there has been some discussion of apparent discrepancies in spectroscopic factors derived from knockout reactions compared to those obtained from low-energy direct reactions. It should be possible to reconcile these discrepancies and we explore this prospect by attempting to describe the 10Be(d,t)9Be data of Nucl. Phys. A157, 305 (1970) using the 10Be/9Be form factors from a recent knockout study, Phys. Rev. Lett. 106, 162502 (2011). The influence of such factors as choice of distorting potentials and multi-step reactions paths will be explored.

  1. Melt Structure and Properties: a Spectroscopic Perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stebbins, J.

    2006-12-01

    Entropy, volume, and their P/T derivatives are at the heart of models of the thermodynamics of silicate melts and magmas. Quantitative characterization of glass structure is leading to important new insights into the links from "Microscopic to Macroscopic" that can at least guide interpretations of data and in some cases even have predictive power. A few recent examples will be discussed here. The often-large configurational components to heat capacities, thermal expansivities, and compressibilities of melts strongly indicate that structural changes with temperature and pressure are of key importance. At least some aspects of thermal increases in configurational (as opposed to vibrational) disorder are amenable to spectroscopic detection, either with in situ methods or on glasses with varying quench rates and thus varying fictive temperatures. In some systems, such changes are now clear, and can be shown to make significant contributions to properties. These include network cation coordination in systems such as borate liquids (BO4 to BO3 at higher T), and Al-Si disordering in aluminosilicates. In general, however, progress in this rich problem has only begun. It has long been suspected from thermodynamic analyses (and theoretical simulations) that configurational changes in melts play a key role in volume compression at high pressure, over and above that which can be expressed in "normal" equations of state or from those expected from bond compression and bending. Scattering and spectroscopic studies have revealed some of the important aspects of pressure-induced structural changes, but again we are just at the beginning of full understanding. For example, binary silicate glasses quenched from high-P melts clearly record some systematic increases in Si coordination, while aluminosilicates record systematic pressure and compositional (modifier cation field strength) effects on Al coordination in recovered samples with large, quenched-in density increases

  2. Mid-infrared spectroscopic investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salisbury, John W.; Vergo, Norma; Walter, Louis

    1987-01-01

    Mid-infrared spectroscopic research efforts are discussed. The development of a new instrumentation to permit advanced measurements in the mid-infrared region of the spectrum, the development of a special library of well-characterized mineral and rock specimens for interpretation of remote sensing data, and cooperative measurements of the spectral signatures of analogues of materials that may be present on the surfaces of asteroids, planets or their Moons are discussed.

  3. Single nanoparticle tracking spectroscopic microscope

    DOEpatents

    Yang, Haw; Cang, Hu; Xu, Cangshan; Wong, Chung M.

    2011-07-19

    A system that can maintain and track the position of a single nanoparticle in three dimensions for a prolonged period has been disclosed. The system allows for continuously imaging the particle to observe any interactions it may have. The system also enables the acquisition of real-time sequential spectroscopic information from the particle. The apparatus holds great promise in performing single molecule spectroscopy and imaging on a non-stationary target.

  4. [Terahertz spectroscopic investigation of imidacloprid].

    PubMed

    Yan, Zhi-gang; Hou, Di-bo; Cao, Bing-hua; Zhang, Guang-xin; Zhou, Ze-kui

    2008-08-01

    Terahertz radiation generated by ultra short laser pulses has a broad band width in the far-infrared range. Terahertz wave interacting with materials is a new research field. In this paper, we performed measurement of absorption coefficient and refractive index of imidacloprid in the frequency range 0.2-2.0 THz at room temperature by THz-TDS. The results indicate that imidacloprid has absorption fingerprints in this frequency range, and the absorption coefficient increases with the frequency. The average refractive index of imidacloprid is 1.65, and the refractive index of imidacloprid increases slightly with frequency. A semi-empirical theory was applied to obtain the structure and vibrational frequencies of the imidacloprid molecules in THz region. The calculated results agree well with the experimental data. The absorption features are caused by the collective vibrational and torsional modes, and different absorption peaks correspond to different vibrational modes. The comparison between experimental and theoretical study shows that far-infrared absorption features are highly sensitive to the structure and spatial arrangement of the molecules. THz-TDS is a potential tool to understand the collective vibrational modes and conformational structures of biomolecules.

  5. Quasar Absorption Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mushotzky, Richard (Technical Monitor); Elvis, Martin

    2004-01-01

    The aim of the proposal is to investigate the absorption properties of a sample of inter-mediate redshift quasars. The main goals of the project are: Measure the redshift and the column density of the X-ray absorbers; test the correlation between absorption and redshift suggested by ROSAT and ASCA data; constrain the absorber ionization status and metallicity; constrain the absorber dust content and composition through the comparison between the amount of X-ray absorption and optical dust extinction. Unanticipated low energy cut-offs where discovered in ROSAT spectra of quasars and confirmed by ASCA, BeppoSAX and Chandra. In most cases it was not possible to constrain adequately the redshift of the absorber from the X-ray data alone. Two possibilities remain open: a) absorption at the quasar redshift; and b) intervening absorption. The evidences in favour of intrinsic absorption are all indirect. Sensitive XMM observations can discriminate between these different scenarios. If the absorption is at the quasar redshift we can study whether the quasar environment evolves with the Cosmic time.

  6. Spectroscopic Needs for Imaging Dark Energy Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Newman, Jeffrey A.; Slosar, Anze; Abate, Alexandra; Abdalla, Filipe B.; Allam, Sahar; Allen, Steven W.; Ansari, Reza; Bailey, Stephen; Barkhouse, Wayne A.; Beers, Timothy C.; Blanton, Michael R.; Brodwin, Mark; Brownstein, Joel R.; Brunner, Robert J.; Carrasco-Kind, Matias; Cervantes-Cota, Jorge; Chisari, Nora Elisa; Colless, Matthew; Comparat, Johan; Coupon, Jean; Cheu, Elliott; Cunha, Carlos E.; de la Macorra, Alex; Dell’Antonio, Ian P.; Frye, Brenda L.; Gawiser, Eric J.; Gehrels, Neil; Grady, Kevin; Hagen, Alex; Hall, Patrick B.; Hearin, Andrew P.; Hildebrandt, Hendrik; Hirata, Christopher M.; Ho, Shirley; Honscheid, Klaus; Huterer, Dragan; Ivezic, Zeljko; Kneib, Jean -Paul; Kruk, Jeffrey W.; Lahav, Ofer; Mandelbaum, Rachel; Marshall, Jennifer L.; Matthews, Daniel J.; Menard, Brice; Miquel, Ramon; Moniez, Marc; Moos, H. W.; Moustakas, John; Papovich, Casey; Peacock, John A.; Park, Changbom; Rhodes, Jason; Sadeh, Iftach; Schmidt, Samuel J.; Stern, Daniel K.; Tyson, J. Anthony; von der Linden, Anja; Wechsler, Risa H.; Wood-Vasey, W. M.; Zentner, A.

    2015-03-15

    in their mean redshift, RMS dispersion, etc. – rather than to make the moments themselves small. Calibration may be done with the same spectroscopic dataset used for training if that dataset is extremely high in redshift completeness (i.e., no populations of galaxies to be used in analyses are systematically missed). Accurate photo-z calibration is necessary for all imaging experiments; Requirements: If extremely low levels of systematic incompleteness (<~0.1%) are attained in training samples, the same datasets described above should be sufficient for calibration. However, existing deep spectroscopic surveys have failed to yield secure redshifts for 30–60% of targets, so that would require very large improvements over past experience. This incompleteness would be a limiting factor for training, but catastrophic for calibration. If <~0.1% incompleteness is not attainable, the best known option for calibration of photometric redshifts is to utilize cross-correlation statistics in some form. The most direct method for this uses cross-correlations between positions on the sky of bright objects of known spectroscopic redshift with the sample of objects that we wish to calibrate the redshift distribution for, measured as a function of spectroscopic z. For such a calibration, redshifts of ~100,000 objects over at least several hundred square degrees, spanning the full redshift range of the samples used for dark energy, would be necessary; and Options: The proposed BAO experiment eBOSS would provide sufficient spectroscopy for basic calibrations, particularly for ongoing and near-future imaging experiments. The planned DESI experiment would provide excellent calibration with redundant cross-checks, but will start after the conclusion of some imaging projects. An extension of DESI to the Southern hemisphere would provide the best possible calibration from cross-correlation methods for DES and LSST. We thus anticipate that our two primary needs for spectroscopy

  7. Spectroscopic Needs for Imaging Dark Energy Experiments

    DOE PAGES

    Newman, Jeffrey A.; Slosar, Anze; Abate, Alexandra; ...

    2015-03-15

    uncertainty in their mean redshift, RMS dispersion, etc. – rather than to make the moments themselves small. Calibration may be done with the same spectroscopic dataset used for training if that dataset is extremely high in redshift completeness (i.e., no populations of galaxies to be used in analyses are systematically missed). Accurate photo-z calibration is necessary for all imaging experiments; Requirements: If extremely low levels of systematic incompleteness (<~0.1%) are attained in training samples, the same datasets described above should be sufficient for calibration. However, existing deep spectroscopic surveys have failed to yield secure redshifts for 30–60% of targets, so that would require very large improvements over past experience. This incompleteness would be a limiting factor for training, but catastrophic for calibration. If <~0.1% incompleteness is not attainable, the best known option for calibration of photometric redshifts is to utilize cross-correlation statistics in some form. The most direct method for this uses cross-correlations between positions on the sky of bright objects of known spectroscopic redshift with the sample of objects that we wish to calibrate the redshift distribution for, measured as a function of spectroscopic z. For such a calibration, redshifts of ~100,000 objects over at least several hundred square degrees, spanning the full redshift range of the samples used for dark energy, would be necessary; and Options: The proposed BAO experiment eBOSS would provide sufficient spectroscopy for basic calibrations, particularly for ongoing and near-future imaging experiments. The planned DESI experiment would provide excellent calibration with redundant cross-checks, but will start after the conclusion of some imaging projects. An extension of DESI to the Southern hemisphere would provide the best possible calibration from cross-correlation methods for DES and LSST. We thus anticipate that our two primary needs for spectroscopy

  8. Optimization of absorption air-conditioning for solar energy applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perry, E. H.

    1976-01-01

    Improved performance of solar cooling systems using the lithium bromide water absorption cycle is investigated. Included are computer simulations of a solar-cooled house, analyses and measurements of heat transfer rates in absorption system components, and design and fabrication of various system components. A survey of solar collector convection suppression methods is presented.

  9. The water vapour continuum in near-infrared windows - Current understanding and prospects for its inclusion in spectroscopic databases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shine, Keith P.; Campargue, Alain; Mondelain, Didier; McPheat, Robert A.; Ptashnik, Igor V.; Weidmann, Damien

    2016-09-01

    report pilot measurements of the water vapour self-continuum using a supercontinuum laser source coupled to an FTS. Such improvements, as well as additional measurements and analyses in other laboratories, would enable the inclusion of the water vapour continuum in future spectroscopic databases, and therefore allow for a more reliable forward modelling of the radiative properties of the atmosphere. It would also allow a more confident assessment of different theoretical descriptions of the underlying cause or causes of continuum absorption.

  10. Absorption heat pump system

    DOEpatents

    Grossman, G.

    1982-06-16

    The efficiency of an absorption heat pump system is improved by conducting liquid from a second stage evaporator thereof to an auxiliary heat exchanger positioned downstream of a primary heat exchanger in the desorber of the system.

  11. Compounds affecting cholesterol absorption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hua, Duy H. (Inventor); Koo, Sung I. (Inventor); Noh, Sang K. (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    A class of novel compounds is described for use in affecting lymphatic absorption of cholesterol. Compounds of particular interest are defined by Formula I: ##STR1## or a pharmaceutically acceptable salt thereof.

  12. Absorption heat pump system

    DOEpatents

    Grossman, Gershon

    1984-01-01

    The efficiency of an absorption heat pump system is improved by conducting liquid from a second stage evaporator thereof to an auxiliary heat exchanger positioned downstream of a primary heat exchanger in the desorber of the system.

  13. Spectroscopic Line Parameters in the Infrared Bands of CH3CN and C2H6

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devi, V. Malathy

    2010-10-01

    In this paper, measurements of critical spectroscopic line parameters such as positions, absolute intensities and pressure broadened (self- and N2) half-width coefficients for transitions in the ν4 band of CH3CN (acetonitile, ethanenitrile, methyl cyanide) and the ν9 band of C2H6 (ethane) are presented. CH3CN has been measured by remote sensing in the earth's atmosphere, in comets and in interstellar molecular clouds. It is also a constituent in the atmospheres of Titan, Saturn's largest moon. Likewise, C2H6 is also an important constituent in the atmosphere of earth, the giant planets and comets. The 12- μm(˜720-850 cm-1) emission features of this molecule have been observed in spectra from outer solar system bodies of Jupiter, Saturn, Neptune and Titan. Because of their importance in remote sensing measurements, we recently recorded and analyzed a large number of laboratory infrared absorption spectra of pure and N2-broadened spectra of both these molecular bands. Spectra used in these analyses were recorded using either the Bruker IFS 125HR or the Bruker IFS 120HR FTS located at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), in Richland Washington. To retrieve the various spectral line parameters, a multispectrum nonlinear least squares fitting algorithm was employed and all spectra belonging to each band were fitted simultaneously. Using this fitting technique, the same spectral regions from multiple spectra were fit all at once to maximize the accuracy of the retrieved parameters. The results obtained from present analyses are briefly discussed. In the case of C2H6 both room- and low temperature (˜210-296 K) spectra were recorded, but results from analyzing only room-temperature spectra will be discussed in this work.

  14. Spectroscopic Methods of Remote Sensing for Vegetation Characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kokaly, R. F.

    2013-12-01

    Imaging spectroscopy (IS), often referred to as hyperspectral remote sensing, is one of the latest innovations in a very long history of spectroscopy. Spectroscopic methods have been used for understanding the composition of the world around us, as well as, the solar system and distant parts of the universe. Continuous sampling of the electromagnetic spectrum in narrow bands is what separates IS from previous forms of remote sensing. Terrestrial imaging spectrometers often have hundreds of channels that cover the wavelength range of reflected solar radiation, including the visible, near-infrared (NIR), and shortwave infrared (SWIR) regions. In part due to the large number of channels, a wide variety of methods have been applied to extract information from IS data sets. These can be grouped into several broad classes, including: multi-channel indices, statistical procedures, full spectrum mixing models, and spectroscopic methods. Spectroscopic methods carry on the more than 150 year history of laboratory-based spectroscopy applied to material identification and characterization. Spectroscopic methods of IS relate the positions and shapes of spectral features resolved by airborne and spaceborne sensors to the biochemical and physical composition of vegetation in a pixel. The chlorophyll 680nm, water 980nm, water 1200nm, SWIR 1700nm, SWIR 2100nm, and SWIR 2300nm features have been the subject of study. Spectral feature analysis (SFA) involves isolating such an absorption feature using continuum removal (CR) and calculating descriptors of the feature, such as center position, depth, width, area, and asymmetry. SFA has been applied to quantify pigment and non-pigment biochemical concentrations in leaves, plants, and canopies. Spectral feature comparison (SFC) utilizes CR of features in each pixel's spectrum and linear regression with continuum-removed features in reference spectra in a library of known vegetation types to map vegetation species and communities. SFC has

  15. Optical absorption measurement system

    DOEpatents

    Draggoo, Vaughn G.; Morton, Richard G.; Sawicki, Richard H.; Bissinger, Horst D.

    1989-01-01

    The system of the present invention contemplates a non-intrusive method for measuring the temperature rise of optical elements under high laser power optical loading to determine the absorption coefficient. The method comprises irradiating the optical element with a high average power laser beam, viewing the optical element with an infrared camera to determine the temperature across the optical element and calculating the absorption of the optical element from the temperature.

  16. Solar selective absorption coatings

    DOEpatents

    Mahoney, Alan R.; Reed, Scott T.; Ashley, Carol S.; Martinez, F. Edward

    2003-10-14

    A new class of solar selective absorption coatings are disclosed. These coatings comprise a structured metallic overlayer such that the overlayer has a sub-micron structure designed to efficiently absorb solar radiation, while retaining low thermal emissivity for infrared thermal radiation. A sol-gel layer protects the structured metallic overlayer from mechanical, thermal, and environmental degradation. Processes for producing such solar selective absorption coatings are also disclosed.

  17. Solar selective absorption coatings

    DOEpatents

    Mahoney, Alan R.; Reed, Scott T.; Ashley, Carol S.; Martinez, F. Edward

    2004-08-31

    A new class of solar selective absorption coatings are disclosed. These coatings comprise a structured metallic overlayer such that the overlayer has a sub-micron structure designed to efficiently absorb solar radiation, while retaining low thermal emissivity for infrared thermal radiation. A sol-gel layer protects the structured metallic overlayer from mechanical, thermal, and environmental degradation. Processes for producing such solar selective absorption coatings are also disclosed.

  18. Intranasal absorption of oxymorphone.

    PubMed

    Hussain, M A; Aungst, B J

    1997-08-01

    The nasal bioavailability of oxymorphone HCI was determined. Rats were surgically prepared to isolate the nasal cavity, into which a solution of oxymorphone was administered. A reference group of rats was administered oxymorphone HCl intravenously. Plasma oxymorphone concentrations were determined by HPLC. Nasal absorption was rapid, nasal bioavailability was 43%, and the iv and nasal elimination profiles were similar. Oxymorphone HCI appears to have the solubility, potency, and absorption properties required for efficient nasal delivery, which is an alternative to injections.

  19. Triplet absorption spectroscopy and electromagnetically induced transparency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghafoor, F.; Nazmitdinov, R. G.

    2016-09-01

    Coherence phenomena in a four-level atomic system, cyclically driven by three coherent fields, are investigated thoroughly at zero and weak magnetic fields. Each strongly interacting atomic state is converted to a triplet due to a dynamical Stark effect. Two dark lines with a Fano-like profile arise in the triplet absorption spectrum with anomalous dispersions. We provide conditions to control the widths of the transparency windows by means of the relative phase of the driving fields and the intensity of the microwave field, which closes the optical system loop. The effect of Doppler broadening on the results of the triplet absorption spectroscopy is analysed in detail.

  20. Spectroscopic Classifications of Optical Transients with SOAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foley, R. J.; Hounsell, R. A.; Downing, S.; Pan, Y.-C.; Scolnic, D.; Jha, S. W.; Rest, A.; Smith, K. W.; Wright, D.; Smartt, S. J.; Huber, M.; Chambers, K. C.; Flewelling, H.; Willman, M.; Primak, N.; Schultz, A.; Gibson, B.; Magnier, E.; Waters, C.; Tonry, J.; Wainscoat, R. J.

    2015-07-01

    We report the following classifications of optical transients from spectroscopic observations with the Goodman spectrograph (wavelength range 3100 - 7100) on the Southern Astrophysical Research (SOAR) telescope.

  1. Spectroscopic signature for ferroelectric ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wójcik, Marek J.; Gług, Maciej; Boczar, Marek; Boda, Łukasz

    2014-09-01

    Various forms of ice exist within our galaxy. Particularly intriguing type of ice - ‘ferroelectric ice' was discovered experimentally and is stable in temperatures below 72 K. This form of ice can generate enormous electric fields and can play an important role in planetary formation. In this letter we present Car-Parrinello simulation of infrared spectra of ferroelectric ice and compare them with spectra of hexagonal ice. Librational region of the spectra can be treated as spectroscopic signature of ice XI and can be of help to identify ferroelectric ice in the Universe.

  2. High-energy spectroscopic astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Güdel, Manuel; Walter, Roland

    After three decades of intense research in X-ray and gamma-ray astronomy, the time was ripe to summarize basic knowledge on X-ray and gamma-ray spectroscopy for interested students and researchers ready to become involved in new high-energy missions. This volume exposes both the scientific basics and modern methods of high-energy spectroscopic astrophysics. The emphasis is on physical principles and observing methods rather than a discussion of particular classes of high-energy objects, but many examples and new results are included in the three chapters as well.

  3. Mid-infrared spectroscopic analysis of saccharides in aqueous solutions with sodium chloride.

    PubMed

    Kanou, Mikihito; Kameoka, Takaharu; Suehara, Ken-Ichiro; Hashimoto, Atsushi

    2017-04-01

    The infrared spectral characteristics of three different types of disaccharides (trehalose, maltose, and sucrose) and four different types of monosaccharides (glucose, mannose, galactose, and fructose) in aqueous solutions with sodium chloride (NaCl) were determined. The infrared spectra were obtained using the FT-IR/ATR method and the absorption intensities respected the interaction between the saccharide and water with NaCl were determined. This study also focused on not only the glycosidic linkage position and the constituent monosaccharides, but also the concentration of the saccharides and NaCl and found that they have a significant influence on the infrared spectroscopic characterization of the disaccharides in an aqueous solution with NaCl. The absorption intensities representing the interaction between a saccharide and water with NaCl were spectroscopically determined. Additionally, the applications of MIR spectroscopy to obtain information about saccharide-NaCl interactions in foods and biosystems were suggested.

  4. Seven-effect absorption refrigeration

    DOEpatents

    DeVault, R.C.; Biermann, W.J.

    1989-05-09

    A seven-effect absorption refrigeration cycle is disclosed utilizing three absorption circuits. In addition, a heat exchanger is used for heating the generator of the low absorption circuit with heat rejected from the condenser and absorber of the medium absorption circuit. A heat exchanger is also provided for heating the generator of the medium absorption circuit with heat rejected from the condenser and absorber of the high absorption circuit. If desired, another heat exchanger can also be provided for heating the evaporator of the high absorption circuit with rejected heat from either the condenser or absorber of the low absorption circuit. 1 fig.

  5. Seven-effect absorption refrigeration

    DOEpatents

    DeVault, Robert C.; Biermann, Wendell J.

    1989-01-01

    A seven-effect absorption refrigeration cycle is disclosed utilizing three absorption circuits. In addition, a heat exchanger is used for heating the generator of the low absorption circuit with heat rejected from the condenser and absorber of the medium absorption circuit. A heat exchanger is also provided for heating the generator of the medium absorption circuit with heat rejected from the condenser and absorber of the high absorption circuit. If desired, another heat exchanger can also be provided for heating the evaporator of the high absorption circuit with rejected heat from either the condenser or absorber of the low absorption circuit.

  6. Backscatter absorption gas imaging systems and light sources therefore

    DOEpatents

    Kulp, Thomas Jan; Kliner, Dahv A. V.; Sommers, Ricky; Goers, Uta-Barbara; Armstrong, Karla M.

    2006-12-19

    The location of gases that are not visible to the unaided human eye can be determined using tuned light sources that spectroscopically probe the gases and cameras that can provide images corresponding to the absorption of the gases. The present invention is a light source for a backscatter absorption gas imaging (BAGI) system, and a light source incorporating the light source, that can be used to remotely detect and produce images of "invisible" gases. The inventive light source has a light producing element, an optical amplifier, and an optical parametric oscillator to generate wavelength tunable light in the IR. By using a multi-mode light source and an amplifier that operates using 915 nm pump sources, the power consumption of the light source is reduced to a level that can be operated by batteries for long periods of time. In addition, the light source is tunable over the absorption bands of many hydrocarbons, making it useful for detecting hazardous gases.

  7. First Spectroscopic Identification of Massive Young Stellar Objects in the Galactic Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    An, Deokkeun; Ramirez, V.; Sellgren, Kris; Arendt, Richard G.; Boogert, A. C.; Schultheis, Mathias; Stolovy, Susan R.; Cotera, Angela S.; Robitaille, Thomas P.; Smith, Howard A.

    2009-01-01

    We report the detection of several molecular gas-phase and ice absorption features in three photometrically-selected young stellar object (YSO) candidates in the central 280 pc of the Milky Way. Our spectra, obtained with the Infrared Spectrograph (IRS) onboard the Spitzer Space Telescope, reveal gas-phase absorption from CO2 (15.0 microns), C2H2 (13.7 microns) and HCN (14.0 microns). We attribute this absorption to warm, dense gas in massive YSOs. We also detect strong and broad 15 microns CO2 ice absorption features, with a remarkable double-peaked structure. The prominent long-wavelength peak is due to CH3OH-rich ice grains, and is similar to those found in other known massive YSOs. Our IRS observa.tions demonstra.te the youth of these objects, and provide the first spectroscopic identification of massive YSOs in the Galactic Center.

  8. The SPHEREx All-Sky Spectroscopic Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Unwin, Stephen C.; SPHEREx Science Team, SPHEREx Project Team

    2016-06-01

    SPHEREx is a mission to conduct an optical-near-IR survey of the entire sky with a spectrum at every pixel location. It was selected by NASA for a Phase A study in its Small Explorer Program; if selected, development would begin in 2016, and the observatory would start a 2-year prime mission in 2020. An all-sky spectroscopic survey can be used to tackle a wide range of science questions. The SPHEREx science team is focusing on three: (1) Probing the physics of inflation through measuring non-Gaussianity from the study of large-scale structure; (2) Studying the origin of water and biogenic molecules in a wide range of physical and chemical environments via ice absorption spectra; (3) Charting the history of star formation in the universe through intensity mapping of the large-scale spatial power. The instrument is a small wide-field telescope operating in the range of 0.75 - 4.8 µm at a spectral resolution of 41.5 in the optical and 150 at the long-wavelength end. It observes in a sun-sync low-earth orbit, covering the sky like WISE and COBE. SPHEREx is a simple instrument that requires no new technology. The Phase A design has substantial technical and resource margins and can be built with low risk. It is a partnership between Caltech and JPL, with Ball Aerospace and the Korea Astronomy and Space Science Institute as major partners. This research was carried out at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under a contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

  9. Orbital Parameters for Two Young Spectroscopic Binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karnath, Nicole

    I report orbital parameters for two low-mass, pre-main sequence spectroscopic binaries VSB 111 and VSB 126. These systems were originally identified as single-lined on the basis of visible-light spectral observations. High-resolution, infrared spectra were obtained to detect absorption lines of the secondary stars and measure radial velocities of both components in the systems. The combination of the visible and infrared observations of VSB 111 leads to a period of 902.1+/-0.9 days, an eccentricity of 0.788+/-0.008, and a mass ratio of 0.52+/-0.05. VSB 126 has a period of 12.9244+/-0.0002 days, an eccentricity of 0.18+/-0.02, and a mass ratio of 0.29+/-0.02. Visible-light photometry using the 0.8-m telescope at Lowell Observatory provided rotation periods for the primary stars in both systems, 3.74+/-0.02 days for VSB 111 and 5.71+/-0.07 days for VSB 126. Based on the vsini values, the primary rotation periods, and estimates for the primary radii, I find inclinations for the primary-star rotation axes, 42+47 -16° for VSB 111 and 54+36-29° for VSB 126, and compare these to the inclination angle of the binary orbits, iorb = 36+/-4° for VSB 111 and i orb = 45+/-4° for VSB 126, estimated from the orbital solutions. Both binaries are located in the young, star- forming cluster NGC 2264 with a complex and clumpy gas and dust structure at a distance of ~800 pc. The center-of-mass velocities of the two systems are consistent with distinct CO clouds within NGC 2264.

  10. The BAT AGN Spectroscopic Survey (BASS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koss, Michael; Trakhtenbrot, Benny; Ricci, Claudio; Lamperti, Isabella; Oh, Kyuseok; Berney, Simon; Schawinski, Kevin; Balokovic, Mislav; Baronchelli, Linda; Gehrels, Neil; Stern, Daniel; Mushotzky, Richard; Veilleux, Sylvain; Ueda, Yoshihiro; Crenshaw, D. Michael; Harrison, Fiona; Fischer, Travis C.; Treister, Ezequiel; BASS Team; Swift BAT Team

    2017-01-01

    We present the Swift BAT AGN Spectroscopic Survey (BASS) and discus the first four papers. The catalog represents an unprecedented census of hard-X-ray selected AGN in the local universe, with ~90% of sources at z<0.2. Starting from an all-sky catalog of AGN detected based on their 14-195 keV flux from the 70-month Swift/BAT catalog, we analyze a total of 1279 optical spectra, taken from twelve dierent telescopes, for a total of 642 spectra of unique AGN. We present the absorption and emission line measurements as well as black hole masses and accretion rates for the majority of obscured and un-obscured AGN (473), representing more than a factor of 10 increase from past studies. Consistent with previous surveys, we find an increase in the fraction of un-obscured (type 1) AGN, as measured from broad Hbeta and Halpha, with increasing 14-195 keV and 2-10 keV luminosity. We find the FWHM of the emission lines to show broad agreement with the X-ray obscuration measurements. Compared to narrow line AGN in the SDSS, the X-ray selected AGN in our sample with emission lines have a larger fraction of dustier galaxies suggesting these types of galaxies are missed in optical AGN surveys using emission line diagnostics. Additionally, we discuss follow-on efforts to study the variation of [OIII] to Xray measurements, a new method to measure accretion rates from using line ratios, a sample of 100 AGN observed with NIR spectroscopy, and an effort to measure the accretion rates and obscuration with merger stage in a subsample of mergers.

  11. Spectroscopic indicators of life on other planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasting, James F.

    2008-10-01

    Astronomers have now identified over 300 extrasolar planets orbiting nearby stars. Most of these planets have been found by using ground-based instruments to measure Doppler shifts in the spectrum of the parent star. For stars similar to our Sun, this method is unable to find planets as small as Earth. Within the next two (three?) decades, however, NASA hopes to launch space-based telescopes that will be able to search directly for extrasolar planets. NASA's planned Terrestrial Planet Finder (TPF) missions, will look for Earth-like planets around nearby stars and, if they exist, provide spectroscopic information on their atmospheres. TPF-C will be a coronagraph that operates in the visible/near-IR. A variant of this idea, called TPF-O, would replace the internal coronagraph with a free-flying occulting disk. TPF-I is envisioned as a free-flying interferometer operating in the thermal-IR. On a planet like modern Earth, TPF-C or TPF--O should be able to see absorption bands of O2, H2O, and possibly O3. TPF-I would be able to see CO2, H2O, and O3. Both O2 and O3 are considered to be good indicators of life for planets orbiting within the liquid water habitable zone of their parent star. Even better evidence for life would be the simultaneous observation of O2 (or O3) and a reduced gas such as CH4 or N2O. That may not be possible with a first-generation TPF instrument but should ultimately be possible in the more distant future.

  12. Atmospheric Measurements by Cavity Enhanced Absorption Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Hongming; Wu, Tao; Coeur-Tourneur, Cécile; Fertein, Eric; Gao, Xiaoming; Zhao, Weixiong; Zhang, Weijun; Chen, Weidong

    2015-04-01

    Since the last decade, atmospheric environmental monitoring has benefited from the development of novel spectroscopic measurement techniques owing to the significant breakthroughs in photonic technology from the UV to the infrared spectral domain [1]. In this presentation, we will overview our recent development and applications of cavity enhanced absorption spectroscopy techniques for in situ optical monitoring of chemically reactive atmospheric species (such as HONO, NO3, NO2, N2O5) in intensive campaigns [2] and/or in smog chamber studies [3]. These field deployments demonstrated that modern photonic technologies (newly emergent light sources combined with high sensitivity spectroscopic techniques) can provide a useful tool to improve our understanding of tropospheric chemical processes which affect climate, air quality, and the spread of pollution. Experimental detail and preliminary results will be presented. Acknowledgements. The financial support from the French Agence Nationale de la Recherche (ANR) under the NexCILAS (ANR-11-NS09-0002) and the CaPPA (ANR-10-LABX-005) contracts is acknowledged. References [1] X. Cui, C. Lengignon, T. Wu, W. Zhao, G. Wysocki, E. Fertein, C. Coeur, A. Cassez,L. Croisé, W. Chen, et al., "Photonic Sensing of the Atmosphere by absorption spectroscopy", J. Quant. Spectrosc. Rad. Transfer 113 (2012) 1300-1316 [2] T. Wu, Q. Zha, W. Chen, Z. XU, T. Wang, X. He, "Development and deployment of a cavity enhanced UV-LED spectrometer for measurements of atmospheric HONO and NO2 in Hong Kong", Atmos. Environ. 95 (2014) 544-551 [3] T. Wu, C. Coeur-Tourneur, G. Dhont,A. Cassez, E. Fertein, X. He, W. Chen,"Application of IBBCEAS to kinetic study of NO3 radical formation from O3 + NO2 reaction in an atmospheric simulation chamber", J. Quant. Spectrosc. Rad. Transfer 133 (2014)199-205

  13. Photoinduced intramolecular charge transfer process of betaine pyridinium: A theoretical spectroscopic study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perrier, Aurélie; Aloïse, Stéphane; Pawlowska, Zuzanna; Sliwa, Michel; Maurel, François; Abe, Jiro

    2011-10-01

    Using Time-Dependent Density Functional Theory and taking into account bulk solvent effects, we investigate the absorption and emission spectra of a betaine pyridinium molecule, the 2-(1-pyridinio) benzimidazolate (SBPa). This molecule exhibits strong photoinduced intramolecular charge transfer (ICT). We have identified two different electronic states involved, respectively, in the strong bathochromic ICT absorption band (S 2) and in the moderate emission band (S 1). The ICT process is analyzed in terms of charge distribution and dipole moment evolutions upon photoexcitation. These results are compared with steady-state spectroscopic measurements.

