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Sample records for absorption spectroscopic technique

  1. Evaluation of laser absorption spectroscopic techniques for eddy covariance flux measurements of ammonia.

    PubMed

    Whitehead, James D; Twigg, Marsailidh; Famulari, Daniela; Nemitz, Eiko; Sutton, Mark A; Gallagher, Martin W; Fowler, David

    2008-03-15

    An intercomparison was made between eddy covariance flux measurements of ammonia by a quantum cascade laser absorption spectrometer (QCLAS) and a lead-salt tunable diode laser absorption spectrometer (TDLAS). The measurements took place in September 2004 and again in April 2005 over a managed grassland site in Southern Scotland, U.K. These were also compared with a flux estimate derived from an "Ammonia Measurement by ANnular Denuder with online Analysis" (AMANDA), using the aerodynamic gradient method (AGM). The concentration and flux measurements from the QCLAS correlated well with those of the TDLAS and the AGM systems when emissions were high, following slurry application to the field. Both the QCLAS and TDLAS, however, underestimated the flux when compared with the AMANDA system, by 64%. A flux loss of 41% due to chemical reaction of ammonia in the QCLAS (and 37% in the TDLAS) sample tube walls was identified and characterized using laboratory tests but did not fully accountforthis difference. Recognizing these uncertainties, the agreement between the systems was nevertheless very close (R2 = 0.95 between the QCLAS and the TDLAS; R2 = 0.84 between the QCLAS and the AMANDA) demonstrating the suitability of the laser absorption methods for quantifying the temporal dynamics of ammonia fluxes.

  2. Determination of Two-Photon Absorption Cross-Section of Noble Gases for Calibration of Laser Spectroscopic Techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Rosa, M. I. de la; Perez, C.; Gruetzmacher, K.; Fuentes, L. M.

    2008-10-22

    The objective of our work is to apply two-photon polarization spectroscopy as a new calibration method for the determination of two-photon excitation cross-sections of noble gases, like Xe and Kr, which are commonly used for calibrations of MP-LIF techniques in other laboratories.

  3. In vivo low-coherence spectroscopic measurements of local hemoglobin absorption spectra in human skin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bosschaart, Nienke; Faber, Dirk J.; van Leeuwen, Ton G.; Aalders, Maurice C. G.

    2011-10-01

    Localized spectroscopic measurements of optical properties are invaluable for diagnostic applications that involve layered tissue structures, but conventional spectroscopic techniques lack exact control over the size and depth of the probed tissue volume. We show that low-coherence spectroscopy (LCS) overcomes these limitations by measuring local attenuation and absorption coefficient spectra in layered phantoms. In addition, we demonstrate the first in vivo LCS measurements of the human epidermis and dermis only. From the measured absorption in two distinct regions of the dermal microcirculation, we determine total hemoglobin concentration (3.0+/-0.5 g/l and 7.8+/-1.2 g/l) and oxygen saturation.

  4. In vivo low-coherence spectroscopic measurements of local hemoglobin absorption spectra in human skin.

    PubMed

    Bosschaart, Nienke; Faber, Dirk J; van Leeuwen, Ton G; Aalders, Maurice C G

    2011-10-01

    Localized spectroscopic measurements of optical properties are invaluable for diagnostic applications that involve layered tissue structures, but conventional spectroscopic techniques lack exact control over the size and depth of the probed tissue volume. We show that low-coherence spectroscopy (LCS) overcomes these limitations by measuring local attenuation and absorption coefficient spectra in layered phantoms. In addition, we demonstrate the first in vivo LCS measurements of the human epidermis and dermis only. From the measured absorption in two distinct regions of the dermal microcirculation, we determine total hemoglobin concentration (3.0±0.5 g∕l and 7.8±1.2 g∕l) and oxygen saturation.

  5. New Developments of Broadband Cavity Enhanced Spectroscopic Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walsh, A.; Zhao, D.; Linnartz, H.; Ubachs, W.

    2013-06-01

    In recent years, cavity enhanced spectroscopic techniques, such as cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS), cavity enhanced absorption spectroscopy (CEAS), and broadband cavity enhanced absorption spectroscopy (BBCEAS), have been widely employed as ultra-sensitive methods for the measurement of weak absorptions and in the real-time detection of trace species. In this contribution, we introduce two new cavity enhanced spectroscopic concepts: a) Optomechanical shutter modulated BBCEAS, a variant of BBCEAS capable of measuring optical absorption in pulsed systems with typically low duty cycles. In conventional BBCEAS applications, the latter substantially reduces the signal-to-noise ratio (S/N), consequently also reducing the detection sensitivity. To overcome this, we incorporate a fast optomechanical shutter as a time gate, modulating the detection scheme of BBCEAS and increasing the effective duty cycle reaches a value close to unity. This extends the applications of BBCEAS into pulsed samples and also in time-resolved studies. b) Cavity enhanced self-absorption spectroscopy (CESAS), a new spectroscopic concept capable of studying light emitting matter (plasma, flames, combustion samples) simultaneously in absorption and emission. In CESAS, a sample (plasma, flame or combustion source) is located in an optically stable cavity consisting of two high reflectivity mirrors, and here it acts both as light source and absorbing medium. A high detection sensitivity of weak absorption is reached without the need of an external light source, such as a laser or broadband lamp. The performance is illustrated by the first CESAS result on a supersonically expanding hydrocarbon plasma. We expect CESAS to become a generally applicable analytical tool for real time and in situ diagnostics. A. Walsh, D. Zhao, W. Ubachs, H. Linnartz, J. Phys. Chem. A, {dx.doi.org/10.1021/jp310392n}, in press, 2013. A. Walsh, D. Zhao, H. Linnartz Rev. Sci. Instrum. {84}(2), 021608 2013. A. Walsh, D. Zhao

  6. Ultraviolet-Absorption Spectroscopic Biofilm Monitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Micheels, Ronald H.

    2004-01-01

    An ultraviolet-absorption spectrometer system has been developed as a prototype instrument to be used in continuous, real-time monitoring to detect the growth of biofilms. Such monitoring is desirable because biofilms are often harmful. For example, biofilms in potable-water and hydroponic systems act as both sources of pathogenic bacteria that resist biocides and as a mechanism for deterioration (including corrosion) of pipes. Biofilms formed from several types of hazardous bacteria can thrive in both plant-growth solutions and low-nutrient media like distilled water. Biofilms can also form in condensate tanks in air-conditioning systems and in industrial heat exchangers. At present, bacteria in potable-water and plant-growth systems aboard the space shuttle (and previously on the Mir space station) are monitored by culture-plate counting, which entails an incubation period of 24 to 48 hours for each sample. At present, there are no commercially available instruments for continuous monitoring of biofilms in terrestrial or spaceborne settings.

  7. A Comparison of Galaxy Counting Techniques in Spectroscopically Undersampled Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Specian, Mike A.; Szalay, Alex S.

    2016-11-01

    Accurate measures of galactic overdensities are invaluable for precision cosmology. Obtaining these measurements is complicated when members of one’s galaxy sample lack radial depths, most commonly derived via spectroscopic redshifts. In this paper, we utilize the Sloan Digital Sky Survey’s Main Galaxy Sample to compare seven methods of counting galaxies in cells when many of those galaxies lack redshifts. These methods fall into three categories: assigning galaxies discrete redshifts, scaling the numbers counted using regions’ spectroscopic completeness properties, and employing probabilistic techniques. We split spectroscopically undersampled regions into three types—those inside the spectroscopic footprint, those outside but adjacent to it, and those distant from it. Through Monte Carlo simulations, we demonstrate that the preferred counting techniques are a function of region type, cell size, and redshift. We conclude by reporting optimal counting strategies under a variety of conditions.

  8. Breath Analysis Using Laser Spectroscopic Techniques: Breath Biomarkers, Spectral Fingerprints, and Detection Limits

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chuji; Sahay, Peeyush

    2009-01-01

    Breath analysis, a promising new field of medicine and medical instrumentation, potentially offers noninvasive, real-time, and point-of-care (POC) disease diagnostics and metabolic status monitoring. Numerous breath biomarkers have been detected and quantified so far by using the GC-MS technique. Recent advances in laser spectroscopic techniques and laser sources have driven breath analysis to new heights, moving from laboratory research to commercial reality. Laser spectroscopic detection techniques not only have high-sensitivity and high-selectivity, as equivalently offered by the MS-based techniques, but also have the advantageous features of near real-time response, low instrument costs, and POC function. Of the approximately 35 established breath biomarkers, such as acetone, ammonia, carbon dioxide, ethane, methane, and nitric oxide, 14 species in exhaled human breath have been analyzed by high-sensitivity laser spectroscopic techniques, namely, tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (TDLAS), cavity ringdown spectroscopy (CRDS), integrated cavity output spectroscopy (ICOS), cavity enhanced absorption spectroscopy (CEAS), cavity leak-out spectroscopy (CALOS), photoacoustic spectroscopy (PAS), quartz-enhanced photoacoustic spectroscopy (QEPAS), and optical frequency comb cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopy (OFC-CEAS). Spectral fingerprints of the measured biomarkers span from the UV to the mid-IR spectral regions and the detection limits achieved by the laser techniques range from parts per million to parts per billion levels. Sensors using the laser spectroscopic techniques for a few breath biomarkers, e.g., carbon dioxide, nitric oxide, etc. are commercially available. This review presents an update on the latest developments in laser-based breath analysis. PMID:22408503

  9. Spectroscopic Measurement Techniques for Aerospace Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danehy, Paul M.; Bathel, Brett F.; Johansen, Craig T.; Cutler, Andrew D.; Hurley, Samantha

    2014-01-01

    The conditions that characterize aerospace flows are so varied, that a single diagnostic technique is not sufficient for its measurement. Fluid dynamists use knowledge of similarity to help categorize and focus on different flow conditions. For example, the Reynolds number represents the ratio of inertial to viscous forces in a flow. When the velocity scales, length scales, and gas density are large and the magnitude of the molecular viscosity is low, the Reynolds number becomes large. This corresponds to large scale vehicles (e.g Airbus A380), fast moving objects (e.g. artillery projectiles), vehicles in dense fluids (e.g. submarine in water), or flows with low dynamic viscosity (e.g. skydiver in air). In each of these cases, the inertial forces dominate viscous forces, and unsteady turbulent fluctuations in the flow variables are observed. In contrast, flows with small length scales (e.g. dispersion of micro-particles in a solid rocket nozzle), slow moving objects (e.g. micro aerial vehicles), flows with low density gases (e.g. atmospheric re-entry), or fluids with a large magnitude of viscosity (e.g. engine coolant flow), all have low Reynolds numbers. In these cases, viscous forces become very important and often the flows can be steady and laminar. The Mach number, which is the ratio of the velocity to the speed of sound in the medium, also helps to differentiate types of flows. At very low Mach numbers, acoustic waves travel much faster than the object, and the flow can be assumed to be incompressible (e.g. Cessna 172 aircraft). As the object speed approaches the speed of sound, the gas density can become variable (e.g. flow over wing of Learjet 85). When the object speed is higher than the speed of sound (Ma > 1), the presences of shock waves and other gas dynamic features can become important to the vehicle performance (e.g. SR-71 Blackbird). In the hypersonic flow regime (Ma > 5), large changes in temperature begin to affect flow properties, causing real

  10. Investigation into Spectroscopic Techniques for Thermal Barrier Coating Spall Detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    deGroot, Wim; Opila, Beth

    2001-01-01

    Spectroscopic methods are proposed for detection of thermal barrier coating (TBC) spallation from engine hot zone components. These methods include absorption and emission of airborne marker species originally embedded in the TBC bond coat. In this study, candidate marker materials for this application were evaluated. Thermochemical analysis of candidate marker materials combined with additional constraints such as toxicity and uniqueness to engine environment, provided a short list of four potential species: platinum, copper oxide, zinc oxide. and indium. The melting point of indium was considered to be too low for serious consideration. The other three candidate marker materials, platinum, copper oxide, and zinc oxide were placed in a high temperature furnace and emission and absorption properties were measured over a temperature range from 800-1400 C and a spectral range from 250 to 18000 nm. Platinum did not provide the desired response, likely due to the low vapor Pressure of the metallic species and the low absorption of the oxide species. It was also found, however. that platinum caused a broadening of the carbon dioxide absorption at 4300 nm. The nature of this effect is not known. Absorption and emission caused by sodium and potassium impurities in the platinum were found in the platinum tests. Zinc oxide did not provide the desired response, again, most likely due to the low vapor pressure of the metallic species and the low absorption of the oxide species. Copper oxide generated two strongly temperature dependent absorption peaks at 324.8 and 327.4 nm. The melting point of copper oxide was determined to be too low for serious consideration as marker material.

  11. Spectroscopic study of low-temperature hydrogen absorption in palladium

    SciTech Connect

    Ienaga, K. Takata, H.; Onishi, Y.; Inagaki, Y.; Kawae, T.; Tsujii, H.; Kimura, T.

    2015-01-12

    We report real-time detection of hydrogen (H) absorption in metallic palladium (Pd) nano-contacts immersed in liquid H{sub 2} using inelastic electron spectroscopy (IES). After introduction of liquid H{sub 2}, the spectra exhibit the time evolution from the pure Pd to the Pd hydride, indicating that H atoms are absorbed in Pd nano-contacts even at the temperature where the thermal process is not expected. The IES time and bias voltage dependences show that H absorption develops by applying bias voltage 30 ∼ 50 mV, which can be explained by quantum tunneling. The results represent that IES is a powerful method to study the kinetics of high density H on solid surface.

  12. Spectroscopic studies of UV irradiated erythrosine B thin films prepared by spin coating technique.

    PubMed

    Zeyada, H M; El-Mallah, H M; Atwee, T; El-Damhogi, D G

    2017-05-15

    The spectroscopic studies of erythrosine B thin films manufactured by the spin coating technique have been presented. The spectra of infrared absorption allow characterization of vibrational modes for erythrosine B in powder form, pristine and UV irradiated thin films. The absorption spectra recorded in UV-vis-NIR for pristine films of erythrosine B display two main bands. UV irradiation on erythrosine B films decreased absorbance over the spectra. Indirect allowed transition with optical energy gap of 2.57eV is observed in pristine films. UV irradiation introduced structural defects and decreased optical band gap. Some of the optical absorption parameters and their relation to UV irradiation times, namely molar extinction coefficient (ε), electronic dipole strength (q(2)), and oscillator strength (f), of the principal optical transitions have also been evaluated.

  13. Analyzing cell structure and dynamics with confocal light scattering and absorption spectroscopic microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Le; Vitkin, Edward; Fang, Hui; Zaman, Munir M.; Andersson, Charlotte; Salahuddin, Saira; Modell, Mark D.; Freedman, Steven D.; Hanlon, Eugene B.; Itzkan, Irving; Perelman, Lev T.

    2007-02-01

    We recently developed a new microscopic optical technique capable of noninvasive analysis of cell structure and cell dynamics on the submicron scale [1]. It combines confocal microscopy, a well-established high-resolution microscopic technique, with light scattering spectroscopy (LSS) and is called confocal light absorption and scattering spectroscopic (CLASS) microscopy. CLASS microscopy requires no exogenous labels and is capable of imaging and continuously monitoring individual viable cells, enabling the observation of cell and organelle functioning at scales on the order of 100 nm. To test the ability of CLASS microscopy to monitor cellular dynamics in vivo we performed experiments with human bronchial epithelial cells treated with DHA and undergoing apoptosis. The treated and untreated cells show not only clear differences in organelle spatial distribution but time sequencing experiments on a single cell show disappearance of certain types of organelles and change of the nuclear shape and density with the progression of apoptosis. In summary, CLASS microscopy provides an insight into metabolic processes within the cell and opens doors for the noninvasive real-time assessment of cellular dynamics. Noninvasive monitoring of cellular dynamics with CLASS microscopy can be used for a real-time dosimetry in a wide variety of medical and environmental applications that have no immediate observable outcome, such as photodynamic therapy, drug screening, and monitoring of toxins.

  14. 60 Kelvin Absorption Cell for Planetary Spectroscopic Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chackerian, Charles, Jr.; McGee, James; Gore, Warren I. Y. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    We will describe a 30 cm long absorption cell which has been in operation for about two years. The cell is designed for use with sensitive-wide-spectral-coverage Fourier transform spectrometers. A helium compressor refrigerator allows temperatures to be achieved down to about 57 K. Heaters allow above-ambient temperatures as well. A unique vibration isolation system effectively quenches the transfer of vibration of the compressor unit to the spectrometer. An acid-resistant stainless steel liner in the copper body of the call permits the use of corrosive gases.

  15. Operando soft X-ray absorption spectroscopic study on a solid oxide fuel cell cathode during electrochemical oxygen reduction.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Takashi; Oike, Ryo; Kimura, Yuta; Tamenori, Yusuke; Kawada, Tatsuya; Amezawa, Koji

    2017-03-16

    Operando soft X-ray absorption spectroscopic technique, which could analyze electronic structures of the electrode materials at elevated temperature and controlled atmosphere under electrochemical polarization, was established and its availability was demonstrated by investigating electronic structural changes of an La2NiO4+d dense film electrode during electrochemical oxygen reduction reaction. Clear O K-edge and Ni L-edge X-ray absorption spectra could be obtained below 773 K in fully atmospheric pressure of 100 ppm O2-He, 0.1% O2-He and 1% O2-He gas mixtures. By the PO2 change and the application of electrical potential, considerable spectral changes were observed in O K-edge X-ray absorption spectra while only small spectral changes were observed in Ni L-edge X-ray absorption spectra. Pre-edge peak of the O K-edge X-ray absorption spectra, which reflects the unoccupied pDOS of Ni3d-O2p hybridization, increased/deceased with cathodic/anodic polarization, respectively. The electronic structural changes of the outermost orbital of the electrode material due to electrochemical polarization were successfully confirmed by the operando X-ray absorption spectroscopy developed in this study.

  16. Application of spectroscopic techniques for the study of paper documents: A survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manso, M.; Carvalho, M. L.

    2009-06-01

    For many centuries paper was the main material for recording cultural achievements all over the world. Paper is mostly made from cellulose with small amounts of organic and inorganic additives, which allow its identification and characterization and may also contribute to its degradation. Prior to 1850, paper was made entirely from rags, using hemp, flax and cotton fibres. After this period, due to the enormous increase in demand, wood pulp began to be commonly used as raw material, resulting in rapid degradation of paper. Spectroscopic techniques represent one of the most powerful tools to investigate the constituents of paper documents in order to establish its identification and its state of degradation. This review describes the application of selected spectroscopic techniques used for paper characterization and conservation. The spectroscopic techniques that have been used and will be reviewed include: Fourier-Transform Infrared spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, Nuclear Magnetic Resonance spectroscopy, X-Ray spectroscopy, Laser-based Spectroscopy, Inductively Coupled Mass Spectroscopy, Laser ablation, Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy and X-Ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy.

  17. Spectroscopic analysis of Pr^3+ (4f^2) absorption intensities in a plastic host (HEMA).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stonestreet, David; Nash, Kelly; Dee, Doug; Yow, Raylon; Gruber, John; Sardar, Dhiraj

    2006-10-01

    A spectroscopic investigation has been performed on the Pr^3+ ions embedded in 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA) solid plastic host. The standard Judd-Ofelt analysis was applied to the room temperature absorption intensities of Pr^3+ transitions to determine three phenomenological intensity parameters: φ2, φ4 and φ6. Values of the intensity parameters were subsequently used to determine the decay rates (emission probabilities), radiative lifetimes, and branching ratios of the principal intermanifold transitions of Pr^3+ from the ^3P2, ^1D2, and ^3P0 manifold states to the lower-lying manifolds. The spectroscopic properties Pr^3+ in HEMA will be compared with those in glasses.

  18. Novel absorption detection techniques for capillary electrophoresis

    SciTech Connect

    Xue, Yongjun

    1994-07-27

    Capillary electrophoresis (CE) has emerged as one of the most versatile separation methods. However, efficient separation is not sufficient unless coupled to adequate detection. The narrow inner diameter (I.D.) of the capillary column raises a big challenge to detection methods. For UV-vis absorption detection, the concentration sensitivity is only at the μM level. Most commercial CE instruments are equipped with incoherent UV-vis lamps. Low-brightness, instability and inefficient coupling of the light source with the capillary limit the further improvement of UV-vis absorption detection in CE. The goals of this research have been to show the utility of laser-based absorption detection. The approaches involve: on-column double-beam laser absorption detection and its application to the detection of small ions and proteins, and absorption detection with the bubble-shaped flow cell.

  19. Evaluation of Her2 status using photoacoustic spectroscopic CT techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaffer, Michael; Kruger, Robert; Reinecke, Daniel; Chin-Sinex, Helen; Mendonca, Marc; Stantz, Keith M.

    2010-02-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to determine the feasibility of using photacoustic CT spectroscopy(PCT-s) to track a near infrared dye conjugated with trastuzumab in vivo. Materials and Methods: An animal model was developed which contained both high and low Her2 expression tumor xenografts on the same mouse. The tumors were imaged at multiple wavelengths (680- 950nm) in the PCT scanner one day prior to injection of the near infrared conjugated probe. Baseline optical imaging data was acquired and the probe was then injected via the tail vein. Fluorescence data was acquired over the next week, PCT spectroscopic data was also acquired during this timeframe. The mice were sacrificed and tumors were extirpated and sent to pathology for IHC staining to verify Her2 expression levels. The optical fluorescence images were analyzed to determine probe uptake dynamics. Reconstructed PCT spectroscopic data was analyzed using IDL routines to deconvolve the probe signal from endogenous background signals, and to determine oxygen saturation. Results: The location of the NIR conjugate was able to be identified within the tumor utilizing IDL fitting routines, in addition oxygen saturation, and hemoglobin concentrations were discernible from the spectroscopic data. Conclusion: Photacoustic spectroscopy allows for the determination of in vivo tumor drug delivery at greater depths than can be determined from optical imaging techniques.

  20. Application of optical spectroscopic techniques for disease diagnosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saha, Anushree

    Optical spectroscopy, a truly non-invasive tool for remote diagnostics, is capable of providing valuable information on the structure and function of molecules. However, most spectroscopic techniques suffer from drawbacks, which limit their application. As a part of my dissertation work, I have developed theoretical and experimental methods to address the above mentioned issues. I have successfully applied these methods for monitoring the physical, chemical and biochemical parameters of biomolecules involved in some specific life threatening diseases like lead poisoning and age-related macular degeneration (AMD). I presented optical studies of melanosomes, which are one of the vital organelles in the human eye, also known to be responsible for a disease called age-related macular degeneration (AMD), a condition of advanced degeneration which causes progressive blindness. I used Raman spectroscopy, to first chemically identify the composition of melanosome, and then monitor the changes in its functional and chemical behavior due to long term exposure to visible light. The above study, apart from explaining the role of melanosomes in AMD, also sets the threshold power for lasers used in surgeries and other clinical applications. In the second part of my dissertation, a battery of spectroscopic techniques was successfully applied to explore the different binding sites of lead ions with the most abundant carrier protein molecule in our circulatory system, human serum albumin. I applied optical spectroscopic tools for ultrasensitive detection of heavy metal ions in solution which can also be used for lead detection at a very early stage of lead poisoning. Apart from this, I used Raman microspectroscopy to study the chemical alteration occurring inside a prostate cancer cell as a result of a treatment with a low concentrated aqueous extract of a prospective drug, Nerium Oleander. The experimental methods used in this study has tremendous potential for clinical

  1. Confocal Light Absorption and Scattering Spectroscopic (CLASS) imaging: From cancer detection to sub-cellular function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Le

    Light scattering spectroscopy (LSS), an optical technique that relates the spectroscopic properties of light elastically scattered by small particles to their size, refractive index and shape, has been recently successfully employed for sensing morphological and biochemical properties of epithelial tissues and cells in vivo. LSS does not require exogenous markers, is non-invasive, and, due to its multispectral nature, can sense biological structures well beyond the diffraction limit. All that makes LSS be a very good candidate to be used both in clinical medicine for in vivo detection of disease and in cell biology to monitor cell function on the organelle scale. Recently we developed two LSS-based imaging modalities: clinical Polarized LSS (PLSS) Endoscopic Technique for locating early pre-cancerous changes in GI tract and Confocal Light Absorption and Scattering Spectroscopic (CLASS) Microscopy for studying cells in vivo without exogenous markers. One important application of the clinical PLSS endoscopic instrument, a noncontact scanning imaging device compatible with the standard clinical endoscopes and capable of detecting dysplastic changes, is to serve as a guide for biopsy in Barrett's esophagus (BE). The instrument detects parallel and perpendicular components of the polarized light, backscattered from epithelial tissues, and determines characteristics of epithelial nuclei from the residual spectra. It also can find tissue oxygenation, hemoglobin content and other properties from the diffuse light component. By rapidly scanning esophagus the PLSS endoscopic instrument makes sure the entire BE portion is scanned and examined for the presence of dysplasia. CLASS microscopy, on the other hand, combines principles of light scattering spectroscopy (LSS) with confocal microscopy. Its main purpose is to image cells on organelle scale in vivo without the use of exogenous labels which may affect the cell function. The confocal geometry selects specific region and

  2. Rapid identification of single microbes by various Raman spectroscopic techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rösch, Petra; Harz, Michaela; Schmitt, Michael; Peschke, Klaus-Dieter; Ronneberger, Olaf; Burkhardt, Hans; Motzkus, Hans-Walter; Lankers, Markus; Hofer, Stefan; Thiele, Hans; Popp, Jürgen

    2006-02-01

    A fast and unambiguous identification of microorganisms is necessary not only for medical purposes but also in technical processes such as the production of pharmaceuticals. Conventional microbiological identification methods are based on the morphology and the ability of microbes to grow under different conditions on various cultivation media depending on their biochemical properties. These methods require pure cultures which need cultivation of at least 6 h but normally much longer. Recently also additional methods to identify bacteria are established e.g. mass spectroscopy, polymerase chain reaction (PCR), flow cytometry or fluorescence spectroscopy. Alternative approaches for the identification of microorganisms are vibrational spectroscopic techniques. With Raman spectroscopy a spectroscopic fingerprint of the microorganisms can be achieved. Using UV-resonance Raman spectroscopy (UVRR) macromolecules like DNA/RNA and proteins are resonantly enhanced. With an excitation wavelength of e.g. 244 nm it is possible to determine the ratio of guanine/cytosine to all DNA bases which allows a genotypic identification of microorganisms. The application of UVRR requires a large amount of microorganisms (> 10 6 cells) e.g. at least a micro colony. For the analysis of single cells micro-Raman spectroscopy with an excitation wavelength of 532 nm can be used. Here, the obtained information is from all type of molecules inside the cells which lead to a chemotaxonomic identification. In this contribution we show how wavelength dependent Raman spectroscopy yields significant molecular information applicable for the identification of microorganisms on a single cell level.

  3. Vibrational Spectroscopic Microscopy: Raman, Near-Infrared and Mid-Infrared Imaging Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, E. Neil; Levin, Ira W.

    1995-02-01

    New instrumental approaches for performing vibrational Raman, near-infrared and mid-infrared spectroscopic imaging microscopy are described. The instruments integrate imaging quality filters such as acousto-optic tunable filters (AOTFs), with visible charge-coupled device (CCD) and infrared focal-plane array detectors. These systems are used in conjunction with infinity-corrected, refractive microscopes for operation in the visible and near-infrared spectral regions and with Cassegrainian reflective optics for operation in the mid-infrared spectral interval. Chemically specific images at moderate spectral resolution (2 nm) and high spatial resolution (1 [mu]m) can be collected rapidly and noninvasively. Image data are presented containing 128 × 128 pixels, although significantly larger format images can be collected in approximately the same time. The instruments can be readily configured for both absorption and reflectance spectroscopies. We present Raman emission images of polystyrene microspheres and a lipid/amino acid mixture and near-infrared images of onion epidermis and a hydrated phospholipid dispersion. Images generated from mid-infrared spectral data are presented for a KBr disk containing nonhomogeneous domains of lipid and for 50-[mu]m slices of monkey cerebellum. These are the first results illustrating the use of infrared focal-plane array detectors as chemically specific spectroscopic imaging devices and demonstrating their application in biomolecular areas. Extensions and future applications of the various vibrational spectroscopic imaging techniques are discussed.

  4. Time-resolved spectroscopic fluorescence imaging, transient absorption and vibrational spectroscopy of intact and photo-inhibited photosynthetic tissue.

    PubMed

    Lukins, Philip B; Rehman, Shakil; Stevens, Gregory B; George, Doaa

    2005-01-01

    Fluorescence, absorption and vibrational spectroscopic techniques were used to study spinach at the photosystem II (PS II), chloroplast and cellular levels and to determine the effects and mechanisms of ultraviolet-B (UV-B) photoinhibition of these structures. Two-photon fluorescence spectroscopic imaging of intact chloroplasts shows significant spatial variations in the component fluorescence spectra in the range 640-740 nm, indicating that the type and distribution of chlorophylls vary markedly with position in the chloroplast. The chlorophyll distributions and excitonic behaviour in chloroplasts and whole plant tissue were studied using picosecond time-gated fluorescence imaging, which also showed UV-induced kinetic changes that clearly indicate that UV-B induces both structural and excitonic uncoupling of chlorophylls within the light-harvesting complexes. Transient absorption measurements and low-frequency infrared and Raman spectroscopy show that the predominant sites of UV-B damage in PS II are at the oxygen-evolving centre (OEC) itself, as well as at specific locations near the OEC-binding sites.

  5. Terahertz imaging of metastatic lymph nodes using spectroscopic integration technique

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jae Yeon; Choi, Hyuck Jae; Cheon, Hwayeong; Cho, Seong Whi; Lee, Seungkoo; Son, Joo-Hiuk

    2017-01-01

    Terahertz (THz) imaging was used to differentiate the metastatic states of frozen lymph nodes (LNs) by using spectroscopic integration technique (SIT). The metastatic states were classified into three groups: healthy LNs, completely metastatic LNs, and partially metastatic LNs, which were obtained from three mice without infection and six mice infected with murine melanoma cells for 30 days and 15 days, respectively. Under histological examination, the healthy LNs and completely metastatic LNs were found to have a homogeneous cellular structure but the partially metastatic LNs had interfaces of the melanoma and healthy tissue. THz signals between the experimental groups were not distinguished at room temperature due to high attenuation by water in the tissues. However, a signal gap between the healthy and completely metastatic LNs was detected at freezing temperature. The signal gap could be enhanced by using SIT that is a signal processing method dichotomizing the signal difference between the healthy cells and melanoma cells with their normalized spectral integration. This technique clearly imaged the interfaces in the partially metastatic LNs, which could not be achieved by existing methods using a peak point or spectral value. The image resolution was high enough to recognize a metastatic area of about 0.7 mm size in the partially metastatic LNs. Therefore, this pilot study demonstrated that THz imaging of the frozen specimen using SIT can be used to diagnose the metastatic state of LNs for clinical application. PMID:28271007

  6. Studies on Nephrite and Jadeite Jades by Fourier Transform Infrared (ftir) and Raman Spectroscopic Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, T. L.; Ng, L. L.; Lim, L. C.

    2013-10-01

    The mineralogical properties of black nephrite jade from Western Australia are studied by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy using both transmission and specular reflectance techniques in the 4000-400 cm-1 wavenumber region. The infrared absorption peaks in the 3700-3600 cm-1 region which are due to the O-H stretching mode provides a quantitative analysis of the Fe/(Fe+Mg) ratio in the mineral composition of jade samples. The Fe/(Fe+Mg) percentage in black nephrite is found to be higher than that in green nephrite, but comparable to that of actinolite (iron-rich nephrite). This implies that the mineralogy of black nephrite is closer to actinolite than tremolite. The jade is also characterized using Raman spectroscopy in the 1200-200 cm-1 region. Results from FTIR and Raman spectroscopic data of black nephrite jade are compared with those of green nephrite jade from New Zealand and jadeite jade from Myanmar. Black nephrite appears to have a slightly different chemical composition from green nephrite. Spectra from FTIR and Raman spectroscopic techniques were found to be useful in differentiating black nephrite, green nephrite, and green jadeite jades. Furthermore, data on refractive index, specific gravity, and hardness of black nephrite jade are measured and compared with those of green nephrite and of jadeite jade.

  7. Analyzing absorption and scattering spectra of micro-scale structures with spectroscopic optical coherence tomography.

    PubMed

    Yi, Ji; Gong, Jianmin; Li, Xu

    2009-07-20

    We demonstrate the feasibility of characterizing the absorption and scattering spectra of micron-scale structures in a turbid medium using a spectroscopic optical coherence tomography (SOCT) system with a bandwidth of 430-650 nm. SOCT measurements are taken from phantoms composed of fluorescent microspheres. The absorption and scattering spectra are recovered with proper selections of spatial window width in the post processing step. Furthermore, we present an analysis using numerical OCT simulation based on full-wave solutions of the Maxwell's Equation to elucidate the origination of the multiple peaks in the OCT image for a single microsphere. Finally, we demonstrate the possibility of identifying contrast agents concentrated in micron-sized scale in an SOCT image. Two different types of microspheres in gel phantom are discriminated based on their distinguished absorbent feature.

  8. Study on the interaction between Besifloxacin and bovine serum albumin by spectroscopic techniques.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xianyong; Jiang, Bingfei; Liao, Zhixi; Jiao, Yue; Yi, Pinggui

    2015-01-01

    The interaction between Besifloxacin (BFLX) and bovine serum albumin (BSA) was investigated by spectroscopic (fluorescence, UV-Vis absorption and circular dichroism) techniques under imitated physiological conditions. The experiments were conducted at different temperatures (298, 304 and 310 K) and the results showed that the BFLX caused the fluorescence quenching of BSA through a static quenching procedure. The binding constant (Ka), binding sites (n) were obtained. The corresponding thermodynamic parameters (ΔH, ΔS and ΔG) of the interaction system were calculated at different temperatures. The results revealed that the binding process was spontaneous and the acting force between BFLX and BSA were mainly electrostatic forces. According to Förster non-radiation energy transfer theory, the binding distance between BFLX and BSA was calculated to be 4.96 nm. What is more, both synchronous fluorescence and circular dichroism spectra confirmed conformational changes of BSA.

  9. Tone-burst technique measures high-intensity sound absorption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powell, J. G.; Van Houten, J. J.

    1971-01-01

    Tone-burst technique, in which narrow-bandwidth, short-duration sonic pulse is propagated down a standing-wave tube, measures sound absorbing capacity of materials used in jet engine noise abatement. Technique eliminates effects of tube losses and yields normal-incidence absorption coefficient of specimen.

  10. Applications of synchrotron-based spectroscopic techniques in studying nucleic acids and nucleic acid-functionalized nanomaterials

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Peiwen; Yu, Yang; McGhee, Claire E.; Tan, Li Huey

    2014-01-01

    In this review, we summarize recent progresses in the application of synchrotron-based spectroscopic techniques for nucleic acid research that takes advantage of high-flux and high-brilliance electromagnetic radiation from synchrotron sources. The first section of the review focuses on the characterization of the structure and folding processes of nucleic acids using different types of synchrotron-based spectroscopies, such as X-ray absorption spectroscopy, X-ray emission spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, synchrotron radiation circular dichroism, X-ray footprinting and small-angle X-ray scattering. In the second section, the characterization of nucleic acid-based nanostructures, nucleic acid-functionalized nanomaterials and nucleic acid-lipid interactions using these spectroscopic techniques is summarized. Insights gained from these studies are described and future directions of this field are also discussed. PMID:25205057

  11. Applications of synchrotron-based spectroscopic techniques in studying nucleic acids and nucleic acid-functionalized nanomaterials.

    PubMed

    Wu, Peiwen; Yu, Yang; McGhee, Claire E; Tan, Li Huey; Lu, Yi

    2014-12-10

    In this review, we summarize recent progress in the application of synchrotron-based spectroscopic techniques for nucleic acid research that takes advantage of high-flux and high-brilliance electromagnetic radiation from synchrotron sources. The first section of the review focuses on the characterization of the structure and folding processes of nucleic acids using different types of synchrotron-based spectroscopies, such as X-ray absorption spectroscopy, X-ray emission spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, synchrotron radiation circular dichroism, X-ray footprinting and small-angle X-ray scattering. In the second section, the characterization of nucleic acid-based nanostructures, nucleic acid-functionalized nanomaterials and nucleic acid-lipid interactions using these spectroscopic techniques is summarized. Insights gained from these studies are described and future directions of this field are also discussed.

  12. Applications of synchrotron-based spectroscopic techniques in studying nucleic acids and nucleic acid-functionalized nanomaterials

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Peiwen; Yu, Yang; McGhee, Claire E.; Tan, Li Huey; Lu, Yi

    2014-09-10

    In this paper, we summarize recent progress in the application of synchrotron-based spectroscopic techniques for nucleic acid research that takes advantage of high-flux and high-brilliance electromagnetic radiation from synchrotron sources. The first section of the review focuses on the characterization of the structure and folding processes of nucleic acids using different types of synchrotron-based spectroscopies, such as X-ray absorption spectroscopy, X-ray emission spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, synchrotron radiation circular dichroism, X-ray footprinting and small-angle X-ray scattering. In the second section, the characterization of nucleic acid-based nanostructures, nucleic acid-functionalized nanomaterials and nucleic acid-lipid interactions using these spectroscopic techniques is summarized. Insights gained from these studies are described and future directions of this field are also discussed.

  13. Applications of synchrotron-based spectroscopic techniques in studying nucleic acids and nucleic acid-functionalized nanomaterials

    DOE PAGES

    Wu, Peiwen; Yu, Yang; McGhee, Claire E.; ...

    2014-09-10

    In this paper, we summarize recent progress in the application of synchrotron-based spectroscopic techniques for nucleic acid research that takes advantage of high-flux and high-brilliance electromagnetic radiation from synchrotron sources. The first section of the review focuses on the characterization of the structure and folding processes of nucleic acids using different types of synchrotron-based spectroscopies, such as X-ray absorption spectroscopy, X-ray emission spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, synchrotron radiation circular dichroism, X-ray footprinting and small-angle X-ray scattering. In the second section, the characterization of nucleic acid-based nanostructures, nucleic acid-functionalized nanomaterials and nucleic acid-lipid interactions using these spectroscopic techniques is summarized. Insightsmore » gained from these studies are described and future directions of this field are also discussed.« less

  14. X-ray absorption spectroscopic investigation of the electronic structure differences in solution and crystalline oxyhemoglobin

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Samuel A.; Green, Evan; Mathews, Irimpan I.; Benfatto, Maurizio; Hodgson, Keith O.; Hedman, Britt; Sarangi, Ritimukta

    2013-01-01

    Hemoglobin (Hb) is the heme-containing O2 transport protein essential for life in all vertebrates. The resting high-spin (S = 2) ferrous form, deoxy-Hb, combines with triplet O2, forming diamagnetic (S = 0) oxy-Hb. Understanding this electronic structure is the key first step in understanding transition metal–O2 interaction. However, despite intense spectroscopic and theoretical studies, the electronic structure description of oxy-Hb remains elusive, with at least three different descriptions proposed by Pauling, Weiss, and McClure-Goddard, based on theory, spectroscopy, and crystallography. Here, a combination of X-ray absorption spectroscopy and extended X-ray absorption fine structure, supported by density functional theory calculations, help resolve this debate. X-ray absorption spectroscopy data on solution and crystalline oxy-Hb indicate both geometric and electronic structure differences suggesting that two of the previous descriptions are correct for the Fe–O2 center in oxy-Hb. These results support the multiconfigurational nature of the ground state developed by theoretical results. Additionally, it is shown here that small differences in hydrogen bonding and solvation effects can tune the ground state, tipping it into one of the two probable configurations. These data underscore the importance of solution spectroscopy and show that the electronic structure in the crystalline form may not always reflect the true ground-state description in solution. PMID:24062465

  15. New Techniques for the Next Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, James C.; Wilkinson, Erik

    2005-01-01

    The Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer (FUSE) has been a great success, and has addressed many critical scientific questions (Moos, et al, 2000). However, it has also highlighted the need for even more powerful instrumentation in the 900- 1200 A, regime. In particular, significantly increased effective area will permit the pursuit of additional scientific programs currently impractical or impossible with FUSE. It is unlikely that FUSE will last more than a few more years. Nor is it likely that any large scale UV-optical follow-on to HST (such as SUVO) will include the 900-1200 A, bandpass. However, FUSE remains well oversubscribed and continues to perform excellent science. Therefore, a MIDEX class mission in the next 4-6 years that could significantly improve on the FUSE capabilities would be a powerful scientific tool that would be of great utility to the astronomical community. It would open up new scientific programs if it can improve on the sensitivity of FUSE by an order of magnitude. We have identified a powerful technique for efficient, high-resolution spectroscopy in the FUV (and possibly the EUV) that may provide exactly what is needed for such a mission To achieve a factor of 10 improvement in effective area, we propose using a large (meter class), low-cost, grazing incidence metal optics. This would produced in a manner similar to the EUVE mirrors (Green, et al, 1986), using diamond turning to create the optical figure followed by uncontrolled polishing to achieve a high quality surface. This process will introduce significant figure errors that will degrade the image quality. However, if a holographic grating is employed, which has utilized the actual telescope in the recording geometry, all wavefront errors will be automatically corrected in the end-to-end spectrometer, and high quality spectroscopy will be possible with low quality (and low-cost) optics. In this way a MIDEX class FUSE can be proposed with 10 times the effective area of the

  16. Deconvolution of CPM absorption spectra: A new technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jensen, Pablo

    1990-12-01

    We have found a new technique for deconvoluting absorption spectra obtained with the constant photocurrent method on hydrogenated amorphous silicon samples. We have shown that our method is simpler and more accurate than those used until now. Finally, examples of spectra deconvolution for one sample after various thermal treatments are provided.

  17. In vivo endoscopic tissue diagnostics based on spectroscopic absorption, scattering, and phase function properties.

    PubMed

    Thueler, Philippe; Charvet, Igor; Bevilacqua, Frederic; St Ghislain, M; Ory, G; Marquet, Pierre; Meda, Paolo; Vermeulen, Ben; Depeursinge, Christian

    2003-07-01

    A fast spectroscopic system for superficial and local determination of the absorption and scattering properties of tissue (480 to 950 nm) is described. The probe can be used in the working channel of an endoscope. The scattering properties include the reduced scattering coefficient and a parameter of the phase function called gamma, which depends on its first two moments. The inverse problem algorithm is based on the fit of absolute reflectance measurements to cubic B-spline functions derived from the interpolation of a set of Monte Carlo simulations. The algorithm's robustness was tested with simulations altered with various amounts of noise. The method was also assessed on tissue phantoms of known optical properties. Finally, clinical measurements performed endoscopically in vivo in the stomach of human subjects are presented. The absorption and scattering properties were found to be significantly different in the antrum and in the fundus and are correlated with histopathologic observations. The method and the instrument show promise for noninvasive tissue diagnostics of various epithelia.

  18. DNA-binding study of anticancer drug cytarabine by spectroscopic and molecular docking techniques.

    PubMed

    Shahabadi, Nahid; Falsafi, Monireh; Maghsudi, Maryam

    2017-01-02

    The interaction of anticancer drug cytarabine with calf thymus DNA (CT-DNA) was investigated in vitro under simulated physiological conditions by multispectroscopic techniques and molecular modeling study. The fluorescence spectroscopy and UV absorption spectroscopy indicated drug interacted with CT-DNA in a groove-binding mode, while the binding constant of UV-vis and the number of binding sites were 4.0 ± 0.2 × 10(4) L mol(-1) and 1.39, respectively. The fluorimetric studies showed that the reaction between the drugs with CT-DNA is exothermic. Circular dichroism spectroscopy was employed to measure the conformational change of DNA in the presence of cytarabine. Furthermore, the drug induces detectable changes in its viscosity for DNA interaction. The molecular modeling results illustrated that cytarabine strongly binds to groove of DNA by relative binding energy of docked structure -20.61 KJ mol(-1). This combination of multiple spectroscopic techniques and molecular modeling methods can be widely used in the investigation on the interaction of small molecular pollutants and drugs with biomacromolecules for clarifying the molecular mechanism of toxicity or side effect in vivo.

  19. Study on the interaction of catechins with human serum albumin using spectroscopic and electrophoretic techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trnková, Lucie; Boušová, Iva; Staňková, Veronika; Dršata, Jaroslav

    2011-01-01

    The interaction between eight naturally occurring flavanols (catechin, epicatechin, gallocatechin, epigallocatechin, catechin gallate, epicatechin gallate, gallocatechin gallate, and epigallocatechin gallate) and human serum albumin (HSA) has been investigated by spectroscopic (fluorescence quenching and UV-Vis absorption) and electrophoretic (native and SDS PAGE) techniques under simulated physiological conditions (pH 7.40, 37 °C). The spectroscopic results confirmed the complex formation for the tested systems. The binding constants and the number of binding sites were obtained by analysis of fluorescence data. The strongest binding affinity to HSA was found for epicatechin gallate and decreased in the order epicatechin gallate ⩾ catechin gallate > epigallocatechin gallate > gallocatechin gallate ≫ epicatechin ⩾ catechin > gallocatechin ⩾ epigallocatechin. All free energy changes possessed negative sign indicating the spontaneity of catechin-HSA systems formation. The binding distances between the donor (HSA) and the acceptors (catechins) estimated by the Förster theory revealed that non-radiation energy transfer from HSA to catechins occurred with high possibility. According to results obtained by native PAGE, the galloylated catechins increased the electrophoretic mobility of HSA, which indicated the change in the molecular charge of HSA, whilst the non-galloylated catechins caused no changes. The ability of aggregation and cross-linking of tested catechins with HSA was not proved by SDS-PAGE. The relationship between the structure characteristics of all tested catechins (e.g. presence of the galloyl moiety on the C-ring, the number of hydroxyl groups on the B-ring, and the spatial arrangement of the substituents on the C-ring) and their binding properties to HSA is discussed. The presented study contributes to the current knowledge in the area of protein-ligand binding, particularly catechin-HSA interactions.

  20. Near-infrared diode laser based spectroscopic detection of ammonia: a comparative study of photoacoustic and direct optical absorption methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bozoki, Zoltan; Mohacsi, Arpad; Szabo, Gabor; Bor, Zsolt; Erdelyi, Miklos; Chen, Weidong; Tittel, Frank K.

    2002-01-01

    A photoacoustic spectroscopic (PAS) and a direct optical absorption spectroscopic (OAS) gas sensor, both using continuous-wave room-temperature diode lasers operating at 1531.8 nm, were compared on the basis of ammonia detection. Excellent linear correlation between the detector signals of the two systems was found. Although the physical properties and the mode of operation of both sensors were significantly different, their performances were found to be remarkably similar, with a sub-ppm level minimum detectable concentration of ammonia and a fast response time in the range of a few minutes.

  1. Galactic Soft X-ray Emission Revealed with Spectroscopic Study of Absorption and Emission Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamasaki, Noriko Y.; Mitsuda, K.; Takei, Y.; Hagihara, T.; Yoshino, T.; Wang, Q. D.; Yao, Y.; McCammon, D.

    2010-03-01

    Spectroscopic study of Oxygen emission/absorption lines is a new tool to investigate the nature of the soft X-ray background. We investigated the emission spectra of 14 fields obtained by Suzaku, and detected OVII and OVIII lines separately. There is an almost isotropic OVII line emission with 2 LU intensity. As the attenuation length in the Galactic plane for that energy is short, that OVII emission should arise within 300 pc of our neighborhood. In comparison with the estimated emission measure for the local bubble, the most plausible origin of this component is the solar wind charge exchange with local interstellar materials. Another component presented from the correlation between the OVII and OVIII line intensity is a thermal emission with an apparent temperature of 0.2 keV with a field-to-field fluctuation of 10% in temperature, while the intensity varies about a factor of 4. By the combination analysis of the emission and the absorption spectra, we can investigate the density and the scale length of intervening plasma separately. We analyzed the Chanrdra grating spectra of LMC X-3 and PKS 2155-304, and emission spectra toward the line of sight by Suzaku. In both cases, the combined analysis showed that the hot plasma is not iso-thermal nor uniform. Assuming an exponential disk distribution, the thickness of the disk is as large as a few kpc. It suggests that there is a thick hot disk or hot halo surrounding our Galaxy, which is similar to X-ray hot haloes around several spiral galaxies.

  2. Recent improvements in PDS technique for low-absorption measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montecchi, Marco; Masetti, Enrico; Emiliani, Gabriele

    1990-08-01

    Photothermal Deflection Spectroscopy (PDS) is a recently developed technique that is finding a useful application in the measurement of low optical absorptance of thin films. Among the noise sources affecting the PDS measurement, probe beam pointing instability and mechanical vibration play a considerable role. In this work an optoelectronic system for the reduction of their influence is described. Moreover, PDS measurements are typically performed keeping the sample immersed in a deflecting liquid; thus measured values of absorptance must be corrected when other surrounding media, as air, are considered. This correction is an easy task for single film coatings. Here the general case of an unknown multiplayer coating is analysed; a range of values containing the true absorptance in air is obtained by theoretical analysis and a practical method to evaluate the absorptance in air is discussed. Finally, deflecting liquids alternative to the commonly used CCI4 have been examined. Useful optical range, thermal diffusivity and "relative deflecting power" of CCI4, CS2, Iso-octane and Aceton are reported.

  3. X-Ray Absorption Spectroscopic Characterization of the Molybdenum Site of 'Escherichia Coli' Dimethyl Sulfoxide Reductase

    SciTech Connect

    George, G.N.; Doonan, C.J.; Rothery, R.A.; Boroumand, N.; Weiner, J.H.; /Saskatchewan U. /Alberta U.

    2007-07-09

    Structural studies of dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) reductases were hampered by modification of the active site during purification. We report an X-ray absorption spectroscopic analysis of the molybdenum active site of Escherichia coli DMSO reductase contained within its native membranes. The enzyme in these preparations is expected to be very close to the form found in vivo. The oxidized active site was found to have four Mo-S ligands at 2.43 angstroms, one Mo=O at 1.71 angstroms, and a longer Mo-O at 1.90 angstroms. We conclude that the oxidized enzyme is a monooxomolybdenum(VI) species coordinated by two molybdopterin dithiolenes and a serine. The bond lengths determined for E. coli DMSO reductase are very similar to those determined for the well-characterized Rhodobacter sphaeroides DMSO reductase, suggesting similar active site structures for the two enzymes. Furthermore, our results suggest that the form found in vivo is the monooxobis(molybdopterin) species.

  4. X-ray absorption spectroscopic studies of mononuclear non-heme iron enzymes

    SciTech Connect

    Westre, Tami E.

    1996-01-01

    Fe-K-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) has been used to investigate the electronic and geometric structure of the iron active site in non-heme iron enzymes. A new theoretical extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) analysis approach, called GNXAS, has been tested on data for iron model complexes to evaluate the utility and reliability of this new technique, especially with respect to the effects of multiple-scattering. In addition, a detailed analysis of the 1s→3d pre-edge feature has been developed as a tool for investigating the oxidation state, spin state, and geometry of iron sites. Edge and EXAFS analyses have then been applied to the study of non-heme iron enzyme active sites.

  5. Studies on the interaction of salvianolic acid B with human hemoglobin by multi-spectroscopic techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Tingting; Zhu, Shajun; Cao, Hui; Shang, Yanfang; Wang, Miao; Jiang, Guoqing; Shi, Yujun; Lu, Tianhong

    2011-04-01

    The interaction between salvianolic acid B (Sal B) and human hemoglobin (HHb) under physiological conditions was investigated by UV-vis absorption, fluorescence, synchronous fluorescence and circular dichroism spectroscopic techniques. The experimental results indicate that the quenching mechanism of fluorescence of HHb by Sal B is a static quenching procedure, the binding reaction is spontaneous, and the hydrophobic interactions play a major role in binding of Sal B to HHb. Based on Förster's theory of non-radiative energy transfer, the binding distance between Sal B and the inner tryptophan residues of HHb was determined to be 2.64 nm. The synchronous fluorescence experiment revealed that Sal B can not lead to the microenvironmental changes around the Tyr and Trp residues of HHb, and the binding site of Sal B on HHb is located at α 1β 2 interface of HHb. Furthermore, the CD spectroscopy indicated the secondary structure of HHb is not changed in the presence of Sal B.

  6. New analytical technique for carbon dioxide absorption solvents

    SciTech Connect

    Pouryousefi, F.; Idem, R.O.

    2008-02-15

    The densities and refractive indices of two binary systems (water + MEA and water + MDEA) and three ternary systems (water + MEA + CO{sub 2}, water + MDEA + CO{sub 2}, and water + MEA + MDEA) used for carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) capture were measured over the range of compositions of the aqueous alkanolamine(s) used for CO{sub 2} absorption at temperatures from 295 to 338 K. Experimental densities were modeled empirically, while the experimental refractive indices were modeled using well-established models from the known values of their pure-component densities and refractive indices. The density and Gladstone-Dale refractive index models were then used to obtain the compositions of unknown samples of the binary and ternary systems by simultaneous solution of the density and refractive index equations. The results from this technique have been compared with HPLC (high-performance liquid chromatography) results, while a third independent technique (acid-base titration) was used to verify the results. The results show that the systems' compositions obtained from the simple and easy-to-use refractive index/density technique were very comparable to the expensive and laborious HPLC/titration techniques, suggesting that the refractive index/density technique can be used to replace existing methods for analysis of fresh or nondegraded, CO{sub 2}-loaded, single and mixed alkanolamine solutions.

  7. Novel Molecular Spectroscopic Multimethod Approach for Monitoring Water Absorption/Desorption Kinetics of CAD/CAM Poly(Methyl Methacrylate) Prosthodontics.

    PubMed

    Wiedemair, Verena; Mayr, Sophia; Wimmer, Daniel S; Köck, Eva Maria; Penner, Simon; Kerstan, Andreas; Steinmassl, Patricia-Anca; Dumfahrt, Herbert; Huck, Christian W

    2016-12-12

    Water absorbed to poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA)-based CAD/CAM (computer-assisted design/computer-assisted manufacturing) prosthodontics can alter their properties including hardness and stability. In the present contribution, water absorption and desorption kinetics under defined experimental conditions were monitored employing several supplementary and advanced Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopic techniques in combination with multivariate analysis (MVA). In this synergistic vibrational spectroscopic multimethod approach, first a novel near-infrared (NIR) diffuse fiber optic probe reflection spectroscopic method was established for time-resolved analysis of water uptake within seven days under controlled conditions. Near-infrared water absorbance spectra in a wavenumber range between 5288-5100 cm(-1) (combination band) and 5424-5352 cm(-1) (second overtone) were used establishing corresponding calibration and validation models to quantify the amount of water in the milligram range. Therefore, 14 well-defined samples exposed to prior optimized experimental conditions were taken into consideration. The average daily water uptake conducting reference analysis was calculated as 22 mg/day for one week. Additionally, in this study for the first time NIR two-dimensional correlation spectroscopy (2D-COS) was conducted to monitor and interpret the spectral dynamics of water absorption on the prosthodontics in a wavenumber range of 5100-5300 cm(-1) For sensitive time-resolved recording of water desorption, a recently developed high-temperature, high-pressure FT-IR reaction cell with water-free ultra-dry in situ and operando operation was applied. The reaction cell, as well as the sample holder, was fully made of quartz glass, with no hot metal or ceramic parts in the vicinity of the high temperature zone. Applying a temperature gradient in the range of 25-150 ℃, mid-infrared (MIR) 2D-COS was successfully conducted to get insights into the dynamic

  8. Theoretical modeling of the spectroscopic absorption properties of luciferin and oxyluciferin: A critical comparison with recent experimental studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anselmi, Massimiliano; Marocchi, Simone; Aschi, Massimiliano; Amadei, Andrea

    2012-01-01

    Firefly luciferin and its oxidated form, oxyluciferin, are two heterocyclic compounds involved in the enzymatic reaction, catalyzed by redox proteins called luciferases, which provides the bioluminescence in a wide group of arthropods. Whereas the electronic absorption spectra of D-luciferin in water at different pHs are known since 1960s, only recently reliable experimental electronic spectra of oxyluciferin have become available. In addition oxyluciferin is involved in a triple chemical equilibria (deprotonation of the two hydroxyl groups and keto-enol tautomerism of the 4-hydroxythiazole ring), that obligates to select during an experiment a predominant species, tuning pH or solvent polarity besides introducing chemical modifications. In this study we report the absorption spectra of luciferin and oxyluciferin in each principal chemical form, calculated by means of perturbed matrix method (PMM), which allowed us to successfully introduce the effect of the solvent on the spectroscopic absorption properties, and compare the result with available experimental data.

  9. Absorption properties of type-II InAs/InAsSb superlattices measured by spectroscopic ellipsometry

    SciTech Connect

    Webster, P. T.; Riordan, N. A.; Liu, S.; Zhang, Y.-H.; Johnson, S. R.; Steenbergen, E. H.

    2015-02-09

    Strain-balanced InAs/InAsSb superlattices offer access to the mid- to long-wavelength infrared region with what is essentially a ternary material system at the GaSb lattice constant. The absorption coefficients of InAs/InAsSb superlattices grown by molecular beam epitaxy on (100)-oriented GaSb substrates are measured at room temperature over the 30 to 800 meV photon energy range using spectroscopic ellipsometry, and the miniband structure of each superlattice is calculated using a Kronig-Penney model. The InAs/InAsSb conduction band offset is used as a fitting parameter to align the calculated superlattice ground state transition energy to the measured absorption onset at room temperature and to the photoluminescence peak energy at low temperature. It is observed that the ground state absorption coefficient and transition strength are proportional to the square of the wavefunction overlap and the ground state absorption coefficient approaches a maximum value of around 5780 cm{sup −1} as the wavefunction overlap approaches 100%. The absorption analysis of these samples indicates that the optical joint density of states is weakly dependent on the period thickness and Sb content of the superlattice, and that wavefunction overlap is the principal design parameter in terms of obtaining strong absorption in these structures.

  10. Characterization of Sorolla's gouache pigments by means of spectroscopic techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roldán, Clodoaldo; Juanes, David; Ferrazza, Livio; Carballo, Jorgelina

    2016-02-01

    This paper presents the characterization of the Joaquín Sorolla's gouache sketches for the oil on canvas series "Vision of Spain" commissioned by A. M. Huntington to decorate the library of the Hispanic Society of America in New York. The analyses were focused on the identification of the elemental composition of the gouache pigments by means of portable EDXRF spectrometry in a non-destructive mode. Additionally, SEM-EDX and FTIR analyses of a selected set of micro-samples were carried out to identify completely the pigments, the paint technique and the binding media. The obtained results have confirmed the identification of lead and zinc white, vermillion, earth pigments, ochre, zinc yellow, chrome yellow, ultramarine, Prussian blue, chromium based and copper-arsenic based green pigments, bone black and carbon based black pigments, and the use of gum arabic as binding media in the gouache pigments.

  11. Fast magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging techniques in human brain- applications in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Al-Iedani, Oun; Lechner-Scott, Jeannette; Ribbons, Karen; Ramadan, Saadallah

    2017-02-28

    Multi voxel magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging (MRSI) is an important imaging tool that combines imaging and spectroscopic techniques. MRSI of the human brain has been beneficially applied to different clinical applications in neurology, particularly in neurooncology but also in multiple sclerosis, stroke and epilepsy. However, a major challenge in conventional MRSI is the longer acquisition time required for adequate signal to be collected. Fast MRSI of the brain in vivo is an alternative approach to reduce scanning time and make MRSI more clinically suitable.Fast MRSI can be categorised into spiral, echo-planar, parallel and turbo imaging techniques, each with its own strengths. After a brief introduction on the basics of non-invasive examination ((1)H-MRS) and localization techniques principles, different fast MRSI techniques will be discussed from their initial development to the recent innovations with particular emphasis on their capacity to record neurochemical changes in the brain in a variety of pathologies.The clinical applications of whole brain fast spectroscopic techniques, can assist in the assessment of neurochemical changes in the human brain and help in understanding the roles they play in disease. To give a good example of the utilities of these techniques in clinical context, MRSI application in multiple sclerosis was chosen. The available up to date and relevant literature is discussed and an outline of future research is presented.

  12. X-ray diffraction and absorption spectroscopic studies of copper mixed ligand complexes with aminophenol as one of the ligands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, A.; Jain, Garima; Patil, H.

    2012-05-01

    X-ray diffraction (XRD) and X-ray absorption spectroscopic (XAS) studies have been conducted on two copper complexes, i.e., copper macrocyclic complex of succinic acid and ortho aminophenol (complex-1) and copper macrocyclic complex of pthalic acid and ortho aminophenol (complex-2). The diffraction pattern of the complexes have been recorded using Rigaku RINT-2000 X-ray diffractometer equipped with rotating anode X-ray tube operated at 40 kV and 100 mA. The X-ray absorption spectra of the complexes have been recorded at the K-edge of copper on Cauchois type bent crystal spectrograph having radius 0.4 m employing a mica crystal, oriented to reflect from (100) planes, for dispersion. The X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) parameters, viz., chemical shift, energy position of the principal absorption maximum and edge-width have been determined and discussed. From the extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) data, the bond lengths have been calculated using three methods, namely, Levy's method, Lytle, Sayers and Stern's (LSS) method and Fourier transformation method. The results obtained have been compared with each other and discussed.

  13. White-light continuum probed femtosecond time-resolved absorption spectroscopic measurement of β-carotene under high pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Wei-Long; Zheng, Zhi-Ren; Zhang, Jian-Ping; Wu, Wen-Zhi; Li, Ai-Hua; Zhang, Wei; Huo, Ming-Ming; Liu, Zhi-Guo; Zhu, Rui-Bin; Zhao, Lian-Cheng; Su, Wen-Hui

    2012-04-01

    We have performed a femtosecond time-resolved absorption spectroscopic experiment of β-carotene in n-hexane solution under high pressure up to ˜1.0 GPa. Using white-light continuum in the visible spectral region as probe light, we found that the energy level of S1 state descends, whereas its lifetime becomes longer with the rising pressure. We ascribe this tendency deviating from the energy gap law to the viscosity effects on the Cdbnd C stretching vibrations, which is fully consistent with the microviscosity theory. This Letter may provide some insights on the light harvesting and photoprotection functions of carotenoids in photosynthetic organisms.

  14. Low-level optical absorption phenomena in organic thin films for solar cell applications investigated by highly sensitive photocurrent and photothermal techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goris, Ludwig J.; Haenen, Ken; Nesladek, Milos; Poruba, A.; Vanecek, M.; Wagner, P.; Lutsen, Laurence J.; Manca, Jean; Vanderzande, Dirk; De Schepper, Luc

    2004-09-01

    Optical absorption phenomena and in particular sub band gap absorption features are of great importance in the understanding of processes of charge generation and transport in organic pure and composite semiconductor films. To come towards this objective, an alternative and high sensitive spectroscopic approach is introduced to examine the absorption of light in pure and compound organic semiconductors. Because sub band gap absorption features are typically characterized by very low absorption coefficients, it is not possible to resolve them using common transmission and reflection measurements and high sensitive alternatives are needed. Therefore, a combination of photocurrent (Constant Photocurrent Method CPM/Fourier Transform Photocurrent Spectroscopy FT-PS) and photothermal techniques (Photothermal Deflection Spectroscopy PDS) has been used, increasing sensitivity by a factor of thousand, reaching detectable absorption coefficients ((E) down to 0.1 cm-1. In this way, the dynamic range of measurable absorption coefficients is increased by several orders of magnitude compared to transmission/reflection measurements. These techniques have been used here to characterize ground state absorption of thin films of MDMO-PPV, PCBM and a mixture of both materials in a 1:4 ratio, as typically used in a standard active layer in a fully organic solar cell. The spectra reveal defect related absorption phenomena and significant indication of existing interaction in the ground state between both materials, contrary to the widely spread conviction that this is not the case. Experimental details of the techniques and measurement procedures are explained.

  15. Absorption and emission spectroscopic characterisation of combined wildtype LOV1-LOV2 domain of phot from Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Song, S-H; Dick, B; Zirak, P; Penzkofer, A; Schiereis, T; Hegemann, P

    2005-10-03

    An absorption and emission spectroscopic characterisation of the combined wild-type LOV1-LOV2 domain string (abbreviated LOV1/2) of phot from the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii is carried out at pH 8. A LOV1/2-MBP fusion protein (MBP=maltose binding protein) and LOV1/2 with a His-tag at the C-terminus (LOV1/2-His) expressed in an Escherichia coli strain are investigated. Blue-light photo-excitation generates a non-fluorescent intermediate photoproduct (flavin-C(4a)-cysteinyl adduct with absorption peak at 390 nm). The photo-cycle dynamics is studied by dark-state absorption and fluorescence measurement, by following the temporal absorption and emission changes under blue and violet light exposure, and by measuring the temporal absorption and fluorescence recovery after light exposure. The fluorescence quantum yield, phi(F), of the dark adapted samples is phi(F)(LOV1/2-His) approximately 0.15 and phi(F)(LOV1/2-MBP) approximately 0.17. A bi-exponential absorption recovery after light exposure with a fast (in the several 10-s range) and a slow component (in the near 10-min range) are resolved. The quantum yield of photo-adduct formation, phi(Ad), is extracted from excitation intensity dependent absorption measurements. It decreases somewhat with rising excitation intensity. The behaviour of the combined wildtype LOV1-LOV2 double domains is compared with the behaviour of the separate LOV1 and LOV2 domains.

  16. Non-Destructive and rapid evaluation of staple foods quality by using spectroscopic techniques: A review.

    PubMed

    Su, Wen-Hao; He, Hong-Ju; Sun, Da-Wen

    2017-03-24

    Staple foods, including cereals, legumes, and root/tuber crops, dominate the daily diet of humans by providing valuable proteins, starch, oils, minerals, and vitamins. Quality evaluation of staple foods is primarily carried out on sensory (e.g. external defect, color), adulteration (e.g. species, origin), chemical (e.g. starch, proteins), mycotoxin (e.g. Fusarium toxin, aflatoxin), parasitic infection (e.g. weevil, beetle), and internal physiological (e.g. hollow heart, black heart) aspects. Conventional methods for the quality assessment of staple foods are always laborious, destructive, and time-consuming. Requirements for online monitoring of staple foods have been proposed to encourage the development of rapid, reagentless, and noninvasive techniques. Spectroscopic techniques, such as visible-infrared spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, and spectral imaging, have been introduced as promising analytical tools and applied for the quality evaluation of staple foods. This review summarizes the recent applications and progress of such spectroscopic techniques in determining various qualities of staple foods. Besides, challenges and future trends of these spectroscopic techniques are also presented.

  17. Advanced in situ spectroscopic techniques and their applications in environmental biogeochemistry: introduction to the special section.

    PubMed

    Lombi, Enzo; Hettiarachchi, Ganga M; Scheckel, Kirk G

    2011-01-01

    Understanding the molecular-scale complexities and interplay of chemical and biological processes of contaminants at solid, liquid, and gas interfaces is a fundamental and crucial element to enhance our understanding of anthropogenic environmental impacts. The ability to describe the complexity of environmental biogeochemical reaction mechanisms relies on our analytical ability through the application and developmemnt of advanced spectroscopic techniques. Accompanying this introductory article are nine papers that either review advanced in situ spectroscopic methods or present original research utilizing these techniques. This collection of articles summarizes the challenges facing environmental biogeochemistry, highlights the recent advances and scientific gaps, and provides an outlook into future research that may benefit from the use of in situ spectroscopic approaches. The use of synchrotron-based techniques and other methods are discussed in detail, as is the importance to integrate multiple analytical approaches to confirm results of complementary procedures or to fill data gaps. We also argue that future direction in research will be driven, in addition to recent analytical developments, by emerging factors such as the need for risk assessment of new materials (i.e., nanotechnologies) and the realization that biogeochemical processes need to be investigated in situ under environmentally relevant conditions.

  18. Laser induced deflection technique for absolute thin film absorption measurement: optimized concepts and experimental results

    SciTech Connect

    Muehlig, Christian; Kufert, Siegfried; Bublitz, Simon; Speck, Uwe

    2011-03-20

    Using experimental results and numerical simulations, two measuring concepts of the laser induced deflection (LID) technique are introduced and optimized for absolute thin film absorption measurements from deep ultraviolet to IR wavelengths. For transparent optical coatings, a particular probe beam deflection direction allows the absorption measurement with virtually no influence of the substrate absorption, yielding improved accuracy compared to the common techniques of separating bulk and coating absorption. For high-reflection coatings, where substrate absorption contributions are negligible, a different probe beam deflection is chosen to achieve a better signal-to-noise ratio. Various experimental results for the two different measurement concepts are presented.

  19. The role of simulation chambers in the development of spectroscopic techniques: campaigns at EUPHORE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ródenas, Milagros; Muñoz, Amalia; Euphore Team

    2016-04-01

    Simulation chambers represent a very useful tool for the study of chemical reactions and their products, but also to characterize instruments. The development of spectroscopic techniques throughout the last decades has benefited from tests and intercomparison exercises carried out in chambers. In fact, instruments can be exposed to various controlled atmospheric scenarios that account for different environmental conditions, eliminating the uncertainties associated to fluctuations of the air mass, which must be taken into account when extrapolating results to the real conditions. Hence, a given instrument can be characterized by assessing its precision, accuracy, detection limits, time response and potential interferences in the presence of other chemical compounds, aerosols, etc. This implies that the instrument can be calibrated and validated, which allows to enhance the features of the instrument. Moreover, chambers are also the scenario of intercomparison trials, permitting multiple instruments to sample from the same well-mixed air mass simultaneously. An overview of different campaigns to characterize and/or intercompare spectroscopic techniques that have taken place in simulation chambers will be given; in particular, those carried out at EUPHORE (two twin domes, 200 m3 each, Spain), where various intercomparison exercises have been deployed under the frame of European projects (e.g. TOXIC, FIONA, PSOA campaigns supported by EUROCHAMP-II). With the common aim of measuring given compounds (e.g. HONO, NO2, OH, glyoxal, m-glyoxal, etc), an important number of spectroscopic instruments and institutions have been involved in chamber experiments, having the chance to intercompare among them and also with other non-spectroscopic systems (e.g. monitors, cromatographs, etc) or model simulations.

  20. Absorption spectroscopic probe to investigate the interaction between Nd(III) and calf-thymus DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devi, Ch. Victory; Singh, N. Rajmuhon

    2011-03-01

    The interaction between Nd(III) and Calf Thymus DNA (CT-DNA) in physiological buffer (pH 7.4) has been studied using absorption spectroscopy involving 4f-4f transition spectra in different aquated organic solvents. Complexation with CT-DNA is indicated by the changes in absorption intensity following the subsequent changes in the oscillator strengths of different 4f-4f bands and Judd-Ofelt intensity ( Tλ) parameters. The other spectral parameters namely Slator-Condon ( Fk's), nephelauxetic effect ( β), bonding ( b1/2) and percent covalency ( δ) parameters are computed to correlate with the binding of Nd(III) with DNA. The absorption spectra of Nd(III) exhibited hyperchromism and red shift in the presence of DNA. The binding constant, Kb has been determined by absorption measurement. The relative viscosity of DNA decreased with the addition of Nd(III). Thermodynamic parameters have been calculated according to relevant absorption data and Van't Hoff equation. The characterisation of bonding mode has been studied in detail. The results suggested that the major interaction mode between Nd(III) and DNA was external electrostatic binding.

  1. Measurement of the absorption coefficient using the sound-intensity technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atwal, M.; Bernhard, R.

    1984-01-01

    The possibility of using the sound intensity technique to measure the absorption coefficient of a material is investigated. This technique measures the absorption coefficient by measuring the intensity incident on the sample and the net intensity reflected by the sample. Results obtained by this technique are compared with the standard techniques of measuring the change in the reverberation time and the standing wave ratio in a tube, thereby, calculating the random incident and the normal incident adsorption coefficient.

  2. Interaction between indium tin oxide nanoparticles and cytochrome c: A surface-enhanced Raman scattering and absorption spectroscopic study

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Yimin E-mail: tqiu@seu.edu.cn; Du, Deyang; Fan, Jiyang; Qiu, Teng E-mail: tqiu@seu.edu.cn; Kong, Fan

    2015-06-28

    Indium-tin-oxide (ITO) nanoparticles were annealed in vacuum or reducing atmosphere to obtain different surface structures and investigate their influence on the adsorptive character and conformation of cytochrome c (Cyt c) molecule. Annealing-induced morphometric or structural changes of ITO nanoparticles were characterized by instruments of transmission electron microscopy, x-ray diffraction, and Raman scattering. Semiconductor ITO nanoparticle-enhanced Raman scattering of Cyt c was observed and the enhanced efficiency was found to closely depend on the surface structures which control the adsorbance of buffer anions needed for Cyt c loading. Direct electron transfer between Cyt c and ITO surface at the moment of molecular elastic collision was found and a reverse electron transfer process for O-terminated surface and metal-terminated surface was observed, according to absorption spectroscopic measurement on the residual solution.

  3. A COMPARISON OF SPECTROSCOPIC VERSUS IMAGING TECHNIQUES FOR DETECTING CLOSE COMPANIONS TO KEPLER OBJECTS OF INTEREST

    SciTech Connect

    Teske, Johanna K.; Everett, Mark E.; Hirsch, Lea; Furlan, Elise; Ciardi, David R.; Horch, Elliott P.; Howell, Steve B.; Gonzales, Erica; Crepp, Justin R.

    2015-11-15

    Kepler planet candidates require both spectroscopic and imaging follow-up observations to rule out false positives and detect blended stars. Traditionally, spectroscopy and high-resolution imaging have probed different host star companion parameter spaces, the former detecting tight binaries and the latter detecting wider bound companions as well as chance background stars. In this paper, we examine a sample of 11 Kepler host stars with companions detected by two techniques—near-infrared adaptive optics and/or optical speckle interferometry imaging, and a new spectroscopic deblending method. We compare the companion effective temperatures (T{sub eff}) and flux ratios (F{sub B}/F{sub A}, where A is the primary and B is the companion) derived from each technique and find no cases where both companion parameters agree within 1σ errors. In 3/11 cases the companion T{sub eff} values agree within 1σ errors, and in 2/11 cases the companion F{sub B}/F{sub A} values agree within 1σ errors. Examining each Kepler system individually considering multiple avenues (isochrone mapping, contrast curves, probability of being bound), we suggest two cases for which the techniques most likely agree in their companion detections (detect the same companion star). Overall, our results support the advantage that the spectroscopic deblending technique has for finding very close-in companions (θ ≲ 0.″02–0.″05) that are not easily detectable with imaging. However, we also specifically show how high-contrast AO and speckle imaging observations detect companions at larger separations (θ ≥ 0.″02–0.″05) that are missed by the spectroscopic technique, provide additional information for characterizing the companion and its potential contamination (e.g., position angle, separation, magnitude differences), and cover a wider range of primary star effective temperatures. The investigation presented here illustrates the utility of combining the two techniques to reveal higher

  4. Quantification of UV-Visible and Laser Spectroscopic Techniques for Materials Accountability and Process Control

    SciTech Connect

    Czerwinski, Kenneth; Weck, Phil

    2013-09-13

    Ultraviolet–visible spectroscopy (UV–Visible) and time-resolved laser fluorescence spectroscopy (TRLFS) optical techniques can permit on-line analysis of actinide elements in a solvent extraction process in real time. These techniques have been used for measuring actinide speciation and concentration under laboratory conditions and are easily adaptable to multiple sampling geometries, such as dip probes, fiber-optic sample cells, and flow-through cell geometries. To fully exploit these techniques, researchers must determine the fundamental speciation of target actinides and the resulting influence on spectroscopic properties. Detection limits, process conditions, and speciation of key actinide components can be established and utilized in a range of areas, particularly those related to materials accountability and process control. Through this project, researchers will develop tools and spectroscopic techniques to evaluate solution extraction conditions and concentrations of U, Pu, and Cm in extraction processes, addressing areas of process control and materials accountability. The team will evaluate UV– Visible and TRLFS for use in solvent extraction-based separations. Ongoing research is examining efficacy of UV-Visible spectroscopy to evaluate uranium and plutonium speciation under conditions found in the UREX process and using TRLFS to evaluate Cm speciation and concentration in the TALSPEAK process. A uranyl and plutonium nitrate UV–Visible spectroscopy study met with success, which supports the utility and continued exploration of spectroscopic methods for evaluation of actinide concentrations and solution conditions for other aspects of the UREX+ solvent extraction scheme. This project will examine U and Pu absorbance in TRUEX and TALSPEAK, perform detailed examination of Cm in TRUEX and TALSPEAK, study U laser fluorescence, and apply project data to contactors. The team will also determine peak ratios as a function of solution concentrations for the

  5. A versatile setup using femtosecond adaptive spectroscopic techniques for coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Yujie; Voronine, Dmitri V.; Sokolov, Alexei V.; Scully, Marlan O.

