Science.gov

Sample records for absorption spectroscopic measurements

  1. In vivo low-coherence spectroscopic measurements of local hemoglobin absorption spectra in human skin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bosschaart, Nienke; Faber, Dirk J.; van Leeuwen, Ton G.; Aalders, Maurice C. G.

    2011-10-01

    Localized spectroscopic measurements of optical properties are invaluable for diagnostic applications that involve layered tissue structures, but conventional spectroscopic techniques lack exact control over the size and depth of the probed tissue volume. We show that low-coherence spectroscopy (LCS) overcomes these limitations by measuring local attenuation and absorption coefficient spectra in layered phantoms. In addition, we demonstrate the first in vivo LCS measurements of the human epidermis and dermis only. From the measured absorption in two distinct regions of the dermal microcirculation, we determine total hemoglobin concentration (3.0+/-0.5 g/l and 7.8+/-1.2 g/l) and oxygen saturation.

  2. In vivo low-coherence spectroscopic measurements of local hemoglobin absorption spectra in human skin.

    PubMed

    Bosschaart, Nienke; Faber, Dirk J; van Leeuwen, Ton G; Aalders, Maurice C G

    2011-10-01

    Localized spectroscopic measurements of optical properties are invaluable for diagnostic applications that involve layered tissue structures, but conventional spectroscopic techniques lack exact control over the size and depth of the probed tissue volume. We show that low-coherence spectroscopy (LCS) overcomes these limitations by measuring local attenuation and absorption coefficient spectra in layered phantoms. In addition, we demonstrate the first in vivo LCS measurements of the human epidermis and dermis only. From the measured absorption in two distinct regions of the dermal microcirculation, we determine total hemoglobin concentration (3.0±0.5 g∕l and 7.8±1.2 g∕l) and oxygen saturation.

  3. Absorption properties of type-II InAs/InAsSb superlattices measured by spectroscopic ellipsometry

    SciTech Connect

    Webster, P. T.; Riordan, N. A.; Liu, S.; Zhang, Y.-H.; Johnson, S. R.; Steenbergen, E. H.

    2015-02-09

    Strain-balanced InAs/InAsSb superlattices offer access to the mid- to long-wavelength infrared region with what is essentially a ternary material system at the GaSb lattice constant. The absorption coefficients of InAs/InAsSb superlattices grown by molecular beam epitaxy on (100)-oriented GaSb substrates are measured at room temperature over the 30 to 800 meV photon energy range using spectroscopic ellipsometry, and the miniband structure of each superlattice is calculated using a Kronig-Penney model. The InAs/InAsSb conduction band offset is used as a fitting parameter to align the calculated superlattice ground state transition energy to the measured absorption onset at room temperature and to the photoluminescence peak energy at low temperature. It is observed that the ground state absorption coefficient and transition strength are proportional to the square of the wavefunction overlap and the ground state absorption coefficient approaches a maximum value of around 5780 cm{sup −1} as the wavefunction overlap approaches 100%. The absorption analysis of these samples indicates that the optical joint density of states is weakly dependent on the period thickness and Sb content of the superlattice, and that wavefunction overlap is the principal design parameter in terms of obtaining strong absorption in these structures.

  4. Evaluation of laser absorption spectroscopic techniques for eddy covariance flux measurements of ammonia.

    PubMed

    Whitehead, James D; Twigg, Marsailidh; Famulari, Daniela; Nemitz, Eiko; Sutton, Mark A; Gallagher, Martin W; Fowler, David

    2008-03-15

    An intercomparison was made between eddy covariance flux measurements of ammonia by a quantum cascade laser absorption spectrometer (QCLAS) and a lead-salt tunable diode laser absorption spectrometer (TDLAS). The measurements took place in September 2004 and again in April 2005 over a managed grassland site in Southern Scotland, U.K. These were also compared with a flux estimate derived from an "Ammonia Measurement by ANnular Denuder with online Analysis" (AMANDA), using the aerodynamic gradient method (AGM). The concentration and flux measurements from the QCLAS correlated well with those of the TDLAS and the AGM systems when emissions were high, following slurry application to the field. Both the QCLAS and TDLAS, however, underestimated the flux when compared with the AMANDA system, by 64%. A flux loss of 41% due to chemical reaction of ammonia in the QCLAS (and 37% in the TDLAS) sample tube walls was identified and characterized using laboratory tests but did not fully accountforthis difference. Recognizing these uncertainties, the agreement between the systems was nevertheless very close (R2 = 0.95 between the QCLAS and the TDLAS; R2 = 0.84 between the QCLAS and the AMANDA) demonstrating the suitability of the laser absorption methods for quantifying the temporal dynamics of ammonia fluxes.

  5. White-light continuum probed femtosecond time-resolved absorption spectroscopic measurement of β-carotene under high pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Wei-Long; Zheng, Zhi-Ren; Zhang, Jian-Ping; Wu, Wen-Zhi; Li, Ai-Hua; Zhang, Wei; Huo, Ming-Ming; Liu, Zhi-Guo; Zhu, Rui-Bin; Zhao, Lian-Cheng; Su, Wen-Hui

    2012-04-01

    We have performed a femtosecond time-resolved absorption spectroscopic experiment of β-carotene in n-hexane solution under high pressure up to ˜1.0 GPa. Using white-light continuum in the visible spectral region as probe light, we found that the energy level of S1 state descends, whereas its lifetime becomes longer with the rising pressure. We ascribe this tendency deviating from the energy gap law to the viscosity effects on the Cdbnd C stretching vibrations, which is fully consistent with the microviscosity theory. This Letter may provide some insights on the light harvesting and photoprotection functions of carotenoids in photosynthetic organisms.

  6. Spectroscopic method for Earth-satellite-Earth laser long-path absorption measurements using Retroreflector In Space (RIS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sugimoto, Nobuo; Minato, Atsushi; Sasano, Yasuhiro

    1992-01-01

    The Retroreflector in Space (RIS) is a single element cube-corner retroreflector with a diameter of 0.5 m designed for earth-satellite-earth laser long-path absorption experiments. The RIS is to be loaded on the Advanced Earth Observing System (ADEOS) satellite which is scheduled for launch in Feb. 1996. The orbit for ADEOS is a sun synchronous subrecurrent polar-orbit with an inclination of 98.6 deg. It has a period of 101 minutes and an altitude of approximately 800 km. The local time at descending node is 10:15-10:45, and the recurrent period is 41 days. The velocity relative to the ground is approximately 7 km/s. In the RIS experiment, a laser beam transmitted from a ground station is reflected by RIS and received at the ground station. The absorption of the intervening atmosphere is measured in the round-trip optical path.

  7. The absorption spectrum of water vapor in the 2.2 μm transparency window: High sensitivity measurements and spectroscopic database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campargue, A.; Mikhailenko, S. N.; Vasilchenko, S.; Reynaud, C.; Béguier, S.; Čermák, P.; Mondelain, D.; Kassi, S.; Romanini, D.

    2017-03-01

    The weak absorption spectrum of water vapor in the important 2.2 μm transparency window is investigated with very high sensitivity. Overall, about 400 absorption lines were measured by Cavity Ring Down Spectroscopy (CRDS) and Optical-Feedback-Cavity Enhanced Laser Spectroscopy (OF-CEAS) in five spectral intervals: 4248.2-4257.3, 4298.4-4302.6, 4336.8.5-4367.5, 4422.4-4441.2 and 4514.6-4533.7 cm-1. The achieved sensitivity of the recordings (noise equivalent absorption, αmin, on the order of 2×10-10 cm-1) allowed detecting transitions with intensity values down to 1×10-28 cm/molecule, more than one order of magnitude better than previous studies by Fourier Transform spectroscopy. The rovibrational assignment was performed on the basis of variational calculations and of previously determined empirical energy values. Most of the newly assigned lines correspond to transitions of the ν1, ν3 and 3ν2 bands of H217O in natural isotopic abundance. Fourteen energy levels of H217O, H218O and HD18O are newly determined. An accurate and complete spectroscopic database is constructed for natural water in the 4190-4550 cm-1 region (2.39-2.20 μm). The list includes about 4500 transitions with intensity greater than 1×10-29 cm/molecule, for the six most abundant isotopologues in natural isotopic abundance. Line positions were obtained by difference of empirical energy values determined from literature data and complemented with the present CRDS results. The list is made mostly complete by including weak transitions not yet detected, with positions calculated from empirical levels and variational intensities. The variational intensities computed by a collaboration between the University College London and the Institute of Applied Physics in Nizhny Novgorod are found to improve significantly previous results by Schwenke and Partridge. Examples of comparison of the constructed line list to CRDS spectra and to simulations based on the HITRAN2012 list illustrate the advantages

  8. A nearly on-axis spectroscopic system for simultaneously measuring UV-visible absorption and X-ray diffraction in the SPring-8 structural genomics beamline.

    PubMed

    Sakaguchi, Miyuki; Kimura, Tetsunari; Nishida, Takuma; Tosha, Takehiko; Sugimoto, Hiroshi; Yamaguchi, Yoshihiro; Yanagisawa, Sachiko; Ueno, Go; Murakami, Hironori; Ago, Hideo; Yamamoto, Masaki; Ogura, Takashi; Shiro, Yoshitsugu; Kubo, Minoru

    2016-01-01

    UV-visible absorption spectroscopy is useful for probing the electronic and structural changes of protein active sites, and thus the on-line combination of X-ray diffraction and spectroscopic analysis is increasingly being applied. Herein, a novel absorption spectrometer was developed at SPring-8 BL26B2 with a nearly on-axis geometry between the X-ray and optical axes. A small prism mirror was placed near the X-ray beamstop to pass the light only 2° off the X-ray beam, enabling spectroscopic analysis of the X-ray-exposed volume of a crystal during X-ray diffraction data collection. The spectrometer was applied to NO reductase, a heme enzyme that catalyzes NO reduction to N2O. Radiation damage to the heme was monitored in real time during X-ray irradiation by evaluating the absorption spectral changes. Moreover, NO binding to the heme was probed via caged NO photolysis with UV light, demonstrating the extended capability of the spectrometer for intermediate analysis.

  9. Optical absorption measurement system

    DOEpatents

    Draggoo, Vaughn G.; Morton, Richard G.; Sawicki, Richard H.; Bissinger, Horst D.

    1989-01-01

    The system of the present invention contemplates a non-intrusive method for measuring the temperature rise of optical elements under high laser power optical loading to determine the absorption coefficient. The method comprises irradiating the optical element with a high average power laser beam, viewing the optical element with an infrared camera to determine the temperature across the optical element and calculating the absorption of the optical element from the temperature.

  10. Description of the Role of Shot Noise in Spectroscopic Absorption and Emission Measurements with Photodiode and Photomultiplier Tube Detectors: Information for an Instrumental Analysis Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McClain, Robert L.; Wright, John C.

    2014-01-01

    A description of shot noise and the role it plays in absorption and emission measurements using photodiode and photomultiplier tube detection systems is presented. This description includes derivations of useful forms of the shot noise equation based on Poisson counting statistics. This approach can deepen student understanding of a fundamental…

  11. Description of the Role of Shot Noise in Spectroscopic Absorption and Emission Measurements with Photodiode and Photomultiplier Tube Detectors: Information for an Instrumental Analysis Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McClain, Robert L.; Wright, John C.

    2014-01-01

    A description of shot noise and the role it plays in absorption and emission measurements using photodiode and photomultiplier tube detection systems is presented. This description includes derivations of useful forms of the shot noise equation based on Poisson counting statistics. This approach can deepen student understanding of a fundamental…

  12. Laser spectroscopic measurement of helium isotope ratios.

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, L.-B.; Mueller, P.; Holt, R. J.; Lu, Z.-T.; O'Connor, T. P.; Sano, Y.; Sturchio, N.; Univ. of Illinois; Univ. of Tokyo; Univ. of Illinois at Chicago

    2003-06-13

    A sensitive laser spectroscopic method has been applied to the quantitative determination of the isotope ratio of helium at the level of {sup 3}He/{sup 4}He = 10{sup -7}--10{sup -5}. The resonant absorption of 1083 nm laser light by the metastable {sup 3}He atoms in a discharge cell was measured with the frequency modulation saturation spectroscopy technique while the abundance of {sup 4}He was measured by a direct absorption technique. The results on three different samples extracted from the atmosphere and commercial helium gas were in good agreement with values obtained with mass spectrometry. The achieved 3{sigma} detection limit of {sup 3}He in helium is 4 x 10{sup -9}. This demonstration required a 200 {mu}L STP sample of He. The sensitivity can be further improved, and the required sample size reduced, by several orders of magnitude with the addition of cavity enhanced spectroscopy.

  13. Ultraviolet-Absorption Spectroscopic Biofilm Monitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Micheels, Ronald H.

    2004-01-01

    An ultraviolet-absorption spectrometer system has been developed as a prototype instrument to be used in continuous, real-time monitoring to detect the growth of biofilms. Such monitoring is desirable because biofilms are often harmful. For example, biofilms in potable-water and hydroponic systems act as both sources of pathogenic bacteria that resist biocides and as a mechanism for deterioration (including corrosion) of pipes. Biofilms formed from several types of hazardous bacteria can thrive in both plant-growth solutions and low-nutrient media like distilled water. Biofilms can also form in condensate tanks in air-conditioning systems and in industrial heat exchangers. At present, bacteria in potable-water and plant-growth systems aboard the space shuttle (and previously on the Mir space station) are monitored by culture-plate counting, which entails an incubation period of 24 to 48 hours for each sample. At present, there are no commercially available instruments for continuous monitoring of biofilms in terrestrial or spaceborne settings.

  14. Studies on monolayers. Part 1. Surface tension and absorption spectroscopic measurements of monolayers of surface-active azo and stilbene dyes

    SciTech Connect

    Heesemann, J.

    1980-03-26

    In order to develop new molecules as function components of monolayer assemblies, a series of 9 surface-active azo and stilbene compounds are synthesized. Their monolayer properties at the air-water interface are studied by surface pressure-surface area measurements and spectroscopic techniques. The results show that small changes in the molecular structure of the surfactants (such as, length of the fatty acid chain and type of the chromphore) have an immense influence on the monolayer properties. For monolayers of compounds I and III-VIII, van der Walls-like isotherms are obtained, which show a liquid expanded state, a phase transition region, and a condensed state. From monolayer absorbance spectra it is found that in the liquid expanded state at 100 to 110 sq angstroms/molecule the chromphores lie flatly on the water surface, forming monomers. The phase transition region of the isotherms can be assigned to a change of orientation of the chromophore axis (horizontal to vertical) and an aggregation process of the chromophores (monomers to H aggregates). 20 references.

  15. Analytical procedure for the simultaneous voltammetric determination of trace metals in food and environmental matrices. Critical comparison with atomic absorption spectroscopic measurements.

    PubMed

    Melucci, Dora; Torsi, Giancarlo; Locatelli, Clinio

    2007-01-01

    An analytical procedure fit for the simultaneous determination of copper (II), chromium(VI), thallium(I), lead(II), tin(II), antimony(III), and zinc(II) by square wave anodic stripping voltammetry (SWASV) in three interdependent environmental matrices involved in foods and food chain as meals, cereal plants and soils is described. The digestion of each matrix was carried out using a concentrated HCl-HNO3-H2SO4 (meals and cereal plants) and HCl-HNO3 (soils) acidic attack mixtures. 0.1 mol/L dibasic ammonium citrate pH 8.5 was employed as the supporting electrolyte. The voltammetric measurements were carried out using, as working electrode, a stationary hanging mercury drop electrode (HMDE) and a platinum electrode and an Ag/AgCl/KClsat electrode as auxiliary and reference electrodes, respectively. The analytical procedure was verified by the analyses of the standard reference materials: Wholemeal BCR-CRM 189, Tomato Leaves NIST-SRM 1573a and Montana Soil Moderately Elevated Traces NIST-SRM 2711. For all the elements in the certified matrix, the precision as repeatability, expressed as relative standard deviation (Sr %) was lower than 5%. The accuracy, expressed as percentage relative error (e %) was of the order of 3-7%, while the detection limits were in the range 0.015-0.103 microg/g. Once set up on the standard reference materials, the analytical procedure was transferred and applied to commercial meal samples, cereal plants and soils samples drawn in sites devoted to agricultural practice. A critical comparison with spectroscopic measurements is also discussed.

  16. Diagnostics of Carbon Nanotube Formation in a Laser Produced Plume: Spectroscopic in situ nanotube detection using spectral absorption and surface temperature measurements by black body emission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeBoer, Gary D.

    2005-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes hold great promise for material advancements in the areas of composites and electronics. The advancement of research in these areas is dependent upon the availability of carbon nanotubes to a broad spectrum of academic and industrial researchers. Although there has been much progress made in reducing the costs of carbon nanotubes and increasing the quality and purity of the products, an increase in demand for still less expensive and specific nanotubes types has also grown. This summer's work has involved two experiments that have been designed to further the understanding of the dynamics and chemical mechanisms of carbon nanotube formation. It is expected that a better understanding of the process of formation of nanotubes will aid current production designs and stimulate ideas for future production designs increasing the quantity, quality, and production control of carbon nanotubes. The first experiment involved the measurement of surface temperature of the target as a function of time with respect to the ablation lasers. A peak surface temperature of 5000 K was determined from spectral analysis of black body emission from the target surface. The surface temperature as a function of various changes in operating parameters was also obtained. This data is expected to aid the modeling of ablation and plume dynamics. The second experiment involved a time and spatial measurement of the spectrally resolved absorbance of the laser produced plume. This experiment explored the possibility of developing absorbance and fluorescence to detect carbon nanotubes during production. To attain control over the production of nanotubes with specific properties and reduce costs, a real time in situ diagnostics method would be very beneficial. Results from this summer's work indicate that detection of nanotubes during production may possibly be used for production feed back control.

  17. High temperature in absorption measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krech, R. H.; Pugh, E. R.

    1981-09-01

    The temperature dependence of the absorption coefficient of water vapor was measured to determine the feasibility of using water vapor as a molecular seed to couple 10.6 micrometer CO2 laser radiation into a propellant for use in a high performance laser heated rocket thruster. A series of shock tube experiments were performed to determine the temperature dependence of the absorption coefficient of water vapor at high temperatures on the P(16), P(18) and P(20) 10.6 micrometer CO2 laser transitions. Measurements were made behind both incident and reflected shock waves encompassing a temperature range from 600 K to 3700 K at pressures from 1 to 40 atmospheres in 2, 5, and 10 mole percent water vapor in argon gas mixtures. Within the spectral range (944 to 948 cm) covered, no significant variation in the absorption coefficient was observed as a function of laser wavelength, water concentration, total pressure, or collision partner. Observations suggest that the water lines are sufficiently broadened to act as a continuum absorber under conditions to be found in a laser-heated rocket thruster. The measured laser high temperature absorption coefficients are 50 percent lower than the values obtained from the Ludwig empirical curve fit to low resolution data.

  18. Aerosol Absorption Measurements in MILAGRO.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaffney, J. S.; Marley, N. A.; Arnott, W. P.; Paredes-Miranda, L.; Barnard, J. C.

    2007-12-01

    During the month of March 2006, a number of instruments were used to determine the absorption characteristics of aerosols found in the Mexico City Megacity and nearby Valley of Mexico. These measurements were taken as part of the Department of Energy's Megacity Aerosol Experiment - Mexico City (MAX-Mex) that was carried out in collaboration with the Megacity Interactions: Local and Global Research Observations (MILAGRO) campaign. MILAGRO was a joint effort between the DOE, NSF, NASA, and Mexican agencies aimed at understanding the impacts of a megacity on the urban and regional scale. A super-site was operated at the Instituto Mexicano de Petroleo in Mexico City (designated T-0) and at the Universidad Technologica de Tecamac (designated T-1) that was located about 35 km to the north east of the T-0 site in the State of Mexico. A third site was located at a private rancho in the State of Hidalgo approximately another 35 km to the northeast (designated T-2). Aerosol absorption measurements were taken in real time using a number of instruments at the T-0 and T-1 sites. These included a seven wavelength aethalometer, a multi-angle absorption photometer (MAAP), and a photo-acoustic spectrometer. Aerosol absorption was also derived from spectral radiometers including a multi-filter rotating band spectral radiometer (MFRSR). The results clearly indicate that there is significant aerosol absorption by the aerosols in the Mexico City megacity region. The absorption can lead to single scattering albedo reduction leading to values below 0.5 under some circumstances. The absorption is also found to deviate from that expected for a "well-behaved" soot anticipated from diesel engine emissions, i.e. from a simple 1/lambda wavelength dependence for absorption. Indeed, enhanced absorption is seen in the region of 300-450 nm in many cases, particularly in the afternoon periods indicating that secondary organic aerosols are contributing to the aerosol absorption. This is likely due

  19. Atmospheric Measurements by Cavity Enhanced Absorption Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Hongming; Wu, Tao; Coeur-Tourneur, Cécile; Fertein, Eric; Gao, Xiaoming; Zhao, Weixiong; Zhang, Weijun; Chen, Weidong

    2015-04-01

    Since the last decade, atmospheric environmental monitoring has benefited from the development of novel spectroscopic measurement techniques owing to the significant breakthroughs in photonic technology from the UV to the infrared spectral domain [1]. In this presentation, we will overview our recent development and applications of cavity enhanced absorption spectroscopy techniques for in situ optical monitoring of chemically reactive atmospheric species (such as HONO, NO3, NO2, N2O5) in intensive campaigns [2] and/or in smog chamber studies [3]. These field deployments demonstrated that modern photonic technologies (newly emergent light sources combined with high sensitivity spectroscopic techniques) can provide a useful tool to improve our understanding of tropospheric chemical processes which affect climate, air quality, and the spread of pollution. Experimental detail and preliminary results will be presented. Acknowledgements. The financial support from the French Agence Nationale de la Recherche (ANR) under the NexCILAS (ANR-11-NS09-0002) and the CaPPA (ANR-10-LABX-005) contracts is acknowledged. References [1] X. Cui, C. Lengignon, T. Wu, W. Zhao, G. Wysocki, E. Fertein, C. Coeur, A. Cassez,L. Croisé, W. Chen, et al., "Photonic Sensing of the Atmosphere by absorption spectroscopy", J. Quant. Spectrosc. Rad. Transfer 113 (2012) 1300-1316 [2] T. Wu, Q. Zha, W. Chen, Z. XU, T. Wang, X. He, "Development and deployment of a cavity enhanced UV-LED spectrometer for measurements of atmospheric HONO and NO2 in Hong Kong", Atmos. Environ. 95 (2014) 544-551 [3] T. Wu, C. Coeur-Tourneur, G. Dhont,A. Cassez, E. Fertein, X. He, W. Chen,"Application of IBBCEAS to kinetic study of NO3 radical formation from O3 + NO2 reaction in an atmospheric simulation chamber", J. Quant. Spectrosc. Rad. Transfer 133 (2014)199-205

  20. Analyzing absorption and scattering spectra of micro-scale structures with spectroscopic optical coherence tomography.

    PubMed

    Yi, Ji; Gong, Jianmin; Li, Xu

    2009-07-20

    We demonstrate the feasibility of characterizing the absorption and scattering spectra of micron-scale structures in a turbid medium using a spectroscopic optical coherence tomography (SOCT) system with a bandwidth of 430-650 nm. SOCT measurements are taken from phantoms composed of fluorescent microspheres. The absorption and scattering spectra are recovered with proper selections of spatial window width in the post processing step. Furthermore, we present an analysis using numerical OCT simulation based on full-wave solutions of the Maxwell's Equation to elucidate the origination of the multiple peaks in the OCT image for a single microsphere. Finally, we demonstrate the possibility of identifying contrast agents concentrated in micron-sized scale in an SOCT image. Two different types of microspheres in gel phantom are discriminated based on their distinguished absorbent feature.

  1. Flux measurements using the BATSE spectroscopic detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcnamara, Bernard

    1993-01-01

    Among the Compton Gama-Ray Observatory instruments, the BATSE Spectroscopic Detectors (SD) have the distinction of being able to detect photons of energies less than about 20 keV. This is an interesting energy range for the examination of low mass X-ray binaries (LMXB's). In fact, Sco X-1, the prototype LMXB, is easily seen even in the raw BATSE spectroscopic data. The all-sky coverage afforded by these detectors offers a unique opportunity to monitor this source over time periods never before possible. The aim of this investigation was to test a number of ways in which both continous and discrete flux measurements can be obtained using the BATSE spectroscopic datasets. A instrumental description of a SD can be found in the Compton Workshop of Apr. 1989, this report will deal only with methods which can be used to analyze its datasets. Many of the items discussed below, particularly in regard to the earth occultation technique, have been developed, refined, and applied by the BATSE team to the reduction of BATSE LAD data. Code written as part of this project utilizes portions of that work. The following discussions will first address issues related to the reduction of SD datasets using the earth occultation technique. It will then discuss methods for the recovery of the flux history of strong sources while they are above the earth's limb. The report will conclude with recommended reduction procedures.

  2. In vivo endoscopic tissue diagnostics based on spectroscopic absorption, scattering, and phase function properties.

    PubMed

    Thueler, Philippe; Charvet, Igor; Bevilacqua, Frederic; St Ghislain, M; Ory, G; Marquet, Pierre; Meda, Paolo; Vermeulen, Ben; Depeursinge, Christian

    2003-07-01

    A fast spectroscopic system for superficial and local determination of the absorption and scattering properties of tissue (480 to 950 nm) is described. The probe can be used in the working channel of an endoscope. The scattering properties include the reduced scattering coefficient and a parameter of the phase function called gamma, which depends on its first two moments. The inverse problem algorithm is based on the fit of absolute reflectance measurements to cubic B-spline functions derived from the interpolation of a set of Monte Carlo simulations. The algorithm's robustness was tested with simulations altered with various amounts of noise. The method was also assessed on tissue phantoms of known optical properties. Finally, clinical measurements performed endoscopically in vivo in the stomach of human subjects are presented. The absorption and scattering properties were found to be significantly different in the antrum and in the fundus and are correlated with histopathologic observations. The method and the instrument show promise for noninvasive tissue diagnostics of various epithelia.

  3. Spectroscopic study of low-temperature hydrogen absorption in palladium

    SciTech Connect

    Ienaga, K. Takata, H.; Onishi, Y.; Inagaki, Y.; Kawae, T.; Tsujii, H.; Kimura, T.

    2015-01-12

    We report real-time detection of hydrogen (H) absorption in metallic palladium (Pd) nano-contacts immersed in liquid H{sub 2} using inelastic electron spectroscopy (IES). After introduction of liquid H{sub 2}, the spectra exhibit the time evolution from the pure Pd to the Pd hydride, indicating that H atoms are absorbed in Pd nano-contacts even at the temperature where the thermal process is not expected. The IES time and bias voltage dependences show that H absorption develops by applying bias voltage 30 ∼ 50 mV, which can be explained by quantum tunneling. The results represent that IES is a powerful method to study the kinetics of high density H on solid surface.

  4. Infrared reflection-absorption spectroscope using thin film structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finke, S. J.; Schrader, G. L.

    Infrared reflection-absorption spectroscopy (IRRAS) has been used extensively in the study of adsorbates and thin layers on metal surfaces, but little work has been performed on non-metals due to the low sensitivity which results when these materials are used. In this work, thin film structures consisting of a thin layer of a semiconductor (silicon) on a metal (copper) surface are used to increase the sensitivity of the technique for examining layers of poly(methylmethacrylate).

  5. Effects of dust absorption on spectroscopic studies of turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kandel, D.; Lazarian, A.; Pogosyan, D.

    2017-09-01

    We study the effect of dust absorption on the recovery velocity and density spectra as well as on the anisotropies of magnetohydrodynamic turbulence using the velocity channel analysis (VCA), velocity coordinate spectrum (VCS) and velocity centroids. The dust limits volume up to an optical depth of unity. We show that in the case of the emissivity proportional to the density of emitters, the effects of random density get suppressed for strong dust absorption intensity variations arise from the velocity fluctuations only. However, for the emissivity proportional to squared density, both density and velocity fluctuations affect the observed intensities. We predict a new asymptotic regime for the spectrum of fluctuations for large scales exceeding the physical depths to unit optical depth. The spectrum gets shallower by unity in this regime. In addition, the dust absorption removes the degeneracy resulted in the universal K-3 spectrum of intensity fluctuations of self-absorbing medium reported by Lazarian & Pogosyan. We show that the predicted result is consistent with the available H ii region emission data. We find that for sub-Alfvénic and trans-Alfvénic turbulence one can get the information about both the magnetic field direction and the fundamental Alfvén, fast and slow modes that constitute MHD turbulence.

  6. A spectroscopic transfer standard for accurate atmospheric CO measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nwaboh, Javis A.; Li, Gang; Serdyukov, Anton; Werhahn, Olav; Ebert, Volker

    2016-04-01

    Atmospheric carbon monoxide (CO) is a precursor of essential climate variables and has an indirect effect for enhancing global warming. Accurate and reliable measurements of atmospheric CO concentration are becoming indispensable. WMO-GAW reports states a compatibility goal of ±2 ppb for atmospheric CO concentration measurements. Therefore, the EMRP-HIGHGAS (European metrology research program - high-impact greenhouse gases) project aims at developing spectroscopic transfer standards for CO concentration measurements to meet this goal. A spectroscopic transfer standard would provide results that are directly traceable to the SI, can be very useful for calibration of devices operating in the field, and could complement classical gas standards in the field where calibration gas mixtures in bottles often are not accurate, available or stable enough [1][2]. Here, we present our new direct tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (dTDLAS) sensor capable of performing absolute ("calibration free") CO concentration measurements, and being operated as a spectroscopic transfer standard. To achieve the compatibility goal stated by WMO for CO concentration measurements and ensure the traceability of the final concentration results, traceable spectral line data especially line intensities with appropriate uncertainties are needed. Therefore, we utilize our new high-resolution Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy CO line data for the 2-0 band, with significantly reduced uncertainties, for the dTDLAS data evaluation. Further, we demonstrate the capability of our sensor for atmospheric CO measurements, discuss uncertainty calculation following the guide to the expression of uncertainty in measurement (GUM) principles and show that CO concentrations derived using the sensor, based on the TILSAM (traceable infrared laser spectroscopic amount fraction measurement) method, are in excellent agreement with gravimetric values. Acknowledgement Parts of this work have been

  7. 60 Kelvin Absorption Cell for Planetary Spectroscopic Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chackerian, Charles, Jr.; McGee, James; Gore, Warren I. Y. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    We will describe a 30 cm long absorption cell which has been in operation for about two years. The cell is designed for use with sensitive-wide-spectral-coverage Fourier transform spectrometers. A helium compressor refrigerator allows temperatures to be achieved down to about 57 K. Heaters allow above-ambient temperatures as well. A unique vibration isolation system effectively quenches the transfer of vibration of the compressor unit to the spectrometer. An acid-resistant stainless steel liner in the copper body of the call permits the use of corrosive gases.

  8. 60 Kelvin Absorption Cell for Planetary Spectroscopic Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chackerian, Charles, Jr.; McGee, James; Gore, Warren I. Y. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    We will describe a 30 cm long absorption cell which has been in operation for about two years. The cell is designed for use with sensitive-wide-spectral-coverage Fourier transform spectrometers. A helium compressor refrigerator allows temperatures to be achieved down to about 57 K. Heaters allow above-ambient temperatures as well. A unique vibration isolation system effectively quenches the transfer of vibration of the compressor unit to the spectrometer. An acid-resistant stainless steel liner in the copper body of the call permits the use of corrosive gases.

  9. New absolute spectroscopic measurement of the solar equatorial rotation rate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snider, J. L.

    1983-01-01

    An atomic-beam resonance-scattering technique applied to the 7699 A solar potassium absorption line is used to make an absolute spectroscopic determination of the solar equatorial rotation rate. This is believed to be a new method which has not previously been used for studying solar rotation. The measurements were made during 1979-82, initially with a permanent apparatus at Oberlin College and more recently with a portable apparatus installed at the Snow Telescope on Mt. Wilson. After carefully allowing for possible systematic errors, it is concluded that the solar sidereal equatorial rotation rate is 13.8 + or - 0.3 deg/day and that it has not varied significantly over the period of these observations.

  10. Towards absolute laser spectroscopic CO2 isotope ratio measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anyangwe Nwaboh, Javis; Werhahn, Olav; Ebert, Volker

    2017-04-01

    Knowledge of isotope composition of carbon dioxide (CO2) in the atmosphere is necessary to identify sources and sinks of this key greenhouse gas. In the last years, laser spectroscopic techniques such as cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS) and tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (TDLAS) have been shown to perform accurate isotope ratio measurements for CO2 and other gases like water vapour (H2O) [1,2]. Typically, isotope ratios are reported in literature referring to reference materials provided by e.g. the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). However, there could be some benefit if field deployable absolute isotope ratio measurement methods were developed to address issues such as exhausted reference material like the Pee Dee Belemnite (PDB) standard. Absolute isotope ratio measurements would be particularly important for situations where reference materials do not even exist. Here, we present CRDS and TDLAS-based absolute isotope ratios (13C/12C ) in atmospheric CO2. We demonstrate the capabilities of the used methods by measuring CO2 isotope ratios in gas standards. We compare our results to values reported for the isotope certified gas standards. Guide to the expression of uncertainty in measurement (GUM) compliant uncertainty budgets on the CRDS and TDLAS absolute isotope ratio measurements are presented, and traceability is addressed. We outline the current impediments in realizing high accuracy absolute isotope ratio measurements using laser spectroscopic methods, propose solutions and the way forward. Acknowledgement Parts of this work have been carried out within the European Metrology Research Programme (EMRP) ENV52 project-HIGHGAS. The EMRP is jointly funded by the EMRP participating countries within EURAMET and the European Union. References [1] B. Kühnreich, S. Wagner, J. C. Habig,·O. Möhler, H. Saathoff, V. Ebert, Appl. Phys. B 119:177-187 (2015). [2] E. Kerstel, L. Gianfrani, Appl. Phys. B 92, 439-449 (2008).

  11. High Temperature in Absorption Measurements.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-09-01

    drives a laser-supported detonation (LSD) wave into the A1 w I-r cow 0. U) z ~Ll N wi N Cl, 0 z 2- Z LU-4 00 0.0 w IL >- z U I -4 CLL0 0 44 CCOw . z C/z...of liquid water at 5 1 1 7 -5 H !4 E0;’.- ’VTY OF vi7ER VADCR" TC-_ 1011~W 1 [ Il .. * ... , ICm .AYg DI - . . ,0 0 : ~L ’ --- ,oo., ,"I~ i 1:, ,. 2a...T-OK Fig. 31 UTRC4 calculated NH3 absorption coefficient. 51 S -AL. 8.8 x 10" 20R2 I a Th where a is in cm2 , R is in cm and Th is in dynes, while t

  12. Spectroscopic quantification of extremely rare molecular species in the presence of interfering optical absorption

    DOEpatents

    Ognibene, Ted; Bench, Graham; McCartt, Alan Daniel; Turteltaub, Kenneth; Rella, Chris W.; Tan, Sze; Hoffnagle, John A.; Crosson, Eric

    2017-05-09

    Optical spectrometer apparatus, systems, and methods for analysis of carbon-14 including a resonant optical cavity configured to accept a sample gas including carbon-14, an optical source configured to deliver optical radiation to the resonant optical cavity, an optical detector configured to detect optical radiation emitted from the resonant cavity and to provide a detector signal; and a processor configured to compute a carbon-14 concentration from the detector signal, wherein computing the carbon-14 concentration from the detector signal includes fitting a spectroscopic model to a measured spectrogram, wherein the spectroscopic model accounts for contributions from one or more interfering species that spectroscopically interfere with carbon-14.

  13. Galactic Soft X-ray Emission Revealed with Spectroscopic Study of Absorption and Emission Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamasaki, Noriko Y.; Mitsuda, K.; Takei, Y.; Hagihara, T.; Yoshino, T.; Wang, Q. D.; Yao, Y.; McCammon, D.

    2010-03-01

    Spectroscopic study of Oxygen emission/absorption lines is a new tool to investigate the nature of the soft X-ray background. We investigated the emission spectra of 14 fields obtained by Suzaku, and detected OVII and OVIII lines separately. There is an almost isotropic OVII line emission with 2 LU intensity. As the attenuation length in the Galactic plane for that energy is short, that OVII emission should arise within 300 pc of our neighborhood. In comparison with the estimated emission measure for the local bubble, the most plausible origin of this component is the solar wind charge exchange with local interstellar materials. Another component presented from the correlation between the OVII and OVIII line intensity is a thermal emission with an apparent temperature of 0.2 keV with a field-to-field fluctuation of 10% in temperature, while the intensity varies about a factor of 4. By the combination analysis of the emission and the absorption spectra, we can investigate the density and the scale length of intervening plasma separately. We analyzed the Chanrdra grating spectra of LMC X-3 and PKS 2155-304, and emission spectra toward the line of sight by Suzaku. In both cases, the combined analysis showed that the hot plasma is not iso-thermal nor uniform. Assuming an exponential disk distribution, the thickness of the disk is as large as a few kpc. It suggests that there is a thick hot disk or hot halo surrounding our Galaxy, which is similar to X-ray hot haloes around several spiral galaxies.

  14. Studies of cavity enhanced absorption spectroscopy for weak absorption gas measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Liucheng; Duo, Liping; Gong, Deyu; Ma, Yanhua; Zhang, Zhiguo; Wang, Yuanhu; Zhou, Dongjian; Jin, Yuqi

    2017-01-01

    In order to determine the concentrations of trace amount metastable species in chemical lasers, an off-axis cavity enhanced absorption spectrometer for the detection of weak absorption gases has been built with a noise equivalent absorption sensitivity of 1.6x10-8 cm-1. The absorption spectrum of trace amount gaseous ammonia and water vapor was obtained with a spectral resolution of about 78 MHz. A multiple-line absorption spectroscopic method to determine the temperature of gaseous ammonia has been developed by use of multiple lines of ammonia molecule absorption spectrum.

  15. Spectroscopic measurements of solar wind generation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kohl, J. L.; Withbroe, G. L.; Zapata, C. A.; Noci, G.

    1983-01-01

    Spectroscopically observable quantities are described which are sensitive to the primary plasma parameters of the solar wind's source region. The method is discussed in which those observable quantities are used as constraints in the construction of empirical models of various coronal structures. Simulated observations are used to examine the fractional contributions to observed spectral intensities from coronal structures of interest which co-exist with other coronal structures along simulated lines-of-sight. The sensitivity of spectroscopic observables to the physical parameters within each of those structures is discussed.

  16. Absorption and emission spectroscopic characterisation of combined wildtype LOV1-LOV2 domain of phot from Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Song, S-H; Dick, B; Zirak, P; Penzkofer, A; Schiereis, T; Hegemann, P

    2005-10-03

    An absorption and emission spectroscopic characterisation of the combined wild-type LOV1-LOV2 domain string (abbreviated LOV1/2) of phot from the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii is carried out at pH 8. A LOV1/2-MBP fusion protein (MBP=maltose binding protein) and LOV1/2 with a His-tag at the C-terminus (LOV1/2-His) expressed in an Escherichia coli strain are investigated. Blue-light photo-excitation generates a non-fluorescent intermediate photoproduct (flavin-C(4a)-cysteinyl adduct with absorption peak at 390 nm). The photo-cycle dynamics is studied by dark-state absorption and fluorescence measurement, by following the temporal absorption and emission changes under blue and violet light exposure, and by measuring the temporal absorption and fluorescence recovery after light exposure. The fluorescence quantum yield, phi(F), of the dark adapted samples is phi(F)(LOV1/2-His) approximately 0.15 and phi(F)(LOV1/2-MBP) approximately 0.17. A bi-exponential absorption recovery after light exposure with a fast (in the several 10-s range) and a slow component (in the near 10-min range) are resolved. The quantum yield of photo-adduct formation, phi(Ad), is extracted from excitation intensity dependent absorption measurements. It decreases somewhat with rising excitation intensity. The behaviour of the combined wildtype LOV1-LOV2 double domains is compared with the behaviour of the separate LOV1 and LOV2 domains.

  17. Spectroscopic Measurements of Target Preheating on OMEGA

    SciTech Connect

    Elton, R.C.; Griem, H.R.; Iglesias, E.J.

    2000-02-28

    The preheating of laser-heated microballoon targets has been measured by time-resolved x-ray and extreme ultraviolet (euv) spectroscopy on the 30 kJ, 351 nm, 60-beam laser-fusion system at the University of Rochester Laboratory for Laser Energetics. Thin coatings of aluminum overcoated with magnesium served as indicators. both the sequence of the x-ray line emission and the intensity of euv radiation were used to determine a preheating peaking at {approx} 10 ns prior to onset of the main laser pulse, with a power density {approx_equal}1% of the main pulse. The measurements are supported by numerical modeling. Further information is provided by absorption spectra from the aluminum coating, backlighted by continuum from the heated surface. The exact source of the preheating energy remains unknown at present, but most likely arrives from early laser leakage through the system. The present target diagnostic is particularly useful when all beams cannot be monitored directly at all laser wavelengths.

  18. Laser ablation absorption spectroscopy for isotopic analysis of plutonium: Spectroscopic properties and analytical performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyabe, M.; Oba, M.; Jung, K.; Iimura, H.; Akaoka, K.; Kato, M.; Otobe, H.; Khumaeni, A.; Wakaida, I.

    2017-08-01

    Spectroscopic properties of atomic species of plutonium were investigated by combining laser ablation and resonance absorption techniques for the analysis of a plutonium oxide sample. For 17 transitions of Pu atoms and ions, the absorbance, isotope shift, and hyperfine splitting were determined via Voigt profile fitting of the recorded absorption spectra. Three transitions were selected as candidates for analytical use. Using these transitions, we investigated the analytical performance that was attainable and determined a correlation coefficient R2 between the absorbance and plutonium concentration of 0.9999, a limit of detection of 30-130 ppm, and a relative standard deviation of approximately 6% for an abundance of 240Pu of 2.4%. These results demonstrate that laser ablation absorption spectroscopy is applicable to the remote isotopic analysis of highly radioactive nuclear fuels and waste materials containing multiple actinide elements.

  19. Absorption and emission spectroscopic characterization of platinum-octaethyl-porphyrin (PtOEP)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bansal, A. K.; Holzer, W.; Penzkofer, A.; Tsuboi, Taiju

    2006-11-01

    The absorption and emission spectroscopic behaviour of the platinum complexed porphyrin PtOEP (platinum-octaethyl-porphyrin) is studied at room temperature. Liquid solutions, doped films, and a neat film are investigated. The absorption cross-section spectra including singlet-triplet absorption, the triplet-singlet stimulated emission cross-section spectra, the phosphorescence quantum distributions, the phosphorescence quantum yields, and the phosphorescence signal decays are determined. In the neat film a red-shifted phosphorescent excimer emission is observed. In diluted solid solution (polystyrene and dicarbazole-biphenyl films) as well as in de-aerated liquid solutions (tetrahydrofuran, toluene, chloroform) high phosphorescence quantum yields are obtained. In air-saturated liquid solutions, the phosphorescence efficiency is reduced by oxygen quenching. At intense short-pulse laser excitation the phosphorescence lifetime is shortened by triplet-triplet annihilation. No amplification of spontaneous emission was observed.

  20. High temperature measurement of water vapor absorption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keefer, Dennis; Lewis, J. W. L.; Eskridge, Richard

    1985-01-01

    An investigation was undertaken to measure the absorption coefficient, at a wavelength of 10.6 microns, for mixtures of water vapor and a diluent gas at high temperature and pressure. The experimental concept was to create the desired conditions of temperature and pressure in a laser absorption wave, similar to that which would be created in a laser propulsion system. A simplified numerical model was developed to predict the characteristics of the absorption wave and to estimate the laser intensity threshold for initiation. A non-intrusive method for temperature measurement utilizing optical laser-beam deflection (OLD) and optical spark breakdown produced by an excimer laser, was thoroughly investigated and found suitable for the non-equilibrium conditions expected in the wave. Experiments were performed to verify the temperature measurement technique, to screen possible materials for surface initiation of the laser absorption wave and to attempt to initiate an absorption wave using the 1.5 kW carbon dioxide laser. The OLD technique was proven for air and for argon, but spark breakdown could not be produced in helium. It was not possible to initiate a laser absorption wave in mixtures of water and helium or water and argon using the 1.5 kW laser, a result which was consistent with the model prediction.

  1. Time-resolved spectroscopic fluorescence imaging, transient absorption and vibrational spectroscopy of intact and photo-inhibited photosynthetic tissue.

    PubMed

    Lukins, Philip B; Rehman, Shakil; Stevens, Gregory B; George, Doaa

    2005-01-01

    Fluorescence, absorption and vibrational spectroscopic techniques were used to study spinach at the photosystem II (PS II), chloroplast and cellular levels and to determine the effects and mechanisms of ultraviolet-B (UV-B) photoinhibition of these structures. Two-photon fluorescence spectroscopic imaging of intact chloroplasts shows significant spatial variations in the component fluorescence spectra in the range 640-740 nm, indicating that the type and distribution of chlorophylls vary markedly with position in the chloroplast. The chlorophyll distributions and excitonic behaviour in chloroplasts and whole plant tissue were studied using picosecond time-gated fluorescence imaging, which also showed UV-induced kinetic changes that clearly indicate that UV-B induces both structural and excitonic uncoupling of chlorophylls within the light-harvesting complexes. Transient absorption measurements and low-frequency infrared and Raman spectroscopy show that the predominant sites of UV-B damage in PS II are at the oxygen-evolving centre (OEC) itself, as well as at specific locations near the OEC-binding sites.

  2. Aerosol optical absorption measurements with photoacoustic spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Kun; Wang, Lei; Liu, Qiang; Wang, Guishi; Tan, Tu; Zhang, Weijun; Chen, Weidong; Gao, Xiaoming

    2015-04-01

    Many parameters related to radiative forcing in climate research are known only with large uncertainties. And one of the largest uncertainties in global radiative forcing is the contribution from aerosols. Aerosols can scatter or absorb the electromagnetic radiation, thus may have negative or positive effects on the radiative forcing of the atmosphere, respectively [1]. And the magnitude of the effect is directly related to the quantity of light absorbed by aerosols [2,3]. Thus, sensitivity and precision measurement of aerosol optical absorption is crucial for climate research. Photoacoustic spectroscopy (PAS) is commonly recognized as one of the best candidates to measure the light absorption of aerosols [4]. A PAS based sensor for aerosol optical absorption measurement was developed. A 532 nm semiconductor laser with an effective power of 160 mW was used as a light source of the PAS sensor. The PAS sensor was calibrated by using known concentration NO2. The minimum detectable optical absorption coefficient (OAC) of aerosol was determined to be 1 Mm-1. 24 hours continues measurement of OAC of aerosol in the ambient air was carried out. And a novel three wavelength PAS aerosol OAC sensor is in development for analysis of aerosol wavelength-dependent absorption Angstrom coefficient. Reference [1] U. Lohmann and J. Feichter, Global indirect aerosol effects: a review, Atmos. Chem. Phys. 5, 715-737 (2005) [2] M. Z. Jacobson, Strong radiative heating due to the mixing state of black carbon in atmospheric aerosols, Nature 409, 695-697 (2001) [3] V. Ramanathan and G. Carmichae, Global and regional climate changes due to black carbon, nature geoscience 1, 221-227 (2008) [4] W.P Arnott, H. Moosmuller, C. F. Rogers, T. Jin, and R. Bruch, Photoacoustic spectrometer for measuring light absorption by aerosol: instrument description. Atmos. Environ. 33, 2845-2852 (1999).

  3. Direct UV-spectroscopic measurement of selected ionic-liquid vapors

    SciTech Connect

    Dai, Sheng; Luo, Huimin; Wang, Congmin; Li, Haoran

    2010-01-01

    The hallmark of ionic liquids lies in their negligible vapor pressure. This ultralow vapor pressure makes it difficult to conduct the direct spectroscopic measurement of ionic-liquid vapors. In fact, there have been no electronic spectroscopic data currently available for ionic-liquid vapors. This deficiency significantly hampers the fundamental understanding of the unique molecular structures of ionic liquids. Herein, the UV absorption spectra of eight ionic liquids, such as 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide ([Bmim{sup +}] [Tf{sub 2}N{sup -}]) and 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(perfluoroethylsulfonyl)imide ([Emim{sup +}][beti{sup -}]) in the vapor phase in a distillation-like environment, were measured through a high-temperature spectroscopic technique to fill this knowledge gap. Two strong absorption peaks of the [Bmim{sup +}][Tf{sub 2}N{sup -}] vapor lie at 202 and 211 nm, slightly different from those of the neat [Bmim{sup +}][Tf{sub 2}N{sup -}] thin film and its solution in water. Based on the quantitative determination of the vapor absorption spectra as a function of temperature, the vaporization enthalpies of these ionic liquids vapors were measured and found to be in good agreement with the corresponding literature values. This in situ method opens up a new avenue to study the nature of ionic-liquid vapors and to determine the vaporization enthalpies of ionic liquids.

  4. Absorption technique for OH measurements and calibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bakalyar, D. M.; James, J. V.; Wang, C. C.

    1982-01-01

    An absorption technique is described which utilizes a stabilized frequency-doubled tunable dye laser and a long-path White cell with high mirror reflectivities both in the red and UV. In laboratory conditions it has been possible to routinely obtain a detection sensitivity of 3 parts in 1,000,000 over absorption paths less than 1 m in length and a detection sensitivity of approximately 6 parts in 100,000 over an absorption path of the order of 1 km. The latter number corresponds to 3,000,000 OH molecules/cu cm, and therefore the technique should be particularly useful for calibration the fluorescence instrument for OH measurements. However, the presence of atmospheric fluctuations coupled with intensity variation accompanying frequency scanning appears to degrade the detection sensitivity in outdoor ambient conditions, thus making it unlikely that this technique can be employed for direct OH monitoring.

  5. OH measurement by laser light absorption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perner, D.

    1986-01-01

    Since the first attempt to measure atmospheric hydroxyl radicals by optical absorption in 1975 (Perner et al., 1976) this method has been continuously developed further and its major obstacles and limitations are known today. The laser beam needs to be expanded in order to reduce the beam divergence. At the same time the energy density of the laser beam which produces OH via ozone photolysis is reduced to such an extent that the self-produced OH concentration ranges well below the atmospheric value. Atmospheric absorptions should be observed over a wide spectral range so that not only the OH radicals are properly identified by several rotational lines but their absorption can be corrected for interfering absorptions from other air constituents as SO2, CH2O, CS2, etc., which can be identified in a wide spectral range with more confidence. Air turbulence demands fast spectral scanning or probing on and off the absorption line. Energy requirements should be kept small in field operations. In the experiment frequency doubled dye laser pulses at 308 nm are produced. The picosecond light pulses are expected to show a smooth profile (light intensity against wavelength) which will be broadened to the required spectral width according to the uncertainty principle. The pump laser will be an optoacoustically modulated Nd:YAG laser.

  6. Interaction between indium tin oxide nanoparticles and cytochrome c: A surface-enhanced Raman scattering and absorption spectroscopic study

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Yimin E-mail: tqiu@seu.edu.cn; Du, Deyang; Fan, Jiyang; Qiu, Teng E-mail: tqiu@seu.edu.cn; Kong, Fan

    2015-06-28

    Indium-tin-oxide (ITO) nanoparticles were annealed in vacuum or reducing atmosphere to obtain different surface structures and investigate their influence on the adsorptive character and conformation of cytochrome c (Cyt c) molecule. Annealing-induced morphometric or structural changes of ITO nanoparticles were characterized by instruments of transmission electron microscopy, x-ray diffraction, and Raman scattering. Semiconductor ITO nanoparticle-enhanced Raman scattering of Cyt c was observed and the enhanced efficiency was found to closely depend on the surface structures which control the adsorbance of buffer anions needed for Cyt c loading. Direct electron transfer between Cyt c and ITO surface at the moment of molecular elastic collision was found and a reverse electron transfer process for O-terminated surface and metal-terminated surface was observed, according to absorption spectroscopic measurement on the residual solution.

  7. X-ray absorption spectroscopic investigation of the electronic structure differences in solution and crystalline oxyhemoglobin.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Samuel A; Green, Evan; Mathews, Irimpan I; Benfatto, Maurizio; Hodgson, Keith O; Hedman, Britt; Sarangi, Ritimukta

    2013-10-08

    Hemoglobin (Hb) is the heme-containing O2 transport protein essential for life in all vertebrates. The resting high-spin (S = 2) ferrous form, deoxy-Hb, combines with triplet O2, forming diamagnetic (S = 0) oxy-Hb. Understanding this electronic structure is the key first step in understanding transition metal-O2 interaction. However, despite intense spectroscopic and theoretical studies, the electronic structure description of oxy-Hb remains elusive, with at least three different descriptions proposed by Pauling, Weiss, and McClure-Goddard, based on theory, spectroscopy, and crystallography. Here, a combination of X-ray absorption spectroscopy and extended X-ray absorption fine structure, supported by density functional theory calculations, help resolve this debate. X-ray absorption spectroscopy data on solution and crystalline oxy-Hb indicate both geometric and electronic structure differences suggesting that two of the previous descriptions are correct for the Fe-O2 center in oxy-Hb. These results support the multiconfigurational nature of the ground state developed by theoretical results. Additionally, it is shown here that small differences in hydrogen bonding and solvation effects can tune the ground state, tipping it into one of the two probable configurations. These data underscore the importance of solution spectroscopy and show that the electronic structure in the crystalline form may not always reflect the true ground-state description in solution.

  8. X-ray absorption spectroscopic investigation of the electronic structure differences in solution and crystalline oxyhemoglobin

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Samuel A.; Green, Evan; Mathews, Irimpan I.; Benfatto, Maurizio; Hodgson, Keith O.; Hedman, Britt; Sarangi, Ritimukta

    2013-01-01

    Hemoglobin (Hb) is the heme-containing O2 transport protein essential for life in all vertebrates. The resting high-spin (S = 2) ferrous form, deoxy-Hb, combines with triplet O2, forming diamagnetic (S = 0) oxy-Hb. Understanding this electronic structure is the key first step in understanding transition metal–O2 interaction. However, despite intense spectroscopic and theoretical studies, the electronic structure description of oxy-Hb remains elusive, with at least three different descriptions proposed by Pauling, Weiss, and McClure-Goddard, based on theory, spectroscopy, and crystallography. Here, a combination of X-ray absorption spectroscopy and extended X-ray absorption fine structure, supported by density functional theory calculations, help resolve this debate. X-ray absorption spectroscopy data on solution and crystalline oxy-Hb indicate both geometric and electronic structure differences suggesting that two of the previous descriptions are correct for the Fe–O2 center in oxy-Hb. These results support the multiconfigurational nature of the ground state developed by theoretical results. Additionally, it is shown here that small differences in hydrogen bonding and solvation effects can tune the ground state, tipping it into one of the two probable configurations. These data underscore the importance of solution spectroscopy and show that the electronic structure in the crystalline form may not always reflect the true ground-state description in solution. PMID:24062465

  9. High temperature and high pressure gas cell for quantitative spectroscopic measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christiansen, Caspar; Stolberg-Rohr, Thomine; Fateev, Alexander; Clausen, Sønnik

    2016-01-01

    A high temperature and high pressure gas cell (HTPGC) has been manufactured for quantitative spectroscopic measurements in the pressure range 1-200 bar and temperature range 300-1300 K. In the present work the cell was employed at up to 100 bar and 1000 K, and measured absorption coefficients of a CO2-N2 mixture at 100 bar and 1000 K are revealed for the first time, exceeding the high temperature and pressure combinations previously reported. This paper discusses the design considerations involved in the construction of the cell and presents validation measurements compared against simulated spectra, as well as published experimental data.

  10. Optical absorption and photoluminescence properties of Nd3+ doped mixed alkali phosphate glasses-spectroscopic investigations.

    PubMed

    Ratnakaram, Y C; Srihari, N V; Kumar, A Vijaya; Naidu, D Thirupathi; Chakradhar, R P S

    2009-02-01

    Spectroscopic investigations were performed on 68NH(4)H(2)PO(4).xLi(2)CO(3)(30-x)K(2)CO(3) and 68NH(4)H(2)PO(4).xNa(2)CO(3)(30-x)K(2)CO(3) (where x=5, 10, 15, 20 and 25) glasses containing 2 mol% Nd(2)O(3). Various spectroscopic parameters (Racah (E(1), E(2), E(3)), spin-orbit (xi(4f)) and configuration interaction (alpha)) are reported. Judd-Ofelt intensity parameters (Omega(2), Omega(4), Omega(6)) are calculated for Nd(3+) doped two mixed alkali phosphate glass matrices. From the magnitude of Judd-Ofelt parameters, covalency is studied as a function of x in the glass matrix. Using Judd-Ofelt intensity parameters, total radiative transition probabilities (A(T)), radiative lifetimes (tau(R)), branching ratios (beta) and integrated absorption cross sections (Sigma) have been computed for certain excited states of Nd(3+) in these mixed alkali phosphate glasses. Emission cross sections (sigma(P)) are calculated for the two transitions, (4)G(7/2)-->(4)I(11/2) and (4)G(7/2)-->(4)I(13/2) of Nd(3+) in these mixed alkali phosphate glasses. Optical band gaps (E(opt)) for direct and indirect transitions are reported.

  11. Ultrafast transient absorption measurements of heme proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Xiong; Demidov, Andrey; Wang, Wei; Christian, James; Champion, Paul

    1998-03-01

    Transient absorption spectra reveal the dynamics and intermediate states of the heme active site after ligand photodissociation, which helps clarify the physical process of ligand dissociation and geminate recombination. To measure the transient absorption spectra, we apply a femtosecond pump-probe technique with frequency resolved detection using a multichannel diode array. The femtosecond pulse output from a regenerative laser amplifier system is split in two; one beam pumps the optical parametric amplifier to produce a tunable wavelength pump pulse, the other beam generates a white light continuum that is varied in time with respect to pump pulse and probe the transient absorbance of the sample. We make a comparative study of myoglobin with different ligands, mutants and pH conditions.

  12. Spectroscopic measurements of electron temperature on VX-10

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sciamma, Ella; Lee, Charles; Bengtson, Roger; Jacobson, Verlin; Lavagni-Bolanos, Frank; McCaskill, Greg

    2004-11-01

    We have made spectroscopic measurements at several locations in the VX-10 experiment in the near UV, visible, and near IR spectral region. We estimate electron temperatures using a collisional radiative model. Residual gas analysis is also performed with plasma discharges. Quantitative estimates of plasma composition are also discussed.

  13. Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer Measurements of Interstellar Fluorine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Federman, S. R.; Sheffer, Yaron; Lambert, David L.; Smith, V. V.

    2005-02-01

    The source of fluorine is not well understood, although core-collapse supernovae, Wolf-Rayet stars, and asymptotic giant branch stars have been suggested. A search for evidence of the ν-process during Type II supernovae is presented. Absorption from interstellar F I is seen in spectra of HD 208440 and HD 209339A acquired with the Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer. In order to extract the column density for F I from the line at 954 Å, absorption from H2 has to be modeled and then removed. Our analysis indicates that for H2 column densities less than about 3×1020 cm-2, the amount of F I can be determined from λ954. For these two sight lines, there is no clear indication for enhanced F abundances resulting from the ν-process in a region shaped by past supernovae. Based on observations made with the NASA/CNES/CSA Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer (FUSE), which is operated for NASA by the Johns Hopkins University under NASA contract NAS 5-32985.

  14. Modeling optical absorption for thermoreflectance measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jia; Ziade, Elbara; Schmidt, Aaron J.

    2016-03-01

    Optical pump-probe techniques based on thermoreflectance, such as time domain thermoreflectance and frequency domain thermoreflectance (FDTR), have been widely used to characterize the thermal conductivity of thin films and the thermal conductance across interfaces. These techniques typically use a transducer layer to absorb the pump light and improve the thermoreflectance signal. The transducer, however, complicates the interpretation of the measured signal because the approximation that all the energy from the pump beam is deposited at the transducer surface is not always accurate. In this paper, we consider the effect of laser absorption in the top layer of a multilayer sample, and derive an analytical solution for the thermoreflectance signal in the diffusion regime based on volumetric heating. We analyze the measurement sensitivity to the pump absorption depth for transducers with different thermal conductivities, and investigate the additional effect of probe laser penetration depth on the measured signal. We validate our model using FDTR measurements on 490 nm thick amorphous silicon films deposited on fused silica and silicon substrates.

  15. Modeling optical absorption for thermoreflectance measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Jia; Ziade, Elbara; Schmidt, Aaron J.

    2016-03-07

    Optical pump-probe techniques based on thermoreflectance, such as time domain thermoreflectance and frequency domain thermoreflectance (FDTR), have been widely used to characterize the thermal conductivity of thin films and the thermal conductance across interfaces. These techniques typically use a transducer layer to absorb the pump light and improve the thermoreflectance signal. The transducer, however, complicates the interpretation of the measured signal because the approximation that all the energy from the pump beam is deposited at the transducer surface is not always accurate. In this paper, we consider the effect of laser absorption in the top layer of a multilayer sample, and derive an analytical solution for the thermoreflectance signal in the diffusion regime based on volumetric heating. We analyze the measurement sensitivity to the pump absorption depth for transducers with different thermal conductivities, and investigate the additional effect of probe laser penetration depth on the measured signal. We validate our model using FDTR measurements on 490 nm thick amorphous silicon films deposited on fused silica and silicon substrates.

  16. Spectroscopic measurements of temperature in a weakly nonideal plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Mitrofanov, N.K.

    1995-04-01

    Application of traditional spectroscopic techniques for determining the temperature in a plasma by measuring the spectral line intensities is incorrect, even for a weakly nonideal plasma. The method of relative intensities of spectral lines and a continuum is modified taking into account a decrease in the line intensity caused by ionization in a plasma microfield. Comparison of temperature measurements in an atmospheric-pressure arc plasma performed by traditional and modified methods supports the validity of our approach.

  17. Spectroscopic Measurement of Leaf Water Status

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goetz, Alexander F. H.; Boardman, Joseph W.

    1995-01-01

    A leaf drying experiment was carried out in the laboratory in which simultaneous spectral reflectance in the 350-2450 nm region, and leaf weights, were measured at 10 second intervals over a 40 minute period. As the leaf water weight dropped from approximately 60 to 38%. a nearly-linear rise in reflectance at all wavelengths beyond 1000 nm was observed. A principal components analysis of the time series of spectra in the 2000-2500 nm wavelength region showed that over 99% of the variance in the spectra, that were individually scaled to have a sum equal to that of the mean spectrum and subsequently mean corrected, was in the first component. This result shows that it is feasible to determine leaf water content remotely with an imaging spectrometer independent of the surface irradiance effects caused by topography.

  18. Microwave absorption measurements of melting spherical and nonspherical hydrometeors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansman, R. J., Jr.

    1986-01-01

    Measurements were made of the absorption behavior of melting and freezing hydrometeors using resonant cavity perturbation techniques at a wavelength of 2.82 cm. Melting ice spheres with equivalent melted diameters between 1.15 and 2.00 mm exhibit a period of strong absorption during melting as predicted by prior theoretical calculations. However, the measured magnitude of the absorption peak exceeds the predicted value. Absorption measuremets of melting oblate and prolate ice ellipsoids also exhibit enhanced absorption during melting.

  19. Microwave absorption measurements of melting spherical and nonspherical hydrometeors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansman, R. J., Jr.

    1986-01-01

    Measurements were made of the absorption behavior of melting and freezing hydrometeors using resonant cavity perturbation techniques at a wavelength of 2.82 cm. Melting ice spheres with equivalent melted diameters between 1.15 and 2.00 mm exhibit a period of strong absorption during melting as predicted by prior theoretical calculations. However, the measured magnitude of the absorption peak exceeds the predicted value. Absorption measuremets of melting oblate and prolate ice ellipsoids also exhibit enhanced absorption during melting.

  20. Spectroscopic Measurement Techniques for Aerospace Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danehy, Paul M.; Bathel, Brett F.; Johansen, Craig T.; Cutler, Andrew D.; Hurley, Samantha

    2014-01-01

    The conditions that characterize aerospace flows are so varied, that a single diagnostic technique is not sufficient for its measurement. Fluid dynamists use knowledge of similarity to help categorize and focus on different flow conditions. For example, the Reynolds number represents the ratio of inertial to viscous forces in a flow. When the velocity scales, length scales, and gas density are large and the magnitude of the molecular viscosity is low, the Reynolds number becomes large. This corresponds to large scale vehicles (e.g Airbus A380), fast moving objects (e.g. artillery projectiles), vehicles in dense fluids (e.g. submarine in water), or flows with low dynamic viscosity (e.g. skydiver in air). In each of these cases, the inertial forces dominate viscous forces, and unsteady turbulent fluctuations in the flow variables are observed. In contrast, flows with small length scales (e.g. dispersion of micro-particles in a solid rocket nozzle), slow moving objects (e.g. micro aerial vehicles), flows with low density gases (e.g. atmospheric re-entry), or fluids with a large magnitude of viscosity (e.g. engine coolant flow), all have low Reynolds numbers. In these cases, viscous forces become very important and often the flows can be steady and laminar. The Mach number, which is the ratio of the velocity to the speed of sound in the medium, also helps to differentiate types of flows. At very low Mach numbers, acoustic waves travel much faster than the object, and the flow can be assumed to be incompressible (e.g. Cessna 172 aircraft). As the object speed approaches the speed of sound, the gas density can become variable (e.g. flow over wing of Learjet 85). When the object speed is higher than the speed of sound (Ma > 1), the presences of shock waves and other gas dynamic features can become important to the vehicle performance (e.g. SR-71 Blackbird). In the hypersonic flow regime (Ma > 5), large changes in temperature begin to affect flow properties, causing real

  1. In vivo absorption spectroscopy for absolute measurement.

    PubMed

    Furukawa, Hiromitsu; Fukuda, Takashi

    2012-10-01

    In in vivo spectroscopy, there are differences between individual subjects in parameters such as tissue scattering and sample concentration. We propose a method that can provide the absolute value of a particular substance concentration, independent of these individual differences. Thus, it is not necessary to use the typical statistical calibration curve, which assumes an average level of scattering and an averaged concentration over individual subjects. This method is expected to greatly reduce the difficulties encountered during in vivo measurements. As an example, for in vivo absorption spectroscopy, the method was applied to the reflectance measurement in retinal vessels to monitor their oxygen saturation levels. This method was then validated by applying it to the tissue phantom under a variety of absorbance values and scattering efficiencies.

  2. ABSORPTION MEASURE DISTRIBUTION IN Mrk 509

    SciTech Connect

    Adhikari, T. P.; Różańska, A.; Sobolewska, M.; Czerny, B.

    2015-12-20

    In this paper we model the observed absorption measure distribution (AMD) in Mrk 509, which spans three orders of magnitude in ionization level with a single-zone absorber in pressure equilibrium. AMD is usually constructed from observations of narrow absorption lines in radio-quiet active galaxies with warm absorbers. We study the properties of the warm absorber in Mrk 509 using recently published broadband spectral energy distribution observed with different instruments. This spectrum is an input in radiative transfer computations with full photoionization treatment using the titan code. We show that the simplest way to fully reproduce the shape of AMD is to assume that the warm absorber is a single zone under constant total pressure. With this assumption, we found theoretical AMD that matches the observed AMD determined on the basis of the 600 ks reflection grating spectrometer XMM-Newton spectrum of Mrk 509. The softness of the source spectrum and the important role of the free–free emission breaks the usual degeneracy in the ionization state calculations, and the explicit dependence of the depths of AMD dips on density open a new path to the density diagnostic for the warm absorber. In Mrk 509, the implied density is of the order of 10{sup 8} cm{sup −3}.

  3. Spectroscopic Combustion Temperature Measurements: Effect Of Optical Depth In Black Liquor Recovery Boilers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whetstone, J. R.; Charagundla, S. R.; Macek, A.; Semerjian, H. G.

    1988-11-01

    Results of a study directed toward using observed spectroscopic features for the measurement of temperature in the combustion zone of recovery boilers are described. Emissions of the potassium doublets at 404 and 766 nanometers (nm) have been observed in recovery boilers and temperature and self absorption effects on lines shapes have been modeled. Predicted emission line shapes are strongly dependent upon predicted concentration values of potassium. Proper selection of concentration ranges results in good qualitative agreement of predicted line shapes with those observed in boilers and laboratory flame experiments. These results indicate that the temperature dependence of potassium emissions is complicated by self-absorption effects which limit the optical pathlength over which emissions are practically observable. Temperature measurement may be feasible using pattern recognition methods coupled with algorithms based on an emission model and realistic estimates of the emitting species concentration.

  4. Absorption spectroscopic probe to investigate the interaction between Nd(III) and calf-thymus DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devi, Ch. Victory; Singh, N. Rajmuhon

    2011-03-01

    The interaction between Nd(III) and Calf Thymus DNA (CT-DNA) in physiological buffer (pH 7.4) has been studied using absorption spectroscopy involving 4f-4f transition spectra in different aquated organic solvents. Complexation with CT-DNA is indicated by the changes in absorption intensity following the subsequent changes in the oscillator strengths of different 4f-4f bands and Judd-Ofelt intensity ( Tλ) parameters. The other spectral parameters namely Slator-Condon ( Fk's), nephelauxetic effect ( β), bonding ( b1/2) and percent covalency ( δ) parameters are computed to correlate with the binding of Nd(III) with DNA. The absorption spectra of Nd(III) exhibited hyperchromism and red shift in the presence of DNA. The binding constant, Kb has been determined by absorption measurement. The relative viscosity of DNA decreased with the addition of Nd(III). Thermodynamic parameters have been calculated according to relevant absorption data and Van't Hoff equation. The characterisation of bonding mode has been studied in detail. The results suggested that the major interaction mode between Nd(III) and DNA was external electrostatic binding.

  5. Transient full-field vibration measurement using spectroscopical stereo photogrammetry.

    PubMed

    Yue, Kaiduan; Li, Zhongke; Zhang, Ming; Chen, Shan

    2010-12-20

    Contrasted with other vibration measurement methods, a novel spectroscopical photogrammetric approach is proposed. Two colored light filters and a CCD color camera are used to achieve the function of two traditional cameras. Then a new calibration method is presented. It focuses on the vibrating object rather than the camera and has the advantage of more accuracy than traditional camera calibration. The test results have shown an accuracy of 0.02 mm.

  6. Near-infrared diode laser based spectroscopic detection of ammonia: a comparative study of photoacoustic and direct optical absorption methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bozoki, Zoltan; Mohacsi, Arpad; Szabo, Gabor; Bor, Zsolt; Erdelyi, Miklos; Chen, Weidong; Tittel, Frank K.

    2002-01-01

    A photoacoustic spectroscopic (PAS) and a direct optical absorption spectroscopic (OAS) gas sensor, both using continuous-wave room-temperature diode lasers operating at 1531.8 nm, were compared on the basis of ammonia detection. Excellent linear correlation between the detector signals of the two systems was found. Although the physical properties and the mode of operation of both sensors were significantly different, their performances were found to be remarkably similar, with a sub-ppm level minimum detectable concentration of ammonia and a fast response time in the range of a few minutes.

  7. Near-infrared diode laser based spectroscopic detection of ammonia: a comparative study of photoacoustic and direct optical absorption methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bozoki, Zoltan; Mohacsi, Arpad; Szabo, Gabor; Bor, Zsolt; Erdelyi, Miklos; Chen, Weidong; Tittel, Frank K.