  14. Spectroscopic studies on the interaction of cysteine capped CuS nanoparticles with tyrosine

    SciTech Connect

    Prasanth, S.; Raj, D. Rithesh; Kumar, T. V. Vineesh; Sudarsanakumar, C.

    2015-06-24

    Biocompatible cysteine coated CuS nanoparticles were synthesized by a simple aqueous solution method. Hexagonal phase of the samples were confirmed from X-ray diffraction and particle size found to be 9 nm. The possible interaction between the bioactive cysteine capped CuS nanoparticles and tyrosine were investigated using spectroscopic techniques such as UV-Visible absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy. It is observed that the luminescence intensity of tyrosine molecule enhanced by the addition CuS nanoparticles.

  15. Spectroscopic study of intermolecular complexes between FAD and some β-carboline derivatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Codoñer, Armando; Monzó, Isidro S.; Tomás, Francisco; Valero, Rosa

    The formation of molecular complexes between flavine adenine dinucleotide (FAD) and some β-carboline derivatives [antidepressant drugs that have a pronounced inhibition of monoamine oxidase (MAO)] has been studied by using electronic absorption and fluorescence spectroscopic methods. Thermodynamic parameters have been determined from the values of association constants for the molecular complexes at various temperatures. The influence of substituents in the β-carboline molecule on the stability of the complexes formed was also investigated.

  16. Spectroscopic imaging in electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Pennycook, Stephen J; Colliex, C.

    2012-01-01

    In the scanning transmission electron microscope, multiple signals can be simultaneously collected, including the transmitted and scattered electron signals (bright field and annular dark field or Z-contrast images), along with spectroscopic signals such as inelastically scattered electrons and emitted photons. In the last few years, the successful development of aberration correctors for the electron microscope has transformed the field of electron microscopy, opening up new possibilities for correlating structure to functionality. Aberration correction not only allows for enhanced structural resolution with incident probes into the sub-angstrom range, but can also provide greater probe currents to facilitate mapping of intrinsically weak spectroscopic signals at the nanoscale or even the atomic level. In this issue of MRS Bulletin, we illustrate the power of the new generation of electron microscopes with a combination of imaging and spectroscopy. We show the mapping of elemental distributions at atomic resolution and also the mapping of electronic and optical properties at unprecedented spatial resolution, with applications ranging from graphene to plasmonic nanostructures, and oxide interfaces to biology.

  17. Spectroscopic insight for tablet compression.

    PubMed

    Lakio, S; Ylinärä, H; Antikainen, O; Räikkönen, H; Yliruusi, J

    2015-02-01

    Tablet compression process has been studied over the years from various perspectives. However what exactly happens to material during compression is still unknown. In this study a novel compression die which enables real-time spectroscopic measurements during the compression of material is represented. Both near infrared and Raman spectroscope probes can be attached to the die. In this study the usage of the die is demonstrated by using Raman spectroscopy. Eicosane, d-glucose anhydrate, α-lactose monohydrate and xylitol were used in the study because their compression behavior and bonding properties during compression were assumed to be different. The intensity of the Raman signal changed during compression with all of the materials. However, the intensity changes were different within the materials. The biggest differences were within the xylitol spectra. It was noticed that some peaks disappeared with higher compression pressures indicating that the pressure affected variously on different bonds in xylitol structure. These reversible changes were supposed to relate the changes in conformation and crystal structure. As a conclusion, the die was found to be a significant addition for studying compression process in real-time. It can help to reveal Process induced transformations (PITs) occurring during powder compaction.

  18. Spectroscopic studies of cryogenic fluids: Benzene in propane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nowak, R.; Bernstein, E. R.

    1987-03-01

    Energy shifts and bandwidths for the 1B2u↔1A1g optical absorption and emission transitions of benzene dissolved in propane are presented as a function of pressure, temperature, and density. Both absorption and emission spectra exhibit shifts to lower energy as a function of density, whereas no shifts are observed if density is kept constant and temperature and pressure are varied simultaneously. Density is thus the fundamental microscopic parameter for energy shifts of optical transitions. The emission half-width is a linear function of both temperature and pressure but the absorption half-width is dependent only upon pressure. These results are interpreted qualitatively in terms of changes occurring in the intermolecular potentials of the ground and excited states. Both changes in shape of and separation between the ground and excited state potentials are considered as a function of density. Classical dielectric (Onsager-Böttcher), microscopic dielectric (Wertheim) and microscopic quantum statistical mechanical (Schweizer-Chandler) theories of solvent effects on solute electronic spectra are compared with the experimental results. Calculations suggest limited applicability of dielectric theories but good agreement between experiment and microscopic theory. The results demonstrate the usefulness of cryogenic solutions for high pressure, low temperature spectroscopic studies of liquids.

  19. Direct UV-spectroscopic measurement of selected ionic-liquid vapors

    SciTech Connect

    Dai, Sheng; Luo, Huimin; Wang, Congmin; Li, Haoran

    2010-01-01

    The hallmark of ionic liquids lies in their negligible vapor pressure. This ultralow vapor pressure makes it difficult to conduct the direct spectroscopic measurement of ionic-liquid vapors. In fact, there have been no electronic spectroscopic data currently available for ionic-liquid vapors. This deficiency significantly hampers the fundamental understanding of the unique molecular structures of ionic liquids. Herein, the UV absorption spectra of eight ionic liquids, such as 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide ([Bmim{sup +}] [Tf{sub 2}N{sup -}]) and 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(perfluoroethylsulfonyl)imide ([Emim{sup +}][beti{sup -}]) in the vapor phase in a distillation-like environment, were measured through a high-temperature spectroscopic technique to fill this knowledge gap. Two strong absorption peaks of the [Bmim{sup +}][Tf{sub 2}N{sup -}] vapor lie at 202 and 211 nm, slightly different from those of the neat [Bmim{sup +}][Tf{sub 2}N{sup -}] thin film and its solution in water. Based on the quantitative determination of the vapor absorption spectra as a function of temperature, the vaporization enthalpies of these ionic liquids vapors were measured and found to be in good agreement with the corresponding literature values. This in situ method opens up a new avenue to study the nature of ionic-liquid vapors and to determine the vaporization enthalpies of ionic liquids.

  20. HEXA: a machine for spectroscopic cartography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrado, D.; Aceituno, J.; Galadí, D.; Iglesias-Páramo, J.; Sánchez, S. F.

    2013-05-01

    We have performed a conceptual and viability study for HEXA, a 6.5 m aperture, wide-field telescope, with high multiplexing factor, framed in the strategic plan for the Calar Alto observatory in 2014-2018 and beyond, centred on the scientific cases arisen from the current need for wide-field spectroscopic surveys with very large multiplexing capability. The baseline design considers a field-of-view of 1.5°, multiplexing factor around or over 500 and possible spectral resolutions in the interval R = 5000 - 50 000, with instruments placed on two Nasmyth platforms. Other variants are also considered, including Ritchey-Chrétien and prime-focus solutions. The telescope concept is described, together with the instruments that have already undergone, or that are still undergoing, the conceptual design process: CEO, an innovative Imaging Fourier Transform spectrograph. GEA, a Gaia-inspired drift-scanning slitless spectrograph. BRONTESS, a fast and simple camera for guiding and ToO work. A PMAS-based multi-IFU, highly multiplexed spectrograph. And the multi-fibre spectrograph GYGES. Some of the instrument concepts analysed are based on the versatile fiber-positioner HECATE (with a minimum of 361 positioners). Some of the fibre-based instruments would allow, too, fibres entering a battery of CAF{É}-type high-res spectrographs.

  1. Spectroscopic Survey Of Delta Scuti Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kahraman Alicavus, Filiz; Niemczura, Ewa; Polinska, Magdalena; Helminiak, Krzysztof G.; Lampens, Patricia; Molenda-Zakowicz, Joanna; Ukita, Nobuharu; Kambe, Eiji

    2016-07-01

    We present the results of a spectroscopic study of pulsating stars of Delta Scuti type. The spectral types and luminosity classes, fundamental atmospheric parameters (the effective temperature, surface gravity, microturbulent velocity), detailed chemical composition and projected rotational velocities of a significant number of Delta Scuti-type stars were derived. The spectral classification was performed by comparing the spectra of our targets with the spectra of standard stars. The atmospheric parameters were determined by using different methods. The initial atmospheric parameters were derived from the analysis of photometric indices, the spectral energy distribution and the hydrogen lines, while the final atmospheric parameters were obtained from the analysis of iron lines. The spectrum synthesis method was used to determine chemical compositions of the investigated stars. As a result, we derived accurate atmospheric parameters, the projected rotational velocities and the abundance patterns of analysed sample. These results allow us to examine the position of Delta Scuti-type stars in the H-R diagram, and to investigate the effect of the rotational velocity on pulsation properties and a chemical difference between the Delta Scuti-type stars and the Gamma Doradus and A-F type hybrid stars.

  2. Towards quantitative atmospheric water vapor profiling with differential absorption lidar.

    PubMed

    Dinovitser, Alex; Gunn, Lachlan J; Abbott, Derek

    2015-08-24

    Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL) is a powerful laser-based technique for trace gas profiling of the atmosphere. However, this technique is still under active development requiring precise and accurate wavelength stabilization, as well as accurate spectroscopic parameters of the specific resonance line and the effective absorption cross-section of the system. In this paper we describe a novel master laser system that extends our previous work for robust stabilization to virtually any number of multiple side-line laser wavelengths for the future probing to greater altitudes. In this paper, we also highlight the significance of laser spectral purity on DIAL accuracy, and illustrate a simple re-arrangement of a system for measuring effective absorption cross-section. We present a calibration technique where the laser light is guided to an absorption cell with 33 m path length, and a quantitative number density measurement is then used to obtain the effective absorption cross-section. The same absorption cell is then used for on-line laser stabilization, while microwave beat-frequencies are used to stabilize any number of off-line lasers. We present preliminary results using ∼300 nJ, 1 μs pulses at 3 kHz, with the seed laser operating as a nanojoule transmitter at 822.922 nm, and a receiver consisting of a photomultiplier tube (PMT) coupled to a 356 mm mirror.

  3. Covalent dyads of porphyrin-fullerene and perylene-fullerene for organic photovoltaics: Spectroscopic and photocurrent studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wróbel, Danuta; Lewandowska, Kornelia

    2011-07-01

    Supermolecular complexes of zinc porphyrin or perylenediimide as covalent dyads with fullerene (C 60) in chloroform and as Langmuir-Blodgett layers on an Au substrate were studied. In our studies we have used following spectroscopic methods: electronic absorption, fluorescence and electron spin resonance in solution. Also infrared absorption spectra in a KBr pellet and reflectance-absorption in Langmuir-Blodgett layers were monitored. Photocurrent generation in a photoelectrochemical cell was also studied. The redistribution of charge both upon porphyrin linkage to C 60 and when the systems are deposited on the Au substrate was shown. Photocurrent examinations show a great influence of the fullerene presence on photoresponse of the systems.

  4. Inclusion complexation between baicalein and β-cyclodextrin and the influence of β-cyclodextrin on the binding of baicalein with DNA: a spectroscopic approach.

    PubMed

    Sameena, Yousuf; Chandrasekaran, Sowrirajan; Israel V M V, Enoch

    2016-07-01

    This work deals with the commonly studied cyclic oligosaccharide and gains importance as it is entered on a drug delivering carbohydrate and provides insight into the oligosaccharide complex-biomolecular interaction. The binding of a flavone, baicalein, to β-cyclodextrin and calf thymus DNA is studied. The binding of baicalein to calf thymus DNA in the presence of β-cyclodextrin is analysed using the UV-vis absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy. The mode of binding and structure of the baicalein-β-cyclodextrin complex are reported. The role of the structure and the stoichiometry of the inclusion complex of baicalein-β-cyclodextrin in its influence on DNA binding are analysed. Highlights • This paper deals with the binding of a flavone, baicalein to β-cyclodextrin and/or DNA. • The inclusion complexation between baicalein and β-cyclodextrin is analysed. • The stoichiometry and the binding strength of the inclusion complex is reported. • The role of β-cyclodextrin in tuning the binding of baicalein to DNA is emphasized. • Spectroscopic and docking analysis are used to articulate the results.

  5. Plant roots and spectroscopic methods - analyzing species, biomass and vitality.

    PubMed

    Rewald, Boris; Meinen, Catharina

    2013-01-01

    In order to understand plant functioning, plant community composition, and terrestrial biogeochemistry, it is decisive to study standing root biomass, (fine) root dynamics, and interactions belowground. While most plant taxa can be identified by visual criteria aboveground, roots show less distinctive features. Furthermore, root systems of neighboring plants are rarely spatially segregated; thus, most soil horizons and samples hold roots of more than one species necessitating root sorting according to taxa. In the last decades, various approaches, ranging from anatomical and morphological analyses to differences in chemical composition and DNA sequencing were applied to discern species' identity and biomass belowground. Among those methods, a variety of spectroscopic methods was used to detect differences in the chemical composition of roots. In this review, spectroscopic methods used to study root systems of herbaceous and woody species in excised samples or in situ will be discussed. In detail, techniques will be reviewed according to their usability to discern root taxa, to determine root vitality, and to quantify root biomass non-destructively or in soil cores holding mixtures of plant roots. In addition, spectroscopic methods which may be able to play an increasing role in future studies on root biomass and related traits are highlighted.

  6. Spectroscopic analysis of keratin endogenous signal for skin multiphoton microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pena, A.-M.; Strupler, M.; Boulesteix, T.; Schanne-Klein, M.-C.

    2005-08-01

    We recorded one-photon excited fluorescence (1PEF) and two-photon excited fluorescence (2PEF) spectra of purified keratin from human epidermis, and determined the action cross section of this endogenous chromophore. We used this spectroscopic analysis to analyse multiphoton images of skin biopsies and assign the intrinsic fluorescence signals in the epidermis. We observed a good agreement between in situ and in vitro 2PEF spectra of keratin. This study provides a comprehensive characterization of the 2PEF signal of the keratins from the epidermis, and will be of practical interest for multiphoton imaging of the skin.

  7. Absorption heat pump system

    DOEpatents

    Grossman, Gershon; Perez-Blanco, Horacio

    1984-01-01

    An improvement in an absorption heat pump cycle is obtained by adding adiabatic absorption and desorption steps to the absorber and desorber of the system. The adiabatic processes make it possible to obtain the highest temperature in the absorber before any heat is removed from it and the lowest temperature in the desorber before heat is added to it, allowing for efficient utilization of the thermodynamic availability of the heat supply stream. The improved system can operate with a larger difference between high and low working fluid concentrations, less circulation losses, and more efficient heat exchange than a conventional system.

  8. Absorption Heat Pump Cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunugi, Yoshifumi; Kashiwagi, Takao

    Various advanced absorption cycles are studied, developed and invented. In this paper, their cycles are classified and arranged using the three categories: effect, stage and loop, then an outline of the cycles are explained on the Duehring diagram. Their cycles include high COP cycles for refrigerations and heat pumps, high temperature lift cycles for heat transformer, absorption-compression hybrid cycles and heat pump transformer cycle. The highest COPi is attained by the seven effect cycle. In addition, the cycles for low temperature are invented and explained. Furthermore the power generation • refrigeration cycles are illustrated.

  9. Photoionization-driven Absorption-line Variability in Balmer Absorption Line Quasar LBQS 1206+1052

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Luming; Zhou, Hongyan; Ji, Tuo; Jiang, Peng; Liu, Bo; Liu, Wenjuan; Pan, Xiang; Shi, Xiheng; Wang, Jianguo; Wang, Tinggui; Yang, Chenwei; Zhang, Shaohua; Miller, Lauren P.

    2017-04-01

    In this paper we present an analysis of absorption-line variability in mini-BAL quasar LBQS 1206+1052. The Sloan Digital Sky Survey spectrum demonstrates that the absorption troughs can be divided into two components of blueshift velocities of ∼700 and ∼1400 km s‑1 relative to the quasar rest frame. The former component shows rare Balmer absorption, which is an indicator of high-density absorbing gas; thus, the quasar is worth follow-up spectroscopic observations. Our follow-up optical and near-infrared spectra using MMT, YFOSC, TSpec, and DBSP reveal that the strengths of the absorption lines vary for both components, while the velocities do not change. We reproduce all of the spectral data by assuming that only the ionization state of the absorbing gas is variable and that all other physical properties are invariable. The variation of ionization is consistent with the variation of optical continuum from the V-band light curve. Additionally, we cannot interpret the data by assuming that the variability is due to a movement of the absorbing gas. Therefore, our analysis strongly indicates that the absorption-line variability in LBQS 1206+1052 is photoionization driven. As shown from photoionization simulations, the absorbing gas with blueshift velocity of ∼700 km s‑1 has a density in the range of 109 to 1010 cm‑3 and a distance of ∼1 pc, and the gas with blueshift velocity of ∼1400 km s‑1 has a density of 103 cm‑3 and a distance of ∼1 kpc.

  10. QUANTIFYING THE BIASES OF SPECTROSCOPICALLY SELECTED GRAVITATIONAL LENSES

    SciTech Connect

    Arneson, Ryan A.; Brownstein, Joel R.; Bolton, Adam S. E-mail: joelbrownstein@astro.utah.edu

    2012-07-01

    Spectroscopic selection has been the most productive technique for the selection of galaxy-scale strong gravitational lens systems with known redshifts. Statistically significant samples of strong lenses provide a powerful method for measuring the mass-density parameters of the lensing population, but results can only be generalized to the parent population if the lensing selection biases are sufficiently understood. We perform controlled Monte Carlo simulations of spectroscopic lens surveys in order to quantify the bias of lenses relative to parent galaxies in velocity dispersion, mass axis ratio, and mass-density profile. For parameters typical of the SLACS and BELLS surveys, we find (1) no significant mass axis ratio detection bias of lenses relative to parent galaxies; (2) a very small detection bias toward shallow mass-density profiles, which is likely negligible compared to other sources of uncertainty in this parameter; (3) a detection bias toward smaller Einstein radius for systems drawn from parent populations with group- and cluster-scale lensing masses; and (4) a lens-modeling bias toward larger velocity dispersions for systems drawn from parent samples with sub-arcsecond mean Einstein radii. This last finding indicates that the incorporation of velocity-dispersion upper limits of non-lenses is an important ingredient for unbiased analyses of spectroscopically selected lens samples. In general, we find that the completeness of spectroscopic lens surveys in the plane of Einstein radius and mass-density profile power-law index is quite uniform, up to a sharp drop in the region of large Einstein radius and steep mass-density profile, and hence that such surveys are ideally suited to the study of massive field galaxies.

  11. Spectroscopic characterization by photodiode array detection of human urinary and amniotic protein HC subpopulations fractionated by anion-exchange and size-exclusion high-performance liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Calero, M; Escribano, J; Soriano, F; Grubb, A; Brew, K; Méndez, E

    1996-01-05

    A procedure for spectroscopic characterization and partial fractionation of human protein HC populations by high-performance liquid chromatography-photodiode array ultraviolet-visible detection is reported. Human protein HC from urine or amniotic fluid fractionated by anion-exchange HPLC in a protein Pak DEAE 5PW appeared to be heterogeneous as judged by the asymmetric elution pattern, consisting of a continuous irregular broad peak with several shoulders distributed along the whole chromatogram. Selected fractions containing shoulders were rechromatographed and finally six symmetrical homogeneous peaks with different retention times were obtained from each protein HC preparation. The direct automatic absorption spectra analyses at each peak maximum, indicated that all of the homogeneous peaks seemed to be protein HC, all of them associated to the same chromophore although with different stoichiometry ratios. Isoelectric focusing showed that each peak was composed of a limited number of subpopulations of protein HC with different isoelectric points. Size microheterogeneity has been also demonstrated in both urinary and amniotic protein HC preparations by a combination of size-exclusion HPLC on a TSK 3000 SW6 column and photodiode array detection. Partial fractionation of human albumin on an analytical anion-exchange Mono-Q PC 1.6/5 column, has allowed the identification of heterogeneous chromophore-containing populations displaying significant absorption in the visible region in resemblance to that of protein HC.

  12. Forensic Analysis of Human Autopsy Tissue for the Presence of Polydimethylsiloxane (Silicone) and Volatile Cyclic Siloxanes using Macro FT-IR, FT-IR Spectroscopic Imaging and Headspace GC-MS.

    PubMed

    Lanzarotta, Adam; Kelley, Caroline Machal

    2016-05-01

    This study describes effective and straightforward primary and secondary methods for the detection of silicone in human autopsy tissue. The primary method is polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) specific and employs either macro-attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FT-IR) spectroscopy for samples with a high PDMS concentration (relative to that of the matrix) or micro-FT-IR spectroscopic imaging in a reflection/absorption modality for samples with a low PDMS concentration. Although the secondary method is not PDMS specific, it employs headspace gas chromatography with mass spectrometric detection (HS/GC-MS) for the detection of low molecular weight volatile cyclic siloxanes (VCS), which are characteristic marker compounds for PDMS. Overall, the combined results from the primary and secondary analyses provide reliable evidence for the presence of silicone.

  13. The Origin, Composition and History of Comets from Spectroscopic Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allamandola, L. J.

    1997-01-01

    A wealth of information essential to understanding the composition and physical structure of cometary ice and hence gain deep insight into the comet's origin and history, can be gleaned by carrying out a full range of spectroscopic studies on the returned sample. These studies ought to be among the first performed as they are generally non-destructive and will provide a broad data bank which will be crucial in planning subsequent analysis. Examples of the spectroscopic techniques along with relative sensitivities and transitions probed, are discussed. Different kind of "spectroscopy" is summarized, with emphasis placed on the kind of information each provides. Infrared spectroscopy should be the premier method of analysis as the mid-IR absorption spectrum of a substance contains more global information about the identity and structure of that material than any other property. In fact, the greatest strides in our understanding of the composition of interstellar ices (thought by many to be the primordial material from which comets have formed) have been taken during the past ten years or so because this was when high quality infrared spectra of the interstellar medium (ISM) first became available. The interpretation of the infrared spectra of mixtures, such as expected in comets, is often (not always) ambiguous. Consequently, a full range of other non-destructive, complementary spectroscopic measurements are required to fully characterize the material, to probe for substances for which the IR is not well suited and to lay the groundwork for future analysis. Given the likelihood that the icy component (including some of the organic and mineral phases) of the returned sample will be exceedingly complex, these techniques must be intensely developed over the next decade and then made ready to apply flawlessly to what will certainly be one of the most precious, and most challenging, samples ever analyzed.

  14. Spectroscopic problems in ITER diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lisitsa, V. S.; Bureyeva, L. A.; Kukushkin, A. B.; Kadomtsev, M. B.; Krupin, V. A.; Levashova, M. G.; Medvedev, A. A.; Mukhin, E. E.; Shurygin, V. A.; Tugarinov, S. N.; Vukolov, K. Yu

    2012-12-01

    Problems of spectroscopic diagnostics of ITER plasma are under consideration. Three types of diagnostics are presented: 1) Balmer lines spectroscopy in the edge and divertor plasmas; 2) Thomson scattering, 3) charge exchange recombination spectroscopy. The Zeeman-Stark structure of line shapes is discussed. The overlapping of isotopes H-D-T spectral line shapes are presented for the SOL and divertor conditions. The polarization measurements of H-alpha spectral lines for H-D mixture on T-10 tokamak are shown in order to separate Zeeman splitting in more details. The problem of plasma background radiation emission for Thomson scattering in ITER is discussed in details. The line shape of P-7 hydrogen spectral line having a wave length close to laser one is presented together with continuum radiation. The charge exchange recombination spectroscopy (CXRS) is discussed in details. The data on Dα, HeII and CVI measurements in CXRS experiments on T-10 tokamak are presented.

  15. The Hubble Spectroscopic Legacy Archive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peeples, Molly S.; Tumlinson, Jason; Fox, Andrew; Aloisi, Alessandra; Ayres, Thomas R.; Danforth, Charles; Fleming, Scott W.; Jenkins, Edward B.; Jedrzejewski, Robert I.; Keeney, Brian A.; Oliveira, Cristina M.

    2016-01-01

    With no future space ultraviolet instruments currently planned, the data from the UV spectrographs aboard the Hubble Space Telescope have a legacy value beyond their initial science goals. The Hubble Spectroscopic Legacy Archive will provide to the community new science-grade combined spectra for all publicly available data obtained by the Cosmic Origins Spectrograph (COS) and the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (STIS). These data will be packaged into "smart archives" according to target type and scientific themes to facilitate the construction of archival samples for common science uses. A new "quick look" capability will make the data easy for users to quickly access, assess the quality of, and download for archival science starting in Cycle 24, with the first generation of these products for the FUV modes of COS available online via MAST in early 2016.

  16. Spectroscopic studies of anthracyclines: Structural characterization and in vitro tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szafraniec, Ewelina; Majzner, Katarzyna; Farhane, Zeineb; Byrne, Hugh J.; Lukawska, Malgorzata; Oszczapowicz, Irena; Chlopicki, Stefan; Baranska, Malgorzata

    2016-12-01

    A broad spectroscopic characterization, using ultraviolet-visible (UV-vis) and Fourier transform infrared absorption as well as Raman scattering, of two commonly used anthracyclines antibiotics (DOX) daunorubicin (DNR), their epimers (EDOX, EDNR) and ten selected analogs is presented. The paper serves as a comprehensive spectral library of UV-vis, IR and Raman spectra of anthracyclines in the solid state and in solution. The particular advantage of Raman spectroscopy for the measurement and analysis of individual antibiotics is demonstrated. Raman spectroscopy can be used to monitor the in vitro uptake and distribution of the drug in cells, using both 488 nm and 785 nm as source wavelengths, with submicrometer spatial resolution, although the cellular accumulation of the drug is different in each case. The high information content of Raman spectra allows studies of the drug-cell interactions, and so the method seems very suitable for monitoring drug uptake and mechanisms of interaction with cellular compartments at the subcellular level.

  17. Spectroscopic Analysis of the Supergiant Star HD 54605

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peña, L.; Rosenzweig, P.; Guzmán, E.; Hearnshaw, J.

    2009-05-01

    The main purpose of the present study is to analyze a high resolution spectrum of the supergiant star HD 54605, obtained in the year 2003, with a CCD coupled with the spectrograph HERCULES, attached to the 1m reflector telescope of Mt. John Observatory of the University of Canterbury (New Zealand). This spectrum covers the region λλ ≈ 4505-7080Å, with R = 41000 and a dispersion of ≈ 2Å/mm. According to previous spectroscopic observations, of low dispersion, the radial velocity of this star showed that it does not vary in periods of time relatively short. Until the present, we have identified five hundred photospheric lines, from which, with no doubt, we will obtain a satisfactory result that will give an important contribution to the database of the values of the radial velocity of HD 54605. We observe that Hβ, shows a relatively wide and deep profile and is in complete absorption.

  18. Amino Acid and Peptide Immobilization on Oxidized Nanocellulose: Spectroscopic Characterization

    PubMed Central

    Barazzouk, Saïd; Daneault, Claude

    2012-01-01

    In this work, oxidized nanocellulose (ONC) was synthesized and chemically coupled with amino acids and peptides using a two step coupling method at room temperature. First, ONC was activated by N-ethyl-N’-(3-dimethylaminopropyl) carbodiimide hydrochloride, forming a stable active ester in the presence of N-hydroxysuccinimide. Second, the active ester was reacted with the amino group of the amino acid or peptide, forming an amide bond between ONC and the grafted molecule. Using this method, the intermolecular interaction of amino acids and peptides was avoided and uniform coupling of these molecules on ONC was achieved. The coupling reaction was very fast in mild conditions and without alteration of the polysaccharide. The coupling products (ONC-amino acids and ONC-peptides) were characterized by transmission electron microscopy and by the absorption, emission, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) spectroscopic techniques.

  19. Spectroscopic Investigations of the Photophysics of Cryptophyte Light-Harvesting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dinshaw, Rayomond

    The biological significance of photosynthesis is indisputable as it is necessary for nearly all life on earth. Photosynthesis provides chemical energy for plants, algae, and bacteria, while heterotrophic organisms rely on these species as their ultimate food source. The initial step in photosynthesis requires the absorption of sunlight to create electronic excitations. Light-harvesting proteins play the functional role of capturing solar radiation and transferring the resulting excitation to the reaction centers where it is used to carry out the chemical reactions of photosynthesis. Despite the wide variety of light-harvesting protein structures and arrangements, most light-harvesting proteins are able to utilize the captured solar energy for charge separation with near perfect quantum efficiency.1 This thesis will focus on understanding the energy transfer dynamics and photophysics of a specific subset of light-harvesting antennae known as phycobiliproteins. These proteins are extracted from cryptophyte algae and are investigated using steady-state and ultrafast spectroscopic techniques.

  20. Spectroscopic study of photo and thermal destruction of riboflavin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Astanov, Salikh; Sharipov, Mirzo Z.; Fayzullaev, Askar R.; Kurtaliev, Eldar N.; Nizomov, Negmat

    2014-08-01

    Influence of temperature and light irradiation on the spectroscopic properties of aqueous solutions of riboflavin was studied using linear dichroism method, absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy. It was established that in a wide temperature range 290-423 K there is a decline of absorbance and fluorescence ability, which is explained by thermodestruction of riboflavin. It is shown that the proportion of molecules, which have undergone degradation, are in the range of 4-28%, and depends on the concentration and quantity of temperature effects. Introduction of hydrochloric and sulfuric acids, as well as different metal ions leads to an increase in the photostability of riboflavin solutions by 2-2.5 times. The observed phenomena are explained by the formation protonation form of riboflavin and a complex between the metal ions and oxygen atoms of the carbonyl group of riboflavin, respectively.

  1. Spectroscopic Study of Low Mass Members of NGC 2244

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alty, Michelle; Ybarra, Jason E.; Román-Zúñiga, Carlos G.; Lada, Elizabeth A.

    2017-01-01

    The results of a near-infrared spectroscopic study of low-mass stars in open cluster NGC 2244 are presented. JH spectra of the stars were obtained using the FLAMINGOS instrument at KPNO. To determine cluster membership, we used Spitzer Space Telescope mid-infrared photometry along with X-ray detections from the Chandra X-ray Observatory. The stars were spectral typed using absorption line ratios and spectral shapes. The stars were then plotted on an H-R diagram along with theoretical isochrones. We discuss these results in context of cluster evolution in the Rosette Molecular Complex. Work supported, in part, by the Dr. John W. Martin Summer Science Research Institute at Bridgewater College.

  2. Ultrasonic and spectroscopic studies on photoactivation of euglena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, Mitsunori; Morita, Shin

    2006-12-01

    We studied the effect of the irradiation wavelength on the activity of photosynthetic euglena. The ultrasonic manipulation technique was used for both the activity evaluation and the movement restriction in the spectral measurements. Euglenas that had been preserved in darkness became inactive, and accordingly most of them were trapped by the ultrasonic standing wave (0.8mW/mm2). However, when they were exposed to light of 500 or 700nm wavelength (0.13W/m2), they became active enough to escape from the trapping. By contrast, irradiation at 550, 600, or 650nm wavelength had no effect on their activity. Spectroscopic measurements, which used to be difficult for locomotive microorganisms, were conducted successfully by trapping euglena at a node of the ultrasonic standing wave. The absorption bands were observed at around 500 or 700nm, which corresponded to the irradiation wavelengths that activated euglena.

