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Sample records for absorption spectroscopic xas

  1. Quantification of rapid environmental redox processes with quick-scanning x-ray absorption spectroscopy (Q-XAS).

    PubMed

    Ginder-Vogel, Matthew; Landrot, Gautier; Fischel, Jason S; Sparks, Donald L

    2009-09-22

    Quantification of the initial rates of environmental reactions at the mineral/water interface is a fundamental prerequisite to determining reaction mechanisms and contaminant transport modeling and predicting environmental risk. Until recently, experimental techniques with adequate time resolution and elemental sensitivity to measure initial rates of the wide variety of environmental reactions were quite limited. Techniques such as electron paramagnetic resonance and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopies suffer from limited elemental specificity and poor sensitivity to inorganic elements, respectively. Ex situ analysis of batch and stirred-flow systems provides high elemental sensitivity; however, their time resolution is inadequate to characterize rapid environmental reactions. Here we apply quick-scanning x-ray absorption spectroscopy (Q-XAS), at sub-second time-scales, to measure the initial oxidation rate of As(III) to As(V) by hydrous manganese(IV) oxide. Using Q-XAS, As(III) and As(V) concentrations were determined every 0.98 s in batch reactions. The initial apparent As(III) depletion rate constants (t < 30 s) measured with Q-XAS are nearly twice as large as rate constants measured with traditional analytical techniques. Our results demonstrate the importance of developing analytical techniques capable of analyzing environmental reactions on the same time scale as they occur. Given the high sensitivity, elemental specificity, and time resolution of Q-XAS, it has many potential applications. They could include measuring not only redox reactions but also dissolution/precipitation reactions, such as the formation and/or reductive dissolution of Fe(III) (hydr)oxides, solid-phase transformations (i.e., formation of layered-double hydroxide minerals), or almost any other reaction occurring in aqueous media that can be measured using x-ray absorption spectroscopy. PMID:19805269

  2. XAS spectroelectrochemistry: reliable measurement of X-ray absorption spectra from redox manipulated solutions at room temperature.

    PubMed

    Best, Stephen P; Levina, Aviva; Glover, Chris; Johannessen, Bernt; Kappen, Peter; Lay, Peter A

    2016-05-01

    The design and operation of a low-volume spectroelectrochemical cell for X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) of solutions at room temperature is described. Fluorescence XAS measurements are obtained from samples contained in the void space of a 50 µL reticulated vitreous carbon (sponge) working electrode. Both rapid electrosynthesis and control of the effects of photoreduction are achieved by control over the flow properties of the solution through the working electrode, where a good balance between the rate of consumption of sample and the minimization of decomposition was obtained by pulsing the flow of the solution by 1-2 µL with duty cycle of ∼3 s while maintaining a small net flow rate (26-100 µL h(-1)). The performance of the cell in terms of control of the redox state of the sample and minimization of the effects of photoreduction was demonstrated by XAS measurements of aqueous solutions of the photosensitive Fe(III) species, [Fe(C2O4)3](3-), together with that of the electrogenerated [Fe(C2O4)3](4-) product. The current response from the cell during the collection of XAS spectra provides an independent measure of the stability of the sample of the measurement. The suitability of the approach for the study of small volumes of mM concentrations of protein samples was demonstrated by the measurement of the oxidized and electrochemically reduced forms of cytochrome c. PMID:27140154

  3. Quick-EXAFS setup at the SuperXAS beamline for in situ X-ray absorption spectroscopy with 10 ms time resolution.

    PubMed

    Müller, Oliver; Nachtegaal, Maarten; Just, Justus; Lützenkirchen-Hecht, Dirk; Frahm, Ronald

    2016-01-01

    The quick-EXAFS (QEXAFS) method adds time resolution to X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) and allows dynamic structural changes to be followed. A completely new QEXAFS setup consisting of monochromator, detectors and data acquisition system is presented, as installed at the SuperXAS bending-magnet beamline at the Swiss Light Source (Paul Scherrer Institute, Switzerland). The monochromator uses Si(111) and Si(311) channel-cut crystals mounted on one crystal stage, and remote exchange allows an energy range from 4.0 keV to 32 keV to be covered. The spectral scan range can be electronically adjusted up to several keV to cover multiple absorption edges in one scan. The determination of the Bragg angle close to the position of the crystals allows high-accuracy measurements. Absorption spectra can be acquired with fast gridded ionization chambers at oscillation frequencies of up to 50 Hz resulting in a time resolution of 10 ms, using both scan directions of each oscillation period. The carefully developed low-noise detector system yields high-quality absorption data. The unique setup allows both state-of-the-art QEXAFS and stable step-scan operation without the need to exchange whole monochromators. The long-term stability of the Bragg angle was investigated and absorption spectra of reference materials as well as of a fast chemical reaction demonstrate the overall capabilities of the new setup. PMID:26698072

  4. Quick-EXAFS setup at the SuperXAS beamline for in situ X-ray absorption spectroscopy with 10 ms time resolution

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Oliver; Nachtegaal, Maarten; Just, Justus; Lützenkirchen-Hecht, Dirk; Frahm, Ronald

    2016-01-01

    The quick-EXAFS (QEXAFS) method adds time resolution to X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) and allows dynamic structural changes to be followed. A completely new QEXAFS setup consisting of monochromator, detectors and data acquisition system is presented, as installed at the SuperXAS bending-magnet beamline at the Swiss Light Source (Paul Scherrer Institute, Switzerland). The monochromator uses Si(111) and Si(311) channel-cut crystals mounted on one crystal stage, and remote exchange allows an energy range from 4.0 keV to 32 keV to be covered. The spectral scan range can be electronically adjusted up to several keV to cover multiple absorption edges in one scan. The determination of the Bragg angle close to the position of the crystals allows high-accuracy measurements. Absorption spectra can be acquired with fast gridded ionization chambers at oscillation frequencies of up to 50 Hz resulting in a time resolution of 10 ms, using both scan directions of each oscillation period. The carefully developed low-noise detector system yields high-quality absorption data. The unique setup allows both state-of-the-art QEXAFS and stable step-scan operation without the need to exchange whole monochromators. The long-term stability of the Bragg angle was investigated and absorption spectra of reference materials as well as of a fast chemical reaction demonstrate the overall capabilities of the new setup. PMID:26698072

  5. Use of X-Ray Absorption Spectroscopy (XAS) to Speciate Manganese in Airborne Particulate Matter from 5 Counties Across the US

    PubMed Central

    Datta, Saugata; Rule, Ana M; Mihalic, Jana N; Chillrud, Steve N; Bostick, Benjamin C.; Ramos-Bonilla, Juan P; Han, Inkyu; Polyak, Lisa M; Geyh, Alison S; Breysse, Patrick N

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to characterize manganese oxidation states and speciation in airborne particulate matter (PM), and describe how these potentially important determinants of PM toxicity vary by location. Ambient PM samples were collected from five counties across the US using a high volume sequential cyclone system that collects PM in dry bulk form segregated into “coarse” and “fine” size fractions. The fine fraction was analyzed for this study. Analyses included total Mn using ICP-MS, and characterization of oxidation states and speciation using X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy (XAS). XAS spectra of all samples and ten standard compounds of Mn were obtained at the National Synchrotron Light Source. XAS data was analyzed using Linear Combination Fitting (LCF). Results of the LCF analysis describe differences in composition between samples. Mn(II) acetate and Mn(II) oxide are present in all samples, while Mn(II) carbonate and Mn(IV) oxide are absent. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first paper to characterize Mn composition of ambient PM and examine differences between urban sites in the US. Differences in oxidation state and composition indicate regional variations in sources and atmospheric chemistry that may help explain differences in health effects identified in epidemiological studies. PMID:22309075

  6. Spectroscopic determination of the bandgap crossover composition in MBE-grown AlxGa1-xAs

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Fluegel, Brian; Alberi, Kirstin; Reno, John; Mascarenhas, Angelo

    2015-03-12

    The aluminum concentration dependence of the energies of the direct and indirect bandgaps arising from the Γ and X conduction bands are measured at 1.7 K in the semiconductor alloy AlxGa1-xAs. The composition at which the bands cross is determined from photoluminescence of molecular-beam epitaxy samples grown very close to crossover. The use of resonant laser excitation and the improved sample linewidth allows precise determination of the bound exciton transition energies. Moreover, photoluminescence excitation spectroscopy is used to measure the binding energies of the donor-bound excitons and the Γ free exciton binding energy.

  7. In-situ X-Ray Absorption Spectroscopy (XAS) Investigation of a Bifunctional Manganese Oxide Catalyst with High Activity for Electrochemical Water Oxidation and Oxygen Reduction

    PubMed Central

    Benck, Jesse D.; Gul, Sheraz; Webb, Samuel M.; Yachandra, Vittal K.; Yano, Junko; Jaramillo, Thomas F.

    2013-01-01

    In-situ x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) is a powerful technique that can be applied to electrochemical systems, with the ability to elucidate the chemical nature of electrocatalysts under reaction conditions. In this study, we perform in-situ XAS measurements on a bifunctional manganese oxide (MnOx) catalyst with high electrochemical activity for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) and the oxygen evolution reaction (OER). Using x-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) and extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS), we find that exposure to an ORR-relevant potential of 0.7 V vs. RHE produces a disordered Mn3II,III,IIIO4 phase with negligible contributions from other phases. After the potential is increased to a highly anodic value of 1.8 V vs. RHE, relevant to the OER, we observe an oxidation of approximately 80% of the catalytic thin film to form a mixed MnIII,IV oxide, while the remaining 20% of the film consists of a less oxidized phase, likely corresponding to unchanged Mn3II,III,IIIO4. XAS and electrochemical characterization of two thin film catalysts with different MnOx thicknesses reveals no significant influence of thickness on the measured oxidation states, at either ORR or OER potentials, but demonstrates that the OER activity scales with film thickness. This result suggests that the films have porous structure, which does not restrict electrocatalysis to the top geometric layer of the film. As the portion of the catalyst film that is most likely to be oxidized at the high potentials necessary for the OER is that which is closest to the electrolyte interface, we hypothesize that the MnIII,IV oxide, rather than Mn3II,III,IIIO4, is the phase pertinent to the observed OER activity. PMID:23758050

  8. Ultraviolet-Absorption Spectroscopic Biofilm Monitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Micheels, Ronald H.

    2004-01-01

    An ultraviolet-absorption spectrometer system has been developed as a prototype instrument to be used in continuous, real-time monitoring to detect the growth of biofilms. Such monitoring is desirable because biofilms are often harmful. For example, biofilms in potable-water and hydroponic systems act as both sources of pathogenic bacteria that resist biocides and as a mechanism for deterioration (including corrosion) of pipes. Biofilms formed from several types of hazardous bacteria can thrive in both plant-growth solutions and low-nutrient media like distilled water. Biofilms can also form in condensate tanks in air-conditioning systems and in industrial heat exchangers. At present, bacteria in potable-water and plant-growth systems aboard the space shuttle (and previously on the Mir space station) are monitored by culture-plate counting, which entails an incubation period of 24 to 48 hours for each sample. At present, there are no commercially available instruments for continuous monitoring of biofilms in terrestrial or spaceborne settings.

  9. Variable angle of incidence spectroscopic ellipsometry Application to GaAs-Al(x)Ga(1-x)As multiple heterostructures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snyder, Paul G.; Rost, Martin C.; Bu-Abbud, George H.; Woollam, John A.; Alterovitz, Samuel A.

    1986-01-01

    The sensitivity of spectroscopic ellipsometry data to multilayer model parameters is shown to be a strong function of the angle of incidence. A quantitative study of sensitivity versus angle of incidence is performed for a GaAs-Al(x)Ga(1-x)As-GaAs substrate structure, showing that maximum sensitivity to layer thicknesses and AlGaAs composition occurs near the wavelength-dependent principal angle. These results are verified by experimental measurements on two molecular-beam epitaxy grown samples.

  10. Effect of Al mole fraction on decay profile of photoinduced IR absorption and the determination of the critical value of xc for AlxGa1-xAs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wubao B.; Alfano, Robert R.; Szmyd, David M.; Nozik, Arthur J.

    1992-10-01

    The hot carrier dynamics in the satellite X valley in AlxGa1-xAs was measured by femtosecond pump-probe infrared absorption spectroscopy. The dynamics of the X valley electrons for samples with x = 0.439. The critical value of xc corresponding to the direct-to-indirect band gap transition for AlxGa1-xAs was determined to be 0.412 +/- 0.006.

  11. Low Absorption Vitreous Carbon Reactors for Operando XAS: A Case Study on Cu/Zeolites for Selective Catalytic Reduction of NOx by NH3

    SciTech Connect

    Kispersky, Vincent F.; Kropf, A. Jeremy; Ribeiro, Fabio H.; Miller, Jeffrey T.

    2012-01-01

    We describe the use of vitreous carbon as an improved reactor material for an operando X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) plug-flow reactor. These tubes significantly broaden the operating range for operando experiments. Using selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of NOx by NH₃ on Cu/Zeolites (SSZ-13, SAPO-34 and ZSM-5) as an example reaction, we illustrate the high-quality XAS data achievable with these reactors. The operando experiments showed that in Standard SCR conditions of 300 ppm NO, 300 ppm NH₃, 5% O₂, 5% H₂O, 5% CO₂ and balance He at 200 °C, the Cu was a mixture of Cu(I) and Cu(II) oxidation states. XANES and EXAFS fitting found the percent of Cu(I) to be 15%, 45% and 65% for SSZ-13, SAPO-34 and ZSM-5, respectively. For Standard SCR, the catalytic rates per mole of Cu for Cu/SSZ-13 and Cu/SAPO-34 were about one third of the rate per mole of Cu on Cu/ZSM-5. Based on the apparent lack of correlation of rate with the presence of Cu(I), we propose that the reaction occurs via a redox cycle of Cu(I) and Cu(II). Cu(I) was not found in in situSCR experiments on Cu/Zeolites under the same conditions, demonstrating a possible pitfall of in situ measurements. A Cu/SiO₂ catalyst, reduced in H₂ at 300 °C, was also used to demonstrate the reactor's operando capabilities using a bending magnet beamline. Analysis of the EXAFS data showed the Cu/SiO₂ catalyst to be in a partially reduced Cu metal–Cu(I) state. In addition to improvements in data quality, the reactors are superior in temperature, stability, strength and ease of use compared to previously proposed borosilicate glass, polyimide tubing, beryllium and capillary reactors. The solid carbon tubes are non-porous, machinable, can be operated at high pressure (tested at 25 bar), are inert, have high material purity and high X-ray transmittance.

  12. LEAD SORPTION ON RUTHENIUM OXIDE: A MACROSCOPIC AND SPECTROSCOPIC STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The sorption and desorption of Pb on RuO2 xH2O were examined kinetically and thermodynamically via spectroscopic and macroscopic investigations. X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) was employed to determine the sorption mechanism with regard to identity of nearest atomic neighbo...

  13. X-ray absorption spectroscopic studies of mononuclear non-heme iron enzymes

    SciTech Connect

    Westre, T.E.

    1996-01-01

    Fe-K-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) has been used to investigate the electronic and geometric structure of the iron active site in non-heme iron enzymes. A new theoretical extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) analysis approach, called GNXAS, has been tested on data for iron model complexes to evaluate the utility and reliability of this new technique, especially with respect to the effects of multiple-scattering. In addition, a detailed analysis of the 1s{yields}3d pre-edge feature has been developed as a tool for investigating the oxidation state, spin state, and geometry of iron sites. Edge and EXAFS analyses have then been applied to the study of non-heme iron enzyme active sites.

  14. X-ray Absorption and Emission Spectroscopic Studies of [L2Fe2S2](n) Model Complexes: Implications for the Experimental Evaluation of Redox States in Iron-Sulfur Clusters.

    PubMed

    Kowalska, Joanna K; Hahn, Anselm W; Albers, Antonia; Schiewer, Christine E; Bjornsson, Ragnar; Lima, Frederico A; Meyer, Franc; DeBeer, Serena

    2016-05-01

    Herein, a systematic study of [L2Fe2S2](n) model complexes (where L = bis(benzimidazolato) and n = 2-, 3-, 4-) has been carried out using iron and sulfur K-edge X-ray absorption (XAS) and iron Kβ and valence-to-core X-ray emission spectroscopies (XES). These data are used as a test set to evaluate the relative strengths and weaknesses of X-ray core level spectroscopies in assessing redox changes in iron-sulfur clusters. The results are correlated to density functional theory (DFT) calculations of the spectra in order to further support the quantitative information that can be extracted from the experimental data. It is demonstrated that due to canceling effects of covalency and spin state, the information that can be extracted from Fe Kβ XES mainlines is limited. However, a careful analysis of the Fe K-edge XAS data shows that localized valence vs delocalized valence species may be differentiated on the basis of the pre-edge and K-edge energies. These findings are then applied to existing literature Fe K-edge XAS data on the iron protein, P-cluster, and FeMoco sites of nitrogenase. The ability to assess the extent of delocalization in the iron protein vs the P-cluster is highlighted. In addition, possible charge states for FeMoco on the basis of Fe K-edge XAS data are discussed. This study provides an important reference for future X-ray spectroscopic studies of iron-sulfur clusters. PMID:27097289

  15. Absorption and emission spectroscopic characterisation of 8-amino-riboflavin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tyagi, A.; Zirak, P.; Penzkofer, A.; Mathes, T.; Hegemann, P.; Mack, M.; Ghisla, S.

    2009-10-01

    The flavin dye 8-amino-8-demethyl- D-riboflavin (AF) in the solvents water, DMSO, methanol, and chloroform/DMSO was studied by absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy. The first absorption band is red-shifted compared to riboflavin, and blue-shifted compared to roseoflavin (8-dimethylamino-8-demethyl-D-riboflavin). The fluorescence quantum yield of AF in the studied solvents varies between 20% and 50%. The fluorescence lifetimes were found to be in the 2-5 ns range. AF is well soluble in DMSO, weakly soluble in water and methanol, and practically insoluble in chloroform. The limited solubility causes AF aggregation, which was seen in differences between measured absorption spectra and fluorescence excitation spectra. Light scattering in the dye absorption region is discussed and approximate absorption cross-section spectra are determined from the combined measurement of transmission and fluorescence excitation spectra. The photo-stability of AF was studied by prolonged light exposure. The photo-degradation routes of AF are discussed.

  16. Integrated approaches of x-ray absorption spectroscopic and electron microscopic techniques on zinc speciation and characterization in a final sewage sludge product.

    PubMed

    Kim, Bojeong; Levard, Clément; Murayama, Mitsuhiro; Brown, Gordon E; Hochella, Michael F

    2014-05-01

    Integration of complementary techniques can be powerful for the investigation of metal speciation and characterization in complex and heterogeneous environmental samples, such as sewage sludge products. In the present study, we combined analytical transmission electron microscopy (TEM)-based techniques with X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) to identify and characterize nanocrystalline zinc sulfide (ZnS), considered to be the dominant Zn-containing phase in the final stage of sewage sludge material of a full-scale municipal wastewater treatment plant. We also developed sample preparation procedures to preserve the organic and sulfur-rich nature of sewage sludge matrices for microscopic and spectroscopic analyses. Analytical TEM results indicate individual ZnS nanocrystals to be in the size range of 2.5 to 7.5 nm in diameter, forming aggregates of a few hundred nanometers. Observed lattice spacings match sphalerite. The ratio of S to Zn for the ZnS nanocrystals is estimated to be 1.4, suggesting that S is present in excess. The XAS results on the Zn speciation in the bulk sludge material also support the TEM observation that approximately 80% of the total Zn has the local structure of a 3-nm ZnS nanoparticle reference material. Because sewage sludge is frequently used as a soil amendment on agricultural lands, future studies that investigate the oxidative dissolution rate of ZnS nanoparticles as a function of size and aggregation state and the change of Zn speciation during post sludge-processing and soil residency are warranted to help determine the bioavailability of sludge-born Zn in the soil environment. PMID:25602819

  17. Spectroscopic study of low-temperature hydrogen absorption in palladium

    SciTech Connect

    Ienaga, K. Takata, H.; Onishi, Y.; Inagaki, Y.; Kawae, T.; Tsujii, H.; Kimura, T.

    2015-01-12

    We report real-time detection of hydrogen (H) absorption in metallic palladium (Pd) nano-contacts immersed in liquid H{sub 2} using inelastic electron spectroscopy (IES). After introduction of liquid H{sub 2}, the spectra exhibit the time evolution from the pure Pd to the Pd hydride, indicating that H atoms are absorbed in Pd nano-contacts even at the temperature where the thermal process is not expected. The IES time and bias voltage dependences show that H absorption develops by applying bias voltage 30 ∼ 50 mV, which can be explained by quantum tunneling. The results represent that IES is a powerful method to study the kinetics of high density H on solid surface.

  18. Photoelectron, nuclear gamma-ray and infrared absorption spectroscopic studies of neptunium in sodium silicate glass

    SciTech Connect

    Veal, B.W.; Carnall, W.T.; Dunlap, B.D.; Mitchell, A.W.; Lam, D.J.

    1986-04-01

    The valence state of neptunium ions in sodium silicate glasses prepared under reducing and oxidizing conditions has been investigated by the x-ray photoelectron, Moessbauer and optical absorption spectroscopic techniques. Results indicate that the Np ions are tetravalent in glasses prepared under reducing conditions and pentavalent in glasses prepared under oxidizing conditions.

  19. Joint X-ray absorption and far infrared spectroscopic studies on zeolite surfaces exchange and siting of copper ions and their redox behavior during NO decomposition in zeolite ZSM-5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esemann, H.; Förster, H.

    1999-05-01

    Far infrared (FIR) and X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) assisted by computer modelling were tested for their aptitude to study ion exchange, cation siting, NO adsorption and redox behavior of CuZSM-5.

  20. Calibration of Energy-Specific TDDFT for Modeling K-edge XAS Spectra of Light Elements.

    PubMed

    Lestrange, Patrick J; Nguyen, Phu D; Li, Xiaosong

    2015-07-14

    X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) has become a powerful technique in chemical physics, because of advances in synchrotron technology that have greatly improved its temporal and spectroscopic resolution. Our recent work on energy-specific time-dependent density functional theory (ES-TDDFT) allows for the direct calculation of excitation energies in any region of the absorption spectrum, from UV-vis to X-ray. However, the ability of different density functional theories to model X-ray absorption spectra (XAS) of light elements has not yet been verified for ES-TDDFT. This work is a calibration of the ability of existing DFT kernels and basis sets to reproduce experimental K-edge excitation energies. Results were compared against 30 different transitions from gas-phase experiments. We focus on six commonly used density functionals (BHandHLYP, B3LYP, PBE1PBE, BP86, HSE06, LC-ωPBE) and various triple-ζ basis sets. The effects of core and diffuse functions are also investigated. PMID:26575736

  1. X-Ray Absorption Spectroscopy of Dinuclear Metallohydrolases

    PubMed Central

    Tierney, David L.; Schenk, Gerhard

    2014-01-01

    In this mini-review, we briefly discuss the physical origin of x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) before illustrating its application using dinuclear metallohydrolases as exemplary systems. The systems we have selected for illustrative purposes present a challenging problem for XAS, one that is ideal to demonstrate the potential of this methodology for structure/function studies of metalloenzymes in general. When the metal ion is redox active, XAS provides a sensitive measure of oxidation-state-dependent differences. When the metal ion is zinc, XAS is the only spectroscopic method that will provide easily accessible structural information in solution. In the case of heterodimetallic sites, XAS has the unique ability to interrogate each metal site independently in the same sample. One of the strongest advantages of XAS is its ability to examine metal ion site structures with crystallographic precision, without the need for a crystal. This is key for studying flexible metal ion sites, such as those described in the selected examples, because it allows one to monitor structural changes that occur during substrate turnover. PMID:25229134

  2. Absorption spectroscopic study of EDA complexes of [70] fullerene with a series of methyl benzenes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharya, Sumanta; Nayak, Sandip K.; Chattopadhyay, Subrata K.; Banerjee, Manas; Mukherjee, Asok K.

    2001-02-01

    [70]Fullerene has been shown to form 1:1 molecular complexes with toluene, p-xylene, m-xylene, 1,2,4,5-tetramethyl benzene (durene) and pentamethyl benzene (PMB) in CCl 4 medium by absorption spectroscopic method. Isosbestic points have been detected in case of complexes with PMB and durene. Charge transfer absorption band could not be detected but the intensity of the broad absorption band of C 70 in CCl 4 decreases systematically with increase in the concentration of the added methylbenzenes. From this trend the formation constants ( Kc) of the complexes have been determined at three different wavelengths. The constancy of Kc with respect to change in the wavelength of measurement supports the view that complex of a single stoichiometry (1:1) is formed in each case.

  3. The Time-resolved and Extreme-conditions XAS (TEXAS) facility at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility: the energy-dispersive X-ray absorption spectroscopy beamline ID24.

    PubMed

    Pascarelli, S; Mathon, O; Mairs, T; Kantor, I; Agostini, G; Strohm, C; Pasternak, S; Perrin, F; Berruyer, G; Chappelet, P; Clavel, C; Dominguez, M C

    2016-01-01

    The European Synchrotron Radiation Facility has recently made available to the user community a facility totally dedicated to Time-resolved and Extreme-conditions X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy--TEXAS. Based on an upgrade of the former energy-dispersive XAS beamline ID24, it provides a unique experimental tool combining unprecedented brilliance (up to 10(14) photons s(-1) on a 4 µm × 4 µm FWHM spot) and detection speed for a full EXAFS spectrum (100 ps per spectrum). The science mission includes studies of processes down to the nanosecond timescale, and investigations of matter at extreme pressure (500 GPa), temperature (10000 K) and magnetic field (30 T). The core activities of the beamline are centered on new experiments dedicated to the investigation of extreme states of matter that can be maintained only for very short periods of time. Here the infrastructure, optical scheme, detection systems and sample environments used to enable the mission-critical performance are described, and examples of first results on the investigation of the electronic and local structure in melts at pressure and temperature conditions relevant to the Earth's interior and in laser-shocked matter are given. PMID:26698085

  4. Blueprint XAS: a Matlab-based toolbox for the fitting and analysis of XAS spectra.

    PubMed

    Delgado-Jaime, Mario Ulises; Mewis, Craig Philip; Kennepohl, Pierre

    2010-01-01

    Blueprint XAS is a new Matlab-based program developed to fit and analyse X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) data, most specifically in the near-edge region of the spectrum. The program is based on a methodology that introduces a novel background model into the complete fit model and that is capable of generating any number of independent fits with minimal introduction of user bias [Delgado-Jaime & Kennepohl (2010), J. Synchrotron Rad. 17, 119-128]. The functions and settings on the five panels of its graphical user interface are designed to suit the needs of near-edge XAS data analyzers. A batch function allows for the setting of multiple jobs to be run with Matlab in the background. A unique statistics panel allows the user to analyse a family of independent fits, to evaluate fit models and to draw statistically supported conclusions. The version introduced here (v0.2) is currently a toolbox for Matlab. Future stand-alone versions of the program will also incorporate several other new features to create a full package of tools for XAS data processing. PMID:20029122

  5. Combined non-destructive XRF and SR-XAS study of archaeological artefacts.

    PubMed

    Bardelli, Fabrizio; Barone, Germana; Crupi, Vincenza; Longo, Francesca; Majolino, Domenico; Mazzoleni, Paolo; Venuti, Valentina

    2011-03-01

    We report on a non-destructive study of Sicilian ceramic fragments of cultural heritage interest, classified as "proto-majolica" pottery and dating back to the twelfth to thirteen centuries AD. The analytical approach used is based on the employment of two totally non-invasive spectroscopic techniques: X-ray fluorescence (XRF), using a portable energy-dispersive XRF analyser, and X-ray absorption spectroscopy, using synchrotron radiation as a probe (SR-XAS). XRF measurements allowed us to collect elemental and spatially resolved information on major and minor constituents of the decorated coating of archaeological pottery fragments, so providing preliminary results on the main components characterizing the surface. In particular, we assigned to Fe and Mn the role of key elements of the colouring agent. With the aim of obtaining more detailed information, we performed SR-XAS measurements at the Fe and Mn K-edges at the Italian BM08 beamline at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (Grenoble, France). The experimental data were analysed by applying principal component analysis and least-squares fitting to the near-edge part of the spectra (X-ray absorption near-edge structure) to determine the samples' speciation. From the overall results, umber, a class of brownish pigments characterized by a mixture of hydrated iron and manganese oxides, has been ascribed as a pigmenting agent. PMID:21311873

  6. X-ray absorption spectroscopic evidence for the complexation of Hg(II) by reduced sulfur in soil humic substances

    SciTech Connect

    Xia, K.; Skyllberg, U.L.; Bleam, W.F.; Helmke, P.A.; Bloom, P.R.; Nater, E.A.

    1999-01-15

    Analysis of Hg(II) complexed by a soil humic acid (HA) using synchrotron-based X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) revealed the importance of reduces sulfur functional groups (thiol (R-SH) and disulfide (R-SS-R)/disulfane (R-SSH)) in humic substances in the complexation of Hg(II). A two-coordinate binding environment with one oxygen atom and one sulfur atom at distances of 2.02 and 2.38 {angstrom}, respectively, was found in the first coordination shell of Hg(II) complexed by humic acid. Model calculations show that a second coordination sphere could contain one carbon atom and a second sulfur atom at 2.78 and 2.93 {angstrom}, respectively. This suggests that in addition to thiol S, disulfide/disulfane S may be involved with the complexation of Hg(II) in soil organic matter. The appearance of carbon atom in the second coordination shell suggests that one O-containing ligand such as carboxyl and phenol ligands rather than H{sub 2}O molecule is bound to the Hg(II). The involvement of oxygen ligand in addition to the reduced S ligands in the complexation of Hg(II) is due to the low density of reduced S ligands in humic substances. The XAS results from this experiment provided direct molecular level evidence for the preference of reduced S functional groups over oxygen ligands by Hg(II) in the complexation with humic substances.

  7. X-Ray Absorption Spectroscopic And Theoretical Studies on (L)(2)[Cu-2(S-2)N](2+) Complexes: Disulfide Versus Disulfide(Center Dot 1-) Bonding

    SciTech Connect

    Sarangi, R.; York, J.T.; Helton, M.E.; Fujisawa, K.; Karlin, K.D.; Tolman, W.B.; Hodgson, K.O.; Hedman, B.; Solomon, E.I.; /Stanford U., Chem. Dept. /SLAC, SSRL /Minnesota U. /Johns Hopkins U. /Tsukuba U.

    2009-04-30

    Cu K-, Cu L-, and S K-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopic (XAS) data have been combined with density functional theory (DFT) calculations on [{l_brace}(TMPA)Cu{r_brace}{sub 2}S{sub 2}](ClO{sub 4}){sub 2} (1), [{l_brace}Cu[HB(3,5-Pr{sub 2}{sup i}pz){sub 3}]{r_brace}{sub 2}(S{sub 2})] (2), and [{l_brace}(TMEDA)Cu{r_brace}{sub 2}(S{sub 2}){sub 2}](OTf){sub 2} (3) to obtain a quantitative description of their ground state wavefunctions. The Cu L-edge intensities give 63 and 37% Cu d-character in the ground state of 1 and 2, respectively, whereas the S K-pre-edge intensities reflect 20 and 48% S character in their ground states, respetively. These data indicate a more than 2-fold increase in the total disulfide bonding character in 2 relative to 1. The increase in the number of Cu?S bonds in 2 ({mu}-{eta}{sup 2}:{eta}{sup 2} S{sub 2}{sup 2-} bridge) compared to 1 ({mu}-{eta}{sup 1}:{eta}{sup 1} S{sub 2}{sup 2-} bridge) dominantly determines the large increase in covalency and Cu-disulfide bond strength in 2. Cu K- and L- and S K-pre-edge energy positions directly demonstrate the Cu{sup II}/(S{sub 2}{sup -}){sub 2} nature of 3. The two disulfide({center_dot}1?)'s in 3 undergo strong bonding interactions that destabilize the resultant filled antibonding {pi}* orbitals of the (S{sub 2}{sup -}){sub 2} fragment relative to the Cu 3d levels. This leads to an inverted bonding scheme in 3 with dominantly ligand-based holes in its ground state, consistent with its description as a dicopper(II)-bis-disulfide({center_dot}1?) complex.

  8. X-ray absorption spectroscopic studies of the active sites of nickel- and copper-containing metalloproteins

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, G.O.

    1993-06-01

    X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) is a useful tool for obtaining structural and chemical information about the active sites of metalloproteins and metalloenzymes. Information may be obtained from both the edge region and the extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) or post-edge region of the K-edge X-ray absorption spectrum of a metal center in a compound. The edge contains information about the valence electronic structure of the atom that absorbs the X-rays. It is possible in some systems to infer the redox state of the metal atom in question, as well as the geometry and nature of ligands connected to it, from the features in the edge in a straightforward manner. The EXAFS modulations, being produced by the backscattering of the ejected photoelectron from the atoms surrounding the metal atom, provide, when analyzed, information about the number and type of neighbouring atoms, and the distances at which they occur. In this thesis, analysis of both the edge and EXAFS regions has been used to gain information about the active sites of various metalloproteins. The metalloproteins studied were plastocyanin (Pc), laccase and nickel carbon monoxide dehydrogenase (Ni CODH). Studies of Cu(I)-imidazole compounds, related to the protein hemocyanin, are also reported here.

  9. X-ray absorption spectroscopic studies on novel microporous copper containing catalytic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhargava, Suresh K.; Akolekar, Deepak B.; Foran, Garry

    2006-11-01

    Novel copper metal modified microporous aluminosilicate and aluminophosphate catalysts with the high phase purity were synthesized and characterized. CuK-edge XAS measurements were carried out over a series of copper containing SAPO-34 and ZSM-5 catalysts. EXAFS technique was used to obtain specific climacteric information related to the copper atomic distances, coordination and near neighbour environments. EXAFS studies indicated the presence of different of Cu species on ZSM-5/SAPO34 catalysts.

  10. Near-infrared diode laser based spectroscopic detection of ammonia: a comparative study of photoacoustic and direct optical absorption methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bozoki, Zoltan; Mohacsi, Arpad; Szabo, Gabor; Bor, Zsolt; Erdelyi, Miklos; Chen, Weidong; Tittel, Frank K.

    2002-01-01

    A photoacoustic spectroscopic (PAS) and a direct optical absorption spectroscopic (OAS) gas sensor, both using continuous-wave room-temperature diode lasers operating at 1531.8 nm, were compared on the basis of ammonia detection. Excellent linear correlation between the detector signals of the two systems was found. Although the physical properties and the mode of operation of both sensors were significantly different, their performances were found to be remarkably similar, with a sub-ppm level minimum detectable concentration of ammonia and a fast response time in the range of a few minutes.

  11. X-Ray Absorption Spectroscopic Characterization of the Molybdenum Site of 'Escherichia Coli' Dimethyl Sulfoxide Reductase

    SciTech Connect

    George, G.N.; Doonan, C.J.; Rothery, R.A.; Boroumand, N.; Weiner, J.H.; /Saskatchewan U. /Alberta U.

    2007-07-09

    Structural studies of dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) reductases were hampered by modification of the active site during purification. We report an X-ray absorption spectroscopic analysis of the molybdenum active site of Escherichia coli DMSO reductase contained within its native membranes. The enzyme in these preparations is expected to be very close to the form found in vivo. The oxidized active site was found to have four Mo-S ligands at 2.43 angstroms, one Mo=O at 1.71 angstroms, and a longer Mo-O at 1.90 angstroms. We conclude that the oxidized enzyme is a monooxomolybdenum(VI) species coordinated by two molybdopterin dithiolenes and a serine. The bond lengths determined for E. coli DMSO reductase are very similar to those determined for the well-characterized Rhodobacter sphaeroides DMSO reductase, suggesting similar active site structures for the two enzymes. Furthermore, our results suggest that the form found in vivo is the monooxobis(molybdopterin) species.

  12. Analyzing cell structure and dynamics with confocal light scattering and absorption spectroscopic microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Le; Vitkin, Edward; Fang, Hui; Zaman, Munir M.; Andersson, Charlotte; Salahuddin, Saira; Modell, Mark D.; Freedman, Steven D.; Hanlon, Eugene B.; Itzkan, Irving; Perelman, Lev T.

    2007-02-01

    We recently developed a new microscopic optical technique capable of noninvasive analysis of cell structure and cell dynamics on the submicron scale [1]. It combines confocal microscopy, a well-established high-resolution microscopic technique, with light scattering spectroscopy (LSS) and is called confocal light absorption and scattering spectroscopic (CLASS) microscopy. CLASS microscopy requires no exogenous labels and is capable of imaging and continuously monitoring individual viable cells, enabling the observation of cell and organelle functioning at scales on the order of 100 nm. To test the ability of CLASS microscopy to monitor cellular dynamics in vivo we performed experiments with human bronchial epithelial cells treated with DHA and undergoing apoptosis. The treated and untreated cells show not only clear differences in organelle spatial distribution but time sequencing experiments on a single cell show disappearance of certain types of organelles and change of the nuclear shape and density with the progression of apoptosis. In summary, CLASS microscopy provides an insight into metabolic processes within the cell and opens doors for the noninvasive real-time assessment of cellular dynamics. Noninvasive monitoring of cellular dynamics with CLASS microscopy can be used for a real-time dosimetry in a wide variety of medical and environmental applications that have no immediate observable outcome, such as photodynamic therapy, drug screening, and monitoring of toxins.

  13. Catalog of Narrow Mg II Absorption Lines in the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhi-Fu; Gu, Qiu-Sheng; Chen, Yan-Mei

    2015-12-01

    Using the Data Release 9 Quasar spectra from the Baryonic Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey, which does not include quasar spectra from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 7, we detect narrow Mg ii λλ2796, 2803 absorption doublets in the spectral data redward of 1250 Å (quasar rest frame) until the red wing of the Mg ii λ2800 emission line. Our survey is limited to quasar spectra with a median signal-to-noise ratio < {{S}}/{{N}}> ≥slant 4 pixel-1 in the surveyed spectral region, resulting in a sample that contains 43,260 quasars. We have detected a total of 18,598 Mg ii absorption doublets with 0.2933 ≤ zabs ≤ 2.6529. About 75% of absorbers have an equivalent width at rest frame of {W}rλ 2796≥slant 1 \\mathringA . About 75% of absorbers have doublet ratios ({DR}={W}rλ 2796/{W}rλ 2803) in the range of 1 ≤ DR ≤ 2, and about 3.2% lie outside the range of 1 - σDR ≤ DR ≤ 2 + σDR. We characterize the detection false positives/negatives by the frequency of detected Mg ii absorption doublets in the limits of the S/N of the spectral data. The S/N = 4.5 limit is assigned a completeness fraction of 53% and tends to be complete when the S/N is greater than 4.5. The redshift number densities of all of the detected Mg ii absorbers moderately increase from z ≈ 0.4 to z ≈ 1.5, which parallels the evolution of the cosmic star formation rate density. Limiting our investigation to those quasars whose emission redshift can be determined from narrow emission lines, the relative velocities (β) of Mg ii absorbers have a complex distribution which probably consists of three classes of Mg ii absorbers: (1) cosmologically intervening absorbers; (2) environmental absorbers that reside within the quasar host galaxies or galaxy clusters; (3) quasar outflow absorbers. After subtracting contributions from cosmologically intervening absorbers and environmental absorbers, the β distribution of the Mg iiabsorbers might mainly be contributed by the quasar outflow

  14. Confocal Light Absorption and Scattering Spectroscopic (CLASS) imaging: From cancer detection to sub-cellular function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Le

    Light scattering spectroscopy (LSS), an optical technique that relates the spectroscopic properties of light elastically scattered by small particles to their size, refractive index and shape, has been recently successfully employed for sensing morphological and biochemical properties of epithelial tissues and cells in vivo. LSS does not require exogenous markers, is non-invasive, and, due to its multispectral nature, can sense biological structures well beyond the diffraction limit. All that makes LSS be a very good candidate to be used both in clinical medicine for in vivo detection of disease and in cell biology to monitor cell function on the organelle scale. Recently we developed two LSS-based imaging modalities: clinical Polarized LSS (PLSS) Endoscopic Technique for locating early pre-cancerous changes in GI tract and Confocal Light Absorption and Scattering Spectroscopic (CLASS) Microscopy for studying cells in vivo without exogenous markers. One important application of the clinical PLSS endoscopic instrument, a noncontact scanning imaging device compatible with the standard clinical endoscopes and capable of detecting dysplastic changes, is to serve as a guide for biopsy in Barrett's esophagus (BE). The instrument detects parallel and perpendicular components of the polarized light, backscattered from epithelial tissues, and determines characteristics of epithelial nuclei from the residual spectra. It also can find tissue oxygenation, hemoglobin content and other properties from the diffuse light component. By rapidly scanning esophagus the PLSS endoscopic instrument makes sure the entire BE portion is scanned and examined for the presence of dysplasia. CLASS microscopy, on the other hand, combines principles of light scattering spectroscopy (LSS) with confocal microscopy. Its main purpose is to image cells on organelle scale in vivo without the use of exogenous labels which may affect the cell function. The confocal geometry selects specific region and

  15. Theoretical modeling of the spectroscopic absorption properties of luciferin and oxyluciferin: A critical comparison with recent experimental studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anselmi, Massimiliano; Marocchi, Simone; Aschi, Massimiliano; Amadei, Andrea

    2012-01-01

    Firefly luciferin and its oxidated form, oxyluciferin, are two heterocyclic compounds involved in the enzymatic reaction, catalyzed by redox proteins called luciferases, which provides the bioluminescence in a wide group of arthropods. Whereas the electronic absorption spectra of D-luciferin in water at different pHs are known since 1960s, only recently reliable experimental electronic spectra of oxyluciferin have become available. In addition oxyluciferin is involved in a triple chemical equilibria (deprotonation of the two hydroxyl groups and keto-enol tautomerism of the 4-hydroxythiazole ring), that obligates to select during an experiment a predominant species, tuning pH or solvent polarity besides introducing chemical modifications. In this study we report the absorption spectra of luciferin and oxyluciferin in each principal chemical form, calculated by means of perturbed matrix method (PMM), which allowed us to successfully introduce the effect of the solvent on the spectroscopic absorption properties, and compare the result with available experimental data.

  16. XAS Spectroscopy, Sulfur, and the Brew Within Blood Cells from Ascidia ceratodes

    PubMed Central

    Frank, Patrick; Hedman, Britt; Hodgson, Keith O.

    2014-01-01

    We report the first use of K-edge x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) as a direct spectroscopic probe of pH and cytosolic emf within living cells. A new accuracy metric of model-based fits to K-edge spectra is further developed. Sulfur functional groups in three collections of living blood cells and one sample of cleared blood plasma from the tunicate Ascidia ceratodes were speciated using K-edge XAS. Cysteine and cystine, the preferred thiol-disulfide model, averaged about 12% of total sulfur. Sulfate monoesters and cyclic diesters unexpectedly constituted 36% of blood cell sulfur. Soluble sulfate averaged about 25% across the three blood cell samples, while the ratio of SO42− to HSO4− implied average signet ring vacuolar pH values of 0.85, 1.4, or 3.1. Intracellular (VSO4)+ was unobserved, while [V(RSO3)n](3−n)+ was detected in the two lowest pH blood cell samples. About 5% of sulfur was distributed as mono- or dibenzothiophene or ethylene-epi-sulfide, or as a thiadiazole reminiscent of the polycarpathiamines. Blood plasma was dominated by sulfate (83%), but with 15% of an alkylsulfate ester and about 2% of low-valent sulfur. Gravimetric analysis of soluble sulfate yielded average concentrations of blood cell sulfur. Average [cysteine] and [cystine] (ranging ~10–30 mM and ~20–90 mM, respectively) implied a blood-cell cytosolic emf values of approximately −0.20 V. High cellular [cysteine] is consistent with the proposed model for enzymatic reduction of vanadate by endogenous thiol, wherein the trajectory of metal site-symmetry is controlled and directed through to a thermodynamically favored 7-coordinate V(III) product. PMID:24333825

  17. Effects of oxidation state on metal ion binding by Medicago sativa (alfalfa): Atomic and X-ray absorption spectroscopic studies with Fe(II) and Fe(III)

    SciTech Connect

    Tiemann, K.J.; Gardea-Torresdey, J.L.; Gamez, G.; Dokken, K.; Cano-Aguilera, I.; Renner, M.W.; Furenlid, L.R.

    2000-02-15

    The authors present here experimental results that investigate the effects of metal-ion binding on iron-ion sorption to and recovery from alfalfa biomass. Fe(II)- and Fe(III)-ion binding were measured in order to ascertain the differences in binding strengths due to changes in oxidation state. Stronger binding was found for iron(III)-biomass as compared to iron(II)-biomass. The optimal pH for iron uptake was determined to be 5. The results of pH binding profile, orion desorption, and temperature-dependent binding experiments as well as X-ray spectroscopic (XAS) measurements all suggest that binding of iron by alfalfa biomass may be occurring through carboxyl ligands. The XAS experiments further demonstrate that the metal binding proceeds without an oxidation state change, and both iron(II) and iron(III) have similar coordination environments. The information presented will assist in understanding the binding of other metals to alfalfa biomass and in developing methods for their recovery.

  18. Absorption properties of type-II InAs/InAsSb superlattices measured by spectroscopic ellipsometry

    SciTech Connect

    Webster, P. T.; Riordan, N. A.; Liu, S.; Zhang, Y.-H.; Johnson, S. R.; Steenbergen, E. H.

    2015-02-09

    Strain-balanced InAs/InAsSb superlattices offer access to the mid- to long-wavelength infrared region with what is essentially a ternary material system at the GaSb lattice constant. The absorption coefficients of InAs/InAsSb superlattices grown by molecular beam epitaxy on (100)-oriented GaSb substrates are measured at room temperature over the 30 to 800 meV photon energy range using spectroscopic ellipsometry, and the miniband structure of each superlattice is calculated using a Kronig-Penney model. The InAs/InAsSb conduction band offset is used as a fitting parameter to align the calculated superlattice ground state transition energy to the measured absorption onset at room temperature and to the photoluminescence peak energy at low temperature. It is observed that the ground state absorption coefficient and transition strength are proportional to the square of the wavefunction overlap and the ground state absorption coefficient approaches a maximum value of around 5780 cm{sup −1} as the wavefunction overlap approaches 100%. The absorption analysis of these samples indicates that the optical joint density of states is weakly dependent on the period thickness and Sb content of the superlattice, and that wavefunction overlap is the principal design parameter in terms of obtaining strong absorption in these structures.

  19. Absorption properties of type-II InAs/InAsSb superlattices measured by spectroscopic ellipsometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webster, P. T.; Riordan, N. A.; Liu, S.; Steenbergen, E. H.; Synowicki, R. A.; Zhang, Y.-H.; Johnson, S. R.

    2015-02-01

    Strain-balanced InAs/InAsSb superlattices offer access to the mid- to long-wavelength infrared region with what is essentially a ternary material system at the GaSb lattice constant. The absorption coefficients of InAs/InAsSb superlattices grown by molecular beam epitaxy on (100)-oriented GaSb substrates are measured at room temperature over the 30 to 800 meV photon energy range using spectroscopic ellipsometry, and the miniband structure of each superlattice is calculated using a Kronig-Penney model. The InAs/InAsSb conduction band offset is used as a fitting parameter to align the calculated superlattice ground state transition energy to the measured absorption onset at room temperature and to the photoluminescence peak energy at low temperature. It is observed that the ground state absorption coefficient and transition strength are proportional to the square of the wavefunction overlap and the ground state absorption coefficient approaches a maximum value of around 5780 cm-1 as the wavefunction overlap approaches 100%. The absorption analysis of these samples indicates that the optical joint density of states is weakly dependent on the period thickness and Sb content of the superlattice, and that wavefunction overlap is the principal design parameter in terms of obtaining strong absorption in these structures.

  20. X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy of the Rare Earth orthophosphates

    SciTech Connect

    Shuh, D.K.; Terminello, L.J.; Boatner, L.A.; Abraham, M.M.

    1993-06-01

    X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy (XAS) of the Rare Earth (RE) 3d levels yields sharp peaks near the edges as a result of strong, quasi-atomic 3d{sup 10}4f{sup n} {yields} 3d-{sup 9}4f{sup n+1} transitions and these transitions exhibit a wealth of spectroscopic features. The XAS measurements of single crystal REPO{sub 4} (RE = La, Ce, Pr, Nd, Sm, Eu, Gd, Tb, Dy, Er) at the 3d edge were performed in the total yield mode at beam line 8-2 at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory (SSRL). The XAS spectra of the RE ions in the orthophosphate matrix generally resemble the XAS of the corresponding RE metal. This is not unexpected and emphasizes the major contribution of the trivalent state to the electronic transitions at the RE 3d edges. These spectra unequivocally identify the transitions originating from well-characterized RE cores and correlate well with previous theoretical investigations.

  1. Local structure and speciation of platinum in fresh and road-aged North American sourced vehicle emissions catalysts: an X-ray absorption spectroscopic study.

    PubMed

    Ash, Peter W; Boyd, David A; Hyde, Timothy I; Keating, Jonathan L; Randlshofer, Gabriele; Rothenbacher, Klaus; Sankar, Gopinathan; Schauer, James J; Shafer, Martin M; Toner, Brandy M

    2014-04-01

    Given emerging concerns about the bioavailability and toxicity of anthropogenic platinum compounds emitted into the environment from sources including vehicle emission catalysts (VEC), the platinum species present in selected North American sourced fresh and road-aged VEC were determined by Pt and Cl X-ray absorption spectroscopy. Detailed analysis of the Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure at the Pt L3 and L2 edges of the solid phase catalysts revealed mainly oxidic species in the fresh catalysts and metallic components dominant in the road-aged catalysts. In addition, some bimetallic components (Pt-Ni, Pt-Pd, Pt-Rh) were observed in the road-aged catalysts from supporting Ni-, Pd-, and Rh-K edge XAS studies. These detailed analyses allow for the significant conclusion that this study did not find any evidence for the presence of chloroplatinate species in the investigated solid phase of a Three Way Catalyst or Diesel Oxidation Catalysts. PMID:24568168

  2. Comparative study of ionization chamber detectors vis-a-vis a CCD detector for dispersive XAS measurement in transmission geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Poswal, A. K.; Agrawal, A.; Bhattachryya, D.; Jha, S. N.; Sahoo, N. K.

    2013-02-05

    We have designed and fabricated parallel plate ionization chamber detectors and voltage vs. current characteristics (V-I curve) of the detectors were recorded with synchrotron radiation to qualify for use in X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy (XAS) measurements. After qualifying the ionization chambers, the detectors were used in the dispersive EXAFS beamline (BL-08) at INDUS-2 SRS in Turbo-XAS geometry. Using the same setup and under the same setting, XAS spectra were also recorded with a CCD detector and the observation on relative performance of the ionization chamber vis-a-vis the CCD detector is presented in this paper.

  3. Comparative study of ionization chamber detectors vis-à-vis a CCD detector for dispersive XAS measurement in transmission geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poswal, A. K.; Agrawal, A.; Bhattachryya, D.; Jha, S. N.; Sahoo, N. K.

    2013-02-01

    We have designed and fabricated parallel plate ionization chamber detectors and voltage vs. current characteristics (V-I curve) of the detectors were recorded with synchrotron radiation to qualify for use in X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy (XAS) measurements. After qualifying the ionization chambers, the detectors were used in the dispersive EXAFS beamline (BL-08) at INDUS-2 SRS in Turbo-XAS geometry. Using the same setup and under the same setting, XAS spectra were also recorded with a CCD detector and the observation on relative performance of the ionization chamber vis-a-vis the CCD detector is presented in this paper.

  4. In Situ XAS of Ni-W Hydrocracking Catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, N.; Mickelson, G. E.; Greenlay, N.; Kelly, S. D.; Bare, Simon R.

    2007-02-01

    Ni-W based catalysts are very attractive in hydrotreating of heavy oil due to their high hydrogenation activity. In the present research, two catalyst samples, prepared by different methods, that exhibit significant differences in activity were sulfided in situ, and the local structure of the Ni and W were studied using X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS). The Ni XANES spectra were analyzed using a linear component fitting, and the EXAFS spectra of the WS2 platelets in the sulfided catalysts were modeled. The Ni and W are fully sulfided in the higher activity sample, and there are both unsulfided Ni (˜25%) and W (<10%) in the lower activity sample.

  5. Correlation of Water Activation, Surface Properties, and Oxygen Reduction Reactivity of Supported PtM/C Bimetallic Electrocatalysts Using XAS

    SciTech Connect

    Teliska,M.; Murthi, V.; Mukerjee, S.; Ramaker, D.

    2005-01-01

    An analysis of X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) data [X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) and extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS)] at the Pt L{sub 3} edge for Pt-M bimetallic materials (M=Co, Cr, Ni, Fe) and at the Co K edge for Pt-Co is reported for Pt-M/C electrodes in HClO{sub 4} at different potentials. The XANES data are analyzed using the {Delta}{mu} method, which utilizes the spectrum at some potential V minus that at 0.54 V reversible hydrogen electrode (RHE) representing a reference spectrum. These {Delta}{mu} data provide direct spectroscopic evidence for the inhibition of OH chemisorption on the cluster surface in the Pt-M. This OH chemisorption, decreasing in the direction Pt>Pt-Ni>Pt-Co>Pt-Fe>Pt-Cr, is directly correlated with the previously reported fuel cell performance (electrocatalytic activities) of these bimetallics, confirming the role of OH poisoning of Pt sites in fuel cells. EXAFS analysis shows that the prepared clusters studied have different morphologies, the Pt-Ni and Pt-Co clusters were more homogeneous with M atoms at the surface, while the Pt-Fe and Pt-Cr clusters had a 'Pt skin.' The cluster morphology determines which previously proposed OH inhibition mechanism dominates, the electronic mechanism in the presence of the Pt skin, or lateral interactions when M-OH groups exist on the surface.

  6. Macroscopic and spectroscopic analysis of lanthanide adsorption to bacterial cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ngwenya, Bryne T.; Mosselmans, J. Fred W.; Magennis, Marisa; Atkinson, Kirk D.; Tourney, Janette; Olive, Valerie; Ellam, Robert M.

    2009-06-01

    This study was designed to combine surface complexation modelling of macroscopic adsorption data with X-ray Absorption Spectroscopic (XAS) measurements to identify lanthanide sorption sites on the bacterial surface. The adsorption of selected representatives for light (La and Nd), middle (Sm and Gd) and heavy (Er and Yb) lanthanides was measured as a function of pH, and biomass samples exposed to 4 mg/L lanthanide at pH 3.5 and 6 were analysed using XAS. Surface complexation modelling was consistent with the light lanthanides adsorbing to phosphate sites, whereas the adsorption of middle and heavy lanthanides could be modelled equally well by carboxyl and phosphate sites. The existence of such mixed mode coordination was confirmed by Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (EXAFS) analysis, which was also consistent with adsorption to phosphate sites at low pH, with secondary involvement of carboxyl sites at high adsorption density (high pH). Thus, the two approaches yield broadly consistent information with regard to surface site identity and lanthanide coordination environment. Furthermore, spectroscopic analysis suggests that coordination to phosphate sites is monodentate at the metal/biomass ratios used. Based on the best-fitting p Ka site, we infer that the phosphate sites are located on N-acetylglucosamine phosphate, the most likely polymer on gram-negative cells with potential phosphate sites that deprotonate around neutral pH.

  7. Characterization of the rare earth orthophosphates and Ce-doped LaPO{sub 4} by X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Shuh, D.K.; Perry, D.; Terminello, L.J.; Boatner, L.A.; Abraham, M.M.

    1993-12-31

    X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy (XAS) of the Rare Earth (RE) 3d levels yields sharp peaks near the edges as a result of strong, quasi-atomic 3d{sup 10}4f {yields} 3d{sup 9}4f{sup n+1} (M{sub 4,5}) transitions that contain a wealth of spectroscopic features. XAS is a useful technique for the characterization of 4f-occupancy, 4f-hybridization, and valence in RE-containing materials. The XAS measurements of the single crystal RE-orthophosphates, as well as a range of Cedoped ({approx}1--30%) LaPO{sub 4} hosts were performed at the 3d edge in the total electron yield mode at beamline 8-2 at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory (SSRL). The XAS spectra of the RE ions in the orthophosphate matrix generally resemble that of the corresponding RE metal and emphasize the major contribution of the trivalent state to the electronic transitions occurring at the 3d edge. There is no energy shift of the La and Ce absorption peaks with Ce doping and furthermore, no additional transitions are observed in either spectral region. However, accompanying the Ce doping there is a significant narrowing of the La absorption peak full width half maximum that contrasts to the Ce features that exhibit no contraction. The La and Ce spectra indicate that the Ce-doping of LaPO{sub 4} is purely substitutional.

  8. Interaction between indium tin oxide nanoparticles and cytochrome c: A surface-enhanced Raman scattering and absorption spectroscopic study

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Yimin E-mail: tqiu@seu.edu.cn; Du, Deyang; Fan, Jiyang; Qiu, Teng E-mail: tqiu@seu.edu.cn; Kong, Fan

    2015-06-28

    Indium-tin-oxide (ITO) nanoparticles were annealed in vacuum or reducing atmosphere to obtain different surface structures and investigate their influence on the adsorptive character and conformation of cytochrome c (Cyt c) molecule. Annealing-induced morphometric or structural changes of ITO nanoparticles were characterized by instruments of transmission electron microscopy, x-ray diffraction, and Raman scattering. Semiconductor ITO nanoparticle-enhanced Raman scattering of Cyt c was observed and the enhanced efficiency was found to closely depend on the surface structures which control the adsorbance of buffer anions needed for Cyt c loading. Direct electron transfer between Cyt c and ITO surface at the moment of molecular elastic collision was found and a reverse electron transfer process for O-terminated surface and metal-terminated surface was observed, according to absorption spectroscopic measurement on the residual solution.

  9. X-ray absorption spectroscopic characterization of a cytochrome P450 compound II derivative

    PubMed Central

    Newcomb, Martin; Halgrimson, James A.; Horner, John H.; Wasinger, Erik C.; Chen, Lin X.; Sligar, Stephen G.

    2008-01-01

    The cytochrome P450 enzyme CYP119, its compound II derivative, and its nitrosyl complex were studied by iron K-edge x-ray absorption spectroscopy. The compound II derivative was prepared by reaction of the resting enzyme with peroxynitrite and had a lifetime of ≈10 s at 23°C. The CYP119 nitrosyl complex was prepared by reaction of the enzyme with nitrogen monoxide gas or with a nitrosyl donor and was stable at 23°C for hours. Samples of CYP119 and its derivatives were studied by x-ray absorption spectroscopy at temperatures below 140 (K) at the Advanced Photon Source of Argonne National Laboratory. The x-ray absorption near-edge structure spectra displayed shifts in edge and pre-edge energies consistent with increasing effective positive charge on iron in the series native CYP119 < CYP119 nitrosyl complex < CYP119 compound II derivative. Extended x-ray absorption fine structure spectra were simulated with good fits for k = 12 Å−1 for native CYP119 and k = 13 Å−1 for both the nitrosyl complex and the compound II derivative. The important structural features for the compound II derivative were an iron-oxygen bond length of 1.82 Å and an iron-sulfur bond length of 2.24 Å, both of which indicate an iron-oxygen single bond in a ferryl-hydroxide, FeIVOH, moiety. PMID:18174331

  10. Spectroscopic studies of copper enzymes

    SciTech Connect

    Dooley, D.M.; Moog, R.; Zumft, W.; Koenig, S.H.; Scott, R.A.; Cote, C.E.; McGuirl, M.

    1986-05-01

    Several spectroscopic methods, including absorption, circular dichroism (CD), magnetic CD (MCD), X-ray absorption, resonance Raman, EPR, NMR, and quasi-elastic light-scattering spectroscopy, have been used to probe the structures of copper-containing amine oxidases, nitrite reductase, and nitrous oxide reductase. The basic goals are to determine the copper site structure, electronic properties, and to generate structure-reactivity correlations. Collectively, the results on the amine oxidases permit a detailed model for the Cu(II) sites in these enzymes to be constructed that, in turn, rationalizes the ligand-binding chemistry. Resonance Raman spectra of the phenylhydrazine and 2,4-dinitrophenyl-hydrazine derivatives of bovine plasma amine oxidase and models for its organic cofactor, e.g. pyridoxal, methoxatin, are most consistent with methoxatin being the intrinsic cofactor. The structure of the Cu(I) forms of the amine oxidases have been investigated by X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS); the copper coordination geometry is significantly different in the oxidized and reduced forms. Some anomalous properties of the amine oxidases in solution are explicable in terms of their reversible aggregation, which the authors have characterized via light scattering. Nitrite and nitrous oxide reductases display several novel spectral properties. The data suggest that new types of copper sites are present.

  11. Ca K-Edge XAS as a Probe of Calcium Centers in Complex Systems

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Herein, Ca K-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) is developed as a means to characterize the local environment of calcium centers. The spectra for six, seven, and eight coordinate inorganic and molecular calcium complexes were analyzed and determined to be primarily influenced by the coordination environment and site symmetry at the calcium center. The experimental results are closely correlated to time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) calculations of the XAS spectra. The applicability of this methodology to complex systems was investigated using structural mimics of the oxygen-evolving complex (OEC) of PSII. It was found that Ca K-edge XAS is a sensitive probe for structural changes occurring in the cubane heterometallic cluster due to Mn oxidation. Future applications to the OEC are discussed. PMID:25492398

  12. Spectroscopic method for determination of the absorption coefficient in brain tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johansson, Johannes D.

    2010-09-01

    I use Monte Carlo simulations and phantom measurements to characterize a probe with adjacent optical fibres for diffuse reflectance spectroscopy during stereotactic surgery in the brain. Simulations and measurements have been fitted to a modified Beer-Lambert model for light transport in order to be able to quantify chromophore content based on clinically measured spectra in brain tissue. It was found that it is important to take the impact of the light absorption into account when calculating the apparent optical path length, lp, for the photons in order to get good estimates of the absorption coefficient, μa. The optical path length was found to be well fitted to the equation lp=a+b ln(Is)+c ln(μa)+d ln(Is)ln(μa), where Is is the reflected light intensity for scattering alone (i.e., zero absorption). Although coefficients a-d calculated in this study are specific to the probe used here, the general form of the equation should be applicable to similar probes.

  13. Asymmetry between absorption and photoluminescence line shapes of TPD: spectroscopic fingerprint of the twisted biphenyl core.

    PubMed

    Scholz, Reinhard; Gisslén, Linus; Himcinschi, Cameliu; Vragović, Igor; Calzado, Eva M; Louis, Enrique; San Fabián Maroto, Emilio; Díaz-García, María A

    2009-01-01

    We analyze absorption, photoluminescence (PL), and resonant Raman spectra of N,N'-diphenyl-N,N'-bis(3-methylphenyl)-(1,1'-biphenyl)-4,4'-diamine (TPD), with the aim of providing a microscopic interpretation of a significant Stokes shift of about 0.5 eV that makes this material suitable for stimulated emission. The optical spectra were measured for TPD dissolved in toluene and chloroform, as well as for polystyrene films doped with varying amounts of TPD. In addition, we measured preresonant and resonant Raman spectra, giving direct access to the vibrational modes elongated in the relaxed excited geometry of the molecule. The experimental data are interpreted with calculations of the molecular geometry in the electronic ground state and the optically excited state using density functional theory. Several strongly elongated high-frequency modes within the carbon rings results in a vibronic progression with a calculated spacing of 158 meV, corroborated by the observation of vibrational sidebands in the PL spectra. The peculiarities of the potential energy surfaces related to a twisting around the central bond in the biphenyl core of TPD allow to quantify the asymmetry between the line shapes observed in absorption and emission. PMID:19086796

  14. Atomic absorption spectroscopic, conductometric and colorimetric methods for determination of some fluoroquinolone antibacterials using ammonium reineckate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Ghannam, Sheikha M.

    2008-04-01

    Three accurate, rapid and simple atomic absorption spectrometric (AAS), conductometric and colorimetric methods were developed for the determination of gatifloxacin (GTF), moxifloxacin (MXF) and sparfloxacin (SPF). The proposed methods depend upon the reaction of ammonium reineckate with the studied drugs to form stable precipitate of ion-pair complexes, which was dissolved in acetone. The pink coloured complexes were determined either by AAS or colorimetrically at λmax 525 nm directly using the dissolved complex. Using conductometric titration, the studied drugs could be evaluated in 50% (v/v) acetone. The optimizations of various experimental conditions were described. Optimum concentration ranges for the determination of GTF, MXF and SPF were 5.0-150, 40-440 μg mL -1 and 0.10-1.5 mg mL -1 using atomic absorption (AAS), conductometric and colorimetric methods, respectively. Detection and quantification limits are ranges from 1.5 to 2.3 μg mL -1 using AAS method or 30-45 μg mL -1 using colorimetric method. The proposed procedures have been applied successfully to the analysis of these drugs in pharmaceutical formulations and the results are favourably comparable to the reference methods.

  15. X-ray absorption spectroscopic studies of the diiron center in methane monooxygenase in the presence of substrate and the coupling protein of the enzyme system

    SciTech Connect

    DeWitt, J.G.; Rosenzweig, A.C.; Salifoglou, A.

    1995-05-10

    The interaction among the hydroxylase component of methane monooxygenase (MMO) from Methylococcus capsulatus (Bath), the coupling protein of the MMO enzyme system (component B), and substrate has been investigated by using Fe K-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS). Fe K-edge extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) studies of the semimet form of the hydroxylase in the presence of the coupling protein, 1-bromo-1-propene, and both the coupling protein and 1-bromo-1-propene revealed small differences in the appearance of the EXAFS above k = 8 {Angstrom}{sup {minus}1} as compared to the noncomplexed hydroxylase. No dramatic change in the Fe coordination was seen in fits to the data. The average first shell Fe-O/N distance for the complexed forms of the semimet hydroxylase ranged between 2.06 and 2.08 {Angstrom}, which is comparable to the distance found for the noncomplexed form, 2.06-2.09 {Angstrom}. Although the average first shell coordination was similar for all samples, a difference was seen in the distribution of long vs short distance contributions to the first shell coordination sphere for samples with component B present. This difference was accompanied by a small but consistent decrease in the Fe-Fe distance of the B-complexed hydroxylase samples, from 3.42 to 3.39 {angstrom}.

  16. X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopic study of uranium nitrides

    SciTech Connect

    Poineau, Frederic; Yeamans, Charles B.; Cerefice, Gary S.; Sattelberger, Alfred P; Czerwinski, Ken R.

    2012-01-01

    Uranium mononitride (UN), sesquinitride (U2N3) and dinitride (UN2) were characterized by extended X-Ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy. Analysis on UN indicate the presence of three uranium shells at distances of 3.46(3), 4.89(5) and 6.01(6) A and a nitrogen shell at a distance of 2.46(2) A . For U2N3, two absorbing uranium atoms at different crystallographic positions are present in the structure. One of the uranium atoms is surrounded by nitrogen atoms at 2.28(2) A and by uranium atoms at 3.66(4) and 3.95(4) A . The second type of uranium atom is surrounded by nitrogen atoms at 2.33(2) and 2.64(3) A and by uranium atoms at 3.66(4), 3.95(4) and 5.31(5) A . Results on UN2 indicate two uranium shells at 3.71(4) and 5.32(5) A and two nitrogen shells at 2.28(2).

  17. Combined in Situ X-ray absorption and diffuse reflectance infraredspectroscopy: An attractive tool for catalytic investigations

    SciTech Connect

    Marinkovic, N.S.; Ehrlich, S.; Wang, Q.; Barrio, L.; Khalid, S.; et.al.

    2010-11-24

    Catalysis investigations are often followed in a range of spectroscopic techniques. While diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy (DRIFTS) can be done on a bench-top instrument, X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) techniques, such as extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) and X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) require synchrotron light. In order to ensure the same conditions during in situ catalysis for each method, a combined XAS/DRIFTS has been developed at beamline X18A at the National Synchrotron Light Source, Brookhaven National Laboratory. A rapid-scan FTIR spectrometer capable of both mid- and far-infrared measurements is equipped with an arm to redirect the IR beam outside the spectrometer. An in situ reaction chamber, equipped with glassy carbon windows for X-ray light and a KBr window for IR light passage is installed firmly on the arm. The reaction cell can be heated to 600 C and allows passage of gases through the catalyst so that both XAS and DRIFTS techniques can be done simultaneously in controlled environment conditions. Together with a fast-moving monochromator for quick-EXAFS and mass-spectrometric residual gas analysis, this new tool is a powerful method for testing catalytic reactions in real time.

  18. Spectroscopic verification of zinc absorption and distribution in the desert plant Prosopis juliflora-velutina (velvet mesquite) treated with ZnO nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Hernandez-Viezcas, J.A.; Castillo-Michel, H.; Servin, A.D.; Peralta-Videa, J.R.; Gardea-Torresdey, J.L.

    2012-01-01

    The impact of metal nanoparticles (NPs) on biological systems, especially plants, is still not well understood. The aim of this research was to determine the effects of zinc oxide (ZnO) NPs in velvet mesquite (Prosopis juliflora-velutina). Mesquite seedlings were grown for 15 days in hydroponics with ZnO NPs (10 nm) at concentrations varying from 500 to 4000 mg L−1. Zinc concentrations in roots, stems and leaves were determined by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy (ICP-OES). Plant stress was examined by the specific activity of catalase (CAT) and ascorbate peroxidase (APOX); while the biotransformation of ZnO NPs and Zn distribution in tissues was determined by X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) and micro X-ray fluorescence (μXRF), respectively. ICP-OES results showed that Zn concentrations in tissues (2102 ± 87, 1135 ± 56, and 628 ± 130 mg kg−1 d wt in roots, stems, and leaves, respectively) were found at 2000 mg ZnO NPs L−1. Stress tests showed that ZnO NPs increased CAT in roots, stems, and leaves, while APOX increased only in stems and leaves. XANES spectra demonstrated that ZnO NPs were not present in mesquite tissues, while Zn was found as Zn(II), resembling the spectra of Zn(NO3)2. The μXRF analysis confirmed the presence of Zn in the vascular system of roots and leaves in ZnO NP treated plants. PMID:22820414

  19. Reactivity of Chromium(III) Nutritional Supplements in Biological Media: An X-Ray Absorption Spectroscopic Study

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, A.; Mulyani, I.; Levina, A.; Lay, P.A.

    2009-05-22

    Chromium(III) nutritional supplements are widely used due to their purported ability to enhance glucose metabolism, despite growing evidence on low activity and the potential genotoxicity of these compounds. Reactivities of Cr(III) complexes used in nutritional formulations, including [Cr3O(OCOEt)6(OH2)3]+ (A), [Cr(pic)3] (pic) = 2-pyridinecarboxylato(-) (B), and trans-[CrCl2(OH2)4]+ (CrCl3 {center_dot} 6H2O; C), in a range of natural and simulated biological media (artificial digestion systems, blood and its components, cell culture media, and intact L6 rat skeletal muscle cells) were studied by X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy. The XANES spectroscopic data were processed by multiple linear-regression analyses with the use of a library of model Cr(III) compounds, and the results were corroborated by the results of X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy and electrospray mass spectrometry. Complexes A and B underwent extensive ligand-exchange reactions under conditions of combined gastric and intestinal digestion (in the presence of a semisynthetic meal, 3 h at 310 K), as well as in blood serum and in a cell culture medium (1-24 h at 310 K), with the formation of Cr(III) complexes with hydroxo and amino acid/protein ligands. Reactions of compounds A-C with cultured muscle cells led to similar ligand-exchange products, with at least part of Cr(III) bound to the surface of the cells. The reactions of B with serum greatly enhanced its propensity to be converted to Cr(VI) by biological oxidants (H2O2 or glucose oxidase system), which is proposed to be a major cause of both the insulin-enhancing activity and toxicity of Cr(III) compounds (Mulyani, I.; Levina, A.; Lay, P. A. Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 2004, 43, 4504-4507). This finding enhances the current concern over the safety of consumption of large doses of Cr(III) supplements, particularly [Cr(pic)3].

  20. Orientation Dependent Polarized Micro-XAS Study of U, Th and Sr in Single Crystal Apatites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Y.; Rakovan, J.; Wright, S.

    2009-05-01

    In order to evaluate apatite as a potential solid nuclear waste form and a contaminant sequestration agent, the complimentary use of single crystal X-ray diffraction and X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) is applied to the study of U, Th, and Sr doped apatite single crystals to investigate the site preference, oxidation state, and structural distortions created by these substituents. Single crystal X-ray diffraction provides average information regarding the site occupancy of U and Th in apatites. Extended X-ray absorption fine-structure (EXAFS) yields quantitative information of the local structure of these substituents, which includes near-neighbor distances, coordination numbers and variations in bond distances; while X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) is used to determine the oxidation states of U. Restricted by the typical small size (20-100 μm) and volume of our synthetic samples, Micro-XAS is required. Different from studies which take full advantage of the polarization of synchrotron radiation, our Micro- XAS study on single crystal apatites was hampered by the polarization effects. In order to extract precise information of valence state and structural variation from XAS, it is necessary to know the crystallographic orientation of the sample with respect to the polarization direction of the incident X-ray beam during data collection. To do this we have designed and built a portable goniometer that duplicates the geometry of our laboratory standard Bruker Apex diffractometer goniometer. Crystal orientation is determined by X-ray diffraction at our home institution. The portable goniometer is then set up on the experimental table at synchrotron facilities and the crystal can be set in any specific known orientation. The lattice orientation determined by X-ray diffraction is applied to XAS data analysis, specifically calculation of scattering amplitudes and phase shifts, to account for polarization effects of synchrotron radiation. The goniometer

  1. High energy resolution five-crystal spectrometer for high quality fluorescence and absorption measurements on an x-ray absorption spectroscopy beamline

    SciTech Connect

    Llorens, Isabelle; Lahera, Eric; Delnet, William; Proux, Olivier; Dermigny, Quentin; Gelebart, Frederic; Morand, Marc; Shukla, Abhay; Bardou, Nathalie; Ulrich, Olivier; and others

    2012-06-15

    Fluorescence detection is classically achieved with a solid state detector (SSD) on x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) beamlines. This kind of detection however presents some limitations related to the limited energy resolution and saturation. Crystal analyzer spectrometers (CAS) based on a Johann-type geometry have been developed to overcome these limitations. We have tested and installed such a system on the BM30B/CRG-FAME XAS beamline at the ESRF dedicated to the structural investigation of very dilute systems in environmental, material and biological sciences. The spectrometer has been designed to be a mobile device for easy integration in multi-purpose hard x-ray synchrotron beamlines or even with a laboratory x-ray source. The CAS allows to collect x-ray photons from a large solid angle with five spherically bent crystals. It will cover a large energy range allowing to probe fluorescence lines characteristic of all the elements from Ca (Z = 20) to U (Z = 92). It provides an energy resolution of 1-2 eV. XAS spectroscopy is the main application of this device even if other spectroscopic techniques (RIXS, XES, XRS, etc.) can be also achieved with it. The performances of the CAS are illustrated by two experiments that are difficult or impossible to perform with SSD and the complementarity of the CAS vs SSD detectors is discussed.

  2. X-Ray Absorption Spectroscopy as a Probe of Microbial Sulfur Biochemistry: the Nature of Bacterial Sulfur Globules Revisited ▿

    PubMed Central

    George, Graham N.; Gnida, Manuel; Bazylinski, Dennis A.; Prince, Roger C.; Pickering, Ingrid J.

    2008-01-01

    The chemical nature of the sulfur in bacterial sulfur globules has been the subject of controversy for a number of years. Sulfur K-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) is a powerful technique for probing the chemical forms of sulfur in situ, but two groups have used it with very different conclusions. The root of the controversy lies with the different detection strategies used by the two groups, which result in very different spectra. This paper seeks to resolve the controversy. We experimentally demonstrate that the use of transmittance detection for sulfur K-edge XAS measurements is highly prone to spectroscopic distortions and that much of the published work on sulfur bacteria is very likely based on distorted data. We also demonstrate that all three detection methods used for X-ray absorption experiments yield essentially identical spectra when the measurements are carried out under conditions where no experimental distortions are expected. Finally, we turn to the original question—the chemical nature of bacterial sulfur. We examine isolated sulfur globules of Allochromatium vinosum and intact cells of a strain of magnetotactic coccus and show that XAS indicates the presence of a chemical form of sulfur resembling S8. PMID:18676668

  3. Analysis of the effects of surface chemistry on the XAS spectra of CdSe nanomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitley, Heather; Prendergast, David; Ogitsu, Tadashi; Schwegler, Eric

    2010-03-01

    X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) is an element-specific probe of local electronic structure, and is an ideal method to analyze chemical bonding. We investigate the consistency of theoretically predicted structures of CdSe nanomaterials with recently measured XAS via ab initio calculations. Using plane-wave DFT, the x-ray absorption cross-section for the Cd L3-edge of small CdSe clusters with a variety of surface ligands is calculated. We also highlight the importance of including excitonic effects in our simulations of core excitation spectra. We compare our simulations to existing experimental data on the ligand dependence of XAS for ligated quantum dots up to ˜3nm in diameter. Based on the favorable comparison of our theoretical spectra with experimental measurements, we infer the validity of our DFT-derived structure and surface passivation for these quantum dots and its relevance to understanding optoelectronic properties of solution-synthesized CdSe nanocrystals. Prepared by LLNL under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  4. Activation and deactivation of a robust immobilized Cp*Ir-transfer hydrogenation catalyst: a multielement in situ X-ray absorption spectroscopy study.