    2015-08-15

    We report a versatile setup based on the femtosecond adaptive spectroscopic techniques for coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering. The setup uses a femtosecond Ti:Sapphire oscillator source and a folded 4f pulse shaper, in which the pulse shaping is carried out through conventional optical elements and does not require a spatial light modulator. Our setup is simple in alignment, and can be easily switched between the collinear single-beam and the noncollinear two-beam configurations. We demonstrate the capability for investigating both transparent and highly scattering samples by detecting transmitted and reflected signals, respectively.

  6. A versatile setup using femtosecond adaptive spectroscopic techniques for coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering.

    PubMed

    Shen, Yujie; Voronine, Dmitri V; Sokolov, Alexei V; Scully, Marlan O

    2015-08-01

    We report a versatile setup based on the femtosecond adaptive spectroscopic techniques for coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering. The setup uses a femtosecond Ti:Sapphire oscillator source and a folded 4f pulse shaper, in which the pulse shaping is carried out through conventional optical elements and does not require a spatial light modulator. Our setup is simple in alignment, and can be easily switched between the collinear single-beam and the noncollinear two-beam configurations. We demonstrate the capability for investigating both transparent and highly scattering samples by detecting transmitted and reflected signals, respectively.

  7. FAST CARS: engineering a laser spectroscopic technique for rapid identification of bacterial spores.

    PubMed

    Scully, M O; Kattawar, G W; Lucht, R P; Opatrny, T; Pilloff, H; Rebane, A; Sokolov, A V; Zubairy, M S

    2002-08-20

    Airborne contaminants, e.g., bacterial spores, are usually analyzed by time-consuming microscopic, chemical, and biological assays. Current research into real-time laser spectroscopic detectors of such contaminants is based on e.g., resonance fluorescence. The present approach derives from recent experiments in which atoms and molecules are prepared by one (or more) coherent laser(s) and probed by another set of lasers. However, generating and using maximally coherent oscillation in macromolecules having an enormous number of degrees of freedom is challenging. In particular, the short dephasing times and rapid internal conversion rates are major obstacles. However, adiabatic fast passage techniques and the ability to generate combs of phase-coherent femtosecond pulses provide tools for the generation and utilization of maximal quantum coherence in large molecules and biopolymers. We call this technique FAST CARS (femtosecond adaptive spectroscopic techniques for coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy), and the present article proposes and analyses ways in which it could be used to rapidly identify preselected molecules in real time.

  8. FAST CARS: Engineering a laser spectroscopic technique for rapid identification of bacterial spores

    PubMed Central

    Scully, M. O.; Kattawar, G. W.; Lucht, R. P.; Opatrný, T.; Pilloff, H.; Rebane, A.; Sokolov, A. V.; Zubairy, M. S.

    2002-01-01

    Airborne contaminants, e.g., bacterial spores, are usually analyzed by time-consuming microscopic, chemical, and biological assays. Current research into real-time laser spectroscopic detectors of such contaminants is based on e.g., resonance fluorescence. The present approach derives from recent experiments in which atoms and molecules are prepared by one (or more) coherent laser(s) and probed by another set of lasers. However, generating and using maximally coherent oscillation in macromolecules having an enormous number of degrees of freedom is challenging. In particular, the short dephasing times and rapid internal conversion rates are major obstacles. However, adiabatic fast passage techniques and the ability to generate combs of phase-coherent femtosecond pulses provide tools for the generation and utilization of maximal quantum coherence in large molecules and biopolymers. We call this technique FAST CARS (femtosecond adaptive spectroscopic techniques for coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy), and the present article proposes and analyses ways in which it could be used to rapidly identify preselected molecules in real time. PMID:12177405

  9. Electron Spin Resonance and optical absorption spectroscopic studies of manganese centers in aluminium lead borate glasses.

    PubMed

    SivaRamaiah, G; LakshmanaRao, J

    2012-12-01

    Electron Spin Resonance (ESR) and optical absorption studies of 5Al(2)O(3)+75H(3)BO(3)+(20-x)PbO+xMnSO(4) (where x=0.5, 1,1.5 and 2 mol% of MnSO(4)) glasses at room temperature have been studied. The ESR spectrum of all the glasses exhibits resonance signals with effective isotropic g values at ≈2.0, 3.3 and 4.3. The ESR resonance signal at isotropic g≈2.0 has been attributed to Mn(2+) centers in an octahedral symmetry. The ESR resonance signals at isotropic g≈3.3 and 4.3 have been attributed to the rhombic symmetry of the Mn(2+) ions. The zero-field splitting parameter (zfs) has been calculated from the intensities of the allowed hyperfine lines. The optical absorption spectrum exhibits an intense band in the visible region and it has been attributed to (5)E(g)→(5)T(2g) transition of Mn(3+)centers in an octahedral environment. The optical band gap and the Urbach energies have been calculated from the ultraviolet absorption edges.

  10. Diode laser absorption tomography using data compression techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindstrom, Chad; Tam, Chung-Jen; Givens, Ryan; Davis, Doug; Williams, Skip

    2008-02-01

    Tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (TDLAS) shows promise for in situ monitoring in high-speed flows. However, the dynamic nature of typical flows of supersonic combustors, gas turbine engines and augmenters can also lead to inhomogenities that cannot be captured by a single line-of-sight TDLAS measurement. Instead, multiple measurements varied over several spatial locations need to be made. In the current study, shock train structure in the isolator section of the Research Cell 18 supersonic combustion facility at Wright-Patterson AFB is measured. Although only two view angles are available for measurement, multiple absorption features along with a priori computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations enable estimates of two dimensional flow features to be formed. Vector quantization/kmeans data clustering is used to identify key flow features from the temporal history of the raw sinograms. Through the use of multiple absorption features that are measured nearly simultaneously, an approximate two-dimensional image can be formed. This image can be further refined through the use of an optimal set of basis functions that can be derived from a set of CFD simulations that describes the flow shapes.

  11. Spectroscopic investigation on cocrystal formation between adenine and fumaric acid based on infrared and Raman techniques.

    PubMed

    Du, Yong; Fang, Hong Xia; Zhang, Qi; Zhang, Hui Li; Hong, Zhi

    2016-01-15

    As an important component of double-stranded DNA, adenine has powerful hydrogen-bond capability, due to rich hydrogen bond donors and acceptors existing within its molecular structure. Therefore, it is easy to form cocrystal between adenine and other small molecules with intermolecular hydrogen-bond effect. In this work, cocrystal of adenine and fumaric acid has been characterized as model system by FT-IR and FT-Raman spectral techniques. The experimental results show that the cocrystal formed between adenine and fumaric acid possesses unique spectroscopical characteristic compared with that of starting materials. Density functional theory (DFT) calculation has been performed to optimize the molecular structures and simulate vibrational modes of adenine, fumaric acid and the corresponding cocrystal. Combining the theoretical and experimental vibrational results, the characteristic bands corresponding to bending and stretching vibrations of amino and carbonyl groups within cocrystal are shifted into lower frequencies upon cocrystal formation, and the corresponding bond lengths show some increase due to the effect of intermolecular hydrogen bonding. Different vibrational modes shown in the experimental spectra have been assigned based on the simulation DFT results. The study could provide experimental and theoretical benchmarks to characterize cocrystal formed between active ingredients and cocrystal formers and also the intermolecular hydrogen-bond effect within cocrystal formation process by vibrational spectroscopic techniques.

  12. Spectroscopic investigation on cocrystal formation between adenine and fumaric acid based on infrared and Raman techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Yong; Fang, Hong Xia; Zhang, Qi; Zhang, Hui Li; Hong, Zhi

    2016-01-01

    As an important component of double-stranded DNA, adenine has powerful hydrogen-bond capability, due to rich hydrogen bond donors and acceptors existing within its molecular structure. Therefore, it is easy to form cocrystal between adenine and other small molecules with intermolecular hydrogen-bond effect. In this work, cocrystal of adenine and fumaric acid has been characterized as model system by FT-IR and FT-Raman spectral techniques. The experimental results show that the cocrystal formed between adenine and fumaric acid possesses unique spectroscopical characteristic compared with that of starting materials. Density functional theory (DFT) calculation has been performed to optimize the molecular structures and simulate vibrational modes of adenine, fumaric acid and the corresponding cocrystal. Combining the theoretical and experimental vibrational results, the characteristic bands corresponding to bending and stretching vibrations of amino and carbonyl groups within cocrystal are shifted into lower frequencies upon cocrystal formation, and the corresponding bond lengths show some increase due to the effect of intermolecular hydrogen bonding. Different vibrational modes shown in the experimental spectra have been assigned based on the simulation DFT results. The study could provide experimental and theoretical benchmarks to characterize cocrystal formed between active ingredients and cocrystal formers and also the intermolecular hydrogen-bond effect within cocrystal formation process by vibrational spectroscopic techniques.

  13. Implementation of Multiple Spectroscopic Techniques to Simultaneously Observe Native and Mutated Protein Unfolding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cull, Brennan; Ben, Kelty; Link, Justin

    A protein's natural, correctly folded structure can determine the protein's ability to carry out its function. If the unfolding process of proteins can be observed, then the relative stability can be better understood between native and mutated proteins. A global picture of the unfolding process may be completed through the studies of strategically mutated proteins using tryptophan as a probe. Horse heart cytochrome c, a thoroughly studied, model protein was used in our investigation to explore this idea. Various spectroscopic techniques such as circular dichroism (CD), absorbance, and fluorescence were simultaneously applied while slowly unfolding our protein by increasing the concentration of a chemical denaturant, guanidine hydrochloride. This provided us information about the thermodynamic properties of the protein and several mutants which can then be interpreted to gain relative stability information among mutations. Efforts to utilize these techniques on native and mutated proteins in comparison to current scientific unfolding theories will be presented in this session.

  14. Measurement of initial absorption of fused silica at 193nm using laser induced deflection technique (LID)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schönfeld, Dörte; Klett, Ursula; Mühlig, Christian; Thomas, Stephan

    2008-01-01

    The ongoing development in microlithography towards further miniaturization of structures creates a strong demand for lens material with nearly ideal optical properties. Beside the highly demanding requirements on homogeneity and stress induced birefringence (SIB), low absorption is a key factor. Even a small absorption is associated with a temperature increase and results in thermally induced local variations of refractive index and SIB. This could affect the achievable resolution of the lithographic process. The total absorption of the material is composed of initial absorption and of absorption induced during irradiation. Thus, the optimization of both improves the lifetime of the material. In principal, it is possible to measure transmission and scattering with a suitable spectrometer assembly and calculate absorption from them. However, owing to the influence of sample surfaces and errors of measurement, these methods usually do not provide satisfactory results for highly light-transmissive fused silica. Therefore, it is most desirable to find a technique that is capable of directly measuring absorption coefficients in the range of (1...10)•10 -4 cm -1 (base 10) directly. We report our first results for fused silica achieved with the LID technique. Besides a fused silica grade designed for 193 nm applications, grades with higher absorption at 193 nm were measured to test the LID technique. A special focus was set on the possibility of measuring initial absorption without the influence of degradation effects.

  15. Study on the interaction between histidine-capped Au nanoclusters and bovine serum albumin with spectroscopic techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Chengzhi; Wang, Huiping; Xu, Wei; Xu, Chaoyong; Liang, Jiangong; Han, Heyou

    2014-01-01

    The understanding of the protein-nanoclusters interaction has significant implications for biological applications of nanoclusters (NCs). In this manuscript, the interaction of histidine-capped Au nanoclusters (NCs) with bovine serum albumin (BSA) has been investigated by fluorescence, UV-vis, circular dichroism (CD) and Raman spectroscopic techniques under simulative physiological conditions. The results showed that the fluorescence of BSA was quenched by Au NCs. The quenching mechanism was discussed to be a dynamic quenching style, which was proved by the fluorescence spectra and UV-vis absorption spectra. According to modified Stern-Volmer equations at different temperatures, corresponding thermodynamic parameters, ΔHθ, ΔSθ and ΔGθ were observed to be 35.97 kJ mol-1, 199.53 J mol-1 K-1 and -23.49 kJ mol-1, respectively. The hydrophobic force played a key role in the interaction process. Further results from the CD spectra and Raman spectra demonstrated that the α-helical content in BSA was reduced upon interaction with Au NCs which induced a partial protein destabilization. This study contributes to a better understanding of the biology toxicity of Au NCs to biomolecular, which is very essential for the development of safe and functional Au NCs.

  16. Study on the interaction between bovine serum albumin and CdTe quantum dots with spectroscopic techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Jiangong; Cheng, Yanping; Han, Heyou

    2008-12-01

    The interaction between bovine serum albumin (BSA) and CdTe quantum dots (QDs) was studied by fluorescence, UV-vis and Raman spectroscopic techniques. The results showed that the fluorescence of BSA was strongly quenched by CdTe QDs. The quenching mechanism was discussed to be a static quenching procedure, which was proved by the quenching rate constant ( Kq) and UV-vis absorption spectra. According to Lineweaver-Burk equations at different temperatures, the thermodynamic parameters, Δ H θ, Δ S θ and Δ G θ were observed to be -23.69 kJ mol -1, 48.39 J mol -1 K -1 and -38.04 kJ mol -1, respectively. The binding constant ( KA) and the number of binding sites ( n) were obtained by Scatchard equation. It was found that hydrophobic force and sulfhydryl group played a key role in the interaction process. Further results from Raman spectra indicated that the α-helical content in BSA reduced after binding with CdTe QDs.

  17. Absorption measurement of thin films by using photothermal techniques: The influence of thermal properties

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Z.L.; Kuo, P.K.; Thomas, R.L.; Fan, Z.X.

    1995-12-31

    Photothermal techniques are widely used for measuring optical absorption of thin film coatings. In these applications the calibration of photothermal signal is typically based on the assumption that the thermal properties of the thin film make very little contribution. In this paper we take mirage technique as an example and present a detailed analysis of the influence of thin film thermal properties on absorption measurements. The results show that the traditional calibration method is not valid on surprisingly many situations.

  18. Spectrum of excess partial molar absorptivity. I. Near infrared spectroscopic study of aqueous acetonitrile and acetone.

    PubMed

    Koga, Yoshikata; Sebe, Fumie; Minami, Takamasa; Otake, Keiko; Saitow, Ken-ichi; Nishikawa, Keiko

    2009-09-03

    We study the mixing schemes or the molecular processes occurring in aqueous acetonitrile (ACN) and acetone (ACT) by near-infrared spectroscopy (NIR). Both solutions (any other aqueous solutions) are not free from strong and complex intermolecular interactions. To tackle such a many-body problem, we first use the concept of the excess molar absorptivity, epsilonE, which is a function of solute mole fraction in addition to that of wavenumber, nu. The plots of epsilonE calculated from NIR spectra for both aqueous solutions against nu showed two clearly separated bands at 5020 and 5230 cm(-1); the former showed negative and the latter positive peaks. At zero and unity mole fractions of solute, epsilonE is identically zero independent of nu. Similar to the thermodynamic excess functions, both negative and positive bands grow in size from zero to the minimum (or the maximum) and back to zero, as the mole fraction varies from 0 to 1. Since the negative band's nu-locus coincides with the NIR spectrum of ice, and the positive with that of liquid H(2)O, we suggest that on addition of solute the "ice-likeness" decreases and the "liquid-likeness" increases, reminiscent of the two-mixture model for liquid H(2)O. The modes of these variations, however, are qualitatively different between ACN-H(2)O and ACT-H(2)O. The former ACN is known to act as a hydrophobe and ACT as a hydrophile from our previous thermodynamic studies. To see the difference more clearly, we introduced and calculated the excess partial molar absorptivity of ACN and ACT, epsilon(E)(N) and epsilon(E)(T), respectively. The mole fraction dependences of epsilon(E)(N) and epsilon(E)(T) show qualitatively different behavior and are consistent with the detailed mixing schemes elucidated by our earlier differential thermodynamic studies. Furthermore, we found in the H(2)O-rich region that the effect of hydrophobic ACN is acted on the negative band at 5020 cm(-1), while that of hydrophilic ACT is on the positive high

  19. Optical absorption, Mössbauer, and FTIR spectroscopic studies of two blue bazzites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taran, Michail N.; Dyar, M. Darby; Khomenko, Vladimir M.; Boesenberg, Joseph S.

    2017-02-01

    Two samples of bazzite, a very rare Sc analog of beryl, from Tørdal, Telemark, Norway and Kent, Central Kazakhstan were studied by electron microprobe, optical absorption, and Mössbauer spectroscopies; the latter sample was also studied by FTIR. Electron microprobe results show that the Norway bazzite is composed of two bazzites with slightly different FeO contents, viz. 5.66 and 5.43 wt%. The Kazakhstan sample consists of several varieties of bazzite displaying strong differences in iron, manganese, magnesium, and aluminum contents (in wt%): FeO from 2.02 to 6.73, MnO from 0.89 to 2.98, MgO from 0.37 to 1.86, and Al2O3 from 0.30 to 1.30. Mössbauer spectroscopy shows different degrees of iron oxidation. The Norway bazzite is completely Fe2+, while the Kazakhstan sample contains roughly equivalent Fe3+ and Fe2+ accommodated in the octahedral site. The difference in iron oxidation causes strong variations in the intensity of the broad optical absorption band around 13,850 cm-1, which is assigned to Fe2+ → Fe3+ IVCT; as a result, there are strong differences in the intensity of blue color. Dichroism (E||c ≫ E⊥c) is much stronger in the Kazakhstan sample than in the Norway one. Intensities of the electronic spin-allowed bands of [6]Fe2+ at 8900 and 10,400 cm-1 are somewhat higher in the latter than in the former. FTIR spectra of the sample from Kent show the presence of only water type II molecules with the H-H vector perpendicular to the c-axis, in contrast to more typical beryls that always show at least weak minor bands of H2O I. This result shows that trapped water molecules in structural channels of studied bazzite occupy only sites next to or between six-membered rings centered by Na atoms. Definite structure can be observed in the vicinities of ν2 and ν3 peaks. Peaks at 1621 and 3663 cm-1 are assigned to "doubly coordinated" H2O (IId), whereas maximums at 1633 and 3643 cm-1 likely represent "singly coordinated" H2O (IIs). Interpretation of the third

  20. Absorption and fluorescence spectroscopic characterization of BLUF domain of AppA from Rhodobacter sphaeroides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zirak, P.; Penzkofer, A.; Schiereis, T.; Hegemann, P.; Jung, A.; Schlichting, I.

    2005-08-01

    The BLUF domain of the transcriptional anti-repressor protein AppA from the non-sulfur anoxyphototrophic purple bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides was characterized by absorption and emission spectroscopy. The BLUF domain constructs AppA 148 (consisting of amino-acid residues 1-148) and AppA 126 (amino-acid residues 1-126) are investigated. The cofactor of the investigated domains is found to consist of a mixture of the flavins riboflavin, FMN, and FAD. The dark-adapted domains exist in two different active receptor conformations (receptor states) with different sub-nanosecond fluorescence lifetimes (BLUF r,f and BLUF r,sl) and a small non-interacting conformation (BLUF nc). The active receptor conformations are transformed to putative signalling states (BLUF s,f and BLUF s,sl) of low fluorescence efficiency and picosecond fluorescence lifetime by blue-light excitation (light-adapted domains). In the dark at room temperature both signalling states recover back to the initial receptor states with a time constant of about 17 min. A quantum yield of signalling state formation of about 25% was determined by intensity dependent transmission measurements. A photo-cycle scheme is presented including photo-induced charge transfer complex formation, charge recombination, and protein binding pocket reorganisation.

  1. Sensitive and absolute absorption measurements in optical materials and coatings by laser-induced deflection technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mühlig, Christian; Bublitz, Simon

    2012-12-01

    The laser-induced deflection (LID) technique, a photo-thermal deflection setup with transversal pump-probe-beam arrangement, is applied for sensitive and absolute absorption measurements of optical materials and coatings. Different LID concepts for bulk and transparent coating absorption measurements, respectively, are explained, focusing on providing accurate absorption data with only one measurement and one sample. Furthermore, a new sandwich concept is introduced that allows transferring the LID technique to very small sample geometries and to significantly increase the sensitivity for materials with weak photo-thermal responses. For each of the different concepts, a representative application example is given. Particular emphasis is placed on the importance of the calibration procedure for providing absolute absorption data. The validity of an electrical calibration procedure for the LID setup is proven using specially engineered surface absorbing samples. The electrical calibration procedure is then applied to evaluate two other approaches that use either doped samples or highly absorptive reference samples.

  2. New spectroscopic tools and techniques for characterizing M dwarfs and discovering their planets in the near-infrared

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terrien, Ryan C.

    M dwarfs are the least massive and most common stars in the Galaxy. Due to their prevalence and long lifetimes, these diminutive stars play an outsize role in several fields of astronomical study. In particular, it is now known that they commonly host planetary systems, and may be the most common hosts of Earth-size, rocky planets in the habitable zone. A comprehensive understanding of M dwarfs is crucial for understanding the origins and conditions of their planetary systems, including their potential habitability. Such an understanding depends on methods for precisely and accurately measuring their properties. These tools have broader applicability as well, underlying the use of M dwarfs as fossils of Galactic evolution, and helping to constrain the structures and interiors of these stars. The measurement of the fundamental parameters of M dwarfs is encumbered by their spectral complexity. Unlike stars of spectral type F, G, or K that are similar to our G type Sun, whose spectra are dominated by continuum emission and atomic features, the cool atmospheres of M dwarfs are dominated by complex molecular absorption. Another challenge for studies of M dwarfs is that these stars are optically faint, emitting much of their radiation in the near-infrared (NIR). The availability and performance of NIR spectrographs have lagged behind those of optical spectrographs due to the challenges of producing low-noise, high-sensitivity NIR detector arrays, which have only recently become available. This thesis discusses two related lines of work that address these challenges, motivated by the development of the Habitable Zone Planet Finder (HPF), a NIR radial velocity (RV) spectrograph under development at Penn State that will search for and confirm planets around nearby M dwarfs. This work includes the development and application of new NIR spectroscopic techniques for characterizing M dwarfs, and the development and optimization of new NIR instrumentation for HPF. The first line

  3. Absorption spectroscopic study of synergistic extraction of praseodymium with benzoyl acetone in presence of crown ether.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Shrabanti; Bhattacharya, Sumanta; Basu, Sukalyan

    2005-04-01

    The extraction behaviour of Pr(III) from aqueous nitric acid medium employing benzoylacetone has been studied in presence of two crown ethers, viz., 15-crown-5 and benzo-15-crown-5 in chloroform medium using UV-vis absorption spectroscopy. The binary equilibrium constant (logk(ex)) for the complex [Pr(benzoylacetonate)(NO3(-))2(H(2)O)] in organic phase was found to be 1.170. The overall equilibrium constants (logK) for the ternary species [Pr(benzoylacetonate)(crown ether)(NO3(-))(2)] were estimated to be 4.01 and 4.41 for 15-crown-5 and benzo-15-crown-5, respectively. The trend in the equilibrium constant values were very much in accordance with the nature of substitution of the donor moiety. The extraction of Pr(III) by the benzoylacetone-crown ether combination was maximum at pH 3.0 and extraction decreases with increase in pH. It has been found that the extent of extraction of Pr(III) in organic phase as the binary as well as ternary complex [Pr(benzoylacetonate)(NO3(-))(2)(H(2)O)] and [Pr(benzoylacetonate)(crown ether)(NO3(-))(2)] increases with increase in concentration of the ligand. Similar trend is observed in the extraction by only donors. Enthalpies and entropies of formation for the ternary extraction process have been estimated. In addition, the effect of NaNO(3) as foreign salt was also studied and it was observed that with increase in ionic strength, percentage extraction increases.

  4. Systematic toxicological analysis of drugs and poisons in biosamples by hyphenated chromatographic and spectroscopic techniques.

    PubMed

    Polettini, A

    1999-10-15

    The introduction of hyphenated chromatographic-spectroscopic techniques represented a substantial step-forward for Systematic Toxicological Analysis (STA), increasing the amount and quality of information obtainable from the analysis of a biological sample, and enhancing the possibilities of identifying unknown drugs and poisons. STA methods based either on GC-MS or on HPLC-UV published in the last decade are reviewed in this paper. The different analytical phases, i.e. sample preparation (pretreatment, extraction, derivatisation), chromatographic separation and detection/identification are examined in detail in order to emphasise the complementarity of the two approaches. In addition, the first STA method based on HPLC-MS is illustrated and some applications of TLC-UV to drug screening are also described. Finally, an overview of semi- and fully-automated STA methods is given.

  5. Nondestructive spectroscopic and imaging techniques for quality evaluation and assessment of fish and fish products.

    PubMed

    He, Hong-Ju; Wu, Di; Sun, Da-Wen

    2015-01-01

    Nowadays, people have increasingly realized the importance of acquiring high quality and nutritional values of fish and fish products in their daily diet. Quality evaluation and assessment are always expected and conducted by using rapid and nondestructive methods in order to satisfy both producers and consumers. During the past two decades, spectroscopic and imaging techniques have been developed to nondestructively estimate and measure quality attributes of fish and fish products. Among these noninvasive methods, visible/near-infrared (VIS/NIR) spectroscopy, computer/machine vision, and hyperspectral imaging have been regarded as powerful and effective analytical tools for fish quality analysis and control. VIS/NIR spectroscopy has been widely applied to determine intrinsic quality characteristics of fish samples, such as moisture, protein, fat, and salt. Computer/machine vision on the other hand mainly focuses on the estimation of external features like color, weight, size, and surface defects. Recently, by incorporating both spectroscopy and imaging techniques in one system, hyperspectral imaging cannot only measure the contents of different quality attributes simultaneously, but also obtain the spatial distribution of such attributes when the quality of fish samples are evaluated and measured. This paper systematically reviews the research advances of these three nondestructive optical techniques in the application of fish quality evaluation and determination and discuss future trends in the developments of nondestructive technologies for further quality characterization in fish and fish products.

  6. Micro-spectroscopic techniques applied to characterization of varnished archeological findings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barone, G.; Ioppolo, S.; Majolino, D.; Migliardo, P.; Ponterio, R.

    2000-04-01

    This work reports an analysis on terracotta varnished finding recovered in east Sicily area (Messina). We have performed FTIR micro-spectroscopy and electronic microscopy (SEM)measurements in order to recognize the elemental constituents of the varnished surfaces. Furthermore, for all the samples, a study on the bulk has been performed by Fourier Transform Infrared Absorption. The analyzed samples consist of a number of pottery fragments belonging to archaic and classical ages, varnished in black and red colors. The obtained data furnished useful information about composition of decorated surfaces and bulk matrixes, about baking temperature, manufacture techniques and alteration mechanisms of findings due to the long burial.

  7. Feasibility of measuring density and temperature of laser produced plasmas using spectroscopic techniques.

    SciTech Connect

    Edens, Aaron D.

    2008-09-01

    A wide variety of experiments on the Z-Beamlet laser involve the creation of laser produced plasmas. Having a direct measurement of the density and temperature of these plasma would an extremely useful tool, as understanding how these quantities evolve in space and time gives insight into the causes of changes in other physical processes, such as x-ray generation and opacity. We propose to investigate the possibility of diagnosing the density and temperature of laser-produced plasma using temporally and spatially resolved spectroscopic techniques that are similar to ones that have been successfully fielded on other systems. Various researchers have measured the density and temperature of laboratory plasmas by looking at the width and intensity ratio of various characteristic lines in gases such as nitrogen and hydrogen, as well as in plasmas produced off of solid targets such as zinc. The plasma conditions produce two major measurable effects on the characteristic spectral lines of that plasma. The 1st is the Stark broadening of an individual line, which depends on the electron density of the plasma, with higher densities leading to broader lines. The second effect is a change in the ratio of various lines in the plasma corresponding to different ionization states. By looking at the ratio of these lines, we can gain some understanding of the plasma ionization state and consequently its temperature (and ion density when coupled with the broadening measurement). The hotter a plasma is, the higher greater the intensity of lines corresponding to higher ionization states. We would like to investigate fielding a system on the Z-Beamlet laser chamber to spectroscopically study laser produced plasmas from different material targets.

  8. A RAPID SPECTROSCOPIC TECHNIQUE FOR DETERMINING THE POTENTIAL ALPHA ENERGY CONCENTRATION OF RADON DECAY PRODUCTS

    SciTech Connect

    Revzan, K. L.; Nazaroff, W. W.

    1981-07-01

    We consider the application of alpha spectroscopy to the rapid determination of the potential alpha energy concentration (PAEC) of radon decay products indoors. Two count totals are obtained after a single counting period. The PAEC is then estimated by a linear combination of the count totals, the two coefficients being determined by analysis of the dependence of the statistical and procedural errors on the equilibrium conditions and the sampling, delay, and counting times. For a total measurement time of 11 min, the procedural error is unlikely to exceed 20% for equilibrium conditions commonly found indoors; the statistical error is less than 20% at a PAEC of 0.005 WL, assuming a product of detector efficiency and flow rate of at least 1.0 l/min. An analysis is made of techniques based on a total alpha count, and the results are compared with those obtained with the rapid spectroscopic technique; the latter is clearly preferable when the measurement time does not exceed 15 min.

  9. Application of spectroscopic techniques for the analysis of kidney stones: a pilot study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shameem, K. M., Muhammed; Chawla, Arun; Bankapur, Aseefhali; Unnikrishnan, V. K.; Santhosh, C.

    2016-03-01

    Identification and characterization of kidney stone remains one of the important analytical tasks in the medical field. Kidney stone is a common health complication throughout the world, which may cause severe pain, obstruction and infection of urinary tract, and can lead to complete renal damage. It commonly occurs in both sexes regardless of age. Kidney stones have different composition, although each stones have a major single characteristic component. A complete understanding of a sample properties and their function can only be feasible by utilizing elemental and molecular information simultaneously. Two laser based analytical techniques; Laser Induced Breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) and Raman spectroscopy have been used to study different types of kidney stones from different patients. LIBS and Raman spectroscopy are highly complementary spectroscopic techniques, which provide elemental and molecular information of a sample. Q-switched Nd:YAG laser at 355 nm laser having energy 17mJ per pulse at 10 Hz repetition rate was used for getting LIBS spectra. Raman measurements were carried out using a home assembled micro-Raman spectrometer. Using the recorded Raman spectra of kidney stones, we were able to differentiate different kinds of kidney stones. LIBS spectra of the same stones are showing the evidence of C, Ca, H, and O and also suggest the presence of certain pigments.

  10. Reactivity of Chromium(III) Nutritional Supplements in Biological Media: An X-Ray Absorption Spectroscopic Study

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, A.; Mulyani, I.; Levina, A.; Lay, P.A.

    2009-05-22

    Chromium(III) nutritional supplements are widely used due to their purported ability to enhance glucose metabolism, despite growing evidence on low activity and the potential genotoxicity of these compounds. Reactivities of Cr(III) complexes used in nutritional formulations, including [Cr3O(OCOEt)6(OH2)3]+ (A), [Cr(pic)3] (pic) = 2-pyridinecarboxylato(-) (B), and trans-[CrCl2(OH2)4]+ (CrCl3 {center_dot} 6H2O; C), in a range of natural and simulated biological media (artificial digestion systems, blood and its components, cell culture media, and intact L6 rat skeletal muscle cells) were studied by X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy. The XANES spectroscopic data were processed by multiple linear-regression analyses with the use of a library of model Cr(III) compounds, and the results were corroborated by the results of X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy and electrospray mass spectrometry. Complexes A and B underwent extensive ligand-exchange reactions under conditions of combined gastric and intestinal digestion (in the presence of a semisynthetic meal, 3 h at 310 K), as well as in blood serum and in a cell culture medium (1-24 h at 310 K), with the formation of Cr(III) complexes with hydroxo and amino acid/protein ligands. Reactions of compounds A-C with cultured muscle cells led to similar ligand-exchange products, with at least part of Cr(III) bound to the surface of the cells. The reactions of B with serum greatly enhanced its propensity to be converted to Cr(VI) by biological oxidants (H2O2 or glucose oxidase system), which is proposed to be a major cause of both the insulin-enhancing activity and toxicity of Cr(III) compounds (Mulyani, I.; Levina, A.; Lay, P. A. Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 2004, 43, 4504-4507). This finding enhances the current concern over the safety of consumption of large doses of Cr(III) supplements, particularly [Cr(pic)3].

  11. Reactivity of chromium(III) nutritional supplements in biological media: an X-ray absorption spectroscopic study.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Annie; Mulyani, Irma; Levina, Aviva; Lay, Peter A

    2008-05-19

    Chromium(III) nutritional supplements are widely used due to their purported ability to enhance glucose metabolism, despite growing evidence on low activity and the potential genotoxicity of these compounds. Reactivities of Cr(III) complexes used in nutritional formulations, including [Cr3O(OCOEt)6(OH2)3](+) (A), [Cr(pic)3] (pic=2-pyridinecarboxylato(-) (B), and trans-[CrCl2(OH2)4](+) (CrCl3.6H2O; C), in a range of natural and simulated biological media (artificial digestion systems, blood and its components, cell culture media, and intact L6 rat skeletal muscle cells) were studied by X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy. The XANES spectroscopic data were processed by multiple linear-regression analyses with the use of a library of model Cr(III) compounds, and the results were corroborated by the results of X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy and electrospray mass spectrometry. Complexes A and B underwent extensive ligand-exchange reactions under conditions of combined gastric and intestinal digestion (in the presence of a semisynthetic meal, 3 h at 310 K), as well as in blood serum and in a cell culture medium (1-24 h at 310 K), with the formation of Cr(III) complexes with hydroxo and amino acid/protein ligands. Reactions of compounds A-C with cultured muscle cells led to similar ligand-exchange products, with at least part of Cr(III) bound to the surface of the cells. The reactions of B with serum greatly enhanced its propensity to be converted to Cr(VI) by biological oxidants (H2O2 or glucose oxidase system), which is proposed to be a major cause of both the insulin-enhancing activity and toxicity of Cr(III) compounds (Mulyani, I.; Levina, A.; Lay, P. A. Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 2004, 43, 4504-4507). This finding enhances the current concern over the safety of consumption of large doses of Cr(III) supplements, particularly [Cr(pic)3].

  12. Planetary Surface Analysis Using Fast Laser Spectroscopic Techniques: Combined Microscopic Raman, LIBS, and Fluorescence Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blacksberg, J.; Rossman, G. R.; Maruyama, Y.; Charbon, E.

    2011-12-01

    In situ exploration of planetary surfaces has to date required multiple techniques that, when used together, yield important information about their formation histories and evolution. We present a time-resolved laser spectroscopic technique that could potentially collect complementary sets of data providing information on mineral structure, composition, and hydration state. Using a picosecond-scale pulsed laser and a fast time-resolved detector we can simultaneously collect spectra from Raman, Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS), and fluorescence emissions that are separated in time due to the unique decay times of each process. The use of a laser with high rep rate (40 KHz) and low pulse energy (1 μJ/pulse) allows us to rapidly collect high signal to noise Raman spectra while minimizing sample damage. Increasing the pulse energy by about an order of magnitude creates a microscopic plasma near the surface and enables the collection of LIBS spectra at an unusually high rep rate and low pulse energy. Simultaneously, broader fluorescence peaks can be detected with lifetimes varying from nanosecond to microsecond. We will present Raman, LIBS, and fluorescence spectra obtained on natural mineral samples such as sulfates, clays, pyroxenes and carbonates that are of interest for Mars mineralogy. We demonstrate this technique using a photocathode-based streak camera detector as well as a newly-developed solid state Single Photon Avalanche Diode (SPAD) sensor array based on Complementary Metal-Oxide Semiconductor (CMOS) technology. We will discuss the impact of system design and detector choice on science return of a potential planetary surface mission, with a specific focus on size, weight, power, and complexity. The research described here was carried out at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under a contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA).

  13. Atmospheric Absorption Parameters for Laser Propagation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    high-resolution, good photometric accuracy data for numerous bands in the 3-5 Am region, using the facility at Kitt Peak National Solar Observatory. The...L49-L52 (2001). 44. A. Castrillo, G. Gagliardi, G. Casa , and L. Gianfrani, "Combined interferometric and absorption-spectroscopic technique for...from FT visible solar absorption spectra and evaluation of spectroscopic databases," JQRST 82, 133-150 (2003). 53. D. Jacquemart, R.R. Gamache, and L.S

  14. Integrated Analysis of the Wood Oil from Xanthocyparis vietnamensis Farjon & Hiep. by Chromatographic and Spectroscopic Techniques.

    PubMed

    Bazzali, Ophélie; Thai, Tran Huy; Hoi, Tran Minh; Khang, Nguyen Sinh; Hien, Nguyen Thi; Casanova, Joseph; Bighelli, Ange; Tomi, Félix

    2016-06-27

    In order to get better knowledge about the volatiles produced by Xanthocyparis vietnamensis, a species recently discovered in Vietnam, its wood oil has been analyzed by a combination of chromatographic (GC, CC) and spectroscopic (GC-MS, (13)C-NMR) techniques. Forty components that accounted for 87.9% of the oil composition have been identified. The composition is dominated by nootkatene (20.7%), 11,12,13-tri-nor-eremophil-1(10)-en-7-one (17.2%), γ-eudesmol (5.1%), nootkatone (4.7%), valencene (3.5%) and 13-nor-eremophil-1(10)-en-11-one (2.6%). The structure of two new compounds-10-epi-nor-γ-eudesmen-11-one and 12-hydroxy-isodihydroagarofuran-has been elucidated, while 11,12,13-tri-nor-eremophil-1(10)-en-7-ol is reported as a natural product for the first time. The composition of X. vietnamensis wood oil varied drastically from those of leaf oils, dominated by hedycaryol (34.4%), phyllocladene (37.8%) or by pimara-6(14)-15-diene (19.4%).

  15. Characterization of the binding of nevadensin to bovine serum albumin by optical spectroscopic technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Zhaolian; Li, Daojin; Ji, Baoming; Chen, Jianjun

    2008-10-01

    Binding of nevadensin to bovine serum albumin (BSA) has been studied in detail at 298 and 310 K using spectrophotometric technique. The intrinsic fluorescence of BSA was strongly quenched by the addition of nevadensin and spectroscopic observations are mainly rationalized in terms of a static quenching process at lower concentration of nevadensin ( Cdrug/ CBSA < 1) and a combined quenching process at higher concentration of nevadensin ( Cdrug/ CBSA > 1). The binding parameters for the reaction at a pH above (7.40) or below (3.40) the isoelectric point have been calculated according to the double logarithm regression curve. The thermodynamic parameters Δ H0, Δ G0, Δ S0 at different temperatures and binding mechanism of nevadensin to BSA at pH 7.40 and 3.40 were evaluated. The binding ability of nevadensin to BSA at pH 7.40 was stronger than that at pH 3.40. Steady fluorescence, synchronous fluorescence and circular dichroism (CD) were applied to investigate protein conformation. A value of 2.15 nm for the average distance r between nevadensin (acceptor) and tryptophan residues (Trp) of BSA (donor) was derived from the fluorescence resonance energy transfer. Moreover, influence of pH on the interaction nevadensin with BSA was investigated.

  16. A computationally assisted spectroscopic technique to measure secondary electron emission coefficients in radio frequency plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daksha, M.; Berger, B.; Schuengel, E.; Korolov, I.; Derzsi, A.; Koepke, M.; Donkó, Z.; Schulze, J.

    2016-06-01

    A computationally assisted spectroscopic technique to measure secondary electron emission coefficients (γ-CAST) in capacitively-coupled radio-frequency plasmas is proposed. This non-intrusive, sensitive diagnostic is based on a combination of phase resolved optical emission spectroscopy and particle-based kinetic simulations. In such plasmas (under most conditions in electropositive gases) the spatio-temporally resolved electron-impact excitation/ionization rate features two distinct maxima adjacent to each electrode at different times within each RF period. While one maximum is the consequence of the energy gain of electrons due to sheath expansion, the second maximum is produced by secondary electrons accelerated towards the plasma bulk by the sheath electric field at the time of maximum voltage drop across the adjacent sheath. Due to these different excitation/ionization mechanisms, the ratio of the intensities of these maxima is very sensitive to the secondary electron emission coefficient γ. This sensitvity, in turn, allows γ to be determined by comparing experimental excitation profiles and simulation data obtained with various γ-coefficients. The diagnostic, tested here in a geometrically symmetric argon discharge, yields an effective secondary electron emission coefficient of γ =0.066+/- 0.01 for stainless steel electrodes.

  17. Qualitative and quantitative changes in phospholipids and proteins investigated by spectroscopic techniques in animal depression model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Depciuch, J.; Sowa-Kucma, M.; Nowak, G.; Papp, M.; Gruca, P.; Misztak, P.; Parlinska-Wojtan, M.

    2017-04-01

    Depression becomes nowadays a high mortality civilization disease with one of the major causes being chronic stress. Raman, Fourier Transform Infra Red (FTIR) and Ultraviolet-Visible (UV-vis) spectroscopies were used to determine the changes in the quantity and structure of phospholipids and proteins in the blood serum of rats subjected to chronic mild stress, which is a common animal depression model. Moreover, the efficiency of the imipramine treatment was evaluated. It was found that chronic mild stress not only damages the structure of the phospholipids and proteins, but also decreases their level in the blood serum. A 5 weeks imipramine treatment did increase slightly the quantity of proteins, leaving the damaged phospholipids unchanged. Structural information from phospholipids and proteins was obtained by UV-vis spectroscopy combined with the second derivative of the FTIR spectra. Indeed, the structure of proteins in blood serum of stressed rats was normalized after imipramine therapy, while the impaired structure of phospholipids remained unaffected. These findings strongly suggest that the depression factor, which is chronic mild stress, may induce permanent (irreversible) damages into the phospholipid structure identified as shortened carbon chains. This study shows a possible new application of spectroscopic techniques in the diagnosis and therapy monitoring of depression.

  18. Spectroscopic technique with wide range of wavelength information improves near-infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eda, Hideo; Aoki, Hiromichi; Eura, Shigeru; Ebe, Kazutoshi

    2009-02-01

    Near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) calculates hemoglobin parameters, such as oxygenated hemoglobin (oxyHb) and deoxygenated hemoglobin (deoxyHb) using the near-infrared light around the wavelength of 800nm. This is based on the modified-Lambert-Beer's law that changes in absorbance are proportional to changes in hemoglobin parameters. Many conventional measurement methods uses only a few wavelengths, however, in this research, basic examination of NIRS measurement was approached by acquiring wide range of wavelength information. Venous occlusion test was performed by using the blood pressure cuff around the upper arm. Pressure of 100mmHg was then applied for about 3 minutes. During the venous occlusion, the spectrum of the lower arm muscles was measured every 15 seconds, within the range of 600 to 1100nm. It was found that other wavelength bands hold information correlating to this venous occlusion task. Technique of improving the performance of NIRS measurement using the Spectroscopic Method is very important for Brain science.

  19. A computationally assisted spectroscopic technique to measure secondary electron emission coefficients in technological rf plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berger, Birk; Schulze, Julian; Daksha, Manaswi; Schuengel, Edmund; Koepke, Mark; Korolov, Ihor; Derzsi, Aranka; Donko, Zoltan

    2016-09-01

    A Computationally Assisted Spectroscopic Technique to measure secondary electron emission coefficients (y-CAST) in capacitive rf plasmas is proposed. This non-intrusive, sensitive diagnostic is based on a combination of Phase Resolved Optical Emission Spectroscopy and PIC simulations. Under most conditions in electropositive plasmas the spatio-temporally resolved electron-impact excitation rate features two distinct maxima adjacent to each electrode at different times within one rf period. One maximum is the consequence of an energy gain of the electrons due to sheath expansion. The second maximum is produced by electrons accelerated towards the plasma bulk by the sheath electric field at the time of maximum voltage drop across the sheath. Due to the different excitation mechanisms the ratio of the intensities of these maxima is very sensitive to y, which allows for its determination via comparing the experimentally measured excitation profiles with corresponding simulation data obtained with various y-coefficients. This diagnostic is tested here in a geometrically symmetric reactor, for stainless steel electrodes and argon gas. An effective secondary electron emission coefficient of y = 0.067+-0.010 is obtained, which is in excellent agreement with previous experimental results.

  20. Innovative combination of spectroscopic techniques to reveal nanoparticle fate in a crop plant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larue, Camille; Castillo-Michel, Hiram; Stein, Ricardo J.; Fayard, Barbara; Pouyet, Emeline; Villanova, Julie; Magnin, Valérie; Pradas del Real, Ana-Elena; Trcera, Nicolas; Legros, Samuel; Sorieul, Stéphanie; Sarret, Géraldine

    2016-05-01

    Nanotechnology is the new industrial revolution of our century. Its development leads to an increasing use of nanoparticles and thus to their dissemination. Their fate in the environment is of great concern and especially their possible transfer in trophic chains might be an issue for food safety. However, so far our knowledge on this topic has been restricted by the lack of appropriate techniques to characterize their behavior in complex matrices. Here, we present in detail the use of cutting-edge beam-based techniques for nanoparticle in situ localization, quantification and speciation in a crop plant species (Lactuca sativa). Lettuce seedlings have been exposed to TiO2 and Ag nanoparticles and analyzed by inductively coupled plasma spectrometry, micro-particle induced X-ray emission coupled to Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy on nuclear microprobe, micro-X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy and X-ray absorption near edge structure spectroscopy. The benefits and drawbacks of each technique are discussed, and the types of information that can be drawn, for example on the translocation to edible parts, change of speciation within the plant, detoxification mechanisms, or impact on the plant ionome, are highlighted. Such type of coupled approach would be an asset for nanoparticle risk assessment.

  1. Analysis of the binding interaction in uric acid - Human hemoglobin system by spectroscopic techniques.

    PubMed

    Makarska-Bialokoz, Magdalena

    2017-01-31

    The binding interaction between human hemoglobin and uric acid has been studied for the first time, by UV-vis absorption and steady-state, synchronous and three-dimensional fluorescence techniques. Characteristic effects observed for human hemoglobin intrinsic fluorescence during interaction with uric acid at neutral pH point at the formation of stacking non-covalent and non-fluorescent complexes. All the calculated parameters, the binding, fluorescence quenching and bimolecular quenching rate constants, as well as Förster resonance energy transfer parameters confirm the existence of static quenching. The results of synchronous fluorescence measurements indicate that the fluorescence quenching of human hemoglobin originates both from Trp and Tyr residues and that the addition of uric acid could significantly hinder the physiological functions of human hemoglobin.

  2. A quality control technique based on UV-VIS absorption spectroscopy for tequila distillery factories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbosa Garcia, O.; Ramos Ortiz, G.; Maldonado, J. L.; Pichardo Molina, J.; Meneses Nava, M. A.; Landgrave, Enrique; Cervantes, M. J.

    2006-02-01

    A low cost technique based on the UV-VIS absorption spectroscopy is presented for the quality control of the spirit drink known as tequila. It is shown that such spectra offer enough information to discriminate a given spirit drink from a group of bottled commercial tequilas. The technique was applied to white tequilas. Contrary to the reference analytic methods, such as chromatography, for this technique neither special personal training nor sophisticated instrumentations is required. By using hand-held instrumentation this technique can be applied in situ during the production process.

  3. Combined laser calorimetry and photothermal technique for absorption measurement of optical coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Li Bincheng; Blaschke, Holger; Ristau, Detlev

    2006-08-10

    To the best of our knowledge, a combined sensitive technique employing both laser calorimetry and a surface thermal lens scheme for measuring absorption values of optical coatings is presented for the first time. Laser calorimetric and pulsed surface thermal lens signals are simultaneously obtained with a highly reflecting UV coating sample irradiated at 193 nm. The advantages and potential applications of the combined technique and the experimental factors limiting the measurement sensitivity are discussed.

  4. Combined laser calorimetry and photothermal technique for absorption measurement of optical coatings.

    PubMed

    Li, Bincheng; Blaschke, Holger; Ristau, Detlev

    2006-08-10

    To the best of our knowledge, a combined sensitive technique employing both laser calorimetry and a surface thermal lens scheme for measuring absorption values of optical coatings is presented for the first time. Laser calorimetric and pulsed surface thermal lens signals are simultaneously obtained with a highly reflecting UV coating sample irradiated at 193 nm. The advantages and potential applications of the combined technique and the experimental factors limiting the measurement sensitivity are discussed.

  5. Examination of optimum carrier materials and quantum dots for a quantum dot solar concentrator using spectroscopic techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallagher, S. J.; Rowan, B. C.; Doran, J.; Norton, B.

    2005-08-01

    Spectroscopic measurements have been undertaken for a range of different quantum dot (QD) types and transparent host materials for use in a novel solar energy-concentrating device, a Quantum Dot Solar Concentrator1 (QDSC). A QDSC comprises QDs seeded in materials such as plastics and glasses that are suitable for incorporation into buildings where photovoltaic cells attached to the edges convert direct and diffuse solar energy into electricity for use in the building. High transparency in the matrix material and QDs with a large Stokes shift are essential for an efficient QDSC. An optimum matrix material for a QDSC has been determined based on absorption characteristics and an optimum commercially available QD type has been chosen using steady-state absorption, photoluminescence and photoluminescence excitation spectroscopy of QDs in solution and solid matrices.

  6. [Application of Raman spectroscopic technique to the identification and investigation of Chinese ancient jades and jade artifacts].

    PubMed

    Zhao, Hong-Xia; Gan, Fu-Xi

    2009-11-01

    Laser Raman spectroscopic technique is one of the essential methods in scientific archaeological research, which belongs to the nondestructive analysis. As a very good nondestructive analysis approach, it has not been widely applied in the research of the Chinese ancient jade artifacts. First of all in the present paper the fundamentals of laser Raman spectroscopic technique and the new research progress in this field were reviewed. Secondly, the Raman spectra of five familiar jades including nephrite (mainly composed of tremolite), Xiuyan Jade (mainly composed of serpentine), Dushan Jade (mainly composed of anorthite and Zoisite), turquoise and lapis lazuli were summarized respectively. As for an example, the Raman spectra of the four Chinese ancient jade artifacts excavated from Liangzhu Site of Zhejiang Province and Yinxu Site of Anyang in Henan Province were compared with that of the nephrite sample in Hetian of Xinjiang Province. It was shown that the Raman spectroscopic technique is a good nondestructive approach to the identification and investigation of the structures and mineral composition of Chinese ancient jade artifacts. Finally, the limitations and the foreground of this technique were discussed.

  7. A nearly on-axis spectroscopic system for simultaneously measuring UV-visible absorption and X-ray diffraction in the SPring-8 structural genomics beamline.

    PubMed

    Sakaguchi, Miyuki; Kimura, Tetsunari; Nishida, Takuma; Tosha, Takehiko; Sugimoto, Hiroshi; Yamaguchi, Yoshihiro; Yanagisawa, Sachiko; Ueno, Go; Murakami, Hironori; Ago, Hideo; Yamamoto, Masaki; Ogura, Takashi; Shiro, Yoshitsugu; Kubo, Minoru

    2016-01-01

    UV-visible absorption spectroscopy is useful for probing the electronic and structural changes of protein active sites, and thus the on-line combination of X-ray diffraction and spectroscopic analysis is increasingly being applied. Herein, a novel absorption spectrometer was developed at SPring-8 BL26B2 with a nearly on-axis geometry between the X-ray and optical axes. A small prism mirror was placed near the X-ray beamstop to pass the light only 2° off the X-ray beam, enabling spectroscopic analysis of the X-ray-exposed volume of a crystal during X-ray diffraction data collection. The spectrometer was applied to NO reductase, a heme enzyme that catalyzes NO reduction to N2O. Radiation damage to the heme was monitored in real time during X-ray irradiation by evaluating the absorption spectral changes. Moreover, NO binding to the heme was probed via caged NO photolysis with UV light, demonstrating the extended capability of the spectrometer for intermediate analysis.

  8. Photothermal self-phase-modulation technique for absorption measurements on high-reflective coatings.

    PubMed

    Steinlechner, Jessica; Jensen, Lars; Krüger, Christoph; Lastzka, Nico; Steinlechner, Sebastian; Schnabel, Roman

    2012-03-10

    We propose and demonstrate a new measurement technique for the optical absorption of high-reflection coatings. Our technique is based on photothermal self-phase modulation and exploits the deformation of cavity Airy peaks that occurs due to coating absorption of intracavity light. The mirror whose coating is under investigation needs to be the input mirror of a high-finesse cavity. Our example measurements were performed on a high-reflection SiO2-Ta2O5 coating in a three-mirror ring-cavity setup at a wavelength of 1064 nm. The optical absorption of the coating was determined to be α=(23.9±2.0)·10(-6) per coating. Our result is in excellent agreement with an independently performed laser calorimetry measurement that gave a value of α=(24.4±3.2)·10(-6) per coating. Since the self-phase modulation in our coating-absorption measurement affects mainly the propagation through the cavity input mirror, our measurement result is practically uninfluenced by the optical absorption of the other cavity mirrors.

  9. Sandwich concept: enhancement for direct absorption measurements by laser-induced deflection (LID) technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mühlig, Ch.; Bublitz, S.; Paa, W.

    2012-11-01

    The new sandwich concept for absolute photo-thermal absorption measurements using the laser induced deflection (LID) technique is introduced and tested in comparison to the standard LID concept. The sandwich concept's idea is the decoupling of the optical materials for the pump and probe beams by placing a sample of investigation in between two optical (sandwich) plates. The pump beam is guided through the sample whereas the probe beams are deflected within the sandwich plates by the thermal lens that is generated by heat transfer from the irradiated sample. Electrical simulation and laser experiments reveal that using appropriate optical materials for the sandwich plates, the absorption detection limit for photo-thermally insensitive materials can be lowered by up to two orders of magnitude. Another advantage of the sandwich concept, the shrinking of the currently required minimum sample size, was used to investigate the laser induced absorption change in a Nd:YVO4 crystal at 1030nm. It was found that the absorption in Nd:YVO4 lowers due to the laser irradiation but partially recovers during irradiation breaks. Furthermore, absorption spectroscopy has been performed at two LBO crystals in the wavelength range 410...600nm to study the absorption structure around the SHG wavelengths of common high power lasers based on Neodymium doped laser crystals.

  10. Development of surface thermal lensing technique in absorption and defect analyses of optical coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Hongbo; Li, Xia; Fan, Shuhai; Shao, Jianda; Zhao, Yuanan; Fan, Zhengxiu

    2005-12-01

    Absorption is one of the main factors which cause damage to optical coatings, under the radiation of high power lasers. Surface thermal lensing (STL) technique was developed into a practical high-sensitivity apparatus for the weak absorption analysis of optical coatings. A 20 W continuous-wave 1064 nm Nd:YAG laser and a 30 mW He-Ne laser were employed as pump source and probe source, respectively. Low noise photoelectrical components and an SR830 DSP lock-in amplifier were used for photo-thermal deformation signal detection. In order to improve sensitivity, the configuration of the apparatus was optimized through choosing appropriate parameters, that including pump beam spot size, chopper frequency, detection distance, waist radius and position of probe beam. Coating samples were mounted on an x-y stage which was driven by high precision stepper motors. Different processes of absorption measurements, including single spot, linear scan and 2-dimension area scan, could be performed manually or automatically under the control of PC program. Various optical coatings were prepared by both electron beam evaporation and ion beam sputtering deposition. High sensitivity was obtained and low to 10 ppb absorption could be measured by surface thermal lensing technique. And a spatial resolution of 25 micron was proved according to the area scanning which traced out the profile of photo-thermal defects inside optical coatings. The system was employed in the analyses of optical absorption, absorption uniformity and defect distribution, and revealed the relationship between laser-induced damage and absorption of optical coatings.

  11. Advances in Understanding the Molecular Structures and Functionalities of Biodegradable Zein-Based Materials Using Spectroscopic Techniques: A Review.

    PubMed

    Turasan, Hazal; Kokini, Jozef L

    2017-02-13

    Zein's amphiphilic properties, film forming capability, and biodegradability make it a highly demanded polymer for fabrication of packaging materials, production of drug carrier nanoparticles, scaffolds in tissue engineering, and formation of biodegradable platforms for biosensors including microfluidic devices. Zein properties can be improved by chemical modifications, which are often analyzed with spectroscopic techniques. However, there is not a consensus on the structure of zein. For this reason, in this Review the aim is to compile the recent studies conducted on zein-based products and compare them under five main spectroscopic techniques: Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), Raman spectroscopy, circular dichroism (CD), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). This Review serves as a library of recent zein studies and helps readers to have a better perception of contradictions in the literature to take their studies one step further.

  12. Determination of lipid content of oleaginous microalgal biomass by NMR spectroscopic and GC-MS techniques.

    PubMed

    Sarpal, Amarijt S; Teixeira, Claudia M L L; Silva, Paulo R M; Lima, Gustavo M; Silva, Samantha R; Monteiro, Thays V; Cunha, Valnei S; Daroda, Romeu J

    2015-05-01

    Direct methods based on (1)H NMR spectroscopic techniques have been developed for the determination of neutral lipids (triglycerides and free fatty acids) and polar lipids (glyceroglycolipids/phospholipids) in the solvent extracts of oleaginous microalgal biomasses cultivated on a laboratory scale with two species in different media. The chemical shift assignments observed in the (1)H and (13)C NMR spectra corresponding to unsaturated (C18:N, N = 1-3, C20:3, C20:5, C22:6, epoxy) and saturated (C14-C18) fatty acid ester components in a complex matrix involving overlapped resonances have been unambiguously confirmed by the application of 2D NMR spectroscopy (total correlation spectroscopy and heteronuclear single quantum coherence-total correlation spectroscopy). The study of the effect of a polar lipid matrix on the determination of neutral lipids by an internal reference blending process by a systematic designed experimental protocol has provided absolute quantification. The fatty acid composition of algal extracts was found to be similar to that of vegetable oils containing saturated (C16-C18:0) and unsaturated (C18:N, N = 1-3, C20:N, N = 3-4, C22:6) fatty acids as confirmed by NMR spectroscopy and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analyses. The NMR methods developed offer great potential for rapid screening of algal strains for generation of algal biomass with the desired lipid content, quality, and potential for biodiesel and value-added polyunsaturated fatty acids in view of the cost economics of the overall cost of generation of the biomass.

  13. Differential absorption lidar technique for measurement of the atmospheric pressure profile

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Korb, C. L.; Weng, C. Y.

    1983-01-01

    A new two-wavelength lidar technique for remotely measuring the pressure profile using the trough absorption region between two strong lines in the oxygen A band is described. The theory of integrated vertical path, differential ranging, and horizontal-path pressure measurements is given, with methods to desensitize and correct for temperature effects. The properties of absorption troughs are described and shown to reduce errors due to laser frequency jitter by up to two orders of magnitude. A general analysis, including laser bandwidth effects, demonstrates that pressure measurements with an integrated-vertical-path technique are typically fifty times more accurate than with a differential ranging technique. Simulations show 0.1-0.3 percent accuracy for ground and Shuttle-based pressure-profile and surface-pressure experiments.

  14. Measurement of the optical properties of skin using terahertz time-domain spectroscopic techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilmink, Gerald J.; Ibey, Bennett L.; Tongue, Thomas; Schulkin, Brian; Peralta, Xomalin; Rivest, Benjamin D.; Haywood, Eric C.; Roach, William P.

    2010-02-01

    Terahertz (THz) radiation is increasingly being used in biomedical imaging and spectroscopy applications. These techniques show tremendous promise to provide new sophisticated tools for the improved detection of skin cancer. However, despite recent efforts to develop these applications, few studies have been conducted to characterize the optical properties of skin at THz frequencies. Such information is required to better understand THz-tissue interactions, and is critical for determining the feasibility of proposed applications. In this study, we have developed and tested a THz time-domain spectroscopy system. We used this system to acquire the optical properties for fresh and frozen/thawed excised porcine skin from 0.1 to 2.0 THz. Results show that the index of refraction (n) for both frozen and fresh skin decreases with frequency. For frozen skin, n equals 2.5 at 0.1 THz and 2.0 at 2.0 THz, and for fresh skin equals 2.0 at 0.1 THz and 1.7 at 2.0 THz. Values for the absorption coefficient (μa) increase with frequency for both frozen and fresh skin. Frozen skin exhibits μa values equal to 56 cm-1 at 0.1 THz and 550 cm-1 at 2.0 THz, whereas fresh skin exhibits values of 56 cm-1 at 0.1 THz and 300 cm-1 at 2.0 THz. Assuming the optical penetration depth (δ) is inversely proportional to μa (absorption-dominated interactions), THz radiation has limited δ in skin (200 μm at 0.1 THz to 40 μm at 2.0 THz). These results suggest that applications exploiting THz radiation show the most promise for investigating superficial tissues.

  15. Spectrum sensing of trace C(2)H(2) detection in differential optical absorption spectroscopy technique.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xi; Dong, Xiaopeng

    2014-09-10

    An improved algorithm for trace C(2)H(2) detection is presented in this paper. The trace concentration is accurately calculated by focusing on the absorption spectrum from the frequency domain perspective. The advantage of the absorption spectroscopy frequency domain algorithm is its anti-interference capability. First, the influence of the background noise on the minimum detectable concentration is greatly reduced. Second, the time-consuming preprocess of spectra calibration in the differential optical absorption spectroscopy technique is skipped. Experimental results showed the detection limit of 50 ppm is achieved at a lightpath length of 0.2 m. This algorithm can be used in real-time spectrum analysis with high accuracy.

  16. Broadband absorption spectroscopy by combining frequency-domain and steady-state techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berger, Andrew J.; Bevilacqua, Frederic; Jakubowski, Dorota B.; Cerussi, Albert E.; Butler, John A.; Hsiang, D.; Tromberg, Bruce J.

    2001-06-01

    A technique for measuring broadband near-infrared absorption spectra of turbid media is presented using a combination of frequency-domain (FD) and steady-state (SS) reflectance methods. Most of the wavelength coverage is provided by a white-light SS measurement, while the FD data are acquired at a few selected wavelengths. Coefficients of absorption ((mu) a) and reduced scattering ((mu) s') derived from the FD data are used to intensity-calibrate the SS measurements and to estimate (mu) s' at all wavelengths in the spectral window of interest. After these steps are performed, (mu) a can be determined by comparing the SS reflectance values to the predictions of diffusion theory, wavelength by wavelength. We present an application of this method to breast tumor characterization. A case study of a fibroadenoma is shown, where different absorption spectra were found between the normal and the tumor sides.

  17. Spectroscopic properties of Bi2ZnOB2O6 single crystals doped with Pr3+ ions: Absorption and luminescence investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasprowicz, D.; Brik, M. G.; Jaroszewski, K.; Pedzinski, T.; Bursa, B.; Głuchowski, P.; Majchrowski, A.; Michalski, E.

    2015-09-01

    Nonlinear optical Bi2ZnOB2O6 single crystals doped with Pr3+ ions were grown using the Kyropoulos method. The absorption and luminescence properties of these new systems were investigated for the first time. The crystals are characterized by the large values of nonlinear optical coefficients. Effective luminescence of the Pr3+ ions makes this system an excellent candidate for the near-infrared (NIR) and/or ultraviolet (UV) to visible (VIS) laser converters. Based on the obtained experimental spectroscopic data, detailed analysis of the absorption and luminescence spectra was performed using the conventional Judd-Ofelt theory. Those transitions, which can be potentially used for laser applications of the Pr3+ ion, have been identified. In addition to the intensity parameters Ω2, Ω4, Ω6 the branching ratios and radiative lifetimes were estimated for all possible transitions in the studied spectral region.

  18. Different speciation for bromine in brown and red algae, revealed by in vivo X-ray absorption spectroscopic studies.

    PubMed

    Küpper, Frithjof C; Leblanc, Catherine; Meyer-Klaucke, Wolfram; Potin, Philippe; Feiters, Martin C

    2014-08-01

    Members of various algal lineages are known to be strong producers of atmospherically relevant halogen emissions, that is a consequence of their capability to store and metabolize halogens. This study uses a noninvasive, synchrotron-based technique, X-ray absorption spectroscopy, for addressing in vivo bromine speciation in the brown algae Ectocarpus siliculosus, Ascophyllum nodosum, and Fucus serratus, the red algae Gracilaria dura, G. gracilis, Chondrus crispus, Osmundea pinnatifida, Asparagopsis armata, Polysiphonia elongata, and Corallina officinalis, the diatom Thalassiosira rotula, the dinoflagellate Lingulodinium polyedrum and a natural phytoplankton sample. The results highlight a diversity of fundamentally different bromine storage modes: while most of the stramenopile representatives and the dinoflagellate store mostly bromide, there is evidence for Br incorporated in nonaromatic hydrocarbons in Thalassiosira. Red algae operate various organic bromine stores - including a possible precursor (by the haloform reaction) for bromoform in Asparagopsis and aromatically bound Br in Polysiphonia and Corallina. Large fractions of the bromine in the red algae G. dura and C. crispus and the brown alga F. serratus are present as Br(-) defects in solid KCl, similar to what was reported earlier for Laminaria parts. These results are discussed according to different defensive strategies that are used within algal taxa to cope with biotic or abiotic stresses.

  19. Atmospheric Pre-Corrected Differential Absorption Techniques to Retrieve Columnar Water Vapor: Theory and Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borel, Christoph C.; Schlaepfer, Daniel

    1996-01-01

    Two different approaches exist to retrieve columnar water vapor from imaging spectrometer data: (1) Differential absorption techniques based on: (a) Narrow-Wide (N/W) ratio between overlapping spectrally wide and narrow channels; (b) Continuum Interpolated Band Ratio (CIBR) between a measurement channel and the weighted sum of two reference channels. (2) Non-linear fitting techniques which are based on spectral radiative transfer calculations. The advantage of the first approach is computational speed and of the second, improved retrieval accuracy. Our goal was to improve the accuracy of the first technique using physics based on radiative transfer. Using a modified version of the Duntley equation, we derived an "Atmospheric Pre-corrected Differential Absorption" (APDA) technique and described an iterative scheme to retrieve water vapor on a pixel-by-pixel basis. Next we compared both, the CIBR and the APDA using the Duntley equation for MODTRAN3 computed irradiances, transmissions and path radiance (using the DISORT option). This simulation showed that the CIBR is very sensitive to reflectance effects and that the APDA performs much better. An extensive data set was created with the radiative transfer code 6S over 379 different ground reflectance spectra. The calculated relative water vapor error was reduced significantly for the APDA. The APDA technique had about 8% (vs. over 35% for the CIBR) of the 379 spectra with a relative water vapor error of greater than +5%. The APDA has been applied to 1991 and 1995 AVIRIS scenes which visually demonstrate the improvement over the CIBR technique.

  20. A Method for Eliminating Beam Steering Error for the Modulated Absorption-Emission Thermometry Technique

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-01-01

    currently valid OMB control number. PLEASE DO NOT RETURN YOUR FORM TO THE ABOVE ADDRESS. 1. REPORT DATE (DD-MM-YYYY) Jan 2014 2. REPORT TYPE Technical...Paper 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) Jan 2014- June 2014 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER In-House A Method for Eliminating Beam...14194 14. ABSTRACT Modulated absorption-emission thermometry (MAET) is a non-intrusive, radiometric technique for measuring line-of-sight average

  1. A Method for Eliminating Beam Steering Error for the Modulated Absorption-Emission Thermometry Technique

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-01-01

    currently valid OMB control number. PLEASE DO NOT RETURN YOUR FORM TO THE ABOVE ADDRESS. 1. REPORT DATE (DD-MM-YYYY) December 2014 2. REPORT TYPE...Briefing Charts 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) December 2014- January 2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER N/A A Method for Eliminating...Jan 2015. PA#14562. 14. ABSTRACT Modulated absorption-emission thermometry (MAET) is a non-intrusive, radiometric technique for measuring line-of

  2. Coal thickness gauge using RRAS techniques, part 1. [radiofrequency resonance absorption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rollwitz, W. L.; King, J. D.

    1978-01-01

    A noncontacting sensor having a measurement range of 0 to 6 in or more, and with an accuracy of 0.5 in or better is needed to control the machinery used in modern coal mining so that the thickness of the coal layer remaining over the rock is maintained within selected bounds. The feasibility of using the radiofrequency resonance absorption (RRAS) techniques of electron magnetic resonance (EMR) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) as the basis of a coal thickness gauge is discussed. The EMR technique was found, by analysis and experiments, to be well suited for this application.

  3. Soliton absorption spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Kalashnikov, V. L.; Sorokin, E.

    2010-01-01

    We analyze optical soliton propagation in the presence of weak absorption lines with much narrower linewidths as compared to the soliton spectrum width using the novel perturbation analysis technique based on an integral representation in the spectral domain. The stable soliton acquires spectral modulation that follows the associated index of refraction of the absorber. The model can be applied to ordinary soliton propagation and to an absorber inside a passively modelocked laser. In the latter case, a comparison with water vapor absorption in a femtosecond Cr:ZnSe laser yields a very good agreement with experiment. Compared to the conventional absorption measurement in a cell of the same length, the signal is increased by an order of magnitude. The obtained analytical expressions allow further improving of the sensitivity and spectroscopic accuracy making the soliton absorption spectroscopy a promising novel measurement technique. PMID:21151755

  4. Method and apparatus for measuring butterfat and protein content using microwave absorption techniques

    DOEpatents

    Fryer, Michael O.; Hills, Andrea J.; Morrison, John L.

    2000-01-01

    A self calibrating method and apparatus for measuring butterfat and protein content based on measuring the microwave absorption of a sample of milk at several microwave frequencies. A microwave energy source injects microwave energy into the resonant cavity for absorption and reflection by the sample undergoing evaluation. A sample tube is centrally located in the resonant cavity passing therethrough and exposing the sample to the microwave energy. A portion of the energy is absorbed by the sample while another portion of the microwave energy is reflected back to an evaluation device such as a network analyzer. The frequency at which the reflected radiation is at a minimum within the cavity is combined with the scatter coefficient S.sub.11 as well as a phase change to calculate the butterfat content in the sample. The protein located within the sample may also be calculated in a likewise manner using the frequency, S.sub.11 and phase variables. A differential technique using a second resonant cavity containing a reference standard as a sample will normalize the measurements from the unknown sample and thus be self-calibrating. A shuttered mechanism will switch the microwave excitation between the unknown and the reference cavities. An integrated apparatus for measuring the butterfat content in milk using microwave absorption techniques is also presented.

  5. Evaluation of structure-reactivity descriptors and biological activity spectra of 4-(6-methoxy-2-naphthyl)-2-butanone using spectroscopic techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agrawal, Megha; Deval, Vipin; Gupta, Archana; Sangala, Bagvanth Reddy; Prabhu, S. S.

    2016-10-01

    The structure and several spectroscopic features along with reactivity parameters of the compound 4-(6-methoxy-2-naphthyl)-2-butanone (Nabumetone) have been studied using experimental techniques and tools derived from quantum chemical calculations. Structure optimization is followed by force field calculations based on density functional theory (DFT) at the B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p) level of theory. The vibrational spectra have been interpreted with the aid of normal coordinate analysis. UV-visible spectrum and the effect of solvent have been discussed. The electronic properties such as HOMO and LUMO energies have been determined by TD-DFT approach. In order to understand various aspects of pharmacological sciences several new chemical reactivity descriptors - chemical potential, global hardness and electrophilicity have been evaluated. Local reactivity descriptors - Fukui functions and local softnesses have also been calculated to find out the reactive sites within molecule. Aqueous solubility and lipophilicity have been calculated which are crucial for estimating transport properties of organic molecules in drug development. Estimation of biological effects, toxic/side effects has been made on the basis of prediction of activity spectra for substances (PASS) prediction results and their analysis by Pharma Expert software. Using the THz-TDS technique, the frequency-dependent absorptions of NBM have been measured in the frequency range up to 3 THz.

  6. A comparison study of linear reconstruction techniques for diffuse optical tomographic imaging of absorption coefficient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaudette, Richard J.; Brooks, Dana H.; Di Marzio, Charles A.; Kilmer, Misha E.; Miller, Eric L.; Gaudette, Thomas; Boas, David A.

    2000-04-01

    We compare, through simulations, the performance of four linear algorithms for diffuse optical tomographic reconstruction of the three-dimensional distribution of absorption coefficient within a highly scattering medium using the diffuse photon density wave approximation. The simulation geometry consisted of a coplanar array of sources and detectors at the boundary of a half-space medium. The forward solution matrix is both underdetermined, because we estimate many more absorption coefficient voxels than we have measurements, and ill-conditioned, due to the ill-posedness of the inverse problem. We compare two algebraic techniques, ART and SIRT, and two subspace techniques, the truncated SVD and CG algorithms. We compare three-dimensional reconstructions with two-dimensional reconstructions which assume all inhomogeneities are confined to a known horizontal slab, and we consider two `object-based' error metrics in addition to mean square reconstruction error. We include a comparison using simulated data generated using a different FDFD method with the same inversion algorithms to indicate how our conclusions are affected in a somewhat more realistic scenario. Our results show that the subspace techniques are superior to the algebraic techniques in localization of inhomogeneities and estimation of their amplitude, that two-dimensional reconstructions are sensitive to underestimation of the object depth, and that an error measure based on a location parameter can be a useful complement to mean squared error.

  7. Analysis of space radiation effects in gallium arsenide and cadmium selenide semiconductor samples using luminescence spectroscopic techniques. Master's thesis

    SciTech Connect

    Shaffer, B.L.

    1990-12-01

    Analysis of space radiation effects in gallium arsenide and cadmium selenide semiconductor samples using luminescence spectroscopic techniques. The M0006 semiconductor samples were placed into a 28.5 degree inclination, 480 km altitude, near-circular orbit aboard the Long Duration Exposure Facility satellite and exposed to direct space environment for a period of 11 months, and were shielded by 0.313 inches of aluminum for another 58 months. The samples were examined for changes using cathodoluminescence and photoluminescence in various wavelength regions from 0.5 to 1.8 micrometers. Samples were cooled to approximately 10 degrees Kelvin in a vacuum of 10-8. (JS)

  8. Coupling spectroscopic and chromatographic techniques for evaluation of the depositional history of hydrocarbons in a subtropical estuary.

    PubMed

    Martins, César C; Doumer, Marta E; Gallice, Wellington C; Dauner, Ana Lúcia L; Cabral, Ana Caroline; Cardoso, Fernanda D; Dolci, Natiely N; Camargo, Luana M; Ferreira, Paulo A L; Figueira, Rubens C L; Mangrich, Antonio S

    2015-10-01

    Spectroscopic and chromatographic techniques can be used together to evaluate hydrocarbon inputs to coastal environments such as the Paranaguá estuarine system (PES), located in the SW Atlantic, Brazil. Historical inputs of aliphatic hydrocarbons (AHs) and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were analyzed using two sediment cores from the PES. The AHs were related to the presence of biogenic organic matter and degraded oil residues. The PAHs were associated with mixed sources. The highest hydrocarbon concentrations were related to oil spills, while relatively low levels could be attributed to the decrease in oil usage during the global oil crisis. The results of electron paramagnetic resonance were in agreement with the absolute AHs and PAHs concentrations measured by chromatographic techniques, while near-infrared spectroscopy results were consistent with unresolved complex mixture (UCM)/total n-alkanes ratios. These findings suggest that the use of a combination of techniques can increase the accuracy of assessment of contamination in sediments.