  3. Spectroscopic analysis of vermicompost for determination of nutritional quality.

    PubMed

    Subhash Kumar, M; Rajiv, P; Rajeshwari, Sivaraj; Venckatesh, Rajendran

    2015-01-25

    Spectroscopic analysis has been carried out to examine the compost quality, maturity and nutritional levels of vermicompost and compost of Eichhornia. 50% Eichhorniacrassipes and 50% cow dung mixtures were vermicomposted using earthworms (Eudrilus eugeniae) and collected on different days' time intervals. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) spectra reveal the presence of humic substance from compost and vermicompost, which improves the soil fertility. Gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy (GC-MS) analysis shows maximum level of Benzene propanoic acid (95.98%) and by 2-Propanone, 1-Phenyl-, OXIM (10.10%) from vermicompost through earthworms activity. Atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS) results reported high level of micronutrient from Eichhornia mediated compost and vermicompost.

  4. Spectroscopic analysis of vermicompost for determination of nutritional quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subhash Kumar, M.; Rajiv, P.; Rajeshwari, Sivaraj; Venckatesh, Rajendran

    2015-01-01

    Spectroscopic analysis has been carried out to examine the compost quality, maturity and nutritional levels of vermicompost and compost of Eichhornia. 50% Eichhorniacrassipes and 50% cow dung mixtures were vermicomposted using earthworms (Eudrilus eugeniae) and collected on different days' time intervals. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) spectra reveal the presence of humic substance from compost and vermicompost, which improves the soil fertility. Gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy (GC-MS) analysis shows maximum level of Benzene propanoic acid (95.98%) and by 2-Propanone, 1-Phenyl-, OXIM (10.10%) from vermicompost through earthworms activity. Atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS) results reported high level of micronutrient from Eichhornia mediated compost and vermicompost.

  5. Spectroscopic Studies of Abell Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Way, Michael Joseph

    The objectives of this work are to use spectroscopic techniques to accurately categorize galaxies as either HII region star forming galaxies or as Active Galactic Nuclei powered via a black hole, and to use radial velocities and projected positions of galaxies in clusters to obtain the total cluster mass and its distribution. The masses and distributions compare well to X-ray mass measurements. The commonly used Dressler, A., Thompson, I. & Shectman, S. 1985, ApJ, 288, 481 technique for discriminating between Active Galactic Nuclei and HII region galaxies uses the measurement of the equivalent width of the emission lines (OII) 3727 A, H/beta, and (OIII) 5007 A. High quality spectra from 42 galaxies were taken and it is shown that their method is not capable of distinguishing between Active Galactic Nuclei and HII region galaxies. The emission line flux from H/beta, (OIII) 5007 A, (OI) 6300 A, Hα, (NII) 6583 A, and (SII) 6716+6731 A in combination with the method of Veilleux, S. & Osterbrock, D. E. 1987, ApJS, 63, 295 must be used to accurately distinguish between Active Galactic Nuclei and HII region galaxies. Galaxy radial velocities from spectroscopic data and their projected 2-D positions in clusters are used to obtain robust estimates of the total mass and mass distribution in two clusters. The total mass is calculated using the Virial theorem after removing substructure. The mass distribution is estimated via several robust statistical tests for 1-D, 2-D and 3-D structure. It is shown that the derived mass estimates agree well with those found independently from hot X-ray gas emission in clusters.

  6. Two-Phonon Absorption

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamilton, M. W.

    2007-01-01

    A nonlinear aspect of the acousto-optic interaction that is analogous to multi-photon absorption is discussed. An experiment is described in which the second-order acousto-optically scattered intensity is measured and found to scale with the square of the acoustic intensity. This experiment using a commercially available acousto-optic modulator is…

  7. The effect of varying short-chain alkyl substitution on the molar absorptivity and quantum yield of cyanine dyes.

    PubMed

    Chapman, Gala; Henary, Maged; Patonay, Gabor

    2011-01-01

    The effect of varying short-chain alkyl substitution of the indole nitrogens on the spectroscopic properties of cyanine dyes was examined. Molar absorptivities and fluorescence quantum yields were determined for a set of pentamethine dyes and a set of heptamethine dyes for which the substitution of the indole nitrogen was varied. For both sets of dyes, increasing alkyl chain length resulted in no significant change in quantum yield or molar absorptivity. These results may be useful in designing new cyanine dyes for analytical applications and predicting their spectroscopic properties.

  8. Novel dipodal Schiff base compounds: Synthesis, characterization and spectroscopic studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obali, Aslihan Yilmaz; Ucan, Halil Ismet

    2015-02-01

    Two novel dipodal Schiff base compounds 1,2-benzyloxy-bis-[2-(benzylideneamino)phenol, L1 and 1,2-benzyloxy-bis[3-(benzylideneamino)pyridine], L2 were synthesized. Their sensing actions were confirmed by UV-Vis absorbance and emission spectroscopic studies in presence of Cr(III), Mn(II), Fe(III), Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II), Zn(II), Sn(II), Cd(II) and Pb(II) in methanol medium (1 × 10-4 M). It was found that the dipodal compounds can selectively bind to Cu(II) and Pb(II) metal ions with a significant change in its emission and absorption spectra, while the addition of other metal ions (Cr(III), Mn(II), Fe(III), Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II), Zn(II), Sn(II), Cd(II) and Pb(II)) produces insignificant or minor changes. The host-guest complexes formed were determined by Job's plot method. As a chemosensor, L1 and L2 dipodal Schiff base compounds shows a specific selectivity towards Cu(II) and Pb(II) ions in according to all spectroscopic data.

  9. Spectroscopic diagnostics of plasma during laser processing of aluminium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lober, R.; Mazumder, J.

    2007-10-01

    The role of the plasma in laser-metal interaction is of considerable interest due to its influence in the energy transfer mechanism in industrial laser materials processing. A 10 kW CO2 laser was used to study its interaction with aluminium under an argon environment. The objective was to determine the absorption and refraction of the laser beam through the plasma during the processing of aluminium. Laser processing of aluminium is becoming an important topic for many industries, including the automobile industry. The spectroscopic relative line to continuum method was used to determine the electron temperature distribution within the plasma by investigating the 4158 Å Ar I line emission and the continuum adjacent to it. The plasmas are induced in 1.0 atm pure Ar environment over a translating Al target, using f/7 and 10 kW CO2 laser. Spectroscopic data indicated that the plasma composition and behaviour were Ar-dominated. Experimental results indicated the plasma core temperature to be 14 000-15 300 K over the incident range of laser powers investigated from 5 to 7 kW. It was found that 7.5-29% of the incident laser power was absorbed by the plasma. Cross-section analysis of the melt pools from the Al samples revealed the absence of any key-hole formation and confirmed that the energy transfer mechanism in the targets was conduction dominated for the reported range of experimental data.

  10. Structure, spectroscopic properties, and photochemistry of the hydroxymethoxy radical.

    PubMed

    Eisfeld, Wolfgang; Francisco, Joseph S

    2009-10-07

    The hydroxymethoxy (HMO) radical is proposed to be the primary product of photodissociation of the atmospherically important hydroxymethyl hydroperoxide (HMHP). This transient species is still unknown and the present study provides theoretical predictions of properties, spectroscopy, and photochemistry of this radical for the first time. Structures, harmonic frequencies, vertical and vibrationally resolved absorption spectra are computed for several electronic states, using state-of-the-art ab initio electronic structure methods. The lowest excited state, absorbing in the mid to near infrared, seems to be the most promising candidate for spectroscopic identification of HMO. The electron affinity of 2.232 eV and the characteristic photodetachment spectrum is also predicted to be suitable for experimental investigations. By contrast, the B state absorbing around 3.5 eV is proposed to undergo fast photodissociation, forming CH(2)O and OH, and thus appears less useful for spectroscopic detection of HMO. However, the photodissociation may be important for the atmospheric chemistry of HMHP. Ionization of HMO will also lead to dissociation or rearrangement of the cation and will yield only unspecific spectra.

  11. The 2003 edition of the GEISA/IASI spectroscopic database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacquinet-Husson, N.; Scott, N. A.; Chédin, A.; Garceran, K.; Armante, R.; Chursin, A. A.; Barbe, A.; Birk, M.; Brown, L. R.; Camy-Peyret, C.; Claveau, C.; Clerbaux, C.; Coheur, P. F.; Dana, V.; Daumont, L.; Debacker-Barilly, M. R.; Flaud, J. M.; Goldman, A.; Hamdouni, A.; Hess, M.; Jacquemart, D.; Köpke, P.; Mandin, J. Y.; Massie, S.; Mikhailenko, S.; Nemtchinov, V.; Nikitin, A.; Newnham, D.; Perrin, A.; Perevalov, V. I.; Régalia-Jarlot, L.; Rublev, A.; Schreier, F.; Schult, I.; Smith, K. M.; Tashkun, S. A.; Teffo, J. L.; Toth, R. A.; Tyuterev, Vl. G.; Vander Auwera, J.; Varanasi, P.; Wagner, G.

    2005-11-01

    The content of the current (2003) version, GEISA/IASI-03, of the computer-accessible spectroscopic database, GEISA/IASI, is described. This “system” or database is comprised of three independent spectroscopic archives, which are (a) a database of individual spectral line parameters on 14 molecules, H2O, CO2, O3, N2O, CO, CH4, O2, NO, SO2, NO2, HNO3, OCS, C2H2, N2, and the related 51 isotopomers and isotopologues, representing 702,550 entries, in the spectral range 599 3001cm, (b) a database of spectral absorption cross-sections (6,572,329 entries related to six molecules, CFC-11, CFC-12, CFC-14, HCFC-22, N2O5, CCl4), and a catalogue of microphysical and optical properties (mainly, the refractive indices) of atmospheric aerosols. The modifications and improvements, which have been implemented since the earlier editions of this database, in terms of content and management, have been explained in detail. GEISA/IASI has been created with the specific purpose of assessing the capability of measurement by the IASI instrument within the designated goals of ISSWG in the frame of the CNES/EUMETSAT European Polar System preparation. All the archived data can be handled through a user-friendly associated management software, which is posted on the ARA/LMD group web site at http://ara.lmd.polytechnique.fr.

  12. Combined spectroscopic and quantum chemical studies of ezetimibe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prajapati, Preeti; Pandey, Jaya; Shimpi, Manishkumar R.; Srivastava, Anubha; Tandon, Poonam; Velaga, Sitaram P.; Sinha, Kirti

    2016-12-01

    Ezetimibe (EZT) is a hypocholesterolemic agent used for the treatment of elevated blood cholesterol levels as it lowers the blood cholesterol by blocking the absorption of cholesterol in intestine. Study aims to combine experimental and computational methods to provide insights into the structural and vibrational spectroscopic properties of EZT which is important for explaining drug substance physical and biological properties. Computational study on molecular properties of ezetimibe is presented using density functional theory (DFT) with B3LYP functional and 6-311++G(d,p) basis set. A detailed vibrational assignment has been done for the observed IR and Raman spectra of EZT. In addition to the conformational study, hydrogen bonding and molecular docking studies have been also performed. For conformational studies, the double well potential energy curves have been plotted for the rotation around the six flexible bonds of the molecule. UV absorption spectrum was examined in methanol solvent and compared with calculated one in solvent environment (IEF-PCM) using TD-DFT/6-31G basis set. HOMO-LUMO energy gap of both the conformers have also been calculated in order to predict its chemical reactivity and stability. The stability of the molecule was also examined by means of natural bond analysis (NBO) analysis. To account for the chemical reactivity and site selectivity of the molecules, molecular electrostatic potential (MEPS) map has been plotted. The combination of experimental and calculated results provide an insight into the structural and vibrational spectroscopic properties of EZT. In order to give an insight for the biological activity of EZT, molecular docking of EZT with protein NPC1L1 has been done.

  13. Investigating a physical basis for spectroscopic estimates of leaf nitrogen concentration

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kokaly, R.F.

    2001-01-01

    The reflectance spectra of dried and ground plant foliage are examined for changes directly due to increasing nitrogen concentration. A broadening of the 2.1-??m absorption feature is observed as nitrogen concentration increases. The broadening is shown to arise from two absorptions at 2.054 ??m and 2.172 ??m. The wavelength positions of these absorptions coincide with the absorption characteristics of the nitrogen-containing amide bonds in proteins. The observed presence of these absorption features in the reflectance spectra of dried foliage is suggested to form a physical basis for high correlations established by stepwise multiple linear regression techniques between the reflectance of dry plant samples and their nitrogen concentration. The consistent change in the 2.1-??m absorption feature as nitrogen increases and the offset position of protein absorptions compared to those of other plant components together indicate that a generally applicable algorithm may be developed for spectroscopic estimates of nitrogen concentration from the reflectance spectra of dried plant foliage samples. ?? 2001 Published by Elsevier Science Ireland Ltd.

  14. Matrix isolation FTIR spectroscopic and theoretical study of 3,3-dichloro-1,1,1-trifluoropropane (HCFC-243).

    PubMed

    Lucena, J R; Sharma, A; Reva, I D; Araújo, R M C U; Ventura, E; do Monte, S A; Braga, C F; Ramos, M N; Fausto, R

    2008-11-20

    The molecular structure and infrared spectrum of the atmospheric pollutant 3,3-dichloro-1,1,1-trifluoropropane (HCFC-243) were characterized experimentally and theoretically. The theoretical calculations show the existence of two conformers, with the gauche (G) and trans (T) orientation around the HCCC dihedral angle. Conformer G was calculated to be more stable than form T by more than 10 kJ mol (-1). In consonance with the large predicted relative energy of conformer T, only the G form was identified spectroscopically in cryogenic argon (10 K) and xenon (20 K) matrices prepared from room-temperature equilibrium vapor of the compound. The observed infrared spectra of the matrix-isolated HCFC-243 were interpreted with the aid of high-level density functional theory calculations and normal coordinate analysis. For experimental identification of the weakest IR absorption bands, the spectrum of HCFC-243 in the neat solid state at 145 K was obtained. This spectrum also confirmed the sole presence of the G conformer in the sample. Natural bond orbital and atomic charge analyses were carried out for the two conformers to shed light on the most important intramolecular interactions in the two conformers, in particular those responsible for their relative stability.

  15. Catalysts at work: From integral to spatially resolved X-ray absorption spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Grunwaldt, Jan-Dierk; Kimmerle, Bertram; Baiker, Alfons; Boye, Pit; Schroer, Christian G.; Glatzel, Pieter; Borca, Camelia N.; Beckmann, Felix

    2009-09-25

    Spectroscopic studies on heterogeneous catalysts have mostly been done in an integral mode. However, in many cases spatial variations in catalyst structure can occur, e.g. during impregnation of pre-shaped particles, during reaction in a catalytic reactor, or in microstructured reactors as the present overview shows. Therefore, spatially resolved molecular information on a microscale is required for a comprehensive understanding of theses systems, partly in ex situ studies, partly under stationary reaction conditions and in some cases even under dynamic reaction conditions. Among the different available techniques, X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) is a well-suited tool for this purpose as the different selected examples highlight. Two different techniques, scanning and full-field X-ray microscopy/tomography, are described and compared. At first, the tomographic structure of impregnated alumina pellets is presented using full-field transmission microtomography and compared to the results obtained with a scanning X-ray microbeam technique to analyse the catalyst bed inside a catalytic quartz glass reactor. On the other hand, by using XAS in scanning microtomography, the structure and the distribution of Cu(0), Cu(I), Cu(II) species in a Cu/ZnO catalyst loaded in a quartz capillary microreactor could be reconstructed quantitatively on a virtual section through the reactor. An illustrating example for spatially resolved XAS under reaction conditions is the partial oxidation of methane over noble metal-based catalysts. In order to obtain spectroscopic information on the spatial variation of the oxidation state of the catalyst inside the reactor XAS spectra were recorded by scanning with a micro-focussed beam along the catalyst bed. Alternatively, full-field transmission imaging was used to efficiently determine the distribution of the oxidation state of a catalyst inside a reactor under reaction conditions. The new technical approaches together with quantitative data

  16. Breath Analysis Using Laser Spectroscopic Techniques: Breath Biomarkers, Spectral Fingerprints, and Detection Limits

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chuji; Sahay, Peeyush

    2009-01-01

    Breath analysis, a promising new field of medicine and medical instrumentation, potentially offers noninvasive, real-time, and point-of-care (POC) disease diagnostics and metabolic status monitoring. Numerous breath biomarkers have been detected and quantified so far by using the GC-MS technique. Recent advances in laser spectroscopic techniques and laser sources have driven breath analysis to new heights, moving from laboratory research to commercial reality. Laser spectroscopic detection techniques not only have high-sensitivity and high-selectivity, as equivalently offered by the MS-based techniques, but also have the advantageous features of near real-time response, low instrument costs, and POC function. Of the approximately 35 established breath biomarkers, such as acetone, ammonia, carbon dioxide, ethane, methane, and nitric oxide, 14 species in exhaled human breath have been analyzed by high-sensitivity laser spectroscopic techniques, namely, tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (TDLAS), cavity ringdown spectroscopy (CRDS), integrated cavity output spectroscopy (ICOS), cavity enhanced absorption spectroscopy (CEAS), cavity leak-out spectroscopy (CALOS), photoacoustic spectroscopy (PAS), quartz-enhanced photoacoustic spectroscopy (QEPAS), and optical frequency comb cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopy (OFC-CEAS). Spectral fingerprints of the measured biomarkers span from the UV to the mid-IR spectral regions and the detection limits achieved by the laser techniques range from parts per million to parts per billion levels. Sensors using the laser spectroscopic techniques for a few breath biomarkers, e.g., carbon dioxide, nitric oxide, etc. are commercially available. This review presents an update on the latest developments in laser-based breath analysis. PMID:22408503

  17. A model for oxygen-dependent backscattering spectroscopic contrast from single red blood cells (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Rongrong; Yi, Ji; Chen, Siyu; Zhang, Hao F.; Backman, Vadim

    2016-03-01

    The oxygen-dependent absorption of hemoglobin provides the fundamental contrast for all label-free techniques measuring blood oxygenation. When hemoglobin is packaged into red blood cells (RBCs), the structure of the cells creates light scattering which also depends on the absorption based on the Kramers-Kronig relationship. Thus a proper characterization of the optical behaviors of blood has been a key to any accurate measurement of blood oxygenation, particularly at the capillary level where RBCs are dispersed individually in contrast to a densely packed whole blood. Here we provided a theoretical model under Born Approximation to characterize the oxygen dependent backscattering spectroscopic contrast from single RBCs. Using this theoretical model, we conducted simulations on both oxygenated and deoxygenated single RBCs with different sizes for standard and possible deformed cell geometries in blood flow, all which suggested similar backscattering spectroscopic contrast and were confirmed by Mie Theory and experiments using visible Optical Coherence Tomography (visOCT). As long as the cell size satisfies Gaussian distribution with a coefficient variance (C.V.) large enough, there is clear absorption contrast between the backscattering spectra of oxygenated and deoxygenated single RBCs calculated by this model, so oxygen saturation can then be characterized. Thus, this theoretical model can be extended to extract absorption features of other scattering particles as long as they satisfy Born Approximation.

  18. Syntheses, spectroscopic and thermal analyses of cyanide bridged heteronuclear polymeric complexes: [M(L)2Ni(CN)4]n (Ldbnd N-methylethylenediamine or N-ethylethylenediamine; Mdbnd Ni(II), Cu(II), Zn(II) or Cd(II))

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karaağaç, Dursun; Kürkçüoğlu, Güneş Süheyla

    2016-02-01

    Polymeric tetracyanonickelate(II) complexes of the type [M(L)2Ni(CN)4]n (Ldbnd N-methylethylenediamine (men) or N-ethylethylenediamine (neen); Mdbnd Ni(II), Cu(II), Zn(II) or Cd(II)) have been prepared and characterized by FT-IR, Raman spectroscopy, thermal and elemental analysis techniques. Additionally, FT-IR and Raman spectral analyses of men and neen have experimentally and theoretically investigated in the range of 4000-250 cm-1. The corresponding vibration assignments of men and neen are performed by using B3LYP density functional theory (DFT) method together with 6-31 G(d) basis set. The spectral features of the complexes suggest that the coordination environment of the M(II) ions are surrounded by the two symmetry related men and neen ligands and the two symmetry related N atom of cyanide groups, whereas the Ni(II) atoms are coordinated with a square-planar to four C atoms of the cyanide groups. Polymeric structures of the complexes consist of one dimensional alternative chains of [M(L)2]2+ and [Ni(CN)4]2- moieties. The thermal decompositions in the temperature range 30-700 °C of the complexes were investigated in the static air atmosphere.

  19. Interaction between 8-methoxypsoralen and trypsin: Monitoring by spectroscopic, chemometrics and molecular docking approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yingying; Zhang, Guowen; Zeng, Ni; Hu, Song

    2017-02-01

    8-Methoxypsoralen (8-MOP) is a naturally occurring furanocoumarin with various biological activities. However, there is little information on the binding mechanism of 8-MOP with trypsin. Here, the interaction between 8-MOP and trypsin in vitro was determined by multi-spectroscopic methods combined with the multivariate curve resolution-alternating least squares (MCR-ALS) chemometrics approach. An expanded UV-vis spectral data matrix was analysed by MCR-ALS, the concentration profiles and pure spectra for the three reaction species (trypsin, 8-MOP and 8-MOP-trypsin) were obtained to monitor the interaction between 8-MOP and trypsin. The fluorescence data suggested that a static type of quenching mechanism occurred in the binding of 8-MOP to trypsin. Hydrophobic interaction dominated the formation of the 8-MOP-trypsin complex on account of the positive enthalpy and entropy changes, and trypsin had one high affinity binding site for 8-MOP with a binding constant of 3.81 × 104 L mol- 1 at 298 K. Analysis of three dimensional fluorescence, UV-vis absorption and circular dichroism spectra indicated that the addition of 8-MOP induced the rearrangement of the polypeptides carbonyl hydrogen-bonding network and the conformational changes in trypsin. The molecular docking predicted that 8-MOP interacted with the catalytic residues His57, Asp102 and Ser195 in trypsin. The binding patterns and trypsin conformational changes may result in the inhibition of trypsin activity. This study has provided insights into the binding mechanism of 8-MOP with trypsin.

  20. 69. INTERIOR VIEW OF THE ABSORPTION TOWER BUILDING, ABSORPTION TOWER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    69. INTERIOR VIEW OF THE ABSORPTION TOWER BUILDING, ABSORPTION TOWER UNDER CONSTRUCTION. (DATE UNKNOWN). - United States Nitrate Plant No. 2, Reservation Road, Muscle Shoals, Muscle Shoals, Colbert County, AL

  1. Collisional Processing Of Comet And Asteroid Surfaces: Velocity Effects On Absorption Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jensen, Elizabeth; Lederer, S. M.; Wooden, D. H.; Lindsay, S. S.; Nakamura-Messenger, K.; Keller, L. P.; Cintala, M. J.; Zolensky, M. E.

    2012-10-01

    A new paradigm has emerged where 3.9 Gyr ago, a violent reshuffling reshaped the placement of small bodies in the solar system (the Nice model). Surface properties of these objects may have been affected by collisions caused by this event, and by collisions with other small bodies since their emplacement. These impacts affect the spectroscopic observations of these bodies today. Shock effects (e.g., planar dislocations) manifest in minerals allowing astronomers to better understand geophysical impact processing that has occurred on small bodies. At the Experimental Impact Laboratory at NASA Johnson Space Center, we have impacted forsterite and enstatite across a range of velocities. We find that the amount of spectral variation, absorption wavelength, and full width half maximum of the absorbance peaks vary non-linearly with the velocity of the impact. We also find that the spectral variation increases with decreasing crystal size (single solid rock versus granular). Future analyses include quantification of the spectral changes with different impactor densities, temperature, and additional impact velocities. Results on diopside, fayalite, and magnesite can be found in Lederer et al., this meeting. Funding was provided by the NASA PG&G grant 09-PGG09-0115, NSF grant AST-1010012, and a Cottrell College Scholarship through the Research Corporation.

  2. Spectroscopic study of molecular structure, antioxidant activity and biological effects of metal hydroxyflavonol complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samsonowicz, Mariola; Regulska, Ewa

    2017-02-01

    Flavonols with varied hydroxyl substitution can act as strong antioxidants. Thanks to their ability to chelate metals as well as to donate hydrogen atoms they have capacity to scavenge free radicals. Their metal complexes are often more active in comparison with free ligands. They exhibit interesting biological properties, e.g. anticancer, antiphlogistic and antibacterial. The relationship between molecular structure and their biological properties was intensively studied using spectroscopic methods (UV-Vis, IR, Raman, NMR, ESI-MS). The aim of this paper is review on spectroscopic analyses of molecular structure and biological activity of hydroxyflavonol metal complexes.

  3. Quantum absorption refrigerator.

    PubMed

    Levy, Amikam; Kosloff, Ronnie

    2012-02-17

    A quantum absorption refrigerator driven by noise is studied with the purpose of determining the limitations of cooling to absolute zero. The model consists of a working medium coupled simultaneously to hot, cold, and noise baths. Explicit expressions for the cooling power are obtained for Gaussian and Poisson white noise. The quantum model is consistent with the first and second laws of thermodynamics. The third law is quantified; the cooling power J(c) vanishes as J(c) ∝ T(c)(α), when T(c)→0, where α=d+1 for dissipation by emission and absorption of quanta described by a linear coupling to a thermal bosonic field, where d is the dimension of the bath.

  4. Acoustic absorption by sunspots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Braun, D. C.; Labonte, B. J.; Duvall, T. L., Jr.

    1987-01-01

    The paper presents the initial results of a series of observations designed to probe the nature of sunspots by detecting their influence on high-degree p-mode oscillations in the surrounding photosphere. The analysis decomposes the observed oscillations into radially propagating waves described by Hankel functions in a cylindrical coordinate system centered on the sunspot. From measurements of the differences in power between waves traveling outward and inward, it is demonstrated that sunspots appear to absorb as much as 50 percent of the incoming acoustic waves. It is found that for all three sunspots observed, the amount of absorption increases linearly with horizontal wavenumber. The effect is present in p-mode oscillations with wavelengths both significantly larger and smaller than the diameter of the sunspot umbrae. Actual absorption of acoustic energy of the magnitude observed may produce measurable decreases in the power and lifetimes of high-degree p-mode oscillations during periods of high solar activity.

  5. Carbon dioxide laser absorption spectra of toxic industrial compounds.

    PubMed

    Loper, G L; Sasaki, G R; Stamps, M A

    1982-05-01

    CO(2) laser absorption cross-section data are reported for acrolein, styrene, ethyl acrylate, trichloroethylene, vinyl bromide, and vinylidene chloride. These data indicate that sub parts per billion level, interference-free detection limits should be possible for these compounds by the CO(2) laser photoacoustic technique. Photoacoustic detectabilities below 40 ppb should be possible for these compounds in the presence of ambient air concentrations of water vapor and other anticipated interferences. These compounds are also found not to be important interferences in the detection of toxic hydrazine-based rocket fuels by CO(2) laser spectroscopic techniques.

  6. Fingerprints of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in infrared absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Tommasini, Matteo; Lucotti, Andrea; Alfè, Michela; Ciajolo, Anna; Zerbi, Giuseppe

    2016-01-05

    We have analyzed a set of 51 PAHs whose structures have been hypothesized from mass spectrometry data collected on samples extracted from carbon particles of combustion origin. We have obtained relationships between infrared absorption signals in the fingerprint region (mid-IR) and the chemical structures of PAHs, thus proving the potential of IR spectroscopy for the characterization of the molecular structure of aromatic combustion products. The results obtained here for the spectroscopic characterization of PAHs can be also of interest in Materials Science and Astrophysics.

  7. Bioacoustic Absorption Spectroscopy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-06-07

    seas in co-operation with fisheries biologists. The first planned experiment will be in the seas off California in co-operation with the Southwest... Fisheries Science Center of NOAA’s National Marine Fisheries Service. These experiments will be designed to investigate the “signatures” of the two major...formulating environmental adaptation strategies for tactical sonars. Fisheries applications: These results suggest that bioacoustic absorptivity can be used to

  8. Vehicular impact absorption system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knoell, A. C.; Wilson, A. H. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    An improved vehicular impact absorption system characterized by a plurality of aligned crash cushions of substantially cubic configuration is described. Each consists of a plurality of voided aluminum beverage cans arranged in substantial parallelism within a plurality of superimposed tiers and a covering envelope formed of metal hardware cloth. A plurality of cables is extended through the cushions in substantial parallelism with an axis of alignment for the cushions adapted to be anchored at each of the opposite end thereof.

  9. Hydrogen Absorption by Niobium.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-04-13

    incorporate an independent means for ascertaining surface cleanliness (e.g. AES). The form of the absorption curve in Fig. 7 appears to agree with that...very interesting study and is well within the capabilities of the systen designed, if the surface cleanliness can be assured. Wire specimens have a...assessing surface cleanliness would be an important supporting technique for understanding the results of these measurements. The simple kinetic

  10. Spectroscopic characterization of uranium in evaporation basin sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duff, M. C.; Morris, D. E.; Hunter, D. B.; Bertsch, P. M.

    2000-05-01

    Evaporation ponds in the San Joaquin Valley (SJV), CA, used for the containment of irrigation drainage waters contain elevated levels of uranium (U) resulting from the extensive leaching by carbonate-rich irrigation waters of the local agricultural soils that contain low levels of naturally-occurring U. The SJV ponds are subjected to changes in redox chemistry with cycles of drying and flooding. Our past studies have shown that U in the SJV Pond 14 surface sediments is present as mostly the oxidized and soluble form, U(VI). However, we were uncertain whether the U in the soil was only present as a U oxide of mixed stoichiometry, such as U 3O 8(s) (pitchblende) or other species. Here we present characterization information, which includes wet chemical and in situ spectroscopic techniques (X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) and low temperature time-resolved luminescence spectroscopies) for samples from two SJV Pond sediments. Surface sediments from SJV Pond 16 were characterized for average oxidation state of U with XANES spectroscopy. The fraction of U(VI) to U(IV) in the Pond 16 sediments decreased with depth with U(IV) being the dominant oxidation state in the 5 cm to 15 cm depth. Two luminescent U(VI) species were identified in the surface sediments from Pond 14; a U(VI)-tricarbonate phase and another phase likely comprised of U(VI)-hydroxide or hydroxycarbonate. The luminescent U(VI) population in the Pond 16 sediments is dominated by species with comparable spectral characteristics to the U(VI)-hydroxide or hydroxycarbonate species found in the Pond 14 sediments. The luminescence spectroscopic results were complemented by wet chemical U leaching methods, which involved the use of carbonate and sulfuric acid solutions and oxidizing solutions of peroxide, hypochlorite and Mn(IV). Leaching was shown to decrease the total U concentration in the sediments in all cases. However, results from luminescence studies of the residual fraction in the leached

  11. A spectroscopic transfer standard for accurate atmospheric CO measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nwaboh, Javis A.; Li, Gang; Serdyukov, Anton; Werhahn, Olav; Ebert, Volker

    2016-04-01

    Atmospheric carbon monoxide (CO) is a precursor of essential climate variables and has an indirect effect for enhancing global warming. Accurate and reliable measurements of atmospheric CO concentration are becoming indispensable. WMO-GAW reports states a compatibility goal of ±2 ppb for atmospheric CO concentration measurements. Therefore, the EMRP-HIGHGAS (European metrology research program - high-impact greenhouse gases) project aims at developing spectroscopic transfer standards for CO concentration measurements to meet this goal. A spectroscopic transfer standard would provide results that are directly traceable to the SI, can be very useful for calibration of devices operating in the field, and could complement classical gas standards in the field where calibration gas mixtures in bottles often are not accurate, available or stable enough [1][2]. Here, we present our new direct tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (dTDLAS) sensor capable of performing absolute ("calibration free") CO concentration measurements, and being operated as a spectroscopic transfer standard. To achieve the compatibility goal stated by WMO for CO concentration measurements and ensure the traceability of the final concentration results, traceable spectral line data especially line intensities with appropriate uncertainties are needed. Therefore, we utilize our new high-resolution Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy CO line data for the 2-0 band, with significantly reduced uncertainties, for the dTDLAS data evaluation. Further, we demonstrate the capability of our sensor for atmospheric CO measurements, discuss uncertainty calculation following the guide to the expression of uncertainty in measurement (GUM) principles and show that CO concentrations derived using the sensor, based on the TILSAM (traceable infrared laser spectroscopic amount fraction measurement) method, are in excellent agreement with gravimetric values. Acknowledgement Parts of this work have been

  12. Relic Neutrino Absorption Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Eberle, b

    2004-01-28

    Resonant annihilation of extremely high-energy cosmic neutrinos on big-bang relic anti-neutrinos (and vice versa) into Z-bosons leads to sizable absorption dips in the neutrino flux to be observed at Earth. The high-energy edges of these dips are fixed, via the resonance energies, by the neutrino masses alone. Their depths are determined by the cosmic neutrino background density, by the cosmological parameters determining the expansion rate of the universe, and by the large redshift history of the cosmic neutrino sources. We investigate the possibility of determining the existence of the cosmic neutrino background within the next decade from a measurement of these absorption dips in the neutrino flux. As a by-product, we study the prospects to infer the absolute neutrino mass scale. We find that, with the presently planned neutrino detectors (ANITA, Auger, EUSO, OWL, RICE, and SalSA) operating in the relevant energy regime above 10{sup 21} eV, relic neutrino absorption spectroscopy becomes a realistic possibility. It requires, however, the existence of extremely powerful neutrino sources, which should be opaque to nucleons and high-energy photons to evade present constraints. Furthermore, the neutrino mass spectrum must be quasi-degenerate to optimize the dip, which implies m{sub {nu}} 0.1 eV for the lightest neutrino. With a second generation of neutrino detectors, these demanding requirements can be relaxed considerably.

