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Sample records for absorption spectroscopic xas

  1. Quantification of rapid environmental redox processes with quick-scanning x-ray absorption spectroscopy (Q-XAS).

    PubMed

    Ginder-Vogel, Matthew; Landrot, Gautier; Fischel, Jason S; Sparks, Donald L

    2009-09-22

    Quantification of the initial rates of environmental reactions at the mineral/water interface is a fundamental prerequisite to determining reaction mechanisms and contaminant transport modeling and predicting environmental risk. Until recently, experimental techniques with adequate time resolution and elemental sensitivity to measure initial rates of the wide variety of environmental reactions were quite limited. Techniques such as electron paramagnetic resonance and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopies suffer from limited elemental specificity and poor sensitivity to inorganic elements, respectively. Ex situ analysis of batch and stirred-flow systems provides high elemental sensitivity; however, their time resolution is inadequate to characterize rapid environmental reactions. Here we apply quick-scanning x-ray absorption spectroscopy (Q-XAS), at sub-second time-scales, to measure the initial oxidation rate of As(III) to As(V) by hydrous manganese(IV) oxide. Using Q-XAS, As(III) and As(V) concentrations were determined every 0.98 s in batch reactions. The initial apparent As(III) depletion rate constants (t < 30 s) measured with Q-XAS are nearly twice as large as rate constants measured with traditional analytical techniques. Our results demonstrate the importance of developing analytical techniques capable of analyzing environmental reactions on the same time scale as they occur. Given the high sensitivity, elemental specificity, and time resolution of Q-XAS, it has many potential applications. They could include measuring not only redox reactions but also dissolution/precipitation reactions, such as the formation and/or reductive dissolution of Fe(III) (hydr)oxides, solid-phase transformations (i.e., formation of layered-double hydroxide minerals), or almost any other reaction occurring in aqueous media that can be measured using x-ray absorption spectroscopy. PMID:19805269

  2. Quick-EXAFS setup at the SuperXAS beamline for in situ X-ray absorption spectroscopy with 10 ms time resolution

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Oliver; Nachtegaal, Maarten; Just, Justus; Lützenkirchen-Hecht, Dirk; Frahm, Ronald

    2016-01-01

    The quick-EXAFS (QEXAFS) method adds time resolution to X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) and allows dynamic structural changes to be followed. A completely new QEXAFS setup consisting of monochromator, detectors and data acquisition system is presented, as installed at the SuperXAS bending-magnet beamline at the Swiss Light Source (Paul Scherrer Institute, Switzerland). The monochromator uses Si(111) and Si(311) channel-cut crystals mounted on one crystal stage, and remote exchange allows an energy range from 4.0 keV to 32 keV to be covered. The spectral scan range can be electronically adjusted up to several keV to cover multiple absorption edges in one scan. The determination of the Bragg angle close to the position of the crystals allows high-accuracy measurements. Absorption spectra can be acquired with fast gridded ionization chambers at oscillation frequencies of up to 50 Hz resulting in a time resolution of 10 ms, using both scan directions of each oscillation period. The carefully developed low-noise detector system yields high-quality absorption data. The unique setup allows both state-of-the-art QEXAFS and stable step-scan operation without the need to exchange whole monochromators. The long-term stability of the Bragg angle was investigated and absorption spectra of reference materials as well as of a fast chemical reaction demonstrate the overall capabilities of the new setup. PMID:26698072

  3. Spectroscopic determination of the bandgap crossover composition in MBE-grown AlxGa1-xAs

    DOE PAGES

    Fluegel, Brian; Alberi, Kirstin; Reno, John; Mascarenhas, Angelo

    2015-03-12

    The aluminum concentration dependence of the energies of the direct and indirect bandgaps arising from the Γ and X conduction bands are measured at 1.7 K in the semiconductor alloy AlxGa1-xAs. The composition at which the bands cross is determined from photoluminescence of molecular-beam epitaxy samples grown very close to crossover. The use of resonant laser excitation and the improved sample linewidth allows precise determination of the bound exciton transition energies. Moreover, photoluminescence excitation spectroscopy is used to measure the binding energies of the donor-bound excitons and the Γ free exciton binding energy.

  4. Use of X-Ray Absorption Spectroscopy (XAS) to Speciate Manganese in Airborne Particulate Matter from 5 Counties Across the US

    PubMed Central

    Datta, Saugata; Rule, Ana M; Mihalic, Jana N; Chillrud, Steve N; Bostick, Benjamin C.; Ramos-Bonilla, Juan P; Han, Inkyu; Polyak, Lisa M; Geyh, Alison S; Breysse, Patrick N

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to characterize manganese oxidation states and speciation in airborne particulate matter (PM), and describe how these potentially important determinants of PM toxicity vary by location. Ambient PM samples were collected from five counties across the US using a high volume sequential cyclone system that collects PM in dry bulk form segregated into “coarse” and “fine” size fractions. The fine fraction was analyzed for this study. Analyses included total Mn using ICP-MS, and characterization of oxidation states and speciation using X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy (XAS). XAS spectra of all samples and ten standard compounds of Mn were obtained at the National Synchrotron Light Source. XAS data was analyzed using Linear Combination Fitting (LCF). Results of the LCF analysis describe differences in composition between samples. Mn(II) acetate and Mn(II) oxide are present in all samples, while Mn(II) carbonate and Mn(IV) oxide are absent. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first paper to characterize Mn composition of ambient PM and examine differences between urban sites in the US. Differences in oxidation state and composition indicate regional variations in sources and atmospheric chemistry that may help explain differences in health effects identified in epidemiological studies. PMID:22309075

  5. In-situ X-Ray Absorption Spectroscopy (XAS) Investigation of a Bifunctional Manganese Oxide Catalyst with High Activity for Electrochemical Water Oxidation and Oxygen Reduction

    PubMed Central

    Benck, Jesse D.; Gul, Sheraz; Webb, Samuel M.; Yachandra, Vittal K.; Yano, Junko; Jaramillo, Thomas F.

    2013-01-01

    In-situ x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) is a powerful technique that can be applied to electrochemical systems, with the ability to elucidate the chemical nature of electrocatalysts under reaction conditions. In this study, we perform in-situ XAS measurements on a bifunctional manganese oxide (MnOx) catalyst with high electrochemical activity for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) and the oxygen evolution reaction (OER). Using x-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) and extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS), we find that exposure to an ORR-relevant potential of 0.7 V vs. RHE produces a disordered Mn3II,III,IIIO4 phase with negligible contributions from other phases. After the potential is increased to a highly anodic value of 1.8 V vs. RHE, relevant to the OER, we observe an oxidation of approximately 80% of the catalytic thin film to form a mixed MnIII,IV oxide, while the remaining 20% of the film consists of a less oxidized phase, likely corresponding to unchanged Mn3II,III,IIIO4. XAS and electrochemical characterization of two thin film catalysts with different MnOx thicknesses reveals no significant influence of thickness on the measured oxidation states, at either ORR or OER potentials, but demonstrates that the OER activity scales with film thickness. This result suggests that the films have porous structure, which does not restrict electrocatalysis to the top geometric layer of the film. As the portion of the catalyst film that is most likely to be oxidized at the high potentials necessary for the OER is that which is closest to the electrolyte interface, we hypothesize that the MnIII,IV oxide, rather than Mn3II,III,IIIO4, is the phase pertinent to the observed OER activity. PMID:23758050

  6. Ultraviolet-Absorption Spectroscopic Biofilm Monitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Micheels, Ronald H.

    2004-01-01

    An ultraviolet-absorption spectrometer system has been developed as a prototype instrument to be used in continuous, real-time monitoring to detect the growth of biofilms. Such monitoring is desirable because biofilms are often harmful. For example, biofilms in potable-water and hydroponic systems act as both sources of pathogenic bacteria that resist biocides and as a mechanism for deterioration (including corrosion) of pipes. Biofilms formed from several types of hazardous bacteria can thrive in both plant-growth solutions and low-nutrient media like distilled water. Biofilms can also form in condensate tanks in air-conditioning systems and in industrial heat exchangers. At present, bacteria in potable-water and plant-growth systems aboard the space shuttle (and previously on the Mir space station) are monitored by culture-plate counting, which entails an incubation period of 24 to 48 hours for each sample. At present, there are no commercially available instruments for continuous monitoring of biofilms in terrestrial or spaceborne settings.

  7. Mn k-edge x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) studies of La{sub 1-x}Sr{sub x}MnO{sub 3}.

    SciTech Connect

    Mini, S. M.; Mitchell, J.; Hinks, D. G.; Alatas, A.; Rosenmann, D.; Kimball, C. W.; Montano, P. A.

    1998-03-06

    Systematic Mn K-edge x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) measurements on samples of La{sub 1{minus}x}Sr{sub x}MnO{sub 3}, which are precursors to colossal magnetoresistive (CMR) materials, are reported. Detailed results on the edge or chemical shift as a function of Sr concentration (hole doping) and sample preparation (air vs oxygen annealed), are discussed. For comparison, a systematic XANES study of the Mn K-edge energy shift, denoting valence change in Mn, has been made in standard manganese oxide systems. Contrary to expectations, the variation in near-edge energies for Mn in La{sub 0.725}Sr{sub 0.275}MnO{sub 3} were small when compared to the difference between that for manganese oxide standards of nominal valence of +3 and +4 (Mn{sub 2}O{sub 3} and MnO{sub 2}).

  8. Low absorption vitreous carbon reactors for operando XAS: a case study on Cu/Zeolites for selective catalytic reduction of NO(x) by NH3.

    PubMed

    Kispersky, Vincent F; Kropf, A Jeremy; Ribeiro, Fabio H; Miller, Jeffrey T

    2012-02-21

    We describe the use of vitreous carbon as an improved reactor material for an operando X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) plug-flow reactor. These tubes significantly broaden the operating range for operando experiments. Using selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of NO(x) by NH(3) on Cu/Zeolites (SSZ-13, SAPO-34 and ZSM-5) as an example reaction, we illustrate the high-quality XAS data achievable with these reactors. The operando experiments showed that in Standard SCR conditions of 300 ppm NO, 300 ppm NH(3), 5% O(2), 5% H(2)O, 5% CO(2) and balance He at 200 °C, the Cu was a mixture of Cu(I) and Cu(II) oxidation states. XANES and EXAFS fitting found the percent of Cu(I) to be 15%, 45% and 65% for SSZ-13, SAPO-34 and ZSM-5, respectively. For Standard SCR, the catalytic rates per mole of Cu for Cu/SSZ-13 and Cu/SAPO-34 were about one third of the rate per mole of Cu on Cu/ZSM-5. Based on the apparent lack of correlation of rate with the presence of Cu(I), we propose that the reaction occurs via a redox cycle of Cu(I) and Cu(II). Cu(I) was not found in in situ SCR experiments on Cu/Zeolites under the same conditions, demonstrating a possible pitfall of in situ measurements. A Cu/SiO(2) catalyst, reduced in H(2) at 300 °C, was also used to demonstrate the reactor's operando capabilities using a bending magnet beamline. Analysis of the EXAFS data showed the Cu/SiO(2) catalyst to be in a partially reduced Cu metal-Cu(I) state. In addition to improvements in data quality, the reactors are superior in temperature, stability, strength and ease of use compared to previously proposed borosilicate glass, polyimide tubing, beryllium and capillary reactors. The solid carbon tubes are non-porous, machinable, can be operated at high pressure (tested at 25 bar), are inert, have high material purity and high X-ray transmittance. PMID:22158950

  9. Low absorption vitreous carbon reactors for operando XAS: a case study on Cu/Zeolites for selective catalytic reduction of NO(x) by NH3.

    PubMed

    Kispersky, Vincent F; Kropf, A Jeremy; Ribeiro, Fabio H; Miller, Jeffrey T

    2012-02-21

    We describe the use of vitreous carbon as an improved reactor material for an operando X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) plug-flow reactor. These tubes significantly broaden the operating range for operando experiments. Using selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of NO(x) by NH(3) on Cu/Zeolites (SSZ-13, SAPO-34 and ZSM-5) as an example reaction, we illustrate the high-quality XAS data achievable with these reactors. The operando experiments showed that in Standard SCR conditions of 300 ppm NO, 300 ppm NH(3), 5% O(2), 5% H(2)O, 5% CO(2) and balance He at 200 °C, the Cu was a mixture of Cu(I) and Cu(II) oxidation states. XANES and EXAFS fitting found the percent of Cu(I) to be 15%, 45% and 65% for SSZ-13, SAPO-34 and ZSM-5, respectively. For Standard SCR, the catalytic rates per mole of Cu for Cu/SSZ-13 and Cu/SAPO-34 were about one third of the rate per mole of Cu on Cu/ZSM-5. Based on the apparent lack of correlation of rate with the presence of Cu(I), we propose that the reaction occurs via a redox cycle of Cu(I) and Cu(II). Cu(I) was not found in in situ SCR experiments on Cu/Zeolites under the same conditions, demonstrating a possible pitfall of in situ measurements. A Cu/SiO(2) catalyst, reduced in H(2) at 300 °C, was also used to demonstrate the reactor's operando capabilities using a bending magnet beamline. Analysis of the EXAFS data showed the Cu/SiO(2) catalyst to be in a partially reduced Cu metal-Cu(I) state. In addition to improvements in data quality, the reactors are superior in temperature, stability, strength and ease of use compared to previously proposed borosilicate glass, polyimide tubing, beryllium and capillary reactors. The solid carbon tubes are non-porous, machinable, can be operated at high pressure (tested at 25 bar), are inert, have high material purity and high X-ray transmittance.

  10. LEAD SORPTION ON RUTHENIUM OXIDE: A MACROSCOPIC AND SPECTROSCOPIC STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The sorption and desorption of Pb on RuO2 xH2O were examined kinetically and thermodynamically via spectroscopic and macroscopic investigations. X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) was employed to determine the sorption mechanism with regard to identity of nearest atomic neighbo...

  11. X-ray absorption spectroscopic studies of mononuclear non-heme iron enzymes

    SciTech Connect

    Westre, T.E.

    1996-01-01

    Fe-K-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) has been used to investigate the electronic and geometric structure of the iron active site in non-heme iron enzymes. A new theoretical extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) analysis approach, called GNXAS, has been tested on data for iron model complexes to evaluate the utility and reliability of this new technique, especially with respect to the effects of multiple-scattering. In addition, a detailed analysis of the 1s{yields}3d pre-edge feature has been developed as a tool for investigating the oxidation state, spin state, and geometry of iron sites. Edge and EXAFS analyses have then been applied to the study of non-heme iron enzyme active sites.

  12. X-ray Absorption and Emission Spectroscopic Studies of [L2Fe2S2](n) Model Complexes: Implications for the Experimental Evaluation of Redox States in Iron-Sulfur Clusters.

    PubMed

    Kowalska, Joanna K; Hahn, Anselm W; Albers, Antonia; Schiewer, Christine E; Bjornsson, Ragnar; Lima, Frederico A; Meyer, Franc; DeBeer, Serena

    2016-05-01

    Herein, a systematic study of [L2Fe2S2](n) model complexes (where L = bis(benzimidazolato) and n = 2-, 3-, 4-) has been carried out using iron and sulfur K-edge X-ray absorption (XAS) and iron Kβ and valence-to-core X-ray emission spectroscopies (XES). These data are used as a test set to evaluate the relative strengths and weaknesses of X-ray core level spectroscopies in assessing redox changes in iron-sulfur clusters. The results are correlated to density functional theory (DFT) calculations of the spectra in order to further support the quantitative information that can be extracted from the experimental data. It is demonstrated that due to canceling effects of covalency and spin state, the information that can be extracted from Fe Kβ XES mainlines is limited. However, a careful analysis of the Fe K-edge XAS data shows that localized valence vs delocalized valence species may be differentiated on the basis of the pre-edge and K-edge energies. These findings are then applied to existing literature Fe K-edge XAS data on the iron protein, P-cluster, and FeMoco sites of nitrogenase. The ability to assess the extent of delocalization in the iron protein vs the P-cluster is highlighted. In addition, possible charge states for FeMoco on the basis of Fe K-edge XAS data are discussed. This study provides an important reference for future X-ray spectroscopic studies of iron-sulfur clusters.

  13. Absorption and emission spectroscopic characterisation of 8-amino-riboflavin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tyagi, A.; Zirak, P.; Penzkofer, A.; Mathes, T.; Hegemann, P.; Mack, M.; Ghisla, S.

    2009-10-01

    The flavin dye 8-amino-8-demethyl- D-riboflavin (AF) in the solvents water, DMSO, methanol, and chloroform/DMSO was studied by absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy. The first absorption band is red-shifted compared to riboflavin, and blue-shifted compared to roseoflavin (8-dimethylamino-8-demethyl-D-riboflavin). The fluorescence quantum yield of AF in the studied solvents varies between 20% and 50%. The fluorescence lifetimes were found to be in the 2-5 ns range. AF is well soluble in DMSO, weakly soluble in water and methanol, and practically insoluble in chloroform. The limited solubility causes AF aggregation, which was seen in differences between measured absorption spectra and fluorescence excitation spectra. Light scattering in the dye absorption region is discussed and approximate absorption cross-section spectra are determined from the combined measurement of transmission and fluorescence excitation spectra. The photo-stability of AF was studied by prolonged light exposure. The photo-degradation routes of AF are discussed.

  14. Spectroscopic study of low-temperature hydrogen absorption in palladium

    SciTech Connect

    Ienaga, K. Takata, H.; Onishi, Y.; Inagaki, Y.; Kawae, T.; Tsujii, H.; Kimura, T.

    2015-01-12

    We report real-time detection of hydrogen (H) absorption in metallic palladium (Pd) nano-contacts immersed in liquid H{sub 2} using inelastic electron spectroscopy (IES). After introduction of liquid H{sub 2}, the spectra exhibit the time evolution from the pure Pd to the Pd hydride, indicating that H atoms are absorbed in Pd nano-contacts even at the temperature where the thermal process is not expected. The IES time and bias voltage dependences show that H absorption develops by applying bias voltage 30 ∼ 50 mV, which can be explained by quantum tunneling. The results represent that IES is a powerful method to study the kinetics of high density H on solid surface.

  15. Spectroscopic study of low-temperature hydrogen absorption in palladium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ienaga, K.; Takata, H.; Onishi, Y.; Inagaki, Y.; Tsujii, H.; Kimura, T.; Kawae, T.

    2015-01-01

    We report real-time detection of hydrogen (H) absorption in metallic palladium (Pd) nano-contacts immersed in liquid H2 using inelastic electron spectroscopy (IES). After introduction of liquid H2, the spectra exhibit the time evolution from the pure Pd to the Pd hydride, indicating that H atoms are absorbed in Pd nano-contacts even at the temperature where the thermal process is not expected. The IES time and bias voltage dependences show that H absorption develops by applying bias voltage 30 ˜ 50 mV, which can be explained by quantum tunneling. The results represent that IES is a powerful method to study the kinetics of high density H on solid surface.

  16. 60 Kelvin Absorption Cell for Planetary Spectroscopic Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chackerian, Charles, Jr.; McGee, James; Gore, Warren I. Y. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    We will describe a 30 cm long absorption cell which has been in operation for about two years. The cell is designed for use with sensitive-wide-spectral-coverage Fourier transform spectrometers. A helium compressor refrigerator allows temperatures to be achieved down to about 57 K. Heaters allow above-ambient temperatures as well. A unique vibration isolation system effectively quenches the transfer of vibration of the compressor unit to the spectrometer. An acid-resistant stainless steel liner in the copper body of the call permits the use of corrosive gases.

  17. Novel high-temperature reactors for in situ studies of three-way catalysts using turbo-XAS.

    PubMed

    Guilera, Gemma; Gorges, Bernard; Pascarelli, Sakura; Vitoux, Hugo; Newton, Mark A; Prestipino, Carmelo; Nagai, Yasutaka; Hara, Naoyuki

    2009-09-01

    Two novel high-temperature reactors for in situ X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) measurements in fluorescence are presented, each of them being optimized for a particular purpose. The powerful combination of these reactors with the turbo-XAS technique used in a dispersive-XAS beamline permits the study of commercial three-way catalysts under realistic gas composition and temporal conditions.

  18. LUCIA, a microfocus soft XAS beamline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flank, A.-M.; Cauchon, G.; Lagarde, P.; Bac, S.; Janousch, M.; Wetter, R.; Dubuisson, J.-M.; Idir, M.; Langlois, F.; Moreno, T.; Vantelon, D.

    2006-05-01

    The beamline "LUCIA" (line for ultimate characterization by imaging and absorption) is a "tender" (0.8-8 keV) X-ray microprobe with capabilities for chemical speciation by micro-X-ray absorption spectroscopy (μ-XAS) and for elemental mapping by X-ray micro-fluorescence (μ-XRF). It allows the possibility to study heterogeneous samples at a micrometer scale and to combine these two element-specific and non-destructive techniques. A monochromatic beam of a few micrometer in size is incident on a sample which is mounted on a scanning x-y-z stage. μ-XRF shows the location of the elements, their relative abundances, and their association with other elements. One can take advantage of the monochromatic beam which allows separating out different elements by their absorption edges. After mapping the fluorescence, spots of interest can be analysed by XAS to determine the speciation (local chemistry, quantitative determination of the local geometric structure around the absorbing atom) of the elements and how they depend on the different components. Installed at first at the SLS of the Paul Scherrer Institute (Switzerland), the LUCIA beamline will be transferred to SOLEIL by the beginning of 2008. The energy range offered by the beamline corresponds to the best performances of SLS and SOLEIL in terms of brightness. It allows XAS experiments at the K edge of elements ranging from Na to Fe, L edges from Ni to Gd, and M edges of rare earths and actinides.

  19. Impact of difference in absorption line parameters in spectroscopic databases on CO2 and CH4 atmospheric content retrievals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chesnokova, T. Yu.; Chentsov, A. V.; Rokotyan, N. V.; Zakharov, V. I.

    2016-09-01

    The impact of uncertainties in CH4 and CO2 absorption line parameters in modern spectroscopic databases on the atmospheric transmission simulation in the near-infrared region is investigated. The atmospheric contents of CH4 and CO2 are retrieved from the absorption solar spectra measured by a ground-based Fourier transform spectrometer. Different spectroscopic databases are used in the forward radiative transfer model and a comparison of the retrieved results is made.

  20. KEMP: A program script for automated biological x-ray absorption spectroscopy data reduction

    SciTech Connect

    Korbas, Malgorzata; Fulla Marsa, Daniel; Meyer-Klaucke, Wolfram

    2006-06-15

    Automation of x-ray absorption spectroscopic (XAS) data reduction is essential to cope with high-throughput data collection becoming available at an increasing number of synchrotron radiation centers. A flexible script called KEMP has been developed and implemented at the XAS beamline at EMBL Hamburg. It automatically processes fluorescence XAS data. The pipeline includes dead time correction, energy calibration, selection of fluorescence detector channels, as well as the extraction of x-ray absorption near-edge structure and extended x-ray-absorption fine structure. The output is quickly available and thus can be included in the design of further experiments, which results in a more efficient use of the beam time.

  1. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance and X-Ray Absorption Spectroscopic Studies of Lithium Insertion in Silver Vanadium Oxide Cathodes

    SciTech Connect

    Leifer,N.; Colon, A.; Martocci, k.; Greenbaum, S.; Alamgir, F.; Reddy, T.; Gleason, N.; Leising, R.; Takeuchi, E.

    2007-01-01

    Structural studies have been carried out on Ag{sub 2}V{sub 4}O{sub 11} (silver vanadium oxide, SVO) and Li{sub x}Ag{sub 2}V{sub 4}O{sub 11}, lithiated SVO with x=0.72, 2.13, and 5.59 using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS). Lithium-7 NMR indicates the formation of a solid electrolyte interphase layer on the x=0.72 sample and lithium intercalation into both octahedral and tetrahedral sites in the SVO lattice, and that most but not all of the Ag (I) is reduced prior to initiation of V(V) reduction. Vanadium-51 NMR studies of SVO and lithiated SVO show decreased crystallinity with increased lithiation, as previously reported. Silver XAS studies indicate the formation of metallic silver crystallites in all the lithiated samples. A comparison of X-ray absorption near edge spectroscopy spectra for vanadium in these samples with those of reference compounds shows that some reduction of vanadium (V) occurs in the lithiated SVO with x=0.72 and increases with further lithiation leading to the formation of V(IV) and V(III) species. The results of this study indicate that vanadium(V) reduction occurs in parallel with silver (I) reduction during the initial stages of SVO lithiation, leading ultimately to the formation of vanadium (IV) and (III) species with further lithiation.

  2. The Time-resolved and Extreme-conditions XAS (TEXAS) facility at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility: the energy-dispersive X-ray absorption spectroscopy beamline ID24.

    PubMed

    Pascarelli, S; Mathon, O; Mairs, T; Kantor, I; Agostini, G; Strohm, C; Pasternak, S; Perrin, F; Berruyer, G; Chappelet, P; Clavel, C; Dominguez, M C

    2016-01-01

    The European Synchrotron Radiation Facility has recently made available to the user community a facility totally dedicated to Time-resolved and Extreme-conditions X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy--TEXAS. Based on an upgrade of the former energy-dispersive XAS beamline ID24, it provides a unique experimental tool combining unprecedented brilliance (up to 10(14) photons s(-1) on a 4 µm × 4 µm FWHM spot) and detection speed for a full EXAFS spectrum (100 ps per spectrum). The science mission includes studies of processes down to the nanosecond timescale, and investigations of matter at extreme pressure (500 GPa), temperature (10000 K) and magnetic field (30 T). The core activities of the beamline are centered on new experiments dedicated to the investigation of extreme states of matter that can be maintained only for very short periods of time. Here the infrastructure, optical scheme, detection systems and sample environments used to enable the mission-critical performance are described, and examples of first results on the investigation of the electronic and local structure in melts at pressure and temperature conditions relevant to the Earth's interior and in laser-shocked matter are given.

  3. Narrow C IV absorption doublets on quasar spectra of the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhi-Fu; Gu, Qiu-Sheng; Zhou, Luwenjia; Chen, Yan-Mei

    2016-11-01

    In this paper, we extend our work of Papers I and II, which are assigned to systematically survey C IV λλ1548,1551 narrow absorption lines (NALs) with zabs ≪ zem on quasar spectra of the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS) to collect C IV NALs with zabs ≈ zem from blue to red wings of C IV λ1549 emission lines. Together with Papers I and II, we have collected a total number of 41 479 C IV NALs with 1.4544 ≤ zabs ≤ 4.9224 in surveyed spectral region redward of Lyα until red wing of C IV λ1549 emission line. We find that the stronger C IV NALs tend to be the more saturated absorptions, and associated systems (zabs ≈ zem) seem to have larger absorption strengths when compared to intervening ones (zabs ≪ zem). The redshift density evolution behaviour of absorbers (the number of absorbers per redshift path) is similar to the history of the cosmic star formation. When compared to the quasar-frame velocity (β) distribution of Mg II absorbers, the β distribution of C IV absorbers is broader at β ≈ 0, shows longer extended tail, and exhibits a larger dispersion for environmental absorptions. In addition, for associated C IV absorbers, we find that low-luminosity quasars seem to exhibit smaller β and stronger absorptions when compared to high-luminosity quasars.

  4. X-ray absorption and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopic study of arsenic mobilization during mackinawite (FeS) oxidation.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Hoon Y; Han, Young-Soo; Hayes, Kim F

    2010-02-01

    In this study we investigated the speciation of the solid-phase As formed by reacting 2 x 10(-4) M As(III) with 1.0 g/L mackinawite and the potential for these sorbed species to be mobilized (released into the aqueous phase) upon exposure to atmospheric oxygen at pH 4.9, 7.1, and 9.1. Before oxygen exposure, X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analyses indicated that As(III) was removed from the aqueous phase by forming As(0), AsS, and surface precipitates as thioarsenites at pH 4.9 and As(0) and thioarsenite surface precipitates at pH 7.1 and 9.1. When oxygen was introduced, XAS analysis indicated that As(0) and the surface precipitates were quickly transformed, whereas AsS was persistent. During intermediate oxygen exposure times, dissolved As increased at pH 4.9 and 7.1 due to the rapid oxidation of As(0) and the slow precipitation of iron (oxyhydr)oxides, the oxidation products of mackinawite. This indicates that oxidative mobilization is a potential pathway for arsenic contamination of water at acidic to neutral pH. The mobilized As was eventually resorbed by forming edge-sharing and double-corner-sharing surface complexes with iron (oxyhydr)oxides.

  5. X-ray absorption spectroscopic evidence for the complexation of Hg(II) by reduced sulfur in soil humic substances

    SciTech Connect

    Xia, K.; Skyllberg, U.L.; Bleam, W.F.; Helmke, P.A.; Bloom, P.R.; Nater, E.A.

    1999-01-15

    Analysis of Hg(II) complexed by a soil humic acid (HA) using synchrotron-based X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) revealed the importance of reduces sulfur functional groups (thiol (R-SH) and disulfide (R-SS-R)/disulfane (R-SSH)) in humic substances in the complexation of Hg(II). A two-coordinate binding environment with one oxygen atom and one sulfur atom at distances of 2.02 and 2.38 {angstrom}, respectively, was found in the first coordination shell of Hg(II) complexed by humic acid. Model calculations show that a second coordination sphere could contain one carbon atom and a second sulfur atom at 2.78 and 2.93 {angstrom}, respectively. This suggests that in addition to thiol S, disulfide/disulfane S may be involved with the complexation of Hg(II) in soil organic matter. The appearance of carbon atom in the second coordination shell suggests that one O-containing ligand such as carboxyl and phenol ligands rather than H{sub 2}O molecule is bound to the Hg(II). The involvement of oxygen ligand in addition to the reduced S ligands in the complexation of Hg(II) is due to the low density of reduced S ligands in humic substances. The XAS results from this experiment provided direct molecular level evidence for the preference of reduced S functional groups over oxygen ligands by Hg(II) in the complexation with humic substances.

  6. X-ray absorption spectroscopic studies of the active sites of nickel- and copper-containing metalloproteins

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, G.O.

    1993-06-01

    X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) is a useful tool for obtaining structural and chemical information about the active sites of metalloproteins and metalloenzymes. Information may be obtained from both the edge region and the extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) or post-edge region of the K-edge X-ray absorption spectrum of a metal center in a compound. The edge contains information about the valence electronic structure of the atom that absorbs the X-rays. It is possible in some systems to infer the redox state of the metal atom in question, as well as the geometry and nature of ligands connected to it, from the features in the edge in a straightforward manner. The EXAFS modulations, being produced by the backscattering of the ejected photoelectron from the atoms surrounding the metal atom, provide, when analyzed, information about the number and type of neighbouring atoms, and the distances at which they occur. In this thesis, analysis of both the edge and EXAFS regions has been used to gain information about the active sites of various metalloproteins. The metalloproteins studied were plastocyanin (Pc), laccase and nickel carbon monoxide dehydrogenase (Ni CODH). Studies of Cu(I)-imidazole compounds, related to the protein hemocyanin, are also reported here.

  7. The Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer Survey of O VI Absorption in and near the Galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wakker, B. P.; Savage, B. D.; Sembach, K. R.; Richter, P.; Meade, M.; Jenkins, E. B.; Shull, J. M.; Ake, T. B.; Blair, W. P.; Dixon, W. V.; Friedman, S. D.; Green, J. C.; Green, R. F.; Kruk, J. W.; Moos, H. W.; Murphy, E. M.; Oegerle, W. R.; Sahnow, D. J.; Sonneborn, G.; Wilkinson, E.; York, D. G.

    2003-05-01

    We present Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer (FUSE) observations of the O VI λλ1031.926, 1037.617 absorption lines associated with gas in and near the Milky Way, as detected in the spectra of a sample of 100 extragalactic targets and two distant halo stars. We combine data from several FUSE Science Team programs with guest observer data that were public before 2002 May 1. The sight lines cover most of the sky above Galactic latitude |b|>25deg-at lower latitude the ultraviolet extinction is usually too large for extragalactic observations. We describe the details of the calibration, alignment in velocity, continuum fitting, and manner in which several contaminants were removed-Galactic H2, absorption intrinsic to the background target and intergalactic Lyβ lines. This decontamination was done very carefully, and in several sight lines very subtle problems were found. We searched for O VI absorption in the velocity range -1200 to 1200 km s-1. With a few exceptions, we only find O VI in the velocity range -400 to 400 km s-1 the exceptions may be intergalactic O VI. In this paper we analyze the O VI associated with the Milky Way (and possibly with the Local Group). We discuss the separation of the observed O VI absorption into components associated with the Milky Way halo and components at high velocity, which are probably located in the neighborhood of the Milky Way. We describe the measurements of equivalent width and column density, and we analyze the different contributions to the errors. We conclude that low-velocity Galactic O VI absorption occurs along all sight lines-the few nondetections only occur in noisy spectra. We further show that high-velocity O VI is very common, having equivalent width >65 mÅ in 50% of the sight lines and equivalent width >30 mÅ in 70% of the high-quality sight lines. The central velocities of high-velocity O VI components range from |vLSR|=100 to 330 km s-1 there is no correlation between velocity and absorption strength

  8. Near-infrared diode laser based spectroscopic detection of ammonia: a comparative study of photoacoustic and direct optical absorption methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bozoki, Zoltan; Mohacsi, Arpad; Szabo, Gabor; Bor, Zsolt; Erdelyi, Miklos; Chen, Weidong; Tittel, Frank K.

    2002-01-01

    A photoacoustic spectroscopic (PAS) and a direct optical absorption spectroscopic (OAS) gas sensor, both using continuous-wave room-temperature diode lasers operating at 1531.8 nm, were compared on the basis of ammonia detection. Excellent linear correlation between the detector signals of the two systems was found. Although the physical properties and the mode of operation of both sensors were significantly different, their performances were found to be remarkably similar, with a sub-ppm level minimum detectable concentration of ammonia and a fast response time in the range of a few minutes.

  9. Galactic Soft X-ray Emission Revealed with Spectroscopic Study of Absorption and Emission Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamasaki, Noriko Y.; Mitsuda, K.; Takei, Y.; Hagihara, T.; Yoshino, T.; Wang, Q. D.; Yao, Y.; McCammon, D.

    2010-03-01

    Spectroscopic study of Oxygen emission/absorption lines is a new tool to investigate the nature of the soft X-ray background. We investigated the emission spectra of 14 fields obtained by Suzaku, and detected OVII and OVIII lines separately. There is an almost isotropic OVII line emission with 2 LU intensity. As the attenuation length in the Galactic plane for that energy is short, that OVII emission should arise within 300 pc of our neighborhood. In comparison with the estimated emission measure for the local bubble, the most plausible origin of this component is the solar wind charge exchange with local interstellar materials. Another component presented from the correlation between the OVII and OVIII line intensity is a thermal emission with an apparent temperature of 0.2 keV with a field-to-field fluctuation of 10% in temperature, while the intensity varies about a factor of 4. By the combination analysis of the emission and the absorption spectra, we can investigate the density and the scale length of intervening plasma separately. We analyzed the Chanrdra grating spectra of LMC X-3 and PKS 2155-304, and emission spectra toward the line of sight by Suzaku. In both cases, the combined analysis showed that the hot plasma is not iso-thermal nor uniform. Assuming an exponential disk distribution, the thickness of the disk is as large as a few kpc. It suggests that there is a thick hot disk or hot halo surrounding our Galaxy, which is similar to X-ray hot haloes around several spiral galaxies.

  10. Confocal Light Absorption and Scattering Spectroscopic (CLASS) imaging: From cancer detection to sub-cellular function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Le

    Light scattering spectroscopy (LSS), an optical technique that relates the spectroscopic properties of light elastically scattered by small particles to their size, refractive index and shape, has been recently successfully employed for sensing morphological and biochemical properties of epithelial tissues and cells in vivo. LSS does not require exogenous markers, is non-invasive, and, due to its multispectral nature, can sense biological structures well beyond the diffraction limit. All that makes LSS be a very good candidate to be used both in clinical medicine for in vivo detection of disease and in cell biology to monitor cell function on the organelle scale. Recently we developed two LSS-based imaging modalities: clinical Polarized LSS (PLSS) Endoscopic Technique for locating early pre-cancerous changes in GI tract and Confocal Light Absorption and Scattering Spectroscopic (CLASS) Microscopy for studying cells in vivo without exogenous markers. One important application of the clinical PLSS endoscopic instrument, a noncontact scanning imaging device compatible with the standard clinical endoscopes and capable of detecting dysplastic changes, is to serve as a guide for biopsy in Barrett's esophagus (BE). The instrument detects parallel and perpendicular components of the polarized light, backscattered from epithelial tissues, and determines characteristics of epithelial nuclei from the residual spectra. It also can find tissue oxygenation, hemoglobin content and other properties from the diffuse light component. By rapidly scanning esophagus the PLSS endoscopic instrument makes sure the entire BE portion is scanned and examined for the presence of dysplasia. CLASS microscopy, on the other hand, combines principles of light scattering spectroscopy (LSS) with confocal microscopy. Its main purpose is to image cells on organelle scale in vivo without the use of exogenous labels which may affect the cell function. The confocal geometry selects specific region and

  11. Soft X-ray absorption spectroscopic studies with different probing depths: Effect of an electrolyte additive on electrode surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yogi, Chihiro; Takamatsu, Daiko; Yamanaka, Keisuke; Arai, Hajime; Uchimoto, Yoshiharu; Kojima, Kazuo; Watanabe, Iwao; Ohta, Toshiaki; Ogumi, Zenpachi

    2014-02-01

    A solid electrolyte interphase (SEI) formed on a model LiCoO2 electrode was analyzed by the ultra-soft X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS). The data of Li K-, B K-, C K-, O K-, and Co L-edges spectra for the SEI film on the electrode were collected using three detection methods with different probing depths. The electrode was prepared by a pulsed laser deposition method. All the spectral data consistently indicated that the SEI film containing lithium carbonate was instantly formed just after the soak of the electrode into the electrolyte solution and that it decomposed during the repeated charge-discharge reactions. The decomposition of the SEI film seems to cause the deterioration in lithium ion battery cycle performance. By adding lithium bis(oxalate) borate (LiBOB) to the electrolyte the decomposition could be suppressed leading to longer cycle life. It was found that some of the Co ions at the electrode surface were reduced to Co(II) during the charge-discharge reactions and this reaction could also be suppressed by the addition of LiBOB.

  12. Nanoflaky MnO2/functionalized carbon nanotubes for supercapacitors: an in situ X-ray absorption spectroscopic investigation.

    PubMed

    Chang, Han-Wei; Lu, Ying-Rui; Chen, Jeng-Lung; Chen, Chi-Liang; Lee, Jyh-Fu; Chen, Jin-Ming; Tsai, Yu-Chen; Chang, Chien-Min; Yeh, Ping-Hung; Chou, Wu-Ching; Liou, Ya-Hsuan; Dong, Chung-Li

    2015-02-01

    The surfaces of acid- and amine-functionalized carbon nanotubes (C-CNT and N-CNT) were decorated with MnO2 nanoflakes as supercapacitors by a spontaneous redox reaction. C-CNT was found to have a lower edge plane structure and fewer defect sites than N-CNT. MnO2/C-CNT with a highly developed surface area exhibited favorable electrochemical performance. To determine the atomic/electronic structures of the MnO2/functionalized CNTs (MnO2/C-CNT and MnO/N-CNT) during the charge/discharge process, in situ X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) measurements were made at the Mn K-edge. Both C-CNT and N-CNT are highly conductive. The effect of the scan rate on the capacitance behavior was also examined, revealing that the π* state of CNT and the size of the tunnels in pseudo-capacitor materials (which facilitate conduction and the transport of electrolyte ions) are critical for the capacitive performance, and their role depends on the scan rate. In the slow charge/discharge process, MnO2/N-CNT has a more symmetrical rectangular cyclic voltammetry (CV) curve. In the fast charge/discharge process, MnO2/C-CNT with a highly developed surface provides fast electronic and ionic channels that support a reversible faradaic redox reaction between MnO2 nanoflakes and the electrolyte, significantly enhancing its capacitive performance over that of MnO2/N-CNT. The MnO2/C-CNT architecture has great potential for supercapacitor applications. The information that was obtained herein helps to elucidate CNT surface modification and the design of the MnO2/functionalized CNT interface with a view for the further development of supercapacitors. This work, and especially the combination of CV with in situ XAS measurements, will be of value to readers with an interest in nanomaterial, nanotechnology and their applications in energy storage.

  13. Theoretical modeling of the spectroscopic absorption properties of luciferin and oxyluciferin: A critical comparison with recent experimental studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anselmi, Massimiliano; Marocchi, Simone; Aschi, Massimiliano; Amadei, Andrea

    2012-01-01

    Firefly luciferin and its oxidated form, oxyluciferin, are two heterocyclic compounds involved in the enzymatic reaction, catalyzed by redox proteins called luciferases, which provides the bioluminescence in a wide group of arthropods. Whereas the electronic absorption spectra of D-luciferin in water at different pHs are known since 1960s, only recently reliable experimental electronic spectra of oxyluciferin have become available. In addition oxyluciferin is involved in a triple chemical equilibria (deprotonation of the two hydroxyl groups and keto-enol tautomerism of the 4-hydroxythiazole ring), that obligates to select during an experiment a predominant species, tuning pH or solvent polarity besides introducing chemical modifications. In this study we report the absorption spectra of luciferin and oxyluciferin in each principal chemical form, calculated by means of perturbed matrix method (PMM), which allowed us to successfully introduce the effect of the solvent on the spectroscopic absorption properties, and compare the result with available experimental data.

  14. XAS Spectroscopy, Sulfur, and the Brew Within Blood Cells from Ascidia ceratodes

    PubMed Central

    Frank, Patrick; Hedman, Britt; Hodgson, Keith O.

    2014-01-01

    We report the first use of K-edge x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) as a direct spectroscopic probe of pH and cytosolic emf within living cells. A new accuracy metric of model-based fits to K-edge spectra is further developed. Sulfur functional groups in three collections of living blood cells and one sample of cleared blood plasma from the tunicate Ascidia ceratodes were speciated using K-edge XAS. Cysteine and cystine, the preferred thiol-disulfide model, averaged about 12% of total sulfur. Sulfate monoesters and cyclic diesters unexpectedly constituted 36% of blood cell sulfur. Soluble sulfate averaged about 25% across the three blood cell samples, while the ratio of SO42− to HSO4− implied average signet ring vacuolar pH values of 0.85, 1.4, or 3.1. Intracellular (VSO4)+ was unobserved, while [V(RSO3)n](3−n)+ was detected in the two lowest pH blood cell samples. About 5% of sulfur was distributed as mono- or dibenzothiophene or ethylene-epi-sulfide, or as a thiadiazole reminiscent of the polycarpathiamines. Blood plasma was dominated by sulfate (83%), but with 15% of an alkylsulfate ester and about 2% of low-valent sulfur. Gravimetric analysis of soluble sulfate yielded average concentrations of blood cell sulfur. Average [cysteine] and [cystine] (ranging ~10–30 mM and ~20–90 mM, respectively) implied a blood-cell cytosolic emf values of approximately −0.20 V. High cellular [cysteine] is consistent with the proposed model for enzymatic reduction of vanadate by endogenous thiol, wherein the trajectory of metal site-symmetry is controlled and directed through to a thermodynamically favored 7-coordinate V(III) product. PMID:24333825

  15. Absorption properties of type-II InAs/InAsSb superlattices measured by spectroscopic ellipsometry

    SciTech Connect

    Webster, P. T.; Riordan, N. A.; Liu, S.; Zhang, Y.-H.; Johnson, S. R.; Steenbergen, E. H.

    2015-02-09

    Strain-balanced InAs/InAsSb superlattices offer access to the mid- to long-wavelength infrared region with what is essentially a ternary material system at the GaSb lattice constant. The absorption coefficients of InAs/InAsSb superlattices grown by molecular beam epitaxy on (100)-oriented GaSb substrates are measured at room temperature over the 30 to 800 meV photon energy range using spectroscopic ellipsometry, and the miniband structure of each superlattice is calculated using a Kronig-Penney model. The InAs/InAsSb conduction band offset is used as a fitting parameter to align the calculated superlattice ground state transition energy to the measured absorption onset at room temperature and to the photoluminescence peak energy at low temperature. It is observed that the ground state absorption coefficient and transition strength are proportional to the square of the wavefunction overlap and the ground state absorption coefficient approaches a maximum value of around 5780 cm{sup −1} as the wavefunction overlap approaches 100%. The absorption analysis of these samples indicates that the optical joint density of states is weakly dependent on the period thickness and Sb content of the superlattice, and that wavefunction overlap is the principal design parameter in terms of obtaining strong absorption in these structures.

  16. White-light continuum probed femtosecond time-resolved absorption spectroscopic measurement of β-carotene under high pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Wei-Long; Zheng, Zhi-Ren; Zhang, Jian-Ping; Wu, Wen-Zhi; Li, Ai-Hua; Zhang, Wei; Huo, Ming-Ming; Liu, Zhi-Guo; Zhu, Rui-Bin; Zhao, Lian-Cheng; Su, Wen-Hui

    2012-04-01

    We have performed a femtosecond time-resolved absorption spectroscopic experiment of β-carotene in n-hexane solution under high pressure up to ˜1.0 GPa. Using white-light continuum in the visible spectral region as probe light, we found that the energy level of S1 state descends, whereas its lifetime becomes longer with the rising pressure. We ascribe this tendency deviating from the energy gap law to the viscosity effects on the Cdbnd C stretching vibrations, which is fully consistent with the microviscosity theory. This Letter may provide some insights on the light harvesting and photoprotection functions of carotenoids in photosynthetic organisms.

  17. Comparative study of ionization chamber detectors vis-a-vis a CCD detector for dispersive XAS measurement in transmission geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Poswal, A. K.; Agrawal, A.; Bhattachryya, D.; Jha, S. N.; Sahoo, N. K.

    2013-02-05

    We have designed and fabricated parallel plate ionization chamber detectors and voltage vs. current characteristics (V-I curve) of the detectors were recorded with synchrotron radiation to qualify for use in X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy (XAS) measurements. After qualifying the ionization chambers, the detectors were used in the dispersive EXAFS beamline (BL-08) at INDUS-2 SRS in Turbo-XAS geometry. Using the same setup and under the same setting, XAS spectra were also recorded with a CCD detector and the observation on relative performance of the ionization chamber vis-a-vis the CCD detector is presented in this paper.

  18. Time-resolved spectroscopic fluorescence imaging, transient absorption and vibrational spectroscopy of intact and photo-inhibited photosynthetic tissue.

    PubMed

    Lukins, Philip B; Rehman, Shakil; Stevens, Gregory B; George, Doaa

    2005-01-01

    Fluorescence, absorption and vibrational spectroscopic techniques were used to study spinach at the photosystem II (PS II), chloroplast and cellular levels and to determine the effects and mechanisms of ultraviolet-B (UV-B) photoinhibition of these structures. Two-photon fluorescence spectroscopic imaging of intact chloroplasts shows significant spatial variations in the component fluorescence spectra in the range 640-740 nm, indicating that the type and distribution of chlorophylls vary markedly with position in the chloroplast. The chlorophyll distributions and excitonic behaviour in chloroplasts and whole plant tissue were studied using picosecond time-gated fluorescence imaging, which also showed UV-induced kinetic changes that clearly indicate that UV-B induces both structural and excitonic uncoupling of chlorophylls within the light-harvesting complexes. Transient absorption measurements and low-frequency infrared and Raman spectroscopy show that the predominant sites of UV-B damage in PS II are at the oxygen-evolving centre (OEC) itself, as well as at specific locations near the OEC-binding sites.

  19. In Situ XAS of Ni-W Hydrocracking Catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, N.; Mickelson, G. E.; Greenlay, N.; Bare, Simon R.; Kelly, S. D.

    2007-02-02

    Ni-W based catalysts are very attractive in hydrotreating of heavy oil due to their high hydrogenation activity. In the present research, two catalyst samples, prepared by different methods, that exhibit significant differences in activity were sulfided in situ, and the local structure of the Ni and W were studied using X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS). The Ni XANES spectra were analyzed using a linear component fitting, and the EXAFS spectra of the WS2 platelets in the sulfided catalysts were modeled. The Ni and W are fully sulfided in the higher activity sample, and there are both unsulfided Ni ({approx}25%) and W (<10%) in the lower activity sample.

  20. Absorption spectroscopic probe to investigate the interaction between Nd(III) and calf-thymus DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devi, Ch. Victory; Singh, N. Rajmuhon

    2011-03-01

    The interaction between Nd(III) and Calf Thymus DNA (CT-DNA) in physiological buffer (pH 7.4) has been studied using absorption spectroscopy involving 4f-4f transition spectra in different aquated organic solvents. Complexation with CT-DNA is indicated by the changes in absorption intensity following the subsequent changes in the oscillator strengths of different 4f-4f bands and Judd-Ofelt intensity ( Tλ) parameters. The other spectral parameters namely Slator-Condon ( Fk's), nephelauxetic effect ( β), bonding ( b1/2) and percent covalency ( δ) parameters are computed to correlate with the binding of Nd(III) with DNA. The absorption spectra of Nd(III) exhibited hyperchromism and red shift in the presence of DNA. The binding constant, Kb has been determined by absorption measurement. The relative viscosity of DNA decreased with the addition of Nd(III). Thermodynamic parameters have been calculated according to relevant absorption data and Van't Hoff equation. The characterisation of bonding mode has been studied in detail. The results suggested that the major interaction mode between Nd(III) and DNA was external electrostatic binding.

  1. Three-photon absorption and vibrational spectroscopic study of 2-methylamino-5-chlorobenzophenone.

    PubMed

    Sajan, D; Chaitanya, K; Safakath, K; Philip, Reji; Suthan, T; Rajesh, N P

    2013-04-01

    In this paper, the vibrational spectral analysis and three-photon absorption properties of an organic material of 2-methylamino-5-chlorobenzophenone have been reported. The geometry and harmonic vibrational wavenumbers are calculated with the help of B3LYP density functional theory method. The detailed interpretation of the vibrational spectra has been carried out with the aid of normal coordinate analysis following the scaled quantum mechanical force field methodology (SQM). SQM force fields have also been used to calculate potential energy distribution (PED) in order to make conspicuous vibrational assignments. The nonlinear absorption properties have been investigated in ethanol solution at 532nm using the Z-scan technique employing laser pulses of 5ns duration. Open aperture Z-scan data reveal the presence of effective three-photon absorption for ns pulses at 532nm resulting in a strong optical limiting behavior, indicating possible photonic applications. PMID:23410921

  2. Interaction between indium tin oxide nanoparticles and cytochrome c: A surface-enhanced Raman scattering and absorption spectroscopic study

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Yimin E-mail: tqiu@seu.edu.cn; Du, Deyang; Fan, Jiyang; Qiu, Teng E-mail: tqiu@seu.edu.cn; Kong, Fan

    2015-06-28

    Indium-tin-oxide (ITO) nanoparticles were annealed in vacuum or reducing atmosphere to obtain different surface structures and investigate their influence on the adsorptive character and conformation of cytochrome c (Cyt c) molecule. Annealing-induced morphometric or structural changes of ITO nanoparticles were characterized by instruments of transmission electron microscopy, x-ray diffraction, and Raman scattering. Semiconductor ITO nanoparticle-enhanced Raman scattering of Cyt c was observed and the enhanced efficiency was found to closely depend on the surface structures which control the adsorbance of buffer anions needed for Cyt c loading. Direct electron transfer between Cyt c and ITO surface at the moment of molecular elastic collision was found and a reverse electron transfer process for O-terminated surface and metal-terminated surface was observed, according to absorption spectroscopic measurement on the residual solution.

  3. Interaction between indium tin oxide nanoparticles and cytochrome c: A surface-enhanced Raman scattering and absorption spectroscopic study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yimin; Du, Deyang; Kong, Fan; Fan, Jiyang; Qiu, Teng

    2015-06-01

    Indium-tin-oxide (ITO) nanoparticles were annealed in vacuum or reducing atmosphere to obtain different surface structures and investigate their influence on the adsorptive character and conformation of cytochrome c (Cyt c) molecule. Annealing-induced morphometric or structural changes of ITO nanoparticles were characterized by instruments of transmission electron microscopy, x-ray diffraction, and Raman scattering. Semiconductor ITO nanoparticle-enhanced Raman scattering of Cyt c was observed and the enhanced efficiency was found to closely depend on the surface structures which control the adsorbance of buffer anions needed for Cyt c loading. Direct electron transfer between Cyt c and ITO surface at the moment of molecular elastic collision was found and a reverse electron transfer process for O-terminated surface and metal-terminated surface was observed, according to absorption spectroscopic measurement on the residual solution.

  4. Spectroscopic method for determination of the absorption coefficient in brain tissue.

    PubMed

    Johansson, Johannes D

    2010-01-01

    I use Monte Carlo simulations and phantom measurements to characterize a probe with adjacent optical fibres for diffuse reflectance spectroscopy during stereotactic surgery in the brain. Simulations and measurements have been fitted to a modified Beer-Lambert model for light transport in order to be able to quantify chromophore content based on clinically measured spectra in brain tissue. It was found that it is important to take the impact of the light absorption into account when calculating the apparent optical path length, lp, for the photons in order to get good estimates of the absorption coefficient, μa. The optical path length was found to be well fitted to the equation lp=a+b ln(Is)+c ln(μa)+d ln(Is)ln(μa), where Is is the reflected light intensity for scattering alone (i.e., zero absorption). Although coefficients a-d calculated in this study are specific to the probe used here, the general form of the equation should be applicable to similar probes.

  5. Spectroscopic investigation of amber color silicate glasses and factors affecting the amber related absorption bands.

    PubMed

    Morsi, Morsi M; El-Sherbiny, Samya I; Mohamed, Karam M

    2015-06-15

    The effects of carbon, Fe2O3 and Na2SO4 contents on the amber color of glass with composition (wt%) 64.3 SiO2, 25.7 CaO, 10 Na2O were studied. The effect of some additives that could be found in glass batch or cullets on the amber related absorption band(s) was also studied. An amber related absorption band due to the chromophore Fe(3+)O3S(2-) was recorded at 420 nm with shoulder at 440 nm. A second amber related band recorded at 474 nm with shoulder at 483 nm was assigned to FeS. Increasing melting time at 1400°C up to 6h caused fainting of the amber color, decreases the intensities of the amber related bands and shifted the first band to 406 nm. Addition of ZnO, Cu2O and NaNO3 to the glass produced decolorizing effect and vanishing of the amber related bands. The effects of melting time and these additives were explained on the bases of destruction the amber chromophore and its conversion into Fe(3+) in tetrahedral sites or ZnS. Addition of Se intensifies the amber related bands and may cause dark coloration due to the formation of Se° and polyselenide. Amber color can be monitored through measuring the absorption in the range 406-420 nm.

  6. Evaluation of laser absorption spectroscopic techniques for eddy covariance flux measurements of ammonia.

    PubMed

    Whitehead, James D; Twigg, Marsailidh; Famulari, Daniela; Nemitz, Eiko; Sutton, Mark A; Gallagher, Martin W; Fowler, David

    2008-03-15

    An intercomparison was made between eddy covariance flux measurements of ammonia by a quantum cascade laser absorption spectrometer (QCLAS) and a lead-salt tunable diode laser absorption spectrometer (TDLAS). The measurements took place in September 2004 and again in April 2005 over a managed grassland site in Southern Scotland, U.K. These were also compared with a flux estimate derived from an "Ammonia Measurement by ANnular Denuder with online Analysis" (AMANDA), using the aerodynamic gradient method (AGM). The concentration and flux measurements from the QCLAS correlated well with those of the TDLAS and the AGM systems when emissions were high, following slurry application to the field. Both the QCLAS and TDLAS, however, underestimated the flux when compared with the AMANDA system, by 64%. A flux loss of 41% due to chemical reaction of ammonia in the QCLAS (and 37% in the TDLAS) sample tube walls was identified and characterized using laboratory tests but did not fully accountforthis difference. Recognizing these uncertainties, the agreement between the systems was nevertheless very close (R2 = 0.95 between the QCLAS and the TDLAS; R2 = 0.84 between the QCLAS and the AMANDA) demonstrating the suitability of the laser absorption methods for quantifying the temporal dynamics of ammonia fluxes.

  7. Spectroscopic investigation of amber color silicate glasses and factors affecting the amber related absorption bands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morsi, Morsi M.; El-sherbiny, Samya I.; Mohamed, Karam M.

    2015-06-01

    The effects of carbon, Fe2O3 and Na2SO4 contents on the amber color of glass with composition (wt%) 64.3 SiO2, 25.7 CaO, 10 Na2O were studied. The effect of some additives that could be found in glass batch or cullets on the amber related absorption band(s) was also studied. An amber related absorption band due to the chromophore Fe3+O3S2- was recorded at 420 nm with shoulder at 440 nm. A second amber related band recorded at 474 nm with shoulder at 483 nm was assigned to FeS. Increasing melting time at 1400 °C up to 6 h caused fainting of the amber color, decreases the intensities of the amber related bands and shifted the first band to 406 nm. Addition of ZnO, Cu2O and NaNO3 to the glass produced decolorizing effect and vanishing of the amber related bands. The effects of melting time and these additives were explained on the bases of destruction the amber chromophore and its conversion into Fe3+ in tetrahedral sites or ZnS. Addition of Se intensifies the amber related bands and may cause dark coloration due to the formation of Se° and polyselenide. Amber color can be monitored through measuring the absorption in the range 406-420 nm.

  8. Absorption spectroscopic study of synergistic extraction of praseodymium with benzoyl acetone in presence of crown ether.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Shrabanti; Bhattacharya, Sumanta; Basu, Sukalyan

    2005-04-01

    The extraction behaviour of Pr(III) from aqueous nitric acid medium employing benzoylacetone has been studied in presence of two crown ethers, viz., 15-crown-5 and benzo-15-crown-5 in chloroform medium using UV-vis absorption spectroscopy. The binary equilibrium constant (logk(ex)) for the complex [Pr(benzoylacetonate)(NO3(-))2(H(2)O)] in organic phase was found to be 1.170. The overall equilibrium constants (logK) for the ternary species [Pr(benzoylacetonate)(crown ether)(NO3(-))(2)] were estimated to be 4.01 and 4.41 for 15-crown-5 and benzo-15-crown-5, respectively. The trend in the equilibrium constant values were very much in accordance with the nature of substitution of the donor moiety. The extraction of Pr(III) by the benzoylacetone-crown ether combination was maximum at pH 3.0 and extraction decreases with increase in pH. It has been found that the extent of extraction of Pr(III) in organic phase as the binary as well as ternary complex [Pr(benzoylacetonate)(NO3(-))(2)(H(2)O)] and [Pr(benzoylacetonate)(crown ether)(NO3(-))(2)] increases with increase in concentration of the ligand. Similar trend is observed in the extraction by only donors. Enthalpies and entropies of formation for the ternary extraction process have been estimated. In addition, the effect of NaNO(3) as foreign salt was also studied and it was observed that with increase in ionic strength, percentage extraction increases.

  9. An XAS experimental approach to study low Pt content electrocatalysts operating in PEM fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Principi, Emiliano; Witkowska, Agnieszka; Dsoke, Sonia; Marassi, Roberto; Di Cicco, Andrea

    2009-11-21

    We present an X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) study of a low Pt content catalyst layer (Pt loading 0.1 mg cm(-2)) operating at the cathode of a proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC). This catalyst is based on the use of a mesoporous inorganic matrix as a support for the catalyst Pt nanoparticles. Due to the high Pt dilution, in situ measurements of its structural properties by XAS are challenging and suitable experimental strategies must be devised for this purpose. In particular, we show that accurate XAS in situ fluorescence measurements can be obtained using an optimized fuel cell, suitable protocols for alignment of a focused X-ray beam and an appropriate filter for the background signal of the other atomic species contained in the electrodes. Details, advantages and limitations of the XAS technique for in situ measurements are discussed. Analysis of the near-edge XAS and EXAFS (extended X-ray absorption fine structure) data, corroborated by a HRTEM (high-resolution transmission electron microscopy) study, shows that the Pt particles have a local structure compatible with that of bulk Pt (fcc) and coordination numbers match those expected for particles with typical sizes in the 1.5-2.0 nm range. Substantial changes in the oxidation state and in local atomic arrangement of the Pt particles are found for different applied potentials. The catalyst support, containing W atoms, exhibits a partial reduction upon PEMFC activation, thus mimicking the catalyst behavior. This indicates a possible role of the mesoporous matrix in favouring the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) and stimulates further research on active catalyst supports.

  10. Reactivity of Chromium(III) Nutritional Supplements in Biological Media: An X-Ray Absorption Spectroscopic Study

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, A.; Mulyani, I.; Levina, A.; Lay, P.A.

    2009-05-22

    Chromium(III) nutritional supplements are widely used due to their purported ability to enhance glucose metabolism, despite growing evidence on low activity and the potential genotoxicity of these compounds. Reactivities of Cr(III) complexes used in nutritional formulations, including [Cr3O(OCOEt)6(OH2)3]+ (A), [Cr(pic)3] (pic) = 2-pyridinecarboxylato(-) (B), and trans-[CrCl2(OH2)4]+ (CrCl3 {center_dot} 6H2O; C), in a range of natural and simulated biological media (artificial digestion systems, blood and its components, cell culture media, and intact L6 rat skeletal muscle cells) were studied by X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy. The XANES spectroscopic data were processed by multiple linear-regression analyses with the use of a library of model Cr(III) compounds, and the results were corroborated by the results of X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy and electrospray mass spectrometry. Complexes A and B underwent extensive ligand-exchange reactions under conditions of combined gastric and intestinal digestion (in the presence of a semisynthetic meal, 3 h at 310 K), as well as in blood serum and in a cell culture medium (1-24 h at 310 K), with the formation of Cr(III) complexes with hydroxo and amino acid/protein ligands. Reactions of compounds A-C with cultured muscle cells led to similar ligand-exchange products, with at least part of Cr(III) bound to the surface of the cells. The reactions of B with serum greatly enhanced its propensity to be converted to Cr(VI) by biological oxidants (H2O2 or glucose oxidase system), which is proposed to be a major cause of both the insulin-enhancing activity and toxicity of Cr(III) compounds (Mulyani, I.; Levina, A.; Lay, P. A. Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 2004, 43, 4504-4507). This finding enhances the current concern over the safety of consumption of large doses of Cr(III) supplements, particularly [Cr(pic)3].

  11. Orientation Dependent Polarized Micro-XAS Study of U, Th and Sr in Single Crystal Apatites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Y.; Rakovan, J.; Wright, S.

    2009-05-01

    In order to evaluate apatite as a potential solid nuclear waste form and a contaminant sequestration agent, the complimentary use of single crystal X-ray diffraction and X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) is applied to the study of U, Th, and Sr doped apatite single crystals to investigate the site preference, oxidation state, and structural distortions created by these substituents. Single crystal X-ray diffraction provides average information regarding the site occupancy of U and Th in apatites. Extended X-ray absorption fine-structure (EXAFS) yields quantitative information of the local structure of these substituents, which includes near-neighbor distances, coordination numbers and variations in bond distances; while X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) is used to determine the oxidation states of U. Restricted by the typical small size (20-100 μm) and volume of our synthetic samples, Micro-XAS is required. Different from studies which take full advantage of the polarization of synchrotron radiation, our Micro- XAS study on single crystal apatites was hampered by the polarization effects. In order to extract precise information of valence state and structural variation from XAS, it is necessary to know the crystallographic orientation of the sample with respect to the polarization direction of the incident X-ray beam during data collection. To do this we have designed and built a portable goniometer that duplicates the geometry of our laboratory standard Bruker Apex diffractometer goniometer. Crystal orientation is determined by X-ray diffraction at our home institution. The portable goniometer is then set up on the experimental table at synchrotron facilities and the crystal can be set in any specific known orientation. The lattice orientation determined by X-ray diffraction is applied to XAS data analysis, specifically calculation of scattering amplitudes and phase shifts, to account for polarization effects of synchrotron radiation. The goniometer

  12. High energy resolution five-crystal spectrometer for high quality fluorescence and absorption measurements on an x-ray absorption spectroscopy beamline

    SciTech Connect

    Llorens, Isabelle; Lahera, Eric; Delnet, William; Proux, Olivier; Dermigny, Quentin; Gelebart, Frederic; Morand, Marc; Shukla, Abhay; Bardou, Nathalie; Ulrich, Olivier; and others

    2012-06-15

    Fluorescence detection is classically achieved with a solid state detector (SSD) on x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) beamlines. This kind of detection however presents some limitations related to the limited energy resolution and saturation. Crystal analyzer spectrometers (CAS) based on a Johann-type geometry have been developed to overcome these limitations. We have tested and installed such a system on the BM30B/CRG-FAME XAS beamline at the ESRF dedicated to the structural investigation of very dilute systems in environmental, material and biological sciences. The spectrometer has been designed to be a mobile device for easy integration in multi-purpose hard x-ray synchrotron beamlines or even with a laboratory x-ray source. The CAS allows to collect x-ray photons from a large solid angle with five spherically bent crystals. It will cover a large energy range allowing to probe fluorescence lines characteristic of all the elements from Ca (Z = 20) to U (Z = 92). It provides an energy resolution of 1-2 eV. XAS spectroscopy is the main application of this device even if other spectroscopic techniques (RIXS, XES, XRS, etc.) can be also achieved with it. The performances of the CAS are illustrated by two experiments that are difficult or impossible to perform with SSD and the complementarity of the CAS vs SSD detectors is discussed.

  13. High energy resolution five-crystal spectrometer for high quality fluorescence and absorption measurements on an x-ray absorption spectroscopy beamline.

    PubMed

    Llorens, Isabelle; Lahera, Eric; Delnet, William; Proux, Olivier; Braillard, Aurélien; Hazemann, Jean-Louis; Prat, Alain; Testemale, Denis; Dermigny, Quentin; Gelebart, Frederic; Morand, Marc; Shukla, Abhay; Bardou, Nathalie; Ulrich, Olivier; Arnaud, Stéphan; Berar, Jean-François; Boudet, Nathalie; Caillot, Bernard; Chaurand, Perrine; Rose, Jérôme; Doelsch, Emmanuel; Martin, Philippe; Solari, Pier Lorenzo

    2012-06-01

    Fluorescence detection is classically achieved with a solid state detector (SSD) on x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) beamlines. This kind of detection however presents some limitations related to the limited energy resolution and saturation. Crystal analyzer spectrometers (CAS) based on a Johann-type geometry have been developed to overcome these limitations. We have tested and installed such a system on the BM30B/CRG-FAME XAS beamline at the ESRF dedicated to the structural investigation of very dilute systems in environmental, material and biological sciences. The spectrometer has been designed to be a mobile device for easy integration in multi-purpose hard x-ray synchrotron beamlines or even with a laboratory x-ray source. The CAS allows to collect x-ray photons from a large solid angle with five spherically bent crystals. It will cover a large energy range allowing to probe fluorescence lines characteristic of all the elements from Ca (Z = 20) to U (Z = 92). It provides an energy resolution of 1-2 eV. XAS spectroscopy is the main application of this device even if other spectroscopic techniques (RIXS, XES, XRS, etc.) can be also achieved with it. The performances of the CAS are illustrated by two experiments that are difficult or impossible to perform with SSD and the complementarity of the CAS vs SSD detectors is discussed.

  14. Activation and deactivation of a robust immobilized Cp*Ir-transfer hydrogenation catalyst: a multielement in situ X-ray absorption spectroscopy study.

    PubMed

    Sherborne, Grant J; Chapman, Michael R; Blacker, A John; Bourne, Richard A; Chamberlain, Thomas W; Crossley, Benjamin D; Lucas, Stephanie J; McGowan, Patrick C; Newton, Mark A; Screen, Thomas E O; Thompson, Paul; Willans, Charlotte E; Nguyen, Bao N

    2015-04-01

    A highly robust immobilized [Cp*IrCl2]2 precatalyst on Wang resin for transfer hydrogenation, which can be recycled up to 30 times, was studied using a novel combination of X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) at Ir L3-edge, Cl K-edge, and K K-edge. These culminate in in situ XAS experiments that link structural changes of the Ir complex with its catalytic activity and its deactivation. Mercury poisoning and "hot filtration" experiments ruled out leached Ir as the active catalyst. Spectroscopic evidence indicates the exchange of one chloride ligand with an alkoxide to generate the active precatalyst. The exchange of the second chloride ligand, however, leads to a potassium alkoxide-iridate species as the deactivated form of this immobilized catalyst. These findings could be widely applicable to the many homogeneous transfer hydrogenation catalysts with Cp*IrCl substructure.

  15. A nearly on-axis spectroscopic system for simultaneously measuring UV-visible absorption and X-ray diffraction in the SPring-8 structural genomics beamline.

    PubMed

    Sakaguchi, Miyuki; Kimura, Tetsunari; Nishida, Takuma; Tosha, Takehiko; Sugimoto, Hiroshi; Yamaguchi, Yoshihiro; Yanagisawa, Sachiko; Ueno, Go; Murakami, Hironori; Ago, Hideo; Yamamoto, Masaki; Ogura, Takashi; Shiro, Yoshitsugu; Kubo, Minoru

    2016-01-01

    UV-visible absorption spectroscopy is useful for probing the electronic and structural changes of protein active sites, and thus the on-line combination of X-ray diffraction and spectroscopic analysis is increasingly being applied. Herein, a novel absorption spectrometer was developed at SPring-8 BL26B2 with a nearly on-axis geometry between the X-ray and optical axes. A small prism mirror was placed near the X-ray beamstop to pass the light only 2° off the X-ray beam, enabling spectroscopic analysis of the X-ray-exposed volume of a crystal during X-ray diffraction data collection. The spectrometer was applied to NO reductase, a heme enzyme that catalyzes NO reduction to N2O. Radiation damage to the heme was monitored in real time during X-ray irradiation by evaluating the absorption spectral changes. Moreover, NO binding to the heme was probed via caged NO photolysis with UV light, demonstrating the extended capability of the spectrometer for intermediate analysis.

  16. Analysis of the effects of surface chemistry on the XAS spectra of CdSe nanomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitley, Heather; Prendergast, David; Ogitsu, Tadashi; Schwegler, Eric

    2010-03-01

    X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) is an element-specific probe of local electronic structure, and is an ideal method to analyze chemical bonding. We investigate the consistency of theoretically predicted structures of CdSe nanomaterials with recently measured XAS via ab initio calculations. Using plane-wave DFT, the x-ray absorption cross-section for the Cd L3-edge of small CdSe clusters with a variety of surface ligands is calculated. We also highlight the importance of including excitonic effects in our simulations of core excitation spectra. We compare our simulations to existing experimental data on the ligand dependence of XAS for ligated quantum dots up to ˜3nm in diameter. Based on the favorable comparison of our theoretical spectra with experimental measurements, we infer the validity of our DFT-derived structure and surface passivation for these quantum dots and its relevance to understanding optoelectronic properties of solution-synthesized CdSe nanocrystals. Prepared by LLNL under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  17. Spectroscopic Character and Spatial Distribution of Hydroxyl and Water Absorption Features Measured on the Lunar Surface by the Moon Mineralogy Mapper Imaging Spectrometer on Chandrayaan-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, R. O.; Pieters, C. M.; Goswami, J.; Clark, R. N.; Annadurai, M.; Boardman, J. W.; Buratti, B. J.; Combe, J.; Dyar, M. D.; Head, J. W.; Hibbitts, C.; Hicks, M.; Isaacson, P.; Klima, R. L.; Kramer, G. Y.; Kumar, S.; Livo, K. E.; Lundeen, S.; Malaret, E.; McCord, T. B.; Mustard, J. F.; Nettles, J. W.; Petro, N. E.; Runyon, C. J.; Staid, M.; Sunshine, J. M.; Taylor, L. A.; Tompkins, S.; Varanasi, P.

    2009-12-01

    The Moon Mineralogy Mapper imaging spectrometer on Chandrayaan-1 has a broad spectral range from 430 to 3000 nm. By design, the range was specified to extend to 3000 nm to allow for possible detection of trace volatile compounds that possess absorption bands near 3000 nm. Soon after acquisition and calibration of a large fraction of the lunar surface in early February 2009, absorption features in the 2700 to 3000 nm region were detected over unexpectedly large regional areas. This extraordinary discovery has withstood extensive re-analysis and falsification efforts. We have concluded these absorption features are fundamentally present in the M3 measurements and are indicators of extensive hydroxyl and water-bearing materials occurring on the surface of the Moon. Based on current analyses, these absorption features appear strongest at high latitudes, but also occur in association with several fresh feldspathic craters. Interestingly, the distribution of these absorption features are not directly correlated with existing neutron spectrometer hydrogen abundance data for the sunlight surface. This may indicate that the formation and retention of hydroxyl and water is an active process largely restricted to the upper most surface. We present the detailed spectroscopic character of these absorption features in the 2700 to 3000 nm spectral region, including selected examples through all levels of measurement processing from raw data to calibrated apparent surface reflectance. In summary we show the measured strength and latitudinal distribution of the absorptions as well as selected localized occurrences in association with fresh feldspathic craters. The presence of hydroxyl and water bearing material over extensive regions of the lunar surface provides a new and unexpected source of volatiles. Options for harvesting these elements directly from the regolith may provide an alternate supply of volatiles for long term human exploration objectives.

  18. Spectroscopic properties of Bi2ZnOB2O6 single crystals doped with Pr3+ ions: Absorption and luminescence investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasprowicz, D.; Brik, M. G.; Jaroszewski, K.; Pedzinski, T.; Bursa, B.; Głuchowski, P.; Majchrowski, A.; Michalski, E.

    2015-09-01

    Nonlinear optical Bi2ZnOB2O6 single crystals doped with Pr3+ ions were grown using the Kyropoulos method. The absorption and luminescence properties of these new systems were investigated for the first time. The crystals are characterized by the large values of nonlinear optical coefficients. Effective luminescence of the Pr3+ ions makes this system an excellent candidate for the near-infrared (NIR) and/or ultraviolet (UV) to visible (VIS) laser converters. Based on the obtained experimental spectroscopic data, detailed analysis of the absorption and luminescence spectra was performed using the conventional Judd-Ofelt theory. Those transitions, which can be potentially used for laser applications of the Pr3+ ion, have been identified. In addition to the intensity parameters Ω2, Ω4, Ω6 the branching ratios and radiative lifetimes were estimated for all possible transitions in the studied spectral region.

  19. Molybdenum L-Edge XAS Spectra of MoFe Nitrogenase

    PubMed Central

    Bjornsson, Ragnar; Delgado-Jaime, Mario U; Lima, Frederico A; Sippel, Daniel; Schlesier, Julia; Weyhermüller, Thomas; Einsle, Oliver; Neese, Frank; DeBeer, Serena

    2015-01-01

    A molybdenum L-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) study is presented for native and oxidized MoFe protein of nitrogenase as well as Mo-Fe model compounds. Recently collected data on MoFe protein (in oxidized and reduced forms) is compared to previously published Mo XAS data on the isolated FeMo cofactor in NMF solution and put in context of the recent Mo K-edge XAS study, which showed a MoIII assignment for the molybdenum atom in FeMoco. The L3-edge data are interpreted within a simple ligand-field model, from which a time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) approach is proposed as a way to provide further insights into the analysis of the molybdenum L3-edges. The calculated results reproduce well the relative spectral trends that are observed experimentally. Ultimately, these results give further support for the MoIII assignment in protein-bound FeMoco, as well as isolated FeMoco. PMID:26213424

  20. XAS study on copper red in ancient glass beads from Thailand.

    PubMed

    Klysubun, Wantana; Thongkam, Yatima; Pongkrapan, Sorapong; Won-in, Krit; T-Thienprasert, Jiraroj; Dararutana, Pisutti

    2011-03-01

    Glass has been used in ornaments and decorations in Thailand for thousands of years, being discovered in several archeological sites and preserved in museums throughout the country. To date only a few of them have been examined by conventional methods for their compositions and colorations. In this work we report for the first time an advanced structural analysis of Thai ancient glass beads using synchrotron X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) and energy-dispersive X-ray (EDX) spectrometry. Four samples of ancient glass beads were selected from four different archeological sites in three southern provinces (Ranong, Krabi and Pang-nga) of Thailand. Archaeological dating indicated that they were made more than 1,300 years ago. A historically known method for obtaining a red color is to add compounds containing transition elements such as gold, copper, and chromium. For our samples, EDX spectrometry data revealed existing fractions of iron, copper, zinc, and chromium in ascending order. Thus, copper was selectively studied by XAS as being potentially responsible for the red color in the glass beads. K-shell X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) and extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) of copper were recorded in fluorescence mode using an advanced 13-element germanium detector. Comparisons with XANES spectra of reference compounds identified two major forms of copper, monovalent copper and a metallic cluster, dispersed in the glass matrix. The cluster dimension was approximated on the basis of structural modeling and a theoretical XANES calculation. As a complement, EXAFS spectra were analyzed to determine the first-shell coordination around copper. XAS was proven to be an outstanding, advanced technique that can be applied to study nondestructively archaeological objects to understand their characteristics and how they were produced in ancient times.