    2002-01-01

    A photoacoustic spectroscopic (PAS) and a direct optical absorption spectroscopic (OAS) gas sensor, both using continuous-wave room-temperature diode lasers operating at 1531.8 nm, were compared on the basis of ammonia detection. Excellent linear correlation between the detector signals of the two systems was found. Although the physical properties and the mode of operation of both sensors were significantly different, their performances were found to be remarkably similar, with a sub-ppm level minimum detectable concentration of ammonia and a fast response time in the range of a few minutes.

  8. Determination of spectroscopic properties of atmospheric molecules from high resolution vacuum ultraviolet cross section and wavelength measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parkinson, W. H.; Yoshino, K.; Freeman, D. E.

    1988-01-01

    Progress is given on work on: cross section measurements in the transmission window regions of the Schumann-Runge bands of oxygen; the determinations of predissociation linewidths; the theoretical calculation of band oscillator strengths of the Schumann-Runge absorption bands of O-16O-18; the determination of molecular spectroscopic constants; and the combined Herzberg continuum cross sections. The experimental investigations relevant to the cross section measurements, predissociation linewidths, and molecular spectroscopic constants are effected at high resolution with a 6.65 m scanning spectrometer which is, by virtue of its small instrumental width (FWHM = 0.0013 nm), suitable for cross section measurements of molecular bands with discrete rotational structure. Such measurements are needed for accurate calculations of the stratospheric production of atomic oxygen and heavy ozone formed following the photo-predissociation of O-16O-18 by solar radiation penetrating between the absorption lines of O-16(sub 2).

  9. X-Ray Absorption Spectroscopic Characterization of the Molybdenum Site of 'Escherichia Coli' Dimethyl Sulfoxide Reductase

    SciTech Connect

    George, G.N.; Doonan, C.J.; Rothery, R.A.; Boroumand, N.; Weiner, J.H.; /Saskatchewan U. /Alberta U.

    2007-07-09

    Structural studies of dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) reductases were hampered by modification of the active site during purification. We report an X-ray absorption spectroscopic analysis of the molybdenum active site of Escherichia coli DMSO reductase contained within its native membranes. The enzyme in these preparations is expected to be very close to the form found in vivo. The oxidized active site was found to have four Mo-S ligands at 2.43 angstroms, one Mo=O at 1.71 angstroms, and a longer Mo-O at 1.90 angstroms. We conclude that the oxidized enzyme is a monooxomolybdenum(VI) species coordinated by two molybdopterin dithiolenes and a serine. The bond lengths determined for E. coli DMSO reductase are very similar to those determined for the well-characterized Rhodobacter sphaeroides DMSO reductase, suggesting similar active site structures for the two enzymes. Furthermore, our results suggest that the form found in vivo is the monooxobis(molybdopterin) species.

  10. Field, laboratory, and X-ray absorption spectroscopic studies of mercury accumulation by water hyacinths.

    PubMed

    Riddle, Sarah G; Tran, Huy H; Dewitt, Jane G; Andrews, Joy C

    2002-05-01

    We have studied water hyacinth (Eichhornia crassipes), a non-native nuisance plant found in the in San Francisco Bay Delta region, for its potential to phytoremediate mercury. Mercury is a common contaminant in San Francisco Bay Area waters because of gold mining activities. In this study, speciation of mercury in hyacinth roots and shoots, rates of mercury uptake by hyacinths in the laboratory, and mercury levels near the Big Break Region in the Delta were studied. In the speciation studies, Hg L3 edge X-ray absorption spectroscopic analysis of Hg model compounds and water hyacinth roots and shoots revealed that Hg was initially bound ionically to oxygen ligands in roots, most likely to carboxylate groups, and was bound covalently to sulfur groups in shoots. In laboratory uptake studies, we found that water hyacinths grown in 1 ppm Hg and one-quarter strength Hoagland's solution accumulated a maximum of 0.20 ppm in shoots and 16.0 ppm in roots, both reaching maximum concentrations after approximately 16 days. Mercury concentrations were found to be 0.26 +/- 0.20 ppm in the water and 0.86 +/- 1.70 ppm in sediment at Big Break. It was proposed that water hyacinths have the potential to phytoremediate mercury in the water at Big Break if the current herbicide treatments are replaced by physical removal.

  11. Analyzing cell structure and dynamics with confocal light scattering and absorption spectroscopic microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Le; Vitkin, Edward; Fang, Hui; Zaman, Munir M.; Andersson, Charlotte; Salahuddin, Saira; Modell, Mark D.; Freedman, Steven D.; Hanlon, Eugene B.; Itzkan, Irving; Perelman, Lev T.

    2007-02-01

    We recently developed a new microscopic optical technique capable of noninvasive analysis of cell structure and cell dynamics on the submicron scale [1]. It combines confocal microscopy, a well-established high-resolution microscopic technique, with light scattering spectroscopy (LSS) and is called confocal light absorption and scattering spectroscopic (CLASS) microscopy. CLASS microscopy requires no exogenous labels and is capable of imaging and continuously monitoring individual viable cells, enabling the observation of cell and organelle functioning at scales on the order of 100 nm. To test the ability of CLASS microscopy to monitor cellular dynamics in vivo we performed experiments with human bronchial epithelial cells treated with DHA and undergoing apoptosis. The treated and untreated cells show not only clear differences in organelle spatial distribution but time sequencing experiments on a single cell show disappearance of certain types of organelles and change of the nuclear shape and density with the progression of apoptosis. In summary, CLASS microscopy provides an insight into metabolic processes within the cell and opens doors for the noninvasive real-time assessment of cellular dynamics. Noninvasive monitoring of cellular dynamics with CLASS microscopy can be used for a real-time dosimetry in a wide variety of medical and environmental applications that have no immediate observable outcome, such as photodynamic therapy, drug screening, and monitoring of toxins.

  12. Spectroscopic temperature measurements of non-equilibrium plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Back, C.A.; Glenzer, S.H.; Lee, R.W.; MacGowan, B.J.

    1996-04-24

    The characterization of laser-produced plasmas has required the application of spectroscopic techniques to non-standard conditions where kinetics models have not been extensively tested. The plasmas are produced by the Nova laser for the study of inertial confinement fusion, can be mm in size, and evolve on sub-nanosecond time scales. These targets typically achieve electron temperatures from 2-4 keV and electron densities of 10{sup 20}-10{sup 22} cm{sup {minus}3}. The authors have measured the electron temperature of two types of targets: bags of gas and hohlraums, Au cylinders with laser entrance holes in the flat ends. By comparing data from different targets, they examine the time-dependence of spectroscopic plasma diagnostics.

  13. Spectroscopic and Interferometric Measurements of Nine K Giant Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baines, Ellyn K.; Döllinger, Michaela P.; Guenther, Eike W.; Hatzes, Artie P.; Hrudkovu, Marie; van Belle, Gerard T.

    2016-09-01

    We present spectroscopic and interferometric measurements for a sample of nine K giant stars. These targets are of particular interest because they are slated for stellar oscillation observations. Our improved parameters will directly translate into reduced errors in the final masses for these stars when interferometric radii and asteroseismic densities are combined. Here, we determine each star’s limb-darkened angular diameter, physical radius, luminosity, bolometric flux, effective temperature, surface gravity, metallicity, and mass. When we compare our interferometric and spectroscopic results, we find no systematic offsets in the diameters and the values generally agree within the errors. Our interferometric temperatures for seven of the nine stars are hotter than those determined from spectroscopy with an average difference of about 380 K.

  14. Urban ozone measurements using differential optical absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Morales, J A; Treacy, J; Coffey, S

    2004-05-01

    In order to improve the air quality in Europe the European Commission has issued a number of directives with regard to acceptable levels of a range of gaseous pollutants, which includes ozone. Therefore, monitoring of this compound is necessary to comply with EU legislation, to provide improved pollution warnings for those who are sensitive to air pollutants as well as providing valuable data for environmental planning. Open-path spectroscopic techniques, such as differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS), are ideal for monitoring pollutants because of the advantages they offer over classical methods and point-source analysers. A DOAS system has been installed in Dublin city centre to monitor a range of criteria pollutants including ozone. Observations of urban background ozone concentrations are presented. The measurements are compared with those obtained using a UV point-source analyser and are presented in the context of the current EU directive. The influence of trans-boundary pollution from mainland Europe leading to ozone episodes is also discussed. Observations of high ozone during this measurement campaign coincided with the influx of photochemically polluted air masses which originated over continental Europe. For the analysed time interval, the data suggest that the ground ozone level in Dublin might be significantly influenced by long-range transport from the United Kingdom and continental Europe.

  15. Spectroscopic measurement of radiation of high-pressure mercury discharge lamps

    SciTech Connect

    Fu Ling; Leutz, Ralf; Ries, Harald

    2005-06-15

    Compact size and high efficiency are important features for projection systems. As the most often used sources for projection optics, short arc lamps are characterized by their impressive economy and the ability to produce extremely bright light from small dimensional sources. In this contribution the old principle of back reflection towards the sources is applied to a high-pressure mercury discharge lamp with a reflector to improve the radiance of the source by 35% at a certain reduced solid angle. Increasing the optical thickness of sources is equivalent to reducing the total phase space (etendue) of emitted radiation by the same factor, which is very useful for compacting sources. In addition, by comparing the forward radiation and the back-reflected radiation obtained from spectroscopic measurements, we calculate the absorptivity, emissivity, absorption, and emission coefficients of the plasma of the arc lamp based on Kirchhoff's Law and Planck's equation which is necessary for determining its temperature and pressure.

  16. Active spectroscopic measurements using the ITER diagnostic system

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, D. M.; Counsell, G.; Johnson, D.; Vasu, P.; Zvonkov, A.

    2010-10-15

    Active (beam-based) spectroscopic measurements are intended to provide a number of crucial parameters for the ITER device being built in Cadarache, France. These measurements include the determination of impurity ion temperatures, absolute densities, and velocity profiles, as well as the determination of the plasma current density profile. Because ITER will be the first experiment to study long timescale ({approx}1 h) fusion burn plasmas, of particular interest is the ability to study the profile of the thermalized helium ash resulting from the slowing down and confinement of the fusion alphas. These measurements will utilize both the 1 MeV heating neutral beams and a dedicated 100 keV hydrogen diagnostic neutral beam. A number of separate instruments are being designed and built by several of the ITER partners to meet the different spectroscopic measurement needs and to provide the maximum physics information. In this paper, we describe the planned measurements, the intended diagnostic ensemble, and we will discuss specific physics and engineering challenges for these measurements in ITER.

  17. Spectroscopic method for determination of the absorption coefficient in brain tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johansson, Johannes D.

    2010-09-01

    I use Monte Carlo simulations and phantom measurements to characterize a probe with adjacent optical fibres for diffuse reflectance spectroscopy during stereotactic surgery in the brain. Simulations and measurements have been fitted to a modified Beer-Lambert model for light transport in order to be able to quantify chromophore content based on clinically measured spectra in brain tissue. It was found that it is important to take the impact of the light absorption into account when calculating the apparent optical path length, lp, for the photons in order to get good estimates of the absorption coefficient, μa. The optical path length was found to be well fitted to the equation lp=a+b ln(Is)+c ln(μa)+d ln(Is)ln(μa), where Is is the reflected light intensity for scattering alone (i.e., zero absorption). Although coefficients a-d calculated in this study are specific to the probe used here, the general form of the equation should be applicable to similar probes.

  18. Confocal Light Absorption and Scattering Spectroscopic (CLASS) imaging: From cancer detection to sub-cellular function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Le

    Light scattering spectroscopy (LSS), an optical technique that relates the spectroscopic properties of light elastically scattered by small particles to their size, refractive index and shape, has been recently successfully employed for sensing morphological and biochemical properties of epithelial tissues and cells in vivo. LSS does not require exogenous markers, is non-invasive, and, due to its multispectral nature, can sense biological structures well beyond the diffraction limit. All that makes LSS be a very good candidate to be used both in clinical medicine for in vivo detection of disease and in cell biology to monitor cell function on the organelle scale. Recently we developed two LSS-based imaging modalities: clinical Polarized LSS (PLSS) Endoscopic Technique for locating early pre-cancerous changes in GI tract and Confocal Light Absorption and Scattering Spectroscopic (CLASS) Microscopy for studying cells in vivo without exogenous markers. One important application of the clinical PLSS endoscopic instrument, a noncontact scanning imaging device compatible with the standard clinical endoscopes and capable of detecting dysplastic changes, is to serve as a guide for biopsy in Barrett's esophagus (BE). The instrument detects parallel and perpendicular components of the polarized light, backscattered from epithelial tissues, and determines characteristics of epithelial nuclei from the residual spectra. It also can find tissue oxygenation, hemoglobin content and other properties from the diffuse light component. By rapidly scanning esophagus the PLSS endoscopic instrument makes sure the entire BE portion is scanned and examined for the presence of dysplasia. CLASS microscopy, on the other hand, combines principles of light scattering spectroscopy (LSS) with confocal microscopy. Its main purpose is to image cells on organelle scale in vivo without the use of exogenous labels which may affect the cell function. The confocal geometry selects specific region and

  19. Infrared spectroscopic measurements relevant to atmospheric remote sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Varanasi, Prasad; Gopalan, Arun

    1993-01-01

    SF6 is a synthetic chemical which is used in many industrial applications and as a meteorological tracer. This paper describes determinations of spectral absorption coefficients k-nu of SF6 measured in the central Q-branches of the nu(3)-fundamental at 947/cm at various temperature-pressure combinations representing tangent heights in solar-occultation experiments or layers in the atmosphere. Spectral data were also obtained for C2H4 and NH3 fundamental bands. Measurements were made with the Doppler-limited spectral resolution of a tunable diode laser spectrometer with a cryogenically cooled absorption cell, described by Varanasi and Chudamani (1992).

  20. Recent spectroscopic measurements of NOx in the lower stratosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Goldman, A.; Murcray, D.G.

    1982-01-01

    High resolution (0.02 and 0.06 per cm) Fourier transform airborne systems were used for measurements of long path atmospheric absorption spectra, covering many of the NOx infrared bands. Atmospheric emission measurements with liquid helium cooled grating spectrometer systems at 0.5 per cm resolution were also carried out from different altitudes in the NOx bands region. Analysis of the absorption and emission spectra provides quantification of NOx in the lower stratosphere at different latitudes and seasons, as well as diurnal variability.

  1. Molar Absorptivity Measurements in Absorbing Solvents: Impact on Solvent Absorptivity Values.

    PubMed

    Bohman, Ariel; Arnold, Mark A

    2016-10-18

    Molar absorptivity is a fundamental molecular property that quantifies absorption strength as a function of wavelength. Absolute measurements of molar absorptivity demand accounting for all mechanisms of light attenuation, including reflective losses at interfaces associated with the sample. Ideally, such measurements are performed in nonabsorbing solvents and reflective losses can be determined in a straightforward manner from Fresnel equations or effectively accounted for by path length difference methods. At near-infrared wavelengths, however, many solvents, including water, are absorbing which complicates the quantification of reflective losses. Here, generalized equations are developed for calculating absolute molar absorptivities of neat liquids wherein the dependency of reflective loss on absorption properties of the liquid are considered explicitly. The resulting equations are used to characterize sensitivity of absolute molar absorptivity measurements for solvents to the absorption strength of the solvent as well as the path length of the measurement. Methods are derived from these equations to properly account for reflective losses in general and the effectiveness of these methods is demonstrated for absolute molar absorptivity measurements for water over the combination region (5000-4000 cm(-1)) of the near-infrared spectrum. Results indicate that ignoring solvent absorption effects can incorporate wide ranging systematic errors depending upon experimental conditions. As an example, systematic errors range from 0 to 10% for common conditions used in the measurement of absolute molar absorptivity of water over the combination region of the near-infrared spectrum.

  2. Surface ozone measurements using differential absorption lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, Sohan L.; Arya, B. C.; Ghude, Sachin D.; Arora, Arun K.; Sinha, Randhir K.

    2005-01-01

    Human activities have been influencing the global atmosphere since the beginning of the industrial era, causing shifts from its natural state. The measurements have shown that tropospheric ozone is increasing gradually due to anthropogenic activities. Surface ozone is a secondary pollutant, its concentration in lower troposphere depends upon its precursors (CO, CH4, non methane hydrocarbons, NOx) as well as weather and transport phenomenon. The surface ozone exceeding the ambient air quality standard is health hazard to human being, animal and vegetation. The regular information of its concentrations on ground levels is needed for setting ambient air quality objectives and understanding photo chemical air pollution in urban areas. A Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL) using a tunable CO2 laser has been designed and developed at National Physical Laboratory, New Delhi, to monitor water vapour, surface ozone, ammonia, ethylene etc. Some times ethylene and surface ozone was found to be more than 40 ppb and 140 ppb respectively which is a health hazard. Seasonal variation in ozone concentrations shows maximum in the months of summer and autumn and minimum in monsoon and winter months. In present communication salient features of experimental set up and results obtained will be presented in detail.

  3. Spectroscopic investigation of amber color silicate glasses and factors affecting the amber related absorption bands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morsi, Morsi M.; El-sherbiny, Samya I.; Mohamed, Karam M.

    2015-06-01

    The effects of carbon, Fe2O3 and Na2SO4 contents on the amber color of glass with composition (wt%) 64.3 SiO2, 25.7 CaO, 10 Na2O were studied. The effect of some additives that could be found in glass batch or cullets on the amber related absorption band(s) was also studied. An amber related absorption band due to the chromophore Fe3+O3S2- was recorded at 420 nm with shoulder at 440 nm. A second amber related band recorded at 474 nm with shoulder at 483 nm was assigned to FeS. Increasing melting time at 1400 °C up to 6 h caused fainting of the amber color, decreases the intensities of the amber related bands and shifted the first band to 406 nm. Addition of ZnO, Cu2O and NaNO3 to the glass produced decolorizing effect and vanishing of the amber related bands. The effects of melting time and these additives were explained on the bases of destruction the amber chromophore and its conversion into Fe3+ in tetrahedral sites or ZnS. Addition of Se intensifies the amber related bands and may cause dark coloration due to the formation of Se° and polyselenide. Amber color can be monitored through measuring the absorption in the range 406-420 nm.

  4. Spectroscopic investigation of amber color silicate glasses and factors affecting the amber related absorption bands.

    PubMed

    Morsi, Morsi M; El-Sherbiny, Samya I; Mohamed, Karam M

    2015-06-15

    The effects of carbon, Fe2O3 and Na2SO4 contents on the amber color of glass with composition (wt%) 64.3 SiO2, 25.7 CaO, 10 Na2O were studied. The effect of some additives that could be found in glass batch or cullets on the amber related absorption band(s) was also studied. An amber related absorption band due to the chromophore Fe(3+)O3S(2-) was recorded at 420 nm with shoulder at 440 nm. A second amber related band recorded at 474 nm with shoulder at 483 nm was assigned to FeS. Increasing melting time at 1400°C up to 6h caused fainting of the amber color, decreases the intensities of the amber related bands and shifted the first band to 406 nm. Addition of ZnO, Cu2O and NaNO3 to the glass produced decolorizing effect and vanishing of the amber related bands. The effects of melting time and these additives were explained on the bases of destruction the amber chromophore and its conversion into Fe(3+) in tetrahedral sites or ZnS. Addition of Se intensifies the amber related bands and may cause dark coloration due to the formation of Se° and polyselenide. Amber color can be monitored through measuring the absorption in the range 406-420 nm. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Optical spectroscopic and 2MASS measurements of Stephenson Halpha stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maheswar, G.; Manoj, P.; Bhatt, H. C.

    2003-05-01

    We present the results of spectroscopic observations for 52 objects from the list of Halpha emission stars of Stephenson (\\cite{Ste86}). Out of six known T Tauri stars observed, five showed Halpha in emission and in one (StHa 40), Halpha changed from being in absorption to emission over a period of two years, accompanied by photometric and spectral type variability. We confirm the T Tauri nature of one Stephenson object (StHa 48) on the basis of the presence of Halpha and Hbeta in emission, Li I lambda6708 in absorption, infrared excess and X-ray emission. Among the 52 objects observed, there were other emission line objects: 1 Ke star, 1 BQ[ ] star, 2 galaxies and 2 Be stars. We present a higher-resolution spectrum of StHa 62 showing permitted and forbidden lines in emission typical of BQ[ ] stars. Twenty five out of 30 newly observed objects failed to show Halpha in emission. We also present 2MASS observations for 112 StHa objects. We suggest three Stephenson objects (StHa 52, 125 and 129) to be YSOs on the basis of 2MASS, IRAS and ROSAT observations. These and all other known YSOs amongst StHa stars are found in regions of star-forming clouds in Taurus, Orion and Ophiuchus. YSOs at high galactic latitudes in other parts of the sky are therefore rare. Table 2 is only available in electronic form at the CDS via anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsweb.u-strasbg.fr/cgi-bin/qcat?J/A+A/402/963

  6. Theoretical modeling of the spectroscopic absorption properties of luciferin and oxyluciferin: A critical comparison with recent experimental studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anselmi, Massimiliano; Marocchi, Simone; Aschi, Massimiliano; Amadei, Andrea

    2012-01-01

    Firefly luciferin and its oxidated form, oxyluciferin, are two heterocyclic compounds involved in the enzymatic reaction, catalyzed by redox proteins called luciferases, which provides the bioluminescence in a wide group of arthropods. Whereas the electronic absorption spectra of D-luciferin in water at different pHs are known since 1960s, only recently reliable experimental electronic spectra of oxyluciferin have become available. In addition oxyluciferin is involved in a triple chemical equilibria (deprotonation of the two hydroxyl groups and keto-enol tautomerism of the 4-hydroxythiazole ring), that obligates to select during an experiment a predominant species, tuning pH or solvent polarity besides introducing chemical modifications. In this study we report the absorption spectra of luciferin and oxyluciferin in each principal chemical form, calculated by means of perturbed matrix method (PMM), which allowed us to successfully introduce the effect of the solvent on the spectroscopic absorption properties, and compare the result with available experimental data.

  7. Operando soft X-ray absorption spectroscopic study on a solid oxide fuel cell cathode during electrochemical oxygen reduction.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Takashi; Oike, Ryo; Kimura, Yuta; Tamenori, Yusuke; Kawada, Tatsuya; Amezawa, Koji

    2017-03-16

    Operando soft X-ray absorption spectroscopic technique, which could analyze electronic structures of the electrode materials at elevated temperature and controlled atmosphere under electrochemical polarization, was established and its availability was demonstrated by investigating electronic structural changes of an La2NiO4+d dense film electrode during electrochemical oxygen reduction reaction. Clear O K-edge and Ni L-edge X-ray absorption spectra could be obtained below 773 K in fully atmospheric pressure of 100 ppm O2-He, 0.1% O2-He and 1% O2-He gas mixtures. By the PO2 change and the application of electrical potential, considerable spectral changes were observed in O K-edge X-ray absorption spectra while only small spectral changes were observed in Ni L-edge X-ray absorption spectra. Pre-edge peak of the O K-edge X-ray absorption spectra, which reflects the unoccupied pDOS of Ni3d-O2p hybridization, increased/deceased with cathodic/anodic polarization, respectively. The electronic structural changes of the outermost orbital of the electrode material due to electrochemical polarization were successfully confirmed by the operando X-ray absorption spectroscopy developed in this study.

  8. Photothermal measurement of optical surface absorption using strain transducers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leslie, D. H.; Trusty, G. L.

    1981-09-01

    We discuss the measurement of small optical surface absorption coefficients. A demonstration experiment was performed using a metallurgical strain gauge to measure 488 nm absorption on the surface of a glass plate. A strain of 10 to the minus 8th power resulted from absorption of 0.3 watts. The results are interpreted and the sensitivity of a proposed fiber optic strain gauge is discussed.

  9. Measuring liquid crystal anchoring energy strength by spectroscopic ellipsometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marino, A.; Tkachenko, V.; Santamato, E.; Bennis, N.; Quintana, X.; Otón, J. M.; Abbate, G.

    2010-04-01

    We describe an experimental procedure for accurate measurement of anchoring energy strength of liquid crystal cells. This technique is based on the possibility of gathering a large amount of very precise data about the linear optical response of the cell in different experimental conditions, using spectroscopic ellipsometry. Then, a careful data analysis exploiting data inversion method, supplemented by simulations from the elastic theory, is able to provide the searched information. The technique has been applied to vertical aligned nematic cells, chosen for its widespread use in the present display market. The results obtained in this particular case together with a thorough comparison with existing alternative techniques, suggest that our technique can be an optimum candidate for the industrial implementation of such measurement. A particular example is fully worked out, giving a result with a precision of 1.5% and an accuracy of 10%.

  10. Infrared spectroscopic measurement of skin hydration and sebum levels and comparison to corneometer and sebumeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ezerskaia, Anna; Pereira, S. F.; Urbach, H. P.; Varghese, Babu

    2016-05-01

    Skin health characterized by a system of water and lipids in Stratum Corneum provide protection from harmful external elements and prevent trans-epidermal water loss. Skin hydration (moisture) and sebum (skin surface lipids) are considered to be important factors in skin health; a right balance between these components is an indication of skin health and plays a central role in protecting and preserving skin integrity. In this manuscript we present an infrared spectroscopic method for simultaneous and quantitative measurement of skin hydration and sebum levels utilizing differential detection with three wavelengths 1720, 1750, and 1770 nm, corresponding to the lipid vibrational bands that lie "in between" the prominent water absorption bands. The skin sebum and hydration values on the forehead under natural conditions and its variations to external stimuli were measured using our experimental set-up. The experimental results obtained with the optical set-up show good correlation with the results obtained with the commercially available instruments Corneometer and Sebumeter.

  11. Measurement of CO2 concentration at high-temperature based on tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jiuying; Li, Chuanrong; Zhou, Mei; Liu, Jianguo; Kan, Ruifeng; Xu, Zhenyu

    2017-01-01

    A diode laser sensor based on absorption spectroscopy has been developed for sensitive measurement of CO2 concentration at high-temperature. Measurement of CO2 can provide information about the extent of combustion and mix in a combustor that may be used to improve fuel efficiency. Most methods of in-situ combustion measurement of CO2 use the spectroscopic parameters taken from database like HITEMP which is mainly derived from the theoretical calculation and remains a high degree of uncertainty in the spectroscopic parameters. A fiber-coupled diode laser system for measurement of CO2 in combustion environment by use of the high-temperature spectroscopic parameters which are obtained by experiment was proposed. Survey spectra of the R(50) line of CO2 at 5007.787 cm-1 were recorded at high-temperature and various pressures to determine line intensities. The line intensities form the theoretical foundation for future applications of this diode laser sensor system. Survey spectra of four test gas mixtures containing 5.01%CO2, 10.01%CO2, 20.08%CO2, and 49.82%CO2 were measured to verify the accuracy of the diode laser sensor system. The measured results indicate that this sensor can measure CO2 concentration with 2% uncertainty in high temperatures.

  12. Quantitative photoacoustic measurement of tissue optical absorption spectrum aided by an optical contrast agent.

    PubMed

    Rajian, Justin Rajesh; Carson, Paul L; Wang, Xueding

    2009-03-16

    In photoacoustic imaging, the intensity of photoacoustic signal induced by optical absorption in biological tissue is proportional to light energy deposition, which is the product of the absorption coefficient and the local light fluence. Because tissue optical properties are highly dependent on the wavelength, the spectrum of the local light fluence at a target tissue beneath the sample surface is different than the spectrum of the incident light fluence. Therefore, quantifying the tissue optical absorption spectrum by using a photoacoustic technique is not feasible without the knowledge of the local light fluence. In this work, a highly accurate photoacoustic measurement of the subsurface tissue optical absorption spectrum has been achieved for the first time by introducing an extrinsic optical contrast agent with known optical properties. From the photoacoustic measurements with and without the contrast agent, a quantified measurement of the chromophore absorption spectrum can be realized in a strongly scattering medium. Experiments on micro-flow vessels containing fresh canine blood buried in phantoms and chicken breast tissues were carried out in a wavelength range from 680 nm to 950 nm. Spectroscopic photoacoustic measurements of both oxygenated and deoxygenated blood specimens presented an improved match with the references when employing this technique.

  13. Spectroscopic measurements of high frequency plasma in supercritical carbon dioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Maehara, T.; Mukasa, S.; Takemori, T.; Watanabe, T.; Kurokawa, K.; Toyota, H.; Nomura, S.; Kawashima, A.; Iwamae, A.

    2009-03-15

    Spectroscopic measurements of high frequency (hf) plasma were performed under high pressure conditions (5 and 7 MPa) and supercritical (sc) CO{sub 2} conditions (8-20 MPa). Temperature evaluated from C{sub 2} Swan bands (d {sup 3}{pi}{sub g}{yields}a {sup 3}{pi}{sub u}) increased from 3600 to 4600 K with an increase in pressure. The first observation of broadening and shifting of the O I line profile (3p {sup 5} P{sub 3,2,1}{yields}3s {sup 5} S{sub 2}{sup 0}) of hf plasma under sc CO{sub 2} conditions was carried out. However, the origin of broadening and the shifting cannot be understood because the present theory explaining them is not valid for such high pressure conditions.

  14. X-ray diffraction and absorption spectroscopic studies of copper mixed ligand complexes with aminophenol as one of the ligands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, A.; Jain, Garima; Patil, H.

    2012-05-01

    X-ray diffraction (XRD) and X-ray absorption spectroscopic (XAS) studies have been conducted on two copper complexes, i.e., copper macrocyclic complex of succinic acid and ortho aminophenol (complex-1) and copper macrocyclic complex of pthalic acid and ortho aminophenol (complex-2). The diffraction pattern of the complexes have been recorded using Rigaku RINT-2000 X-ray diffractometer equipped with rotating anode X-ray tube operated at 40 kV and 100 mA. The X-ray absorption spectra of the complexes have been recorded at the K-edge of copper on Cauchois type bent crystal spectrograph having radius 0.4 m employing a mica crystal, oriented to reflect from (100) planes, for dispersion. The X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) parameters, viz., chemical shift, energy position of the principal absorption maximum and edge-width have been determined and discussed. From the extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) data, the bond lengths have been calculated using three methods, namely, Levy's method, Lytle, Sayers and Stern's (LSS) method and Fourier transformation method. The results obtained have been compared with each other and discussed.

  15. Combined Mössbauer spectroscopic, multi-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopic, and density functional theoretical study of the radical SAM enzyme spore photoproduct lyase.

    PubMed

    Silver, Sunshine C; Gardenghi, David J; Naik, Sunil G; Shepard, Eric M; Huynh, Boi Hanh; Szilagyi, Robert K; Broderick, Joan B

    2014-03-01

    Spore photoproduct lyase (SPL), a member of the radical S-adenosyl-L-methionine (SAM) superfamily, catalyzes the direct reversal of the spore photoproduct, a thymine dimer specific to bacterial spores, to two thymines. SPL requires SAM and a redox-active [4Fe-4S] cluster for catalysis. Mössbauer analysis of anaerobically purified SPL indicates the presence of a mixture of cluster states with the majority (40 %) as [2Fe-2S](2+) clusters and a smaller amount (15 %) as [4Fe-4S](2+) clusters. On reduction, the cluster content changes to primarily (60 %) [4Fe-4S](+). The speciation information from Mössbauer data allowed us to deconvolute iron and sulfur K-edge X-ray absorption spectra to uncover electronic (X-ray absorption near-edge structure, XANES) and geometric (extended X-ray absorption fine structure, EXAFS) structural features of the Fe-S clusters, and their interactions with SAM. The iron K-edge EXAFS data provide evidence for elongation of a [2Fe-2S] rhomb of the [4Fe-4S] cluster on binding SAM on the basis of an Fe···Fe scatterer at 3.0 Å. The XANES spectra of reduced SPL in the absence and presence of SAM overlay one another, indicating that SAM is not undergoing reductive cleavage. The X-ray absorption spectroscopy data for SPL samples and data for model complexes from the literature allowed the deconvolution of contributions from [2Fe-2S] and [4Fe-4S] clusters to the sulfur K-edge XANES spectra. The analysis of pre-edge features revealed electronic changes in the Fe-S clusters as a function of the presence of SAM. The spectroscopic findings were further corroborated by density functional theory calculations that provided insights into structural and electronic perturbations that can be correlated by considering the role of SAM as a catalyst or substrate.

  16. [Measurement and analysis of absorption spectrum of human blood].

    PubMed

    Zhao, Zhi-Min; Xin, Yu-Jun; Wang, Le-Xin; Zhu, Wei-Hua; Zheng, Min; Guo, Xin

    2008-01-01

    The present paper puts forward a method of disease diagnosis by using the technology of spectrum analysis of human blood serum. The generation mechanism of absorption spectrum is explained and the absorption spectra of the normal blood serum and the sick blood serum are listed from the experiments of absorption spectrometry. Though the value of absorbency of the sick blood serum is almost equal to that of the normal blood serum in the most absorption spectra, there are some differences around 278 nm in the absorption spectrum. The absorbency of the blood serum with hyperglycemia is greater than that of the normal blood serum at 285 nm in the spectrum, and besides, there comes a peak shift of absorption with hyperglycemia. In the absorption spectrum of the blood serum with hypercholesterolemia, there is a clear absorption peak at 414 nm. However there is not any peak at that wavelength in the absorption spectrum of the normal blood serum. Through comparing the characters of the spectrum, we can judge if the blood sample is or not, and this blood analysis is a new method for the diagnosis of disease. Compared with other methods of blood measurements, the method of absorption spectrum analysis of blood serum presented in this paper, is more convenient for measurement, simpler for analysis, and easier to popularize.

  17. Spectroscopic measurement of the softness of ultracold atomic collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coslovsky, Jonathan; Afek, Gadi; Mil, Alexander; Almog, Ido; Davidson, Nir

    2017-09-01

    The softness of elastic atomic collisions, defined as the average number of collisions each atom undergoes until its energy decorrelates significantly, can have a considerable effect on the decay dynamics of atomic coherence. In this paper we combine two spectroscopic methods to measure these dynamics and obtain the collisional softness of ultracold atoms in an optical trap: Ramsey spectroscopy to measure the energy decorrelation rate and echo spectroscopy to measure the collision rate. We obtain a value of 2.5(3) for the collisional softness, in good agreement with previously reported numerical molecular-dynamics simulations. This fundamental quantity is used to determine the s -wave scattering lengths of different atoms but has not been directly measured. We further show that the decay dynamics of the revival amplitudes in the echo experiment has a transition in its functional decay. The transition time is related to the softness of the collisions and provides yet another way to approximate it. These conclusions are supported by Monte Carlo simulations of the full echo dynamics. The methods presented here can allow measurement of a generalized softness parameter for other two-level quantum systems with discrete spectral fluctuations.

  18. Application of Spectroscopic Doppler Velocimetry for Measurement of Streamwise Vorticity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fagan, Amy; Zaman, Khairul B.; Elam, Kristie A.; Clem, Michelle M.

    2013-01-01

    A spectroscopic Doppler velocimetry technique has been developed for measuring two transverse components of velocity and hence streamwise vorticity in free jet flows. The nonintrusive optical measurement system uses Mie scattering from a 200 mW green continuous-wave laser interacting with dust and other tracer particulates naturally present in the air flow to measure the velocities. Scattered light is collected in two opposing directions to provide measurements of two orthogonal velocity components. An air-spaced Fabry-Perot interferometer is used for spectral analysis to determine the optical frequency shift between the incident laser light and the Mie scattered light. This frequency shift is directly proportional to the velocity component in the direction of the bisector of the incident and scattered light wave propagation vectors. Data were acquired for jet Mach numbers of 1.73 and 0.99 using a convergent 1.27-cm diameter round nozzle fitted with a single triangular "delta-tab". The velocity components and the streamwise vorticity calculated from the measurements are presented. The results demonstrate the ability of this novel optical system to obtain velocity and vorticity data without any artificial seeding and using a low power laser system.

  19. Improved Sensitivity of Spectroscopic Quantification of Stable Isotope Content Using Capillary Absorption Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moran, J.; Wilcox Freeburg, E.; Kriesel, J.; Linley, T. J.; Kelly, J.; Coleman, M. L.; Christensen, L. E.; Vance, S.

    2016-12-01

    Spectroscopy-based platforms have recently risen to the forefront for making stable isotope measurements of methane, carbon dioxide, water, or other analytes. These spectroscopy systems can be relatively straightforward to operate (versus a mass spectrometry platform), largely relieve the analyst of mass interference artifacts, and many can be used in the field. Despite these significant advantages, however, existing spectroscopy techniques suffer from a lack of measurement sensitivity that can ultimately limit select applications including spatially resolved and compound-specific measurements. Here we present a capillary absorption spectroscopy (CAS) system that is designed to mitigate sensitivity issues in spectroscopy-based stable isotope evaluation. The system uses mid-wave infrared excitation generated from a continuous wave quantum cascade laser. Importantly, the sample `chamber' is a flexible capillary with a total volume of less than one cc. Proprietary coatings on the internal surface of the fiber improve optical performance, guiding the light to a detector and facilitating high levels of interaction between the laser beam and gaseous analytes. We present data demonstrating that a tapered hollow fiber cell, with an internal diameter that broadens toward the detector, reduces optical feedback to further improve measurement sensitivity. Sensitivity of current hollow fiber / CAS systems enable measurements of only 10's of picomoles CO2 while theoretical improvements should enable measurements of as little as 10's of femtomoles. Continued optimization of sample introduction and improvements to optical feedback are being explored. Software is being designed to provide rapid integration of data and generation of processed isotope measurements using a graphical user interface. Taken together, the sensitivity improvements of the CAS system under development could, when coupled to a laser ablation sampling device, enable up to 2 µm spatial resolution (roughly the

  20. Examination of the Measurement of Absorption Using the Reverberant Room Method for Highly Absorptive Acoustic Foam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes, William O.; McNelis, Anne M.; Chris Nottoli; Eric Wolfram

    2015-01-01

    The absorption coefficient for material specimens are needed to quantify the expected acoustic performance of that material in its actual usage and environment. The ASTM C423-09a standard, "Standard Test Method for Sound Absorption and Sound Absorption Coefficients by the Reverberant Room Method" is often used to measure the absorption coefficient of material test specimens. This method has its basics in the Sabine formula. Although widely used, the interpretation of these measurements are a topic of interest. For example, in certain cases the measured Sabine absorption coefficients are greater than 1.0 for highly absorptive materials. This is often attributed to the diffraction edge effect phenomenon. An investigative test program to measure the absorption properties of highly absorbent melamine foam has been performed at the Riverbank Acoustical Laboratories. This paper will present and discuss the test results relating to the effect of the test materials' surface area, thickness and edge sealing conditions. A follow-on paper is envisioned that will present and discuss the results relating to the spacing between multiple piece specimens, and the mounting condition of the test specimen.

  1. Airborne differential absorption lidar system for measurements of atmospheric water vapor and aerosols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carter, Arlen F.; Allen, Robert J.; Mayo, M. Neale; Butler, Carolyn F.; Grossman, Benoist E.; Ismail, Syed; Grant, William B.; Browell, Edward V.; Higdon, Noah S.; Mayor, Shane D.; hide

    1994-01-01

    An airborne differential absorption lidar (DIAL) system has been developed at the NASA Langley Research Center for remote measurements of atmospheric water vapor (H2O) and aerosols. A solid-state alexandrite laser with a 1-pm linewidth and greater than 99.85% spectral purity was used as the on-line transmitter. Solid-state avalanche photodiode detector technology has replaced photomultiplier tubes in the receiver system, providing an average increase by a factor of 1.5-2.5 in the signal-to-noise ratio of the H2O measurement. By incorporating advanced diagnostic and data-acquisition instrumentation into other subsystems, we achieved additional improvements in system operational reliability and measurement accuracy. Laboratory spectroscopic measurements of H2O absorption-line parameters were performed to reduce the uncertainties in our knowledge of the absorption cross sections. Line-center H2O absorption cross sections were determined, with errors of 3-6%, for more than 120 lines in the 720-nm region. Flight tests of the system were conducted during 1989-1991 on the NASA Wallops Flight Facility Electra aircraft, and extensive intercomparison measurements were performed with dew-point hygrometers and H2O radiosondes. The H2O distributions measured with the DIAL system differed by less than 10% from the profiles determined with the in situ probes in a variety of atmospheric conditions.

  2. Airborne differential absorption lidar system for measurements of atmospheric water vapor and aerosols.

    PubMed

    Higdon, N S; Browell, E V; Ponsardin, P; Grossmann, B E; Butler, C F; Chyba, T H; Mayo, M N; Allen, R J; Heuser, A W; Grant, W B; Ismail, S; Mayor, S D; Carter, A F

    1994-09-20

    An airborne differential absorption lidar (DIAL) system has been developed at the NASA Langley Research Center for remote measurements of atmospheric water vapor (H(2)O) and aerosols. A solid-state alexandrite laser with a 1-pm linewidth and > 99.85% spectral purity was used as the on-line transmitter. Solid-state avalanche photodiode detector technology has replaced photomultiplier tubes in the receiver system, providing an average increase by a factor of 1.5-2.5 in the signal-to-noise ratio of the H(2)O measurement. By incorporating advanced diagnostic and data-acquisition instrumentation into other subsystems, we achieved additional improvements in system operational reliability and measurement accuracy. Laboratory spectroscopic measurements of H(2)O absorption-line parameters were perfo med to reduce the uncertainties in our knowledge of the absorption cross sections. Line-center H(2)O absorption cross sections were determined, with errors of 3-6%, for more than 120 lines in the 720-nm region. Flight tests of the system were conducted during 1989-1991 on the NASA Wallops Flight Facility Electra aircraft, and extensive intercomparison measurements were performed with dew-point hygrometers and H(2)O radiosondes. The H(2)O distributions measured with the DIAL system differed by ≤ 10% from the profiles determined with the in situ probes in a variety of atmospheric conditions.

  3. Artificial absorption creation for more accurate tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Wei; Chang, Jun; Cao, Lihua; Liu, Yuanyuan; Chen, Xi; Zhu, Cunguang; Qin, Zengguang

    2017-09-01

    A novel strategy for more accurate tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (TDLAS) measurement is presented. This method is immune to non-absorption transmission losses, and allows dead zone removal for ultra-low concentration detection, and reference point selection at atmospheric pressure. The method adjusts laser emission and creates artificial absorption peaks according to requirements. By creating an artificial absorption peak next to the real absorption zone, calibration is not necessary. The developed method can be applied to not only wavelength modulation spectroscopy (WMS) but also direct absorption (DA). In WMS, the method does not need two harmonic signals, resulting in higher reliability, better performance, and no electro-optical gain uncertainty. At the same time, non-absorption transmission losses effect is suppressed from 70% to 0.425% with DA and from 70% to 0.225% with WMS method. When the artificial absorption peak coincides with the real one, the dead zone of measurement can be removed to give a lower detection limit, and water vapor still can be detected when concentration is lower than 0.2 ppm in our experiment. Reference point selection uncertainty with the DA method, especially when the signal-to-noise ratio is low and absorption line is broad, can also be facilitated. And the uncertainty of reference point selection is improved from 6% to 0.8% by measuring reference point amplitude. The method is demonstrated and validated by WMS and DA measurements of water vapor (1 atm, 296 K, 1368.597 nm). The measurement results obtained using the new method reveal its promise in TDLAS.

  4. Review of spectroscopic parameters for upper atmospheric measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, M. A. H. (Editor)

    1985-01-01

    The workshop included communication of spectroscopic data requirements for the planned upper atmosphere research satellite (UARS) mission, review of the status of currently available spectroscopic parameters, and recommendation of additional studies. The objectives were accomplished and resulted in a series of general and specific recommendations for laboratory spectroscopy research to meet the needs of UARS and other atmospheric remote sensing programs.

  5. Quantum cascade laser absorption spectroscopy of UF6 at 7.74 μm for analytical uranium enrichment measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewicki, Rafal; Kosterev, Anatoliy A.; Toor, Fatima; Yao, Yu; Gmachl, Claire; Tsai, Tracy; Wysocki, Gerard; Wang, Xiaojun; Troccoli, Mariano; Fong, Mary; Tittel, Frank K.

    2010-01-01

    The ν1+ν3 combination band of uranium hexafluoride (UF6) is targeted to perform analytical enrichment measurements using laser absorption spectroscopy. A high performance widely tunable EC-QCL sources emitting radiation at 7.74 μm (1291 cm-1) is employed as an UF6-LAS optical source to measure the unresolved rotational-vibrational spectral structure of several tens of wavenumbers (cm-1). A preliminary spectroscopic measurement based on a direct laser absorption spectroscopy of methane (CH4) as an appropriate UF6 analyte simulant, was demonstrated.

  6. Development of instrumentation for differential spectroscopic measurements at millimeter wavelengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Alessandro, G.; de Bernardis, P.; Masi, S.; Schillaci, A.

    2016-07-01

    The study of the spectral-spatial anisotropy of the high-latitude mm-wave sky is a powerful tool of cosmology. It can be used to provide deep insight in the Sunyaev-Zeldovich (SZ) effect, the Cosmic Infrared Background, the anisotropy of the CMB, using the spectral dimension to provide substantially increased information with respect to what is achievable by means of standard multiband photometry. Here we focus on spectral measurements of the SZ effect. Large mm-wave telescopes are now routinely mapping photometrically the SZ effect in a number of clusters, estimating the comptonisation parameter and using them as cosmological probes. Low-resolution spectroscopic measurements of the SZ effect would be very effective in removing the degeneracy between parameters inevitable in photometric measurements. We describe a real-world implementation of this measurement strategy, based on an imaging, efficient, differential Fourier transform spectrometer (FTS). The instrument is based on a Martin-Puplett interferometer (MPI) configuration. We combined two MPIs working synchronously to use the entire input power. In our implementation the observed sky field is divided into two halves along the meridian. Each half-field corresponds to one of the two input ports of the MPI. Each detector in the FTS focal planes measures the difference in brightness between two sky pixels, symmetrically located with respect to the meridian. Exploiting the high common mode rejection of the MPI, tiny sky brightness gradients embedded in an overwhelming isotropic background might be measured. We investigate experimentally the common-mode rejection achievable in the MPI at mm wavelengths, and discuss the use of such an instrument to measure the spectrum of cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropy and the SZ effect.

  7. [Progress in Raman spectroscopic measurement of methane hydrate].

    PubMed

    Xu, Feng; Zhu, Li-hua; Wu, Qiang; Xu, Long-jun

    2009-09-01

    Complex thermodynamics and kinetics problems are involved in the methane hydrate formation and decomposition, and these problems are crucial to understanding the mechanisms of hydrate formation and hydrate decomposition. However, it was difficult to accurately obtain such information due to the difficulty of measurement since methane hydrate is only stable under low temperature and high pressure condition, and until recent years, methane hydrate has been measured in situ using Raman spectroscopy. Raman spectroscopy, a non-destructive and non-invasive technique, is used to study vibrational modes of molecules. Studies of methane hydrate using Raman spectroscopy have been developed over the last decade. The Raman spectra of CH4 in vapor phase and in hydrate phase are presented in this paper. The progress in the research on methane hydrate formation thermodynamics, formation kinetics, decomposition kinetics and decomposition mechanism based on Raman spectroscopic measurements in the laboratory and deep sea are reviewed. Formation thermodynamic studies, including in situ observation of formation condition of methane hydrate, analysis of structure, and determination of hydrate cage occupancy and hydration numbers by using Raman spectroscopy, are emphasized. In the aspect of formation kinetics, research on variation in hydrate cage amount and methane concentration in water during the growth of hydrate using Raman spectroscopy is also introduced. For the methane hydrate decomposition, the investigation associated with decomposition mechanism, the mutative law of cage occupancy ratio and the formulation of decomposition rate in porous media are described. The important aspects for future hydrate research based on Raman spectroscopy are discussed.

  8. The Comparison of Spectroscopic Measurements of the Solar Rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jejčič, S.; Čadež, A.

    We studied the velocity field on the surface of the Sun measured by the Doppler shift of Fraunhofer Sodium lines Na-D_{2} at 5891.583 Å, Na-D_{1} at 5897.557 Å and Nickel line Ni I at 5894.505 Å. All the spectroscopic measurements were done at Ljubljana observatory on September 9, 10, 13 and 14 1999 using double monochromator DFS-12. The calibration was done through five telluric water lines in the vicinity of Sodium lines. With respect to telluric water lines Fraunhofer lines were analysed and through their Doppler velocity we determined the velocity field on the surface of the Sun. The data were fitted to the rotation model to determine the average solar angular (sidereal) coefficients, the average gravitational redshift velocity and the average parameters of the systematic limb shift for each line separately. Solar rotation coefficients determined by our measurements are compared with those of Howard and Harvey, Snodgrass and Ulrich, and Wittmann.

  9. Spectroscopic ellipsometer based on direct measurement of polarization ellipticity

    SciTech Connect

    Watkins, Lionel R.

    2011-06-20

    A polarizer-sample-Wollaston prism analyzer ellipsometer is described in which the ellipsometric angles {psi} and {Delta} are determined by direct measurement of the elliptically polarized light reflected from the sample. With the Wollaston prism initially set to transmit p- and s-polarized light, the azimuthal angle P of the polarizer is adjusted until the two beams have equal intensity. This condition yields {psi}={+-}P and ensures that the reflected elliptically polarized light has an azimuthal angle of {+-}45 deg. and maximum ellipticity. Rotating the Wollaston prism through 45 deg. and adjusting the analyzer azimuth until the two beams again have equal intensity yields the ellipticity that allows {Delta} to be determined via a simple linear relationship. The errors produced by nonideal components are analyzed. We show that the polarizer dominates these errors but that for most practical purposes, the error in {psi} is negligible and the error in {Delta} may be corrected exactly. A native oxide layer on a silicon substrate was measured at a single wavelength and multiple angles of incidence and spectroscopically at a single angle of incidence. The best fit film thicknesses obtained were in excellent agreement with those determined using a traditional null ellipsometer.

  10. Differential absorption lidar measurements of atmospheric temperature and pressure profiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Korb, C. L.

    1981-01-01

    The theory and methodology of using differential absorption lidar techniques for the remote measurement of atmospheric pressure profiles, surface pressure, and temperature profiles from ground, air, and space-based platforms are presented. Pressure measurements are effected by means of high resolution measurement of absorption at the edges of the oxygen A band lines where absorption is pressure dependent due to collisional line broadening. Temperature is assessed using measurements of the absorption at the center of the oxygen A band line originating from a quantum state with high ground state energy. The population of the state is temperature dependent, allowing determination of the temperature through the Boltzmann term. The results of simulations of the techniques using Voigt profile and variational analysis are reported for ground-based, airborne, and Shuttle-based systems. Accuracies in the 0.5-1.0 K and 0.1-0.3% range are projected.

  11. Measuring optical absorption coefficient of pure water in UV using the integrating cavity absorption meter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ling

    2008-10-01

    The integrating cavity absorption meter (ICAM) has been used successfully to measure the low absorption coefficient of pure water. The ICAM produces an effective total path length of several meters or even longer, although the physical size of the instrument is only several centimeters. The long effective total path length ensures a high sensitivity that enables the ICAM to measure liquid mediums with low absorption. Compared to the conventional transmission type of instruments that were used to measure the same medium with the same path length, the ICAM eliminates the effect of scattering by introducing isotropic illumination in the medium, and consequently measures the true absorption coefficient of the medium in stead of the attenuation coefficient. The original ICAM was constructed with Spectralon and used in the wavelength range from 380 nm to 700 nm. Later studies showed that Spectralon is not suitable for measurements in the UV region because of its relatively lower reflectivity in this region and, even worse, the continuously decaying reflectivity under the exposure to UV radiation. Thus, we have developed a new way to construct the ICAM utilizing the material fumed silica. The resulting ICAM has a high sensitivity even in the UV region and doesn't have the deterioration problem. The measurement results from the new ICAM are in good agreement with the existing results. The absorption coefficients of pure water at wavelengths between 250 nm and 400 nm are presented here.

  12. Absorption and fluorescence spectroscopic characterization of BLUF domain of AppA from Rhodobacter sphaeroides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zirak, P.; Penzkofer, A.; Schiereis, T.; Hegemann, P.; Jung, A.; Schlichting, I.

    2005-08-01

    The BLUF domain of the transcriptional anti-repressor protein AppA from the non-sulfur anoxyphototrophic purple bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides was characterized by absorption and emission spectroscopy. The BLUF domain constructs AppA 148 (consisting of amino-acid residues 1-148) and AppA 126 (amino-acid residues 1-126) are investigated. The cofactor of the investigated domains is found to consist of a mixture of the flavins riboflavin, FMN, and FAD. The dark-adapted domains exist in two different active receptor conformations (receptor states) with different sub-nanosecond fluorescence lifetimes (BLUF r,f and BLUF r,sl) and a small non-interacting conformation (BLUF nc). The active receptor conformations are transformed to putative signalling states (BLUF s,f and BLUF s,sl) of low fluorescence efficiency and picosecond fluorescence lifetime by blue-light excitation (light-adapted domains). In the dark at room temperature both signalling states recover back to the initial receptor states with a time constant of about 17 min. A quantum yield of signalling state formation of about 25% was determined by intensity dependent transmission measurements. A photo-cycle scheme is presented including photo-induced charge transfer complex formation, charge recombination, and protein binding pocket reorganisation.

  13. Cadmium and lead in infant cereals--electrothermal-atomic absorption spectroscopic determination.

    PubMed

    Roca de Togores, M; Farré, R; Frigola, A M

    1999-08-30

    Because infant cereals are an important component of the infant diet from the fourth month of life onwards and therefore contribute to the dietetic intake of metals by infants, cadmium and lead were measured in samples of cereals commercially available in Spain. For this purpose an electrothermal atomic absorption (ET-AAS) method for determining cadmium and lead in these products was studied. The ET-AAS instrumental conditions and temperature/time furnace program were selected. The analytical parameters of the method (linearity, detection and quantification limits and precision) show its usefulness in measuring cadmium and lead in infant cereal products. The method was applied to eight different types of infant cereals from four different manufacturers, in all 29 different infant cereal products commercially available in Spain. The cadmium and lead contents of milk-free infant cereals range from 6.6 to 35.8 ng/g and from 36.1 to 305.6 ng/g, respectively, while the ranges corresponding to milk-added infant cereals are 2.9-40.0 ng/g for cadmium and 53.5-598.3 ng/g for lead. The cadmium and lead contents of cereal products of the same type from different manufacturers is responsible for the large confidence intervals and made it impossible to detect significant differences among the different products. Given the values found for lead and the correlation between chronic exposure to low lead doses and neuropsychological damage in early childhood, efforts should be made to reduce lead contamination.

  14. Spectroscopic Measurements of Radio Frequency Plasmas in Supercritical Fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Maehara, Tsunehiro; Iwamae, Atsushi; Kawashima, Ayato

    2010-10-29

    Spectroscopic measurements of radio frequency (rf) plasma were performed under high pressure CO{sub 2} conditions (5 and 7 MPa) and supercritical (sc)CO{sub 2} conditions (8-20 MPa). The temperatures evaluated from C{sub 2} Swan bands increased from 3600 K to 4600 K with increasing pressure. The broadening and shifting of the O I line profile ({approx}777 nm) of rf plasma was observed under scCO{sub 2} conditions. The width of the line profile increased with increasing pressure. The reason for the broadening and shifting is still unclear because the present theory used to explain them is not valid for such high pressure conditions. Further, the broadening of the Ar I line profile ({approx}811.5 nm) in rf plasmas was observed under atmospheric Ar (0.1 MPa), high pressure Ar conditions (1-4 MPa), and scAr condition (5 MPa); the observation of the O I line profile in CO{sub 2} plasmas is difficult in this pressure range owing to its weak intensity therein. Similar to the case of the O I line in CO{sub 2} plasmas, the reason for the broadening of the Ar I line profile at 5 MPa is unclear.

  15. Spectroscopic Measurements of Photo Pumped Highly Charged Ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graf, A.; Beiersdorfer, P.; Brown, G. V.; Crespo Lopez Urrutia, J. R.

    2011-11-01

    We report on recent x-ray laser spectroscopic measurements of line emission from photo-excited highly charged ions. The ion cloud of the HI-LIGHT portable electron beam ion trap (EBIT) was used as a target for the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) free electron laser in the Soft X-Ray (SXR) end station. The SXR monochromator allowed a precision investigation of transition energies and oscillator strength ratios of emission lines from Na-like Fe^15+ and Ne-like Fe^16+ important for astrophysical diagnostics. We have demonstrated a technique for calibration of the SXR monochromator photon energy scale using photo-excited resonant fluorescence spectra of very well known lines from H-like and He-like F and O. Numerous instruments were used to diagnose the fluorescent and autoionizing decay channels of the trapped plasma including an Iglet-X broadband germanium detector, a variable line spacing reflection grating soft x-ray/VUV spectrometer and a Wien filter based ion extraction system. An overview of the experiment as well as preliminary results will be presented.

  16. Spectroscopic Measurement of Neutral Particle Influx Ratio on EAST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yingying; Fu, Jia; Shi, Yuejiang; Zhang, Wei; Shen, Yongcai; Wang, Fudi; Lu, Bo; Huang, Juan; Zhang, Ling; Xu, Jingcui; Zhou, Qian

    2013-06-01

    The spectra of HeI (587.6 nm), Hα (656.28 nm) and Dα (656.1 nm) of the helium discharges as well as the normal deuterium discharges have been measured with two optical spectroscopic multi-channel analysis (OMA) systems on the experimental advanced superconducting tokamak (EAST). The influx ratio of the sum of H and D to He spectral lines and the influx ratio of H to D are given. In this way the ratio of hydrogen/deuterium ion (S/XB)H/D to (S/XB)He as well as (S/XB)H/D is not very sensitive to the variation in the edge density and temperature. The low-density helium discharges are operated in order to reduce the recycling hydrogen fluxes; however, the effect is not obvious. The possible reason is that the number of helium discharges is not enough and the content of hydrogen in the wall is still very abundant, which is caused by frequent wall conditionings and the vacuum leakage. The H/(H+D) ratio decreases quickly after one lithium coating and reduces to less than 10% using several accumulated lithium wall conditioning. It is found that the deposited He atoms on the carbon wall will remain at a low level after several D2 discharges.

  17. Theoretical studies of spectroscopic problems of importance for atmospheric radiation measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tipping, Richard H.

    1994-01-01

    Many of the instruments used to deduce the physical parameters of the Earth's atmosphere necessary for climate studies or for pollution monitoring (for instance, temperature versus pressure or number densities of trace molecules) rely on the existence of accurate spectroscopic data and an understanding of the physical processes responsible for the absorption or emission of radiation. During the summer, research was either continued or begun on three distinct problems: (1) an improved theoretical framework for the calculation of the far-wing absorption of allowed spectral lines; (2) a refinement of the calculation of the collision-induced fundamental spectrum of N2; and (3) an investigation of possible line-mixing effects in the fundamental spectrum of CH4. Progress in these three areas is summarized below. During the past few years, we have developed a theoretical framework for the calculation of the absorption of radiation by the far wings of spectral lines. Such absorption due to water vapor plays a crucial role in the greenhouse effect as well as limiting the retrieval of temperature profiles from satellite data. Several improvements in the theory have been made and the results are being prepared for publication. Last year we published results for the theoretical calculation of the absorption of radiation due to the dipoles induced during binary collisions of N2 molecules using independently measured molecular parameters; the results were in reasonable agreement with experimental data. However, recent measurements have revealed new fine structure that has been attributed to line-mixing effects. We do not think that this is correct, rather that the structure results from short-range anisotropic dipoles. We are in the process of including this refinement in our theoretical calculation in order to compare with the new experimental data. Subtle changes in the spectra of CH4 measured by researchers at Langley have also been attributed to line-mixing effects. By

  18. High reflector absorptance measurements by the surface thermal lensing technique

    SciTech Connect

    Chow, R.; Taylor, J.R.; Wu, Z.L.; Krupka, R.; Yang, T.

    1996-11-01

    Surface thermal lensing is an alternate configuration of a photothermal deflection system that was used to measure low levels of optical absorption. The thermal lensing configuration facilitated the alignment of the pump and probe laser beams by using a larger diameter probe beam. This technique was applied to high performance optical coatings, specifically high reflectors at 511 nm, zero degrees angle of incidence. The absorptance of these coatings was previously measured using a high power copper vapor laser system. A high power copper laser beam is focused onto a -2 mm diameter spot. A thermal camera senses the temperature rise with respect to the rest of the coating. The temperature change, power density and beam diameter were used with an empirical formula that yields optical absorption. The surface thermal lensing technique was able to resolve absorption levels lower than that achieved with the copper laser method.

  19. Models of filter-based particle light absorption measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamasha, Khadeejeh M.

    Light absorption by aerosol is very important in the visible, near UN, and near I.R region of the electromagnetic spectrum. Aerosol particles in the atmosphere have a great influence on the flux of solar energy, and also impact health in a negative sense when they are breathed into lungs. Aerosol absorption measurements are usually performed by filter-based methods that are derived from the change in light transmission through a filter where particles have been deposited. These methods suffer from interference between light-absorbing and light-scattering aerosol components. The Aethalometer is the most commonly used filter-based instrument for aerosol light absorption measurement. This dissertation describes new understanding of aerosol light absorption obtained by the filter method. The theory uses a multiple scattering model for the combination of filter and particle optics. The theory is evaluated using Aethalometer data from laboratory and ambient measurements in comparison with photoacoustic measurements of aerosol light absorption. Two models were developed to calculate aerosol light absorption coefficients from the Aethalometer data, and were compared to the in-situ aerosol light absorption coefficients. The first is an approximate model and the second is a "full" model. In the approximate model two extreme cases of aerosol optics were used to develop a model-based calibration scheme for the 7-wavelength Aethalometer. These cases include those of very strong scattering aerosols (Ammonium sulfate sample) and very absorbing aerosols (kerosene soot sample). The exponential behavior of light absorption in the strong multiple scattering limit is shown to be the square root of the total absorption optical depth rather than linear with optical depth as is commonly assumed with Beer's law. 2-stream radiative transfer theory was used to develop the full model to calculate the aerosol light absorption coefficients from the Aethalometer data. This comprehensive model

  20. Spectroscopic metrology for isotope composition measurements and transfer standards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anyangwe Nwaboh, Javis; Balslev-Harder, David; Kääriäinen, Teemu; Richmond, Craig; Manninen, Albert; Mohn, Joachim; Kiseleva, Maria; Petersen, Jan C.; Werhahn, Olav; Ebert, Volker

    2017-04-01

    The World Meteorological Organization (WMO) has identified greenhouse gases such as CO2, CH4 and N2O as critical for global climate monitoring. Other molecules such as CO that has an indirect effect of enhancing global warming are also monitored. WMO has stated compatibility goals for atmospheric concentration and isotope ratio measurements of these gases, e.g. 0.1 ppm for CO2 concentration measurements in the northern hemisphere and 0.01 ‰ for δ13C-CO2. For measurements of the concentration of greenhouse gases, gas analysers are typically calibrated with static gas standards e.g. traceable to the WMO scale or to the International System of Units (SI) through a national metrology institute. However, concentrations of target components, e.g. CO, in static gas standards have been observed to drift, and typically the gas matrix as well as the isotopic composition of the target component does not always reflect field gas composition, leading to deviations of the analyser response, even after calibration. The deviations are dependent on the measurement technique. To address this issue, part of the HIGHGAS (Metrology for high-impact greenhouse gases) project [1] focused on the development of optical transfer standards (OTSs) for greenhouse gases, e.g. CO2 and CO, potentially complementing gas standards. Isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS) [2] is currently used to provide state-of-the-art high precision (in the 0.01 ‰ range) measurements for the isotopic composition of greenhouse gases. However, there is a need for field-deployable techniques such as optical isotope ratio spectroscopy (OIRS) that can be combined with metrological measurement methods. Within the HIGHGAS project, OIRS methods and procedures based on e.g. cavity enhanced spectroscopy (CES) and tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (TDLAS), matched to metrological principles have been established for the measurement of 13C/12C and 18O/16O ratios in CO2, 15N/14N ratios in N2O, and 13C/12C and 2H

  1. Inferring surface solar absorption from broadband satellite measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cess, Robert D.; Vulis, Inna L.

    1989-01-01

    An atmospheric solar radiation model and surface albedo models that include wavelength dependence and surface anisotropy are combined to study the possibility of inferring the surface solar absorption from satellite measurements. The model includes ocean, desert, pasture land, savannah, and bog surface categories. Problems associated with converting narrowband measurements to broadband quantities are discussed, suggesting that it would be easier to infer surface solar absorption from broadband measurements directly. The practice of adopting a linear relationship between planetary and surface albedo to estimate surface albedos from satellite measurements is examined, showing that the linear conversion between broadband planetary and surface albedos is strongly dependent on vegetation type. It is suggested that there is a linear slope-offset relationship between surface and surface-atmosphere solar absorption.

  2. Measurement of moisture content in photovoltaic panel encapsulants using spectroscopic optical coherence tomography: a feasibility study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rashtchi, Shabnam; Ruiz, Pablo D.; Wildman, Ricky; Ashcroft, Ian

    2012-10-01

    EVA, a copolymer of ethylene and vinyl acetate, is a common encapsulant material used in silicon-based PV modules. It contributes to the structural integrity of the modules, provides electrical insulation and also acts as an environmental barrier. However, water can diffuse through EVA into the modules, leading to swelling and chemical degradation, which can impact interfacial bonds, leading to delamination and allowing more ingress to occur that can eventually end up in accelerated corrosion and device failure. Fourier Transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and gravimetric techniques have been used to quantify water concentration and the diffusion coefficient in free standing EVA films. However, these techniques cannot be applied to measure water content in PV modules deployed in the field, as the encapsulant is usually between a glass front sheet and a back sheet made of glass or multilayered films. In this paper we study the feasibility of combining FTIR and spectroscopic optical coherence tomography (SOCT) to measure water concentration of the EVA layer inside the modules. SOCT provides depth resolved spectral information and thus has the potential of measuring water absorption at different layers in the PV module. These depth-resolved measurements are necessary to inform predictive models developed to study the structural integrity, stability and durability of PV modules. The fundamental principle of the technique is explained, the optimum spectral ranges are identified and the feasibility of a SOCT system is discussed based on light source and detector characteristics. Other strategies are also considered.

  3. Ozone absorption cross section measurements in the Wulf bands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Stuart M.; Hupalo, Peter; Mauersberger, Konrad

    1993-01-01

    A tandem dual-beam spectrometer has been developed to determine ozone absorption cross sections for 13 selected wavelengths between 750 and 975 nm at room temperature. The increasingly pronounced structure in this region may interfere with atmospheric trace gas transitions that are useful for remote sensing and complicate the measurement of aerosols. Ozone concentrations were determined by absorption at the common HeNe laser transition near 632.8 nm using the absolute cross section reported previously. The overall accuracy of these room temperature measurements is generally better than 2 percent. A synoptic near-IR spectrum scaled to these measurements is employed for comparison with results of previous studies.

  4. Analysis of Phytoplankton Communities Using Hyperspectral Absorption Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wollschläger, J.; Röttgers, R.

    2016-02-01

    Methods based on optical measurements are well suited for phytoplankton observation. They are rapid, require comparably low effort, and are often automatable. Besides fluorescence, also the absorption of the water is influenced by the concentration and type of the phytoplankton present. With instruments based on integrating cavities like the point source integrating cavity absorption meter (PSICAM), it is possible to analyze natural water samples in situ. Due to its design, the PSICAM has a long optical path length and the sample has not to be concentrated on a filter prior to analysis. Additionally, light scattered by particles present in the sample has no effect on the absorption measurements. Since the hyperspectral measurements are of high quality, efforts have been made to adapt this approach also for continuous and automated measurement (flow-through-PSICAM). Absorption coefficient data were obtained using both instruments on research cruises in the German Bight and along the Norwegian coast. In case of the discrete measurements, the water samples were filtered through various pore sizes to separate the bulk absorption into the absorption of the different phytoplankton size classes (micro-, nano-, and picophytoplankton). A proxy for chl-a concentration was derived from the data which was used to characterize phytoplankton biomass distributions in the area of investigation. Furthermore, in order to obtain additional information about the phytoplankton community beyond biomass distributions, also the spectral shape of the absorption spectra was analyzed. Attempts were made to attribute different spectral shapes to different phytoplankton groups and find similarities or differences between the cruises stations, respectively.

  5. Absorption and Emission Spectroscopic Investigation of Thermal Dynamics and Photo-Dynamics of the Rhodopsin Domain of the Rhodopsin-Guanylyl Cyclase from the Nematophagous Fungus Catenaria anguillulae.

    PubMed

    Penzkofer, Alfons; Scheib, Ulrike; Stehfest, Katja; Hegemann, Peter

    2017-10-05

    The rhodopsin-guanylyl cyclase from the nematophagous fungus Catenaria anguillulae belongs to a recently discovered class of enzymerhodopsins and may find application as a tool in optogenetics. Here the rhodopsin domain CaRh of the rhodopsin-guanylyl cyclase from Catenaria anguillulae was studied by absorption and emission spectroscopic methods. The absorption cross-section spectrum and excitation wavelength dependent fluorescence quantum distributions of CaRh samples were determined (first absorption band in the green spectral region). The thermal stability of CaRh was studied by long-time attenuation measurements at room temperature (20.5 °C) and refrigerator temperature of 3.5 °C. The apparent melting temperature of CaRh was determined by stepwise sample heating up and cooling down (obtained apparent melting temperature: 62 ± 2 °C). The photocycle dynamics of CaRh was investigated by sample excitation to the first inhomogeneous absorption band of the CaRhda dark-adapted state around 590 nm (long-wavelength tail), 530 nm (central region) and 470 nm (short-wavelength tail) and following the absorption spectra development during exposure and after exposure (time resolution 0.0125 s). The original protonated retinal Schiff base PRSBall-trans in CaRhda photo-converted reversibly to protonated retinal Schiff base PRSBall-trans,la1 with restructured surroundings (CaRhla₁ light-adapted state, slightly blue-shifted and broadened first absorption band, recovery to CaRhda with time constant of 0.8 s) and deprotonated retinal Schiff base RSB13-cis (CaRhla₂ light-adapted state, first absorption band in violet to near ultraviolet spectral region, recovery to CaRhda with time constant of 0.35 s). Long-time light exposure of light-adapted CaRhla₁ around 590, 530 and 470 nm caused low-efficient irreversible degradation to photoproducts CaRhprod. Schemes of the primary photocycle dynamics of CaRhda and the secondary photocycle dynamics of CaRhla1 are developed.

  6. Spectroscopic inferences from HIS measurements of atmospheric thermal emission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Revercomb, H. E.; Knuteson, R. O.; Smith, W. L.; Woolf, H. M.; Howell, H. B.