  9. Development and Quantification of UV-Visible and Laser Spectroscopic Techniques for Materials Accountability and Process Control

    SciTech Connect

    Ken Czerwinski; Phil Weck; Frederic Poineau

    2010-12-29

    Ultraviolet-Visible Spectroscopy (UV-Visible) and Time Resolved Laser Fluorescence Spectroscopy (TRLFS) optical techniques can permit on-line, real-time analysis of the actinide elements in a solvent extraction process. UV-Visible and TRLFS techniques have been used for measuring the speciation and concentration of the actinides under laboratory conditions. These methods are easily adaptable to multiple sampling geometries, such as dip probes, fiber-optic sample cells, and flow-through cell geometries. To fully exploit these techniques for GNEP applications, the fundamental speciation of the target actinides and the resulting influence on 3 spectroscopic properties must be determined. Through this effort detection limits, process conditions, and speciation of key actinide components can be establish and utilized in a range of areas of interest to GNEP, especially in areas related to materials accountability and process control.

  10. Atmospheric pre-corrected differential absorption techniques to retrieve columnar water vapor: Theory and simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Borel, C.C.; Schlaepfer, D.

    1996-03-01

    Two different approaches exist to retrieve columnar water vapor from imaging spectrometer data: (1) Differential absorption techniques based on: (a) Narrow-Wide (N/W) ratio between overlapping spectrally wide and narrow channels (b) Continuum Interpolated Band Ratio (CIBR) between a measurement channel and the weighted sum of two reference channels; and (2) Non-linear fitting techniques which are based on spectral radiative transfer calculations. The advantage of the first approach is computational speed and of the second, improved retrieval accuracy. Our goal was to improve the accuracy of the first technique using physics based on radiative transfer. Using a modified version of the Duntley equation, we derived an {open_quote}Atmospheric Pre-corrected Differential Absorption{close_quote} (APDA) technique and described an iterative scheme to retrieve water vapor on a pixel-by-pixel basis. Next we compared both, the CIBR and the APDA using the Duntley equation for MODTRAN3 computed irradiances, transmissions and path radiance (using the DISORT option). This simulation showed that the CIBR is very sensitive to reflectance effects and that the APDA performs much better. An extensive data set was created with the radiative transfer code 6S over 379 different ground reflectance spectra. The calculated relative water vapor error was reduced significantly for the APDA. The APDA technique had about 8% (vs. over 35% for the CIBR) of the 379 spectra with a relative water vapor error of greater than {+-}5%. The APDA has been applied to 1991 and 1995 AVIRIS scenes which visually demonstrate the improvement over the CIBR technique.

  11. Analysis of algebraic reconstruction technique for accurate imaging of gas temperature and concentration based on tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hui-Hui, Xia; Rui-Feng, Kan; Jian-Guo, Liu; Zhen-Yu, Xu; Ya-Bai, He

    2016-06-01

    An improved algebraic reconstruction technique (ART) combined with tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy(TDLAS) is presented in this paper for determining two-dimensional (2D) distribution of H2O concentration and temperature in a simulated combustion flame. This work aims to simulate the reconstruction of spectroscopic measurements by a multi-view parallel-beam scanning geometry and analyze the effects of projection rays on reconstruction accuracy. It finally proves that reconstruction quality dramatically increases with the number of projection rays increasing until more than 180 for 20 × 20 grid, and after that point, the number of projection rays has little influence on reconstruction accuracy. It is clear that the temperature reconstruction results are more accurate than the water vapor concentration obtained by the traditional concentration calculation method. In the present study an innovative way to reduce the error of concentration reconstruction and improve the reconstruction quality greatly is also proposed, and the capability of this new method is evaluated by using appropriate assessment parameters. By using this new approach, not only the concentration reconstruction accuracy is greatly improved, but also a suitable parallel-beam arrangement is put forward for high reconstruction accuracy and simplicity of experimental validation. Finally, a bimodal structure of the combustion region is assumed to demonstrate the robustness and universality of the proposed method. Numerical investigation indicates that the proposed TDLAS tomographic algorithm is capable of detecting accurate temperature and concentration profiles. This feasible formula for reconstruction research is expected to resolve several key issues in practical combustion devices. Project supported by the Young Scientists Fund of the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 61205151), the National Key Scientific Instrument and Equipment Development Project of China (Grant

  12. The absorption of ultraviolet light by cell nuclei. A technique for identifying neoplastic change

    SciTech Connect

    Baisden, C.R.; Booker, D.; Wright, R.D. )

    1989-11-01

    A technique for measuring the absorption of 260-nm ultraviolet light by cell nuclei is described. The results of such measurements of normal thyroid epithelial cells and benign and malignant thyroid neoplastic cells demonstrate a progressive increase in absorbance that correlates with the histologic appearance of neoplasia. The possible theoretic basis for this phenomenon is explored. The increased nuclear absorbance observed in neoplastic cells is hypothesized to result from the disruption of hydrogen bonds between the DNA base pairs, which allows unwinding of the double helix and loss of the normal control of mitosis.

  13. Determination of photocarrier density under continuous photoirradiation using spectroscopic techniques as applied to polymer: Fullerene blend films

    SciTech Connect

    Kanemoto, Katsuichi Nakatani, Hitomi; Domoto, Shinya

    2014-10-28

    We propose a method to determine the density of photocarrier under continuous photoirradiation in conjugated polymers using spectroscopic signals obtained by photoinduced absorption (PIA) measurements. The bleaching signals in the PIA measurements of polymer films and the steady-state absorption signals of oxidized polymer solution are employed to determine the photocarrier density. The method is applied to photocarriers of poly (3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) in a blended film consisting of P3HT and [6,6]-phenyl C61 butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM). The photocarrier density under continuous photoirradiation of 580 mW/cm{sup 2} is determined to be 3.5 × 10{sup 16 }cm{sup −3}. Using a trend of the carrier density increasing in proportion to the square root of photo-excitation intensity, we provide a general formula to estimate the photocarrier density under simulated 1 sun solar irradiation for the P3HT: PCBM film of an arbitrary thickness. We emphasize that the method proposed in this study enables an estimate of carrier density without measuring a current and can be applied to films with no electrodes as well as to devices.

  14. Laser-spectroscopic measurement techniques for hypersonic, turbulent wind tunnel flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mckenzie, Robert L.; Fletcher, Douglas G.

    1992-01-01

    A review is given of the nature, present status, and capabilities of two laser spectroscopic methods for the simultaneous measurement of temperature, density, and their fluctuations owing to turbulence in high speed wind tunnel flows. One method is based on the two frequency excitation of nitric oxide seeded into a nitrogen flow, using tunable dye lasers. The second, more recent method relies on the excitation of oxygen in air flows using a tunable, ArF excimer laser. Signal are obtained from both the laser induced fluorescence and from Raman scattering of the same laser pulse. Measurements are demonstrated in the turbulent boundary layer of a Mach-2 channel flow.

  15. Invited Review Article: Imaging techniques for harmonic and multiphoton absorption fluorescence microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Carriles, Ramón; Schafer, Dawn N.; Sheetz, Kraig E.; Field, Jeffrey J.; Cisek, Richard; Barzda, Virginijus; Sylvester, Anne W.; Squier, Jeffrey A.

    2009-01-01

    We review the current state of multiphoton microscopy. In particular, the requirements and limitations associated with high-speed multiphoton imaging are considered. A description of the different scanning technologies such as line scan, multifoci approaches, multidepth microscopy, and novel detection techniques is given. The main nonlinear optical contrast mechanisms employed in microscopy are reviewed, namely, multiphoton excitation fluorescence, second harmonic generation, and third harmonic generation. Techniques for optimizing these nonlinear mechanisms through a careful measurement of the spatial and temporal characteristics of the focal volume are discussed, and a brief summary of photobleaching effects is provided. Finally, we consider three new applications of multiphoton microscopy: nonlinear imaging in microfluidics as applied to chemical analysis and the use of two-photon absorption and self-phase modulation as contrast mechanisms applied to imaging problems in the medical sciences. PMID:19725639

  16. Invited review article: Imaging techniques for harmonic and multiphoton absorption fluorescence microscopy.

    PubMed

    Carriles, Ramón; Schafer, Dawn N; Sheetz, Kraig E; Field, Jeffrey J; Cisek, Richard; Barzda, Virginijus; Sylvester, Anne W; Squier, Jeffrey A

    2009-08-01

    We review the current state of multiphoton microscopy. In particular, the requirements and limitations associated with high-speed multiphoton imaging are considered. A description of the different scanning technologies such as line scan, multifoci approaches, multidepth microscopy, and novel detection techniques is given. The main nonlinear optical contrast mechanisms employed in microscopy are reviewed, namely, multiphoton excitation fluorescence, second harmonic generation, and third harmonic generation. Techniques for optimizing these nonlinear mechanisms through a careful measurement of the spatial and temporal characteristics of the focal volume are discussed, and a brief summary of photobleaching effects is provided. Finally, we consider three new applications of multiphoton microscopy: nonlinear imaging in microfluidics as applied to chemical analysis and the use of two-photon absorption and self-phase modulation as contrast mechanisms applied to imaging problems in the medical sciences.

  17. New Spectroscopic Technique Based on Coaddition of Surface Brightness Fluctuations: NGC 4449 and its Stellar Tidal Stream

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toloba, Elisa; Guhathakurta, Puragra; Romanowsky, Aaron J.; Brodie, Jean P.; Martínez-Delgado, David; Arnold, Jacob A.; Ramachandran, Neel; Theakanath, Kuriakose

    2016-06-01

    We present a new spectroscopic technique based in part on targeting the upward fluctuations of the surface brightness for studying the internal stellar kinematics and metallicities of galaxies of low surface brightness effects both to galaxies and streams beyond the Local Group. The distance to these systems makes them unsuitable for targeting individual red giant branch (RGB) stars (tip of RGB at I≳ 24 mag) and their surface brightness is too low ({μ }r≳ 25 mag arcsec-2) for integrated light spectroscopic measurements. This technique overcomes these two problems by targeting individual objects that are brighter than the tip of the RGB. We apply this technique to the star-forming dwarf galaxy NGC 4449 and its stellar stream. We use Keck/DEIMOS data to measure the line-of-sight radial velocity out to ˜7 kpc in the east side of the galaxy and ˜8 kpc along the stream. We find that the two systems are likely gravitationally bound to each other and have heliocentric radial velocities of 227.3 ± 10.7 km s-1 and 225.8 ± 16.0 km s-1, respectively. Neither the stream nor the near half of the galaxy shows a significant velocity gradient. We estimate the stellar metallicity of the stream based on the equivalent width of its calcium triplet lines and find [Fe/H] =\\quad -1.37+/- 0.41, which is consistent with the metallicity-luminosity relation for dwarf galaxies in the Local Group. Whether the stream's progenitor was moderately or severely stripped cannot be constrained with this uncertainty in metallicity. We demonstrate that this new technique can be used to measure the kinematics and (possibly) the metallicity of the numerous faint satellites and stellar streams in the halos of nearby (˜4 Mpc) galaxies.

  18. Studies on the interaction between promethazine and human serum albumin in the presence of flavonoids by spectroscopic and molecular modeling techniques.

    PubMed

    He, Ling-Ling; Wang, Zhi-Xin; Wang, Yong-Xia; Liu, Xian-Ping; Yang, Yan-Jie; Gao, Yan-Ping; Wang, Xin; Liu, Bin; Wang, Xin

    2016-09-01

    Fluorescence, absorption, time-correlated single photon counting (TCSPC), and circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopic techniques as well as molecular modeling methods were used to study the binding characterization of promethazine (PMT) to human serum albumin (HSA) and the influence of flavonoids, rutin and baicalin, on their affinity. The results indicated that the fluorescence quenching mechanism of HSA by PMT is a static quenching due to the formation of complex. The reaction was spontaneous and mainly mediated by hydrogen bonds and hydrophobic interactions. The binding distance between the tryptophan residue of HSA and PMT is less than 8nm, which indicated that the energy transfer from the tryptophan residue of HSA to PMT occurred. The binding site of PMT on HSA was located in sites I and the presence of PMT can cause the conformational changes of HSA. There was the competitive binding to HSA between PMT and flavonoids because of the overlap of binding sites in HSA. The flavonoids could decrease the association constant and increase the binding distance. In addition, their synergistic effect can further change the conformation of HSA. The decrease in the affinities of PMT binding to HSA in the presence of flavonoids may lead to the increase of free drug in blood, which would affect the transportation or disposition of drug and evoke an adverse or toxic effect. Hence, rationalising dosage and diet regimens should be taken into account in clinical application of PMT.

  19. Gamma-irradiation and UV-C light-induced lipid peroxidation: a Fourier transform-infrared absorption spectroscopic study.

    PubMed

    Kinder, R; Ziegler, C; Wessels, J M

    1997-05-01

    Fourier transform-infrared spectroscopy of dry, multibilayer films has been used to study gamma-radiation and UV-C light induced lipid peroxidation in 1,2-dilinoleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine liposomes. The observed spectral changes were compared with the results obtained from measurement of hydroperoxides, conjugated dienes and to the formation of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances, such as malondialdehyde (MDA) or MDA-like substances. Upon irradiation a decrease in intensity of the asymmetric C - H stretching vibration (va(CH2)) of the isolated cis C = C - H groups (3010 cm-1) was observed. Directly correlated with the decrease of the va(CH2) absorption was a shift of the asymmetric phosphate ester stretching vibration (va(P = O)) towards smaller wavenumbers (1260-->1244 cm-1), indicating that the lipid peroxidation induced molecular alterations in the fatty acid chains influence the packing of the phospholipids in dry multibilayer films. In addition, the formation of a new absorption band at 1693 cm-1 could be detected, the intensity of which was comparable with the formation of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances and, therefore, attributed to the (C = O) stretching of alpha, beta unsaturated aldehydes. Dose-dependent studies using ionizing radiation showed that the decrease of va(CH2) was directly correlated with an increase in absorption of the conjugated dienes at 234 nm and with the formation of hydroperoxides suggesting that the absorption at 3010 cm-1 is solely due to isolated cis C = C - H groups and hence subject to the early stages of the radical chain reaction. UV-C light induced lipid peroxidation revealed a non-linear decrease of I3010, which was directly correlated with the formation of hydroperoxides. The observed early saturation of the conjugated dienes was attributed to an early photodecomposition of the conjugated double bonds.

  20. X-ray absorption spectroscopic studies of the active sites of nickel- and copper-containing metalloproteins

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, G.O.

    1993-06-01

    X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) is a useful tool for obtaining structural and chemical information about the active sites of metalloproteins and metalloenzymes. Information may be obtained from both the edge region and the extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) or post-edge region of the K-edge X-ray absorption spectrum of a metal center in a compound. The edge contains information about the valence electronic structure of the atom that absorbs the X-rays. It is possible in some systems to infer the redox state of the metal atom in question, as well as the geometry and nature of ligands connected to it, from the features in the edge in a straightforward manner. The EXAFS modulations, being produced by the backscattering of the ejected photoelectron from the atoms surrounding the metal atom, provide, when analyzed, information about the number and type of neighbouring atoms, and the distances at which they occur. In this thesis, analysis of both the edge and EXAFS regions has been used to gain information about the active sites of various metalloproteins. The metalloproteins studied were plastocyanin (Pc), laccase and nickel carbon monoxide dehydrogenase (Ni CODH). Studies of Cu(I)-imidazole compounds, related to the protein hemocyanin, are also reported here.

  1. Probing the binding of (+)-catechin to bovine serum albumin by isothermal titration calorimetry and spectroscopic techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiangrong; Hao, Yongbing

    2015-07-01

    In this study, the interaction between (+)-catechin and bovine serum albumin (BSA) was investigated using isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC), in combination with fluorescence spectroscopy, UV-vis absorption spectroscopy, and Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy. Thermodynamic investigations reveal that the electrostatic interaction and hydrophobic interaction are the major binding forces in the binding of (+)-catechin to BSA. The binding of (+)-catechin to BSA is synergistically driven by enthalpy and entropy. Fluorescence experiments suggest that (+)-catechin can quench the fluorescence of BSA through a static quenching mechanism. The obtained binding constants and the equilibrium fraction of unbound (+)-catechin show that (+)-catechin can be stored and transported from the circulatory system to reach its target organ. Binding site I is found to be the primary binding site for (+)-catechin. Additionally, as shown by the UV-vis absorption, synchronous fluorescence spectroscopy and FT-IR, (+)-catechin may induce conformational and microenvironmental changes of BSA.

  2. Development of the laser absorption radiation thermometry technique to measure thermal diffusivity in addition to temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levick, Andrew; Lobato, Killian; Edwards, Gordon

    2003-01-01

    A comparative technique based on photothermal radiometry has been developed to measure thermal diffusivity of semi-infinite targets with arbitrary geometry. The technique exploits the principle that the frequency response of the temperature modulation induced by a periodic modulated heating source (in this case a laser spot) scales with thermal diffusivity. To demonstrate this technique, a photothermal radiometer has been developed, which detects modulated thermal radiance at a wavelength of 2 μm due to a small temperature modulation induced on the target surface by a modulated erbium fiber laser of power 1 W. Two frequency responses were measured for platinum and oxidized Inconel 600 targets (the frequency response is a scan of the amplitude of the modulated thermal radiance over laser modulation frequency). Scaling the two responses with respect to frequency gives a ratio of thermal diffusivities Dplatinum/DInconel of 4.45(33) which compares with a literature value of 4.46(50). The aim is to combine this technique with laser absorption radiation thermometry to produce multithermal property instrument for measuring "industrial" targets.

  3. Cerebral and muscle oxygen saturation measurement by a frequency-domain near-infrared spectroscopic technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrari, Marco; De Blasi, Roberto A.; Fantini, Sergio; Franceschini, Maria-Angela; Barbieri, Beniamino B.; Quaresima, Valentina; Gratton, Enrico

    1995-05-01

    Absorption and reduced scattering coefficients at 715 and 825 nm as well as hemoglobin saturation and content of the forehead and the forearm were measured by a 110 MHz frequency-domain multisource instrument. The absolute data obtained by the frequency- domain spectrometer were compared with oxygenation changes measured by a continuous wave instrument during quadriceps ischemia and postural changes. These preliminary results indicate that portable frequency-domain instruments could be very helpful to investigate brain and muscle pathophysiology.

  4. Binding studies of lophirone B with bovine serum albumin (BSA): Combination of spectroscopic and molecular docking techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaves, Otávio Augusto; da Silva, Veridiana A.; Sant'Anna, Carlos Maurício R.; Ferreira, Aurélio B. B.; Ribeiro, Tereza Auxiliadora N.; de Carvalho, Mário G.; Cesarin-Sobrinho, Dari; Netto-Ferreira, José Carlos

    2017-01-01

    The interaction between the transport protein bovine serum albumin (BSA) and the natural product lophirone B, was investigated by spectroscopic techniques combined with a computational method (molecular docking). From the KSV and kq values it was concluded that lophirone B quenches the fluorescence of BSA by dynamic and static mechanisms. The Ka values, of the order of 104 M-1, and the number of binding sites (n ≈ 1), indicate that the binding is moderate and there is just one main binding site in BSA for lophirone B. The negative ΔG° values are in accordance with the spontaneity of the process and the positive ΔH° and ΔS° values indicate that the binding is entropically driven; the main binding forces for the association BSA:lophirone B are probably lipophilic interactions. Circular dichroism (CD) studies show there is not a significant perturbation on the secondary structure of the albumin upon the binding process. In order to better understand the spectroscopic results, a computational method was applied: molecular docking suggests Trp-213 site, as the main binding site for the ligand. Lophirone B seems to be exposed to the aqueous media as well as accommodated inside the protein cavity, resulting in a moderate affinity for the albumin. The Arg-198, His-287, Lys-294 and Lys-439 residues are interacting via hydrogen bonding with lophirone B, whereas the interaction with Trp-213 residue occurs through a lipophilic interaction.

  5. X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopic determination of plutonium speciation at the Rocky Flats environmental technology

    SciTech Connect

    Lezama-pacheco, Juan S; Conradson, Steven D; Clark, David L

    2008-01-01

    X-ray Absorption Fine Structure spectroscopy was used to probe the speciation of the ppm level Pu in thirteen soil and concrete samples from the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site in support of the site remediation effort that has been successfully completed since these measurements. In addition to X-ray Absorption Near Edge Spectra, two of the samples yielded Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure spectra that could be analyzed by curve-fits. Most of these spectra exhibited features consistent with PU(IV), and more specificaJly, PuO{sub 2+x}-type speciation. Two were ambiguous, possibly indicating that Pu that was originally present in a different form was transforming into PuO{sub 2+x}, and one was interpreted as demonstrating the presence of an unusual Pu(VI) compound, consistent with its source being spills from a PUREX purification line onto a concrete floor and the resultant extreme conditions. These experimental results therefore validated models that predicted that insoluble PuO{sub 2+x} would be the most stable form of Pu in equilibrium with air and water even when the source terms were most likely Pu metal with organic compounds or a Pu fire. A corollary of these models' predictions and other in situ observations is therefore that the minimal transport of Pu that occurred on the site was via the resuspension and mobilization of colloidal particles. Under these conditions, the small amounts of diffusely distributed Pu that were left on the site after its remediation pose only a negligible hazard.

  6. Probing local structure of pyrochlore lead zinc niobate with synchrotron x-ray absorption spectroscopy technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanchiang, Kanokwan; Pramchu, Sittichain; Yimnirun, Rattikorn; Pakawanit, Phakkhananan; Ananta, Supon; Laosiritaworn, Yongyut

    2013-08-01

    Local structure of lead zinc niobate (PZN) ceramic, synthesized via B-site oxide precursor route in atmospheric pressure, was investigated using synchrotron x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) technique. The x-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) simulation was first carried out. The XANES simulation results indicate that the PZN ceramic is in pyrochlore phase having Zn2+ substituted on Nb5+ site. Afterwards, the extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) analysis was performed to extract the bond length information between Zn2+ and its neighboring atoms. From the EXAFS fitting, the bond length between Zn2+ and Pb2+ in the pyrochlore phase was found to be longer than the previously reported bond length in the perovskite phase. Further, with the radial distribution information of Zn2+'s neighboring atoms, the formation energies along the precursor-to-pyrochlore and precursor-to-perovskite reaction paths were calculated using the density functional theory (DFT). The calculated results show that the formation energy of the perovskite phase is noticeably higher than that of the pyrochlore phase, which is influenced by the presence of energetic Pb2+ lone pair, as the perovskite phase has shorter Zn2+ to Pb2+ bonding. This therefore suggests the steric hindrance of Pb2+ lone pair and the mutual interactions between Pb2+ lone pair and Zn2+ are main causes of the instability of lead zinc niobate in the perovskite structure and confirm the efficacy of XAS and DFT analysis in revealing local structural details of complex pyrochlore materials.

  7. PROBING THE FERMI BUBBLES IN ULTRAVIOLET ABSORPTION: A SPECTROSCOPIC SIGNATURE OF THE MILKY WAY'S BICONICAL NUCLEAR OUTFLOW

    SciTech Connect

    Fox, Andrew J.; Bordoloi, Rongmon; Hernandez, Svea; Tumlinson, Jason; Savage, Blair D.; Wakker, Bart P.; Lockman, Felix J.; Bland-Hawthorn, Joss; Kim, Tae-Sun; Benjamin, Robert A.

    2015-01-20

    Giant lobes of plasma extend ≈55° above and below the Galactic center, glowing in emission from gamma rays (the Fermi Bubbles) to microwaves and polarized radio waves. We use ultraviolet absorption-line spectra from the Hubble Space Telescope to constrain the velocity of the outflowing gas within these regions, targeting the quasar PDS 456 (ℓ, b = 10.°4, +11.°2). This sightline passes through a clear biconical structure seen in hard X-ray and gamma-ray emission near the base of the northern Fermi Bubble. We report two high-velocity metal absorption components, at v {sub LSR} = –235 and +250 km s{sup –1}, which cannot be explained by co-rotating gas in the Galactic disk or halo. Their velocities are suggestive of an origin on the front and back side of an expanding biconical outflow emanating from the Galactic center. We develop simple kinematic biconical outflow models that can explain the observed profiles with an outflow velocity of ≳900 km s{sup –1} and a full opening angle of ≈110° (matching the X-ray bicone). This indicates Galactic center activity over the last ≈2.5-4.0 Myr, in line with age estimates of the Fermi Bubbles. The observations illustrate the use of UV spectroscopy to probe the properties of swept-up gas venting into the Fermi Bubbles.

  8. Absorption and fluorescence spectroscopic characterisation of the circadian blue-light photoreceptor cryptochrome from Drosophila melanogaster (dCry)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirdel, J.; Zirak, P.; Penzkofer, A.; Breitkreuz, H.; Wolf, E.

    2008-09-01

    The absorption and fluorescence behaviour of the circadian blue-light photoreceptor cryptochrome from Drosophila melanogaster (dCry) in a pH 8 aqueous buffer solution is studied. The flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) cofactor of dCry is identified to be present in its oxidized form (FAD ox), and the 5,10-methenyltetrahydrofolate (MTHF) cofactor is found to be hydrolyzed and oxidized to 10-formyldihydrofolate (10-FDHF). The absorption and the fluorescence behaviour of dCry is investigated in the dark-adapted (receptor) state, the light-adapted (signalling) state, and under long-time violet light exposure. Photo-excitation of FAD ox in dCry causes a reductive electron transfer to the formation of anionic FAD semiquinone (FAD rad - ), and photo-excitation of the generated FAD rad - causes an oxidative electron transfer to the back formation of FAD ox. In light adapted dCry a photo-induced equilibrium between FAD ox and FAD rad - exists. The photo-cycle dynamics of signalling state formation and recovery is discussed. Quantum yields of photo-induced signalling state formation of about 0.2 and of photo-induced back-conversion of about 0.2 are determined. A recovery of FAD rad - to FAD ox in the dark with a time constant of 1.6 min at room temperature is found.

  9. Spectroscopic and DFT study of solvent effects on the electronic absorption spectra of sulfamethoxazole in neat and binary solvent mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almandoz, M. C.; Sancho, M. I.; Blanco, S. E.

    2014-01-01

    The solvatochromic behavior of sulfamethoxazole (SMX) was investigated using UV-vis spectroscopy and DFT methods in neat and binary solvent mixtures. The spectral shifts of this solute were correlated with the Kamlet and Taft parameters (α, β and π*). Multiple lineal regression analysis indicates that both specific hydrogen-bond interaction and non specific dipolar interaction play an important role in the position of the absorption maxima in neat solvents. The simulated absorption spectra using TD-DFT methods were in good agreement with the experimental ones. Binary mixtures consist of cyclohexane (Cy)-ethanol (EtOH), acetonitrile (ACN)-dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO), ACN-dimethylformamide (DMF), and aqueous mixtures containing as co-solvents DMSO, ACN, EtOH and MeOH. Index of preferential solvation was calculated as a function of solvent composition and non-ideal characteristics are observed in all binary mixtures. In ACN-DMSO and ACN-DMF mixtures, the results show that the solvents with higher polarity and hydrogen bond donor ability interact preferentially with the solute. In binary mixtures containing water, the SMX molecules are solvated by the organic co-solvent (DMSO or EtOH) over the whole composition range. Synergistic effect is observed in the case of ACN-H2O and MeOH-H2O, indicating that at certain concentrations solvents interact to form association complexes, which should be more polar than the individual solvents of the mixture.

  10. Spectroscopic and DFT study of solvent effects on the electronic absorption spectra of sulfamethoxazole in neat and binary solvent mixtures.

    PubMed

    Almandoz, M C; Sancho, M I; Blanco, S E

    2014-01-24

    The solvatochromic behavior of sulfamethoxazole (SMX) was investigated using UV-vis spectroscopy and DFT methods in neat and binary solvent mixtures. The spectral shifts of this solute were correlated with the Kamlet and Taft parameters (α, β and π(*)). Multiple lineal regression analysis indicates that both specific hydrogen-bond interaction and non specific dipolar interaction play an important role in the position of the absorption maxima in neat solvents. The simulated absorption spectra using TD-DFT methods were in good agreement with the experimental ones. Binary mixtures consist of cyclohexane (Cy)-ethanol (EtOH), acetonitrile (ACN)-dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO), ACN-dimethylformamide (DMF), and aqueous mixtures containing as co-solvents DMSO, ACN, EtOH and MeOH. Index of preferential solvation was calculated as a function of solvent composition and non-ideal characteristics are observed in all binary mixtures. In ACN-DMSO and ACN-DMF mixtures, the results show that the solvents with higher polarity and hydrogen bond donor ability interact preferentially with the solute. In binary mixtures containing water, the SMX molecules are solvated by the organic co-solvent (DMSO or EtOH) over the whole composition range. Synergistic effect is observed in the case of ACN-H2O and MeOH-H2O, indicating that at certain concentrations solvents interact to form association complexes, which should be more polar than the individual solvents of the mixture.

  11. Evaluation of iron-containing carbon nanotubes by near edge X-ray absorption technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osorio, A. G.; Bergmann, C. P.

    2015-10-01

    The synthesis of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) via Chemical Vapor Deposition method with ferrocene results in CNTs filled with Fe-containing nanoparticles. The present work proposes a novel route to characterize the Fe phases in CNTs inherent to the synthesis process. CNTs were synthesized and, afterwards, the CNTs were heat treated at 1000 °C for 20 min in an inert atmosphere during a thermogravimetric experiment. X-Ray Absorption Spectroscopy (XAS) experiments were performed on the CNTs before and after the heat treatment and, also, during the heat treatment, e.g., in situ tests were performed while several Near-Edge X-Ray Absorption (XANES) spectra were collected during the heating of the samples. The XAS technique was successfully applied to evaluate the phases encapsulated by CNTs. Phase transformations of the Fe-based nanoparticles were also observed from iron carbide to metallic iron when the in situ experiments were performed. Results also indicated that the applied synthesis method guarantees that Fe phases are not oxidize. In addition, the results show that heat treatment under inert atmosphere can control which phase remains encapsulated by the CNTs.

  12. Structural, Optical and Mechanical properties of PVC/PMMA Polymer Blend by Spectroscopic Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, Gaurang; Sureshkumar, M. B.; Patel, Purvi

    2011-10-01

    PVC/PMMA polymer blends were characterized by Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR), UV-VIS Spectroscopy and mechanical analysis. The changes in mechanical properties are reflected by the changes in the IR spectrum. The mechanical properties of such poly blends revealed a substantial increase in Young's modulus and ultimate tensile strength after initial drop at 10% of PMMA. Optical properties such as the absorption coefficient, optical (Direct/Indirect) energy gap were calculated. The effects of different blending percentage on these parameters have been discussed and their results are co-related with IR study.

  13. Understanding refraction contrast using a comparison of absorption and refraction computed tomographic techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiebe, S.; Rhoades, G.; Wei, Z.; Rosenberg, A.; Belev, G.; Chapman, D.

    2013-05-01

    Refraction x-ray contrast is an imaging modality used primarily in a research setting at synchrotron facilities, which have a biomedical imaging research program. The most common method for exploiting refraction contrast is by using a technique called Diffraction Enhanced Imaging (DEI). The DEI apparatus allows the detection of refraction between two materials and produces a unique ''edge enhanced'' contrast appearance, very different from the traditional absorption x-ray imaging used in clinical radiology. In this paper we aim to explain the features of x-ray refraction contrast as a typical clinical radiologist would understand. Then a discussion regarding what needs to be considered in the interpretation of the refraction image takes place. Finally we present a discussion about the limitations of planar refraction imaging and the potential of DEI Computed Tomography. This is an original work that has not been submitted to any other source for publication. The authors have no commercial interests or conflicts of interest to disclose.

  14. Study on the interaction characteristics of cefamandole with bovine serum albumin by spectroscopic technique.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qian; Liu, Xuyang; Su, Ming; Shi, Zhihong; Sun, Hanwen

    2015-02-05

    The interaction of cefamandole with bovine serum albumin (BSA) was studied by fluorescence quenching in combination with UV-Vis spectroscopic method under near physiological conditions. The fluorescence quenching rate constants and binding constants for BSA-cefamandole system were determined at different temperatures. The fluorescence quenching of BSA by cefamandole is due to static quenching and energy transfer. The results of thermodynamic parameters, ΔH (-268.0 kJ mol(-1)), ΔS (-810.0 J mol(-1) K(-1)) and ΔG (-26.62 to -8.52 kJ mol(-1)), indicated that van der Waals interaction and hydrogen bonding played a major role for cefamandole-BSA association. The competitive experiments demonstrated that the primary binding site of cefamandole on BSA was located at site III in sub-domain IIIA of BSA. The distance between cefamandole and a tryptophane unit was estimated to be 1.18 nm based on the Förster resonance energy transfer theory. The binding constant (KA) of BSA-cefamandole at 298 K was 2.239×10(4) L mol(-1). Circular dichroism spectra, synchronous fluorescence and three-dimensional fluorescence studies showed that the presence of cefamandole could change the conformation of BSA during the binding process.

  15. Molecular structure and spectroscopic characterization of Carbamazepine with experimental techniques and DFT quantum chemical calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suhasini, M.; Sailatha, E.; Gunasekaran, S.; Ramkumaar, G. R.

    2015-04-01

    A systematic vibrational spectroscopic assignment and analysis of Carbamazepine has been carried out by using FT-IR, FT-Raman and UV spectral data. The vibrational analysis were aided by electronic structure calculations - ab initio (RHF) and hybrid density functional methods (B3LYP) performed with standard basis set 6-31G(d,p). Molecular equilibrium geometries, electronic energies, natural bond order analysis, harmonic vibrational frequencies and IR intensities have been computed. A detailed interpretation of the vibrational spectra of the molecule has been made on the basis of the calculated Potential Energy Distribution (PED) by VEDA program. UV-visible spectrum of the compound was also recorded and the electronic properties, such as HOMO and LUMO energies and λmax were determined by HF/6-311++G(d,p) Time-Dependent method. The thermodynamic functions of the title molecule were also performed using the RHF and DFT methods. The restricted Hartree-Fock and density functional theory-based nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) calculation procedure was also performed, and it was used for assigning the 13C and 1H NMR chemical shifts of Carbamazepine.

  16. Molecular structure and spectroscopic characterization of Carbamazepine with experimental techniques and DFT quantum chemical calculations.

    PubMed

    Suhasini, M; Sailatha, E; Gunasekaran, S; Ramkumaar, G R

    2015-04-15

    A systematic vibrational spectroscopic assignment and analysis of Carbamazepine has been carried out by using FT-IR, FT-Raman and UV spectral data. The vibrational analysis were aided by electronic structure calculations - ab initio (RHF) and hybrid density functional methods (B3LYP) performed with standard basis set 6-31G(d,p). Molecular equilibrium geometries, electronic energies, natural bond order analysis, harmonic vibrational frequencies and IR intensities have been computed. A detailed interpretation of the vibrational spectra of the molecule has been made on the basis of the calculated Potential Energy Distribution (PED) by VEDA program. UV-visible spectrum of the compound was also recorded and the electronic properties, such as HOMO and LUMO energies and λmax were determined by HF/6-311++G(d,p) Time-Dependent method. The thermodynamic functions of the title molecule were also performed using the RHF and DFT methods. The restricted Hartree-Fock and density functional theory-based nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) calculation procedure was also performed, and it was used for assigning the (13)C and (1)H NMR chemical shifts of Carbamazepine.

  17. Structure, spectra and antioxidant action of ascorbic acid studied by density functional theory, Raman spectroscopic and nuclear magnetic resonance techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Gurpreet; Mohanty, B. P.; Saini, G. S. S.

    2016-02-01

    Structure, vibrational and nuclear magnetic resonance spectra, and antioxidant action of ascorbic acid towards hydroxyl radicals have been studied computationally and in vitro by ultraviolet-visible, nuclear magnetic resonance and vibrational spectroscopic techniques. Time dependant density functional theory calculations have been employed to specify various electronic transitions in ultraviolet-visible spectra. Observed chemical shifts and vibrational bands in nuclear magnetic resonance and vibrational spectra, respectively have been assigned with the help of calculations. Changes in the structure of ascorbic acid in aqueous phase have been examined computationally and experimentally by recording Raman spectra in aqueous medium. Theoretical calculations of the interaction between ascorbic acid molecule and hydroxyl radical predicted the formation of dehydroascorbic acid as first product, which has been confirmed by comparing its simulated spectra with the corresponding spectra of ascorbic acid in presence of hydrogen peroxide.

  18. Structure, spectra and antioxidant action of ascorbic acid studied by density functional theory, Raman spectroscopic and nuclear magnetic resonance techniques.

    PubMed

    Singh, Gurpreet; Mohanty, B P; Saini, G S S

    2016-02-15

    Structure, vibrational and nuclear magnetic resonance spectra, and antioxidant action of ascorbic acid towards hydroxyl radicals have been studied computationally and in vitro by ultraviolet-visible, nuclear magnetic resonance and vibrational spectroscopic techniques. Time dependant density functional theory calculations have been employed to specify various electronic transitions in ultraviolet-visible spectra. Observed chemical shifts and vibrational bands in nuclear magnetic resonance and vibrational spectra, respectively have been assigned with the help of calculations. Changes in the structure of ascorbic acid in aqueous phase have been examined computationally and experimentally by recording Raman spectra in aqueous medium. Theoretical calculations of the interaction between ascorbic acid molecule and hydroxyl radical predicted the formation of dehydroascorbic acid as first product, which has been confirmed by comparing its simulated spectra with the corresponding spectra of ascorbic acid in presence of hydrogen peroxide.

  19. NONLINEAR-APPROXIMATION TECHNIQUE FOR DETERMINING VERTICAL OZONE-CONCENTRATION PROFILES WITH A DIFFERENTIAL-ABSORPTION LIDAR

    EPA Science Inventory

    A new technique is presented for the retrieval of ozone concentration profiles from backscattered signals obtained by a multi-wavelength differential-absorption lidar (DIAL). The technique makes it possible to reduce erroneous local fluctuations induced in the ozone-concentration...

  20. Spectral fluorescence signature techniques and absorption measurements for continuous monitoring of biofuel-producing microalgae cultures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martín de la Cruz, M. C.; Gonzalez Vilas, L.; Yarovenko, N.; Spyrakos, E.; Torres Palenzuela, J. M.

    2013-08-01

    Biofuel production from microalgae can be both sustainable and economically viable. Particularly in the case of algal growth in wastewater an extra benefit is the removal or biotransformation of pollutants from these types of waters. A continuous monitoring system of the microalgae status and the concentration of different wastewater contaminants could be of great help in the biomass production and the water characterisation. In this study we present a system where spectral fluorescence signature (SFS) techniques are used along with absorption measurements to monitor microalgae cultures in wastewater and other mediums. This system aims to optimise the microalgae production for biofuel applications or other uses and was developed and tested in prototype indoor photo-bioreactors at the University of Vigo. SFS techniques were applied using the fluorescence analyser INSTAND-SCREENER developed by Laser Diagnostic Instruments AS. INSTAND-SCREENER permits wavelength scanning in two modes, one in UV and another in VIS. In parallel, it permits the on-line monitoring and rapid analysis of both water quality and phytoplankton status without prior treatment of the sample. Considering that different contaminants and microalgae features (density, status etc.) have different spectral signatures of fluorescence and absorption properties, it is possible to characterise them developing classification libraries. Several algorithms were used for the classification. The implementation of this system in an outdoor raceway reactor in a Spanish wastewater treatment plant is also discussed. This study was part of the Project EnerBioAlgae (http://www.enerbioalgae.com/), which was funded by the Interreg SUDOE and led by the University of Vigo.

  1. Study on the sonodynamic activity and mechanism of promethazine hydrochloride by multi-spectroscopic techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Ling-Ling; Wang, Xin; Liu, Bin; Wang, Jun; Sun, Ya-Guang; Xu, Shu-Kun

    2011-10-01

    In this paper, the bovine serum albumin (BSA) was selected as a target molecule, the sonodynamic damage to protein in the presence of promethazine hydrochloride (PMT) and its mechanism were studied by the means of absorption, fluorescence and circular dichroism (CD) spectra. The results of hyperchromic effect of absorption spectra and quenching of intrinsic fluorescence spectra indicate that the ultrasound-induced BSA molecules damage is enhanced by PMT. The damage degree of BSA molecules increases with the increase of ultrasonic irradiation time and PMT concentration. The results of synchronous fluorescence, three-dimensional fluorescence and CD spectra confirmed that the synergistic effects of ultrasound and PMT induced the damage of BSA molecules. The results of oxidation-extraction photometry with several reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavengers indicate that the damage of BSA molecules could be mainly due to the generation of ROS and both 1O 2 and rad OH are the important mediators of the ultrasound-induced BSA molecules damage in the presence of PMT.

  2. Investigation on the interaction between isorhamnetin and bovine liver catalase by spectroscopic techniques under different pH conditions.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yumin; Li, Daojin

    2016-08-01

    The binding of isorhamnetin to bovine liver catalase (BLC) was first investigated at 302, 310 and 318 K at pH 7.4 using spectroscopic methods including fluorescence spectra, circular dichroism (CD) and UV-vis absorption. Spectrophotometric observations are rationalized mainly in terms of a static quenching process. The binding constants and binding sites were evaluated by fluorescence quenching methods. Enzymatic activity of BLC in the absence and presence of isorhamnetin was measured using a UV/vis spectrophotometer. The result revealed that the binding of isorhamnetin to BLC led to a reduction in the activity of BLC. The positive entropy change and enthalpy change indicated that the interaction of isorhamnetin with BLC was mainly driven by hydrophobic forces. The distance r between the donor (BLC) and acceptor (isorhamnetin) was estimated to be 2.99 nm according to fluorescence resonance energy transfer. Fluorescence, synchronous fluorescence, and CD spectra showed no obvious change in the conformation of BLC upon the binding of isorhamnetin. In addition, the influence of pH on the binding of isorhamnetin to BLC was investigated and the binding ability of the drug to BLC deceased under other pH conditions (pH 9.0, 6.5, 5.0, 3.5, or 2.0) as compared with that at pH 7.4. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. X-ray absorption spectroscopic studies of sputter-deposited LaNiO3 thin films on Si substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hsin-Yi; Wu, Tai-Bor; Lee, Jyh-Fu

    1996-08-01

    X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) was applied to investigate the growth behavior of LaNiO3 thin films on Si substrate deposited via radio frequency magnetron sputtering at high temperature. The thickness of deposited film was always proportional to the sputtering time. However, the Ni-to-La ratio in the film was found to decrease with increasing substrate temperature. It is due to a loss of Ni on high-temperature deposition which lowers the film growth rate and leads to a gradual structural change. Nevertheless, the oxidation states of both Ni atom and La atom in the thin films were not influenced by the substrate temperature or sputtering time. All the XAS evidence was consistent with the results from x-ray reflectivity, x-ray diffraction, and chemical analysis.

  4. Spectroscopic determination of leaf biochemistry using band-depth analysis of absorption features and stepwise multiple linear regression

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kokaly, R.F.; Clark, R.N.

    1999-01-01

    We develop a new method for estimating the biochemistry of plant material using spectroscopy. Normalized band depths calculated from the continuum-removed reflectance spectra of dried and ground leaves were used to estimate their concentrations of nitrogen, lignin, and cellulose. Stepwise multiple linear regression was used to select wavelengths in the broad absorption features centered at 1.73 ??m, 2.10 ??m, and 2.30 ??m that were highly correlated with the chemistry of samples from eastern U.S. forests. Band depths of absorption features at these wavelengths were found to also be highly correlated with the chemistry of four other sites. A subset of data from the eastern U.S. forest sites was used to derive linear equations that were applied to the remaining data to successfully estimate their nitrogen, lignin, and cellulose concentrations. Correlations were highest for nitrogen (R2 from 0.75 to 0.94). The consistent results indicate the possibility of establishing a single equation capable of estimating the chemical concentrations in a wide variety of species from the reflectance spectra of dried leaves. The extension of this method to remote sensing was investigated. The effects of leaf water content, sensor signal-to-noise and bandpass, atmospheric effects, and background soil exposure were examined. Leaf water was found to be the greatest challenge to extending this empirical method to the analysis of fresh whole leaves and complete vegetation canopies. The influence of leaf water on reflectance spectra must be removed to within 10%. Other effects were reduced by continuum removal and normalization of band depths. If the effects of leaf water can be compensated for, it might be possible to extend this method to remote sensing data acquired by imaging spectrometers to give estimates of nitrogen, lignin, and cellulose concentrations over large areas for use in ecosystem studies.We develop a new method for estimating the biochemistry of plant material using

  5. Probing the Fermi Bubbles in Ultraviolet Absorption: A Spectroscopic Signature of the Milky Way's Biconical Nuclear Outflow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fox, Andrew J.; Bordoloi, Rongmon; Savage, Blair D.; Lockman, Felix J.; Jenkins, Edward B.; Wakker, Bart P.; Bland-Hawthorn, Joss; Hernandez, Svea; Kim, Tae-Sun; Benjamin, Robert A.; Bowen, David V.; Tumlinson, Jason

    2015-01-01

    Giant lobes of plasma extend ≈55° above and below the Galactic center, glowing in emission from gamma rays (the Fermi Bubbles) to microwaves and polarized radio waves. We use ultraviolet absorption-line spectra from the Hubble Space Telescope to constrain the velocity of the outflowing gas within these regions, targeting the quasar PDS 456 (l, b = 10.°4, +11.°2). This sightline passes through a clear biconical structure seen in hard X-ray and gamma-ray emission near the base of the northern Fermi Bubble. We report two high-velocity metal absorption components, at v LSR = -235 and +250 km s-1, which cannot be explained by co-rotating gas in the Galactic disk or halo. Their velocities are suggestive of an origin on the front and back side of an expanding biconical outflow emanating from the Galactic center. We develop simple kinematic biconical outflow models that can explain the observed profiles with an outflow velocity of gsim900 km s-1 and a full opening angle of ≈110° (matching the X-ray bicone). This indicates Galactic center activity over the last ≈2.5-4.0 Myr, in line with age estimates of the Fermi Bubbles. The observations illustrate the use of UV spectroscopy to probe the properties of swept-up gas venting into the Fermi Bubbles. Based on observations taken under program 13448 of the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained at the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under NASA contract NAS 5-26555, and under program 14B-299 of the NRAO Green Bank Telescope, which is a facility of the National Science Foundation operated under cooperative agreement by Associated Universities, Inc.

  6. An in-line micro-pyrolysis system to remove contaminating organic species for precise and accurate water isotope analysis by spectroscopic techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panetta, R. J.; Hsiao, G.

    2011-12-01

    Trace levels of organic contaminants such as short alcohols and terpenoids have been shown to cause spectral interference in water isotope analysis by spectroscopic techniques. The result is degraded precision and accuracy in both δD and δ18O for samples such as beverages, plant extracts or slightly contaminated waters. An initial approach offered by manufacturers is post-processing software that analyzes spectral features to identify and flag contaminated samples. However, it is impossible for this software to accurately reconstruct the water isotope signature, thus it is primarily a metric for data quality. Here, we describe a novel in-line pyrolysis system (Micro-Pyrolysis Technology, MPT) placed just prior to the inlet of a cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS) analyzer that effectively removes interfering organic molecules without altering the isotope values of the water. Following injection of the water sample, N2 carrier gas passes the sample through a micro-pyrolysis tube heated with multiple high temperature elements in an oxygen-free environment. The temperature is maintained above the thermal decomposition threshold of most organic compounds (≤ 900 oC), but well below that of water (~2000 oC). The main products of the pyrolysis reaction are non-interfering species such as elemental carbon and H2 gas. To test the efficacy and applicability of the system, waters of known isotopic composition were spiked with varying amounts of common interfering alcohols (methanol, ethanol, propanol, hexanol, trans-2-hexenol, cis-3-hexanol up to 5 % v/v) and common soluble plant terpenoids (carveol, linalool, geraniol, prenol). Spiked samples with no treatment to remove the organics show strong interfering absorption peaks that adversely affect the δD and δ18O values. However, with the MPT in place, all interfering absorption peaks are removed and the water absorption spectrum is fully restored. As a consequence, the δD and δ18O values also return to their original

  7. Monitoring PDT effects in murine tumors by spectroscopic and imaging techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramaprasad, Subbaraya; Rzepka, Elzbieta; Pi, Jiaxiong; Joshi, Shantaram S.; Dobhal, Mahabeer; Missert, Joseph; Pandey, Ravindra K.

    2004-04-01

    The changes in the tumor that occur following photodynamic therapy (PDT) were studied using a small animal MR imager operating at 7Tesla. The animal model used in these studies was mice bearing radiation induced fibrosarcoma (RIF) tumor on the foot dorsum. The mice were injected with 10μM/kg of one of the photosensitizers: (1) Photofrin, (2) Non-fluorinated porphyrin photosensitizer (DOD-1), (3) Fluorinated porphyrin photosensitizer (DOD-2) and, (4) Fluorinated chlorin photosensitizer (DOD-6). Laser light at 630 or 650 nm (150 mW/cm2, 270 joules/cm2) was delivered to the tumor at 2-24 hours of photosensitizer administration. The MR spectroscopic and imaging examination of the tumors involved both the 1H and 31P nuclei. The tumor bioenergetics was measured by 31P spectroscopy. The water proton relaxivity and diffusion measurements were used to obtain local changes in different regions of the tumor. Changes in 31P MR spectra were observed following PDT using Photofrin and fluorinated chlorin sensitizer (DOD-6). However, no significant changes were observed when the fluorinated porphyrin and its nonfluorinated analog were used. The PDT induced changes in tumor volumes showed significant tumor regression with Photofrin, fluorinated porphyrin and chlorin sensitizers. No tumor regression was observed with the non labeled porphyrin sensitizer and the growth profile followed the general pattern of unperturbed tumors. Serial noninvasive measurements of tumor response to PDT are measurable by both MRI and MRS. The MR derived parameters that are characteristic of the tumor status before and after the therapy are discussed here.

  8. Development of a spectroscopic technique for simultaneous magnetic field, electron density, and temperature measurements in ICF-relevant plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutra, E. C.; Koch, J. A.; Presura, R.; Angermeier, W. A.; Darling, T.; Haque, S.; Mancini, R. C.; Covington, A. M.

    2016-11-01

    Spectroscopic techniques in the visible range are often used in plasma experiments to measure B-field induced Zeeman splitting, electron densities via Stark broadening, and temperatures from Doppler broadening. However, when electron densities and temperatures are sufficiently high, the broadening of the Stark and Doppler components can dominate the emission spectra and obscure the Zeeman component. In this research, we are developing a time-resolved multi-axial technique for measuring the Zeeman, Stark, and Doppler broadened line emission of dense magnetized plasmas for Z-pinch and Dense Plasma Focus (DPF) accelerators. The line emission is used to calculate the electron densities, temperatures, and B-fields. In parallel, we are developing a line-shape modeling code that incorporates the broadening effects due to Stark, Doppler, and Zeeman effects for dense magnetized plasma. This manuscript presents the details of the experimental setup and line shape code, along with the results obtained from an Al iii doublet at the University of Nevada, Reno at Nevada Terawatt Facility. Future tests are planned to further evaluate the technique and modeling on other material wire array, gas puff, and DPF platforms.

  9. Spectrum of excess partial molar absorptivity. Part II: a near infrared spectroscopic study of aqueous Na-halides.

    PubMed

    Sebe, Fumie; Nishikawa, Keiko; Koga, Yoshikata

    2012-04-07

    Our earlier thermodynamic studies suggested that F(-) and Cl(-) form hydration shells with the hydration number 14 ± 2 and 2.3 ± 0.6, respectively, and leave the bulk H(2)O away from hydration shells unperturbed. Br(-) and I(-), on the other hand, form hydrogen bonds directly with the momentarily existing hydrogen bond network of H(2)O, and retard the degree of entropy-volume cross fluctuation inherent in liquid H(2)O. The effect of the latter is stronger for I(-) than Br(-). Here we seek additional information about this qualitative difference between Cl(-) and (Br(-) and I(-)) pair by near infrared (NIR) spectroscopy. We analyze the ν(2) + ν(3) band of H(2)O in the range 4600-5500 cm(-1) of aqueous solutions of NaCl, NaBr and NaI, by a new approach. From observed absorbance, we calculate excess molar absorptivity, ε(E), excess over the additive contributions of solute and solvent. ε(E) thus contains information about the effect of inter-molecular interactions in the ν(2) + ν(3) spectrum. The spectrum of ε(E) shows three bands; two negative ones at 5263 and 4873 cm(-1), and the positive band at 5123 cm(-1). We then define and calculate the excess partial molar absorptivity of each salt, ε(E)(salt). From the behaviour of ε(E)(salt) we suggest that the negative band at 5263 cm(-1) represents free H(2)O without much hydrogen bonding under the influence of local electric field of ions. Furthermore, from a sudden change in the x(salt) (mole fraction of salt) dependence of ε(E)(salt), we suggest that there is an ion-pairing in x(salt) > 0.032, 0.036, and 0.04 for NaCl, NaBr and NaI respectively. The positive band of ε(E) at 5123 cm(-1) is attributed to a modestly organized hydrogen bond network of H(2)O (or liquid-likeness), and the x(salt) dependence of ε indicated a qualitative difference in the effect of Cl(-) from those of Br(-) and I(-). Namely, the values of ε(E)(salt) stay constant for Cl(-) but those for Br(-) and I(-) decrease smoothly on

  10. Formation and microwave absorption of barium and strontium ferrite prepared by sol-gel technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sürig, C.; Hempel, K. A.; Bonnenberg, D.

    1993-11-01

    Ba and Sr ferrites are prepared by sol-gel technique with different Fe/Ba(Sr) ratios in the starting materials. Magnetization, coercive, and anisotropy field strength are determined depending on the heat treatment of the gel and the iron/barium(strontium) ratio in the starting material. A two-step heat treatment is used to prepare single-domain powders with high magnetization. These powders prepared by sol-gel technique show single-domain behavior with specific magnetization σS=649 A cm2/g and coercive field strength HcM=402 kA/m in the case of Ba ferrite and σS=695 A cm2/g and HcM=416 kA/m for Sr the ferrite. Al-substituted ferrites with high anisotropy field strengths are prepared additionally. Ferromagnetic resonance absorption is used to determine the anisotropy field strength and to investigate the formation process of the hexaferrite phase during the heat treatment. The beginning of hexaferrite formation occurs at annealing temperatures below 700 °C.

  11. In situ infrared reflection absorption spectroscopic characterization of sustained kinetic oscillations in the Pt(100)/NO+CO system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magtoto, Noel P.; Richardson, Hugh H.

    1998-11-01

    We have excited kinetic oscillations in the Pt(100)/NO+CO system at 470 K and pressure region around 2×10 -4 Torr. These oscillations are sustained and they arise by simply adjusting the partial pressures of NO and CO while holding the surface temperature at 470 K. However, they can only be induced if the partial pressure of CO is greater than that of NO (i.e., 1.4±0.05< pCO/ pNO<1.7±0.04). Infrared reflection-absorption spectra (IRAS) collected during the oscillation showed that the periodic growth and decay of the CO band are counterphase to the reaction-rate oscillations. Infrared bands due to molecularly adsorbed NO were not found during the early stages of the temporal evolution of the system into the upper reaction-rate branch. However, during the later stages of the evolution, a single IR band due to chemisorbed NO was observed. This band eventually disappeared as the reaction rate finally reached its maximum value. With the use of the model by Fink et al., we were able to rationalize the occurrence of oscillations under the present experimental conditions. Oscillations are caused by the periodic change in the level of adsorbate coverages that controls the dissociation of NO.

  12. The chemical environment of iron in mineral fibres. A combined X-ray absorption and Mössbauer spectroscopic study.

    PubMed

    Pollastri, Simone; D'Acapito, Francesco; Trapananti, Angela; Colantoni, Ivan; Andreozzi, Giovanni B; Gualtieri, Alessandro F

    2015-11-15

    Although asbestos represents today one of the most harmful contaminant on Earth, in 72% of the countries worldwide only amphiboles are banned while controlled use of chrysotile is allowed. Uncertainty on the potential toxicity of chrysotile is due to the fact that the mechanisms by which mineral fibres induces cyto- and geno-toxic damage are still unclear. We have recently started a long term project aimed at the systematic investigation of the crystal-chemistry, bio-interaction and toxicity of the mineral fibres. This work presents a systematic structural investigation of iron in asbestos and erionite (considered the most relevant mineral fibres of social and/or economic-industrial importance) using synchrotron X-ray absorption and Mössbauer spectroscopy. In all investigated mineral fibres, iron in the bulk structure is found in octahedral sites and can be made available at the surface via fibre dissolution. We postulate that the amount of hydroxyl radicals released by the fibers depends, among other factors, upon their dissolution rate; in relation to this, a ranking of ability of asbestos fibres to generate hydroxyl radicals, resulting from available surface iron, is advanced: amosite > crocidolite ≈ chrysotile > anthophyllite > tremolite. Erionite, with a fairly high toxicity potential, contains only octahedrally coordinated Fe(3+). Although it needs further experimental evidence, such available surface iron may be present as oxide nanoparticles coating and can be a direct cause of generation of hydroxyl radicals when such coating dissolves.

  13. Advanced techniques for high resolution spectroscopic observations of cosmic gamma-ray sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matteson, J. L.; Pelling, M. R.; Peterson, L. E.; Lin, R. P.; Anderson, K. A.; Pehl, R. H.; Hurley, K. C.; Vedrenne, G.; Sniel, M.; Durouchoux, P.

    1985-01-01

    An advanced gamma-ray spectrometer that is currently in development is described. It will obtain a sensitivity of 0.0001 ph/sq cm./sec in a 6 hour balloon observation and uses innovative techniques for background reduction and source imaging.

  14. Spatially-resolved spectroscopic technique for measuring optical properties of food

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Quantification of optical properties is important to understand light interaction with biological materials, and to develop effective optical sensing techniques for property characterization and quality measurement of food products. This chapter reviews spatially-resolved method, with the focus on f...

  15. Reflective and photoacoustic infrared spectroscopic techniques in assessment of binding media in paintings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Łojewski, Tomasz; Bagniuk, Jacek; Kołodziej, Andrzej; Łojewska, Joanna

    2011-11-01

    This study proposes a method to estimate the lipid content in binding media in paintings that can be used at any laboratory equipped with an infrared spectrometer. The lipid content estimator, termed greasiness index (GI), is defined as a ratio of lipid ν(C=O) and protein amide I bands at 1743 and 1635 cm-1, respectively. Three Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) sampling techniques were evaluated for GI determination: reflective attenuated total reflection—ATR, specular reflection microscopy— μSR and photoacoustic—PAS. A set of model painting samples containing three tempera binding media (casein, egg, egg + oil), seven pigments and one varnish type were used in the study. Multivariate analysis was used to evaluate the resulting data. A good reproducibility of GI was obtained by ATR and PAS but not with μSR. The discriminative power of the technique is higher for unvarnished samples, but, generally, the GI estimator can be used for the categorisation of binding media in large populations of painting samples analysed with the same FTIR technique (sampling technique, detection, etc.).

  16. Insights to Superconducting Radio-Frequency Cavity Processing from First Principles Calculations and Spectroscopic Techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Ford, Denise Christine

    2013-03-01

    Insights to the fundamental processes that occur during the manufacturing of niobium superconducting radio-frequency (SRF) cavities are provided via analyses of density functional theory calculations and Raman, infrared, and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra. I show that during electropolishing fluorine is bound and released by the reaction of the acid components in the solution: HF + H2SO4 <-> HFSO3 + H2O. This result implies that new recipes can possibly be developed on the principle of controlled release of fluorine by a chemical reaction. I also show that NMR or Raman spectroscopy can be used to monitor the free fluorine when polishing with the standard electropolishing recipe. Density functional theory was applied to calculate the properties of common processing impurities – hydrogen, oxygen, nitrogen, and carbon – in the niobium. These impurities lower the superconducting transition temperature of niobium, and hydride precipitates are at best weakly superconducting. I modeled several of the niobium hydride phases relevant to SRF cavities, and explain the phase changes in the niobium hydrogen system based on the charge transfer between niobium and hydrogen and the strain field inside of the niobium. I also present evidence for a niobium lattice vacancy serving as a nucleation center for hydride phase formation. In considering the other chemical impurities in niobium, I show that the absorption of oxygen into a niobium lattice vacancy is preferred over the absorption of hydrogen, which indicates that oxygen can block these phase nucleation centers. I also show that dissolved oxygen atoms can trap dissolved hydrogen atoms to prevent niobium hydride phase formation. Nitrogen and carbon were studied in less depth, but behaved similarly to oxygen. Based on these results and a literature survey, I propose a mechanism for the success of the low-temperature anneal applied to niobium SRF cavities. Finally, I

  17. Insights to Superconducting Radio-Frequency Cavity Processing from First Principles Calculations and Spectroscopic Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ford, Denise Christine

    Insights to the fundamental processes that occur during the manufacturing of niobium superconducting radio-frequency (SRF) cavities are provided via analyses of density functional theory calculations and Raman, infrared, and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra. I show that during electropolishing fluorine is bound and released by the reaction of the acid components in the solution: HF + H2SO4 <-> HFSO3 + H2O. This result implies that new recipes can possibly be developed on the principle of controlled release of fluorine by a chemical reaction. I also show that NMR or Raman spectroscopy can be used to monitor the free fluorine when polishing with the standard electropolishing recipe. Density functional theory was applied to calculate the properties of common processing impurities---hydrogen, oxygen, nitrogen, and carbon---in the niobium. These impurities lower the superconducting transition temperature of niobium, and hydride precipitates are at best weakly superconducting. I modeled several of the niobium hydride phases relevant to SRF cavities, and explain the phase changes in the niobium hydrogen system based on the charge transfer between niobium and hydrogen and the strain field inside of the niobium. I also present evidence for a niobium lattice vacancy serving as a nucleation center for hydride phase formation. In considering the other chemical impurities in niobium, I show that the absorption of oxygen into a niobium lattice vacancy is preferred over the absorption of hydrogen, which indicates that oxygen can block these phase nucleation centers. I also show that dissolved oxygen atoms can trap dissolved hydrogen atoms to prevent niobium hydride phase formation. Nitrogen and carbon were studied in less depth, but behaved similarly to oxygen. Based on these results and a literature survey, I propose a mechanism for the success of the low-temperature anneal applied to niobium SRF cavities. Finally, I present the beginning of a model to describe magnetic

  18. Using terahertz time-domain spectroscopical technique to monitor cocrystal formation between piracetam and 2,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Yong; Xia, Yi; Zhang, Huili; Hong, Zhi

    2013-07-01

    Far-infrared vibrational absorption of cocrystal formation between 2,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid (2,5-DHBA) and piracetam compounds under solvent evaporation and grinding methods have been investigated using terahertz time-domain spectroscopy (THz-TDS) at room temperature. The experimental results show large difference among absorption spectra of the formed cocrystals and the involved individual parent molecules in 0.20-1.50 THz region, which probably originated from the intra-molecular and inter-molecular hydrogen bonds due to the presence of two hydroxyl groups in 2,5-DHBA and amide moieties in piracetam compound. The THz absorption spectra of two formed cocrystals with different methods are almost identical. With grinding method, the reaction process can be monitored directly from both time-domain and frequency-domain spectra using THz-TDS technique. The results indicate that THz-TDS technology can absolutely offer us a high potential method to identify and characterize the formed cocrystals, and also provide the rich information about their reaction dynamic process involving two or more molecular crystals in situ to better know the corresponding reaction mechanism in pharmaceutical fields.

  19. Using terahertz time-domain spectroscopical technique to monitor cocrystal formation between piracetam and 2,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid.

    PubMed

    Du, Yong; Xia, Yi; Zhang, Huili; Hong, Zhi

    2013-07-01

    Far-infrared vibrational absorption of cocrystal formation between 2,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid (2,5-DHBA) and piracetam compounds under solvent evaporation and grinding methods have been investigated using terahertz time-domain spectroscopy (THz-TDS) at room temperature. The experimental results show large difference among absorption spectra of the formed cocrystals and the involved individual parent molecules in 0.20-1.50 THz region, which probably originated from the intra-molecular and inter-molecular hydrogen bonds due to the presence of two hydroxyl groups in 2,5-DHBA and amide moieties in piracetam compound. The THz absorption spectra of two formed cocrystals with different methods are almost identical. With grinding method, the reaction process can be monitored directly from both time-domain and frequency-domain spectra using THz-TDS technique. The results indicate that THz-TDS technology can absolutely offer us a high potential method to identify and characterize the formed cocrystals, and also provide the rich information about their reaction dynamic process involving two or more molecular crystals in situ to better know the corresponding reaction mechanism in pharmaceutical fields.

  20. Combined X-Ray and Raman Spectroscopic Techniques for the Characterization of Sea Spray Aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aller, J. Y.; Alpert, P. A.; Knopf, D. A.; Kilthau, W.; Bothe, D.; Charnawskas, J. C.; Gilles, M. K.; OBrien, R. E.; Moffet, R.; Radway, J.

    2014-12-01

    Sea spray aerosol along with mineral dust dominates the global mass flux of particles to the atmosphere. Marine aerosol particles are of particular interest because of their continual impact on cloud formation, precipitation, atmospheric chemical processes, and thus global climate. Here we report on the physical/chemical characteristics of sub-surface waters, aerosolized sea spray particles, and particles/organic species present in surface microlayer (SML) samples collected during oceanic field campaigns and generated during laboratory experiments, revealing a biogenic primary source of the organic fraction of airborne particles. We also report on ice nucleation experiments with aerosolized particles collected during the May 2014 WACS II North Atlantic cruise and with laboratory generated exudate material from diatom cultures with the potential to impact cirrus and mixed phase clouds. Physicochemical analyses using a multi-modal approach which includes Scanning Transmission X-ray Microscopy coupled with Near-Edge Absorption Fine Structure Spectroscopy (STXM/NEXAFS) and Raman spectroscopy confirm the presence and chemical similarity of polysaccharide-rich transparent exopolymer (TEP) material and proteins in both SML sea spray aerosol and ice forming aerosol particles, regardless of the extent of biological activity in surface waters. Our results demonstrate a direct relationship between the marine environment and composition of marine aerosol through primary particle emission.

  1. Chemical leaching of an Indian bituminous coal and characterization of the products by vibrational spectroscopic techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manoj, B.; Kunjomana, A. G.

    2012-04-01

    High volatile bituminous coal was demineralized by a chemical method. The vibrations of the "aromatics" structure of graphite, crystalline or non-crystalline, were observed in the spectra at the 1600 cm-1 region. The band at 1477 cm-1 is assigned as VR band, the band at 1392 cm-1 as VL band and the band at 1540 cm-1 as GR band. Graphite structure remains after chemical leaching liberates oxygenated functional groups and mineral groups. The silicate bands between 1010 and 1100 cm-1 are active in the infrared (IR) spectrum but inactive in the Raman spectrum. Absorption arising from C-H stretching in alkenes occurs in the region of 3000 to 2840 cm-1. Raman bands because of symmetric stretch of water molecules were also observed in the spectrum at 3250 cm-1 and 3450 cm-1. Scanning electron microscopy analysis revealed the presence of a graphite layer on the surface. Leaching of the sample with hydrofluoric acid decreases the mineral phase and increases the carbon content. The ash content is reduced by 84.5wt% with leaching from its initial value by mainly removing aluminum and silicate containing minerals.

  2. Spectroscopic studies on Solvatochromism of mixed-chelate copper(II) complexes using MLR technique.

    PubMed

    Golchoubian, Hamid; Moayyedi, Golasa; Fazilati, Hakimeh

    2012-01-01

    Mixed-chelate copper(II) complexes with a general formula [Cu(acac)(diamine)]X where acac=acetylacetonate ion, diamine=N,N-dimethyl,N'-benzyl-1,2-diaminoethane and X=BPh(4)(-), PF(6)(-), ClO(4)(-) and BF(4)(-) have been prepared. The complexes were characterized on the basis of elemental analysis, molar conductance, UV-vis and IR spectroscopies. The complexes are solvatochromic and their solvatochromism were investigated by visible spectroscopy. All complexes demonstrated the positive solvatochromism and among the complexes [Cu(acac)(diamine)]BPh(4)·H(2)O showed the highest Δν(max) value. To explore the mechanism of interaction between solvent molecules and the complexes, different solvent parameters such as DN, AN, α and β using multiple linear regression (MLR) method were employed. The statistical results suggested that the DN parameter of the solvent plays a dominate contribution to the shift of the d-d absorption band of the complexes.

  3. The Pleiades Using Astronomical Spectroscopic Technique within the Range of H-{alpha} Region

    SciTech Connect

    Zambri Zainuddin, Mohd; Muhyidin, Meer Ashwinkumar; Ahmad, Nazhatulshima; Mohd Saadon, Mohd Hafiz

    2011-03-30

    The Pleiades is an open star cluster located in the constellation of Taurus, which mainly consists of hot and luminous B-type stars. Observations were conducted over five-day period in December 2009 at Langkawi National Observatory, Malaysia by using 20-inch telescope diameter of Ritchey-Chretien reflector telescope, together with SBIG Self Guided Spectrograph and SBIG ST-7 CCD camera. The spectra of seven main members of the cluster, namely Alcyone; Atlas; Celaeno; Electra; Maia; Merope and Taygeta; and of Alcyone B; a smaller component of Alcyone quadruple system, were obtained in the optical range of approximately 6300 A to 7100 A. This range was picked due to the vicinity of Balmer H-{alpha} spectral line at 6562.852 A. Alcyone, Electra and Merope were found to have H-{alpha} emissions possibly caused by the presence of equatorial circumstellar disks or envelopes made up of ejected matter. Electra and Merope in particular exhibited peculiar asymmetric double emission peaks, which could be evidence of one-armed density wave in each of their circumstellar disks. Atlas, Celaeno, Merope, Taygeta and Alcyone B showed strong H-{alpha} absorptions with broadening characteristic of high rotational velocities. As deduced from the spectra, the stars were found to have atmospheres with similar chemical content, with spectral lines characteristics of singly ionized silicon, singly ionized iron and singly ionized oxygen. The measured radial velocities of all eight stars also suggest that the cluster could someday disperse.

  4. Interaction of oridonin with human serum albumin by isothermal titration calorimetry and spectroscopic techniques.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiangrong; Yang, Zhenhua

    2015-05-05

    Oridonin has been traditionally and widely used for treatment of various human diseases due to its uniquely biological, pharmacological and physiological functions. In this study, the interaction between oridonin and human serum albumin (HSA) was investigated using isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC), in combination with fluorescence spectroscopy and UV-vis absorption spectroscopy. We found that the hydrogen bond and van der Waals force are the major binding forces in the binding of oridonin to HSA. The binding of oridonin to HSA is driven by favorable enthalpy and unfavorable entropy. Oridonin can quench the fluorescence of HSA through a static quenching mechanism. The binding constant between oridonin and HSA is moderate and the equilibrium fraction of unbound oridonin f(u) > 60%. Binding site I is found to be the primary binding site for oridonin. Additionally, oridonin may induce conformational changes of HSA and affect its biological function as the carrier protein. The results of the current study suggest that oridonin can be stored and transported from the circulatory system to reach its target organ to provide its therapeutic effects. But its side-effect in the clinics cannot be overlook. The study provides an accurate and full basic data for clarifying the binding mechanism of oridonin with HSA and is helpful for understanding its effect on protein function during the blood transportation process and its biological activity in vivo.

  5. X-ray absorption and photoelectron spectroscopic study of plasma-nitrided SiO{sub 2} film

    SciTech Connect

    Song, H.J.; Shin, H.J.; Chung, Youngsu; Lee, J.C.; Lee, M.K.

    2005-06-01

    Plasma-nitrided SiO{sub 2} thin film has been analyzed by synchrotron-radiation-based x-ray absorption and photoelectron spectroscopies (XAS and XPS). High-resolution N 1s XAS and N 1s, O 1s, and Si 2p XPS spectral changes were obtained for different annealing temperatures. N 1s XPS and XAS spectra show that at room temperature, besides the main species of N[Si(O-){sub 3-x}]{sub 3}, there exist free moleculelike N{sub 2} and HN[Si(O-){sub 3}]{sub 2}, H{sub 2}NSi(O-){sub 3}, and N-Si{sub 2}O species with surface contaminants. The spectral intensities of the N{sub 2} and the HN[Si(O-){sub 3}]{sub 2}, H{sub 2}NSi(O-){sub 3}, and N-Si{sub 2}O species decrease as the annealing temperature increases, and finally the nitrogen exists dominantly in the form of N[Si(O){sub 3}]{sub 3} species above 820 K, indicating out-diffusion of molecular N{sub 2} and structural reconstruction to form a stable structure upon annealing. The Si 2p and O 1s XPS spectra show that Si{sup >4+} 2p peak and O 1s peak appear at 103.7 and 534.0 eV, respectively, which are higher binding energies than those of thermally grown oxynitride films with lower coverage on silicon. Upon annealing the sample, these peaks shift towards lower binding energy; {approx}0.3 eV for Si{sup >4+} and 0.4 eV for O 1s. The causes of the peaks appearance at relatively higher binding energy and the peak shift upon annealing are discussed.

  6. Absorption and emission spectroscopic characterization of photo-dynamics of photoactivated adenylyl cyclase mutant bPAC-Y7F of Beggiatoa sp.

    PubMed

    Penzkofer, Alfons; Stierl, Manuela; Mathes, Tilo; Hegemann, Peter

    2014-11-01

    The photoactivated cyclase bPAC of the microbial mats bacterium Beggiatoa sp. consists of a BLUF domain and an adenylyl cyclase domain. It has strong activity of photo-induced cyclic adenylyl monophosphate (cAMP) formation and is therefore an important optogenetic tool in neuroscience applications. The SUMO-bPAC-Y7F mutant where Tyr-7 is replaced by Phe-7 in the BLUF domain has lost the typical BLUF domain photo-cycle dynamics. Instead, the investigated SUMO-bPAC-Y7F mutant consisted of three protein conformations with different triplet based photo-dynamics: (i) reversible flavin quinone (Fl) cofactor reduction to flavin semiquinone (FlH), (ii) reversible violet/near ultraviolet absorbing flavin photoproduct (FlA) formation, and (iii) irreversible red absorbing flavin photoproduct (FlC) formation. Absorption and emission spectroscopic measurements on SUMO-bPAC-Y7F were carried out before, during and after light exposure. Flavin photo-dynamics schemes are developed for the SUMO-bPAC-Y7F fractions performing photo-induced FlH, FlA, and FlC formation. Quantitative parameters of the flavin cofactor excitation, relaxation and recovery dynamics in SUMO-bPAC-Y7F are determined.

  7. Murillo's paintings revealed by spectroscopic techniques and dedicated laboratory-made micro X-ray diffraction.

    PubMed

    Duran, A; Siguenza, M B; Franquelo, M L; Jimenez de Haro, M C; Justo, A; Perez-Rodriguez, J L

    2010-06-25

    This paper describes one of the first case studies using micro-diffraction laboratory-made systems to analyse painting cross-sections. Pigments, such as lead white, vermilion, red ochre, red lac, lapis lazuli, smalt, lead tin yellow type I, massicot, ivory black, lamp black and malachite, were detected in cross-sections prepared from six Bartolomé Esteban Murillo paintings by micro-Raman and micro-XRD combined with complementary techniques (optical microscopy, SEM-EDS, and FT-IR). The use of micro-XRD was necessary due to the poor results obtained with conventional XRD. In some cases, pigment identification was only possible by combining results from the different analytical techniques utilised in this study.

  8. Neutron Stimulated Emission Computed Tomography: A New Technique for Spectroscopic Medical Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kapadia, A. J.

    Neutron stimulated emission computed tomography (NSECT) is being developed as a new medical-imaging technique to quantify spatial distributions of elements in a sample through inelastic scattering of fast neutrons and detection of the resulting gamma rays. It has the potential to diagnose several disorders in the human body that are characterized by changes in element concentration in the diseased tissue. NSECT is sensitive to several naturally occurring elements in the human body that demonstrate concentration changes in the presence of diseases. NSECT, therefore, has the potential to noninvasively diagnose such disorders with radiation dose that is comparable to other ionizing imaging modalities. This chapter discusses the development and progress of NSECT and presents an overview of the current status of the imaging technique.

  9. Microsampling techniques for infrared spectroscopic analysis of lunar and terrestrial minerals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Estep, P. A.; Kovach, J. J.; Karr, C.