  1. XAS and RIXS study of acetic acid and methyl formate in liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, O.; Nishida, N.; Kanai, S.; Horikawa, Y.; Tokushima, T.

    2016-05-01

    Structure of acetic acid (AA) and methyl formate (MF) in the liquid phase is studied using X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) and X-ray emission spectroscopy (XES) experimentally and theoretically. Two distinct XES spectra are observed by tuning photon energy for both molecules. Model structure in the liquid phase is constructed using the classical and first principle molecular dynamics simulations, and XES spectra are calculated using density functional theory. Calculated XES spectra are consistent with experimental ones. The effect of core-hole induced excited state molecular dynamics are discussed.

  2. Operando XAS study of the influence of CO and NO on methane oxidation by Pd/Al2O3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchionni, V.; Nachtegaal, M.; Petrov, A.; Kröcher, O.; Ferri, D.

    2016-05-01

    Methane oxidation on Pd/Al2O3 has been investigated using operando X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) at the Pd K-edge. The influence of CO and NO on methane abatement has been addressed performing temperature programmed reaction runs while recording simultaneously XANES spectra. During CO oxidation Pd is reduced while methane conversion is shifted to higher temperature. NO strongly inhibits both CO and CH4 oxidation, despite the higher fraction of oxidized palladium.

  3. Atomistic simulation and XAS investigation of Mn induced defects in Bi12TiO20

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rezende, Marcos V. dos S.; Santos, Denise J.; Jackson, Robert A.; Valerio, Mário E. G.; Macedo, Zélia S.

    2016-06-01

    This work reports an investigation of the valence and site occupancy of Mn dopants in Bi12TiO20 (BTO: Mn) host using X-ray Absorption (XAS) and atomistic simulation techniques based on energy minimisation. X-ray Absorption Near Edge Structure (XANES) at the Mn K-edges gave typical results for Mn ions with mixed valences of 3+ and 4+. Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (EXAFS) results indicated that Mn ions are probably substituted at Ti sites. Atomistic simulation was performed assuming the incorporation of Mn2+, Mn3+ and Mn4+ ions at either Bi3+ or Ti4+ sites, and the results were compared to XANES and EXAFS measurements. Electrical conductivity for pure and doped samples was used to evaluate the consistency of the proposed model.

  4. Spectroscopic method for Earth-satellite-Earth laser long-path absorption measurements using Retroreflector In Space (RIS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sugimoto, Nobuo; Minato, Atsushi; Sasano, Yasuhiro

    1992-01-01

    The Retroreflector in Space (RIS) is a single element cube-corner retroreflector with a diameter of 0.5 m designed for earth-satellite-earth laser long-path absorption experiments. The RIS is to be loaded on the Advanced Earth Observing System (ADEOS) satellite which is scheduled for launch in Feb. 1996. The orbit for ADEOS is a sun synchronous subrecurrent polar-orbit with an inclination of 98.6 deg. It has a period of 101 minutes and an altitude of approximately 800 km. The local time at descending node is 10:15-10:45, and the recurrent period is 41 days. The velocity relative to the ground is approximately 7 km/s. In the RIS experiment, a laser beam transmitted from a ground station is reflected by RIS and received at the ground station. The absorption of the intervening atmosphere is measured in the round-trip optical path.

  5. Speciation of water soluble iron in size segregated airborne particulate matter using LED based liquid waveguide with a novel dispersive absorption spectroscopic measurement technique.

    PubMed

    Chan, K L; Jiang, S Y N; Ning, Z

    2016-03-31

    In this study, we present the development and evaluation of a dispersive absorption spectroscopic technique for trace level soluble ferrous detection. The technique makes use of the broadband absorption spectra of the ferrous-ferrozine complex with a novel spectral fitting algorithm to determine soluble ferrous concentrations in samples and achieves much improved measurement precision compared to conventional methods. The developed method was evaluated by both model simulations and experimental investigations. The results demonstrated the robustness of the method against the spectral fluctuation, wavelength drift and electronic noise, while achieving excellent linearity (R(2) > 0.999) and low detection limit (0.06 μg L(-1)) for soluble ferrous detection. The developed method was also used for the speciation of soluble iron in size segregated atmospheric aerosols. The measurement was carried out during Spring and Summer in typical urban environment in Hong Kong. The measured total iron concentrations are in good agreement compared to conventional Inductively Coupled Plasma - Optical Emission Spectroscopy (ICP-OES) measurements. Investigation on ambient particulate matter samples shows the size dependent characteristic of iron speciation in the atmosphere with a more active role of fine particles in transforming between ferrous and ferric. The method demonstrated in this study provides a cost and time effective approach for the speciation of iron in ambient aerosols. PMID:26965332

  6. Thermodynamic Modeling of Poorly Complexing Metals in Concentrated Electrolyte Solutions: An X-Ray Absorption and UV-Vis Spectroscopic Study of Ni(II) in the NiCl2-MgCl2-H2O System

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ning; Brugger, Joël; Etschmann, Barbara; Ngothai, Yung; Zeng, Dewen

    2015-01-01

    Knowledge of the structure and speciation of aqueous Ni(II)-chloride complexes is important for understanding Ni behavior in hydrometallurgical extraction. The effect of concentration on the first-shell structure of Ni(II) in aqueous NiCl2 and NiCl2-MgCl2 solutions was investigated by Ni K edge X-ray absorption (XAS) and UV-Vis spectroscopy at ambient conditions. Both techniques show that no large structural change (e.g., transition from octahedral to tetrahedral-like configuration) occurs. Both methods confirm that the Ni(II) aqua ion (with six coordinated water molecules at RNi-O = 2.07(2) Å) is the dominant species over the whole NiCl2 concentration range. However, XANES, EXAFS and UV-Vis data show subtle changes at high salinity (> 2 mol∙kg-1 NiCl2), which are consistent with the formation of small amounts of the NiCl+ complex (up to 0.44(23) Cl at a Ni-Cl distance of 2.35(2) Å in 5.05 mol∙kg-1 NiCl2) in the pure NiCl2 solutions. At high Cl:Ni ratio in the NiCl2-MgCl2-H2O solutions, small amounts of [NiCl2]0 are also present. We developed a speciation-based mixed-solvent electrolyte (MSE) model to describe activity-composition relationships in NiCl2-MgCl2-H2O solutions, and at the same time predict Ni(II) speciation that is consistent with our XAS and UV-Vis data and with existing literature data up to the solubility limit, resolving a long-standing uncertainty about the role of chloride complexing in this system. PMID:25885410

  7. Thermodynamic modeling of poorly complexing metals in concentrated electrolyte solutions: an X-ray absorption and UV-Vis spectroscopic study of Ni(II) in the NiCl2-MgCl2-H2O system.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ning; Brugger, Joël; Etschmann, Barbara; Ngothai, Yung; Zeng, Dewen

    2015-01-01

    Knowledge of the structure and speciation of aqueous Ni(II)-chloride complexes is important for understanding Ni behavior in hydrometallurgical extraction. The effect of concentration on the first-shell structure of Ni(II) in aqueous NiCl2 and NiCl2-MgCl2 solutions was investigated by Ni K edge X-ray absorption (XAS) and UV-Vis spectroscopy at ambient conditions. Both techniques show that no large structural change (e.g., transition from octahedral to tetrahedral-like configuration) occurs. Both methods confirm that the Ni(II) aqua ion (with six coordinated water molecules at RNi-O = 2.07(2) Å) is the dominant species over the whole NiCl2 concentration range. However, XANES, EXAFS and UV-Vis data show subtle changes at high salinity (> 2 mol∙kg(-1) NiCl2), which are consistent with the formation of small amounts of the NiCl+ complex (up to 0.44(23) Cl at a Ni-Cl distance of 2.35(2) Å in 5.05 mol∙kg(-1) NiCl2) in the pure NiCl2 solutions. At high Cl:Ni ratio in the NiCl2-MgCl2-H2O solutions, small amounts of [NiCl2]0 are also present. We developed a speciation-based mixed-solvent electrolyte (MSE) model to describe activity-composition relationships in NiCl2-MgCl2-H2O solutions, and at the same time predict Ni(II) speciation that is consistent with our XAS and UV-Vis data and with existing literature data up to the solubility limit, resolving a long-standing uncertainty about the role of chloride complexing in this system.

  8. Thermodynamic modeling of poorly complexing metals in concentrated electrolyte solutions: an X-ray absorption and UV-Vis spectroscopic study of Ni(II) in the NiCl2-MgCl2-H2O system.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ning; Brugger, Joël; Etschmann, Barbara; Ngothai, Yung; Zeng, Dewen

    2015-01-01

    Knowledge of the structure and speciation of aqueous Ni(II)-chloride complexes is important for understanding Ni behavior in hydrometallurgical extraction. The effect of concentration on the first-shell structure of Ni(II) in aqueous NiCl2 and NiCl2-MgCl2 solutions was investigated by Ni K edge X-ray absorption (XAS) and UV-Vis spectroscopy at ambient conditions. Both techniques show that no large structural change (e.g., transition from octahedral to tetrahedral-like configuration) occurs. Both methods confirm that the Ni(II) aqua ion (with six coordinated water molecules at RNi-O = 2.07(2) Å) is the dominant species over the whole NiCl2 concentration range. However, XANES, EXAFS and UV-Vis data show subtle changes at high salinity (> 2 mol∙kg(-1) NiCl2), which are consistent with the formation of small amounts of the NiCl+ complex (up to 0.44(23) Cl at a Ni-Cl distance of 2.35(2) Å in 5.05 mol∙kg(-1) NiCl2) in the pure NiCl2 solutions. At high Cl:Ni ratio in the NiCl2-MgCl2-H2O solutions, small amounts of [NiCl2]0 are also present. We developed a speciation-based mixed-solvent electrolyte (MSE) model to describe activity-composition relationships in NiCl2-MgCl2-H2O solutions, and at the same time predict Ni(II) speciation that is consistent with our XAS and UV-Vis data and with existing literature data up to the solubility limit, resolving a long-standing uncertainty about the role of chloride complexing in this system. PMID:25885410

  9. Development of wide-band-gap AlxGa1-xAs (x>0.7) photodiodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, X. J.; Kang, Tae Hoon; Hammig, Mark; Johnson, E. B.; Christian, J. F.

    2015-08-01

    The development of high-performance scintillation materials that emit light below 400 nm has prompted the development of improved solid-state UV photodetectors. While silicon provides a mature context for UV photodetectors, the high dark current due to its low band-gap (1.1 eV) limits the signal-to-noise performance when scaling the detector to large areas. Photodetectors fabricated in materials with a larger band-gap have the potential to surmount the performance limitations experienced by silicon. AlxGa1-xAs, is a material that provides a band gap from 1.55 eV to 2.13 eV, depending on the Al concentration. Using high Al concentration (0.7 < x < 1), AlxGa1-xAs to engineer a wider bandgap > 2eV is very desirable in terms of reducing dark noise. Due to its strong absorption of UV-light at the material surface, however, surface effects limit the quantum efficiency below 400 nm. Introducing surface layers that have a longer penetration depth for UV photons promises to boost the quantum efficiency in the UV while maintaining low dark current. This work describes the development of a photodiode fabricated in AlxGa1-xAs, x > 0.7, compared to an AlxGa1-xAs, x > 0.7 photodiode with an AlAs surface (x = 1). It presents the design of the photodiodes, simulations of their performance, the fabrication process, along with characterization data of fabricated photodiodes. We report on the surface effects of high aluminum concentration AlxGa1-xAs, x > 0.7, to provide a high quantum efficiency for photons below 400 nm, by examining the charge collection.

  10. X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopic determination of plutonium speciation at the Rocky Flats environmental technology

    SciTech Connect

    Lezama-pacheco, Juan S; Conradson, Steven D; Clark, David L

    2008-01-01

    X-ray Absorption Fine Structure spectroscopy was used to probe the speciation of the ppm level Pu in thirteen soil and concrete samples from the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site in support of the site remediation effort that has been successfully completed since these measurements. In addition to X-ray Absorption Near Edge Spectra, two of the samples yielded Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure spectra that could be analyzed by curve-fits. Most of these spectra exhibited features consistent with PU(IV), and more specificaJly, PuO{sub 2+x}-type speciation. Two were ambiguous, possibly indicating that Pu that was originally present in a different form was transforming into PuO{sub 2+x}, and one was interpreted as demonstrating the presence of an unusual Pu(VI) compound, consistent with its source being spills from a PUREX purification line onto a concrete floor and the resultant extreme conditions. These experimental results therefore validated models that predicted that insoluble PuO{sub 2+x} would be the most stable form of Pu in equilibrium with air and water even when the source terms were most likely Pu metal with organic compounds or a Pu fire. A corollary of these models' predictions and other in situ observations is therefore that the minimal transport of Pu that occurred on the site was via the resuspension and mobilization of colloidal particles. Under these conditions, the small amounts of diffusely distributed Pu that were left on the site after its remediation pose only a negligible hazard.

  11. PROBING THE FERMI BUBBLES IN ULTRAVIOLET ABSORPTION: A SPECTROSCOPIC SIGNATURE OF THE MILKY WAY'S BICONICAL NUCLEAR OUTFLOW

    SciTech Connect

    Fox, Andrew J.; Bordoloi, Rongmon; Hernandez, Svea; Tumlinson, Jason; Savage, Blair D.; Wakker, Bart P.; Lockman, Felix J.; Bland-Hawthorn, Joss; Kim, Tae-Sun; Benjamin, Robert A.

    2015-01-20

    Giant lobes of plasma extend ≈55° above and below the Galactic center, glowing in emission from gamma rays (the Fermi Bubbles) to microwaves and polarized radio waves. We use ultraviolet absorption-line spectra from the Hubble Space Telescope to constrain the velocity of the outflowing gas within these regions, targeting the quasar PDS 456 (ℓ, b = 10.°4, +11.°2). This sightline passes through a clear biconical structure seen in hard X-ray and gamma-ray emission near the base of the northern Fermi Bubble. We report two high-velocity metal absorption components, at v {sub LSR} = –235 and +250 km s{sup –1}, which cannot be explained by co-rotating gas in the Galactic disk or halo. Their velocities are suggestive of an origin on the front and back side of an expanding biconical outflow emanating from the Galactic center. We develop simple kinematic biconical outflow models that can explain the observed profiles with an outflow velocity of ≳900 km s{sup –1} and a full opening angle of ≈110° (matching the X-ray bicone). This indicates Galactic center activity over the last ≈2.5-4.0 Myr, in line with age estimates of the Fermi Bubbles. The observations illustrate the use of UV spectroscopy to probe the properties of swept-up gas venting into the Fermi Bubbles.

  12. A dispenser-reactor apparatus applied for in situ XAS monitoring of Pt nanoparticle formation.

    PubMed

    Boita, Jocenir; Castegnaro, Marcus Vinicius; Alves, Maria do Carmo Martins; Morais, Jonder

    2015-05-01

    In situ time-resolved X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) measurements collected at the Pt L3-edge during the synthesis of Pt nanoparticles (NPs) in aqueous solution are reported. A specially designed dispenser-reactor apparatus allowed for monitoring changes in the XAS spectra from the earliest moments of Pt ions in solution until the formation of metallic nanoparticles with a mean diameter of 4.9 ± 1.1 nm. By monitoring the changes in the local chemical environment of the Pt atoms in real time, it was possible to observe that the NPs formation kinetics involved two stages: a reduction-nucleation burst followed by a slow growth and stabilization of NPs. Subsequently, the synthesized Pt NPs were supported on activated carbon and characterized by synchrotron-radiation-excited X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS). The supported Pt NPs remained in the metallic chemical state and with a reduced size, presenting slight lattice parameter contraction in comparison with the bulk Pt values.

  13. Degradation of Bimetallic Model Electrocatalysts ___ an in situ XAS Study

    SciTech Connect

    Friebel, Daniel

    2011-06-22

    One of the major challenges in the development of clean energy fuel cells is the performance degradation of the electrocatalyst, which, apart from poisoning effects, can suffer from corrosion due to its exposure to a harsh environment under high potentials. In this communication, we demonstrate how interactions of Pt with a transition metal support affect not only, as commonly intended, the catalytic activity, but also the reactivity of Pt towards oxide formation or dissolution. We use two well-defined single-crystal model systems, Pt/Rh(111) and Pt/Au(111) and a unique x-ray spectroscopy technique with enhanced energy resolution to monitor the potential-dependent oxidation state of Pt, and find two markedly different oxidation mechanisms on the two different substrates. This information can be of great significance for future design of more active and more stable catalysts. We have studied the potential-induced degradation of Pt monolayer model electrocatalysts on Rh(111) and Au(111) single-crystal substrates. The anodic formation of Pt oxides was monitored using in situ high energy resolution fluorescence detection x-ray absorption spectroscopy (HERFD XAS). Although Pt was deposited on both substrates in a three-dimensional island growth mode, we observed remarkable differences during oxide formation that can only be understood in terms of strong Pt-substrate interactions throughout the Pt islands. Anodic polarization of Pt/Rh(111) up to +1.6 V vs. RHE (reversible hydrogen electrode) leads to formation an incompletely oxidized passive layer, whereas formation of PtO2 and partial Pt dissolution is observed for Pt/Au(111).

  14. Hydride generation and condensation flame atomic absorption spectroscopic determination of antimony in raw coffee beans and processed coffee.

    PubMed

    Kuennen, R W; Hahn, M H; Fricke, F L; Wolnik, K A

    1982-09-01

    A method was developed for determining Sb at nanogram per gram levels in raw coffee beans and processed coffee. The procedure uses either total acid digestion or extraction with 6M HCl followed by hydride generation/condensation with subsequent revolatilization of stibine (SbH3) and detection by flame atomic absorption spectroscopy. The lowest quantifiable level, based on a 2 g (dry weight) sample, is 2 ng Sb/g. The results of recoveries on spiked samples, precision studies on composited coffee samples, and the analysis of National Bureau of Standards Standard Reference Materials demonstrate the reliability and accuracy of the procedure. Sb concentrations in coffee samples were verified by neutron activation analysis and inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy. Advantages of the method compared with the AOAC colorimetric procedure and hydride generation without condensation are discussed. PMID:7130087

  15. Spectroscopic determination of leaf biochemistry using band-depth analysis of absorption features and stepwise multiple linear regression

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kokaly, R.F.; Clark, R.N.

    1999-01-01

    We develop a new method for estimating the biochemistry of plant material using spectroscopy. Normalized band depths calculated from the continuum-removed reflectance spectra of dried and ground leaves were used to estimate their concentrations of nitrogen, lignin, and cellulose. Stepwise multiple linear regression was used to select wavelengths in the broad absorption features centered at 1.73 ??m, 2.10 ??m, and 2.30 ??m that were highly correlated with the chemistry of samples from eastern U.S. forests. Band depths of absorption features at these wavelengths were found to also be highly correlated with the chemistry of four other sites. A subset of data from the eastern U.S. forest sites was used to derive linear equations that were applied to the remaining data to successfully estimate their nitrogen, lignin, and cellulose concentrations. Correlations were highest for nitrogen (R2 from 0.75 to 0.94). The consistent results indicate the possibility of establishing a single equation capable of estimating the chemical concentrations in a wide variety of species from the reflectance spectra of dried leaves. The extension of this method to remote sensing was investigated. The effects of leaf water content, sensor signal-to-noise and bandpass, atmospheric effects, and background soil exposure were examined. Leaf water was found to be the greatest challenge to extending this empirical method to the analysis of fresh whole leaves and complete vegetation canopies. The influence of leaf water on reflectance spectra must be removed to within 10%. Other effects were reduced by continuum removal and normalization of band depths. If the effects of leaf water can be compensated for, it might be possible to extend this method to remote sensing data acquired by imaging spectrometers to give estimates of nitrogen, lignin, and cellulose concentrations over large areas for use in ecosystem studies.We develop a new method for estimating the biochemistry of plant material using

  16. Probing the Fermi Bubbles in Ultraviolet Absorption: A Spectroscopic Signature of the Milky Way's Biconical Nuclear Outflow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fox, Andrew J.; Bordoloi, Rongmon; Savage, Blair D.; Lockman, Felix J.; Jenkins, Edward B.; Wakker, Bart P.; Bland-Hawthorn, Joss; Hernandez, Svea; Kim, Tae-Sun; Benjamin, Robert A.; Bowen, David V.; Tumlinson, Jason

    2015-01-01

    Giant lobes of plasma extend ≈55° above and below the Galactic center, glowing in emission from gamma rays (the Fermi Bubbles) to microwaves and polarized radio waves. We use ultraviolet absorption-line spectra from the Hubble Space Telescope to constrain the velocity of the outflowing gas within these regions, targeting the quasar PDS 456 (l, b = 10.°4, +11.°2). This sightline passes through a clear biconical structure seen in hard X-ray and gamma-ray emission near the base of the northern Fermi Bubble. We report two high-velocity metal absorption components, at v LSR = -235 and +250 km s-1, which cannot be explained by co-rotating gas in the Galactic disk or halo. Their velocities are suggestive of an origin on the front and back side of an expanding biconical outflow emanating from the Galactic center. We develop simple kinematic biconical outflow models that can explain the observed profiles with an outflow velocity of gsim900 km s-1 and a full opening angle of ≈110° (matching the X-ray bicone). This indicates Galactic center activity over the last ≈2.5-4.0 Myr, in line with age estimates of the Fermi Bubbles. The observations illustrate the use of UV spectroscopy to probe the properties of swept-up gas venting into the Fermi Bubbles. Based on observations taken under program 13448 of the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained at the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under NASA contract NAS 5-26555, and under program 14B-299 of the NRAO Green Bank Telescope, which is a facility of the National Science Foundation operated under cooperative agreement by Associated Universities, Inc.

  17. Different speciation for bromine in brown and red algae, revealed by in vivo X-ray absorption spectroscopic studies.

    PubMed

    Küpper, Frithjof C; Leblanc, Catherine; Meyer-Klaucke, Wolfram; Potin, Philippe; Feiters, Martin C

    2014-08-01

    Members of various algal lineages are known to be strong producers of atmospherically relevant halogen emissions, that is a consequence of their capability to store and metabolize halogens. This study uses a noninvasive, synchrotron-based technique, X-ray absorption spectroscopy, for addressing in vivo bromine speciation in the brown algae Ectocarpus siliculosus, Ascophyllum nodosum, and Fucus serratus, the red algae Gracilaria dura, G. gracilis, Chondrus crispus, Osmundea pinnatifida, Asparagopsis armata, Polysiphonia elongata, and Corallina officinalis, the diatom Thalassiosira rotula, the dinoflagellate Lingulodinium polyedrum and a natural phytoplankton sample. The results highlight a diversity of fundamentally different bromine storage modes: while most of the stramenopile representatives and the dinoflagellate store mostly bromide, there is evidence for Br incorporated in nonaromatic hydrocarbons in Thalassiosira. Red algae operate various organic bromine stores - including a possible precursor (by the haloform reaction) for bromoform in Asparagopsis and aromatically bound Br in Polysiphonia and Corallina. Large fractions of the bromine in the red algae G. dura and C. crispus and the brown alga F. serratus are present as Br(-) defects in solid KCl, similar to what was reported earlier for Laminaria parts. These results are discussed according to different defensive strategies that are used within algal taxa to cope with biotic or abiotic stresses. PMID:26988449

  18. Atomic absorption spectroscopic, conductometric and colorimetric methods for determination of fluoroquinolone antibiotics using ammonium reineckate ion-pair complex formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ragab, Gamal H.; Amin, Alaa S.

    2004-03-01

    Three accurate, rapid and simple atomic absorption spectrometric, conductometric and colorimetric methods were developed for the determination of norfloxacin (NRF), ciprofloxacin (CIP), ofloxacin (OFL) and enrofloxacin (ENF). The proposed methods depend upon the reaction of ammonium reineckate with the studied drugs to form stable precipitate of ion-pair complexes, which was dissolved in acetone. The pink coloured complexes were determined either by AAS or colorimetrically at λmax 525 nm directly using the dissolved complex. Using conductometric titration, the studied drugs could be evaluated in 50% (v/v) acetone in the range 5.0-65, 4.0-48, 5.0-56 and 6.0-72 μg ml -1 of NRF, CPF, OFL and ENF, respectively. The optimizations of various experimental conditions were described. The results obtained showed good recoveries of 99.15±1.15, 99.30±1.40, 99.60±1.50, and 99.00±1.25% with relative standard deviations of 0.81, 1.06, 0.97, and 0.69% for NRF, CPF, OFL, and ENF, respectively. Applications of the proposed methods to representative pharmaceutical formulations are successfully presented.

  19. The chemical environment of iron in mineral fibres. A combined X-ray absorption and Mössbauer spectroscopic study.

    PubMed

    Pollastri, Simone; D'Acapito, Francesco; Trapananti, Angela; Colantoni, Ivan; Andreozzi, Giovanni B; Gualtieri, Alessandro F

    2015-11-15

    Although asbestos represents today one of the most harmful contaminant on Earth, in 72% of the countries worldwide only amphiboles are banned while controlled use of chrysotile is allowed. Uncertainty on the potential toxicity of chrysotile is due to the fact that the mechanisms by which mineral fibres induces cyto- and geno-toxic damage are still unclear. We have recently started a long term project aimed at the systematic investigation of the crystal-chemistry, bio-interaction and toxicity of the mineral fibres. This work presents a systematic structural investigation of iron in asbestos and erionite (considered the most relevant mineral fibres of social and/or economic-industrial importance) using synchrotron X-ray absorption and Mössbauer spectroscopy. In all investigated mineral fibres, iron in the bulk structure is found in octahedral sites and can be made available at the surface via fibre dissolution. We postulate that the amount of hydroxyl radicals released by the fibers depends, among other factors, upon their dissolution rate; in relation to this, a ranking of ability of asbestos fibres to generate hydroxyl radicals, resulting from available surface iron, is advanced: amosite > crocidolite ≈ chrysotile > anthophyllite > tremolite. Erionite, with a fairly high toxicity potential, contains only octahedrally coordinated Fe(3+). Although it needs further experimental evidence, such available surface iron may be present as oxide nanoparticles coating and can be a direct cause of generation of hydroxyl radicals when such coating dissolves.

  20. Different speciation for bromine in brown and red algae, revealed by in vivo X-ray absorption spectroscopic studies.

    PubMed

    Küpper, Frithjof C; Leblanc, Catherine; Meyer-Klaucke, Wolfram; Potin, Philippe; Feiters, Martin C

    2014-08-01

    Members of various algal lineages are known to be strong producers of atmospherically relevant halogen emissions, that is a consequence of their capability to store and metabolize halogens. This study uses a noninvasive, synchrotron-based technique, X-ray absorption spectroscopy, for addressing in vivo bromine speciation in the brown algae Ectocarpus siliculosus, Ascophyllum nodosum, and Fucus serratus, the red algae Gracilaria dura, G. gracilis, Chondrus crispus, Osmundea pinnatifida, Asparagopsis armata, Polysiphonia elongata, and Corallina officinalis, the diatom Thalassiosira rotula, the dinoflagellate Lingulodinium polyedrum and a natural phytoplankton sample. The results highlight a diversity of fundamentally different bromine storage modes: while most of the stramenopile representatives and the dinoflagellate store mostly bromide, there is evidence for Br incorporated in nonaromatic hydrocarbons in Thalassiosira. Red algae operate various organic bromine stores - including a possible precursor (by the haloform reaction) for bromoform in Asparagopsis and aromatically bound Br in Polysiphonia and Corallina. Large fractions of the bromine in the red algae G. dura and C. crispus and the brown alga F. serratus are present as Br(-) defects in solid KCl, similar to what was reported earlier for Laminaria parts. These results are discussed according to different defensive strategies that are used within algal taxa to cope with biotic or abiotic stresses.

  1. X-ray Absorption and Emission Study of Dioxygen Activation by a Small-Molecule Manganese Complex

    PubMed Central

    Rees, Julian A.; Martin-Diaconescu, Vlad; Kovacs, Julie A.; DeBeer, Serena

    2015-01-01

    Manganese K-edge X-ray absorption (XAS) and Kβ emission (XES) spectroscopies were used to investigate the factors contributing to O–O bond activation in a small-molecule system. The recent structural characterization of a metastable peroxo-bridged dimeric Mn(III)2 complex derived from dioxygen has provided the first opportunity to obtain X-ray spectroscopic data on this type of species. Ground state and time-dependent density functional theory calculations have provided further insight into the nature of the transitions in XAS pre-edge and valence-to-core (VtC) XES spectral regions. An experimentally validated electronic structure description has also enabled the determination of structural and electronic factors that govern peroxo bond activation, and have allowed us to propose both a rationale for the metastability of this unique compound, as well as potential future ligand designs which may further promote or inhibit O–O bond scission. Finally, we have explored the potential of VtC XES as an element-selective probe of both the coordination mode and degree of activation of peroxomanganese adducts. The comparison of these results to a recent VtC XES study of iron-mediated dintrogen activation helps to illustrate the factors that may determine the success of this spectroscopic method for future studies of small-molecule activation at transition metal sites. PMID:26061165

  2. XAS Studies of Arsenic in the Environment

    SciTech Connect

    Charnock, J. M.; Polya, D. A.; Gault, A. G.; Morgan, A. J.

    2007-02-02

    Arsenic is present in low concentrations in much of the Earth's crust and changes in its speciation are vital to understanding its transport and toxicity in the environment. We have used X-ray absorption spectroscopy to investigate the coordination sites of arsenic in a wide variety of samples, including soil and earthworm tissues from arsenic-contaminated land, and human hair and nail samples from people exposed to arsenic in Cambodia. Our results confirm the effectiveness of using X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) and X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy to determine speciation changes in environmental samples.

  3. XAS Studies of Arsenic in the Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charnock, J. M.; Polya, D. A.; Gault, A. G.; Morgan, A. J.

    2007-02-01

    Arsenic is present in low concentrations in much of the Earth's crust and changes in its speciation are vital to understanding its transport and toxicity in the environment. We have used X-ray absorption spectroscopy to investigate the coordination sites of arsenic in a wide variety of samples, including soil and earthworm tissues from arsenic-contaminated land, and human hair and nail samples from people exposed to arsenic in Cambodia. Our results confirm the effectiveness of using X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) and X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy to determine speciation changes in environmental samples.

  4. Behavior of fission gases in nuclear fuel: XAS characterization of Kr in UO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, P. M.; Vathonne, E.; Carlot, G.; Delorme, R.; Sabathier, C.; Freyss, M.; Garcia, P.; Bertolus, M.; Glatzel, P.; Proux, O.

    2015-11-01

    X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy (XAS) was used to study the behavior of krypton as a function of its concentration in UO2 samples implanted with Kr ions. For a 0.5 at.% krypton local concentration, by combining XAS results and DFT + U calculations, we show that without any thermal treatment Kr atoms are mainly incorporated in the UO2 lattice as single atoms inside a neutral bound Schottky defect with O vacancies aligned along the (100) direction (BSD1). A thermal treatment at 1273 K induces the precipitation of dense Kr nano-aggregates, most probably solid at room temperature. In addition, 26 ± 2% of the Kr atoms remain inside BSD1 showing that Kr-BSD1 complex is stable up to this temperature. Consequently, the (in-)solubility of krypton in UO2 has to be re-evaluated. For high Kr concentration (8 at.%), XAS signals show that Kr atoms have precipitated in nanometer-sized aggregates with internal densities ranging between 4.15(7) g cm-3 and 3.98(5) g cm-3 even after annealing at 873 K. By neglecting the effect due to the UO2 matrix, the corresponding krypton pressures at 300 K were equal to 2.6(3) GPa and 2.0(2) GPa, respectively. After annealing at 1673 K, regardless of the initial Kr concentration, a bi-modal distribution is observed with solid nano-aggregates even at room temperature and larger cavities only partially filled with Kr. These results are very close to those observed in UO2 fuel irradiated in reactor. In this study we show that a rare gas can be used as a probe to investigate the defect creation and their stability in UO2.

  5. Compressed shell conditions extracted from spectroscopic analysis of Ti K-shell absorption spectra with evaluation of line self-emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johns, H. M.; Mancini, R. C.; Hakel, P.; Nagayama, T.; Smalyuk, V. A.; Regan, S. P.; Delettrez, J.

    2014-08-01

    Ti-doped tracer layers embedded in the shell at varying distances from the fuel-shell interface serve as a spectroscopic diagnostic for direct-drive experiments conducted at OMEGA. Detailed modeling of Ti K-shell absorption spectra produced in the tracer layer considers n = 1-2 transitions in F- through Li-like Ti ions in the 4400-4800 eV range, both including and excluding line self-emission. Testing the model on synthetic spectra generated from 1-D LILAC hydrodynamic simulations reveals that the model including self-emission best reproduces the simulation, while the model excluding self-emission overestimates electron temperature Te and density Ne to a higher degree for layers closer to the core. The prediction of the simulation that the magnitude of Te and duration of Ti absorption will be strongly tied to the distance of the layer from the core is consistent with the idea that regions of the shell close to the core are more significantly heated by thermal transport out of the hot dense core, but more distant regions are less affected by it. The simulation predicts more time variation in the observed Te, Ne conditions in the compressed shell than is observed in the experiment, analysis of which reveals conditions remain in the range Te = 400-600 eV and Ne = 3.0-10.0 × 1024 cm-3 for all but the most distant Ti-doped layer, with error bars ˜5% Te value and ˜10% Ne on average. The Te, Ne conditions of the simulation lead to a greater degree of ionization for zones close to the core than occurs experimentally, and less ionization for zones far from the core.

  6. Advanced XAS Analysis for Investigating Fuel Cell Electrocatalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Witkowska, Agnieszka; Principi, Emiliano; Di Cicco, Andrea; Marassi, Roberto

    2007-02-02

    In the paper we present an accurate structural study of a Pt-based electrode by means of XAS, accounting for both the catalytic nanoparticles size distribution and sample inhomogeneities. Morphology and size distribution of the nanoparticles were investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and X-ray diffraction techniques. XAS data-analysis was performed using advanced multiple-scattering techniques (GNXAS), disentangling possible effects due to surface atom contributions in nanoparticles and sample homogeneity, contributing to a reduction of intensity of the structural signal. This approach for XAS investigation of electrodes of FC devices can represent a viable and reliable way to understand structural details, important for producing more efficient catalytic materials.

  7. Local structural studies of the cubic Cd1–xCaxO system through Cd K-edge extended X-ray absorption spectroscopic studies

    PubMed Central

    Srihari, Velaga; Sridharan, V.; Nomura, Masaharu; Sastry, V. Sankara; Sundar, C. S

    2012-01-01

    Cd K-edge extended X-ray absorption fine-structure spectroscopic studies were carried out on Cd1–xCaxO (0 ≤ x ≤0.9) solid solutions and the first and second nearest neighbour (NN) distances and their mean square relative displacement σ2 were estimated. The first NN distance, d Cd–O(x), was found to be smaller than its expected value, a(x)/2, obtained from the X-ray diffraction measurements. It increases monotonically and non-linearly with a negative curvature, comparable with that of the a(x) value variation. The variation σ2 of the 1NN with x is consistent with a disordered solid solution model. The 2NN distances d Cd–Cd(x) and d Cd–Ca(x) are found to follow the average values obtained by X-ray diffraction with d Cd–Ca(x) > d Cd–Cd(x). From detailed analysis it is argued that the solid solution exhibits a bimodal distribution of the 1NN distances, d Cd–O(x) and d Ca–O(x), and that the system belongs to a persistent type. PMID:22713887

  8. X-ray absorption spectroscopic analyses and fluorescence emission characteristics of PbO-Bi203-Ga203 glasses doped with rare-earth ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Yong Gyu; Kim, Kyong-Hon; Chernov, Vladimir A.; Heo, Jong

    1999-12-01

    A representative of heavy metal oxide glasses, i.e., a PbO- Bi2O3-Ga2O3 glass, was investigated to identify the network structure of the glass and the electronic transition properties of rare-earth ions doped. X-ray absorption spectroscopic analyses showed that gallium forms GaO4 tetrahedral units with an average Ga-O bond length of approximately 1.87 A. Lead forms both PbO3 and PbO4 polyhedra, but the fraction of PbO4 decreases with decreasing PbO content. Bismuth in glasses constructs BiO5 and BiO6 polyhedra, which have a similar coordination scheme of the (alpha) -Bi2O3 crystal. Formation of three-coordinated oxygens is necessary to compensate shortage of oxygens to be two-fold coordinated. These glasses exhibit a relatively good thermal stability as well as the lowest phonon energy among oxide glasses, and thereby enhance numerous fluorescence emissions that are quenched in the conventional oxide glasses. Magnitudes of multiphonon relaxation are the lowest among oxide glasses and comparable to those of fluoride glasses. Fluorescence emission characteristics of Pr3+: 1.3 micrometer and Er3+: 2.7 micrometer were discussed in detail. In addition, influence of OH- on the Nd3+: 1.3 micrometer emission was analyzed. Further research efforts on impurity minimization and fiberization may realize a new oxide-based fiber-optic host.

  9. X-ray absorption fine structure of aged, Pu-doped glass and ceramic waste forms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hess, N. J.; Weber, W. J.; Conradson, S. D.

    1998-04-01

    X-ray absorption spectroscopic (XAS) studies were performed on three compositionally identical, Pu-doped, borosilicate glasses prepared 15 years ago at different α-activities by varying the 239Pu/ 238Pu isotopic ratio. The resulting α-activities ranged from 1.9×10 7 to 4.2×10 9 Bq/g and have current, accumulated doses between 8.8×10 15 to 1.9×10 18 α-decays/g. Two ceramic, polycrystalline zircon (ZrSiO 4) samples prepared 16 years ago with 10.0 wt% Pu was also investigated. Varying the 239Pu/ 238Pu isotopic ratio in these samples resulted in α-activities of 2.5×10 8 and 5.6×10 10 Bq/g and current, accumulated doses of 1.2×10 17 and 2.8×10 19 α-decays/g. The multicomponent composition of the waste forms permitted XAS investigations at six absorption edges for the borosilicate glass and at three absorption edges for the polycrystalline zircons. For both waste forms, analysis of extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) and X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) spectra indicates that the local environment around the cations exhibits different degrees of disorder as a result of the accumulated α-decay dose. In general, cations with short cation-oxygen bonds show little effect from self-radiation whereas cations with long cation-oxygen bonds show a greater degree of disorder with accumulated α-decay dose.

  10. XAS and XPS Characterization of Mercury Binding on Brominated Activated Carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Hutson,N.; Attwood, B.; Scheckel, K.

    2007-01-01

    Brominated powdered activated carbon sorbents have been shown to be quite effective for mercury capture when injected into the flue gas duct at coal-fired power plants and are especially useful when burning Western low-chlorine subbituminous coals. X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) have been used to determine information about the speciation and binding of mercury on two commercially available brominated activated carbons. The results are compared with similar analysis of a conventional (non-halogenated) and chlorinated activated carbon. Both the XAS and XPS results indicate that the mercury, though introduced as elemental vapor, is consistently bound on the carbon in the oxidized form. The conventional and chlorinated activated carbons appeared to contain mercury bound to chlorinated sites and possibly to sulfate species that have been incorporated onto the carbon from adsorbed SO{sub 2}. The mercury-containing brominated sorbents appear to contain mercury bound primarily at bromination sites. The mechanism of capture for the sorbents likely consists of surface-enhanced oxidation of the elemental mercury vapor via interaction with surface-bound halide species with subsequent binding by surface halide or sulfate species.

  11. XAS and XPS characterization of mercury binding on brominated activated carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Nick D. Hutson; Brian C. Attwood; Kirk G. Scheckel

    2007-03-01

    Brominated powdered activated carbon sorbents have been shown to be quite effective for mercury capture when injected into the flue gas duct at coal-fired power plants and are especially useful when burning Western low-chlorine subbituminous coals. X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) have been used to determine information about the speciation and binding of mercury on two commercially available brominated activated carbons. The results are compared with similar analysis of a conventional (non-halogenated) and chlorinated activated carbon. Both the XAS and XPS results indicate that the mercury, though introduced as elemental vapor, is consistently bound on the carbon in the oxidized form. The conventional and chlorinated activated carbons appeared to contain mercury bound to chlorinated sites and possibly to sulfate species that have been incorporated onto the carbon from adsorbed SO{sub 2}. The mercury-containing brominated sorbents appear to contain mercury bound primarily at bromination sites. The mechanism of capture for the sorbents likely consists of surface-enhanced oxidation of the elemental mercury vapor via interaction with surface-bound halide species with subsequent binding by surface halide or sulfate species. 22 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  12. Application of Sequential Extractions and X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy to Determine the Speciation of Chromium in Northern New Jersey Marsh Soils Developed in Chromite ore Processing Residue (COPR)

    SciTech Connect

    Elzinga, E.; Cirmo, A

    2010-01-01

    The Cr speciation in marsh soils developed in weathering chromite ore processing residue (COPR) was characterized using sequential extractions and synchrotron microbeam and bulk X-ray absorption spectroscopic (XAS) analyses. The sequential extractions suggested substantial Cr associated with reducible and oxidizable soil components, and significant non-extractable residual Cr. Notable differences in Cr speciation estimates from three extraction schemes underscore the operationally defined nature of Cr speciation provided by these methods. Micro X-ray fluorescence maps and {mu}-XAS data indicated the presence of {micro}m-sized chromite particles scattered throughout the weathered COPR matrix. These particles derive from the original COPR material, and have relatively high resistance towards weathering, and therefore persist even after prolonged leaching. Bulk XAS data further indicated Cr(III) incorporated in Fe(OH){sub 3}, and Cr(III) associated with organic matter. The low Cr contents of the weathered material (200-850 ppm) compared to unweathered COPR (20,000-60,000 ppm) point to substantial Cr leaching during COPR weathering, with partial repartitioning of released Cr into secondary Fe(OH){sub 3} phases and organics. The effects of anoxia on Cr speciation, and the potential of active COPR weathering releasing Cr(VI) deeper in the profile require further study.

  13. XAS study of mercury(II) ions trapped in mercaptan-functionalized mesostructured silicate with a wormhole framework structure.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chia-Chen; McKimmy, Emily J; Pinnavaia, Thomas J; Hayes, Kim F

    2004-09-15

    Directly assembled wormhole mesostructures with high level functionalized mercaptan (MP-HMS) have been shown to be effective mercury(II) (Hg2+) trapping agents. Sorption of Hg2+ onto MP-HMS was investigated using X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) to identify the structural coordination of the adsorbed Hg. Samples with different fractions of mercaptan functionalized groups (i.e., x = 0.1 and 0.5) with various Hg/S molar ratios ranging from 0.05 to 1.4 were investigated. XAS analysis indicates that adsorbed Hg first coordination shell is best fitted with an Hg-O path and an Hg-S path. The Hg-S atomic distance (R(Hg-S)) remained relatively constant while the Hg-S coordination numbers (CN) decreased as Hg/S loading increased. For the Hg-O path, both the CN and the R(Hg-O) increased with increasing Hg loading. XAS results suggest that at low Hg loadings, adsorbed Hg2+ forms mostly monodentate sulfur complexes (-S-Hg-OH) with the sulfur functional groups on the MP-HMS surfaces. At high Hg loadings, the Hg coordination environment is consistent with the formation of a double-layer structure of Hg attached to sulfur binding sites (-S-Hg-O-Hg-OH).

  14. Electrochemical Kinetics and X-ray Absorption Spectroscopic Investigations of Oxygen Reduction on Chalcogen-Modified Ruthenium Catalysts in Alkaline Media

    SciTech Connect

    N Ramaswamy; R Allen; S Mukerjee; Y

    2011-12-31

    The oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in alkaline media has been investigated on chalcogen-modified ruthenium nanoparticles (Ru/C, Se/Ru/C, Se/RuMo/C, S/Ru/C, S/RuMo/C) synthesized in-house via aqueous routes. In acidic medium, it is well known that modification by a chalcogen prevents the oxidation of the underlying transition-metal (Ru) surface, thereby promoting direct molecular O{sub 2} adsorption on the Ru metal. On an unmodified Ru catalyst in alkaline media, the surface oxides on Ru mediate the 2e{sup -} reduction of molecular O{sub 2} to a stable peroxide anion (HO{sub 2}{sup -}) intermediate via an outer-sphere electron-transfer mechanism. This increases the activity of HO{sub 2}{sup -} near the electrode surface and decreases the overpotential for ORR by effectively carrying out the reduction of HO{sub 2}{sup -} to OH{sup -} at the oxide-free ruthenium metal site. An increase in ORR activity of Ru is observed by modification with a chalcogen; however, the increase is not as significant as observed in acidic media. Ternary additives, such as Mo, were found to significantly improve the stability of the chalcogen-modified catalysts. Detailed investigations of the ORR activity of this class of catalyst have been carried out in alkaline media along with comparisons to acidic media wherever necessary. A combination of electrochemical and X-ray absorption spectroscopic (EXAFS, XANES, {Delta}{mu}) studies has been performed in order to understand the structure/property relationships of these catalysts within the context of ORR in alkaline electrolytes.

  15. XAS and TRLIF spectroscopy of uranium and neptunium in seawater.

    PubMed

    Maloubier, Melody; Solari, Pier Lorenzo; Moisy, Philippe; Monfort, Marguerite; Den Auwer, Christophe; Moulin, Christophe

    2015-03-28

    Seawater contains radionuclides at environmental levels; some are naturally present and others come from anthropogenic nuclear activity. In this report, the molecular speciation in seawater of uranium(VI) and neptunium(V) at a concentration of 5 × 10(-5) M has been investigated for the first time using a combination of two spectroscopic techniques: Time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence (TRLIF) for U and extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) for U and Np at the LIII edge. In parallel, the theoretical speciation of uranium and neptunium in seawater at the same concentration is also discussed and compared to spectroscopic data. The uranium complex was identified as the neutral carbonato calcic complex UO2(CO3)3Ca2, which has been previously described in other natural systems. In the case of neptunium, the complex identified is mainly a carbonato complex whose exact stoichiometry is more difficult to assess. The knowledge of the actinide molecular speciation and reactivity in seawater is of fundamental interest in the particular case of uranium recovery and more generally regarding the actinide life cycle within the biosphere in the case of accidental release. This is the first report of actinide direct speciation in seawater medium that can complement inventory data.

  16. Integration of XAS and NMR techniques for the structure determination of metalloproteins. Examples from the study of copper transport proteins.

    PubMed

    Banci, Lucia; Bertini, Ivano; Mangani, Stefano

    2005-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is a powerful technique for protein structure determination in solution. However, when dealing with metalloproteins, NMR methods are unable to directly determine the structure of the metal site and its coordination geometry. The capability of X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) to provide the structure of a metal ion bound to a protein is then perfectly suited to complement the process of the structure determination. This aspect is particularly relevant in structural genomic projects where high throughput of structural results is the main goal. The synergism of the two techniques has been exploited in the structure determination of bacterial copper transport proteins.

  17. In situ XAS studies of Pt{sub x}Pd{sub 1-x} nanoparticles under thermal annealing

    SciTech Connect

    Bernardi, F.; Morais, J.; Alves, M. C. M.

    2009-01-29

    In this work, we have studied Pt{sub x}Pd{sub 1-x}(x = 1, 0.7 or 0.5) nanoparticles subjected to H{sub 2} reduction and sulfidation under H{sub 2}S atmosphere, both at 300 deg. C. The system was studied by in-situ x-ray absorption spectroscopy (in-situ XAS). We observed that the efficiency of sulfidation is directly proportional to the quantity of Pd atoms in the nanoparticle, provided the reduction process has been achieved.

  18. Using combined XAS/DRIFTS to study CO/NO Oxidation over Pt/Al2O3 catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gänzler, A. M.; Lichtenberg, H.; Frenkel, A. I.; Casapu, M.; Boubnov, A.; Wang, D.; Grunwaldt, J.-D.

    2016-05-01

    Combined X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) and diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy (DRIFTS) were applied to investigate the interaction between reaction atmosphere, adsorbates and Pt oxidation state of Pt/Al2O3 model diesel oxidation catalysts under CO/NO oxidation conditions. The Pt oxidation state was correlated to the adsorbates on the catalyst's surface. Even at low temperature the reaction atmosphere had a strong impact on the oxidation state of the catalyst, and the oxidation state in turn strongly affected CO adsorption on the Pt particles.

  19. Simultaneous surface plasmon resonance and x-ray absorption spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Serrano, A.; Rodriguez de la Fuente, O.; Collado, V.; Rubio-Zuazo, J.; Castro, G. R.; Monton, C.; Garcia, M. A.

    2012-08-15

    We present an experimental setup for the simultaneous measurement of surface plasmon resonance (SPR) and x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) on metallic thin films at a synchrotron beamline. The system allows measuring in situ and in real time the effect of x-ray irradiation on the SPR curves to explore the interaction of x-rays with matter. It is also possible to record XAS spectra while exciting SPR in order to study changes in the films induced by the excitation of surface plasmons. Combined experiments recording simultaneously SPR and XAS curves while scanning different parameters can be also carried out. The relative variations in the SPR and XAS spectra that can be detected with this setup range from 10{sup -3} to 10{sup -5}, depending on the particular experiment.

  20. Simultaneous surface plasmon resonance and x-ray absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serrano, A.; Rodríguez de la Fuente, O.; Collado, V.; Rubio-Zuazo, J.; Monton, C.; Castro, G. R.; García, M. A.

    2012-08-01

    We present an experimental setup for the simultaneous measurement of surface plasmon resonance (SPR) and x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) on metallic thin films at a synchrotron beamline. The system allows measuring in situ and in real time the effect of x-ray irradiation on the SPR curves to explore the interaction of x-rays with matter. It is also possible to record XAS spectra while exciting SPR in order to study changes in the films induced by the excitation of surface plasmons. Combined experiments recording simultaneously SPR and XAS curves while scanning different parameters can be also carried out. The relative variations in the SPR and XAS spectra that can be detected with this setup range from 10-3 to 10-5, depending on the particular experiment.

  1. In Situ XAS of the Solvothermal Decomposition of Dithiocarbamate Complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Islam, Husn-Ubayda; Roffey, Anna; Hollingsworth, Nathan; Catlow, Richard; Wolthers, Mariette; De Leeuw, Nora; Bras, Wim; Sankar, Gopinathan; Hogarth, Graeme

    2013-04-01

    An in situ XAS study of the solvothermal decomposition of iron and nickel dithiocarbamate complexes was performed in order to gain understanding of the decomposition mechanisms. This work has given insight into the steps involved in the decomposition, showing variation in reaction pathways between the iron and nickel dithiocarbamates, and the non-innocent role of oleylamine as the solvent and capping agent in the reaction.

  2. Characterization of chemical bonding in low-k dielectric materialsfor interconnect isolation: a xas and eels study

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffmann, P.; Schmeisser, D.; Engelmann, H.-J.; Zschech, E.; Stegmann, H.; Himpsel, F.; Denlinger, J.

    2006-04-10

    The use of low dielectric constant materials in the on-chipinterconnect process reduces interconnect delay, power dissipation andcrosstalk noise. To achieve the requirements of the ITRS for 2007-2009minimal sidewall damage from etch, ash or cleans is required. In chemicalvapor deposited (CVD) organo-silicate glass (OSG) which are used asintermetal dielectric (IMD) materials the substitution of oxygen in SiO2by methyl groups (-CH3) reduces the permittivity significantly (from 4.0in SiO2 to 2.6-3.3 in the OSG), since the electronic polarizability islower for Si-C bonds than for Si-O bonds. However, plasma processing forresist stripping, trench etching and post-etch cleaning removes C and Hcontaining molecular groups from the near-surface layer of OSG.Therefore, compositional analysis and chemical bonding characterizationof structured IMD films with nanometer resolution is necessary forprocess optimization. OSG thin films as-deposited and after plasmatreatment are studied using X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) andelectron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS). In both techniques, the finestructure near the C1s absorption or energy loss edge, respectively,allows to identify C-H, C-C, and C-O bonds. This gives the opportunity todifferentiate between individual low-k materials and their modifications.The O1s signal is less selective to individual bonds. XAS spectra havebeen recorded for non-patterned films and EELS spectra for patternedstructures. The chemical bonding is compared for as-deposited andplasma-treated low-k materials. The Fluorescence Yield (FY) and the TotalElectron Yield (TEY) recorded while XAS measurement are compared.Examination of the C 1s near-edge structures reveal a modified bonding ofthe remaining C atoms in the plasma-treated sample regions.

  3. Coupling CP-MD simulations and X-ray absorption spectroscopy: exploring the structure of oxaliplatin in aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Beret, Elizabeth C; Provost, Karine; Müller, Diane; Marcos, Enrique Sánchez

    2009-09-10

    A combined experimental-theoretical approach applying X-ray absorption spectroscopy and ab initio molecular dynamics (CP-MD) simulations is used to get insight into the structural determination of oxaliplatin, a third-generation anticancer drug of the cisplatin family, in aqueous solution. Experimental Pt L(III)-edge EXAFS and XANES spectra of oxaliplatin in water are compared with theoretical XAS spectra. The latter are obtained as statistically averaged spectra computed for a set of selected snapshots extracted from the MD trajectory of ethyldiamineoxalatoplatinum(II) (EDO-Pt) in liquid water. This compound is a simplified structure of oxaliplatin, where the outer part of the cyclohexane ring contained in the cyclohexanediamine ligand of oxaliplatin has been removed. We show that EDO-Pt is an appropriate model to simulate the spectroscopical properties of oxaliplatin given that the cyclohexane ring does not generate particular features in neither the EXAFS nor the XANES spectra. The computation of average EXAFS spectra using structures from the MD simulation in which atoms are selected according to different cutoff radii around the Pt center allows the assignment of spectral features to particular structural motifs, both in k and R-spaces. The outer oxygen atoms of the oxalate ligand (R(Pt-O(II)) = 3.97 +/- 0.03 A) are responsible for a well-defined hump at around 6.5 A(-1) in the k(2)-weighted EXAFS spectrum. The conventional EXAFS analysis data procedure is reexamined by its application to the simulated average EXAFS spectra. The structural parameters resulting from the fit may then be compared with those obtained from the simulation, providing an estimation of the methodological error associated with the global fitting procedure. A thorough discussion on the synergy between the experimental and theoretical XAS approaches is presented, and evidence for the detection of a slight hydration structure around the Pt complex is shown, leading to the suggestion of a

  4. Iron speciation in ancient Attic pottery pigments: a non-destructive SR-XAS investigation.

    PubMed

    Bardelli, Fabrizio; Barone, Germana; Crupi, Vincenza; Longo, Francesca; Maisano, Giacomo; Majolino, Domenico; Mazzoleni, Paolo; Venuti, Valentina

    2012-09-01

    The present work reports a detailed investigation on the speciation of iron in the pigments of decorated pottery fragments of cultural heritage relevance. The fragments come from the Gioiosa Guardia archaeological site in the area of the `Strait of Messina' (Sicily, Southern Italy), and date back to VI-V century BC. The purpose of this study is to characterize the main pigmenting agents responsible for the dark-red coloration of the specimens using non-destructive analytical techniques such as synchrotron radiation X-ray absorption spectroscopy (SR-XAS), a well established technique for cultural heritage and environmental subjects. Absorption spectra were collected at the Fe K-edge on the Italian beamline for absorption and diffraction (BM8-GILDA) at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility in Grenoble (France). In order to determine the speciation of Fe in the samples, principal component analysis and least-squares fitting procedures were applied to the near-edge part of the absorption spectra (XANES). Details on the local structure around the Fe sites were obtained by analyzing the extended part of the spectra (EXAFS). Furthermore, an accurate determination of the average Fe oxidation state was carried out through analysis of the pre-edge peaks of the absorption spectra. Samples resulted composed of an admixture of Fe(2)O(3) (hematite or maghemite) and magnetite (Fe(3)O(4)), occurring in different relative abundance in the dark- and light-colored areas of the specimens. The results obtained are complementary to information previously obtained by means of instrumental neutron activation analysis, Fourier transform infrared absorbance and time-of-flight neutron diffraction. PMID:22898958

  5. Iron speciation in ancient Attic pottery pigments: a non-destructive SR-XAS investigation.

    PubMed

    Bardelli, Fabrizio; Barone, Germana; Crupi, Vincenza; Longo, Francesca; Maisano, Giacomo; Majolino, Domenico; Mazzoleni, Paolo; Venuti, Valentina

    2012-09-01

    The present work reports a detailed investigation on the speciation of iron in the pigments of decorated pottery fragments of cultural heritage relevance. The fragments come from the Gioiosa Guardia archaeological site in the area of the `Strait of Messina' (Sicily, Southern Italy), and date back to VI-V century BC. The purpose of this study is to characterize the main pigmenting agents responsible for the dark-red coloration of the specimens using non-destructive analytical techniques such as synchrotron radiation X-ray absorption spectroscopy (SR-XAS), a well established technique for cultural heritage and environmental subjects. Absorption spectra were collected at the Fe K-edge on the Italian beamline for absorption and diffraction (BM8-GILDA) at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility in Grenoble (France). In order to determine the speciation of Fe in the samples, principal component analysis and least-squares fitting procedures were applied to the near-edge part of the absorption spectra (XANES). Details on the local structure around the Fe sites were obtained by analyzing the extended part of the spectra (EXAFS). Furthermore, an accurate determination of the average Fe oxidation state was carried out through analysis of the pre-edge peaks of the absorption spectra. Samples resulted composed of an admixture of Fe(2)O(3) (hematite or maghemite) and magnetite (Fe(3)O(4)), occurring in different relative abundance in the dark- and light-colored areas of the specimens. The results obtained are complementary to information previously obtained by means of instrumental neutron activation analysis, Fourier transform infrared absorbance and time-of-flight neutron diffraction.

  6. Automated system for x-ray absorption spectroscopy of nanoparticle nucleation and growth

    SciTech Connect

    Calvin, S.; Carpenter, E.E.; Cestone, V.; Kurihara, L.K.; Harris, V.G.; Brown, E.C.

    2005-01-01

    X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) is a useful tool for studying nanoparticle synthesis and growth. Described here is a system for automating synthesis and data collection, allowing time-resolved XAS measurements at a synchrotron to be accurately combined with measurements made under identical conditions elsewhere, and promising the ability to use XAS with experiments in combinatorial chemistry. The primary components of this system are a commercial parallel processor and a custom flow cell. The system has been used to collect data on the synthesis of iron oxides from iron(II) acetylacetonate.

  7. Axial Ligation and Redox Changes at the Cobalt Ion in Cobalamin Bound to Corrinoid Iron-Sulfur Protein (CoFeSP) or in Solution Characterized by XAS and DFT

    PubMed Central

    Schrapers, Peer; Mebs, Stefan; Goetzl, Sebastian; Hennig, Sandra E.; Dau, Holger; Dobbek, Holger; Haumann, Michael

    2016-01-01

    A cobalamin (Cbl) cofactor in corrinoid iron-sulfur protein (CoFeSP) is the primary methyl group donor and acceptor in biological carbon oxide conversion along the reductive acetyl-CoA pathway. Changes of the axial coordination of the cobalt ion within the corrin macrocycle upon redox transitions in aqua-, methyl-, and cyano-Cbl bound to CoFeSP or in solution were studied using X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) at the Co K-edge in combination with density functional theory (DFT) calculations, supported by metal content and cobalt redox level quantification with further spectroscopic methods. Calculation of the highly variable pre-edge X-ray absorption features due to core-to-valence (ctv) electronic transitions, XANES shape analysis, and cobalt-ligand bond lengths determination from EXAFS has yielded models for the molecular and electronic structures of the cobalt sites. This suggested the absence of a ligand at cobalt in CoFeSP in α-position where the dimethylbenzimidazole (dmb) base of the cofactor is bound in Cbl in solution. As main species, (dmb)CoIII(OH2), (dmb)CoII(OH2), and (dmb)CoIII(CH3) sites for solution Cbl and CoIII(OH2), CoII(OH2), and CoIII(CH3) sites in CoFeSP-Cbl were identified. Our data support binding of a serine residue from the reductive-activator protein (RACo) of CoFeSP to the cobalt ion in the CoFeSP-RACo protein complex that stabilizes Co(II). The absence of an α-ligand at cobalt not only tunes the redox potential of the cobalamin cofactor into the physiological range, but is also important for CoFeSP reactivation. PMID:27384529

  8. Axial Ligation and Redox Changes at the Cobalt Ion in Cobalamin Bound to Corrinoid Iron-Sulfur Protein (CoFeSP) or in Solution Characterized by XAS and DFT.

    PubMed

    Schrapers, Peer; Mebs, Stefan; Goetzl, Sebastian; Hennig, Sandra E; Dau, Holger; Dobbek, Holger; Haumann, Michael

    2016-01-01

    A cobalamin (Cbl) cofactor in corrinoid iron-sulfur protein (CoFeSP) is the primary methyl group donor and acceptor in biological carbon oxide conversion along the reductive acetyl-CoA pathway. Changes of the axial coordination of the cobalt ion within the corrin macrocycle upon redox transitions in aqua-, methyl-, and cyano-Cbl bound to CoFeSP or in solution were studied using X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) at the Co K-edge in combination with density functional theory (DFT) calculations, supported by metal content and cobalt redox level quantification with further spectroscopic methods. Calculation of the highly variable pre-edge X-ray absorption features due to core-to-valence (ctv) electronic transitions, XANES shape analysis, and cobalt-ligand bond lengths determination from EXAFS has yielded models for the molecular and electronic structures of the cobalt sites. This suggested the absence of a ligand at cobalt in CoFeSP in α-position where the dimethylbenzimidazole (dmb) base of the cofactor is bound in Cbl in solution. As main species, (dmb)CoIII(OH2), (dmb)CoII(OH2), and (dmb)CoIII(CH3) sites for solution Cbl and CoIII(OH2), CoII(OH2), and CoIII(CH3) sites in CoFeSP-Cbl were identified. Our data support binding of a serine residue from the reductive-activator protein (RACo) of CoFeSP to the cobalt ion in the CoFeSP-RACo protein complex that stabilizes Co(II). The absence of an α-ligand at cobalt not only tunes the redox potential of the cobalamin cofactor into the physiological range, but is also important for CoFeSP reactivation. PMID:27384529

  9. Axial Ligation and Redox Changes at the Cobalt Ion in Cobalamin Bound to Corrinoid Iron-Sulfur Protein (CoFeSP) or in Solution Characterized by XAS and DFT.

    PubMed

    Schrapers, Peer; Mebs, Stefan; Goetzl, Sebastian; Hennig, Sandra E; Dau, Holger; Dobbek, Holger; Haumann, Michael

    2016-01-01

    A cobalamin (Cbl) cofactor in corrinoid iron-sulfur protein (CoFeSP) is the primary methyl group donor and acceptor in biological carbon oxide conversion along the reductive acetyl-CoA pathway. Changes of the axial coordination of the cobalt ion within the corrin macrocycle upon redox transitions in aqua-, methyl-, and cyano-Cbl bound to CoFeSP or in solution were studied using X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) at the Co K-edge in combination with density functional theory (DFT) calculations, supported by metal content and cobalt redox level quantification with further spectroscopic methods. Calculation of the highly variable pre-edge X-ray absorption features due to core-to-valence (ctv) electronic transitions, XANES shape analysis, and cobalt-ligand bond lengths determination from EXAFS has yielded models for the molecular and electronic structures of the cobalt sites. This suggested the absence of a ligand at cobalt in CoFeSP in α-position where the dimethylbenzimidazole (dmb) base of the cofactor is bound in Cbl in solution. As main species, (dmb)CoIII(OH2), (dmb)CoII(OH2), and (dmb)CoIII(CH3) sites for solution Cbl and CoIII(OH2), CoII(OH2), and CoIII(CH3) sites in CoFeSP-Cbl were identified. Our data support binding of a serine residue from the reductive-activator protein (RACo) of CoFeSP to the cobalt ion in the CoFeSP-RACo protein complex that stabilizes Co(II). The absence of an α-ligand at cobalt not only tunes the redox potential of the cobalamin cofactor into the physiological range, but is also important for CoFeSP reactivation.

  10. Gold nanoparticles with different capping systems: an electronic and structural XAS analysis.

    PubMed

    López-Cartes, C; Rojas, T C; Litrán, R; Martínez-Martínez, D; de la Fuente, J M; Penadés, S; Fernández, A

    2005-05-12

    Gold nanoparticles (NPs) have been prepared with three different capping systems: a tetralkylammonium salt, an alkanethiol, and a thiol-derivatized neoglycoconjugate. Also gold NPs supported on a porous TiO(2) substrate have been investigated. X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) has been used to determine the electronic behavior of the different capped/supported systems regarding the electron/hole density of d states. Surface and size effects, as well as the role of the microstructure, have been also studied through an exhaustive analysis of the EXAFS (extended X-ray absorption fine structure) data. Very small gold NPs functionalized with thiol-derivatized molecules show an increase in d-hole density at the gold site due to Au-S charge transfer. This effect is overcoming size effects (which lead to a slightly increase of the d-electron density) for high S:Au atomic ratios and core-shell microstructures where an atomically abrupt Au-S interface likely does not exist. It has been also shown that thiol functionalization of very small gold NPs is introducing a strong distortion as compared to fcc order. To the contrary, electron transfer from reduced support oxides to gold NPs can produce a higher increase in d-electron density at the gold site, as compared to naked gold clusters. PMID:16852039

  11. Gold nanoparticles with different capping systems: an electronic and structural XAS analysis.

    PubMed

    López-Cartes, C; Rojas, T C; Litrán, R; Martínez-Martínez, D; de la Fuente, J M; Penadés, S; Fernández, A

    2005-05-12

    Gold nanoparticles (NPs) have been prepared with three different capping systems: a tetralkylammonium salt, an alkanethiol, and a thiol-derivatized neoglycoconjugate. Also gold NPs supported on a porous TiO(2) substrate have been investigated. X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) has been used to determine the electronic behavior of the different capped/supported systems regarding the electron/hole density of d states. Surface and size effects, as well as the role of the microstructure, have been also studied through an exhaustive analysis of the EXAFS (extended X-ray absorption fine structure) data. Very small gold NPs functionalized with thiol-derivatized molecules show an increase in d-hole density at the gold site due to Au-S charge transfer. This effect is overcoming size effects (which lead to a slightly increase of the d-electron density) for high S:Au atomic ratios and core-shell microstructures where an atomically abrupt Au-S interface likely does not exist. It has been also shown that thiol functionalization of very small gold NPs is introducing a strong distortion as compared to fcc order. To the contrary, electron transfer from reduced support oxides to gold NPs can produce a higher increase in d-electron density at the gold site, as compared to naked gold clusters.

  12. Atomic structure of machined semiconducting chips: An x-ray absorption spectroscopy study

    SciTech Connect

    Paesler, M.; Sayers, D.

    1988-12-01

    X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) has been used to examine the atomic structure of chips of germanium that were produced by single point diamond machining. It is demonstrated that although the local (nearest neighbor) atomic structure is experimentally quite similar to that of single crystal specimens information from more distant atoms indicates the presence of considerable stress. An outline of the technique is given and the strength of XAS in studying the machining process is demonstrated.

  13. Fast-scanning high-flux microprobe for biological X-ray fluorescence microscopy and microXAS

    SciTech Connect

    Barrea, R.A.; Gore, D.; Kujala, N.; Karanfil, C.; Kozyrenko, S.; Heurich, R.; Vukonich, M.; Huang, R.; Paunesku, T.; Woloschak, G.; Irving, T.C.

    2010-07-23

    There is a growing interest in the biomedical community in obtaining information concerning the distribution and local chemical environment of metals in tissues and cells. Recently, biological X-ray fluorescence microscopy (XFM) has emerged as the tool of choice to address these questions. A fast-scanning high-flux X-ray microprobe, built around a recently commissioned pair of 200 mm-long Rh-coated silicon Kirkpatrick-Baez mirrors, has been constructed at BioCAT beamline 18ID at the Advanced Photon Source. The new optical system delivers a flux of 1.3 x 10{sup 12} photons s{sup -1} into a minimum focal spot size of {approx}3-5 {micro}m FWHM. A set of Si drift detectors and bent Laue crystal analyzers may be used in combination with standard ionization chambers for X-ray fluorescence measurements. BioCAT's scanning software allows fast continuous scans to be performed while acquiring and storing full multichannel analyzer spectra per pixel on-the-fly with minimal overhead time (<20 ms per pixel). Together, the high-flux X-ray microbeam and the rapid-scanning capabilities of the BioCAT beamline allow the collection of XFM and micro X-ray absorption spectroscopy (microXAS) measurements from as many as 48 tissue sections per day. This paper reports the commissioning results of the new instrument with representative XFM and microXAS results from tissue samples.

  14. Ligand K-edge XAS, DFT, and TDDFT analysis of pincer linker variations in Rh(i) PNP complexes: reactivity insights from electronic structure.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kyounghoon; Wei, Haochuan; Blake, Anastasia V; Donahue, Courtney M; Keith, Jason M; Daly, Scott R

    2016-06-14

    Here we report P K-edge, Cl K-edge, and Rh L3-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) data for Rh[C5H3N-2,6-(XP(t)Bu2)2]Cl, where X = O ((tBu)PONOP; ) or CH2 ((tBu)PNP; ). Solid-state XAS data for and were compared to density functional theory (DFT) and time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) calculations to identify how changing the PNP pincer linker from O to CH2 affected electronic structure and bonding at Rh(i). Pronounced differences in XAS peak intensities and energies were observed. The P K-edge XAS data revealed a large increase in Rh 4dx(2)-y(2) and P 3p orbital-mixing (Rh-P σ*) in compared to , and pronounced transition energy variations reflected marked differences in orbital energies and compositions. By comparison, the Cl K-edge XAS data revealed only subtle differences in Rh-Cl covalency, although larger splitting between the Rh-Cl π* and σ* transitions was observed in . Analysis of the occupied MOs from DFT (HOMO, HOMO-1, HOMO-2, and HOMO-3) and comparison to the unoccupied MOs involved in XAS revealed a relatively uniform energy increase (ca. 0.3-0.5 eV) for all five 4d-derived molecular orbitals in Rh((tBu)PNP)Cl () compared to Rh((tBu)PONOP)Cl (). The energy shift was relatively invariant with respect to differences in orbital symmetry, bonding type (σ or π), and orbital mixing, which suggested that the increase could be attributed to electrostatic effects. The change in d-orbital energies are consistent with known reactivity differences of Rh((tBu)PONOP)(+) and Rh((tBu)PNP)(+) towards CO, H2, and CH2Cl2, and are explained here by considering how d-orbital energies affect covalent L → M σ bonding and M → L π backbonding. PMID:27216135

  15. Evidence for 5d-σ and 5d-π covalency in lanthanide sesquioxides from oxygen K-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Altman, Alison B; Pacold, Joseph I; Wang, Jian; Lukens, Wayne W; Minasian, Stefan G

    2016-06-14

    The electronic structure in the complete series of stable lanthanide sesquioxides, Ln2O3 (Ln = La to Lu, except radioactive Pm), has been evaluated using oxygen K-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) with a scanning transmission X-ray microscope (STXM). The experimental results agree with recent synthetic, spectroscopic and theoretical investigations that provided evidence for 5d orbital involvement in lanthanide bonding, while confirming the traditional viewpoint that there is little Ln 4f and O 2p orbital mixing. However, the results also showed that changes in the energy and occupancy of the 4f orbitals can impact Ln 5d and O 2p mixing, leading to several different bonding modes for seemingly identical Ln2O3 structures. On moving from left to right in the periodic table, abrupt changes were observed for the energy and intensity of transitions associated with Ln 5d and O 2p antibonding states. These changes in peak intensity, which were directly related to the amounts of O 2p and Ln 5d mixing, were closely correlated to the well-established trends in the chemical accessibility of the 4f orbitals towards oxidation or reduction. The unique insight provided by the O K-edge XAS is discussed in the context of several recent theoretical and physical studies on trivalent lanthanide compounds.

  16. Evidence for 5d-σ and 5d-π covalency in lanthanide sesquioxides from oxygen K-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Altman, Alison B; Pacold, Joseph I; Wang, Jian; Lukens, Wayne W; Minasian, Stefan G

    2016-06-14

    The electronic structure in the complete series of stable lanthanide sesquioxides, Ln2O3 (Ln = La to Lu, except radioactive Pm), has been evaluated using oxygen K-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) with a scanning transmission X-ray microscope (STXM). The experimental results agree with recent synthetic, spectroscopic and theoretical investigations that provided evidence for 5d orbital involvement in lanthanide bonding, while confirming the traditional viewpoint that there is little Ln 4f and O 2p orbital mixing. However, the results also showed that changes in the energy and occupancy of the 4f orbitals can impact Ln 5d and O 2p mixing, leading to several different bonding modes for seemingly identical Ln2O3 structures. On moving from left to right in the periodic table, abrupt changes were observed for the energy and intensity of transitions associated with Ln 5d and O 2p antibonding states. These changes in peak intensity, which were directly related to the amounts of O 2p and Ln 5d mixing, were closely correlated to the well-established trends in the chemical accessibility of the 4f orbitals towards oxidation or reduction. The unique insight provided by the O K-edge XAS is discussed in the context of several recent theoretical and physical studies on trivalent lanthanide compounds. PMID:26979662

  17. Os layers spontaneously deposited on the Pt(111) electrode : XPS, STM and GIF-XAS study.

    SciTech Connect

    Rhee, C. K.; Wakisaka, M.; Tolmachev, Y.; Johnston, C.; Haasch, R.; Attenkofer, K.; Lu, G. Q.; You, H.; Wieckowski, A.; Univ. of Illinois Champaigh-Urbana

    2003-01-01

    Scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) characterized adlayers of spontaneously deposited osmium on a Pt(111) electrode were investigated using ex-situ X-ray photoemission spectroscopy (XPS) and in-situ grazing incidence fluorescence X-ray absorption spectroscopy (GIF-XAS). After a single spontaneous deposition, monoatomic (or nearly monoatomic) nanoislands of osmium are formed. The island diameter varies from 2 to 5 nm depending on the Os coverage, which in turn is adjusted by varying the concentration of the Os precursor salt (OsCl3) in the deposition bath and/or by the deposition time. XPS reveals three oxidation states: a metallic Os (the 4f7/2 core level binding energy of 50.8 eV), Os(IV) (51.5 eV) and Os(VIII) (52.4 eV). The metallic osmium exists at potentials below 500 mV (vs. RHE) while above 500 mV osmium is oxidized to Os(IV). Electrodissolution of osmium begins above 900 mV and occurs simultaneously with platinum oxidation. At ca. 1200 mV V versus the RHE reference, the oxidation state of some small amounts of osmium that survive dissolution is the Os(VIII). We demonstrate, for the first time, that mixed or odd valencies of osmium exist on the platinum surface at potentials higher that 800 mV. In-situ GIF-XAS measurements of an Os LIII edge also reveal the presence of three Os oxidation states. Namely, below the electrode potential of 400 mV, the X-ray fluorescent energy at maximum absorption is 10.8765 keV, and is characteristic of the metallic Os. In the potential range between 500 and 1000 mV this energy is gradually shifted to higher values, assignable to higher valencies of osmium, like Os(IV). This tendency continues to higher potentials consistent with the third, highly oxidized osmium form present, most likely Os(VIII). The variation of the 'raw edge jump height' of Os with the electrode potential, which is equivalent to a drop in osmium surface concentration, demonstrates that the electrochemical stripping of Os begins below 1.0 V versus RHE, as

  18. Errors in spectroscopic measurements of SO/sub 2/ due to nonexponential absorption of laser radiation, with application to the remote monitoring of atmospheric pollutants

    SciTech Connect

    Brassington, D.J.; Moncrieff, T.M.; Felton, R.C.; Jolliffe, B.W.; Marx, B.R.; Rowley, W.R.C.; Woods, P.T.