    1991-01-01

    Radiometrically accurate observations of the earth's emission spectrum from 3.8 to 16.6 microns have been made using the High-resolution Interferometer Sounder (HIS) to look downward from the NASA U2/ER2 aircraft or upward from the ground. These observations have been used to demonstrate the substantially improved vertical resolution of temperature and water vapor soundings derived from high resolution spectra (resolving power from 1800 to 3800), as compared to soundings from the low resolution filter radiometer observations used in current satellite sounders. The HIS observations have also demonstrated that Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) instruments are especially well suited to absolute emission measurements of broad spectral bands at high resolution. A fundamental advantage of FTIR instruments for accurate calibration is wavelength integrity, the same property which has made FTIR the standard for very high resolution absorption measurements. The long wavelength part of a HIS downwelling radiance spectrum is compared to a calculated spectrum. The calculation uses the AFGL HITRAN/86 line file and FASCOD2 line-by-line program with atmospheric state data from in situ measurements. In general, agreement between HIS and FASCOD2 spectra is remarkably good, a tribute to the current state of spectral line files and line-by-line codes. Reproducible differences between HIS observations and FASCOD2 line-by-line calculations lead to the following conclusions: (1) The FASCOD2 water vapor continuum in the longwave window region from 10 to 13 microns (750 to 1000 cm(exp -1)) gives reasonable agreement with radiance observations; (2) The model H2O continuum from 7 to 8 microns (1250 to 1425 cm(exp -2)) needs adjustment to reduce its contribution by about 60 percent; (3) CO2 absorption in the region from 13.1 to 14.3 microns (700 to 760 cm(exp -1)) is too small in the model; and (4) Water vapor line strengths in the region from 8.1 to 9.1 microns (1100 to 1230 cm(exp -1)) need

  7. Spectroscopic inferences from HIS measurements of atmospheric thermal emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Revercomb, H. E.; Knuteson, R. O.; Smith, W. L.; Woolf, H. M.; Howell, H. B.

    1991-12-01

    Radiometrically accurate observations of the earth's emission spectrum from 3.8 to 16.6 microns have been made using the High-resolution Interferometer Sounder (HIS) to look downward from the NASA U2/ER2 aircraft or upward from the ground. These observations have been used to demonstrate the substantially improved vertical resolution of temperature and water vapor soundings derived from high resolution spectra (resolving power from 1800 to 3800), as compared to soundings from the low resolution filter radiometer observations used in current satellite sounders. The HIS observations have also demonstrated that Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) instruments are especially well suited to absolute emission measurements of broad spectral bands at high resolution. A fundamental advantage of FTIR instruments for accurate calibration is wavelength integrity, the same property which has made FTIR the standard for very high resolution absorption measurements. The long wavelength part of a HIS downwelling radiance spectrum is compared to a calculated spectrum. The calculation uses the AFGL HITRAN/86 line file and FASCOD2 line-by-line program with atmospheric state data from in situ measurements. In general, agreement between HIS and FASCOD2 spectra is remarkably good, a tribute to the current state of spectral line files and line-by-line codes. Reproducible differences between HIS observations and FASCOD2 line-by-line calculations lead to the following conclusions: (1) The FASCOD2 water vapor continuum in the longwave window region from 10 to 13 microns (750 to 1000 cm(exp -1)) gives reasonable agreement with radiance observations; (2) The model H2O continuum from 7 to 8 microns (1250 to 1425 cm(exp -2)) needs adjustment to reduce its contribution by about 60 percent; (3) CO2 absorption in the region from 13.1 to 14.3 microns (700 to 760 cm(exp -1)) is too small in the model; and (4) Water vapor line strengths in the region from 8.1 to 9.1 microns (1100 to 1230 cm(exp -1)) need

  8. Atmospheric Water Vapour Differential Absorption Measurements with an Infrared Sounder.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-03-01

    such as amonia . As the differential absorption was only of the order of 2 dB for the above measurements (at 450 m range), the measurements were repeated...frequent(ref.7), and most seriously affect surface based radio frequency sensors and communications systems. Further development and refinement of the

  9. Measurements of scattering and absorption in mammalian cell suspensions

    SciTech Connect

    Mourant, J.R.; Johnson, T.M.; Freyer, J.P.

    1996-03-01

    During the past several years a range of spectroscopies, including fluorescence and elastic-scatter spectroscopy, have been investigated for optically based detection of cancer and other tissue pathologies. Both elastic-scatter and fluorescence signals depend, in part, on scattering and absorption properties of the cells in the tissue. Therefore an understanding of the scattering and absorption properties of cells is a necessary prerequisite for understanding and developing these techniques. Cell suspensions provide a simple model with which to begin studying the absorption and scattering properties of cells. In this study we have made preliminary measurements of the scattering and absorption properties of suspensions of mouse mammary carcinoma cells (EMT6) over a broad wavelength range (380 nm to 800 nm).

  10. Review of Spectroscopic Data for Measurements of Stratospheric Species

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldman, A. (Editor); Hoell, J. M., Jr. (Editor)

    1980-01-01

    Results and recommendations from a two day workshop are discussed. A review of the current status of experimental and theoretical spectroscopic data on molecules of stratospheric interest is given along with recommendations for additional research. Methods for disseminating new and existing data are also discussed.

  11. Integrating Sphere Microscopy for Direct Absorption Measurements of Single Nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Mann, Sander A; Sciacca, Beniamino; Zhang, Yunyan; Wang, Jia; Kontoleta, Evgenia; Liu, Huiyun; Garnett, Erik C

    2017-02-28

    Nanoscale materials are promising for optoelectronic devices because their physical dimensions are on the order of the wavelength of light. This leads to a variety of complex optical phenomena that, for instance, enhance absorption and emission. However, quantifying the performance of these nanoscale devices frequently requires measuring absolute absorption at the nanoscale, and remarkably, there is no general method capable of doing so directly. Here, we present such a method based on an integrating sphere but modified to achieve submicron spatial resolution. We explore the limits of this technique by using it to measure spatial and spectral absorptance profiles on a wide variety of nanoscale systems, including different combinations of weakly and strongly absorbing and scattering nanomaterials (Si and GaAs nanowires, Au nanoparticles). This measurement technique provides quantitative information about local optical properties that are crucial for improving any optoelectronic device with nanoscale dimensions or nanoscale surface texturing.

  12. Integrating Sphere Microscopy for Direct Absorption Measurements of Single Nanostructures

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Nanoscale materials are promising for optoelectronic devices because their physical dimensions are on the order of the wavelength of light. This leads to a variety of complex optical phenomena that, for instance, enhance absorption and emission. However, quantifying the performance of these nanoscale devices frequently requires measuring absolute absorption at the nanoscale, and remarkably, there is no general method capable of doing so directly. Here, we present such a method based on an integrating sphere but modified to achieve submicron spatial resolution. We explore the limits of this technique by using it to measure spatial and spectral absorptance profiles on a wide variety of nanoscale systems, including different combinations of weakly and strongly absorbing and scattering nanomaterials (Si and GaAs nanowires, Au nanoparticles). This measurement technique provides quantitative information about local optical properties that are crucial for improving any optoelectronic device with nanoscale dimensions or nanoscale surface texturing. PMID:28056171

  13. X-ray absorption spectroscopic studies of mononuclear non-heme iron enzymes

    SciTech Connect

    Westre, Tami E.

    1996-01-01

    Fe-K-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) has been used to investigate the electronic and geometric structure of the iron active site in non-heme iron enzymes. A new theoretical extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) analysis approach, called GNXAS, has been tested on data for iron model complexes to evaluate the utility and reliability of this new technique, especially with respect to the effects of multiple-scattering. In addition, a detailed analysis of the 1s→3d pre-edge feature has been developed as a tool for investigating the oxidation state, spin state, and geometry of iron sites. Edge and EXAFS analyses have then been applied to the study of non-heme iron enzyme active sites.

  14. Electron Spin Resonance and optical absorption spectroscopic studies of manganese centers in aluminium lead borate glasses.

    PubMed

    SivaRamaiah, G; LakshmanaRao, J

    2012-12-01

    Electron Spin Resonance (ESR) and optical absorption studies of 5Al(2)O(3)+75H(3)BO(3)+(20-x)PbO+xMnSO(4) (where x=0.5, 1,1.5 and 2 mol% of MnSO(4)) glasses at room temperature have been studied. The ESR spectrum of all the glasses exhibits resonance signals with effective isotropic g values at ≈2.0, 3.3 and 4.3. The ESR resonance signal at isotropic g≈2.0 has been attributed to Mn(2+) centers in an octahedral symmetry. The ESR resonance signals at isotropic g≈3.3 and 4.3 have been attributed to the rhombic symmetry of the Mn(2+) ions. The zero-field splitting parameter (zfs) has been calculated from the intensities of the allowed hyperfine lines. The optical absorption spectrum exhibits an intense band in the visible region and it has been attributed to (5)E(g)→(5)T(2g) transition of Mn(3+)centers in an octahedral environment. The optical band gap and the Urbach energies have been calculated from the ultraviolet absorption edges.

  15. Skin Absorption of Anions: Part One. Methodology for In Vitro Cutaneous Absorption Measurements.

    PubMed

    Paweloszek, Raphaël; Briançon, Stéphanie; Chevalier, Yves; Gilon-Delepine, Nicole; Pelletier, Jocelyne; Bolzinger, Marie-Alexandrine

    2016-07-01

    Measurement of skin absorption of ions requires specific experimental protocols regarding the use of pig skin as a model, the viability of excised skin in water medium over 24 h, the presence of endogenous ions, and evaluation of the contributions of facilitated transport through ion channels and ion transporters. Absorption experiments of halide anions F(-), Cl(-), Br(-) and I(-) in excised skin were performed in Franz diffusion cells. Experiments were performed on human and porcine skin under various conditions so as to define and validate experimental protocols. The distributions of endogenous ions and the absorption kinetics of halide ions were similar in both porcine and human skin models. Fresh skin kept its viability over 24 h in salt-free water, allowing experiments following OECD guidelines. Permeation increased in the order F(-) < Cl(-) < Br(-) < I(-) for all receptor media and skin samples. Absorption was larger in fresh skin due to the transport through chloride channels or exchangers. Skin absorption experiments of ions in Franz cells rely on working with fresh excised skin (human or porcine) and pure water as receptor fluid. Experiments with chloride blockers or frozen/thawed skin allow discriminating passive diffusion and facilitated transport.

  16. Plasma absorption evidence via chirped pulse spectral transmission measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Jedrkiewicz, Ottavia; Minardi, Stefano; Couairon, Arnaud; Jukna, Vytautas; Selva, Marco; Di Trapani, Paolo

    2015-06-08

    This work aims at highlighting the plasma generation dynamics and absorption when a Bessel beam propagates in glass. We developed a simple diagnostics allowing us to retrieve clear indications of the formation of the plasma in the material, thanks to transmission measurements in the angular and wavelength domains. This technique featured by the use of a single chirped pulse having the role of pump and probe simultaneously leads to results showing the plasma nonlinear absorption effect on the trailing part of the pulse, thanks to the spectral-temporal correspondence in the measured signal, which is also confirmed by numerical simulations.

  17. A photophonic instrument concept to measure atmospheric aerosol absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engle, C. D.

    1982-03-01

    A laboratory model of an instrument to measure the absorption of atmospheric aerosols was designed, built, and tested. The design was based on the photophonic phenomenon discovered by Bell and an acoustic resonator developed by Helmholtz. Experiments were done to show ways the signal amplitude could be improved and the noise reduced and to confirm the instrument was sensitive enough to be practical. The research was undertaken to develop concepts which show promise of being improvements on the instruments that are presently used to measure the absorption of the Sun's radiation by the Earth's atmospheric aerosols.

  18. [Influencing factors in measuring absorption coefficient of suspended particulate matters].

    PubMed

    Yu, Xiao-long; Shen, Fang; Zhang, Jin-fang

    2013-05-01

    Absorption coefficient of suspended particulate matters in natural water is one of the key parameters in ocean color remote sensing. In order to study the influencing factors that affect the measurement, a series of experiments were designed to measure samples using transmittance method (T method), transmittance-reflectance method (T-R method) and absorptance method (A method). The results shows that absorption coefficient measured by the A method has a much lower error compared to the T method and T-R method due to influencing factors,such as filter-to-filter variations, water content of the filter, and homogeneity of filter load and so on. Another factor influence absorption coefficient is path-length amplification induced by multiple scattering inside the filter. To determine the path-length amplification, the true absorption was measured by AC-s (WetLabs). The linear fitting result shows that the mean path-length amplification is much higher for the A method than that of the T-R method and the T method (4.01 versus 2.20 and 2.32), and the corresponding correlation coefficient are 0.90, 0.87 and 0.80. For the A method and the T-R method, higher correlation coefficients are calculated when using polynomial fitting, and the value are 0.95 and 0.94. Analysis of the mean relative error caused by different influencing factors indicates that path-length amplification is the largest error source in measuring the absorption coefficient.

  19. Simple test of intestinal calcium absorption measured by stable strontium.

    PubMed Central

    Milsom, S; Ibbertson, K; Hannan, S; Shaw, D; Pybus, J

    1987-01-01

    A clinical test of intestinal calcium absorption has been developed using non-radioactive stable strontium as a calcium tracer. In nine elderly subjects there was a close correlation between the fractional absorption of strontium and radioactive calcium (45Ca) during a five hour period after the simultaneous oral administration of the two tracers. Comparable precision was achieved with each tracer in six subjects in whom the test was repeated after two weeks. The effect of food on strontium absorption was examined in a further 33 normal subjects (age 21-60 years), and the administration of the strontium with a standard breakfast was shown to reduce the variance at individual time points. A simplified test in which serum strontium concentration was measured four hours after the oral dose given with a standard breakfast was adopted as the routine procedure. The normal range (mean (2 SD], established over 97 tests in 53 patients, was 7.0-18.0% of the dose in the extracellular fluid. A further 30 patients with possible disorders of calcium absorption (10 with primary hyperparathyroidism and 20 with coeliac disease) were studied by this standard test. In both groups of patients the mean four hour strontium values were significantly different from normal. This standard strontium absorption test allows assessment of calcium absorption with sufficient sensitivity and precision to have a wide application in clinical practice. PMID:3115389

  20. Pulsed Airborne Lidar Measurements of C02 Column Absorption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abshire, James B.; Riris, Haris; Allan, Graham R.; Weaver, Clark J.; Mao, Jianping; Sun, Xiaoli; Hasselbrack, William E.; Rodriquez, Michael; Browell, Edward V.

    2011-01-01

    We report on airborne lidar measurements of atmospheric CO2 column density for an approach being developed as a candidate for NASA's ASCENDS mission. It uses a pulsed dual-wavelength lidar measurement based on the integrated path differential absorption (IPDA) technique. We demonstrated the approach using the CO2 measurement from aircraft in July and August 2009 over four locations. The results show clear CO2 line shape and absorption signals, which follow the expected changes with aircraft altitude from 3 to 13 km. The 2009 measurements have been analyzed in detail and the results show approx.1 ppm random errors for 8-10 km altitudes and approx.30 sec averaging times. Airborne measurements were also made in 2010 with stronger signals and initial analysis shows approx. 0.3 ppm random errors for 80 sec averaging times for measurements at altitudes> 6 km.

  1. Automation of long-path absorption cell measurements.

    PubMed

    Watkins, W R; Dixon, R G

    1979-01-01

    Recent advances have been made in the operation of long-path absorption cells which make them easier to align and improve the accuracy of measurements made with them. Only one person is required now for routine measurements of low absorption coefficients of atmospheric absorbers. Unique gear designs for the adjustment of the cell mirrors are described which utilize low-torque linear drives and make possible rapid changes in pathlength and precision repositioning of the cell output beam at long pathlengths. Automation of cell operation by the use of remote Selsyn controls is described. Several techniques are discussed for precision optical alignment of long-path absorption cells, including the use of infrared radiation sources. The system accuracy which results from these refinements in operation is included.

  2. Lunar absorption spectrophotometer for measuring atmospheric water vapor.

    PubMed

    Querel, Richard R; Naylor, David A

    2011-02-01

    A novel instrument has been designed to measure the nighttime atmospheric water vapor column abundance by near-infrared absorption spectrophotometry of the Moon. The instrument provides a simple, effective, portable, and inexpensive means of rapidly measuring the water vapor content along the lunar line of sight. Moreover, the instrument is relatively insensitive to the atmospheric model used and, thus, serves to provide an independent calibration for other measures of precipitable water vapor from both ground- and space-based platforms.

  3. Atomic absorption spectroscopic, conductometric and colorimetric methods for determination of some fluoroquinolone antibacterials using ammonium reineckate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Ghannam, Sheikha M.

    2008-04-01

    Three accurate, rapid and simple atomic absorption spectrometric (AAS), conductometric and colorimetric methods were developed for the determination of gatifloxacin (GTF), moxifloxacin (MXF) and sparfloxacin (SPF). The proposed methods depend upon the reaction of ammonium reineckate with the studied drugs to form stable precipitate of ion-pair complexes, which was dissolved in acetone. The pink coloured complexes were determined either by AAS or colorimetrically at λmax 525 nm directly using the dissolved complex. Using conductometric titration, the studied drugs could be evaluated in 50% (v/v) acetone. The optimizations of various experimental conditions were described. Optimum concentration ranges for the determination of GTF, MXF and SPF were 5.0-150, 40-440 μg mL -1 and 0.10-1.5 mg mL -1 using atomic absorption (AAS), conductometric and colorimetric methods, respectively. Detection and quantification limits are ranges from 1.5 to 2.3 μg mL -1 using AAS method or 30-45 μg mL -1 using colorimetric method. The proposed procedures have been applied successfully to the analysis of these drugs in pharmaceutical formulations and the results are favourably comparable to the reference methods.

  4. Temperature and pressure measurement based on tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy with gas absorption linewidth detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Yunxia; Liu, Tiegen; Liu, Kun; Jiang, Junfeng; Wang, Tao; Wang, Ranran

    2014-11-01

    A gas temperature and pressure measurement method based on Tunable Diode Laser Absorption Spectroscopy (TDLAS) detecting linewidth of gas absorption line was proposed in this paper. Combined with Lambert-Beer Law and ideal gas law, the relationship between temperature, pressure and gas linewidth with Lorentzian line shape was investigated in theory. Taking carbon monoxide (CO) at 1567.32 nm for example, the linewidths of gas absorption line in different temperatures and pressures were obtained by simulation. The relationship between the linewidth of second harmonic and temperature, pressure with the coefficient 0.025 pm/K and 0.0645 pm/kPa respectively. According to the relationship of simulation results and detected linewidth, the undefined temperature and pressure of CO gas were measured. The gas temperature and pressure measurement based on linewidth detection, avoiding the influence of laser intensity, is an effective temperature and pressure measurement method. This method also has the ability to detect temperature and pressure of other gases with Lorentzian line shape.

  5. Measurement of incidence angle dependence of solar absorptance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohnishi, A.; Hayashi, T.

    1983-12-01

    For measuring solar absorptance dependence on incidence angle, an integrating sphere, in which the sample is fixed on the surface of the sphere, and the incident angle for the monochromatic beam on the surface is adjusted by the rotation of the integrating sphere, is proposed. Results for spacecraft materials are presented. Results for aluminized Teflon are 4% better compared with the standard method.

  6. Tone-burst technique measures high-intensity sound absorption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powell, J. G.; Van Houten, J. J.

    1971-01-01

    Tone-burst technique, in which narrow-bandwidth, short-duration sonic pulse is propagated down a standing-wave tube, measures sound absorbing capacity of materials used in jet engine noise abatement. Technique eliminates effects of tube losses and yields normal-incidence absorption coefficient of specimen.

  7. Recent improvements in PDS technique for low-absorption measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montecchi, Marco; Masetti, Enrico; Emiliani, Gabriele

    1990-08-01

    Photothermal Deflection Spectroscopy (PDS) is a recently developed technique that is finding a useful application in the measurement of low optical absorptance of thin films. Among the noise sources affecting the PDS measurement, probe beam pointing instability and mechanical vibration play a considerable role. In this work an optoelectronic system for the reduction of their influence is described. Moreover, PDS measurements are typically performed keeping the sample immersed in a deflecting liquid; thus measured values of absorptance must be corrected when other surrounding media, as air, are considered. This correction is an easy task for single film coatings. Here the general case of an unknown multiplayer coating is analysed; a range of values containing the true absorptance in air is obtained by theoretical analysis and a practical method to evaluate the absorptance in air is discussed. Finally, deflecting liquids alternative to the commonly used CCI4 have been examined. Useful optical range, thermal diffusivity and "relative deflecting power" of CCI4, CS2, Iso-octane and Aceton are reported.

  8. Absorption of sound in air - High-frequency measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bass, H. E.; Shields, F. D.

    1977-01-01

    The absorption of sound in air at frequencies from 4 to 100 kHz in 1/12 octave intervals, for temperatures from 255.4 K (0 F) to 310.9 K (100 F) in 5.5 K (10 F) intervals, and at 10% relative-humidity increments between 0% and saturation has been measured. The values of free-field absorption have been analyzed to determine the relaxation frequency of oxygen for each of the 92 combinations of temperature and relative humidity studied and the results are compared to an empirical expression. The relaxation frequencies of oxygen have been analyzed to determine the microscopic energy-transfer rates.

  9. Absorption of sound in air - High-frequency measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bass, H. E.; Shields, F. D.

    1977-01-01

    The absorption of sound in air at frequencies from 4 to 100 kHz in 1/12 octave intervals, for temperatures from 255.4 K (0 F) to 310.9 K (100 F) in 5.5 K (10 F) intervals, and at 10% relative-humidity increments between 0% and saturation has been measured. The values of free-field absorption have been analyzed to determine the relaxation frequency of oxygen for each of the 92 combinations of temperature and relative humidity studied and the results are compared to an empirical expression. The relaxation frequencies of oxygen have been analyzed to determine the microscopic energy-transfer rates.

  10. Measurements of scattering and absorption changes in muscle and brain.

    PubMed Central

    Gratton, E; Fantini, S; Franceschini, M A; Gratton, G; Fabiani, M

    1997-01-01

    Non-invasive techniques for the study of human brain function based on changes of the haemoglobin content or on changes of haemoglobin saturation have recently been proposed. Among the new methods, near-infrared transmission measurements may have significant advantages and complement well-established methods such as functional magnetic resonance imaging and positron emission tomography. Near-infrared measurements can be very fast, comparable in speed to electrophysiological measurements, bur are better localized. We will present the demonstration of measurements of millisecond signals due to brain activity in humans following stimulation of the visual cortex. However, major unresolved questions remain about the origin of the signals observed. Optical measurements on exposed cortex in animals show that both the absorption and the scattering coefficient are affected by neural activity. Model calculations show that the signals we detected may originate from rapid changes of the scattering coefficient in a region about 1 to 2 cm below the scalp. We discuss our measurement protocol, which is based on a frequency-domain instrument, and the algorithm to separate the absorption from the scattering contribution in the overall response. Our method produces excellent separation between scattering and absorption in relatively homogeneous masses such as large muscles. The extrapolation of our measurement protocol to a complex structure such as the human head is critically evaluated. PMID:9232861

  11. Spectroscopic measurement of adipose tissue thickness and comparison with ultrasound imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geraskin, Dmitri; Boeth, Heide; Kohl-Bareis, Matthias

    2007-07-01

    Near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) is widely applied for applications monitoring skeletal muscle oxygenation. However, this method is obstructed by the subcutaneous adipose tissue thickness (ATT) which might vary between < 1 mm to more than 12 mm. Though diffuse optical imaging can be applied to measure ATT, the objective here is to get this measure from spectroscopic data of a single source-detector distance. For the measurement of the optical lipid signal we used a broad band spatially resolved system (SRS), which is based on measurements of the wavelength dependence of the attenuation A for source detector distances ρ between 29 mm and 39 mm. Ultrasound images served as an anatomical reference of the lipid layer. The measurements were taken on 5 different muscle groups of 20 healthy volunteers, each for left and right limbs, e.g. vastus medialis, vastus lateralis and gastrocnemius muscle on the leg and ventral forearm muscles and biceps brachii muscle on the arm. Different analysis strategies were tested for the best calculation of ATT. There is a good non-linear correlation between optical lipid signal and ultrasound data, with an overall error in ATT prediction of about 0.5 mm. This finding is supported experimentally by additional MRI measurements as well as a multi-layer Monte Carlo (MC) model. Based on this data of the ATT thickness, a newly developed algorithm which exploits the wavelength dependence of the slope in attenuation with respect to source-detector distance and MC simulation for these parameters as a function of absorption and scattering coefficients delivers a considerably better fit of reflectance spectra when fitting haemoglobin concentrations. Implications for the monitoring of muscle oxygen saturation are discussed.

  12. Prediction of absorption coefficients by pulsed laser induced photoacoustic measurements.

    PubMed

    Priya, Mallika; Satish Rao, B S; Ray, Satadru; Mahato, K K

    2014-06-05

    In the current study, a pulsed laser induced photoacoustic spectroscopy setup was designed and developed, aiming its application in clinical diagnostics. The setup was optimized with carbon black samples in water and with various tryptophan concentrations at 281nm excitations. The sensitivity of the setup was estimated by determining minimum detectable concentration of tryptophan in water at the same excitation, and was found to be 0.035mM. The photoacoustic experiments were also performed with various tryptophan concentrations at 281nm excitation for predicting optical absorption coefficients in them and for comparing the outcomes with the spectrophotometrically-determined absorption coefficients for the same samples. Absorption coefficients for a few serum samples, obtained from some healthy female volunteers, were also determined through photoacoustic and spectrophotometric measurements at the same excitations, which showed good agreement between them, indicating its clinical implications.

  13. Towards higher stability of resonant absorption measurements in pulsed plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Britun, Nikolay; Michiels, Matthieu; Snyders, Rony

    2015-12-15

    Possible ways to increase the reliability of time-resolved particle density measurements in pulsed gaseous discharges using resonant absorption spectroscopy are proposed. A special synchronization, called “dynamic source triggering,” between a gated detector and two pulsed discharges, one representing the discharge of interest and another being used as a reference source, is developed. An internal digital delay generator in the intensified charge coupled device camera, used at the same time as a detector, is utilized for this purpose. According to the proposed scheme, the light pulses from the reference source follow the gates of detector, passing through the discharge of interest only when necessary. This allows for the utilization of short-pulse plasmas as reference sources, which is critical for time-resolved absorption analysis of strongly emitting pulsed discharges. In addition to dynamic source triggering, the reliability of absorption measurements can be further increased using simultaneous detection of spectra relevant for absorption method, which is also demonstrated in this work. The proposed methods are illustrated by the time-resolved measurements of the metal atom density in a high-power impulse magnetron sputtering (HiPIMS) discharge, using either a hollow cathode lamp or another HiPIMS discharge as a pulsed reference source.

  14. Absorption spectroscopy characterization measurements of a laser-produced Na atomic beam

    SciTech Connect

    Ching, C.H.; Bailey, J.E.; Lake, P.W.; Filuk, A.B.; Adams, R.G.; McKenney, J.

    1997-01-01

    A pulsed Na atomic beam source developed for spectroscopic diagnosis of a high-power ion diode is described. The goal is to produce a {approximately}10{sup 12}-cm{sup {minus}3}-density Na atomic beam that can be injected into the diode acceleration gap to measure electric and magnetic fields from the Stark and Zeeman effects through laser-induced fluorescence or absorption spectroscopy. A {approximately}10 ns full width at half-maximum (FWHM), 1.06 {mu}m, 0.6 J/cm{sup 2} laser incident through a glass slide heats a Na-bearing thin film, creating a plasma that generates a sodium vapor plume. A {approximately}1 {mu}s FWHM dye laser beam tuned to 5890 {Angstrom} is used for absorption measurement of the NaI resonant doublet by viewing parallel to the film surface. The dye laser light is coupled through a fiber to a spectrograph with a time-integrated charge-coupled-device camera. A two-dimensional mapping of the Na vapor density is obtained through absorption measurements at different spatial locations. Time-of-flight and Doppler broadening of the absorption with {approximately}0.1 {Angstrom} spectral resolution indicate that the Na neutral vapor temperature is about 0.5{endash}2 eV. Laser-induced fluorescence from {approximately}1{times}10{sup 12} cm{sup {minus}3} NaI 3s-3p lines observed with a streaked spectrograph provides a signal level sufficient for {approximately}{plus_minus}0.06 {Angstrom} wavelength shift measurements in a mock-up of an ion diode experiment. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  15. Absorption spectroscopy characterization measurements of a laser-produced Na atomic beam

    SciTech Connect

    Ching, C.H.; Bailey, J.E.; Lake, P.W.; Filuk, A.B.; Adams, R.G.; McKenney, J.

    1996-06-01

    This work describes a pulsed Na atomic beam source developed for spectroscopic diagnosis of a high-power ion diode on the Particle Beam Fusion Accelerator II. The goal is to produce a {approximately} 10{sup 12}-cm{sup {minus}3}-density Na atomic beam that can be injected into the diode acceleration gap to measure electric and magnetic fields from the Stark and Zeeman effects through laser-induced-fluorescence or absorption spectroscopy. A {approximately} 10 ns fwhm, 1.06 {micro}m, 0.6 J/cm{sup 2} laser incident through a glass slide heats a Na-bearing thin film, creating a plasma that generates a sodium vapor plume. A {approximately} 1 {micro}sec fwhm dye laser beam tuned to 5,890 {angstrom} is used for absorption measurement of the Na I resonant doublet by viewing parallel to the film surface. The dye laser light is coupled through a fiber to a spectrograph with a time-integrated CCD camera. A two-dimensional mapping of the Na vapor density is obtained through absorption measurements at different spatial locations. Time-of-flight and Doppler broadening of the absorption with {approximately} 0.1 {angstrom} spectral resolution indicate that the Na neutral vapor temperature is about 0.5 to 2 eV. Laser-induced-fluorescence from {approximately} 1 {times} 10{sup 12}-cm{sup {minus}3} Na I 3s-3p lines observed with a streaked spectrograph provides a signal level sufficient for {approximately} 0.06 {angstrom} wavelength shift measurements in a mock-up of an ion diode experiment.

  16. Spectrophone measurements of infrared laser energy absorption by atmospheric dust.

    PubMed

    Schleusener, S A; Lindberg, J D; White, K O; Johnson, R L

    1976-10-01

    A new method of quantitatively measuring the absorption of atmospheric dust or other particulate matter is described. The system uses a differential-spectrophone KBr pellet technique and should ultimately prove useful from the uv to the far ir wavelength region. Preliminary measurement data on atmospheric dust, quartz, and soot are presented at 1.06-microm, 9.6-microm, and 10.6-microm wavelengths.

  17. Highly specific spectroscopic photoacoustic molecular imaging of dynamic optical absorption shifts of an antibody-ICG contrast agent (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Katheryne E.; Bachawal, Sunitha; Abou-Elkacem, Lotfi; Jensen, Kristen C.; Machtaler, Steven; Tian, Lu; Willmann, Juergen K.

    2017-03-01

    Improved techniques for breast cancer screening are critically needed as current methods lack diagnostic accuracy. Using spectroscopic photoacoustic (sPA) molecular imaging with a priori knowledge of optical absorption spectra allows suppression of endogenous background signal, increasing the overall sensitivity and specificity of the modality to exogenous contrast agents. Here, sPA imaging was used to monitor antibody-indocyanine green (ICG) conjugates as they undergo optical absorption spectrum shifts after cellular endocytosis and degradation to allow differentiation between normal murine mammary glands from breast cancer by enhancing molecular imaging signal from target (B7-H3)-bound antibody-ICG. First, B7-H3 was shown to have highly specific (AUC of 0.93) expression on both vascular endothelium and tumor stroma in malignant lesions through quantitative immunohistochemical staining of B7-H3 on 279 human samples (normal (n=53), benign lesions (11 subtypes, n=182), breast cancers (4 subtypes, n=97)), making B7-H3 a promising target for sPA imaging. Second, absorption spectra of intracellular and degraded B7-H3-ICG and Isotype control (Iso-ICG) were characterized through in vitro and in vivo experiments. Finally, a transgenic murine breast cancer model (FVB/N-Tg(MMTVPyMT)634Mul) was imaged, and sPA imaging in found a 3.01 (IQR 2.63, 3.38, P<0.001) fold increase in molecular B7-H3-ICG signal in tumors (n=80) compared to control conditions (B7-H3-ICG in tumor negative animals (n=60), Iso-ICG (n=30), blocking B7-H3+B7-H3-ICG (n=20), and free ICG (n=20)) despite significant tumor accumulation of Iso-ICG, confirmed through ex vivo histology. Overall, leveraging anti-B7-H3 antibody-ICG contrast agents, which have dynamic optical absorption spectra representative of molecular interactions, allows for highly specific sPA imaging of murine breast cancer.

  18. Low-frequency sound absorption measurements in air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zuckerwar, A. J.; Meredith, R. W.

    1984-01-01

    Thirty sets of sound absorption measurements in air at a pressure of 1 atmosphere are presented at temperatures from 10 C to 50 C, relative humidities from 0 to 100 percent, and frequencies from 10 to 2500 Hz. The measurements were conducted by the method of free decay in a resonant tube having a length of 18.261 m and bore diameter of 0.152 m. Background measurements in a gas consisting of 89.5 percent N2 and 10.5 percent Ar, a mixture which has the same sound velocity as air, permitted the wall and structural losses of the tube to be separated from the constituent absorption, consisting of classical rotational and vibrational absorption, in the air samples. The data were used to evaluate the vibrational relaxation frequencies of N2 and/or O2 for each of the 30 sets of meteorological parameters. Over the full range of humidity, the measured relaxation frequencies of N2 in air lie between those specified by ANSI Standard S1.26-1978 and those measured earlier in binary N2H2O mixtures. The measured relaxation frequencies could be determined only at very low values of humidity, reveal a significant trend away from the ANSI standard, in agreement with a prior investigation.

  19. The Hyperspectral Absorption Sensor - Advantages and challenges of continuous, in situ absorption coefficient measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wollschläger, J.; Röttgers, R.; Petersen, W.; Zielinski, O.

    2016-12-01

    The marine environment is a highly dynamic system and rapid changes can occur on both spatial and temporal scales. This is especially true for the phytoplankton, which forms the basis of the marine food web. Comprehensive monitoring and investigation of its often patchy distribution and seasonal succession requires sensors which are fast, can be used in situ, and are automatable to reduce operational costs. Optical sensors fulfil all of these requirements. Due to its variety of (sometimes group-specific) photosynthetic and photoprotective pigments, phytoplankton has a considerable influence on the water's inherent and apparent optical properties. This offers the possibility to obtain information about the phytoplankton present by measuring these properties, for example the absorption coefficients of the water at the photosynthetic active wavelengths. However, common obstacles for obtaining high quality absorption coefficient measurements are the often low concentration of absorbing material present as well as errors introduced by light scattering on particles. These problems can be overcome by instruments taking advantage of integrating cavities, like the point-source integrating cavity absorption meter (PSICAM). The Hyperspectral Absorption Sensor (HyAbS) is the result of an attempt to combine the advantages of the PSICAM approach with the high resolution of continuous measurements. Its setup and working principle is described, and challenges and potential solutions with respect to its long-term automated operation are highlighted. This includes the replacement of the dye-based calibration of the instrument by a solid standard calibration. Finally, also results from field test with respect to phytoplankton investigation are given.

  20. Optical absorption, Mössbauer, and FTIR spectroscopic studies of two blue bazzites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taran, Michail N.; Dyar, M. Darby; Khomenko, Vladimir M.; Boesenberg, Joseph S.

    2017-02-01

    Two samples of bazzite, a very rare Sc analog of beryl, from Tørdal, Telemark, Norway and Kent, Central Kazakhstan were studied by electron microprobe, optical absorption, and Mössbauer spectroscopies; the latter sample was also studied by FTIR. Electron microprobe results show that the Norway bazzite is composed of two bazzites with slightly different FeO contents, viz. 5.66 and 5.43 wt%. The Kazakhstan sample consists of several varieties of bazzite displaying strong differences in iron, manganese, magnesium, and aluminum contents (in wt%): FeO from 2.02 to 6.73, MnO from 0.89 to 2.98, MgO from 0.37 to 1.86, and Al2O3 from 0.30 to 1.30. Mössbauer spectroscopy shows different degrees of iron oxidation. The Norway bazzite is completely Fe2+, while the Kazakhstan sample contains roughly equivalent Fe3+ and Fe2+ accommodated in the octahedral site. The difference in iron oxidation causes strong variations in the intensity of the broad optical absorption band around 13,850 cm-1, which is assigned to Fe2+ → Fe3+ IVCT; as a result, there are strong differences in the intensity of blue color. Dichroism (E||c ≫ E⊥c) is much stronger in the Kazakhstan sample than in the Norway one. Intensities of the electronic spin-allowed bands of [6]Fe2+ at 8900 and 10,400 cm-1 are somewhat higher in the latter than in the former. FTIR spectra of the sample from Kent show the presence of only water type II molecules with the H-H vector perpendicular to the c-axis, in contrast to more typical beryls that always show at least weak minor bands of H2O I. This result shows that trapped water molecules in structural channels of studied bazzite occupy only sites next to or between six-membered rings centered by Na atoms. Definite structure can be observed in the vicinities of ν2 and ν3 peaks. Peaks at 1621 and 3663 cm-1 are assigned to "doubly coordinated" H2O (IId), whereas maximums at 1633 and 3643 cm-1 likely represent "singly coordinated" H2O (IIs). Interpretation of the third

  1. Optical absorption, Mössbauer, and FTIR spectroscopic studies of two blue bazzites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taran, Michail N.; Dyar, M. Darby; Khomenko, Vladimir M.; Boesenberg, Joseph S.

    2017-07-01

    Two samples of bazzite, a very rare Sc analog of beryl, from Tørdal, Telemark, Norway and Kent, Central Kazakhstan were studied by electron microprobe, optical absorption, and Mössbauer spectroscopies; the latter sample was also studied by FTIR. Electron microprobe results show that the Norway bazzite is composed of two bazzites with slightly different FeO contents, viz. 5.66 and 5.43 wt%. The Kazakhstan sample consists of several varieties of bazzite displaying strong differences in iron, manganese, magnesium, and aluminum contents (in wt%): FeO from 2.02 to 6.73, MnO from 0.89 to 2.98, MgO from 0.37 to 1.86, and Al2O3 from 0.30 to 1.30. Mössbauer spectroscopy shows different degrees of iron oxidation. The Norway bazzite is completely Fe2+, while the Kazakhstan sample contains roughly equivalent Fe3+ and Fe2+ accommodated in the octahedral site. The difference in iron oxidation causes strong variations in the intensity of the broad optical absorption band around 13,850 cm-1, which is assigned to Fe2+ → Fe3+ IVCT; as a result, there are strong differences in the intensity of blue color. Dichroism ( E|| c ≫ E⊥ c) is much stronger in the Kazakhstan sample than in the Norway one. Intensities of the electronic spin-allowed bands of [6]Fe2+ at 8900 and 10,400 cm-1 are somewhat higher in the latter than in the former. FTIR spectra of the sample from Kent show the presence of only water type II molecules with the H-H vector perpendicular to the c-axis, in contrast to more typical beryls that always show at least weak minor bands of H2O I. This result shows that trapped water molecules in structural channels of studied bazzite occupy only sites next to or between six-membered rings centered by Na atoms. Definite structure can be observed in the vicinities of ν2 and ν3 peaks. Peaks at 1621 and 3663 cm-1 are assigned to "doubly coordinated" H2O (IId), whereas maximums at 1633 and 3643 cm-1 likely represent "singly coordinated" H2O (IIs). Interpretation of the

  2. Spectrum of excess partial molar absorptivity. I. Near infrared spectroscopic study of aqueous acetonitrile and acetone.

    PubMed

    Koga, Yoshikata; Sebe, Fumie; Minami, Takamasa; Otake, Keiko; Saitow, Ken-ichi; Nishikawa, Keiko

    2009-09-03

    We study the mixing schemes or the molecular processes occurring in aqueous acetonitrile (ACN) and acetone (ACT) by near-infrared spectroscopy (NIR). Both solutions (any other aqueous solutions) are not free from strong and complex intermolecular interactions. To tackle such a many-body problem, we first use the concept of the excess molar absorptivity, epsilonE, which is a function of solute mole fraction in addition to that of wavenumber, nu. The plots of epsilonE calculated from NIR spectra for both aqueous solutions against nu showed two clearly separated bands at 5020 and 5230 cm(-1); the former showed negative and the latter positive peaks. At zero and unity mole fractions of solute, epsilonE is identically zero independent of nu. Similar to the thermodynamic excess functions, both negative and positive bands grow in size from zero to the minimum (or the maximum) and back to zero, as the mole fraction varies from 0 to 1. Since the negative band's nu-locus coincides with the NIR spectrum of ice, and the positive with that of liquid H(2)O, we suggest that on addition of solute the "ice-likeness" decreases and the "liquid-likeness" increases, reminiscent of the two-mixture model for liquid H(2)O. The modes of these variations, however, are qualitatively different between ACN-H(2)O and ACT-H(2)O. The former ACN is known to act as a hydrophobe and ACT as a hydrophile from our previous thermodynamic studies. To see the difference more clearly, we introduced and calculated the excess partial molar absorptivity of ACN and ACT, epsilon(E)(N) and epsilon(E)(T), respectively. The mole fraction dependences of epsilon(E)(N) and epsilon(E)(T) show qualitatively different behavior and are consistent with the detailed mixing schemes elucidated by our earlier differential thermodynamic studies. Furthermore, we found in the H(2)O-rich region that the effect of hydrophobic ACN is acted on the negative band at 5020 cm(-1), while that of hydrophilic ACT is on the positive high

  3. Absorptance Measurements of Optical Coatings - A Round Robin

    SciTech Connect

    Chow, R; Taylor, J R; Wu, Z L; Boccara, C A; Broulik, U; Commandre, M; DiJon, J; Fleig, C; Giesen, A; Fan, Z X; Kuo, P K; Lalezari, R; Moncur, K; Obramski, H-J; Reicher, D; Ristau, D; Roche, P; Steiger, B; Thomsen, M; von Gunten, M

    2000-10-26

    An international round robin study was conducted on the absorption measurement of laser-quality coatings. Sets of optically coated samples were made by a ''reactive DC magnetron'' sputtering and an ion beam sputtering deposition process. The sample set included a high reflector at 514 nm and a high reflector for the near infrared (1030 to 1318 nm), single layers of silicon dioxide, tantalum pentoxide, and hafnium dioxide. For calibration purposes, a sample metalized with hafnium and an uncoated, superpolished fused silica substrate were also included. The set was sent to laboratory groups for absorptance measurement of these coatings. Whenever possible, each group was to measure a common, central area and another area specifically assigned to the respective group. Specific test protocols were also suggested in regards to the laser exposure time, power density, and surface preparation.

  4. Ozone absorption coefficients' role in Dobson instrument ozone measurement accuracy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basher, R. E.

    1982-11-01

    The differences of 10% or more between the laboratory measurements of UV absorption coefficients by different investigators indicate accuracies that are quite inadequate for current needs in the measurement of atmospheric ozone. The standard band-integrated set of coefficients now used with the Dobson instrument are mutually consistent to about 2%, but their absolute accuracy is still in question. The accurate calculation of band-integrated coefficients must take account of their dependence on source spectral irradiance, atmospheric spectral transmittance, mean ozone temperature, and instrument spectral transmittance. A careful examination shows that Komhyr's (1980) case for an error of about +5% in the standard Dobson AD ozone estimation is subject to large uncertainties and certain lacks of independence. The obvious solution to this accuracy problem lies in better laboratory measurements of ozone absorption.

  5. Scattering error corrections for in situ absorption and attenuation measurements.

    PubMed

    McKee, David; Piskozub, Jacek; Brown, Ian

    2008-11-24

    Monte Carlo simulations are used to establish a weighting function that describes the collection of angular scattering for the WETLabs AC-9 reflecting tube absorption meter. The equivalent weighting function for the AC-9 attenuation sensor is found to be well approximated by a binary step function with photons scattered between zero and the collection half-width angle contributing to the scattering error and photons scattered at larger angles making zero contribution. A new scattering error correction procedure is developed that accounts for scattering collection artifacts in both absorption and attenuation measurements. The new correction method does not assume zero absorption in the near infrared (NIR), does not assume a wavelength independent scattering phase function, but does require simultaneous measurements of spectrally matched particulate backscattering. The new method is based on an iterative approach that assumes that the scattering phase function can be adequately modeled from estimates of particulate backscattering ratio and Fournier-Forand phase functions. It is applied to sets of in situ data representative of clear ocean water, moderately turbid coastal water and highly turbid coastal water. Initial results suggest significantly higher levels of attenuation and absorption than those obtained using previously published scattering error correction procedures. Scattering signals from each correction procedure have similar magnitudes but significant differences in spectral distribution are observed.

  6. Solar absorptance measurements in space on operational spacecraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babel, Hank W.; Jones, Cherie A.; Wilkes, Donald R.; Linton, Roger C.

    1995-07-01

    Spacecraft hardware such as radiators requires the maintenance of solar absorptance within tight bounds for their design life. Such hardware is sized in part based on the beginning- and end-of-life absorptance. It has been difficult to make accurate end-of-life determinations based on either ground based data or flight data. The synergistic effect of atomic oxygen, ultraviolet radiation, and contamination has made it difficult to duplicate space exposures in the laboratory. The absorptance of flight exposed samples brought back to earth are not representative of the conditions in space because of changes brought about by exposure to air. This paper proposes to augment the current in-space monitoring techniques with periodic, in- space, direct measurements of the solar absorptance on operational hardware. NASA funded AZ Technology to develop a portable, space-rated device similar to the LPSR-200 portable spectroreflectometer, a space portable spectroreflectometer (SPSR). This instrument is robotically compatible and can be run using spacecraft power or batteries. The instrument also has measurement storage capacity for later retrieval and evaluation. Although extensive development work has already been completed, authorization to build a unit for a flight experiment has not been received. The Russians have expressed an interest in having absorptance measurements made on their MIR I Space Station as part of the NASA/MIR flight experiments. Proposals are currently being made to obtain authorization for the construction and use of SPSR on NASA/MIR flight experiments, to help mitigate potential problems for the International Space Station Alpha (ISSA).

  7. Decay Heat Measurements Using Total Absorption Gamma-ray Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rice, S.; Valencia, E.; Algora, A.; Taín, J. L.; Regan, P. H.; Podolyák, Z.; Agramunt, J.; Gelletly, W.; Nichols, A. L.

    2012-09-01

    A knowledge of the decay heat emitted by thermal neutron-irradiated nuclear fuel is an important factor in ensuring safe reactor design and operation, spent fuel removal from the core, and subsequent storage prior to and after reprocessing, and waste disposal. Decay heat can be readily calculated from the nuclear decay properties of the fission products, actinides and their decay products as generated within the irradiated fuel. Much of the information comes from experiments performed with HPGe detectors, which often underestimate the beta feeding to states at high excitation energies. This inability to detect high-energy gamma emissions effectively results in the derivation of decay schemes that suffer from the pandemonium effect, although such a serious problem can be avoided through application of total absorption γ-ray spectroscopy (TAS). The beta decay of key radionuclei produced as a consequence of the neutron-induced fission of 235U and 239Pu are being re-assessed by means of this spectroscopic technique. A brief synopsis is given of the Valencia-Surrey (BaF2) TAS detector, and their method of operation, calibration and spectral analysis.

  8. Evanescent wave absorption measurements of corroded materials using ATR and optical fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Namkung, Juock; Hoke, Mike; Schwartz, Andy

    2011-06-01

    The purpose of this research effort is to develop an in-situ corrosion sensing capability. The technique will permit detection of corrosion on and within aircraft structures. This includes component junctions that are susceptible to corrosion but which are not accessible for visual inspection. The prototype experimental configuration we are developing includes long wave infrared transmitting optical fiber probes interfaced with a Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) interferometer for evanescent wave absorption spectroscopic measurements. The mature and fielded technique will allow periodic remote sensing for detection of corrosion and for general onboard aircraft structural health monitoring. An experimental setup using an Attenuated Total Reflection (ATR) crystal integrated with an FTIR spectrometer has been assembled. Naturally occurring corrosion including Aluminum Hydroxide [Al(OH)3] is one of the main corrosion products of aluminum the principle structural metal of aircraft. Absorption spectra of our model corrosion product, pure Al(OH)3, have been collected with this ATR/FTIR experimental setup. The Al(OH)3spectra serve as reference spectral signatures. The spectra of corrosion samples from a simulated corrosion process have been collected and compared with the reference Al(OH)3 spectra. Also absorption spectra of naturally occurring corrosion collected from a fielded corroded aircraft part have been obtained and compared with the spectra from the simulated corrosion.

  9. Absorption spectroscopic study of synergistic extraction of praseodymium with benzoyl acetone in presence of crown ether.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Shrabanti; Bhattacharya, Sumanta; Basu, Sukalyan

    2005-04-01

    The extraction behaviour of Pr(III) from aqueous nitric acid medium employing benzoylacetone has been studied in presence of two crown ethers, viz., 15-crown-5 and benzo-15-crown-5 in chloroform medium using UV-vis absorption spectroscopy. The binary equilibrium constant (logk(ex)) for the complex [Pr(benzoylacetonate)(NO3(-))2(H(2)O)] in organic phase was found to be 1.170. The overall equilibrium constants (logK) for the ternary species [Pr(benzoylacetonate)(crown ether)(NO3(-))(2)] were estimated to be 4.01 and 4.41 for 15-crown-5 and benzo-15-crown-5, respectively. The trend in the equilibrium constant values were very much in accordance with the nature of substitution of the donor moiety. The extraction of Pr(III) by the benzoylacetone-crown ether combination was maximum at pH 3.0 and extraction decreases with increase in pH. It has been found that the extent of extraction of Pr(III) in organic phase as the binary as well as ternary complex [Pr(benzoylacetonate)(NO3(-))(2)(H(2)O)] and [Pr(benzoylacetonate)(crown ether)(NO3(-))(2)] increases with increase in concentration of the ligand. Similar trend is observed in the extraction by only donors. Enthalpies and entropies of formation for the ternary extraction process have been estimated. In addition, the effect of NaNO(3) as foreign salt was also studied and it was observed that with increase in ionic strength, percentage extraction increases.

  10. Spectroscopic measurements of total CFC-11 freon in the atmosphere near St. Petersburg

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yagovkina, I. S.; Polyakov, A. V.; Poberovskii, A. V.; Timofeev, Yu. M.

    2011-04-01

    On the basis of ground based measurements of the infrared spectra of solar radiation with a high spectral resolution, estimates of total CFC-11 freon content in the atmosphere near St. Petersburg in January and May 2009 have been yielded in Russia for the first time. These data are conformed to various independent measurements within the limits of spectroscopic measurement errors.

  11. Flame inhibition by hydrogen halides - Some spectroscopic measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lerner, N. R.; Cagliostro, D. E.

    1973-01-01

    The far-ultraviolet absorption spectrum of an air-propane diffusion flame inhibited with hydrogen halides has been studied. Plots of the absorption of light by hydrogen halides as a function of position in the flame and also as a function of the amount of hydrogen halide added to the flame have been obtained. The hydrogen halides are shown to be more stable on the fuel side of the reaction zone than they are on the air side. Thermal diffusion is seen to be important in determining the concentration distribution of the heavier hydrogen halides in diffusion flames. The relationship between the concentration distribution of the hydrogen halides in the flame and the flame inhibition mechanism is discussed.

  12. Flame inhibition by hydrogen halides - Some spectroscopic measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lerner, N. R.; Cagliostro, D. E.

    1973-01-01

    The far-ultraviolet absorption spectrum of an air-propane diffusion flame inhibited with hydrogen halides has been studied. Plots of the absorption of light by hydrogen halides as a function of position in the flame and also as a function of the amount of hydrogen halide added to the flame have been obtained. The hydrogen halides are shown to be more stable on the fuel side of the reaction zone than they are on the air side. Thermal diffusion is seen to be important in determining the concentration distribution of the heavier hydrogen halides in diffusion flames. The relationship between the concentration distribution of the hydrogen halides in the flame and the flame inhibition mechanism is discussed.

  13. Excited State Absorption Measurements In Some Scintillator Dye Solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dharamsi, A., N.; Jong, Shawpin; Hassam, A. B.

    1986-11-01

    Time-resolved excited state triplet-triplet absorption spectra were measured for solutions of 2,5 diphenyloxazole (PPO) and 2,1 napthyl, 5 phenyloxazole (aNPO) in several solvents. Concentration quenching effects due to excimer formation in nonaromatic solvents were observed. A numerical analysis of the experimental results yielded the rate constants for intersystem crossing, triplet quenching by 02, triplet self quenching and the formation of excimers.

  14. Direct absorption measurements in thin rods and optical fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mühlig, Christian; Bublitz, Simon; Lorenz, Martin

    2015-11-01

    We report on the first realization of direct absorption measurements in thin rods and optical fibers using the laser induced deflection (LID) technique. Typically, along the fiber processing chain more or less technology steps are able to introduce additional losses to the starting material. After the final processing, the fibers are commonly characterized regarding losses using the so-called cut-back technique in combination with spectrometers. This, however, only serves for a total loss determination. For optimization of the fiber processing, it would be of great interest to not only distinguish between different loss mechanisms but also have a better understanding of possible causes. For measuring the absorption losses along the fiber processing, a particular concept for the LID technique is introduced and requirements, calibration procedure as well as first results are presented. It allows to measure thin rods, e.g. during preform manufacturing, as well as optical fibers. In addition, the results show the prospects to also apply the new concept to topics like characterizing unwanted absorption after fiber splicing or Bragg grating inscription.

  15. Comparison of spectroscopically measured tissue alcohol concentration to blood and breath alcohol measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ridder, Trent D.; Ver Steeg, Benjamin J.; Laaksonen, Bentley D.

    2009-09-01

    Alcohol testing is an expanding area of interest due to the impacts of alcohol abuse that extend well beyond drunk driving. However, existing approaches such as blood and urine assays are hampered in some testing environments by biohazard risks. A noninvasive, in vivo spectroscopic technique offers a promising alternative, as no body fluids are required. The purpose of this work is to report the results of a 36-subject clinical study designed to characterize tissue alcohol measured using near-infrared spectroscopy relative to venous blood, capillary blood, and breath alcohol. Comparison of blood and breath alcohol concentrations demonstrated significant differences in alcohol concentration [root mean square of 9.0 to 13.5 mg/dL] that were attributable to both assay accuracy and precision as well as alcohol pharmacokinetics. A first-order kinetic model was used to estimate the contribution of alcohol pharmacokinetics to the differences in concentration observed between the blood, breath, and tissue assays. All pair-wise combinations of alcohol assays were investigated, and the fraction of the alcohol concentration variance explained by pharmacokinetics ranged from 41.0% to 83.5%. Accounting for pharmacokinetic concentration differences, the accuracy and precision of the spectroscopic tissue assay were found to be comparable to those of the blood and breath assays.

  16. The Importance of Optical Pathlength Control for Plasma Absorption Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cruden, Brett A.; Rao, M. V. V. S.; Sharma, Surendra P.; Meyyappan, M.; Partridge, Harry (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    An inductively coupled GEC Cell with modified viewing ports has been used to measure in-situ absorption in CF4 plasmas via Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy, and the results compared to those obtained in a standard viewport configuration. The viewing ports were modified so that the window boundary is inside, rather than outside, of the GEC cell. Because the absorption obtained is a spatially integrated absorption, measurements made represent an averaging of absorbing species inside and outside of the plasma. This modification is made to reduce this spatial averaging and thus allow a more accurate estimation of neutral species concentrations and temperatures within the plasmas. By reducing this pathlength, we find that the apparent CF4 consumption increases from 65% to 95% and the apparent vibrational temperature of CF4 rises by 50-75 K. The apparent fraction of etch product SiF4 decreases from 4% to 2%. The data suggests that these density changes may be due to significant temperature gradients between the plasma and chamber viewports.

  17. Integrated measurements of 222Rn by absorption in Makrofol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pressyanov, Dobromir; Buysse, Jozef; Poffijn, André; Van Deynse, Annick; Meesen, Geert

    2004-01-01

    Recently, a method for long-term 222Rn measurements based on the radon absorption ability and track-etch properties of Makrofol has been proposed. The basic idea is to remove, after exposure, a surface layer, thicker than the range of the α-particles of the 222Rn or 220Rn progenies, and to study the track density of the electrochemically etched tracks at that depth. This paper summarizes the performance of the method under laboratory and field conditions. The effects on the response due to differences in pressure, temperature, humidity, the presence of 220Rn, dust and cigarette smoke in the air have been studied experimentally. The effect of these factors, but the temperature, is either absent, or restricted to about 10% for the very extreme cases. The variation of the response at the studied depth of 83 μm over the temperature interval 15-25°C is ±12% around the 19.5°C value. The field comparison conducted showed an agreement between the method of radon absorption in Makrofol and the conventional diffusion chambers. Therefore, a potential for long-term 222Rn measurements in the human environment by radon absorption in Makrofol or equivalent polycarbonates clearly exists.

  18. Interpreting measurements obtained with the cloud absorption radiometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    The software developed for the analysis of data from the Cloud Absorption Radiometer (CAR) is discussed. The CAR is a multichannel radiometer designed to measure the radiation field in the middle of an optically thick cloud (the diffusion domain). It can also measure the surface albedo and escape function. The instrument currently flies on a C-131A aircraft operated by the University of Washington. Most of this data was collected during the First International satellite cloud climatology project Regional Experiment (FIRE) Marine Stratocumulus Intensive Field Observation program off San Diego during July 1987. Earlier flights of the CAR have also been studied.

  19. Transient Infrared Measurement of Laser Absorption Properties of Porous Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marynowicz, Andrzej

    2016-06-01

    The infrared thermography measurements of porous building materials have become more frequent in recent years. Many accompanying techniques for the thermal field generation have been developed, including one based on laser radiation. This work presents a simple optimization technique for estimation of the laser beam absorption for selected porous building materials, namely clinker brick and cement mortar. The transient temperature measurements were performed with the use of infrared camera during laser-induced heating-up of the samples' surfaces. As the results, the absorbed fractions of the incident laser beam together with its shape parameter are reported.

  20. Excited-state absorption measurements of Tm3+-doped crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szela, J. W.; Mackenzie, J. I.

    2012-06-01

    High resolution, absolute excited-state absorption (ESA) spectra, at room temperature, from the long-lived 3F4 energy level of several crystals doped with trivalent thulium (Tm3+) ions have been measured employing high-brightness narrowband (FWHM <30 nm) light emitting diodes (LEDs) as a probe wavelength. The aim of this investigation was to determine the strength of ESA channels at wavelengths addressable by commercially available semiconductor laser diodes operating around 630-680 nm. The favourable lifetime of the 3F4 manifold and negligible ground-state absorption (GSA) for the red-wavelength second-step excitation, ensures a direct and efficient route for a dual-wavelength pumping scheme of the thulium ion, which will enable blue-green laser emission from its 1G4 upper-laser level.

  1. Preliminary Spectroscopic Measurements for a Gallium Electromagnetic (GEM) Thruster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, Robert E.; Burton, Rodney L.; Glumac, Nick G.; Polzin, Kurt A.

    2007-01-01

    As a propellant option for electromagnetic thrusters, liquid ,gallium appears to have several advantages relative to other propellants. The merits of using gallium in an electromagnetic thruster (EMT) are discussed and estimates of discharge current levels and mass flow rates yielding efficient operation are given. The gallium atomic weight of 70 predicts high efficiency in the 1500-2000 s specific impulse range, making it ideal for higher-thrust, near-Earth missions. A spatially and temporally broad spectroscopic survey in the 220-520 nm range is used to determine which species are present in the plasma and estimate electron temperature. The spectra show that neutral, singly, and doubly ionized gallium species are present in a 20 J, 1.8 kA (peak) are discharge. With graphite present on the insulator to facilitate breakdown, singly and doubly ionized carbon atoms are also present, and emission is observed from molecular carbon (CZ) radicals. A determination of the electron temperature was attempted using relative emission line data, and while the spatially and temporally averaged, spectra don't fit well to single temperatures, the data and presence of doubly ionized gallium are consistent with distributions in the 1-3 eV range.

  2. Determining the Uncertainty of X-Ray Absorption Measurements

    PubMed Central

    Wojcik, Gary S.

    2004-01-01

    X-ray absorption (or more properly, x-ray attenuation) techniques have been applied to study the moisture movement in and moisture content of materials like cement paste, mortar, and wood. An increase in the number of x-ray counts with time at a location in a specimen may indicate a decrease in moisture content. The uncertainty of measurements from an x-ray absorption system, which must be known to properly interpret the data, is often assumed to be the square root of the number of counts, as in a Poisson process. No detailed studies have heretofore been conducted to determine the uncertainty of x-ray absorption measurements or the effect of averaging data on the uncertainty. In this study, the Poisson estimate was found to adequately approximate normalized root mean square errors (a measure of uncertainty) of counts for point measurements and profile measurements of water specimens. The Poisson estimate, however, was not reliable in approximating the magnitude of the uncertainty when averaging data from paste and mortar specimens. Changes in uncertainty from differing averaging procedures were well-approximated by a Poisson process. The normalized root mean square errors decreased when the x-ray source intensity, integration time, collimator size, and number of scanning repetitions increased. Uncertainties in mean paste and mortar count profiles were kept below 2 % by averaging vertical profiles at horizontal spacings of 1 mm or larger with counts per point above 4000. Maximum normalized root mean square errors did not exceed 10 % in any of the tests conducted. PMID:27366627

  3. Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL) Measurements from Air and Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Browell, E. V.; Ismail, S.; Grant, W. B.

    1998-01-01

    Differential absorption lidar (DIAL) systems have been used for the measurement of ozone, water vapor, and aerosols from aircraft platforms for over 18 years, yielding new insights into atmospheric chemistry, composition, and dynamics in large-scale field experiments conducted all over the world. The successful deployment of the lidar in-space technology experiment (LITE) in September 1994 demonstrated that space-based lidars can also collect valuable information on the global atmosphere. This paper reviews some of the contributions of the NASA Langley Research Center's airborne ozone and water vapor DIAL systems and space-based LITE system to the understanding of the atmosphere and discusses the feasibility and advantages of putting DIAL systems in space for routine atmospheric measurements of ozone and/or water vapor and aerosols and clouds. The technology and applications of the differential absorption lidar (DIAL) technique have progressed significantly since the first DIAL measurements of Schotland, and airborne DIAL measurements of ozone and water vapor are frequently being made in a wide range of field experiments. In addition, plans are underway to develop DIAL systems for use on satellites for continuous global measurements. This paper will highlight the history of airborne lidar and DIAL systems, summarize the major accomplishments of the NASA Langley DIAL program, and discuss specifications and goals for DIAL systems in space.

  4. A spectroscopic study on the absorption of carbonic anhydrase onto the nanoporous silica nanoparticle.

    PubMed

    Khameneh, Hannaneh Pourjabbari; Bolouri, Termeh Ghorbanian; Nemati, Fahimeh; Rezvani, Fatemeh; Attar, Farnoosh; Saboury, Ali Akbar; Falahati, Mojtaba

    2017-06-01

    Herein, KIT-6 nanoporous silica nanoparticles were used as a solid support for immobilization of bovine carbonic anhydrase, isoform II (BCA II). The zeta potential study revealed that KIT-6 and BCA II provided negative (-13.58±1.95mV) and positive (4.23±0.72mV) charge distribution, respectively. Dynamic light scattering (DLS) analysis also showed that the hydrodynamic radius of KIT-6 is less than 100nm. In addition, the structural studies of free and immobilized BCA II against urea-induced denaturation were investigated by circular dichroism (CD) and fluorescence spectroscopy. CD studies showed that the absorbed BCA II, in comparison with the free enzyme, demonstrated higher stability against rising urea concentration. Fluorescence spectroscopy showed lower values of Stern- Volmer constant (KSV) for immobilized BCA II relative to free enzyme, reflecting the relative enzyme stability of BCA II after immobilization. Melting temperature (Tm) measurement of free and immobilized BCA II showed that immobilized enzyme had a more stable structure (Tm=71.9°C) relative to the free counterpart (Tm=64.7°C). In addition, the immobilized BCA II showed pronounced stability against pH and thermal deactivation. This study may provide new and complementary details regarding the design and development of enzymes in industrial applications.

  5. Spectroscopic Measurements of the Far-Ultraviolet Dust Attenuation Curve at z ˜ 3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reddy, Naveen A.; Steidel, Charles C.; Pettini, Max; Bogosavljević, Milan

    2016-09-01

    We present the first spectroscopic measurements of the shape of the far-ultraviolet (far-UV; λ =950{--}1500 Å) dust attenuation curve at high redshift (z˜ 3). Our analysis employs rest-frame UV spectra of 933 galaxies at z˜ 3, 121 of which have very deep spectroscopic observations (≳ 7 hr) at λ =850{--}1300 \\mathring{{A}} , with the Low Resolution Imaging Spectrograph on the Keck Telescope. By using an iterative approach in which we calculate the ratios of composite spectra in different bins of continuum color excess, E(B-V), we derive a dust curve that implies a lower attenuation in the far-UV for a given E(B-V) than those obtained with standard attenuation curves. We demonstrate that the UV composite spectra of z˜ 3 galaxies can be modeled well by assuming our new attenuation curve, a high covering fraction of H i, and absorption from the Lyman-Werner bands of {{{H}}}2 with a small (≲ 20 % ) covering fraction. The low covering fraction of {{{H}}}2 relative to that of the {{H}} {{I}} and dust suggests that most of the dust in the ISM of typical galaxies at z˜ 3 is unrelated to the catalysis of {{{H}}}2, and is associated with other phases of the ISM (i.e., the ionized and neutral gas). The far-UV dust curve implies a factor of ≈ 2 lower dust attenuation of Lyman continuum (ionizing) photons relative to those inferred from the most commonly assumed attenuation curves for L* galaxies at z˜ 3. Our results may be utilized to assess the degree to which ionizing photons are attenuated in H ii regions or, more generally, in the ionized or low column density (N({{H}} {{I}})≲ {10}17.2 cm-2) neutral ISM of high-redshift galaxies. Based on data obtained at the W.M. Keck Observatory, which is operated as a scientific partnership among the California Institute of Technology, the University of California, and NASA, and was made possible by the generous financial support of the W.M. Keck Foundation.

  6. Absorption and emission spectroscopic characterization of photo-dynamics of photoactivated adenylyl cyclase mutant bPAC-Y7F of Beggiatoa sp.

    PubMed

    Penzkofer, Alfons; Stierl, Manuela; Mathes, Tilo; Hegemann, Peter

    2014-11-01

    The photoactivated cyclase bPAC of the microbial mats bacterium Beggiatoa sp. consists of a BLUF domain and an adenylyl cyclase domain. It has strong activity of photo-induced cyclic adenylyl monophosphate (cAMP) formation and is therefore an important optogenetic tool in neuroscience applications. The SUMO-bPAC-Y7F mutant where Tyr-7 is replaced by Phe-7 in the BLUF domain has lost the typical BLUF domain photo-cycle dynamics. Instead, the investigated SUMO-bPAC-Y7F mutant consisted of three protein conformations with different triplet based photo-dynamics: (i) reversible flavin quinone (Fl) cofactor reduction to flavin semiquinone (FlH), (ii) reversible violet/near ultraviolet absorbing flavin photoproduct (FlA) formation, and (iii) irreversible red absorbing flavin photoproduct (FlC) formation. Absorption and emission spectroscopic measurements on SUMO-bPAC-Y7F were carried out before, during and after light exposure. Flavin photo-dynamics schemes are developed for the SUMO-bPAC-Y7F fractions performing photo-induced FlH, FlA, and FlC formation. Quantitative parameters of the flavin cofactor excitation, relaxation and recovery dynamics in SUMO-bPAC-Y7F are determined.

  7. Reactivity of chromium(III) nutritional supplements in biological media: an X-ray absorption spectroscopic study.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Annie; Mulyani, Irma; Levina, Aviva; Lay, Peter A

    2008-05-19

    Chromium(III) nutritional supplements are widely used due to their purported ability to enhance glucose metabolism, despite growing evidence on low activity and the potential genotoxicity of these compounds. Reactivities of Cr(III) complexes used in nutritional formulations, including [Cr3O(OCOEt)6(OH2)3](+) (A), [Cr(pic)3] (pic=2-pyridinecarboxylato(-) (B), and trans-[CrCl2(OH2)4](+) (CrCl3.6H2O; C), in a range of natural and simulated biological media (artificial digestion systems, blood and its components, cell culture media, and intact L6 rat skeletal muscle cells) were studied by X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy. The XANES spectroscopic data were processed by multiple linear-regression analyses with the use of a library of model Cr(III) compounds, and the results were corroborated by the results of X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy and electrospray mass spectrometry. Complexes A and B underwent extensive ligand-exchange reactions under conditions of combined gastric and intestinal digestion (in the presence of a semisynthetic meal, 3 h at 310 K), as well as in blood serum and in a cell culture medium (1-24 h at 310 K), with the formation of Cr(III) complexes with hydroxo and amino acid/protein ligands. Reactions of compounds A-C with cultured muscle cells led to similar ligand-exchange products, with at least part of Cr(III) bound to the surface of the cells. The reactions of B with serum greatly enhanced its propensity to be converted to Cr(VI) by biological oxidants (H2O2 or glucose oxidase system), which is proposed to be a major cause of both the insulin-enhancing activity and toxicity of Cr(III) compounds (Mulyani, I.; Levina, A.; Lay, P. A. Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 2004, 43, 4504-4507). This finding enhances the current concern over the safety of consumption of large doses of Cr(III) supplements, particularly [Cr(pic)3].

  8. Reactivity of Chromium(III) Nutritional Supplements in Biological Media: An X-Ray Absorption Spectroscopic Study

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, A.; Mulyani, I.; Levina, A.; Lay, P.A.

    2009-05-22

    Chromium(III) nutritional supplements are widely used due to their purported ability to enhance glucose metabolism, despite growing evidence on low activity and the potential genotoxicity of these compounds. Reactivities of Cr(III) complexes used in nutritional formulations, including [Cr3O(OCOEt)6(OH2)3]+ (A), [Cr(pic)3] (pic) = 2-pyridinecarboxylato(-) (B), and trans-[CrCl2(OH2)4]+ (CrCl3 {center_dot} 6H2O; C), in a range of natural and simulated biological media (artificial digestion systems, blood and its components, cell culture media, and intact L6 rat skeletal muscle cells) were studied by X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy. The XANES spectroscopic data were processed by multiple linear-regression analyses with the use of a library of model Cr(III) compounds, and the results were corroborated by the results of X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy and electrospray mass spectrometry. Complexes A and B underwent extensive ligand-exchange reactions under conditions of combined gastric and intestinal digestion (in the presence of a semisynthetic meal, 3 h at 310 K), as well as in blood serum and in a cell culture medium (1-24 h at 310 K), with the formation of Cr(III) complexes with hydroxo and amino acid/protein ligands. Reactions of compounds A-C with cultured muscle cells led to similar ligand-exchange products, with at least part of Cr(III) bound to the surface of the cells. The reactions of B with serum greatly enhanced its propensity to be converted to Cr(VI) by biological oxidants (H2O2 or glucose oxidase system), which is proposed to be a major cause of both the insulin-enhancing activity and toxicity of Cr(III) compounds (Mulyani, I.; Levina, A.; Lay, P. A. Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 2004, 43, 4504-4507). This finding enhances the current concern over the safety of consumption of large doses of Cr(III) supplements, particularly [Cr(pic)3].

  9. An interpretation of the near-ultraviolet absorption spectrum of SO2 - Implications for Venus, Io, and laboratory measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Belton, M. J. S.

    1982-01-01

    Line characteristics of remotely sensed SO2 spectra near the UV are discussed, noting the implications for the interpretation of data gathered by the IUE of Io and ground-based and Pioneer spectra of Venus. It is shown that the ratio of mean line spacing to linewidth is greater than unity, and that fully resolved lines have features consistent with concepts of temperature and pressure broadening. The application of Beer's approximation for the absorption spectra of Venus and Io atmospheres is found to be incorrect. Further, the spectroscopic limit on the SO2 line data from Io observations by the IUE are interpreted as establishing a lower bound on the SO2 in the Io atmosphere. A greater concentration of SO2 in vapor equilibrium may be present in the lower atmosphere. Laboratory measurements to resolve the uncertainties regarding the UV spectroscopic data from Io and Venus are suggested.