  13. Spectroscopic analysis of chromium bioremediation products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varadharajan, C.; Nico, P. S.; Yang, L.; Marcus, M. A.; Steefel, C.; Larsen, J. T.; Beller, H. R.; Brodie, E. L.

    2010-12-01

    Remediation of chromium contamination frequently involves reducing the toxic and soluble hexavalent form, Cr(VI), to the relatively harmless and mostly immobile trivalent state, Cr(III). The objective of this study is to identify the biogeochemical reactions that control in situ chromium reduction in the presence of different dominant electron acceptors, i.e., NO3-, Fe(III), and SO42-. It was hypothesized that indirect, abiotic reduction of Cr(VI) by reduced metabolic products [Fe(II) and sulfides] would dominate over direct enzymatic reduction by denitrifying, iron-reducing, or sulfate-reducing bacteria. It is further hypothesized that the enzymatic reduction of Cr(VI) would produce relatively pure chromium hydroxide precipitates, whereas indirect reduction would result in mixed Cr-Fe hydroxide solid phases. Flow-through columns containing homogenized sediments from the 100H site at Hanford, WA were subjected to nitrate-, sulfate- or iron-reducing conditions in the presence of 5 µM Cr(VI) and 5 mM lactate. Cr(VI) was depleted in the effluent solutions from the nitrate- and sulfate-reducing columns; however only a small amount of Cr(VI) was removed under iron-reducing conditions. Preliminary analysis of micro X-ray absorption spectra indicate that the untreated and iron-reducing column sediments contained pre-existing Cr in the form of primary minerals, e.g. chromite and/or Cr-bearing micas. However, there was an increase in the relative abundance of mixed-phase Cr-Fe hydroxides, i.e., Cr1-xFex(OH)3 in the nitrate- and sulfate-treated columns. A possible explanation for the observations is that the production of Fe(II) was enhanced under the nitrate- and sulfate- reducing conditions, and was most likely sulfide-driven in the latter case. The Fe(II) was subsequently available for reduction of Cr(VI) resulting in the mixed-phase precipitates. The results from the spectroscopic analysis support the hypothesis that Fe(II)-mediated Cr reduction prevails over direct

  14. Intestinal absorption of aluminium in renal failure.

    PubMed

    Drüeke, Tilman B

    2002-01-01

    The proportion of the daily ingested aluminium that is absorbed in the intestinal tract has remained a matter of debate for many years because no reliable method of measurement was available. Studies with earlier analytic techniques reported fractional absorption of aluminium from as little as 0.001% to as much as 27% of an oral dose. Measurement of (26)Al by high-energy accelerator mass spectrometry has permitted more accurate analyses. In normal young rats, 0.05-0.1% of ingested aluminium is absorbed in the intestine, of which roughly half goes to the skeleton within 2 h, whereas the remaining half is excreted in the urine, most of it within 48 h. Deposition in organs other than the skeleton appears to be negligible. In healthy human volunteers, the most recent estimates of fractional intestinal (26)Al absorption were also in the range of 0.06-0.1%. In both rats and humans, intestinal absorption of aluminium is subject to many systemic and local factors. The latter include various compounds with which aluminium is complexed in the gut lumen, and gastric acidity. The influence of food is controversial; however, absorption appears higher in the fasted than the post-prandial state. Luminal phosphate concentration decreases aluminium absorption, whereas citrate increases it. For theoretical reasons, silicates should prevent aluminium absorption, but experimental evidence has not supported this theory. Whether water hardness affects aluminium bioavailability remains a matter of debate. General conditions may also modify aluminium absorption and deposition in bone. Examples of these general factors include the uraemic syndrome, diabetes mellitus, secondary hyperparathyroidism, vitamin D status, Alzheimer's disease and Down's syndrome. Awareness of intestinal absorption of aluminium is particularly important, given that aluminium-based binders continue to be used in uraemic patients, despite the hazards of aluminium accumulation. The lessons we have learned about

  15. Thin-film spectroscopic sensor

    DOEpatents

    Burgess, Jr., Lloyd W.; Goldman, Don S.

    1992-01-01

    There is disclosed an integrated spectrometer for chemical analysis by evanescent electromagnetic radiation absorption in a reaction volume. The spectrometer comprises a noninteractive waveguide, a substrate, an entrance grating and an exit grating, an electromagnetic radiation source, and an electromagnetic radiation sensing device. There is further disclosed a chemical sensor to determine the pressure and concentration of a chemical species in a mixture comprising an interactive waveguide, a substrate, an entrance grating and an exit grating, an electromagnetic radiation source, and an electromagnetic radiation sensing device.

  16. The development and evaluation of airborne in situ N2O and CH4 sampling using a Quantum Cascade Laser Absorption Spectrometer (QCLAS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pitt, Joseph; Le Breton, Michael; Allen, Grant; Percival, Carl; Gallagher, Martin; Bauguitte, Stephane; O'Shea, Sebastian; Muller, Jennifer; Zahniser, Mark; Pyle, John; Palmer, Paul

    2016-04-01

    Spectroscopic measurements of atmospheric N2O and CH4 mole fractions were made on board the FAAM (Facility for Airborne Atmospheric Measurements) large Atmospheric Research Aircraft. We evaluate the performance of the mid-IR continuous wave Aerodyne Research Inc. Quantum Cascade Laser Absorption Spectrometer (QCLAS) employed over 17 flights conducted during summer 2014. Two different methods of correcting for the influence of water vapour on the spectroscopic retrievals are compared and evaluated. Test flight data demonstrating the sensitivity of the instrument to changes in cabin pressure is presented, and a new in-flight calibration procedure to account for this issue is described and assessed. Total 1σ uncertainties of 1.81 ppb for CH4 and 0.35 ppb for N2O are derived. We report a mean difference in 1 Hz CH4 mole fraction of 2.05 ppb (1σ = 5.85 ppb) between in-flight measurements made using the QCLAS and simultaneous measurements using a previously characterised Los Gatos Research Fast Greenhouse Gas Analyser (FGGA).

  17. The development and evaluation of airborne in situ N2O and CH4 sampling using a Quantum Cascade Laser Absorption Spectrometer (QCLAS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pitt, J. R.; Le Breton, M.; Allen, G.; Percival, C. J.; Gallagher, M. W.; Bauguitte, S. J.-B.; O'Shea, S. J.; Muller, J. B. A.; Zahniser, M. S.; Pyle, J.; Palmer, P. I.

    2015-08-01

    Spectroscopic measurements of atmospheric N2O and CH4 mole fractions were made on board the FAAM (Facility for Airborne Atmospheric Measurements) large Atmospheric Research Aircraft. We present details of the mid-IR Aerodyne Research Inc. Quantum Cascade Laser Absorption Spectrometer (QCLAS) employed, including its configuration for airborne sampling, and evaluate its performance over 17 flights conducted during summer 2014. Two different methods of correcting for the influence of water vapour on the spectroscopic retrievals are compared and evaluated. A new in-flight calibration procedure to account for the observed sensitivity of the instrument to ambient pressure changes is described, and its impact on instrument performance is assessed. Test flight data linking this sensitivity to changes in cabin pressure is presented. Total 1σ uncertainties of 1.81 ppb for CH4 and 0.35 ppb for N2O are derived. We report a mean difference in 1 Hz CH4 mole fraction of 2.05 ppb (1σ = 5.85 ppb) between in-flight measurements made using the QCLAS and simultaneous measurements using a previously characterised Los Gatos Research Fast Greenhouse Gas Analyser (FGGA). Finally, a potential case study for the estimation of a regional N2O flux using a mass balance technique is identified, and the method for calculating such an estimate is outlined.

  18. The development and evaluation of airborne in situ N2O and CH4 sampling using a Quantum Cascade Laser Absorption Spectrometer (QCLAS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pitt, J. R.; Le Breton, M. R.; Allen, G.; Percival, C.; Gallagher, M. W.; Bauguitte, S.; O'Shea, S.; Muller, J.; Zahniser, M. S.; Pyle, J. A.; Palmer, P. I.

    2015-12-01

    Spectroscopic measurements of atmospheric N2O and CH4 mole fractions were made on board the FAAM (Facility for Airborne Atmospheric Measurements) large Atmospheric Research Aircraft. We evaluate the performance of the mid-IR continuous wave Aerodyne Research Inc. Quantum Cascade Laser Absorption Spectrometer (QCLAS) employed over 17 flights conducted during summer 2014. Two different methods of correcting for the influence of water vapour on the spectroscopic retrievals are compared and evaluated. Test flight data demonstrating the sensitivity of the instrument to changes in cabin pressure is presented, and a new in-flight calibration procedure to account for this issue is described and assessed. Total 1σ uncertainties of 1.81 ppb for CH4 and 0.35 ppb for N2O are derived. We report a mean difference in 1 Hz CH4 mole fraction of 2.05 ppb (1σ = 5.85 ppb) between in-flight measurements made using the QCLAS and simultaneous measurements using a previously characterised Los Gatos Research Fast Greenhouse Gas Analyser (FGGA).

  19. The development and evaluation of airborne in situ N2O and CH4 sampling using a quantum cascade laser absorption spectrometer (QCLAS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pitt, J. R.; Le Breton, M.; Allen, G.; Percival, C. J.; Gallagher, M. W.; Bauguitte, S. J.-B.; O'Shea, S. J.; Muller, J. B. A.; Zahniser, M. S.; Pyle, J.; Palmer, P. I.

    2016-01-01

    Spectroscopic measurements of atmospheric N2O and CH4 mole fractions were made on board the FAAM (Facility for Airborne Atmospheric Measurements) large atmospheric research aircraft. We present details of the mid-infrared quantum cascade laser absorption spectrometer (QCLAS, Aerodyne Research Inc., USA) employed, including its configuration for airborne sampling, and evaluate its performance over 17 flights conducted during summer 2014. Two different methods of correcting for the influence of water vapour on the spectroscopic retrievals are compared and evaluated. A new in-flight calibration procedure to account for the observed sensitivity of the instrument to ambient pressure changes is described, and its impact on instrument performance is assessed. Test flight data linking this sensitivity to changes in cabin pressure are presented. Total 1σ uncertainties of 2.47 ppb for CH4 and 0.54 ppb for N2O are derived. We report a mean difference in 1 Hz CH4 mole fraction of 2.05 ppb (1σ = 5.85 ppb) between in-flight measurements made using the QCLAS and simultaneous measurements using a previously characterised Fast Greenhouse Gas Analyser (FGGA, Los Gatos Research, USA). Finally, a potential case study for the estimation of a regional N2O flux using a mass balance technique is identified, and the method for calculating such an estimate is outlined.

  20. Site- and phase-selective x-ray absorption spectroscopy based on phase-retrieval calculation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawaguchi, Tomoya; Fukuda, Katsutoshi; Matsubara, Eiichiro

    2017-03-01

    Understanding the chemical state of a particular element with multiple crystallographic sites and/or phases is essential to unlocking the origin of material properties. To this end, resonant x-ray diffraction spectroscopy (RXDS) achieved through a combination of x-ray diffraction (XRD) and x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) techniques can allow for the measurement of diffraction anomalous fine structure (DAFS). This is expected to provide a peerless tool for electronic/local structural analyses of materials with complicated structures thanks to its capability to extract spectroscopic information about a given element at each crystallographic site and/or phase. At present, one of the major challenges for the practical application of RXDS is the rigorous determination of resonant terms from observed DAFS, as this requires somehow determining the phase change in the elastic scattering around the absorption edge from the scattering intensity. This is widely known in the field of XRD as the phase problem. The present review describes the basics of this problem, including the relevant background and theory for DAFS and a guide to a newly-developed phase-retrieval method based on the logarithmic dispersion relation that makes it possible to analyze DAFS without suffering from the intrinsic ambiguities of conventional iterative-fitting. Several matters relating to data collection and correction of RXDS are also covered, with a final emphasis on the great potential of powder-sample-based RXDS (P-RXDS) to be used in various applications relevant to practical materials, including antisite-defect-type electrode materials for lithium-ion batteries.

  1. Site- and phase-selective x-ray absorption spectroscopy based on phase-retrieval calculation.

    PubMed

    Kawaguchi, Tomoya; Fukuda, Katsutoshi; Matsubara, Eiichiro

    2017-03-22

    Understanding the chemical state of a particular element with multiple crystallographic sites and/or phases is essential to unlocking the origin of material properties. To this end, resonant x-ray diffraction spectroscopy (RXDS) achieved through a combination of x-ray diffraction (XRD) and x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) techniques can allow for the measurement of diffraction anomalous fine structure (DAFS). This is expected to provide a peerless tool for electronic/local structural analyses of materials with complicated structures thanks to its capability to extract spectroscopic information about a given element at each crystallographic site and/or phase. At present, one of the major challenges for the practical application of RXDS is the rigorous determination of resonant terms from observed DAFS, as this requires somehow determining the phase change in the elastic scattering around the absorption edge from the scattering intensity. This is widely known in the field of XRD as the phase problem. The present review describes the basics of this problem, including the relevant background and theory for DAFS and a guide to a newly-developed phase-retrieval method based on the logarithmic dispersion relation that makes it possible to analyze DAFS without suffering from the intrinsic ambiguities of conventional iterative-fitting. Several matters relating to data collection and correction of RXDS are also covered, with a final emphasis on the great potential of powder-sample-based RXDS (P-RXDS) to be used in various applications relevant to practical materials, including antisite-defect-type electrode materials for lithium-ion batteries.

  2. Thermal dependence of optical properties of silver thin films studied by spectroscopic ellipsometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sundari, S. Tripura; Dash, S.; Tyagi, A. K.

    2012-06-01

    The thermal dependence of the dielectric constants of silver thin films were investigated between 300 K and 650 K by spectroscopic ellipsometer in the energy range 1.5 to 5 eV. The studies showed an increase in the imaginary part (ɛ2) of the dielectric function, a shift of ˜300 meV in the onset of the main absorption (L3-L2'(EF)), appearance of additional absorption above 500 K which is attributed to (L2'- L1) and increased broadening of the absorption spectra owing to smearing of Fermi level. It was found that the unscreened plasma frequency ωpu associated with resonant oscillations of conduction electrons increased while the relaxation time decreased with increase in temperature.

  3. Spectroscopic studies of UV irradiated erythrosine B thin films prepared by spin coating technique.

    PubMed

    Zeyada, H M; El-Mallah, H M; Atwee, T; El-Damhogi, D G

    2017-05-15

    The spectroscopic studies of erythrosine B thin films manufactured by the spin coating technique have been presented. The spectra of infrared absorption allow characterization of vibrational modes for erythrosine B in powder form, pristine and UV irradiated thin films. The absorption spectra recorded in UV-vis-NIR for pristine films of erythrosine B display two main bands. UV irradiation on erythrosine B films decreased absorbance over the spectra. Indirect allowed transition with optical energy gap of 2.57eV is observed in pristine films. UV irradiation introduced structural defects and decreased optical band gap. Some of the optical absorption parameters and their relation to UV irradiation times, namely molar extinction coefficient (ε), electronic dipole strength (q(2)), and oscillator strength (f), of the principal optical transitions have also been evaluated.

  4. MDM OSMOS Spectroscopic classification of Supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bose, Subhash; Dong, Subo; Chen, Ping; Klusmeyer, J.; Prieto, Jose Luis; Shappee, B.; Shields, J.; Brown, J.; Stanek, K. Z.; Kochanek, C.

    2016-11-01

    We report optical spectroscopic classification of supernova candidates 2016hgd (ATel #9651), 2016hli (ATel #9685), CSS161013:015319+171853 and CSS161013:020130+141534 (http://nesssi.cacr.caltech.edu/catalina/AllSN.html).

  5. CSP Spectroscopic Classification of LSQ16oi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morrell, N.; Phillips, M.; Lira, P.; Ellman, N.; Baltay, C.; Rabinowitz, D.; Rostami, S.; Hsiao, E. Y.

    2016-02-01

    We report the spectroscopic classification of a La Silla-QUEST (LSQ) supernova (Baltay et al. 2013, PASP, 125, 683) taken using WFCCD on the 2.5-m du Pont Telescope as part of the Carnegie Supernova Project (CSP).

  6. Spectroscopic Classifications of Optical Transients with SOAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hounsell, R. A.; Miller, J. A.; Pan, Y.-C.; Foley, R. J.; Jha, S. W.; Rest, A.; Scolnic, D.; Smith, K. W.; Wright, D.; Smartt, S. J.; Huber, M.; Chambers, K. C.; Flewelling, H.; Willman, M.; Primak, N.; Schultz, A.; Gibson, B.; Magnier, E.; Waters, C.; Tonry, J.; Wainscoat, R. J.

    2016-06-01

    We report the following classifications of optical transients from spectroscopic observations with the Goodman spectrograph on the SOAR 4-m telescope. Targets were supplied by the Pan-STARRS Survey for Transients (PSST).

  7. Asiago spectroscopic classification of SN2017awk.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomasella, L.; Benetti, S.; Cappellaro, E.; Elias-Rosa, N.; Ochner; Pastorello, P.; Turatto, M.; Terreran, G

    2017-02-01

    The Asiago Transient Classification Program (Tomasella et al. 2014, AN, 335, 841) reports the spectroscopic observation of ASASSN-17co The target was supplied by All Sky Automated Survey for SuperNovae (ASAS-SN).

  8. Asiago spectroscopic classification of SN2017mf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ochner, P.; Benetti, S.; Tomasella, L.; Cappellaro, E.; Elias-Rosa, N.; Pastorello, P.; Turatto, M.; Terreran, G

    2017-01-01

    The Asiago Transient Classification Program (Tomasella et al. 2014, AN, 335, 841) reports the spectroscopic observation of SN2017mf. The observation was performed with the Asiago 1.22-m Galileo Telescope (+ Boller & Chivens spectrograph).

  9. Corrosion Problems in Absorption Chillers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stetson, Bruce

    1978-01-01

    Absorption chillers use a lithium bromide solution as the medium of absorption and water as the refrigerant. Discussed are corrosion and related problems, tests and remedies, and cleaning procedures. (Author/MLF)

  10. Effect of the solvent environment on the spectroscopic properties and dynamics of the lowest excited states of carotenoids

    SciTech Connect

    Frank, H.A.; Bautista, J.A.; Josue, J.; Pendon, Z.; Hiller, R.G.; Sharples, F.P.; Gosztola, D.; Wasielewski, M.R.

    2000-05-11

    The spectroscopic properties and dynamics of the lowest excited singlet states of peridinin, fucoxanthin, neoxanthin, uriolide acetate, spheroidene, and spheroidenone in several different solvents have been studied by steady-state absorption and fast-transient optical spectroscopic techniques. Peridinin, fucoxanthin, uriolide acetate, and spheroidenone, which contain carbonyl functional groups in conjugation with the carbon-carbon {pi}-electron system, display broader absorption spectral features and are affected more by the solvent environment than neoxanthin and spheroidene, which do not contain carbonyl functional groups. The possible sources of the spectral broadening are explored by examining the absorption spectra at 77 K in glassy solvents. Also, carotenoids which contain carbonyls have complex transient absorption spectra and show a pronounced dependence of the excited singlet state lifetime on the solvent environment. It is postulated that these effects are related to the presence of an intramolecular charge transfer state strongly coupled to the S{sub 1} (2{sup 1}A{sub g}) excited singlet state. Structural variations in the series of carotenoids studied here make it possible to focus on the general molecular features that control the spectroscopic and dynamic properties of carotenoids.

  11. Vibrational spectroscopic characterization of fluoroquinolones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neugebauer, U.; Szeghalmi, A.; Schmitt, M.; Kiefer, W.; Popp, J.; Holzgrabe, U.

    2005-05-01

    Quinolones are important gyrase inhibitors. Even though they are used as active agents in many antibiotics, the detailed mechanism of action on a molecular level is so far not known. It is of greatest interest to shed light on this drug-target interaction to provide useful information in the fight against growing resistances and obtain new insights for the development of new powerful drugs. To reach this goal, on a first step it is essential to understand the structural characteristics of the drugs and the effects that are caused by the environment in detail. In this work we report on Raman spectroscopical investigations of a variety of gyrase inhibitors (nalidixic acid, oxolinic acid, cinoxacin, flumequine, norfloxacin, ciprofloxacin, lomefloxacin, ofloxacin, enoxacin, sarafloxacin and moxifloxacin) by means of micro-Raman spectroscopy excited with various excitation wavelengths, both in the off-resonance region (532, 633, 830 and 1064 nm) and in the resonance region (resonance Raman spectroscopy at 244, 257 and 275 nm). Furthermore DFT calculations were performed to assign the vibrational modes, as well as for an identification of intramolecular hydrogen bonding motifs. The effect of small changes in the drug environment was studied by adding successively small amounts of water until physiological low concentrations of the drugs in aqueous solution were obtained. At these low concentrations resonance Raman spectroscopy proved to be a useful and sensitive technique. Supplementary information was obtained from IR and UV/vis spectroscopy.

  12. Handbook of Basic Atomic Spectroscopic Data

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 108 Handbook of Basic Atomic Spectroscopic Data (Web, free access)   This handbook provides a selection of the most important and frequently used atomic spectroscopic data. The compilation includes data for the neutral and singly-ionized atoms of all elements hydrogen through einsteinium (Z = 1-99). The wavelengths, intensities, and spectrum assignments are given for each element, and the data for the approximately 12,000 lines of all elements are also collected into a single table.

  13. Spectroscopic investigation of actinide speciation in concentrated chloride solution

    SciTech Connect

    Runde, W.; Neu, M.P.; Conradson, S.D.; Clark, D.L.; Palmer, P.D.; Reilly, S.D.; Scott, B.L.; Tait, C.D.

    1997-12-31

    The proposed disposal of nuclear waste in geological salt formations, e.g., the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (USA) and the Gorleben site (Germany), raises a fundamental question: To what degree actinides will be solubilized and mobilized upon interaction with chloride ions? Actinide solubilities in highly concentrated chloride solutions are about one order of magnitude higher than in similar inert electrolyte (NaClO{sub 4}) solutions. This increased solubility is due to interactions between actinide and chloride ions. Contradictory results exist regarding the interaction mechanism between actinide and chloride ions. Specifically, both inner-sphere complex formation and ion pair association have been implicated in the interpretation of spectrophotometric and extraction data. To address this controversy, the authors investigated the interaction between actinide ions in the (III), (IV), (V) and (VI) oxidation states and chloride ions using a multi-method approach. Spectroscopic techniques (TRLFS, Raman, UV-Vis absorption, EXAFS) were used to distinguish between changes in the inner coordination sphere of the actinide ion and effects of ion pairing, X-ray absorption spectroscopy and single crystal X-ray diffraction were used to determine structural details of the actinide chloro complexes formed in solution and solid states.

  14. Spectroscopic properties of multilayered gold nanoparticle 2D sheets.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Akihito; Imazu, Keisuke; Li, Xinheng; Okamoto, Koichi; Tamada, Kaoru

    2012-12-11

    We report the fabrication technique and optical properties of multilayered two-dimensional (2D) gold nanoparticle sheets ("Au nanosheet"). The 2D crystalline monolayer sheet composed of Au nanoparticles shows an absorption peak originating from a localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR). It was found that the absorption spectra dramatically change when the monolayers are assembled into the multilayers on different substrates (quartz or Au). In the case of the multilayers on Au thin film (d = 200 nm), the LSPR peak is shifted to longer wavelength at the near-IR region by increasing the number of layers. The absorbance also depends on the layer number and shows the nonlinear behavior. On the other hand, the multilayers on quartz substrate show neither such LSPR peak shift nor nonlinear response of absorbance. The layer number dependence on metal surfaces can be interpreted as the combined effects between the near-field coupling of the LSPR and the far-field optics of the stratified metamaterial films, as proposed in our previous study. We also report the spectroscopic properties of hybrid multilayers composed of two kinds of monolayers, i.e., Au nanosheet and Ag nanosheet. The combination of the different metal nanoparticle sheets realizes more flexible plasmonic color tuning.

  15. Molecular docking, spectroscopic studies and quantum calculations on nootropic drug.

    PubMed

    Uma Maheswari, J; Muthu, S; Sundius, Tom

    2014-04-05

    A systematic vibrational spectroscopic assignment and analysis of piracetam [(2-oxo-1-pyrrolidineacetamide)] have been carried out using FT-IR and FT-Raman spectral data. The vibrational analysis was aided by an electronic structure calculation based on the hybrid density functional method B3LYP using a 6-311G++(d,p) basis set. Molecular equilibrium geometries, electronic energies, IR and Raman intensities, and harmonic vibrational frequencies have been computed. The assignments are based on the experimental IR and Raman spectra, and a complete assignment of the observed spectra has been proposed. The UV-visible spectrum of the compound was recorded and the electronic properties, such as HOMO and LUMO energies and the maximum absorption wavelengths λmax were determined by the time-dependent DFT (TD-DFT) method. The geometrical parameters, vibrational frequencies and absorption wavelengths were compared with the experimental data. The complete vibrational assignments are performed on the basis of the potential energy distributions (PED) of the vibrational modes in terms of natural internal coordinates. The simulated FT-IR, FT-Raman, and UV spectra of the title compound have been constructed. Molecular docking studies have been carried out in the active site of piracetam by using Argus Lab. In addition, the potential energy surface, HOMO and LUMO energies, first-order hyperpolarizability and the molecular electrostatic potential have been computed.

  16. Acoustic Absorption Characteristics of People.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kingsbury, H. F.; Wallace, W. J.

    1968-01-01

    The acoustic absorption characteristics of informally dressed college students in typical classroom seating are shown to differ substantially from data for formally dressed audiences in upholstered seating. Absorption data, expressed as sabins per person or absorption coefficient per square foot, shows that there is considerable variation between…

  17. Femtosecond electron diffraction and spectroscopic studies of a solid state organic chemical reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jean-Ruel, Hubert

    Photochromic diarylethene molecules are excellent model systems for studying electrocyclic reactions, in addition to having important technological applications in optoelectronics. The photoinduced ring-closing reaction in a crystalline photochromic diarylethene derivative was fully resolved using the complementary techniques of transient absorption spectroscopy and femtosecond electron crystallography. These studies are detailed in this thesis, together with the associated technical developments which enabled them. Importantly, the time-resolved crystallographic investigation reported here represents a highly significant proof-of-principle experiment. It constitutes the first study directly probing the molecular structural changes associated with an organic chemical reaction with sub-picosecond temporal and atomic spatial resolution---to follow the primary motions directing chemistry. In terms of technological development, the most important advance reported is the implementation of a radio frequency rebunching system capable of producing femtosecond electron pulses of exceptional brightness. The temporal resolution of this newly developed electron source was fully characterized using laser ponderomotive scattering, confirming a 435 +/- 75 fs instrument response time with 0.20 pC bunches. The ultrafast spectroscopic and crystallographic measurements were both achieved by exploiting the photoreversibility of diarylethene. The transient absorption study was first performed, after developing a novel robust acquisition scheme for thermally irreversible reactions in the solid state. It revealed the formation of an open-ring excited state intermediate, following photoexcitation of the open-ring isomer with an ultraviolet laser pulse, with a time constant of approximately 200 fs. The actual ring closing was found to occur from this intermediate with a time constant of 5.3 +/- 0.3 ps. The femtosecond diffraction measurements were then performed using multiple crystal

  18. Spectroscopic mode identification of γ Doradus stars: frequencies, modes, rotation and wave leakage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pollard, Karen R.; Brunsden, E.; Davie, M.; Greenwood, A.; Cottrell, P. L.

    The gravity modes present in γ Doradus stars probe the deep stellar interiors and are thus of particular interest in asteroseismology. The MUSICIAN programme at the University of Canterbury has been successfully identifying frequencies and pulsation modes in many γ Doradus stars using hundreds of precise, high resolution spectroscopic observations obtained with the 1.0 m telescope and HERCULES spectrograph at the Mt John Observatory in New Zealand. In this paper we present a summary of our spectroscopic frequency and mode identifications. Of particular interest from our spectroscopic analyses are: the prevalence of (l, m) = 1, 1 modes in many γ Dor stars; the importance of stellar rotation in the interpretation of the frequency and mode identification; and finally, possible evidence of wave leakage in one of these stars.

  19. A SURVEY OF ALKALI LINE ABSORPTION IN EXOPLANETARY ATMOSPHERES

    SciTech Connect

    Jensen, Adam G.; Redfield, Seth; Endl, Michael; Cochran, William D.; Koesterke, Lars; Barman, Travis S. E-mail: sredfield@wesleyan.edu E-mail: wdc@astro.as.utexas.edu E-mail: barman@lowell.edu

    2011-12-20

    We obtained over 90 hr of spectroscopic observations of four exoplanetary systems with the Hobby-Eberly Telescope. Observations were taken in transit and out of transit, and we analyzed the differenced spectra-i.e., the transmission spectra-to inspect it for absorption at the wavelengths of the neutral sodium (Na I) doublet at {lambda}{lambda}5889, 5895 and neutral potassium (K I) at {lambda}7698. We used the transmission spectrum at Ca I {lambda}6122-which shows strong stellar absorption but is not an alkali metal resonance line that we expect to show significant absorption in these atmospheres-as a control line to examine our measurements for systematic errors. We use an empirical Monte Carlo method to quantify these systematic errors. In a reanalysis of the same data set using a reduction and analysis pipeline that was derived independently, we confirm the previously seen Na I absorption in HD 189733b at a level of (- 5.26 {+-} 1.69) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -4} (the average value over a 12 A integration band to be consistent with previous authors). Additionally, we tentatively confirm the Na I absorption seen in HD 209458b (independently by multiple authors) at a level of (- 2.63 {+-} 0.81) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -4}, though the interpretation is less clear. Furthermore, we find Na I absorption of (- 3.16 {+-} 2.06) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -4} at <3{sigma} in HD 149026b; features apparent in the transmission spectrum are consistent with real absorption and indicate this may be a good target for future observations to confirm. No other results (Na I in HD 147506b and Ca I and K I in all four targets) are significant to {>=}3{sigma}, although we observe some features that we argue are primarily artifacts.

  20. Scramjet Performance Assessment Using Water Absorption Diagnostics (U)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cavolowsky, John A.; Loomis, Mark P.; Deiwert, George

    1995-01-01

    Simultaneous multiple path measurements of temperature and H2O concentration will be presented for the AIMHYE test entries in the NASA Ames 16-Inch Shock Tunnel. Monitoring the progress of high temperature chemical reactions that define scramjet combustor efficiencies is a task uniquely suited to nonintrusive optical diagnostics. One application strategy to overcome the many challenges and limitations of nonintrusive measurements is to use laser absorption spectroscopy coupled with optical fibers. Absorption spectroscopic techniques with rapidly tunable lasers are capable of making simultaneous measurements of mole fraction, temperature, pressure, and velocity. The scramjet water absorption diagnostic was used to measure combustor efficiency and was compared to thrust measurements using a nozzle force balance and integrated nozzle pressures to develop a direct technique for evaluating integrated scramjet performance. Tests were initially performed with a diode laser tuning over a water absorption feature at 1391.7 nm. A second diode laser later became available at a wavelength near 1343.3 nm covering an additional water absorption feature and was incorporated in the system for a two-wavelength technique. Both temperature and mole fraction can be inferred from the lineshape analysis using this approach. Additional high temperature spectroscopy research was conducted to reduce uncertainties in the scramjet application. The lasers are optical fiber coupled to ports at the combustor exit and in the nozzle region. The output from the two diode lasers were combined in a single fiber, and the resultant two-wavelength beam was subsequently split into four legs. Each leg was directed through 60 meters of optical fiber to four combustor exit locations for measurement of beam intensity after absorption by the water within the flow. Absorption results will be compared to 1D combustor analysis using RJPA and nozzle CFD computations as well as to data from a nozzle metric

  1. Absorption/emission spectroscopy and applications using shock tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sulzmann, K. G. P.