    1984-02-01

    Methods of measuring the concentration of atmospheric pollutants by laser absorption spectroscopy, such as differential absorption lidar (DIAL) and integrated long-path techniques, all rely on the validity of Beer's exponential absorption law. It is shown here that departures from this law occur if the probing laser has a bandwidth larger than the wavelength scale of structure in the absorption spectrum of the pollutant. A comprehensive experimental and theoretical treatment of the errors resulting from these departures is presented for the particular case of SO/sub 2/ monitoring at approx.300 nm. It is shown that the largest error occurs where the initial calibration measurement of absorption cross section is made at low pressure, in which case errors in excess of 5% in the cross section could occur for laser bandwidths >0.01 nm. Atmospheric measurements by DIAL or long-path methods are in most cases affected less, because pressure broadening smears the spectral structure, but when measuring high concentrations errors can exceed 5%.

  19. Local structures and interface morphology of InxGa1-xAs1-yNy thin films grown on GaAs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soo, Y. L.; Huang, S.; Kao, Y. H.; Chen, J. G.; Hulbert, S. L.; Geisz, J. F.; Kurtz, Sarah; Olson, J. M.; Kurtz, Steven R.; Jones, E. D.; Allerman, A. A.

    1999-11-01

    X-ray absorption fine-structure techniques have been utilized to probe the short-range structures around N and In in InxGa1-xAs1-yNy compounds containing about 3% of N and 8% of In. Our results indicate that N impurities most likely substitute for As atoms in the system. The In-As interatomic distance in these compounds remains practically the same as in InAs, while the coordination number of As atoms around In shows possible variations with changes in the material characteristics. The N atoms play an important role in affecting the changes of band gap while also serving as ``strain moderators'' by providing a tensile strain in the film to counteract the compressive strain caused by the In impurities. Further, grazing incidence x-ray scattering measurements of InxGa1-xAs1-yNy/GaAs heterojunctions provide direct evidence that the InxGa1-xAs1-yNy thin films can indeed be lattice matched to GaAs substrates resulting in a reasonably smooth heterointerface.

  20. The crystalline nanocluster phase as a medium for structural and spectroscopic studies of light absorption of photosensitizer dyes on semiconductor surfaces.

    PubMed

    Benedict, Jason B; Coppens, Philip

    2010-03-10

    The crystalline nanocluster phase, in which nanoscale metal oxide clusters are self-assembled in three-dimensional periodic arrays, is described. The crystalline assembly of nanoparticles functionalized with technologically relevant ligands offers the opportunity to obtain unambiguous structural information that can be combined with theoretical calculations based on the known geometry and used to interpret spectroscopic and other information. A series of Ti/O clusters up to approximately 2.0 nm in diameter have been synthesized and functionalized with the adsorbents catechol and isonicotinic acid. Whereas the isonicotinate is always adsorbed in a bridging monodentate mode, four different adsorption modes of catechol have been identified. The particles show a significantly larger variation of the Ti-O distances than observed in the known TiO(2) phases and exhibit both sevenfold overcoordination and five- and fourfold undercoordination of the Ti atoms. Theoretical calculations show only a moderate dependence of the catecholate net charge on the geometry of adsorption. All of the catechol-functionalized clusters have a deep-red color due to penetration of the highest occupied catechol levels into the band gap of the Ti/O particles. Spectroscopic measurements of the band gap of the Ti(17) cluster are in good agreement with the theoretical values and show a blue shift of approximately 0.22 eV relative to those reported for anatase nanoparticles.

  1. Description of the Role of Shot Noise in Spectroscopic Absorption and Emission Measurements with Photodiode and Photomultiplier Tube Detectors: Information for an Instrumental Analysis Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McClain, Robert L.; Wright, John C.

    2014-01-01

    A description of shot noise and the role it plays in absorption and emission measurements using photodiode and photomultiplier tube detection systems is presented. This description includes derivations of useful forms of the shot noise equation based on Poisson counting statistics. This approach can deepen student understanding of a fundamental…

  2. Development of Ta-based Superconducting Tunnel Junction X-ray Detectors for Fluorescence XAS

    SciTech Connect

    Friedrich, S; Drury, O; Hall, J; Cantor, R

    2009-09-23

    We are developing superconducting tunnel junction (STJ) soft X-ray detectors for chemical analysis of dilute samples by fluorescence-detected X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS). Our 36-pixel Nb-based STJ spectrometer covers a solid angle {Omega}/4{pi} {approx} 10{sup -3}, offers an energy resolution of {approx}10-20 eV FWHM for energies up to {approx}1 keV, and can be operated at total count rates of {approx}10{sup 6} counts/s. For increased quantum efficiency and cleaner response function, we have now started the development of Ta-based STJ detector arrays. Initial devices modeled after our Nb-based STJs have an energy resolution below 10 eV FWHM for X-ray energies below 1 keV, and pulse rise time discrimination can be used to improve their response function for energies up to several keV. We discuss the performance of the Ta-STJs and outline steps towards the next-generation of large STJ detector arrays with higher sensitivity.

  3. Development of Ta-based Superconducting Tunnel Junction X-ray Detectors for Fluorescence XAS

    SciTech Connect

    Friedrich, Stephan; Drury, Owen B.; Hall, John; Cantor, Robin

    2010-06-23

    We are developing superconducting tunnel junction (STJ) soft X-ray detectors for chemical analysis of dilute samples by fluorescence-detected X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS). Our 36-pixel Nb-based STJ spectrometer covers a solid angle {Omega}/4{pi}{approx_equal}10{sup -3}, offers an energy resolution of {approx}10-20 eV FWHM for energies up to {approx}1 keV, and can be operated at total count rates of {approx}10{sup 6} counts/s. For increased quantum efficiency and cleaner response function, we have now started the development of Ta-based STJ detector arrays. Initial devices modeled after our Nb-based STJs have an energy resolution below 10 eV FWHM for X-ray energies below 1 keV, and pulse rise time discrimination can be used to improve their response function for energies up to several keV. We discuss the performance of the Ta-STJs and outline steps towards the next-generation of large STJ detector arrays with higher sensitivity.

  4. Structural Investigation of Mixed Nitrided Galloaluminophosphates ``AlGaPON'' by EELS, XAS, and XPS Spectroscopies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delsarte, S.; Serin, V.; Flank, A.-M.; Villain, F.; Grange, P.

    2002-01-01

    Amorphous nitrided galloaluminophosphates "AlGaPON" catalysts with nitrogen contents varying from 0 to 23.3 wt% N were obtained by nitriding an Al0.5Ga0.5PO4 precursor under ammonia flow at 750°C in a tubular furnace. The structural changes induced by this treatment were investigated by electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS), X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS), and X-ray photoelecton spectroscopy (XPS). XANES and XPS results indicate that the first-coordination spheres of P, Ga, and Al atoms are modified by nitridation. In particular, the comparison of the P XANES spectra recorded on "AlGaPON" and on a PON phosphorus oxynitride (reference of mixed PO2N2 tetrahedra) reveals that mainly PO2N2 tetrahedra are present in highly nitrided samples. Moreover, the replacement of oxygen by nitrogen probably concerned P-O-Ga bonds rather than P-O-Al. EELS investigation reveals that the precursor is homogeneous at the used probe scale, but indicates that nitridation is accompanied by a loss of homogeneity of the material.

  5. Contributions of Paint and Soil to Pb in Household Dust Wipes: An XAS Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pingitore, N. E.; Clague, J. W.; Amaya, M. A.

    2010-12-01

    Speciation of Pb by X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) indicated that Pb compounds associated with lead-based paint accounted for perhaps half of the Pb in 24 household dust wipes collected in El Paso, Texas. Soil-derived, sorbed Pb, likely Pb-humate, was also a major Pb species in many of the dust wipes. Household dust wipes are a standard technique for evaluating health risks of Pb to children, particularly toddlers, in public and private housing. The level of Pb in the wipes does not, however, indicate whether the source of the Pb is the house itself (peeling or powdering interior or exterior paint) or external, from contaminated soil or airborne particulate matter brought into the house by wind or foot traction. Understanding the origin of Pb in household dust is important in remediation: cover the old paint or remove the yard soil. XAS speciation can assist in understanding the source of Pb in household dust. The presence of significant Pb-humate requires a soil source, and suggests the need for soil remediation. Such species of Pb as hydrocerussite, lead sulfate, lead silicate, and lead chromate can be presumed to be components of lead-based paint. These may represent interior and/or exterior paint and thus do not uniquely identify the locus of the Pb source(s). Pb L-III edge XAFS data were collected on beam lines 7-3, 10-2, and 11-2 at SSRL at typical conditions of 3 GeV field and 80-200 mA current, using Si(220) water- or liquid-nitrogen-cooled monochromator crystals. Data were collected at ambient temperature in fluorescence mode using a 13- or 30-element Ge detector with a Se 3 or 6 filter and Soller slits to reduce scattered radiation. This publication was made possible by grant numbers 1RO1-ES11367 and 1 S11 ES013339-01A1 from the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS), NIH. Its contents are solely the responsibility of the authors and do not necessarily represent the official views of the NIEHS, NIH. Portions of this research were

  6. Soft X-Ray Studies of Pu Electronic Structure: Past Lessons From XAS and Future Direction With BIS

    SciTech Connect

    Tobin, J G; Yu, S W; Chung, B W; Waddill, G D; Kutepov, A L

    2008-12-10

    Synchrotron-radiation-based spectroscopies such as X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy (XAS) have contributed greatly to our improved understanding of Pu electronic structure. However, significant questions remain concerning the nature of Pu electronic structure. Perhaps the missing piece of the puzzle is the direct experimental determination of the unoccupied electronic structure using high energy inverse photoelectron spectroscopy (IPES) or Bremstrahlung Isochromat Spectroscopy (BIS). Past BIS studies of Th and U indicate the feasibility and utility of Pu studies. To this end, a new BIS capability has been developed in our laboratory. Electron stimulated emission of photons has been carried out using the XES-350 monochromator and detector system. Our preliminary results and future plans will be presented.

  7. Spectroscopic evidence for the formation of singlet molecular oxygen (/sup 1/. delta. /sub g/O/sub 2/) upon irradiation of a solvent-oxygen (/sup 3/Sigma/sub g//sup -/O/sub 2/) cooperative absorption band

    SciTech Connect

    Scurlock, R.D.; Ogilby, P.R.

    1988-01-20

    It is well-known that the presence of molecular oxygen (/sup 3/..sigma../sub g//sup -/O/sub 2/) in a variety of organic solvents causes an often substantial red shift in the solvent absorption spectrum. This extra, broad absorption feature is reversibly removed by purging the solvent with nitrogen gas. Mulliken and Tsubomura assigned the oxygen-dependent absorption band to a transition from a ground state solvent-oxygen complex to a solvent-oxygen charge transfer (CT) state (sol/sup .+/O/sub 2//sup .-/). In addition to the broad Mulliken CT band, there are, often in the same spectral region, distinct singlet-triplet transitions (T/sub 1/ reverse arrow S/sub 0/) which are enhanced by molecular oxygen (/sup 3/..sigma../sub g//sup -/O/sub 2/). Since both of these solvent-oxygen cooperative transitions may result in the formation of reactive oxygenating species, singlet molecular oxygen (/sup 1/..delta../sub g/O/sub 2/) and/or the superoxide ion (O/sub 2//sup .-/), it follows that recent studies have focused on unsaturated hydrocarbon oxygenation subsequent to the irradiation of the oxygen-induced absorption bands in both the solution phase and cryogenic (10 K) glasses. In these particular experiments, oxygenated products characteristic of both /sup 1/..delta../sub g/O/sub 2/ and O/sub 2//sub .-/ were obtained, although the systems studied appeared to involve the participation of one intermediate at the exclusion of the other. In this communication, the authors provide, for the first time, direct spectroscopic evidence for the formation of /sup 1/..delta../sub g/O/sub 2/ following a solvent-oxygen (/sup 3/..sigma../sub g//sup -/O/sub 2/) cooperative absorption. They have observed, in a time-resolved experiment, a near-IR luminescence subsequent to laser excitation of the oxygen-induced absorption bands of mesitylene, p-xylene, o-xylene, toluene, and benzene at 355 nm and 1,4-dioxane at 266 nm. They suggest that this signal is due to /sup 1/..delta../sub g/O/sub 2

  8. X-Ray absorption spectroscopy investigation of 1-alkyl-3-methylimidazolium bromide salts

    SciTech Connect

    D'Angelo, Paola; Zitolo, Andrea; Migliorati, Valentina; Bodo, Enrico; Caminiti, Ruggero; Aquilanti, Giuliana; Hazemann, Jean Louis; Testemale, Denis; Mancini, Giordano

    2011-08-21

    X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) has been used to unveil the bromide ion local coordination structure in 1-alkyl-3-methylimidazolium bromide [C{sub n}mim]Br ionic liquids (ILs) with different alkyl chains. The XAS spectrum of 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium bromide has been found to be different from those of the other members of the series, from the butyl to the decyl derivatives, that have all identical XAS spectra. This result indicates that starting from 1-buthyl-3-methylimidazolium bromide the local molecular arrangement around the bromide anion is the same independently from the length of the alkyl chain, and that the imidazolium head groups in the liquid ILs with long alkyl chains assume locally the same orientation as in the [C{sub 4}mim]Br crystal. With this study we show that the XAS technique is an effective direct tool for unveiling the local structural arrangements around selected atoms in ILs.

  9. X-Ray Absorption And EPR Spectroscopic Studies of the Biotransformations of Chromium(Vi) in Mammalian Cells. Is Chromodulin An Artifact of Isolation Methods?

    SciTech Connect

    Levina, A.; Harris, H.H.; Lay, P.A.; /Sydney U.

    2007-07-10

    Very different biological activities are usually ascribed to Cr(VI) (a toxin and carcinogen) and Cr(III) (an antidiabetic agent), although recent evidence suggests that both these types of actions are likely to arise from cellular uptake of varying concentrations of Cr(VI). The first systematic study of XANES spectra of Cr(III) complexes formed in Cr(VI)-treated mammalian cells (A549, HepG2, V79, and C2C12 cell lines), and in subcellular fractions of A549 cells, has been performed using a library of XANES spectra of model Cr(III) complexes. The results of multiple linear regression analyses of XANES spectra, in combination with multiple-scattering fits of XAFS spectra, indicate that Cr(III) formed in Cr(VI)-treated cells is most likely to bind to carboxylato, amine, and imidazole residues of amino acids, and to a lesser extent to hydroxo or aqua ligands. A combination of XANES and EPR spectroscopic data for Cr(VI)-treated cells indicates that the main component of Cr(III) formed in such cells is bound to high-molecular-mass ligands (>30 kDa, probably proteins), but significant redistribution of Cr(III) occurs during the cell lysis, which leads to the formation of a low-molecular-mass (<30 kDa) Cr(III)-containing fraction. The spectroscopic (XANES, XAFS, and EPR) properties of this fraction were strikingly similar to those of the purported natural Cr(III)-containing factor, chromodulin, that was reported to be isolated from the reaction of Cr(VI) with liver. These data support the hypothesis that a chromodulin-like species, which is formed from such a reaction, is an artifact of the reported isolation procedure.

  10. Characterization of the physico-chemical properties of polymeric materials for aerospace flight. [differential thermal and atomic absorption spectroscopic analysis of nickel cadmium batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rock, M.

    1981-01-01

    Electrodes and electrolytes of nickel cadmium sealed batteries were analyzed. Different thermal analysis of negative and positive battery electrodes was conducted and the temperature ranges of occurrence of endotherms indicating decomposition of cadmium hydroxide and nickel hydroxide are identified. Atomic absorption spectroscopy was used to analyze electrodes and electrolytes for traces of nickel, cadmium, cobalt, and potassium. Calibration curves and data are given for each sample analyzed. Instrumentation and analytical procedures used for each method are described.

  11. Absorption and fluorescence emission spectroscopic characters of naphtho-homologated yy-DNA bases and effect of methanol solution and base pairing.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Laibin; Li, Huifang; Li, Jilai; Chen, Xiaohua; Bu, Yuxiang

    2010-03-01

    A comprehensive theoretical study of electronic transitions of naphtho-homologated base analogs, namely, yy-T, yy-C, yy-A, and yy-G, was performed. The nature of the low-lying excited states is discussed, and the results are compared with those from experiment and also with those of y-bases. Geometrical characteristics of the lowest excited singlet pipi* and npi* states were explored using the CIS method, and the effects of methanol solution and paring with their complementary natural bases on the relevant absorption and emission spectra of these modified bases were examined. The calculated excitation and emission energies agree well with the measured data, where experimental results are available. In methanol solution, the fluorescence from yy-A and yy-G would be expected to occur around 539 and 562 nm, respectively, suggesting that yy-A is a green-colored fluorophore, whereas yy-G is a yellow-colored fluorophore. The methanol solution was found to red-shift both the absorption and emission maxima of yy-A, yy-T, and yy-C, but blue-shift those for yy-G. Generally, though base pairing has no significant effects on the absorption and fluorescence maxima of yy-A, yy-C, and yy-T, it blue-shifts those for yy-G.

  12. Investigating the Distribution of Chemical Forms of Sulfur in Prostate Cancer Tissue Using X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Czapla-Masztafiak, Joanna; Okoń, Krzysztof; Gałka, Marek; Huthwelker, Thomas; Kwiatek, Wojciech M

    2016-02-01

    The use of synchrotron radiation may shed more light on the study of prostate cancer, one of the leading diseases among men. In the presented study the microbeam setup at the PSI Swiss Light Source combined with fluorescence detected X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) was applied to determine two-dimensional (2D) imaging of distributions of various chemical sulfur forms in prostate cancer tissue sections, since sulfur is considered important and essential in cancer progression. The research focused on prostate tissues obtained during routine prostatectomies on patients suffering from prostate cancer.Our previous studies using μ-XAS point measurements on prostate cancer cell lines showed the differences in fractions of various forms of sulfur between cancerous and non-cancerous cells. Therefore, in this experiment the chosen areas of prostate cancer tissues were scanned to get the full picture of the chemical composition of tissue, which is highly heterogeneous. The incident X-ray beams of energies tuned to spectroscopic features of the near-edge region of sulfur K-edge absorption spectra were used to provide contrast between chemical species presented in the tissue. Next, the relative content of the three main sulfur forms, found in biological systems, was calculated and the results are presented in a form of 2D color maps. These maps are correlated with the microscopic histological image of the scanned area.The main findings show that sulfur occurs in prostate tissue mainly in reduced form. The oxidized form of sulfur is present mostly in prostatic stroma, while sulfur in intermediate oxidation state is present in trace amount.

  13. Micro-spectroscopic investigation of selenium-bearing minerals from the Western US Phosphate Resource Area

    PubMed Central

    Ryser, Amy L; Strawn, Daniel G; Marcus, Matthew A; Johnson-Maynard, Jodi L; Gunter, Mickey E; Möller, Gregory

    2005-01-01

    Mining activities in the US Western Phosphate Resource Area (WPRA) have released Se into the environment. Selenium has several different oxidation states and species, each having varying degrees of solubility, reactivity, and bioavailability. In this study we are investigating the speciation of Se in mine-waste rocks. Selenium speciation was determined using bulk and micro-x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS), as well as micro-x-ray fluorescence mapping. Rocks used for bulk-XAS were ground into fine powders. Shale used for micro-XAS was broken along depositional planes to expose unweathered surfaces. The near edge region of the XAS spectra (XANES) for the bulk rock samples revealed multiple oxidation states, with peaks indicative of Se(-II), Se(IV), and Se(+VI) species. Micro-XANES analysis of the shale indicated that three unique Se-bearing species were present. Using the XANES data together with ab initio fitting of the extended x-ray absorption fine structure region of the micro-XAS data (micro-EXAFS) the three Se-bearing species were identified as dzharkenite, a di-selenide carbon compound, and Se-substituted pyrite. Results from this research will allow for a better understanding of the biogeochemical cycling of Se in the WPRA.

  14. Numerical simulation of impact ionization in Ge/AlxGa1-xAs avalanche photodiode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chia, C. K.

    2010-08-01

    Impact ionization in Ge/AlxGa1-xAs p-i-n heterostructures has been studied using the Monte Carlo technique. The thin (<300 nm) Ge/AlxGa1-xAs single heterojunction structure was found to exhibit large hole (β) to electron (α) ionization coefficient ratio, owing to a higher β in the Ge layer and a lower α in the AlxGa1-xAs layer, together with the dead space effects. The Ge/AlxGa1-xAs avalanche photodiodes are attractive for applications where a wide wavelength detection range is required for compatibility with multiple sources such as in the emerging active optical cable and optical interconnect applications, as well as in the established optical fiber telecommunication systems.

  15. Doping effect on the physical properties of LixFe2-xAs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, W.; Wang, X. C.; Gu, J. J.; Liu, Q. Q.; Deng, Z.; Jin, C. Q.

    2015-12-01

    We have studied the physical properties of Li-doped compound Fe2As, which is isostructural to the famous iron-based superconductor LiFeAs. The results indicate that both a-axis and c-axis of LixFe2-xAs increases with the increase in Li content when it is less than 0.2. The Néel temperature of LixFe2-xAs decreases with the increase in Li content, which may be related to the changes of distance for FeII-FeII layers. The resistivity of LixFe2-xAs is similar to that of Fe2As at low doping level 0-0.2. As the doping amount is increased to 0.9, the resistivity of LixFe2-xAs approaches the value of LiFeAs.

  16. X-ray absorption studies of battery materials

    SciTech Connect

    McBreen, J.

    1996-10-01

    X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) is ideal for {ital in}{ital situ} studies of battery materials because both the probe and signal are penetrating x rays. The advantage of XAS being element specific permits investigation of the environment of a constituent element in a composite material. This makes it very powerful for studying electrode additives and corrosion of individual components of complex metal hydride alloys. The near edge part of the spectrum (XANES) provides information on oxidation state and site symmetry of the excited atom. This is particularly useful in study of corrosion and oxidation changes in cathode materials during charge/discharge cycle. Extended fine structure (EXAFS) gives structural information. Thus the technique provides both chemical and structural information. Since XAS probes only short range order, it can be applied to study of amorphous electrode materials and electrolytes. This paper discusses advantages and limitations of the method, as well as some experimental aspects.

  17. MOVPE of Al xGa 1- xAs alloys above 850° C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basmaji, P.; Leycuras, A.; Leymarie, J.; Gibart, P.; Gauthier, D.; Portal, J. C.; Gil, B.

    1988-12-01

    Undoped and Sn-doped Al xGa 1- xAs epitaxial layers were grown at high temperatures (850-950° C) by MOVPE. Undoped samples reveal better quality optical properties than alloys grown at the usual temperatures. This is shown by low temperature photoluminescence and reflectivity measurements. Highly doped Sn-Al xGa 1- xAs samples do not show typical features related to DX centers.

  18. X-ray-absorption spectroscopic investigation of alkali and alkaline earth catalysts in coal gasification. Final report, January 1987-September 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Huggins, F.E.; Shah, N.; Huffman, G.P.

    1990-04-01

    The structures of alkali and alkaline-earth metal catalyst species in lignite and polymer chars and during pyrolysis pretreatment and char gasification have been investigated using ambient and newly-developed, in situ XAFS spectroscopic techniques. The XAFS data, which were obtained at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory, were supplemented by char characterization and reactivity measurements made at the Pennsylvania State University. The findings of the investigation are as follows: (i) the catalytic species, as introduced to the char or lignite, is an atomically-dispersed, metal-ion-oxygen-anion complex, and remains a metal-oxygen complex throughout pyrolysis and gasification; (ii) the catalyst species transforms to a bulk oxide species during pyrolysis pretreatment; (iii) during gasification, the catalyst species rapidly transforms to bulk alkali carbonate in the case of the alkali-metal species and slowly to calcium oxide in the case of the calcium species; (iv) higher catalyst loadings results in an increased number of catalytic sites, rather than any structural variation of the catalyst site due to concentration effects; and (v) reaction of alkali with aluminosilicates (from clays) or silica is the major catalyst poisoning reaction, unless the coal is demineralized in which case the alkali may react with residual halide from HCl or HF used to clean the coal. Such poisoning reactions were not demonstrated for calcium-oxygen species.

  19. Structure of the dinuclear active site of urease. X-ray absorption spectroscopic study of native and 2-mercaptoethanol-inhibited bacterial and plant enzymes

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Shengke; Scott, R.A. ); Lee, M.H.; Hausinger, R.P. ); Clark, P.A.; Wilcox, D.E. )

    1994-04-13

    The structures of the dinuclear Ni(II) active sites of urease from jack bean and Klebsiella aerogenes are compared with and without the addition of the inhibitor 2-mercaptoethanol (2-ME). No significant differences are observed by nickel K-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy between the plant and bacterial enzymes. The Ni X-ray absorption edge spectra display an 8332-eV 1s[yields]3d peak intensity similar to that observed for five-coordinate Ni(II) compounds[sup 1] for both native and 2-ME-bound derivatives. Curve-fitting of Ni EXAFS data indicates that the average Ni(II) coordination environment in native urease can be described as Ni(imidazole)[sub x](N,O)[sub 5[minus]x], with x = 2 or 3. Addition of 2-ME results in replacement of one of the non-imidazole (N,O) ligands with (S,Cl) (most likely the thiolate sulfur of 2-ME) and results in the appearance of a new peak in the Fourier transforms that can only be fit with a Ni[center dot][center dot][center dot]Ni scattering component at a Ni-Ni distance of [approximately]3.26 [angstrom]. A structure for this 2-ME-bound dinuclear site is proposed to contain the two Ni(II) ions bridged by the thiolate sulfur of 2-ME.

  20. A femtosecond transient absorption spectroscopic study on a carbonyl-containing carotenoid analogue, 2-(all-trans-retinylidene)-indan-1,3-dione

    PubMed Central

    Kusumoto, Toshiyuki; Kosumi, Daisuke; Uragami, Chiasa; Frank, Harry A.; Birge, Robert R.; Cogdell, Richard J.; Hashimoto, Hideki

    2011-01-01

    The photophysical properties of a carbonyl-containing carotenoid analogue in an s-cis configuration, relative to the conjugated π system, 2-(all-trans-retinylidene)-indan-1,3-dione (C20Ind), were investigated by femtosecond time-resolved spectroscopy in various solvents. The lifetime of the optically forbidden S1 state of C20Ind becomes long as solvent polarity increases. This trend is completely opposite to the situation of S1-ICT dynamics of carbonyl-containing carotenoids, such as peridinin and fucoxanthin. Excitation energy dependence of the transient absorption measurements shows that the transient absorption spectra in non-polar solvents were originated from two distinct transient species, while those in polar and protic solvents are due to a single transient species. By referring to the results of MNDO-PSDCI (modified neglect of differential overlap with partial single- and double-configuration interaction) calculations, we conclude: (1) In polar and protic solvents, the S1 state is generated following excitation up to the S2 state; (2) In non-polar solvents, however, both the S1 and 1nπ* states are generated; and (3) C20Ind does not generate the S1-ICT state, despite the fact that it has two conjugated carbonyl groups. PMID:21361262

  1. Reaction cell for in situ soft x-ray absorption spectroscopy and resonant inelastic x-ray scattering measurements of heterogeneous catalysis up to 1 atm and 250 °C

    SciTech Connect

    Kristiansen, P. T.; Rocha, T. C. R.; Knop-Gericke, A.; Guo, J. H.; Duda, L. C.

    2013-11-15

    We present a novel in situ reaction cell for heterogeneous catalysis monitored in situ by x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) and resonant inelastic x-ray scattering (RIXS). The reaction can be carried out at a total pressure up to 1 atm, a regime that has not been accessible to comparable in situ techniques and thus closes the pressure gap to many industrial standard conditions. Two alternate catalyst geometries were tested: (A) a thin film evaporated directly onto an x-ray transparent membrane with a flowing reaction gas mixture behind it or (B) a powder placed behind both the membrane and a gap of flowing reaction gas mixture. To illustrate the working principle and feasibility of our reaction cell setup we have chosen ethylene epoxidation over a silver catalyst as a test case. The evolution of incorporated oxygen species was monitored by total electron/fluorescence yield O K-XAS as well as O K-RIXS, which is a powerful method to separate contributions from inequivalent sites. We find that our method can reliably detect transient species that exist during catalytic reaction conditions that are hardly accessible using other spectroscopic methods.

  2. Uranyl adsorption and surface speciation at the imogolite-water interface: Self-consistent spectroscopic and surface complexation models

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Arai, Y.; McBeath, M.; Bargar, J.R.; Joye, J.; Davis, J.A.

    2006-01-01

    Macro- and molecular-scale knowledge of uranyl (U(VI)) partitioning reactions with soil/sediment mineral components is important in predicting U(VI) transport processes in the vadose zone and aquifers. In this study, U(VI) reactivity and surface speciation on a poorly crystalline aluminosilicate mineral, synthetic imogolite, were investigated using batch adsorption experiments, X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS), and surface complexation modeling. U(VI) uptake on imogolite surfaces was greatest at pH ???7-8 (I = 0.1 M NaNO3 solution, suspension density = 0.4 g/L [U(VI)]i = 0.01-30 ??M, equilibration with air). Uranyl uptake decreased with increasing sodium nitrate concentration in the range from 0.02 to 0.5 M. XAS analyses show that two U(VI) inner-sphere (bidentate mononuclear coordination on outer-wall aluminol groups) and one outer-sphere surface species are present on the imogolite surface, and the distribution of the surface species is pH dependent. At pH 8.8, bis-carbonato inner-sphere and tris-carbonato outer-sphere surface species are present. At pH 7, bis- and non-carbonato inner-sphere surface species co-exist, and the fraction of bis-carbonato species increases slightly with increasing I (0.1-0.5 M). At pH 5.3, U(VI) non-carbonato bidentate mononuclear surface species predominate (69%). A triple layer surface complexation model was developed with surface species that are consistent with the XAS analyses and macroscopic adsorption data. The proton stoichiometry of surface reactions was determined from both the pH dependence of U(VI) adsorption data in pH regions of surface species predominance and from bond-valence calculations. The bis-carbonato species required a distribution of surface charge between the surface and ?? charge planes in order to be consistent with both the spectroscopic and macroscopic adsorption data. This research indicates that U(VI)-carbonato ternary species on poorly crystalline aluminosilicate mineral surfaces may be important in

  3. In situ extended X-ray absorption fine structure study during selective alcohol oxidation over Pd/Al2O3 in supercritical carbon dioxide.

    PubMed

    Grunwaldt, Jan-Dierk; Caravati, Matteo; Baiker, Alfons

    2006-05-25

    High-pressure in situ X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) and extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) data are reported during the selective oxidation of benzyl alcohol to benzaldehyde in supercritical carbon dioxide over a Pd/Al(2)O(3) catalyst (shell impregnated). For this purpose, a continuous-flow system with a spectroscopic cell suitable for in situ X-ray absorption studies on heterogeneous catalysts up to 200 degrees C and 200 bar has been developed. Due to the high contribution of the dense fluid to the overall X-ray absorption, high stability of the process pressure is mandatory, particularly when recording EXAFS spectra. According to EXAFS and XANES results, the palladium particles were fully reduced after exposure to benzyl alcohol in scCO(2). In contrast to Pd-catalyzed liquid-phase oxidation, a higher oxygen tolerance of the catalyst was observed. Palladium was partially oxidized on the surface under typical reaction conditions (0.9 mol % benzyl alcohol/0.5 mol % O(2) in carbon dioxide), which gradually increased when the concentration of oxygen in the feed was raised. Both XANES and EXAFS data uncovered that palladium is mainly oxidized on the surface or within the outermost layers. These results are in accordance with simulations of the XANES data using the FEFF8.20 code (program for ab initio calculations on multiple scattering XAS) and EXAFS data fitting/simulation. PMID:16706447

  4. A multi-epoch spectroscopic study of the BAL quasar APM 08279+5255. II. Emission- and absorption-line variability time lags

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saturni, F. G.; Trevese, D.; Vagnetti, F.; Perna, M.; Dadina, M.

    2016-03-01

    Context. The study of high-redshift bright quasars is crucial to gather information about the history of galaxy assembly and evolution. Variability analyses can provide useful data on the physics of quasar processes and their relation with the host galaxy. Aims: In this study, we aim to measure the black hole mass of the bright lensed BAL QSO APM 08279+5255 at z = 3.911 through reverberation mapping, and to update and extend the monitoring of its C IV absorption line variability. Methods: We perform the first reverberation mapping of the Si IV and C IV emission lines for a high-luminosity quasar at high redshift with the use of 138 R-band photometric data and 30 spectra available over 16 years of observations. We also cross-correlate the C IV absorption equivalent width variations with the continuum light curve to estimate the recombination time lags of the various absorbers and infer the physical conditions of the ionised gas. Results: We find a reverberation-mapping time lag of ~900 rest-frame days for both Si IV and C IV emission lines. This is consistent with an extension of the BLR size-to-luminosity relation for active galactic nuclei up to a luminosity of ~1048 erg s-1, and implies a black hole mass of 1010 M⊙. Additionally, we measure a recombination time lag of ~160 days in the rest frame for the C IV narrow absorption system, which implies an electron density of the absorbing gas of ~2.5 × 104 cm-3. Conclusions: The measured black hole mass of APM 08279+5255 indicates that the quasar resides in an under-massive host-galaxy bulge with Mbulge ~ 7.5MBH, and that the lens magnification is lower than ~8. Finally, the inferred electron density of the narrow-line absorber implies a distance of the order of 10 kpc of the absorbing gas from the quasar, placing it within the host galaxy.

  5. The X-ray absorption spectroscopic model of the copper(II) imidazole complex ion in liquid aqueous solution: a strongly solvated square pyramid.

    PubMed

    Frank, Patrick; Benfatto, Maurizio; Hedman, Britt; Hodgson, Keith O

    2012-02-20

    Cu K-edge extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) and Minuit X-ray absorption near-edge structure (MXAN) analyses were combined to evaluate the structure of the copper(II) imidazole complex ion in liquid aqueous solution. Both methods converged to the same square-pyramidal inner coordination sphere [Cu(Im)(4)L(ax)](2+) (L(ax) indeterminate) with four equatorial nitrogen atoms at EXAFS, 2.02 ± 0.01 Å, and MXAN, 1.99 ± 0.03 Å. A short-axial N/O scatterer (L(ax)) was found at 2.12 ± 0.02 Å (EXAFS) or 2.14 ± 0.06 Å (MXAN). A second but very weak axial Cu-N/O interaction was found at 2.9 ± 0.1 Å (EXAFS) or 3.0 ± 0.1 Å (MXAN). In the MXAN fits, only a square-pyramidal structural model successfully reproduced the doubled maximum of the rising K-edge X-ray absorption spectrum, specifically excluding an octahedral model. Both EXAFS and MXAN also found eight outlying oxygen scatterers at 4.2 ± 0.3 Å that contributed significant intensity over the entire spectral energy range. Two prominent rising K-edge shoulders at 8987.1 and 8990.5 eV were found to reflect multiple scattering from the 3.0 Å axial scatterer and the imidazole rings, respectively. In the MXAN fits, the imidazole rings took in-plane rotationally staggered positions about copper. The combined (EXAFS and MXAN) model for the unconstrained cupric imidazole complex ion in liquid aqueous solution is an axially elongated square-pyramidal core, with a weak nonbonded interaction at the second axial coordination position and a solvation shell of eight nearest-neighbor water molecules. This core square-pyramidal motif has persisted through [Cu(H(2)O)(5)](2+), [Cu(NH(3))(4)(NH(3),H(2)O)](2+), (1, 2) and now [Cu(Im)(4)L(ax))](2+) and appears to be the geometry preferred by unconstrained aqueous-phase copper(II) complex ions. PMID:22316238

  6. Spectroscopic characterization of C7H3(+) and C7H3˙: electronic absorption and fluorescence in 6 K neon matrices.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Arghya; Fulara, Jan; Dietsche, Rainer; Maier, John P

    2014-04-21

    Mass selective deposition of C7H3(+) (m/z = 87) into solid neon reveals the 1(1)A1←X(1)A1 electronic absorption system of hepta-1,2,3,4,5,6-heptahexaenylium cation B(+) [H2CCCCCCCH](+) with an origin band at 441.3 nm, 1(1)A'←X(1)A' transition of 2,4-pentadiynylium,1-ethynyl cation C(+) [HCCCHCCCCH](+) starting at 414.6 nm and the 1(1)A1←X(1)A1 one of cyclopropenylium,1,3-butadiynyl cation A(+) [HCCCCC<(CH=CH)](+) with an onset at 322.2 nm. Vibrationally resolved fluorescence was observed for isomer B(+) upon laser excitation of the absorption bands in the 1(1)A1←X(1)A1 transition. After neutralization of the cations in the matrix five absorption systems of the C7H3 neutral radicals starting at 530.3, 479.4, 482.3, 325.0 and 302.5 nm were detected. These were identified as the 1(2)A'←X(2)A' and 2(2)A'←X(2)A' electronic transitions of 2-(buta-1,3-diynyl)cycloprop-2yl-1-1ylidene E˙ [HCCCCC<(C=CH2)]˙, 1(2)B1←X(2)B1 of 1,2,3,4,5,6-heptahexaenyl B˙ [H2CCCCCCCH]˙, 3(2)B1←X(2)B1 of 3-buta-1,3-diynyl-cyclopropenyl A˙ [HCCCCC<(CH=CH)]˙ and 2(2)B1←X(2)A2 transition of 1,2-divinylidene-cyclopropanyl radical F˙ [HCC-cyc-(CCHC)-CCH]˙, respectively. The assignment is based on calculated vertical excitation energies using the CASPT2 method. Comparison of the calculated harmonic vibrational frequencies with those inferred from the spectra supports the assignment.

  7. The Five-To-Six-Coordination Transition of Ferric Human Serum Heme-Albumin Is Allosterically-Modulated by Ibuprofen and Warfarin: A Combined XAS and MD Study

    PubMed Central

    Bionducci, Monica; Fanali, Gabriella; Meli, Massimiliano; Colombo, Giorgio; Fasano, Mauro; Ascenzi, Paolo; Mobilio, Settimio

    2014-01-01

    Human serum albumin (HSA) is involved physiologically in heme scavenging; in turn, heme-albumin (HSA-heme-Fe) displays globin-like properties. Here, the allosteric effect of ibuprofen and warfarin on the local atomic structure around the ferric heme-Fe (heme-Fe(III)) atom of HSA-heme-Fe (HSA-heme-Fe(III)) has been probed by Fe-K edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS). The quantitative analysis of the Fe-K edge extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) signals and modeling of the near edge (XANES) spectral features demonstrated that warfarin and ibuprofen binding modify the local structure of the heme-Fe(III). Combined XAS data analysis and targeted molecular dynamics (MD) simulations provided atomic resolution insights of protein structural rearrangements required to accommodate the heme-Fe(III) upon ibuprofen and warfarin binding. In the absence of drugs, the heme-Fe(III) atom is penta-coordinated having distorted 4+1 configuration made by the nitrogen atoms of the porphyrin ring and the oxygen phenoxy atom of the Tyr161 residue. MD simulations show that ibuprofen and warfarin association to the secondary fatty acid (FA) binding site 2 (FA2) induces a reorientation of domain I of HSA-heme-Fe(III), this leads to the redirection of the His146 residue providing an additional bond to the heme-Fe(III) atom, providing the 5+1 configuration. The comparison of Fe-K edge XANES spectra calculated using MD structures with those obtained experimentally confirms the reliability of the proposed structural model. As a whole, combining XAS and MD simulations it has been possible to provide a reliable model of the heme-Fe(III) atom coordination state and to understand the complex allosteric transition occurring in HSA-heme-Fe(III) upon ibuprofen and warfarin binding. PMID:25153171

  8. X-ray absorption spectroscopic studies of the dinuclear iron center in methane monooxygenase and the sulfure and chlorine centers in photographic materials

    SciTech Connect

    DeWitt, J.G.

    1992-12-01

    The dinuclear iron center of the hydroxylase component of soluble methane monooxygenase (MMO) from Methylococcus capsulatus and Methylosinus trichosporiwn has been studied by X-ray absorption spectroscopy. Analysis of the Fe K-edge EXAFS revealed that the first shell coordination of the Fe(HI)Fe(IH) oxidized state of the hydroxylase from M. capsulatus consists of approximately 6 N and 0 atoms at an average distance of 2.04 {Angstrom}. The Fe-Fe distance was determined to be 3.4 {Angstrom}. No evidence for the presence of a short oxo bridge in the iron center of the oxidized hydroxylase was found, suggesting that the active site of MMO is significantly different from the active sites of the dinuclear iron proteins hemery and ribonucleotide reductase. In addition, the results of the first shell fits suggest that there are more oxygen than nitrogen donor ligands.

  9. X-ray absorption spectroscopic studies of the dinuclear iron center in methane monooxygenase and the sulfure and chlorine centers in photographic materials

    SciTech Connect

    DeWitt, J.G.

    1992-12-01

    The dinuclear iron center of the hydroxylase component of soluble methane monooxygenase (MMO) from Methylococcus capsulatus and Methylosinus trichosporiwn has been studied by X-ray absorption spectroscopy. Analysis of the Fe K-edge EXAFS revealed that the first shell coordination of the Fe(HI)Fe(IH) oxidized state of the hydroxylase from M. capsulatus consists of approximately 6 N and 0 atoms at an average distance of 2.04 [Angstrom]. The Fe-Fe distance was determined to be 3.4 [Angstrom]. No evidence for the presence of a short oxo bridge in the iron center of the oxidized hydroxylase was found, suggesting that the active site of MMO is significantly different from the active sites of the dinuclear iron proteins hemery and ribonucleotide reductase. In addition, the results of the first shell fits suggest that there are more oxygen than nitrogen donor ligands.

  10. Microprobe XRF mapping and XAS investigations of the intracellular metabolism of arsenic for understanding arsenic-induced toxicity.

    PubMed

    Munro, Kristie L; Mariana, Anna; Klavins, Andrejs I; Foster, Amalanie J; Lai, Barry; Vogt, Stefan; Cai, ZhongHou; Harris, Hugh H; Dillon, Carolyn T

    2008-09-01

    Arsenic (As) is responsible for mass-poisonings worldwide following the ingestion of As-contaminated drinking water. Importantly, however, As toxicity is exploited in the antileukemia drug, Trisenox (As2O3), which successfully cures 65-80% of patients suffering relapsed acute promyelocytic leukemia. In an effort to determine the intracellular organelle and biomolecular targets of As, microprobe X-ray fluorescence (XRF) and X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) analyses were performed on HepG2 cells following their exposure to high doses of arsenite (1 mM) or arsenate (20 mM). Microprobe XRF elemental mapping of thin-sectioned cells showed As accumulation in the euchromatin region of the cell nucleus (following arsenite exposure) synonymous with As targeting of DNA or proteins involved in DNA transcription. X-ray absorption near edge spectroscopy (XANES) and extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) analysis of arsenite-treated cells, however, showed the predominance of an As tris-sulfur species, providing increased credence to As interactions with nuclear proteins as a key factor in As-induced toxicity. PMID:18597498

  11. Electronic absorption and luminescence spectroscopic studies of kyanite single crystals: differentiation between excitation of FeTi charge transfer and Cr3+ dd transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Platonov, A. N.; Tarashchan, A. N.; Langer, K.; Andrut, M.; Partzsch, G.; Matsyuk, S. S.

    A selected set of five different kyanite samples was analysed by electron microprobe and found to contain chromium between <0.001 and 0.055 per formula unit (pfu). Polarized electronic absorption spectroscopy on oriented single crystals, R1, R2-sharp line luminescence and spectra of excitation of λ3- and λ4-components of R1-line of Cr3+-emission had the following results: (1) The Fe2+-Ti4+ charge transfer in c-parallel chains of edge connected M(1) and M(2) octahedra shows up in the electronic absorption spectra as an almost exclusively c(||Z')-polarized, very strong and broad band at 16000 cm-1 if < , in this case the only band in the spectrum, and at an invariably lower energy of 15400 cm-1 in crystals with >= . The energy difference is explained by an expansion of the Of-Ok, and Ob-Om edges, by which the M(1) and M(2) octahedra are interconnected (Burnham 1963), when Cr3+ substitutes for Al compared to the chromium-free case. (2) The Cr3+ is proven in two greatly differing crystal fields a and b, giving rise to two sets of bands, derived from the well known dd transitions of Cr3+4A2g-->4T2g(F)(I), -->4T1g(F)(II), and -->4T1g(P)(III). Band energies in the two sets a and b, as obtained by absorption, A, and excitation, E, agree well: I: 17300(a,A), 17200(a,E), 16000(b,A), 16200(b,E) II: 24800(a,A), 24400(a,E) 22300(b,A), 22200(b,E) III: 28800(b,A) cm-1. Evaluation of crystal field parameters from the bands in the electronic spectra yield Dq(a)=1730 cm-1, Dq(b)=1600 cm-1, B(a)=790 cm-1, B(b)=620 cm-1 (errors ca. +/-10 cm-1), again in agreement with values extracted from the λ3,λ4 excitation spectra. The CF-values of set a are close to those typical of Cr3+ substituting for Al in octahedra of other silicate minerals without constitutional OH- as for sapphirine, mantle garnets or beryl, and are, therefore, interpreted as caused by Cr3+ substituting for Al in some or all of the M(1) to M(4) octaheda of the kyanite structure, which are crystallographically

  12. Constraining the N2O5 UV absorption cross section from spectroscopic trace gas measurements in the tropical mid-stratosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kritten, L.; Butz, A.; Chipperfield, M. P.; Dorf, M.; Dhomse, S.; Hossaini, R.; Oelhaf, H.; Prados-Roman, C.; Wetzel, G.; Pfeilsticker, K.

    2014-09-01

    The absorption cross section of N2O5, σN2O5(λ, T), which is known from laboratory measurements with the uncertainty of a factor of 2 (Table 4-2 in (Jet Propulsion Laboratory) JPL-2011; the spread in laboratory data, however, points to an uncertainty in the range of 25 to 30%, Sander et al., 2011), was investigated by balloon-borne observations of the relevant trace gases in the tropical mid-stratosphere. The method relies on the observation of the diurnal variation of NO2 by limb scanning DOAS (differential optical absorption spectroscopy) measurements (Weidner et al., 2005; Kritten et al., 2010), supported by detailed photochemical modelling of NOy (NOx(= NO + NO2) + NO3 + 2N2O5 + ClONO2 + HO2NO2 + BrONO2 + HNO3) photochemistry and a non-linear least square fitting of the model result to the NO2 observations. Simulations are initialised with O3 measured by direct sun observations, the NOy partitioning from MIPAS-B (Michelson Interferometer for Passive Atmospheric Sounding - Balloon-borne version) observations in similar air masses at night-time, and all other relevant species from simulations of the SLIMCAT (Single Layer Isentropic Model of Chemistry And Transport) chemical transport model (CTM). Best agreement between the simulated and observed diurnal increase of NO2 is found if the σN2O5(λ, T) is scaled by a factor of 1.6 ± 0.8 in the UV-C (200-260 nm) and by a factor of 0.9 ± 0.26 in the UV-B/A (260-350 nm), compared to current recommendations. As a consequence, at 30 km altitude, the N2O5 lifetime against photolysis becomes a factor of 0.77 shorter at solar zenith angle (SZA) of 30° than using the recommended σN2O5(λ, T), and stays more or less constant at SZAs of 60°. Our scaled N2O5 photolysis frequency slightly reduces the lifetime (0.2-0.6%) of ozone in the tropical mid- and upper stratosphere, but not to an extent to be important for global ozone.

  13. Determination of Phase Ratio in Polymorphic Materials by X-Ray Absorption Spectroscopy: The Case of Anatase and Rutile Phase Mixture in TiO2

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, M. F.; Klysubun, W.; Kityakarn, S.; Worayingyong, A.; Zhang, S. B.; Wei, S. H.; Onkaw, D.; Songsiriritthigul, P.; Rujirawat, S.; Limpijumnong, S.

    2009-01-01

    We demonstrate that x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) can be used as an unconventional characterization technique to determine the proportions of different crystal phases in polymorphic samples. As an example, we show that ratios of anatase and rutile phases contained in the TiO{sub 2} samples obtained by XAS are in agreement with conventional x-ray diffraction (XRD) measurements to within a few percent. We suggest that XAS measurement is a useful and reliable technique that can be applied to study the phase composition of highly disordered or nanoparticle polymorphic materials, where traditional XRD technique might be difficult.

  14. The apparent absence of chemical sensitivity in the 4d and 5d X-ray absorption spectroscopy of uranium compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Tobin, J. G.

    2013-05-03

    X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) and related derivative measurements have been used to demonstrate that the Pu 5f states are strongly relativistic and have a 5f occupation number near 5. Owing to the success in this regime, it has been argued that the XAS measurements should be a powerful tool to probe 5f occupation variation, both as a function of elemental nature (actinide atomic number) and as a function of physical and chemical perturbation, e.g., oxidation state. We show that XAS and its related measurements fail in this latter aspect for a wide variety of uranium compounds and materials. Possible causes will be discussed.

  15. Identification of the chemical form of sulfur compounds in the Japanese pink coral (Corallium elatius) skeleton using μ-XRF/XAS speciation mapping.

    PubMed

    Tamenori, Yusuke; Yoshimura, Toshihiro; Luan, Nguyen Trong; Hasegawa, Hiroshi; Suzuki, Atsushi; Kawahata, Hodaka; Iwasaki, Nozomu

    2014-05-01

    The distributions and chemical forms of sulfur compounds in the skeleton of Japanese pink coral (Corallium elatius) were investigated using X-ray spectroscopic techniques combined with micro-focused soft X-ray radiation. Microscopic X-ray fluorescence/soft X-ray photoabsorption (μ-XRF/XAS) speciation mapping clarified that sulfate is the primary species in the coral skeleton, with minor amounts of organic sulfur, whereas both sulfate and organic sulfur coexist in coenenchyme. Analysis of the post-edge region of the XAS spectra confirmed that sulfate ions in the coral skeleton are mainly in the form of gypsum-like inorganic sulfate substituting for the carbonate ions in the calcite skeleton. The sulfate concentration was negatively correlated with the magnesium concentration and positively correlated with that of phosphorus. Speciation mapping of sulfate in the coral skeleton showed clear fluctuations with sulfate concentrations being higher at dark bands, whereas the small amount of organic sulfur had unclear dark/bright bands. These results suggest that the little organic sulfur that is present is contained in the organic matter embedded in the biocrystal of coral skeleton.

  16. A spectroscopic proton-exchange membrane fuel cell test setup allowing fluorescence x-ray absorption spectroscopy measurements during state-of-the-art cell tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrova, Olga; Kulp, Christian; van den Berg, Maurits W. E.; Klementiev, Konstantin V.; Otto, Bruno; Otto, Horst; Lopez, Marco; Bron, Michael; Grünert, Wolfgang

    2011-04-01

    A test setup for membrane-electrode-assemblies (MEAs) of proton exchange membrane fuel cells which allows in situ fluorescence x-ray absorption spectroscopy studies of one electrode with safe exclusion of contributions from the counter electrode is described. Interference by the counter electrode is excluded by a geometry including a small angle of incidence (< 6°) between primary beam and electrode layer. The cell has been constructed by introducing just minor modifications to an electrochemical state-of-the-art MEA test setup, which ensures realistic electrochemical test conditions. This is at the expense of significant intensity losses in the path of the incident beam, which calls for the brilliance of third-generation synchrotrons to provide meaningful data. In measurements on Pt/C and Pt-Co/C cathodes combined with Pt-C anodes (H2/O2 feed), good data quality was demonstrated both for the majority element Pt as well as for Co despite of a low areal Co density in the order of 0.02 mg/cm2.

  17. [X-ray absorption spectroscopic evidence for the formation of Pb(II) inner-sphere adsorption complexes and precipitates at the alkaline soil-water interface].

    PubMed

    Hu, Ning-Jing; Luo, Yong-Ming; Huang, Peng; Hu, Tian-Dou; Xie, Ya-Ning; Wu, Zi-Yu; Shi, Xue-Fa

    2011-02-01

    Adsorption mechanisms of Pb on soil with high CaCO3 content were investigated by combined batch sorption and X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS). Date from the batch equilibrium studies showed that Pb sorption was nonlinear and was well fitted to Langmiur isotherm. The XAFS data indicated that Pb could be adsorbed via the inner-sphere complex, the precipitation of calcium carbonate containing Pb (PbCaCO3), and outer-sphere Pb sorption complex. The formations of inner-sphere complexes and PbCaCO3 implied strong metal interactions with the surfaces the mechanistic reason for the affinity of Pb for CaCO3 as observed in macroscopic studies. At low metal concentration, 500 mg x L(-1) of initial Pb, radial distance of the first-shell Pb-O (R1) was 0.169 2 nm, however, at 1 000 mg x L(-1) of initial Pb, the R1 was 0.166 8 nm. These revealed that the percentage of inner-sphere complexes increased when the initial Pb was increased from 500 to 1 000 mg x L(-1). PMID:21510427

  18. A novel surface-sensitive X-ray absorption spectroscopic detector to study the thermal decomposition of cathode materials for Li-ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nonaka, Takamasa; Okuda, Chikaaki; Oka, Hideaki; Nishimura, Yusaku F.; Makimura, Yoshinari; Kondo, Yasuhito; Dohmae, Kazuhiko; Takeuchi, Yoji

    2016-09-01

    A surface-sensitive conversion-electron-yield X-ray absorption fine structure (CEY-XAFS) detector that operates at elevated temperatures is developed to investigate the thermal decomposition of cathode materials for Li-ion batteries. The detector enables measurements with the sample temperature controlled from room temperature up to 450 °C. The detector is applied to the LiNi0.75Co0.15Al0.05Mg0.05O2 cathode material at 0% state of charge (SOC) and 50% SOC to examine the chemical changes that occur during heating in the absence of an electrolyte. The combination of surface-sensitive CEY-XAFS and bulk-sensitive transmission-mode XAFS shows that the reduction of Ni and Co ions begins at the surface of the cathode particles at around 150 °C, and propagates inside the particle upon further heating. These changes with heating are irreversible and are more obvious at 50% SOC than at 0% SOC. The fraction of reduced Ni ions is larger than that of reduced Co ions. These results demonstrate the capability of the developed detector to obtain important information for the safe employment of this cathode material in Li-ion batteries.

  19. Material/element-dependent fluorescence-yield modes on soft X-ray absorption spectroscopy of cathode materials for Li-ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asakura, Daisuke; Hosono, Eiji; Nanba, Yusuke; Zhou, Haoshen; Okabayashi, Jun; Ban, Chunmei; Glans, Per-Anders; Guo, Jinghua; Mizokawa, Takashi; Chen, Gang; Achkar, Andrew J.; Hawthron, David G.; Regier, Thomas Z.; Wadati, Hiroki

    2016-03-01

    We evaluate the utilities of fluorescence-yield (FY) modes in soft X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) of several cathode materials for Li-ion batteries. In the case of total-FY (TFY) XAS for LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4, the line shape of the Mn L3-edge XAS was largely distorted by the self-absorption and saturation effects, while the distortions were less pronounced at the Ni L3 edge. The distortions were suppressed for the inverse-partial-FY (IPFY) spectra. We found that, in the cathode materials, the IPFY XAS is highly effective for the Cr, Mn, and Fe L edges and the TFY and PFY modes are useful enough for the Ni L edge which is far from the O K edge.

  20. X-ray absorption and photoelectron spectroscopic study of the association of As(III) with nanoparticulate FeS and FeS-coated sand.

    PubMed

    Han, Young-Soo; Jeong, Hoon Y; Demond, Avery H; Hayes, Kim F

    2011-11-01

    Iron sulfide (FeS) has been demonstrated to have a high removal capacity for arsenic (As) in reducing environments. However, FeS may be present as a coating, rather than in nanoparticulate form, in both natural and engineered systems. Frequently, the removal capacity of coatings may be different than that of nanoparticulates in batch systems. To assess the differences in removal mechanisms between nanoparticulate FeS and FeS present as a coating, the solid phase products from the reaction of As(III) with FeS-coated sand and with suspensions of nanoparticulate (NP) FeS were determined using x-ray absorption spectroscopy and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. In reaction with NP FeS at pH 5, As(III) was reduced to As(II) to form realgar (AsS), while at pH 9, As(III) adsorbed as an As(III) thioarsenite species. In contrast, in the FeS-coated sand system, As(III) formed the solid phase orpiment (As(2)S(3)) at pH 5, but adsorbed as an As(III) arsenite species at pH 9. These different solid reaction products are attributed to differences in FeS concentration and the resultant redox (pe) differences in the FeS-coated sand system versus suspensions of NP FeS. These results point to the importance of accounting for differences in concentration and redox when making inferences for coatings based on batch suspension studies.

  1. Constraining the N2O5 UV absorption cross-section from spectroscopic trace gas measurements in the tropical mid-stratosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kritten, L.; Butz, A.; Chipperfield, M. P.; Dorf, M.; Dhomse, S.; Hossaini, R.; Oelhaf, H.; Prados-Roman, C.; Wetzel, G.; Pfeilsticker, K.

    2014-02-01

    The absorption cross-section of N2O5, σN2O5(λ, T), which is known from laboratory measurements with the uncertainty of a factor of 2 (Table 4-2 in JPL-2011, Sander et al., 2011), was investigated by balloon-borne observations of the relevant trace gases in the tropical mid-stratosphere. The method relies on the observation of the diurnal variation of NO2 supported by detailed photochemical modelling of NOy (NOx(= NO + NO2) + NO3 + 2N2O5 + ClONO2 + HO2NO2 +BrONO2 + HNO3) photochemistry. Simulations are initialised with O3 measured by direct sun observations, the NOy partitioning from MIPAS-B (Michelson Interferometer for Passive Atmospheric Sounding-Balloon) observations in similar air masses at nighttime, and all other relevant species from simulations of the SLIMCAT chemical transport model (CTM). Best agreement between the simulated and observed diurnal increase of NO2 is found if the σN2O5(λ, T) is scaled by a factor of 1.6 ± 0.8 in the UV-C (200-260 nm) and by a factor of 0.9 ± 0.26 in the UV-B/A (260-350 nm), compared to current recommendations. In consequence, at 30 km altitude, the N2O5 lifetime against photolysis becomes a factor of 0.77 shorter at solar zenith angle (SZA) of 30° than using the recommended σN2O5 (λ, T), and stays more or less constant at SZAs of 60°. Our scaled N2O5 photolysis frequency slightly reduces the lifetime (0.2-0.6%) of ozone in the tropical mid- and upper stratosphere, but not to an extent to be important for global ozone.

  2. Spectroscopic analysis of small organic molecules: A comprehensive near-edge x-ray-absorption fine-structure study of C{sub 6}-ring-containing molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Kolczewski, C.; Puettner, R.; Martins, M.; Schlachter, A.S.; Snell, G.; Sant'Anna, M.M.; Hermann, K.; Kaindl, G.

    2006-01-21

    We report high-resolution C 1s near-edge x-ray-absorption fine-structure (NEXAFS) spectra of the C{sub 6}-ring-containing molecules benzene (C{sub 6}H{sub 6}), 1,3- and 1,4-cyclohexadiene (C{sub 6}H{sub 8}), cyclohexene (C{sub 6}H{sub 10}), cyclohexane (C{sub 6}H{sub 12}), styrene (C{sub 8}H{sub 8}), and ethylbenzene (C{sub 8}H{sub 10}) which allow us to examine the gradual development of delocalization of the corresponding {pi} electron systems. Due to the high experimental resolution, vibrational progressions can be partly resolved in the spectra. The experimental spectra are compared with theoretical NEXAFS spectra obtained from density-functional theory calculations where electronic final-state relaxation is accounted for. The comparison yields very good agreement between theoretical spectra and experimental results. In all cases, the spectra can be described by excitations to {pi}*- and {sigma}*-type final-state orbitals with valence character, while final-state orbitals of Rydberg character make only minor contributions. The lowest C 1s{yields}1{pi}* excitation energy is found to agree in the (experimental and theoretical) spectra of all molecules except for 1,3-cyclohexadiene (C{sub 6}H{sub 8}) where an energy smaller by about 0.6 eV is obtained. The theoretical analysis can explain this result by different binding properties of this molecule compared to the others.

  3. Nuclear magnetic resonance and optical absorption spectroscopic studies on paramagnetic praseodymium(III) complexes with beta-diketone and heterocyclic amines.

    PubMed

    Ansari, A A; Ahmed, Zubair; Iftikhar, K

    2007-09-01

    The optical absorption spectra of [Pr(acac)(3)(H(2)O)(2)].H(2)O, [Pr(acac)(3)phen.H(2)O] and [Pr(acac)(3)bpy] (where acac is the anion of acetylacetone, phen is 1,10-phenanthroline and bpy is 2,2'-bipyridyl) have been analyzed in the visible region in a series of non-aqueous solvents (methanol, ethanol, isopropanol, chloroform, acetonitrile and pyridine). The complexes display four non-hypersensitive 4f-4f transitions ((3)P(2), (3)P(1)+(1)I(6), (3)P(0) and (1)D(2)) from the (3)H(4) ground state. The band shape of the transitions shows remarkable changes upon dissolving in different solvents. Distinctively different band shapes have been observed for phen and bpy complexes. The phen is more effective in producing changes and the splitting of the bands is more pronounced in phen complex since it is a stronger ligand and leads to stronger Pr-N(phen) bond. The splitting of the bands is indicative of partaking of f-orbitals in bonding. The NMR signals of heterocyclic amines have been shifted to high fields while the resonances due to acetylacetone moiety have moved to low fields which is the consequence of change in geometry of the complexes upon coordination of the heterocyclic amines and reflects the importance of geometric factor (3cos(2)theta-1) in changing sign of the shift and to a good approximation the shifts arise predominantly from the dipolar mechanism. The phen complexes have narrower line width than bpy complexes. The line broadening in the case of bpy complexes is suggestive of exchange between inter-converting forms. The bpy possesses some degree of rotational freedom about C(6)-C(6') bond and the two pyridine rings undergo scissoring motion with respect to each other.

  4. Crystal-Field and Covalency Effects in Uranates: An X-ray Spectroscopic Study.

    PubMed

    Butorin, Sergei M; Kvashnina, Kristina O; Smith, Anna L; Popa, Karin; Martin, Philippe M

    2016-07-01

    The electronic structure of U(V) - and U(VI) -containing uranates NaUO3 and Pb3 UO6 was studied by using an advanced technique, namely X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) in high-energy-resolution fluorescence-detection (HERFD) mode. Due to a significant reduction in core-hole lifetime broadening, the crystal-field splittings of the 5f shell were probed directly in HERFD-XAS spectra collected at the U 3d edge, which is not possible by using conventional XAS. In addition, the charge-transfer satellites that result from U 5f-O 2p hybridization were clearly resolved. The crystal-field parameters, 5f occupancy, and degree of covalency of the chemical bonding in these uranates were estimated by using the Anderson impurity model by calculating the U 3d HERFD-XAS, conventional XAS, core-to-core (U 4f-3d transitions) resonant inelastic X-ray scattering (RIXS), and U 4f X-ray photoelectron spectra. The crystal field was found to be strong in these systems and the 5f occupancy was determined to be 1.32 and 0.84 electrons in the ground state for NaUO3 and Pb3 UO6 , respectively, which indicates a significant covalent character for these compounds. PMID:27257782

  5. Reactivity-activity relationships of oral anti-diabetic vanadium complexes in gastrointestinal media: an X-ray absorption spectroscopic study.

    PubMed

    Levina, Aviva; McLeod, Andrew I; Kremer, Lauren E; Aitken, Jade B; Glover, Christopher J; Johannessen, Bernt; Lay, Peter A

    2014-10-01

    The reactions of oral V(V/IV) anti-diabetic drugs within the gastrointestinal environment (particularly in the presence of food) are a crucial factor that affects their biological activities, but to date these have been poorly understood. In order to build up reactivity-activity relationships, the first detailed study of the reactivities of typical V-based anti-diabetics, Na3V(V)O4 (A), [V(IV)O(OH2)5](SO4) (B), [V(IV)O(ma)2] (C, ma = maltolato(-)) and (NH4)[V(V)(O)2(dipic)] (D, dipic = pyridine-2,5-dicarboxylato(2-)) with simulated gastrointestinal (GI) media in the presence or absence of food components has been performed by the use of XANES (X-ray absorption near edge structure) spectroscopy. Changes in speciation under conditions that simulate interactions in the GI tract have been discerned using correlations of XANES parameters that were based on a library of model V(V), V(IV), and V(III) complexes for preliminary assessment of the oxidation states and coordination numbers. More detailed speciation analyses were performed using multiple linear regression fits of XANES from the model complexes to XANES obtained from the reaction products from interactions with the GI media. Compounds B and D were relatively stable in the gastric environment (pH ∼ 2) in the absence of food, while C was mostly dissociated, and A was converted to [V10O28](6-). Sequential gastric and intestinal digestion in the absence of food converted A, B and D to poorly absorbed tetrahedral vanadates, while C formed five- or six-coordinate V(V) species where the maltolato ligands were likely to be partially retained. XANES obtained from gastric digestion of A-D in the presence of typical food components converged to that of a mixture of V(IV)-aqua, V(IV)-amino acid and V(III)-aqua complexes. Subsequent intestinal digestion led predominantly to V(IV) complexes that were assigned as citrato or complexes with 2-hydroxyacidato donor groups from other organic compounds, including certain

  6. Reactivity-activity relationships of oral anti-diabetic vanadium complexes in gastrointestinal media: an X-ray absorption spectroscopic study.

    PubMed

    Levina, Aviva; McLeod, Andrew I; Kremer, Lauren E; Aitken, Jade B; Glover, Christopher J; Johannessen, Bernt; Lay, Peter A

    2014-10-01

    The reactions of oral V(V/IV) anti-diabetic drugs within the gastrointestinal environment (particularly in the presence of food) are a crucial factor that affects their biological activities, but to date these have been poorly understood. In order to build up reactivity-activity relationships, the first detailed study of the reactivities of typical V-based anti-diabetics, Na3V(V)O4 (A), [V(IV)O(OH2)5](SO4) (B), [V(IV)O(ma)2] (C, ma = maltolato(-)) and (NH4)[V(V)(O)2(dipic)] (D, dipic = pyridine-2,5-dicarboxylato(2-)) with simulated gastrointestinal (GI) media in the presence or absence of food components has been performed by the use of XANES (X-ray absorption near edge structure) spectroscopy. Changes in speciation under conditions that simulate interactions in the GI tract have been discerned using correlations of XANES parameters that were based on a library of model V(V), V(IV), and V(III) complexes for preliminary assessment of the oxidation states and coordination numbers. More detailed speciation analyses were performed using multiple linear regression fits of XANES from the model complexes to XANES obtained from the reaction products from interactions with the GI media. Compounds B and D were relatively stable in the gastric environment (pH ∼ 2) in the absence of food, while C was mostly dissociated, and A was converted to [V10O28](6-). Sequential gastric and intestinal digestion in the absence of food converted A, B and D to poorly absorbed tetrahedral vanadates, while C formed five- or six-coordinate V(V) species where the maltolato ligands were likely to be partially retained. XANES obtained from gastric digestion of A-D in the presence of typical food components converged to that of a mixture of V(IV)-aqua, V(IV)-amino acid and V(III)-aqua complexes. Subsequent intestinal digestion led predominantly to V(IV) complexes that were assigned as citrato or complexes with 2-hydroxyacidato donor groups from other organic compounds, including certain

  7. Spectroscopic Low Coherence Interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bosschaart, Nienke; van Leeuwen, T. G.; Aalders, Maurice C.; Hermann, Boris; Drexler, Wolfgang; Faber, Dirk J.

    Low-coherence interferometry (LCI) allows high-resolution volumetric imaging of tissue morphology and provides localized optical properties that can be related to the physiological status of tissue. This chapter discusses the combination of spatial and spectroscopic information by means of spectroscopic OCT (sOCT) and low-coherence spectroscopy (LCS). We describe the theory behind these modalities for the assessment of spatially resolved optical absorption and (back)scattering coefficient spectra. These spectra can be used for the highly localized quantification of chromophore concentrations and assessment of tissue organization on (sub)cellular scales. This leads to a wealth of potential clinical applications, ranging from neonatology for the determination of billibrubin concentrations, to oncology for the optical assessment of the aggressiveness of a cancerous lesion.

  8. ATHENA, ARTEMIS, HEPHAESTUS: data analysis for X-ray absorption spectropscopy using IFEFFIT

    SciTech Connect

    Ravel, B.; Newville, M.

    2010-07-20

    A software package for the analysis of X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) data is presented. This package is based on the IFEFFIT library of numerical and XAS algorithms and is written in the Perl programming language using the Perl/Tk graphics toolkit. The programs described here are: (i) ATHENA, a program for XAS data processing, (ii) ARTEMIS, a program for EXAFS data analysis using theoretical standards from FEFF and (iii) HEPHAESTUS, a collection of beamline utilities based on tables of atomic absorption data. These programs enable high-quality data analysis that is accessible to novices while still powerful enough to meet the demands of an expert practitioner. The programs run on all major computer platforms and are freely available under the terms of a free software license.

  9. XAS and XFM studies of selenium and copper speciation and distribution in the kidneys of selenite-supplemented rats.

    PubMed

    Weekley, Claire M; Shanu, Anu; Aitken, Jade B; Vogt, Stefan; Witting, Paul K; Harris, Hugh H

    2014-09-01

    Dietary selenium has been implicated in the prevention of cancer and other diseases, but its safety and efficacy is dependent on the supplemented form and its metabolites. In this study, X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) and X-ray fluorescence microscopy (XFM) have been used to investigate the speciation and distribution of Se and Cu in vivo. In kidneys isolated from rats fed a diet containing 5 ppm Se as selenite for 3 weeks, Se levels increased 5-fold. XFM revealed a strong correlation between the distribution of Se and the distribution of Cu in the kidney, a phenomenon that has previously been observed in cell culture (Weekley et al., JBIC, J. Biol. Inorg. Chem., 2014, DOI: 10.1007/s00775-014-1113-x). However, X-ray absorption spectra suggest that most of the Se in the kidney is found as Se-Se species, rather than Cu-bound, and that most of the Cu is bound to S and N, presumably to amino acid residues in proteins. Furthermore, SOD1 expression did not change in response to the high Se diet. We cannot rule out the possibility of some Cu-Se bonding in the tissues, but our results suggest mechanisms other than the formation of Cu-Se species and SOD1 upregulation are responsible for the highly correlated distributions of Se and Cu in the kidneys of rats fed high selenite diets.

  10. AlxGa1-xAs Single-Quantum-Well Surface-Emitting Lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Jae H.

    1992-01-01

    Surface-emitting solid-state laser contains edge-emitting Al0.08Ga0.92As single-quantum-well (SQW) active layer sandwiched between graded-index-of-refraction separate-confinement-heterostructure (GRINSCH) layers of AlxGa1-xAs, includes etched 90 degree mirrors and 45 degree facets to direct edge-emitted beam perpendicular to top surface. Laser resembles those described in "Pseudomorphic-InxGa1-xAs Surface-Emitting Lasers" (NPO-18243). Suitable for incorporation into optoelectronic integrated circuits for photonic computing; e.g., optoelectronic neural networks.

  11. Spectroscopic Characterization of the Water Oxidation Intermediates in the Blue Dimer Ru-Based Catalyst for Artificial Photosynthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moonshiram, Dooshaye; Pushkar, Yulia; Jurss, Jonah; Concepcion, Javier; Meyer, Thomas; Zakharova, Taisiya; Alperovich, Igor

    2012-02-01

    Utilization of sunlight requires solar capture, light-to-energy conversion and storage. One effective way to store energy is to convert it into chemical energy by fuel-forming reactions, such as water splitting into hydrogen and oxygen. Ruthenium complexes are among few molecular-defined catalysts capable of water splitting. Mechanistic insights about such catalysts can be acquired by spectroscopic analysis of short-lived intermediates of catalytic water oxidation. Use of techniques such as EPR and X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) are used to determine electronic requirements of catalytic water oxidation. About 30 years ago Meyer and coworkers reported first ruthenium-based catalyst for water oxidation, the ``blue dimer''. We performed EPR studies and characterized structures and electronic configurations of intermediates of water oxidation by the ``blue dimer''. Intermediates were prepared chemically by oxidation of Ru-complexes with defined number of Ce (IV) equivalents and freeze-quenched at controlled times. Changes in oxidation state of Ru atom were detected by XANES at Ru K-edges. K-edges are sensitive to changes in Ru oxidation state for Blue Dimer [3,3]^4+, [3,4]^4+, [3,4]'^4+ and [4,5]^3+ allowing a clear assignment of Ru oxidation state in intermediates. EXAFS demonstrated structural changes.

  12. Biological X-ray absorption spectroscopy and metalloproteomics.

    PubMed

    Ascone, Isabella; Strange, Richard

    2009-05-01

    In the past seven years the size of the known protein sequence universe has been rapidly expanding. At present, more then five million entries are included in the UniProtKB/TrEMBL protein database. In this context, a retrospective evaluation of recent X-ray absorption studies is undertaken to assess its potential role in metalloproteomics. Metalloproteomics is the structural and functional characterization of metal-binding proteins. This is a new area of active research which has particular relevance to biology and for which X-ray absorption spectroscopy is ideally suited. In the last three years, biological X-ray absorption spectroscopy (BioXAS) has been included among the techniques used in post-genomics initiatives for metalloprotein characterization. The emphasis of this review is on the progress in BioXAS that has emerged from recent meetings in 2007-2008. Developments required to enable BioXAS studies to better contribute to metalloproteomics throughput are also discussed. Overall, this paper suggests that X-ray absorption spectroscopy could have a higher impact on metalloproteomics, contributing significantly to the understanding of metal site structures and of reaction mechanisms for metalloproteins. PMID:19395808

  13. Dimensional magnetoplasma resonance detected by free-exciton photoluminescence in modulation-doped GaAs/AlxGa1-xAs heterojunctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashkinadze, B. M.; Linder, E.; Umansky, V.

    2000-10-01

    We studied the effect of microwave (mw) irradiation on the low-temperature photoluminescence (PL) of high-quality, modulation-doped, wide GaAs/AlxGa1-xAs heterojunctions (HJ's) containing a two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG), in the density range of (0.9-4)×1011 cm-2. The PL arises from excitons that recombine radiatively in the GaAs buffer layer, far from the 2DEG which is confined close to the GaAs/AlxGa1-xAs interface. We observe that the exciton PL is affected by a mw heating of the 2DEG: the mw-induced PL intensity change increases with increasing 2DEG density as well as under a perpendicular magnetic field that corresponds to the 2DEG dimensional magnetoplasma resonance (DMPR) condition. Moreover, the exciton PL intensity shows a bistability at magnetic field strengths that are close to those observed in the DMPR mw absorption. The mw-induced PL modulation effects are interpreted as being due to the interaction of the excitons with low-energy, ballistically propagating acoustic phonons that are emitted by the mw-heated 2DEG. The exciton PL quenching is associated with an exciton drag by the phonon flux towards the opposite HJ interface where the excitons recombine nonradiatively. The rate of phonon emission is determined by the 2DEG state, and thus the exciton PL responds to the changes of the 2DEG parameters.

  14. In situ soft XAS study on nickel-based layered cathode material at elevated temperatures: A novel approach to study thermal stability

    DOE PAGES

    Yoon, Won -Sub; Yang, Xiao -Qing; Haas, Otto; Muhammad, Shoaib; Kim, Hyunchul; Lee, Wontae; Kim, Donghwi; Fischer, Daniel A.; Jaye, Cherno; Balasubramanian, Mahalingam; et al

    2014-10-29

    Tracking thermally induced reactions has always been challenging for electrode materials of electrochemical battery systems. Traditionally, a variety of calorimetric techniques and in situ XRD at elevated temperatures has been used to evaluate the thermal stability of electrode materials. These techniques are capable of providing variations in heat capacity, mass and average bulk composition of materials only. Herein, we report investigation of thermal characteristics of Li0.33Ni0.8Co0.15Al0.05O2 by using in situ soft XAS measurements in combination with XRD. Fluorescence yield and partial electron yield measurements are used simultaneously to obtain element selective surface and bulk information. Fluorescence yield measurements reveal nomore » energy change of the absorption peak and thus no valence state change in the bulk. However, electron yield measurements indicate that NiO-type rock salt structure is formed at the surface at temperatures above 200°C while no evidence for a surface reaction near Co sites in investigated temperature range is found. These results clearly show that in situ soft XAS can give a unique understanding of the role of each element in the structural transformation under thermal abuse offering a useful guidance in developing new battery system with improved safety performance.« less

  15. Uptake and reduction of Cr(VI) to Cr(III) by mesquite (Prosopis spp.): chromate-plant interaction in hydroponics and solid media studied using XAS.