  10. An interpretation of the near-ultraviolet absorption spectrum of SO2 - Implications for Venus, Io, and laboratory measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Belton, M. J. S.

    1982-01-01

    Line characteristics of remotely sensed SO2 spectra near the UV are discussed, noting the implications for the interpretation of data gathered by the IUE of Io and ground-based and Pioneer spectra of Venus. It is shown that the ratio of mean line spacing to linewidth is greater than unity, and that fully resolved lines have features consistent with concepts of temperature and pressure broadening. The application of Beer's approximation for the absorption spectra of Venus and Io atmospheres is found to be incorrect. Further, the spectroscopic limit on the SO2 line data from Io observations by the IUE are interpreted as establishing a lower bound on the SO2 in the Io atmosphere. A greater concentration of SO2 in vapor equilibrium may be present in the lower atmosphere. Laboratory measurements to resolve the uncertainties regarding the UV spectroscopic data from Io and Venus are suggested.

  11. Measurement of Scattering and Absorption Cross Sections of Dyed Microspheres

    PubMed Central

    Gaigalas, Adolfas K; Choquette, Steven; Zhang, Yu-Zhong

    2013-01-01

    Measurements of absorbance and fluorescence emission were carried out on aqueous suspensions of polystyrene (PS) microspheres with a diameter of 2.5 µm using a spectrophotometer with an integrating sphere detector. The apparatus and the principles of measurements were described in our earlier publications. Microspheres with and without green BODIPY@ dye were measured. Placing the suspension inside an integrating sphere (IS) detector of the spectrophotometer yielded (after a correction for fluorescence emission) the absorbance (called A in the text) due to absorption by BODIPY@ dye inside the microsphere. An estimate of the absorbance due to scattering alone was obtained by subtracting the corrected BODIPY@ dye absorbance (A) from the measured absorbance of a suspension placed outside the IS detector (called A1 in the text). The absorption of the BODIPY@ dye inside the microsphere was analyzed using an imaginary index of refraction parameterized with three Gaussian-Lorentz functions. The Kramer-Kronig relation was used to estimate the contribution of the BODIPY@ dye to the real part of the microsphere index of refraction. The complex index of refraction, obtained from the analysis of A, was used to analyze the absorbance due to scattering ((A1- A) in the text). In practice, the analysis of the scattering absorbance, A1-A, and the absorbance, A, was carried out in an iterative manner. It was assumed that A depended primarily on the imaginary part of the microsphere index of refraction with the other parameters playing a secondary role. Therefore A was first analyzed using values of the other parameters obtained from a fit to the absorbance due to scattering, A1-A, with the imaginary part neglected. The imaginary part obtained from the analysis of A was then used to reanalyze A1-A, and obtain better estimates of the other parameters. After a few iterations, consistent estimates were obtained of the scattering and absorption cross sections in the wavelength region 300

  12. Ground-based infrared spectroscopic measurements of atmospheric hydrogen cyanide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rinsland, C. P.; Smith, M. A. H.; Rinsland, P. L.; Goldman, A.; Brault, J. W.; Stokes, G. M.

    1982-01-01

    A number of lines of the nu-3 band of hydrogen cyanide have been detected in solar absorption spectra recorded near sunrise and sunset at Kitt Peak National Observatory (elevation 2095 m) with a 0.01/cm resolution Fourier transform spectrometer. Analysis of two of the strongest and best isolated lines has led to a value of 2.73 x 10 to the 15th molecules/sq cm for the vertical column abundance of HCN above Kitt Peak. The accuracy of this value is estimated as + or - 25%. This result, combined with the stratospheric concentration of HCN derived by Coffey, Mankin, and Cicerone (1981), yields 166 parts per trillion by volume for the average mixing ratio of HCN between 2 and 12 km. This is the first determination of the HCN concentration in the nonurban troposphere.

  13. The Cassini mission: Infrared and microwave spectroscopic measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kunde, V. G.

    1989-01-01

    The Cassini Orbiter and Titan Probe model payloads include a number of infrared and microwave instruments. This document describes: (1) the fundamental scientific objectives for Saturn and Titan which can be addressed by infrared and microwave instrumentation, (2) the instrument requirements and the accompanying instruments, and (3) the synergism resulting from the comprehensive coverage of the total infrared and microwave spectrum by the complement of individual instruments. The baseline consists of four instruments on the orbiter and two on the Titan probe. The orbiter infrared instruments are: (1) a microwave spectrometer and radiometer; (2) a far to mid-infrared spectrometer; (3) a pressure modulation gas correlation spectrometer, and (4) a near-infrared grating spectrometer. The two Titan probe infrared instruments are: (1) a near-infrared instrument, and (2) a tunable diode laser infrared absorption spectrometer and nephelometer.

  14. Absorptivity Measurements and Heat Source Modeling to Simulate Laser Cladding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wirth, Florian; Eisenbarth, Daniel; Wegener, Konrad

    The laser cladding process gains importance, as it does not only allow the application of surface coatings, but also additive manufacturing of three-dimensional parts. In both cases, process simulation can contribute to process optimization. Heat source modeling is one of the main issues for an accurate model and simulation of the laser cladding process. While the laser beam intensity distribution is readily known, the other two main effects on the process' heat input are non-trivial. Namely the measurement of the absorptivity of the applied materials as well as the powder attenuation. Therefore, calorimetry measurements were carried out. The measurement method and the measurement results for laser cladding of Stellite 6 on structural steel S 235 and for the processing of Inconel 625 are presented both using a CO2 laser as well as a high power diode laser (HPDL). Additionally, a heat source model is deduced.

  15. Gamma-irradiation and UV-C light-induced lipid peroxidation: a Fourier transform-infrared absorption spectroscopic study.

    PubMed

    Kinder, R; Ziegler, C; Wessels, J M

    1997-05-01

    Fourier transform-infrared spectroscopy of dry, multibilayer films has been used to study gamma-radiation and UV-C light induced lipid peroxidation in 1,2-dilinoleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine liposomes. The observed spectral changes were compared with the results obtained from measurement of hydroperoxides, conjugated dienes and to the formation of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances, such as malondialdehyde (MDA) or MDA-like substances. Upon irradiation a decrease in intensity of the asymmetric C - H stretching vibration (va(CH2)) of the isolated cis C = C - H groups (3010 cm-1) was observed. Directly correlated with the decrease of the va(CH2) absorption was a shift of the asymmetric phosphate ester stretching vibration (va(P = O)) towards smaller wavenumbers (1260-->1244 cm-1), indicating that the lipid peroxidation induced molecular alterations in the fatty acid chains influence the packing of the phospholipids in dry multibilayer films. In addition, the formation of a new absorption band at 1693 cm-1 could be detected, the intensity of which was comparable with the formation of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances and, therefore, attributed to the (C = O) stretching of alpha, beta unsaturated aldehydes. Dose-dependent studies using ionizing radiation showed that the decrease of va(CH2) was directly correlated with an increase in absorption of the conjugated dienes at 234 nm and with the formation of hydroperoxides suggesting that the absorption at 3010 cm-1 is solely due to isolated cis C = C - H groups and hence subject to the early stages of the radical chain reaction. UV-C light induced lipid peroxidation revealed a non-linear decrease of I3010, which was directly correlated with the formation of hydroperoxides. The observed early saturation of the conjugated dienes was attributed to an early photodecomposition of the conjugated double bonds.

  16. Measurement of Acoustic Attenuation and Absorption Coefficients using Thermometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morris, Hugh; Rivens, Ian; Shaw, Adam; ter Haar, Gail

    2007-05-01

    Accurate knowledge of both the attenuation and the absorption coefficient of tissue are required when planning an optimal high intensity focused ultrasound treatment. A novel technique for simple measurement of this parameters has been developed in which a thin-film thermocouple (TFT) is placed between two layers of tissue of different thicknesses. The sample can be rotated about an axis through the junction of the TFT so that it can be insonated from either side leaving the tissue adjacent to the junction unchanged, but changing the overlying thickness. The attenuation and absorption coefficients can be calculated from the heating curves measured in the two orientations. Experiments have been carried out in both tissue mimicking material (TMM) and in ex vivo liver tissue. Weakly focused transducers, resonant at 1.05 MHz, 2.4 MHz and 3.55 MHz were used at free-field spatial peak intensities of 9-14 W/cm2. The temperature rise was measured as a function of time using a TFT. These thermocouples are not subject to the viscous heating artefact that is common to other thermocouple devices and so are advantageous for this purpose. Alignment was achieved with a 3D automated gantry system, which was controlled with specialised software. Timing and data acquisition were also controlled with this software. All experiments were carried out in degassed water. Results for TMM and degassed excised bovine liver are presented.

  17. Measurements of parallel electron velocity distributions using whistler wave absorption

    SciTech Connect

    Thuecks, D. J.; Skiff, F.; Kletzing, C. A.

    2012-08-15

    We describe a diagnostic to measure the parallel electron velocity distribution in a magnetized plasma that is overdense ({omega}{sub pe} > {omega}{sub ce}). This technique utilizes resonant absorption of whistler waves by electrons with velocities parallel to a background magnetic field. The whistler waves were launched and received by a pair of dipole antennas immersed in a cylindrical discharge plasma at two positions along an axial background magnetic field. The whistler wave frequency was swept from somewhat below and up to the electron cyclotron frequency {omega}{sub ce}. As the frequency was swept, the wave was resonantly absorbed by the part of the electron phase space density which was Doppler shifted into resonance according to the relation {omega}-k{sub ||v||} = {omega}{sub ce}. The measured absorption is directly related to the reduced parallel electron distribution function integrated along the wave trajectory. The background theory and initial results from this diagnostic are presented here. Though this diagnostic is best suited to detect tail populations of the parallel electron distribution function, these first results show that this diagnostic is also rather successful in measuring the bulk plasma density and temperature both during the plasma discharge and into the afterglow.

  18. Temperature dependent absorption measurement of various transition metal doped laser materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horackova, Lucie; Šulc, Jan; Jelinkova, Helena; Jambunathan, Venkatesan; Lucianetti, Antonio; Mocek, Tomás.

    2015-05-01

    In recent years, there has been a vast development of high energy class lasers of the order of 100 J to kJ level which have potential applications in the field of science and technology. Many such systems use the gain media cooled at cryogenic temperatures which will help in enhancing the spectroscopic and thermo-optical properties. Nevertheless, parasitic effects like amplified spontaneous emission enhance and affect the overall efficiency. The best way to suppress this effect is to use cladding element attached to the gain material. Based on these facts, this work was focused on the systematic investigation of temperature dependent absorption of several materials doped with transition metals, which can be used as cladding, as laser gain material, or as passive Q-switching element. The Ti:sapphire, Cr:YAG, V:YAG, and Co:MALO samples were measured in temperature range from 80 K to 330 K by step of 50 K. Using Beer-Lambert law we estimated the absorption coefficient of these materials.

  19. Estimation of background gas concentration from differential absorption lidar measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, Peter; Smith, Nadia; Livina, Valerie; Gardiner, Tom; Robinson, Rod; Innocenti, Fabrizio

    2016-10-01

    Approaches are considered to estimate the background concentration level of a target species in the atmosphere from an analysis of the measured data provided by the National Physical Laboratory's differential absorption lidar (DIAL) system. The estimation of the background concentration level is necessary for an accurate quantification of the concentration level of the target species within a plume, which is the quantity of interest. The focus of the paper is on methodologies for estimating the background concentration level and, in particular, contrasting the assumptions about the functional and statistical models that underpin those methodologies. An approach is described to characterise the noise in the recorded signals, which is necessary for a reliable estimate of the background concentration level. Results for measured data provided by a field measurement are presented, and ideas for future work are discussed.

  20. Stratospheric species measurements with tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Menzies, R. T.; Webster, C. R.

    1983-01-01

    A balloon-borne instrument for stratospheric research has been developed with the capability to simultaneously measure several chemically related species in situ, for a full diurnal cycle. The instrument utilizes tunable infrared diode lasers (TDLs) to provide the radiation in selected wavelength regions for sensitive absorption spectroscopy over a one-km round-trip path. The TDL radiation is directed to a remote retroreflector which is lowered 500 m below the instrument gondola. A HeNe laser and co-aligned TV camera with CID imaging are used for retroreflector tracking. Currently the instrument operates with two TDLs, and the capability exists to measure four stratospheric species: NO, NO2, O3, and H2O. The number of operating TDLs can be expanded to four, resulting in the possibility of measuring several additional trace species.

  1. Precision spectroscopic measurements in few-electron ions

    SciTech Connect

    Dunford, R.W.; Berry, H.G.; Church, D.A.; Dinneen, T.P.; Hass, M.; Liu, C.J.; Berrah-Mansour, N.; Pardo, R.C.; Raphaelian, M.L.A.; Young, L.; Zabransky, B.J. ); Curtis, L.J. . Dept. of Physics and Astronomy)

    1990-01-01

    We describe recent precision experiments in few-electron ions including measurements of the lifetimes of two-photon-emitting levels in Ni{sup 26+} and Ni{sup 27+}, a measurement of the lifetime of the 2{sup 3}S{sub 1} level in Br{sup 33+} and measurements of the 2{sup 3}S{sub 1} {yields} 2{sup 3}{sub 0,1,2} transition energies in B{sup 3+}. 13 refs., 4 figs.

  2. Potential of a spectroscopic measurement method using adding-doubling to retrieve the bulk optical properties of dense microalgal media.

    PubMed

    Bellini, Sarah; Bendoula, Ryad; Latrille, Eric; Roger, Jean-Michel

    2014-01-01

    In the context of algal mass cultivation, current techniques used for the characterization of algal cells require time-consuming sample preparation and a large amount of costly, standard instrumentation. As the physical and chemical properties of the algal cells strongly affect their optical properties, the optical characterization is seen as a promising method to provide an early diagnosis in the context of mass cultivation monitoring. This article explores the potential of a spectroscopic measurement method coupled with the inversion of the radiative transfer theory for the retrieval of the bulk optical properties of dense algal samples. Total transmittance and total reflectance measurements were performed over the 380-1020 nm range on dense algal samples with a double integrating sphere setup. The bulk absorption and scattering coefficients were thus extracted over the 380-1020 nm range by inverting the radiative transfer theory using inverse-adding-doubling computations. The experimental results are presented and discussed; the configuration of the optical setup remains a critical point. The absorption coefficients obtained for the four samples of this study appear not to be more informative about pigment composition than would be classical methods in analytical spectroscopy; however, there is a real added value in measuring the reduced scattering coefficient, as it appears to be strongly correlated to the size distribution of the algal cells.

  3. Spectroscopic Measurements of Optical Elements for Submillimeter Receivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawamura, J.; Paine, S.; Papa, D. C.

    1996-03-01

    As submillimeter receivers improve in performance, more attention needs to be given to the design of lenses and windows, because input and coupling losses are responsible for an increasingly larger fraction of the total system noise. In order to optimize the designs, accurate measurements of optical and thermal contraction properties are needed. We discuss techniques of dispersive Fourier transform spectroscopy by which optical constants, thermal contraction coefficients, and surface reflectivities may be measured. Measurements of the optical constants of TPX, Teflon (PTFE), polyethylene, and Teflon-AF, a new material, are presented over the frequency range 0.3 to 2.5 THz. Thermal contraction properties for Teflon are presented. Reflection measurements are presented for a quartz window with a machined matching layer; properties of wire-meshes and wire-grids are also measured.

  4. Instrumentation for the determination of material properties from spectroscopic measurements of total integrated scatter

    SciTech Connect

    Powell, G.L.; Barber, T.E.; Neu, J.T.

    1995-06-19

    A variety of important optical properties can be determined from spectroscopic analysis of diffuse reflectance of surfaces. The design of a small user friendly, light-weight, field hardened, computer controlled device for performing infrared spectroscopic analysis of trace contaminants on surfaces is described. The device employs a miniature Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectrometer with very efficient diffuse reflectance optics and a portable computer to provide reflectance spectra of surfaces measured relative to some idealized surface. These spectra yield qualitative and quantitative chemical information from a host of surfaces that has imminently practical applications in the determination of surface identification, contamination, and degradation.

  5. Proposal of AAA-battery-size one-shot ATR Fourier spectroscopic imager for on-site analysis: Simultaneous measurement of multi-components with high accuracy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosono, Satsuki; Qi, Wei; Sato, Shun; Suzuki, Yo; Fujiwara, Masaru; Hiramatsu, Hiroyuki; Suzuki, Satoru; Abeygunawardhana, P. K. W.; Wada, Kenji; Nishiyama, Akira; Ishimaru, Ichiro

    2015-03-01

    For simultaneous measurement of multi-components on-site like factories, the ultra-compact (diameter: 9[mm], length: 45[mm], weight: 200[g]) one-shot ATR (Attenuated Total Reflection) Fourier spectroscopic imager was proposed. Because the proposed one-shot Fourier spectroscopic imaging is based on spatial-phase-shift interferometer, interferograms could be obtained with simple optical configurations. We introduced the transmission-type relativeinclined phase-shifter, that was constructed with a cuboid prism and a wedge prism, onto the optical Fourier transform plane of infinity corrected optical systems. And also, small light-sources and cameras in the mid-infrared light region, whose size are several millimeter on a side, are essential components for the ultra-compact spectroscopic configuration. We selected the Graphite light source (light source area: 1.7×1.7[mm], maker: Hawkeye technologies) whose radiation factor was high. Fortunately, in these days we could apply the cost-effective 2-dimensional light receiving device for smartphone (e.g. product name: LEPTON, maker: FLIR, price: around 400USD). In the case of alcoholic drinks factory, conventionally workers measure glucose and ethanol concentrations by bringing liquid solution back to laboratories every day. The high portable spectroscopy will make it possible to measure multi-components simultaneously on manufacturing scene. But we found experimentally that absorption spectrum of glucose and water and ethanol were overlapped each other in near infrared light region. But for mid-infrared light region, we could distinguish specific absorption peaks of glucose (@10.5[μm]) and ethanol (@11.5[μm]) independently from water absorption. We obtained standard curve between absorption (@9.6[μm]) and ethanol concentration with high correlation coefficient 0.98 successfully by ATR imaging-type 2-dimensional Fourier spectroscopy (wavelength resolution: 0.057[μm]) with the graphite light source (maker: Hawkeye

  6. Measurement of solutes in dialysate using UV absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fridolin, Ivo; Magnusson, Martin; Lindberg, Lars-Goeran

    2001-06-01

    The aim of this work was to describe a new method for optical monitoring of solutes in a spent dialysate. The method utilizes UV light absorption employing a commercially available spectrophotometer. Measurements were performed both on collected dialysate samples and on-line. The concentration of several removed solutes and electrolytes in the serum and in the dialysate was determined simultaneously using standard laboratory techniques. During on-line monitoring the spectrophotometer was connected to the fluid outlet of the dialysis machine. On-line measurements during a single hemodialysis session demonstrated a possibility to monitor deviations in the dialysator performance (e.g. dialysator in by-pass). The experimental results indicated a good correlation between UV absorption and several removed solutes (urea, creatinine) in the spent dialysate. The correlation coefficient for urea and creatinine concentrations in the dialysate was very high for every individual treatment. The UV absorbance correlates well to the concentrations of several solutes thought to be uremic toxins. The results indicate that the technique can be used as a continuous, on-line method for monitoring deviations in the dialysator performance and may estimate the removal of the overall toxins. In the future, the new method will be used to evaluate parameters describing delivery of the prescribed treatment dose such as KT/V and Urea Reduction Rate (URR).

  7. O2 absorption for measurements of sea surface air pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, B.; Hu, Y.

    2006-12-01

    Currently, sea surface air pressure measurements can only be obtained from in situ observations including buoy and dropsonde measurements, which are sparse in spatial coverage and expensive to implement. There are no operational remote sensing methods available even in experimental stages. The study considers use absorption features of microwave radiative transfer, especially the differential O2 absorption for active microwave systems working at 50-56 GHz bands, to fill the observational gap. The numerical simulation results for homogeneous sea surface backgrounds show that the rms errors of the instantaneous surface pressure estimates can be as low as 4 mb. This considered active system will have great potential for weather observations and other meteorological applications, especially for forecasts of hurricanes. Case studies show that with the remotely sensed sea surface barometric pressure data, the errors of hurricane center pressure, the most important indicator of hurricane intensity, in weather prediction models would reduce from about 48 mb to about 1.5 mb. The increased accuracy is about 1/3 of whole range of possible variations of hurricane center pressure. The uncertainties in the weather model predicted landfall positions or tracks of hurricanes also shrink greatly from ~350 km to within 100 km.

  8. Measurements of the absorption coefficient of stratospheric aerosols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ogren, J. A.; Ahlquist, N. C.; Clarke, A. D.; Charlson, R. J.

    1981-01-01

    The absorption coefficients of stratospheric aerosols are measured using a variation on the integrating plate method. The technique is based on the decrease in the transparency of a substrate when an absorbing aerosol is deposited on it. A Lambert scatterer is placed behind the substrate to integrate forward scattered light and minimize the effect of scattering on the measurement. The low pressure in the stratosphere is used for the direct impaction of particles onto a narrow strip of opal glass. The eight samples collected had a median value of 4 x 10 to the -9th m with an uncertainty of + or - 5 x 10 to the -9th m. If this absorption is due to graphitic carbon, then its concentration is estimated at about 0.4 ng/cu m, or about 0.25% of the total aerosol mass concentration. Estimates of the aerosol scattering coefficients based on satellite extinction inversions result in an aerosol single-scattering albedo in the range of 0.96-1.0.

  9. Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL) Measurements of Landfill Methane Emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Innocenti, Fabrizio; Robinson, Rod; Gardiner, Tom; Finlayson, Andrew; Connor, Andy

    2017-04-01

    DIFFERENTIAL ABSORPTION LIDAR (DIAL) MEASURMENTS OF LANDFILL METHANE EMISSIONS F. INNOCENTI *, R.A. ROBINSON *, T.D. GARDINER, A. FINLAYSON *, A. CONNOR* * National Physical Laboratory (NPL), Hampton Road, Teddington, Middlesex, TW11 0LW, United Kingdom Methane is one of the most important gaseous hydrocarbon species for both industrial and environmental reasons. Understanding and quantifying methane emissions to atmosphere is an important element of climate change research. Range-resolved infrared Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL) measurements provide the means to map and quantify a wide range of different methane sources. DIAL is a powerful technique that can be used to track and quantify plumes emitted from area emission sources such as landfill sites, waste water treatment plants and petrochemical plants. By using lidar (light detection and ranging), the DIAL technique is able to make remote range-resolved single-ended measurements of the actual distribution of target gases in the atmosphere, with no disruption to normal site operational activities. DIAL provides 3D mapping of emission concentrations and quantification of emission rates for a wide range of target gases such as methane. The NPL DIAL laser source is operated alternately at two similar wavelengths. One of these, termed the "on-resonant wavelength", is chosen to be at a wavelength which is absorbed by the target species. The other, the "off-resonant wavelength", is chosen to be at a nearby wavelength which is not absorbed significantly by the target species. The two wavelengths are chosen to be close, so that the atmospheric scattering properties are the same for both wavelengths. They are also chosen so that any differential absorption due to other atmospheric species are minimised. Any measured difference in the returned signals is therefore due to absorption by the target gas. In the typical DIAL measurement configuration the mobile DIAL facility is positioned downwind of the area being

  10. Measurement of EUV absorber and resist CD using spectroscopic ellipsometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Kyung M.; Tavassoli, Malahat; Yan, Pei-yang; Zhang, Guojing

    2013-09-01

    Evaluation of lithography process or stepper involves very large quantity of CD measurements and measurement time. In this paper, we report on an application of Scatterometry based metrology for evaluation of EUV photomask lithography. Measurements were made on mask level with Ellipsometric scatterometer for develop-check CD (DCCD) and final check CD (FCCD). Calculation of scatterometer profile information was performed with in-situ library-based rigorous coupled wave analysis (RCWA) method. We characterized the CD uniformity (CDU) and metal film thickness uniformity. OCD results show that high precision CD measurement EUV absorber and resist is possible with this method. A series of simulations were also performed to investigate the feasibility of Ellipsometric scatterometry for various pitches/line CD sizes, down to 11nm half-pitch at 1x magnification. The data showed that Scatterometry provides a nondestructive and faster mean of characterizing mask CD performance for various EUV process generations.

  11. Measurement of Zinc Absorption From Meals: Comparison of Extrinsi Zinc Labeling and Independent Measurements of Dietary Zinc Absorption

    PubMed Central

    Sheng, Xiao-Yang; Hambidge, K. Michael; Miller, Leland V.; Westcott, Jamie E.; Lei, Sian; Krebs, Nancy F.

    2017-01-01

    Background Extrinsic labeling techniques are typically used to measure fractional absorption of zinc (FAZextrinsic) but none have been adequately evaluated. Objective To compare determination of the quantity of zinc absorbed (TAZextrinsic) using measurements of FAZextrinsic with results of simultaneous determinations of dietary zinc absorbed (TAZmetabolic) that are not dependent on labeling ingested food with an extrinsic tracer (modified metabolic balance technique). Design 70Zn was administered orally with all meals for 6 consecutive days to 21 healthy, free-living adult women consuming a constant diet. 68Zn and 67Zn were administered intravenously. FAZextrinsic was measured using a dual isotope tracer ratio technique and multiplied by dietary zinc to give TAZextrinsic TAZmetabolic was determined by addition of net absorption of zinc and endogenous fecal zinc, the latter determined by an isotope dilution technique. Results TAZextrinsic and TAZmetabolic were 3.0 ± 1.1mg/day and 3.1 ± 1.1 mg/day respectively, paired t-test p = 0.492. The correlation coefficient for TAZextrinsic and TAZmetabolic was 0.91, and for FAZextrinsic and FAZmetabolic was 0.95. A Bland Altman analysis indicated a bias of 0.07, and the limits of agreement of −0.86 to 1.01 for TAZextrinsic and TAZmatabolic Conclusion These results from two independent methods provide reasonable validation of our extrinsic labeling technique for a wide range of composite diets. PMID:20209474

  12. Ultra sound absorption measurements in rock samples at low temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herminghaus, C.; Berckhemer, H.

    1974-01-01

    A new technique, comparable with the reverberation method in room acoustics, is described. It allows Q-measurements at rock samples of arbitrary shape in the frequency range of 50 to 600 kHz in vacuum (.1 mtorr) and at low temperatures (+20 to -180 C). The method was developed in particular to investigate rock samples under lunar conditions. Ultrasound absorption has been measured at volcanics, breccia, gabbros, feldspar and quartz of different grain size and texture yielding the following results: evacuation raises Q mainly through lowering the humidity in the rock. In a dry compact rock, the effect of evacuation is small. With decreasing temperature, Q generally increases. Between +20 and -30 C, Q does not change much. With further decrease of temperature in many cases distinct anomalies appear, where Q becomes frequency dependent.

  13. Ultraviolet absorption: Experiment MA-059. [measurement of atmospheric species concentrations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Donahue, T. M.; Hudson, R. D.; Rawlins, W. T.; Anderson, J.; Kaufman, F.; Mcelroy, M. B.

    1977-01-01

    A technique devised to permit the measurement of atmospheric species concentrations is described. This technique involves the application of atomic absorption spectroscopy and the quantitative observation of resonance fluorescence in which atomic or molecular species scatter resonance radiation from a light source into a detector. A beam of atomic oxygen and atomic nitrogen resonance radiation, strong unabsorbable oxygen and nitrogen radiation, and visual radiation was sent from Apollo to Soyuz. The density of atomic oxygen and atomic nitrogen between the two spacecraft was measured by observing the amount of resonance radiation absorbed when the line joining Apollo and Soyuz was perpendicular to their velocity with respect to the ambient atmosphere. Results of postflight analysis of the resonance fluorescence data are discussed.

  14. Measurement of iron absorption from meals contaminated with iron

    SciTech Connect

    Hallberg, L.; Bjoern-Rasmussen, E.

    1981-12-01

    A method is described to measure in vitro the extent of isotopic exchange between the native nonheme food iron and added inorganic reduction to radioiron tracer. The food is digested with pepsin and trypsin in the presence of radioiron. The exchangeability of food iron is calculated from the specific activity in the food and in an extract of bathophenantroline in isoamyl alcohol obtained after digesting this food. The precision and accuracy of the method is illustrated by two kinds of studies, those in which different amounts of contamination iron are added to a meal and those evaluating contamination iron in natural meals. The present method will make it possible to measure validly iron absorption from meals contaminated with unknown amounts of iron of unknown exchangeability with the extrinsic radioiron tracer.

  15. Ultra sound absorption measurements in rock samples at low temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herminghaus, C.; Berckhemer, H.

    1974-01-01

    A new technique, comparable with the reverberation method in room acoustics, is described. It allows Q-measurements at rock samples of arbitrary shape in the frequency range of 50 to 600 kHz in vacuum (.1 mtorr) and at low temperatures (+20 to -180 C). The method was developed in particular to investigate rock samples under lunar conditions. Ultrasound absorption has been measured at volcanics, breccia, gabbros, feldspar and quartz of different grain size and texture yielding the following results: evacuation raises Q mainly through lowering the humidity in the rock. In a dry compact rock, the effect of evacuation is small. With decreasing temperature, Q generally increases. Between +20 and -30 C, Q does not change much. With further decrease of temperature in many cases distinct anomalies appear, where Q becomes frequency dependent.

  16. Phase measurement of fast light pulse in electromagnetically induced absorption.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yoon-Seok; Lee, Hee Jung; Moon, Han Seb

    2013-09-23

    We report the phase measurement of a fast light pulse in electromagnetically induced absorption (EIA) of the 5S₁/₂ (F = 2)-5P₃/₂ (F' = 3) transition of ⁸⁷Rb atoms. Using a beat-note interferometer method, a stable measurement without phase dithering of the phase of the probe pulse before and after it has passed through the EIA medium was achieved. Comparing the phases of the light pulse in air and that of the fast light pulse though the EIA medium, the phase of the fast light pulse at EIA resonance was not shifted and maintained to be the same as that of the free-space light pulse. The classical fidelity of the fast light pulse according to the advancement of the group velocity by adjusting the atomic density was estimated to be more than 97%.

  17. Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer and Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph Observations of Intervening O VI Absorption Line Systems in the Spectrum of PG 0953+415

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savage, B. D.; Sembach, K. R.; Tripp, T. M.; Richter, P.

    2002-01-01

    We present Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer (FUSE) and Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (STIS) observations of the intergalactic medium toward the bright QSO PG 0953+415 (zem=0.239). The FUSE spectra extend from 905 to 1187 Å and have a resolution of 25 km s-1, while the STIS spectra cover 1150-1730 Å and have a resolution of 7 km s-1. Additional STIS observations at 30 km s-1 are obtained in selected wavelength ranges. An O VI system at z=0.06807 is detected in H I Lyα, Lyβ, Lyγ, O VI λλ1031.93, 1037.62, N V λλ1238.82, 1242.80, C IV λλ1548.20, 1550.77, and C III λ977.02. The observed column densities can be modeled as a low-density intervening gas with a metallicity of 0.4+0.6-0.2 times solar in photoionization equilibrium with the ionizing extragalactic background radiation. The best fit is achieved with an ionization parameter, logU=-1.35, which implies nH~10-5 cm-3 and a path length of ~80 kpc through the absorbing gas. H I Lyα absorption at z=0.14232 spans a velocity range of 410 km s-1 with the strongest components near 0 and 80 km s-1 in the z=0.14232 rest frame. In this system, O VI λλ1031.93, 1037.62 absorption is strong near 0 km s-1 and not detected at 80 km s-1. C III λ977.02 absorption is marginally detected at 80 km s-1 but is not detected at 0 km s-1. The observations place constraints on the properties of the z=0.14232 system but do not discriminate between collisional ionization in hot gas versus photoionization in a very low density medium with an ionization parameter logU>-0.74. The z=0.06807 and 0.14232 O VI systems occur at redshifts where there are peaks in the number density of intervening galaxies along the line of sight determined from WIYN redshift measurements of galaxies in the ~1° field centered on PG 0953+415. We combine our observations of PG 0953+415 with those for other QSOs to update the estimate of the low-redshift number density of intervening O VI systems. Over a total unobscured redshift path of Δz=0

  18. Spectroscopic imaging ellipsometry: real-time measurement of single, intact wood pulp fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Chun

    2006-12-01

    A nondestructive method based on spectroscopic ellipsometry has been developed and demonstrated for the real-time measurement of a single pulp fiber's microfibril angle and phase retardation, with the latter proportional to the cell wall thickness. The method uses an optical arrangement insensitive to the sample's orientation in combination with a proper spectral analysis of the sample's image. The optical arrangement and the measurement principle of the method are described. To test the new method, equipment functioning as a spectroscopic imaging ellipsometer was constructed according to the arrangement, and measurements were carried out in which single pulp fibers and ordinary wave plates were measured. The test measurements and results are described and presented.

  19. Spectroscopic Temperature and Emissivity Measurements of Iron and Quartz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akin, M. C.; Chau, R.; Crum, R. S.; Nguyen, J.; Ambrose, W. P.; Holmes, N. C.

    2016-12-01

    We report on progress toward measuring the temperature of Fe at 200 GPa, near the melting point on the Hugoniot, as part of an effort to obtain a complete equation of state for Fe. Fe was directly coated on a LiF tamping window and shock compressed using a two stage light gas gun. Radiance and reflectance were simultaneously measured from 350-750 nm using four streak spectrometers. Comparison of reflected and emitted light allows us to calculate emissivity as a function of wavelength to correct graybody emission to determine T, predicted to be around 5000K, and compare measured reflectance with band structure calculations. This work performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  20. Spectroscopic measurements and characterization of soft tissue phantoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solarte, Efrain; Ipus, Erick

    2013-02-01

    Tissue phantoms are important tools to calibrate and validate light propagation effects, measurements and diagnostic test in real biological soft tissue. We produce low cost phantoms using standard commercial jelly, distillated water, glycerol and a 20% lipid emulsion (Oliclinomel N7-1000 ®) was used in place of the usual Intralipid®. In a previous work we designed a protocol to elaborate high purity phantoms which can be used over months. We produced three different types of phantoms regarding the lipid emulsion - glycerol - gelatin - water composition: Pure gelatin phantoms, lipid in glycerol, and lipid in gelatin phantoms were produced and different concentrations of the lipid emulsion were used to study optical propagation properties of diffusive mixtures. Besides, 1.09 μm poly latex spheres in distilled water were used to produce reference phantoms. In order to use all the phantom sides, the phantoms were produced in disposable spectrometer cuvettes, designed for fluorescence studies. Measurements were performed using an OceanOptics 4000 channels spectrophotometer and integrating spheres. For the scattering measurements a homemade goniometer with a high resolution angular scale was used and the scattering detector was a linear array of optical fibers, with an angular collimator, connected to the spectrophotometer. White LED was used as light source, and the 6328.8 nm HeNe Laser was used for calibration. In this work we present characterization measurements for gelatin and microspheres phantoms using spectral reflectance, diffuse and direct spectral transmittance, and angle scattering measurements. The results of these measurements and their comparison are presented.

  1. Spectroscopic, orbital, and physical properties of the binary Feige 24 and detection of transient He II absorption in the system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vennes, S.; Thorstensen, J. R.

    1994-11-01

    We have obtained new high-dispersion optical spectroscopy at Kitt Peak National Observatory (KPNO) and new International Ultraviolet Explorer (IUE) spectroscopy of the white dwarf+red dwarf binary system Feige 24. The optical range shows a composite DA+dM spectrum, together with H I Balmer and He I emission. The orbital phase dependence of the emission shows that it results from extreme ultraviolet (EUV) light reprocessing in the red dwarf upper atmosphere. The systems close enough and hot enough to show this reprocessing signature only recently emerged from common-envelope evolution. The ultraviolet spectrum exclusively emanates from the white dwarf and shows numerous heavy element absorption lines. We measured accurate radial velocities of the red dwarf component motion, traced by both optical absorption and emission lines, and new radial velocities of the white dwarf, traced by ultraviolet Fe V lines. Combining these measurements, we refined the orbital parameters presented by Vennes et al. (1991), and we confirmed that the white dwarf gravitational redshift is exceptionally small with 9 +/- 2 km/s. From this we deduced that the interior is either pure helium or carbon with a thick hydrogen layer, and we derived, for the combined interior compositions, a white dwarf mass and radius of MWD = 0.44-050 solar mass and RWD = 0.028-0.036 solar radius. We suggest that Feige 24 could be a typical case of close binary evolution leading to the formation of a low-mass helium white dwarf. The mass of the red dwarf and the inclination of the system naturally follow: MdM = 0.26-0.33 solar mass, i greater than or equal to 75 deg. High-dispersion H-alpha line profiles are asymmetrical, strongly enhanced toward the blue, suggesting a moving atmosphere possibly linked to a mass loss rate of 10-10 solar mass/yr. The IUE spectra taken when the system is near inferior conjunction show strong He II 1640 A absorption. The profile is highly variable in width and intensity. Because it

  2. X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopic determination of plutonium speciation at the Rocky Flats environmental technology

    SciTech Connect

    Lezama-pacheco, Juan S; Conradson, Steven D; Clark, David L

    2008-01-01

    X-ray Absorption Fine Structure spectroscopy was used to probe the speciation of the ppm level Pu in thirteen soil and concrete samples from the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site in support of the site remediation effort that has been successfully completed since these measurements. In addition to X-ray Absorption Near Edge Spectra, two of the samples yielded Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure spectra that could be analyzed by curve-fits. Most of these spectra exhibited features consistent with PU(IV), and more specificaJly, PuO{sub 2+x}-type speciation. Two were ambiguous, possibly indicating that Pu that was originally present in a different form was transforming into PuO{sub 2+x}, and one was interpreted as demonstrating the presence of an unusual Pu(VI) compound, consistent with its source being spills from a PUREX purification line onto a concrete floor and the resultant extreme conditions. These experimental results therefore validated models that predicted that insoluble PuO{sub 2+x} would be the most stable form of Pu in equilibrium with air and water even when the source terms were most likely Pu metal with organic compounds or a Pu fire. A corollary of these models' predictions and other in situ observations is therefore that the minimal transport of Pu that occurred on the site was via the resuspension and mobilization of colloidal particles. Under these conditions, the small amounts of diffusely distributed Pu that were left on the site after its remediation pose only a negligible hazard.

  3. Spectroscopic measurements and AMO data center in KAERI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rhee, Yongjoo; Kim, S. K.; Park, H. M.; Lee, Jongmin

    2000-11-01

    An introduction to the AMO (Atomic, Molecular, and Optical) database system in KAERI is given with some experimental aspects related to the AMO data production. Data sources, constructing concepts and current status of the database are described. An example of measured data which have been compiled internally is given. .

  4. Detection of water vapour absorption around 363nm in measured atmospheric absorption spectra and its effect on DOAS evaluations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lampel, Johannes; Polyansky, Oleg. L.; Kyuberis, Alexandra A.; Zobov, Nikolai F.; Tennyson, Jonathan; Lodi, Lorenzo; Pöhler, Denis; Frieß, Udo; Platt, Ulrich; Beirle, Steffen; Wagner, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    Water vapour is known to absorb light from the microwave region to the blue part of the visible spectrum at a decreasing magnitude. Ab-initio approaches to model individual absorption lines of the gaseous water molecule predict absorption lines until its dissociation limit at 243 nm. We present first evidence of water vapour absorption at 363 nm from field measurements based on the POKAZATEL absorption line list by Polyansky et al. (2016) using data from Multi-Axis differential optical absorption spectroscopy (MAX-DOAS) and Longpath (LP)-DOAS measurements. The predicted absorptions contribute significantly to the observed optical depths with up to 2 × 10-3. Their magnitude correlates well (R2 = 0.89) to simultaneously measured well-established water vapour absorptions in the blue spectral range from 452-499 nm, but is underestimated by a factor of 2.6 ± 0.6 in the ab-initio model. At a spectral resolution of 0.5nm this leads to a maximum absorption cross-section value of 5.4 × 10-27 cm2/molec at 362.3nm. The results are independent of the employed cross-section data to compensate for the overlayed absorption of the oxygen dimer O4. The newly found absorption can have a significant impact on the spectral retrieval of absorbing trace-gas species in the spectral range around 363 nm. Its effect on the spectral analysis of O4, HONO and OClO are discussed.

  5. On the measurement of absorption cross sections of gaseous media

    SciTech Connect

    Gamalii, V.F.; Toptygin, D.D.

    1995-02-01

    A new technique for experimental determination of integral absorption cross sections of gaseous media by the method of modulation intracavity laser spectroscopy (MILS) is proposed. A formula relating the integral absorption cross section to the spectral position of radiation spectral condensation peaks in the absorption line wings is derived. 8 refs., 2 figs.

  6. [Measurement of oxygen concentration using multimode diode laser absorption spectroscopy].

    PubMed

    Gao, Guang-zhen; Cai, Ting-dong; Hu, Bo; Jia, Tian-jun

    2015-01-01

    Tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (TDLAS) is a widely used technique for high sensitivity, good selectivity and fast response. It is widely used in environment monitoring, industrial process control and biomedical sensing. In order to overcome the drawbacks of TDLAS including high cost, poor stability and center wavelength shift problem. A multi-mode diode laser system based on correlation spectroscopy and wavelength modulation spectroscopy (TMDL-COSPEC-WMS) was used to measure O2 concentration near 760nm at the 1%~30% range of near room temperature. During the experiment, the light is splitter into two beams, respectively through the sample and measuring cell, two receiving optical signal collection containing gas concentration information sent back stage treatment, invert the oxygen concentration through correlation and ratio between measured signal and reference signal, the correlation spectroscopy harmonic detection technique is used to improve the stability of the system and the signal to noise ratio. The result showed that, there was a good linear relationship between the measured oxygen concentration and the actual concentration value. A detection limit of 280 pmm. m in the 1 atmospheric which approved of the same sample. A continuous measurement for oxygen with the standard deviation of 0. 056% in ambient air during approximately 30 minutes confirms the stability and the capability of the system. The design of the system includes soft and hardware can meet the needs of oxygen online monitoring. The experimental device is simple and easy to use, easy to complex environment application.

  7. Measuring Microwaves via Absorption and Dispersion in Rydberg Atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stack, Daniel; Kunz, Paul; Meyer, David; Solmeyer, Neal

    2016-05-01

    Weak microwave frequency electromagnetic fields can be difficult to detect and fully characterize with traditional methods. However it is possible to transduce the measurement of these fields from the microwave domain to the optical domain via resonant transitions between Rydberg levels in atomic vapors using electromagnetically-induced transparency and the Autler-Townes effect. This technique allows for sensitive measurements of the microwave field amplitude, polarization, and spatial waveform (via the position of the probe and coupling laser beams) as compared to measurements performed with dipole antennas. We are able to obtain these quantities by monitoring the properties of a probe laser beam as it passes through a rubidium vapor cell. Previous experiments using Rydberg spectroscopy have typically relied on measuring the absorption of the probe laser as it passed through the atomic system. We report on progress to use the polarization rotation of the probe as it passes through the atoms in a static magnetic field, which corresponds to the real part of the susceptibility of the atomic medium, for measuring the characteristics of a microwave frequency signal. This effect is known as Nonlinear Magneto Optical Rotation (NMOR) and has been used for sensitive magnetometry.

  8. Spectral Measurements of Aerosol Absorption from UV to VISIBLE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krotkov, N. A.; Labow, G.; Herman, J.; Bhartia, P. K.; Slusser, J.; Durham, B.; Janson, G.; Wilson, C.; Disterhoft, P.; Cede, A.; Abuhassan, N.; Eck, T. F.; Holben, B.; Bais, A.; Rapsomanikis, S.

    2007-05-01

    Amount of solar radiation reaching the Earth's surface can be strongly influenced by aerosol absorption. The aerosol absorption optical thickness (AAOT) in the visible and near IR (440 nm- 1020nm) is routinely produced from almucantar measurements made by the CIMEL instruments in the AERONET network. AAOT in the UV (300nm- 368nm) have been derived from the total and diffuse hemispherical flux measurements made by UV- Multifilter Rotating Shadowband Radiometer (UV-MFRSR, Yankee Environmental Systems, Inc.) instruments. However, no direct comparisons between these two methods exist because the CIMEL wavelengths (used in almucantar retrievals) do not overlap with the UV-MFRSR wavelengths. To enable direct comparisons between the two techniques, we have modified our UV-MFRSR, part of USDA UVB Monitoring and Research Network, by replacing standard 300nm filter with 440nm filter used in AERONET network. The instrument has been deployed at Mauna Loa Observatory, at NASA GSFC in Greenbelt, MD (July 2005 - June 2006) and during SCOUT-03 field campaign in Thessaloniki, Greece in July 2006. During these deployments the instrument's calibration was monitored daily using co-located AERONET and BREWER direct sun measurements of aerosol extinction optical thickness (AOT). Between the deployments the instrument was thoroughly calibrated at the NOAA Central UV Calibration Facility in Boulder, Colorado. We find that the UV-MSFRSR instrument is highly susceptible to calibration drifts. However, these drifts can be accurately assessed using AERONET and BREWER direct sun data. After correcting for these calibration changes, the AAOT was inferred by fitting the measurements of global and diffuse atmospheric transmittances with the forward RT model independently at each spectral channel. The AOT data and ancillary measurements of aerosol column particle size distribution and refractive index in the visible wavelengths (by CIMEL sun-sky almucantar inversions), direct -sun column NO2 and

  9. Comparative Spectroscopic Temperature Measurements In Hydrogen Hollow Cathode Glow Discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majstorovic, G. Lj.; Šišovic, N. M.; Konjevic, N.

    2010-07-01

    We report results of optical emission spectroscopy measurements of rotational Trot and translational temperature Ttr of hydrogen molecules. The light source was hollow cathode glow discharge with titanium cathode operated in hydrogen at low pressure. The rotational temperature of excited electronic states of H2 was determined either from relative line intensities of the R branch of the GK ? B band or from the Q branch of the Fulcher-a diagonal band. The population of excited energy levels, determined from relative line intensities, was used to derive ro-vibronic temperature of the ground state of hydrogen molecule.

  10. Spectroscopic Measurements of Impurity Spectra on the EAST Tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Jia; Li, Yingying; Shi, Yuejiang; Wang, Fudi; Zhang, Wei; Lv, Bo; Huang, Juan; Wan, Baonian; Zhou, Qian

    2012-12-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) and visible impurity spectra (200~750 nm) are commonly used to study plasma and wall interactions in magnetic fusion plasmas. Two optical multi-channel analysis (OMA) systems have been installed for the UV-visible spectrum measurement on EAST. These two OMA systems are both equipped with the Czerny-Turner (C-T) type spectrometer. The upper vacuum vessel and inner divertor baffle can be viewed simultaneously through two optical lenses. The OMA1 system is mainly used for multi-impurity lines radiation measurement. A 280 nm wavelength range can be covered by a 300 mm focal length spectrometer equipped with a 300 grooves/mm grating. The Dα/Hα line shapes can be resolved by the OMA2 system. The focal length is 750 mm. The spectral resolution can be up to 0.01 nm using a 1800 grooves/mm grating. The impurity behaviour and hydrogen ratio evolution after boroniztion, lithium coating, and siliconization are compared. Lithium coating has shown beneficial effects on the reduction of edge recycling and low Z impurity (C, O) influx. The impurity expelling effect of the divertor configuration is also briefly discussed through multi-channels observation of OMA1 system.

  11. Atmospheric NO2 concentration measurements using differential absorption lidar technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devara, P. C. S.; Raj, P. Ernest

    1992-02-01

    Using the Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL) technique, two types of approaches, namely, reflection from retroreflector / topographic target and backscatter from atmosphere, are available for studying remotely the atmospheric NO2 concentration. The Argon ion lidar system at the Indian Institute of Tropical Meteorology (IITM), Pune, India has been used for the measurements by following both the path-averaged and range-resolved approaches. For the former, a topographic target (hill) is used for determining path-averaged surface concentration. In the latter, spectral properties of atmospheric attenuation is used for making range-resolved measurements in the surface layer. The results of the observations collected by following both approaches are presented. The average surface NO2 concentration was found to vary between 0.01 and 0.105 ppm and the range-resolved measurements exhibited higher values suggesting treatment of the lidar data for scattering and extinction effects due to atmospheric aerosols and air molecules, and atmospheric turbulence. Certain modifications that are suggested to the experimental set-up, data acquisition and analysis to improve the measurements are briefly described.

  12. Comb mode filtering silver mirror cavity for spectroscopic distance measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Šmíd, R.; Hänsel, A.; Pravdová, L.; Sobota, J.; Číp, O.; Bhattacharya, N.

    2016-09-01

    In this work we present a design of an external optical cavity based on Fabry-Perot etalons applied to a 100 MHz Er-doped fiber optical frequency comb working at 1560 nm to increase its repetition frequency. A Fabry-Perot cavity is constructed based on a transportable cage system with two silver mirrors in plano-concave geometry including the mode-matching lenses, fiber coupled collimation package and detection unit. The system enables full 3D angle mirror tilting and x-y off axis movement as well as distance between the mirrors. We demonstrate the increase of repetition frequency by direct measurement of the beat frequency and spectrally by using the virtually imaged phased array images.

  13. Measuring FeO variation using astronomical spectroscopic observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Unterguggenberger, Stefanie; Noll, Stefan; Feng, Wuhu; Plane, John M. C.; Kausch, Wolfgang; Kimeswenger, Stefan; Jones, Amy; Moehler, Sabine

    2017-03-01

    Airglow emission lines of OH, O2, O and Na are commonly used to probe the MLT (mesosphere-lower thermosphere) region of the atmosphere. Furthermore, molecules like electronically excited NO, NiO and FeO emit a (pseudo-) continuum. These continua are harder to investigate than atomic emission lines. So far, limb-sounding from space and a small number of ground-based low-to-medium resolution spectra have been used to measure FeO emission in the MLT. In this study the medium-to-high resolution echelle spectrograph X-shooter at the Very Large Telescope (VLT) in the Chilean Atacama Desert (24°37' S, 70°24' W; 2635 m) is used to study the FeO pseudo-continuum in the range from 0.5 to 0.72 µm based on 3662 spectra. Variations of the FeO spectrum itself, as well as the diurnal and seasonal behaviour of the FeO and Na emission intensities, are reported. These airglow emissions are linked by their common origin, meteoric ablation, and they share O3 as a common reactant. Major differences are found in the main emission peak of the FeO airglow spectrum between 0.58 and 0.61 µm, compared with a theoretical spectrum. The FeO and Na airglow intensities exhibit a similar nocturnal variation and a semi-annual seasonal variation with equinoctial maxima. This is satisfactorily reproduced by a whole atmosphere chemistry climate model, if the quantum yields for the reactions of Fe and Na with O3 are 13 ± 3 and 11 ± 2 % respectively. However, a comparison between the modelled O3 in the upper mesosphere and measurements of O3 made with the SABER satellite instrument suggests that these quantum yields may be a factor of ˜ 2 smaller.

  14. DFT assessment of the spectroscopic constants and absorption spectra of neutral and charged diatomic species of group 11 and 14 elements.

    PubMed

    Tsipis, Athanassios C

    2014-09-15

    The spectroscopic constants and absorption spectra of neutral and charged diatomic molecules of group 11 and 14 elements formulated as [M(2)](+/0/-) (M = Cu, Ag, Au), and [E(2)](+/0/-) (E = C, Si, Ge, Sn, Pb) have been calculated at the PBE0/Def2-QZVPP level of theory. The electronic and bonding properties of the diatomics have been analyzed by natural bond orbital analysis approach and topology analysis by the atoms in molecules method. Particular emphasis was given on the absorption spectra of the diatomic species, which were simulated by time-dependent density functional theory calculations employing the hybrid Coulomb-attenuating CAM-B3LYP density functional. The simulated absorption spectra of the [M(2)](+/0/-) (M = Cu, Ag, Au) and [E(2)](+/0/-) (E = C, Si, Ge, Sn, Pb) species are in close resemblance with the experimentally observed spectra whenever available. The neutral M(2) and E(2) diatomics strongly absorb in the ultraviolet region, given rise to UVC, UVA and in a few cases UVB absorptions. In a few cases, weak absorbion bands also occur in the visible region. The absorption bands have thoroughly been analyzed and assignments of the contributing principal electronic transitions associated to individual excitations have been made. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Novel Molecular Spectroscopic Multimethod Approach for Monitoring Water Absorption/Desorption Kinetics of CAD/CAM Poly(Methyl Methacrylate) Prosthodontics.

    PubMed

    Wiedemair, Verena; Mayr, Sophia; Wimmer, Daniel S; Köck, Eva Maria; Penner, Simon; Kerstan, Andreas; Steinmassl, Patricia-Anca; Dumfahrt, Herbert; Huck, Christian W

    2016-12-12

    Water absorbed to poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA)-based CAD/CAM (computer-assisted design/computer-assisted manufacturing) prosthodontics can alter their properties including hardness and stability. In the present contribution, water absorption and desorption kinetics under defined experimental conditions were monitored employing several supplementary and advanced Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopic techniques in combination with multivariate analysis (MVA). In this synergistic vibrational spectroscopic multimethod approach, first a novel near-infrared (NIR) diffuse fiber optic probe reflection spectroscopic method was established for time-resolved analysis of water uptake within seven days under controlled conditions. Near-infrared water absorbance spectra in a wavenumber range between 5288-5100 cm(-1) (combination band) and 5424-5352 cm(-1) (second overtone) were used establishing corresponding calibration and validation models to quantify the amount of water in the milligram range. Therefore, 14 well-defined samples exposed to prior optimized experimental conditions were taken into consideration. The average daily water uptake conducting reference analysis was calculated as 22 mg/day for one week. Additionally, in this study for the first time NIR two-dimensional correlation spectroscopy (2D-COS) was conducted to monitor and interpret the spectral dynamics of water absorption on the prosthodontics in a wavenumber range of 5100-5300 cm(-1) For sensitive time-resolved recording of water desorption, a recently developed high-temperature, high-pressure FT-IR reaction cell with water-free ultra-dry in situ and operando operation was applied. The reaction cell, as well as the sample holder, was fully made of quartz glass, with no hot metal or ceramic parts in the vicinity of the high temperature zone. Applying a temperature gradient in the range of 25-150 ℃, mid-infrared (MIR) 2D-COS was successfully conducted to get insights into the dynamic

  16. Spectroscopic assays for measuring quantities of erythrocyte membrane "halves"

    PubMed Central

    1982-01-01

    The quantities of outer and inner"halves" produced by freeze-fracturing human erythrocyte membranes have been measured by visible and fluorescence spectroscopy. Assays have been developed that are based on the use of two membrane surface markers: hemoglobin (Hb), a native marker for the cytoplasmic side of the membrane, and fluoresceinated concanavalin A (FITC-Con-A), a marker for the extracellular side. Hb absorbance is proportional to the fraction of cytoplasmic "half" membranes, and FITC fluorescence is proportional to the fraction of extracellular "halves." A procedure is described for the preparation of surface-labeled, intact erythrocytes suitable for the formation of homogeneous, planar cell monolayers of square-centimeter dimensions on polylysine-treated glass (PL-glass). Cell monolayers were frozen and fractured, and the fractions of absorbance and fluorescence in each of the two split portions determined. The PL-glass portion of membrane contained a substantially higher ratio of fluorescence to absorbance than unsplit controls, and its paired portion, a complementary lower ratio, demonstrating that the PL-glass portion was significantly enriched in extracellular "half" membrane. Experiments investigating split membrane recovery show that the double labeled membrane splitting technique is well suited to analysis of the transmembrane distribution of membrane lipids and polypeptides using methods that do not require quantitation by electron microscopy. PMID:7056801

  17. Preliminary submillimeter spectroscopic measurements using a submillimeter heterodyne radiometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Safren, H. G.; Stabnow, W. R.; Bufton, J. L.; Peruso, C. J.; Rossey, C. E.; Walker, H. E.

    1982-01-01

    A submillimeter heterodyne radiometer uses a submillimeter laser, pumped by a CO2 laser, as a local oscillator and a room temperature Schottky barrier diode as the first IF mixer. The radiometer can resolve spectral lines in the submillimeter region of the spectrum (arising from pure rotational molecular transitions) to within 0.3 MHz, using acousto-optic spectrum analyzer which measures the power spectrum by simultaneously sampling 0.3 MHz wide channels over a 100 MHz bandwidth spanning the line. Preliminary observations of eight spectral lines of H2O2, CO, NH3 and H2O, all lying in the 434-524 micrometer wavelength range are described. All eight lines were observed using two local oscillator frequencies obtained by operating the submillimeter laser with either methyl fluoride (CH3F) or formic acid (HCOOH) as the lasing gas. Sample calculations of line parameters from the observed data show good agreement with established values. One development goal is the size and weight reduction of the package to make it suitable for balloon or shuttle experiments to detect trace gases in the upper atmosphere.

  18. Measures of exposure versus measures of rate and extent of absorption.

    PubMed

    Chen, M L; Lesko, L; Williams, R L

    2001-01-01

    Regulatory assessment of bioavailability and bioequivalence in the US frequently relies on measures of rate and extent of absorption. Rate of absorption is not only difficult to measure but also bears little clinical relevance. This paper proposes that measures of bioavailability and bioequivalence for drugs that achieve their therapeutic effects after entry into the systemic circulation are best expressed in terms of early [partial area under the concentration-time curve (AUC)], peak plasma or serum drug concentration and total AUC exposure for a plasma or serum concentration-time profile. With suitable documentation, these systemic exposure measures can be related to efficacy and tolerability outcomes. The early measure is recommended for an immediate release drug product where a better control of drug absorption is needed, for example to ensure rapid onset of a therapeutic effect or to avoid an adverse reaction from a fast input rate. The 3 systemic exposure measures for bioavailability and bioequivalence studies can provide critical links between product quality and clinical outcome and thereby reduce the current emphasis on rate of absorption.

  19. Contact sponge water absorption test implemented for in situ measures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaggero, Laura; Scrivano, Simona

    2016-04-01

    The contact sponge method is a non-destructive in-situ methodology used to estimate a water uptake coefficient. The procedure, unlike other in-situ measurement was proven to be directly comparable to the water uptake laboratory measurements, and was registered as UNI 11432:2011. The UNI Normal procedure requires to use a sponge with known density, soaked in water, weighed, placed on the material for 1 minute (UNI 11432, 2011; Pardini & Tiano, 2004), then weighed again. Difficulties arise in operating on test samples or on materials with porosity varied for decay. While carrying on the test, fluctuations in the bearing of the environmental parameters were negligible, but not the pressure applied to the surface, that induced the release of different water amounts towards the material. For this reason we designed a metal piece of the same diameter of the plate carrying the sponge, to be screwed at the tip of a pocket penetrometer. With this instrument the sponge was kept in contact with the surface for 1 minute applying two different loads, at first pushed with 0.3 kg/cm2 in order to press the sponge, but not its holder, against the surface. Then, a load of 1.1 kg/ cm2 was applied, still avoiding deviating the load to the sponge holder. We applied both the current and our implemented method to determine the water absorption by contact sponge on 5 fresh rock types (4 limestones: Fine - and Coarse grained Pietra di Vicenza, Rosso Verona, Breccia Aurora, and the silicoclastic Macigno sandstone). The results show that 1) the current methodology imply manual skill and experience to produce a coherent set of data; the variable involved are in fact not only the imposed pressure but also the compression mechanics. 2) The control on the applied pressure allowed reproducible measurements. Moreover, 3) the use of a thicker sponge enabled to apply the method even on rougher surfaces, as the device holding the sponge is not in contact with the tested object. Finally, 4) the

  20. Infrared measurements of increased CF(2)Cl(2) (CFC- 12) absorption above the South Pole.

    PubMed

    Rinsland, C P; Goldman, A; Murcray, F J; Murcray, F H; Murcray, D G; Levine, J S

    1988-02-01

    High-resolution ground-based solar spectra recorded at the Amundsen-Scott South Pole station in Dec. 1980 and Nov. 1986 have been analyzed in the region of the CF(2)Cl(2) (chlorofluorocarbon 12) nu(8) band Q branches at 1161 cm(-1). An increase in the CF(2)Cl(2) total vertical column above the South Pole of 1.24 +/- 0.15 over the 6-yr period, corresponding to an average rate of increase of 3.6 +/- 2.1%, is derived. This rate of increase is lower than indicated by in situ measurements at the South Pole over the same time period, but there is agreement when the rather error bars of the spectral measurement results are considered. Spectroscopic parameters that can successfully model CF(2)C1(2) absorption at low temperatures are needed to improve retrieval accuracies and could be applied to a number of pre-1980 atmospheric spectral data sets in the literature to obtain an improved record of early CF(2)Cl(2) concentration trends for comparison with estimates of historical release rates.

  1. Emission rates of benzene and ammonia area sources determined by spectroscopic remote measurements and inverse dispersion modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaefer, Klaus; Emeis, Stefan M.; Stockhause, Martina; Sedlmaier, Achim; Hoffmann, Herbert; Depta, Georg; Gronauer, Andreas

    1999-02-01

    The emission rates of diffuse and heterogeneous distributed sources are difficult to determine because point measurements are not representative. Therefore a method was further developed to determine gaseous emission rates by measurements of path-integrated mixing ratios with open-path spectroscopic systems in the exhaust plume (VOC, NH3, CH4, N2O, CO, CO2) and of meteorological parameters. Inverse dispersion modeling is used to quantify the emission rates afterwards with these data. The measurements are performed by Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (DOAS) at 50 to 500 m optical path lengths about 1 to 20 m above ground level. The measurement accuracy for greenhouse gases and ammonia is about plus or minus 10% and for BTX about plus or minus 30%. The whole method was validated at a livestock building with a single exhaust chimney. The Gaussian model PAL was applied for inverse modeling to investigate limited pieces of land and isolated facilities in flat terrain. Including the accuracy of the dispersion simulations the determined emission rates have an error margin of about plus or minus 30%. Results of measurement campaigns are discussed as emission rates of ammonia from slurry spreading as well as of benzene from gas stations and a tank farm.

  2. Spectroscopic properties of Bi2ZnOB2O6 single crystals doped with Pr3+ ions: Absorption and luminescence investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasprowicz, D.; Brik, M. G.; Jaroszewski, K.; Pedzinski, T.; Bursa, B.; Głuchowski, P.; Majchrowski, A.; Michalski, E.

    2015-09-01

    Nonlinear optical Bi2ZnOB2O6 single crystals doped with Pr3+ ions were grown using the Kyropoulos method. The absorption and luminescence properties of these new systems were investigated for the first time. The crystals are characterized by the large values of nonlinear optical coefficients. Effective luminescence of the Pr3+ ions makes this system an excellent candidate for the near-infrared (NIR) and/or ultraviolet (UV) to visible (VIS) laser converters. Based on the obtained experimental spectroscopic data, detailed analysis of the absorption and luminescence spectra was performed using the conventional Judd-Ofelt theory. Those transitions, which can be potentially used for laser applications of the Pr3+ ion, have been identified. In addition to the intensity parameters Ω2, Ω4, Ω6 the branching ratios and radiative lifetimes were estimated for all possible transitions in the studied spectral region.

  3. Quantitative measurement of endogenous amino acid absorption in unanaesthetized pigs.

    PubMed

    Rerat, A; Vaissade, P; Vaugelade, P

    1988-06-01

    The present experiment was carried out with 11 pigs (mean body weight: 53.9 +/- 1.3 kg) fitted with permanent catheters in the portal vein and carotid artery and with an electromagnetic flow probe around the portal vein. They were each subjected to 2 or 3 trials at 3 to 4-day intervals. During each trial the animals received after a previous fasting of 20 h a given amount of a protein-free diet (200 to 1200 g). The blood was collected either continuously for a quantitative determination of amino nitrogen, reducing sugars, urea and ammonia (number of meals 12, mean intake: 727 +/- 60 g) or discontinuously every 30 min between 0 and 8 h after the meal for amino acid analysis (number of meals 8; mean intake 709 +/- 105 g). A rather constant appearance (2 g/h) of amino acids in the portal blood was observed throughout the postprandial period. The intestinal absorption of each amino acid was however variable and represented between 10 and 50% of the daily requirements of the animal during the measuring period (8 h). Glutamine and to a less extent glutamic acid were exceptions as they were taken up by the gut wall from the arterial blood. There was also a marked synthesis of ornithine and citrulline by the latter. Because of the low blood level of urea, there were no apparent exchanges of urea between the blood and the intestine; in contrast, the ammonia absorption represented about 70% of that observed after ingestion of normal protein diets. Most amino acids are largely taken up by the liver and peripheral tissues, but in the case of alanine the syntheses exceed the uptake.

  4. Laser induced deflection technique for absolute thin film absorption measurement: optimized concepts and experimental results

    SciTech Connect

    Muehlig, Christian; Kufert, Siegfried; Bublitz, Simon; Speck, Uwe

    2011-03-20

    Using experimental results and numerical simulations, two measuring concepts of the laser induced deflection (LID) technique are introduced and optimized for absolute thin film absorption measurements from deep ultraviolet to IR wavelengths. For transparent optical coatings, a particular probe beam deflection direction allows the absorption measurement with virtually no influence of the substrate absorption, yielding improved accuracy compared to the common techniques of separating bulk and coating absorption. For high-reflection coatings, where substrate absorption contributions are negligible, a different probe beam deflection is chosen to achieve a better signal-to-noise ratio. Various experimental results for the two different measurement concepts are presented.

  5. Measuring Food Intake and Nutrient Absorption in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Gomez-Amaro, Rafael L.; Valentine, Elizabeth R.; Carretero, Maria; LeBoeuf, Sarah E.; Rangaraju, Sunitha; Broaddus, Caroline D.; Solis, Gregory M.; Williamson, James R.; Petrascheck, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Caenorhabditis elegans has emerged as a powerful model to study the genetics of feeding, food-related behaviors, and metabolism. Despite the many advantages of C. elegans as a model organism, direct measurement of its bacterial food intake remains challenging. Here, we describe two complementary methods that measure the food intake of C. elegans. The first method is a microtiter plate-based bacterial clearing assay that measures food intake by quantifying the change in the optical density of bacteria over time. The second method, termed pulse feeding, measures the absorption of food by tracking de novo protein synthesis using a novel metabolic pulse-labeling strategy. Using the bacterial clearance assay, we compare the bacterial food intake of various C. elegans strains and show that long-lived eat mutants eat substantially more than previous estimates. To demonstrate the applicability of the pulse-feeding assay, we compare the assimilation of food for two C. elegans strains in response to serotonin. We show that serotonin-increased feeding leads to increased protein synthesis in a SER-7-dependent manner, including proteins known to promote aging. Protein content in the food has recently emerged as critical factor in determining how food composition affects aging and health. The pulse-feeding assay, by measuring de novo protein synthesis, represents an ideal method to unequivocally establish how the composition of food dictates protein synthesis. In combination, these two assays provide new and powerful tools for C. elegans research to investigate feeding and how food intake affects the proteome and thus the physiology and health of an organism. PMID:25903497

  6. Measuring Food Intake and Nutrient Absorption in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Gomez-Amaro, Rafael L; Valentine, Elizabeth R; Carretero, Maria; LeBoeuf, Sarah E; Rangaraju, Sunitha; Broaddus, Caroline D; Solis, Gregory M; Williamson, James R; Petrascheck, Michael

    2015-06-01

    Caenorhabditis elegans has emerged as a powerful model to study the genetics of feeding, food-related behaviors, and metabolism. Despite the many advantages of C. elegans as a model organism, direct measurement of its bacterial food intake remains challenging. Here, we describe two complementary methods that measure the food intake of C. elegans. The first method is a microtiter plate-based bacterial clearing assay that measures food intake by quantifying the change in the optical density of bacteria over time. The second method, termed pulse feeding, measures the absorption of food by tracking de novo protein synthesis using a novel metabolic pulse-labeling strategy. Using the bacterial clearance assay, we compare the bacterial food intake of various C. elegans strains and show that long-lived eat mutants eat substantially more than previous estimates. To demonstrate the applicability of the pulse-feeding assay, we compare the assimilation of food for two C. elegans strains in response to serotonin. We show that serotonin-increased feeding leads to increased protein synthesis in a SER-7-dependent manner, including proteins known to promote aging. Protein content in the food has recently emerged as critical factor in determining how food composition affects aging and health. The pulse-feeding assay, by measuring de novo protein synthesis, represents an ideal method to unequivocally establish how the composition of food dictates protein synthesis. In combination, these two assays provide new and powerful tools for C. elegans research to investigate feeding and how food intake affects the proteome and thus the physiology and health of an organism.

  7. Method for improving terahertz band absorption spectrum measurement accuracy using noncontact sample thickness measurement.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhi; Zhang, Zhaohui; Zhao, Xiaoyan; Su, Haixia; Yan, Fang; Zhang, Han

    2012-07-10

    The terahertz absorption spectrum has a complex nonlinear relationship with sample thickness, which is normally measured mechanically with limited accuracy. As a result, the terahertz absorption spectrum is usually determined incorrectly. In this paper, an iterative algorithm is proposed to accurately determine sample thickness. This algorithm is independent of the initial value used and results in convergent calculations. Precision in sample thickness can be improved up to 0.1 μm. A more precise absorption spectrum can then be extracted. By comparing the proposed method with the traditional method based on mechanical thickness measurements, quantitative analysis experiments on a three-component amino acid mixture shows that the global error decreased from 0.0338 to 0.0301.

  8. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Kapteyn's star spectroscopic measurements (Anglada-Escude+ 2014)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anglada-Escude, G.; Arriagada, P.; Tuomi, M.; Zechmeister, M.; Jenkins, J. S.; Ofir, A.; Dreizler, S.; Gerlach, E.; Marvin, C. J.; Reiners, A.; Jeffers, S. V.; Butler, R. P.; Vogt, S. S.; Amado, P. J.; Rodriguez-Lopez, C.; Berdinas, Z. M.; Morin, J.; Crane, J. D.; Shectman, S. A.; Thompson, I. B.; Diaz, M.; Rivera, E.; Sarmiento, L. F.; Jones, H. R. A.

    2014-05-01

    Time-series of spectroscopic measurements used in the paper. Median value and a perspective acceleration were subtracted to each RVs set (Ins. 1 is HARPS, 2 is HIRES, 3 is PFS). Measurements of the FWHM, BIS of the cross-correlation profiles and measurements of the S-index are provided for HARPS data only. Uncertainty in the FWHM is 2.5 times the uncertainty in BIS. Check (2012ApJS..200...15A), for more detailed definitions of the measurements and their uses. (1 data file).

  9. X-ray absorption measurement by scanning capacitance microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishii, Masashi; Uchihashi, Takayuki

    2003-12-01

    This paper describes a demonstration of scanning capacitance microscopy (SCM) as a technique for measuring X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) in what is called the SCM-XAFS method. This method achieves the simultaneous analysis of the electrical and chemical characteristics of surface-trapping centers. In obtaining the XAFS spectrum of trapping centers, the method takes advantage of the fact that the X-ray-induced photoemission of a localized electron leads to a change in capacitance. When the Fermi level corresponds to the trapping level, the photoemission process is sensitively detected. Therefore, a specific trapping center may be selectively observed by controlling the bias. From SCM-XAFS measurements of a GaAs surface, we found that gallium oxide trapping centers capture electrons in the positive bias voltage region. Moreover, experimental findings that resonant intra-transition and resonant scattering of emitted photoelectrons enhance the SCM-XAFS signal at particular X-ray photon energy reveal the local density of states of the gallium oxide and the complex structure of the trapping centers.