    1988-09-01

    A historical overview is presented about the important contributions made by Penner, his co-workers, and his students to the application of shock-tube techniques for quantitative emission and absorption spectroscopy and its applications to chemical kinetics studies in high-temperature gases. The discussions address critical aspects related to valid determinations of quantitative spectroscopic data and chemical rate parameters and stress the requirements for uniformly heated gas samples, temperature determinations, gas-mixture preparations, selection of useful spectral intervals, verification of LTE conditions, time resolutions for concentration histories, uniqueness of kinetic measurements, as well as accuracies and reproducibilities of measurement results.The potential of absorption spectroscopy by molecule and/or radical resonance radiation and by laser transmission techniques is highlighted for kinetic studies in mixtures with very small reactant concentrations.Besides the work by the honoree and his school, the references include books, monographs and key articles related to the subjects discussed.

  2. Shedding light on the photostability of two intermolecular charge-transfer complexes between highly fluorescent bis-1,8-naphthalimide dyes and some π-acceptors: A spectroscopic study in solution and solid states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Refat, Moamen S.; Ismail, Lamia A.; Adam, Abdel Majid A.

    2015-01-01

    Given the great importance of the various uses of 1,8-naphthalimides in the trends of biology, medicine and industry, the current study focused on extending the scope of these dyes by introducing some of their charge-transfer (CT) complexes. For this purpose, two highly fluorescent bis-1,8-naphthalimide dyes and their complexes with some π-acceptors have been synthesized and characterized spectroscopically. The π-acceptors include picric acid (PA), chloranilic acid (CLA), tetracyanoquinodimethane (TCNQ) and dichlorodicyanobenzoquinone (DDQ). The molecular structure, spectroscopic and fluorescence properties as well as the binding modes were deduced from IR, UV-vis and 1H NMR spectral studies. The binding ratio of complexation was determined to be 1:1 according to the elemental analyses and photometric titrations. It has been found that the order of acceptance ability for the different acceptors is TCNQ > DDQ > CLA > PA. The photostability of 1,8-naphthalimide dye as a donor and its charge-transfer complex doped in polymethyl methacrylate/PMMA were exposed to UV-Vis radiation and the change in the absorption spectra was achieved at different times during irradiation period.

  3. A spectroscopic census in young stellar regions: the σ Orionis cluster

    SciTech Connect

    Hernández, Jesús; Perez, Alice; Hernan, Ramírez; Calvet, Nuria; Hartmann, Lee; Briceño, Cesar; Olguin, Lorenzo; Contreras, Maria E.; Allen, Lori; Espaillat, Catherine

    2014-10-10

    We present a spectroscopic survey of the stellar population of the σ Orionis cluster. We have obtained spectral types for 340 stars. Spectroscopic data for spectral typing come from several spectrographs with similar spectroscopic coverage and resolution. More than half of the stars in our sample are members confirmed by the presence of lithium in absorption, strong Hα in emission or weak gravity-sensitive features. In addition, we have obtained high-resolution (R ∼ 34,000) spectra in the Hα region for 169 stars in the region. Radial velocities were calculated from this data set. The radial velocity distribution for members of the cluster is in agreement with previous work. Analysis of the profile of the Hα line and infrared observations reveals two binary systems or fast rotators that mimic the Hα width expected in stars with accretion disks. On the other hand, there are stars with optically thick disks and narrow Hα profiles not expected in stars with accretion disks. This contribution constitutes the largest homogeneous spectroscopic data set of the σ Orionis cluster to date.

  4. Ultraviolet absorption hygrometer

    DOEpatents

    Gersh, Michael E.; Bien, Fritz; Bernstein, Lawrence S.

    1986-01-01

    An ultraviolet absorption hygrometer is provided including a source of pulsed ultraviolet radiation for providing radiation in a first wavelength region where water absorbs significantly and in a second proximate wavelength region where water absorbs weakly. Ultraviolet radiation in the first and second regions which has been transmitted through a sample path of atmosphere is detected. The intensity of the radiation transmitted in each of the first and second regions is compared and from this comparison the amount of water in the sample path is determined.

  5. Ultraviolet absorption hygrometer

    DOEpatents

    Gersh, M.E.; Bien, F.; Bernstein, L.S.

    1986-12-09

    An ultraviolet absorption hygrometer is provided including a source of pulsed ultraviolet radiation for providing radiation in a first wavelength region where water absorbs significantly and in a second proximate wavelength region where water absorbs weakly. Ultraviolet radiation in the first and second regions which has been transmitted through a sample path of atmosphere is detected. The intensity of the radiation transmitted in each of the first and second regions is compared and from this comparison the amount of water in the sample path is determined. 5 figs.

  6. Modular total absorption spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karny, M.; Rykaczewski, K. P.; Fijałkowska, A.; Rasco, B. C.; Wolińska-Cichocka, M.; Grzywacz, R. K.; Goetz, K. C.; Miller, D.; Zganjar, E. F.

    2016-11-01

    The design and performance of the Modular Total Absorption Spectrometer built and commissioned at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory is presented. The active volume of the detector is approximately one ton of NaI(Tl), which results in very high full γ energy peak efficiency of 71% at 6 MeV and nearly flat efficiency of around 81.5% for low energy γ-rays between 300 keV and 1 MeV. In addition to the high peak efficiency, the modular construction of the detector permits the use of a γ-coincidence technique in data analysis as well as β-delayed neutron observation.

  7. Proton polarization from π+ absorption in 4He

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aclander, J.; MayTal-Beck, S.; Altman, A.; Ashery, D.; Hahn, H.; Moinester, M. A.; Rahav, A.; Feltham, A.; Jones, G.; Pavan, M.; Sevior, M.; Hutcheon, D.; Ottewell, D.; Smith, G. R.; Niskanen, J. A.

    1993-02-01

    The polarization of protons resulting from π+ absorption in 4He was measured at bombarding energies of 120 MeV and 250 MeV. Events arising from absorption in a quasi-deuteron were analysed by using kinematical constraints. The apparatus was tested by measuring the polarization of protons resulting from π +d→ overline→pp . Differences observed between polarization measured for pion absorption in the deuteron and in quasi-deuterons inside 3He and 4He suggest that the density of the absorbing nucleon pair affects this observable. There is however a large discrepancy between the experimental results and theoretical predictions.

  8. Spectroscopic investigation of protein corona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choudhary, Poonam

    Nanotechnology has revolutionalized the landscape of modern science and technology, including materials, electronics, therapeutics, bioimaging, sensing, and the environment. Research in the past decade has examined the fate of nanomaterials in vitro and in vivo, as well as the interactions between nanoparticles and biological and ecosystems using primarily toxicological and ecotoxicological approaches. However, due to the versatility in the physical and physicochemical properties of nanoparticles, and due to the vast complexity of their hosting systems, the solubility, transformation, and biocompatibility of nanomaterials are still poorly understood. Nanotechnology has been undergoing tremendous development in recent decades, driven by realized perceived applications of nanomaterials in electronics, therapeutics, imaging, sensing, environmental remediation, and consumer products. Nanoparticles on entering the blood stream undergo an identity change, they become coated with proteins. There are different kind of proteins present in blood. Proteins compete for getting coated over the surface of nanoparticle and this whole entity of proteins coated over nanoparticle surface is called Protein Corona. Proteins tightly bound to the surface of nanoparticle form hard corona and the ones loosely bound on the outer surface form soft corona. This dissertation is aimed at spectroscopic investigation of Protein Corona. Chapter I of this dissertation offers a comprehensive review of the literature based on nanomaterials with the focus on carbon based nanomaterilas and introduction to Protein Corona. Chapter II is based different methods used for Graphene Synthesis,different types of defects and doping. In Chapter III influence of defects on Graphene Protein Corona was investigated. Chapter IV is based on the study of Apoptosis induced cell death by Gold and silver nanoparticles. In vitro study of effect of Protein Corona on toxicity of cells was done.

  9. Spectroscopic Observations of Merging Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donzelli, C. J.; Pastoriza, M. G.

    2000-07-01

    In this paper we describe the spectroscopic and infrared properties of a sample of 25 merging galaxy pairs, selected from the catalog of Arp & Madore, and we compare them with those observed in a similar sample of interacting galaxies (Donzelli & Pastoriza). It is noted that mergers as well as interacting systems comprise a wide range of spectral types, going from those corresponding to well-evolved stellar populations (older than 200 Myr) to those that show clear signatures of H II regions with stellar populations younger than 8 Myr. However, merger galaxies show on average more excited spectra than interacting pairs, which could be attributed to lower gas metallicity. From the emission lines we also found that merging systems show on average higher (about a factor of 2) star formation rates than interacting galaxies. Classical diagnostic diagrams show that only three of 50 of the galaxies (6%) present some form of nuclear activity: two Seyfert galaxies and one LINER. However, through a detailed analysis of the pure emission-line spectra, we conclude that this fraction may raise up to 23% of the mergers if we consider that some galaxies host a low-luminosity active nucleus surrounded by strong star-forming regions. This latter assumption is also supported by the infrared colors of the galaxies. Regarding to the total infrared luminosities, the merging galaxies show on average an IR luminosity, log(Lir)=10.7, lower than that of interacting systems, log(Lir)=10.9. We find that only three mergers of the sample (12%) can be classified as luminous infrared galaxies, while this fraction increases to 24% in the interacting sample. Based on observations made at CASLEO. Complejo Astronómico El Leoncito is operated under agreement between the Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas de la República Argentina and the National Universities of La Plata, Córdoba and San Juan.

  10. Spectroscopic characterization of manganese minerals.

    PubMed

    Lakshmi Reddy, S; Padma Suvarna, K; Udayabhaska Reddy, G; Endo, Tamio; Frost, R L

    2014-01-03

    Manganese minerals ardenite, alleghanyite and leucopoenicite originated from Madhya Pradesh, India, Nagano prefecture Japan, Sussex Country and Parker Shaft Franklin, Sussex Country, New Jersey respectively are used in the present work. In these minerals manganese is the major constituent and iron if present is in traces only. An EPR study of on all of the above samples confirms the presence of Mn(II) with g around 2.0. Optical absorption spectrum of the mineral alleghanyite indicates that Mn(II) is present in two different octahedral sites and in leucophoenicite Mn(II) is also in octahedral geometry. Ardenite mineral gives only a few Mn(II) bands. NIR results of the minerals ardenite, leucophoenicite and alleghanyite are due to hydroxyl and silicate anions which confirming the formulae of the minerals.

  11. Spectral Fingerprinting of Individual Cells Visualized by Cavity-Reflection-Enhanced Light-Absorption Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Arai, Yoshiyuki; Yamamoto, Takayuki; Minamikawa, Takeo; Takamatsu, Tetsuro; Nagai, Takeharu

    2015-01-01

    The absorption spectrum of light is known to be a “molecular fingerprint” that enables analysis of the molecular type and its amount. It would be useful to measure the absorption spectrum in single cell in order to investigate the cellular status. However, cells are too thin for their absorption spectrum to be measured. In this study, we developed an optical-cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopic microscopy method for two-dimensional absorption imaging. The light absorption is enhanced by an optical cavity system, which allows the detection of the absorption spectrum with samples having an optical path length as small as 10 μm, at a subcellular spatial resolution. Principal component analysis of various types of cultured mammalian cells indicates absorption-based cellular diversity. Interestingly, this diversity is observed among not only different species but also identical cell types. Furthermore, this microscopy technique allows us to observe frozen sections of tissue samples without any staining and is capable of label-free biopsy. Thus, our microscopy method opens the door for imaging the absorption spectra of biological samples and thereby detecting the individuality of cells. PMID:25950513

  12. Spectral fingerprinting of individual cells visualized by cavity-reflection-enhanced light-absorption microscopy.

    PubMed

    Arai, Yoshiyuki; Yamamoto, Takayuki; Minamikawa, Takeo; Takamatsu, Tetsuro; Nagai, Takeharu

    2015-01-01

    The absorption spectrum of light is known to be a "molecular fingerprint" that enables analysis of the molecular type and its amount. It would be useful to measure the absorption spectrum in single cell in order to investigate the cellular status. However, cells are too thin for their absorption spectrum to be measured. In this study, we developed an optical-cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopic microscopy method for two-dimensional absorption imaging. The light absorption is enhanced by an optical cavity system, which allows the detection of the absorption spectrum with samples having an optical path length as small as 10 μm, at a subcellular spatial resolution. Principal component analysis of various types of cultured mammalian cells indicates absorption-based cellular diversity. Interestingly, this diversity is observed among not only different species but also identical cell types. Furthermore, this microscopy technique allows us to observe frozen sections of tissue samples without any staining and is capable of label-free biopsy. Thus, our microscopy method opens the door for imaging the absorption spectra of biological samples and thereby detecting the individuality of cells.

  13. The HI absorption "Zoo"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geréb, K.; Maccagni, F. M.; Morganti, R.; Oosterloo, T. A.

    2015-03-01

    We present an analysis of the H I 21 cm absorption in a sample of 101 flux-selected radio AGN (S1.4 GHz> 50 mJy) observed with the Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope (WSRT). We detect H I absorption in 32 objects (30% of the sample). In a previous paper, we performed a spectral stacking analysis on the radio sources, while here we characterize the absorption spectra of the individual detections using the recently presented busy function. The H I absorption spectra show a broad variety of widths, shapes, and kinematical properties. The full width half maximum (FWHM) of the busy function fits of the detected H I lines lies in the range 32 km s-1absorption (FW20) lies in the range 63 km s-1 200 km s-1). We study the kinematical and radio source properties of each group, with the goal of identifying different morphological structures of H I. Narrow lines mostly lie at the systemic velocity and are likely produced by regularly rotating H I disks or gas clouds. More H I disks can be present among galaxies with lines of intermediate widths; however, the H I in these sources is more unsettled. We study the asymmetry parameter and blueshift/redshift distribution of the lines as a function of their width. We find a trend for which narrow profiles are also symmetric, while broad lines are the most asymmetric. Among the broadest lines, more lines appear blueshifted than redshifted, similarly to what was found by previous studies. Interestingly, symmetric broad lines are absent from the sample. We argue that if a profile is broad, it is also asymmetric and shifted relative to the systemic velocity because it is tracing unsettled H I gas. In particular, besides three of the broadest (up to FW20 = 825 km s-1

  14. Graphite filter atomizer in atomic absorption spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katskov, Dmitri A.

    2007-09-01

    Graphite filter atomizers (GFA) for electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS) show substantial advantages over commonly employed electrothermal vaporizers and atomizers, tube and platform furnaces, for direct determination of high and medium volatility elements in matrices associated with strong spectral and chemical interferences. Two factors provide lower limits of detection and shorter determination cycles with the GFA: the vaporization area in the GFA is separated from the absorption volume by a porous graphite partition; the sample is distributed over a large surface of a collector in the vaporization area. These factors convert the GFA into an efficient chemical reactor. The research concerning the GFA concept, technique and analytical methodology, carried out mainly in the author's laboratory in Russia and South Africa, is reviewed. Examples of analytical applications of the GFA in AAS for analysis of organic liquids and slurries, bio-samples and food products are given. Future prospects for the GFA are discussed in connection with analyses by fast multi-element AAS.

  15. Defects in a mixed-habit Yakutian diamond: Studies by optical and cathodoluminescence microscopy, infrared absorption, Raman scattering and photoluminescence spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lang, A. R.; Bulanova, G. P.; Fisher, D.; Furkert, S.; Sarua, A.

    2007-12-01

    Widespread occurrences in the crystallisation history of natural diamonds are epochs of mixed-habit growth in which normal {1 1 1}-faceted growth is accompanied by non-faceted growth on curved surfaces of mean orientation ˜{1 0 0}, termed 'cuboid'. This paper analyses mixed-habit-related phenomena in a near-central, (1 1 0)-polished slice of an octahedron from the Mir pipe, previously studied principally by SIMS probes analysing N impurity content and C and N isotope composition. In the present work, newly studied features include dislocation content, fine structure in cathodoluminescence (CL) patterns, refined IR absorption data, Raman and photoluminescence (PL) microspectroscopy and microscopy of internal non-diamond bodies. Topographic imaging and spectroscopic techniques traced the specimen's morphological evolution from a cubo-octahedral core containing complex relative development of {1 1 1} and cuboid sectors, both populated by graphite crystallites, diameters up to ˜5 μm, lying on all diamond host {1 1 1}. Coherently overgrowing the core was a zone of widely but smoothly varying relative development of {1 1 1} and cuboid sectors, both on birefringence evidence dislocation-free, emitting strongly from cuboid sectors the PL spectra associated with Ni-N-vacancy complexes. An enclosing octahedral shell of solely {1 1 1} lamellae terminated mixed-habit growth. High-resolution FTIR absorption measurements of I( B'), the integrated absorption due to {1 0 0}-platelet defects, showed from its absence or weakness that total or substantial platelet degradation had taken place in the mixed-habit zones, indicating that these had undergone conditions close to the diamond-graphite phase boundary in their history.

  16. Spectroscopic analysis of pharmaceutical formulations through the use of chemometric tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ornelas-Soto, N.; Barbosa-García, O.; Meneses-Nava, M.; Ramos-Ortíz, G.; Pichardo-Molina, J.; Maldonado, J. L.; Contreras, U.; López-Martínez, L.; López-de-Alba, P.; López-Barajas, F.

    2009-09-01

    In this work, fast and reliable spectroscopic methods in combination with chemometric tools were developed for simultaneous determination of Acetylsalicylic Acid, Acetaminophen and Caffeine in commercial formulations. For the first-order multivariate calibration method (PLS-1), calibration and validation sets were constructed with 23 and 10 samples respectively according to a central composite design. The Micro-Raman, FTIR-HATR and UV absorption spectra in the region of 100-2000 cm-1, 400-4400 cm-1 and 200-350 nm, respectively, were recorded. The % REP's (Percentage of relative error of prediction) was less than 18 for all used spectroscopic techniques. Subsequently, commercial pharmaceutical samples were analyzed with percentage of recovery between 90 and 117% for the three compounds.

  17. High-definition Fourier transform infrared spectroscopic imaging of breast tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leslie, L. Suzanne; Kadjacsy-Balla, Andre; Bhargava, Rohit

    2015-03-01

    Breast cancer diagnosis relies on staining serial sections of a biopsy in a process that can be time intensive and costly. Fourier transform infrared imaging (FT-IR) is a non-destructive, label-free chemical imaging technique that uses the vibrational structure of the biological molecules of the sample to provide contrast for images at any absorption peak in the mid-infrared. The full potential of spectroscopic imaging has been limited by the spatial resolution provided by most commercial instruments. By increasing the magnification and numerical aperture of the microscope, image pixel sizes on the order of 1.1 micron can be achieved, allowing HD FT-IR spectroscopic imaging to provide high quality images that could aid in histopathology, diagnosis, and studies of breast cancer progression.

  18. Atmospheric and environmental sensing by photonic absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, W.; Wu, T.; Zhao, W.; Wysocki, G.; Cui, X.; Lengignon, C.; Maamary, R.; Fertein, E.; Coeur, C.; Cassez, A.; Wang, Y.; Zhang, W.; Gao, X.; Liu, W.; Dong, F.; Zha, G.; Zheng, Xu; Wang, T.

    2013-01-01

    Chemically reactive short-lived species play a crucial role in tropospheric processes affecting regional air quality and global climate change. Contrary to long-lived species (such as greenhouse gases), fast, accurate and precise monitoring changes in concentration of atmospheric short-lived species represents a real challenge due to their short life time (~1 s for OH radical) and very low concentration in the atmosphere (down to 106 molecules/cm3, corresponding to 0.1 pptv at standard temperature and pressure). We report on our recent progress in instrumentation developments for spectroscopic sensing of trace reactive species. Modern photonic sources such as quantum cascade laser (QCL), distributed feedback (DFB) diode laser, light emitting diode (LED), difference-frequency generation (DFG) parametric source are implemented in conjunction with highsensitivity spectroscopic measurement techniques for : (1) nitrous acid (HONO) monitoring by QCL-based long optical pathlength absorption spectroscopy and LED-based IBBCEAS (incoherent broadband cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopy); (2) DFB laser-based hydroxyl free radical (OH) detection using WM-OA-ICOS (wavelength modulation off-axis integrated cavity output spectroscopy) and FRS (Faraday rotation spectroscopy), respectively; (3) nitrate radical (NO3) and nitrogen dioxide (NO2) simultaneous measurements with IBBCEAS approach. Applications in field observation and in smog chamber study will be presented.

  19. Spacelab Charcoal Analyses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slivon, L. E.; Hernon-Kenny, L. A.; Katona, V. R.; Dejarme, L. E.

    1995-01-01

    This report describes analytical methods and results obtained from chemical analysis of 31 charcoal samples in five sets. Each set was obtained from a single scrubber used to filter ambient air on board a Spacelab mission. Analysis of the charcoal samples was conducted by thermal desorption followed by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). All samples were analyzed using identical methods. The method used for these analyses was able to detect compounds independent of their polarity or volatility. In addition to the charcoal samples, analyses of three Environmental Control and Life Support System (ECLSS) water samples were conducted specifically for trimethylamine.

  20. Determination of spectroscopic properties of atmospheric molecules from high resolution vacuum ultraviolet cross section and wavelength measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parkinson, W. H.; Yoshino, K.; Freeman, D. E.

    1988-01-01

    Progress is given on work on: cross section measurements in the transmission window regions of the Schumann-Runge bands of oxygen; the determinations of predissociation linewidths; the theoretical calculation of band oscillator strengths of the Schumann-Runge absorption bands of O-16O-18; the determination of molecular spectroscopic constants; and the combined Herzberg continuum cross sections. The experimental investigations relevant to the cross section measurements, predissociation linewidths, and molecular spectroscopic constants are effected at high resolution with a 6.65 m scanning spectrometer which is, by virtue of its small instrumental width (FWHM = 0.0013 nm), suitable for cross section measurements of molecular bands with discrete rotational structure. Such measurements are needed for accurate calculations of the stratospheric production of atomic oxygen and heavy ozone formed following the photo-predissociation of O-16O-18 by solar radiation penetrating between the absorption lines of O-16(sub 2).

  1. sick: The Spectroscopic Inference Crank

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casey, Andrew R.

    2016-03-01

    There exists an inordinate amount of spectral data in both public and private astronomical archives that remain severely under-utilized. The lack of reliable open-source tools for analyzing large volumes of spectra contributes to this situation, which is poised to worsen as large surveys successively release orders of magnitude more spectra. In this article I introduce sick, the spectroscopic inference crank, a flexible and fast Bayesian tool for inferring astrophysical parameters from spectra. sick is agnostic to the wavelength coverage, resolving power, or general data format, allowing any user to easily construct a generative model for their data, regardless of its source. sick can be used to provide a nearest-neighbor estimate of model parameters, a numerically optimized point estimate, or full Markov Chain Monte Carlo sampling of the posterior probability distributions. This generality empowers any astronomer to capitalize on the plethora of published synthetic and observed spectra, and make precise inferences for a host of astrophysical (and nuisance) quantities. Model intensities can be reliably approximated from existing grids of synthetic or observed spectra using linear multi-dimensional interpolation, or a Cannon-based model. Additional phenomena that transform the data (e.g., redshift, rotational broadening, continuum, spectral resolution) are incorporated as free parameters and can be marginalized away. Outlier pixels (e.g., cosmic rays or poorly modeled regimes) can be treated with a Gaussian mixture model, and a noise model is included to account for systematically underestimated variance. Combining these phenomena into a scalar-justified, quantitative model permits precise inferences with credible uncertainties on noisy data. I describe the common model features, the implementation details, and the default behavior, which is balanced to be suitable for most astronomical applications. Using a forward model on low-resolution, high signal

  2. Spectroscopic and Structural Investigations of alpha-beta-, and gamma-AIH3 Phases

    SciTech Connect

    Manciu, F.S.; Graetz, J.; Reza, L.; Durrer, W.G.; Bronson, A.; Lacina, D.

    2010-07-01

    With its reputation as a high-energy density fuel, aluminum hydride (AlH{sub 3}) has received renewed attention as a material that is particularly suitable, not only for hydrogen storage but also for rocket propulsion. While the various phases of AlH{sub 3} have been investigated theoretically, there is a shortage of experimental studies corroborating the theoretical findings. In response to this, we present here an investigation of these compounds based primarily on two research areas in which there is the greatest scarcity of information in the literature, namely Raman and infrared (IR) absorption analysis. To the authors knowledge, this is the first report of experimental far-IR absorption results on these compounds. Two different samples prepared by broadly similar ethereal reactions of AlCl{sub 3} with LiAlH{sub 4} were analyzed. Both Raman and IR absorption measurements indicate that one sample is purely {gamma}-AlH{sub 3} and that the other is a mixture of {alpha}-, {beta}-, and {gamma}-AlH{sub 3} phases. X-ray diffraction confirms the spectroscopic findings, most notably for the {beta}-AlH{sub 3} phase, for which optical spectroscopic data are reported here for the first time.

  3. Statistics of cosmological Lyman α absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munshi, Dipak; Coles, Peter; Viel, Matteo

    2012-12-01

    We study the effect of the non-Gaussianity induced by gravitational evolution upon the statistical properties of absorption in quasar (quasi-stellar object) spectra. Using the generic hierarchical ansatz and the lognormal approximation, we derive the analytical expressions for the one-point probability distribution function (PDF) as well as for the joint two-point PDF of transmitted fluxes in two neighbouring quasi-stellar objects. These flux PDFs are constructed in three dimensions as well as in projection (i.e. in two dimensions). The PDFs are constructed by relating the lower-order moments (i.e. cumulants and cumulant correlators) of the fluxes to the three-dimensional neutral hydrogen distribution, which is, in turn, expressed as a function of the underlying dark matter distribution. Next, the lower-order moments are modelled using a generating function formalism in the context of a minimal tree-model for the higher-order correlation hierarchy. These different approximations give nearly identical results for the range of redshifts probed, and we also find very good agreement between our predictions and the outputs of hydrodynamical simulations. The formalism developed here for the joint statistics of flux-decrements concerning two lines of sight can be extended to multiple lines of sight, which could be particularly important for the three-dimensional reconstruction of the cosmic web from the spectra of quasi-stellar objects (e.g. in the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey). These statistics probe the underlying projected neutral hydrogen field and are thus linked to hotspots of absorption. The results for the PDF and the bias presented here use the same functional forms of scaling functions that have previously been employed for the modelling of other cosmological observations, such as the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect.

  4. MASSIVE YOUNG STELLAR OBJECTS IN THE GALACTIC CENTER. I. SPECTROSCOPIC IDENTIFICATION FROM SPITZER INFRARED SPECTROGRAPH OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    An, Deokkeun; RamIrez, Solange V.; Boogert, A. C. Adwin; Sellgren, Kris; Arendt, Richard G.; Schultheis, Mathias; Cotera, Angela S.; Stolovy, Susan R.

    2011-08-01

    We present results from our spectroscopic study, using the Infrared Spectrograph (IRS) on board the Spitzer Space Telescope, designed to identify massive young stellar objects (YSOs) in the Galactic center (GC). Our sample of 107 YSO candidates was selected based on Infrared Array Camera (IRAC) colors from the high spatial resolution, high sensitivity Spitzer/IRAC images in the Central Molecular Zone, which spans the central {approx}300 pc region of the Milky Way. We obtained IRS spectra over 5-35 {mu}m using both high- and low-resolution IRS modules. We spectroscopically identify massive YSOs by the presence of a 15.4 {mu}m shoulder on the absorption profile of 15 {mu}m CO{sub 2} ice, suggestive of CO{sub 2} ice mixed with CH{sub 3}OH ice on grains. This 15.4 {mu}m shoulder is clearly observed in 16 sources and possibly observed in an additional 19 sources. We show that nine massive YSOs also reveal molecular gas-phase absorption from CO{sub 2}, C{sub 2}H{sub 2}, and/or HCN, which traces warm and dense gas in YSOs. Our results provide the first spectroscopic census of the massive YSO population in the GC. We fit YSO models to the observed spectral energy distributions and find YSO masses of 8-23 M{sub sun}, which generally agree with the masses derived from observed radio continuum emission. We find that about 50% of photometrically identified YSOs are confirmed with our spectroscopic study. This implies a preliminary star formation rate of {approx}0.07 M{sub sun} yr{sup -1} at the GC.

  5. Massive Young Stellar Objects in the Galactic Center. 1; Spectroscopic Identification from Spitzer/IRS Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    An, Deokkeun; Ramirez, Solange V.; Sellgren, Kris; Arendt, Richard G.; Boogert, A. C. Adwin; Robitaille, Thomas P.; Schultheis, Mathias; Cotera, Angela S.; Smith, Howard A.; Stolovy, Susan R.

    2011-01-01

    We present results from our spectroscopic study, using the Infrared Spectrograph (IRS) onboard the Spitzer Space Telescope, designed to identify massive young stellar objects (YSOs) in the Galactic Center (GC). Our sample of 107 YSO candidates was selected based on IRAC colors from the high spatial resolution, high sensitivity Spitzer/IRAC images in the Central Molecular Zone (CMZ), which spans the central approximately 300 pc region of the Milky Way Galaxy. We obtained IRS spectra over 5 micron to 35 micron using both high- and low-resolution IRS modules. We spectroscopically identify massive YSOs by the presence of a 15.4 micron shoulder on the absorption profile of 15 micron CO2 ice, suggestive of CO2 ice mixed with CH30H ice on grains. This 15.4 micron shoulder is clearly observed in 16 sources and possibly observed in an additional 19 sources. We show that 9 massive YSOs also reveal molecular gas-phase absorption from C02, C2H2, and/or HCN, which traces warm and dense gas in YSOs. Our results provide the first spectroscopic census of the massive YSO population in the GC. We fit YSO models to the observed spectral energy distributions and find YSO masses of 8 - 23 solar Mass, which generally agree with the masses derived from observed radio continuum emission. We find that about 50% of photometrically identified YSOs are confirmed with our spectroscopic study. This implies a preliminary star formation rate of approximately 0.07 solar mass/yr at the GC.

  6. Wavelet Analyses and Applications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bordeianu, Cristian C.; Landau, Rubin H.; Paez, Manuel J.

    2009-01-01

    It is shown how a modern extension of Fourier analysis known as wavelet analysis is applied to signals containing multiscale information. First, a continuous wavelet transform is used to analyse the spectrum of a nonstationary signal (one whose form changes in time). The spectral analysis of such a signal gives the strength of the signal in each…

  7. Apollo 14 microbial analyses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, G. R.

    1972-01-01

    Extensive microbiological analyses that were performed on the Apollo 14 prime and backup crewmembers and ancillary personnel are discussed. The crewmembers were subjected to four separate and quite different environments during the 137-day monitoring period. The relation between each of these environments and observed changes in the microflora of each astronaut are presented.

  8. Differential optoacoustic absorption detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shumate, M. S. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    A differential optoacoustic absorption detector employed two tapered cells in tandem or in parallel. When operated in tandem, two mirrors were used at one end remote from the source of the beam of light directed into one cell back through the other, and a lens to focus the light beam into the one cell at a principal focus half way between the reflecting mirror. Each cell was tapered to conform to the shape of the beam so that the volume of one was the same as for the other, and the volume of each received maximum illumination. The axes of the cells were placed as close to each other as possible in order to connect a differential pressure detector to the cells with connecting passages of minimum length. An alternative arrangement employed a beam splitter and two lenses to operate the cells in parallel.