    PubMed

    Sherborne, Grant J; Chapman, Michael R; Blacker, A John; Bourne, Richard A; Chamberlain, Thomas W; Crossley, Benjamin D; Lucas, Stephanie J; McGowan, Patrick C; Newton, Mark A; Screen, Thomas E O; Thompson, Paul; Willans, Charlotte E; Nguyen, Bao N

    2015-04-01

    A highly robust immobilized [Cp*IrCl2]2 precatalyst on Wang resin for transfer hydrogenation, which can be recycled up to 30 times, was studied using a novel combination of X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) at Ir L3-edge, Cl K-edge, and K K-edge. These culminate in in situ XAS experiments that link structural changes of the Ir complex with its catalytic activity and its deactivation. Mercury poisoning and "hot filtration" experiments ruled out leached Ir as the active catalyst. Spectroscopic evidence indicates the exchange of one chloride ligand with an alkoxide to generate the active precatalyst. The exchange of the second chloride ligand, however, leads to a potassium alkoxide-iridate species as the deactivated form of this immobilized catalyst. These findings could be widely applicable to the many homogeneous transfer hydrogenation catalysts with Cp*IrCl substructure. PMID:25768298

  5. The gaseous extent of galaxies and the origin of Lyman-alpha absorption systems: A survey of galaxies in the fields of Hubble Space Telescope spectroscopic target QSOs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lanzetta, Kenneth M.; Bowen, David B.; Tytler, David; Webb, John K.

    1995-01-01

    We present initial results of an imaging and spectroscopic survey of faint galaxies in fields of Hubble Space Telescope (HST) spectroscopic target QSOs. The primary objectives of the survey are (1) to determine the incidence, extent, and covering factor of extended gaseous envelopes of luminous galaxies and (2) to determine the fraction of Ly(alpha) absorption systems that arise in luminous galaxies. The goal of the survey is to identify in each field under construction all objects with apparent r-band magnitudes satisfying r less than 21.5 within angular distances to the QSOs satisfying 0 less thyan 1.3'. The current observations cover six fields and are 37% complete to the goal ofthe survey. These observations identify 46 galaxies at redshifts spanning z = 0.0700-0.5526 and at impact parameters to the QSOs spanning rho = 16.6-346.9/h kpc. Of these galaxies, 11 are coincident in redshift with absorption systems and 21 do not give rise to absorption to within sensitive upper limits. Nine galaxies are coincident in redshift with 'Ly(alpha)-forest' absorption systems that show Ly(alpha) absorption but no corresponding metal-line absorption, and two galaxies are coincident in redshift with C IV absorption systems that show both Ly(alpha) and C IV absorption. Various lines of evidence demonstrate that the coincident galaxies are responsible for the corresponding absorption systems and are not present as the result of chance coincidence or merely spatial correlated with the absorption systems. The most important evidence is that there exists a statistical anti-correlation between Ly(aplha) rest-frame equivalent width and the impact parameter. Each of five galaxies with rho = 70-160/h kpc give rise to Ly(alpha) absorption, and just one of nine galaxies with rho greater than 70-160/h kpc gives rise to Ly(alpha) absorption. At least eight of 23 Ly(alpha) absorption systyems arise in galaxies. On the basis of these results we reach the following conclusions: (1) At z less

  6. Opportunities for Time Resolved Studies at the ID24 Energy Dispersive XAS Beamline of the ESRF

    SciTech Connect

    Mathon, O.; Aquilanti, G.; Guilera, G.; Labiche, J.-C.; Linden, P. van der; Newton, M. A.; Ponchut, C.; Trapananti, A.; Pascarelli, S.

    2007-01-19

    ID24 is the energy dispersive beamline of the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility dedicated to X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy (XAS). Thanks to the parallel acquisition mode that allows data in a large energy range to be collected simultaneously, XAS using dispersive optics is particularly suited for the study of time dependent processes. The techniques that can be used to study such systems vary according to the timescale of the phenomena under investigation. They take advantage of the temporal structure of the synchrotron radiation in case of time resolution of the order of the intrinsic duration of the x-ray pulse (100 ps), while for time scales above 100 {mu}s or below 100 ps, the x-ray beam can be considered continuous and the time resolution is determined by the different detection systems.

  7. The Uptake and Fate of Vanadyl Ion in Ascidian Blood Cells and A Detailed Hypothesis for the Mechanism and Location of Biological Vanadium Reduction: A Visible and X-Ray Absorption Spectroscopic Study

    PubMed Central

    Frank, Patrick; Carlson, Elaine J.; Carlson, Robert M. K.; Hedman, Britt; Hodgson, Keith O.

    2010-01-01

    Vanadium K-edge x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) has been used to track the uptake and fate of VO2+ ion in blood cells from Ascidia ceratodes, following exposure to dithiothreitol (DTT) or to DTT plus VO2+. The full range of endogenous vanadium was queried by fitting the XAS of blood cells with the XAS spectra of model vanadium complexes. In cells exposed only to DTT, ~0.4% of a new V(III) species was found in a site similar to Na[V(edta)(H2O)]. With exposure to DTT and VO2+, average intracellular [VO(aq)]2+ increased from 3% to 5%, and 6% of a new complexed form of vanadyl ion appeared evidencing a ligand array similar to [VO(edta)]2−. At the same time, the relative ratio of blood cell [V(H2O)6]3+ increased at the expense of [V(H2O)5(SO4)]+ in a manner consistent with a significant increase in endogenous acidity. In new UV/visible experiments, VO2+ could be reduced to 7-coordinate [V(nta)(H2O)3] or [V(nta)(ida)]2−with cysteine methyl ester in pH 6.5 solution. Ascorbate reduced [VO(edta)]2− to 7-coordinate [V(edta)(H2O)]−, while [VO(trdta)]2− was unreactive. These results corroborate the finding that the reductive EMF of VO2+ is increased by the availability of a 7-coordinate V(III) product. Finally a new and complete hypothesis is proposed for an ascidian vanadate reductase. The structure of the enzyme active site, the vanadate-vanadyl-vanadic reduction mechanism, the cellular locale, and elements of the regulatory machinery governing the biological reduction of vanadate and vanadyl ion by ascidians are all predicted. Together these constitute the new field of vanadium redox enzymology. PMID:18234345

  8. Spectroscopic Character and Spatial Distribution of Hydroxyl and Water Absorption Features Measured on the Lunar Surface by the Moon Mineralogy Mapper Imaging Spectrometer on Chandrayaan-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, R. O.; Pieters, C. M.; Goswami, J.; Clark, R. N.; Annadurai, M.; Boardman, J. W.; Buratti, B. J.; Combe, J.; Dyar, M. D.; Head, J. W.; Hibbitts, C.; Hicks, M.; Isaacson, P.; Klima, R. L.; Kramer, G. Y.; Kumar, S.; Livo, K. E.; Lundeen, S.; Malaret, E.; McCord, T. B.; Mustard, J. F.; Nettles, J. W.; Petro, N. E.; Runyon, C. J.; Staid, M.; Sunshine, J. M.; Taylor, L. A.; Tompkins, S.; Varanasi, P.

    2009-12-01

    The Moon Mineralogy Mapper imaging spectrometer on Chandrayaan-1 has a broad spectral range from 430 to 3000 nm. By design, the range was specified to extend to 3000 nm to allow for possible detection of trace volatile compounds that possess absorption bands near 3000 nm. Soon after acquisition and calibration of a large fraction of the lunar surface in early February 2009, absorption features in the 2700 to 3000 nm region were detected over unexpectedly large regional areas. This extraordinary discovery has withstood extensive re-analysis and falsification efforts. We have concluded these absorption features are fundamentally present in the M3 measurements and are indicators of extensive hydroxyl and water-bearing materials occurring on the surface of the Moon. Based on current analyses, these absorption features appear strongest at high latitudes, but also occur in association with several fresh feldspathic craters. Interestingly, the distribution of these absorption features are not directly correlated with existing neutron spectrometer hydrogen abundance data for the sunlight surface. This may indicate that the formation and retention of hydroxyl and water is an active process largely restricted to the upper most surface. We present the detailed spectroscopic character of these absorption features in the 2700 to 3000 nm spectral region, including selected examples through all levels of measurement processing from raw data to calibrated apparent surface reflectance. In summary we show the measured strength and latitudinal distribution of the absorptions as well as selected localized occurrences in association with fresh feldspathic craters. The presence of hydroxyl and water bearing material over extensive regions of the lunar surface provides a new and unexpected source of volatiles. Options for harvesting these elements directly from the regolith may provide an alternate supply of volatiles for long term human exploration objectives.

  9. X-ray absorption spectroscopic studies of the dinuclear iron center in methane monooxygenase and the sulfur and chlorine centers in photographic materials

    SciTech Connect

    DeWitt, J.G.

    1993-01-01

    The dinuclear iron center of the hydroxylase component of soluble methane monooxygenase (MMO) from Methylococcus capsulatus (Bath) and Methylosinus trichosporium (OB3b) has been studied by X-ray absorption spectroscopy. Analysis of the Fe K-edge EXAFS revealed that the first shell coordination of the hydroxylase consists of [approximately]6 N and O atoms at an average distance of 2.04[angstrom] in the oxidized form, increasing to 2.06-2.09[angstrom] in the semimet form, and 2.15 [angstrom] for the oxidized and semimet hydroxylase samples. No evidence for the presence of a short oxo bridge in the iron center was found. The presence of component B, the regulatory protein of the MMO enzyme system, had an effect on the distance distribution of first shell atoms in the hydroyxlase active site. No evidence of a Br contribution was seen in the hydroxylase EXAFS in the presence of a brominated substrate, suggesting the substrate binds more than 4[angstrom] from the iron center. An investigation of the EXAFS analysis technique using structurally-characterized iron dimers demonstrated that the results of the second shell fits exhibit a bias for the Fe-FE distance of the model compound from which the fitting parameters were obtained. An asymmetric pre-edge feature in the edge spectra of iron dimers was characteristic of oxo-bridge compounds, while a split pre-edge was characteristic of non-oxo-bridged compounds. Spectral sensitizing dyes and chemical sensitizing centers of importance to the photographic system were characterized by S and Cl K-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy. The appearance of the S K-edge spectra was characteristic of the environment of the S atoms and oriented single-crystal studies permitted the assignment of the features. The nature and extend of interaction between S and Ag and Au was characterized using XAS and used to investigate the nature of the interaction between photographic dyes and the AgBr substrate.

  10. Molybdenum L-Edge XAS Spectra of MoFe Nitrogenase

    PubMed Central

    Bjornsson, Ragnar; Delgado-Jaime, Mario U; Lima, Frederico A; Sippel, Daniel; Schlesier, Julia; Weyhermüller, Thomas; Einsle, Oliver; Neese, Frank; DeBeer, Serena

    2015-01-01

    A molybdenum L-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) study is presented for native and oxidized MoFe protein of nitrogenase as well as Mo-Fe model compounds. Recently collected data on MoFe protein (in oxidized and reduced forms) is compared to previously published Mo XAS data on the isolated FeMo cofactor in NMF solution and put in context of the recent Mo K-edge XAS study, which showed a MoIII assignment for the molybdenum atom in FeMoco. The L3-edge data are interpreted within a simple ligand-field model, from which a time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) approach is proposed as a way to provide further insights into the analysis of the molybdenum L3-edges. The calculated results reproduce well the relative spectral trends that are observed experimentally. Ultimately, these results give further support for the MoIII assignment in protein-bound FeMoco, as well as isolated FeMoco. PMID:26213424

  11. XAS and RIXS study of acetic acid and methyl formate in liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, O.; Nishida, N.; Kanai, S.; Horikawa, Y.; Tokushima, T.

    2016-05-01

    Structure of acetic acid (AA) and methyl formate (MF) in the liquid phase is studied using X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) and X-ray emission spectroscopy (XES) experimentally and theoretically. Two distinct XES spectra are observed by tuning photon energy for both molecules. Model structure in the liquid phase is constructed using the classical and first principle molecular dynamics simulations, and XES spectra are calculated using density functional theory. Calculated XES spectra are consistent with experimental ones. The effect of core-hole induced excited state molecular dynamics are discussed.

  12. Time-resolved XAS (Bonn-SUT-SLRI) beamline at SLRI.

    PubMed

    Poo-arporn, Yingyot; Chirawatkul, Prae; Saengsui, Worasarit; Chotiwan, Siwarak; Kityakarn, Sutasinee; Klinkhieo, Supat; Hormes, Josef; Songsiriritthigul, Prayoon

    2012-11-01

    An energy-dispersive X-ray absorption spectroscopy beamline has been constructed at the Synchrotron Light Research Institute, Thailand. The beamline was designed to utilize the synchrotron radiation with photon energies between 2400 and 8000 eV. The horizontal focusing of the bent crystal in the energy-dispersive monochromator offers a small polychromatic focal spot of 1 mm at the sample position. By employing an energy-dispersive scheme, the whole X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) can be obtained simultaneously using a position-sensitive detector with a fastest readout speed of 25 ms. The short data collection time opens a new opportunity for time-resolved X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) experiments such as studies of changes of the electronic structures or the local coordination environments of an atom during a change in thermodynamic conditions. For this purpose, an in situ cell was designed and fabricated for the beamline. Thermal oxidation of TiO(2) was chosen as an in situ experiment example. The structural change of TiO(2) as a function of temperatures was monitored from the change in the measured XAS spectra. The obtained Ti K-edge XANES spectra clearly show the formation of an anatase phase when the temperature was raised to 673 K. PMID:23093752

  13. Operando XAS study of the influence of CO and NO on methane oxidation by Pd/Al2O3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchionni, V.; Nachtegaal, M.; Petrov, A.; Kröcher, O.; Ferri, D.

    2016-05-01

    Methane oxidation on Pd/Al2O3 has been investigated using operando X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) at the Pd K-edge. The influence of CO and NO on methane abatement has been addressed performing temperature programmed reaction runs while recording simultaneously XANES spectra. During CO oxidation Pd is reduced while methane conversion is shifted to higher temperature. NO strongly inhibits both CO and CH4 oxidation, despite the higher fraction of oxidized palladium.

  14. Atomistic simulation and XAS investigation of Mn induced defects in Bi12TiO20

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rezende, Marcos V. dos S.; Santos, Denise J.; Jackson, Robert A.; Valerio, Mário E. G.; Macedo, Zélia S.

    2016-06-01

    This work reports an investigation of the valence and site occupancy of Mn dopants in Bi12TiO20 (BTO: Mn) host using X-ray Absorption (XAS) and atomistic simulation techniques based on energy minimisation. X-ray Absorption Near Edge Structure (XANES) at the Mn K-edges gave typical results for Mn ions with mixed valences of 3+ and 4+. Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (EXAFS) results indicated that Mn ions are probably substituted at Ti sites. Atomistic simulation was performed assuming the incorporation of Mn2+, Mn3+ and Mn4+ ions at either Bi3+ or Ti4+ sites, and the results were compared to XANES and EXAFS measurements. Electrical conductivity for pure and doped samples was used to evaluate the consistency of the proposed model.

  15. Thermodynamic Modeling of Poorly Complexing Metals in Concentrated Electrolyte Solutions: An X-Ray Absorption and UV-Vis Spectroscopic Study of Ni(II) in the NiCl2-MgCl2-H2O System

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ning; Brugger, Joël; Etschmann, Barbara; Ngothai, Yung; Zeng, Dewen

    2015-01-01

    Knowledge of the structure and speciation of aqueous Ni(II)-chloride complexes is important for understanding Ni behavior in hydrometallurgical extraction. The effect of concentration on the first-shell structure of Ni(II) in aqueous NiCl2 and NiCl2-MgCl2 solutions was investigated by Ni K edge X-ray absorption (XAS) and UV-Vis spectroscopy at ambient conditions. Both techniques show that no large structural change (e.g., transition from octahedral to tetrahedral-like configuration) occurs. Both methods confirm that the Ni(II) aqua ion (with six coordinated water molecules at RNi-O = 2.07(2) Å) is the dominant species over the whole NiCl2 concentration range. However, XANES, EXAFS and UV-Vis data show subtle changes at high salinity (> 2 mol∙kg-1 NiCl2), which are consistent with the formation of small amounts of the NiCl+ complex (up to 0.44(23) Cl at a Ni-Cl distance of 2.35(2) Å in 5.05 mol∙kg-1 NiCl2) in the pure NiCl2 solutions. At high Cl:Ni ratio in the NiCl2-MgCl2-H2O solutions, small amounts of [NiCl2]0 are also present. We developed a speciation-based mixed-solvent electrolyte (MSE) model to describe activity-composition relationships in NiCl2-MgCl2-H2O solutions, and at the same time predict Ni(II) speciation that is consistent with our XAS and UV-Vis data and with existing literature data up to the solubility limit, resolving a long-standing uncertainty about the role of chloride complexing in this system. PMID:25885410

  16. Comparison of Spectroscopic Data with Cluster Calculations of Plutonium, Plutonium Dioxide and Uranium Dioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Tobin, J G; Yu, S W; Chung, B W; Ryzhkov, M V; Mirmelstein, A

    2012-05-15

    Using spectroscopic data produced in the experimental investigations of bulk systems, including X-Ray Absorption Spectroscopy (XAS), Photoelectron Spectroscopy (PES) and Bremstrahlung Isochromat Spectroscopy (BIS), the theoretical results within for UO{sub 2}{sup 6}, PuO{sub 2}{sup 6} and Pu{sup 7} clusters have been evaluated. The calculations of the electronic structure of the clusters have been performed within the framework of the Relativistic Discrete-Variational Method (RDV). The comparisons between the LLNL experimental data and the Russian calculations are quite favorable. The cluster calculations may represent a new and useful avenue to address unresolved questions within the field of actinide electron structure, particularly that of Pu. Observation of the changes in the Pu electronic structure as a function of size suggests interesting implications for bulk Pu electronic structure.

  17. Catalysts at work: From integral to spatially resolved X-ray absorption spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Grunwaldt, Jan-Dierk; Kimmerle, Bertram; Baiker, Alfons; Boye, Pit; Schroer, Christian G.; Glatzel, Pieter; Borca, Camelia N.; Beckmann, Felix

    2009-09-25

    Spectroscopic studies on heterogeneous catalysts have mostly been done in an integral mode. However, in many cases spatial variations in catalyst structure can occur, e.g. during impregnation of pre-shaped particles, during reaction in a catalytic reactor, or in microstructured reactors as the present overview shows. Therefore, spatially resolved molecular information on a microscale is required for a comprehensive understanding of theses systems, partly in ex situ studies, partly under stationary reaction conditions and in some cases even under dynamic reaction conditions. Among the different available techniques, X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) is a well-suited tool for this purpose as the different selected examples highlight. Two different techniques, scanning and full-field X-ray microscopy/tomography, are described and compared. At first, the tomographic structure of impregnated alumina pellets is presented using full-field transmission microtomography and compared to the results obtained with a scanning X-ray microbeam technique to analyse the catalyst bed inside a catalytic quartz glass reactor. On the other hand, by using XAS in scanning microtomography, the structure and the distribution of Cu(0), Cu(I), Cu(II) species in a Cu/ZnO catalyst loaded in a quartz capillary microreactor could be reconstructed quantitatively on a virtual section through the reactor. An illustrating example for spatially resolved XAS under reaction conditions is the partial oxidation of methane over noble metal-based catalysts. In order to obtain spectroscopic information on the spatial variation of the oxidation state of the catalyst inside the reactor XAS spectra were recorded by scanning with a micro-focussed beam along the catalyst bed. Alternatively, full-field transmission imaging was used to efficiently determine the distribution of the oxidation state of a catalyst inside a reactor under reaction conditions. The new technical approaches together with quantitative data

  18. X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopic determination of plutonium speciation at the Rocky Flats environmental technology

    SciTech Connect

    Lezama-pacheco, Juan S; Conradson, Steven D; Clark, David L

    2008-01-01

    X-ray Absorption Fine Structure spectroscopy was used to probe the speciation of the ppm level Pu in thirteen soil and concrete samples from the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site in support of the site remediation effort that has been successfully completed since these measurements. In addition to X-ray Absorption Near Edge Spectra, two of the samples yielded Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure spectra that could be analyzed by curve-fits. Most of these spectra exhibited features consistent with PU(IV), and more specificaJly, PuO{sub 2+x}-type speciation. Two were ambiguous, possibly indicating that Pu that was originally present in a different form was transforming into PuO{sub 2+x}, and one was interpreted as demonstrating the presence of an unusual Pu(VI) compound, consistent with its source being spills from a PUREX purification line onto a concrete floor and the resultant extreme conditions. These experimental results therefore validated models that predicted that insoluble PuO{sub 2+x} would be the most stable form of Pu in equilibrium with air and water even when the source terms were most likely Pu metal with organic compounds or a Pu fire. A corollary of these models' predictions and other in situ observations is therefore that the minimal transport of Pu that occurred on the site was via the resuspension and mobilization of colloidal particles. Under these conditions, the small amounts of diffusely distributed Pu that were left on the site after its remediation pose only a negligible hazard.

  19. Association of Copper to Riboflavin Binding Protein; Characterization by EPR and XAS

    SciTech Connect

    Smith,S.; Bencze, K.; Wasiukanis, K.; Stemmler, T.; Benore-Parsons, M.

    2008-01-01

    The association of copper to Riboflavin Binding Protein (RBP) from egg white has been studied by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and X-ray absorption (XAS) spectroscopies. The type II site contains a mix of copper I and II in an oxygen rich environment. The association of copper to Riboflavin Binding Protein (RBP) from egg white has been studied by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and X-ray absorption (XAS) spectroscopies in order to provide insight into how this essential protein may transport and store copper in avian embryos. Riboflavin Binding Protein, RBP, purified from avian egg white, has been shown to bind copper in a 1:1 molar ratio when dialyzed against copper(II) [1]. While the egg is a unique environment and quite rich in copper, the mechanisms by which this copper is delivered during development and stored for eventual use remain unclear [2]. Since RBP is already identified in the active transport of the cofactor riboflavin to the egg, evidence of its copper binding ability may suggest an additional role for RBP in the transport and storage of copper.

  20. Characterisation of bhringaraj and guduchi herb by ICP-MS analysis, optical absorption, infrared and EPR spectroscopic methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reddy, S. Lakshmi; Fayazuddin, Md.; Reddy, N. C. G.; Ahmad, Adeel; Reddy, G. Siva; Rao, P. Sambasiva; Reddy, B. Jagannatha; Frost, R. L.

    2008-11-01

    Leaves of bhringaraj and guduchi herb of Kadapa district of Andhra Pradesh, India, are dried and powdered. ICP-MS analysis of samples indicates that copper is present in both the samples. An EPR study of guduchi sample also confirms the presence of Fe(III) whereas Eclipta alba confirms the presence of Fe(III), Mn(II) and Cu(II). Optical absorption spectrum of guduchi indicates that Cu(II) is present in rhombically distorted octahedral environment. NIR and IR results are due to carbonate fundamentals.

  1. Degradation of Bimetallic Model Electrocatalysts ___ an in situ XAS Study

    SciTech Connect

    Friebel, Daniel

    2011-06-22

    One of the major challenges in the development of clean energy fuel cells is the performance degradation of the electrocatalyst, which, apart from poisoning effects, can suffer from corrosion due to its exposure to a harsh environment under high potentials. In this communication, we demonstrate how interactions of Pt with a transition metal support affect not only, as commonly intended, the catalytic activity, but also the reactivity of Pt towards oxide formation or dissolution. We use two well-defined single-crystal model systems, Pt/Rh(111) and Pt/Au(111) and a unique x-ray spectroscopy technique with enhanced energy resolution to monitor the potential-dependent oxidation state of Pt, and find two markedly different oxidation mechanisms on the two different substrates. This information can be of great significance for future design of more active and more stable catalysts. We have studied the potential-induced degradation of Pt monolayer model electrocatalysts on Rh(111) and Au(111) single-crystal substrates. The anodic formation of Pt oxides was monitored using in situ high energy resolution fluorescence detection x-ray absorption spectroscopy (HERFD XAS). Although Pt was deposited on both substrates in a three-dimensional island growth mode, we observed remarkable differences during oxide formation that can only be understood in terms of strong Pt-substrate interactions throughout the Pt islands. Anodic polarization of Pt/Rh(111) up to +1.6 V vs. RHE (reversible hydrogen electrode) leads to formation an incompletely oxidized passive layer, whereas formation of PtO2 and partial Pt dissolution is observed for Pt/Au(111).

  2. Spectroscopic and DFT study of solvent effects on the electronic absorption spectra of sulfamethoxazole in neat and binary solvent mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almandoz, M. C.; Sancho, M. I.; Blanco, S. E.

    2014-01-01

    The solvatochromic behavior of sulfamethoxazole (SMX) was investigated using UV-vis spectroscopy and DFT methods in neat and binary solvent mixtures. The spectral shifts of this solute were correlated with the Kamlet and Taft parameters (α, β and π*). Multiple lineal regression analysis indicates that both specific hydrogen-bond interaction and non specific dipolar interaction play an important role in the position of the absorption maxima in neat solvents. The simulated absorption spectra using TD-DFT methods were in good agreement with the experimental ones. Binary mixtures consist of cyclohexane (Cy)-ethanol (EtOH), acetonitrile (ACN)-dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO), ACN-dimethylformamide (DMF), and aqueous mixtures containing as co-solvents DMSO, ACN, EtOH and MeOH. Index of preferential solvation was calculated as a function of solvent composition and non-ideal characteristics are observed in all binary mixtures. In ACN-DMSO and ACN-DMF mixtures, the results show that the solvents with higher polarity and hydrogen bond donor ability interact preferentially with the solute. In binary mixtures containing water, the SMX molecules are solvated by the organic co-solvent (DMSO or EtOH) over the whole composition range. Synergistic effect is observed in the case of ACN-H2O and MeOH-H2O, indicating that at certain concentrations solvents interact to form association complexes, which should be more polar than the individual solvents of the mixture.

  3. Tiny peaks vs mega backgrounds: a general spectroscopic method with applications in resonant Raman scattering and atmospheric absorptions.

    PubMed

    Auguié, Baptiste; Reigue, Antoine; Le Ru, Eric C; Etchegoin, Pablo G

    2012-09-18

    A simple method using standard spectrometers with charge-coupled device (CCD) detectors is described to routinely measure background-corrected spectra in situations where the signal is composed of weak spectral features (such as Raman peaks or absorption lines) engulfed in a much stronger (by as much as ∼10(5)) broad background. The principle of the method is to subtract the dominant fixed-structure noise and obtain a shot-noise limited spectrum. The final noise level can therefore be reduced as desired by sufficient integration time. The method requires multiple shifts of the diffraction gratings to extract the pixel-dependent noise structure, which is then used as a flat-field correction. An original peak-retrieval procedure is proposed, demonstrating accurate determination of peak lineshapes and linewidths and robustness on practical examples where conventional methods would not be applicable. Examples are discussed to illustrate the potential of the technique to perform routine resonant Raman measurements of fluorescent dyes with high quantum yield, using conventional Raman systems. The method can equally be applied to other situations where small features are masked by a broad overwhelming background. An explicit example is given with the measurement of weak absorption lines in atmospheric gases. PMID:22894881

  4. PROBING THE FERMI BUBBLES IN ULTRAVIOLET ABSORPTION: A SPECTROSCOPIC SIGNATURE OF THE MILKY WAY'S BICONICAL NUCLEAR OUTFLOW

    SciTech Connect

    Fox, Andrew J.; Bordoloi, Rongmon; Hernandez, Svea; Tumlinson, Jason; Savage, Blair D.; Wakker, Bart P.; Lockman, Felix J.; Bland-Hawthorn, Joss; Kim, Tae-Sun; Benjamin, Robert A.

    2015-01-20

    Giant lobes of plasma extend ≈55° above and below the Galactic center, glowing in emission from gamma rays (the Fermi Bubbles) to microwaves and polarized radio waves. We use ultraviolet absorption-line spectra from the Hubble Space Telescope to constrain the velocity of the outflowing gas within these regions, targeting the quasar PDS 456 (ℓ, b = 10.°4, +11.°2). This sightline passes through a clear biconical structure seen in hard X-ray and gamma-ray emission near the base of the northern Fermi Bubble. We report two high-velocity metal absorption components, at v {sub LSR} = –235 and +250 km s{sup –1}, which cannot be explained by co-rotating gas in the Galactic disk or halo. Their velocities are suggestive of an origin on the front and back side of an expanding biconical outflow emanating from the Galactic center. We develop simple kinematic biconical outflow models that can explain the observed profiles with an outflow velocity of ≳900 km s{sup –1} and a full opening angle of ≈110° (matching the X-ray bicone). This indicates Galactic center activity over the last ≈2.5-4.0 Myr, in line with age estimates of the Fermi Bubbles. The observations illustrate the use of UV spectroscopy to probe the properties of swept-up gas venting into the Fermi Bubbles.

  5. Spectroscopic determination of leaf biochemistry using band-depth analysis of absorption features and stepwise multiple linear regression

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kokaly, R.F.; Clark, R.N.

    1999-01-01

    We develop a new method for estimating the biochemistry of plant material using spectroscopy. Normalized band depths calculated from the continuum-removed reflectance spectra of dried and ground leaves were used to estimate their concentrations of nitrogen, lignin, and cellulose. Stepwise multiple linear regression was used to select wavelengths in the broad absorption features centered at 1.73 ??m, 2.10 ??m, and 2.30 ??m that were highly correlated with the chemistry of samples from eastern U.S. forests. Band depths of absorption features at these wavelengths were found to also be highly correlated with the chemistry of four other sites. A subset of data from the eastern U.S. forest sites was used to derive linear equations that were applied to the remaining data to successfully estimate their nitrogen, lignin, and cellulose concentrations. Correlations were highest for nitrogen (R2 from 0.75 to 0.94). The consistent results indicate the possibility of establishing a single equation capable of estimating the chemical concentrations in a wide variety of species from the reflectance spectra of dried leaves. The extension of this method to remote sensing was investigated. The effects of leaf water content, sensor signal-to-noise and bandpass, atmospheric effects, and background soil exposure were examined. Leaf water was found to be the greatest challenge to extending this empirical method to the analysis of fresh whole leaves and complete vegetation canopies. The influence of leaf water on reflectance spectra must be removed to within 10%. Other effects were reduced by continuum removal and normalization of band depths. If the effects of leaf water can be compensated for, it might be possible to extend this method to remote sensing data acquired by imaging spectrometers to give estimates of nitrogen, lignin, and cellulose concentrations over large areas for use in ecosystem studies.We develop a new method for estimating the biochemistry of plant material using

  6. Bridging the gap between macroscopic and spectroscopic studies of metal ion sorption at the oxide/water interface: Sr(II), Co(II), and Pb(II) sorption to quartz.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chia-Chen; Coleman, Michael L; Katz, Lynn E

    2006-01-01

    Metal sorption mechanisms were investigated for strontium, cobalt, and lead using sodium chloride, sodium nitrate, and sodium perchlorate as background electrolytes and quartz as the adsorbent. Spectroscopic analyses of concentrated sorption samples were evaluated for their ability to provide insight into the controlling sorption process for more dilute systems. For strontium, outer-sphere complexes identified using X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) of concentrated samples were consistent with macroscopic sorption data collected in more dilute systems. XAS results indicated that cobalt formed a new solid phase upon sorption to silica. Macroscopic studies of cobalt sorption supported the spectroscopic data for total cobalt concentrations of 10(-5) M, regardless of the background electrolyte composition or concentration. At a lower total cobalt concentration (10(-7) M), adsorption appeared to be the prevailing mechanism of cobalt removal. Spectroscopic results suggested that lead adsorbed as an inner-sphere complex on silica. The decrease of lead removal with increasing chloride concentration was attributed to competition with aqueous lead-chloride complexes, based on thermodynamic calculations. PMID:16433344

  7. Probing the Fermi Bubbles in Ultraviolet Absorption: A Spectroscopic Signature of the Milky Way's Biconical Nuclear Outflow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fox, Andrew J.; Bordoloi, Rongmon; Savage, Blair D.; Lockman, Felix J.; Jenkins, Edward B.; Wakker, Bart P.; Bland-Hawthorn, Joss; Hernandez, Svea; Kim, Tae-Sun; Benjamin, Robert A.; Bowen, David V.; Tumlinson, Jason

    2015-01-01

    Giant lobes of plasma extend ≈55° above and below the Galactic center, glowing in emission from gamma rays (the Fermi Bubbles) to microwaves and polarized radio waves. We use ultraviolet absorption-line spectra from the Hubble Space Telescope to constrain the velocity of the outflowing gas within these regions, targeting the quasar PDS 456 (l, b = 10.°4, +11.°2). This sightline passes through a clear biconical structure seen in hard X-ray and gamma-ray emission near the base of the northern Fermi Bubble. We report two high-velocity metal absorption components, at v LSR = -235 and +250 km s-1, which cannot be explained by co-rotating gas in the Galactic disk or halo. Their velocities are suggestive of an origin on the front and back side of an expanding biconical outflow emanating from the Galactic center. We develop simple kinematic biconical outflow models that can explain the observed profiles with an outflow velocity of gsim900 km s-1 and a full opening angle of ≈110° (matching the X-ray bicone). This indicates Galactic center activity over the last ≈2.5-4.0 Myr, in line with age estimates of the Fermi Bubbles. The observations illustrate the use of UV spectroscopy to probe the properties of swept-up gas venting into the Fermi Bubbles. Based on observations taken under program 13448 of the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained at the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under NASA contract NAS 5-26555, and under program 14B-299 of the NRAO Green Bank Telescope, which is a facility of the National Science Foundation operated under cooperative agreement by Associated Universities, Inc.

  8. In Situ XAS Studies on the Structure of the Active Site of Supported Gold Catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Weiher, Norbert; Beesley, Angela M.; Tsapatsaris, Nikolaos; Louis, Catherine; Delannoy, Laurent; Bokhoven, Jeroen A. van; Schroeder, Sven L. M.

    2007-02-02

    Gold clusters supported on Al2O3 and TiO2 have been exposed to different mixtures of CO and O2. Their structure has been probed in situ using X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) at the Au L3-edge. In all materials, the dominant phase during catalysis is Au0. Both samples show variations of the electronic structure of the gold clusters with changing reaction conditions as evidenced by changes in the X-ray absorption near-edge (XANES) region. These variations are caused by interaction between the gold clusters and the carbon monoxide present in the gas phase. The gold atoms remain zerovalent throughout all experiments confirming the importance of Au0 for catalytic activity.

  9. XAS Studies of Arsenic in the Environment

    SciTech Connect

    Charnock, J. M.; Polya, D. A.; Gault, A. G.; Morgan, A. J.

    2007-02-02

    Arsenic is present in low concentrations in much of the Earth's crust and changes in its speciation are vital to understanding its transport and toxicity in the environment. We have used X-ray absorption spectroscopy to investigate the coordination sites of arsenic in a wide variety of samples, including soil and earthworm tissues from arsenic-contaminated land, and human hair and nail samples from people exposed to arsenic in Cambodia. Our results confirm the effectiveness of using X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) and X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy to determine speciation changes in environmental samples.

  10. X-ray Absorption and Emission Study of Dioxygen Activation by a Small-Molecule Manganese Complex

    PubMed Central

    Rees, Julian A.; Martin-Diaconescu, Vlad; Kovacs, Julie A.; DeBeer, Serena

    2015-01-01

    Manganese K-edge X-ray absorption (XAS) and Kβ emission (XES) spectroscopies were used to investigate the factors contributing to O–O bond activation in a small-molecule system. The recent structural characterization of a metastable peroxo-bridged dimeric Mn(III)2 complex derived from dioxygen has provided the first opportunity to obtain X-ray spectroscopic data on this type of species. Ground state and time-dependent density functional theory calculations have provided further insight into the nature of the transitions in XAS pre-edge and valence-to-core (VtC) XES spectral regions. An experimentally validated electronic structure description has also enabled the determination of structural and electronic factors that govern peroxo bond activation, and have allowed us to propose both a rationale for the metastability of this unique compound, as well as potential future ligand designs which may further promote or inhibit O–O bond scission. Finally, we have explored the potential of VtC XES as an element-selective probe of both the coordination mode and degree of activation of peroxomanganese adducts. The comparison of these results to a recent VtC XES study of iron-mediated dintrogen activation helps to illustrate the factors that may determine the success of this spectroscopic method for future studies of small-molecule activation at transition metal sites. PMID:26061165

  11. Advanced XAS Analysis for Investigating Fuel Cell Electrocatalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Witkowska, Agnieszka; Principi, Emiliano; Di Cicco, Andrea; Marassi, Roberto

    2007-02-02

    In the paper we present an accurate structural study of a Pt-based electrode by means of XAS, accounting for both the catalytic nanoparticles size distribution and sample inhomogeneities. Morphology and size distribution of the nanoparticles were investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and X-ray diffraction techniques. XAS data-analysis was performed using advanced multiple-scattering techniques (GNXAS), disentangling possible effects due to surface atom contributions in nanoparticles and sample homogeneity, contributing to a reduction of intensity of the structural signal. This approach for XAS investigation of electrodes of FC devices can represent a viable and reliable way to understand structural details, important for producing more efficient catalytic materials.

  12. The chemical environment of iron in mineral fibres. A combined X-ray absorption and Mössbauer spectroscopic study.

    PubMed

    Pollastri, Simone; D'Acapito, Francesco; Trapananti, Angela; Colantoni, Ivan; Andreozzi, Giovanni B; Gualtieri, Alessandro F

    2015-11-15

    Although asbestos represents today one of the most harmful contaminant on Earth, in 72% of the countries worldwide only amphiboles are banned while controlled use of chrysotile is allowed. Uncertainty on the potential toxicity of chrysotile is due to the fact that the mechanisms by which mineral fibres induces cyto- and geno-toxic damage are still unclear. We have recently started a long term project aimed at the systematic investigation of the crystal-chemistry, bio-interaction and toxicity of the mineral fibres. This work presents a systematic structural investigation of iron in asbestos and erionite (considered the most relevant mineral fibres of social and/or economic-industrial importance) using synchrotron X-ray absorption and Mössbauer spectroscopy. In all investigated mineral fibres, iron in the bulk structure is found in octahedral sites and can be made available at the surface via fibre dissolution. We postulate that the amount of hydroxyl radicals released by the fibers depends, among other factors, upon their dissolution rate; in relation to this, a ranking of ability of asbestos fibres to generate hydroxyl radicals, resulting from available surface iron, is advanced: amosite > crocidolite ≈ chrysotile > anthophyllite > tremolite. Erionite, with a fairly high toxicity potential, contains only octahedrally coordinated Fe(3+). Although it needs further experimental evidence, such available surface iron may be present as oxide nanoparticles coating and can be a direct cause of generation of hydroxyl radicals when such coating dissolves. PMID:26073382

  13. Atomic absorption spectroscopic, conductometric and colorimetric methods for determination of fluoroquinolone antibiotics using ammonium reineckate ion-pair complex formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ragab, Gamal H.; Amin, Alaa S.

    2004-03-01

    Three accurate, rapid and simple atomic absorption spectrometric, conductometric and colorimetric methods were developed for the determination of norfloxacin (NRF), ciprofloxacin (CIP), ofloxacin (OFL) and enrofloxacin (ENF). The proposed methods depend upon the reaction of ammonium reineckate with the studied drugs to form stable precipitate of ion-pair complexes, which was dissolved in acetone. The pink coloured complexes were determined either by AAS or colorimetrically at λmax 525 nm directly using the dissolved complex. Using conductometric titration, the studied drugs could be evaluated in 50% (v/v) acetone in the range 5.0-65, 4.0-48, 5.0-56 and 6.0-72 μg ml -1 of NRF, CPF, OFL and ENF, respectively. The optimizations of various experimental conditions were described. The results obtained showed good recoveries of 99.15±1.15, 99.30±1.40, 99.60±1.50, and 99.00±1.25% with relative standard deviations of 0.81, 1.06, 0.97, and 0.69% for NRF, CPF, OFL, and ENF, respectively. Applications of the proposed methods to representative pharmaceutical formulations are successfully presented.

  14. An x-ray absorption spectroscopic study of the electronic structure and bonding of rare-earth orthoferrites.

    PubMed

    Hayes, J R; Grosvenor, A P

    2011-11-23

    Rare-earth orthoferrites, REFeO₃ (RE D rare earth; Y), are tremendously adaptable compounds that are being investigated for use in a wide variety of applications including gas sensors, vehicle catalytic converters, and solid-oxide fuel cells. They also exhibit interesting magnetic properties such as high-temperature antiferromagnetism, making them useful for data storage applications. The compounds adopt a distorted perovskite-type structure where the tilt angle of the octahedra increases (Fe-O-Fe bond angle decreases) as the size of the rare-earth atom decreases. Despite intensive study of the physical properties of these compounds, very few studies have investigated how the bonding and electronic structure of these systems change with substitution of the RE. X-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy (XANES) is a technique well-suited for such a study, and, in view of this, Fe L-, Fe K- and O K-edge spectra from a series of REFeO₃ compounds (RE D La, Pr, Nd, Sm, Eu, Gd, Ho, Yb, Y) have been collected, and are presented here. Fe L-edge spectra show that Fe is octahedrally coordinated and that the Fe-centered octahedra do not appear to distort with changes in the identity of the RE. The Fe K-edge spectra contain an intersite hybrid peak, which is an ill-studied feature that is attributed to non-local transitions of 1s electrons to 3d states on the next-nearest-neighbor atom that are hybridized with 4p states on the absorbing atom through O 2p states. In this study, it is shown that the intensity of this feature is strongly dependent on the Fe-O-Fe bond angle; the lower the Fe-O-Fe bond angle, the less intense the intersite hybrid peak is. PMID:22056809

  15. An x-ray absorption spectroscopic study of the electronic structure and bonding of rare-earth orthoferrites

    SciTech Connect

    Hayes, J.R.; Grosvenor, A.P.

    2011-11-07

    Rare-earth orthoferrites, REFeO{sub 3} (RE=rare earth; Y), are tremendously adaptable compounds that are being investigated for use in a wide variety of applications including gas sensors, vehicle catalytic converters, and solid-oxide fuel cells. They also exhibit interesting magnetic properties such as high-temperature antiferromagnetism, making them useful for data storage applications. The compounds adopt a distorted perovskite-type structure where the tilt angle of the octahedra increases (Fe-O-Fe bond angle decreases) as the size of the rare-earth atom decreases. Despite intensive study of the physical properties of these compounds, very few studies have investigated how the bonding and electronic structure of these systems change with substitution of the RE. X-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy (XANES) is a technique well-suited for such a study, and, in view of this, Fe L-, Fe K- and O K-edge spectra from a series of REFeO{sub 3} compounds (RE=La, Pr, Nd, Sm, Eu, Gd, Ho, Yb, Y) have been collected, and are presented here. Fe L-edge spectra show that Fe is octahedrally coordinated and that the Fe-centered octahedra do not appear to distort with changes in the identity of the RE. The Fe K-edge spectra contain an intersite hybrid peak, which is an ill-studied feature that is attributed to non-local transitions of 1s electrons to 3d states on the next-nearest-neighbor atom that are hybridized with 4p states on the absorbing atom through O 2p states. In this study, it is shown that the intensity of this feature is strongly dependent on the Fe-O-Fe bond angle; the lower the Fe-O-Fe bond angle, the less intense the intersite hybrid peak is.

  16. An x-ray absorption spectroscopic study of the electronic structure and bonding of rare-earth orthoferrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayes, J. R.; Grosvenor, A. P.

    2011-11-01

    Rare-earth orthoferrites, REFeO3 (RE=rare earth; Y), are tremendously adaptable compounds that are being investigated for use in a wide variety of applications including gas sensors, vehicle catalytic converters, and solid-oxide fuel cells. They also exhibit interesting magnetic properties such as high-temperature antiferromagnetism, making them useful for data storage applications. The compounds adopt a distorted perovskite-type structure where the tilt angle of the octahedra increases (Fe-O-Fe bond angle decreases) as the size of the rare-earth atom decreases. Despite intensive study of the physical properties of these compounds, very few studies have investigated how the bonding and electronic structure of these systems change with substitution of the RE. X-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy (XANES) is a technique well-suited for such a study, and, in view of this, Fe L-, Fe K- and O K-edge spectra from a series of REFeO3 compounds (RE=La, Pr, Nd, Sm, Eu, Gd, Ho, Yb, Y) have been collected, and are presented here. Fe L-edge spectra show that Fe is octahedrally coordinated and that the Fe-centered octahedra do not appear to distort with changes in the identity of the RE. The Fe K-edge spectra contain an intersite hybrid peak, which is an ill-studied feature that is attributed to non-local transitions of 1s electrons to 3d states on the next-nearest-neighbor atom that are hybridized with 4p states on the absorbing atom through O 2p states. In this study, it is shown that the intensity of this feature is strongly dependent on the Fe-O-Fe bond angle; the lower the Fe-O-Fe bond angle, the less intense the intersite hybrid peak is.

  17. X-ray absorption fine structure of aged, Pu-doped glass and ceramic waste forms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hess, N. J.; Weber, W. J.; Conradson, S. D.

    1998-04-01

    X-ray absorption spectroscopic (XAS) studies were performed on three compositionally identical, Pu-doped, borosilicate glasses prepared 15 years ago at different α-activities by varying the 239Pu/ 238Pu isotopic ratio. The resulting α-activities ranged from 1.9×10 7 to 4.2×10 9 Bq/g and have current, accumulated doses between 8.8×10 15 to 1.9×10 18 α-decays/g. Two ceramic, polycrystalline zircon (ZrSiO 4) samples prepared 16 years ago with 10.0 wt% Pu was also investigated. Varying the 239Pu/ 238Pu isotopic ratio in these samples resulted in α-activities of 2.5×10 8 and 5.6×10 10 Bq/g and current, accumulated doses of 1.2×10 17 and 2.8×10 19 α-decays/g. The multicomponent composition of the waste forms permitted XAS investigations at six absorption edges for the borosilicate glass and at three absorption edges for the polycrystalline zircons. For both waste forms, analysis of extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) and X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) spectra indicates that the local environment around the cations exhibits different degrees of disorder as a result of the accumulated α-decay dose. In general, cations with short cation-oxygen bonds show little effect from self-radiation whereas cations with long cation-oxygen bonds show a greater degree of disorder with accumulated α-decay dose.

  18. XAS and XPS Characterization of Mercury Binding on Brominated Activated Carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Hutson,N.; Attwood, B.; Scheckel, K.

    2007-01-01

    Brominated powdered activated carbon sorbents have been shown to be quite effective for mercury capture when injected into the flue gas duct at coal-fired power plants and are especially useful when burning Western low-chlorine subbituminous coals. X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) have been used to determine information about the speciation and binding of mercury on two commercially available brominated activated carbons. The results are compared with similar analysis of a conventional (non-halogenated) and chlorinated activated carbon. Both the XAS and XPS results indicate that the mercury, though introduced as elemental vapor, is consistently bound on the carbon in the oxidized form. The conventional and chlorinated activated carbons appeared to contain mercury bound to chlorinated sites and possibly to sulfate species that have been incorporated onto the carbon from adsorbed SO{sub 2}. The mercury-containing brominated sorbents appear to contain mercury bound primarily at bromination sites. The mechanism of capture for the sorbents likely consists of surface-enhanced oxidation of the elemental mercury vapor via interaction with surface-bound halide species with subsequent binding by surface halide or sulfate species.

  19. XAS and XPS characterization of mercury binding on brominated activated carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Nick D. Hutson; Brian C. Attwood; Kirk G. Scheckel

    2007-03-01

    Brominated powdered activated carbon sorbents have been shown to be quite effective for mercury capture when injected into the flue gas duct at coal-fired power plants and are especially useful when burning Western low-chlorine subbituminous coals. X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) have been used to determine information about the speciation and binding of mercury on two commercially available brominated activated carbons. The results are compared with similar analysis of a conventional (non-halogenated) and chlorinated activated carbon. Both the XAS and XPS results indicate that the mercury, though introduced as elemental vapor, is consistently bound on the carbon in the oxidized form. The conventional and chlorinated activated carbons appeared to contain mercury bound to chlorinated sites and possibly to sulfate species that have been incorporated onto the carbon from adsorbed SO{sub 2}. The mercury-containing brominated sorbents appear to contain mercury bound primarily at bromination sites. The mechanism of capture for the sorbents likely consists of surface-enhanced oxidation of the elemental mercury vapor via interaction with surface-bound halide species with subsequent binding by surface halide or sulfate species. 22 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  20. XAS study of mercury(II) ions trapped in mercaptan-functionalized mesostructured silicate with a wormhole framework structure.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chia-Chen; McKimmy, Emily J; Pinnavaia, Thomas J; Hayes, Kim F

    2004-09-15

    Directly assembled wormhole mesostructures with high level functionalized mercaptan (MP-HMS) have been shown to be effective mercury(II) (Hg2+) trapping agents. Sorption of Hg2+ onto MP-HMS was investigated using X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) to identify the structural coordination of the adsorbed Hg. Samples with different fractions of mercaptan functionalized groups (i.e., x = 0.1 and 0.5) with various Hg/S molar ratios ranging from 0.05 to 1.4 were investigated. XAS analysis indicates that adsorbed Hg first coordination shell is best fitted with an Hg-O path and an Hg-S path. The Hg-S atomic distance (R(Hg-S)) remained relatively constant while the Hg-S coordination numbers (CN) decreased as Hg/S loading increased. For the Hg-O path, both the CN and the R(Hg-O) increased with increasing Hg loading. XAS results suggest that at low Hg loadings, adsorbed Hg2+ forms mostly monodentate sulfur complexes (-S-Hg-OH) with the sulfur functional groups on the MP-HMS surfaces. At high Hg loadings, the Hg coordination environment is consistent with the formation of a double-layer structure of Hg attached to sulfur binding sites (-S-Hg-O-Hg-OH). PMID:15487784

  1. Application of Sequential Extractions and X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy to Determine the Speciation of Chromium in Northern New Jersey Marsh Soils Developed in Chromite ore Processing Residue (COPR)

    SciTech Connect

    Elzinga, E.; Cirmo, A

    2010-01-01

    The Cr speciation in marsh soils developed in weathering chromite ore processing residue (COPR) was characterized using sequential extractions and synchrotron microbeam and bulk X-ray absorption spectroscopic (XAS) analyses. The sequential extractions suggested substantial Cr associated with reducible and oxidizable soil components, and significant non-extractable residual Cr. Notable differences in Cr speciation estimates from three extraction schemes underscore the operationally defined nature of Cr speciation provided by these methods. Micro X-ray fluorescence maps and {mu}-XAS data indicated the presence of {micro}m-sized chromite particles scattered throughout the weathered COPR matrix. These particles derive from the original COPR material, and have relatively high resistance towards weathering, and therefore persist even after prolonged leaching. Bulk XAS data further indicated Cr(III) incorporated in Fe(OH){sub 3}, and Cr(III) associated with organic matter. The low Cr contents of the weathered material (200-850 ppm) compared to unweathered COPR (20,000-60,000 ppm) point to substantial Cr leaching during COPR weathering, with partial repartitioning of released Cr into secondary Fe(OH){sub 3} phases and organics. The effects of anoxia on Cr speciation, and the potential of active COPR weathering releasing Cr(VI) deeper in the profile require further study.

  2. Compressed shell conditions extracted from spectroscopic analysis of Ti K-shell absorption spectra with evaluation of line self-emission

    SciTech Connect

    Johns, H. M.; Mancini, R. C.; Hakel, P.; Nagayama, T.; Smalyuk, V. A.; Regan, S. P.; Delettrez, J.

    2014-08-15

    Ti-doped tracer layers embedded in the shell at varying distances from the fuel-shell interface serve as a spectroscopic diagnostic for direct-drive experiments conducted at OMEGA. Detailed modeling of Ti K-shell absorption spectra produced in the tracer layer considers n = 1–2 transitions in F- through Li-like Ti ions in the 4400–4800 eV range, both including and excluding line self-emission. Testing the model on synthetic spectra generated from 1-D LILAC hydrodynamic simulations reveals that the model including self-emission best reproduces the simulation, while the model excluding self-emission overestimates electron temperature T{sub e} and density N{sub e} to a higher degree for layers closer to the core. The prediction of the simulation that the magnitude of T{sub e} and duration of Ti absorption will be strongly tied to the distance of the layer from the core is consistent with the idea that regions of the shell close to the core are more significantly heated by thermal transport out of the hot dense core, but more distant regions are less affected by it. The simulation predicts more time variation in the observed T{sub e}, N{sub e} conditions in the compressed shell than is observed in the experiment, analysis of which reveals conditions remain in the range T{sub e} = 400–600 eV and N{sub e} = 3.0–10.0 × 10{sup 24} cm{sup −3} for all but the most distant Ti-doped layer, with error bars ∼5% T{sub e} value and ∼10% N{sub e} on average. The T{sub e}, N{sub e} conditions of the simulation lead to a greater degree of ionization for zones close to the core than occurs experimentally, and less ionization for zones far from the core.

  3. X-ray absorption spectroscopic characterization of the diferric-peroxo intermediate of human deoxyhypusine hydroxylase in the presence of its substrate eIF5a.

    PubMed

    Jasniewski, Andrew J; Engstrom, Lisa M; Vu, Van V; Park, Myung Hee; Que, Lawrence

    2016-09-01

    Human deoxyhypusine hydroxylase (hDOHH) is an enzyme that is involved in the critical post-translational modification of the eukaryotic translation initiation factor 5A (eIF5A). Following the conversion of a lysine residue on eIF5A to deoxyhypusine (Dhp) by deoxyhypusine synthase, hDOHH hydroxylates Dhp to yield the unusual amino acid residue hypusine (Hpu), a modification that is essential for eIF5A to promote peptide synthesis at the ribosome, among other functions. Purification of hDOHH overexpressed in E. coli affords enzyme that is blue in color, a feature that has been associated with the presence of a peroxo-bridged diiron(III) active site. To gain further insight into the nature of the diiron site and how it may change as hDOHH goes through the catalytic cycle, we have conducted X-ray absorption spectroscopic studies of hDOHH on five samples that represent different species along its reaction pathway. Structural analysis of each species has been carried out, starting with the reduced diferrous state, proceeding through its O2 adduct, and ending with a diferric decay product. Our results show that the Fe⋯Fe distances found for the five samples fall within a narrow range of 3.4-3.5 Å, suggesting that hDOHH has a fairly constrained active site. This pattern differs significantly from what has been associated with canonical dioxygen activating nonheme diiron enzymes, such as soluble methane monooxygenase and Class 1A ribonucleotide reductases, for which the Fe⋯Fe distance can change by as much as 1 Å during the redox cycle. These results suggest that the O2 activation mechanism for hDOHH deviates somewhat from that associated with the canonical nonheme diiron enzymes, opening the door to new mechanistic possibilities for this intriguing family of enzymes. PMID:27380180

  4. Electrochemical Kinetics and X-ray Absorption Spectroscopic Investigations of Oxygen Reduction on Chalcogen-Modified Ruthenium Catalysts in Alkaline Media

    SciTech Connect

    N Ramaswamy; R Allen; S Mukerjee; Y

    2011-12-31

    The oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in alkaline media has been investigated on chalcogen-modified ruthenium nanoparticles (Ru/C, Se/Ru/C, Se/RuMo/C, S/Ru/C, S/RuMo/C) synthesized in-house via aqueous routes. In acidic medium, it is well known that modification by a chalcogen prevents the oxidation of the underlying transition-metal (Ru) surface, thereby promoting direct molecular O{sub 2} adsorption on the Ru metal. On an unmodified Ru catalyst in alkaline media, the surface oxides on Ru mediate the 2e{sup -} reduction of molecular O{sub 2} to a stable peroxide anion (HO{sub 2}{sup -}) intermediate via an outer-sphere electron-transfer mechanism. This increases the activity of HO{sub 2}{sup -} near the electrode surface and decreases the overpotential for ORR by effectively carrying out the reduction of HO{sub 2}{sup -} to OH{sup -} at the oxide-free ruthenium metal site. An increase in ORR activity of Ru is observed by modification with a chalcogen; however, the increase is not as significant as observed in acidic media. Ternary additives, such as Mo, were found to significantly improve the stability of the chalcogen-modified catalysts. Detailed investigations of the ORR activity of this class of catalyst have been carried out in alkaline media along with comparisons to acidic media wherever necessary. A combination of electrochemical and X-ray absorption spectroscopic (EXAFS, XANES, {Delta}{mu}) studies has been performed in order to understand the structure/property relationships of these catalysts within the context of ORR in alkaline electrolytes.

  5. XAS and TRLIF spectroscopy of uranium and neptunium in seawater.

    PubMed

    Maloubier, Melody; Solari, Pier Lorenzo; Moisy, Philippe; Monfort, Marguerite; Den Auwer, Christophe; Moulin, Christophe

    2015-03-28

    Seawater contains radionuclides at environmental levels; some are naturally present and others come from anthropogenic nuclear activity. In this report, the molecular speciation in seawater of uranium(VI) and neptunium(V) at a concentration of 5 × 10(-5) M has been investigated for the first time using a combination of two spectroscopic techniques: Time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence (TRLIF) for U and extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) for U and Np at the LIII edge. In parallel, the theoretical speciation of uranium and neptunium in seawater at the same concentration is also discussed and compared to spectroscopic data. The uranium complex was identified as the neutral carbonato calcic complex UO2(CO3)3Ca2, which has been previously described in other natural systems. In the case of neptunium, the complex identified is mainly a carbonato complex whose exact stoichiometry is more difficult to assess. The knowledge of the actinide molecular speciation and reactivity in seawater is of fundamental interest in the particular case of uranium recovery and more generally regarding the actinide life cycle within the biosphere in the case of accidental release. This is the first report of actinide direct speciation in seawater medium that can complement inventory data. PMID:25689216

  6. An in-situ heater for the XAS beamline (12-ID) in Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johannessen, B.; Hussain, Z. S.; East, D. R.; Gibson, M. A.

    2013-04-01

    To accommodate for a growing number of requests by our user community an in-situ heater has been commissioned for the X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) beamline 12-ID at the Australian Synchrotron. Here, we present an in-situ method for calibrating the temperature of the heating stage based on an anharmonic, correlated Einstein model. Specifically, we show that a temperature-dependant study of a bulk metallic foil (7.5 μm Cu) can be used to accurately calibrate the temperature of the heater. We also present the temperature-dependant coordination number, bond length, Debye-Waller factor, and third order cumulant to the bond length distribution function of the material from 18K to 1074K. At the higher temperatures we find that the atomic structure is comparable to that of an amorphous or liquid material indicating a gradual transition from crystalline to disordered atomic structure.

  7. In situ XAS studies of Pt{sub x}Pd{sub 1-x} nanoparticles under thermal annealing

    SciTech Connect

    Bernardi, F.; Morais, J.; Alves, M. C. M.

    2009-01-29

    In this work, we have studied Pt{sub x}Pd{sub 1-x}(x = 1, 0.7 or 0.5) nanoparticles subjected to H{sub 2} reduction and sulfidation under H{sub 2}S atmosphere, both at 300 deg. C. The system was studied by in-situ x-ray absorption spectroscopy (in-situ XAS). We observed that the efficiency of sulfidation is directly proportional to the quantity of Pd atoms in the nanoparticle, provided the reduction process has been achieved.

  8. In Situ XAS of the Solvothermal Decomposition of Dithiocarbamate Complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Islam, Husn-Ubayda; Roffey, Anna; Hollingsworth, Nathan; Catlow, Richard; Wolthers, Mariette; De Leeuw, Nora; Bras, Wim; Sankar, Gopinathan; Hogarth, Graeme

    2013-04-01

    An in situ XAS study of the solvothermal decomposition of iron and nickel dithiocarbamate complexes was performed in order to gain understanding of the decomposition mechanisms. This work has given insight into the steps involved in the decomposition, showing variation in reaction pathways between the iron and nickel dithiocarbamates, and the non-innocent role of oleylamine as the solvent and capping agent in the reaction.

  9. Simultaneous surface plasmon resonance and x-ray absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Serrano, A; Rodríguez de la Fuente, O; Collado, V; Rubio-Zuazo, J; Monton, C; Castro, G R; García, M A

    2012-08-01

    We present an experimental setup for the simultaneous measurement of surface plasmon resonance (SPR) and x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) on metallic thin films at a synchrotron beamline. The system allows measuring in situ and in real time the effect of x-ray irradiation on the SPR curves to explore the interaction of x-rays with matter. It is also possible to record XAS spectra while exciting SPR in order to study changes in the films induced by the excitation of surface plasmons. Combined experiments recording simultaneously SPR and XAS curves while scanning different parameters can be also carried out. The relative variations in the SPR and XAS spectra that can be detected with this setup range from 10(-3) to 10(-5), depending on the particular experiment. PMID:22938268

  10. Simultaneous surface plasmon resonance and x-ray absorption spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Serrano, A.; Rodriguez de la Fuente, O.; Collado, V.; Rubio-Zuazo, J.; Castro, G. R.; Monton, C.; Garcia, M. A.

    2012-08-15

    We present an experimental setup for the simultaneous measurement of surface plasmon resonance (SPR) and x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) on metallic thin films at a synchrotron beamline. The system allows measuring in situ and in real time the effect of x-ray irradiation on the SPR curves to explore the interaction of x-rays with matter. It is also possible to record XAS spectra while exciting SPR in order to study changes in the films induced by the excitation of surface plasmons. Combined experiments recording simultaneously SPR and XAS curves while scanning different parameters can be also carried out. The relative variations in the SPR and XAS spectra that can be detected with this setup range from 10{sup -3} to 10{sup -5}, depending on the particular experiment.

  11. Effect of steric hindrance on carbon dioxide absorption into new amine solutions: thermodynamic and spectroscopic verification through solubility and NMR analysis.

    PubMed

    Park, Jung-Yeon; Yoon, Sang Jun; Lee, Huen

    2003-04-15

    Acid gas absorption technology is of great importance in these days for the prevention of global warming and the resulting worldwide climate change. More efficient process design and development for the removal of acid gases has become important, together with the development of new absorbents as one of urgent areas of research in addressing global-warming problems. In the present work, aqueous solutions of 2-amino-2-hydroxymethyl-1,3-propanediol (AHPD), a sterically hindered amine, has been examined as a potential CO2 absorbent and compared with the most commonly used absorbent, monoethanolamine (MEA) solution, through equilibrium solubility measurements and 13C NMR spectroscopic analyses. The solubilities of CO2 in aqueous 10 mass % AHPD solutions were higher than those in aqueous 10 mass % MEA solutions above 4 kPa at 298.15 K, but below 4 kPa, the solubility behavior appeared to be the opposite. The solubility difference between these two solutions increased with the CO2 partial pressures above the crossover pressure. Equilibrated CO2-MEA-H2O and CO2-AHPD-H2O solutions at various CO2 partal pressures ranging from 0.01 to 3000 kPa were analyzed by 13C NMR spectroscopy to provide a more microscopic understanding of the reaction mechanisms in the two solutions. In the CO2-amine-H2O solutions, amine reacted with CO2 to form mainly the protonated amine (AMH+), bicarbonate ion (HCO3-), and carbamate anion (AMCO2-), where the quantitative ratio of bicarbonate ion to carbamate anion strongly influenced the CO2 loading in the amine solutions. A profusion of bicarbonate ions, but a very small amount of carbamate anions, was identified in the CO2-AHPD-H2O solution, whereas a considerable amount of carbamate anions was formed in the CO2-MEA-H2O solution. AHPD contains more hydroxyl groups than nonhindered MEA, and hence, the chemical shifts in its 13C NMR spectra were strongly influenced by the solution pH values. In contrast, MEA appeared to be insensitive to pH. The

  12. Electronic and molecular structures of the members of the electron transfer series [Cr(tbpy)3]n (n = 3+, 2+, 1+, 0): an X-ray absorption spectroscopic and density functional theoretical study.

    PubMed

    Scarborough, Christopher C; Sproules, Stephen; Weyhermüller, Thomas; DeBeer, Serena; Wieghardt, Karl

    2011-12-19

    The electron transfer series of complexes [Cr((t)bpy)(3)](n)(PF(6))(n) (n = 3+, 2+, 1+, 0 (1-4)) has been synthesized and the molecular structures of 1, 2, and 3 have been determined by single-crystal X-ray crystallography; the structure of 4 has been investigated using extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) analysis. Magnetic susceptibility measurements (4-300 K) established an S = 3/2 ground state for 1, an S = 1 ground state for 2, an S = 1/2 ground state for 3, and an S = 0 ground state for 4. The electrochemistry of this series in CH(3)CN solution exhibits three reversible one-electron transfer waves. UV-vis/NIR spectra and Cr K-edge X-ray absorption spectra (XAS) are reported. The same experimental techniques have been applied for [Cr(III)(tacn)(2)]Br(3)·5H(2)O (5) and [Cr(II)(tacn)(2)]Cl(2) (6), which possess an S = 3/2 and an S = 2 ground state, respectively (tacn = 1,4,7-triazacyclononane, a tridentate, pure σ-donor ligand). The Cr K-edge XAS spectra of the corresponding complexes K(4)[Cr(II)(CN)(6)]·10H(2)O (S = 1) (7) and K(3)[Cr(III)(CN)(6)] (S = 3/2) (8) have also been recorded. All complexes have been studied computationally with density functional theory (DFT) using the B3LYP functional. The molecular and electronic structures of the anionic members of the series [Cr(bpy)(3)](1-,2-,3-) have also been calculated. It is unequivocally shown that all members of the electron transfer series 1-4 and [Cr(bpy)(3)](n) (n = 3+, 2+, 1+, 0, 1-, 2, 3-) possess a central Cr(III) ion ((t(2g))(3), S = 3/2). The three N,N'-coordinated neutral (bpy(0)) ligands in the trication 1 and [Cr(III)(bpy)(3)](3+) are one-electron reduced in a stepwise fashion to localized one, two, and three π-radical anions (bpy(•))(1-) in the dicationic, monocationic, and neutral species, respectively. Complexes 2 and [Cr(bpy)(3)](2+) cannot be described as low-spin Cr(II) species; they are in fact best described as [Cr(III)((t)bpy(•))((t)bpy(0))(2)](2+) and [Cr

  13. Iron speciation in ancient Attic pottery pigments: a non-destructive SR-XAS investigation.

    PubMed

    Bardelli, Fabrizio; Barone, Germana; Crupi, Vincenza; Longo, Francesca; Maisano, Giacomo; Majolino, Domenico; Mazzoleni, Paolo; Venuti, Valentina

    2012-09-01

    The present work reports a detailed investigation on the speciation of iron in the pigments of decorated pottery fragments of cultural heritage relevance. The fragments come from the Gioiosa Guardia archaeological site in the area of the `Strait of Messina' (Sicily, Southern Italy), and date back to VI-V century BC. The purpose of this study is to characterize the main pigmenting agents responsible for the dark-red coloration of the specimens using non-destructive analytical techniques such as synchrotron radiation X-ray absorption spectroscopy (SR-XAS), a well established technique for cultural heritage and environmental subjects. Absorption spectra were collected at the Fe K-edge on the Italian beamline for absorption and diffraction (BM8-GILDA) at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility in Grenoble (France). In order to determine the speciation of Fe in the samples, principal component analysis and least-squares fitting procedures were applied to the near-edge part of the absorption spectra (XANES). Details on the local structure around the Fe sites were obtained by analyzing the extended part of the spectra (EXAFS). Furthermore, an accurate determination of the average Fe oxidation state was carried out through analysis of the pre-edge peaks of the absorption spectra. Samples resulted composed of an admixture of Fe(2)O(3) (hematite or maghemite) and magnetite (Fe(3)O(4)), occurring in different relative abundance in the dark- and light-colored areas of the specimens. The results obtained are complementary to information previously obtained by means of instrumental neutron activation analysis, Fourier transform infrared absorbance and time-of-flight neutron diffraction. PMID:22898958

  14. Real-Time Observation of Platinum Redispersion on Ceria-Based Oxide by In-situ Turbo-XAS in Fluorescence Mode

    SciTech Connect

    Nagai, Yasutaka; Dohmae, Kazuhiko; Tanabe, Toshitaka; Shinjoh, Hirofumi; Takagi, Nobuyuki; Ikeda, Yasuo; Guilera, Gemma; Pascarelli, Sakura; Newton, Mark; Matsumoto, Shin'ichi

    2007-02-02

    A real-time observation of the redispersion behavior of sintered Pt on ceria-based oxide was made possible by in-situ time-resolved Turbo-XAS in fluorescence mode. 2 wt% Pt/Ce-Zr-Y mixed oxide samples were prepared, and then treated under an aging condition. The average Pt particle size measured by CO absorption method after aging was 7 nm. Redispersion treatments of the previously aged catalyst were carried out at 600 deg. C within an in-situ XAS cell in a cyclical flow of reducing/oxidizing gases. Pt L3-edge XANES spectra were collected every 1.1 second under in-situ conditions. From a change in the XANES spectra, we observed that the Pt particle size of the aged catalyst decreased from 7 to 5 nm after 60 seconds and then to 3 nm after 1000 seconds.

  15. Spectroscopic characterization of ion-irradiated multi-layer graphenes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsukagoshi, Akira; Honda, Shin-ichi; Osugi, Ryo; Okada, Hiraku; Niibe, Masahito; Terasawa, Mititaka; Hirase, Ryuji; Izumi, Hirokazu; Yoshioka, Hideki; Niwase, Keisuke; Taguchi, Eiji; Lee, Kuei-Yi; Oura, Masaki

    2013-11-01

    Low-energy Ar ions (0.5-2 keV) were irradiated to multi-layer graphenes and the damage process, the local electronic states, and the degree of alignment of the basal plane, and the oxidation process upon ion irradiation were investigated by Raman spectroscopy, soft X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) and in situ X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). By Raman spectroscopy, we observed two stages similar to the case of irradiated graphite, which should relate to the accumulations of vacancies and turbulence of the basal plane, respectively. XAS analysis indicated that the number of sp2-hybridized carbon (sp2-C) atoms decreased after ion irradiation. Angle-resolved XAS revealed that the orientation parameter (OP) decreased with increasing ion energy and fluence, reflecting the turbulence of the basal plane under irradiation. In situ XPS shows the oxidation of the irradiated multi-layer graphenes after air exposure.

  16. XAS study of the active site of a bacterial heme-sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Della Longa, S.; Arcovito, A.; Brunori, M.; Castiglione, N.; Cutruzzolà, F.; D'Angelo, P.; Giardina, G.; Rinaldo, S.

    2009-11-01

    Denitrifying bacteria control NO and NO2 cytosolic levels by regulating the expression of denitrification gene clusters via REDOX signalling of specific transcriptional factors that may act as NO sensors in vivo. A protein belonging to the subclass DNR (dissimilative nitrate respiration regulator) from Pseudomonas aeruginosa has been recently suggested to be a heme containing protein. Very recently the three dimensional structure of the apo-form of DNR (in the absence of heme) has been determined by X-Ray crystallography, whereas the holo-form (in the presence of heme) has not yet been crystallized. We have investigated the heme local structure in solution of ferric and ferrous holo-DNR by XAS. The Fe K-edge XANES spectrum of the ferric adduct displays typical features of a low-spin hexacoordinate Fe-heme complex, having two histidines ligated. After chemical reduction, relevant changes of the XANES fingerprints suggest a repositioning of the heme inside the hydrophobic core of the protein in agreement with previously reported structural and spectroscopic evidence. Partial release of the axial ligands leaves the Fe(II)heme available, and very reactive, to bind exogenous ligands like NO, thus supporting its role as the cofactor involved in NO sensing activity.

  17. Gold nanoparticles with different capping systems: an electronic and structural XAS analysis.

    PubMed

    López-Cartes, C; Rojas, T C; Litrán, R; Martínez-Martínez, D; de la Fuente, J M; Penadés, S; Fernández, A

    2005-05-12

    Gold nanoparticles (NPs) have been prepared with three different capping systems: a tetralkylammonium salt, an alkanethiol, and a thiol-derivatized neoglycoconjugate. Also gold NPs supported on a porous TiO(2) substrate have been investigated. X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) has been used to determine the electronic behavior of the different capped/supported systems regarding the electron/hole density of d states. Surface and size effects, as well as the role of the microstructure, have been also studied through an exhaustive analysis of the EXAFS (extended X-ray absorption fine structure) data. Very small gold NPs functionalized with thiol-derivatized molecules show an increase in d-hole density at the gold site due to Au-S charge transfer. This effect is overcoming size effects (which lead to a slightly increase of the d-electron density) for high S:Au atomic ratios and core-shell microstructures where an atomically abrupt Au-S interface likely does not exist. It has been also shown that thiol functionalization of very small gold NPs is introducing a strong distortion as compared to fcc order. To the contrary, electron transfer from reduced support oxides to gold NPs can produce a higher increase in d-electron density at the gold site, as compared to naked gold clusters. PMID:16852039

  18. Axial Ligation and Redox Changes at the Cobalt Ion in Cobalamin Bound to Corrinoid Iron-Sulfur Protein (CoFeSP) or in Solution Characterized by XAS and DFT

    PubMed Central

    Schrapers, Peer; Mebs, Stefan; Goetzl, Sebastian; Hennig, Sandra E.; Dau, Holger; Dobbek, Holger; Haumann, Michael

    2016-01-01

    A cobalamin (Cbl) cofactor in corrinoid iron-sulfur protein (CoFeSP) is the primary methyl group donor and acceptor in biological carbon oxide conversion along the reductive acetyl-CoA pathway. Changes of the axial coordination of the cobalt ion within the corrin macrocycle upon redox transitions in aqua-, methyl-, and cyano-Cbl bound to CoFeSP or in solution were studied using X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) at the Co K-edge in combination with density functional theory (DFT) calculations, supported by metal content and cobalt redox level quantification with further spectroscopic methods. Calculation of the highly variable pre-edge X-ray absorption features due to core-to-valence (ctv) electronic transitions, XANES shape analysis, and cobalt-ligand bond lengths determination from EXAFS has yielded models for the molecular and electronic structures of the cobalt sites. This suggested the absence of a ligand at cobalt in CoFeSP in α-position where the dimethylbenzimidazole (dmb) base of the cofactor is bound in Cbl in solution. As main species, (dmb)CoIII(OH2), (dmb)CoII(OH2), and (dmb)CoIII(CH3) sites for solution Cbl and CoIII(OH2), CoII(OH2), and CoIII(CH3) sites in CoFeSP-Cbl were identified. Our data support binding of a serine residue from the reductive-activator protein (RACo) of CoFeSP to the cobalt ion in the CoFeSP-RACo protein complex that stabilizes Co(II). The absence of an α-ligand at cobalt not only tunes the redox potential of the cobalamin cofactor into the physiological range, but is also important for CoFeSP reactivation. PMID:27384529

  19. Atomic structure of machined semiconducting chips: An x-ray absorption spectroscopy study

    SciTech Connect

    Paesler, M.; Sayers, D.

    1988-12-01

    X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) has been used to examine the atomic structure of chips of germanium that were produced by single point diamond machining. It is demonstrated that although the local (nearest neighbor) atomic structure is experimentally quite similar to that of single crystal specimens information from more distant atoms indicates the presence of considerable stress. An outline of the technique is given and the strength of XAS in studying the machining process is demonstrated.

  20. Fast-scanning high-flux microprobe for biological X-ray fluorescence microscopy and microXAS

    SciTech Connect

    Barrea, R.A.; Gore, D.; Kujala, N.; Karanfil, C.; Kozyrenko, S.; Heurich, R.; Vukonich, M.; Huang, R.; Paunesku, T.; Woloschak, G.; Irving, T.C.

    2010-07-23

    There is a growing interest in the biomedical community in obtaining information concerning the distribution and local chemical environment of metals in tissues and cells. Recently, biological X-ray fluorescence microscopy (XFM) has emerged as the tool of choice to address these questions. A fast-scanning high-flux X-ray microprobe, built around a recently commissioned pair of 200 mm-long Rh-coated silicon Kirkpatrick-Baez mirrors, has been constructed at BioCAT beamline 18ID at the Advanced Photon Source. The new optical system delivers a flux of 1.3 x 10{sup 12} photons s{sup -1} into a minimum focal spot size of {approx}3-5 {micro}m FWHM. A set of Si drift detectors and bent Laue crystal analyzers may be used in combination with standard ionization chambers for X-ray fluorescence measurements. BioCAT's scanning software allows fast continuous scans to be performed while acquiring and storing full multichannel analyzer spectra per pixel on-the-fly with minimal overhead time (<20 ms per pixel). Together, the high-flux X-ray microbeam and the rapid-scanning capabilities of the BioCAT beamline allow the collection of XFM and micro X-ray absorption spectroscopy (microXAS) measurements from as many as 48 tissue sections per day. This paper reports the commissioning results of the new instrument with representative XFM and microXAS results from tissue samples.

  1. Polycapillary based μ-XAS and confocal μ-XANES at a bending magnet source of the ESRF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silversmit, Geert; Vekemans, Bart; Nikitenko, Sergey; Tirez, Kristof; Bras, Wim; Brenker, Frank E.; Vincze, Laszlo

    2009-11-01

    Glass polycapillary optics are shown to be easy to use focusing optics for bending magnet XAS stations. These achromatic optics have acceptances of several mm horizontally and vertically, while their angular acceptances can be matched to the source divergence by the design of the polycapillary. A polycapillary half-lens based focusing system was successfully tested for transmission and fluorescence μ-XAS at the DUBBLE beamline (BM26A, ESRF) and the feasibility of confocal μ-XANES in fluorescence mode is presented. Transmission efficiencies of 25-45% with flux density gain factors of about 2000 and beam sizes of 10-20 μm were obtained in the 7-14 keV energy range. Although the polycapillary optic has a smoothly changing energy dependent transmission efficiency, the amplitude and shape of the EXAFS oscillations are not influenced by this. The focusing properties of the polycapillary lens cancel slight vertical motions of the incoming X-ray beam, resulting in a fixed μ-beam spot in the focal plane, making polycapillaries also suitable optic in combination with a non-fixed exit monochromator. In addition, by mounting a second polycapillary half-lens in front of an energy dispersive detector, a confocal set-up is obtained, which restricts the part of the sample seen by the detector to a microscopic volume of about 20×20×15 μm3 at the Fe K absorption edge for example.