  10. Task-specific tailored multiple-reflection mirror systems for sensitivity enhancement of spectroscopic measurements: application for aircraft engine exhaust emission measurements with FT-IR spectro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brockmann, Klaus; Kurtenbach, Ralf; Kriesche, Volker; Wiesen, Peter; Heland, Joerg; Schaefer, Klaus

    1999-09-01

    Multi-path reflection mirror systems in White- or Herriott- type configuration have been widely used to enhance the absorption path-length and thus the sensitivity of laboratory spectroscopic systems, e.g. for smog chamber studies and molecular spectroscopy. Field studies, for instance using mobile tunable diode laser spectroscopy have widened the range of applications of these mirror systems for specific measurement tasks. In this paper a special designed White-type system mounted in two racks with 5 m base-length and adjustable optical path-length up to 74 passes is described. This system has been tested and successfully used to enhance the sensitivity of non-intrusive FT-IR measurements of aircraft engine exhaust emissions in the harsh environment of an engine test bed. The open cell around the engine plume including the transfer optics for the adaption of the spectrometers in a separate room allowed manual switching between passive FT-IR emission measurements, FT-IR absorption measurements with the cell, and, by covering the infrared source (globar) with a shutter, multi-path FT-IR emission measurements. Tests prior to the aircraft engine measurements were made to investigate the influence of different path- lengths, the position of the plume in the White cell, soot in the exhaust gas, and vibrations of the mirrors. The FT-IR spectra from all three measurement modes using the White cell during the engine measurements were found to be of good quality and the results of the analyses were comparable to the results from intrusive measurement systems.

  11. [Shortening of the measurement time by 1H-MR turbo spectroscopic imaging of the brain].

    PubMed

    Träber, F; Block, W; Lamerichs, R; Keller, E; Schild, H H

    1997-03-01

    Development of a new technique for reduction of measurement time in 1H-MR spectroscopic imaging of the brain. Optimisation of the sequence parameters in volunteer and in patient examinations and comparison to the results obtained with conventional 2 D-SI. Examination of 20 healthy volunteers and 5 patients in a 1.5 T whole-body MR system. In "turbo-spectroscopic imaging" (TSI) sequences, a train of spin-echo signals with different phase encoding is acquired after each 90 degrees excitation. 32 x 32 matrix elements covered a field of view of 20 cm, and additional volume selection was performed by double spin echo excitation. Measurement duration 9 min with acquisition of four phase encoding steps per TR interval, whereas the corresponding 2 D-SI sequence (TR/TE 2000/272 ms) took 30 min. The TSI data sets yielded maps of the regional distribution of metabolite concentrations with a quality comparable to the 2 D-SI results. Signal homogeneity and delineation of brain lesions, however, were superior in conventional spectroscopic imaging. The T2 relaxation of the metabolites required a reduced sampling interval for each phase-encoded echo, and hence the frequency resolution of the corresponding TSI spectra was not always sufficient for separating choline and creatine signals. With measurement durations < 10 min the TSI technique allows in clinical studies a combination with single-voxel MRS for accurate quantification and with a diagnostic MRI within a total examination time of less than one hour.

  12. Measurements of Water Absorption in the Warm Exo-Uranus GJ 3470b

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benneke, Björn; Crossfield, Ian; Knutson, Heather; McCullough, Peter; Lothringer, Joshua; Howard, Andrew; Morley, Caroline; Fortney, Jonathan; Dragomir, Diana; Gilliland, Ron

    2015-12-01

    The discovery of short-period planets with masses and radii intermediate between Earth and Neptune was one of the biggest surprises in the brief history of exoplanet science. These “super-Earths” and “sub-Neptunes” are an order of magnitude more abundant than close-in giant planets. Despite this ubiquity, we know little about their typical compositions and formation histories. Spectroscopic transit observations can shed new light on these mysterious worlds by probing their atmospheric compositions. In this talk, we will give an overview of our ongoing 124-orbit (200-hour) Hubble Space Telescope program to reveal the chemical diversity and formation histories of super-Earths. This unprecedented survey will provide the first comprehensive look at this intriguing new class of planets ranging from 1 Neptune mass and temperatures close to 2000K to a 1 Earth mass planet near the habitable zone of its host star. In this talk, I will discuss the scope of the program and present early science results including measurements of water absorption in the atmosphere of the warm exo-Uranus GJ3470b.

  13. Improved self-absorption correction for extended x-ray absorption fine-structure measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Booth, C.H.; Bridges, F.

    2003-06-04

    Extended x-ray absorption fine-structure (EXAFS) data collected in the fluorescence mode are susceptible to an apparent amplitude reduction due to the self-absorption of the fluorescing photon by the sample before it reaches a detector. Previous treatments have made the simplifying assumption that the effect of the EXAFS on the correction term is negligible, and that the samples are in the thick limit. We present a nearly exact treatment that can be applied for any sample thickness or concentration, and retains the EXAFS oscillations in the correction term.

  14. Differential Absorption Lidar Measurements of Fugitive Benzene Emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, R. A.; Innocenti, F.; Helmore, J.; Gardiner, T.; Finlayson, A.; Connor, A.

    2016-12-01

    The Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL) technique is based on the optical analogue of radar; lidar (light detection and ranging). It provides the capability to remotely measure the concentration and spatial distribution of compounds in the atmosphere. The ability to scan the optical measurement beam throughout the atmosphere enables pollutant concentrations to be mapped, and emission fluxes to be determined when combined with wind data. The NPL DIAL systems can operate in the UV and infrared spectral, enabling the measurement of a range of air pollutants and GHGs including hazardous air pollutants such as benzene. The mobile ground based DIAL systems developed at NPL for pollution monitoring have been used for over 25 years. They have been deployed for routine monitoring, emission factor studies, research investigations and targeted monitoring campaigns. More recently the NPL DIAL has been used in studies to validate other monitoring techniques. In support of this capability, NPL have developed a portable, configurable controlled release system (CRF) able to simulate emissions from typical sources. This has been developed to enable the validation and assessment of fugitive emission monitoring techniques. Following a brief summary of the technique, we outline recent developments in the use of DIAL for monitoring fugitive and diffuse emissions, including the development of a European Standard Method for fugitive emission monitoring. We will present the results of a number of validation exercises using the CRF presenting an update on the performance of DIAL for emission quantification and discuss the wider validation of novel technologies. We will report on recent measurements of the emissions of benzene from industrial sites including a large scale emissions monitoring study carried out by the South Coast Air Quality Management District (SCAQMD) and will report on the measurement of emissions from petrochemical facilities and examine an example of the identification

  15. Infrared reflection absorption spectroscopic study on the adsorption structures of acrylonitrile on Ag(111) and Ag(110) surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osaka, Naoki; Akita, Masato; Hiramoto, Shuji; Itoh, Koichi

    1999-06-01

    Infrared reflection-absorption spectra in CN stretching, CH 2 out-of-plane wagging and CH 2 twisting vibration regions were measured for acrylonitrile (CH 2CHCN) exposed to Ag(111) and Ag(110) in increasing amounts at 77 K. The adsorbate on Ag(111) takes on a series of discrete adsorption states; i.e., an isolated state, associated states, and ordered and amorphous multilayer states. The adsorbate on Ag(110) at lower exposures is in a state with the CN group weakly coordinated to a silver atom (or silver atoms). The adsorbate on Ag(110) takes the associated state and the amorphous multilayer at larger exposures. On raising the temperature to 96 K, the amorphous states on both Ag(111) and Ag(110) are converted to the ordered multilayer. The desorption temperature of the ordered multilayer is below 99 K for Ag(110), while the temperature is above 107 K for Ag(111); the result indicates the effect of the surface morphology on the stability of the ordered state.

  16. Development of miniaturized, spectroscopically assisted Penning gauges for fractional helium and hydrogen neutral pressure measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Flesch, K.; Kremeyer, T.; Schmitz, O.; Soukhanovskii, V.; Wenzel, U.

    2016-08-18

    Direct measurements of the helium (He) fractional neutral pressure in the neutral gas around fusion devices is challenging because of the small mass difference between the abundant D-2 molecules and the He ash which will be produced by deuterium-tritium fusion. In order to study He exhaust, an in situ Penning gauge system is being developed at UW-Madison that is optimized for good pressure and high spectroscopic sensitivity. There are three different anode geometries that we have studied regarding their vacuum electrostatic fields, light output, and ion current. The light output of the two new anode configurations are at least one order of magnitude above the currently available designs, hence improving the spectroscopic sensitivity at similar total neutral pressure resolution.

  17. Development of miniaturized, spectroscopically assisted Penning gauges for fractional helium and hydrogen neutral pressure measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Flesch, K. Kremeyer, T.; Schmitz, O.; Soukhanovskii, V.; Wenzel, U.

    2016-11-15

    Direct measurements of the helium (He) fractional neutral pressure in the neutral gas around fusion devices is challenging because of the small mass difference between the abundant D{sub 2} molecules and the He ash which will be produced by deuterium-tritium fusion. To study He exhaust, an in situ Penning gauge system is being developed at UW-Madison that is optimized for good pressure and high spectroscopic sensitivity. Three different anode geometries have been studied regarding their vacuum electrostatic fields, light output, and ion current. The light output of the two new anode configurations are at least one order of magnitude above the currently available designs, hence improving the spectroscopic sensitivity at similar total neutral pressure resolution.

  18. Development of miniaturized, spectroscopically assisted Penning gauges for fractional helium and hydrogen neutral pressure measurements

    DOE PAGES

    Flesch, K.; Kremeyer, T.; Schmitz, O.; ...

    2016-08-18

    Direct measurements of the helium (He) fractional neutral pressure in the neutral gas around fusion devices is challenging because of the small mass difference between the abundant D-2 molecules and the He ash which will be produced by deuterium-tritium fusion. In order to study He exhaust, an in situ Penning gauge system is being developed at UW-Madison that is optimized for good pressure and high spectroscopic sensitivity. There are three different anode geometries that we have studied regarding their vacuum electrostatic fields, light output, and ion current. The light output of the two new anode configurations are at least onemore » order of magnitude above the currently available designs, hence improving the spectroscopic sensitivity at similar total neutral pressure resolution.« less

  19. Development of miniaturized, spectroscopically assisted Penning gauges for fractional helium and hydrogen neutral pressure measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flesch, K.; Kremeyer, T.; Schmitz, O.; Soukhanovskii, V.; Wenzel, U.

    2016-11-01

    Direct measurements of the helium (He) fractional neutral pressure in the neutral gas around fusion devices is challenging because of the small mass difference between the abundant D2 molecules and the He ash which will be produced by deuterium-tritium fusion. To study He exhaust, an in situ Penning gauge system is being developed at UW-Madison that is optimized for good pressure and high spectroscopic sensitivity. Three different anode geometries have been studied regarding their vacuum electrostatic fields, light output, and ion current. The light output of the two new anode configurations are at least one order of magnitude above the currently available designs, hence improving the spectroscopic sensitivity at similar total neutral pressure resolution.

  20. In situ Gas Temperature Measurements by UV-Absorption Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fateev, A.; Clausen, S.

    2009-02-01

    The absorption spectrum of the NO A2Σ+ ← X2Πγ-system can be used for in situ evaluation of gas temperature. Experiments were performed with a newly developed atmospheric-pressure high-temperature flow gas cell at highly uniform and stable gas temperatures over a 0.533 m path in the range from 23 °C to 1,500 °C. The gas temperature was evaluated (1) from the analysis of the structure of selected NO high-resolution γ-absorption bands and (2) from the analysis of vibrational distribution in the NO γ-absorption system in the (211-238) nm spectral range. The accuracy of both methods is discussed. Validation of the classical Lambert-Beer law has been demonstrated at NO concentrations up to 500 ppm and gas temperatures up to 1,500 °C over an optical absorption path length of 0.533 m.

  1. Metrology for laser spectroscopic concentration and isotope ratio measurements of atmospheric greenhouse gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nwaboh, Javis; Manninen, Albert; Mohn, Joachim; Petersen, Jan C.; Werhahn, Olav; Ebert, Volker

    2015-04-01

    Continuous, accurate and precise measurements of greenhouse gases (GHG) and their isotopic composition are required to understand the global cycle as well as source and sink processes of these environmentally harmful substances. Part of the EMRP project HIGHGAS (Metrology for high-impact greenhouse gases) [1] focuses on spectroscopic methods for GHG isotopic composition measurements and optical transfer standards. Harmonization of terminologies and concepts used in the GHG measurement communities and the metrology community are in focus, especially for isotope ratio measurements by laser spectroscopy, where gas metrology is still at an early stage. The focus of the HIGHGAS project here is on 13C/12C and 18O/16O ratios in CO2, 15N/14N ratios in N2O and 13C/12C and 2H/1H ratios in CH4. As an alternative and complement of gas mixture standards, optical spectroscopic transfer standards for CO2 and CO shall be developed providing concentration results that are directly traceable to the international system of units (SI). Optical transfer standards offer an alternative in situ calibration route for other GHG measurement devices operating in the field. An optical transfer standard becomes particularly interesting when measuring sticky or reactive gases where cylinder-based reference gas mixtures may not be feasible. We present an approach to perform IR-spectrometry on gases with results directly traceable to the SI. This is crucial for the development of optical spectroscopic transfer standards providing SI-traceability to field measurements. Ideas for spectroscopic isotope ratio measurements aiming at SI-traceability will be discussed. Finally, we demonstrate the current performance and limitations of our measurement approaches and project possible solutions. Acknowledgement Parts of this work have been carried out within the European Metrology Research Programme (EMRP) ENV52 project-HIGHGAS (Metrology for high-impact greenhouse gases). The EMRP is jointly funded by the

  2. Characterising molecules for fundamental physics: an accurate spectroscopic model of methyltrioxorhenium derived from new infrared and millimetre-wave measurements.

    PubMed

    Asselin, Pierre; Berger, Yann; Huet, Thérèse R; Margulès, Laurent; Motiyenko, Roman; Hendricks, Richard J; Tarbutt, Michael R; Tokunaga, Sean K; Darquié, Benoît

    2017-02-08

    Precise spectroscopic analysis of polyatomic molecules enables many striking advances in physical chemistry and fundamental physics. We use several new high-resolution spectroscopic devices to improve our understanding of the rotational and rovibrational structure of methyltrioxorhenium (MTO), the achiral parent of a family of large oxorhenium compounds that are ideal candidate species for a planned measurement of parity violation in chiral molecules. Using millimetre-wave and infrared spectroscopy in a pulsed supersonic jet, a cryogenic buffer gas cell, and room temperature absorption cells, we probe the ground state and the Re[double bond, length as m-dash]O antisymmetric and symmetric stretching excited states of both CH3(187)ReO3 and CH3(185)ReO3 isotopologues in the gas phase with unprecedented precision. By extending the rotational spectra to the 150-300 GHz range, we characterize the ground state rotational and hyperfine structure up to J = 43 and K = 41, resulting in refinements to the rotational, quartic and hyperfine parameters, and the determination of sextic parameters and a centrifugal distortion correction to the quadrupolar hyperfine constant. We obtain rovibrational data for temperatures between 6 and 300 K in the 970-1015 cm(-1) range, at resolutions down to 8 MHz and accuracies of 30 MHz. We use these data to determine more precise excited-state rotational, Coriolis and quartic parameters, as well as the ground-state centrifugal distortion parameter DK of the (187)Re isotopologue. We also account for hyperfine structure in the rovibrational transitions and hence determine the upper state rhenium atom quadrupole coupling constant eQq'.

  3. Simultaneous microscopic measurements of thermal and spectroscopic fields of a phase change material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romano, M.; Ryu, M.; Morikawa, J.; Batsale, J. C.; Pradere, C.

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, simultaneous microscopic measurements of thermal and spectroscopic fields of a paraffin wax n-alkane phase change material are reported. Measurements collected using an original set-up are presented and discussed with emphasis on the ability to perform simultaneous characterization of the system when the proposed imaging process is used. Finally, this work reveals that the infrared wavelength contains two sets of important information. Furthermore, this versatile and flexible technique is well adapted to characterize many systems in which the mass and heat transfers effects are coupled.

  4. Laser-spectroscopic measurement techniques for hypersonic, turbulent wind tunnel flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mckenzie, Robert L.; Fletcher, Douglas G.

    1992-01-01

    A review is given of the nature, present status, and capabilities of two laser spectroscopic methods for the simultaneous measurement of temperature, density, and their fluctuations owing to turbulence in high speed wind tunnel flows. One method is based on the two frequency excitation of nitric oxide seeded into a nitrogen flow, using tunable dye lasers. The second, more recent method relies on the excitation of oxygen in air flows using a tunable, ArF excimer laser. Signal are obtained from both the laser induced fluorescence and from Raman scattering of the same laser pulse. Measurements are demonstrated in the turbulent boundary layer of a Mach-2 channel flow.

  5. An all-fiber spectroscopic Raman lidar system for atmospheric water vapor measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yufeng; Zhao, Meina; Fu, Qiang; Li, Zhao; Di, Huige; Wang, Li; Hua, Dengxin

    2016-01-01

    Aimed to establish a Raman lidar system with high-reliability and high anti-interference performance, an newly all-fiber spectroscopic Raman lidar system was proposed for atmospheric water vapor measurement, in which optical fiber couplers, fiber band-width filters and fiber F-P filters constitute the all-fiber spectroscopic system. On the basis of the design of fiber F-P filters and its transmission analysis, the series connection of optical fiber coupler is designed as fiber optics splitter, which is not only to obtain fiber coupling of the input and output of lidar returns, and also to achieve the optimal energy output ratio at three fiber channels. Furthermore, fiber band-width filters are proposed to replace the dichroic mirrors, and the structure of fiber band-width filters and fiber F-P filters is to constitute the secondary cascade filter system, achieving the fine extraction of interested spectrum and high rejection rate to elastic scattering signals. Preliminary test results indicated that, the energy at the three output ports is %sim;5: 2.5: 2.5, and the two fiber band-width filters are provided with the central wavelength of 606nm and 660nm, the bandwidth of 20nm, and the out of band inhibition of >0.5%, which met the design requirements. The design and results will provide a reliable basis for the integration and experiment of the subsequent all-fiber spectroscopic system.

  6. Precise methane absorption measurements in the 1.64 μm spectral region for the MERLIN mission.

    PubMed

    Delahaye, T; Maxwell, S E; Reed, Z D; Lin, H; Hodges, J T; Sung, K; Devi, V M; Warneke, T; Spietz, P; Tran, H

    2016-06-27

    In this article we describe a high-precision laboratory measurement targeting the R(6) manifold of the 2ν3 band of (12)CH4. Accurate physical models of this absorption spectrum will be required by the Franco-German, Methane Remote Sensing LIDAR (MERLIN) space mission for retrievals of atmospheric methane. The analysis uses the Hartmann-Tran profile for modeling line shape and also includes line-mixing effects. To this end, six high-resolution and high signal-to-noise absorption spectra of air-broadened methane were recorded using a frequency-stabilized cavity ring-down spectroscopy apparatus. Sample conditions corresponded to room temperature and spanned total sample pressures of 40 hPa - 1013 hPa with methane molar fractions between 1 μmol mol(-1) and 12 μmol mol(-1). All spectroscopic model parameters were simultaneously adjusted in a multispectrum nonlinear least-squares fit to the six measured spectra. Comparison of the fitted model to the measured spectra reveals the ability to calculate the room-temperature, methane absorption coefficient to better than 0.1% at the on-line position of the MERLIN mission. This is the first time that such fidelity has been reached in modeling methane absorption in the investigated spectral region, fulfilling the accuracy requirements of the MERLIN mission. We also found excellent agreement when comparing the present results with measurements obtained over different pressure conditions and using other laboratory techniques. Finally, we also evaluated the impact of these new spectral parameters on atmospheric transmissions spectra calculations.

  7. Precise methane absorption measurements in the 1.64 μm spectral region for the MERLIN mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delahaye, T.; Maxwell, S. E.; Reed, Z. D.; Lin, H.; Hodges, J. T.; Sung, K.; Devi, V. M.; Warneke, T.; Spietz, P.; Tran, H.

    2016-06-01

    In this article we describe a high-precision laboratory measurement targeting the R(6) manifold of the 2ν3 band of 12CH4. High-fidelity modeling of this absorption spectrum for atmospheric temperature and pressure conditions will be required by the Franco-German, Methane Remote Sensing LIDAR (MERLIN) space mission for retrievals of atmospheric methane. The analysis uses the Hartmann-Tran profile for modeling line shape and also includes line-mixing effects. To this end, six high-resolution and high signal-to-noise ratio absorption spectra of air-broadened methane were recorded using a frequency-stabilized cavity ring-down spectroscopy apparatus. Sample conditions corresponded to room temperature and spanned total sample pressures of 40 hPa-1013 hPa with methane molar fractions between 1 µmol mol-1 and 12 µmol mol-1. All spectroscopic model parameters were simultaneously adjusted in a multispectrum nonlinear least squares fit to the six measured spectra. Comparison of the fitted model to the measured spectra reveals the ability to calculate the room temperature, methane absorption coefficient to better than 0.1% at the online position of the MERLIN mission. This is the first time that such fidelity has been reached in modeling methane absorption in the investigated spectral region, fulfilling the accuracy requirements of the MERLIN mission. We also found excellent agreement when comparing the present results with measurements obtained over different pressure conditions and using other laboratory techniques. Finally, we also evaluated the impact of these new spectral parameters on atmospheric transmissions spectra calculations.

  8. Measuring galaxy environment with the synergy of future photometric and spectroscopic surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cucciati, O.; Marulli, F.; Cimatti, A.; Merson, A. I.; Norberg, P.; Pozzetti, L.; Baugh, C. M.; Branchini, E.

    2016-10-01

    We exploit the synergy between low-resolution spectroscopy and photometric redshifts to study environmental effects on galaxy evolution in slitless spectroscopic surveys from space. As a test case, we consider the future Euclid Deep survey (˜40 deg2), which combines a slitless spectroscopic survey limited at Hα flux ≥5 × 10-17 erg cm-2 s-1 and a photometric survey limited in H band (H ≤ 26). We use Euclid-like galaxy mock catalogues, in which we anchor the photometric redshifts to the 3D galaxy distribution of the available spectroscopic redshifts. We then estimate the local density contrast by counting objects in cylindrical cells with radius from 1 to 10 h-1Mpc, over the redshift range 0.9 < z < 1.8. We compare this density field with the one computed in a mock catalogue with the same depth as the Euclid Deep survey (H = 26) but without redshift measurement errors. We find that our method successfully separates high- from low-density environments (the last from the first quintile of the density distribution), with higher efficiency at low redshift and large cells: the fraction of low-density regions mistaken by high-density peaks is <1 per cent for all scales and redshifts explored, but for scales of 1 h-1Mpc for which is a few per cent. These results show that we can efficiently study environment in photometric samples if spectroscopic information is available for a smaller sample of objects that sparsely samples the same volume. We demonstrate that these studies are possible in the Euclid Deep survey, i.e. in a redshift range in which environmental effects are different from those observed in the local Universe, hence providing new constraints for galaxy evolution models.

  9. Measurement of optical nonlinearity by antiresonant ring interferometric nonlinear spectroscopic (ARINS) technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhushan, B.

    2016-08-01

    We have reported the measurement of third-order optical nonlinearity by antiresonant ring interferometric nonlinear spectroscopic (ARINS) technique and discussed its usefulness over other popular measuring techniques such as Z-scan, degenerate four wave mixing (DFWM) and third harmonic generation (THG). The measurement has been simulated theoretically by taking different numerical values as well as sign of δ, which is a key parameter of ARINS. The technique has been benchmarked using toluene and the theoretical simulation has been substantiated experimentally by measuring the nonlinear optical coefficients ( n 2 and β) of two different samples. The disadvantages of the technique have also been discussed. However, a number of advantages of ARINS override its disadvantages and therefore, ARINS may be preferred over other measuring techniques for the measurement of nonlinear optical parameters.

  10. A Comparison of Spectroscopic Measurements of an Inductive Plasma Source with the INDUCT Model

    SciTech Connect

    Huebschman, M.L.; Bakshi, V.; Bengtson, R.D.; Ekerdt, J.G.; Vitello, P.; Wiley, J.C.; Xiang, N.

    1999-10-03

    Noninvasive spectroscopic measurements of an inductively driven hydrogen plasma source with density and temperature characteristic of plasma processing tools have been made with an ultimate application of cleaning of silicon substrates. These measurements allow full radial and axial profiles of electron density and temperature to be measured from absolutely calibrated multichannel spectroscopic measurements of upper state number densities and a collisional radiative model. Profiles were obtained over a range of powers from 50 to 200 W and pressures from 5 to 50 mTorr in hydrogen in a small cylindrical source. The hydrogen working gas and simple cylindrical geometry was chosen to simplify detailed comparisons with a 2D computational model (INDUCT95) which uses a fluid approximation for tbc plasma and neutral gas. The code calculates the inductive coupling of the 13.56 MHz RF source, the collisional, radiative, and wall losses as well as a chemistry model for electrons, H{sub 2}, H, H{sup +}, H{sub 2}, and H{sub 3}{sup +}. Simulation results were sensitive to the value for the wall coefficient. The simulation and experimental temperature and density profiles in r and z were in rough agreement, but some details were quite different. The simulated axial density profile was located under the coil while the measured density profiles extended well beyond the edges of the coil. The scaling of conditions with pressure and power was in rough agreement between experiment and simulations.

  11. Spectroscopic measurements of soybeans used to parameterize physiological traits in the AgroIBIS ecosystem model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, A.; Serbin, S.; Kucharik, C. J.; Townsend, P. A.

    2014-12-01

    Ecosystem models such AgroIBIS require detailed parameterizations of numerous vegetation traits related to leaf structure, biochemistry and photosynthetic capacity to properly assess plant carbon assimilation and yield response to environmental variability. In general, these traits are estimated from a limited number of field measurements or sourced from the literature, but rarely is the full observed range of variability in these traits utilized in modeling activities. In addition, pathogens and pests, such as the exotic soybean aphid (Aphis glycines), which affects photosynthetic pathways in soybean plants by feeding on phloem and sap, can potentially impact plant productivity and yields. Capturing plant responses to pest pressure in conjunction with environmental variability is of considerable interest to managers and the scientific community alike. In this research, we employed full-range (400-2500 nm) field and laboratory spectroscopy to rapidly characterize the leaf biochemical and physiological traits, namely foliar nitrogen, specific leaf area (SLA) and the maximum rate of RuBP carboxylation by the enzyme RuBisCo (Vcmax) in soybean plants, which experienced a broad range of environmental conditions and soybean aphid pressures. We utilized near-surface spectroscopic remote sensing measurements as a means to capture the spatial and temporal patterns of aphid impacts across broad aphid pressure levels. In addition, we used the spectroscopic data to generate a much larger dataset of key model parameters required by AgroIBIS than would be possible through traditional measurements of biochemistry and leaf-level gas exchange. The use of spectroscopic retrievals of soybean traits allowed us to better characterize the variability of plant responses associated with aphid pressure to more accurately model the likely impacts of soybean aphid on soybeans. Our next steps include the coupling of the information derived from our spectral measurements with the Agro

  12. Effect of steric hindrance on carbon dioxide absorption into new amine solutions: thermodynamic and spectroscopic verification through solubility and NMR analysis.

    PubMed

    Park, Jung-Yeon; Yoon, Sang Jun; Lee, Huen

    2003-04-15

    Acid gas absorption technology is of great importance in these days for the prevention of global warming and the resulting worldwide climate change. More efficient process design and development for the removal of acid gases has become important, together with the development of new absorbents as one of urgent areas of research in addressing global-warming problems. In the present work, aqueous solutions of 2-amino-2-hydroxymethyl-1,3-propanediol (AHPD), a sterically hindered amine, has been examined as a potential CO2 absorbent and compared with the most commonly used absorbent, monoethanolamine (MEA) solution, through equilibrium solubility measurements and 13C NMR spectroscopic analyses. The solubilities of CO2 in aqueous 10 mass % AHPD solutions were higher than those in aqueous 10 mass % MEA solutions above 4 kPa at 298.15 K, but below 4 kPa, the solubility behavior appeared to be the opposite. The solubility difference between these two solutions increased with the CO2 partial pressures above the crossover pressure. Equilibrated CO2-MEA-H2O and CO2-AHPD-H2O solutions at various CO2 partal pressures ranging from 0.01 to 3000 kPa were analyzed by 13C NMR spectroscopy to provide a more microscopic understanding of the reaction mechanisms in the two solutions. In the CO2-amine-H2O solutions, amine reacted with CO2 to form mainly the protonated amine (AMH+), bicarbonate ion (HCO3-), and carbamate anion (AMCO2-), where the quantitative ratio of bicarbonate ion to carbamate anion strongly influenced the CO2 loading in the amine solutions. A profusion of bicarbonate ions, but a very small amount of carbamate anions, was identified in the CO2-AHPD-H2O solution, whereas a considerable amount of carbamate anions was formed in the CO2-MEA-H2O solution. AHPD contains more hydroxyl groups than nonhindered MEA, and hence, the chemical shifts in its 13C NMR spectra were strongly influenced by the solution pH values. In contrast, MEA appeared to be insensitive to pH. The

  13. Temperature-dependent absorption cross-section measurements of 1-butene (1-C4H8) in VUV and IR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Es-sebbar, Et-touhami; Benilan, Yves; Farooq, Aamir

    2013-01-01

    Vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) and infrared (IR) absorption cross-section measurements of 1-butene (1-C4H8; CH2=CHCH2CH3; Butylene) are reported over the temperature range of 296-529 K. The VUV measurements are performed between 115 and 205 nm using synchrotron radiation as a tunable VUV light source. Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy is employed to measure absorption cross-section and band strengths in the IR region between 1.54 and 25 μm (˜6500-400 cm-1). The measured room-temperature VUV and IR absorption cross-sections are compared with available literature data and are found to be in good agreement. The oscillator strength for the electronic transition (A1A‧→X1A‧) around 150-205 nm is determined to be 0.32±0.01.The gas temperature has a strong effect on both VUV and IR spectra. Measurements made in the VUV region show that the peak value of the band cross-section decreases and the background continuum increases with increasing gas temperature. This behavior is due to a change in the rotational and vibrational population distribution of 1-butene molecule. Similar changes in rotational population are observed in the IR spectra. Moreover, variation of the IR spectra with temperature is used to measure the enthalpy difference between syn and skew conformations of 1-butene and is found to be 0.24±0.03 kcal/mol, which is in excellent agreement with values reported in the literature. The measurements reported in this work will provide the much-needed spectroscopic information for the development of high-temperature quantitative diagnostics in combustion applications and validation of atmospheric chemistry models of extra-solar planets.

  14. Measurement of axial neutral density profiles in a microwave discharge ion thruster by laser absorption spectroscopy with optical fiber probes.

    PubMed

    Tsukizaki, Ryudo; Koizumi, Hiroyuki; Nishiyama, Kazutaka; Kuninaka, Hitoshi

    2011-12-01

    In order to reveal the physical processes taking place within the "μ10" microwave discharge ion thruster, internal plasma diagnosis is indispensable. However, the ability of metallic probes to access microwave plasmas biased at a high voltage is limited from the standpoints of the disturbance created in the electric field and electrical isolation. In this study, the axial density profiles of excited neutral xenon were successfully measured under ion beam acceleration by using a novel laser absorption spectroscopy system. The target of the measurement was metastable Xe I 5p(5)((2)P(0) (3/2))6s[3/2](0) (2) which absorbed a wavelength of 823.16 nm. Signals from laser absorption spectroscopy that swept a single-mode optical fiber probe along the line of sight were differentiated and converted into axial number densities of the metastable neutral particles in the plasma source. These measurements revealed a 10(18) m(-3) order of metastable neutral particles situated in the waveguide, which caused two different modes during the operation of the μ10 thruster. This paper reports a novel spectroscopic measurement system with axial resolution for microwave plasma sources utilizing optical fiber probes.

  15. Measurement of axial neutral density profiles in a microwave discharge ion thruster by laser absorption spectroscopy with optical fiber probes

    SciTech Connect

    Tsukizaki, Ryudo; Koizumi, Hiroyuki; Nishiyama, Kazutaka; Kuninaka, Hitoshi

    2011-12-15

    In order to reveal the physical processes taking place within the ''{mu}10'' microwave discharge ion thruster, internal plasma diagnosis is indispensable. However, the ability of metallic probes to access microwave plasmas biased at a high voltage is limited from the standpoints of the disturbance created in the electric field and electrical isolation. In this study, the axial density profiles of excited neutral xenon were successfully measured under ion beam acceleration by using a novel laser absorption spectroscopy system. The target of the measurement was metastable Xe I 5p{sup 5}({sup 2}P{sup 0}{sub 3/2})6s[{sup 3}/{sub 2}]{sup 0}{sub 2} which absorbed a wavelength of 823.16 nm. Signals from laser absorption spectroscopy that swept a single-mode optical fiber probe along the line of sight were differentiated and converted into axial number densities of the metastable neutral particles in the plasma source. These measurements revealed a 10{sup 18} m{sup -3} order of metastable neutral particles situated in the waveguide, which caused two different modes during the operation of the {mu}10 thruster. This paper reports a novel spectroscopic measurement system with axial resolution for microwave plasma sources utilizing optical fiber probes.

  16. Microwave absorption of oxygen measured with a Fabry-Perot spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poon, R. K. L.

    1977-01-01

    A semiconfocal configuration of a Fabry-Perot interferometer is described, which can be used for measuring moderately weak absorption at a fixed microwave frequency as a function of pressure by measuring the change in the Q of the system when the gas is introduced. An accuracy of 0.3 dB/km at 58.82 GHz is achieved with just conventional laboratory equipment. The absorption need not be resonant, and can be determined as a function of such physical factors as pressure, temperature, and mixture composition. Oxygen absorption measurements support calculations based on theories of line overlap inside the oxygen absorption band at subatmospheric pressure.

  17. Measurements of the Absorption by Auditorium SEATING—A Model Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    BARRON, M.; COLEMAN, S.

    2001-01-01

    One of several problems with seat absorption is that only small numbers of seats can be tested in standard reverberation chambers. One method proposed for reverberation chamber measurements involves extrapolation when the absorption coefficient results are applied to actual auditoria. Model seat measurements in an effectively large model reverberation chamber have allowed the validity of this extrapolation to be checked. The alternative barrier method for reverberation chamber measurements was also tested and the two methods were compared. The effect on the absorption of row-row spacing as well as absorption by small numbers of seating rows was also investigated with model seats.

  18. Midinfrared absorption measured at a lambda/400 resolution with an atomic force microscope.

    PubMed

    Houel, Julien; Homeyer, Estelle; Sauvage, Sébastien; Boucaud, Philippe; Dazzi, Alexandre; Prazeres, Rui; Ortéga, Jean-Michel

    2009-06-22

    Midinfrared absorption can be locally measured using a detection combining an atomic force microscope and a pulsed excitation. This is illustrated for the midinfrared bulk GaAs phonon absorption and for the midinfrared absorption of thin SiO(2) microdisks. We show that the signal given by the cantilever oscillation amplitude of the atomic force microscope follows the spectral dependence of the bulk material absorption. The absorption spatial resolution achieved with microdisks is around 50 nanometer for an optical excitation around 22 micrometer wavelength.

  19. Inference of the microwave absorption coefficient from stray radiation measurements in Wendelstein 7-X

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moseev, D.; Laqua, H. P.; Marsen, S.; Marushchenko, N.; Stange, T.; Braune, H.; Gellert, F.; Hirsch, M.; Hoefel, U.; Knauer, J.; Oosterbeek, J. W.; Turkin, Y.; The Wendelstein 7-X Team

    2017-03-01

    The efficiency of electron cyclotron heating is determined by the microwave absorption of the plasma. Good microwave absorption is also crucial for the machine safety. In this paper we present a method of evaluating the microwave absorption coefficient from stray radiation measurements. The discussed method is computationally simple and can be applied potentially in real time. Evolution of the second harmonic extraordinary mode (X2) microwave absorption coefficient in Wendelstein 7-X during the start-up phase is presented, as well as an estimate of the absorption coefficient for the second harmonic ordinary mode (O2) wave.

  20. Extended-range spectroscopic pH measurement using optimized mixtures of dyes.

    PubMed

    Raghuraman, B; Gustavson, G; Van Hal, R E G; Dressaire, E; Zhdaneev, O

    2006-12-01

    The spectroscopic technique for pH measurement is a well-established laboratory technique that can give high-accuracy pH values. Recent studies have shown the advantage of this technique over standard potentiometric methods for pH measurements in fresh water and seawater and also at high temperatures and pressures. However, a limitation of the spectroscopic technique is that a single pH dye is sensitive only over a narrow pH range. We have developed optimized dye mixtures that are both sensitive and accurate over a broad pH range. The measurement is robust and simple, requires a minimum of two wavelengths, and is independent of the volume of the dye mixture added. Optimization of the dye mixture formulation to maximize accuracy in a broad range of pH involves varying both the dye type and its mole fraction and also accounting for spectral noise. This technique has been successfully applied for in situ pH measurements of oilfield formation waters.

  1. Spectroscopic measurements and terahertz imaging of the cornea using a rapid scanning terahertz time domain spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen-Quan, Liu; Yuan-Fu, Lu; Guo-Hua, Jiao; Xian-Feng, Chen; Zhi-Sheng, Zhou; Rong-Bin, She; Jin-Ying, Li; Si-Hai, Chen; Yu-Ming, Dong; Jian-Cheng, Lv

    2016-06-01

    Spectroscopic measurements and terahertz imaging of the cornea are carried out by using a rapid scanning terahertz time domain spectroscopy (THz-TDS) system. A voice coil motor stage based optical delay line (VCM-ODL) is developed to provide a rather simple and robust structure with both the high scanning speed and the large delay length. The developed system is used for THz spectroscopic measurements and imaging of the corneal tissue with different amounts of water content, and the measurement results show the consistence with the reported results, in which the measurement time using VCM-ODL is a factor of 360 shorter than the traditional motorized optical delay line (MDL). With reducing the water content a monotonic decrease of the complex permittivity of the cornea is observed. The two-term Debye relaxation model is employed to explain our experimental results, revealing that the fast relaxation time of a dehydrated cornea is much larger than that of a hydrated cornea and its dielectric behavior can be affected by the presence of the biological macromolecules. These results demonstrate that our THz spectrometer may be a promising candidate for tissue hydration sensing and practical application of THz technology. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 61205101), the Shenzhen Municipal Research Foundation, China (Grant Nos. GJHZ201404171134305 and JCYJ20140417113130693), and the Marie Curie Actions-International Research Staff Exchange Scheme (IRSES) (Grant No. FP7 PIRSES-2013-612267).

  2. On the errors in measuring the particle density by the light absorption method

    SciTech Connect

    Ochkin, V. N.

    2015-04-15

    The accuracy of absorption measurements of the density of particles in a given quantum state as a function of the light absorption coefficient is analyzed. Errors caused by the finite accuracy in measuring the intensity of the light passing through a medium in the presence of different types of noise in the recorded signal are considered. Optimal values of the absorption coefficient and the factors capable of multiplying errors when deviating from these values are determined.

  3. Acoustic Absorption Measurements for Characterization of Gas Mixing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    of the box (Gas A). Gas B is humidified by passing the same grade CO2 through a bubbler. The humidity of the gas is varied by mixing the relative...the accuracy with which the “mixedness profile” can be inverted. 1Bhatia, A., Ultrasonic Absorption, Dover Publications: New York, 1967. 2

  4. Spectral type of auroral precipitating electrons estimated from optical and cosmic noise absorption measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Y.-M.; Kubota, M.; Ishii, M.; Monzen, Y.; Murayama, Y.; Mori, H.; Lummerzheim, D.

    2006-11-01

    We estimate the energy spectra of precipitating electrons from optical emissions and cosmic noise absorption (CNA) that were observed with the all-sky imager (ASI) and the 16 × 16-element imaging riometer at Poker Flat Research Range (PFRR) (65.11° N, 147.42° W), Alaska. Maxwellian energy parameters (peak energy and total energy flux) are derived from the auroral spectroscopic emissions according to the conventional photometric method. We theoretically estimate CNA from the derived Maxwellian spectra and compare it with the observed CNA. The difference between the estimated CNA and the observed (δCNA) is used as an indicator of the difference in high-energy electron flux (E > ˜20 keV) between the actual energy distribution and Maxwellian. This analysis is carried out for two substorm events in the evening sector to show the temporal and spatial variations of the energy spectra. Event 1 exhibits two arcs of CNA during the growth phase of the substorm. The results for this event suggest that the energy spectra of the two CNA arcs have different shapes, and this difference is revealed in the precipitating electron flux quasi-simultaneously measured by NOAA-17. Event 2 is a typical substorm that consists of growth, expansion, and recovery phases. The δCNA changes throughout the course of the substorm, which can be consistently explained by the energy spectrum variation of the precipitating electrons measured in previous studies. Furthermore, the energy spectra consistent for both optical and CNA data are estimated by assuming a kappa or a Gaussian distribution. This estimation method based on ground observations of the energy spectra has the potential to provide significant information on substorms.

  5. Measurements of new absorption lines of acetylene at 1.53μm using a tunable diode laser absorption spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ningwu; Deng, Hao; He, Tianbo; Liu, Yu; Zhang, Lei; Li, Jingsong

    2017-11-05

    A new investigation of acetylene absorption lines between 6526.5 and 6531.5cm(-1) spectral region was performed by using a long-path absorption cell based tunable diode laser absorption spectrometer. The multi-spectrum fitting procedure has been applied to these intensive absorption lines of acetylene within the spectral range of particular interest to recover the line parameters. Line intensities and line positions of total 42 lines of acetylene were reported, including 22 new lines precisely identified for the first time. The reported results will be valuable to complete the spectroscopic databases of acetylene, and also be useful for upgrading our newly developed TDLAS sensor system for industrial C2H2 gas detection. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Modeled optical properties of SiGe and Si layers compared to spectroscopic ellipsometry measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kriso, C.; Triozon, F.; Delerue, C.; Schneider, L.; Abbate, F.; Nolot, E.; Rideau, D.; Niquet, Y.-M.; Mugny, G.; Tavernier, C.

    2017-03-01

    The optical response of strained SiGe alloys, as well as thin Si layers, is analyzed using a sp3d5s∗ tight-binding model within the independent particle approximation. The theoretical results are compared to measurements obtained on samples with various Ge content and layer thicknesses. The dielectric function is extracted from spectroscopic ellipsometry allowing a separation of its real and imaginary parts. Theory and simulation show similar trends for the variation of the dielectric function of SiGe with varying Ge content. Variations are also well reproduced for thin Si layers with varying thickness and are attributed to quantum confinement.

  7. Rapid, broadband spectroscopic temperature measurement of hbox {CO}_2 using VIPA spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klose, Andrew; Ycas, Gabriel; Cruz, Flavio C.; Maser, Daniel L.; Diddams, Scott A.

    2016-04-01

    Time-resolved spectroscopic temperature measurements of a sealed carbon dioxide sample cell were realized with an optical frequency comb combined with a two-dimensional dispersive spectrometer. A supercontinuum laser source based on an erbium fiber mode-locked laser was employed to generate coherent light around 2000 nm (5000hbox { cm}^{-1}). The laser was passed through a 12-cm-long cell containing hbox {CO}_2, and the transmitted light was analyzed in a virtually imaged phased array-based spectrometer. Broadband spectra spanning more than 100hbox { cm}^{-1 } with a spectral resolution of roughly 0.075hbox { cm}^{-1} (2.2 GHz) were acquired with an integration period of 2 ms. The temperature of the hbox {CO}_2 sample was deduced from fitting a modeled spectrum to the line intensities of the experimentally acquired spectrum. Temperature dynamics on the timescale of milliseconds were observed with a temperature resolution of 2.6 K. The spectroscopically deduced temperatures agreed with temperatures of the sample cell measured with a thermistor. Potential applications of this technique include quantitative measurement of carbon dioxide concentration and temperature dynamics in gas-phase chemical reactions (e.g., combustion) and plasma diagnostics.

  8. Airborne Measurements of CO2 Column Absorption and Range Using a Pulsed Direct-Detection Integrated Path Differential Absorption Lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abshire, James B.; Riris, Haris; Weaver, Clark J.; Mao, Jianping; Allan, Graham R.; Hasselbrack, William E.; Browell, Edward V.

    2013-01-01

    We report on airborne CO2 column absorption measurements made in 2009 with a pulsed direct-detection lidar operating at 1572.33 nm and utilizing the integrated path differential absorption technique. We demonstrated these at different altitudes from an aircraft in July and August in flights over four locations in the central and eastern United States. The results show clear CO2 line shape and absorption signals, which follow the expected changes with aircraft altitude from 3 to 13 km. The lidar measurement statistics were also calculated for each flight as a function of altitude. The optical depth varied nearly linearly with altitude, consistent with calculations based on atmospheric models. The scatter in the optical depth measurements varied with aircraft altitude as expected, and the median measurement precisions for the column varied from 0.9 to 1.2 ppm. The altitude range with the lowest scatter was 810 km, and the majority of measurements for the column within it had precisions between 0.2 and 0.9 ppm.

  9. Infrared spectroscopic measurements of carbon monoxide within a high temperature ablative boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGuire, S. D.; Tibère-Inglesse, A. C.; Laux, C. O.

    2016-12-01

    Theoretical studies have indicated that the formation of carbon monoxide within a high temperature ablative boundary layer can significantly alter the afterbody radiative heat transfer to the surface of a reentry capsule. This paper represents a first attempt to experimentally measure the concentration of carbon monoxide within the high temperature boundary layer surrounding an ablative material exposed to an atmospheric pressure air plasma. A plasma torch facility was used to produce the high temperature flow and a sample of ASTERM ablative material was inserted into the flow. At the stagnation point, the heat flux to the surface was estimated at 8 MW m-2 and the surface temperature at 2900  ±  100 K. Both emission and absorption spectroscopy techniques were used to measure the distribution of carbon monoxide within the flow. Emission spectroscopy yielded better signal-to-noise measurements, but the absorption spectroscopy measurements were used to validate emission measurements. In the cases examined, both emission and absorption measurements were consistent and in agreement with one another. Estimates of carbon monoxide temperature and mole fraction were deduced from the spectra taken within the boundary layer downstream of the stagnation point. No carbon monoxide was observed at the stagnation point. These measurements provide a test case for numerical simulations of plasma-ablator interactions.

  10. Measurement of initial absorption of fused silica at 193nm using laser induced deflection technique (LID)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schönfeld, Dörte; Klett, Ursula; Mühlig, Christian; Thomas, Stephan

    2008-01-01

    The ongoing development in microlithography towards further miniaturization of structures creates a strong demand for lens material with nearly ideal optical properties. Beside the highly demanding requirements on homogeneity and stress induced birefringence (SIB), low absorption is a key factor. Even a small absorption is associated with a temperature increase and results in thermally induced local variations of refractive index and SIB. This could affect the achievable resolution of the lithographic process. The total absorption of the material is composed of initial absorption and of absorption induced during irradiation. Thus, the optimization of both improves the lifetime of the material. In principal, it is possible to measure transmission and scattering with a suitable spectrometer assembly and calculate absorption from them. However, owing to the influence of sample surfaces and errors of measurement, these methods usually do not provide satisfactory results for highly light-transmissive fused silica. Therefore, it is most desirable to find a technique that is capable of directly measuring absorption coefficients in the range of (1...10)•10 -4 cm -1 (base 10) directly. We report our first results for fused silica achieved with the LID technique. Besides a fused silica grade designed for 193 nm applications, grades with higher absorption at 193 nm were measured to test the LID technique. A special focus was set on the possibility of measuring initial absorption without the influence of degradation effects.

  11. Cerebral and muscle oxygen saturation measurement by a frequency-domain near-infrared spectroscopic technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrari, Marco; De Blasi, Roberto A.; Fantini, Sergio; Franceschini, Maria-Angela; Barbieri, Beniamino B.; Quaresima, Valentina; Gratton, Enrico

    1995-05-01

    Absorption and reduced scattering coefficients at 715 and 825 nm as well as hemoglobin saturation and content of the forehead and the forearm were measured by a 110 MHz frequency-domain multisource instrument. The absolute data obtained by the frequency- domain spectrometer were compared with oxygenation changes measured by a continuous wave instrument during quadriceps ischemia and postural changes. These preliminary results indicate that portable frequency-domain instruments could be very helpful to investigate brain and muscle pathophysiology.

  12. The VIMOS Public Extragalactic Survey (VIPERS). First Data Release of 57 204 spectroscopic measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garilli, B.; Guzzo, L.; Scodeggio, M.; Bolzonella, M.; Abbas, U.; Adami, C.; Arnouts, S.; Bel, J.; Bottini, D.; Branchini, E.; Cappi, A.; Coupon, J.; Cucciati, O.; Davidzon, I.; De Lucia, G.; de la Torre, S.; Franzetti, P.; Fritz, A.; Fumana, M.; Granett, B. R.; Ilbert, O.; Iovino, A.; Krywult, J.; Le Brun, V.; Le Fèvre, O.; Maccagni, D.; Małek, K.; Marulli, F.; McCracken, H. J.; Paioro, L.; Polletta, M.; Pollo, A.; Schlagenhaufer, H.; Tasca, L. A. M.; Tojeiro, R.; Vergani, D.; Zamorani, G.; Zanichelli, A.; Burden, A.; Di Porto, C.; Marchetti, A.; Marinoni, C.; Mellier, Y.; Moscardini, L.; Nichol, R. C.; Peacock, J. A.; Percival, W. J.; Phleps, S.; Wolk, M.

    2014-02-01

    We present the first Public Data Release (PDR-1) of the VIMOS Public Extragalactic Survey (VIPERS). It comprises 57 204 spectroscopic measurements together with all additional information necessary for optimal scientific exploitation of the data, in particular the associated photometric measurements and quantification of the photometric and survey completeness. VIPERS is an ESO Large Programme designed to build a spectroscopic sample of ≃100 000 galaxies with iAB < 22.5 and 0.5 < z < 1.2 with high sampling rate (≃45%). The survey spectroscopic targets are selected from the CFHTLS-Wide five-band catalogues in the W1 and W4 fields. The final survey will cover a total area of nearly 24 deg2, for a total comoving volume between z = 0.5 and 1.2 of ≃4 × 107 h-3 Mpc3 and a median galaxy redshift of z ≃ 0.8. The release presented in this paper includes data from virtually the entire W4 field and nearly half of the W1 area, thus representing 64% of the final dataset. We provide a detailed description of sample selection, observations and data reduction procedures; we summarise the global properties of the spectroscopic catalogue and explain the associated data products and their use, and provide all the details for accessing the data through the survey database (http://vipers.inaf.it) where all information can be queried interactively. Based on observations collected at the European Southern Observatory, Cerro Paranal, Chile, using the Very Large Telescope under programs 182.A-0886 and partly 070.A-9007. Also based on observations obtained with MegaPrime/MegaCam, a joint project of CFHT and CEA/DAPNIA, at the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope (CFHT), which is operated by the National Research Council (NRC) of Canada, the Institut National des Sciences de l'Univers of the Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS) of France, and the University of Hawaii. This work is based in part on

  13. Spectroscopic measurements of plasma emission light for plasma-based acceleration experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filippi, F.; Anania, M. P.; Biagioni, A.; Chiadroni, E.; Cianchi, A.; Ferrario, M.; Mostacci, A.; Palumbo, L.; Zigler, A.

    2016-09-01

    Advanced particle accelerators are based on the excitation of large amplitude plasma waves driven by either electron or laser beams. Future experiments scheduled at the SPARC_LAB test facility aim to demonstrate the acceleration of high brightness electron beams through the so-called resonant Plasma Wakefield Acceleration scheme in which a train of electron bunches (drivers) resonantly excites wakefields into a preformed hydrogen plasma; the last bunch (witness) injected at the proper accelerating phase gains energy from the wake. The quality of the accelerated beam depends strongly on plasma density and its distribution along the acceleration length. The measurements of plasma density of the order of 1016-1017 cm-3 can be performed with spectroscopic measurements of the plasma-emitted light. The measured density distribution for hydrogen filled capillary discharge with both Balmer alpha and Balmer beta lines and shot-to-shot variation are here reported.

  14. Active, passive and satellite borne spectroscopic measurements of tropospheric BrO during the OASIS 2009 campaign in Barrow, Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friess, U.; Sihler, H.; Wagner, T.; Platt, U.

    2009-12-01

    Bromine activation plays an important role in the chemistry of the springtime Arctic boundary layer. The presence of elevated BrO levels, leading to the destruction of near-surface ozone down to undetectable concentrations, is a widespread phenomenon over the sea-ice covered Arctic Ocean. BrO is thought to be released from saline surfaces, such as brine and frost flowers, by autocatalytic reaction cycles leading to the exponential increase of reactive bromine in the gas phase - the so-called bromine explosion. However, the direct sources of reactive bromine and the recycling mechanisms taking place at aerosol particles and snow surfaces are still not entirely understood, and the current knowledge on the BrO vertical distribution is very limited. Here we present synergistic multi-platform spectroscopic measurements of BrO performed during the OASIS 2009 field campaign in Barrow, Alaska. Active Long-Path Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (DOAS) measurements of BrO and other trace gases (e.g., ozone, NO2, SO2, formaldehyde) directly yield the average near-surface concentration along a light path of several kilometers along the coast using an artificial light source. Simultaneously a passive Multi-Axis DOAS instrument collected scattered skylight from different viewing directions between zenith and close to the horizon, making it very sensitive for the overall tropospheric BrO vertical column density. Furthermore, Multi-Axis DOAS measurements contain information on the vertical distribution of trace gases, allowing the retrieval of BrO vertical profiles. Our ground-based measurements will be compared with BrO vertical column densities from the GOME-2 instrument onboard the MetOp satellite. At high latitudes, this instrument has the capability to scan each location several times a day, allowing for the comparison of the diurnal variation of BrO with the ground-based observations.

  15. Development of hydrophobic surface substrates enabling reproducible drop-and-dry spectroscopic measurements.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jinah; Duy, Pham Khac; Park, Seok Chan; Chung, Hoeil

    2016-06-01

    We investigated several spectroscopic substrates with hydrophobic surfaces that were able to form reproducible droplets of aqueous samples for reliable high throughput drop-and-dry measurements. An amine-coated substrate, a polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) disk, and a perfluorooctyltrichlorosilane (FTS) coated substrate were prepared and initially evaluated for use in the determination of fat concentrations in milks using near-infrared (NIR) spectroscopy. Since the dried milk spots were not compositionally uniform due to the localization of components during sample drying, NIR spectra were collected by fully covering each spot to ensure a correct compositional representation of the sample. The amine-coated substrate yielded more reproducible dried milk patterns because its hydrophobicity was optimal for loading an appropriate amount of milk with decreased component localization after drying. The relative standard deviation (RSD) of the absorbance at 4330cm(-1) was 1.0%, thereby resulting in the more accurate determination of fat concentration. In addition, infrared (IR) spectroscopic discrimination between wild and transgenic tobaccos using their extracts was attempted. The extracted metabolites had a low concentration, so an FTS-coated CaF2 substrate that maximized sample loading was used to improve measurement sensitivity and produce reproducible droplets. The RSD of the absorbance at 1070cm(-1) was only 0.8%. Our strategy produced droplets that had consistent sizes and provided reproducible IR spectral features, which enabled the differentiation between wild and transgenic tobacco groups in the principal component (PC) score domain.

  16. X-ray absorption spectroscopic studies of the active sites of nickel- and copper-containing metalloproteins

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, G.O.

    1993-06-01

    X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) is a useful tool for obtaining structural and chemical information about the active sites of metalloproteins and metalloenzymes. Information may be obtained from both the edge region and the extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) or post-edge region of the K-edge X-ray absorption spectrum of a metal center in a compound. The edge contains information about the valence electronic structure of the atom that absorbs the X-rays. It is possible in some systems to infer the redox state of the metal atom in question, as well as the geometry and nature of ligands connected to it, from the features in the edge in a straightforward manner. The EXAFS modulations, being produced by the backscattering of the ejected photoelectron from the atoms surrounding the metal atom, provide, when analyzed, information about the number and type of neighbouring atoms, and the distances at which they occur. In this thesis, analysis of both the edge and EXAFS regions has been used to gain information about the active sites of various metalloproteins. The metalloproteins studied were plastocyanin (Pc), laccase and nickel carbon monoxide dehydrogenase (Ni CODH). Studies of Cu(I)-imidazole compounds, related to the protein hemocyanin, are also reported here.

  17. Emergence of charge-transfer-to-solvent band in the absorption spectra of hydrogen halides on ice nanoparticles: spectroscopic evidence for acidic dissociation.

    PubMed

    Oncák, Milan; Slavícek, Petr; Poterya, Viktoriya; Fárník, Michal; Buck, Udo

    2008-06-19

    Extensive ab initio calculations complemented by a photodissociation experiment at 193 nm elucidate the nature of hydrogen halide molecules bound on free ice nanoparticles. Electronic absorption spectra of small water clusters (up to 5 water molecules) and water clusters doped with hydrogen fluoride, hydrogen chloride and hydrogen bromide were calculated. The spectra were modeled at the time-dependent density functional (TDDFT) level of theory with the BHandHLYP functional using the reflection principle. We observe the emergence of a charge-transfer-to-solvent (CTTS) band in the absorption spectra upon the acidic dissociation of the hydrogen halides. The CTTS band provides a spectroscopically observable feature for the acidic dissociation. The calculated spectra were compared with our new experimental photodissociation data for larger water clusters doped with HCl and HBr. We conclude that HCl and HBr dissociate to a large extent on the surface of ice nanoparticles at temperatures near 120 K and photoactive products are formed. The acidic dissociation of HX leads to an enhancement by about 4 orders of magnitude of the HCl photolysis rate in the 200-300 nm region, which is potentially relevant for the halogen budget in the atmosphere.

  18. Spectroscopic measurements in low temperature inductively coupled RF discharges in hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huebschman, Michael Lee

    1999-10-01

    Noninvasive spectroscopic measurements of density and temperature which are characteristic of plasma processing tools have been obtained on inductively driven low- density hydrogen plasma sources. These measurements allow full radial and axial profiles of electron density and temperature to be estimated from absolutely calibrated multichannel spectroscopic measurements of upper state densities and a collisional radiative model that accounts for both collisional and radiative processes. The electron temperature and density were estimated by minimizing the least square deviation of measured population of upper state densities and the prediction of the collisional radiative model. Profiles were obtained over a range of powers from 50 to 200 Watts and pressures from 5 to 50 mTorr in hydrogen in a small cylindrical source. Typical density and temperature measurement profiles have been plotted to characterize the apparatus. An elementary sensitivity analysis, which includes plasma opacity and non- Maxwellian electron distributions, showed that, for hydrogen at processing pressures, the accuracy of the technique is relatively unaffected by these perturbations. The molecular dissociation processes were found to be important in determining the steady state densities of atomic hydrogen but had little affect in populating the upper state hydrogen levels for the plasma conditions measured. A hydrogen working gas and simple geometry were chosen to simplify detailed comparisons with a 2D computational model (INDUCT95) which uses a fluid approximation for the plasma and neutral gas. The code calculates the inductive coupling of the 13.5MHz RIF source and collisional, radiative, and wall losses as well as a complete chemistry model for H2, H, H+, H 3+. Good qualitative agreement between the initial model calculations and experimental data have been obtained over part of the operational range. Lastly, to characterize the apparatus for use in wafer cleaning, radial profiles of the

  19. Measurement of the absorption coefficient using the sound-intensity technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atwal, M.; Bernhard, R.

    1984-01-01

    The possibility of using the sound intensity technique to measure the absorption coefficient of a material is investigated. This technique measures the absorption coefficient by measuring the intensity incident on the sample and the net intensity reflected by the sample. Results obtained by this technique are compared with the standard techniques of measuring the change in the reverberation time and the standing wave ratio in a tube, thereby, calculating the random incident and the normal incident adsorption coefficient.

  20. Tunable, high-sensitive measurement of inter-dot transition via tunneling induced absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Yandong; Yang, Aihong; Chen, Bing; Li, Lei; Liu, Shande; Guo, Hongju

    2016-10-01

    A tunable, narrow absorption spectrum induced by resonant tunneling is demonstrated and proposed for measuring interdot tunneling. Tunneling-induced absorption (TIA) arises from constructive interference between different transition paths, and the large nonlinear TIA significantly enhances the total absorption. The narrow nonlinear TIA spectrum is sensitive to inter-dot tunneling, and its sensor characteristics, including sensitivity and bandwidth, are investigated in weak-coupling and strong-coupling regimes, respectively.

  1. Infrared spectroscopic measurements of halogenated source gases in the stratosphere with the ATMOS instrument

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zander, R.; Rinsland, C. P.; Farmer, C. B.; Norton, R. H.

    1987-01-01

    The volume mixing ratios of the six most important halogenated source species (CH3Cl, CF2Cl2, CFCl3, CHF2Cl, CCl4, and CF4) have been retrieved over the 10- to 30-km altitude range from the analysis of 0.01/cm resolution infrared solar occultation spectra recorded near 30 deg N and 47 deg S latitudes with the ATMOS (Atmospheric Trace Molecule Spectroscopy) instrument, operating from on board Spacelab 3 (April-May 1985). The results reported here, although in satisfactory agreement with recent in situ values obtained from air sampling techniques, are limited in accuracy by the limited absorption representative of most of the species and by uncertainties in the spectroscopic parameters currently available for these gases. They demonstrate, however, the power of the IR remote sensing approach for evaluating on a global scale the total chlorine budget of the atmosphere, and they provide an independent set of simultaneous data acquired for the important source and reservoir halogenated molecular species in the upper atmosphere.

  2. Laser Absorption spectrometer instrument for tomographic 2D-measurement of climate gas emission from soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seidel, Anne; Wagner, Steven; Dreizler, Andreas; Ebert, Volker

    2014-05-01

    One of the most intricate effects in climate modelling is the role of permafrost thawing during the global warming process. Soil that has formerly never totally lost its ice cover now emits climate gases due to melting processes[1]. For a better prediction of climate development and possible feedback mechanisms, insights into physical procedures (like e.g. gas emission from underground reservoirs) are required[2]. Therefore, a long-term quantification of greenhouse gas concentrations (and further on fluxes) is necessary and the related structures that are responsible for emission need to be identified. In particular the spatial heterogeneity of soils caused by soil internal structures (e.g. soil composition changes or surface cracks) or by surface modifications (e.g. by plant growth) generate considerable complexities and difficulties for local measurements, for example with soil chambers. For such situations, which often cannot be avoided, a spatially resolved 2D-measurement to identify and quantify the gas emission from the structured soil would be needed, to better understand the influence of the soil sub-structures on the emission behavior. Thus we designed a spatially scanning laser absorption spectrometer setup to determine a 2D-gas concentration map in the soil-air boundary layer. The setup is designed to cover the surfaces in the range of square meters in a horizontal plane above the soil to be investigated. Existing field instruments for gas concentration or flux measurements are based on point-wise measurements, so structure identification is very tedious or even impossible. For this reason, we have developed a tomographic in-situ instrument based on TDLAS ('tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy') that delivers absolute gas concentration distributions of areas with 0.8m × 0.8m size, without any need for reference measurements with a calibration gas. It is a simple and robust device based on a combination of scanning mirrors and reflecting foils, so

  3. Spectroscopic measurement of H(1S) and H sub 2 (v double prime ,J double prime ) in an H sup minus ion source plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Stutzin, G.C.

    1990-08-01

    Low pressure H{sub 2} discharges have been used for some time as sources of H{sup {minus}} ions. These discharges contain many different species of particles which interact with each other and with the walls of the discharge chamber. Models exist that predict the populations of the various species for given macroscopic discharge parameters. However, many of the cross sections and wall catalyzation coefficients are unknown or somewhat uncertain. Therefore, it is of interest to measure the populations of as many of these species as possible, in order to determine the validity of the models. These models predict that H{sup {minus}} is created predominantly by the two-step process of vibrational excitation of hydrogen molecules followed by dissociative attachment of slow electrons to these vibrationally-excited hydrogen molecules. Many different collisional processes must be included in the models to explain the dependence of the various populations upon macroscopic parameters. This work presents results of spectroscopic measurements of the density and translational temperature of hydrogen atoms and of specific rotationally- and vibrationally-excited states of electronic ground-state H{sub 2}, in a discharge optimized for H{sup {minus}} production, as well as conventional measurements of the various charged species within the plasma. The spectroscopic measurements are performed directly by narrowband, single-photon absorption in the vacuum ultraviolet.

  4. Carbon Dioxide Laser Absorption Spectrometer (CO2LAS) Aircraft Measurements of CO2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christensen, Lance E.; Spiers, Gary D.; Menzies, Robert T.; Jacob, Joseph C.; Hyon, Jason

    2011-01-01

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory Carbon Dioxide Laser Absorption Spectrometer (CO2LAS) utilizes Integrated Path Differential Absorption (IPDA) at 2.05 microns to obtain CO2 column mixing ratios weighted heavily in the boundary layer. CO2LAS employs a coherent detection receiver and continuous-wave Th:Ho:YLF laser transmitters with output powers around 100 milliwatts. An offset frequency-locking scheme coupled to an absolute frequency reference enables the frequencies of the online and offline lasers to be held to within 200 kHz of desired values. We describe results from 2009 field campaigns when CO2LAS flew on the Twin Otter. We also describe spectroscopic studies aimed at uncovering potential biases in lidar CO2 retrievals at 2.05 microns.

  5. Thermal Pressure in Diffuse H2 Gas Measured by Herschel [C II] Emission and FUSE UV H2 Absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velusamy, T.; Langer, W. D.; Goldsmith, P. F.; Pineda, J. L.

    2017-04-01

    UV absorption studies with the Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer (FUSE) satellite have made important observations of H2 molecular gas in Galactic interstellar translucent and diffuse clouds. Observations of the 158 μm [C ii] fine-structure line with Herschel trace the same H2 molecular gas in emission. We present [C ii] observations along 27 lines of sight (LOSs) toward target stars of which 25 have FUSE H2 UV absorption. Two stars have only HST STIS C ii λ2325 absorption data. We detect [C ii] 158 μm emission features in all but one target LOS. For three target LOSs that are close to the Galactic plane, | {\\text{}}b| < 1°, we also present position-velocity maps of [C ii] emission observed by Herschel Heterodyne Instrument in the Far Infrared (HIFI) in on-the-fly spectral-line mapping. We use the velocity-resolved [C ii] spectra observed by the HIFI instrument toward the target LOSs observed by FUSE to identify [C ii] velocity components associated with the H2 clouds. We analyze the observed velocity integrated [C ii] spectral-line intensities in terms of the densities and thermal pressures in the H2 gas using the H2 column densities and temperatures measured by the UV absorption data. We present the H2 gas densities and thermal pressures for 26 target LOSs and from the [C ii] intensities derive a mean thermal pressure in the range of ˜6100-7700 K cm-3 in diffuse H2 clouds. We discuss the thermal pressures and densities toward 14 targets, comparing them to results obtained using the UV absorption data for two other tracers C i and CO. Our results demonstrate the richness of the far-IR [C ii] spectral data which is a valuable complement to the UV H2 absorption data for studying diffuse H2 molecular clouds. While the UV absorption is restricted to the directions of the target star, far-IR [C ii] line emission offers an opportunity to employ velocity-resolved spectral-line mapping capability to study in detail the clouds’ spatial and velocity structures.

  6. Pseudopotential calculations and photothermal lensing measurements of two-photon absorption in solids

    SciTech Connect

    White, W.T. III

    1985-11-04

    We have studied two-photon absorption in solids theoretically and experimentally. We have shown that it is possible to use accurate band structure techniques to compute two-photon absorption spectra within 15% of measured values in a wide band-gap material, ZnS. The empirical pseudopotential technique that we used is significantly more accurate than previous models of two-photon absorption in zinc blende materials, including present tunneling theories (which are essentially parabolic-band results in disguise) and the nonparabolic-band formalism of Pidgeon et al. and Weiler. The agreement between our predictions and previous measurements allowed us to use ZnS as a reference material in order to validate a technique for measuring two-photon absorption that was previously untried in solids, pulsed dual-beam thermal lensing. With the validated technique, we examined nonlinear absorption in one other crystal (rutile) and in several glasses, including silicates, borosilicates, and one phosphate glass. Initially, we believed that the absorption edges of all the materials were comparable; however, subsequent evidence suggested that the effective band-gap energies of the glasses were above the energy of two photons in our measurement. Therefore, we attribute the nonlinear absorption that we observed in glasses to impurities or defects. The measured nonlinear absorption coefficients were of the order of a few cm/TW in the glasses and of the order of 10 cm/GW in the crystals, four orders of magnitude higher than in glasses. 292 refs.

  7. Measurement of nitrous acid (HONO) by external-cavity quantum cascade laser based quartz-enhanced photoacoustic absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Hongming; Maamary, Rabih; Gao, Xiaoming; Sigrist, Markus W.; Fertein, Eric; Chen, Weidong

    2016-04-01

    Spectroscopic detection of short-lived gaseous nitrous acid (HONO) at 1254.85 cm-1 was realized by off-beam coupled quartz-enhanced photoacoustic spectroscopy (QEPAS) in conjunction with an external cavity quantum cascade lasers (EC-QCL). High sensitivity monitoring of HONO was performed within a very small gas-sample volume (of ~40 mm3) allowing a significant reduction (of about 4 orders of magnitude) of air sampling residence time which is highly desired for accurate quantification of chemically reactive short-lived species. Calibration of the developed QEPAS-based HONO sensor was carried out by means of lab-generated HONO samples whose concentrations were determined by simultaneous measurements of direct HONO absorption spectra in a 109.5 m multipass cell using a distributed feedback (DBF) QCL. A minimum detection limit (MDL @ SNR=1) of 66 ppbv HONO was achieved at 70 mbar using a laser output power of 50 mW and 1 s integration time, which corresponded to a normalized noise equivalent absorption coefficient of 3.6×10-8 cm-1.W/Hz1/2. This MDL was down to 7 ppbv at the optimal integration time of 150 s. The corresponding minimum detected absorption coefficient (SNR=1) is ~1.1×10-7 cm-1 (MDL: ~3 ppbv) in 1 s and ~1.1×10-8 cm-1 (MDL~330 pptv) in 150 s, respectively, with 1 W laser power. Acknowledgements The authors acknowledge financial supports from the CaPPA project (ANR-10-LABX-005) and the CPER CLIMIBIO program. References H. Yi, R. Maamary, X. Gao, M. W. Sigrist, E. Fertein, W. Chen, "Short-lived species detection of nitrous acid by external-cavity quantum cascade laser based quartz-enhanced photoacoustic absorption spectroscopy", Appl. Phys. Lett. 106 (2015) 101109

  8. Raman spectroscopic measurements of beta-carotene and lycopene in human skin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darvin, M. E.; Gerzonde, I.; Ey, S.; Brandt, Nikolai N.; Albrecht, Hansjoerg; Gonchukov, Sergei A.; Sterry, Wolfram; Lademann, Juergen

    2004-08-01

    The antioxidant β-carotene and lycopene substances were detected non-invasively, in vivo in human skin using resonance Raman spectroscopy. Both substances were detected simultaneously. To distinguish between the substances, the Raman signals were excited at 488 nm and 514,5 nm simultaneously using a multilane Ar+ laser. The application of a fiber based optical imaging system allowed the detection of β-carotene and lycopene on any skin area. The disturbance of the measurements because of non-homogeneous skin pigmentation was avoided by using a measuring area of 28 mm2. The minimum power density for registration of the Raman signals and their optimum relation was determined. The Raman spectroscopic method is well suited for the evaluation of the efficacy of topically or systematically applied amounts of β-carotene and lycopene.