    PubMed

    Aldrich, M V; Gardea-Torresdey, J L; Peralta-Videa, J R; Parsons, J G

    2003-05-01

    Chromium (Cr) is a well-established carcinogen that is a contaminant at half of the EPA Superfund sites in the United States. Two separate studies were performed to investigate the possibility that mesquite (Prosopis spp.), which is an indigenous desert plant species, can remove Cr from the environment via active transport systems to the aerial portions of the plant. The first study was performed by growing mesquite on solid media (agar) at Cr(VI) concentrations of 75 and 125 ppm. The accumulation found in the leaves under the present conditions indicated that mesquite could be classified as a hyperaccumulator of chromium. The second study was conducted to investigate the differences between the type of Cr ligand involved in Cr uptake with agar and hydroponic cultures. We used X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) to determine the mechanisms involved in the uptake and binding of Cr(VI) in live mesquite tissue. The XAS results for this study showed that some of the supplied Cr(VI) was uptaken by the mesquite roots; however, the data analyses of the plant tissues demonstrated that it was fully reduced to Cr(III) in the leaf tissues. Experiments are currently being performed to evaluate the behavior of the Mesquite plant using lower Cr concentrations.

  16. In situ soft XAS study on nickel-based layered cathode material at elevated temperatures: A novel approach to study thermal stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Won-Sub; Haas, Otto; Muhammad, Shoaib; Kim, Hyunchul; Lee, Wontae; Kim, Donghwi; Fischer, Daniel A.; Jaye, Cherno; Yang, Xiao-Qing; Balasubramanian, Mahalingam; Nam, Kyung-Wan

    2014-10-01

    Tracking thermally induced reactions has always been challenging for electrode materials of electrochemical battery systems. Traditionally, a variety of calorimetric techniques and in situ XRD at elevated temperatures has been used to evaluate the thermal stability of electrode materials. These techniques are capable of providing variations in heat capacity, mass and average bulk composition of materials only. Herein, we report investigation of thermal characteristics of Li0.33Ni0.8Co0.15Al0.05O2 by using in situ soft XAS measurements in combination with XRD. Fluorescence yield and partial electron yield measurements are used simultaneously to obtain element selective surface and bulk information. Fluorescence yield measurements reveal no energy change of the absorption peak and thus no valence state change in the bulk. However, electron yield measurements indicate that NiO-type rock salt structure is formed at the surface at temperatures above 200°C while no evidence for a surface reaction near Co sites in investigated temperature range is found. These results clearly show that in situ soft XAS can give a unique understanding of the role of each element in the structural transformation under thermal abuse offering a useful guidance in developing new battery system with improved safety performance.

  17. Sulfur K-edge XAS and DFT calculations on nitrile hydratase: geometric and electronic structure of the non-heme iron active site.

    PubMed

    Dey, Abhishek; Chow, Marina; Taniguchi, Kayoko; Lugo-Mas, Priscilla; Davin, Steven; Maeda, Mizuo; Kovacs, Julie A; Odaka, Masafumi; Hodgson, Keith O; Hedman, Britt; Solomon, Edward I

    2006-01-18

    The geometric and electronic structure of the active site of the non-heme iron enzyme nitrile hydratase (NHase) is studied using sulfur K-edge XAS and DFT calculations. Using thiolate (RS(-))-, sulfenate (RSO(-))-, and sulfinate (RSO(2)(-))-ligated model complexes to provide benchmark spectral parameters, the results show that the S K-edge XAS is sensitive to the oxidation state of S-containing ligands and that the spectrum of the RSO(-) species changes upon protonation as the S-O bond is elongated (by approximately 0.1 A). These signature features are used to identify the three cysteine residues coordinated to the low-spin Fe(III) in the active site of NHase as CysS(-), CysSOH, and CysSO(2)(-) both in the NO-bound inactive form and in the photolyzed active form. These results are correlated to geometry-optimized DFT calculations. The pre-edge region of the X-ray absorption spectrum is sensitive to the Z(eff) of the Fe and reveals that the Fe in [FeNO](6) NHase species has a Z(eff) very similar to that of its photolyzed Fe(III) counterpart. DFT calculations reveal that this results from the strong pi back-bonding into the pi antibonding orbital of NO, which shifts significant charge from the formally t(2)(6) low-spin metal to the coordinated NO. PMID:16402841

  18. Structural and electronic properties of protein/thiolate-protected gold nanocluster with ``staple'' motif: A XAS, L-DOS, and XPS study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simms, Gordon A.; Padmos, J. Daniel; Zhang, Peng

    2009-12-01

    Following the recent breakthrough of total structural determination of a Au-thiolate nanocluster [P. Jadzinsky et al., Science 318, 430 (2007)], extensive interests have been stimulated to unveil (or revisit) the structure-property relationship of various thiolate-Au nanostructures in light of the new finding of -SR-(Au-SR)x- "staple" motif. Here, we present experimental x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) results on the local structure and electronic properties of thiolate-protected Au nanocluster encapsulated in bovine serum albumin (Au-BSA) together with theoretical calculation of projected local density of states (l-DOS) of Au25(SR)18 model cluster. Analysis of the Au L3-edge extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) of Au-BSA suggested that the nanocluster is Au25 with Au-thiolate "staple" motif. X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) and Au 4f XPS were used to probe the electronic behavior of Au-BSA. The Au d-electron density of Au-BSA was found to decrease by 0.047 e- relative to that of the bulk. A self-consistent real space Green's function approach implemented in ab initio FEFF8 program was used to calculate the l-DOS of Au25(SR)18 and other model clusters from a site-specific perspective. The theoretical results are in good agreement with the experimental d-DOS data of Au-BSA and, importantly, systematically illustrate the effect of Au-thiolate "staple" motif on the electronic behavior of Au25(SR)18. The present work sheds light on the structure-property relationship of thiolate-protected Au25 from both experimental and theoretical perspectives and illustrates the usefulness of XAS/l-DOS method in such studies.

  19. XAS Studies of Se Speciation in Selenite-Fed Rats

    PubMed Central

    Weekley, Claire M.; Aitken, Jade B.; Witting, Paul K.; Harris, Hugh H.

    2014-01-01

    The biological activity of selenium is dependent on its chemical form. Therefore, knowledge of Se chemistry in vivo is required for efficacious use of selenium compounds in disease prevention and treatment. Using X-ray absorption spectroscopy, Se speciation in the kidney, liver, heart, spleen, testis and red blood cells of rats fed control (~0.3 ppm Se) or selenite-supplemented (1 ppm or 5 ppm Se) diets for 3 or 6 weeks, was investigated. X-ray absorption spectroscopy revealed the presence of Se–Se and Se–C species in the kidney and liver, and Se–S species in the kidney, but not the liver. X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) spectra showed that there was variation in speciation in the liver and kidneys, but Se speciation was much more uniform in the remaining organs. Using principal component analysis (PCA) to interpret the Se K-edge X-ray absorption spectra, we were able to directly compare the speciation of Se in two different models of selenite metabolism – human lung cancer cells and rat tissues. The effects of Se dose, tissue type and duration of diet on selenium speciation in rat tissues were investigated, and a relationship between the duration of the diet (3 weeks versus 6 weeks) and selenium speciation was observed. PMID:25363824

  20. Al 2p core exciton in AlxGa1-xAs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nithianandam, Jeyasingh; Schnatterly, Stephen E.

    1990-08-01

    Al L2,3 x-ray emission spectra from AlxGa1-xAs of varying aluminum concentration are presented. The nature of the Al 2p core exciton observed in these spectra is discussed. Some comments are also made on the effects of anion disorder in these alloys.

  1. XAS studies of Ni(I), Ni(II), and Ni(III) complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Furenlid, L.R.; Renner, M.W.; Fujita, E.

    1995-01-01

    XAS techniques for studying structural and electronic changes taking place during oxidation and reduction reactions of nickel complexes are described and applied to selected models for Factor 430, a nickel containing cofactor catalyzing an important step in the conversion of carbon dioxide to methane by methanogenic bacteria.

  2. An x-ray absorption spectroscopy study of Cd binding onto a halophilic archaeon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showalter, Allison R.; Szymanowski, Jennifer E. S.; Fein, Jeremy B.; Bunker, Bruce A.

    2016-05-01

    X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) and cadmium (Cd) isotherm experiments determine how Cd adsorbs to the surface of halophilic archaeon Halobacterium noricense. This archaeon, isolated from the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) near Carlsbad, New Mexico could be involved with the transport of toxic metals stored in the transuranic waste in the salt mine. The isotherm experiments show that adsorption is relatively constant across the tolerable pH range for H. noricense. The XAS results indicate that Cd adsorption occurs predominately via a sulfur site, most likely sulfhydryl, with the same site dominating all measured pH values.

  3. X-Ray Absorption Spectroscopy of Cuprous-Thiolate Clusters in Saccharomyces Cerevisiae Metallothionein

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, L.; Pickering, I.J.; Winge, D.R.; George, G.N.

    2009-05-28

    Copper (Cu) metallothioneins are cuprous-thiolate proteins that contain multimetallic clusters, and are thought to have dual functions of Cu storage and Cu detoxification. We have used a combination of X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) and density-functional theory (DFT) to investigate the nature of Cu binding to Saccharomyces cerevisiae metallothionein. We found that the XAS of metallothionein prepared, containing a full complement of Cu, was quantitatively consistent with the crystal structure, and that reconstitution of the apo-metallothionein with stoichiometric Cu results in the formation of a tetracopper cluster, indicating cooperative binding of the Cu ions by the metallothionein.

  4. XMCD and XAS examination of cation ordering in synthetic Mg- and Al-substituted titanomagnetites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lappe, S. C. L. L.; Bowles, J.; Jackson, M.; Arenholz, E.

    2015-12-01

    composition. X-ray absorption spectra (XAS) of the Ti, Mg and Al show no significant differences for samples of different anneal stages, suggesting no reordering of the Ti4+, Al3+ and Mg2+. The lack of observed (re)ordering between A and B lattice sites suggests the process may be vacancy mediated or there might be short-range cation (re)ordering within the lattice sites.

  5. Speciation of Fe adsorbed onto and assimilated by bacteria: XAS structural analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez, Aridane G.; Pokrovsky, Oleg S.; Shirikova, Ludmilla S.; Pokrovski, Gleb S.; Jimenez-Villacorta, Felix; Magdalena Santana-Casiano, J.; González-Dávila, Melchor; Emnova, Ecaterina E.

    2010-05-01

    The speciation of iron has been studied in natural waters in order to elucidate the biogeochemical cycle of this element in the environment. One important aspect of Fe biogeochemistry that remains poorly investigated is the speciation of this element within the living organisms, notably bacteria. In this study, iron speciation has been measured using X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) structural analysis in bacterial samples having surface adsorbed or intracellular incorporated Fe. Three typical and abundant cyanobacteria (Synechococcus sp., Planktothrix sp. and Gloeocapsa sp.) and one soil bacteria (rhizospheric Pseudomonas aureofaciens) were used both in assimilation (from Fe3+-containing nutrient solution) and adsorption (from Fe3+ and Fe2+- containing inert electrolyte) experiments. Aquatic cyanobacteria were selected for their well-known requirement for Fe and Pseudomonas aureofaciens was used due to its capacity to produce high exopolysacharide on the cell surface under environmental stress. Results of this work demonstrated that Fe uptake during growth of EPS-producing and EPS-poor cultures produces octahedral oxygen environment of trivalent iron with no polymers of Fe-O-Fe structures even at pH 7 (P. aurefaciens) and 10.5 (cyanobacteria). Intracellular Fe storage in the form of Fe(III) phosphate is the most likely scavenging mechanism during growth at high concentration (10-100 mg/L of Fe(aq)). Fe(III)-phosphate complexes at the surface and inside the cells were detected for Synechochoccus sp., Planthotrix sp. and P. aureofaciens. In contrast, studies with Gloeocapsa sp. showed mainly Fe-Alginate structures. Fe(II) were not detected by XANES analysis, being all oxidized to Fe(III) under aerobic environmental conditions. Our results strongly suggest that, in the presence of surface organic ligands, the oxidation of divalent iron does occur but the polymerization of formed Fe(III) oxyhydroxides is completely inhibited and adsorbed iron presents in the form

  6. Determination of arsenic species in edible periwinkles (Littorina littorea) by HPLC-ICPMS and XAS along a contamination gradient

    SciTech Connect

    Whaley-Martin, K. J.; Koch, I.; Reimer, K. J.

    2013-06-12

    Arsenic is naturally found in the tissues of marine animals, usually as the non-toxic arsenical arsenobetaine, but exposure to elevated arsenic concentrations in the environment may alter the arsenic species distribution within tissues of the organism. This study examined the arsenic species in the tissues of the marine periwinkle (Littorina littorea) along an arsenic concentration gradient in the sediment. The arsenicals in L. littorea were examined using the complementary analytical methods high performance liquid chromatography coupled with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (HPLC–ICPMS) and X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS). Total arsenic concentrations in the periwinkle tissues ranged from 56 to 840 mg · kg-1 dry weight (equivalent to 13 to 190 mg · kg-1 wet weight). Inorganic arsenicals were found to be positively correlated with total arsenic concentrations (R2 = 0.993) and reached 600 mg · kg-1 dry weight, the highest reported to date in marine organisms. These high inorganic arsenic concentrations within this low trophic organism pose a potential toxicological risk to higher trophic consumers.

  7. Determination of arsenic species in edible periwinkles (Littorina littorea) by HPLC-ICPMS and XAS along a contamination gradient.

    PubMed

    Whaley-Martin, K J; Koch, I; Reimer, K J

    2013-07-01

    Arsenic is naturally found in the tissues of marine animals, usually as the non-toxic arsenical arsenobetaine, but exposure to elevated arsenic concentrations in the environment may alter the arsenic species distribution within tissues of the organism. This study examined the arsenic species in the tissues of the marine periwinkle (Littorina littorea) along an arsenic concentration gradient in the sediment. The arsenicals in L. littorea were examined using the complementary analytical methods high performance liquid chromatography coupled with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (HPLC-ICPMS) and X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS). Total arsenic concentrations in the periwinkle tissues ranged from 56 to 840 mg·kg(-1) dry weight (equivalent to 13 to 190 mg·kg(-1) wet weight). Inorganic arsenicals were found to be positively correlated with total arsenic concentrations (R(2)=0.993) and reached 600 mg·kg(-1) dry weight, the highest reported to date in marine organisms. These high inorganic arsenic concentrations within this low trophic organism pose a potential toxicological risk to higher trophic consumers. PMID:23588137

  8. Note: Sample chamber for in situ x-ray absorption spectroscopy studies of battery materials

    SciTech Connect

    Pelliccione, CJ; Timofeeva, EV; Katsoudas, JP; Segre, CU

    2014-12-01

    In situ x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) provides element-specific characterization of both crystalline and amorphous phases and enables direct correlations between electrochemical performance and structural characteristics of cathode and anode materials. In situ XAS measurements are very demanding to the design of the experimental setup. We have developed a sample chamber that provides electrical connectivity and inert atmosphere for operating electrochemical cells and also accounts for x-ray interactions with the chamber and cell materials. The design of the sample chamber for in situ measurements is presented along with example XAS spectra from anode materials in operating pouch cells at the Zn and Sn K-edges measured in fluorescence and transmission modes, respectively. (C) 2014 AIP Publishing LLC.

  9. Spectroscopic detection

    DOEpatents

    Woskov, Paul P.; Hadidi, Kamal

    2003-01-01

    In embodiments, spectroscopic monitor monitors modulated light signals to detect low levels of contaminants and other compounds in the presence of background interference. The monitor uses a spectrometer that includes a transmissive modulator capable of causing different frequency ranges to move onto and off of the detector. The different ranges can include those with the desired signal and those selected to subtract background contributions from those with the desired signal. Embodiments of the system are particularly useful for monitoring metal concentrations in combustion effluent.

  10. Predicting X-ray absorption spectra of semiconducting polymers for electronic structure and morphology characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Gregory; Patel, Shrayesh; Pemmaraju, C. Das; Kramer, Edward; Prendergast, David; Chabinyc, Michael

    2015-03-01

    Core-level X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) reveals important information on the electronic structure of materials and plays a key role in morphology characterization. Semiconducting polymers are the active component in many organic electronics. Their electronic properties are critically linked to device performance, and a proper understanding of semiconducting polymer XAS is crucial. Techniques such as resonant X-ray scattering rely on core-level transitions to gain materials contrast and probe orientational order. However, it is difficult to identify these transitions based on experiments alone, and complementary simulations are required. We show that first-principles calculations can capture the essential features of experimental XAS of semiconducting polymers, and provide insight into which molecular model, such as oligomers or periodic boundary conditions, are best suited for XAS calculations. Simulated XAS can reveal contributions from individual atoms and be used to visualize molecular orbitals. This allows for improved characterization of molecular orientation and scattering analysis. These predictions lay the groundwork for understanding how chemical makeup is linked to electronic structure, and to properly utilize experiments to characterize semiconducting polymers.

  11. In operando observation system for electrochemical reaction by soft X-ray absorption spectroscopy with potential modulation method

    SciTech Connect

    Nagasaka, Masanari Kosugi, Nobuhiro; Yuzawa, Hayato; Horigome, Toshio

    2014-10-15

    In order to investigate local structures of electrolytes in electrochemical reactions under the same scan rate as a typical value 100 mV/s in cyclic voltammetry (CV), we have developed an in operando observation system for electrochemical reactions by soft X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) with a potential modulation method. XAS spectra of electrolytes are measured by using a transmission-type liquid flow cell with built-in electrodes. The electrode potential is swept with a scan rate of 100 mV/s at a fixed photon energy, and soft X-ray absorption coefficients at different potentials are measured at the same time. By repeating the potential modulation at each fixed photon energy, it is possible to measure XAS of electrochemical reaction at the same scan rate as in CV. We have demonstrated successful measurement of the Fe L-edge XAS spectra of aqueous iron sulfate solutions and of the change in valence of Fe ions at different potentials in the Fe redox reaction. The mechanism of these Fe redox processes is discussed by correlating the XAS results with those at different scan rates.

  12. Redox chemistry of a binary transition metal oxide (AB2O4): a study of the Cu(2+)/Cu(0) and Fe(3+)/Fe(0) interconversions observed upon lithiation in a CuFe2O4 battery using X-ray absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Cama, Christina A; Pelliccione, Christopher J; Brady, Alexander B; Li, Jing; Stach, Eric A; Wang, Jiajun; Wang, Jun; Takeuchi, Esther S; Takeuchi, Kenneth J; Marschilok, Amy C

    2016-06-22

    Copper ferrite, CuFe2O4, is a promising candidate for application as a high energy electrode material in lithium based batteries. Mechanistic insight on the electrochemical reduction and oxidation processes was gained through the first X-ray absorption spectroscopic study of lithiation and delithiation of CuFe2O4. A phase pure tetragonal CuFe2O4 material was prepared and characterized using laboratory and synchrotron X-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. Ex situ X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) measurements were used to study the battery redox processes at the Fe and Cu K-edges, using X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES), extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS), and transmission X-ray microscopy (TXM) spectroscopies. EXAFS analysis showed upon discharge, an initial conversion of 50% of the copper(ii) to copper metal positioned outside of the spinel structure, followed by a migration of tetrahedral iron(iii) cations to octahedral positions previously occupied by copper(ii). Upon charging to 3.5 V, the copper metal remained in the metallic state, while iron metal oxidation to iron(iii) was achieved. The results provide new mechanistic insight regarding the evolution of the local coordination environments at the iron and copper centers upon discharging and charging. PMID:27292604

  13. Spectroscopic studies of U(VI) sorption at the kaolinite-water interface. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, H.A.; Parks, G.A.; Brown, G.E. Jr.

    1994-06-01

    Efficient use of U as a resource and safe handling, recycling and disposal of U-containing wastes require an understanding of the factors controlling the fate of U, where fate refers to the destination of U, typically expressed as an environmental medium or a process phase. The sorption process constitutes a change in elemental fate. Partitioning of an element from solution to a solid phase, or sorption, can be divided into three broad categories: adsorption, surface precipitation, and absorption. Extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS), a type of X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS), offers the possibility for distinguishing among different modes of sorption by characterizing the atomic environment of the sorbing element. In this study, the authors use EXAFS to determine the structure of U(VI) sorption complexes at the kaolinite-water interface. In Chapter One, they present an overview of selected aspects of U structural chemistry as a basis for considering the structural environment of U at the solid-water interface. To evaluate the utility of XAS for characterization of the structural environment of U(VI) at the solid-water interface, they have carried out an in-depth analysis of XAS data from U(VI)-containing solid and solution model compounds, which they describe in Chapter Two. In Chapter three, they consider sorption of U by kaolinite as a means of effecting the removal of U from surface collection pond waters on the Rocky Flats Plant site in northern Colorado.

  14. XAS study of TiO2-based nanomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, K.; Zajac, D.; Sikora, M.; Kapusta, Cz.; Michalow-Mauke, K.; Graule, Th.; Rekas, M.

    2015-07-01

    X-Ray Absorption Spectroscopy studies of the W (0-1 at% W) and Mo-doped TiO2 (0-1 at% Mo) nanoparticle specimens at the K edges of titanium and molybdenum as well as at the L2 L3 edges of tungsten are presented. The materials were prepared with Flame Spray Synthesis process by oxidation of metal-organic precursors. The Ti:K edge spectra in the XANES range show pre-edge and post-edge features characteristic for anatase. A decrease of the amplitude of the EXAFS function with doping is observed and attributed to a softening of the crystal lattice. The Mo EXAFS functions show a considerable decrease of the second-neighbour-shell peak with increasing Mo content, which is attributed to an increased number of cation vacancies. For tungsten a less pronounced effect is observed. The Mo and W XANES spectra do not show noticeable changes with doping level, which indicates their unchanged oxidation states.

  15. Sulfur K-Edge XAS and DFT Calculations on NitrileHydratase: Geometric and Electronic Structure of the Non-heme Iron Active Site

    SciTech Connect

    Dey, Abhishek; Chow, Marina; Taniguchi, Kayoko; Lugo-Mas, Priscilla; Davin, Steven; Maeda, Mizuo; Kovacs, Julie A.; Odaka, Masafumi; Hodgson, Keith O.; Hedman, Britt; Solomon, Edward I.; /SLAC, SSRL

    2006-09-28

    The geometric and electronic structure of the active site of the non-heme iron enzyme nitrile hydratase (NHase) is studied using sulfur K-edge XAS and DFT calculations. Using thiolate (RS{sup -})-, sulfenate (RSO{sup -})-, and sulfinate (RSO{sub 2}{sup -})-ligated model complexes to provide benchmark spectral parameters, the results show that the S K-edge XAS is sensitive to the oxidation state of S-containing ligands and that the spectrum of the RSO- species changes upon protonation as the S-O bond is elongated (by {approx}0.1 {angstrom}). These signature features are used to identify the three cysteine residues coordinated to the low-spin Fe{sup III} in the active site of NHase as CysS{sup -}, CysSOH, and CysSO{sub 2}{sup -} both in the NO-bound inactive form and in the photolyzed active form. These results are correlated to geometry-optimized DFT calculations. The pre-edge region of the X-ray absorption spectrum is sensitive to the Z{sub eff} of the Fe and reveals that the Fe in [FeNO]{sup 6} NHase species has a Z{sub eff} very similar to that of its photolyzed Fe{sup III} counterpart. DFT calculations reveal that this results from the strong {pi} back-bonding into the {pi}* antibonding orbital of NO, which shifts significant charge from the formally t{sub 2}{sup 6} low-spin metal to the coordinated NO.

  16. X-ray absorption and emission spectroscopy study of Mn and Co valence and spin states in TbM n1 -xC oxO3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuartero, V.; Lafuerza, S.; Rovezzi, M.; García, J.; Blasco, J.; Subías, G.; Jiménez, E.

    2016-10-01

    The valence and spin state evolution of Mn and Co on TbM n1 -xC oxO3 series is precisely determined by means of soft and hard x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) and K β x-ray emission spectroscopy (XES). Our results show the change from M n3 + to M n4 + both high-spin (HS) together with the evolution from C o2 + HS to C o3 + low-spin (LS) with increasing x . In addition, high energy resolution XAS spectra on the K pre-edge region are interpreted in terms of the strong charge transfer and hybridization effects along the series. These results correlate well with the spin values of Mn and Co atoms obtained from the K β XES data. In this paper, we determine that Co enters into the transition metal sublattice of TbMn O3 as a divalent ion in HS state, destabilizing the Mn long-range magnetic order since very low doping compositions (x ≤0.1 ). Samples in the intermediate composition range (0.4 ≤x ≤0.6 ) adopt the crystal structure of a double perovskite with long-range ferromagnetic ordering which is due to M n4 + -O-C o2 + superexchange interactions with both cations in HS configuration. Ferromagnetism vanishes for x ≥0.7 due to the structural disorder that collapses the double perovskite structure. The spectroscopic techniques reveal the occurrence of M n4 + HS and a fluctuating valence state C o2 + HS/C o3 + LS in this composition range. Disorder and competitive interactions lead to a magnetic glassy behavior in these samples.

  17. Resolving Spectral Lines with a Periscope-Type DVD Spectroscope

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wakabayashi, Fumitaka

    2008-01-01

    A new type of DVD spectroscope, the periscope type, is described and the numerical analysis of the observed emission and absorption spectra is demonstrated. A small and thin mirror is put inside and an eighth part of a DVD is used as a grating. Using this improved DVD spectroscope, one can observe and photograph visible spectra more easily and…

  18. Concentration-modulated absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Langley, A J; Beaman, R A; Baran, J; Davies, A N; Jones, W J

    1985-07-01

    Concentration modulation is demonstrated to be a technique capable of markedly extending sensitivity limits in absorption spectroscopy. The gain generated relates in such a manner to sample transmittance that for the first reported time direct spectroscopic concentration measurements become possible. When concentration modulation is used with picosecond lasers, state lifetimes can be determined to a limit of approximately 20 psec.

  19. The 1997 spectroscopic GEISA databank.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacquinet-Husson, N.; Arie, E.; Ballard, J.; Barbe, A.; Bjoraker, G.; Bonnet, B.; Brown, L. R.; Camy-Peyret, C.; Champion, J. P.; Chedin, A.; Chursin, A.; Clerbaux, C.; Duxbury, G.; Flaud, J.-M.; Fourrie, N.; Fayt, A.; Graner, G.; Gamache, R.; Goldman, A.; Golovko, V.; Guelachvili, G.; Hartmann, J. M.; Hilico, J. C.; Hillman, J.; Lefevre, G.; Lellouch, E.; Mikhailenko, S. N.; Naumenko, O. V.; Nemtchinov, V.; Newnham, D. A.; Nikitin, A.; Orphal, J.; Perrin, A.; Reuter, D. C.; Rinsland, C. P.; Rosenmann, L.; Rothman, L. S.; Scott, N. A.; Selby, J.; Sinitsa, L. N.; Sirota, J. M.; Smith, A. M.; Smith, K. M.; Tyuterev, V. G.; Tipping, R. H.; Urban, S.; Varanasi, P.; Weber, M.

    1999-05-01

    The current version GEISA-97 of the computer-accessible database system GEISA (Gestion et Etude des Informations Spectroscopiques Atmospheriques: Management and Study of Atmospheric Spectroscopic Information) is described. This catalogue contains 1,346,266 entries. These are the spectroscopic parameters required to describe adequately the individual spectral lines belonging to 42 molecules (96 isotopic species) and located between 0 and 22656 cm-1. The featured molecules are of interest in studies of the terrestrial as well as the other planetary atmospheres, especially those of the giant planets. GEISA-97 contains also a catalog of absorption cross-sections of molecules such as chlorofluorocarbons which exhibit unresolvable spectra. The modifications and improvements made to the earlier edition (GEISA-92) and the data management software are described.

  20. Probing Variable Amine/Amide Ligation in NiIIN2S2 Complexes Using Sulfur K-Edge and Nickel L-Edge X-ray Absorption Spectroscopies: Implications for the Active Site of Nickel Superoxide Dismutase

    SciTech Connect

    Shearer,J.; Dehestani, A.; Abanda, F.

    2008-01-01

    Nickel superoxide dismutase (NiSOD) is a recently discovered metalloenzyme that catalyzes the disproportionation of O2* into O2 and H2O2. In its reduced state, the mononuclear NiII ion is ligated by two cis-cysteinate sulfurs, an amine nitrogen (from the protein N-terminus), and an amide nitrogen (from the peptide backbone). Unlike many small molecule and metallopeptide-based NiN2S2 complexes, S-based oxygenation is not observed in NiSOD. Herein we explore the spectroscopic properties of a series of three NiIIN2S2 complexes (bisamine-ligated (bmmp-dmed)NiII, amine/amide-ligated (NiII(BEAAM)), and bisamide-ligated (NiII(emi))2) with varying amine/amide ligation to determine the origin of the dioxygen stability of NiSOD. Ni L-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) demonstrates that there is a progression in ligand-field strength with (bmmp-dmed)NiII having the weakest ligand field and (NiII(emi)2) having the strongest ligand field. Furthermore, these Ni L-edge XAS studies also show that all three complexes are highly covalent with (NiII(BEEAM)) having the highest degree of metal-ligand covalency of the three compounds studied. S K-edge XAS also shows a high degree of NiS covalency in all three complexes. The electronic structures of the three complexes were probed using both hybrid-DFT and multiconfigurational SORCI calculations. These calculations demonstrate that the nucleophilic Ni(3d)/S()* HOMO of these NiN2S2 complexes progressively decreases in energy as the amide-nitrogens are replaced with amine nitrogens. This decrease in energy of the HOMO deactivates the Ni-center toward O2 reactivity. Thus, the NiS bond is protected from S-based oxygenation explaining the enhanced stability of the NiSOD active-site toward oxygenation by dioxygen.

  1. Ce K edge XAS of ceria-based redox materials under realistic conditions for the two-step solar thermochemical dissociation of water and/or CO2.

    PubMed

    Rothensteiner, Matthäus; Sala, Simone; Bonk, Alexander; Vogt, Ulrich; Emerich, Hermann; van Bokhoven, Jeroen A

    2015-10-28

    X-ray absorption spectroscopy was used to characterise ceria-based materials under realistic conditions present in a reactor for solar thermochemical two-step water and carbon dioxide splitting. A setup suitable for in situ measurements in transmission mode at the cerium K edge from room temperature up to 1773 K is presented. Time-resolved X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) data, collected for a 10 mol% hafnium-doped ceria sample (Ce0.9Hf0.1O2-δ) during reduction at 1773 K in a flow of inert gas and during re-oxidation by CO2 at 1073 K, enables the quantitative determination of the non-stoichiometry δ of the fluorite-type structure. XANES analysis suggests the formation of the hexagonal Ce2O3 phase upon reduction in 2% hydrogen/helium at 1773 K. We discuss the experimental limitations and possibilities of high-temperature in situ XAS at edges of lower energy as well as the importance of the technique for understanding and improving the properties of ceria-based oxygen storage materials for thermochemical solar energy conversion.

  2. XAS and XMCD study of the influence of annealing on the atomic ordering and magnetism in an NiMnGa alloy.

    PubMed

    Chaboy, J; Lázpita, P; Barandiarán, J M; Gutiérrez, Jon; Fernández-Gubieda, Maria Luisa; Kawamura, N

    2009-01-01

    The proper annealing of Ni(51)Mn(28)Ga(21) ribbon alloy gives rise to an increase of the saturation magnetization and of the magnetic order T(C) (up to 20 K) and martensitic transition T(M) (up to 10 K) temperatures. The combined x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) and x-ray magnetic circular dichroism (XMCD) studies indicate that the annealing treatment drives the alloy to a more ordered structure without significantly affecting the local structure in terms of interatomic distances and bonding geometry. By contrast, the annealing strongly affects the near-edge absorption at the Mn K-edge while no effect is observed at either the Ni or Ga K-edge. These results suggest that annealing leads to a modification of the electronic structure of the Mn atoms while that of Ni and Ga atoms remains unvaried. However, strong XMCD signals are detected at both Ni and Ga K-edges whose amplitude increases after annealing. These results point out that despite the change of the magnetic properties of the system being mainly associated with the modification of the electronic properties of the Mn atoms, both Ni and Ga may play a non-negligible role through the polarization of the conduction band. PMID:21817239

  3. XAS and XMCD study of the influence of annealing on the atomic ordering and magnetism in an NiMnGa alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaboy, J.; Lázpita, P.; Barandiarán, J. M.; Gutiérrez, Jon; Fernández-Gubieda, Maria Luisa; Kawamura, N.

    2009-01-01

    The proper annealing of Ni51Mn28Ga21 ribbon alloy gives rise to an increase of the saturation magnetization and of the magnetic order TC (up to 20 K) and martensitic transition TM (up to 10 K) temperatures. The combined x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) and x-ray magnetic circular dichroism (XMCD) studies indicate that the annealing treatment drives the alloy to a more ordered structure without significantly affecting the local structure in terms of interatomic distances and bonding geometry. By contrast, the annealing strongly affects the near-edge absorption at the Mn K-edge while no effect is observed at either the Ni or Ga K-edge. These results suggest that annealing leads to a modification of the electronic structure of the Mn atoms while that of Ni and Ga atoms remains unvaried. However, strong XMCD signals are detected at both Ni and Ga K-edges whose amplitude increases after annealing. These results point out that despite the change of the magnetic properties of the system being mainly associated with the modification of the electronic properties of the Mn atoms, both Ni and Ga may play a non-negligible role through the polarization of the conduction band.

  4. Selenium Metabolism in Cancer Cells: The Combined Application of XAS and XFM Techniques to the Problem of Selenium Speciation in Biological Systems

    PubMed Central

    Weekley, Claire M.; Aitken, Jade B.; Finney, Lydia; Vogt, Stefan; Witting, Paul K.; Harris, Hugh H.

    2013-01-01

    Determining the speciation of selenium in vivo is crucial to understanding the biological activity of this essential element, which is a popular dietary supplement due to its anti-cancer properties. Hyphenated techniques that combine separation and detection methods are traditionally and effectively used in selenium speciation analysis, but require extensive sample preparation that may affect speciation. Synchrotron-based X-ray absorption and fluorescence techniques offer an alternative approach to selenium speciation analysis that requires minimal sample preparation. We present a brief summary of some key HPLC-ICP-MS and ESI-MS/MS studies of the speciation of selenium in cells and rat tissues. We review the results of a top-down approach to selenium speciation in human lung cancer cells that aims to link the speciation and distribution of selenium to its biological activity using a combination of X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) and X-ray fluorescence microscopy (XFM). The results of this approach highlight the distinct fates of selenomethionine, methylselenocysteine and selenite in terms of their speciation and distribution within cells: organic selenium metabolites were widely distributed throughout the cells, whereas inorganic selenium metabolites were compartmentalized and associated with copper. New data from the XFM mapping of electrophoretically-separated cell lysates show the distribution of selenium in the proteins of selenomethionine-treated cells. Future applications of this top-down approach are discussed. PMID:23698165

  5. Double-Peak Emission Rate Spectrum of DX-Centers in AlxGa1-xAs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fudamoto, Michihiro; Tahira, Kenichiro; Tashiro, Syuuji; Morimoto, Jun; Miyakawa, Toru

    1989-10-01

    Emission rate spectra S(λ) of the DX-centers in AlxGa1-xAs were studied for dopants, such as Te, Sn, Si and Se, using the SADLTS (spectral analysis of deep level transient spectroscopy) method. The double peak emission rate spectra were observed for these DX-centers in AlxGa1-xAs at around x{=}0.5 of Al mole fraction. The band effect (crossover of L-band and \\varGamma-band) is the dominant contribution to the rather broadened spectra of DX-centers appearing in the conventional DLTS.

  6. DX Deep Centers in AlxGa1-xAs Grown by Liquid-Phase Epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tachikawa, Masami; Mizuta, Masashi; Kukimoto, Hiroshi

    1984-12-01

    Deep levels, the so-called DX centers, in the AlxGa1-xAs alloy system grown by liquid-phase epitaxy (LPE) were investigated by junction-capacitance spectroscopy. The dependence of the activation energy of the DX center in Sn-doped AlxGa1-xAs on the alloy composition was determined by DLTS. This dependence seems to reflect the change in the nature of the conduction bands in this alloy system. The other donor species studied: Si, Te and Se, were also found to form DX centers. An anomalously high concentration of DX centers was determined using low-temperature C-V techniques.

  7. The XAS model of dissolved Cu(II) and its significance to biological electron transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frank, Patrick; Benfatto, Maurizio; Hedman, Britt; Hodgson, Keith O.

    2009-11-01

    The standard model for dissolved Cu(II) portrays the complex ion as an axially elongated, equatorially planar octahedron. Using EXAFS and MXAN analyses of copper K-edge XAS spectra, new structural models for dissolved [Cu(aq)]2+ and [Cu(amm)]2+ have been determined. These structures uniformly depart from the octahedral model in favour of an axially elongated square pyramidal core. MXAN results also indicate that the equatorial ligands need not be coplanar with copper. Further structural elements include a -z axially localized scatterer at ~3 Å. Even more distant scatterers imply second shell solvent organization, which can vary with the medium. Preliminary results from new extended, k = 18 Å-1, higher resolution copper K-edge XAS data sets are reported. The low symmetry of dissolved Cu(II) ion contradicts the central thesis of the rack-induced bonding hypothesis of copper electron transfer proteins. The asymmetry of biological copper is not a frozen vibronic excited state enforced by a rigid protein scaffold, but is entirely in harmony with the structural ground state of the dissolved aqueous Cu(II) complex ion.

  8. Wet thermal oxidation of Al(x)Ga(1-x)As compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burton, R. S.; Schlesinger, T. E.

    1994-11-01

    Results are presented on the wet thermal oxidation of Al(x)Ga(1-x)As. The growth of wet thermal oxides of Al(x)Ga(1-x)As is shown to be linear with time. An O2 carrier gas was found to form a self-terminating oxide for compositions investigated (x greater than 0.4), but required elevated temperature for substantial growth. The use of a medium oxygen concentration (about 20%) in a N2 carrier formed nonuniform oxides for all compositions investigated. A low O2 concentration (0.1%) in the N2 carrier was found to reduce the activation energy of the oxidation process for Al(0.6)Ga(0.4)As from 1.9 to 1.0 eV while increasing the activation energy of Al(0.8)Ga(0.2)As from 1.6 to 1.75 eV. For these wet thermal oxides it is observed that lateral oxidation at heterojunction interfaces is enhanced. This enhanced lateral oxidation can be attributed to local stress due to the smaller volume of the growing oxide compared to the volume of the consumed semiconductor.

  9. Time-resolved in situ XAS study of the preparation of supported gold clusters.

    PubMed

    Bus, Eveline; Prins, Roel; van Bokhoven, Jeroen A

    2007-07-01

    Incipient-wetness impregnation of gamma-Al(2)O(3) with HAuCl(4) and subsequent removal of chlorine with NaOH, and deposition-precipitation of HAuCl(4) on TiO(2) at pH 7 resulted in supported Au(3+) species. Time-resolved in situ XAS at the Au L(3) edge showed that the Al(2)O(3)-supported oxidic or hydroxidic species were reduced in hydrogen at 440 K to yield small metallic gold clusters. The Au(3+) precursor decomposed to metallic gold in inert atmosphere at 573 K and in oxidizing atmosphere above 623 K. In all atmospheres, initially small clusters were formed that gradually grew with increasing temperature. The TiO(2)-supported species were considerably less stable. In hydrogen and carbon monoxide, Au(0) clusters of 1 to 1.5 nm were formed at room temperature, which was the lowest temperature studied. In inert and oxidizing atmosphere, the Au(3+) precursor decomposed fully to metallic gold at 530 K, as shown by XAS and temperature-programmed experiments. Large clusters were obtained already in the initial stage of reduction. Residual chlorine inhibited the reduction and led to sintering of the gold clusters. Exposure of the TiO(2)-supported catalyst precursor to light or the X-ray beam led to partial reduction, and STEM showed that storage of the reduced gold clusters under ambient conditions led to agglomeration and bimodal cluster-size distributions. PMID:17579741

  10. Soft X-Ray Absorption Spectroscopy at an X-ray Free Electron Laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higley, Daniel; Schlotter, William; Turner, Joshua; Moeller, Stefan; Mitra, Ankush; Tsukamoto, Arata; Marvel, Robert; Haglund, Richard; Durr, Hermann; Stohr, Joachim; Dakovski, Georgi

    2015-03-01

    X-ray free electron lasers, providing coherent, ultrafast, high intensity x-ray pulses, have enabled groundbreaking scattering experiments to probe the atomic structure of materials on femtosecond timescales. Nonetheless, x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS), one of the most fundamental and common x-ray techniques practiced at synchrotron light sources, has proven challenging to conduct with satisfactory signal-to-noise levels at soft x-ray energies using free electron laser sources. The ability to routinely collect high quality XAS spectra, especially in a time-resolved manner, will open many new scientific possibilities in the areas of ultrafast demagnetization, phase transitions and chemical dynamics to highlight a few. Here, we report how XAS using total fluorescence yield detection yields high signal-to-noise x-ray absorption spectra at an x-ray free electron laser source. Data were collected over multiple absorption edges on technologically relevant materials. These measurements were recorded on the Soft X-Ray Materials Science instrument at the Linac Coherent Light Source. The results are easily extendable to time-resolved measurements.

  11. The apparent absence of chemical sensitivity in the 4d and 5d X-ray absorption spectroscopy of uranium compounds

    DOE PAGES

    Tobin, J. G.

    2013-05-03

    X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) and related derivative measurements have been used to demonstrate that the Pu 5f states are strongly relativistic and have a 5f occupation number near 5. Owing to the success in this regime, it has been argued that the XAS measurements should be a powerful tool to probe 5f occupation variation, both as a function of elemental nature (actinide atomic number) and as a function of physical and chemical perturbation, e.g., oxidation state. We show that XAS and its related measurements fail in this latter aspect for a wide variety of uranium compounds and materials. Possible causesmore » will be discussed.« less

  12. The HITRAN2012 molecular spectroscopic database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rothman, L. S.; Gordon, I. E.; Babikov, Y.; Barbe, A.; Chris Benner, D.; Bernath, P. F.; Birk, M.; Bizzocchi, L.; Boudon, V.; Brown, L. R.; Campargue, A.; Chance, K.; Cohen, E. A.; Coudert, L. H.; Devi, V. M.; Drouin, B. J.; Fayt, A.; Flaud, J.-M.; Gamache, R. R.; Harrison, J. J.; Hartmann, J.-M.; Hill, C.; Hodges, J. T.; Jacquemart, D.; Jolly, A.; Lamouroux, J.; Le Roy, R. J.; Li, G.; Long, D. A.; Lyulin, O. M.; Mackie, C. J.; Massie, S. T.; Mikhailenko, S.; Müller, H. S. P.; Naumenko, O. V.; Nikitin, A. V.; Orphal, J.; Perevalov, V.; Perrin, A.; Polovtseva, E. R.; Richard, C.; Smith, M. A. H.; Starikova, E.; Sung, K.; Tashkun, S.; Tennyson, J.; Toon, G. C.; Tyuterev, Vl. G.; Wagner, G.

    2013-11-01

    This paper describes the status of the 2012 edition of the HITRAN molecular spectroscopic compilation. The new edition replaces the previous HITRAN edition of 2008 and its updates during the intervening years. The HITRAN molecular absorption compilation is comprised of six major components structured into folders that are freely accessible on the internet. These folders consist of the traditional line-by-line spectroscopic parameters required for high-resolution radiative-transfer codes, infrared absorption cross-sections for molecules not yet amenable to representation in a line-by-line form, ultraviolet spectroscopic parameters, aerosol indices of refraction, collision-induced absorption data, and general tables such as partition sums that apply globally to the data. The new HITRAN is greatly extended in terms of accuracy, spectral coverage, additional absorption phenomena, and validity. Molecules and isotopologues have been added that address the issues of atmospheres beyond the Earth. Also discussed is a new initiative that casts HITRAN into a relational database format that offers many advantages over the long-standing sequential text-based structure that has existed since the initial release of HITRAN in the early 1970s.

  13. Intermediate Coupling For Core-Level Excited States: Consequences For X-Ray Absorption Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Bagus, Paul S.; Sassi, Michel JPC; Rosso, Kevin M.

    2015-04-15

    The origin of the complex NEXAFS features of X-Ray Absorption, XAS, spectra in transition metal complexes is analyzed and interpreted in terms of the angular momentum coupling of the open shell electrons. Especially for excited configurations where a core-electron is promoted to an open valence shell, the angular momentum coupling is intermediate between the two limits of Russell- Saunders, RS, coupling where spin-orbit splitting of the electron shells is neglected and j-j coupling where this splitting is taken as dominant. The XAS intensities can be understood in terms of two factors: (1) The dipole selection rules that give the allowed excited RS multiplets and (2) The contributions of these allowed multiplets to the wavefunctions of the intermediate coupled levels. It is shown that the origin of the complex XAS spectra is due to the distribution of the RS allowed multiplets over several different intermediate coupled excited levels. The specific case that is analyzed is the L2,3 edge XAS of an Fe3+ cation, because this cation allows a focus on the angular momentum coupling to the exclusion of other effects; e.g., chemical bonding. Arguments are made that the properties identified for this atomic case are relevant for more complex materials. The analysis is based on the properties of fully relativistic, ab initio, many-body wavefunctions for the initial and final states of the XAS process. The wavefunction properties considered include the composition of the wavefunctions in terms of RS multiplets and the occupations of the spin-orbit split open shells; the latter vividly show whether the coupling is j-j or not.

  14. Ensemble Monte Carlo characterization of graded Al(x)Ga(1-x)As heterojunction barriers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kamoua, R.; East, J. R.; Haddad, G. I.

    1990-01-01

    The current-voltage characteristics of graded Al(x)Ga(1-x)As heterojunction barriers were investigated using a self-consistent ensemble Monte Carlo method. Results are presented for barriers with two doping levels (10 to the 15th/cu cm and 10 to the 17th/cu cm) and two barrier heights (100 and 265 meV). It was found that the lower barrier structure exhibited little rectification at room temperature at both doping levels, while the higher barrier exhibited considerable rectification. The structures with the lower doping value exhibited a smaller current in both forward and reverse regions, due to space-charge effect. The results of studies of the energy and momentum distribution functions along the barrier indicate that the assumption of drifted Maxwellian distribution used in energy-momentum models is not justified for Gamma valley electrons.

  15. Fine structure of DX(Sn) centers in AlxGa1-xAs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhan, H. H.; Kang, J. Y.; Wu, Z. Y.; Huang, Q. S.

    1998-09-01

    High resolution Laplace defect spectroscopy was used to study the fine structure of the electron emission process of DX(Sn) centers in AlxGa1-xAs (x=0.26,0.53). Two groups of peaks in the spectra of electron emission rates were found to correspond to two DX-like centers observed by deep level transient spectroscopy. The line splitting in both groups derives from the alloy disorder effect attributed to the different local configurations of Al and Ga atoms around two DX-like centers. Experimental evidence for the microscopic nature of two DX-like centers in Sn-doped AlGaAs is provided.

  16. Photoluminescence Properties of Sn-Related Donor State in AlxGa1-xAs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Junyong; Iida, Seishi; Huang, Qisheng; Fukuda, Tsuguo

    1993-08-01

    We have investigated the near-gap recombinations in Sn-doped AlxGa1-xAs by photoluminescence. By analyzing the variations of spectral lineshapes under various excitation intensities, only one type of recombination was assigned to associate with the Sn-related donor state, which was different from the hydrogenlike shallow donor states and the DX centers. Phonon replicas were observed to accompany the recombination in the samples with high AlAs mole fractions of direct gaps, as well as in those of indirect gaps. The Franck-Condon shift and the phonon energy of the recombination were found to increase with increasing AlAs mole fraction. This behavior was explained in terms of a variation of local lattice distortion around an ionized Sn-related donor and a weighted average of two local vibrational mode frequencies of the Sn-related donor.

  17. High pressure dynamic XAS studies using an energy-dispersive spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathon, O.; Occelli, F.; Lescoute, E.; Sollier, A.; Loubeyre, P.; Helsby, W.; Headspith, J.; Torchio, R.; Kantor, I.; Pascarelli, S.

    2016-07-01

    We present in this paper recent advances in the high pressure domain provided by the introduction of time-resolved energy-dispersive XAS (EDXAS) techniques at synchrotrons. We highlight technical aspects and describe two modes of acquisition: the 'movie' mode, where the time resolution is given by the detector acquisition speed and the 'pump-and-probe' mode, where the time resolution is given by the delay between the pump and the probe. These two modes define a frontier in the time resolution, respectively above and below the ∼10 μs regime. In the former, examples of applications are chemical stability and reactions at high pressure and high temperature or probing the warm dense matter regime using rapid current ramps. In the latter, an example is given on studies of dynamically compressed matter, by coupling single-bunch EDXAS at high-brilliance synchrotron to a nanosecond high-power laser.

  18. Estimation of the catalytic centre in double metal cyanide catalysts by XAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawniczak-Jablonska, Krystyna; Chrusciel, Arkadiusz

    2016-05-01

    Double metal cyanide (DMC) catalysts are commonly applied at industrial ring opening polymerization of epoxides. Nevertheless, the knowledge on the molecular nature of their high activity and selectivity is limited. XAS studies were performed to look for the possible catalytic centre in this family of catalysts. DMC catalysts were synthesized from ZnCl2 and potassium hexacyanocobaltate(III) solution, in the presence of the different organic ligands and show significant fraction of the non-crystalline structure. Two ligands were analysed (tert-butanol ( t BuOH) or glyme (CH3OCH2CH2OCH3)). EXAFS analysis established that only Zn atoms are the active metallic centers in DMC regardless the used ligand. The coordination around Zn was changed from octahedral in reference non catalytic material to tetrahedral in catalysts, and Cl atoms were detected near some of Zn atoms.

  19. High-temperature XAS study of Fe[sub 2]SiO[sub 4] liquid: Reduced coordination of ferrous iron

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, W.E.; Brown, G.E. Jr.; Waychunas, G.A. ); Leon, J.M. de; Conradson, S.D. ); Combes, J.M. )

    1993-10-08

    X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) of Fe[sup 2+] in Fe[sub 2]SiO[sub 4] liquid at 1575 kelvin and 10[sup [minus]4] gigapascal (1 bar) shows that the Fe[sup 2+]-O bond length is 1.98 [+-] 0.02 angstroms compared with [approximately]2.22 angstroms in crystalline Fe[sub 2]SiO[sub 4] (fayalite) at the melting point (1478 kelvin), which indicates a decrease in average Fe[sup 2+] coordination number from six in fayalite to four in the liquid. Anharmonicity in the liquid was accounted for using a data analysis procedure. This reduction in coordination number is similar to that observed on the melting of certain ionic salts. These results are used to develop a model of the medium-range structural environment of Fe[sup 2+] in olivine-composition melts, which helps explain some of the properties of Fe[sub 2]SiO[sub 4] liquid, including density, viscosity, and the partitioning of iron and nickel between silicate melts and crystalline olivines. Some of the implications of this model for silicate melts in the Earth's crust and mantle are discussed.

  20. X-ray absorption spectroscopic evidence for binding of the competitive inhibitor 2-mercaptoethanol to the nickel sites of Jack bean urease. A new Ni-Ni interaction in the inhibited enzyme

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, P.A.; Wilcox, D.E. ); Scott, R.A. )

    1990-02-21

    The enzyme Jack bean urease has been identified as the first nickel-containing metalloenzyme to catalyze the hydrolysis of urea to carbon dioxide and ammonia. Competitive inhibitors such as 2-mercaptoethanol (2-ME) have been shown to dramatically affect the ground-state electronic properties of the urease Ni(II) ions. Results of preliminary structural investigations using x-ray absorption spectroscopy of the nickel salts of urease in its native and 2-ME bound forms are presented. The binding of 2-ME to Ni(II) through the thiolate sulfur is confirmed by the results of this study. 17 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  1. The HITRAN 2008 Molecular Spectroscopic Database

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rothman, Laurence S.; Gordon, Iouli E.; Barbe, Alain; Benner, D. Chris; Bernath, Peter F.; Birk, Manfred; Boudon, V.; Brown, Linda R.; Campargue, Alain; Champion, J.-P.; Chance, Kelly V.; Coudert, L. H.; Sung, K.; Toth, R. A.

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes the status of the 2008 edition of the HITRAN molecular spectroscopic database. The new edition is the first official public release since the 2004 edition, although a number of crucial updates had been made available online since 2004. The HITRAN compilation consists of several components that serve as input for radiative-transfer calculation codes: individual line parameters for the microwave through visible spectra of molecules in the gas phase; absorption cross-sections for molecules having dense spectral features, i.e., spectra in which the individual lines are not resolved; individual line parameters and absorption cross sections for bands in the ultra-violet; refractive indices of aerosols, tables and files of general properties associated with the database; and database management software. The line-by-line portion of the database contains spectroscopic parameters for forty-two molecules including many of their isotopologues.

  2. Spectroscopic (FT-IR, FT-Raman, UV absorption, 1H and 13C NMR) and theoretical (in B3LYP/6-311++G** level) studies on alkali metal salts of caffeic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Świsłocka, Renata

    The effect of some metals on the electronic system of benzoic and nicotinic acids has recently been investigated by IR, Raman and UV spectroscopy [1-3]. Benzoic and nicotinic acids are regarded model systems representing a wide group of aromatic ligands which are incorporated into enzymes. In this work the FT-IR (in solid state and in solution), FT-Raman, UV absorption and 1H and 13C NMR spectra of caffeic acid (3,4-dihydroxycinnamic acid) and its salts with lithium, sodium, potassium, rubidium and caesium were registered, assigned and analyzed. The effect of alkali metals on the electronic system of ligands was discussed. Studies of differences in the number and position of bands from the IR, Raman, UV absorption spectra and chemical shifts from NMR spectra allowed to conclude on the distribution of electronic charge in the molecules, the delocalization energy of π electrons and the reactivity of ligands in metal complexes. Optimized geometrical structures of studied compounds were calculated by B3LYP method using 6-311++G** basis set. Bond lengths, angles and dipole moments for the optimized structures of caffeic acid and lithium, sodium, potassium caffeinates were also calculated. The theoretical wavenumbers and intensities of IR spectra were obtained. The calculated parameters were compared to the experimental characteristics of investigated compounds. Microbial activity of studied compounds was tested against Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus and Proteus vulgaris.

  3. Incorporation of Trace Elements in Ancient and Modern Human Bone: An X-Ray Absorption Spectroscopy Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pingitore, N. E.; Cruz-Jimenez, G.; Price, T. D.

    2001-12-01

    X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) affords the opportunity to probe the atomic environment of trace elements in human bone. We are using XAS to investigate the mode(s) of incorporation of Sr, Zn, Pb, and Ba in both modern and ancient (and thus possibly altered) human and animal bone. Because burial and diagenesis may add trace elements to bone, we performed XAS analysis on samples of pristine contemporary and ancient, buried human and animal bone. We assume that deposition of these elements during burial occurs by processes distinct from those in vivo, and this will be reflected in their atomic environments. Archaeologists measure strontium in human and animal bone as a guide to diet. Carnivores show lower Sr/Ca ratios than their herbivore prey due to discrimination against Sr relative to Ca up the food chain. In an initial sample suite no difference was observed between modern and buried bone. Analysis of additional buried samples, using a more sensitive detector, revealed significant differences in the distance to the second and third neighbors of the Sr in some of the buried samples. Distances to the first neighbor, oxygen, were similar in all samples. Zinc is also used in paleo-diet studies. Initial x-ray absorption spectroscopy of a limited suite of bones did not reveal any differences between modern and buried samples. This may reflect the limited number of samples examined or the low levels of Zn in typical aqueous solutions in soils. Signals from barium and lead were too low to record useful XAS spectra. Additional samples will be studied for Zn, Ba, and Pb. We conducted our XAS experiments on beam lines 4-1 and 4-3 at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory. Data were collected in the fluorescence mode, using a Lytle detector and appropriate filter, and a solid state, 13-element Ge-detector.

  4. Speciation and Lability of Ag-, AgCl- and Ag2S-Nanoparticles in Soil Determined by X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy and Diffusive Gradients in Thin Films

    EPA Science Inventory

    Long-term speciation and lability of silver (Ag-), silver chloride (AgCl-) and silver sulfide nanoparticles (Ag2S-NPs) in soil were studied by X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS), and newly developed "nano" Diffusive Gradients in Thin Films (DGT) devices. These nano-D...

  5. X-ray absorption spectroscopic study of chemically and electrochemically Li ion extracted Li{sub y}Co{sub 0.85}Al{sub 0.15}O{sub 2} compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, M.G.; Yo, C.H.

    1999-08-05

    The local structure refinements for chemically and electrochemically Li ion extracted Li{sub y}Co{sub 0.85}Al{sub 0.15}O{sub 2} compounds have been investigated by Co K-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy. In the X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES), the 1s {r_arrow} 3d transition at {approximately} 7,709.9 eV and 1s {r_arrow} 4p transition at {approximately} 7,727.8 eV for the pristine LiCo{sub 0.85}Al{sub 0.15}O{sub 2} have shifted effectively to higher energy regions of {approximately} 0.6 eV and {approximately} 2.5 eV for the higher Li ion extraction, respectively, which shows that the average oxidation state of Co ion increases gradually with the extraction. The systematic variations of peak intensities for the 1s {r_arrow} 3d transition and 1s {r_arrow} 4p transition result from Co 3d and 4p orbital mixing by the local structure distortion around Co atoms. In particular, the abrupt decrease of peak intensity for 1s {r_arrow} 4p transition with shakedown process by ligand to metal charge transfer (LMCT) represents the transfer of the hole state from the oxygen to Co atom and the localization at the Co atomic site as a form of Co{sup IV} ion by structural distortion. The XANES features for the electrochemical extraction have shown that the electrochemical redox reaction is always not reversible in the Li ion extraction/insertion process. From the extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) refinement, the interatomic distances of bond pairs decrease for the Li ion extraction. The chemical and electrochemical extractions have a significant effect on Fourier transform (FT) magnitude, which decreases linearly with the extraction. Since single and multiple scatterings with Co atoms have predominantly contributed to the FT magnitudes, the systematic decrease of FT magnitude is closely related to the static disorder of two different oxidative Co{sup III} and Co{sup IV} ions. This fact is consistent with the increase of the Debye-Waller factor for each

  6. Millisecond Kinetics of Nanocrystal Cation Exchange UsingMicrofluidic X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Chan, Emory M.; Marcus, Matthew A.; Fakra, Sirine; Elnaggar,Mariam S.; Mathies, Richard A.; Alivisatos, A. Paul

    2007-05-07

    We describe the use of a flow-focusing microfluidic reactorto measure the kinetics of theCdSe-to-Ag2Se nanocrystal cation exchangereaction using micro-X-ray absorption spectroscopy (mu XAS). The smallmicroreactor dimensions facilitate the millisecond mixing of CdSenanocrystal and Ag+ reactant solutions, and the transposition of thereaction time onto spatial coordinates enables the in situ observation ofthe millisecond reaction with mu XAS. XAS spectra show the progression ofCdSe nanocrystals to Ag2Se over the course of 100 ms without the presenceof long-lived intermediates. These results, along with supporting stoppedflow absorption experiments, suggest that this nanocrystal cationexchange reaction is highly efficient and provide insight into how thereaction progresses in individual particles. This experiment illustratesthe value and potential of in situ microfluidic X-ray synchrotrontechniques for detailed studies of the millisecond structuraltransformations of nanoparticles and other solution-phase reactions inwhich diffusive mixing initiates changes in local bond structures oroxidation states.

  7. Redox State of Iron in Lunar Glasses using X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy and Multivariate Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dyar, M. D.; McCanta, M. C.; Lanzirotti, A.; Sutton, S. R.; Carey, C. J.; Mahadevan, S.; Rutherford, M. J.

    2014-12-01

    The oxidation state of igneous materials on a planet is a critically-important variable in understanding magma evolution on bodies in our solar system. However, direct and indirect methods for quantifying redox states are challenging, especially across the broad spectrum of silicate glass compositions found on airless bodies. On the Moon, early Mössbauer studies of bulk samples suggested the presence of significant Fe3+ (>10%) in lunar glasses (green, orange, brown); lunar analog glasses synthesized at fO2 <10-11 have similar Fe3+. All these Mössbauer spectra are challenging to interpret due to the presence of multiple coordination environments in the glasses. X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) allows pico- and nano-scale interrogation of primitive planetary materials using the pre-edge, main edge, and EXAFS regions of absorption edge spectra. Current uses of XAS require availability of standards with compositions similar to those of unknowns and complex procedures for curve-fitting of pre-edge features that produce results with poorly constrained accuracy. A new approach to accurate and quantitative redox measurements with XAS is to couple use of spectra from synthetic glass standards covering a broad compositional range with multivariate analysis (MVA) techniques. Mössbauer and XAS spectra from a suite of 33 synthetic glass standards covering a wide range of compositions and fO2(Dyar et al., this meeting) were used to develop a MVA model that utilizes valuable predictive information not only in the major spectral peaks/features, but in all channels of the XAS region. Algorithms for multivariate analysis t were used to "learn" the characteristics of a data set as a function of varying spectral characteristics. These models were applied to the study of lunar glasses, which provide a challenging test case for these newly-developed techniques due to their very low fO2. Application of the new XAS calibration model to Apollo 15 green (15426, 15427 and 15425

  8. A Complete Overhaul of the Electron Energy-Loss Spectroscopy and X-Ray Absorption Spectroscopy Database: eelsdb.eu.

    PubMed

    Ewels, Philip; Sikora, Thierry; Serin, Virginie; Ewels, Chris P; Lajaunie, Luc

    2016-06-01

    The electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS) and X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) database has been completely rewritten, with an improved design, user interface, and a number of new tools. The database is accessible at https://eelsdb.eu/ and can now be used without registration. The submission process has been streamlined to encourage spectrum submissions and the new design gives greater emphasis on contributors' original work by highlighting their papers. With numerous new filters and a powerful search function, it is now simple to explore the database of several hundred EELS and XAS spectra. Interactive plots allow spectra to be overlaid, facilitating online comparison. An application-programming interface has been created, allowing external tools and software to easily access the information held within the database. In addition to the database itself, users can post and manage job adverts and read the latest news and events regarding the EELS and XAS communities. In accordance with the ongoing drive toward open access data increasingly demanded by funding bodies, the database will facilitate open access data sharing of EELS and XAS spectra. PMID:26899024

  9. A Complete Overhaul of the Electron Energy-Loss Spectroscopy and X-Ray Absorption Spectroscopy Database: eelsdb.eu.

    PubMed

    Ewels, Philip; Sikora, Thierry; Serin, Virginie; Ewels, Chris P; Lajaunie, Luc

    2016-06-01

    The electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS) and X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) database has been completely rewritten, with an improved design, user interface, and a number of new tools. The database is accessible at https://eelsdb.eu/ and can now be used without registration. The submission process has been streamlined to encourage spectrum submissions and the new design gives greater emphasis on contributors' original work by highlighting their papers. With numerous new filters and a powerful search function, it is now simple to explore the database of several hundred EELS and XAS spectra. Interactive plots allow spectra to be overlaid, facilitating online comparison. An application-programming interface has been created, allowing external tools and software to easily access the information held within the database. In addition to the database itself, users can post and manage job adverts and read the latest news and events regarding the EELS and XAS communities. In accordance with the ongoing drive toward open access data increasingly demanded by funding bodies, the database will facilitate open access data sharing of EELS and XAS spectra.

  10. Surface- and bulk-sensitive x-ray absorption study of the valence states of Mn and Co ions in Zn1-2xMnxCoxO nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kataoka, T.; Yamazaki, Y.; Sakamoto, Y.; Fujimori, A.; Chang, F.-H.; Lin, H.-J.; Huang, D. J.; Chen, C. T.; Tanaka, A.; Mandal, S. K.; Nath, T. K.; Karmakar, D.; Dasgupta, I.

    2010-06-01

    We have performed x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) measurements on Zn1-2xMnxCoxO nanoparticles. From the XAS results, it seems that the Mn and Co ions are in a mixed-valence (2+, 3+, and 4+) state and the relative concentrations of the high-valence (3+ and 4+) Mn and Co ions are higher in the surface region than in the deep core region. We suggest that this is a distinct trend of nanoparticle diluted magnetic semiconductor (DMS) unlike the case of DMS in film and bulk forms, where the transition-metal ions are expected to be 2+.

  11. Sulfur X-Ray Absorption And Vibrational Spectroscopic Study of Sulfur Dioxide, Sulfite, And Sulfonate Solutions And of the Substituted Sulfonate Ions X(3)CSO(3-)(X = H, Cl, F)

    SciTech Connect

    Risberg, E.Damian; Eriksson, L.; Mink, J.; Pettersson, L.G.M.; Skripkin, M.Yu.; Sandstrom, M.

    2009-06-02

    Sulfur K-edge X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectra have been recorded and the S(1s) electron excitations evaluated by means of density functional theory-transition potential (DFT-TP) calculations to provide insight into the coordination, bonding, and electronic structure. The XANES spectra for the various species in sulfur dioxide and aqueous sodium sulfite solutions show considerable differences at different pH values in the environmentally important sulfite(IV) system. In strongly acidic (pH < {approx}1) aqueous sulfite solution the XANES spectra confirm that the hydrated sulfur dioxide molecule, SO{sub 2}(aq), dominates. The theoretical spectra are consistent with an OSO angle of {approx}119{sup o} in gas phase and acetonitrile solution, while in aqueous solution hydrogen bonding reduces the angle to {approx}116{sup o}. The hydration affects the XANES spectra also for the sulfite ion, SO{sub 3}{sup 2-}. At intermediate pH (4) the two coordination isomers, the sulfonate (HSO{sub 3{sup -}}) and hydrogen sulfite (SO{sub 3}H{sup -}) ions with the hydrogen atom coordinated to sulfur and oxygen, respectively, could be distinguished with the ratio HSO{sub 3{sup -}}:SO{sub 3}H{sup -} about 0.28:0.72 at 298 K. The relative amount of HSO{sub 3{sup -}} increased with increasing temperature in the investigated range from 275 to 343 K. XANES spectra of sulfonate, methanesulfonate, trichloromethanesulfonate, and trifluoromethanesulfonate compounds, all with closely similar S-O bond distances in tetrahedral configuration around the sulfur atom, were interpreted by DFT-TP computations. The energy of their main electronic transition from the sulfur K-shell is about 2478 eV. The additional absorption features are similar when a hydrogen atom or an electron-donating methyl group is bonded to the -SO{sub 3} group. Significant changes occur for the electronegative trichloromethyl (Cl{sub 3}C-) and trifluoromethyl (F{sub 3}C-) groups, which strongly affect the

  12. Experimental and theoretical correlations between vanadium K-edge X-ray absorption and K[Formula: see text] emission spectra.

    PubMed

    Rees, Julian A; Wandzilak, Aleksandra; Maganas, Dimitrios; Wurster, Nicole I C; Hugenbruch, Stefan; Kowalska, Joanna K; Pollock, Christopher J; Lima, Frederico A; Finkelstein, Kenneth D; DeBeer, Serena

    2016-09-01

    A series of vanadium compounds was studied by K-edge X-ray absorption (XAS) and K[Formula: see text] X-ray emission spectroscopies (XES). Qualitative trends within the datasets, as well as comparisons between the XAS and XES data, illustrate the information content of both methods. The complementary nature of the chemical insight highlights the success of this dual-technique approach in characterizing both the structural and electronic properties of vanadium sites. In particular, and in contrast to XAS or extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS), we demonstrate that valence-to-core XES is capable of differentiating between ligating atoms with the same identity but different bonding character. Finally, density functional theory (DFT) and time-dependent DFT calculations enable a more detailed, quantitative interpretation of the data. We also establish correction factors for the computational protocols through calibration to experiment. These hard X-ray methods can probe vanadium ions in any oxidation or spin state, and can readily be applied to sample environments ranging from solid-phase catalysts to biological samples in frozen solution. Thus, the combined XAS and XES approach, coupled with DFT calculations, provides a robust tool for the study of vanadium atoms in bioinorganic chemistry. PMID:27251139

  13. Electron beam source molecular beam epitaxial growth of analog graded Al(x)Ga(1-x)As ballistic transistors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malik, Roger J.; Levi, Anthony F. J.

    1988-01-01

    A new method has been developed for the growth of graded band-gap Al(x)Ga(1-x)As alloys by molecular beam epitaxy which is based upon electron beam evaporation of the group III elements. The metal fluxes are measured and feedback controlled using a modulated ion gauge sensor. The system is computer controlled which allows precise programming of the Ga and Al evaporation rates. The large dynamic response of the metal sources enables growth of variable band-gap III-V alloys with arbitrary composition profiles. This new technique is demonstrated by synthesis of analog graded Al(x)Ga(1-x)As unipolar ballistic electron transistors.

  14. Surfactant mediated epitaxial growth of InxGa1 - xAs on GaAs (001)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massies, J.; Grandjean, N.; Etgens, V. H.

    1992-07-01

    It is shown that Te can be used as a surfactant for the growth of highly strained InxGa1-xAs on GaAs(001). As observed by reflection high-energy electron diffraction analysis during growth, adsorption of Te on the GaAs surface prior to the growth of InxGa1-xAs drastically increases the layer thickness which can be grown in a two-dimensional layer-by-layer fashion. In analogy with the behavior of As and Sb as surfactant in the growth of Si/Ge [Copel, Reuter, Kaxiras, and Tromp, Phys. Rev. Lett. 63, 632 (1989)] Te is only slightly incorporated in the growing layer and floats at the surface.

  15. Picosecond flash spectroscopic studies on ultraviolet stabilizers and stabilized polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott, G. W.

    1982-01-01

    Spectroscopic and excited state decay kinetics are reported for monomeric and polymeric forms of ultraviolet stabilizers in the 2-(2'-hydroxyphenyl)-benzotriazole and 2-hydroxybenzophenone classes. For some of these molecules in various solvents at room temperature, (1) ground state absorption spectra, (2) emission spectra, (3) picosecond time-resolved transient absorption spectra, (4) ground state absorption recovery kinetics, (5) emission kinetics, and (6) transient absorption kinetics are reported. In the solid state at low temperatures, emission spectra and their temperature dependent kinetics up to approximately 200K as well as, in one case, the 12K excitation spectra of the observed dual emission are also reported.

  16. XAS Characterization of the Zn Site of Non-structural Protein 3 (NS3) from Hepatitis C Virus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ascone, I.; Nobili, G.; Benfatto, M.; Congiu-Castellano, A.

    2007-02-01

    XANES spectra of non structural protein 3 (NS3) have been calculated using 4 Zn coordination models from three crystallographic structures in the Protein Data Base (PDB): 1DY9, subunit B, 1CU1 subunit A and B, and 1JXP subunit B. Results indicate that XANES is an appropriate tool to distinguish among them. Experimental XANES spectra have been simulated refining crystallographic data. The model obtained by XAS is compared with the PDB models.

  17. Direct evidence for the negative-U nature of the DX center in AlxGa1-xAs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Subhasis; Kumar, Vikram

    1992-09-01

    Photoemission-deep-level transient spectroscopy with 1.38-eV light reveals a new level with a thermal activation energy of 0.2 eV for the DX centers in silicon-doped AlxGa1-xAs (x=0.26). The observation of this level directly proves the negative-U properties of DX centers and the existence of a metastable state DX0, which is also confirmed by transient photoconductivity experiments.

  18. Substitutionality of Te- and Sn-related DX centers in AlxGa1-xAs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Kin Man; Khachaturyan, Ken; Weber, Eicke R.; Lee, Henry P.; Kolas, Etienne G.

    1991-01-01

    The lattice locations of Te and Sn atoms forming DX centers in AlxGa1-xAs were determined by particle-induced x-ray emission and ion-beam-channeling methods. The Te atoms were found to be in the As substitutional sites while the Sn atoms were in the Ga(Al) sites. No off-center displacement of Te and Sn larger than 0.14 Å from the substitutional sites was observed in either system.

  19. Analyzing Water's Optical Absorption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    A cooperative agreement between World Precision Instruments (WPI), Inc., and Stennis Space Center has led the UltraPath(TM) device, which provides a more efficient method for analyzing the optical absorption of water samples at sea. UltraPath is a unique, high-performance absorbance spectrophotometer with user-selectable light path lengths. It is an ideal tool for any study requiring precise and highly sensitive spectroscopic determination of analytes, either in the laboratory or the field. As a low-cost, rugged, and portable system capable of high- sensitivity measurements in widely divergent waters, UltraPath will help scientists examine the role that coastal ocean environments play in the global carbon cycle. UltraPath(TM) is a trademark of World Precision Instruments, Inc. LWCC(TM) is a trademark of World Precision Instruments, Inc.

  20. Crystallographic and X-ray absorption spectroscopic characterization of Helicobacter pylori UreE bound to Ni²⁺ and Zn²⁺ reveals a role for the disordered C-terminal arm in metal trafficking.

    PubMed

    Banaszak, Katarzyna; Martin-Diaconescu, Vlad; Bellucci, Matteo; Zambelli, Barbara; Rypniewski, Wojciech; Maroney, Michael J; Ciurli, Stefano

    2012-02-01

    The survival and growth of the pathogen Helicobacter pylori in the gastric acidic environment is ensured by the activity of urease, an enzyme containing two essential Ni²⁺ ions in the active site. The metallo-chaperone UreE facilitates in vivo Ni²⁺ insertion into the apoenzyme. Crystals of apo-HpUreE (H. pylori UreE) and its Ni⁺- and Zn⁺-bound forms were obtained from protein solutions in the absence and presence of the metal ions. The crystal structures of the homodimeric protein, determined at 2.00 Å (apo), 1.59 Å (Ni²⁺) and 2.52 Å (Zn²⁺) resolution, show the conserved proximal and solvent-exposed His¹⁰² residues from two adjacent monomers invariably involved in metal binding. The C-terminal regions of the apoprotein are disordered in the crystal, but acquire significant ordering in the presence of the metal ions due to the binding of His¹⁵². The analysis of X-ray absorption spectral data obtained using solutions of Ni²⁺- and Zn²⁺-bound HpUreE provided accurate information of the metal-ion environment in the absence of solid-state effects. These results reveal the role of the histidine residues at the protein C-terminus in metal-ion binding, and the mutual influence of protein framework and metal-ion stereo-electronic properties in establishing co-ordination number and geometry leading to metal selectivity.

  1. Novel spectro-electrochemical cell for in situ/operando observation of common composite electrode with liquid electrolyte by X-ray absorption spectroscopy in the tender X-ray region.

    PubMed

    Nakanishi, Koji; Kato, Daisuke; Arai, Hajime; Tanida, Hajime; Mori, Takuya; Orikasa, Yuki; Uchimoto, Yoshiharu; Ohta, Toshiaki; Ogumi, Zempachi

    2014-08-01

    A novel spectro-electochemical cell for X-ray absorption spectroscopy in the tender X-ray region (TX-XAS) was designed and fabricated to investigate the electrochemical behavior of common battery materials with liquid electrolytes under in situ/operando conditions. The cell has several unique features, such as high X-ray transmittance, high signal to noise ratio, and high vacuum tightness. These features enable us quick and reliable XAS measurements. Operando P K-edge XAS measurements of an olivine-type LiFePO4 composite positive electrode were carried out to clarify its phosphorus environment during the electrochemical charging process. Results of spectral analysis show that there is no significant change in the oxidation state of phosphorus and in the coordination of the phosphate anions in the charging process, but a closer look of the consecutive XAS spectra suggests the shrinkage of the PO4 cage during the charging process, and the structural changes in a biphasic manner. These results demonstrate the usefulness of the cell for in situ/operando TX-XAS observations of light elements in practical batteries.

  2. Novel spectro-electrochemical cell for in situ/operando observation of common composite electrode with liquid electrolyte by X-ray absorption spectroscopy in the tender X-ray region

    PubMed Central

    Nakanishi, Koji; Kato, Daisuke; Arai, Hajime; Tanida, Hajime; Mori, Takuya; Orikasa, Yuki; Uchimoto, Yoshiharu; Ohta, Toshiaki; Ogumi, Zempachi

    2014-01-01

    A novel spectro-electochemical cell for X-ray absorption spectroscopy in the tender X-ray region (TX-XAS) was designed and fabricated to investigate the electrochemical behavior of common battery materials with liquid electrolytes under in situ/operando conditions. The cell has several unique features, such as high X-ray transmittance, high signal to noise ratio, and high vacuum tightness. These features enable us quick and reliable XAS measurements. Operando P K-edge XAS measurements of an olivine-type LiFePO4 composite positive electrode were carried out to clarify its phosphorus environment during the electrochemical charging process. Results of spectral analysis show that there is no significant change in the oxidation state of phosphorus and in the coordination of the phosphate anions in the charging process, but a closer look of the consecutive XAS spectra suggests the shrinkage of the PO4 cage during the charging process, and the structural changes in a biphasic manner. These results demonstrate the usefulness of the cell for in situ/operando TX-XAS observations of light elements in practical batteries. PMID:25173283

  3. Phonon-drag magnetothermopower oscillations in GaAs/AsxGa1-xAs heterojunctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fromhold, T. M.; Butcher, P. N.; Qin, G.; Mulimani, B. G.; Oxley, J. P.; Gallagher, B. L.