  2. Fast-scanning high-flux microprobe for biological X-ray fluorescence microscopy and microXAS.

    PubMed

    Barrea, R A; Gore, D; Kujala, N; Karanfil, C; Kozyrenko, S; Heurich, R; Vukonich, M; Huang, R; Paunesku, T; Woloschak, G; Irving, T C

    2010-07-01

    There is a growing interest in the biomedical community in obtaining information concerning the distribution and local chemical environment of metals in tissues and cells. Recently, biological X-ray fluorescence microscopy (XFM) has emerged as the tool of choice to address these questions. A fast-scanning high-flux X-ray microprobe, built around a recently commissioned pair of 200 mm-long Rh-coated silicon Kirkpatrick-Baez mirrors, has been constructed at BioCAT beamline 18ID at the Advanced Photon Source. The new optical system delivers a flux of 1.3 x 10(12) photons s(-1) into a minimum focal spot size of approximately 3-5 microm FWHM. A set of Si drift detectors and bent Laue crystal analyzers may be used in combination with standard ionization chambers for X-ray fluorescence measurements. BioCAT's scanning software allows fast continuous scans to be performed while acquiring and storing full multichannel analyzer spectra per pixel on-the-fly with minimal overhead time (<20 ms per pixel). Together, the high-flux X-ray microbeam and the rapid-scanning capabilities of the BioCAT beamline allow the collection of XFM and micro X-ray absorption spectroscopy (microXAS) measurements from as many as 48 tissue sections per day. This paper reports the commissioning results of the new instrument with representative XFM and microXAS results from tissue samples. PMID:20567085

  3. Potential of Chilopsis Linearis for Gold Phytomining: Using XAS to Determine Gold Reduction And Nanoparticle Formation Within Plant Tissues

    SciTech Connect

    E, Rodriguez; Parsons, J.G.; Peralta-Videa, J.R.; Cruz-Jiminez, G.; Romera-Gonzalez, J.; Sanchez-Salcido, B.E.; Saupe, G.B.; Duarte-Gardea, M.; Gardea-Torresdey, J.L.

    2009-06-04

    This study reports on the capability of the desert plant Chilopsis linearis (Cav.) Sweet (desert willow) to uptake gold (Au) from gold-enriched media at different plant-growth stages. Plants were exposed to 20, 40, 80, 160, and 320 mg Au L{sup -1} in agar-based growing media for 13, 18, 23, and 35 d. The Au content and oxidation state of Au in the plants were determined using an inductively coupled plasma/optical emission spectrometer (ICP/OES) and X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS), respectively. Gold concentrations ranging from 20 to 80 mg Au L{sup -1} did not significantly affect Chilopsis linearis plant growth. The concentration of gold in the plants increased as the age of the plant increased. The Au concentrations in leaves for the 20, 40, 80, and 160 mg Au L{sup -1} treatments were 32, 60, 62, and 179 mg Au kg{sup -1} dry weight mass, respectively, demonstrating the gold uptake capability of desert willow. The XAS data indicated that desert willow produced gold nanoparticles within plant tissues. Plants exposed to 160 mg Au L{sup -1} formed nanoparticles that averaged approximately 8, 35, and 18 in root, stem, and leaves, respectively. It was observed that the average size of the Au nanoparticles formed by the plants is related to the total Au concentration in tissues and their location in the plant.

  4. Fast-scanning high-flux microprobe for biological X-ray fluorescence microscopy and microXAS

    PubMed Central

    Barrea, R. A.; Gore, D.; Kujala, N.; Karanfil, C.; Kozyrenko, S.; Heurich, R.; Vukonich, M.; Huang, R.; Paunesku, T.; Woloschak, G.; Irving, T. C.

    2010-01-01

    There is a growing interest in the biomedical community in obtaining information concerning the distribution and local chemical environment of metals in tissues and cells. Recently, biological X-ray fluorescence microscopy (XFM) has emerged as the tool of choice to address these questions. A fast-scanning high-flux X-ray microprobe, built around a recently commissioned pair of 200 mm-long Rh-coated silicon Kirkpatrick–Baez mirrors, has been constructed at BioCAT beamline 18ID at the Advanced Photon Source. The new optical system delivers a flux of 1.3 × 1012 photons s−1 into a minimum focal spot size of ∼3–5 µm FWHM. A set of Si drift detectors and bent Laue crystal analyzers may be used in combination with standard ionization chambers for X-ray fluorescence measurements. BioCAT’s scanning software allows fast continuous scans to be performed while acquiring and storing full multichannel analyzer spectra per pixel on-the-fly with minimal overhead time (<20 ms per pixel). Together, the high-flux X-ray microbeam and the rapid-scanning capabilities of the BioCAT beamline allow the collection of XFM and micro X-ray absorption spectroscopy (microXAS) measurements from as many as 48 tissue sections per day. This paper reports the commissioning results of the new instrument with representative XFM and microXAS results from tissue samples. PMID:20567085

  5. Ligand K-edge XAS, DFT, and TDDFT analysis of pincer linker variations in Rh(i) PNP complexes: reactivity insights from electronic structure.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kyounghoon; Wei, Haochuan; Blake, Anastasia V; Donahue, Courtney M; Keith, Jason M; Daly, Scott R

    2016-06-14

    Here we report P K-edge, Cl K-edge, and Rh L3-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) data for Rh[C5H3N-2,6-(XP(t)Bu2)2]Cl, where X = O ((tBu)PONOP; ) or CH2 ((tBu)PNP; ). Solid-state XAS data for and were compared to density functional theory (DFT) and time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) calculations to identify how changing the PNP pincer linker from O to CH2 affected electronic structure and bonding at Rh(i). Pronounced differences in XAS peak intensities and energies were observed. The P K-edge XAS data revealed a large increase in Rh 4dx(2)-y(2) and P 3p orbital-mixing (Rh-P σ*) in compared to , and pronounced transition energy variations reflected marked differences in orbital energies and compositions. By comparison, the Cl K-edge XAS data revealed only subtle differences in Rh-Cl covalency, although larger splitting between the Rh-Cl π* and σ* transitions was observed in . Analysis of the occupied MOs from DFT (HOMO, HOMO-1, HOMO-2, and HOMO-3) and comparison to the unoccupied MOs involved in XAS revealed a relatively uniform energy increase (ca. 0.3-0.5 eV) for all five 4d-derived molecular orbitals in Rh((tBu)PNP)Cl () compared to Rh((tBu)PONOP)Cl (). The energy shift was relatively invariant with respect to differences in orbital symmetry, bonding type (σ or π), and orbital mixing, which suggested that the increase could be attributed to electrostatic effects. The change in d-orbital energies are consistent with known reactivity differences of Rh((tBu)PONOP)(+) and Rh((tBu)PNP)(+) towards CO, H2, and CH2Cl2, and are explained here by considering how d-orbital energies affect covalent L → M σ bonding and M → L π backbonding. PMID:27216135

  6. Os layers spontaneously deposited on the Pt(111) electrode : XPS, STM and GIF-XAS study.

    SciTech Connect

    Rhee, C. K.; Wakisaka, M.; Tolmachev, Y.; Johnston, C.; Haasch, R.; Attenkofer, K.; Lu, G. Q.; You, H.; Wieckowski, A.; Univ. of Illinois Champaigh-Urbana

    2003-01-01

    Scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) characterized adlayers of spontaneously deposited osmium on a Pt(111) electrode were investigated using ex-situ X-ray photoemission spectroscopy (XPS) and in-situ grazing incidence fluorescence X-ray absorption spectroscopy (GIF-XAS). After a single spontaneous deposition, monoatomic (or nearly monoatomic) nanoislands of osmium are formed. The island diameter varies from 2 to 5 nm depending on the Os coverage, which in turn is adjusted by varying the concentration of the Os precursor salt (OsCl3) in the deposition bath and/or by the deposition time. XPS reveals three oxidation states: a metallic Os (the 4f7/2 core level binding energy of 50.8 eV), Os(IV) (51.5 eV) and Os(VIII) (52.4 eV). The metallic osmium exists at potentials below 500 mV (vs. RHE) while above 500 mV osmium is oxidized to Os(IV). Electrodissolution of osmium begins above 900 mV and occurs simultaneously with platinum oxidation. At ca. 1200 mV V versus the RHE reference, the oxidation state of some small amounts of osmium that survive dissolution is the Os(VIII). We demonstrate, for the first time, that mixed or odd valencies of osmium exist on the platinum surface at potentials higher that 800 mV. In-situ GIF-XAS measurements of an Os LIII edge also reveal the presence of three Os oxidation states. Namely, below the electrode potential of 400 mV, the X-ray fluorescent energy at maximum absorption is 10.8765 keV, and is characteristic of the metallic Os. In the potential range between 500 and 1000 mV this energy is gradually shifted to higher values, assignable to higher valencies of osmium, like Os(IV). This tendency continues to higher potentials consistent with the third, highly oxidized osmium form present, most likely Os(VIII). The variation of the 'raw edge jump height' of Os with the electrode potential, which is equivalent to a drop in osmium surface concentration, demonstrates that the electrochemical stripping of Os begins below 1.0 V versus RHE, as

  7. Evidence for 5d-σ and 5d-π covalency in lanthanide sesquioxides from oxygen K-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Altman, Alison B; Pacold, Joseph I; Wang, Jian; Lukens, Wayne W; Minasian, Stefan G

    2016-06-14

    The electronic structure in the complete series of stable lanthanide sesquioxides, Ln2O3 (Ln = La to Lu, except radioactive Pm), has been evaluated using oxygen K-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) with a scanning transmission X-ray microscope (STXM). The experimental results agree with recent synthetic, spectroscopic and theoretical investigations that provided evidence for 5d orbital involvement in lanthanide bonding, while confirming the traditional viewpoint that there is little Ln 4f and O 2p orbital mixing. However, the results also showed that changes in the energy and occupancy of the 4f orbitals can impact Ln 5d and O 2p mixing, leading to several different bonding modes for seemingly identical Ln2O3 structures. On moving from left to right in the periodic table, abrupt changes were observed for the energy and intensity of transitions associated with Ln 5d and O 2p antibonding states. These changes in peak intensity, which were directly related to the amounts of O 2p and Ln 5d mixing, were closely correlated to the well-established trends in the chemical accessibility of the 4f orbitals towards oxidation or reduction. The unique insight provided by the O K-edge XAS is discussed in the context of several recent theoretical and physical studies on trivalent lanthanide compounds. PMID:26979662

  8. Revisiting the total ion yield x-ray absorption spectra of liquid water microjets

    SciTech Connect

    Saykally, Richard J; Cappa, Chris D.; Smith, Jared D.; Wilson, Kevin R.; Saykally, Richard J.

    2008-02-16

    Measurements of the total ion yield (TIY) x-ray absorption spectrum (XAS) of liquid water by Wilson et al. (2002 J. Phys.: Condens. Matter 14 L221 and 2001 J. Phys. Chem. B 105 3346) have been revisited in light of new experimental and theoretical efforts by our group. Previously, the TIY spectrum was interpreted as a distinct measure of the electronic structure of the liquid water surface. However, our new results indicate that the previously obtained spectrum may have suffered from as yet unidentified experimental artifacts. Although computational results indicate that the liquid water surface should exhibit a TIY-XAS that is fundamentally distinguishable from the bulk liquid XAS, the new experimental results suggest that the observable TIY-XAS is actually nearly identical in appearance to the total electron yield (TEY-)XAS, which is a bulk probe. This surprising similarity between the observed TIY-XAS and TEY-XAS likely results from large contributions from x-ray induced electron stimulated desorption of ions, and does not necessarily indicate that the electronic structure of the bulk liquid and liquid surface are identical.

  9. Development of Ta-based Superconducting Tunnel Junction X-ray Detectors for Fluorescence XAS

    SciTech Connect

    Friedrich, S; Drury, O; Hall, J; Cantor, R

    2009-09-23

    We are developing superconducting tunnel junction (STJ) soft X-ray detectors for chemical analysis of dilute samples by fluorescence-detected X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS). Our 36-pixel Nb-based STJ spectrometer covers a solid angle {Omega}/4{pi} {approx} 10{sup -3}, offers an energy resolution of {approx}10-20 eV FWHM for energies up to {approx}1 keV, and can be operated at total count rates of {approx}10{sup 6} counts/s. For increased quantum efficiency and cleaner response function, we have now started the development of Ta-based STJ detector arrays. Initial devices modeled after our Nb-based STJs have an energy resolution below 10 eV FWHM for X-ray energies below 1 keV, and pulse rise time discrimination can be used to improve their response function for energies up to several keV. We discuss the performance of the Ta-STJs and outline steps towards the next-generation of large STJ detector arrays with higher sensitivity.

  10. Development of Ta-based Superconducting Tunnel Junction X-ray Detectors for Fluorescence XAS

    SciTech Connect

    Friedrich, Stephan; Drury, Owen B.; Hall, John; Cantor, Robin

    2010-06-23

    We are developing superconducting tunnel junction (STJ) soft X-ray detectors for chemical analysis of dilute samples by fluorescence-detected X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS). Our 36-pixel Nb-based STJ spectrometer covers a solid angle {Omega}/4{pi}{approx_equal}10{sup -3}, offers an energy resolution of {approx}10-20 eV FWHM for energies up to {approx}1 keV, and can be operated at total count rates of {approx}10{sup 6} counts/s. For increased quantum efficiency and cleaner response function, we have now started the development of Ta-based STJ detector arrays. Initial devices modeled after our Nb-based STJs have an energy resolution below 10 eV FWHM for X-ray energies below 1 keV, and pulse rise time discrimination can be used to improve their response function for energies up to several keV. We discuss the performance of the Ta-STJs and outline steps towards the next-generation of large STJ detector arrays with higher sensitivity.

  11. Unconventional XAS applications in Physical Science using Pixel Array X-ray Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oyanagi, Hiroyuki

    2007-03-01

    Fluorescence x-ray yield is a conventional technique which increases sensitivity of x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS). Combining high brilliance x-ray sources and state-of-the-art pixel array detector (PAD) opened up unconventional application channels in condensed matter science. PAD is a segmented detector fabricated onto a mono domain single crystal by lithography. Our Ge PAD consists of 10×10 segments with almost 100% packing ratio. The local structure of photo-induced phase transition of Fe(II) spin-crossover complex under visible light irradiation was studied. We find that the coordination symmetry is retained upon the diamagnetic (S=0)↔paramagnetic (S=2) transformation. In the application to high-temperature superconducting (La,Sr)2CuO4 thin film single crystals, the EXAFS results show that the local structure (CuO6 octahedron) is tetragonally deformed in accordance with the epitaxial strain. High-quality data without the effect of substrates were obtained by real-time monitoring segmented fluorescence signals.

  12. XAS Structural Investigation of Early Intermediates in the Mechanism of DNA Repair by Human ABH2

    PubMed Central

    Giri, Nitai Charan; Sun, Hong; Chen, Haobin; Costa, Max; Maroney, Michael J.

    2011-01-01

    Human ABH2 repairs DNA lesions by using an Fe(II)- and αKG-dependent oxidative demethylation mechanism. The structure of the active site features the facial triad of protein ligands consisting of the side chains of two histidine and one aspartate residues that is common to many nonheme Fe(II) oxygenases. X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) of metallated (Fe and Ni) samples of ABH2 were used to investigate the mechanism of ABH2 and its inhibition by Ni(II) ions. The data are consistent with a sequential mechanism that features a five coordinate metal center in both the presence and absence of the α-ketoglutarate cofactor. This aspect is not altered in the Ni(II)-substituted enzyme, and both metals are shown to bind the cofactor. When substrate is bound to the native Fe(II) complex with α-ketoglutarate bound, a five-coordinate Fe(II) center is retained that features an open coordination position for O2 binding. However, in the case of the Ni(II)-substituted enzyme, the complex that forms in the presence of cofactor and substrate is six-coordinate, and therefore features no open coordination site for oxygen activation at the metal. PMID:21510633

  13. Determination of the geometric and electronic structure of activated bleomycin using X-ray absorption spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Westre, T.E.; Loeb, K.E.; Zaleski, J.M.; Hedman, B.; Hodgson, K.O.; Solomon, E.I. )

    1995-02-01

    Activated Bleomycin (BLM) is the first mononuclear non-heme iron oxygen intermediate stable enough for detailed spectroscopic study. DNA degradation by activated BLM involves C-H bond cleavage at the C4[prime] position of deoxyribose moieties and results in the production of base propenals. It has been postulated that activated BLM is an oxo-ferryl intermediate on the basis of its reactivity and analogy with cytochrome P-450 chemistry. Alternatively, spectroscopic and model studies have indicated activated BLM to have an iron(III)-peroxide site. In this study, X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) has been used to directly probe the oxidation and spin states of the iron in activated BLM and to determine if a short iron-oxo bond is present, which would be characteristic of the oxo-ferryl species of heme iron. Both the pre-edge and edge regions of the Fe K-edge spectra indicate that activated BLM is a low spin ferric complex. The pre-edge intensity of activated BLM is also similar to that of low spin ferric BLM and does not show the intensity enhancement which would be present if there were a short Fe-O bond. Furthermore, bond distances obtained from EXAFS are similar to those in low spin Fe[sup III]BLM and show no evidence for a short iron-oxo bond. 33 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  14. A flow-through x-ray absorption spectroscopy cell for characterization of powder catalysts in the working state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Odzak, J. F.; Argo, A. M.; Lai, F. S.; Gates, B. C.; Pandya, K.; Feraria, L.

    2001-10-01

    We report the design and demonstration of an x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) cell used for the characterization of solid (powder) catalysts in operation with gas-phase reactants. The use of powder samples removes complications arising from mass transfer limitations in pressed wafer samples, the typical form of catalyst used in other in situ XAS cells. The new cell allows collection of XAS data at temperatures ranging from about 230 to 470 K, gas flow rates ranging from about 10 to 500 ml min-1, and pressures ranging from about 1 to 3 atm. The cell is designed to function nearly as a plug flow reactor.

  15. Description of the Role of Shot Noise in Spectroscopic Absorption and Emission Measurements with Photodiode and Photomultiplier Tube Detectors: Information for an Instrumental Analysis Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McClain, Robert L.; Wright, John C.

    2014-01-01

    A description of shot noise and the role it plays in absorption and emission measurements using photodiode and photomultiplier tube detection systems is presented. This description includes derivations of useful forms of the shot noise equation based on Poisson counting statistics. This approach can deepen student understanding of a fundamental…

  16. Contributions of Paint and Soil to Pb in Household Dust Wipes: An XAS Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pingitore, N. E.; Clague, J. W.; Amaya, M. A.

    2010-12-01

    Speciation of Pb by X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) indicated that Pb compounds associated with lead-based paint accounted for perhaps half of the Pb in 24 household dust wipes collected in El Paso, Texas. Soil-derived, sorbed Pb, likely Pb-humate, was also a major Pb species in many of the dust wipes. Household dust wipes are a standard technique for evaluating health risks of Pb to children, particularly toddlers, in public and private housing. The level of Pb in the wipes does not, however, indicate whether the source of the Pb is the house itself (peeling or powdering interior or exterior paint) or external, from contaminated soil or airborne particulate matter brought into the house by wind or foot traction. Understanding the origin of Pb in household dust is important in remediation: cover the old paint or remove the yard soil. XAS speciation can assist in understanding the source of Pb in household dust. The presence of significant Pb-humate requires a soil source, and suggests the need for soil remediation. Such species of Pb as hydrocerussite, lead sulfate, lead silicate, and lead chromate can be presumed to be components of lead-based paint. These may represent interior and/or exterior paint and thus do not uniquely identify the locus of the Pb source(s). Pb L-III edge XAFS data were collected on beam lines 7-3, 10-2, and 11-2 at SSRL at typical conditions of 3 GeV field and 80-200 mA current, using Si(220) water- or liquid-nitrogen-cooled monochromator crystals. Data were collected at ambient temperature in fluorescence mode using a 13- or 30-element Ge detector with a Se 3 or 6 filter and Soller slits to reduce scattered radiation. This publication was made possible by grant numbers 1RO1-ES11367 and 1 S11 ES013339-01A1 from the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS), NIH. Its contents are solely the responsibility of the authors and do not necessarily represent the official views of the NIEHS, NIH. Portions of this research were

  17. Soft X-Ray Studies of Pu Electronic Structure: Past Lessons From XAS and Future Direction With BIS

    SciTech Connect

    Tobin, J G; Yu, S W; Chung, B W; Waddill, G D; Kutepov, A L

    2008-12-10

    Synchrotron-radiation-based spectroscopies such as X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy (XAS) have contributed greatly to our improved understanding of Pu electronic structure. However, significant questions remain concerning the nature of Pu electronic structure. Perhaps the missing piece of the puzzle is the direct experimental determination of the unoccupied electronic structure using high energy inverse photoelectron spectroscopy (IPES) or Bremstrahlung Isochromat Spectroscopy (BIS). Past BIS studies of Th and U indicate the feasibility and utility of Pu studies. To this end, a new BIS capability has been developed in our laboratory. Electron stimulated emission of photons has been carried out using the XES-350 monochromator and detector system. Our preliminary results and future plans will be presented.

  18. Optical anisotropy in GaAs/AlxGa1-xAs multiple quantum wells under thermally induced uniaxial strain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, H.; Wraback, M.; Pamulapati, J.; Newman, P. G.; Dutta, M.; Lu, Y.; Kuo, H. C.

    1993-05-01

    The effect of thermally induced in-plane uniaxial strain on the optical properties of a GaAs/AlxGa1-xAs multiple quantum well (MQW) has been studied in detail. The strain was produced by bonding the MQW thin films to LiTaO3, a transparent substrate which possesses a direction-dependent thermal expansion coefficient. At temperatures different from the bonding temperature we have observed an anisotropy in the optical properties of the MQW due to the strain-induced lowering of its in-plane fourfold rotation symmetry. The anisotropic absorption and birefringence for light incident normal to such a MQW structure have been determined and compared to a theory involving the mixing of the valence subbands.

  19. Spectroscopic evidence for the formation of singlet molecular oxygen (/sup 1/. delta. /sub g/O/sub 2/) upon irradiation of a solvent-oxygen (/sup 3/Sigma/sub g//sup -/O/sub 2/) cooperative absorption band

    SciTech Connect

    Scurlock, R.D.; Ogilby, P.R.

    1988-01-20

    It is well-known that the presence of molecular oxygen (/sup 3/..sigma../sub g//sup -/O/sub 2/) in a variety of organic solvents causes an often substantial red shift in the solvent absorption spectrum. This extra, broad absorption feature is reversibly removed by purging the solvent with nitrogen gas. Mulliken and Tsubomura assigned the oxygen-dependent absorption band to a transition from a ground state solvent-oxygen complex to a solvent-oxygen charge transfer (CT) state (sol/sup .+/O/sub 2//sup .-/). In addition to the broad Mulliken CT band, there are, often in the same spectral region, distinct singlet-triplet transitions (T/sub 1/ reverse arrow S/sub 0/) which are enhanced by molecular oxygen (/sup 3/..sigma../sub g//sup -/O/sub 2/). Since both of these solvent-oxygen cooperative transitions may result in the formation of reactive oxygenating species, singlet molecular oxygen (/sup 1/..delta../sub g/O/sub 2/) and/or the superoxide ion (O/sub 2//sup .-/), it follows that recent studies have focused on unsaturated hydrocarbon oxygenation subsequent to the irradiation of the oxygen-induced absorption bands in both the solution phase and cryogenic (10 K) glasses. In these particular experiments, oxygenated products characteristic of both /sup 1/..delta../sub g/O/sub 2/ and O/sub 2//sub .-/ were obtained, although the systems studied appeared to involve the participation of one intermediate at the exclusion of the other. In this communication, the authors provide, for the first time, direct spectroscopic evidence for the formation of /sup 1/..delta../sub g/O/sub 2/ following a solvent-oxygen (/sup 3/..sigma../sub g//sup -/O/sub 2/) cooperative absorption. They have observed, in a time-resolved experiment, a near-IR luminescence subsequent to laser excitation of the oxygen-induced absorption bands of mesitylene, p-xylene, o-xylene, toluene, and benzene at 355 nm and 1,4-dioxane at 266 nm. They suggest that this signal is due to /sup 1/..delta../sub g/O/sub 2

  20. X-ray photoelectron and optical absorption spectroscopic studies on the dye chlorodiane blue, used as a carrier generation molecule in organic photoconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Pacansky, J.; Waltman, R.J.

    1992-07-01

    The dye chlorodiane blue, used as a carrier generation molecule in organic photoconductors, is characterized via optical absorption and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and the results are interpreted on the basis of ab initio quantum mechanical molecular models. These data indicate that chlorodiane blue exists as azo-enol and hydrazone-quinone chemical structures and it is the hydrazone-quinone form that provides the higher xerographic gain in electrophotographic applications. Optimized geometries, atomic charges, and molecular orbital plots and energies are reported for both the azo-enol and hydrazone-quinone forms of chlorodiane blue. The two structural forms of the dye are experimentally distinguishable via both optical absorption and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and the wavelength and chemical shifts, respectively, are interpreted via the theoretical results. 29 refs., 9 figs., 4 tabs.

  1. Characterization of the physico-chemical properties of polymeric materials for aerospace flight. [differential thermal and atomic absorption spectroscopic analysis of nickel cadmium batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rock, M.

    1981-01-01

    Electrodes and electrolytes of nickel cadmium sealed batteries were analyzed. Different thermal analysis of negative and positive battery electrodes was conducted and the temperature ranges of occurrence of endotherms indicating decomposition of cadmium hydroxide and nickel hydroxide are identified. Atomic absorption spectroscopy was used to analyze electrodes and electrolytes for traces of nickel, cadmium, cobalt, and potassium. Calibration curves and data are given for each sample analyzed. Instrumentation and analytical procedures used for each method are described.

  2. Acetate- and thiol-capped monodisperse ruthenium nanoparticles: XPS, XAS, and HRTEM studies.

    PubMed

    Chakroune, Nassira; Viau, Guillaume; Ammar, Souad; Poul, Laurence; Veautier, Delphine; Chehimi, Mohamed M; Mangeney, Claire; Villain, Françoise; Fiévet, Fernand

    2005-07-19

    Monodisperse ruthenium nanoparticles were prepared by reduction of RuCl3 in 1,2-propanediol. The mean particle size was controlled by appropriate choice of the reduction temperature and the acetate ion concentration. Colloidal solutions in toluene were obtained by coating the metal particles with dodecanethiol. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XANES and EXAFS for the Ru K-absorption edge) were performed on particles of two different diameters, 2 and 4 nm, and in different environments, polyol/acetate or thiol. For particles stored in polyol/acetate XPS studies revealed superficial oxidation limited to one monolayer and a surface coating containing mostly acetate ions. Analysis of the EXAFS spectra showed both oxygen and ruthenium atoms around the ruthenium atoms with a Ru-Ru coordination number N smaller than the bulk value, as expected for fine particles. In the case of 2 nm acetate-capped particles N is consistent with particles made up of a metallic core and an oxidized monolayer. For 2 nm thiol-coated particles, a Ru-S bond was evidenced by XPS and XAS. For the 4 nm particles XANES and XPS studies showed that most of the ruthenium atoms are in the zerovalent state. Nevertheless, in both cases, when capped with thiol, the Ru-Ru coordination number inferred from EXAFS is much smaller than for particles of the same size stored in polyol. This is attributed to a structural disorganization of the particles by thiol chemisorption. HRTEM studies confirm the marked dependence of the structural properties of the ruthenium particles on their chemical environment; they show the acetate-coated particles to be single crystals, whereas the thiol-coated particles appear to be polycrystalline. PMID:16008388

  3. Micro-spectroscopic investigation of selenium-bearing minerals from the Western US Phosphate Resource Area

    PubMed Central

    Ryser, Amy L; Strawn, Daniel G; Marcus, Matthew A; Johnson-Maynard, Jodi L; Gunter, Mickey E; Möller, Gregory

    2005-01-01

    Mining activities in the US Western Phosphate Resource Area (WPRA) have released Se into the environment. Selenium has several different oxidation states and species, each having varying degrees of solubility, reactivity, and bioavailability. In this study we are investigating the speciation of Se in mine-waste rocks. Selenium speciation was determined using bulk and micro-x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS), as well as micro-x-ray fluorescence mapping. Rocks used for bulk-XAS were ground into fine powders. Shale used for micro-XAS was broken along depositional planes to expose unweathered surfaces. The near edge region of the XAS spectra (XANES) for the bulk rock samples revealed multiple oxidation states, with peaks indicative of Se(-II), Se(IV), and Se(+VI) species. Micro-XANES analysis of the shale indicated that three unique Se-bearing species were present. Using the XANES data together with ab initio fitting of the extended x-ray absorption fine structure region of the micro-XAS data (micro-EXAFS) the three Se-bearing species were identified as dzharkenite, a di-selenide carbon compound, and Se-substituted pyrite. Results from this research will allow for a better understanding of the biogeochemical cycling of Se in the WPRA.

  4. X-ray absorption studies of battery materials

    SciTech Connect

    McBreen, J.

    1996-10-01

    X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) is ideal for {ital in}{ital situ} studies of battery materials because both the probe and signal are penetrating x rays. The advantage of XAS being element specific permits investigation of the environment of a constituent element in a composite material. This makes it very powerful for studying electrode additives and corrosion of individual components of complex metal hydride alloys. The near edge part of the spectrum (XANES) provides information on oxidation state and site symmetry of the excited atom. This is particularly useful in study of corrosion and oxidation changes in cathode materials during charge/discharge cycle. Extended fine structure (EXAFS) gives structural information. Thus the technique provides both chemical and structural information. Since XAS probes only short range order, it can be applied to study of amorphous electrode materials and electrolytes. This paper discusses advantages and limitations of the method, as well as some experimental aspects.

  5. X-Ray Absorption Spectroscopy Imaging of Biological Tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pickering, Ingrid J.; George, Graham N.

    2007-02-01

    X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) is proving invaluable in determining the average chemical form of metals or metalloids in intact biological tissues. As most tissues have spatial structure, there is great additional interest in visualizing the spatial location of the metal(loid) as well as its chemical forms. XAS imaging gives the opportunity of producing maps of specific chemical types of elements in vivo in dilute biological systems. X-ray fluorescence microprobe techniques are routinely used to study samples with spatial heterogeneity. Microprobe produces elemental maps, with chemical sensitivity obtained by recording micro-XAS spectra at selected point locations on the map. Unfortunately, using these procedures spatial detail may be lost as the number of point spectra recorded generally is limited. A powerful extension of microprobe is XAS imaging or chemically specific imaging. Here, the incident energy is tuned to features in the near-edge which are characteristic of the expected chemical forms of the element. With a few simple assumptions, these XAS images can then be converted to quantitative images of specific chemical form, yielding considerable clarity in the distributions.

  6. X-ray absorption spectroscopic study of LiCoO2 as the negative electrode of lithium-ion batteries.

    PubMed

    Chadwick, Alan V; Savin, Shelley L P; Alcántara, Ricardo; Fernández Lisbona, Diego; Lavela, Pedro; Ortiz, Gregorio F; Tirado, José L

    2006-05-12

    Lithium cobalt oxide (LiCoO(2)) particles are modified using rotor blade grinding and re-annealing and used as the active electrode material versus lithium in the 3-0 V potential interval, in which a maximum capacity of 903 mA h g(-1) is achieved. X-ray absorption near edge structure spectra reveal the complete reduction of Co(3+) to Co metal at 0 V. Cell recharge leads to an incomplete reoxidation of cobalt. A maximum reversible capacity of 812 mA h g(-1) is obtained, although a poor capacity retention upon prolonged cycling may limit its application. PMID:16612798

  7. Structure of the dinuclear active site of urease. X-ray absorption spectroscopic study of native and 2-mercaptoethanol-inhibited bacterial and plant enzymes

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Shengke; Scott, R.A. ); Lee, M.H.; Hausinger, R.P. ); Clark, P.A.; Wilcox, D.E. )

    1994-04-13

    The structures of the dinuclear Ni(II) active sites of urease from jack bean and Klebsiella aerogenes are compared with and without the addition of the inhibitor 2-mercaptoethanol (2-ME). No significant differences are observed by nickel K-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy between the plant and bacterial enzymes. The Ni X-ray absorption edge spectra display an 8332-eV 1s[yields]3d peak intensity similar to that observed for five-coordinate Ni(II) compounds[sup 1] for both native and 2-ME-bound derivatives. Curve-fitting of Ni EXAFS data indicates that the average Ni(II) coordination environment in native urease can be described as Ni(imidazole)[sub x](N,O)[sub 5[minus]x], with x = 2 or 3. Addition of 2-ME results in replacement of one of the non-imidazole (N,O) ligands with (S,Cl) (most likely the thiolate sulfur of 2-ME) and results in the appearance of a new peak in the Fourier transforms that can only be fit with a Ni[center dot][center dot][center dot]Ni scattering component at a Ni-Ni distance of [approximately]3.26 [angstrom]. A structure for this 2-ME-bound dinuclear site is proposed to contain the two Ni(II) ions bridged by the thiolate sulfur of 2-ME.

  8. Reaction cell for in situ soft x-ray absorption spectroscopy and resonant inelastic x-ray scattering measurements of heterogeneous catalysis up to 1 atm and 250 °C

    SciTech Connect

    Kristiansen, P. T.; Rocha, T. C. R.; Knop-Gericke, A.; Guo, J. H.; Duda, L. C.

    2013-11-15

    We present a novel in situ reaction cell for heterogeneous catalysis monitored in situ by x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) and resonant inelastic x-ray scattering (RIXS). The reaction can be carried out at a total pressure up to 1 atm, a regime that has not been accessible to comparable in situ techniques and thus closes the pressure gap to many industrial standard conditions. Two alternate catalyst geometries were tested: (A) a thin film evaporated directly onto an x-ray transparent membrane with a flowing reaction gas mixture behind it or (B) a powder placed behind both the membrane and a gap of flowing reaction gas mixture. To illustrate the working principle and feasibility of our reaction cell setup we have chosen ethylene epoxidation over a silver catalyst as a test case. The evolution of incorporated oxygen species was monitored by total electron/fluorescence yield O K-XAS as well as O K-RIXS, which is a powerful method to separate contributions from inequivalent sites. We find that our method can reliably detect transient species that exist during catalytic reaction conditions that are hardly accessible using other spectroscopic methods.

  9. The Five-To-Six-Coordination Transition of Ferric Human Serum Heme-Albumin Is Allosterically-Modulated by Ibuprofen and Warfarin: A Combined XAS and MD Study

    PubMed Central

    Bionducci, Monica; Fanali, Gabriella; Meli, Massimiliano; Colombo, Giorgio; Fasano, Mauro; Ascenzi, Paolo; Mobilio, Settimio

    2014-01-01

    Human serum albumin (HSA) is involved physiologically in heme scavenging; in turn, heme-albumin (HSA-heme-Fe) displays globin-like properties. Here, the allosteric effect of ibuprofen and warfarin on the local atomic structure around the ferric heme-Fe (heme-Fe(III)) atom of HSA-heme-Fe (HSA-heme-Fe(III)) has been probed by Fe-K edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS). The quantitative analysis of the Fe-K edge extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) signals and modeling of the near edge (XANES) spectral features demonstrated that warfarin and ibuprofen binding modify the local structure of the heme-Fe(III). Combined XAS data analysis and targeted molecular dynamics (MD) simulations provided atomic resolution insights of protein structural rearrangements required to accommodate the heme-Fe(III) upon ibuprofen and warfarin binding. In the absence of drugs, the heme-Fe(III) atom is penta-coordinated having distorted 4+1 configuration made by the nitrogen atoms of the porphyrin ring and the oxygen phenoxy atom of the Tyr161 residue. MD simulations show that ibuprofen and warfarin association to the secondary fatty acid (FA) binding site 2 (FA2) induces a reorientation of domain I of HSA-heme-Fe(III), this leads to the redirection of the His146 residue providing an additional bond to the heme-Fe(III) atom, providing the 5+1 configuration. The comparison of Fe-K edge XANES spectra calculated using MD structures with those obtained experimentally confirms the reliability of the proposed structural model. As a whole, combining XAS and MD simulations it has been possible to provide a reliable model of the heme-Fe(III) atom coordination state and to understand the complex allosteric transition occurring in HSA-heme-Fe(III) upon ibuprofen and warfarin binding. PMID:25153171

  10. High-resolution molybdenum K-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy analyzed with time-dependent density functional theory.

    PubMed

    Lima, Frederico A; Bjornsson, Ragnar; Weyhermüller, Thomas; Chandrasekaran, Perumalreddy; Glatzel, Pieter; Neese, Frank; DeBeer, Serena

    2013-12-28

    X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) is a widely used experimental technique capable of selectively probing the local structure around an absorbing atomic species in molecules and materials. When applied to heavy elements, however, the quantitative interpretation can be challenging due to the intrinsic spectral broadening arising from the decrease in the core-hole lifetime. In this work we have used high-energy resolution fluorescence detected XAS (HERFD-XAS) to investigate a series of molybdenum complexes. The sharper spectral features obtained by HERFD-XAS measurements enable a clear assignment of the features present in the pre-edge region. Time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) has been previously shown to predict K-pre-edge XAS spectra of first row transition metal compounds with a reasonable degree of accuracy. Here we extend this approach to molybdenum K-edge HERFD-XAS and present the necessary calibration. Modern pure and hybrid functionals are utilized and relativistic effects are accounted for using either the Zeroth Order Regular Approximation (ZORA) or the second order Douglas-Kroll-Hess (DKH2) scalar relativistic approximations. We have found that both the predicted energies and intensities are in excellent agreement with experiment, independent of the functional used. The model chosen to account for relativistic effects also has little impact on the calculated spectra. This study provides an important calibration set for future applications of molybdenum HERFD-XAS to complex catalytic systems. PMID:24197060

  11. Spectroscopic characterization of C7H3(+) and C7H3˙: electronic absorption and fluorescence in 6 K neon matrices.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Arghya; Fulara, Jan; Dietsche, Rainer; Maier, John P

    2014-04-21

    Mass selective deposition of C7H3(+) (m/z = 87) into solid neon reveals the 1(1)A1←X(1)A1 electronic absorption system of hepta-1,2,3,4,5,6-heptahexaenylium cation B(+) [H2CCCCCCCH](+) with an origin band at 441.3 nm, 1(1)A'←X(1)A' transition of 2,4-pentadiynylium,1-ethynyl cation C(+) [HCCCHCCCCH](+) starting at 414.6 nm and the 1(1)A1←X(1)A1 one of cyclopropenylium,1,3-butadiynyl cation A(+) [HCCCCC<(CH=CH)](+) with an onset at 322.2 nm. Vibrationally resolved fluorescence was observed for isomer B(+) upon laser excitation of the absorption bands in the 1(1)A1←X(1)A1 transition. After neutralization of the cations in the matrix five absorption systems of the C7H3 neutral radicals starting at 530.3, 479.4, 482.3, 325.0 and 302.5 nm were detected. These were identified as the 1(2)A'←X(2)A' and 2(2)A'←X(2)A' electronic transitions of 2-(buta-1,3-diynyl)cycloprop-2yl-1-1ylidene E˙ [HCCCCC<(C=CH2)]˙, 1(2)B1←X(2)B1 of 1,2,3,4,5,6-heptahexaenyl B˙ [H2CCCCCCCH]˙, 3(2)B1←X(2)B1 of 3-buta-1,3-diynyl-cyclopropenyl A˙ [HCCCCC<(CH=CH)]˙ and 2(2)B1←X(2)A2 transition of 1,2-divinylidene-cyclopropanyl radical F˙ [HCC-cyc-(CCHC)-CCH]˙, respectively. The assignment is based on calculated vertical excitation energies using the CASPT2 method. Comparison of the calculated harmonic vibrational frequencies with those inferred from the spectra supports the assignment. PMID:24603977

  12. A multi-epoch spectroscopic study of the BAL quasar APM 08279+5255. II. Emission- and absorption-line variability time lags

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saturni, F. G.; Trevese, D.; Vagnetti, F.; Perna, M.; Dadina, M.

    2016-03-01

    Context. The study of high-redshift bright quasars is crucial to gather information about the history of galaxy assembly and evolution. Variability analyses can provide useful data on the physics of quasar processes and their relation with the host galaxy. Aims: In this study, we aim to measure the black hole mass of the bright lensed BAL QSO APM 08279+5255 at z = 3.911 through reverberation mapping, and to update and extend the monitoring of its C IV absorption line variability. Methods: We perform the first reverberation mapping of the Si IV and C IV emission lines for a high-luminosity quasar at high redshift with the use of 138 R-band photometric data and 30 spectra available over 16 years of observations. We also cross-correlate the C IV absorption equivalent width variations with the continuum light curve to estimate the recombination time lags of the various absorbers and infer the physical conditions of the ionised gas. Results: We find a reverberation-mapping time lag of ~900 rest-frame days for both Si IV and C IV emission lines. This is consistent with an extension of the BLR size-to-luminosity relation for active galactic nuclei up to a luminosity of ~1048 erg s-1, and implies a black hole mass of 1010 M⊙. Additionally, we measure a recombination time lag of ~160 days in the rest frame for the C IV narrow absorption system, which implies an electron density of the absorbing gas of ~2.5 × 104 cm-3. Conclusions: The measured black hole mass of APM 08279+5255 indicates that the quasar resides in an under-massive host-galaxy bulge with Mbulge ~ 7.5MBH, and that the lens magnification is lower than ~8. Finally, the inferred electron density of the narrow-line absorber implies a distance of the order of 10 kpc of the absorbing gas from the quasar, placing it within the host galaxy.

  13. Analytical procedure for the simultaneous voltammetric determination of trace metals in food and environmental matrices. Critical comparison with atomic absorption spectroscopic measurements.

    PubMed

    Melucci, Dora; Torsi, Giancarlo; Locatelli, Clinio

    2007-01-01

    An analytical procedure fit for the simultaneous determination of copper (II), chromium(VI), thallium(I), lead(II), tin(II), antimony(III), and zinc(II) by square wave anodic stripping voltammetry (SWASV) in three interdependent environmental matrices involved in foods and food chain as meals, cereal plants and soils is described. The digestion of each matrix was carried out using a concentrated HCl-HNO3-H2SO4 (meals and cereal plants) and HCl-HNO3 (soils) acidic attack mixtures. 0.1 mol/L dibasic ammonium citrate pH 8.5 was employed as the supporting electrolyte. The voltammetric measurements were carried out using, as working electrode, a stationary hanging mercury drop electrode (HMDE) and a platinum electrode and an Ag/AgCl/KClsat electrode as auxiliary and reference electrodes, respectively. The analytical procedure was verified by the analyses of the standard reference materials: Wholemeal BCR-CRM 189, Tomato Leaves NIST-SRM 1573a and Montana Soil Moderately Elevated Traces NIST-SRM 2711. For all the elements in the certified matrix, the precision as repeatability, expressed as relative standard deviation (Sr %) was lower than 5%. The accuracy, expressed as percentage relative error (e %) was of the order of 3-7%, while the detection limits were in the range 0.015-0.103 microg/g. Once set up on the standard reference materials, the analytical procedure was transferred and applied to commercial meal samples, cereal plants and soils samples drawn in sites devoted to agricultural practice. A critical comparison with spectroscopic measurements is also discussed. PMID:17822223

  14. X-ray absorption spectroscopic studies of the dinuclear iron center in methane monooxygenase and the sulfure and chlorine centers in photographic materials

    SciTech Connect

    DeWitt, J.G.

    1992-12-01

    The dinuclear iron center of the hydroxylase component of soluble methane monooxygenase (MMO) from Methylococcus capsulatus and Methylosinus trichosporiwn has been studied by X-ray absorption spectroscopy. Analysis of the Fe K-edge EXAFS revealed that the first shell coordination of the Fe(HI)Fe(IH) oxidized state of the hydroxylase from M. capsulatus consists of approximately 6 N and 0 atoms at an average distance of 2.04 [Angstrom]. The Fe-Fe distance was determined to be 3.4 [Angstrom]. No evidence for the presence of a short oxo bridge in the iron center of the oxidized hydroxylase was found, suggesting that the active site of MMO is significantly different from the active sites of the dinuclear iron proteins hemery and ribonucleotide reductase. In addition, the results of the first shell fits suggest that there are more oxygen than nitrogen donor ligands.

  15. X-ray absorption spectroscopic studies of the dinuclear iron center in methane monooxygenase and the sulfure and chlorine centers in photographic materials

    SciTech Connect

    DeWitt, J.G.

    1992-12-01

    The dinuclear iron center of the hydroxylase component of soluble methane monooxygenase (MMO) from Methylococcus capsulatus and Methylosinus trichosporiwn has been studied by X-ray absorption spectroscopy. Analysis of the Fe K-edge EXAFS revealed that the first shell coordination of the Fe(HI)Fe(IH) oxidized state of the hydroxylase from M. capsulatus consists of approximately 6 N and 0 atoms at an average distance of 2.04 {Angstrom}. The Fe-Fe distance was determined to be 3.4 {Angstrom}. No evidence for the presence of a short oxo bridge in the iron center of the oxidized hydroxylase was found, suggesting that the active site of MMO is significantly different from the active sites of the dinuclear iron proteins hemery and ribonucleotide reductase. In addition, the results of the first shell fits suggest that there are more oxygen than nitrogen donor ligands.

  16. Identification of the chemical form of sulfur compounds in the Japanese pink coral (Corallium elatius) skeleton using μ-XRF/XAS speciation mapping.

    PubMed

    Tamenori, Yusuke; Yoshimura, Toshihiro; Luan, Nguyen Trong; Hasegawa, Hiroshi; Suzuki, Atsushi; Kawahata, Hodaka; Iwasaki, Nozomu

    2014-05-01

    The distributions and chemical forms of sulfur compounds in the skeleton of Japanese pink coral (Corallium elatius) were investigated using X-ray spectroscopic techniques combined with micro-focused soft X-ray radiation. Microscopic X-ray fluorescence/soft X-ray photoabsorption (μ-XRF/XAS) speciation mapping clarified that sulfate is the primary species in the coral skeleton, with minor amounts of organic sulfur, whereas both sulfate and organic sulfur coexist in coenenchyme. Analysis of the post-edge region of the XAS spectra confirmed that sulfate ions in the coral skeleton are mainly in the form of gypsum-like inorganic sulfate substituting for the carbonate ions in the calcite skeleton. The sulfate concentration was negatively correlated with the magnesium concentration and positively correlated with that of phosphorus. Speciation mapping of sulfate in the coral skeleton showed clear fluctuations with sulfate concentrations being higher at dark bands, whereas the small amount of organic sulfur had unclear dark/bright bands. These results suggest that the little organic sulfur that is present is contained in the organic matter embedded in the biocrystal of coral skeleton. PMID:24727132

  17. XAS and XMCD evidence for species-dependent partitioning of arsenic during microbial reduction of ferrihydrite to magnetite.

    PubMed

    Coker, V S; Gault, A G; Pearce, C I; van der Laan, G; Telling, N D; Charnock, J M; Polya, D A; Lloyd, J R

    2006-12-15

    Poorly crystalline Fe(III) oxyhydroxides, ubiquitously distributed as mineral coatings and discrete particles in aquifer sediments, are well-known hosts of sedimentary As. Microbial reduction of these phases is widely thought to be responsible for the genesis of As-rich reducing groundwaters found in many parts of the world, most notably in Bangladesh and West Bengal, India. As such, it is important to understand the behavior of As associated with ferric oxyhydroxides during the early stages of Fe(lll) reduction. We have used X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) and X-ray magnetic circular dichroism (XMCD) to elucidate the changes in the bonding mechanism of As(III) and As(V) as their host Fe(III) oxyhydroxide undergoes bacterially induced reductive transformation to magnetite. Two-line ferrihydrite, with adsorbed As(III) or As(V), was incubated under anaerobic conditions in the presence of acetate as an electron donor, and Geobacter sulfurreducens, a subsurface bacterium capable of respiring on Fe(lll), but not As(V). In both experiments, no increase in dissolved As was observed during reduction to magnetite (complete upon 5 days incubation), consistent with our earlier observation of As sequestration by the formation of biogenic Fe(III)-bearing minerals. XAS data suggested that the As bonding environment of the As(III)-magnetite product is indistinguishable from that obtained from simple adsorption of As(lll) on the surface of biogenic magnetite. In contrast, reduction of As(V)-sorbed ferrihydrite to magnetite caused incorporation of As5+ within the magnetite structure. XMCD analysis provided further evidence of structural partitioning of As5+ as the small size of the As5+ cation caused a distortion of the spinel structure compared to standard biogenic magnetite. These results may have implications regarding the species-dependent mobility of As undergoing anoxic biogeochemical transformations, e.g., during early sedimentary diagenesis. PMID:17256522

  18. Determination of Phase Ratio in Polymorphic Materials by X-Ray Absorption Spectroscopy: The Case of Anatase and Rutile Phase Mixture in TiO2

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, M. F.; Klysubun, W.; Kityakarn, S.; Worayingyong, A.; Zhang, S. B.; Wei, S. H.; Onkaw, D.; Songsiriritthigul, P.; Rujirawat, S.; Limpijumnong, S.

    2009-01-01

    We demonstrate that x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) can be used as an unconventional characterization technique to determine the proportions of different crystal phases in polymorphic samples. As an example, we show that ratios of anatase and rutile phases contained in the TiO{sub 2} samples obtained by XAS are in agreement with conventional x-ray diffraction (XRD) measurements to within a few percent. We suggest that XAS measurement is a useful and reliable technique that can be applied to study the phase composition of highly disordered or nanoparticle polymorphic materials, where traditional XRD technique might be difficult.

  19. The apparent absence of chemical sensitivity in the 4d and 5d X-ray absorption spectroscopy of uranium compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Tobin, J. G.

    2013-05-03

    X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) and related derivative measurements have been used to demonstrate that the Pu 5f states are strongly relativistic and have a 5f occupation number near 5. Owing to the success in this regime, it has been argued that the XAS measurements should be a powerful tool to probe 5f occupation variation, both as a function of elemental nature (actinide atomic number) and as a function of physical and chemical perturbation, e.g., oxidation state. We show that XAS and its related measurements fail in this latter aspect for a wide variety of uranium compounds and materials. Possible causes will be discussed.

  20. Constraining the N2O5 UV absorption cross section from spectroscopic trace gas measurements in the tropical mid-stratosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kritten, L.; Butz, A.; Chipperfield, M. P.; Dorf, M.; Dhomse, S.; Hossaini, R.; Oelhaf, H.; Prados-Roman, C.; Wetzel, G.; Pfeilsticker, K.

    2014-09-01

    The absorption cross section of N2O5, σN2O5(λ, T), which is known from laboratory measurements with the uncertainty of a factor of 2 (Table 4-2 in (Jet Propulsion Laboratory) JPL-2011; the spread in laboratory data, however, points to an uncertainty in the range of 25 to 30%, Sander et al., 2011), was investigated by balloon-borne observations of the relevant trace gases in the tropical mid-stratosphere. The method relies on the observation of the diurnal variation of NO2 by limb scanning DOAS (differential optical absorption spectroscopy) measurements (Weidner et al., 2005; Kritten et al., 2010), supported by detailed photochemical modelling of NOy (NOx(= NO + NO2) + NO3 + 2N2O5 + ClONO2 + HO2NO2 + BrONO2 + HNO3) photochemistry and a non-linear least square fitting of the model result to the NO2 observations. Simulations are initialised with O3 measured by direct sun observations, the NOy partitioning from MIPAS-B (Michelson Interferometer for Passive Atmospheric Sounding - Balloon-borne version) observations in similar air masses at night-time, and all other relevant species from simulations of the SLIMCAT (Single Layer Isentropic Model of Chemistry And Transport) chemical transport model (CTM). Best agreement between the simulated and observed diurnal increase of NO2 is found if the σN2O5(λ, T) is scaled by a factor of 1.6 ± 0.8 in the UV-C (200-260 nm) and by a factor of 0.9 ± 0.26 in the UV-B/A (260-350 nm), compared to current recommendations. As a consequence, at 30 km altitude, the N2O5 lifetime against photolysis becomes a factor of 0.77 shorter at solar zenith angle (SZA) of 30° than using the recommended σN2O5(λ, T), and stays more or less constant at SZAs of 60°. Our scaled N2O5 photolysis frequency slightly reduces the lifetime (0.2-0.6%) of ozone in the tropical mid- and upper stratosphere, but not to an extent to be important for global ozone.

  1. X-Ray Absorption Fine Structure Spectroscopic Studies of Octakis(DMSO)Lanthanoid(III) Complexes in Solution And in the Solid Iodides

    SciTech Connect

    Persson, I.; Risberg, E.Damian; D'Angelo, P.; Panfilis, S.De; Sandstrom, M.; Abbasi, A.

    2009-06-04

    Octakis(DMSO)lanthanoid(III) iodides (DMSO = dimethylsulfoxide), [Ln(OS(CH{sub 3}){sub 2}){sub 8}]I{sub 3}, of most lanthanoid(III) ions in the series from La to Lu have been studied in the solid state and in DMSO solution by extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy. L{sub 3}-edge and also some K-edge spectra were recorded, which provided mean Ln-O bond distances for the octakis(DMSO)lanthanoid(III) complexes. The agreement with the average of the Ln-O bond distances obtained in a separate study by X-ray crystallography was quite satisfactory. The crystalline octakis(DMSO)lanthanoid(III) iodide salts have a fairly broad distribution of Ln-O bond distances, ca. 0.1 {angstrom}, with a few disordered DMSO ligands. Their EXAFS spectra are in excellent agreement with those obtained for the solvated lanthanoid(III) ions in DMSO solution, both of which show slightly asymmetric distributions of the Ln-O bond distances. Hence, all lanthanoid(III) ions are present as octakis(DMSO)lanthanoid(III) complexes in DMSO solution, with the mean Ln-O distances centered at 2.50 (La), 2.45 (Pr), 2.43 (Nd), 2.41 (Sm), 2.40 (Eu), 2.39 (Gd), 2.37 (Tb), 2.36 (Dy), 2.34 (Ho), 2.33 (Er), 2.31 (Tm), and 2.29 {angstrom} (Lu). This decrease in the Ln-O bond distances is larger than expected from the previously established ionic radii for octa-coordination. This indicates increasing polarization of the Ln{sup III}-O(DMSO) bonds with increasing atomic number. However, the S(1s) electron transition energies in the sulfur K-edge X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectra, probing the unoccupied molecular orbitals of lowest energy of the DMSO ligands for the [Ln(OS(CH{sub 3}){sub 2}){sub 8}]{sup 3+} complexes, change only insignificantly from Ln = La to Lu. This indicates that there is no appreciable change in the ?-contribution to the S-O bond, probably due to a corresponding increase in the contribution from the sulfur lone pair to the bonding.

  2. An X-ray absorption spectroscopic study of the metal site preference in Al{sub 1-x}Ga{sub x}FeO{sub 3}

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, James D.S.; Grosvenor, Andrew P.

    2013-01-15

    Magnetoelectric materials have potential for being introduced into next generation technologies, especially memory devices. The AFeO{sub 3} (Pna2{sub 1}; A=Al, Ga) system has received attention to better understand the origins of magnetoelectric coupling. The magnetoelectric properties this system exhibits depend on the amount of anti-site disorder present, which is affected by the composition and the method of synthesis. In this study, Al{sub 1-x}Ga{sub x}FeO{sub 3} was synthesized by the ceramic method and studied by X-ray absorption spectroscopy. Al L{sub 2,3}-, Ga K-, and Fe K-edge spectra were collected to examine how the average metal coordination number changes with composition. Examination of XANES spectra from Al{sub 1-x}Ga{sub x}FeO{sub 3} indicate that with increasing Ga content, Al increasingly occupies octahedral sites while Ga displays a preference for occupying the tetrahedral site. The Fe K-edge spectra indicate that more Fe is present in the tetrahedral site in AlFeO{sub 3} than in GaFeO{sub 3}, implying more anti-site disorder is present in AlFeO{sub 3}. - Graphical abstract: Al{sub 1-x}Ga{sub x}FeO{sub 3} has been investigated by XANES. Through examination of Al L{sub 2,3}-, Ga K-, and Fe K-edge XANES spectra, it was found that more anti-site disorder of the Fe atoms is present in AlFeO{sub 3} compared to in GaFeO{sub 3}. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Al{sub 1-x}Ga{sub x}FeO{sub 3} was investigated by X-ray absorption spectroscopy. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ga prefers to occupy the tetrahedral site in Al{sub 1-x}Ga{sub x}FeO{sub 3}. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Fe prefers to occupy the octahedral sites in Al{sub 1-x}Ga{sub x}FeO{sub 3} as x increases. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer More anti-site disorder is present in AlFeO{sub 3} compared to in GaFeO{sub 3.}.

  3. A novel surface-sensitive X-ray absorption spectroscopic detector to study the thermal decomposition of cathode materials for Li-ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nonaka, Takamasa; Okuda, Chikaaki; Oka, Hideaki; Nishimura, Yusaku F.; Makimura, Yoshinari; Kondo, Yasuhito; Dohmae, Kazuhiko; Takeuchi, Yoji

    2016-09-01

    A surface-sensitive conversion-electron-yield X-ray absorption fine structure (CEY-XAFS) detector that operates at elevated temperatures is developed to investigate the thermal decomposition of cathode materials for Li-ion batteries. The detector enables measurements with the sample temperature controlled from room temperature up to 450 °C. The detector is applied to the LiNi0.75Co0.15Al0.05Mg0.05O2 cathode material at 0% state of charge (SOC) and 50% SOC to examine the chemical changes that occur during heating in the absence of an electrolyte. The combination of surface-sensitive CEY-XAFS and bulk-sensitive transmission-mode XAFS shows that the reduction of Ni and Co ions begins at the surface of the cathode particles at around 150 °C, and propagates inside the particle upon further heating. These changes with heating are irreversible and are more obvious at 50% SOC than at 0% SOC. The fraction of reduced Ni ions is larger than that of reduced Co ions. These results demonstrate the capability of the developed detector to obtain important information for the safe employment of this cathode material in Li-ion batteries.

  4. Absorption spectroscopic and FTIR studies on EDA complexes between TNT (2,4,6-trinitrotoluene) with amines in DMSO and determination of the vertical electron affinity of TNT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, S. P.; Lahiri, S. C.

    2008-06-01

    TNT (2,4,6-trinitrotoluene) formed deep red 1:1 CT complexes with chromogenic agents like isopropylamine, ethylenediamine, bis(3-aminopropyl)amine and tetraethylenepentamine in DMSO. The complexes were also observed in solvents like methanol, acetone, etc. when the amines were present in large excess. The isopropylamine, complex showed three absorption peaks (at 378, 532 and 629 nm) whereas higher amines showed four peaks (at 370, 463, 532 and 629 nm). The peak at 463 nm vanished rapidly. The peak of the complexes near 530 nm required about 8-10 min to develop and the complexes were stable for about an hour but the peak slowly shifted towards 500 nm and the complexes were found to be stable for more than 24 h. The evidence of complex formation was obtained from distinct spots in HPTLC plates and from the shifts in frequencies and formation of new peaks in FTIR spectra. The peaks near 460 nm (transient) and 530 nm may be due to Janovsky reaction but could not be established. The extinction coefficients of the complexes were determined directly which enabled the accurate determination of the association constants KDA with TNT and amines in stoichiometric ratios. The results were verified using iterative method. The quantfication of TNT was made using ɛ value of the complex with ethylenediamine. The vertical electron affinity ( EA) of TNT was calculated using the method suggested by Mulliken.

  5. Constraining the N2O5 UV absorption cross-section from spectroscopic trace gas measurements in the tropical mid-stratosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kritten, L.; Butz, A.; Chipperfield, M. P.; Dorf, M.; Dhomse, S.; Hossaini, R.; Oelhaf, H.; Prados-Roman, C.; Wetzel, G.; Pfeilsticker, K.

    2014-02-01

    The absorption cross-section of N2O5, σN2O5(λ, T), which is known from laboratory measurements with the uncertainty of a factor of 2 (Table 4-2 in JPL-2011, Sander et al., 2011), was investigated by balloon-borne observations of the relevant trace gases in the tropical mid-stratosphere. The method relies on the observation of the diurnal variation of NO2 supported by detailed photochemical modelling of NOy (NOx(= NO + NO2) + NO3 + 2N2O5 + ClONO2 + HO2NO2 +BrONO2 + HNO3) photochemistry. Simulations are initialised with O3 measured by direct sun observations, the NOy partitioning from MIPAS-B (Michelson Interferometer for Passive Atmospheric Sounding-Balloon) observations in similar air masses at nighttime, and all other relevant species from simulations of the SLIMCAT chemical transport model (CTM). Best agreement between the simulated and observed diurnal increase of NO2 is found if the σN2O5(λ, T) is scaled by a factor of 1.6 ± 0.8 in the UV-C (200-260 nm) and by a factor of 0.9 ± 0.26 in the UV-B/A (260-350 nm), compared to current recommendations. In consequence, at 30 km altitude, the N2O5 lifetime against photolysis becomes a factor of 0.77 shorter at solar zenith angle (SZA) of 30° than using the recommended σN2O5 (λ, T), and stays more or less constant at SZAs of 60°. Our scaled N2O5 photolysis frequency slightly reduces the lifetime (0.2-0.6%) of ozone in the tropical mid- and upper stratosphere, but not to an extent to be important for global ozone.

  6. Spectroscopic analysis of small organic molecules: A comprehensive near-edge x-ray-absorption fine-structure study of C{sub 6}-ring-containing molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Kolczewski, C.; Puettner, R.; Martins, M.; Schlachter, A.S.; Snell, G.; Sant'Anna, M.M.; Hermann, K.; Kaindl, G.

    2006-01-21

    We report high-resolution C 1s near-edge x-ray-absorption fine-structure (NEXAFS) spectra of the C{sub 6}-ring-containing molecules benzene (C{sub 6}H{sub 6}), 1,3- and 1,4-cyclohexadiene (C{sub 6}H{sub 8}), cyclohexene (C{sub 6}H{sub 10}), cyclohexane (C{sub 6}H{sub 12}), styrene (C{sub 8}H{sub 8}), and ethylbenzene (C{sub 8}H{sub 10}) which allow us to examine the gradual development of delocalization of the corresponding {pi} electron systems. Due to the high experimental resolution, vibrational progressions can be partly resolved in the spectra. The experimental spectra are compared with theoretical NEXAFS spectra obtained from density-functional theory calculations where electronic final-state relaxation is accounted for. The comparison yields very good agreement between theoretical spectra and experimental results. In all cases, the spectra can be described by excitations to {pi}*- and {sigma}*-type final-state orbitals with valence character, while final-state orbitals of Rydberg character make only minor contributions. The lowest C 1s{yields}1{pi}* excitation energy is found to agree in the (experimental and theoretical) spectra of all molecules except for 1,3-cyclohexadiene (C{sub 6}H{sub 8}) where an energy smaller by about 0.6 eV is obtained. The theoretical analysis can explain this result by different binding properties of this molecule compared to the others.

  7. Mineralogy and inorganic chemistry of naturally occurring biogenic iron oxyhydroxides: Spectroscopic evidence of thermal maturation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haddad, A.; Fakra, S.; Orcutt, B. N.; Toner, B.; Edwards, K. J.

    2011-12-01

    Microbial mats were sampled at four sites at the Lo'ihi Seamount and examined for changes in mineralogy and inorganic chemistry via synchrotron-sourced X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy (XAS). These mats are rich in iron oxyhydroxides with morphologies similar to those produced by iron oxidizing microorganisms related to Zetaproteobacteria such as Mariprofundus ferroxydans, which have been shown to be present and active in all of these mat ecosystems. The same particle morphologies are observed consistently at all four sites, which range in temperature (4 - 40°C) and hydrothermal activity (dead to very active). Fe L-edge XAS reveals no significant differences in Fe speciation between the morphologies. Mineralogy, however, as reflected in O 1s XAS measurements, appears to be a function of thermal maturation with the hottest site harboring more crystalline particles. Morphology does not factor into the changes in mineralogy. These measurements are confirmed by Fe 1s XAS spectroscopy. The C 1s XAS spectroscopy is highly variable and may be related to overall maturation (age) or undetermined factors. Elucidating the effect of thermal maturation on biogenic iron oxhydroxide particles is essential to understanding the environmental influences on their preservation in the rock record.

  8. Crystal-Field and Covalency Effects in Uranates: An X-ray Spectroscopic Study.

    PubMed

    Butorin, Sergei M; Kvashnina, Kristina O; Smith, Anna L; Popa, Karin; Martin, Philippe M

    2016-07-01

    The electronic structure of U(V) - and U(VI) -containing uranates NaUO3 and Pb3 UO6 was studied by using an advanced technique, namely X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) in high-energy-resolution fluorescence-detection (HERFD) mode. Due to a significant reduction in core-hole lifetime broadening, the crystal-field splittings of the 5f shell were probed directly in HERFD-XAS spectra collected at the U 3d edge, which is not possible by using conventional XAS. In addition, the charge-transfer satellites that result from U 5f-O 2p hybridization were clearly resolved. The crystal-field parameters, 5f occupancy, and degree of covalency of the chemical bonding in these uranates were estimated by using the Anderson impurity model by calculating the U 3d HERFD-XAS, conventional XAS, core-to-core (U 4f-3d transitions) resonant inelastic X-ray scattering (RIXS), and U 4f X-ray photoelectron spectra. The crystal field was found to be strong in these systems and the 5f occupancy was determined to be 1.32 and 0.84 electrons in the ground state for NaUO3 and Pb3 UO6 , respectively, which indicates a significant covalent character for these compounds. PMID:27257782

  9. Reactivity-activity relationships of oral anti-diabetic vanadium complexes in gastrointestinal media: an X-ray absorption spectroscopic study.

    PubMed

    Levina, Aviva; McLeod, Andrew I; Kremer, Lauren E; Aitken, Jade B; Glover, Christopher J; Johannessen, Bernt; Lay, Peter A

    2014-10-01

    The reactions of oral V(V/IV) anti-diabetic drugs within the gastrointestinal environment (particularly in the presence of food) are a crucial factor that affects their biological activities, but to date these have been poorly understood. In order to build up reactivity-activity relationships, the first detailed study of the reactivities of typical V-based anti-diabetics, Na3V(V)O4 (A), [V(IV)O(OH2)5](SO4) (B), [V(IV)O(ma)2] (C, ma = maltolato(-)) and (NH4)[V(V)(O)2(dipic)] (D, dipic = pyridine-2,5-dicarboxylato(2-)) with simulated gastrointestinal (GI) media in the presence or absence of food components has been performed by the use of XANES (X-ray absorption near edge structure) spectroscopy. Changes in speciation under conditions that simulate interactions in the GI tract have been discerned using correlations of XANES parameters that were based on a library of model V(V), V(IV), and V(III) complexes for preliminary assessment of the oxidation states and coordination numbers. More detailed speciation analyses were performed using multiple linear regression fits of XANES from the model complexes to XANES obtained from the reaction products from interactions with the GI media. Compounds B and D were relatively stable in the gastric environment (pH ∼ 2) in the absence of food, while C was mostly dissociated, and A was converted to [V10O28](6-). Sequential gastric and intestinal digestion in the absence of food converted A, B and D to poorly absorbed tetrahedral vanadates, while C formed five- or six-coordinate V(V) species where the maltolato ligands were likely to be partially retained. XANES obtained from gastric digestion of A-D in the presence of typical food components converged to that of a mixture of V(IV)-aqua, V(IV)-amino acid and V(III)-aqua complexes. Subsequent intestinal digestion led predominantly to V(IV) complexes that were assigned as citrato or complexes with 2-hydroxyacidato donor groups from other organic compounds, including certain

  10. Morphological and spectroscopic investigation of the behavior of permanent iridium modifier deposited on pyrolytic graphite coated and zirconium treated platforms in electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slaveykova, Vera I.; Lampugnani, Leonardo; Tsalev, Dimiter L.; Sabbatini, L.

    1997-12-01

    In order to better characterise a permanent modifier based on iridium deposited on zirconium or tungsten treated platforms of transversely heated graphite atomizer, and to gain additional information about its chemical behavior directed to an eventual further optimization, a series of experiments were carried out, both by surface techniques such as scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS or ESCA) and X-ray fluorescence (XRF) and by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry on the iridium release from unmodified and various other modified pyrolytic graphite platforms. Special attention was paid to the influence of the amount of iridium, zirconium carbide coating of the platform surface and the presence of citric acid on the iridium vaporization during pyrolysis and atomization. The processes of iridium losses during pyrolysis and atomization and peak maximum alignment depend on the amount of the iridium deposited on the pyrolytic graphite coated platforms in the presence of nitric acid. A fractional order of release which suggests an atom vaporization from the surface or edges of the iridium islands was estimated. In the presence of citric acid, mass independence and zero order of the atom release were found. The zirconium treatment of the platform results in change of the spatial distribution of iridium and hence its vaporization. Vaporization temperatures as high as 2100°C, and first order of the process of atom generation were obtained. While it was possible to study the iridium atomization from uncoated and zirconium coated surfaces, evidencing a different order for the release process, the same was not possible for the tungsten coated platforms due to an 'overstabilization' that brought the iridium atomization temperature out of the working range of the instrument used. The different chemical behavior of tungsten and zirconium was also confirmed by XPS investigations. With tungsten, evidence of both WC and WO bonding

  11. ATHENA, ARTEMIS, HEPHAESTUS: data analysis for X-ray absorption spectropscopy using IFEFFIT

    SciTech Connect

    Ravel, B.; Newville, M.

    2010-07-20

    A software package for the analysis of X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) data is presented. This package is based on the IFEFFIT library of numerical and XAS algorithms and is written in the Perl programming language using the Perl/Tk graphics toolkit. The programs described here are: (i) ATHENA, a program for XAS data processing, (ii) ARTEMIS, a program for EXAFS data analysis using theoretical standards from FEFF and (iii) HEPHAESTUS, a collection of beamline utilities based on tables of atomic absorption data. These programs enable high-quality data analysis that is accessible to novices while still powerful enough to meet the demands of an expert practitioner. The programs run on all major computer platforms and are freely available under the terms of a free software license.

  12. Spectroscopic Low Coherence Interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bosschaart, Nienke; van Leeuwen, T. G.; Aalders, Maurice C.; Hermann, Boris; Drexler, Wolfgang; Faber, Dirk J.

    Low-coherence interferometry (LCI) allows high-resolution volumetric imaging of tissue morphology and provides localized optical properties that can be related to the physiological status of tissue. This chapter discusses the combination of spatial and spectroscopic information by means of spectroscopic OCT (sOCT) and low-coherence spectroscopy (LCS). We describe the theory behind these modalities for the assessment of spatially resolved optical absorption and (back)scattering coefficient spectra. These spectra can be used for the highly localized quantification of chromophore concentrations and assessment of tissue organization on (sub)cellular scales. This leads to a wealth of potential clinical applications, ranging from neonatology for the determination of billibrubin concentrations, to oncology for the optical assessment of the aggressiveness of a cancerous lesion.

  13. AlxGa1-xAs Single-Quantum-Well Surface-Emitting Lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Jae H.

    1992-01-01

    Surface-emitting solid-state laser contains edge-emitting Al0.08Ga0.92As single-quantum-well (SQW) active layer sandwiched between graded-index-of-refraction separate-confinement-heterostructure (GRINSCH) layers of AlxGa1-xAs, includes etched 90 degree mirrors and 45 degree facets to direct edge-emitted beam perpendicular to top surface. Laser resembles those described in "Pseudomorphic-InxGa1-xAs Surface-Emitting Lasers" (NPO-18243). Suitable for incorporation into optoelectronic integrated circuits for photonic computing; e.g., optoelectronic neural networks.

  14. In situ soft XAS study on nickel-based layered cathode material at elevated temperatures: A novel approach to study thermal stability

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Won-Sub; Haas, Otto; Muhammad, Shoaib; Kim, Hyunchul; Lee, Wontae; Kim, Donghwi; Fischer, Daniel A.; Jaye, Cherno; Yang, Xiao-Qing; Balasubramanian, Mahalingam; Nam, Kyung-Wan

    2014-01-01

    Tracking thermally induced reactions has always been challenging for electrode materials of electrochemical battery systems. Traditionally, a variety of calorimetric techniques and in situ XRD at elevated temperatures has been used to evaluate the thermal stability of electrode materials. These techniques are capable of providing variations in heat capacity, mass and average bulk composition of materials only. Herein, we report investigation of thermal characteristics of Li0.33Ni0.8Co0.15Al0.05O2 by using in situ soft XAS measurements in combination with XRD. Fluorescence yield and partial electron yield measurements are used simultaneously to obtain element selective surface and bulk information. Fluorescence yield measurements reveal no energy change of the absorption peak and thus no valence state change in the bulk. However, electron yield measurements indicate that NiO-type rock salt structure is formed at the surface at temperatures above 200°C while no evidence for a surface reaction near Co sites in investigated temperature range is found. These results clearly show that in situ soft XAS can give a unique understanding of the role of each element in the structural transformation under thermal abuse offering a useful guidance in developing new battery system with improved safety performance. PMID:25351344

  15. In situ soft XAS study on nickel-based layered cathode material at elevated temperatures: A novel approach to study thermal stability

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Yoon, Won -Sub; Yang, Xiao -Qing; Haas, Otto; Muhammad, Shoaib; Kim, Hyunchul; Lee, Wontae; Kim, Donghwi; Fischer, Daniel A.; Jaye, Cherno; Balasubramanian, Mahalingam; et al

    2014-10-29

    Tracking thermally induced reactions has always been challenging for electrode materials of electrochemical battery systems. Traditionally, a variety of calorimetric techniques and in situ XRD at elevated temperatures has been used to evaluate the thermal stability of electrode materials. These techniques are capable of providing variations in heat capacity, mass and average bulk composition of materials only. Herein, we report investigation of thermal characteristics of Li0.33Ni0.8Co0.15Al0.05O2 by using in situ soft XAS measurements in combination with XRD. Fluorescence yield and partial electron yield measurements are used simultaneously to obtain element selective surface and bulk information. Fluorescence yield measurements reveal nomore » energy change of the absorption peak and thus no valence state change in the bulk. However, electron yield measurements indicate that NiO-type rock salt structure is formed at the surface at temperatures above 200°C while no evidence for a surface reaction near Co sites in investigated temperature range is found. These results clearly show that in situ soft XAS can give a unique understanding of the role of each element in the structural transformation under thermal abuse offering a useful guidance in developing new battery system with improved safety performance.« less

  16. In situ soft XAS study on nickel-based layered cathode material at elevated temperatures: A novel approach to study thermal stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Won-Sub; Haas, Otto; Muhammad, Shoaib; Kim, Hyunchul; Lee, Wontae; Kim, Donghwi; Fischer, Daniel A.; Jaye, Cherno; Yang, Xiao-Qing; Balasubramanian, Mahalingam; Nam, Kyung-Wan

    2014-10-01

    Tracking thermally induced reactions has always been challenging for electrode materials of electrochemical battery systems. Traditionally, a variety of calorimetric techniques and in situ XRD at elevated temperatures has been used to evaluate the thermal stability of electrode materials. These techniques are capable of providing variations in heat capacity, mass and average bulk composition of materials only. Herein, we report investigation of thermal characteristics of Li0.33Ni0.8Co0.15Al0.05O2 by using in situ soft XAS measurements in combination with XRD. Fluorescence yield and partial electron yield measurements are used simultaneously to obtain element selective surface and bulk information. Fluorescence yield measurements reveal no energy change of the absorption peak and thus no valence state change in the bulk. However, electron yield measurements indicate that NiO-type rock salt structure is formed at the surface at temperatures above 200°C while no evidence for a surface reaction near Co sites in investigated temperature range is found. These results clearly show that in situ soft XAS can give a unique understanding of the role of each element in the structural transformation under thermal abuse offering a useful guidance in developing new battery system with improved safety performance.

  17. In situ soft XAS study on nickel-based layered cathode material at elevated temperatures: A novel approach to study thermal stability

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, Won -Sub; Yang, Xiao -Qing; Haas, Otto; Muhammad, Shoaib; Kim, Hyunchul; Lee, Wontae; Kim, Donghwi; Fischer, Daniel A.; Jaye, Cherno; Balasubramanian, Mahalingam; Nam, Kyung -Wan

    2014-10-29

    Tracking thermally induced reactions has always been challenging for electrode materials of electrochemical battery systems. Traditionally, a variety of calorimetric techniques and in situ XRD at elevated temperatures has been used to evaluate the thermal stability of electrode materials. These techniques are capable of providing variations in heat capacity, mass and average bulk composition of materials only. Herein, we report investigation of thermal characteristics of Li0.33Ni0.8Co0.15Al0.05O2 by using in situ soft XAS measurements in combination with XRD. Fluorescence yield and partial electron yield measurements are used simultaneously to obtain element selective surface and bulk information. Fluorescence yield measurements reveal no energy change of the absorption peak and thus no valence state change in the bulk. However, electron yield measurements indicate that NiO-type rock salt structure is formed at the surface at temperatures above 200°C while no evidence for a surface reaction near Co sites in investigated temperature range is found. These results clearly show that in situ soft XAS can give a unique understanding of the role of each element in the structural transformation under thermal abuse offering a useful guidance in developing new battery system with improved safety performance.