  9. Spectroscopic rotating compensator ellipsometry in the infrared: retarder design and measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    den Boer, J. H. W. G.; Kroesen, G. M. W.; de Hoog, F. J.

    1997-05-01

    Rotating compensator ellipsometry (RCE) is an approach to ellipsometry that is superior to the widely used rotating analyser ellipsometry (RAE). An essential component in RCE is a retarder that generates a retardance close to 0957-0233/8/5/004/img1. In contrast to RCE at a single wavelength, spectroscopic RCE requires a retarder that performs well over a wide range of the used spectrum. The designed retarder is capable of this and works on the principle of total internal reflection. Making use of this retarder, RCE is tested by measuring the optical characteristics of a Teflon-like layer on an aluminium substrate. The results show good agreement with similar RAE measurements, as well as data calculated from an ellipsometric model.

  10. NEUTRON RADIOGRAPHY MEASUREMENT OF SALT SOLUTION ABSORPTION IN MORTAR.

    PubMed

    Lucero, Catherine L; Spragg, Robert P; Bentz, Dale P; Hussey, Daniel S; Jacobson, David L; Weiss, W Jason

    2017-01-01

    Some concrete pavements in the US have recently exhibited premature joint deterioration. It is hypothesized that one component of this damage can be attributed to a reaction that occurs when salt-laden water is absorbed in the concrete and reacts with the matrix. This study examines the absorption of CaCl2 solution in mortar via neutron imaging. Mortar specimens were prepared with water to cement ratios, (w/c), of 0.36, 0.42 and 0.50 by mass and exposed to chloride solutions with concentrations ranging from 0 % to 29.8 % by mass. Depth of fluid penetration and moisture content along the specimen length were determined for 96 h after exposure. At high salt concentration (29.8 %), the sorption rate decreased by over 80 % in all samples. Along with changes in surface tension and viscosity, CaCl2 reacts with the cement paste to produce products (Friedel's salt, Kuzel's salt, or calcium oxychloride) that block pores and reduce absorption.

  11. Oscillator strength measurements of atomic absorption lines from stellar spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lobel, Alex

    2011-05-01

    Herein we develop a new method to determine oscillator strength values of atomic absorption lines with state-of-the-art detailed spectral synthesis calculations of the optical spectrum of the Sun and of standard spectral reference stars. We update the log(gf) values of 911 neutral lines observed in the KPNO-FTS flux spectrum of the Sun and high-resolution echelle spectra (R = 80 000) of Procyon (F5 IV-V) and Eps Eri (K2 V) observed with large signal-to-noise (S/N) ratios of 2000 using the new Mercator-Hermes spectrograph at La Palma Observatory (Spain). We find for 483 Fe I, 85 Ni I, and 51 Si I absorption lines in the sample a systematic overestimation of the literature log(gf) values with central line depths below 15%. We employ a curve-of-growth analysis technique to test the accuracy of the new oscillator strength values and compare calculated equivalent line widths to the Moore, Minnaert, and Houtgast atlas of the Sun. The online SpectroWeb database at http://spectra.freeshell.org interactively displays the observed and synthetic spectra and provides the new log(gf) values together with important atomic line data. The graphical database is under development for stellar reference spectra of every spectral sub-class observed with large spectral resolution and S/N ratios.

  12. Rapid calibration of near-infrared spectroscopic measurements of mammalian cell cultivations.

    PubMed

    Riley, M R; Okeson, C D; Frazier, B L

    1999-01-01

    Near-infrared (NIR) spectroscopy is a flexible method that can be employed to noninvasively monitor the concentrations of multiple nutrients and wastes in mammalian cell bioreactors. Development of suitable calibrations can be a labor- and time-intensive process that must be repeated when process conditions are altered significantly. To address this difficulty, we have produced a new approach for generating NIR spectroscopic calibrations that requires significantly less time compared with standard calibration schemes. This method reduces development time from the present level of several weeks to several hours. A small number of experimentally collected spectra serve as inputs to a computational procedure that yields a large number of simulated spectra, each containing both analyte-specific and analyte-independent information. Such simulated spectra may be employed as a calibration set for quantifying analytes in experimentally collected spectra. Spectroscopic measurements of the concentrations of five components (ammonia, glucose, glutamate, glutamine, and lactate) can be accomplished with levels of error similar to those obtained with full experimental calibrations. A key to this process is the utilization of random numbers, which randomizes the influence of natural variations, present in each experimentally collected spectrum, on the resultant composite spectrum. This approach may increase the feasibility of employing NIR spectroscopy to monitor bioreactors and other biological processes subjected to varying operating conditions.

  13. Optimized spectroscopic scheme for enhanced precision CO measurements with applications to urban source attribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nottrott, A.; Hoffnagle, J.; Farinas, A.; Rella, C.

    2014-12-01

    Carbon monoxide (CO) is an urban pollutant generated by internal combustion engines which contributes to the formation of ground level ozone (smog). CO is also an excellent tracer for emissions from mobile combustion sources. In this work we present an optimized spectroscopic sampling scheme that enables enhanced precision CO measurements. The scheme was implemented on the Picarro G2401 Cavity Ring-Down Spectroscopy (CRDS) analyzer which measures CO2, CO, CH4 and H2O at 0.2 Hz. The optimized scheme improved the raw precision of CO measurements by 40% from 5 ppb to 3 ppb. Correlations of measured CO2, CO, CH4 and H2O from an urban tower were partitioned by wind direction and combined with a concentration footprint model for source attribution. The application of a concentration footprint for source attribution has several advantages. The upwind extent of the concentration footprint for a given sensor is much larger than the flux footprint. Measurements of mean concentration at the sensor location can be used to estimate source strength from a concentration footprint, while measurements of the vertical concentration flux are necessary to determine source strength from the flux footprint. Direct measurement of vertical concentration flux requires high frequency temporal sampling and increases the cost and complexity of the measurement system.

  14. Laser-spectroscopic electric field measurements in a ns-pulsed microplasma in nitrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boehm, Patrick; Luggenhoelscher, Dirk; Czarnetzki, Uwe; 1123 Research Group Collaboration

    2013-09-01

    In this work for the first time ns-pulsed discharges in nitrogen at near atmospheric pressures are investigated by laser-spectroscopic electric field measurements, ultra-fast optical emission spectroscopy, current and voltage measurements. The discharge is operated with kV-pulses of about 150 ns duration between two parallel plate electrodes with a 1.2 mm gap. The laser technique for electric field measurement is based on a four-wave mixing process similar to Coherent anti-Stokes Raman Scattering (CARS). Here the static electric field acts effectively as the third wave with a zero frequency. The frequency of the generated anti-Stokes wave is in the IR regime and the amplitude is proportional to the electric field strength. By measuring the intensity of the IR- and anti-Stokes-signal it is now possible to determine the static electric field. Due to the short pulse-length of the lasers a temporal resolution in the ns range and a typical sensitivity of 50 - 100 V/mm in pure nitrogen is achieved (p > 50 mbar). Field-measurements are accompanied by emission measurements using a streak-camera with sub-ns resolutions. Further, current and voltage measurements combined with the electric field measurements allow determination of the plasma density. Funding by DFG through FOR 1123.

  15. Soliton absorption spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Kalashnikov, V. L.; Sorokin, E.

    2010-01-01

    We analyze optical soliton propagation in the presence of weak absorption lines with much narrower linewidths as compared to the soliton spectrum width using the novel perturbation analysis technique based on an integral representation in the spectral domain. The stable soliton acquires spectral modulation that follows the associated index of refraction of the absorber. The model can be applied to ordinary soliton propagation and to an absorber inside a passively modelocked laser. In the latter case, a comparison with water vapor absorption in a femtosecond Cr:ZnSe laser yields a very good agreement with experiment. Compared to the conventional absorption measurement in a cell of the same length, the signal is increased by an order of magnitude. The obtained analytical expressions allow further improving of the sensitivity and spectroscopic accuracy making the soliton absorption spectroscopy a promising novel measurement technique. PMID:21151755

  16. Photoacoustic technique for simultaneous measurements of thermal effusivity and absorptivity of pigments in liquid solution.

    PubMed

    Balderas-López, J A; Díaz-Reyes, J; Zelaya-Angel, O

    2011-12-01

    A photoacoustic (PA) methodology, in the transmission configuration, for simultaneous measurements of thermal effusivity and molar absorption coefficient (absorptivity) for pigments in liquid solution is introduced. The analytical treatment involves a self-normalization procedure for the PA signal, as a function of the modulation frequency, for a strong absorbing material in the thermally thin regime, when the light travels across the sample under study. Two fitted parameters are obtained from the analysis of the self-normalized PA amplitude and phase, one of them proportional to the sample's optical absorption coefficient and from which, taking it for a series of samples at different concentrations, the pigment's absorptivity in liquid solution can be measured, the other one yields the sample's thermal effusivity. Methylene blue's absorptivity in distilled water was measured with this methodology at 658 nm, finding good agreement with the corresponding one reported in the literature.

  17. Sensitive and absolute absorption measurements in optical materials and coatings by laser-induced deflection technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mühlig, Christian; Bublitz, Simon

    2012-12-01

    The laser-induced deflection (LID) technique, a photo-thermal deflection setup with transversal pump-probe-beam arrangement, is applied for sensitive and absolute absorption measurements of optical materials and coatings. Different LID concepts for bulk and transparent coating absorption measurements, respectively, are explained, focusing on providing accurate absorption data with only one measurement and one sample. Furthermore, a new sandwich concept is introduced that allows transferring the LID technique to very small sample geometries and to significantly increase the sensitivity for materials with weak photo-thermal responses. For each of the different concepts, a representative application example is given. Particular emphasis is placed on the importance of the calibration procedure for providing absolute absorption data. The validity of an electrical calibration procedure for the LID setup is proven using specially engineered surface absorbing samples. The electrical calibration procedure is then applied to evaluate two other approaches that use either doped samples or highly absorptive reference samples.

  18. Broadband cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopy in the ultraviolet spectral region for measurements of nitrogen dioxide and formaldehyde

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Washenfelder, R. A.; Attwood, A. R.; Flores, J. M.; Zarzana, K. J.; Rudich, Y.; Brown, S. S.

    2016-01-01

    Formaldehyde (CH2O) is the most abundant aldehyde in the atmosphere, and it strongly affects photochemistry through its photolysis. We describe simultaneous measurements of CH2O and nitrogen dioxide (NO2) using broadband cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopy in the ultraviolet spectral region. The light source consists of a continuous-wave diode laser focused into a Xenon bulb to produce a plasma that emits high-intensity, broadband light. The plasma discharge is optically filtered and coupled into a 1 m optical cavity. The reflectivity of the cavity mirrors is 0.99930 ± 0.00003 (1- reflectivity = 700 ppm loss) at 338 nm, as determined from the known Rayleigh scattering of He and zero air. This mirror reflectivity corresponds to an effective path length of 1.43 km within the 1 m cell. We measure the cavity output over the 315-350 nm spectral region using a grating monochromator and charge-coupled device array detector. We use published reference spectra with spectral fitting software to simultaneously retrieve CH2O and NO2 concentrations. Independent measurements of NO2 standard additions by broadband cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopy and cavity ring-down spectroscopy agree within 2 % (slope for linear fit = 1.02 ± 0.03 with r2 = 0.998). Standard additions of CH2O measured by broadband cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopy and calculated based on flow dilution are also well correlated, with r2 = 0.9998. During constant mixed additions of NO2 and CH2O, the 30 s measurement precisions (1σ) of the current configuration were 140 and 210 pptv, respectively. The current 1 min detection limit for extinction measurements at 315-350 nm provides sufficient sensitivity for measurement of trace gases in laboratory experiments and ground-based field experiments. Additionally, the instrument provides highly accurate, spectroscopically based trace gas detection that may complement higher precision techniques based on non

  19. High Precision Measurements of Line Mixing and Collisional Induced Absorption in the O_{2} A-Band

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adkins, Erin M.; Ghysels, Mélanie; Long, David A.; Hodges, Joseph T.

    2017-06-01

    Molecular oxygen (O_{2}) has a well-known and uniform molar fraction within the Earth's atmosphere. Consequently, the O_{2} A-band is commonly used in satellite and remote sensing measurements (GOSAT, OCO-2, TCCON) to determine the surface pressure-pathlength product for transmittance measurements that involve light propagation through the atmospheric column. For these missions, physics-based spectroscopic models and experimentally determined line-by-line parameters are used to predict the temperature- and pressure-dependence of the absorption cross-section as a function of wave number, pressure, temperature and water vapor concentration. At present, there remain airmass-dependent biases in retrievals of CO_{2} which are linked to limitations in existing models of line mixing (LM) and collisional induced absorption (CIA). In order to better quantify these effects, we measured O_{2} A-band spectra with a frequency-stabilized cavity ring-down spectroscopy (FS-CRDS) system. Because of the high molar fraction of O_{2} in air samples, line cores and near wings of the dominant absorption transitions are heavily saturated, which makes it impossible to obtain continuous FS-CRDS spectra over the entire range of optical depth. Here, we focused on LM and CIA effects which dominate the valleys between strongly absorbing transitions. To this end, the FS-CRDS system employs a thresholding mechanism that avoids the optically thick regions and scans over the entire O_{2} A-band and beyond the band head region. This approach provides high signal-to-noise ratio spectra that can be fit to yield LM and CIA parameters. These results are intended to provide strong constraints on multispectrum fits of continuous and broadband Fourier-transform-spectroscopy based O_{2} A-band spectra. Long D.A and J.T. Hodges, J. Geophys. Res. 2012, 117: p. D12309.

  20. Acoustic absorption measurement of human hair and skin within the audible frequency range.

    PubMed

    Katz, B F

    2000-11-01

    Utilizing the two-microphone impedance tube method, the acoustic absorption of human skin and hair is measured in the frequency range 1-6 kHz. Various locations on a number of human subjects are measured to determine if the presence of bone or an air pocket affects the acoustic absorption of human skin. The absorption coefficient of human hair is also measured. Additional techniques are utilized to minimize errors due to sample mounting methods. Techniques are employed to minimize potential errors in sensor and sample locations. The results of these measurements are compared to relevant historical papers on similar investigations. Results for skin measurements compare well with previous work. Measured hair absorption data do not agree with previous work in the area but do coincide with expected trends, which previous works do not.

  1. Spectroscopic and DFT study of solvent effects on the electronic absorption spectra of sulfamethoxazole in neat and binary solvent mixtures.

    PubMed

    Almandoz, M C; Sancho, M I; Blanco, S E

    2014-01-24

    The solvatochromic behavior of sulfamethoxazole (SMX) was investigated using UV-vis spectroscopy and DFT methods in neat and binary solvent mixtures. The spectral shifts of this solute were correlated with the Kamlet and Taft parameters (α, β and π(*)). Multiple lineal regression analysis indicates that both specific hydrogen-bond interaction and non specific dipolar interaction play an important role in the position of the absorption maxima in neat solvents. The simulated absorption spectra using TD-DFT methods were in good agreement with the experimental ones. Binary mixtures consist of cyclohexane (Cy)-ethanol (EtOH), acetonitrile (ACN)-dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO), ACN-dimethylformamide (DMF), and aqueous mixtures containing as co-solvents DMSO, ACN, EtOH and MeOH. Index of preferential solvation was calculated as a function of solvent composition and non-ideal characteristics are observed in all binary mixtures. In ACN-DMSO and ACN-DMF mixtures, the results show that the solvents with higher polarity and hydrogen bond donor ability interact preferentially with the solute. In binary mixtures containing water, the SMX molecules are solvated by the organic co-solvent (DMSO or EtOH) over the whole composition range. Synergistic effect is observed in the case of ACN-H2O and MeOH-H2O, indicating that at certain concentrations solvents interact to form association complexes, which should be more polar than the individual solvents of the mixture.

  2. PROBING THE FERMI BUBBLES IN ULTRAVIOLET ABSORPTION: A SPECTROSCOPIC SIGNATURE OF THE MILKY WAY'S BICONICAL NUCLEAR OUTFLOW

    SciTech Connect

    Fox, Andrew J.; Bordoloi, Rongmon; Hernandez, Svea; Tumlinson, Jason; Savage, Blair D.; Wakker, Bart P.; Lockman, Felix J.; Bland-Hawthorn, Joss; Kim, Tae-Sun; Benjamin, Robert A.

    2015-01-20

    Giant lobes of plasma extend ≈55° above and below the Galactic center, glowing in emission from gamma rays (the Fermi Bubbles) to microwaves and polarized radio waves. We use ultraviolet absorption-line spectra from the Hubble Space Telescope to constrain the velocity of the outflowing gas within these regions, targeting the quasar PDS 456 (ℓ, b = 10.°4, +11.°2). This sightline passes through a clear biconical structure seen in hard X-ray and gamma-ray emission near the base of the northern Fermi Bubble. We report two high-velocity metal absorption components, at v {sub LSR} = –235 and +250 km s{sup –1}, which cannot be explained by co-rotating gas in the Galactic disk or halo. Their velocities are suggestive of an origin on the front and back side of an expanding biconical outflow emanating from the Galactic center. We develop simple kinematic biconical outflow models that can explain the observed profiles with an outflow velocity of ≳900 km s{sup –1} and a full opening angle of ≈110° (matching the X-ray bicone). This indicates Galactic center activity over the last ≈2.5-4.0 Myr, in line with age estimates of the Fermi Bubbles. The observations illustrate the use of UV spectroscopy to probe the properties of swept-up gas venting into the Fermi Bubbles.

  3. Spectroscopic and DFT study of solvent effects on the electronic absorption spectra of sulfamethoxazole in neat and binary solvent mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almandoz, M. C.; Sancho, M. I.; Blanco, S. E.

    2014-01-01

    The solvatochromic behavior of sulfamethoxazole (SMX) was investigated using UV-vis spectroscopy and DFT methods in neat and binary solvent mixtures. The spectral shifts of this solute were correlated with the Kamlet and Taft parameters (α, β and π*). Multiple lineal regression analysis indicates that both specific hydrogen-bond interaction and non specific dipolar interaction play an important role in the position of the absorption maxima in neat solvents. The simulated absorption spectra using TD-DFT methods were in good agreement with the experimental ones. Binary mixtures consist of cyclohexane (Cy)-ethanol (EtOH), acetonitrile (ACN)-dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO), ACN-dimethylformamide (DMF), and aqueous mixtures containing as co-solvents DMSO, ACN, EtOH and MeOH. Index of preferential solvation was calculated as a function of solvent composition and non-ideal characteristics are observed in all binary mixtures. In ACN-DMSO and ACN-DMF mixtures, the results show that the solvents with higher polarity and hydrogen bond donor ability interact preferentially with the solute. In binary mixtures containing water, the SMX molecules are solvated by the organic co-solvent (DMSO or EtOH) over the whole composition range. Synergistic effect is observed in the case of ACN-H2O and MeOH-H2O, indicating that at certain concentrations solvents interact to form association complexes, which should be more polar than the individual solvents of the mixture.

  4. Absorption and fluorescence spectroscopic characterisation of the circadian blue-light photoreceptor cryptochrome from Drosophila melanogaster (dCry)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirdel, J.; Zirak, P.; Penzkofer, A.; Breitkreuz, H.; Wolf, E.

    2008-09-01

    The absorption and fluorescence behaviour of the circadian blue-light photoreceptor cryptochrome from Drosophila melanogaster (dCry) in a pH 8 aqueous buffer solution is studied. The flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) cofactor of dCry is identified to be present in its oxidized form (FAD ox), and the 5,10-methenyltetrahydrofolate (MTHF) cofactor is found to be hydrolyzed and oxidized to 10-formyldihydrofolate (10-FDHF). The absorption and the fluorescence behaviour of dCry is investigated in the dark-adapted (receptor) state, the light-adapted (signalling) state, and under long-time violet light exposure. Photo-excitation of FAD ox in dCry causes a reductive electron transfer to the formation of anionic FAD semiquinone (FAD rad - ), and photo-excitation of the generated FAD rad - causes an oxidative electron transfer to the back formation of FAD ox. In light adapted dCry a photo-induced equilibrium between FAD ox and FAD rad - exists. The photo-cycle dynamics of signalling state formation and recovery is discussed. Quantum yields of photo-induced signalling state formation of about 0.2 and of photo-induced back-conversion of about 0.2 are determined. A recovery of FAD rad - to FAD ox in the dark with a time constant of 1.6 min at room temperature is found.

  5. Direct measurements of nonlinear absorption and refraction in solutions of phthalocyanines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wei, T. H.; Hagan, D. J.; Sence, M. J.; Van Stryland, E. W.; Perry, J. W.; Coulter, D. R.

    1992-01-01

    Direct measurements are reported of the excited singlet-state absorption cross section and the associated nonlinear refractive cross section using picosecond pulses at 532 nm in solutions of phthalocyanine and naphthalocyanine dyes. By monitoring the transmittance and far-field spatial beam distortion for different pulsewidths in the picosecond regime, it is shown that both the nonlinear absorption and refraction are fluence (energy-per-unit-area) rather than irradiance dependent. Thus, excited-state absorption is the dominant nonlinear absorption process, and the observed nonlinear refraction is also due to real population excitation.

  6. Direct measurements of nonlinear absorption and refraction in solutions of phthalocyanines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wei, T. H.; Hagan, D. J.; Sence, M. J.; Van Stryland, E. W.; Perry, J. W.; Coulter, D. R.

    1992-01-01

    Direct measurements are reported of the excited singlet-state absorption cross section and the associated nonlinear refractive cross section using picosecond pulses at 532 nm in solutions of phthalocyanine and naphthalocyanine dyes. By monitoring the transmittance and far-field spatial beam distortion for different pulsewidths in the picosecond regime, it is shown that both the nonlinear absorption and refraction are fluence (energy-per-unit-area) rather than irradiance dependent. Thus, excited-state absorption is the dominant nonlinear absorption process, and the observed nonlinear refraction is also due to real population excitation.

  7. A comment on the measurement of atmospheric density by absorption of Lyman-alpha.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, L. G.; Miller, K. L.

    1973-01-01

    It is shown that the absorption cross section for molecular oxygen at Lyman alpha is about 0.8 times 10 to the minus twentieth power sq cm. It is pointed out that, for application of absorption spectroscopy to the measurement of molecular oxygen density in the atmosphere, no correction for the variation of cross section with wavelength is necessary.

  8. [Measurement of the absorption coefficient of barium using cavity ringdown spectroscopy].

    PubMed

    Zhao, H; Liu, X; Zhan, M

    2001-06-01

    An apparatus for cavity ringdown spectroscopy was constructed and used for atomic absorption measurement. The transition probability for 6s6p1P1<--6s6s1S0 transition of barium atoms was obtained in the self-made apparatus. The relation between atomic absorption coefficient and atomic oven temperature was also analysed.

  9. Absorption coefficient measurements of particle-laden filters using laser heating: Validation with nigrosin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Presser, Cary

    2012-05-01

    A laser-heating technique, referred as the laser-driven thermal reactor, was used in conjunction with laser transmissivity measurements to determine the absorption coefficient of particle-laden substrates (e.g., quartz-fiber filters). The novelty of this approach is that it analyzes a wide variety of specific samples (not just filtered samples) and overcomes measurement issues (e.g., absorption enhancement) associated with other filter-based particle absorption techniques. The absorption coefficient was determined for nigrosin-laden, quartz-fiber filters and the effect of the filter on the absorption measurements was estimated when compared to the isolated nigrosin results. The isolated nigrosin absorption coefficient compared favorably with Lorenz-Mie calculations for an idealized polydispersion of spherical particles (based on a measured nigronsin/de-ionized water suspension size distribution) dispersed throughout a volume equivalent to that of the nigrosin-laden filter. To validate the approach, the absorption coefficient of a nigrosin/de-ionized water suspension was in good agreement with results obtained from an ultraviolet/visible spectrometer. In addition, the estimated imaginary part of the refractive index from the Lorenz-Mie calculations compared well with literature values and was used to estimate the absorption coefficient of optically opaque packed nigrosin.

  10. Contactless nondestructive measurement of bulk and surface recombination using frequency-modulated free carrier absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanii, F.; Giles, F. P.; Schwartz, R. J.; Gray, J. L.

    1992-03-01

    A measurement procedure is described which allows the contactless measurement of bulk lifetime and surface recombination. The procedure uses the the free-carrier absorption of a long-wavelength laser beam by a modulated free-carrier wave to measure and separate the bulk recombination from the surface recombination. The dependence of the absorption on the modulation frequency is used to accomplish the separation. Limitations of the technique are also discussed.

  11. Quantitative infrared absorption cross sections of isoprene for atmospheric measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Brauer, Carolyn S.; Blake, Thomas A.; Guenther, Alex B.; Sharpe, Steven W.; Sams, Robert L.; Johnson, Timothy J.

    2014-11-19

    The OH- and O3- initiated oxidations of isoprene, which is one of the primary volatile organic compounds produced by vegetation, are a major source of atmospheric formaldehyde and other oxygenated organics, yet little quantitative IR data exists for isoprene. We thus report absorption coefficients and integrated band intensities for isoprene in the 600 - 6500 cm-1 region. The pressure-broadened (1 atmosphere N2) spectra were recorded at 278, 298 and 323 K in a 19.96 cm path length cell at 0.112 cm-1 resolution, using a Bruker 66V FTIR. Composite spectra are derived from a minimum of seven pressures at each temperature.

  12. Tunable diode laser measurements of HO2NO2 absorption coefficients near 12.5 microns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    May, R. D.; Molina, L. T.; Webster, C. R.

    1988-01-01

    A tunable diode laser spectrometer has been used to measure absorption coefficients of peroxynitric acid (HO2NO2) near the 803/cm Q branch. HO2NO2 concentrations in a low-pressure flowing gas mixture were determined from chemical titration procedures and UV absorption spectroscopy. The diode laser measured absorption coefficients, at a spectral resolution of better than 0.001/cm, are about 10 percent larger than previous Fourier transform infrared measurements made at a spectral resolution of 0.06/cm.

  13. Tunable diode laser measurements of HO2NO2 absorption coefficients near 12.5 microns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    May, R. D.; Molina, L. T.; Webster, C. R.

    1988-01-01

    A tunable diode laser spectrometer has been used to measure absorption coefficients of peroxynitric acid (HO2NO2) near the 803/cm Q branch. HO2NO2 concentrations in a low-pressure flowing gas mixture were determined from chemical titration procedures and UV absorption spectroscopy. The diode laser measured absorption coefficients, at a spectral resolution of better than 0.001/cm, are about 10 percent larger than previous Fourier transform infrared measurements made at a spectral resolution of 0.06/cm.

  14. Modified Sagnac interferometer for contact-free length measurement of a direct absorption cell.

    PubMed

    Elandaloussi, Hadj; Rouillé, Christian; Marie-Jeanne, Patrick; Janssen, Christof

    2016-03-10

    Accurate path length measurements in absorption cells are recurrent requirements in quantitative molecular absorption spectroscopy. A new twin path laser interferometer for length measurements in a simple direct path absorption geometry is presented, along with a full uncertainty budget. The path in an absorption cell is determined by measuring the optical path length change due to the diminution of the refractive index when the cell originally filled with nitrogen gas is evacuated. The performance of the instrument based on a stabilized HeNe laser is verified by comparison with the results of direct mechanical length measurements of a roughly 45 mm long, specially designed absorption cell. Due to a resolution of about 1/300 of a HeNe fringe, an expanded (coverage factor k=2) uncertainty of 16 μm in the length measurement is achieved, providing an expanded relative uncertainty of 3.6·10⁻⁴ for the length of our test absorption cell. This value is about 8 times lower than what has been reported previously. The instrument will be useful for precision measurements of absorption cross sections of strong absorbers which require short light paths, such as ozone, halogen oxides, sulfur dioxide, and volatile organic compounds in the UV.

  15. Spectroscopic imaging of blood vessels only near the skin surface for non-invasive blood glucose measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujiwara, Masaru; Sato, Shun; Abeygunawardhana, Pradeep K. W.; Suzuki, Satoru; Nishiyama, Akira; Wada, Kenji; Ishimaru, Ichiro

    2015-07-01

    To realize the non-invasive blood glucose measurement, it will be effective to acquire the spectroscopic imaging of blood vessels only near the skin surface for eliminating other biological-component's disturbances. Our proposed imaging-type 2-dimensional Fourier spectroscopic imaging can limit the measuring depth into focal plane with high light detection sensitivity. Thus, the proposed method will be suitable for measuring only near the skin surface with detecting weak reflected light from inner biomembrane. But reflectance of skin surface is more than 1000 times larger than inner skin's reflectance. Paying attention on Fresnel reflection, fingers what were illuminated by p-polarized beam from Brewster's angle were observed with crossed-Nicol dark field optics. We successfully acquired spectroscopic characteristics of hemoglobin at vein area near the skin surface.

  16. High-accuracy and high-sensitivity spectroscopic measurement of dinitrogen pentoxide (N2O5) in an atmospheric simulation chamber using a quantum cascade laser.

    PubMed

    Yi, Hongming; Wu, Tao; Lauraguais, Amélie; Semenov, Vladimir; Coeur, Cecile; Cassez, Andy; Fertein, Eric; Gao, Xiaoming; Chen, Weidong

    2017-09-15

    A spectroscopic instrument based on a mid-infrared external cavity quantum cascade laser (EC-QCL) was developed for high-accuracy measurements of dinitrogen pentoxide (N2O5) at the ppbv-level. A specific concentration retrieval algorithm was developed to remove, from the broadband absorption spectrum of N2O5, both etalon fringes resulting from the EC-QCL intrinsic structure and spectral interference lines of H2O vapour absorption, which led to a significant improvement in measurement accuracy and detection sensitivity (by a factor of 10), compared to using a traditional algorithm for gas concentration retrieval. The developed EC-QCL-based N2O5 sensing platform was evaluated by real-time tracking N2O5 concentration in its most important nocturnal tropospheric chemical reaction of NO3 + NO2 ↔ N2O5 in an atmospheric simulation chamber. Based on an optical absorption path-length of Leff = 70 m, a minimum detection limit of 15 ppbv was achieved with a 25 s integration time and it was down to 3 ppbv in 400 s. The equilibrium rate constant Keq involved in the above chemical reaction was determined with direct concentration measurements using the developed EC-QCL sensing platform, which was in good agreement with the theoretical value deduced from a referenced empirical formula under well controlled experimental conditions. The present work demonstrates the potential and the unique advantage of the use of a modern external cavity quantum cascade laser for applications in direct quantitative measurement of broadband absorption of key molecular species involved in chemical kinetic and climate-change related tropospheric chemistry.

  17. The temperature measurement research for high-speed flow based on tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di, Yue; Jin, Yi; Jiang, Hong-liang; Zhai, Chao

    2013-09-01

    Due to the particularity of the high-speed flow, in order to accurately obtain its' temperature, the measurement system should has some characteristics of not interfereing with the flow, non-contact measurement and high time resolution. The traditional measurement method cannot meet the above requirements, however the measurement method based on tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (TDLAS) technology can meet the requirements for high-speed flow temperature measurement. When the near-infared light of a specific frequency is through the media to be measured, it will be absorbed by the water vapor molecules and then the transmission light intensity is detected by the detector. The temperature of the water vapor which is also the high-speed flow temperature, can be accurately obtained by the Beer-Lambert law. This paper focused on the research of absorption spectrum method for high speed flow temperature measurement with the scope of 250K-500K. Firstly, spectral line selection method for low temperature measurement of high-speed flow is discussed. Selected absorption lines should be isolated and have a high peak absorption within the range of 250-500K, at the same time the interference of the other lines should be avoided, so that a high measurement accuracy can be obtained. According to the near-infrared absorption spectra characteristics of water vapor, four absorption lines at the near 1395 nm and 1409 nm are selected. Secondly, a system for the temperature measurement of the water vapor in the high-speed flow is established. Room temperature are measured through two methods, direct absorption spectroscopy (DAS) and wavelength modulation spectroscopy (WMS) ,the results show that this system can realize on-line measurement of the temperature and the measurement error is about 3%. Finally, the system will be used for temperature measurement of the high-speed flow in the shock tunnel, its feasibility of measurement is analyzed.

  18. Spectroscopic determination of leaf biochemistry using band-depth analysis of absorption features and stepwise multiple linear regression

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kokaly, R.F.; Clark, R.N.

    1999-01-01

    We develop a new method for estimating the biochemistry of plant material using spectroscopy. Normalized band depths calculated from the continuum-removed reflectance spectra of dried and ground leaves were used to estimate their concentrations of nitrogen, lignin, and cellulose. Stepwise multiple linear regression was used to select wavelengths in the broad absorption features centered at 1.73 ??m, 2.10 ??m, and 2.30 ??m that were highly correlated with the chemistry of samples from eastern U.S. forests. Band depths of absorption features at these wavelengths were found to also be highly correlated with the chemistry of four other sites. A subset of data from the eastern U.S. forest sites was used to derive linear equations that were applied to the remaining data to successfully estimate their nitrogen, lignin, and cellulose concentrations. Correlations were highest for nitrogen (R2 from 0.75 to 0.94). The consistent results indicate the possibility of establishing a single equation capable of estimating the chemical concentrations in a wide variety of species from the reflectance spectra of dried leaves. The extension of this method to remote sensing was investigated. The effects of leaf water content, sensor signal-to-noise and bandpass, atmospheric effects, and background soil exposure were examined. Leaf water was found to be the greatest challenge to extending this empirical method to the analysis of fresh whole leaves and complete vegetation canopies. The influence of leaf water on reflectance spectra must be removed to within 10%. Other effects were reduced by continuum removal and normalization of band depths. If the effects of leaf water can be compensated for, it might be possible to extend this method to remote sensing data acquired by imaging spectrometers to give estimates of nitrogen, lignin, and cellulose concentrations over large areas for use in ecosystem studies.We develop a new method for estimating the biochemistry of plant material using

  19. Hydride generation and condensation flame atomic absorption spectroscopic determination of antimony in raw coffee beans and processed coffee.

    PubMed

    Kuennen, R W; Hahn, M H; Fricke, F L; Wolnik, K A

    1982-09-01

    A method was developed for determining Sb at nanogram per gram levels in raw coffee beans and processed coffee. The procedure uses either total acid digestion or extraction with 6M HCl followed by hydride generation/condensation with subsequent revolatilization of stibine (SbH3) and detection by flame atomic absorption spectroscopy. The lowest quantifiable level, based on a 2 g (dry weight) sample, is 2 ng Sb/g. The results of recoveries on spiked samples, precision studies on composited coffee samples, and the analysis of National Bureau of Standards Standard Reference Materials demonstrate the reliability and accuracy of the procedure. Sb concentrations in coffee samples were verified by neutron activation analysis and inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy. Advantages of the method compared with the AOAC colorimetric procedure and hydride generation without condensation are discussed.

  20. X-ray absorption spectroscopic studies of sputter-deposited LaNiO3 thin films on Si substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hsin-Yi; Wu, Tai-Bor; Lee, Jyh-Fu

    1996-08-01

    X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) was applied to investigate the growth behavior of LaNiO3 thin films on Si substrate deposited via radio frequency magnetron sputtering at high temperature. The thickness of deposited film was always proportional to the sputtering time. However, the Ni-to-La ratio in the film was found to decrease with increasing substrate temperature. It is due to a loss of Ni on high-temperature deposition which lowers the film growth rate and leads to a gradual structural change. Nevertheless, the oxidation states of both Ni atom and La atom in the thin films were not influenced by the substrate temperature or sputtering time. All the XAS evidence was consistent with the results from x-ray reflectivity, x-ray diffraction, and chemical analysis.

  1. Probing the Fermi Bubbles in Ultraviolet Absorption: A Spectroscopic Signature of the Milky Way's Biconical Nuclear Outflow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fox, Andrew J.; Bordoloi, Rongmon; Savage, Blair D.; Lockman, Felix J.; Jenkins, Edward B.; Wakker, Bart P.; Bland-Hawthorn, Joss; Hernandez, Svea; Kim, Tae-Sun; Benjamin, Robert A.; Bowen, David V.; Tumlinson, Jason

    2015-01-01

    Giant lobes of plasma extend ≈55° above and below the Galactic center, glowing in emission from gamma rays (the Fermi Bubbles) to microwaves and polarized radio waves. We use ultraviolet absorption-line spectra from the Hubble Space Telescope to constrain the velocity of the outflowing gas within these regions, targeting the quasar PDS 456 (l, b = 10.°4, +11.°2). This sightline passes through a clear biconical structure seen in hard X-ray and gamma-ray emission near the base of the northern Fermi Bubble. We report two high-velocity metal absorption components, at v LSR = -235 and +250 km s-1, which cannot be explained by co-rotating gas in the Galactic disk or halo. Their velocities are suggestive of an origin on the front and back side of an expanding biconical outflow emanating from the Galactic center. We develop simple kinematic biconical outflow models that can explain the observed profiles with an outflow velocity of gsim900 km s-1 and a full opening angle of ≈110° (matching the X-ray bicone). This indicates Galactic center activity over the last ≈2.5-4.0 Myr, in line with age estimates of the Fermi Bubbles. The observations illustrate the use of UV spectroscopy to probe the properties of swept-up gas venting into the Fermi Bubbles. Based on observations taken under program 13448 of the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained at the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under NASA contract NAS 5-26555, and under program 14B-299 of the NRAO Green Bank Telescope, which is a facility of the National Science Foundation operated under cooperative agreement by Associated Universities, Inc.

  2. Spatially resolved spectroscopic ion temperature measurements at plasma edge of the T-10 tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klyuchnikov, L. A.; Krupin, V. A.; Nurgaliev, M. R.; Nemets, A. R.; Zemtsov, I. A.; Tugarinov, S. N.; Naumenko, N. N.

    2017-09-01

    Spectroscopic diagnostics of the edge ion temperature were developed on the T-10 tokamak. Spatially resolved measurements of C5+ and other ionization states of carbon spectral line shapes are provided. Spectra were measured with high spectral resolution using 14 lines of sight in one poloidal section of the tokamak. Each measured line-integrated spectrum contains a combination of multiple local spectra with corresponding values of ion temperature. Modeling of spatial distribution of line emissivity and spectral line shapes along the lines of sight allows the reconstruction of the ion temperature profile on the basis of the closest match of measured and modeled spectra. The fine structure of spectral line, Zeeman effect, and apparatus function are taken into account during data processing. Obtained ion temperature profiles, Ti(r), at the plasma edge are in good agreement with ion temperature profiles measured by Charge eXchange Recombination Spectroscopy (CXRS) diagnostics of T-10. Use of the CXRS equipment for measurements of passive spectra can provide additional information on the temporal evolution of the edge ion temperature. Developed diagnostics provide necessary data for the research of geodesic acoustic modes, which are strongly dependent on plasma edge ion temperature.

  3. Spectroscopic determination of electrical conductivity in an MHD duct from absolute intensity measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, S. Y.; Smith, J. M.

    1977-01-01

    Measurements of the electrical conductivity in the NASA Lewis cesium seeded, H2-O2 MHD duct made by applying a voltage across the channel from one end electrode to the other, measuring the current, and using the inner electrodes as probes to monitor the voltage distribution along the channel were found to be in good agreement with theory except at low combustion pressures and/or high ratios of seed/oxygen mass flows. To corroborate these measurements and to analyze the possibility of nonuniform seed injection as a cause of the above deviations, a spectroscopic investigation of the plasma conductivity was undertaken. Radial profiles of emission coefficient were obtained from measured transverse profiles of the absolute integrated intensity by Abel inversion. Radial profiles of electrical conductivity were then obtained under two different assumptions. In the first the Cs seed fraction is assumed uniform and equal to the measured flow rate at the time when the temperature and conductivity were obtained. In the second method the local temperature and pressure are taken to be those given by a one-dimensional channel calculation including heat transfer and friction. The results of the two methods are compared to the previously measured conductivity.

  4. Spectroscopic determination of electrical conductivity in an MHD duct from absolute intensity measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, S. Y.; Smith, M.

    1977-01-01

    Measurements of the electrical conductivity in the NASA Lewis cesium seeded, H2-O2 MHD duct have been previously reported. In order to corroborate the above measurements and to analyze the possibility of nonuniform seed injection as a cause of the deviations, a spectroscopic investigation of the plasma conductivity has been undertaken. Transverse profiles of the absolute integrated intensity were measured from the optically thin lines of CSI-.5664 microns and .5636 microns. Radial profiles of emission coefficient were obtained from the measured transverse profiles of intensity by Abel inversion. Radial profiles of electrical conductivity were then obtained under two different assumptions. In the first, the Cs seed fraction is assumed uniform and equal to the measured flow rate at the time when the temperature and conductivity were obtained. In the second method, the local temperature and pressure are taken to be those given by a one-dimensional channel calculation including heat transfer and friction. In this case profiles of conductivity and seed fractions are obtained. The results of the two methods are compared to the previously measured conductivity.

  5. PRECISION MEASUREMENT OF THE MOST DISTANT SPECTROSCOPICALLY CONFIRMED SUPERNOVA Ia WITH THE HUBBLE SPACE TELESCOPE

    SciTech Connect

    Rubin, D.; Rykoff, E.; Aldering, G.; Barbary, K.; Fakhouri, H. K.; Goldhaber, G.; Hsiao, E. Y.; Knop, R. A.; Amanullah, R.; Goobar, A.; Burns, M. S.; Conley, A.; Connolly, N.; Deustua, S.; Fruchter, A. S.; Fadeyev, V.; Gibbons, R. A.; Huang, X.; Kowalski, M.; Lidman, C.; Collaboration: Supernova Cosmology Project; and others

    2013-01-20

    We report the discovery of a redshift 1.71 supernova in the GOODS-North field. The Hubble Space Telescope (HST) ACS spectrum has almost negligible contamination from the host or neighboring galaxies. Although the rest-frame-sampled range is too blue to include any Si II line, a principal component analysis allows us to confirm it as a Type Ia supernova with 92% confidence. A recent serendipitous archival HST WFC3 grism spectrum contributed a key element of the confirmation by giving a host-galaxy redshift of 1.713 {+-} 0.007. In addition to being the most distant SN Ia with spectroscopic confirmation, this is the most distant Ia with a precision color measurement. We present the ACS WFC and NICMOS 2 photometry and ACS and WFC3 spectroscopy. Our derived supernova distance is in agreement with the prediction of {Lambda}CDM.

  6. Using broadband absorption spectroscopy to measure concentration of sulfur dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, H. S.; Zhang, Y. G.; Wu, S. H.; Lou, X. T.; Zhang, Z. G.; Qin, Y. K.

    2010-09-01

    A linear relationship between concentration of sulfur dioxide (SO2) and optical parameter (OP) is established using the Beer-Lambert law. The SO2 measuring system is set up to measure the concentration of sulfur dioxide in the wavelength range 275-315 nm. Experimental results indicate that the detection limit of the sulfur dioxide measuring system is below 0.2 ppm per meter of path length, and the measurement precision is better than ±1%. The proposed SO2 measuring method features limited interference from other gases and dust, and high stability and short response time.

  7. Polarizing beam-splitter rotation in Martin-Puplett interferometers for spectroscopic measurements at millimeter wavelengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Alessandro, Giuseppe; de Bernardis, Paolo; di Tano, Silvio; Masi, Silvia; Mele, Lorenzo

    2017-09-01

    The spectroscopic measurement of the Cosmic Microwave Background at mm and sub-mm wavelengths received significant attention recently, aimed at measuring tiny spectral distortions of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) relevant for cosmology. Several experiments, including OLIMPO (Masi et al. 2003), PRISM (André et al., 2014), MILLIMETRON (Smirnov and Baryshev, 2012), PIXIE (Kogut and Fixsen, 2011) are based on a Martin-Puplett Fourier-transform spectrometer. Its differential capabilities are the key to success in these difficult measurements. The polarizing beam splitter is the optical core of a Martin-Puplett interferometer. In this paper we analyze, analytically and experimentally, the systematic effects induced by a beam splitter orientation different from the canonical 45 ° . These effects are potenitally important for the delicate measurements of CMB spectral distortions. We find an analytical formula describing the effect, and verify experimentally, in the range 150-600 GHz, that our formula correctly describes the results (with a C.L. of 88 %). We also demonstrate that the rotation of the beam splitter does not induce distortions in the measured spectra.

  8. Quantitative infrared absorption cross sections of isoprene for atmospheric measurements

    DOE PAGES

    Brauer, C. S.; Blake, T. A.; Guenther, A. B.; ...

    2014-11-19

    Isoprene (C5H8, 2-methyl-1,3-butadiene) is a volatile organic compound (VOC) and is one of the primary contributors to annual global VOC emissions. Isoprene is produced primarily by vegetation as well as anthropogenic sources, and its OH- and O3-initiated oxidations are a major source of atmospheric oxygenated organics. Few quantitative infrared studies have been reported for isoprene, limiting the ability to quantify isoprene emissions via remote or in situ infrared detection. We thus report absorption cross sections and integrated band intensities for isoprene in the 600–6500 cm-1 region. The pressure-broadened (1 atmosphere N2) spectra were recorded at 278, 298, and 323 Kmore » in a 19.94 cm path-length cell at 0.112 cm-1 resolution, using a Bruker IFS 66v/S Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectrometer. Composite spectra are derived from a minimum of seven isoprene sample pressures, each at one of three temperatures, and the number densities are normalized to 296 K and 1 atm.« less

  9. Ultraviolet (UV)/visible absorption spectroscopy for atmospheric pollution measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stergis, Christos G.

    1994-09-01

    The primary objective of this effort is the development of instrumentation and techniques for determining the species, concentrations and lifetimes of atmospheric pollutants that may be generated by U.S. Air Force operations. The instrumentation being developed covers the spectral range of 200 nm to 900 nm, namely, the middle ultraviolet, the near ultraviolet, the visible and a portion of the near infrared. It has the capability of scanning throughout this range to look for unknown pollutants and also to look in detail at one or more suspected pollutants. The advantages of looking in this wavelength range, as well as some limitations, are discussed. Among the characteristics of the instrumentation that are described are the focal length and aperture ratio of the spectrometer, the gratings used, the spectral resolution and spectral dispersion of the spectrometer, the CCD detector, the digitization of the video signal, and the computer with the software needed for controlling the instrumentation and for recording and analyzing the data. Special attention is placed on the sensitivity of the instrumentation which is expected to be in the parts per trillion range for those molecules that have a substantial absorption cross section.

  10. Spectrum of excess partial molar absorptivity. Part II: a near infrared spectroscopic study of aqueous Na-halides.

    PubMed

    Sebe, Fumie; Nishikawa, Keiko; Koga, Yoshikata

    2012-04-07

    Our earlier thermodynamic studies suggested that F(-) and Cl(-) form hydration shells with the hydration number 14 ± 2 and 2.3 ± 0.6, respectively, and leave the bulk H(2)O away from hydration shells unperturbed. Br(-) and I(-), on the other hand, form hydrogen bonds directly with the momentarily existing hydrogen bond network of H(2)O, and retard the degree of entropy-volume cross fluctuation inherent in liquid H(2)O. The effect of the latter is stronger for I(-) than Br(-). Here we seek additional information about this qualitative difference between Cl(-) and (Br(-) and I(-)) pair by near infrared (NIR) spectroscopy. We analyze the ν(2) + ν(3) band of H(2)O in the range 4600-5500 cm(-1) of aqueous solutions of NaCl, NaBr and NaI, by a new approach. From observed absorbance, we calculate excess molar absorptivity, ε(E), excess over the additive contributions of solute and solvent. ε(E) thus contains information about the effect of inter-molecular interactions in the ν(2) + ν(3) spectrum. The spectrum of ε(E) shows three bands; two negative ones at 5263 and 4873 cm(-1), and the positive band at 5123 cm(-1). We then define and calculate the excess partial molar absorptivity of each salt, ε(E)(salt). From the behaviour of ε(E)(salt) we suggest that the negative band at 5263 cm(-1) represents free H(2)O without much hydrogen bonding under the influence of local electric field of ions. Furthermore, from a sudden change in the x(salt) (mole fraction of salt) dependence of ε(E)(salt), we suggest that there is an ion-pairing in x(salt) > 0.032, 0.036, and 0.04 for NaCl, NaBr and NaI respectively. The positive band of ε(E) at 5123 cm(-1) is attributed to a modestly organized hydrogen bond network of H(2)O (or liquid-likeness), and the x(salt) dependence of ε indicated a qualitative difference in the effect of Cl(-) from those of Br(-) and I(-). Namely, the values of ε(E)(salt) stay constant for Cl(-) but those for Br(-) and I(-) decrease smoothly on

  11. Absorption of Solar Radiation by the Cloudy Atmosphere Interpretations of Collocated Aircraft Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Valero, Francisco P. J.; Cess, Robert D.; Zhang, Minghua; Pope, Shelly K.; Bucholtz, Anthony; Bush, Brett; Vitko, John, Jr.

    1997-01-01

    As part of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Enhanced Shortwave Experiment (ARESE), we have obtained and analyzed measurements made from collocated aircraft of the absorption of solar radiation within the atmospheric column between the two aircraft. The measurements were taken during October 1995 at the ARM site in Oklahoma. Relative to a theoretical radiative transfer model, we find no evidence for excess solar absorption in the clear atmosphere and significant evidence for its existence in the cloudy atmosphere. This excess cloud solar absorption appears to occur in both visible (0.224-0.68 microns) and near-infrared (0.68-3.30 microns) spectral regions, although not at 0.5 microns for the visible contribution, and it is shown to be true absorption rather than an artifact of sampling errors caused by measuring three-dimensional clouds.

  12. Cyclotron-absorption measurement of the runaway-electron distribution in a tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Zvonkov, A.V.; Suvorov, E.V.; Timofeev, A.V.; Fraiman, A.A.

    1983-03-01

    The distribution function of runaway electrons in a tokamak can be determined in the slightly relativistic region from measurements of the absorption coefficient corresponding to electron cyclotron waves. The plasma should be probed in the vertical direction.

  13. Measurement of atmospheric precipitable water using a solar radiometer. [water vapor absorption effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pitts, D. E.; Dillinger, A. E.; Mcallum, W. E.

    1974-01-01

    A technique is described and tested that allows the determination of atmospheric precipitable water from two measurements of solar intensity: one in a water-vapor absorption band and another in a nearby spectral region unaffected by water vapor.

  14. PRISM: Processing routines in IDL for spectroscopic measurements (installation manual and user's guide, version 1.0)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kokaly, Raymond F.

    2011-01-01

    This report describes procedures for installing and using the U.S. Geological Survey Processing Routines in IDL for Spectroscopic Measurements (PRISM) software. PRISM provides a framework to conduct spectroscopic analysis of measurements made using laboratory, field, airborne, and space-based spectrometers. Using PRISM functions, the user can compare the spectra of materials of unknown composition with reference spectra of known materials. This spectroscopic analysis allows the composition of the material to be identified and characterized. Among its other functions, PRISM contains routines for the storage of spectra in database files, import/export of ENVI spectral libraries, importation of field spectra, correction of spectra to absolute reflectance, arithmetic operations on spectra, interactive continuum removal and comparison of spectral features, correction of imaging spectrometer data to ground-calibrated reflectance, and identification and mapping of materials using spectral feature-based analysis of reflectance data. This report provides step-by-step instructions for installing the PRISM software and running its functions.

  15. Intestinal adaptation in patients with short bowel syndrome. Measurement by calcium absorption

    SciTech Connect

    Gouttebel, M.C.; Saint Aubert, B.; Colette, C.; Astre, C.; Monnier, L.H.; Joyeux, H. )

    1989-05-01

    Functional adaptation of remaining intestine was evaluated in 30 patients with extensive small bowel resection. Calcium and xylose absorption tests were compared. Calcium absorption was measured by a double-radiotracer technique. Serum xylosemia was measured 2 hr after D-xylose ingestion. Patients were divided into two groups according to the time interval between surgery and evaluation: less (group I) or more (group II) than two years. A statistically significant correlation was found between xylosemia and remaining small bowel length (r = 0.71; P less than 0.001) and between calcium absorption and remaining small bowel length (r = 0.75; P less than 0.001) in group I. A significant correlation was also observed between calcium absorption and time after surgery (r = 0.65; P = 0.001) but not for xylose absorption. Calcium absorption value was significantly increased in group II patients compared with group I patients matched for remaining small bowel length (36.2 +/- 12.5% vs 14.5 +/- 9.1%; P less than 0.001) while no difference was observed between the two groups concerning xylose absorption. These data indicate that intestinal calcium absorption continues to increase for more than two years after a major bowel resection in man. The intestine does not seem to recover all its functions at the same time.

  16. Shock tube measurements of the optical absorption of triatomic carbon, C3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, J. J.

    1977-01-01

    The spectral absorption of C3 has been measured in a shock tube using a test gas mixture of acetylene diluted with argon. The absorption of a pulsed xenon light source was measured by means of eight photomultiplier channels to a spectrograph and an accompanying drum camera. The postshock test gas temperature and pressure were varied over the range 3300-4300 K and 0.36 to 2.13 atmospheres, respectively. The results showed appreciable absorption from C3 for the wavelength range 300 to 540 nanometers. The computed electronic oscillator strength varied from 0.12 to 0.06 as a function of temperature.

  17. Atomic absorption spectroscopic, conductometric and colorimetric methods for determination of fluoroquinolone antibiotics using ammonium reineckate ion-pair complex formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ragab, Gamal H.; Amin, Alaa S.

    2004-03-01

    Three accurate, rapid and simple atomic absorption spectrometric, conductometric and colorimetric methods were developed for the determination of norfloxacin (NRF), ciprofloxacin (CIP), ofloxacin (OFL) and enrofloxacin (ENF). The proposed methods depend upon the reaction of ammonium reineckate with the studied drugs to form stable precipitate of ion-pair complexes, which was dissolved in acetone. The pink coloured complexes were determined either by AAS or colorimetrically at λmax 525 nm directly using the dissolved complex. Using conductometric titration, the studied drugs could be evaluated in 50% (v/v) acetone in the range 5.0-65, 4.0-48, 5.0-56 and 6.0-72 μg ml -1 of NRF, CPF, OFL and ENF, respectively. The optimizations of various experimental conditions were described. The results obtained showed good recoveries of 99.15±1.15, 99.30±1.40, 99.60±1.50, and 99.00±1.25% with relative standard deviations of 0.81, 1.06, 0.97, and 0.69% for NRF, CPF, OFL, and ENF, respectively. Applications of the proposed methods to representative pharmaceutical formulations are successfully presented.

  18. The chemical environment of iron in mineral fibres. A combined X-ray absorption and Mössbauer spectroscopic study.

    PubMed

    Pollastri, Simone; D'Acapito, Francesco; Trapananti, Angela; Colantoni, Ivan; Andreozzi, Giovanni B; Gualtieri, Alessandro F

    2015-11-15

    Although asbestos represents today one of the most harmful contaminant on Earth, in 72% of the countries worldwide only amphiboles are banned while controlled use of chrysotile is allowed. Uncertainty on the potential toxicity of chrysotile is due to the fact that the mechanisms by which mineral fibres induces cyto- and geno-toxic damage are still unclear. We have recently started a long term project aimed at the systematic investigation of the crystal-chemistry, bio-interaction and toxicity of the mineral fibres. This work presents a systematic structural investigation of iron in asbestos and erionite (considered the most relevant mineral fibres of social and/or economic-industrial importance) using synchrotron X-ray absorption and Mössbauer spectroscopy. In all investigated mineral fibres, iron in the bulk structure is found in octahedral sites and can be made available at the surface via fibre dissolution. We postulate that the amount of hydroxyl radicals released by the fibers depends, among other factors, upon their dissolution rate; in relation to this, a ranking of ability of asbestos fibres to generate hydroxyl radicals, resulting from available surface iron, is advanced: amosite > crocidolite ≈ chrysotile > anthophyllite > tremolite. Erionite, with a fairly high toxicity potential, contains only octahedrally coordinated Fe(3+). Although it needs further experimental evidence, such available surface iron may be present as oxide nanoparticles coating and can be a direct cause of generation of hydroxyl radicals when such coating dissolves.

  19. L-Edge X-ray Absorption Spectroscopic Investigation of {FeNO}6: Delocalization vs Antiferromagnetic Coupling

    DOE PAGES

    Yan, James J.; Gonzales, Margarita A.; Mascharak, Pradip K.; ...

    2016-12-22

    NO is a classic non-innocent ligand, and iron nitrosyls can have different electronic structure descriptions depending on their spin state and coordination environment. These highly covalent ligands are found in metalloproteins and are also used as models for Fe–O2 systems. Here, this study utilizes iron L-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS), interpreted using a valence bond configuration interaction multiplet model, to directly experimentally probe the electronic structure of the S = 0 {FeNO}6 compound [Fe(PaPy3)NO]2+ (PaPy3 = N,N-bis(2-pyridylmethyl)amine-N-ethyl-2-pyridine-2-carboxamide) and the S = 0 [Fe(PaPy3)CO]+ reference compound. This method allows separation of the σ-donation and π-acceptor interactions of the ligand through ligand-to-metalmore » and metal-to-ligand charge-transfer mixing pathways. The analysis shows that the {FeNO}6 electronic structure is best described as FeIII–NO(neutral), with no localized electron in an NO π* orbital or electron hole in an Fe dπ orbital. This delocalization comes from the large energy gap between the Fe–NO π-bonding and antibonding molecular orbitals relative to the exchange interactions between electrons in these orbitals. This study demonstrates the utility of L-edge XAS in experimentally defining highly delocalized electronic structures.« less

  20. Different speciation for bromine in brown and red algae, revealed by in vivo X-ray absorption spectroscopic studies.

    PubMed

    Küpper, Frithjof C; Leblanc, Catherine; Meyer-Klaucke, Wolfram; Potin, Philippe; Feiters, Martin C

    2014-08-01

    Members of various algal lineages are known to be strong producers of atmospherically relevant halogen emissions, that is a consequence of their capability to store and metabolize halogens. This study uses a noninvasive, synchrotron-based technique, X-ray absorption spectroscopy, for addressing in vivo bromine speciation in the brown algae Ectocarpus siliculosus, Ascophyllum nodosum, and Fucus serratus, the red algae Gracilaria dura, G. gracilis, Chondrus crispus, Osmundea pinnatifida, Asparagopsis armata, Polysiphonia elongata, and Corallina officinalis, the diatom Thalassiosira rotula, the dinoflagellate Lingulodinium polyedrum and a natural phytoplankton sample. The results highlight a diversity of fundamentally different bromine storage modes: while most of the stramenopile representatives and the dinoflagellate store mostly bromide, there is evidence for Br incorporated in nonaromatic hydrocarbons in Thalassiosira. Red algae operate various organic bromine stores - including a possible precursor (by the haloform reaction) for bromoform in Asparagopsis and aromatically bound Br in Polysiphonia and Corallina. Large fractions of the bromine in the red algae G. dura and C. crispus and the brown alga F. serratus are present as Br(-) defects in solid KCl, similar to what was reported earlier for Laminaria parts. These results are discussed according to different defensive strategies that are used within algal taxa to cope with biotic or abiotic stresses.

  1. In situ infrared reflection absorption spectroscopic characterization of sustained kinetic oscillations in the Pt(100)/NO+CO system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magtoto, Noel P.; Richardson, Hugh H.

    1998-11-01

    We have excited kinetic oscillations in the Pt(100)/NO+CO system at 470 K and pressure region around 2×10 -4 Torr. These oscillations are sustained and they arise by simply adjusting the partial pressures of NO and CO while holding the surface temperature at 470 K. However, they can only be induced if the partial pressure of CO is greater than that of NO (i.e., 1.4±0.05< pCO/ pNO<1.7±0.04). Infrared reflection-absorption spectra (IRAS) collected during the oscillation showed that the periodic growth and decay of the CO band are counterphase to the reaction-rate oscillations. Infrared bands due to molecularly adsorbed NO were not found during the early stages of the temporal evolution of the system into the upper reaction-rate branch. However, during the later stages of the evolution, a single IR band due to chemisorbed NO was observed. This band eventually disappeared as the reaction rate finally reached its maximum value. With the use of the model by Fink et al., we were able to rationalize the occurrence of oscillations under the present experimental conditions. Oscillations are caused by the periodic change in the level of adsorbate coverages that controls the dissociation of NO.

  2. X-ray absorption spectroscopic evidence for the complexation of Hg(II) by reduced sulfur in soil humic substances

    SciTech Connect

    Xia, K.; Skyllberg, U.L.; Bleam, W.F.; Helmke, P.A.; Bloom, P.R.; Nater, E.A.

    1999-01-15

    Analysis of Hg(II) complexed by a soil humic acid (HA) using synchrotron-based X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) revealed the importance of reduces sulfur functional groups (thiol (R-SH) and disulfide (R-SS-R)/disulfane (R-SSH)) in humic substances in the complexation of Hg(II). A two-coordinate binding environment with one oxygen atom and one sulfur atom at distances of 2.02 and 2.38 {angstrom}, respectively, was found in the first coordination shell of Hg(II) complexed by humic acid. Model calculations show that a second coordination sphere could contain one carbon atom and a second sulfur atom at 2.78 and 2.93 {angstrom}, respectively. This suggests that in addition to thiol S, disulfide/disulfane S may be involved with the complexation of Hg(II) in soil organic matter. The appearance of carbon atom in the second coordination shell suggests that one O-containing ligand such as carboxyl and phenol ligands rather than H{sub 2}O molecule is bound to the Hg(II). The involvement of oxygen ligand in addition to the reduced S ligands in the complexation of Hg(II) is due to the low density of reduced S ligands in humic substances. The XAS results from this experiment provided direct molecular level evidence for the preference of reduced S functional groups over oxygen ligands by Hg(II) in the complexation with humic substances.

  3. Absorption measurement of thin films by using photothermal techniques: The influence of thermal properties

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Z.L.; Kuo, P.K.; Thomas, R.L.; Fan, Z.X.

    1995-12-31

    Photothermal techniques are widely used for measuring optical absorption of thin film coatings. In these applications the calibration of photothermal signal is typically based on the assumption that the thermal properties of the thin film make very little contribution. In this paper we take mirage technique as an example and present a detailed analysis of the influence of thin film thermal properties on absorption measurements. The results show that the traditional calibration method is not valid on surprisingly many situations.

  4. Temperature measurement using ultraviolet laser absorption of carbon dioxide behind shock waves.

    PubMed

    Oehlschlaeger, Matthew A; Davidson, David F; Jeffries, Jay B

    2005-11-01

    A diagnostic for microsecond time-resolved temperature measurements behind shock waves, using ultraviolet laser absorption of vibrationally hot carbon dioxide, is demonstrated. Continuous-wave laser radiation at 244 and 266 nm was employed to probe the spectrally smooth CO2 ultraviolet absorption, and an absorbance ratio technique was used to determine temperature. Measurements behind shock waves in both nonreacting and reacting (ignition) systems were made, and comparisons with isentropic and constant-volume calculations are reported.

  5. Measurements of Soot Mass Absorption Coefficients from 300 to 660 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renbaum-Wolff, Lindsay; Fisher, Al; Helgestad, Taylor; Lambe, Andrew; Sedlacek, Arthur; Smith, Geoffrey; Cappa, Christopher; Davidovits, Paul; Onasch, Timothy; Freedman, Andrew

    2016-04-01

    Soot, a product of incomplete combustion, plays an important role in the earth's climate system through the absorption and scattering of solar radiation. In particular, the assumed mass absorption coefficient (MAC) of soot and its variation with wavelength presents a significant uncertainty in the calculation of radiative forcing in global climate change models. As part of the fourth Boston College/Aerodyne soot properties measurement campaign, we have measured the mass absorption coefficient of soot produced by an inverted methane diffusion flame over a spectral range of 300-660 nm using a variety of optical absorption techniques. Extinction and absorption were measured using a dual cavity ringdown photoacoustic spectrometer (CRD-PAS, UC Davis) at 405 nm and 532 nm. Scattering and extinction were measured using a CAPS PMssa single scattering albedo monitor (Aerodyne) at 630 nm; the absorption coefficient was determined by subtraction. In addition, the absorption coefficients in 8 wavelength bands from 300 to 660 nm were measured using a new broadband photoacoustic absorption monitor (UGA). Soot particle mass was quantified using a centrifugal particle mass analyzer (CPMA, Cambustion), mobility size with a scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS, TSI) and soot concentration with a CPC (Brechtel). The contribution of doubly charged particles to the sample mass was determined using a Single Particle Soot Photometer (DMT). Over a mass range of 1-8 fg, corresponding to differential mobility diameters of ~150 nm to 550 nm, the value of the soot MAC proved to be independent of mass for all wavelengths. The wavelength dependence of the MAC was best fit to a power law with an Absorption Ångstrom Coefficient slightly greater than 1.

  6. Technical note: Aerosol light absorption measurements with a carbon analyser - Calibration and precision estimates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ammerlaan, B. A. J.; Holzinger, R.; Jedynska, A. D.; Henzing, J. S.

    2017-09-01

    Equivalent Black Carbon (EBC) and Elemental Carbon (EC) are different mass metrics to quantify the amount of combustion aerosol. Both metrics have their own measurement technique. In state-of-the-art carbon analysers, optical measurements are used to correct for organic carbon that is not evolving because of pyrolysis. These optical measurements are sometimes used to apply the technique of absorption photometers. Here, we use the transmission measurements of our carbon analyser for simultaneous determination of the elemental carbon concentration and the absorption coefficient. We use MAAP data from the CESAR observatory, the Netherlands, to correct for aerosol-filter interactions by linking the attenuation coefficient from the carbon analyser to the absorption coefficient measured by the MAAP. Application of the calibration to an independent data set of MAAP and OC/EC observations for the same location shows that the calibration is applicable to other observation periods. Because of simultaneous measurements of light absorption properties of the aerosol and elemental carbon, variation in the mass absorption efficiency (MAE) can be studied. We further show that the absorption coefficients and MAE in this set-up are determined within a precision of 10% and 12%, respectively. The precisions could be improved to 4% and 8% when the light transmission signal in the carbon analyser is very stable.

  7. Raman Spectroscopic and Ultrasonic Measurements to Monitor the HMX ( ) Phase Transition

    SciTech Connect

    GIESKE,JOHN H.; MILLER,JILL C.; RENLUND,ANITA M.; TAPPAN,ALEXANDER S.

    1999-10-14

    The HMX {beta}-{delta} solid-solid phase transition, which occurs as HMX is heated near 170 C, is clearly linked to increased reactivity and sensitivity to initiation. Thermally damaged energetic materials (EMs) containing HMX therefore may present a safety concern. Information about the phase transition is vital to a predictive safety model for HMX and HMX-containing EMs. We report work in progress on monitoring the phase transition with real-time Raman spectroscopy and ultrasonic measurements aimed towards a better understanding of physical properties through the phase transition. HMX samples were confined with minimal free volume.in a cell with constant volume. The cell was heated at a controlled rate and real-time Raman spectroscopic or ultrasonic measurements were performed. Raman spectroscopy provides a clear distinction between the two phases because the vibrational transitions of the molecule change with confirmational changes associated with the phase transition. Ultrasonic time-of-flight measurements provide an additional method of distinguishing the two phases because the sound speed through the material changes with the phase transition. Ultrasonic attenuation measurements also provide information about microstructural changes such as increased porosity due to evolution of gaseous decomposition products.

  8. Mass specific optical absorption coefficients of mineral dust components measured by a multi wavelength photoacoustic spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Utry, N.; Ajtai, T.; Pintér, M.; Tombácz, E.; Illés, E.; Bozóki, Z.; Szabó, G.

    2014-09-01

    Mass specific optical absorption coefficients of various mineral dust components including silicate clays (illite, kaolin and bentonite), oxides (quartz, hematite and rutile), and carbonate (limestone) were determined at wavelengths of 1064, 532, 355 and 266 nm. These values were calculated from aerosol optical absorption coefficients measured by a multi-wavelength photoacoustic (PA) instrument, the mass concentration and the number size distribution of the generated aerosol samples as well as the size transfer functions of the measuring instruments. These results are expected to have considerable importance in global radiative forcing calculations. They can also serve as reference for validating calculated wavelength dependent imaginary parts (κ) of complex refractive indices which up to now have been typically deduced from bulk phase measurements by using indirect measurement methods. Accordingly, the presented comparison of the measured and calculated aerosol optical absorption spectra revealed the strong need for standardized sample preparation and measurement methodology in case of bulk phase measurements.

  9. Minute Concentration Measurements of Simple Hydrocarbon Species Using Supercontinuum Laser Absorption Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Jihyung; Traina, Nicholas; Halloran, Michael; Lee, Tonghun

    2016-06-01

    Minute concentration measurements of simple hydrocarbon gases are demonstrated using near-infrared supercontinuum laser absorption spectroscopy. Absorption-based gas sensors, particularly when combined with optical fiber components, can significantly enhance diagnostic capabilities to unprecedented levels. However, these diagnostic techniques are subject to limitations under certain gas sensing applications where interference and harsh conditions dominate. Supercontinuum laser absorption spectroscopy is a novel laser-based diagnostic technique that can exceed the above-mentioned limitations and provide accurate and quantitative concentration measurement of simple hydrocarbon species while maintaining compatibility with telecommunications-grade optical fiber components. Supercontinuum radiation generated using a highly nonlinear photonic crystal fiber is used to probe rovibrational absorption bands of four hydrocarbon species using full-spectral absorption diagnostics. Absorption spectra of methane (CH4), acetylene (C2H2), and ethylene (C2H4) were measured in the near-infrared spectrum at various pressures and concentrations to determine the accuracy and feasibility of the diagnostic strategy. Absorption spectra of propane (C3H8) were subsequently probed between 1650 nm and 1700 nm, to demonstrate the applicability of the strategy. Measurements agreed very well with simulated spectra generated using the HITRAN database as well as with previous experimental results. Absorption spectra of CH4, C2H2, and C2H4 were then analyzed to determine their respective measurement accuracy and detection limit. Concentration measurements integrated from experimental results were in very good agreement with independent concentration measurements. Calculated detection limits of CH4, C2H2, and C2H4 at room temperature and atmospheric pressure are 0.1%, 0.09%, and 0.17%, respectively.

  10. An x-ray absorption spectroscopic study of the electronic structure and bonding of rare-earth orthoferrites

    SciTech Connect

    Hayes, J.R.; Grosvenor, A.P.

    2011-11-07

    Rare-earth orthoferrites, REFeO{sub 3} (RE=rare earth; Y), are tremendously adaptable compounds that are being investigated for use in a wide variety of applications including gas sensors, vehicle catalytic converters, and solid-oxide fuel cells. They also exhibit interesting magnetic properties such as high-temperature antiferromagnetism, making them useful for data storage applications. The compounds adopt a distorted perovskite-type structure where the tilt angle of the octahedra increases (Fe-O-Fe bond angle decreases) as the size of the rare-earth atom decreases. Despite intensive study of the physical properties of these compounds, very few studies have investigated how the bonding and electronic structure of these systems change with substitution of the RE. X-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy (XANES) is a technique well-suited for such a study, and, in view of this, Fe L-, Fe K- and O K-edge spectra from a series of REFeO{sub 3} compounds (RE=La, Pr, Nd, Sm, Eu, Gd, Ho, Yb, Y) have been collected, and are presented here. Fe L-edge spectra show that Fe is octahedrally coordinated and that the Fe-centered octahedra do not appear to distort with changes in the identity of the RE. The Fe K-edge spectra contain an intersite hybrid peak, which is an ill-studied feature that is attributed to non-local transitions of 1s electrons to 3d states on the next-nearest-neighbor atom that are hybridized with 4p states on the absorbing atom through O 2p states. In this study, it is shown that the intensity of this feature is strongly dependent on the Fe-O-Fe bond angle; the lower the Fe-O-Fe bond angle, the less intense the intersite hybrid peak is.