  9. Two absorption furosemide prodrugs.

    PubMed

    Mombrú, A W; Mariezcurrena, R A; Suescun, L; Pardo, H; Manta, E; Prandi, C

    1999-03-15

    The structures of two absorption furosemide prodrugs, hexanoyloxymethyl 4-chloro-N-furfuryl-5-sulfamoyl-anthranilate (C19H23CIN2O7S), (I), and benzoyloxymethyl 4-chloro-N-furfuryl-5-sulfamoylanthranilate (C20H17CIN2O7S), (II), are described in this paper and compared with furosemide and four other prodrugs. The molecular conformations of both compounds are similar to those of the other prodrugs; the packing and the crystal system are the primary differences. Compound (I) crystallizes in the trigonal space group R3 and compound (II) in the monoclinic space group P2(1)/n. The packing of both structures is stabilized by a three-dimensional hydrogen-bond network.

  10. High Resolution Spectra of Low Redshift Damped Lyalpha Absorption Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, R. D.; Beaver, E. A.; Junkkarinen, V. T.; Lyons, R. W.; Smith, H. E.

    1998-05-01

    We have been able to form a fairly complete picture of the galaxy responsible for the z_a=0.395 absorption line system in PKS 1229--021 by combining Keck HIRES and LRIS spectroscopy with observations taken with the Hubble Space Telescope. The image of the absorber is consistent with the inclined disk of a moderately luminous spiral galaxy. We have not been able to detect the continuum from this galaxy spectroscopically, but our LRIS spectra show emission from [O II] lambda3727 which can be interpreted to be indicative of star formation at the rate of a few M_⊙ per year. The HIRES spectra clearly show an ``edge--leading'' absorption profile. Prochaska and Wolfe have predicted that the velocity of the center of mass of the absorbing galaxy should fall near one edge of the absorption profile if the damped Lyalpha systems are due to the rotating disks of spiral galaxies. The [O II] emission velocity is consistent with this, but there is some ambiguity due to the doublet nature of the [O II] emission. Although the absorption lines of the abundant elements are saturated in the components which correspond to the H I absorption, we have been able to measure accurate column densities for Ca II, Ti II, and Mn II for comparison with the H I column density determined from low resolution HST/FOS spectra. The abundances are compatible with approximately 0.1 of solar, with little or no dust, but they are also consistent with lines of sight toward zeta Oph through warm interstellar clouds. HIRES observations of the z_a=0.692 absorption line system in 3CR 286 will also be discussed, after the data are fully analyzed. This work is part of the Goddard High Resolution Spectrograph Guaranteed Time Observations and is supported by NASA grant NAG5--1858 and the NSF.

  11. Arsenate adsorption on ruthenium oxides: A spectroscopic and kinetic investigation

    SciTech Connect

    Luxton, Todd P.; Eick, Matthew J.; Scheckel, Kirk G.

    2008-12-08

    Arsenate adsorption on amorphous (RuO{sub 2} {center_dot} 1.1H{sub 2}O) and crystalline (RuO{sub 2}) ruthenium oxides was evaluated using spectroscopic and kinetic methods to elucidate the adsorption mechanism. Extended X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (EXAFS) was used to determine the local coordination environment of adsorbed arsenate. Additionally, pressure-jump (p-jump) relaxation spectroscopy was used to investigate the kinetics of arsenate adsorption/desorption on ruthenium oxides. Chemical relaxations resulting from the induced pressure change were monitored via electrical conductivity detection. EXAFS data were collected for two initial arsenate solution concentrations, 3 and 33 mM at pH 5. The collected spectra indicated a similar coordination environment for arsenate adsorbed to RuO{sub 2} {center_dot} 1.1H{sub 2}O for both arsenate concentrations. In contrast the EXAFS spectra of RuO{sub 2} indicated differences in the local coordination environments for the crystalline material with increasing arsenate concentration. Data analysis indicated that both mono- and bidentate surfaces complexes were present on both RuO{sub 2} {center_dot} 1.1H{sub 2}O and RuO{sub 2}. Relaxation spectra from the pressure-jump experiments of both ruthenium oxides resulted in a double relaxation event. Based on the relaxation spectra, a two step reaction mechanism for arsenate adsorption is proposed resulting in the formation of a bidentate surface complex. Analysis of the kinetic and spectroscopic data suggested that while there were two relaxation events, arsenate adsorbed to ruthenium oxide surfaces through both mono- and bidentate surface complexes.

  12. Spectroscopic diagnostics of dusty plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouaras, Karim

    2014-10-01

    The formation of carbon nanoparticles particles in low pressure magnetized hydrocarbon plasmas is investigated using infrared quantum cascade laser absorption spectroscopy (QCLAS), mass spectrometry (MS) and laser extinction spectroscopy (LES). Results showed that dust formation is correlated to the presence of a large amount of large positively charged hydrocarbon ions. Large negative ions or neutral species were not observed. These results, along with a qualitative comparison of diffusion and reaction characteristic, suggest that a positive ion may contribute to the growth of nanoparticles in hydrocarbon magnetized plasmas. Growth of carbon nanoparticles has been widely studied in RF plasma. Our aim is to complete these studies in different discharge system, in which the growth mechanisms may be different. In particular, we focus our work on dipolar ECR microwave discharge. The magnetic field of the plasma source is likely to trap carbon-containing charged particles and then modify the dust growth kinetics. In the present study the combination of these diagnostics gives us the tools to study the kinetics of plasma processes. In this way both qualitative and quantitative characteristics could be obtained. An outstanding role may be attributed to the positive ions in the monitored magnetized plasmas, whereas usually formation of dust is supposed driven by negative ions. In addition, we focus our work in tungsten nanoparticle in particular with LES, this noninvasive technique provide us the tool to follow the dynamics and concentration dust. K. Ouaras, L. Colina Delacqua, G. Lombardi, K. Hassouni, and X. Bonnin.

  13. Quantifying the effect of finite spectral bandwidth on extinction coefficient of species in laser absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Manjeet; Singh, Jaswant; Singh, Baljit; Ghanshyam, C.

    2016-11-01

    The aim of this study is to quantify the finite spectral bandwidth effect on laser absorption spectroscopy for a wide-band laser source. Experimental analysis reveals that the extinction coefficient of an analyte is affected by the bandwidth of the spectral source, which may result in the erroneous conclusions. An approximate mathematical model has been developed for optical intensities having Gaussian line shape, which includes the impact of source's spectral bandwidth in the equation for spectroscopic absorption. This is done by introducing a suitable first order and second order bandwidth approximation in the Beer-Lambert law equation for finite bandwidth case. The derived expressions were validated using spectroscopic analysis with higher SBW on a test sample, Rhodamine B. The concentrations calculated using proposed approximation, were in significant agreement with the true values when compared with those calculated with conventional approach.

  14. The number of stratum corneum cell layers correlates with the pseudo-absorption of the corneocytes.

    PubMed

    Jacobi, U; Kaiser, M; Richter, H; Audring, H; Sterry, W; Lademann, J

    2005-01-01

    The removal of the stratum corneum (SC) using adhesive tapes is a common technique in cutaneous studies. The determination of the varying amounts of the SC removed would be a helpful tool in such investigations. In the present study, the cell layers of porcine SC were counted before and after removal of several tape strips using histological techniques. In addition, the pseudo-absorption of the corneocytes reflecting the amount of these cells was determined using spectroscopy. Different amounts of SC were removed using 20 tape strips. The spectroscopically determined data correlate linearly with the number of removed cell layers. Based on these results, the pseudo-absorption of the corneocytes can be used to calculate the absolute number of cell layers removed with a standard deviation of less than 11%. In this way, the SC can be quantified using the procedure of tape stripping in combination with the spectroscopic determination of the corneocytes.

  15. Optical Spectroscopic Monitoring of Parachute Yarn Aging

    SciTech Connect

    Tallant, D.R.; Garcia, M.J.; Simpson, R.L.; Behr, V.L.; Whinery, L.D.; Peng, L.W.

    1999-04-01

    Optical spectroscopic techniques were evaluated as nondestructive monitors of the aging of parachutes in nuclear weapons. We analyzed thermally aged samples of nylon and Kevlar webbing by photoluminescence spectroscopy and reflection spectroscopy. Infrared analysis was also performed to help understand the degradation mechanisms of the polymer materials in the webbing. The photoluminescence and reflection spectra were analyzed by chemometric data treatment techniques to see if aged-induced changes in the spectra correlated to changes in measured tensile strength. A correlation was found between the shapes of the photoluminescent bands and the measured tensile strengths. Photoluminescent spectra can be used to predict the tensile strengths of nylon and Kevlar webbing with sufficient accuracy to categorize the webbing sample as above rated tensile strength, marginal or below rated tensile strength. The instrumentation required to perform the optical spectroscopic measurement can be made rugged, compact and portable. Thus, optical spectroscopic techniques offer a means for nondestructive field monitoring of parachutes in the enduring stockpile/

  16. Chemical detection and laser wavelength stabilization employing spectroscopic absorption via laser compliance voltage sensing

    DOEpatents

    Taubman, Matthew S; Phillips, Mark C

    2014-03-18

    Systems and methods are disclosed that provide a direct indication of the presence and concentration of an analyte within the external cavity of a laser device that employ the compliance voltage across the laser device. The systems can provide stabilization of the laser wavelength. The systems and methods can obviate the need for an external optical detector, an external gas cell, or other sensing region and reduce the complexity and size of the sensing configuration.

  17. Chemical detection and laser wavelength stabilization employing spectroscopic absorption via laser compliance voltage sensing

    SciTech Connect

    Taubman, Matthew S.; Phillips, Mark C.

    2016-01-12

    Systems and methods are disclosed that provide a direct indication of the presence and concentration of an analyte within the external cavity of a laser device that employ the compliance voltage across the laser device. The systems can provide stabilization of the laser wavelength. The systems and methods can obviate the need for an external optical detector, an external gas cell, or other sensing region and reduce the complexity and size of the sensing configuration.

  18. A spectroscopic study on the absorption of carbonic anhydrase onto the nanoporous silica nanoparticle.

    PubMed

    Khameneh, Hannaneh Pourjabbari; Bolouri, Termeh Ghorbanian; Nemati, Fahimeh; Rezvani, Fatemeh; Attar, Farnoosh; Saboury, Ali Akbar; Falahati, Mojtaba

    2017-06-01

    Herein, KIT-6 nanoporous silica nanoparticles were used as a solid support for immobilization of bovine carbonic anhydrase, isoform II (BCA II). The zeta potential study revealed that KIT-6 and BCA II provided negative (-13.58±1.95mV) and positive (4.23±0.72mV) charge distribution, respectively. Dynamic light scattering (DLS) analysis also showed that the hydrodynamic radius of KIT-6 is less than 100nm. In addition, the structural studies of free and immobilized BCA II against urea-induced denaturation were investigated by circular dichroism (CD) and fluorescence spectroscopy. CD studies showed that the absorbed BCA II, in comparison with the free enzyme, demonstrated higher stability against rising urea concentration. Fluorescence spectroscopy showed lower values of Stern- Volmer constant (KSV) for immobilized BCA II relative to free enzyme, reflecting the relative enzyme stability of BCA II after immobilization. Melting temperature (Tm) measurement of free and immobilized BCA II showed that immobilized enzyme had a more stable structure (Tm=71.9°C) relative to the free counterpart (Tm=64.7°C). In addition, the immobilized BCA II showed pronounced stability against pH and thermal deactivation. This study may provide new and complementary details regarding the design and development of enzymes in industrial applications.

  19. Mushroom (Agaricus bisporus) polyphenoloxidase inhibited by apigenin: Multi-spectroscopic analyses and computational docking simulation.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Zhiqiang; Liu, Wei; Zhou, Lei; Zou, Liqiang; Chen, Jun

    2016-07-15

    It has been revealed that some polyphenols can prevent enzymatic browning caused by polyphenoloxidase (PPO). Apigenin, widely distributed in many fruits and vegetables, is an important bioactive flavonoid compound. In this study, apigenin exhibited a strong inhibitory activity against PPO, and some reagents had synergistic effect with apigenin on inhibiting PPO. Apigenin inhibited PPO activity reversibly in a mixed-type manner. The fact that inactivation rate constant (k) of PPO increased while activation energy (Ea) and thermodynamic parameters (ΔG, ΔH and ΔS) decreased indicated that the thermosensitivity and stability of PPO decreased. The conformational changes of PPO were revealed by fluorescence emission spectra and circular dichroism. Atomic force microscopy observation suggested that the dimension of PPO molecules was larger after interacting with apigenin. Moreover, computational docking simulation indicated that apigenin bound to PPO and inserted into the hydrophobic cavity of PPO to interact with some amino acid residues.

  20. Laboratory spectroscopic analyses of electron irradiated alkanes and alkenes in solar system ices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hand, K. P.; Carlson, R. W.

    2012-03-01

    We report results from laboratory experiments of 10 keV electron irradiation of thin ice films of water and short-chain hydrocarbons at ˜10-8 Torr and temperatures ranging from 70-100 K. Hydrocarbon mixtures include water with C3H8, C3H6, C4H10 (butane and isobutane), and C4H8, (1-butene and cis/trans-2-butene). The double bonds of the alkenes in our initial mixtures were rapidly destroyed or converted to single carbon bonds, covalent bonds with hydrogen, bonds with -OH (hydroxyl), bonds with oxygen (C-O), or double bonds with oxygen (carbonyl). Spectra resulting from irradiation of alkane and alkene ices are largely indistinguishable; the initial differences in film composition are destroyed and the resulting mixture includes long-chain, branched aliphatics, aldehydes, ketones, esters, and alcohols. Methane was observed as a product during radiolysis but CO was largely absent. We find that while some of the carbon is oxidized and lost to CO2 formation, some carbon is sequestered into highly refractory, long-chain aliphatic compounds that remain as a thin residue even after the ice film has been raised to standard temperature and pressure. We conclude that the high availability of hydrogen in our experiments leads to the formation of the formyl radical which then serves as the precursor for formaldehyde and polymerization of longer hydrocarbon chains.

  1. Optical spectroscopic and reverse-phase HPLC analyses of Hg(II) binding to phytochelatins.

    PubMed Central

    Mehra, R K; Miclat, J; Kodati, V R; Abdullah, R; Hunter, T C; Mulchandani, P

    1996-01-01

    Optical spectroscopy and reverse-phase HPLC were used to investigate the binding of Hg(II) to plant metal-binding peptides (phytochelatins) with the structure (gammaGlu-Cys)2Gly, (gammaGlu-Cys)3Gly and (gammaGlu-Cys)4Gly. Glutathione-mediated transfer of Hg(II) into phytochelatins and the transfer of the metal ion from one phytochelatin to another was also studied using reverse-phase HPLC. The saturation of Hg(II)-induced bands in the UV/visible and CD spectra of (gammaGlu-Cys)2Gly suggested the formation of a single Hg(II)-binding species of this peptide with a stoichiometry of one metal ion per peptide molecule. The separation of apo-(gammaGlu-Cys)2Gly from its Hg(II) derivative on a C18 reverse-phase column also indicated the same metal-binding stoichiometry. The UV/visible spectra of both (gammaGlu-Cys)3Gly and (gammaGlu-Cys)4Gly at pH 7.4 showed distinct shoulders in the ligand-to-metal charge-transfer region at 280-290 mm. Two distinct Hg(II)-binding species, occurring at metal-binding stoichiometries of around 1.25 and 2.0 Hg(II) ions per peptide molecule, were observed for (gammaGlu-Cys)3Gly. These species exhibited specific spectral features in the charge-transfer region and were separable by HPLC. Similarly, two main Hg(II)-binding species of (gammaGlu-Cys)4Gly were observed by UV/visible and CD spectroscopy at metal-binding stoichiometries of around 1.25 and 2.5 respectively. Only a single peak of Hg(II)-(gammaGlu-Cys)4Gly complexes was resolved under the conditions used for HPLC. The overall Hg(II)-binding stoichiometries of phytochelatins were similar at pH 2.0 and at pH 7.4, indicating that pH did not influence the final Hg(II)-binding capacity of these peptides. The reverse-phase HPLC assays indicated a rapid transfer of Hg(II) from glutathione to phytochelatins. These assays also demonstrated a facile transfer of the metal ion from shorter- to longer-chain phytochelatins. The strength of Hg(II) binding to glutathione and phytochelatins followed the order: gammaGlu-Cys-Gly<(gammaGlu-Cys)2Gly<(gammaGlu-Cy s)3Gly<(gamma Glu-Cys)4Gly. PMID:8660312

  2. Compositional, spectroscopic and rheological analyses of mucilage isolated from taro (Colocasia esculenta L. Schott) corms.

    PubMed

    Njintang, Nicolas Yanou; Boudjeko, Thaddee; Tatsadjieu, Leopold Ngoune; Nguema-Ona, Eric; Scher, Joel; Mbofung, Carl M F

    2014-05-01

    Tropical roots and tubers generally contain mucilage. These mucilages exhibit unique rheological properties with considerable potential as a food thickener and stabilizer. A one-step extraction procedure was used to isolate starch free mucilage and associated proteins from a number of taro (Colocasia esculenta) varieties. The monosaccharide and amino acid composition, the structural and flow properties were investigated. The results showed that yield of mucilage fraction varied from 30 to 190 g.kg(-1). A negative correlation (r = -0.87; p < 0.05) was observed between the crude protein level and the yield. The monosaccharide profiles revealed that galactose, mannose and arabinose were the main monosaccharides in the hydrolysate of the mucilage. From the 17 amino acids analyzed, aspartic acid/asparagine (14.4-17.2%) and glutamic acid/glutamine (10.3-13.6%) were prominent in the mucilage as well as the flour. No significant differences were observed in the FT-IR spectra and in the viscosity behavior of the mucilage dispersions. The greatest difference in the mucilage is based on its monosaccharide profile while the protein composition, which reflects that of the flour, is relatively stable.

  3. Spectroscopic analyses on interaction of bovine serum albumin with novel spiro[cyclopropane-pyrrolizin].

    PubMed

    Yu, Xianyong; Liao, Zhixi; Jiang, Bingfei; Hu, Xiaolian; Li, Xiaofang

    2015-02-25

    The interaction between novel spiro[cyclopropane-pyrrolizin] (NSCP) and bovine serum albumin (BSA) was analyzed by fluorescence and ultraviolet-visible (UV-Vis) spectroscopy at 298 K, 304 K and 310 K under simulative physiological conditions. The results showed that NSCP can effectively quench the intrinsic fluorescence of BSA via static quenching. The binding constants, binding sites of NSCP with BSA were calculated. Hydrogen binds and van der Waals force played a major role in stabilizing the complex and the binding reaction were spontaneous. According to the Förster non-radiation energy transfer theory, the average binding distances between NSCP and BSA were obtained. What is more, the synchronous fluorescence spectra indicated that the conformation of BSA has been changed.

  4. Structural and spectroscopic analyses of europium doped yttrium oxyfluoride powders prepared by combustion synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Rakov, Nikifor; Guimarães, R. B.; Maciel, Glauco S.; Lozano B, W.

    2013-07-28

    A facile widely spread technique employed to produce low-cost high-yield oxide powders, combustion synthesis, was used to prepare yttrium oxyfluoride crystalline ceramic powders. The structure of the powders was analyzed by X-ray powder diffraction and Rietveld refinement. Samples heat treated at 700 °C had a predominance of vernier orthorhombic Y{sub 6}O{sub 5}F{sub 8} phase, while samples heat treated at 800 °C crystallized in stoichiometric rhombohedral YOF phase. The samples were doped with luminescent europium trivalent ions (Eu{sup 3+}) in different concentrations (1–15 wt.%) and Judd-Ofelt theory was used to probe the distortion from the inversion symmetry of the local crystal field and the degree of covalency between the rare-earth ion and the surrounding ligands. The luminescence lifetime was measured and the luminescence quantum efficiency (LQE) was estimated. We observed that Eu{sup 3+}:Y{sub 6}O{sub 5}F{sub 8} samples presented higher LQE in spite of the larger local crystal field anisotropy found for Eu{sup 3+}:YOF samples.

  5. Structural and spectroscopic analyses of europium doped yttrium oxyfluoride powders prepared by combustion synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rakov, Nikifor; Guimarães, R. B.; Lozano B., W.; Maciel, Glauco S.

    2013-07-01

    A facile widely spread technique employed to produce low-cost high-yield oxide powders, combustion synthesis, was used to prepare yttrium oxyfluoride crystalline ceramic powders. The structure of the powders was analyzed by X-ray powder diffraction and Rietveld refinement. Samples heat treated at 700 °C had a predominance of vernier orthorhombic Y6O5F8 phase, while samples heat treated at 800 °C crystallized in stoichiometric rhombohedral YOF phase. The samples were doped with luminescent europium trivalent ions (Eu3+) in different concentrations (1-15 wt.%) and Judd-Ofelt theory was used to probe the distortion from the inversion symmetry of the local crystal field and the degree of covalency between the rare-earth ion and the surrounding ligands. The luminescence lifetime was measured and the luminescence quantum efficiency (LQE) was estimated. We observed that Eu3+:Y6O5F8 samples presented higher LQE in spite of the larger local crystal field anisotropy found for Eu3+:YOF samples.

  6. Spectroscopic, thermal analyses, structural and antibacterial studies on the interaction of some metals with ofloxacin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zordok, W. A.; El-Shwiniy, W. H.; El-Attar, M. S.; Sadeek, S. A.

    2013-09-01

    Reaction between the fluoroquinolone antibacterial agent ofloxacin and V(IV), Zr(IV) and U(VI) in methanol and acetone was studied. The ability of ofloxacin to form metal complexes is high. The isolated solid complexes were characterized by elemental analysis, magnetic moment, conductance measurements, infrared, electronic, 1H NMR spectra and thermal investigation. In all complexes the ofloxacin ligand is coordinated through the pyridone and carboxylate oxygen forming 1:2 M:HOfl complexes. The calculated bond length and force constant, F(Udbnd O), in the uranyl complex are 1.73 Å and 640.83 N m-1, respectively. The metal-ligand binding of the V(IV) and Zr(IV) complexes was predicted by using the density functional theory (DFT) at the B3LYP-CEP-31G level of theory and total energy, dipole moment estimation of different V(IV) and Zr(IV) ofloxacin structures. All the synthesized complexes exhibited higher biocidal activity against S. aureus K1, Bacillus subtilis K22, Br. otitidis K76, Escherichia coli K32, Pseudomonas aeruginosa SW1 and Klebsiella oxytoca K42. compared to parent compounds and standard drugs.

  7. Subwavelength single layer absorption resonance antireflection coatings.

    PubMed

    Huber, S P; van de Kruijs, R W E; Yakshin, A E; Zoethout, E; Boller, K-J; Bijkerk, F

    2014-01-13

    We present theoretically derived design rules for an absorbing resonance antireflection coating for the spectral range of 100 - 400 nm, applied here on top of a molybdenum-silicon multilayer mirror (Mo/Si MLM) as commonly used in extreme ultraviolet lithography. The design rules for optimal suppression are found to be strongly dependent on the thickness and optical constants of the coating. For wavelengths below λ ∼ 230 nm, absorbing thin films can be used to generate an additional phase shift and complement the propagational phase shift, enabling full suppression already with film thicknesses far below the quarter-wave limit. Above λ ∼ 230 nm, minimal absorption (k < 0.2) is necessary for low reflectance and the minimum required layer thickness increases with increasing wavelength slowly converging towards the quarter-wave limit.As a proof of principle, SixCyNz thin films were deposited that exhibit optical constants close to the design rules for suppression around 285 nm. The thin films were deposited by electron beam co-deposition of silicon and carbon, with N+ ion implantation during growth and analyzed with variable angle spectroscopic ellipsometry to characterize the optical constants. We report a reduction of reflectance at λ = 285 nm, from 58% to 0.3% for a Mo/Si MLM coated with a 20 nm thin film of Si0.52C0.16N0.29.

  8. In vivo absorption spectra of the two stable states of the Euglena photoreceptor photocycle.

    PubMed

    Barsanti, Laura; Coltelli, Primo; Evangelista, Valtere; Passarelli, Vincenzo; Frassanito, Anna Maria; Vesentini, Nicoletta; Santoro, Fabrizio; Gualtieri, Paolo

    2009-01-01

    Euglena gracilis possesses a simple but sophisticated light detecting system, consisting of an eyespot formed by carotenoids globules and a photoreceptor. The photoreceptor of Euglena is characterized by optical bistability, with two stable states. In order to provide important and discriminating information on the series of structural changes that Euglena photoreceptive protein(s) undergoes inside the photoreceptor in response to light, we measured the in vivo absorption spectra of the two stable states A and B of photoreceptor photocycle. Data were collected using two different devices, i.e. a microspectrophotometer and a digital microscope. Our results show that the photocycle and the absorption spectra of the photoreceptor possess strong spectroscopic similarities with a rhodopsin-like protein. Moreover, the analysis of the absorption spectra of the two stable states of the photoreceptor and the absorption spectrum of the eyespot suggests an intriguing hypothesis for the orientation of microalgae toward light.

  9. Hyperpolarized 13C pyruvate mouse brain metabolism with absorptive-mode EPSI at 1 T

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miloushev, Vesselin Z.; Di Gialleonardo, Valentina; Salamanca-Cardona, Lucia; Correa, Fabian; Granlund, Kristin L.; Keshari, Kayvan R.

    2017-02-01

    The expected signal in echo-planar spectroscopic imaging experiments was explicitly modeled jointly in spatial and spectral dimensions. Using this as a basis, absorptive-mode type detection can be achieved by appropriate choice of spectral delays and post-processing techniques. We discuss the effects of gradient imperfections and demonstrate the implementation of this sequence at low field (1.05 T), with application to hyperpolarized [1-13C] pyruvate imaging of the mouse brain. The sequence achieves sufficient signal-to-noise to monitor the conversion of hyperpolarized [1-13C] pyruvate to lactate in the mouse brain. Hyperpolarized pyruvate imaging of mouse brain metabolism using an absorptive-mode EPSI sequence can be applied to more sophisticated murine disease and treatment models. The simple modifications presented in this work, which permit absorptive-mode detection, are directly translatable to human clinical imaging and generate improved absorptive-mode spectra without the need for refocusing pulses.

  10. External cavity quantum cascade lasers for spectroscopic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Tracy

    Mid-infrared spectroscopy is a powerful tool in monitoring trace gases for applications in atmospheric science, industrial processes, and homeland security. However, although current mid-infrared spectrometers (i.e. Fourier Transform Spectrometers or FTS) have a wide spectral range for multi-species and/or broadband molecular detection, they are too large with slow scan rates for practical use in high resolution spectroscopic applications. Quantum cascade lasers (QCLs) are compact, powerful, and efficient mid-infrared sources that can be quantum engineered with broadband gain profiles. Placed inside a diffraction grating based external cavity arrangement, they can easily provide >100 cm -1 frequency range with a spectral resolution limited by the laser linewidth (˜10-3 cm-1). Therefore, the external cavity quantum cascade laser (EC-QCL) provides both high spectral resolution and a wide frequency range. This thesis describes the study and development of EC-QCLs for spectroscopic applications. A new active wavelength method is presented to simplify the spectrometer system by allowing for reliable operation of the EC-QCL without additional wavelength diagnostic equipment. Typically, such equipment must be added to the spectrometer, because the grating equation is inaccurate in describing the EC-QCL output wavelength due to spectral misalignment of other wavelength-selective resonances in the EC-QCL. The active wavelength locking method automatically controls the EC-QCL wavelength, which improves the accuracy of the grating equation to 0.06 cm-1 and offers an ultimate 3σ precision of 0.042 cm-1. For industrial spectroscopic sensing applications in which scan rates must be on the order of kilohertz so that the turbulent gas system can be approximated as a quasi-stable one, a fast-wavelength-scanning folded EC-QCL design capable of 1 kHz scan rate is presented. Two modes of operation have been studied: 1) low resolution pulsed mode and 2) high resolution continuous

  11. X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Yano, Junko; Yachandra, Vittal K.

    2009-07-09

    This review gives a brief description of the theory and application of X-ray absorption spectroscopy, both X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) and extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS), especially, pertaining to photosynthesis. The advantages and limitations of the methods are discussed. Recent advances in extended EXAFS and polarized EXAFS using oriented membranes and single crystals are explained. Developments in theory in understanding the XANES spectra are described. The application of X-ray absorption spectroscopy to the study of the Mn4Ca cluster in Photosystem II is presented.

  12. BASIC STUDIES IN PERCUTANEOUS ABSORPTION.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    FATTY ACIDS, *SKIN(ANATOMY), ABSORPTION, ALKYL RADICALS, AMIDES, DIFFUSION, ELECTRON MICROSCOPY, HUMIDITY, LABORATORY ANIMALS, LIPIDS, ORGANIC SOLVENTS, PENETRATION, PRIVATION, PROTEINS, RATS, TEMPERATURE, WATER

  13. Spectroscopic measurements of solar wind generation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kohl, J. L.; Withbroe, G. L.; Zapata, C. A.; Noci, G.

    1983-01-01

    Spectroscopically observable quantities are described which are sensitive to the primary plasma parameters of the solar wind's source region. The method is discussed in which those observable quantities are used as constraints in the construction of empirical models of various coronal structures. Simulated observations are used to examine the fractional contributions to observed spectral intensities from coronal structures of interest which co-exist with other coronal structures along simulated lines-of-sight. The sensitivity of spectroscopic observables to the physical parameters within each of those structures is discussed.

  14. Development of a THz spectroscopic imaging system.

    PubMed

    Usami, M; Iwamoto, T; Fukasawa, R; Tani, M; Watanabe, M; Sakai, K

    2002-11-07

    We have developed a real-time THz imaging system based on the two-dimensional (2D) electro-optic (EO) sampling technique. Employing the 2D EO-sampling technique, we can obtain THz images using a CCD camera at a video rate of up to 30 frames per second. A spatial resolution of 1.4 mm was achieved. This resolution was reasonably close to the theoretical limit determined by diffraction. We observed not only static objects but also moving ones. To acquire spectroscopic information, time-domain images were collected. By processing these images on a computer, we can obtain spectroscopic images. Spectroscopy for silicon wafers was demonstrated.

  15. Experimental and theoretical investigations on spectroscopic properties of the imidazole-fused phenanthroline and its derivatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Rongfeng; Xu, Shengxian; Wang, Jinglan; Zhao, Feng; Xia, Hongying; Wang, Yibo

    2016-05-01

    Two phenanthroline derivatives, 1H-imidazo[4,5-f][1,10]phenanthroline (imPhen) and 2-(9H-fluoren-2-yl)-1H-imidazo[4,5-f][1,10]phenanthroline (Flu-imPhen), have been synthesized and characterized and the corresponding absorption and emission spectroscopic properties have been studied in CH2Cl2 solution. The imPhen exhibits the main two absorption bands at 282 nm and 229 nm and these bands are assigned as the typical π → π*(Phen) state. In addition, the weak absorption bands at 313 nm associated with a shoulder near 302 nm were assigned to the π → π*(Phen) state with partial charge transfer (CT) character. A similar absorption spectra are observed in the case of the Flu-imPhen in the region of 200-300 nm, while the region of 300-400 nm of the spectra are dominated by the characteristic π → π* transition of the fluorene moiety. imPhen shows the typical ligand-centered 1π → π* emission, while Flu-imPhen emits from the mixed 1π → π*/CT states. Density functional theory (DFT) and time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) were employed to rationalize the photophysical properties of these ligands studied. The theoretical data confirm the assignment of the experimental absorption spectra and the nature of the emitting states.

  16. Atmospheric tether mission analyses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    NASA is considering the use of tethered satellites to explore regions of the atmosphere inaccessible to spacecraft or high altitude research balloons. This report summarizes the Lockheed Martin Astronautics (LMA) effort for the engineering study team assessment of an Orbiter-based atmospheric tether mission. Lockheed Martin responsibilities included design recommendations for the deployer and tether, as well as tether dynamic analyses for the mission. Three tether configurations were studied including single line, multistrand (Hoytether) and tape designs.

  17. Raman spectroscopic study of "The Malatesta": a Renaissance painting?

    PubMed

    Edwards, Howell G M; Vandenabeele, Peter; Benoy, Timothy J

    2015-02-25

    Raman spectroscopic analysis of the pigments on an Italian painting described as a "Full Length Portrait of a Gentleman", known also as the "Malatesta", and attributed to the Renaissance period has established that these are consistent with the historical research provenance undertaken earlier. Evidence is found for the early 19th Century addition of chrome yellow to highlighted yellow ochre areas in comparison with a similar painting executed in 1801 by Sir Thomas Lawrence of John Kemble in the role of Hamlet, Prince of Denmark. The Raman data are novel in that no analytical studies have previously been made on this painting and reinforces the procedure whereby scientific analyses are accompanied by parallel historical research.