  18. Chapter 1 - The Impacts of X-Ray Absorption Spectroscopy on Understanding Soil Processes and Reaction Mechanisms

    SciTech Connect

    Ginder-Vogel, Matthew; Sparks, Donald L.

    2011-11-17

    During the last two decades, X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) has developed into a mature technique for obtaining the speciation (e.g., oxidation state) and short-range structure of elements present in soils and sediments. XAS encompasses both X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy and extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy. XAS has a number of advantageous qualities for studying soils and sediments, which include elemental specificity, sensitivity to the local chemical and structural state of an element, and the ability to analyze materials in situ. This information allows accurate determination of oxidation state, type of nearest neighbors, coordination number, bond distance, and orbital symmetries of the X-ray absorbing element. In this review, we examine the application of a wide variety of synchrotron X-ray techniques to fundamental issues in environmental soil chemistry. Additionally, we examine the application of microfocused and time-resolved XAS to determine speciation (e.g., oxidation state and/or local coordination environment) and transformation kinetics of contaminants in heterogeneous environmental systems. During the last three decades, XAS has a played a critical role in furthering our understanding of a myriad of environmental systems and will continue to do so into the foreseeable future.

  19. Correlation between Soft X-ray Absorption and Emission Spectra of the Nitrogen Atoms within Imidazolium-Based Ionic Liquids.

    PubMed

    Horikawa, Yuka; Tokushima, Takashi; Takahashi, Osamu; Hoke, Hiroshi; Takamuku, Toshiyuki

    2016-08-01

    Soft X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) has been performed on the N K-edge of two imidazolium-based ionic liquids (ILs), 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)amide ([C2mim][TFSA]) and 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium bromide ([C2mim][Br]), to clarify the electronic structures of the ILs. Soft X-ray emission spectroscopy (XES) has also been applied to the ILs by excitation at various X-ray energies according to the XAS spectra. It was possible to fully associate the XAS peaks with the XES peaks. Additionally, both XAS and XES spectra of the ILs were well reproduced by the theoretical spectra for a single-molecule model on [C2mim](+) and [TFSA](-) using density functional theory. The assignments for the XAS and XES peaks of the ILs were accomplished from both experimental and theoretical approaches. The theoretical XAS and XES spectra of [C2mim](+) and [TFSA](-) did not significantly depend on the conformations of the ions. The reproducibility of the theoretical spectra for the single-molecule model suggested that the interactions between the cations and anions are very weak in the ILs, thus scarcely influencing the electronic structures of the nitrogen atoms. PMID:27388151

  20. XMCD and XAS examination of cation ordering in synthetic Mg- and Al-substituted titanomagnetites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lappe, S. C. L. L.; Bowles, J.; Jackson, M.; Arenholz, E.

    2015-12-01

    composition. X-ray absorption spectra (XAS) of the Ti, Mg and Al show no significant differences for samples of different anneal stages, suggesting no reordering of the Ti4+, Al3+ and Mg2+. The lack of observed (re)ordering between A and B lattice sites suggests the process may be vacancy mediated or there might be short-range cation (re)ordering within the lattice sites.

  1. An x-ray absorption spectroscopy study of Cd binding onto a halophilic archaeon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showalter, Allison R.; Szymanowski, Jennifer E. S.; Fein, Jeremy B.; Bunker, Bruce A.

    2016-05-01

    X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) and cadmium (Cd) isotherm experiments determine how Cd adsorbs to the surface of halophilic archaeon Halobacterium noricense. This archaeon, isolated from the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) near Carlsbad, New Mexico could be involved with the transport of toxic metals stored in the transuranic waste in the salt mine. The isotherm experiments show that adsorption is relatively constant across the tolerable pH range for H. noricense. The XAS results indicate that Cd adsorption occurs predominately via a sulfur site, most likely sulfhydryl, with the same site dominating all measured pH values.

  2. X-Ray Absorption Spectroscopy of Cuprous-Thiolate Clusters in Saccharomyces Cerevisiae Metallothionein

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, L.; Pickering, I.J.; Winge, D.R.; George, G.N.

    2009-05-28

    Copper (Cu) metallothioneins are cuprous-thiolate proteins that contain multimetallic clusters, and are thought to have dual functions of Cu storage and Cu detoxification. We have used a combination of X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) and density-functional theory (DFT) to investigate the nature of Cu binding to Saccharomyces cerevisiae metallothionein. We found that the XAS of metallothionein prepared, containing a full complement of Cu, was quantitatively consistent with the crystal structure, and that reconstitution of the apo-metallothionein with stoichiometric Cu results in the formation of a tetracopper cluster, indicating cooperative binding of the Cu ions by the metallothionein.

  3. Determination of arsenic species in edible periwinkles (Littorina littorea) by HPLC-ICPMS and XAS along a contamination gradient.

    PubMed

    Whaley-Martin, K J; Koch, I; Reimer, K J

    2013-07-01

    Arsenic is naturally found in the tissues of marine animals, usually as the non-toxic arsenical arsenobetaine, but exposure to elevated arsenic concentrations in the environment may alter the arsenic species distribution within tissues of the organism. This study examined the arsenic species in the tissues of the marine periwinkle (Littorina littorea) along an arsenic concentration gradient in the sediment. The arsenicals in L. littorea were examined using the complementary analytical methods high performance liquid chromatography coupled with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (HPLC-ICPMS) and X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS). Total arsenic concentrations in the periwinkle tissues ranged from 56 to 840 mg·kg(-1) dry weight (equivalent to 13 to 190 mg·kg(-1) wet weight). Inorganic arsenicals were found to be positively correlated with total arsenic concentrations (R(2)=0.993) and reached 600 mg·kg(-1) dry weight, the highest reported to date in marine organisms. These high inorganic arsenic concentrations within this low trophic organism pose a potential toxicological risk to higher trophic consumers. PMID:23588137

  4. Determination of arsenic species in edible periwinkles (Littorina littorea) by HPLC-ICPMS and XAS along a contamination gradient

    SciTech Connect

    Whaley-Martin, K. J.; Koch, I.; Reimer, K. J.

    2013-06-12

    Arsenic is naturally found in the tissues of marine animals, usually as the non-toxic arsenical arsenobetaine, but exposure to elevated arsenic concentrations in the environment may alter the arsenic species distribution within tissues of the organism. This study examined the arsenic species in the tissues of the marine periwinkle (Littorina littorea) along an arsenic concentration gradient in the sediment. The arsenicals in L. littorea were examined using the complementary analytical methods high performance liquid chromatography coupled with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (HPLC–ICPMS) and X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS). Total arsenic concentrations in the periwinkle tissues ranged from 56 to 840 mg · kg-1 dry weight (equivalent to 13 to 190 mg · kg-1 wet weight). Inorganic arsenicals were found to be positively correlated with total arsenic concentrations (R2 = 0.993) and reached 600 mg · kg-1 dry weight, the highest reported to date in marine organisms. These high inorganic arsenic concentrations within this low trophic organism pose a potential toxicological risk to higher trophic consumers.

  5. In Situ XAS and XRD Studies of Substituted Spinel Lithium Manganese Oxides in the 4-5 V Region

    SciTech Connect

    McBreen, J.; Mukerjee, S.; Yang, X. Q.; Sun, X.; Ein-Eli, Y.

    1998-11-01

    Partial substitution of Mn in lithium manganese oxide spinel materials by Cu and Ni greatly affects the electrochemistry and the phase behavior of the cathode. Substitution with either metal or with a combination of both shortens the 4.2 V plateau and results in higher voltage plateaus. In situ x-ray absorption (XAS) studies indicate that the higher voltage plateaus are related to redox processes on the substituents. In situ x-ray diffraction (XRD) on LiCu{sub 0.5}Mn{sub 1.5}O{sub 4} shows single phase behavior during the charge and discharge process. Three phases are observed for LiNi{sub 0.5}Mn{sub 1.5}O{sub 4} and two phases are observed in the case of LiNi{sub 0.25}Cu{sub 0.25}Mn{sub 1.5}O{sub 4}. The electrolyte stability is dependent on both the operating voltage and the cathode composition. Even though Ni substituted materials have lower voltages, the electrolyte is more stable in cells with the Cu substituted materials.

  6. Depth-selective X-ray absorption spectroscopy by detection of energy-loss Auger electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isomura, Noritake; Soejima, Narumasa; Iwasaki, Shiro; Nomoto, Toyokazu; Murai, Takaaki; Kimoto, Yasuji

    2015-11-01

    A unique X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) method is proposed for depth profiling of chemical states in material surfaces. Partial electron yield mode detecting energy-loss Auger electrons, called the inelastic electron yield (IEY) mode, enables a variation in the probe depth. As an example, Si K-edge XAS spectra for a well-defined multilayer sample (Si3N4/SiO2/Si) have been investigated using this method at various kinetic energies. We found that the peaks assigned to the layers from the top layer to the substrate appeared in the spectra in the order of increasing energy loss relative to the Auger electrons. Thus, the probe depth can be changed by the selection of the kinetic energy of the energy loss electrons in IEY-XAS.

  7. Note: Sample chamber for in situ x-ray absorption spectroscopy studies of battery materials

    SciTech Connect

    Pelliccione, CJ; Timofeeva, EV; Katsoudas, JP; Segre, CU

    2014-12-01

    In situ x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) provides element-specific characterization of both crystalline and amorphous phases and enables direct correlations between electrochemical performance and structural characteristics of cathode and anode materials. In situ XAS measurements are very demanding to the design of the experimental setup. We have developed a sample chamber that provides electrical connectivity and inert atmosphere for operating electrochemical cells and also accounts for x-ray interactions with the chamber and cell materials. The design of the sample chamber for in situ measurements is presented along with example XAS spectra from anode materials in operating pouch cells at the Zn and Sn K-edges measured in fluorescence and transmission modes, respectively. (C) 2014 AIP Publishing LLC.

  8. Predicting X-ray absorption spectra of semiconducting polymers for electronic structure and morphology characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Gregory; Patel, Shrayesh; Pemmaraju, C. Das; Kramer, Edward; Prendergast, David; Chabinyc, Michael

    2015-03-01

    Core-level X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) reveals important information on the electronic structure of materials and plays a key role in morphology characterization. Semiconducting polymers are the active component in many organic electronics. Their electronic properties are critically linked to device performance, and a proper understanding of semiconducting polymer XAS is crucial. Techniques such as resonant X-ray scattering rely on core-level transitions to gain materials contrast and probe orientational order. However, it is difficult to identify these transitions based on experiments alone, and complementary simulations are required. We show that first-principles calculations can capture the essential features of experimental XAS of semiconducting polymers, and provide insight into which molecular model, such as oligomers or periodic boundary conditions, are best suited for XAS calculations. Simulated XAS can reveal contributions from individual atoms and be used to visualize molecular orbitals. This allows for improved characterization of molecular orientation and scattering analysis. These predictions lay the groundwork for understanding how chemical makeup is linked to electronic structure, and to properly utilize experiments to characterize semiconducting polymers.

  9. In operando observation system for electrochemical reaction by soft X-ray absorption spectroscopy with potential modulation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagasaka, Masanari; Yuzawa, Hayato; Horigome, Toshio; Kosugi, Nobuhiro

    2014-10-01

    In order to investigate local structures of electrolytes in electrochemical reactions under the same scan rate as a typical value 100 mV/s in cyclic voltammetry (CV), we have developed an in operando observation system for electrochemical reactions by soft X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) with a potential modulation method. XAS spectra of electrolytes are measured by using a transmission-type liquid flow cell with built-in electrodes. The electrode potential is swept with a scan rate of 100 mV/s at a fixed photon energy, and soft X-ray absorption coefficients at different potentials are measured at the same time. By repeating the potential modulation at each fixed photon energy, it is possible to measure XAS of electrochemical reaction at the same scan rate as in CV. We have demonstrated successful measurement of the Fe L-edge XAS spectra of aqueous iron sulfate solutions and of the change in valence of Fe ions at different potentials in the Fe redox reaction. The mechanism of these Fe redox processes is discussed by correlating the XAS results with those at different scan rates.

  10. In operando observation system for electrochemical reaction by soft X-ray absorption spectroscopy with potential modulation method.

    PubMed

    Nagasaka, Masanari; Yuzawa, Hayato; Horigome, Toshio; Kosugi, Nobuhiro

    2014-10-01

    In order to investigate local structures of electrolytes in electrochemical reactions under the same scan rate as a typical value 100 mV/s in cyclic voltammetry (CV), we have developed an in operando observation system for electrochemical reactions by soft X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) with a potential modulation method. XAS spectra of electrolytes are measured by using a transmission-type liquid flow cell with built-in electrodes. The electrode potential is swept with a scan rate of 100 mV/s at a fixed photon energy, and soft X-ray absorption coefficients at different potentials are measured at the same time. By repeating the potential modulation at each fixed photon energy, it is possible to measure XAS of electrochemical reaction at the same scan rate as in CV. We have demonstrated successful measurement of the Fe L-edge XAS spectra of aqueous iron sulfate solutions and of the change in valence of Fe ions at different potentials in the Fe redox reaction. The mechanism of these Fe redox processes is discussed by correlating the XAS results with those at different scan rates. PMID:25362423

  11. In operando observation system for electrochemical reaction by soft X-ray absorption spectroscopy with potential modulation method

    SciTech Connect

    Nagasaka, Masanari Kosugi, Nobuhiro; Yuzawa, Hayato; Horigome, Toshio

    2014-10-15

    In order to investigate local structures of electrolytes in electrochemical reactions under the same scan rate as a typical value 100 mV/s in cyclic voltammetry (CV), we have developed an in operando observation system for electrochemical reactions by soft X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) with a potential modulation method. XAS spectra of electrolytes are measured by using a transmission-type liquid flow cell with built-in electrodes. The electrode potential is swept with a scan rate of 100 mV/s at a fixed photon energy, and soft X-ray absorption coefficients at different potentials are measured at the same time. By repeating the potential modulation at each fixed photon energy, it is possible to measure XAS of electrochemical reaction at the same scan rate as in CV. We have demonstrated successful measurement of the Fe L-edge XAS spectra of aqueous iron sulfate solutions and of the change in valence of Fe ions at different potentials in the Fe redox reaction. The mechanism of these Fe redox processes is discussed by correlating the XAS results with those at different scan rates.

  12. Redox chemistry of a binary transition metal oxide (AB2O4): a study of the Cu(2+)/Cu(0) and Fe(3+)/Fe(0) interconversions observed upon lithiation in a CuFe2O4 battery using X-ray absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Cama, Christina A; Pelliccione, Christopher J; Brady, Alexander B; Li, Jing; Stach, Eric A; Wang, Jiajun; Wang, Jun; Takeuchi, Esther S; Takeuchi, Kenneth J; Marschilok, Amy C

    2016-06-22

    Copper ferrite, CuFe2O4, is a promising candidate for application as a high energy electrode material in lithium based batteries. Mechanistic insight on the electrochemical reduction and oxidation processes was gained through the first X-ray absorption spectroscopic study of lithiation and delithiation of CuFe2O4. A phase pure tetragonal CuFe2O4 material was prepared and characterized using laboratory and synchrotron X-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. Ex situ X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) measurements were used to study the battery redox processes at the Fe and Cu K-edges, using X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES), extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS), and transmission X-ray microscopy (TXM) spectroscopies. EXAFS analysis showed upon discharge, an initial conversion of 50% of the copper(ii) to copper metal positioned outside of the spinel structure, followed by a migration of tetrahedral iron(iii) cations to octahedral positions previously occupied by copper(ii). Upon charging to 3.5 V, the copper metal remained in the metallic state, while iron metal oxidation to iron(iii) was achieved. The results provide new mechanistic insight regarding the evolution of the local coordination environments at the iron and copper centers upon discharging and charging. PMID:27292604

  13. XAS and Pulsed EPR Studies of the Copper Binding Site in Riboflavin Binding Protein

    SciTech Connect

    Smith,S.; Bencze, K.; Wasiukanis, K.; Benore-Parsons, T.; Stemmler, T.

    2008-01-01

    Riboflavin Binding Protein (RBP) binds copper in a 1:1 molar ratio, forming a distinct well-ordered type II site. The nature of this site has been examined using X-ray absorption and pulsed electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopies, revealing a four coordinate oxygen/nitrogen rich environment. On the basis of analysis of the Cambridge Structural Database, the average protein bound copper-ligand bond length of 1.96 Angstroms, obtained by extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS), is consistent with four coordinate Cu(I) and Cu(II) models that utilize mixed oxygen and nitrogen ligand distributions. These data suggest a CuO3N coordination state for copper bound to RBP. While pulsed EPR studies including hyperfine sublevel correlation spectroscopy and electron nuclear double resonance show clear spectroscopic evidence for a histidine bound to the copper, inclusion of a histidine in the EXAFS simulation did not lead to any significant improvement in the fit.

  14. Spectroscopic definition of the geometric and electronic structure of the non-heme iron active site in iron(II) bleomycin. Correlation with oxygen reactivity

    SciTech Connect

    Loeb, K.E.; Zaleski, J.M.; Westre, T.E.; Hedman, B.; Hodgson, K.O.; Solomon, E.I.; Guajardo, R.J.; Mascharak, P.K.

    1995-04-26

    The geometric and electronic structure of high-spin ferrous complexes of bleomycin (Fe{sup II}BLM) and the structural analog PMAH ([Fe{sup II}PMA]{sup +}, where PMAH is a macrocyclic ligand with pyrimidine, imidazole, deprotonated amide, and secondary and primary amine functionalities) have been investigated by optical (Abs) and X-ray (XAS) absorption, magnetic circular dichroism (MCD), and resonance Raman (rR) spectroscopies. The lability of high-spin iron combined with steric constraints of the BLM ligand framework and its weaker axial interaction with solvent support a dissociative mechanism for O{sub 2} reactivity. Our spectroscopic studies of solid [Fe{sup II}PMA]{sup +} have defined the nature of such a five-coordinate intermediate as square pyramidal which provides an open coordination position for reaction with O{sub 2}. A major electronic structure difference between Fe{sup II}BLM (and [Fe{sup II}PMA]{sup +}) and other non-heme ferrous sites is the presence of low-energy CT transitions which reflect strong iron(II) {yields} pyrimidine backbonding. Despite generally being considered a non-heme iron system due to the absence of an extensive delocalized {pi} network, the existence of low-energy MLCT transitions with reasonable intensity, hence the presence of some backbonding, identifies BLM as an important link bridging the chemistry of non-heme and heme active sites. 113 refs., 17 figs., 4 tabs.

  15. XAS study of TiO2-based nanomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, K.; Zajac, D.; Sikora, M.; Kapusta, Cz.; Michalow-Mauke, K.; Graule, Th.; Rekas, M.

    2015-07-01

    X-Ray Absorption Spectroscopy studies of the W (0-1 at% W) and Mo-doped TiO2 (0-1 at% Mo) nanoparticle specimens at the K edges of titanium and molybdenum as well as at the L2 L3 edges of tungsten are presented. The materials were prepared with Flame Spray Synthesis process by oxidation of metal-organic precursors. The Ti:K edge spectra in the XANES range show pre-edge and post-edge features characteristic for anatase. A decrease of the amplitude of the EXAFS function with doping is observed and attributed to a softening of the crystal lattice. The Mo EXAFS functions show a considerable decrease of the second-neighbour-shell peak with increasing Mo content, which is attributed to an increased number of cation vacancies. For tungsten a less pronounced effect is observed. The Mo and W XANES spectra do not show noticeable changes with doping level, which indicates their unchanged oxidation states.

  16. Spectroscopic studies of U(VI) sorption at the kaolinite-water interface. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, H.A.; Parks, G.A.; Brown, G.E. Jr.

    1994-06-01

    Efficient use of U as a resource and safe handling, recycling and disposal of U-containing wastes require an understanding of the factors controlling the fate of U, where fate refers to the destination of U, typically expressed as an environmental medium or a process phase. The sorption process constitutes a change in elemental fate. Partitioning of an element from solution to a solid phase, or sorption, can be divided into three broad categories: adsorption, surface precipitation, and absorption. Extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS), a type of X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS), offers the possibility for distinguishing among different modes of sorption by characterizing the atomic environment of the sorbing element. In this study, the authors use EXAFS to determine the structure of U(VI) sorption complexes at the kaolinite-water interface. In Chapter One, they present an overview of selected aspects of U structural chemistry as a basis for considering the structural environment of U at the solid-water interface. To evaluate the utility of XAS for characterization of the structural environment of U(VI) at the solid-water interface, they have carried out an in-depth analysis of XAS data from U(VI)-containing solid and solution model compounds, which they describe in Chapter Two. In Chapter three, they consider sorption of U by kaolinite as a means of effecting the removal of U from surface collection pond waters on the Rocky Flats Plant site in northern Colorado.

  17. Sulfur K-Edge XAS and DFT Calculations on NitrileHydratase: Geometric and Electronic Structure of the Non-heme Iron Active Site

    SciTech Connect

    Dey, Abhishek; Chow, Marina; Taniguchi, Kayoko; Lugo-Mas, Priscilla; Davin, Steven; Maeda, Mizuo; Kovacs, Julie A.; Odaka, Masafumi; Hodgson, Keith O.; Hedman, Britt; Solomon, Edward I.; /SLAC, SSRL

    2006-09-28

    The geometric and electronic structure of the active site of the non-heme iron enzyme nitrile hydratase (NHase) is studied using sulfur K-edge XAS and DFT calculations. Using thiolate (RS{sup -})-, sulfenate (RSO{sup -})-, and sulfinate (RSO{sub 2}{sup -})-ligated model complexes to provide benchmark spectral parameters, the results show that the S K-edge XAS is sensitive to the oxidation state of S-containing ligands and that the spectrum of the RSO- species changes upon protonation as the S-O bond is elongated (by {approx}0.1 {angstrom}). These signature features are used to identify the three cysteine residues coordinated to the low-spin Fe{sup III} in the active site of NHase as CysS{sup -}, CysSOH, and CysSO{sub 2}{sup -} both in the NO-bound inactive form and in the photolyzed active form. These results are correlated to geometry-optimized DFT calculations. The pre-edge region of the X-ray absorption spectrum is sensitive to the Z{sub eff} of the Fe and reveals that the Fe in [FeNO]{sup 6} NHase species has a Z{sub eff} very similar to that of its photolyzed Fe{sup III} counterpart. DFT calculations reveal that this results from the strong {pi} back-bonding into the {pi}* antibonding orbital of NO, which shifts significant charge from the formally t{sub 2}{sup 6} low-spin metal to the coordinated NO.

  18. Adding diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy capability to extended x-ray-absorption fine structure in a new cell to study solid catalysts in combination with a modulation approach

    SciTech Connect

    Chiarello, Gian Luca; Nachtegaal, Maarten; Marchionni, Valentina; Quaroni, Luca; Ferri, Davide

    2014-07-15

    We describe a novel cell used to combine in situ transmission X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) with diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy (DRIFTS) in a single experiment. The novelty of the cell design compared to current examples is that both radiations are passed through an X-ray and IR transparent window in direct contact with the sample. This innovative geometry also offers a wide surface for IR collection. In order to avoid interference from the crystalline IR transparent materials (e.g., CaF{sub 2}, MgF{sub 2}, diamond) a 500 μm carbon filled hole is laser drilled in the center of a CaF{sub 2} window. The cell is designed to represent a plug flow reactor, has reduced dead volume in order to allow for fast exchange of gases and is therefore suitable for experiments under fast transients, e.g., according to the concentration modulation approach. High quality time-resolved XAS and DRIFTS data of a 2 wt.% Pt/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalyst are obtained in concentration modulation experiments where CO (or H{sub 2}) pulses are alternated to O{sub 2} pulses at 150 °C. We show that additional information can be obtained on the Pt redox dynamic under working conditions thanks to the improved sensitivity given by the modulation approach followed by Phase Sensitive Detection (PSD) analysis. It is anticipated that the design of the novel cell is likely suitable for a number of other in situ spectroscopic and diffraction methods.

  19. Resolving Spectral Lines with a Periscope-Type DVD Spectroscope

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wakabayashi, Fumitaka

    2008-01-01

    A new type of DVD spectroscope, the periscope type, is described and the numerical analysis of the observed emission and absorption spectra is demonstrated. A small and thin mirror is put inside and an eighth part of a DVD is used as a grating. Using this improved DVD spectroscope, one can observe and photograph visible spectra more easily and…

  20. Probing Variable Amine/Amide Ligation in NiIIN2S2 Complexes Using Sulfur K-Edge and Nickel L-Edge X-ray Absorption Spectroscopies: Implications for the Active Site of Nickel Superoxide Dismutase

    SciTech Connect

    Shearer,J.; Dehestani, A.; Abanda, F.

    2008-01-01

    Nickel superoxide dismutase (NiSOD) is a recently discovered metalloenzyme that catalyzes the disproportionation of O2* into O2 and H2O2. In its reduced state, the mononuclear NiII ion is ligated by two cis-cysteinate sulfurs, an amine nitrogen (from the protein N-terminus), and an amide nitrogen (from the peptide backbone). Unlike many small molecule and metallopeptide-based NiN2S2 complexes, S-based oxygenation is not observed in NiSOD. Herein we explore the spectroscopic properties of a series of three NiIIN2S2 complexes (bisamine-ligated (bmmp-dmed)NiII, amine/amide-ligated (NiII(BEAAM)), and bisamide-ligated (NiII(emi))2) with varying amine/amide ligation to determine the origin of the dioxygen stability of NiSOD. Ni L-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) demonstrates that there is a progression in ligand-field strength with (bmmp-dmed)NiII having the weakest ligand field and (NiII(emi)2) having the strongest ligand field. Furthermore, these Ni L-edge XAS studies also show that all three complexes are highly covalent with (NiII(BEEAM)) having the highest degree of metal-ligand covalency of the three compounds studied. S K-edge XAS also shows a high degree of NiS covalency in all three complexes. The electronic structures of the three complexes were probed using both hybrid-DFT and multiconfigurational SORCI calculations. These calculations demonstrate that the nucleophilic Ni(3d)/S()* HOMO of these NiN2S2 complexes progressively decreases in energy as the amide-nitrogens are replaced with amine nitrogens. This decrease in energy of the HOMO deactivates the Ni-center toward O2 reactivity. Thus, the NiS bond is protected from S-based oxygenation explaining the enhanced stability of the NiSOD active-site toward oxygenation by dioxygen.

  1. Ce K edge XAS of ceria-based redox materials under realistic conditions for the two-step solar thermochemical dissociation of water and/or CO2.

    PubMed

    Rothensteiner, Matthäus; Sala, Simone; Bonk, Alexander; Vogt, Ulrich; Emerich, Hermann; van Bokhoven, Jeroen A

    2015-10-28

    X-ray absorption spectroscopy was used to characterise ceria-based materials under realistic conditions present in a reactor for solar thermochemical two-step water and carbon dioxide splitting. A setup suitable for in situ measurements in transmission mode at the cerium K edge from room temperature up to 1773 K is presented. Time-resolved X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) data, collected for a 10 mol% hafnium-doped ceria sample (Ce0.9Hf0.1O2-δ) during reduction at 1773 K in a flow of inert gas and during re-oxidation by CO2 at 1073 K, enables the quantitative determination of the non-stoichiometry δ of the fluorite-type structure. XANES analysis suggests the formation of the hexagonal Ce2O3 phase upon reduction in 2% hydrogen/helium at 1773 K. We discuss the experimental limitations and possibilities of high-temperature in situ XAS at edges of lower energy as well as the importance of the technique for understanding and improving the properties of ceria-based oxygen storage materials for thermochemical solar energy conversion. PMID:26412705

  2. An in situ XAS investigation of the kinetics of the ammonolysis of Ga(2)O(3) and the oxidation of GaN.

    PubMed

    Brendt, J; Samuelis, D; Weirich, T E; Martin, M

    2009-05-01

    The ammonolysis of beta-Ga(2)O(3) to alpha-GaN and the oxidation of alpha-GaN to beta-Ga(2)O(3) have been studied by means of in situ X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). In situ X-ray absorption measurements on polycrystalline powder particles on the gallium K-edge during both reactions give detailed information about the reaction kinetics. We were able to extract this kinetics by fitting linear combinations of beta-Ga(2)O(3) and alpha-GaN spectra only. The kinetics of the ammonolysis can be described well by an extended Johnson-Mehl-Avrami-Kolmogorow model, while the oxidation kinetics can be modelled by a shrinking core model. Investigations by means of TEM and SEM support the assumptions in both models. Our experimental results and the models are discussed in terms of the reaction energetics and the reaction mechanisms. PMID:19370207

  3. Synchrotron-based X-ray absorption spectroscopy for art conservation: looking back and looking forward.

    PubMed

    Cotte, Marine; Susini, Jean; Dik, Joris; Janssens, Koen

    2010-06-15

    A variety of analytical techniques augmented by the use of synchrotron radiation (SR), such as X-ray fluorescence (SR-XRF) and X-ray diffraction (SR-XRD), are now readily available, and they differ little, conceptually, from their common laboratory counterparts. Because of numerous advantages afforded by SR-based techniques over benchtop versions, however, SR methods have become popular with archaeologists, art historians, curators, and other researchers in the field of cultural heritage (CH). Although the CH community now commonly uses both SR-XRF and SR-XRD, the use of synchrotron-based X-ray absorption spectroscopy (SR-XAS) techniques remains marginal, mostly because CH specialists rarely interact with SR physicists. In this Account, we examine the basic principles and capabilities of XAS techniques in art preservation. XAS techniques offer a combination of features particularly well-suited for the chemical analysis of works of art. The methods are noninvasive, have low detection limits, afford high lateral resolution, and provide exceptional chemical sensitivity. These characteristics are highly desirable for the chemical characterization of precious, heterogeneous, and complex materials. In particular, the chemical mapping capability, with high spatial resolution that provides information about local composition and chemical states, even for trace elements, is a unique asset. The chemistry involved in both the object's history (that is, during fabrication) and future (that is, during preservation and restoration treatments) can be addressed by XAS. On the one hand, many studies seek to explain optical effects occurring in historical glasses or ceramics by probing the molecular environment of relevant chromophores. Hence, XAS can provide insight into craft skills that were mastered years, decades, or centuries ago but were lost over the course of time. On the other hand, XAS can also be used to characterize unwanted reactions, which are then considered

  4. Optical control of growth of AlxGa1 - xAs by organometallic molecular beam epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aspnes, D. E.; Quinn, W. E.; Gregory, S.

    1990-12-01

    Using spectroellipsometry, we obtain information on the near-surface composition x of epitaxial AlxGa1-xAs layers during crystal growth by organometallic molecular beam epitaxy and use this information to regulate the flow of triethylaluminum to the growth surface. The resulting closed-loop control system maintains the imaginary part of the dielectric response of thick AlxGa1-xAs films constant to an equivalent compositional precision better than ±0.001 over extended periods of time.

  5. Wet thermal oxidation of Al(x)Ga(1-x)As compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burton, R. S.; Schlesinger, T. E.

    1994-11-01

    Results are presented on the wet thermal oxidation of Al(x)Ga(1-x)As. The growth of wet thermal oxides of Al(x)Ga(1-x)As is shown to be linear with time. An O2 carrier gas was found to form a self-terminating oxide for compositions investigated (x greater than 0.4), but required elevated temperature for substantial growth. The use of a medium oxygen concentration (about 20%) in a N2 carrier formed nonuniform oxides for all compositions investigated. A low O2 concentration (0.1%) in the N2 carrier was found to reduce the activation energy of the oxidation process for Al(0.6)Ga(0.4)As from 1.9 to 1.0 eV while increasing the activation energy of Al(0.8)Ga(0.2)As from 1.6 to 1.75 eV. For these wet thermal oxides it is observed that lateral oxidation at heterojunction interfaces is enhanced. This enhanced lateral oxidation can be attributed to local stress due to the smaller volume of the growing oxide compared to the volume of the consumed semiconductor.

  6. The XAS model of dissolved Cu(II) and its significance to biological electron transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frank, Patrick; Benfatto, Maurizio; Hedman, Britt; Hodgson, Keith O.

    2009-11-01

    The standard model for dissolved Cu(II) portrays the complex ion as an axially elongated, equatorially planar octahedron. Using EXAFS and MXAN analyses of copper K-edge XAS spectra, new structural models for dissolved [Cu(aq)]2+ and [Cu(amm)]2+ have been determined. These structures uniformly depart from the octahedral model in favour of an axially elongated square pyramidal core. MXAN results also indicate that the equatorial ligands need not be coplanar with copper. Further structural elements include a -z axially localized scatterer at ~3 Å. Even more distant scatterers imply second shell solvent organization, which can vary with the medium. Preliminary results from new extended, k = 18 Å-1, higher resolution copper K-edge XAS data sets are reported. The low symmetry of dissolved Cu(II) ion contradicts the central thesis of the rack-induced bonding hypothesis of copper electron transfer proteins. The asymmetry of biological copper is not a frozen vibronic excited state enforced by a rigid protein scaffold, but is entirely in harmony with the structural ground state of the dissolved aqueous Cu(II) complex ion.

  7. Capturing Transient Electronic and Molecular Structures in Liquids by Picosecond X-Ray Absorption Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Gawelda, W.; Pham, V. T.; El Nahhas, A.; Kaiser, M.; Zaushitsyn, Y.; Bressler, C.; Chergui, M.; Johnson, S. L.; Grolimund, D.; Abela, R.; Hauser, A.

    2007-02-02

    We describe an advanced setup for time-resolved x-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) Spectroscopy with picosecond temporal resolution. It combines an intense femtosecond laser source synchronized to the x-ray pulses delivered into the microXAS beamline of the Swiss Light Source (SLS). The setup is applied to measure the short-lived high-spin geometric structure of photoexcited aqueous Fe(bpy)3 at room temperature.

  8. Growth of BxGa1-xAs, BxAl1-xAs and BxGa1-x-yInyAs epilayers on (001)GaAs by LP-MOCVD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qi; Ren, Xiaomin; Huang, Yongqing; Huang, Hui; Cai, Shiwei; Zhang, Xia

    2008-11-01

    High quality zinc-blende BxGa1-xAs, BxAl1-xAs, BxGa1-x-yInyAs epilayers and relevant MQW structures containing 10- period BGaAs(10nm)/GaAs(50nm) and BGaInAs(10nm)/GaAs(50nm) have been successfully grown on exactly-oriented (001)GaAs substrates by low-pressure metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (LP-MOCVD). Triethylboron, trimethylgallium, trimethylaluminium, trimethylindium and arsine were used as the precursors. Boron incorporation behaviors have been studied as a function of growth temperature and gas-phase triethylboron mole fraction. In this study, the maximum boron composition x of 5.8% and 1.3% was achieved at the same growth temperature of 580°C for bulk BxGa1-xAs and BxAl1-xAs, respectively. 11K photoluminescence (PL) peak wavelength of lattice-matched BxGa1-x-yInyAs epilayer with boron composition of about 4% reached 1.24μm.

  9. XAS on Rh and Ir metal sites in post synthetically functionalized UiO-67 Zirconium MOFs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braglia, L.; Borfecchia, E.; Lomachenko, K. A.; Øien, S.; Lillerud, K. P.; Lamberti, C.

    2016-05-01

    We synthesized UiO-67 metal-organic-frameworks (MOFs) functionalized with different transition metals (Rh, Ir). Using EXAFS we verified that the synthesis has been successful. Furthermore, we observed the change of local environment while varying of metal site. XAS spectroscopy is the most informative technique to characterize these kind of materials and to study the local environment around the metal site.

  10. Correlation between N 1s core level x-ray photoelectron and x-ray absorption spectra of amorphous carbon nitride films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quirós, C.; Gómez-García, J.; Palomares, F. J.; Soriano, L.; Elizalde, E.; Sanz, J. M.

    2000-08-01

    This work presents a comparative analysis of the N 1s core level spectra, as measured by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS), of amorphous CNx films which gives evidence of the existing correlation between the different components that constitute the respective spectra. After annealing, the contribution of XPS at 399.3 eV and the components of XAS at 399.6 and 400.8 eV are clearly enhanced. They are assigned to sp2 with two neighbors and to sp states of nitrogen. In addition, the XPS component at 401.3 eV is related to the XAS feature at 402.0 eV and has been assigned to sp2 nitrogen bonded to three carbon neighbors.

  11. The apparent absence of chemical sensitivity in the 4d and 5d X-ray absorption spectroscopy of uranium compounds

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Tobin, J. G.

    2013-05-03

    X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) and related derivative measurements have been used to demonstrate that the Pu 5f states are strongly relativistic and have a 5f occupation number near 5. Owing to the success in this regime, it has been argued that the XAS measurements should be a powerful tool to probe 5f occupation variation, both as a function of elemental nature (actinide atomic number) and as a function of physical and chemical perturbation, e.g., oxidation state. We show that XAS and its related measurements fail in this latter aspect for a wide variety of uranium compounds and materials. Possible causesmore » will be discussed.« less

  12. Mn L{sub 2,3}-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopic studies on charge-discharge mechanism of Li{sub 2}MnO{sub 3}

    SciTech Connect

    Kubobuchi, Kei; Mogi, Masato; Imai, Hideto; Ikeno, Hidekazu; Tanaka, Isao; Mizoguchi, Teruyasu

    2014-02-03

    The redox reaction of Mn in Li{sub 2}MnO{sub 3} was studied by X-ray absorption spectroscopy and ab initio multiplet calculation. Associated with the de-intercalation of Li-ion, small but clear spectral changes were observed in Mn-L{sub 2,3} X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES). The systematic ab initio multiplet calculations of Mn-L{sub 2,3} XANES revealed that the spectral changes in the experiment could not simply be ascribed to the change of the valency from Mn{sup 4+} to Mn{sup 5+} but can be explained well by the changes of local atomic structures around Mn{sup 4+} due to the Li de-intercalation. Our results suggest that the electronic state of oxygen should change during charging in Li{sub 2}MnO{sub 3}.

  13. The HITRAN2012 molecular spectroscopic database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rothman, L. S.; Gordon, I. E.; Babikov, Y.; Barbe, A.; Chris Benner, D.; Bernath, P. F.; Birk, M.; Bizzocchi, L.; Boudon, V.; Brown, L. R.; Campargue, A.; Chance, K.; Cohen, E. A.; Coudert, L. H.; Devi, V. M.; Drouin, B. J.; Fayt, A.; Flaud, J.-M.; Gamache, R. R.; Harrison, J. J.; Hartmann, J.-M.; Hill, C.; Hodges, J. T.; Jacquemart, D.; Jolly, A.; Lamouroux, J.; Le Roy, R. J.; Li, G.; Long, D. A.; Lyulin, O. M.; Mackie, C. J.; Massie, S. T.; Mikhailenko, S.; Müller, H. S. P.; Naumenko, O. V.; Nikitin, A. V.; Orphal, J.; Perevalov, V.; Perrin, A.; Polovtseva, E. R.; Richard, C.; Smith, M. A. H.; Starikova, E.; Sung, K.; Tashkun, S.; Tennyson, J.; Toon, G. C.; Tyuterev, Vl. G.; Wagner, G.

    2013-11-01

    This paper describes the status of the 2012 edition of the HITRAN molecular spectroscopic compilation. The new edition replaces the previous HITRAN edition of 2008 and its updates during the intervening years. The HITRAN molecular absorption compilation is comprised of six major components structured into folders that are freely accessible on the internet. These folders consist of the traditional line-by-line spectroscopic parameters required for high-resolution radiative-transfer codes, infrared absorption cross-sections for molecules not yet amenable to representation in a line-by-line form, ultraviolet spectroscopic parameters, aerosol indices of refraction, collision-induced absorption data, and general tables such as partition sums that apply globally to the data. The new HITRAN is greatly extended in terms of accuracy, spectral coverage, additional absorption phenomena, and validity. Molecules and isotopologues have been added that address the issues of atmospheres beyond the Earth. Also discussed is a new initiative that casts HITRAN into a relational database format that offers many advantages over the long-standing sequential text-based structure that has existed since the initial release of HITRAN in the early 1970s.

  14. XAS Monitoring of Zinc Scavenging in Layered Double Hydroxydes (LDHs) and Phyllosilicates in Impacted Soils From Western Europe.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juillot, F.; Morin, G.; Ponthieu, M.; Benedetti, M.; Ildefonse, P.; Trainor, T.; Kinniburgh, D.; Kretzschmar, R.; Brown, G.; Calas, G.

    2002-12-01

    Among trace metals, zinc is one of the most widespread in contaminated soils. Its phytotoxicity is well established and, as other trace metals, its mobility and bioavailability are strongly dependant of its chemical form (i.e. speciation). This parameter results from interactions between soluble species and reactive mineral and organic surfaces (phyllosilicates, hydrous Fe, Mn and Al oxides, humic substances) which cause the formation of sorption or surface-precipitation complexes. Zinc speciation was followed in three european soils (France, Switzerland and England) impacted by pyrometallurgical activities or sewage sludge adding and differing in mineralogical composition (silty, carbonaceous clayey and sandy). Because of the low concentration for zinc in these soils (between 300 and 2500 mg/kg), conventional mineralogical techniques such as Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) failed at localizing this element at the micron scale and at determining its speciation. X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy (XAS), combined with selective chemical extractions, yielded evidences for the incorporation of Zn2+ in Zn/Al-layered double hydroxides (Zn/Al-LDHs) and/or Zn-bearing phyllosilicates as well as its sorption onto hydrous iron oxides and humic substances. In a silty French soil and in a clayey carbonaceous Swiss one (pH ranging from 5.5 to 8.0), Zn/Al-LDHs and Zn-bearing phyllosilicates were the most abundant Zn-bearing components. Their relative proportions were related to pH conditions, Zn/Al-LDHs occurring mainly in the soils with the highest pH. In a sandy English soil (pH 6.5), Zn-bearing phyllosilicates were found together with zinc sorption complexes on hydrous iron oxides. The relative proportion of these two Zn chemical forms depends on the depth of sampling, Zn-bearing phyllosilicates occurring in larger amounts in deeper horizons. The ubiquity of Zn/Al-layered double hydroxides (Zn/Al-LDHs) and/or Zn-bearing phyllosilicates in Zn2

  15. Estimation of the catalytic centre in double metal cyanide catalysts by XAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawniczak-Jablonska, Krystyna; Chrusciel, Arkadiusz

    2016-05-01

    Double metal cyanide (DMC) catalysts are commonly applied at industrial ring opening polymerization of epoxides. Nevertheless, the knowledge on the molecular nature of their high activity and selectivity is limited. XAS studies were performed to look for the possible catalytic centre in this family of catalysts. DMC catalysts were synthesized from ZnCl2 and potassium hexacyanocobaltate(III) solution, in the presence of the different organic ligands and show significant fraction of the non-crystalline structure. Two ligands were analysed (tert-butanol ( t BuOH) or glyme (CH3OCH2CH2OCH3)). EXAFS analysis established that only Zn atoms are the active metallic centers in DMC regardless the used ligand. The coordination around Zn was changed from octahedral in reference non catalytic material to tetrahedral in catalysts, and Cl atoms were detected near some of Zn atoms.

  16. Reduction of selenite on iron surfaces: Amicro-spectroscopic study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheidegger, A. M.; Grolimund, D.; Cui, D.; Devoy, J.; Spahiu, K.; Wersin, P.; Bonhoure, I.; Janousch, M.

    2003-03-01

    Under anoxie conditions zero-valent iron can react with water to produce hydrogen gas and magnetite or green rust, a highly reactive mineral phase that can induce reduction processes and thus control the speciation, the solubility, toxicity and the mobility of redox sensitive elements in (nuclear) waste repositories. In this study micro X-ray fluorescence (micro-XRF) and micro X-ray absorption spectroscopy (micro-XAS) were used to investigate the speciation of selenium that immobilized in the presence of Fe(0) and an anoxie synthetic groundwater solution. The selenium immobilization was accompanied by the formation of a green rust corrosion layer. Micro-XRF revealed that a Se-rich layer is present along the iron surfaces that were exposed to the Se(IV) solution. Micro-XAS experiments at the Se K-edge showed that Se(IV) was reduced to elemental Se(0). Thus, the reactivity of zero-valent and green rust should to be considered in assessing the long-term fate of selenium in nuclear waste repositories.

  17. Intermediate Coupling For Core-Level Excited States: Consequences For X-Ray Absorption Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Bagus, Paul S.; Sassi, Michel JPC; Rosso, Kevin M.

    2015-04-15

    The origin of the complex NEXAFS features of X-Ray Absorption, XAS, spectra in transition metal complexes is analyzed and interpreted in terms of the angular momentum coupling of the open shell electrons. Especially for excited configurations where a core-electron is promoted to an open valence shell, the angular momentum coupling is intermediate between the two limits of Russell- Saunders, RS, coupling where spin-orbit splitting of the electron shells is neglected and j-j coupling where this splitting is taken as dominant. The XAS intensities can be understood in terms of two factors: (1) The dipole selection rules that give the allowed excited RS multiplets and (2) The contributions of these allowed multiplets to the wavefunctions of the intermediate coupled levels. It is shown that the origin of the complex XAS spectra is due to the distribution of the RS allowed multiplets over several different intermediate coupled excited levels. The specific case that is analyzed is the L2,3 edge XAS of an Fe3+ cation, because this cation allows a focus on the angular momentum coupling to the exclusion of other effects; e.g., chemical bonding. Arguments are made that the properties identified for this atomic case are relevant for more complex materials. The analysis is based on the properties of fully relativistic, ab initio, many-body wavefunctions for the initial and final states of the XAS process. The wavefunction properties considered include the composition of the wavefunctions in terms of RS multiplets and the occupations of the spin-orbit split open shells; the latter vividly show whether the coupling is j-j or not.

  18. High-temperature XAS study of Fe[sub 2]SiO[sub 4] liquid: Reduced coordination of ferrous iron

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, W.E.; Brown, G.E. Jr.; Waychunas, G.A. ); Leon, J.M. de; Conradson, S.D. ); Combes, J.M. )

    1993-10-08

    X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) of Fe[sup 2+] in Fe[sub 2]SiO[sub 4] liquid at 1575 kelvin and 10[sup [minus]4] gigapascal (1 bar) shows that the Fe[sup 2+]-O bond length is 1.98 [+-] 0.02 angstroms compared with [approximately]2.22 angstroms in crystalline Fe[sub 2]SiO[sub 4] (fayalite) at the melting point (1478 kelvin), which indicates a decrease in average Fe[sup 2+] coordination number from six in fayalite to four in the liquid. Anharmonicity in the liquid was accounted for using a data analysis procedure. This reduction in coordination number is similar to that observed on the melting of certain ionic salts. These results are used to develop a model of the medium-range structural environment of Fe[sup 2+] in olivine-composition melts, which helps explain some of the properties of Fe[sub 2]SiO[sub 4] liquid, including density, viscosity, and the partitioning of iron and nickel between silicate melts and crystalline olivines. Some of the implications of this model for silicate melts in the Earth's crust and mantle are discussed.

  19. Reflection-absorption infrared spectroscopic study on a CuO X/SiO 2 model catalyst prepared by spin-coating on a SiO 2/W/Si(100) buried metal substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukui, Ken-ichi; Oshima, Itaru; Oosterbeek, Heiko; Iwasawa, Yasuhiro

    1999-01-01

    CuO X particles were deposited by spin-coating on a SiO 2(50 nm)/W(70 nm)/Si(100) buried metal substrate using 2-propanol solution of a Cu precursor followed by oxidation. The CuO X/SiO 2/W/Si model catalyst was used to detect vibrational modes of submonolayer adsorbates by reflection-absorption infrared spectroscopy (RAIRS). During methanol reaction on CuO X/SiO 2/W/Si, RAIR spectra showed that methoxy species was formed on CuO X particles and spilt over to the SiO 2 substrate, replacing hydroxyl species.

  20. Incorporation of Trace Elements in Ancient and Modern Human Bone: An X-Ray Absorption Spectroscopy Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pingitore, N. E.; Cruz-Jimenez, G.; Price, T. D.

    2001-12-01

    X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) affords the opportunity to probe the atomic environment of trace elements in human bone. We are using XAS to investigate the mode(s) of incorporation of Sr, Zn, Pb, and Ba in both modern and ancient (and thus possibly altered) human and animal bone. Because burial and diagenesis may add trace elements to bone, we performed XAS analysis on samples of pristine contemporary and ancient, buried human and animal bone. We assume that deposition of these elements during burial occurs by processes distinct from those in vivo, and this will be reflected in their atomic environments. Archaeologists measure strontium in human and animal bone as a guide to diet. Carnivores show lower Sr/Ca ratios than their herbivore prey due to discrimination against Sr relative to Ca up the food chain. In an initial sample suite no difference was observed between modern and buried bone. Analysis of additional buried samples, using a more sensitive detector, revealed significant differences in the distance to the second and third neighbors of the Sr in some of the buried samples. Distances to the first neighbor, oxygen, were similar in all samples. Zinc is also used in paleo-diet studies. Initial x-ray absorption spectroscopy of a limited suite of bones did not reveal any differences between modern and buried samples. This may reflect the limited number of samples examined or the low levels of Zn in typical aqueous solutions in soils. Signals from barium and lead were too low to record useful XAS spectra. Additional samples will be studied for Zn, Ba, and Pb. We conducted our XAS experiments on beam lines 4-1 and 4-3 at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory. Data were collected in the fluorescence mode, using a Lytle detector and appropriate filter, and a solid state, 13-element Ge-detector.

  1. Spectroscopic (FT-IR, FT-Raman, UV absorption, 1H and 13C NMR) and theoretical (in B3LYP/6-311++G** level) studies on alkali metal salts of caffeic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Świsłocka, Renata

    The effect of some metals on the electronic system of benzoic and nicotinic acids has recently been investigated by IR, Raman and UV spectroscopy [1-3]. Benzoic and nicotinic acids are regarded model systems representing a wide group of aromatic ligands which are incorporated into enzymes. In this work the FT-IR (in solid state and in solution), FT-Raman, UV absorption and 1H and 13C NMR spectra of caffeic acid (3,4-dihydroxycinnamic acid) and its salts with lithium, sodium, potassium, rubidium and caesium were registered, assigned and analyzed. The effect of alkali metals on the electronic system of ligands was discussed. Studies of differences in the number and position of bands from the IR, Raman, UV absorption spectra and chemical shifts from NMR spectra allowed to conclude on the distribution of electronic charge in the molecules, the delocalization energy of π electrons and the reactivity of ligands in metal complexes. Optimized geometrical structures of studied compounds were calculated by B3LYP method using 6-311++G** basis set. Bond lengths, angles and dipole moments for the optimized structures of caffeic acid and lithium, sodium, potassium caffeinates were also calculated. The theoretical wavenumbers and intensities of IR spectra were obtained. The calculated parameters were compared to the experimental characteristics of investigated compounds. Microbial activity of studied compounds was tested against Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus and Proteus vulgaris.

  2. Spectroscopic (FT-IR, FT-Raman, UV absorption, 1H and 13C NMR) and theoretical (in B3LYP/6-311++G** level) studies on alkali metal salts of caffeic acid.

    PubMed

    Świsłocka, Renata

    2013-01-01

    The effect of some metals on the electronic system of benzoic and nicotinic acids has recently been investigated by IR, Raman and UV spectroscopy [1-3]. Benzoic and nicotinic acids are regarded model systems representing a wide group of aromatic ligands which are incorporated into enzymes. In this work the FT-IR (in solid state and in solution), FT-Raman, UV absorption and (1)H and (13)C NMR spectra of caffeic acid (3,4-dihydroxycinnamic acid) and its salts with lithium, sodium, potassium, rubidium and caesium were registered, assigned and analyzed. The effect of alkali metals on the electronic system of ligands was discussed. Studies of differences in the number and position of bands from the IR, Raman, UV absorption spectra and chemical shifts from NMR spectra allowed to conclude on the distribution of electronic charge in the molecules, the delocalization energy of π electrons and the reactivity of ligands in metal complexes. Optimized geometrical structures of studied compounds were calculated by B3LYP method using 6-311++G** basis set. Bond lengths, angles and dipole moments for the optimized structures of caffeic acid and lithium, sodium, potassium caffeinates were also calculated. The theoretical wavenumbers and intensities of IR spectra were obtained. The calculated parameters were compared to the experimental characteristics of investigated compounds. Microbial activity of studied compounds was tested against Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus and Proteus vulgaris. PMID:22369898

  3. Cholesterol absorption.

    PubMed

    Ostlund, Richard E

    2002-03-01

    Cholesterol absorption is a key regulatory point in human lipid metabolism because it determines the amount of endogenous biliary as well as dietary cholesterol that is retained, thereby influencing whole body cholesterol balance. Plant sterols (phytosterols) and the drug ezetimibe reduce cholesterol absorption and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol in clinical trials, complementing the statin drugs, which inhibit cholesterol biosynthesis. The mechanism of cholesterol absorption is not completely known but involves the genes ABC1, ABCG5, and ABCG8, which are members of the ATP-binding cassette protein family and appear to remove unwanted cholesterol and phytosterols from the enterocyte. ABC1 is upregulated by the liver X (LXR) and retinoid X (RXR) nuclear receptors. Acylcholesterol acytransferase-2 is an intestinal enzyme that esterifies absorbed cholesterol and increases cholesterol absorption when dietary intake is high. New clinical treatments based on better understanding of absorption physiology are likely to substantially improve clinical cholesterol management in the future. PMID:17033296

  4. The HITRAN 2008 Molecular Spectroscopic Database

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rothman, Laurence S.; Gordon, Iouli E.; Barbe, Alain; Benner, D. Chris; Bernath, Peter F.; Birk, Manfred; Boudon, V.; Brown, Linda R.; Campargue, Alain; Champion, J.-P.; Chance, Kelly V.; Coudert, L. H.; Sung, K.; Toth, R. A.

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes the status of the 2008 edition of the HITRAN molecular spectroscopic database. The new edition is the first official public release since the 2004 edition, although a number of crucial updates had been made available online since 2004. The HITRAN compilation consists of several components that serve as input for radiative-transfer calculation codes: individual line parameters for the microwave through visible spectra of molecules in the gas phase; absorption cross-sections for molecules having dense spectral features, i.e., spectra in which the individual lines are not resolved; individual line parameters and absorption cross sections for bands in the ultra-violet; refractive indices of aerosols, tables and files of general properties associated with the database; and database management software. The line-by-line portion of the database contains spectroscopic parameters for forty-two molecules including many of their isotopologues.

  5. Speciation and Lability of Ag-, AgCl- and Ag2S-Nanoparticles in Soil Determined by X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy and Diffusive Gradients in Thin Films

    EPA Science Inventory

    Long-term speciation and lability of silver (Ag-), silver chloride (AgCl-) and silver sulfide nanoparticles (Ag2S-NPs) in soil were studied by X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS), and newly developed "nano" Diffusive Gradients in Thin Films (DGT) devices. These nano-D...

  6. Millisecond Kinetics of Nanocrystal Cation Exchange UsingMicrofluidic X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Chan, Emory M.; Marcus, Matthew A.; Fakra, Sirine; Elnaggar,Mariam S.; Mathies, Richard A.; Alivisatos, A. Paul

    2007-05-07

    We describe the use of a flow-focusing microfluidic reactorto measure the kinetics of theCdSe-to-Ag2Se nanocrystal cation exchangereaction using micro-X-ray absorption spectroscopy (mu XAS). The smallmicroreactor dimensions facilitate the millisecond mixing of CdSenanocrystal and Ag+ reactant solutions, and the transposition of thereaction time onto spatial coordinates enables the in situ observation ofthe millisecond reaction with mu XAS. XAS spectra show the progression ofCdSe nanocrystals to Ag2Se over the course of 100 ms without the presenceof long-lived intermediates. These results, along with supporting stoppedflow absorption experiments, suggest that this nanocrystal cationexchange reaction is highly efficient and provide insight into how thereaction progresses in individual particles. This experiment illustratesthe value and potential of in situ microfluidic X-ray synchrotrontechniques for detailed studies of the millisecond structuraltransformations of nanoparticles and other solution-phase reactions inwhich diffusive mixing initiates changes in local bond structures oroxidation states.

  7. The soft X-ray absorption spectrum of the allyl free radical.

    PubMed

    Alagia, M; Bodo, E; Decleva, P; Falcinelli, S; Ponzi, A; Richter, R; Stranges, S

    2013-01-28

    The first experimental study of the X-ray absorption spectrum (XAS) of the allyl free radical, CH(2)CHCH(2), is reported. A supersonic He seeded beam of hyperthermal allyl radicals was crossed by a high resolution synchrotron radiation (SR) in the focus of a 3D ion momentum imaging time-of-flight (TOF) spectrometer to investigate the soft X-ray absorption and fragmentation processes. The XAS, recorded as Total-Ion-Yield (TIY), is dominated by C1s electron excitations from either the central carbon atom, C(C), or the two terminal carbon atoms, C(T), to the frontier orbitals, the semi-occupied-molecular-orbital (SOMO) and the lowest-unoccupied-molecular-orbital (LUMO). All of the intense features in the XAS could only be assigned with the aid of ab initio spectral simulation at the Multi-Configuration Self-Consistent-Field (MCSCF) level of theory, this level being required because of the multi-reference nature of the core-excited state wavefunctions of the open shell molecule. The ionization energies (IEs) of the singlet and triplet states of the C1s ionized allyl radical (XPS) were also calculated at the MCSCF level. PMID:23232557

  8. Theoretical analysis of x-ray absorption spectra of Ti compounds used as catalysts in lithium amide/imide reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsumuraya, Takao; Shishidou, Tatsuya; Oguchi, Tamio

    2008-06-01

    We present a theoretical analysis and interpretation of the x-ray absorption near-edge structure of x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) at the titanium K -edge of several Ti compounds for understanding catalysis mechanism in lithium amide LiNH2 and imide Li2NH systems for hydrogen storage. Our theoretical approach is based on first-principles calculations using all-electron full-potential linear augmented plane-wave method. Chemical bonding and local geometry of catalytically-active Ti states in the hydrogen desorption reaction LiNH2+LiH→Li2NH+H2 are investigated. It is found that XAS spectra of some compounds consisting of elements Li, N, H, and Ti are quite similar to measured ones of catalytically-active Ti compounds. We conclude that Ti ions may occupy the Li sites in LiNH2 during the reaction.

  9. Spectroscopic investigations of dithienyl polyenes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, Thomas M.; Sowards, Laura A.; Natarajan, Lalgudi V.; Kirkpatrick, Sean M.; Chandra, Suresh; McLean, Daniel G.; Spangler, Charles W.

    1999-10-01

    To understand the photophysics of nonlinear absorbers, we have investigated the photophysics of a series of di(2- thienyl-3,3',4,4'-butyl)polyenes. Spectroscopic measurements, including UV/Vis, fluorescence, fluorescence lifetimes, fluorescence quantum yields, triplet state lifetime, solvent effects and two-photon absorption coefficient were obtained as a function of the number of double bonds (n equals 1 - 5). Trends in the data reflected the ordering, energy gap between and mixing of 1Bu* and 1Ag* excited state configurations. We investigated the solvatochromism of a series of (alpha) ,(omega) -di(2- dithienyl 3,3',4,4'-butyl) polyenes. Absorption (n equals 1 - 5 double bonds) were collected in a series of aprotic solvents. The absorption energy dispersion effect sensitivity increased smoothly with n, reaching asymptotic behavior as n approached 5. The emission energy had less solvent sensitivity, giving evidence for a polar 1Bu* absorbing state and a nonpolar 1Ag* emitting state. We observed sensitivity of the absorbing and emitting states to solute-solvent dipole-dipole interactions, suggesting the dithienyl polyenes had a polar syn ground state conformation.

  10. Redox State of Iron in Lunar Glasses using X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy and Multivariate Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dyar, M. D.; McCanta, M. C.; Lanzirotti, A.; Sutton, S. R.; Carey, C. J.; Mahadevan, S.; Rutherford, M. J.

    2014-12-01

    The oxidation state of igneous materials on a planet is a critically-important variable in understanding magma evolution on bodies in our solar system. However, direct and indirect methods for quantifying redox states are challenging, especially across the broad spectrum of silicate glass compositions found on airless bodies. On the Moon, early Mössbauer studies of bulk samples suggested the presence of significant Fe3+ (>10%) in lunar glasses (green, orange, brown); lunar analog glasses synthesized at fO2 <10-11 have similar Fe3+. All these Mössbauer spectra are challenging to interpret due to the presence of multiple coordination environments in the glasses. X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) allows pico- and nano-scale interrogation of primitive planetary materials using the pre-edge, main edge, and EXAFS regions of absorption edge spectra. Current uses of XAS require availability of standards with compositions similar to those of unknowns and complex procedures for curve-fitting of pre-edge features that produce results with poorly constrained accuracy. A new approach to accurate and quantitative redox measurements with XAS is to couple use of spectra from synthetic glass standards covering a broad compositional range with multivariate analysis (MVA) techniques. Mössbauer and XAS spectra from a suite of 33 synthetic glass standards covering a wide range of compositions and fO2(Dyar et al., this meeting) were used to develop a MVA model that utilizes valuable predictive information not only in the major spectral peaks/features, but in all channels of the XAS region. Algorithms for multivariate analysis t were used to "learn" the characteristics of a data set as a function of varying spectral characteristics. These models were applied to the study of lunar glasses, which provide a challenging test case for these newly-developed techniques due to their very low fO2. Application of the new XAS calibration model to Apollo 15 green (15426, 15427 and 15425

  11. Mineral composition of TALDICE aeolian ice core dust by means of synchrotron radiation XAS and XRF techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marcelli, A.; Cibin, G.; Sala, M.; Hampai, D.; Maggi, V.; Marino, F.; Delmonte, B.

    2009-04-01

    In this work we present the first accurate non-destructive comparison of the mineral composition of atmospheric dusts contained in a deep ice core from Antarctica using synchrotron radiation. Different mineral assemblages reaching glaciated areas could be correlated to sources areas starting from the knowledge of the dust composition. In this investigation we demonstrate the possibility to characterize with SR the mineral composition of the dust in order to perform its geochemical characterization and to understand the pattern of the transport and the trajectories of the aerosol. This study has been focused on the elemental characterization and the identification of the iron oxidation state of aeolian Antarctic dust by means of synchrotron radiation X-Ray Fluorescence and X-Ray Absorption Spectroscopy. A set of twelve ice samples from the TALDICE (TD, 72˚ 46'S, 159˚ 04'E, 2316 m a.s.l., mean accumulation rate 80 kg*m-2*yr-1) ice core, corresponding to the warm climatic period, Holocene, and to the cold climatic period, Marine Isotopic Stage 3 (MIS 3) have been measured. To obtain both the elemental composition and the iron oxidation state of the mineral dust we performed experiments on specially prepared samples at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource (SSRL) laboratory in the framework of the Proposal N.3082B. Actually, melted ice samples were filtered and then mineral particles were deposited onto Nuclepore polycarbonate membranes in a 1000 class clean room under a 100 class laminar flow bench for both XRF and XAS experiments. A dedicated HV experimental chamber, that allows performing different type of experimental technique on very low absorber concentration samples was developed and tested in Italy. The original experimental setup, including an in-vacuum sample micromanipulator and a special alignment and docking sample system was installed at the beamline 10-2 at SSRL. For the x-ray detection a 7 mm2 high sensitive Silicon Drift Detector was

  12. A Complete Overhaul of the Electron Energy-Loss Spectroscopy and X-Ray Absorption Spectroscopy Database: eelsdb.eu.

    PubMed

    Ewels, Philip; Sikora, Thierry; Serin, Virginie; Ewels, Chris P; Lajaunie, Luc

    2016-06-01

    The electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS) and X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) database has been completely rewritten, with an improved design, user interface, and a number of new tools. The database is accessible at https://eelsdb.eu/ and can now be used without registration. The submission process has been streamlined to encourage spectrum submissions and the new design gives greater emphasis on contributors' original work by highlighting their papers. With numerous new filters and a powerful search function, it is now simple to explore the database of several hundred EELS and XAS spectra. Interactive plots allow spectra to be overlaid, facilitating online comparison. An application-programming interface has been created, allowing external tools and software to easily access the information held within the database. In addition to the database itself, users can post and manage job adverts and read the latest news and events regarding the EELS and XAS communities. In accordance with the ongoing drive toward open access data increasingly demanded by funding bodies, the database will facilitate open access data sharing of EELS and XAS spectra. PMID:26899024

  13. Spectroscopic studies of heat-treated FeNxCy/C involved in electrochemical oxygen reduction under acid media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Shou-Heng; Wu, Jyun-Ren

    2015-03-01

    Carbon-incorporated FeNx electrocatalysts (FeNC/C-T) have been synthesized by carbonizing a nitrogen-containing specie and iron precursor on carbon blacks at various heat-treated temperatures. The catalyst properties (crystalline structure, surface chemical states, oxidation state and co-ordination geometry) and their formation scheme of FeNC/C-T have been thoroughly examined by X-ray based spectroscopies such as X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS). The electrochemical performance of oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) and methanol tolerance were also investigated by rotating disk electrode tests in 0.5 M H2SO4. By combined results from XPS and XAS spectroscopies, the catalysts carbonized at 1073 K possess higher surface Fe/C and N/C atomic ratios with formation of carbons incorporated FeN4 species were found to have the optimal electrocatalytic properties.

  14. Atomic and electronic aspects of the coloration mechanism of gasochromic Pt/Mo-modified V2O5 smart films: an in situ X-ray spectroscopic study.

    PubMed

    Lu, Ying-Rui; Hsu, Hsin-Hua; Chen, Jeng-Lung; Chang, Han-Wei; Chen, Chi-Liang; Chou, Wu-Ching; Dong, Chung-Li

    2016-02-21

    In this work, gasochromic pristine and Mo-modified V2O5 thin films were prepared by the sol-gel spin coating method. Both films exhibit excellent gasochromic coloration. Synchrotron grazing incidence X-ray diffraction reveals that the Mo-modified V2O5 thin film is more amorphous than the pristine V2O5 thin film. X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) was utilized to elucidate the modifications of the local electronic and atomic structures that are caused by Mo. In situ soft-XAS and in situ hard-XAS were performed to monitor the effect of the adsorption of dihydrogen on the charge state of vanadium and local atomic rearrangement in the gasochromic thin films. The gasochromic V2O5 film has a significantly pyramid-like oxygen-coordinated environment. However, the Mo-modified film exhibits mixed pyramid- and octahedral-like structures. Analytic results indicate that upon gasochromic coloration, adsorption of hydrogen adds electrons to the V 3d t2g orbital, lowering the charge state of vanadium. The films undergo structural modification before the valence is changed. The Mo-modified V2O5 film exhibits faster coloration because the apical V-O bond differs from that in the pristine V2O5 film. This in situ XAS allows real-time monitoring of changes in the element-specific local atomic structure during the gasochromic reaction and enables the elucidation of the gasochromic mechanism. PMID:26813863

  15. Experimental and theoretical correlations between vanadium K-edge X-ray absorption and K[Formula: see text] emission spectra.

    PubMed

    Rees, Julian A; Wandzilak, Aleksandra; Maganas, Dimitrios; Wurster, Nicole I C; Hugenbruch, Stefan; Kowalska, Joanna K; Pollock, Christopher J; Lima, Frederico A; Finkelstein, Kenneth D; DeBeer, Serena

    2016-09-01

    A series of vanadium compounds was studied by K-edge X-ray absorption (XAS) and K[Formula: see text] X-ray emission spectroscopies (XES). Qualitative trends within the datasets, as well as comparisons between the XAS and XES data, illustrate the information content of both methods. The complementary nature of the chemical insight highlights the success of this dual-technique approach in characterizing both the structural and electronic properties of vanadium sites. In particular, and in contrast to XAS or extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS), we demonstrate that valence-to-core XES is capable of differentiating between ligating atoms with the same identity but different bonding character. Finally, density functional theory (DFT) and time-dependent DFT calculations enable a more detailed, quantitative interpretation of the data. We also establish correction factors for the computational protocols through calibration to experiment. These hard X-ray methods can probe vanadium ions in any oxidation or spin state, and can readily be applied to sample environments ranging from solid-phase catalysts to biological samples in frozen solution. Thus, the combined XAS and XES approach, coupled with DFT calculations, provides a robust tool for the study of vanadium atoms in bioinorganic chemistry. PMID:27251139

  16. Sulfur X-Ray Absorption And Vibrational Spectroscopic Study of Sulfur Dioxide, Sulfite, And Sulfonate Solutions And of the Substituted Sulfonate Ions X(3)CSO(3-)(X = H, Cl, F)

    SciTech Connect

    Risberg, E.Damian; Eriksson, L.; Mink, J.; Pettersson, L.G.M.; Skripkin, M.Yu.; Sandstrom, M.

    2009-06-02

    Sulfur K-edge X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectra have been recorded and the S(1s) electron excitations evaluated by means of density functional theory-transition potential (DFT-TP) calculations to provide insight into the coordination, bonding, and electronic structure. The XANES spectra for the various species in sulfur dioxide and aqueous sodium sulfite solutions show considerable differences at different pH values in the environmentally important sulfite(IV) system. In strongly acidic (pH < {approx}1) aqueous sulfite solution the XANES spectra confirm that the hydrated sulfur dioxide molecule, SO{sub 2}(aq), dominates. The theoretical spectra are consistent with an OSO angle of {approx}119{sup o} in gas phase and acetonitrile solution, while in aqueous solution hydrogen bonding reduces the angle to {approx}116{sup o}. The hydration affects the XANES spectra also for the sulfite ion, SO{sub 3}{sup 2-}. At intermediate pH (4) the two coordination isomers, the sulfonate (HSO{sub 3{sup -}}) and hydrogen sulfite (SO{sub 3}H{sup -}) ions with the hydrogen atom coordinated to sulfur and oxygen, respectively, could be distinguished with the ratio HSO{sub 3{sup -}}:SO{sub 3}H{sup -} about 0.28:0.72 at 298 K. The relative amount of HSO{sub 3{sup -}} increased with increasing temperature in the investigated range from 275 to 343 K. XANES spectra of sulfonate, methanesulfonate, trichloromethanesulfonate, and trifluoromethanesulfonate compounds, all with closely similar S-O bond distances in tetrahedral configuration around the sulfur atom, were interpreted by DFT-TP computations. The energy of their main electronic transition from the sulfur K-shell is about 2478 eV. The additional absorption features are similar when a hydrogen atom or an electron-donating methyl group is bonded to the -SO{sub 3} group. Significant changes occur for the electronegative trichloromethyl (Cl{sub 3}C-) and trifluoromethyl (F{sub 3}C-) groups, which strongly affect the

  17. XAS Characterization of the Zn Site of Non-structural Protein 3 (NS3) from Hepatitis C Virus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ascone, I.; Nobili, G.; Benfatto, M.; Congiu-Castellano, A.

    2007-02-01

    XANES spectra of non structural protein 3 (NS3) have been calculated using 4 Zn coordination models from three crystallographic structures in the Protein Data Base (PDB): 1DY9, subunit B, 1CU1 subunit A and B, and 1JXP subunit B. Results indicate that XANES is an appropriate tool to distinguish among them. Experimental XANES spectra have been simulated refining crystallographic data. The model obtained by XAS is compared with the PDB models.

  18. The x-ray absorption spectroscopy model of solvation about sulfur in aqueous L-cysteine

    PubMed Central

    Sarangi, Ritimukta; Frank, Patrick; Benfatto, Maurizio; Morante, Silvia; Minicozzi, Velia; Hedman, Britt; Hodgson, Keith O.

    2012-01-01

    The environment of sulfur in dissolved aqueous L-cysteine has been examined using K-edge x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS), extended continuum multiple scattering (ECMS) theory, and density functional theory (DFT). For the first time, bound-state and continuum transitions representing the entire XAS spectrum of L-cysteine sulfur are accurately reproduced by theory. Sulfur K-edge absorption features at 2473.3 eV and 2474.2 eV represent transitions to LUMOs that are mixtures of S–C and S–H σ* orbitals significantly delocalized over the entire L-cysteine molecule. Continuum features at 2479, 2489, and 2530 eV were successfully reproduced using extended continuum theory. The full L-cysteine sulfur K-edge XAS spectrum could not be reproduced without addition of a water-sulfur hydrogen bond. Density functional theory analysis shows that although the Cys(H)S⋯H–OH hydrogen bond is weak (∼2 kcal) the atomic charge on sulfur is significantly affected by this water. MXAN analysis of hydrogen-bonding structures for L-cysteine and water yielded a best fit model featuring a tandem of two water molecules, 2.9 Å and 5.8 Å from sulfur. The model included a Scys⋯H–Ow1H hydrogen-bond of 2.19 Å and of 2.16 Å for H2Ow1⋯H–Ow2H. One hydrogen-bonding water-sulfur interaction alone was insufficient to fully describe the continuum XAS spectrum. However, density functional theoretical results are convincing that the water-sulfur interaction is weak and should be only transient in water solution. The durable water-sulfur hydrogen bond in aqueous L-cysteine reported here therefore represents a break with theoretical studies indicating its absence. Reconciling the apparent disparity between theory and result remains the continuing challenge. PMID:23206038

  19. The x-ray absorption spectroscopy model of solvation about sulfur in aqueous L-cysteine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarangi, Ritimukta; Frank, Patrick; Benfatto, Maurizio; Morante, Silvia; Minicozzi, Velia; Hedman, Britt; Hodgson, Keith O.

    2012-11-01

    The environment of sulfur in dissolved aqueous L-cysteine has been examined using K-edge x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS), extended continuum multiple scattering (ECMS) theory, and density functional theory (DFT). For the first time, bound-state and continuum transitions representing the entire XAS spectrum of L-cysteine sulfur are accurately reproduced by theory. Sulfur K-edge absorption features at 2473.3 eV and 2474.2 eV represent transitions to LUMOs that are mixtures of S-C and S-H σ* orbitals significantly delocalized over the entire L-cysteine molecule. Continuum features at 2479, 2489, and 2530 eV were successfully reproduced using extended continuum theory. The full L-cysteine sulfur K-edge XAS spectrum could not be reproduced without addition of a water-sulfur hydrogen bond. Density functional theory analysis shows that although the Cys(H)S⋯H-OH hydrogen bond is weak (˜2 kcal) the atomic charge on sulfur is significantly affected by this water. MXAN analysis of hydrogen-bonding structures for L-cysteine and water yielded a best fit model featuring a tandem of two water molecules, 2.9 Å and 5.8 Å from sulfur. The model included a Scys⋯H-Ow1H hydrogen-bond of 2.19 Å and of 2.16 Å for H2Ow1⋯H-Ow2H. One hydrogen-bonding water-sulfur interaction alone was insufficient to fully describe the continuum XAS spectrum. However, density functional theoretical results are convincing that the water-sulfur interaction is weak and should be only transient in water solution. The durable water-sulfur hydrogen bond in aqueous L-cysteine reported here therefore represents a break with theoretical studies indicating its absence. Reconciling the apparent disparity between theory and result remains the continuing challenge.

  20. Observation of natural superlattice in AlXGa1-XAs layers grown by metalorganic vapor phase epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pradhan, A.; Maitra, T.; Mukherjee, S.; Mukherjee, S.; Nayak, A.; Satpati, B.; Bhunia, S.

    2016-05-01

    Atomic Cu-Pt type ordering in monolayer scale is well known in Ga0.5 In0.5 P epitaxial layers leading to change in its bandgap. Despite wide scale use of AlxGa1-xAs (0xAs epitaxial layers. Clear evidence of such ordering was first noticed in the barrier layers of GaAs/Al0.3Ga0.7As quantum well structures. Further investigation on bulk epitaxial growth of AlxGa1-xAs layer with different composition (x=0.2) has also confirmed existence of such structures. We have probed the sample using high resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy coupled with x-ray rocking curve (XRC) and reflectivity (XRR) measurements. Sharp superlattice peaks around (004) substrate Bragg peak as well as around (002) forbidden peak in XRC have been observed. Similar peaks are present in XRR also. We have presented detailed analysis of X-ray diffraction data with the help of kinematical diffraction theory here. The stability of the superlattice structures has been further investigated by annealing the sample at different temperatures.

  1. High purity GaAs and Al xGa 1-xAs grown by metalorganic molecular beam epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furuhata, Naoki; Okamoto, Akihiko; Hoshino, Hitoshi

    1990-06-01

    High purity GaAs and Al xGa 1- xAs were grown by metalorganic molecular beam epitaxy (MOMBE) using metalorganic sources and arsenic (As 4). In GaAs growth using triethylgallium (TEG) and As 4, carrier concentrations depended on As 4 pressure and substrate temperatures. Below 1.5 x 10 -4 Torr As 4 pressure, the p-type carrier concentrations decreased with an increase in As 4 pressure. Above 1.5 x 10 -4 Torr As 4 pressure, the epilayer converted from p-type to n-type conductivity. Carrier concentrations decreased with a decrease in substrate temperatures. At 500°C and 1.5 x 10 -4 Torr As 4 pressure, the carrier concentration in the p-type GaAs epilayer exhibited 1.5 x 10 14 cm -3 with a room temperature mobility of 400 cm 2/V.s. Al xGa 1-xAs ( x=0.1-0. .2) was also grown using TEG, three different Al sources (triethylaluminum (TEA), trimethylaluminum (TMA) and dimethylaluminum hydride (DMAH) and As 4. Using TEG, TEA and As 4, the Al 0.15Ga 0.85As epilayer showed p-type conduction with carrier concentration of 1.2x10 15 cm -3 and mobility of 117 cm 2/V.s. This carrier concentration is the lowest value ever reported for Al xGa 1- xAs grown by MOMBE.

  2. Relaxed InxGa1-xAs graded buffers grown with organometallic vapor phase epitaxy on GaAs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bulsara, Mayank T.; Leitz, Chris; Fitzgerald, Eugene A.