    1993-08-01

    The tensor M--> which determines the heat flux U=M-->E in a weak electric field E is calculated for a two-dimensional electron gas in a perpendicular magnetic field B. The dominant phonon-drag contribution is calculated using Boltzmann transport, allowing for the two-dimensional (2D) character of the electron gas. The Landau levels are taken to have Gaussian line shapes with the rms level width γ=CB1/2 where C is the only adjustable parameter. Setting C=0.5 meV T-1/2 gives good agreement with new experimental values of Myx obtained for GaAs/AlxGa1-xAs heterojunctions when B varies between 2 and 10 T and the temperature varies between 1 and 5 K. Myx is negative and contains strong magneto-oscillations in phase with the density of states at the Fermi level. The model also predicts Mxx=0, whereas experiment gives peak values of ||Mxx|| up to 60% of those of ||Myx||. We demonstrate that setting Mxx=0 in the calculation has little effect on the predicted thermopower component Sxx but yields poor approximations to the experimental values of Syx.

  4. Observations of flow in Inx Ga1-xAs multilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korte, S.; McLaughlin, K. K.; Farrer, I.; Clegg, W. J.

    2008-08-01

    Work elsewhere has shown that the hardnesses of coherent InxGa1-xAs multilayer structures in which the misfit stresses are controlled by varying the indium content in each layer are influenced by the thicknesses and the coherency strains in the layers. These results have been interpreted in terms of the length-scale for flow being greater than the layer thickness and associated with deformation size effects. However, nanoindentation of InxGa1-x As suggests an influence of the flow stress of the individual layers on the overall multilayer flow stress. Consequently, initiation of flow in the weaker layer is expected. A deformed multilayer has been characterized by measurement of the lattice rotations measured from energy-filtered convergent beam electron diffraction (CBED) patterns recorded in scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) mode. Based on the movement of Kikuchi lines as a result of rotations of the lattice the local orientation of the crystal can be extracted, allowing the local orientations to be estimated. The small probe-size in CBED of ~1 nm used here ensures the region sampled is smaller than the thickness of the individual layers. These measurements have been used to construct a map of the axes of rotation in the lattice which demonstrates the ability to distinguish the individual layers.

  5. Calibration method for spectroscopic systems

    DOEpatents

    Sandison, David R.

    1998-01-01

    Calibration spots of optically-characterized material placed in the field of view of a spectroscopic system allow calibration of the spectroscopic system. Response from the calibration spots is measured and used to calibrate for varying spectroscopic system operating parameters. The accurate calibration achieved allows quantitative spectroscopic analysis of responses taken at different times, different excitation conditions, and of different targets.

  6. Calibration method for spectroscopic systems

    DOEpatents

    Sandison, D.R.

    1998-11-17

    Calibration spots of optically-characterized material placed in the field of view of a spectroscopic system allow calibration of the spectroscopic system. Response from the calibration spots is measured and used to calibrate for varying spectroscopic system operating parameters. The accurate calibration achieved allows quantitative spectroscopic analysis of responses taken at different times, different excitation conditions, and of different targets. 3 figs.

  7. Ni K-Edge XAS Suggests that Coordination of Ni II to the Unstructured Amyloidogenice Region of the Human Prion Protein Produces a Ni2 bis-u-hydroxo Dimer

    SciTech Connect

    Shearer,J.; Soh, P.

    2007-01-01

    Prion diseases are thought to be caused by the misfolding of the ubiquitous neuronal membrane prion protein (PrP) through an unknown mechanism that may involve Cu{sup II} coordination to the PrP. Previous work has utilized Ni{sup II} as a diamagnetic probe for Cu{sup II} coordination [C.E. Jones, M. Klewpatinond, S.R. Abdelraheim, D.R. Brown, J.H. Viles, J. Mol. Biol. 346 (2005) 1393-1407]. Herein we investigate Ni{sup II} coordination to the PrP fragment PrP(93-114) (AcN-GGTHSQWNKPSKPKTNMKHMAG) at pH = 10.0 by Ni K-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS). We find that two equivalents of Ni{sup II} will coordinate to PrP(93-114) by UV/Vis titrations and mass spectrometry. Ni K-edge XAS data is consistent with Ni{sup II} ligated by five N/O based ligands (three N/O ligands at 2.01(2) {angstrom} and two at 1.855(2) {angstrom}). We were also able to locate a Ni-Ni vector at 3.1(1) {angstrom}, which suggests the two Ni{sup II} centers are contained in a bis-{mu}-hydroxo dimer. We therefore suggest that Ni{sup II} may not be a suitable diamagnetic mimic for Cu{sup II} coordination within the PrP since differential coordination modes for the two metals exist.

  8. A cavity type absorption cell for double resonance microwave spectroscopy.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, M. C.; White, W. F.

    1972-01-01

    Description of an experimental dual resonant cavity absorption cell for observing microwave spectroscopic double-resonance effects. The device is composed of two Fabry-Perot interferometers excited by independent microwave sources and mounted at right angles in a suitable vacuum enclosure. The pumping transition is modulated by one source and the modulation induced on the rf absorption in the orthogonal cavity is detected.

  9. XAS Study at Mo and Co K-Edges of the Sulfidation of a CoMo / Al2O3 Hydrotreating Catalyst

    SciTech Connect

    Pichon, C.; Gandubert, A. D.; Legens, C.; Guillaume, D.

    2007-02-02

    Because of its impact on environment, the removal of sulfur is an indispensable step, called hydrotreatment, in the refining of petroleum. One of the most commonly used hydrotreating catalysts is CoMo-type catalyst which is composed of molybdenum disulfide slabs promoted by cobalt atoms (CoMoS phase) and well dispersed on a high specific area alumina. As far as the highest sulfur content allowed in gasoline and diesel is continually decreasing, more and more efficient and active hydrotreating catalysts are required. In order to optimize the reactivity of the CoMo-type catalyst in hydrotreatment, a better understanding of the processes used to produce the active phase (CoMoS slabs) of the catalyst is necessary. The study reported here deals with the sulfiding mechanism of the slabs and the influence of temperature on the phenomenon. Ex situ X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XANES and EXAFS) was used to study the evolution of the structure of CoMo-type catalyst sulfided at various temperatures (from 293 to 873 K). XAS analysis was performed at both molybdenum and cobalt K-edges to obtain a cross-characterization of the sulfidation of the slabs. It evidenced the formation of various compounds, including two molybdenum oxides, MoS3 (or MoS3-like compound) and Co9S8, at specific steps of the sulfiding process. It showed the role of intermediate played by MoS3 (or MoS3-like compound) during the formation of the slabs and the competition between the appearance of promoted slabs (CoMoS phase) and Co9S8. At last, it leaded to the proposal of a mechanism for the sulfidation of the catalyst.

  10. XAS molecular-level speciation and isotopes to assess the biogeochemistry of trace elements in soils and sediments : Few examples on Zn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juillot, F.; Marechal-Chenevier, C.; Noël, V. S.; Morin, G.; Cacaly, S.; Louvat, P.; Telouk, P.; Hazemann, J.; Proux, O.; gelabert, A.; Jouvin, D.; Voegelin, A.; Mueller, B.; Brown, G. E.

    2011-12-01

    Since the mid of the 90's, multi-Collector Inductively-Coupled-Plasma Mass Spectrometry (MC-ICP-MS) offers the possibility of measuring the relative proportions of isotopes for a broad range of environmentally relevant elements labelled as ''non traditional isotopes'' (Cr, Fe, Ni, Cu, Zn, Se, Hg,...). These recent analytical possibilities have already been used in a large set of studies in Earth and Environmental Sciences to depict the biogeochemical behavior of these elements (Johnson et al., 2004; Weiss et al., 2008). However, establishing the link between the isotopes signature of a given element in a given system at a given time and its biogeochemical history (sources and pathways) is not always straightforward and complementary information on the actual speciation of this element can reveal very useful to address this issue. Since the end of the 80's, synchrotron-based X-Ray Absorption Spectroscopy has revealed as one of the most efficient way to directly assess the molecular-level speciation of an element in a natural system (Brown and Sturchio, 2002). Although this technique has been restricted to heavily polluted systems at the beginning because of its low detection limit, third- and fourth-generation synchrotron facilities now offer the possibility of obtaining this kind of information on very dilute systems, which makes it useful for almost all natural systems. The aim of this presentation will be to show how combining isotopes and molecular-level XAS speciation in natural and laboratory systems can reveal really powerful to help at understanding how isotopes fractionate in nature and, in turn, how these isotopes can be used to improve our understanding of the biogeochemical behavior of trace elements in continental systems (soils and sediments). Examples presented will concern Zn because this trace element is the most frequently encountered in soils and sediments and because it can act as a nutrient or as a poison, depending on its concentration.

  11. XAS Study at Mo and Co K-Edges of the Sulfidation of a CoMo / Al2O3 Hydrotreating Catalyst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pichon, C.; Gandubert, A. D.; Legens, C.; Guillaume, D.

    2007-02-01

    Because of its impact on environment, the removal of sulfur is an indispensable step, called hydrotreatment, in the refining of petroleum. One of the most commonly used hydrotreating catalysts is CoMo-type catalyst which is composed of molybdenum disulfide slabs promoted by cobalt atoms (CoMoS phase) and well dispersed on a high specific area alumina. As far as the highest sulfur content allowed in gasoline and diesel is continually decreasing, more and more efficient and active hydrotreating catalysts are required. In order to optimize the reactivity of the CoMo-type catalyst in hydrotreatment, a better understanding of the processes used to produce the active phase (CoMoS slabs) of the catalyst is necessary. The study reported here deals with the sulfiding mechanism of the slabs and the influence of temperature on the phenomenon. Ex situ X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XANES and EXAFS) was used to study the evolution of the structure of CoMo-type catalyst sulfided at various temperatures (from 293 to 873 K). XAS analysis was performed at both molybdenum and cobalt K-edges to obtain a cross-characterization of the sulfidation of the slabs. It evidenced the formation of various compounds, including two molybdenum oxides, MoS3 (or MoS3-like compound) and Co9S8, at specific steps of the sulfiding process. It showed the role of intermediate played by MoS3 (or MoS3-like compound) during the formation of the slabs and the competition between the appearance of promoted slabs (CoMoS phase) and Co9S8. At last, it leaded to the proposal of a mechanism for the sulfidation of the catalyst.

  12. Applications of absorption spectroscopy using quantum cascade lasers.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lizhu; Tian, Guang; Li, Jingsong; Yu, Benli

    2014-01-01

    Infrared laser absorption spectroscopy (LAS) is a promising modern technique for sensing trace gases with high sensitivity, selectivity, and high time resolution. Mid-infrared quantum cascade lasers, operating in a pulsed or continuous wave mode, have potential as spectroscopic sources because of their narrow linewidths, single mode operation, tunability, high output power, reliability, low power consumption, and compactness. This paper reviews some important developments in modern laser absorption spectroscopy based on the use of quantum cascade laser (QCL) sources. Among the various laser spectroscopic methods, this review is focused on selected absorption spectroscopy applications of QCLs, with particular emphasis on molecular spectroscopy, industrial process control, combustion diagnostics, and medical breath analysis.

  13. Applications of Absorption Spectroscopy Using Quantum Cascade Lasers.

    PubMed

    2014-10-01

    Infrared laser absorption spectroscopy (LAS) is a promising modern technique for sensing trace gases with high sensitivity, selectivity, and high time resolution. Mid-infrared quantum cascade lasers, operating in a pulsed or continuous wave mode, have potential as spectroscopic sources because of their narrow linewidths, single mode operation, tunability, high output power, reliability, low power consumption, and compactness. This paper reviews some important developments in modern laser absorption spectroscopy based on the use of quantum cascade laser (QCL) sources. Among the various laser spectroscopic methods, this review is focused on selected absorption spectroscopy applications of QCLs, with particular emphasis on molecular spectroscopy, industrial process control, combustion diagnostics, and medical breath analysis.

  14. Arsenate Adsorption On Ruthenium Oxides: A Spectroscopic And Kinetic Investigation

    EPA Science Inventory

    Arsenate adsorption on amorphous (RuO2•1.1H2O) and crystalline (RuO2) ruthenium oxides was evaluated using spectroscopic and kinetic methods to elucidate the adsorption mechanism. Extended X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (EXAFS) was ...

  15. X-ray absorption spectroscopy of lithium sulfur battery reaction intermediates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wujcik, Kevin; Pascal, Tod; Prendergast, David; Balsara, Nitash

    2015-03-01

    Lithium sulfur batteries have a theoretical energy density nearly five times greater than current lithium ion battery standards, but questions still remain regarding the reaction pathways through which soluble lithium polysulfide (Li2Sx, ``x'' ranging from 2 to 8) reaction intermediates are formed. Complicating spectroelectrochemical approaches to elucidate redox pathways is the challenge of obtaining spectral standards for individual Li2Sx species. Lithium polysulfides cannot be isolated as individual component and exist only in solution as a distribution of different Li2Sx molecules formed via disproportionation reactions (e.g. 2Li2S4 goes to Li2S3 + Li2S5). X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) at the sulfur K-edge has recently been employed as a technique to study Li-S chemistry. We have recently obtained XAS standards for individual Li2Sx species via first principles DFT simulations and the excited electron and core hole approach. Here, experimental sulfur K-edge XAS of Li2Sx species dissolved in poly(ethylene oxide) are compared to spectra obtained from analogous theoretical calculations. The impact that polysulfide solution concentration and the presence of other lithium salts (e.g. LiNO3) have on X-ray spectra of Li2Sx species is explored via experiment and theory.

  16. Atomic-scale roughness of Li metal surface evident in soft X-ray absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prendergast, David; Wan, Liwen; Liang, Yufeng; Chuang, Yi-De; Qiao, Ruimin; Yan, Shishen; Yang, Wanli

    2015-03-01

    Realizing Li metal electrodes depends on fundamental understanding and efficient control of surface properties, which requires reliable characterization of the Li metal surface. Controlled experiments of Li K-edge soft X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) reveal evidence of steady oxidation of the Li metal surface even under ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) conditions. The XAS of the short-lived Li metal surface, prepared by in-situ scratching, exhibits a prominent peak at 55.6 eV, more intense and at a slightly higher energy than the first peak expected for bulk Li metal at 55 eV. First-principles XAS calculations explain the origin of both the increased intensity and energy shift. This required the use of surface structural models with under-coordinated Li atoms and an estimated 4 Åinelastic mean-free-path for Auger electrons, implying extreme surface sensitivity of the measurements to the first 2-3 atomic layers. This work provides a benchmark on both experiment and theory for further studies of Li and other reactive metal surfaces, which are currently under scrutiny for next-generation energy storage devices. DP, LW, and YL acknowledge support from the Joint Center for Energy Storage Research, an Energy Innovation Hub funded by the US Dept. of Energy, Office of Science, Basic Energy Sciences.

  17. Synchrotron soft X-ray absorption spectroscopy study of carbon and silicon nanostructures for energy applications.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Jun; Zhang, Hui; Sun, Xuhui; Lee, Shuit-Tong

    2014-12-10

    Carbon and silicon materials are two of the most important materials involved in the history of the science and technology development. In the last two decades, C and Si nanoscale materials, e.g., carbon nanotubes, graphene, and silicon nanowires, and quantum dots, have also emerged as the most interesting nanomaterials in nanoscience and nanotechnology for their myriad promising applications such as for electronics, sensors, biotechnology, etc. In particular, carbon and silicon nanostructures are being utilized in energy-related applications such as catalysis, batteries, solar cells, etc., with significant advances. Understanding of the nature of surface and electronic structures of nanostructures plays a key role in the development and improvement of energy conversion and storage nanosystems. Synchrotron soft X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) and related techniques, such as X-ray emission spectroscopy (XES) and scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM), show unique capability in revealing the surface and electronic structures of C and Si nanomaterials. In this review, XAS is demonstrated as a powerful technique for probing chemical bonding, the electronic structure, and the surface chemistry of carbon and silicon nanomaterials, which can greatly enhance the fundamental understanding and also applicability of these nanomaterials in energy applications. The focus is on the unique advantages of XAS as a complementary tool to conventional microscopy and spectroscopy for effectively providing chemical and structural information about carbon and silicon nanostructures. The employment of XAS for in situ, real-time study of property evolution of C and Si nanostructures to elucidate the mechanisms in energy conversion or storage processes is also discussed.

  18. High-resolution X-ray absorption spectroscopy as a probe of crystal-field and covalency effects in actinide compounds.

    PubMed

    Butorin, Sergei M; Kvashnina, Kristina O; Vegelius, Johan R; Meyer, Daniel; Shuh, David K

    2016-07-19

    Applying the high-energy resolution fluorescence-detection (HERFD) mode of X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS), we were able to probe, for the first time to our knowledge, the crystalline electric field (CEF) splittings of the [Formula: see text] shell directly in the HERFD-XAS spectra of actinides. Using ThO2 as an example, data measured at the Th 3d edge were interpreted within the framework of the Anderson impurity model. Because the charge-transfer satellites were also resolved in the HERFD-XAS spectra, the analysis of these satellites revealed that ThO2 is not an ionic compound as previously believed. The Th [Formula: see text] occupancy in the ground state was estimated to be twice that of the Th [Formula: see text] states. We demonstrate that HERFD-XAS allows for characterization of the CEF interaction and degree of covalency in the ground state of actinide compounds as it is extensively done for 3d transition metal systems. PMID:27370799

  19. Iron L-edge X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy of Oxy-Picket Fence Porphyrin: Experimental Insight into Fe-O2 Bonding

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Samuel A.; Kroll, Thomas; Decreau, Richard A.; Hocking, Rosalie K.; Lundberg, Marcus; Hedman, Britt; Hodgson, Keith O.; Solomon, Edward I.

    2013-01-01

    The electronic structure of the Fe–O2 center in oxy-hemoglobin and oxy-myoglobin is a long-standing issue in the field of bioinorganic chemistry. Spectroscopic studies have been complicated by the highly delocalized nature of the porphyrin and calculations require interpretation of multi-determinant wavefunctions for a highly covalent metal site. Here, iron L-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS), interpreted using a valence bond configuration interaction (VBCI) multiplet model, is applied to directly probe the electronic structure of the iron in the biomimetic Fe–O2 heme complex [Fe(pfp)(1-MeIm)O2] (pfp = meso-tetra(α,α,α,α-o-pivalamidophenyl) porphyrin or TpivPP). This method allows separate estimates of σ-donor, π-donor, and π-acceptor interactions through ligand to metal charge transfer (LMCT) and metal to ligand charge transfer (MLCT) mixing pathways. The L-edge spectrum of [Fe(pfp)(1-MeIm)O2] is further compared to those of [FeII(pfp)(1-MeIm)2], [FeII(pfp)], and [FeIII(tpp)(ImH)2]Cl (tpp = meso-tetraphenylporphyrin) which have FeII S = 0, FeII S = 1 and FeIII S = 1/2 ground states, respectively. These serve as references for the three possible contributions to the ground state of oxy-pfp. The Fe–O2 pfp site is experimentally determined to have both significant σ-donation and a strong π-interaction of the O2 with the iron, with the latter having implications with respect to the spin polarization of the ground state. PMID:23259487

  20. X-ray absorption and infrared spectra of water and ice: A first-principles electronic structure study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Wei

    responsible for the substantial change of the main spectral edge in the conversion from ice to water. The effect of densification may not involve hydrogen bond breaking as shown by experiment in high-density amorphous ice. Chapter 1 serves as a short summary of the problems at hand, as well as an outline of our theoretical and numerical approaches. In Chapter 2, some necessary background of the subject is provided, including a review of the water XAS controversy in the literature. Chapter 3 describes how we compute XAS theoretically from ground state DFT. In Chapter 4, we go beyond ground state theories and investigate the quasi-particle behavior of the excited states. This is achieved using the many-body Green's function approach known as the GW approximation (GWA). We also present a detailed analysis of the origin of calculated spectral features. The second part of this thesis, Chapter 5, is devoted to a discussion of the infrared spectra of ice and water, in particular, the role of dynamic dipolar correlations. In this chapter, we present a method to decompose the dipolar correlations into intra- and intermolecular contributions. We find that intermolecular contributions play a role as important as the intramolecular counterpart over the entire frequency range. The decomposition technique proposed here is generally applicable to interpret other spectroscopic data and other systems, such as water at interfaces. The conclusions of our studies are summarized in Chapter 6.

  1. Theoretical characterization of X-ray absorption, emission, and photoelectron spectra of nitrogen doped along graphene edges.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xianlong; Hou, Zhufeng; Ikeda, Takashi; Oshima, Masaharu; Kakimoto, Masa-aki; Terakura, Kiyoyuki

    2013-01-24

    K-edge X-ray absorption (XAS), emission (XES), and photoelectron (XPS) spectra of nitrogen doped along graphene edges are systematically investigated by using first-principles methods. In this study we considered pyridinium-like, pyridine-like, cyanide-like, and amine-like nitrogens at armchair and zigzag edges and pyrrole-like nitrogen at armchair edge as well as graphite-like nitrogen at graphene interior site. Our results indicate that nitrogen configuration and its location (armchair or zigzag edge) in nitrogen-doped graphene can be identified via the spectral analysis. Furthermore, some controversial spectral features observed in experiment for N-doped graphene-like materials are unambiguously assigned. The present analysis gives an explanation to the reason why the peak assignment is usually made differently between XPS and XAS.

  2. Chemical-state analysis of organic semiconductors using soft X-ray absorption spectroscopy combined with first-principles calculation.

    PubMed

    Natsume, Yutaka; Kohno, Teiichiro; Minakata, Takashi; Konishi, Tokuzo; Gullikson, Eric M; Muramatsu, Yasuji

    2012-02-16

    The chemical states of organic semiconductors were investigated by total-electron-yield soft X-ray absorption spectroscopy (TEY-XAS) and first-principles calculations. The organic semiconductors, pentacene (C(22)H(14)) and pentacenequinone (C(22)H(12)O(2)), were subjected to TEY-XAS and the experimental spectra obtained were compared with the 1s core-level excited spectra of C and O atoms, calculated by a first-principles planewave pseudopotential method. Excellent agreement between the measured and the calculated spectra were obtained for both materials. Using this methodology, we examined the chemical states of the aged pentacene, and confirmed that both C-OH and C═O chemical bonds are generated by exposure to air. This result implies that not only oxygen but also humidity causes pentacene oxidation.

  3. A pH-dependent x-ray absorption spectroscopy study of U adsorption to bacterial cell walls.

    SciTech Connect

    Ravel, B.; Kelly, S. D.; Gorman-Lewis, D.; Boyanov, M. I.; Fein, J. B.; Kemner, K. M.; Biosciences Division; Univ. of Notre Dame

    2006-01-01

    Metal mobility in subsurface water systems involves the complex interaction of the metal, the fluid, and the mineral surfaces over which the fluid flows. This mobility is further influenced by metal adsorption onto bacteria and other biomass in the subsurface. To better understand the mechanism of this adsorption as well as its dependence on the chemical composition of the fluid, we have performed a series of metal adsorption experiments of aqueous uranyl (UO{sub 2}){sup 2+} to the gram-positive bacterium B. subtilis in the presence and absence of carbonate along with X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy (XAS) to determine the binding structures at the cell surface. In this paper we demonstrate an approach to the XAS data analysis which allows us to measure the partitioning of the adsorption of uranium to hydroxyl, carboxyl/carbonato, and phosphoryl active sites at the cell surface.

  4. Versatile plug flow catalytic cell for in situ transmission/fluorescence x-ray absorption fine structure measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Centomo, P.; Meneghini, C.; Zecca, M.

    2013-05-01

    A novel flow-through catalytic cell has been developed for in situ x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) experiments on heterogeneous catalysts under working conditions and in the presence of a liquid and a gas phase. The apparatus allows to carry out XAS measurements in both the transmission and fluorescence modes, at moderate temperature (from RT to 50-80 °C) and low-medium gas pressure (up to 7-8 bars). The materials employed are compatible with several chemicals such as those involved in the direct synthesis of hydrogen peroxide (O2, H2, H2O2, methanol). The versatile design of the cell allows to fit it to different experimental setups in synchrotron radiation beamlines. It was used successfully for the first time to test nanostructured Pd catalysts during the direct synthesis of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) in methanol solution from dihydrogen and dioxygen.

  5. A facile heating cell for in situ transmittance and fluorescence X-ray absorption spectroscopy investigations.

    PubMed

    An, Pengfei; Hong, Caihao; Zhang, Jing; Xu, Wei; Hu, Tiandou

    2014-01-01

    A facile heating cell has been designed for in situ transmittance and fluorescence X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) measurements up to 1273 K under vacuum or an inert atmosphere. These high temperatures are achieved using a tantalum heating element by ohmic heating. Because of the small specific heat capacity, the temperature can be changed in a matter of minutes from room temperature to high temperature. Furthermore, a commercial power controller was adapted to provide stable temperature control. The construction of the heat shielding system provides a novel approach to reducing the beam's path length and the cell's size. The cell is inexpensive and easy to build. Its performance was evaluated by in situ XAS measurements of the temperature-dependent structure of ceria nanocrystals. Some preliminary results for the structural mechanism in ceria nanocrystal redox applications are given.

  6. Composition induced design considerations for InP/Ga xIn 1- xAs heterojunction bipolar transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohammad, S. Noor

    2002-12-01

    Several design principles based on compositional grading and heavy doping of the base region of a heterojunction bipolar transistor (HBT) have been presented. Physical and technological advantages underlying composition induced design criteria of InP/Ga xIn 1- xAs HBTs have been discussed. A number of issues such as superlattice based grading in the base region, base resistance vs base region grading, the emitter-base junction design, tradeoffs between base region grading and the nonuniform doping of the base region, and the surface recombination at the external base region, have been articulated.

  7. Evidence for two DX-like centers in Sn-doped AlxGa1-xAs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Q. S.; Kang, J. Y.; Wu, Z. Y.; Liao, B.

    1993-05-01

    The photocapacitance method was used to investigate the two donor states with optical ionization energies of 0.73 and 1.30 eV in Sn-doped AlxGa1-xAs. Evidence is presented that both large-lattice-relaxation states are independent charge states and originate from different deep centers. The observation of phonons at about 10 meV accompanying the multiphonon processes in the photocapacitance transient implies that the atomic structures of the two deep centers are substitutional-interstitial in character.

  8. PySpline: A Modern, Cross-Platform Program for the Processing of Raw Averaged XAS Edge and EXAFS Data

    SciTech Connect

    Tenderholt, Adam; Hedman, Britt; Hodgson, Keith O.

    2007-02-02

    PySpline is a modern computer program for processing raw averaged XAS and EXAFS data using an intuitive approach which allows the user to see the immediate effect of various processing parameters on the resulting k- and R-space data. The Python scripting language and Qt and Qwt widget libraries were chosen to meet the design requirement that it be cross-platform (i.e. versions for Windows, Mac OS X, and Linux). PySpline supports polynomial pre- and post-edge background subtraction, splining of the EXAFS region with a multi-segment polynomial spline, and Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) of the resulting k3-weighted EXAFS data.

  9. Properties of Ga{sub 1-x}Mn{sub x}As with high x (>0.1)

    SciTech Connect

    Chiba, D.; Yu, K. M.; Walukiewicz, W.; Nishitani, Y.; Matsukura, F.; Ohno, H.

    2008-04-01

    We have investigated the magnetic and the crystalline properties of a set of Ga{sub 1-x}Mn{sub x}As layers with high nominal Mn compositions (x=0.101-0.198). Magnetization measurements and combined channeling Rutherford backscattering (c-RBS) and particle induced x-ray emission (c-PIXE) measurements have been performed to determine the effective Mn composition x{sub eff} and the fraction of Mn atoms at various lattice sites. Here, x{sub eff} determined from magnetization measurements, which increases with increasing x, is consistent with the results determined from c-RBS-PIXE measurements.

  10. Exciton recombination at crystal-phase quantum rings in GaAs/InxGa1-xAs core/multishell nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corfdir, P.; Lewis, R. B.; Marquardt, O.; Küpers, H.; Grandal, J.; Dimakis, E.; Trampert, A.; Geelhaar, L.; Brandt, O.; Phillips, R. T.

    2016-08-01

    We study the optical properties of coaxial GaAs/InxGa1-xAs core/multishell nanowires with x between 0.2 and 0.4 at 10 K. The evolution of the photoluminescence energy of the InxGa1-xAs quantum well shell with x and shell thickness agrees with the result of 8-band k .p calculations, demonstrating that the shell growth is pseudomorphic. At low excitation power, the photoluminescence from the shell is dominated by the recombination of exciton states deeply localized within the shell. We show that these states are associated with crystal-phase quantum rings that form at polytype segments of the InxGa1-xAs quantum well shell.

  11. Proxima 1, a New Beamline on the Third Generation SR Source SOLEIL Combining PX and Single-Crystal BioXAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ascone, I.; Girard, E.; Gourhant, P.; Legrand, P.; Roudenko, O.; Roussier, L.; Thompson, A. W.

    2007-02-01

    We describe the main characteristics of the PROXIMA 1 beamline at the third generation synchrotron radiation (SR) facility SOLEIL in France. This beamline was designed for macromolecular crystallography, in particular combined MAD/SAD and BioXAS measurements on single crystals with X-ray energies in the 5-15 keV range. An advanced system for beam line diagnostics, alignment and optimization is being developed. The overall design is oriented toward joint accurate data collection by the two techniques. It is well known that combination of PX and BioXAS adds atomic resolution to low and medium resolution PX data on metal centers in metalloproteins. Moreover we suggest probing systematically the redox state of metalloproteins with high quality XAS measurements in order to detect photoreduction processes.

  12. Competitive sorption and selective sequence of Cu(II) and Ni(II) on montmorillonite: Batch, modeling, EPR and XAS studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Shitong; Ren, Xuemei; Zhao, Guixia; Shi, Weiqun; Montavon, Gilles; Grambow, Bernd; Wang, Xiangke

    2015-10-01

    Heavy metal ions that leach from various industrial and agricultural processes are simultaneously present in the contaminated soil and water systems. The competitive sorption of these toxic metal ions on the natural soil components and sediments significantly influences their migration, bioavailability and ecotoxicity in the geochemical environment. In this study, the competitive sorption and selectivity order of Cu(II) and Ni(II) on montmorillonite are investigated by combining the batch experiments, X-ray diffraction (XRD), electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR), surface complexation modeling and X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy (XAS). The batch experimental data show that the coexisting Ni(II) exhibits a negligible influence on the sorption behavior of Cu(II), whereas the coexisting Cu(II) reduces the Ni(II) sorption percentage and changes the shape of the Ni(II) sorption isotherm. The sorption species of Cu(II) and Ni(II) on montmorillonite over the acidic and near-neutral pH range are well simulated by the surface complexation modeling. However, this model cannot identify the occurrence of surface nucleation and the co-precipitation processes at a highly alkaline pH. Based on the results of the EPR and XAS analyses, the microstructures of Cu(II) on montmorillonite are identified as the hydrated free Cu(II) ions at pH 5.0, inner-sphere surface complexes at pH 6.0 and the surface dimers/Cu(OH)2(s) precipitate at pH 8.0 in the single-solute and the binary-solute systems. For the Ni(II) sorption in the single-solute system, the formed microstructure varies from the hydrated free Ni(II) ions at the pH values of 5.0 and 6.0 to the inner-sphere surface complexes at pH 8.0. For the Ni(II) sorption in the binary-solute system, the coexisting Cu(II) induces the formation of the inner-sphere complexes at pH 6.0. In contrast, Ni(II) is adsorbed on montmorillonite via the formation of Ni phyllosilicate co-precipitate/α-Ni(OH)2(s) precipitate at pH 8.0. The selective sequence

  13. Operando X-ray scattering and spectroscopic analysis of germanium nanowire anodes in lithium ion batteries.

    PubMed

    Silberstein, Katharine E; Lowe, Michael A; Richards, Benjamin; Gao, Jie; Hanrath, Tobias; Abruña, Héctor D

    2015-02-17

    X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Fourier transform extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) analysis of X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) measurements have been employed to determine structural and bonding changes, as a function of the lithium content/state of charge, of germanium nanowires used as the active anode material within lithium ion batteries (LIBs). Our data, collected throughout the course of battery cycling (operando), indicate that lithium incorporation within the nanostructured germanium occurs heterogeneously, preferentially into amorphous regions over crystalline domains. Maintenance of the molecular structural integrity within the germanium nanowire is dependent on the depth of discharge. Discharging to a shallower cutoff voltage preserves partial crystallinity for several cycles.

  14. MAMA Spectroscopic Throughputs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lennon, Daniel

    2009-07-01

    This activity sets new baseline post-SM4 sensitivity/throughput measurements for all the STIS/MAMA spectroscopic modes, and establishes if there changes with respect to perfomance prior to the LVPS failure. It also checks the NUV focus of STIS and its dependence on wavelength.

  15. Petroleum Science and Technology Institute with the TeXas Earth and Space Science (TXESS) Revolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olson, H. C.; Olson, J. E.; Bryant, S. L.; Lake, L. W.; Bommer, P.; Torres-Verdin, C.; Jablonowski, C.; Willis, M.

    2009-12-01

    The TeXas Earth and Space Science (TXESS) Revolution, a professional development program for 8th- thru 12th-grade Earth Science teachers, presented a one-week Petroleum Science and Technology Institute at The University of Texas at Austin campus. The summer program was a joint effort between the Jackson School of Geosciences and the Department of Petroleum and Geosystems Engineering. The goal of the institute was to focus on the STEM components involved in the petroleum industry and to introduce teachers to the larger energy resources theme. The institute kicked off with a welcoming event and tour of a green, energy-efficient home (LEED Platinum certified) owned by one of the petroleum engineering faculty. Tours of the home included an introduction to rainwater harvesting, solar energy, sustainable building materials and other topics on energy efficiency. Classroom topics included drilling technology (including a simulator lab and an overview of the history of the technology), energy use and petroleum geology, well-logging technology and interpretation, reservoir engineering and volumetrics (including numerous labs combining chemistry and physics), risk assessment and economics, carbon capture and storage (CO2 sequestration technology) and hydraulic fracturing. A mid-week field trip included visiting the Ocean Star offshore platform in Galveston, the Weiss Energy Hall at the Houston Museum of Science and Schlumberger (to view 3-D visualization technology) in Houston. Teachers remarked that they really appreciated the focused nature of the institute and especially found the increased use of mathematics both a tool for professional growth, as well as a challenge for them to use more math in their science classes. STEM integration was an important feature of the summer institute, and teachers found the integration of science (earth sciences, geophysics), technology, engineering (petroleum, chemical and reservoir) and mathematics particularly valuable. Pre

  16. A Progress Report on the TeXas Earth and Space Science (TXESS) Revolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellins, K. K.; Snow, E.; Olson, H. C.; Odell, M. R.; Stocks, E.

    2009-12-01

    The TeXas Earth and Space Science (TXESS) Revolution is a five-year, NSF-sponsored professional development program for minority-serving 8th grade and high science school teachers who are preparing to teach a new senior capstone course in Earth and Space Science that is an option for the four years of science required for high school graduation in Texas. In this presentation (1) we will describe the sequence and content of the professional development academies and the summer institutes; (2) report on our effort to reach minority students; (3) review the preliminary results of the project evaluation on the effectiveness of the TXESS Revolution professional development program; and (4) describe enrichment opportunities for TXESS Revolution participants in connection with other projects, professional organizations and consortia (e.g., UNAVCO, IRIS, and the Consortium for Ocean Leadership). The program consists of eight professional development academies, each with a different contemporary content theme, during which teachers engage in rigorous, data-driven learning activities. Field trips, guest lectures, and other special programs are integrated into the professional development. Summer institutes are offered each year. The number of teachers participating in Cohorts A (spring 2008- summer 2009), B (fall 2008 - summer 2010) and C (fall 2009 - summer 2011) is 160. Cohort A and B teachers have directly impacted 9,494 K-12 students of which 67% are Hispanic, African American, Asian American or Native American, and 35% are Caucasian. Thirty-five Cohort A teachers have turned the training around and offered project-related professional development to 1,356 other teachers. The content of the TXESS Revolution worklshops is rigorous. Evaluation results reveal that many teachers felt overwhelmed at the start of the project. However, they soon became accustomed to the level of information presented and felt increased confidence in the core content. Participants appreciate how

  17. Interaction of selenite with reduced Fe and/or S species: An XRD and XAS study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finck, Nicolas; Dardenne, Kathy

    2016-05-01

    In this study, we investigated the interaction between selenite and either Fe(II)aq or S(- II)aq in solution, and the results were used to investigate the interaction between Se(IV)aq and FeS in suspension. The reaction products were characterized by a combination of methods (SEM, XRD and XAS) and the reaction mechanisms were identified. In a first experiment, Se(IV)aq was reduced to Se(0) by interaction with Fe(II)aq which was oxidized to Fe(III), but the reaction was only partial. Subsequently, some Fe(III) produced akaganeite (β-FeOOH) and the release of proton during that reaction decreased the pH. The pH decrease changed the Se speciation in solution which hindered further Se(IV) reduction by Fe(II)aq. In a second experiment, Se(IV)aq was quantitatively reduced to Se(0) by S(- II)aq and the reaction was fast. Two sulfide species were needed to reduce one Se(IV), and the observed pH increase was due to a proton consumption. For both experiments, experimental results are consistent with expectations based on the oxidation reduction potential of the various species. Upon interaction with FeS, Se(IV)aq was reduced to Se(0) and minute amounts of pyrite were detected, a consequence of partial mackinawite oxidation at surface sulfur sites. These results are of prime importance with respect to safe deep disposal of nuclear waste which contains the long-lived radionuclide 79Se. This study shows that after release of 79Se(IV) upon nuclear waste matrix corrosion, selenite can be reduced in the near field to low soluble Se(0) by interaction with Fe(II)aq and/or S(- II)aq species. Because the solubility of Se(0) species is significantly lower than that of Se(IV), selenium will become much less (bio)available and its migration out of deep HLW repositories may be drastically hindered.

  18. Laser spectroscopic measurement of helium isotope ratios.

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, L.-B.; Mueller, P.; Holt, R. J.; Lu, Z.-T.; O'Connor, T. P.; Sano, Y.; Sturchio, N.; Univ. of Illinois; Univ. of Tokyo; Univ. of Illinois at Chicago

    2003-06-13

    A sensitive laser spectroscopic method has been applied to the quantitative determination of the isotope ratio of helium at the level of {sup 3}He/{sup 4}He = 10{sup -7}--10{sup -5}. The resonant absorption of 1083 nm laser light by the metastable {sup 3}He atoms in a discharge cell was measured with the frequency modulation saturation spectroscopy technique while the abundance of {sup 4}He was measured by a direct absorption technique. The results on three different samples extracted from the atmosphere and commercial helium gas were in good agreement with values obtained with mass spectrometry. The achieved 3{sigma} detection limit of {sup 3}He in helium is 4 x 10{sup -9}. This demonstration required a 200 {mu}L STP sample of He. The sensitivity can be further improved, and the required sample size reduced, by several orders of magnitude with the addition of cavity enhanced spectroscopy.

  19. Spectroscopic evidence for uranium bearing precipitates in vadose zone sediments at the Hanford 300-area site

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Arai, Y.; Marcus, M.A.; Tamura, N.; Davis, J.A.; Zachara, J.M.

    2007-01-01

    Uranium (U) solid-state speciation in vadose zone sediments collected beneath the former North Process Pond (NPP) in the 300 Area of the Hanford site (Washington) was investigated using multi-scale techniques. In 30 day batch experiments, only a small fraction of total U (???7.4%) was released to artificial groundwater solutions equilibrated with 1% pCO2. Synchrotron-based micro-X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy analyses showed that U was distributed among at least two types of species: (i) U discrete grains associated with Cu and (ii) areas with intermediate U concentrations on grains and grain coatings. Metatorbernite (Cu[UO2]2[PO 4]2??8H2O) and uranophane (Ca[UO 2]2[SiO3(OH)]2?? 5H 2O) at some U discrete grains, and muscovite at U intermediate concentration areas, were identified in synchrotron-based micro-X-ray diffraction. Scanning electron microscopy/energy dispersive X-ray analyses revealed 8-10 ??m size metatorbernite particles that were embedded in C-, Al-, and Si-rich coatings on quartz and albite grains. In ??- and bulk-X-ray absorption structure (??-XAS and XAS) spectroscopy analyses, the structure of metatorbernite with additional U-C and U-U coordination environments was consistently observed at U discrete grains with high U concentrations. The consistency of the ??- and bulk-XAS analyses suggests that metatorbernite may comprise a significant fraction of the total U in the sample. The entrapped, micrometer-sized metatorbernite particles in C-, Al-, and Si-rich coatings, along with the more soluble precipitated uranyl carbonates and uranophane, likely control the long-term release of U to water associated with the vadose zone sediments. ?? 2007 American Chemical Society.

  20. An in situ XAS study of ferric iron hydrolysis and precipitation in the presence of perchlorate, nitrate, chloride and sulfate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collins, Richard N.; Rosso, Kevin M.; Rose, Andrew L.; Glover, Chris J.; David Waite, T.

    2016-03-01

    Using a novel combination of in situ potentiometric experiments and quick-scanning XAS we present Fe K-edge XAS spectra (to k = 12 Å-1) during FeIII hydrolysis and precipitation in 0.33 M Fe(ClO4)3, Fe(NO3)3, FeCl3 and Fe2(SO4)3 solutions up to pH 4.8. Edge-sharing FeIII polymers appeared almost immediately upon hydrolysis with strong evidence for a μ-oxo dimer species forming in the Fe(ClO4)3, Fe(NO3)3 and FeCl3 solutions. The effects of SO4 on hydrolysis and polymerization pathways included inhibition of both the formation of the μ-oxo dimer and double corner FeIII bonding, ultimately resulting in the precipitation of schwertmannite. As such, under these experimental conditions, double corner FeIII bonding appears to be critical to the formation of ferrihydrite. The spectral trends indicated that the decomposition/transformation of the dimer was sudden and broadly coincident with shortening average Fe-O bond distances, increased Fe neighbors at ∼3.43 Å and a pre-edge energy transformation suggestive of decreased ligand field strength as well as increasing proportions of tetrahedral FeIII. This result suggests that the incorporation of tetrahedral FeIII into ferrihydrite occurs only at the latter stages of extended polymerization.

  1. Precise Determination of the Direct-Indirect Band Gap Energy Crossover In AlxGa1-xAs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fluegel, Brian; Beaton, Daniel; Alberi, Kirstin; Mascarenhas, Angelo

    2014-03-01

    AlxGa1-xAs is a technologically important semiconductor material system for optoelectronic applications due to its type I band alignment with GaAs under nearly lattice-matched conditions. Heterostructure design often relies on exactly controlling the relative positions of the Γ and X conduction band edges, yet despite over three decades of research on this alloy, the precise energy and composition of the direct-indirect band gap crossover is still not well resolved. We report the results of our most recent investigation of AlxGa1-xAs (0.28 < x<0.42) epitaxial films, in which the observation of concurrent photoluminescence (PL) emission peaks from the direct and indirect band gaps combined with time-resolved PL information yields a precise determination of the direct-indirect band gap crossover energy and composition. This work was supported by the DOE Office of Science, Basic Energy Sciences under contract DE-AC36-08GO28308. Acknowledgement: the samples were provided by John Reno from Sandia National Laboratory.

  2. X-RAY ABSORPTION SPECTROSCOPY OF YB3+-DOPED OPTICAL FIBERS

    SciTech Connect

    Citron, Robert; Kropf, A.J.

    2008-01-01

    Optical fibers doped with Ytterbium-3+ have become increasingly common in fiber lasers and amplifiers. Yb-doped fibers provide the capability to produce high power and short pulses at specific wavelengths, resulting in highly effective gain media. However, little is known about the local structure, distribution, and chemical coordination of Yb3+ in the fibers. This information is necessary to improve the manufacturing process and optical qualities of the fibers. Five fibers doped with Yb3+ were studied using Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy and X-ray Absorption Near Edge Spectroscopy (XANES), in addition to Yb3+ mapping. The Yb3+ distribution in each fiber core was mapped with 2D and 1D intensity scans, which measured X-ray fluorescence over the scan areas. Two of the five fibers examined showed highly irregular Yb3+ distributions in the core center. In four of the five fibers Yb3+ was detected outside of the given fiber core dimensions, suggesting possible Yb3+ diffusion from the core, manufacturing error, or both. X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) analysis has so far proven inconclusive, but did show that the fibers had differing EXAFS spectra. The Yb3+ distribution mapping proved highly useful, but additional modeling and examination of fiber preforms must be conducted to improve XAS analysis, which has been shown to have great potential for the study of similar optical fi bers.

  3. ABSORPTION ANALYZER

    DOEpatents

    Brooksbank, W.A. Jr.; Leddicotte, G.W.; Strain, J.E.; Hendon, H.H. Jr.

    1961-11-14

    A means was developed for continuously computing and indicating the isotopic assay of a process solution and for automatically controlling the process output of isotope separation equipment to provide a continuous output of the desired isotopic ratio. A counter tube is surrounded with a sample to be analyzed so that the tube is exactly in the center of the sample. A source of fast neutrons is provided and is spaced from the sample. The neutrons from the source are thermalized by causing them to pass through a neutron moderator, and the neutrons are allowed to diffuse radially through the sample to actuate the counter. A reference counter in a known sample of pure solvent is also actuated by the thermal neutrons from the neutron source. The number of neutrons which actuate the detectors is a function of a concentration of the elements in solution and their neutron absorption cross sections. The pulses produced by the detectors responsive to each neu tron passing therethrough are amplified and counted. The respective times required to accumulate a selected number of counts are measured by associated timing devices. The concentration of a particular element in solution may be determined by utilizing the following relation: T2/Ti = BCR, where B is a constant proportional to the absorption cross sections, T2 is the time of count collection for the unknown solution, Ti is the time of count collection for the pure solvent, R is the isotopic ratlo, and C is the molar concentration of the element to be determined. Knowing the slope constant B for any element and when the chemical concentration is known, the isotopic concentration may be readily determined, and conversely when the isotopic ratio is known, the chemical concentrations may be determined. (AEC)

  4. Spectroscopic Binary Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batten, A.; Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    Historically, spectroscopic binary stars were binary systems whose nature was discovered by the changing DOPPLER EFFECT or shift of the spectral lines of one or both of the component stars. The observed Doppler shift is a combination of that produced by the constant RADIAL VELOCITY (i.e. line-of-sight velocity) of the center of mass of the whole system, and the variable shift resulting from the o...

  5. New Developments of Broadband Cavity Enhanced Spectroscopic Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walsh, A.; Zhao, D.; Linnartz, H.; Ubachs, W.

    2013-06-01

    In recent years, cavity enhanced spectroscopic techniques, such as cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS), cavity enhanced absorption spectroscopy (CEAS), and broadband cavity enhanced absorption spectroscopy (BBCEAS), have been widely employed as ultra-sensitive methods for the measurement of weak absorptions and in the real-time detection of trace species. In this contribution, we introduce two new cavity enhanced spectroscopic concepts: a) Optomechanical shutter modulated BBCEAS, a variant of BBCEAS capable of measuring optical absorption in pulsed systems with typically low duty cycles. In conventional BBCEAS applications, the latter substantially reduces the signal-to-noise ratio (S/N), consequently also reducing the detection sensitivity. To overcome this, we incorporate a fast optomechanical shutter as a time gate, modulating the detection scheme of BBCEAS and increasing the effective duty cycle reaches a value close to unity. This extends the applications of BBCEAS into pulsed samples and also in time-resolved studies. b) Cavity enhanced self-absorption spectroscopy (CESAS), a new spectroscopic concept capable of studying light emitting matter (plasma, flames, combustion samples) simultaneously in absorption and emission. In CESAS, a sample (plasma, flame or combustion source) is located in an optically stable cavity consisting of two high reflectivity mirrors, and here it acts both as light source and absorbing medium. A high detection sensitivity of weak absorption is reached without the need of an external light source, such as a laser or broadband lamp. The performance is illustrated by the first CESAS result on a supersonically expanding hydrocarbon plasma. We expect CESAS to become a generally applicable analytical tool for real time and in situ diagnostics. A. Walsh, D. Zhao, W. Ubachs, H. Linnartz, J. Phys. Chem. A, {dx.doi.org/10.1021/jp310392n}, in press, 2013. A. Walsh, D. Zhao, H. Linnartz Rev. Sci. Instrum. {84}(2), 021608 2013. A. Walsh, D. Zhao

  6. Sulfur K-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy and time-dependent density functional theory of arsenic dithiocarbamates.

    PubMed

    Donahue, Courtney M; Pacheco, Juan S Lezama; Keith, Jason M; Daly, Scott R

    2014-06-28

    S K-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) and time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) calculations were performed on a series of As[S2CNR2]3 complexes, where R2 = Et2, (CH2)5 and Ph2, to determine how dithiocarbamate substituents attached to N affect As[S2CNR2]3 electronic structure. Complimentary [PPh4][S2CNR2] salts were also studied to compare dithiocarbamate bonding in the absence of As. The XAS results indicate that changing the orientation of the alkyl substituents from trans to cis (R2 = Et2vs. (CH2)5) yields subtle variations whereas differences associated with a change from alkyl to aryl are much more pronounced. For example, despite the differences in As 4p mixing, the first features in the S K-edge XAS spectra of [PPh4][S2CNPh2] and As[S2CNPh2]3 were both shifted by 0.3 eV compared to their alkyl-substituted derivatives. DFT calculations revealed that the unique shift observed for [PPh4][S2CNPh2] is due to phenyl-induced splitting of the π* orbitals delocalized over N, C and S. A similar phenomenon accounts for the shift observed for As[S2CNPh2]3, but the presence of two unique S environments (As-S and As···S) prevented reliable analysis of As-S covalency from the XAS data. In the absence of experimental values, DFT calculations revealed a decrease in As-S orbital mixing in As[S2CNPh2]3 that stems from a redistribution of electron density to S atoms participating in weaker As···S interactions. Simulated spectra obtained from TDDFT calculations reproduce the experimental differences in the S K-edge XAS data, which suggests that the theory is accurately modeling the experimental differences in As-S orbital mixing. The results highlight how S K-edge XAS and DFT can be used cooperatively to understand the electronic structure of low symmetry coordination complexes containing S atoms in different chemical environments. PMID:24811926

  7. Spectroscopically Unlocking Exoplanet Characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, Nikole

    2016-05-01

    Spectroscopy plays a critical role in a number of areas of exoplanet research. The first exoplanets were detected by precisely measuring Doppler shifts in high resolution (R ~ 100,000) stellar spectra, a technique that has become known as the Radial Velocity (RV) method. The RV method provides critical constraints on exoplanet masses, but is currently limited to some degree by robust line shape predictions. Beyond the RV method, spectroscopy plays a critical role in the characterization of exoplanets beyond their mass and radius. The Hubble Space Telescope has spectroscopically observed the atmospheres of exoplanets that transit their host stars as seen from Earth giving us key insights into atmospheric abundances of key atomic and molecular species as well as cloud optical properties. Similar spectroscopic characterization of exoplanet atmospheres will be carried out at higher resolution (R ~ 100-3000) and with broader wavelength coverage with the James Webb Space Telescope. Future missions such as WFIRST that seek to the pave the way toward the detection and characterization of potentially habitable planets will have the capability of directly measuring the spectra of exoplanet atmospheres and potentially surfaces. Our ability to plan for and interpret spectra from exoplanets relies heavily on the fidelity of the spectroscopic databases available and would greatly benefit from further laboratory and theoretical work aimed at optical properties of atomic, molecular, and cloud/haze species in the pressure and temperature regimes relevant to exoplanet atmospheres.

  8. XAS AND XPS CHARACTERIZATION OF MERCURY BINDING ON BROMINATED ACTIVATED CARBON

    EPA Science Inventory

    Brominated powdered activated carbon sorbents have been shown to e quite effective for mercury capture when injected into the flue gas duct at coal-fired power plants and are especially useful when buring Western low-chlorine subbituminous coals. X-ray absorption spectroscopy (X...

  9. Using thermal and spectroscopic (XANES) indices to understand the biological stability of soil organic matter.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gillespie, A. W.; Sanei, H.; Diochon, A.; Tarnocai, C.; Janzen, H.; Regier, T. Z.; Gregorich, E.

    2014-12-01

    Soil organic matter (SOM) composition is a key property that underpins ecosystem productivity. Understanding its physical, chemical and biological properties is important for evaluating its role in carbon (C) and nutrient cycling in terrestrial ecosystems. In particular, the stability of SOM (i.e., resistance to microbial degradation) has important implications in ecosystem processes, including nutrient cycling, emission of greenhouse gases from soil, and C sequestration. Thus there is interest in developing new ways to measure and quantify the labile and stable forms of soil organic carbon. In this presentation, we describe the combined use of thermal decomposition methods based on pyrolysis, and chemical properties using X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS), to describe the stability of soil organic matter. Soils (n=81) for this study were obtained from a wide geographical range and management practices. Controlled respiration studies were conducted on the soils to determine the biodegradability of organic C after 98 days. In the thermal analysis, the sample is subjected to a temperature ramp and pyrolyzed/volatilized organic C was recorded as a function of temperature. Analysis by XAS provided information on the types of C functional groups present in a soil sample. We show that biological stability is well described using a two component model which included thermal stability and C composition chemistry.

  10. Application of X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy to the study of nuclear structural materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Shanshan

    One of key technologies for the next generation nuclear systems are advanced materials, including high temperature structural materials, fast neutron resistance core materials and so on. Local structure determination in these systems, which often are crystallographically intractable, is critical to gaining an understanding of their properties. In this thesis, X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy (XAS), including Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (EXAFS) and X-ray Absorption Near Edge Structure (XANES), is used to examine the geometric and electronic structure of nuclear structural materials under varying conditions. The thesis is divided into two main sections. The first examines the structural analysis of nanostructured ferritic alloys (NFA) which are dispersion strengthened by an ultra high density of Y-Ti-O enriched nano-features, resulting in remarkable high temperature creep strength and radiation damage resistance. Titanium and Yttrium K-edge XAS shows commercial alloys MA957 and J12YWT more closely resemble the as received Fe-14Cr-3W-0.4Ti (wt. %) powders, and mechanically alloyed (MA) powders with 0.25Y2O3 (wt. %). It shows that a significant fraction of substitutional Ti remains dissolved in the (BCC) ferrite matrix. In contrast, annealed powders and hot isostatic press (HIP) consolidated alloys show high temperature heat treatments shift the Y and Ti to more oxidized states that are consistent with combinations of Y2Ti2O7 and, especially, TiO. The second section describes corrosion studies of Pb with 316L stainless steel, molybdenum and spinet (MgAl2O4) at high temperature by XAS. The corrosion of fuel cladding and structural materials by liquid lead at elevated temperatures is an issue that must be considered when designing advanced nuclear systems and high-power spallation neutron targets. The results of ex-situ studies show that a Mo substrate retained a smooth and less corroded surface than 316L stainless steel sample at elevated temperature. In

  11. Incorporation of arsenic in mammal bone: X-ray absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kretschmer, X.; Pingitore, N. E.; Cruz-Jimenez, G.

    2002-12-01

    X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) of the distal tibia of a modern deer, Odocoileus virginianus, revealed that the energy position of the As K edge matched that of a reference arsenic(V) model compound. Comparison of the x-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) of the deer spectrum to the spectra of model As compounds indicated a close match to arsenate(V), e.g., zinc orthoarsenate(5). This indicates that the nearest-neighbor shell of the arsenic in the bone consists of four oxygens in the tetrahedral arrangement typical of arsenic(V) oxysalts. The XANES analysis demonstrates that the arsenic in the deer bone is not associated with an organic compound as a result of methylation. This suggests that the arsenic is associated with the mineral fraction of the bone, most likely with As substituting for P at the latter's structural site in the hydroxyapatite. The XAS data for the deer bone were very noisy due to the low level of arsenic present, just over 1 ppm.. A total of 18 scans, taking nearly a full 8-hour beam shift, were averaged to obtain the spectrum studied. It is not clear that the second neighbor shell can be characterized sufficiently from these data to confirm that As substitutes for P in hydroxyapatite. We conducted our XAS experiments on beam line 4-3 at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory. Data were collected in the fluorescence mode, using a solid state, 13-element Ge-detector. The energy reference was As(0) metal foil run parasitically in transmission mode during collection of the bone spectra. The edge shift seen in the experimental and As(V) model compound relative to the energy position of the arsenic(0) foil is consistent with the additional energy required to photoeject the 1-s electron of As(V), relative to that required for As(0). Arsenic content of the deer bone was determined by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry.

  12. Structural characterization of vanadium oxide catalysts supported on nanostructured silica SBA-15 using X-ray absorption spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    The local structure of vanadium oxide supported on nanostructured SiO2 (VxOy/SBA-15) was investigated by in situ X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS). Because the number of potential parameters in XAS data analysis often exceeds the number of "independent" parameters, evaluating the reliability and significance of a particular fitting procedure is mandatory. The number of independent parameters (Nyquist) may not be sufficient. Hence, in addition to the number of independent parameters, a novel approach to evaluate the significance of structural fitting parameters in XAS data analysis is introduced. Three samples with different V loadings (i.e. 2.7 wt %, 5.4 wt %, and 10.8 wt %) were employed. Thermal treatment in air at 623 K resulted in characteristic structural changes of the V oxide species. Independent of the V loading, the local structure around V centers in dehydrated VxOy/SBA-15 corresponded to an ordered arrangement of adjacent V2O7 units. Moreover, the V2O7 units were found to persist under selective oxidation reaction conditions. PMID:20181222

  13. Arsenic speciation in synthetic gypsum (CaSO4·2H2O): A synchrotron XAS, single-crystal EPR, and pulsed ENDOR study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Jinru; Chen, Ning; Nilges, Mark J.; Pan, Yuanming

    2013-04-01

    Gypsum (CaSO4·2H2O) is a major by-product of mining and milling processes of borate, phosphate and uranium deposits worldwide and, therefore, potentially plays an important role in the stability and bioavailability of heavy metalloids, including As, in tailings and surrounding areas. Gypsum containing 1900 and 185 ppm As, synthesized with Na2HAsO4·7H2O and NaAsO2 in the starting materials, respectively, have been investigated by synchrotron X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS), single-crystal electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy (EPR), and pulsed electron nuclear double resonance spectroscopy (ENDOR). Quantitative analyses of As K edge XANES and EXAFS spectra show that arsenic occurs in both +3 and +5 oxidation states and the As3+/As5+ value varies from 0.35 to 0.79. Single-crystal EPR spectra of gamma-ray-irradiated gypsum reveal two types of arsenic-associated oxyradicals: [AsO3]2- and an [AsO2]2-. The [AsO3]2- center is characterized by principal 75As hyperfine coupling constants of A1 = 1952.0(2) MHz, A2 = 1492.6(2) MHz and A3 = 1488.7(2) MHz, with the unique A axis along the S-O1 bond direction, and contains complex 1H superhyperfine structures that have been determined by pulsed ENDOR. These results suggest that the [AsO3]2- center formed from electron trapping on the central As5+ ion of a substitutional (AsO4)3- group after removal of an O1 atom. The [AsO2]2- center is characterized by its unique A(75As) axis approximately perpendicular to the O1-S-O2 plane and the A2 axis along the S-O2 bond direction, consistent with electron trapping on the central As3+ ion of a substitutional (AsO3)3- group after removal of an O2 atom. These results confirm lattice-bound As5+ and As3+ in gypsum and point to potential application of this mineral for immobilization and removal of arsenic pollution.

  14. Iron Transformation Pathways and Redox Micro-Environments in Seafloor Sulfide-Mineral Deposits: Spatially Resolved Fe XAS and δ(57/54)Fe Observations.

    PubMed

    Toner, Brandy M; Rouxel, Olivier J; Santelli, Cara M; Bach, Wolfgang; Edwards, Katrina J

    2016-01-01

    Hydrothermal sulfide chimneys located along the global system of oceanic spreading centers are habitats for microbial life during active venting. Hydrothermally extinct, or inactive, sulfide deposits also host microbial communities at globally distributed sites. The main goal of this study is to describe Fe transformation pathways, through precipitation and oxidation-reduction (redox) reactions, and examine transformation products for signatures of biological activity using Fe mineralogy and stable isotope approaches. The study includes active and inactive sulfides from the East Pacific Rise 9°50'N vent field. First, the mineralogy of Fe(III)-bearing precipitates is investigated using microprobe X-ray absorption spectroscopy (μXAS) and X-ray diffraction (μXRD). Second, laser-ablation (LA) and micro-drilling (MD) are used to obtain spatially-resolved Fe stable isotope analysis by multicollector-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (MC-ICP-MS). Eight Fe-bearing minerals representing three mineralogical classes are present in the samples: oxyhydroxides, secondary phyllosilicates, and sulfides. For Fe oxyhydroxides within chimney walls and layers of Si-rich material, enrichments in both heavy and light Fe isotopes relative to pyrite are observed, yielding a range of δ(57)Fe values up to 6‰. Overall, several pathways for Fe transformation are observed. Pathway 1 is characterized by precipitation of primary sulfide minerals from Fe(II)aq-rich fluids in zones of mixing between vent fluids and seawater. Pathway 2 is also consistent with zones of mixing but involves precipitation of sulfide minerals from Fe(II)aq generated by Fe(III) reduction. Pathway 3 is direct oxidation of Fe(II) aq from hydrothermal fluids to form Fe(III) precipitates. Finally, Pathway 4 involves oxidative alteration of pre-existing sulfide minerals to form Fe(III). The Fe mineralogy and isotope data do not support or refute a unique biological role in sulfide alteration. The findings

  15. Iron Transformation Pathways and Redox Micro-Environments in Seafloor Sulfide-Mineral Deposits: Spatially Resolved Fe XAS and δ(57/54)Fe Observations.

    PubMed

    Toner, Brandy M; Rouxel, Olivier J; Santelli, Cara M; Bach, Wolfgang; Edwards, Katrina J

    2016-01-01

    Hydrothermal sulfide chimneys located along the global system of oceanic spreading centers are habitats for microbial life during active venting. Hydrothermally extinct, or inactive, sulfide deposits also host microbial communities at globally distributed sites. The main goal of this study is to describe Fe transformation pathways, through precipitation and oxidation-reduction (redox) reactions, and examine transformation products for signatures of biological activity using Fe mineralogy and stable isotope approaches. The study includes active and inactive sulfides from the East Pacific Rise 9°50'N vent field. First, the mineralogy of Fe(III)-bearing precipitates is investigated using microprobe X-ray absorption spectroscopy (μXAS) and X-ray diffraction (μXRD). Second, laser-ablation (LA) and micro-drilling (MD) are used to obtain spatially-resolved Fe stable isotope analysis by multicollector-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (MC-ICP-MS). Eight Fe-bearing minerals representing three mineralogical classes are present in the samples: oxyhydroxides, secondary phyllosilicates, and sulfides. For Fe oxyhydroxides within chimney walls and layers of Si-rich material, enrichments in both heavy and light Fe isotopes relative to pyrite are observed, yielding a range of δ(57)Fe values up to 6‰. Overall, several pathways for Fe transformation are observed. Pathway 1 is characterized by precipitation of primary sulfide minerals from Fe(II)aq-rich fluids in zones of mixing between vent fluids and seawater. Pathway 2 is also consistent with zones of mixing but involves precipitation of sulfide minerals from Fe(II)aq generated by Fe(III) reduction. Pathway 3 is direct oxidation of Fe(II) aq from hydrothermal fluids to form Fe(III) precipitates. Finally, Pathway 4 involves oxidative alteration of pre-existing sulfide minerals to form Fe(III). The Fe mineralogy and isotope data do not support or refute a unique biological role in sulfide alteration. The findings

  16. Iron transformation pathways and redox micro-environments in seafloor sulfide-mineral deposits: Spatially resolved Fe XAS and δ57/54Fe observations

    DOE PAGES

    Toner, Brandy M.; Rouxel, Olivier J.; Santelli, Cara M.; Bach, Wolfgang; Edwards, Katrina J.

    2016-05-10

    Hydrothermal sulfide chimneys located along the global system of oceanic spreading centers are habitats for microbial life during active venting. Hydrothermally extinct, or inactive, sulfide deposits also host microbial communities at globally distributed sites. The main goal of this study is to describe Fe transformation pathways, through precipitation and oxidation-reduction (redox) reactions, and examine transformation products for signatures of biological activity using Fe mineralogy and stable isotope approaches. The study includes active and inactive sulfides from the East Pacific Rise 9°50'N vent field. First, the mineralogy of Fe(III)-bearing precipitates is investigated using microprobe X-ray absorption spectroscopy (μXAS) and X-ray diffractionmore » (μXRD). Second, laser-ablation (LA) and micro-drilling (MD) are used to obtain spatially-resolved Fe stable isotope analysis by multicollector-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (MC-ICP-MS). Eight Fe-bearing minerals representing three mineralogical classes are present in the samples: oxyhydroxides, secondary phyllosilicates, and sulfides. For Fe oxyhydroxides within chimney walls and layers of Si-rich material, enrichments in both heavy and light Fe isotopes relative to pyrite are observed, yielding a range of δ57Fe values up to 6‰. Overall, several pathways for Fe transformation are observed. Pathway 1 is characterized by precipitation of primary sulfide minerals from Fe(II)aq-rich fluids in zones of mixing between vent fluids and seawater. Pathway 2 is also consistent with zones of mixing but involves precipitation of sulfide minerals from Fe(II)aq generated by Fe(III) reduction. Pathway 3 is direct oxidation of Fe(II) aq from hydrothermal fluids to form Fe(III) precipitates. Finally, Pathway 4 involves oxidative alteration of pre-existing sulfide minerals to form Fe(III). The Fe mineralogy and isotope data do not support or refute a unique biological role in sulfide alteration. The

  17. Iron Transformation Pathways and Redox Micro-Environments in Seafloor Sulfide-Mineral Deposits: Spatially Resolved Fe XAS and δ57/54Fe Observations

    PubMed Central

    Toner, Brandy M.; Rouxel, Olivier J.; Santelli, Cara M.; Bach, Wolfgang; Edwards, Katrina J.

    2016-01-01

    Hydrothermal sulfide chimneys located along the global system of oceanic spreading centers are habitats for microbial life during active venting. Hydrothermally extinct, or inactive, sulfide deposits also host microbial communities at globally distributed sites. The main goal of this study is to describe Fe transformation pathways, through precipitation and oxidation-reduction (redox) reactions, and examine transformation products for signatures of biological activity using Fe mineralogy and stable isotope approaches. The study includes active and inactive sulfides from the East Pacific Rise 9°50′N vent field. First, the mineralogy of Fe(III)-bearing precipitates is investigated using microprobe X-ray absorption spectroscopy (μXAS) and X-ray diffraction (μXRD). Second, laser-ablation (LA) and micro-drilling (MD) are used to obtain spatially-resolved Fe stable isotope analysis by multicollector-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (MC-ICP-MS). Eight Fe-bearing minerals representing three mineralogical classes are present in the samples: oxyhydroxides, secondary phyllosilicates, and sulfides. For Fe oxyhydroxides within chimney walls and layers of Si-rich material, enrichments in both heavy and light Fe isotopes relative to pyrite are observed, yielding a range of δ57Fe values up to 6‰. Overall, several pathways for Fe transformation are observed. Pathway 1 is characterized by precipitation of primary sulfide minerals from Fe(II)aq-rich fluids in zones of mixing between vent fluids and seawater. Pathway 2 is also consistent with zones of mixing but involves precipitation of sulfide minerals from Fe(II)aq generated by Fe(III) reduction. Pathway 3 is direct oxidation of Fe(II) aq from hydrothermal fluids to form Fe(III) precipitates. Finally, Pathway 4 involves oxidative alteration of pre-existing sulfide minerals to form Fe(III). The Fe mineralogy and isotope data do not support or refute a unique biological role in sulfide alteration. The findings

  18. Dependence of GaAs-AlxGa1 - xAs heterostructures on Al composition for metal-semiconductor field-effect transistor operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiruma, Kenji; Mori, Mitsuhiro; Kakibayashi, Hiroji; Ihara, Ayako; Takahashi, Susumu; Yanokura, Eiji

    1989-08-01

    High-quality GaAs-AlxGa1-xAs heterostructures for metal-semiconductor field-effect transistor (MESFET) applications have been grown by metalorganic vapor-phase epitaxy. High electron Hall mobility of up to 4000 cm2/(V s) for a carrier concentration of 3.5×1017 cm-3 was obtained for Si-doped GaAs grown on AlxGa1-xAs. It was learned that the electron Hall mobility of GaAs is not dependent on the Al composition of the AlxGa1-xAs buffer layer for 0≤x≤0.8. Good drain current-voltage saturation characteristics were observed for GaAs MESFETs with a 0.3-μm gate length and AlxGa1-xAs buffer layers. At drain voltages below 3 V, the drain conductance was at its lowest for Al composition around x=0.6. However, an anomalous peak in the drain conductance was observed at drain voltages of 3-6 V and at Al compositions of x=0.6 and 0.8. Drain conductance also increased as x did for x≥0.45 when measured at a microwave frequency. These phenomena can be understood by considering electron injection into the buffer/substrate region from the GaAs channel. The amount of this injection coincided well with the reduction in the conduction-band energy barrier at the GaAs-AlxGa1-xAs heterointerface for x>0.45 for electron transport.

  19. A computer method for the automatic reduction of spectroscopic data.

    PubMed

    Ditzel, E F; Giddings, L E

    1967-12-01

    A computer program, written in Fortran IV and for use with an associated spectral comparator, has been developed at The Naval Research Laboratory for the purpose of automatically reducing spectroscopic data. A Datex digitalizing magnetic tape recorder in conjunction with a modified Jarrell-Ash microphotometer allows the reading of spectral information from a photographic plate at the rate of twentyfive data pairs per second. Spectra of local interest analyzed by this method are (1) absorption, (2) emission, (3) plasma type, obtained from time-resolved spectroscopic techniques, and (4) solar echellegrams obtained from rocket probings of the upper atmosphere. Markedly useful features of the program are its capabilities of (a) recognizing spectral peaks from a background of variable density, (b) obtaining absolute values for the radiance or irradiance. An essential characteristic of the method is the saving of significant amounts of time in the reduction of photographic spectroscopic data.

  20. Note: Application of a pixel-array area detector to simultaneous single crystal x-ray diffraction and x-ray absorption spectroscopy measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Cheng-Jun Brewe, Dale L.; Heald, Steve M.; Zhang, Bangmin; Chen, Jing-Sheng; Chow, G. M.; Venkatesan, T.

    2014-04-15

    X-ray diffraction (XRD) and X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) are two main x-ray techniques in synchrotron radiation facilities. In this Note, we present an experimental setup capable of performing simultaneous XRD and XAS measurements by the application of a pixel-array area detector. For XRD, the momentum transfer in specular diffraction was measured by scanning the X-ray energy with fixed incoming and outgoing x-ray angles. By selecting a small fixed region of the detector to collect the XRD signal, the rest of the area was available for collecting the x-ray fluorescence for XAS measurements. The simultaneous measurement of XRD and X-ray absorption near edge structure for Pr{sub 0.67}Sr{sub 0.33}MnO{sub 3} film was demonstrated as a proof of principle for future time-resolved pump-probe measurements. A static sample makes it easy to maintain an accurate overlap of the X-ray spot and laser pump beam.

  1. Photoluminescence properties of Sn-related donor state in Al(x)Ga(1-x)As

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Junyog; Iida, Seishi; Huang, Qisheng; Fukuda, Tsuguo

    1993-08-01

    We have investigated the near-gap recombinations in Sn-doped Al(x)Ga(1-x)As by photoluminescence. By analyzing the variations of spectral lineshapes under various excitation intensities, only one type of recombination was assigned to associated with the Sn-related donor state, which was different from the hydrogenlike shallow donor states and the DX centers. Phonon replicas were observed to accompany the recombination in the samples with high AlAs mole fractions of direct gaps, as well as in those of indirect gaps. The Franck-Condon shift and the phonon energy of the recombination were found to increase with increasing AlAs mole fraction. This behavior was explained in terms of a variation of local lattice distortion around an ionized Sn-related donor and a weighted average of two local vibrational mode frequencies of the Sn-related donor.

  2. Free-standing AlxGa1-xAs heterostructures by gas-phase etching of germanium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cole, Garrett D.; Bai, Yu; Aspelmeyer, Markus; Fitzgerald, Eugene A.

    2010-06-01

    We outline a facile fabrication technique for the realization of free-standing AlxGa1-xAs heterostructures of arbitrary aluminum content. Utilizing xenon difluoride (XeF2) we rapidly and selectively remove a sacrificial germanium (Ge) underlayer in a room temperature gas-phase etching procedure. We demonstrate two possibilities for exploiting this unique process: (1) bulk micromachining of a suspended high-frequency low-dissipation micro-optomechanical resonator consisting of an epitaxial GaAs/AlAs multilayer grown on a Ge substrate and (2) epitaxial lift-off of a GaAs film via removal of an embedded Ge sacrificial layer, resulting in lateral etch rates up to 3 mm/h and a conservative selectivity of ˜106.

  3. PySpline: A Modern, Cross-Platform Program for the Processing of Raw Averaged XAS Edge and EXAFS Data

    SciTech Connect

    Tenderholt, A.; Hedman, B.; Hodgson, K.O.

    2007-01-08

    PySpline is a modern computer program for processing raw averaged XAS and EXAFS data using an intuitive approach which allows the user to see the immediate effect of various processing parameters on the resulting k- and R-space data. The Python scripting language and Qt and Qwt widget libraries were chosen to meet the design requirement that it be cross-platform (i.e. versions for Windows, Mac OS X, and Linux). PySpline supports polynomial pre- and post-edge background subtraction, splining of the EXAFS region with a multi-segment polynomial spline, and Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) of the resulting k{sup 3}-weighted EXAFS data.

  4. Tunneling calculations for GaAs-Al(x)Ga(1-x)As graded band-gap sawtooth superlattices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forrest, Kathrine; Meijer, Paul H. E.

    1990-01-01

    The transmission resonance spectra and tunneling current-voltage characteristics for direct conduction band electrons in sawtooth GaAs-Al(x)Ga(1-x)As superlattices are computed. Only direct-gap interfaces are considered. It is found that sawtooth superlattices exhibit resonant tunneling similar to that in step superlattices, manifested by correlation of peaks and regions of negative differential resistance in the current-voltage curves with transmission resonances. The Stark shift of the resonances of step-barrier superlattices is a linear function of the field, whereas in sawtooth superlattices under strong fields the shift is not a simple function of the field. This follows from the different ways in which the two structures deform under uniform electric fields: the sawtooth deforms into a staircase, at which field strength all barriers to tunneling are eradicated. The step-barrier superlattice always presents some barrier to tunneling, no matter how high the electric field strength.

  5. Identification of the Ga interstitial in Al(x)Ga(1-x)As by optically detected magnetic resonance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kennedy, T. A.; Spencer, M. G.

    1986-01-01

    A new optically detected magnetic resonance spectrum in Al(x)Ga(1-x)As is reported and assigned to native Ga interstitials. Luminescence-quenching signals were observed over the energy region from 0.75 to 1.1 eV. The optically detected magnetic resonance is nearly isotropic, with spin-Hamiltonian parameters g = 2.025 + or - 0.006, central hyperfine splitting A(Ga-69) = 0.050 + or - 0.001/cm, and A(Ga-71) = 0.064 + or - 0.001/cm for H near the 001 line. The strong hyperfine coupling denotes an electronic state of A1 symmetry, which current theories predict for the Ga interstitial but not the Ga antisite. The slight anisotropy probably indicates that the Ga(i) is paired with a second, unknown defect.

  6. Noise Characteristics of 100nm-scaleGaAs/Al_xGa_{1-x}As Scanning Hall Probes

    SciTech Connect

    Hicks, C.W.; Luan, L.; Moler, K.A.; Zeldov, E.; /Weizmann Inst.