    1973-01-01

    Microsampling techniques have been developed for infrared analysis of single mineral grains from lunar rocks and dusts, allowing a detailed molecular structure characterization of these complex fine-grained samples. The methods include special devices for isolating single grains, preparing micropellets from the grains, and obtaining in situ microspecular reflectance spectra from grains in polished rock samples. Although specifically developed for the work on lunar samples, the special techniques for single grain infrared analysis were found to be equally useful in studies of complex terrestrial mineral samples. For example, infrared microanalysis has contributed substantially in solving problems concerned with our natural resources, such as the structural characterization of minerals from commercial iron ores, marine deposits, coal, and fly ash derived from coal.

  10. Development of a spectroscopic technique for simultaneous magnetic field, electron density, and temperature measurements in Z-pinch plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutra, Eric; Presura, Radu; Covington, Aaron; Mancini, Roberto; Darling, Timothy; Angermeier, William

    2016-10-01

    Visible spectroscopic techniques are often used in plasma experiments to measure B-field induced Zeeman splitting, electron densities via Stark broadening, and temperatures from Doppler broadening. However, when electron densities and temperatures are sufficiently high, the broadening of the Stark and Doppler components can dominate the emission spectra and obscure the Zeeman component. In this research, we are developing a time-resolved multi-axial technique for measuring the Zeeman, Stark, and Doppler broadened line emission of dense magnetized plasmas for Z-pinch. In parallel, we are developing a line-shape modeling code that incorporates the broadening effects due to Stark, Doppler, and Zeeman effects for dense magnetized plasma. Experiments were conducted at the University of Nevada (Reno) at the Nevada Terawatt Facility (NTF) using the 1 MA Z-pinch (Zebra). The research explored the optical emission of Al III doublet, 4P 2P3/2 to 4S 2S1/2 and 4P 2P1/2 to 4s 2S1/2 transitions and used it to measure Zeeman, Stark, and Doppler broadened emission. The initial parameters for the line shape code are varied to simulate emission spectra. The simulated spectra are compared to experimental results. These results are used to infer temperature, electron density, and B-fields in the magnetized plasma.

  11. Study of fossil bones by synchrotron radiation micro-spectroscopic techniques and scanning electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Zougrou, I M; Katsikini, M; Pinakidou, F; Paloura, E C; Papadopoulou, L; Tsoukala, E

    2014-01-01

    Earlymost Villafranchian fossil bones of an artiodactyl and a perissodactyl from the Milia excavation site in Grevena, Greece, were studied in order to evaluate diagenetic effects. Optical microscopy revealed the different bone types (fibro-lamellar and Haversian, respectively) of the two fragments and their good preservation state. The spatial distribution of bone apatite and soil-originating elements was studied using micro-X-ray fluorescence (µ-XRF) mapping and scanning electron microscopy. The approximate value of the Ca/P ratio was 2.2, as determined from scanning electron microscopy measurements. Bacterial boring was detected close to the periosteal region and Fe bearing oxides were found to fill bone cavities, e.g. Haversian canals and osteocyte lacunae. In the perissodactyl bone considerable amounts of Mn were detected close to cracks (the Mn/Fe weight ratio takes values up to 3.5). Goethite and pyrite were detected in both samples by means of metallographic microscopy. The local Ca/P ratio determined with µ-XRF varied significantly in metal-poor spots indicating spatial inhomogeneities in the ionic substitutions. XRF line scans that span the bone cross sections revealed that Fe and Mn contaminate the bones from both the periosteum and medullar cavity and aggregate around local maxima. The formation of goethite, irrespective of the local Fe concentration, was verified by the Fe K-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) spectra. Finally, Sr K-edge extended XAFS (EXAFS) revealed that Sr substitutes for Ca in bone apatite without obvious preference to the Ca1 or Ca2 unit-cell site occupation.

  12. The absorption spectrum of water vapor in the 2.2 μm transparency window: High sensitivity measurements and spectroscopic database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campargue, A.; Mikhailenko, S. N.; Vasilchenko, S.; Reynaud, C.; Béguier, S.; Čermák, P.; Mondelain, D.; Kassi, S.; Romanini, D.

    2017-03-01

    The weak absorption spectrum of water vapor in the important 2.2 μm transparency window is investigated with very high sensitivity. Overall, about 400 absorption lines were measured by Cavity Ring Down Spectroscopy (CRDS) and Optical-Feedback-Cavity Enhanced Laser Spectroscopy (OF-CEAS) in five spectral intervals: 4248.2-4257.3, 4298.4-4302.6, 4336.8.5-4367.5, 4422.4-4441.2 and 4514.6-4533.7 cm-1. The achieved sensitivity of the recordings (noise equivalent absorption, αmin, on the order of 2×10-10 cm-1) allowed detecting transitions with intensity values down to 1×10-28 cm/molecule, more than one order of magnitude better than previous studies by Fourier Transform spectroscopy. The rovibrational assignment was performed on the basis of variational calculations and of previously determined empirical energy values. Most of the newly assigned lines correspond to transitions of the ν1, ν3 and 3ν2 bands of H217O in natural isotopic abundance. Fourteen energy levels of H217O, H218O and HD18O are newly determined. An accurate and complete spectroscopic database is constructed for natural water in the 4190-4550 cm-1 region (2.39-2.20 μm). The list includes about 4500 transitions with intensity greater than 1×10-29 cm/molecule, for the six most abundant isotopologues in natural isotopic abundance. Line positions were obtained by difference of empirical energy values determined from literature data and complemented with the present CRDS results. The list is made mostly complete by including weak transitions not yet detected, with positions calculated from empirical levels and variational intensities. The variational intensities computed by a collaboration between the University College London and the Institute of Applied Physics in Nizhny Novgorod are found to improve significantly previous results by Schwenke and Partridge. Examples of comparison of the constructed line list to CRDS spectra and to simulations based on the HITRAN2012 list illustrate the advantages

  13. Development of synchrotron x-ray micro-spectroscopic techniques and application to problems in low temperature geochemistry. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-10-01

    The focus of the technical development effort has been the development of apparatus and techniques for the utilization of X-ray Fluorescence (XRF), Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (EXAFS) and X-ray Absorption Near Edge Structure (XANES) spectroscopies in a microprobe mode. The present XRM uses white synchrotron radiation (3 to 30 keV) from a bending magnet for trace element analyses using the x-ray fluorescence technique Two significant improvements to this device have been recently implemented. Focusing Mirror: An 8:1 ellipsoidal mirror was installed in the X26A beamline to focus the incident synchrotron radiation and thereby increase the flux on the sample by about a factor of 30. Incident Beam Monochromator: The monochromator has been successfully installed and commissioned in the X26A beamline upstream of the mirror to permit analyses with focused monochromatic radiation. The monochromator consists of a channel-cut silicon (111) crystal driven by a Klinger stepping motor translator. We have demonstrated the operating range of this instrument is 4 and 20 keV with 0.01 eV steps and produces a beam with a {approximately}10{sup {minus}4} energy bandwidth. The primary purpose of the monochromator is for x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) measurements but it is also used for selective excitation in trace element microanalysis. To date, we have conducted XANES studies on Ti, Cr, Fe, Ce and U, spanning the entire accessible energy range and including both K and L edge spectra. Practical detection limits for microXANES are 10--100 ppM for 100 {mu}m spots.

  14. Development and applications of laser spectroscopic techniques related to combustion diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aldén, Marcus

    2006-07-01

    Thanks to features as non-intrusiveness combined with high spatial and temporal resolution, various laser diagnostic techniques have during the last decades become of utmost importance for characterization of combustion related phenomena. In the following presentation some further development of the techniques will be highlighted aiming at a) surface temperatures using Thermographic Phosphors, TP, b) species specific, spatially and temporally resolved detection of species absorbing in the IR spectral region using polarization spectroscopy and Laser-induced fluorescence, and finally c) high speed visualization using a special designed laser system in combination with a framing camera. In terms of surface thermometry, Thermographic Phosphors have been used for many years for temperature measurements on solid surfaces. We have during the last years further developed and applied this technique for temperature measurements on burning surfaces and on materials going through phase shifts, e.g. pyrolysis and droplets. The basic principle behind this technique is to apply micron size particles to the surface of interest. By exciting the TP with a short pulse UV laser (ns), the phosphorescence will exhibit a behaviour where the spectral emission as well as the temporal decay are dependent on the temperature. It is thus possible to measure the temperature both in one and two dimensions. The presentation will include basic description of the technique as well as various applications, e.g in fire science, IC engines and gasturbines. Several of the species of interest for combustion/flow diagnostics exhibit a molecular structure which inhibits the use of conventional laser-induced fluorescence for spatially and spectrally resolved measurements. We have during the last years investigated the use of excitation and detection in the infrared region of the spectrum. Here, it is possible to detect both carbonmono/dioxide, water as well as species specific hydrocarbons. The techniques

  15. Observation of the origin of d0 magnetism in ZnO nanostructures using X-ray-based microscopic and spectroscopic techniques.

    PubMed

    Singh, Shashi B; Wang, Yu-Fu; Shao, Yu-Cheng; Lai, Hsuan-Yu; Hsieh, Shang-Hsien; Limaye, Mukta V; Chuang, Chen-Hao; Hsueh, Hung-Chung; Wang, Hsaiotsu; Chiou, Jau-Wern; Tsai, Hung-Ming; Pao, Chih-Wen; Chen, Chia-Hao; Lin, Hong-Ji; Lee, Jyh-Fu; Wu, Chun-Te; Wu, Jih-Jen; Pong, Way-Faung; Ohigashi, Takuji; Kosugi, Nobuhiro; Wang, Jian; Zhou, Jigang; Regier, Tom; Sham, Tsun-Kong

    2014-08-07

    Efforts have been made to elucidate the origin of d(0) magnetism in ZnO nanocactuses (NCs) and nanowires (NWs) using X-ray-based microscopic and spectroscopic techniques. The photoluminescence and O K-edge and Zn L3,2-edge X-ray-excited optical luminescence spectra showed that ZnO NCs contain more defects than NWs do and that in ZnO NCs, more defects are present at the O sites than at the Zn sites. Specifically, the results of O K-edge scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM) and the corresponding X-ray-absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy demonstrated that the impurity (non-stoichiometric) region in ZnO NCs contains a greater defect population than the thick region. The intensity of O K-edge STXM-XANES in the impurity region is more predominant in ZnO NCs than in NWs. The increase in the unoccupied (occupied) density of states at/above (at/below) the conduction-band minimum (valence-band maximum) or the Fermi level is related to the population of defects at the O sites, as revealed by comparing the ZnO NCs to the NWs. The results of O K-edge and Zn L3,2-edge X-ray magnetic circular dichroism demonstrated that the origin of magnetization is attributable to the O 2p orbitals rather than the Zn d orbitals. Further, the local density approximation (LDA) + U verified that vacancies in the form of dangling or unpaired 2p states (due to Zn vacancies) induced a significant local spin moment in the nearest-neighboring O atoms to the defect center, which was determined from the uneven local spin density by analyzing the partial density of states of O 2p in ZnO.

  16. Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer and Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph Observations of Intervening O VI Absorption Line Systems in the Spectrum of PG 0953+415

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savage, B. D.; Sembach, K. R.; Tripp, T. M.; Richter, P.

    2002-01-01

    We present Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer (FUSE) and Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (STIS) observations of the intergalactic medium toward the bright QSO PG 0953+415 (zem=0.239). The FUSE spectra extend from 905 to 1187 Å and have a resolution of 25 km s-1, while the STIS spectra cover 1150-1730 Å and have a resolution of 7 km s-1. Additional STIS observations at 30 km s-1 are obtained in selected wavelength ranges. An O VI system at z=0.06807 is detected in H I Lyα, Lyβ, Lyγ, O VI λλ1031.93, 1037.62, N V λλ1238.82, 1242.80, C IV λλ1548.20, 1550.77, and C III λ977.02. The observed column densities can be modeled as a low-density intervening gas with a metallicity of 0.4+0.6-0.2 times solar in photoionization equilibrium with the ionizing extragalactic background radiation. The best fit is achieved with an ionization parameter, logU=-1.35, which implies nH~10-5 cm-3 and a path length of ~80 kpc through the absorbing gas. H I Lyα absorption at z=0.14232 spans a velocity range of 410 km s-1 with the strongest components near 0 and 80 km s-1 in the z=0.14232 rest frame. In this system, O VI λλ1031.93, 1037.62 absorption is strong near 0 km s-1 and not detected at 80 km s-1. C III λ977.02 absorption is marginally detected at 80 km s-1 but is not detected at 0 km s-1. The observations place constraints on the properties of the z=0.14232 system but do not discriminate between collisional ionization in hot gas versus photoionization in a very low density medium with an ionization parameter logU>-0.74. The z=0.06807 and 0.14232 O VI systems occur at redshifts where there are peaks in the number density of intervening galaxies along the line of sight determined from WIYN redshift measurements of galaxies in the ~1° field centered on PG 0953+415. We combine our observations of PG 0953+415 with those for other QSOs to update the estimate of the low-redshift number density of intervening O VI systems. Over a total unobscured redshift path of Δz=0

  17. The analytical investigations of ancient pottery from Kaveripakkam, Vellore dist, Tamilnadu by spectroscopic techniques.

    PubMed

    Ravisankar, R; Naseerutheen, A; Annamalai, G Raja; Chandrasekaran, A; Rajalakshmi, A; Kanagasabapathy, K V; Prasad, M V R; Satpathy, K K

    2014-01-01

    Analytical investigations using Fourier Transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), Powder X-ray Diffraction (PXRD), Thermal Analysis (TG-DTA), Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and Energy Dispersive X-ray Fluorescence Spectrometry (EDXRF) were carried out on ancient pottery fragments from Kaveripakkam, in order to outline manufacturing skills, technology information, firing condition and temperature of potteries. The whole set of data showed the firing temperature in the range of 800-900°C. The analytical characterization of the potsherds, by different complimentary techniques has allowed to identifying the raw materials and technology applied by the ancient artisans.

  18. The analytical investigations of ancient pottery from Kaveripakkam, Vellore dist, Tamilnadu by spectroscopic techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravisankar, R.; Naseerutheen, A.; Raja Annamalai, G.; Chandrasekaran, A.; Rajalakshmi, A.; Kanagasabapathy, K. V.; Prasad, M. V. R.; Satpathy, K. K.

    2014-03-01

    Analytical investigations using Fourier Transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), Powder X-ray Diffraction (PXRD), Thermal Analysis (TG-DTA), Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and Energy Dispersive X-ray Fluorescence Spectrometry (EDXRF) were carried out on ancient pottery fragments from Kaveripakkam, in order to outline manufacturing skills, technology information, firing condition and temperature of potteries. The whole set of data showed the firing temperature in the range of 800-900 °C. The analytical characterization of the potsherds, by different complimentary techniques has allowed to identifying the raw materials and technology applied by the ancient artisans.

  19. Raman spectroscopic studies of thin film carbon nanostructures deposited using electro deposition technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dayal, Saurabh; Sasi, Arshali; Jhariya, Sapna; Sasikumar, C.

    2016-05-01

    In the present work our focus is to synthesize carbon nanostructures (CNS) by electro deposition technique without using any surface pretreatment or catalyst preparation before CNS formation. The process were carried out at significantly low voltage and at low temperature as reported elsewhere. Further the samples were characterized using different characterization tools such as SEM and Raman spectroscopy. The SEM results showed the fibres or tubular like morphology. Raman spectra shows strong finger print at 1600 cm-1 (G peak), 1350 cm-1 (D peak) along with the radial breathing mode (RBM) between 150cm-1 to 300 cm-1. This confirms the formation of tubular carbon nanostructures.

  20. Study of hydrogen-bonding, vibrational dynamics and structure-activity relationship of genistein using spectroscopic techniques coupled with DFT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Harshita; Singh, Swapnil; Srivastava, Anubha; Tandon, Poonam; Bharti, Purnima; Kumar, Sudhir; Dev, Kapil; Maurya, Rakesh

    2017-02-01

    The conformational and hydrogen bonding studies of genistein have been performed by combined spectroscopic and quantum chemical approach. The vibrational spectra (FT-IR and FT-Raman), UV-visible and 1H and 13C NMR absorption spectra of genistein have been recorded and examined. The vibrational wavenumbers of optimized geometry and total energy for isolated molecule and hydrogen-bonded dimers of genistein have been determined using the quantum chemical calculation (DFT/B3LYP) with extended 6-311++G (d,p) basis set. The vibrational assignments for the observed FT-IR and FT-Raman spectra of genistein are provided by calculations on monomer and hydrogen-bonded dimer. The quantum theory of atoms in molecules (QTAIM) is used for investigating the nature and strength of hydrogen-bonds. UV-visible spectrum of the genistein was recorded in methanol solvent and the electronic properties were calculated by using time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT). The computed HOMO and LUMO energies predicted the type of transition as π → π*. The 1H and 13C NMR signals of the genistein were computed by the Gauge including atomic orbital (GIAO) approach. Natural bond orbital (NBO) analysis predicted the stability of molecules due to charge delocalization and hyper conjugative interactions. NBO analysis shows that there is an Osbnd H⋯O inter and intramolecular hydrogen bond, and π → π* transition in the monomer and dimer, which is consistent with the conclusion obtained by the investigation of molecular structure and assignment of UV-visible spectra.

  1. Characterization of a laser-produced plasma using the technique of point-projection absorption spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    O'Neill, D.M.; Lewis, C.L.S.; Neely, D.; Davidson, S.J. ); Rose, S.J. ); Lee, R.W. )

    1991-08-15

    The technique of point-projection spectroscopy has been shown to be applicable to the study of expanding aluminum plasmas generated by {similar to}80 ps laser pulses incident on massive, aluminum stripe targets of {similar to}125 {mu}m width. Targets were irradiated at an intensity of 2.5{plus minus}0.5{times}10{sup 13} W/cm{sup 2} in a line focus geometry and under conditions similar to those of interest in x-ray laser schemes. Hydrogenic and heliumlike aluminum resonance lines were observed in absorption using a quasicontinuous uranium backlighter plasma. Using a pentaerythrital Bragg crystal as the dispersive element, a resolving power of {similar to}3500 was achieved with spatial resolution at the 5-{mu}m level in frame times of the order of 100 ps. Reduction of the data for times up to 150 ps after the peak of the incident laser pulse produced estimates of the temperature and ion densities present, as a function of space and time. The one-dimensional Lagrangian hydrodynamic code MEDUSA coupled to the atomic physics non-local-thermodynamic-equilibrium ionized material package was used to simulate the experiment in planar geometry and has been shown to be consistent with the measurements.

  2. Study on the interaction of silver(I) complex with bovine serum albumin by spectroscopic techniques.

    PubMed

    Shahabadi, Nahid; Maghsudi, Maryam; Ahmadipour, Zeinab

    2012-06-15

    The interaction of silver(I) complex, [Ag (2,9-dimethyl-1,10-phenanthroline)(2)](NO(3))·H(2)O, and bovine serum albumin (BSA) was investigated by spectrophotometry, spectrofluorimetry and circular dichroism (CD) techniques. The experimental results indicated that the quenching mechanism of BSA by the complex was a static procedure. Various binding parameters were evaluated. The negative value of ΔH, negative value of ΔS and the negative value of ΔG indicated that van der Waals force and hydrogen bonding play major roles in the binding of the complex and BSA. Based on Forster's theory of non-radiation energy transfer, the binding distance, r, between the donor (BSA) and acceptor (Ag(I) complex) was evaluated. The results of CD and UV-vis spectroscopy showed that the binding of this complex could bind to BSA and be effectively transported and eliminated in the body.

  3. Comparison of spectroscopic techniques for the determination of Kjeldahl and ammoniacal nitrogen content of farmyard manure.

    PubMed

    Kemsley, E K; Tapp, H S; Scarlett, A J; Miles, S J; Hammond, R; Wilson, R H

    2001-02-01

    The feasibility of determining the nitrogen content of farmyard manure using infrared spectroscopy was investigated. Fifteen samples each of cattle, pig, and turkey manure were analyzed by three infrared techniques: Fourier transform mid-infrared (MIR), using attenuated total reflection (ATR); near-infrared reflectance (NIR-R); and near-infrared optothermal photoacoustic (NIR-OT). The near-infrared measurements were made at wavelengths determined respectively by four (NIR-OT) and five (NIR-R) band-pass filters. The total nitrogen (using the Kjeldahl method) and volatile (ammoniacal) nitrogen contents of all samples were measured by wet chemistry. Internally cross-validated (ICV) partial least-squares (PLS) regression was then used to obtain calibrations for the nitrogen content. The data sets obtained by each technique were treated separately. Within these sets, data from each manure type were treated both separately and combined: the best predictive ability was obtained by combining data from all three manure types. From the combined data set, the residual standard deviations and correlation coefficients for the ICV-predicted versus actual Kjeldahl nitrogen content were, respectively, 6772 mg/kg dry wt, 0.862 (MIR); 9434 mg/kg dry wt, 0.771 (NIR-OT); and 8943 mg/kg dry wt, 0.865 (NIR-R). For the ammoniacal nitrogen content, the residual standard deviations and correlation coefficients were 3869 mg/kg dry wt, 0.899 (MIR); 6079 mg/kg dry wt, 0.820 (NIR-OT); and 3498 mg/kg dry wt, 0.961 (NIR-R).

  4. Applications of absorption spectroscopy using quantum cascade lasers.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lizhu; Tian, Guang; Li, Jingsong; Yu, Benli

    2014-01-01

    Infrared laser absorption spectroscopy (LAS) is a promising modern technique for sensing trace gases with high sensitivity, selectivity, and high time resolution. Mid-infrared quantum cascade lasers, operating in a pulsed or continuous wave mode, have potential as spectroscopic sources because of their narrow linewidths, single mode operation, tunability, high output power, reliability, low power consumption, and compactness. This paper reviews some important developments in modern laser absorption spectroscopy based on the use of quantum cascade laser (QCL) sources. Among the various laser spectroscopic methods, this review is focused on selected absorption spectroscopy applications of QCLs, with particular emphasis on molecular spectroscopy, industrial process control, combustion diagnostics, and medical breath analysis.

  5. Synthesis, structural, and spectroscopic (FT-IR, NMR, and UV) Characterization of 1-(Cyclohexylmethyl)-2-(pyridin-2-yl)-1 H-benzo[ d]imidazole by experimental techniques and quantum chemical calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Özdemir, Namık; Dayan, Osman; Demirmen, Selin

    2016-05-01

    The title compound ( II), 1-(cyclohexylmethyl)-2-(pyridin-2-yl)-1 H-benzo[ d]imidazole (C19H21N3), was synthesized via N-alkylation of 2-(pyridin-2-yl)-1 H-benzo[ d]imidazole ( I). Both compounds I and II were characterized by IR, NMR and UV-vis spectroscopy. Solid-state structure of compound II was determined by single-crystal X-ray diffraction technique. Furthermore, quantum chemical calculations employing density functional theory (DFT/B3LYP) method with the 6-311++ G( d, p) basis set were performed for the theoretical characterization of the molecular and spectroscopic features of the compounds. Using the TD-DFT method, electronic absorption spectra of the compounds have been predicted at same level. When the obtained results were compared with the experimental findings, it is seen that theoretical results support the experimental data and a good agreement exists between them.

  6. Effect of nonlinear absorption on electric field applied lead chloride by Z-scan technique

    SciTech Connect

    Rejeena, I.; Lillibai,; Nampoori, V. P. N.; Radhakrishnan, P.; Rahimkutty, M. H.

    2014-10-15

    The preparation, spectral response and optical nonlinearity of gel grown lead chloride single crystals subjected to electric field of 20V using parallel plate arrangements have been investigated. Optical band gap of the samples were determined using linear absorption spectra. Open aperture z-scan was employed for the determination of nonlinear absorption coefficient of PbCl{sub 2} solution. The normalized transmittance curve exhibits a valley shows reverse saturable absorption. The non linear absorption at different input fluences were recorded using a single Gaussian laser beam in tight focus geometry. The RSA nature of the sample makes it suitable for optical limiting applications.

  7. Rapid non-destructive assessment of pork edible quality by using VIS/NIR spectroscopic technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Leilei; Peng, Yankun; Dhakal, Sagar; Song, Yulin; Zhao, Juan; Zhao, Songwei

    2013-05-01

    The objectives of this research were to develop a rapid non-destructive method to evaluate the edible quality of chilled pork. A total of 42 samples were packed in seal plastic bags and stored at 4°C for 1 to 21 days. Reflectance spectra were collected from visible/near-infrared spectroscopy system in the range of 400nm to 1100nm. Microbiological, physicochemical and organoleptic characteristics such as the total viable counts (TVC), total volatile basic-nitrogen (TVB-N), pH value and color parameters L* were determined to appraise pork edible quality. Savitzky-Golay (SG) based on five and eleven smoothing points, Multiple Scattering Correlation (MSC) and first derivative pre-processing methods were employed to eliminate the spectra noise. The support vector machines (SVM) and partial least square regression (PLSR) were applied to establish prediction models using the de-noised spectra. A linear correlation was developed between the VIS/NIR spectroscopy and parameters such as TVC, TVB-N, pH and color parameter L* indexes, which could gain prediction results with Rv of 0.931, 0.844, 0.805 and 0.852, respectively. The results demonstrated that VIS/NIR spectroscopy technique combined with SVM possesses a powerful assessment capability. It can provide a potential tool for detecting pork edible quality rapidly and non-destructively.

  8. The Book of Kells: A non-invasive MOLAB investigation by complementary spectroscopic techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doherty, B.; Daveri, A.; Clementi, C.; Romani, A.; Bioletti, S.; Brunetti, B.; Sgamellotti, A.; Miliani, C.

    2013-11-01

    This paper highlights the efficacy of non-invasive portable spectroscopy for assessing the execution technique and constituent materials in one of the most important medieval manuscripts, the Book of Kells. An aimed campaign of in situ measurements by the MObile LABoratory (MOLAB) has analyzed its elemental composition and vibrational and electronic molecular properties. The ample analytical toolbox has afforded complementary diagnostic information of the pigment palette permitting the characterization of both inorganic and organic materials as pigments and dyes in the white, purple, blue, red, orange, green and black areas. In particular, the novel widespread use of calcinated gypsum (anhydrite) as both a white pigment and in correlation to the organic dyes in this manuscript has been noted. The non-invasive identification of the organic dye orchil is significant considering its rare non invasive detection in medieval manuscripts. Finally the occurrence of particular alterations of the organic black areas giving rise to calcium carboxylate and calcium oxalate has been specifically highlighted. Importantly, this work elaborates complex aspects of the employed painting materials which have given rise to numerous significant points of interest for a more elaborate understanding of this Irish treasure.

  9. The Book of Kells: a non-invasive MOLAB investigation by complementary spectroscopic techniques.

    PubMed

    Doherty, B; Daveri, A; Clementi, C; Romani, A; Bioletti, S; Brunetti, B; Sgamellotti, A; Miliani, C

    2013-11-01

    This paper highlights the efficacy of non-invasive portable spectroscopy for assessing the execution technique and constituent materials in one of the most important medieval manuscripts, the Book of Kells. An aimed campaign of in situ measurements by the MObile LABoratory (MOLAB) has analyzed its elemental composition and vibrational and electronic molecular properties. The ample analytical toolbox has afforded complementary diagnostic information of the pigment palette permitting the characterization of both inorganic and organic materials as pigments and dyes in the white, purple, blue, red, orange, green and black areas. In particular, the novel widespread use of calcinated gypsum (anhydrite) as both a white pigment and in correlation to the organic dyes in this manuscript has been noted. The non-invasive identification of the organic dye orchil is significant considering its rare non invasive detection in medieval manuscripts. Finally the occurrence of particular alterations of the organic black areas giving rise to calcium carboxylate and calcium oxalate has been specifically highlighted. Importantly, this work elaborates complex aspects of the employed painting materials which have given rise to numerous significant points of interest for a more elaborate understanding of this Irish treasure.

  10. Observational and laboratory studies of optical properties of black and brown carbon particles in the atmosphere using spectroscopic techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakayama, Tomoki; Matsumi, Yutaka

    2015-04-01

    Light absorption and scattering by aerosols are as an important contributor to radiation balance in the atmosphere. Black carbon (BC) is considered to be the most potent light absorbing material in the visible region of the spectrum, although light absorbing organic carbon (brown carbon or BrC) and mineral dust may also act as sources of significant absorption, especially in the ultraviolet (UV) and shorter visible wavelength regions. The optical properties of such particles depend on wavelength, particle size and shape, morphology, coating, and complex refractive index (or chemical composition), and therefore accurate in situ measurements of the wavelength dependence of the optical properties of particles are needed. Recently, cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS) and photoacoustic spectroscopy (PAS) have been used for the direct measurements of extinction and absorption coefficients of particles suspended in air. We have applied these techniques to the observational studies of optical properties of BC and BrC in an urban site in Japan and to the laboratory studies of optical properties of secondary organic aerosols (SOAs) generated from a variety of biogenic and anthropogenic volatile organic compounds and those of diesel exhaust particles (DEPs). In the presentation, the basic principles of these techniques and the results obtained in our studies and in the recent literatures will be overviewed. References Guo, X. et al., Measurement of the light absorbing properties of diesel exhaust particles using a three-wavelength photoacoustic spectrometer, Atmos. Environ., 94, 428-437 (2014). Nakayama, T. et al., Measurements of aerosol optical properties in central Tokyo during summertime using cavity ring-down spectroscopy: Comparison with conventional techniques, Atmos. Environ., 44, 3034-3042 (2010). Nakayama, T. et al., Laboratory studies on optical properties of secondary organic aerosols generated during the photooxidation of toluene and the ozonolysis of alpha

  11. Surface analysis of all elements with isotopic resolution at high ambient pressures using ion spectroscopic techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Smentkowski, V.S.; Krauss, A.R.; Gruen, D.M.; Holecek, J.C.; Schultz, J.A.

    1997-09-01

    The authors have developed a mass spectrometer capable of surface analysis using the techniques of secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS) and mass spectroscopy of recoiled ions (MSRI). For SIMS, an energetic ion beam creates a collision cascade which results in the ejection of low kinetic energy secondary ions from the surface being analyzed. The low kinetic energy SIMS ions are very susceptible to charge neutralization with the surface, and as a result, the SIMS ion yield varies by orders of magnitude depending on the chemical state of the surface. SIM spectra contain elemental ions, and molecular ions. For MSRI, a pulsed ion beam induces a binary collision with the surface being analyzed and the surface species are recoiled into the forward scattering direction with a large kinetic energy. The violence of the binary collision results in complete molecular decomposition, and only elemental ions are detected. The high kinetic energy MSRI ions are much less susceptible to charge neutralization with the surface than the low kinetic energy SIMS ions. In MSRI, the ion yield typically varies by less than a factor of ten as the chemical state of the surface changes--simplifying quantitative analysis vs. SIMS. In this paper, they authors will demonstrate that the high kinetic energy MSRI ions are able to transverse high pressure paths with only a reduction in peak intensity--making MSRI an ideal tool for real-time, in-situ film growth studies. The use of a single analyzer for both MSRI and SIMS is unique and provides complimentary information.

  12. Binding of caffeine with caffeic acid and chlorogenic acid using fluorescence quenching, UV/vis and FTIR spectroscopic techniques.

    PubMed

    Belay, Abebe; Kim, Hyung Kook; Hwang, Yoon-Hwae

    2016-03-01

    The interactions of caffeine (CF) with chlorogenic acid (CGA) and caffeic acid (CFA) were investigated by fluorescence quenching, UV/vis and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopic techniques. The results of the study indicated that the fluorescence quenching between caffeine and hydroxycinnamic acids could be rationalized in terms of static quenching or the formation of non-fluorescent CF-CFA and CF-CGA complexes. From fluorescence quenching spectral analysis, the quenching constant (KSV), quenching rate constant (kq), number of binding sites (n), thermodynamic properties and conformational changes of the interaction were determined. The quenching constants (KSV) between CF and CGA, CFA are 1.84 × 10(4) and 1.04 × 10(4) L/mol at 298 K and their binding site n is ~ 1. Thermodynamic parameters determined using the Van't Hoff equation indicated that hydrogen bonds and van der Waal's forces have a major role in the reaction of caffeine with caffeic acid and chlorogenic acid. The 3D fluorescence, UV/vis and FTIR spectra also showed that the binding of CF with CFA and CGA induces conformational changes in CFA and CGA.

  13. Development and experimental testing of an optical micro-spectroscopic technique incorporating true line-scan excitation.

    PubMed

    Biener, Gabriel; Stoneman, Michael R; Acbas, Gheorghe; Holz, Jessica D; Orlova, Marianna; Komarova, Liudmila; Kuchin, Sergei; Raicu, Valerică

    2013-12-27

    Multiphoton micro-spectroscopy, employing diffraction optics and electron-multiplying CCD (EMCCD) cameras, is a suitable method for determining protein complex stoichiometry, quaternary structure, and spatial distribution in living cells using Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) imaging. The method provides highly resolved spectra of molecules or molecular complexes at each image pixel, and it does so on a timescale shorter than that of molecular diffusion, which scrambles the spectral information. Acquisition of an entire spectrally resolved image, however, is slower than that of broad-bandwidth microscopes because it takes longer times to collect the same number of photons at each emission wavelength as in a broad bandwidth. Here, we demonstrate an optical micro-spectroscopic scheme that employs a laser beam shaped into a line to excite in parallel multiple sample voxels. The method presents dramatically increased sensitivity and/or acquisition speed and, at the same time, has excellent spatial and spectral resolution, similar to point-scan configurations. When applied to FRET imaging using an oligomeric FRET construct expressed in living cells and consisting of a FRET acceptor linked to three donors, the technique based on line-shaped excitation provides higher accuracy compared to the point-scan approach, and it reduces artifacts caused by photobleaching and other undesired photophysical effects.

  14. Interaction of an antiepileptic drug, lamotrigine with human serum albumin (HSA): Application of spectroscopic techniques and molecular modeling methods.

    PubMed

    Poureshghi, Fatemeh; Ghandforoushan, Parisa; Safarnejad, Azam; Soltani, Somaieh

    2017-01-01

    Lamotrigine (an epileptic drug) interaction with human serum albumin (HSA) was investigated by fluorescence, UV-Vis, FTIR, CD spectroscopic techniques, and molecular modeling methods. Binding constant (Kb) of 5.74×10(3) and number of binding site of 0.97 showed that there is a slight interaction between lamotrigine and HSA. Thermodynamic studies was constructed using the flourimetric titrations in three different temperatures and the resulted data used to calculate the parameters using Vant Hoff equation. Decreased Stern Volmer quenching constant by enhanced temperature revealed the static quenching mechanism. Negative standard enthalpy (ΔH) and standard entropy (ΔS) changes indicated that van der Waals interactions and hydrogen bonds were dominant forces which facilitate the binding of Lamotrigine to HSA, the results were confirmed by molecular docking studies which showed no hydrogen binding. The FRET studies showed that there is a possibility of energy transfer between Trp214 and lamotrigine. Also the binding of lamotrigine to HSA in the studied concentrations was not as much as many other drugs, but the secondary structure of the HSA was significantly changed following the interaction in a way that α-helix percentage was reduced from 67% to 57% after the addition of lamotrigine in the molar ratio of 4:1 to HSA. According to the docking studies, lamotrigine binds to IB site preferably.

  15. Conformers of β-aminoisobutyric acid probed by jet-cooled microwave and matrix isolation infrared spectroscopic techniques.

    PubMed

    Kuş, N; Sharma, A; Peña, I; Bermúdez, M C; Cabezas, C; Alonso, J L; Fausto, R

    2013-04-14

    β-aminoisobutyric acid (BAIBA) has been studied in isolation conditions: in the gas phase and trapped into a cryogenic N2 matrix. A solid sample of the compound was vaporized by laser ablation and investigated through their rotational spectra in a supersonic expansion using two different spectroscopic techniques: broadband chirped pulse Fourier transform microwave spectroscopy and conventional molecular beam Fourier transform microwave spectroscopy. Four conformers with structures of two types could be successfully identified by comparison of the experimental rotational and (14)N nuclear quadruple coupling constants with those predicted theoretically: type A, bearing an OH⋯N intramolecular hydrogen bond and its carboxylic group in the trans geometry (H-O-C=O dihedral ∼180°), and type B, having an NH⋯O bond and the cis arrangement of the carboxylic group. These two types of conformers could also be trapped from the gas phase into a cryogenic N2 matrix and probed by Fourier transform infrared (IR) spectroscopy. In situ irradiation of BAIBA isolated in N2 matrix of type B conformers using near-IR radiation tuned at the frequency of the O-H stretching 1st overtone (∼6930 cm(-1)) of these forms allowed to selectively convert them into type A conformers and into a new type of conformers of higher energy (type D) bearing an NH⋯O=C bond and a O-H "free" trans carboxylic group.

  16. Conformers of β-aminoisobutyric acid probed by jet-cooled microwave and matrix isolation infrared spectroscopic techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuş, N.; Sharma, A.; Peña, I.; Bermúdez, M. C.; Cabezas, C.; Alonso, J. L.; Fausto, R.

    2013-04-01

    β-aminoisobutyric acid (BAIBA) has been studied in isolation conditions: in the gas phase and trapped into a cryogenic N2 matrix. A solid sample of the compound was vaporized by laser ablation and investigated through their rotational spectra in a supersonic expansion using two different spectroscopic techniques: broadband chirped pulse Fourier transform microwave spectroscopy and conventional molecular beam Fourier transform microwave spectroscopy. Four conformers with structures of two types could be successfully identified by comparison of the experimental rotational and 14N nuclear quadruple coupling constants with those predicted theoretically: type A, bearing an OH⋯N intramolecular hydrogen bond and its carboxylic group in the trans geometry (H-O-C=O dihedral ˜180°), and type B, having an NH⋯O bond and the cis arrangement of the carboxylic group. These two types of conformers could also be trapped from the gas phase into a cryogenic N2 matrix and probed by Fourier transform infrared (IR) spectroscopy. In situ irradiation of BAIBA isolated in N2 matrix of type B conformers using near-IR radiation tuned at the frequency of the O-H stretching 1st overtone (˜6930 cm-1) of these forms allowed to selectively convert them into type A conformers and into a new type of conformers of higher energy (type D) bearing an NH⋯O=C bond and a O-H "free" trans carboxylic group.

  17. Photoacoustic technique for simultaneous measurements of thermal effusivity and absorptivity of pigments in liquid solution.

    PubMed

    Balderas-López, J A; Díaz-Reyes, J; Zelaya-Angel, O

    2011-12-01

    A photoacoustic (PA) methodology, in the transmission configuration, for simultaneous measurements of thermal effusivity and molar absorption coefficient (absorptivity) for pigments in liquid solution is introduced. The analytical treatment involves a self-normalization procedure for the PA signal, as a function of the modulation frequency, for a strong absorbing material in the thermally thin regime, when the light travels across the sample under study. Two fitted parameters are obtained from the analysis of the self-normalized PA amplitude and phase, one of them proportional to the sample's optical absorption coefficient and from which, taking it for a series of samples at different concentrations, the pigment's absorptivity in liquid solution can be measured, the other one yields the sample's thermal effusivity. Methylene blue's absorptivity in distilled water was measured with this methodology at 658 nm, finding good agreement with the corresponding one reported in the literature.

  18. Measurements of the aerosol chemical composition and mixing state in the Po Valley using multiple spectroscopic techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Decesari, S.; Allan, J.; Plass-Duelmer, C.; Williams, B. J.; Paglione, M.; Facchini, M. C.; O'Dowd, C.; Harrison, R. M.; Gietl, J. K.; Coe, H.; Giulianelli, L.; Gobbi, G. P.; Lanconelli, C.; Carbone, C.; Worsnop, D.; Lambe, A. T.; Ahern, A. T.; Moretti, F.; Tagliavini, E.; Elste, T.; Gilde, S.; Zhang, Y.; Dall'Osto, M.

    2014-04-01

    The use of co-located multiple spectroscopic techniques can provide detailed information on the atmospheric processes regulating aerosol chemical composition and mixing state. So far, field campaigns heavily equipped with aerosol mass spectrometers have been carried out mainly in large conurbations and in areas directly affected by their outflow, whereas lesser efforts have been dedicated to continental areas characterized by a less dense urbanization. We present here the results obtained in San Pietro Capofiume, which is located in a sparsely inhabited sector of the Po Valley, Italy. The experiment was carried out in summer 2009 in the framework of the EUCAARI project ("European Integrated Project on Aerosol, Cloud Climate Aerosol Interaction"). For the first time in Europe, six state-of-the-art techniques were used in parallel: (1) on-line TSI aerosol time-of-flight mass spectrometer (ATOFMS), (2) on-line Aerodyne high-resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer (HR-TOF-AMS), (3) soot particle aerosol mass spectrometer (SP-AMS), (4) on-line high resolution time-of-flight mass spectrometer-thermal desorption aerosol gas chromatograph (HR-ToFMS-TAG), (5) off-line twelve-hour resolution proton nuclear magnetic resonance (H-NMR) spectroscopy, and (6) chemical ionization mass spectrometry (CIMS) for the analysis of gas-phase precursors of secondary aerosol. Data from each aerosol spectroscopic method were analysed individually following ad-hoc tools (i.e. PMF for AMS, Art-2a for ATOFMS). The results obtained from each techniques are herein presented and compared. This allows us to clearly link the modifications in aerosol chemical composition to transitions in air mass origin and meteorological regimes. Under stagnant conditions, atmospheric stratification at night and early morning hours led to the accumulation of aerosols produced by anthropogenic sources distributed over the Po Valley plain. Such aerosols include primary components such as black carbon (BC

  19. Compressed shell conditions extracted from spectroscopic analysis of Ti K-shell absorption spectra with evaluation of line self-emission

    SciTech Connect

    Johns, H. M.; Mancini, R. C.; Hakel, P.; Nagayama, T.; Smalyuk, V. A.; Regan, S. P.; Delettrez, J.

    2014-08-15

    Ti-doped tracer layers embedded in the shell at varying distances from the fuel-shell interface serve as a spectroscopic diagnostic for direct-drive experiments conducted at OMEGA. Detailed modeling of Ti K-shell absorption spectra produced in the tracer layer considers n = 1–2 transitions in F- through Li-like Ti ions in the 4400–4800 eV range, both including and excluding line self-emission. Testing the model on synthetic spectra generated from 1-D LILAC hydrodynamic simulations reveals that the model including self-emission best reproduces the simulation, while the model excluding self-emission overestimates electron temperature T{sub e} and density N{sub e} to a higher degree for layers closer to the core. The prediction of the simulation that the magnitude of T{sub e} and duration of Ti absorption will be strongly tied to the distance of the layer from the core is consistent with the idea that regions of the shell close to the core are more significantly heated by thermal transport out of the hot dense core, but more distant regions are less affected by it. The simulation predicts more time variation in the observed T{sub e}, N{sub e} conditions in the compressed shell than is observed in the experiment, analysis of which reveals conditions remain in the range T{sub e} = 400–600 eV and N{sub e} = 3.0–10.0 × 10{sup 24} cm{sup −3} for all but the most distant Ti-doped layer, with error bars ∼5% T{sub e} value and ∼10% N{sub e} on average. The T{sub e}, N{sub e} conditions of the simulation lead to a greater degree of ionization for zones close to the core than occurs experimentally, and less ionization for zones far from the core.

  20. Prediction of Human intestinal absorption of compounds using artificial intelligence techniques.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Rajnish; Sharma, Anju; Siddiqui, Mohammed Haris; Tiwari, Rajesh Kumar

    2017-04-04

    Information about Pharmacokinetics of compounds is an essential component of drug design and development. Modeling the pharmacokinetic properties require identification of the factors effecting absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion of compounds. There have been continuous attempts in the prediction of absorption of compounds using various Artificial intelligence methods in the effort to reduce the attrition rate of drug candidates entering to preclinical and clinical trials. Currently, there are large numbers of individual predictive models available for absorption using machine learning approaches. In current work, we are presenting a comprehensive study of prediction of absorption. Six Artificial intelligence methods namely, Support vector machine, k- nearest neighbor, Probabilistic neural network, Artificial neural network, Partial least square and Linear discriminant analysis were used for prediction of absorption of compounds with prediction accuracy of 91.54%, 88.33%, 84.30%, 86.51%, 79.07% and 80.08% respectively. Comparative analysis of all the six prediction models suggested that Support vector machine with Radial basis function based kernel is comparatively better for binary classification of compounds using human intestinal absorption and may be useful at preliminary stages of drug design and development.

  1. Studies on monolayers. Part 1. Surface tension and absorption spectroscopic measurements of monolayers of surface-active azo and stilbene dyes

    SciTech Connect

    Heesemann, J.

    1980-03-26

    In order to develop new molecules as function components of monolayer assemblies, a series of 9 surface-active azo and stilbene compounds are synthesized. Their monolayer properties at the air-water interface are studied by surface pressure-surface area measurements and spectroscopic techniques. The results show that small changes in the molecular structure of the surfactants (such as, length of the fatty acid chain and type of the chromphore) have an immense influence on the monolayer properties. For monolayers of compounds I and III-VIII, van der Walls-like isotherms are obtained, which show a liquid expanded state, a phase transition region, and a condensed state. From monolayer absorbance spectra it is found that in the liquid expanded state at 100 to 110 sq angstroms/molecule the chromphores lie flatly on the water surface, forming monomers. The phase transition region of the isotherms can be assigned to a change of orientation of the chromophore axis (horizontal to vertical) and an aggregation process of the chromophores (monomers to H aggregates). 20 references.

  2. A comparison investigation of DNP-binding effects to HSA and HTF by spectroscopic and molecular modeling techniques.

    PubMed

    Zolfagharzadeh, Mahboobeh; Pirouzi, Maliheh; Asoodeh, Ahmad; Saberi, Mohammad Reza; Chamani, Jamshidkhan

    2014-12-01

    This paper describes the interaction between 2,4-dinitrophenol (DNP) with the two drug carrier proteins - human serum albumin (HSA) and human holo transferrin (HTF). Hence, binding characteristics of DNP to HSA and HTF were analyzed by spectroscopic and molecular modeling techniques. Based on results obtained from fluorescence spectroscopy, DNP had a strong ability to quench the intrinsic fluorescence of HSA and HTF through a static quenching procedure. The binding constant and the number of binding sites were calculated as 2.3 × 10(11) M(-1) and .98 for HSA, and 1.7 × 10(11) M(-1) and 1.06 for HTF, respectively. In addition, synchronous fluorescence results showed that the microenvironment of Trp had a slight tendency of increasing its hydrophobicity, whereas the microenvironment of the Tyr residues of HSA did not change and that of HTF showed a significant trend (red shift of about 4 nm) of an increase in polarity. The distance between donor and acceptor was obtained by the Förster energy according to fluorescence resonance energy transfer, and was found to be 3.99 and 3.72 nm for HSA and HTF, respectively. The critical induced aggregation concentration (CCIAC) of the drug on both proteins was determined and confirmed by an inflection point of the zeta potential behavior. Circular dichroism data revealed that the presence of DNP caused a decrease of the α-helical content of HSA and HTF, and induced a remarkable mild denaturation of both proteins. The molecular modeling data confirmed our experimental results. This study is deemed useful for determining drug dosage.

  3. Application of phosphorus-31 and aluminum-27 NMR spectroscopic techniques to study aqueous and methanolic solutions of tetraphenylammonium aluminophosphate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goudarzi, Nasser; Amin, Amir H.

    2017-01-01

    In this work, aluminum-27 and phosphorus-31 NMR spectroscopic techniques were used to investigate and characterize the distribution of aluminophosphate (AlPO) species soluble in the aqueous and methanolic solutions of tetraphenylammonium (TPhA) chloride. The reaction between hexaaquaaluminum cations, [A1(H2O)6]3+, and different phosphate ligands such as H3PO4, H2PO4-, and the acidic dimers H6P2O8 and H5P2O8- resulted in the formation of the soluble AlPO cations. The effective aluminum-27 and phosphorous-31 NMR spectroscopies can be employed to characterize the species present in a solution. Assignment of the peaks present in the aluminum-27 NMR spectra to the aluminate species or aluminate connectivities was done to acquire information about different AlPO complexes. Some resonance lines were observed in the phosphorus-31 {1H} NMR spectra, indicating the existence of different complexes in the AlPO solutions. Some peaks were observed in the methanolic solutions of AlPO at the chemical shifts of -0.41, -6.4, -7.5, -7.9, -13.1, -13.9, -16.6, -18.1, and -20.6 ppm. Four additional peaks were also observed in the phosphorus-31 {1H} NMR spectra of the methanolic solutions of AlPO, whose intensities changed with changes in the methanol:water volume ratio; they were observed in methanol but not in aqueous AlPO.

  4. Imaging of droplets and vapor distributions in a diesel fuel spray by means of a laser absorption-scattering technique.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Y Y; Yoshizaki, T; Nishida, K

    2000-11-20

    The droplets and vapor distributions in a fuel spray were imaged by a dual-wavelength laser absorption-scattering technique. 1,3-dimethylnaphthalene, which has physical properties similar to those of Diesel fuel, strongly absorbs the ultraviolet light near the fourth harmonic (266 nm) of a Nd:YAG laser but is nearly transparent to the visible light near the second harmonic (532 nm) of a Nd:YAG laser. Therefore, droplets and vapor distributions in a Diesel spray can be visualized by an imaging system that uses a Nd:YAG laser as the incident light and 1,3-dimethylnaphthalene as the test fuel. For a quantitative application consideration, the absorption coefficients of dimethylnapthalene vapor at different temperatures and pressures were examined with an optical spectrometer. The findings of this study suggest that this imaging technique has great promise for simultaneously obtaining quantitative information of droplet density and vapor concentration in Diesel fuel spray.

  5. Measurements of the aerosol chemical composition and mixing state in the Po Valley using multiple spectroscopic techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Decesari, S.; Allan, J.; Plass-Duelmer, C.; Williams, B. J.; Paglione, M.; Facchini, M. C.; O'Dowd, C.; Harrison, R. M.; Gietl, J. K.; Coe, H.; Giulianelli, L.; Gobbi, G. P.; Lanconelli, C.; Carbone, C.; Worsnop, D.; Lambe, A. T.; Ahern, A. T.; Moretti, F.; Tagliavini, E.; Elste, T.; Gilge, S.; Zhang, Y.; Dall'Osto, M.

    2014-11-01

    The use of co-located multiple spectroscopic techniques can provide detailed information on the atmospheric processes regulating aerosol chemical composition and mixing state. So far, field campaigns heavily equipped with aerosol mass spectrometers have been carried out mainly in large conurbations and in areas directly affected by their outflow, whereas lesser efforts have been dedicated to continental areas characterised by a less dense urbanisation. We present here the results obtained at a background site in the Po Valley, Italy, in summer 2009. For the first time in Europe, six state-of-the-art spectrometric techniques were used in parallel: aerosol time-of-flight mass spectrometer (ATOFMS), two aerosol mass spectrometers (high-resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer - HR-ToF-AMS and soot particle aerosol mass spectrometer - SP-AMS), thermal desorption aerosol gas chromatography (TAG), chemical ionisation mass spectrometry (CIMS) and (offline) proton nuclear magnetic resonance (1H-NMR) spectroscopy. The results indicate that, under high-pressure conditions, atmospheric stratification at night and early morning hours led to the accumulation of aerosols produced by anthropogenic sources distributed over the Po Valley plain. Such aerosols include primary components such as black carbon (BC), secondary semivolatile compounds such as ammonium nitrate and amines and a class of monocarboxylic acids which correspond to the AMS cooking organic aerosol (COA) already identified in urban areas. In daytime, the entrainment of aged air masses in the mixing layer is responsible for the accumulation of low-volatility oxygenated organic aerosol (LV-OOA) and also for the recycling of non-volatile primary species such as black carbon. According to organic aerosol source apportionment, anthropogenic aerosols accumulating in the lower layers overnight accounted for 38% of organic aerosol mass on average, another 21% was accounted for by aerosols recirculated in

  6. Atmospheric Pre-Corrected Differential Absorption Techniques to Retrieve Columnar Water Vapor: Application to AVIRIS 91/95 Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schlaepfer, Daniel; Borel, Christoph C.; Keller, Johannes; Itten, Klaus I.

    1996-01-01

    Water vapor is one of the main forces for weather development as well as for mesoscale air transport processes. The monitoring of water vapor is therefore an important aim in remote sensing of the atmosphere. Current operational systems for water vapor detection use primarily the emission in the thermal infrared (AVHRR, GOES, ATSR, Meteosat) or in the microwave radiation bands (DMSP). The disadvantage of current satellite systems is either a coarse spatial (horizontal) resolution ranging from one to tens of kilometers or a limited insight into the lower atmosphere. Imaging spectrometry on the other hand measures total column water vapor contents at a high spatial horizontal resolution and has therefore the potential of filling these gaps. The sensors of the AVIRIS instrument are capable of acquiring hyperspectral data in 224 bands located in the visible and near infrared at 10 nm resolution. This data includes the information on constituents of the earth's surface as well as of the atmosphere. The optical measurement of water vapor can be performed using sensor channels located in bands or lines of the absorption spectrum. The AVIRIS sensor has been used to retrieve water vapor and with less accuracy carbon dioxide, oxygen and ozone. To retrieve the water vapor amount, the so called differential absorption technique has been applied. The goal of this technique is to eliminate background factors by taking a ratio between channels within the absorption band and others besides the band. Various ratioing methods on the basis of different channels and calculation techniques were developed. The influence of a trace gas of interest on the radiance at the sensor level is usually simulated by using radiative transfer codes. In this study, the spectral transmittance and radiance are calculated by MODTRAN3 simulations with the new DISORT option. The objective of this work is to test the best performing differential absorption techniques for imaging spectrometry of

  7. X-ray absorption spectroscopic studies of iron framework-substituted and exchanged zeolites: Characterization and quantification of incorporated iron species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanfel, Christine Marie

    X-ray absorption spectroscopic (XAS) analysis methods were derived which allowed iron species within iron substituted and exchanged zeolites to be characterized, and the fractional contribution of each species to the zeolite iron population to be quantified. Framework (T-site occupant) and non-framework iron species simultaneously present within zeolites were differentiated. Non-framework iron was segregated further into phases respectively exhibiting and lacking long range order. The former was described as precipitate iron. Zeolitic precipitate iron was found to occur either as an ordered Goethite-type phase, or a disordered aggregate. Iron species lacking long range order were found to be approximated by hydrated ferric ions (Fe(Hsb2O)sb6sp{3+}). XAS methods allowed determination of the fractional contribution of each iron phase; framework, precipitate, and low long range order, to the zeolite. XAS analysis methods were applied to an iron framework-substituted LTL zeolite (Fe LTL2) and two ferric exchanged analogs of Fe LTL2 (Fesp{3+} exchanged Fe LTL2). Fesp{3+} exchanged Fe LTL2 zeolites differed according to ferric salt and acid exposure length. Fe LTL2 was found to contain 20% disordered aggregate precipitate iron, and 80% framework iron. Fesp{3+} exchanged Fe LTL2 zeolites contained three iron species; framework, precipitate, and low long range order. Exchange left Fe LTL2 precipitate type and quantity unchanged, while framework iron decreased. Elemental analysis indicated composition changes arose from framework iron removal by acid exposure. Iron lacking long range order served a charge-balancing function as increased levels correlated with decreased Ksp+/(Al + Fesbframework) ratios. XAS methods were additionally applied to six iron framework-substituted faujasites (Fe FAU) with Si/Al ratios consistent with zeolites X, Y, and ECR-32. Two iron substitution levels, low and high, were synthesized for each isotype. Iron within each faujasite partitioned into

  8. Effect of steric hindrance on carbon dioxide absorption into new amine solutions: thermodynamic and spectroscopic verification through solubility and NMR analysis.

    PubMed

    Park, Jung-Yeon; Yoon, Sang Jun; Lee, Huen

    2003-04-15

    Acid gas absorption technology is of great importance in these days for the prevention of global warming and the resulting worldwide climate change. More efficient process design and development for the removal of acid gases has become important, together with the development of new absorbents as one of urgent areas of research in addressing global-warming problems. In the present work, aqueous solutions of 2-amino-2-hydroxymethyl-1,3-propanediol (AHPD), a sterically hindered amine, has been examined as a potential CO2 absorbent and compared with the most commonly used absorbent, monoethanolamine (MEA) solution, through equilibrium solubility measurements and 13C NMR spectroscopic analyses. The solubilities of CO2 in aqueous 10 mass % AHPD solutions were higher than those in aqueous 10 mass % MEA solutions above 4 kPa at 298.15 K, but below 4 kPa, the solubility behavior appeared to be the opposite. The solubility difference between these two solutions increased with the CO2 partial pressures above the crossover pressure. Equilibrated CO2-MEA-H2O and CO2-AHPD-H2O solutions at various CO2 partal pressures ranging from 0.01 to 3000 kPa were analyzed by 13C NMR spectroscopy to provide a more microscopic understanding of the reaction mechanisms in the two solutions. In the CO2-amine-H2O solutions, amine reacted with CO2 to form mainly the protonated amine (AMH+), bicarbonate ion (HCO3-), and carbamate anion (AMCO2-), where the quantitative ratio of bicarbonate ion to carbamate anion strongly influenced the CO2 loading in the amine solutions. A profusion of bicarbonate ions, but a very small amount of carbamate anions, was identified in the CO2-AHPD-H2O solution, whereas a considerable amount of carbamate anions was formed in the CO2-MEA-H2O solution. AHPD contains more hydroxyl groups than nonhindered MEA, and hence, the chemical shifts in its 13C NMR spectra were strongly influenced by the solution pH values. In contrast, MEA appeared to be insensitive to pH. The

  9. Nondestructive and rapid concurrent estimation of paracetamol and nimesulide in their combined dosage form using Raman spectroscopic technique.

    PubMed

    Lakhwani, Gargi R; Sherikar, O D; Mehta, Priti J

    2013-03-01

    A rapid, nondestructive Raman spectroscopic method was developed for quantitative estimation of paracetamol and nimesulide in their combined dosage form. A Raman univariate calibration model was developed by measuring the peak intensities of paracetamol and nimesulide at 853 cm(-1) and 1336 cm(-1), respectively. The developed method was successfully applied for in situ, concurrent estimation of paracetamol and nimesulide in their combined dosage and method was also validated according to International Conference on Harmonisation guidelines. Thus, the developed Raman spectroscopic method can be applied for simultaneous estimation of paracetamol and nimesulide in their combined dosage form as a process analytical technology tool by pharmaceutical industries for routine quality control.

  10. Application of a new non-linear least squares velocity curve analysis technique for spectroscopic binary stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karami, K.; Mohebi, R.; Soltanzadeh, M. M.

    2008-11-01

    Using measured radial velocity data of nine double lined spectroscopic binary systems NSV 223, AB And, V2082 Cyg, HS Her, V918 Her, BV Dra, BW Dra, V2357 Oph, and YZ Cas, we find corresponding orbital and spectroscopic elements via the method introduced by Karami and Mohebi (Chin. J. Astron. Astrophys. 7:558, 2007a) and Karami and Teimoorinia (Astrophys. Space Sci. 311:435, 2007). Our numerical results are in good agreement with those obtained by others using more traditional methods.

  11. [IR/UV spectroscopic analysis of gangliosides and their microstructures of polymeric aggregates observed by AFM technique].

    PubMed

    Wang, Hai-long; Sun, Run-guang; Zhang, Jing; Hao, Chang-chun

    2009-04-01

    Gangliosides, a kind of acid glycosphingolipid containing sialic acid, plays a very important physiological role in biomembrane as one of the important components of neurocyte membrane. They were extracted from bovine brain by the Folch method and purified by silica gel and DEAE-Sephadex A-25 column chromatograph. Their molecular functional groups and microstructures of polymeric aggregates were studied by infrared spectrum (IR), ultraviolet spectrum (UV) and atomic force microscope (AFM). The experimental results indicate that: 55.2 mg of Gls from 100 g of wet bovine brain had a certain purity, 62.84%. And their UV absorption spectra appeared at 195 nm, near to the results reported by other peoples. Compared with the IR spectra of sialic acid, the experimental results showed that the structures of the products had the units of sialic acid. In order to investigate the aggregate structures of ganglioside. AFM technique was applied in water, and the results showed that gangliosides can form spherical or ellipsoidal structures in water. It was determined that the size of polymeric aggregates of gangliosides varies between 55 and 380 nm, the average size is (148.9+/-66.7) nm; the height is between 1.0 and 5.0 nm, and the average height is (3.25+/-1.01) nm. The experimental results provide a theoretical and experimental basis for investigating biological activity and the exploitation and utilization of neural drugs.

  12. Spectroscopic analysis of solar and cosmic X-ray spectra. 1: The nature of cosmic X-ray spectra and proposed analytical techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, A. B. C., Jr.

    1975-01-01

    Techniques for the study of the solar corona are reviewed as an introduction to a discussion of modifications required for the study of cosmic sources. Spectroscopic analysis of individual sources and the interstellar medium is considered. The latter was studied via analysis of its effect on the spectra of selected individual sources. The effects of various characteristics of the ISM, including the presence of grains, molecules, and ionization, are first discussed, and the development of ISM models is described. The expected spectral structure of individual cosmic sources is then reviewed with emphasis on supernovae remnants and binary X-ray sources. The observational and analytical requirements imposed by the characteristics of these sources are identified, and prospects for the analysis of abundances and the study of physical parameters within them are assessed. Prospects for the spectroscopic study of other classes of X-ray sources are also discussed.

  13. Stark effect spectrophone for continuous absorption spectra monitoring. [a technique for gas analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kavaya, M. J. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    A Stark effect spectrophone using a pulsed or continuous wave laser having a beam with one or more absorption lines of a constituent of an unknown gas is described. The laser beam is directed through windows of a closed cell while the unknown gas to be modified flows continuously through the cell between electric field plates disposed in the cell on opposite sides of the beam path through the cell. When the beam is pulsed, energy absorbed by the gas increases at each point along the beam path according to the spectral lines of the constituents of the gas for the particular field strengths at those points. The pressure measurement at each point during each pulse of energy yields a plot of absorption as a function of electric field for simultaneous detection of the gas constituents. Provision for signal averaging and modulation is included.

  14. VO2+ ions in zinc lead borate glasses studied by EPR and optical absorption techniques.

    PubMed

    Prakash, P Giri; Rao, J Lakshmana

    2005-09-01

    Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and optical absorption spectra of vanadyl ions in zinc lead borate (ZnO-PbO-B2O3) glass system have been studied. EPR spectra of all the glass samples exhibit resonance signals characteristic of VO2+ ions. The values of spin-Hamiltonian parameters indicate that the VO2+ ions in zinc lead borate glasses were present in octahedral sites with tetragonal compression and belong to C4V symmetry. The spin-Hamiltonian parameters g and A are found to be independent of V2O5 content and temperature but changing with ZnO content. The decrease in Deltag( parallel)/Deltag( perpendicular) value with increase in ZnO content indicates that the symmetry around VO2+ ions is more octahedral. The decrease in intensity of EPR signal above 10 mol% of V2O5 is attributed to a fall in the ratio of the number of V4+ ions (N4) to the number of V5+ ions (N5). The number of spins (N) participating in resonance was calculated as a function of temperature for VO2+ doped zinc lead borate glass sample and the activation energy was calculated. From the EPR data, the paramagnetic susceptibility was calculated at various temperatures and the Curie constant was evaluated from the 1/chi-T graph. The optical absorption spectra show single absorption band due to VO2+ ions in tetragonally distorted octahedral sites.

  15. Continuous wave laser absorption techniques for gasdynamic measurements in supersonic flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davidson, David F.; Chang, Albert Y.; Dirosa, Michael D.; Hanson, Ronald K.

    1991-01-01

    Line-of-sight measurements of velocity, temperature, pressure, density, and mass flux were performed in a transient shock tube flow using three laser absorption schemes. All methods employed an intracavity-doubled ring dye laser tuned to an OH transition at 306 nm. In the first scheme, the gas was labeled by 193.3-nm excimer photolysis of H2O, and the passage of the generated OH was detected downstream. In the second method, the laser was tuned at a rate of 3 kHz over the R1(7) and R1(11) line pair, and absorption was simultaneously monitored at 90 and 60 deg with respect to the flow. Velocity was determined from the Doppler shift of the profiles and the temperature from the intensity ratio of the lines. Pressure was determined from both the magnitude of absorption and the collisional broadening. In the third method, the laser wavelength was fixed at a single frequency, and a continuous measurement of velocity and pressure was obtained using the signals from the two beam paths. All methods gave results which compare favorably to calculated values.

  16. X-ray absorption spectroscopy of Mn doped ZnO thin films prepared by rf sputtering technique

    SciTech Connect

    Yadav, Ashok Kumar; Jha, S. N.; Bhattacharyya, D.; Haque, Sk Maidul; Shukla, Dinesh; Choudhary, Ram Janay

    2015-11-15

    A set of r.f. sputter deposited ZnO thin films prepared with different Mn doping concentrations have been characterised by Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (EXAFS) and X-ray Absorption Near Edge Spectroscopy (XANES) measurements at Zn, Mn and O K edges and at Mn L{sub 2,3} edges apart from long range structural characterisation by Grazing Incident X-ray Diffraction (GIXRD) technique. Magnetic measurements show room temperature ferromagnetism in samples with lower Mn doping which is however, gets destroyed at higher Mn doping concentration. The results of the magnetic measurements have been explained using the local structure information obtained from EXAFS and XANES measurements.

  17. Analysis for nonlinear inversion technique developed to estimate depth-distribution of absorption by spatially resolved backscattering measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishida, Kazuhiro; Namita, Takeshi; Kato, Yuji; Shimizu, Koichi

    2015-03-01

    We have proposed a new nonlinear inversion technique to estimate the spatial distribution of the absorption coefficient (μa) in the depth direction of a turbid medium by spatially resolved backscattering measurement. With this technique, we can obtain cross-sectional image of μa as deep as the backscattered light traveled even when the transmitted light through the medium cannot be detected. In this technique, the depth distribution of absorption coefficient is determined by iterative calculation using the spatial path-length distribution (SPD) of traveled photons as a function of source-detector distance. In this calculation, the variance of path-length of many photons in each layer is also required. The SPD and the variance of path-length are obtained by Monte Carlo simulation using a known reduced scattering coefficient (μs'). Therefore, we need to know the μs' of the turbid medium beforehand. We have shown in computer simulation that this technique works well when the μs' is the typical values of mammalian body tissue, or 1.0 /mm. In this study, the accuracy of the μa estimation was analyzed and its dependence on the μs' was clarified quantitatively in various situations expected in practice. 10% deviations in μs' resulted in about 30% error in μa estimation, in average. This suggested that the measurement or the appropriate estimation of μs' is required to utilize the proposed technique effectively. Through this analysis, the effectiveness and the limitation of the newly proposed technique were clarified, and the problems to be solved were identified.

  18. Detailed transient heme structures of Mb-CO in solution after CO dissociation: an X-ray transient absorption spectroscopic study.

    PubMed

    Stickrath, Andrew B; Mara, Michael W; Lockard, Jenny V; Harpham, Michael R; Huang, Jier; Zhang, Xiaoyi; Attenkofer, Klaus; Chen, Lin X

    2013-04-25

    Although understanding the structural dynamics associated with ligand photodissociation is necessary in order to correlate structure and function in biological systems, few techniques are capable of measuring the ultrafast dynamics of these systems in solution-phase at room temperature. We present here a detailed X-ray transient absorption (XTA) study of the photodissociation of CO-bound myoglobin (Fe(II)CO-Mb) in room-temperature aqueous buffer solution with a time resolution of 80 ps, along with a general procedure for handling biological samples under the harsh experimental conditions that transient X-ray experiments entail. The XTA spectra of (Fe(II)CO-Mb) exhibit significant XANES and XAFS alterations following 527 nm excitation, which remain unchanged for >47 μs. These spectral changes indicate loss of the CO ligand, resulting in a five-coordinate, domed heme, and significant energetic reorganization of the 3d orbitals of the Fe center. With the current experimental setup, each X-ray pulse in the pulse train, separated by ~153 ns, can be separately discriminated, yielding snapshots of the myoglobin evolution over time. These methods can be easily applied to other biological systems, allowing for simultaneous structural and electronic measurements of any biological system with both ultrafast and slow time resolutions, effectively mapping out all of the samples' relevant physiological processes.

  19. Investigation of potential of differential absorption Lidar techniques for remote sensing of atmospheric pollutants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Butler, C. F.; Shipley, S. T.; Allen, R. J.

    1981-01-01

    The NASA multipurpose differential absorption lidar (DIAL) system uses two high conversion efficiency dye lasers which are optically pumped by two frequency-doubled Nd:YAG lasers mounted rigidly on a supporting structure that also contains the transmitter, receiver, and data system. The DIAL system hardware design and data acquisition system are described. Timing diagrams, logic diagrams, and schematics, and the theory of operation of the control electronics are presented. Success in obtaining remote measurements of ozone profiles with an airborne systems is reported and results are analyzed.

  20. Measurement of Hydrogen Absorption in Ternary Alloys with Volumetric (Sieverts Loop) Techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Aceves, S.

    2015-10-26

    The Sieverts loop is an inexpensive, robust and reliable methodology for calculating hydrogen absorption in materials [1]. In this approach, we start by storing a sample of the material being tested in the volume Vcell (Figure 1) and initiate the process by producing a high vacuum in the system while the material sample is heated to eliminate (most of) the hydrogen and other impurities previously absorbed. The system typically operates isothermally, with the volume Vref at ambient temperature and the sample at a temperature of interest – high enough to liquefy the alloy for the current application to nuclear fusion.

  1. Vitamin A equivalency and apparent absorption of beta-carotene in ileostomy subjects using a dual-isotope dilution technique.

    PubMed

    Van Loo-Bouwman, Carolien A; Naber, Ton H J; van Breemen, Richard B; Zhu, Dongwei; Dicke, Heleen; Siebelink, Els; Hulshof, Paul J M; Russel, Frans G M; Schaafsma, Gertjan; West, Clive E

    2010-06-01

    The objective was to quantify the vitamin A equivalency of beta-carotene in two diets using a dual-isotope dilution technique and the apparent beta-carotene absorption as measured by the oral-faecal balance technique. Seventeen healthy adults with an ileostomy completed the 4-week diet-controlled, cross-over intervention study. Each subject followed both diets for 2 weeks: a diet containing vegetables low in beta-carotene content with supplemental beta-carotene in salad dressing oil ('oil diet'; mean beta-carotene intake 3.1 mg/d) and a diet containing vegetables and fruits high in beta-carotene content ('mixed diet'; mean beta-carotene intake 7.6 mg/d). Daily each subject consumed a mean of 190 microg [13C10]beta-carotene and 195 microg [13C10]retinyl palmitate in oil capsules. The vitamin A equivalency of beta-carotene was calculated as the dose-corrected ratio of [13C5]retinol to [13C10]retinol in serum. Apparent absorption of beta-carotene was determined with oral-faecal balance. Isotopic data quantified a vitamin A equivalency of [13C10]beta-carotene in oil of 3.6:1 (95 % CI 2.8, 4.6) regardless of dietary matrices differences. The apparent absorption of (labelled and dietary) beta-carotene from the 'oil diet' (30 %) was 1.9-fold higher than from the 'mixed diet' (16 %). This extrinsic labelling technique can measure precisely the vitamin A equivalency of beta-carotene in oil capsules, but it does not represent the effect of different dietary matrices.

  2. Using non-invasive molecular spectroscopic techniques to detect unique aspects of protein Amide functional groups and chemical properties of modeled forage from different sourced-origins.

    PubMed

    Ji, Cuiying; Zhang, Xuewei; Yu, Peiqiang

    2016-03-05

    The non-invasive molecular spectroscopic technique-FT/IR is capable to detect the molecular structure spectral features that are associated with biological, nutritional and biodegradation functions. However, to date, few researches have been conducted to use these non-invasive molecular spectroscopic techniques to study forage internal protein structures associated with biodegradation and biological functions. The objectives of this study were to detect unique aspects and association of protein Amide functional groups in terms of protein Amide I and II spectral profiles and chemical properties in the alfalfa forage (Medicago sativa L.) from different sourced-origins. In this study, alfalfa hay with two different origins was used as modeled forage for molecular structure and chemical property study. In each forage origin, five to seven sources were analyzed. The molecular spectral profiles were determined using FT/IR non-invasive molecular spectroscopy. The parameters of protein spectral profiles included functional groups of Amide I, Amide II and Amide I to II ratio. The results show that the modeled forage Amide I and Amide II were centered at 1653 cm(-1) and 1545 cm(-1), respectively. The Amide I spectral height and area intensities were from 0.02 to 0.03 and 2.67 to 3.36 AI, respectively. The Amide II spectral height and area intensities were from 0.01 to 0.02 and 0.71 to 0.93 AI, respectively. The Amide I to II spectral peak height and area ratios were from 1.86 to 1.88 and 3.68 to 3.79, respectively. Our results show that the non-invasive molecular spectroscopic techniques are capable to detect forage internal protein structure features which are associated with forage chemical properties.

  3. Using non-invasive molecular spectroscopic techniques to detect unique aspects of protein Amide functional groups and chemical properties of modeled forage from different sourced-origins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Cuiying; Zhang, Xuewei; Yu, Peiqiang

    2016-03-01

    The non-invasive molecular spectroscopic technique-FT/IR is capable to detect the molecular structure spectral features that are associated with biological, nutritional and biodegradation functions. However, to date, few researches have been conducted to use these non-invasive molecular spectroscopic techniques to study forage internal protein structures associated with biodegradation and biological functions. The objectives of this study were to detect unique aspects and association of protein Amide functional groups in terms of protein Amide I and II spectral profiles and chemical properties in the alfalfa forage (Medicago sativa L.) from different sourced-origins. In this study, alfalfa hay with two different origins was used as modeled forage for molecular structure and chemical property study. In each forage origin, five to seven sources were analyzed. The molecular spectral profiles were determined using FT/IR non-invasive molecular spectroscopy. The parameters of protein spectral profiles included functional groups of Amide I, Amide II and Amide I to II ratio. The results show that the modeled forage Amide I and Amide II were centered at 1653 cm- 1 and 1545 cm- 1, respectively. The Amide I spectral height and area intensities were from 0.02 to 0.03 and 2.67 to 3.36 AI, respectively. The Amide II spectral height and area intensities were from 0.01 to 0.02 and 0.71 to 0.93 AI, respectively. The Amide I to II spectral peak height and area ratios were from 1.86 to 1.88 and 3.68 to 3.79, respectively. Our results show that the non-invasive molecular spectroscopic techniques are capable to detect forage internal protein structure features which are associated with forage chemical properties.

  4. Remote-Sensing Technique for Determination of the Volume Absorption Coefficient of Turbid Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sydor, Michael; Arnone, Robert A.; Gould, Richard W., Jr.; Terrie, Gregory E.; Ladner, Sherwin D.; Wood, Christoper G.

    1998-07-01

    We use remote-sensing reflectance from particulate R rs to determine the volume absorption coefficient a of turbid water in the 400 700-nm spectral region. The calculated and measured values of a ( ) show good agreement for 0 . 5 a 10 (m 1 ). To determine R rs from a particulate, we needed to make corrections for remote-sensing reflectance owing to surface roughness S rs . We determined the average spectral distribution of S rs from the difference in total remote-sensing reflectance measured with and without polarization. The spectral shape of S rs showed an excellent fit to theoretical formulas for glare based on Rayleigh and aerosol scattering from the atmosphere.

  5. Multilayer thin film design for far ultraviolet polarizers using an induced transmission and absorption technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Jongmin; Zukic, Muamer; Torr, Douglas G.

    1993-01-01

    An explanation of induced transmission for spectral regions excluding the far ultraviolet (FUV) is given to better understand how induced transmission and absorption can be used to design effective polarizers in the FUV spectral region. We achieve high s-polarization reflectance and a high degree of polarization (P equals (Rs-Rp)/(Rs+Rp)) by means of a MgF2/Al/MgF2 three layer structure on an opaque thick film of Al as the substrate. For example, our polarizer designed for the Lyman-alpha line (lambda equals 121.6 nm) has 87.95 percent reflectance for the s-polarization case and 0.43 percent for the p-polarization case, with a degree of polarization of 99.03 percent. If a double reflection polarizer is made with this design, it will have a degree of polarization of 99.99 percent and s-polarization throughput of 77.35 percent.