    1998-03-01

    InxGa1-xAs structures with compositionally graded buffers were grown with organometallic vapor phase epitaxy on GaAs substrates and characterized with plan-view and cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, and x-ray diffraction. The results show that surface roughness experiences a maximum at growth temperatures where phase separation occurs in InxGa1-xAs. The strain fields from misfit dislocations induce this phase separation in the <110> directions. At growth temperatures above and below this temperature, the surface roughness is decreased significantly; however, only growth temperatures above this regime ensure nearly complete relaxed graded buffers with the most uniform composition caps. With the optimum growth temperature for grading InxGa1-xAs determined to be 700 °C, it was possible to produce In0.33Ga0.67As diode structures on GaAs with threading dislocation densities <8.5×106/cm2.

  3. Crystallographic and X-ray absorption spectroscopic characterization of Helicobacter pylori UreE bound to Ni2+ and Zn2+ reveal a role for the disordered C-terminal arm in metal trafficking

    PubMed Central

    Banaszak, Katarzyna; Martin-Diaconescu, Vlad; Bellucci, Matteo; Zambelli, Barbara; Rypniewski, Wojciech; Maroney, Michael J.; Ciurli, Stefano

    2012-01-01

    The survival and growth of the pathogen Helicobacter pylori in the gastric acidic environment is ensured by the activity of urease, an enzyme containing two essential Ni2+ ions in the active site. The metallo-chaperone UreE facilitates in vivo Ni2+ insertion into the apo-enzyme. Crystals of apo-HpUreE and its Ni2+ and Zn2+ bound forms were obtained from protein solutions in the absence and presence of the metal ions. The crystal structures of the homodimeric protein, determined at 2.00 Å (apo), 1.59 Å (Ni) and 2.52 Å (Zn) resolution, show the conserved proximal and solvent-exposed His102 residues from two adjacent monomers invariably involved in metal binding. The C-terminal regions of the apo-protein are disordered in the crystal, but acquire significant ordering in the presence of the metal ions due to the binding of His152. The analysis of X-ray absorption spectral data obtained on solutions of Ni2+- and Zn2+-HpUreE provided accurate information of the metal ion environment in the absence of solid-state effects. These results reveal the role of the histidine residues at the protein C-terminus in metal ion binding, and the mutual influence of protein framework and metal ion stereo-electronic properties in establishing coordination number and geometry leading to metal selectivity. PMID:22010876

  4. Analyzing Water's Optical Absorption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    A cooperative agreement between World Precision Instruments (WPI), Inc., and Stennis Space Center has led the UltraPath(TM) device, which provides a more efficient method for analyzing the optical absorption of water samples at sea. UltraPath is a unique, high-performance absorbance spectrophotometer with user-selectable light path lengths. It is an ideal tool for any study requiring precise and highly sensitive spectroscopic determination of analytes, either in the laboratory or the field. As a low-cost, rugged, and portable system capable of high- sensitivity measurements in widely divergent waters, UltraPath will help scientists examine the role that coastal ocean environments play in the global carbon cycle. UltraPath(TM) is a trademark of World Precision Instruments, Inc. LWCC(TM) is a trademark of World Precision Instruments, Inc.

  5. Picosecond flash spectroscopic studies on ultraviolet stabilizers and stabilized polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott, G. W.

    1982-01-01

    Spectroscopic and excited state decay kinetics are reported for monomeric and polymeric forms of ultraviolet stabilizers in the 2-(2'-hydroxyphenyl)-benzotriazole and 2-hydroxybenzophenone classes. For some of these molecules in various solvents at room temperature, (1) ground state absorption spectra, (2) emission spectra, (3) picosecond time-resolved transient absorption spectra, (4) ground state absorption recovery kinetics, (5) emission kinetics, and (6) transient absorption kinetics are reported. In the solid state at low temperatures, emission spectra and their temperature dependent kinetics up to approximately 200K as well as, in one case, the 12K excitation spectra of the observed dual emission are also reported.

  6. Characterization of Th carbonate solutions using XAS and implications for thermodynamic modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Hess, N.J.; Felmy, A.R.; Rai, D.; Conradson, S.D.

    1997-12-31

    The chemical behavior of actinide elements in tank solutions, in soil, and in groundwater is dependent upon the chemical species that form when aqueous solutions come in contact with the actinide compounds. In particular the chemical speciation of the reduced actinide oxidation states (III and IV) are important, for example, to DOE waste tank processing and, more generally, to nuclear waste disposal issues. Predicting the solubility of the actinides in these solutions requires identification of the strong aqueous complexes, such as carbonates and organic chelating agents, that can form in aqueous solution. Previous speciation work has often relied on indirect techniques such as potentiometric titrations or solubility measurements. Recent XAS experiments determine directly the speciation of the Th carbonato species of seven solutions under a range of carbonate concentrations and pH conditions. The presence of the pentacarbonato complex is confirmed and the complex`s stability at low carbonate concentrations is determined. These experimental results support a proposed thermodynamic model that describes the solubility of Th(IV) hydrous oxide in the aqueous Na{sup +}-HCO{sub 3}{sup {minus}}-CO{sub 3}{sup 2{minus}}-OH{sup {minus}}-ClO{sub 4}{sup {minus}}-H{sub 2}O system extending to high concentrations at 25 C. This model is relatively simple in that only two aqueous species are included Th(OH){sub 3}CO{sub 3}{sup {minus}} and Th(CO{sub 3}){sub 5}{sup 6{minus}}.

  7. Novel spectro-electrochemical cell for in situ/operando observation of common composite electrode with liquid electrolyte by X-ray absorption spectroscopy in the tender X-ray region.

    PubMed

    Nakanishi, Koji; Kato, Daisuke; Arai, Hajime; Tanida, Hajime; Mori, Takuya; Orikasa, Yuki; Uchimoto, Yoshiharu; Ohta, Toshiaki; Ogumi, Zempachi

    2014-08-01

    A novel spectro-electochemical cell for X-ray absorption spectroscopy in the tender X-ray region (TX-XAS) was designed and fabricated to investigate the electrochemical behavior of common battery materials with liquid electrolytes under in situ/operando conditions. The cell has several unique features, such as high X-ray transmittance, high signal to noise ratio, and high vacuum tightness. These features enable us quick and reliable XAS measurements. Operando P K-edge XAS measurements of an olivine-type LiFePO4 composite positive electrode were carried out to clarify its phosphorus environment during the electrochemical charging process. Results of spectral analysis show that there is no significant change in the oxidation state of phosphorus and in the coordination of the phosphate anions in the charging process, but a closer look of the consecutive XAS spectra suggests the shrinkage of the PO4 cage during the charging process, and the structural changes in a biphasic manner. These results demonstrate the usefulness of the cell for in situ/operando TX-XAS observations of light elements in practical batteries. PMID:25173283

  8. Novel spectro-electrochemical cell for in situ/operando observation of common composite electrode with liquid electrolyte by X-ray absorption spectroscopy in the tender X-ray region

    PubMed Central

    Nakanishi, Koji; Kato, Daisuke; Arai, Hajime; Tanida, Hajime; Mori, Takuya; Orikasa, Yuki; Uchimoto, Yoshiharu; Ohta, Toshiaki; Ogumi, Zempachi

    2014-01-01

    A novel spectro-electochemical cell for X-ray absorption spectroscopy in the tender X-ray region (TX-XAS) was designed and fabricated to investigate the electrochemical behavior of common battery materials with liquid electrolytes under in situ/operando conditions. The cell has several unique features, such as high X-ray transmittance, high signal to noise ratio, and high vacuum tightness. These features enable us quick and reliable XAS measurements. Operando P K-edge XAS measurements of an olivine-type LiFePO4 composite positive electrode were carried out to clarify its phosphorus environment during the electrochemical charging process. Results of spectral analysis show that there is no significant change in the oxidation state of phosphorus and in the coordination of the phosphate anions in the charging process, but a closer look of the consecutive XAS spectra suggests the shrinkage of the PO4 cage during the charging process, and the structural changes in a biphasic manner. These results demonstrate the usefulness of the cell for in situ/operando TX-XAS observations of light elements in practical batteries. PMID:25173283

  9. Novel spectro-electrochemical cell for in situ/operando observation of common composite electrode with liquid electrolyte by X-ray absorption spectroscopy in the tender X-ray region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakanishi, Koji; Kato, Daisuke; Arai, Hajime; Tanida, Hajime; Mori, Takuya; Orikasa, Yuki; Uchimoto, Yoshiharu; Ohta, Toshiaki; Ogumi, Zempachi

    2014-08-01

    A novel spectro-electochemical cell for X-ray absorption spectroscopy in the tender X-ray region (TX-XAS) was designed and fabricated to investigate the electrochemical behavior of common battery materials with liquid electrolytes under in situ/operando conditions. The cell has several unique features, such as high X-ray transmittance, high signal to noise ratio, and high vacuum tightness. These features enable us quick and reliable XAS measurements. Operando P K-edge XAS measurements of an olivine-type LiFePO4 composite positive electrode were carried out to clarify its phosphorus environment during the electrochemical charging process. Results of spectral analysis show that there is no significant change in the oxidation state of phosphorus and in the coordination of the phosphate anions in the charging process, but a closer look of the consecutive XAS spectra suggests the shrinkage of the PO4 cage during the charging process, and the structural changes in a biphasic manner. These results demonstrate the usefulness of the cell for in situ/operando TX-XAS observations of light elements in practical batteries.

  10. Terahertz broadband spectroscopic investigations of amino acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, De-chong; Zhang, Liang-liang; Zhong, Hua; Zhang, Cun-lin

    2011-08-01

    We present an experimental terahertz (THz) spectroscopic investigation of amino acid using an air-breakdown-coherent detection (ABCD) system. The strong and ultra-broadband (0.1 to 10THz) terahertz radiations generated by two-color laser induced air plasma and measured by coherent heterodyne detection. The broadband THz reflection spectra of L-Lysine (C6H14N2O2) and L-Arginine (C6H14N2O2) are obtained. To solve the phase-retrieval problem in RTDS, the absorption signatures of the materials are extracted directly from the first derivative of the relative reflectance with respect to frequency. The absorption features of the two amino acids are characterized in the 0.5~6 THz region. It is found that both the two amino acids have an absorption peak at 1.10 THz.

  11. Theory and interpretation of L-shell X-ray absorption spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nesvizhskii, Alexey I.

    X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) directly reflects the electronic structure in a material. However, despite significant progress in XANES theory, the quantitative analysis of XANES is not fully developed and remains a challenge. In this work, a detailed analysis of the L2,3 edge XANES in transition metals was performed using relativistic, self-consistent real space Green's function code FEFFS. Several prescriptions for taking into account core hole in calculations of x-ray absorption spectra (XAS) were discussed. It was found that in most cases of L2,3 edge XANES in transition metals, the initial state (ground state) calculations were in the best agreement with experimental data. A procedure was developed for quantitative applications of the sum rules for XAS, e.g., for x-ray magnetic circular dichroism and for obtaining hole counts. The approach is based on theoretical atomic calculations of transformations relating various experimental spectra to corresponding operator-spectral densities. This approach overcomes the difficulties of background subtraction and hole-count normalization of other sum rule analysis methods and yields quantitative values for spin- and orbital-moments from experimental absorption spectra. The developed approach was theoretically tested and applied to experimental XAS data in Cu, Ni, Co, Fe, and other materials. Hole counts obtained from XAS are often interpreted in terms of free-atom occupation numbers or Mulliken counts. We demonstrated that renormalized-atom (RA) counts are a better choice to characterize the configuration of occupied electron states in molecules and condensed matter. A projection-operator approach was introduced to subtract delocalized states and to determine such hole counts from XAS quantitatively. Theoretical tests for the s- and d-electrons in transition metals showed that the approach works well. A formalism was developed based on time dependent local density approximation (TDLDA) theory that takes

  12. Calibration method for spectroscopic systems

    DOEpatents

    Sandison, David R.

    1998-01-01

    Calibration spots of optically-characterized material placed in the field of view of a spectroscopic system allow calibration of the spectroscopic system. Response from the calibration spots is measured and used to calibrate for varying spectroscopic system operating parameters. The accurate calibration achieved allows quantitative spectroscopic analysis of responses taken at different times, different excitation conditions, and of different targets.

  13. Calibration method for spectroscopic systems

    DOEpatents

    Sandison, D.R.

    1998-11-17

    Calibration spots of optically-characterized material placed in the field of view of a spectroscopic system allow calibration of the spectroscopic system. Response from the calibration spots is measured and used to calibrate for varying spectroscopic system operating parameters. The accurate calibration achieved allows quantitative spectroscopic analysis of responses taken at different times, different excitation conditions, and of different targets. 3 figs.

  14. Ni K-Edge XAS Suggests that Coordination of Ni II to the Unstructured Amyloidogenice Region of the Human Prion Protein Produces a Ni2 bis-u-hydroxo Dimer

    SciTech Connect

    Shearer,J.; Soh, P.

    2007-01-01

    Prion diseases are thought to be caused by the misfolding of the ubiquitous neuronal membrane prion protein (PrP) through an unknown mechanism that may involve Cu{sup II} coordination to the PrP. Previous work has utilized Ni{sup II} as a diamagnetic probe for Cu{sup II} coordination [C.E. Jones, M. Klewpatinond, S.R. Abdelraheim, D.R. Brown, J.H. Viles, J. Mol. Biol. 346 (2005) 1393-1407]. Herein we investigate Ni{sup II} coordination to the PrP fragment PrP(93-114) (AcN-GGTHSQWNKPSKPKTNMKHMAG) at pH = 10.0 by Ni K-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS). We find that two equivalents of Ni{sup II} will coordinate to PrP(93-114) by UV/Vis titrations and mass spectrometry. Ni K-edge XAS data is consistent with Ni{sup II} ligated by five N/O based ligands (three N/O ligands at 2.01(2) {angstrom} and two at 1.855(2) {angstrom}). We were also able to locate a Ni-Ni vector at 3.1(1) {angstrom}, which suggests the two Ni{sup II} centers are contained in a bis-{mu}-hydroxo dimer. We therefore suggest that Ni{sup II} may not be a suitable diamagnetic mimic for Cu{sup II} coordination within the PrP since differential coordination modes for the two metals exist.

  15. XAS Study at Mo and Co K-Edges of the Sulfidation of a CoMo / Al2O3 Hydrotreating Catalyst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pichon, C.; Gandubert, A. D.; Legens, C.; Guillaume, D.

    2007-02-01

    Because of its impact on environment, the removal of sulfur is an indispensable step, called hydrotreatment, in the refining of petroleum. One of the most commonly used hydrotreating catalysts is CoMo-type catalyst which is composed of molybdenum disulfide slabs promoted by cobalt atoms (CoMoS phase) and well dispersed on a high specific area alumina. As far as the highest sulfur content allowed in gasoline and diesel is continually decreasing, more and more efficient and active hydrotreating catalysts are required. In order to optimize the reactivity of the CoMo-type catalyst in hydrotreatment, a better understanding of the processes used to produce the active phase (CoMoS slabs) of the catalyst is necessary. The study reported here deals with the sulfiding mechanism of the slabs and the influence of temperature on the phenomenon. Ex situ X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XANES and EXAFS) was used to study the evolution of the structure of CoMo-type catalyst sulfided at various temperatures (from 293 to 873 K). XAS analysis was performed at both molybdenum and cobalt K-edges to obtain a cross-characterization of the sulfidation of the slabs. It evidenced the formation of various compounds, including two molybdenum oxides, MoS3 (or MoS3-like compound) and Co9S8, at specific steps of the sulfiding process. It showed the role of intermediate played by MoS3 (or MoS3-like compound) during the formation of the slabs and the competition between the appearance of promoted slabs (CoMoS phase) and Co9S8. At last, it leaded to the proposal of a mechanism for the sulfidation of the catalyst.

  16. XAS Study at Mo and Co K-Edges of the Sulfidation of a CoMo / Al2O3 Hydrotreating Catalyst

    SciTech Connect

    Pichon, C.; Gandubert, A. D.; Legens, C.; Guillaume, D.

    2007-02-02

    Because of its impact on environment, the removal of sulfur is an indispensable step, called hydrotreatment, in the refining of petroleum. One of the most commonly used hydrotreating catalysts is CoMo-type catalyst which is composed of molybdenum disulfide slabs promoted by cobalt atoms (CoMoS phase) and well dispersed on a high specific area alumina. As far as the highest sulfur content allowed in gasoline and diesel is continually decreasing, more and more efficient and active hydrotreating catalysts are required. In order to optimize the reactivity of the CoMo-type catalyst in hydrotreatment, a better understanding of the processes used to produce the active phase (CoMoS slabs) of the catalyst is necessary. The study reported here deals with the sulfiding mechanism of the slabs and the influence of temperature on the phenomenon. Ex situ X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XANES and EXAFS) was used to study the evolution of the structure of CoMo-type catalyst sulfided at various temperatures (from 293 to 873 K). XAS analysis was performed at both molybdenum and cobalt K-edges to obtain a cross-characterization of the sulfidation of the slabs. It evidenced the formation of various compounds, including two molybdenum oxides, MoS3 (or MoS3-like compound) and Co9S8, at specific steps of the sulfiding process. It showed the role of intermediate played by MoS3 (or MoS3-like compound) during the formation of the slabs and the competition between the appearance of promoted slabs (CoMoS phase) and Co9S8. At last, it leaded to the proposal of a mechanism for the sulfidation of the catalyst.

  17. Comparative research on reflection-mode GaAs photocathode with graded AlxGa1-xAs buffer layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Liang; Shen, Yang; Zhang, Shuqin; Qian, Yunsheng; Xu, Sunan

    2015-11-01

    The graded Al compositional AlxGa1-xAs buffer layer can not only form continuous internal electric field from buffer layer to active layer but also optimize the interface properties by decreasing the misfit dislocations and stacking faults arising from lattice mismatch. By measuring the spectral response current (SRC) for two reflection-mode (r-mode) designed samples of graded and stationary Al compositional structure, we can find the special phenomenon that the graded structure had quite influence at the middle wavelength band from 550 nm to 850 nm, but not the short wavelength band from 400 nm to 550 nm, though the buffer layer can only absorb photon energy at the short wavelength band. Through the comparative research for designed samples through SPV before Cs-O activation and SRC after Cs-O activation, the graded structure can well optimize the key parameters such as LD, Ln, Sv and P. For the photon absorption lengths are relative little at the short wavelength band and relative long at the middle wavelength band, so the optimizations of key parameters have little influence on photo-excited electrons at the short wavelength band which are mainly excited from the region in active layer near surface barriers. The optimizations of key parameter, mainly the back interface recombination velocity (Sv), can have quite impact on photo-excited electrons at the middle short wavelength band which are mainly excited from the internal active layer near the back interface. This comparative research can help to well study the photo-emission theory and structure design on graded Al compositional design for r-mode GaAs photocathodes in the future research.

  18. New oxypnictide superconductors: PrOFe{sub 1-x}Co{sub x}As

    SciTech Connect

    Prakash, J.; Singh, S.J.; Das, D.; Patnaik, S.; Ganguli, A.K.

    2010-02-15

    Oxypnictides of the type PrOFe{sub 1-x}Co{sub x}As (x<=0.3) were synthesized for the first time by the sealed tube method. All the compounds were found to be monophasic and crystallize in the tetragonal ZrCuSiAs type structure (space group=P4/nmm) and the lattice parameters (a and c) decrease with increase in cobalt content. Moessbauer measurements of the compounds indicate low spin Fe{sup 2+} in tetrahedral coordination. Resistivity and magnetization studies reveal superconducting transitions in compounds with 'x'=0.05, 0.10 and 0.15, with maximum transition temperature (T{sub c}) at {approx}14 K in the compound with 'x'=0.1. The variation of resistivity with temperature under different magnetic field has been studied to estimate the upper critical field (H{sub c2}) ({approx}50.2 T for the 'x'=0.1 composition). The Seebeck and Hall coefficient (R{sub H}) suggests electron type charge carriers in these compound and the charge carrier density increases with increase in Co-doping. - Graphical abstract: Cobalt doping at the iron site in PrOFeAs (semimetal) compound suppresses structural distortion and spin density wave with the evolution of superconductivity. The Seebeck and Hall coefficient (R{sub H}) indicate electron type charge carriers in these compounds and charge carrier density increases with increase in Co-doping. Temperature dependence of resistivity (rho) for (a) PrOFeAs, (b) PrOFe{sub 0.95}Co{sub 0.05}As, (c) PrOFe{sub 0.9}Co{sub 0.1}As, (d) PrOFe{sub 0.85}Co{sub 0.15}As, (e) PrOFe{sub 0.8}Co{sub 0.2}As and (f) PrOFe{sub 0.7}Co{sub 0.3}As.

  19. X-ray absorption spectroscopy of lithium sulfur battery reaction intermediates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wujcik, Kevin; Pascal, Tod; Prendergast, David; Balsara, Nitash

    2015-03-01

    Lithium sulfur batteries have a theoretical energy density nearly five times greater than current lithium ion battery standards, but questions still remain regarding the reaction pathways through which soluble lithium polysulfide (Li2Sx, ``x'' ranging from 2 to 8) reaction intermediates are formed. Complicating spectroelectrochemical approaches to elucidate redox pathways is the challenge of obtaining spectral standards for individual Li2Sx species. Lithium polysulfides cannot be isolated as individual component and exist only in solution as a distribution of different Li2Sx molecules formed via disproportionation reactions (e.g. 2Li2S4 goes to Li2S3 + Li2S5). X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) at the sulfur K-edge has recently been employed as a technique to study Li-S chemistry. We have recently obtained XAS standards for individual Li2Sx species via first principles DFT simulations and the excited electron and core hole approach. Here, experimental sulfur K-edge XAS of Li2Sx species dissolved in poly(ethylene oxide) are compared to spectra obtained from analogous theoretical calculations. The impact that polysulfide solution concentration and the presence of other lithium salts (e.g. LiNO3) have on X-ray spectra of Li2Sx species is explored via experiment and theory.

  20. Arsenate Adsorption On Ruthenium Oxides: A Spectroscopic And Kinetic Investigation

    EPA Science Inventory

    Arsenate adsorption on amorphous (RuO2•1.1H2O) and crystalline (RuO2) ruthenium oxides was evaluated using spectroscopic and kinetic methods to elucidate the adsorption mechanism. Extended X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (EXAFS) was ...

  1. Use of XAS for the elucidation of metal structure and function: applications to nickel biochemistry, molecular toxicology, and carcinogenesis.

    PubMed Central

    Carrington, Paul E; Al-Mjeni, Faizah; Zoroddu, Maria A; Costa, Max; Maroney, Michael J

    2002-01-01

    Nickel has been shown to be an essential trace element involved in the metabolism of several species of bacteria, archea, and plants. In these organisms, nickel is involved in enzymes that catalyze both non-redox (e.g., urease, glyoxalase I) and redox (e.g., hydrogenase, carbon monoxide dehydrogenase, superoxide dismutase) reactions, and proteins involved in the transport, storage, metallocenter assembly, and regulation of nickel concentration have evolved. Studies of structure/function relationships in nickel biochemistry reveal that cysteine ligands are used to stabilize the Ni(III/II) redox couple. Certain nickel compounds have also been shown to be potent human carcinogens. A likely target for carcinogenic nickel is nuclear histone proteins. Here we present X-ray absorption spectroscopic studies of a model Ni peptide designed to help characterize the structure of the nickel complexes formed with histones and place them in the context of nickel structure/function relationships, to gain insights into the molecular mechanism of nickel carcinogenesis. PMID:12426116

  2. Synchrotron soft X-ray absorption spectroscopy study of carbon and silicon nanostructures for energy applications.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Jun; Zhang, Hui; Sun, Xuhui; Lee, Shuit-Tong

    2014-12-10

    Carbon and silicon materials are two of the most important materials involved in the history of the science and technology development. In the last two decades, C and Si nanoscale materials, e.g., carbon nanotubes, graphene, and silicon nanowires, and quantum dots, have also emerged as the most interesting nanomaterials in nanoscience and nanotechnology for their myriad promising applications such as for electronics, sensors, biotechnology, etc. In particular, carbon and silicon nanostructures are being utilized in energy-related applications such as catalysis, batteries, solar cells, etc., with significant advances. Understanding of the nature of surface and electronic structures of nanostructures plays a key role in the development and improvement of energy conversion and storage nanosystems. Synchrotron soft X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) and related techniques, such as X-ray emission spectroscopy (XES) and scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM), show unique capability in revealing the surface and electronic structures of C and Si nanomaterials. In this review, XAS is demonstrated as a powerful technique for probing chemical bonding, the electronic structure, and the surface chemistry of carbon and silicon nanomaterials, which can greatly enhance the fundamental understanding and also applicability of these nanomaterials in energy applications. The focus is on the unique advantages of XAS as a complementary tool to conventional microscopy and spectroscopy for effectively providing chemical and structural information about carbon and silicon nanostructures. The employment of XAS for in situ, real-time study of property evolution of C and Si nanostructures to elucidate the mechanisms in energy conversion or storage processes is also discussed. PMID:25204894

  3. The iron-site structure of [Fe]-hydrogenase and model systems: an X-ray absorption near edge spectroscopy study†‡

    PubMed Central

    Salomone-Stagni, Marco; Stellato, Francesco; Whaley, C. Matthew; Vogt, Sonja; Morante, Silvia; Shima, Seigo; Rauchfuss, Thomas B.; Meyer-Klaucke, Wolfram

    2012-01-01

    The [Fe]-hydrogenase is an ideal system for studying the electronic properties of the low spin iron site that is common to the catalytic centres of all hydrogenases. Because they have no auxiliary iron-sulfur clusters and possess a cofactor containing a single iron centre, the [Fe]-hydrogenases are well suited for spectroscopic analysis of those factors required for the activation of molecular hydrogen. Specifically, in this study we shed light on the electronic and molecular structure of the iron centre by XAS analysis of [Fe]-hydrogenase from Methanocaldococcus jannashii and five model complexes (Fe(ethanedithiolate)-(CO)2(PMe3)2, [K(18-crown-6)]2[Fe(CN)2(CO)3], K[Fe(CN)(CO)4], K3[Fe(iii)(CN)6], K4[Fe(ii)(CN)6]). The different electron donors have a strong influence on the iron absorption K-edge energy position, which is frequently used to determine the metal oxidation state. Our results demonstrate that the K-edges of Fe(ii) complexes, achieved with low-spin ferrous thiolates, are consistent with a ferrous centre in the [Fe]-hydrogenase from Methanocaldococcus jannashii. The metal geometry also strongly influences the XANES and thus the electronic structure. Using in silico simulation, we were able to reproduce the main features of the XANES spectra and describe the effects of individual donor contributions on the spectra. Thereby, we reveal the essential role of an unusual carbon donor coming from an acyl group of the cofactor in the determination of the electronic structure required for the activity of the enzyme. PMID:20221540

  4. Iron L-edge X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy of Oxy-Picket Fence Porphyrin: Experimental Insight into Fe-O2 Bonding

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Samuel A.; Kroll, Thomas; Decreau, Richard A.; Hocking, Rosalie K.; Lundberg, Marcus; Hedman, Britt; Hodgson, Keith O.; Solomon, Edward I.

    2013-01-01

    The electronic structure of the Fe–O2 center in oxy-hemoglobin and oxy-myoglobin is a long-standing issue in the field of bioinorganic chemistry. Spectroscopic studies have been complicated by the highly delocalized nature of the porphyrin and calculations require interpretation of multi-determinant wavefunctions for a highly covalent metal site. Here, iron L-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS), interpreted using a valence bond configuration interaction (VBCI) multiplet model, is applied to directly probe the electronic structure of the iron in the biomimetic Fe–O2 heme complex [Fe(pfp)(1-MeIm)O2] (pfp = meso-tetra(α,α,α,α-o-pivalamidophenyl) porphyrin or TpivPP). This method allows separate estimates of σ-donor, π-donor, and π-acceptor interactions through ligand to metal charge transfer (LMCT) and metal to ligand charge transfer (MLCT) mixing pathways. The L-edge spectrum of [Fe(pfp)(1-MeIm)O2] is further compared to those of [FeII(pfp)(1-MeIm)2], [FeII(pfp)], and [FeIII(tpp)(ImH)2]Cl (tpp = meso-tetraphenylporphyrin) which have FeII S = 0, FeII S = 1 and FeIII S = 1/2 ground states, respectively. These serve as references for the three possible contributions to the ground state of oxy-pfp. The Fe–O2 pfp site is experimentally determined to have both significant σ-donation and a strong π-interaction of the O2 with the iron, with the latter having implications with respect to the spin polarization of the ground state. PMID:23259487

  5. High-resolution X-ray absorption spectroscopy as a probe of crystal-field and covalency effects in actinide compounds.

    PubMed

    Butorin, Sergei M; Kvashnina, Kristina O; Vegelius, Johan R; Meyer, Daniel; Shuh, David K

    2016-07-19

    Applying the high-energy resolution fluorescence-detection (HERFD) mode of X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS), we were able to probe, for the first time to our knowledge, the crystalline electric field (CEF) splittings of the [Formula: see text] shell directly in the HERFD-XAS spectra of actinides. Using ThO2 as an example, data measured at the Th 3d edge were interpreted within the framework of the Anderson impurity model. Because the charge-transfer satellites were also resolved in the HERFD-XAS spectra, the analysis of these satellites revealed that ThO2 is not an ionic compound as previously believed. The Th [Formula: see text] occupancy in the ground state was estimated to be twice that of the Th [Formula: see text] states. We demonstrate that HERFD-XAS allows for characterization of the CEF interaction and degree of covalency in the ground state of actinide compounds as it is extensively done for 3d transition metal systems. PMID:27370799

  6. Properties of Ga{sub 1-x}Mn{sub x}As with high x (>0.1)

    SciTech Connect

    Chiba, D.; Yu, K. M.; Walukiewicz, W.; Nishitani, Y.; Matsukura, F.; Ohno, H.

    2008-04-01

    We have investigated the magnetic and the crystalline properties of a set of Ga{sub 1-x}Mn{sub x}As layers with high nominal Mn compositions (x=0.101-0.198). Magnetization measurements and combined channeling Rutherford backscattering (c-RBS) and particle induced x-ray emission (c-PIXE) measurements have been performed to determine the effective Mn composition x{sub eff} and the fraction of Mn atoms at various lattice sites. Here, x{sub eff} determined from magnetization measurements, which increases with increasing x, is consistent with the results determined from c-RBS-PIXE measurements.

  7. X-ray absorption and infrared spectra of water and ice: A first-principles electronic structure study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Wei

    responsible for the substantial change of the main spectral edge in the conversion from ice to water. The effect of densification may not involve hydrogen bond breaking as shown by experiment in high-density amorphous ice. Chapter 1 serves as a short summary of the problems at hand, as well as an outline of our theoretical and numerical approaches. In Chapter 2, some necessary background of the subject is provided, including a review of the water XAS controversy in the literature. Chapter 3 describes how we compute XAS theoretically from ground state DFT. In Chapter 4, we go beyond ground state theories and investigate the quasi-particle behavior of the excited states. This is achieved using the many-body Green's function approach known as the GW approximation (GWA). We also present a detailed analysis of the origin of calculated spectral features. The second part of this thesis, Chapter 5, is devoted to a discussion of the infrared spectra of ice and water, in particular, the role of dynamic dipolar correlations. In this chapter, we present a method to decompose the dipolar correlations into intra- and intermolecular contributions. We find that intermolecular contributions play a role as important as the intramolecular counterpart over the entire frequency range. The decomposition technique proposed here is generally applicable to interpret other spectroscopic data and other systems, such as water at interfaces. The conclusions of our studies are summarized in Chapter 6.

  8. Versatile plug flow catalytic cell for in situ transmission/fluorescence x-ray absorption fine structure measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Centomo, P.; Meneghini, C.; Zecca, M.

    2013-05-01

    A novel flow-through catalytic cell has been developed for in situ x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) experiments on heterogeneous catalysts under working conditions and in the presence of a liquid and a gas phase. The apparatus allows to carry out XAS measurements in both the transmission and fluorescence modes, at moderate temperature (from RT to 50-80 °C) and low-medium gas pressure (up to 7-8 bars). The materials employed are compatible with several chemicals such as those involved in the direct synthesis of hydrogen peroxide (O2, H2, H2O2, methanol). The versatile design of the cell allows to fit it to different experimental setups in synchrotron radiation beamlines. It was used successfully for the first time to test nanostructured Pd catalysts during the direct synthesis of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) in methanol solution from dihydrogen and dioxygen.

  9. Probing the dynamics of plasmon-excited hexanethiol-capped gold nanoparticles by picosecond X-ray absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Zamponi, Flavio; Penfold, Thomas J; Nachtegaal, Maarten; Lübcke, Andrea; Rittmann, Jochen; Milne, Chris J; Chergui, Majed; van Bokhoven, Jeroen A

    2014-11-14

    Picosecond X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) is used to investigate the electronic and structural dynamics initiated by plasmon excitation of 1.8 nm diameter Au nanoparticles (NPs) functionalised with 1-hexanethiol. We show that 100 ps after photoexcitation the transient XAS spectrum is consistent with an 8% expansion of the Au-Au bond length and a large increase in disorder associated with melting of the NPs. Recovery of the ground state occurs with a time constant of ∼1.8 ns, arising from thermalisation with the environment. Simulations reveal that the transient spectrum exhibits no signature of charge separation at 100 ps and allows us to estimate an upper limit for the quantum yield (QY) of this process to be <0.1. PMID:25251452

  10. X-ray-induced photo-chemistry and X-ray absorption spectroscopy of biological samples

    PubMed Central

    George, Graham N.; Pickering, Ingrid J.; Pushie, M. Jake; Nienaber, Kurt; Hackett, Mark J.; Ascone, Isabella; Hedman, Britt; Hodgson, Keith O.; Aitken, Jade B.; Levina, Aviva; Glover, Christopher; Lay, Peter A.

    2012-01-01

    As synchrotron light sources and optics deliver greater photon flux on samples, X-ray-induced photo-chemistry is increasingly encountered in X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) experiments. The resulting problems are particularly pronounced for biological XAS experiments. This is because biological samples are very often quite dilute and therefore require signal averaging to achieve adequate signal-to-noise ratios, with correspondingly greater exposures to the X-ray beam. This paper reviews the origins of photo-reduction and photo-oxidation, the impact that they can have on active site structure, and the methods that can be used to provide relief from X-ray-induced photo-chemical artifacts. PMID:23093745

  11. Investigation of the Unoccupied Electronic Structure of UO2 with Bermstrahlung Isochromat Spectroscopy and X-Ray Absorption Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Tobin, J G; Yu, S W; Crowhurst, J C; Sharma, S; Dewhurst, J K; Olalde-Velasco, P; Yang, W L; Siekhaus, W J

    2011-03-17

    UO{sub 2} is an important nuclear fuel for electrical power generation. Global goal : Actinides (5f electron systems) exhibit fascinating physical and chemical properties, due to 5f electron correlation, including the highly radioactive systems such as Pu. Onsite Instrumentation: A spectroscopic system containing spin resolved photoelectron spectroscopy (SRPES) and bremsstrahlung isochromat spectroscopy (BIS) has been built and commissioned at LLNL. ALS Instrumentation: The XAS was done on Beamline 8. Both Total Electron Yield (TEY) and Total Fluorescence Yield (TFY) were used. TFY is less surface sensitive than TEY. A combined experimental and theoretical study of Uranium Dioxide has been performed, including XAS, BIS, XPS and spectral simulations. The Conduction Bands or Unoccupied Density of States (UDOS) of UO{sub 2} are shown to be divided into two parts, the lower region being U5f-O2p and the upper region U6d-O2p. This means that UO{sub 2} is an f-f Mott Insulator, electron-correlated system. The keys to success with the XAS were the (1) the utilization of both TEY and TFY and (2) the accurate co-location of the uranium and oxygen states, which in turn hinged upon a proper calibration of the gratings of the beamline monochromator. The calibration of the gratings was greatly aided by the availibility of the O1s XAS from 1st, 2nd and 3rd order light. The success of this approach to differentiation of the Uranium UDOS into U5f and U6d components is of great importance and bodes well for its application to other actinide systems. Our ultimate goal remains Pu and its electron correlation.

  12. Competitive sorption and selective sequence of Cu(II) and Ni(II) on montmorillonite: Batch, modeling, EPR and XAS studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Shitong; Ren, Xuemei; Zhao, Guixia; Shi, Weiqun; Montavon, Gilles; Grambow, Bernd; Wang, Xiangke

    2015-10-01

    Heavy metal ions that leach from various industrial and agricultural processes are simultaneously present in the contaminated soil and water systems. The competitive sorption of these toxic metal ions on the natural soil components and sediments significantly influences their migration, bioavailability and ecotoxicity in the geochemical environment. In this study, the competitive sorption and selectivity order of Cu(II) and Ni(II) on montmorillonite are investigated by combining the batch experiments, X-ray diffraction (XRD), electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR), surface complexation modeling and X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy (XAS). The batch experimental data show that the coexisting Ni(II) exhibits a negligible influence on the sorption behavior of Cu(II), whereas the coexisting Cu(II) reduces the Ni(II) sorption percentage and changes the shape of the Ni(II) sorption isotherm. The sorption species of Cu(II) and Ni(II) on montmorillonite over the acidic and near-neutral pH range are well simulated by the surface complexation modeling. However, this model cannot identify the occurrence of surface nucleation and the co-precipitation processes at a highly alkaline pH. Based on the results of the EPR and XAS analyses, the microstructures of Cu(II) on montmorillonite are identified as the hydrated free Cu(II) ions at pH 5.0, inner-sphere surface complexes at pH 6.0 and the surface dimers/Cu(OH)2(s) precipitate at pH 8.0 in the single-solute and the binary-solute systems. For the Ni(II) sorption in the single-solute system, the formed microstructure varies from the hydrated free Ni(II) ions at the pH values of 5.0 and 6.0 to the inner-sphere surface complexes at pH 8.0. For the Ni(II) sorption in the binary-solute system, the coexisting Cu(II) induces the formation of the inner-sphere complexes at pH 6.0. In contrast, Ni(II) is adsorbed on montmorillonite via the formation of Ni phyllosilicate co-precipitate/α-Ni(OH)2(s) precipitate at pH 8.0. The selective sequence

  13. Interaction of selenite with reduced Fe and/or S species: An XRD and XAS study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finck, Nicolas; Dardenne, Kathy

    2016-05-01

    In this study, we investigated the interaction between selenite and either Fe(II)aq or S(- II)aq in solution, and the results were used to investigate the interaction between Se(IV)aq and FeS in suspension. The reaction products were characterized by a combination of methods (SEM, XRD and XAS) and the reaction mechanisms were identified. In a first experiment, Se(IV)aq was reduced to Se(0) by interaction with Fe(II)aq which was oxidized to Fe(III), but the reaction was only partial. Subsequently, some Fe(III) produced akaganeite (β-FeOOH) and the release of proton during that reaction decreased the pH. The pH decrease changed the Se speciation in solution which hindered further Se(IV) reduction by Fe(II)aq. In a second experiment, Se(IV)aq was quantitatively reduced to Se(0) by S(- II)aq and the reaction was fast. Two sulfide species were needed to reduce one Se(IV), and the observed pH increase was due to a proton consumption. For both experiments, experimental results are consistent with expectations based on the oxidation reduction potential of the various species. Upon interaction with FeS, Se(IV)aq was reduced to Se(0) and minute amounts of pyrite were detected, a consequence of partial mackinawite oxidation at surface sulfur sites. These results are of prime importance with respect to safe deep disposal of nuclear waste which contains the long-lived radionuclide 79Se. This study shows that after release of 79Se(IV) upon nuclear waste matrix corrosion, selenite can be reduced in the near field to low soluble Se(0) by interaction with Fe(II)aq and/or S(- II)aq species. Because the solubility of Se(0) species is significantly lower than that of Se(IV), selenium will become much less (bio)available and its migration out of deep HLW repositories may be drastically hindered.

  14. Interaction of selenite with reduced Fe and/or S species: An XRD and XAS study.

    PubMed

    Finck, Nicolas; Dardenne, Kathy

    2016-05-01

    In this study, we investigated the interaction between selenite and either Fe((II))aq or S((-II))aq in solution, and the results were used to investigate the interaction between Se((IV))aq and FeS in suspension. The reaction products were characterized by a combination of methods (SEM, XRD and XAS) and the reaction mechanisms were identified. In a first experiment, Se((IV))aq was reduced to Se((0)) by interaction with Fe((II))aq which was oxidized to Fe((III)), but the reaction was only partial. Subsequently, some Fe((III)) produced akaganeite (β-FeOOH) and the release of proton during that reaction decreased the pH. The pH decrease changed the Se speciation in solution which hindered further Se((IV)) reduction by Fe((II))aq. In a second experiment, Se((IV))aq was quantitatively reduced to Se((0)) by S((-II))aq and the reaction was fast. Two sulfide species were needed to reduce one Se((IV)), and the observed pH increase was due to a proton consumption. For both experiments, experimental results are consistent with expectations based on the oxidation reduction potential of the various species. Upon interaction with FeS, Se((IV))aq was reduced to Se((0)) and minute amounts of pyrite were detected, a consequence of partial mackinawite oxidation at surface sulfur sites. These results are of prime importance with respect to safe deep disposal of nuclear waste which contains the long-lived radionuclide (79)Se. This study shows that after release of (79)Se((IV)) upon nuclear waste matrix corrosion, selenite can be reduced in the near field to low soluble Se((0)) by interaction with Fe((II))aq and/or S((-II))aq species. Because the solubility of Se((0)) species is significantly lower than that of Se((IV)), selenium will become much less (bio)available and its migration out of deep HLW repositories may be drastically hindered. PMID:27010738

  15. Petroleum Science and Technology Institute with the TeXas Earth and Space Science (TXESS) Revolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olson, H. C.; Olson, J. E.; Bryant, S. L.; Lake, L. W.; Bommer, P.; Torres-Verdin, C.; Jablonowski, C.; Willis, M.

    2009-12-01

    The TeXas Earth and Space Science (TXESS) Revolution, a professional development program for 8th- thru 12th-grade Earth Science teachers, presented a one-week Petroleum Science and Technology Institute at The University of Texas at Austin campus. The summer program was a joint effort between the Jackson School of Geosciences and the Department of Petroleum and Geosystems Engineering. The goal of the institute was to focus on the STEM components involved in the petroleum industry and to introduce teachers to the larger energy resources theme. The institute kicked off with a welcoming event and tour of a green, energy-efficient home (LEED Platinum certified) owned by one of the petroleum engineering faculty. Tours of the home included an introduction to rainwater harvesting, solar energy, sustainable building materials and other topics on energy efficiency. Classroom topics included drilling technology (including a simulator lab and an overview of the history of the technology), energy use and petroleum geology, well-logging technology and interpretation, reservoir engineering and volumetrics (including numerous labs combining chemistry and physics), risk assessment and economics, carbon capture and storage (CO2 sequestration technology) and hydraulic fracturing. A mid-week field trip included visiting the Ocean Star offshore platform in Galveston, the Weiss Energy Hall at the Houston Museum of Science and Schlumberger (to view 3-D visualization technology) in Houston. Teachers remarked that they really appreciated the focused nature of the institute and especially found the increased use of mathematics both a tool for professional growth, as well as a challenge for them to use more math in their science classes. STEM integration was an important feature of the summer institute, and teachers found the integration of science (earth sciences, geophysics), technology, engineering (petroleum, chemical and reservoir) and mathematics particularly valuable. Pre

  16. A Progress Report on the TeXas Earth and Space Science (TXESS) Revolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellins, K. K.; Snow, E.; Olson, H. C.; Odell, M. R.; Stocks, E.

    2009-12-01

    The TeXas Earth and Space Science (TXESS) Revolution is a five-year, NSF-sponsored professional development program for minority-serving 8th grade and high science school teachers who are preparing to teach a new senior capstone course in Earth and Space Science that is an option for the four years of science required for high school graduation in Texas. In this presentation (1) we will describe the sequence and content of the professional development academies and the summer institutes; (2) report on our effort to reach minority students; (3) review the preliminary results of the project evaluation on the effectiveness of the TXESS Revolution professional development program; and (4) describe enrichment opportunities for TXESS Revolution participants in connection with other projects, professional organizations and consortia (e.g., UNAVCO, IRIS, and the Consortium for Ocean Leadership). The program consists of eight professional development academies, each with a different contemporary content theme, during which teachers engage in rigorous, data-driven learning activities. Field trips, guest lectures, and other special programs are integrated into the professional development. Summer institutes are offered each year. The number of teachers participating in Cohorts A (spring 2008- summer 2009), B (fall 2008 - summer 2010) and C (fall 2009 - summer 2011) is 160. Cohort A and B teachers have directly impacted 9,494 K-12 students of which 67% are Hispanic, African American, Asian American or Native American, and 35% are Caucasian. Thirty-five Cohort A teachers have turned the training around and offered project-related professional development to 1,356 other teachers. The content of the TXESS Revolution worklshops is rigorous. Evaluation results reveal that many teachers felt overwhelmed at the start of the project. However, they soon became accustomed to the level of information presented and felt increased confidence in the core content. Participants appreciate how

  17. X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy and Reactivity of Thiolate-Ligated FeIII-OOR Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Stasser, Jay; Namuswe, Frances; Kasper, Gary D.; Jiang, Yunbo; Krest, Courtney M.; Green, Michael T.; Penner-Hahn, James; Goldberg, David P.

    2010-01-01

    The reaction of a series of thiolate-ligated iron(II) complexes [FeII([15]aneN4)(SC6H5)]BF4 (1), [FeII([15]aneN4)(SC6H4-p-Cl)]BF4 (2), and [FeII([15]aneN4)(SC6H4-p-NO2)]BF4 (3) with alkylhydroperoxides at low temperature (−78 °C or −40 °C) leads to the metastable alkylperoxo-iron(III) species [FeIII([15]aneN4)(SC6H5)(OOtBu)]BF4 (1a), [FeIII([15]aneN4)(SC6H4-p-Cl)(OOtBu)]BF4 (2a), and [FeIII([15]aneN4)(SC6H4-p-NO2)(OOtBu)]BF4 (3a), respectively. X-ray absorption spectroscopic studies (XAS) were conducted on the FeIII-OOR complexes and their iron(II) precursors. The edge energy for the iron(II) complexes (~7118 eV) shifts to higher energy upon oxidation by ROOH, and the resulting edge energies for the FeIII-OOR species range from 7121 – 7125 eV and correlate with the nature of the thiolate donor. EXAFS analysis of the iron(II) complexes 1 – 3 in CH2Cl2 show that their solid state structures remain intact in solution. The EXAFS data on 1a – 3a confirm their proposed structures as mononuclear, 6-coordinate FeIII-OOR complexes with 4N and 1S donors completing the coordination sphere. The Fe-O bond distances obtained from EXAFS for 1a – 3a are 1.82 – 1.85 Å, significantly longer than other low-spin FeIII-OOR complexes. The Fe-O distances correlate with the nature of the thiolate donor, in agreement with the previous trends observed for ν(Fe-O) from resonance Raman (RR) spectroscopy, and supported by optimized geometries obtained from density functional theory (DFT) calculations. Reactivity and kinetic studies on 1a – 3a show an important influence of the thiolate donor. PMID:20839847

  18. Operando X-ray scattering and spectroscopic analysis of germanium nanowire anodes in lithium ion batteries.

    PubMed

    Silberstein, Katharine E; Lowe, Michael A; Richards, Benjamin; Gao, Jie; Hanrath, Tobias; Abruña, Héctor D

    2015-02-17

    X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Fourier transform extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) analysis of X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) measurements have been employed to determine structural and bonding changes, as a function of the lithium content/state of charge, of germanium nanowires used as the active anode material within lithium ion batteries (LIBs). Our data, collected throughout the course of battery cycling (operando), indicate that lithium incorporation within the nanostructured germanium occurs heterogeneously, preferentially into amorphous regions over crystalline domains. Maintenance of the molecular structural integrity within the germanium nanowire is dependent on the depth of discharge. Discharging to a shallower cutoff voltage preserves partial crystallinity for several cycles. PMID:25616130

  19. An in situ XAS study of ferric iron hydrolysis and precipitation in the presence of perchlorate, nitrate, chloride and sulfate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collins, Richard N.; Rosso, Kevin M.; Rose, Andrew L.; Glover, Chris J.; David Waite, T.

    2016-03-01

    Using a novel combination of in situ potentiometric experiments and quick-scanning XAS we present Fe K-edge XAS spectra (to k = 12 Å-1) during FeIII hydrolysis and precipitation in 0.33 M Fe(ClO4)3, Fe(NO3)3, FeCl3 and Fe2(SO4)3 solutions up to pH 4.8. Edge-sharing FeIII polymers appeared almost immediately upon hydrolysis with strong evidence for a μ-oxo dimer species forming in the Fe(ClO4)3, Fe(NO3)3 and FeCl3 solutions. The effects of SO4 on hydrolysis and polymerization pathways included inhibition of both the formation of the μ-oxo dimer and double corner FeIII bonding, ultimately resulting in the precipitation of schwertmannite. As such, under these experimental conditions, double corner FeIII bonding appears to be critical to the formation of ferrihydrite. The spectral trends indicated that the decomposition/transformation of the dimer was sudden and broadly coincident with shortening average Fe-O bond distances, increased Fe neighbors at ∼3.43 Å and a pre-edge energy transformation suggestive of decreased ligand field strength as well as increasing proportions of tetrahedral FeIII. This result suggests that the incorporation of tetrahedral FeIII into ferrihydrite occurs only at the latter stages of extended polymerization.

  20. Precise Determination of the Direct-Indirect Band Gap Energy Crossover In AlxGa1-xAs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fluegel, Brian; Beaton, Daniel; Alberi, Kirstin; Mascarenhas, Angelo

    2014-03-01

    AlxGa1-xAs is a technologically important semiconductor material system for optoelectronic applications due to its type I band alignment with GaAs under nearly lattice-matched conditions. Heterostructure design often relies on exactly controlling the relative positions of the Γ and X conduction band edges, yet despite over three decades of research on this alloy, the precise energy and composition of the direct-indirect band gap crossover is still not well resolved. We report the results of our most recent investigation of AlxGa1-xAs (0.28 < x<0.42) epitaxial films, in which the observation of concurrent photoluminescence (PL) emission peaks from the direct and indirect band gaps combined with time-resolved PL information yields a precise determination of the direct-indirect band gap crossover energy and composition. This work was supported by the DOE Office of Science, Basic Energy Sciences under contract DE-AC36-08GO28308. Acknowledgement: the samples were provided by John Reno from Sandia National Laboratory.

  1. Growth of block copolymer stabilized metal nanoparticles probed simultaneously by in situ XAS and UV-Vis spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Nayak, C; Bhattacharyya, D; Jha, S N; Sahoo, N K

    2016-01-01

    The growth of Au and Pt nanoparticles from their respective chloride precursors using block copolymer-based reducers has been studied by simultaneous in situ measurement of XAS and UV-Vis spectroscopy at the energy-dispersive EXAFS beamline (BL-08) at INDUS-2 SRS at RRCAT, Indore, India. While the XANES spectra of the precursor give real-time information on the reduction process, the EXAFS spectra reveal the structure of the clusters formed at the intermediate stages of growth. The growth kinetics of both types of nanoparticles are found to be almost similar and are found to follow three stages, though the first stage of nucleation takes place earlier in the case of Au than in the case of Pt nanoparticles due to the difference in the reduction potential of the respective precursors. The first two stages of the growth of Au and Pt nanoparticles as obtained by in situ XAS measurements could be corroborated by simultaneous in situ measurement of UV-Vis spectroscopy also. PMID:26698077

  2. Mass and energy dispersive recoil spectrometry of MOCVD grown Al xGa 1- xAs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, S. R.; Johnston, P. N.; Bubb, I. F.; Stannard, W. B.; Cohen, D. D.; Dytlewski, N.; Hult, M.; Whitlow, H. J.; Zaring, C.; Östling, M.; Andersson, M.

    1994-12-01

    Mass and energy dispersive Recoil Spectrometry (RS) has been employed to study stoichiometric variations in Al xGa 1- xAs layers. Quantitative determination of x is an important problem in the production of device materials which is not easily solved with standard techniques. Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry (RBS) has been used extensively in semiconductor research but overlap of signals in the backscattered ion spectrum is an important limitation in the analysis of materials such as Al xGa 1- xAs which contain elements of low and similar masses. Particle Induced X-ray Emission (PIXE) analysis has good elemental resolution for this class of materials but provides little depth resolution. RS enables the determination of separate energy spectra for individual or small groups of isotopes. This allows it to be used in many situations where RBS is inappropriate. It employs a heavy ion beam to cause constituent nuclei to recoil from the target, and a Time of Flight and Energy (ToF- E) detector to detect these recoiling nuclei. Appropriate mass selection of the ToF- E data allows the determination of depth distributions for each element.

  3. Spectroscopic infrared ellipsometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roseler, A.

    1992-03-01

    The spectroscopic infrared ellipsometry (SIRE) by means of the combination of a photometric ellipsometer with a Fourier transform spectrometer is used to measure optical properties in the infrared. From the observed four Stokes parameters, the spectrum of the degree of polarization after the reflection at the sample is calculated and discussed.

  4. Spectroscopic wear detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Madzsar, George C. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    The elemental composition of a material exposed to hot gases and subjected to wear is determined. Atoms of an elemental species not appearing in this material are implanted in a surface at a depth based on the maximum allowable wear. The exhaust gases are spectroscopically monitored to determine the exposure of these atoms when the maximum allowable wear is reached.

  5. Spectroscopic evidence for uranium bearing precipitates in vadose zone sediments at the Hanford 300-area site

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Arai, Y.; Marcus, M.A.; Tamura, N.; Davis, J.A.; Zachara, J.M.

    2007-01-01

    Uranium (U) solid-state speciation in vadose zone sediments collected beneath the former North Process Pond (NPP) in the 300 Area of the Hanford site (Washington) was investigated using multi-scale techniques. In 30 day batch experiments, only a small fraction of total U (???7.4%) was released to artificial groundwater solutions equilibrated with 1% pCO2. Synchrotron-based micro-X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy analyses showed that U was distributed among at least two types of species: (i) U discrete grains associated with Cu and (ii) areas with intermediate U concentrations on grains and grain coatings. Metatorbernite (Cu[UO2]2[PO 4]2??8H2O) and uranophane (Ca[UO 2]2[SiO3(OH)]2?? 5H 2O) at some U discrete grains, and muscovite at U intermediate concentration areas, were identified in synchrotron-based micro-X-ray diffraction. Scanning electron microscopy/energy dispersive X-ray analyses revealed 8-10 ??m size metatorbernite particles that were embedded in C-, Al-, and Si-rich coatings on quartz and albite grains. In ??- and bulk-X-ray absorption structure (??-XAS and XAS) spectroscopy analyses, the structure of metatorbernite with additional U-C and U-U coordination environments was consistently observed at U discrete grains with high U concentrations. The consistency of the ??- and bulk-XAS analyses suggests that metatorbernite may comprise a significant fraction of the total U in the sample. The entrapped, micrometer-sized metatorbernite particles in C-, Al-, and Si-rich coatings, along with the more soluble precipitated uranyl carbonates and uranophane, likely control the long-term release of U to water associated with the vadose zone sediments. ?? 2007 American Chemical Society.

  6. Laser spectroscopic measurement of helium isotope ratios.

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, L.-B.; Mueller, P.; Holt, R. J.; Lu, Z.-T.; O'Connor, T. P.; Sano, Y.; Sturchio, N.; Univ. of Illinois; Univ. of Tokyo; Univ. of Illinois at Chicago

    2003-06-13

    A sensitive laser spectroscopic method has been applied to the quantitative determination of the isotope ratio of helium at the level of {sup 3}He/{sup 4}He = 10{sup -7}--10{sup -5}. The resonant absorption of 1083 nm laser light by the metastable {sup 3}He atoms in a discharge cell was measured with the frequency modulation saturation spectroscopy technique while the abundance of {sup 4}He was measured by a direct absorption technique. The results on three different samples extracted from the atmosphere and commercial helium gas were in good agreement with values obtained with mass spectrometry. The achieved 3{sigma} detection limit of {sup 3}He in helium is 4 x 10{sup -9}. This demonstration required a 200 {mu}L STP sample of He. The sensitivity can be further improved, and the required sample size reduced, by several orders of magnitude with the addition of cavity enhanced spectroscopy.

  7. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopic study of truffles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Dezhang; Liu, Gang; Song, Dingshan; Liu, Jian-hong; Zhou, Yilan; Ou, Jiaming; Sun, Shizhong

    2006-01-01

    Truffles are rare wild growing edible mushrooms belonging to Ascomycetes. In this paper, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy was used to obtain vibrational spectra of truffles. The results show that the mushrooms exhibit characteristic spectra. The two strongest absorption bands appear at about 1077cm -1 and 1040 cm -1, which were described as C-O stretching in carbohydrate. The vibrational spectra indicate that the main compositions of the truffles are polysaccharide and protein. According to the characteristics bands and absorption ratios of spectra, different species of truffles can be discriminated. It is also found the great changes between moldy and healthy truffles, which the major differences are observed in the bands of protein. In addition, FTIR spectral differences are observed between the same species of truffles from different producing areas. It is showed that the FTIR spectroscopic method is valuable tool for rapid and nondestructive analysis of truffles prior to any extraction method used.

  8. Quantitative investigation of two metallohydrolases by X-ray absorption spectroscopy near-edge spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, W.; Chu, W. S.; Yang, F. F.; Yu, M. J.; Chen, D. L.; Guo, X. Y.; Zhou, D. W.; Shi, N.; Marcelli, A.; Niu, L. W.; Teng, M. K.; Gong, W. M.; Benfatto, M.; Wu, Z. Y.

    2007-09-01

    The last several years have witnessed a tremendous increase in biological applications using X-ray absorption spectroscopy (BioXAS), thanks to continuous advancements in synchrotron radiation (SR) sources and detector technology. However, XAS applications in many biological systems have been limited by the intrinsic limitations of the Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (EXAFS) technique e.g., the lack of sensitivity to bond angles. As a consequence, the application of the X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy changed this scenario that is now continuously changing with the introduction of the first quantitative XANES packages such as Minut XANES (MXAN). Here we present and discuss the XANES code MXAN, a novel XANES-fitting package that allows a quantitative analysis of experimental data applied to Zn K-edge spectra of two metalloproteins: Leptospira interrogans Peptide deformylase ( LiPDF) and acutolysin-C, a representative of snake venom metalloproteinases (SVMPs) from Agkistrodon acutus venom. The analysis on these two metallohydrolases reveals that proteolytic activities are correlated to subtle conformation changes around the zinc ion. In particular, this quantitative study clarifies the occurrence of the LiPDF catalytic mechanism via a two-water-molecules model, whereas in the acutolysin-C we have observed a different proteolytic activity correlated to structural changes around the zinc ion induced by pH variations.

  9. X-RAY ABSORPTION SPECTROSCOPY OF YB3+-DOPED OPTICAL FIBERS

    SciTech Connect

    Citron, Robert; Kropf, A.J.

    2008-01-01

    Optical fibers doped with Ytterbium-3+ have become increasingly common in fiber lasers and amplifiers. Yb-doped fibers provide the capability to produce high power and short pulses at specific wavelengths, resulting in highly effective gain media. However, little is known about the local structure, distribution, and chemical coordination of Yb3+ in the fibers. This information is necessary to improve the manufacturing process and optical qualities of the fibers. Five fibers doped with Yb3+ were studied using Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy and X-ray Absorption Near Edge Spectroscopy (XANES), in addition to Yb3+ mapping. The Yb3+ distribution in each fiber core was mapped with 2D and 1D intensity scans, which measured X-ray fluorescence over the scan areas. Two of the five fibers examined showed highly irregular Yb3+ distributions in the core center. In four of the five fibers Yb3+ was detected outside of the given fiber core dimensions, suggesting possible Yb3+ diffusion from the core, manufacturing error, or both. X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) analysis has so far proven inconclusive, but did show that the fibers had differing EXAFS spectra. The Yb3+ distribution mapping proved highly useful, but additional modeling and examination of fiber preforms must be conducted to improve XAS analysis, which has been shown to have great potential for the study of similar optical fi bers.

  10. ABSORPTION ANALYZER

    DOEpatents

    Brooksbank, W.A. Jr.; Leddicotte, G.W.; Strain, J.E.; Hendon, H.H. Jr.

    1961-11-14

    A means was developed for continuously computing and indicating the isotopic assay of a process solution and for automatically controlling the process output of isotope separation equipment to provide a continuous output of the desired isotopic ratio. A counter tube is surrounded with a sample to be analyzed so that the tube is exactly in the center of the sample. A source of fast neutrons is provided and is spaced from the sample. The neutrons from the source are thermalized by causing them to pass through a neutron moderator, and the neutrons are allowed to diffuse radially through the sample to actuate the counter. A reference counter in a known sample of pure solvent is also actuated by the thermal neutrons from the neutron source. The number of neutrons which actuate the detectors is a function of a concentration of the elements in solution and their neutron absorption cross sections. The pulses produced by the detectors responsive to each neu tron passing therethrough are amplified and counted. The respective times required to accumulate a selected number of counts are measured by associated timing devices. The concentration of a particular element in solution may be determined by utilizing the following relation: T2/Ti = BCR, where B is a constant proportional to the absorption cross sections, T2 is the time of count collection for the unknown solution, Ti is the time of count collection for the pure solvent, R is the isotopic ratlo, and C is the molar concentration of the element to be determined. Knowing the slope constant B for any element and when the chemical concentration is known, the isotopic concentration may be readily determined, and conversely when the isotopic ratio is known, the chemical concentrations may be determined. (AEC)

  11. Comparison of Synchrotron X-Ray Fluorescence Mapping and Micro-XANES to Bulk X-Ray Absorption Spectra in Metal-Contaminated Sediments

    SciTech Connect

    O'Day, P; Carroll, S A; Bajt, S

    2003-01-16

    Synchrotron X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) is one of the few techniques that can supply molecular-scale information for a variety of elements at concentrations relevant to natural systems in non-vacuum conditions. Bulk XAS analysis supplies the dominant chemical bonding mode(s) for a specific element. In complex materials such as natural soils and sediments, however, the dominant mode may not necessarily be the most reactive because changes in speciation at surfaces may results in changes in reactivity. Our previous work at Naval Air Station (NAS) Alameda (CA) focused on in situ metal chemistry in surface and deep sediments, and the impact of metal mobility by sediment oxidation. Estuary sediments at the Alameda Naval Station Air in California have elevated metal concentrations that increase with increasing depth. The metal concentrations in these sediments are: Cd (10-350 ppm), Cr (200-1000 ppm), Cu (100-230 ppm), Pb (200-1200 ppm) and Zn (250-600 ppm). We have extensively characterized these sediments using bulk XAS and other non-synchrotron supporting methods [ 1]. In this experiment, we collected fluorescence element maps using synchrotron X-ray microprobe of unreacted and seawater-oxidized sediment samples from Alameda NAS to determine the spatial distribution and correlation of lead, zinc, and iron. We then compared micro-XANES spectra for lead and zinc collected with the X-ray microprobe to previously collected bulk XANES spectra. The results from our bulk XAS characterization of the sediments showed both oxide and sulfide components for the trace metals. However, the bulk XAS data were not able to identify the composition of the oxide component (i.e. carbonate or hydroxide), nor could absorbed species or solid solutions be definitively identified. Our objective in using micro-XANES and fluorescence element maps was to attempt a more precise identification of metal speciation in or on individual particles.

  12. XAS AND XPS CHARACTERIZATION OF MERCURY BINDING ON BROMINATED ACTIVATED CARBON

    EPA Science Inventory

    Brominated powdered activated carbon sorbents have been shown to e quite effective for mercury capture when injected into the flue gas duct at coal-fired power plants and are especially useful when buring Western low-chlorine subbituminous coals. X-ray absorption spectroscopy (X...

  13. Formation of nanostructures in Eu3+ doped glass-ceramics: an XAS study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pellicer-Porres, J.; Segura, A.; Martínez-Criado, G.; Rodríguez-Mendoza, U. R.; Lavín, V.

    2013-01-01

    We describe the results of x-ray absorption experiments carried out to deduce structural and chemical information in Eu3+ doped, transparent, oxyfluoride glass and nanostructured glass-ceramic samples. The spectra were measured at the Pb and Eu-LIII edges. The Eu environment in the glass samples is observed to be similar to that of EuF3. Complementary x-ray diffraction experiments show that thermal annealing creates β-PbF2 type nanocrystals. X-ray absorption indicates that Eu ions act as seeds in the nanocrystal formation. There is evidence of interstitial fluorine atoms around Eu ions as well as Eu dimers. X-ray absorption at the Pb-LIII edge shows that after the thermal treatment most lead atoms form a PbO amorphous phase and that only 10% of the lead atoms remain available to form β-PbF2 type nanocrystals. Both x-ray diffraction and absorption point to a high Eu content in the nanocrystals. Our study suggests new approaches to the oxyfluoride glass-ceramic synthesis in order to further improve their properties.

  14. Sulfur K-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy and time-dependent density functional theory of arsenic dithiocarbamates.

    PubMed

    Donahue, Courtney M; Pacheco, Juan S Lezama; Keith, Jason M; Daly, Scott R

    2014-06-28

    S K-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) and time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) calculations were performed on a series of As[S2CNR2]3 complexes, where R2 = Et2, (CH2)5 and Ph2, to determine how dithiocarbamate substituents attached to N affect As[S2CNR2]3 electronic structure. Complimentary [PPh4][S2CNR2] salts were also studied to compare dithiocarbamate bonding in the absence of As. The XAS results indicate that changing the orientation of the alkyl substituents from trans to cis (R2 = Et2vs. (CH2)5) yields subtle variations whereas differences associated with a change from alkyl to aryl are much more pronounced. For example, despite the differences in As 4p mixing, the first features in the S K-edge XAS spectra of [PPh4][S2CNPh2] and As[S2CNPh2]3 were both shifted by 0.3 eV compared to their alkyl-substituted derivatives. DFT calculations revealed that the unique shift observed for [PPh4][S2CNPh2] is due to phenyl-induced splitting of the π* orbitals delocalized over N, C and S. A similar phenomenon accounts for the shift observed for As[S2CNPh2]3, but the presence of two unique S environments (As-S and As···S) prevented reliable analysis of As-S covalency from the XAS data. In the absence of experimental values, DFT calculations revealed a decrease in As-S orbital mixing in As[S2CNPh2]3 that stems from a redistribution of electron density to S atoms participating in weaker As···S interactions. Simulated spectra obtained from TDDFT calculations reproduce the experimental differences in the S K-edge XAS data, which suggests that the theory is accurately modeling the experimental differences in As-S orbital mixing. The results highlight how S K-edge XAS and DFT can be used cooperatively to understand the electronic structure of low symmetry coordination complexes containing S atoms in different chemical environments. PMID:24811926

  15. Methane overtone absorption by intracavity laser spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Obrien, James J.

    1990-01-01

    Interpretation of planetary methane (CH4) visible-near IR spectra, used to develop models of planetary atmospheres, has been hampered by a lack of suitable laboratory spectroscopic data. The particular CH4 spectral bands are due to intrinsically weak, high overtone-combination transitions too complex for classical spectroscopic analysis. The traditional multipass cell approach to measuring spectra of weakly absorbing species is insufficiently sensitive to yield reliable results for some of the weakest CH4 absorption features and is difficult to apply at the temperatures of the planetary environments. A time modulated form of intracavity laser spectroscopy (ILS), has been shown to provide effective absorption pathlengths of 100 to 200 km with sample cells less than 1 m long. The optical physics governing this technique and the experimental parameters important for obtaining reliable, quantitative results are now well understood. Quantitative data for CH4 absorption obtained by ILS have been reported recently. Illustrative ILS data for CH4 absorption in the 619.7 nm and 681.9 nm bands are presented. New ILS facilities at UM-St. Louis will be used to measure CH4 absorption in the 700 to 1000 nm region under conditions appropriate to the planetary atmospheres.

  16. New Developments of Broadband Cavity Enhanced Spectroscopic Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walsh, A.; Zhao, D.; Linnartz, H.; Ubachs, W.

    2013-06-01

    In recent years, cavity enhanced spectroscopic techniques, such as cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS), cavity enhanced absorption spectroscopy (CEAS), and broadband cavity enhanced absorption spectroscopy (BBCEAS), have been widely employed as ultra-sensitive methods for the measurement of weak absorptions and in the real-time detection of trace species. In this contribution, we introduce two new cavity enhanced spectroscopic concepts: a) Optomechanical shutter modulated BBCEAS, a variant of BBCEAS capable of measuring optical absorption in pulsed systems with typically low duty cycles. In conventional BBCEAS applications, the latter substantially reduces the signal-to-noise ratio (S/N), consequently also reducing the detection sensitivity. To overcome this, we incorporate a fast optomechanical shutter as a time gate, modulating the detection scheme of BBCEAS and increasing the effective duty cycle reaches a value close to unity. This extends the applications of BBCEAS into pulsed samples and also in time-resolved studies. b) Cavity enhanced self-absorption spectroscopy (CESAS), a new spectroscopic concept capable of studying light emitting matter (plasma, flames, combustion samples) simultaneously in absorption and emission. In CESAS, a sample (plasma, flame or combustion source) is located in an optically stable cavity consisting of two high reflectivity mirrors, and here it acts both as light source and absorbing medium. A high detection sensitivity of weak absorption is reached without the need of an external light source, such as a laser or broadband lamp. The performance is illustrated by the first CESAS result on a supersonically expanding hydrocarbon plasma. We expect CESAS to become a generally applicable analytical tool for real time and in situ diagnostics. A. Walsh, D. Zhao, W. Ubachs, H. Linnartz, J. Phys. Chem. A, {dx.doi.org/10.1021/jp310392n}, in press, 2013. A. Walsh, D. Zhao, H. Linnartz Rev. Sci. Instrum. {84}(2), 021608 2013. A. Walsh, D. Zhao

  17. Spectroscopic Binary Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batten, A.; Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    Historically, spectroscopic binary stars were binary systems whose nature was discovered by the changing DOPPLER EFFECT or shift of the spectral lines of one or both of the component stars. The observed Doppler shift is a combination of that produced by the constant RADIAL VELOCITY (i.e. line-of-sight velocity) of the center of mass of the whole system, and the variable shift resulting from the o...

  18. Spectroscopically Unlocking Exoplanet Characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, Nikole

    2016-05-01

    Spectroscopy plays a critical role in a number of areas of exoplanet research. The first exoplanets were detected by precisely measuring Doppler shifts in high resolution (R ~ 100,000) stellar spectra, a technique that has become known as the Radial Velocity (RV) method. The RV method provides critical constraints on exoplanet masses, but is currently limited to some degree by robust line shape predictions. Beyond the RV method, spectroscopy plays a critical role in the characterization of exoplanets beyond their mass and radius. The Hubble Space Telescope has spectroscopically observed the atmospheres of exoplanets that transit their host stars as seen from Earth giving us key insights into atmospheric abundances of key atomic and molecular species as well as cloud optical properties. Similar spectroscopic characterization of exoplanet atmospheres will be carried out at higher resolution (R ~ 100-3000) and with broader wavelength coverage with the James Webb Space Telescope. Future missions such as WFIRST that seek to the pave the way toward the detection and characterization of potentially habitable planets will have the capability of directly measuring the spectra of exoplanet atmospheres and potentially surfaces. Our ability to plan for and interpret spectra from exoplanets relies heavily on the fidelity of the spectroscopic databases available and would greatly benefit from further laboratory and theoretical work aimed at optical properties of atomic, molecular, and cloud/haze species in the pressure and temperature regimes relevant to exoplanet atmospheres.

  19. Variability of the health effects of crystalline silica: Fe speciation in industrial quartz reagents and suspended dusts—insights from XAS spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Benedetto, Francesco; D'Acapito, Francesco; Capacci, Fabio; Fornaciai, Gabriele; Innocenti, Massimo; Montegrossi, Giordano; Oberhauser, Werner; Pardi, Luca A.; Romanelli, Maurizio

    2014-03-01

    We investigated the speciation of Fe in bulk and in suspended respirable quartz dusts coming from ceramic and iron-casting industrial processes via X-ray absorption spectroscopy, with the aim of contributing to a better understanding of the variability of crystalline silica toxicity. Four different bulk industrial quartz powders, nominally pure quartz samples with Fe contents below 200 ppm, and three respirable dusts filters were selected. Fe speciation was determined in all samples through a coupled study of the X-ray absorption near-edge structure and extended X-ray absorption fine structure regions, operating at the Fe-K edge. Fe speciation revealed common features at the beginning of the different production processes, whereas significant differences were observed on both respirable dusts and bulk dusts exiting from the production process. Namely, a common pollution of the raw quartz dusts by elemental Fe was evidenced and attributed to residuals of the industrial production of quartz materials. Moreover, the respirable samples indicated that reactivity occurs after the suspension of the powders in air. The gravitational selection during the particle suspension consistently allowed us to clearly discriminate between suspended and bulk dusts. On the basis of the obtained results, we provide an apparent spectroscopic discrimination between the raw materials used in the considered industrial processes, and those that are effectively inhaled by workers. In particular, an amorphous FeIII oxide, with an unsaturated coordination sphere, can be related to silica reactivity (and health consequences).

  20. Application of X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy to the study of nuclear structural materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Shanshan

    One of key technologies for the next generation nuclear systems are advanced materials, including high temperature structural materials, fast neutron resistance core materials and so on. Local structure determination in these systems, which often are crystallographically intractable, is critical to gaining an understanding of their properties. In this thesis, X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy (XAS), including Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (EXAFS) and X-ray Absorption Near Edge Structure (XANES), is used to examine the geometric and electronic structure of nuclear structural materials under varying conditions. The thesis is divided into two main sections. The first examines the structural analysis of nanostructured ferritic alloys (NFA) which are dispersion strengthened by an ultra high density of Y-Ti-O enriched nano-features, resulting in remarkable high temperature creep strength and radiation damage resistance. Titanium and Yttrium K-edge XAS shows commercial alloys MA957 and J12YWT more closely resemble the as received Fe-14Cr-3W-0.4Ti (wt. %) powders, and mechanically alloyed (MA) powders with 0.25Y2O3 (wt. %). It shows that a significant fraction of substitutional Ti remains dissolved in the (BCC) ferrite matrix. In contrast, annealed powders and hot isostatic press (HIP) consolidated alloys show high temperature heat treatments shift the Y and Ti to more oxidized states that are consistent with combinations of Y2Ti2O7 and, especially, TiO. The second section describes corrosion studies of Pb with 316L stainless steel, molybdenum and spinet (MgAl2O4) at high temperature by XAS. The corrosion of fuel cladding and structural materials by liquid lead at elevated temperatures is an issue that must be considered when designing advanced nuclear systems and high-power spallation neutron targets. The results of ex-situ studies show that a Mo substrate retained a smooth and less corroded surface than 316L stainless steel sample at elevated temperature. In

  1. Testing interaction models by using x-ray absorption spectroscopy: solid Pb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Cicco, Andrea; Minicucci, Marco; Principi, Emiliano; Witkowska, Agnieszka; Rybicki, Jaroslaw; Laskowski, Robert

    2002-04-01

    Structural models obtained using classical molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and realistic interatomic potentials for solid metals are tested using experimental results obtained by x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS). Accurate L-edge extended x-ray absorption fine-structure (EXAFS) measurements of Pb grains dispersed in BN and graphite matrices have been collected for temperatures up to the melting point. The thermal expansion of the grains was measured by energy-dispersive x-ray diffraction techniques and found to be coincident with that of pure Pb up to the limit of the present measurements. L3-edge EXAFS measurements of solid Pb at various temperatures have been analysed using advanced data-analysis techniques (GNXAS) based on exact spherical-wave multiple-scattering simulation of the absorption cross-section. Realistic structural models for solid Pb were obtained from MD simulations using an empirical pair potential (Dzugutov, Larsson and Ebbsjo (DLE)), a tight-binding (TB) square-root functional, and an embedded-atom (EA) model potential parametrized by us. The short-range pair distribution function g(r) reconstructed by means of EXAFS is compared with those obtained by MD simulations. The empirical DLE potential, originally designed for the liquid state, is too soft, showing too-large values for the average distance R, variance σ2, and skewness β. The TB and EA potentials are both compatible with XAS data as regards the average distance and skewness of the first neighbours. The distance variance, associated with the thermal vibration amplitudes, is underestimated for the TB potential, while the EA model is found to be in agreement with XAS data. The present results are also compared with those from a previous EXAFS study on solid lead, where the cumulant expansion and a simple one-dimensional anharmonic oscillator model were used. The need for realistic interaction models and appropriate simulation schemes for reliable XAS data analysis is emphasized

  2. Line shape studies in CW dye laser intracavity absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, P.; Brink, G. O.; Spence, S.; Lakkaraju, H. S.

    1980-01-01

    The line shape of the signals observed by intracavity absorption in an atomic beam of barium is studied as a function of absorber density. Complex structure is observed consisting of both absorption and enhancement features. Comparison is made with models of intracavity absorption, and it is concluded that the rate equation model in its present form does not explain the structure. On the other hand the super-regen model does seem able to partially account for the observed structure. The complexity of the line shape will directly affect those workers who are using intracavity absorption as a spectroscopic technique.

  3. Iron transformation pathways and redox micro-environments in seafloor sulfide-mineral deposits: Spatially resolved Fe XAS and δ57/54Fe observations

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Toner, Brandy M.; Rouxel, Olivier J.; Santelli, Cara M.; Bach, Wolfgang; Edwards, Katrina J.