  11. X-ray absorption and photoelectron spectroscopic study of plasma-nitrided SiO{sub 2} film

    SciTech Connect

    Song, H.J.; Shin, H.J.; Chung, Youngsu; Lee, J.C.; Lee, M.K.

    2005-06-01

    Plasma-nitrided SiO{sub 2} thin film has been analyzed by synchrotron-radiation-based x-ray absorption and photoelectron spectroscopies (XAS and XPS). High-resolution N 1s XAS and N 1s, O 1s, and Si 2p XPS spectral changes were obtained for different annealing temperatures. N 1s XPS and XAS spectra show that at room temperature, besides the main species of N[Si(O-){sub 3-x}]{sub 3}, there exist free moleculelike N{sub 2} and HN[Si(O-){sub 3}]{sub 2}, H{sub 2}NSi(O-){sub 3}, and N-Si{sub 2}O species with surface contaminants. The spectral intensities of the N{sub 2} and the HN[Si(O-){sub 3}]{sub 2}, H{sub 2}NSi(O-){sub 3}, and N-Si{sub 2}O species decrease as the annealing temperature increases, and finally the nitrogen exists dominantly in the form of N[Si(O){sub 3}]{sub 3} species above 820 K, indicating out-diffusion of molecular N{sub 2} and structural reconstruction to form a stable structure upon annealing. The Si 2p and O 1s XPS spectra show that Si{sup >4+} 2p peak and O 1s peak appear at 103.7 and 534.0 eV, respectively, which are higher binding energies than those of thermally grown oxynitride films with lower coverage on silicon. Upon annealing the sample, these peaks shift towards lower binding energy; {approx}0.3 eV for Si{sup >4+} and 0.4 eV for O 1s. The causes of the peaks appearance at relatively higher binding energy and the peak shift upon annealing are discussed.

  12. L-Edge X-ray Absorption Spectroscopic Investigation of {FeNO}6: Delocalization vs Antiferromagnetic Coupling

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, James J.; Gonzales, Margarita A.; Mascharak, Pradip K.; Hedman, Britt; Hodgson, Keith O.; Solomon, Edward I.

    2016-12-22

    NO is a classic non-innocent ligand, and iron nitrosyls can have different electronic structure descriptions depending on their spin state and coordination environment. These highly covalent ligands are found in metalloproteins and are also used as models for Fe–O2 systems. Here, this study utilizes iron L-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS), interpreted using a valence bond configuration interaction multiplet model, to directly experimentally probe the electronic structure of the S = 0 {FeNO}6 compound [Fe(PaPy3)NO]2+ (PaPy3 = N,N-bis(2-pyridylmethyl)amine-N-ethyl-2-pyridine-2-carboxamide) and the S = 0 [Fe(PaPy3)CO]+ reference compound. This method allows separation of the σ-donation and π-acceptor interactions of the ligand through ligand-to-metal and metal-to-ligand charge-transfer mixing pathways. The analysis shows that the {FeNO}6 electronic structure is best described as FeIII–NO(neutral), with no localized electron in an NO π* orbital or electron hole in an Fe dπ orbital. This delocalization comes from the large energy gap between the Fe–NO π-bonding and antibonding molecular orbitals relative to the exchange interactions between electrons in these orbitals. This study demonstrates the utility of L-edge XAS in experimentally defining highly delocalized electronic structures.

  13. Measurement of Carbon Dioxide Column via Space Borne Laser Absorption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heaps, WIlliam S.

    2007-01-01

    In order to better understand the budget of carbon dioxide in the Earth's atmosphere it is necessary to develop a global high precision understanding of the carbon dioxide column. In order to uncover the 'missing sink that is responsible for the large discrepancies in the budget as we presently understand it calculation has indicated that measurement accuracy on the order of 1 ppm is necessary. Because typical column average CO2 has now reached 380 ppm this represents a precision on the order of .25% for these column measurements. No species has ever been measured from space at such a precision. In recognition of the importance of understanding the CO2 budget in order to evaluate its impact on global warming the National Research Council in its decadal survey report to NASA recommended planning for a laser based total CO2 mapping mission in the near future. The extreme measurement accuracy requirements on this mission places very strong requirements on the laser system used for the measurement. This work presents an analysis of the characteristics necessary in a laser system used to make this measurement. Consideration is given to the temperature dependence, pressure broadening, and pressure shift of the CO2 lines themselves and how these impact the laser system characteristics Several systems for meeting these requirements that are under investigation at various institutions in the US as well as Europe will be discussed.

  14. Portable Instrument to Measure CDOM Light Absorption in Aquatic Systems: WPI Success Story

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    World Precision Instruments, Inc. (WPI), of Sarasota, FL, in collaboration with NASA's John C. Stennis Space Center, has developed an innovative instrument to accurately measure Colored Dissolved Organic Matter (CDOM) absorption in the field. This successful collaboration has culminated in an exciting new device, called the UltraPath, now commercially available through WPI. Traditional methods of measuring absorption of dissolved materials require special handling and storage prior to measurement. Use of laboratory spectrophotometers as the measuring devices have proven time consuming, cumbersome, and delicate to handle. The UltraPath provides a low-cost, highly sensitive, rugged, portable system that is capable of high sensitivity measurements in widely divergent waters.

  15. Measurement of Two-Photon Absorption Cross Section of Metal Ions by a Mass Sedimentation Approach

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Zhuo-Chen; Chen, Qi-Dai; Han, Bing; Liu, Xue-Qing; Song, Jun-Feng; Sun, Hong-Bo

    2015-01-01

    The photo-reduction of metal ions in solution induced by femtosecond laser is an important and novel method for fabricating three-dimensional metal microstructures. However, the nonlinear absorption cross section of metal ions remains unknown because its measurement is difficult. In the present study, a method based on Two-Photon Excited Sedimentation (TPES) is proposed to measure the two-photon absorption cross section (TPACS) of metal ions in solution. The power-squared dependence of the amount of sediment on the excitation intensity was confirmed, revealing that 800 nm femtosecond laser induced reduction of metal ions was a two photon absorption process. We believe that the proposed method may be applied to measure the TPACS of several metal ions, thereby opening a new avenue towards future analysis of two-photon absorption materials. PMID:26657990

  16. Method and apparatus for background signal reduction in opto-acoustic absorption measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosengren, L. G. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    The sensitivity of an opto-acoustic absorption detector is increased to make it possible to measure trace amounts of constituent gases. A second beam radiation path is created through the sample cell identical to a first path except as to length, alternating the beam through the two paths and minimizing the detected pressure difference for the two paths while the beam wavelength is tuned away from the absorption lines of the sample. Then with the beam wavelength tuned to the absorption line of any constituent of interest, the pressure difference is a measure of trace amounts of the constituent. The same improved detector may also be used for measuring the absorption coefficient of known concentrations of absorbing gases.

  17. Re-Evaluation of Dust Radiative Forcing Using Remote Measurements of Dust Absorption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, Yoram J.; Tanre, Didier; Karnieli, Arnon; Remer, Lorraine A.

    1998-01-01

    Spectral remote observations of dust properties from space and from the ground creates a powerful tool for determination of dust absorption of solar radiation with an unprecedented accuracy. Absorption is a key component in understanding dust impact on climate. We use Landsat spaceborne measurements at 0.47 to 2.2 microns over Senegal with ground based sunphotometers to find that Saharan dust absorption of solar radiation is two to four times smaller than in models. Though dust absorbs in the blue, almost no absorption was found for wavelengths greater 0.6 microns. The new finding increases by 50% recent estimated solar radiative forcing by dust and decreases the estimated dust heating of the lower troposphere. Dust transported from Asia shows slightly higher absorption probably due to the presence of black carbon from populated regions. Large scale application of this method to satellite data from the Earth Observing System can reduce significantly the uncertainty in the dust radiative effects.

  18. Autumn and Winter Anomalies in Ionospheric Absorption as Measured by Riometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ranta, H.

    1984-01-01

    Seasonal variations of ionospheric absorption were studied using riometer (A2) measurements over a wide latitude range. In agreement with the results of earlier studies of A1 radiowave absorption, equinoctial maxima of approximately equal amplitude are observed in the auroral zone and near the equator. However, at intermediate latitudes riometer absorption maximizes during the fall season, whereas the A1 data show a semi-annual variation with maxima occurring in summer and winter. The autumn anomaly in riometer absorption is observed at much higher geographic latitude in the Southern Hemisphere, but at comparable geomagnetic latitudes in both hemispheres. The winter anomaly was seen only in absorption values calculated at constant solar zenith angle.

  19. Direct Measurement of Polarized Absorption Cross-Section of Single-Wall Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Islam, M. F.; Milkie, D. E.; Kane, C. L.; Yodh, A. Y.; Kikkawa, J. M.

    2004-03-01

    We use a combination of polarized Raman scattering and linear optical absorption to infer optical absorption cross-sections of single-wall carbon nanotube ensembles for visible light co- and cross-polarized with respect to the nanotube axes. These data reveal a strong linear absorption anisotropy, and provide a rapid method by which linear absorption spectra can be used to quantitatively measure the orientation of dispersed nanotubes, even in strongly absorbing media for which Raman approaches are complicated by anisotropic re-absorption processes. Comparison with theory demonstrates that local field depolarization plays a crucial role in affecting optical spectra of the nanotubes. This work supported by NSF through DMR-0203378, DMR-079909 and DGE-0221664, NASA through NAG8-2172, DARPA/ONR through N00014-01-1-0831, and SENS.

  20. Optical fiber sensing of corroded materials with evanescent wave absorption measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Namkung, Juock; Schwartz, Andy

    2012-06-01

    This research effort is to demonstrate a remote sensing method using optical fibers with a Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) interferometer as an evanescent wave spectroscopic technique. In addition to the usual advantages of optical fiber sensors, such as small size and weight, optical fibers can be embedded in aircraft structures in locations where humidity and corrosion can accumulate but cannot be directly observed. A fiber-optic-FTIR experimental setup, including several samples of field corroded materials, has been assembled to spectrally detect Aluminum Hydroxide [Al(OH)3] which is one of the major components of aluminum corrosion. Absorption spectra of Al(OH)3 have been collected using an Attenuated Total Reflection (ATR) crystal as a reference spectral signature. The absorption spectra of samples from a simulated corrosion process and from the field corroded structures have been collected and compared with the reference Al(OH)3 spectra. Chalcogenide optical fibers are used for remote sensing purposes to detect corrosion. Two distinctive absorption peaks, attributable to aluminum hydroxide, are noticed from the simulated corrosion and from the field corroded structures.

  1. Measuring moisture in cheese by near infrared absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    McKenna, D

    2001-01-01

    Data in the literature indicate that the measurement of moisture in cheese by near infrared transmittance (NIT) is more accurate than by reflectance (NIR). The accuracy of the NIT measurement (SEP) was calculated for Edam, Gouda, Brie, Colby, and Cheddar. A range of SEP values (0.12-0.35) was obtained using different methods of calibration for different types of samples. There was close agreement between these results, as they related to the precision of the reference method. The calibration validation technique described as Standard Error of Cross Validation (SECV) generated results that compared very closely to the equivalent SEP values for independent sample sets.

  2. Space-resolved fluorescence spectroscopic measurements with an optical fiber probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Enbang; Qiu, Hialin

    2008-12-01

    By monitoring of the emitted signal from a sample while varying the excitation wavelength, emission wavelength or both of them, fluorescence spectroscopy has become a powerful diagnostic technology. Fluorescence spectrometers can be used to measure and record the fluorescence spectra of a given sample, and have been successfully applied in different areas including biology, biochemistry, chemistry, medicine, environmental science, material science, food industry, and pharmaceutical industry. In order to increase the flexibility and applicability of conventional fluorescence spectrometers, we design an optic fiber probe for conducting the UV/Vis excitation light to a sample under study, and for collecting the fluorescence produced by the sample. Different excitation/emission fiber bundle arrangements have been fabricated and their performances have been evaluated and compared. Fiber adaptors which can be used for different commercial fluorescence spectrometers are also developed. In order to achieve space-resolved fluorescence spectroscopic measurements, we connect the fiber probe to a microscope which is mounted on a 3D traverse stage. Experiments and measurement results using the space-resolved fiber optic fluorescence spectrometer are presented in this paper.

  3. In situ measurements of the oblique incidence sound absorption coefficient for finite sized absorbers.

    PubMed

    Ottink, Marco; Brunskog, Jonas; Jeong, Cheol-Ho; Fernandez-Grande, Efren; Trojgaard, Per; Tiana-Roig, Elisabet

    2016-01-01

    Absorption coefficients are mostly measured in reverberation rooms or with impedance tubes. Since these methods are only suitable for measuring the random incidence and the normal incidence absorption coefficient, there exists an increasing need for absorption coefficient measurement of finite absorbers at oblique incidence in situ. Due to the edge diffraction effect, oblique incidence methods considering an infinite sample fail to measure the absorption coefficient at large incidence angles of finite samples. This paper aims for the development of a measurement method that accounts for the finiteness of the absorber. A sound field model, which accounts for scattering from the finite absorber edges, assuming plane wave incidence is derived. A significant influence of the finiteness on the radiation impedance and the corresponding absorption coefficient is found. A finite surface method, which combines microphone array measurements over a finite sample with the sound field model in an inverse manner, is proposed. Besides, a temporal subtraction method, a microphone array method, impedance tube measurements, and an equivalent fluid model are used for validation. The finite surface method gives promising agreement with theory, especially at near grazing incidence. Thus, the finite surface method is proposed for further measurements at large incidence angles.

  4. Comparisons of measured rate constants with spectroscopically determined electron-transfer parameters.

    PubMed

    Nelsen, Stephen F; Konradsson, Asgeir E; Weaver, Michael N; Stephenson, Rachel M; Lockard, Jenny V; Zink, Jeffrey I; Zhao, Yi

    2007-06-21

    This work involves comparison of rate constants measured for an intervalence (IV) compound with electron-transfer parameters derived from its optical absorption spectrum. The temperature-dependent rate constants for the radical cation having 3-tert-butyl-2,3-diazabicyclo[2.2.2]oct-2-yl (hydrazine) charge-bearing units attached para to a tetramethylbenzene bridge (1+) were previously measured. In this study, resonance Raman is used to calculate the magnitudes of the distortions of normal modes of vibration caused by excitation into the intervalence absorption band. These data produce a vibrational reorganization energy lambdavsym of 9250 cm(-1), and averaged single-mode omegav for use in the Golden Rule equation of 697 cm(-1). Zhu-Nakamura theory has been used to calculate preexponential factors for analysis of the previously measured variable temperature optical spectra using quartic-enhanced intervalence bands to extract the total reorganization energy and the intramolecular electron-transfer rate constants for intramolecular electron transfer using electron spin resonance. In contrast to using the Golden Rule equation, separation of lambda into solvent and vibrational components is not significant for these data. The Zhu-Nakamura theory calculations produce ln(k/T) versus 1/T slopes that are consistent with the experimental data for electronic couplings that are somewhat larger than the values obtained from the optical spectra using Hush's method.

  5. In Situ Measurements of Aerosol Mass Concentration and Spectral Absorption in Xianghe, SE of Beijing, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaudhry, Z.; Martins, V.; Li, Z.

    2005-12-01

    China's rapid industrialization over the last few decades has affected air quality in many regions of China, and even the regional climate. As a part of the EAST-AIRE (East Asian Study of Tropospheric Aerosols: an International Regional Experiment) study, Nuclepore filters were collected in two size ranges (PM10 and PM2.5) at 12 hour intervals since January 2005 at Xianghe, about 70 km southeast of Beijing. Each filter was analyzed for mass concentration, aerosol scattering and absorption efficiencies. Mass concentrations during the winter months (January-March) ranged from 9 to 459 μg/m3 in the coarse mode with an average concentration of 122 μg/m3, and from 11 to 203 μg/m3 in the fine mode with an average concentration of 45 μg/m3. While some of the extreme values are likely linked to local emissions, regional air pollution episodes also played important roles. Absorption efficiency measurements at 550 nm show very high values compared to measurements performed in the United States during the CLAMS experiment. The spectral mass absorption efficiency was measured from 350 to 2500 nm and shows large differences between the absorption properties of soil dust, black carbon, and organic aerosols. The strong spectral differences observed can be related to differences in refractive indices from the several collected species and particle size effects. The absorption properties from aerosols measured in China show large absorption efficiencies, compared to aerosols measured in the US, possibly linked to different technology practices used in these countries. For organic plus black carbon aerosols, where the refractive index seems to be relatively constant, the absorption efficiency spectral dependence for fine mode aerosols falls between 1/λ and 1/λ2. The coarse mode absorption shows much less spectral dependence.

  6. Assessment of multiphoton absorption in inert gases for the measurement of gas temperatures.

    PubMed

    Bednar, Natalie J; Walewski, Joachim W; Sanders, Scott T

    2006-03-01

    A spatially resolved optical technique to measure gas temperature was assessed. The technique relies on multiphoton absorption in inert gases. In contrast to laser-induced fluorescence, absorption is insensitive to collisional deactivation, and, in contrast to one-photon absorption, multiphoton absorption only occurs around the focus point of a typical laser beam. Multiphoton absorption features both the merits of being insensitive to quenching and of being a spatially resolved technique. In a case study we assessed two-photon absorption in xenon upon exciting the 5p6 1S0-->5p56p[5/2]2 transition in xenon at a wavelength of 256 nm. The amount of light absorbed by xenon is related to the number density of the gas, and if the gas pressure is known then the gas temperature can be inferred from the number density. Two-photon absorbance was measured as a function of xenon number density and was used to validate a theoretical model of the absorption process. We discuss the circumnavigation of experimental challenges in applying this technique and analyze its precision in terms of the inferred gas temperature.

  7. Instrumentation for Combined Dispersion and Absorption Measurements in the VUV.

    PubMed

    Banfield, F P; Huber, M C; Parkinson, W H; Tubbs, E F

    1973-06-01

    When the hook method that measures anomalous dispersion is combined with photoelectric photometry, a particularly powerful tool results. An apparatus that combines these techniques over a wavelength range extending into the vacuum ultraviolet has been constructed and used chiefly on the iron-group elements. It consists of hydrogen-discharge light source, a Mach-Zehnder interferormeter, a high temperature furnace, a stigmatic spectrograph, and a photoelectric photometer.

  8. Method for measuring changes in light absorption of highly scattering media

    DOEpatents

    Bigio, Irving J.; Johnson, Tamara M.; Mourant, Judith R.

    2002-01-01

    The noninvasive measurement of variations in absorption that are due to changes in concentrations of biochemically relevant compounds in tissue is important in many clinical settings. One problem with such measurements is that the pathlength traveled by the collected light through the tissue depends on the scattering properties of the tissue. It is demonstrated, using both Monte Carlo simulations and experimental measurements, that for an appropriate separation between light-delivery and light-collection fibers, the pathlength of the collected photons is insensitive to scattering parameters for the range of parameters typically found in tissue. This is important for developing rapid, noninvasive, inexpensive, and accurate methods for measuring absorption changes in tissue.

  9. Dynamics of laser-driven proton acceleration exhibited by measured laser absorptivity and reflectivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bin, J. H.; Allinger, K.; Khrennikov, K.; Karsch, S.; Bolton, P. R.; Schreiber, J.

    2017-03-01

    Proton acceleration from nanometer thin foils with intense laser pulses is investigated experimentally. We analyzed the laser absorptivity by parallel monitoring of laser transmissivity and reflectivity with different laser intensities when moving the targets along the laser axis. A direct correlation between laser absorptivity and maximum proton energy is observed. Experimental results are interpreted in analytical estimation, exhibiting a coexistence of plasma expansion and light-sail form of radiation pressure acceleration (RPA-LS) mechanisms during the entire proton acceleration process based on the measured laser absorptivity and reflectivity.

  10. [Gas Concentration Measurement Based on the Integral Value of Absorptance Spectrum].

    PubMed

    Liu, Hui-jun; Tao, Shao-hua; Yang, Bing-chu; Deng, Hong-gui

    2015-12-01

    The absorptance spectrum of a gas is the basis for the qualitative and quantitative analysis of the gas by the law of the Lambert-Beer. The integral value of the absorptance spectrum is an important parameter to describe the characteristics of the gas absorption. Based on the measured absorptance spectrum of a gas, we collected the required data from the database of HIT-RAN, and chose one of the spectral lines and calculated the integral value of the absorptance spectrum in the frequency domain, and then substituted the integral value into Lambert-Beer's law to obtain the concentration of the detected gas. By calculating the integral value of the absorptance spectrum we can avoid the more complicated calculation of the spectral line function and a series of standard gases for calibration, so the gas concentration measurement will be simpler and faster. We studied the changing trends of the integral values of the absorptance spectrums versus temperature. Since temperature variation would cause the corresponding variation in pressure, we studied the changing trends of the integral values of the absorptance spectrums versus both the pressure not changed with temperature and changed with the temperature variation. Based on the two cases, we found that the integral values of the absorptance spectrums both would firstly increase, then decrease, and finally stabilize with temperature increasing, but the ranges of specific changing trend were different in the two cases. In the experiments, we found that the relative errors of the integrated values of the absorptance spectrum were much higher than 1% and still increased with temperature when we only considered the change of temperature and completely ignored the pressure affected by the temperature variation, and the relative errors of the integrated values of the absorptance spectrum were almost constant at about only 1% when we considered that the pressure were affected by the temperature variation. As the integral value

  11. Deriving brown carbon from multiwavelength absorption measurements: Method and application to AERONET and Aethalometer observations

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, X.; Heald, C. L.; Sedlacek, A.; de Sa, S. S.; Martin, S. T.; Alexander, M. L.; Watson, T. B.; Aiken, A. C.; Springston, S. R.; Artaxo, P.

    2016-10-13

    The radiative impact of organic aerosols (OA) is a large source of uncertainty in estimating the global direct radiative effect (DRE) of aerosols. This radiative impact includes not only light scattering but also light absorption from a subclass of OA referred to as brown carbon (BrC). However the absorption properties of BrC are poorly understood leading to large uncertainties in modelling studies. To obtain observational constraints from measurements, a simple Absorption Ångström Exponent (AAE) method is often used to separate the contribution of BrC absorption from that of black carbon (BC). However, this attribution method is based on assumptions regarding the spectral dependence of BC that are often violated in the ambient atmosphere. Here we develop a new method that decreases the uncertainties associated with estimating BrC absorption. By applying this method to multi-wavelength absorption aerosol optical depth (AAOD) measurements at AERONET sites worldwide and surface aerosol absorption measurements at multiple ambient sites, we estimate that BrC globally contributes 6-40% of the absorption at 440nm. We find that the mass absorption coefficient of OA (OA-MAC) is positively correlated with BC/OA mass ratio. Based on the variability of BC properties and BC/OA emission ratio, we estimate a range of 0.05-1.2 m2/g for OA-MAC at 440nm. Using the combination of AERONET and OMI UV absorption observations we estimate that the AAE388/440nm for BrC is generally ~4 world-wide, with a smaller value in Europe (< 2). Our analyses of two surface sites (Cape Cod, to the southeast of Boston, and the GoAmazon2014/5 T3 site, to the west of Manaus, Brazil) reveal no significant relationship between BrC absorptivity and photochemical aging in typical urban influenced conditions. However, the absorption of BrC measured during the biomass burning season near Manaus is found to decrease with photochemical aging with a lifetime of ~1 day. This lifetime is

  12. Dynamics of laser-driven proton acceleration exhibited by measured laser absorptivity and reflectivity

    PubMed Central

    Bin, J. H.; Allinger, K.; Khrennikov, K.; Karsch, S.; Bolton, P. R.; Schreiber, J.

    2017-01-01

    Proton acceleration from nanometer thin foils with intense laser pulses is investigated experimentally. We analyzed the laser absorptivity by parallel monitoring of laser transmissivity and reflectivity with different laser intensities when moving the targets along the laser axis. A direct correlation between laser absorptivity and maximum proton energy is observed. Experimental results are interpreted in analytical estimation, exhibiting a coexistence of plasma expansion and light-sail form of radiation pressure acceleration (RPA-LS) mechanisms during the entire proton acceleration process based on the measured laser absorptivity and reflectivity. PMID:28272471

  13. Deriving brown carbon from multiwavelength absorption measurements: Method and application to AERONET and Aethalometer observations

    DOE PAGES

    Wang, X.; Heald, C. L.; Sedlacek, A.; ...

    2016-10-13

    The radiative impact of organic aerosols (OA) is a large source of uncertainty in estimating the global direct radiative effect (DRE) of aerosols. This radiative impact includes not only light scattering but also light absorption from a subclass of OA referred to as brown carbon (BrC). However the absorption properties of BrC are poorly understood leading to large uncertainties in modelling studies. To obtain observational constraints from measurements, a simple Absorption Ångström Exponent (AAE) method is often used to separate the contribution of BrC absorption from that of black carbon (BC). However, this attribution method is based on assumptions regardingmore » the spectral dependence of BC that are often violated in the ambient atmosphere. Here we develop a new method that decreases the uncertainties associated with estimating BrC absorption. By applying this method to multi-wavelength absorption aerosol optical depth (AAOD) measurements at AERONET sites worldwide and surface aerosol absorption measurements at multiple ambient sites, we estimate that BrC globally contributes 6-40% of the absorption at 440nm. We find that the mass absorption coefficient of OA (OA-MAC) is positively correlated with BC/OA mass ratio. Based on the variability of BC properties and BC/OA emission ratio, we estimate a range of 0.05-1.2 m2/g for OA-MAC at 440nm. Using the combination of AERONET and OMI UV absorption observations we estimate that the AAE388/440nm for BrC is generally ~4 world-wide, with a smaller value in Europe (< 2). Our analyses of two surface sites (Cape Cod, to the southeast of Boston, and the GoAmazon2014/5 T3 site, to the west of Manaus, Brazil) reveal no significant relationship between BrC absorptivity and photochemical aging in typical urban influenced conditions. However, the absorption of BrC measured during the biomass burning season near Manaus is found to decrease with photochemical aging with a lifetime of ~1 day. This lifetime is comparable to

  14. Active feedback regulation of a Michelson interferometer to achieve zero-background absorption measurements.

    PubMed

    Lundin, Patrik; Guan, Zuguang; Svanberg, Sune

    2011-01-20

    An active phase-controlling scheme based on a proportional-integral-derivative-controlled piezoelectric transducer is presented with the purpose of stabilizing a quasi-zero-background absorption spectrometer. A fiber-based balanced Michelson interferometer is used, and absorption due to a gas sample in one of its arms results in an increased light signal to a detector, which otherwise, thanks to destructive interference, experiences a very low light level. With the presented approach, the sensitivity of already potent absorption measurement techniques, e.g., based on modulation, could be improved even further.

  15. Correction of optical absorption and scattering variations in laser speckle rheology measurements

    PubMed Central

    Hajjarian, Zeinab; Nadkarni, Seemantini K.

    2014-01-01

    Laser Speckle Rheology (LSR) is an optical technique to evaluate the viscoelastic properties by analyzing the temporal fluctuations of backscattered speckle patterns. Variations of optical absorption and reduced scattering coefficients further modulate speckle fluctuations, posing a critical challenge for quantitative evaluation of viscoelasticity. We compare and contrast two different approaches applicable for correcting and isolating the collective influence of absorption and scattering, to accurately measure mechanical properties. Our results indicate that the numerical approach of Monte-Carlo ray tracing (MCRT) reliably compensates for any arbitrary optical variations. When scattering dominates absorption, yet absorption is non-negligible, diffusing wave spectroscopy (DWS) formalisms perform similar to MCRT, superseding other analytical compensation approaches such as Telegrapher equation. The computational convenience of DWS greatly simplifies the extraction of viscoelastic properties from LSR measurements in a number of chemical, industrial, and biomedical applications. PMID:24663983

  16. Measurements of Laser Absorption and Ion Energy in Femtosecond Laser-Cluster Interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Jing-Quan; Zhang, Jie; Li, Ying-Jun; Chen, Li-Ming; Lü, Tie-Zheng; Teng, Hao; Man, Bao-Yuan; Zhao, Li-Zeng

    2001-02-01

    Laser absorption is measured in Xe, Ar and He clusters irradiated by 5 mJ laser pulses in 150 fs. The measurements show that the absorption efficiency strongly depends on the backing pressure of the gas jets, the laser pulse duration and the atomic number Z of the working gas. The laser absorption for Xe clusters is found to be as high as 45% at a backing pressure of 20 atm and a laser intensity of 1×1015 W/cm2. Significant numbers of ions with energies up to 100 keV are detected from Xe cluster explosion. The variation trend of the average ion energy at different backing pressures is consistent with that of the laser energy absorption.

  17. Correction of optical absorption and scattering variations in Laser Speckle Rheology measurements.

    PubMed

    Hajjarian, Zeinab; Nadkarni, Seemantini K

    2014-03-24

    Laser Speckle Rheology (LSR) is an optical technique to evaluate the viscoelastic properties by analyzing the temporal fluctuations of backscattered speckle patterns. Variations of optical absorption and reduced scattering coefficients further modulate speckle fluctuations, posing a critical challenge for quantitative evaluation of viscoelasticity. We compare and contrast two different approaches applicable for correcting and isolating the collective influence of absorption and scattering, to accurately measure mechanical properties. Our results indicate that the numerical approach of Monte-Carlo ray tracing (MCRT) reliably compensates for any arbitrary optical variations. When scattering dominates absorption, yet absorption is non-negligible, diffusing wave spectroscopy (DWS) formalisms perform similar to MCRT, superseding other analytical compensation approaches such as Telegrapher equation. The computational convenience of DWS greatly simplifies the extraction of viscoelastic properties from LSR measurements in a number of chemical, industrial, and biomedical applications.

  18. Optoacoustic measurements of water vapor absorption at selected CO laser wavelengths in the 5-micron region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Menzies, R. T.; Shumate, M. S.

    1976-01-01

    Measurements of water vapor absorption were taken with a resonant optoacoustical detector (cylindrical pyrex detector, two BaF2 windows fitted into end plates at slight tilt to suppress Fabry-Perot resonances), for lack of confidence in existing spectral tabular data for the 5-7 micron region, as line shapes in the wing regions of water vapor lines are difficult to characterize. The measurements are required for air pollution studies using a CO laser, to find the differential absorption at the wavelengths in question due to atmospheric constituents other than water vapor. The design and performance of the optoacoustical detector are presented. Effects of absorption by ambient NO are considered, and the fixed-frequency discretely tunable CO laser is found suitable for monitoring urban NO concentrations in a fairly dry climate, using the water vapor absorption data obtained in the study.

  19. Optoacoustic measurements of water vapor absorption at selected CO laser wavelengths in the 5-micron region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Menzies, R. T.; Shumate, M. S.

    1976-01-01

    Measurements of water vapor absorption were taken with a resonant optoacoustical detector (cylindrical pyrex detector, two BaF2 windows fitted into end plates at slight tilt to suppress Fabry-Perot resonances), for lack of confidence in existing spectral tabular data for the 5-7 micron region, as line shapes in the wing regions of water vapor lines are difficult to characterize. The measurements are required for air pollution studies using a CO laser, to find the differential absorption at the wavelengths in question due to atmospheric constituents other than water vapor. The design and performance of the optoacoustical detector are presented. Effects of absorption by ambient NO are considered, and the fixed-frequency discretely tunable CO laser is found suitable for monitoring urban NO concentrations in a fairly dry climate, using the water vapor absorption data obtained in the study.

  20. Wind speed measurements of Doppler-shifted absorption lines using two-beam interferometry.

    PubMed

    Pierce, Robert M; Roark, Shane E

    2012-04-20

    Wind speed can be measured remotely, with varying degrees of success, using interferometry of Doppler-shifted optical spectra. Under favorable conditions, active systems using laser pulse backscatter are capable of high resolution; passive systems, which measure Doppler shifts of atmospheric emission lines in the mesosphere, have also been shown. Two-beam interferometry of Doppler-shifted absorption lines has not been previously investigated; we describe such an effort here. Even in a well-defined environment, measuring absorption line Doppler shifts requires overcoming several technical hurdles in order to obtain sensitivity to wind speeds on the order of 10 m/s. These hurdles include precise knowledge of the shape of the absorption line, tight, stable filtering, and understanding precisely how an interferometer phase should respond to a change in the absorption profile. We discuss the instrument design, a Michelson interferometer and Fabry-Perot filter, and include an analysis of how to choose the optimal optical path difference of the two beams for a given spectrum and filter. We discuss two beam interferometric measurements of emission line and absorption line Doppler shifts, and include an illustration of the effects of filtering on LIDAR Doppler interferometry. Finally, we discuss the construction and implementation of a Michelson interferometer used to measure Doppler shifts of oxygen absorption lines and present results obtained with 5 m/s wind speed measurement precision. Although the theoretical shot noise limited Doppler wind speed measurement of the system described can be less than 1 m/s, the instrument's resolution limit is dominated by residual filter instability. Application of absorption line interferometry to determine atmospheric wind speeds remains problematic.

  1. Microwave Resonator Measurements of Atmospheric Absorption Coefficients: A Preliminary Design Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walter, Steven J.; Spilker, Thomas R.

    1995-01-01

    A preliminary design study examined the feasibility of using microwave resonator measurements to improve the accuracy of atmospheric absorption coefficients and refractivity between 18 and 35 GHz. Increased accuracies would improve the capability of water vapor radiometers to correct for radio signal delays caused by Earth's atmosphere. Calibration of delays incurred by radio signals traversing the atmosphere has applications to both deep space tracking and planetary radio science experiments. Currently, the Cassini gravity wave search requires 0.8-1.0% absorption coefficient accuracy. This study examined current atmospheric absorption models and estimated that current model accuracy ranges from 5% to 7%. The refractivity of water vapor is known to 1% accuracy, while the refractivity of many dry gases (oxygen, nitrogen, etc.) are known to better than 0.1%. Improvements to the current generation of models will require that both the functional form and absolute absorption of the water vapor spectrum be calibrated and validated. Several laboratory techniques for measuring atmospheric absorption and refractivity were investigated, including absorption cells, single and multimode rectangular cavity resonators, and Fabry-Perot resonators. Semi-confocal Fabry-Perot resonators were shown to provide the most cost-effective and accurate method of measuring atmospheric gas refractivity. The need for accurate environmental measurement and control was also addressed. A preliminary design for the environmental control and measurement system was developed to aid in identifying significant design issues. The analysis indicated that overall measurement accuracy will be limited by measurement errors and imprecise control of the gas sample's thermodynamic state, thermal expansion and vibration- induced deformation of the resonator structure, and electronic measurement error. The central problem is to identify systematic errors because random errors can be reduced by averaging

  2. The effect of ISM absorption on stellar activity measurements and its relevance for exoplanet studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fossati, L.; Marcelja, S. E.; Staab, D.; Cubillos, P. E.; France, K.; Haswell, C. A.; Ingrassia, S.; Jenkins, J. S.; Koskinen, T.; Lanza, A. F.; Redfield, S.; Youngblood, A.; Pelzmann, G.

    2017-05-01

    Past ultraviolet and optical observations of stars hosting close-in Jupiter-mass planets have shown that some of these stars present an anomalously low chromospheric activity, significantly below the basal level. For the hot Jupiter planet host WASP-13, observations have shown that the apparent lack of activity is possibly caused by absorption from the intervening interstellar medium (ISM). Inspired by this result, we study the effect of ISM absorption on activity measurements (S and log R 'HK indices) for main-sequence late-type stars. To this end, we employ synthetic stellar photospheric spectra combined with varying amounts of chromospheric emission and ISM absorption. We present the effect of ISM absorption on activity measurements by varying several instrumental (spectral resolution), stellar (projected rotational velocity, effective temperature, and chromospheric emission flux), and ISM parameters (relative velocity between stellar and ISM Ca ii lines, broadening b-parameter, and Ca ii column density). We find that for relative velocities between the stellar and ISM lines smaller than 30-40 km s-1 and for ISM Ca ii column densities log NCaII ⪆ 12, the ISM absorption has a significant influence on activity measurements. Direct measurements and three dimensional maps of the Galactic ISM absorption indicate that an ISM Ca ii column density of log NCaII = 12 is typically reached by a distance of about 100 pc along most sight lines. In particular, for a Sun-like star lying at a distance greater than 100 pc, we expect a depression (bias) in the log R'HK value larger than 0.05-0.1 dex, about the same size as the typical measurement and calibration uncertainties on this parameter. This work shows that the bias introduced by ISM absorption must always be considered when measuring activity for stars lying beyond 100 pc. We also consider the effect of multiple ISM absorption components. We discuss the relevance of this result for exoplanet studies and revise the

  3. Correlating the excited state relaxation dynamics as measured by photoluminescence and transient absorption with the photocatalytic activity of Au@TiO2 core-shell nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Dillon, Robert J; Joo, Ji-Bong; Zaera, Francisco; Yin, Yadong; Bardeen, Christopher J

    2013-02-07

    The spectroscopic and photocatalytic properties of a series of Au@TiO(2) core-shell nanostructures are characterized. The crystallinity of the TiO(2) shells was varied by changing the etching and calcination conditions. Measurements of the photoluminescence, transient absorption, and H(2) production rate permit us to look for correlations between the spectroscopic and catalytic behaviors. We found that there is a strong effect of crystallinity on the H(2) production rate and also the stretched exponential lifetime of the photoluminescence created by short-wavelength (266 and 300 nm) photoexcitation. As the TiO(2) crystallinity is increased, the photoluminescence lifetime increases from 22 to 140 ps in a 1 ns detection window, while the H(2) production rate increases by a factor of ~4. There is no discernible effect of crystallinity on the photoluminescence dynamics excited at 350 or 430 nm, or on the electronic dynamics measured by femtosecond transient absorption after excitation at 300 nm. We hypothesize that high-energy photons create reactive and emissive charge-separated states in parallel, and that both species are subject to similar electron-hole recombination processes that depend on sample crystallinity. Based on our observations, it can be concluded that the photoluminescence dynamics may be used to evaluate the potential performance of this class of photocatalysts.

  4. Intrinsic beam emittance of laser-accelerated electrons measured by x-ray spectroscopic imaging.

    PubMed

    Golovin, G; Banerjee, S; Liu, C; Chen, S; Zhang, J; Zhao, B; Zhang, P; Veale, M; Wilson, M; Seller, P; Umstadter, D

    2016-04-19

    The recent combination of ultra-intense lasers and laser-accelerated electron beams is enabling the development of a new generation of compact x-ray light sources, the coherence of which depends directly on electron beam emittance. Although the emittance of accelerated electron beams can be low, it can grow due to the effects of space charge during free-space propagation. Direct experimental measurement of this important property is complicated by micron-scale beam sizes, and the presence of intense fields at the location where space charge acts. Reported here is a novel, non-destructive, single-shot method that overcame this problem. It employed an intense laser probe pulse, and spectroscopic imaging of the inverse-Compton scattered x-rays, allowing measurement of an ultra-low value for the normalized transverse emittance, 0.15 (±0.06) π mm mrad, as well as study of its subsequent growth upon exiting the accelerator. The technique and results are critical for designing multi-stage laser-wakefield accelerators, and generating high-brightness, spatially coherent x-rays.

  5. Development of Micro-Raman Spectroscopic Instrumentation for Measurement of Novel 2D Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watson, Michael; Thompson, Zach; Simpson, Jeff; Towson University Team

    2013-03-01

    Recent research activity in mono-atomic layer graphene stimulates interest in other novel 2D materials, including molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) . Raman spectroscopy, based on the inelastic scattering of light, provides a powerful and high-throughput spectroscopic technique to probe low energy excitations, e.g., phonons, in graphene and related novel 2D materials. The accurate measurement of phonon frequency, especially its sensitive dependence on physical parameters such as temperature, carrier doping, and defects, requires an appropriately calibrated spectrometer. We report on the implementation and calibration of a homebuilt Raman system. Specifically we correlated peak wavelength from known atomic spectral lines with the pixel number detected on a thermoelectrically-cooled CCD camera attached to a grating monochromator. Additionally we developed software to control the grating position and maintain calibration while acquiring spectra. Once calibrated, we interfaced the spectrometer to a microscope to acquire spatial maps of small samples. Single-layer MoS2 flakes were prepared using the mechanical exfoliation of bulk MoS2 and transferred to substrates using techniques pioneered in graphene research. Using HeNe and Ar ion lasers for excitation, we measured the Raman spectra of single-layer MoS2 flakes. The temperature-dependence of the observed Raman-active phonons will be discussed.

  6. Intrinsic beam emittance of laser-accelerated electrons measured by x-ray spectroscopic imaging

    PubMed Central

    Golovin, G.; Banerjee, S.; Liu, C.; Chen, S.; Zhang, J.; Zhao, B.; Zhang, P.; Veale, M.; Wilson, M.; Seller, P.; Umstadter, D.

    2016-01-01

    The recent combination of ultra-intense lasers and laser-accelerated electron beams is enabling the development of a new generation of compact x-ray light sources, the coherence of which depends directly on electron beam emittance. Although the emittance of accelerated electron beams can be low, it can grow due to the effects of space charge during free-space propagation. Direct experimental measurement of this important property is complicated by micron-scale beam sizes, and the presence of intense fields at the location where space charge acts. Reported here is a novel, non-destructive, single-shot method that overcame this problem. It employed an intense laser probe pulse, and spectroscopic imaging of the inverse-Compton scattered x-rays, allowing measurement of an ultra-low value for the normalized transverse emittance, 0.15 (±0.06) π mm mrad, as well as study of its subsequent growth upon exiting the accelerator. The technique and results are critical for designing multi-stage laser-wakefield accelerators, and generating high-brightness, spatially coherent x-rays. PMID:27090440

  7. Intrinsic beam emittance of laser-accelerated electrons measured by x-ray spectroscopic imaging

    DOE PAGES

    Golovin, G.; Banerjee, S.; Liu, C.; ...

    2016-04-19

    Here, the recent combination of ultra-intense lasers and laser-accelerated electron beams is enabling the development of a new generation of compact x-ray light sources, the coherence of which depends directly on electron beam emittance. Although the emittance of accelerated electron beams can be low, it can grow due to the effects of space charge during free-space propagation. Direct experimental measurement of this important property is complicated by micron-scale beam sizes, and the presence of intense fields at the location where space charge acts. Reported here is a novel, non-destructive, single-shot method that overcame this problem. It employed an intense lasermore » probe pulse, and spectroscopic imaging of the inverse-Compton scattered x-rays, allowing measurement of an ultra-low value for the normalized transverse emittance, 0.15 (±0.06) π mm mrad, as well as study of its subsequent growth upon exiting the accelerator. The technique and results are critical for designing multi-stage laser-wakefield accelerators, and generating high-brightness, spatially coherent x-rays.« less

  8. [Spectroscopic measurement of intermediate free radicals of n-heptane in the combustion reaction].

    PubMed

    Ye, Bin; Li, Ping; Zhang, Chang-hua; Wang, Li-dong; Tang, Hong-chang; Li, Xiang-yuan

    2012-04-01

    Using an intensified spectroscopic detector CCD and a chemical shock tube, transient emission spectra of n-heptane during the reaction process of combustion were measured, with exposure time of 6 micros and a spectral range of 200 - 850 nm Experiments were conducted at an ignition temperature of 1 408 K and pressure of 2.0 atmos, with an initial fuel mole fraction of 1.0% and an equivalence ratio of 1.0. Measured emission bands were determined to be produced by OH, CH and C2 free radicals, which reveals that small OH, CH and C2 radicals are important intermediate products in the combustion process of n-heptane. Time-resolved spectra indicate that radical concentrations of OH, CH and C2 reached their peaks sharply; however, CH and C2 reduced and disappeared rapidly while the duration of OH was much longer in the reaction. This work provides experimental data for understanding the microscopic process and validating the mechanism of n-heptane combustion reaction.

  9. Intrinsic beam emittance of laser-accelerated electrons measured by x-ray spectroscopic imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Golovin, G.; Banerjee, S.; Liu, C.; Chen, S.; Zhang, J.; Zhao, B.; Zhang, P.; Veale, M.; Wilson, M.; Seller, P.; Umstadter, D.

    2016-04-19

    Here, the recent combination of ultra-intense lasers and laser-accelerated electron beams is enabling the development of a new generation of compact x-ray light sources, the coherence of which depends directly on electron beam emittance. Although the emittance of accelerated electron beams can be low, it can grow due to the effects of space charge during free-space propagation. Direct experimental measurement of this important property is complicated by micron-scale beam sizes, and the presence of intense fields at the location where space charge acts. Reported here is a novel, non-destructive, single-shot method that overcame this problem. It employed an intense laser probe pulse, and spectroscopic imaging of the inverse-Compton scattered x-rays, allowing measurement of an ultra-low value for the normalized transverse emittance, 0.15 (±0.06) π mm mrad, as well as study of its subsequent growth upon exiting the accelerator. The technique and results are critical for designing multi-stage laser-wakefield accelerators, and generating high-brightness, spatially coherent x-rays.

  10. Investigation of laser-tissue interaction in medicine by means of laser spectroscopic measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lademann, Juergen; Weigmann, Hans-Juergen

    1995-01-01

    Toxic and carcinogenic substances were produced during laser application in medicine for the cutting and evaporation of tissue. The laser smoke presents a danger potential for the medical staff and the patients. The laser tissue interaction process was investigated by means of laser spectroscopic measurements which give the possibility of measuring metastable molecular states directly as a prerequisite to understand and to influence fundamental laser tissue interaction processes in order to reduce the amount of harmful chemicals. Highly excited atomic and molecular states and free radicals (CN, OH, C2, CH, CH2) have been detected applying spontaneous and laser induced fluorescence methods. It was found that the formation of harmful substances in the laser plumes can be reduced significantly by optimization of the surrounding gas atmosphere. A high content of oxygen or water in the interaction zone has been found, in agreement with the results of classical and analytical methods, as a suitable way to decrease pollutant emission. The experimental methods and the principal results are applicable not only in laser medicine but in laser material treatment generally.

  11. Reconciling Spectroscopic Electron Temperature Measurements in the Solar Corona with In Situ Charge State Observations.

    PubMed

    Esser; Edgar

    2000-03-20

    It has been a puzzle for quite some time that spectroscopic measurements in the inner corona indicate electron temperatures far too low to produce the ion fractions observed in situ in the solar wind. In the present Letter, we show that in order to reconcile the two sets of measurements, a number of conditions have to exist in the inner corona: (1) The electron distribution function has to be Maxwellian or close to Maxwellian at the coronal base, (2) the non-Maxwellian character of the distribution has to develop rapidly as a function of height and has to reach close to interplanetary properties inside of a few solar radii, and (3) ions of different elements have to flow with significantly different speeds to separate their "freezing-in" distances sufficiently so that they can encounter different distribution functions. We choose two examples to demonstrate that these conditions are general requirements if both coronal electron temperatures and in situ ion fractions are correct. However, these two examples also show that the details of the required distribution functions are very sensitive to the exact electron temperature, density, and ion flow speed profiles in the region of the corona where the ions predominantly form.

  12. A computationally assisted spectroscopic technique to measure secondary electron emission coefficients in technological rf plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berger, Birk; Schulze, Julian; Daksha, Manaswi; Schuengel, Edmund; Koepke, Mark; Korolov, Ihor; Derzsi, Aranka; Donko, Zoltan

    2016-09-01

    A Computationally Assisted Spectroscopic Technique to measure secondary electron emission coefficients (y-CAST) in capacitive rf plasmas is proposed. This non-intrusive, sensitive diagnostic is based on a combination of Phase Resolved Optical Emission Spectroscopy and PIC simulations. Under most conditions in electropositive plasmas the spatio-temporally resolved electron-impact excitation rate features two distinct maxima adjacent to each electrode at different times within one rf period. One maximum is the consequence of an energy gain of the electrons due to sheath expansion. The second maximum is produced by electrons accelerated towards the plasma bulk by the sheath electric field at the time of maximum voltage drop across the sheath. Due to the different excitation mechanisms the ratio of the intensities of these maxima is very sensitive to y, which allows for its determination via comparing the experimentally measured excitation profiles with corresponding simulation data obtained with various y-coefficients. This diagnostic is tested here in a geometrically symmetric reactor, for stainless steel electrodes and argon gas. An effective secondary electron emission coefficient of y = 0.067+-0.010 is obtained, which is in excellent agreement with previous experimental results.

  13. Measurements of Cs absorption and retention in man

    SciTech Connect

    Henrichs, H.; Paretzke, H.G.; Voigt, G.; Berg, D. )

    1989-10-01

    One of the consequences of the Chernobyl reactor accident in 1986 was a comparatively high contamination of foodstuffs in Southern Federal Republic of Germany. In order to test radioecological models predicting the radiological consequences of such accidents, several thousand measurements were performed to determine Cs body burdens in members of the public. For the interpretation of these data and as a contribution to the improvement of the available database on the biokinetics of Cs isotopes in humans, we followed a small group of volunteers after their consumption of highly contaminated venison. Intakes, excretion rates and total body activities were measured during a period of more than 200 d. The data obtained were evaluated in terms of a compartment model to derive gastrointestinal uptakes, biological half-lives and dose conversion factors. The resulting uptake factors range from 65-90%, the half-lives of the long-term retention from 45 to 200 d. The majority of the resulting dose conversion factors lie below the values recommended by the ICRP, showing that the ICRP model is a reasonable and safe description of the Cs biokinetics in our study group, while the great variability of the results shows that it is not an accurate representation of the individual Cs retention.

  14. Measurement of the parameters of non-stationary gas flows by diode laser absorption spectroscopy in case of high temperature and high pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolshov, M. A.; Liger, V. V.; Kuritsyn, Yu. A.; Mironenko, V. R.; Ponurovskii, Ya. Ya.; Kolesnikov, O. M.

    2016-12-01

    Experimental version of diode laser absorption spectrometer (DLAS) for contactless measurements of temperature and water vapor concentration in supersonic gas flows is developed. The spectrometer can be used for the measurements of temperature up to 2500 K and total pressure up to 3 atm. The technique is based on the registration of the transient absorption spectra of a target molecules and fitting of the experimental spectra by the simulated ones constructed using the spectroscopic databases. The temperature is inferred from the ratio of the intensities of the absorption lines with different low energy levels. In gas media with the above parameters the absorption lines are broadened which demands the use of two diode lasers (DL) working in different spectral ranges. The software for selection of the optimal line combinations was developed. The combination of two strong lines in the spectral ranges 1.39 μ and 1.34 μ was selected as the optimal one. The efficiency of the developed technique was exemplified in the first set of the experiments in conditions of real propulsion in Zhukovsky Central Aerohydrodynamic Institute (TsAGI) for the temperatures within (500-2200) K range and total pressure up to 3 atm.

  15. Direct measurements of residual absorption in fluoridic thin films and optical materials for DUV laser applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mühlig, Ch.; Triebel, W.; Kufert, S.; Noppeney, Ch.; Bernitzki, H.

    2007-01-01

    The absorption of ArF laser pulses in calcium fluoride, fused silica as well as in highly (HR) and partially (PR) reflecting fluoridic coatings is directly measured using the laser induced deflection technique (LID). For the calcium fluoride sample it is proved that the LID technique allows to separate surface and bulk absorption by measuring only one sample with the size 20 x 20 x 10 mm 3. At a laser pulse fluence Φ = 36 mJ/cm2 and a repetition rate f = 1 kHz the bulk absorption coefficient and the surface absorption are determined to 0.0029 cm -1 and 0.00043 (two surfaces), respectively. For the HR and PR coatings the ArF laser absorption is 0.0004 for Φ= 22 mJ/cm2 (f = 1 kHz) and 0.0066 for Φ= 40 mJ/cm2 (f = 1 kHz), respectively. For the example of the PR coating the influence of high coating scattering on the LID measurements is discussed and an appropriate measuring procedure is derived and applied to avoid the scattering influence. In addition to the established LID setup requiring rectangular substrate dimensions a modified setup is introduced enabling the measurement of cylindrical optical elements. The principle of the new LID setup is explained and first measurements at fused silica are presented.

  16. Effect of Water Vapor Absorption on Measurements of Atmospheric Nitrate Radical by LP-DOAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Su-wen; Liu, Wen-qing; Xie, Pin-hua; Yang, Yi-jun; Chen, De-bao; Li, Zheng

    2008-10-01

    During the measurement of atmospheric nitrate radical by long-path differential optical absorption spec-troscopy, water vapor strong absorption could affect the measurement of nitrate radical and detection limits of system. Under the tropospheric condition, the optical density of water vapor absorption is non-linearly dependent on column density. An effective method was developed to eliminate the effect of water vapor absorption. Reference spectra of water vapor based on the daytime atmospheric absorption spectra, when fitted together with change of cross section with water vapor column densities, gave a more accurate fitting of water vapor absorptions, thus its effect on the measurements of nitrate radical could be restricted to a minimum and detection limits of system reached 3.6 ppt. The modified method was applied during an intensive field campaign in the Pearl River Delta, China. The NO3 concentration in polluted air masses varied from 3.6 ppt to 82.5 ppt with an average level of 23.6±1.8 ppt.

  17. An in-situ spectroscopic erosion yield measurement with applications to sputtering and surface morphology alterations

    SciTech Connect

    Leung, W.K.; Hirooka, Y.; Conn, R.W.; Goebel, D.M.; LaBombard, B.; Nygren, R.

    1988-07-01

    An in-situ spectroscopic erosion yield measurement is developed and used to monitor material surface erosion during bombardment by a plasma. The experiments are performed in a plasma that has the characteristics of a fusion tokamak boundary plasma but the technique is applicable to many processes where plasma erosion is important. Erosion yield of materials bombarded in a high flux (up to 10/sup 18/ion/cm/sup 2//s) plasma environment has been previously studied using weight loss measurements. In the present study, the sputtered flux from a material is monitored by the line emission intensities of atoms eroded from the surface. The line intensities can be used to infer erosion yields after proper calibration. The method agrees well with results from weight loss measurements. Earlier work established that the material surface structure can substantially influence the erosion yield. When a change of surface morphology (e.g. cone formation) occurs, weight loss methods cannot be used to determine the erosion yield. However, the in-situ erosion measurement is suitable and is used to investigate the relation between the on-set of morphology changes and alternations in erosion yield during plasma bombardment. Experiments are reported for copper, as an example of pure material, and stainless steel, as a example of an alloy system. The formation of surface cones is observed only when both the sample temperature is above a critical value and surface impurities exist. If the source of impurities is removed, or the sample temperature is lowered below the critical values, a surface rough with cones will be returned to smooth state. 20 refs., 10 figs.

  18. Vacuum Ultraviolet Absorption Measurements of Atomic Oxygen in a Shock Tube

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, Scott Andrew

    1995-01-01

    The absorption of vacuum ultraviolet light by atomic oxygen has been measured in the Electric Arc-driven Shock Tube (EAST) Facility at NASA-Ames Research Center. This investigation demonstrates the instrumentation required to determine atomic oxygen concentrations from absorption measurements in impulse facilities. A shock wave dissociates molecular oxygen, producing a high temperature sample of atomic oxygen in the shock tube. A probe beam is generated with a Raman-shifted ArF excimer laser. By suitable tuning of the laser, absorption is measured over a range of wavelengths in the region of the atomic line at 130.49 nm. The line shape function is determined from measurements at atomic oxygen densities of 3x10(exp 17) and 9x10(exp 17) cm(exp -3). The broadening coefficient for resonance interactions is deduced from this data, and this value is in accord with available theoretical models.

  19. Vacuum Ultraviolet Absorption Measurements of Atomic Oxygen in a Shock Tube

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, Scott Andrew

    1995-01-01

    The absorption of vacuum ultraviolet light by atomic oxygen has been measured in the Electric Arc-driven Shock Tube (EAST) Facility at NASA-Ames Research Center. This investigation demonstrates the instrumentation required to determine atomic oxygen concentrations from absorption measurements in impulse facilities. A shock wave dissociates molecular oxygen, producing a high temperature sample of atomic oxygen in the shock tube. A probe beam is generated with a Raman-shifted ArF excimer laser. By suitable tuning of the laser, absorption is measured over a range of wavelengths in the region of the atomic line at 130.49 nm. The line shape function is determined from measurements at atomic oxygen densities of 3 x 10(exp 17) and 9 x 10(exp 17) cm(exp -3). The broadening coefficient for resonance interactions is deduced from this data, and this value is in accord with available theoretical models.

  20. [Development of a photoacoustic spectroscopy system for the measurement of absorption coefficient of atmospheric aerosols].

    PubMed

    Liu, Qiang; Niu, Ming-Sheng; Wang, Gui-Shi; Cao, Zhen-Song; Liu, Kun; Chen, Wei-Dong; Gao, Xiao-Ming

    2013-07-01

    In the present paper, the authors focus on the effect of the resonance frequency shift due to the changes in temperature and humidity on the PA signal, present several methods to control the noise derived form gas flow and vibration from the sampling pump. Based on the efforts mentioned above, a detection limit of 1.4 x 10(-8) W x cm(-1) x Hz(-1/2) was achieved for the measurement of atmospheric aerosols absorption coefficient. During the experiments, the PA cell was calibrated with the absorption of standard NO2 gas at 532 nm and the atmospheric aerosols were measured continuously. The measurement results show that the PAS is suitable for the real-time measurement of the absorption coefficient of atmospheric aerosols in their natural suspended state.

  1. Vacuum Ultraviolet Absorption Measurements of Atomic Oxygen in a Shock Tube

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, Scott Andrew

    1995-01-01

    The absorption of vacuum ultraviolet light by atomic oxygen has been measured in the Electric Arc-driven Shock Tube (EAST) Facility at NASA-Ames Research Center. This investigation demonstrates the instrumentation required to determine atomic oxygen concentrations from absorption measurements in impulse facilities. A shock wave dissociates molecular oxygen, producing a high temperature sample of atomic oxygen in the shock tube. A probe beam is generated with a Raman-shifted ArF excimer laser. By suitable tuning of the laser, absorption is measured over a range of wavelengths in the region of the atomic line at 130.49 nm. The line shape function is determined from measurements at atomic oxygen densities of 3 x 10(exp 17) and 9 x 10(exp 17)/cu cm. The broadening coefficient for resonance interactions is deduced from this data, and this value is in accord with available theoretical models.

  2. Vacuum Ultraviolet Absorption Measurements of Atomic Oxygen in a Shock Tube

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, Scott Andrew

    1995-01-01

    The absorption of vacuum ultraviolet light by atomic oxygen has been measured in the Electric Arc-driven Shock Tube (EAST) Facility at NASA-Ames Research Center. This investigation demonstrates the instrumentation required to determine atomic oxygen concentrations from absorption measurements in impulse facilities. A shock wave dissociates molecular oxygen, producing a high temperature sample of atomic oxygen in the shock tube. A probe beam is generated with a Raman-shifted ArF excimer laser. By suitable tuning of the laser, absorption is measured over a range of wavelengths in the region of the atomic line at 130.49 nm. The line shape function is determined from measurements at atomic oxygen densities of 3 x 10(exp 17) and 9 x 10(exp 17)/cu cm. The broadening coefficient for resonance interactions is deduced from this data, and this value is in accord with available theoretical models.

  3. A reinvestigation of EXAFS and EPR spectroscopic measurements of chromium(VI) reduction by coir pith.

    PubMed

    Suksabye, Parinda; Worasith, Niramon; Thiravetyan, Paitip; Nakajima, Akira; Goodman, Bernard A

    2010-08-15

    New measurements using extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) techniques are consistent with Cr in the Cr(III) oxidation state as the main product from the adsorption of Cr(VI) on coir pith. These confirm the previous X-ray measurements, but differ from the results of previous EPR studies, which indicated that Cr(V) was the main form of Cr. The reason for this discrepancy is the presence of a broad signal from Cr(III) in an unsymmetrical environment that was missed previously; the Cr(V) component is in fact only a minor reaction product. As a result of this problem with spectral acquisition and interpretation, some simple recommendations are presented for conducting EPR investigations on natural systems.

  4. Absorption and transmission spectral measurement of fiber-optic components using supercontinuum radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehtonen, M.; Genty, G.; Ludvigsen, H.

    2005-07-01

    We report on broadband absorption and transmission measurements using supercontinuum sources generated in microstructured fibers. The advantages of this measurement technique include high brightness and broad bandwidth. Furthermore, the high spatial coherence of the supercontinuum source allows for efficient coupling into the device under test compared to standard light bulbs. Employing this technique, we measure the impurity absorption spectrum of Erbium-doped fibers with both low and high dopant concentration. The transmission spectra of a photonic bandgap fiber and a high-finesse fiber cavity are also characterized.

  5. Photothermal self-phase-modulation technique for absorption measurements on high-reflective coatings.

    PubMed

    Steinlechner, Jessica; Jensen, Lars; Krüger, Christoph; Lastzka, Nico; Steinlechner, Sebastian; Schnabel, Roman

    2012-03-10

    We propose and demonstrate a new measurement technique for the optical absorption of high-reflection coatings. Our technique is based on photothermal self-phase modulation and exploits the deformation of cavity Airy peaks that occurs due to coating absorption of intracavity light. The mirror whose coating is under investigation needs to be the input mirror of a high-finesse cavity. Our example measurements were performed on a high-reflection SiO2-Ta2O5 coating in a three-mirror ring-cavity setup at a wavelength of 1064 nm. The optical absorption of the coating was determined to be α=(23.9±2.0)·10(-6) per coating. Our result is in excellent agreement with an independently performed laser calorimetry measurement that gave a value of α=(24.4±3.2)·10(-6) per coating. Since the self-phase modulation in our coating-absorption measurement affects mainly the propagation through the cavity input mirror, our measurement result is practically uninfluenced by the optical absorption of the other cavity mirrors.

  6. Infrared measurements of increased CF/sub 2/Cl/sub 2/ (CFC-12) absorption above the South Pole

    SciTech Connect

    Rinsland, C.P.; Goldman, A.; Murcray, F.J.; Murcray, F.H.; Murcray, D.G.; Levine, J.S.

    1988-02-01

    High-resolution ground-based solar spectra recorded at the Amundsen-Scott South Pole station in Dec. 1980 and Nov. 1986 have been analyzed in the region of the CF/sub 2/Cl/sub 2/ (chlorofluorocarbon 12) atgn/sub 8/ band Q branches at 1161 cm/sup arrow-right-left//sup 1/. An increase in the CF/sub 2/Cl/sub 2/ total vertical column above the South Pole of 1.24 atmapprox. = 0.15 over the 6-yr period, corresponding to an average rate of increase of 3.6 atmapprox. = 2.1%, is derived. This rate of increase is lower than indicated by in situ measurements at the South Pole over the same time period, but there is agreement when the rather error bars of the spectral measurement results are considered. Spectroscopic parameters that can successfully model CF/sub 2/Cl/sub 2/ absorption at low temperatures are needed to improve retrieval accuracies and could be applied to a number of pre-1980 atmospheric spectral data sets in the literature to obtain an improved record of early CF/sub 2/Cl/sub 2/ concentration trends for comparison with estimates of historical release rates.

  7. Intercomparison of OH Radical Measurements by Long-Path Absorption and Laser Induced Fluorescence in the Atmosphere Simulation Chamber SAPHIR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorn, H.-P.; Brauers, T.; Greif, J.; Häseler, R.; Hofzumahaus, A.; Holland, F.; Rupp, L.

    2003-04-01

    A striking advantage of the SAPHIR chamber is the availability of two spectroscopic detection instruments for OH radicals: Laser-Induced Fluorescence Spectroscopy (LIF) and Long-Path Differential Optical Laser Absorption Spectroscopy (DOAS). Both instruments have already been compared in 1994 during the field measurement campaign POPCORN. They agreed well with a correlation coefficient of r=0.90 and a weighted linear fit with a slope of 1.09 +- 0.12. However, OH measurements in the simulation chamber differ significantly from measurements in ambient air. While DOAS measures OH as an integral value along the central longitudinal axis of SAPHIR, LIF samples the air locally and close (2 cm) to the floor of the chamber. Thus, the LIF measurements might be possibly affected by local concentration gradients caused by insufficient mixing of the chamber air or by deposition to the wall. On the other hand, if turbulent mixing of the chamber air is weak and high concentrations of ozone are used in experiments, the DOAS instrument might be subject to artificial formation of OH radicals in the air volume which is illuminated by the detection laser. This interference results from laser induced photolysis of ozone and the subsequent reaction of water vapor with the excited oxygen atoms formed. Thus it is of decisive importance to compare OH measurements from both instruments in order to investigate potential disturbing effects due to the specific sampling properties of both instruments within SAPHIR. We report on OH measurements accomplished simultaneously with both instruments using different trace gas compositions and experimental conditions.

  8. Emission Spectroscopic Measurements with an Optical Probe in the NASA Ames IHF Arc Jet Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winter, Michael; Prabhu, Dinesh K.; Raiche, George A.; Terrazas-Salinas, Imelda; Hui, Frank C. L.

    2011-01-01

    An optical probe was designed to measure radiation (from inside the arc heater) incident on a test sample immersed in the arc-heated stream. Currently, only crude estimates are available for this incident radiation. Unlike efforts of the past, where the probe line of sight was inclined to the nozzle centerline, the present development focuses on having the probe line of sight coincide with the nozzle centerline. A fiber-coupled spectrometer was used to measure the spectral distribution of incident radiation in the wavelength range of 225 to 900 nm. The radiation heat flux in this wavelength range was determined by integration of measured emission spectral intensity calibrated to incident irradiance from an integrating sphere. Two arc-heater conditions, corresponding to stream bulk enthalpy levels of 12 and 22 MJ/kg, were investigated in the 13-inch diameter nozzle of the Interaction Heating Facility at NASA Ames Research Center. With the probe placed at a distance of 10 inches from the nozzle exit plane, total radiative heat fluxes were measured to be 3.3 and 8.4 W/sq cm for the 12 and 22 MJ/kg conditions, respectively. About 17% of these radiative fluxes were due to bound-bound radiation from atoms and molecules, while the remaining 83% could be attributed to continua (bound-free and/or free-free). A comparison with spectral simulation based on CFD solutions for the arc-heater flow field and with spectroscopic measurements in the plenum region indicates that more than 95% of the measured radiation is generated in the arc region. The total radiative heat flux from the line radiation could increase by a factor of two through contributions from wavelengths outside the measured range, i.e., from the vacuum ultraviolet (wavelengths less than 225 nm) and the infrared (wavelengths greater than 900 nm). An extrapolation of the continuum radiation to these two wavelength regions was not attempted. In the tested configuration, the measured radiative heat flux accounts for

  9. Compressed shell conditions extracted from spectroscopic analysis of Ti K-shell absorption spectra with evaluation of line self-emission

    SciTech Connect

    Johns, H. M.; Mancini, R. C.; Hakel, P.; Nagayama, T.; Smalyuk, V. A.; Regan, S. P.; Delettrez, J.

    2014-08-15

    Ti-doped tracer layers embedded in the shell at varying distances from the fuel-shell interface serve as a spectroscopic diagnostic for direct-drive experiments conducted at OMEGA. Detailed modeling of Ti K-shell absorption spectra produced in the tracer layer considers n = 1–2 transitions in F- through Li-like Ti ions in the 4400–4800 eV range, both including and excluding line self-emission. Testing the model on synthetic spectra generated from 1-D LILAC hydrodynamic simulations reveals that the model including self-emission best reproduces the simulation, while the model excluding self-emission overestimates electron temperature T{sub e} and density N{sub e} to a higher degree for layers closer to the core. The prediction of the simulation that the magnitude of T{sub e} and duration of Ti absorption will be strongly tied to the distance of the layer from the core is consistent with the idea that regions of the shell close to the core are more significantly heated by thermal transport out of the hot dense core, but more distant regions are less affected by it. The simulation predicts more time variation in the observed T{sub e}, N{sub e} conditions in the compressed shell than is observed in the experiment, analysis of which reveals conditions remain in the range T{sub e} = 400–600 eV and N{sub e} = 3.0–10.0 × 10{sup 24} cm{sup −3} for all but the most distant Ti-doped layer, with error bars ∼5% T{sub e} value and ∼10% N{sub e} on average. The T{sub e}, N{sub e} conditions of the simulation lead to a greater degree of ionization for zones close to the core than occurs experimentally, and less ionization for zones far from the core.

  10. Assessment of Spectroscopic, Real-time Ion Thruster Grid Erosion-rate Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Domonkos, Matthew T.; Stevens, Richard E.

    2000-01-01

    The success of the ion thruster on the Deep Space One mission has opened the gate to the use of primary ion propulsion. Many of the projected planetary missions require throughput and specific impulse beyond those qualified to date. Spectroscopic, real-time ion thruster grid erosion-rate measurements are currently in development at the NASA Glenn Research Center. A preliminary investigation of the emission spectra from an NSTAR derivative thruster with titanium grid was conducted. Some titanium lines were observed in the discharge chamber; however, the signals were too weak to estimate the erosion of the screen grid. Nevertheless, this technique appears to be the only non-intrusive real-time means to evaluate screen grid erosion, and improvement of the collection optics is proposed. Direct examination of the erosion species using laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) was determined to be the best method for a real-time accelerator grid erosion diagnostic. An approach for a quantitative LIF diagnostic was presented.

  11. Scientific considerations for future spectroscopic measurements from space of activity on the Sun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holman, Gordon D.

    2016-12-01

    High-resolution UV and X-ray spectroscopy are important to understanding the origin and evolution of magnetic energy release in the solar atmosphere, as well as the subsequent evolution of heated plasma and accelerated particles. Electromagnetic radiation is observed from plasma heated to temperatures ranging from about 10 kK to above 10 MK, from accelerated electrons emitting photons primarily at X-ray energies, and from ions emitting in γ rays. These observations require space-based instruments sensitive to emissions at wavelengths shorter than the near UV. This article reviews some recent observations with emphasis on solar eruptive events, the models that describe them, and the measurements they indicate are needed for substantial progress in the future. Specific examples are discussed demonstrating that imaging spectroscopy with a cadence of seconds or better is needed to follow, understand, and predict the evolution of solar activity. Critical to substantial progress is the combination of a judicious choice of UV, EUV, and soft X-ray imaging spectroscopy sensitive to the evolution of this thermal plasma combined with hard X-ray imaging spectroscopy sensitive to suprathermal electrons. The major challenge will be to conceive instruments that, within the bounds of possible technologies and funding, have the flexibility and field of view to obtain spectroscopic observations where and when events occur while providing an optimum balance of dynamic range, spectral resolution and range, and spatial resolution.

  12. Scientific Considerations for Future Spectroscopic Measurements from Space of Activity on the Sun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holman, Gordon D.

    2016-01-01

    High-resolution UV and X-ray spectroscopy are important to understanding the origin and evolution of magnetic energy release in the solar atmosphere, as well as the subsequent evolution of heated plasma and accelerated particles. Electromagnetic radiation is observed from plasma heated to temperatures ranging from about 10 k K to above 10 MK, from accelerated electrons emitting photons primarily at X-ray energies, and from ions emitting in gamma rays. These observations require space-based instruments sensitive to emissions at wavelengths shorter than the near UV. This article reviews some recent observations with emphasis on solar eruptive events, the models that describe them, and the measurements they indicate are needed for substantial progress in the future. Specific examples are discussed demonstrating that imaging spectroscopy with a cadence of seconds or better is needed to follow, understand, and predict the evolution of solar activity. Critical to substantial progress is the combination of a judicious choice of UV, EUV, and soft X-ray imaging spectroscopy sensitive to the evolution of this thermal plasma combined with hard X-ray imaging spectroscopy sensitive to suprathermal electrons. The major challenge will be to conceive instruments that, within the bounds of possible technologies and funding, have the flexibility and field of view to obtain spectroscopic observations where and when events occur while providing an optimum balance of dynamic range, spectral resolution and range, and spatial resolution.