  6. Pseudorandom Noise Code-Based Technique for Thin Cloud Discrimination with CO2 and O2 Absorption Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, Joel F.; Prasad, Narasimha S.; Flood, Michael A.

    2011-01-01

    NASA Langley Research Center is working on a continuous wave (CW) laser based remote sensing scheme for the detection of CO2 and O2 from space based platforms suitable for ACTIVE SENSING OF CO2 EMISSIONS OVER NIGHTS, DAYS, AND SEASONS (ASCENDS) mission. ASCENDS is a future space-based mission to determine the global distribution of sources and sinks of atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2). A unique, multi-frequency, intensity modulated CW (IMCW) laser absorption spectrometer (LAS) operating at 1.57 micron for CO2 sensing has been developed. Effective aerosol and cloud discrimination techniques are being investigated in order to determine concentration values with accuracies less than 0.3%. In this paper, we discuss the demonstration of a pseudo noise (PN) code based technique for cloud and aerosol discrimination applications. The possibility of using maximum length (ML)-sequences for range and absorption measurements is investigated. A simple model for accomplishing this objective is formulated, Proof-of-concept experiments carried out using SONAR based LIDAR simulator that was built using simple audio hardware provided promising results for extension into optical wavelengths.

  7. Fabrication of controllable form submicrometer structures on positive photoresist by one-photon absorption direct laser writing technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tong, Quang Cong; Do, Minh Thanh; Journet, Bernard; Ledoux-Rak, Isabelle; Lai, Ngoc Diep

    2016-04-01

    We demonstrate a very simple and low-cost method based on one-photon absorption direct laser writing technique to fabricate arbitrary two-dimensional (2D) polymeric submicrometer structures with controllable form. In this technique, a continuous-wave green laser beam (532 nm) with very weak power is tightly focused into a positive photoresist (S1805) by a high numerical aperture (NA) objective lens (OL), depolymerizing the polymer in a local submicrometer region. The focusing spot is then moved in a controllable trajectory by a 3D piezo translation stage, resulting in desired structures. The low absorption effect of the photoresist at the excitation wavelength allows obtaining structures with submicrometer size and great depth. In particular, by controlling the exposure dose, e.g. the scanning speed, and the scanning configuration, the structures have been created in positive (cylindrical material in air) or negative (air holes) form. The 2D square structures with periods in between 0.6 μm and 1 μm and with a feature size of about 150 nm have been demonstrated with an OL of NA = 0.9 (air-immersion). The fabricated results are well consistent with those obtained numerically by using a vectorial diffraction theory for high NA OLs. This investigation should be very useful for fabrication of photonic and plasmonic templates.

  8. One-step fabrication of submicrostructures by low one-photon absorption direct laser writing technique with local thermal effect

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, Dam Thuy Trang; Tong, Quang Cong; Ledoux-Rak, Isabelle; Lai, Ngoc Diep

    2016-01-07

    In this work, local thermal effect induced by a continuous-wave laser has been investigated and exploited to optimize the low one-photon absorption (LOPA) direct laser writing (DLW) technique for fabrication of polymer-based microstructures. It was demonstrated that the temperature of excited SU8 photoresist at the focusing area increases to above 100 °C due to high excitation intensity and becomes stable at that temperature thanks to the use of a continuous-wave laser at 532 nm-wavelength. This optically induced thermal effect immediately completes the crosslinking process at the photopolymerized region, allowing obtain desired structures without using the conventional post-exposure bake (PEB) step, which is usually realized after the exposure. Theoretical calculation of the temperature distribution induced by local optical excitation using finite element method confirmed the experimental results. LOPA-based DLW technique combined with optically induced thermal effect (local PEB) shows great advantages over the traditional PEB, such as simple, short fabrication time, high resolution. In particular, it allowed the overcoming of the accumulation effect inherently existed in optical lithography by one-photon absorption process, resulting in small and uniform structures with very short lattice constant.

  9. Screening Technique for Lead and Cadmium in Toys and Other Materials Using Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brouwer, Henry

    2005-01-01

    A simple procedure to quickly screen different consumer products for the presence of lead, cadmium, and other metals is described. This screening technique avoids expending a lot of preparation time on samples known to contain low levels of hazardous metals where only samples testing positive for the desired elements need to be analyzed…

  10. Multilayer Thin Film Polarizer Design for Far Ultraviolet using Induced Transmission and Absorption Technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Jongmin; Zukic, Muamer; Wilson, Michele M.; Park, Jung Ho; Torr, Douglas G.

    1994-01-01

    Good theoretical designs of far ultraviolet polarizers have been reported using a MgF2/Al/MgF2 three layer structure on a thick Al layer as a substrate. The thicknesses were determined to induce transmission and absorption of p-polarized light. In these designs Al optical constants were used from films produced in ultrahigh vacuum (UHV: 10(exp -10) torr). Reflectance values for polarizers fabricated in a conventional high vacuum (p approx. 10(exp -6 torr)) using the UHV design parameters differed dramatically from the design predictions. Al is a highly reactive material and is oxidized even in a high vacuum chamber. In order to solve the problem other metals have been studied. It is found that a larger reflectance difference is closely related to higher amplitude and larger phase difference of Fresnel reflection coefficients between two polarizations at the boundary of MgF2/metal. It is also found that for one material a larger angle of incidence from the surface normal brings larger amplitude and phase difference. Be and Mo are found good materials to replace Al. Polarizers designed for 121.6 nm with Be at 60 deg and with Mo at 70 deg are shown as examples.

  11. Mid-infrared carbon monoxide detection system using differential absorption spectroscopy technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Ming; Sui, Yue; Li, Guo-lin; Zheng, Chuan-tao; Chen, Mei-mei; Wang, Yi-ding

    2015-11-01

    A differential carbon monoxide (CO) concentration sensing device using a self-fabricated spherical mirror (e.g. light-collector) and a multi-pass gas-chamber is presented in this paper. Single-source dual-channel detection method is adopted to suppress the interferences from light source, optical path and environmental changes. Detection principle of the device is described, and both the optical part and the electrical part are developed. Experiments are carried out to evaluate the sensing performance on CO concentration. The results indicate that at 1.013×105 Pa and 298 K, the limit of detection (LoD) is about 11.5 mg/m3 with an absorption length of 40 cm. As the gas concentration gets larger than 115 mg/m3 (1.013×105 Pa, 298 K), the relative detection error falls into the range of -1.7%—+1.9%. Based on 12 h long-term measurement on the 115 mg/m3 and 1 150 mg/m3 CO samples, the maximum detection errors are about 0.9% and 5.5%, respectively. Due to the low cost and competitive characteristics, the proposed device shows potential applications in CO detection in the circumstances of coal-mine production and environmental protection.

  12. Assessment of natural radioactivity and function of minerals in soils of Yelagiri hills, Tamilnadu, India by Gamma Ray spectroscopic and Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) techniques with statistical approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandrasekaran, A.; Ravisankar, R.; Rajalakshmi, A.; Eswaran, P.; Vijayagopal, P.; Venkatraman, B.

    2015-02-01

    Gamma Ray and Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopic techniques were used to evaluate the natural radioactivity due to natural radionuclides and mineralogical characterization in soils of Yelagiri hills, Tamilnadu, India. Various radiological parameters were calculated to assess the radiation hazards associated with the soil. The distribution pattern of activity due to natural radionuclides is explained by Kriging method of mapping. Using FTIR spectroscopic technique the minerals such as quartz, microcline feldspar, orthoclase feldspar, kaolinite, montmorillonite, illite, and organic carbon were identified and characterized. The extinction coefficient values were calculated to know the relative distribution of major minerals such as quartz, microcline feldspar, orthoclase feldspar and kaolinite. The calculated values indicate that the amount of quartz is higher than orthoclase feldspar, microcline feldspar and much higher than kaolinite. Crystallinity index was calculated to know the crystalline nature of quartz. The result indicates that the presence of disordered crystalline quartz in soils. The relation between minerals and radioactivity was assessed by multivariate statistical analysis (Pearson's correlation and cluster analysis). The statistical analysis confirms that the clay mineral kaolinite and non-clay mineral quartz is the major factor than other major minerals to induce the important radioactivity variables and concentrations of uranium and thorium.

  13. A differential absorption technique to estimate atmospheric total water vapor amounts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frouin, Robert; Middleton, Elizabeth

    1990-01-01

    Vertically integrated water-vapor amounts can be remotely determined by measuring the solar radiance reflected by the earth's surface with satellites or aircraft-based instruments. The technique is based on the method by Fowle (1912, 1913) and utilizes the 0.940-micron water-vapor band to retrieve total-water-vapor data that is independent of surface reflectance properties and other atmospheric constituents. A channel combination is proposed to provide more accurate results, the SE-590 spectrometer is used to verify the data, and the effects of atmospheric photon backscattering is examined. The spectrometer and radiosonde data confirm the accuracy of using a narrow and a wide channel centered on the same wavelength to determine water vapor amounts. The technique is suitable for cloudless conditions and can contribute to atmospheric corrections of land-surface parameters.

  14. Folic acid absorption determined by a single stool sample test--a double-isotope technique. The folic acid absorption capacity in children

    SciTech Connect

    Hjelt, K. )

    1989-10-01

    The fractional folic acid absorption (FAFol) was determined in 66 patients with various gastrointestinal diseases by a double-isotope technique, employing a single stool sample test (SSST) as well as a complete stool collection. The age of the patients ranged from 2.5 months to 16.8 years (mean 6.3 years). The test dose was administered orally and consisted of 50 micrograms of (3H)folic acid (monoglutamate) (approximately 20 muCi), carmine powder, and 2 mg 51CrCl3 (approximately 1.25 muCi) as the unabsorbable tracer. The whole-body radiation given to a 1-year-old child averaged 4.8 mrad only. The stool and napkin contents were collected and homogenized by the addition of 300 ml chromium sulfuric acid. A 300-ml sample of the homogenized stool and napkin contents, as well as 300 ml chromium sulfuric acid (75% vol/vol) containing the standards, were counted for the content of 51Cr in a broad-based well counter. The quantity of (3H)folic acid was determined by liquid scintillation, after duplicate distillation. Estimated by SSST, the FAFol, which employs the stool with the highest content of 51Cr corresponding to the most carmine-colored stool, correlated closely with the FAFol based on complete stool collection (r = 0.96, n = 39, p less than 0.0001). The reproducibility of FAFol determined by SSST was assessed from repeated tests in 18 patients. For a mean of 81%, the SD was 4.6%, which corresponded to a coefficient of variation of 5.7%.

  15. Explaining the Cyclic Voltammetry of a Poly(1,4-phenylene-ethynylene)-alt-poly(1,4-phenylene-vinylene) Copolymer upon Oxidation by using Spectroscopic Techniques.

    PubMed

    Enengl, Christina; Enengl, Sandra; Bouguerra, Nassima; Havlicek, Marek; Neugebauer, Helmut; Egbe, Daniel A M

    2017-01-04

    Poly(1,4-phenylene-ethynylene)-alt-poly(1,4-phenylene-vinylene) (PPE-PPV) copolymers have attracted quite a lot of attention in the last few years for electronic device applications owing to their enhanced fluorescence. In this work, we focus on one particular PPE-PPV copolymer with dissymmetrically substituted 1,4-phenylene-ethynylene and symmetrically substituted 1,4-phenylene-vinylene building units. Six successively performed cyclic voltammograms are presented, measured during the oxidation reactions. As the oxidation onset of the electrochemical reaction shifts to lower potentials in each cycle, this behavior is elucidated by using spectroscopic techniques ranging from UV/Vis/near-IR to mid-IR including spin-resonance techniques. Hence, these findings help to explain some of the copolymer's most advantageous properties in terms of possible oxidation products.

  16. Laser spectroscopic measurement of helium isotope ratios.

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, L.-B.; Mueller, P.; Holt, R. J.; Lu, Z.-T.; O'Connor, T. P.; Sano, Y.; Sturchio, N.; Univ. of Illinois; Univ. of Tokyo; Univ. of Illinois at Chicago

    2003-06-13

    A sensitive laser spectroscopic method has been applied to the quantitative determination of the isotope ratio of helium at the level of {sup 3}He/{sup 4}He = 10{sup -7}--10{sup -5}. The resonant absorption of 1083 nm laser light by the metastable {sup 3}He atoms in a discharge cell was measured with the frequency modulation saturation spectroscopy technique while the abundance of {sup 4}He was measured by a direct absorption technique. The results on three different samples extracted from the atmosphere and commercial helium gas were in good agreement with values obtained with mass spectrometry. The achieved 3{sigma} detection limit of {sup 3}He in helium is 4 x 10{sup -9}. This demonstration required a 200 {mu}L STP sample of He. The sensitivity can be further improved, and the required sample size reduced, by several orders of magnitude with the addition of cavity enhanced spectroscopy.

  17. An indoor test campaign of the tomography long path differential optical absorption spectroscopy technique.

    PubMed

    Mettendorf, K U; Hartl, A; Pundt, I

    2006-02-01

    In this study we validate the two-dimensional long path DOAS tomography measurement technique by means of an indoor experiment with well-known concentration distributions. The experiment was conducted over an area of 10 m x 15 m using one and two cylindrical polycarbonate containers of diameter 2 m, respectively, filled with NO2. The setup was realized with three of the multibeam instruments recently developed by Pundt and Mettendorf (Appl. Opt., 2005, in press), which allow the simultaneous measurement along at least four light paths each. The configuration consisted of twelve simultaneous light beams, 39 horizontal light paths in total, and 18 different cylinder positions inside the field. It was found that for the discretization and inversion technique shown here reconstructions of the concentration distributions from experimental data agree well with simulated reconstructions. In order to draw conclusions for atmospheric applications, numerical studies including instrumental errors were carried out. It was found that with the presented measurement setup it is possible to measure and reconstruct one or two NO2 plumes of 600 m diameter and average concentrations above 4.2 ppbv each, on a scale of 13.5 km2. Theoretical investigations show that it should be possible to localize and quantify 600 m diameter plumes of SO2 > 1.5 ppbv, H2CO > 6.3 ppbv, HONO > 3.2 ppbv, and ozone > 46.2 ppbv. Larger plumes can be measured with higher precision.

  18. Semi-Empirical Validation of the Cross-Band Relative Absorption Technique for the Measurement of Molecular Mixing Ratios

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pliutau, Denis; Prasad, Narasimha S

    2013-01-01

    Studies were performed to carry out semi-empirical validation of a new measurement approach we propose for molecular mixing ratios determination. The approach is based on relative measurements in bands of O2 and other molecules and as such may be best described as cross band relative absorption (CoBRA). . The current validation studies rely upon well verified and established theoretical and experimental databases, satellite data assimilations and modeling codes such as HITRAN, line-by-line radiative transfer model (LBLRTM), and the modern-era retrospective analysis for research and applications (MERRA). The approach holds promise for atmospheric mixing ratio measurements of CO2 and a variety of other molecules currently under investigation for several future satellite lidar missions. One of the advantages of the method is a significant reduction of the temperature sensitivity uncertainties which is illustrated with application to the ASCENDS mission for the measurement of CO2 mixing ratios (XCO2). Additional advantages of the method include the possibility to closely match cross-band weighting function combinations which is harder to achieve using conventional differential absorption techniques and the potential for additional corrections for water vapor and other interferences without using the data from numerical weather prediction (NWP) models.

  19. Determination of mercury in an assortment of dietary supplements using an inexpensive combustion atomic absorption spectrometry technique.

    PubMed

    Levine, Keith E; Levine, Michael A; Weber, Frank X; Hu, Ye; Perlmutter, Jason; Grohse, Peter M

    2005-01-01

    The concentrations of mercury in forty, commercially available dietary supplements, were determined using a new, inexpensive analysis technique. The method involves thermal decomposition, amalgamation, and detection of mercury by atomic absorption spectrometry with an analysis time of approximately six minutes per sample. The primary cost savings from this approach is that labor-intensive sample digestion is not required prior to analysis, further automating the analytical procedure. As a result, manufacturers and regulatory agencies concerned with monitoring lot-to-lot product quality may find this approach an attractive alternative to the more classical acid-decomposition, cold vapor atomic absorption methodology. Dietary supplement samples analyzed included astragalus, calcium, chromium picolinate, echinacea, ephedra, fish oil, ginger, ginkgo biloba, ginseng, goldenseal, guggul, senna, St John's wort, and yohimbe products. Quality control samples analyzed with the dietary supplements indicated a high level of method accuracy and precision. Ten replicate preparations of a standard reference material (NIST 1573a, tomato leaves) were analyzed, and the average mercury recovery was 109% (2.0% RSD). The method quantitation limit was 0.3 ng, which corresponded to 1.5 ng/g sample. The highest found mercury concentration (123 ng/g) was measured in a concentrated salmon oil sample. When taken as directed by an adult, this product would result in an approximate mercury ingestion of 7 mug per week.

  20. Determination of Mercury in an Assortment of Dietary Supplements Using an Inexpensive Combustion Atomic Absorption Spectrometry Technique

    PubMed Central

    Levine, Michael A.; Weber, Frank X.; Hu, Ye; Perlmutter, Jason; Grohse, Peter M.

    2005-01-01

    The concentrations of mercury in forty, commercially available dietary supplements, were determined using a new, inexpensive analysis technique. The method involves thermal decomposition, amalgamation, and detection of mercury by atomic absorption spectrometry with an analysis time of approximately six minutes per sample. The primary cost savings from this approach is that labor-intensive sample digestion is not required prior to analysis, further automating the analytical procedure. As a result, manufacturers and regulatory agencies concerned with monitoring lot-to-lot product quality may find this approach an attractive alternative to the more classical acid-decomposition, cold vapor atomic absorption methodology. Dietary supplement samples analyzed included astragalus, calcium, chromium picolinate, echinacea, ephedra, fish oil, ginger, ginkgo biloba, ginseng, goldenseal, guggul, senna, St John's wort, and yohimbe products. Quality control samples analyzed with the dietary supplements indicated a high level of method accuracy and precision. Ten replicate preparations of a standard reference material (NIST 1573a, tomato leaves) were analyzed, and the average mercury recovery was 109% (2.0% RSD). The method quantitation limit was 0.3 ng, which corresponded to 1.5 ng/g sample. The highest found mercury concentration (123 ng/g) was measured in a concentrated salmon oil sample. When taken as directed by an adult, this product would result in an approximate mercury ingestion of 7 μg per week. PMID:18924735

  1. DEMONSTRATION OF TUMOR-SPECIFIC ANTIGENS IN HUMAN COLONIC CARCINOMATA BY IMMUNOLOGICAL TOLERANCE AND ABSORPTION TECHNIQUES

    PubMed Central

    Gold, Phil; Freedman, Samuel O.

    1965-01-01

    Two methods were used to demonstrate the presence of tumor-specific antigens in adenocarcinomata of the human colon: (a) rabbits were immunized with extracts of pooled colonic carcinomata, and the antitumor antisera thus produced were absorbed with a pooled extract of normal human colon and with human blood components; (b) newborn rabbits were made immunologically tolerant to normal colonic tissue at birth, and were then immunized with pooled tumor material in adult life. Normal and tumor tissues were obtained from the same human donors in order to avoid misinterpretation of results due to individual-specific antigenic differences. The antisera prepared by both methods were tested against normal and tumor antigens by the techniques of agar gel diffusion, immunoelectrophoresis, hemagglutination, PCA, and immunofluorescence. Distinct antibody activity directed against at least two qualitatively tumor-specific antigens, or antigenic determinants, was detected in the antisera prepared by both methods and at least two additional tumor antigens were detected exclusively in antisera prepared by the tolerance technique. Whether these additional antigens were qualitatively different from normal tissue antigens, or merely present in tumor tissue in higher concentrations than in normal tissue has not as yet been determined. Furthermore, it was shown that the tumor-specific antibodies were not directed against bacterial contaminants or against the unusually high concentrations of fibrin found in many neoplastic tissues. It was concluded from these results that the pooled tumor extracts contained tumor-specific antigens not present in normal colonic tissue. Identical tumor-specific antigens were also demonstrated in a number of individual colonic carcinomata obtained from different human donors. PMID:14270243

  2. The feasibility of water vapor sounding of the cloudy boundary layer using a differential absorption radar technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebsock, M. D.; Suzuki, K.; Millan, L. F.; Kalmus, P. M.

    2015-06-01

    The feasibility of Differential Absorption Radar (DAR) for the spaceborne remote profiling of water vapor within the cloudy boundary layer is assessed by applying a radar instrument simulator to Large Eddy Simulations (LES). Frequencies near the 183 GHz water vapor absorption line attenuate too strongly to penetrate the large vapor concentrations that are ubiquitous in the boundary layer. However it is shown that lower frequencies between 140 and 170 GHz in the water vapor absorption continuum and on the wings of the absorption line, which are attenuated less efficiently than those near the line center, still have sufficient spectral variation of gaseous attenuation to perform sounding. The high resolution LES allow for assessment of the potential uncertainty in the method due to natural variability in thermodynamic and dynamic variables on scales smaller than the instrument field of view. The (160, 170) GHz frequency pair is suggested to best maximize signal for vapor profiling while minimizing noise due to undesired spectral variation in the target extinction properties. Precision in the derived water vapor is quantified as a function of the range resolution and the instrument precision. Assuming an observational spatial scale of 500 m vertical and 750 m Full Width at Half Maximum (FWHM) horizontal, measurement precision better that 1 g m-3 is achievable for stratocumulus scenes and 3 g m-3 for cumulus scenes given precision in radar reflectivity of 0.16 dBZ. Expected precision in the Column Water Vapor (CWV) is achievable between 0.5 and 2 kg m-2 on these same spatial scales. Sampling efficiency is quantified as a function of radar sensitivity. Mean biases in CWV due to natural variability in the target extinction properties do not exceed 0.25 kg m-2. Potential biases due to uncertainty in the temperature and pressure profile are negligible relative to those resulting from natural variability. Assuming a -35 dBZ minimum detectable signal, 40 % (21.9 %) of

  3. The feasibility of water vapor sounding of the cloudy boundary layer using a differential absorption radar technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebsock, M. D.; Suzuki, K.; Millán, L. F.; Kalmus, P. M.

    2015-09-01

    The feasibility of differential absorption radar (DAR) for the spaceborne remote profiling of water vapor within the cloudy boundary layer is assessed by applying a radar instrument simulator to large eddy simulations (LES). Frequencies near the 183 GHz water vapor absorption line attenuate too strongly to penetrate the large vapor concentrations that are ubiquitous in the boundary layer. However it is shown that lower frequencies between 140 and 170 GHz in the water vapor absorption continuum and on the wings of the absorption line, which are attenuated less efficiently than those near the line center, still have sufficient spectral variation of gaseous attenuation to perform sounding. The high resolution LES allow for assessment of the potential uncertainty in the method due to natural variability in thermodynamic and dynamic variables on scales smaller than the instrument field of view. The (160, 170) GHz frequency pair is suggested to best maximize signal for vapor profiling while minimizing noise due to undesired spectral variation in the target extinction properties. Precision in the derived water vapor is quantified as a function of the range resolution and the instrument precision. Assuming an observational spatial scale of 500 m vertical and 750 m full width at half maximum (FWHM) horizontal, measurement precision better that 1 g m-3 is achievable for stratocumulus scenes and 3 g m-3 for cumulus scenes given precision in radar reflectivity of 0.16 dBZ. Expected precision in the column water vapor (CWV) is achievable between 0.5 and 2 kg m-2 on these same spatial scales. Sampling efficiency is quantified as a function of radar sensitivity. Mean biases in CWV due to natural variability in the target extinction properties do not exceed 0.25 kg m-2. Potential biases due to uncertainty in the temperature and pressure profile are negligible relative to those resulting from natural variability. Assuming a -35 dBZ minimum detectable signal, 40 %(21.9 %) of

  4. Analysis of diffential absorption lidar technique for measurements of anhydrous hydrogen chloride from solid rocket motors using a deuterium fluoride laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bair, C. H.; Allario, F.

    1977-01-01

    An active optical technique (differential absorption lidar (DIAL)) for detecting, ranging, and quantifying the concentration of anhydrous HCl contained in the ground cloud emitted by solid rocket motors (SRM) is evaluated. Results are presented of an experiment in which absorption coefficients of HCl were measured for several deuterium fluoride (DF) laser transitions demonstrating for the first time that a close overlap exists between the 2-1 P(3) vibrational transition of the DF laser and the 1-0 P(6) absorption line of HCl, with an absorption coefficient of 5.64 (atm-cm) to the -1 power. These measurements show that the DF laser can be an appropriate radiation source for detecting HCl in a DIAL technique. Development of a mathematical computer model to predict the sensitivity of DIAL for detecting anhydrous HCl in the ground cloud is outlined, and results that assume a commercially available DF laser as the radiation source are presented.

  5. Description of the Role of Shot Noise in Spectroscopic Absorption and Emission Measurements with Photodiode and Photomultiplier Tube Detectors: Information for an Instrumental Analysis Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McClain, Robert L.; Wright, John C.

    2014-01-01

    A description of shot noise and the role it plays in absorption and emission measurements using photodiode and photomultiplier tube detection systems is presented. This description includes derivations of useful forms of the shot noise equation based on Poisson counting statistics. This approach can deepen student understanding of a fundamental…

  6. Analytical performance of different X-ray spectroscopic techniques for the environmental monitoring of the recultivated uranium mine site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alsecz, A.; Osán, J.; Kurunczi, S.; Alföldy, B.; Várhegyi, A.; Török, S.

    2007-08-01

    One uranium deposit exists in Hungary, with continuous radiological monitoring of the site. Nuclear spectroscopical methods are well established in order to study the problem concerning radionuclides. However, very limited information is available on the distribution and chemical form of uranium in the tailings sludge. In order to solve this complex analytical problem, a combination of different analytical methods is necessary. One of the most applied methods for studying the major elemental composition of particulate samples is electron probe microanalysis (EPMA). However, uranium and its daughter elements are often present only at trace amounts in the particles, below detection limit of EPMA. For most actinides that are long-lived radionuclides, microbeam X-ray fluorescence (μ-XRF) has superior sensitivity to determine elements in microparticles. Detection limits and applicability of EPMA and laboratory μ-XRF are discussed for localization of uranium-rich particles in the inhomogeneous tailings material. Laboratory μ-XRF provided an efficient way to identify these particles that can be easily relocated for further non-destructive microchemical investigations. Finally, for water analysis a simple and reliable method for U analysis is presented using total reflection X-ray fluorescence spectrometry (TXRF) that can be applied for on-site analysis in situations of accidental uranium contamination.

  7. Investigation into the interaction of losartan with human serum albumin and glycated human serum albumin by spectroscopic and molecular dynamics simulation techniques: A comparison study.

    PubMed

    Moeinpour, Farid; Mohseni-Shahri, Fatemeh S; Malaekeh-Nikouei, Bizhan; Nassirli, Hooriyeh

    2016-09-25

    The interaction between losartan and human serum albumin (HSA), as well as its glycated form (gHSA) was studied by multiple spectroscopic techniques and molecular dynamics simulation under physiological conditions. The binding information, including the binding constants, effective quenching constant and number of binding sites showed that the binding partiality of losartan to HSA was higher than to gHSA. The findings of three-dimensional fluorescence spectra demonstrated that the binding of losartan to HSA and gHSA would alter the protein conformation. The distances between Trp residue and the binding sites of the drug were evaluated on the basis of the Förster theory, and it was indicated that non-radiative energy transfer from HSA and gHSA to the losartan happened with a high possibility. According to molecular dynamics simulation, the protein secondary and tertiary structure changes were compared in HSA and gHSA for clarifying the obtained results.

  8. Study on the interaction of β-carotene and astaxanthin with trypsin and pepsin by spectroscopic techniques.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiangrong; Li, Peihong

    2016-05-01

    β-Carotene and astaxanthin are two carotenoids with powerful antioxidant properties, but the binding mechanisms of β-carotene/astaxanthin to proteases remain unclear. In this study, the interaction of these two carotenoids with trypsin and pepsin was investigated using steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence measurements, synchronous fluorescence spectroscopy, UV-vis absorption spectroscopy and circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy. The experimental results indicated that the quenching mechanisms of trypsin/pepsin by the two carotenoids are static processes. The binding constants of trypsin and pepsin with these two carotenoids are in the following order: astaxanthin-trypsin > astaxanthin-pepsin > β-carotene-trypsin > β-carotene-pepsin, respectively. Thermodynamic investigations revealed that the interaction between the two carotenoids and trypsin/pepsin is synergistically driven by enthalpy and entropy, and hydrophobic forces and electrostatic attraction have a significant role in the reactions. In addition, as shown by synchronous fluorescence spectroscopy, UV-vis absorption spectroscopy and CD, the two carotenoids may induce conformational and microenvironmental changes in trypsin/pepsin. The study provides an accurate and full basic data for clarifying the binding mechanisms of the two carotenoids with trypsin/pepsin and is helpful in understanding their effect on protein function and their biological activity in vivo.

  9. Response to the Letter to the Editor by D. Richardson: Analysis of the Interaction of Dp44mT with Human Serum Albumin and Calf Thymus DNA Using Molecular Docking and Spectroscopic Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Zhongjie; Liu, Youxun; Zhou, Sufeng; Fu, Yun; Li, Changzheng

    2016-01-01

    This response refers to: Xu, Z.; Liu, Y.; Zhou, S.; Fu, Y.; Li, C. Analysis of the Interaction of Dp44mT with Human Serum Albumin and Calf Thymus DNA Using Molecular Docking and Spectroscopic Techniques. Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2016, 17, 1042. Merlot, A.M.; Sahni, S.; Lane, D.J.R.; Richardson, V.; Huang, M.L.H.; Kalinowski, D.S.; Richardson, D.R. Letter to the Editor: Analysis of the Interaction of Dp44mT with Human Serum Albumin and Calf Thymus DNA Using Molecular Docking and Spectroscopic Techniques and. Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2016, 17, 1916. PMID:27854349

  10. X-Ray Absorption And EPR Spectroscopic Studies of the Biotransformations of Chromium(Vi) in Mammalian Cells. Is Chromodulin An Artifact of Isolation Methods?

    SciTech Connect

    Levina, A.; Harris, H.H.; Lay, P.A.; /Sydney U.

    2007-07-10

    Very different biological activities are usually ascribed to Cr(VI) (a toxin and carcinogen) and Cr(III) (an antidiabetic agent), although recent evidence suggests that both these types of actions are likely to arise from cellular uptake of varying concentrations of Cr(VI). The first systematic study of XANES spectra of Cr(III) complexes formed in Cr(VI)-treated mammalian cells (A549, HepG2, V79, and C2C12 cell lines), and in subcellular fractions of A549 cells, has been performed using a library of XANES spectra of model Cr(III) complexes. The results of multiple linear regression analyses of XANES spectra, in combination with multiple-scattering fits of XAFS spectra, indicate that Cr(III) formed in Cr(VI)-treated cells is most likely to bind to carboxylato, amine, and imidazole residues of amino acids, and to a lesser extent to hydroxo or aqua ligands. A combination of XANES and EPR spectroscopic data for Cr(VI)-treated cells indicates that the main component of Cr(III) formed in such cells is bound to high-molecular-mass ligands (>30 kDa, probably proteins), but significant redistribution of Cr(III) occurs during the cell lysis, which leads to the formation of a low-molecular-mass (<30 kDa) Cr(III)-containing fraction. The spectroscopic (XANES, XAFS, and EPR) properties of this fraction were strikingly similar to those of the purported natural Cr(III)-containing factor, chromodulin, that was reported to be isolated from the reaction of Cr(VI) with liver. These data support the hypothesis that a chromodulin-like species, which is formed from such a reaction, is an artifact of the reported isolation procedure.

  11. Synthesis, Spectroscopic and Thermal Characterization of Copper(II) and Iron(III) Complexes of Folic Acid and Their Absorption Efficiency in the Blood

    PubMed Central

    Hamed, E.; Attia, M. S.; Bassiouny, K.

    2009-01-01

    The absorption efficiency of any drug in blood is of prime importance. Compounds having the general formula: Kn[M(FO)2(H2O)2] · xH2O, where (M = Cu(II) or Fe(III), n = 2 or 1, FO = folate anion, x = 2 or 3 with respect), were prepared, and their absorption efficiency in rodent's blood was determined. The obtained compounds were characterized by elemental analysis, infrared as well as thermogravimetric analysis and polarization of light. The results suggest that the two folate complexes were formed in 1 : 2 molar ratio (metal : folic acid) which acted as a bidentate ligand through both carboxylic groups. Polarization of light proved that the folate complexes have symmetric geometry. Biological application proved that Cu(II) and Fe(III) complexes were absorbed more efficiently in rodent blood than folic acid itself. PMID:19746175

  12. Evanescent-wave spectroscopic fiber optic pH sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egami, C.; Takeda, K.; Isai, M.; Ogita, M.

    1996-02-01

    We demonstrate a new type of fiber optic pH sensor, which is the application of evanescent-wave spectroscopic technique. A methyl red (MR)-doped-poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) film that coated as part of cladding does function as a pH sensor probe. In this system MR doped in PMMA is used as indicator dye for pH measurement. The absorption spectrum shift in wavelength of indicator dye enables us to get the pH value. The sensor probe is immersed in water solution containing a small proportion of acetic acid over the wide pH range of 5.0 to 7.0. The chemical interaction between MR in sensor probe and hydrogen ion in the water solution causes a change in the dipole moment of MR, that is, the absorption spectrum macroscopically. The evanescent-wave spectroscopic technique provides the measurement of the absorption spectrum shift over a broad range of visible wavelength. The result of experiment was that MR absorption spectrum shifted by 40 nm every increase of 1.0 in pH. The small change in the pH value can be sensed as a large wavelength shift of pH indicator absorption spectrum.

  13. Characterization of the physico-chemical properties of polymeric materials for aerospace flight. [differential thermal and atomic absorption spectroscopic analysis of nickel cadmium batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rock, M.

    1981-01-01

    Electrodes and electrolytes of nickel cadmium sealed batteries were analyzed. Different thermal analysis of negative and positive battery electrodes was conducted and the temperature ranges of occurrence of endotherms indicating decomposition of cadmium hydroxide and nickel hydroxide are identified. Atomic absorption spectroscopy was used to analyze electrodes and electrolytes for traces of nickel, cadmium, cobalt, and potassium. Calibration curves and data are given for each sample analyzed. Instrumentation and analytical procedures used for each method are described.

  14. Time-dependent X-ray absorption spectroscopic (XAS) study on the transformation of zinc basic salt into bis(N-oxopyridine-2-thionato) zinc (II).

    PubMed

    Paek, Seung-Min; Jo, Won-Young; Park, Man; Choy, Jin-Ho

    2007-11-01

    Solid transchelation reaction was established for the synthesis of bis(N-oxopyridine-2-thionato) zinc (II), commonly known as zinc pyrithione (ZPT), to control particle size using zinc basic salt (ZBS) and aqueous sodium pyrithione solution. Distinguished from ZPT particles prepared by usual precipitation reaction, the obtained ZPT nanoparticles exhibited very narrow size distribution. X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) at Zn K-edge was systematically examined to elucidate time-dependent local structural evolution during solid transchelation reaction. X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) analysis clearly revealed that local environment around zinc atoms transformed into pentahedron as reaction proceeded. Based on quantitative X-ray diffraction and XANES analysis, we made structural models. Theoretical XAS spectrum calculated with FEFF code could reproduce experimental one, suggesting that XAS analysis could be very powerful tool to probe phase transformation. Furthermore, according to extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) fitting results, Zn-O distance in reaction products gradually increased from 1.96 to 2.07 angstroms, suggesting that zinc atoms bounded with oxygen ones in ZBS were transchelated with pyrithione ligands. This study could be a strong evidence for the usefulness of XAS to study time-dependent structural transformation of nanocrystalline materials.

  15. Multidisciplinary approach for the study of an Egyptian coffin (late 22nd/early 25th dynasty): combining imaging and spectroscopic techniques.

    PubMed

    Bracci, S; Caruso, O; Galeotti, M; Iannaccone, R; Magrini, D; Picchi, D; Pinna, D; Porcinai, S

    2015-06-15

    This paper demonstrates that an educated methodology based on both non-invasive and micro invasive techniques in a two-step approach is a powerful tool to characterize the materials and stratigraphies of an Egyptian coffin, which was restored several times. This coffin, belonging to a certain Mesiset, is now located at the Museo Civico Archeologico of Bologna (inventory number MCABo EG 1963). Scholars attributed it to the late 22nd/early 25th dynasty by stylistic comparison. The first step of the diagnostic approach applied imaging techniques on the whole surface in order to select measurements spots and to unveil both original and restored areas. Images and close microscopic examination of the polychrome surface allowed selecting representative areas to be investigated in situ by portable spectroscopic techniques: X-ray Fluorescence (XRF), Fiber Optic Reflectance Spectroscopy (FORS) and Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). After the analysis of the results coming from the first step, very few selected samples were taken to clarify the stratigraphy of the polychrome layers. The first step, based on the combination of imaging and spectroscopic techniques in a totally non-invasive modality, is quite unique in the literature on Egyptian coffins and enabled us to reveal many differences in the ground layer's composition and to identify a remarkable number of pigments in the original and restored areas. This work offered also a chance to check the limitations of the non-invasive approach applied on a complex case, namely the right localization of different materials in the stratigraphy and the identification of binding media. Indeed, to dissolve any remaining doubts on superimposed layers belonging to different interventions, it was necessary to sample few micro-fragments in some selected areas and analyze them prepared as cross-sections. The original ground layer is made of calcite, while the restored areas show the presence of either a mixture of calcite

  16. Multidisciplinary approach for the study of an Egyptian coffin (late 22nd/early 25th dynasty): Combining imaging and spectroscopic techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bracci, S.; Caruso, O.; Galeotti, M.; Iannaccone, R.; Magrini, D.; Picchi, D.; Pinna, D.; Porcinai, S.

    2015-06-01

    This paper demonstrates that an educated methodology based on both non-invasive and micro invasive techniques in a two-step approach is a powerful tool to characterize the materials and stratigraphies of an Egyptian coffin, which was restored several times. This coffin, belonging to a certain Mesiset, is now located at the Museo Civico Archeologico of Bologna (inventory number MCABo EG 1963). Scholars attributed it to the late 22nd/early 25th dynasty by stylistic comparison. The first step of the diagnostic approach applied imaging techniques on the whole surface in order to select measurements spots and to unveil both original and restored areas. Images and close microscopic examination of the polychrome surface allowed selecting representative areas to be investigated in situ by portable spectroscopic techniques: X-ray Fluorescence (XRF), Fiber Optic Reflectance Spectroscopy (FORS) and Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). After the analysis of the results coming from the first step, very few selected samples were taken to clarify the stratigraphy of the polychrome layers. The first step, based on the combination of imaging and spectroscopic techniques in a totally non-invasive modality, is quite unique in the literature on Egyptian coffins and enabled us to reveal many differences in the ground layer's composition and to identify a remarkable number of pigments in the original and restored areas. This work offered also a chance to check the limitations of the non-invasive approach applied on a complex case, namely the right localization of different materials in the stratigraphy and the identification of binding media. Indeed, to dissolve any remaining doubts on superimposed layers belonging to different interventions, it was necessary to sample few micro-fragments in some selected areas and analyze them prepared as cross-sections. The original ground layer is made of calcite, while the restored areas show the presence of either a mixture of calcite

  17. Methane overtone absorption by intracavity laser spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Obrien, James J.

    1990-01-01

    Interpretation of planetary methane (CH4) visible-near IR spectra, used to develop models of planetary atmospheres, has been hampered by a lack of suitable laboratory spectroscopic data. The particular CH4 spectral bands are due to intrinsically weak, high overtone-combination transitions too complex for classical spectroscopic analysis. The traditional multipass cell approach to measuring spectra of weakly absorbing species is insufficiently sensitive to yield reliable results for some of the weakest CH4 absorption features and is difficult to apply at the temperatures of the planetary environments. A time modulated form of intracavity laser spectroscopy (ILS), has been shown to provide effective absorption pathlengths of 100 to 200 km with sample cells less than 1 m long. The optical physics governing this technique and the experimental parameters important for obtaining reliable, quantitative results are now well understood. Quantitative data for CH4 absorption obtained by ILS have been reported recently. Illustrative ILS data for CH4 absorption in the 619.7 nm and 681.9 nm bands are presented. New ILS facilities at UM-St. Louis will be used to measure CH4 absorption in the 700 to 1000 nm region under conditions appropriate to the planetary atmospheres.

  18. A femtosecond transient absorption spectroscopic study on a carbonyl-containing carotenoid analogue, 2-(all-trans-retinylidene)-indan-1,3-dione

    PubMed Central

    Kusumoto, Toshiyuki; Kosumi, Daisuke; Uragami, Chiasa; Frank, Harry A.; Birge, Robert R.; Cogdell, Richard J.; Hashimoto, Hideki

    2011-01-01

    The photophysical properties of a carbonyl-containing carotenoid analogue in an s-cis configuration, relative to the conjugated π system, 2-(all-trans-retinylidene)-indan-1,3-dione (C20Ind), were investigated by femtosecond time-resolved spectroscopy in various solvents. The lifetime of the optically forbidden S1 state of C20Ind becomes long as solvent polarity increases. This trend is completely opposite to the situation of S1-ICT dynamics of carbonyl-containing carotenoids, such as peridinin and fucoxanthin. Excitation energy dependence of the transient absorption measurements shows that the transient absorption spectra in non-polar solvents were originated from two distinct transient species, while those in polar and protic solvents are due to a single transient species. By referring to the results of MNDO-PSDCI (modified neglect of differential overlap with partial single- and double-configuration interaction) calculations, we conclude: (1) In polar and protic solvents, the S1 state is generated following excitation up to the S2 state; (2) In non-polar solvents, however, both the S1 and 1nπ* states are generated; and (3) C20Ind does not generate the S1-ICT state, despite the fact that it has two conjugated carbonyl groups. PMID:21361262

  19. Absorption and emission spectroscopic characterisation of the LOV2-domain of phot from Chlamydomonas reinhardtii fused to a maltose binding protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holzer, W.; Penzkofer, A.; Susdorf, T.; Álvarez, M.; Islam, Sh. D. M.; Hegemann, P.

    2004-07-01

    The absorption and emission behaviour of flavin mononucleotide (FMN) in the wild-type light, oxygen and voltage-sensitive (LOV) domain LOV2 of the photoreceptor phot from the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii is studied at pH 8. Actually a LOV2-MBP-fusion protein (MBP=maltose binding protein) expressed in an Escherichia coli strain is investigated. For fresh samples stored in the dark an initial fluorescence quantum yield of φF=0.08±0.01 is determined. Blue-light photo-excitation generates a non-fluorescent intermediate photoproduct (flavin-C(4a)-cysteinyl adduct with absorption peak at 390 nm). In the aqueous solutions studied approximately seven percent of the FMN molecules are not bound to the protein (free FMN in oxidized form) and about seven percent of the non-covalently bound FMN are not convertible to an adduct. Approximately two thirds of the intermediate photoproduct recovers with a time constant of 41 ± 1 s, while approximately one third recovers with a time constant of about 7 min. The photo-adduct formation is thought to proceed via singlet excited-state electron transfer and triplet formation.

  20. An efficient and accurate technique to compute the absorption, emission, and transmission of radiation by the Martian atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindner, Bernhard Lee; Ackerman, Thomas P.; Pollack, James B.

    1990-01-01

    CO2 comprises 95 pct. of the composition of the Martian atmosphere. However, the Martian atmosphere also has a high aerosol content. Dust particles vary from less than 0.2 to greater than 3.0. CO2 is an active absorber and emitter in near IR and IR wavelengths; the near IR absorption bands of CO2 provide significant heating of the atmosphere, and the 15 micron band provides rapid cooling. Including both CO2 and aerosol radiative transfer simultaneously in a model is difficult. Aerosol radiative transfer requires a multiple scattering code, while CO2 radiative transfer must deal with complex wavelength structure. As an alternative to the pure atmosphere treatment in most models which causes inaccuracies, a treatment was developed called the exponential sum or k distribution approximation. The chief advantage of the exponential sum approach is that the integration over k space of f(k) can be computed more quickly than the integration of k sub upsilon over frequency. The exponential sum approach is superior to the photon path distribution and emissivity techniques for dusty conditions. This study was the first application of the exponential sum approach to Martian conditions.

  1. Applications of the direct photon absorption technique for measuring bone mineral content in vivo. Determination of body composition in vivo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cameron, J. R.

    1972-01-01

    The bone mineral content, BMC, determined by monoenergetic photon absorption technique, of 29 different locations on the long bones and vertebral columns of 24 skeletons was measured. Compressive tests were made on bone from these locations in which the maximum load and maximum stress were measured. Also the ultimate strain, modulus of elasticity and energy absorbed to failure were determined for compact bone from the femoral diaphysis and cancellous bone from the eighth through eleventh thoracic vertebrae. Correlations and predictive relationships between these parameters were examined to investigate the applicability of using the BMC at sites normally measured in vivo, i.e. radius and ulna in estimating the BMC and/or strength of the spine or femoral neck. It was found that the BMC at sites on the same bone were highly correlated r = 0.95 or better; the BMC at sites on different bones were also highly interrelated, r = 0.85. The BMC at various sites on the long bones could be estimated to between 10 and 15 per cent from the BMC of sites on the radius or ulna.

  2. Standardization and validation of a new atomic absorption spectroscopy technique for determination and quantitation of aluminium adjuvant in immunobiologicals.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Arti; Bhalla, Sumir Rai; Rawat, Sameera; Bansal, Vivek; Sehgal, Rakesh; Kumar, Sunil

    2007-10-01

    In the present study, Aluminium quantification in immunobiologicals has been described using atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS) technique. The assay was found to be linear in 25-125 microg/ml Aluminium range. The procedure was found to be accurate for different vaccines with recoveries of external additions ranging between 93.26 and 103.41%. The mean Limit of Variation (L.V.) for both intra- and inter-assay precision was calculated to be 1.62 and 2.22%, respectively. Further the procedure was found to be robust in relation to digestion temperature, alteration in acid (HNO(3) and H(2)SO(4)) ratio used for sample digestion and storage of digested vaccine samples up to a period of 15 days. After validation, AAS method was compared for its equivalency with routinely used complexometric titration method. On simultaneously applying on seven different groups of both bacterial and viral vaccines, viz., DPT, DT, TT, Hepatitis-A and B, Antirabies vaccine (cell culture) and tetravalent DPT-Hib, a high degree of positive correlation (+0.85-0.998) among AAS and titration methods was observed. Further AAS method was found to have an edge over complexometric titration method that a group of vaccines, viz., ARV (cell culture, adsorbed) and Hepatitis-A, in which Aluminium estimation is not feasible by pharmacopoeial approved complexometric titration method (possibly due to some interference in the sample matrix), this newly described and validated AAS assay procedure delivered accurate and reproducible results.

  3. Comparative study on three highly sensitive absorption measurement techniques characterizing lithium niobate over its entire transparent spectral range.

    PubMed

    Leidinger, M; Fieberg, S; Waasem, N; Kühnemann, F; Buse, K; Breunig, I

    2015-08-24

    We employ three highly sensitive spectrometers: a photoacoustic spectrometer, a photothermal common-path interferometer and a whispering-gallery-resonator-based absorption spectrometer, for a comparative study of measuring the absorption coefficient of nominally transparent undoped, congruently grown lithium niobate for ordinarily and extraordinarily polarized light in the wavelength range from 390 to 3800 nm. The absorption coefficient ranges from below 10(-4) cm(-1) up to 2 cm(-1). Furthermore, we measure the absorption at the Urbach tail as well as the multiphonon edge of the material by a standard grating spectrometer and a Fourier-transform infrared spectrometer, providing for the first time an absorption spectrum of the whole transparency window of lithium niobate. The absorption coefficients obtained by the three highly sensitive and independent methods show good agreement.

  4. Comprehensive analysis of TEM methods for LiFePO4/FePO4 phase mapping: spectroscopic techniques (EFTEM, STEM-EELS) and STEM diffraction techniques (ACOM-TEM).

    PubMed

    Mu, X; Kobler, A; Wang, D; Chakravadhanula, V S K; Schlabach, S; Szabó, D V; Norby, P; Kübel, C

    2016-11-01

    Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) has been used intensively in investigating battery materials, e.g. to obtain phase maps of partially (dis)charged (lithium) iron phosphate (LFP/FP), which is one of the most promising cathode material for next generation lithium ion (Li-ion) batteries. Due to the weak interaction between Li atoms and fast electrons, mapping of the Li distribution is not straightforward. In this work, we revisited the issue of TEM measurements of Li distribution maps for LFP/FP. Different TEM techniques, including spectroscopic techniques (energy filtered (EF)TEM in the energy range from low-loss to core-loss) and a STEM diffraction technique (automated crystal orientation mapping (ACOM)), were applied to map the lithiation of the same location in the same sample. This enabled a direct comparison of the results. The maps obtained by all methods showed excellent agreement with each other. Because of the strong difference in the imaging mechanisms, it proves the reliability of both the spectroscopic and STEM diffraction phase mapping. A comprehensive comparison of all methods is given in terms of information content, dose level, acquisition time and signal quality. The latter three are crucial for the design of in-situ experiments with beam sensitive Li-ion battery materials. Furthermore, we demonstrated the power of STEM diffraction (ACOM-STEM) providing additional crystallographic information, which can be analyzed to gain a deeper understanding of the LFP/FP interface properties such as statistical information on phase boundary orientation and misorientation between domains.

  5. On-line preferential solvation studies of polymers by coupled chromatographic-Fourier transform infrared spectroscopic flow-cell technique.

    PubMed

    Malanin, M; Eichhorn, K-J; Lederer, A; Treppe, P; Adam, G; Fischer, D; Voigt, D

    2009-12-18

    Qualitative and quantitative comparison between liquid chromatography (LC) and LC coupled with Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (LC-FTIR) to evaluate preferential solvation phenomenon of polymers in a mixed solvent has been performed. These studies show that LC-FTIR technique leads to detailed structural information without the requirement for determination of additional parameters for quantitative analysis except calibration. Appropriate experimental conditions for preferential solvation study have been established by variation of polymer concentration, molar mass and eluent content.

  6. Analytical procedure for the simultaneous voltammetric determination of trace metals in food and environmental matrices. Critical comparison with atomic absorption spectroscopic measurements.

    PubMed

    Melucci, Dora; Torsi, Giancarlo; Locatelli, Clinio

    2007-01-01

    An analytical procedure fit for the simultaneous determination of copper (II), chromium(VI), thallium(I), lead(II), tin(II), antimony(III), and zinc(II) by square wave anodic stripping voltammetry (SWASV) in three interdependent environmental matrices involved in foods and food chain as meals, cereal plants and soils is described. The digestion of each matrix was carried out using a concentrated HCl-HNO3-H2SO4 (meals and cereal plants) and HCl-HNO3 (soils) acidic attack mixtures. 0.1 mol/L dibasic ammonium citrate pH 8.5 was employed as the supporting electrolyte. The voltammetric measurements were carried out using, as working electrode, a stationary hanging mercury drop electrode (HMDE) and a platinum electrode and an Ag/AgCl/KClsat electrode as auxiliary and reference electrodes, respectively. The analytical procedure was verified by the analyses of the standard reference materials: Wholemeal BCR-CRM 189, Tomato Leaves NIST-SRM 1573a and Montana Soil Moderately Elevated Traces NIST-SRM 2711. For all the elements in the certified matrix, the precision as repeatability, expressed as relative standard deviation (Sr %) was lower than 5%. The accuracy, expressed as percentage relative error (e %) was of the order of 3-7%, while the detection limits were in the range 0.015-0.103 microg/g. Once set up on the standard reference materials, the analytical procedure was transferred and applied to commercial meal samples, cereal plants and soils samples drawn in sites devoted to agricultural practice. A critical comparison with spectroscopic measurements is also discussed.

  7. Mercury in Environmental and Biological Samples Using Online Combustion with Sequential Atomic Absorption and Fluorescence Measurements: A Direct Comparison of Two Fundamental Techniques in Spectrometry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cizdziel, James V.

    2011-01-01

    In this laboratory experiment, students quantitatively determine the concentration of an element (mercury) in an environmental or biological sample while comparing and contrasting the fundamental techniques of atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS) and atomic fluorescence spectrometry (AFS). A mercury analyzer based on sample combustion,…

  8. Characterization of Phyllanthus amarus herb by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometric (ICP-MS) analysis, optical absorption and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopic methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reddy, S. Lakshmi; Reddy, N. C. Gangi; Reddy, R. Rama Subba; Reddy, G. Siva; Rao, P. Sambasiva; Reddy, B. Jagannatha; Frost, R. L.

    A powdered sample of Phyllanthus amarus herb of Kadapa district of Andhra Pradesh, India, is used in the present study. ICP-MS analysis indicates that copper is present in higher concentration when compared to other elements. Although the Pb is toxic, it is within the permissible limit. The evaluated soil and herb physico-chemical parameters indicate that the sample is acidic in nature in comparison with the soil. An EPR study on powdered sample confirms the presence of Fe(III), Mn(II) and Cu(II). Optical absorption spectrum indicates that Fe(III) impurity is present in octahedral structure whereas Cu(II) is present in rhombically distorted octahedral environment. MIR results are due to carbonate fundamentals.

  9. X-ray absorption spectroscopic studies of the dinuclear iron center in methane monooxygenase and the sulfure and chlorine centers in photographic materials

    SciTech Connect

    DeWitt, J.G.

    1992-12-01

    The dinuclear iron center of the hydroxylase component of soluble methane monooxygenase (MMO) from Methylococcus capsulatus and Methylosinus trichosporiwn has been studied by X-ray absorption spectroscopy. Analysis of the Fe K-edge EXAFS revealed that the first shell coordination of the Fe(HI)Fe(IH) oxidized state of the hydroxylase from M. capsulatus consists of approximately 6 N and 0 atoms at an average distance of 2.04 [Angstrom]. The Fe-Fe distance was determined to be 3.4 [Angstrom]. No evidence for the presence of a short oxo bridge in the iron center of the oxidized hydroxylase was found, suggesting that the active site of MMO is significantly different from the active sites of the dinuclear iron proteins hemery and ribonucleotide reductase. In addition, the results of the first shell fits suggest that there are more oxygen than nitrogen donor ligands.

  10. X-ray absorption spectroscopic studies of the dinuclear iron center in methane monooxygenase and the sulfure and chlorine centers in photographic materials

    SciTech Connect

    DeWitt, Jane G.

    1992-12-01

    The dinuclear iron center of the hydroxylase component of soluble methane monooxygenase (MMO) from Methylococcus capsulatus and Methylosinus trichosporiwn has been studied by X-ray absorption spectroscopy. Analysis of the Fe K-edge EXAFS revealed that the first shell coordination of the Fe(HI)Fe(IH) oxidized state of the hydroxylase from M. capsulatus consists of approximately 6 N and 0 atoms at an average distance of 2.04 Å. The Fe-Fe distance was determined to be 3.4 Å. No evidence for the presence of a short oxo bridge in the iron center of the oxidized hydroxylase was found, suggesting that the active site of MMO is significantly different from the active sites of the dinuclear iron proteins hemery and ribonucleotide reductase. In addition, the results of the first shell fits suggest that there are more oxygen than nitrogen donor ligands.

  11. In situ X-ray Absorption Spectroscopic Investigation of the Electrochemical Conversion Reactions of CuF2-MoO3 Nanocomposite

    SciTech Connect

    A Mansour; F Badway; W Yoon; K Chung; G Amatucci

    2011-12-31

    We have used X-ray absorption spectroscopy at the Cu K-edge to investigate the electrochemical conversion reaction of 20 nm size 85 wt% CuF{sub 2}-15 wt% MoO{sub 3} nanocomposite under in situ conditions. The nanocomposite was prepared by high energy milling. Upon discharge, the lithiation reaction with the nanocomposite resulted in the formation of nanophase metallic Cu, which is consistent with the conversion of CuF{sub 2} into Cu and LiF. Based on XANES and Fourier transforms of EXAFS spectra, we show that the discharge process proceeded via the formation of highly dispersed Cu particles. Based on the coordination number of the first shell of Cu, the average size of the Cu particles was estimated to be in the 1-3 nm range in the fully discharged state.

  12. In vivo optical analysis of pancreatic cancer tissue in living model mice using fluorescence and Raman spectroscopic techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Toshiaki; Hattori, Yusuke; Katagiri, Takashi; Mitsuoka, Hiroki; Sato, Ken-ichi; Asakura, Toru; Shimosegawa, Toru; Sato, Hidetoshi

    2009-02-01

    Living pancreatic cancer tissues grown subcutaneously in nude mice are studied by in vivo Raman spectroscopy and autofluorescence imaging. Comparing the same point spectra of alive pancreatic cancer tissue to that of the dead tissue, it is found that they are different each other. The results suggest that the spectral changes reflect the protein conformational changes in the tumor tissue with death of the host animal. From the result of autofluorescence study, in vivo autofluorescence imaging has potential as a method to assign the histological elements of the pancreatic cancer tissue without any staining. These results strongly suggest that combination of these techniques is very important to study biological tissue.

  13. Spectroscopic properties of spheroidene analogs having different extents of {pi}-electron conjugation

    SciTech Connect

    Frank, H.A.; Desamero, R.Z.B.; Chynwat, V.; Gebhard, R.; Hoef, I. van der; Jansen, F.J.; Lugtenburg, J.; Gosztola, D.; Wasielewski, M.R. |

    1997-01-09

    Spectroscopic properties of spheroidene and a series of spheroidene analogs were studied using steady-state absorption, fluorescence, fluorescence excitation, and time-resolved absorption spectroscopy. A systematic series of molecules that control energy transfer to bacteriochlorophyll is provided. The molecules were purified by high-pressure liquid chromatographic techniques. Absorption spectra were observed to red-shift with increasing extent of {pi}-electron conjugation. The transient data of the energy gap law for radiationless transitions allow a prediction of the S{sub 1} energies of the molecules. The process of light harvesting by carotenoids in photosynthesis is discussed. 44 refs., 8 figs., 3 tabs.

  14. Spectroscopic properties of alexandrite crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Powell, Richard C.; Xi, Lin; Gang, Xu; Quarles, Gregory J.; Walling, John C.

    1985-09-01

    Details of the optical-spectroscopic properties of alexandrite (BeAl2O4:Cr3+) crystals were studied by different laser-spectroscopy techniques. The temperature dependences of the fluorescence lifetimes and widths of the zero-phonon lines were found to be quite different for Cr3+ ions in the mirror and inversion crystal-field sites. The results indicate that direct phonon-absorption processes dominate both thermal line broadening and lifetime quenching for ions in the mirror sites while phonon-scattering processes dominate the line broadening of inversion-site ions and leave their lifetime independent of temperature. Tunable-dye-laser site-selection methods were used to obtain the excitation spectra of the Cr3+ ions in inversion sites at low temperature and to identify six types of exchange-coupled pairs of Cr3+ ions in the lattice. Time-resolved site-selection spectroscopy was used to monitor the energy transfer between Cr3+ ions in mirror and inversion sites at both low and high temperature. Finally, high-power, picosecond pulse excitation was used to produce two-photon absorption, and the resulting emission spectrum was found to exhibit a new fluorescence band in the 400-nm spectral region.

  15. Reliability of a new technique for the determination of vitamin B12 absorption in children: single stool sample test--a double isotope technique

    SciTech Connect

    Hjelt, K.

    1986-03-01

    The fractional vitamin B12 absorption (FAB12) was determined in 39 patients with various gastrointestinal diseases by a double-isotope technique, employing a single stool sample test (SSST), as well as a complete stool collection. The age of the patients ranged from 2.5 months to 16.2 years (mean 5.0 years). The test dose was administered orally and consisted of 0.5-4.5 micrograms of /sup 57/CoB12 (approximately 0.05 microCi), carmine powder, and 2 mg /sup 51/CrCl/sub 3/ (approximately 1.25 microCi) as the inabsorbable tracer. The wholebody radiation to a 1-year-old child averaged only 20 mrad. The stool and napkin was collected and homogenized by addition of 300 ml chromium sulfuric acid. A 300-ml sample of the homogenized stool and napkin, as well as 300 ml chromium sulfuric acid (75% v/v) containing the standards, were counted in a broad-based well counter. The FAB12 determined by SSST employing the stool with the highest content of /sup 51/Cr (which corresponded to the most carmine-colored stool) correlated closely to the FAB12 based on complete stool collection (r = 0.98, n = 39, p less than 0.001). The reproducibility of FAB12 determined by SSST was assessed from double assays in 19 patients. For a mean value of 12%, the SD was 3%, which corresponded to a coefficient of variation (CV) of 25%. The excretion of /sup 57/Co and /sup 51/Cr in the urine was examined in six patients with moderate to severe mucosal damage and was found to be low.

  16. Evaluating the abnormal ossification in tibiotarsi of developing chick embryos exposed to 1.0ppm doses of platinum group metals by spectroscopic techniques.

    PubMed

    Stahler, Adam C; Monahan, Jennifer L; Dagher, Jessica M; Baker, Joshua D; Markopoulos, Marjorie M; Iragena, Diane B; NeJame, Britney M; Slaughter, Robert; Felker, Daniel; Burggraf, Larry W; Isaac, Leon A C; Grossie, David; Gagnon, Zofia E; Sizemore, Ioana E Pavel

    2013-04-01

    Platinum group metals (PGMs), i.e., palladium (Pd), platinum (Pt) and rhodium (Rh), are found at pollutant levels in the environment and are known to accumulate in plant and animal tissues. However, little is known about PGM toxicity. Our previous studies showed that chick embryos exposed to PGM concentrations of 1mL of 5.0ppm (LD50) and higher exhibited severe skeletal deformities. This work hypothesized that 1.0ppm doses of PGMs will negatively impact the mineralization process in tibiotarsi. One milliliter of 1.0ppm of Pd(II), Pt(IV), Rh(III) aqueous salt solutions and a PGM-mixture were injected into the air sac on the 7th and 14th day of incubation. Control groups with no-injection and vehicle injections were included. On the 20th day, embryos were sacrificed to analyze the PGM effects on tibiotarsi using four spectroscopic techniques. 1) Micro-Raman imaging: Hyperspectral Raman data were collected on paraffin embedded cross-sections of tibiotarsi, and processed using in-house-written MATLAB codes. Micro-Raman univariate images that were created from the ν1(PO4(3-)) integrated areas revealed anomalous mineral inclusions within the bone marrow for the PGM-mixture treatment. The age of the mineral crystals (ν(CO3(2-))/ν1(PO4(3-))) was statistically lower for all treatments when compared to controls (p≤0.05). 2) FAAS: The percent calcium content of the chemically digested tibiotarsi in the Pd and Pt groups changed by ~45% with respect to the no-injection control (16.1±0.2%). 3) Micro-XRF imaging: Abnormal calcium and phosphorus inclusions were found within the inner longitudinal sections of tibiotarsi for the PGM-mixture treatment. A clear increase in the mineral content was observed for the outer sections of the Pd treatment. 4) ICP-OES: PGM concentrations in tibiotarsi were undetectable (<5ppb). The spectroscopic techniques gave corroborating results, confirmed the hypothesis, and explained the observed pathological (skeletal developmental abnormalities

  17. A new approach for the modelling of chestnut wood photo-degradation monitored by different spectroscopic techniques.

    PubMed

    Bonifazi, G; Calienno, L; Capobianco, G; Monaco, A Lo; Pelosi, C; Picchio, R; Serranti, S

    2016-01-15

    The aim of this work is to study the colour and chemical modifications of the surfaces in chestnut wood samples as a consequence of irradiating in a controlled environment. The changes were investigated by a new analytical approach by combining traditional techniques such as reflectance spectrophotometry in the visible range and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy with new hyperspectral imaging, in order to obtain forecast models to describe the phenomenon. The statistical elaboration of the experimental data allowed to validate the measurements and to obtain models enabling to relate the investigated parameters; the elaboration of the hyperspectral images by chemometric methods allowed for studying the changes in the reflectance spectra. A result of great importance is the possibility to correlate the oxidation of wood chemical components with the colour change in a totally non-invasive modality. This result is particularly relevant in the field of cultural heritage and in general in the control processes of wooden materials.

  18. Chemical and morphological changes in hydrochars derived from microcrystalline cellulose and investigated by chromatographic, spectroscopic and adsorption techniques.

    PubMed

    Diakité, Mamadou; Paul, Andrea; Jäger, Christian; Pielert, Judith; Mumme, Jan

    2013-12-01

    Hydrothermal carbonization (HTC) can be used for converting the biomass into a carbon-rich material, whose application as a fuel requires higher heating value, whereas soil amendment needs stable carbon. This work was focused on the characterization of hydrochars derived from microcrystalline cellulose. The chars were investigated using elemental analysis, Brunauer-Emmett-Teller technique, nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, Raman, Fourier transform infrared, and electron spin resonance spectroscopy. Severity in temperature between 230 and 270°C with reaction times between 2 and 10 h only affect the carbon content moderately. The results show that aromatization of HTC chars correlates well with temperature, which was further supported by the increase of organic radicals with decreasing g values at higher temperatures. Based on these results, the energetic use of chars favors mild HTC (T<230°C and t≤6 h), while the soil amendement favors serve conditions (T≥230°C, and t>6 h).

  19. Precise oxygen and hydrogen isotope determination in nanoliter quantities of speleothem inclusion water by cavity ring-down spectroscopic techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uemura, Ryu; Nakamoto, Masashi; Asami, Ryuji; Mishima, Satoru; Gibo, Masakazu; Masaka, Kosuke; Jin-Ping, Chen; Wu, Chung-Che; Chang, Yu-Wei; Shen, Chuan-Chou

    2016-01-01

    Speleothem inclusion-water isotope compositions are a promising new climatic proxy, but their applicability is limited by their low content in water and by analytical challenges. We have developed a precise and accurate isotopic technique that is based on cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS). This method features a newly developed crushing apparatus, a refined sample extraction line, careful evaluation of the water/carbonate adsorption effect. After crushing chipped speleothem in a newly-developed crushing device, released inclusion water is purified and mixed with a limited amount of nitrogen gas in the extraction line for CRDS measurement. We have measured 50-260 nL of inclusion water from 77 to 286 mg of stalagmite deposits sampled from Gyokusen Cave, Okinawa Island, Japan. The small sample size requirement demonstrates that our analytical technique can offer high-resolution inclusion water-based paleoclimate reconstructions. The 1σ reproducibility for different stalagmites ranges from ±0.05 to 0.61‰ for δ18O and ±0.0 to 2.9‰ for δD. The δD vs. δ18O plot for inclusion water from modern stalagmites is consistent with the local meteoric water line. The 1000 ln α values based on calcite and fluid inclusion measurements from decades-old stalagmites are in agreement with the data from present-day farmed calcite experiment. Combination of coeval carbonate and fluid inclusion data suggests that past temperatures at 9-10 thousand years ago (ka) and 26 ka were 3.4 ± 0.7 °C and 8.2 ± 2.4 °C colder than at present, respectively.

  20. X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopic studies of Octakis(DMSO)lanthanoid(III) complexes in solution and in the solid iodides.

    PubMed

    Persson, Ingmar; Risberg, Emiliana Damian; D'Angelo, Paola; De Panfilis, Simone; Sandström, Magnus; Abbasi, Alireza

    2007-09-17

    Octakis(DMSO)lanthanoid(III) iodides (DMSO = dimethylsulfoxide), [Ln(OS(CH3)2)8]I3, of most lanthanoid(III) ions in the series from La to Lu have been studied in the solid state and in DMSO solution by extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy. L3-edge and also some K-edge spectra were recorded, which provided mean Ln-O bond distances for the octakis(DMSO)lanthanoid(III) complexes. The agreement with the average of the Ln-O bond distances obtained in a separate study by X-ray crystallography was quite satisfactory. The crystalline octakis(DMSO)lanthanoid(III) iodide salts have a fairly broad distribution of Ln-O bond distances, ca. 0.1 A, with a few disordered DMSO ligands. Their EXAFS spectra are in excellent agreement with those obtained for the solvated lanthanoid(III) ions in DMSO solution, both of which show slightly asymmetric distributions of the Ln-O bond distances. Hence, all lanthanoid(III) ions are present as octakis(DMSO)lanthanoid(III) complexes in DMSO solution, with the mean Ln-O distances centered at 2.50 (La), 2.45 (Pr), 2.43 (Nd), 2.41 (Sm), 2.40 (Eu), 2.39 (Gd), 2.37 (Tb), 2.36 (Dy), 2.34 (Ho), 2.33 (Er), 2.31 (Tm), and 2.29 A (Lu). This decrease in the Ln-O bond distances is larger than expected from the previously established ionic radii for octa-coordination. This indicates increasing polarization of the LnIII-O(DMSO) bonds with increasing atomic number. However, the S(1s) electron transition energies in the sulfur K-edge X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectra, probing the unoccupied molecular orbitals of lowest energy of the DMSO ligands for the [Ln(OS(CH3)2)8](3+) complexes, change only insignificantly from Ln = La to Lu. This indicates that there is no appreciable change in the sigma-contribution to the S-O bond, probably due to a corresponding increase in the contribution from the sulfur lone pair to the bonding.

  1. X-Ray Absorption Fine Structure Spectroscopic Studies of Octakis(DMSO)Lanthanoid(III) Complexes in Solution And in the Solid Iodides

    SciTech Connect

    Persson, I.; Risberg, E.Damian; D'Angelo, P.; Panfilis, S.De; Sandstrom, M.; Abbasi, A.

    2009-06-04

    Octakis(DMSO)lanthanoid(III) iodides (DMSO = dimethylsulfoxide), [Ln(OS(CH{sub 3}){sub 2}){sub 8}]I{sub 3}, of most lanthanoid(III) ions in the series from La to Lu have been studied in the solid state and in DMSO solution by extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy. L{sub 3}-edge and also some K-edge spectra were recorded, which provided mean Ln-O bond distances for the octakis(DMSO)lanthanoid(III) complexes. The agreement with the average of the Ln-O bond distances obtained in a separate study by X-ray crystallography was quite satisfactory. The crystalline octakis(DMSO)lanthanoid(III) iodide salts have a fairly broad distribution of Ln-O bond distances, ca. 0.1 {angstrom}, with a few disordered DMSO ligands. Their EXAFS spectra are in excellent agreement with those obtained for the solvated lanthanoid(III) ions in DMSO solution, both of which show slightly asymmetric distributions of the Ln-O bond distances. Hence, all lanthanoid(III) ions are present as octakis(DMSO)lanthanoid(III) complexes in DMSO solution, with the mean Ln-O distances centered at 2.50 (La), 2.45 (Pr), 2.43 (Nd), 2.41 (Sm), 2.40 (Eu), 2.39 (Gd), 2.37 (Tb), 2.36 (Dy), 2.34 (Ho), 2.33 (Er), 2.31 (Tm), and 2.29 {angstrom} (Lu). This decrease in the Ln-O bond distances is larger than expected from the previously established ionic radii for octa-coordination. This indicates increasing polarization of the Ln{sup III}-O(DMSO) bonds with increasing atomic number. However, the S(1s) electron transition energies in the sulfur K-edge X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectra, probing the unoccupied molecular orbitals of lowest energy of the DMSO ligands for the [Ln(OS(CH{sub 3}){sub 2}){sub 8}]{sup 3+} complexes, change only insignificantly from Ln = La to Lu. This indicates that there is no appreciable change in the ?-contribution to the S-O bond, probably due to a corresponding increase in the contribution from the sulfur lone pair to the bonding.

  2. Quantitative spectroscopic and theoretical study of the optical absorption spectra of H2O, HOD, and D2O in the 125-145 nm region.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Bing-Ming; Chung, Chao-Yu; Bahou, Mohammed; Lee, Yuan-Pern; Lee, L C; van Harrevelt, Rob; van Hemert, Marc C

    2004-01-01

    The room temperature absorption spectra of water and its isotopomers D2O and HOD have been determined in absolute cross section units in the 125 to 145 nm wavelength region using synchrotron radiation. The experimental results for these B band spectra are compared with results from quantum mechanical calculations using accurate diabatic ab initio potentials. A Monte Carlo sampling over the initial rotational states of the molecules is applied in order to calculate the cross sections at a temperature of 300 K. The overall rotation of the water molecule is treated exactly. Both for the experimental and for the theoretical spectrum an analysis is made in terms of a component attributed to rapid direct dissociation processes and a component attributed to longer-lived resonances. The agreement between the results from experiment and theory is excellent for H2O and D2O. In the case of HOD in the results of theory two more resonances are found at low energy. It is demonstrated that the width of the resonances of 0.04 eV is the result of overlapping and somewhat narrower resonances in the spectra of molecules differing in rotational ground state.

  3. Absorption spectroscopic and FTIR studies on EDA complexes between TNT (2,4,6-trinitrotoluene) with amines in DMSO and determination of the vertical electron affinity of TNT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, S. P.; Lahiri, S. C.

    2008-06-01

    TNT (2,4,6-trinitrotoluene) formed deep red 1:1 CT complexes with chromogenic agents like isopropylamine, ethylenediamine, bis(3-aminopropyl)amine and tetraethylenepentamine in DMSO. The complexes were also observed in solvents like methanol, acetone, etc. when the amines were present in large excess. The isopropylamine, complex showed three absorption peaks (at 378, 532 and 629 nm) whereas higher amines showed four peaks (at 370, 463, 532 and 629 nm). The peak at 463 nm vanished rapidly. The peak of the complexes near 530 nm required about 8-10 min to develop and the complexes were stable for about an hour but the peak slowly shifted towards 500 nm and the complexes were found to be stable for more than 24 h. The evidence of complex formation was obtained from distinct spots in HPTLC plates and from the shifts in frequencies and formation of new peaks in FTIR spectra. The peaks near 460 nm (transient) and 530 nm may be due to Janovsky reaction but could not be established. The extinction coefficients of the complexes were determined directly which enabled the accurate determination of the association constants KDA with TNT and amines in stoichiometric ratios. The results were verified using iterative method. The quantfication of TNT was made using ɛ value of the complex with ethylenediamine. The vertical electron affinity ( EA) of TNT was calculated using the method suggested by Mulliken.

  4. A novel surface-sensitive X-ray absorption spectroscopic detector to study the thermal decomposition of cathode materials for Li-ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nonaka, Takamasa; Okuda, Chikaaki; Oka, Hideaki; Nishimura, Yusaku F.; Makimura, Yoshinari; Kondo, Yasuhito; Dohmae, Kazuhiko; Takeuchi, Yoji

    2016-09-01

    A surface-sensitive conversion-electron-yield X-ray absorption fine structure (CEY-XAFS) detector that operates at elevated temperatures is developed to investigate the thermal decomposition of cathode materials for Li-ion batteries. The detector enables measurements with the sample temperature controlled from room temperature up to 450 °C. The detector is applied to the LiNi0.75Co0.15Al0.05Mg0.05O2 cathode material at 0% state of charge (SOC) and 50% SOC to examine the chemical changes that occur during heating in the absence of an electrolyte. The combination of surface-sensitive CEY-XAFS and bulk-sensitive transmission-mode XAFS shows that the reduction of Ni and Co ions begins at the surface of the cathode particles at around 150 °C, and propagates inside the particle upon further heating. These changes with heating are irreversible and are more obvious at 50% SOC than at 0% SOC. The fraction of reduced Ni ions is larger than that of reduced Co ions. These results demonstrate the capability of the developed detector to obtain important information for the safe employment of this cathode material in Li-ion batteries.

  5. Spectroscopic verification of zinc absorption and distribution in the desert plant Prosopis juliflora-velutina (velvet mesquite) treated with ZnO nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Hernandez-Viezcas, J.A.; Castillo-Michel, H.; Servin, A.D.; Peralta-Videa, J.R.; Gardea-Torresdey, J.L.