    2016-05-10

    Hydrothermal sulfide chimneys located along the global system of oceanic spreading centers are habitats for microbial life during active venting. Hydrothermally extinct, or inactive, sulfide deposits also host microbial communities at globally distributed sites. The main goal of this study is to describe Fe transformation pathways, through precipitation and oxidation-reduction (redox) reactions, and examine transformation products for signatures of biological activity using Fe mineralogy and stable isotope approaches. The study includes active and inactive sulfides from the East Pacific Rise 9°50'N vent field. First, the mineralogy of Fe(III)-bearing precipitates is investigated using microprobe X-ray absorption spectroscopy (μXAS) and X-ray diffractionmore » (μXRD). Second, laser-ablation (LA) and micro-drilling (MD) are used to obtain spatially-resolved Fe stable isotope analysis by multicollector-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (MC-ICP-MS). Eight Fe-bearing minerals representing three mineralogical classes are present in the samples: oxyhydroxides, secondary phyllosilicates, and sulfides. For Fe oxyhydroxides within chimney walls and layers of Si-rich material, enrichments in both heavy and light Fe isotopes relative to pyrite are observed, yielding a range of δ57Fe values up to 6‰. Overall, several pathways for Fe transformation are observed. Pathway 1 is characterized by precipitation of primary sulfide minerals from Fe(II)aq-rich fluids in zones of mixing between vent fluids and seawater. Pathway 2 is also consistent with zones of mixing but involves precipitation of sulfide minerals from Fe(II)aq generated by Fe(III) reduction. Pathway 3 is direct oxidation of Fe(II) aq from hydrothermal fluids to form Fe(III) precipitates. Finally, Pathway 4 involves oxidative alteration of pre-existing sulfide minerals to form Fe(III). The Fe mineralogy and isotope data do not support or refute a unique biological role in sulfide alteration. The

  4. Iron Transformation Pathways and Redox Micro-Environments in Seafloor Sulfide-Mineral Deposits: Spatially Resolved Fe XAS and δ57/54Fe Observations

    PubMed Central

    Toner, Brandy M.; Rouxel, Olivier J.; Santelli, Cara M.; Bach, Wolfgang; Edwards, Katrina J.

    2016-01-01

    Hydrothermal sulfide chimneys located along the global system of oceanic spreading centers are habitats for microbial life during active venting. Hydrothermally extinct, or inactive, sulfide deposits also host microbial communities at globally distributed sites. The main goal of this study is to describe Fe transformation pathways, through precipitation and oxidation-reduction (redox) reactions, and examine transformation products for signatures of biological activity using Fe mineralogy and stable isotope approaches. The study includes active and inactive sulfides from the East Pacific Rise 9°50′N vent field. First, the mineralogy of Fe(III)-bearing precipitates is investigated using microprobe X-ray absorption spectroscopy (μXAS) and X-ray diffraction (μXRD). Second, laser-ablation (LA) and micro-drilling (MD) are used to obtain spatially-resolved Fe stable isotope analysis by multicollector-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (MC-ICP-MS). Eight Fe-bearing minerals representing three mineralogical classes are present in the samples: oxyhydroxides, secondary phyllosilicates, and sulfides. For Fe oxyhydroxides within chimney walls and layers of Si-rich material, enrichments in both heavy and light Fe isotopes relative to pyrite are observed, yielding a range of δ57Fe values up to 6‰. Overall, several pathways for Fe transformation are observed. Pathway 1 is characterized by precipitation of primary sulfide minerals from Fe(II)aq-rich fluids in zones of mixing between vent fluids and seawater. Pathway 2 is also consistent with zones of mixing but involves precipitation of sulfide minerals from Fe(II)aq generated by Fe(III) reduction. Pathway 3 is direct oxidation of Fe(II) aq from hydrothermal fluids to form Fe(III) precipitates. Finally, Pathway 4 involves oxidative alteration of pre-existing sulfide minerals to form Fe(III). The Fe mineralogy and isotope data do not support or refute a unique biological role in sulfide alteration. The findings

  5. Iron Transformation Pathways and Redox Micro-Environments in Seafloor Sulfide-Mineral Deposits: Spatially Resolved Fe XAS and δ(57/54)Fe Observations.

    PubMed

    Toner, Brandy M; Rouxel, Olivier J; Santelli, Cara M; Bach, Wolfgang; Edwards, Katrina J

    2016-01-01

    Hydrothermal sulfide chimneys located along the global system of oceanic spreading centers are habitats for microbial life during active venting. Hydrothermally extinct, or inactive, sulfide deposits also host microbial communities at globally distributed sites. The main goal of this study is to describe Fe transformation pathways, through precipitation and oxidation-reduction (redox) reactions, and examine transformation products for signatures of biological activity using Fe mineralogy and stable isotope approaches. The study includes active and inactive sulfides from the East Pacific Rise 9°50'N vent field. First, the mineralogy of Fe(III)-bearing precipitates is investigated using microprobe X-ray absorption spectroscopy (μXAS) and X-ray diffraction (μXRD). Second, laser-ablation (LA) and micro-drilling (MD) are used to obtain spatially-resolved Fe stable isotope analysis by multicollector-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (MC-ICP-MS). Eight Fe-bearing minerals representing three mineralogical classes are present in the samples: oxyhydroxides, secondary phyllosilicates, and sulfides. For Fe oxyhydroxides within chimney walls and layers of Si-rich material, enrichments in both heavy and light Fe isotopes relative to pyrite are observed, yielding a range of δ(57)Fe values up to 6‰. Overall, several pathways for Fe transformation are observed. Pathway 1 is characterized by precipitation of primary sulfide minerals from Fe(II)aq-rich fluids in zones of mixing between vent fluids and seawater. Pathway 2 is also consistent with zones of mixing but involves precipitation of sulfide minerals from Fe(II)aq generated by Fe(III) reduction. Pathway 3 is direct oxidation of Fe(II) aq from hydrothermal fluids to form Fe(III) precipitates. Finally, Pathway 4 involves oxidative alteration of pre-existing sulfide minerals to form Fe(III). The Fe mineralogy and isotope data do not support or refute a unique biological role in sulfide alteration. The findings

  6. Arsenic speciation in synthetic gypsum (CaSO4·2H2O): A synchrotron XAS, single-crystal EPR, and pulsed ENDOR study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Jinru; Chen, Ning; Nilges, Mark J.; Pan, Yuanming

    2013-04-01

    Gypsum (CaSO4·2H2O) is a major by-product of mining and milling processes of borate, phosphate and uranium deposits worldwide and, therefore, potentially plays an important role in the stability and bioavailability of heavy metalloids, including As, in tailings and surrounding areas. Gypsum containing 1900 and 185 ppm As, synthesized with Na2HAsO4·7H2O and NaAsO2 in the starting materials, respectively, have been investigated by synchrotron X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS), single-crystal electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy (EPR), and pulsed electron nuclear double resonance spectroscopy (ENDOR). Quantitative analyses of As K edge XANES and EXAFS spectra show that arsenic occurs in both +3 and +5 oxidation states and the As3+/As5+ value varies from 0.35 to 0.79. Single-crystal EPR spectra of gamma-ray-irradiated gypsum reveal two types of arsenic-associated oxyradicals: [AsO3]2- and an [AsO2]2-. The [AsO3]2- center is characterized by principal 75As hyperfine coupling constants of A1 = 1952.0(2) MHz, A2 = 1492.6(2) MHz and A3 = 1488.7(2) MHz, with the unique A axis along the S-O1 bond direction, and contains complex 1H superhyperfine structures that have been determined by pulsed ENDOR. These results suggest that the [AsO3]2- center formed from electron trapping on the central As5+ ion of a substitutional (AsO4)3- group after removal of an O1 atom. The [AsO2]2- center is characterized by its unique A(75As) axis approximately perpendicular to the O1-S-O2 plane and the A2 axis along the S-O2 bond direction, consistent with electron trapping on the central As3+ ion of a substitutional (AsO3)3- group after removal of an O2 atom. These results confirm lattice-bound As5+ and As3+ in gypsum and point to potential application of this mineral for immobilization and removal of arsenic pollution.

  7. Tunneling calculations for GaAs-Al(x)Ga(1-x)As graded band-gap sawtooth superlattices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forrest, Kathrine; Meijer, Paul H. E.

    1990-01-01

    The transmission resonance spectra and tunneling current-voltage characteristics for direct conduction band electrons in sawtooth GaAs-Al(x)Ga(1-x)As superlattices are computed. Only direct-gap interfaces are considered. It is found that sawtooth superlattices exhibit resonant tunneling similar to that in step superlattices, manifested by correlation of peaks and regions of negative differential resistance in the current-voltage curves with transmission resonances. The Stark shift of the resonances of step-barrier superlattices is a linear function of the field, whereas in sawtooth superlattices under strong fields the shift is not a simple function of the field. This follows from the different ways in which the two structures deform under uniform electric fields: the sawtooth deforms into a staircase, at which field strength all barriers to tunneling are eradicated. The step-barrier superlattice always presents some barrier to tunneling, no matter how high the electric field strength.

  8. Noise Characteristics of 100nm-scaleGaAs/Al_xGa_{1-x}As Scanning Hall Probes

    SciTech Connect

    Hicks, C.W.; Luan, L.; Moler, K.A.; Zeldov, E.; /Weizmann Inst.

    2007-03-23

    The authors have fabricated and characterized GaAs/Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1-x}As two-dimensional electron gas scanning Hall probes for imaging perpendicular magnetic fields at surfaces. The Hall crosses range from 85 x 85 to 1000 x 1000 nm{sup 2}. They study low-frequency noise in these probes, especially random telegraph noise, and show that low-frequency noise can be significantly reduced by optimizing the voltage on a gate over the Hall cross. The authors demonstrate a 100 nm Hall probe with a sensitivity of 0.5 G/{radical}Hz (flux sensitivity of 0.25m {Phi}{sub 0}/{radical}Hz; spin sensitivity of 1.2 x 10{sup 4} {mu}{sub B}/{radical}Hz) at 3 Hz and 9 K.

  9. Active sites in Cu-SSZ-13 deNOx catalyst under reaction conditions: a XAS/XES perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lomachenko, Kirill A.; Borfecchia, Elisa; Bordiga, Silvia; Soldatov, Alexander V.; Beato, Pablo; Lamberti, Carlo

    2016-05-01

    Cu-SSZ-13 is a highly active catalyst for the NH3-assisted selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of the harmful nitrogen oxides (NOx, x=1, 2). Since the catalytically active sites for this reaction are mainly represented by isolated Cu ions incorporated into the zeolitic framework, element-selective studies of Cu local environment are crucial to fully understand the enhanced catalytic properties of this material. Herein, we highlight the recent advances in the characterization of the most abundant Cu-sites in Cu-SSZ-13 upon different reaction-relevant conditions made employing XAS and XES spectroscopies, complemented by computational analysis. A concise review of the most relevant literature is also presented.

  10. Identification of the Ga interstitial in Al(x)Ga(1-x)As by optically detected magnetic resonance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kennedy, T. A.; Spencer, M. G.

    1986-01-01

    A new optically detected magnetic resonance spectrum in Al(x)Ga(1-x)As is reported and assigned to native Ga interstitials. Luminescence-quenching signals were observed over the energy region from 0.75 to 1.1 eV. The optically detected magnetic resonance is nearly isotropic, with spin-Hamiltonian parameters g = 2.025 + or - 0.006, central hyperfine splitting A(Ga-69) = 0.050 + or - 0.001/cm, and A(Ga-71) = 0.064 + or - 0.001/cm for H near the 001 line. The strong hyperfine coupling denotes an electronic state of A1 symmetry, which current theories predict for the Ga interstitial but not the Ga antisite. The slight anisotropy probably indicates that the Ga(i) is paired with a second, unknown defect.

  11. InP-based InxGa1-xAs metamorphic buffers with different mismatch grading rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang, Fang; Yi, Gu; Xingyou, Chen; Li, Zhou; Yuanying, Cao; Haosibaiyin, Li; Yonggang, Zhang

    2013-07-01

    Linearly graded InxGa1-xAs metamorphic buffers with different mismatch grading rates were grown on InP substrate by gas source molecular beam epitaxy. Room temperature photoluminescence spectra show that the sample with lower mismatch grading rate in the buffer has stronger photoluminescence signal, indicating the improved optical property. Atomic force microscope images show that the lower mismatch grading rate in the buffer leads to a slightly rougher surface. The relaxation procedure with two steps in the buffer layers has been observed by X-ray diffraction reciprocal space mapping. The measurements of X-ray diffraction also reveal that the lower mismatch grading rate in the buffer is beneficial for the lattice relaxation and release of residual strain. To further increase the relaxation degree, a lower mismatch grading rate and composition “overshoot" are suggested.

  12. Coprecipitation of Uranium (VI) with Calcite: XAFS, Micro-XAS,and Luminescence Characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Reeder, Richard J; Nugent, Melissa; Tait, C DREW; Morris, David E; Heald, Steve M; Beck, Kenneth M; Hess, Wayne P; Lanzirotti, Anthony

    2001-04-06

    X-ray absorption and luminescence spectroscopies have been used to characterize the local structure and coordination of uranium (VI) species coprecipitated with calcite (CaCO3) in room-temperature aqueous solutions. Different solution chemistries and pHs are found to result in defferences in the equatorial coordination of the uranyl species (UO2/2+) in the calcite, with multiple coordination environments of uranyl evident in one sample.

  13. Note: Application of a pixel-array area detector to simultaneous single crystal x-ray diffraction and x-ray absorption spectroscopy measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Cheng-Jun Brewe, Dale L.; Heald, Steve M.; Zhang, Bangmin; Chen, Jing-Sheng; Chow, G. M.; Venkatesan, T.

    2014-04-15

    X-ray diffraction (XRD) and X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) are two main x-ray techniques in synchrotron radiation facilities. In this Note, we present an experimental setup capable of performing simultaneous XRD and XAS measurements by the application of a pixel-array area detector. For XRD, the momentum transfer in specular diffraction was measured by scanning the X-ray energy with fixed incoming and outgoing x-ray angles. By selecting a small fixed region of the detector to collect the XRD signal, the rest of the area was available for collecting the x-ray fluorescence for XAS measurements. The simultaneous measurement of XRD and X-ray absorption near edge structure for Pr{sub 0.67}Sr{sub 0.33}MnO{sub 3} film was demonstrated as a proof of principle for future time-resolved pump-probe measurements. A static sample makes it easy to maintain an accurate overlap of the X-ray spot and laser pump beam.

  14. Speciation of metal(loid)s in environmental samples by X-ray absorption spectroscopy: a critical review.

    PubMed

    Gräfe, Markus; Donner, Erica; Collins, Richard N; Lombi, Enzo

    2014-04-25

    Element specificity is one of the key factors underlying the widespread use and acceptance of X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) as a research tool in the environmental and geo-sciences. Independent of physical state (solid, liquid, gas), XAS analyses of metal(loid)s in complex environmental matrices over the past two decades have provided important information about speciation at environmentally relevant interfaces (e.g. solid-liquid) as well as in different media: plant tissues, rhizosphere, soils, sediments, ores, mineral process tailings, etc. Limited sample preparation requirements, the concomitant ability to preserve original physical and chemical states, and independence from crystallinity add to the advantages of using XAS in environmental investigations. Interpretations of XAS data are founded on sound physical and statistical models that can be applied to spectra of reference materials and mixed phases, respectively. For spectra collected directly from environmental matrices, abstract factor analysis and linear combination fitting provide the means to ascertain chemical, bonding, and crystalline states, and to extract quantitative information about their distribution within the data set. Through advances in optics, detectors, and data processing, X-ray fluorescence microprobes capable of focusing X-rays to micro- and nano-meter size have become competitive research venues for resolving the complexity of environmental samples at their inherent scale. The application of μ-XANES imaging, a new combinatorial approach of X-ray fluorescence spectrometry and XANES spectroscopy at the micron scale, is one of the latest technological advances allowing for lateral resolution of chemical states over wide areas due to vastly improved data processing and detector technology. PMID:24725743

  15. Total Electron Yield Soft X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy in the C K Region of the Mixtures of Graphitic Carbons and Diamond for Quantitative Analysis of the sp2/sp3-Hybridized Carbon Ratio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muramatsu, Yasuji; Shimomura, Kenta; Katayama, Tetsuya; Gullikson, Eric M.

    2009-06-01

    To elucidate the possibility of quantitatively analyzing sp2-hybridized carbon (sp2-C) and sp3-C in carbon materials using total-electron-yield (TEY) X-ray absorption spectra (XAS) in the C K region, we measured the TEY-XAS of mixtures of multi-walled carbon nanotubes or carbon black as sp2-C sources and diamond as an sp3-C source. The measured relationship between the π*/σ* peak intensity ratio in the C K TEY-XAS and the weight (atomic)% of sp2-C can be successfully explained by the summed TEY of the sp2-C and sp3-C components and considering the TEY efficiency of sp3-C relative to sp2-C, k. However, the experimentally determined k values show that TEY of the sp3-C is much smaller than that of sp2-C by about one order of magnitude, even depending on the chemical form and/or electronic properties of individual carbon components. This suggests that further evaluation of the TEY efficiency is necessary prior to the quantitative sp2/sp3 analysis of carbon materials using the TEY-XAS.

  16. Liquid helium cryostat with internal fluorescence detection for x-ray absorption studies in the 2-6 keV energy region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McFarlane Holman, Karen L.; Latimer, Matthew J.; Yachandra, Vittal K.

    2004-06-01

    X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) in the intermediate x-ray region (2-6 keV) for dilute biological samples has been limited because of detector/flux limitations and inadequate cryogenic instrumentation. We have designed and constructed a new tailpiece/sample chamber for a commercially available liquid helium cooled cryostat which overcomes difficulties related to low fluorescence signals by using thin window materials and incorporating an internal photodiode detector. With the apparatus, XAS data at the Cl, S, and Ca K edges have been collected on frozen solutions and biological samples at temperatures down to 60 K. A separate chamber has been incorporated for collecting room-temperature spectra of standard compounds (for energy calibration purposes) which prevents contamination of the cryostat chamber and allows the sample to remain undisturbed, both important concerns for studying dilute and radiation-sensitive samples.

  17. Evidence of CuI/CuII Redox Process by X-ray Absorption and EPR Spectroscopy: Direct Synthesis of Dihydrofurans from b-Ketocarbonyl Derivatives and Olefins

    SciTech Connect

    Yi, Hong; Liao, Zhixiong; Zhang, Guanghui; Zhang, Guoting; Fan, Chao; Zhang, Xu; Bunel, Emilio E.; Pao, Chih-Wen; Lee, Jyh-Fu; Lei, Aiwen

    2015-01-01

    Abstract: The CuI/CuII and CuI/CuIII catalytic cycles have been subject to intense debate in the field of copper-catalyzed oxidative coupling reactions. A mechanistic study on the CuI/CuII redox process, by X-ray absorption (XAS) and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopies, has elucidated the reduction mechanism of CuII to CuI by 1,3-diketone and detailed investigation revealed that the halide ion is important for the reduction process. The oxidative nature of the thereby-formed CuI has also been studied by XAS and EPR spectroscopy. This mechanistic information is applicable to the copper-catalyzed oxidative cyclization of b-ketocarbonyl derivatives to dihydrofurans. This protocol provides an ideal route to highly substituted dihydrofuran rings from easily available 1,3-dicarbonyls and olefins. Copper

  18. Effect of silica capping on the oxidation of Fe3O4 nanoparticles in dispersion revealed by x-ray absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warland, A.; Antoniak, C.; Darbandi, M.; Weis, C.; Landers, J.; Keune, W.; Wende, H.

    2012-06-01

    Fe3O4 nanoparticles have been investigated as they are biocompatible and their surface can be functionalized. We synthesized iron oxide nanoparticles using a water-in-oil microemulsion method. Bare and silica-coated iron oxide nanoparticles of a core size of 6 nm dispersed in ethanol have been investigated by means of x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS). Due to a dedicated experimental setup the particles can be measured directly in dispersion. XAS allows us to disentangle the contributions of the Fe2+ and Fe3+ ions and therefore to estimate the amount of Fe3O4 in the particles. In case of the silica coated particles a high amount of magnetite was obtained. In contrast, the bare nanoparticles showed indications of a further oxidation into γ-Fe2O3 even in dispersion.

  19. Compound formation and superconductivity in Au-Si: X-ray absorption measurements on ion-beam-mixed Au-Si films

    SciTech Connect

    Jeon, Y.; Jisrawi, N.; Liang, G.; Lu, F.; Croft, M.; McLean, W.L.; Hart, D.L.; Stoffel, N.G.; Sun, J.Z.; Geballe, T.H.; and others

    1989-03-15

    Multilayered Au-Si thin films have been deposited with the net compositions ''Au/sub 1-//sub x/Si/sub x/,'' x = 0.29, 0.5, and 0.8. After ion-beam mixing these films exhibited superconductivity in the 0.3--1.2 K range despite the nonsuperconducting character of both Au and Si. Near-edge x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) measurements on the Au L/sub 3/ edge in these films indicate that metastable Au-Si compound formation occurs in these ion-mixed materials. Specifically, the XAS measurements indicate changes in Au 5d-orbital occupancy and changes in the local Au structural environment which are both consistent with local compound formation.

  20. Solid-Phase Speciation of Arsenic As the Primary Control on Dissolved As Concentrations in a Glacial Aquifer System: Quantifying Speciation of Arsenic in Glacial Aquifer Solids with μXAS Mapping.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicholas, S. L.; Gowan, A. S.; Knaeble, A. R.; Erickson, M. L.; Woodruff, L. G.; Marcus, M.; Toner, B. M.

    2014-12-01

    Western Minnesota, USA, is a regional locus of drinking-water wells with high arsenic (As) (As>10µgL-1). Arsenic concentrations vary widely among neighboring wells with otherwise similar water chemistry [1,2]. As(III) should be the most mobile As species in Minnesota well waters (median Eh in As affected wells is -50mV). This As is geogenic, sourced from glacial deposits derived from Cretaceous sedimentary bedrock (dolostone, limestone, shale). Our hypothesis is that As speciation in the solid phase is the important factor controlling the introduction of As to groundwater—more significant in this region than absolute As concentrations or landscape variability. Our previous research used micro-X-ray absorption spectroscopy (µXAS) speciation mapping [3] on archived glacial tills (stored dry at room temperature in air). µXAS results from this material showed that As in a reduced chemical state within the till aquitard is spatially correlated with iron sulfide at the micron scale. Conversley, As in aquifer sediments was mainly oxidized As(V). At the aquifer-aquitard contact As was observed as a mixture of both reduced and oxidized forms. This suggests that the aquifer-aquitard contact is a geochemically active zone in which reduced As species present within glacial till are converted to As(V) through complex redox processes, and subsequently release into aquifer sediments. Our current research applies the same methods to describe As speciation in samples collected from fresh cores of glacial sediment and frozen under argon in the field. Preliminary results are similar to our previous work in that As is, in general, more reduced in aquitard sediments, and more oxidized at the contact and in aquifer sediments. Arsenic(III) was preserved as a minor consitutent in ambient archived cores but is a more significant constituent in fresh, anaerobically preserved cores. Results will be presented comparing anaerobic samples with ambient-air aliquots of the same sample to

  1. First X-Ray absorption spectroscopy results on Aeolian dust archived in Antarctica and Alpine firn cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marcelli, A.; Maggi, V.; Cibin, G.; Sala, M.; Marino, F.; Delmonte, B.

    2006-12-01

    We present the first x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) data at the Fe K-edge collected on insoluble mineral dust from Talos Dome firn core (TDC, 159°04'E, 72°46'S, 2316 m a.s.l., mean accumulation rate 8 g cm-2 yr- 1), drilled in the framework of the International Trans Antarctic Scientific Expedition (ITASE), and from a Colle del Lys 2003 firn core (CDL03, 45°92'N, 7°86'E, 4248m a.s.l., mean accumulation rate 134 g cm-2 yr-1, Lys Glacier, Mt. Rosa, Italy). The low concentration of mineral particles, obtained by filtering each firn core melted samples on Nuclepore membranes in a 1000 class clean room, required a specific procedure to prepare the samples necessary to the successful collection of the XAS data. The firn samples were decontaminated in clean room under laminar flow bench by means of a ceramic knife and discarding the external part of the cores. Analyses of the insoluble particle content were performed by particle counter Beckman CounterãMultisizer III in order to defined concentration and size distribution of particles in each samples. A dedicated HV experimental chamber, devoted to the realization of XAS experiments on very low absorber concentration samples, was developed and realized in the framework of the CryoAlp collaboration at IMONT, the Italian National Institute for Mountains. The original experimental setup, thanks to the presence of an in-vacuum sample micromanipulator and special sample alignment and docking system installed for these experiments at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory at the beamline 6-2, allows both normal-incidence X-ray Fluorescence detection using a Ketek SDD detector having an energy resolution of about 150 eV and extremely low energy detection limit, and Total X-ray Reflection Fluorescence and Absorption Spectroscopy measurements. The high quality of the XANES experiments performed, using both normal incidence and Total Reflection XAS measurements, allowed recognizing iron-inclusion mineral fractions

  2. Spectroscopic survey of LAMOST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yongheng

    2014-07-01

    LAMOST is a special reflecting Schmidt telescope. LAMOST breaks through the bottleneck of the large scale spectroscopic survey observation with both large aperture (effective aperture of 3.6 - 4.9m) and wide field of view (5 degrees). It is an innovative active reflecting Schmidt configuration achieved by changing mirror surface continuously to achieve a series different reflecting Schmidt system in different moments. By using the parallel controllable fiber positioning technique, the focal surface of 1.75 meters in diameter accommodates 4000 optical fibers. Also, LAMOST has 16 spectrographs with 32 CCD cameras. LAMOST is the telescope of the highest spectrum acquiring rate. As a national large scientific project, LAMOST project was proposed formally in 1996. The construction was started in 2001 and completed in 2008. After commission period, LAMOST pilot survey was started in October 2011 and spectroscopic survey began in September 2012. From October 2011 to June 2013, LAMOST has obtained more than 2 million spectra of celestial objects. There are 1.7 million spectra of stars, in which the stellar parameters (effective temperature, surface gravity, metalicitiy and radial velocity) of more than 1 million stars was obtained. In the first period of spectroscopic survey of LAMOST, 5 million of stellar spectra will be obtained and will make substantial contribution to the study of the stellar astrophysics and the structure of the Galaxy, such as the spheroid substructure of the Galaxy, the galactic gravitational potential and the distribution of the dark matter in the Galaxy, the extremely metal poor stars and hypervelocity stars, the 3D extinction in the Galaxy, the structure of thin and thick disks of the Galaxy, and so on.

  3. In Situ X-Ray Absorption Spectroscopy Study of the LiNiO2 Electrode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mansour, A. N.; McBreen, J.; Melendres, C. A.

    1997-03-01

    LiNiO2 is one of the most promising active material for the development of novel 4V rechargeable lithium batteries. Recent x-ray diffraction studies showed that the electrochemical reactivity of this electrode is sensitive to the structure of the starting material as well as the charged products. To further examine this material, we have conducted an x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) study to determine the structure of this electrode as a function of its charge state. Specifically, the x-ray absorption Ni K-edge energy, the pre-edge structure, and local structure parameters such as bond lengths, coordination numbers and disorders were investigated at various states of charge corresponding to Li_(1-x)NiO2 for x values of 0.0, 0.11, 0.23, 0.34, 0.45, 0.82, and 0.99. The charging which proceeds via lithium de-intercalation was conducted using constant current anodization at 0.5 mA in a non aqueous electrolyte consisting of 1M LiPF6 in 1:1:3 propylene ! carbonate, ethylene carbonate and dimethyl carbonate. The XAS results for this electrode will be compared with those of γ-NiOOH and KNiIO_6, the latter being used as a reference for quadrivalent nickel.

  4. REACTION KINETICS AND X-RAY ABSORPTION SPECTROSCOPY STUDIES OF YTTRIUM CONTAINING METAL HYDRIDE ELECTRODES

    SciTech Connect

    TICIANELLI,E.A.; MUKERJEE,S.; MCBREEN,J.; ADZIC,G.D.; JOHNSON,J.R.; REILLY,J.J.

    1998-11-01

    This was a study of electrode degradation mechanisms and the reaction kinetics of LaNi{sub 4.7}Sn{sub 0.3}, La{sub (1{minus}x)}, (x = 0.1, 0.2, and 0.3) and La{sub 0.7}Y{sub 0.3}Ni{sub 4.6}Sn{sub 0.3}Co{sub 0.1} metal hydride electrodes. Alloy characterization included x-ray diffraction (XRD), x-ray absorption (XAS), hydrogen absorption in a Sieverts apparatus, and electrochemical cycling of alloy electrodes. The atomic volume of H was determined for two of the alloys. Electrochemical kinetic measurements were made using steady state galvanostatic measurements, galvanodynamic sweep, and electrochemical impedance techniques. XAS was used to examine the degree of corrosion of the alloys with cycling. Alloying with Y decreased the corrosion rate. The results are consistent with corrosion inhibition by a Y containing passive film. The increase in the kinetics of the hydrogen oxidation reaction (HOR) with increasing depth of discharge was much greater on the Y containing alloys. This may be due to the dehydriding of the catalytic species on the surface of the metal hydride particles.

  5. Reaction kinetics and x-ray absorption spectroscopy studies of yttrium containing metal hydride electrodes

    SciTech Connect

    Ticianelli, E.A.; Mukerjee, S.; McBreen, J.; Adzic, G.D.; Johnson, J.R.; Reilly, J.J.

    1998-12-31

    This was a study of electrode degradation mechanisms and the reaction kinetics of LaNi{sub 4.7}Sn{sub 0.3}, La{sub (1{minus}x)} Y{sub x}Ni{sub 4.7}Sn{sub 0.3} (x = 0.1, 0.2, and 0.3) and La{sub 0.7}Y{sub 0.3}Ni{sub 4.6}Sn{sub 0.3}Co{sub 0.1} metal hydride electrodes. Alloy characterization included x-ray diffraction (XRD), x-ray absorption (XAS), hydrogen absorption in a Sieverts apparatus, and electrochemical cycling of alloy electrodes. The atomic volume of H was determined for two of the alloys. Electrochemical kinetic measurements were made using steady state galvanostatic measurements, galvanodynamic sweep, and electrochemical impedance techniques. XAS was used to examine the degree of corrosion of the alloys with cycling. Alloying with Y decreased the corrosion rate. The results are consistent with corrosion inhibition by a Y containing passive film. The increase in the kinetics of the hydrogen oxidation reaction (HOR) with increasing depth of discharge was much greater on the Y containing alloys. This may be due to the dehydriding of the catalytic species on the surface of the metal hydride particles.

  6. X-ray absorption spectroscopy as a probe of dissolved polysulfides in lithium sulfur batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pascal, Tod; Prendergast, David

    2015-03-01

    There has been enormous interest lately in lithium sulfur batteries, since they have 5 times the theoretical capacity of lithium ion batteries. Large-scale adoption of this technology has been hampered by numerous shortcomings, chiefly the poor utilization of the active cathode material and rapid capacity fading during cycling. Overcoming these limitations requires methods capable of identifying and quantifying the products of the poorly understood electrochemical reactions. One recent advance has been the use of X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS), an element-specific probe of the unoccupied energy levels around an excited atom upon absorption of an X-ray photon, to identify the reaction products and intermediates. In this talk, we'll present first principles molecular dynamics and spectral simulations of dissolved lithium polysulfide species, showing how finite temperature dynamics, molecular geometry, molecular charge state and solvent environment conspire to determine the peak positions and intensity of the XAS. We'll present a spectral analysis of the radical (-1e charge) species, and reveal a unique low energy feature that can be used to identify these species from their more common dianion (-2e charge) counterparts.

  7. X-ray absorption spectroscopy and EPR studies of oriented spinach thylakoid preparations

    SciTech Connect

    Andrews, J.C. |

    1995-08-01

    In this study, oriented Photosystem II (PS II) particles from spinach chloroplasts are studied with electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) to determine more details of the structure of the oxygen evolving complex (OEC). The nature of halide binding to Mn is also studied with Cl K-edge and Mn EXAFS (extended x-ray absorption fine structure) of Mn-Cl model compounds, and with Mn EXAFS of oriented PS II in which Br has replaced Cl. Attention is focused on the following: photosynthesis and the oxygen evolving complex; determination of mosaic spread in oriented photosystem II particles from signal II EPR measurement; oriented EXAFS--studies of PS II in the S{sub 2} state; structural changes in PS II as a result of treatment with ammonia: EPR and XAS studies; studies of halide binding to Mn: Cl K-edge and Mn EXAFS of Mn-Cl model compounds and Mn EXAFS of oriented Br-treated photosystem II.

  8. Commissioning and performance of X-ray absorption spectroscopy beamline at the Siam Photon Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klysubun, W.; Sombunchoo, P.; Wongprachanukul, N.; Tarawarakarn, P.; Klinkhieo, S.; Chaiprapa, J.; Songsiriritthigul, P.

    2007-11-01

    We report commissioning results and performance of X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) beamline, BL-8, at the Siam Photon Laboratory. BL-8 has been opened for users since the year 2006. It is tunable by a fixed-exit double crystal monochromator equipped with InSb(1 1 1), Si(1 1 1), and Ge(2 2 0) crystals covering photon energy from 1830 to 9000 eV. Thus elemental absorption K-edges of silicon up to copper can be investigated. Other heavier elements may be studied via their L or M edges. The front end is windowless and the beamline is terminated with a Kapton window followed by the XAS station equipped with ionization chambers for transmission-mode measurements. The measured photon flux at sample is approximately 10 8-10 10 photons/s/100 mA for the 1 mm×10 mm beam size. The commissioning XANES spectra of sulfur standards and EXAFS spectra of copper are presented.

  9. Evaluation of iron-containing carbon nanotubes by near edge X-ray absorption technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osorio, A. G.; Bergmann, C. P.

    2015-10-01

    The synthesis of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) via Chemical Vapor Deposition method with ferrocene results in CNTs filled with Fe-containing nanoparticles. The present work proposes a novel route to characterize the Fe phases in CNTs inherent to the synthesis process. CNTs were synthesized and, afterwards, the CNTs were heat treated at 1000 °C for 20 min in an inert atmosphere during a thermogravimetric experiment. X-Ray Absorption Spectroscopy (XAS) experiments were performed on the CNTs before and after the heat treatment and, also, during the heat treatment, e.g., in situ tests were performed while several Near-Edge X-Ray Absorption (XANES) spectra were collected during the heating of the samples. The XAS technique was successfully applied to evaluate the phases encapsulated by CNTs. Phase transformations of the Fe-based nanoparticles were also observed from iron carbide to metallic iron when the in situ experiments were performed. Results also indicated that the applied synthesis method guarantees that Fe phases are not oxidize. In addition, the results show that heat treatment under inert atmosphere can control which phase remains encapsulated by the CNTs.

  10. Spectroscopic investigations of heme proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogilvie, Jennifer Pauline

    Using several novel spectroscopic techniques, we investigate the dynamics of heme proteins over the full range of time scales relevant to their function. With ˜10 femtosecond time resolution we use ultrafast pump-probe spectroscopy to gain insight into the earliest dynamics initiated by the photodissociation of the carbon monoxide ligand from myoglobin. Coherent oscillations that are driven by the bond-breaking event reveal several vibrational modes of the heme that provide the driving force for the initial motions along the pathway to protein function. Much later along this pathway we address the question of ligand escape from myoglobin. With this purpose we develop heterodyne-detected diffractive-optics-based phase-grating spectroscopy, which provides more than 2 orders of magnitude increase in sensitivity for the measurement of volume changes and energetics. The improved sensitivity allows us to directly observe the ligand escape, which occurs via a number of discrete routes through the protein. Following the escape process, we observe the full cycle of dynamics that is complete when the carbon monoxide ligand rebinds to the protein. Using a resonant probe we re-examine the dynamics of ligand escape from myoglobin using transient absorption and transient-grating spectroscopy. This study confirms the findings of the previous off-resonant work, and allows us to explore the relationship between the observables in the phase-grating experiment and other resonant spectroscopies. The various dynamical processes of myoglobin provide a basis for understanding the structure/function relationship at the single protein level. This lays the foundation for a description of protein-protein interactions such as cooperativity in hemoglobin.

  11. Spectroscopic observations of spatial and temporal variations on Venus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, A. T.; Young, L. G.; Woszczyk, A.

    1974-01-01

    Details of the Table Mountain spectroscopic patrol of Venus in September-October 1972 are given. The data indicate systematic variation over the disc, with more CO2 absorption near the terminator than at the limb, and slightly more in the southern than in the northern hemisphere. The semiregular four-day variation, reported to occur simultaneously over the disk at 8689 A by Young et al. (1973), is confirmed by observations of the 7820 A and 7883 A CO2 bands.

  12. New infrared spectroscopic database for bromine nitrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, Georg; Birk, Manfred

    2016-08-01

    Fourier transform infrared measurements of bromine nitrate have been performed in the spectral region 675-1400 cm-1 at 0.014 cm-1 spectral resolution. Absorption cross sections were derived from 38 spectra covering the temperature range from 203 to 296 K and air pressure range from 0 to 190 mbar. For line-by-line analysis, further spectra were recorded at 0.00094 cm-1 spectral resolution at 223 and 293 K. The sample was synthesized from ClONO2 and Br2. Band strengths of the bands ν3 around 803 cm-1 and ν2 around 1286 cm-1 were determined from three pure BrONO2 measurements at different temperatures and pressures. Number densities in the absorption cell were derived from pressure measurements of the purified sample taking into account small amounts of impurities determined spectroscopically. Resulting band strengths are Sν3 = 2.872(52) × 10-17 cm2 molec-1 cm-1 and Sν2 = 3.63(15) × 10-17 cm2 molec-1 cm-1. Absorption cross sections of all measurements were scaled to these band strengths. Further data reduction was achieved with an interpolation scheme based on two-dimensional polynomials in ln(pressure) and temperature. The database is well-suited for remote-sensing application and should reduce the atmospheric bromine nitrate error budget substantially.

  13. Spectroscopic survey of LAMOST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yongheng

    2015-08-01

    LAMOST is a special reflecting Schmidt telescope. LAMOST breaks through the bottleneck of the large scale spectroscopic survey observation with both large aperture (effective aperture of 3.6 - 4.9m) and wide field of view (5 degrees). It is an innovative active reflecting Schmidt configuration achieved by changing mirror surface continuously to achieve a series different reflecting Schmidt system in different moments. By using the parallel controllable fiber positioning technique, the focal surface of 1.75 meters in diameter accommodates 4000 optical fibers. Also, LAMOST has 16 spectrographs with 32 CCD cameras. LAMOST is the telescope of the highest spectrum acquiring rate.In the spectroscopic survey of LAMOST from October 2011 to June 2014, LAMOST has obtained more than 4.13 million spectra of celestial objects. There are 3.27 million spectra of stars, in which the stellar parameters of 2.16 million stars were obtained.In the five-year regular survey upto 2017, LAMOST will obtaine 5 million stellar spectra, which would make substantial contribution to the study of the stellar astrophysics and the structure of the Galaxy, such as the spheroid substructure of the Galaxy, the galactic gravitational potential and the distribution of the dark matter in the Galaxy, the extremely metal poor stars and hypervelocity stars, the 3D extinction in the Galaxy, the structure of thin and thick disks of the Galaxy, and so on.

  14. XRD and XAS structural study of CuAlO2 under high pressure.

    PubMed

    Pellicer-Porres, J; Segura, A; Ferrer-Roca, Ch; Polian, A; Munsch, P; Kim, D

    2013-03-20

    We present the results of x-ray diffraction and x-ray absorption spectroscopy experiments in CuAlO(2) under high pressure. We discuss the polarization dependence of the x-ray absorption near-edge structure at the Cu K-edge. XRD under high pressure evidences anisotropic compression, the a-axis being more compressible than the c-axis. EXAFS yields the copper-oxygen bond length, from which the only internal parameter of the delafossite structure is deduced. The combination of anisotropic compression and the internal parameter decrease results in a regularization of the AlO(6) octahedra. The anisotropic compression is related to the chemical trends observed in the lattice parameters when Al is substituted by other trivalent cations. Both experiments evidence the existence of an irreversible phase transition that clearly manifests at 35 ± 2 GPa. The structure of the high-pressure polymorph could not be determined, but it implies a change of the Cu environment, which remains anisotropic. Precursor effects are observed from the lowest pressures, which are possibly related to crystal breaking at a submicroscopic scale with partial reorientation of the crystallites. PMID:23423689

  15. The GEISA Spectroscopic Database System in its latest Edition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacquinet-Husson, N.; Crépeau, L.; Capelle, V.; Scott, N. A.; Armante, R.; Chédin, A.

    2009-04-01

    GEISA (Gestion et Etude des Informations Spectroscopiques Atmosphériques: Management and Study of Spectroscopic Information)[1] is a computer-accessible spectroscopic database system, designed to facilitate accurate forward planetary radiative transfer calculations using a line-by-line and layer-by-layer approach. It was initiated in 1976. Currently, GEISA is involved in activities related to the assessment of the capabilities of IASI (Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer on board the METOP European satellite -http://earth-sciences.cnes.fr/IASI/)) through the GEISA/IASI database[2] derived from GEISA. Since the Metop (http://www.eumetsat.int) launch (October 19th 2006), GEISA/IASI is the reference spectroscopic database for the validation of the level-1 IASI data, using the 4A radiative transfer model[3] (4A/LMD http://ara.lmd.polytechnique.fr; 4A/OP co-developed by LMD and Noveltis with the support of CNES). Also, GEISA is involved in planetary research, i.e.: modelling of Titan's atmosphere, in the comparison with observations performed by Voyager: http://voyager.jpl.nasa.gov/, or by ground-based telescopes, and by the instruments on board the Cassini-Huygens mission: http://www.esa.int/SPECIALS/Cassini-Huygens/index.html. The updated 2008 edition of GEISA (GEISA-08), a system comprising three independent sub-databases devoted, respectively, to line transition parameters, infrared and ultraviolet/visible absorption cross-sections, microphysical and optical properties of atmospheric aerosols, will be described. Spectroscopic parameters quality requirement will be discussed in the context of comparisons between observed or simulated Earth's and other planetary atmosphere spectra. GEISA is implemented on the CNES/CNRS Ether Products and Services Centre WEB site (http://ether.ipsl.jussieu.fr), where all archived spectroscopic data can be handled through general and user friendly associated management software facilities. More than 350 researchers are

  16. Experimental (XAS STEM TPR and XPS) and Theoretical (DFT) Characterization of Supported Rhenium Catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    S Bare; S Kelly; F Vila; D Boldingh; E Karapetrova; J Kas; G Mickelson; F Modica; N Yang; J Rehr

    2011-12-31

    A high surface area supported Re-based catalyst, fundamental to heterogeneous catalysis, is studied in the oxidic and reduced states using a combination of experimental (XAFS, STEM, TPR, and XPS) and theoretical (DFT and X-ray spectroscopy simulations) approaches. In the calcined dried catalyst, the Re species is present as an isolated trioxo(oxoaluminate) Re(VII) species. The temperature at which the Re undergoes reduction is a function of the hydrogen partial pressure and temperature ramp rate, but the maximum rate of reduction occurs in the range 300-400 C. Following reduction at 500 or 700 C in dry hydrogen, the Re is present as a mixture of species: unreduced trioxo(oxoaluminate) Re(VII) species, Re nanoclusters, and isolated Re atoms. By using a multifaceted approach, it is apparent that the majority species is an isolated Re adatom bound to the alumina support. DFT calculations identify several likely adsorption sites for these Re adatoms on the [110] surface of {gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}. The final extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) model taking into account these three species is used to identify the dominant adsorption site for Re on the alumina surface. FEFF8 X-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy (XANES) calculations of unsupported and alumina-supported Re nanoclusters provide interpretation of the shape and edge position of the Re L{sub 3}-edge XANES after reduction. The presence of moisture during reduction stronly affects the mobility of the Re on the alumina leading to agglomeration. Subsequent air exposure of a reduced catalyst readily reoxidizes the reduced Re. The power of using a combination of analysis tools provides insight into the behavior of dispersed Re on supported alumina under oxidizing and reducing conditions relevant to heterogeneous catalysis.

  17. Comparative XRPD and XAS study of the impact of the synthesis process on the electronic and structural environments of uranium-americium mixed oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prieur, D.; Lebreton, F.; Martin, P. M.; Caisso, M.; Butzbach, R.; Somers, J.; Delahaye, T.

    2015-10-01

    Uranium-americium mixed oxides are potential compounds to reduce americium inventory in nuclear waste via a partitioning and transmutation strategy. A thorough assessment of the oxygen-to-metal ratio is paramount in such materials as it determines the important underlying electronic structure and phase relations, affecting both thermal conductivity of the material and its interaction with the cladding and coolant. In 2011, various XAS experiments on U1-xAmxO2±δ samples prepared by different synthesis methods have reported contradictory results on the charge distribution of U and Am. This work alleviates this discrepancy. The XAS results confirm that, independently of the synthesis process, the reductive sintering of U1-xAmxO2±δ leads to the formation of similar fluorite solid solution indicating the presence of Am+III and U+V in equimolar proportions.

  18. Multiscale structural characterizations of mixed U(iv)-An(iii) oxalates (An(iii) = Pu or Am) combining XAS and XRD measurements.

    PubMed

    Arab-Chapelet, B; Martin, P M; Costenoble, S; Delahaye, T; Scheinost, A C; Grandjean, S; Abraham, F

    2016-04-28

    Mixed actinide(III,IV) oxalates of the general formula M2.2UAn(C2O4)5·nH2O (An = Pu or Am and M = H3O(+) and N2H5(+)) have been quantitatively precipitated by oxalic precipitation in nitric acid medium (yield >99%). Thorough multiscale structural characterization using XRD and XAS measurements confirmed the existence of mixed actinide oxalate solid solutions. The XANES analysis confirmed that the oxidation states of the metallic cations, tetravalent for uranium and trivalent for plutonium and americium, are maintained during the precipitation step. EXAFS measurements show that the local environments around U(+IV), Pu(+III) and Am(+III) are comparable, and the actinides are surrounded by ten oxygen atoms from five bidentate oxalate anions. The mean metal-oxygen distances obtained by XAS measurements are in agreement with those calculated from XRD lattice parameters. PMID:26979820

  19. Wet oxidation of AlxGa1 - xAs: Temporal evolution of composition and microstructure and the implications for metal-insulator-semiconductor applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashby, Carol I. H.; Sullivan, John P.; Newcomer, Paula P.; Missert, Nancy A.; Hou, Hong Q.; Hammons, B. E.; Hafich, Michael J.; Baca, Albert G.

    1997-05-01

    Three important processes dominate the wet thermal oxidation of AlxGa1-xAs on GaAs: (1) oxidation of Al and Ga in the AlxGa1-xAs alloy to form an amorphous oxide, (2) formation and elimination of crystalline and amorphous elemental As and of amorphous As2O3, and (3) crystallization of the amorphous oxide film. Residual As can lead to strong Fermi-level pinning at the oxidized AlGaAs/GaAs interface, up to a 100-fold increase in leakage current, and a 30% increase in the dielectric constant of the oxide layer. Thermodynamically favored interfacial As may impose a fundamental limitation on the use of AlGaAs wet oxidation in metal-insulatorsemiconductor devices in the GaAs material system.

  20. The time-resolved and extreme conditions XAS (TEXAS) facility at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility: the general-purpose EXAFS bending-magnet beamline BM23

    PubMed Central

    Mathon, O.; Beteva, A.; Borrel, J.; Bugnazet, D.; Gatla, S.; Hino, R.; Kantor, I.; Mairs, T.; Munoz, M.; Pasternak, S.; Perrin, F.; Pascarelli, S.

    2015-01-01

    BM23 is the general-purpose EXAFS bending-magnet beamline at the ESRF, replacing the former BM29 beamline in the framework of the ESRF upgrade. Its mission is to serve the whole XAS user community by providing access to a basic service in addition to the many specialized instruments available at the ESRF. BM23 offers high signal-to-noise ratio EXAFS in a large energy range (5–75 keV), continuous energy scanning for quick-EXAFS on the second timescale and a micro-XAS station delivering a spot size of 4 µm × 4 µm FWHM. It is a user-friendly facility featuring a high degree of automation, online EXAFS data reduction and a flexible sample environment. PMID:26524321

  1. Search for planets by spectroscopic methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Serkowski, K.

    1980-01-01

    Spectroscopic means of detecting the motion of a star around a star-planet barycenter are considered. The precision of such an observation, which requires a radial velocity error of not more than 5 m/sec, is discussed in relation to the spectral resolutions of the detectors utilized. The University of Arizona radial velocity spectrometer is then presented, with particular attention given to the location of the absorption cell in a beam of light from an incandescent bulb, high-accuracy wavelength calibration involving the use of a Fabry-Perot interferometer in front of an echelle spectrograph, and future plans for the use of light reflected from a Fabry-Perot etalon to improve transmittance. On the basis of these techniques, it is expected that radial velocities with accuracies sufficient for the detection of extrasolar planets will be obtained.

  2. Cadmium Speciation and Release Kinetics in a Thai Paddy Soil: An In situ Molecular-Scale Investigation Using X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy (XAS)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Transformation of Cd species can occur in response to fluctuating soil moisture conditions. Redox potential is a master variable controlling Cd speciation and bioavailability in paddy soils, and soil pH influences the transport and fate of Cd (e.g., via sorption to organic matter or metal oxides an...

  3. The XAS Model of the Copper(II)-Imidazole Complex Ion in Liquid Aqueous Solution: A Strongly Solvated Square Pyramid

    PubMed Central

    Frank, Patrick; Benfatto, Maurizio; Hedman, Britt; Hodgson, Keith O.

    2012-01-01

    Copper K-edge EXAFS and MXAN analyses were combined to evaluate the structure of the copper(II)-imidazole complex ion in liquid aqueous solution. Both methods converged to the same square pyramidal inner coordination sphere [Cu(Im)4Lax]2+, (Lax indeterminate) with four equatorial nitrogens at: EXAFS, 2.02±0.01 Å, and; MXAN, 1.99±0.03 Å. A short axial N/O scatterer, (Lax), was found at 2.12±0.02 (EXAFS) or 2.14±0.06 Å (MXAN). A second but very weak axial Cu-N/O interaction was found at 2.9±0.1 Å (EXAFS) or 3.0±0.1 Å (MXAN). In the MXAN fits, only a square pyramidal structural model successfully reproduced the doubled maximum of the rising K-edge XAS, specifically excluding an octahedral model. Both EXAFS and MXAN also found eight outlying oxygen scatterers at 4.2±0.3 Å that contributed significant intensity over the entire XAS energy range. Two prominent rising K-edge shoulders at 8987.1 eV and 8990.5 eV were found to reflect multiple scattering from the 3.0 Å axial scatterer and the imidazole rings, respectively. In the MXAN fits, the imidazole rings took in-plane rotationally staggered positions about copper. The combined (EXAFS and MXAN) model for the unconstrained cupric-imidazole complex ion in liquid aqueous solution is an axially elongated square pyramidal core, with a weak non-bonded interaction at the second axial coordination position and a solvation shell of eight nearest neighbor water molecules. This core square pyramidal motif has persisted through [Cu(H2O)5]2+, [Cu(NH3)4(NH3,H2O)]2+,1,2 and now [Cu(Im)4Lax)]2+, and appears to be the geometry preferred by unconstrained aqueous-phase Cu(II) complex ions. PMID:22316238

  4. Spectroscopic Ellipsometry Applications in Advanced Lithography Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Synowicki, R. A.; Pribil, Greg K.; Hilfiker, James N.; Edwards, Kevin

    2005-09-01

    Spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE) is an optical metrology technique widely used in the semiconductor industry. For lithography applications SE is routinely used for measurement of film thickness and refractive index of polymer photoresist and antireflective coatings. While this remains a primary use of SE, applications are now expanding into other areas of advanced lithography research. New applications include immersion lithography, phase-shift photomasks, transparent pellicles, 193 and 157 nm lithography, stepper optical coatings, imprint lithography, and even real-time monitoring of etch development rate in liquid ambients. Of recent interest are studies of immersion fluids where knowledge of the fluid refractive index and absorption are critical to their use in immersion lithography. Phase-shift photomasks are also of interest as the thickness and index of the phase-shift and absorber layers must be critically controlled for accurate intensity and phase transmission. Thin transparent pellicles to protect these masks must be also characterized for thickness and refractive index. Infrared ellipsometry is sensitive to chemical composition, film thickness, and how film chemistry changes with processing. Real-time monitoring of polymer film thickness during etching in a liquid developer allows etch rate and endpoint determination with monolayer sensitivity. This work considers these emerging applications to survey the current status of spectroscopic ellipsometry as a characterization technique in advanced lithography applications.

  5. Spectroscopic characterization of the Stentor photoreceptor.

    PubMed

    Walker, E B; Lee, T Y; Song, P S

    1979-09-20

    1. On the basis of chromatographic and spectroscopic (absorption, fluorescence and its polarization, fluorescence lifetime, circular dichroism) characterization of the Stentor photoreceptor (stentorin) for photophobic response, the photoreceptor chromophore released from mild acid hydrolysis has been identified as hypericin. 2. The native chromophore is apparently linked to a protein (65 K) containing Lys and several hydrophobic residues, which is soluble in acetone and n-pentane. The peptide-linked stentorin (I) chromophore exhibits circular dichroism in the visible region due to the induced optical activity provided by the peptide. 3. The sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of a 38% fraction of the sucrose density centrifugation has resolved stentorin II proteins having molecular weights of 13 000, 16 000, 65 000 and 130 000. These proteins, as well as the acetone-soluble peptide, have been spectroscopically characterized with particular emphasis on their primary photoreactivity as the photophobic receptor of Stentor coeruleus. 4. Irradiation of whole living Stentor in dilute buffer solutions induces a decrease in the pH of the medium. A strong dependence upon pH in the fluorescence spectra of both synthetic and native chromophores is also evident, showing a significant drop in the pKa of one or more hydroxyl groups in the excited state. A mechanism for the photophobic response, based on this lowering of the pKa as the primary photoprocess, has been discussed. PMID:39631

  6. The influence of growth chemistry on the MOVPE growth of GaAs and Al(x)Ga(1-x)As layers and heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuech, T. F.; Veuhoff, E.; Kuan, T. S.; Deline, V.; Potemski, R.

    1986-09-01

    Various combinations of triethylgallium, triethylaluminum, trimethylgallium, and trimethylaluminum have been used during the metalorganic vapor phase epitaxy (MOVPE) growth of Al(x)Ga(1-x)As in order to ascertain the influence of their growth chemistry on the properties of the resulting semiconductor layers and quantum well structures. Substantial reductions in carbon incorporation can be achieved using the ethyl-based growth chemistry. Narrow quantum well structures were demonstrated using both ethyl- and methyl-based precursors.

  7. Oxygen-induced Al surface segregation in Al(x)Ga(1-x)As and the effect of Y overlayers on the oxidation of the Y/Al(x)Ga(1-x)As interface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mesarwi, A.; Ignatiev, A.

    1992-01-01

    The oxidation of Al(x)Ga(1-x)As (x = 0.15, AlGaAs) was studied by AES and XPS at 350 C and different oxygen exposures (up to 5 x 10 exp 4 L). Also studied were the effects of yttrium overlayers (theta = 3 ML) on the oxidation of the AlGaAs surface. Substantial oxygen-induced Al surface segregation has been observed for both yttriated and nonyttriated AlGaAs surfaces which increased with increasing oxygen exposure. Also observed is a significant Y-enhanced oxidation of the AlGaAs surface. Oxidation of the yttriated AlGaAs surface was found to be a factor of 4 greater than that of the nonyttriated surface. Also, while oxidation of the nonyttriated AlGaAs yielded mainly Al2O(x) (x less than 3) and only little Ga2O3, the yttriated AlGaAs surface oxide layer was principally Ga2O3 and stoichiometric Al2O3. However, both the yttriated and nonyttriated surfaces were found to contain metallic As within the oxide layer.

  8. Cadmium Chemical Form in Mine Waste Materials by X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diacomanolis, V.; Ng, J. C.; Sadler, R.; Harris, H. H.; Nomura, M.; Noller, B. N.

    2010-06-01

    This study examines the molecular form of cadmium (Cd) present in mine wastes by X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy (XAS; Cd>20 mg/kg) using the K-edge of Cd at the Photon Factory Advanced Ring (PF-AR), NW10A beam line at KEK-Tsukuba-Japan. Mine waste materials and zinc concentrate were analyzed for Cd by ICPMS prior to undertaking XAS (range 21-452 mg/kg). Model compounds (CdO, Cd(OH)2, CdCO3, Cdacetate, CdS, Cdstearate, CdDEDTC) and samples were examined in solid form at 20 K. The XANES spectra showed similar E max values for both model compounds and samples. The EXAFS showed that Cd-S in CdS, gives a flatter spectrum in the extended region compared to Cd-O found with CdCO3, CdO and Cd Stearate. Linear combination fitting with model Cd compounds did not give clear assignments of composition, indicating that more detailed EXAFS spectra is required as mineral forms containing Cd were present rather than simple Cd compounds such as CdCO3. The Cd bond for a single shell model in mine waste sample matrices appears to be either Cd-O or Cd-S, or a combination of both. Comparison of molecular data from the XAS studies with bioaccessibility data giving a prediction of bioavailability for mine waste materials provides useful information about the significance of the cadmium form as a contaminant for health risk assessment purposes.

  9. Cadmium Chemical Form in Mine Waste Materials by X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Diacomanolis, V.; Ng, J. C.; Sadler, R.; Harris, H. H.; Nomura, M.; Noller, B. N.

    2010-06-23

    This study examines the molecular form of cadmium (Cd) present in mine wastes by X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy (XAS; Cd>20 mg/kg) using the K-edge of Cd at the Photon Factory Advanced Ring (PF-AR), NW10A beam line at KEK-Tsukuba-Japan. Mine waste materials and zinc concentrate were analyzed for Cd by ICPMS prior to undertaking XAS (range 21-452 mg/kg). Model compounds (CdO, Cd(OH){sub 2}, CdCO{sub 3}, Cdacetate, CdS, Cdstearate, CdDEDTC) and samples were examined in solid form at 20 K. The XANES spectra showed similar E max values for both model compounds and samples. The EXAFS showed that Cd-S in CdS, gives a flatter spectrum in the extended region compared to Cd-O found with CdCO{sub 3}, CdO and Cd Stearate. Linear combination fitting with model Cd compounds did not give clear assignments of composition, indicating that more detailed EXAFS spectra is required as mineral forms containing Cd were present rather than simple Cd compounds such as CdCO{sub 3}. The Cd bond for a single shell model in mine waste sample matrices appears to be either Cd-O or Cd-S, or a combination of both. Comparison of molecular data from the XAS studies with bioaccessibility data giving a prediction of bioavailability for mine waste materials provides useful information about the significance of the cadmium form as a contaminant for health risk assessment purposes.

  10. A X-Ray Absorption Spectroscopy Study of Manganese Containing Compounds and Photosynthetic Spinach Chloroplasts.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirby, Jon Allan

    The manganese sites in chloroplasts, long thought to be involved in photosynthetic oxygen evolution have been examined and partially characterized by X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy (XAS) using synchrotron radiation. The local environment about the manganese atoms is estimated from an analysis of the extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (EXAFS). Comparisons with and simulations of the manganese EXAFS for several reference compounds leads to a model in which the chloroplast manganese atoms are contained in a binuclear complex similar to di-u-oxo -tetrakis-(2,2'-bipyridine) dimanganese. It is suggested that the partner metal is another manganese. The bridging ligands are most probably oxygen. The remaining manganese ligands are carbon, oxygen, or nitrogen. A roughly linear correlation between the X-ray K edge onset energy and the "coordination charge" of a large number of manganese coordination complexes and compounds has been developed. Entry of the chloroplast manganese edge energy onto this correlation diagram establishes that the active pool of manganese is in an oxidation state greater than +2. If the manganese is in a dimeric form the oxidation states are most probably (II,III). Underlying these results is an extensive data analysis methodology. The method developed involves the use of many different background removal techniques, Fourier transforms and ultimately curve fitting to the modulations in the x-ray absorption cross sections. A large number of model compounds were used to evaluate the analysis method. These analyses are used to show that the two major curve fitting models available are essentially equivalent. Due to its greater versatility, the theoretical model of Teo and Lee is preferred (J. Am. Chem. Soc. (1979), 101, 2815). The results are also used to determine the informational limitations of XAS within the limits of the present understanding of X-ray absorption phenomena by inner shell electrons for atoms with atomic number greater than that

  11. Survey for z>3 damped Ly alpha absorption systems: the evolution of neutral gas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Storrie-Lombardi, L. J.; Wolfe, A. M.

    2000-01-01

    We have completed spectroscopic observations using LRIS on the Keck 1 telescope of 30 very high redshift quasars, 11 selected for the presence of damped Ly alpha absorption systems and 19 with redshifts z>3.5 not previously surveyed for absorption systems.

  12. Zn0.85Cd0.15Se active layers on graded-composition InxGa1-xAs buffer layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, B. H.; Lantier, R.; Sorba, L.; Heun, S.; Rubini, S.; Lazzarino, M.; Franciosi, A.; Napolitani, E.; Romanato, F.; Drigo, A. V.; Lazzarini, L.; Salviati, G.

    1999-06-01

    We investigated the structural and optical properties of Zn0.85Cd0.15Se epilayers for blue optical emission on lattice-matched InxGa1-xAs buffer layers. Both the II-VI layers and the III-V buffers were grown by molecular beam epitaxy on GaAs(001) wafers. A parabolic In concentration profile within the graded-composition InxGa1-xAs buffers was selected to control strain relaxation and minimize the concentration of threading dislocations. Dislocation-free II-VI growth was readily achieved on the graded buffers, with a Rutherford backscattering yield ratio reduced by a factor of 3 and a deep-level emission intensity reduced by over two orders of magnitude relative to those observed following direct II-VI growth on GaAs. The surface morphology of the materials, however, was found to replicate the crosshatched pattern of the underlying InxGa1-xAs substrates.

  13. Local Structure Determination of Carbon/Nickel Ferrite Composite Nanofibers Probed by X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Nilmoung, Sukunya; Kidkhunthod, Pinit; Maensiri, Santi

    2015-11-01

    Carbon/NiFe2O4 composite nanofibers have been successfully prepared by electrospinning method using a various concentration solution of Ni and Fe nitrates dispersed into polyacrylonitride (PAN) solution in N,N' dimethylformamide. The phase and mophology of PAN/NiFe2O4 composite samples were characterized and investigated by X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy. The magnetic properties of the prepared samples were measured at ambient temperature by a vibrating sample magnetometer. It is found that all composite samples exhibit ferromagnetism. This could be local-structurally explained by the existed oxidation states of Ni2+ and Fe3+ in the samples. Moreover, local environments around Ni and Fe ions could be revealed by X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) measurement including X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) and Extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS). PMID:26726677

  14. Phytostabilization of Mining Soils By the Plant Anthyllis Vulneraria: A Micro-XRF and XAS Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isaure, M. P.

    2014-12-01

    Mine tailings are typical highly metal contaminated areas with very scarce vegetation. They are affected by intensive rain and wind erosion processes, thus representing a source of environmental and health hazard. Due to their large area and high level of contamination, conventional remediation techniques are not appropriate, and phytostabilization has emerged as an alternative technique during the last decade. The legume plant Anthyllis vulneraria has been identified as a pionner plant to revegetalize mining sites from South of France where an experimental site has been set up for 10 years. Our objective was to clarify the role of Anthyllis vulneraria in the distribution and speciation of Cd and Zn in the soil. For that, we used a combination of micro X-ray fluorescence (μXRF) and micro X-ray Absorption Near Edge Structure spectroscopy (μXANES) combined to Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure spectroscopy (EXAFS). Results showed that the vegetation process had homogeneized the metal distribution in the soil compared to unvegetalized soil, and had decreased the Zn and Cd amount in the surface soil. Undisturbed cross-sections of soils showed that the top of the rhizosphere was highly enriched with organic matter after 10 years of vegetalization. Cd and Zn forms, mainly identified as CdCO3 and ZnCO3 in the unvegetalized soil, did not change significantly in the bulk rhizosphere but investigations at the micrometer scale allowed the identification of Cd and Zn organic phases in the upper part, probably related to the shoots decomposition, and thus to the organic matter recycling. At the close vicinity of the roots, some minor organic metallic forms were found whilst CdCO3 and ZnCO3 minerals were still present, thus highlighting the low direct impact of the roots in the soil. Finally, this study indicated that the direct impact of the plant on Cd and Zn speciation in the soil was weak, while an indirect effect resulting from shoots decomposition could be observed.

  15. Interaction of vanadium and sulfate in blood cells from the tunicate Ascidia ceratodes: Observations using x-ray absorption edge structure and EPR spectroscopies

    SciTech Connect

    Frank, P.; Hedman, B.; Hodgson, K.O.; Carlson, R.M.K.

    1994-08-17

    Sulfur K-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy (S-K XAS) and EPR spectroscopy have been used to investigate the inorganic solution chemistry of vanadium, sulfate, and methanesulfonate, with application to blood cells from the tunicate Ascidia ceratodes. Three independent whole blood cell preparations (S85, S86, W87) collected over a period of 18 months were examined. Average blood cell vanadium concentrations were determined to be 0.099, 0.079, and 0.062 M, respectively. All three collections gave sulfur XAS spectra consistent with significant intracellular concentrations of low-valent sulfur, an alkanesulfonic acid, and sulfate. In model studies, the line width of the sulfate K-edge XAS spectrum was found to titrate with both pH and [V(III)]. Application of this finding to A. ceratodes blood cell sulfur XAS spectra provided evidence for direct interactions between endogenous dissolved sulfate and V(III) in two of the three collections. All three collections yielded sulfate XAS edge spectra consistent with low pH. Curve-fitting analysis of the S-K edge XAS spectra for the three whole blood cell collections yielded the ratios of intracellular sulfate:alkane sulfonate:low-valent sulfur to be as follows: S85, 1.0:0.9:0.36;S86, 1.0;0.5;1.5;W87,1.0;0.44:0.24. Comparisons with models indicated that the low-valent blood cell sulfur included various disulfide-like compounds unlike cystine. This all implies a surprisingly rich and variable sulfur biochemistry in these marine organisms. EPR spectroscopy of whole blood cells from one animal from the W87 collection revealed an endogenous VO{sup 2+}-sulfate interaction. Thus both V(III) and VO{sup 2+} can sense an intracellular pool of sulfate, implying the biological colocation of these two metal ions. The variations in blood chemistry observed over time as described herein caution against definitive application of single point experiments.

  16. ALD Zn(O,S) Thin Films’ Interfacial Chemical and Structural Configuration Probed by XAS

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The ability to precisely control interfaces of atomic layer deposited (ALD) zinc oxysulfide (Zn(O,S)) buffer layers to other layers allows precise tuning of solar cell performance. The O K- and S K-edge X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) of ∼2–4 nm thin Zn(O,S) films reveals the chemical and structural influences of their interface with ZnO, a common electrode material and diffusion barrier in solar cells. We observe that sulfate formation at oxide/sulfide interfaces is independent of film composition, a result of sulfur diffusion toward interfaces. Leveraging sulfur’s diffusivity, we propose an alternative ALD process in which the zinc precursor pulse is bypassed during H2S exposure. Such a process yields similar results to the nanolaminate deposition method and highlights mechanistic differences between ALD sulfides and oxides. By identifying chemical species and structural evolution at sulfide/oxide interfaces, this work provides insights into increasing thin film solar cell efficiencies. PMID:27223620

  17. LUCIA - a new 1-7 keV {mu}-XAS Beamline

    SciTech Connect

    Janousch, M.; Schmidt, Th.; Wetter, R.; Grolimund, G.; Scheidegger, A.M.; Flank, A.-M.; Lagarde, P.; Cauchon, G.; Bac, S.; Dubuisson, J.M.

    2004-05-12

    LURE-SOLEIL (France) and the Swiss Light Source (SLS) are building together a new micro focused beamline for micro x-ray absorption spectroscopy and micro imaging. This line is designed to deliver a photon flux of the order of 1012 ph/sec on a 1 x 1 {mu}m spot within the energy domain of 0.8 to 7 keV. This beam line is being installed on the X07M straight section of SLS. The source is an APPLE II undulator with a period of 54 mm. The main advantage of this device lies in the delivery of any degree of polarization, linear or circular, over the whole energy range, without the need of a sample-position change. The monochromator will be a fixed exit double crystal equipped with 5 sets of crystals, thanks to the very narrow photon beam from the undulator ( Beryl, KTP, YB66, InSb(111), Si(111) ). The optics includes a first horizontal focusing mirror (spherical), which produces an intermediate source for the horizontal mirror of a Kirkpatrick-Baez (KB) system. The vertical mirror of the KB directly images the source. Finally, a low-pass double mirror filter insures a proper harmonic rejection.

  18. Structural phase transitions in ionic conductor Bi2O3 by temperature dependent XPD and XAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Yingcai; An, Pengfei; Yu, Meijuan; Marcelli, Augusto; Liu, Yong; Hu, Tiandou; Xu, Wei

    2016-05-01

    The superionic behavior of cubic δ-phase Bi2O3, a metastable phase at high temperature, is of great interests from both scientific and technological perspectives. With the highest ionic conductivity among all known compounds, the δ-phase Bi2O3 possesses promising applications in solid-oxide fuel cells. Previous investigations pointed out the α to δ- phase transition occurs during the heating process, as supported by the X-ray and Neutron diffraction experiments. Through in situ measurements of the long-range order structure and the local structure by X-ray powder diffraction and X-ray absorption spectroscopy, we investigated the evolution of the structures under different temperatures. Both techniques provided ample evidence that the existence of meta-stable β-phase are crucial for forming the defective fluorite cubic δ phase. Our finding suggested that the phase transition from tetragonal β-phase to δ-phase is an influencing factor for the generation of the oxygen-ion pathways.

  19. ALD Zn(O,S) Thin Films' Interfacial Chemical and Structural Configuration Probed by XAS.

    PubMed

    Dadlani, Anup L; Acharya, Shinjita; Trejo, Orlando; Prinz, Fritz B; Torgersen, Jan

    2016-06-15

    The ability to precisely control interfaces of atomic layer deposited (ALD) zinc oxysulfide (Zn(O,S)) buffer layers to other layers allows precise tuning of solar cell performance. The O K- and S K-edge X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) of ∼2-4 nm thin Zn(O,S) films reveals the chemical and structural influences of their interface with ZnO, a common electrode material and diffusion barrier in solar cells. We observe that sulfate formation at oxide/sulfide interfaces is independent of film composition, a result of sulfur diffusion toward interfaces. Leveraging sulfur's diffusivity, we propose an alternative ALD process in which the zinc precursor pulse is bypassed during H2S exposure. Such a process yields similar results to the nanolaminate deposition method and highlights mechanistic differences between ALD sulfides and oxides. By identifying chemical species and structural evolution at sulfide/oxide interfaces, this work provides insights into increasing thin film solar cell efficiencies. PMID:27223620

  20. Undistorted X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy Using s-Core-Orbital Emissions.

    PubMed

    Golnak, Ronny; Xiao, Jie; Atak, Kaan; Unger, Isaak; Seidel, Robert; Winter, Bernd; Aziz, Emad F

    2016-05-12

    Detection of secondary emissions, fluorescence yield (FY), or electron yield (EY), originating from the relaxation processes upon X-ray resonant absorption has been widely adopted for X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) measurements when the primary absorption process cannot be probed directly in transmission mode. Various spectral distortion effects inherent in the relaxation processes and in the subsequent transportation of emitted particles (electron or photon) through the sample, however, undermine the proportionality of the emission signals to the X-ray absorption coefficient. In the present study, multiple radiative (FY) and nonradiative (EY) decay channels have been experimentally investigated on a model system, FeCl3 aqueous solution, at the excitation energy of the Fe L-edge. The systematic comparisons between the experimental spectra taken from various decay channels, as well as the comparison with the theoretically simulated Fe L-edge XA spectrum that involves only the absorption process, indicate that the detection of the Fe 3s → 2p partial fluorescence yield (PFY) gives rise to the true Fe L-edge XA spectrum. The two key characteristics generalized from this particular decay channel-zero orbital angular momentum (i.e., s orbital) and core-level emission-set a guideline for obtaining undistorted X-ray absorption spectra in the future. PMID:27101344

  1. Excitonic diamagnetic shifts and linewidths in Al_xGa_1-xAs alloys in high magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senger, R. T.; Coli, G.; Bajaj, K. K.; Reno, J. L.; Jones, E. D.; Crooker, Scott

    2002-03-01

    We have measured both the diamagnetic shifts and the linewidths of excitonic transitions in Alx Ga_1-xAs alloys as a function of aluminum concentration and magnetic field at 1.4 K using photoluminescence spectroscopy. The aluminum composition in our samples ranged from 0 to 300 to 50 tesla. The samples were grown on GaAs substrates oriented along [001] direction using molecular beam epitaxy at 590ºC. We find that for a given value of alloy composition, both the diamagnetic shift and excitonic linewidth increase as a function of magnetic field. The observed variations of the diamagnetic shifts and excitonic linewidths with magnetic field are considerably smaller than those calculated by Lee and Bajaj [J. Appl. Phys. 73, 1788 (1993)] using a free exciton model. To explain our experimental data we propose that the excitons are localized in a very specific manner. To simulate exciton localization, we assume that the exciton reduced mass is increased and is obtained by using the alloy dependent heavy-hole mass along [001] direction treated isotropically. The calculated values of the variations of the diamagnetic shift and excitonic linewidth as a function of magnetic field obtained using this model agree very well with those reported here. Sandia is a multiprogram laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, for the United States Department of Energy under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  2. XAS and XRF investigation of an actual HAWC glass fragment obtained from the Karlsruhe vitrification plant (VEK)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dardenne, K.; González-Robles, E.; Rothe, J.; Müller, N.; Christill, G.; Lemmer, D.; Praetorius, R.; Kienzler, B.; Metz, V.; Roth, G.; Geckeis, H.

    2015-05-01

    Several sections of HAWC glass rods remaining at the end of glass pouring at the Karlsruhe Vitrification Plant (VEK) were retained during vitrification operation in 2009-2010 and transferred to the KIT-INE shielded box line for later glass product characterization. A mm sized fragment with a contact dose rate of ∼590 μSv/h was selected for pilot XAS/XRF investigations at the INE-Beamline for actinide science at the ANKA synchrotron radiation source. The experiment was aimed at elucidating the potential of direct radionuclide speciation with an emphasis on the fission products Se and Tc in highly active nuclear materials and at assessing the possible influence of the γ-radiation field surrounding highly active samples on the beamline instrumentation. While the influence of γ-radiation turned out to be negligible, initial radionuclide speciation studies by XAFS were most promising. In addition to Se and Tc speciation, the focus of these initial investigations was on the possibility for direct actinide speciation by recording corresponding L3-edge XAFS data. The registration of high quality XANES data was possible for the actinide elements U, Np, Pu and Am, as well as for Zr.

  3. Determination of free electron density in sequentially doped InxGa1-xAs by Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Kort, Kenneth R; Hung, P Y; Loh, Wei-Yip; Bersuker, Gennadi; Banerjee, Sarbajit

    2015-01-01

    The advent and exponential growth of mobile computing has spurred greater emphasis on the adoption of III-V compound semiconductors in device architectures. The introduction of high charge carrier densities within InxGa1-xAs and the development of metrologies to quantitate the extent of doping have thus emerged as an urgent imperative. As an amphoteric dopant, Si begins to occupy anionic sites at high concentrations, thereby limiting the maximum carrier density that can be obtained upon Si doping of III-V semiconductors. Here, we present Raman results on sequentially doped In0.53Ga0.47As wherein sulfur monolayer doping is used to introduce additional carrier density to Si-doped samples. The sequential doping of Si and S allows for high carrier concentrations of up to 1.3 × 10(19) cm(-3) to be achieved without damaging the III-V lattice. The coupling of the plasmon in the doped samples to the longitudinal optic phonons allows Raman spectroscopy to serve as an excellent probe of the extent of dopant activation, charge carrier density, and the surface depletion region. In particular, the energy position of a high-frequency coupled mode (HFCM) that is detected above 400 cm(-1) is used to extract the free electron density in these samples. The extracted free electron densities are well correlated with measured sheet resistance values and the carrier densities deduced from Hall measurements. PMID:25588191

  4. The effect of Ru and Sn additions to Pt on the electrocatalysis of methanol oxidation: An in situ XAS investigation

    SciTech Connect

    Mukerjee, S.; McBreen, J.

    1997-07-01

    Elements such as Ru and Sn used as ad-atoms or as alloying elements are known to enhance methanol oxidation reaction (MOR). Ru, both as alloying element as well as upd deposited on Pt/C is widely acknowledged for enhancing MOR. Sn on the other hand is more controversial, with evidence indicating enhancements for MOR when present as upd layer and marginally effective when present as an alloying element. In situ XAS is used to investigate some of these inconsistencies in the electrocatalysis of MOR. Results indicate that alloying Sn with Pt (Pt{sub 3}Sn primary phase) causes partial filling of the Pt 5 d-band vacancies and increase in the Pt-Pt bond distances which is directly opposite to a similar situation with Ru. Upd Sn however does not perturb Pt structurally or electronically. Ru and Sn (both as alloying element and as upd ad-layer) are associated with oxygenated species, the nature and strength of the Ru. and Sn - oxygen interactions are potential dependent. Hence alloying with Sn renders Pt surface unfavorable for methanol adsorption in contrast to alloying with Ru. Both Ru and Sn however promote MOR via their ability to nucleate oxygenated species on their surface at lower potentials as compared to pure Pt.