  18. Analytical Raman spectroscopic discrimination between yellow pigments of the Renaissance.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Howell G M

    2011-10-01

    The Renaissance represented a major advance in painting techniques, subject matter, artistic style and the use of pigments and pigment mixtures. However, most pigments in general use were still mineral-based as most organic dyes were believed to be fugitive; the historical study of artists' palettes and recipes has assumed importance for the attribution of art works to the Renaissance period. Although the application of diagnostic elemental and molecular spectroscopic techniques play vital and complementary roles in the analysis of art works, elemental techniques alone cannot definitively provide the data needed for pigment identification. The advantages and limitations of Raman spectroscopy for the definitive diagnostic characterisation of yellow pigments that were in use during the Renaissance is demonstrated here in consideration of heavy metal oxides and sulphides; these data will be compared with those obtained from analyses of synthetic yellow pigments that were available during the eighteenth and nineteenth Centuries which could have been used in unrecorded restorations of Renaissance paintings.

  19. Spectroscopic analysis of impurity precipitates in CdS films

    SciTech Connect

    Webb, J.D.; Keane, J.; Ribelin, R.; Gedvilas, L.; Swartzlander, A.; Ramanathan, K.; Albin, D.S.; Noufi, R.

    1999-03-01

    Impurities in cadmium sulfide (CdS) films are a concern in the fabrication of copper (indium, gallium) diselenide (CIGS) and cadmium telluride (CdTe) photovoltaic devices. Devices incorporating chemical-bath-deposited (CBD) CdS are comparable in quality to devices incorporating purer CdS films grown using vacuum deposition techniques, despite the higher impurity concentrations typically observed in the CBD CdS films. In this paper, we summarize and review the results of Fourier transform infrared (FTIR). Auger, electron microprobe, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopic (XPS) analyses of the impurities in CBD CdS films. We show that these impurities differ as a function of substrate type and film deposition conditions. We also show that some of these impurities exist as 10{sup 2} micron-scale precipitates. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

  20. Spectroscopic Analysis of Impurity Precipitates in CdS Films

    SciTech Connect

    Webb, J. D.; Keane, J.; Ribelin, R.; Gedvilas, L.; Swartzlander, A.; Ramanathan, K.; Albin, D. S.; Noufi, R.

    1999-10-31

    Impurities in cadmium sulfide (CdS) films are a concern in the fabrication of copper (indium, gallium) diselenide (CIGS) and cadmium telluride (CdTe) photovoltaic devices. Devices incorporating chemical-bath-deposited (CBD) CdS are comparable in quality to devices incorporating purer CdS films grown using vacuum deposition techniques, despite the higher impurity concentrations typically observed in the CBD CdS films. In this paper, we summarize and review the results of Fourier transform infrared (FTIR), Auger, electron microprobe, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopic (XPS) analyses of the impurities in CBD CdS films. We show that these impurities differ as a function of substrate type and film deposition conditions. We also show that some of these impurities exist as 10{sup 2} micron-scale precipitates.

  1. SPECTROSCOPIC REDSHIFTS OF GALAXIES WITHIN THE FRONTIER FIELDS

    SciTech Connect

    Ebeling, Harald; Ma, Cheng-Jiun; Barrett, Elizabeth

    2014-04-01

    We present a catalog of 1921 spectroscopic redshifts measured in the fields of the massive galaxy clusters MACSJ0416.1–2403 (z = 0.397), MACSJ0717.5+3745 (z = 0.546), and MACSJ1149.5+2223 (z = 0.544), i.e., three of the four clusters selected by Space Telescope Science Institute as the targets of the Frontier Fields (FFs) initiative for studies of the distant Universe via gravitational lensing. Compiled in the course of the Massive Cluster Survey project (MACS) that detected the FF clusters, this catalog is provided to the community for three purposes: (1) to allow the identification of cluster members for studies of the galaxy population of these extreme systems, (2) to facilitate the removal of unlensed galaxies and thus reduce shear dilution in weak-lensing analyses, and (3) to improve the calibration of photometric redshifts based on both ground- and spacebased observations of the FF clusters.

  2. Irradiation effects on canvas oil painting: Spectroscopic observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manea, Mihaela Maria; Negut, C. D.; Stanculescu, Ioana Rodica; Ponta, C. C.

    2012-10-01

    "Winter" oil painting, by Romanian contemporary artist George Alexandrescu was used as experimental model for the substantiation of gamma radiation treatment, as the best choice to stop the biological attack of paintings. In this purpose, spectroscopic and colorimetric methods were used to analyse in situ, non-destructively and non-contact, the experimental model before and after 60Co gamma irradiation. Chemical structure and colour changes were monitored by FTIR, FT-Raman and Vis reflectance spectroscopy. Negligible Infrared spectral transformations have been observed after irradiation. Furthermore, it was found that gamma irradiation did not induce any significant colour alterations. Insignificant structural and colour changes observed, recommend the use of gamma irradiation in the disinfection of oil paintings.

  3. Fluorescence Spectroscopic Properties of Normal and Abnormal Biomedical Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pradhan, Asima

    Steady state and time-resolved optical spectroscopy and native fluorescence is used to study the physical and optical properties occurring in diseased and non-diseased biological human tissue, in particular, cancer of the human breast, artery and the dynamics of a photosensitizer useful in photodynamic therapy. The main focus of the research is on the optical properties of cancer and atherosclerotic tissues as compared to their normal counterparts using the different luminescence based spectroscopic techniques such as steady state fluorescence, time-resolved fluorescence, excitation spectroscopy and phosphorescence. The excitation and steady-state spectroscopic fluorescence using visible excitation wavelength displays a difference between normal and malignant tissues. This difference is attributed to absorption of the emission by hemoglobin in normal tissues. This method using 488nm fails to distinguish neoplastic tissue such as benign tissues and tumors from malignant tumors. The time-resolved fluorescence at visible, near -uv and uv excitation wavelengths display non-exponential profiles which are significantly different for malignant tumors as compared to non-malignant tissues only with uv excitation. The differences observed with visible and near-uv excitation wavelengths are not as significant. The non-exponential profiles are interpreted as due to a combination of fluorophores along with the action of non-radiative processes. Low temperature luminescence studies confirm the occurrence of non-radiative decay processes while temporal studies of various relevant biomolecules indicate the probable fluorophores responsible for the observed signal in tissues. Phosphorescence from human tissues have been observed for the first time and lifetimes of a few hundred nanoseconds are measured for malignant and benign tissues. Time-resolved fluorescence studies of normal artery and atherosclerotic plaque have shown that a combination of two excitation wavelengths can

  4. Structure-spectroscopic property relationships in a series of platinum acetylides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, Thomas M.; Haley, Joy E.; Krein, Douglas M.; Burke, Aaron R.; Slagle, Jonathan E.

    2016-09-01

    In order to understand electronic and conformational effects on structure-spectroscopic property relationships in platinum acetylides, we synthesized a model series of chromophores trans-Pt(PBu3)2(C-CPhenyl-X)2, where X = NH2, OCH3, diphenylamino, t-Bu, methyl, H, F, benzothiazole, trifluoromethyl, CN and nitro. We collected linear spectra, including ground state absorption, phosphorescence and phosphorescence excitation spectra. We also performed DFT and TDDFT calculations on the ground and excited state properties of these compounds. The calculations and experimental data show the excited state properties are a function of the electronic properties of the substituents and the molecular conformation.

  5. High temperature and high pressure gas cell for quantitative spectroscopic measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christiansen, Caspar; Stolberg-Rohr, Thomine; Fateev, Alexander; Clausen, Sønnik

    2016-01-01

    A high temperature and high pressure gas cell (HTPGC) has been manufactured for quantitative spectroscopic measurements in the pressure range 1-200 bar and temperature range 300-1300 K. In the present work the cell was employed at up to 100 bar and 1000 K, and measured absorption coefficients of a CO2-N2 mixture at 100 bar and 1000 K are revealed for the first time, exceeding the high temperature and pressure combinations previously reported. This paper discusses the design considerations involved in the construction of the cell and presents validation measurements compared against simulated spectra, as well as published experimental data.

  6. Spectroscopic methods for the determination of surface-active substances in water (a review)

    SciTech Connect

    Subbotina, E.I.; Dedkov, Yu.M.

    1987-12-01

    Synthetic surfactants, for their ability to mingle with and transform chemicals more toxic in nature such as petroleum products, oils, pesticides, and chlorinated hydrocarbons into substances that easily permeate and move through the hydrosphere into water reservoirs and other exposure pathways, pose a grave danger to water quality control. This paper reviews predominantly the spectrophotometric procedures available for monitoring these surfactants but also discusses fluorimetric, infrared spectroscopic, and atomic absorption procedures, and compares a wide range of solvents and reagents for the extraction and preparatory activation of the surfactants.

  7. Spectroscopic, luminescent and laser properties of nanostructured CaF2:Tm materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyapin, A. A.; Fedorov, P. P.; Garibin, E. A.; Malov, A. V.; Osiko, V. V.; Ryabochkina, P. A.; Ushakov, S. N.

    2013-08-01

    The laser quality transparent СаF2:Tm fluoride ceramics has been prepared by hot forming. Comparative study of absorption and emission spectra of СаF2:Tm (4 mol.% TmF3) ceramic and single crystal samples demonstrated that these materials possess almost identical spectroscopic properties. Laser oscillations of СаF2:Tm ceramics were obtained at 1898 nm under diode pumping, with the slope efficiency of 5.5%. Also, the continuous-wave (CW) laser have been obtained for СаF2:Tm single crystal at 1890 nm pumped by a diode laser was demonstrated.

  8. FESTR: Finite-Element Spectral Transfer of Radiation spectroscopic modeling and analysis code

    DOE PAGES

    Hakel, Peter

    2016-10-01

    Here we report on the development of a new spectral postprocessor of hydrodynamic simulations of hot, dense plasmas. Based on given time histories of one-, two-, and three-dimensional spatial distributions of materials, and their local temperature and density conditions, spectroscopically-resolved signals are computed. The effects of radiation emission and absorption by the plasma on the emergent spectra are simultaneously taken into account. This program can also be used independently of hydrodynamic calculations to analyze available experimental data with the goal of inferring plasma conditions.

  9. THE YOUNG SOLAR ANALOGS PROJECT. I. SPECTROSCOPIC AND PHOTOMETRIC METHODS AND MULTI-YEAR TIMESCALE SPECTROSCOPIC RESULTS

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, R. O.; Briley, M. M.; Lambert, R. A.; Fuller, V. A.; Newsome, I. M.; Seeds, M. F.; Saken, J. M.; Kahvaz, Y.; Corbally, C. J.

    2015-12-15

    This is the first in a series of papers presenting methods and results from the Young Solar Analogs Project, which began in 2007. This project monitors both spectroscopically and photometrically a set of 31 young (300–1500 Myr) solar-type stars with the goal of gaining insight into the space environment of the Earth during the period when life first appeared. From our spectroscopic observations we derive the Mount Wilson S chromospheric activity index (S{sub MW}), and describe the method we use to transform our instrumental indices to S{sub MW} without the need for a color term. We introduce three photospheric indices based on strong absorption features in the blue-violet spectrum—the G-band, the Ca i resonance line, and the Hydrogen-γ line—with the expectation that these indices might prove to be useful in detecting variations in the surface temperatures of active solar-type stars. We also describe our photometric program, and in particular our “Superstar technique” for differential photometry which, instead of relying on a handful of comparison stars, uses the photon flux in the entire star field in the CCD image to derive the program star magnitude. This enables photometric errors on the order of 0.005–0.007 magnitude. We present time series plots of our spectroscopic data for all four indices, and carry out extensive statistical tests on those time series demonstrating the reality of variations on timescales of years in all four indices. We also statistically test for and discover correlations and anti-correlations between the four indices. We discuss the physical basis of those correlations. As it turns out, the “photospheric” indices appear to be most strongly affected by emission in the Paschen continuum. We thus anticipate that these indices may prove to be useful proxies for monitoring emission in the ultraviolet Balmer continuum. Future papers in this series will discuss variability of the program stars on medium (days–months) and short

  10. Localized and Spectroscopic Orbitals: Squirrel Ears on Water.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, R. Bruce

    1988-01-01

    Reexamines the electronic structure of water considering divergent views. Discusses several aspects of molecular orbital theory using spectroscopic molecular orbitals and localized molecular orbitals. Gives examples for determining lowest energy spectroscopic orbitals. (ML)

  11. Anion pairs in room temperature ionic liquids predicted by molecular dynamics simulation, verified by spectroscopic characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Schwenzer, Birgit; Kerisit, Sebastien N.; Vijayakumar, M.

    2014-01-01

    Molecular-level spectroscopic analyses of an aprotic and a protic room-temperature ionic liquid, BMIM OTf and BMIM HSO4, respectively, have been carried out with the aim of verifying molecular dynamics simulations that predict anion pair formation in these fluid structures. Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy of various nuclei support the theoretically-determined average molecular arrangements.

  12. [The study of absorption spectrum for cell substrate].

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yuan-Li; Zhang, Feng-Qiu; Ge, Xiang-Hong; Yao, Shu-Xia; Liang, Er-jun

    2004-08-01

    The authors collected the absorption spectrum of RPMI 1640 and DMEM substrates that cultivated Hela and CNE by UV-3101 spectrophotometer and analysed the absorbability of proteins in the substrate. The absorption peaks of the RPMI 1 640 culture medium that cultivated cells for different times shifted from 227 to 222 or 218 nm and from 278 to 280 nm respectively; while during growing course of cultivated cells, one of the absorption peaks of DMEM culture medium shifted from 224 nm to one near 221 nm, and the absorption peak 278 nm almost had no shift. All of these shifts show that the content of each amino acid such as tryptophan and casein has already changed. That is, during the growing course of cultivating cancer cells, the tryptophan and casein were not depleted equivalently. In the growth period of Hela and CNE, they consumed different amino acid. So they need different component proportion for amino acid.

  13. [Experimental determination of the absorption coefficients of biological tissues].

    PubMed

    Kovtun, A V; Kondrat'ev, V S; Terekhov, D V

    1980-01-01

    Procedure is presented for studying the coefficient of biological tissue absorption of radiation with the wavelength lambda = 1.06 mkm. The absorption coefficient is determined by the temperature values of biological tissue experimentally measured with thermopairs. The coherent radiation current falls on the surface of biological tissue. A mathematical model is formulated for biological tissue heating with radiation. Solution of Furier equation obtained by means of Green function is given. Using the relationship found, the energy absorbed by the biological tissue was calculated and the absorption coefficient of radiation with lambda - 1.06 mkm was determined. The results were analysed and the error of the obtained values of absorption coefficients of biological tissues under study were determined.

  14. Solar Absorption in Cloudy Atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harshvardhan; Ridgway, William; Ramaswamy, V.; Freidenreich, S. M.; Batey, Michael

    1996-01-01

    The theoretical computations used to compute spectral absorption of solar radiation are discussed. Radiative properties relevant to the cloud absorption problem are presented and placed in the context of radiative forcing. Implications for future measuring programs and the effect of horizontal inhomogeneities are discussed.

  15. Atmospheric absorption of sound - Update

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bass, H. E.; Sutherland, L. C.; Zuckerwar, A. J.

    1990-01-01

    Best current expressions for the vibrational relaxation times of oxygen and nitrogen in the atmosphere are used to compute total absorption. The resulting graphs of total absorption as a function of frequency for different humidities should be used in lieu of the graph published earlier by Evans et al (1972).

  16. Subgap Absorption in Conjugated Polymers

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Sinclair, M.; Seager, C. H.; McBranch, D.; Heeger, A. J; Baker, G. L.

    1991-01-01

    Along with X{sup (3)}, the magnitude of the optical absorption in the transparent window below the principal absorption edge is an important parameter which will ultimately determine the utility of conjugated polymers in active integrated optical devices. With an absorptance sensitivity of < 10{sup {minus}5}, Photothermal Deflection Spectroscopy (PDS) is ideal for determining the absorption coefficients of thin films of transparent'' materials. We have used PDS to measure the optical absorption spectra of the conjugated polymers poly(1,4-phenylene-vinylene) (and derivitives) and polydiacetylene-4BCMU in the spectral region from 0.55 eV to 3 eV. Our spectra show that the shape of the absorption edge varies considerably from polymer to polymer, with polydiacetylene-4BCMU having the steepest absorption edge. The minimum absorption coefficients measured varied somewhat with sample age and quality, but were typically in the range 1 cm{sup {minus}1} to 10 cm{sup {minus}1}. In the region below 1 eV, overtones of C-H stretching modes were observed, indicating that further improvements in transparency in this spectral region might be achieved via deuteration of fluorination.

  17. Spectroscopic mode identification in gamma Doradus stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rylvia Pollard, Karen

    2015-08-01

    The MUSICIAN programme at the University of Canterbury has been successfully identifying frequencies and pulsation modes in many gamma Doradus stars using hundreds of precise, high resolution spectroscopic observations. This paper describes some of these frequency and mode identifications and the emerging patterns of the programme.

  18. Asiago spectroscopic classification of two SNe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benetti, S.; Cappellaro, E.; Elias-Rosa, N.; Ochner, P.; Pastorello, A.; Terreran, G.; Tomasella, L.; OAPd, M. Turatto (INAF

    2016-09-01

    The Asiago Transient Classification Program (Tomasella et al. 2014, AN, 335, 841) reports the spectroscopic classification of two transients. The targets are supplied by the All Sky Automated Survey for SuperNOvae (ASAS-SN) and the TNS (https://wis-tns.weizmann.ac.il).

  19. Spectroscopic study in Z-pinch discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Garamoon, A.A.; Saudy, A.H.; Shark, W.

    1995-12-31

    The temporal variation of the emitted line intensity has been investigated, and thus an important information about the dynamic ionization stages in the Z-pinch discharge has been studied. Also the electron temperature Te, has been deduced by using a spectroscopic technique.

  20. Asiago spectroscopic classification of SN 2017ati.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benetti, S.; Tomasella, L.; Cappellaro, E.; Elias-Rosa, N.; Ochner, P.; Pastorello, A.; Turatto, M.; Terreran, G.

    2017-02-01

    The Asiago Transient Classification Program (Tomasella et al. 2014, AN, 335, 841) reports the spectroscopic observation of Gaia17aiq. The target was supplied by Gaia Photometric Science Alerts programme . The observation was performed with the Asiago 1.82m Copernico Telescope (+AFOSC; range 340-820 nm; resolution 1.4 nm). Survey name | IAU name | Host galaxy | Disc.

  1. Asiago spectroscopic classification of ASASSN-15db

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ochner, P.; Pastorello, A.; Benetti, S.; Cappellaro, E.; Elias-Rosa, N.; Tartaglia, L.; Terreran, G.; Tomasella, L.; Turatto, M.

    2015-02-01

    The Asiago Transient Classification Program (Tomasella et al. 2014, AN, 335, 841) reports the spectroscopic observation of ASASSN-15db in NGC 5996. The observation was performed with the Asiago 1.82m Copernico Telescope (+AFOSC; range 340-820 nm; resolution 1.4 nm), equipped with the CCD Andor IKON L936.

  2. LDEF Satellite Radiation Analyses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armstrong, T. W.; Colborn, B. L.

    1996-01-01

    Model calculations and analyses have been carried out to compare with several sets of data (dose, induced radioactivity in various experiment samples and spacecraft components, fission foil measurements, and LET spectra) from passive radiation dosimetry on the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) satellite, which was recovered after almost six years in space. The calculations and data comparisons are used to estimate the accuracy of current models and methods for predicting the ionizing radiation environment in low earth orbit. The emphasis is on checking the accuracy of trapped proton flux and anisotropy models.

  3. Optical absorption of silicon nanowires

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, T.; Lambert, Y.; Krzeminski, C.; Grandidier, B.; Stievenard, D.; Leveque, G.; Akjouj, A.; Pennec, Y.; Djafari-Rouhani, B.

    2012-08-01

    We report on simulations and measurements of the optical absorption of silicon nanowires (NWs) versus their diameter. We first address the simulation of the optical absorption based on two different theoretical methods: the first one, based on the Green function formalism, is useful to calculate the scattering and absorption properties of a single or a finite set of NWs. The second one, based on the finite difference time domain (FDTD) method, is well-adapted to deal with a periodic set of NWs. In both cases, an increase of the onset energy for the absorption is found with increasing diameter. Such effect is experimentally illustrated, when photoconductivity measurements are performed on single tapered Si nanowires connected between a set of several electrodes. An increase of the nanowire diameter reveals a spectral shift of the photocurrent intensity peak towards lower photon energies that allow to tune the absorption onset from the ultraviolet radiations to the visible light spectrum.

  4. Ultraviolet absorption spectrum of HOCl

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burkholder, James B.

    1993-01-01

    The room temperature UV absorption spectrum of HOCl was measured over the wavelength range 200 to 380 nm with a diode array spectrometer. The absorption spectrum was identified from UV absorption spectra recorded following UV photolysis of equilibrium mixtures of Cl2O/H2O/HOCl. The HOCl spectrum is continuous with a maximum at 242 nm and a secondary peak at 304 nm. The measured absorption cross section at 242 nm was (2.1 +/- 0.3) x 10 exp -19/sq cm (2 sigma error limits). These results are in excellent agreement with the work of Knauth et al. (1979) but in poor agreement with the more recent measurements of Mishalanie et al. (1986) and Permien et al. (1988). An HOCl nu2 infrared band intensity of 230 +/- 35/sq cm atm was determined based on this UV absorption cross section. The present results are compared with these previous measurements and the discrepancies are discussed.

  5. Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy. The Present and the Future.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slavin, Walter

    1982-01-01

    The status of current techniques and methods of atomic absorption (AA) spectroscopy (flame, hybrid, and furnace AA) is discussed, including limitations. Technological opportunities and how they may be used in AA are also discussed, focusing on automation, microprocessors, continuum AA, hybrid analyses, and others. (Author/JN)

  6. Optical spectroscopic and 2MASS measurements of Stephenson Halpha stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maheswar, G.; Manoj, P.; Bhatt, H. C.

    2003-05-01

    We present the results of spectroscopic observations for 52 objects from the list of Halpha emission stars of Stephenson (\\cite{Ste86}). Out of six known T Tauri stars observed, five showed Halpha in emission and in one (StHa 40), Halpha changed from being in absorption to emission over a period of two years, accompanied by photometric and spectral type variability. We confirm the T Tauri nature of one Stephenson object (StHa 48) on the basis of the presence of Halpha and Hbeta in emission, Li I lambda6708 in absorption, infrared excess and X-ray emission. Among the 52 objects observed, there were other emission line objects: 1 Ke star, 1 BQ[ ] star, 2 galaxies and 2 Be stars. We present a higher-resolution spectrum of StHa 62 showing permitted and forbidden lines in emission typical of BQ[ ] stars. Twenty five out of 30 newly observed objects failed to show Halpha in emission. We also present 2MASS observations for 112 StHa objects. We suggest three Stephenson objects (StHa 52, 125 and 129) to be YSOs on the basis of 2MASS, IRAS and ROSAT observations. These and all other known YSOs amongst StHa stars are found in regions of star-forming clouds in Taurus, Orion and Ophiuchus. YSOs at high galactic latitudes in other parts of the sky are therefore rare. Table 2 is only available in electronic form at the CDS via anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsweb.u-strasbg.fr/cgi-bin/qcat?J/A+A/402/963

  7. Optical and spectroscopic study of erbium doped calcium borotellurite glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomes, J. F.; Lima, A. M. O.; Sandrini, M.; Medina, A. N.; Steimacher, A.; Pedrochi, F.; Barboza, M. J.

    2017-04-01

    In this study, 10CaF2 - (29.9-0.4x)CaO - (60-0.6x)B2O3 - xTeO2 - 0,1Er2O3 (x = 10, 16, 22, 30 and 50 mol %) glasses were synthesized, and their optical and spectroscopic properties were investigated. X-ray diffraction, density, glass transition temperature (Tg), crystallization temperature (Tx), refraction index, luminescence, radiative lifetime and optical absorption measurements were carried out. Molar volume (Vm), thermal stability (Tx-Tg), electronic polarizability (αm), optical bang gap energy (Eg) and Judd-Ofelt (JO) parameters Ωt (2,4,6) were also calculated. The results are discussed in terms of tellurium oxide content. The increase of TeO2 in the glasses composition increases density, refractive index and electronic polarizability. The optical band gap energy decreases varying from 3.37 to 2.71 eV for the glasses with 10 and 50 mol% of TeO2, respectively. The optical absorption coefficient spectra show characteristic bands of Er3+ ions. Furthermore, these spectra in NIR region show a decrease of hydroxyl groups as a function of TeO2 addition. Luminescence intensity and radiative lifetimes at 1530 nm show an increasing with the TeO2 content. The JO parameters of Er:CaBTeX glasses follow the trend Ω2 > Ω4 > Ω6 and the quality factor values (Ω4/Ω6) were between 1.37 and 3.07. By comparing the measured lifetime with the calculated radiative decay time, quantum efficiency was calculated. The luminescence emission intensity at 1530 nm decreases with the increase of temperature. The lifetime values show a slight trend to decrease with the temperature increase, from 300 to 420 K, for all the samples.

  8. Interaction between serum albumins and sonochemically synthesized cadmium sulphide nanoparticles: a spectroscopic study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naveenraj, Selvaraj; Asiri, Abdullah M.; Anandan, Sambandam

    2013-05-01

    Cadmium Sulphide nanoparticles approximately 5-10 nm in size range were synthesized by sonochemical technique, which follows acoustic cavitation phenomenon and generates nanoparticles with a smaller size range and higher surface area. The in vitro binding interaction of these sonochemically synthesized CdS nanoparticles with serum albumins (SA) were investigated using UV-Vis absorption, fluorescence and circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopic techniques since CdS nanoparticles has biological applications such as cellular labelling and deep-tissue imaging. UV-Vis absorption and fluorescence studies confirm that CdS nanoparticles bind with SA through ground state complex formation (static quenching mechanism). The results suggest that sonochemically synthesized CdS nanoparticles interact with HSA more than that of BSA and these nanoparticles can be easily transported and rapidly released to the targets by serum albumins. CD studies confirmed the conformational change of serum albumins on the interaction of CdS nanoparticles.

  9. Wrapping Together Galactic Archaeology and Interstellar Medium Studies in Large Spectroscopic Surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kos, J.

    2016-10-01

    The cold interstellar medium (ISM) in our galaxy is usually observed at wavelengths other than optical. But optical spectroscopic surveys of stars give unprecedented information that is valuable also for ISM studies because they cover millions of lines-of-sight penetrating regions in and out of the Galactic plane that most all-sky surveys. Big advantages are distances to observed stars from which we infer distances to clumps of the ISM. The ISM is detected as scarce absorptions of several atoms and simple molecules and also as diffuse interstellar bands (DIBs), weak but numerous absorption features at visible and near IR wavelengths. With the enormous amount of information the surveys provide we can start doing galactic archaeology from the ISM point of view. Even though the principles are very different for star and gas dynamics, the starting points are the same. Here we present some results that are the first steps toward the galactic archaeology of the ISM.

  10. Interaction between melamine and bovine serum albumin: Spectroscopic approach and density functional theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Hua; Wu, Junyong; Dai, Guoliang; Zhong, Aiguo; Yang, Jianguo; Liang, Huading; Pan, Fuyou

    2010-04-01

    Spectroscopic approach and density functional theory (DFT) have been employed to investigate the interaction between melamine (MA) and bovine serum albumin (BSA). The UV absorption difference spectra show the MA-BSA complexes can form under physiological conditions. Furthermore, the B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p) calculations indicate that the protonated melamine (MAH +) bond to Asp, Glu, Asn, Gln, Ser, Thr amino acid residues or peptide groups via N sbnd H(MAH +)…O dbnd C(BSA) or N sbnd H(MAH +)…O sbnd C(BSA) hydrogen bonds, in agreement with the results of UV absorption difference spectra, and the interaction energies of them decrease in the order Asp, Glu > Pep > Asn, Gln > Ser, Thr. The fluorescence spectra, synchronous fluorescence spectra and FT-IR spectra demonstrate that this interaction has no obvious effect on the secondary structure of BSA.

  11. Spectroscopic Combustion Temperature Measurements: Effect Of Optical Depth In Black Liquor Recovery Boilers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whetstone, J. R.; Charagundla, S. R.; Macek, A.; Semerjian, H. G.

    1988-11-01

    Results of a study directed toward using observed spectroscopic features for the measurement of temperature in the combustion zone of recovery boilers are described. Emissions of the potassium doublets at 404 and 766 nanometers (nm) have been observed in recovery boilers and temperature and self absorption effects on lines shapes have been modeled. Predicted emission line shapes are strongly dependent upon predicted concentration values of potassium. Proper selection of concentration ranges results in good qualitative agreement of predicted line shapes with those observed in boilers and laboratory flame experiments. These results indicate that the temperature dependence of potassium emissions is complicated by self-absorption effects which limit the optical pathlength over which emissions are practically observable. Temperature measurement may be feasible using pattern recognition methods coupled with algorithms based on an emission model and realistic estimates of the emitting species concentration.

  12. Synthesis, spectroscopic properties and theoretical studies of bis-Schiff bases derived from polyamine and pyrazolones.

    PubMed

    Ren, Tiegang; Liu, Shuyun; Li, Guihui; Zhang, Jinglai; Guo, Jia; Li, Weijie; Yang, Lirong

    2012-11-01

    A series of novel bis-Schiff base were synthesized from 1-aryl-3-methyl-4-benzoyl-5-pyrazolones and diethylenetriamine (or triethylenetetramine) as the starting materials. All of these bis-Schiff bases were characterized by means of NMR, IR, and MS. The UV-vis absorption spectra and fluorescent spectra of these bis-Schiff bases were also measured. Moreover, the B3LYP/6-31G(d) method was used to optimize the ground state geometry of the bis-Schiff bases; and the UV-vis spectroscopic properties of the products were computed and compared with corresponding experimental data based on cc-pVDZ basis set of TD-B3LYP method. It has been found that all of these bis-Schiff bases show a remarkable absorption peak in a wavelength range of 270-340 nm; and their maximum emission peaks are around 348 nm.

  13. Gas-absorption process

    DOEpatents

    Stephenson, Michael J.; Eby, Robert S.

    1978-01-01

    This invention is an improved gas-absorption process for the recovery of a desired component from a feed-gas mixture containing the same. In the preferred form of the invention, the process operations are conducted in a closed-loop system including a gas-liquid contacting column having upper, intermediate, and lower contacting zones. A liquid absorbent for the desired component is circulated through the loop, being passed downwardly through the column, regenerated, withdrawn from a reboiler, and then recycled to the column. A novel technique is employed to concentrate the desired component in a narrow section of the intermediate zone. This technique comprises maintaining the temperature of the liquid-phase input to the intermediate zone at a sufficiently lower value than that of the gas-phase input to the zone to effect condensation of a major part of the absorbent-vapor upflow to the section. This establishes a steep temperature gradient in the section. The stripping factors below this section are selected to ensure that virtually all of the gases in the downflowing absorbent from the section are desorbed. The stripping factors above the section are selected to ensure re-dissolution of the desired component but not the less-soluble diluent gases. As a result, a peak concentration of the desired component is established in the section, and gas rich in that component can be withdrawn therefrom. The new process provides important advantages. The chief advantage is that the process operations can be conducted in a single column in which the contacting zones operate at essentially the same pressure.

  14. Low-coherence terahertz tomography based on spatially separated counterpropagating beams with allowance for probe radiation absorption in the medium

    SciTech Connect

    Mandrosov, V I

    2015-10-31

    This paper analyses low-coherence tomography of absorbing media with the use of spatially separated counterpropagating object and reference beams. A probe radiation source based on a broadband terahertz (THz) generator that emits sufficiently intense THz waves in the spectral range 90 – 350 μm and a prism spectroscope that separates out eight narrow intervals from this range are proposed for implementing this method. This allows media of interest to be examined by low-coherence tomography with counterpropagating beams in each interval. It is shown that, according to the Rayleigh criterion, the method is capable of resolving inhomogeneities with a size near one quarter of the coherence length of the probe radiation. In addition, the proposed tomograph configuration allows one to determine the average surface asperity slope and the refractive index and absorption coefficient of inhomogeneities 180 to 700 mm in size, and obtain spectra of such inhomogeneities in order to determine their chemical composition. (laser applications and other topics in quantum electronics)

  15. Characterization of selenium in UO2 spent nuclear fuel by micro X-ray absorption spectroscopy and its thermodynamic stability.