    2012-01-01

    The impact of metal nanoparticles (NPs) on biological systems, especially plants, is still not well understood. The aim of this research was to determine the effects of zinc oxide (ZnO) NPs in velvet mesquite (Prosopis juliflora-velutina). Mesquite seedlings were grown for 15 days in hydroponics with ZnO NPs (10 nm) at concentrations varying from 500 to 4000 mg L−1. Zinc concentrations in roots, stems and leaves were determined by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy (ICP-OES). Plant stress was examined by the specific activity of catalase (CAT) and ascorbate peroxidase (APOX); while the biotransformation of ZnO NPs and Zn distribution in tissues was determined by X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) and micro X-ray fluorescence (μXRF), respectively. ICP-OES results showed that Zn concentrations in tissues (2102 ± 87, 1135 ± 56, and 628 ± 130 mg kg−1 d wt in roots, stems, and leaves, respectively) were found at 2000 mg ZnO NPs L−1. Stress tests showed that ZnO NPs increased CAT in roots, stems, and leaves, while APOX increased only in stems and leaves. XANES spectra demonstrated that ZnO NPs were not present in mesquite tissues, while Zn was found as Zn(II), resembling the spectra of Zn(NO3)2. The μXRF analysis confirmed the presence of Zn in the vascular system of roots and leaves in ZnO NP treated plants. PMID:22820414

  6. Infrared absorption spectroscopic and DFT calculation studies on the adsorption structures of nitromethane on the single crystals of Cu and Ag

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itoh, K.; Iwa, A.; Uriu, Y.; Kadokura, K.

    2008-07-01

    The adsorption structures of nitromethane on Ag(1 1 0), Ag(1 1 1), Cu(1 1 0) and Cu(1 1 1) at 80 K were studied by using infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy (IRAS) and non-local density functional theory (DFT) calculation performed on nitromethane/Cu(1 1 0) and nitromethane/Cu(1 1 1) cluster models. Upon increasing exposure levels, the adsorbate on each substrate exhibits discrete spectral changes, characterizing sub-monolayer and/or monolayer, amorphous and multilayer (crystalline) states. The DFT calculation successively simulated the IRA spectra of nitromethane on the copper substrates, suggesting that nitromethane adsorbs on Cu(1 1 0) through an on-top coordination with one of the oxygen atom of the NO 2 group to the Cu atom and that nitromethane adsorbs on Cu(1 1 1) through a bridging coordination of the oxygen atom. In both states nitromethane takes an eclipsed form with the molecular plane perpendicular to the substrates surface and the hydrogen atom pointing to the surface in the molecular plane plays an important role in stabilizing the adsorption states in addition to the coordination interaction.

  7. Absorption spectroscopic and FTIR studies on EDA complexes between TNT (2,4,6-trinitrotoluene) with amines in DMSO and determination of the vertical electron affinity of TNT.

    PubMed

    Sharma, S P; Lahiri, S C

    2008-06-01

    TNT (2,4,6-trinitrotoluene) formed deep red 1:1 CT complexes with chromogenic agents like isopropylamine, ethylenediamine, bis(3-aminopropyl)amine and tetraethylenepentamine in DMSO. The complexes were also observed in solvents like methanol, acetone, etc. when the amines were present in large excess. The isopropylamine, complex showed three absorption peaks (at 378, 532 and 629 nm) whereas higher amines showed four peaks (at 370, 463, 532 and 629 nm). The peak at 463 nm vanished rapidly. The peak of the complexes near 530 nm required about 8-10 min to develop and the complexes were stable for about an hour but the peak slowly shifted towards 500 nm and the complexes were found to be stable for more than 24 h. The evidence of complex formation was obtained from distinct spots in HPTLC plates and from the shifts in frequencies and formation of new peaks in FTIR spectra. The peaks near 460 nm (transient) and 530 nm may be due to Janovsky reaction but could not be established. The extinction coefficients of the complexes were determined directly which enabled the accurate determination of the association constants KDA with TNT and amines in stoichiometric ratios. The results were verified using iterative method. The quantification of TNT was made using epsilon value of the complex with ethylenediamine. The vertical electron affinity (EA) of TNT was calculated using the method suggested by Mulliken.

  8. An infrared reflection-absorption spectroscopic (IRRAS) study of the interaction of lipid A and lipopolysaccharide Re with endotoxin-binding proteins.

    PubMed

    Kerth, Andreas; Garidel, Patrick; Howe, Jörg; Alexander, Christian; Mach, Jean-Pierre; Waelli, Thierry; Blume, Alfred; Th Rietschel, Ernst; Brandenburg, K

    2009-11-01

    Lipopolysaccharides (LPS, endotoxins) are main constituents of the outer membranes of Gram-negative bacteria, with the 'endotoxic principle' lipid A anchoring LPS into the membrane. When LPS is removed from the bacteria by the action of the immune system or simply by cell dividing, it may interact strongly with immunocompetent cells such as mononuclear cells. This interaction may lead, depending on the LPS concentration, to beneficial (at low) or pathophysiological (at high concentrations) reactions, the latter frequently causing the septic shock syndrome. There is a variety of endogenous LPS-binding proteins. To this class belong lactoferrin (LF) and hemoglobin (Hb), which have been shown to suppress and enhance the LPS-induced cytokine secretion in mononuclear cells, respectively. To elucidate the interaction mechanisms of endotoxins with these proteins, we have investigated in an infrared reflection-absorption spectroscopy (IRRAS) study the interaction of LPS or lipid A monolayers at the air/water interface with LF and Hb proteins, injected into the aqueous subphase. The data are clearly indicative of completely different interaction mechanisms of the endotoxins with the proteins, with the LF acting only at the LPS backbone, whereas Hb incorporates into the lipid monolayer. These data allow an understanding of the different reactivities in the biomedicinal systems.

  9. Quantification of zinc-porphyrin in dry-cured ham products by spectroscopic methods Comparison of absorption, fluorescence and X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Laursen, Kristoffer; Adamsen, Christina E; Laursen, Jens; Olsen, Karsten; Møller, Jens K S

    2008-03-01

    Zinc-protoporphyrin (Zn-pp), which has been identified as the major pigment in certain dry-cured meat products, was extracted with acetone/water (75%) and isolated from the following meat products: Parma ham, Iberian ham and dry-cured ham with added nitrite. The quantification of Zn-pp by electron absorption, fluorescence and X-ray fluorescence (XRF) spectroscopy was compared (concentration range used [Zn-pp]=0.8-9.7μM). All three hams were found to contain Zn-pp, and the results show no significant difference among the content of Zn-pp quantified by fluorescence, absorbance and X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy for Parma ham and Iberian ham. All three methods can be used for quantification of Zn-pp in acetone/water extracts of different ham types if the content is higher than 1.0ppm. For dry-cured ham with added nitrite, XRF was not applicable due to the low content of Zn-pp (<0.1ppm). In addition, XRF spectroscopy provides further information regarding other trace elements and can therefore be advantageous in this aspect. This study also focused on XRF determination of Fe in the extracts and as no detectable Fe was found in the three types of ham extracts investigated (limit of detection; Fe⩽1.8ppm), it allows the conclusion that iron containing pigments, e.g., heme, do not contribute to the noticeable red colour observed in some of the extracts.

  10. X-ray Absorption Spectroscopic and Computational Investigation of a Possible S···S Interaction in the [Cu3S2]3+ Core

    PubMed Central

    Sarangi, Ritimukta; Yang, Lei; Winikoff, Stuart G.; Gagliardi, Laura; Cramer, Christopher J.; Tolman, William B.; Solomon, Edward I.

    2011-01-01

    The electronic structure of the [Cu3S2]3+ core of [(LCu)3(S)2]3+ (L = N,N,N′,N′-tetramethyl-2R,3R-cyclohexanediamine) is investigated using a combination of Cu and S K-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy and calculations at the density functional and multireference second-order perturbation levels of theory. The results show that the [Cu3S2]3+ core is best described as having all copper centers close to, but more oxidized than, Cu2+, while the charge on the S2 fragment is between that of a sulfide (S2−) and a subsulfide (S23−) species. The [Cu3S2]3+ core thus is different from a previously described, analogous [Cu3O2]3+ core, which has a localized [(Cu3+Cu2+Cu2+)(O2−)2]3+ electronic structure. The difference in electronic structure between the two analogues is attributed to increased covalent overlap between the Cu 3d and S 3p orbitals and the increased radial distribution function of the S 3p orbital (relative to O 2p). These features result in donation of electron density from the S-S σ* to the Cu and result in some bonding interaction between the two S atoms at ~ 2.69 Å in [Cu3S2]3+, stabilizing a delocalized S=1 ground state. PMID:21923178

  11. Use of radiocarbon and spectroscopic analyses to characterise soil organic matter pools isolated using different fractionation techniques.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Gemma; Cloy, Joanna; Garnett, Mark; Sohi, Saran; Rees, Robert; Griffiths, Bryan

    2015-04-01

    Experimental division of soil organic matter (SOM) into functional pools has the potential to improve soil C modelling. Soil physical fractionation techniques seek to quantify these pools, however the fractions isolated vary in number, size, ecological role and composition. The use of different techniques to quantify soil C fractions in different studies presents a question - do similar fractions isolated by different methods fit the same conceptual definition? This study examined a sandy loam from the south-west of Scotland, sampled in summer, which had been under grassland management for at least 20 years. We compared average 14C ages of SOM fractions isolated using three published and frequently applied physical fractionation methods (1) a density separation technique isolating three fractions - free light (FLF) < 1.8 cm 3, intra-aggregate light (IALF) < 1.8 cm-3 after aggregate disruption, and organo-mineral (O-min) > 1.8 g cm 3 (Sohi et al, 2001); (2) a combined physical and chemical separation isolating five fractions: sand and aggregates (S+A) > 63 µm and > 1.8 g cm-3, particulate organic matter (POM) > 63 µm and < 1.8 g cm 3, silt and clay (s+c) < 63 but > 45 µm, residual organic carbon (rSOC) the residue left after s+c is oxidised with NaOCl, and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) < 45 µm (Zimmermann et al, 2007); and (3) a hot water extraction method isolating two fractions: water soluble C (WSC) at 20 °C and hot water extractable C (HWEC) at 80 °C (Ghani et al, 2003). The fractions from Method 1 had the most distinct average 14C ages with O-min, FLF and IALF assessed as 206, 1965 and 6172 years before present (BP) respectively. The fractions from Method 2 fell into two age groups, < ~1000 years BP for s+c, rSOC and S+A and > 4000 years BP for DOC and POM. Both Method 3 fractions were dominated by modern C. The average 14C ages of FLF, IALF, DOC and POM were surprisingly higher than the mineral bound fractions, although they made up a relatively small

  12. Understanding of sub-band gap absorption of femtosecond-laser sulfur hyperdoped silicon using synchrotron-based techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Limaye, Mukta V.; Chen, S. C.; Lee, C. Y.; Chen, L. Y.; Singh, Shashi B.; Shao, Y. C.; Wang, Y. F.; Hsieh, S. H.; Hsueh, H. C.; Chiou, J. W.; Chen, C. H.; Jang, L. Y.; Cheng, C. L.; Pong, W. F.; Hu, Y. F.

    2015-06-01

    The correlation between sub-band gap absorption and the chemical states and electronic and atomic structures of S-hyperdoped Si have been extensively studied, using synchrotron-based x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), x-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy (XANES), extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS), valence-band photoemission spectroscopy (VB-PES) and first-principles calculation. S 2p XPS spectra reveal that the S-hyperdoped Si with the greatest (~87%) sub-band gap absorption contains the highest concentration of S2- (monosulfide) species. Annealing S-hyperdoped Si reduces the sub-band gap absorptance and the concentration of S2- species, but significantly increases the concentration of larger S clusters [polysulfides (Sn2-, n > 2)]. The Si K-edge XANES spectra show that S hyperdoping in Si increases (decreased) the occupied (unoccupied) electronic density of states at/above the conduction-band-minimum. VB-PES spectra evidently reveal that the S-dopants not only form an impurity band deep within the band gap, giving rise to the sub-band gap absorption, but also cause the insulator-to-metal transition in S-hyperdoped Si samples. Based on the experimental results and the calculations by density functional theory, the chemical state of the S species and the formation of the S-dopant states in the band gap of Si are critical in determining the sub-band gap absorptance of hyperdoped Si samples.

  13. X-ray spectroscopic technique for energetic electron transport studies in short-pulse laser/plasma interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Tutt, T.E.

    1994-12-01

    When a solid target is irradiated by a laser beam, the material is locally heated to a high temperature and a plasma forms. The interaction of the laser with plasma can produce energetic electrons. By observing the behavior of these {open_quotes}hot{close_quotes} electrons, we hope to obtain a better understanding of Laser/Plasma Interactions. In this work we employ a layered-fluorescer technique to study the transport, and therefore the energetics, of the electrons. The plasma forms on a thin foil of metallic Pd which is bonded to thin layer of metallic Sn. Electrons formed from the plasma penetrate first the Pd and then the Sn. In both layers the energetic electrons promote inner (K) shell ionization of the metallic atoms which leads to the emission of characteristic K{sub {alpha}} x-rays of the fluorescers. By recording the x-ray spectrum emitted by the two foils, we can estimate the energy-dependent range of the electrons and their numbers.

  14. Study on the interaction of the epilepsy drug, zonisamide with human serum albumin (HSA) by spectroscopic and molecular docking techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahabadi, Nahid; Khorshidi, Aref; Moghadam, Neda Hossinpour

    2013-10-01

    In the present investigation, an attempt has been made to study the interaction of zonisamide (ZNS) with the transport protein, human serum albumin (HSA) employing UV-Vis, fluorometric, circular dichroism (CD) and molecular docking techniques. The results indicated that binding of ZNS to HSA caused strong fluorescence quenching of HSA through static quenching mechanism, hydrogen bonds and van der Waals contacts are the major forces in the stability of protein ZNS complex and the process of the binding of ZNS with HSA was driven by enthalpy (ΔH = -193.442 kJ mol-1). The results of CD and UV-Vis spectroscopy showed that the binding of this drug to HSA induced conformational changes in HSA. Furthermore, the study of molecular docking also indicated that zonisamide could strongly bind to the site I (subdomain IIA) of HSA mainly by hydrophobic interaction and there were hydrogen bond interactions between this drug and HSA, also known as the warfarin binding site.

  15. Studying Iron Mineralogy to Understand Redox Conditions in the Mesoproterozoic Belt Basin, USA Using Complementary Microscopic, Spectroscopic, and Magnetic Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slotznick, S. P.; Webb, S.; Kirschvink, J. L.; Fischer, W. W.

    2015-12-01

    Observations of iron chemistry and mineralogy over time provide a valuable tool for studying paleoenvironments, but questions still remain as to the redox character of Proterozoic basins after the rise of oxygen. To evaluate the mechanisms of iron mineralization in Proterozoic samples, we developed an approach that pairs the microscale textural techniques of light microscopy, magnetic scanning microscopy, and (synchrotron-based) microprobe x-ray spectroscopy with sensitive bulk rock magnetic experiments. Samples were collected from stratigraphic sections across the ~1.4 Ga lower Belt Group, Belt Supergroup, MT and ID, USA with a focus on excellently preserved sedimentary rocks, but also including those altered by a variety of diagenetic, metamorphic, and metasomatic events. Results show that even in the best-preserved parts of the Belt Basin, late diagenetic and/or metasomatic fluids affected (in some cases very mildly) the primary iron phases as evidenced by prevalent post-depositional alterations such as rare base metal sulfides. In more heavily altered rocks, the appearance of pyrrhotite and other minerals signaled transformations in iron mineralogy through metamorphism and metasomatism. Despite these secondary phases crystallizing in an open fluid-rich system, primary records of redox chemistry were preserved in the recrystallized early diagenetic framboidal pyrite and (sub)micron-sized detrital magnetite grains. Detrital magnetite is not the most abundant iron-bearing phase in any of the samples (typically <0.01 wt%), but is widely observed in both proximal and deeper basin facies, illustrating an important detrital flux of iron to the basin and a highly reactive iron source for early diagenetic pyrite. Based on our analyses, we interpret the shallow waters of the Belt Basin to be oxic with sulfidic pore fluids and deeper waters in parts of the basin as likely euxinic, consistent with the results of some bulk geochemical proxies. This redox reconstruction also

  16. An assessment of contemporary atomic spectroscopic techniques for the determination of lead in blood and urine matrices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parsons, Patrick J.; Geraghty, Ciaran; Verostek, Mary Frances

    2001-09-01

    The preparation and validation of a number of clinical reference materials for the determination of lead in blood and urine is described. Four candidate blood lead reference materials (Lots, 047-050), and four candidate urine lead reference materials (Lots, 034, 035, 037 and 038), containing physiologically-bound lead at clinically relevant concentrations, were circulated to up to 21 selected laboratories specializing in this analysis. Results from two interlaboratory studies were used to establish certified values and uncertainty estimates for these reference materials. These data also provided an assessment of current laboratory techniques for the measurement of lead in blood and urine. For the blood lead measurements, four laboratories used electrothermal atomization AAS, three used anodic stripping voltammetry and one used both ETAAS and ICP-MS. For the urine lead measurements, 11 laboratories used ETAAS (most with Zeeman background correction) and 10 used ICP-MS. Certified blood lead concentrations, ±S.D., ranged from 5.9±0.4 μg/dl (0.28±0.02 μmol/l) to 76.0±2.2 μg/dl (3.67±0.11 μmol/l) and urine lead concentrations ranged from 98±5 μg/l (0.47±0.02 μmol/l) to 641±36 μg/l (3.09±0.17 μmol/l). The highest concentration blood lead material was subjected to multiple analyses using ETAAS over an extended time period. The data indicate that more stringent internal quality control practices are necessary to improve long-term precision. While the certification of blood lead materials was accomplished in a manner consistent with established practices, the urine lead materials proved more troublesome, particularly at concentrations above 600 μg/l (2.90 μmol/l).

  17. Nuclear magnetic resonance and optical absorption spectroscopic studies on paramagnetic praseodymium(III) complexes with beta-diketone and heterocyclic amines.

    PubMed

    Ansari, A A; Ahmed, Zubair; Iftikhar, K

    2007-09-01

    The optical absorption spectra of [Pr(acac)(3)(H(2)O)(2)].H(2)O, [Pr(acac)(3)phen.H(2)O] and [Pr(acac)(3)bpy] (where acac is the anion of acetylacetone, phen is 1,10-phenanthroline and bpy is 2,2'-bipyridyl) have been analyzed in the visible region in a series of non-aqueous solvents (methanol, ethanol, isopropanol, chloroform, acetonitrile and pyridine). The complexes display four non-hypersensitive 4f-4f transitions ((3)P(2), (3)P(1)+(1)I(6), (3)P(0) and (1)D(2)) from the (3)H(4) ground state. The band shape of the transitions shows remarkable changes upon dissolving in different solvents. Distinctively different band shapes have been observed for phen and bpy complexes. The phen is more effective in producing changes and the splitting of the bands is more pronounced in phen complex since it is a stronger ligand and leads to stronger Pr-N(phen) bond. The splitting of the bands is indicative of partaking of f-orbitals in bonding. The NMR signals of heterocyclic amines have been shifted to high fields while the resonances due to acetylacetone moiety have moved to low fields which is the consequence of change in geometry of the complexes upon coordination of the heterocyclic amines and reflects the importance of geometric factor (3cos(2)theta-1) in changing sign of the shift and to a good approximation the shifts arise predominantly from the dipolar mechanism. The phen complexes have narrower line width than bpy complexes. The line broadening in the case of bpy complexes is suggestive of exchange between inter-converting forms. The bpy possesses some degree of rotational freedom about C(6)-C(6') bond and the two pyridine rings undergo scissoring motion with respect to each other.

  18. Spectroscopic analysis of small organic molecules: A comprehensive near-edge x-ray-absorption fine-structure study of C{sub 6}-ring-containing molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Kolczewski, C.; Puettner, R.; Martins, M.; Schlachter, A.S.; Snell, G.; Sant'Anna, M.M.; Hermann, K.; Kaindl, G.

    2006-01-21

    We report high-resolution C 1s near-edge x-ray-absorption fine-structure (NEXAFS) spectra of the C{sub 6}-ring-containing molecules benzene (C{sub 6}H{sub 6}), 1,3- and 1,4-cyclohexadiene (C{sub 6}H{sub 8}), cyclohexene (C{sub 6}H{sub 10}), cyclohexane (C{sub 6}H{sub 12}), styrene (C{sub 8}H{sub 8}), and ethylbenzene (C{sub 8}H{sub 10}) which allow us to examine the gradual development of delocalization of the corresponding {pi} electron systems. Due to the high experimental resolution, vibrational progressions can be partly resolved in the spectra. The experimental spectra are compared with theoretical NEXAFS spectra obtained from density-functional theory calculations where electronic final-state relaxation is accounted for. The comparison yields very good agreement between theoretical spectra and experimental results. In all cases, the spectra can be described by excitations to {pi}*- and {sigma}*-type final-state orbitals with valence character, while final-state orbitals of Rydberg character make only minor contributions. The lowest C 1s{yields}1{pi}* excitation energy is found to agree in the (experimental and theoretical) spectra of all molecules except for 1,3-cyclohexadiene (C{sub 6}H{sub 8}) where an energy smaller by about 0.6 eV is obtained. The theoretical analysis can explain this result by different binding properties of this molecule compared to the others.

  19. Spectroscopic remote sensing of plant stress at leaf and canopy levels using the chlorophyll 680 nm absorption feature with continuum removal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanches, Ieda Del'Arco; Souza Filho, Carlos Roberto; Kokaly, Raymond Floyd

    2014-11-01

    This paper explores the use of spectral feature analysis to detect plant stress in visible/near infrared wavelengths. A time series of close range leaf and canopy reflectance data of two plant species grown in hydrocarbon-contaminated soil was acquired with a portable spectrometer. The ProSpecTIR-VS airborne imaging spectrometer was used to obtain far range hyperspectral remote sensing data over the field experiment. Parameters describing the chlorophyll 680 nm absorption feature (depth, width, and area) were derived using continuum removal applied to the spectra. A new index, the Plant Stress Detection Index (PSDI), was calculated using continuum-removed values near the chlorophyll feature centre (680 nm) and on the green-edge (560 and 575 nm). Chlorophyll feature's depth, width and area, the PSDI and a narrow-band normalised difference vegetation index were evaluated for their ability to detect stressed plants. The objective was to analyse how the parameters/indices were affected by increasing degrees of plant stress and to examine their utility as plant stress indicators at the remote sensing level (e.g. airborne sensor). For leaf data, PSDI and the chlorophyll feature area revealed the highest percentage (67-70%) of stressed plants. The PSDI also proved to be the best constraint for detecting the stress in hydrocarbon-impacted plants with field canopy spectra and airborne imaging spectroscopy data. This was particularly true using thresholds based on the ASD canopy data and considering the combination of higher percentage of stressed plants detected (across the thresholds) and fewer false-positives.

  20. Structure and spectroscopic analysis of the graphene monolayer film directly grown on the quartz substrate via the HF-CVD technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahmoud, Waleed E.; Al-Hazmi, Farag S.; Al-Ghamdi, A. A.; Shokr, F. S.; Beall, Gary W.; Bronstein, Lyudmila M.

    2016-08-01

    Direct growth of a monolayer graphene film on a quartz substrate by a hot filament chemical vapor deposition technique is reported. The monolayer graphene film prepared was characterized by Raman spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), selected area electron diffraction (SAED), and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The optical properties were studied by spectroscopic elliposmetry. The experimental data were fitted by the Forouhi-Bloomer model to estimate the extinction coefficient and the refractive index of the monolayer graphene film. The refractive index spectrum in the visible region was studied based on the harmonic oscillator model. The lattice dielectric constant, real and imaginary dielectric constants and the ratio of the charge carrier number to the effective mass were determined. The surface and volume energy loss parameters were also found and showed that the value of the surface energy loss is greater than the volume energy loss. The determination of these optical constants will open new avenue for novel applications of graphene films in the field of wave plates, light modulators, ultrahigh-frequency signal processing and LCDs.

  1. Binding site identification of metformin to human serum albumin and glycated human serum albumin by spectroscopic and molecular modeling techniques: a comparison study.

    PubMed

    Rahnama, Elaheh; Mahmoodian-Moghaddam, Maryam; Khorsand-Ahmadi, Sabra; Saberi, Mohammad Reza; Chamani, Jamshidkhan

    2015-01-01

    The interaction between metformin and human serum albumin (HSA), as well as its glycated form (gHSA) was investigated by multiple spectroscopic techniques, zeta potential, and molecular modeling under physiological conditions. The steady state and time-resolved fluorescence data displayed the quenching mechanism of HSA-metformin and gHSA-metformin was static. The binding information, including the binding constants, number of binding sites, effective quenching constant showed that the binding affinity of metformin to HSA was greater than to gHSA which also confirmed by anisotropy measurements. It was determined that metformin had two and one set of binding sites on HSA and gHSA, respectively. Far-UV CD spectra of proteins demonstrated that the α-helical content decreased with increasing metformin concentration. The zeta potential and resonance light scattering (RLS) diagrams provided that lower drug concentration induced metformin aggregation on gHSA surface as compare to HSA. The increase in polarizability was one of the important factors for the enhancement of RLS and the formation of drug/protein complexes. The zeta potential results suggested that both hydrophobic and electrostatic interactions played important roles in the protein-metformin complex formation. Site marker experiments and molecular modeling showed that the metformin bound to subdomain IIIA (Sudlow's site II) on HSA and gHSA.

  2. In vitro studies on the behavior of salmeterol xinafoate and its interaction with calf thymus DNA by multi-spectroscopic techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Tingting; Bi, Shuyun; Wang, Yu; Wang, Tianjiao; Pang, Bo; Gu, Tingting

    2014-11-01

    The salmeterol xinafoate (SX) binding to calf thymus DNA in vitro was explored by fluorescence, resonance light scattering (RLS), UV-vis absorption, as well as viscometry, ionic strength effect and DNA melting techniques. It was found that SX could bind to DNA weakly, and the binding constants (Ka) were determined as 8.52 × 103, 8.31 × 103 and 6.14 × 103 L mol-1 at 18, 28 and 38 °C respectively. When bound to DNA, SX showed fluorescence quenching in the fluorescence spectra and hyperchromic effect in the absorption spectra. Stern-Volmer plots revealed that the quenching of fluorescence of SX by DNA was a static quenching. Furthermore, the relative viscosity and melting temperature of DNA solution were hardly influenced by SX, while the fluorescence intensity of SX-DNA was observed to decrease with the increasing ionic strength of system. Also, the binding constant between SX and double stranded DNA (dsDNA) was much weaker than that between SX and single stranded DNA (ssDNA). All these results suggested that the binding mode of SX to DNA should be groove binding. The obtained thermodynamic parameters indicated that electrostatic force might play a predominant role in SX binding to DNA. The quantum yield (φ) of SX was measured as 0.13 using comparative method. Based on the Förster resonance energy transfer theory (FRET), the binding distance (r0) between the acceptor and donor was calculated as 4.10 nm.

  3. Excitonic emission and absorption resonances in V0.25W0.75Se2 single crystals grown by direct vapour transport technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solanki, G. K.; Pataniya, Pratik; Sumesh, C. K.; Patel, K. D.; Pathak, V. M.

    2016-05-01

    A systematic study on emission and absorption spectra of vanadium mixed tungsten diselenide single crystals grown by direct vapour transport (DVT) technique is reported. The grown crystals were characterized by energy dispersive analysis of X-ray (EDAX), which gives the confirmation about the stoichiometry. The structural characterizations were accomplished by X-ray diffraction (XRD), surface morphology and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). These characterizations were indicating the growth of V0.25W0.75Se2 single crystal from vapour phase. The optical response of this material has been observed by combination of UV-vis-NIR spectroscopy and photo luminescence (PL) spectroscopy. A detailed study of excitonic emission and absorption resonances was carried out on grown crystals. The energy band gap was calculated for indirect allowed transition with absorbed and emitted phonon. Additionally, absorption tail for grown crystal is found to obey the Urbach's rule.

  4. Spectroscopic Low Coherence Interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bosschaart, Nienke; van Leeuwen, T. G.; Aalders, Maurice C.; Hermann, Boris; Drexler, Wolfgang; Faber, Dirk J.

    Low-coherence interferometry (LCI) allows high-resolution volumetric imaging of tissue morphology and provides localized optical properties that can be related to the physiological status of tissue. This chapter discusses the combination of spatial and spectroscopic information by means of spectroscopic OCT (sOCT) and low-coherence spectroscopy (LCS). We describe the theory behind these modalities for the assessment of spatially resolved optical absorption and (back)scattering coefficient spectra. These spectra can be used for the highly localized quantification of chromophore concentrations and assessment of tissue organization on (sub)cellular scales. This leads to a wealth of potential clinical applications, ranging from neonatology for the determination of billibrubin concentrations, to oncology for the optical assessment of the aggressiveness of a cancerous lesion.

  5. Differentiation of Salmonella enterica serovars and strains in cultures and food using infrared spectroscopic and microspectroscopic techniques combined with soft independent modeling of class analogy pattern recognition analysis.

    PubMed

    Männig, Annegret; Baldauf, Nathan A; Rodriguez-Romo, Luis A; Yousef, Ahmed E; Rodríguez-Saona, Luis E

    2008-11-01

    Detection of pathogenic microorganisms in food is often a tedious and time-consuming exercise. Developing rapid and cost-effective techniques for identifying pathogens to subspecies is critical for tracking causes of foodborne disease outbreaks. The objective of this study was to develop a method for rapid identification and differentiation of Salmonella serovars and strains within these serovars through isolation on hydrophobic grid membrane filters (HGMFs), examination by infrared (IR) spectroscopy and microspectroscopy, and data analysis by multivariate statistical techniques. Salmonella serovars (Anatum, Enteritidis, Heidelberg, Kentucky, Muenchen, and Typhimurium), most of which were represented by multiple strains, were grown in tryptic soy broth (24 h at 42 degrees C), diluted to 10(2) to 10(3) CFU/ml, and filtered using HGMFs. The membranes were incubated on Miller-Mallinson agar (24 h at 42 degrees C), and typical Salmonella colonies were sonicated in 50% acetonitrile and centrifuged. Resulting pellets were vacuum dried on a ZnSe crystal and analyzed using IR spectroscopy. Alternatively, the membranes containing Salmonella growth were removed from the agar, vacuum dried, and colonies were analyzed directly by IR microspectroscopy. Soft independent modeling of class analogy (SIMCA) models were developed from spectra. The method was validated by analyzing Salmonella-inoculated tomato juice, eggs, milk, and chicken. Salmonella serovars exhibited distinctive and reproducible spectra in the fingerprint region (1,200 to 900 cm(-1)) of the IR spectrum. SIMCA permitted distinguishing Salmonella strains from each other through differences in bacterial lipopolysaccharides and other membrane components. The model correctly predicted Salmonella in foods at serovar (100%) and strain (90%) levels. Isolation of Salmonella on HGMF and selective agar followed by IR spectroscopic analysis resulted in rapid and efficient isolation, identification, and differentiation of

  6. Reactivity-activity relationships of oral anti-diabetic vanadium complexes in gastrointestinal media: an X-ray absorption spectroscopic study.

    PubMed

    Levina, Aviva; McLeod, Andrew I; Kremer, Lauren E; Aitken, Jade B; Glover, Christopher J; Johannessen, Bernt; Lay, Peter A

    2014-10-01

    The reactions of oral V(V/IV) anti-diabetic drugs within the gastrointestinal environment (particularly in the presence of food) are a crucial factor that affects their biological activities, but to date these have been poorly understood. In order to build up reactivity-activity relationships, the first detailed study of the reactivities of typical V-based anti-diabetics, Na3V(V)O4 (A), [V(IV)O(OH2)5](SO4) (B), [V(IV)O(ma)2] (C, ma = maltolato(-)) and (NH4)[V(V)(O)2(dipic)] (D, dipic = pyridine-2,5-dicarboxylato(2-)) with simulated gastrointestinal (GI) media in the presence or absence of food components has been performed by the use of XANES (X-ray absorption near edge structure) spectroscopy. Changes in speciation under conditions that simulate interactions in the GI tract have been discerned using correlations of XANES parameters that were based on a library of model V(V), V(IV), and V(III) complexes for preliminary assessment of the oxidation states and coordination numbers. More detailed speciation analyses were performed using multiple linear regression fits of XANES from the model complexes to XANES obtained from the reaction products from interactions with the GI media. Compounds B and D were relatively stable in the gastric environment (pH ∼ 2) in the absence of food, while C was mostly dissociated, and A was converted to [V10O28](6-). Sequential gastric and intestinal digestion in the absence of food converted A, B and D to poorly absorbed tetrahedral vanadates, while C formed five- or six-coordinate V(V) species where the maltolato ligands were likely to be partially retained. XANES obtained from gastric digestion of A-D in the presence of typical food components converged to that of a mixture of V(IV)-aqua, V(IV)-amino acid and V(III)-aqua complexes. Subsequent intestinal digestion led predominantly to V(IV) complexes that were assigned as citrato or complexes with 2-hydroxyacidato donor groups from other organic compounds, including certain

  7. Infrared reflection absorption spectroscopic studies on the adsorption structures of dimethyl sulfide and methyl ethyl sulfide on Ag(1 1 0) and Cu(1 1 0)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasahara, T.; Shinohara, H.; Oshima, Y.; Kadokura, K.; Uriu, Y.; Ohe, C.; Itoh, K.

    2004-06-01

    Infrared reflection absorption (IRA) spectra were measured for dimethyl sulfide (CH 3SCH 3, DMS) and methyl ethyl sulfide (CH 3SCH 2CH 3, MES) with increasing exposure to metal substrates, Ag(1 1 0) and Cu(1 1 0), at 80 K. The spectral simulations performed by using the DFT calculation at the B3LYP/6-311++G** level indicated that (i) DMS adsorbs on the substrates with the CSC plane appreciably tilted from the surface normal, the tilt angle being about 80° for the adsorbate on Ag(1 1 0) and about 60° for the adsorbate on Cu(1 1 0), (ii) MES on Ag(1 1 0) at a submonolayer coverage state takes on the trans form with the molecular plane tilted from the surface normal by about 60°, and (iii) MES on Cu(1 1 0) takes the gauche form with the CSC plane almost perpendicular to the surface. The tilting of DMS is contrasted to dimethyl ether (DME) adsorbs on Ag(1 1 0) and Cu(1 1 0), where the molecular plane is perpendicular to the substrate surfaces [J. Phys. Chem. B 106 (2002) 3469]. The adsorption structures of DMS and DME are mainly determined by the coordination of the sulfur and oxygen atoms, the sulfur atom tending to coordinate to the Ag and Cu atoms through one of the 3p lone pairs (atop coordination) and the oxygen atom to the metal atoms through both of the 2p lone pairs (bridging coordination). It has been known that methyl ethyl ether (MEE) on Ag(1 1 0) takes on the trans form with the molecular plane tilted by about 45° and MEE on Cu(1 1 0) the gauche form with the COC plane almost perpendicular to the surface [J. Phys. Chem. B 107 (2003) 5008]. These results suggest that an attractive van der Waals interaction between the ethyl group of the adsorbates and the substrate surfaces play an important role in addition to the coordination of the sulfur and oxygen atoms in determining the rotational isomerism and orientation of MES and MEE on Ag(1 1 0) and Cu(1 1 0).

  8. Excitation induced spectroscopic study and quenching effect in cerium samarium codoped lithium aluminoborate glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaur, Parvinder; Kaur, Simranpreet; Singh, Gurinder Pal; Arora, Deepawali; Kumar, Sunil; Singh, D. P.

    2016-08-01

    Lithium aluminium borate host has been codoped with cerium and samarium to prepare glass by conventional melt quench technique. Their structural and spectroscopic investigation has been carried out using XRD, FTIR and density measurements. The UV-Vis absorption spectra and fluorescence spectra (λexc.=380 nm and 400 nm) have been studied for spectroscopic analysis. The amorphous nature of the prepared samples is shown by XRD. The density is increasing with addition of cerium at the expense of aluminium, keeping other components constant. FTIR study also shows the presence of compact and stable tetrahedral BO4 units thus supporting the density results. The UV- Vis absorption spectra show a shift of optical absorption edge towards longer wavelength along with an increase in intensity of peaks with rising samarium concentration. The fluorescence spectra show a blue shift and subsequent suppression of cerium peaks with addition of samarium.

  9. Understanding of sub-band gap absorption of femtosecond-laser sulfur hyperdoped silicon using synchrotron-based techniques

    PubMed Central

    Limaye, Mukta V.; Chen, S. C.; Lee, C. Y.; Chen, L. Y.; Singh, Shashi B.; Shao, Y. C.; Wang, Y. F.; Hsieh, S. H.; Hsueh, H. C.; Chiou, J. W.; Chen, C. H.; Jang, L. Y.; Cheng, C. L.; Pong, W. F.; Hu, Y. F.

    2015-01-01

    The correlation between sub-band gap absorption and the chemical states and electronic and atomic structures of S-hyperdoped Si have been extensively studied, using synchrotron-based x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), x-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy (XANES), extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS), valence-band photoemission spectroscopy (VB-PES) and first-principles calculation. S 2p XPS spectra reveal that the S-hyperdoped Si with the greatest (~87%) sub-band gap absorption contains the highest concentration of S2− (monosulfide) species. Annealing S-hyperdoped Si reduces the sub-band gap absorptance and the concentration of S2− species, but significantly increases the concentration of larger S clusters [polysulfides (Sn2−, n > 2)]. The Si K-edge XANES spectra show that S hyperdoping in Si increases (decreased) the occupied (unoccupied) electronic density of states at/above the conduction-band-minimum. VB-PES spectra evidently reveal that the S-dopants not only form an impurity band deep within the band gap, giving rise to the sub-band gap absorption, but also cause the insulator-to-metal transition in S-hyperdoped Si samples. Based on the experimental results and the calculations by density functional theory, the chemical state of the S species and the formation of the S-dopant states in the band gap of Si are critical in determining the sub-band gap absorptance of hyperdoped Si samples. PMID:26098075

  10. Influence of Ga doping ratio on the saturable absorption mechanism in Ga doped ZnO thin solid films processed by sol–gel spin coating technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandeep, K. M.; Bhat, Shreesha; Dharmaprakash, S. M.; Byrappa, K.

    2017-03-01

    In the present study, the nonlinear optical properties of sol–gel spin coated gallium doped zinc oxide (GZO) thin solid films are explored with nanosecond laser pulses using the z-scan technique. The higher doping ratios of Ga result in a large redshift of the energy gap (0.38 eV) due to the existence of enhanced grain boundary defects in GZO films. A positive nonlinear absorption coefficient is observed in undoped 1 at.wt.% GZO and 2 at.wt.% GZO films, and a negative nonlinear absorption coefficient in 3 at.wt.% GZO film. Fewer defects in undoped 1% GZO and 2% GZO films resulted in reverse saturable absorption (RSA), whereas a saturable absorption (SA) mechanism is observed in 3% GZO films and is attributed to the enhanced defect concentration in the band structure of GZO. However, all the films showed a self-defocusing mechanism, derived by a closed aperture z-scan technique. The present work sheds light on the defect mechanism involved in the observed nonlinear properties of GZO films.

  11. Infrared reflection absorption spectroscopic study of the adsorption structures of dimethyl ether and methyl ethyl ether on Cu(1 1 1) and Ag(1 1 1)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasahara, Takahiro; Itoh, Koichi

    2007-02-01

    Infrared reflection absorption (IRA) spectra measured for dimethyl ether (DME) adsorbed at 80 K on Cu(1 1 1) and Ag(1 1 1) give IR bands belonging only to the A 1 and B 2 species, indicating that the adsorbate takes on an orientation in which the C2 axis bisecting the COC bond angle tilts away from the surface normal within the plane perpendicular to the substrates. The DFT method was applied to simulate the IRA spectra, indicating that the tilt angles of DME on Cu(1 1 1) and Ag(1 1 1) are about 50° and 55°, respectively, at submonolayer coverages. The results are in contrast to the case of DME on Cu(1 1 0) and Ag(1 1 0), where the C2 axis is perpendicular to the substrates [T. Kiyohara et al., J. Phys. Chem. A 106 (2002) 3469]. Methyl ethyl ether (MEE) adsorbed at 80 K on Cu(1 1 1) gives IRA bands mainly ascribable to the gauche ( G) form, whereas the IRA spectra measured for MEE on Ag(1 1 1) are characterized by the trans ( T) form. The rotational isomers are identical with those on Cu(1 1 0) and Ag(1 1 0); i.e., MEE on Cu(1 1 0) takes the G form and the adsorbate on Ag(1 1 0) the T form [T. Kiyohara et al., J. Phys. Chem. B 107 (2003) 5008]. The simulation of the IRA spectra indicated that (i) the G form adsorbate on Cu(1 1 1) takes an orientation, in which the axis bisecting the COC bond angle tilts away from the surface normal by ca. 30° within the plane perpendicular to the surface to make the CH 3-CH 2 bond almost parallel to the surface, and (ii) the T form adsorbate on Ag(1 1 1) takes an orientation, in which the bisecting axis tilts away by ca. 60° from the surface normal within the perpendicular plane. Comparison of these adsorption structures of MEE on the (1 1 1) substrates with those of MEE on Cu(1 1 0) and Ag(1 1 0) indicates that the structures are mainly determined by a coordination interaction of the oxygen atom to the surface metals and an attractive van der Waals interaction between the ethyl group of MEE and the substrate surfaces. The

  12. Near-infrared spectroscopic photoacoustic microscopy using a multi-color fiber laser source

    PubMed Central

    Buma, Takashi; Wilkinson, Benjamin C.; Sheehan, Timothy C.

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate a simple multi-wavelength optical source suitable for spectroscopic optical resolution photoacoustic microscopy (OR-PAM) of lipid-rich tissue. 1064 nm laser pulses are converted to multiple wavelengths beyond 1300 nm via nonlinear optical propagation in a birefringent optical fiber. OR-PAM experiments with lipid phantoms clearly show the expected absorption peak near 1210 nm. We believe this simple multi-color technique is a promising cost-effective approach to spectroscopic OR-PAM of lipid-rich tissue. PMID:26309746

  13. Development of a spectroscopic technique for simultaneous magnetic field, electron density, and temperature measurements in ICF-relevant plasmas (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutra, Eric C.; Covington, Aaron M.; Darling, Timothy; Mancini, Roberto C.; Haque, Showera; Angermeier, William A.

    2016-09-01

    Visible spectroscopic techniques are often used in plasma experiments to measure B-field induced Zeeman splitting, electron densities via Stark broadening and temperatures from Doppler broadening. However, when electron densities and temperatures are sufficiently high, the broadening of the Stark and Doppler components can dominate the emission spectra and obscure the Zeeman component. In this research, we are developing a time-resolved multi-axial technique for measuring the Zeeman, Stark, and Doppler broadened line emission of dense magnetized plasmas for Z-pinch and Dense Plasma Focus (DPF) accelerators. The line emission is used to calculate the electron densities, temperatures, and B-fields. In parallel, we are developing a line-shape modeling code that incorporates the broadening effects due to Stark, Doppler, and Zeeman effects for dense magnetized plasma. Experiments conducted at the University of Nevada (Reno) at the Nevada Terawatt Facility (NTF) using the 1 MA Z-pinch (Zebra). The research explored the response of Al III doublet, 4p 2P3/2 to 4s 2S1/2 and 4p 2P1/2 to 4s 2S1/2 transitions. Optical light emitted from the pinch is fiber coupled to high-resolution spectrometers. The dual spectrometers are coupled to two high-speed visible streak cameras to capture time-resolved emission spectra from the experiment. The data reflects emission spectra from 100 ns before the current peak to 100 ns after the current peak, where the current peak is approximately the time at which the pinch occurs. The Al III doublet is used to measure Zeeman, Stark, and Doppler broadened emission. The line emission is then used to calculate the temperature, electron density, and B-fields. The measured quantities are used as initial parameters for the line shape code to simulate emission spectra and compare to experimental results. Future tests are planned to evaluate technique and modeling on other material wire array, gas puff, and DPF platforms. This work was done by National

  14. Spectroscopic ellipsometry of Zn(1-x)Cu(x)O thin films based on a modified sol-gel dip-coating technique.

    PubMed

    Al-Khanbashi, Hibah A; Shirbeeny, W; Al-Ghamdi, A A; Bronstein, Lyudmila M; Mahmoud, Waleed E

    2014-01-24

    Nanocrystalline Zn(1-x)Cu(x)O thin films (x=0, 0.01, 0.02, 0.03, 0.04 and 0.05) were synthesized by sol-gel dip-coating technique on a quartz substrate. These films were annealed at 350°C for 2 h. The X-ray diffraction showed a hexagonal crystal structure with high intensity peak for the (002) reflection plane indicating preferential growth along the c-axis of the crystal lattice. The peak position related to the (002) peak was shifted as a result of the copper ion incorporation, confirming the interstitial substitution of the zinc ions by the copper ions. This interstitial substitution leads to a decrease of an average crystallite size and lattice constants and an increase of the micro-strain up to 2 at.% of the copper amount. The surface morphology was explored by scanning electron microscopy which confirmed the homogenous distribution of nanoparticles in the deposited films along the quartz substrates. The energy dispersion X-ray spectroscopy revealed absence of impurities in the as-deposited films. The high resolution electron microscopy and selected area electron diffraction depicted that the films have polycrystalline nature. The film thickness and optical constants of the Zn(1-x)Cu(x)O thin films were estimated by fitting the spectroscopic ellipsometric data (ψ and Δ) using three different models. The refractive index was fitted using harmonic oscillator model from which the oscillator and the dispersive energies were found. The dielectric constant, dielectric loss, energy loss functions were also determined.

  15. Spectroscopic ellipsometry of Zn1-xCuxO thin films based on a modified sol-gel dip-coating technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Khanbashi, Hibah A.; Shirbeeny, W.; Al-Ghamdi, A. A.; Bronstein, Lyudmila M.; Mahmoud, Waleed E.

    2014-01-01

    Nanocrystalline Zn1-xCuxO thin films (x = 0, 0.01, 0.02, 0.03, 0.04 and 0.05) were synthesized by sol-gel dip-coating technique on a quartz substrate. These films were annealed at 350 °C for 2 h. The X-ray diffraction showed a hexagonal crystal structure with high intensity peak for the (0 0 2) reflection plane indicating preferential growth along the c-axis of the crystal lattice. The peak position related to the (0 0 2) peak was shifted as a result of the copper ion incorporation, confirming the interstitial substitution of the zinc ions by the copper ions. This interstitial substitution leads to a decrease of an average crystallite size and lattice constants and an increase of the micro-strain up to 2 at.% of the copper amount. The surface morphology was explored by scanning electron microscopy which confirmed the homogenous distribution of nanoparticles in the deposited films along the quartz substrates. The energy dispersion X-ray spectroscopy revealed absence of impurities in the as-deposited films. The high resolution electron microscopy and selected area electron diffraction depicted that the films have polycrystalline nature. The film thickness and optical constants of the Zn1-xCuxO thin films were estimated by fitting the spectroscopic ellipsometric data (ψ and Δ) using three different models. The refractive index was fitted using harmonic oscillator model from which the oscillator and the dispersive energies were found. The dielectric constant, dielectric loss, energy loss functions were also determined.

  16. X-ray Absorption and Emission Spectroscopic Studies of [L2Fe2S2]n Model Complexes: Implications for the Experimental Evaluation of Redox States in Iron–Sulfur Clusters

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Herein, a systematic study of [L2Fe2S2]n model complexes (where L = bis(benzimidazolato) and n = 2-, 3-, 4-) has been carried out using iron and sulfur K-edge X-ray absorption (XAS) and iron Kβ and valence-to-core X-ray emission spectroscopies (XES). These data are used as a test set to evaluate the relative strengths and weaknesses of X-ray core level spectroscopies in assessing redox changes in iron–sulfur clusters. The results are correlated to density functional theory (DFT) calculations of the spectra in order to further support the quantitative information that can be extracted from the experimental data. It is demonstrated that due to canceling effects of covalency and spin state, the information that can be extracted from Fe Kβ XES mainlines is limited. However, a careful analysis of the Fe K-edge XAS data shows that localized valence vs delocalized valence species may be differentiated on the basis of the pre-edge and K-edge energies. These findings are then applied to existing literature Fe K-edge XAS data on the iron protein, P-cluster, and FeMoco sites of nitrogenase. The ability to assess the extent of delocalization in the iron protein vs the P-cluster is highlighted. In addition, possible charge states for FeMoco on the basis of Fe K-edge XAS data are discussed. This study provides an important reference for future X-ray spectroscopic studies of iron–sulfur clusters. PMID:27097289

  17. Spectroscopic studies on the interaction of cysteine capped CuS nanoparticles with tyrosine

    SciTech Connect

    Prasanth, S.; Raj, D. Rithesh; Kumar, T. V. Vineesh; Sudarsanakumar, C.

    2015-06-24

    Biocompatible cysteine coated CuS nanoparticles were synthesized by a simple aqueous solution method. Hexagonal phase of the samples were confirmed from X-ray diffraction and particle size found to be 9 nm. The possible interaction between the bioactive cysteine capped CuS nanoparticles and tyrosine were investigated using spectroscopic techniques such as UV-Visible absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy. It is observed that the luminescence intensity of tyrosine molecule enhanced by the addition CuS nanoparticles.

  18. Resonance lamp absorption technique for simultaneous determination of the OH concentration and temperature at 10 spatial positions in combustion environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shirinzadeh, B.; Gregory, Ray W.

    1994-01-01

    A rugged, easy to implement, line-of-sight absorption instrument which utilizes a low pressure water vapor microwave discharge cell as the light source, has been developed to make simultaneous measurements of the OH concentration and temperature at 10 spatial positions. The design, theory, and capability of the instrument are discussed. Results of the measurements obtained on a methane/air flat flame burner are compared with those obtained using a single-frequency, tunable dye laser system.

  19. Extinction measurement of dense media by an optical coherence tomography technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ago, Tomoki; Iwai, Toshiaki; Yokota, Ryoko

    2016-10-01

    The optical coherence tomography will make progress as the next stage toward a spectroscopic analysis technique. The spectroscopic analysis is based on the Beer-Lambert law. The absorption and scattering coefficients even for the dense medium can be measured by the Beer-Lambert law because the OCT can detect only the light keeping the coherency which propagated rectilinearly and retro-reflected from scatters. This study is concerned with the quantitative verification of Beer-Lambert law in the OCT imaging.

  20. Optical absorptions of polyfluorene transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Yvonne Y.; Sirringhaus, Henning

    2005-07-01

    Conjugated polymers are a promising class of materials for organic electronics. While the progress in device performance is impressive, the basics of charge transport still pose many open questions. Specifically, conduction at the comparatively rough polymer-polymer interface in an all-polymer field-effect transistor is expected to be different from a sharp interface with an inorganic dielectric, such as silicon dioxide. In this work, charge modulation spectroscopy (CMS) is used to study the optical absorptions in the presence of charges in situ in the transistor structure. This allows direct observation of the charge carriers in the operational device via their spectroscopic signature; the technique is by design very sensitive to the properties of the semiconductor-dielectric interface. The semiconducting copolymer poly( 9,9' -dioctyl-fluorene-co-bithiophene) (F8T2) is incorporated into a top-gate thin-film transistor structure with a polymer dielectric layer deposited by spin coating and inkjet-printed polymer electrodes. A prominent charge-induced absorption at 1.65eV is observed as well as a shoulder at 1.3eV and a tail extending toward the absorption edge. The bias dependence of the CMS signature confirms that intermixing of the polymer layers is minimal, as expected from the excellent transistor characteristics. Polarization-dependent CMS measurements on aligned transistors show that the main feature at 1.65eV is strongly polarized whereas the shoulder is unpolarized. This observation, as well as further experimental evidence, lead to the conclusion that while the main absorption is attributable to the intrinsic, polaronic absorption in F8T2, the shoulder is likely to originate from a defect state.

  1. Spectroscopic Approaches for Phosphorus Speciation in Soils and other Environmental Systems

    SciTech Connect

    F Kizewski; A Morris; Y Liu; D Hesterberg

    2011-12-31

    In the past decades, environmental scientists have become increasingly involved in developing novel approaches for applying emerging spectroscopic techniques to complex environmental matrices. The objective of this review is to convey the most common chemical species of phosphorus reported for soils, sediments, model systems, and waste materials based on analyses by four spectroscopic techniques: X-ray absorption near-edge structure, nuclear magnetic resonance, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and Raman spectroscopy. Unique information is provided by each technique at a level of specificity that depends in part on matrix complexity. The X-ray absorption near-edge structure and nuclear magnetic resonance techniques reveal inorganic and organic P species in intact environmental matrices or in chemical extracts, whereas the Fourier transform infrared and Raman techniques can provide more specific bonding information about mineral or adsorbed P species in model analogs of matrix components. The most common P species in soils and sediments as indicated by spectroscopy are hydroxyapatite and octacalcium phosphate minerals, phosphate adsorbed on Fe- and Al-oxides, pyrophosphates and polyphosphates, phosphate mono- and di-esters, and phosphonates. Continued advancements in spectroscopic methods should improve speciation-based models of P mobilization and transformations in the environment.

  2. Optical systems modeling and experimental realization of pump and probe technique: investigation of nonlinear absorption in colloidal quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smirnov, A.; Golinskaya, A.; Ezhova, K.; Kozlova, M.; Dneprovskii, V.

    2016-04-01

    Two optical systems modeling of laser and broadband radiation focusing, that is necessary for realization of the pump and probe method, was carried out in this work. Modeling was utilized to construct experimental setup for transmission spectra measuring of studied sample by probe nanosecond broadband radiation (coumarin photoluminescence) depending on the intensity of the nanosecond laser pump pulses. The saturation effect of absorption and the induced charge Stark-effect coexistence and predominate issue of these effects are determined by power of optical excitation. In dependence of tuning of excitation radiation frequency from basic exciton transition frequency nonlinear effects in colloidal CdSe/ZnS quantum dots has been investigated.

  3. Evanescent wave absorption based fiber optic pH sensor prepared by dye doped sol-gel immobilization technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, B. D.; Sharma, D. K.

    1997-02-01

    A fiber optic pH sensor based on evanescent wave absorption is presented. To prepare the probe a small length of the cladding is removed from the middle portion of the fiber. A thin porous film of glass with pH-sensitive dye entrapped in it is deposited on the surface of the unclad portion of the fiber using sol-gel technology. The sensor response and its dynamic range are reported for phenol red, cresol red and bromophenol blue dyes. The sol-gel process has been found to increase the dynamic range of the pH sensor.

  4. Determination of cadmium and lead in urine by derivative flame atomic absorption spectrometry using the atom trapping technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han-wen, Sun; De-qiang, Zhang; Li-li, Yang; Jian-min, Sun

    1997-06-01

    A method is described for the determinations of cadmium and lead in urine by derivative flame atomic absorption spectrometry with a modified water-cooled stainless steel atom trapping tube. The effects of the trap position, the flame conditions, the coolant flow rates, and the collection time were studied. With a 1 min collection time, the characteristic concentrations (derivative absorbance of 0.0044) for cadmium and lead were 0.028 and 1.4 μg L -1, the detection limits (3σ) were 0.02 and 0.27 μg L -1, respectively. The detection limits and sensitivities of the proposed method were 2 and 3 orders of magnitude higher for 1-3 min collection time than those of conventional flame atomic absorption spectrometry for cadmium and lead, respectively. Urine samples from a small population of normal individuals have been analyzed for cadmium and lead by the proposed method. Satisfactory recoveries of 91-110% and 91-106%, for Cd and Pb were obtained with these urine samples.

  5. Wavelength calibration techniques and subtle surface and atmospheric absorption features in the Mariner 6, 7 IRS reflectance data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bell, James F., III; Roush, T. L.; Martin, T. Z.; Pollack, James B.; Freedman, R.

    1994-01-01

    1994 marks the 25th anniversary of the Mariner 6 and 7 flyby missions to Mars. Despite its age, the Mariner 6,7 Infrared Spectrometer (IRS) data are a unique set of measurements that can provide important information about the Martian surface, atmospheric, and atmospheric aerosol composition. For certain mid-IR wavelengths, the IRS spectra are the only such spacecraft data obtained for Mars. At other wavelengths, IRS measured surface regions different from those measured by Mariner 9 or Phobos 2 and under different dust opacity conditions. We are interested in examining the IRS reflectance data in the 1.8 to 3.0 micron region because there are numerous diagnostic absorption features at these wavelengths that could be indicative of hydrated silicate minerals or of carbonate- or sulfate-bearing minerals. Groundbased telescopic data and recent Phobos ISM measurements have provided controversial and somewhat contradictory evidence for the existence of mineralogic absorption features at these wavelengths. Our goal is to determine whether any such features can be seen in the IRS data and to use their presence or absence to re-assess the quality and interpretations of previous telescopic and spacecraft measurements.

  6. Quantum Entanglement Molecular Absorption Spectrum Simulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Quang-Viet; Kojima, Jun

    2006-01-01

    Quantum Entanglement Molecular Absorption Spectrum Simulator (QE-MASS) is a computer program for simulating two photon molecular-absorption spectroscopy using quantum-entangled photons. More specifically, QE-MASS simulates the molecular absorption of two quantum-entangled photons generated by the spontaneous parametric down-conversion (SPDC) of a fixed-frequency photon from a laser. The two-photon absorption process is modeled via a combination of rovibrational and electronic single-photon transitions, using a wave-function formalism. A two-photon absorption cross section as a function of the entanglement delay time between the two photons is computed, then subjected to a fast Fourier transform to produce an energy spectrum. The program then detects peaks in the Fourier spectrum and displays the energy levels of very short-lived intermediate quantum states (or virtual states) of the molecule. Such virtual states were only previously accessible using ultra-fast (femtosecond) laser systems. However, with the use of a single-frequency continuous wave laser to produce SPDC photons, and QEMASS program, these short-lived molecular states can now be studied using much simpler laser systems. QE-MASS can also show the dependence of the Fourier spectrum on the tuning range of the entanglement time of any externally introduced optical-path delay time. QE-MASS can be extended to any molecule for which an appropriate spectroscopic database is available. It is a means of performing an a priori parametric analysis of entangled photon spectroscopy for development and implementation of emerging quantum-spectroscopic sensing techniques. QE-MASS is currently implemented using the Mathcad software package.

  7. Spectroscopic detection

    DOEpatents

    Woskov, Paul P.; Hadidi, Kamal

    2003-01-01

    In embodiments, spectroscopic monitor monitors modulated light signals to detect low levels of contaminants and other compounds in the presence of background interference. The monitor uses a spectrometer that includes a transmissive modulator capable of causing different frequency ranges to move onto and off of the detector. The different ranges can include those with the desired signal and those selected to subtract background contributions from those with the desired signal. Embodiments of the system are particularly useful for monitoring metal concentrations in combustion effluent.

  8. Towards quantitative atmospheric water vapor profiling with differential absorption lidar.

    PubMed

    Dinovitser, Alex; Gunn, Lachlan J; Abbott, Derek

    2015-08-24

    Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL) is a powerful laser-based technique for trace gas profiling of the atmosphere. However, this technique is still under active development requiring precise and accurate wavelength stabilization, as well as accurate spectroscopic parameters of the specific resonance line and the effective absorption cross-section of the system. In this paper we describe a novel master laser system that extends our previous work for robust stabilization to virtually any number of multiple side-line laser wavelengths for the future probing to greater altitudes. In this paper, we also highlight the significance of laser spectral purity on DIAL accuracy, and illustrate a simple re-arrangement of a system for measuring effective absorption cross-section. We present a calibration technique where the laser light is guided to an absorption cell with 33 m path length, and a quantitative number density measurement is then used to obtain the effective absorption cross-section. The same absorption cell is then used for on-line laser stabilization, while microwave beat-frequencies are used to stabilize any number of off-line lasers. We present preliminary results using ∼300 nJ, 1 μs pulses at 3 kHz, with the seed laser operating as a nanojoule transmitter at 822.922 nm, and a receiver consisting of a photomultiplier tube (PMT) coupled to a 356 mm mirror.

  9. Carbon dioxide laser absorption spectra of toxic industrial compounds.

    PubMed

    Loper, G L; Sasaki, G R; Stamps, M A

    1982-05-01

    CO(2) laser absorption cross-section data are reported for acrolein, styrene, ethyl acrylate, trichloroethylene, vinyl bromide, and vinylidene chloride. These data indicate that sub parts per billion level, interference-free detection limits should be possible for these compounds by the CO(2) laser photoacoustic technique. Photoacoustic detectabilities below 40 ppb should be possible for these compounds in the presence of ambient air concentrations of water vapor and other anticipated interferences. These compounds are also found not to be important interferences in the detection of toxic hydrazine-based rocket fuels by CO(2) laser spectroscopic techniques.

  10. Pharmaceutical applications of separation of absorption and scattering in near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS).

    PubMed

    Shi, Zhenqi; Anderson, Carl A

    2010-12-01

    The number of near-infrared (NIR) spectroscopic applications in the pharmaceutical sciences has grown significantly in the last decade. Despite its widespread application, the fundamental interaction between NIR radiation and pharmaceutical materials is often not mechanistically well understood. Separation of absorption and scattering in near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) is intended to extract absorption and scattering spectra (i.e., absorption and reduced scattering coefficients) from reflectance/transmittance NIR measurements. The purpose of the separation is twofold: (1) to enhance the understanding of the individual roles played by absorption and scattering in NIRS and (2) to apply the separated absorption and scattering spectra for practical spectroscopic analyses. This review paper surveys the multiple techniques reported to date on the separation of NIR absorption and scattering within pharmaceutical applications, focusing on the instrumentations, mathematical approaches used to separate absorption and scattering and related pharmaceutical applications. This literature review is expected to enhance the understanding and thereby the utility of NIRS in pharmaceutical science. Further, the measurement and subsequent understanding of the separation of absorption and scattering is expected to increase not only the number of NIRS applications, but also their robustness.

  11. An Improved Computational Technique for Calculating Electromagnetic Forces and Power Absorptions Generated in Spherical and Deformed Body in Levitation Melting Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zong, Jin-Ho; Szekely, Julian; Schwartz, Elliot

    1992-01-01

    An improved computational technique for calculating the electromagnetic force field, the power absorption and the deformation of an electromagnetically levitated metal sample is described. The technique is based on the volume integral method, but represents a substantial refinement; the coordinate transformation employed allows the efficient treatment of a broad class of rotationally symmetrical bodies. Computed results are presented to represent the behavior of levitation melted metal samples in a multi-coil, multi-frequency levitation unit to be used in microgravity experiments. The theoretical predictions are compared with both analytical solutions and with the results or previous computational efforts for the spherical samples and the agreement has been very good. The treatment of problems involving deformed surfaces and actually predicting the deformed shape of the specimens breaks new ground and should be the major usefulness of the proposed method.

  12. Optical spectroscopic determination of human meniscus composition.

    PubMed

    Ala-Myllymäki, Juho; Honkanen, Juuso T J; Töyräs, Juha; Afara, Isaac O

    2016-02-01

    This study investigates the correlation between the composition of human meniscus and its absorption spectrum in the visible (VIS) and near infrared (NIR) spectral range. Meniscus samples (n = 24) were obtained from nonarthritic knees of human cadavers with no history of joint diseases. Specimens (n = 72) were obtained from three distinct sections of the meniscus, namely; anterior, center, posterior. Absorption spectra were acquired from each specimen in the VIS and NIR spectral range (400-1,100 nm). Following spectroscopic probing, the specimens were subjected to biochemical analyses to determine the matrix composition, that is water, hydroxyproline, and uronic acid contents. Multivariate analytical techniques, including principal component analysis (PCA) and partial least squares (PLS) regression, were then used to investigate the correlation between the matrix composition and it spectral response. Our results indicate that the optical absorption of meniscus matrix is related to its composition, and this relationship is optimal in the NIR spectral range (750-1,100 nm). High correlations (R(2) (uronic)  = 86.9%, R(2) (water)  = 83.8%, R(2) (hydroxyproline)  = 81.7%, p < 0.0001) were obtained between the spectral predicted and measured meniscus composition, thus suggesting that spectral data in the NIR range can be utilized for estimating the matrix composition of human meniscus. In conclusion, optical spectroscopy, particularly in the NIR spectral range, is a potential method for evaluating the composition of human meniscus. This presents a promising technique for rapid and nondestructive evaluation of meniscus integrity in real-time during arthroscopic surgery.

  13. The number of stratum corneum cell layers correlates with the pseudo-absorption of the corneocytes.

    PubMed

    Jacobi, U; Kaiser, M; Richter, H; Audring, H; Sterry, W; Lademann, J

    2005-01-01

    The removal of the stratum corneum (SC) using adhesive tapes is a common technique in cutaneous studies. The determination of the varying amounts of the SC removed would be a helpful tool in such investigations. In the present study, the cell layers of porcine SC were counted before and after removal of several tape strips using histological techniques. In addition, the pseudo-absorption of the corneocytes reflecting the amount of these cells was determined using spectroscopy. Different amounts of SC were removed using 20 tape strips. The spectroscopically determined data correlate linearly with the number of removed cell layers. Based on these results, the pseudo-absorption of the corneocytes can be used to calculate the absolute number of cell layers removed with a standard deviation of less than 11%. In this way, the SC can be quantified using the procedure of tape stripping in combination with the spectroscopic determination of the corneocytes.

  14. Development of a 2-micron Pulsed Differential Absorption Lidar for Atmospheric CO2 Concentration Measurement by Direct Detection Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, J.; Singh, U. N.; Petros, M.; Bai, Y.

    2011-12-01

    Researchers at NASA Langley Research Center are developing a 2-micron Pulsed Differential Absorption Lidar instrument for ground and airborne measurements via direct detection method. This instrument will provide an alternate approach to measure atmospheric CO2 concentrations with significant advantages. A high energy pulsed approach provides high-precision measurement capbility by having high signal-to-noise level and unambiguously eliminates the contamination from aerosols and clouds that can bias the IPDA measurement. A key component of the CO2 DIAL system, transceiver, is an existing, airborne ready, robust hardware which can provide 250mJ at 10Hz with double pulse format specifically designed for DIAL instrument. The exact wavelengths of the transceiver are controlled by well defined CW seed laser source to provide the required injection source for generating on-and-off line wavelength pulses sequentially. The compact, rugged, highly reliable transceiver is based on the unique Ho:Tm:YLF high-energy 2-micron pulsed laser technology. All the optical mounts are custom designed and have space heritage. They are designed to be adjustable and lockable and hardened to withstand vibrations that can occur in airborne operation. For the direct detection lidar application, a large primary mirror size is preferred. A 14 inch diameter telescope will be developed for this program. The CO2 DIAL/IPDA system requires many electronic functions to operate. These include diode, RF, seed laser, and PZT drivers; injection seeding detection and control; detector power supplies; and analog inputs to sample various sensors. Under NASA Laser Risk Reduction Program (LRRP), a control unit Compact Laser Electronics (CLE), is developed for the controlling the coherent wind lidar transceiver. Significant modifications and additions are needed to update it for CO2 lidar controls. The data acquisition system was built for ground CO2 measurement demonstration. The software will be updated for

  15. Spectroscopic properties of Eu3+, Dy3+ and Tb3+ ions in lead silicate glasses obtained by the conventional high-temperature melt-quenching technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Żur, L.; Janek, J.; Sołtys, M.; Pisarska, J.; Pisarski, W. A.

    2013-11-01

    The luminescence properties of selected rare-earth ions in lead silicate glasses have been studied. Europium, dysprosium and terbium ions were chosen as active dopants. Based on excitation and emission measurements as well as luminescence decay analysis, some spectroscopic parameters for these lanthanide ions were determined. In particular, the intensity ratios R/O (Eu3+), Y/B (Dy3+) and G/B (Tb3+) were calculated. Luminescence lifetimes for the 5D0 state of Eu3+ ions, the 4F9/2 state of Dy3+ ions and the 5D4 state of Tb3+ ions were also determined.

  16. Light Absorption Spectroscopy as a Paleoclimate and Correlation Technique for the CRP and CIROS-1 Drill Cores, McMurdo Sound, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanden Berg, M. D.; Jarrard, R. D.

    2001-12-01

    Coring at CIROS-1 and at the three drillsites of the Cape Roberts Project (CRP) provided a record of glacial influence in McMurdo Sound, Antarctica, during the Late Eocene and Oligocene. All four sites have well established sequence stratigraphies. Prior analyses of one CRP site, CRP-2, suggested a correlation between sequence stratigraphy and provenance, attributed to a link between local sea level and climate. However, sampling density was low. We have used light absorption spectroscopy (LAS) for high-resolution (0.5-1.0 m spacing) determination of downcore mineralogic variations at the four sites. LAS is a rapid, nondestructive mineral identification technique that measures the absorption spectrum, in visible and near-infrared bands (350-2500 nm), of light reflected from any surface. At these drillsites, relative abundance of smectite and illite is thought to reflect warm/humid (smectite-rich) versus cold/dry (illite-rich) paleoclimates. The 3300 LAS-based measurements of smectite/illite variations, confirmed by widely spaced XRD determinations, exhibit a pattern of generally higher smectite contents within highstand system tracts, suggesting that warmer climates correspond to higher local sea levels. Conversion of these high-resolution records from core depth to age is hampered by correlation uncertainties between the CIROS-1 and CRP cores. The smectite/illite curves, as well as other spectral characteristics, are very useful in correlating these Antarctic drill cores.

  17. Coherent absorption of light by graphene and other optically conducting surfaces in realistic on-substrate configurations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zanotto, S.; Bianco, F.; Miseikis, V.; Convertino, D.; Coletti, C.; Tredicucci, A.

    2017-01-01

    Analytical formulas are derived describing the coherent absorption of light from a realistic multilayer structure composed by an optically conducting surface on a supporting substrate. The model predicts two fundamental results. First, the absorption regime named coherent perfect transparency theoretically can always be reached. Second, the optical conductance of the surface can be extrapolated from absorption experimental data even when the substrate thickness is unknown. The theoretical predictions are experimentally verified by analyzing a multilayer graphene structure grown on a silicon carbide substrate. The graphene thickness estimated through the coherent absorption technique resulted in good agreement with the values obtained by two other spectroscopic techniques. Thanks to the high spatial resolution that can be reached and high sensitivity to the probed structure thickness, coherent absorption spectroscopy represents an accurate and non-destructive diagnostic method for the spatial mapping of the optical properties of two-dimensional materials and of metasurfaces on a wafer scale.

  18. Determination of wood burning and fossil fuel contribution of black carbon at Delhi, India using aerosol light absorption technique.

    PubMed

    Tiwari, S; Pipal, A S; Srivastava, A K; Bisht, D S; Pandithurai, G

    2015-02-01

    A comprehensive measurement program of effective black carbon (eBC), fine particle (PM2.5), and carbon monoxide (CO) was undertaken during 1 December 2011 to 31 March 2012 (winter period) in Delhi, India. The mean mass concentrations of eBC, PM2.5, and CO were recorded as 12.1 ± 8.7 μg/m(3), 182.75 ± 114.5 μg/m(3), and 3.41 ± 1.6 ppm, respectively, during the study period. Also, the absorption Angstrom exponent (AAE) was estimated from eBC and varied from 0.38 to 1.29 with a mean value of 1.09 ± 0.11. The frequency of occurrence of AAE was ~17 % less than unity whereas ~83 % greater than unity was observed during the winter period in Delhi. The mass concentrations of eBC were found to be higher by ~34 % of the average value of eBC (12.1 μg/m(3)) during the study period. Sources of eBC were estimated, and they were ~94 % from fossil fuel (eBCff) combustion whereas only 6 % was from wood burning (eBCwb). The ratio between eBCff and eBCwb was 15, which indicates a higher impact from fossil fuels compared to biomass burning. When comparing eBCff during day and night, a factor of three higher concentrations was observed in nighttime than daytime, and it is due to combustion of fossil fuel (diesel vehicle emission) and shallow boundary layer conditions. The contribution of eBCwb in eBC was higher between 1800 and 2100 hours due to burning of wood/biomass. A significant correlation between eBC and PM2.5 (r = 0.78) and eBC and CO (r = 0.46) indicates the similarity in location sources. The mass concentration of eBC was highest (23.4 μg/m(3)) during the month of December when the mean visibility (VIS) was lowest (1.31 km). Regression analysis among wind speed (WS), VIS, soot particles, and CO was studied, and significant negative relationships were seen between VIS and eBC (-0.65), eBCff (-0.66), eBCwb (-0.34), and CO (-0.65); however, between WS and eBC (-0.68), eBCff (-0.67), eBCwb (-0.28), and CO (-0.53). The regression analysis indicated

  19. Controlled coupling of a single nanoparticle in polymeric microstructure by low one-photon absorption-based direct laser writing technique.

    PubMed

    Do, M T; Nguyen, D T T; Ngo, H M; Ledoux-Rak, I; Lai, N D

    2015-03-13

    We investigated the coupling of a single nanoparticle (NP) into a polymer-based photonic structure (PS). The low one-photon absorption microscopy with a two-step technique allowed us first to accurately determine the location of a NP and then to embed it as desired into an arbitrary PS. The coupling of a gold NP and a polymer-based PS was experimentally investigated showing a six-fold photon collection enhancement as compared to that of a NP in unpatterned film. The simulation results based on finite-difference time-domain calculation method confirmed this observation and showed a 2.86-fold enhancement in extraction efficiency thanks to the NP/PS coupling.

  20. A technique coupling the analyte electrodeposition followed by in-situ stripping with electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry for analysis of samples with high NaCl contents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Čánský, Zdeněk; Rychlovský, Petr; Petrová, Zuzana; Matousek, J. P.

    2007-03-01

    A technique coupling the analyte electrodeposition followed by in-situ stripping with electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry has been developed for determination of lead and cadmium in samples with high salt contents. To separate the analyte from the sample matrix, the analyte was in-situ quantitatively electrodeposited on a platinum sampling capillary serving as the cathode (sample volume, 20 μL). The spent electrolyte containing the sample matrix was then withdrawn, the capillary with the analyte deposited was washed with deionized water and the analyte was stripped into a chemically simple electrolyte (5 g/L NH 4H 2PO 4) by reversing the polarity of the electrodeposition circuit. Electrothermal atomization using a suitable optimized temperature program followed. A fully automated manifold was designed for this coupled technique and the appropriate control software was developed. The operating conditions for determination of Pb and Cd in samples with high contents of inorganic salts were optimized, the determination was characterized by principal analytical parameters and its applicability was verified on analyses of urine reference samples. The absolute limits of detection for lead and cadmium (3 σ criterion) in a sample containing 30 g/L NaCl were 8.5 pg and 2.3 pg, respectively (peak absorbance) and the RSD values amounted to 1.6% and 1.9% for lead (at the 40 ng mL - 1 level) and cadmium (at the 4.0 ng mL - 1 level), respectively. These values (and also the measuring sensitivity) are superior to the results attained in conventional electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometric determination of Pb and Cd in pure solutions (5 g/L NH 4H 2PO 4). The sensitivity of the Pb and Cd determination is not affected by the NaCl concentration up to a value of 100 g/L, demonstrating an efficient matrix removal during the electrodeposition step.

  1. Electronic absorption spectroscopic studies on charge-transfer interactions in a biologically important molecule: N, N'-dimethyl-4,4'-bipyridylium chloride (paraquat or methyl viologen) as an electron acceptor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murthy, A. S. N.; Bhardwaj, A. P.

    The charge-transfer spectra of N, N'-dimethyl-4,4'-bipyridylium chloride (paraquat, PQ 2+) with a wide range of electron donors has been investigated and the thermodynamic data determined. An estimate of the empirical energy parameters has been made using the spectroscopic and thermodynamic data, using Mulliken's theory.