  5. Applications of absorption spectroscopy using quantum cascade lasers.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lizhu; Tian, Guang; Li, Jingsong; Yu, Benli

    2014-01-01

    Infrared laser absorption spectroscopy (LAS) is a promising modern technique for sensing trace gases with high sensitivity, selectivity, and high time resolution. Mid-infrared quantum cascade lasers, operating in a pulsed or continuous wave mode, have potential as spectroscopic sources because of their narrow linewidths, single mode operation, tunability, high output power, reliability, low power consumption, and compactness. This paper reviews some important developments in modern laser absorption spectroscopy based on the use of quantum cascade laser (QCL) sources. Among the various laser spectroscopic methods, this review is focused on selected absorption spectroscopy applications of QCLs, with particular emphasis on molecular spectroscopy, industrial process control, combustion diagnostics, and medical breath analysis. PMID:25239063

  6. Quantum Entanglement Molecular Absorption Spectrum Simulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Quang-Viet; Kojima, Jun

    2006-01-01

    Quantum Entanglement Molecular Absorption Spectrum Simulator (QE-MASS) is a computer program for simulating two photon molecular-absorption spectroscopy using quantum-entangled photons. More specifically, QE-MASS simulates the molecular absorption of two quantum-entangled photons generated by the spontaneous parametric down-conversion (SPDC) of a fixed-frequency photon from a laser. The two-photon absorption process is modeled via a combination of rovibrational and electronic single-photon transitions, using a wave-function formalism. A two-photon absorption cross section as a function of the entanglement delay time between the two photons is computed, then subjected to a fast Fourier transform to produce an energy spectrum. The program then detects peaks in the Fourier spectrum and displays the energy levels of very short-lived intermediate quantum states (or virtual states) of the molecule. Such virtual states were only previously accessible using ultra-fast (femtosecond) laser systems. However, with the use of a single-frequency continuous wave laser to produce SPDC photons, and QEMASS program, these short-lived molecular states can now be studied using much simpler laser systems. QE-MASS can also show the dependence of the Fourier spectrum on the tuning range of the entanglement time of any externally introduced optical-path delay time. QE-MASS can be extended to any molecule for which an appropriate spectroscopic database is available. It is a means of performing an a priori parametric analysis of entangled photon spectroscopy for development and implementation of emerging quantum-spectroscopic sensing techniques. QE-MASS is currently implemented using the Mathcad software package.

  7. Local electronic states of Fe{sub 4}N films revealed by x-ray absorption spectroscopy and x-ray magnetic circular dichroism

    SciTech Connect

    Ito, Keita; Toko, Kaoru; Suemasu, Takashi; Takeda, Yukiharu; Saitoh, Yuji; Oguchi, Tamio; Kimura, Akio

    2015-05-21

    We performed x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) and x-ray magnetic circular dichroism (XMCD) measurements at Fe L{sub 2,3} and N K-edges for Fe{sub 4}N epitaxial films grown by molecular beam epitaxy. In order to clarify the element specific local electronic structure of Fe{sub 4}N, we compared experimentally obtained XAS and XMCD spectra with those simulated by a combination of a first-principles calculation and Fermi's golden rule. We revealed that the shoulders observed at Fe L{sub 2,3}-edges in the XAS and XMCD spectra were due to the electric dipole transition from the Fe 2p core-level to the hybridization state generated by σ* anti-bonding between the orbitals of N 2p at the body-centered site and Fe 3d on the face-centered (II) sites. Thus, the observed shoulders were attributed to the local electronic structure of Fe atoms at II sites. As to the N K-edge, the line shape of the obtained spectra was explained by the dipole transition from the N 1s core-level to the hybridization state formed by π* and σ* anti-bondings between the Fe 3d and N 2p orbitals. This hybridization plays an important role in featuring the electronic structures and physical properties of Fe{sub 4}N.

  8. Finite temperature effects on the X-ray absorption spectra of lithium compounds: first-principles interpretation of X-ray Raman measurements.

    PubMed

    Pascal, Tod A; Boesenberg, Ulrike; Kostecki, Robert; Richardson, Thomas J; Weng, Tsu-Chien; Sokaras, Dimosthenis; Nordlund, Dennis; McDermott, Eamon; Moewes, Alexander; Cabana, Jordi; Prendergast, David

    2014-01-21

    We elucidate the role of room-temperature-induced instantaneous structural distortions in the Li K-edge X-ray absorption spectra (XAS) of crystalline LiF, Li2SO4, Li2O, Li3N, and Li2CO3 using high resolution X-ray Raman spectroscopy (XRS) measurements and first-principles density functional theory calculations within the eXcited electron and Core Hole approach. Based on thermodynamic sampling via ab initio molecular dynamics simulations, we find calculated XAS in much better agreement with experiment than those computed using the rigid crystal structure alone. We show that local instantaneous distortion of the atomic lattice perturbs the symmetry of the Li 1s core-excited-state electronic structure, broadening spectral line-shapes and, in some cases, producing additional spectral features. The excellent agreement with high-resolution XRS measurements validates the accuracy of our first-principles approach to simulating XAS, and provides both accurate benchmarks for model compounds and a predictive theoretical capability for identification and characterization of multi-component systems, such as lithium-ion batteries, under working conditions. PMID:25669363

  9. Australasian microtektites from Antarctica: XAS determination of the Fe oxidation state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giuli, Gabriele; Cicconi, Maria Rita; Eeckhout, Sigrid Griet; Pratesi, Giovanni; Paris, Eleonora; Folco, Luigi

    2014-04-01

    The Fe oxidation state and coordination number of 29 impact glass spherules recently recovered from the Transantarctic Mountains (Antarctica) have been determined by X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy. Based on geochemical, isotopic, and fission track data, these spherules are considered as microtektites from the Australasian tektite/microtektite strewn field. Their find location is the farthest so far discovered from the possible source crater region, and their alkali content is the lowest compared with other published data on Australasian microtektite glasses. The Fe3+/(Fe2++Fe3+) ratio, determined from the analysis of the pre-edge peak energy position and integrated intensity, is below 0.1 (±0.04) for all the samples, and is comparable to that of most tektites and microtektites from the Australasian strewn field. Also, the pre-edge peak integrated intensity, which is sensitive to the average Fe coordination geometry, is comparable to that of other Australasian microtektites reported in the literature. The agreement of the Fe oxidation state and coordination number, between the Transantarctic Mountain microtektites (TAM) and the Australasian tektites and microtektites, further confirms the impact origin of these glass spherules and provides an independent suggestion that they represent a major extension southeastward of the Australasian strewn field. The fact that similar redox conditions are observed in tektites and microtektites within the Australasian strewn field regardless of the distance from the source crater area (up to approximately 11000 km) could be an important constraint for better understanding the different processes affecting microtektite formation and transport. The fact that the Fe oxidation state of microtektites does not increase with distance, as in the case of North American microtektites, means that thermal and redox histories of Australasian and TAM microtektites could differ significantly from those of North

  10. Using XAS and SXRF to Study Copper in Wilson Disease at the Molecular and Tissue Level

    SciTech Connect

    Ralle, Martina; Lutsenko, Svetlana; Blackburn, Ninian J.

    2007-02-02

    Wilson disease (WD) is a genetic disorder of copper metabolism associated with severe hepatic, neurological, and psychiatric abnormalities. In WD, the billiary copper excretion is impaired and copper accumulates in tissues, particularly in the liver and the brain. The affected gene, ATP7B, encodes the copper transporting ATPase, Wilson disease protein (WNDP). WNDP has six copper binding sites in the N-terminal portion of the molecule. Each site includes the conserved amino acid sequence MXCXXC, and binds 1 Cu(I) through its 2 cysteine residues. We performed X-ray absorption studies at the Cu K{alpha}-edge on the recombinant N-terminal domain of WNDP (N-WNDP). Copper was bound to N-WNDP either in vivo or in vitro in the presence of different reducing agents. We found that in N-WNDP copper is predominantly coordinated in a linear fashion by two cysteines, with the appearance of a Cu-Cu interaction when all metal binding sites are filled. Increasing amounts of reducing agents containing sulfide or phosphine groups led to binding of the exogenous ligands to copper thereby increasing the coordination number of copper from two to three. To better understand the role of copper in WD, we utilized livers of the 6-weeks-old Atp7b-/- mice (an animal model for WD) in which the copper concentration was 10-20-fold higher compared to that of the control mice. The distribution of copper in hepatocytes was evaluated by synchrotron based X-ray fluorescence microprobe (SXRF). We demonstrate that we can prepare liver slices that retain copper and can detect copper with subcellular resolution. On the same sections {mu}-XANES (spot size: 5 micron) was used to determine the oxidation state of copper.

  11. Using Xas And Sxrf to Study Copper in Wilson Disease at the Molecular And Tissue Level

    SciTech Connect

    Ralle, M.; Blackburn, N.J.; Lutsenko, S.

    2009-06-05

    Wilson disease (WD) is a genetic disorder of copper metabolism associated with severe hepatic, neurological, and psychiatric abnormalities. In WD, the billiary copper excretion is impaired and copper accumulates in tissues, particularly in the liver and the brain. The affected gene, ATP7B, encodes the copper transporting ATPase, Wilson disease protein (WNDP). WNDP has six copper binding sites in the N-terminal portion of the molecule. Each site includes the conserved amino acid sequence MXCXXC, and binds 1 Cu(I) through its 2 cysteine residues. We performed X-ray absorption studies at the Cu K{sub {alpha}}-edge on the recombinant N-terminal domain of WNDP (N-WNDP). Copper was bound to N-WNDP either in vivo or in vitro in the presence of different reducing agents. We found that in N-WNDP copper is predominantly coordinated in a linear fashion by two cysteines, with the appearance of a Cu-Cu interaction when all metal binding sites are filled. Increasing amounts of reducing agents containing sulfide or phosphine groups led to binding of the exogenous ligands to copper thereby increasing the coordination number of copper from two to three. To better understand the role of copper in WD, we utilized livers of the 6-weeks-old Atp7b-/- mice (an animal model for WD) in which the copper concentration was 10--20-fold higher compared to that of the control mice. The distribution of copper in hepatocytes was evaluated by synchrotron based X-ray fluorescence microprobe (SXRF). We demonstrate that we can prepare liver slices that retain copper and can detect copper with subcellular resolution. On the same sections {mu}-XANES (spot size: 5 micron) was used to determine the oxidation state of copper.

  12. Using XAS and SXRF to Study Copper in Wilson Disease at the Molecular and Tissue Level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ralle, Martina; Blackburn, Ninian J.; Lutsenko, Svetlana

    2007-02-01

    Wilson disease (WD) is a genetic disorder of copper metabolism associated with severe hepatic, neurological, and psychiatric abnormalities. In WD, the billiary copper excretion is impaired and copper accumulates in tissues, particularly in the liver and the brain. The affected gene, ATP7B, encodes the copper transporting ATPase, Wilson disease protein (WNDP). WNDP has six copper binding sites in the N-terminal portion of the molecule. Each site includes the conserved amino acid sequence MXCXXC, and binds 1 Cu(I) through its 2 cysteine residues. We performed X-ray absorption studies at the Cu Kα-edge on the recombinant N-terminal domain of WNDP (N-WNDP). Copper was bound to N-WNDP either in vivo or in vitro in the presence of different reducing agents. We found that in N-WNDP copper is predominantly coordinated in a linear fashion by two cysteines, with the appearance of a Cu-Cu interaction when all metal binding sites are filled. Increasing amounts of reducing agents containing sulfide or phosphine groups led to binding of the exogenous ligands to copper thereby increasing the coordination number of copper from two to three. To better understand the role of copper in WD, we utilized livers of the 6-weeks-old Atp7b-/- mice (an animal model for WD) in which the copper concentration was 10-20-fold higher compared to that of the control mice. The distribution of copper in hepatocytes was evaluated by synchrotron based X-ray fluorescence microprobe (SXRF). We demonstrate that we can prepare liver slices that retain copper and can detect copper with subcellular resolution. On the same sections μ-XANES (spot size: 5 micron) was used to determine the oxidation state of copper.

  13. Pressure-induced structural distortion of TbMnO3 : A combined x-ray diffraction and x-ray absorption spectroscopy study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, J. M.; Chou, T. L.; Lee, J. M.; Chen, S. A.; Chan, T. S.; Chen, T. H.; Lu, K. T.; Chuang, W. T.; Sheu, H.-S.; Chen, S. W.; Lin, C. M.; Hiraoka, N.; Ishii, H.; Tsuei, K. D.; Yang, T. J.

    2009-04-01

    The variation of electronic states and structural distortion in highly compressed multiferroic TbMnO3 was probed by x-ray diffraction (XRD) and x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) using synchrotron radiation. Refined XRD data enabled observation of a reduced local Jahn-Teller (JT) distortion of Mn sites within MnO6 octahedra in TbMnO3 with increasing hydrostatic pressure. A progressively increasing intensity of the white line in MnK -edge x-ray absorption spectra of TbMnO3 was detected with increasing pressure. The absorption threshold of MnK -edge spectra of TbMnO3 is shifted toward higher energy, whereas the pre-edge peak is slightly shifted to lower energy with increasing hydrostatic pressure. We provide spectral evidence for pressure-induced bandwidth broadening for mangnites. The enhanced intensity of the white line and the shifted absorption threshold of MnK -edge spectra are explained in terms of a reduced JT distortion of MnO6 octahedra in compressed TbMnO3 . Comparison of XAS data with full-multiple-scattering calculations using code FDMNES shows satisfactory agreement between experimental and calculated MnK -edge spectra.

  14. Enhanced squeezing by absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grünwald, P.; Vogel, W.

    2016-04-01

    Absorption is usually expected to be detrimental to quantum coherence effects. However, there have been few studies into the situation for complex absorption spectra. We consider the resonance fluorescence of excitons in a semiconductor quantum well. The creation of excitons requires absorption of the incoming pump-laser light. Thus, the absorption spectrum of the medium acts as a spectral filter for the emitted light. Surprisingly, absorption can even improve quantum effects, as is demonstrated for the squeezing of the resonance fluorescence of the quantum-well system. This effect can be explained by an improved phase matching due to absorption.

  15. Spectroscopic classification of supernova candidates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodgkin, S. T.; Hall, A.; Fraser, M.; Campbell, H.; Wyrzykowski, L.; Kostrzewa-Rutkowska, Z.; Pietro, N.

    2014-09-01

    We report the spectroscopic classification of four supernovae at the 2.5m Isaac Newton Telescope on La Palma, using the Intermediate Dispersion Spectrograph and the R300V grating (3500-8000 Ang; ~6 Ang resolution).

  16. Spectroscopic optical coherence elastography

    PubMed Central

    Adie, Steven G.; Liang, Xing; Kennedy, Brendan F.; John, Renu; Sampson, David D.; Boppart, Stephen A.

    2010-01-01

    We present an optical technique to image the frequency-dependent complex mechanical response of a viscoelastic sample. Three-dimensional hyperspectral data, comprising two-dimensional B-mode images and a third dimension corresponding to vibration frequency, were acquired from samples undergoing external mechanical excitation in the audio-frequency range. We describe the optical coherence tomography (OCT) signal when vibration is applied to a sample and detail the processing and acquisition techniques used to extract the local complex mechanical response from three-dimensional data that, due to a wide range of vibration frequencies, possess a wide range of sample velocities. We demonstrate frequency-dependent contrast of the displacement amplitude and phase of a silicone phantom containing inclusions of higher stiffness. Measurements of an ex vivo tumor margin demonstrate distinct spectra between adipose and tumor regions, and images of displacement amplitude and phase demonstrated spatially-resolved contrast. Contrast was also observed in displacement amplitude and phase images of a rat muscle sample. These results represent the first demonstration of mechanical spectroscopy based on B-mode OCT imaging. Spectroscopic optical coherence elastography (S-OCE) provides a high-resolution imaging capability for the detection of tissue pathologies that are characterized by a frequency-dependent viscoelastic response. PMID:21164898

  17. Spectroscopic optical coherence elastography.

    PubMed

    Adie, Steven G; Liang, Xing; Kennedy, Brendan F; John, Renu; Sampson, David D; Boppart, Stephen A

    2010-12-01

    We present an optical technique to image the frequency-dependent complex mechanical response of a viscoelastic sample. Three-dimensional hyperspectral data, comprising two-dimensional B-mode images and a third dimension corresponding to vibration frequency, were acquired from samples undergoing external mechanical excitation in the audio-frequency range. We describe the optical coherence tomography (OCT) signal when vibration is applied to a sample and detail the processing and acquisition techniques used to extract the local complex mechanical response from three-dimensional data that, due to a wide range of vibration frequencies, possess a wide range of sample velocities. We demonstrate frequency-dependent contrast of the displacement amplitude and phase of a silicone phantom containing inclusions of higher stiffness. Measurements of an ex vivo tumor margin demonstrate distinct spectra between adipose and tumor regions, and images of displacement amplitude and phase demonstrated spatially-resolved contrast. Contrast was also observed in displacement amplitude and phase images of a rat muscle sample. These results represent the first demonstration of mechanical spectroscopy based on B-mode OCT imaging. Spectroscopic optical coherence elastography (S-OCE) provides a high-resolution imaging capability for the detection of tissue pathologies that are characterized by a frequency-dependent viscoelastic response. PMID:21164898

  18. Spectroscopic Parameters for Ozone and its Isotopes: Current Status, Prospects for Improvement, and the Identification of 16O16O17O and O-16O-16O-17 and O-16O-17O-16 Lines in Infrared Ground-Based and Stratospheric Solar Absorption Spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rinsland, C. P.; Flaud, J.-M.; Goldman, A.; Perrin, A.; Camy-Peyret, C.; Smith, M. A. H.; Devi, V. Malathy; Benner, D. C.; Barbe, A.; Stephens, T. M.; Murcray, F. J.

    1998-01-01

    We describe the updates to the spectroscopic parameters of ozone and its isotopes in the 1996 HITRAN compilation. Recent published studies not included in HITRAN are also summarized. Finally, we report the identification of infrared lines of the v(sub 3) bands of O-16O-16O-17 and O-16O-17O-16 in high-resolution solar spectra recorded by stratospheric balloon-borne and ground-based Fourier transform spectrometers.

  19. Spectroscopic Observations of Nearby Low Mass Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vican, Laura; Zuckerman, B. M.; Rodriguez, D.

    2014-01-01

    Young low-mass stars are known to be bright in X-ray and UV due to a high level of magnetic activity. By cross-correlating the GALEX Catalog with the WISE and 2MASS Point Source Catalogs, we have identified more than 2,000 stars whose UV excesses suggest ages in the 10-100 Myr range. We used the Shane 3-m telescope at Lick Observatory on Mount Hamilton, California to observe some of these 2,000 stars spectroscopically. We measured the equivalent width of lithium at 6708 A absorption and H-alpha emission lines. Out of a total of 122 stars observed with the Kast grating spectrometer, we find that roughly 10% have strong lithium absorption features. The high percentage of stars with lithium present is further evidence of the importance of UV emission as a youth indicator for low-mass stars. In addition, we used high-resolution spectra obtained with the Hamilton echelle spectrograph to determine radial velocities for several UV-bright stars. These radial velocities will be useful for the calculation of Galactic UVW space velocities for determination of possible moving group membership. This work is supported by NASA Astrophysics Data Analysis Program award NNX12AH37G to RIT and UCLA and Chilean FONDECYT grant 3130520 to Universidad de Chile. This submission presents work for the GALNYSS project and should be linked to abstracts submitted by David Rodriguez, Laura Vican, and Joel Kastner.

  20. Fabrication of multi-layered absorption structure for high quantum efficiency photon detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Fujii, Go; Fukuda, Daiji; Numata, Takayuki; Yoshizawa, Akio; Tsuchida, Hidemi; Fujino, Hidetoshi; Ishii, Hiroyuki; Itatani, Taro; Zama, Tatsuya; Inoue, Shuichiro

    2009-12-16

    We report on some efforts to improve a quantum efficiency of titanium-based optical superconducting transition edge sensors using the multi-layered absorption structure for maximizing photon absorption in the Ti layer. Using complex refractive index values of each film measured by a Spectroscopic Ellipsometry, we designed and optimized by a simulation code. An absorption measurement of fabricated structure was in good agreement with the design and was higher than 99% at optimized wavelength of 1550 nm.

  1. Electrochemical and spectroscopic study of novel Cu and Fe-based catalysts for oxygen reduction in alkaline media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Qinggang; Yang, Xiaofang; He, Ruihua; Bueno-López, Agustín; Miller, Hamish; Ren, Xiaoming; Yang, Wanli; Koel, Bruce E.

    2012-09-01

    We synthesized two “single-core” Fe-Nx/C and Cu-Nx/C electrocatalysts and a bi-core CuFe-Nx/C composite electrocatalyst using iron and copper phthalocyanine-based precursors and a high-temperature pyrolysis method. The morphology, structure, and activity toward the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in alkaline media were evaluated for each electrocatalyst by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray Diffraction (XRD), and the rotating ring-disk electrode (RRDE) method. Although the Cu-Nx/C catalyst showed lower catalytic activity than Fe-Nx/C, the presence of Cu enhanced the ORR performance of bi-core CuFe-Nx/C, as compared to single-core Fe-Nx/C. To fully understand the synergistic effect between Cu and Fe on this enhancement, high resolution X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (HR-XPS) and soft X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) was employed to study the electronic structure of as-synthesized electrocatalysts. The HR-XPS analysis showed that metal-nitrogen bonding was maintained and that the oxidation states of Fe and Cu were influenced by the presence of the second metal in the bi-core catalyst. The XAS data revealed that a fraction of an electron was transferred from Fe to Cu, which may help to lower the kinetic barrier during the ORR process. Based on our experimental results and four different models, we briefly discuss ORR mechanisms on these metallic catalysts.

  2. Structural iron in dioctahedral and trioctahedral smectites: a polarized XAS study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finck, N.; Schlegel, M. L.; Bauer, A.

    2015-11-01

    The chemical form of structural Fe in smectites influences many physicochemical properties of these clay minerals. Powder EXAFS data for structural Fe in smectites have been reported; however, the preferred orientation of clay platelets with respect to the X-ray beam may lead to erroneous conclusions on the local chemical environment. Dioctahedral montmorillonite and for the first time trioctahedral hectorite were prepared as textured samples, and the Fe local environment was probed by analysis of the X-ray absorption pre-edge peaks at the magic angle and by polarized EXAFS (P-EXAFS) spectroscopy. Compared to powder measurements, overlapping contributions from shells with distinct orientations can be filtered more easily by P-EXAFS, thus decreasing uncertainties on structural parameters. The pre-edge spectrum of montmorillonite is similar to spectra commonly reported for dioctahedral smectites. In contrast, the pre-edge spectrum of hectorite is notably distinct and hints to either differences in the site symmetry and/or in covalence. In both smectites, Fe is surrounded by a first O shell at a distance consistent with sixfold-coordinated Fe(III), suggesting that Fe(III) is located in the smectite octahedral sheet. This is corroborated by the distances and orientations of neighboring cationic shells, such as in-plane (Mg, Al) and out-of-plane Si shells. For montmorillonite, the results indicate Fe substitution for Al/Mg in the octahedral sheet, and a number of Fe neighbors consistent with random distribution in the octahedral sheet. For hectorite, results indicate a slight tendency for Fe atoms to form pairs in octahedral sheets; however, low numbers of neighboring cations were obtained, presumably a consequence of the presence of vacancies and/or Li in the vicinity of Fe, or of the coexistence of Fe and Mg neighbors with mutually canceling EXAFS waves. Consistent with pre-edge data, the coordination numbers can also indicate some incoherency in Fe-cation interatomic

  3. Coupling MD Simulations and X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy to Study Ions in Solution

    SciTech Connect

    Marcos, E. Sanchez; Beret, E. C.; Martinez, J. M.; Pappalardo, R. R.; Ayala, R.; Munoz-Paez, A.

    2007-11-29

    The structure of ionic solutions is a key-point in understanding physicochemical properties of electrolyte solutions. Among the reduced number of experimental techniques which can supply direct information on the ion environment, X-ray Absorption techniques (XAS) have gained importance during the last decades although they are not free of difficulties associated to the data analysis leading to provide reliable structures. Computer simulations of ions in solution is a theoretical alternative to provide information on the solvation structure. Thus, the use of computational chemistry can increase the understanding of these systems although an accurate description of ionic solvation phenomena represents nowadays a significant challenge to theoretical chemistry. We present: (a) the assignment of features in the XANES spectrum to well defined structural motif in the ion environment, (b) MD-based evaluation of EXAFS parameters used in the fitting procedure to make easier the structural resolution, and (c) the use of the agreement between experimental and simulated XANES spectra to help in the choice of a given intermolecular potential for Computer Simulations. Chemical problems examined are: (a) the identification of the second hydration shell in dilute aqueous solutions of highly-charged cations, such as Cr{sup 3+}, Rh{sup 3+}, Ir{sup 3+}, (b) the invisibility by XAS of certain structures characterized by Computer Simulations but exhibiting high dynamical behavior and (c) the solvation of Br{sup -} in acetonitrile.

  4. A multi-channel monolithic Ge detector system for fluorescence x-ray absorption spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Bucher, J.J.; Allen, P.G.; Edelstein, N.M.; Shuh, D.K.; Madden, N.W.; Cork, C.; Luke, P.; Pehl, D.; Malone, D.

    1995-03-01

    Construction and performance of a monolithic quad-pixel Ge detector for fluorescence x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) at synchrotron radiation sources are described. The detector semiconductor element has an active surface area of 4.0 cm{sup 2} which is electrically separated into four 1.0 cm{sup 2} pixels, with little interfacial dead volume. Spatial response of the array shows that cross-talk between adjacent pixels is < 10% for 5.9 keV photons that fall within 0.5 mm of the pixel boundaries. The detector electronics system uses pre-amplifiers built at LBNL with commercial Tennelec Model TC 244 amplifiers. Using an {sup 55}Fe test source (MnK{sub {alpha}}, 5.9 keV), energy resolution of better than 200 eV is achieved with a 4 {mu}sec peaking time. At 0.5 {mu}sec peaking time, pulse pileup results in a 75% throughput efficiency for an incoming count rate of 100 kHz. Initial XAS fluoresncece measurements at the beamline 4 wiggler end stations at SSRL show that the detector system has several advantages over commercial x-ray spectrometers for low-concentration counting.

  5. Complementary characterization of Ti-Si-C films by x-ray diffraction and absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawniczak-Jablonska, K.; Klepka, M. T.; Dynowska, E.; Wolska, A.; Borysiewicz, M. A.; Piotrowska, A.

    2013-12-01

    Advanced electronic devices based on III-N semiconductors, particularly these operated at the high power and high frequency or corrosive atmosphere, need elaboration of new technology for contacts metallization which are thermally and chemically stable. Performed studies aimed at the development of materials for applications in the improved metallization. Due to the unique combination of the metallic electro-thermal conductivity and ceramic resistance to oxidation and thermal stability, the MAX phases were chosen as the materials potentially applicable to this task. Particular interest lies in the MAX phases based on the Ti, Si and C or N atoms, especially on the Ti3SiC2 phase. The paper focuses on a comprehensive characterization of films grown by means of high-temperature magnetron Ti, Si and C co-sputtering. The complementary characterization by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) is presented. XRD studies pointed out the presence of several phases in the investigated samples, therefore XAS as an atomic sensitive probe was applied to examine the average atomic order around Ti atoms as a function of the technological parameters and to point towards proper procedures to achieve the appropriate stoichiometry around Ti atoms and finally the Ti3SiC2 phase.

  6. Identification of lead chemical form in mine waste materials by X-ray absorption spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Taga, Raijeli L.; Ng, Jack; Zheng Jiajia; Huynh, Trang; Noller, Barry; Harris, Hugh H.

    2010-06-23

    X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) provides a direct means for measuring lead chemical forms in complex samples. In this study, XAS was used to identify the presence of plumbojarosite (PbFe{sub 6}(SO{sub 4}){sub 4}(OH){sub 12}) by lead L{sub 3}-edge XANES spectra in mine waste from a small gold mining operation in Fiji. The presence of plumbojarosite in tailings was confirmed by XRD but XANES gave better resolution. The potential for human uptake of Pb from tailings was measured using a physiologically based extract test (PBET), an in-vitro bioaccessibility (BAc) method. The BAc of Pb was 55%. Particle size distribution of tailings indicated that 40% of PM{sub 10} particulates exist which could be a potential risk for respiratory effects via the inhalation route. Food items collected in the proximity of the mine site had lead concentrations which exceed food standard guidelines. Lead within the mining lease exceeded sediment guidelines. The results from this study are used to investigate exposure pathways via ingestion and inhalation for potential risk exposure pathways of Pb in that locality. The highest Pb concentration in soil and tailings was 25,839 mg/kg, exceeding the Australian National Environment Protection Measure (NEPM) soil health investigation levels.

  7. Speciation of selenium in stream insects using X-ray absorption spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Ruwandi Andrahennadi; Mark Wayland; Ingrid J. Pickering

    2007-11-15

    Selenium contamination in the environment is a widespread problem affecting insects and other wildlife. Insects occupy a critical middle link and aid in trophic transfer of selenium in many terrestrial and freshwater food chains, but the mechanisms of selenium uptake through the food chain are poorly understood. In particular, biotransformation of selenium by insects into different chemical forms will greatly influence how toxic or benign the selenium is to that organism or to its predators. We have used X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) to identify the chemical form of selenium in insects inhabiting selenium contaminated streams near Hinton, Alberta (Canada). Selenium K near-edge spectra indicate a variability of selenium speciation among the insects that included mayflies (Ephemeroptera), stoneflies (Plecoptera), caddisflies (Trichoptera), and craneflies (Diptera). Higher percentages of inorganic selenium were observed in primary consumers, detritivores, and filter feeders than in predatory insects. Among the organic forms of selenium, organic selenides constituted a major fraction in most organisms. A species modeled as trimethylselenonium was observed during the pupal stage of caddisflies. These results provide insights into how the insects cope with their toxic cargo, including how the selenium is biotransformed into less toxic forms and how it can be eliminated from the insects. More broadly, this study demonstrates the strengths of XAS to probe the effects of heavy elements at trace levels in insects from the field.

  8. Speciation of Selenium in Stream Insects Using X-Ray Absorption Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Andrahennadi, R.; Wayland, M.; Pickering, I.J.

    2009-05-28

    Selenium contamination in the environment is a widespread problem affecting insects and other wildlife. Insects occupy a critical middle link and aid in trophic transfer of selenium in many terrestrial and freshwater food chains, but the mechanisms of selenium uptake through the food chain are poorly understood. In particular, biotransformation of selenium by insects into different chemical forms will greatly influence how toxic or benign the selenium is to that organism or to its predators. We have used X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) to identify the chemical form of selenium in insects inhabiting selenium contaminated streams near Hinton, Alberta (Canada). Selenium K near-edge spectra indicate a variability of selenium speciation among the insects that included mayflies (Ephemeroptera), stoneflies (Plecoptera), caddisflies (Trichoptera), and craneflies (Diptera). Higher percentages of inorganic selenium were observed in primary consumers, detritivores, and filter feeders than in predatory insects. Among the organic forms of selenium, organic selenides constituted a major fraction in most organisms. A species modeled as trimethylselenonium was observed during the pupal stage of caddisflies. These results provide insights into how the insects cope with their toxic cargo, including how the selenium is biotransformed into less toxic forms and how it can be eliminated from the insects. More broadly, this study demonstrates the strengths of XAS to probe the effects of heavy elements at trace levels in insects from the field.

  9. Identification of lead chemical form in mine waste materials by X-ray absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taga, Raijeli L.; Zheng, Jiajia; Huynh, Trang; Ng, Jack; Harris, Hugh H.; Noller, Barry

    2010-06-01

    X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) provides a direct means for measuring lead chemical forms in complex samples. In this study, XAS was used to identify the presence of plumbojarosite (PbFe6(SO4)4(OH)12) by lead L3-edge XANES spectra in mine waste from a small gold mining operation in Fiji. The presence of plumbojarosite in tailings was confirmed by XRD but XANES gave better resolution. The potential for human uptake of Pb from tailings was measured using a physiologically based extract test (PBET), an in-vitro bioaccessibility (BAc) method. The BAc of Pb was 55%. Particle size distribution of tailings indicated that 40% of PM10 particulates exist which could be a potential risk for respiratory effects via the inhalation route. Food items collected in the proximity of the mine site had lead concentrations which exceed food standard guidelines. Lead within the mining lease exceeded sediment guidelines. The results from this study are used to investigate exposure pathways via ingestion and inhalation for potential risk exposure pathways of Pb in that locality. The highest Pb concentration in soil and tailings was 25,839 mg/kg, exceeding the Australian National Environment Protection Measure (NEPM) soil health investigation levels.

  10. Time-Dependent Density Functional Calculations of Ligand K-Edge X-Ray Absorption Spectra

    SciTech Connect

    DeBeer George, S.; Petrenko, T.; Neese, F.

    2007-07-10

    X-ray absorption spectra (XAS) at the Cl and S K edge and Mo L edge have been calculated at the TDDFT level for a series of dioxomolybdenum complexes LMoO{sub 2}X (L = hydrotris(3,5-dimethyl-1-pyrazolyl)borate, X = Cl, SCH{sub 2}Ph, OPh), which play an important role in modeling the catalytic cycle of the sulfite oxidase enzyme. Also, the XAS spectra of model molecules of the Mo complexes have been simulated and interpreted in terms of the Mo 4d orbital splitting, in order to find possible correlations with the spectral pattern of the complexes. Comparison with the available experimental data allows us to assess the performances of the present computational scheme to describe the core excitations in large bioinorganic systems. The theoretical interpretation of the spectral features of both the metal and ligand core excitations in terms of the oscillator strength distribution provides important insight into the covalency of the metal-ligand bond.

  11. The Chemistry os Spent Nuclear Fuel From X-Ray Absorption Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    F.A. Fortner; A.J. Kropf; J.C. Cunnane

    2006-09-21

    Present and future nuclear fuel cycles will require an understanding of the complex chemistry of trace fission products and transuranium actinides in spent nuclear fuel (SNF). Because of the unique analytical challenges presented by SNF to the materials scientist, many of its fundamental physical and chemical properties remain poorly understood, especially on the microscopic scale. Such an understanding of the chemical states of radionuclides in SNF would benefit development of technologies for fuel monitoring, fuel performance improvement and modeling, fuel reprocessing, and spent fuel storage and disposal. We have recently demonstrated the use of synchrotron x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) to examine crystal chemical properties of actinides and fission products in extracted specimens of SNF. Information obtained includes oxidation state, chemical bond coordination, and quantitative elemental concentration and distribution. We have also used XAS in a scanning mode to obtain x-ray spectral micrographs with resolution approaching 1 micron. A brief overview of the technique will be presented, along with findings on uranium, plutonium, neptunium, technetium, and molybdenum in commercial PWR SNF specimens.

  12. Atomic Structure of Pt3Ni Nanoframe Electrocatalysts by in Situ X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Becknell, Nigel; Kang, Yijin; Chen, Chen; Resasco, Joaquin; Kornienko, Nikolay; Guo, Jinghua; Markovic, Nenad M; Somorjai, Gabor A; Stamenkovic, Vojislav R; Yang, Peidong

    2015-12-23

    Understanding the atomic structure of a catalyst is crucial to exposing the source of its performance characteristics. It is highly unlikely that a catalyst remains the same under reaction conditions when compared to as-synthesized. Hence, the ideal experiment to study the catalyst structure should be performed in situ. Here, we use X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) as an in situ technique to study Pt3Ni nanoframe particles which have been proven to be an excellent electrocatalyst for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). The surface characteristics of the nanoframes were probed through electrochemical hydrogen underpotential deposition and carbon monoxide electrooxidation, which showed that nanoframe surfaces with different structure exhibit varying levels of binding strength to adsorbate molecules. It is well-known that Pt-skin formation on Pt-Ni catalysts will enhance ORR activity by weakening the binding energy between the surface and adsorbates. Ex situ and in situ XAS results reveal that nanoframes which bind adsorbates more strongly have a rougher Pt surface caused by insufficient segregation of Pt to the surface and consequent Ni dissolution. In contrast, nanoframes which exhibit extremely high ORR activity simultaneously demonstrate more significant segregation of Pt over Ni-rich subsurface layers, allowing better formation of the critical Pt-skin. This work demonstrates that the high ORR activity of the Pt3Ni hollow nanoframes depends on successful formation of the Pt-skin surface structure. PMID:26652294

  13. D-xylose absorption

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003606.htm D-xylose absorption To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. D-xylose absorption is a laboratory test to determine ...

  14. The spectroscopic foundation of CO2 climate forcing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mlynczak, M. G.; Daniels, T.; Kratz, D. P.; Collins, W.; Feldman, D.; Lawler, J. E.; Anderson, L. W.; Fahey, D. W.; Hunt, L. A.

    2015-12-01

    The radiative forcing (RF) of carbon dioxide (CO2) is the leading contribution to climate change from anthropogenic activities. Calculating CO2 RF requires detailed knowledge of spectral line parameters and lineshape functions for thousands of infrared absorption lines. A reliable spectroscopic characterization of CO2 forcing is therefore a critical input to scientific and policy-oriented assessments of present climate and future climate change. Our study is partly motivated by a recent assertion that CO2 RF values, and hence predictions of climate sensitivity to elevated CO2, have a significant high bias because the CO2 spectroscopic parameters being used are incorrect. Our results show that CO2 RF in a variety of atmospheres is remarkably insensitive to known uncertainties in the three main CO2 spectroscopic parameters: the line strengths, half widths, and line shapes. We demonstrate that this is due largely to the definition of CO2 RF, which is the difference between the CO2 longwave net flux at the tropopause for doubled CO2 concentrations from the preindustrial era. We also assess the effects of sub-Lorentzian wings of CO2 lines and find that the computed RF is largely insensitive to the spectral lineshape function. Overall, the spectroscopic uncertainty in present-day CO2 RF is less than a few percent. Our study highlights the basics and subtleties of RF calculations, addressing interests of the expert and non-expert.

  15. The specific sorption of Np(V) on the corundum (α-Al2O3) surface in the presence of trivalent lanthanides Eu(III) and Gd(III): A batch sorption and XAS study.

    PubMed

    Virtanen, S; Bok, F; Ikeda-Ohno, A; Rossberg, A; Lützenkirchen, J; Rabung, T; Lehto, J; Huittinen, N

    2016-12-01

    The sorption of pentavalent neptunium, Np(V), on corundum (α-Al2O3) was investigated in the absence and presence of trivalent europium or gadolinium as a competing element under CO2-free conditions. The objective of this study was to investigate how a trivalent metal ion with a higher charge than that of the neptunyl(V) ion would affect the sorption of Np(V) when allowed to adsorb on the mineral surface before the addition of Np(V). Batch sorption experiments conducted as a function of pH (pH-edges) and as a function of Np(V) concentration (isotherms) in the absence and presence of 1×10(-5)M Eu(III) showed no sign of Eu being able to block Np sorption sites. Surface complexation modelling using the diffuse double layer model was applied to the batch data to obtain surface complexation constants for the formed Np(V) complexes on corundum. To account for potential changes occurring in the coordination environment of the neptunium ion in the presence of a trivalent lanthanide, X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) measurements were carried out on the samples containing only Np(V) and Np(V)+Gd(III). The results reveal the presence of a bidentate Np(V) edge-sharing complex on the corundum surface in the absence of Gd(III), while the coordination environment of Np(V) on the corundum surface could be changed when Gd(III) is added to the sample before the sorption of Np(V). PMID:27569516

  16. X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy Characterization of Zn Underpotential Deposition on Au(111) from Phosphate Supporting Electrolyte

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, J R; O'Malley, R L; O'Connell, T J; Vollmer, A; Rayment, T

    2009-12-11

    Zn K-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) has been used to investigate the structure of Zn monolayers prepared on Au(111) electrodes via underpotential deposition (UPD) from phosphate supporting electrolyte. Theoretical modeling of the XAS data indicates that the Zn adatoms adopt a commensurate ({radical}3x{radical}3)R30{sup o} ({mu}{sub sc} = 0.33) adlayer structure and reside within the 3-fold hollow sites of the Au(111) surface. Meanwhile, phosphate counter-ions co-adsorb on the UPD adlayer and bridge between the Zn adatoms in a ({radical}3x{radical}3)R30{sup o} ({mu}{sub sc} = 0.33) configuration, with each phosphorous atom residing above a vacant 3-fold hollow site of the Au(111). Significantly, this surface structure is invariant between the electrochemical potential for UPD adlayer formation and the onset of bulk Zn electrodeposition. Analysis of the Zn K-edge absorption onset also presents the possibility that the Zn adatoms do not fully discharge during the process of UPD, which had been proposed in prior voltammetric studies of the phosphate/Zn(UPD)/Au(111) system.

  17. Rapid Mapping of Lithiation Dynamics in Transition Metal Oxide Particles with Operando X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nowack, Lea; Grolimund, Daniel; Samson, Vallerie; Marone, Federica; Wood, Vanessa

    2016-02-01

    Since the commercialization of lithium ion batteries (LIBs), layered transition metal oxides (LiMO2, where M = Co, Mn, Ni, or mixtures thereof) have been materials of choice for LIB cathodes. During cycling, the transition metals change their oxidation states, an effect that can be tracked by detecting energy shifts in the X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) spectrum. X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) can therefore be used to visualize and quantify lithiation kinetics in transition metal oxide cathodes; however, in-situ measurements are often constrained by temporal resolution and X-ray dose, necessitating compromises in the electrochemistry cycling conditions used or the materials examined. We report a combined approach to reduce measurement time and X-ray exposure for operando XAS studies of lithium ion batteries. A highly discretized energy resolution coupled with advanced post-processing enables rapid yet reliable identification of the oxidation state. A full-field microscopy setup provides sub-particle resolution over a large area of battery electrode, enabling the oxidation state within many transition metal oxide particles to be tracked simultaneously. Here, we apply this approach to gain insights into the lithiation kinetics of a commercial, mixed-metal oxide cathode material, nickel cobalt aluminium oxide (NCA), during (dis)charge and its degradation during overcharge.

  18. Rapid Mapping of Lithiation Dynamics in Transition Metal Oxide Particles with Operando X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Nowack, Lea; Grolimund, Daniel; Samson, Vallerie; Marone, Federica; Wood, Vanessa

    2016-01-01

    Since the commercialization of lithium ion batteries (LIBs), layered transition metal oxides (LiMO2, where M = Co, Mn, Ni, or mixtures thereof) have been materials of choice for LIB cathodes. During cycling, the transition metals change their oxidation states, an effect that can be tracked by detecting energy shifts in the X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) spectrum. X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) can therefore be used to visualize and quantify lithiation kinetics in transition metal oxide cathodes; however, in-situ measurements are often constrained by temporal resolution and X-ray dose, necessitating compromises in the electrochemistry cycling conditions used or the materials examined. We report a combined approach to reduce measurement time and X-ray exposure for operando XAS studies of lithium ion batteries. A highly discretized energy resolution coupled with advanced post-processing enables rapid yet reliable identification of the oxidation state. A full-field microscopy setup provides sub-particle resolution over a large area of battery electrode, enabling the oxidation state within many transition metal oxide particles to be tracked simultaneously. Here, we apply this approach to gain insights into the lithiation kinetics of a commercial, mixed-metal oxide cathode material, nickel cobalt aluminium oxide (NCA), during (dis)charge and its degradation during overcharge. PMID:26908198

  19. Rapid Mapping of Lithiation Dynamics in Transition Metal Oxide Particles with Operando X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Nowack, Lea; Grolimund, Daniel; Samson, Vallerie; Marone, Federica; Wood, Vanessa

    2016-01-01

    Since the commercialization of lithium ion batteries (LIBs), layered transition metal oxides (LiMO2, where M = Co, Mn, Ni, or mixtures thereof) have been materials of choice for LIB cathodes. During cycling, the transition metals change their oxidation states, an effect that can be tracked by detecting energy shifts in the X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) spectrum. X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) can therefore be used to visualize and quantify lithiation kinetics in transition metal oxide cathodes; however, in-situ measurements are often constrained by temporal resolution and X-ray dose, necessitating compromises in the electrochemistry cycling conditions used or the materials examined. We report a combined approach to reduce measurement time and X-ray exposure for operando XAS studies of lithium ion batteries. A highly discretized energy resolution coupled with advanced post-processing enables rapid yet reliable identification of the oxidation state. A full-field microscopy setup provides sub-particle resolution over a large area of battery electrode, enabling the oxidation state within many transition metal oxide particles to be tracked simultaneously. Here, we apply this approach to gain insights into the lithiation kinetics of a commercial, mixed-metal oxide cathode material, nickel cobalt aluminium oxide (NCA), during (dis)charge and its degradation during overcharge. PMID:26908198

  20. Arsenic speciation in solids using X-ray absorption spectroscopy

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Foster, Andrea L.; Kim, Chris S.

    2014-01-01

    One of the most important aims of this review is to clarify the different types of analysis that are performed on As-XAS spectra, and to describe the benefits, drawbacks, and limitations of each. Arsenic XAS spectra are analyzed to obtain one or more of the following types of information (in increasing order of sophistication):

  1. Direct Comparison of the X-Ray Emission and Absorption of Cerium Oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Tobin, J G; Yu, S W; Chung, B W; Waddill, G D; Denlinger, J D

    2010-11-24

    Bremstrahlung Isochromat Spectroscopy (BIS). The XES spectra were collected using a Specs electron gun for the excitation and the XES 350 grating monochromator and channel plate system from Scienta as the photon detection. Spectra were collected in 'normal mode,' where the electron gun kinetic energy (KE) and the energy position of the center of the channel plate were both fixed and the energy distribution in the photon (hv) spectrum was derived from the intensities distributed across the channel plate detector in the energy dispersal direction. The polycrystalline Ce sample was oxidized by exposure to air at ambient pressures. After introduction to the ultra-high vacuum system, the oxidized sample was bombarded with Ar, to clean the topmost surface region and stabilize the surface and near surface regions. Although CeO{sub 2} would be the thermodynamically preferred composition in an oxygen rich environment, the combination of a vacuum environment and ion etching may have driven the near surface region into a Ce{sub 2}O{sub 3} stoichiometry. XES data collection occurred with the sample at or near room temperature. The base pressure of the system was 3 x 10{sup -10} torr, but the pressure changed depending the energy and current of the electron gun. For example, with the XES measurements at KE = 3KeV, the pressure was approximately 8 to 9 x 10{sup -10} torr and the excitation current to the sample was typically 0.01 mA. More detail of the sample preparation and analysis can be found in Reference 1. The XAS experiments were performed at Beamline 8 of the Advance Light Source, as part of a larger collaboration. The ex situ sample used at the ALS was prepared in a fashion similar to that described above. X-ray Emission Spectroscopy (XES) and X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy (XAS), have been used to investigate the photon emission and absorption associated with the Ce3d{sub 5/2} and Ce3d{sub 3/2} core-levels in CeOxide. A comparison of the two processes and their spectra

  2. Microbeam x-ray absorption spectroscopy study of chromium in large-grain uranium dioxide fuel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mieszczynski, C.; Kuri, G.; Bertsch, J.; Martin, M.; Borca, C. N.; Delafoy, Ch; Simoni, E.

    2014-09-01

    Synchrotron-based microprobe x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) has been used to study the local atomic structure of chromium in chromia-doped uranium dioxide (UO2) grains. The specimens investigated were a commercial grade chromia-doped UO2 fresh fuel pellet, and materials from a spent fuel pellet of the same batch, irradiated with an average burnup of ~40 MW d kg-1. Uranium L3-edge and chromium K-edge XAS have been measured, and the structural environments of central uranium and chromium atoms have been elucidated. The Fourier transform of uranium L3-edge extended x-ray absorption fine structure shows two well-defined peaks of U-O and U-U bonds at average distances of 2.36 and 3.83 Å. Their coordination numbers are determined as 8 and 11, respectively. The chromium Fourier transform extended x-ray absorption fine structure of the pristine UO2 matrix shows similar structural features with the corresponding spectrum of the irradiated spent fuel, indicative of analogous chromium environments in the two samples studied. From the chromium XAS experimental data, detectable next neighbor atoms are oxygen and uranium of the cation-substituted UO2 lattice, and two distinct subshells of chromium and oxygen neighbors, possibly because of undissolved chromia particles present in the doped fuels. Curve-fitting analyses using theoretical amplitude and phase-shift functions of the closest Cr-O shell and calculations with ab initio computer code FEFF and atomic clusters generated from the chromium-dissolved UO2 structure have been carried out. There is a prominent reduction in the length of the adjacent Cr-O bond of about 0.3 Å in chromia-doped UO2 compared with the ideal U-O bond length in standard UO2 that would be expected because of the change in effective Coulomb interactions resulting from replacing U4+ with Cr3+ and their ionic size differences. The contraction of shortest Cr-U bond is ~0.1 Å relative to the U-U bond length in bulk UO2. The difference in the

  3. Microbeam x-ray absorption spectroscopy study of chromium in large-grain uranium dioxide fuel.

    PubMed

    Mieszczynski, C; Kuri, G; Bertsch, J; Martin, M; Borca, C N; Delafoy, Ch; Simoni, E

    2014-09-01

    Synchrotron-based microprobe x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) has been used to study the local atomic structure of chromium in chromia-doped uranium dioxide (UO2) grains. The specimens investigated were a commercial grade chromia-doped UO2 fresh fuel pellet, and materials from a spent fuel pellet of the same batch, irradiated with an average burnup of ~40 MW d kg(-1). Uranium L3-edge and chromium K-edge XAS have been measured, and the structural environments of central uranium and chromium atoms have been elucidated. The Fourier transform of uranium L3-edge extended x-ray absorption fine structure shows two well-defined peaks of U-O and U-U bonds at average distances of 2.36 and 3.83 Å. Their coordination numbers are determined as 8 and 11, respectively. The chromium Fourier transform extended x-ray absorption fine structure of the pristine UO2 matrix shows similar structural features with the corresponding spectrum of the irradiated spent fuel, indicative of analogous chromium environments in the two samples studied. From the chromium XAS experimental data, detectable next neighbor atoms are oxygen and uranium of the cation-substituted UO2 lattice, and two distinct subshells of chromium and oxygen neighbors, possibly because of undissolved chromia particles present in the doped fuels. Curve-fitting analyses using theoretical amplitude and phase-shift functions of the closest Cr-O shell and calculations with ab initio computer code FEFF and atomic clusters generated from the chromium-dissolved UO2 structure have been carried out. There is a prominent reduction in the length of the adjacent Cr-O bond of about 0.3 Å in chromia-doped UO2 compared with the ideal U-O bond length in standard UO2 that would be expected because of the change in effective Coulomb interactions resulting from replacing U(4+) with Cr(3+) and their ionic size differences. The contraction of shortest Cr-U bond is ~0.1 Å relative to the U-U bond length in bulk UO2. The difference in the

  4. The spectroscopic foundation of radiative forcing of climate by carbon dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mlynczak, Martin G.; Daniels, Taumi S.; Kratz, David P.; Feldman, Daniel R.; Collins, William D.; Mlawer, Eli J.; Alvarado, Matthew J.; Lawler, James E.; Anderson, L. W.; Fahey, David W.; Hunt, Linda A.; Mast, Jeffrey C.

    2016-05-01

    The radiative forcing (RF) of carbon dioxide (CO2) is the leading contribution to climate change from anthropogenic activities. Calculating CO2 RF requires detailed knowledge of spectral line parameters for thousands of infrared absorption lines. A reliable spectroscopic characterization of CO2 forcing is critical to scientific and policy assessments of present climate and climate change. Our results show that CO2 RF in a variety of atmospheres is remarkably insensitive to known uncertainties in the three main CO2 spectroscopic parameters: the line shapes, line strengths, and half widths. We specifically examine uncertainty in RF due to line mixing as this process is critical in determining line shapes in the far wings of CO2 absorption lines. RF computed with a Voigt line shape is also examined. Overall, the spectroscopic uncertainty in present-day CO2 RF is less than 1%, indicating a robust foundation in our understanding of how rising CO2 warms the climate system.

  5. CD-ROM Spectroscope: A Simple and Inexpensive Tool for Classroom Demonstrations on Chemical Spectroscopy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wakabayashi, Fumitaka; Hamada, Kiyohito; Sone, Kozo

    1998-01-01

    Describes the construction and use of a spectroscope using a compact disk as a reflection grating. Lists instructions for viewing emission spectra of white or fluorescent light sources or discharge tubes, and absorption spectra of colored solutions. Includes modified directions and expanded activities. Contains 16 references. (WRM)

  6. Spectroscopic data for thermal infrared remote sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Varanasi, P.; Nemtchinov, V.; Li, Z.

    1995-01-01

    There has been extensive world-wide use of chloro-fluoro-carbons (CFC's), especially CFC-11 (CFCl3) and CFC-12 (CF2Cl2), hydro-chloro-fluoro-carbons (HCFC's), HCFC-22 (CHFCl2) in particular, and sulphur hexaflouride (SF6) in numerous many industrial applications. These chemicals possess either a strong ozone-depletion potential or a global-warming potential, or both, and pose a threat to the inhabitability of our planet. Recognition of this fact has led to significant curtailment, if not total banishment, of their use globally. However, as recent satellite observations have shown, decline in their atmospheric concentrations may not be immediate. The marked depletion of ozone which has been observed in recent years at high latitudes has made infrared remote sensing of the atmosphere an activity of high priority. The success of any infrared remote sensing experiment conducted in the atmosphere depends upon the availability of accurate, high-resolution, spectroscopic data that are applicable to that experiment. This paper presents a preliminary phase of a multi-faceted work using a Fourier-transform spectrometer (FTS) which is in progress in our laboratory. The concept of how laboratory-borne measurements can be geared toward obtaining a database that is directly applicable to satellite-borne remote sensing missions is the main thrust of this paper which addresses itself to ongoing or planned international space missions. Spectroscopic data on the unresolvable bands of the above mentioned as well as several other man-made gases and on the individual spectral lines of such naturally present trace gases as CO2, N2O, NH3, and CH4 are presented. There is often significant overlap between the isolated lines of better known bands of the more abundant species and the weaker absorption features identifiable as bands of the currently less abundant CFC's, HCFC's, and SF6.

  7. Study of the relation between Mg content and dissolution kinetics of natural lime stone using μXRF, μXRD and μXAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grunwaldt, H. S.; Zimina, A.; Göttlicher, J.; Steininger, R.; Grunwaldt, J.-D.

    2016-05-01

    The dissolution parameters of calcium carbonates play a key role in agriculture as they regulate the plant nutrients uptake and buffer the pH-value of the soil. The combination of μXRF, μXAS and μXRD mapping in the hard X-ray regime for the examination of both short- and long range order in natural limestones revealed that their dissolution properties depend both on the crystallinity of the mineral phases and their composition. The results particularly show that in many cases the presence of magnesium inhibits dissolution of the phases.

  8. Extended long-wavelength lambda = 11-15-micron GaAs/Al(x)Ga(1-x)As quantum-well infrared photodetectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zussman, A.; Levine, B. F.; Kuo, J. M.; De Jong, J.

    1991-01-01

    Success has been achieved in extending the spectral wavelength of GaAs/Al(x)Ga(1-x)As quantum-well infrared photodetectors to significantly longer wavelengths of 11-15 micron. High responsivity of 0.5 A/W, high quantum efficiency of 12 percent, and high detectivity as well as an excellent noise equivalent temperature difference of 4 mK have been achieved at T = 50 K. High performance of 19 mK has also been achieved at an even higher temperature of 60 K.

  9. Growth of In xGa 1- xAs layers with pyramidal morphology on (1 0 0)GaAs patterned substrates by liquid-phase epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iida, S.; Balakrishnan, K.; Koyama, T.; Hayakawa, Y.; Kumagawa, M.

    2000-05-01

    Liquid-phase epitaxial growth of In xGa 1- xAs ( x=0.6) layers on various types of patterned (1 0 0)GaAs substrates was investigated. Non-planar InGaAs layer having filled tent-like structure was grown on non-patterned substrate. When the InGaAs was grown on circular-patterned substrate, a non-hollow pyramid structure was obtained. Perfect hollow pyramid structured InGaAs was found to be grown on trench substrates of (1 0 0)GaAs.

  10. Quantum effects in linear and nonlinear transport of T -shaped ballistic junction patterned from GaAs/AlxGa1-xAs heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wróbel, J.; Zagrajek, P.; Czapkiewicz, M.; Bek, M.; Sztenkiel, D.; Fronc, K.; Hey, R.; Ploog, K. H.; Bułka, B. R.

    2010-06-01

    We report low-temperature transport measurements of three-terminal T -shaped device patterned from GaAs/AlxGa1-xAs heterostructure. We demonstrate the mode branching and bend resistance effects predicted by numerical modeling for linear conductance data. We show also that the backscattering at the junction area depends on the wave function parity. We find evidence that in a nonlinear transport regime the voltage of floating electrode always increases as a function of push-pull polarization. Such anomalous effect occurs for the symmetric device, provided the applied voltage is less than the Fermi energy in equilibrium.

  11. Water-related absorption in fibrous diamonds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zedgenizov, D. A.; Shiryaev, A. A.; Kagi, H.; Navon, O.

    2003-04-01

    Cubic and coated diamonds from several localities (Brasil, Canada, Yakutia) were investigated using spectroscopic techniques. Special emphasis was put on investigation of water-related features of transmission Infra-red and Raman spectra. Presence of molecular water is inferred from broad absorption bands in IR at 3420 and 1640 cm-1. These bands were observed in many of the investigated samples. It is likely that molecular water is present in microinclusions in liquid state, since no clear indications of solid H_2O (ice VI-VII, Kagi et al., 2000) were found. Comparison of absorption by HOH and OH vibrations shows that diamonds can be separated into two principal groups: those containing liquid water (direct proportionality of OH and HOH absorption) and those with stronger absorption by OH group. Fraction of diamonds in every group depends on their provenance. There might be positive correlation between internal pressure in microinclusions (determined using quartz barometer, Navon et al., 1988) and affiliation with diamonds containing liquid water. In many cases absorption by HOH vibration is considerably lower than absorption by hydroxyl (OH) group. This may be explained if OH groups are partially present in mineral and/or melt inclusions. This hypothesis is supported by following fact: in diamonds with strong absorption by silicates and other minerals shape and position of the OH band differs from that in diamonds with low absorption by minerals. Moreover, in Raman spectra of individual inclusions sometimes the broad band at 3100 cm-1 is observed. This band is OH-related. In some samples water distribution is not homogeneous. Central part of the diamond usually contains more water than outer parts, but this is not a general rule for all the samples. Water absorption usually correlated with absorption of other components (carbonates, silicates and others). At that fibrous diamonds with relatively high content of silicates are characterized by molecular water. OH

  12. CO2 Absorption Spectroscopy and Climate Change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feldman, Daniel; Mlawer, Eli; Mlynczak, Martin; Gero, Jon; Collins, William; Torn, Margaret

    2014-03-01

    Most of the absorption, and therefore radiative forcing, due to increased atmospheric CO2 occurs in line wings, so utilizing an accurate line shape is necessary for climate science. Recent advances in CO2 absorption spectroscopy have been incorporated into benchmark line-by-line radiative transfer models. These updates include the Energy Corrected Sudden Approximation to represent isolated line profiles, line mixing, and line clusters. The CO2 line profiles are sub-Lorentzian and are explicitly modeled up to 25 cm-1 from each line's center. Consistent continuum absorption is implemented over the remainder of the profile except for modest empirical adjustments based on observations. Thus, line-by-line models calculate the absorption effects of CO2 that agree with theory and measurements. This is validated with long-term spectroscopic measurements from the ARM program's AERI instrument. This spectroscopy trains computationally-efficient correlated-k methods for climate model radiative transfer, but they overpredict instantaneous radiative forcing from doubled CO2 by approximately 7% in part because they have larger errors handling the impact of increased CO2 in the stratosphere than the troposphere. The implications of this can be tested with supercomputers. This work was supported by the Director, Office of Science, Office of Biol. & Env. Res., Clim. & Env. Sci. Div., of the U.S. D.O.E., Contract No. DE-AC02-05CH11231 as part of the Atmos. Sys. Res.

  13. Spectroscopic Investigation of Ce(3+) Doped Fluoride Crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reinhart, Donald H.; Armagan, Guzin; Marsh, Waverly; Barnes, James; Chai, B. H. T.

    1995-01-01

    Doping of the trivalent rare-earth cerium ion into fluoride crystals is of interest in producing turnable ultra-violet solid state lasers. These lasers are desirable for many applications in medicine, industry, and scientific research, including remote sensing. High absorption and stimulated emission cross sections of the dipole allowed 4f-5d transitions show promise in cerium as a laser ion in crystals. Several research groups have already reported the observation of stimulated emission of cerium in LiYF4, LiSrAlF6, and LiCaAlF6. However, the color center formation in the crystals due to the excited state absorption of ultra-violet pump light adds difficulty to achieving laser action. We have investigated the spectroscopic properties of cerium such as absorption and emission spectra, and lifetimes in four different fluoride crystals, including LiCaAlF6, LiSrAlF6, KyF4 and LiYF4. We have derived the polarized absorption and stimulated emission cross sections from transmission and fluorescence emission measurements for each of the host crystals. we have measured the lifetime of the lowest 5d level; moreover, investigated the temperature dependence of this lifetime and color center formation. Our results on absorption and stimulated emission cross sections for LiCaAlF6 and LiSrAlF6 are similar to the results already published.

  14. A DVD Spectroscope: A Simple, High-Resolution Classroom Spectroscope

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wakabayashi, Fumitaka; Hamada, Kiyohito

    2006-01-01

    Digital versatile disks (DVDs) have successfully made up an inexpensive but high-resolution spectroscope suitable for classroom experiments that can easily be made with common material and gives clear and fine spectra of various light sources and colored material. The observed spectra can be photographed with a digital camera, and such images can…

  15. Spectroscopic evidence for Davydov-like solitons in acetanilide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Careri, G.; Buontempo, U.; Galluzzi, F.; Scott, A. C.; Gratton, E.; Shyamsunder, E.

    1984-10-01

    Detailed measurements of infrared absorption and Raman scattering on crystalline acetanilide [(CH3CONHC6H5)x] at low temperature show a new band close to the conventional amide I band. Equilibrium properties and spectroscopic data rule out explanations based on a conventional assignment, crystal defects, Fermi resonance, and upon frozen kinetics between two different subsystems. Thus we cannot account for this band using the concepts of conventional molecular spectroscopy, but a soliton model, similar to that proposed by Davydov for α-helix in protein, is in satisfactory agreement with the experimental data.

  16. The GEISA spectroscopic line parameters data bank in 1984

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Husson, N.; Chedin, A.; Scott, N. A.; Bailly, D.; Graner, G.; Lacome, N.; Brown, L. R.; Orton, G.; Rinsland, C. P.; Smith, M. A. H.

    1986-01-01

    The 1984 update of the GEISA data bank, containing spectroscopic information on 323,521 lines corresponding to 36 molecules and 79 isotopic species in the spectal range 3 x 10 to the -6th/cm to 17,879/cm, is discussed. The bank compiles parameters describing the radiation absorption or emission properties of gases involved in the atmospheres of the earth and planets. Values of a new exponent which summarized the variation of the collision halfwidth with temperature are given for 10 molecules. Six new molecules, HOCl, N2, CH3Cl, H2O2, H2S, and HCOOH, are included in this edition.

  17. Spectroscopic properties of vitamin E models in solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveira, L. B. A.; Colherinhas, G.; Fonseca, T. L.; Castro, M. A.

    2015-05-01

    We investigate the first absorption band and the 13C and 17O magnetic shieldings of vitamin E models in chloroform and in water using the S-MC/QM methodology in combination with the TD-DFT and GIAO approaches. The results show that the solvent effects on these spectroscopic properties are small but a proper description of the solvent shift for 17O magnetic shielding of the hydroxyl group in water requires the use of explicit solute-solvent hydrogen bonds. In addition, the effect of the replacement of hydrogen atoms by methyl groups in the vitamin E models only affects magnetic shieldings.

  18. PREFACE: The 15th International Conference on X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (XAFS15)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Z. Y.

    2013-04-01

    , accepted after a rigorous peer review procedure. A group of about 90 outstanding scientists in the field reviewed and suggested revisions of the manuscripts to improve scientific presentation. As a result, we believe the entire volume has reached a high standard. The 19 topics covered are listed as follows: Theory Data analysis New technology and devices of XAFS Applications in Nano science and technology Applications in Life Science Applications in Chemistry Applications in Catalytic Science Applications in Surface and Interface Science Applications in Material Science Applications in Energy and Environmental Science Applications in Magnetic and Related Material Science Applications in Nuclear Science Applications in Disordered Systems Applications in Extreme Conditions Applications for Time-resolved experiments XMCD technology and its applications Advanced methods (e.g., new coherent sources and spectroscopic imaging techniques) XAFS combined with other experimental methods Other related studies We hope this volume will be a useful reference for the ongoing scientific activity in XAFS. We would also like to express our sincere appreciation to the sponsors for their generous support: Chinese Academy of Science, National Natural Science Foundation of China, China Center of Advanced Science and Technology World Laboratory, University of Science and Technology of China, National Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory, Institute of High Energy Physics Chinese Academy of Sciences, and our commercial sponsors (AREVA, Xi'an Action Power Electric Co., Ltd). Finally, we would like to acknowledge the entire local organizing staff (names are given below) and particularly the collaborators and members of the XAS group at the National Natural Science Foundation of China and Institute of High Energy Physics Chinese Academy of Sciences for their efforts to make the XAFS15 conference a success. Ziyu Wu Chair of the Conference and Proceedings Editor Hefei, P. R. China, 28 September 2012

  19. Potassium emission absorption system. Topical report 12

    SciTech Connect

    Bauman, L.E.

    1995-04-01

    The Potassium Emission Absorption System is one of the advanced optical diagnostics developed at Mississippi State University to provide support for the demonstration of prototype-scale coal-fired combustion magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) electrical power generation. Intended for application in the upstream of an MHD flow, the system directly measures gas temperature and neutral potassium atom number density through spectroscopic emission absorption techniques. From these measurements the electron density can be inferred from a statistical equilibrium calculation and the electron conductivity in the MHD channel found by use of an electron mobility model. The instrument has been utilized for field test measurements on MHD facilities for almost a decade and has been proven to provide useful measurements as designed for MHD nozzle, channel, and diffuser test sections. The theory of the measurements, a system description, its capabilities, and field test measurement results are reported here. During the development and application of the instrument several technical issues arose which when addressed advanced the state of the art in emission absorption measurement. Studies of these issues are also reported here and include: two-wavelength measurements for particle-laden flows, potassium D-line far wing absorption coefficient, bias in emission absorption measurements arising from dirty windows and misalignments, non-coincident multiwavelength emission absorption sampling errors, and lineshape fitting for boundary layer flow profile information. Although developed for NLHD application, the instrument could be applied to any high temperature flow with a resonance line in the 300 to 800 nm range, for instance other types of flames, rocket plumes or low temperature plasmas.

  20. Excitation induced spectroscopic study and quenching effect in cerium samarium codoped lithium aluminoborate glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaur, Parvinder; Kaur, Simranpreet; Singh, Gurinder Pal; Arora, Deepawali; Kumar, Sunil; Singh, D. P.

    2016-08-01

    Lithium aluminium borate host has been codoped with cerium and samarium to prepare glass by conventional melt quench technique. Their structural and spectroscopic investigation has been carried out using XRD, FTIR and density measurements. The UV-Vis absorption spectra and fluorescence spectra (λexc.=380 nm and 400 nm) have been studied for spectroscopic analysis. The amorphous nature of the prepared samples is shown by XRD. The density is increasing with addition of cerium at the expense of aluminium, keeping other components constant. FTIR study also shows the presence of compact and stable tetrahedral BO4 units thus supporting the density results. The UV- Vis absorption spectra show a shift of optical absorption edge towards longer wavelength along with an increase in intensity of peaks with rising samarium concentration. The fluorescence spectra show a blue shift and subsequent suppression of cerium peaks with addition of samarium.

  1. Development of Palladium L-Edge X-Ray Absorption Spectroscopy And Its Application for Chloropalladium Complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Boysen, R.B.; Szilagyi, R.K.

    2009-05-12

    X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) is a synchrotron-based experimental technique that provides information about geometric and electronic structures of transition metal complexes. Combination of metal L-edge and ligand K-edge XAS has the potential to define the complete experimental ground state electronic structures for metal complexes with unoccupied d manifolds. We developed a quantitative treatment for Pd L-edge spectroscopy on the basis of the well-established chlorine K-edge XAS for a series of chloropalladium complexes that are pre-catalysts in various organic transformations. We found that Pd-Cl bonds are highly covalent, such as 24 {+-} 2%, 34 {+-} 3%, and 48 {+-} 4% chloride 3p character for each Pd-Cl bond in [PdCl{sub 4}]{sup 2-}, [PdCl{sub 6}]{sup 2-}, and PdCl{sub 2}, respectively. Pd(2p {yields} 4d) transition dipole integrals of 20.8 (SSRL)/16.9 (ALS) eV and 14.1 (SSRL)/11.9 (ALS) eV were determined using various combinations of L-edges for Pd(II) and Pd(IV), respectively. Application of metal-ligand covalency and transition dipole integrals were demonstrated for the example of bridging chloride ligands in PdCl{sub 2}. Our work lays the foundation for extending the quantitative treatment to other catalytically important ligands, such as phosphine, phosphite, olefin, amine, and alkyl in order to correlate the electronic structures of palladium complexes with their catalytic activity.

  2. Zinc ligands in the metal hyperaccumulator Thlaspi caerulescens as determined using X-ray absorption spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Salt, D.E.; Prince, R.C.; Baker, A.J.M.; Raskin, I.; Pickering, I.J.

    1999-03-01

    Using the noninvasive technique of X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS), the authors have been able to determine the ligand environment of Zn in different tissues of the Zn-hyperaccumulator Thlaspi caerulescens. The majority of intracellular Zn in roots of T. caerulescens was found to be coordinated with histidine. In the xylem sap Zn was found to be transported mainly as the free hydrated Zn{sup 2+} cation with a smaller proportion coordinated with organic acids. In the shoots, Zn coordination occurred mainly via organic acids, with a smaller proportion present as the hydrated cation and coordinated with histidine and the cell wall. Their data suggest that histidine plays an important role in Zn homeostasis in the roots, whereas organic acids are involved in xylem transport and Zn storage in shoots.

  3. Electronic Structure of Transition Metal-Cysteine Complexes From X-Ray Absorption Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Leung, B.O.; Jalilehvand, F.; Szilagyi, R.K.

    2009-05-19

    The electronic structures of Hg{sup II}, Ni{sup II}, Cr{sup III}, and Mo{sup V} complexes with cysteine were investigated by sulfur K-edge X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy and density functional theory. The covalency in the metal-sulfur bond was determined by analyzing the intensities of the electric-dipole allowed pre-edge features appearing in the XANES spectra below the ionization threshold. Because of the well-defined structures of the selected cysteine complexes, the current work provides a reference set for further sulfur K-edge XAS studies of bioinorganic active sites with transition metal-sulfur bonds from cysteine residues as well as more complex coordination compounds with thiolate ligands.

  4. Climate Literacy Initiatives as part of the TXESS (TeXas Earth and Space Science) Revolution Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olson, H. C.; Ellins, K. K.; Snow, E.; Bryant, S. L.; Olson, J. E.; Castillo Comer, C. A.; Willis, M.; Odell, M.; Stocks, E.

    2010-12-01

    For four years the National Science Foundation (NSF)-sponsored TeXas Earth and Space Science (TXESS) Revolution professional development program has helped teachers build a solid foundation in the geosciences through guided inquiry activities and lectures delivered by science experts. The professional development program comprises eight professional development academies and two summer institutes. Climate literacy has been a cross-cutting theme throughout the series of academies and institutes. Although we present a special emphasis on climate literacy in the 7th academy on Climate Change, the 8th academy on Humans at the Helm and the 2nd summer institute module on climate mitigation technology, activities related to climate literacy are woven into each academy. Examples of climate as a cross-cutting theme include a module on water and drought, including research on climate change through the analysis of deep-sea cores, and the effects on the Mayan population. Our distinguished lecturers bring in climate literacy as part of their presentations and programs: our Poking Holes into the Planet and Team Science professional development academy included two distinguished lecturers who brought current research results and educational materials from the ANDRILL (Antarctic Geological Drilling) program and the Integrated Ocean Drilling Program. Our Earth as a Habitable Planet professional development academy featured an activity on corals that used data to explore how higher than normal sea surface temperatures contribute to coral bleaching events. TXESS Revolution also works with our teachers to link them with other opportunities aligned with our professional development goals. With our assistance, one of our TXESS Revolution teachers sailed as part of the science team on Integrated Ocean Drilling Program expedition 317 to investigate sea level fluctuations in the Canterbury Basin offshore New Zealand, creating various resources (e.g., podcasts, blogs) to multiply the

  5. X-ray absorption spectroscopy of chicken sulfite oxidase crystals

    SciTech Connect

    George, G.N.; Pickering, I.J.; Kisker, C.

    1999-05-17

    Sulfite oxidase catalyzes the physiologically vital oxidation of sulfite to sulfate. Recently, the crystal structure of chicken sulfite oxidase has been reported at 1.9 {angstrom} resolution. In contrast to the information available from previous X-ray absorption spectroscopic studies, the active site indicated by crystallography was a mono-oxo species. Because of this the possibility that the crystals did in fact contain a reduced molybdenum species was considered in the crystallographic work. The authors report herein an X-ray absorption spectroscopic study of polycrystalline sulfite oxidase prepared in the same manner as the previous single-crystal samples, and compare this with data for frozen solutions of oxidized and reduced enzyme.

  6. Optical absorptions of the low-lying states with higher angular momenta of a D{sup -} system in a spherical quantum dot

    SciTech Connect

    Xie Wenfang

    2013-01-31

    Optical absorptions of the low-lying states with higher angular momenta of the D{sup -} system in a spherical quantum dot (QD) with the Gaussian potential are studied by using the matrix diagonalisation method and the compact density-matrix approach. The linear, nonlinear third-order and total optical absorption coefficients are calculated for the {sup 1}P{sup -} {yields} {sup 1}D{sup +} and {sup 1}D{sup +} {yields} {sup 1}F{sup -} transitions. Numerical results for GaAs/Ga{sub 1-x}Al{sub x}As QDs are presented. The calculated results show that with increasing quantum numbers describing the angular momenta of transitions the optical absorption peaks shift towards lower energies and their intensities increase. (quantum dots)

  7. Investigation into Spectroscopic Techniques for Thermal Barrier Coating Spall Detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    deGroot, Wim; Opila, Beth

    2001-01-01

    Spectroscopic methods are proposed for detection of thermal barrier coating (TBC) spallation from engine hot zone components. These methods include absorption and emission of airborne marker species originally embedded in the TBC bond coat. In this study, candidate marker materials for this application were evaluated. Thermochemical analysis of candidate marker materials combined with additional constraints such as toxicity and uniqueness to engine environment, provided a short list of four potential species: platinum, copper oxide, zinc oxide. and indium. The melting point of indium was considered to be too low for serious consideration. The other three candidate marker materials, platinum, copper oxide, and zinc oxide were placed in a high temperature furnace and emission and absorption properties were measured over a temperature range from 800-1400 C and a spectral range from 250 to 18000 nm. Platinum did not provide the desired response, likely due to the low vapor Pressure of the metallic species and the low absorption of the oxide species. It was also found, however. that platinum caused a broadening of the carbon dioxide absorption at 4300 nm. The nature of this effect is not known. Absorption and emission caused by sodium and potassium impurities in the platinum were found in the platinum tests. Zinc oxide did not provide the desired response, again, most likely due to the low vapor pressure of the metallic species and the low absorption of the oxide species. Copper oxide generated two strongly temperature dependent absorption peaks at 324.8 and 327.4 nm. The melting point of copper oxide was determined to be too low for serious consideration as marker material.

  8. Spectroscopic observations of the dwarf nova IP Pegasi

    SciTech Connect

    Hessman, F.V. )

    1989-08-01

    Time-resolved spectroscopic measurements of IP Peg were obtained immediately after a dwarf nova eruption. The radio-velocity amplitude of the white dwarf (118 + or - 10 km/s) implied by measurements from the wings of the Balmer emission lines is different from that found previously. The results suggest a mass ratio M1/M2 of 0.435 + or - 0.052 and that the narrow component is due to unusually strong chromospheric emission from the late-type star. The low value for the radial-velocity amplitude of this narrow emission (about 200 km/s) is consistent with the observed absorption-line amplitude of 331 km/s if the irradiated surface of the M dwarf produces little line absorption. 40 refs.

  9. Spectroscopic intravascular photoacoustic imaging of neovasculature: phantom studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Jimmy L.; Wang, Bo; Emelianov, Stanislav Y.

    2009-02-01

    An acceleration of angiogenesis in the adventitial vasa-vasorum is usually associated with vulnerable, thin-cap fibroatheroma in atherosclerotic plaques. Angiogenesis creates microvasculature too small to be detected and differentiated using conventional imaging techniques. However, by using spectroscopic photoacoustic imaging, we take advantage of the wavelength-dependent optical absorption properties of blood. We used a vessel-mimicking phantom with micro blood vessels. The phantom was imaged with intravascular photoacoustic imaging across a range of wavelengths. The image intensities were cross-correlated with the known absorption spectra of blood. The resulting cross-correlation image was able to reveal the location of the artificial blood vessels differentiated from non-blood vessel components.