    2007-03-23

    The authors have fabricated and characterized GaAs/Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1-x}As two-dimensional electron gas scanning Hall probes for imaging perpendicular magnetic fields at surfaces. The Hall crosses range from 85 x 85 to 1000 x 1000 nm{sup 2}. They study low-frequency noise in these probes, especially random telegraph noise, and show that low-frequency noise can be significantly reduced by optimizing the voltage on a gate over the Hall cross. The authors demonstrate a 100 nm Hall probe with a sensitivity of 0.5 G/{radical}Hz (flux sensitivity of 0.25m {Phi}{sub 0}/{radical}Hz; spin sensitivity of 1.2 x 10{sup 4} {mu}{sub B}/{radical}Hz) at 3 Hz and 9 K.

  7. Active sites in Cu-SSZ-13 deNOx catalyst under reaction conditions: a XAS/XES perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lomachenko, Kirill A.; Borfecchia, Elisa; Bordiga, Silvia; Soldatov, Alexander V.; Beato, Pablo; Lamberti, Carlo

    2016-05-01

    Cu-SSZ-13 is a highly active catalyst for the NH3-assisted selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of the harmful nitrogen oxides (NOx, x=1, 2). Since the catalytically active sites for this reaction are mainly represented by isolated Cu ions incorporated into the zeolitic framework, element-selective studies of Cu local environment are crucial to fully understand the enhanced catalytic properties of this material. Herein, we highlight the recent advances in the characterization of the most abundant Cu-sites in Cu-SSZ-13 upon different reaction-relevant conditions made employing XAS and XES spectroscopies, complemented by computational analysis. A concise review of the most relevant literature is also presented.

  8. Ab Initio XAS Debye-Waller Factors Beyond the Harmonic Approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vila, Fernando; Rossner, H. H.; Krappe, H. J.; Rehr, J. J.

    2007-03-01

    We introduce an ab initio approach to calculate the temperature dependent vibrational effects in x-ray absorption spectra beyond the harmonic approximation. Instead of relying on empirical models, we apply electronic structure theory to determine the dynamical matrix of the system, from which the appropriate vibrational densities of state can be obtained using a Lanczos recursion algorithm [2]. By combining thermodynamic perturbation theory and the quasi-harmonic approximation we obtain x-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) cumulants such as the mean square relative displacement (2nd cumulant), the thermal expansion (first cumulant), the asymmetry of the distribution (third cumulant) and the perpendicular motion contribution to the DW factor. Other quantities of interest such as mean square atomic displacements are also discussed. [2]H.J. Krappe and H.H. Rossner, Phys. Rev. B70, 104102 (2004).

  9. Spectroscopic survey of LAMOST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yongheng

    2014-07-01

    LAMOST is a special reflecting Schmidt telescope. LAMOST breaks through the bottleneck of the large scale spectroscopic survey observation with both large aperture (effective aperture of 3.6 - 4.9m) and wide field of view (5 degrees). It is an innovative active reflecting Schmidt configuration achieved by changing mirror surface continuously to achieve a series different reflecting Schmidt system in different moments. By using the parallel controllable fiber positioning technique, the focal surface of 1.75 meters in diameter accommodates 4000 optical fibers. Also, LAMOST has 16 spectrographs with 32 CCD cameras. LAMOST is the telescope of the highest spectrum acquiring rate. As a national large scientific project, LAMOST project was proposed formally in 1996. The construction was started in 2001 and completed in 2008. After commission period, LAMOST pilot survey was started in October 2011 and spectroscopic survey began in September 2012. From October 2011 to June 2013, LAMOST has obtained more than 2 million spectra of celestial objects. There are 1.7 million spectra of stars, in which the stellar parameters (effective temperature, surface gravity, metalicitiy and radial velocity) of more than 1 million stars was obtained. In the first period of spectroscopic survey of LAMOST, 5 million of stellar spectra will be obtained and will make substantial contribution to the study of the stellar astrophysics and the structure of the Galaxy, such as the spheroid substructure of the Galaxy, the galactic gravitational potential and the distribution of the dark matter in the Galaxy, the extremely metal poor stars and hypervelocity stars, the 3D extinction in the Galaxy, the structure of thin and thick disks of the Galaxy, and so on.

  10. Nickel L-edge and K-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy of non-innocent Ni[S₂C₂(CF₃)₂]₂(n) series (n = -2, -1, 0): direct probe of nickel fractional oxidation state changes.

    PubMed

    Gu, Weiwei; Wang, Hongxin; Wang, Kun

    2014-05-01

    A series of nickel dithiolene complexes Ni[S2C2(CF3)2]2(n) (n = -2, -1, 0) has been investigated using Ni L- and K-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS). The L3 centroid shifts about 0.3 eV for a change of one unit in the formal oxidation state (or 0.3 eV per oxi), corresponding to ~33% of the shift for Ni oxides or fluorides (about 0.9 eV per oxi). The K-edge XAS edge position shifts about 0.7 eV per oxi, corresponding to ~38% of that for Ni oxides (1.85 eV per oxi). In addition, Ni L sum rule analysis found the Ni(3d) ionicity in the frontier orbitals being 50.5%, 44.0% and 38.5% respectively (for n = -2, -1, 0), in comparison with their formal oxidation states (of Ni(II), Ni(III), and Ni(IV)). For the first time, direct and quantitative measurement of the Ni fractional oxidation state changes becomes possible for Ni dithiolene complexes, illustrating the power of L-edge XAS and L sum rule analysis in such a study. The Ni L-edge and K-edge XAS can be used in a complementary manner to better assess the oxidation states for Ni.

  11. Electronic structural changes of the electrochemically Li-ion deintercalated LiNi 0.8Co 0.15Al 0.05O 2 cathode material investigated by X-ray absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Won-Sub; Chung, Kyung Yoon; McBreen, James; Fischer, Daniel A.; Yang, Xiao-Qing

    In situ hard X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) at metal K-edges and soft XAS at O K-edge and metal L-edges have been carried out during the first charging process for the layered Li 1- xNi 0.8Co 0.15Al 0.05O 2 cathode material. The metal K-edge XAS results show that the major charge compensation at the metal site during Li-ion deintercalation is achieved by the oxidation of Ni ions, while the cobalt ions remain mostly unchanged in the Co 3+ state. Ni L II,III-edge and O K-edge XAS results in both the fluorescence yield (FY) and partial electron yield (PEY) modes show that substantial amount of Ni ions at the surface of LiNi 0.8Co 0.15Al 0.05O 2 powders exist as Ni 2+, whereas most of Ni ions in the bulk are in the form of Ni 3+. Therefore, if the PEY mode, which is a surface-sensitive technique, is used alone, the interpretation of the results is limited to the surface structures only. In order to get the full picture of both the surface and the bulk, the FY mode and PEY mode should be used simultaneously.

  12. Evidence of CuI/CuII Redox Process by X-ray Absorption and EPR Spectroscopy: Direct Synthesis of Dihydrofurans from b-Ketocarbonyl Derivatives and Olefins

    SciTech Connect

    Yi, Hong; Liao, Zhixiong; Zhang, Guanghui; Zhang, Guoting; Fan, Chao; Zhang, Xu; Bunel, Emilio E.; Pao, Chih-Wen; Lee, Jyh-Fu; Lei, Aiwen

    2015-01-01

    Abstract: The CuI/CuII and CuI/CuIII catalytic cycles have been subject to intense debate in the field of copper-catalyzed oxidative coupling reactions. A mechanistic study on the CuI/CuII redox process, by X-ray absorption (XAS) and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopies, has elucidated the reduction mechanism of CuII to CuI by 1,3-diketone and detailed investigation revealed that the halide ion is important for the reduction process. The oxidative nature of the thereby-formed CuI has also been studied by XAS and EPR spectroscopy. This mechanistic information is applicable to the copper-catalyzed oxidative cyclization of b-ketocarbonyl derivatives to dihydrofurans. This protocol provides an ideal route to highly substituted dihydrofuran rings from easily available 1,3-dicarbonyls and olefins. Copper

  13. Effect of silica capping on the oxidation of Fe3O4 nanoparticles in dispersion revealed by x-ray absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warland, A.; Antoniak, C.; Darbandi, M.; Weis, C.; Landers, J.; Keune, W.; Wende, H.

    2012-06-01

    Fe3O4 nanoparticles have been investigated as they are biocompatible and their surface can be functionalized. We synthesized iron oxide nanoparticles using a water-in-oil microemulsion method. Bare and silica-coated iron oxide nanoparticles of a core size of 6 nm dispersed in ethanol have been investigated by means of x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS). Due to a dedicated experimental setup the particles can be measured directly in dispersion. XAS allows us to disentangle the contributions of the Fe2+ and Fe3+ ions and therefore to estimate the amount of Fe3O4 in the particles. In case of the silica coated particles a high amount of magnetite was obtained. In contrast, the bare nanoparticles showed indications of a further oxidation into γ-Fe2O3 even in dispersion.

  14. Solid-Phase Speciation of Arsenic As the Primary Control on Dissolved As Concentrations in a Glacial Aquifer System: Quantifying Speciation of Arsenic in Glacial Aquifer Solids with μXAS Mapping.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicholas, S. L.; Gowan, A. S.; Knaeble, A. R.; Erickson, M. L.; Woodruff, L. G.; Marcus, M.; Toner, B. M.

    2014-12-01

    Western Minnesota, USA, is a regional locus of drinking-water wells with high arsenic (As) (As>10µgL-1). Arsenic concentrations vary widely among neighboring wells with otherwise similar water chemistry [1,2]. As(III) should be the most mobile As species in Minnesota well waters (median Eh in As affected wells is -50mV). This As is geogenic, sourced from glacial deposits derived from Cretaceous sedimentary bedrock (dolostone, limestone, shale). Our hypothesis is that As speciation in the solid phase is the important factor controlling the introduction of As to groundwater—more significant in this region than absolute As concentrations or landscape variability. Our previous research used micro-X-ray absorption spectroscopy (µXAS) speciation mapping [3] on archived glacial tills (stored dry at room temperature in air). µXAS results from this material showed that As in a reduced chemical state within the till aquitard is spatially correlated with iron sulfide at the micron scale. Conversley, As in aquifer sediments was mainly oxidized As(V). At the aquifer-aquitard contact As was observed as a mixture of both reduced and oxidized forms. This suggests that the aquifer-aquitard contact is a geochemically active zone in which reduced As species present within glacial till are converted to As(V) through complex redox processes, and subsequently release into aquifer sediments. Our current research applies the same methods to describe As speciation in samples collected from fresh cores of glacial sediment and frozen under argon in the field. Preliminary results are similar to our previous work in that As is, in general, more reduced in aquitard sediments, and more oxidized at the contact and in aquifer sediments. Arsenic(III) was preserved as a minor consitutent in ambient archived cores but is a more significant constituent in fresh, anaerobically preserved cores. Results will be presented comparing anaerobic samples with ambient-air aliquots of the same sample to

  15. X-ray absorption spectroscopy and EPR studies of oriented spinach thylakoid preparations

    SciTech Connect

    Andrews, J.C. |

    1995-08-01

    In this study, oriented Photosystem II (PS II) particles from spinach chloroplasts are studied with electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) to determine more details of the structure of the oxygen evolving complex (OEC). The nature of halide binding to Mn is also studied with Cl K-edge and Mn EXAFS (extended x-ray absorption fine structure) of Mn-Cl model compounds, and with Mn EXAFS of oriented PS II in which Br has replaced Cl. Attention is focused on the following: photosynthesis and the oxygen evolving complex; determination of mosaic spread in oriented photosystem II particles from signal II EPR measurement; oriented EXAFS--studies of PS II in the S{sub 2} state; structural changes in PS II as a result of treatment with ammonia: EPR and XAS studies; studies of halide binding to Mn: Cl K-edge and Mn EXAFS of Mn-Cl model compounds and Mn EXAFS of oriented Br-treated photosystem II.

  16. In Situ X-Ray Absorption Spectroscopy Study of the LiNiO2 Electrode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mansour, A. N.; McBreen, J.; Melendres, C. A.

    1997-03-01

    LiNiO2 is one of the most promising active material for the development of novel 4V rechargeable lithium batteries. Recent x-ray diffraction studies showed that the electrochemical reactivity of this electrode is sensitive to the structure of the starting material as well as the charged products. To further examine this material, we have conducted an x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) study to determine the structure of this electrode as a function of its charge state. Specifically, the x-ray absorption Ni K-edge energy, the pre-edge structure, and local structure parameters such as bond lengths, coordination numbers and disorders were investigated at various states of charge corresponding to Li_(1-x)NiO2 for x values of 0.0, 0.11, 0.23, 0.34, 0.45, 0.82, and 0.99. The charging which proceeds via lithium de-intercalation was conducted using constant current anodization at 0.5 mA in a non aqueous electrolyte consisting of 1M LiPF6 in 1:1:3 propylene ! carbonate, ethylene carbonate and dimethyl carbonate. The XAS results for this electrode will be compared with those of γ-NiOOH and KNiIO_6, the latter being used as a reference for quadrivalent nickel.

  17. Evaluation of iron-containing carbon nanotubes by near edge X-ray absorption technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osorio, A. G.; Bergmann, C. P.

    2015-10-01

    The synthesis of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) via Chemical Vapor Deposition method with ferrocene results in CNTs filled with Fe-containing nanoparticles. The present work proposes a novel route to characterize the Fe phases in CNTs inherent to the synthesis process. CNTs were synthesized and, afterwards, the CNTs were heat treated at 1000 °C for 20 min in an inert atmosphere during a thermogravimetric experiment. X-Ray Absorption Spectroscopy (XAS) experiments were performed on the CNTs before and after the heat treatment and, also, during the heat treatment, e.g., in situ tests were performed while several Near-Edge X-Ray Absorption (XANES) spectra were collected during the heating of the samples. The XAS technique was successfully applied to evaluate the phases encapsulated by CNTs. Phase transformations of the Fe-based nanoparticles were also observed from iron carbide to metallic iron when the in situ experiments were performed. Results also indicated that the applied synthesis method guarantees that Fe phases are not oxidize. In addition, the results show that heat treatment under inert atmosphere can control which phase remains encapsulated by the CNTs.

  18. X-ray absorption spectroscopy as a probe of dissolved polysulfides in lithium sulfur batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pascal, Tod; Prendergast, David

    2015-03-01

    There has been enormous interest lately in lithium sulfur batteries, since they have 5 times the theoretical capacity of lithium ion batteries. Large-scale adoption of this technology has been hampered by numerous shortcomings, chiefly the poor utilization of the active cathode material and rapid capacity fading during cycling. Overcoming these limitations requires methods capable of identifying and quantifying the products of the poorly understood electrochemical reactions. One recent advance has been the use of X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS), an element-specific probe of the unoccupied energy levels around an excited atom upon absorption of an X-ray photon, to identify the reaction products and intermediates. In this talk, we'll present first principles molecular dynamics and spectral simulations of dissolved lithium polysulfide species, showing how finite temperature dynamics, molecular geometry, molecular charge state and solvent environment conspire to determine the peak positions and intensity of the XAS. We'll present a spectral analysis of the radical (-1e charge) species, and reveal a unique low energy feature that can be used to identify these species from their more common dianion (-2e charge) counterparts.

  19. Spectroscopic survey of LAMOST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yongheng

    2015-08-01

    LAMOST is a special reflecting Schmidt telescope. LAMOST breaks through the bottleneck of the large scale spectroscopic survey observation with both large aperture (effective aperture of 3.6 - 4.9m) and wide field of view (5 degrees). It is an innovative active reflecting Schmidt configuration achieved by changing mirror surface continuously to achieve a series different reflecting Schmidt system in different moments. By using the parallel controllable fiber positioning technique, the focal surface of 1.75 meters in diameter accommodates 4000 optical fibers. Also, LAMOST has 16 spectrographs with 32 CCD cameras. LAMOST is the telescope of the highest spectrum acquiring rate.In the spectroscopic survey of LAMOST from October 2011 to June 2014, LAMOST has obtained more than 4.13 million spectra of celestial objects. There are 3.27 million spectra of stars, in which the stellar parameters of 2.16 million stars were obtained.In the five-year regular survey upto 2017, LAMOST will obtaine 5 million stellar spectra, which would make substantial contribution to the study of the stellar astrophysics and the structure of the Galaxy, such as the spheroid substructure of the Galaxy, the galactic gravitational potential and the distribution of the dark matter in the Galaxy, the extremely metal poor stars and hypervelocity stars, the 3D extinction in the Galaxy, the structure of thin and thick disks of the Galaxy, and so on.

  20. New infrared spectroscopic database for bromine nitrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, Georg; Birk, Manfred

    2016-08-01

    Fourier transform infrared measurements of bromine nitrate have been performed in the spectral region 675-1400 cm-1 at 0.014 cm-1 spectral resolution. Absorption cross sections were derived from 38 spectra covering the temperature range from 203 to 296 K and air pressure range from 0 to 190 mbar. For line-by-line analysis, further spectra were recorded at 0.00094 cm-1 spectral resolution at 223 and 293 K. The sample was synthesized from ClONO2 and Br2. Band strengths of the bands ν3 around 803 cm-1 and ν2 around 1286 cm-1 were determined from three pure BrONO2 measurements at different temperatures and pressures. Number densities in the absorption cell were derived from pressure measurements of the purified sample taking into account small amounts of impurities determined spectroscopically. Resulting band strengths are Sν3 = 2.872(52) × 10-17 cm2 molec-1 cm-1 and Sν2 = 3.63(15) × 10-17 cm2 molec-1 cm-1. Absorption cross sections of all measurements were scaled to these band strengths. Further data reduction was achieved with an interpolation scheme based on two-dimensional polynomials in ln(pressure) and temperature. The database is well-suited for remote-sensing application and should reduce the atmospheric bromine nitrate error budget substantially.

  1. Investigation of infrared spectra of atmospheric gases to support stratospheric spectroscopic investigations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaw, J. H.

    1980-01-01

    Spectroscopic instrumentation and the absorption characteristics of atmospheric gases are discussed in relation to the requirements of spectroscopic stratospheric experiments. Improvement in the spectral resolution, accuracy of the line parameters, and the ranges of atmospheric conditions over which information is to be obtained are among the factors considered. Methods of simultaneously analyzing entire bands containing many lines were developed and applied to the analysis of bands of N20 and CO2. Progress in this analysis is reported.

  2. XAS study of Sn-related DX centers in (Al, Ga)As

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pant, J.; Lurio, L. B.; Hayes, T. M.; Williamson, D. L.; Gibart, P.; Theis, T. N.

    1995-02-01

    We have used fluorescence-detection X-ray absorption spectroscopy to measure the Sn atomic-scale environment in single-crystal Sn doped Al 0.23Ga 0.77As in two states for direct comparison: in the dark at 80 K, where Sn atoms are in DX states; after photoexcitation at 20 K, where they are in shallow donor states. The observed differences in Sn near neighbors are not consistent with the widely accepted model for DX centers put forth by Chadi and Chang (PRL 1988).

  3. The Time Domain Spectroscopic Survey: Spectroscopic Variability Investigations Within SDSS-IV/eBOSS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, Paul J.; Anderson, Scott F.; Morganson, Eric; Eracleous, Michael; Shen, Yue; Brandt, W. Niel; Ruan, John J.; Schmidt, Sarah J.; Badenes, Carles; West, Andrew A.; Ju, Wenhua; Greene, Jenny E.; Tdss, Panstarrs-1, Sdss-Iv

    2015-01-01

    The Time Domain Spectroscopic Survey (TDSS) is an SDSS-IV subproject that began summer 2014 and will continue for 4-6 years. Besides its main program to obtain initial characterization spectra of about 220,000 optical variables selected from PanSTARRS-1, the TDSS includes 9 separate smaller programs to study spectroscopic variability. We describe each of these Few-Epoch Spectroscopy (FES) programs, which target objects with existing SDSS spectroscopy amongst classes of quasars and stars of particular astrophysical interest. These include, in approximate order of decreasing sample size: Broad Absorption Line Quasars (BALQSOs), the most photometrically variable ("HyperVariable") quasars, high S/N normal broad line quasars, quasars with double-peaked or very asymmetric broad emission line profiles, Hypervariable stars, active ultracool (late-M and L-type) dwarf stars with Halpha emission, dwarf carbon stars, white dwarf/M dwarf spectroscopic binaries with Halpha emission, and binary supermassive black hole candidates from MgII broad line velocity shift analysis. We summarize herein the unique and diverse astrophysical investigations facilitated by these TDSS FES programs.

  4. XRD and XAS structural study of CuAlO2 under high pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pellicer-Porres, J.; Segura, A.; Ferrer-Roca, Ch; Polian, A.; Munsch, P.; Kim, D.

    2013-03-01

    We present the results of x-ray diffraction and x-ray absorption spectroscopy experiments in CuAlO2 under high pressure. We discuss the polarization dependence of the x-ray absorption near-edge structure at the Cu K-edge. XRD under high pressure evidences anisotropic compression, the a-axis being more compressible than the c-axis. EXAFS yields the copper-oxygen bond length, from which the only internal parameter of the delafossite structure is deduced. The combination of anisotropic compression and the internal parameter decrease results in a regularization of the AlO6 octahedra. The anisotropic compression is related to the chemical trends observed in the lattice parameters when Al is substituted by other trivalent cations. Both experiments evidence the existence of an irreversible phase transition that clearly manifests at 35 ± 2 GPa. The structure of the high-pressure polymorph could not be determined, but it implies a change of the Cu environment, which remains anisotropic. Precursor effects are observed from the lowest pressures, which are possibly related to crystal breaking at a submicroscopic scale with partial reorientation of the crystallites.

  5. XRD and XAS structural study of CuAlO2 under high pressure.

    PubMed

    Pellicer-Porres, J; Segura, A; Ferrer-Roca, Ch; Polian, A; Munsch, P; Kim, D

    2013-03-20

    We present the results of x-ray diffraction and x-ray absorption spectroscopy experiments in CuAlO(2) under high pressure. We discuss the polarization dependence of the x-ray absorption near-edge structure at the Cu K-edge. XRD under high pressure evidences anisotropic compression, the a-axis being more compressible than the c-axis. EXAFS yields the copper-oxygen bond length, from which the only internal parameter of the delafossite structure is deduced. The combination of anisotropic compression and the internal parameter decrease results in a regularization of the AlO(6) octahedra. The anisotropic compression is related to the chemical trends observed in the lattice parameters when Al is substituted by other trivalent cations. Both experiments evidence the existence of an irreversible phase transition that clearly manifests at 35 ± 2 GPa. The structure of the high-pressure polymorph could not be determined, but it implies a change of the Cu environment, which remains anisotropic. Precursor effects are observed from the lowest pressures, which are possibly related to crystal breaking at a submicroscopic scale with partial reorientation of the crystallites. PMID:23423689

  6. The GEISA Spectroscopic Database System in its latest Edition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacquinet-Husson, N.; Crépeau, L.; Capelle, V.; Scott, N. A.; Armante, R.; Chédin, A.

    2009-04-01

    GEISA (Gestion et Etude des Informations Spectroscopiques Atmosphériques: Management and Study of Spectroscopic Information)[1] is a computer-accessible spectroscopic database system, designed to facilitate accurate forward planetary radiative transfer calculations using a line-by-line and layer-by-layer approach. It was initiated in 1976. Currently, GEISA is involved in activities related to the assessment of the capabilities of IASI (Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer on board the METOP European satellite -http://earth-sciences.cnes.fr/IASI/)) through the GEISA/IASI database[2] derived from GEISA. Since the Metop (http://www.eumetsat.int) launch (October 19th 2006), GEISA/IASI is the reference spectroscopic database for the validation of the level-1 IASI data, using the 4A radiative transfer model[3] (4A/LMD http://ara.lmd.polytechnique.fr; 4A/OP co-developed by LMD and Noveltis with the support of CNES). Also, GEISA is involved in planetary research, i.e.: modelling of Titan's atmosphere, in the comparison with observations performed by Voyager: http://voyager.jpl.nasa.gov/, or by ground-based telescopes, and by the instruments on board the Cassini-Huygens mission: http://www.esa.int/SPECIALS/Cassini-Huygens/index.html. The updated 2008 edition of GEISA (GEISA-08), a system comprising three independent sub-databases devoted, respectively, to line transition parameters, infrared and ultraviolet/visible absorption cross-sections, microphysical and optical properties of atmospheric aerosols, will be described. Spectroscopic parameters quality requirement will be discussed in the context of comparisons between observed or simulated Earth's and other planetary atmosphere spectra. GEISA is implemented on the CNES/CNRS Ether Products and Services Centre WEB site (http://ether.ipsl.jussieu.fr), where all archived spectroscopic data can be handled through general and user friendly associated management software facilities. More than 350 researchers are

  7. Electrochemical and in situ spectroscopic studies of materials of relevance to energy storage and electrocatalysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mo, Yibo

    In situ X-ray absorption (XAS), surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) and rotating ring disk electrode techniques have been employed for the characterization of materials of relevance to electrochemical energy storage and electrocatalysis. In particular, analysis of in situ Ir LIII-edge extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) of IrO2 films electrodeposited on Au substrates yielded Ir-O bond lengths decreasing in the sequence 2.02, 1.97 and 1.93 A, for Ir3+, Ir4+ and Ir5+ sites, respectively. Although features consistent with the presence of crystalline IrO2 in the highly hydrated films were found from in situ SERS, the lack of intense shells in the FT of the EXAFS function beyond the nearest oxygen neighbors indicates that the films by and large do not display long range order. In similar studies, the Fourier transform of the k3-weighted Ru K-edge EXAFS of electrodeposited RuO2 films recorded in situ were characterized by two shells attributed to Ru-O and Ru-Ru interactions at 1.94(1) and 3.12(2) A, in agreement with results obtained ex situ for Ru4+ in hydrous RuO2, whereas films in the reduced state yielded a single Ru-O interaction shell at 2.02(1) A. Extensions of these in situ XAS to the study of electrocatalysts for the nitrite reduction made it possible to identify and characterize the electronic and structural properties of a nitrosyl iron porphyrin adduct adsorbed on an electrode surface via the analysis of Fe K-edge XAS data. The effects of Se and S ad-atoms on the electrocatalytic activity of Pt electrodes have been examined using RRDE techniques. In acid, within a rather narrow range of coverages, both S- and Se-modified Pt surfaces promote the 2-electron reduction of dioxygen to hydrogen peroxide at ca. 100% faradaic efficiency over a wide potential region. Also developed were methods for immobilizing unsupported dispersed high area Pt particles a glassy carbon (GC) disk of a rotating Pt(ring)/GC(disk) electrode assembly allowing

  8. Galaxy And Mass Assembly (GAMA): spectroscopic analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hopkins, A. M.; Driver, S. P.; Brough, S.; Owers, M. S.; Bauer, A. E.; Gunawardhana, M. L. P.; Cluver, M. E.; Colless, M.; Foster, C.; Lara-López, M. A.; Roseboom, I.; Sharp, R.; Steele, O.; Thomas, D.; Baldry, I. K.; Brown, M. J. I.; Liske, J.; Norberg, P.; Robotham, A. S. G.; Bamford, S.; Bland-Hawthorn, J.; Drinkwater, M. J.; Loveday, J.; Meyer, M.; Peacock, J. A.; Tuffs, R.; Agius, N.; Alpaslan, M.; Andrae, E.; Cameron, E.; Cole, S.; Ching, J. H. Y.; Christodoulou, L.; Conselice, C.; Croom, S.; Cross, N. J. G.; De Propris, R.; Delhaize, J.; Dunne, L.; Eales, S.; Ellis, S.; Frenk, C. S.; Graham, Alister W.; Grootes, M. W.; Häußler, B.; Heymans, C.; Hill, D.; Hoyle, B.; Hudson, M.; Jarvis, M.; Johansson, J.; Jones, D. H.; van Kampen, E.; Kelvin, L.; Kuijken, K.; López-Sánchez, Á.; Maddox, S.; Madore, B.; Maraston, C.; McNaught-Roberts, T.; Nichol, R. C.; Oliver, S.; Parkinson, H.; Penny, S.; Phillipps, S.; Pimbblet, K. A.; Ponman, T.; Popescu, C. C.; Prescott, M.; Proctor, R.; Sadler, E. M.; Sansom, A. E.; Seibert, M.; Staveley-Smith, L.; Sutherland, W.; Taylor, E.; Van Waerbeke, L.; Vázquez-Mata, J. A.; Warren, S.; Wijesinghe, D. B.; Wild, V.; Wilkins, S.

    2013-04-01

    The Galaxy And Mass Assembly (GAMA) survey is a multiwavelength photometric and spectroscopic survey, using the AAOmega spectrograph on the Anglo-Australian Telescope to obtain spectra for up to ˜300 000 galaxies over 280 deg2, to a limiting magnitude of rpet < 19.8 mag. The target galaxies are distributed over 0 < z ≲ 0.5 with a median redshift of z ≈ 0.2, although the redshift distribution includes a small number of systems, primarily quasars, at higher redshifts, up to and beyond z = 1. The redshift accuracy ranges from σv ≈ 50 km s-1 to σv ≈ 100 km s-1 depending on the signal-to-noise ratio of the spectrum. Here we describe the GAMA spectroscopic reduction and analysis pipeline. We present the steps involved in taking the raw two-dimensional spectroscopic images through to flux-calibrated one-dimensional spectra. The resulting GAMA spectra cover an observed wavelength range of 3750 ≲ λ ≲ 8850 Å at a resolution of R ≈ 1300. The final flux calibration is typically accurate to 10-20 per cent, although the reliability is worse at the extreme wavelength ends, and poorer in the blue than the red. We present details of the measurement of emission and absorption features in the GAMA spectra. These measurements are characterized through a variety of quality control analyses detailing the robustness and reliability of the measurements. We illustrate the quality of the measurements with a brief exploration of elementary emission line properties of the galaxies in the GAMA sample. We demonstrate the luminosity dependence of the Balmer decrement, consistent with previously published results, and explore further how Balmer decrement varies with galaxy mass and redshift. We also investigate the mass and redshift dependencies of the [N II]/Hα versus [O III]/Hβ spectral diagnostic diagram, commonly used to discriminate between star forming and nuclear activity in galaxies.

  9. Spectroscopic observations of HZ Herculis. II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bopp, B. W.; Grupsmith, G.; Mcmillan, R. S.; Vanden Bout, P. A.; Wootten, H. A.

    1973-01-01

    Preliminary results from an extensive series of spectroscopic observations of the HZ Her optical counterpart of the eclipsing, pulsating X-ray binary Her X-1. Spectrograms with a dispersion of 30 A/mm reveal a spectral type as late as F5 near minimum in the light curve with the G-band and metallic lines present. Narrow Fe lines show that HZ Her is not a rapid rotator. Low-dispersion (115 A/mm) spectra, obtained with 10-minute time resolution, reveal rapid (10-min) variations in the 4640 N III emission and in the 4471 He I absorbtion features. The H-beta absorption is variable in equivalent width, and shows evidence of being partially filled with emission.

  10. Experimental (XAS STEM TPR and XPS) and Theoretical (DFT) Characterization of Supported Rhenium Catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    S Bare; S Kelly; F Vila; D Boldingh; E Karapetrova; J Kas; G Mickelson; F Modica; N Yang; J Rehr

    2011-12-31

    A high surface area supported Re-based catalyst, fundamental to heterogeneous catalysis, is studied in the oxidic and reduced states using a combination of experimental (XAFS, STEM, TPR, and XPS) and theoretical (DFT and X-ray spectroscopy simulations) approaches. In the calcined dried catalyst, the Re species is present as an isolated trioxo(oxoaluminate) Re(VII) species. The temperature at which the Re undergoes reduction is a function of the hydrogen partial pressure and temperature ramp rate, but the maximum rate of reduction occurs in the range 300-400 C. Following reduction at 500 or 700 C in dry hydrogen, the Re is present as a mixture of species: unreduced trioxo(oxoaluminate) Re(VII) species, Re nanoclusters, and isolated Re atoms. By using a multifaceted approach, it is apparent that the majority species is an isolated Re adatom bound to the alumina support. DFT calculations identify several likely adsorption sites for these Re adatoms on the [110] surface of {gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}. The final extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) model taking into account these three species is used to identify the dominant adsorption site for Re on the alumina surface. FEFF8 X-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy (XANES) calculations of unsupported and alumina-supported Re nanoclusters provide interpretation of the shape and edge position of the Re L{sub 3}-edge XANES after reduction. The presence of moisture during reduction stronly affects the mobility of the Re on the alumina leading to agglomeration. Subsequent air exposure of a reduced catalyst readily reoxidizes the reduced Re. The power of using a combination of analysis tools provides insight into the behavior of dispersed Re on supported alumina under oxidizing and reducing conditions relevant to heterogeneous catalysis.

  11. Wet oxidation of AlxGa1 - xAs: Temporal evolution of composition and microstructure and the implications for metal-insulator-semiconductor applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashby, Carol I. H.; Sullivan, John P.; Newcomer, Paula P.; Missert, Nancy A.; Hou, Hong Q.; Hammons, B. E.; Hafich, Michael J.; Baca, Albert G.

    1997-05-01

    Three important processes dominate the wet thermal oxidation of AlxGa1-xAs on GaAs: (1) oxidation of Al and Ga in the AlxGa1-xAs alloy to form an amorphous oxide, (2) formation and elimination of crystalline and amorphous elemental As and of amorphous As2O3, and (3) crystallization of the amorphous oxide film. Residual As can lead to strong Fermi-level pinning at the oxidized AlGaAs/GaAs interface, up to a 100-fold increase in leakage current, and a 30% increase in the dielectric constant of the oxide layer. Thermodynamically favored interfacial As may impose a fundamental limitation on the use of AlGaAs wet oxidation in metal-insulatorsemiconductor devices in the GaAs material system.

  12. Multiscale structural characterizations of mixed U(iv)-An(iii) oxalates (An(iii) = Pu or Am) combining XAS and XRD measurements.

    PubMed

    Arab-Chapelet, B; Martin, P M; Costenoble, S; Delahaye, T; Scheinost, A C; Grandjean, S; Abraham, F

    2016-04-28

    Mixed actinide(III,IV) oxalates of the general formula M2.2UAn(C2O4)5·nH2O (An = Pu or Am and M = H3O(+) and N2H5(+)) have been quantitatively precipitated by oxalic precipitation in nitric acid medium (yield >99%). Thorough multiscale structural characterization using XRD and XAS measurements confirmed the existence of mixed actinide oxalate solid solutions. The XANES analysis confirmed that the oxidation states of the metallic cations, tetravalent for uranium and trivalent for plutonium and americium, are maintained during the precipitation step. EXAFS measurements show that the local environments around U(+IV), Pu(+III) and Am(+III) are comparable, and the actinides are surrounded by ten oxygen atoms from five bidentate oxalate anions. The mean metal-oxygen distances obtained by XAS measurements are in agreement with those calculated from XRD lattice parameters. PMID:26979820

  13. Comparative XRPD and XAS study of the impact of the synthesis process on the electronic and structural environments of uranium-americium mixed oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prieur, D.; Lebreton, F.; Martin, P. M.; Caisso, M.; Butzbach, R.; Somers, J.; Delahaye, T.

    2015-10-01

    Uranium-americium mixed oxides are potential compounds to reduce americium inventory in nuclear waste via a partitioning and transmutation strategy. A thorough assessment of the oxygen-to-metal ratio is paramount in such materials as it determines the important underlying electronic structure and phase relations, affecting both thermal conductivity of the material and its interaction with the cladding and coolant. In 2011, various XAS experiments on U1-xAmxO2±δ samples prepared by different synthesis methods have reported contradictory results on the charge distribution of U and Am. This work alleviates this discrepancy. The XAS results confirm that, independently of the synthesis process, the reductive sintering of U1-xAmxO2±δ leads to the formation of similar fluorite solid solution indicating the presence of Am+III and U+V in equimolar proportions.

  14. The time-resolved and extreme conditions XAS (TEXAS) facility at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility: the general-purpose EXAFS bending-magnet beamline BM23.

    PubMed

    Mathon, O; Beteva, A; Borrel, J; Bugnazet, D; Gatla, S; Hino, R; Kantor, I; Mairs, T; Munoz, M; Pasternak, S; Perrin, F; Pascarelli, S

    2015-11-01

    BM23 is the general-purpose EXAFS bending-magnet beamline at the ESRF, replacing the former BM29 beamline in the framework of the ESRF upgrade. Its mission is to serve the whole XAS user community by providing access to a basic service in addition to the many specialized instruments available at the ESRF. BM23 offers high signal-to-noise ratio EXAFS in a large energy range (5-75 keV), continuous energy scanning for quick-EXAFS on the second timescale and a micro-XAS station delivering a spot size of 4 µm × 4 µm FWHM. It is a user-friendly facility featuring a high degree of automation, online EXAFS data reduction and a flexible sample environment.

  15. The time-resolved and extreme conditions XAS (TEXAS) facility at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility: the general-purpose EXAFS bending-magnet beamline BM23

    PubMed Central

    Mathon, O.; Beteva, A.; Borrel, J.; Bugnazet, D.; Gatla, S.; Hino, R.; Kantor, I.; Mairs, T.; Munoz, M.; Pasternak, S.; Perrin, F.; Pascarelli, S.

    2015-01-01

    BM23 is the general-purpose EXAFS bending-magnet beamline at the ESRF, replacing the former BM29 beamline in the framework of the ESRF upgrade. Its mission is to serve the whole XAS user community by providing access to a basic service in addition to the many specialized instruments available at the ESRF. BM23 offers high signal-to-noise ratio EXAFS in a large energy range (5–75 keV), continuous energy scanning for quick-EXAFS on the second timescale and a micro-XAS station delivering a spot size of 4 µm × 4 µm FWHM. It is a user-friendly facility featuring a high degree of automation, online EXAFS data reduction and a flexible sample environment. PMID:26524321

  16. Cadmium Chemical Form in Mine Waste Materials by X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Diacomanolis, V.; Ng, J. C.; Sadler, R.; Harris, H. H.; Nomura, M.; Noller, B. N.

    2010-06-23

    This study examines the molecular form of cadmium (Cd) present in mine wastes by X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy (XAS; Cd>20 mg/kg) using the K-edge of Cd at the Photon Factory Advanced Ring (PF-AR), NW10A beam line at KEK-Tsukuba-Japan. Mine waste materials and zinc concentrate were analyzed for Cd by ICPMS prior to undertaking XAS (range 21-452 mg/kg). Model compounds (CdO, Cd(OH){sub 2}, CdCO{sub 3}, Cdacetate, CdS, Cdstearate, CdDEDTC) and samples were examined in solid form at 20 K. The XANES spectra showed similar E max values for both model compounds and samples. The EXAFS showed that Cd-S in CdS, gives a flatter spectrum in the extended region compared to Cd-O found with CdCO{sub 3}, CdO and Cd Stearate. Linear combination fitting with model Cd compounds did not give clear assignments of composition, indicating that more detailed EXAFS spectra is required as mineral forms containing Cd were present rather than simple Cd compounds such as CdCO{sub 3}. The Cd bond for a single shell model in mine waste sample matrices appears to be either Cd-O or Cd-S, or a combination of both. Comparison of molecular data from the XAS studies with bioaccessibility data giving a prediction of bioavailability for mine waste materials provides useful information about the significance of the cadmium form as a contaminant for health risk assessment purposes.

  17. Improvement of the growth of InxGa1 - xAs on GaAs (001) using Te as surfactant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grandjean, N.; Massies, J.; Delamarre, C.; Wang, L. P.; Dubon, A.; Laval, J. Y.

    1993-07-01

    It is demonstrated by using reflection high-energy electron diffraction and transmission electron microscopy that the epitaxial growth of highly strained InxGa1-xAs (x≳0.3) layers on GaAs(001) is improved by a preadsorbed Te surfactant layer. The formation of 3D islands is inhibited by the surfactant action and consequently the onset of plastic relaxation (i.e., the critical thickness) is significantly delayed.

  18. A X-Ray Absorption Spectroscopy Study of Manganese Containing Compounds and Photosynthetic Spinach Chloroplasts.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirby, Jon Allan

    The manganese sites in chloroplasts, long thought to be involved in photosynthetic oxygen evolution have been examined and partially characterized by X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy (XAS) using synchrotron radiation. The local environment about the manganese atoms is estimated from an analysis of the extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (EXAFS). Comparisons with and simulations of the manganese EXAFS for several reference compounds leads to a model in which the chloroplast manganese atoms are contained in a binuclear complex similar to di-u-oxo -tetrakis-(2,2'-bipyridine) dimanganese. It is suggested that the partner metal is another manganese. The bridging ligands are most probably oxygen. The remaining manganese ligands are carbon, oxygen, or nitrogen. A roughly linear correlation between the X-ray K edge onset energy and the "coordination charge" of a large number of manganese coordination complexes and compounds has been developed. Entry of the chloroplast manganese edge energy onto this correlation diagram establishes that the active pool of manganese is in an oxidation state greater than +2. If the manganese is in a dimeric form the oxidation states are most probably (II,III). Underlying these results is an extensive data analysis methodology. The method developed involves the use of many different background removal techniques, Fourier transforms and ultimately curve fitting to the modulations in the x-ray absorption cross sections. A large number of model compounds were used to evaluate the analysis method. These analyses are used to show that the two major curve fitting models available are essentially equivalent. Due to its greater versatility, the theoretical model of Teo and Lee is preferred (J. Am. Chem. Soc. (1979), 101, 2815). The results are also used to determine the informational limitations of XAS within the limits of the present understanding of X-ray absorption phenomena by inner shell electrons for atoms with atomic number greater than that

  19. Local Structure Determination of Carbon/Nickel Ferrite Composite Nanofibers Probed by X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Nilmoung, Sukunya; Kidkhunthod, Pinit; Maensiri, Santi

    2015-11-01

    Carbon/NiFe2O4 composite nanofibers have been successfully prepared by electrospinning method using a various concentration solution of Ni and Fe nitrates dispersed into polyacrylonitride (PAN) solution in N,N' dimethylformamide. The phase and mophology of PAN/NiFe2O4 composite samples were characterized and investigated by X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy. The magnetic properties of the prepared samples were measured at ambient temperature by a vibrating sample magnetometer. It is found that all composite samples exhibit ferromagnetism. This could be local-structurally explained by the existed oxidation states of Ni2+ and Fe3+ in the samples. Moreover, local environments around Ni and Fe ions could be revealed by X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) measurement including X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) and Extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS).

  20. Interaction of vanadium and sulfate in blood cells from the tunicate Ascidia ceratodes: Observations using x-ray absorption edge structure and EPR spectroscopies

    SciTech Connect

    Frank, P.; Hedman, B.; Hodgson, K.O.; Carlson, R.M.K.

    1994-08-17

    Sulfur K-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy (S-K XAS) and EPR spectroscopy have been used to investigate the inorganic solution chemistry of vanadium, sulfate, and methanesulfonate, with application to blood cells from the tunicate Ascidia ceratodes. Three independent whole blood cell preparations (S85, S86, W87) collected over a period of 18 months were examined. Average blood cell vanadium concentrations were determined to be 0.099, 0.079, and 0.062 M, respectively. All three collections gave sulfur XAS spectra consistent with significant intracellular concentrations of low-valent sulfur, an alkanesulfonic acid, and sulfate. In model studies, the line width of the sulfate K-edge XAS spectrum was found to titrate with both pH and [V(III)]. Application of this finding to A. ceratodes blood cell sulfur XAS spectra provided evidence for direct interactions between endogenous dissolved sulfate and V(III) in two of the three collections. All three collections yielded sulfate XAS edge spectra consistent with low pH. Curve-fitting analysis of the S-K edge XAS spectra for the three whole blood cell collections yielded the ratios of intracellular sulfate:alkane sulfonate:low-valent sulfur to be as follows: S85, 1.0:0.9:0.36;S86, 1.0;0.5;1.5;W87,1.0;0.44:0.24. Comparisons with models indicated that the low-valent blood cell sulfur included various disulfide-like compounds unlike cystine. This all implies a surprisingly rich and variable sulfur biochemistry in these marine organisms. EPR spectroscopy of whole blood cells from one animal from the W87 collection revealed an endogenous VO{sup 2+}-sulfate interaction. Thus both V(III) and VO{sup 2+} can sense an intracellular pool of sulfate, implying the biological colocation of these two metal ions. The variations in blood chemistry observed over time as described herein caution against definitive application of single point experiments.

  1. Applications of absorption spectroscopy using quantum cascade lasers.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lizhu; Tian, Guang; Li, Jingsong; Yu, Benli

    2014-01-01

    Infrared laser absorption spectroscopy (LAS) is a promising modern technique for sensing trace gases with high sensitivity, selectivity, and high time resolution. Mid-infrared quantum cascade lasers, operating in a pulsed or continuous wave mode, have potential as spectroscopic sources because of their narrow linewidths, single mode operation, tunability, high output power, reliability, low power consumption, and compactness. This paper reviews some important developments in modern laser absorption spectroscopy based on the use of quantum cascade laser (QCL) sources. Among the various laser spectroscopic methods, this review is focused on selected absorption spectroscopy applications of QCLs, with particular emphasis on molecular spectroscopy, industrial process control, combustion diagnostics, and medical breath analysis. PMID:25239063

  2. Spectroscopic optical coherence elastography

    PubMed Central

    Adie, Steven G.; Liang, Xing; Kennedy, Brendan F.; John, Renu; Sampson, David D.; Boppart, Stephen A.

    2010-01-01

    We present an optical technique to image the frequency-dependent complex mechanical response of a viscoelastic sample. Three-dimensional hyperspectral data, comprising two-dimensional B-mode images and a third dimension corresponding to vibration frequency, were acquired from samples undergoing external mechanical excitation in the audio-frequency range. We describe the optical coherence tomography (OCT) signal when vibration is applied to a sample and detail the processing and acquisition techniques used to extract the local complex mechanical response from three-dimensional data that, due to a wide range of vibration frequencies, possess a wide range of sample velocities. We demonstrate frequency-dependent contrast of the displacement amplitude and phase of a silicone phantom containing inclusions of higher stiffness. Measurements of an ex vivo tumor margin demonstrate distinct spectra between adipose and tumor regions, and images of displacement amplitude and phase demonstrated spatially-resolved contrast. Contrast was also observed in displacement amplitude and phase images of a rat muscle sample. These results represent the first demonstration of mechanical spectroscopy based on B-mode OCT imaging. Spectroscopic optical coherence elastography (S-OCE) provides a high-resolution imaging capability for the detection of tissue pathologies that are characterized by a frequency-dependent viscoelastic response. PMID:21164898

  3. Spectroscopic Detection of Pathogens

    SciTech Connect

    ALAM,M. KATHLEEN; TIMLIN,JERILYN A.; MARTIN,LAURA E.; HJELLE,DRIAN; LYONS,RICK; GARRISON,KRISTIN

    2000-11-01

    The goal of this LDRD Research project was to provide a preliminary examination of the use of infrared spectroscopy as a tool to detect the changes in cell cultures upon activation by an infectious agent. Due to a late arrival of funding, only 5 months were available to transfer and setup equipment at UTTM,develop cell culture lines, test methods of in-situ activation and collect kinetic data from activated cells. Using attenuated total reflectance (ATR) as a sampling method, live cell cultures were examined prior to and after activation. Spectroscopic data were collected from cells immediately after activation in situ and, in many cases for five successive hours. Additional data were collected from cells activated within a test tube (pre-activated), in both transmission mode as well as in ATR mode. Changes in the infrared data were apparent in the transmission data collected from the pre-activated cells as well in some of the pre-activated ATR data. Changes in the in-situ activated spectral data were only occasionally present due to (1) the limited time cells were studied and (2) incomplete activation. Comparison of preliminary data to infrared bands reported in the literature suggests the primary changes seen are due an increase in ribonucleic acid (RNA) production. This work will be continued as part of a 3 year DARPA grant.

  4. Spectroscopic optical coherence elastography.

    PubMed

    Adie, Steven G; Liang, Xing; Kennedy, Brendan F; John, Renu; Sampson, David D; Boppart, Stephen A

    2010-12-01

    We present an optical technique to image the frequency-dependent complex mechanical response of a viscoelastic sample. Three-dimensional hyperspectral data, comprising two-dimensional B-mode images and a third dimension corresponding to vibration frequency, were acquired from samples undergoing external mechanical excitation in the audio-frequency range. We describe the optical coherence tomography (OCT) signal when vibration is applied to a sample and detail the processing and acquisition techniques used to extract the local complex mechanical response from three-dimensional data that, due to a wide range of vibration frequencies, possess a wide range of sample velocities. We demonstrate frequency-dependent contrast of the displacement amplitude and phase of a silicone phantom containing inclusions of higher stiffness. Measurements of an ex vivo tumor margin demonstrate distinct spectra between adipose and tumor regions, and images of displacement amplitude and phase demonstrated spatially-resolved contrast. Contrast was also observed in displacement amplitude and phase images of a rat muscle sample. These results represent the first demonstration of mechanical spectroscopy based on B-mode OCT imaging. Spectroscopic optical coherence elastography (S-OCE) provides a high-resolution imaging capability for the detection of tissue pathologies that are characterized by a frequency-dependent viscoelastic response. PMID:21164898

  5. Spectroscopic classification of supernova candidates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodgkin, S. T.; Hall, A.; Fraser, M.; Campbell, H.; Wyrzykowski, L.; Kostrzewa-Rutkowska, Z.; Pietro, N.

    2014-09-01

    We report the spectroscopic classification of four supernovae at the 2.5m Isaac Newton Telescope on La Palma, using the Intermediate Dispersion Spectrograph and the R300V grating (3500-8000 Ang; ~6 Ang resolution).

  6. ALD Zn(O,S) Thin Films’ Interfacial Chemical and Structural Configuration Probed by XAS

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The ability to precisely control interfaces of atomic layer deposited (ALD) zinc oxysulfide (Zn(O,S)) buffer layers to other layers allows precise tuning of solar cell performance. The O K- and S K-edge X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) of ∼2–4 nm thin Zn(O,S) films reveals the chemical and structural influences of their interface with ZnO, a common electrode material and diffusion barrier in solar cells. We observe that sulfate formation at oxide/sulfide interfaces is independent of film composition, a result of sulfur diffusion toward interfaces. Leveraging sulfur’s diffusivity, we propose an alternative ALD process in which the zinc precursor pulse is bypassed during H2S exposure. Such a process yields similar results to the nanolaminate deposition method and highlights mechanistic differences between ALD sulfides and oxides. By identifying chemical species and structural evolution at sulfide/oxide interfaces, this work provides insights into increasing thin film solar cell efficiencies. PMID:27223620

  7. ALD Zn(O,S) Thin Films' Interfacial Chemical and Structural Configuration Probed by XAS.

    PubMed

    Dadlani, Anup L; Acharya, Shinjita; Trejo, Orlando; Prinz, Fritz B; Torgersen, Jan

    2016-06-15

    The ability to precisely control interfaces of atomic layer deposited (ALD) zinc oxysulfide (Zn(O,S)) buffer layers to other layers allows precise tuning of solar cell performance. The O K- and S K-edge X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) of ∼2-4 nm thin Zn(O,S) films reveals the chemical and structural influences of their interface with ZnO, a common electrode material and diffusion barrier in solar cells. We observe that sulfate formation at oxide/sulfide interfaces is independent of film composition, a result of sulfur diffusion toward interfaces. Leveraging sulfur's diffusivity, we propose an alternative ALD process in which the zinc precursor pulse is bypassed during H2S exposure. Such a process yields similar results to the nanolaminate deposition method and highlights mechanistic differences between ALD sulfides and oxides. By identifying chemical species and structural evolution at sulfide/oxide interfaces, this work provides insights into increasing thin film solar cell efficiencies.

  8. Structural phase transitions in ionic conductor Bi2O3 by temperature dependent XPD and XAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Yingcai; An, Pengfei; Yu, Meijuan; Marcelli, Augusto; Liu, Yong; Hu, Tiandou; Xu, Wei

    2016-05-01

    The superionic behavior of cubic δ-phase Bi2O3, a metastable phase at high temperature, is of great interests from both scientific and technological perspectives. With the highest ionic conductivity among all known compounds, the δ-phase Bi2O3 possesses promising applications in solid-oxide fuel cells. Previous investigations pointed out the α to δ- phase transition occurs during the heating process, as supported by the X-ray and Neutron diffraction experiments. Through in situ measurements of the long-range order structure and the local structure by X-ray powder diffraction and X-ray absorption spectroscopy, we investigated the evolution of the structures under different temperatures. Both techniques provided ample evidence that the existence of meta-stable β-phase are crucial for forming the defective fluorite cubic δ phase. Our finding suggested that the phase transition from tetragonal β-phase to δ-phase is an influencing factor for the generation of the oxygen-ion pathways.

  9. Excitonic diamagnetic shifts and linewidths in Al_xGa_1-xAs alloys in high magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senger, R. T.; Coli, G.; Bajaj, K. K.; Reno, J. L.; Jones, E. D.; Crooker, Scott

    2002-03-01

    We have measured both the diamagnetic shifts and the linewidths of excitonic transitions in Alx Ga_1-xAs alloys as a function of aluminum concentration and magnetic field at 1.4 K using photoluminescence spectroscopy. The aluminum composition in our samples ranged from 0 to 300 to 50 tesla. The samples were grown on GaAs substrates oriented along [001] direction using molecular beam epitaxy at 590ºC. We find that for a given value of alloy composition, both the diamagnetic shift and excitonic linewidth increase as a function of magnetic field. The observed variations of the diamagnetic shifts and excitonic linewidths with magnetic field are considerably smaller than those calculated by Lee and Bajaj [J. Appl. Phys. 73, 1788 (1993)] using a free exciton model. To explain our experimental data we propose that the excitons are localized in a very specific manner. To simulate exciton localization, we assume that the exciton reduced mass is increased and is obtained by using the alloy dependent heavy-hole mass along [001] direction treated isotropically. The calculated values of the variations of the diamagnetic shift and excitonic linewidth as a function of magnetic field obtained using this model agree very well with those reported here. Sandia is a multiprogram laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, for the United States Department of Energy under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  10. Finite temperature effects on the X-ray absorption spectra of lithium compounds: first-principles interpretation of X-ray Raman measurements.

    PubMed

    Pascal, Tod A; Boesenberg, Ulrike; Kostecki, Robert; Richardson, Thomas J; Weng, Tsu-Chien; Sokaras, Dimosthenis; Nordlund, Dennis; McDermott, Eamon; Moewes, Alexander; Cabana, Jordi; Prendergast, David

    2014-01-21

    We elucidate the role of room-temperature-induced instantaneous structural distortions in the Li K-edge X-ray absorption spectra (XAS) of crystalline LiF, Li2SO4, Li2O, Li3N, and Li2CO3 using high resolution X-ray Raman spectroscopy (XRS) measurements and first-principles density functional theory calculations within the eXcited electron and Core Hole approach. Based on thermodynamic sampling via ab initio molecular dynamics simulations, we find calculated XAS in much better agreement with experiment than those computed using the rigid crystal structure alone. We show that local instantaneous distortion of the atomic lattice perturbs the symmetry of the Li 1s core-excited-state electronic structure, broadening spectral line-shapes and, in some cases, producing additional spectral features. The excellent agreement with high-resolution XRS measurements validates the accuracy of our first-principles approach to simulating XAS, and provides both accurate benchmarks for model compounds and a predictive theoretical capability for identification and characterization of multi-component systems, such as lithium-ion batteries, under working conditions.

  11. Low-temperature spin-state transition in LaCoO{sub 3} investigated using resonant x-ray absorption at the Co K edge

    SciTech Connect

    Medarde, M.; Pomjakushina, E.; Conder, K.; Dallera, C.; Grioni, M.; Voigt, J.; Podlesnyak, A.; Neisius, Th.; Tjernberg, O.; Barilo, S. N.

    2006-02-01

    LaCoO{sub 3} displays two broad anomalies in the DC magnetic susceptibility {chi}{sup DC}, occurring, respectively, around 50 K and 500 K. We have investigated the first of them within the 10 Kabsorption spectroscopy (XAS) in the partial fluorescence yield mode. In contrast with previous O K-edge XAS reports, our data show the existence of abrupt changes around 50 K which can be nicely correlated with the anomaly in {chi}{sup DC}. To our knowledge, this is the first time that a clear, quantitative relationship between the temperature dependence of the magnetic susceptibility and that of the XAS spectra is reported. The intensity changes in the preedge region, which are consistent with a transition from a lower to a higher spin state, have been analyzed using a minimal model including the Co 3d and O 2p hybridization in the initial state. The temperature dependence of the Co magnetic moment obtained from the estimated e{sub g} and t{sub 2g} occupations could be satisfactorily reproduced. Also, the decrease of the Co 3d and O 2p hybridization by increasing temperature obtained from this simple model compares favorably with the values estimated from thermal evolution of the crystallographic structure.

  12. Local electronic states of Fe{sub 4}N films revealed by x-ray absorption spectroscopy and x-ray magnetic circular dichroism

    SciTech Connect

    Ito, Keita; Toko, Kaoru; Suemasu, Takashi; Takeda, Yukiharu; Saitoh, Yuji; Oguchi, Tamio; Kimura, Akio

    2015-05-21

    We performed x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) and x-ray magnetic circular dichroism (XMCD) measurements at Fe L{sub 2,3} and N K-edges for Fe{sub 4}N epitaxial films grown by molecular beam epitaxy. In order to clarify the element specific local electronic structure of Fe{sub 4}N, we compared experimentally obtained XAS and XMCD spectra with those simulated by a combination of a first-principles calculation and Fermi's golden rule. We revealed that the shoulders observed at Fe L{sub 2,3}-edges in the XAS and XMCD spectra were due to the electric dipole transition from the Fe 2p core-level to the hybridization state generated by σ* anti-bonding between the orbitals of N 2p at the body-centered site and Fe 3d on the face-centered (II) sites. Thus, the observed shoulders were attributed to the local electronic structure of Fe atoms at II sites. As to the N K-edge, the line shape of the obtained spectra was explained by the dipole transition from the N 1s core-level to the hybridization state formed by π* and σ* anti-bondings between the Fe 3d and N 2p orbitals. This hybridization plays an important role in featuring the electronic structures and physical properties of Fe{sub 4}N.

  13. Origin of Ferromagnetism in Zn1-xCoxO Thin Films: Evidences Provided by Hard and Soft X-Ray Absorption Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xi, Shi-Bo; Cui, Ming-Qi; Qin, Xiu-Fang; Xu, Xiao-Hong; Xu, Wei; Zheng, Lei; Zhou, Jing; Liu, Li-Juan; Yang, Dong-Liang; Guo, Zhi-Ying

    2012-12-01

    Although dilute magnetic semiconductors have promising potentials in spintronics applications, the mechanism of their ferromagnetism remains ambiguous. The extensive theoretical models and exotic experimental evidences provide self-consistent but usually contradictory explanations on its either intrinsic or extrinsic origins. We find room temperature ferromagnetism in a series of Zn1-xCoxO (0.03 <= x <= 0.10) thin films prepared using magnetron co-sputtering method and treated with post-annealing at temperatures 350°C and 500°C. The origin of the ferromagnetism is investigated in terms of electronic structure combining hard x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) at Zn and Co K-edge, and soft x-ray XAS at O K-edge and Co L2,3-edge. The full multiple scattering theory is employed to reinforce the interpretation of the XAS spectra, which concludes that full substitution of zinc by cobalt is responsible for the room temperature ferromagnetism due to the d states of cobalt within the framework of bound magnetic polaron. Moreover, the evidence of cobalt nanoclusters is detected at highly doped and annealed samples. The first principles calculation confirms the electronic structural evidences via the formation energy.

  14. Quantum Entanglement Molecular Absorption Spectrum Simulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Quang-Viet; Kojima, Jun

    2006-01-01

    Quantum Entanglement Molecular Absorption Spectrum Simulator (QE-MASS) is a computer program for simulating two photon molecular-absorption spectroscopy using quantum-entangled photons. More specifically, QE-MASS simulates the molecular absorption of two quantum-entangled photons generated by the spontaneous parametric down-conversion (SPDC) of a fixed-frequency photon from a laser. The two-photon absorption process is modeled via a combination of rovibrational and electronic single-photon transitions, using a wave-function formalism. A two-photon absorption cross section as a function of the entanglement delay time between the two photons is computed, then subjected to a fast Fourier transform to produce an energy spectrum. The program then detects peaks in the Fourier spectrum and displays the energy levels of very short-lived intermediate quantum states (or virtual states) of the molecule. Such virtual states were only previously accessible using ultra-fast (femtosecond) laser systems. However, with the use of a single-frequency continuous wave laser to produce SPDC photons, and QEMASS program, these short-lived molecular states can now be studied using much simpler laser systems. QE-MASS can also show the dependence of the Fourier spectrum on the tuning range of the entanglement time of any externally introduced optical-path delay time. QE-MASS can be extended to any molecule for which an appropriate spectroscopic database is available. It is a means of performing an a priori parametric analysis of entangled photon spectroscopy for development and implementation of emerging quantum-spectroscopic sensing techniques. QE-MASS is currently implemented using the Mathcad software package.

  15. Probing Cu(I) in homogeneous catalysis using high-energy-resolution fluorescence-detected X-ray absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Walroth, Richard C; Uebler, Jacob W H; Lancaster, Kyle M

    2015-06-18

    Metal-to-ligand charge transfer excitations in Cu(I) X-ray absorption spectra are introduced as spectroscopic handles for the characterization of species in homogeneous catalytic reaction mixtures. Analysis is supported by correlation of a spectral library to calculations and to complementary spectroscopic parameters.

  16. Mid-infrared vibrational spectroscopic characterization of 5,6-dihydroxyindole and eumelanin derived from it

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hyogo, Ryosuke; Nakamura, Atsushi; Okuda, Hidekazu; Wakamatsu, Kazumasa; Ito, Shosuke; Sota, Takayuki

    2011-12-01

    Mid-infrared vibrational spectroscopic study has been made on 5,6-dihydroxyindole (DHI) and DHI-derived eumelanin. It has been revealed for DHI monomer that measured infrared absorption spectrum is well reproduced by that predicted from ab initio calculations. Thus, vibrational modes of DHI monomer causing dominant absorption bands have been successfully assigned. It has been also reconfirmed that DHI-derived eumelanin includes indolequinone and/or quinone methide units in addition to DHI units.

  17. Spectroscopic orbits and variations of RS Ophiuchi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandi, E.; Quiroga, C.; Mikołajewska, J.; Ferrer, O. E.; García, L. G.

    2009-04-01

    Aims: The aims of our study are to improve the orbital elements of the giant and to derive the spectroscopic orbit for the white dwarf companion of the symbiotic system RS Oph. Spectral variations related to the 2006 outburst are also studied. Methods: We performed an analysis of about seventy optical and near infrared spectra of RS Oph that were acquired between 1998 and June 2008. The spectroscopic orbits were obtained by measuring the radial velocities of the cool component absorption lines and the broad Hα emission wings, which seem to be associated with the hot component. A set of cF-type absorption lines were also analyzed for a possible connection with the hot component motion. Results: A new period of 453.6 days and a mass ratio, q = M_g/Mh = 0.59 ± 0.05 were determined. Assuming a massive white dwarf as the hot component (Mh = 1.2-1.4 M⊙) the red giant mass is Mg = 0.68-0.80 M⊙ and the orbit inclination, i = 49°-52°. The cF-type lines are not associated with either binary component, and are most likely formed in the material streaming towards the hot component. We also confirm the presence of the Li I doublet in RS Oph and its radial velocities fit very well to the M-giant radial velocity curve. Regardless of the mechanism involved to produce lithium, its origin is most likely from within the cool giant rather than material captured by the giant at the time of the nova explosion. The quiescent spectra reveal a correlation of the H I and He I emission line fluxes with the monochromatic magnitudes at 4800 Å, indicating that the hot component activity is responsible for those flux variations. We also discuss the spectral characteristics around 54-55 and 240 days after the 2006 outburst. In April 2006 most of the emission lines present a broad pedestal with a strong and narrow component at about -20 km s-1 and two other extended emission components at -200 and +150 km s-1. These components could originate in a bipolar gas outflow supporting the model

  18. Electrochemical and spectroscopic study of novel Cu and Fe-based catalysts for oxygen reduction in alkaline media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Qinggang; Yang, Xiaofang; He, Ruihua; Bueno-López, Agustín; Miller, Hamish; Ren, Xiaoming; Yang, Wanli; Koel, Bruce E.

    2012-09-01

    We synthesized two “single-core” Fe-Nx/C and Cu-Nx/C electrocatalysts and a bi-core CuFe-Nx/C composite electrocatalyst using iron and copper phthalocyanine-based precursors and a high-temperature pyrolysis method. The morphology, structure, and activity toward the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in alkaline media were evaluated for each electrocatalyst by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray Diffraction (XRD), and the rotating ring-disk electrode (RRDE) method. Although the Cu-Nx/C catalyst showed lower catalytic activity than Fe-Nx/C, the presence of Cu enhanced the ORR performance of bi-core CuFe-Nx/C, as compared to single-core Fe-Nx/C. To fully understand the synergistic effect between Cu and Fe on this enhancement, high resolution X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (HR-XPS) and soft X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) was employed to study the electronic structure of as-synthesized electrocatalysts. The HR-XPS analysis showed that metal-nitrogen bonding was maintained and that the oxidation states of Fe and Cu were influenced by the presence of the second metal in the bi-core catalyst. The XAS data revealed that a fraction of an electron was transferred from Fe to Cu, which may help to lower the kinetic barrier during the ORR process. Based on our experimental results and four different models, we briefly discuss ORR mechanisms on these metallic catalysts.

  19. Using XAS and SXRF to Study Copper in Wilson Disease at the Molecular and Tissue Level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ralle, Martina; Blackburn, Ninian J.; Lutsenko, Svetlana

    2007-02-01

    Wilson disease (WD) is a genetic disorder of copper metabolism associated with severe hepatic, neurological, and psychiatric abnormalities. In WD, the billiary copper excretion is impaired and copper accumulates in tissues, particularly in the liver and the brain. The affected gene, ATP7B, encodes the copper transporting ATPase, Wilson disease protein (WNDP). WNDP has six copper binding sites in the N-terminal portion of the molecule. Each site includes the conserved amino acid sequence MXCXXC, and binds 1 Cu(I) through its 2 cysteine residues. We performed X-ray absorption studies at the Cu Kα-edge on the recombinant N-terminal domain of WNDP (N-WNDP). Copper was bound to N-WNDP either in vivo or in vitro in the presence of different reducing agents. We found that in N-WNDP copper is predominantly coordinated in a linear fashion by two cysteines, with the appearance of a Cu-Cu interaction when all metal binding sites are filled. Increasing amounts of reducing agents containing sulfide or phosphine groups led to binding of the exogenous ligands to copper thereby increasing the coordination number of copper from two to three. To better understand the role of copper in WD, we utilized livers of the 6-weeks-old Atp7b-/- mice (an animal model for WD) in which the copper concentration was 10-20-fold higher compared to that of the control mice. The distribution of copper in hepatocytes was evaluated by synchrotron based X-ray fluorescence microprobe (SXRF). We demonstrate that we can prepare liver slices that retain copper and can detect copper with subcellular resolution. On the same sections μ-XANES (spot size: 5 micron) was used to determine the oxidation state of copper.

  20. Using Xas And Sxrf to Study Copper in Wilson Disease at the Molecular And Tissue Level

    SciTech Connect

    Ralle, M.; Blackburn, N.J.; Lutsenko, S.

    2009-06-05

    Wilson disease (WD) is a genetic disorder of copper metabolism associated with severe hepatic, neurological, and psychiatric abnormalities. In WD, the billiary copper excretion is impaired and copper accumulates in tissues, particularly in the liver and the brain. The affected gene, ATP7B, encodes the copper transporting ATPase, Wilson disease protein (WNDP). WNDP has six copper binding sites in the N-terminal portion of the molecule. Each site includes the conserved amino acid sequence MXCXXC, and binds 1 Cu(I) through its 2 cysteine residues. We performed X-ray absorption studies at the Cu K{sub {alpha}}-edge on the recombinant N-terminal domain of WNDP (N-WNDP). Copper was bound to N-WNDP either in vivo or in vitro in the presence of different reducing agents. We found that in N-WNDP copper is predominantly coordinated in a linear fashion by two cysteines, with the appearance of a Cu-Cu interaction when all metal binding sites are filled. Increasing amounts of reducing agents containing sulfide or phosphine groups led to binding of the exogenous ligands to copper thereby increasing the coordination number of copper from two to three. To better understand the role of copper in WD, we utilized livers of the 6-weeks-old Atp7b-/- mice (an animal model for WD) in which the copper concentration was 10--20-fold higher compared to that of the control mice. The distribution of copper in hepatocytes was evaluated by synchrotron based X-ray fluorescence microprobe (SXRF). We demonstrate that we can prepare liver slices that retain copper and can detect copper with subcellular resolution. On the same sections {mu}-XANES (spot size: 5 micron) was used to determine the oxidation state of copper.

  1. Xenon behavior in TiN: A coupled XAS/TEM study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bès, R.; Gaillard, C.; Millard-Pinard, N.; Gavarini, S.; Martin, P.; Cardinal, S.; Esnouf, C.; Malchère, A.; Perrat-Mabilon, A.

    2013-03-01

    Titanium nitride is a refractory material that is being considered as an inert matrix in future Generation IV nuclear reactors, in particular in relation to the Gas-cooled Fast Reactor. The main role of this matrix would be to act as a barrier against the release of fission products, in particular gaseous ones like xenon. This release phenomenon will be enhanced by high temperatures expected in the fuel vicinity: 1200 °C under normal conditions, and up to 1800 °C under accidental conditions. It is therefore necessary to investigate the behavior of volatile fission products in TiN under high temperature and irradiation. Indeed, these basic data are very useful to predict the volatile fission products released under these extreme conditions. Our previous work has shown that Xe introduced by ion implantation in sintered TiN tends to be released as a result of annealing, due to a transport mechanism towards the sample surface. The aim of the present work is to determine under which physical state Xe is in TiN. Xenon was first introduced using ion implantation at 800 keV in TiN samples obtained by hot pressing at several concentrations ranging from 0.4 to 8 at.%. Secondly, samples were annealed at high temperature, from 1000 °C to 1500 °C. Xe was then characterized by X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy and Transmission Electron Microscopy. The formation of intragranular xenon bubbles was demonstrated, and the xenon concentration which is sufficient to form bubbles is found to be lower than 0.4 at.% under our experimental conditions. These bubbles were found unpressurised at 15 K. Their size increases with the temperature and the local xenon concentration. For the highest xenon concentrations, a mechanism involving the formation of a Xe interconnected bubble network is proposed to explain Xe massive release observed by Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry experiments.

  2. Australasian microtektites from Antarctica: XAS determination of the Fe oxidation state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giuli, Gabriele; Cicconi, Maria Rita; Eeckhout, Sigrid Griet; Pratesi, Giovanni; Paris, Eleonora; Folco, Luigi

    2014-04-01

    The Fe oxidation state and coordination number of 29 impact glass spherules recently recovered from the Transantarctic Mountains (Antarctica) have been determined by X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy. Based on geochemical, isotopic, and fission track data, these spherules are considered as microtektites from the Australasian tektite/microtektite strewn field. Their find location is the farthest so far discovered from the possible source crater region, and their alkali content is the lowest compared with other published data on Australasian microtektite glasses. The Fe3+/(Fe2++Fe3+) ratio, determined from the analysis of the pre-edge peak energy position and integrated intensity, is below 0.1 (±0.04) for all the samples, and is comparable to that of most tektites and microtektites from the Australasian strewn field. Also, the pre-edge peak integrated intensity, which is sensitive to the average Fe coordination geometry, is comparable to that of other Australasian microtektites reported in the literature. The agreement of the Fe oxidation state and coordination number, between the Transantarctic Mountain microtektites (TAM) and the Australasian tektites and microtektites, further confirms the impact origin of these glass spherules and provides an independent suggestion that they represent a major extension southeastward of the Australasian strewn field. The fact that similar redox conditions are observed in tektites and microtektites within the Australasian strewn field regardless of the distance from the source crater area (up to approximately 11000 km) could be an important constraint for better understanding the different processes affecting microtektite formation and transport. The fact that the Fe oxidation state of microtektites does not increase with distance, as in the case of North American microtektites, means that thermal and redox histories of Australasian and TAM microtektites could differ significantly from those of North

  3. The spectroscopic foundation of CO2 climate forcing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mlynczak, M. G.; Daniels, T.; Kratz, D. P.; Collins, W.; Feldman, D.; Lawler, J. E.; Anderson, L. W.; Fahey, D. W.; Hunt, L. A.

    2015-12-01

    The radiative forcing (RF) of carbon dioxide (CO2) is the leading contribution to climate change from anthropogenic activities. Calculating CO2 RF requires detailed knowledge of spectral line parameters and lineshape functions for thousands of infrared absorption lines. A reliable spectroscopic characterization of CO2 forcing is therefore a critical input to scientific and policy-oriented assessments of present climate and future climate change. Our study is partly motivated by a recent assertion that CO2 RF values, and hence predictions of climate sensitivity to elevated CO2, have a significant high bias because the CO2 spectroscopic parameters being used are incorrect. Our results show that CO2 RF in a variety of atmospheres is remarkably insensitive to known uncertainties in the three main CO2 spectroscopic parameters: the line strengths, half widths, and line shapes. We demonstrate that this is due largely to the definition of CO2 RF, which is the difference between the CO2 longwave net flux at the tropopause for doubled CO2 concentrations from the preindustrial era. We also assess the effects of sub-Lorentzian wings of CO2 lines and find that the computed RF is largely insensitive to the spectral lineshape function. Overall, the spectroscopic uncertainty in present-day CO2 RF is less than a few percent. Our study highlights the basics and subtleties of RF calculations, addressing interests of the expert and non-expert.

  4. Fabrication of multi-layered absorption structure for high quantum efficiency photon detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Fujii, Go; Fukuda, Daiji; Numata, Takayuki; Yoshizawa, Akio; Tsuchida, Hidemi; Fujino, Hidetoshi; Ishii, Hiroyuki; Itatani, Taro; Zama, Tatsuya; Inoue, Shuichiro

    2009-12-16

    We report on some efforts to improve a quantum efficiency of titanium-based optical superconducting transition edge sensors using the multi-layered absorption structure for maximizing photon absorption in the Ti layer. Using complex refractive index values of each film measured by a Spectroscopic Ellipsometry, we designed and optimized by a simulation code. An absorption measurement of fabricated structure was in good agreement with the design and was higher than 99% at optimized wavelength of 1550 nm.

  5. X-ray absorption spectroscopy of metalloproteins.

    PubMed

    Ward, Jesse; Ollmann, Emily; Maxey, Evan; Finney, Lydia A

    2014-01-01

    Metalloproteins are enormously important in biology. While a variety of techniques exist for studying metals in biology, X-ray absorption spectroscopy is particularly useful in that it can determine the local electronic and physical structure around the metal center, and is one of the few avenues for studying "spectroscopically silent" metal ions like Zn(II) and Cu(I) that have completely filled valence bands. While X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) and extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) are useful for studying metalloprotein structure, they suffer the limitation that the detected signal is an average of all the various metal centers in the sample, which limits its usefulness for studying metal centers in situ or in cell lysates. It would be desirable to be able to separate the various proteins in a mixture prior to performing X-ray absorption studies, so that the derived signal is from one species only. Here we describe a method for performing X-ray absorption spectroscopy on protein bands following electrophoretic separation and western blotting.

  6. Using Softer X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy to Probe Biological Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Akabayov,B.; Doonan, C.; Pickering, I.; George, G.; Sagi, I.

    2005-01-01

    Many inorganic species are now recognized as being essential for life, including many forms of sulfur, phosphate and numerous classes of metal ions. For example, recent progress in the fields of biochemistry and biology has pointed out the critical importance of sulfur in the biosynthesis of vital cofactors and active sites in proteins, and in the complex reaction mechanisms often involved. Special attention has also been drawn to the diverse roles of alkaline (Na{sup +}, K{sup +}) and alkaline earth (Mg{sup 2+}, Ca{sup 2+}) metal ions in mediating the activity of RNA, proteins and many processes in living cells. While the general effect of these ions in biology is mostly understood, information on their detailed role is deficient. Here the application of softer X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) to probe the local structural and electronic environment of such ions within their biological complexes and during physiological reactions is discussed. In addition, the required experimental set-up and the difficulties associated with conducting softer XAS experiments on biological samples are presented.