  13. A computationally assisted spectroscopic technique to measure secondary electron emission coefficients in radio frequency plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daksha, M.; Berger, B.; Schuengel, E.; Korolov, I.; Derzsi, A.; Koepke, M.; Donkó, Z.; Schulze, J.

    2016-06-01

    A computationally assisted spectroscopic technique to measure secondary electron emission coefficients (γ-CAST) in capacitively-coupled radio-frequency plasmas is proposed. This non-intrusive, sensitive diagnostic is based on a combination of phase resolved optical emission spectroscopy and particle-based kinetic simulations. In such plasmas (under most conditions in electropositive gases) the spatio-temporally resolved electron-impact excitation/ionization rate features two distinct maxima adjacent to each electrode at different times within each RF period. While one maximum is the consequence of the energy gain of electrons due to sheath expansion, the second maximum is produced by secondary electrons accelerated towards the plasma bulk by the sheath electric field at the time of maximum voltage drop across the adjacent sheath. Due to these different excitation/ionization mechanisms, the ratio of the intensities of these maxima is very sensitive to the secondary electron emission coefficient γ. This sensitvity, in turn, allows γ to be determined by comparing experimental excitation profiles and simulation data obtained with various γ-coefficients. The diagnostic, tested here in a geometrically symmetric argon discharge, yields an effective secondary electron emission coefficient of γ =0.066+/- 0.01 for stainless steel electrodes.

  14. Integration of an intensified charge-coupled device (ICCD) camera for accurate spectroscopic measurements.

    PubMed

    Peláez, Ramón Javier; Mar, Santiago; Aparicio, Juan Antonio; Belmonte, María Teresa

    2012-08-01

    Intensified charge-coupled devices (ICCD) are used in a great variety of spectroscopic applications, some of them requiring high sensitivity and spectral resolution. The setup, configuration, and featuring of these cameras are fundamental issues in order to acquire high quality spectra. In this work a critical assessment of these detectors is performed and the specific configuration, the optical alignment, featuring, and the dark and shot noise are described and analyzed. Spatial response of the detector usually shows a significant lack of spatial homogeneity and a map of interferences may appear in certain ranges of wavelengths, which damages the quality of the recorded spectra. In this work the spectral resolution and the spatial and spectral sensitivity are also studied. The analysis of the dark current reveals the existence of a smooth but clear spatial dependence. As a final conclusion, the spectra registered with the spectrometer equipped with our ICCD camera allow us to explore and measure accurately spectral line shapes emitted by pulsed plasmas in the visible range and particularly in the ultraviolet (UV) range.

  15. Electrochemical Kinetics and X-ray Absorption Spectroscopic Investigations of Oxygen Reduction on Chalcogen-Modified Ruthenium Catalysts in Alkaline Media

    SciTech Connect

    N Ramaswamy; R Allen; S Mukerjee; Y

    2011-12-31

    The oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in alkaline media has been investigated on chalcogen-modified ruthenium nanoparticles (Ru/C, Se/Ru/C, Se/RuMo/C, S/Ru/C, S/RuMo/C) synthesized in-house via aqueous routes. In acidic medium, it is well known that modification by a chalcogen prevents the oxidation of the underlying transition-metal (Ru) surface, thereby promoting direct molecular O{sub 2} adsorption on the Ru metal. On an unmodified Ru catalyst in alkaline media, the surface oxides on Ru mediate the 2e{sup -} reduction of molecular O{sub 2} to a stable peroxide anion (HO{sub 2}{sup -}) intermediate via an outer-sphere electron-transfer mechanism. This increases the activity of HO{sub 2}{sup -} near the electrode surface and decreases the overpotential for ORR by effectively carrying out the reduction of HO{sub 2}{sup -} to OH{sup -} at the oxide-free ruthenium metal site. An increase in ORR activity of Ru is observed by modification with a chalcogen; however, the increase is not as significant as observed in acidic media. Ternary additives, such as Mo, were found to significantly improve the stability of the chalcogen-modified catalysts. Detailed investigations of the ORR activity of this class of catalyst have been carried out in alkaline media along with comparisons to acidic media wherever necessary. A combination of electrochemical and X-ray absorption spectroscopic (EXAFS, XANES, {Delta}{mu}) studies has been performed in order to understand the structure/property relationships of these catalysts within the context of ORR in alkaline electrolytes.

  16. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopic measurements of FCCP-induced change in membrane permeability of MDCK cells.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Lingzhi; Li, Xianchan; Lin, Yuqing; Yang, Lifen; Yu, Ping; Mao, Lanqun

    2012-05-07

    This study demonstrates a new electrochemical impedance spectroscopic (EIS) method for measurements of the changes in membrane permeability during the process of cell anoxia. Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells were employed as the model cells and were cultured onto gelatin-modified glassy carbon (GC) electrodes. EIS measurements were conducted at the MDCK/gelatin-modified GC electrodes with Fe(CN)(6)(3-/4-) as the redox probe. The anoxia of the cells grown onto electrode surface was induced by the addition of carbonycyanide p-(trifluoromethoxy) phenylhydrazone (FCCP) into the cell culture, in which the MDCK/gelatin-modified GC electrodes were immersed for different times. The EIS results show that the presence of FCCP in the cell culture clearly decreases the charge-transfer resistance of the Fe(CN)(6)(3-/4-) redox probe at the MDCK/gelatin-modified GC electrodes, and the charge-transfer resistance decreases with increasing time employed for immersing the MDCK/gelatin-modified GC electrodes into the cell culture containing FCCP. These results demonstrate that the EIS method could be used to monitor the changes in the cell membrane permeability during the FCCP-induced cell anoxia. To simulate the EIS system, a rational equivalent circuit was proposed and the values of ohmic resistance of the electrolyte, charge-transfer resistance and constant phase elements for both the gelatin and the cell layers are given with the fitting error in an acceptable value. This study actually offers a new and simple approach to measuring the dynamic process of cell death induced by anoxia through monitoring the changes in the cell membrane permeability.

  17. Spectroscopic measurement of the MHD dynamo in the MST reversed field pinch

    SciTech Connect

    Chapman, James Tharp

    1998-09-01

    The author has directly observed the coupling of ion velocity fluctuations and magnetic field fluctuations to produce an MHD dynamo electric field in the interior of the MST reversed field pinch. Chord averaged ion velocity fluctuations were measured with a fast spectroscopic diagnostic which collects line radiation from intrinsic carbon impurities simultaneously along two lines of sight. The chords employed for the measurements resolved long wavelength velocity fluctuations of several km/s at 8-20 kHz as tiny, fast Doppler shifts in the emitted line profile. During discrete dynamo events the velocity fluctuations, like the magnetic fluctuations, increase dramatically. The toroidal and poloidal chords with impact parameters of 0.3 a and 0.6 a respectively, resolved fluctuation wavenumbers with resonance surfaces near or along the lines of sight indicating a radial velocity fluctuation width for each mode which spans only a fraction of the plasma radius. The phase between the measured toroidal velocity fluctuations and the magnetic fluctuations matches the predictions of resistive MHD while the poloidal velocity fluctuations exhibit a phase consistent with the superposition of MHD effects and the advection of a mean flow gradient past the poloidal line of sight. Radial velocity fluctuations resolved by a chord through the center of the plasma were small compared to the poloidal and toroidal fluctuations and exhibited low coherence with the magnetic fluctuations. The ensembled nonlinear product of the ion velocity fluctuations and fluctuations in the magnetic field indicates a substantial dynamo electric field which peaks during the periods of spontaneous flux generation.

  18. Small-volume, ultrahigh-vacuum-compatible high-pressure reaction cell for combined kinetic and in situ IR spectroscopic measurements on planar model catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Z.; Diemant, T.; Häring, T.; Rauscher, H.; Behm, R. J.

    2005-12-01

    We describe the design and performance of a high-pressure reaction cell for simultaneous kinetic and in situ infrared reflection (IR) spectroscopic measurements on model catalysts at elevated pressures, between 10-3 and 103mbars, which can be operated both as batch reactor and as flow reactor with defined gas flow. The cell is attached to an ultrahigh-vacuum (UHV) system, which is used for sample preparation and also contains facilities for sample characterization. Specific for this design is the combination of a small cell volume, which allows kinetic measurements with high sensitivity under batch or continuous flow conditions, the complete isolation of the cell from the UHV part during UHV measurements, continuous temperature control during both UHV and high-pressure operation, and rapid transfer between UHV and high-pressure stage. Gas dosing is performed by a designed gas-handling system, which allows operation as flow reactor with calibrated gas flows at adjustable pressures. To study the kinetics of reactions on the model catalysts, a quadrupole mass spectrometer is connected to the high-pressure cell. IR measurements are possible in situ by polarization-modulation infrared reflection-absorption spectroscopy, which also allows measurements at elevated pressures. The performance of the setup is demonstrated by test measurements on the kinetics for CO oxidation and the CO adsorption on a Au /TiO2/Ru(0001) model catalyst film at 1-50 mbar total pressure.

  19. A 2-Micron Pulsed Integrated Path Differential Absorption Lidar Development For Atmospheric CO2 Concentration Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yu, Jirong; Petros, Mulugeta; Reithmaier, Karl; Bai, Yingxin; Trieu, Bo C.; Refaat, Tamer F.; Kavaya, Michael J.; Singh, Upendra N.

    2012-01-01

    A 2-micron pulsed, Integrated Path Differential Absorption (IPDA) lidar instrument for ground and airborne atmospheric CO2 concentration measurements via direct detection method is being developed at NASA Langley Research Center. This instrument will provide an alternate approach to measure atmospheric CO2 concentrations with significant advantages. A high energy pulsed approach provides high-precision measurement capability by having high signal-to-noise level and unambiguously eliminates the contamination from aerosols and clouds that can bias the IPDA measurement.

  20. On the importance of high-frequency air-temperature fluctuations for spectroscopic corrections of open-path carbon dioxide flux measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogoev, Ivan; Helbig, Manuel; Sonnentag, Oliver

    2015-04-01

    A growing number of studies report systematic differences in CO2 flux estimates obtained with the two main types of gas analyzers: compared to eddy-covariance systems based on closed-path (CP) gas analyzers, systems with open-path (OP) gas analyzers systematically overestimate CO2 uptake during daytime periods with high positive sensible heat fluxes, while patterns for differences in nighttime CO2 exchange are less obvious. These biases have been shown to correlate with the sign and the magnitude of the sensible heat flux and to introduce large uncertainties when calculating annual CO2 budgets. In general, CP and OP gas analyzers commonly used to measure the CO2 density in the atmosphere operate on the principle of infrared light absorption approximated by Beer-Lambert's law. Non-dispersive interference-based optical filter elements are used to select spectral bands with strong attenuation of light transmission, characteristic to the gas of interest. The intensity of the light passing through the optical sensing path depends primarily on the amount of absorber gas in the measurement volume. Besides the density of the gas, barometric pressure and air temperature are additional factors affecting the strength and the half-width of the absorption lines. These so-called spectroscopic effects are accounted for by measuring barometric pressure and air temperature in the sensing path and scaling the light-intensity measurements before applying the calibration equation. This approach works well for CP gas analyzers with an intake tube that acts as a low-pass filter on fast air-temperature fluctuations. Low-frequency response temperature sensors in the measurement cell are therefore sufficient to account for spectroscopic temperature effects. In contrast, OP gas analyzers are exposed to high-frequency air-temperature fluctuations associated with the atmospheric surface-layer turbulent heat exchange. If not corrected adequately, these fast air-temperature variations can cause

  1. FT-IR spectroscopic assessment of gas-phase absorption of atmospheric molecular species at low concentrations and their associated adsorption effects on various material surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dowdye, Edward Henry, Jr.

    2000-11-01

    Changes in the infrared absorbance observed at levels of concentration in the subparts per million (sub-ppm) of atmospherically significant molecular species, such as HCl, SO2, NO2 and NH3, has been quantified as a function of pressure and temperature for the surface reactions of these gases with various materials (e.g. copper, aluminum, stainless steel and teflon). A Nicolet Magna-IR 550 Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectrometer operating in the 400-4000 cm-1 region and fitted with a 10-meter multipass absorption cell and a deuterated triglycine sulfate (DTGS) detector has been used for recording the spectra. Tubing materials chosen are typically associated with the hardware of measuring instruments used to collect atmospheric trace gas samples. The FT-IR spectrometer has been used to determine the concentration levels at the inlet and outlet tubing of the absorption cell. Small changes in the species concentration down to sub-ppm levels have also been recorded in the 650-4000 cm-1 region using a liquid nitrogen-cooled Mercury Cadmium Telluride (MCT-A) detector interfaced with the FT-IR spectrometer. The associated adsorption effects at the various gas-solid interfaces in the measuring apparatus, including the `sticking' effects on the walls of the absorption cell, have been quantified. Carefully monitored pressure and temperature conditions were utilized to provide a controlled environment, so as to quantify minute changes in the absorption of infrared radiation due to variations in the concentration of the gas samples brought about by different adsorption effects. Values for the absorption coefficients of the different gas phase molecular species in the infrared region of interest were derived from the absorbance measurements. The degree of adsorption for specific gassolid interfaces and the kinetic theory of the adsorption process (assuming a mono-layer) enabled the determination of the corresponding rate constants. It is envisioned that the accurate

  2. Photo-acoustic measurements of gas and aerosol absorption with diode lasers.

    PubMed

    Ponomarev, Yu N

    2004-12-01

    The results of designing multipurpose high-sensitive photo-acoustic (PA) detectors and their application to high-resolution diode laser spectroscopy of molecular gases, gas analysis, and aerosol absorption measurements are summarized in this paper. The hardware and software of the diode laser spectrometer with a Helmholtz resonant PA detector providing an absorption sensitivity limit of better than 10(-7)Wm(-1)Hz(-1/2) are described. A procedure is proposed for an experiment involving the measurements of the rotational structure of hot vibrational bands of molecules. The results of the application of the nonresonant PA cell with temporal resolution of signals to measurements of weak nonresonant absorption of gases and soot aerosols are presented, and the possibility of creating a broad-band PA laser diode aerosol-meter is discussed.

  3. Measurement of transient gas flow parameters by diode laser absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolshov, M. A.; Kuritsyn, Yu A.; Liger, V. V.; Mironenko, V. R.; Nadezhdinskii, A. I.; Ponurovskii, Ya Ya; Leonov, S. B.; Yarantsev, D. A.

    2015-04-01

    An absorption spectrometer based on diode lasers is developed for measuring two-dimension maps of temperature and water vapour concentration distributions in the combustion zones of two mixing supersonic flows of fuel and oxidiser in the single run regime. The method of measuring parameters of hot combustion zones is based on detection of transient spectra of water vapour absorption. The design of the spectrometer considerably reduces the influence of water vapour absorption along the path of a sensing laser beam outside the burning chamber. The optical scheme is developed, capable of matching measurement results in different runs of mixture burning. A new algorithm is suggested for obtaining information about the mixture temperature by constructing the correlation functions of the experimental spectrum with those simulated from databases. A two-dimensional map of temperature distribution in a test chamber is obtained for the first time under the conditions of plasma-induced combusion of the ethylene - air mixture.

  4. Uncertainty analysis of optical components absorption coefficient measurement using an intra-cavity device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Baozhu; Liu, Wenguang; Zhou, Qiong; Du, Shaojun; Yang, Yi

    2017-06-01

    In order to measure the absorption coefficient and performance degradation characteristics of optical components which used in high power laser system, an intra-cavity device was established based on a discharge-drived CW chemical laser. Two pieces of 45 degree reflecting mirrors were tested. Each mirror was tested for more than twenty times, and high power laser irradiation on the testing mirrors lasted 100 seconds continuously in each test. The dependence of absorption coefficients on irradiation times was acquired. The testing results of both reflecting mirrors showed that, the differences between the experimental absorption coefficients and their fitting curve were up to 30.7% and 21.6% respectively, and the differences were independent of irradiation condition, such as irradiation energy, irradiation power and beam crosssectional area. The uncertainty of absorption coefficient was composed of two parts. For one thing, the uncertainty of the direct measurement results, such as the temperature rise of optical components, can cause the uncertainty of absorption coefficients. This part of uncertainty was about 11.3%. For another, the resonant cavity need to be adjusted again when other optical components were replaced, which lead to the change of the incident angle of the optical components to be measured. A typical film system of 24 layers (12 pairs) was calculated by Thin Film Design Software called TFCalc, which showed the absorption coefficients increased with the increase of incident angle. When the angle of incidence was 0.5 degree from the design value, there would be -60 71ppm difference of absorption coefficient from the original one, and the uncertainty was 14.5%. When there was a deviation of 1 degree, the difference of absorption coefficient and the uncertainty were -112 155ppm and 31.7% respectively. This results showed that, the deviation of incident angle was between 0.5 1 degree in the test. In order to reduce the testing uncertainty of absorption

  5. Evanescent wave absorption measurements of corroded materials using optical fibers as remote probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Namkung, Juock; Hoke, Mike; Schwartz, Andy

    2010-04-01

    This research effort is intended to demonstrate an in-situ optical fiber corrosion sensor that operates in conjunction with a Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) interferometer as an evanescent wave absorption spectroscopic technique. This technique will allow periodic remote sensing for onboard structural health monitoring of areas of normally inaccessible structural components. The potential advantages of optical fiber sensors result from the fact that the sensing element, the optical fiber, can be embedded in junctions in aircraft structures, in locations where humidity and corrosion can accumulate, but are such that they can not be directly observed. A fiber-optic-FTIR experimental setup, including several samples of field corrosion material has been assembled in the laboratory to spectrally detect Aluminum Hydroxide [Al(OH)3] which is one component of corrosion of aluminum. Absorption spectra of Al(OH)3, have been collected using an Attenuated Total Reflection (ATR) crystal as a reference spectral signature. The spectra of samples from a simulated corrosion process have been collected and compared with Al(OH)3 spectra. The laboratory experimental setup has included samples from the controlled corrosion conditions.

  6. Comparison of tunable diode laser and long-path ultraviolet/visible spectroscopic measurements of ambient formaldehyde concentrations during the 1993 OH Photochemistry Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harder, J. W.; Fried, Alan; Sewell, Scott; Henry, Bruce

    1997-03-01

    Two different spectroscopic techniques for measuring atmospheric concentrations of formaldehyde were compared during a 6-week field study in the mountains 17 km west of Boulder, Colorado, in August and September 1993. A long-path ultraviolet/visible (UV/Vis) absorption spectrometer and an IR tunable diode laser absorption spectrometer (TDLAS) were the two instruments employed. The former measured ambient formaldehyde levels over a 10.3 km open path (20.6 km total path) extending between Fritz Peak Observatory and Idaho Hill, while the latter measured in situ levels at the Idaho Hill site. In addition to utilizing different spectral regions, both instruments employed different sampling and calibration approaches. Because of the closer proximity to anthropogenic sources the long-path UV/Vis instrument generally detected higher formaldehyde concentrations than the TDLAS system at all times during the day. Averaged over the entire study for all wind regimes, the former resulted in formaldehyde concentrations 15% higher than the latter. The mean and median formaldehyde concentration measured by both instruments was around 1.5 ppbv and individual 5-min averages varied from a maximum of about 5 ppbv down to levels 0.6 ppbv. However, during periods of strong westerly flow where anthropogenic and meteorological influences are minimized, both techniques were in agreement to within 5%. This regime, which constitutes 19% of the total mutual data set, resulted in a continental background formaldehyde concentration of 0.92±0.16 ppbv. The present instrument comparison thus bridges the gap in formaldehyde instrument comparison studies between those in the background free troposphere and those in polluted urban regimes. In addition to providing further confidence in both measurement techniques, the present comparison study also provided a valuable data set necessary for advancing our understanding of tropospheric oxidation mechanisms. A set of guidelines for future comparisons of

  7. Mercury And The Moon: Mid-infrared Spectroscopic Measurements Of The Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donaldson Hanna, Kerri L.; Sprague, A. L.; Kozlowski, R. W.; Boccafolo, K.; Helbert, J.; Maturilli, A.; Warell, J.

    2006-09-01

    Spectroscopic observations (7.5 - 13 μm) of Mercury and the Moon obtained with MIRSI (Mid-Infrared Spectrometer and Imager) at the NASA Infrared Telescope Facility (IRTF) are presented. The spectra were acquired at mercurian W. longitudes 172 - 282° covering north polar to south polar latitudes. Also acquired were lunar surface measurements of the Apollo 16 landing site and Grimaldi basin and highlands. Mercury measurements covered Caloris Basin, Basin S, and other regions on the side not imaged by Mariner 10. Lunar locations were chosen for their known surface compositions determined from near-infrared spectral telescopic observations and Apollo return samples. Spectra for both bodies were reduced with the same calibration star to minimize reduction differences. Spectral differences between the mercurian locations indicate a heterogeneous composition and differences between Mercury and lunar spectra indicate compositional differences between the two bodies. All collected spectra from Mercury and the Moon show distinct and recognizable features including the Christiansen emissivity maximum and one or more transmission minima. Other features have yet to be identified. True emission spectra of rock and mineral powders with varying grain sizes will be presented for comparison with the data. Acknowledgements: The authors of this paper were Visiting Astronomers at the Infrared Telescope Facility, which is operated by the University of Hawaii under Cooperative Agreement no. NCC 5-538 with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Science Mission Directorate, Planetary Astronomy Program. We are especially grateful to Alan Tokunaga and Eric Tollestrup for useful engineering time on the telescope and Don Hunten for helpful discussions. This work was supported by NSF grant AST-0406796.

  8. Novel spectroscopic sensor for the hydroxyl radical scavenging activity measurement of biological samples.

    PubMed

    Bekdeşer, Burcu; Özyürek, Mustafa; Güçlü, Kubilay; Apak, Reşat

    2012-09-15

    A novel spectroscopic sensor was developed and validated for hydroxyl radical scavenging (HRS) activity estimation using terephthalate (TP) as probe. This sensor was designed by electrostatic immobilization of the chromogenic oxidizing agent of the CUPric Reducing Antioxidant Capacity (CUPRAC) method, Cu(II)-Neocuproine (Cu(II)-Nc) complex, on a Nafion cation-exchange membrane, and the spectrophotometric assay developed in aqueous-alcoholic solutions was integrated to the CUPRAC sensor. Hydroxyl radicals ((•)OH) generated from an equivalent mixture of Fe(II)+EDTA with hydrogen peroxide attacked both the probe and the (•)OH scavengers in 37 °C-incubated solutions for 1/2h. The HRS activity was measured using the decrease in CUPRAC absorbance at 450 nm - arising from the reduction of Cu(II)-Nc reagent to the Cu(I)-neocuproine chelate - of the hydroxylated probe (TP) undergoing radical attack in the presence of (•)OH scavengers. The HRS activity was evaluated as the second-order rate constants of biologically active compounds for (•)OH scavenging and also as the percentage scavenging of a measured compound or sample relative to a reference compound. Using this reaction, a kinetic approach was adopted to assess the HRS activity of amino acids, plasma- and thiol-antioxidants. This assay, applicable to small molecule antioxidants and tissue homogenates, proved to be efficient for serine and albumin for which the widely used TBARS (thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances) test is nonresponsive. Under optimal conditions, about half of the probe (TP) was converted into 2-hydroxyterephthalate (hTP), and this monohydroxylated derivative, being the only product of hydroxylation, was a more specific marker of (•)OH than the non-specific malondialdehyde end-product of the TBARS test. The sensor gave a linear response to scavenger concentration in the competition kinetic equation.

  9. Pressure Measurements Using an Airborne Differential Absorption Lidar. Part 1; Analysis of the Systematic Error Sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flamant, Cyrille N.; Schwemmer, Geary K.; Korb, C. Laurence; Evans, Keith D.; Palm, Stephen P.

    1999-01-01

    Remote airborne measurements of the vertical and horizontal structure of the atmospheric pressure field in the lower troposphere are made with an oxygen differential absorption lidar (DIAL). A detailed analysis of this measurement technique is provided which includes corrections for imprecise knowledge of the detector background level, the oxygen absorption fine parameters, and variations in the laser output energy. In addition, we analyze other possible sources of systematic errors including spectral effects related to aerosol and molecular scattering interference by rotational Raman scattering and interference by isotopic oxygen fines.

  10. Cryogenic Thermal Absorptance Measurements on Small-Diameter Stainless Steel Tubing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tuttle, James; Jahromi, Amir; Canavan, Edgar; DiPirro, Michael

    2015-01-01

    The Mid Infrared Instrument (MIRI) on the James Webb Space Telescope includes a mechanical cryocooler which cools its detectors to their 6 Kelvin operating temperature. The coolant gas flows through several meters of small-diameter stainless steel tubing, which is exposed to thermal radiation from its environment. Over much of its length this tubing is gold-plated to minimize the absorption of this radiant heat. In order to confirm that the cryocooler will meet MIRI's requirements, the thermal absorptance of this tubing was measured as a function of its environment temperature. We describe the measurement technique and present the results.

  11. Cryogenic thermal absorptance measurements on small-diameter stainless steel tubing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuttle, James; Jahromi, Amir; Canavan, Edgar; DiPirro, Michael

    2016-03-01

    The Mid Infrared Instrument (MIRI) on the James Webb Space Telescope includes a mechanical cryocooler which cools its detectors to their 6 K operating temperature. The coolant gas flows through several meters of small-diameter stainless steel tubing, which is exposed to thermal radiation from its environment. Over much of its length this tubing is gold-plated to minimize the absorption of this radiant heat. In order to confirm that the cryocooler will meet MIRI's requirements, the thermal absorptance of this tubing was measured as a function of its environment temperature. We describe the measurement technique and present the results.

  12. Application of a multi-pass absorption cell for measurement of sputtered tungsten atoms' density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blagoev, A.; Pashov, A.; Stanev, A.; Bozhinova, I.; Rusinov, I.

    2010-01-01

    A dedicated gas discharge tube equipped with a hollow cathode made of tungsten is setup for sputtering of W atoms. A multi-pass White type absorption cell is designed to increase the sensitivity of the absorption method. The optical system consists of three externally mounted aluminium-coated spherical mirrors with 70 cm radius of curvature. Measurements of the cell relative transmittance in the UV and visible spectral regions are carried out. Time-resolved measurements of sputtered ground-state tungsten atoms' density in 2-pass configuration, as well as assessment of the diffusion coefficient of these atoms in argon at 350 K temperature are made.

  13. A photophonic instrument concept to measure atmospheric aerosol absorption. M.S. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Engle, C. D.

    1982-01-01

    A laboratory model of an instrument to measure the absorption of atmospheric aerosols was designed, built, and tested. The design was based on the photophonic phenomenon discovered by Bell and an acoustic resonator developed by Helmholtz. Experiments were done to show ways the signal amplitude could be improved and the noise reduced and to confirm the instrument was sensitive enough to be practical. The research was undertaken to develop concepts which show promise of being improvements on the instruments that are presently used to measure the absorption of the Sun's radiation by the Earth's atmospheric aerosols.

  14. Intersubband infrared absorption in Ge(x)Si(1-x)/Si superlattice by photocurrent measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karunasiri, R. P. G.; Park, J. S.; Wang, K. L.; Cheng, Li-Jen

    1990-01-01

    The intersubband IR absorption of holes in a Ge(x)Si(1-x)/Si superlattice is observed for the first time. In the experiment, the photocurrent is measured as a function of applied bias which is used to inject holes to the minibands of the superlattice. Two peaks in the photocurrent as a function of bias across the device are observed due to intersubband absorption between the ground to the first and the first of the second light hole minibands. The polarization dependence measurement is used to study the nature of the transitions and is in good agreement with the selection rules.

  15. Traffic-related differences in indoor and personal absorption coefficient measurements in Amsterdam, the Netherlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wichmann, Janine; Janssen, Nicole A. H.; van der Zee, Saskia; Brunekreef, Bert

    Population studies indicate that study participants living near major roads are more prone to chronic respiratory symptoms, lung function decrements and hospital admissions for asthma. The majority of the studies used proxy measures, such as distance to major roads or traffic intensity in the surroundings of the home. Few studies have communicated findings of concurrently performed measurements of outdoor, indoor and personal air pollution in urban streets with high- and low-traffic density. Measuring light absorption or reflectance of particulate matter (PM) collected on filters is an alternative method to determine elemental carbon, a marker for particles produced by incomplete combustion, compared to expensive and destructive analytical methods. This study sets out to test the null hypothesis that there is no difference in personal and indoor filter absorption coefficients for participants living along busy and quiet roads in Amsterdam. In one study we measured personal and indoor absorption coefficients in a sample of adults (50-70 years) and, in another study, the indoor levels in a population of adults (50-70 years) and school children (10-12 years). In the first study, the ratios of personal and indoor absorption coefficients in homes along busy roads compared with homes on quiet streets were significantly higher by 29% for personal measurements ( n=16 days, p<0.001), and by 19% for indoor measurements ( n=20, p<0.001), while in the second study, the ratio for the indoor measurements was higher by 26% ( n=25 days, p<0.05). Exposure differences between homes along busy compared to homes along quiet streets remained and significant after adjustment for potential indoor sources (such as cooking and use of unvented heating appliances). This study therefore provides tentative support for the use of the type of road as proxy measure for indoor and personal absorption coefficient measurements in epidemiological studies due to the limitations of the study.

  16. A benchmarking method to measure dietary absorption efficiency of chemicals by fish.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Ruiyang; Adolfsson-Erici, Margaretha; Åkerman, Gun; McLachlan, Michael S; MacLeod, Matthew

    2013-12-01

    Understanding the dietary absorption efficiency of chemicals in the gastrointestinal tract of fish is important from both a scientific and a regulatory point of view. However, reported fish absorption efficiencies for well-studied chemicals are highly variable. In the present study, the authors developed and exploited an internal chemical benchmarking method that has the potential to reduce uncertainty and variability and, thus, to improve the precision of measurements of fish absorption efficiency. The authors applied the benchmarking method to measure the gross absorption efficiency for 15 chemicals with a wide range of physicochemical properties and structures. They selected 2,2',5,6'-tetrachlorobiphenyl (PCB53) and decabromodiphenyl ethane as absorbable and nonabsorbable benchmarks, respectively. Quantities of chemicals determined in fish were benchmarked to the fraction of PCB53 recovered in fish, and quantities of chemicals determined in feces were benchmarked to the fraction of decabromodiphenyl ethane recovered in feces. The performance of the benchmarking procedure was evaluated based on the recovery of the test chemicals and precision of absorption efficiency from repeated tests. Benchmarking did not improve the precision of the measurements; after benchmarking, however, the median recovery for 15 chemicals was 106%, and variability of recoveries was reduced compared with before benchmarking, suggesting that benchmarking could account for incomplete extraction of chemical in fish and incomplete collection of feces from different tests.

  17. Near-IR diode laser absorption for measurement of tropospheric HO2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stanton, Alan C.

    1994-01-01

    The possibility of using tunable lead salt diode lasers in the infrared for measurement of tropospheric HO2 has been frequently considered. Although the sensitivity of diode laser absorption has been improved through the use of high frequency detection techniques, nature has been unkind in that the HO2 absorption cross sections are weak. Even using the most optimistic assumptions about attainable path length and detectable absorbance, measurement of tropospheric HO2 by diode laser absorption in the mid-IR appears marginal. A possible alternative method for measuring HO2 is by absorption at near-infrared wavelengths. Several absorption bands of HO2 occur in the wavelength region between 1.2 and 1.6 micron due to electronic transitions and overtones of the fundamental vibrational modes. InGaAsP diode lasers operate in this wavelength region and can be used for high resolution spectroscopy in a manner analogous to the lead salt lasers. A diode laser system in the near-IR offers some advantages.

  18. Measurement and feature analysis of absorption spectra of four algal species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Jianhua; Zhou, Hongli; Han, Bing; Li, Tongji

    2017-03-01

    Two methods for particulate pigments (i.e., quantitative filter technique, QFT, and in vivo measurement, InVivo, respectively) and two methods for dissolved pigments (i.e., Acetone Extracts, AceEx, and high-performance liquid chromatography, HPLC, respectively) were used to obtain the optical absorption coefficient spectra for cultures of four typical algal species. Through normalization and analysis of the spectra, it is shown that (1) the four methods are able to measure optical absorption spectra of particulate and/or dissolved pigments; (2) that the optical absorption spectra of particulate and dissolved pigments were consistent in terms of the peak position in the blue wavelength, and the difference of the peak position in the near infrared wavelength was 10 nm between each other; and (3) that the leveling effect of the absorption spectra of particulate pigments was significant. These four methods can all effectively measure the absorption coefficients of phytoplankton pigments, while each one has its unique advantages in different applications. Therefore, appropriate method should be carefully selected for various application due to their intrinsic difference.

  19. Measurement and feature analysis of absorption spectra of four algal species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Jianhua; Zhou, Hongli; Han, Bing; Li, Tongji

    2016-04-01

    Two methods for particulate pigments (i.e., quantitative filter technique, QFT, and in vivo measurement, InVivo, respectively) and two methods for dissolved pigments (i.e., Acetone Extracts, AceEx, and high-performance liquid chromatography, HPLC, respectively) were used to obtain the optical absorption coefficient spectra for cultures of four typical algal species. Through normalization and analysis of the spectra, it is shown that (1) the four methods are able to measure optical absorption spectra of particulate and/or dissolved pigments; (2) that the optical absorption spectra of particulate and dissolved pigments were consistent in terms of the peak position in the blue wavelength, and the difference of the peak position in the near infrared wavelength was ~10 nm between each other; and (3) that the leveling effect of the absorption spectra of particulate pigments was significant. These four methods can all effectively measure the absorption coefficients of phytoplankton pigments, while each one has its unique advantages in different applications. Therefore, appropriate method should be carefully selected for various application due to their intrinsic difference.

  20. Near-IR diode laser absorption for measurement of tropospheric HO2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stanton, Alan C.

    1994-01-01

    The possibility of using tunable lead salt diode lasers in the infrared for measurement of tropospheric HO2 has been frequently considered. Although the sensitivity of diode laser absorption has been improved through the use of high frequency detection techniques, nature has been unkind in that the HO2 absorption cross sections are weak. Even using the most optimistic assumptions about attainable path length and detectable absorbance, measurement of tropospheric HO2 by diode laser absorption in the mid-IR appears marginal. A possible alternative method for measuring HO2 is by absorption at near-infrared wavelengths. Several absorption bands of HO2 occur in the wavelength region between 1.2 and 1.6 micron due to electronic transitions and overtones of the fundamental vibrational modes. InGaAsP diode lasers operate in this wavelength region and can be used for high resolution spectroscopy in a manner analogous to the lead salt lasers. A diode laser system in the near-IR offers some advantages.

  1. Measurement of Broad Absorption Features Using a Tunable External Cavity Quantum Cascade Laser

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, Mark C.; Myers, Tanya L.; Wojcik, Michael D.; Cannon, Bret D.; Taubman, Matthew S.; Scott, David C.

    2007-09-25

    We demonstrate the use of a tunable external cavity quantum cascade laser system for measurement of broad absorption features in the mid-infrared spectral region. The thermoelectrically cooled external cavity laser was tuned over a 65 cm-1 range centered at 8.7 microns using stepper motor control. Pulsing the laser at a high duty cycle provided 3-5 mW average output power over the tuning range, and enabled phase-sensitive detection of amplitude-modulated signals. We used the laser system to measure the absorption spectra of Freon-125 using a Herriott cell. In addition, the absorption spectrum of water in the laboratory air was measured. The measurements showed excellent agreement with reference spectra, in both wavelength and amplitude. The measured scan resolution of 0.14 cm-1 is suitable for measurement of the absorption features of complex molecules as well as simple molecules with atmospherically broadened lines. We discuss the limits to the scan resolution due to effects of spectral chirp and mode-hops during pulsed operation.

  2. Measurements of SO2 absorption coefficients using a tunable dye laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, R. T., Jr.; Hoell, J. M., Jr.; Wade, W. R.

    1975-01-01

    High-resolution measurements of SO2 absorption coefficients in the UV are presented in the wavelength interval between 2962 and 3011 A using a frequency-doubled dye laser as the radiation source. These measurements have application to pollution monitoring of SO2 using the differential absorption scattering (DAS) technique. The spectral resolution of the measurements was 0.2 A (determined by the linewidth of the dye laser) and the generated spectra exhibited considerable rotational structure on the (000) double prime to (060) prime, (070) prime, and (080) prime electronic-vibrational transitions. The latter transitions correspond to center wavelengths of 3001.8, 2981.0, and 2962 A, respectively. The laser measurements were obtained with a signal-processing technique which eliminated calibration procedures associated with conventional optical-absorption measurements. Using this technique, the statistical uncertainty associated with measured absorption coefficients has been reduced to less than plus or minus 2% with a wavelength uncertainty of the laser source of plus or minus 0.1 A.

  3. Deriving brown carbon from multiwavelength absorption measurements: method and application to AERONET and Aethalometer observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xuan; Heald, Colette L.; Sedlacek, Arthur J.; de Sá, Suzane S.; Martin, Scot T.; Lizabeth Alexander, M.; Watson, Thomas B.; Aiken, Allison C.; Springston, Stephen R.; Artaxo, Paulo

    2016-10-01

    The radiative impact of organic aerosols (OA) is a large source of uncertainty in estimating the global direct radiative effect (DRE) of aerosols. This radiative impact includes not only light scattering but also light absorption from a subclass of OA referred to as brown carbon (BrC). However, the absorption properties of BrC are poorly understood, leading to large uncertainties in modeling studies. To obtain observational constraints from measurements, a simple absorption Ångström exponent (AAE) method is often used to separate the contribution of BrC absorption from that of black carbon (BC). However, this attribution method is based on assumptions regarding the spectral dependence of BC that are often violated in the ambient atmosphere. Here we develop a new AAE method which improves upon previous approaches by using the information from the wavelength-dependent measurements themselves and by allowing for an atmospherically relevant range of BC properties, rather than fixing these at a single assumed value. We note that constraints on BC optical properties and mixing state would help further improve this method. We apply this method to multiwavelength absorption aerosol optical depth (AAOD) measurements at AERONET sites worldwide and surface aerosol absorption measurements at multiple ambient sites. We estimate that BrC globally contributes up to 40 % of the seasonally averaged absorption at 440 nm. We find that the mass absorption coefficient of OA (OA-MAC) is positively correlated with the BC / OA mass ratio. Based on the variability in BC properties and BC / OA emission ratio, we estimate a range of 0.05-1.5 m2 g-1 for OA-MAC at 440 nm. Using the combination of AERONET and OMI UV absorption observations we estimate that the AAE388/440 nm for BrC is generally ˜ 4 worldwide, with a smaller value in Europe (< 2). Our analyses of observations at two surface sites (Cape Cod, to the southeast of Boston, and the GoAmazon2014/5 T3 site, to the west of

  4. Development of optical spectroscopic instruments and application to field measurements of marine trace gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coburn, Sean Christopher

    Halogens (X = Cl, Br, I) and organic carbon are relevant to the oxidative capacity of the atmosphere, are linked to atmospheric sulfur and nitrogen cycles, modify aerosols, and oxidize atmospheric mercury. The abundance of halogen radical species in the atmosphere is very low, but even concentrations of parts per trillion (1 ppt = 10-12 volume mixing ratio) or parts per quadrillion (1 ppq = 10-15 volume mixing ratio) are relevant for the aforementioned processes. Halogen radicals can be traced through measurements of halogen oxides (XO, where X = Cl, Br, I), that are ~1-10 times more abundant. However, measurements of halogen oxides are sparse, partly due to the lack of analytical techniques that enable their routine detection. In Chapters II-IV, I describe the development of a research grade Multi-AXis Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (MAX-DOAS) instrument to measure bromine monoxide (BrO) and iodine monoxide (IO) routinely in the troposphere. I present autonomous measurements of BrO and IO in Pensacola, Florida that maximize sensitivity towards the detection of BrO in the free troposphere (altitudes >2km) from ground. The measurements are then coupled to a box-model to assess their impact on the oxidation of mercury in the atmosphere. Chapter V describes the Fast Light-Emitting-Diode Cavity-Enhanced DOAS (Fast LED-CE-DOAS) instrument and first measurements of glyoxal diurnal cycles and Eddy Covariance (EC) fluxes of glyoxal in the marine atmosphere. Glyoxal is the smallest alpha-dicarbonyl and a useful tracer molecule for fast photochemistry of hydrocarbons over oceans. The unique physical and chemical properties of glyoxal pose challenges in explaining this soluble gas over the remote ocean, and recent measurements over the open ocean currently remain unexplained by models. Results from a first cruise deployment over the tropical Pacific Ocean (TORERO field campaign) are presented.

  5. Developments in Methods for Measuring the Intestinal Absorption of Nanoparticle-Bound Drugs.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wei; Pan, Hao; Zhang, Caiyun; Zhao, Liling; Zhao, Ruixia; Zhu, Yongtao; Pan, Weisan

    2016-07-21

    With the rapid development of nanotechnology, novel drug delivery systems comprising orally administered nanoparticles (NPs) have been paid increasing attention in recent years. The bioavailability of orally administered drugs has significant influence on drug efficacy and therapeutic dosage, and it is therefore imperative that the intestinal absorption of oral NPs be investigated. This review examines the various literature on the oral absorption of polymeric NPs, and provides an overview of the intestinal absorption models that have been developed for the study of oral nanoparticles. Three major categories of models including a total of eight measurement methods are described in detail (in vitro: dialysis bag, rat gut sac, Ussing chamber, cell culture model; in situ: intestinal perfusion, intestinal loops, intestinal vascular cannulation; in vivo: the blood/urine drug concentration method), and the advantages and disadvantages of each method are contrasted and elucidated. In general, in vitro and in situ methods are relatively convenient but lack accuracy, while the in vivo method is troublesome but can provide a true reflection of drug absorption in vivo. This review summarizes the development of intestinal absorption experiments in recent years and provides a reference for the systematic study of the intestinal absorption of nanoparticle-bound drugs.

  6. Developments in Methods for Measuring the Intestinal Absorption of Nanoparticle-Bound Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Wei; Pan, Hao; Zhang, Caiyun; Zhao, Liling; Zhao, Ruixia; Zhu, Yongtao; Pan, Weisan

    2016-01-01

    With the rapid development of nanotechnology, novel drug delivery systems comprising orally administered nanoparticles (NPs) have been paid increasing attention in recent years. The bioavailability of orally administered drugs has significant influence on drug efficacy and therapeutic dosage, and it is therefore imperative that the intestinal absorption of oral NPs be investigated. This review examines the various literature on the oral absorption of polymeric NPs, and provides an overview of the intestinal absorption models that have been developed for the study of oral nanoparticles. Three major categories of models including a total of eight measurement methods are described in detail (in vitro: dialysis bag, rat gut sac, Ussing chamber, cell culture model; in situ: intestinal perfusion, intestinal loops, intestinal vascular cannulation; in vivo: the blood/urine drug concentration method), and the advantages and disadvantages of each method are contrasted and elucidated. In general, in vitro and in situ methods are relatively convenient but lack accuracy, while the in vivo method is troublesome but can provide a true reflection of drug absorption in vivo. This review summarizes the development of intestinal absorption experiments in recent years and provides a reference for the systematic study of the intestinal absorption of nanoparticle-bound drugs. PMID:27455239

  7. Sandwich concept: enhancement for direct absorption measurements by laser-induced deflection (LID) technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mühlig, Ch.; Bublitz, S.; Paa, W.

    2012-11-01

    The new sandwich concept for absolute photo-thermal absorption measurements using the laser induced deflection (LID) technique is introduced and tested in comparison to the standard LID concept. The sandwich concept's idea is the decoupling of the optical materials for the pump and probe beams by placing a sample of investigation in between two optical (sandwich) plates. The pump beam is guided through the sample whereas the probe beams are deflected within the sandwich plates by the thermal lens that is generated by heat transfer from the irradiated sample. Electrical simulation and laser experiments reveal that using appropriate optical materials for the sandwich plates, the absorption detection limit for photo-thermally insensitive materials can be lowered by up to two orders of magnitude. Another advantage of the sandwich concept, the shrinking of the currently required minimum sample size, was used to investigate the laser induced absorption change in a Nd:YVO4 crystal at 1030nm. It was found that the absorption in Nd:YVO4 lowers due to the laser irradiation but partially recovers during irradiation breaks. Furthermore, absorption spectroscopy has been performed at two LBO crystals in the wavelength range 410...600nm to study the absorption structure around the SHG wavelengths of common high power lasers based on Neodymium doped laser crystals.

  8. Cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS) system for measuring atmospheric mercury using differential absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierce, A.; Obrist, D.; Moosmuller, H.; Moore, C.

    2012-04-01

    Atmospheric elemental mercury (Hg0) is a globally pervasive element that can be transported and deposited to remote ecosystems where it poses — particularly in its methylated form — harm to many organisms including humans. Current techniques for measurement of atmospheric Hg0 require several liters of sample air and several minutes for each analysis. Fast-response (i.e., 1 second or faster) measurements would improve our ability to understand and track chemical cycling of mercury in the atmosphere, including high frequency Hg0 fluctuations, sources and sinks, and chemical transformation processes. We present theory, design, challenges, and current results of our new prototype sensor based on cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS) for fast-response measurement of Hg0 mass concentrations. CRDS is a direct absorption technique that implements path-lengths of multiple kilometers in a compact absorption cell using high-reflectivity mirrors, thereby improving sensitivity and reducing sample volume compared to conventional absorption spectroscopy. Our sensor includes a frequency-doubled, dye-laser emitting laser pulses tunable from 215 to 280 nm, pumped by a Q-switched, frequency tripled Nd:YAG laser with a pulse repetition rate of 50 Hz. We present how we successfully perform automated wavelength locking and stabilization of the laser to the peak Hg0 absorption line at 253.65 nm using an external isotopically-enriched mercury (202Hg0) cell. An emphasis of this presentation will be on the implementation of differential absorption measurement whereby measurements are alternated between the peak Hg0 absorption wavelength and a nearby wavelength "off" the absorption line. This can be achieved using a piezo electric tuning element that allows for pulse-by-pulse tuning and detuning of the laser "online" and "offline" of the Hg absorption line, and thereby allows for continuous correction of baseline extinction losses. Unexpected challenges with this approach included

  9. Airborne Carbon Dioxide Laser Absorption Spectrometer for IPDA Measurements of Tropospheric CO2: Recent Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spiers, Gary D.; Menzies, Robert T.

    2008-01-01

    The National Research Council's decadal survey on Earth Science and Applications from Space[1] recommended the Active Sensing of CO2 Emissions over Nights, Days, and Seasons (ASCENDS) mission for launch in 2013-2016 as a logical follow-on to the Orbiting Carbon Observatory (OCO) which is scheduled for launch in late 2008 [2]. The use of a laser absorption measurement technique provides the required ability to make day and night measurements of CO2 over all latitudes and seasons. As a demonstrator for an approach to meeting the instrument needs for the ASCENDS mission we have developed the airborne Carbon Dioxide Laser Absorption Spectrometer (CO2LAS) which uses the Integrated Path Differential Absorption (IPDA) Spectrometer [3] technique operating in the 2 micron wavelength region.. During 2006 a short engineering checkout flight of the CO2LAS was conducted and the results presented previously [4]. Several short flight campaigns were conducted during 2007 and we report results from these campaigns.

  10. Measurement of the depolarization ratio of Rayleigh scattering at absorption bands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anglister, J.; Steinberg, I. Z.

    1981-01-01

    Measurements of the depolarization ratio ρv of light scattered by the pigments lycopene and β-carotene at the red part of their absorption bands yielded values which are very close to the theoretical value 1/3 of a fully anisotropic molecular polarizability, i.e., that due to an electric dipole moment. Measurements of ρv at the blue edge of the visible absorption band of pinacyanol chloride yielded a value of 0.75 at 472.2 nm, which is the maximum value that a depolarization ratio can assume, and is attained if the average molecular polarizability is zero. This is possible only if the diagonalized polarizability tensor has at least one negative element to counterbalance the positive ones. A negative refractive index at the blue edge of the absorption band is thus experimentally demonstrated.

  11. Experimental determination of the self-absorption factor for MTR plates by passive gamma spectrometric measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berndt, R.; Mortreau, P.

    2011-07-01

    The measurement of the absolute activity or the mass of radioactive substances by gamma spectrometry needs to include a correction for the radiation absorption inside the source volume, the so-called self-absorption factor. It depends on geometry and material composition of the source, the detector geometry and on the geometrical arrangement of source and gamma radiation detector; it can be calculated if full information about all that is available. This article however describes how to determine the self-absorption factor from measurements if the radiation sources are plates of uranium fuel with typical parameters of nuclear fuel for MTR reactors and without using detail information on the source geometry, thus allowing easy inspection without relying on - potentially falsified - declarations on the internal properties of the fuel objects and without calculation.

  12. Sensitivity analysis of differential absorption lidar measurements in the mid-infrared region.

    PubMed

    Ambrico, P F; Amodeo, A; Di Girolamo, P; Spinelli, N

    2000-12-20

    The availability of new laser sources that are tunable in the IR spectral region opens new perspectives for differential absorption lidar (DIAL) measurements. A region of particular interest is located in the near IR, where some of the atmospheric pollutants have absorption lines that permit monitoring of emissions from industrial plants and in urban areas. In DIAL measurements, the absorption lines for the species to be measured must be carefully chosen to prevent interference from other molecules, to minimize the dependence of the absorption cross section on temperature, and to optimize the measurements with respect to the optical depth. We analyze the influence of these factors and discuss a set of criteria for selecting the best pairs of wavelengths (lambda(on) and lambda(off)) to be used in DIAL measurements of several molecular species (HCl, CO, CO(2), NO(2), CH(4), H(2)O, and O(2)). Moreover, a sensitivity study has been carried out for selected lines in three different regimes: clean air, urban polluted air, and emission from an incinerator stack.

  13. Differences in molar absorptivity of 4-NP with the reaction solution and apparatus affect ALP measurement.

    PubMed

    Huang, W F; Yang, M Q; Zeng, J; Li, L Z; Cheng, G R

    1997-11-01

    We examined the differences in molar absorptivity of 4-NP obtained using different kits for ALP measurement and different instruments. The apparent molar absorptivity of 4-NP in the same reaction solution determined by six different instruments was 15.98, 16.72, 16.06, 17.00, 16.27, 17.62 and that using four different reaction solution kits for ALP with the same instrument was 16.90, 17.38, 17.72, 16.11. We measured ALP in three serum samples with six instruments using the same kit and in twelve serum samples with the same instrument using four kits. ALP activities measured using the same molar absorptivity value differed with the instrument(p < 0.01). However, those measured using the apparent molar absorptivity value for each instrument revealed no significant differences(p > 0.05). In conclusion, we suggest that standard material should be contained in each kit for enzyme measurement and the apparent epsilon for each kit and instrument should be obtained to minimize the systematic error caused by using the same epsilon in different laboratories.

  14. Improved And Quality Assessed Emission And Absorption Line Measurements In Sloan Digital Sky Survey Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, Kyuseok; Sarzi, M.; Schawinski, K.; Yi, S. K.

    2011-01-01

    We have established a new database of absorption and emission line measurements from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey 7th data release for the galaxies within a redshift of 0.2. This work used publicly available codes, pPXF(penalized pixel-fitting) and GANDALF(gas and absorption line fitting), to achieve robust spectral fits and reliable measurements. The absorption line strengths measured by SDSS pipeline are seriously contaminated by emission fill-in. We effectively separate emission lines from absorption lines. For instance, this work successfully extract [NI] doublet from Mgb and it leads to more realistic result of alpha enhancement on late-type galaxies compared to the previous database. Besides accurately measuring line strengths, the database will be provided with new parameters that are indicative of line strength measurement quality. Users can build a subset of database optimal for their studies using specific cuts in the fitting quality parameters as well as empirical signal-to-noise. Applying these parameters, we found galaxies with dramatically broad line regions among the galaxies with poor fitting quality parameters. We applied a new continuum finding prescriptions to newly identified BLRs and they turned out to be Seyfert I nuclei.

  15. Electric field measurements of the LH wave and ICRF near-field utilizing non-perturbative spectroscopic techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, E. H.; Caughman, J. B. O.; Klepper, C. C.; Goniche, M.; Isler, R. C.; Hillairet, J.; Bottereau, C.

    2015-12-01

    The physics of wave heating and current drive processes in the bulk hot plasma are generally well identified. However, details of the wave-plasma interaction in the cold plasma edge are still not fully understood. In this paper a spectroscopic technique allowing for measurements of the electric field driving wave-plasma interactions in the edge region for LH current drive and ICRH systems will be discussed. Experimental results obtained in Tore Supra near the LH C3 antenna and in the magnetized capacitively coupled RF sheath from an experiment designed to mimic the ICRF near-field are presented. In conclusion, future plans to implement a laser-based spectroscopic technique to acquire the high resolution measurements needed for model validation is discussed.

  16. Water vapour foreign-continuum absorption in near-infrared windows from laboratory measurements.

    PubMed

    Ptashnik, Igor V; McPheat, Robert A; Shine, Keith P; Smith, Kevin M; Williams, R Gary

    2012-06-13

    For a long time, it has been believed that atmospheric absorption of radiation within wavelength regions of relatively high infrared transmittance (so-called 'windows') was dominated by the water vapour self-continuum, that is, spectrally smooth absorption caused by H(2)O--H(2)O pair interaction. Absorption due to the foreign continuum (i.e. caused mostly by H(2)O--N(2) bimolecular absorption in the Earth's atmosphere) was considered to be negligible in the windows. We report new retrievals of the water vapour foreign continuum from high-resolution laboratory measurements at temperatures between 350 and 430 K in four near-infrared windows between 1.1 and 5 μm (9000-2000 cm(-1)). Our results indicate that the foreign continuum in these windows has a very weak temperature dependence and is typically between one and two orders of magnitude stronger than that given in representations of the continuum currently used in many climate and weather prediction models. This indicates that absorption owing to the foreign continuum may be comparable to the self-continuum under atmospheric conditions in the investigated windows. The calculated global-average clear-sky atmospheric absorption of solar radiation is increased by approximately 0.46 W m(-2) (or 0.6% of the total clear-sky absorption) by using these new measurements when compared with calculations applying the widely used MTCKD (Mlawer-Tobin-Clough-Kneizys-Davies) foreign-continuum model.

  17. Photoacoustic Z-scan for the measurement of third-order nonlinear absorption coefficient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yelleswarapu, Chandra S.; Kothapalli, Sri-Rajasekhar; Rao, D. V. G. L. N.

    2011-03-01

    The third order optical nonlinearities cover a vast and diverse area in nonlinear optics. The third order nonlinear susceptibility χ(3) is a complex quantity and its real and imaginary components represent nonlinear refraction and nonlinear absorption, respectively. Measurement of these parameters is important for many practical applications. Z-scan is a simple optical technique for determining these characteristics with high accuracy. Here we present a novel photoacoustic Z-scan (PAZ-scan) technique that combines the advantages offered by the conventional Z-scan method and the sensitivity of the photoacoustic detection. In PAZ-scan, instead of measuring the transmitted optical signal as in the case of traditional Z-scan, we record the generated photoacoustic (PA) signal using a 10 MHz focused ultrasound transducer while the sample is translated along the focused laser beam. Since the photoacoustic signal strength is directly proportional to the optical absorption, PAZ-scan displays nonlinear behavior depicting the nonlinear optical absorption of the material. For reverse saturable absorber (RSA) materials, absorption and hence the PA signal increases with the increase of input intensity. Similarly for saturable absorber (SA) materials, absorption and the associated PA signal decreases with increase in input intensity. We studied the nonlinear absorption properties of SA and RSA materials. Our calculations of nonlinear absorption coefficient are in good agreement with conventional the Z-scan data.We believe that PAZ-scan will be a valuable tool for material characterization and has potential for applications in the fields of chemistry, physics, material science, biomedical, and manufacturing.

  18. Ground-based spectroscopic measurements of atmospheric gas composition near Saint Petersburg (Russia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timofeyev, Yury; Virolainen, Yana; Makarova, Maria; Poberovsky, Anatoly; Polyakov, Alexander; Ionov, Dmitry; Osipov, Sergey; Imhasin, Hamud

    2016-05-01

    Since early 2009, high-resolution solar absorption spectra have been recorded at the Peterhof station (59.88°N, 29.82°E) of Saint Petersburg State University located in the suburbs of St. Petersburg. Measurements are made with the Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) system, which consists of Bruker IFS 125HR instrument (with maximum spectral resolution of 0.005 cm-1) and self-designed solar tracker. We derived total column (TC) of a dozen of atmospheric gases from recorded spectra and performed the error analysis of these retrievals. Furthermore, we analysed the temporal variability of the important climatically active gases, such as H2O, CH4, O3, CO, and NO2 near St. Petersburg and compared our retrievals with independent ground-based and satellite data, as well as with the results of EMAC model numerical simulations. Currently, the results of our measurements and the measuring system are under validation for entering the international Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Composition Change (NDACC).

  19. LDRD final report : raman spectroscopic measurements to monitor the HMX beta-delta phase transition.

    SciTech Connect

    Renlund, Anita Mariana; Tappan, Alexander Smith; Miller, Jill C.

    2000-11-01

    The HMX {beta}-{delta} solid-solid phase transition, which occurs as HMX is heated near 170 C, is linked to increased reactivity and sensitivity to initiation. Thermally damaged energetic materials (EMs) containing HMX therefore may present a safety concern. Information about the phase transition is vital to predictive safety models for HMX and HMX-containing EMs. We report work on monitoring the phase transition with real-time Raman spectroscopy aimed towards obtaining a better understanding of physical properties of HMX through the phase transition. HMX samples were confined in a cell of minimal free volume in a displacement-controlled or load-controlled arrangement. The cell was heated and then cooled at controlled rates while real-time Raman spectroscopic measurements were performed. Raman spectroscopy provides a clear distinction between the phases of HMX because the vibrational transitions of the molecule change with conformational changes associated with the phase transition. Temperature of phase transition versus load data are presented for both the heating and cooling cycles in the load-controlled apparatus, and general trends are discussed. A weak dependence of the temperature of phase transition on load was discovered during the heating cycle, with higher loads causing the phase transition to occur at a higher temperature. This was especially true in the temperature of completion of phase transition data as opposed to the temperature of onset of phase transition data. A stronger dependence on load was observed in the cooling cycle, with higher loads causing the reverse phase transitions to occur at a higher cooling temperature. Also, higher loads tended to cause the phase transition to occur over a longer period of time in the heating cycle and over a shorter period of time in the cooling cycle. All three of the pure HMX phases ({alpha}, {beta} and {delta}) were detected on cooling of the heated samples, either in pure form or as a mixture.

  20. Aerosol absorption measurement with a sinusoidal phase modulating fiber optic photo thermal interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shuwang; Shao, Shiyong; Mei, Haiping; Rao, Ruizhong

    2016-10-01

    Aerosol light absorption plays an important role in the earth's atmosphere direct and semi-direct radiate forcing, simultaneously, it also has a huge influence on the visibility impairment and laser engineering application. Although various methods have been developed for measuring aerosol light absorption, huge challenge still remains in precision, accuracy and temporal resolution. The main reason is that, as a part of aerosol light extinction, aerosol light absorption always generates synchronously with aerosol light scattering, and unfortunately aerosol light scattering is much stronger in most cases. Here, a novel photo-thermal interferometry is proposed only for aerosol absorption measurement without disturbance from aerosol scattering. The photo-thermal interferometry consists of a sinusoidal phase-modulating single mode fiber-optic interferometer. The thermal dissipation, caused by aerosol energy from photo-thermal conversion when irritated by pump laser through interferometer, is detected. This approach is completely insensitive to aerosol scattering, and the single mode fiber-optic interferometer is compact, low-cost and insensitive to the polarization shading. The theory of this technique is illustrated, followed by the basic structure of the sinusoidal phase-modulating fiber-optic interferometer and demodulation algorithms. Qualitative and quantitative analysis results show that the new photo-thermal interference is a potential approach for aerosol absorption detection and environmental pollution detection.

  1. O absorption measurements in an engineering-scale high-pressure coal gasifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Kai; Sur, Ritobrata; Jeffries, Jay B.; Hanson, Ronald K.; Clark, Tommy; Anthony, Justin; Machovec, Scott; Northington, John

    2014-10-01

    A real-time, in situ water vapor (H2O) sensor using a tunable diode laser near 1,352 nm was developed to continuously monitor water vapor in the synthesis gas of an engineering-scale high-pressure coal gasifier. Wavelength-scanned wavelength-modulation spectroscopy with second harmonic detection (WMS-2 f) was used to determine the absorption magnitude. The 1 f-normalized, WMS-2 f signal (WMS-2 f/1 f) was insensitive to non-absorption transmission losses including beam steering and light scattering by the particulate in the synthesis gas. A fitting strategy was used to simultaneously determine the water vapor mole fraction and the collisional-broadening width of the transition from the scanned 1 f-normalized WMS-2 f waveform at pressures up to 15 atm, which can be used for large absorbance values. This strategy is analogous to the fitting strategy for wavelength-scanned direct absorption measurements. In a test campaign at the US National Carbon Capture Center, the sensor demonstrated a water vapor detection limit of ~800 ppm (25 Hz bandwidth) at conditions with more than 99.99 % non-absorption transmission losses. Successful unattended monitoring was demonstrated over a 435 h period. Strong correlations between the sensor measurements and transient gasifier operation conditions were observed, demonstrating the capability of laser absorption to monitor the gasification process.

  2. Gas concentration measurement by optical similitude absorption spectroscopy: methodology and experimental demonstration.

    PubMed

    Anselmo, Christophe; Welschinger, Jean-Yves; Cariou, Jean-Pierre; Miffre, Alain; Rairoux, Patrick

    2016-06-13

    We propose a new methodology to measure gas concentration by light-absorption spectroscopy when the light source spectrum is larger than the spectral width of one or several molecular gas absorption lines. We named it optical similitude absorption spectroscopy (OSAS), as the gas concentration is derived from a similitude between the light source and the target gas spectra. The main OSAS-novelty lies in the development of a robust inversion methodology, based on the Newton-Raphson algorithm, which allows retrieving the target gas concentration from spectrally-integrated differential light-absorption measurements. As a proof, OSAS is applied in laboratory to the 2ν3 methane absorption band at 1.66 µm with uncertainties revealed by the Allan variance. OSAS has also been applied to non-dispersive infra-red and the optical correlation spectroscopy arrangements. This all-optics gas concentration retrieval does not require the use of a gas calibration cell and opens new tracks to atmospheric gas pollution and greenhouse gases sources monitoring.

  3. Inter-laboratory comparisons of hexenuronic acid measurements in kraft eucalyptus pulps using a UV-Vis spectroscopic method

    Treesearch

    J.Y. Zhu; H.F Zhou; Chai X.S.; Donna Johannes; Richard Pope; Cristina Valls; M. Blanca Roncero

    2014-01-01

    An inter-laboratory comparison of a UV-Vis spectroscopic method (TAPPI T 282 om-13 “Hexeneuronic acid content of chemical pulp”) for hexeneuronic acid measurements was conducted using three eucalyptus kraft pulps. The pulp samples were produced in a laboratory at kappa numbers of approximately 14, 20, and 35. The hexeneuronic acid contents of the three pulps were...

  4. Calibration method for spectroscopic systems

    DOEpatents

    Sandison, David R.

    1998-01-01

    Calibration spots of optically-characterized material placed in the field of view of a spectroscopic system allow calibration of the spectroscopic system. Response from the calibration spots is measured and used to calibrate for varying spectroscopic system operating parameters. The accurate calibration achieved allows quantitative spectroscopic analysis of responses taken at different times, different excitation conditions, and of different targets.

  5. Calibration method for spectroscopic systems

    DOEpatents

    Sandison, D.R.

    1998-11-17

    Calibration spots of optically-characterized material placed in the field of view of a spectroscopic system allow calibration of the spectroscopic system. Response from the calibration spots is measured and used to calibrate for varying spectroscopic system operating parameters. The accurate calibration achieved allows quantitative spectroscopic analysis of responses taken at different times, different excitation conditions, and of different targets. 3 figs.

  6. Measurements and Modeling of Aerosol Absorption and Single Scattering Albedo at Ambient Relative Hum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Redemann, J.; Russell, P. B.; Hamill, P.

    2000-01-01

    Uncertainties in the aerosol single scattering albedo have been identified to be an important source of errors in current large-scale model estimates of the direct aerosol radiative forcing of climate. A number of investigators have obtained estimates of the single scattering albedo from a variety of remote sensing and in situ measurements during aerosol field experiments. During the Tropospheric Aerosol Radiative Forcing Observational Experiment (TARFOX, 1996) for example, estimates of the aerosol single scattering albedo were obtained (1) as a best-fit parameter in comparing radiative flux changes measured by airborne pyranometer to those computed from independently measured aerosol properties; (2) from estimates of the aerosol complex index of refraction derived using a combination of airborne sunphotometer, lidar backscatter and in situ size distribution measurements; and (3) from airborne measurements of aerosol scattering and absorption using nephelometers and absorption photometers. In this paper, we briefly compare the results of the latter two methods for two TARFOX case studies, since those techniques provide height-resolved information about the aerosol single scattering albedo. Estimates of the aerosol single scattering albedo from nephelometer and absorption photometer measurements require knowledge of the scattering and absorption humidification (i.e., the increase in these properties in response to an increase in ambient relative humidity), since both measurements are usually carried out at a relative humidity different from the ambient atmosphere. In principle, the scattering humidification factor can be measured, but there is currently no technique widely available to measure the absorption of an aerosol sample as a function of relative humidity. Frequently, for lack of better knowledge, the absorption humidification is assumed to be unity (meaning that there is no change in aerosol absorption due to an increase in ambient relative humidity). This

  7. Measurements and Modeling of Aerosol Absorption and Single Scattering Albedo at Ambient Relative Hum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Redemann, J.; Russell, P. B.; Hamill, P.

    2000-01-01

    Uncertainties in the aerosol single scattering albedo have been identified to be an important source of errors in current large-scale model estimates of the direct aerosol radiative forcing of climate. A number of investigators have obtained estimates of the single scattering albedo from a variety of remote sensing and in situ measurements during aerosol field experiments. During the Tropospheric Aerosol Radiative Forcing Observational Experiment (TARFOX, 1996) for example, estimates of the aerosol single scattering albedo were obtained (1) as a best-fit parameter in comparing radiative flux changes measured by airborne pyranometer to those computed from independently measured aerosol properties; (2) from estimates of the aerosol complex index of refraction derived using a combination of airborne sunphotometer, lidar backscatter and in situ size distribution measurements; and (3) from airborne measurements of aerosol scattering and absorption using nephelometers and absorption photometers. In this paper, we briefly compare the results of the latter two methods for two TARFOX case studies, since those techniques provide height-resolved information about the aerosol single scattering albedo. Estimates of the aerosol single scattering albedo from nephelometer and absorption photometer measurements require knowledge of the scattering and absorption humidification (i.e., the increase in these properties in response to an increase in ambient relative humidity), since both measurements are usually carried out at a relative humidity different from the ambient atmosphere. In principle, the scattering humidification factor can be measured, but there is currently no technique widely available to measure the absorption of an aerosol sample as a function of relative humidity. Frequently, for lack of better knowledge, the absorption humidification is assumed to be unity (meaning that there is no change in aerosol absorption due to an increase in ambient relative humidity). This

  8. Atmospheric Solar Absorption measurements in the lowest 3-km of the atmosphere with small UAVs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramana, M. V.; Ramanathan, V.; Roberts, G.; Corrigan, C.; Nguyen, H. V.; McFarquhar, G.

    2007-12-01

    This paper reports unique measurements of atmospheric solar absorption and heating rates in the visible (0.4- 0.7 Ým) and broadband (0.3-2.8 Ým) spectral regions using vertically stacked multiple light weight autonomous unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) during the Maldives autonomous UAV campaign (MAC). The UAVs and ground based remote sensing instruments determined most of the parameters required for calculating the albedo and vertical distribution of solar fluxes. Measured fluxes have been compared with those derived from a Monte-Carlo radiative transfer algorithm which can incorporate both gaseous and aerosol components. The analysis focuses on a cloud-free day when the air was polluted due to long range transport from India, and the mean aerosol optical depth (AOD) was 0.31 and mean single scattering albedo was 0.92. The UAV measured absorption AOD was 0.019 which agreed within 20% of the value of 0.024 reported by a ground based instrument. The observed and simulated solar absorption agreed within 5% above 1.0 km and aerosol absorption accounted for 30% to 50% of the absorption depending upon the altitude and solar zenith angle. Thus there was no need to invoke anomalous or excess absorption or unknown physics in clear skies, provided we account for aerosol black carbon. The diurnal mean absorption values for altitudes between 0.5 and 3.0 km msl were observed to be 41¡Ó3 Wm-2 (1.5 K/day) in the broadband region and 8¡Ó2 Wm-2 (0.3 K/day) in the visible region. Future investigations into the atmospheric absorption in cloudy skies will characterize the spatial and temporal variation of the cloudy atmosphere in sufficient detail to simulate the vertical distribution of net solar fluxes to permit comparison with the collected radiative observations. This next phase will utilize 4 stacked UAVs to observe the extended cloud decks off the coast of California. A combination of observations and models will then be used to assess if the amount of solar absorption

  9. Inter-comparison of 2 microm Heterodyne Differential Absorption Lidar, Laser Diode Spectrometer, LICOR NDIR analyzer and flasks measurements of near-ground atmospheric CO2 mixing ratio.

    PubMed

    Gibert, Fabien; Joly, Lilian; Xuéref-Rémy, Irène; Schmidt, Martina; Royer, Adrien; Flamant, Pierre H; Ramonet, Michel; Parvitte, Bertrand; Durry, Georges; Zéninari, Virginie

    2009-01-01

    Remote sensing and in situ instruments are presented and compared in the same location for accurate CO(2) mixing ratio measurements in the atmosphere: (1) a 2.064 microm Heterodyne DIfferential Absorption Lidar (HDIAL), (2) a field deployable infrared Laser Diode Spectrometer (LDS) using new commercial diode laser technology at 2.68 microm, (3) LICOR NDIR analyzer and (4) flasks. LDS, LICOR and flasks measurements were made in the same location, LICOR and flasks being taken as reference. Horizontal HDIAL measurements of CO(2) absorption using aerosol backscatter signal are reported. Using new spectroscopic data in the 2 microm band and meteorological sensor measurements, a mean CO(2) mixing ratio is inferred by the HDIAL in a 1 km long path above the 15m height location of the CO(2) in situ sensors. We compare HDIAL and LDS measurements with the LICOR data for 30 min of time averaging. The mean standard deviation of the HDIAL and the LDS CO(2) mixing ratio results are 3.3 ppm and 0.89 ppm, respectively. The bias of the HDIAL and the LDS measurements are -0.54 ppm and -0.99 ppm, respectively.

  10. Optimal frequency selection of multi-channel O2-band different absorption barometric radar for air pressure measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Bing; Min, Qilong

    2017-02-01

    Through theoretical analysis, optimal selection of frequencies for O2 differential absorption radar systems on air pressure field measurements is achieved. The required differential