  10. Characterization and speciation of mercury-bearing mine wastes using X-ray absorption spectroscopy

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kim, C.S.; Brown, Gordon E., Jr.; Rytuba, J.J.

    2000-01-01

    Mining of mercury deposits located in the California Coast Range has resulted in the release of mercury to the local environment and water supplies. The solubility, transport, and potential bioavailability of mercury are controlled by its chemical speciation, which can be directly determined for samples with total mercury concentrations greater than 100 mg kg-1 (ppm) using X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS). This technique has the additional benefits of being non-destructive to the sample, element-specific, relatively sensitive at low concentrations, and requiring minimal sample preparation. In this study, Hg L(III)-edge extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectra were collected for several mercury mine tailings (calcines) in the California Coast Range. Total mercury concentrations of samples analyzed ranged from 230 to 1060 ppm. Speciation data (mercury phases present and relative abundances) were obtained by comparing the spectra from heterogeneous, roasted (calcined) mine tailings samples with a spectral database of mercury minerals and sorbed mercury complexes. Speciation analyses were also conducted on known mixtures of pure mercury minerals in order to assess the quantitative accuracy of the technique. While some calcine samples were found to consist exclusively of mercuric sulfide, others contain additional, more soluble mercury phases, indicating a greater potential for the release of mercury into solution. Also, a correlation was observed between samples from hot-spring mercury deposits, in which chloride levels are elevated, and the presence of mercury-chloride species as detected by the speciation analysis. The speciation results demonstrate the ability of XAS to identify multiple mercury phases in a heterogeneous sample, with a quantitative accuracy of ??25% for the mercury-containing phases considered. Use of this technique, in conjunction with standard microanalytical techniques such as X-ray diffraction and electron probe microanalysis

  11. The effect of thin film thickness on the incorporation of Mn interstitials in Ga{sub 1-x}Mn{sub x}As

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, K.M.; Walukiewicz, W.; Wojtowicz, T.; Denlinger, J.; Scarpulla, M.A.; Liu, X.; Furdyna, J.K.

    2004-10-05

    We have investigated the effect of film thickness on the distribution of Mn atoms at various lattice sites in Ga{sub 1-x}Mn{sub x}As thin films. We find that the growth surface acts as a sink facilitating the out-diffusion of Mn interstitials (Mn{sub I}), and thus reducing its concentration in the film. The out-diffused Mn{sub I} accumulate on the surface in a surface oxide layer and do not participate in the ferromagnetism of the film. For thin films less than 15 nm thick, no Mn{sub I} can be detected. Because of the absence of compensating Mn{sub I} defects, higher T{sub C} can be achieved for such extremely thin Ga{sub 1-x}Mn{sub x}As layers. These results agree with our previously suggested Fermi-level-governed upper limit of the T{sub C} of III-Mn-V ferromagnetic semiconductors.

  12. Comparative XRPD and XAS study of the impact of the synthesis process on the electronic and structural environments of uranium–americium mixed oxides

    SciTech Connect

    Prieur, D.; Lebreton, F.; Somers, J.; Delahaye, T.

    2015-10-15

    Uranium–americium mixed oxides are potential compounds to reduce americium inventory in nuclear waste via a partitioning and transmutation strategy. A thorough assessment of the oxygen-to-metal ratio is paramount in such materials as it determines the important underlying electronic structure and phase relations, affecting both thermal conductivity of the material and its interaction with the cladding and coolant. In 2011, various XAS experiments on U{sub 1−x}Am{sub x}O{sub 2±δ} samples prepared by different synthesis methods have reported contradictory results on the charge distribution of U and Am. This work alleviates this discrepancy. The XAS results confirm that, independently of the synthesis process, the reductive sintering of U{sub 1−x}Am{sub x}O{sub 2±δ} leads to the formation of similar fluorite solid solution indicating the presence of Am{sup +III} and U{sup +V} in equimolar proportions. - Graphical abstract: Formation of (U{sup IV/V},Am{sup III})O{sup 2} solid solution by sol–gel and by powder metallurgy. - Highlights: • Uranium–americium mixed oxides were synthesized by sol–gel and powder metallurgy. • Fluorite solid solutions with similar local environment have been obtained. • U{sup V} and Am{sup III} are formed in equimolar proportions.

  13. Probing semiconductor band structures and heterojunction interface properties with ballistic carrier emission: GaAs/AlxGa1-xAs as a model system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Wei; Narayanamurti, Venkatesh; Lu, Hong; Scarpulla, Michael A.; Gossard, Arthur C.

    2010-06-01

    Utilizing three-terminal tunnel emission of ballistic electrons and holes in a planar tunnel transistor with a Mott-barrier collector, we have developed a method to self-consistently determine the energy gap of a semiconductor and band discontinuities at a semiconductor heterojunction without using a priori material parameters. Measurements are performed on lattice-matched GaAs/AlxGa1-xAs (100) single-barrier double heterostructures with AlxGa1-xAs as the model ternary III-V compounds. Electronic band gaps of the AlGaAs alloys and band offsets at the GaAs/AlGaAs (100) interfaces are measured with a resolution of several meV at 4.2 K. The direct-gap Γ band offset ratio for the GaAs/AlGaAs (100) interface is found to be 59:41 (±3%) . Reexamination of our previous experiment [W. Yi , Appl. Phys. Lett. 95, 112102 (2009)10.1063/1.3224914] revealed that, in the indirect-gap regime, ballistic electrons from direct tunnel emissions probe the X valley in the conduction band, while those from Auger-like scattering processes in the metal base film probe the higher-lying L valley. Such selective electron collection may be explained by their different momentum distributions and parallel momentum conservation at the quasiepitaxial Al/GaAs (100) interface. We argue that the present method is in principle applicable to arbitrary type-I semiconductor heterostructures.

  14. XAS Corroboration of the Uptake and Storage of CeO2 Nanoparticles and Assessment of their Differential Toxicity in Four Edible Plant Species

    PubMed Central

    López-Moreno, Martha L.; de la Rosa, Guadalupe; Hernández-Viezcas, José A.; Peralta-Videa, José R.; Gardea-Torresdey, Jorge L.

    2010-01-01

    Fate, transport, and possible toxicity of cerium oxide nanoparticles (nanoceria, CeO2) are still unknown. In this study, seeds of alfalfa (Medicago sativa), corn (Zea mays), cucumber (Cucumis sativus), and tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum) were treated with nanoceria at 0–4000 mg L−1. Cerium uptake and oxidation state within tissues were determined using ICP-OES and XAS, respectively. Germination rate and root elongation were also determined. Results showed that nanoceria significantly reduced corn germination (about 30% at 2000 mg L−1, p < 0.05), and at 2000 mg L−1 germination of tomato and cucumber was reduced by 30% and 20%, respectively (p < 0.05). Root growth was significantly promoted (p < 0.05) by nanoceria in cucumber and corn but reduced (p < 0.05) in alfalfa and tomato. Almost at all concentrations nanoceria promoted shoot elongation in the four plant species. XAS data clearly showed the nanoceria within tissues of the four plant species. To the authors’ knowledge, this is the first report on the presence nanoceria within plants. PMID:20187606

  15. Relieved kink effects in symmetrically graded In0.45Al0.55As/InxGa1-xAs metamorphic high-electron-mobility transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Ching-Sung; Liao, Chen-Hsian

    2007-12-01

    Kink effects in an In-rich InxGa1-xAs (x=0.53-0.63) linearly graded channel of an In0.45Al0.55As/InxGa1-xAs metamorphic high-electron-mobility transistor have been effectively relieved by depositing a high-barrier Ni /Au gate with the silicon nitride passivation. Complete physical investigations for the relieved kink effects have been made by comparing identical devices with/without a high-barrier Schottky gate or the surface passivation. After successfully suppressing the kink effects, the proposed device has shown a superior voltage gain of 173.8, low output conductance of 2.09mS/mm, and excellent power-added efficiency of 54.1% with high output power (power gain) of 14.87dBm (14.53dB). Improved linearity and excellent thermal threshold coefficient (∂Vth/∂T) of -0.14mV/K have also been achieved. The proposed design provides good potential for high-gain and high-linearity circuit applications.

  16. Structural Investigations of the Nickel-Induced Inhibition of Truncated Constructs of the JMJD2 Family of Histone Demethylases Using X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Giri, Nitai Charan; Passantino, Lisa; Sun, Hong; Zoroddu, Maria Antonietta; Costa, Max; Maroney, Michael J.

    2013-01-01

    Occupational and/or environmental exposure to nickel has been implicated in various types of cancer, and in vitro exposure to nickel compounds results in accumulation of Ni(II) ions in cells. One of the major targets of Ni(II) ions inside the cell is Fe(II)- and αKG-dependent dioxygenases. Using JMJD2A and JMJD2C as examples, we show that JMJD2 family of histone demethylases, which are products of putative oncogenes as well as Fe(II)- and αKG-dependent dioxygenases, are highly sensitive to inhibition by Ni(II) ions. In this work, X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) has been used to investigate the Fe(II) active site of truncated JMJD2A and JMJD2C (1 – 350 aa) in the presence and absence of αKG and/or substrate to obtain mechanistic details of the early steps in catalysis that precede O2 binding in histone demethylation by the JMJD2 family of histone demethylases. Zinc K-edge XAS has been performed on the resting JMJD2A (with iron in the active site) to confirm the presence of the expected structural zinc site. XAS of the Ni(II)-substituted enzymes has also been performed to investigate the inhibition of these enzymes by Ni(II) ions. Our XAS results indicate that the five-coordinate Fe(II) center in the resting enzyme is retained in the binary and ternary complexes. In contrast, the Ni(II) center is six-coordinate in the resting enzyme, binary and ternary complexes. XAS results indicate that both Fe(II) and Ni(II) bind αKG in the binary and ternary complexes. The electron density build-up that is observed at the Fe(II) center in the presence of αKG and substrate is not observed at the Ni(II) center. Thus, both electronic and steric factors are responsible for Ni-induced inhibition of the JMJD2 family of histone demethylases. Ni-induced inhibition of these enzymes may explain the alteration of the epigenetic mechanism of gene expression that is responsible for Ni-induced carcinogenesis. PMID:23692052

  17. CD-ROM Spectroscope: A Simple and Inexpensive Tool for Classroom Demonstrations on Chemical Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wakabayashi, Fumitaka; Hamada, Kiyohito; Sone, Kozo

    1998-12-01

    Construction of a handy spectroscope using a compact disk (CD) or a CD-ROM and its application to the observation of emission and absorption spectra are described. Using this simple cardboard-made spectroscope, one can readily observe line emission spectra of fluorescent lamps, gas discharge tubes, etc. The spectroscope is also used to observe the absorption spectra of colored solutions; the absorption bands are observed as distinct black bands on the rainbow-colored continuous spectrum of an incandescent lamp. The results for the aqueous solution of potassium permanganate, the methanol and ethanol solutions of cobalt chloride, and Fe(III)-thiocyanate complex are described. These results clearly show the general rule that a colored solution absorbs the complementary color of the color of the solution. Thus, the CD-ROM spectroscope is a useful tool in primary and secondary schools to teach what color is and what spectra are. Furthermore, it can be used effectively in introductory courses in colleges and universities to teach that spectra are really beautiful natural phenomena which can be observed simply.

  18. Solar absorption surface panel

    DOEpatents

    Santala, Teuvo J.

    1978-01-01

    A composite metal of aluminum and nickel is used to form an economical solar absorption surface for a collector plate wherein an intermetallic compound of the aluminum and nickel provides a surface morphology with high absorptance and relatively low infrared emittance along with good durability.

  19. Ligand K-edge x-ray absorption spectroscopy as a probe of ligand-metal bonding: Charge donation and covalency in copper-chloride systems

    SciTech Connect

    Shadle, S.E.; Hedman, B.; Solomon, E.I.; Hodgson, K.O.

    1994-09-14

    X-ray absorption spectra (XAS) have been measured at the chloride K-edge for a series of complexes containing chloride ligands bound to open shell d{sup 9} copper ions in order to probe ligand-metal bonding. The intensity of the pre-edge feature in these spectra reflects the covalency in the half-occupied d{sub x}{sup 2-}{sub y}{sup 2-} derived molecular orbital (HOMO) of the complex. The energy of the pre-edge feature as well as the energy of the rising absorption edge provides quantitative information about the covalency of the ligand-metal interaction, the charge donated by the chloride, and the energy of the copper d-manifold. The results demonstrate that ligand K-edge XAS features can be used to obtain information about ligand-metal bonding. The results also identify the chemical basis for trends in the XAS data for the following complexes: D{sub 4h} CuCl{sub 4}{sup 2-}, D{sub 2d} CuCl{sub 4}{sup 2-}, planar trans-CuCl{sub 2-} (pdmp){sub 2} (pdmp = N-phenyl-3,5-dimethylpyrazole), square pyramidal CuCl{sub 5}{sup 3-}, the planar dimer KCuCl{sub 3}, the distorted tetrahedral dimer (Ph{sub 4}P)CuCl{sub 3}, and two dimers with mixed ligation, one containing a bridging chloride, and the other, containing terminally bound chloride. Several of these results are supported by independent spectral data or by basic ligand field concepts. A geometric distortion from square planar to distorted tetrahedral results in a decrease in the chloride-copper HOMO covalency but an increase in the total charge donation by the chlorides. While the geometry can maximize the overlap for a highly covalent HOMO, this does not necessarily reflect the overall charge donation.

  20. An in situ sample environment reaction cell for spatially resolved x-ray absorption spectroscopy studies of powders and small structured reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Chu; Gustafson, Johan; Merte, Lindsay R.; Evertsson, Jonas; Norén, Katarina; Carlson, Stefan; Svensson, Håkan; Carlsson, Per-Anders

    2015-03-15

    An easy-to-use sample environment reaction cell for X-ray based in situ studies of powders and small structured samples, e.g., powder, pellet, and monolith catalysts, is described. The design of the cell allows for flexible use of appropriate X-ray transparent windows, shielding the sample from ambient conditions, such that incident X-ray energies as low as 3 keV can be used. Thus, in situ X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) measurements in either transmission or fluorescence mode are facilitated. Total gas flows up to about 500 ml{sub n}/min can be fed while the sample temperature is accurately controlled (at least) in the range of 25–500 °C. The gas feed is composed by a versatile gas-mixing system and the effluent gas flow composition is monitored with mass spectrometry (MS). These systems are described briefly. Results from simultaneous XAS/MS measurements during oxidation of carbon monoxide over a 4% Pt/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} powder catalyst are used to illustrate the system performance in terms of transmission XAS. Also, 2.2% Pd/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and 2% Ag − Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} powder catalysts have been used to demonstrate X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy in fluorescence mode. Further, a 2% Pt/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} monolith catalyst was used ex situ for transmission XANES. The reaction cell opens for facile studies of structure-function relationships for model as well as realistic catalysts both in the form of powders, small pellets, and coated or extruded monoliths at near realistic conditions. The applicability of the cell for X-ray diffraction measurements is discussed.

  1. An in situ sample environment reaction cell for spatially resolved x-ray absorption spectroscopy studies of powders and small structured reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Chu; Gustafson, Johan; Merte, Lindsay R.; Evertsson, Jonas; Norén, Katarina; Carlson, Stefan; Svensson, Hâkan; Carlsson, Per-Anders

    2015-03-01

    An easy-to-use sample environment reaction cell for X-ray based in situ studies of powders and small structured samples, e.g., powder, pellet, and monolith catalysts, is described. The design of the cell allows for flexible use of appropriate X-ray transparent windows, shielding the sample from ambient conditions, such that incident X-ray energies as low as 3 keV can be used. Thus, in situ X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) measurements in either transmission or fluorescence mode are facilitated. Total gas flows up to about 500 mln/min can be fed while the sample temperature is accurately controlled (at least) in the range of 25-500 °C. The gas feed is composed by a versatile gas-mixing system and the effluent gas flow composition is monitored with mass spectrometry (MS). These systems are described briefly. Results from simultaneous XAS/MS measurements during oxidation of carbon monoxide over a 4% Pt/Al2O3 powder catalyst are used to illustrate the system performance in terms of transmission XAS. Also, 2.2% Pd/Al2O3 and 2% Ag - Al2O3 powder catalysts have been used to demonstrate X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy in fluorescence mode. Further, a 2% Pt/Al2O3 monolith catalyst was used ex situ for transmission XANES. The reaction cell opens for facile studies of structure-function relationships for model as well as realistic catalysts both in the form of powders, small pellets, and coated or extruded monoliths at near realistic conditions. The applicability of the cell for X-ray diffraction measurements is discussed.

  2. Petawatt laser absorption bounded

    PubMed Central

    Levy, Matthew C.; Wilks, Scott C.; Tabak, Max; Libby, Stephen B.; Baring, Matthew G.

    2014-01-01

    The interaction of petawatt (1015 W) lasers with solid matter forms the basis for advanced scientific applications such as table-top particle accelerators, ultrafast imaging systems and laser fusion. Key metrics for these applications relate to absorption, yet conditions in this regime are so nonlinear that it is often impossible to know the fraction of absorbed light f, and even the range of f is unknown. Here using a relativistic Rankine-Hugoniot-like analysis, we show for the first time that f exhibits a theoretical maximum and minimum. These bounds constrain nonlinear absorption mechanisms across the petawatt regime, forbidding high absorption values at low laser power and low absorption values at high laser power. For applications needing to circumvent the absorption bounds, these results will accelerate a shift from solid targets, towards structured and multilayer targets, and lead the development of new materials. PMID:24938656

  3. Petawatt laser absorption bounded

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levy, Matthew C.; Wilks, Scott C.; Tabak, Max; Libby, Stephen B.; Baring, Matthew G.

    2014-06-01

    The interaction of petawatt (1015 W) lasers with solid matter forms the basis for advanced scientific applications such as table-top particle accelerators, ultrafast imaging systems and laser fusion. Key metrics for these applications relate to absorption, yet conditions in this regime are so nonlinear that it is often impossible to know the fraction of absorbed light f, and even the range of f is unknown. Here using a relativistic Rankine-Hugoniot-like analysis, we show for the first time that f exhibits a theoretical maximum and minimum. These bounds constrain nonlinear absorption mechanisms across the petawatt regime, forbidding high absorption values at low laser power and low absorption values at high laser power. For applications needing to circumvent the absorption bounds, these results will accelerate a shift from solid targets, towards structured and multilayer targets, and lead the development of new materials.

  4. Soft X-ray absorption and photoemission spectroscopy study of semiconductor oxide nanoparticles for dye-sensitized solar cell: ZnSnO3 and Zn2SnO4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hyun Woo; Lee, Eunsook; Kim, D. H.; Seong, Seungho; Moon, Soo Yeon; Shin, Yu-Ju; Baik, J.; Shin, H. J.; Kang, J.-S.

    2016-06-01

    The electronic structures of the Zn-stannate nanoparticles of ZnSnO3 and Zn2SnO4, which are the potential nano-structured semiconductor oxides for a dye sensitized solar cell (DSSC), have been investigated by employing photoemission spectroscopy (PES) and soft X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS), and compared to those of reference materials. The divalent and tetravalent valence states of Zn2+ and Sn4+ ions are confirmed experimentally. The energy levels of both the valence-band and conduction-band edges are determined experimentally. The top of the valence band in PES is slightly higher in Zn2SnO4 than in ZnSnO3. The onset energies of the O 1s XAS spectra of the Zn-stannates are found to be similar to each other, but higher than that of TiO2. The O 1 s XAS spectrum of ZnSnO3 exhibits the higher unoccupied density of states near the bottom of the conduction band than those of Zn2SnO4, SnO2 and ZnO, reflecting the larger number of holes in the Zn 3 d bands of ZnSnO3. Hence, the easier electron transfer is expected from the LUMO (lowest unoccupied molecular orbital) of a dye molecule to the conduction band of ZnSnO3 nanoparticles on the transparent conductive electrode of a DSSC.

  5. Percutaneous absorption of drugs.

    PubMed

    Wester, R C; Maibach, H I

    1992-10-01

    The skin is an evolutionary masterpiece of living tissue which is the final control unit for determining the local and systemic availability of any drug which must pass into and through it. In vivo in humans, many factors will affect the absorption of drugs. These include individual biological variation and may be influenced by race. The skin site of the body will also influence percutaneous absorption. Generally, those body parts exposed to the open environment (and to cosmetics, drugs and hazardous toxic substances) are most affected. Treating patients may involve single daily drug treatment or multiple daily administration. Finally, the body will be washed (normal daily process or when there is concern about skin decontamination) and this will influence percutaneous absorption. The vehicle of a drug will affect release of drug to skin. On skin, the interrelationships of this form of administration involve drug concentration, surface area exposed, frequency and time of exposure. These interrelationships determine percutaneous absorption. Accounting for all the drug administered is desirable in controlled studies. The bioavailability of the drug then is assessed in relationship to its efficacy and toxicity in drug development. There are methods, both quantitative and qualitative, in vitro and in vivo, for studying percutaneous absorption of drugs. Animal models are substituted for humans to determine percutaneous absorption. Each of these methods thus becomes a factor in determining percutaneous absorption because they predict absorption in humans. The relevance of these predictions to humans in vivo is of intense research interest. The most relevant determination of percutaneous absorption of a drug in humans is when the drug in its approved formulation is applied in vivo to humans in the intended clinical situation. Deviation from this scenario involves the introduction of variables which may alter percutaneous absorption. PMID:1296607

  6. Spectroscopic features of cytochrome P450 reaction intermediates

    PubMed Central

    Luthra, Abhinav; Denisov, Ilia G.; Sligar, Stephen G.

    2010-01-01

    Preface Cytochromes P450 constitute a broad class of heme monooxygenase enzymes with more than 11,500 isozymes which have been identified in organisms from all biological kingdoms [1]. These enzymes are responsible for catalyzing dozens chemical oxidative transformations such as hydroxylation, epoxidation, N-demethylation, etc., with very broad range of substrates [2-3]. Historically these enzymes received their name from ‘pigment 450’ due to the unusual position of the Soret band in UV-Vis absorption spectra of the reduced CO-saturated state [4-5]. Despite detailed biochemical characterization of many isozymes, as well as later discoveries of other ‘P450-like heme enzymes’ such as nitric oxide synthase and chloroperoxidase, the phenomenological term ‘cytochrome P450’ is still commonly used as indicating an essential spectroscopic feature of the functionally active protein which is now known to be due to the presence of a thiolate ligand to the heme iron [6]. Heme proteins with an imidazole ligand such as myoglobin and hemoglobin as well as an inactive form of P450 are characterized by Soret maxima at 420 nm [7]. This historical perspective highlights the importance of spectroscopic methods for biochemical studies in general, and especially for heme enzymes, where the presence of the heme iron and porphyrin macrocycle provides rich variety of specific spectroscopic markers available for monitoring chemical transformations and transitions between active intermediates of catalytic cycle. PMID:21167809

  7. Characterization of semicrystalline polymers after nanoimprint by spectroscopic ellipsometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Si; Rond, Johannes; Steinberg, Christian; Papenheim, Marc; Scheer, Hella-Christin

    2016-02-01

    Semicrystalline Reg-P3HT (regio-regular poly-3-hexylthiophene) is a promising material for organic electronics. It features relatively high charge mobility and enables easy preparation because of its solubility. Due to its high optical and electrical anisotropy, the size, number and orientation of the ordered domains are important for applications. To control these properties without limitation from crystalline domains existing after spin coating, thermal nanoimprint is performed beyond the melting point. The state of the art of measurement to analyze the complex morphology is X-ray diffraction (XRD). We address an alternative measurement method to characterize the material by its optical properties, spectroscopic ellipsometry. It provides information on the degree of order from the typical fingerprint absorption spectrum. In addition, when the material is modeled as a uniaxial layer, an anisotropy factor can be derived. The results obtained from spectroscopic ellipsometry are in accordance with those from XRD. In particular, spectroscopic ellipsometry is able to distinguish between order along the backbone and order in π- π stacking direction, which is important with respect to conductivity.

  8. Progress in laser-spectroscopic techniques for aerodynamic measurements - An overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mckenzie, Robert L.

    1991-01-01

    An overview is given of the capabilities and recent progress in laser-spectroscopic measurement techniques for use in aerodynamic test facilities and flight research vehicles. It includes a survey of the literature which is centered on this application of laser spectroscopy. The intended reader is the specialist in experimental fluid dynamics who is not intimately familiar with the physics or applications of laser spectroscopy. Thus, some discussion is also included of the nature of each laser-spectroscopic technique and the practical aspects of its use for aerodynamic measurements. The specific techniques reviewed include laser absorption, laser-induced fluorescence, laser Rayleigh scattering, and laser Raman scattering including spontaneous and coherent processes.

  9. Near-infrared spectroscopic photoacoustic microscopy using a multi-color fiber laser source

    PubMed Central

    Buma, Takashi; Wilkinson, Benjamin C.; Sheehan, Timothy C.

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate a simple multi-wavelength optical source suitable for spectroscopic optical resolution photoacoustic microscopy (OR-PAM) of lipid-rich tissue. 1064 nm laser pulses are converted to multiple wavelengths beyond 1300 nm via nonlinear optical propagation in a birefringent optical fiber. OR-PAM experiments with lipid phantoms clearly show the expected absorption peak near 1210 nm. We believe this simple multi-color technique is a promising cost-effective approach to spectroscopic OR-PAM of lipid-rich tissue. PMID:26309746

  10. Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer Measurements of Interstellar Fluorine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Federman, S. R.; Sheffer, Yaron; Lambert, David L.; Smith, V. V.

    2005-02-01

    The source of fluorine is not well understood, although core-collapse supernovae, Wolf-Rayet stars, and asymptotic giant branch stars have been suggested. A search for evidence of the ν-process during Type II supernovae is presented. Absorption from interstellar F I is seen in spectra of HD 208440 and HD 209339A acquired with the Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer. In order to extract the column density for F I from the line at 954 Å, absorption from H2 has to be modeled and then removed. Our analysis indicates that for H2 column densities less than about 3×1020 cm-2, the amount of F I can be determined from λ954. For these two sight lines, there is no clear indication for enhanced F abundances resulting from the ν-process in a region shaped by past supernovae. Based on observations made with the NASA/CNES/CSA Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer (FUSE), which is operated for NASA by the Johns Hopkins University under NASA contract NAS 5-32985.

  11. Molecular weight, polydispersity, and spectroscopic properties of aquatic humic substances

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chin, Y.-P.; Aiken, G.; O'Loughlin, E.

    1994-01-01

    The number- and weight-averaged molecular weights of a number of aquatic fulvic acids, a commercial humic acid, and unfractionated organic matter from four natural water samples were measured by high-pressure size exclusion chromatography (HPSEC). Molecular weights determined in this manner compared favorably with those values reported in the literature. Both recent literature values and our data indicate that these substances are smaller and less polydisperse than previously believed. Moreover, the molecular weights of the organic matter from three of the four natural water samples compared favorably to the fulvic acid samples extracted from similar environments. Bulk spectroscopic properties of the fulvic substances such as molar absorptivity at 280 nm and the E4/E6 ratio were also measured. A strong correlation was observed between molar absorptivity, total aromaticity, and the weight average molecular weights of all the humic substances. This observation suggests that bulk spectroscopic properties can be used to quickly estimate the size of humic substances and their aromatic contents. Both parameters are important with respect to understanding humic substance mobility and their propensity to react with both organic and inorganic pollutants. ?? 1994 American Chemical Society.

  12. Quasar Absorption Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mushotzky, Richard (Technical Monitor); Elvis, Martin

    2004-01-01

    The aim of the proposal is to investigate the absorption properties of a sample of inter-mediate redshift quasars. The main goals of the project are: Measure the redshift and the column density of the X-ray absorbers; test the correlation between absorption and redshift suggested by ROSAT and ASCA data; constrain the absorber ionization status and metallicity; constrain the absorber dust content and composition through the comparison between the amount of X-ray absorption and optical dust extinction. Unanticipated low energy cut-offs where discovered in ROSAT spectra of quasars and confirmed by ASCA, BeppoSAX and Chandra. In most cases it was not possible to constrain adequately the redshift of the absorber from the X-ray data alone. Two possibilities remain open: a) absorption at the quasar redshift; and b) intervening absorption. The evidences in favour of intrinsic absorption are all indirect. Sensitive XMM observations can discriminate between these different scenarios. If the absorption is at the quasar redshift we can study whether the quasar environment evolves with the Cosmic time.

  13. High-resolution Mn K -edge x-ray emission and absorption spectroscopy study of the electronic and local structure of the three different phases in N d0.5S r0.5Mn O3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lafuerza, S.; García, J.; Subías, G.; Blasco, J.; Glatzel, P.

    2016-05-01

    N d0.5S r0.5Mn O3 is particularly representative of mixed-valent manganites since their three characteristic macroscopic phases (charge-ordered insulator, ferromagnetic-metallic, and paramagnetic insulator) appear at different temperatures. We here report a complete x-ray emission and absorption spectroscopy (XES-XAS) study of N d0.5S r0.5Mn O3 as a function of temperature to investigate the electronic and local structure changes of the Mn atom in these three phases. Compared with the differences in the XES-XAS spectra between N d0.5S r0.5Mn O3 and the single-valent reference compounds NdMn O3 (M n3 + ) and Sr/CaMn O3 (M n4 + ), only modest changes have been obtained across the magnetoelectrical transitions. The XES spectra, including both the Mn Kα and Kβ emission lines, have mainly shown a subtle decrease in the local spin density accompanying the passage to the ferromagnetic-metallic phase. For the same phase, the small intensity variations in the pre-edge region of the high-resolution XAS spectra reflect an increase of the p -d mixing. The analysis of these XAS spectra imply a charge segregation between the two different Mn sites far from one electron, being in intermediate valences M n+3.5 ±δ /2(δ <0.2 e -) for all the phases. Our results indicate that the spin, charge, and geometrical structure of the Mn atom hardly change among the three macroscopic phases demonstrating the strong competition between the ferromagnetic conductor and the charge-ordered insulator behaviors in the manganites.

  14. Strategies of Gammarus pulex L. to cope with arsenic--Results from speciation analyses by IC-ICP-MS and XAS micro-mapping.

    PubMed

    Schaller, Jörg; Koch, Iris; Caumette, Guilhem; Nearing, Michelle; Reimer, Kenneth J; Planer-Friedrich, Britta

    2015-10-15

    The invertebrate shredder Gammarus pulex L. is a key species for aquatic carbon turnover via litter decomposition and can thrive in high-arsenic (As) environments. To understand their strategies for coping with increased As concentrations while fulfilling their ecosystem functions, we analyzed the As concentration and speciation in their aquatic habitat and in leaves with heterotrophic biofilms as their natural food source. We also followed the As distribution and speciation on the cuticle and within the body of G. pulex by X-ray absorption spectroscopic imaging. Half of the total As on G. pulex was found to be associated with the cuticle but was not taken up. Removing this externally bound As yielded only arsenate in the wash solution which reflects the speciation of the surrounding aquatic phase and shows that this As does not undergo any biotransformation. The major pathway into the organism is suggested to be incorporation via food intake, but only very low amounts of As were taken up or translocated from the gut system to other tissues. In one of the main food sources, leaves, 68% arsenate and 29% monomethylarsenate were found. After ingestion into the gut system, up to 23% of the more toxic arsenite was seen, but a substantial share was methylated to dimethylarsenate (46-56%). Little arsenate and arsenite were found in the adjacent tissues. Besides 76-80% mono- and di-methylarsenate, 10-21% of the As was complexed as As(III)-S species. G. pulex plays an important role in As cycling and our results indicate that As translocation from the gut to other tissues is minimized, but a transformation to other As-species occurred. PMID:26068228

  15. Accurate calculation of the x-ray absorption spectrum of water via the GW/Bethe-Salpeter equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilmore, Keith; Vinson, John; Kas, Josh; Vila, Fernando; Rehr, John

    2014-03-01

    We calculate x-ray absorption spectra (XAS) of water within the OCEAN code, which combines plane-wave, pseudopotential electronic structure, PAW transition elements, GW self-energy corrections, and the NIST BSE solver. Due to the computational demands of this approach, our initial XAS calculations were limited to 17 molecule super cells. This lead to unphysical, size dependent effects in the calculated spectra. To treat larger systems, we extended the OCEAN interface to support well-parallelized codes such as QuantumESPRESSO. We also implemented an efficient interpolation scheme of Shirley. We applied this large-scale GW/BSE approach to 64 molecule unit cell structures of water obtained from classical DFT/MD and PIMD simulations. In concurrence with previous work, we find the calculated spectrum both qualitatively and quantitatively reproduces the experimental features. The agreement implies that structures based on PIMD, which are similar to the traditional distorted tetrahedral view, are consistent with experimental observations. Supported by the DOE CMCSN through DOE award DE-SC0005180 (Princeton University) and in part by DOE Grant No. DE-FG03-97ER45623 (JJR) with computer support from NERSC.

  16. Reaction-driven restructuring of Pt and Pd catalysts: In operando X-ray absorption spectroscopy study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elsen, Annika; Jung, Ulrich; Li, Yuanyuan; Frenkel, Anatoly; Nuzzo, Ralph

    2014-03-01

    The catalyzed hydrogenation of ethylene on supported metal catalysts has been intensively investigated, mainly because this reaction lies at the heart of many industrial processes. Most previous studies have been performed using surface science techniques in UHV. Therefor little is known about the nature of the active state of the catalyst at ambient pressure where the kinetics is very different. We employed operando X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) to correlate the structural changes of SiO2-supported Pt and Pd catalysts with their activity for ethylene hydrogenation. The XAS experiments were performed at the beamlines X19A and X18B, NSLS, BNL. For both catalysts, strong and largely reversible transformations of the metal bonding were identified at about the maximum ethane conversion. The changes were different for Pt/SiO2 and Pd/SiO2 due to the ability of the latter to form bulk hydride, while the former can only adsorb hydrogen on the surface. As a result, Pt/SiO2 undergoes disordering of the surface, leading to a strong reduction of the Pt-Pt coordination number under H2-deficient conditions, while the main effect for Pd/SiO2 is the hydrogen uptake with concomitant increase in Pd-Pd bond length. The correlation between these different kinds of order transitions and differences in rates for these catalysts will be discussed.

  17. Versatile plug flow catalytic cell for in situ transmission/fluorescence x-ray absorption fine structure measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Centomo, P.; Zecca, M.; Meneghini, C.

    2013-05-15

    A novel flow-through catalytic cell has been developed for in situ x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) experiments on heterogeneous catalysts under working conditions and in the presence of a liquid and a gas phase. The apparatus allows to carry out XAS measurements in both the transmission and fluorescence modes, at moderate temperature (from RT to 50-80 Degree-Sign C) and low-medium gas pressure (up to 7-8 bars). The materials employed are compatible with several chemicals such as those involved in the direct synthesis of hydrogen peroxide (O{sub 2}, H{sub 2}, H{sub 2}O{sub 2}, methanol). The versatile design of the cell allows to fit it to different experimental setups in synchrotron radiation beamlines. It was used successfully for the first time to test nanostructured Pd catalysts during the direct synthesis of hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) in methanol solution from dihydrogen and dioxygen.

  18. X-ray absorption spectroscopy and magnetic circular dichroism studies of L10-Mn-Ga thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glas, M.; Sterwerf, C.; Schmalhorst, J. M.; Ebke, D.; Jenkins, C.; Arenholz, E.; Reiss, G.

    2013-11-01

    Tetragonally distorted Mn3-xGax thin films with 0.1absorption spectroscopy (XAS) and magnetic circular dichroism (XMCD). A highly textured L10 crystal structure of the Mn-Ga films was verified by X-ray diffraction measurements. For samples with e-beam evaporated MgO barrier no evidence for Mn-O was found whereas in samples with magnetron sputtered MgO, Mn-O was detected, even for the thickest interlayer thickness. Both XAS and XMCD measurements showed an increasing interfacial Mn-O amount with decreasing CoFeB interlayer thickness. Additional element specific full hysteresis loops determined an out-of-plane magnetization axis for the Mn and Co, respectively.

  19. X-ray absorption spectroscopy and magnetic circular dichroism studies of L1{sub 0}-Mn-Ga thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Glas, M. Sterwerf, C.; Schmalhorst, J. M.; Reiss, G.; Ebke, D.; Jenkins, C.; Arenholz, E.

    2013-11-14

    Tetragonally distorted Mn{sub 3−x}Ga{sub x} thin films with 0.1absorption spectroscopy (XAS) and magnetic circular dichroism (XMCD). A highly textured L1{sub 0} crystal structure of the Mn-Ga films was verified by X-ray diffraction measurements. For samples with e-beam evaporated MgO barrier no evidence for Mn-O was found whereas in samples with magnetron sputtered MgO, Mn-O was detected, even for the thickest interlayer thickness. Both XAS and XMCD measurements showed an increasing interfacial Mn-O amount with decreasing CoFeB interlayer thickness. Additional element specific full hysteresis loops determined an out-of-plane magnetization axis for the Mn and Co, respectively.

  20. X-ray absorption spectroscopy studies on magnetic tunnel junctions with AlO and AlN tunnel barriers

    SciTech Connect

    Mun, B. S.; Moon, J. C.; Hong, S. W.; Kang, K. S.; Kim, K.; Kim, T. W.; Ju, H. L.

    2006-04-15

    X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) measurements of the optimized magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJs) with AlO and AlN barriers have been performed to study the chemical structures of the barrier and the underlying layer. These MTJs with AlO and AlN barriers exhibited increased tunneling magnetoresistance (TMR) after annealing at 200 deg. C from 27% to 45% and from 25% to 33%, respectively. Surprisingly, the XPS and XAS measurements confirmed that both the as-grown and the annealed MTJs had metallic Co and Fe at the interface between the barrier and the underlying CoFe layer. After annealing, under-stoichiometric AlO{sub x} and AlN{sub x} phases in MTJs with AlO and AlN barriers partially transformed into stoichiometric Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and AlN phases, respectively. Thus the increase in TMR after annealing for MTJs with clean interface between the barrier and the underlying layer is believed due to the anion redistribution inside the barrier layer, not from back diffusion from pinned magnetic layer to barrier layer.

  1. Spectroscopic characterization of polymers: report

    SciTech Connect

    Koenig, J.L.

    1987-10-01

    Polymer characterization has presented major difficulties to the analytical chemist, who has had to develop techniques to cope with the challenge. Even the elementary problem of measuring molecular weight is not easy. Yet such measurements are essential, because the physical, mechanical, and flow properties depend on the length of the polymer chain. Because of the limited solubility and high viscosity of polymers, many classical techniques have been of little use or have had to be extensively modified to measure the molecular weight of polymers. Size-exclusion chromatographic techniques such as gel permeation have been developed to measure these molecular weight distributions. Special chromatographic instruments with a range of spectroscopic detectors (including infrared and laser-light scattering) have emerged commercially to aid the analytical chemist in the fundamental endeavor to measure the length of the polymer chain and its distribution. The author describes the advantages and disadvantages and disadvantages of various spectroscopic techniques.

  2. Spectroscopic low coherence interferometry using a supercontinuum source and an ultra broadband spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleischhauer, F.; Caujolle, S.; Feutcher, T.; Rajendram, R.; Leick, L.; Podoleanu, A.

    2016-03-01

    Spectroscopic optical coherence tomography (SOCT) combines the imaging capability of optical coherence tomography with spectroscopic absorption information. SOCT requires a large bandwidth combined with a broadband spectrometer, due to the processing of the measured data, which includes dividing the spectrum in spectral bands. Both, spectral and axial resolution of SOCT depend on the spectral width of each window. A supercontinuum source with its broad spectrum allows a sufficient number of windows combined with a reasonable axial resolution, which depends on the application. Here a SOCT system is used in the visible spectral range from 480 to 730 nm by combining a supercontinuum light source, a Michelson interferometer and a commercial available broadband spectrometer. This wavelength range is chosen because it covers a range of useful absorbers, including that of human proteins. The system is tested with a laser dye rhodamine B for calibration and verification. Rhodamine B has an absorption peak at around 542 nm, which resembles the absorption spectrum of several proteins in the globin group. The results show that the absorption spectrum of rhodamine B can be reconstructed with sufficient accuracy and demonstrate that varying spectroscopic information can be retrieved from different depths.

  3. Single nanoparticle tracking spectroscopic microscope

    DOEpatents

    Yang, Haw; Cang, Hu; Xu, Cangshan; Wong, Chung M.

    2011-07-19

    A system that can maintain and track the position of a single nanoparticle in three dimensions for a prolonged period has been disclosed. The system allows for continuously imaging the particle to observe any interactions it may have. The system also enables the acquisition of real-time sequential spectroscopic information from the particle. The apparatus holds great promise in performing single molecule spectroscopy and imaging on a non-stationary target.

  4. Evidence for core–shell nanoclusters in oxygen dispersion strengthened steels measured using X-ray absorption spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, S.; Odette, G. R.; Segre, C. U.

    2014-02-01

    Nanostructured ferritic alloys (NFA) dispersion strengthened by an ultra high density of Y–Ti–O enriched nano-features (NF) exhibit superior creep strength and the potential for high resistance to radiation damage. However, the detailed character of the NF, that precipitate from solid solution during hot consolidation of metallic powders mechanically alloyed with Y₂O₃, are not well understood. In order to clarify the nature of the NF, X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) technique, including X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) and extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) were used to characterize the local structure of the Ti and Y atoms in both NFA powders and consolidated alloys. The powders were characterized in the as-received, as-milled and after annealing milled powders at 850, 1000 and 1150 °C. The consolidated alloys included powders hot isostatic pressed (HIPed) at 1150 °C and commercial vendor alloys, MA957 and J12YWT. The NFA XAS data were compared various Ti and Y-oxide standards. The XANES and EXAFS spectra for the annealed and HIPed powders are similar and show high temperature heat treatments shift the Y and Ti to more oxidized states that are consistent with combinations of Y₂Ti₂O₇ and, especially, TiO. However, the MA957 and J12YWT and annealed–consolidated powder data differ. The commercial vendor alloys results more closely resemble the as-milled powder data and all show that a significant fraction of substitutional Ti remains dissolved in the (BCC) ferrite matrix.

  5. Biomimetic mono- and dinuclear Ni(I) and Ni(II) complexes studied by X-ray absorption and emission spectroscopy and quantum chemical calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuth, N.; Gehring, H.; Horn, B.; Holze, P.; Kositzki, R.; Schrapers, P.; Limberg, C.; Haumann, M.

    2016-05-01

    Five biomimetic mono- or dinuclear nickel complexes featuring Ni(I) or Ni(II) sites were studied by X-ray absorption and emission spectroscopy and DFT calculations. Ni K-edge XANES spectra and Kβ main and satellite emission lines were collected on powder samples. The pre-edge absorption transitions (core-to-valence excitation) and Kβ2,5 emission transitions (valence-to-core decay) were calculated using DFT (TPSSh/TZVP) on crystal structures. This yielded theoretical ctv and vtc spectra in near-quantitative agreement with the experiment, showing the adequacy of the DFT approach for electronic structure description, emphasizing the sensitivity of the XAS/XES spectra for ligation/redox changes at nickel, and revealing the configuration of unoccupied and occupied valence levels, as well as the spin-coupling modes in the dinuclear complexes. XAS/XES-DFT is valuable for molecular and electronic structure analysis of synthetic complexes and of nickel centers in H2 or COx converting metalloenzymes.

  6. Compounds affecting cholesterol absorption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hua, Duy H. (Inventor); Koo, Sung I. (Inventor); Noh, Sang K. (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    A class of novel compounds is described for use in affecting lymphatic absorption of cholesterol. Compounds of particular interest are defined by Formula I: ##STR1## or a pharmaceutically acceptable salt thereof.

  7. Absorption heat pump system

    DOEpatents

    Grossman, Gershon

    1984-01-01

    The efficiency of an absorption heat pump system is improved by conducting liquid from a second stage evaporator thereof to an auxiliary heat exchanger positioned downstream of a primary heat exchanger in the desorber of the system.

  8. Absorption heat pump system

    DOEpatents

    Grossman, G.

    1982-06-16

    The efficiency of an absorption heat pump system is improved by conducting liquid from a second stage evaporator thereof to an auxiliary heat exchanger positioned downstream of a primary heat exchanger in the desorber of the system.

  9. Dipeptide absorption in man

    PubMed Central

    Hellier, M. D.; Holdsworth, C. D.; McColl, I.; Perrett, D.

    1972-01-01

    A quantitative perfusion method has been used to study intestinal absorption of two dipeptides—glycyl-glycine and glycyl-l-alanine—in normal subjects. In each case, the constituent amino acids were absorbed faster when presented as dipeptides than as free amino acids, suggesting intact dipeptide transport. During absorption constituent amino acids were measured within the lumen and it is suggested that these represent amino acids which have diffused back to the lumen after absorption as dipeptide. Portal blood analyses during absorption of a third dipeptide, glycyl-l-lysine, have shown that this dipeptide, known to be transported intact from the intestinal lumen, is hydrolysed to its constitutent amino acids before it reaches portal venous blood. PMID:4652039

  10. Optical absorption measurement system

    DOEpatents

    Draggoo, Vaughn G.; Morton, Richard G.; Sawicki, Richard H.; Bissinger, Horst D.

    1989-01-01

    The system of the present invention contemplates a non-intrusive method for measuring the temperature rise of optical elements under high laser power optical loading to determine the absorption coefficient. The method comprises irradiating the optical element with a high average power laser beam, viewing the optical element with an infrared camera to determine the temperature across the optical element and calculating the absorption of the optical element from the temperature.

  11. Solar selective absorption coatings

    DOEpatents

    Mahoney, Alan R.; Reed, Scott T.; Ashley, Carol S.; Martinez, F. Edward

    2004-08-31

    A new class of solar selective absorption coatings are disclosed. These coatings comprise a structured metallic overlayer such that the overlayer has a sub-micron structure designed to efficiently absorb solar radiation, while retaining low thermal emissivity for infrared thermal radiation. A sol-gel layer protects the structured metallic overlayer from mechanical, thermal, and environmental degradation. Processes for producing such solar selective absorption coatings are also disclosed.

  12. Solar selective absorption coatings

    DOEpatents

    Mahoney, Alan R.; Reed, Scott T.; Ashley, Carol S.; Martinez, F. Edward

    2003-10-14

    A new class of solar selective absorption coatings are disclosed. These coatings comprise a structured metallic overlayer such that the overlayer has a sub-micron structure designed to efficiently absorb solar radiation, while retaining low thermal emissivity for infrared thermal radiation. A sol-gel layer protects the structured metallic overlayer from mechanical, thermal, and environmental degradation. Processes for producing such solar selective absorption coatings are also disclosed.

  13. Conduction-band electronic states of YbInCu{sub 4} studied by photoemission and soft x-ray absorption spectroscopies

    SciTech Connect

    Utsumi, Yuki; Kurihara, Hidenao; Maso, Hiroyuki; Tobimatsu, Komei; Sato, Hitoshi; Shimada, Kenya; Namatame, Hirofumi; Hiraoka, Koichi; Kojima, Kenichi; Ohkochi, Takuo; Fujimori, Shin-ichi; Takeda, Yukiharu; Saitoh, Yuji; Mimura, Kojiro; Ueda, Shigenori; Yamashita, Yoshiyuki; Yoshikawa, Hideki; Kobayashi, Keisuke; Oguchi, Tamio; Taniguchi, Masaki

    2011-09-15

    We have studied conduction-band (CB) electronic states of a typical valence-transition compound YbInCu{sub 4} by means of temperature-dependent hard x-ray photoemission spectroscopy (HX-PES) of the Cu 2p{sub 3/2} and In 3d{sub 5/2} core states taken at h{nu}=5.95 keV, soft x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) of the Cu 2p{sub 3/2} core absorption region around h{nu}{approx}935 eV, and soft x-ray photoemission spectroscopy (SX-PES) of the valence band at the Cu 2p{sub 3/2} absorption edge of h{nu}=933.0 eV. With decreasing temperature below the valence transition at T{sub V}=42 K, we have found that (1) the Cu 2p{sub 3/2} and In 3d{sub 5/2} peaks in the HX-PES spectra exhibit the energy shift toward the lower binding-energy side by {approx}40 and {approx}30 meV, respectively, (2) an energy position of the Cu 2p{sub 3/2} main absorption peak in the XAS spectrum is shifted toward higher photon-energy side by {approx}100 meV, with an appearance of a shoulder structure below the Cu 2p{sub 3/2} main absorption peak, and (3) an intensity of the Cu L{sub 3}VV Auger spectrum is abruptly enhanced. These experimental results suggest that the Fermi level of the CB-derived density of states is shifted toward the lower binding-energy side. We have described the valence transition in YbInCu{sub 4} in terms of the charge transfer from the CB to Yb 4f states.

  14. Understanding Electrocatalytic Pathways in Low and Medium Temperature Fuel Cells: Synchrotron-based In Situ X-Ray Absorption Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Mukerjee, S.; Ziegelbauer, J; Arruda, T; Ramaker, D; Shyam, B

    2008-01-01

    Over the last few decades, researchers have made significant developments in producing more advanced electrocatalytic materials for power generation applications. For example, traditional fuel cell catalysts often involve high-priced precious metals such as Pt. However, in order for fuel cells to become commercially viable, there is a need to reduce or completely remove precious metal altogether. As a result, a myriad of novel, unconventional materials have been explored such as chalcogenides, porphyrins, and organic-metal-macrocycles for low/medium temperature fuel cells as well as enzymatic and microbial fuel cells. As these materials increasingly become more complex, researchers often find themselves in search of new characterization methods, especially those which are allow in situ and operando measurements with element specificity. One such method that has received much attention for analysis of electrocatalytic materials is X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS). XAS is an element specific, core level absorption technique which yields structural and electronic information. As a core electron method, XAS requires an extremely bright source, hence a synchrotron. The resulting intensity of synchrotron radiation allow for experiments to be conducted in situ, under electrochemically relevant conditions. Although a bulk-averaging technique requiring rigorous mathematical manipulation, XAS has the added benefit that it can probe materials which possess no long range order. This makes it ideal to characterize nano-scale electrocatalysts. XAS experiments are conducted by ramping the X-ray photon energy while measuring absorption of the incident beam the sample or by counting fluorescent photons released from a sample due to subsequent relaxation. Absorption mode XAS follows the Beer-Lambert Law, {mu}x = log(I{sub 0}/I{sub t}) (1) where {mu} is the absorption coefficient, x is the sample thickness and I{sub 0} and I{sub t} are the intensities of the incident and

  15. Seven-effect absorption refrigeration

    DOEpatents

    DeVault, Robert C.; Biermann, Wendell J.

    1989-01-01

    A seven-effect absorption refrigeration cycle is disclosed utilizing three absorption circuits. In addition, a heat exchanger is used for heating the generator of the low absorption circuit with heat rejected from the condenser and absorber of the medium absorption circuit. A heat exchanger is also provided for heating the generator of the medium absorption circuit with heat rejected from the condenser and absorber of the high absorption circuit. If desired, another heat exchanger can also be provided for heating the evaporator of the high absorption circuit with rejected heat from either the condenser or absorber of the low absorption circuit.

  16. Seven-effect absorption refrigeration

    DOEpatents

    DeVault, R.C.; Biermann, W.J.

    1989-05-09

    A seven-effect absorption refrigeration cycle is disclosed utilizing three absorption circuits. In addition, a heat exchanger is used for heating the generator of the low absorption circuit with heat rejected from the condenser and absorber of the medium absorption circuit. A heat exchanger is also provided for heating the generator of the medium absorption circuit with heat rejected from the condenser and absorber of the high absorption circuit. If desired, another heat exchanger can also be provided for heating the evaporator of the high absorption circuit with rejected heat from either the condenser or absorber of the low absorption circuit. 1 fig.

  17. Millisecond kinetics of photo-darkening/bleaching in xGe45Se55-(1-x)As45Se55 chalcogenide amorphous films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Qiqi; Jain, Himanshu; Yang, Guang; Ren, Jing; Chen, Guorong

    2012-09-01

    Photosensitivity of thermally evaporated chalcogenide amorphous films of xGe45Se55-(1-x)As45Se55 (x = 0, 0.25, 0.5, 0.75, 1) composition is investigated when exposed to the laser light of 660 nm wavelength. The photo-induced effects transition from photodarkening (PD) to photobleaching (PB) as Ge45Se55 x increases from 0 to 1. The degree of PB correlates with the concentration of Ge-Ge homopolar bonds. The kinetics of PD and PB can be well described by a stretched exponential function. The dynamic response of PB is much faster than that of PD films in the present glass system.

  18. Electrical conductivity studies in (Ag3AsS3)x(As2S3)1-x superionic glasses and composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Studenyak, I. P.; Neimet, Yu. Yu.; Kranjčec, M.; Solomon, A. M.; Orliukas, A. F.; Kežionis, A.; Kazakevičius, E.; Šalkus, T.

    2014-01-01

    Compositional, frequency, and temperature studies of impedance and electrical conductivity in (Ag3AsS3)x(As2S3)1-x superionic glasses and composites were performed. Frequency range from 10 Hz to 3 × 109 Hz and temperature interval 300-400 K were used for the measurements. Compositional dependences of electrical conductivity and activation energy are analyzed; the most substantial changes are observed with the transition from (Ag3AsS3)0.4(As2S3)0.6 glass to (Ag3AsS3)0.5(As2S3)0.5 composite. With increase of Ag3AsS3 content, the investigated materials are found to have crystalline inclusions and show the two-phase composite nature. Addition of Ag3AsS3 leads to the increase of electrical conductivity whereas the activation energy decreases.

  19. Temperature stability of Al(x)Ga(1-x)As (x = 0-1) thermal oxide masks for selective-area epitaxy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Stephen H.; Lau, Kei May; Pouch, John J.

    1988-01-01

    The use of thermal oxides of Al(x)Ga(1-x)As (x = 0-1) as masking materials for selective-area epitaxy by a organometallic chemical-vapor deposition has been investigated. It was found that the thermal oxide of GaAs is only applicable for low growth temperatures (less than or equal to 600 C), and the addition of aluminum significantly improves the thermal stability of the oxide. The oxide of Al(0.4)Ga(0.6)As is suitable for high-temperature deposition, but there are criteria for the thickness and oxidation temperature. Thin layers of AlAs oxidized at 475 C are excellent masks and allow precise thickness control. Promising results of selective-area deposition using these aluminum oxide masks have been obtained. High-quality single crystal grew in mask openings uniformly surrounded by dense and fine-grain polycrystalline deposits, producing a planar duplication of the original pattern.

  20. Effect of wet oxidized AlxGa1-xAs layer on the interdiffusion of InGaAs/GaAs quantum wells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choe, Joong-Seon; Ryu, Sang-Wan; Choe, Byung-Doo; Lim, H.

    1998-06-01

    The effect of wet oxidized AlAs cap layer and AlGaAs interlayer on the thermal stability of In0.2Ga0.8As/GaAs quantum well (QW) is studied. The QW interdiffusion rate is observed to increase with the Al composition of the AlxGa1-xAs interlayer until x reaches about 0.5 and then saturate for x⩾0.5. When the oxidation is performed at 380 °C for 15 min, the threshold value of x for the enhancement of QW interdiffusion is found to be 0.3. It is also confirmed that the QW interdiffusion can only be explained when the strain effect in InGaAs is taken into account.

  1. Temperature stability of Al(x)Ga(1-x)As (x = 0-1) thermal oxide masks for selective-area epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Stephen H.; Lau, Kei May; Pouch, John J.

    1988-07-01

    The use of thermal oxides of Al(x)Ga(1-x)As (x = 0-1) as masking materials for selective-area epitaxy by a organometallic chemical-vapor deposition has been investigated. It was found that the thermal oxide of GaAs is only applicable for low growth temperatures (less than or equal to 600 C), and the addition of aluminum significantly improves the thermal stability of the oxide. The oxide of Al(0.4)Ga(0.6)As is suitable for high-temperature deposition, but there are criteria for the thickness and oxidation temperature. Thin layers of AlAs oxidized at 475 C are excellent masks and allow precise thickness control. Promising results of selective-area deposition using these aluminum oxide masks have been obtained. High-quality single crystal grew in mask openings uniformly surrounded by dense and fine-grain polycrystalline deposits, producing a planar duplication of the original pattern.

  2. Local atomic structure and oxidation processes of Cu(I) binding site in amyloid beta peptide: XAS Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kremennaya, M. A.; Soldatov, M. A.; Stretsov, V. A.; Soldatov, A. V.

    2016-05-01

    There are two different motifs of X-ray absorption spectra for Cu(I) K-edge in amyloid-β peptide which could be due to two different configurations of local Cu(I) environment. Two or three histidine ligands can coordinate copper ion in varying conformations. On the other hand, oxidation of amyloid-β peptide could play an additional role in local copper environment. In order to explore the peculiarities of local atomic and electronic structure of Cu(I) binding sites in amyloid-β peptide the x-ray absorption spectra were simulated for various Cu(I) environments including oxidized amyloid-β and compared with experimental data.

  3. Surface Arsenic Speciation of a Drinking-Water Treatment Residual Using X-Ray Absorption Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Makris, K.C.; Sarkar, D.; Parsons, J.G.; Datta, R.; Gardea-Torresdey, J.L.

    2009-06-03

    Drinking-water treatment residuals (WTRs) present a low-cost geosorbent for As-contaminated waters and soils. Previous work has demonstrated the high affinity of WTRs for As, but data pertaining to the stability of sorbed As is missing. Sorption/desorption and X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS), both XANES (X-ray absorption near edge structure) and EXAFS (extended X-ray absorption fine structure) studies, were combined to determine the stability of As sorbed by an Fe-based WTR. Arsenic(V) and As(III) sorption kinetics were biphasic in nature, sorbing <90% of the initial added As (15,000 mg kg{sup -1}) after 48 h of reaction. Subsequent desorption experiments with a high P load (7500 mg kg{sup -1}) showed negligible As desorption for both As species, approximately <3.5% of sorbed As; the small amount of desorbed As was attributed to the abundance of sorption sites. XANES data showed that sorption kinetics for either As(III) or As(V) initially added to solution had no effect on the sorbed As oxidation state. EXAFS spectroscopy suggested that As added either as As(III) or as As(V) formed inner-sphere mononuclear, bidentate complexes, suggesting the stability of the sorbed As, which was further corroborated by the minimum As desorption from the Fe-WTR.

  4. Reactions between vanadium ions and biogenic reductants of tunicates: Spectroscopic probing for complexation and redox products in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Ryan, D.E.; Grant, K.B.; Nakanishi, K.

    1996-07-02

    Several species of marine tunicates store oxygen-sensitive V{sup III} in blood cells. A sensitive colorimetric V{sup III} assay was used t survey the leading candidates for the native reducing agent of vanadate in tunicates (i.e., An-type tunichromes, glutathione, NADPH, and H{sub 2}S) in reactions with V{sup V} or V{sup IV} ions under anaerobic, aqueous conditions at acidic or neutral pH. Except for the case of An-1 and V{sup V} ions in pH 7 buffer, the assay results for the biogenic reducing agents clearly showed that appreciable quantities of V{sup III} products were not generated under the conditions tested. Therefore, the assay results place new limits on hypothetical mechanisms of V{sup III} formation in vivo. For reactions between An-1 and V{sup V} ions in pH 7 buffer, low levels of V{sup III} products could not be ruled out because of an interfering peak in the colorimetric assays. For similar reactions between V{sup V} ions and An-1, or an An-1,2 mixture, in mildly to moderately basic media, the product mixtures precipitated as greenish black solids. Analyses of the precipitated V/An mixtures using vanadium K-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) showed that the major products were tris(catecholate)-type V{sup IV} complexes (65 {plus_minus} 6%) and bis(catecholate)-type V{sup IV}O complexes (20 {plus_minus} 4%). XAS analysis of the V/An-1 product mixture also provided evidence of a minor V{sup III} component (9 {plus_minus} 5% of total V), notable for possible relevance to tunicate biochemistry. The combined results of XAS studies, spectrophotometric studies, and EPR studies consistently establish that reactions between tunichromes (Mm-1 or An-1) and V{sup V} ions generate predominantly V{sup IV}-tunichrome complexes in neutral to moderately basic aqueous media. 53 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  5. Identification and Spectroscopic Characterization of Nonheme Iron(III) Hypochlorite Intermediates†

    PubMed Central

    Draksharapu, Apparao; Angelone, Davide; Quesne, Matthew G.; Padamati, Sandeep K.; Gómez, Laura; Hage, Ronald; Costas, Miquel

    2015-01-01

    Abstract FeIII–hypohalite complexes have been implicated in a wide range of important enzyme‐catalyzed halogenation reactions including the biosynthesis of natural products and antibiotics and post‐translational modification of proteins. The absence of spectroscopic data on such species precludes their identification. Herein, we report the generation and spectroscopic characterization of nonheme FeIII–hypohalite intermediates of possible relevance to iron halogenases. We show that FeIII‐OCl polypyridylamine complexes can be sufficiently stable at room temperature to be characterized by UV/Vis absorption, resonance Raman and EPR spectroscopies, and cryo‐ESIMS. DFT methods rationalize the pathways to the formation of the FeIII‐OCl, and ultimately FeIV=O, species and provide indirect evidence for a short‐lived FeII‐OCl intermediate. The species observed and the pathways involved offer insight into and, importantly, a spectroscopic database for the investigation of iron halogenases. PMID:27478260

  6. Identification and Spectroscopic Characterization of Nonheme Iron(III) Hypochlorite Intermediates**

    PubMed Central

    Draksharapu, Apparao; Angelone, Davide; Quesne, Matthew G; Padamati, Sandeep K; Gómez, Laura; Hage, Ronald; Costas, Miquel; Browne, Wesley R; de Visser, Sam P

    2015-01-01

    FeIII–hypohalite complexes have been implicated in a wide range of important enzyme-catalyzed halogenation reactions including the biosynthesis of natural products and antibiotics and post-translational modification of proteins. The absence of spectroscopic data on such species precludes their identification. Herein, we report the generation and spectroscopic characterization of nonheme FeIII–hypohalite intermediates of possible relevance to iron halogenases. We show that FeIII-OCl polypyridylamine complexes can be sufficiently stable at room temperature to be characterized by UV/Vis absorption, resonance Raman and EPR spectroscopies, and cryo-ESIMS. DFT methods rationalize the pathways to the formation of the FeIII-OCl, and ultimately FeIV=O, species and provide indirect evidence for a short-lived FeII-OCl intermediate. The species observed and the pathways involved offer insight into and, importantly, a spectroscopic database for the investigation of iron halogenases. PMID:25663379

  7. A Combined theoretical and experimental study of conformational and spectroscopic profile of 2-acetamido-5-aminopyridine.

    PubMed

    Pathak, Shilendra K; Srivastava, Ruchi; Sachan, Alok K; Prasad, Onkar; Sinha, Leena

    2015-05-15

    Present work aims at identifying the conformational and spectroscopic profile of 2-acetamido-5-aminopyridine compound by means of experimental and computational methods. To achieve this, three-dimensional potential energy scan (PES) was performed by varying the selected dihedral angles at B3LYP/6-31+G(d,p) level of theory and thus stable conformers of the title compound were determined. The most stable conformer was further optimized at higher level and vibrational wavenumbers were calculated. Experimentally, vibrational features of title compound were determined by FT-IR and FT-Raman spectroscopic methods in the solid phase while the electronic absorption spectrum was recorded in methanol solution. On the basis of these investigations, the conformational and spectroscopic attributes of 2-acetamido-5-aminopyridine were interpreted. PMID:25725210

  8. A Combined theoretical and experimental study of conformational and spectroscopic profile of 2-acetamido-5-aminopyridine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pathak, Shilendra K.; Srivastava, Ruchi; Sachan, Alok K.; Prasad, Onkar; Sinha, Leena

    2015-05-01

    Present work aims at identifying the conformational and spectroscopic profile of 2-acetamido-5-aminopyridine compound by means of experimental and computational methods. To achieve this, three-dimensional potential energy scan (PES) was performed by varying the selected dihedral angles at B3LYP/6-31+G(d,p) level of theory and thus stable conformers of the title compound were determined. The most stable conformer was further optimized at higher level and vibrational wavenumbers were calculated. Experimentally, vibrational features of title compound were determined by FT-IR and FT-Raman spectroscopic methods in the solid phase while the electronic absorption spectrum was recorded in methanol solution. On the basis of these investigations, the conformational and spectroscopic attributes of 2-acetamido-5-aminopyridine were interpreted.

  9. Spectroscopic Methods of Remote Sensing for Vegetation Characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kokaly, R. F.

    2013-12-01

    Imaging spectroscopy (IS), often referred to as hyperspectral remote sensing, is one of the latest innovations in a very long history of spectroscopy. Spectroscopic methods have been used for understanding the composition of the world around us, as well as, the solar system and distant parts of the universe. Continuous sampling of the electromagnetic spectrum in narrow bands is what separates IS from previous forms of remote sensing. Terrestrial imaging spectrometers often have hundreds of channels that cover the wavelength range of reflected solar radiation, including the visible, near-infrared (NIR), and shortwave infrared (SWIR) regions. In part due to the large number of channels, a wide variety of methods have been applied to extract information from IS data sets. These can be grouped into several broad classes, including: multi-channel indices, statistical procedures, full spectrum mixing models, and spectroscopic methods. Spectroscopic methods carry on the more than 150 year history of laboratory-based spectroscopy applied to material identification and characterization. Spectroscopic methods of IS relate the positions and shapes of spectral features resolved by airborne and spaceborne sensors to the biochemical and physical composition of vegetation in a pixel. The chlorophyll 680nm, water 980nm, water 1200nm, SWIR 1700nm, SWIR 2100nm, and SWIR 2300nm features have been the subject of study. Spectral feature analysis (SFA) involves isolating such an absorption feature using continuum removal (CR) and calculating descriptors of the feature, such as center position, depth, width, area, and asymmetry. SFA has been applied to quantify pigment and non-pigment biochemical concentrations in leaves, plants, and canopies. Spectral feature comparison (SFC) utilizes CR of features in each pixel's spectrum and linear regression with continuum-removed features in reference spectra in a library of known vegetation types to map vegetation species and communities. SFC has

  10. Arsenic Re-Mobilization in Water Treatment Adsorbents Under Reducing Conditions: Part II, XAS and Modeling Study

    SciTech Connect

    Liu,S.; Jing, C.; Meng, X.

    2008-01-01

    The mechanism of arsenic re-mobilization in spent adsorbents under reducing conditions was studied using X-ray absorption spectroscopy and surface complexation model calculations. X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy demonstrated that As(V) was partially reduced to As(III) in spent granular ferric hydroxide (GFH), titanium dioxide (TiO2), activated alumina (AA) and modified activated alumina (MAA) adsorbents after 2 years of anaerobic incubation. As(V) was completely reduced to As(III) in spent granular ferric oxide (GFO) under 2-year incubation. The extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy analysis showed that As(III) formed bidentate binuclear surface complexes on GFO as evidenced by an average As(III)-O bond distance of 1.78 Angstroms and As(III)-Fe distance of 3.34 Angstroms . The release of As from the spent GFO and TiO2 was simulated using the charge distribution multi-site complexation (CD-MUSIC) model. The observed redox ranges for As release and sulfate mobility were described by model calculations.

  11. Backscatter absorption gas imaging systems and light sources therefore

    DOEpatents

    Kulp, Thomas Jan; Kliner, Dahv A. V.; Sommers, Ricky; Goers, Uta-Barbara; Armstrong, Karla M.

    2006-12-19

    The location of gases that are not visible to the unaided human eye can be determined using tuned light sources that spectroscopically probe the gases and cameras that can provide images corresponding to the absorption of the gases. The present invention is a light source for a backscatter absorption gas imaging (BAGI) system, and a light source incorporating the light source, that can be used to remotely detect and produce images of "invisible" gases. The inventive light source has a light producing element, an optical amplifier, and an optical parametric oscillator to generate wavelength tunable light in the IR. By using a multi-mode light source and an amplifier that operates using 915 nm pump sources, the power consumption of the light source is reduced to a level that can be operated by batteries for long periods of time. In addition, the light source is tunable over the absorption bands of many hydrocarbons, making it useful for detecting hazardous gases.

  12. Atmospheric Measurements by Cavity Enhanced Absorption Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Hongming; Wu, Tao; Coeur-Tourneur, Cécile; Fertein, Eric; Gao, Xiaoming; Zhao, Weixiong; Zhang, Weijun; Chen, Weidong

    2015-04-01

    Since the last decade, atmospheric environmental monitoring has benefited from the development of novel spectroscopic measurement techniques owing to the significant breakthroughs in photonic technology from the UV to the infrared spectral domain [1]. In this presentation, we will overview our recent development and applications of cavity enhanced absorption spectroscopy techniques for in situ optical monitoring of chemically reactive atmospheric species (such as HONO, NO3, NO2, N2O5) in intensive campaigns [2] and/or in smog chamber studies [3]. These field deployments demonstrated that modern photonic technologies (newly emergent light sources combined with high sensitivity spectroscopic techniques) can provide a useful tool to improve our understanding of tropospheric chemical processes which affect climate, air quality, and the spread of pollution. Experimental detail and preliminary results will be presented. Acknowledgements. The financial support from the French Agence Nationale de la Recherche (ANR) under the NexCILAS (ANR-11-NS09-0002) and the CaPPA (ANR-10-LABX-005) contracts is acknowledged. References [1] X. Cui, C. Lengignon, T. Wu, W. Zhao, G. Wysocki, E. Fertein, C. Coeur, A. Cassez,L. Croisé, W. Chen, et al., "Photonic Sensing of the Atmosphere by absorption spectroscopy", J. Quant. Spectrosc. Rad. Transfer 113 (2012) 1300-1316 [2] T. Wu, Q. Zha, W. Chen, Z. XU, T. Wang, X. He, "Development and deployment of a cavity enhanced UV-LED spectrometer for measurements of atmospheric HONO and NO2 in Hong Kong", Atmos. Environ. 95 (2014) 544-551 [3] T. Wu, C. Coeur-Tourneur, G. Dhont,A. Cassez, E. Fertein, X. He, W. Chen,"Application of IBBCEAS to kinetic study of NO3 radical formation from O3 + NO2 reaction in an atmospheric simulation chamber", J. Quant. Spectrosc. Rad. Transfer 133 (2014)199-205

  13. Fe and S K-edge XAS determination of iron-sulfur species present in a range of acid sulfate soils: Effects of particle size and concentration on quantitative XANES determinations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgan, Kate E.; Burton, Edward D.; Cook, Perran; Raven, Mark D.; Fitzpatrick, Robert W.; Bush, Richard; Sullivan, Leigh A.; Hocking, Rosalie K.

    2009-11-01

    Acid sulfate soils (ASS) are soils and soft sediments in which sulfuric acid may be produced from iron sulfides or have been produced leaving iron oxyhydroxysulfates in amounts that have a long lasting effect on soil characteristics. If soil material is exposed to rotting vegetation or other reducing material, the Fe-oxyhydroxysulfates can be bacterially reduced to sulfides including disulfides (pyrite and marcasite), and Monosulfidic Black Ooze (MBO) a poorly characterised material known to be a mixture of iron sulfides (especially mackinawite) and organic matter. The chemistry of these environments is strongly affected by Fe and S cycling processes and herein we have sought to identify key differences in environments that occur as a function of Fe and S concentration. In addition to our chemical results, we have found that the effects of particle size on self absorption in natural sediments play an important role in the spectroscopic identification of the relative proportions of different species present.

  14. Petawatt laser absorption bounded

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levy, Matthew; Wilks, Scott; Tabak, Max; Libby, Stephen; Baring, Matthew

    2014-10-01

    The interaction of petawatt (1015 W) lasers with solid matter forms the basis for advanced scientific applications such as table-top relativistic particle accelerators, ultrafast charged particle imaging systems and fast ignition inertial confinement fusion. Key metrics for these applications relate to absorption, yet conditions in this regime are so nonlinear that it is often impossible to know the fraction of absorbed light f, and even the range of f is unknown. In this presentation, using a relativistic Rankine-Hugoniot-like analysis, we show how to derive the theoretical maximum and minimum of f. These boundaries constrain nonlinear absorption mechanisms across the petawatt regime, forbidding high absorption values at low laser power and low absorption values at high laser power. Close agreement is shown with several dozens of published experimental data points and simulation results, helping to confirm the theory. For applications needing to circumvent the absorption bounds, these results will accelerate a shift from solid targets, towards structured and multilayer targets, and lead the development of new materials.

  15. Spectroscopic signature for ferroelectric ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wójcik, Marek J.; Gług, Maciej; Boczar, Marek; Boda, Łukasz

    2014-09-01

    Various forms of ice exist within our galaxy. Particularly intriguing type of ice - ‘ferroelectric ice' was discovered experimentally and is stable in temperatures below 72 K. This form of ice can generate enormous electric fields and can play an important role in planetary formation. In this letter we present Car-Parrinello simulation of infrared spectra of ferroelectric ice and compare them with spectra of hexagonal ice. Librational region of the spectra can be treated as spectroscopic signature of ice XI and can be of help to identify ferroelectric ice in the Universe.

  16. The far ultraviolet spectroscopic explorer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boggess, A.

    1982-01-01

    The scientific objectives and performance characteristics of a new astronomy mission referred to as the far ultraviolet spectroscopic explorer, or FUSE are being defined by a team involving people experienced instrumental requirements that best meet the scientific needs. The team is intended to have a lifetime of about one year, ending with the submission of a report to NASA which could be used as the basis for an engineering design study. The principal objective of FUSE is to obtain astronomical spectra at wavelengths shorter than is possible with the Space Telescope.

  17. High-energy spectroscopic astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Güdel, Manuel; Walter, Roland

    After three decades of intense research in X-ray and gamma-ray astronomy, the time was ripe to summarize basic knowledge on X-ray and gamma-ray spectroscopy for interested students and researchers ready to become involved in new high-energy missions. This volume exposes both the scientific basics and modern methods of high-energy spectroscopic astrophysics. The emphasis is on physical principles and observing methods rather than a discussion of particular classes of high-energy objects, but many examples and new results are included in the three chapters as well.

  18. Infrared laser spectroscopic trace gas sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sigrist, Markus

    2016-04-01

    Chemical sensing and analyses of gas samples by laser spectroscopic methods are attractive owing to several advantages such as high sensitivity and specificity, large dynamic range, multi-component capability, and lack of pretreatment or preconcentration procedures. The preferred wavelength range comprises the fundamental molecular absorption range in the mid-infared between 3 and 15 μm, whereas the near-infrared range covers the (10-100 times weaker) higher harmonics and combination bands. The availability of near-infrared and, particularly, of broadly tunable mid-infrared sources like external cavity quantum cascade lasers (EC-QCLs), interband cascade lasers (ICLs), difference frequency generation (DFG), optical parametric oscillators (OPOs), recent developments of diode-pumped lead salt semiconductor lasers, of supercontinuum sources or of frequency combs have eased the implementation of laser-based sensing devices. Sensitive techniques for molecular absorption measurements include multipass absorption, various configurations of cavity-enhanced techniques such as cavity ringdown (CRD), or of photoacoustic spectroscopy (PAS) including quartz-enhanced (QEPAS) or cantilever-enhanced (CEPAS) techniques. The application requirements finally determine the optimum selection of laser source and detection scheme. In this tutorial talk I shall discuss the basic principles, present various experimental setups and illustrate the performance of selected systems for chemical sensing of selected key atmospheric species. Applications include an early example of continuous vehicle emission measurements with a mobile CO2-laser PAS system [1]. The fast analysis of C1-C4 alkanes at sub-ppm concentrations in gas mixtures is of great interest for the petrochemical industry and was recently achieved with a new type of mid-infrared diode-pumped piezoelectrically tuned lead salt vertical external cavity surface emitting laser (VECSEL) [2]. Another example concerns measurements on short

  19. Characteristic and spectroscopic properties of the Schiff-base model compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jarząbek, B.; Kaczmarczyk, B.; Sęk, D.

    2009-11-01

    Two series of conjugated aromatic imines (Schiff-base model compounds) with different central groups and various side-group substitutions have been synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) technique, hydrogen nuclear magnetic resonance ( 1H NMR), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) and ultra-violet and visible light (UV-vis) spectroscopy measurements. The UV-vis absorption of solutions of these compounds in dimethylacetamid (DMA), chloroform and methanol was investigated in the optical range from 240 to 450 nm, where two distinct absorption bands: at 250-280 and 315-360 nm with the different level of absorption have been observed. The influence of compound molecular structure and polarity of solvent on the absorption spectra and the possible optical transitions have been discussed. Structure of diamines in the azomethine models fundamentally affected their spectroscopic properties and conjugation of π-electrons.

  20. First Spectroscopic Identification of Massive Young Stellar Objects in the Galactic Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    An, Deokkeun; Ramirez, V.; Sellgren, Kris; Arendt, Richard G.; Boogert, A. C.; Schultheis, Mathias; Stolovy, Susan R.; Cotera, Angela S.; Robitaille, Thomas P.; Smith, Howard A.

    2009-01-01

    We report the detection of several molecular gas-phase and ice absorption features in three photometrically-selected young stellar object (YSO) candidates in the central 280 pc of the Milky Way. Our spectra, obtained with the Infrared Spectrograph (IRS) onboard the Spitzer Space Telescope, reveal gas-phase absorption from CO2 (15.0 microns), C2H2 (13.7 microns) and HCN (14.0 microns). We attribute this absorption to warm, dense gas in massive YSOs. We also detect strong and broad 15 microns CO2 ice absorption features, with a remarkable double-peaked structure. The prominent long-wavelength peak is due to CH3OH-rich ice grains, and is similar to those found in other known massive YSOs. Our IRS observa.tions demonstra.te the youth of these objects, and provide the first spectroscopic identification of massive YSOs in the Galactic Center.