  7. Speciation of selenium in stream insects using X-ray absorption spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Ruwandi Andrahennadi; Mark Wayland; Ingrid J. Pickering

    2007-11-15

    Selenium contamination in the environment is a widespread problem affecting insects and other wildlife. Insects occupy a critical middle link and aid in trophic transfer of selenium in many terrestrial and freshwater food chains, but the mechanisms of selenium uptake through the food chain are poorly understood. In particular, biotransformation of selenium by insects into different chemical forms will greatly influence how toxic or benign the selenium is to that organism or to its predators. We have used X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) to identify the chemical form of selenium in insects inhabiting selenium contaminated streams near Hinton, Alberta (Canada). Selenium K near-edge spectra indicate a variability of selenium speciation among the insects that included mayflies (Ephemeroptera), stoneflies (Plecoptera), caddisflies (Trichoptera), and craneflies (Diptera). Higher percentages of inorganic selenium were observed in primary consumers, detritivores, and filter feeders than in predatory insects. Among the organic forms of selenium, organic selenides constituted a major fraction in most organisms. A species modeled as trimethylselenonium was observed during the pupal stage of caddisflies. These results provide insights into how the insects cope with their toxic cargo, including how the selenium is biotransformed into less toxic forms and how it can be eliminated from the insects. More broadly, this study demonstrates the strengths of XAS to probe the effects of heavy elements at trace levels in insects from the field.

  8. The Chemistry os Spent Nuclear Fuel From X-Ray Absorption Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    F.A. Fortner; A.J. Kropf; J.C. Cunnane

    2006-09-21

    Present and future nuclear fuel cycles will require an understanding of the complex chemistry of trace fission products and transuranium actinides in spent nuclear fuel (SNF). Because of the unique analytical challenges presented by SNF to the materials scientist, many of its fundamental physical and chemical properties remain poorly understood, especially on the microscopic scale. Such an understanding of the chemical states of radionuclides in SNF would benefit development of technologies for fuel monitoring, fuel performance improvement and modeling, fuel reprocessing, and spent fuel storage and disposal. We have recently demonstrated the use of synchrotron x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) to examine crystal chemical properties of actinides and fission products in extracted specimens of SNF. Information obtained includes oxidation state, chemical bond coordination, and quantitative elemental concentration and distribution. We have also used XAS in a scanning mode to obtain x-ray spectral micrographs with resolution approaching 1 micron. A brief overview of the technique will be presented, along with findings on uranium, plutonium, neptunium, technetium, and molybdenum in commercial PWR SNF specimens.

  9. Atomic Structure of Pt3Ni Nanoframe Electrocatalysts by in Situ X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Becknell, Nigel; Kang, Yijin; Chen, Chen; Resasco, Joaquin; Kornienko, Nikolay; Guo, Jinghua; Markovic, Nenad M; Somorjai, Gabor A; Stamenkovic, Vojislav R; Yang, Peidong

    2015-12-23

    Understanding the atomic structure of a catalyst is crucial to exposing the source of its performance characteristics. It is highly unlikely that a catalyst remains the same under reaction conditions when compared to as-synthesized. Hence, the ideal experiment to study the catalyst structure should be performed in situ. Here, we use X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) as an in situ technique to study Pt3Ni nanoframe particles which have been proven to be an excellent electrocatalyst for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). The surface characteristics of the nanoframes were probed through electrochemical hydrogen underpotential deposition and carbon monoxide electrooxidation, which showed that nanoframe surfaces with different structure exhibit varying levels of binding strength to adsorbate molecules. It is well-known that Pt-skin formation on Pt-Ni catalysts will enhance ORR activity by weakening the binding energy between the surface and adsorbates. Ex situ and in situ XAS results reveal that nanoframes which bind adsorbates more strongly have a rougher Pt surface caused by insufficient segregation of Pt to the surface and consequent Ni dissolution. In contrast, nanoframes which exhibit extremely high ORR activity simultaneously demonstrate more significant segregation of Pt over Ni-rich subsurface layers, allowing better formation of the critical Pt-skin. This work demonstrates that the high ORR activity of the Pt3Ni hollow nanoframes depends on successful formation of the Pt-skin surface structure.

  10. A multi-channel monolithic Ge detector system for fluorescence x-ray absorption spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Bucher, J.J.; Allen, P.G.; Edelstein, N.M.; Shuh, D.K.; Madden, N.W.; Cork, C.; Luke, P.; Pehl, D.; Malone, D.

    1995-03-01

    Construction and performance of a monolithic quad-pixel Ge detector for fluorescence x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) at synchrotron radiation sources are described. The detector semiconductor element has an active surface area of 4.0 cm{sup 2} which is electrically separated into four 1.0 cm{sup 2} pixels, with little interfacial dead volume. Spatial response of the array shows that cross-talk between adjacent pixels is < 10% for 5.9 keV photons that fall within 0.5 mm of the pixel boundaries. The detector electronics system uses pre-amplifiers built at LBNL with commercial Tennelec Model TC 244 amplifiers. Using an {sup 55}Fe test source (MnK{sub {alpha}}, 5.9 keV), energy resolution of better than 200 eV is achieved with a 4 {mu}sec peaking time. At 0.5 {mu}sec peaking time, pulse pileup results in a 75% throughput efficiency for an incoming count rate of 100 kHz. Initial XAS fluoresncece measurements at the beamline 4 wiggler end stations at SSRL show that the detector system has several advantages over commercial x-ray spectrometers for low-concentration counting.

  11. Identification of lead chemical form in mine waste materials by X-ray absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taga, Raijeli L.; Zheng, Jiajia; Huynh, Trang; Ng, Jack; Harris, Hugh H.; Noller, Barry

    2010-06-01

    X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) provides a direct means for measuring lead chemical forms in complex samples. In this study, XAS was used to identify the presence of plumbojarosite (PbFe6(SO4)4(OH)12) by lead L3-edge XANES spectra in mine waste from a small gold mining operation in Fiji. The presence of plumbojarosite in tailings was confirmed by XRD but XANES gave better resolution. The potential for human uptake of Pb from tailings was measured using a physiologically based extract test (PBET), an in-vitro bioaccessibility (BAc) method. The BAc of Pb was 55%. Particle size distribution of tailings indicated that 40% of PM10 particulates exist which could be a potential risk for respiratory effects via the inhalation route. Food items collected in the proximity of the mine site had lead concentrations which exceed food standard guidelines. Lead within the mining lease exceeded sediment guidelines. The results from this study are used to investigate exposure pathways via ingestion and inhalation for potential risk exposure pathways of Pb in that locality. The highest Pb concentration in soil and tailings was 25,839 mg/kg, exceeding the Australian National Environment Protection Measure (NEPM) soil health investigation levels.

  12. Identification of lead chemical form in mine waste materials by X-ray absorption spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Taga, Raijeli L.; Ng, Jack; Zheng Jiajia; Huynh, Trang; Noller, Barry; Harris, Hugh H.

    2010-06-23

    X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) provides a direct means for measuring lead chemical forms in complex samples. In this study, XAS was used to identify the presence of plumbojarosite (PbFe{sub 6}(SO{sub 4}){sub 4}(OH){sub 12}) by lead L{sub 3}-edge XANES spectra in mine waste from a small gold mining operation in Fiji. The presence of plumbojarosite in tailings was confirmed by XRD but XANES gave better resolution. The potential for human uptake of Pb from tailings was measured using a physiologically based extract test (PBET), an in-vitro bioaccessibility (BAc) method. The BAc of Pb was 55%. Particle size distribution of tailings indicated that 40% of PM{sub 10} particulates exist which could be a potential risk for respiratory effects via the inhalation route. Food items collected in the proximity of the mine site had lead concentrations which exceed food standard guidelines. Lead within the mining lease exceeded sediment guidelines. The results from this study are used to investigate exposure pathways via ingestion and inhalation for potential risk exposure pathways of Pb in that locality. The highest Pb concentration in soil and tailings was 25,839 mg/kg, exceeding the Australian National Environment Protection Measure (NEPM) soil health investigation levels.

  13. Speciation of Selenium in Stream Insects Using X-Ray Absorption Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Andrahennadi, R.; Wayland, M.; Pickering, I.J.

    2009-05-28

    Selenium contamination in the environment is a widespread problem affecting insects and other wildlife. Insects occupy a critical middle link and aid in trophic transfer of selenium in many terrestrial and freshwater food chains, but the mechanisms of selenium uptake through the food chain are poorly understood. In particular, biotransformation of selenium by insects into different chemical forms will greatly influence how toxic or benign the selenium is to that organism or to its predators. We have used X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) to identify the chemical form of selenium in insects inhabiting selenium contaminated streams near Hinton, Alberta (Canada). Selenium K near-edge spectra indicate a variability of selenium speciation among the insects that included mayflies (Ephemeroptera), stoneflies (Plecoptera), caddisflies (Trichoptera), and craneflies (Diptera). Higher percentages of inorganic selenium were observed in primary consumers, detritivores, and filter feeders than in predatory insects. Among the organic forms of selenium, organic selenides constituted a major fraction in most organisms. A species modeled as trimethylselenonium was observed during the pupal stage of caddisflies. These results provide insights into how the insects cope with their toxic cargo, including how the selenium is biotransformed into less toxic forms and how it can be eliminated from the insects. More broadly, this study demonstrates the strengths of XAS to probe the effects of heavy elements at trace levels in insects from the field.

  14. Structural iron in dioctahedral and trioctahedral smectites: a polarized XAS study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finck, N.; Schlegel, M. L.; Bauer, A.

    2015-11-01

    The chemical form of structural Fe in smectites influences many physicochemical properties of these clay minerals. Powder EXAFS data for structural Fe in smectites have been reported; however, the preferred orientation of clay platelets with respect to the X-ray beam may lead to erroneous conclusions on the local chemical environment. Dioctahedral montmorillonite and for the first time trioctahedral hectorite were prepared as textured samples, and the Fe local environment was probed by analysis of the X-ray absorption pre-edge peaks at the magic angle and by polarized EXAFS (P-EXAFS) spectroscopy. Compared to powder measurements, overlapping contributions from shells with distinct orientations can be filtered more easily by P-EXAFS, thus decreasing uncertainties on structural parameters. The pre-edge spectrum of montmorillonite is similar to spectra commonly reported for dioctahedral smectites. In contrast, the pre-edge spectrum of hectorite is notably distinct and hints to either differences in the site symmetry and/or in covalence. In both smectites, Fe is surrounded by a first O shell at a distance consistent with sixfold-coordinated Fe(III), suggesting that Fe(III) is located in the smectite octahedral sheet. This is corroborated by the distances and orientations of neighboring cationic shells, such as in-plane (Mg, Al) and out-of-plane Si shells. For montmorillonite, the results indicate Fe substitution for Al/Mg in the octahedral sheet, and a number of Fe neighbors consistent with random distribution in the octahedral sheet. For hectorite, results indicate a slight tendency for Fe atoms to form pairs in octahedral sheets; however, low numbers of neighboring cations were obtained, presumably a consequence of the presence of vacancies and/or Li in the vicinity of Fe, or of the coexistence of Fe and Mg neighbors with mutually canceling EXAFS waves. Consistent with pre-edge data, the coordination numbers can also indicate some incoherency in Fe-cation interatomic

  15. The specific sorption of Np(V) on the corundum (α-Al2O3) surface in the presence of trivalent lanthanides Eu(III) and Gd(III): A batch sorption and XAS study.

    PubMed

    Virtanen, S; Bok, F; Ikeda-Ohno, A; Rossberg, A; Lützenkirchen, J; Rabung, T; Lehto, J; Huittinen, N

    2016-12-01

    The sorption of pentavalent neptunium, Np(V), on corundum (α-Al2O3) was investigated in the absence and presence of trivalent europium or gadolinium as a competing element under CO2-free conditions. The objective of this study was to investigate how a trivalent metal ion with a higher charge than that of the neptunyl(V) ion would affect the sorption of Np(V) when allowed to adsorb on the mineral surface before the addition of Np(V). Batch sorption experiments conducted as a function of pH (pH-edges) and as a function of Np(V) concentration (isotherms) in the absence and presence of 1×10(-5)M Eu(III) showed no sign of Eu being able to block Np sorption sites. Surface complexation modelling using the diffuse double layer model was applied to the batch data to obtain surface complexation constants for the formed Np(V) complexes on corundum. To account for potential changes occurring in the coordination environment of the neptunium ion in the presence of a trivalent lanthanide, X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) measurements were carried out on the samples containing only Np(V) and Np(V)+Gd(III). The results reveal the presence of a bidentate Np(V) edge-sharing complex on the corundum surface in the absence of Gd(III), while the coordination environment of Np(V) on the corundum surface could be changed when Gd(III) is added to the sample before the sorption of Np(V).

  16. The specific sorption of Np(V) on the corundum (α-Al2O3) surface in the presence of trivalent lanthanides Eu(III) and Gd(III): A batch sorption and XAS study.

    PubMed

    Virtanen, S; Bok, F; Ikeda-Ohno, A; Rossberg, A; Lützenkirchen, J; Rabung, T; Lehto, J; Huittinen, N

    2016-12-01

    The sorption of pentavalent neptunium, Np(V), on corundum (α-Al2O3) was investigated in the absence and presence of trivalent europium or gadolinium as a competing element under CO2-free conditions. The objective of this study was to investigate how a trivalent metal ion with a higher charge than that of the neptunyl(V) ion would affect the sorption of Np(V) when allowed to adsorb on the mineral surface before the addition of Np(V). Batch sorption experiments conducted as a function of pH (pH-edges) and as a function of Np(V) concentration (isotherms) in the absence and presence of 1×10(-5)M Eu(III) showed no sign of Eu being able to block Np sorption sites. Surface complexation modelling using the diffuse double layer model was applied to the batch data to obtain surface complexation constants for the formed Np(V) complexes on corundum. To account for potential changes occurring in the coordination environment of the neptunium ion in the presence of a trivalent lanthanide, X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) measurements were carried out on the samples containing only Np(V) and Np(V)+Gd(III). The results reveal the presence of a bidentate Np(V) edge-sharing complex on the corundum surface in the absence of Gd(III), while the coordination environment of Np(V) on the corundum surface could be changed when Gd(III) is added to the sample before the sorption of Np(V). PMID:27569516

  17. Evidence for Photoionization-driven Broad Absorption Line Variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Tinggui; Yang, Chenwei; Wang, Huiyuan; Ferland, Gary

    2015-12-01

    We present a qualitative analysis of the variability of quasar broad absorption lines using the large multi-epoch spectroscopic data set of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 10. We confirm that variations of absorption lines are highly coordinated among different components of the same ion or the same absorption component of different ions for C iv, Si iv, and N v. Furthermore, we show that the equivalent widths (EWs) of the lines decrease or increase statistically when the continuum brightens or dims. This is further supported by the synchronized variations of emission and absorption-line EWs when the well-established intrinsic Baldwin effect for emission lines is taken into account. We find that the emergence of an absorption component is usually accompanied by the dimming of the continuum while the disappearance of an absorption-line component is accompanied by the brightening of the continuum. This suggests that the emergence or disappearance of a C iv absorption component is only the extreme case, when the ionic column density is very sensitive to continuum variations or the continuum variability the amplitude is larger. These results support the idea that absorption-line variability is driven mainly by changes in the gas ionization in response to continuum variations, that the line-absorbing gas is highly ionized, and in some extreme cases, too highly ionized to be detected in UV absorption lines. Due to uncertainties in the spectroscopic flux calibration, we cannot quantify the fraction of quasars with asynchronized continuum and absorption-line variations.

  18. X-ray Absorption Spectra of Dissolved Polysulfides in Lithium-Sulfur Batteries from First-Principles.

    PubMed

    Pascal, Tod A; Wujcik, Kevin H; Velasco-Velez, Juan; Wu, Chenghao; Teran, Alexander A; Kapilashrami, Mukes; Cabana, Jordi; Guo, Jinghua; Salmeron, Miquel; Balsara, Nitash; Prendergast, David

    2014-05-01

    The X-ray absorption spectra (XAS) of lithium polysulfides (Li2Sx) of various chain lengths (x) dissolved in a model solvent are obtained from first-principles calculations. The spectra exhibit two main absorption features near the sulfur K-edge, which are unambiguously interpreted as a pre-edge near 2471 eV due to the terminal sulfur atoms at either end of the linear polysulfide dianions and a main-edge near 2473 eV due to the (x - 2) internal atoms in the chain, except in the case of Li2S2, which only has a low-energy feature. We find an almost linear dependence between the ratio of the peaks and chain length, although the linear dependence is modified by the delocalized, molecular nature of the core-excited states that can span up to six neighboring sulfur atoms. Thus, our results indicate that the ratio of the peak area, and not the peak intensities, should be used when attempting to differentiate the polysulfides from XAS.

  19. Rapid Mapping of Lithiation Dynamics in Transition Metal Oxide Particles with Operando X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nowack, Lea; Grolimund, Daniel; Samson, Vallerie; Marone, Federica; Wood, Vanessa

    2016-02-01

    Since the commercialization of lithium ion batteries (LIBs), layered transition metal oxides (LiMO2, where M = Co, Mn, Ni, or mixtures thereof) have been materials of choice for LIB cathodes. During cycling, the transition metals change their oxidation states, an effect that can be tracked by detecting energy shifts in the X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) spectrum. X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) can therefore be used to visualize and quantify lithiation kinetics in transition metal oxide cathodes; however, in-situ measurements are often constrained by temporal resolution and X-ray dose, necessitating compromises in the electrochemistry cycling conditions used or the materials examined. We report a combined approach to reduce measurement time and X-ray exposure for operando XAS studies of lithium ion batteries. A highly discretized energy resolution coupled with advanced post-processing enables rapid yet reliable identification of the oxidation state. A full-field microscopy setup provides sub-particle resolution over a large area of battery electrode, enabling the oxidation state within many transition metal oxide particles to be tracked simultaneously. Here, we apply this approach to gain insights into the lithiation kinetics of a commercial, mixed-metal oxide cathode material, nickel cobalt aluminium oxide (NCA), during (dis)charge and its degradation during overcharge.

  20. Rapid Mapping of Lithiation Dynamics in Transition Metal Oxide Particles with Operando X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Nowack, Lea; Grolimund, Daniel; Samson, Vallerie; Marone, Federica; Wood, Vanessa

    2016-02-24

    Since the commercialization of lithium ion batteries (LIBs), layered transition metal oxides (LiMO2, where M = Co, Mn, Ni, or mixtures thereof) have been materials of choice for LIB cathodes. During cycling, the transition metals change their oxidation states, an effect that can be tracked by detecting energy shifts in the X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) spectrum. X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) can therefore be used to visualize and quantify lithiation kinetics in transition metal oxide cathodes; however, in-situ measurements are often constrained by temporal resolution and X-ray dose, necessitating compromises in the electrochemistry cycling conditions used or the materials examined. We report a combined approach to reduce measurement time and X-ray exposure for operando XAS studies of lithium ion batteries. A highly discretized energy resolution coupled with advanced post-processing enables rapid yet reliable identification of the oxidation state. A full-field microscopy setup provides sub-particle resolution over a large area of battery electrode, enabling the oxidation state within many transition metal oxide particles to be tracked simultaneously. Here, we apply this approach to gain insights into the lithiation kinetics of a commercial, mixed-metal oxide cathode material, nickel cobalt aluminium oxide (NCA), during (dis)charge and its degradation during overcharge.

  1. X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy Characterization of Zn Underpotential Deposition on Au(111) from Phosphate Supporting Electrolyte

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, J R; O'Malley, R L; O'Connell, T J; Vollmer, A; Rayment, T

    2009-12-11

    Zn K-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) has been used to investigate the structure of Zn monolayers prepared on Au(111) electrodes via underpotential deposition (UPD) from phosphate supporting electrolyte. Theoretical modeling of the XAS data indicates that the Zn adatoms adopt a commensurate ({radical}3x{radical}3)R30{sup o} ({mu}{sub sc} = 0.33) adlayer structure and reside within the 3-fold hollow sites of the Au(111) surface. Meanwhile, phosphate counter-ions co-adsorb on the UPD adlayer and bridge between the Zn adatoms in a ({radical}3x{radical}3)R30{sup o} ({mu}{sub sc} = 0.33) configuration, with each phosphorous atom residing above a vacant 3-fold hollow site of the Au(111). Significantly, this surface structure is invariant between the electrochemical potential for UPD adlayer formation and the onset of bulk Zn electrodeposition. Analysis of the Zn K-edge absorption onset also presents the possibility that the Zn adatoms do not fully discharge during the process of UPD, which had been proposed in prior voltammetric studies of the phosphate/Zn(UPD)/Au(111) system.

  2. Rapid Mapping of Lithiation Dynamics in Transition Metal Oxide Particles with Operando X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Nowack, Lea; Grolimund, Daniel; Samson, Vallerie; Marone, Federica; Wood, Vanessa

    2016-01-01

    Since the commercialization of lithium ion batteries (LIBs), layered transition metal oxides (LiMO2, where M = Co, Mn, Ni, or mixtures thereof) have been materials of choice for LIB cathodes. During cycling, the transition metals change their oxidation states, an effect that can be tracked by detecting energy shifts in the X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) spectrum. X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) can therefore be used to visualize and quantify lithiation kinetics in transition metal oxide cathodes; however, in-situ measurements are often constrained by temporal resolution and X-ray dose, necessitating compromises in the electrochemistry cycling conditions used or the materials examined. We report a combined approach to reduce measurement time and X-ray exposure for operando XAS studies of lithium ion batteries. A highly discretized energy resolution coupled with advanced post-processing enables rapid yet reliable identification of the oxidation state. A full-field microscopy setup provides sub-particle resolution over a large area of battery electrode, enabling the oxidation state within many transition metal oxide particles to be tracked simultaneously. Here, we apply this approach to gain insights into the lithiation kinetics of a commercial, mixed-metal oxide cathode material, nickel cobalt aluminium oxide (NCA), during (dis)charge and its degradation during overcharge. PMID:26908198

  3. The spectroscopic foundation of radiative forcing of climate by carbon dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mlynczak, Martin G.; Daniels, Taumi S.; Kratz, David P.; Feldman, Daniel R.; Collins, William D.; Mlawer, Eli J.; Alvarado, Matthew J.; Lawler, James E.; Anderson, L. W.; Fahey, David W.; Hunt, Linda A.; Mast, Jeffrey C.

    2016-05-01

    The radiative forcing (RF) of carbon dioxide (CO2) is the leading contribution to climate change from anthropogenic activities. Calculating CO2 RF requires detailed knowledge of spectral line parameters for thousands of infrared absorption lines. A reliable spectroscopic characterization of CO2 forcing is critical to scientific and policy assessments of present climate and climate change. Our results show that CO2 RF in a variety of atmospheres is remarkably insensitive to known uncertainties in the three main CO2 spectroscopic parameters: the line shapes, line strengths, and half widths. We specifically examine uncertainty in RF due to line mixing as this process is critical in determining line shapes in the far wings of CO2 absorption lines. RF computed with a Voigt line shape is also examined. Overall, the spectroscopic uncertainty in present-day CO2 RF is less than 1%, indicating a robust foundation in our understanding of how rising CO2 warms the climate system.

  4. CD-ROM Spectroscope: A Simple and Inexpensive Tool for Classroom Demonstrations on Chemical Spectroscopy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wakabayashi, Fumitaka; Hamada, Kiyohito; Sone, Kozo

    1998-01-01

    Describes the construction and use of a spectroscope using a compact disk as a reflection grating. Lists instructions for viewing emission spectra of white or fluorescent light sources or discharge tubes, and absorption spectra of colored solutions. Includes modified directions and expanded activities. Contains 16 references. (WRM)

  5. A photometrically and spectroscopically confirmed population of passive spiral galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fraser-McKelvie, Amelia; Brown, Michael J. I.; Pimbblet, Kevin A.; Dolley, Tim; Crossett, Jacob P.; Bonne, Nicolas J.

    2016-10-01

    We have identified a population of passive spiral galaxies from photometry and integral field spectroscopy. We selected z < 0.035 spiral galaxies that have WISE colours consistent with little mid-infrared emission from warm dust. Matched aperture photometry of 51 spiral galaxies in ultraviolet, optical and mid-infrared show these galaxies have colours consistent with passive galaxies. Six galaxies form a spectroscopic pilot study and were observed using the Wide-Field Spectrograph to check for signs of nebular emission from star formation. We see no evidence of substantial nebular emission found in previous red spiral samples. These six galaxies possess absorption-line spectra with 4000 Å breaks consistent with an average luminosity-weighted age of 2.3 Gyr. Our photometric and integral field spectroscopic observations confirm the existence of a population of local passive spiral galaxies, implying that transformation into early-type morphologies is not required for the quenching of star formation.

  6. Arsenic speciation in solids using X-ray absorption spectroscopy

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Foster, Andrea L.; Kim, Chris S.

    2014-01-01

    One of the most important aims of this review is to clarify the different types of analysis that are performed on As-XAS spectra, and to describe the benefits, drawbacks, and limitations of each. Arsenic XAS spectra are analyzed to obtain one or more of the following types of information (in increasing order of sophistication):

  7. Microbeam x-ray absorption spectroscopy study of chromium in large-grain uranium dioxide fuel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mieszczynski, C.; Kuri, G.; Bertsch, J.; Martin, M.; Borca, C. N.; Delafoy, Ch; Simoni, E.

    2014-09-01

    Synchrotron-based microprobe x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) has been used to study the local atomic structure of chromium in chromia-doped uranium dioxide (UO2) grains. The specimens investigated were a commercial grade chromia-doped UO2 fresh fuel pellet, and materials from a spent fuel pellet of the same batch, irradiated with an average burnup of ~40 MW d kg-1. Uranium L3-edge and chromium K-edge XAS have been measured, and the structural environments of central uranium and chromium atoms have been elucidated. The Fourier transform of uranium L3-edge extended x-ray absorption fine structure shows two well-defined peaks of U-O and U-U bonds at average distances of 2.36 and 3.83 Å. Their coordination numbers are determined as 8 and 11, respectively. The chromium Fourier transform extended x-ray absorption fine structure of the pristine UO2 matrix shows similar structural features with the corresponding spectrum of the irradiated spent fuel, indicative of analogous chromium environments in the two samples studied. From the chromium XAS experimental data, detectable next neighbor atoms are oxygen and uranium of the cation-substituted UO2 lattice, and two distinct subshells of chromium and oxygen neighbors, possibly because of undissolved chromia particles present in the doped fuels. Curve-fitting analyses using theoretical amplitude and phase-shift functions of the closest Cr-O shell and calculations with ab initio computer code FEFF and atomic clusters generated from the chromium-dissolved UO2 structure have been carried out. There is a prominent reduction in the length of the adjacent Cr-O bond of about 0.3 Å in chromia-doped UO2 compared with the ideal U-O bond length in standard UO2 that would be expected because of the change in effective Coulomb interactions resulting from replacing U4+ with Cr3+ and their ionic size differences. The contraction of shortest Cr-U bond is ~0.1 Å relative to the U-U bond length in bulk UO2. The difference in the

  8. A spectroscopic study of the effects of a microbial siderophore on Pb adsorption to kaolinite

    SciTech Connect

    Mishra, Bhoopesh; Haack, Elizabeth A.; Maurice, Patricia A.; Bunker, Bruce A.

    2010-11-12

    Batch adsorption experiments were combined with X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy (XAS) analysis to determine the mechanism(s) whereby the microbial trihydroxamate siderophore ligand desferrioxamine-B (DFO-B) affects Pb sorption to kaolinite at pH 4, 6, and 7.5 (in 0.1 M NaClO{sub 4}, 22 C; Pb:DFO-B ratio 120:240 {micro}M). In the absence of DFO-B, Pb adsorbs only slightly to kaolinite at pH 4, by a combination of inner- and outer-sphere complexation. Adsorption increases at pH 6, and sorption (adsorption/surface precipitation) further increases at pH 7.5. At pH 4, DFO-B does not bind Pb in solution appreciably, and the Pb adsorption mechanism(s) is unchanged by the presence of DFO-B. At pH 6, DFO-B slightly enhances Pb adsorption, due at least in part to formation of a DFO-B-Pb-kaolinite type A ternary surface complex. At pH 7.5, DFO-B decreases Pb sorption and Pb adsorption is dominated by a DFO-B-Pb-kaolinite type A ternary surface complex. Although XAS and thermodynamic speciation modeling indicate that Pb is bound by multiple DFO-B functional groups in solution at pH 7.5, the DFO-B-Pb-kaolinite surface complex appears to involve only a single hydroxamate group. This study thus demonstrates that the detailed structure of a ternary surface complex cannot necessarily be predicted from the structure of the solution organic-metal complex.

  9. Ligand K-edge x-ray adsorption spectroscopic studies of the electronic structure of inorganic model complexes and metalloprotein active sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shadle, S. E.

    1994-08-01

    Ligand K-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) has been developed as a technique for the investigation of ligand-metal bonding and has been applied to the study of electronic structure in organic model complexes and metalloprotein active sites. Ligand K-edge XAS has been measured at the chloride K-edge for a series of complexes containing chloride ligands bound to open shell d(sup 9) copper ions. The intensity of the pre-edge feature in these spectra reflects the covalency in the half-occupied d(sub x)2(sub -y)2-derived molecular orbital (HOMO) of the complex. The energy of the pre-edge feature is related to both the charge on the ligand and the HOMO energy. An analysis of the intensity and energy of the pre-edge feature as well as the energy of the rising edge absorption provides quantitative information about the covalency of the ligand-metal interaction, the charge donated by the chloride, and the energy of the copper d-manifold. The results demonstrate that ligand K-edge XAS features can be used to obtain quantitative information about ligand-metal bonding. The results also identify the chemical basis for trends in the XAS data for the complexes: D(sub 4h)CuCl4(sup 2-), D(sub 2d)CuCl4(sup 2-), planar, trans-CuCl2(pdmp)(sub 2) (pdmp=N-phenyl-3,5-dimethylpyrazole), square pyramidal CuCl5(sup 3-), the planar dimer KCuCl3, the distorted tetrahedral dimer (Ph4P)CuCl3, and two dimers with mixed ligation, one containing a bridging chloride, and the other, terminally bound chloride. A geometric distortion from square planar to distorted tetrahedral results in a decrease in the chloride-copper HOMO covalency but an increase in the total charge donation by the chlorides. Thus, while the geometry can maximize the overlap for a highly covalent HOMO, this does not necessarily reflect the overall charge donation. The Cl-Cu(II) bonding interactions are dependent on the nature of the other coordinating ligands.

  10. A DVD Spectroscope: A Simple, High-Resolution Classroom Spectroscope

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wakabayashi, Fumitaka; Hamada, Kiyohito

    2006-01-01

    Digital versatile disks (DVDs) have successfully made up an inexpensive but high-resolution spectroscope suitable for classroom experiments that can easily be made with common material and gives clear and fine spectra of various light sources and colored material. The observed spectra can be photographed with a digital camera, and such images can…

  11. Spectroscopic Investigation of Ce(3+) Doped Fluoride Crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reinhart, Donald H.; Armagan, Guzin; Marsh, Waverly; Barnes, James; Chai, B. H. T.

    1995-01-01

    Doping of the trivalent rare-earth cerium ion into fluoride crystals is of interest in producing turnable ultra-violet solid state lasers. These lasers are desirable for many applications in medicine, industry, and scientific research, including remote sensing. High absorption and stimulated emission cross sections of the dipole allowed 4f-5d transitions show promise in cerium as a laser ion in crystals. Several research groups have already reported the observation of stimulated emission of cerium in LiYF4, LiSrAlF6, and LiCaAlF6. However, the color center formation in the crystals due to the excited state absorption of ultra-violet pump light adds difficulty to achieving laser action. We have investigated the spectroscopic properties of cerium such as absorption and emission spectra, and lifetimes in four different fluoride crystals, including LiCaAlF6, LiSrAlF6, KyF4 and LiYF4. We have derived the polarized absorption and stimulated emission cross sections from transmission and fluorescence emission measurements for each of the host crystals. we have measured the lifetime of the lowest 5d level; moreover, investigated the temperature dependence of this lifetime and color center formation. Our results on absorption and stimulated emission cross sections for LiCaAlF6 and LiSrAlF6 are similar to the results already published.

  12. Spectroscopic evidence for Davydov-like solitons in acetanilide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Careri, G.; Buontempo, U.; Galluzzi, F.; Scott, A. C.; Gratton, E.; Shyamsunder, E.

    1984-10-01

    Detailed measurements of infrared absorption and Raman scattering on crystalline acetanilide [(CH3CONHC6H5)x] at low temperature show a new band close to the conventional amide I band. Equilibrium properties and spectroscopic data rule out explanations based on a conventional assignment, crystal defects, Fermi resonance, and upon frozen kinetics between two different subsystems. Thus we cannot account for this band using the concepts of conventional molecular spectroscopy, but a soliton model, similar to that proposed by Davydov for α-helix in protein, is in satisfactory agreement with the experimental data.

  13. Spectroscopic properties of vitamin E models in solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveira, L. B. A.; Colherinhas, G.; Fonseca, T. L.; Castro, M. A.

    2015-05-01

    We investigate the first absorption band and the 13C and 17O magnetic shieldings of vitamin E models in chloroform and in water using the S-MC/QM methodology in combination with the TD-DFT and GIAO approaches. The results show that the solvent effects on these spectroscopic properties are small but a proper description of the solvent shift for 17O magnetic shielding of the hydroxyl group in water requires the use of explicit solute-solvent hydrogen bonds. In addition, the effect of the replacement of hydrogen atoms by methyl groups in the vitamin E models only affects magnetic shieldings.

  14. Water-related absorption in fibrous diamonds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zedgenizov, D. A.; Shiryaev, A. A.; Kagi, H.; Navon, O.

    2003-04-01

    Cubic and coated diamonds from several localities (Brasil, Canada, Yakutia) were investigated using spectroscopic techniques. Special emphasis was put on investigation of water-related features of transmission Infra-red and Raman spectra. Presence of molecular water is inferred from broad absorption bands in IR at 3420 and 1640 cm-1. These bands were observed in many of the investigated samples. It is likely that molecular water is present in microinclusions in liquid state, since no clear indications of solid H_2O (ice VI-VII, Kagi et al., 2000) were found. Comparison of absorption by HOH and OH vibrations shows that diamonds can be separated into two principal groups: those containing liquid water (direct proportionality of OH and HOH absorption) and those with stronger absorption by OH group. Fraction of diamonds in every group depends on their provenance. There might be positive correlation between internal pressure in microinclusions (determined using quartz barometer, Navon et al., 1988) and affiliation with diamonds containing liquid water. In many cases absorption by HOH vibration is considerably lower than absorption by hydroxyl (OH) group. This may be explained if OH groups are partially present in mineral and/or melt inclusions. This hypothesis is supported by following fact: in diamonds with strong absorption by silicates and other minerals shape and position of the OH band differs from that in diamonds with low absorption by minerals. Moreover, in Raman spectra of individual inclusions sometimes the broad band at 3100 cm-1 is observed. This band is OH-related. In some samples water distribution is not homogeneous. Central part of the diamond usually contains more water than outer parts, but this is not a general rule for all the samples. Water absorption usually correlated with absorption of other components (carbonates, silicates and others). At that fibrous diamonds with relatively high content of silicates are characterized by molecular water. OH

  15. Tetrahedrally symmetric DX-like states of substitutional donors in GaAs and AlxGa1-xAs alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chadi, D. J.

    1992-09-01

    The structural and electronic properties of Si, Ge, Sn, S, Se, and Te substitutional donors in GaAs are examined via self-consistent pseudopotential calculations. Two distinct negatively charged DX-like deep donor states are found. The first has a broken-bond atomic configuration while the second arises from a symmetric ``breathing-mode'' relaxation around the impurity. The energies of the two configurations are especially close for Sn, Se, and Te donors. Experimental data on DX centers in AlxGa1-xAs alloys are analyzed within this model.

  16. Study of the relation between Mg content and dissolution kinetics of natural lime stone using μXRF, μXRD and μXAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grunwaldt, H. S.; Zimina, A.; Göttlicher, J.; Steininger, R.; Grunwaldt, J.-D.

    2016-05-01

    The dissolution parameters of calcium carbonates play a key role in agriculture as they regulate the plant nutrients uptake and buffer the pH-value of the soil. The combination of μXRF, μXAS and μXRD mapping in the hard X-ray regime for the examination of both short- and long range order in natural limestones revealed that their dissolution properties depend both on the crystallinity of the mineral phases and their composition. The results particularly show that in many cases the presence of magnesium inhibits dissolution of the phases.

  17. Excitation induced spectroscopic study and quenching effect in cerium samarium codoped lithium aluminoborate glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaur, Parvinder; Kaur, Simranpreet; Singh, Gurinder Pal; Arora, Deepawali; Kumar, Sunil; Singh, D. P.

    2016-08-01

    Lithium aluminium borate host has been codoped with cerium and samarium to prepare glass by conventional melt quench technique. Their structural and spectroscopic investigation has been carried out using XRD, FTIR and density measurements. The UV-Vis absorption spectra and fluorescence spectra (λexc.=380 nm and 400 nm) have been studied for spectroscopic analysis. The amorphous nature of the prepared samples is shown by XRD. The density is increasing with addition of cerium at the expense of aluminium, keeping other components constant. FTIR study also shows the presence of compact and stable tetrahedral BO4 units thus supporting the density results. The UV- Vis absorption spectra show a shift of optical absorption edge towards longer wavelength along with an increase in intensity of peaks with rising samarium concentration. The fluorescence spectra show a blue shift and subsequent suppression of cerium peaks with addition of samarium.

  18. Potassium emission absorption system. Topical report 12

    SciTech Connect

    Bauman, L.E.

    1995-04-01

    The Potassium Emission Absorption System is one of the advanced optical diagnostics developed at Mississippi State University to provide support for the demonstration of prototype-scale coal-fired combustion magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) electrical power generation. Intended for application in the upstream of an MHD flow, the system directly measures gas temperature and neutral potassium atom number density through spectroscopic emission absorption techniques. From these measurements the electron density can be inferred from a statistical equilibrium calculation and the electron conductivity in the MHD channel found by use of an electron mobility model. The instrument has been utilized for field test measurements on MHD facilities for almost a decade and has been proven to provide useful measurements as designed for MHD nozzle, channel, and diffuser test sections. The theory of the measurements, a system description, its capabilities, and field test measurement results are reported here. During the development and application of the instrument several technical issues arose which when addressed advanced the state of the art in emission absorption measurement. Studies of these issues are also reported here and include: two-wavelength measurements for particle-laden flows, potassium D-line far wing absorption coefficient, bias in emission absorption measurements arising from dirty windows and misalignments, non-coincident multiwavelength emission absorption sampling errors, and lineshape fitting for boundary layer flow profile information. Although developed for NLHD application, the instrument could be applied to any high temperature flow with a resonance line in the 300 to 800 nm range, for instance other types of flames, rocket plumes or low temperature plasmas.

  19. Zinc ligands in the metal hyperaccumulator Thlaspi caerulescens as determined using X-ray absorption spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Salt, D.E.; Prince, R.C.; Baker, A.J.M.; Raskin, I.; Pickering, I.J.

    1999-03-01

    Using the noninvasive technique of X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS), the authors have been able to determine the ligand environment of Zn in different tissues of the Zn-hyperaccumulator Thlaspi caerulescens. The majority of intracellular Zn in roots of T. caerulescens was found to be coordinated with histidine. In the xylem sap Zn was found to be transported mainly as the free hydrated Zn{sup 2+} cation with a smaller proportion coordinated with organic acids. In the shoots, Zn coordination occurred mainly via organic acids, with a smaller proportion present as the hydrated cation and coordinated with histidine and the cell wall. Their data suggest that histidine plays an important role in Zn homeostasis in the roots, whereas organic acids are involved in xylem transport and Zn storage in shoots.

  20. Spectroscopic studies of microwave plasmas containing hexamethyldisiloxane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nave, A. S. C.; Mitschker, F.; Awakowicz, P.; Röpcke, J.

    2016-10-01

    Low-pressure microwave discharges containing hexamethyldisiloxane (HMDSO) with admixtures of oxygen and nitrogen, used for the deposition of silicon containing films, have been studied spectroscopically. Optical emission spectroscopy (OES) in the visible spectral range has been combined with infrared laser absorption spectroscopy (IRLAS). The experiments were carried out in order to analyze the dependence of plasma chemical phenomena on power and gas mixture at relatively low pressures, up to 50 Pa, and power values, up to 2 kW. The evolution of the concentration of the methyl radical, CH3, and of seven stable molecules, HMDSO, CH4, C2H2, C2H4, C2H6, CO and CO2, was monitored in the plasma processes by in situ IRLAS using tunable lead salt diode lasers (TDL) and external-cavity quantum cascade lasers (EC-QCL) as radiation sources. To achieve reliable values for the gas temperature inside and outside the plasma bulk as well as for the temperature in the plasma hot and colder zones, which are of great importance for calculation of species concentrations, three different methods based on emission and absorption spectroscopy data of N2, CH3 and CO have been used. In this approach line profile analysis has been combined with spectral simulation methods. The concentrations of the various species, which were found to be in the range between 1011 to 1015 cm-3, are in the focus of interest. The influence of the discharge parameters power, pressure and gas mixture on the molecular concentrations has been studied. To achieve further insight into general plasma chemical aspects the dissociation of the HMDSO precursor gas including its fragmentation and conversion to the reaction products was analyzed in detail.

  1. Investigation into Spectroscopic Techniques for Thermal Barrier Coating Spall Detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    deGroot, Wim; Opila, Beth

    2001-01-01

    Spectroscopic methods are proposed for detection of thermal barrier coating (TBC) spallation from engine hot zone components. These methods include absorption and emission of airborne marker species originally embedded in the TBC bond coat. In this study, candidate marker materials for this application were evaluated. Thermochemical analysis of candidate marker materials combined with additional constraints such as toxicity and uniqueness to engine environment, provided a short list of four potential species: platinum, copper oxide, zinc oxide. and indium. The melting point of indium was considered to be too low for serious consideration. The other three candidate marker materials, platinum, copper oxide, and zinc oxide were placed in a high temperature furnace and emission and absorption properties were measured over a temperature range from 800-1400 C and a spectral range from 250 to 18000 nm. Platinum did not provide the desired response, likely due to the low vapor Pressure of the metallic species and the low absorption of the oxide species. It was also found, however. that platinum caused a broadening of the carbon dioxide absorption at 4300 nm. The nature of this effect is not known. Absorption and emission caused by sodium and potassium impurities in the platinum were found in the platinum tests. Zinc oxide did not provide the desired response, again, most likely due to the low vapor pressure of the metallic species and the low absorption of the oxide species. Copper oxide generated two strongly temperature dependent absorption peaks at 324.8 and 327.4 nm. The melting point of copper oxide was determined to be too low for serious consideration as marker material.

  2. X-ray absorption spectroscopy of chicken sulfite oxidase crystals

    SciTech Connect

    George, G.N.; Pickering, I.J.; Kisker, C.

    1999-05-17

    Sulfite oxidase catalyzes the physiologically vital oxidation of sulfite to sulfate. Recently, the crystal structure of chicken sulfite oxidase has been reported at 1.9 {angstrom} resolution. In contrast to the information available from previous X-ray absorption spectroscopic studies, the active site indicated by crystallography was a mono-oxo species. Because of this the possibility that the crystals did in fact contain a reduced molybdenum species was considered in the crystallographic work. The authors report herein an X-ray absorption spectroscopic study of polycrystalline sulfite oxidase prepared in the same manner as the previous single-crystal samples, and compare this with data for frozen solutions of oxidized and reduced enzyme.

  3. Climate Literacy Initiatives as part of the TXESS (TeXas Earth and Space Science) Revolution Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olson, H. C.; Ellins, K. K.; Snow, E.; Bryant, S. L.; Olson, J. E.; Castillo Comer, C. A.; Willis, M.; Odell, M.; Stocks, E.

    2010-12-01

    For four years the National Science Foundation (NSF)-sponsored TeXas Earth and Space Science (TXESS) Revolution professional development program has helped teachers build a solid foundation in the geosciences through guided inquiry activities and lectures delivered by science experts. The professional development program comprises eight professional development academies and two summer institutes. Climate literacy has been a cross-cutting theme throughout the series of academies and institutes. Although we present a special emphasis on climate literacy in the 7th academy on Climate Change, the 8th academy on Humans at the Helm and the 2nd summer institute module on climate mitigation technology, activities related to climate literacy are woven into each academy. Examples of climate as a cross-cutting theme include a module on water and drought, including research on climate change through the analysis of deep-sea cores, and the effects on the Mayan population. Our distinguished lecturers bring in climate literacy as part of their presentations and programs: our Poking Holes into the Planet and Team Science professional development academy included two distinguished lecturers who brought current research results and educational materials from the ANDRILL (Antarctic Geological Drilling) program and the Integrated Ocean Drilling Program. Our Earth as a Habitable Planet professional development academy featured an activity on corals that used data to explore how higher than normal sea surface temperatures contribute to coral bleaching events. TXESS Revolution also works with our teachers to link them with other opportunities aligned with our professional development goals. With our assistance, one of our TXESS Revolution teachers sailed as part of the science team on Integrated Ocean Drilling Program expedition 317 to investigate sea level fluctuations in the Canterbury Basin offshore New Zealand, creating various resources (e.g., podcasts, blogs) to multiply the

  4. Characterization and speciation of mercury-bearing mine wastes using X-ray absorption spectroscopy

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kim, C.S.; Brown, Gordon E.; Rytuba, J.J.

    2000-01-01

    Mining of mercury deposits located in the California Coast Range has resulted in the release of mercury to the local environment and water supplies. The solubility, transport, and potential bioavailability of mercury are controlled by its chemical speciation, which can be directly determined for samples with total mercury concentrations greater than 100 mg kg-1 (ppm) using X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS). This technique has the additional benefits of being non-destructive to the sample, element-specific, relatively sensitive at low concentrations, and requiring minimal sample preparation. In this study, Hg L(III)-edge extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectra were collected for several mercury mine tailings (calcines) in the California Coast Range. Total mercury concentrations of samples analyzed ranged from 230 to 1060 ppm. Speciation data (mercury phases present and relative abundances) were obtained by comparing the spectra from heterogeneous, roasted (calcined) mine tailings samples with a spectral database of mercury minerals and sorbed mercury complexes. Speciation analyses were also conducted on known mixtures of pure mercury minerals in order to assess the quantitative accuracy of the technique. While some calcine samples were found to consist exclusively of mercuric sulfide, others contain additional, more soluble mercury phases, indicating a greater potential for the release of mercury into solution. Also, a correlation was observed between samples from hot-spring mercury deposits, in which chloride levels are elevated, and the presence of mercury-chloride species as detected by the speciation analysis. The speciation results demonstrate the ability of XAS to identify multiple mercury phases in a heterogeneous sample, with a quantitative accuracy of ??25% for the mercury-containing phases considered. Use of this technique, in conjunction with standard microanalytical techniques such as X-ray diffraction and electron probe microanalysis

  5. Photophysics of poly(ethylene terephthalate): Ultraviolet absorption and emission

    SciTech Connect

    LaFemina, J.P. ); Arjavalingam, G. )

    1991-01-24

    Polarized and unpolarized emission spectra for poly(ethylene terephthalate) are presented, and a new phosphorescence peak at 564 nm is reported. The spectroscopically parameterized CNDO/S3 model is used to provide a detailed description of the absorption and monomeric emission. Moreover, preliminary computations on an idealized terephthalate dimer indicate that the 368-nm fluorescence and the newly reported phosphorescence emission may be attributable to an associated ground-state dimer.

  6. [Transient UV absorption spectra of artemisinin reacting with sodium hydroxide].

    PubMed

    Gao, Yan-Jun; Ping, Li; Yang, Li-Jun; Wang, Qi-Ming; Xue, Jun-Peng; Wu, Da-Cheng; Li, Rui-Xia

    2009-03-01

    UV absorption spectrum of artemisinin and transient absorption spectra of various concentrations of artemisinin reacting with sodium hydroxide were measured by using an intensified spectroscopic detector ICCD. The exposure time of each spectrum was 0.1 ms. Results indicate that artemisinin has an obvious UV absorption band centered at 212.52 nm and can react with sodium hydroxide easily. All absorption spectra of different concentrations of artemisinin reacting with sodium hydroxide have the similar changes, but the moment at which the changes happened is different. After adding sodium hydroxide into artemisinin in ethanol solution, there was a new absorption band centered at 288 nm appearing firstly. As reaction went on, the intensity of another absorption band centered at 260 nm increased gradually. At the end of the reaction, a continuous absorption band from 200 to 350 nm with the peak at 245 nm formed finally. No other transient absorption spectral data are available on the reaction of artemisinin with sodium hydroxide currently. The new spectral information obtained in this experiment provides very important experimental basis for understanding the properties of artemisinin reacting with alkaline medium and is useful for correctly using of artemisinin as a potential anticancer drug.

  7. The X-type asteroids: spectroscopic results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fornasier, S.; Clark, B. E.; Dotto, E.

    2011-10-01

    We have carried out a spectroscopic survey in the 2004-2007 years of X-type asteroids in the visible and near infrared range at the NTT, TNG and IRTF telescopes. In this paper we present new VIS-NIR spectra of 24 asteroids belonging to the X type as defined by Tholen & Barucci [1], that is an "E-M-P" type asteroid for which albedo information was not available at the time of their classification. We find a large variety of near-infrared spectral behaviors within the X class, and we identify weak absorption bands in spectra of 11 asteroids. Our spectra, together with the new albedo values [2], can be used to suggest new Tholen classifications for these objects. To constrain their compositions, we conduct a search for meteorite analogues using the RELAB database, and we model the asteroid surface composition with geographical mixtures of selected minerals when a meteorite match is not satisfactory. In addition, we present an analysis of X complex spectral slope values and class distributions in the asteroid main belt, where we include previously published observations ofMand E-type asteroids obtained during the same survey [3,4].

  8. Infrared spectroscopic ellipsometry in semiconductor manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guittet, Pierre-Yves; Mantz, Ulrich; Weidner, Peter; Stehle, Jean-Louis; Bucchia, Marc; Bourtault, Sophie; Zahorski, Dorian

    2004-05-01

    Infrared spectroscopic ellipsometry (IRSE) metrology is an emerging technology in semiconductor production environment. Infineon Technologies SC300 implemented the first worldwide automated IRSE in a class 1 clean room in 2002. Combining properties of IR light -- large wavelength, low absorption in silicon -- with a short focus optics -- no backside reflection -- which allow model-based analysis, a large number of production applications were developed. Part of Infineon IRSE development roadmap is now focused on depth monitoring for arrays of 3D dry-etched structures. In trench DRAM manufacturing, the areal density is high, and critical dimensions are much lower than mid-IR wavelength. Therefore, extensive use of effective medium theory is made to model 3D structures. IR-SE metrology is not limited by shrinking critical dimensions, as long as the areal density is above a specific cut-off value determined by trenches dimensions, trench-filling and surrounding materials. Two applications for depth monitoring are presented. 1D models were developed and successfully applied to the DRAM trench capacitor structures. Modeling and correlation to reference methods are shown as well as dynamic repeatability and gauge capability results. Limitations of the current tool configuration are reviewed for shallow structures.

  9. Bistability of the Sn donor in Al(x)Ga(1-x)As and GaAs under pressure studied by Moessbauer spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibart, Pierre; Williamson, Don L.

    1991-02-01

    Deep donor levels are observed in Al(x)Ga(1-x)As for x of greater than 0.22 and GaAs under hydrostatic pressure (for p of more than 2GPa). Persistent photoconduction (PPC) is the most striking feature of this deep donor, the DX center. Upon illumination at low temperature, the free-electrons concentration increases and remains at this new value even after the light is off. Basically the DX centers are photoionized and one (or several) electrons per center are transferred to the conduction band. The bistable character of the donor which involves two electronic configurations is studied by Moessbauer spectroscopy (MS). Electronic wavefunctions, near-neighbor geometries and lattice vibrational properties can be probed. Moessbauer spectroscopy is used to observe the Sn DX center in Al(x)Ga(1-x)As near x = 0.3-0.4 and in GaAs under high pressure. The latter experiment, coupled with Hall data, provides strong evidence that the Sn DX center localizes two or more electrons in the ground state.

  10. The effect of thin film thickness on the incorporation of Mn interstitials in Ga{sub 1-x}Mn{sub x}As

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, K.M.; Walukiewicz, W.; Wojtowicz, T.; Denlinger, J.; Scarpulla, M.A.; Liu, X.; Furdyna, J.K.

    2004-10-05

    We have investigated the effect of film thickness on the distribution of Mn atoms at various lattice sites in Ga{sub 1-x}Mn{sub x}As thin films. We find that the growth surface acts as a sink facilitating the out-diffusion of Mn interstitials (Mn{sub I}), and thus reducing its concentration in the film. The out-diffused Mn{sub I} accumulate on the surface in a surface oxide layer and do not participate in the ferromagnetism of the film. For thin films less than 15 nm thick, no Mn{sub I} can be detected. Because of the absence of compensating Mn{sub I} defects, higher T{sub C} can be achieved for such extremely thin Ga{sub 1-x}Mn{sub x}As layers. These results agree with our previously suggested Fermi-level-governed upper limit of the T{sub C} of III-Mn-V ferromagnetic semiconductors.

  11. Comparative XRPD and XAS study of the impact of the synthesis process on the electronic and structural environments of uranium–americium mixed oxides

    SciTech Connect

    Prieur, D.; Lebreton, F.; Somers, J.; Delahaye, T.

    2015-10-15

    Uranium–americium mixed oxides are potential compounds to reduce americium inventory in nuclear waste via a partitioning and transmutation strategy. A thorough assessment of the oxygen-to-metal ratio is paramount in such materials as it determines the important underlying electronic structure and phase relations, affecting both thermal conductivity of the material and its interaction with the cladding and coolant. In 2011, various XAS experiments on U{sub 1−x}Am{sub x}O{sub 2±δ} samples prepared by different synthesis methods have reported contradictory results on the charge distribution of U and Am. This work alleviates this discrepancy. The XAS results confirm that, independently of the synthesis process, the reductive sintering of U{sub 1−x}Am{sub x}O{sub 2±δ} leads to the formation of similar fluorite solid solution indicating the presence of Am{sup +III} and U{sup +V} in equimolar proportions. - Graphical abstract: Formation of (U{sup IV/V},Am{sup III})O{sup 2} solid solution by sol–gel and by powder metallurgy. - Highlights: • Uranium–americium mixed oxides were synthesized by sol–gel and powder metallurgy. • Fluorite solid solutions with similar local environment have been obtained. • U{sup V} and Am{sup III} are formed in equimolar proportions.

  12. MAPPING THE DYNAMICS OF COLD GAS AROUND SGR A* THROUGH 21 cm ABSORPTION

    SciTech Connect

    Christian, Pierre; Loeb, Abraham

    2015-11-20

    The presence of a circumnuclear stellar disk around Sgr A* and megamaser systems near other black holes indicates that dense neutral disks can be found in galactic nuclei. We show that depending on their inclination angle, optical depth, and spin temperature, these disks could be observed spectroscopically through 21 cm absorption. Related spectroscopic observations of Sgr A* can determine its HI disk parameters and the possible presence of gaps in the disk. Clumps of dense gas similar to the G2 could could also be detected in 21 cm absorption against Sgr A* radio emission.

  13. Spectroscopic features of cytochrome P450 reaction intermediates

    PubMed Central

    Luthra, Abhinav; Denisov, Ilia G.; Sligar, Stephen G.

    2010-01-01

    Preface Cytochromes P450 constitute a broad class of heme monooxygenase enzymes with more than 11,500 isozymes which have been identified in organisms from all biological kingdoms [1]. These enzymes are responsible for catalyzing dozens chemical oxidative transformations such as hydroxylation, epoxidation, N-demethylation, etc., with very broad range of substrates [2-3]. Historically these enzymes received their name from ‘pigment 450’ due to the unusual position of the Soret band in UV-Vis absorption spectra of the reduced CO-saturated state [4-5]. Despite detailed biochemical characterization of many isozymes, as well as later discoveries of other ‘P450-like heme enzymes’ such as nitric oxide synthase and chloroperoxidase, the phenomenological term ‘cytochrome P450’ is still commonly used as indicating an essential spectroscopic feature of the functionally active protein which is now known to be due to the presence of a thiolate ligand to the heme iron [6]. Heme proteins with an imidazole ligand such as myoglobin and hemoglobin as well as an inactive form of P450 are characterized by Soret maxima at 420 nm [7]. This historical perspective highlights the importance of spectroscopic methods for biochemical studies in general, and especially for heme enzymes, where the presence of the heme iron and porphyrin macrocycle provides rich variety of specific spectroscopic markers available for monitoring chemical transformations and transitions between active intermediates of catalytic cycle. PMID:21167809

  14. Characterization of semicrystalline polymers after nanoimprint by spectroscopic ellipsometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Si; Rond, Johannes; Steinberg, Christian; Papenheim, Marc; Scheer, Hella-Christin

    2016-02-01

    Semicrystalline Reg-P3HT (regio-regular poly-3-hexylthiophene) is a promising material for organic electronics. It features relatively high charge mobility and enables easy preparation because of its solubility. Due to its high optical and electrical anisotropy, the size, number and orientation of the ordered domains are important for applications. To control these properties without limitation from crystalline domains existing after spin coating, thermal nanoimprint is performed beyond the melting point. The state of the art of measurement to analyze the complex morphology is X-ray diffraction (XRD). We address an alternative measurement method to characterize the material by its optical properties, spectroscopic ellipsometry. It provides information on the degree of order from the typical fingerprint absorption spectrum. In addition, when the material is modeled as a uniaxial layer, an anisotropy factor can be derived. The results obtained from spectroscopic ellipsometry are in accordance with those from XRD. In particular, spectroscopic ellipsometry is able to distinguish between order along the backbone and order in π- π stacking direction, which is important with respect to conductivity.

  15. Spectroscopic Characterization of Streptavidin Functionalized Quantum dots1

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yang; Lopez, Gabriel P.; Sklar, Larry A.; Buranda, Tione

    2007-01-01

    The spectroscopic properties of quantum dots can be strongly influenced by the conditions of their synthesis. In this work we have characterized several spectroscopic properties of commercial, streptavidin functionalized quantum dots (QD525, lot#1005-0045 and QD585, Lot#0905-0031 from Invitrogen). This is the first step in the development of calibration beads, to be used in a generalizable quantification scheme of multiple fluorescent tags in flow cytometry or microscopy applications. We used light absorption, photoexcitation, and emission spectra, together with excited-state lifetime measurements to characterize their spectroscopic behavior, concentrating on the 400-500nm wavelength ranges that are important in biological applications. Our data show an anomalous dependence of emission spectrum, lifetimes, and quantum yield (QY) on excitation wavelength that is particularly pronounced in the QD525. For QD525, QY values ranged from 0.2 at 480nm excitation up to 0.4 at 450nm and down again to 0.15 at 350nm. For QD585, QY values were constant at 0.2 between 500nm and 400nm, but dropped to 0.1 at 350nm. We attribute the wavelength dependences to heterogeneity in size and surface defects in the QD525, consistent with characteristics previously described in the chemistry literature. The results are discussed in the context of bridging the gap between what is currently known in the physical chemistry literature of quantum dots, and the quantitative needs of assay development in biological applications. PMID:17368555

  16. An in situ sample environment reaction cell for spatially resolved x-ray absorption spectroscopy studies of powders and small structured reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Chu; Gustafson, Johan; Merte, Lindsay R.; Evertsson, Jonas; Norén, Katarina; Carlson, Stefan; Svensson, Håkan; Carlsson, Per-Anders

    2015-03-15

    An easy-to-use sample environment reaction cell for X-ray based in situ studies of powders and small structured samples, e.g., powder, pellet, and monolith catalysts, is described. The design of the cell allows for flexible use of appropriate X-ray transparent windows, shielding the sample from ambient conditions, such that incident X-ray energies as low as 3 keV can be used. Thus, in situ X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) measurements in either transmission or fluorescence mode are facilitated. Total gas flows up to about 500 ml{sub n}/min can be fed while the sample temperature is accurately controlled (at least) in the range of 25–500 °C. The gas feed is composed by a versatile gas-mixing system and the effluent gas flow composition is monitored with mass spectrometry (MS). These systems are described briefly. Results from simultaneous XAS/MS measurements during oxidation of carbon monoxide over a 4% Pt/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} powder catalyst are used to illustrate the system performance in terms of transmission XAS. Also, 2.2% Pd/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and 2% Ag − Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} powder catalysts have been used to demonstrate X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy in fluorescence mode. Further, a 2% Pt/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} monolith catalyst was used ex situ for transmission XANES. The reaction cell opens for facile studies of structure-function relationships for model as well as realistic catalysts both in the form of powders, small pellets, and coated or extruded monoliths at near realistic conditions. The applicability of the cell for X-ray diffraction measurements is discussed.

  17. An in situ sample environment reaction cell for spatially resolved x-ray absorption spectroscopy studies of powders and small structured reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Chu; Gustafson, Johan; Merte, Lindsay R.; Evertsson, Jonas; Norén, Katarina; Carlson, Stefan; Svensson, Hâkan; Carlsson, Per-Anders

    2015-03-01

    An easy-to-use sample environment reaction cell for X-ray based in situ studies of powders and small structured samples, e.g., powder, pellet, and monolith catalysts, is described. The design of the cell allows for flexible use of appropriate X-ray transparent windows, shielding the sample from ambient conditions, such that incident X-ray energies as low as 3 keV can be used. Thus, in situ X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) measurements in either transmission or fluorescence mode are facilitated. Total gas flows up to about 500 mln/min can be fed while the sample temperature is accurately controlled (at least) in the range of 25-500 °C. The gas feed is composed by a versatile gas-mixing system and the effluent gas flow composition is monitored with mass spectrometry (MS). These systems are described briefly. Results from simultaneous XAS/MS measurements during oxidation of carbon monoxide over a 4% Pt/Al2O3 powder catalyst are used to illustrate the system performance in terms of transmission XAS. Also, 2.2% Pd/Al2O3 and 2% Ag - Al2O3 powder catalysts have been used to demonstrate X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy in fluorescence mode. Further, a 2% Pt/Al2O3 monolith catalyst was used ex situ for transmission XANES. The reaction cell opens for facile studies of structure-function relationships for model as well as realistic catalysts both in the form of powders, small pellets, and coated or extruded monoliths at near realistic conditions. The applicability of the cell for X-ray diffraction measurements is discussed.

  18. Spectroscopic studies of cathode materials for lithium-ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Totir, Dana Alexa

    2000-10-01

    Structural changes that occur during electrochemical cycling of lithium-ion battery cathode materials have been investigated using in situ spectroscopic techniques. A new method was developed for the preparation of carbon and binder free cathodes utilizing powder materials of interest for commercial batteries. The extraordinary quality of the cyclic voltammetric curves recorded for this type of electrodes during the in situ measurements allows direct correlations to be made between the state of charge of the material and its structural and electronic characteristics. LiCoO2, LiMn2O4 and LiCo0.15Ni 0.85O2 electrodes were evaluated using cycling voltammetry and the mean diffusion coefficient for Li-ions in the lattice (DLi) was calculated for LiMn2O4. LiMn2O4 electrodes prepared by this technique have been studied in situ using Mn K-edge XAS. Data analysis for the species formed at different potentials indicated a contraction of the lattice associated with the increase in the oxidation state of manganese. In situ Raman spectra of particles of LiMn2O 4, and LiCoO2 embedded in Au and also of KS-44 graphite and carbon microfibers MCF28 embedded in thermally annealed Ni have been recorded as a function of the applied potential. Fe K-edge XAFS of pyrite electrodes in a Li/PEO(LiClO4)/FeS 2 cell and S K-edge XANES measurements of a FeS2 electrode in a non-aqueous electrolyte have been acquired as a function of the state of charge. The studies have clearly evidenced the formation of metallic Fe and Li2S as intermediates after 4 e- discharge and the formation of Li2FeS2 after 2 e- recharge. While Fe K-edge studies have indicated that there is no change in the Fe environment and oxidation state upon 4 e- recharge, the results obtained from S K-edge studies are inconclusive for this stage. Finally, in situ Co K-edge XAFS data were obtained for the first time during the electrochemical cycling of electrodeposited Co(OH) 2 films in alkaline solutions. The results support

  19. Solar absorption surface panel

    DOEpatents

    Santala, Teuvo J.

    1978-01-01

    A composite metal of aluminum and nickel is used to form an economical solar absorption surface for a collector plate wherein an intermetallic compound of the aluminum and nickel provides a surface morphology with high absorptance and relatively low infrared emittance along with good durability.

  20. High pressure effects on U L3 x-ray absorption in partial fluorescence yield mode and single crystal x-ray diffraction in the heavy fermion compound UCd11

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nasreen, Farzana; Antonio, Daniel; VanGennep, Derrick; Booth, Corwin H.; Kothapalli, Karunakar; Bauer, Eric D.; Sarrao, John L.; Lavina, Barbara; Iota-Herbei, Valentin; Sinogeikin, Stanislav; Chow, Paul; Xiao, Yuming; Zhao, Yusheng; Cornelius, Andrew L.

    2016-03-01

    We report a study of high pressure x-ray absorption (XAS) performed in the partial fluorescence yield mode (PFY) at the U L3 edge (0-28.2 GPa) and single crystal x-ray diffraction (SXD) (0-20 GPa) on the UCd11 heavy fermion compound at room temperature. Under compression, the PFY-XAS results show that the white line is shifted by  +4.1(3) eV at the highest applied pressure of 28.2 GPa indicating delocalization of the 5f electrons. The increase in full width at half maxima and decrease in relative amplitude of the white line with respect to the edge jump point towards 6d band broadening under high pressure. A bulk modulus of K 0  =  62(1) GPa and its pressure derivative, K0\\prime   =  4.9(2) was determined from high pressure SXD results. Both the PFY-XAS and diffraction results do not show any sign of a structural phase transition in the applied pressure range.

  1. Localized and mixed valence state of Ce 4 f in superconducting and ferromagnetic CeO1 -xFxBiS2 revealed by x-ray absorption and photoemission spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugimoto, T.; Ootsuki, D.; Paris, E.; Iadecola, A.; Salome, M.; Schwier, E. F.; Iwasawa, H.; Shimada, K.; Asano, T.; Higashinaka, R.; Matsuda, T. D.; Aoki, Y.; Saini, N. L.; Mizokawa, T.

    2016-08-01

    We have performed Ce L3-edge x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) and Ce 4 d -4 f resonant photoemission spectroscopy (PES) on single crystals of CeO1 -xFxBiS2 for x =0.0 and 0.5 in order to investigate the Ce 4 f electronic states. In Ce L3-edge XAS, a mixed valence of Ce was found in the x =0.0 sample, and F doping suppressed it, which is consistent with the results on polycrystalline samples. As for resonant PES, we found that the Ce 4 f electrons in both x =0.0 and 0.5 systems respectively formed a flat band at 1.0 and 1.4 eV below the Fermi level and there was no contribution to the Fermi surfaces. Interestingly, Ce valence in CeOBiS2 deviates from Ce3 + even though Ce 4 f electrons are localized, indicating the Ce valence is not in a typical valence fluctuation regime. We assume that localized Ce 4 f in CeOBiS2 is mixed with unoccupied Bi 6 pz , which is consistent with a previous local structural study. Based on the analysis of the Ce L3-edge XAS spectra using Anderson's impurity model calculation, we found that the transfer integral becomes smaller, increasing the number of Ce 4 f electrons upon the F substitution for O.

  2. In Situ X-ray Absorption and Diffraction Studies of Carbon Coated LiFe1/4Mn1/4Co1/4Ni1/4PO4 Cathode During First Charge

    SciTech Connect

    Nam,K.W.; Yang,X.

    2009-04-01

    Synchrotron based in situ X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) techniques are used to study electronic and crystal structure changes of the carbon coated LiFe1/4Mn1/4Co1/4Ni1/4PO4 (LiFe1/4Mn1/4Co1/4Ni1/4PO4/C) cathode material for Li-ion batteries during the first charge. In situ Fe, Mn, Co and Ni K-edge XAS results revealed that the three voltage plateaus at 3.6, 4.2 and 4.7 V vs. Li/Li+ are attributed to the redox reactions of Fe2+/Fe3+, Mn2+/Mn3+ and Co2+/Co3+, respectively, while the apparent capacities above 4.9 V is not originated from the Ni2+/Ni3+ redox, but very likely from the electrolyte decomposition. Interesting phase transition behaviors of LiFe1/4Mn1/4Co1/4Ni1/4PO4/C wereobserved with the formation of an intermediate phase and the solid solution regions. Combined in situ XAS and XRD techniques indicate fast electronic structural changes and slow bulk crystal structural changes.

  3. Near-infrared spectroscopic photoacoustic microscopy using a multi-color fiber laser source

    PubMed Central

    Buma, Takashi; Wilkinson, Benjamin C.; Sheehan, Timothy C.

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate a simple multi-wavelength optical source suitable for spectroscopic optical resolution photoacoustic microscopy (OR-PAM) of lipid-rich tissue. 1064 nm laser pulses are converted to multiple wavelengths beyond 1300 nm via nonlinear optical propagation in a birefringent optical fiber. OR-PAM experiments with lipid phantoms clearly show the expected absorption peak near 1210 nm. We believe this simple multi-color technique is a promising cost-effective approach to spectroscopic OR-PAM of lipid-rich tissue. PMID:26309746

  4. A spectroscopic rule from the solvatochromism of aromatic solutes in nonpolar solvents.

    PubMed

    Catalán, Javier; Del Valle, Juan Carlos

    2014-05-15

    The UV-vis absorption spectroscopy for a series of selected symmetrical aromatic hydrocarbons, benzene, naphthalene, anthracene, 9,10-diphenylanthracene, perylene, and rubrene in the gas phase or in 2-methylbutane, shows the consistency of a new spectroscopic rule. From a thorough spectroscopic analysis with temperature variation (293-113 K) this rule states that "an aromatic molecule, on Franck-Condon excitation can hardly generate an excited electronic state with a lower polarizability than that of its ground electronic-state." We have not found any exceptions to this rule. PMID:24735522

  5. Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer Measurements of Interstellar Fluorine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Federman, S. R.; Sheffer, Yaron; Lambert, David L.; Smith, V. V.

    2005-02-01

    The source of fluorine is not well understood, although core-collapse supernovae, Wolf-Rayet stars, and asymptotic giant branch stars have been suggested. A search for evidence of the ν-process during Type II supernovae is presented. Absorption from interstellar F I is seen in spectra of HD 208440 and HD 209339A acquired with the Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer. In order to extract the column density for F I from the line at 954 Å, absorption from H2 has to be modeled and then removed. Our analysis indicates that for H2 column densities less than about 3×1020 cm-2, the amount of F I can be determined from λ954. For these two sight lines, there is no clear indication for enhanced F abundances resulting from the ν-process in a region shaped by past supernovae. Based on observations made with the NASA/CNES/CSA Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer (FUSE), which is operated for NASA by the Johns Hopkins University under NASA contract NAS 5-32985.

  6. Mid-infrared spectroscopic investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salisbury, John W.; Vergo, Norma; Walter, Louis

    1987-01-01

    Mid-infrared spectroscopic research efforts are discussed. The development of a new instrumentation to permit advanced measurements in the mid-infrared region of the spectrum, the development of a special library of well-characterized mineral and rock specimens for interpretation of remote sensing data, and cooperative measurements of the spectral signatures of analogues of materials that may be present on the surfaces of asteroids, planets or their Moons are discussed.

  7. Spectroscopic ellipsometry on lamellar gratings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antos, R.; Ohlidal, I.; Mistrik, J.; Murakami, K.; Yamaguchi, T.; Pistora, J.; Horie, M.; Visnovsky, S.

    2005-05-01

    Deep lamellar diffraction gratings fabricated by etching a transparent quartz plate are studied using spectroscopic ellipsometry. The rigorous coupled-wave analysis is used to calculate the optical response of the gratings. Three parameters of the rectangular profile are determined by utilizing the least-square method. Detailed investigation of the spectral dependences demonstrates the uniqueness of the solution. Observing the spectral dependences of Wood anomalies suggests that even complicated profiles can be fitted with high authenticity.

  8. Single nanoparticle tracking spectroscopic microscope

    DOEpatents

    Yang, Haw; Cang, Hu; Xu, Cangshan; Wong, Chung M.

    2011-07-19

    A system that can maintain and track the position of a single nanoparticle in three dimensions for a prolonged period has been disclosed. The system allows for continuously imaging the particle to observe any interactions it may have. The system also enables the acquisition of real-time sequential spectroscopic information from the particle. The apparatus holds great promise in performing single molecule spectroscopy and imaging on a non-stationary target.

  9. Spectroscopic studies of copper doped alkaline earth lead zinc phosphate glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sastry, S. Sreehari; Rao, B. Rupa Venkateswara

    2014-02-01

    In this paper spectroscopic investigation of Cu2+ doped alkaline earth lead zinc phosphate glasses was done through the spectroscopic techniques like X-ray diffraction, Ultra Violet (UV) absorption Spectroscopy, Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR - X band), Fourier Transform Infra Red (FTIR) and Raman Spectroscopy. Alkaline earth lead zinc phosphate glasses containing 0.1% copper oxide (CuO) were prepared by the melt quenching technique. Spectroscopic studies indicated that there is a greater possibility for the copper ions to exist in Cu2+ state in these glasses. The optical absorption spectra indicated that the absorption peak of Cu2+ is a function of composition. The maxima absorption peak was reported at 862 nm for strontium lead zinc phosphate glass. Bonding parameters were calculated for the optical and EPR data. All these spectral results indicated clearly that there are certain structural changes in the present glass system with different alkaline earth contents. The IR and Raman spectra noticed the breaking of the P-O-P bonds and creating more number of new P-O-Cu bonds.

  10. Spectroscopic low coherence interferometry using a supercontinuum source and an ultra broadband spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleischhauer, F.; Caujolle, S.; Feutcher, T.; Rajendram, R.; Leick, L.; Podoleanu, A.

    2016-03-01

    Spectroscopic optical coherence tomography (SOCT) combines the imaging capability of optical coherence tomography with spectroscopic absorption information. SOCT requires a large bandwidth combined with a broadband spectrometer, due to the processing of the measured data, which includes dividing the spectrum in spectral bands. Both, spectral and axial resolution of SOCT depend on the spectral width of each window. A supercontinuum source with its broad spectrum allows a sufficient number of windows combined with a reasonable axial resolution, which depends on the application. Here a SOCT system is used in the visible spectral range from 480 to 730 nm by combining a supercontinuum light source, a Michelson interferometer and a commercial available broadband spectrometer. This wavelength range is chosen because it covers a range of useful absorbers, including that of human proteins. The system is tested with a laser dye rhodamine B for calibration and verification. Rhodamine B has an absorption peak at around 542 nm, which resembles the absorption spectrum of several proteins in the globin group. The results show that the absorption spectrum of rhodamine B can be reconstructed with sufficient accuracy and demonstrate that varying spectroscopic information can be retrieved from different depths.

  11. Accurate calculation of the x-ray absorption spectrum of water via the GW/Bethe-Salpeter equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilmore, Keith; Vinson, John; Kas, Josh; Vila, Fernando; Rehr, John

    2014-03-01

    We calculate x-ray absorption spectra (XAS) of water within the OCEAN code, which combines plane-wave, pseudopotential electronic structure, PAW transition elements, GW self-energy corrections, and the NIST BSE solver. Due to the computational demands of this approach, our initial XAS calculations were limited to 17 molecule super cells. This lead to unphysical, size dependent effects in the calculated spectra. To treat larger systems, we extended the OCEAN interface to support well-parallelized codes such as QuantumESPRESSO. We also implemented an efficient interpolation scheme of Shirley. We applied this large-scale GW/BSE approach to 64 molecule unit cell structures of water obtained from classical DFT/MD and PIMD simulations. In concurrence with previous work, we find the calculated spectrum both qualitatively and quantitatively reproduces the experimental features. The agreement implies that structures based on PIMD, which are similar to the traditional distorted tetrahedral view, are consistent with experimental observations. Supported by the DOE CMCSN through DOE award DE-SC0005180 (Princeton University) and in part by DOE Grant No. DE-FG03-97ER45623 (JJR) with computer support from NERSC.

  12. X-ray absorption spectroscopy studies on magnetic tunnel junctions with AlO and AlN tunnel barriers

    SciTech Connect

    Mun, B. S.; Moon, J. C.; Hong, S. W.; Kang, K. S.; Kim, K.; Kim, T. W.; Ju, H. L.

    2006-04-15

    X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) measurements of the optimized magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJs) with AlO and AlN barriers have been performed to study the chemical structures of the barrier and the underlying layer. These MTJs with AlO and AlN barriers exhibited increased tunneling magnetoresistance (TMR) after annealing at 200 deg. C from 27% to 45% and from 25% to 33%, respectively. Surprisingly, the XPS and XAS measurements confirmed that both the as-grown and the annealed MTJs had metallic Co and Fe at the interface between the barrier and the underlying CoFe layer. After annealing, under-stoichiometric AlO{sub x} and AlN{sub x} phases in MTJs with AlO and AlN barriers partially transformed into stoichiometric Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and AlN phases, respectively. Thus the increase in TMR after annealing for MTJs with clean interface between the barrier and the underlying layer is believed due to the anion redistribution inside the barrier layer, not from back diffusion from pinned magnetic layer to barrier layer.

  13. Versatile plug flow catalytic cell for in situ transmission/fluorescence x-ray absorption fine structure measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Centomo, P.; Zecca, M.; Meneghini, C.

    2013-05-15

    A novel flow-through catalytic cell has been developed for in situ x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) experiments on heterogeneous catalysts under working conditions and in the presence of a liquid and a gas phase. The apparatus allows to carry out XAS measurements in both the transmission and fluorescence modes, at moderate temperature (from RT to 50-80 Degree-Sign C) and low-medium gas pressure (up to 7-8 bars). The materials employed are compatible with several chemicals such as those involved in the direct synthesis of hydrogen peroxide (O{sub 2}, H{sub 2}, H{sub 2}O{sub 2}, methanol). The versatile design of the cell allows to fit it to different experimental setups in synchrotron radiation beamlines. It was used successfully for the first time to test nanostructured Pd catalysts during the direct synthesis of hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) in methanol solution from dihydrogen and dioxygen.

  14. Reaction-driven restructuring of Pt and Pd catalysts: In operando X-ray absorption spectroscopy study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elsen, Annika; Jung, Ulrich; Li, Yuanyuan; Frenkel, Anatoly; Nuzzo, Ralph

    2014-03-01

    The catalyzed hydrogenation of ethylene on supported metal catalysts has been intensively investigated, mainly because this reaction lies at the heart of many industrial processes. Most previous studies have been performed using surface science techniques in UHV. Therefor little is known about the nature of the active state of the catalyst at ambient pressure where the kinetics is very different. We employed operando X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) to correlate the structural changes of SiO2-supported Pt and Pd catalysts with their activity for ethylene hydrogenation. The XAS experiments were performed at the beamlines X19A and X18B, NSLS, BNL. For both catalysts, strong and largely reversible transformations of the metal bonding were identified at about the maximum ethane conversion. The changes were different for Pt/SiO2 and Pd/SiO2 due to the ability of the latter to form bulk hydride, while the former can only adsorb hydrogen on the surface. As a result, Pt/SiO2 undergoes disordering of the surface, leading to a strong reduction of the Pt-Pt coordination number under H2-deficient conditions, while the main effect for Pd/SiO2 is the hydrogen uptake with concomitant increase in Pd-Pd bond length. The correlation between these different kinds of order transitions and differences in rates for these catalysts will be discussed.

  15. X-ray absorption spectroscopy and magnetic circular dichroism studies of L1{sub 0}-Mn-Ga thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Glas, M. Sterwerf, C.; Schmalhorst, J. M.; Reiss, G.; Ebke, D.; Jenkins, C.; Arenholz, E.

    2013-11-14

    Tetragonally distorted Mn{sub 3−x}Ga{sub x} thin films with 0.1absorption spectroscopy (XAS) and magnetic circular dichroism (XMCD). A highly textured L1{sub 0} crystal structure of the Mn-Ga films was verified by X-ray diffraction measurements. For samples with e-beam evaporated MgO barrier no evidence for Mn-O was found whereas in samples with magnetron sputtered MgO, Mn-O was detected, even for the thickest interlayer thickness. Both XAS and XMCD measurements showed an increasing interfacial Mn-O amount with decreasing CoFeB interlayer thickness. Additional element specific full hysteresis loops determined an out-of-plane magnetization axis for the Mn and Co, respectively.

  16. Quasar Absorption Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mushotzky, Richard (Technical Monitor); Elvis, Martin

    2004-01-01

    The aim of the proposal is to investigate the absorption properties of a sample of inter-mediate redshift quasars. The main goals of the project are: Measure the redshift and the column density of the X-ray absorbers; test the correlation between absorption and redshift suggested by ROSAT and ASCA data; constrain the absorber ionization status and metallicity; constrain the absorber dust content and composition through the comparison between the amount of X-ray absorption and optical dust extinction. Unanticipated low energy cut-offs where discovered in ROSAT spectra of quasars and confirmed by ASCA, BeppoSAX and Chandra. In most cases it was not possible to constrain adequately the redshift of the absorber from the X-ray data alone. Two possibilities remain open: a) absorption at the quasar redshift; and b) intervening absorption. The evidences in favour of intrinsic absorption are all indirect. Sensitive XMM observations can discriminate between these different scenarios. If the absorption is at the quasar redshift we can study whether the quasar environment evolves with the Cosmic time.

  17. Strategies of Gammarus pulex L. to cope with arsenic--Results from speciation analyses by IC-ICP-MS and XAS micro-mapping.

    PubMed

    Schaller, Jörg; Koch, Iris; Caumette, Guilhem; Nearing, Michelle; Reimer, Kenneth J; Planer-Friedrich, Britta

    2015-10-15

    The invertebrate shredder Gammarus pulex L. is a key species for aquatic carbon turnover via litter decomposition and can thrive in high-arsenic (As) environments. To understand their strategies for coping with increased As concentrations while fulfilling their ecosystem functions, we analyzed the As concentration and speciation in their aquatic habitat and in leaves with heterotrophic biofilms as their natural food source. We also followed the As distribution and speciation on the cuticle and within the body of G. pulex by X-ray absorption spectroscopic imaging. Half of the total As on G. pulex was found to be associated with the cuticle but was not taken up. Removing this externally bound As yielded only arsenate in the wash solution which reflects the speciation of the surrounding aquatic phase and shows that this As does not undergo any biotransformation. The major pathway into the organism is suggested to be incorporation via food intake, but only very low amounts of As were taken up or translocated from the gut system to other tissues. In one of the main food sources, leaves, 68% arsenate and 29% monomethylarsenate were found. After ingestion into the gut system, up to 23% of the more toxic arsenite was seen, but a substantial share was methylated to dimethylarsenate (46-56%). Little arsenate and arsenite were found in the adjacent tissues. Besides 76-80% mono- and di-methylarsenate, 10-21% of the As was complexed as As(III)-S species. G. pulex plays an important role in As cycling and our results indicate that As translocation from the gut to other tissues is minimized, but a transformation to other As-species occurred.

  18. Evidence for core–shell nanoclusters in oxygen dispersion strengthened steels measured using X-ray absorption spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, S.; Odette, G. R.; Segre, C. U.

    2014-02-01

    Nanostructured ferritic alloys (NFA) dispersion strengthened by an ultra high density of Y–Ti–O enriched nano-features (NF) exhibit superior creep strength and the potential for high resistance to radiation damage. However, the detailed character of the NF, that precipitate from solid solution during hot consolidation of metallic powders mechanically alloyed with Y₂O₃, are not well understood. In order to clarify the nature of the NF, X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) technique, including X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) and extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) were used to characterize the local structure of the Ti and Y atoms in both NFA powders and consolidated alloys. The powders were characterized in the as-received, as-milled and after annealing milled powders at 850, 1000 and 1150 °C. The consolidated alloys included powders hot isostatic pressed (HIPed) at 1150 °C and commercial vendor alloys, MA957 and J12YWT. The NFA XAS data were compared various Ti and Y-oxide standards. The XANES and EXAFS spectra for the annealed and HIPed powders are similar and show high temperature heat treatments shift the Y and Ti to more oxidized states that are consistent with combinations of Y₂Ti₂O₇ and, especially, TiO. However, the MA957 and J12YWT and annealed–consolidated powder data differ. The commercial vendor alloys results more closely resemble the as-milled powder data and all show that a significant fraction of substitutional Ti remains dissolved in the (BCC) ferrite matrix.

  19. In-situ X-ray absorption spectroscopy study of Pt and Ru chemistry during methanol electrooxidation.

    PubMed

    Holstein, William L; Rosenfeld, H David

    2005-02-17

    Methanol electrooxidation in a 0.5 M sulfuric acid electrolyte containing 1.0 M CH3OH was studied on 30% Pt/carbon and 30% PtRu/carbon (Pt/Ru = 1:1) catalysts using X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS). Absorption by Pt and Ru was measured at constant photon energy in the near edge region during linear potential sweeps of 10-50 mV/s between 0.01 and 1.36 V vs rhe. The absorption results were used to follow Pt and Ru oxidation and reduction under transient conditions as well as to monitor Ru dissolution. Both catalysts exhibited higher activity for methanol oxidation at high potential following multiple potential cycles. Correlation of XAS data with the potential sweeps indicates that Pt catalysts lose activity at high potentials due to Pt oxidation. The addition of Ru to Pt accelerates the rate of methanol oxidation at all potentials. Ru is more readily oxidized than Pt, but unlike Pt, its oxidation does not result in a decrease in catalytic activity. PtRu/carbon catalysts underwent significant changes during potential cycling due to Ru loss. Similar current density vs potential results were obtained using the same PtRu/carbon catalyst at the same loading in a membrane electrode assembly half cell with only a Nafion (DuPont) solid electrolyte. The results are interpreted in terms of a bifunctional catalyst mechanism in which Pt surface sites serve to chemisorb and dissociate methanol to protons and carbon monoxide, while Ru surface sites activate water and accelerate the oxidation of the chemisorbed CO intermediate. PtRu/carbon catalysts maintain their activity at very high potentials, which is attributed to the ability of the added Ru to keep Pt present in a reduced state, a necessary requirement for methanol chemisorption and dissociation. PMID:16851209

  20. Biomimetic mono- and dinuclear Ni(I) and Ni(II) complexes studied by X-ray absorption and emission spectroscopy and quantum chemical calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuth, N.; Gehring, H.; Horn, B.; Holze, P.; Kositzki, R.; Schrapers, P.; Limberg, C.; Haumann, M.

    2016-05-01

    Five biomimetic mono- or dinuclear nickel complexes featuring Ni(I) or Ni(II) sites were studied by X-ray absorption and emission spectroscopy and DFT calculations. Ni K-edge XANES spectra and Kβ main and satellite emission lines were collected on powder samples. The pre-edge absorption transitions (core-to-valence excitation) and Kβ2,5 emission transitions (valence-to-core decay) were calculated using DFT (TPSSh/TZVP) on crystal structures. This yielded theoretical ctv and vtc spectra in near-quantitative agreement with the experiment, showing the adequacy of the DFT approach for electronic structure description, emphasizing the sensitivity of the XAS/XES spectra for ligation/redox changes at nickel, and revealing the configuration of unoccupied and occupied valence levels, as well as the spin-coupling modes in the dinuclear complexes. XAS/XES-DFT is valuable for molecular and electronic structure analysis of synthetic complexes and of nickel centers in H2 or COx converting metalloenzymes.

  1. Enhanced visible and near-infrared optical absorption in silicon supersaturated with chalcogens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Si H.; Recht, Daniel; Charnvanichborikarn, Supakit; Williams, James S.; Aziz, Michael J.

    2011-03-01

    We show that single-crystal silicon supersaturated with sulfur (S), selenium (Se), or tellurium (Te) displays a substantially enhanced absorption coefficient for light with wavelengths of 400 to 1600 nm. Alloys were prepared in silicon on insulator wafers by ion implantation followed by nanosecond pulsed laser melting. Measurements of the absorption coefficient were made by direct transmission through freestanding thin films and by spectroscopic ellipsometry.

  2. Absorption heat pump system

    DOEpatents

    Grossman, G.

    1982-06-16

    The efficiency of an absorption heat pump system is improved by conducting liquid from a second stage evaporator thereof to an auxiliary heat exchanger positioned downstream of a primary heat exchanger in the desorber of the system.

  3. Absorption heat pump system

    DOEpatents

    Grossman, Gershon

    1984-01-01

    The efficiency of an absorption heat pump system is improved by conducting liquid from a second stage evaporator thereof to an auxiliary heat exchanger positioned downstream of a primary heat exchanger in the desorber of the system.

  4. Compounds affecting cholesterol absorption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hua, Duy H. (Inventor); Koo, Sung I. (Inventor); Noh, Sang K. (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    A class of novel compounds is described for use in affecting lymphatic absorption of cholesterol. Compounds of particular interest are defined by Formula I: ##STR1## or a pharmaceutically acceptable salt thereof.

  5. Conduction-band electronic states of YbInCu{sub 4} studied by photoemission and soft x-ray absorption spectroscopies

    SciTech Connect

    Utsumi, Yuki; Kurihara, Hidenao; Maso, Hiroyuki; Tobimatsu, Komei; Sato, Hitoshi; Shimada, Kenya; Namatame, Hirofumi; Hiraoka, Koichi; Kojima, Kenichi; Ohkochi, Takuo; Fujimori, Shin-ichi; Takeda, Yukiharu; Saitoh, Yuji; Mimura, Kojiro; Ueda, Shigenori; Yamashita, Yoshiyuki; Yoshikawa, Hideki; Kobayashi, Keisuke; Oguchi, Tamio; Taniguchi, Masaki

    2011-09-15

    We have studied conduction-band (CB) electronic states of a typical valence-transition compound YbInCu{sub 4} by means of temperature-dependent hard x-ray photoemission spectroscopy (HX-PES) of the Cu 2p{sub 3/2} and In 3d{sub 5/2} core states taken at h{nu}=5.95 keV, soft x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) of the Cu 2p{sub 3/2} core absorption region around h{nu}{approx}935 eV, and soft x-ray photoemission spectroscopy (SX-PES) of the valence band at the Cu 2p{sub 3/2} absorption edge of h{nu}=933.0 eV. With decreasing temperature below the valence transition at T{sub V}=42 K, we have found that (1) the Cu 2p{sub 3/2} and In 3d{sub 5/2} peaks in the HX-PES spectra exhibit the energy shift toward the lower binding-energy side by {approx}40 and {approx}30 meV, respectively, (2) an energy position of the Cu 2p{sub 3/2} main absorption peak in the XAS spectrum is shifted toward higher photon-energy side by {approx}100 meV, with an appearance of a shoulder structure below the Cu 2p{sub 3/2} main absorption peak, and (3) an intensity of the Cu L{sub 3}VV Auger spectrum is abruptly enhanced. These experimental results suggest that the Fermi level of the CB-derived density of states is shifted toward the lower binding-energy side. We have described the valence transition in YbInCu{sub 4} in terms of the charge transfer from the CB to Yb 4f states.

  6. X-Ray Absorption Spectroscopy of Strontium(II) Coordination.

    PubMed

    Sahai; Carroll; Roberts; O'Day

    2000-02-15

    Sorption of dissolved strontium on kaolinite, amorphous silica, and goethite was studied as a function of pH, aqueous strontium concentration, the presence or absence of atmospheric CO(2) or dissolved phosphate, and aging over a 57-day period. Selected sorption samples ([Sr(aq)](i) approximately 0.5-1x10(-3) m) were examined with synchrotron X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) at low (13-23 K) and room temperatures to determine the local molecular coordination around strontium. Quantitative analyses of the extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) of kaolinite, amorphous silica, and most goethite sorption samples showed a single first shell of 9-10 (+/-1) oxygen atoms around strontium at an average Sr-O bond-distance of 2.61 (+/-0.02) Å, indicating hydrated surface complexes. The EXAFS spectra were unchanged after reaction for up to 57 days. Likewise, in kaolinite sorption samples prepared in 100% nitrogen atmosphere, the presence of dissolved phosphate (0.5x10(-3) m) in addition to strontium did not change the local coordination around strontium. In two goethite sorption samples reacted in air at pH approximately 8.5, the EXAFS spectra (collected at low and room temperature) clearly showed that the local structure around strontium is that of strontianite (SrCO(3)(s)). We also noted an increase in strontium uptake on goethite in the presence of atmospheric CO(2) in batch experiments, relative to CO(2)-free experiments. These observations suggest that sorption of carbonate may nucleate the precipitation of SrCO(3) in the pH range in which carbonate sorption on goethite is near a maximum. At higher pH, carbonate surface sorption decreases as dissolved CO(2) decreases. For goethite sorption samples above pH 8.6, hydrated surface complexes, rather than a precipitate, were observed in the EXAFS spectra. Copyright 2000 Academic Press.

  7. Solar selective absorption coatings

    DOEpatents

    Mahoney, Alan R.; Reed, Scott T.; Ashley, Carol S.; Martinez, F. Edward

    2004-08-31

    A new class of solar selective absorption coatings are disclosed. These coatings comprise a structured metallic overlayer such that the overlayer has a sub-micron structure designed to efficiently absorb solar radiation, while retaining low thermal emissivity for infrared thermal radiation. A sol-gel layer protects the structured metallic overlayer from mechanical, thermal, and environmental degradation. Processes for producing such solar selective absorption coatings are also disclosed.

  8. Solar selective absorption coatings

    DOEpatents

    Mahoney, Alan R.; Reed, Scott T.; Ashley, Carol S.; Martinez, F. Edward

    2003-10-14

    A new class of solar selective absorption coatings are disclosed. These coatings comprise a structured metallic overlayer such that the overlayer has a sub-micron structure designed to efficiently absorb solar radiation, while retaining low thermal emissivity for infrared thermal radiation. A sol-gel layer protects the structured metallic overlayer from mechanical, thermal, and environmental degradation. Processes for producing such solar selective absorption coatings are also disclosed.

  9. Optical absorption measurement system

    DOEpatents

    Draggoo, Vaughn G.; Morton, Richard G.; Sawicki, Richard H.; Bissinger, Horst D.

    1989-01-01

    The system of the present invention contemplates a non-intrusive method for measuring the temperature rise of optical elements under high laser power optical loading to determine the absorption coefficient. The method comprises irradiating the optical element with a high average power laser beam, viewing the optical element with an infrared camera to determine the temperature across the optical element and calculating the absorption of the optical element from the temperature.

  10. Reactions between vanadium ions and biogenic reductants of tunicates: Spectroscopic probing for complexation and redox products in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Ryan, D.E.; Grant, K.B.; Nakanishi, K.

    1996-07-02

    Several species of marine tunicates store oxygen-sensitive V{sup III} in blood cells. A sensitive colorimetric V{sup III} assay was used t survey the leading candidates for the native reducing agent of vanadate in tunicates (i.e., An-type tunichromes, glutathione, NADPH, and H{sub 2}S) in reactions with V{sup V} or V{sup IV} ions under anaerobic, aqueous conditions at acidic or neutral pH. Except for the case of An-1 and V{sup V} ions in pH 7 buffer, the assay results for the biogenic reducing agents clearly showed that appreciable quantities of V{sup III} products were not generated under the conditions tested. Therefore, the assay results place new limits on hypothetical mechanisms of V{sup III} formation in vivo. For reactions between An-1 and V{sup V} ions in pH 7 buffer, low levels of V{sup III} products could not be ruled out because of an interfering peak in the colorimetric assays. For similar reactions between V{sup V} ions and An-1, or an An-1,2 mixture, in mildly to moderately basic media, the product mixtures precipitated as greenish black solids. Analyses of the precipitated V/An mixtures using vanadium K-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) showed that the major products were tris(catecholate)-type V{sup IV} complexes (65 {plus_minus} 6%) and bis(catecholate)-type V{sup IV}O complexes (20 {plus_minus} 4%). XAS analysis of the V/An-1 product mixture also provided evidence of a minor V{sup III} component (9 {plus_minus} 5% of total V), notable for possible relevance to tunicate biochemistry. The combined results of XAS studies, spectrophotometric studies, and EPR studies consistently establish that reactions between tunichromes (Mm-1 or An-1) and V{sup V} ions generate predominantly V{sup IV}-tunichrome complexes in neutral to moderately basic aqueous media. 53 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  11. Spectroscopic Methods of Remote Sensing for Vegetation Characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kokaly, R. F.

    2013-12-01

    Imaging spectroscopy (IS), often referred to as hyperspectral remote sensing, is one of the latest innovations in a very long history of spectroscopy. Spectroscopic methods have been used for understanding the composition of the world around us, as well as, the solar system and distant parts of the universe. Continuous sampling of the electromagnetic spectrum in narrow bands is what separates IS from previous forms of remote sensing. Terrestrial imaging spectrometers often have hundreds of channels that cover the wavelength range of reflected solar radiation, including the visible, near-infrared (NIR), and shortwave infrared (SWIR) regions. In part due to the large number of channels, a wide variety of methods have been applied to extract information from IS data sets. These can be grouped into several broad classes, including: multi-channel indices, statistical procedures, full spectrum mixing models, and spectroscopic methods. Spectroscopic methods carry on the more than 150 year history of laboratory-based spectroscopy applied to material identification and characterization. Spectroscopic methods of IS relate the positions and shapes of spectral features resolved by airborne and spaceborne sensors to the biochemical and physical composition of vegetation in a pixel. The chlorophyll 680nm, water 980nm, water 1200nm, SWIR 1700nm, SWIR 2100nm, and SWIR 2300nm features have been the subject of study. Spectral feature analysis (SFA) involves isolating such an absorption feature using continuum removal (CR) and calculating descriptors of the feature, such as center position, depth, width, area, and asymmetry. SFA has been applied to quantify pigment and non-pigment biochemical concentrations in leaves, plants, and canopies. Spectral feature comparison (SFC) utilizes CR of features in each pixel's spectrum and linear regression with continuum-removed features in reference spectra in a library of known vegetation types to map vegetation species and communities. SFC has

  12. Understanding Electrocatalytic Pathways in Low and Medium Temperature Fuel Cells: Synchrotron-based In Situ X-Ray Absorption Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Mukerjee, S.; Ziegelbauer, J; Arruda, T; Ramaker, D; Shyam, B

    2008-01-01

    Over the last few decades, researchers have made significant developments in producing more advanced electrocatalytic materials for power generation applications. For example, traditional fuel cell catalysts often involve high-priced precious metals such as Pt. However, in order for fuel cells to become commercially viable, there is a need to reduce or completely remove precious metal altogether. As a result, a myriad of novel, unconventional materials have been explored such as chalcogenides, porphyrins, and organic-metal-macrocycles for low/medium temperature fuel cells as well as enzymatic and microbial fuel cells. As these materials increasingly become more complex, researchers often find themselves in search of new characterization methods, especially those which are allow in situ and operando measurements with element specificity. One such method that has received much attention for analysis of electrocatalytic materials is X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS). XAS is an element specific, core level absorption technique which yields structural and electronic information. As a core electron method, XAS requires an extremely bright source, hence a synchrotron. The resulting intensity of synchrotron radiation allow for experiments to be conducted in situ, under electrochemically relevant conditions. Although a bulk-averaging technique requiring rigorous mathematical manipulation, XAS has the added benefit that it can probe materials which possess no long range order. This makes it ideal to characterize nano-scale electrocatalysts. XAS experiments are conducted by ramping the X-ray photon energy while measuring absorption of the incident beam the sample or by counting fluorescent photons released from a sample due to subsequent relaxation. Absorption mode XAS follows the Beer-Lambert Law, {mu}x = log(I{sub 0}/I{sub t}) (1) where {mu} is the absorption coefficient, x is the sample thickness and I{sub 0} and I{sub t} are the intensities of the incident and

  13. Surface arsenic speciation of a drinking-water treatment residual using X-ray absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Makris, Konstantinos C; Sarkar, Dibyendu; Parsons, Jason G; Datta, Rupali; Gardea-Torresdey, Jorge L

    2007-07-15

    Drinking-water treatment residuals (WTRs) present a low-cost geosorbent for As-contaminated waters and soils. Previous work has demonstrated the high affinity of WTRs for As, but data pertaining to the stability of sorbed As is missing. Sorption/desorption and X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS), both XANES (X-ray absorption near edge structure) and EXAFS (extended X-ray absorption fine structure) studies, were combined to determine the stability of As sorbed by an Fe-based WTR. Arsenic(V) and As(III) sorption kinetics were biphasic in nature, sorbing >90% of the initial added As (15,000 mg kg(-1)) after 48 h of reaction. Subsequent desorption experiments with a high P load (7500 mg kg(-1)) showed negligible As desorption for both As species, approximately <3.5% of sorbed As; the small amount of desorbed As was attributed to the abundance of sorption sites. XANES data showed that sorption kinetics for either As(III) or As(V) initially added to solution had no effect on the sorbed As oxidation state. EXAFS spectroscopy suggested that As added either as As(III) or as As(V) formed inner-sphere mononuclear, bidentate complexes, suggesting the stability of the sorbed As, which was further corroborated by the minimum As desorption from the Fe-WTR.

  14. X-ray microprobe for micro x-ray fluorescence and absorption spectroscopies at GSECARS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newville, M.; Sutton, S.; Rivers, M.

    2002-12-01

    The hard x-ray microprobe for x-ray fluorescence and absorption spectroscopy at GeoSoilEnviroCARS is presented. Using focused synchrotron radiation from an undulator beamline at the Advanced Photon Source at Argonne National Lab, the x-ray microprobe provides bright, monochromatic x-rays with typical spot sizes down to 1x1 μm for x-ray fluorescence and absorption spectroscopies. Quantitative x-ray fluorescence (XRF) analysis gives precise elemental composition and correlations, while x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) gives the chemical state and local atomic coordination for a selected atomic species. These two techniques can be used in conjunction with one another on a wide range of samples, including minerals, glasses, fluid inclusions, soils, sediments, and plant tissue. This x-ray microprobe is part of the GeoSoilEnviroCARS user facility, available for use in all areas geological, soil, and environmental sciences, and selected examples from these fields will be given.

  15. Surface Arsenic Speciation of a Drinking-Water Treatment Residual Using X-Ray Absorption Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Makris, K.C.; Sarkar, D.; Parsons, J.G.; Datta, R.; Gardea-Torresdey, J.L.

    2009-06-03

    Drinking-water treatment residuals (WTRs) present a low-cost geosorbent for As-contaminated waters and soils. Previous work has demonstrated the high affinity of WTRs for As, but data pertaining to the stability of sorbed As is missing. Sorption/desorption and X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS), both XANES (X-ray absorption near edge structure) and EXAFS (extended X-ray absorption fine structure) studies, were combined to determine the stability of As sorbed by an Fe-based WTR. Arsenic(V) and As(III) sorption kinetics were biphasic in nature, sorbing <90% of the initial added As (15,000 mg kg{sup -1}) after 48 h of reaction. Subsequent desorption experiments with a high P load (7500 mg kg{sup -1}) showed negligible As desorption for both As species, approximately <3.5% of sorbed As; the small amount of desorbed As was attributed to the abundance of sorption sites. XANES data showed that sorption kinetics for either As(III) or As(V) initially added to solution had no effect on the sorbed As oxidation state. EXAFS spectroscopy suggested that As added either as As(III) or as As(V) formed inner-sphere mononuclear, bidentate complexes, suggesting the stability of the sorbed As, which was further corroborated by the minimum As desorption from the Fe-WTR.

  16. Seven-effect absorption refrigeration

    DOEpatents

    DeVault, R.C.; Biermann, W.J.

    1989-05-09

    A seven-effect absorption refrigeration cycle is disclosed utilizing three absorption circuits. In addition, a heat exchanger is used for heating the generator of the low absorption circuit with heat rejected from the condenser and absorber of the medium absorption circuit. A heat exchanger is also provided for heating the generator of the medium absorption circuit with heat rejected from the condenser and absorber of the high absorption circuit. If desired, another heat exchanger can also be provided for heating the evaporator of the high absorption circuit with rejected heat from either the condenser or absorber of the low absorption circuit. 1 fig.

  17. Seven-effect absorption refrigeration

    DOEpatents

    DeVault, Robert C.; Biermann, Wendell J.

    1989-01-01

    A seven-effect absorption refrigeration cycle is disclosed utilizing three absorption circuits. In addition, a heat exchanger is used for heating the generator of the low absorption circuit with heat rejected from the condenser and absorber of the medium absorption circuit. A heat exchanger is also provided for heating the generator of the medium absorption circuit with heat rejected from the condenser and absorber of the high absorption circuit. If desired, another heat exchanger can also be provided for heating the evaporator of the high absorption circuit with rejected heat from either the condenser or absorber of the low absorption circuit.

  18. Spectroscopic signature for ferroelectric ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wójcik, Marek J.; Gług, Maciej; Boczar, Marek; Boda, Łukasz

    2014-09-01

    Various forms of ice exist within our galaxy. Particularly intriguing type of ice - ‘ferroelectric ice' was discovered experimentally and is stable in temperatures below 72 K. This form of ice can generate enormous electric fields and can play an important role in planetary formation. In this letter we present Car-Parrinello simulation of infrared spectra of ferroelectric ice and compare them with spectra of hexagonal ice. Librational region of the spectra can be treated as spectroscopic signature of ice XI and can be of help to identify ferroelectric ice in the Universe.

  19. Spectroscopic Survey of Cool Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linsky, J.

    This program will obtain far-UV spectra of cool stars that span a broad range of spectral type and luminosity class. It is our intention to obtain these spectra early in the FUSE program and to provide the spectra quickly to the user community in order to guide potential guest investigators in designing their observing programs. The specific science objectives include: (1) studying transition region dynamics (winds and downflows), (2) modeling the thermal structure of transition regions, (3) measuring electron densities, (4) search for low temperature coronae, (5) studying molecular excitation and fluorescence processes, and (6) inferring how the transition regions of spectroscopic binary systems differ from those of single stars.

  20. The far ultraviolet spectroscopic explorer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boggess, A.

    1982-01-01

    The scientific objectives and performance characteristics of a new astronomy mission referred to as the far ultraviolet spectroscopic explorer, or FUSE are being defined by a team involving people experienced instrumental requirements that best meet the scientific needs. The team is intended to have a lifetime of about one year, ending with the submission of a report to NASA which could be used as the basis for an engineering design study. The principal objective of FUSE is to obtain astronomical spectra at wavelengths shorter than is possible with the Space Telescope.

  1. Lattice dynamics properties of XAs (X=Al, Ga and In) with zinc-blende structure from first-principle calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xingxiu; Tao, Xiaoma; Li, Ran; Chen, Hongmei; Ouyang, Yifang; Du, Yong

    2012-08-01

    Band structures, density of states, dielectric and vibrational properties of XAs (X=Al, Ga and In) alloys with zinc-blende structure have been studied using the density functional theory (DFT). The calculated lattice constants, band gap, static dielectric constants and phonon frequencies are all in good agreement with the available experimental data and other theoretical results. The calculated results show that Born effective charges ZB increase with cation mass. A similar tendency has been observed for phonon frequencies ωTO and ωLO. Calculation results prove that static dielectric constants ɛ(0) increase with atomic weight, i.e. in the sequences AlAs-GaAs-InAs, and show an inverse sequence for band gap.

  2. Temperature stability of Al(x)Ga(1-x)As (x = 0-1) thermal oxide masks for selective-area epitaxy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Stephen H.; Lau, Kei May; Pouch, John J.

    1988-01-01

    The use of thermal oxides of Al(x)Ga(1-x)As (x = 0-1) as masking materials for selective-area epitaxy by a organometallic chemical-vapor deposition has been investigated. It was found that the thermal oxide of GaAs is only applicable for low growth temperatures (less than or equal to 600 C), and the addition of aluminum significantly improves the thermal stability of the oxide. The oxide of Al(0.4)Ga(0.6)As is suitable for high-temperature deposition, but there are criteria for the thickness and oxidation temperature. Thin layers of AlAs oxidized at 475 C are excellent masks and allow precise thickness control. Promising results of selective-area deposition using these aluminum oxide masks have been obtained. High-quality single crystal grew in mask openings uniformly surrounded by dense and fine-grain polycrystalline deposits, producing a planar duplication of the original pattern.

  3. Effect of wet oxidized AlxGa1-xAs layer on the interdiffusion of InGaAs/GaAs quantum wells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choe, Joong-Seon; Ryu, Sang-Wan; Choe, Byung-Doo; Lim, H.

    1998-06-01

    The effect of wet oxidized AlAs cap layer and AlGaAs interlayer on the thermal stability of In0.2Ga0.8As/GaAs quantum well (QW) is studied. The QW interdiffusion rate is observed to increase with the Al composition of the AlxGa1-xAs interlayer until x reaches about 0.5 and then saturate for x⩾0.5. When the oxidation is performed at 380 °C for 15 min, the threshold value of x for the enhancement of QW interdiffusion is found to be 0.3. It is also confirmed that the QW interdiffusion can only be explained when the strain effect in InGaAs is taken into account.

  4. Temperature stability of Al(x)Ga(1-x)As (x = 0-1) thermal oxide masks for selective-area epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Stephen H.; Lau, Kei May; Pouch, John J.

    1988-07-01

    The use of thermal oxides of Al(x)Ga(1-x)As (x = 0-1) as masking materials for selective-area epitaxy by a organometallic chemical-vapor deposition has been investigated. It was found that the thermal oxide of GaAs is only applicable for low growth temperatures (less than or equal to 600 C), and the addition of aluminum significantly improves the thermal stability of the oxide. The oxide of Al(0.4)Ga(0.6)As is suitable for high-temperature deposition, but there are criteria for the thickness and oxidation temperature. Thin layers of AlAs oxidized at 475 C are excellent masks and allow precise thickness control. Promising results of selective-area deposition using these aluminum oxide masks have been obtained. High-quality single crystal grew in mask openings uniformly surrounded by dense and fine-grain polycrystalline deposits, producing a planar duplication of the original pattern.

  5. Resonant DX centers in highly doped Sn-Ga 1- xAl xAs under hydrostatic pressure in magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basmaji, P.; Portal, J. C.; Aulombard, R. L.; Gibart, P.

    1987-07-01

    We report experimental evidence of deep impurity states producing a localized resonance in the Γ 1c band continuum in highly doped Sn-Ga 1- xAl xAs. At low temperatures and increasing pressure, electrons were transferred from the Γ 1c band to the deep Sn donor state; this transfer of carriers was directly related to the pressure dependence of Shubnikov de Haas oscillations. Persistent photoconductivity, due to the DX nature of this deep level, was observed through the increase in the Γ carrier density resulting from illumination with a light emitting diode. This is interpreted as a photoionization of the DX centers up to the Γ 1c valley.

  6. Electrical conductivity studies in (Ag3AsS3)x(As2S3)1-x superionic glasses and composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Studenyak, I. P.; Neimet, Yu. Yu.; Kranjčec, M.; Solomon, A. M.; Orliukas, A. F.; Kežionis, A.; Kazakevičius, E.; Šalkus, T.

    2014-01-01

    Compositional, frequency, and temperature studies of impedance and electrical conductivity in (Ag3AsS3)x(As2S3)1-x superionic glasses and composites were performed. Frequency range from 10 Hz to 3 × 109 Hz and temperature interval 300-400 K were used for the measurements. Compositional dependences of electrical conductivity and activation energy are analyzed; the most substantial changes are observed with the transition from (Ag3AsS3)0.4(As2S3)0.6 glass to (Ag3AsS3)0.5(As2S3)0.5 composite. With increase of Ag3AsS3 content, the investigated materials are found to have crystalline inclusions and show the two-phase composite nature. Addition of Ag3AsS3 leads to the increase of electrical conductivity whereas the activation energy decreases.

  7. The influence of interfacial growth patterns on the transmission properties of carriers through nonabrupt GaAs/Al xGa 1- xAs single barriers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lima, M. C. A.; Junior, J. M. Pereira; Farias, G. A.; Freire, V. N.

    1995-06-01

    The influence of interfacial growth patterns on the tunelling of carriers through nonabrupt GaAs/Al xCa 1- xAs single barriers is studied. Five interfacial growth patterns are considered, all of them representative of interfacial alloy variations generated by different growth techniques. With a generalization of the scheme proposed previously by Freire et al [Superlatt. Microstruct. 1, 17 (1992)], the inter-related single barrier potential and effective mass is obtained. The envelope function equation with a position dependent kinetic energy operator is solved with a multistep scheme. The position of the resonant peaks, their peak-to-valley ratios, and the mean width of the resonance structures are shown to depend on the interfacial growth patterns.

  8. Intrinsic and interfacial recombination in OMVPE- and MBE-prepared GaAs/Al[sub x]Ga[sub 1-x]As heterostructures

    SciTech Connect

    Gilliland, G.D.; Wolford, D.J.; Kuech, T.F.; Bradley, J.A. . Thomas J. Watson Research Center); Klem, J.; Hjalmarson, H.P. )

    1993-01-01

    We have studied intrinsic free-carrier recombination in a variety of GaAs structures, including: OMVPE- and MBE-prepared GaAs/Al[sub x]Ga[sub 1-x]As double heterostructures, Na[sub 2]S passivated GaAs structures and bare GaAs structures. We find OMVPE prepared structures are superior to all of these other structures with 300 K lifetimes of [approximately] 2.5 [mu]s and negligible nonradiative interface and bulkrecombination, and thus are truly surface-free (S < 40 cm/s). Moreover, we observe systematic trends in optical properties versus growth conditions. Lastly, we find that the presence of free-exciton recombination in the low-temperature photoluminescence spectra is a necessary but not sufficient condition for optimal optical properties (i.e. long minority-carrier lifetimes).

  9. Spectroscopic Classifications of Optical Transients with SOAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foley, R. J.; Hounsell, R. A.; Downing, S.; Pan, Y.-C.; Scolnic, D.; Jha, S. W.; Rest, A.; Smith, K. W.; Wright, D.; Smartt, S. J.; Huber, M.; Chambers, K. C.; Flewelling, H.; Willman, M.; Primak, N.; Schultz, A.; Gibson, B.; Magnier, E.; Waters, C.; Tonry, J.; Wainscoat, R. J.

    2015-07-01

    We report the following classifications of optical transients from spectroscopic observations with the Goodman spectrograph (wavelength range 3100 - 7100) on the Southern Astrophysical Research (SOAR) telescope.

  10. Local atomic structure and oxidation processes of Cu(I) binding site in amyloid beta peptide: XAS Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kremennaya, M. A.; Soldatov, M. A.; Stretsov, V. A.; Soldatov, A. V.

    2016-05-01

    There are two different motifs of X-ray absorption spectra for Cu(I) K-edge in amyloid-β peptide which could be due to two different configurations of local Cu(I) environment. Two or three histidine ligands can coordinate copper ion in varying conformations. On the other hand, oxidation of amyloid-β peptide could play an additional role in local copper environment. In order to explore the peculiarities of local atomic and electronic structure of Cu(I) binding sites in amyloid-β peptide the x-ray absorption spectra were simulated for various Cu(I) environments including oxidized amyloid-β and compared with experimental data.

  11. Infrared laser spectroscopic trace gas sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sigrist, Markus

    2016-04-01

    Chemical sensing and analyses of gas samples by laser spectroscopic methods are attractive owing to several advantages such as high sensitivity and specificity, large dynamic range, multi-component capability, and lack of pretreatment or preconcentration procedures. The preferred wavelength range comprises the fundamental molecular absorption range in the mid-infared between 3 and 15 μm, whereas the near-infrared range covers the (10-100 times weaker) higher harmonics and combination bands. The availability of near-infrared and, particularly, of broadly tunable mid-infrared sources like external cavity quantum cascade lasers (EC-QCLs), interband cascade lasers (ICLs), difference frequency generation (DFG), optical parametric oscillators (OPOs), recent developments of diode-pumped lead salt semiconductor lasers, of supercontinuum sources or of frequency combs have eased the implementation of laser-based sensing devices. Sensitive techniques for molecular absorption measurements include multipass absorption, various configurations of cavity-enhanced techniques such as cavity ringdown (CRD), or of photoacoustic spectroscopy (PAS) including quartz-enhanced (QEPAS) or cantilever-enhanced (CEPAS) techniques. The application requirements finally determine the optimum selection of laser source and detection scheme. In this tutorial talk I shall discuss the basic principles, present various experimental setups and illustrate the performance of selected systems for chemical sensing of selected key atmospheric species. Applications include an early example of continuous vehicle emission measurements with a mobile CO2-laser PAS system [1]. The fast analysis of C1-C4 alkanes at sub-ppm concentrations in gas mixtures is of great interest for the petrochemical industry and was recently achieved with a new type of mid-infrared diode-pumped piezoelectrically tuned lead salt vertical external cavity surface emitting laser (VECSEL) [2]. Another example concerns measurements on short

  12. Optimized wavelength selection for molecular absorption thermometry.

    PubMed

    An, Xinliang; Caswell, Andrew W; Lipor, John J; Sanders, Scott T

    2015-04-01

    A differential evolution (DE) algorithm is applied to a recently developed spectroscopic objective function to select wavelengths that optimize the temperature precision of water absorption thermometry. DE reliably finds optima even when many-wavelength sets are chosen from large populations of wavelengths (here 120 000 wavelengths from a spectrum with 0.002 cm(-1) resolution calculated by 16 856 transitions). Here, we study sets of fixed wavelengths in the 7280-7520 cm(-1) range. When optimizing the thermometer for performance within a narrow temperature range, the results confirm that the best temperature precision is obtained if all the available measurement time is split judiciously between the two most temperature-sensitive wavelengths. In the wide temperature range case (thermometer must perform throughout 280-2800 K), we find (1) the best four-wavelength set outperforms the best two-wavelength set by an average factor of 2, and (2) a complete spectrum (all 120 000 wavelengths from 16 856 transitions) is 4.3 times worse than the best two-wavelength set. Key implications for sensor designers include: (1) from the perspective of spectroscopic temperature sensitivity, it is usually sufficient to monitor two or three wavelengths, depending on the sensor's anticipated operating temperature range; and (2) although there is a temperature precision penalty to monitoring a complete spectrum, that penalty may be small enough, particularly at elevated pressure, to justify the complete-spectrum approach in many applications.

  13. Aluminum-Induced photoluminescence red shifts in core-shell GaAs/Al(x)Ga(1-x)As nanowires.

    PubMed

    Dhaka, Veer; Oksanen, Jani; Jiang, Hua; Haggren, Tuomas; Nykänen, Antti; Sanatinia, Reza; Kakko, Joona-Pekko; Huhtio, Teppo; Mattila, Marco; Ruokolainen, Janne; Anand, Srinivasan; Kauppinen, Esko; Lipsanen, Harri

    2013-08-14

    We report a new phenomenon related to Al-induced carrier confinement at the interface in core-shell GaAs/Al(x)Ga(1-x)As nanowires grown using metal-organic vapor phase epitaxy with Au as catalyst. All Al(x)Ga(1-x)As shells strongly passivated the GaAs nanowires, but surprisingly the peak photoluminescence (PL) position and the intensity from the core were found to be a strong function of Al composition in the shell at low temperatures. Large and systematic red shifts of up to ~66 nm and broadening in the PL emission from the GaAs core were observed when the Al composition in the shell exceeded 3%. On the contrary, the phenomenon was observed to be considerably weaker at the room temperature. Cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy reveals Al segregation in the shell along six Al-rich radial bands displaying a 3-fold symmetry. Time-resolved PL measurements suggest the presence of indirect electron-hole transitions at the interface at higher Al composition. We discuss all possibilities including a simple shell-core-shell model using simulations where the density of interface traps increases with the Al content, thus creating a strong local electron confinement. The carrier confinement at the interface is most likely related to Al inhomogeneity and/or Al-induced traps. Our results suggest that a low Al composition in the shell is desirable in order to achieve ideal passivation in GaAs nanowires.

  14. Backscatter absorption gas imaging systems and light sources therefore

    DOEpatents

    Kulp, Thomas Jan; Kliner, Dahv A. V.; Sommers, Ricky; Goers, Uta-Barbara; Armstrong, Karla M.

    2006-12-19

    The location of gases that are not visible to the unaided human eye can be determined using tuned light sources that spectroscopically probe the gases and cameras that can provide images corresponding to the absorption of the gases. The present invention is a light source for a backscatter absorption gas imaging (BAGI) system, and a light source incorporating the light source, that can be used to remotely detect and produce images of "invisible" gases. The inventive light source has a light producing element, an optical amplifier, and an optical parametric oscillator to generate wavelength tunable light in the IR. By using a multi-mode light source and an amplifier that operates using 915 nm pump sources, the power consumption of the light source is reduced to a level that can be operated by batteries for long periods of time. In addition, the light source is tunable over the absorption bands of many hydrocarbons, making it useful for detecting hazardous gases.

  15. Spectroscopic survey of M-type asteroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fornasier, S.; Clark, B. E.; Dotto, E.; Migliorini, A.; Ockert-Bell, M.; Barucci, M. A.

    2010-12-01

    M-type asteroids, as defined in the Tholen taxonomy (Tholen, D.J. [1984]. Asteroid Taxonomy from Cluster Analysis of Photometry. Ph.D. Dissertation, University of Arizona, Tucson), are medium albedo bodies supposed to have a metallic composition and to be the progenitors both of differentiated iron-nickel meteorites and enstatite chondrites. We carried out a spectroscopic survey in the visible and near infrared wavelength range (0.4-2.5 μm) of 30 asteroids chosen from the population of asteroids initially classified as Tholen M-types, aiming to investigate their surface composition. The data were obtained during several observing runs during the years 2004-2007 at the TNG, NTT, and IRTF telescopes. We computed the spectral slopes in several wavelength ranges for each observed asteroid, and we searched for diagnostic spectral features. We confirm a large variety of spectral behaviors for these objects as their spectra are extended into the near infrared, including the identification of weak absorption bands, mainly of the 0.9 μm band tentatively attributed to orthopyroxene, and of the 0.43 μm band that may be associated to chlorites and Mg-rich serpentines or pyroxene minerals such us pigeonite or augite. A comparison with previously published data indicates that the surfaces of several asteroids belonging to the M-class may vary significantly. We attempt to constrain the asteroid surface compositions of our sample by looking for meteorite spectral analogs in the RELAB database and by modeling with geographical mixtures of selected meteorites/minerals. We confirm that iron meteorites, pallasites, and enstatite chondrites are the best matches to most objects in our sample, as suggested for M-type asteroids. For 22 Kalliope, we demonstrate that a synthetic mixture obtained enriching a pallasite meteorite with small amounts (1-2%) of silicates well reproduce the spectral behavior including the observed 0.9 μm feature. The presence of subtle absorption features on

  16. Spectroscopic indicators of life on other planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasting, James F.

    2008-10-01

    Astronomers have now identified over 300 extrasolar planets orbiting nearby stars. Most of these planets have been found by using ground-based instruments to measure Doppler shifts in the spectrum of the parent star. For stars similar to our Sun, this method is unable to find planets as small as Earth. Within the next two (three?) decades, however, NASA hopes to launch space-based telescopes that will be able to search directly for extrasolar planets. NASA's planned Terrestrial Planet Finder (TPF) missions, will look for Earth-like planets around nearby stars and, if they exist, provide spectroscopic information on their atmospheres. TPF-C will be a coronagraph that operates in the visible/near-IR. A variant of this idea, called TPF-O, would replace the internal coronagraph with a free-flying occulting disk. TPF-I is envisioned as a free-flying interferometer operating in the thermal-IR. On a planet like modern Earth, TPF-C or TPF--O should be able to see absorption bands of O2, H2O, and possibly O3. TPF-I would be able to see CO2, H2O, and O3. Both O2 and O3 are considered to be good indicators of life for planets orbiting within the liquid water habitable zone of their parent star. Even better evidence for life would be the simultaneous observation of O2 (or O3) and a reduced gas such as CH4 or N2O. That may not be possible with a first-generation TPF instrument but should ultimately be possible in the more distant future.

  17. The SPHEREx All-Sky Spectroscopic Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Unwin, Stephen C.; SPHEREx Science Team, SPHEREx Project Team

    2016-06-01

    SPHEREx is a mission to conduct an optical-near-IR survey of the entire sky with a spectrum at every pixel location. It was selected by NASA for a Phase A study in its Small Explorer Program; if selected, development would begin in 2016, and the observatory would start a 2-year prime mission in 2020. An all-sky spectroscopic survey can be used to tackle a wide range of science questions. The SPHEREx science team is focusing on three: (1) Probing the physics of inflation through measuring non-Gaussianity from the study of large-scale structure; (2) Studying the origin of water and biogenic molecules in a wide range of physical and chemical environments via ice absorption spectra; (3) Charting the history of star formation in the universe through intensity mapping of the large-scale spatial power. The instrument is a small wide-field telescope operating in the range of 0.75 - 4.8 µm at a spectral resolution of 41.5 in the optical and 150 at the long-wavelength end. It observes in a sun-sync low-earth orbit, covering the sky like WISE and COBE. SPHEREx is a simple instrument that requires no new technology. The Phase A design has substantial technical and resource margins and can be built with low risk. It is a partnership between Caltech and JPL, with Ball Aerospace and the Korea Astronomy and Space Science Institute as major partners. This research was carried out at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under a contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

  18. The SPHEREx All-Sky Spectroscopic Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Unwin, Stephen C.; SPHEREx Science Team, SPHEREx Project Team

    2016-06-01

    SPHEREx is a mission to conduct an optical-near-IR survey of the entire sky with a spectrum at every pixel location. It was selected by NASA for a Phase A study in its Small Explorer Program; if selected, development would begin in 2016, and the observatory would start a 2-year prime mission in 2020. An all-sky spectroscopic survey can be used to tackle a wide range of science questions. The SPHEREx science team is focusing on three: (1) Probing the physics of inflation through measuring non-Gaussianity from the study of large-scale structure; (2) Studying the origin of water and biogenic molecules in a wide range of physical and chemical environments via ice absorption spectra; (3) Charting the history of star formation in the universe through intensity mapping of the large-scale spatial power. The instrument is a small wide-field telescope operating in the range of 0.75 - 4.8 µm at a spectral resolution of 41.5 in the optical and 150 at the long-wavelength end. It observes in a sun-sync low-earth orbit, covering the sky like WISE and COBE. SPHEREx is a simple instrument that requires no new technology. The Phase A design has substantial technical and resource margins and can be built with low risk. It is a partnership between Caltech and JPL, with Ball Aerospace and the Korea Astronomy and Space Science Institute as major partners. This research was carried out at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under a contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. © 2016 California Institute of Technology. Government sponsorship acknowledged.

  19. First Spectroscopic Identification of Massive Young Stellar Objects in the Galactic Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    An, Deokkeun; Ramirez, V.; Sellgren, Kris; Arendt, Richard G.; Boogert, A. C.; Schultheis, Mathias; Stolovy, Susan R.; Cotera, Angela S.; Robitaille, Thomas P.; Smith, Howard A.

    2009-01-01

    We report the detection of several molecular gas-phase and ice absorption features in three photometrically-selected young stellar object (YSO) candidates in the central 280 pc of the Milky Way. Our spectra, obtained with the Infrared Spectrograph (IRS) onboard the Spitzer Space Telescope, reveal gas-phase absorption from CO2 (15.0 microns), C2H2 (13.7 microns) and HCN (14.0 microns). We attribute this absorption to warm, dense gas in massive YSOs. We also detect strong and broad 15 microns CO2 ice absorption features, with a remarkable double-peaked structure. The prominent long-wavelength peak is due to CH3OH-rich ice grains, and is similar to those found in other known massive YSOs. Our IRS observa.tions demonstra.te the youth of these objects, and provide the first spectroscopic identification of massive YSOs in the Galactic Center.

  20. Arsenic Re-Mobilization in Water Treatment Adsorbents Under Reducing Conditions: Part II, XAS and Modeling Study

    SciTech Connect

    Liu,S.; Jing, C.; Meng, X.

    2008-01-01

    The mechanism of arsenic re-mobilization in spent adsorbents under reducing conditions was studied using X-ray absorption spectroscopy and surface complexation model calculations. X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy demonstrated that As(V) was partially reduced to As(III) in spent granular ferric hydroxide (GFH), titanium dioxide (TiO2), activated alumina (AA) and modified activated alumina (MAA) adsorbents after 2 years of anaerobic incubation. As(V) was completely reduced to As(III) in spent granular ferric oxide (GFO) under 2-year incubation. The extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy analysis showed that As(III) formed bidentate binuclear surface complexes on GFO as evidenced by an average As(III)-O bond distance of 1.78 Angstroms and As(III)-Fe distance of 3.34 Angstroms . The release of As from the spent GFO and TiO2 was simulated using the charge distribution multi-site complexation (CD-MUSIC) model. The observed redox ranges for As release and sulfate mobility were described by model calculations.

  1. Atmospheric Measurements by Cavity Enhanced Absorption Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Hongming; Wu, Tao; Coeur-Tourneur, Cécile; Fertein, Eric; Gao, Xiaoming; Zhao, Weixiong; Zhang, Weijun; Chen, Weidong

    2015-04-01

    Since the last decade, atmospheric environmental monitoring has benefited from the development of novel spectroscopic measurement techniques owing to the significant breakthroughs in photonic technology from the UV to the infrared spectral domain [1]. In this presentation, we will overview our recent development and applications of cavity enhanced absorption spectroscopy techniques for in situ optical monitoring of chemically reactive atmospheric species (such as HONO, NO3, NO2, N2O5) in intensive campaigns [2] and/or in smog chamber studies [3]. These field deployments demonstrated that modern photonic technologies (newly emergent light sources combined with high sensitivity spectroscopic techniques) can provide a useful tool to improve our understanding of tropospheric chemical processes which affect climate, air quality, and the spread of pollution. Experimental detail and preliminary results will be presented. Acknowledgements. The financial support from the French Agence Nationale de la Recherche (ANR) under the NexCILAS (ANR-11-NS09-0002) and the CaPPA (ANR-10-LABX-005) contracts is acknowledged. References [1] X. Cui, C. Lengignon, T. Wu, W. Zhao, G. Wysocki, E. Fertein, C. Coeur, A. Cassez,L. Croisé, W. Chen, et al., "Photonic Sensing of the Atmosphere by absorption spectroscopy", J. Quant. Spectrosc. Rad. Transfer 113 (2012) 1300-1316 [2] T. Wu, Q. Zha, W. Chen, Z. XU, T. Wang, X. He, "Development and deployment of a cavity enhanced UV-LED spectrometer for measurements of atmospheric HONO and NO2 in Hong Kong", Atmos. Environ. 95 (2014) 544-551 [3] T. Wu, C. Coeur-Tourneur, G. Dhont,A. Cassez, E. Fertein, X. He, W. Chen,"Application of IBBCEAS to kinetic study of NO3 radical formation from O3 + NO2 reaction in an atmospheric simulation chamber", J. Quant. Spectrosc. Rad. Transfer 133 (2014)199-205

  2. Photoinduced intramolecular charge transfer process of betaine pyridinium: A theoretical spectroscopic study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perrier, Aurélie; Aloïse, Stéphane; Pawlowska, Zuzanna; Sliwa, Michel; Maurel, François; Abe, Jiro

    2011-10-01

    Using Time-Dependent Density Functional Theory and taking into account bulk solvent effects, we investigate the absorption and emission spectra of a betaine pyridinium molecule, the 2-(1-pyridinio) benzimidazolate (SBPa). This molecule exhibits strong photoinduced intramolecular charge transfer (ICT). We have identified two different electronic states involved, respectively, in the strong bathochromic ICT absorption band (S 2) and in the moderate emission band (S 1). The ICT process is analyzed in terms of charge distribution and dipole moment evolutions upon photoexcitation. These results are compared with steady-state spectroscopic measurements.

  3. Spectroscopic characterizations of organic/inorganic nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Govani, Jayesh R.

    2009-12-01

    In the present study, pure and 0.3 wt%, 0.4 wt%, as well as 0.5 wt% L-arginine doped potassium dihydrogen phosphate (KDP) crystals were grown using solution growth techniques and further subjected to infrared (IR) absorption and Raman studies for confirmation of chemical group functionalization for investigating the incorporation mechanism of the L-arginine organic material into the KDP crystal structure. Infrared spectroscopic analysis suggests that structural changes are occurring for the L-arginine molecule as a result of its interaction with the KPD crystal. Infrared spectroscopic technique confirms the disturbance of the N-H, C-H and C-N bonds of the amino acid, suggesting successful incorporation of L-arginine into the KDP crystals. Raman analysis also reveals modification of the N-H, C-H and C-N bonds of the amino acid, implying successful inclusion of L-arginine into the KDP crystals. With the help of Gaussian software, a prediction of possible incorporation mechanisms of the organic material was obtained from comparison of the simulated infrared and Raman vibrational spectra with the experimental results. Furthermore, we also studied the effect of L-arginine doping on the thermal stability of the grown KDP crystal by employing Thermo gravimetric analysis (TGA). TGA suggests that increasing the level of L-arginine doping speeds the decomposition process and it weakens the KDP crystal, which indicates successful doping of the KDP crystals with L-arginine amino acid. Urinary stones are one of the oldest and most widely spread diseases in humans, animals and birds. Many remedies have been employed through the ages for the treatment of urinary stones. Recent medicinal measures reflect the modern advances, which are based on surgical removal, percutaneous techniques and extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL). Although these procedures are valuable, they are quite expensive for most people. Furthermore, recurrence of these diseases is awfully frequent with

  4. Spectroscopic studies on the interaction of cysteine capped CuS nanoparticles with tyrosine

    SciTech Connect

    Prasanth, S.; Raj, D. Rithesh; Kumar, T. V. Vineesh; Sudarsanakumar, C.

    2015-06-24

    Biocompatible cysteine coated CuS nanoparticles were synthesized by a simple aqueous solution method. Hexagonal phase of the samples were confirmed from X-ray diffraction and particle size found to be 9 nm. The possible interaction between the bioactive cysteine capped CuS nanoparticles and tyrosine were investigated using spectroscopic techniques such as UV-Visible absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy. It is observed that the luminescence intensity of tyrosine molecule enhanced by the addition CuS nanoparticles.

  5. Spectroscopic studies on the interaction of cysteine capped CuS nanoparticles with tyrosine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasanth, S.; Raj, D. Rithesh; Kumar, T. V. Vineesh; Sudarsanakumar, C.

    2015-06-01

    Biocompatible cysteine coated CuS nanoparticles were synthesized by a simple aqueous solution method. Hexagonal phase of the samples were confirmed from X-ray diffraction and particle size found to be 9 nm. The possible interaction between the bioactive cysteine capped CuS nanoparticles and tyrosine were investigated using spectroscopic techniques such as UV-Visible absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy. It is observed that the luminescence intensity of tyrosine molecule enhanced by the addition CuS nanoparticles.

  6. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopic study of intact cells of the nitrogen-fixing bacterium Azospirillum brasilense

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamnev, A. A.; Ristić, M.; Antonyuk, L. P.; Chernyshev, A. V.; Ignatov, V. V.

    1997-06-01

    The data of Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopic measurements performed on intact cells of the soil nitrogen-fixing bacterium Azospirillum brasilense grown in a standard medium and under the conditions of an increased metal uptake are compared and discussed. The structural FTIR information obtained is considered together with atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS) data on the content of metal cations in the bacterial cells. Some methodological aspects concerning preparation of bacterial cell samples for FTIR measurements are also discussed.

  7. Spectroscopic Engineering in the Submillimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Lucia, Frank C.

    2013-06-01

    The field of high-resolution spectroscopy, as represented by the community that supports this meeting, has continued to grow and prosper, in no small part because the field has continued to evolve. Much of this evolution could fall under the rubric, Spectroscopic Engineering. This is especially true in the submillimeter where spectroscopists have taken on much broader roles in fields that have grown out of submillimeter spectroscopy. With specific examples from spectroscopic remote and point sensing, astronomy and atmospheric science, imaging, and process control, opportunities and paths forward for will be considered. Emphasis will be placed on the underlying physics that drives the optimization of applications. Since this is Columbus, at least one complex Hamiltonian will be shown. We will also discuss: What are the opportunities for young people entering the field and how might they be optimized? Is spectroscopy as a tool, less noble than spectroscopy as a science? Is what we do really physics (or even chemistry)? Where does what we do fit into the structure of academia, government, and industry?

  8. Spectroscopic imaging in electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Pennycook, Stephen J; Colliex, C.

    2012-01-01

    In the scanning transmission electron microscope, multiple signals can be simultaneously collected, including the transmitted and scattered electron signals (bright field and annular dark field or Z-contrast images), along with spectroscopic signals such as inelastically scattered electrons and emitted photons. In the last few years, the successful development of aberration correctors for the electron microscope has transformed the field of electron microscopy, opening up new possibilities for correlating structure to functionality. Aberration correction not only allows for enhanced structural resolution with incident probes into the sub-angstrom range, but can also provide greater probe currents to facilitate mapping of intrinsically weak spectroscopic signals at the nanoscale or even the atomic level. In this issue of MRS Bulletin, we illustrate the power of the new generation of electron microscopes with a combination of imaging and spectroscopy. We show the mapping of elemental distributions at atomic resolution and also the mapping of electronic and optical properties at unprecedented spatial resolution, with applications ranging from graphene to plasmonic nanostructures, and oxide interfaces to biology.

  9. Fe and S K-edge XAS determination of iron-sulfur species present in a range of acid sulfate soils: Effects of particle size and concentration on quantitative XANES determinations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgan, Kate E.; Burton, Edward D.; Cook, Perran; Raven, Mark D.; Fitzpatrick, Robert W.; Bush, Richard; Sullivan, Leigh A.; Hocking, Rosalie K.

    2009-11-01

    Acid sulfate soils (ASS) are soils and soft sediments in which sulfuric acid may be produced from iron sulfides or have been produced leaving iron oxyhydroxysulfates in amounts that have a long lasting effect on soil characteristics. If soil material is exposed to rotting vegetation or other reducing material, the Fe-oxyhydroxysulfates can be bacterially reduced to sulfides including disulfides (pyrite and marcasite), and Monosulfidic Black Ooze (MBO) a poorly characterised material known to be a mixture of iron sulfides (especially mackinawite) and organic matter. The chemistry of these environments is strongly affected by Fe and S cycling processes and herein we have sought to identify key differences in environments that occur as a function of Fe and S concentration. In addition to our chemical results, we have found that the effects of particle size on self absorption in natural sediments play an important role in the spectroscopic identification of the relative proportions of different species present.

  10. Sulfur X-Ray Absorption Spectroscopy of Living Mammalian Cells: An Enabling Tool for Sulfur Metabolomics. in Situ Observation of Uptake of Taurine Into MDCK Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Gnida, M.; Sneeden, E.Yu; Whitin, J.C.; Prince, R.C.; Pickering, I.J.; Korbas, M.; George, G.N.

    2009-06-01

    Sulfur is essential for life, with important roles in biological structure and function. However, because of a lack of suitable biophysical techniques, in situ information about sulfur biochemistry is generally difficult to obtain. Here, we present an in situ sulfur X-ray absorption spectroscopy (S-XAS) study of living cell cultures of the mammalian renal epithelial MDCK cell line. A great deal of information is retrieved from a characteristic sulfonate feature in the X-ray absorption spectrum of the cell cultures, which can be related to the amino acid taurine. We followed the time and dose dependence of uptake of taurine into MDCK cell monolayers. The corresponding uptake curves showed a typical saturation behavior with considerable levels of taurine accumulation inside the cells (as much as 40% of total cellular sulfur). We also investigated the polarity of uptake of taurine into MDCK cells, and our results confirmed that uptake in situ is predominantly a function of the basolateral cell surface.

  11. Spectroscopic ellipsometric and Raman spectroscopic investigations of pulsed laser treated glassy carbon surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Csontos, J.; Pápa, Z.; Gárdián, A.; Füle, M.; Budai, J.; Toth, Z.

    2015-05-01

    In this study spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE) and Raman spectroscopy are applied to study structural modification of glassy carbon, due to high intensity laser ablation. Two KrF lasers with different pulse durations (480 fs and 18 ns), an ArF (20 ns), and a frequency doubled Nd:YAG laser (8 ns) were applied to irradiate the surface of glassy carbon targets. The main characteristics of the different laser treatments are compared by introducing the volumetric fluence which takes into account the different absorption values at different wavelengths. SE showed the appearance of a modified layer on the ablated surfaces. In the case of the ns lasers the thickness of this layer was in the range of 10-60 nm, while in the case of fs laser it was less than 20 nm. In all cases the average refractive index (n) of the modified layers slightly decreased compared to the refractive index of glassy carbon. Increase in extinction coefficient (k) was observed in the cases of ArF and fs KrF laser treatment, while the k values decreased significantly in the cases of nanosecond pulse duration KrF and Nd:YAG laser treatments. In the Raman spectra of the ablated areas the characteristic D and G peaks were widened due to appearance of an amorphous phase. Both Raman spectroscopy and SE indicate that the irradiated areas show carbon nanoparticle formation in all cases.

  12. Towards quantitative atmospheric water vapor profiling with differential absorption lidar.

    PubMed

    Dinovitser, Alex; Gunn, Lachlan J; Abbott, Derek

    2015-08-24

    Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL) is a powerful laser-based technique for trace gas profiling of the atmosphere. However, this technique is still under active development requiring precise and accurate wavelength stabilization, as well as accurate spectroscopic parameters of the specific resonance line and the effective absorption cross-section of the system. In this paper we describe a novel master laser system that extends our previous work for robust stabilization to virtually any number of multiple side-line laser wavelengths for the future probing to greater altitudes. In this paper, we also highlight the significance of laser spectral purity on DIAL accuracy, and illustrate a simple re-arrangement of a system for measuring effective absorption cross-section. We present a calibration technique where the laser light is guided to an absorption cell with 33 m path length, and a quantitative number density measurement is then used to obtain the effective absorption cross-section. The same absorption cell is then used for on-line laser stabilization, while microwave beat-frequencies are used to stabilize any number of off-line lasers. We present preliminary results using ∼300 nJ, 1 μs pulses at 3 kHz, with the seed laser operating as a nanojoule transmitter at 822.922 nm, and a receiver consisting of a photomultiplier tube (PMT) coupled to a 356 mm mirror. PMID:26368258

  13. Towards quantitative atmospheric water vapor profiling with differential absorption lidar.

    PubMed

    Dinovitser, Alex; Gunn, Lachlan J; Abbott, Derek

    2015-08-24

    Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL) is a powerful laser-based technique for trace gas profiling of the atmosphere. However, this technique is still under active development requiring precise and accurate wavelength stabilization, as well as accurate spectroscopic parameters of the specific resonance line and the effective absorption cross-section of the system. In this paper we describe a novel master laser system that extends our previous work for robust stabilization to virtually any number of multiple side-line laser wavelengths for the future probing to greater altitudes. In this paper, we also highlight the significance of laser spectral purity on DIAL accuracy, and illustrate a simple re-arrangement of a system for measuring effective absorption cross-section. We present a calibration technique where the laser light is guided to an absorption cell with 33 m path length, and a quantitative number density measurement is then used to obtain the effective absorption cross-section. The same absorption cell is then used for on-line laser stabilization, while microwave beat-frequencies are used to stabilize any number of off-line lasers. We present preliminary results using ∼300 nJ, 1 μs pulses at 3 kHz, with the seed laser operating as a nanojoule transmitter at 822.922 nm, and a receiver consisting of a photomultiplier tube (PMT) coupled to a 356 mm mirror.

  14. Direct UV-spectroscopic measurement of selected ionic-liquid vapors

    SciTech Connect

    Dai, Sheng; Luo, Huimin; Wang, Congmin; Li, Haoran

    2010-01-01

    The hallmark of ionic liquids lies in their negligible vapor pressure. This ultralow vapor pressure makes it difficult to conduct the direct spectroscopic measurement of ionic-liquid vapors. In fact, there have been no electronic spectroscopic data currently available for ionic-liquid vapors. This deficiency significantly hampers the fundamental understanding of the unique molecular structures of ionic liquids. Herein, the UV absorption spectra of eight ionic liquids, such as 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide ([Bmim{sup +}] [Tf{sub 2}N{sup -}]) and 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(perfluoroethylsulfonyl)imide ([Emim{sup +}][beti{sup -}]) in the vapor phase in a distillation-like environment, were measured through a high-temperature spectroscopic technique to fill this knowledge gap. Two strong absorption peaks of the [Bmim{sup +}][Tf{sub 2}N{sup -}] vapor lie at 202 and 211 nm, slightly different from those of the neat [Bmim{sup +}][Tf{sub 2}N{sup -}] thin film and its solution in water. Based on the quantitative determination of the vapor absorption spectra as a function of temperature, the vaporization enthalpies of these ionic liquids vapors were measured and found to be in good agreement with the corresponding literature values. This in situ method opens up a new avenue to study the nature of ionic-liquid vapors and to determine the vaporization enthalpies of ionic liquids.

  15. A Sequential Chemical Extraction and Spectroscopic Assessment of the Potential Bioavailability of Mercury Released From the Inoperative New Idria Mercury Mine, San Benito Co., CA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jew, A. D.; Luong, P. N.; Rytuba, J. J.; Brown, G. E.

    2012-12-01

    The inoperative New Idria mercury mine in San Benito Co., CA, is a potential point source of Hg to the Central Valley of California. To determine the phases and the potential bioavailability of Hg present in stream bed deposits downstream of the mine, sequential chemical extractions (SCEs) targeting Hg-bearing phases and synchrotron-based spectroscopic and imaging techniques were used on sediment samples taken from the acid mine drainage (AMD) system, Hg sorbed in the laboratory to ferrihydrite (synthetic 2-line and natural), and Hg associated with diatom-rich samples. In all field samples examined, both the wet and dry seasons, removal of > 97% of the Hg required 1M KOH or harsher chemical treatments. X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) showed that HgS was the dominant inorganic Hg phase present, with no detectable Hg associated with the ferrihydrite. Uptake and subsequent SCE analysis of Hg to both synthetic and natural ferrihydrite showed that 1M MgCl2 removed ≥ 90% of the total Hg, suggesting that Hg does not sorb strongly to ferrihydrite. This finding is surprising, because in most settings ferrihydrite is considered to be a strong adsorbent of heavy metals. Due to the lack of Hg sorption to ferrihydrite in field samples, another pool for the non-HgS/HgSe fraction in sediments is needed. SEM analysis of the downstream samples showed that regardless of pH, freshwater diatoms were present. To determine if diatoms were the sink for dissolved Hg in this system, SCE analysis on commercially available and diatom-rich field samples from the New Idria site and Harley Gulch (Lake County, CA) were completed. The vast majority of Hg in diatom-rich samples was removed by 1M KOH, which corresponds to the non-HgS/HgSe fraction of the New Idria field samples. Analysis for carbon and nitrogen in the diatom-rich samples showed no detectable nitrogen, indicating little to no organic material was left in the samples. We therefore infer that Hg in the diatoms is contained in

  16. Absorption heat pump system

    DOEpatents

    Grossman, Gershon; Perez-Blanco, Horacio

    1984-01-01

    An improvement in an absorption heat pump cycle is obtained by adding adiabatic absorption and desorption steps to the absorber and desorber of the system. The adiabatic processes make it possible to obtain the highest temperature in the absorber before any heat is removed from it and the lowest temperature in the desorber before heat is added to it, allowing for efficient utilization of the thermodynamic availability of the heat supply stream. The improved system can operate with a larger difference between high and low working fluid concentrations, less circulation losses, and more efficient heat exchange than a conventional system.

  17. Operando spectroscopic analysis of an amorphous cobalt sulfide hydrogen evolution electrocatalyst.

    PubMed

    Kornienko, Nikolay; Resasco, Joaquin; Becknell, Nigel; Jiang, Chang-Ming; Liu, Yi-Sheng; Nie, Kaiqi; Sun, Xuhui; Guo, Jinghua; Leone, Stephen R; Yang, Peidong

    2015-06-17

    The generation of chemical fuel in the form of molecular H2 via the electrolysis of water is regarded to be a promising approach to convert incident solar power into an energy storage medium. Highly efficient and cost-effective catalysts are required to make such an approach practical on a large scale. Recently, a number of amorphous hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) catalysts have emerged that show promise in terms of scalability and reactivity, yet remain poorly understood. In this work, we utilize Raman spectroscopy and X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) as a tool to elucidate the structure and function of an amorphous cobalt sulfide (CoSx) catalyst. Ex situ measurements reveal that the as-deposited CoSx catalyst is composed of small clusters in which the cobalt is surrounded by both sulfur and oxygen. Operando experiments, performed while the CoSx is catalyzing the HER, yield a molecular model in which cobalt is in an octahedral CoS2-like state where the cobalt center is predominantly surrounded by a first shell of sulfur atoms, which, in turn, are preferentially exposed to electrolyte relative to bulk CoS2. We surmise that these CoS2-like clusters form under cathodic polarization and expose a high density of catalytically active sulfur sites for the HER.

  18. Structural differences of oxidized iron-sulfur and nickel-iron cofactors in O2-tolerant and O2-sensitive hydrogenases studied by X-ray absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Sigfridsson, Kajsa G V; Leidel, Nils; Sanganas, Oliver; Chernev, Petko; Lenz, Oliver; Yoon, Ki-Seok; Nishihara, Hirofumi; Parkin, Alison; Armstrong, Fraser A; Dementin, Sébastien; Rousset, Marc; De Lacey, Antonio L; Haumann, Michael

    2015-02-01

    The class of [NiFe]-hydrogenases comprises oxygen-sensitive periplasmic (PH) and oxygen-tolerant membrane-bound (MBH) enzymes. For three PHs and four MBHs from six bacterial species, structural features of the nickel-iron active site of hydrogen turnover and of the iron-sulfur clusters functioning in electron transfer were determined using X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS). Fe-XAS indicated surplus oxidized iron and a lower number of ~2.7 Å Fe-Fe distances plus additional shorter and longer distances in the oxidized MBHs compared to the oxidized PHs. This supported a double-oxidized and modified proximal FeS cluster in all MBHs with an apparent trimer-plus-monomer arrangement of its four iron atoms, in agreement with crystal data showing a [4Fe3S] cluster instead of a [4Fe4S] cubane as in the PHs. Ni-XAS indicated coordination of the nickel by the thiol group sulfurs of four conserved cysteines and at least one iron-oxygen bond in both MBH and PH proteins. Structural differences of the oxidized inactive [NiFe] cofactor of MBHs in the Ni-B state compared to PHs in the Ni-A state included a ~0.05 Å longer Ni-O bond, a two times larger spread of the Ni-S bond lengths, and a ~0.1 Å shorter Ni-Fe distance. The modified proximal [4Fe3S] cluster, weaker binding of the Ni-Fe bridging oxygen species, and an altered localization of reduced oxygen species at the active site may each contribute to O2 tolerance.

  19. X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy Study of the Effect of Rh doping in Sr2IrO4

    PubMed Central

    Sohn, C. H.; Cho, Deok-Yong; Kuo, C.-T.; Sandilands, L. J.; Qi, T. F.; Cao, G.; Noh, T. W.

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the effect of Rh doping in Sr2IrO4 using X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS). We observed appearance of new electron-addition states with increasing Rh concentration (x in Sr2Ir1−xRhxO4) in accordance with the concept of hole doping. The intensity of the hole-induced state is however weak, suggesting weakness of charge transfer (CT) effect and Mott insulating ground states. Also, Ir Jeff = 1/2 upper Hubbard band shifts to lower energy as x increases up to x = 0.23. Combined with optical spectroscopy, these results suggest a hybridisation-related mechanism, in which Rh doping can weaken the (Ir Jeff = 1/2)–(O 2p) orbital hybridisation in the in-planar Rh-O-Ir bond networks. PMID:27025538

  20. X-ray absorption and magnetic circular dichroism studies of Co2FeAl in magnetic tunnel junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Ebke, D.; Kugler, Z.; Thomas, P.; Schebaum, O.; Schafers, M.; Nissen, D.; Schmalhorst, J.; Hutten, A.; Arenholz, E.; Thomas, A.

    2010-01-11

    The bulk magnetic moment and the element specific magnetic moment of Co{sub 2}FeAl thin films were examined as a function of annealing temperature by alternating gradient magnetometer (AGM) and X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS)/X-ray magnetic circular dichroism (XMCD), respectively. A high magnetic moment can be achieved for all annealing temperatures and the predicted bulk and interface magnetic moment of about 5 {tilde A}{sub B} are reached via heating. We will also present tunnel magnetoresistance (TMR) values of up to 153% at room temperature and 260% at 13 K for MgO based magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJs) with Co{sub 2}FeAl and Co-Fe electrodes.