  2. Resolving Spectral Lines with a Periscope-Type DVD Spectroscope

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wakabayashi, Fumitaka

    2008-01-01

    A new type of DVD spectroscope, the periscope type, is described and the numerical analysis of the observed emission and absorption spectra is demonstrated. A small and thin mirror is put inside and an eighth part of a DVD is used as a grating. Using this improved DVD spectroscope, one can observe and photograph visible spectra more easily and…

  3. Direct UV-spectroscopic measurement of selected ionic-liquid vapors

    SciTech Connect

    Dai, Sheng; Luo, Huimin; Wang, Congmin; Li, Haoran

    2010-01-01

    The hallmark of ionic liquids lies in their negligible vapor pressure. This ultralow vapor pressure makes it difficult to conduct the direct spectroscopic measurement of ionic-liquid vapors. In fact, there have been no electronic spectroscopic data currently available for ionic-liquid vapors. This deficiency significantly hampers the fundamental understanding of the unique molecular structures of ionic liquids. Herein, the UV absorption spectra of eight ionic liquids, such as 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide ([Bmim{sup +}] [Tf{sub 2}N{sup -}]) and 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(perfluoroethylsulfonyl)imide ([Emim{sup +}][beti{sup -}]) in the vapor phase in a distillation-like environment, were measured through a high-temperature spectroscopic technique to fill this knowledge gap. Two strong absorption peaks of the [Bmim{sup +}][Tf{sub 2}N{sup -}] vapor lie at 202 and 211 nm, slightly different from those of the neat [Bmim{sup +}][Tf{sub 2}N{sup -}] thin film and its solution in water. Based on the quantitative determination of the vapor absorption spectra as a function of temperature, the vaporization enthalpies of these ionic liquids vapors were measured and found to be in good agreement with the corresponding literature values. This in situ method opens up a new avenue to study the nature of ionic-liquid vapors and to determine the vaporization enthalpies of ionic liquids.

  4. Spectroscopic characterization of polymers: report

    SciTech Connect

    Koenig, J.L.

    1987-10-01

    Polymer characterization has presented major difficulties to the analytical chemist, who has had to develop techniques to cope with the challenge. Even the elementary problem of measuring molecular weight is not easy. Yet such measurements are essential, because the physical, mechanical, and flow properties depend on the length of the polymer chain. Because of the limited solubility and high viscosity of polymers, many classical techniques have been of little use or have had to be extensively modified to measure the molecular weight of polymers. Size-exclusion chromatographic techniques such as gel permeation have been developed to measure these molecular weight distributions. Special chromatographic instruments with a range of spectroscopic detectors (including infrared and laser-light scattering) have emerged commercially to aid the analytical chemist in the fundamental endeavor to measure the length of the polymer chain and its distribution. The author describes the advantages and disadvantages and disadvantages of various spectroscopic techniques.

  5. Absorption/emission spectroscopy and applications using shock tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sulzmann, K. G. P.

    1988-09-01

    A historical overview is presented about the important contributions made by Penner, his co-workers, and his students to the application of shock-tube techniques for quantitative emission and absorption spectroscopy and its applications to chemical kinetics studies in high-temperature gases. The discussions address critical aspects related to valid determinations of quantitative spectroscopic data and chemical rate parameters and stress the requirements for uniformly heated gas samples, temperature determinations, gas-mixture preparations, selection of useful spectral intervals, verification of LTE conditions, time resolutions for concentration histories, uniqueness of kinetic measurements, as well as accuracies and reproducibilities of measurement results.The potential of absorption spectroscopy by molecule and/or radical resonance radiation and by laser transmission techniques is highlighted for kinetic studies in mixtures with very small reactant concentrations.Besides the work by the honoree and his school, the references include books, monographs and key articles related to the subjects discussed.

  6. The application of thermodynamic and spectroscopic techniques to adhesion in the polyimide/Ti 6-4 and polyphenylquinoxaline/Ti 6-4 systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dias, S.; Wightman, J. P.

    1984-01-01

    The results of calorimetric measurements of Ti adherend surfaces are presented. The measurements were carried out after several chemical pretreatments and after fracture of several lap shear samples aged at high temperature. The exact composition of the Ti samples was Ti(6 percent Al-4 percent V). The adhesives used were polyimides and polyphenylquinoxalines (PPQ). Each chemical pretreatment was accompanied by a unique spectroscopic feature which was characterized by XPS, SEM, and specular reflectance infrared spectroscopy. The energetics of the interaction between primer solutions and the Ti adherend were evaluated by microcalorimetry. Changes in the structure of the surface oxide layer upon heating of the adherend were deduced from immersion temperatures of the PI and PPQ solutions. The XPS and SEM data are given is a table.

  7. Potassium emission absorption system. Topical report 12

    SciTech Connect

    Bauman, L.E.

    1995-04-01

    The Potassium Emission Absorption System is one of the advanced optical diagnostics developed at Mississippi State University to provide support for the demonstration of prototype-scale coal-fired combustion magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) electrical power generation. Intended for application in the upstream of an MHD flow, the system directly measures gas temperature and neutral potassium atom number density through spectroscopic emission absorption techniques. From these measurements the electron density can be inferred from a statistical equilibrium calculation and the electron conductivity in the MHD channel found by use of an electron mobility model. The instrument has been utilized for field test measurements on MHD facilities for almost a decade and has been proven to provide useful measurements as designed for MHD nozzle, channel, and diffuser test sections. The theory of the measurements, a system description, its capabilities, and field test measurement results are reported here. During the development and application of the instrument several technical issues arose which when addressed advanced the state of the art in emission absorption measurement. Studies of these issues are also reported here and include: two-wavelength measurements for particle-laden flows, potassium D-line far wing absorption coefficient, bias in emission absorption measurements arising from dirty windows and misalignments, non-coincident multiwavelength emission absorption sampling errors, and lineshape fitting for boundary layer flow profile information. Although developed for NLHD application, the instrument could be applied to any high temperature flow with a resonance line in the 300 to 800 nm range, for instance other types of flames, rocket plumes or low temperature plasmas.

  8. Thermodynamic Modeling of Poorly Complexing Metals in Concentrated Electrolyte Solutions: An X-Ray Absorption and UV-Vis Spectroscopic Study of Ni(II) in the NiCl2-MgCl2-H2O System

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ning; Brugger, Joël; Etschmann, Barbara; Ngothai, Yung; Zeng, Dewen

    2015-01-01

    Knowledge of the structure and speciation of aqueous Ni(II)-chloride complexes is important for understanding Ni behavior in hydrometallurgical extraction. The effect of concentration on the first-shell structure of Ni(II) in aqueous NiCl2 and NiCl2-MgCl2 solutions was investigated by Ni K edge X-ray absorption (XAS) and UV-Vis spectroscopy at ambient conditions. Both techniques show that no large structural change (e.g., transition from octahedral to tetrahedral-like configuration) occurs. Both methods confirm that the Ni(II) aqua ion (with six coordinated water molecules at RNi-O = 2.07(2) Å) is the dominant species over the whole NiCl2 concentration range. However, XANES, EXAFS and UV-Vis data show subtle changes at high salinity (> 2 mol∙kg-1 NiCl2), which are consistent with the formation of small amounts of the NiCl+ complex (up to 0.44(23) Cl at a Ni-Cl distance of 2.35(2) Å in 5.05 mol∙kg-1 NiCl2) in the pure NiCl2 solutions. At high Cl:Ni ratio in the NiCl2-MgCl2-H2O solutions, small amounts of [NiCl2]0 are also present. We developed a speciation-based mixed-solvent electrolyte (MSE) model to describe activity-composition relationships in NiCl2-MgCl2-H2O solutions, and at the same time predict Ni(II) speciation that is consistent with our XAS and UV-Vis data and with existing literature data up to the solubility limit, resolving a long-standing uncertainty about the role of chloride complexing in this system. PMID:25885410

  9. Thermodynamic modeling of poorly complexing metals in concentrated electrolyte solutions: an X-ray absorption and UV-Vis spectroscopic study of Ni(II) in the NiCl2-MgCl2-H2O system.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ning; Brugger, Joël; Etschmann, Barbara; Ngothai, Yung; Zeng, Dewen

    2015-01-01

    Knowledge of the structure and speciation of aqueous Ni(II)-chloride complexes is important for understanding Ni behavior in hydrometallurgical extraction. The effect of concentration on the first-shell structure of Ni(II) in aqueous NiCl2 and NiCl2-MgCl2 solutions was investigated by Ni K edge X-ray absorption (XAS) and UV-Vis spectroscopy at ambient conditions. Both techniques show that no large structural change (e.g., transition from octahedral to tetrahedral-like configuration) occurs. Both methods confirm that the Ni(II) aqua ion (with six coordinated water molecules at RNi-O = 2.07(2) Å) is the dominant species over the whole NiCl2 concentration range. However, XANES, EXAFS and UV-Vis data show subtle changes at high salinity (> 2 mol∙kg(-1) NiCl2), which are consistent with the formation of small amounts of the NiCl+ complex (up to 0.44(23) Cl at a Ni-Cl distance of 2.35(2) Å in 5.05 mol∙kg(-1) NiCl2) in the pure NiCl2 solutions. At high Cl:Ni ratio in the NiCl2-MgCl2-H2O solutions, small amounts of [NiCl2]0 are also present. We developed a speciation-based mixed-solvent electrolyte (MSE) model to describe activity-composition relationships in NiCl2-MgCl2-H2O solutions, and at the same time predict Ni(II) speciation that is consistent with our XAS and UV-Vis data and with existing literature data up to the solubility limit, resolving a long-standing uncertainty about the role of chloride complexing in this system.

  10. Rapid, Time-Division Multiplexed, Direct Absorption- and Wavelength Modulation-Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Klein, Alexander; Witzel, Oliver; Ebert, Volker

    2014-01-01

    We present a tunable diode laser spectrometer with a novel, rapid time multiplexed direct absorption- and wavelength modulation-spectroscopy operation mode. The new technique allows enhancing the precision and dynamic range of a tunable diode laser absorption spectrometer without sacrificing accuracy. The spectroscopic technique combines the benefits of absolute concentration measurements using calibration-free direct tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (dTDLAS) with the enhanced noise rejection of wavelength modulation spectroscopy (WMS). In this work we demonstrate for the first time a 125 Hz time division multiplexed (TDM-dTDLAS-WMS) spectroscopic scheme by alternating the modulation of a DFB-laser between a triangle-ramp (dTDLAS) and an additional 20 kHz sinusoidal modulation (WMS). The absolute concentration measurement via the dTDLAS-technique allows one to simultaneously calibrate the normalized 2f/1f-signal of the WMS-technique. A dTDLAS/WMS-spectrometer at 1.37 μm for H2O detection was built for experimental validation of the multiplexing scheme over a concentration range from 50 to 3000 ppmV (0.1 MPa, 293 K). A precision of 190 ppbV was achieved with an absorption length of 12.7 cm and an averaging time of two seconds. Our results show a five-fold improvement in precision over the entire concentration range and a significantly decreased averaging time of the spectrometer. PMID:25405508

  11. Water-related absorption in fibrous diamonds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zedgenizov, D. A.; Shiryaev, A. A.; Kagi, H.; Navon, O.

    2003-04-01

    Cubic and coated diamonds from several localities (Brasil, Canada, Yakutia) were investigated using spectroscopic techniques. Special emphasis was put on investigation of water-related features of transmission Infra-red and Raman spectra. Presence of molecular water is inferred from broad absorption bands in IR at 3420 and 1640 cm-1. These bands were observed in many of the investigated samples. It is likely that molecular water is present in microinclusions in liquid state, since no clear indications of solid H_2O (ice VI-VII, Kagi et al., 2000) were found. Comparison of absorption by HOH and OH vibrations shows that diamonds can be separated into two principal groups: those containing liquid water (direct proportionality of OH and HOH absorption) and those with stronger absorption by OH group. Fraction of diamonds in every group depends on their provenance. There might be positive correlation between internal pressure in microinclusions (determined using quartz barometer, Navon et al., 1988) and affiliation with diamonds containing liquid water. In many cases absorption by HOH vibration is considerably lower than absorption by hydroxyl (OH) group. This may be explained if OH groups are partially present in mineral and/or melt inclusions. This hypothesis is supported by following fact: in diamonds with strong absorption by silicates and other minerals shape and position of the OH band differs from that in diamonds with low absorption by minerals. Moreover, in Raman spectra of individual inclusions sometimes the broad band at 3100 cm-1 is observed. This band is OH-related. In some samples water distribution is not homogeneous. Central part of the diamond usually contains more water than outer parts, but this is not a general rule for all the samples. Water absorption usually correlated with absorption of other components (carbonates, silicates and others). At that fibrous diamonds with relatively high content of silicates are characterized by molecular water. OH

  12. The 1997 spectroscopic GEISA databank.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacquinet-Husson, N.; Arie, E.; Ballard, J.; Barbe, A.; Bjoraker, G.; Bonnet, B.; Brown, L. R.; Camy-Peyret, C.; Champion, J. P.; Chedin, A.; Chursin, A.; Clerbaux, C.; Duxbury, G.; Flaud, J.-M.; Fourrie, N.; Fayt, A.; Graner, G.; Gamache, R.; Goldman, A.; Golovko, V.; Guelachvili, G.; Hartmann, J. M.; Hilico, J. C.; Hillman, J.; Lefevre, G.; Lellouch, E.; Mikhailenko, S. N.; Naumenko, O. V.; Nemtchinov, V.; Newnham, D. A.; Nikitin, A.; Orphal, J.; Perrin, A.; Reuter, D. C.; Rinsland, C. P.; Rosenmann, L.; Rothman, L. S.; Scott, N. A.; Selby, J.; Sinitsa, L. N.; Sirota, J. M.; Smith, A. M.; Smith, K. M.; Tyuterev, V. G.; Tipping, R. H.; Urban, S.; Varanasi, P.; Weber, M.

    1999-05-01

    The current version GEISA-97 of the computer-accessible database system GEISA (Gestion et Etude des Informations Spectroscopiques Atmospheriques: Management and Study of Atmospheric Spectroscopic Information) is described. This catalogue contains 1,346,266 entries. These are the spectroscopic parameters required to describe adequately the individual spectral lines belonging to 42 molecules (96 isotopic species) and located between 0 and 22656 cm-1. The featured molecules are of interest in studies of the terrestrial as well as the other planetary atmospheres, especially those of the giant planets. GEISA-97 contains also a catalog of absorption cross-sections of molecules such as chlorofluorocarbons which exhibit unresolvable spectra. The modifications and improvements made to the earlier edition (GEISA-92) and the data management software are described.

  13. Atmospheric Measurements by Cavity Enhanced Absorption Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Hongming; Wu, Tao; Coeur-Tourneur, Cécile; Fertein, Eric; Gao, Xiaoming; Zhao, Weixiong; Zhang, Weijun; Chen, Weidong

    2015-04-01

    Since the last decade, atmospheric environmental monitoring has benefited from the development of novel spectroscopic measurement techniques owing to the significant breakthroughs in photonic technology from the UV to the infrared spectral domain [1]. In this presentation, we will overview our recent development and applications of cavity enhanced absorption spectroscopy techniques for in situ optical monitoring of chemically reactive atmospheric species (such as HONO, NO3, NO2, N2O5) in intensive campaigns [2] and/or in smog chamber studies [3]. These field deployments demonstrated that modern photonic technologies (newly emergent light sources combined with high sensitivity spectroscopic techniques) can provide a useful tool to improve our understanding of tropospheric chemical processes which affect climate, air quality, and the spread of pollution. Experimental detail and preliminary results will be presented. Acknowledgements. The financial support from the French Agence Nationale de la Recherche (ANR) under the NexCILAS (ANR-11-NS09-0002) and the CaPPA (ANR-10-LABX-005) contracts is acknowledged. References [1] X. Cui, C. Lengignon, T. Wu, W. Zhao, G. Wysocki, E. Fertein, C. Coeur, A. Cassez,L. Croisé, W. Chen, et al., "Photonic Sensing of the Atmosphere by absorption spectroscopy", J. Quant. Spectrosc. Rad. Transfer 113 (2012) 1300-1316 [2] T. Wu, Q. Zha, W. Chen, Z. XU, T. Wang, X. He, "Development and deployment of a cavity enhanced UV-LED spectrometer for measurements of atmospheric HONO and NO2 in Hong Kong", Atmos. Environ. 95 (2014) 544-551 [3] T. Wu, C. Coeur-Tourneur, G. Dhont,A. Cassez, E. Fertein, X. He, W. Chen,"Application of IBBCEAS to kinetic study of NO3 radical formation from O3 + NO2 reaction in an atmospheric simulation chamber", J. Quant. Spectrosc. Rad. Transfer 133 (2014)199-205

  14. Effect of the solvent environment on the spectroscopic properties and dynamics of the lowest excited states of carotenoids

    SciTech Connect

    Frank, H.A.; Bautista, J.A.; Josue, J.; Pendon, Z.; Hiller, R.G.; Sharples, F.P.; Gosztola, D.; Wasielewski, M.R.

    2000-05-11

    The spectroscopic properties and dynamics of the lowest excited singlet states of peridinin, fucoxanthin, neoxanthin, uriolide acetate, spheroidene, and spheroidenone in several different solvents have been studied by steady-state absorption and fast-transient optical spectroscopic techniques. Peridinin, fucoxanthin, uriolide acetate, and spheroidenone, which contain carbonyl functional groups in conjugation with the carbon-carbon {pi}-electron system, display broader absorption spectral features and are affected more by the solvent environment than neoxanthin and spheroidene, which do not contain carbonyl functional groups. The possible sources of the spectral broadening are explored by examining the absorption spectra at 77 K in glassy solvents. Also, carotenoids which contain carbonyls have complex transient absorption spectra and show a pronounced dependence of the excited singlet state lifetime on the solvent environment. It is postulated that these effects are related to the presence of an intramolecular charge transfer state strongly coupled to the S{sub 1} (2{sup 1}A{sub g}) excited singlet state. Structural variations in the series of carotenoids studied here make it possible to focus on the general molecular features that control the spectroscopic and dynamic properties of carotenoids.

  15. Investigating a physical basis for spectroscopic estimates of leaf nitrogen concentration

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kokaly, R.F.

    2001-01-01

    The reflectance spectra of dried and ground plant foliage are examined for changes directly due to increasing nitrogen concentration. A broadening of the 2.1-??m absorption feature is observed as nitrogen concentration increases. The broadening is shown to arise from two absorptions at 2.054 ??m and 2.172 ??m. The wavelength positions of these absorptions coincide with the absorption characteristics of the nitrogen-containing amide bonds in proteins. The observed presence of these absorption features in the reflectance spectra of dried foliage is suggested to form a physical basis for high correlations established by stepwise multiple linear regression techniques between the reflectance of dry plant samples and their nitrogen concentration. The consistent change in the 2.1-??m absorption feature as nitrogen increases and the offset position of protein absorptions compared to those of other plant components together indicate that a generally applicable algorithm may be developed for spectroscopic estimates of nitrogen concentration from the reflectance spectra of dried plant foliage samples. ?? 2001 Published by Elsevier Science Ireland Ltd.

  16. Detection of β-amyloid peptide (1-16) and amyloid precursor protein (APP770) using spectroscopic ellipsometry and QCM techniques: a step forward towards Alzheimers disease diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Mustafa, M K; Nabok, A; Parkinson, D; Tothill, I E; Salam, F; Tsargorodskaya, A

    2010-12-15

    A highly sensitive method of spectroscopic ellipsometry in total internal reflection mode (TIRE) was exploited for detecting β-amyloid peptide (Aβ(1-16)) in the direct immune reaction with monoclonal DE2 antibodies (raised against Aβ(1-16)) electrostatically immobilised on the surface of gold. A rapid detection of Aβ(1-16) in a wide range of concentrations from 5 μg/ml down to 0.05 ng/ml was achieved using a cost-effective and label-free direct immunoassay format. TIRE dynamic spectral measurements proved that the immune reaction between DE2 monoclonal antibodies and Aβ(1-16) is highly specific with the affinity constant K(D)=1.46×10(-8) mol/l. The same DE2 antibodies were utilised for detection of amyloid precursor protein APP(770), a larger protein containing Aβ(1-16) domain, using the quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) measurements in liquid. A combination of QCM and TIRE kinetics results allowed the evaluation of the originally unknown concentration of APP(770) in complete medium solution containing other proteins, salts, and amino acids.

  17. Study on the interaction between pelargonidin-3-O-glucoside and bovine serum albumin using spectroscopic, transmission electron microscopy and molecular modeling techniques.

    PubMed

    Li, Shu; Tang, Lin; Bi, Hongna

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the binding behavior between pelargonidin-3-O-glucoside (P3G) and bovine serum albumin (BSA) using multi-spectroscopic, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and molecular docking methods under physiological conditions. Fluorescence spectroscopy and time-resolved fluorescence showed that the fluorescence of BSA could be quenched remarkably by P3G via a static quenching mechanism, and there is a single class of binding site on BSA. In addition, the thermodynamic functions ΔH and ΔS were -21.69 kJ/mol and 24.46 J/mol/K, indicating that an electrostatic interaction was a main acting force. The distance between BSA and P3G was 2.74 nm according to Förster's theory, illustrating that energy transfer occurred. In addition, the secondary structure of BSA changed with a decrease in the α-helix content from 66.2% to 64.0% as seen using synchronous fluorescence, UV/vis, circular dichroism and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopies, whereas TEM images showed that P3G led to BSA aggregation and fibrillation. Furthermore, site marker competitive experiments and molecular docking indicated that P3G could bind with subdomain IIA of BSA. The calculated results of the equilibrium fraction showed that the concentration of free P3G in plasma was high enough to be stored and transported from the circulatory system to its target sites to provide therapeutic effects.

  18. Structure analysis and spectroscopic characterization of 2-Fluoro-3-Methylpyridine-5-Boronic Acid with experimental (FT-IR, Raman, NMR and XRD) techniques and quantum chemical calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alver, Özgür; Dikmen, Gökhan

    2016-03-01

    Possible stable conformers, geometrical molecular structures, vibrational properties as well as band assignments, nuclear magnetic shielding tensors of 2-Fluoro-3-Methylpyridine-5-Boronic Acid (2F3MP5BA) were studied experimentally and theoretically using FT-IR, Raman, (CP/MAS) NMR and XRD spectroscopic methods. FT-IR and Raman spectra were evaluated in the region of 3500-400 cm-1, and 3200-400 cm-1, respectively. The optimized geometric structures, vibrational wavenumbers and nuclear magnetic shielding tensors were examined using Becke-3-Lee-Yang-Parr (B3LYP) hybrid density functional theory method with 6-311++G(d, p) basis set. 1H, 13C NMR chemical shifts were calculated using the gauge invariant atomic orbital (GIAO) method. 1H, 13C, APT and HETCOR NMR experiments of title molecule were carried out in DMSO solution. 13C CP/MAS NMR measurement was done with 4 mm zirconium rotor and glycine was used as an external standard. Single crystal of 2F3MP5BA was also prepared for XRD measurements. Assignments of vibrational wavenumbers were also strengthened by calculating the total energy distribution (TED) values using scaled quantum mechanical (SQM) method.

  19. Scramjet Performance Assessment Using Water Absorption Diagnostics (U)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cavolowsky, John A.; Loomis, Mark P.; Deiwert, George

    1995-01-01

    Simultaneous multiple path measurements of temperature and H2O concentration will be presented for the AIMHYE test entries in the NASA Ames 16-Inch Shock Tunnel. Monitoring the progress of high temperature chemical reactions that define scramjet combustor efficiencies is a task uniquely suited to nonintrusive optical diagnostics. One application strategy to overcome the many challenges and limitations of nonintrusive measurements is to use laser absorption spectroscopy coupled with optical fibers. Absorption spectroscopic techniques with rapidly tunable lasers are capable of making simultaneous measurements of mole fraction, temperature, pressure, and velocity. The scramjet water absorption diagnostic was used to measure combustor efficiency and was compared to thrust measurements using a nozzle force balance and integrated nozzle pressures to develop a direct technique for evaluating integrated scramjet performance. Tests were initially performed with a diode laser tuning over a water absorption feature at 1391.7 nm. A second diode laser later became available at a wavelength near 1343.3 nm covering an additional water absorption feature and was incorporated in the system for a two-wavelength technique. Both temperature and mole fraction can be inferred from the lineshape analysis using this approach. Additional high temperature spectroscopy research was conducted to reduce uncertainties in the scramjet application. The lasers are optical fiber coupled to ports at the combustor exit and in the nozzle region. The output from the two diode lasers were combined in a single fiber, and the resultant two-wavelength beam was subsequently split into four legs. Each leg was directed through 60 meters of optical fiber to four combustor exit locations for measurement of beam intensity after absorption by the water within the flow. Absorption results will be compared to 1D combustor analysis using RJPA and nozzle CFD computations as well as to data from a nozzle metric

  20. Spectroscopic properties of chlorophyll f.

    PubMed

    Li, Yaqiong; Cai, Zheng-Li; Chen, Min

    2013-09-26

    The absorption and fluorescence spectra of chlorophyll f (newly discovered in 2010) have been measured in acetone and methanol at different temperatures. The spectral analysis and assignment are compared with the spectra of chlorophyll a and d under the same experimental conditions. The spectroscopic properties of these chlorophylls have further been studied by the aid of density functional CAM-B3LYP and high-level symmetric adapted coupled-cluster configuration interaction calculations. The main Q and Soret bands and possible sidebands of chlorophylls have been determined. The photophysical properties of chlorophyll f are discussed.

  1. Binding of fluphenazine with human serum albumin in the presence of rutin and quercetin: An evaluation of food-drug interaction by spectroscopic techniques.

    PubMed

    Jing, Jiao-Jiao; Liu, Bin; Wang, Xin; Wang, Xin; He, Ling-Ling; Guo, Xue-Yuan; Xu, Ming-Ling; Li, Qian-Yu; Gao, Bo; Dong, Bo-Yang

    2017-04-04

    The interactions between human serum albumin (HSA) and fluphenazine (FPZ) in the presence or absence of rutin or quercetin were studied by fluorescence, absorption and circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy and molecular modeling. The results showed that the fluorescence quenching mechanism was static quenching by the formation of an HSA-FPZ complex. Entropy change (ΔS(0) ) and enthalpy change (ΔH(0) ) values were 68.42 J/(mol⋅K) and -4.637 kJ/mol, respectively, which indicated that hydrophobic interactions and hydrogen bonds played major roles in the acting forces. The interaction process was spontaneous because the Gibbs free energy change (ΔG(0) ) values were negative. The results of competitive experiments demonstrated that FPZ was mainly located within HSA site I (sub-domain IIA). Molecular docking results were in agreement with the experimental conclusions of the thermodynamic parameters and competition experiments. Competitive binding to HSA between flavonoids and FPZ decreased the association constants and increased the binding distances of FPZ binding to HSA. The results of absorption, synchronous fluorescence, three-dimensional fluorescence, and CD spectra showed that the binding of FPZ to HSA caused conformational changes in HSA and simultaneous effects of FPZ and flavonoids induced further HSA conformational changes.

  2. Spectral Fingerprinting of Individual Cells Visualized by Cavity-Reflection-Enhanced Light-Absorption Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Arai, Yoshiyuki; Yamamoto, Takayuki; Minamikawa, Takeo; Takamatsu, Tetsuro; Nagai, Takeharu

    2015-01-01

    The absorption spectrum of light is known to be a “molecular fingerprint” that enables analysis of the molecular type and its amount. It would be useful to measure the absorption spectrum in single cell in order to investigate the cellular status. However, cells are too thin for their absorption spectrum to be measured. In this study, we developed an optical-cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopic microscopy method for two-dimensional absorption imaging. The light absorption is enhanced by an optical cavity system, which allows the detection of the absorption spectrum with samples having an optical path length as small as 10 μm, at a subcellular spatial resolution. Principal component analysis of various types of cultured mammalian cells indicates absorption-based cellular diversity. Interestingly, this diversity is observed among not only different species but also identical cell types. Furthermore, this microscopy technique allows us to observe frozen sections of tissue samples without any staining and is capable of label-free biopsy. Thus, our microscopy method opens the door for imaging the absorption spectra of biological samples and thereby detecting the individuality of cells. PMID:25950513

  3. Spectral fingerprinting of individual cells visualized by cavity-reflection-enhanced light-absorption microscopy.

    PubMed

    Arai, Yoshiyuki; Yamamoto, Takayuki; Minamikawa, Takeo; Takamatsu, Tetsuro; Nagai, Takeharu

    2015-01-01

    The absorption spectrum of light is known to be a "molecular fingerprint" that enables analysis of the molecular type and its amount. It would be useful to measure the absorption spectrum in single cell in order to investigate the cellular status. However, cells are too thin for their absorption spectrum to be measured. In this study, we developed an optical-cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopic microscopy method for two-dimensional absorption imaging. The light absorption is enhanced by an optical cavity system, which allows the detection of the absorption spectrum with samples having an optical path length as small as 10 μm, at a subcellular spatial resolution. Principal component analysis of various types of cultured mammalian cells indicates absorption-based cellular diversity. Interestingly, this diversity is observed among not only different species but also identical cell types. Furthermore, this microscopy technique allows us to observe frozen sections of tissue samples without any staining and is capable of label-free biopsy. Thus, our microscopy method opens the door for imaging the absorption spectra of biological samples and thereby detecting the individuality of cells.

  4. A model for oxygen-dependent backscattering spectroscopic contrast from single red blood cells (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Rongrong; Yi, Ji; Chen, Siyu; Zhang, Hao F.; Backman, Vadim

    2016-03-01

    The oxygen-dependent absorption of hemoglobin provides the fundamental contrast for all label-free techniques measuring blood oxygenation. When hemoglobin is packaged into red blood cells (RBCs), the structure of the cells creates light scattering which also depends on the absorption based on the Kramers-Kronig relationship. Thus a proper characterization of the optical behaviors of blood has been a key to any accurate measurement of blood oxygenation, particularly at the capillary level where RBCs are dispersed individually in contrast to a densely packed whole blood. Here we provided a theoretical model under Born Approximation to characterize the oxygen dependent backscattering spectroscopic contrast from single RBCs. Using this theoretical model, we conducted simulations on both oxygenated and deoxygenated single RBCs with different sizes for standard and possible deformed cell geometries in blood flow, all which suggested similar backscattering spectroscopic contrast and were confirmed by Mie Theory and experiments using visible Optical Coherence Tomography (visOCT). As long as the cell size satisfies Gaussian distribution with a coefficient variance (C.V.) large enough, there is clear absorption contrast between the backscattering spectra of oxygenated and deoxygenated single RBCs calculated by this model, so oxygen saturation can then be characterized. Thus, this theoretical model can be extended to extract absorption features of other scattering particles as long as they satisfy Born Approximation.

  5. Hyperpolarized 13C pyruvate mouse brain metabolism with absorptive-mode EPSI at 1 T

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miloushev, Vesselin Z.; Di Gialleonardo, Valentina; Salamanca-Cardona, Lucia; Correa, Fabian; Granlund, Kristin L.; Keshari, Kayvan R.

    2017-02-01

    The expected signal in echo-planar spectroscopic imaging experiments was explicitly modeled jointly in spatial and spectral dimensions. Using this as a basis, absorptive-mode type detection can be achieved by appropriate choice of spectral delays and post-processing techniques. We discuss the effects of gradient imperfections and demonstrate the implementation of this sequence at low field (1.05 T), with application to hyperpolarized [1-13C] pyruvate imaging of the mouse brain. The sequence achieves sufficient signal-to-noise to monitor the conversion of hyperpolarized [1-13C] pyruvate to lactate in the mouse brain. Hyperpolarized pyruvate imaging of mouse brain metabolism using an absorptive-mode EPSI sequence can be applied to more sophisticated murine disease and treatment models. The simple modifications presented in this work, which permit absorptive-mode detection, are directly translatable to human clinical imaging and generate improved absorptive-mode spectra without the need for refocusing pulses.

  6. Studies of cavity enhanced absorption spectroscopy for weak absorption gas measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Liucheng; Duo, Liping; Gong, Deyu; Ma, Yanhua; Zhang, Zhiguo; Wang, Yuanhu; Zhou, Dongjian; Jin, Yuqi

    2017-01-01

    In order to determine the concentrations of trace amount metastable species in chemical lasers, an off-axis cavity enhanced absorption spectrometer for the detection of weak absorption gases has been built with a noise equivalent absorption sensitivity of 1.6x10-8 cm-1. The absorption spectrum of trace amount gaseous ammonia and water vapor was obtained with a spectral resolution of about 78 MHz. A multiple-line absorption spectroscopic method to determine the temperature of gaseous ammonia has been developed by use of multiple lines of ammonia molecule absorption spectrum.

  7. Interaction between serum albumins and sonochemically synthesized cadmium sulphide nanoparticles: a spectroscopic study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naveenraj, Selvaraj; Asiri, Abdullah M.; Anandan, Sambandam

    2013-05-01

    Cadmium Sulphide nanoparticles approximately 5-10 nm in size range were synthesized by sonochemical technique, which follows acoustic cavitation phenomenon and generates nanoparticles with a smaller size range and higher surface area. The in vitro binding interaction of these sonochemically synthesized CdS nanoparticles with serum albumins (SA) were investigated using UV-Vis absorption, fluorescence and circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopic techniques since CdS nanoparticles has biological applications such as cellular labelling and deep-tissue imaging. UV-Vis absorption and fluorescence studies confirm that CdS nanoparticles bind with SA through ground state complex formation (static quenching mechanism). The results suggest that sonochemically synthesized CdS nanoparticles interact with HSA more than that of BSA and these nanoparticles can be easily transported and rapidly released to the targets by serum albumins. CD studies confirmed the conformational change of serum albumins on the interaction of CdS nanoparticles.

  8. Application of Spectroscopic Techniques (FT-IR, 13C NMR) to the analysis of humic substances in volcanic soils along an environmental gradient (Tenerife, Canary Islands, Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez Rodriguez, Antonio; María Armas Herrera, Cecilia; González Pérez, José Antonio; González-Vila, Francisco Javier; Arbelo Rodríguez, Carmen Dolores; Mora Hernández, Juan Luis; Polvillo Polo, Oliva

    2010-05-01

    Andosols and andic soils are considered as efficient C-sinks in terms of C sequestration. These soils are usually developed from volcanic materials, and are characterized by a predominance of short-range ordered minerals like allophanes, imogolite and other Fe and Al oxyhydroxides. Such materials occur commonly associated with organic compounds, thus generating highly stable organo-mineral complexes and leading to the accumulation of a high amount of organic carbon. Spectroscopic methods like FT-IR and 13C NMR are suitable for the analysis of the chemical structure of soil humic substances, and allow identifying distinct functional groups and protein, lipids, lignin, carbohydrate-derived fragments. In this work we study the structural features of four soils developed on Pleistocene basaltic lavae in Tenerife (Canary Island, Spain), distributed along an altitudinal climatic gradient. The soil sequence comprises soils with different degree of geochemical evolution and andic character, including a mineral ‘Hypersalic Solonchak' (Tabaibal de Rasca), a slightly vitric ‘Luvic Phaeozem' (Los Frailes), a degraded and shallow ‘Endoleptic, fulvic, silandic Andosol' (Siete Lomas), and a well-developed and deep ‘Fulvic, silandic, Andosol' (Ravelo). Samples of the raw soil and humic and fulvic acids isolated from the surface horizons were analyzed. The results show a low content of organic carbon in the mineral soil, the inherited humin predominating, and a very high content of humic and fulvic acids in Andosols. The FT-IR and 13C NMR spectra of the raw soil samples show a low resolution, related to interferences from mineral complexes signals, particularly in soils with lower organic carbon content. 13C NMR shows a predominance of O-alkyl carbon (derived of carbohydrates) in andic soils, whereas O-alkyl and aromatic fractions are most evident in the mineral soil. The humic acids spectra are characterized by a dominance of alkyl and aromatic fractions with a high degree

  9. Monomeric and dimeric structures analysis and spectroscopic characterization of 3,5-difluorophenylboronic acid with experimental (FT-IR, FT-Raman, 1H and 13C NMR, UV) techniques and quantum chemical calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karabacak, Mehmet; Kose, Etem; Atac, Ahmet; Asiri, Abdullah M.; Kurt, Mustafa

    2014-01-01

    The spectroscopic properties of 3,5-difluorophenylboronic acid (3,5-DFPBA, C6H3F2B(OH)2) were investigated by FT-IR, FT-Raman UV-Vis, 1H and 13C NMR spectroscopic techniques. FT-IR (4000-400 cm-1) and FT-Raman spectra (3500-10 cm-1) in the solid phase and 1H and 13C NMR spectra in DMSO solution were recorded. The UV spectra that dissolved in ethanol and water were recorded in the range of 200-400 nm for each solution. The structural and spectroscopic data of the molecule have been obtained for possible three conformers from DFT (B3LYP) with 6-311++G(d,p) basis set calculations. The geometry of the molecule was fully optimized, vibrational spectra were calculated and fundamental vibrations were assigned on the basis of the total energy distribution (TED) of the vibrational modes, calculated with scaled quantum mechanics (SQM) method and PQS program. Hydrogen-bonded dimer of title molecule, optimized by counterpoise correction, was also studied B3LYP at the 6-311++G(d,p) level and the effects of molecular association through O-H⋯O hydrogen bonding have been discussed. 1H and 13C NMR chemical shifts were calculated by using the gauge-invariant atomic orbital (GIAO) method. The electronic properties, such as excitation energies, oscillator strength, wavelengths, HOMO and LUMO energies, were performed by time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) results complements with the experimental findings. Total and partial density of state (TDOS and PDOS) and also overlap population density of state (OPDOS) diagrams analysis were presented. The effects due to the substitutions of boric acid group and halogen were investigated. The results of the calculations were applied to simulate spectra of the title compound, which show excellent agreement with observed spectra. Besides, frontier molecular orbitals (FMO), molecular electrostatic potential (MEP), nonlinear optical properties (NLO) and thermodynamic features were performed.

  10. A Comparison of FTNMR and FTIR Techniques.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ahn, Myong-Ku

    1989-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance and infrared are two spectroscopic methods that commonly use the Fourier transform technique. Discussed are the similarities and differences in the use of the Fourier transform in these two spectroscopic techniques. (CW)

  11. Spectroscopic analysis of pharmaceutical formulations through the use of chemometric tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ornelas-Soto, N.; Barbosa-García, O.; Meneses-Nava, M.; Ramos-Ortíz, G.; Pichardo-Molina, J.; Maldonado, J. L.; Contreras, U.; López-Martínez, L.; López-de-Alba, P.; López-Barajas, F.

    2009-09-01

    In this work, fast and reliable spectroscopic methods in combination with chemometric tools were developed for simultaneous determination of Acetylsalicylic Acid, Acetaminophen and Caffeine in commercial formulations. For the first-order multivariate calibration method (PLS-1), calibration and validation sets were constructed with 23 and 10 samples respectively according to a central composite design. The Micro-Raman, FTIR-HATR and UV absorption spectra in the region of 100-2000 cm-1, 400-4400 cm-1 and 200-350 nm, respectively, were recorded. The % REP's (Percentage of relative error of prediction) was less than 18 for all used spectroscopic techniques. Subsequently, commercial pharmaceutical samples were analyzed with percentage of recovery between 90 and 117% for the three compounds.

  12. High-definition Fourier transform infrared spectroscopic imaging of breast tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leslie, L. Suzanne; Kadjacsy-Balla, Andre; Bhargava, Rohit

    2015-03-01

    Breast cancer diagnosis relies on staining serial sections of a biopsy in a process that can be time intensive and costly. Fourier transform infrared imaging (FT-IR) is a non-destructive, label-free chemical imaging technique that uses the vibrational structure of the biological molecules of the sample to provide contrast for images at any absorption peak in the mid-infrared. The full potential of spectroscopic imaging has been limited by the spatial resolution provided by most commercial instruments. By increasing the magnification and numerical aperture of the microscope, image pixel sizes on the order of 1.1 micron can be achieved, allowing HD FT-IR spectroscopic imaging to provide high quality images that could aid in histopathology, diagnosis, and studies of breast cancer progression.

  13. Synthesis and fading of eighteenth-century Prussian blue pigments: a combined study by spectroscopic and diffractive techniques using laboratory and synchrotron radiation sources.

    PubMed

    Samain, Louise; Grandjean, Fernande; Long, Gary J; Martinetto, Pauline; Bordet, Pierre; Sanyova, Jana; Strivay, David

    2013-05-01

    Prussian blue, a hydrated iron(III) hexacyanoferrate(II) complex, is a synthetic pigment discovered in Berlin in 1704. Because of both its highly intense color and its low cost, Prussian blue was widely used as a pigment in paintings until the 1970s. The early preparative methods were rapidly recognized as a contributory factor in the fading of the pigment, a fading already known by the mid-eighteenth century. Herein two typical eighteenth-century empirical recipes have been reproduced and the resulting pigment analyzed to better understand the reasons for this fading. X-ray absorption and Mössbauer spectroscopy indicated that the early syntheses lead to Prussian blue together with variable amounts of an undesirable iron(III) product. Pair distribution functional analysis confirmed the presence of nanocrystalline ferrihydrite, Fe10O14(OH)2, and also identified the presence of alumina hydrate, Al10O14(OH)2, with a particle size of ∼15 Å. Paint layers prepared from these pigments subjected to accelerated light exposure showed a tendency to turn green, a tendency that was often reported in eighteenth- and nineteenth-century books. The presence of particles of hydrous iron(III) oxides was also observed in a genuine eighteenth-century Prussian blue sample obtained from a polychrome sculpture.

  14. Determination of the elemental distribution and chemical speciation in highly heterogeneous cementitious materials using synchrotron-based micro-spectroscopic techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Vespa, M. Wieland, E.; Daehn, R.; Grolimund, D.; Scheidegger, A.M.

    2007-11-15

    Synchrotron-based micro-X-ray fluorescence (XRF) combined with scanning electron microscopy-based energy dispersive micro-analysis (EDS) has been used to determine the elemental distribution of contaminants (e.g., Ni) and of chemical elements inherent to the cement matrix (e.g., Si, Ca, Al, S) in hardened cement paste. Detailed information on the cement microstructure was gained by using backscattered electron (BSE) imaging. The results obtained from the complementary use of micro-XRF, EDS and BSE reveal that Ni is primarily distributed around inner calcium silicate hydrates (inner-C-S-H) and that Ni is preferentially associated with Al. This suggests the formation of a Ni-Al phase and its direct association with inner-C-S-H. Further information on the chemical speciation of Ni in relation to Al and S was obtained at selected regions of interests in the cement matrix using synchrotron-based micro-X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS). Data analysis shows that Ni is predominantly immobilized in layered double hydroxides, while predominant formation of ettringite was indicated from the Al and S XAS data. The present study demonstrates that the combined use of micro-XRF, BSE, EDS and micro-XAS, opens up a powerful analytical approach to determine the distribution and the speciation of chemical elements in complex heterogeneous cementitious materials on the same region of interest with micro-scale resolution.

  15. Spectroscopic characterizations of organic/inorganic nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Govani, Jayesh R.

    2009-12-01

    In the present study, pure and 0.3 wt%, 0.4 wt%, as well as 0.5 wt% L-arginine doped potassium dihydrogen phosphate (KDP) crystals were grown using solution growth techniques and further subjected to infrared (IR) absorption and Raman studies for confirmation of chemical group functionalization for investigating the incorporation mechanism of the L-arginine organic material into the KDP crystal structure. Infrared spectroscopic analysis suggests that structural changes are occurring for the L-arginine molecule as a result of its interaction with the KPD crystal. Infrared spectroscopic technique confirms the disturbance of the N-H, C-H and C-N bonds of the amino acid, suggesting successful incorporation of L-arginine into the KDP crystals. Raman analysis also reveals modification of the N-H, C-H and C-N bonds of the amino acid, implying successful inclusion of L-arginine into the KDP crystals. With the help of Gaussian software, a prediction of possible incorporation mechanisms of the organic material was obtained from comparison of the simulated infrared and Raman vibrational spectra with the experimental results. Furthermore, we also studied the effect of L-arginine doping on the thermal stability of the grown KDP crystal by employing Thermo gravimetric analysis (TGA). TGA suggests that increasing the level of L-arginine doping speeds the decomposition process and it weakens the KDP crystal, which indicates successful doping of the KDP crystals with L-arginine amino acid. Urinary stones are one of the oldest and most widely spread diseases in humans, animals and birds. Many remedies have been employed through the ages for the treatment of urinary stones. Recent medicinal measures reflect the modern advances, which are based on surgical removal, percutaneous techniques and extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL). Although these procedures are valuable, they are quite expensive for most people. Furthermore, recurrence of these diseases is awfully frequent with

  16. Time-Resolved Broadband Cavity-Enhanced Absorption Spectroscopy behind Shock Waves.

    PubMed

    Matsugi, Akira; Shiina, Hiroumi; Oguchi, Tatsuo; Takahashi, Kazuo

    2016-04-07

    A fast and sensitive broadband absorption technique for measurements of high-temperature chemical kinetics and spectroscopy has been developed by applying broadband cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopy (BBCEAS) in a shock tube. The developed method has effective absorption path lengths of 60-200 cm, or cavity enhancement factors of 12-40, over a wavelength range of 280-420 nm, and is capable of simultaneously recording absorption time profiles over an ∼32 nm spectral bandpass in a single experiment with temporal and spectral resolutions of 5 μs and 2 nm, respectively. The accuracy of the kinetic and spectroscopic measurements was examined by investigating high-temperature reactions and absorption spectra of formaldehyde behind reflected shock waves using 1,3,5-trioxane as a precursor. The rate constants obtained for the thermal decomposition reactions of 1,3,5-trioxane (to three formaldehyde molecules) and formaldehyde (to HCO + H) agreed well with the literature data. High-temperature absorption cross sections of formaldehyde between 280 and 410 nm have been determined at the post-reflected-shock temperatures of 955, 1265, and 1708 K. The results demonstrate the applicability of the BBCEAS technique to time- and wavelength-resolved sensitive absorption measurements at high temperatures.

  17. The Origin, Composition and History of Comets from Spectroscopic Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allamandola, L. J.

    1997-01-01

    A wealth of information essential to understanding the composition and physical structure of cometary ice and hence gain deep insight into the comet's origin and history, can be gleaned by carrying out a full range of spectroscopic studies on the returned sample. These studies ought to be among the first performed as they are generally non-destructive and will provide a broad data bank which will be crucial in planning subsequent analysis. Examples of the spectroscopic techniques along with relative sensitivities and transitions probed, are discussed. Different kind of "spectroscopy" is summarized, with emphasis placed on the kind of information each provides. Infrared spectroscopy should be the premier method of analysis as the mid-IR absorption spectrum of a substance contains more global information about the identity and structure of that material than any other property. In fact, the greatest strides in our understanding of the composition of interstellar ices (thought by many to be the primordial material from which comets have formed) have been taken during the past ten years or so because this was when high quality infrared spectra of the interstellar medium (ISM) first became available. The interpretation of the infrared spectra of mixtures, such as expected in comets, is often (not always) ambiguous. Consequently, a full range of other non-destructive, complementary spectroscopic measurements are required to fully characterize the material, to probe for substances for which the IR is not well suited and to lay the groundwork for future analysis. Given the likelihood that the icy component (including some of the organic and mineral phases) of the returned sample will be exceedingly complex, these techniques must be intensely developed over the next decade and then made ready to apply flawlessly to what will certainly be one of the most precious, and most challenging, samples ever analyzed.

  18. Amino Acid and Peptide Immobilization on Oxidized Nanocellulose: Spectroscopic Characterization

    PubMed Central

    Barazzouk, Saïd; Daneault, Claude

    2012-01-01

    In this work, oxidized nanocellulose (ONC) was synthesized and chemically coupled with amino acids and peptides using a two step coupling method at room temperature. First, ONC was activated by N-ethyl-N’-(3-dimethylaminopropyl) carbodiimide hydrochloride, forming a stable active ester in the presence of N-hydroxysuccinimide. Second, the active ester was reacted with the amino group of the amino acid or peptide, forming an amide bond between ONC and the grafted molecule. Using this method, the intermolecular interaction of amino acids and peptides was avoided and uniform coupling of these molecules on ONC was achieved. The coupling reaction was very fast in mild conditions and without alteration of the polysaccharide. The coupling products (ONC-amino acids and ONC-peptides) were characterized by transmission electron microscopy and by the absorption, emission, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) spectroscopic techniques.

  19. Spectroscopic Investigations of the Photophysics of Cryptophyte Light-Harvesting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dinshaw, Rayomond

    The biological significance of photosynthesis is indisputable as it is necessary for nearly all life on earth. Photosynthesis provides chemical energy for plants, algae, and bacteria, while heterotrophic organisms rely on these species as their ultimate food source. The initial step in photosynthesis requires the absorption of sunlight to create electronic excitations. Light-harvesting proteins play the functional role of capturing solar radiation and transferring the resulting excitation to the reaction centers where it is used to carry out the chemical reactions of photosynthesis. Despite the wide variety of light-harvesting protein structures and arrangements, most light-harvesting proteins are able to utilize the captured solar energy for charge separation with near perfect quantum efficiency.1 This thesis will focus on understanding the energy transfer dynamics and photophysics of a specific subset of light-harvesting antennae known as phycobiliproteins. These proteins are extracted from cryptophyte algae and are investigated using steady-state and ultrafast spectroscopic techniques.

  20. Ultrasonic and spectroscopic studies on photoactivation of euglena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, Mitsunori; Morita, Shin

    2006-12-01

    We studied the effect of the irradiation wavelength on the activity of photosynthetic euglena. The ultrasonic manipulation technique was used for both the activity evaluation and the movement restriction in the spectral measurements. Euglenas that had been preserved in darkness became inactive, and accordingly most of them were trapped by the ultrasonic standing wave (0.8mW/mm2). However, when they were exposed to light of 500 or 700nm wavelength (0.13W/m2), they became active enough to escape from the trapping. By contrast, irradiation at 550, 600, or 650nm wavelength had no effect on their activity. Spectroscopic measurements, which used to be difficult for locomotive microorganisms, were conducted successfully by trapping euglena at a node of the ultrasonic standing wave. The absorption bands were observed at around 500 or 700nm, which corresponded to the irradiation wavelengths that activated euglena.

  1. The HITRAN2012 molecular spectroscopic database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rothman, L. S.; Gordon, I. E.; Babikov, Y.; Barbe, A.; Chris Benner, D.; Bernath, P. F.; Birk, M.; Bizzocchi, L.; Boudon, V.; Brown, L. R.; Campargue, A.; Chance, K.; Cohen, E. A.; Coudert, L. H.; Devi, V. M.; Drouin, B. J.; Fayt, A.; Flaud, J.-M.; Gamache, R. R.; Harrison, J. J.; Hartmann, J.-M.; Hill, C.; Hodges, J. T.; Jacquemart, D.; Jolly, A.; Lamouroux, J.; Le Roy, R. J.; Li, G.; Long, D. A.; Lyulin, O. M.; Mackie, C. J.; Massie, S. T.; Mikhailenko, S.; Müller, H. S. P.; Naumenko, O. V.; Nikitin, A. V.; Orphal, J.; Perevalov, V.; Perrin, A.; Polovtseva, E. R.; Richard, C.; Smith, M. A. H.; Starikova, E.; Sung, K.; Tashkun, S.; Tennyson, J.; Toon, G. C.; Tyuterev, Vl. G.; Wagner, G.

    2013-11-01

    This paper describes the status of the 2012 edition of the HITRAN molecular spectroscopic compilation. The new edition replaces the previous HITRAN edition of 2008 and its updates during the intervening years. The HITRAN molecular absorption compilation is comprised of six major components structured into folders that are freely accessible on the internet. These folders consist of the traditional line-by-line spectroscopic parameters required for high-resolution radiative-transfer codes, infrared absorption cross-sections for molecules not yet amenable to representation in a line-by-line form, ultraviolet spectroscopic parameters, aerosol indices of refraction, collision-induced absorption data, and general tables such as partition sums that apply globally to the data. The new HITRAN is greatly extended in terms of accuracy, spectral coverage, additional absorption phenomena, and validity. Molecules and isotopologues have been added that address the issues of atmospheres beyond the Earth. Also discussed is a new initiative that casts HITRAN into a relational database format that offers many advantages over the long-standing sequential text-based structure that has existed since the initial release of HITRAN in the early 1970s.

  2. Suspended nanoparticles in surfactant media as a microextraction technique for simultaneous separation and preconcentration of cobalt, nickel and copper ions for electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry determination.

    PubMed

    Dadfarnia, Shayessteh; Shakerian, Farid; Shabani, Ali Mohammad Haji

    2013-03-15

    The aim of this study was to describe a new method of microextraction based on the suspension of alumina nanoparticles in the surfactant media for simultaneous separation and preconcentration of the ultra-traces of cobalt, nickel and copper ions. In this technique, the alumina nanoparticles were suspended in the non-ionic surfactant solution of Triton X-114. The analytes in the sample solution were adsorbed onto the nanoparticles. After the phase separation based on the cloud point of the mixture at 40 °C, the nanoparticles settled down in the surfactant rich phase. Then 120 μL of nitric acid (3.0 mol L(-1)) was added to the surfactant rich phase which caused desorption of the analytes. Finally, the liquid phase was separated by centrifugation from the nanoparticles and was used for the quantification of the analytes by the electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS). The parameters affecting the extraction and detection processes were optimized. Under the optimized experimental conditions (i.e. pH∼8, Triton X-114, 0.05% (v/v); temperature 40 °C), a sample volume of 25 mL resulted in the enhancement factors of 198, 205 and 206 and detection limits (defined as 3Sb/m) of 2.5, 2.8 and 2.6 ng L(-1) for Co(II), Ni(II) and Cu(II) respectively. The sorbent showed high capacity for these metal ions (30-40 mg g(-1) sorbent). The method was successfully applied to the determination of the analytes in natural water samples.

  3. Infrared Absorption of Methanol-Water Clusters Mn(H2O), n = 1-4, Recorded with the Vuv-Ionization Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Yu-Fang; Lee, Yuan-Pern

    2016-06-01

    We investigated IR spectra in the CH- and OH-stretching regions of size-selected methanol-water clusters, Mn(H_2O) with M representing CH_3OH and n = 1-4, in a pulsed supersonic jet by using the VUV (vacuum-ultraviolet)-ionization/IR-depletion technique. The VUV light at 118 nm served as the source of ionization in a time-of-flight mass spectrometer. The tunable IR laser served as a source of dissociation for clusters before ionization. Spectra of methanol-water clusters in the OH region show significant variations as the number of methanol molecules increase, whereas spectra in the CH region are similar. For M(H_2O), absorption of a structure with H_2O as a proton donor was observed at 3570, 3682, and 3722 wn, whereas that of methanol as a proton donor was observed at 3611 and 3753 wn. For M2(H_2O), the OH-stretching band of the dangling OH of H_2O was observed at 3721 wn, whereas overlapped bands near 3425, 3472, and 3536 wn correspond to the OH-stretching modes of three hydrogen-bonded OH in a cyclic structure. For M3(H_2O), the dangling OH shifts to 3715 wn, and the hydrogen-bonded OH-stretching bands become much broader, with a band near 3179 wn having the smallest wavenumber. Scaled harmonic vibrational wavenumbers and relative IR intensities predicted for the methanol-water clusters with the M06-2X/aug-cc-pVTZ method are consistent with our experimental results. For M4(H_2O), observed spectrum agree less with theoretical predictions, indicating the presence of isomers other than the most stable cyclic one. Spectra of Mn(H_2O) and Mn+1 are compared and the cooperative hydrogen-bonding is discussed.

  4. On the sub-band gap optical absorption in heat treated cadmium sulphide thin film deposited on glass by chemical bath deposition technique

    SciTech Connect

    Chattopadhyay, P.; Karim, B.; Guha Roy, S.

    2013-12-28

    The sub-band gap optical absorption in chemical bath deposited cadmium sulphide thin films annealed at different temperatures has been critically analyzed with special reference to Urbach relation. It has been found that the absorption co-efficient of the material in the sub-band gap region is nearly constant up to a certain critical value of the photon energy. However, as the photon energy exceeds the critical value, the absorption coefficient increases exponentially indicating the dominance of Urbach rule. The absorption coefficients in the constant absorption region and the Urbach region have been found to be sensitive to annealing temperature. A critical examination of the temperature dependence of the absorption coefficient indicates two different kinds of optical transitions to be operative in the sub-band gap region. After a careful analyses of SEM images, energy dispersive x-ray spectra, and the dc current-voltage characteristics, we conclude that the absorption spectra in the sub-band gap domain is possibly associated with optical transition processes involving deep levels and the grain boundary states of the material.

  5. Review on VUV to MIR absorption spectroscopy of atmospheric pressure plasma jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reuter, Stephan; Santos Sousa, Joao; Stancu, Gabi Daniel; Hubertus van Helden, Jean-Pierre

    2015-10-01

    Absorption spectroscopy (AS) represents a reliable method for the characterization of cold atmospheric pressure plasma jets. The method’s simplicity stands out in comparison to competing diagnostic techniques. AS is an in situ, non-invasive technique giving absolute densities, free of calibration procedures, which other diagnostics, such as laser-induced fluorescence or optical emission spectroscopy, have to rely on. Ground state densities can be determined without the knowledge of the influence of collisional quenching. Therefore, absolute densities determined by absorption spectroscopy can be taken as calibration for other methods. In this paper, fundamentals of absorption spectroscopy are presented as an entrance to the topic. In the second part of the manuscript, a review of AS performed on cold atmospheric pressure plasma jets, as they are used e.g. in the field of plasma medicine, is presented. The focus is set on special techniques overcoming not only the drawback of spectrally overlapping absorbing species, but also the line-of-sight densities that AS usually provides or the necessity of sufficiently long absorption lengths. Where references are not available for measurements on cold atmospheric pressure plasma jets, other plasma sources including low-pressure plasmas are taken as an example to give suggestions for possible approaches. The final part is a table summarizing examples of absorption spectroscopic measurements on cold atmospheric pressure plasma jets. With this, the paper provides a ‘best practice’ guideline and gives a compendium of works by groups performing absorption spectroscopy on cold atmospheric pressure plasma jets.

  6. A time-resolved single-pass technique for measuring optical absorption coefficients of window materials under 100 GPa shock pressures.

    PubMed

    Li, Jun; Zhou, Xianming; Li, Jiabo

    2008-12-01

    An experimental method was developed to perform time-resolved, single-pass optical absorption measurements and to determine absorption coefficients of window materials under strong shock compression up to approximately 200 GPa. Experimental details are described of (i) a configuration to generate an in situ dynamic, bright, optical source and (ii) a sample assembly with a lithium fluoride plate to essentially eliminate heat transfer from the hot radiator into the specimen and to maintain a constant optical source within the duration of the experiment. Examples of measurements of optical absorption coefficients of several initially transparent single crystal materials at high shock pressures are presented.

  7. Novel, near-infrared spectroscopic, label-free, techniques to assess bone abnormalities such as Paget's disease, osteoporosis and bone fractures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sordillo, Diana C.; Sordillo, Laura A.; Shi, Lingyan; Budansky, Yury; Sordillo, Peter P.; Alfano, Robert R.

    2015-02-01

    Near- infrared (NIR) light with wavelengths from 650 nm to 950 nm (known as the first NIR window) has conventionally been used as a non-invasive technique that can reach deeper penetration depths through media than light at shorter wavelengths. Recently, several novel, NIR, label-free, techniques have been developed to assess Paget's disease of bone, osteoporosis and bone microfractures. We designed a Bone Optical Analyzer (BOA) which utilizes the first window to measure changes of Hb and HbO2. Paget's disease is marked by an increase in vascularization in bones, and this device can enable easy diagnosis and more frequent monitoring of the patient's condition, without exposing him to a high cumulative dose of radiation. We have also used inverse imaging algorithms to reconstruct 2D and 3D maps of the bone's structure. This device could be used to assess diseases such as osteoporosis. Using 800 nm femtosecond excitation with two-photon (2P) microscopy, we acquired 2PM images of the periosteum and spatial frequency spectra (based on emission of collagen) from the periosteal regions. This technique can provide information on the structure of the periosteum and can detect abnormalities which may be an indication of disease. Most recently, we showed that longer NIR wavelengths in the second and third NIR windows (1100 nm-1350 nm, 1600 nm-1870 nm), could be used to image bone microfractures. Use of NIR light could allow for repeated studies in patients with diseases such as Paget's and osteoporosis quickly and non-invasively, and could impact the current management for these diseases.

  8. Spectroscopic optical coherence elastography.

    PubMed

    Adie, Steven G; Liang, Xing; Kennedy, Brendan F; John, Renu; Sampson, David D; Boppart, Stephen A

    2010-12-06

    We present an optical technique to image the frequency-dependent complex mechanical response of a viscoelastic sample. Three-dimensional hyperspectral data, comprising two-dimensional B-mode images and a third dimension corresponding to vibration frequency, were acquired from samples undergoing external mechanical excitation in the audio-frequency range. We describe the optical coherence tomography (OCT) signal when vibration is applied to a sample and detail the processing and acquisition techniques used to extract the local complex mechanical response from three-dimensional data that, due to a wide range of vibration frequencies, possess a wide range of sample velocities. We demonstrate frequency-dependent contrast of the displacement amplitude and phase of a silicone phantom containing inclusions of higher stiffness. Measurements of an ex vivo tumor margin demonstrate distinct spectra between adipose and tumor regions, and images of displacement amplitude and phase demonstrated spatially-resolved contrast. Contrast was also observed in displacement amplitude and phase images of a rat muscle sample. These results represent the first demonstration of mechanical spectroscopy based on B-mode OCT imaging. Spectroscopic optical coherence elastography (S-OCE) provides a high-resolution imaging capability for the detection of tissue pathologies that are characterized by a frequency-dependent viscoelastic response.

  9. Absorption and luminescence spectroscopic analysis of tautomeric forms of protonatedN,N-dimethyl-N'-(1-nitro-9-acridinyl)-1,3-propanediamine (nitracrine) and its nitro isomers in poly(vinyl alcohol) films.

    PubMed

    Rak, J; Nowaczyk, K; Blazejowski, J; Kawski, A

    1991-03-01

    The electronic absorption, fluorescence, and phosphorescence excitation spectra, as well as the fluorescence and phosphorescence spectra, at either room or liquid nitrogen temperatures, were measured forN,N-dimethyl-N'-(1-nitro-9-acridinyl)-1,3-propanediamine and its three nitro isomers in acidified poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) film. The spectral characteristics obtained reveal the existence of the compounds studied in at least two structural forms. The results are interpreted in terms of the tautomeric phenomena which originate due to the migration of the hydrogen atom, which is bound to the nitrogen atom attached to the carbon atom (9), to the acridine ring nitrogen.

  10. The HITRAN 2008 Molecular Spectroscopic Database

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rothman, Laurence S.; Gordon, Iouli E.; Barbe, Alain; Benner, D. Chris; Bernath, Peter F.; Birk, Manfred; Boudon, V.; Brown, Linda R.; Campargue, Alain; Champion, J.-P.; Chance, Kelly V.; Coudert, L. H.; Sung, K.; Toth, R. A.

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes the status of the 2008 edition of the HITRAN molecular spectroscopic database. The new edition is the first official public release since the 2004 edition, although a number of crucial updates had been made available online since 2004. The HITRAN compilation consists of several components that serve as input for radiative-transfer calculation codes: individual line parameters for the microwave through visible spectra of molecules in the gas phase; absorption cross-sections for molecules having dense spectral features, i.e., spectra in which the individual lines are not resolved; individual line parameters and absorption cross sections for bands in the ultra-violet; refractive indices of aerosols, tables and files of general properties associated with the database; and database management software. The line-by-line portion of the database contains spectroscopic parameters for forty-two molecules including many of their isotopologues.

  11. Experimental quantification of useful and parasitic absorption of light in plasmon-enhanced thin silicon films for solar cells application

    PubMed Central

    Morawiec, Seweryn; Holovský, Jakub; Mendes, Manuel J.; Müller, Martin; Ganzerová, Kristina; Vetushka, Aliaksei; Ledinský, Martin; Priolo, Francesco; Fejfar, Antonin; Crupi, Isodiana

    2016-01-01

    A combination of photocurrent and photothermal spectroscopic techniques is applied to experimentally quantify the useful and parasitic absorption of light in thin hydrogenated microcrystalline silicon (μc-Si:H) films incorporating optimized metal nanoparticle arrays, located at the rear surface, for improved light trapping via resonant plasmonic scattering. The photothermal technique accounts for the total absorptance and the photocurrent signal accounts only for the photons absorbed in the μc-Si:H layer (useful absorptance); therefore, the method allows for independent quantification of the useful and parasitic absorptance of the plasmonic (or any other) light trapping structure. We demonstrate that with a 0.9 μm thick absorber layer the optical losses related to the plasmonic light trapping in the whole structure are insignificant below 730 nm, above which they increase rapidly with increasing illumination wavelength. An average useful absorption of 43% and an average parasitic absorption of 19% over 400–1100 nm wavelength range is measured for μc-Si:H films deposited on optimized self-assembled Ag nanoparticles coupled with a flat mirror (plasmonic back reflector). For this sample, we demonstrate a significant broadband enhancement of the useful absorption resulting in the achievement of 91% of the maximum theoretical Lambertian limit of absorption. PMID:26935322

  12. Experimental quantification of useful and parasitic absorption of light in plasmon-enhanced thin silicon films for solar cells application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morawiec, Seweryn; Holovský, Jakub; Mendes, Manuel J.; Müller, Martin; Ganzerová, Kristina; Vetushka, Aliaksei; Ledinský, Martin; Priolo, Francesco; Fejfar, Antonin; Crupi, Isodiana

    2016-03-01

    A combination of photocurrent and photothermal spectroscopic techniques is applied to experimentally quantify the useful and parasitic absorption of light in thin hydrogenated microcrystalline silicon (μc-Si:H) films incorporating optimized metal nanoparticle arrays, located at the rear surface, for improved light trapping via resonant plasmonic scattering. The photothermal technique accounts for the total absorptance and the photocurrent signal accounts only for the photons absorbed in the μc-Si:H layer (useful absorptance); therefore, the method allows for independent quantification of the useful and parasitic absorptance of the plasmonic (or any other) light trapping structure. We demonstrate that with a 0.9 μm thick absorber layer the optical losses related to the plasmonic light trapping in the whole structure are insignificant below 730 nm, above which they increase rapidly with increasing illumination wavelength. An average useful absorption of 43% and an average parasitic absorption of 19% over 400–1100 nm wavelength range is measured for μc-Si:H films deposited on optimized self-assembled Ag nanoparticles coupled with a flat mirror (plasmonic back reflector). For this sample, we demonstrate a significant broadband enhancement of the useful absorption resulting in the achievement of 91% of the maximum theoretical Lambertian limit of absorption.

  13. Thermal inkjet application in the preparation of oral dosage forms: dispensing of prednisolone solutions and polymorphic characterization by solid-state spectroscopic techniques.

    PubMed

    Meléndez, Peter A; Kane, Kevin M; Ashvar, Claudine S; Albrecht, Mary; Smith, Pamela A

    2008-07-01

    The utility of thermal inkjet (TIJ) technology for preparing solid dosage forms of drugs was examined. Solutions of prednisolone in a solvent mixture of ethanol, water, and glycerol (80/17/3 by volume) were dispensed onto poly(tetrafluoroethylene)-coated fiberglass films using TIJ cartridges and a personal printer and using a micropipette for comparison. The post-dried, TIJ-dispensed samples were shown to contain a mixture of prednisolone Forms I and III based on PXRD analyses that were confirmed by Raman analyses. The starting commercial material was determined to be Form I. Samples prepared by dispensing the solution from a micropipette initially showed only Form I; subsequent Raman mapping of these samples revealed the presence of two polymorphs. Raman mapping of the TIJ-dispensed samples also showed both polymorphs. The results indicate that the solvent mixture used in the dispensing solution combined with the thermal treatment of the samples after dispensing were likely the primary reason for the generation of the two polymorphs. The advantages of using a multidisciplinary approach to characterize drug delivery systems are demonstrated using solid state mapping techniques. Both PXRD and Raman spectroscopy were needed to fully characterize the samples. Finally, this report clarifies prednisolone's polymorphic nomenclature existent in the scientific literature.

  14. Domain-specific interactions between MLN8237 and human serum albumin estimated by STD and WaterLOGSY NMR, ITC, spectroscopic, and docking techniques.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hongqin; Liu, Jiuyang; Huang, Yanmei; Gao, Rui; Tang, Bin; Li, Shanshan; He, Jiawei; Li, Hui

    2017-03-30

    Alisertib (MLN8237) is an orally administered inhibitor of Aurora A kinase. This small-molecule inhibitor is under clinical or pre-clinical phase for the treatment of advanced malignancies. The present study provides a detailed characterization of the interaction of MLN8237 with a drug transport protein called human serum albumin (HSA). STD and WaterLOGSY nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR)-binding studies were conducted first to confirm the binding of MLN8237 to HSA. In the ligand orientation assay, the binding sites of MLN8237 were validated through two site-specific spy molecules (warfarin sodium and ibuprofen, which are two known site-selective probes) by using STD and WaterLOGSY NMR competition techniques. These competition experiments demonstrate that both spy molecules do not compete with MLN8237 for the specific binding site. The AutoDock-based blind docking study recognizes the hydrophobic subdomain IB of the protein as the probable binding site for MLN8237. Thermodynamic investigations by isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) reveal that the non-covalent interaction between MLN8237 and HSA (binding constant was approximately 10(5) M(-1)) is driven mainly by favorable entropy and unfavorable enthalpy. In addition, synchronous fluorescence, circular dichroism (CD), and 3D fluorescence spectroscopy suggest that MLN8237 may induce conformational changes in HSA.

  15. Domain-specific interactions between MLN8237 and human serum albumin estimated by STD and WaterLOGSY NMR, ITC, spectroscopic, and docking techniques

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Hongqin; Liu, Jiuyang; Huang, Yanmei; Gao, Rui; Tang, Bin; Li, Shanshan; He, Jiawei; Li, Hui

    2017-01-01

    Alisertib (MLN8237) is an orally administered inhibitor of Aurora A kinase. This small-molecule inhibitor is under clinical or pre-clinical phase for the treatment of advanced malignancies. The present study provides a detailed characterization of the interaction of MLN8237 with a drug transport protein called human serum albumin (HSA). STD and WaterLOGSY nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR)-binding studies were conducted first to confirm the binding of MLN8237 to HSA. In the ligand orientation assay, the binding sites of MLN8237 were validated through two site-specific spy molecules (warfarin sodium and ibuprofen, which are two known site-selective probes) by using STD and WaterLOGSY NMR competition techniques. These competition experiments demonstrate that both spy molecules do not compete with MLN8237 for the specific binding site. The AutoDock-based blind docking study recognizes the hydrophobic subdomain IB of the protein as the probable binding site for MLN8237. Thermodynamic investigations by isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) reveal that the non-covalent interaction between MLN8237 and HSA (binding constant was approximately 105 M−1) is driven mainly by favorable entropy and unfavorable enthalpy. In addition, synchronous fluorescence, circular dichroism (CD), and 3D fluorescence spectroscopy suggest that MLN8237 may induce conformational changes in HSA. PMID:28358124

  16. Optical Spectroscopic Monitoring of Parachute Yarn Aging

    SciTech Connect

    Tallant, D.R.; Garcia, M.J.; Simpson, R.L.; Behr, V.L.; Whinery, L.D.; Peng, L.W.

    1999-04-01

    Optical spectroscopic techniques were evaluated as nondestructive monitors of the aging of parachutes in nuclear weapons. We analyzed thermally aged samples of nylon and Kevlar webbing by photoluminescence spectroscopy and reflection spectroscopy. Infrared analysis was also performed to help understand the degradation mechanisms of the polymer materials in the webbing. The photoluminescence and reflection spectra were analyzed by chemometric data treatment techniques to see if aged-induced changes in the spectra correlated to changes in measured tensile strength. A correlation was found between the shapes of the photoluminescent bands and the measured tensile strengths. Photoluminescent spectra can be used to predict the tensile strengths of nylon and Kevlar webbing with sufficient accuracy to categorize the webbing sample as above rated tensile strength, marginal or below rated tensile strength. The instrumentation required to perform the optical spectroscopic measurement can be made rugged, compact and portable. Thus, optical spectroscopic techniques offer a means for nondestructive field monitoring of parachutes in the enduring stockpile/

  17. Spectroscopic (FT-IR, FT-Raman, UV absorption, 1H and 13C NMR) and theoretical (in B3LYP/6-311++G** level) studies on alkali metal salts of caffeic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Świsłocka, Renata

    The effect of some metals on the electronic system of benzoic and nicotinic acids has recently been investigated by IR, Raman and UV spectroscopy [1-3]. Benzoic and nicotinic acids are regarded model systems representing a wide group of aromatic ligands which are incorporated into enzymes. In this work the FT-IR (in solid state and in solution), FT-Raman, UV absorption and 1H and 13C NMR spectra of caffeic acid (3,4-dihydroxycinnamic acid) and its salts with lithium, sodium, potassium, rubidium and caesium were registered, assigned and analyzed. The effect of alkali metals on the electronic system of ligands was discussed. Studies of differences in the number and position of bands from the IR, Raman, UV absorption spectra and chemical shifts from NMR spectra allowed to conclude on the distribution of electronic charge in the molecules, the delocalization energy of π electrons and the reactivity of ligands in metal complexes. Optimized geometrical structures of studied compounds were calculated by B3LYP method using 6-311++G** basis set. Bond lengths, angles and dipole moments for the optimized structures of caffeic acid and lithium, sodium, potassium caffeinates were also calculated. The theoretical wavenumbers and intensities of IR spectra were obtained. The calculated parameters were compared to the experimental characteristics of investigated compounds. Microbial activity of studied compounds was tested against Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus and Proteus vulgaris.

  18. Trans fat labeling and levels in U.S. foods: assessment of gas chromatographic and infrared spectroscopic techniques for regulatory compliance.

    PubMed

    Mossoba, Magdi M; Moss, Julie; Kramer, John K G

    2009-01-01

    Trans fatty acids are found in a variety of foods like dairy and meat products, but the major dietary sources are products that contain commercially hydrogenated fats. There has been a renewed need for accurate analytical methods for the quantitation of total trans fat since mandatory requirements to declare the amount of trans fat present in food products and dietary supplements were issued in many countries. Official capillary GC and IR methodologies are the two most common validated methods used to identify and quantify trans fatty acids for regulatory compliance. The present article provides a comprehensive discussion of the GC and IR techniques, including the latest attenuated total reflection (ATR)-FTIR methodology called the negative second derivative ATR-FTIR procedure, which is currently being validated in an international collaborative study. The identification and quantitation of trans fatty acid isomers by GC is reviewed and an alternative GC method is proposed using two temperature programs and combining their results; this proposed method deals more effectively with the resolution of large numbers of geometric and positional monoene, diene, and triene fatty acid isomers present in ruminant fats. In addition, the different methylation procedures that affect quantitative conversion to fatty acid methyl esters are reviewed. There is also a lack of commercial chromatographic standards for many trans fatty acid isomers. This review points to potential sources of interferences in the FTIR determination that may lead to inaccurate results, particularly at low trans levels. The presence of high levels of saturated fats may lead to interferences in the FTIR spectra observed for trans triacylglycerols (TAGs). TAGs require no derivatization, but have to be melted prior to IR measurement. While GC is currently the method of choice, ATR-FTIR spectroscopy is a viable, rapid alternative, and a complementary method to GC for a more rapid determination of total trans

  19. Characterization of the deterioration of bone black in the 17 th century Oranjezaal paintings using electron-microscopic and micro-spectroscopic imaging techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Loon, Annelies; Boon, Jaap J.

    2004-10-01

    A whitish deterioration product was observed on the dark paint in a number of large-scale oil paintings that are part of the Oranjezaal interior decoration in the Royal Palace Huis ten Bosch (The Hague). The whitened areas of a painting by Pieter Soutman dating from 1648 were micro-sampled and compared with "healthy" black paint using different analytical imaging techniques. The dark paint was identified as bone black in linseed oil with a lead drier added. Microscopic images of the cross-section revealed a white top layer of 10-20 μm in the black paint layer. Imaging the cross-section surface with scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive X-ray analysis (SEM-EDX) and specular reflection Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) showed homogeneous distributions of phosphate, phosphorus and calcium over the black and the white degraded bone black. X-ray diffraction (XRD) showed the presence of calcium phosphate hydrate (Ca 3(PO 4) 2· xH 2O), monetite (CaHPO 4) with possibly some poorly crystalline or amorphous hydroxyapatite (Ca 5(OH)(PO 4) 3). The EDX maps of lead and carbon, however, showed some discontinuity between the degraded and non-degraded bone black. There was an increase in the lead concentration in the white top layer, and a slight decrease of carbon. Transmission FTIR demonstrated that aromatic network polymers from the carbon black are markedly diminished in the white deterioration product. It is proposed that the carbonized organic matter in the bone black is vulnerable to photo bleaching in the presence of a lead catalyst under these circumstances.

  20. Synthesis and evaluation of changes induced by solvent and substituent in electronic absorption spectra of some azo disperse dyes.

    PubMed

    Mohammadi, Asadollah; Yazdanbakhsh, Mohammad Reza; Farahnak, Lahya

    2012-04-01

    Five azo disperse dyes were prepared by diazotizing 4'-aminoacetophenone and p-anisidine and coupling with varies N-alkylated aromatic amines. Characterization of the dyes was carried out by using UV-vis, FTIR and 1H NMR spectroscopic techniques. The electronic absorption spectra of dyes are determined at room temperature in fifteen solvents with different polarities. The solvent dependent maximum absorption band shifts, were investigated using dielectric constant (ɛ), refractive index (n) and Kamlet-Taft polarity parameters (hydrogen bond donating ability (α), hydrogen bond accepting ability (β) and dipolarity/polarizability polarity scale (π*)). Acceptable agreement was found between the maximum absorption band of dyes and solvent polarity parameters especially with π*. The effect of substituents of coupler and/or diazo component on the color of dyes was investigated. The effects of acid and base on the visible absorption maxima of the dyes are also reported.

  1. Development of a THz spectroscopic imaging system.

    PubMed

    Usami, M; Iwamoto, T; Fukasawa, R; Tani, M; Watanabe, M; Sakai, K

    2002-11-07

    We have developed a real-time THz imaging system based on the two-dimensional (2D) electro-optic (EO) sampling technique. Employing the 2D EO-sampling technique, we can obtain THz images using a CCD camera at a video rate of up to 30 frames per second. A spatial resolution of 1.4 mm was achieved. This resolution was reasonably close to the theoretical limit determined by diffraction. We observed not only static objects but also moving ones. To acquire spectroscopic information, time-domain images were collected. By processing these images on a computer, we can obtain spectroscopic images. Spectroscopy for silicon wafers was demonstrated.

  2. Atmospheric and environmental sensing by photonic absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, W.; Wu, T.; Zhao, W.; Wysocki, G.; Cui, X.; Lengignon, C.; Maamary, R.; Fertein, E.; Coeur, C.; Cassez, A.; Wang, Y.; Zhang, W.; Gao, X.; Liu, W.; Dong, F.; Zha, G.; Zheng, Xu; Wang, T.

    2013-01-01

    Chemically reactive short-lived species play a crucial role in tropospheric processes affecting regional air quality and global climate change. Contrary to long-lived species (such as greenhouse gases), fast, accurate and precise monitoring changes in concentration of atmospheric short-lived species represents a real challenge due to their short life time (~1 s for OH radical) and very low concentration in the atmosphere (down to 106 molecules/cm3, corresponding to 0.1 pptv at standard temperature and pressure). We report on our recent progress in instrumentation developments for spectroscopic sensing of trace reactive species. Modern photonic sources such as quantum cascade laser (QCL), distributed feedback (DFB) diode laser, light emitting diode (LED), difference-frequency generation (DFG) parametric source are implemented in conjunction with highsensitivity spectroscopic measurement techniques for : (1) nitrous acid (HONO) monitoring by QCL-based long optical pathlength absorption spectroscopy and LED-based IBBCEAS (incoherent broadband cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopy); (2) DFB laser-based hydroxyl free radical (OH) detection using WM-OA-ICOS (wavelength modulation off-axis integrated cavity output spectroscopy) and FRS (Faraday rotation spectroscopy), respectively; (3) nitrate radical (NO3) and nitrogen dioxide (NO2) simultaneous measurements with IBBCEAS approach. Applications in field observation and in smog chamber study will be presented.

  3. A spectroscopic study of the radial velocity variations and accretion disks found in four dwarf novae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stover, R. J.

    Time resolved spectroscopic observations of the four dwarf novae SS Cyg, EM Cyg, U Gem, and RU Peg are presented. Although these systems were studied previously, all of the spectroscopic studies were done photographically. A linear response, digital detector is employed. Analytic techniques to the study of the radial velocity variations and emission line profiles found in dwarf novae are applied. In the study of SS Cyg cross-correlation techniques were used for the first time to measure the radial velocity variations of the secondary star absorption lines. In the study of U Gem, analysis of the accretion disk emission lines showed that the motion of the material in the disk cannot be described accurately by orbits defined within the three-body approximation. The observations of EM Cyg reveal an unstable accretion disk, with emission lines that vary erratically on timescales of minutes to days. New measurements of the radial velocity variations of the emission and absorption lines found in the spectrum of RU Peg agree with previous measurements but have a higher accuracy.

  4. Comparative spectroscopic analysis of urinary calculi inhibition by Larrea Tridentata infusion and NDGA chemical extract

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manciu, Felicia

    2012-10-01

    In the present comparative spectroscopic study we try to understand calcium oxalate kidney stone formation as well as its inhibition by using a traditional medicine approach with Larrea Tridentata (LT) herbal extracts and nordihydroguaiaretic acid (NDGA), which is a chemical extract of the LT bush. The samples were synthesized without and with LT or NDGA using a simplified single diffusion gel growth technique. While the use of infusion from LT decreases the sizes of calcium oxalate crystals and also changes their structure from monohydrate for pure crystals to dihydrate for crystals grown with different amounts of inhibitor, both Raman and infrared absorption spectroscopic techniques, which are the methods of analysis employed in this work, reveal that NDGA is not responsible for the change in the morphology of calcium oxalate crystals and does not contribute significantly to the inhibition process. The presence of NDGA slightly affects the structure of the crystals by modifying the strength of the C-C bonds as seen in the Raman data. Also, the current infrared absorption results demonstrate the presence of NDGA in the samples through a vibrational line that corresponds to the double bond between carbon atoms of the ester group of NDGA.

  5. Spectroscopic characterization of uranium in evaporation basin sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duff, M. C.; Morris, D. E.; Hunter, D. B.; Bertsch, P. M.

    2000-05-01

    Evaporation ponds in the San Joaquin Valley (SJV), CA, used for the containment of irrigation drainage waters contain elevated levels of uranium (U) resulting from the extensive leaching by carbonate-rich irrigation waters of the local agricultural soils that contain low levels of naturally-occurring U. The SJV ponds are subjected to changes in redox chemistry with cycles of drying and flooding. Our past studies have shown that U in the SJV Pond 14 surface sediments is present as mostly the oxidized and soluble form, U(VI). However, we were uncertain whether the U in the soil was only present as a U oxide of mixed stoichiometry, such as U 3O 8(s) (pitchblende) or other species. Here we present characterization information, which includes wet chemical and in situ spectroscopic techniques (X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) and low temperature time-resolved luminescence spectroscopies) for samples from two SJV Pond sediments. Surface sediments from SJV Pond 16 were characterized for average oxidation state of U with XANES spectroscopy. The fraction of U(VI) to U(IV) in the Pond 16 sediments decreased with depth with U(IV) being the dominant oxidation state in the 5 cm to 15 cm depth. Two luminescent U(VI) species were identified in the surface sediments from Pond 14; a U(VI)-tricarbonate phase and another phase likely comprised of U(VI)-hydroxide or hydroxycarbonate. The luminescent U(VI) population in the Pond 16 sediments is dominated by species with comparable spectral characteristics to the U(VI)-hydroxide or hydroxycarbonate species found in the Pond 14 sediments. The luminescence spectroscopic results were complemented by wet chemical U leaching methods, which involved the use of carbonate and sulfuric acid solutions and oxidizing solutions of peroxide, hypochlorite and Mn(IV). Leaching was shown to decrease the total U concentration in the sediments in all cases. However, results from luminescence studies of the residual fraction in the leached

  6. Infrared laser spectroscopic trace gas sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sigrist, Markus

    2016-04-01

    Chemical sensing and analyses of gas samples by laser spectroscopic methods are attractive owing to several advantages such as high sensitivity and specificity, large dynamic range, multi-component capability, and lack of pretreatment or preconcentration procedures. The preferred wavelength range comprises the fundamental molecular absorption range in the mid-infared between 3 and 15 μm, whereas the near-infrared range covers the (10-100 times weaker) higher harmonics and combination bands. The availability of near-infrared and, particularly, of broadly tunable mid-infrared sources like external cavity quantum cascade lasers (EC-QCLs), interband cascade lasers (ICLs), difference frequency generation (DFG), optical parametric oscillators (OPOs), recent developments of diode-pumped lead salt semiconductor lasers, of supercontinuum sources or of frequency combs have eased the implementation of laser-based sensing devices. Sensitive techniques for molecular absorption measurements include multipass absorption, various configurations of cavity-enhanced techniques such as cavity ringdown (CRD), or of photoacoustic spectroscopy (PAS) including quartz-enhanced (QEPAS) or cantilever-enhanced (CEPAS) techniques. The application requirements finally determine the optimum selection of laser source and detection scheme. In this tutorial talk I shall discuss the basic principles, present various experimental setups and illustrate the performance of selected systems for chemical sensing of selected key atmospheric species. Applications include an early example of continuous vehicle emission measurements with a mobile CO2-laser PAS system [1]. The fast analysis of C1-C4 alkanes at sub-ppm concentrations in gas mixtures is of great interest for the petrochemical industry and was recently achieved with a new type of mid-infrared diode-pumped piezoelectrically tuned lead salt vertical external cavity surface emitting laser (VECSEL) [2]. Another example concerns measurements on short

  7. Picosecond flash spectroscopic studies on ultraviolet stabilizers and stabilized polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott, G. W.

    1982-01-01

    Spectroscopic and excited state decay kinetics are reported for monomeric and polymeric forms of ultraviolet stabilizers in the 2-(2'-hydroxyphenyl)-benzotriazole and 2-hydroxybenzophenone classes. For some of these molecules in various solvents at room temperature, (1) ground state absorption spectra, (2) emission spectra, (3) picosecond time-resolved transient absorption spectra, (4) ground state absorption recovery kinetics, (5) emission kinetics, and (6) transient absorption kinetics are reported. In the solid state at low temperatures, emission spectra and their temperature dependent kinetics up to approximately 200K as well as, in one case, the 12K excitation spectra of the observed dual emission are also reported.

  8. A Spectroscopic-Based Laboratory Experiment for Protein Conformational Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ramos, Carlos Henrique I.

    2004-01-01

    This article describes a practical experiment for teaching basic spectroscopic techniques to introduce the topic of protein conformational change to students in the field of molecular biology, biochemistry, or structural biology. The spectroscopic methods employed in the experiment are absorbance, for protein concentration measurements, and…

  9. Non-Heme Iron Absorption and Utilization from Typical Whole Chinese Diets in Young Chinese Urban Men Measured by a Double-Labeled Stable Isotope Technique

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Lichen; Zhang, Yuhui; Wang, Jun; Huang, Zhengwu; Gou, Lingyan; Wang, Zhilin; Ren, Tongxiang; Piao, Jianhua; Yang, Xiaoguang

    2016-01-01

    Background This study was to observe the non-heme iron absorption and biological utilization from typical whole Chinese diets in young Chinese healthy urban men, and to observe if the iron absorption and utilization could be affected by the staple food patterns of Southern and Northern China. Materials and Methods Twenty-two young urban men aged 18–24 years were recruited and randomly assigned to two groups in which the staple food was rice and steamed buns, respectively. Each subject received 3 meals containing approximately 3.25 mg stable 57FeSO4 (the ratio of 57Fe content in breakfast, lunch and dinner was 1:2:2) daily for 2 consecutive days. In addition, approximately 2.4 mg 58FeSO4 was administered intravenously to each subject at 30–60 min after dinner each day. Blood samples were collected from each subject to measure the enrichment of the 57Fe and 58Fe. Fourteen days after the experimental diet, non-heme iron absorption was assessed by measuring 57Fe incorporation into red blood cells, and absorbed iron utilization was determined according to the red blood cell incorporation of intravenously infused 58Fe SO4. Results Non-heme iron intake values overall, and in the rice and steamed buns groups were 12.8 ±2.1, 11.3±1.3 and 14.3±1.5 mg, respectively; the mean 57Fe absorption rates were 11±7%, 13±7%, and 8±4%, respectively; and the mean infused 58Fe utilization rates were 85±8%, 84±6%, and 85±10%, respectively. There was no significantly difference in the iron intakes, and 57Fe absorption and infused 58Fe utilization rates between rice and steamed buns groups (all P>0.05). Conclusion We present the non-heme iron absorption and utilization rates from typical whole Chinese diets among young Chinese healthy urban men, which was not affected by the representative staple food patterns of Southern and Northern China. This study will provide a basis for the setting of Chinese iron DRIs. PMID:27099954

  10. Graphite furnace and hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometric determination of cadmium, lead, and tin traces in natural surface waters: study of preconcentration technique performance.

    PubMed

    Tsogas, George Z; Giokas, Dimosthenis L; Vlessidis, Athanasios G

    2009-04-30

    In this study three major types of preconcentration methods based upon different principles (cation exchange, physical absorption and hydrophobic extraction) were evaluated and optimized for the extraction and determination of three highly toxic heavy metals namely Cd, Pb and Sn by graphite furnace and hybrid generation atomic absorption spectrometry in real samples. The optimum analytical conditions were examined and the analytical features of each method were revealed and compared. Detection limits as low as 0.003-0.025 microg L(-1) for Cd(2+), 0.05-0.10 microg L(-1) for Pb(2+) and 0.1-0.25 microg L(-1) for Sn(4+) depending on the extraction method were obtained with RSD values between 3.08% and 6.11%. A preliminary assessment of the pollution status of three important natural ecosystems in Epirus region (NW Greece) was performed and some early conclusions were drawn and discussed.

  11. Analyzing Water's Optical Absorption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    A cooperative agreement between World Precision Instruments (WPI), Inc., and Stennis Space Center has led the UltraPath(TM) device, which provides a more efficient method for analyzing the optical absorption of water samples at sea. UltraPath is a unique, high-performance absorbance spectrophotometer with user-selectable light path lengths. It is an ideal tool for any study requiring precise and highly sensitive spectroscopic determination of analytes, either in the laboratory or the field. As a low-cost, rugged, and portable system capable of high- sensitivity measurements in widely divergent waters, UltraPath will help scientists examine the role that coastal ocean environments play in the global carbon cycle. UltraPath(TM) is a trademark of World Precision Instruments, Inc. LWCC(TM) is a trademark of World Precision Instruments, Inc.

  12. Extraction of full absorption peaks in airborne gamma-spectrometry by filtering techniques coupled with a study of the derivatives. Comparison with the window method.

    PubMed

    Guillot, L

    2001-01-01

    In this paper, an adaptation of a spectral profile analysis method, currently used in high-resolution spectrometry, to airborne gamma measurements is presented. A new algorithm has been developed for extraction of full absorption peaks by studying the variations in the spectral profile of data recorded with large-volume NaI detectors (16 l) with a short sampling time (2 s). The use of digital filters, taking into consideration the characteristics of the absorption peaks, significantly reduced the counting fluctuations, making detection possible based on study of the first and second derivatives. The absorption peaks are then obtained by modelling, followed by subtraction of the Compton continuum in the detection window. Compared to the conventional stripping ratio method, spectral profile analysis offers similar performance for the natural radioelements. The 137Cs 1SD detection limit is approximately 1200 Bq/m2 in a natural background of 200 Bq/kg 40K, 33 Bq/kg 238U and 33 Bq/kg 232Th. At low energy the very high continuum leads to detection limits similar to those obtained by the windows method, but the results obtained are more reliable. In the presence of peak overlaps, however, analysis of the spectral profile alone is not sufficient to separate the peaks, and further processing is necessary. Within the framework of environmental monitoring studies, spectral profile analysis is of great interest because it does not require any assumptions about the nature of the nuclides. The calculation of the concentrations from the results obtained is simple and reliable, since only the full absorption contributions are taken into consideration. A quantitative estimate of radioactive anomalies can thus be obtained rapidly.

  13. Broadband optical absorption enhancement of N719 dye in ethanol by gold-silver alloy nanoparticles fabricated under laser ablation technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Azawi, Mohammed A.; Bidin, Noriah; Abbas, Khaldoon N.; Bououdina, Mohamed; Azzez, Shrook A.

    2016-04-01

    The formation of gold-silver alloy nanoparticles (Au-Ag alloy NPs) by a two-step process with a pulsed Nd:YAG laser without any additives is presented. Mixtures of Au and Ag colloidal suspensions were separately obtained by 1064-nm laser ablation of metallic targets immersed in ethanol. Subsequently, the as-mixed colloidal suspensions were reirradiated by laser-induced heating at the second-harmonic generation (532 nm) for different irradiation periods of time. The absorption spectra and morphology of the colloidal alloys were studied as a function of exposure time to laser irradiation. Transmission electron microscopy revealed the formation of monodispersed spherical nanoparticles with a homogeneous size distribution in all the synthesized samples. UV-vis and photoluminescence spectroscopy measurements were also employed to characterize the changes in the light absorption and emission of N719 dye solution with different concentrations of Au-Ag colloidal alloys, respectively. The localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) of Au-Ag alloy NPs enhanced the absorption and fluorescence peak of the dye solution. The mixture of dye molecules with a higher concentration of alloy NPs exhibited an additional coupling of dipole moments with the LSPR, thereby contributing to the improvement of the optical properties of the mixture.

  14. Optical absorption and NMR spectroscopic studies on paramagnetic neodymium(III) complexes with beta-diketone and heterocyclic amines. The environment effect on 4f-4f hypersensitive transitions.

    PubMed

    Ansari, A A; Irfanullah, M; Iftikhar, K

    2007-08-01

    The optical absorption spectra of [Nd(acac)3(H2O)2].H2O, [Nd(acac)3bpy] and [Nd(acac)3phen(H2O)2] (where acac=acetylacetone, bpy=2,2'-bipyridyl and phen=1,10-phenanthroline) complexes in the visible region, in a series of non-aqueous solvents (methanol, ethanol, isopropanol, chloroform, acetonitrile, pyridine, nitrobenzene and dimethylsulphoxide) have been analyzed. The transition 4G(5/2)<--4I(9/2) (Nd-VI) located near the middle of the visible region (17,500 cm(-1)) is hypersensitive. Its behavior is in sharp contrast to many other typically weak and consistently unvaried, normal 4f-4f transitions. The oscillator strength of this transition for the chelate as well as its adducts with phen and bpy in any of the solvent employed is larger than the oscillator strength of Nd3+ aqua-ion. It is most intense in pyridine for all the complexes studied and, therefore, pyridine is the most effective in promoting f-f spectral intensity. The band shape and oscillator strength of the hypersensitive transitions display pronounced changes as compared to Nd3+ aqua-ion. The band shapes of the hypersensitive transitions show remarkable changes on passing from aqueous solution to various non-aqueous solutions, which is the result of change in the environment about the Nd(III) ion in the various solutions and suggests change in the environment about the Nd(III) ion in the various solutions and suggests coordination of solvent molecule(s), in some cases. A comparative account of hypersensitivity in the present complexes with those of other adducts of Nd(beta-diketoenolate)3 with heterocyclic amines is discussed. The NMR signals of heterocyclic amines have been shifted to high fields while the resonances due to acetylacetone moiety have moved to low fields. The paramagnetic shift in the complexes is dipolar in nature.

  15. Spectroscopic investigation of actinide speciation in concentrated chloride solution

    SciTech Connect

    Runde, W.; Neu, M.P.; Conradson, S.D.; Clark, D.L.; Palmer, P.D.; Reilly, S.D.; Scott, B.L.; Tait, C.D.

    1997-12-31

    The proposed disposal of nuclear waste in geological salt formations, e.g., the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (USA) and the Gorleben site (Germany), raises a fundamental question: To what degree actinides will be solubilized and mobilized upon interaction with chloride ions? Actinide solubilities in highly concentrated chloride solutions are about one order of magnitude higher than in similar inert electrolyte (NaClO{sub 4}) solutions. This increased solubility is due to interactions between actinide and chloride ions. Contradictory results exist regarding the interaction mechanism between actinide and chloride ions. Specifically, both inner-sphere complex formation and ion pair association have been implicated in the interpretation of spectrophotometric and extraction data. To address this controversy, the authors investigated the interaction between actinide ions in the (III), (IV), (V) and (VI) oxidation states and chloride ions using a multi-method approach. Spectroscopic techniques (TRLFS, Raman, UV-Vis absorption, EXAFS) were used to distinguish between changes in the inner coordination sphere of the actinide ion and effects of ion pairing, X-ray absorption spectroscopy and single crystal X-ray diffraction were used to determine structural details of the actinide chloro complexes formed in solution and solid states.

  16. Spectroscopic properties of multilayered gold nanoparticle 2D sheets.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Akihito; Imazu, Keisuke; Li, Xinheng; Okamoto, Koichi; Tamada, Kaoru

    2012-12-11

    We report the fabrication technique and optical properties of multilayered two-dimensional (2D) gold nanoparticle sheets ("Au nanosheet"). The 2D crystalline monolayer sheet composed of Au nanoparticles shows an absorption peak originating from a localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR). It was found that the absorption spectra dramatically change when the monolayers are assembled into the multilayers on different substrates (quartz or Au). In the case of the multilayers on Au thin film (d = 200 nm), the LSPR peak is shifted to longer wavelength at the near-IR region by increasing the number of layers. The absorbance also depends on the layer number and shows the nonlinear behavior. On the other hand, the multilayers on quartz substrate show neither such LSPR peak shift nor nonlinear response of absorbance. The layer number dependence on metal surfaces can be interpreted as the combined effects between the near-field coupling of the LSPR and the far-field optics of the stratified metamaterial films, as proposed in our previous study. We also report the spectroscopic properties of hybrid multilayers composed of two kinds of monolayers, i.e., Au nanosheet and Ag nanosheet. The combination of the different metal nanoparticle sheets realizes more flexible plasmonic color tuning.

  17. Spectral and Non Radiative Decay Studies of Lead Di Bromide Single Crystals by Mode Matched Thermal Lens Technique.

    PubMed

    Rejeena, I; Lillibai, B; Thomas, V; Nampoori, V P N; Radhakrishnan, P

    2016-07-01

    In the present paper, the investigations on the non radiative decay mechanism, optical band gap determination from absorption spectroscopic studies and fluorescence emission by photo luminescence techniques using different excitation wavelengths on gel derived lead di bromide single crystals are reported. Non radiative decay of the sample is studied using high sensitive dual beam mode matched thermal lens technique. For the thermal lensing experiment the crystal in solution phase is incorporated with rhodamine 6G dye for enhancing the absorption of the crystal sample. The thermal diffusivity of lead di bromide is determined using the probe beam intensity v/s time measurements.

  18. Spectroscopic Online Monitoring for Process Control and Safeguarding of Radiochemical Fuel Reprocessing Streams

    SciTech Connect

    Bryan, Samuel A.; Levitskaia, Tatiana G.; Casella, Amanda J.; Peterson, James M.

    2013-02-24

    There is a renewed interest worldwide to promote the use of nuclear power and close the nuclear fuel cycle. The long term successful use of nuclear power is critically dependent upon adequate and safe processing and disposition of the spent nuclear fuel. Liquid-liquid extraction is a separation technique commonly employed for the processing of the dissolved spent nuclear fuel. The instrumentation used to monitor these processes must be robust, require little or no maintenance, and be able to withstand harsh environments such as high radiation fields and aggressive chemical matrices. In addition, the ability for continuous online monitoring allows for numerous benefits. This paper reviews application of the absorption and vibrational spectroscopic techniques supplemented by physicochemical measurements for radiochemical process monitoring. In this context, our team experimentally assessed the potential of Raman and spectrophotometric techniques for on-line real-time monitoring of the U(VI)/nitrate ion/nitric acid and Pu(IV)/Np(V)/Nd(III), respectively, in solutions relevant to spent fuel reprocessing. Both techniques demonstrated robust performance in the repetitive batch measurements of each analyte in a wide concentration range using simulant and commercial dissolved spent fuel solutions. Static spectroscopic measurements served as training sets for the multivariate data analysis to obtain partial least squares predictive models, which were validated using on-line centrifugal contactor extraction tests. Satisfactory prediction of the analytes concentrations in these preliminary experiments warrants further development of the spectroscopy-based methods for radiochemical safeguards and process control.

  19. Spectroscopic Online Monitoring for Process Control and Safeguarding of Radiochemical Fuel Reprocessing Streams - 13553

    SciTech Connect

    Bryan, S.A.; Levitskaia, T.G.; Casella, Amanda; Peterson, James

    2013-07-01

    There is a renewed interest worldwide to promote the use of nuclear power and close the nuclear fuel cycle. The long term successful use of nuclear power is critically dependent upon adequate and safe processing and disposition of the used nuclear fuel. Liquid-liquid extraction is a separation technique commonly employed for the processing of the dissolved spent nuclear fuel. The instrumentation used to monitor these processes must be robust, require little or no maintenance, and be able to withstand harsh environments such as high radiation fields and aggressive chemical matrices. This paper discusses application of absorption and vibrational spectroscopic techniques supplemented by physicochemical measurements for radiochemical process monitoring. In this context, our team experimentally assessed the potential of Raman and spectrophotometric techniques for on-line real-time monitoring of the U(VI)/nitrate ion/nitric acid and Pu(IV)/Np(V)/Nd(III), respectively, in solutions relevant to spent fuel reprocessing. Both techniques demonstrated robust performance in the repetitive batch measurements of each analyte in a wide concentration range using simulant and commercial dissolved spent fuel solutions. Static spectroscopic measurements served as training sets for the multivariate data analysis to obtain partial least squares predictive models, which were validated using on-line centrifugal contactor extraction tests. Satisfactory prediction of the analytes concentrations in these preliminary experiments warrants further development of the spectroscopy-based methods for radiochemical safeguards and process control. (authors)

  20. Ultrasensitive near-infrared integrated cavity output spectroscopy technique for detection of CO at 1.57 μm: new sensitivity limits for absorption measurements in passive optical cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engel, Gregory S.; Drisdell, Walter S.; Keutsch, Frank N.; Moyer, Elisabeth J.; Anderson, James G.

    2006-12-01

    A robust absorption spectrometer using the off-axis integrated cavity output spectroscopy (ICOS) technique in a passive cavity is presented. The observed sensitivity, conceptually the detection threshold for the absorption cross section (cm2) multiplied by the concentration (cm-3) and normalized by the averaging time, is measured to be 1.9×10-12 (1/cm√Hz). This high sensitivity arises from using the optical cavity to amplify the observed path length in the spectrometer while avoiding cavity resonances by careful design of the spot pattern within the cavity. The instrument is ideally suited for routine monitoring of trace gases in the near-infrared region. A spectrum showing ambient carbon monoxide at 1.57 μm is presented.

  1. Spectroscopic study in Z-pinch discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Garamoon, A.A.; Saudy, A.H.; Shark, W.

    1995-12-31

    The temporal variation of the emitted line intensity has been investigated, and thus an important information about the dynamic ionization stages in the Z-pinch discharge has been studied. Also the electron temperature Te, has been deduced by using a spectroscopic technique.

  2. Quantum Cascade Laser Absorption Spectroscopy as a Plasma Diagnostic Tool: An Overview

    PubMed Central

    Welzel, Stefan; Hempel, Frank; Hübner, Marko; Lang, Norbert; Davies, Paul B.; Röpcke, Jürgen

    2010-01-01

    The recent availability of thermoelectrically cooled pulsed and continuous wave quantum and inter-band cascade lasers in the mid-infrared spectral region has led to significant improvements and new developments in chemical sensing techniques using in-situ laser absorption spectroscopy for plasma diagnostic purposes. The aim of this article is therefore two-fold: (i) to summarize the challenges which arise in the application of quantum cascade lasers in such environments, and, (ii) to provide an overview of recent spectroscopic results (encompassing cavity enhanced methods) obtained in different kinds of plasma used in both research and industry. PMID:22163581

  3. X-ray absorption in GaGdN: A study of local structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez-Criado, G.; Sancho-Juan, O.; Garro, N.; Sans, J. A.; Cantarero, A.; Susini, J.; Roever, M.; Mai, D.-D.; Bedoya-Pinto, A.; Malindretos, J.; Rizzi, A.

    2008-07-01

    In this study, we report on the incorporation of dilute Gd amounts into GaN films grown by molecular beam epitaxy. A combination of x-ray fluorescence with x-ray absorption spectroscopic techniques enabled us to examine not only the distribution of rare earth atoms in the GaN matrix but also the short-range structural order. Our results show Gd atoms in a trivalent state with tetrahedral coordination, thus substituting Ga in the wurtzite GaN structure.

  4. Spaceborne estimate of atmospheric CO2 column by use of the differential absorption method: error analysis.

    PubMed

    Dufour, Emmanuel; Bréon, François-Marie

    2003-06-20

    For better knowledge of the carbon cycle, there is a need for spaceborne measurements of atmospheric CO2 concentration. Because the gradients are relatively small, the accuracy requirements are better than 1%. We analyze the feasibility of a CO2-weighted-column estimate, using the differential absorption technique, from high-resolution spectroscopic measurements in the 1.6- and 2-microm CO2 absorption bands. Several sources of uncertainty that can be neglected for other gases with less stringent accuracy requirements need to be assessed. We attempt a quantification of errors due to the radiometric noise, uncertainties in the temperature, humidity and surface pressure uncertainty, spectroscopic coefficients, and atmospheric scattering. Atmospheric scattering is the major source of error [5 parts per 10 (ppm) for a subvisual cirrus cloud with an assumed optical thickness of 0.03], and additional research is needed to properly assess the accuracy of correction methods. Spectroscopic data are currently a major source of uncertainty but can be improved with specific ground-based sunphotometry measurements. The other sources of error amount to several ppm, which is less than, but close to, the accuracy requirements. Fortunately, these errors are mostly random and will therefore be reduced by proper averaging.

  5. Quantitative photoacoustic measurement of tissue optical absorption spectrum aided by an optical contrast agent.

    PubMed

    Rajian, Justin Rajesh; Carson, Paul L; Wang, Xueding

    2009-03-16

    In photoacoustic imaging, the intensity of photoacoustic signal induced by optical absorption in biological tissue is proportional to light energy deposition, which is the product of the absorption coefficient and the local light fluence. Because tissue optical properties are highly dependent on the wavelength, the spectrum of the local light fluence at a target tissue beneath the sample surface is different than the spectrum of the incident light fluence. Therefore, quantifying the tissue optical absorption spectrum by using a photoacoustic technique is not feasible without the knowledge of the local light fluence. In this work, a highly accurate photoacoustic measurement of the subsurface tissue optical absorption spectrum has been achieved for the first time by introducing an extrinsic optical contrast agent with known optical properties. From the photoacoustic measurements with and without the contrast agent, a quantified measurement of the chromophore absorption spectrum can be realized in a strongly scattering medium. Experiments on micro-flow vessels containing fresh canine blood buried in phantoms and chicken breast tissues were carried out in a wavelength range from 680 nm to 950 nm. Spectroscopic photoacoustic measurements of both oxygenated and deoxygenated blood specimens presented an improved match with the references when employing this technique.

  6. Infrared Spectroscopic Imaging of Latent Fingerprints and Associated Forensic Evidence

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Tsoching; Schultz, Zachary D.; Levin, Ira W.

    2011-01-01

    Fingerprints reflecting a specific chemical history, such as exposure to explosives, are clearly distinguished from overlapping, and interfering latent fingerprints using infrared spectroscopic imaging techniques and multivariate analysis. PMID:19684917

  7. Investigation of the optical-absorption bands of Nb4+ and Ti3+ in lithium niobate using magnetic circular dichroism and optically detected magnetic-resonance techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reyher, H.-J.; Schulz, R.; Thiemann, O.

    1994-08-01

    The magnetic circular dichroism (MCD) of the absorption of Nb4+Li and Ti3+Li centers in LiNbO3 has been selectively measured by applying optically detected magnetic resonance. The attribution of a well-known broad and unstructured absorption band peaking at 1.6 eV to the Nb4+Li bound small polaron is now unambiguously confirmed. In the MCD spectrum of the isoelectronic Ti3+Li center, bands show up, which closely resemble the MCD bands at 1.6 eV of this bound small polaron. This striking similarity is explained by a cluster model, representing both defects. Either TiLi or NbLi is at the center of this cluster. In both cases, the small polaron is bound to the cluster, and its MCD bands correspond to intervalence transfer transitions within the constituents of the cluster. A study of the spin-orbit coupling of the molecular orbitals of the cluster allows one to analyze the structure of the MCD bands at 2.9 eV of Ti3+Li have no counterpart in the Nb4+Li spectrum. These bands are assigned to transitions to excited states, which are specific to the impurity and are related to the 10Dq transitions known for the crystal field states of a d1 ion.

  8. High-resolution three-dimensional imaging of a depleted CMOS sensor using an edge Transient Current Technique based on the Two Photon Absorption process (TPA-eTCT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García, Marcos Fernández; Sánchez, Javier González; Echeverría, Richard Jaramillo; Moll, Michael; Santos, Raúl Montero; Moya, David; Pinto, Rogelio Palomo; Vila, Iván

    2017-02-01

    For the first time, the deep n-well (DNW) depletion space of a High Voltage CMOS sensor has been characterized using a Transient Current Technique based on the simultaneous absorption of two photons. This novel approach has allowed to resolve the DNW implant boundaries and therefore to accurately determine the real depleted volume and the effective doping concentration of the substrate. The unprecedented spatial resolution of this new method comes from the fact that measurable free carrier generation in two photon mode only occurs in a micrometric scale voxel around the focus of the beam. Real three-dimensional spatial resolution is achieved by scanning the beam focus within the sample.

  9. PERITONEAL ABSORPTION

    PubMed Central

    Hahn, P. F.; Miller, L. L.; Robscheit-Robbins, F. S.; Bale, W. F.; Whipple, G. H.

    1944-01-01

    The absorption of red cells from the normal peritoneum of the dog can be demonstrated by means of red cells labeled with radio-iron incorporated in the hemoglobin of these red cells. Absorption in normal dogs runs from 20 to 100 per cent of the amount given within 24 hours. Dogs rendered anemic by bleeding absorb red cells a little less rapidly—ranging from 5 to 80 per cent of the injected red cells. Doubly depleted dogs (anemic and hypoproteinemic) absorb even less in the three experiments recorded. This peritoneal absorption varies widely in different dogs and even in the same dog at different times. We do not know the factors responsible for these variations but there is no question about active peritoneal absorption. The intact red cells pass readily from the peritoneal cavity into lymph spaces in diaphragm and other areas of the peritoneum. The red cells move along the lymphatics and through the lymph glands with little or no phagocytosis and eventually into the large veins through the thoracic ducts. PMID:19871404

  10. Nutrient absorption.

    PubMed

    Rubin, Deborah C

    2004-03-01

    Our understanding of nutrient absorption continues to grow, from the development of unique animal models and from studies in which cutting-edge molecular and cellular biologic approaches have been used to analyze the structure and function of relevant molecules. Studies of the molecular genetics of inherited disorders have also provided many new insights into these processes. A major advance in lipid absorption has been the cloning and characterization of several intestinal acyl CoA:monoacylglycerol acyltransferases; these may provide new targets for antiobesity drug therapy. Studies of intestinal cholesterol absorption and reverse cholesterol transport have encouraged the development of novel potential treatments for hyperlipidemia. Observations in genetically modified mice and in humans with mutations in glucose transporter 2 suggest the importance of a separate microsomal membrane transport pathway for glucose transport. The study of iron metabolism has advanced greatly with the identification of the hemochromatosis gene and the continued examination of the genetic regulation of iron absorptive pathways. Several human thiamine transporters have been identified, and their specific roles in different tissues are being explored.

  11. Spectroscopic and structural study of the newly synthesized heteroligand complex of copper with creatinine and urea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gangopadhyay, Debraj; Singh, Sachin Kumar; Sharma, Poornima; Mishra, Hirdyesh; Unnikrishnan, V. K.; Singh, Bachcha; Singh, Ranjan K.

    2016-02-01

    Study of copper complex of creatinine and urea is very important in life science and medicine. In this paper, spectroscopic and structural study of a newly synthesized heteroligand complex of copper with creatinine and urea has been discussed. Structural studies have been carried out using DFT calculations and spectroscopic analyses were carried out by FT-IR, Raman, UV-vis absorption and fluorescence techniques. The copper complex of creatinine and the heteroligand complex were found to have much increased water solubility as compared to pure creatinine. The analysis of FT-IR and Raman spectra helps to understand the coordination properties of the two ligands and to determine the probable structure of the heteroligand complex. The LIBS spectra of the heteroligand complex reveal that the complex is free from other metal impurities. UV-visible absorption spectra and the fluorescence emission spectra of the aqueous solution of Cu-Crn-urea heteroligand complex at different solute concentrations have been analyzed and the complex is found to be rigid and stable in its monomeric form at very low concentrations.

  12. Spectroscopic and structural study of the newly synthesized heteroligand complex of copper with creatinine and urea.

    PubMed

    Gangopadhyay, Debraj; Singh, Sachin Kumar; Sharma, Poornima; Mishra, Hirdyesh; Unnikrishnan, V K; Singh, Bachcha; Singh, Ranjan K

    2016-02-05

    Study of copper complex of creatinine and urea is very important in life science and medicine. In this paper, spectroscopic and structural study of a newly synthesized heteroligand complex of copper with creatinine and urea has been discussed. Structural studies have been carried out using DFT calculations and spectroscopic analyses were carried out by FT-IR, Raman, UV-vis absorption and fluorescence techniques. The copper complex of creatinine and the heteroligand complex were found to have much increased water solubility as compared to pure creatinine. The analysis of FT-IR and Raman spectra helps to understand the coordination properties of the two ligands and to determine the probable structure of the heteroligand complex. The LIBS spectra of the heteroligand complex reveal that the complex is free from other metal impurities. UV-visible absorption spectra and the fluorescence emission spectra of the aqueous solution of Cu-Crn-urea heteroligand complex at different solute concentrations have been analyzed and the complex is found to be rigid and stable in its monomeric form at very low concentrations.

  13. LEAD SORPTION ON RUTHENIUM OXIDE: A MACROSCOPIC AND SPECTROSCOPIC STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The sorption and desorption of Pb on RuO2 xH2O were examined kinetically and thermodynamically via spectroscopic and macroscopic investigations. X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) was employed to determine the sorption mechanism with regard to identity of nearest atomic neighbo...

  14. Arsenate Adsorption On Ruthenium Oxides: A Spectroscopic And Kinetic Investigation

    EPA Science Inventory

    Arsenate adsorption on amorphous (RuO2•1.1H2O) and crystalline (RuO2) ruthenium oxides was evaluated using spectroscopic and kinetic methods to elucidate the adsorption mechanism. Extended X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (EXAFS) was ...

  15. Spectroscopic properties of the CP43 core antenna protein of photosystem II.

    PubMed

    Groot, M L; Frese, R N; de Weerd, F L; Bromek, K; Pettersson, A; Peterman, E J; van Stokkum, I H; van Grondelle, R; Dekker, J P

    1999-12-01

    CP43 is a chlorophyll-protein complex that funnels excitation energy from the main light-harvesting system of photosystem II to the photochemical reaction center. We purified CP43 from spinach photosystem II membranes in the presence of the nonionic detergent n-dodecyl-beta,D-maltoside and recorded its spectroscopic properties at various temperatures between 4 and 293 K by a number of polarized absorption and fluorescence techniques, fluorescence line narrowing, and Stark spectroscopy. The results indicate two "red" states in the Q(y) absorption region of the chlorophylls. The first peaks at 682.5 nm at 4 K, has an extremely narrow bandwidth with a full width at half-maximum of approximately 2.7 nm (58 cm(-1)) at 4 K, and has the oscillator strength of a single chlorophyll. The second peaks at approximately 679 nm, has a much broader bandshape, is caused by several excitonically interacting chlorophylls, and is responsible for all 4 K absorption at wavelengths longer than 685 nm. The Stark spectrum of CP43 resembles the first derivative of the absorption spectrum and has an exceptionally small overall size, which we attribute to opposing orientations of the monomer dipole moments of the excitonically coupled pigments.

  16. Spectroscopic online monitoring for process control and safeguarding of radiochemical streams

    SciTech Connect

    Bryan, S.A.; Levitskaia, T.G.

    2013-07-01

    This paper summarizes application of the absorption and vibrational spectroscopic techniques supplemented by physicochemical measurements for radiochemical process monitoring. In this context, our team experimentally assessed the potential of Raman and spectrophotometric techniques for online real-time monitoring of the U(VI)/nitrate ion/nitric acid and Pu(IV)/Np(V)/Nd(III), respectively, in solutions relevant to spent fuel reprocessing. These techniques demonstrate robust performance in the repetitive batch measurements of each analyte in a wide concentration range using simulant and commercial dissolved spent fuel solutions. Spectroscopic measurements served as training sets for the multivariate data analysis to obtain partial least squares predictive models, which were validated using on-line centrifugal contactor extraction tests. Satisfactory prediction of the analytes concentrations in these preliminary experiments warrants further development of the spectroscopy-based methods for radiochemical process control and safeguarding. Additionally, the ability to identify material intentionally diverted from a liquid-liquid extraction contactor system was successfully tested using on-line process monitoring as a means to detect the amount of material diverted. (authors)

  17. Optimization of the steady neutron source technique for absorption cross section measurement by using an 124Sb-Be neutron source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Jing; Gardner, Robin P.

    2004-01-01

    An improved experimental approach has been developed to determine thermal neutron absorption cross sections. It uses an 124Sb-Be neutron source which has an average neutron energy of only about 12 keV. It can be moderated in either a water tank or a paraffin filled box and can be used for aqueous or powder samples. This new design is first optimized by MCNP simulation and then benchmarked and calibrated with experiments to verify the simulations and realize the predicted improved measurement sensitivity and reproducibility. The 124Sb-Be source device is from 1.35 to 1.71 times more sensitive than the previous method based on the use of a 252Cf source.

  18. Absorption, transport and insulin-mimetic properties of bis(maltolato)oxovanadium (IV) in streptozotocin-induced hyperglycemic rats by integrated mass spectrometric techniques.

    PubMed

    Iglesias-González, T; Sánchez-González, C; Montes-Bayón, M; Llopis-González, J; Sanz-Medel, A

    2012-01-01

    The use of V(IV) complexes as insulin-enhancing agents has been increasing during the last decade. Among them, 3-hydroxy-2-methyl-4-pyrone and 2-ethyl-3-hydroxy-4-pyrone (maltol and ethyl maltol, respectively) have proven to be especially suitable as ligands for vanadyl ions. In fact, they have passed phase I and phase II clinical trials, respectively. However, the mechanism through which those drugs exert their insulin-mimetic properties is still not fully understood. Thus, the aim of this study is to obtain an integrated picture of the absorption, biodistribution and insulin-mimetic properties of the bis(maltolato)oxovanadium (IV) (BMOV) in streptozotocin-induced hyperglycaemic rats. For this purpose, BMOV hypoglycaemic properties were evaluated by monitoring both the circulating glucose and the glycohemoglobin, biomarkers of diabetes mellitus. In both cases, the results were drug concentration dependent. Using doses of vanadium at 3 mg/day, it was possible to reduce the glycaemia of the diabetic rats to almost control levels. BMOV absorption experiments have been conducted by intestinal perfusion revealing that approximately 35% of V is absorbed by the intestinal cells. Additionally, the transport of the absorbed vanadium (IV) by serum proteins was studied. For this purpose, a speciation strategy using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) for separation and inductively coupled serum mass spectrometry, ICP-MS, for detection has been employed. The obtained HPLC-ICP-MS results, confirmed by MALDI-MS data, showed evidence that V, administered orally, is uniquely bound to transferrin in rat serum.

  19. Optical microresonators as single-particle absorption spectrometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heylman, Kevin D.; Thakkar, Niket; Horak, Erik H.; Quillin, Steven C.; Cherqui, Charles; Knapper, Kassandra A.; Masiello, David J.; Goldsmith, Randall H.

    2016-12-01

    Optical measurements of nanoscale objects offer major insights into fundamental biological, material and photonic properties. In absorption spectroscopy, sensitivity limits applications at the nanoscale. Here, we present a new single-particle double-modulation photothermal absorption spectroscopy method that employs on-chip optical whispering-gallery-mode (WGM) microresonators as ultrasensitive thermometers. Optical excitation of a nanoscale object on the microresonator produces increased local temperatures that are proportional to the absorption cross-section of the object. We resolve photothermal shifts in the resonance frequency of the microresonator that are smaller than 100 Hz, orders of magnitude smaller than previous WGM sensing schemes. The application of our new technique to single gold nanorods reveals a dense array of sharp Fano resonances arising from the coupling between the localized surface plasmon of the gold nanorod and the WGMs of the resonator, allowing for the exploration of plasmonic-photonic hybridization. In terms of the wider applicability, our approach adds label-free spectroscopic identification to microresonator-based detection schemes.

  20. Experimental validation of a millimeter wave radar technique to remotely sense atmospheric pressure at the Earth's surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flower, D. A.; Peckham, G. E.; Bradford, W. J.

    1984-01-01

    Experiments with a millimeter wave radar operating on the NASA CV-990 aircraft which validate the technique for remotely sensing atmospheric pressure at the Earth's surface are described. Measurements show that the precise millimeter wave observations needed to deduce pressure from space with an accuracy of 1 mb are possible, that sea surface reflection properties agree with theory and that the measured variation of differential absorption with altitude corresponds to that expected from spectroscopic models.

  1. The identification of post-starburst galaxies at z ˜ 1 using multiwavelength photometry: a spectroscopic verification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maltby, David T.; Almaini, Omar; Wild, Vivienne; Hatch, Nina A.; Hartley, William G.; Simpson, Chris; McLure, Ross J.; Dunlop, James; Rowlands, Kate; Cirasuolo, Michele

    2016-06-01

    Despite decades of study, we still do not fully understand why some massive galaxies abruptly switch off their star formation in the early Universe, and what causes their rapid transition to the red sequence. Post-starburst galaxies provide a rare opportunity to study this transition phase, but few have currently been spectroscopically identified at high redshift (z > 1). In this paper, we present the spectroscopic verification of a new photometric technique to identify post-starbursts in high-redshift surveys. The method classifies the broad-band optical-near-infrared spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of galaxies using three spectral shape parameters (supercolours), derived from a principal component analysis of model SEDs. When applied to the multiwavelength photometric data in the UKIDSS Ultra Deep Survey, this technique identified over 900 candidate post-starbursts at redshifts 0.5 < z < 2.0. In this study, we present deep optical spectroscopy for a subset of these galaxies, in order to confirm their post-starburst nature. Where a spectroscopic assessment was possible, we find the majority (19/24 galaxies; ˜80 per cent) exhibit the strong Balmer absorption (H δ equivalent width Wλ > 5 Å) and Balmer break, characteristic of post-starburst galaxies. We conclude that photometric methods can be used to select large samples of recently-quenched galaxies in the distant Universe.

  2. Remote determination of exposure degree and iron concentration of lunar soils using VIS-NIR spectroscopic methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fischer, Erich M.; Pieters, Carle M.

    1994-01-01

    On the Moon, space weathering processes such as micrometeorite bombardment alter the optical properties of lunar soils. As a consequence, lunar soil optical properties are a function not only of composition, but of degree of exposure on the lunar surface as well. In order to accurately assess the compositional properties of the lunar surface using remotely acquired visible and near-infrared spectroscopic data, it is thus necessary either (1) to compare optical properties only of soils characterized by similar degrees of exposure or (2) to otherwise normalize or remove the optical effects due to exposure. Laboratory spectroscopic data for lunar soils are used to develop and test remote spectrocopic methods for determining degree of exposure and for distinguishing between the optical effects due to exposure and those due to composition. A method employing a ratio between reflectances within and outside of the 1 micrometer Fe(2+) crystal field absorption band was developed for remotely identifying highland soils that have reached a steady-state maturity. The relative optical properties of these soils are a function solely of composition and as such can be directly compared. Spectroscopic techniques for accurate quantitative determination of iron content for lunar highland soils are investigated as well. It is shown that approximations of the 1 micrometer Fe(2+) absorption band depth using few to several channel multispectral data or spectroscopic data of inadequate spectral range cannot be used with confidence for compositional analysis. However, band depth measurements derived from continuum-removed high spectral resolution data can be used to calculate the weight percent FeO and relative proportion of iron-bearing silicates in mature lunar highland and mare/highland mixture soils. A preliminary effort to calibrate telescopic band depth to laboratory soil measurements is described.

  3. Hydrogen Absorption by Niobium.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-04-13

    incorporate an independent means for ascertaining surface cleanliness (e.g. AES). The form of the absorption curve in Fig. 7 appears to agree with that...very interesting study and is well within the capabilities of the systen designed, if the surface cleanliness can be assured. Wire specimens have a...assessing surface cleanliness would be an important supporting technique for understanding the results of these measurements. The simple kinetic

  4. [Direct determination of lead and cadmium in soil by slurry-sampling graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry using matrix modification technique].

    PubMed

    Sun, Han-Wen; Wen, Xiao-Hua; Liang, Shu-Xuan

    2006-05-01

    A method for the direct determination of lead and cadmium in soil by slurry-sampling graphite furnace-atomic absorption spectrometry using NH4 H2 PO4 as matrix modifier was developed. The effects of slurry stability, particle size of sample, matrix modifiers, ashing temperature, atomization temperature and common coexistent components on the signal intensities of lead and cadmium were investigated. The apparent activation energies of lead and cadmium were measured based on the linear relationship between the logarithm value of atomization peak time and atomization temperature. The mechanism of matrix modification was discussed. Under optimized conditions, the detection limit was 9.05 x 10(-10) g x mL(-1) for Pb and 1.76 x 10(-11) g x mL(-1) for Cd. The recoveries were in the range of 91%-97% for Pb and 93%-109% for Cd. The relative standard deviations were in the range of 4.2%-7.8%.

  5. Qualitative and Quantitative Content Determination of Macro-Minor Elements in Bryonia Alba L. Roots using Flame Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy Technique

    PubMed Central

    Karpiuk, Uliana Vladimirovna; Al Azzam, Khaldun Mohammad; Abudayeh, Zead Helmi Mahmoud; Kislichenko, Viktoria; Naddaf, Ahmad; Cholak, Irina; Yemelianova, Oksana

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the elements in Bryonia alba L. roots, collected from the Crimean Peninsula region in Ukraine. Methods: Dry ashing was used as a flexible method and all elements were determined using atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS) equipped with flame and graphite furnace. Results: The average concentrations of the determined elements, expressed as mg/100 g dry weight of the sample, were as follow: 13.000 for Fe, 78.000 for Si, 88.000 for P, 7.800 for Al, 0.130 for Mn, 105.000 for Mg, 0.030 for Pb, 0.052 for Ni, 0.030 for Mo, 210.000 for Ca, 0.130 for Cu, 5.200 for Zn, 13.000 for Na, 1170.000 for K, 0.780 for Sr, 0.030 for Co, 0.010 for Cd, 0.010 for As, and 0.010 for Hg. Toxic elements such as Cd and Pb were also found but at very low concentration. Among the analyzed elements, K was the most abundant followed by Ca, Mg, P, Si, Fe, Na, and Zn, whereas Hg, As, Cd, Co, Mo, and Pb were found in low concentration. Conclusion: The results suggest that the roots of Bryonia alba L. plant has potential medicinal property through their high element contents present. Moreover, it showed that the AAS method is a simple, fast, and reliable for the determination of elements in plant materials. The obtained results of the current study provide justification for the usage of such fruit in daily diet for nutrition and for medicinal usage in the treatment of various diseases. PMID:27478794

  6. Blending Bragg scattering with optical absorption: spectroscopy without a spectroscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nozières, Philippe

    2006-03-01

    A double resonance method is proposed, blending resonant X-ray Bragg scattering with an optical laser that blurs the Bragg spots. One can detect the cross signal without resolving the satellite lines from the main beam, simply modulating the laser intensity at low frequency and carrying a synchronous detection. The concept is illustrated on two simple naive examples. To cite this article: Ph. Nozières, C. R. Physique 7 (2006).

  7. Group velocity delay spectroscopy technique for industrial monitoring of electron-beam-induced vapors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benterou, Jerry J.; Berzins, Leon V.; Sharma, Manish N.

    1999-01-01

    Spectroscopic techniques are ideal for characterization and process control of electron beam generated beam generated vapor plumes. Absorption based techniques work well for a wide variety of applications, but are difficult to apply to optically dense or opaque vapor plumes. We describe an approach for monitoring optically dense vapor plumes that is based on measuring the group velocity delay of a laser beam near an optical transition to determine the vapor density. This technique has a larger dynamic range than absorption environment. Aluminum as chosen because of its prevalence in high performance aircraft alloys. In these applications, composition control of the alloy constituents is critical to the deposition process. Data is presented demonstrating the superior dynamic range of the measurement. In addition, preliminary data demonstrating aluminum vapor rate control in an electron beam evaporator is presented. Alternative applications where this technique could be useful are discussed.

  8. X-ray absorption and diffraction studies of the metal binding sites in amyloid beta-peptide.

    PubMed

    Streltsov, Victor

    2008-03-01

    A major source of neurodegeneration observed in Alzheimer's disease is believed to be caused by the toxicity from reactive oxygen species produced in the brain mediated by the A beta protein and mainly copper species. An atomic model of an amyloid beta-peptide (A beta) Cu2+ complex or at least the structure of the metal binding site is of great interest. Accurate information about the Cu-binding site of A beta protein can facilitate simulation of redox chemistry using high level quantum mechanics. Complementary X-ray diffraction and X-ray absorption techniques can be employed to obtain such accurate information. This review provides a blend of X-ray diffraction results on amyloid structures and selected works on A beta Cu2+ binding based on spectroscopic measurements with emphasis on the X-ray absorption technique.

  9. Vibrational spectroscopic study of newly developed self-forming lipids and nanovesicles.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bista, Rajan; Bruch, Reinhard

    2009-03-01

    We present the first experimental study of self-forming synthetic nanovesicles, trademarked as QuSomes, using vibrational spectroscopic techniques namely near-infrared (NIR) and laser tweezers Raman spectroscopy. Raman spectra of these new artificial nanovesicles suspended in Phosphate Buffered Saline (PBS) have been obtained by using an inverted confocal laser-tweezers-Raman-microscopy system in the spectral range of 3100 to 500 cm-1. This spectrometer works with an 80 mW diode-pumped solid-state laser, operating at a wavelength of 785 nm in the TEM00 mode. The laser is used both for optical trapping and Raman excitation. Similarly, NIR absorption spectra of these novel nanovesicles have been recorded in the spectral range of 9000-4800 cm-1 by using a new miniaturized micro-mirror spectrometer based on micro-optical-electro-mechanical systems (MOEMS) technology. In this work, we have found that the most prominent bands in the studied spectral region of Raman spectra are dominated by vibrational modes arising from C-C and CH2 bonds. Similarly, NIR spectra are primarily assigned as first and second overtone of C-H stretching mode and second overtone of C=O stretching mode. These spectroscopic techniques have proven to be an excellent tool to establish the fingerprint region revealing the molecular structure and conformation of QuSomes nanoparticles.

  10. Spectroscopic Studies of Abell Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Way, Michael Joseph

    The objectives of this work are to use spectroscopic techniques to accurately categorize galaxies as either HII region star forming galaxies or as Active Galactic Nuclei powered via a black hole, and to use radial velocities and projected positions of galaxies in clusters to obtain the total cluster mass and its distribution. The masses and distributions compare well to X-ray mass measurements. The commonly used Dressler, A., Thompson, I. & Shectman, S. 1985, ApJ, 288, 481 technique for discriminating between Active Galactic Nuclei and HII region galaxies uses the measurement of the equivalent width of the emission lines (OII) 3727 A, H/beta, and (OIII) 5007 A. High quality spectra from 42 galaxies were taken and it is shown that their method is not capable of distinguishing between Active Galactic Nuclei and HII region galaxies. The emission line flux from H/beta, (OIII) 5007 A, (OI) 6300 A, Hα, (NII) 6583 A, and (SII) 6716+6731 A in combination with the method of Veilleux, S. & Osterbrock, D. E. 1987, ApJS, 63, 295 must be used to accurately distinguish between Active Galactic Nuclei and HII region galaxies. Galaxy radial velocities from spectroscopic data and their projected 2-D positions in clusters are used to obtain robust estimates of the total mass and mass distribution in two clusters. The total mass is calculated using the Virial theorem after removing substructure. The mass distribution is estimated via several robust statistical tests for 1-D, 2-D and 3-D structure. It is shown that the derived mass estimates agree well with those found independently from hot X-ray gas emission in clusters.

  11. On the determination of the substrate effective doping concentration of irradiated HV-CMOS sensors using an edge-TCT technique based on the Two-Photon-Absorption process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández García, M.; González Sánchez, J.; Jaramillo Echeverría, R.; Moll, M.; Montero, R.; Moya, D.; Palomo Pinto, R.; Vila, I.

    2017-01-01

    We introduce a new method based on the transient-current technique (TCT) for the radiation tolerance assessment of an n-in-p junction with a deep n-well on a relatively low-resistivity p-type substrate commonly used for HV-CMOS pixel sensors. The transient-current method here employed uses a femtosecond laser to generate excess carriers via a two-photon-absorption (TPA) process. Special attention has been paid to overcome the limitations of the conventional transient-current method based on single-photon-absorption carrier generation when applied to the HV-CMOS sensors. Specifically, we tackle the precise determination of the depletion region boundaries, including the deep-n-well spatial location, needed to calculate the effective doping concentration of the substrate. As illustration, we have applied this new TPA-based method to both a fresh and a neutron irradiated single-pixel deep-n-well diode manufactured in a 180 nm high-voltage CMOS process. In the irradiated device, concurrent with the expected effective acceptor removal in the p-type substrate, an indication of an effective donor removal in the DNW implant was also observed.

  12. ABSORPTION ANALYZER

    DOEpatents

    Brooksbank, W.A. Jr.; Leddicotte, G.W.; Strain, J.E.; Hendon, H.H. Jr.

    1961-11-14

    A means was developed for continuously computing and indicating the isotopic assay of a process solution and for automatically controlling the process output of isotope separation equipment to provide a continuous output of the desired isotopic ratio. A counter tube is surrounded with a sample to be analyzed so that the tube is exactly in the center of the sample. A source of fast neutrons is provided and is spaced from the sample. The neutrons from the source are thermalized by causing them to pass through a neutron moderator, and the neutrons are allowed to diffuse radially through the sample to actuate the counter. A reference counter in a known sample of pure solvent is also actuated by the thermal neutrons from the neutron source. The number of neutrons which actuate the detectors is a function of a concentration of the elements in solution and their neutron absorption cross sections. The pulses produced by the detectors responsive to each neu tron passing therethrough are amplified and counted. The respective times required to accumulate a selected number of counts are measured by associated timing devices. The concentration of a particular element in solution may be determined by utilizing the following relation: T2/Ti = BCR, where B is a constant proportional to the absorption cross sections, T2 is the time of count collection for the unknown solution, Ti is the time of count collection for the pure solvent, R is the isotopic ratlo, and C is the molar concentration of the element to be determined. Knowing the slope constant B for any element and when the chemical concentration is known, the isotopic concentration may be readily determined, and conversely when the isotopic ratio is known, the chemical concentrations may be determined. (AEC)

  13. Spectroscopic (NMR, UV, FT-IR and FT-Raman) analysis and theoretical investigation of nicotinamide N-oxide with density functional theory.

    PubMed

    Atac, Ahmet; Karabacak, Mehmet; Kose, Etem; Karaca, Caglar

    2011-12-01

    The spectroscopic properties of the nicotinamide N-oxide (abbreviated as NANO, C(6)H(6)N(2)O(2)) were examined by FT-IR, FT-Raman, NMR and UV techniques. FT-IR and FT-Raman spectra in solid state were observed in the region 4000-400 cm(-1) and 3500-50 cm(-1), respectively. The (1)H and (13)C NMR spectra were recorded in DMSO. The UV absorption spectrum of the compound that dissolved in water was recorded in the range of 200-800 nm. The structural and spectroscopic data of the molecule in the ground state were calculated by using Density Functional Theory (DFT) employing B3LYP methods with the 6-311++G(d,p) basis set. The geometry of the molecule was fully optimized, vibrational spectra were calculated and fundamental vibrations were assigned on the basis of the total energy distribution (TED) of the vibrational modes, calculated with scaled quantum mechanics (SQM) method and PQS program. The optimized structure of compound was interpreted and compared with the reported experimental values. The observed vibrational wavenumbers, absorption wavelengths and chemical shifts were compared with calculated values. As a result, the optimized geometry and calculated spectroscopic data show a good agreement with the experimental results.

  14. Assessment of recent advances in measurement techniques for atmospheric carbon dioxide and methane observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zellweger, Christoph; Emmenegger, Lukas; Firdaus, Mohd; Hatakka, Juha; Heimann, Martin; Kozlova, Elena; Spain, T. Gerard; Steinbacher, Martin; van der Schoot, Marcel V.; Buchmann, Brigitte

    2016-09-01

    Until recently, atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) and methane (CH4) measurements were made almost exclusively using nondispersive infrared (NDIR) absorption and gas chromatography with flame ionisation detection (GC/FID) techniques, respectively. Recently, commercially available instruments based on spectroscopic techniques such as cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS), off-axis integrated cavity output spectroscopy (OA-ICOS) and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy have become more widely available and affordable. This resulted in a widespread use of these techniques at many measurement stations. This paper is focused on the comparison between a CRDS "travelling instrument" that has been used during performance audits within the Global Atmosphere Watch (GAW) programme of the World Meteorological Organization (WMO) with instruments incorporating other, more traditional techniques for measuring CO2 and CH4 (NDIR and GC/FID). We demonstrate that CRDS instruments and likely other spectroscopic techniques are suitable for WMO/GAW stations and allow a smooth continuation of historic CO2 and CH4 time series. Moreover, the analysis of the audit results indicates that the spectroscopic techniques have a number of advantages over the traditional methods which will lead to the improved accuracy of atmospheric CO2 and CH4 measurements.

  15. Spectroscopic Binary Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batten, A.; Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    Historically, spectroscopic binary stars were binary systems whose nature was discovered by the changing DOPPLER EFFECT or shift of the spectral lines of one or both of the component stars. The observed Doppler shift is a combination of that produced by the constant RADIAL VELOCITY (i.e. line-of-sight velocity) of the center of mass of the whole system, and the variable shift resulting from the o...

  16. Fluorescence, spectroscopic and NLO properties of green tea extract in deoxyribonucleic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manea, Ana-Maria; Rau, Ileana; Kajzar, Francois; Meghea, Aurelia

    2013-11-01

    Natural, purely biological deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA)-green tea extract (GTE) complexes at different concentrations were prepared and characterized for their spectroscopic, fluorescent, linear and nonlinear optical properties. The complexes can be processed into good optical quality thin films by solution casting. They fluoresce when excited in UV absorption band, with a significantly larger quantum yield for the DNA-GTE complex than for a pure GTE solution. The thin film refractive indices were determined by Fabry-Perot (FP) interference patterns. The third-order nonlinear optical (NLO) properties of thin films were determined by the optical third-harmonic generation technique at 1064.2 nm fundamental wavelength. The phase of THG susceptibility was determined from the concentration variation of THG susceptibility. It reveals presence of a two-photon resonance with a band lying in the optical gap.

  17. High-definition Fourier transform infrared spectroscopic imaging of prostate tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wrobel, Tomasz P.; Kwak, Jin Tae; Kadjacsy-Balla, Andre; Bhargava, Rohit

    2016-03-01

    Histopathology forms the gold standard for cancer diagnosis and therapy, and generally relies on manual examination of microscopic structural morphology within tissue. Fourier-Transform Infrared (FT-IR) imaging is an emerging vibrational spectroscopic imaging technique, especially in a High-Definition (HD) format, that provides the spatial specificity of microscopy at magnifications used in diagnostic surgical pathology. While it has been shown for standard imaging that IR absorption by tissue creates a strong signal where the spectrum at each pixel is a quantitative "fingerprint" of the molecular composition of the sample, here we show that this fingerprint also enables direct digital pathology without the need for stains or dyes for HD imaging. An assessment of the potential of HD imaging to improve diagnostic pathology accuracy is presented.

  18. Spectroscopic investigations of the interaction of the anti‑hypertension drug valsartan with human serum albumin.

    PubMed

    Jing, Jian; Qu, Xin; Tu, Zhi; Zheng, Chenhoo; Zheng, Zhicheng

    2014-06-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the interaction between valsartan, an anti-hypertension drug, and human serum albumin (HSA) using spectroscopic techniques, including fluorescence, ultraviolet-visible absorption, synchronous fluorescence and circular dichroism (CD). The results demonstrated that valsartan and HSA form a complex and that a static quenching mechanism occurs. In addition, the binding constant and the number of binding sites for valsartan on HSA were analyzed. Hydrophobic interactions and hydrogen bonds were the predominant forces in the association reaction based on thermodynamic parameters. The distance between the donor (HSA) and the acceptor (valsartan) was 1.994 nm as derived from Forster's theory. Alterations in the secondary structure of HSA in the presence of valsartan were assessed using synchronous fluorescence and CD. This study provides an enhanced understanding of the pharmacodynamic effects of valsartan on the physiologically important protein HSA.

  19. SPECTROSCOPIC ONLINE MONITORING FOR PROCESS CONTROL AND SAFEGUARDING OF RADIOCHEMICAL STREAMS

    SciTech Connect

    Bryan, Samuel A.; Levitskaia, Tatiana G.

    2013-09-29

    There is a renewed interest worldwide to promote the use of nuclear power and close the nuclear fuel cycle. The long term successful use of nuclear power is critically dependent upon adequate and safe processing and disposition of the used nuclear fuel. Liquid-liquid extraction is a separation technique commonly employed for the processing of the dissolved used nuclear fuel. The instrumentation used to monitor these processes must be robust, require little or no maintenance, and be able to withstand harsh environments such as high radiation fields and aggressive chemical matrices. This paper summarizes application of the absorption and vibrational spectroscopic techniques supplemented by physicochemical measurements for radiochemical process monitoring. In this context, our team experimentally assessed the potential of Raman and spectrophotometric techniques for online real-time monitoring of the U(VI)/nitrate ion/nitric acid and Pu(IV)/Np(V)/Nd(III), respectively, in solutions relevant to spent fuel reprocessing. These techniques demonstrate robust performance in the repetitive batch measurements of each analyte in a wide concentration range using simulant and commercial dissolved spent fuel solutions. Spectroscopic measurements served as training sets for the multivariate data analysis to obtain partial least squares predictive models, which were validated using on-line centrifugal contactor extraction tests. Satisfactory prediction of the analytes concentrations in these preliminary experiments warrants further development of the spectroscopy-based methods for radiochemical process control and safeguarding. Additionally, the ability to identify material intentionally diverted from a liquid-liquid extraction contactor system was successfully tested using on-line process monitoring as a means to detect the amount of material diverted. A chemical diversion and detection from a liquid-liquid extraction scheme was demonstrated using a centrifugal contactor system

  20. Optimization of formulation and process parameters for the production of nanosuspension by wet media milling technique: effect of Vitamin E TPGS and nanocrystal particle size on oral absorption.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Indrajit; Schenck, Daniel; Bose, Sonali; Ruegger, Colleen

    2012-11-20

    The purpose of this study was to develop nanosuspension formulations of a poorly soluble drug using a wet media milling technique. The milling process was optimized by studying the effects of critical process parameters on the size of nanoparticles using a factorial design approach. During the design of experiments (DOEs) study, different concentrations of Vitamin E TPGS in the suspensions were used to evaluate its influence on the stabilization of a nanosuspension. Once the final formulation was optimized, a pharmacokinetic study was performed in beagle dogs to investigate the effect of different ranges of particle size of nanocrystals on the plasma profile. A significant increase in AUC and C(max) was observed when the drug substance was converted into nanocrystals, likely due to the increase in dissolution rate. Results also revealed that the nanosuspension formulation (consists of nanocrystals with narrow size distribution, having a mean particle size<300 nm) produced less variability with regards to the individual plasma concentrations in the dogs when compared an alternate nanocrystal formulation (consists of nanocrystals with broad size distribution having a mean particle size<750 nm). This type of observation can be explained due to the Ostwald ripening phenomena between the nanocrystals when the particle size distribution was very broad (higher poly dispersity index). Surprisingly, the un-micronized suspension containing Vitamin E TPGS did not show any significant impact on pharmacokinetic parameters.

  1. Spectral radiative heat transfer in coal furnaces using a hybrid technique

    SciTech Connect

    Ahluwalia, R.K.; Im, K.H.

    1994-03-01

    A hybrid technique has been developed to solve three-dimensional spectral radiation transport equations for absorbing, emitting and anisotropically scattering media. An optimal mix of computational speed and accuracy is obtained by combining the discrete ordinate method (S{sub 4}), modified differential approximation (MDA) and P{sub 1} approximation for use in different range of optical thicknesses. The technique is used in conjunction with a char burnout model and spectroscopic data for H{sub 2}O, CO{sub 2}, CO, char, soot and ash to determine the influence of ash composition, ash content and coal preparation on furnace heat absorption.

  2. Fluorescence Spectroscopic Properties of Normal and Abnormal Biomedical Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pradhan, Asima

    Steady state and time-resolved optical spectroscopy and native fluorescence is used to study the physical and optical properties occurring in diseased and non-diseased biological human tissue, in particular, cancer of the human breast, artery and the dynamics of a photosensitizer useful in photodynamic therapy. The main focus of the research is on the optical properties of cancer and atherosclerotic tissues as compared to their normal counterparts using the different luminescence based spectroscopic techniques such as steady state fluorescence, time-resolved fluorescence, excitation spectroscopy and phosphorescence. The excitation and steady-state spectroscopic fluorescence using visible excitation wavelength displays a difference between normal and malignant tissues. This difference is attributed to absorption of the emission by hemoglobin in normal tissues. This method using 488nm fails to distinguish neoplastic tissue such as benign tissues and tumors from malignant tumors. The time-resolved fluorescence at visible, near -uv and uv excitation wavelengths display non-exponential profiles which are significantly different for malignant tumors as compared to non-malignant tissues only with uv excitation. The differences observed with visible and near-uv excitation wavelengths are not as significant. The non-exponential profiles are interpreted as due to a combination of fluorophores along with the action of non-radiative processes. Low temperature luminescence studies confirm the occurrence of non-radiative decay processes while temporal studies of various relevant biomolecules indicate the probable fluorophores responsible for the observed signal in tissues. Phosphorescence from human tissues have been observed for the first time and lifetimes of a few hundred nanoseconds are measured for malignant and benign tissues. Time-resolved fluorescence studies of normal artery and atherosclerotic plaque have shown that a combination of two excitation wavelengths can

  3. Nonplanar property study of antifungal agent tolnaftate-spectroscopic approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arul Dhas, D.; Hubert Joe, I.; Roy, S. D. D.; Balachandran, S.

    2011-09-01

    Vibrational analysis of the thionocarbamate fungicide tolnaftate which is antidermatophytic, antitrichophytic and antimycotic agent, primarily inhibits the ergosterol biosynthesis in the fungus, was carried out using NIR FT-Raman and FTIR spectroscopic techniques. The equilibrium geometry, various bonding features, harmonic vibrational wavenumbers and torsional potential energy surface (PES) scan studies have been computed using density functional theory method. The detailed interpretation of the vibrational spectra has been carried out with the aid of VEDA.4 program. Vibrational spectra, natural bonding orbital (NBO) analysis and optimized molecular structure show the clear evidence for electronic interaction of thionocarbamate group with aromatic ring. Predicted electronic absorption spectrum from TD-DFT calculation has been compared with the UV-vis spectrum. The Mulliken population analysis on atomic charges and the HOMO-LUMO energy were also calculated. Vibrational analysis reveals that the simultaneous IR and Raman activation of the C-C stretching mode in the phenyl and naphthalene ring provide evidence for the charge transfer interaction between the donor and acceptor groups and is responsible for its bioactivity as a fungicide.

  4. Spectroscopic Characterization of Niagara Blue Dye in the Restricted Geometry of Layer-By Self-Assembled Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Indra; Das, Bandana; Nath, Ranendu Kumar; Ganguly, Banti; Mishra, Bijay Kumar; Pal, Ajitesh

    2016-06-01

    Multilayer films can be precisely engineered on solid substrate via layer-by-layer (LbL) self-assemble technique using negatively charged organic dye and positively charged polyelectrolytes or surfactants. This communication first time reports the successful incorporation of an anionic dye Niagara blue (NB) in Polyallylamine hydrochloride (PAH) by electrostatic sequential alternative LbL adsorption. The photo-physical characteristics of LbL films are investigated by varying different parameters such as number of deposited layer, dipping time in dye solution, pH of PAH solution, concentration of the dye, etc. In addition, the interaction of NB with double tail surfactant Didodecyl dimethyl ammonium bromide (DDAB) at different concentrations is also studied in the light of UV-Vis absorption spectroscopy. Spectroscopic analysis reveals that NB has been successfully anchored to PAH or DDAB through electrostatic self-assembled technique and forms molecular aggregates. The formation of aggregates is further confirmed by atomic force microscopic (AFM) study.

  5. Modular total absorption spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karny, M.; Rykaczewski, K. P.; Fijałkowska, A.; Rasco, B. C.; Wolińska-Cichocka, M.; Grzywacz, R. K.; Goetz, K. C.; Miller, D.; Zganjar, E. F.

    2016-11-01

    The design and performance of the Modular Total Absorption Spectrometer built and commissioned at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory is presented. The active volume of the detector is approximately one ton of NaI(Tl), which results in very high full γ energy peak efficiency of 71% at 6 MeV and nearly flat efficiency of around 81.5% for low energy γ-rays between 300 keV and 1 MeV. In addition to the high peak efficiency, the modular construction of the detector permits the use of a γ-coincidence technique in data analysis as well as β-delayed neutron observation.

  6. LIBS spectroscopic classification relative to compressive sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffin, Steven T.; Jacobs, Eddie; Furxhi, Orges

    2011-05-01

    Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) utilizes a diversity of standard spectroscopic techniques for classification of materials present in the sample. Pre-excitation processing sometimes limits the analyte to a short list of candidates. Prior art demonstrates that sparsity is present in the data. This is sometimes characterized as identification by components. Traditionally, spectroscopic identification has been accomplished by an expert reader in a manner typical for MRI images in the medicine. In an effort to automate this process, more recent art has emphasized the use of customized variations to standard classification algorithms. In addition, formal mathematical proofs for compressive sensing have been advanced. Recently the University of Memphis has been contracted by the Spectroscopic Materials Identification Center to advance and characterize the sensor research and development related to LIBS. Applications include portable standoff sensing for improvised explosive device detection and related law enforcement and military applications. Reduction of the mass, power consumption and other portability parameters is seen as dependent on classification choices for a LIBS system. This paper presents results for the comparison of standard LIBS classification techniques to those implied by Compressive Sensing mathematics. Optimization results and implications for portable LIBS design are presented.

  7. Flux measurements using the BATSE spectroscopic detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcnamara, Bernard

    1993-01-01

    Among the Compton Gama-Ray Observatory instruments, the BATSE Spectroscopic Detectors (SD) have the distinction of being able to detect photons of energies less than about 20 keV. This is an interesting energy range for the examination of low mass X-ray binaries (LMXB's). In fact, Sco X-1, the prototype LMXB, is easily seen even in the raw BATSE spectroscopic data. The all-sky coverage afforded by these detectors offers a unique opportunity to monitor this source over time periods never before possible. The aim of this investigation was to test a number of ways in which both continous and discrete flux measurements can be obtained using the BATSE spectroscopic datasets. A instrumental description of a SD can be found in the Compton Workshop of Apr. 1989, this report will deal only with methods which can be used to analyze its datasets. Many of the items discussed below, particularly in regard to the earth occultation technique, have been developed, refined, and applied by the BATSE team to the reduction of BATSE LAD data. Code written as part of this project utilizes portions of that work. The following discussions will first address issues related to the reduction of SD datasets using the earth occultation technique. It will then discuss methods for the recovery of the flux history of strong sources while they are above the earth's limb. The report will conclude with recommended reduction procedures.