    PubMed

    Curti, E; Puranen, A; Grolimund, D; Jädernas, D; Sheptyakov, D; Mesbah, A

    2015-10-01

    Direct disposal of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) in deep geological formations is the preferred option for the final storage of nuclear waste in many countries. In order to assess to which extent radionuclides could be released to the environment, it is of great importance to understand how they are chemically bound in the waste matrix. This is particularly important for long-lived radionuclides such as (79)Se, (129)I, (14)C or (36)Cl, which form poorly sorbing anionic species in water and therefore migrate without significant retardation through argillaceous repository materials and host rocks. We present here X-ray absorption spectroscopic data providing evidence that in the investigated SNF samples selenium is directly bound to U atoms as Se(-II) (selenide) ion, probably replacing oxygen in the cubic UO2 lattice. This result is corroborated by a simple thermodynamic analysis, showing that selenide is the stable form of Se under reactor operation conditions. Because selenide is almost insoluble in water, our data indirectly explain the unexpectedly low release of Se in short-term aqueous leaching experiments, compared to iodine or cesium. These results have a direct impact on safety analyses for potential nuclear waste repository sites, as they justify assuming a small fractional release of selenium in performance assessment calculations.

  16. In situ mid-infrared analyses of reactive gas-phase intermediates in TEOS/Ozone SAPCVD

    SciTech Connect

    Whidden, Thomas K.; Doiron, Sarah

    1998-11-24

    In this report, we present in situ characterizations of chemical vapour deposition (CVD) reactors used in silicon dioxide thin film depositions. The characterizations are based on Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The infrared absorption data are interpreted within the context of process and thin film properties and the bearing of the spectroscopic data upon the chemical mechanisms extant in the deposition reaction. The relevance of the interpretations to real-time process control is discussed. The process under study in this work is TEOS/ozone-based deposition of silicon dioxide thin films at subatmospheric pressures. This process exhibits many desirable properties but has fundamental problems that may be solvable by reaction control based on in situ analyses and the real-time manipulation of reagent concentrations and process conditions. Herein we discuss our preliminary data on characterizations of TEOS/ozone chemistries in commercial reactor configurations. Reaction products and reactive intermediate species are detected and identified. Quantitative in situ measurements of the reagent materials are demonstrated. Preliminary correlations of these data with process and thin film properties are discussed.

  17. Coherent absorption of light by graphene and other optically conducting surfaces in realistic on-substrate configurations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zanotto, S.; Bianco, F.; Miseikis, V.; Convertino, D.; Coletti, C.; Tredicucci, A.

    2017-01-01

    Analytical formulas are derived describing the coherent absorption of light from a realistic multilayer structure composed by an optically conducting surface on a supporting substrate. The model predicts two fundamental results. First, the absorption regime named coherent perfect transparency theoretically can always be reached. Second, the optical conductance of the surface can be extrapolated from absorption experimental data even when the substrate thickness is unknown. The theoretical predictions are experimentally verified by analyzing a multilayer graphene structure grown on a silicon carbide substrate. The graphene thickness estimated through the coherent absorption technique resulted in good agreement with the values obtained by two other spectroscopic techniques. Thanks to the high spatial resolution that can be reached and high sensitivity to the probed structure thickness, coherent absorption spectroscopy represents an accurate and non-destructive diagnostic method for the spatial mapping of the optical properties of two-dimensional materials and of metasurfaces on a wafer scale.

  18. Structure-induced resonant tail-state regime absorption in polymer: fullerene bulk-heterojunction solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfadler, Thomas; Kiel, Thomas; Stärk, Martin; Werra, Julia F. M.; Matyssek, Christian; Sommer, Daniel; Boneberg, Johannes; Busch, Kurt; Weickert, Jonas; Schmidt-Mende, Lukas

    2016-05-01

    In this work, we present resonant tail-state regime absorption enhanced organic photovoltaics. We combine periodically structured TiO2 bottom electrodes with P3HT-PCBM bulk-heterojunction solar cells in an inverted device configuration. The wavelength-scale patterns are transferred to the electron-selective bottom electrodes via direct laser interference patterning, a fast method compatible with roll-to-roll processing. Spectroscopic and optoelectronic device measurements suggest polarization-dependent absorption enhancement along with photocurrent generation unambiguously originating from the population of tail states. We discuss the effects underlying these absorption patterns with the help of electromagnetic simulations using the discontinuous Galerkin time domain method. For this, we focus on the total absorption spectra along with spatially resolved power loss densities. Our simulations stress the tunability of the absorption resonances towards arbitrary wavelength regions.

  19. Radiative heating and cooling in the middle and lower atmosphere of Venus and responses to atmospheric and spectroscopic parameter variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haus, R.; Kappel, D.; Arnold, G.

    2015-11-01

    A sophisticated radiative transfer model that considers absorption, emission, and multiple scattering by gaseous and particulate constituents over the broad spectral range 0.125-1000 μm is applied to calculate radiative fluxes and temperature change rates in the middle and lower atmosphere of Venus (0-100 km). Responses of these quantities to spectroscopic and atmospheric parameter variations are examined in great detail. Spectroscopic parameter studies include the definition of an optimum spectral grid for monochromatic calculations as well as comparisons for different input data with respect to spectral line databases, continuum absorption, line shape factors, and solar irradiance spectra. Atmospheric parameter studies are based on distinct variations of an initial model data set. Analyses of actual variations of the radiative energy budget using atmospheric features that have been recently retrieved from Venus Express data will be subject of a subsequent paper. The calculated cooling (heating) rates are very reliable at altitudes below 95 (85) km with maximum uncertainties of about 0.25 K/day. Heating uncertainties may reach 3-5 K/day at 100 km. Using equivalent Planck radiation as solar insolation source in place of measured spectra is not recommended. Cooling rates strongly respond to variations of atmospheric thermal structure, while heating rates are less sensitive. The influence of mesospheric minor gas variations is small, but may become more important near the cloud base and in case of episodic SO2 boosts. Responses to cloud mode 1 particle abundance changes are weak, but variations of other mode parameters (abundances, cloud top and base altitudes) may significantly alter radiative temperature change rates up to 50% in Venus' lower mesosphere and upper troposphere. A new model for the unknown UV absorber for two altitude domains is proposed. It is not directly linked to cloud particle modes and permits an investigation of radiative effects regardless of

  20. Spectroscopic, cyclic voltammetric and biological studies of transition metal complexes with mixed nitrogen-sulphur (NS) donor macrocyclic ligand derived from thiosemicarbazide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandra, Sulekh; Gupta, Lokesh Kumar; Sangeetika

    2005-11-01

    The complexation of new mixed thia-aza-oxa macrocycle viz., 2,12-dithio-5,9,14,18-tetraoxo-7,16-dithia-1,3,4,10,11,13-hexaazacyclooctadecane containing thiosemicarba-zone unit with a series of transition metals Co(II), Ni(II) and Cu(II) has been investigated, by different spectroscopic techniques. The structural features of the ligand have been studied by EI-mass, 1H NMR and IR spectral techniques. Elemental analyses, magnetic moment susceptibility, molar conductance, IR, electronic, and EPR spectral studies characterized the complexes. Electronic absorption and IR spectra of the complexes indicate octahedral geometry for chloro, nitrato, thiocyanato or acetato complexes. The dimeric and neutral nature of the sulphato complexes are confirmed from magnetic susceptibility and low conductance values. Electronic spectra suggests square-planar geometry for all sulphato complexes. The redox behaviour was studied by cyclic voltammetry, show metal-centered reduction processes for all complexes. The complexes of copper show both oxidation and reduction process. The redox potentials depend on the conformation of central atom in the macrocyclic complexes. Newly synthesized macrocyclic ligand and its transition metal complexes show markedly growth inhibitory activity against pathogenic bacterias and plant pathogenic fungi under study. Most of the complexes have higher activity than that of the metal free ligand.

  1. Anodic stripping voltammetry with gold electrodes as an alternative method for the routine determination of mercury in fish. Comparison with spectroscopic approaches.

    PubMed

    Giacomino, Agnese; Ruo Redda, Andrea; Squadrone, Stefania; Rizzi, Marco; Abete, Maria Cesarina; La Gioia, Carmela; Toniolo, Rosanna; Abollino, Ornella; Malandrino, Mery

    2017-04-15

    The applicability to the determination of mercury in tuna of square wave anodic stripping voltammetry (SW-ASV) conducted at both solid gold electrode (SGE) and a gold nanoparticle-modified glassy carbon electrode (AuNPs-GCE) was demonstrated. Mercury content in two certified materials and in ten samples of canned tuna was measured. The performances of the electrodes were compared with one another as well as with two spectroscopic techniques, namely cold vapour atomic absorption spectroscopy (CV-AAS) and a direct mercury analyser (DMA). The results found pointed out that both SW-ASV approaches were suitable and easy-to-use method to monitor mercury concentration in tunas, since they allowed accurate quantification at concentration values lower than the maximum admissible level in this matrix ([Hg]=1mg/kgwet weight,ww). In particular, mercury detection at the AuNPs-GCE showed a LOQ in fish-matrix of 0.1μg/l, corresponding to 0.06mg/kgww, with performance comparable to that of DMA.

  2. Infrared spectroscopic characteristics of normal and malignant colonic epithelium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krupnik, Eduardo; Jackson, Michael; Bird, Ranjana P.; Smith, Ian C. P.; Mantsch, Henry H.

    1998-04-01

    IR spectroscopy is being widely used to study the biochemical changes associated with cancer. In particular, based upon the hypothesis that biochemical changes associated with cancer precede morphological manifestations of the disease, IR spectroscopy is being evaluated as a potential early diagnostic and prognostic tool. In the current study, IR spectroscopy was applied to the study of colon tissue from rats treated with the specific colon carcinogen azoxymethane, to determine whether tumor induction was associated with identifiable spectroscopic changes in the colon. Characteristic spectra were found for each layer of the colon. Spectra of normal-appearing mucosa and tumors form treated animals then compared to spectra of control mucosa. Differences between tumors and control mucosa were apparent, indicating changes in cellular biochemistry associated with tumor development. In particular, differences in absorptions attributed to nucleic acids were seen, indicating alterations in the structure of cellular DNA in malignant and carcinogen treated tissues. Interestingly, spectra of carcinogen treated rates exhibit characteristics intermediate between those of normal mucosa and tumors. Application of multivariate analysis allowed non-subjective classification of the spectra into three distinct classes with and accuracy of 86.7 percent. The separate classification of control and treated mucosa suggests that IR spectroscopy, when combined with the appropriate classifier, can indeed detect biochemical changes in tissue before physical manifestation of the disease process.

  3. Optical properties of InN studied by spectroscopic ellipsometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chunya, Ye; Wei, Lin; Jin, Zhou; Shuping, Li; Li, Chen; Heng, Li; Xiaoxuan, Wu; Songqing, Liu; Junyong, Kang

    2016-10-01

    With recently developed InN epitaxy via a controlling In bilayer, spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE) measurements had been carried out on the grown InN and the measured ellipsometric spectra were fitted with the Delta Psi2 software by using a suitable model and the dispersion rule. The thickness was measured by a scanning electron microscope (SEM). Insight into the film quality of InN and the lattice constant were gained by X-ray diffraction (XRD). By fitting the SE, the thickness of the InN film is consistent with that obtained by SEM cross-sectional thickness measurement. The optical bandgap of InN was put forward to be 1.05 eV, which conforms to the experimental results measured by the absorption spectrum and cathodoluminescence (CL). The refractive index and the extinction coefficient of interest were represented for InN, which is useful to design optoelectronic devices. Project supported by the State Key Development Program for Basic Research of China (No. 2012CB619301), the National High Technology Research and Development Program of China (No. 2014AA032608), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 11204254, 11404271), and the Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities (Nos. 2012121014, 20720150027).

  4. Spectroscopic investigation of U, Np and Th in nuclear glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calas, G.; Galoisy, L. V.; Petit-Maire, D.

    2011-12-01

    Vitrification of high-level radioactive waste in borosilicate glasses is currently used on an industrial scale in several countries. The fundamental properties of the waste forms are their chemical and mechanical durability against the forcing conditions represented by chemical alteration or internal/external irradiation. The waste immobilized in glass is composed of over 30 different nuclear fission and activation products, as well as minor actinides. The oxidation state and local atomic coordination of long-lived radionuclides are important parameters to understand the long-term evolution of the glass. We present an overview of the local structure around actinides in glasses similar to the French nuclear glass. X-Ray absorption spectroscopy has been used to probe the local environment around uranium, neptunium and thorium in these glasses. It is combined with with UV-visible spectroscopy, used to get selective information on the surrounding of U(IV), U(V) and U(VI) in glasses. Our spectroscopic data show that U, Np and Th occur in nuclear glasses in a peculiar surrounding showing significant differences with the crystal chemistry of these elements in crystalline compounds. Element speciation may be used as a pertinent parameter to follow the long-term stability of nuclear glasses, either under irradiation or during the alteration of the glass.

  5. Spectroscopic properties of five-coordinated Co2+ in phosphates.

    PubMed

    Hunault, M; Robert, J-L; Newville, M; Galoisy, L; Calas, G

    2014-01-03

    Co3(PO4)2, SrCo2(PO4)2, Co2P2O7, BaCoP2O7 and SrCoP2O7 present different geometries of five-coordinated Co(2+) (([5])Co(2+)) sites, coexisting with ([6])Co(2+) in Co3(PO4)2 and Co2P2O7, and ([4])Co(2+) in SrCo2(PO4)2. ([5])Co K-edge XANES spectra show that the intensity of the pre-edge and main-edge is intermediate between those of ([6])- and ([4])Co. Diffuse reflectance spectra show the contributions of Co(2+) in (D3h) symmetry for SrCo2(PO4)2, and (C4v) symmetry for BaCoP2O7 and SrCoP2O7. In Co3(PO4)2 and Co2P2O7 the multiple transitions observed arise from energy level splitting and may be labeled in (C2v) symmetry. Spectroscopic data confirm that (D3h) and (C4v) symmetries may be distinguished upon the intensity of the optical absorption bands and crystal field splitting values. We discuss the influence of the geometrical distortion and of the nature of the next nearest neighbors.

  6. Spectroscopic properties of Er3+-doped fluorotellurite glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miguel, A.; Al-Saleh, M.; Azkargorta, J.; Morea, R.; Gonzalo, J.; Arriandiaga, M. A.; Fernandez, J.; Balda, R.

    2013-09-01

    In this work we report the spectroscopic properties of Er3+-doped fluorotellurite glasses in the 46.6TeO2-18.2ZnO-35.2ZnF2 system for different ErF3 concentrations between 0.5 and 3 wt%. Absorption and emission spectra and lifetimes have been measured in the visible and near infrared regions. Judd-Ofelt analysis has been performed to estimate the radiative transition probabilities. The high content of ZnF2 in this glass decreases the covalency degree in rare-earth site and results in a lower value of Ω2 if compared with zinc tellurite glasses. The infrared emissions at 1532 nm are broader by nearly 30 nm in these glasses if compared to silica glass. This broad emission together with the high values of the stimulated emission cross-section and lifetime of level 4I13/2 make these glasses attractive for broadband amplifiers. The decays from level 4I13/2 are single exponentials for all concentrations which indicates a fast energy diffusion between Er3+ ions. Similar values for the critical radius and energy transfer microparameter are obtained for the different concentrations, which supports the dipole-dipole transfer hypothesis.

  7. Nonplanar property study of antifungal agent tolnaftate-spectroscopic approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arul Dhas, D.; Hubert Joe, I.; Roy, S. D. D.; Balachandran, S.

    2011-09-01

    Vibrational analysis of the thionocarbamate fungicide tolnaftate which is antidermatophytic, antitrichophytic and antimycotic agent, primarily inhibits the ergosterol biosynthesis in the fungus, was carried out using NIR FT-Raman and FTIR spectroscopic techniques. The equilibrium geometry, various bonding features, harmonic vibrational wavenumbers and torsional potential energy surface (PES) scan studies have been computed using density functional theory method. The detailed interpretation of the vibrational spectra has been carried out with the aid of VEDA.4 program. Vibrational spectra, natural bonding orbital (NBO) analysis and optimized molecular structure show the clear evidence for electronic interaction of thionocarbamate group with aromatic ring. Predicted electronic absorption spectrum from TD-DFT calculation has been compared with the UV-vis spectrum. The Mulliken population analysis on atomic charges and the HOMO-LUMO energy were also calculated. Vibrational analysis reveals that the simultaneous IR and Raman activation of the C-C stretching mode in the phenyl and naphthalene ring provide evidence for the charge transfer interaction between the donor and acceptor groups and is responsible for its bioactivity as a fungicide.

  8. [Spectroscopic properties of Pr3+ doped transparent oxyfluoride vitroceramics].

    PubMed

    Chen, Ying; Chen, Xiao-bo; Chen, Luan; Yang, Xiao-dong; Hu, Li-li; Wu, Zheng-long; Yu, Chun-lei; Wang, Ya-fei; Liu, Da-he; Tian, Qiang

    2011-12-01

    In the present paper, the room-temperature absorption spectrum of Pr+ -doped transparent oxyfluoride vitroceramics (Pr(0.2):FOV) was studied systematically. The optical characterisation of Pr(0.2):FOV was performed. The standard and modified Judd-Ofelt theories were used to determine the J-O intensity parameters. The problems with standard Judd-Ofelt theorie for Pr3+ were discussed. Based on the intensity parameters, some predicted optical parameters, such as the spontaneous radiative transition probabilities, radiative lifetimes, branching ratios and integrated emission cross section were calculated. And the application of Pr:FOV was analyzed. Especially there are large oscillator strength and large integrated emission cross section in the transitions of (3)P0-->(3)H4, (3)P1-->(3)H5 and (3)P0-->(3)H6, (3)P0-->(3)F2. So, they are more worthy of attention. The obtained spectroscopic results show the potential application of the Pr3+ -doped oxyfluoride vitroceramics for solid-state lasers.

  9. Spectroscopic detection of metals ions using a novel selective sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peralta-Domínguez, D.; Ramos-Ortiz, G.; Maldonado, J. L.; Rodriguez, M.; Meneses-Nava, M. A.; Barbosa-Garcia, O.; Santillan, R.; Farfan, N.

    2011-09-01

    Colorimetric chemosensors are simple, economical and practical optical approach for detecting toxic metal ions (Hg2+, Pb2+, Ni2+, etc.) in the environment. In this work, we present a simple but highly specific organic compound 4-chloro-2-((E)-((E)-3-(4-(dimethylamino)phenyl)allylidene)amino)phenol (L1) that acts as a colorimetric sensor for divalent metal ions in H2O. The mechanism of the interaction between L1 and various metal-ions has been established by UV-vis absorption and emission spectroscopic experiments that indicate favorable coordination of metal ions with L1 in different solvents. Experimental results indicate that the shape of the electronic transition band of L1 (receptor compound) changed after the interaction with divalent metal-ions, such as Hg2+, Pb2+, Mn2+, Co2+, Cu2+, and Ni2+ in aqueous solution. We found that L1 have a considerable selectivity for Ni2+ ions, even in presence of other metals ions when mixtures of DMSO/H2O as are used as solvents. L1, which has been targeted for sensing transition metal ions, exhibits binding-induced color changes from yellow to pink observed even by the naked eye in presence of Ni2+ ions.

  10. EEG analyses with SOBI.

    SciTech Connect

    Glickman, Matthew R.; Tang, Akaysha

    2009-02-01

    The motivating vision behind Sandia's MENTOR/PAL LDRD project has been that of systems which use real-time psychophysiological data to support and enhance human performance, both individually and of groups. Relevant and significant psychophysiological data being a necessary prerequisite to such systems, this LDRD has focused on identifying and refining such signals. The project has focused in particular on EEG (electroencephalogram) data as a promising candidate signal because it (potentially) provides a broad window on brain activity with relatively low cost and logistical constraints. We report here on two analyses performed on EEG data collected in this project using the SOBI (Second Order Blind Identification) algorithm to identify two independent sources of brain activity: one in the frontal lobe and one in the occipital. The first study looks at directional influences between the two components, while the second study looks at inferring gender based upon the frontal component.

  11. Gastrointestinal citrate absorption in nephrolithiasis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fegan, J.; Khan, R.; Poindexter, J.; Pak, C. Y.

    1992-01-01

    Gastrointestinal absorption of citrate was measured in stone patients with idiopathic hypocitraturia to determine if citrate malabsorption could account for low urinary citrate. Citrate absorption was measured directly from recovery of orally administered potassium citrate (40 mEq.) in the intestinal lavage fluid, using an intestinal washout technique. In 7 stone patients citrate absorption, serum citrate levels, peak citrate concentration in serum and area under the curve were not significantly different from those of 7 normal subjects. Citrate absorption was rapid and efficient in both groups, with 96 to 98% absorbed within 3 hours. The absorption of citrate was less efficient from a tablet preparation of potassium citrate than from a liquid preparation, probably due to a delayed release of citrate from wax matrix. However, citrate absorption from solid potassium citrate was still high at 91%, compared to 98% for a liquid preparation. Thus, hypocitraturia is unlikely to be due to an impaired gastrointestinal absorption of citrate in stone patients without overt bowel disease.

  12. Network Class Superposition Analyses

    PubMed Central

    Pearson, Carl A. B.; Zeng, Chen; Simha, Rahul

    2013-01-01

    Networks are often used to understand a whole system by modeling the interactions among its pieces. Examples include biomolecules in a cell interacting to provide some primary function, or species in an environment forming a stable community. However, these interactions are often unknown; instead, the pieces' dynamic states are known, and network structure must be inferred. Because observed function may be explained by many different networks (e.g., for the yeast cell cycle process [1]), considering dynamics beyond this primary function means picking a single network or suitable sample: measuring over all networks exhibiting the primary function is computationally infeasible. We circumvent that obstacle by calculating the network class ensemble. We represent the ensemble by a stochastic matrix , which is a transition-by-transition superposition of the system dynamics for each member of the class. We present concrete results for derived from Boolean time series dynamics on networks obeying the Strong Inhibition rule, by applying to several traditional questions about network dynamics. We show that the distribution of the number of point attractors can be accurately estimated with . We show how to generate Derrida plots based on . We show that -based Shannon entropy outperforms other methods at selecting experiments to further narrow the network structure. We also outline an experimental test of predictions based on . We motivate all of these results in terms of a popular molecular biology Boolean network model for the yeast cell cycle, but the methods and analyses we introduce are general. We conclude with open questions for , for example, application to other models, computational considerations when scaling up to larger systems, and other potential analyses. PMID:23565141

  13. Network class superposition analyses.

    PubMed

    Pearson, Carl A B; Zeng, Chen; Simha, Rahul

    2013-01-01

    Networks are often used to understand a whole system by modeling the interactions among its pieces. Examples include biomolecules in a cell interacting to provide some primary function, or species in an environment forming a stable community. However, these interactions are often unknown; instead, the pieces' dynamic states are known, and network structure must be inferred. Because observed function may be explained by many different networks (e.g., ≈ 10(30) for the yeast cell cycle process), considering dynamics beyond this primary function means picking a single network or suitable sample: measuring over all networks exhibiting the primary function is computationally infeasible. We circumvent that obstacle by calculating the network class ensemble. We represent the ensemble by a stochastic matrix T, which is a transition-by-transition superposition of the system dynamics for each member of the class. We present concrete results for T derived from boolean time series dynamics on networks obeying the Strong Inhibition rule, by applying T to several traditional questions about network dynamics. We show that the distribution of the number of point attractors can be accurately estimated with T. We show how to generate Derrida plots based on T. We show that T-based Shannon entropy outperforms other methods at selecting experiments to further narrow the network structure. We also outline an experimental test of predictions based on T. We motivate all of these results in terms of a popular molecular biology boolean network model for the yeast cell cycle, but the methods and analyses we introduce are general. We conclude with open questions for T, for example, application to other models, computational considerations when scaling up to larger systems, and other potential analyses.

  14. Optical microresonators as single-particle absorption spectrometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heylman, Kevin D.; Thakkar, Niket; Horak, Erik H.; Quillin, Steven C.; Cherqui, Charles; Knapper, Kassandra A.; Masiello, David J.; Goldsmith, Randall H.

    2016-12-01

    Optical measurements of nanoscale objects offer major insights into fundamental biological, material and photonic properties. In absorption spectroscopy, sensitivity limits applications at the nanoscale. Here, we present a new single-particle double-modulation photothermal absorption spectroscopy method that employs on-chip optical whispering-gallery-mode (WGM) microresonators as ultrasensitive thermometers. Optical excitation of a nanoscale object on the microresonator produces increased local temperatures that are proportional to the absorption cross-section of the object. We resolve photothermal shifts in the resonance frequency of the microresonator that are smaller than 100 Hz, orders of magnitude smaller than previous WGM sensing schemes. The application of our new technique to single gold nanorods reveals a dense array of sharp Fano resonances arising from the coupling between the localized surface plasmon of the gold nanorod and the WGMs of the resonator, allowing for the exploration of plasmonic-photonic hybridization. In terms of the wider applicability, our approach adds label-free spectroscopic identification to microresonator-based detection schemes.

  15. A cryogenic circulating advective multi-pass absorption cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stockett, M. H.; Lawler, J. E.

    2012-03-01

    A novel absorption cell has been developed to enable a spectroscopic survey of a broad range of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) under astrophysically relevant conditions and utilizing a synchrotron radiation continuum to test the still controversial hypothesis that these molecules or their ions could be carriers of the diffuse interstellar bands. The cryogenic circulating advective multi-pass absorption cell resembles a wind tunnel; molecules evaporated from a crucible or injected using a custom gas feedthrough are entrained in a laminar flow of cryogenically cooled buffer gas and advected into the path of the synchrotron beam. This system includes a multi-pass optical White cell enabling absorption path lengths of hundreds of meters and a detection sensitivity to molecular densities on the order of 107 cm-3. A capacitively coupled radio frequency dielectric barrier discharge provides ionized and metastable buffer gas atoms for ionizing the candidate molecules via charge exchange and the Penning effect. Stronger than expected clustering of PAH molecules has slowed efforts to record gas phase PAH spectra at cryogenic temperatures, though such clusters may play a role in other interstellar phenomena.

  16. A cryogenic circulating advective multi-pass absorption cell.

    PubMed

    Stockett, M H; Lawler, J E

    2012-03-01

    A novel absorption cell has been developed to enable a spectroscopic survey of a broad range of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) under astrophysically relevant conditions and utilizing a synchrotron radiation continuum to test the still controversial hypothesis that these molecules or their ions could be carriers of the diffuse interstellar bands. The cryogenic circulating advective multi-pass absorption cell resembles a wind tunnel; molecules evaporated from a crucible or injected using a custom gas feedthrough are entrained in a laminar flow of cryogenically cooled buffer gas and advected into the path of the synchrotron beam. This system includes a multi-pass optical White cell enabling absorption path lengths of hundreds of meters and a detection sensitivity to molecular densities on the order of 10(7) cm(-3). A capacitively coupled radio frequency dielectric barrier discharge provides ionized and metastable buffer gas atoms for ionizing the candidate molecules via charge exchange and the Penning effect. Stronger than expected clustering of PAH molecules has slowed efforts to record gas phase PAH spectra at cryogenic temperatures, though such clusters may play a role in other interstellar phenomena.

  17. High Velocity Absorption during Eta Car B's Periastron Passage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nielsen, Krister E.; Groh, J. H.; Hillier, J.; Gull, Theodore R.; Owocki, S. P.; Okazaki, A. T.; Damineli, A.; Teodoro, M.; Weigelt, G.; Hartman, H.

    2010-01-01

    Eta Car is one of the most luminous massive stars in the Galaxy, with repeated eruptions with a 5.5 year periodicity. These events are caused by the periastron passage of a massive companion in an eccentric orbit. We report the VLT/CRIRES detection of a strong high-velocity, (<1900 km/s) , broad absorption wing in He I at 10833 A during the 2009.0 periastron passage. Previous observations during the 2003.5 event have shown evidence of such high-velocity absorption in the He I 10833 transition, allowing us to conclude that the high-velocity gas is crossing the line-of-sight toward Eta Car over a time period of approximately 2 months. Our analysis of HST/STlS archival data with observations of high velocity absorption in the ultraviolet Si IV and C IV resonance lines, confirm the presence of a high-velocity material during the spectroscopic low state. The observations provide direct detection of high-velocity material flowing from the wind-wind collision zone around the binary system, and we discuss the implications of the presence of high-velocity gas in Eta Car during periastron

  18. A cryogenic circulating advective multi-pass absorption cell

    SciTech Connect

    Stockett, M. H.; Lawler, J. E.

    2012-03-15

    A novel absorption cell has been developed to enable a spectroscopic survey of a broad range of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) under astrophysically relevant conditions and utilizing a synchrotron radiation continuum to test the still controversial hypothesis that these molecules or their ions could be carriers of the diffuse interstellar bands. The cryogenic circulating advective multi-pass absorption cell resembles a wind tunnel; molecules evaporated from a crucible or injected using a custom gas feedthrough are entrained in a laminar flow of cryogenically cooled buffer gas and advected into the path of the synchrotron beam. This system includes a multi-pass optical White cell enabling absorption path lengths of hundreds of meters and a detection sensitivity to molecular densities on the order of 10{sup 7} cm{sup -3}. A capacitively coupled radio frequency dielectric barrier discharge provides ionized and metastable buffer gas atoms for ionizing the candidate molecules via charge exchange and the Penning effect. Stronger than expected clustering of PAH molecules has slowed efforts to record gas phase PAH spectra at cryogenic temperatures, though such clusters may play a role in other interstellar phenomena.

  19. Identification of radiolucent foreign bodies in tissue using optoacoustic spectroscopic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Page, Leland; Maswadi, Saher; Glickman, Randolph D.

    2011-03-01

    One of the leading causes of medical malpractice claims in emergency medicine is the misdiagnosis of the presence of foreign bodies. Radiolucent foreign bodies are especially difficult to differentiate from surrounding soft tissue, gas, and bone using existing clinical imaging modalities. Because many radiolucent foreign bodies have sufficient contrast for imaging in the optical domain, we are exploring the use of laser-induced optoacoustic imaging for the detection of foreign bodies, especially in orbital and craniofacial injuries, in which the foreign bodies are likely to lie within the penetration depth of visible and near infrared wavelengths. In order to evaluate the performance of optoacoustic imaging for clinical detection and characterization, common foreign bodies have been scanned over a range of visible and near infrared wavelengths to obtain the spectroscopic properties of the materials commonly associated with these foreign bodies. The foreign bodies are also being embedded in realistic ex vivo tissue phantoms to evaluate the changes that may occur in the spectroscopic absorption of the materials due to the interaction with tissue absorbers. Ultimately, we anticipate that spectroscopic characterization will help identify specific wavelengths to be used for imaging foreign bodies that will provide useful diagnostic data about the material properties of the object, thereby enabling the characterization, as well as the location, of the objects. This information will aid the clinician in choosing the optimal treatment course for the patient.

  20. Application of spectroscopic techniques for the study of paper documents: A survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manso, M.; Carvalho, M. L.

    2009-06-01

    For many centuries paper was the main material for recording cultural achievements all over the world. Paper is mostly made from cellulose with small amounts of organic and inorganic additives, which allow its identification and characterization and may also contribute to its degradation. Prior to 1850, paper was made entirely from rags, using hemp, flax and cotton fibres. After this period, due to the enormous increase in demand, wood pulp began to be commonly used as raw material, resulting in rapid degradation of paper. Spectroscopic techniques represent one of the most powerful tools to investigate the constituents of paper documents in order to establish its identification and its state of degradation. This review describes the application of selected spectroscopic techniques used for paper characterization and conservation. The spectroscopic techniques that have been used and will be reviewed include: Fourier-Transform Infrared spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, Nuclear Magnetic Resonance spectroscopy, X-Ray spectroscopy, Laser-based Spectroscopy, Inductively Coupled Mass Spectroscopy, Laser ablation, Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy and X-Ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy.