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Sample records for absorption spectroscopy atomic

  1. Atomic absorption spectroscopy with high temperature flames.

    PubMed

    Willis, J B

    1968-07-01

    An account is given of the history of the development of high temperature flames for the atomic absorption measurement of metals forming refractory oxides. The principles governing the design of premix burners for such flames, and the relative merits of different types of nebulizer burner systems are described. After a brief account of the structure and emission characteristics of the premixed oxygen-acetylene and nitrous oxide-acetylene flames, the scope and limitations of the latter flame in chemical analysis are discussed. PMID:20068790

  2. Visualizing the Solute Vaporization Interference in Flame Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dockery, Christopher R.; Blew, Michael J.; Goode, Scott R.

    2008-01-01

    Every day, tens of thousands of chemists use analytical atomic spectroscopy in their work, often without knowledge of possible interferences. We present a unique approach to study these interferences by using modern response surface methods to visualize an interference in which aluminum depresses the calcium atomic absorption signal. Calcium…

  3. Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy. The Present and the Future.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slavin, Walter

    1982-01-01

    The status of current techniques and methods of atomic absorption (AA) spectroscopy (flame, hybrid, and furnace AA) is discussed, including limitations. Technological opportunities and how they may be used in AA are also discussed, focusing on automation, microprocessors, continuum AA, hybrid analyses, and others. (Author/JN)

  4. Developing a Transdisciplinary Teaching Implement for Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drew, John

    2008-01-01

    In this article I explain why I wrote the set of teaching notes on Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy (AAS) and why they look the way they do. The notes were intended as a student reference to question, highlight and write over as much as they wish during an initial practical demonstration of the threshold concept being introduced, in this case…

  5. The determination of vanadium in brines by atomic absorption spectroscopy

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Crump-Wiesner, Hans J.; Feltz, H.R.; Purdy, W.C.

    1971-01-01

    A standard addition method is described for the determination of vanadium in brines by atomic absorption spectroscopy with a nitrous oxide-acetylene flame. Sample pH is adjusted to 1.0 with concentrated hydrochloric acid and the vanadium is directly extracted with 5% cupferron in methyl isobutyl ketone (MIBK). The ketone layer is then aspirated into the flame and the recorded absorption values are plotted as a function of the concentration of the added metal. As little as 2.5 ??g l-1 of vanadium can be detected under the conditions of the procedure. Tungsten and tin interfere when present in excess of 5 and 10 ??g ml-1, respectively. The concentrations of the two interfering ions normally found in brines are well below interference levels. ?? 1971.

  6. Speciation of mercury compounds by differential atomization - atomic absorption spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, J.W.; Skelly, E.M.

    1982-01-01

    This paper describes the dual stage atomization technique which allows speciation of several mercury-containing compounds in aqueous solution and in biological fluids. The technique holds great promise for further speciation studies. Accurate temperature control, expecially at temperatures less than 200/sup 0/C, is needed to separate the extremely volatile mercury halides and simple organomercurials from each other. Studies with mercury salts and EDTA, L-cysteine and dithioxamide demonstrate that this technique may be used to study the extent of complex formation. Investigations of biological fluids indicate that there is a single predominant form of mercury in sweat and a single predominant form of mercury in urine. The mercury compound in urine is more volatile than that in sweat. Both quantitative and qualitative analyses are possible with this technique.

  7. A heated chamber burner for atomic absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Venghiattis, A A

    1968-07-01

    A new heated chamber burner is described. The burner is of the premixed type, and burner heads of the types conventionally used in atomic absorption may be readily adapted to it. This new sampling system has been tested for Ag, Al, Ca, Cu, Fe, Mg, Mn, Ni, Pb, Si, Ti, and Zn in aqueous solutions. An improvement of the order of ten times has been obtained in sensitivity, and in detection limits as well, for the elements determined. Interferences controllable are somewhat more severe than in conventional burners but are controllable. PMID:20068792

  8. Etalon-induced baseline drift and correction in atom flux sensors based on atomic absorption spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Du, Yingge; Chambers, Scott A.

    2014-10-20

    Atom flux sensors based on atomic absorption (AA) spectroscopy are of significant interest in thin film growth as they can provide unobtrusive, element specific real-time flux sensing and control. The ultimate sensitivity and performance of these sensors are strongly affected by baseline drift. Here we demonstrate that an etalon effect resulting from temperature changes in optical viewport housings is a major source of signal instability, which has not been previously considered, and cannot be corrected using existing methods. We show that small temperature variations in the fused silica viewports can introduce intensity modulations of up to 1.5% which in turn significantly deteriorate AA sensor performance. This undesirable effect can be at least partially eliminated by reducing the size of the beam and tilting the incident light beam off the viewport normal.

  9. Etalon-induced Baseline Drift And Correction In Atom Flux Sensors Based On Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Du, Yingge; Chambers, Scott A.

    2014-10-20

    Atom flux sensors based on atomic absorption (AA) spectroscopy are of significant interest in thin film growth as they can provide unobtrusive, element specific, real-time flux sensing and control. The ultimate sensitivity and performance of the sensors are strongly affected by the long-term and short term baseline drift. Here we demonstrate that an etalon effect resulting from temperature changes in optical viewport housings is a major source of signal instability which has not been previously considered or corrected by existing methods. We show that small temperature variations in the fused silica viewports can introduce intensity modulations of up to 1.5%, which in turn significantly deteriorate AA sensor performance. This undesirable effect can be at least partially eliminated by reducing the size of the beam and tilting the incident light beam off the viewport normal.

  10. Atomic structure of machined semiconducting chips: An x-ray absorption spectroscopy study

    SciTech Connect

    Paesler, M.; Sayers, D.

    1988-12-01

    X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) has been used to examine the atomic structure of chips of germanium that were produced by single point diamond machining. It is demonstrated that although the local (nearest neighbor) atomic structure is experimentally quite similar to that of single crystal specimens information from more distant atoms indicates the presence of considerable stress. An outline of the technique is given and the strength of XAS in studying the machining process is demonstrated.

  11. Circuit Board Analysis for Lead by Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy in a Course for Nonscience Majors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weidenhammer, Jeffrey D.

    2007-01-01

    A circuit board analysis of the atomic absorption spectroscopy, which is used to measure lead content in a course for nonscience majors, is being presented. The experiment can also be used to explain the potential environmental hazards of unsafe disposal of various used electronic equipments.

  12. DETERMINING BERYLLIUM IN DRINKING WATER BY GRAPHITE FURNACE ATOMIC ABSORPTION SPECTROSCOPY

    EPA Science Inventory

    A direct graphite furnace atomic absorption spectroscopy method for the analysis of beryllium in drinking water has been derived from a method for determining beryllium in urine. Ammonium phosphomolybdate and ascorbic acid were employed as matrix modifiers. The matrix modifiers s...

  13. Determination of Calcium in Cereal with Flame Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy: An Experiment for a Quantitative Methods of Analysis Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bazzi, Ali; Kreuz, Bette; Fischer, Jeffrey

    2004-01-01

    An experiment for determination of calcium in cereal using two-increment standard addition method in conjunction with flame atomic absorption spectroscopy (FAAS) is demonstrated. The experiment is intended to introduce students to the principles of atomic absorption spectroscopy giving them hands on experience using quantitative methods of…

  14. Laboratory atomic transition data for precise optical quasar absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, Michael T.; Berengut, Julian C.

    2014-02-01

    Quasar spectra reveal a rich array of important astrophysical information about galaxies which intersect the quasar line of sight. They also enable tests of the variability of fundamental constants over cosmological time- and distance-scales. Key to these endeavours are the laboratory frequencies, isotopic and hyperfine structures of various metal-ion transitions. Here, we review and synthesize the existing information about these quantities for 43 transitions which are important for measuring possible changes in the fine-structure constant, α, using optical quasar spectra, i.e. those of Na, Mg, Al, Si, Ca, Cr, Mn, Fe, Ni and Zn. We also summarize the information currently missing that precludes more transitions being used. We present an up-to-date set of coefficients, q, which define the sensitivity of these transitions to variations in α. New calculations of isotopic structures and q-coefficients are performed for Si II and Ti II, including Si II λ1808 and Ti IIλλ1910.6/1910.9 for the first time. Finally, simulated absorption-line spectra are used to illustrate the systematic errors expected if the isotopic/hyperfine structures are omitted from profile fitting analyses. To ensure transparency, repeatability and currency of the data and calculations, we supply a comprehensive data base as Supporting Information. This will be updated as new measurements and calculations are performed.

  15. Tunable Diode Laser Absorption Spectroscopy of Metastable Atoms in Dusty Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Hoang Tung Do; Hippler, Rainer

    2008-09-07

    Spatial density profile of neon metastable produced in dusty plasma was investigated by means of tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy. The line averaged measured density drops about 30% with the presence of dust particles. The observations provide evidence for a significant interaction between atoms and powder particles which are important for energy transfer from plasma to particles. The power per unit area absorbed by dust particles due to the collision of metastable atoms with dust particle surface is about some tens of mW/m{sup 2}.

  16. Tunable Diode Laser Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy for Detection of Potassium under Optically Thick Conditions.

    PubMed

    Qu, Zhechao; Steinvall, Erik; Ghorbani, Ramin; Schmidt, Florian M

    2016-04-01

    Potassium (K) is an important element related to ash and fine-particle formation in biomass combustion processes. In situ measurements of gaseous atomic potassium, K(g), using robust optical absorption techniques can provide valuable insight into the K chemistry. However, for typical parts per billion K(g) concentrations in biomass flames and reactor gases, the product of atomic line strength and absorption path length can give rise to such high absorbance that the sample becomes opaque around the transition line center. We present a tunable diode laser atomic absorption spectroscopy (TDLAAS) methodology that enables accurate, calibration-free species quantification even under optically thick conditions, given that Beer-Lambert's law is valid. Analyte concentration and collisional line shape broadening are simultaneously determined by a least-squares fit of simulated to measured absorption profiles. Method validation measurements of K(g) concentrations in saturated potassium hydroxide vapor in the temperature range 950-1200 K showed excellent agreement with equilibrium calculations, and a dynamic range from 40 pptv cm to 40 ppmv cm. The applicability of the compact TDLAAS sensor is demonstrated by real-time detection of K(g) concentrations close to biomass pellets during atmospheric combustion in a laboratory reactor. PMID:26938713

  17. Determination of heavy metals in solid emission and immission samples using atomic absorption spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Fara, M.; Novak, F.

    1995-12-01

    Both flame and electrothermal methods of atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS) have been applied to the determination of Al, As, Be, Ca, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mn, Ni, Pb, TI, Se, V and Zn in emission and emission (deposition) samples decomposed in open PTFE test-tubes by individual fuming-off hydrofluoric, perchloroic and nitric acid. An alternative hydride technique was also used for As and Se determination and Hg was determined using a self-contained AAS analyzer. A graphite platform proved good to overcome non-spectral interferences in AAS-ETA. Methods developed were verified by reference materials (inc. NBS 1633a).

  18. The determination of aluminum, copper, iron, and lead in glycol formulations by atomic absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    Initial screening tests and the results obtained in developing procedures to determine Al, Cu, Fe, and Pb in glycol formulations are described. Atomic absorption completion was selected for Cu, Fe and Pb, and after comparison with emission spectroscopy, was selected for Al also. Before completion, carbon, iron, and lead are extracted with diethyl dithio carbamate (DDC) into methyl isobutyl ketone (MIBK). Aluminum was also extracted into MIBK using 8-hydroxyquinoline as a chelating agent. As little as 0.02 mg/l carbon and 0.06 mg/l lead or iron may be determined in glycol formulations. As little as 0.3 mg/l aluminum may be determined.

  19. Ablation-initiated Isotope-selective Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy of Lanthanide Elements

    SciTech Connect

    Miyabe, M.; Oba, M.; Iimura, H.; Akaoka, K.; Maruyama, Y.; Wakaida, I.; Watanabe, K.

    2009-03-17

    For remote isotope analysis of low-decontaminated trans-uranium (TRU) fuel, absorption spectroscopy has been applied to a laser-ablated plume of lanthanide elements. To improve isotopic selectivity and detection sensitivity of the ablated species, various experimental conditions were optimized. Isotope-selective absorption spectra were measured by observing the slow component of the plume produced under low-pressure rare-gas ambient. The measured minimum line width of about 0.9 GHz was close to the Doppler width of the Gd atomic transition at room temperature. The relaxation rate of high-lying metastable state was found to be higher than that of the ground state, which suggests that higher analytical sensitivity can be obtained using low-lying state transition. Under helium gas environment, Doppler splitting was caused from particle motion. This effect was considered for optimization for isotope selection and analysis. Some analytical performances of this method were determined under optimum conditions and were discussed.

  20. Microplasmas as vacuum ultraviolet source for Cl-atom density measurements by resonance absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Virginie; Bauville, Gérard; Sadeghi, Nader; Puech, Vincent

    2011-11-01

    A micro-hollow cathode discharge was used to generate radiation on the chlorine atom resonance lines. Such radiation could be used to measure, by resonance absorption spectroscopy, the density of chlorine atoms in either ground state (3p5 2P3/2) or in the fine structure metastable state (3p5 2P1/2), which is located at 882.35 cm-1. Among the nine analysed lines in the 132-142 nm spectral region, only those at 137.953 and 139.653 nm, which are strong enough and are not affected by the self-absorption, can be used for the resonance absorption diagnostic of the ground state and the metastable state, respectively. The best operating conditions of the lamp source are 0.5% of Cl2 in argon at 150 mbar and 4 mA discharge current. The measured 800 ± 30 K gas temperature of the microplasma, indicates that under these specific conditions, these two lines are dominantly Doppler broadened. So their profile is Gaussian shaped with full widths at half maximum of (4.7 ± 0.1) × 10-4 nm.

  1. Self-corrected Sensors Based On Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy For Atom Flux Measurements In Molecular Beam Epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Du, Yingge; Droubay, Timothy C.; Liyu, Andrey V.; Li, Guosheng; Chambers, Scott A.

    2014-04-24

    A high sensitivity atom flux sensor based on atomic absorption spectroscopy has been designed and implemented to control electron beam evaporators and effusion cells in a molecular beam epitaxy system. Using a high-resolution spectrometer and a two-dimensional charge coupled device (CCD) detector in a double-beam configuration, we employ a non-resonant line or a resonant line with lower absorbance from the same hollow cathode lamp as the reference for nearly perfect background correction and baseline drift removal. This setup also significantly shortens the warm-up time needed compared to other sensor technologies and drastically reduces the noise coming from the surrounding environment. In addition, the high-resolution spectrometer allows the most sensitive resonant line to be isolated and used to provide excellent signal-to-noise ratio.

  2. Self-corrected sensors based on atomic absorption spectroscopy for atom flux measurements in molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Du, Y. E-mail: scott.chambers@pnnl.gov; Liyu, A. V.; Droubay, T. C.; Chambers, S. A. E-mail: scott.chambers@pnnl.gov; Li, G.

    2014-04-21

    A high sensitivity atom flux sensor based on atomic absorption spectroscopy has been designed and implemented to control electron beam evaporators and effusion cells in a molecular beam epitaxy system. Using a high-resolution spectrometer and a two-dimensional charge coupled device detector in a double-beam configuration, we employ either a non-resonant line or a resonant line with low cross section from the same hollow cathode lamp as the reference for nearly perfect background correction and baseline drift removal. This setup also significantly shortens the warm-up time needed compared to other sensor technologies and drastically reduces the noise coming from the surrounding environment. In addition, the high-resolution spectrometer allows the most sensitive resonant line to be isolated and used to provide excellent signal-to-noise ratio.

  3. Absorption spectroscopy characterization measurements of a laser-produced Na atomic beam

    SciTech Connect

    Ching, C.H.; Bailey, J.E.; Lake, P.W.; Filuk, A.B.; Adams, R.G.; McKenney, J.

    1996-06-01

    This work describes a pulsed Na atomic beam source developed for spectroscopic diagnosis of a high-power ion diode on the Particle Beam Fusion Accelerator II. The goal is to produce a {approximately} 10{sup 12}-cm{sup {minus}3}-density Na atomic beam that can be injected into the diode acceleration gap to measure electric and magnetic fields from the Stark and Zeeman effects through laser-induced-fluorescence or absorption spectroscopy. A {approximately} 10 ns fwhm, 1.06 {micro}m, 0.6 J/cm{sup 2} laser incident through a glass slide heats a Na-bearing thin film, creating a plasma that generates a sodium vapor plume. A {approximately} 1 {micro}sec fwhm dye laser beam tuned to 5,890 {angstrom} is used for absorption measurement of the Na I resonant doublet by viewing parallel to the film surface. The dye laser light is coupled through a fiber to a spectrograph with a time-integrated CCD camera. A two-dimensional mapping of the Na vapor density is obtained through absorption measurements at different spatial locations. Time-of-flight and Doppler broadening of the absorption with {approximately} 0.1 {angstrom} spectral resolution indicate that the Na neutral vapor temperature is about 0.5 to 2 eV. Laser-induced-fluorescence from {approximately} 1 {times} 10{sup 12}-cm{sup {minus}3} Na I 3s-3p lines observed with a streaked spectrograph provides a signal level sufficient for {approximately} 0.06 {angstrom} wavelength shift measurements in a mock-up of an ion diode experiment.

  4. Laser absorption spectroscopy diagnostics of helium metastable atoms generated in dielectric barrier discharge cryoplasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urabe, Keiichiro; Muneoka, Hitoshi; Stauss, Sven; Sakai, Osamu; Terashima, Kazuo

    2015-10-01

    Cryoplasmas, which are plasmas whose gas temperatures are below room temperature (RT), have shown dynamic changes in their physical and chemical characteristics when the gas temperature in the plasmas (Tgp) was decreased from RT. In this study, we measured the temporal behavior of helium metastable (Hem) atoms generated in a parallel-plate dielectric barrier discharge at ambient gas temperatures (Tga) of 300, 100, and 14 K and with a gas density similar to atmospheric conditions by laser absorption spectroscopy. The increments of Tgp to Tga were less than 20 K. We found from the results that the Hem lifetime and maximum density become longer and larger over one order of magnitude for lower Tga. The reasons for the long Hem lifetime at low Tga are decreases in the rate coefficients of three-body Hem quenching reactions and in the amounts of molecular impurities with boiling points higher than that of He.

  5. A Simplified Digestion Protocol for the Analysis of Hg in Fish by Cold Vapor Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kristian, Kathleen E.; Friedbauer, Scott; Kabashi, Donika; Ferencz, Kristen M.; Barajas, Jennifer C.; O'Brien, Kelly

    2015-01-01

    Analysis of mercury in fish is an interesting problem with the potential to motivate students in chemistry laboratory courses. The recommended method for mercury analysis in fish is cold vapor atomic absorption spectroscopy (CVAAS), which requires homogeneous analyte solutions, typically prepared by acid digestion. Previously published digestion…

  6. Cadmium accumulation in the crayfish, Procambarus clarkii, using graphite furnace atomic absorption spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Diaz-Mayans, J.; Hernandez, F.; Medina, J.; Del Ramo, J.; Torreblanca, A.

    1986-11-01

    Lake Albufera and the surrounding rice-field waters are being subject to very heavy loads of sewage and toxic industrial residues (including heavy metals and pesticides) from the many urban and wastewaters in this area. The American red crayfish Procambarus clarkii is native to the Louisiana marshes (USA). In 1978, the crayfish appeared in Lake Albufera near Valencia (Spain), and presently, without adequate sanitary controls, the crayfish is being fished commercially for human consumption. In view of this interest, it is important to have accurate information on concentrations of cadmium in natural waters and cadmium levels of tissues of freshwaters animals used as human food, as well as the accumulation rates of this metal in this animal. In the present study, the authors investigated the accumulation of cadmium in several tissues of the red crayfish, P clarkii (Girard) from Lake Albufera following cadmium exposure. Determinations of cadmium were made by flameless atomic absorption spectroscopy and the standard additions method. Digestion of samples was made by wet ashing in open flasks with concentrated HNO/sub 3/ at 80-90/sup 0/C.

  7. Atomic Structure of Pt3Ni Nanoframe Electrocatalysts by in Situ X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Becknell, Nigel; Kang, Yijin; Chen, Chen; Resasco, Joaquin; Kornienko, Nikolay; Guo, Jinghua; Markovic, Nenad M; Somorjai, Gabor A; Stamenkovic, Vojislav R; Yang, Peidong

    2015-12-23

    Understanding the atomic structure of a catalyst is crucial to exposing the source of its performance characteristics. It is highly unlikely that a catalyst remains the same under reaction conditions when compared to as-synthesized. Hence, the ideal experiment to study the catalyst structure should be performed in situ. Here, we use X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) as an in situ technique to study Pt3Ni nanoframe particles which have been proven to be an excellent electrocatalyst for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). The surface characteristics of the nanoframes were probed through electrochemical hydrogen underpotential deposition and carbon monoxide electrooxidation, which showed that nanoframe surfaces with different structure exhibit varying levels of binding strength to adsorbate molecules. It is well-known that Pt-skin formation on Pt-Ni catalysts will enhance ORR activity by weakening the binding energy between the surface and adsorbates. Ex situ and in situ XAS results reveal that nanoframes which bind adsorbates more strongly have a rougher Pt surface caused by insufficient segregation of Pt to the surface and consequent Ni dissolution. In contrast, nanoframes which exhibit extremely high ORR activity simultaneously demonstrate more significant segregation of Pt over Ni-rich subsurface layers, allowing better formation of the critical Pt-skin. This work demonstrates that the high ORR activity of the Pt3Ni hollow nanoframes depends on successful formation of the Pt-skin surface structure. PMID:26652294

  8. Detection of Glucose with Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy by Using Oligonucleotide Functionalized Gold Nanoparticle.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hong; Yan, Honglian; Ling, Liansheng

    2016-06-01

    A novel method for the detection of glucose was established with atomic absorption spectroscopy by using the label of gold nanoparticle (AuNP). Silver-coated glass assembled with oligonucleotide 5'-SH-T12-AGA CAA GAG AGG-3' (Oligo 1) was acted as separation probe, oligonucleotide 5'-CAA CAG AGA ACG-T12-SH-3' modified gold nanoparticle (AuNP-Oligo 2) was acted as signal-reporting probe. Oligonucleotide 5'-CGT TCT CTG TTG CCT CTC TTG TCT-3' (Oligo 3) could hybridize with Oligo 1 on the surface of silver-coated glass and AuNP-Oligo 2, and free AuNP-Oligo 2 could be removed by rinsing with buffer. Hence the concentration of Oligo 3 was transformed into the concentration of gold element. In addition, Oligo 3 could be cleaved into DNA fragments by glucose, glucose oxidase and Fe(2+)-EDTA through Fenton reaction. Thereby the concentration of glucose could be transformed to the absorbance of gold element. Under the optimum conditions, the integrated absorbance decreased proportionally to the concentration of glucose over the range from 50.0 μM to 1.0 mM with a detection limit of 40.0 μM. Moreover, satisfactory result was obtained when the assay was used to determinate glucose in human serum. PMID:27427698

  9. Spectroscopy of 1S0- 3P1 transition of magnesium atom in an external absorption cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagayev, S. N.; Baraulya, V. I.; Bonert, A. E.; Goncharov, A. N.; Seydaliev, M. R.

    2001-09-01

    The results of saturated absorption spectroscopy of the intercombination 1S0- 3P1 transition of magnesium atoms at 457 nm in an external absorption cell are presented. A laser system based on a Ti:Sa laser with frequency doubling in a LBO nonlinear crystal was used in these experiments. Saturated absorption resonances of magnesium in an external cell at the 1S0- 3P1 transition have been obtained for the first time. Pressure broadening of resonances equal to 12.5±1.5 kHz/mTorr has been measured.

  10. Direct determination and speciation of mercury compounds in environmental and biological samples by carbon bed atomic absorption spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Skelly, E.M.

    1982-01-01

    A method was developed for the direct determination of mercury in water and biological samples using a unique carbon bed atomizer for atomic absorption spectroscopy. The method avoided sources of error such as loss of volatile mercury during sample digestion and contamination of samples through added reagents by eliminating sample pretreatment steps. The design of the atomizer allowed use of the 184.9 nm mercury resonance line in the vacuum ultraviolet region, which increased sensitivity over the commonly used spin-forbidden 253.7 nm line. The carbon bed atomizer method was applied to a study of mercury concentrations in water, hair, sweat, urine, blood, breath and saliva samples from a non-occupationally exposed population. Data were collected on the average concentration, the range and distribution of mercury in the samples. Data were also collected illustrating individual variations in mercury concentrations with time. Concentrations of mercury found were significantly higher than values reported in the literature for a ''normal'' population. This is attributed to the increased accuracy gained by eliminating pretreatment steps and increasing atomization efficiency. Absorption traces were obtained for various solutions of pure and complexed mercury compounds. Absorption traces of biological fluids were also obtained. Differences were observed in the absorption-temperatures traces of various compounds. The utility of this technique for studying complexation was demonstrated.

  11. Hydrogen atom temperature measured with wavelength-modulated laser absorption spectroscopy in large scale filament arc negative hydrogen ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Nakano, H. Goto, M.; Tsumori, K.; Kisaki, M.; Ikeda, K.; Nagaoka, K.; Osakabe, M.; Takeiri, Y.; Kaneko, O.; Nishiyama, S.; Sasaki, K.

    2015-04-08

    The velocity distribution function of hydrogen atoms is one of the useful parameters to understand particle dynamics from negative hydrogen production to extraction in a negative hydrogen ion source. Hydrogen atom temperature is one of the indicators of the velocity distribution function. To find a feasibility of hydrogen atom temperature measurement in large scale filament arc negative hydrogen ion source for fusion, a model calculation of wavelength-modulated laser absorption spectroscopy of the hydrogen Balmer alpha line was performed. By utilizing a wide range tunable diode laser, we successfully obtained the hydrogen atom temperature of ∼3000 K in the vicinity of the plasma grid electrode. The hydrogen atom temperature increases as well as the arc power, and becomes constant after decreasing with the filling of hydrogen gas pressure.

  12. VUV absorption spectroscopy measurements of the role of fast neutral atoms in high-power gap breakdown

    SciTech Connect

    FILUK,A.B.; BAILEY,JAMES E.; CUNEO,MICHAEL E.; LAKE,PATRICK WAYNE; NASH,THOMAS J.; NOACK,DONALD D.; MARON,Y.

    2000-03-20

    The maximum power achieved in a wide variety of high-power devices, including electron and ion diodes, z pinches, and microwave generators, is presently limited by anode-cathode gap breakdown. A frequently-discussed hypothesis for this effect is ionization of fast neutral atoms injected throughout the anode-cathode gap during the power pulse. The authors describe a newly-developed diagnostic tool that provides the first direct test of this hypothesis. Time-resolved vacuum-ultraviolet absorption spectroscopy is used to directly probe fast neutral atoms with 1 mm spatial resolution in the 10 mm anode-cathode gap of the SABRE 5 MV, 1 TW applied-B ion diode. Absorption spectra collected during Ar RF glow discharges and with CO{sub 2} gas fills confirm the reliability of the diagnostic technique. Throughout the 50--100 ns ion diode pulses no measurable neutral absorption is seen, setting upper limits of 0.12--1.5 x 10{sup 14} cm{sup {minus}3} for ground state fast neutral atom densities of H, C, N, O, F. The absence of molecular absorption bands also sets upper limits of 0.16--1.2 x 10{sup 15} cm{sup {minus}3} for common simple molecules. These limits are low enough to rule out ionization throughout the gap as a breakdown mechanism. This technique can now be applied to quantify the role of neutral atoms in other high-power devices.

  13. New Homogeneous Standards by Atomic Layer Deposition for Synchrotron X-ray Fluorescence and Absorption Spectroscopies.

    SciTech Connect

    Butterworth, A.L.; Becker, N.; Gainsforth, Z.; Lanzirotti, A.; Newville, M.; Proslier, T.; Stodolna, J.; Sutton, S.; Tyliszczak, T.; Westphal, A.J.; Zasadzinski, J.

    2012-03-13

    Quantification of synchrotron XRF analyses is typically done through comparisons with measurements on the NIST SRM 1832/1833 thin film standards. Unfortunately, these standards are inhomogeneous on small scales at the tens of percent level. We are synthesizing new homogeneous multilayer standards using the Atomic Layer Deposition technique and characterizing them using multiple analytical methods, including ellipsometry, Rutherford Back Scattering at Evans Analytical, Synchrotron X-ray Fluorescence (SXRF) at Advanced Photon Source (APS) Beamline 13-ID, Synchrotron X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy (XAS) at Advanced Light Source (ALS) Beamlines 11.0.2 and 5.3.2.1 and by electron microscopy techniques. Our motivation for developing much-needed cross-calibration of synchrotron techniques is borne from coordinated analyses of particles captured in the aerogel of the NASA Stardust Interstellar Dust Collector (SIDC). The Stardust Interstellar Dust Preliminary Examination (ISPE) team have characterized three sub-nanogram, {approx}1{micro}m-sized fragments considered as candidates to be the first contemporary interstellar dust ever collected, based on their chemistries and trajectories. The candidates were analyzed in small wedges of aerogel in which they were extracted from the larger collector, using high sensitivity, high spatial resolution >3 keV synchrotron x-ray fluorescence spectroscopy (SXRF) and <2 keV synchrotron x-ray transmission microscopy (STXM) during Stardust ISPE. The ISPE synchrotron techniques have complementary capabilities. Hard X-ray SXRF is sensitive to sub-fg mass of elements Z {ge} 20 (calcium) and has a spatial resolution as low as 90nm. X-ray Diffraction data were collected simultaneously with SXRF data. Soft X-ray STXM at ALS beamline 11.0.2 can detect fg-mass of most elements, including cosmochemically important oxygen, magnesium, aluminum and silicon, which are invisible to SXRF in this application. ALS beamline 11.0.2 has spatial resolution

  14. Determination of ruthenium in pharmaceutical compounds by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Jia, Xiujuan; Wang, Tiebang; Bu, Xiaodong; Tu, Qiang; Spencer, Sandra

    2006-04-11

    A graphite furnace atomic absorption (GFAA) spectrometric method for the determination of ruthenium (Rh) in solid and liquid pharmaceutical compounds has been developed. Samples are dissolved or diluted in dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) without any other treatment before they were analyzed by GFAA with a carefully designed heating program to avoid pre-atomization signal loss and to achieve suitable sensitivity. Various inorganic and organic solvents were tested and compared and DMSO was found to be the most suitable. In addition, ruthenium was found to be stable in DMSO for at least 5 days. Spike recoveries ranged from 81 to 100% and the limit of quantitation (LOQ) was determined to be 0.5 microg g(-1) for solid samples or 0.005 microg ml(-1) for liquid samples based a 100-fold dilution. The same set of samples was also analyzed by ICP-MS with a different sample preparation method, and excellent agreement was achieved. PMID:16314066

  15. Attosecond XUV absorption spectroscopy of doubly excited states in helium atoms dressed by a time-delayed femtosecond infrared laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Z. Q.; Ye, D. F.; Ding, Thomas; Pfeifer, Thomas; Fu, L. B.

    2015-01-01

    In the present paper, we investigate the time-resolved transient absorption spectroscopy of doubly excited states of helium atoms by solving the time-dependent two-electron Schrödinger equation numerically based on a one-dimensional model. The helium atoms are subjected to an extreme ultraviolet (XUV) attosecond pulse and a time-delayed infrared (IR) few-cycle laser pulse. A superposition of doubly excited states populated by the XUV pulse is identified, which interferes with the direct ionization pathway leading to Fano resonance profiles in the photoabsorption spectrum. In the presence of an IR laser, however, the Fano line profiles are strongly modified: A shifting, splitting, and broadening of the original absorption lines is observed when the XUV attosecond pulse and infrared few-cycle laser pulse overlap in time, which is in good agreement with recent experimental results. At certain time delays, we observe symmetric Lorentz, inverted Fano profiles, and even negative absorption cross sections indicating that the XUV light can be amplified during the interaction with atoms. We further prove that the above pictures are general for different doubly excited states by suitably varying the frequency of the IR field to coherently couple the corresponding states.

  16. Speciation of methylmercury in market seafood by thermal degradation, amalgamation and atomic absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-de-Cenzano, Manuela; Rochina-Marco, Arancha; Cervera, M Luisa; de la Guardia, Miguel

    2014-09-01

    Sample thermal decomposition followed by mercury amalgamation and atomic absorption has been employed for the determination of methylmercury (MeHg) in fish. The method involves HBr leaching of MeHg, extraction into toluene, and back-extraction into an aqueous l-cysteine solution. Preliminary studies were focused on the extraction efficiency, losses, contaminations, and species interconversion prevention. The limit of detection was 0.018µgg(-1) (dry weight). The intraday precision for three replicate analysis at a concentration of 4.2µgg(-1) (dry weight) was 3.5 percent, similar to the interday precision according to analysis of variance (ANOVA). The accuracy was guaranteed by the use of fortified samples involving 83-105 percent recoveries, and certified reference materials TORT-2 (lobster hepatopancreas) and DORM-3 (dogfish liver), providing 107 and 98 percent recovery of certified values. The greenness of the method was also evaluated with the analytical eco-scale being obtained a final score of 73 points which means an acceptable green analysis. The method was applied to fifty-seven market samples of different fish acquired from local markets in several sampling campaigns. The content of MeHg found varied between 0.0311 and 1.24µgg(-1) (wet weight), with values that involve 33-129 percent of the total mercury content. Some considerations about food safety were also done taking into account data about Spanish fish consume and Tolerable Weekly Intake (TWI) established for MeHg. PMID:24927385

  17. Absolute number densities of helium metastable atoms determined by atomic absorption spectroscopy in helium plasma-based discharges used as ambient desorption/ionization sources for mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reininger, Charlotte; Woodfield, Kellie; Keelor, Joel D.; Kaylor, Adam; Fernández, Facundo M.; Farnsworth, Paul B.

    2014-10-01

    The absolute number densities of helium atoms in the 2s 3S1 metastable state were determined in four plasma-based ambient desorption/ionization sources by atomic absorption spectroscopy. The plasmas included a high-frequency dielectric barrier discharge (HF-DBD), a low temperature plasma (LTP), and two atmospheric-pressure glow discharges, one with AC excitation and the other with DC excitation. Peak densities in the luminous plumes downstream from the discharge capillaries of the HF-DBD and the LTP were 1.39 × 1012 cm- 3 and 0.011 × 1012 cm- 3, respectively. Neither glow discharge produced a visible afterglow, and no metastable atoms were detected downstream from the capillary exits. However, densities of 0.58 × 1012 cm- 3 and 0.97 × 1012 cm- 3 were measured in the interelectrode regions of the AC and DC glow discharges, respectively. Time-resolved measurements of metastable atom densities revealed significant random variations in the timing of pulsed absorption signals with respect to the voltage waveforms applied to the discharges.

  18. Rate and composition control by atomic absorption spectroscopy for the coevaporation of high T sub c superconducting films

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, C. ); Missert, N.; Mooij, J.E.; Rosenthal, P.; Matijasevic, V.; Beasley, M.R.; Hammond, R.H. )

    1989-02-01

    Atomic absorption spectroscopy has been used to control the deposition rates during coevaporation processes with multiple electron-beam sources. This technique is material specific and thus allows the deposition rate of each component to be controlled independently. Because only a light beam is needed to interact with the vapor stream, the sampling region can be selected to be very close to the substrate for precise control of the film composition. With its high sensitivity and no limitations on operation pressure, this technique offers some unique advantages for the preparation of high Tc superconducting films by coevaporation in a high oxygen partial pressure environment. The performance of a multi-source deposition controller and the resultant film properties are presented.

  19. Analysis of the Essential Nutrient Strontium in Marine Aquariums by Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy: An Undergraduate Analytical Chemistry Laboratory Exercise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilles de Pelichy, Laurent D.; Adam, Carl; Smith, Eugene T.

    1997-10-01

    An undergraduate atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS) laboratory experiment is presented involving the analysis of the essential nutrient strontium in a real-life sample, sea water. The quantitative analysis of strontium in sea water is a problem well suited for an undergraduate analytical chemistry laboratory. Sea water contains numerous components which prevent the direct quantitative determination of strontium. Students learn first hand about the role of interferences in analytical measurements, and about the method of standard addition which is used to minimize these effects. This laboratory exercise also introduces undergraduate students to practical problems associated with AAS. We encourage students as a part of this experiment to collect and analyze marine water samples from local pet shops.

  20. Compartmentalization of trace elements in guinea pig tissues by INAA (instrumental neutron activation analysis) and AAS (atomic absorption spectroscopy)

    SciTech Connect

    Chatt, A.; Holzbecher, J.; Katz, S.A.

    1988-01-01

    Human scalp hair analysis has received considerable attention from a variety of disciplines over the last 20 yr or so. Trace element levels of hair have been used in environmental, epidemiological, forensic, nutritional, predictive, and preventive medicine studies. There still exist confusion, skepticism, and controversy, however, among the experts as well as lay persons in the interpretation of hair trace element data. Much of the criticism stems from the lack of quantitative and reliable data on the ability of hair to accurately reflect dose-response relationships. To better define the significance or hair trace element levels (under the auspices of the International Atomic Energy Agency), the authors have undertaken a controlled set of animal experiments in which trace element levels in hair and other tissues have been measured after a mild state of systemic intoxication by chronic, low-does exposure to cadmium and selenium. Instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA) and atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS) methods have been developed for the determination of several elements with a high degree of precision and accuracy.

  1. USEPA METHOD STUDY 38 - SW-846 METHOD 3010, ACID DIGESTION OF AQUEOUS SAMPLES AND EXTRACTS FOR TRACE METALS BY FLAME ATOMIC ABSORPTION SPECTROSCOPY

    EPA Science Inventory

    An interlaboratory collaborative study was conducted on SW-846 Method 3010, "Acid Digestion of Aqueous Samples and Extracts for Total Metals for Analysis by Flame Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy", to determine the mean recovery and precision for analyses of 21 trace metals in surf...

  2. Determination of Fe Content of Some Food Items by Flame Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy (FAAS): A Guided-Inquiry Learning Experience in Instrumental Analysis Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fakayode, Sayo O.; King, Angela G.; Yakubu, Mamudu; Mohammed, Abdul K.; Pollard, David A.

    2012-01-01

    This article presents a guided-inquiry (GI) hands-on determination of Fe in food samples including plantains, spinach, lima beans, oatmeal, Frosted Flakes cereal (generic), tilapia fish, and chicken using flame atomic absorption spectroscopy (FAAS). The utility of the GI experiment, which is part of an instrumental analysis laboratory course,…

  3. Analysis of an Air Conditioning Coolant Solution for Metal Contamination Using Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy: An Undergraduate Instrumental Analysis Exercise Simulating an Industrial Assignment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baird, Michael J.

    2004-01-01

    A real-life analytical assignment is presented to students, who had to examine an air conditioning coolant solution for metal contamination using an atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS). This hands-on access to a real problem exposed the undergraduate students to the mechanism of AAS, and promoted participation in a simulated industrial activity.

  4. Atomic structure of Mn-rich nanocolumns probed by x-ray absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rovezzi, M.; Devillers, T.; Arras, E.; d'Acapito, F.; Barski, A.; Jamet, M.; Pochet, P.

    2008-06-01

    In this letter, we have used the extended x-ray-absorption fine-structure (EXAFS) technique to investigate the structure of Mn-rich self-organized nanocolumns grown by low temperature molecular beam epitaxy. The EXAFS analysis has shown that Mn-rich nanocolumns exhibit a complex local structure that cannot be described by a simple substitutional model. Additional interatomic distances had to be considered in the EXAFS model which are in excellent agreement with the structure of a Ge-3Mn building block tetrahedron of Ge3Mn5.

  5. Local surrounding of vanadium atoms in CuCr1 - x V x S2: X-ray absorption spectroscopy analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smirnova, Yu. O.; Smolentsev, N. Yu.; Guda, A. A.; Soldatov, M. A.; Kvashnina, K. O.; Glatzel, P.; Korotaev, E. V.; Soldatov, A. V.; Mazalov, L. N.

    2013-03-01

    In the present work local surrounding of vanadium atoms in layered copper-chromium disulfides CuCr1 - x V x S2 is investigated using high-resolution X-ray absorption spectroscopy above vanadium K-edge. Based on experimental and theoretically simulated spectra comparison it is shown that vanadium atoms replace chromium ones even at high concentrations of vanadium and that they are in 3+ oxidation state.

  6. Low temperature hydrogen plasma-assisted atomic layer deposition of copper studied using in situ infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Chaukulkar, Rohan P.; Rai, Vikrant R.; Agarwal, Sumit; Thissen, Nick F. W.

    2014-01-15

    Atomic layer deposition (ALD) is an ideal technique to deposit ultrathin, conformal, and continuous metal thin films. However, compared to the ALD of binary materials such as metal oxides and metal nitrides, the surface reaction mechanisms during metal ALD are not well understood. In this study, the authors have designed and implemented an in situ reflection-absorption infrared spectroscopy (IRAS) setup to study the surface reactions during the ALD of Cu on Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} using Cu hexafluoroacetylacetonate [Cu(hfac){sub 2}] and a remote H{sub 2} plasma. Our infrared data show that complete ligand-exchange reactions occur at a substrate temperature of 80 °C in the absence of surface hydroxyl groups. Based on infrared data and previous studies, the authors propose that Cu(hfac){sub 2} dissociatively chemisorbs on the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} surface, where the Al-O-Al bridge acts as the surface reactive site, leading to surface O-Cu-hfac and O-Al-hfac species. Surface saturation during the Cu(hfac){sub 2} half-cycle occurs through blocking of the available chemisorption sites. In the next half-reaction cycle, H radicals from an H{sub 2} plasma completely remove these surface hfac ligands. Through this study, the authors have demonstrated the capability of in situ IRAS as a tool to study surface reactions during ALD of metals. While transmission and internal reflection infrared spectroscopy are limited to the first few ALD cycles, IRAS can be used to probe all stages of metal ALD starting from initial nucleation to the formation of a continuous film.

  7. Unraveling the Solid-Liquid-Vapor Phase Transition Dynamics at the Atomic Level with Ultrafast X-Ray Absorption Near-Edge Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorchies, F.; Lévy, A.; Goyon, C.; Combis, P.; Descamps, D.; Fourment, C.; Harmand, M.; Hulin, S.; Leguay, P. M.; Petit, S.; Peyrusse, O.; Santos, J. J.

    2011-12-01

    X-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy (XANES) is a powerful probe of electronic and atomic structures in various media, ranging from molecules to condensed matter. We show how ultrafast time resolution opens new possibilities to investigate highly nonequilibrium states of matter including phase transitions. Based on a tabletop laser-plasma ultrafast x-ray source, we have performed a time-resolved (˜3ps) XANES experiment that reveals the evolution of an aluminum foil at the atomic level, when undergoing ultrafast laser heating and ablation. X-ray absorption spectra highlight an ultrafast transition from the crystalline solid to the disordered liquid followed by a progressive transition of the delocalized valence electronic structure (metal) down to localized atomic orbitals (nonmetal—vapor), as the average distance between atoms increases.

  8. Overcoming Matrix Effects in a Complex Sample: Analysis of Multiple Elements in Multivitamins by Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arnold, Randy J.; Arndt, Brett; Blaser, Emilia; Blosser, Chris; Caulton, Dana; Chung, Won Sog; Fiorenza, Garrett; Heath, Wyatt; Jacobs, Alex; Kahng, Eunice; Koh, Eun; Le, Thao; Mandla, Kyle; McCory, Chelsey; Newman, Laura; Pithadia, Amit; Reckelhoff, Anna; Rheinhardt, Joseph; Skljarevski, Sonja; Stuart, Jordyn; Taylor, Cassie; Thomas, Scott; Tse, Kyle; Wall, Rachel; Warkentien, Chad

    2011-01-01

    A multivitamin tablet and liquid are analyzed for the elements calcium, magnesium, iron, zinc, copper, and manganese using atomic absorption spectrometry. Linear calibration and standard addition are used for all elements except calcium, allowing for an estimate of the matrix effects encountered for this complex sample. Sample preparation using…

  9. Determination of trace and minor elements in alloys by atomic-absorption spectroscopy using an induction-heated graphite-well furnace as atom source-II.

    PubMed

    Ashy, M A; Headridge, J B; Sowerbutts, A

    1974-06-01

    Results are presented for the atomic-absorption spectrophotometric determination of zinc in aluminium and aluminium-silicon alloys, and aluminium, antimony and tin in steels, by means of solid samples dropped into an induction-heated graphite-well furnace to produce the atomic vapour. PMID:18961510

  10. Relic Neutrino Absorption Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Eberle, b

    2004-01-28

    Resonant annihilation of extremely high-energy cosmic neutrinos on big-bang relic anti-neutrinos (and vice versa) into Z-bosons leads to sizable absorption dips in the neutrino flux to be observed at Earth. The high-energy edges of these dips are fixed, via the resonance energies, by the neutrino masses alone. Their depths are determined by the cosmic neutrino background density, by the cosmological parameters determining the expansion rate of the universe, and by the large redshift history of the cosmic neutrino sources. We investigate the possibility of determining the existence of the cosmic neutrino background within the next decade from a measurement of these absorption dips in the neutrino flux. As a by-product, we study the prospects to infer the absolute neutrino mass scale. We find that, with the presently planned neutrino detectors (ANITA, Auger, EUSO, OWL, RICE, and SalSA) operating in the relevant energy regime above 10{sup 21} eV, relic neutrino absorption spectroscopy becomes a realistic possibility. It requires, however, the existence of extremely powerful neutrino sources, which should be opaque to nucleons and high-energy photons to evade present constraints. Furthermore, the neutrino mass spectrum must be quasi-degenerate to optimize the dip, which implies m{sub {nu}} 0.1 eV for the lightest neutrino. With a second generation of neutrino detectors, these demanding requirements can be relaxed considerably.

  11. Hot tube atomic absorption spectrochemistry.

    PubMed

    Woodriff, R; Stone, R W

    1968-07-01

    A small, commercially available atomic absorption instrument is used with a heated graphite tube for the atomic absorption analysis of liquid and solid silver samples. Operating conditions of the furnace are described and a sensitivity of about 5 ng of silver is reported. PMID:20068797

  12. A passive measurement of dissociated atom densities in atmospheric pressure air discharge plasmas using vacuum ultraviolet self-absorption spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Laity, George; Fierro, Andrew; Dickens, James; Neuber, Andreas; Frank, Klaus

    2014-03-28

    We demonstrate a method for determining the dissociation degree of atmospheric pressure air discharges by measuring the self-absorption characteristics of vacuum ultraviolet radiation from O and N atoms in the plasma. The atom densities are determined by modeling the amount of radiation trapping present in the discharge, without the use of typical optical absorption diagnostic techniques which require external sources of probing radiation into the experiment. For an 8.0 mm spark discharge between needle electrodes at atmospheric pressure, typical peak O atom densities of 8.5 × 10{sup 17} cm{sup −3} and peak N atom densities of 9.9 × 10{sup 17} cm{sup −3} are observed within the first ∼1.0 mm of plasma near the anode tip by analyzing the OI and NI transitions in the 130.0–132.0 nm band of the vacuum ultraviolet spectrum.

  13. Absorption spectroscopy measurements of argon metastable and resonant atom density in atmospheric pressure Ar-He surface-wave plasmas using a low pressure lamp

    SciTech Connect

    Munoz, J.; Margot, J.; Calzada, M. D.

    2012-01-15

    The densities of metastable and resonant atom were measured in atmospheric pressure Ar-He surface-wave plasmas. Measurements were performed using an absorption spectroscopy method taking into account the Voigt profiles of the plasma lines. The density values of the argon {sup 3}P{sub 2}, {sup 3}P{sub 0} (metastable atoms) and {sup 3}P{sub 1} (resonant atoms) levels measured in pure argon discharges are in good agreement with those reported in the literature. A drastic decrease of metastable and resonant densities is observed when introducing helium in amounts as low as 2%. The influence of electron density and gas temperature on the population mechanisms (direct electron excitation from the ground state and dissociative recombination) of metastable and resonant atoms is discussed using a simplified theoretical model.

  14. X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Yano, Junko; Yachandra, Vittal K.

    2009-07-09

    This review gives a brief description of the theory and application of X-ray absorption spectroscopy, both X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) and extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS), especially, pertaining to photosynthesis. The advantages and limitations of the methods are discussed. Recent advances in extended EXAFS and polarized EXAFS using oriented membranes and single crystals are explained. Developments in theory in understanding the XANES spectra are described. The application of X-ray absorption spectroscopy to the study of the Mn4Ca cluster in Photosystem II is presented.

  15. Absorption properties of identical atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Sancho, Pedro

    2013-09-15

    Emission rates and other optical properties of multi-particle systems in collective and entangled states differ from those in product ones. We show the existence of similar effects in the absorption probabilities for (anti)symmetrized states of two identical atoms. The effects strongly depend on the overlapping between the atoms and differ for bosons and fermions. We propose a viable experimental verification of these ideas. -- Highlights: •The absorption rates of a pair of identical atoms in product and (anti)symmetrized states are different. •The modifications of the optical properties are essentially determined by the overlapping between the atoms. •The absorption properties differ, in some cases, for bosons and fermions.

  16. Absorption spectroscopy of heavy alkaline earth metals Ba and Sr in rare gas matrices--CCSD(T) calculations and atomic site occupancies.

    PubMed

    Davis, Barry M; McCaffrey, John G

    2016-01-28

    Isolation of the heavier alkaline earth metals Ba and Sr in the solid rare gases (RGs) Ar, Kr, and Xe is analysed with absorption spectroscopy and interpreted partly with the assistance of ab initio calculations of the diatomic M ⋅ RG ground state interaction potentials. The y(1)P ← a(1)S resonance transitions in the visible spectral region are used to compare the isolation conditions of these two metal atom systems and calcium. Complex absorption bands were recorded in all three metal atom systems even after extensive sample annealing. Coupled cluster calculations conducted on the ground states of the nine M ⋅ RG diatomics (M = Ca, Sr, and Ba; RG = Ar, Kr, and Xe) at the coupled cluster single, double, and non-iterative triple level of theory revealed long bond lengths (>5 Å) and shallow bound regions (<130 cm(-1)). All of the M ⋅ RG diatomics have bond lengths considerably longer than those of the rare gas dimers, with the consequence that isolation of these metal atoms in a single substitutional site of the solid rare gas is unlikely, with the possible exception of Ca/Xe. The luminescence of metal dimer bands has been recorded for Ba and Sr revealing very different behaviours. Resonance fluorescence with a lifetime of 15 ns is observed for the lowest energy transition of Sr2 while this transition is quenched in Ba2. This behaviour is consistent with the absence of vibrational structure on the dimer absorption band in Ba2 indicating lifetime broadening arising from efficient relaxation to low-lying molecular states. More extensive 2D excitation-emission data recorded for the complex site structures present on the absorption bands of the atomic Ba and Sr systems will be presented in future publications. PMID:26827218

  17. Absorption spectroscopy of heavy alkaline earth metals Ba and Sr in rare gas matrices—CCSD(T) calculations and atomic site occupancies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Barry M.; McCaffrey, John G.

    2016-01-01

    Isolation of the heavier alkaline earth metals Ba and Sr in the solid rare gases (RGs) Ar, Kr, and Xe is analysed with absorption spectroscopy and interpreted partly with the assistance of ab initio calculations of the diatomic M ṡ RG ground state interaction potentials. The y1P←a1S resonance transitions in the visible spectral region are used to compare the isolation conditions of these two metal atom systems and calcium. Complex absorption bands were recorded in all three metal atom systems even after extensive sample annealing. Coupled cluster calculations conducted on the ground states of the nine M ṡ RG diatomics (M = Ca, Sr, and Ba; RG = Ar, Kr, and Xe) at the coupled cluster single, double, and non-iterative triple level of theory revealed long bond lengths (>5 Å) and shallow bound regions (<130 cm-1). All of the M ṡ RG diatomics have bond lengths considerably longer than those of the rare gas dimers, with the consequence that isolation of these metal atoms in a single substitutional site of the solid rare gas is unlikely, with the possible exception of Ca/Xe. The luminescence of metal dimer bands has been recorded for Ba and Sr revealing very different behaviours. Resonance fluorescence with a lifetime of 15 ns is observed for the lowest energy transition of Sr2 while this transition is quenched in Ba2. This behaviour is consistent with the absence of vibrational structure on the dimer absorption band in Ba2 indicating lifetime broadening arising from efficient relaxation to low-lying molecular states. More extensive 2D excitation-emission data recorded for the complex site structures present on the absorption bands of the atomic Ba and Sr systems will be presented in future publications.

  18. Graphite filter atomizer in atomic absorption spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katskov, Dmitri A.

    2007-09-01

    Graphite filter atomizers (GFA) for electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS) show substantial advantages over commonly employed electrothermal vaporizers and atomizers, tube and platform furnaces, for direct determination of high and medium volatility elements in matrices associated with strong spectral and chemical interferences. Two factors provide lower limits of detection and shorter determination cycles with the GFA: the vaporization area in the GFA is separated from the absorption volume by a porous graphite partition; the sample is distributed over a large surface of a collector in the vaporization area. These factors convert the GFA into an efficient chemical reactor. The research concerning the GFA concept, technique and analytical methodology, carried out mainly in the author's laboratory in Russia and South Africa, is reviewed. Examples of analytical applications of the GFA in AAS for analysis of organic liquids and slurries, bio-samples and food products are given. Future prospects for the GFA are discussed in connection with analyses by fast multi-element AAS.

  19. Absorption properties of identical atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sancho, Pedro

    2013-09-01

    Emission rates and other optical properties of multi-particle systems in collective and entangled states differ from those in product ones. We show the existence of similar effects in the absorption probabilities for (anti)symmetrized states of two identical atoms. The effects strongly depend on the overlapping between the atoms and differ for bosons and fermions. We propose a viable experimental verification of these ideas.

  20. Determination of heavy metal contents by atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS) in some medicinal plants from Pakistani and Malaysian origin.

    PubMed

    Akram, Sobia; Najam, Rahila; Rizwani, Ghazala H; Abbas, Syed Atif

    2015-09-01

    This study depicts a profile of existence of heavy metals (Cu, Ni, Zn, Cd, Hg, Mn, Fe, Na, Ca, and Mg) in some important herbal plants like (H. Integrifolia, D. regia, R. communis, C. equisetifolia, N. oleander, T. populnea, M. elengi, H. schizopetalus, P. pterocarpum) from Pakistan and an antidiabetic Malaysian herbal drug product containing (Punica granatum L. (Mast) Hook, Momordica charantia L., Tamarindus indica L., Lawsonia inermis L.) using atomic absorption spectrophotometer. Heavy metals in these herbal plants and Malaysian product were in the range of 0.02-0.10 ppm of Cu, 0.00-0.02 ppm of Ni, 0.02-0.29 ppm of Zn, 0.00-0.04 ppm of Cd, 0.00-1.33 ppm of Hg, 0.00-0.54 ppm of Mn, 0.22-3.16 ppm of Fe, 0.00-9.17 ppm of Na, 3.27-15.63 ppm of Ca and 1.85-2.03 ppm of Mg. All the metals under study were within the prescribed limits except mercury. Out of 10 medicinal plants/product under study 07 were beyond the limit of mercury permissible limits. Purpose of this study is to determine heavy metals contents in selected herbal plants and Malaysian product, also to highlight the health concerns related to the presence of toxic levels of heavy metals. PMID:26408897

  1. The H + OCS hot atom reaction - CO state distributions and translational energy from time-resolved infrared absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nickolaisen, Scott L.; Cartland, Harry E.

    1993-01-01

    Time-resolved infrared diode laser spectroscopy has been used to probe CO internal and translational excitation from the reaction of hot H atoms with OCS. Product distributions should be strongly biased toward the maximum 1.4 eV collision energy obtained from 278 nm pulsed photolysis of HI. Rotations and vibrations are both colder than predicted by statistical density of states theory, as evidenced by large positive surprisal parameters. The bias against rotation is stronger than that against vibration, with measurable population as high as v = 4. The average CO internal excitation is 1920/cm, accounting for only 13 percent of the available energy. Of the energy balance, time-resolved sub-Doppler line shape measurements show that more than 38 percent appears as relative translation of the separating CO and SH fragments. Studies of the relaxation kinetics indicate that some rotational energy transfer occurs on the time scale of our measurements, but the distributions do not relax sufficiently to alter our conclusions. Vibrational distributions are nascent, though vibrational relaxation of excited CO is unusually fast in the OCS bath, with rates approaching 3 percent of gas kinetic for v = 1.

  2. Trace and Essential Elements Analysis in Cymbopogon citratus (DC.) Stapf Samples by Graphite Furnace-Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy and Its Health Concern.

    PubMed

    Anal, Jasha Momo H

    2014-01-01

    Cymbopogon citratus (DC.) Stapf commonly known as lemon grass is used extensively as green tea and even as herbal tea ingredient across the world. Plants have the ability to uptake metals as nutrient from the soil and its environment which are so essential for their physiological and biochemical growth. Concentrations of these twelve trace elements, namely, Mg, Ca, Cr, Mn, Fe, Ni, Cu, Zn, Mo, As, Cd, and Pb, are analysed by graphite furnace-atomic absorption spectroscopy (GF-AAS) and are compared with the permissible limits of FAO/WHO, ICMR, and NIH, USA, which are found to be within permissible limits. Toxic metals like As, Cd, and Pb, analysed are within the tolerable daily diet limit and at low concentration. PMID:25525430

  3. Trace and Essential Elements Analysis in Cymbopogon citratus (DC.) Stapf Samples by Graphite Furnace-Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy and Its Health Concern

    PubMed Central

    Anal, Jasha Momo H.

    2014-01-01

    Cymbopogon citratus (DC.) Stapf commonly known as lemon grass is used extensively as green tea and even as herbal tea ingredient across the world. Plants have the ability to uptake metals as nutrient from the soil and its environment which are so essential for their physiological and biochemical growth. Concentrations of these twelve trace elements, namely, Mg, Ca, Cr, Mn, Fe, Ni, Cu, Zn, Mo, As, Cd, and Pb, are analysed by graphite furnace-atomic absorption spectroscopy (GF-AAS) and are compared with the permissible limits of FAO/WHO, ICMR, and NIH, USA, which are found to be within permissible limits. Toxic metals like As, Cd, and Pb, analysed are within the tolerable daily diet limit and at low concentration. PMID:25525430

  4. Local atomic structure of chromium bearing precipitates in chromia doped uranium dioxide investigated by combined micro-beam X-ray diffraction and absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuri, G.; Mieszczynski, C.; Martin, M.; Bertsch, J.; Borca, C. N.; Delafoy, Ch.

    2014-06-01

    Experimental studies have evidenced the presence of some chromium oxide precipitates in chromia (Cr2O3) doped UO2 fuels, currently being used in many light water reactors. The main objective of this study was to analyze the atomic scale microstructure of these precipitates in a non-destructive way employing modern synchrotron-based X-ray radiation. To investigate UO2 microstructures and chemical compositions of the precipitates an industrial grade fresh Cr2O3-doped UO2 pellet (produced with an initial amount of 0.16 wt.% Cr2O3 powder) was examined using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and electron probe micro analysis (EPMA). Average grain diameter of the UO2 matrix was measured by SEM image analysis method. Precipitates were detected by EPMA. For all precipitates of micrometer scale analyzed by EPMA the composition was determined to be very close to Cr2O3. The structural property and the next neighbor Cr atomic environment in these precipitates were studied by a combination of more sensitive tools such as micro-focused X-ray diffraction (μ-XRD) and absorption spectroscopy (μ-XAS). According to the XRD data, the chromia precipitates contain structural disorder and have a somewhat distorted lattice structure as compared to that of standard and crystalline α-Cr2O3 hexagonal crystal unit cell. The μ-XAS results provide insight into the local atomic environment of chromium including the oxidation state assignment.

  5. Current Trends in Atomic Spectroscopy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wynne, James J.

    1983-01-01

    Atomic spectroscopy is the study of atoms/ions through their interaction with electromagnetic radiation, in particular, interactions in which radiation is absorbed or emitted with an internal rearrangement of the atom's electrons. Discusses nature of this field, its status and future, and how it is applied to other areas of physics. (JN)

  6. Absolute atomic oxygen density measurements for nanosecond-pulsed atmospheric-pressure plasma jets using two-photon absorption laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, C.; Carter, C.

    2014-12-01

    Nanosecond-pulsed plasma jets that are generated under ambient air conditions and free from confinement of electrodes have become of great interest in recent years due to their promising applications in medicine and dentistry. Reactive oxygen species that are generated by nanosecond-pulsed, room-temperature non-equilibrium He-O2 plasma jets among others are believed to play an important role during the bactericidal or sterilization processes. We report here absolute measurements of atomic oxygen density in a 1 mm-diameter He/(1%)O2 plasma jet at atmospheric pressure using two-photon absorption laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy. Oxygen number density on the order of 1013 cm-3 was obtained in a 150 ns, 6 kV single-pulsed plasma jet for an axial distance up to 5 mm above the device nozzle. Temporally resolved O density measurements showed that there are two maxima, separated in time by 60-70 µs, and a total pulse duration of 260-300 µs. Electrostatic modeling indicated that there are high-electric-field regions near the nozzle exit that may be responsible for the observed temporal behavior of the O production. Both the field-distribution-based estimation of the time interval for the O number density profile and a pulse-energy-dependence study confirmed that electric-field-dependent, direct and indirect electron-induced processes play important roles for O production.

  7. Automatic flow-batch system for cold vapor atomic absorption spectroscopy determination of mercury in honey from Argentina using online sample treatment.

    PubMed

    Domínguez, Marina A; Grünhut, Marcos; Pistonesi, Marcelo F; Di Nezio, María S; Centurión, María E

    2012-05-16

    An automatic flow-batch system that includes two borosilicate glass chambers to perform sample digestion and cold vapor atomic absorption spectroscopy determination of mercury in honey samples was designed. The sample digestion was performed by using a low-cost halogen lamp to obtain the optimum temperature. Optimization of the digestion procedure was done using a Box-Behnken experimental design. A linear response was observed from 2.30 to 11.20 μg Hg L(-1). The relative standard deviation was 3.20% (n = 11, 6.81 μg Hg L(-1)), the sample throughput was 4 sample h(-1), and the detection limit was 0.68 μg Hg L(-1). The obtained results with the flow-batch method are in good agreement with those obtained with the reference method. The flow-batch system is simple, allows the use of both chambers simultaneously, is seen as a promising methodology for achieving green chemistry goals, and is a good proposal to improving the quality control of honey. PMID:22540901

  8. Atomic Resolution Mapping of the Excited-State Electronic Structure of Cu2O with Time-Resolved X-Ray Absorption Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Hillyard, Patrick B.; Kuchibhatla, Satyanarayana V N T; Glover, T. E.; Hertlein, M. P.; Huse, N.; Nachimuthu, Ponnusamy; Saraf, Laxmikant V.; Thevuthasan, Suntharampillai; Gaffney, Kelly J.

    2009-09-29

    We have used time-resolved soft x-ray spectroscopy to investigate the electronic structure of optically excited cuprous oxide at the O K-edge and the Cu L3-edge. The 400 nm optical excitation shifts the Cu and O absorptions to lower energy, but does not change the integrated x-ray absorption significantly for either edge. The constant integrated x-ray absorption cross-section indicates that that the conduction band and valence band edges have very similar Cu 3d and O 2p orbital contributions. The 2.1 eV optical band gap of Cu2O significantly exceeds the one eV shift in the Cu L3- and O K-edges absorption edges induced by optical excitation, demonstrating the importance of core-hole excitonic effects and valence electron screening in the x-ray absorption process.

  9. Atomic resolution mapping of the excited-state electronic structure of Cu2O with time-resolved x-ray absorption spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Hillyard, P. W.; Kuchibhatla, S. V. N. T.; Glover, T. E.; Hertlein, M. P.; Huse, Nils; Nachimuthu, P.; Saraf, L. V.; Thevuthasan, S.; Gaffney, K. J.

    2010-05-02

    We have used time-resolved soft x-ray spectroscopy to investigate the electronic structure of optically excited cuprous oxide at the O K-edge and the Cu L3-edge. The 400 nm optical excitation shifts the Cu and O absorptions to lower energy, but does not change the integrated x-ray absorption significantly for either edge. The constant integrated x-ray absorption cross-section indicates that the conduction-band and valence-band edges have very similar Cu 3d and O 2p orbital contributions. The 2.1 eV optical band gap of Cu2O significantly exceeds the one eV shift in the Cu L3- and O K-edges absorption edges induced by optical excitation, demonstrating the importance of core-hole excitonic effects and valence electron screening in the x-ray absorption process.

  10. Solar Spectroscopy: Atomic Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mason, H.; Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    A Greek philosopher called DEMOCRITUS (c. 460-370 BC) first introduced the concept of atoms (which means indivisible). His atoms do not precisely correspond to our atoms of today, which are not indivisible, but made up of a nucleus (protons with positive charge and neutrons which have no charge) and orbiting electrons (with negative charge). Indeed, in the solar atmosphere, the temperature is suc...

  11. Absorption Spectroscopy in Homogeneous and Micellar Solutions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shah, S. Sadiq; Henscheid, Leonard G.

    1983-01-01

    Describes an experiment which has helped physical chemistry students learn principles of absorption spectroscopy, the effect of solvent polarity on absorption spectra, and some micellar chemistry. Background information and experimental procedures are provided. (JN)

  12. Spectroscopy, Understanding the Atom Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hellman, Hal

    This booklet is one of the "Understanding the Atom" Series. The science of spectroscopy is presented by a number of topics dealing with (1) the uses of spectroscopy, (2) its origin and background, (3) the basic optical systems of spectroscopes, spectrometers, and spectrophotometers, (4) the characteristics of wave motion, (5) the electromagnetic…

  13. Graphene intracavity spaser absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lozovik, Yu. E.; Nechepurenko, I. A.; Dorofeenko, A. V.

    2016-09-01

    We propose an intracavity plasmon absorption spectroscopy method based on graphene active plasmonics. It is shown that the plasmonic cavity contribution to the sensitivity is proportional to the quality factor Q of the graphene plasmonic cavity and reaches two orders of magnitude. The addition of gain medium into the cavity increases the sensitivity of method. Maximum sensitivity is reached in the vicinity of the plasmon generation threshold. The gain contribution to the sensitivity is proportional to Q1/2. The giant amplification of sensitivity in the graphene plasmon generator is associated with a huge path length, limited only by the decoherence processes. An analytical estimation of the sensitivity to loss caused by analyzed particles (molecules, nanoparticles, etc.) normalized by the single pass plasmon scheme is derived. Usage of graphene nanoflakes as plasmonic cavity allows a high spatial resolution to be reached, in addition to high sensitivity.

  14. Determination of gold, indium, tellurium and thallium in the same sample digest of geological materials by atomic-absorption spectroscopy and two-step solvent extraction

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hubert, A.E.; Chao, T.T.

    1985-01-01

    A rock, soil, or stream-sediment sample is decomposed with hydrofluoric acid, aqua regia, and hydrobromic acid-bromine solution. Gold, thallium, indium and tellurium are separated and concentrated from the sample digest by a two-step MIBK extraction at two concentrations of hydrobromic add. Gold and thallium are first extracted from 0.1M hydrobromic acid medium, then indium and tellurium are extracted from 3M hydrobromic acid in the presence of ascorbic acid to eliminate iron interference. The elements are then determined by flame atomic-absorption spectrophotometry. The two-step solvent extraction can also be used in conjunction with electrothermal atomic-absorption methods to lower the detection limits for all four metals in geological materials. ?? 1985.

  15. Atomic emission spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andrew, K. H.

    1975-01-01

    The relationship between the Slater-Condon theory and the conditions within the atom as revealed by experimental data was investigated. The first spectrum of Si, Rb, Cl, Br, I, Ne, Ar, and Xe-136 and the second spectrum of As, Cu, and P were determined. Methods for assessing the phase stability of fringe counting interferometers and the design of an autoranging scanning system for digitizing the output of an infrared spectrometer and recording it on magnetic tape are described.

  16. Atomic Absorption, Atomic Fluorescence, and Flame Emission Spectrometry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horlick, Gary

    1984-01-01

    This review is presented in six sections. Sections focus on literature related to: (1) developments in instrumentation, measurement techniques, and procedures; (2) performance studies of flames and electrothermal atomizers; (3) applications of atomic absorption spectrometry; (4) analytical comparisons; (5) atomic fluorescence spectrometry; and (6)…

  17. Do Atoms Really "Emit" Absorption Lines?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brecher, Kenneth

    1991-01-01

    Presents three absorption line sources that enhance student understanding of the phenomena associated with the interaction of light with matter and help dispel the misconception that atoms "emit" absorption lines. Sources include neodymium, food coloring and other common household liquids, and fluorescent materials. (MDH)

  18. Communication: XUV transient absorption spectroscopy of iodomethane and iodobenzene photodissociation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drescher, L.; Galbraith, M. C. E.; Reitsma, G.; Dura, J.; Zhavoronkov, N.; Patchkovskii, S.; Vrakking, M. J. J.; Mikosch, J.

    2016-07-01

    Time-resolved extreme ultraviolet (XUV) transient absorption spectroscopy of iodomethane and iodobenzene photodissociation at the iodine pre-N4,5 edge is presented, using femtosecond UV pump pulses and XUV probe pulses from high harmonic generation. For both molecules the molecular core-to-valence absorption lines fade immediately, within the pump-probe time-resolution. Absorption lines converging to the atomic iodine product emerge promptly in CH3I but are time-delayed in C6H5I. We attribute this delay to the initial π → σ* excitation in iodobenzene, which is distant from the iodine reporter atom. We measure a continuous shift in energy of the emerging atomic absorption lines in CH3I, attributed to relaxation of the excited valence shell. An independent particle model is used to rationalize the observed experimental findings.

  19. Communication: XUV transient absorption spectroscopy of iodomethane and iodobenzene photodissociation.

    PubMed

    Drescher, L; Galbraith, M C E; Reitsma, G; Dura, J; Zhavoronkov, N; Patchkovskii, S; Vrakking, M J J; Mikosch, J

    2016-07-01

    Time-resolved extreme ultraviolet (XUV) transient absorption spectroscopy of iodomethane and iodobenzene photodissociation at the iodine pre-N4,5 edge is presented, using femtosecond UV pump pulses and XUV probe pulses from high harmonic generation. For both molecules the molecular core-to-valence absorption lines fade immediately, within the pump-probe time-resolution. Absorption lines converging to the atomic iodine product emerge promptly in CH3I but are time-delayed in C6H5I. We attribute this delay to the initial π → σ(*) excitation in iodobenzene, which is distant from the iodine reporter atom. We measure a continuous shift in energy of the emerging atomic absorption lines in CH3I, attributed to relaxation of the excited valence shell. An independent particle model is used to rationalize the observed experimental findings. PMID:27394091

  20. Laser techniques for spectroscopy of core-excited atomic levels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, S. E.; Young, J. F.; Falcone, R. W.; Rothenberg, J. E.; Willison, J. R.

    1982-01-01

    We discuss three techniques which allow the use of tunable lasers for high resolution and picosecond time scale spectroscopy of core-excited atomic levels. These are: anti-Stokes absorption spectroscopy, laser induced emission from metastable levels, and laser designation of selected core-excited levels.

  1. Laser spectroscopy of sputtered atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Gruen, D.M.; Pellin, M.J.; Young, C.E.; Calaway, W.F.

    1985-01-01

    The use of laser radiation to study the sputtering process is of relatively recent origin. Much has been learned from this work about the basic physics of the sputtering process itself through measurements of velocity and excited state distributions of sputtered atoms and the effects of adsorbates on substrate sputtering yields. Furthermore, the identification, characterization, and sensitive detection of sputtered atoms by laser spectroscopy has led to the development of in situ diagnostics for impurity fluxes in the plasma edge regions of tokamaks and of ultrasensitive methods (ppB Fe in Si) for surface analysis with ultralow (picocoulomb) ion fluences. The techniques involved in this work, laser fluorescence and multiphoton resonance ionization spectroscopy, will be described and illustrations given of results achieved up to now. 55 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  2. Precision Spectroscopy of Atomic Hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beyer, A.; Parthey, Ch G.; Kolachevsky, N.; Alnis, J.; Khabarova, K.; Pohl, R.; Peters, E.; Yost, D. C.; Matveev, A.; Predehl, K.; Droste, S.; Wilken, T.; Holzwarth, R.; Hänsch, T. W.; Abgrall, M.; Rovera, D.; Salomon, Ch; Laurent, Ph; Udem, Th

    2013-12-01

    Precise determinations of transition frequencies of simple atomic systems are required for a number of fundamental applications such as tests of quantum electrodynamics (QED), the determination of fundamental constants and nuclear charge radii. The sharpest transition in atomic hydrogen occurs between the metastable 2S state and the 1S ground state. Its transition frequency has now been measured with almost 15 digits accuracy using an optical frequency comb and a cesium atomic clock as a reference [1]. A recent measurement of the 2S - 2P3/2 transition frequency in muonic hydrogen is in significant contradiction to the hydrogen data if QED calculations are assumed to be correct [2, 3]. We hope to contribute to this so-called "proton size puzzle" by providing additional experimental input from hydrogen spectroscopy.

  3. An improved method for the determination of trace levels of arsenic and antimony in geological materials by automated hydride generation-atomic absorption spectroscopy

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Crock, J.G.; Lichte, F.E.

    1982-01-01

    An improved, automated method for the determination of arsenic and antimony in geological materials is described. After digestion of the material in sulfuric, nitric, hydrofluoric and perchloric acids, a hydrochloric acid solution of the sample is automatically mixed with reducing agents, acidified with additional hydrochloric acid, and treated with a sodium tetrahydroborate solution to form arsine and stibine. The hydrides are decomposed in a heated quartz tube in the optical path of an atomic absorption spectrometer. The absorbance peak height for arsenic or antimony is measured. Interferences that exist are minimized to the point where most geological materials including coals, soils, coal ashes, rocks and sediments can be analyzed directly without use of standard additions. The relative standard deviation of the digestion and the instrumental procedure is less than 2% at the 50 ??g l-1 As or Sb level. The reagent-blank detection limit is 0.2 ??g l-1 As or Sb. ?? 1982.

  4. Further advancement of differential optical absorption spectroscopy: theory of orthogonal optical absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Liudchik, Alexander M

    2014-08-10

    A modified version of the differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS) method is presented. The technique is called orthogonal optical absorption spectroscopy (OOAS). A widespread variant of DOAS with smoothing of the registered spectrum and absorption cross sections being made employing a polynomial regression is a particular case of OOAS. The concept of OOAS provides a variety of new possibilities for constructing computational schemes and analyzing the influence of different error sources on calculated concentrations. PMID:25320931

  5. Detection of palladium by cold atom solution atomic absorption.

    PubMed

    Molloy, John L; Holcombe, James A

    2006-09-15

    One of the largest obstacles in miniaturizing traditional atomic spectroscopic sources is the need for a thermal/electrical source for free atom production. A single article in the literature has demonstrated atomic absorption detection of Ag, Cu, and Pd in solution at room temperature for atoms in the gas phase, which may ultimately permit miniaturization. Unfortunately, several laboratories have found that reproducing the phenomenon has been difficult. Without a sound fundamental explanation of the processes leading to the signal, one must conclude that it can be done, but some unsuspected and unknown design/methodological nuances are responsible for only a single reported success. Gas phase atoms could exist at room temperature "in solution" if the atoms were trapped in very small bubbles. In the current study, submicrometer-sized bubbles were created in a flow-through cell during the mixing of an alcohol-water solution containing a reducing agent with water containing the analyte. A repeatable atomic absorption signal was produced. Replacement of ethanol with 1-propanol and use of a surfactant increased the signal. Limits of detection of approximately 100 ppb in Pd were achieved, and it is estimated that approximately 0.4% of the Pd initially added is contained within the bubbles as gaseous atoms. The paper discusses the fundamental processes needed to achieve a repeatable signal. PMID:16970344

  6. Simultaneous multielement atomic absorption spectrometry with graphite furnace atomization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harnly, James M.; Miller-Ihli, Nancy J.; O'Haver, Thomas C.

    The extended analytical range capability of a simultaneous multielement atomic absorption continuum source spectrometer (SIMAAC) was tested for furnace atomization with respect to the signal measurement mode (peak height and area), the atomization mode (from the wall or from a platform), and the temperature program mode (stepped or ramped atomization). These parameters were evaluated with respect to the shapes of the analytical curves, the detection limits, carry-over contamination and accuracy. Peak area measurements gave more linear calibration curves. Methods for slowing the atomization step heating rate, the use of a ramped temperature program or a platform, produced similar calibration curves and longer linear ranges than atomization with a stepped temperature program. Peak height detection limits were best using stepped atomization from the wall. Peak area detection limits for all atomization modes were similar. Carry-over contamination was worse for peak area than peak height, worse for ramped atomization than stepped atomization, and worse for atomization from a platform than from the wall. Accurate determinations (100 ± 12% for Ca, Cu, Fe, Mn, and Zn in National Bureau of Standards' Standard Reference Materials Bovine Liver 1577 and Rice Flour 1568 were obtained using peak area measurements with ramped atomization from the wall and stepped atomization from a platform. Only stepped atomization from a platform gave accurate recoveries for K. Accurate recoveries, 100 ± 10%, with precisions ranging from 1 to 36 % (standard deviation), were obtained for the determination of Al, Co, Cr, Fe, Mn, Mo, Ni. Pb, V and Zn in Acidified Waters (NBS SRM 1643 and 1643a) using stepped atomization from a platform.

  7. Determination of nickel in food samples by flame atomic absorption spectroscopy after preconcentration and microextraction based ionic liquids using full factorial and central composite design.

    PubMed

    Zarei, Zohre; Shemirani, Farzaneh

    2012-12-01

    In this research, a microextraction technique based on ionic liquids (ILs) termed in situ solvent formation microextraction (ISFME) was used for determination of nickel in solutions. 1-(2-pyridylazo)-2-naphtol (PAN) was chosen as a complexing agent. After preconcentration, the settled IL-phase was dissolved in 50 μL of ethanol and aspirated into the flame atomic absorption spectrometer (FAAS) using a home-made microsample introduction system. Injection of 50 μL volumes of analyte into an air-acetylene flame provided very sensitive spike-like and reproducible signals. ISFME is based on phase separation phenomenon of ionic liquids in aqueous solutions. This method is simple and rapid for extraction and preconcentration of metal ions from food samples and can be applied for the sample solutions containing very high concentrations of salt. Furthermore, this technique is much safer in comparison with the organic solvent extraction because of using ionic liquid. The effective parameters such as amount of IL, salt effect, concentration of the chelating agent and ion pairing agent were inspected by a full factorial design to identify important parameters and their interactions. Next, a central composite design was applied to obtain optimum point of the important parameters. Under the optimum conditions, the calibration graph was linear over the range of 2 to 80 ng/mL. The limit of detection and relative standard deviation (n= 6) were 0.6 ng/mL and 2%, respectively. PMID:22853633

  8. Cavity Enhanced Ultrafast Transient Absorption Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allison, Thomas K.; Reber, Melanie Roberts; Chen, Yuning

    2015-06-01

    Ultrafast spectroscopy on gas phase systems is typically restricted to techniques involving photoionization, whereas solution phase experiments utilize the detection of light. At Stony Brook, we are developing new techniques for performing femtosecond time-resolved spectroscopy using frequency combs and high-finesse optical resonators. A large detection sensitivity enhancement over traditional methods enables the extension of all-optical ultrafast spectroscopies, such as broad-band transient absorption spectroscopy (TAS) and 2D spectroscopy, to dilute gas phase samples produced in molecular beams. Here, gas phase data can be directly compared to solution phase data. Initial demonstration experiments are focusing on the photodissociation of iodine in small neutral argon clusters, where cluster size strongly influences the effects solvent-caging and geminate recombination. I will discuss these initial results, our high power home-built Yb:fiber laser systems, and also extensions of the methods to the mid-IR to study the vibrational dynamics of hydrogen bonded clusters.

  9. Qualitative and Quantitative Content Determination of Macro-Minor Elements in Bryonia Alba L. Roots using Flame Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy Technique

    PubMed Central

    Karpiuk, Uliana Vladimirovna; Al Azzam, Khaldun Mohammad; Abudayeh, Zead Helmi Mahmoud; Kislichenko, Viktoria; Naddaf, Ahmad; Cholak, Irina; Yemelianova, Oksana

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the elements in Bryonia alba L. roots, collected from the Crimean Peninsula region in Ukraine. Methods: Dry ashing was used as a flexible method and all elements were determined using atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS) equipped with flame and graphite furnace. Results: The average concentrations of the determined elements, expressed as mg/100 g dry weight of the sample, were as follow: 13.000 for Fe, 78.000 for Si, 88.000 for P, 7.800 for Al, 0.130 for Mn, 105.000 for Mg, 0.030 for Pb, 0.052 for Ni, 0.030 for Mo, 210.000 for Ca, 0.130 for Cu, 5.200 for Zn, 13.000 for Na, 1170.000 for K, 0.780 for Sr, 0.030 for Co, 0.010 for Cd, 0.010 for As, and 0.010 for Hg. Toxic elements such as Cd and Pb were also found but at very low concentration. Among the analyzed elements, K was the most abundant followed by Ca, Mg, P, Si, Fe, Na, and Zn, whereas Hg, As, Cd, Co, Mo, and Pb were found in low concentration. Conclusion: The results suggest that the roots of Bryonia alba L. plant has potential medicinal property through their high element contents present. Moreover, it showed that the AAS method is a simple, fast, and reliable for the determination of elements in plant materials. The obtained results of the current study provide justification for the usage of such fruit in daily diet for nutrition and for medicinal usage in the treatment of various diseases. PMID:27478794

  10. Element selective detection of molecular species applying chromatographic techniques and diode laser atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Kunze, K; Zybin, A; Koch, J; Franzke, J; Miclea, M; Niemax, K

    2004-12-01

    Tunable diode laser atomic absorption spectroscopy (DLAAS) combined with separation techniques and atomization in plasmas and flames is presented as a powerful method for analysis of molecular species. The analytical figures of merit of the technique are demonstrated by the measurement of Cr(VI) and Mn compounds, as well as molecular species including halogen atoms, hydrogen, carbon and sulfur. PMID:15561625

  11. Absorption spectroscopy with quantum cascade lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kosterev, A. A.; Curl, R. F.; Tittel, F. K.; Gmachl, C.; Capasso, F.; Sivco, D. L.; Baillargeon, J. N.; Hutchinson, A. L.; Cho, A. Y.

    2001-01-01

    Novel pulsed and cw quantum cascade distributed feedback (QC-DFB) lasers operating near lambda=8 micrometers were used for detection and quantification of trace gases in ambient air by means of sensitive absorption spectroscopy. N2O, 12CH4, 13CH4, and different isotopic species of H2O were detected. Also, a highly selective detection of ethanol vapor in air with a sensitivity of 125 parts per billion by volume (ppb) was demonstrated.

  12. Cavity-Enhanced Ultrafast Transient Absorption Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yuning; Reber, Melanie Roberts; Keleher, Kevin; Allison, Thomas K.

    2014-06-01

    We introduce cavity enhanced ultrafast transient absorption spectroscopy, which employs frequency combs and high-finesse optical cavities. % The schematic of apparatus is shown in Figure 1. Sub-100 fs pulses with a repetition rate of 90 MHz are generated by a home-built Ytterbium fiber laser. The amplified light has a power up to 10 W, which is used to pump an optical parametric oscillator, followed by second-harmonic generation(SHG) that converts the wavelength from near-IR to visible. A pump comb at 530 nm is separately generated by SHG. Both pump and probe combs are coupled into high-finesse cavities. Compared to the conventional transient absorption spectroscopy method, the detection sensitivity can be improved by a factor of (F/π)^2 ˜ 10^5, where F is the finesse of cavity. This ultrasensitive technology enables the direct all-optical dynamics study in molecular beams. We will apply the cavity enhanced ultrafast transient absorption spectroscopy to investigate the dynamics of visible chromophores and then extend the wavelength to mid-IR to study vibrational dynamics of small hydrogen-bonded clusters.

  13. Phase Fluctuation Absorption Spectroscopy of Small Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fluckiger, David Ulrich

    The purpose of this dissertation is to establish a viable mass measurement technique for in situ aerosol. Adaptation of the photothermal effect in a Mach-Zehnder interferometer provided high mass sensitivity in an instrument employing Phase Fluctuation Laser Optical Heterodyne (PFLOH) absorption spectroscopy. The theory of aerosol absorption of electromagnetic energy and subsequent thermalization in continuum, Rayleigh regime region is presented. From this theory the general behavior of PFLOH detection of aerosol is described and shown to give a signal proportional to the absorption species mass. Furthermore the signal is shown to be linear in excitation energy and modulation frequency, and scalable. The instrument is calibrated and shown to behave as predicted. PFLOH detection is then used in determining the mass size distribution of the aerosol component of the ozone-isoprene and ozone -(alpha)-pinene products as a function of isoprene and (alpha) -pinene concentration.

  14. CO2 Absorption Spectroscopy and Climate Change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feldman, Daniel; Mlawer, Eli; Mlynczak, Martin; Gero, Jon; Collins, William; Torn, Margaret

    2014-03-01

    Most of the absorption, and therefore radiative forcing, due to increased atmospheric CO2 occurs in line wings, so utilizing an accurate line shape is necessary for climate science. Recent advances in CO2 absorption spectroscopy have been incorporated into benchmark line-by-line radiative transfer models. These updates include the Energy Corrected Sudden Approximation to represent isolated line profiles, line mixing, and line clusters. The CO2 line profiles are sub-Lorentzian and are explicitly modeled up to 25 cm-1 from each line's center. Consistent continuum absorption is implemented over the remainder of the profile except for modest empirical adjustments based on observations. Thus, line-by-line models calculate the absorption effects of CO2 that agree with theory and measurements. This is validated with long-term spectroscopic measurements from the ARM program's AERI instrument. This spectroscopy trains computationally-efficient correlated-k methods for climate model radiative transfer, but they overpredict instantaneous radiative forcing from doubled CO2 by approximately 7% in part because they have larger errors handling the impact of increased CO2 in the stratosphere than the troposphere. The implications of this can be tested with supercomputers. This work was supported by the Director, Office of Science, Office of Biol. & Env. Res., Clim. & Env. Sci. Div., of the U.S. D.O.E., Contract No. DE-AC02-05CH11231 as part of the Atmos. Sys. Res.

  15. Continuum Absorption Coefficient of Atoms and Ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armaly, B. F.

    1979-01-01

    The rate of heat transfer to the heat shield of a Jupiter probe has been estimated to be one order of magnitude higher than any previously experienced in an outer space exploration program. More than one-third of this heat load is due to an emission of continuum radiation from atoms and ions. The existing computer code for calculating the continuum contribution to the total load utilizes a modified version of Biberman's approximate method. The continuum radiation absorption cross sections of a C - H - O - N ablation system were examined in detail. The present computer code was evaluated and updated by being compared with available exact and approximate calculations and correlations of experimental data. A detailed calculation procedure, which can be applied to other atomic species, is presented. The approximate correlations can be made to agree with the available exact and experimental data.

  16. Absorption effects in diffusing wave spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Sarmiento-Gomez, Erick; Morales-Cruzado, Beatriz; Castillo, Rolando

    2014-07-20

    The effect of absorption in diffusing wave spectroscopy (DWS) was studied using an absorption-dependent diffusive equation for describing the light propagation within a turbid liquid where dielectric microspheres have been embedded. Here, we propose an expression for the time-averaged light intensity autocorrelation function that correctly describes the time fluctuations for the scattered light, in the regime where the diffusion approximation accurately describes the light propagation. This correction was suspected previously, but it was not formally derived from a light diffusive equation. As in the case of no absorption, we obtained that time fluctuations of the scattered light can be related to the mean square displacement of the embedded particles. However, if a correction for absorption is not taken into account, the colloidal dynamics can be misinterpreted. Experimental results show that this new formulation correctly describes the time fluctuations of scattered light. This new procedure extends the applicability of DWS, and it opens the possibility of doing microrheology with this optical method in systems where absorption cannot be avoided. PMID:25090203

  17. Methane overtone absorption by intracavity laser spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Obrien, James J.

    1990-01-01

    Interpretation of planetary methane (CH4) visible-near IR spectra, used to develop models of planetary atmospheres, has been hampered by a lack of suitable laboratory spectroscopic data. The particular CH4 spectral bands are due to intrinsically weak, high overtone-combination transitions too complex for classical spectroscopic analysis. The traditional multipass cell approach to measuring spectra of weakly absorbing species is insufficiently sensitive to yield reliable results for some of the weakest CH4 absorption features and is difficult to apply at the temperatures of the planetary environments. A time modulated form of intracavity laser spectroscopy (ILS), has been shown to provide effective absorption pathlengths of 100 to 200 km with sample cells less than 1 m long. The optical physics governing this technique and the experimental parameters important for obtaining reliable, quantitative results are now well understood. Quantitative data for CH4 absorption obtained by ILS have been reported recently. Illustrative ILS data for CH4 absorption in the 619.7 nm and 681.9 nm bands are presented. New ILS facilities at UM-St. Louis will be used to measure CH4 absorption in the 700 to 1000 nm region under conditions appropriate to the planetary atmospheres.

  18. OH absorption spectroscopy in a flame using spatial heterodyne spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Bartula, Renata J; Ghandhi, Jaal B; Sanders, Scott T; Mierkiewicz, Edwin J; Roesler, Fred L; Harlander, John M

    2007-12-20

    We demonstrate measurements of OH absorption spectra in the post-flame zone of a McKenna burner using spatial heterodyne spectroscopy (SHS). SHS permits high-resolution, high-throughput measurements. In this case the spectra span approximately 308-310 nm with a resolution of 0.03 nm, even though an extended source (extent of approximately 2x10(-7) m(2) rad(2)) was used. The high spectral resolution is important for interpreting spectra when multiple absorbers are present for inferring accurate gas temperatures from measured spectra and for monitoring weak absorbers. The present measurement paves the way for absorption spectroscopy by SHS in practical combustion devices, such as reciprocating and gas-turbine engines. PMID:18091974

  19. OH absorption spectroscopy in a flame using spatial heterodyne spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartula, Renata J.; Ghandhi, Jaal B.; Sanders, Scott T.; Mierkiewicz, Edwin J.; Roesler, Fred L.; Harlander, John M.

    2007-12-01

    We demonstrate measurements of OH absorption spectra in the post-flame zone of a McKenna burner using spatial heterodyne spectroscopy (SHS). SHS permits high-resolution, high-throughput measurements. In this case the spectra span ~308-310 nm with a resolution of 0.03 nm, even though an extended source (extent of ~2×10-7 m2 rad2) was used. The high spectral resolution is important for interpreting spectra when multiple absorbers are present for inferring accurate gas temperatures from measured spectra and for monitoring weak absorbers. The present measurement paves the way for absorption spectroscopy by SHS in practical combustion devices, such as reciprocating and gas-turbine engines.

  20. Gas in scattering media absorption spectroscopy - GASMAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svanberg, Sune

    2008-09-01

    An overview of the new field of Gas in Scattering Media Absorption Spectroscopy (GASMAS) is presented. GASMAS combines narrow-band diode-laser spectroscopy with diffuse media optical propagation. While solids and liquids have broad absorption features, free gas in pores and cavities in the material is characterized by sharp spectral signatures, typically 10,000 times sharper than those of the host material. Many applications in materials science, food packaging, pharmaceutics and medicine have been demonstrated. So far molecular oxygen and water vapour have been studied around 760 and 935 nm, respectively. Liquid water, an important constituent in many natural materials, such as tissue, has a low absorption at such wavelengths, allowing propagation. Polystyrene foam, wood, fruits, food-stuffs, pharmaceutical tablets, and human sinus cavities have been studied. Transport of gas in porous media can readily be studied by first immersing the material in, e.g., pure nitrogen, and then observing the rate at which normal air, containing oxygen, reinvades the material. The conductance of the sinus connective passages can be measured in this way by flushing the nasal cavity with nitrogen. Also other dynamic processes such as drying of materials can be studied. The techniques have also been extended to remote-sensing applications (LIDAR-GASMAS).

  1. Aerosol optical absorption measurements with photoacoustic spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Kun; Wang, Lei; Liu, Qiang; Wang, Guishi; Tan, Tu; Zhang, Weijun; Chen, Weidong; Gao, Xiaoming

    2015-04-01

    Many parameters related to radiative forcing in climate research are known only with large uncertainties. And one of the largest uncertainties in global radiative forcing is the contribution from aerosols. Aerosols can scatter or absorb the electromagnetic radiation, thus may have negative or positive effects on the radiative forcing of the atmosphere, respectively [1]. And the magnitude of the effect is directly related to the quantity of light absorbed by aerosols [2,3]. Thus, sensitivity and precision measurement of aerosol optical absorption is crucial for climate research. Photoacoustic spectroscopy (PAS) is commonly recognized as one of the best candidates to measure the light absorption of aerosols [4]. A PAS based sensor for aerosol optical absorption measurement was developed. A 532 nm semiconductor laser with an effective power of 160 mW was used as a light source of the PAS sensor. The PAS sensor was calibrated by using known concentration NO2. The minimum detectable optical absorption coefficient (OAC) of aerosol was determined to be 1 Mm-1. 24 hours continues measurement of OAC of aerosol in the ambient air was carried out. And a novel three wavelength PAS aerosol OAC sensor is in development for analysis of aerosol wavelength-dependent absorption Angstrom coefficient. Reference [1] U. Lohmann and J. Feichter, Global indirect aerosol effects: a review, Atmos. Chem. Phys. 5, 715-737 (2005) [2] M. Z. Jacobson, Strong radiative heating due to the mixing state of black carbon in atmospheric aerosols, Nature 409, 695-697 (2001) [3] V. Ramanathan and G. Carmichae, Global and regional climate changes due to black carbon, nature geoscience 1, 221-227 (2008) [4] W.P Arnott, H. Moosmuller, C. F. Rogers, T. Jin, and R. Bruch, Photoacoustic spectrometer for measuring light absorption by aerosol: instrument description. Atmos. Environ. 33, 2845-2852 (1999).

  2. UV laser long-path absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dorn, Hans-Peter; Brauers, Theo; Neuroth, Rudolf

    1994-01-01

    Long path Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (DOAS) using a picosecond UV laser as a light source was developed in our institute. Tropospheric OH radicals are measured by their rotational absorption lines around 308 nm. The spectra are obtained using a high resolution spectrograph. The detection system has been improved over the formerly used optomechanical scanning device by application of a photodiode array which increased the observed spectral range by a factor of 6 and which utilizes the light much more effectively leading to a considerable reduction of the measurement time. This technique provides direct measurements of OH because the signal is given by the product of the absorption coefficient and the OH concentration along the light path according to Lambert-Beers law. No calibration is needed. Since the integrated absorption coefficient is well known the accuracy of the measurement essentially depends on the extent to which the OH absorption pattern can be detected in the spectra. No interference by self generated OH radicals in the detection lightpath has been observed. The large bandwidth (greater than 0.15 nm) and the high spectral resolution (1.5 pm) allows absolute determination of interferences by other trace gas absorptions. The measurement error is directly accessible from the absorption-signal to baseline-noise ratio in the spectra. The applicability of the method strongly depends on visibility. Elevated concentrations of aerosols lead to considerable attenuation of the laser light which reduces the S/N-ratio. In the moderately polluted air of Julich, where we performed a number of OH measurement spectra. In addition absorption features of unidentified species were frequently detected. A quantitative deconvolution even of the known species is not easy to achieve and can leave residual structures in the spectra. Thus interferences usually increase the noise and deteriorate the OH detection sensitivity. Using diode arrays for sensitive

  3. Tomographic laser absorption spectroscopy using Tikhonov regularization.

    PubMed

    Guha, Avishek; Schoegl, Ingmar

    2014-12-01

    The application of tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (TDLAS) to flames with nonhomogeneous temperature and concentration fields is an area where only few studies exist. Experimental work explores the performance of tomographic reconstructions of species concentration and temperature profiles from wavelength-modulated TDLAS measurements within the plume of an axisymmetric McKenna burner. Water vapor transitions at 1391.67 and 1442.67 nm are probed using calibration-free wavelength modulation spectroscopy with second harmonic detection (WMS-2f). A single collimated laser beam is swept parallel to the burner surface, where scans yield pairs of line-of-sight (LOS) data at multiple radial locations. Radial profiles of absorption data are reconstructed using Tikhonov regularized Abel inversion, which suppresses the amplification of experimental noise that is typically observed for reconstructions with high spatial resolution. Based on spectral data reconstructions, temperatures and mole fractions are calculated point-by-point. Here, a least-squares approach addresses difficulties due to modulation depths that cannot be universally optimized due to a nonuniform domain. Experimental results show successful reconstructions of temperature and mole fraction profiles based on two-transition, nonoptimally modulated WMS-2f and Tikhonov regularized Abel inversion, and thus validate the technique as a viable diagnostic tool for flame measurements. PMID:25607968

  4. Correlating absolute concentrations of gas-phase species determined by microwave, Fourier transform infrared, and atomic absorption spectroscopies to properties of silicon dioxide films deposited in an electron cyclotron resonance reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cornett, Mary Jezl

    Three different gas-phase absorption spectroscopies (microwave, FTIR, and silicon atomic absorption) were used simultaneously during the plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition of SiO2 and fluorinated SiO 2 films using an ECR deposition reactor. With these spectroscopic techniques, absolute concentrations of a large number of species present in these deposition plasmas were determined. A new ECR system with multiple diagnostic ports on the same horizontal plane, and incorporating an electrostatic chuck, rf-bias, and He-backside cooling, was constructed to facilitate these studies. Correlations to the quality of the resulting films were made using ellipsometry, FTIR, XPS, and wet etch rate techniques. The systems investigated were SiH 4/O2/Ar, SiH4/SiF4/O2 and TEOS/O2 plasmas. The SiH4/O2 plasmas are found to contain less water than previously expected (under our detection limit of 0.1 mTorr). The molecular fragment SiO was monitored as a function of power, pressure, oxygen flow, and argon flow at densities between 3.7 × 109 and 1.3 × 10-11 cm-3 in this system. Silicon atoms were detected at densities between 5.1 × 109 and 5.8 × 1010 cm -3. The decomposition of SiF4 is investigated and is shown to occur at a constant rate of about 98% in pure SiF4/O 2 plasmas. This dissociation rate is enhanced when silane is added. Water and HF are generated in large quantities when SiH4 and SiF 4 are both present in the system, and reach their maximum concentrations at the SiF4/SiH4 ratio where the film quality appears to be the best. Fluorine incorporation into SiOF films result in a consistent decrease in index of refraction values. No SiO molecules were detected in SiH4/SiF4/O2 chemistries (<5 × 10 9 cm-3). Plasmas employing TEOS/O2 chemistries show large concentrations of CO, CO2 and H2O. Larger organic molecules (ethanol, acetaldehyde, methanol, formaldehyde, and formic acid) are also present in these plasmas, totaling about 9% of the species present under most

  5. Spectroscopy and Dynamics of K Atoms on Argon Clusters.

    PubMed

    Douady, J; Awali, S; Poisson, L; Soep, B; Mestdagh, J M; Gervais, B

    2015-06-11

    We present a combined experimental and simulation study of the 4s → 4p photoexcitation of the K atom trapped at the surface of ArN clusters made of a few hundred Ar atoms. Our experimental method based on photoelectron spectroscopy allows us to firmly establish that one single K atom is trapped at the surface of the cluster. The absorption spectrum is characterized by the splitting of the atomic absorption line into two broad bands, a Π band associated with p orbitals parallel to the cluster surface and a Σ band associated with the perpendicular orientation. The spectrum is consistent with observations reported for K atoms trapped on lighter inert gas clusters, but the splitting between the Π and Σ bands is significantly larger. We show that a large amount of K atoms are transiently stuck and eventually lost by the Ar cluster, in contrast with previous observations reported for alkaline earth metal systems. The excitation in the Σ band leads systematically to the ejection of the K atom from the Ar cluster. On the contrary, excitation in the Π band leads to the formation of a bound state. In this case, the analysis of the experimental photoelectron spectrum by means of nonadiabatic molecular dynamics simulation shows that the relaxation drives the system toward a basin where the coordination of the K atom is 2.2 Ar atoms on the average, in a poorly structured surface. PMID:25854161

  6. Investigation of (235)U, (226)Ra, (232)Th, (40)K, (137)Cs, and heavy metal concentrations in Anzali international wetland using high-resolution gamma-ray spectrometry and atomic absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Zare, Mohammad Reza; Kamali, Mahdi; Fallahi Kapourchali, Maryam; Bagheri, Hashem; Khoram Bagheri, Mahdi; Abedini, Ali; Pakzad, Hamid Reza

    2016-02-01

    Measurements of natural radioactivity levels and heavy metals in sediment and soil samples of the Anzali international wetland were carried out by two HPGe-gamma ray spectrometry and atomic absorption spectroscopy techniques. The concentrations of (235)U, (226)Ra, (232)Th, (40)K, and (137)Cs in sediment samples ranged between 1.05 ± 0.51-5.81 ± 0.61, 18.06 ± 0.63-33.36 ± .0.34, 17.57 ± 0.38-45.84 ± 6.23, 371.88 ± 6.36-652.28 ± 11.60, and 0.43 ± 0.06-63.35 ± 0.94 Bq/kg, while in the soil samples they vary between 2.36-5.97, 22.71-38.37, 29.27-42.89, 472.66-533, and 1.05-9.60 Bq/kg for (235)U, (226)Ra, (232)Th, (40)K, and (137)Cs, respectively. Present results are compared with the available literature data and also with the world average values. The radium equivalent activity was well below the defined limit of 370 Bq/kg. The external hazard indices were found to be less than 1, indicating a low dose. Heavy metal concentrations were found to decrease in order as Fe > Mn > Sr > Zn > Cu > Cr > Ni > Pb > Co > Cd. These measurements will serve as background reference levels for the Anzali wetland. PMID:26490904

  7. Combined Electron Paramagnetic Resonance and Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy/Inductively Coupled Plasma Analysis As Diagnostics for Soluble Manganese Species from Mn-Based Positive Electrode Materials in Li-ion Cells.

    PubMed

    Shilina, Yuliya; Ziv, Baruch; Meir, Aviv; Banerjee, Anjan; Ruthstein, Sharon; Luski, Shalom; Aurbach, Doron; Halalay, Ion C

    2016-04-19

    Manganese dissolution from positive electrodes significantly reduces the durability of lithium-ion batteries. Knowledge of dissolution rates and oxidation states of manganese ions is essential for designing effective mitigation measures for this problem. We show that electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) combined with atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS) or inductively coupled plasma (ICP) can determine both manganese dissolution rates and relative Mn(3+) amounts, by comparing the correlation between EPR and AAS/ICP data for Mn(2+) standards with that for samples containing manganese cations dissolved from active materials (LiMn2O4 (LMO) and LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 (LNMO)) into the same electrolyte solution. We show that Mn(3+), and not Mn(2+), is the dominant species dissolved from LMO, while Mn(2+) is predominant for LNMO. Although the dissolution rate of LMO varies significantly for the two investigated materials, due to particle morphology and the presence of Cr in one of them, the Mn speciation appears independent of such details. Thus, the relative abundance of dissolved manganese ions in various oxidation states depends mainly on the overall chemical identity of the active material (LMO vs LNMO). We demonstrate the relevance of our methodology for practical batteries with data for graphite-LMO cells after high-temperature cycling or stand at 4.2 V. PMID:27018717

  8. Relativistic atomic beam spectroscopy II

    SciTech Connect

    1989-12-31

    The negative ion of H is one of the simplest 3-body atomic systems. The techniques we have developed for experimental study of atoms moving near speed of light have been productive. This proposal request continuing support for experimental studies of the H{sup -} system, principally at the 800 MeV linear accelerator (LAMPF) at Los Alamos. Four experiments are currently planned: photodetachment of H{sup -} near threshold in electric field, interaction of relativistic H{sup -} ions with matter, high excitations and double charge escape in H{sup -}, and multiphoton detachment of electrons from H{sup -}.

  9. Measuring Microwaves via Absorption and Dispersion in Rydberg Atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stack, Daniel; Kunz, Paul; Meyer, David; Solmeyer, Neal

    2016-05-01

    Weak microwave frequency electromagnetic fields can be difficult to detect and fully characterize with traditional methods. However it is possible to transduce the measurement of these fields from the microwave domain to the optical domain via resonant transitions between Rydberg levels in atomic vapors using electromagnetically-induced transparency and the Autler-Townes effect. This technique allows for sensitive measurements of the microwave field amplitude, polarization, and spatial waveform (via the position of the probe and coupling laser beams) as compared to measurements performed with dipole antennas. We are able to obtain these quantities by monitoring the properties of a probe laser beam as it passes through a rubidium vapor cell. Previous experiments using Rydberg spectroscopy have typically relied on measuring the absorption of the probe laser as it passed through the atomic system. We report on progress to use the polarization rotation of the probe as it passes through the atoms in a static magnetic field, which corresponds to the real part of the susceptibility of the atomic medium, for measuring the characteristics of a microwave frequency signal. This effect is known as Nonlinear Magneto Optical Rotation (NMOR) and has been used for sensitive magnetometry.

  10. Atomic vapor spectroscopy in integrated photonic structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfau, Tilman; Löw, Robert; Ritter, Ralf; Kübler, Harald; Gruhler, Nico; Pernice, Wolfram

    2016-05-01

    We investigate an integrated optical chip immersed in atomic vapor providing several waveguide geometries for spectroscopy applications. This includes integrated ring resonators, Mach Zehnder interferometers, slot waveguides and counterpropagating coupling schemes. The narrow-band transmission through a silicon nitride waveguide and interferometer is altered when the guided light is coupled to a vapor of rubidium atoms via the evanescent tail of the waveguide mode. We use grating couplers to couple between the waveguide mode and the radiating wave, which allow for addressing arbitrary coupling positions on the chip surface. The evanescent atom-light interaction can be numerically simulated and shows excellent agreement with our experimental data. This work demonstrates a next step towards miniaturization and integration of alkali atom spectroscopy and provides a platform for further fundamental studies of strong atom light coupling. Cooperativities on the order of 1 are within reach.

  11. Atmospheric Measurements by Cavity Enhanced Absorption Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Hongming; Wu, Tao; Coeur-Tourneur, Cécile; Fertein, Eric; Gao, Xiaoming; Zhao, Weixiong; Zhang, Weijun; Chen, Weidong

    2015-04-01

    Since the last decade, atmospheric environmental monitoring has benefited from the development of novel spectroscopic measurement techniques owing to the significant breakthroughs in photonic technology from the UV to the infrared spectral domain [1]. In this presentation, we will overview our recent development and applications of cavity enhanced absorption spectroscopy techniques for in situ optical monitoring of chemically reactive atmospheric species (such as HONO, NO3, NO2, N2O5) in intensive campaigns [2] and/or in smog chamber studies [3]. These field deployments demonstrated that modern photonic technologies (newly emergent light sources combined with high sensitivity spectroscopic techniques) can provide a useful tool to improve our understanding of tropospheric chemical processes which affect climate, air quality, and the spread of pollution. Experimental detail and preliminary results will be presented. Acknowledgements. The financial support from the French Agence Nationale de la Recherche (ANR) under the NexCILAS (ANR-11-NS09-0002) and the CaPPA (ANR-10-LABX-005) contracts is acknowledged. References [1] X. Cui, C. Lengignon, T. Wu, W. Zhao, G. Wysocki, E. Fertein, C. Coeur, A. Cassez,L. Croisé, W. Chen, et al., "Photonic Sensing of the Atmosphere by absorption spectroscopy", J. Quant. Spectrosc. Rad. Transfer 113 (2012) 1300-1316 [2] T. Wu, Q. Zha, W. Chen, Z. XU, T. Wang, X. He, "Development and deployment of a cavity enhanced UV-LED spectrometer for measurements of atmospheric HONO and NO2 in Hong Kong", Atmos. Environ. 95 (2014) 544-551 [3] T. Wu, C. Coeur-Tourneur, G. Dhont,A. Cassez, E. Fertein, X. He, W. Chen,"Application of IBBCEAS to kinetic study of NO3 radical formation from O3 + NO2 reaction in an atmospheric simulation chamber", J. Quant. Spectrosc. Rad. Transfer 133 (2014)199-205

  12. Monitoring PVD metal vapors using laser absorption spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Braun, D.G.; Anklam, T.M.; Berzins, L.V.; Hagans, K.G.

    1994-04-01

    Laser absorption spectroscopy (LAS) has been used by the Atomic Vapor Laser Isotope Separation (AVLIS) program for over 10 years to monitor the co-vaporization of uranium and iron in its separators. During that time, LAS has proven to be an accurate and reliable method to monitor both the density and composition of the vapor. It has distinct advantages over other rate monitors, in that it is completely non-obtrusive to the vaporization process and its accuracy is unaffected by the duration of the run. Additionally, the LAS diagnostic has been incorporated into a very successful process control system. LAS requires only a line of sight through the vacuum chamber, as all hardware is external to the vessel. The laser is swept in frequency through an absorption line of interest. In the process a baseline is established, and the line integrated density is determined from the absorption profile. The measurement requires no hardware calibration. Through a proper choice of the atomic transition, a wide range of elements and densities have been monitored (e.g. nickel, iron, cerium and gadolinium). A great deal of information about the vapor plume can be obtained from the measured absorption profiles. By monitoring different species at the same location, the composition of the vapor is measured in real time. By measuring the same density at different locations, the spatial profile of the vapor plume is determined. The shape of the absorption profile is used to obtain the flow speed of the vapor. Finally, all of the above information is used evaluate the total vaporization rate.

  13. Conditional ramsey spectroscopy with synchronized atoms.

    PubMed

    Xu, Minghui; Holland, M J

    2015-03-13

    We investigate Ramsey spectroscopy performed on a synchronized ensemble of two-level atoms. The synchronization is induced by the collective coupling of the atoms to a heavily damped mode of an optical cavity. We show that, in principle, with this synchronized system it is possible to observe Ramsey fringes indefinitely, even in the presence of spontaneous emission and other sources of individual-atom dephasing. This could have important consequences for atomic clocks and a wide range of precision metrology applications. PMID:25815931

  14. 2. VIEW IN ROOM 111, ATOMIC ABSORPTION BERYLLIUM ANALYSIS LABORATORY. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. VIEW IN ROOM 111, ATOMIC ABSORPTION BERYLLIUM ANALYSIS LABORATORY. AIR FILTERS AND SWIPES ARE DISSOLVED WITH ACIDS AND THE REMAINING RESIDUES ARE SUSPENDED IN NITRIC ACID SOLUTION. THE SOLUTION IS PROCESSED THROUGH THE ATOMIC ABSORPTION SPECTROPHOTOMETER TO DETECT THE PRESENCE AND LEVELS OF BERYLLIUM. - Rocky Flats Plant, Health Physics Laboratory, On Central Avenue between Third & Fourth Streets, Golden, Jefferson County, CO

  15. Atomic vapor spectroscopy in integrated photonic structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ritter, Ralf; Gruhler, Nico; Pernice, Wolfram; Kübler, Harald; Pfau, Tilman; Löw, Robert

    2015-07-01

    We investigate an integrated optical chip immersed in atomic vapor providing several waveguide geometries for spectroscopy applications. The narrow-band transmission through a silicon nitride waveguide and interferometer is altered when the guided light is coupled to a vapor of rubidium atoms via the evanescent tail of the waveguide mode. We use grating couplers to couple between the waveguide mode and the radiating wave, which allow for addressing arbitrary coupling positions on the chip surface. The evanescent atom-light interaction can be numerically simulated and shows excellent agreement with our experimental data. This work demonstrates a next step towards miniaturization and integration of alkali atom spectroscopy and provides a platform for further fundamental studies of complex waveguide structures.

  16. Atomic vapor spectroscopy in integrated photonic structures

    SciTech Connect

    Ritter, Ralf; Kübler, Harald; Pfau, Tilman; Löw, Robert; Gruhler, Nico; Pernice, Wolfram

    2015-07-27

    We investigate an integrated optical chip immersed in atomic vapor providing several waveguide geometries for spectroscopy applications. The narrow-band transmission through a silicon nitride waveguide and interferometer is altered when the guided light is coupled to a vapor of rubidium atoms via the evanescent tail of the waveguide mode. We use grating couplers to couple between the waveguide mode and the radiating wave, which allow for addressing arbitrary coupling positions on the chip surface. The evanescent atom-light interaction can be numerically simulated and shows excellent agreement with our experimental data. This work demonstrates a next step towards miniaturization and integration of alkali atom spectroscopy and provides a platform for further fundamental studies of complex waveguide structures.

  17. Flameless atomic-absorption determination of gold in geological materials

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Meier, A.L.

    1980-01-01

    Gold in geologic material is dissolved using a solution of hydrobromic acid and bromine, extracted with methyl isobutyl ketone, and determined using an atomic-absorption spectrophotometer equipped with a graphite furnace atomizer. A comparison of results obtained by this flameless atomic-absorption method on U.S. Geological Survey reference rocks and geochemical samples with reported values and with results obtained by flame atomic-absorption shows that reasonable accuracy is achieved with improved precision. The sensitivity, accuracy, and precision of the method allows acquisition of data on the distribution of gold at or below its crustal abundance. ?? 1980.

  18. The atomic structural dynamics of γ-Al2O3 supported Ir-Pt nanocluster catalysts prepared from a bimetallic molecular precursor: a study using aberration-corrected electron microscopy and X-ray absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Small, Matthew W; Sanchez, Sergio I; Menard, Laurent D; Kang, Joo H; Frenkel, Anatoly I; Nuzzo, Ralph G

    2011-03-16

    This study describes a prototypical, bimetallic heterogeneous catalyst: compositionally well-defined Ir-Pt nanoclusters with sizes in the range of 1-2 nm supported on γ-Al(2)O(3). Deposition of the molecular bimetallic cluster [Ir(3)Pt(3)(μ-CO)(3)(CO)(3)(η-C(5)Me(5))(3)] on γ-Al(2)O(3), and its subsequent reduction with hydrogen, provides highly dispersed supported bimetallic Ir-Pt nanoparticles. Using spherical aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy (C(s)-STEM) and theoretical modeling of synchrotron-based X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) measurements, our studies provide unambiguous structural assignments for this model catalytic system. The atomic resolution C(s)-STEM images reveal strong and specific lattice-directed strains in the clusters that follow local bonding configurations of the γ-Al(2)O(3) support. Combined nanobeam diffraction (NBD) and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) data suggest the polycrystalline γ-Al(2)O(3) support material predominantly exposes (001) and (011) surface planes (ones commensurate with the zone axis orientations frequently exhibited by the bimetallic clusters). The data reveal that the supported bimetallic clusters exhibit complex patterns of structural dynamics, ones evidencing perturbations of an underlying oblate/hemispherical cuboctahedral cluster-core geometry with cores that are enriched in Ir (a result consistent with models based on surface energetics, which favor an ambient cluster termination by Pt) due to the dynamical responses of the M-M bonding to the specifics of the adsorbate and metal-support interactions. Taken together, the data demonstrate that strong temperature-dependent charge-transfer effects occur that are likely mediated variably by the cluster-support, cluster-adsorbate, and intermetallic bonding interactions. PMID:21341654

  19. Signals for Lorentz violation in atomic spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vargas, Arnaldo J.; Kostelecký, V. Alan

    2015-05-01

    A breakdown of Lorentz and CPT symmetry has been proposed as a possible signal in several candidate theories of quantum gravity. This talk discusses the prospects for detecting Lorentz and CPT violation via atomic spectroscopy, using the effective field theory known as the Standard-Model Extension and including operators of both renormalizable and nonrenormalizable mass dimensions. The discussion targets commonly measured atomic transitions in experiments with conventional matter and with more exotic atoms such as antihydrogen, muonium, and muonic hydrogen. Potential signals are identified and constraints from existing data are obtained.

  20. Infrared Absorption Spectroscopy and Chemical Kinetics of Free Radicals

    SciTech Connect

    Curl, Robert F; Glass, Graham

    2004-11-01

    This research was directed at the detection, monitoring, and study of the chemical kinetic behavior by infrared absorption spectroscopy of small free radical species thought to be important intermediates in combustion. Work on the reaction of OH with acetaldehyde has been completed and published and work on the reaction of O({sup 1}D) with CH{sub 4} has been completed and submitted for publication. In the course of our investigation of branching ratios of the reactions of O({sup 1}D) with acetaldehyde and methane, we discovered that hot atom chemistry effects are not negligible at the gas pressures (13 Torr) initially used. Branching ratios of the reaction of O({sup 1}D) with CH{sub 4} have been measured at a tenfold higher He flow and fivefold higher pressure.

  1. Determination of iridium in mafic rocks by atomic absorption

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Grimaldi, F.S.; Schnepfe, M.M.

    1970-01-01

    Iridium is determined in mineralized mafic rocks by atomic absorption after fire-assay concentration into a gold bead. Interelement interferences in the atomic-absorption determination are removed and Ir sensitivity is increased by buffering the solutions with a mixture of copper and sodium sulphates. Substantial amounts of Ag, Al, Au, Bi, Ca, Cd, Co, Cr, Fe, Ho, Hg, K, La, Mg, Mn, Mo, Ni, Pb, Te, Ti, V, Y, Zn and platinum metals can be tolerated in the atomic-absorption determination. The sensitivity and detection limits are 3.2 and 0.25 ppm of Ir, respectively. ?? 1970.

  2. Spectroscopy of Rb atoms in hollow-core fibers

    SciTech Connect

    Slepkov, Aaron D.; Bhagwat, Amar R.; Venkataraman, Vivek; Londero, Pablo; Gaeta, Alexander L.

    2010-05-15

    Recent demonstrations of light-matter interactions with atoms and molecules confined to hollow waveguides offer great promise for ultralow-light-level applications. The use of waveguides allows for tight optical confinement over interaction lengths much greater than what could be achieved in bulk geometries. However, the combination of strong atom-photon interactions and nonuniformity of guided light modes gives rise to spectroscopic features that must be understood in order to take full advantage of the properties of such systems. We use light-induced atomic desorption to generate an optically dense Rb vapor at room temperature inside a hollow-core photonic band-gap fiber. Saturable-absorption spectroscopy and passive slow-light experiments reveal large ac Stark shifts, power broadening, and transit-time broadening, that are present in this system even at nanowatt powers.

  3. Scanning Josephson spectroscopy on the atomic scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Randeria, Mallika T.; Feldman, Benjamin E.; Drozdov, Ilya K.; Yazdani, Ali

    2016-04-01

    The Josephson effect provides a direct method to probe the strength of the pairing interaction in superconductors. By measuring the phase fluctuating Josephson current between a superconducting tip of a scanning tunneling microscope and a BCS superconductor with isolated magnetic adatoms on its surface, we demonstrate that the spatial variation of the pairing order parameter can be characterized on the atomic scale. This system provides an example where the local pairing potential suppression is not directly reflected in the spectra measured via quasiparticle tunneling. Spectroscopy with such superconducting tips also shows signatures of previously unexplored Andreev processes through individual impurity-bound Shiba states. The atomic resolution achieved here establishes scanning Josephson spectroscopy as a promising technique for the study of novel superconducting phases.

  4. Atomic Force Microscope for Imaging and Spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pike, W. T.; Hecht, M. H.; Anderson, M. S.; Akiyama, T.; Gautsch, S.; deRooij, N. F.; Staufer, U.; Niedermann, Ph.; Howald, L.; Mueller, D.

    2000-01-01

    We have developed, built, and tested an atomic force microscope (AFM) for extraterrestrial applications incorporating a micromachined tip array to allow for probe replacement. It is part of a microscopy station originally intended for NASA's 2001 Mars lander to identify the size, distribution, and shape of Martian dust and soil particles. As well as imaging topographically down to nanometer resolution, this instrument can be used to reveal chemical information and perform infrared and Raman spectroscopy at unprecedented resolution.

  5. Methods for analysis of selected metals in water by atomic absorption

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fishman, Marvin J.; Downs, Sanford C.

    1966-01-01

    This manual describes atomic-absorption-spectroscopy methods for determining calcium, copper, lithium, magnesium, manganese, potassium, sodium, strontium and zinc in atmospheric precipitation, fresh waters, and brines. The procedures are intended to be used by water quality laboratories of the Water Resources Division of the U.S. Geological Survey. Detailed procedures, calculations, and methods for the preparation of reagents are given for each element along with data on accuracy, precision, and sensitivity. Other topics discussed briefly are the principle of atomic absorption, instrumentation used, and special analytical techniques.

  6. THE EVOLUTION OF ATOMIC SPECTROSCOPY IN MEASURING TOXIC CONTAMINANTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Three decades of study of environmental conditions necessary for the protection of freshwater
    aquatic life have been limited by the development and application of analytical methodology utilizing atomic adsorption, atomic fluorescence, and atomic emission spectroscopy.
    The...

  7. Two-photon-excited fluorescence spectroscopy of atomic fluorine at 170 nm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herring, G. C.; Dyer, Mark J.; Jusinski, Leonard E.; Bischel, William K.

    1988-01-01

    Two-photon-excited fluorescence spectroscopy of atomic fluorine is reported. A doubled dye laser at 286-nm is Raman shifted in H2 to 170 nm (sixth anti-Stokes order) to excite ground-state 2P(0)J fluorine atoms to the 2D(0)J level. The fluorine atoms are detected by one of two methods: observing the fluorescence decay to the 2PJ level or observing F(+) production through the absorption of an additional photon by the excited atoms. Relative two-photon absorption cross sections to and the radiative lifetimes of the 2D(0)J states are measured.

  8. Perfect electromagnetic absorption at one-atom-thick scale

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Sucheng; Duan, Qian; Li, Shuo; Yin, Qiang; Lu, Weixin; Li, Liang; Hou, Bo; Gu, Bangming; Wen, Weijia

    2015-11-02

    We experimentally demonstrate that perfect electromagnetic absorption can be realized in the one-atom thick graphene. Employing coherent illumination in the waveguide system, the absorbance of the unpatterned graphene monolayer is observed to be greater than 94% over the microwave X-band, 7–13 GHz, and to achieve a full absorption, >99% in experiment, at ∼8.3 GHz. In addition, the absorption characteristic manifests equivalently a wide range of incident angle. The experimental results agree very well with the theoretical calculations. Our work accomplishes the broadband, wide-angle, high-performance absorption in the thinnest material with simple configuration.

  9. Photoelectron and X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy Of Pu

    SciTech Connect

    Tobin, J; Chung, B; Schulze, R; Farr, J; Shuh, D

    2003-11-12

    We have performed Photoelectron Spectroscopy and X-Ray Absorption Spectroscopy upon highly radioactive samples of Plutonium at the Advanced Light Source in Berkeley, CA, USA. First results from alpha and delta Plutonium are reported as well as plans for future studies of actinide studies.

  10. Probing the influence of the center atom coordination structure in iron phthalocyanine multi-walled carbon nanotube-based oxygen reduction reaction catalysts by X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Yingxiang; Li, Zhipan; Xia, Dingguo; Zheng, Lirong; Liao, Yi; Li, Kai; Zuo, Xia

    2015-09-01

    Three different pentacoordinate iron phthalocyanine (FePc) electrocatalysts with an axial ligand (pyridyl group, Py) anchored to multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) are prepared by a microwave method as high performance composite electrocatalysts (FePc-Py/MWCNTs) for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). For comparison, tetracoordinate FePc electrocatalysts without an axial ligand anchored to MWCNTs (FePc/MWCNTs) are assembled in the same way. Ultraviolet-visible spectrophotometry (UV-Vis), Raman spectroscopy (RS), and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) are used to characterize the obtained electrocatalysts. The electrocatalytic activity of the samples is measured by linear sweep voltammetry (LSV), and the onset potential of all of the FePc-Py/MWCNTs electrocatalysts is found to be more positive than that of their FePc/MWCNTs counterparts. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) spectroscopy are employed to elucidate the relationship between molecular structure and electrocatalytic activity. XPS indicates that higher concentrations of Fe3+ and pyridine-type nitrogen play critical roles in determining the electrocatalytic ORR activity of the samples. XAFS spectroscopy reveals that the FePc-Py/MWCNTs electrocatalysts have a coordination geometry around Fe that is closer to the square pyramidal structure, a higher concentration of Fe3+, and a smaller phthalocyanine ring radius compared with those of FePc/MWCNTs.

  11. Determination of Copper by Graphite Furnace Atomic Absorption Spectrophotometry: A Student Exercise in Instrumental Methods of Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williamson, Mark A.

    1989-01-01

    Discusses a student exercise which requires the optimizing of the charring and atomization temperatures by producing a plot of absorbance versus temperature for each temperature parameter. Notes that although the graphite furnace atomic absorption spectroscopy technique has widespread industrial use, there are no published, structured experiments…

  12. Multiplexed absorption tomography with calibration-free wavelength modulation spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Cai, Weiwei; Kaminski, Clemens F.

    2014-04-14

    We propose a multiplexed absorption tomography technique, which uses calibration-free wavelength modulation spectroscopy with tunable semiconductor lasers for the simultaneous imaging of temperature and species concentration in harsh combustion environments. Compared with the commonly used direct absorption spectroscopy (DAS) counterpart, the present variant enjoys better signal-to-noise ratios and requires no baseline fitting, a particularly desirable feature for high-pressure applications, where adjacent absorption features overlap and interfere severely. We present proof-of-concept numerical demonstrations of the technique using realistic phantom models of harsh combustion environments and prove that the proposed techniques outperform currently available tomography techniques based on DAS.

  13. X-Ray Absorption Spectroscopy Of Thin Foils Irradiated By An Ultra-short Laser Pulse

    SciTech Connect

    Renaudin, P.; Blancard, C.; Cosse, P.; Faussurier, G.; Lecherbourg, L.; Audebert, P.; Bastiani-Ceccotti, S.; Geindre, J.-P.; Shepherd, R.

    2007-08-02

    Point-projection K-shell absorption spectroscopy has been used to measure absorption spectra of transient plasma created by an ultra-short laser pulse. The 1s-2p and 1s-3p absorption lines of weakly ionized aluminum and the 2p-3d absorption lines of bromine were measured over an extended range of densities in a low-temperature regime. Independent plasma characterization was obtained using frequency domain interferometry diagnostic (FDI) that allows the interpretation of the absorption spectra in terms of spectral opacities. Assuming local thermodynamic equilibrium, spectral opacity calculations have been performed using the density and temperature inferred from the FDI diagnostic to compare to the measured absorption spectra. A good agreement is obtained when non-equilibrium effects due to non-stationary atomic physics are negligible at the x-ray probe time.

  14. X-Ray Absorption Spectroscopy Of Thin Foils Irradiated By An Ultra-short Laser Pulse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renaudin, P.; Lecherbourg, L.; Blancard, C.; Cossé, P.; Faussurier, G.; Audebert, P.; Bastiani-Ceccotti, S.; Geindre, J.-P.; Shepherd, R.

    2007-08-01

    Point-projection K-shell absorption spectroscopy has been used to measure absorption spectra of transient plasma created by an ultra-short laser pulse. The 1s-2p and 1s-3p absorption lines of weakly ionized aluminum and the 2p-3d absorption lines of bromine were measured over an extended range of densities in a low-temperature regime. Independent plasma characterization was obtained using frequency domain interferometry diagnostic (FDI) that allows the interpretation of the absorption spectra in terms of spectral opacities. Assuming local thermodynamic equilibrium, spectral opacity calculations have been performed using the density and temperature inferred from the FDI diagnostic to compare to the measured absorption spectra. A good agreement is obtained when non-equilibrium effects due to non-stationary atomic physics are negligible at the x-ray probe time.

  15. Examination of the local structure in composite and lowdimensional semiconductor by X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Lawniczak-Jablonska, K.; Demchenko, I.N.; Piskorska, E.; Wolska,A.; Talik, E.; Zakharov, D.N.; Liliental-Weber, Z.

    2006-09-25

    X-ray absorption methods have been successfully used to obtain quantitative information about local atomic composition of two different materials. X-ray Absorption Near Edge Structure analysis and X-Ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy allowed us to determine seven chemical compounds and their concentrations in c-BN composite. Use of Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure in combination with Transmission Electron Microscopy enabled us to determine the composition and size of buried Ge quantum dots. It was found that the quantum dots consisted out of pure Ge core covered by 1-2 monolayers of a layer rich in Si.

  16. Absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy on a smartphone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hossain, Md. Arafat; Canning, John; Cook, Kevin; Ast, Sandra; Rutledge, Peter J.; Jamalipour, Abbas

    2015-07-01

    A self-powered smartphone-based field-portable "dual" spectrometer has been developed for both absorption and fluorescence measurements. The smartphone's existing flash LED has sufficient optical irradiance to undertake absorption measurements within a 3D-printed case containing a low cost nano-imprinted polymer diffraction grating. A UV (λex ~ 370 nm) and VIS (λex ~ 450 nm) LED are wired into the circuit of the flash LED to provide an excitation source for fluorescence measurements. Using a customized app on the smartphone, measurements of absorption and fluorescence spectra are demonstrated using pH-sensitive and Zn2+-responsive probes. Detection over a 300 nm span with 0.42 nm/pixel spectral resolution is demonstrated. Despite the low cost and small size of the portable spectrometer, the results compare well with bench top instruments.

  17. Applications of absorption spectroscopy using quantum cascade lasers.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lizhu; Tian, Guang; Li, Jingsong; Yu, Benli

    2014-01-01

    Infrared laser absorption spectroscopy (LAS) is a promising modern technique for sensing trace gases with high sensitivity, selectivity, and high time resolution. Mid-infrared quantum cascade lasers, operating in a pulsed or continuous wave mode, have potential as spectroscopic sources because of their narrow linewidths, single mode operation, tunability, high output power, reliability, low power consumption, and compactness. This paper reviews some important developments in modern laser absorption spectroscopy based on the use of quantum cascade laser (QCL) sources. Among the various laser spectroscopic methods, this review is focused on selected absorption spectroscopy applications of QCLs, with particular emphasis on molecular spectroscopy, industrial process control, combustion diagnostics, and medical breath analysis. PMID:25239063

  18. Infrared Absorption Spectroscopy Measurement of SOx using Tunable Infrared Laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukuchi, Tetsuo

    The absorption characteristics of sulfur dioxide (SO2) and sulfur trioxide (SO3) in the infrared region were measured using a quantum cascade laser and an absorption cell of length 1 m heated to 150°C. The laser was scanned over the wavelength range 6.9-7.4 μm, which included the absorption bands of SO2 and SO3. Measurement results showed that the absorption bands of SO2 and SO3 partially overlapped, with peaks at 7.28 μm and 7.35 μm for SO2 and 7.14 μm and 7.25 μm for SO3. These results showed the possbility of using infrared laser absorption spectroscopy for measurement of sulfur oxides (SOx) in flue gas. For SO3 measurement, infrared absorption spectroscopy was shown to be more suitable than ultraviolet absorption spectroscopy. The absorption characteristics of open air in the same wavelength region showed that the interference due to water vapor must be efficiently removed to perform SOx measurement in flue gas.

  19. Atomic Multiplets in X-ray Spectroscopies of Solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delley, Bernard; Uldry, Anne-Christine

    2013-03-01

    The electronic structures of compounds involving open d- and f- shell are studied frequently by X-ray and electron spectroscopies. For a better understanding of the multiplets arising in spectra involving one or more open shells, we have developed recently an easy to use program multiX,[2] which is available to download.[3] This first step allows the inclusion of the crystal environment as a crystal field entered simply as positions and charges of a cluster of atoms around the core hole site. This often gives valuable insights in the case of x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) and resonant inelastic x-ray spectroscopy (RIXS) measurements. However, in many cases it is desirable to allow for hybridization of the open shell electrons with the orbitals of neighbor atoms. This requires dealing with a significantly larger active Hilbert space. This is addressed with our recent Lanczos-based procedure to calculate spectra. First results will be discussed. Swiss SNF grant 200021-129970 is gratefully acknowledged.

  20. Atomic-absorption determination of rhodium in chromite concentrates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schnepfe, M.M.; Grimaldi, F.S.

    1969-01-01

    Rhodium is determined in chromite concentrates by atomic absorption after concentration either by co-precipitation with tellurium formed by the reduction of tellurite with tin(II) chloride or by fire assay into a gold bead. Interelement interferences in the atomic-absorption determination are removed by buffering the solutions with lanthanum sulphate (lanthanum concentration 1%). Substantial amounts of Ag, Al, Au, Bi, Ca, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Ho, Hg, K, La, Mg, Mn, Mo, Na, Ni, Pb, Te, Ti, V, Y, Zn and platinum metals can be tolerated. A lower limit of approximately 0.07 ppm Rh can be determined in a 3-g sample. ?? 1969.

  1. Determination of palladium and platinum by atomic absorption

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schnepfe, M.M.; Grimaldi, F.S.

    1969-01-01

    Palladium and platinum are determined by atomic absorption after fire-assay concentration into a gold bead. The limit of determination is ~0??06 ppm in a 20-g sample. Serious depressive interelement interferences are removed by buffering the solutions with a mixture of cadmium and copper sulphates with cadmium and copper concentrations each at 0??5%. Substantial amounts of Ag, Al, Au, Bi, Ca, Co, Cr, Fe, Hg, K, La, Mg, Mn, Mo, Na, Ni, Pb, Te, Ti, V, Y, Zn, and the platinum metals do not interfere in the atomic-absorption determination. ?? 1969.

  2. [Study of retrieving formaldehyde with differential optical absorption spectroscopy].

    PubMed

    Li, Yu-Jin; Xie, Pin-Hua; Qin, Min; Qu, Xiao-Ying; Hu, Lin

    2009-01-01

    The present paper introduces the method of retrieving the concentration of HCHO with differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS). The authors measured ambient HCHO in Beijing region with the help of differential optical absorption spectroscopy instrument made by ourself, and discussed numerous factors in retrieving the concentration of HCHO with differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS), especially, the choice of HCHO wave band, how to avoid absorption of ambient SO2, NO2 and O3, and the influence of the Xenon lamp spectrum structure on the absorption of ambient HCHO. The authors achieved the HCHO concentration by simultaneously retrieving the concentrations of HCHO, SO2, NO2 and O3 with non-linear least square fitting method, avoiding the effect of choosing narrow wave of HCHO and the residual of SO2, NO2, O3 and the Xenon lamp spectrum structure in retrieving process to attain the concentration of HCHO, Finally the authors analyzed the origin of error in retrieving the concentration of HCHO with differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS), and the total error is within 13.7% in this method. PMID:19385238

  3. X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy of the Rare Earth orthophosphates

    SciTech Connect

    Shuh, D.K.; Terminello, L.J.; Boatner, L.A.; Abraham, M.M.

    1993-06-01

    X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy (XAS) of the Rare Earth (RE) 3d levels yields sharp peaks near the edges as a result of strong, quasi-atomic 3d{sup 10}4f{sup n} {yields} 3d-{sup 9}4f{sup n+1} transitions and these transitions exhibit a wealth of spectroscopic features. The XAS measurements of single crystal REPO{sub 4} (RE = La, Ce, Pr, Nd, Sm, Eu, Gd, Tb, Dy, Er) at the 3d edge were performed in the total yield mode at beam line 8-2 at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory (SSRL). The XAS spectra of the RE ions in the orthophosphate matrix generally resemble the XAS of the corresponding RE metal. This is not unexpected and emphasizes the major contribution of the trivalent state to the electronic transitions at the RE 3d edges. These spectra unequivocally identify the transitions originating from well-characterized RE cores and correlate well with previous theoretical investigations.

  4. Single-particle absorption spectroscopy by photothermal contrast.

    PubMed

    Yorulmaz, Mustafa; Nizzero, Sara; Hoggard, Anneli; Wang, Lin-Yung; Cai, Yi-Yu; Su, Man-Nung; Chang, Wei-Shun; Link, Stephan

    2015-05-13

    Removing effects of sample heterogeneity through single-molecule and single-particle techniques has advanced many fields. While background free luminescence and scattering spectroscopy is widely used, recording the absorption spectrum only is rather difficult. Here we present an approach capable of recording pure absorption spectra of individual nanostructures. We demonstrate the implementation of single-particle absorption spectroscopy on strongly scattering plasmonic nanoparticles by combining photothermal microscopy with a supercontinuum laser and an innovative calibration procedure that accounts for chromatic aberrations and wavelength-dependent excitation powers. Comparison of the absorption spectra to the scattering spectra of the same individual gold nanoparticles reveals the blueshift of the absorption spectra, as predicted by Mie theory but previously not detectable in extinction measurements that measure the sum of absorption and scattering. By covering a wavelength range of 300 nm, we are furthermore able to record absorption spectra of single gold nanorods with different aspect ratios. We find that the spectral shift between absorption and scattering for the longitudinal plasmon resonance decreases as a function of nanorod aspect ratio, which is in agreement with simulations. PMID:25849105

  5. COMPUTER-ASSISTED FURNACE ATOMIC ABSORPTION SPECTROMETRIC ANALYSIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The use of furnace atomic absorption instrumentation with a turnkey chromatography data system is described. A simple addition of relays to the furnace power supply allows for automatic start-up of A/D conversion and spectrophotometer zeroing at the proper time. Manipulations inv...

  6. A COMPUTER CONTROL AND ACQUISITION SYSTEM FOR ATOMIC ABSORPTION DATA

    EPA Science Inventory

    A system is presented that controls and acquires data from a Perkin-Elmer 603 or similar atomic absorption spectrophotometer operating in the flame mode and equipped with a 200 place auto-sampler. The hardware consists of a PDP11 computer with minimum peripheral equipment and a s...

  7. Induced absorption and annihilation in hadronic hydrogen atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pomerantsev, Vladimir N.; Popov, Vladimir P.

    The induced absorption or annihilation in the collisions of the hydrogen hadronic atoms in the excited states with ordinary hydrogen have been described in a unified manner with the elastic scattering, Stark transitions, and Coulomb de-excitation in the framework of a close-coupling approach including both the open and closed channels corresponding to both the stationary and non-stationary states of hadronic atom. The general features of the induced absorption cross sections have been studied in a wide range of the complex energy-shift values. The total and differential cross sections of all processes have been calculated for π - p, K - p, and bar p p atoms with the principal quantum numbers n = 2 - 8 and kinetic energy from 0.001 eV up to 100 eV.

  8. Induced absorption and annihilation in hadronic hydrogen atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pomerantsev, Vladimir N.; Popov, Vladimir P.

    2012-05-01

    The induced absorption or annihilation in the collisions of the hydrogen hadronic atoms in the excited states with ordinary hydrogen have been described in a unified manner with the elastic scattering, Stark transitions, and Coulomb de-excitation in the framework of a close-coupling approach including both the open and closed channels corresponding to both the stationary and non-stationary states of hadronic atom. The general features of the induced absorption cross sections have been studied in a wide range of the complex energy-shift values. The total and differential cross sections of all processes have been calculated for π - p, K - p, and bar p p atoms with the principal quantum numbers n = 2 - 8 and kinetic energy from 0.001 eV up to 100 eV.

  9. Molecular shock response of explosives: electronic absorption spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Mcgrne, Shawn D; Moore, David S; Whitley, Von H; Bolme, Cindy A; Eakins, Daniel E

    2009-01-01

    Electronic absorption spectroscopy in the range 400-800 nm was coupled to ultrafast laser generated shocks to begin addressing the question of the extent to which electronic excitations are involved in shock induced reactions. Data are presented on shocked polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) thin films and single crystal pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN). Shocked PMMA exhibited thin film interference effects from the shock front. Shocked PETN exhibited interference from the shock front as well as broadband increased absorption. Relation to shock initiation hypotheses and the need for time dependent absorption data (future experiments) is briefly discussed.

  10. Quantitative atomic spectroscopy for primary thermometry

    SciTech Connect

    Truong, Gar-Wing; Luiten, Andre N.; May, Eric F.; Stace, Thomas M.

    2011-03-15

    Quantitative spectroscopy has been used to measure accurately the Doppler broadening of atomic transitions in {sup 85}Rb vapor. By using a conventional platinum resistance thermometer and the Doppler thermometry technique, we were able to determine k{sub B} with a relative uncertainty of 4.1x10{sup -4} and with a deviation of 2.7x10{sup -4} from the expected value. Our experiment, using an effusive vapor, departs significantly from other Doppler-broadened thermometry (DBT) techniques, which rely on weakly absorbing molecules in a diffusive regime. In these circumstances, very different systematic effects such as magnetic sensitivity and optical pumping are dominant. Using the model developed recently by Stace and Luiten, we estimate the perturbation due to optical pumping of the measured k{sub B} value was less than 4x10{sup -6}. The effects of optical pumping on atomic and molecular DBT experiments is mapped over a wide range of beam size and saturation intensity, indicating possible avenues for improvement. We also compare the line-broadening mechanisms, windows of operation and detection limits of some recent DBT experiments.

  11. Laser photothermal spectroscopy of light-induced absorption

    SciTech Connect

    Skvortsov, L A

    2013-01-31

    Basic methods of laser photothermal spectroscopy, which are used to study photoinduced absorption in various media, are briefly considered. Comparative analysis of these methods is performed and the latest results obtained in this field are discussed. Different schemes and examples of their practical implementation are considered. (review)

  12. Absorption and Emission Spectroscopy of a Lasing Material: Ruby

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Esposti, C. Degli; Bizzocchi, L.

    2007-01-01

    Ruby is a crystalline material, which comes very expensive and is of great significance, as it helped in the creation of first laser. An experiment to determine the absorption and emission spectroscopy, in addition to the determination of the room-temperature lifetime of the substance is being described.

  13. Coherent Enhanced Absorption in an Intracavity Atomic Medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, David D.; Myneni, Krishna; Chang, Hongrok; Odutola, Jamiu A.

    2011-05-01

    The conditions for coherent enhanced absorption of an intracavity atomic medium are discussed. For a symmetric cavity, a specific amplitude and phase relationship between two oppositely oriented input beams results in coherent perfect absorption by the medium. In contrast, for a single input beam, perfect absorption requires a perfectly asymmetric, i.e., single port, cavity. Even when the cavity is not perfectly asymmetric or lossless, we find that enhanced absorption can occur. For a single input to an asymmetric cavity, as the input intensity is increased and the medium saturates, the cavity passes from the over-coupled to the under-coupled regime. We find the counterintuitive result that the cavity absorptance can increase with increasing input intensity in the over-coupled regime, i.e., the atom-cavity system behaves as a reverse saturable absorber. These results were compared with measurements performed using a tunable laser incident on a Fabry-Perot cavity containing an Rb87 cell, taking into account the effects of saturation and beam divergence.

  14. [Application of atomic absorption spectrometry in the engine knock detection].

    PubMed

    Chen, Li-Dan

    2013-02-01

    Because existing human experience diagnosis method and apparatus for auxiliary diagnosis method are difficult to diagnose quickly engine knock. Atomic absorption spectrometry was used to detect the automobile engine knock in in innovative way. After having determined Fe, Al, Cu, Cr and Pb content in the 35 groups of Audi A6 engine oil whose travel course is 2 000 -70 000 kilometers and whose sampling interval is 2 000 kilometers by atomic absorption spectrometry, the database of primary metal content in the same automobile engine at different mileage was established. The research shows that the main metal content fluctuates within a certain range. In practical engineering applications, after the determination of engine oil main metal content and comparison with its database value, it can not only help to diagnose the type and location of engine knock without the disintegration and reduce vehicle maintenance costs and improve the accuracy of engine knock fault diagnosis. PMID:23697150

  15. Estimation of molar absorptivities and pigment sizes for eumelanin and pheomelanin using femtosecond transient absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piletic, Ivan R.; Matthews, Thomas E.; Warren, Warren S.

    2009-11-01

    Fundamental optical and structural properties of melanins are not well understood due to their poor solubility characteristics and the chemical disorder present during biomolecular synthesis. We apply nonlinear transient absorption spectroscopy to quantify molar absorptivities for eumelanin and pheomelanin and thereby get an estimate for their average pigment sizes. We determine that pheomelanin exhibits a larger molar absorptivity at near IR wavelengths (750nm), which may be extended to shorter wavelengths. Using the molar absorptivities, we estimate that melanin pigments contain ˜46 and 28 monomer units for eumelanin and pheomelanin, respectively. This is considerably larger than the oligomeric species that have been recently proposed to account for the absorption spectrum of eumelanin and illustrates that larger pigments comprise a significant fraction of the pigment distribution.

  16. Towards Atomic Column-by-Column Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Pennycook, S.J.; Rafferty, B.

    1998-09-06

    The optical arrangement of the scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) is ideally suited for performing analysis of individual atomic columns in materials. Using the incoherent Z-contrast image as a reference, and arranging incoherent conditions also for the spectroscopy, a precise correspondence is ensured between features in the inelastic image and elastic signals. In this way the exact probe position needed to maximise the inelastic signal from a selected column can be located and monitored during the analysis using the much higher intensity elastic signal. Although object functions for EELS are typically less than 1 {Angstrom} full width at half maximum, this is still an order of magnitude larger than the corresponding object functions for elastic (or diffuse) scattering used to form the Z-contrast image. Therefore the analysis is performed with an effective probe that is significantly broader than that used for the reference Z-contrast image. For a 2.2 {Angstrom} probe the effective probe is of the order of 2.5 {Angstrom}, while for a 1.3 {Angstrom} probe the effective probe is 1.6 {Angstrom}. Such increases in effective probe size can significantly reduce or even eliminate contrast between atomic columns that are visible in the image. However, this is only true if we consider circular collector apertures. Calculations based upon the theory of Maslen and Rossouw (Maslen and Rossouw 1984; Rossouw and Maslen 1984) show that employing an annular aperture can reduce the FWHM of the inelastic object function down to values close 0.1 {Angstrom}. With practical aperture sizes it should be possible to achieve this increased spatial resolution without loosing too much signal.

  17. Determination of nanogram amounts of bismuth in rocks by atomic absorption spectrometry with electrothermal atomization

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kane, J.S.

    1979-01-01

    Bismuth concentrations as low as 10 ng g-1 in 100-mg samples of geological materials can be determined by atomic absorption spectrometry with electrothermal atomization. After HF-HClO4 decomposition of the sample, bismuth is extracted as the iodide into methyl isobutyl ketone and is then stripped with ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid into the aqueous phase. Aliquots of this solution are pipetted into the graphite furnace and dried, charred, and atomized in an automated sequence. Atomic absorbance at the Bi 223.1-nm line provides a measure of the amount of bismuth present. Results are presented for 14 U.S. Geological Survey standard rocks. ?? 1979.

  18. Light-induced changes in subband absorption in a-Si:H using photoluminescence absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, S. Q.; Taylor, P. C.; Nitta, S.

    1991-08-01

    We have used the photoluminescence (PL) generated in a thin-film sample of a-Si:H to probe low absorption levels by measuring the absorption of the PL as it travels down the length of the film in a waveguide mode. This technique, which we have called PL absorption spectroscopy of PLAS, allows the measurement of values of the absorption coefficient α down to about 0.1 cm-1. Because this technique probes the top and bottom surfaces of the a-Si:H sample, it is important to separate surface from bulk absorption mechanisms. An improved sample geometry has been employed to facilitate this separation. One sample consisted of an a-Si1-xNix:H/a-Si:H/ a-Si1-xNx:H/NiCr layered structure where the silicon nitride layers served as the cladding layers for the waveguide. In a second sample the a-Si:H layer was interrupted near the middle for two separate, thin (100 Å) layers of a-Si1-xNx:H in order to check for the importance of the absorption at the silicon/silicon nitride interfaces in these PLAS measurements. Changes in the below-gap absorption on light soaking were examined using irradiation from an Ar+ laser (5145 Å, ˜200 mW/cm2 for 5.5 hours at 300 K). The silicon/silicon nitride interface is responsible for an absorption which has a shoulder near 1.2 eV while the bulk a-Si:H absorption exhibits no such shoulder. The metastable, optically-induced increase in the below gap absorption appears to come entirely from the bulk of the a-Si:H. These low temperature PLAS measurements are compared with those obtained at 300 K by photothermal deflection spectroscopy.

  19. Role of transient processes in resonance line spectroscopy of caesium atoms in cells with antirelaxation coating

    SciTech Connect

    Sevost'yanov, D I; Yakovlev, V P; Kozlov, A N; Vasil'ev, V V; Zibrov, S A; Velichansky, Vladimir L

    2013-07-31

    We study the peculiarities of the absorption spectra in D{sub 1,2}-lines of Cs, caused by optical pumping in cells with antirelaxation coating. In these cells the internal state of the atom, which arose under optical pumping by a monochromatic laser field, is preserved with a high probability in a collision with the wall. As a result, the optical pumping action extends to the entire volume of the cell and to all the velocities of the atoms. This leads to the speed-dependent scanning distortions of the absorption line profile. The detected features should be considered when using laserpumped quantum magnetometers with antirelaxation-coated cells. (laser spectroscopy)

  20. Infrared absorption spectroscopy and chemical kinetics of free radicals

    SciTech Connect

    Curl, R.F.; Glass, G.P.

    1993-12-01

    This research is directed at the detection, monitoring, and study of chemical kinetic behavior by infrared absorption spectroscopy of small free radical species thought to be important intermediates in combustion. During the last year, infrared kinetic spectroscopy using excimer laser flash photolysis and color-center laser probing has been employed to study the high resolution spectrum of HCCN, the rate constant of the reaction between ethynyl (C{sub 2}H) radical and H{sub 2} in the temperature region between 295 and 875 K, and the recombination rate of propargyl (CH{sub 2}CCH) at room temperature.

  1. Optimization of electrothermal atomization parameters for simultaneous multielement atomic absorption spectrometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Harnly, J.M.; Kane, J.S.

    1984-01-01

    The effect of the acid matrix, the measurement mode (height or area), the atomizer surface (unpyrolyzed and pyrolyzed graphite), the atomization mode (from the wall or from a platform), and the atomization temperature on the simultaneous electrothermal atomization of Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mn, Mo, Ni, V, and Zn was examined. The 5% HNO3 matrix gave rise to severe irreproducibility using a pyrolyzed tube unless the tube was properly "prepared". The 5% HCl matrix did not exhibit this problem, and no problems were observed with either matrix using an unpyrolized tube or a pyrolyzed platform. The 5% HCl matrix gave better sensitivities with a pyrolyzed tube but the two matrices were comparable for atomization from a platform. If Mo and V are to be analyzed with the other seven elements, a high atomization temperature (2700??C or greater) is necessary regardless of the matrix, the measurement mode, the atomization mode, or the atomizer surface. Simultaneous detection limits (peak height with pyrolyzed tube atomization) were comparable to those of conventional atomic absorption spectrometry using electrothermal atomization above 280 nm. Accuracies and precisions of ??10-15% were found in the 10 to 120 ng mL-1 range for the analysis of NBS acidified water standards.

  2. A thin-walled metallic hollow cathode as an atomizer for Zeeman atomic absorption spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganeyev, A. A.; Sholupov, S. E.

    1998-03-01

    A new kind of glow discharge atomizer, a thin-walled metallic hollow cathode (TMHC) combined with Zeeman atomic absorption spectrometry using high frequency modulated light polarization (ZAAS-HFM), is studied. A theoretically suggested, and experimentally confirmed, model of the atom confinement in the TMHC yields the appearance of the diffusion traps for atoms at both ends of the cathode, which increases the residence time of the analyte atoms in the analysis volume. The high atomization efficiency in the glow discharge atomizer (caused by the ionic-thermal mechanism of sputtering) and the high selectivity of ZAAS-HFM are demonstrated in the analysis of complex matrix samples such as whole blood and urine. The analytical system TMHC + ZAAS-HFM is characterized by low detection limits, which are comparable to those of graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GFAAS). Owing to its rather low average power consumption (30-50 W) the TMHC can be used in a portable and mobile spectrometer, and is therefore suitable for the in situ analysis of various sample materials.

  3. Characterizing caged molecules through flash photolysis and transient absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Kao, Joseph P Y; Muralidharan, Sukumaran

    2013-01-01

    Caged molecules are photosensitive molecules with latent biological activity. Upon exposure to light, they are rapidly transformed into bioactive molecules such as neurotransmitters or second messengers. They are thus valuable tools for using light to manipulate biology with exceptional spatial and temporal resolution. Since the temporal performance of the caged molecule depends critically on the rate at which bioactive molecules are generated by light, it is important to characterize the kinetics of the photorelease process. This is accomplished by initiating the photoreaction with a very brief but intense pulse of light (i.e., flash photolysis) and monitoring the course of the ensuing reactions through various means, the most common of which is absorption spectroscopy. Practical guidelines for performing flash photolysis and transient absorption spectroscopy are described in this chapter. PMID:23494372

  4. Total absorption spectroscopy of the β decay of 76Ga

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dombos, A. C.; Fang, D.-L.; Spyrou, A.; Quinn, S. J.; Simon, A.; Brown, B. A.; Cooper, K.; Gehring, A. E.; Liddick, S. N.; Morrissey, D. J.; Naqvi, F.; Sumithrarachchi, C. S.; Zegers, R. G. T.

    2016-06-01

    The β decay of 76Ga was studied using the technique of total absorption spectroscopy for the first time. The experiment was performed at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory using the Summing NaI(Tl) detector. The extracted β -decay feeding intensity distribution and Gamow-Teller transition strength distribution are compared to shell-model calculations to help constrain nuclear matrix elements relevant to the neutrinoless double-β decay of 76Ge.

  5. 21 CFR 862.2850 - Atomic absorption spectrophotometer for clinical use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Atomic absorption spectrophotometer for clinical... Laboratory Instruments § 862.2850 Atomic absorption spectrophotometer for clinical use. (a) Identification. An atomic absorption spectrophotometer for clinical use is a device intended to identify and...

  6. 21 CFR 862.2850 - Atomic absorption spectrophotometer for clinical use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Atomic absorption spectrophotometer for clinical... Laboratory Instruments § 862.2850 Atomic absorption spectrophotometer for clinical use. (a) Identification. An atomic absorption spectrophotometer for clinical use is a device intended to identify and...

  7. 21 CFR 862.2850 - Atomic absorption spectrophotometer for clinical use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Atomic absorption spectrophotometer for clinical... Laboratory Instruments § 862.2850 Atomic absorption spectrophotometer for clinical use. (a) Identification. An atomic absorption spectrophotometer for clinical use is a device intended to identify and...

  8. 21 CFR 862.2850 - Atomic absorption spectrophotometer for clinical use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Atomic absorption spectrophotometer for clinical... Laboratory Instruments § 862.2850 Atomic absorption spectrophotometer for clinical use. (a) Identification. An atomic absorption spectrophotometer for clinical use is a device intended to identify and...

  9. Label free detection of phospholipids by infrared absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, Tahsin; Foster, Erick; Vigil, Genevieve; Khan, Aamir A.; Bohn, Paul; Howard, Scott S.

    2014-08-01

    We present our study on compact, label-free dissolved lipid sensing by combining capillary electrophoresis separation in a PDMS microfluidic chip online with mid-infrared (MIR) absorption spectroscopy for biomarker detection. On-chip capillary electrophoresis is used to separate the biomarkers without introducing any extrinsic contrast agent, which reduces both cost and complexity. The label free biomarker detection could be done by interrogating separated biomarkers in the channel by MIR absorption spectroscopy. Phospholipids biomarkers of degenerative neurological, kidney, and bone diseases are detectable using this label free technique. These phospholipids exhibit strong absorption resonances in the MIR and are present in biofluids including urine, blood plasma, and cerebrospinal fluid. MIR spectroscopy of a 12-carbon chain phosphatidic acid (PA) (1,2-dilauroyl-snglycero- 3-phosphate (sodium salt)) dissolved in N-methylformamide, exhibits a strong amide peak near wavenumber 1660 cm-1 (wavelength 6 μm), arising from the phosphate headgroup vibrations within a low-loss window of the solvent. PA has a similar structure to many important phospholipids molecules like phosphatidylcholine (PC), phosphatidylinositol (PI), phosphatidylethanolamine (PE), phosphatidylglycerol (PG), and phosphatidylserine (PS), making it an ideal molecule for initial proof-of-concept studies. This newly proposed detection technique can lead us to minimal sample preparation and is capable of identifying several biomarkers from the same sample simultaneously.

  10. Reduced-background gas-phase absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Sweetser, J N; Trebino, R

    1998-08-15

    We propose and demonstrate a new method for single-shot multiplex absorption spectroscopy that permits enhanced sensitivity in the simultaneous measurement of multiple spectral lines in rapidly changing gas-phase media, such as turbulent flames. It uses an ultrashort laser pulse that propagates through the absorbing medium, for which the relevant absorption information resides in the free-induction decay that is trailing behind the transmitted pulse. Time gating out most of the transmitted pulse, but not the free-induction decay, enhances the relative fraction of light that contains absorption information when the spectrum is measured. This procedure reduces the background associated with the input light, thus enhancing detection sensitivity. PMID:18087501

  11. Cinchocaine hydrochloride determination by atomic absorption spectrometry and spectrophotometry.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Ghani, Nour T; Youssef, Ahmed F A; Awady, Mohamed A

    2005-05-01

    Two sensitive spectrophotometric and atomic absorption spectrometric procedures have been developed for determination of cinchocaine hydrochloride (Cin.Cl) in pure form and in pharmaceutical formulation. The spectrophotometric method was based on formation of an insoluble colored ion-associate between the cited drug and tetrathiocyanatocobaltate (CoTC) or hexathiocyanatochromate (CrTC) which dissolved and extracted in an organic solvent. The optimal experimental conditions for quantitative extraction such as pH, concentration of the reagents and solvent were studied. Toluene and iso-butyl alcohol proved to be the most suitable solvents for quantitative extraction of Cin-CoTC and Cin-CrTC ion-associates with maximum absorbance at 620 and 555 nm, respectively. The optimum concentration ranges, molar absorptivities, Ringbom ranges and Sandell sensitivities were also evaluated. The atomic absorption spectrometric method is based on measuring of the excess cobalt or chromium in the aqueous solution, after precipitation of the drug, at 240.7 and 357.9 nm, respectively. Linear application ranges, characteristic masses and detection limits were 57.99-361.9, 50.40 and 4.22 microg ml(-1) of Cin.Cl, in case of CoTC, while 37.99-379.9, 18.94 and 0.81 microg ml(-1) in case of CrTC. PMID:15910814

  12. A Comprehensive X-Ray Absorption Model for Atomic Oxygen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gorczyca, T. W.; Bautista, M. A.; Hasoglu, M. F.; Garcia, J.; Gatuzz, E.; Kaastra, J. S.; Kallman, T. R.; Manson, S. T.; Mendoza, C.; Raassen, A. J. J.; de Vries, C. P.; Zatsarinny, O.

    2013-01-01

    An analytical formula is developed to accurately represent the photoabsorption cross section of atomic Oxygen for all energies of interest in X-ray spectral modeling. In the vicinity of the K edge, a Rydberg series expression is used to fit R-matrix results, including important orbital relaxation effects, that accurately predict the absorption oscillator strengths below threshold and merge consistently and continuously to the above-threshold cross section. Further, minor adjustments are made to the threshold energies in order to reliably align the atomic Rydberg resonances after consideration of both experimental and observed line positions. At energies far below or above the K-edge region, the formulation is based on both outer- and inner-shell direct photoionization, including significant shake-up and shake-off processes that result in photoionization-excitation and double-photoionization contributions to the total cross section. The ultimate purpose for developing a definitive model for oxygen absorption is to resolve standing discrepancies between the astronomically observed and laboratory-measured line positions, and between the inferred atomic and molecular oxygen abundances in the interstellar medium from XSTAR and SPEX spectral models.

  13. High sensitivity ultra-broad-band absorption spectroscopy of inductively coupled chlorine plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marinov, Daniil; Foucher, Mickaël; Campbell, Ewen; Brouard, Mark; Chabert, Pascal; Booth, Jean-Paul

    2016-06-01

    We propose a method to measure the densities of vibrationally excited Cl2(v) molecules in levels up to v  =  3 in pure chlorine inductively coupled plasmas (ICPs). The absorption continuum of Cl2 in the 250–450 nm spectral range is deconvoluted into the individual components originating from the different vibrational levels of the ground state, using a set of ab initio absorption cross sections. It is shown that gas heating at constant pressure is the major depletion mechanism of the Cl2 feedstock in the plasma. In these line-integrated absorption measurements, the absorption by the hot (and therefore rarefied) Cl2 gas in the reactor centre is masked by the cooler (and therefore denser) Cl2 near the walls. These radial gradients in temperature and density make it difficult to assess the degree of vibrational excitation in the centre of the reactor. The observed line-averaged vibrational distributions, when analyzed taking into account the radial temperature gradient, suggest that vibrational and translational degrees of freedom in the plasma are close to local equilibrium. This can be explained by efficient vibrational-translational (VT) relaxation between Cl2 and Cl atoms. Besides the Cl2(v) absorption band, a weak continuum absorption is observed at shorter wavelengths, and is attributed to photodetachment of Cl‑ negative ions. Thus, line-integrated densities of negative ions in chlorine plasmas can be directly measured using broad-band absorption spectroscopy.

  14. Performance characteristics of an S-600 portable atomic absorption spectrophotometer

    SciTech Connect

    Pelieva, L.A.; Dyndar, Zh.I.

    1995-12-01

    Performance characteristics of an S-600 portable atomic absorption spectrophotometer are discussed. The optimum analysis conditions, characteristic mass, and detection limit for determining Be, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mn, Ni, Pb, and Zn in solutions and in powders are specified. Direct analysis of solid-state samples (standard soil samples) is described. The relative error of measurement by the calibration graph method lies, with few exceptions, within 7-30%, and by the addition method, within 4-20%. The time needed for a single element determination is 10-20 min.

  15. Optical Frequency Comb Spectroscopy of Rare Earth Atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swiatlowski, Jerlyn; Palm, Christopher; Joshi, Trinity; Montcrieffe, Caitlin; Jackson Kimball, Derek

    2013-05-01

    We discuss progress in our experimental program to employ optical-frequency-comb-based spectroscopy to understand the complex spectra of rare-earth atoms. We plan to carry out systematic measurements of atomic transitions in rare-earth atoms to elucidate the energy level structure and term assignment and determine presently unknown atomic state parameters. This spectroscopic information is important in view of the increasing interest in rare-earth atoms for atomic frequency standards, in astrophysical investigations of chemically peculiar stars, and in tests of fundamental physics (tests of parity and time-reversal invariance, searches for time variation of fundamental constants, etc.). We are presently studying the use of hollow cathode lamps as atomic sources for two-photon frequency comb spectroscopy. Supported by the National Science Foundation under grant PHY-0958749.

  16. Experimental Atomic Spectroscopy At NIST In Support Of Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nave, Gillian; Sansonetti, C. J.; Redman, S. L.

    2012-01-01

    The Atomic Spectroscopy Group at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) has equipment to measure atomic wavelengths and oscillator strengths of astrophysical interest over a wide spectral range. Our 2-m Fourier transform (FT) spectrometer covers wavelengths from 230 nm to 5500 nm at a resolving power of over a million. It has been used to measure calibration data for ground-based astronomical spectrographs, including infrared atlases of Th/Ar and U/Ne hollow cathode lamps and measurements of iodine absorption cells that calibrate many of the spectrographs used for exoplanet searches. Our ultraviolet FT spectrometer covers the range from 140 nm to 900 nm with a resolving power of over a million at 200 nm. Below 140 nm, our 10.7 m normal incidence vacuum spectrograph has been used to provide calibration data for three spectrographs on the Hubble Space Telescope (GHRS, STIS and COS). Although originally designed for use with photographic plates, we have begun using this instrument with phosphor image plates as detectors. These provide a linear intensity response throughout the vacuum ultraviolet, enabling us to measure branching ratios in Fe II and the change in spectral line intensities of Pt/Ne hollow cathode lamps as they age. Data from all three instruments are currently being analyzed to obtain comprehensive descriptions of the spectra of Fe II and Cr II covering wavelengths from 90 nm to 5500 nm. Much of this work has been partly funded by NASA, most recently under agreement NNH11AQ551 to analyze spectra of iron-group elements. Such support is crucial to the continuation of this work at NIST, much of which is of little interest in basic atomic physics but is vital for the interpretation of astrophysical spectra. We are seeking collaborations with astronomers who can assist us in determining future research directions.

  17. Theoretical Calculations of Atomic Data for Spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bautista, Manuel A.

    2000-01-01

    Several different approximations and techniques have been developed for the calculation of atomic structure, ionization, and excitation of atoms and ions. These techniques have been used to compute large amounts of spectroscopic data of various levels of accuracy. This paper presents a review of these theoretical methods to help non-experts in atomic physics to better understand the qualities and limitations of various data sources and assess how reliable are spectral models based on those data.

  18. Biochemical applications of surface-enhanced infrared absorption spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Heberle, Joachim

    2007-01-01

    An overview is presented on the application of surface-enhanced infrared absorption (SEIRA) spectroscopy to biochemical problems. Use of SEIRA results in high surface sensitivity by enhancing the signal of the adsorbed molecule by approximately two orders of magnitude and has the potential to enable new studies, from fundamental aspects to applied sciences. This report surveys studies of DNA and nucleic acid adsorption to gold surfaces, development of immunoassays, electron transfer between metal electrodes and proteins, and protein–protein interactions. Because signal enhancement in SEIRA uses surface properties of the nano-structured metal, the biomaterial must be tethered to the metal without hampering its functionality. Because many biochemical reactions proceed vectorially, their functionality depends on proper orientation of the biomaterial. Thus, surface-modification techniques are addressed that enable control of the proper orientation of proteins on the metal surface. Figure Surface enhanced infrared absorption spectroscopy (SEIRAS) on the studies of tethered protein monolayer (cytochrome c oxidase and cytochrome c) on gold substrate (left), and its potential induced surface enhanced infrared difference absorption (SEIDA) spectrum PMID:17242890

  19. APPLICATION OF ABSORPTION SPECTROSCOPY TO ACTINIDE PROCESS ANALYSIS AND MONITORING

    SciTech Connect

    Lascola, R.; Sharma, V.

    2010-06-03

    The characteristic strong colors of aqueous actinide solutions form the basis of analytical techniques for actinides based on absorption spectroscopy. Colorimetric measurements of samples from processing activities have been used for at least half a century. This seemingly mature technology has been recently revitalized by developments in chemometric data analysis. Where reliable measurements could formerly only be obtained under well-defined conditions, modern methods are robust with respect to variations in acidity, concentration of complexants and spectral interferents, and temperature. This paper describes two examples of the use of process absorption spectroscopy for Pu analysis at the Savannah River Site, in Aiken, SC. In one example, custom optical filters allow accurate colorimetric measurements of Pu in a stream with rapid nitric acid variation. The second example demonstrates simultaneous measurement of Pu and U by chemometric treatment of absorption spectra. The paper concludes with a description of the use of these analyzers to supplement existing technologies in nuclear materials monitoring in processing, reprocessing, and storage facilities.

  20. Pathlength determination for gas in scattering media absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Mei, Liang; Somesfalean, Gabriel; Svanberg, Sune

    2014-01-01

    Gas in scattering media absorption spectroscopy (GASMAS) has been extensively studied and applied during recent years in, e.g., food packaging, human sinus monitoring, gas diffusion studies, and pharmaceutical tablet characterization. The focus has been on the evaluation of the gas absorption pathlength in porous media, which a priori is unknown due to heavy light scattering. In this paper, three different approaches are summarized. One possibility is to simultaneously monitor another gas with known concentration (e.g., water vapor), the pathlength of which can then be obtained and used for the target gas (e.g., oxygen) to retrieve its concentration. The second approach is to measure the mean optical pathlength or physical pathlength with other methods, including time-of-flight spectroscopy, frequency-modulated light scattering interferometry and the frequency domain photon migration method. By utilizing these methods, an average concentration can be obtained and the porosities of the material are studied. The last method retrieves the gas concentration without knowing its pathlength by analyzing the gas absorption line shape, which depends upon the concentration of buffer gases due to intermolecular collisions. The pathlength enhancement effect due to multiple scattering enables also the use of porous media as multipass gas cells for trace gas monitoring. All these efforts open up a multitude of different applications for the GASMAS technique. PMID:24573311

  1. Pathlength Determination for Gas in Scattering Media Absorption Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Mei, Liang; Somesfalean, Gabriel; Svanberg, Sune

    2014-01-01

    Gas in scattering media absorption spectroscopy (GASMAS) has been extensively studied and applied during recent years in, e.g., food packaging, human sinus monitoring, gas diffusion studies, and pharmaceutical tablet characterization. The focus has been on the evaluation of the gas absorption pathlength in porous media, which a priori is unknown due to heavy light scattering. In this paper, three different approaches are summarized. One possibility is to simultaneously monitor another gas with known concentration (e.g., water vapor), the pathlength of which can then be obtained and used for the target gas (e.g., oxygen) to retrieve its concentration. The second approach is to measure the mean optical pathlength or physical pathlength with other methods, including time-of-flight spectroscopy, frequency-modulated light scattering interferometry and the frequency domain photon migration method. By utilizing these methods, an average concentration can be obtained and the porosities of the material are studied. The last method retrieves the gas concentration without knowing its pathlength by analyzing the gas absorption line shape, which depends upon the concentration of buffer gases due to intermolecular collisions. The pathlength enhancement effect due to multiple scattering enables also the use of porous media as multipass gas cells for trace gas monitoring. All these efforts open up a multitude of different applications for the GASMAS technique. PMID:24573311

  2. Axial segregation in high intensity discharge lamps measured by laser absorption spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Flikweert, A.J.; Nimalasuriya, T.; Groothuis, C.H.J.M.; Kroesen, G.M.W.; Stoffels, W.W.

    2005-10-01

    High intensity discharge lamps have a high efficiency. These lamps contain rare-earth additives (in our case dysprosium iodide) which radiate very efficiently. A problem is color separation in the lamp because of axial segregation of the rare-earth additives, caused by diffusion and convection. Here two-dimensional atomic dysprosium density profiles are measured by means of laser absorption spectroscopy; the order of magnitude of the density is 10{sup 22} m{sup -3}. The radially resolved atomic density measurements show a hollow density profile. In the outer parts of the lamp molecules dominate, while the center is depleted of dysprosium atoms due to ionization. From the axial profiles the segregation parameter is determined. It is shown that the lamp operates on the right-hand side of the Fischer curve [J. Appl. Phys. 47, 2954 (1976)], i.e., a larger convection leads to less segregation.

  3. Study on the elemental mercury absorption cross section based on differential optical absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Haiming; Yao, Penghui

    2015-08-01

    With the method of ultraviolet absorption spectrum, the exact absorption cross-section with the light source of the low-pressure mercury lamp was determined, during which the optimum wavelength for mercury concentrations inversion was 253.69 nm, the highest detection limit was 0.177 μg/cm3, and the lowest detection limit was 0.034 μg/cm3. Furthermore, based on the differential optical absorption spectroscopy(DOAS), the relationship between the integral parameters (IP) and the concentration as well as the signal-noise ration (SNR) under the conditions of gas flow was determined and the lowest detection limit was figured out to be 0.03524 μg/cm3, providing a method of DOAS to de-noise through the comparison between the mercury concentration values produced by DOAS and that produced by the wavelet de-noising method (db5). It turned out that the differential optical absorption spectroscopy had a strong anti-interference ability, while the wavelet de-noising method was not suitable for measuring the trace concentration change.

  4. Oscillator strength measurements of atomic absorption lines from stellar spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lobel, Alex

    2011-05-01

    Herein we develop a new method to determine oscillator strength values of atomic absorption lines with state-of-the-art detailed spectral synthesis calculations of the optical spectrum of the Sun and of standard spectral reference stars. We update the log(gf) values of 911 neutral lines observed in the KPNO-FTS flux spectrum of the Sun and high-resolution echelle spectra (R = 80 000) of Procyon (F5 IV-V) and Eps Eri (K2 V) observed with large signal-to-noise (S/N) ratios of 2000 using the new Mercator-Hermes spectrograph at La Palma Observatory (Spain). We find for 483 Fe I, 85 Ni I, and 51 Si I absorption lines in the sample a systematic overestimation of the literature log(gf) values with central line depths below 15%. We employ a curve-of-growth analysis technique to test the accuracy of the new oscillator strength values and compare calculated equivalent line widths to the Moore, Minnaert, and Houtgast atlas of the Sun. The online SpectroWeb database at http://spectra.freeshell.org interactively displays the observed and synthetic spectra and provides the new log(gf) values together with important atomic line data. The graphical database is under development for stellar reference spectra of every spectral sub-class observed with large spectral resolution and S/N ratios.

  5. A comprehensive X-ray absorption model for atomic oxygen

    SciTech Connect

    Gorczyca, T. W.; Bautista, M. A.; Mendoza, C.; Hasoglu, M. F.; García, J.; Gatuzz, E.; Kaastra, J. S.; Raassen, A. J. J.; De Vries, C. P.; Kallman, T. R.; Manson, S. T.; Zatsarinny, O.

    2013-12-10

    An analytical formula is developed to accurately represent the photoabsorption cross section of O I for all energies of interest in X-ray spectral modeling. In the vicinity of the K edge, a Rydberg series expression is used to fit R-matrix results, including important orbital relaxation effects, that accurately predict the absorption oscillator strengths below threshold and merge consistently and continuously to the above-threshold cross section. Further, minor adjustments are made to the threshold energies in order to reliably align the atomic Rydberg resonances after consideration of both experimental and observed line positions. At energies far below or above the K-edge region, the formulation is based on both outer- and inner-shell direct photoionization, including significant shake-up and shake-off processes that result in photoionization-excitation and double-photoionization contributions to the total cross section. The ultimate purpose for developing a definitive model for oxygen absorption is to resolve standing discrepancies between the astronomically observed and laboratory-measured line positions, and between the inferred atomic and molecular oxygen abundances in the interstellar medium from XSTAR and SPEX spectral models.

  6. Organic solvents as interferents in arsenic determination by hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometry with flame atomization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karadjova, Irina B.; Lampugnani, Leonardo; Dědina, Jiri; D'Ulivo, Alessandro; Onor, Massimo; Tsalev, Dimiter L.

    2006-05-01

    Interference effects of various organic solvents miscible with water on arsenic determination by hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometry have been studied. Arsine was chemically generated in continuous flow hydride generation system and atomized by using a flame atomizer able to operate in two modes: miniature diffusion flame and flame-in-flame. The effects of experimental variables and atomization mode were investigated: tetrahydroborate and hydrochloric acid concentrations, argon, hydrogen and oxygen supply rates for the microflame, and the distance from the atomization region to the observation zone. The nature of the species formed in the flame due to the pyrolysis of organic solvent vapors entering the flame volume together with arsine is discussed. The observed signal depression in the presence of organic solvents has been mainly attributed to the atomization interference due to heterogeneous gas-solid reaction between the free arsenic atoms and finely dispersed carbon particles formed by carbon radicals recombination. The best tolerance to interferences was obtained by using flame-in-flame atomization (5-10 ml min - 1 of oxygen flow rate), together with higher argon and hydrogen supply rates and elevated observation heights.

  7. In situ x-ray-absorption spectroscopy study of hydrogen absorption by nickel-magnesium thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farangis, B.; Nachimuthu, P.; Richardson, T. J.; Slack, J. L.; Perera, R. C.; Gullikson, E. M.; Lindle, D. W.; Rubin, M.

    2003-02-01

    Structural and electronic properties of co-sputtered Ni-Mg thin films with varying Ni to Mg ratio were studied by in situ x-ray absorption spectroscopy in the Ni L-edge and Mg K-edge regions. Codeposition of the metals led to increased disorder and decreased coordination around Ni and Mg compared to pure metal films. Exposure of the metallic films to hydrogen resulted in formation of hydrides and increased disorder. The presence of hydrogen as a near neighbor around Mg caused a drastic reduction in the intensities of multiple scattering resonances at higher energies. The optical switching behavior and changes in the x-ray spectra varied with Ni to Mg atomic ratio. Pure Mg films with Pd overlayers were converted to MgH2: The H atoms occupy regular sites as in bulk MgH2. Although optical switching was slow in the absence of Ni, the amount of H2 absorption was large. Incorporation of Ni in Mg films led to an increase in the speed of optical switching but decreased maximum transparency. Significant shifts in the Ni L3 and L2 peaks are consistent with strong interaction with hydrogen in the mixed films.

  8. Transient absorption spectra of the laser-dressed hydrogen atom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murakami, Mitsuko; Chu, Shih-I.

    2013-10-01

    We present a theoretical study of transient absorption spectra of laser-dressed hydrogen atoms, based on numerical solutions of the time-dependent Schrödinger equation. The timing of absorption is controlled by the delay between an extreme ultra violet (XUV) pulse and an infrared (IR) laser field. The XUV pulse is isolated and several hundred attoseconds in duration, which acts as a pump to drive the ground-state electron to excited p states. The subsequent interaction with the IR field produces dressed states, which manifest as sidebands between the 1s-np absorption spectra separated by one IR-photon energy. We demonstrate that the population of dressed states is maximized when the timing of the XUV pulse coincides with the zero crossing of the IR field, and that their energies can be manipulated in a subcycle time scale by adding a chirp to the IR field. An alternative perspective to the problem is to think of the XUV pulse as a probe to detect the dynamical ac Stark shifts. Our results indicate that the accidental degeneracy of the hydrogen excited states is removed while they are dressed by the IR field, leading to large ac Stark shifts. Furthermore, we observe the Autler-Townes doublets for the n=2 and 3 levels using the 656 nm dressing field, but their separation does not agree with the prediction by the conventional three-level model that neglects the dynamical ac Stark shifts.

  9. Direct analysis of solids by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry using a second surface atomizer

    SciTech Connect

    Rettberg, T.M.; Holcombe, J.A.

    1986-06-01

    The direct graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometric analysis of solids using the second surface atomizer has been investigated. The atomizer features a gas-cooled Ta insert within the graphite furnace onto which the analyte can be condensed, after which atomization is performed by raising the furnace to a higher temperature and shutting off the coolant gas. The analyses were conducted on standard reference material fly ash, river sediment, and citrus leaves, in addition to filter paper samples. All analyses were conducted without sample pretreatment or use of matrix modifiers. Quantitation was done by using simple aqueous standards. By use of peak heights, the recoveries varied from 81% to 127%, although several determinations were within the certified concentration range. The procedures typically gave low background absorbances and peak shapes that were relatively independent of the original sample matrix.

  10. X-ray absorption spectroscopy of liquid surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Iwao; Tanida, Hajime; Kawauchi, Sigehiro; Harada, Makoto; Nomura, Masaharu

    1997-09-01

    An apparatus has been constructed for x-ray absorption spectroscopy of elements at air/aqueous solution interface. Its surface sensitivity is gained from glancing incidence of synchrotron radiation under total reflection condition. The absorption is detected by total conversion He ion-yield method. This apparatus was operated at the beam line 7C of Photon Factory, where the incident photon beam comes from a sagittal focus double-crystal monochromator via a 70-cm-long bent mirror. The mirror focuses the beam vertically and changes the beam direction downward by 1 mrad to irradiate solution surface. The essential requirement of this technique, ripple-free liquid surface at accurate position, was attained by introducing a trough on a floating boat, continuous surface level monitoring, and an automatic Z-stage control. The x-ray absorption edge jump demonstrated that surface concentration of bromide ion follows the Langmuir type adsorption for tetraalkylammonuim bromide solution. By comparing the jump values for surface-active and -inactive bromide salt solutions, the detecting depth of the present technique was determined to be 8.8 nm. An extended x-ray absorption fine structure analysis of bromide ion segregated to the surface by stearyltrimethylammonium cation indicated that its solvation structure is different from that of bulk.

  11. Diagnostic potential of cosmic-neutrino absorption spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Barenboim, Gabriela; Mena Requejo, Olga; Quigg, Chris; /Fermilab

    2004-12-01

    Annihilation of extremely energetic cosmic neutrinos on the relic-neutrino background can give rise to absorption lines at energies corresponding to formation of the electroweak gauge boson Z{sup 0}. The positions of the absorption dips are set by the masses of the relic neutrinos. Suitably intense sources of extremely energetic (10{sup 21} - 10{sup 25}-eV) cosmic neutrinos might therefore enable the determination of the absolute neutrino masses and the flavor composition of the mass eigenstates. Several factors--other than neutrino mass and composition--distort the absorption lines, however. We analyze the influence of the time-evolution of the relic-neutrino density and the consequences of neutrino decay. We consider the sensitivity of the lineshape to the age and character of extremely energetic neutrino sources, and to the thermal history of the Universe, reflected in the expansion rate. We take into account Fermi motion arising from the thermal distribution of the relic-neutrino gas. We also note the implications of Dirac vs. Majorana relics, and briefly consider unconventional neutrino histories. We ask what kinds of external information would enhance the potential of cosmic-neutrino absorption spectroscopy, and estimate the sensitivity required to make the technique a reality.

  12. Operando X-ray absorption and infrared fuel cell spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, Emily A.; Kendrick, Ian; Jia, Qingying; Grice, Corey; Segre, Carlo U.; Smotkin, Eugene S.

    2011-11-17

    A polymer electrolyte fuel cell enables operando X-ray absorption and infrared spectroscopy of the membrane electrode assembly catalytic layer with flowing fuel and air streams at controlled temperature. Time-dependent X-ray absorption near edge structure spectra of the Pt and Ni edge of Pt based catalysts of an air-breathing cathode show that catalyst restructuring, after a potential step, has time constants from minutes to hours. The infrared Stark tuning plots of CO adsorbed on Pt at 100, 200, 300 and 400 mV vs. hydrogen reference electrode were obtained. The Stark tuning plots of CO adsorbed at 400 mV exhibit a precipitous drop in frequency coincident with the adsorption potential. The turn-down potential decreases relative to the adsorption potential and is approximately constant after 300 mV. These Stark tuning characteristics are attributed to potential dependent adsorption site selection by CO and competitive adsorption processes.

  13. Fingerprints of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in infrared absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Tommasini, Matteo; Lucotti, Andrea; Alfè, Michela; Ciajolo, Anna; Zerbi, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    We have analyzed a set of 51 PAHs whose structures have been hypothesized from mass spectrometry data collected on samples extracted from carbon particles of combustion origin. We have obtained relationships between infrared absorption signals in the fingerprint region (mid-IR) and the chemical structures of PAHs, thus proving the potential of IR spectroscopy for the characterization of the molecular structure of aromatic combustion products. The results obtained here for the spectroscopic characterization of PAHs can be also of interest in Materials Science and Astrophysics. PMID:26208268

  14. Spatially resolved concentration measurements based on backscatter absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ze; Sanders, Scott T.; Robinson, Michael A.

    2016-06-01

    We demonstrate the feasibility of spatially resolved measurements of gas properties using direct absorption spectroscopy in conjunction with backscattered signals. We report a 1-D distribution of H2O mole fraction with a spatial resolution of 5 mm. The peak and average discrepancy between the measured and expected mole fraction are 21.1 and 8.0 %, respectively. The demonstration experiment is related to a diesel aftertreatment system; a selective catalytic reduction brick made of cordierite is used. The brick causes volume scattering interference; advanced baseline fitting based on a genetic algorithm is used to reduce the effects of this interference by a factor of 2.3.

  15. Fingerprints of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in infrared absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tommasini, Matteo; Lucotti, Andrea; Alfè, Michela; Ciajolo, Anna; Zerbi, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    We have analyzed a set of 51 PAHs whose structures have been hypothesized from mass spectrometry data collected on samples extracted from carbon particles of combustion origin. We have obtained relationships between infrared absorption signals in the fingerprint region (mid-IR) and the chemical structures of PAHs, thus proving the potential of IR spectroscopy for the characterization of the molecular structure of aromatic combustion products. The results obtained here for the spectroscopic characterization of PAHs can be also of interest in Materials Science and Astrophysics.

  16. The Use of a Microprocessor-Controlled, Video Output Atomic Absorption Spectrometer as an Educational Tool in a Two-Year Technical Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kerfoot, Henry B.

    Based on instructional experiences at Charles County Community College, Maryland, this report examines the pedagogical advantage of teaching atomic absorption (AA) spectroscopy with an AA spectrophotometer that is equipped with a microprocessor and video output mechanism. The report first discusses the growing importance of AA spectroscopy in…

  17. Limiting resolution of linear absorption spectroscopy in thin gas cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izmailov, A. Ch.

    2010-06-01

    The most narrow sub-Doppler frequency resonances in the linear absorption of monochromatic radiation that propagates in the normal direction through a cell containing a layer of rarefied gas medium with a thickness smaller than or on the order of the wavelength of this radiation are theoretically studied. The calculation is performed using as an example a three-dimensional gas cell shaped like a rectangular parallelepiped. It is shown that the width and amplitude of considered sub-Doppler resonances (in the vicinity of centers of rather weak quantum transitions) significantly depend on the transit relaxation of atomic particles, which is determined by their transit times through the irradiated region of the cell both in longitudinal and in transverse directions. The restrictions of the approximation of the planar one-dimensional cell that was previously used in such calculations are determined. Possible applications of linear absorption resonances in ultrathin (nanometer) gas cells as references for optical frequency standards are discussed.

  18. Two attosecond pulse transient absorption spectroscopy and extraction of the instantaneous AC Stark shift in helium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bækhøj, Jens E.; Bojer Madsen, Lars

    2016-07-01

    In two attosecond pulse absorption spectroscopy (TAPAS) the use of two attosecond XUV pulses allows the extraction of atomic and molecular quantum mechanical dipole phases from spectroscopic measurements. TAPAS relies on interference between processes that individually only include a single XUV photon, and therefore does not rely on high intensity attosecond pulses. To show the usefulness and limitations of the TAPAS method we investigate its capability of capturing the instantaneous AC Stark shift induced by a midinfrared 3200 nm pulse in the | 1{{s}}2{{p}}> state of helium.

  19. Laser Spectroscopy of Atoms and Molecules.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schawlow, Arthur L.

    1978-01-01

    Surveys new laser techniques and a variety of spectroscopic experiments that can be used to detect, measure and study very small numbers of atoms on molecules. The range of applicability of these techniques is also included. (HM)

  20. The role of atomic absorption spectrometry in geochemical exploration

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Viets, J.G.; O'Leary, R. M.

    1992-01-01

    In this paper we briefly describe the principles of atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS) and the basic hardware components necessary to make measurements of analyte concentrations. Then we discuss a variety of methods that have been developed for the introduction of analyte atoms into the light path of the spectrophotometer. This section deals with sample digestion, elimination of interferences, and optimum production of ground-state atoms, all critical considerations when choosing an AAS method. Other critical considerations are cost, speed, simplicity, precision, and applicability of the method to the wide range of materials sampled in geochemical exploration. We cannot attempt to review all of the AAS methods developed for geological materials but instead will restrict our discussion to some of those appropriate for geochemical exploration. Our background and familiarity are reflected in the methods we discuss, and we have no doubt overlooked many good methods. Our discussion should therefore be considered a starting point in finding the right method for the problem, rather than the end of the search. Finally, we discuss the future of AAS relative to other instrumental techniques and the promising new directions for AAS in geochemical exploration. ?? 1992.

  1. Absorption spectroscopy of a laboratory photoionized plasma experiment at Z

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, I. M.; Durmaz, T.; Mancini, R. C.; Bailey, J. E.; Rochau, G. A.; Golovkin, I. E.; MacFarlane, J. J.

    2014-03-15

    The Z facility at the Sandia National Laboratories is the most energetic terrestrial source of X-rays and provides an opportunity to produce photoionized plasmas in a relatively well characterised radiation environment. We use detailed atomic-kinetic and spectral simulations to analyze the absorption spectra of a photoionized neon plasma driven by the x-ray flux from a z-pinch. The broadband x-ray flux both photoionizes and backlights the plasma. In particular, we focus on extracting the charge state distribution of the plasma and the characteristics of the radiation field driving the plasma in order to estimate the ionisation parameter.

  2. Preconcentration and Atomization of Arsane in a Dielectric Barrier Discharge with Detection by Atomic Absorption Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Novák, Petr; Dědina, Jiří; Kratzer, Jan

    2016-06-01

    Atomization of arsane in a 17 W planar quartz dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) atomizer was optimized, and its performance was compared to that of a multiple microflame quartz tube atomizer (MMQTA) for atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS). Argon, at a flow rate of 60 mL min(-1), was the best DBD discharge gas. Free As atoms were also observed in the DBD with nitrogen, hydrogen, and helium discharge gases but not in air. A dryer tube filled with NaOH beads placed downstream from the gas-liquid separator to prevent residual aerosol and moisture transport to the atomizer was found to improve the response by 25%. Analytical figures of merit were comparable, reaching an identical sensitivity of 0.48 s ng (-1) As in both atomizers and limits of detection (LOD) of 0.15 ng mL(-1) As in MMQTA and 0.16 ng mL(-1) As in DBD, respectively. Compared to MMQTA, DBD provided 1 order of magnitude better resistance to interference from other hydride-forming elements (Sb, Se, and Bi). Atomization efficiency in DBD was estimated to be 100% of that reached in the MMQTA. A simple procedure of lossless in situ preconcentration of arsane was developed. Addition of 7 mL min(-1) O2 to the Ar plasma discharge resulted in a quantitative retention of arsane in the optical arm of the DBD atomizer. Complete analyte release and atomization was reached as soon as oxygen was switched off. Preconcentration efficiency of 100% was observed, allowing a decrease of the LOD to 0.01 ng mL(-1) As employing a 300 s preconcentration period. PMID:27159266

  3. Studies of Element-Specific Local Structures in Compound Materials Using X-Ray Absorption Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soo, Yun-Liang

    1995-01-01

    The x-ray absorption spectroscopy techniques have been used to study a variety of semiconductor and superconductor materials. In such experiments, synchrotron radiation harnessed by a delicate beamline electronic and control system are used to obtain data with analyzable quality in a reasonable time scale. The element-selectivity is achieved by selecting an energy-scan range close to a characteristic "absorption edge" of the selected element. Peak structures below the absorption edge (pre-edge structures) reflect the local unoccupied states of the selected atomic species. The position of absorption edge (part of the near-edge x-ray absorption fine structure, NEXAFS) provides some qualitative information of the effective valency of the selected element. And, most importantly, the modulation in the spectrum some 40 eV above the absorption edge (extended x-ray absorption fine structure, EXAFS) gives quantitative information of the local structure around the selected atomic species. The selected atomic species such as magnetic Mn ions in III-V diluted magnetic semiconductors (DMS) rm In_{1-x}Mn_{x}As, Mn as the luminescent centers in nanocrystals of ZnS, O in the CuO_2 planes which host the carriers in high-T_{rm c} superconductors, and F as the electron reservoir in the n-type high-T_{rm c} superconductors rm Nd_2CuO _{4-x}F_{x} all play an important role in the novel mechanism of these new materials. Along with other detailed information, our EXAFS results have revealed (i) III-V DMS can indeed be prepared by substitutional doping of magnetic impurities under proper processing conditions. (ii) Mn ions substitute for the Zn sites in the nanocrystals of ZnS with significant size-dependent local structural changes. (iii) Only ~6% of O in the CuO_2 planes in rm Nd_2CuO_{4 -x}F_{x} are substituted by F. The rest of F atoms substitute for O atoms in the NdO layers and serve as electron reservoirs. The NEXAFS results have shown that the effective valency of Mn in Zn

  4. Analysis of lithium in deep basalt groundwaters using graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrophotometry

    SciTech Connect

    Dill, J.A.; Marcy, A.D.

    1986-05-01

    Lithium is under consideration for use as a reactive (sorptive) tracer in experiments designed to provide information regarding natural attenuation processes in a basalt-groundwater environment. In support of these activities, background lithium concentrations in samples obtained from a variety of test horizons have been determined using graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrophotometry. Significant interference was observed in these determinations and was found to be due to the presence of silicate in the samples. It was found that these problems could be circumvented through the use of alkaline silicate or synthetic groundwater matrix modifiers. This matrix effect was examined in some detail. Results obtained using the graphite furnace were compared to results obtained using inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy.

  5. Diagnostics of a see-through hollow cathode discharge by emission, absorption, and fluorescence spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Nicholas

    Atomic line filters have been suggested to be attractive in areas of Doppler velocimetry, resonance fluorescence detection, and resonance ionization detection. They are based on the resonant absorption of photons by an atomic vapor, and allow all other radiation to pass. This allows the detection of very low levels of light superimposed on a large optical background. Several elements have been studied for use as atomic line filters, such as the alkali metals, alkaline earths, and thallium. As previously recognized, thallium is especially attractive since the 535.046 nm metastable transition overlaps with the second harmonic output of an Nd:La2Be2O 5 (BEL) laser (1070 nm). This makes thallium ideal for certain applications as an atomic line filter. Recently a see-through hollow cathode lamp, or galvatron (Hamamatsu), was made commercially available. The galvatron geometry is unique compared to traditional hollow cathode lamps since the cathode and cell are oriented in a T-shape, with the cathode bored completely through to allow the propagation of a light source through the cathode. This allows multi-step excitation of the atomic vapor, not easily accomplished with a traditional hollow cathode lamp. The advantages that a galvatron offers over conventional atomic reservoirs make it an attractive candidate for the application as an atomic line filter; however, little spectroscopic data have been found in the literature. For this reason, Doppler temperatures, number densities, quantum efficiencies, and lifetimes have been determined in order to characterize this atomic reservoir as a potential atomic line filter. These parameters are determined by use of various spectroscopic techniques which include emission, absorption, time-resolved fluorescence, and time-resolved laser-induced saturated fluorescence spectroscopy. From these measurements, it has been demonstrated that a galvatron is an attractive atomic reservoir for applications as an atomic line filter. The

  6. Mid-infrared absorption spectroscopy using quantum cascade lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haibach, Fred; Erlich, Adam; Deutsch, Erik

    2011-06-01

    Block Engineering has developed an absorption spectroscopy system based on widely tunable Quantum Cascade Lasers (QCL). The QCL spectrometer rapidly cycles through a user-selected range in the mid-infrared spectrum, between 6 to 12 μm (1667 to 833 cm-1), to detect and identify substances on surfaces based on their absorption characteristics from a standoff distance of up to 2 feet with an eye-safe laser. It can also analyze vapors and liquids in a single device. For military applications, the QCL spectrometer has demonstrated trace explosive, chemical warfare agent (CWA), and toxic industrial chemical (TIC) detection and analysis. The QCL's higher power density enables measurements from diffuse and highly absorbing materials and substrates. Other advantages over Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy include portability, ruggedness, rapid analysis, and the ability to function from a distance through free space or a fiber optic probe. This paper will discuss the basic technology behind the system and the empirical data on various safety and security applications.

  7. Simultaneous Atomic Absorption Spectrometry for Cadmium and Lead Determination in Wastewater: A Laboratory Exercise

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Correia, Paulo R. M.; Oliveira, Pedro V.

    2004-01-01

    The simultaneous determination of cadmium and lead by multi-element atomic absorption spectrometry with electrochemical atomization is proposed by employing a problem-based approach. The reports indicate that the students assimilated the principles of the simultaneous atomic absorption spectrometry (SIMAAS), the role of the chemical modifier, the…

  8. A X-Ray Absorption Spectroscopy Study of Manganese Containing Compounds and Photosynthetic Spinach Chloroplasts.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirby, Jon Allan

    The manganese sites in chloroplasts, long thought to be involved in photosynthetic oxygen evolution have been examined and partially characterized by X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy (XAS) using synchrotron radiation. The local environment about the manganese atoms is estimated from an analysis of the extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (EXAFS). Comparisons with and simulations of the manganese EXAFS for several reference compounds leads to a model in which the chloroplast manganese atoms are contained in a binuclear complex similar to di-u-oxo -tetrakis-(2,2'-bipyridine) dimanganese. It is suggested that the partner metal is another manganese. The bridging ligands are most probably oxygen. The remaining manganese ligands are carbon, oxygen, or nitrogen. A roughly linear correlation between the X-ray K edge onset energy and the "coordination charge" of a large number of manganese coordination complexes and compounds has been developed. Entry of the chloroplast manganese edge energy onto this correlation diagram establishes that the active pool of manganese is in an oxidation state greater than +2. If the manganese is in a dimeric form the oxidation states are most probably (II,III). Underlying these results is an extensive data analysis methodology. The method developed involves the use of many different background removal techniques, Fourier transforms and ultimately curve fitting to the modulations in the x-ray absorption cross sections. A large number of model compounds were used to evaluate the analysis method. These analyses are used to show that the two major curve fitting models available are essentially equivalent. Due to its greater versatility, the theoretical model of Teo and Lee is preferred (J. Am. Chem. Soc. (1979), 101, 2815). The results are also used to determine the informational limitations of XAS within the limits of the present understanding of X-ray absorption phenomena by inner shell electrons for atoms with atomic number greater than that

  9. [Retrieval of monocyclic aromatic hydrocarbons with differential optical absorption spectroscopy].

    PubMed

    Xie, Pin-Hua; Fu, Qiang; Liu, Jian-Guo; Liu, Wen-Qing; Qin, Min; Li, Ang; Liu, Shi-Sheng; Wei, Qing-Nong

    2006-09-01

    Differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS) technique has been used to measure trace gases in the atmosphere by their strongly structured absorption of radiation in the UV and visible spectral range, e. g. SO2, NO2, O3 etc. However, unlike the absorption spectra of SO2 and NO2, the analysis of aromatic compounds is difficult and strongly suffers from the cross interference of other absorbers (Herzberg bands of oxygen, ozone and sulfur dioxide), especially with relatively low concentrations of aromatic compounds in the atmosphere. In the present paper, the DOAS evaluation of aromatic compounds was performed by nonlinear least square fit with two interpolated oxygen optical density spectra at different path lengths and reference spectra of ozone at different temperature and SO2 cross section to correct the interference from absorbers of O2, O3 and SO2. The measurement of toluene, benzene, (m, p, o) xylene and phenol with a DOAS system showed that DOAS method is suitable for monocyclic aromatic compounds monitoring in the atmosphere. PMID:17112022

  10. Femtosecond transient absorption spectroscopy of silanized silicon quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuntermann, Volker; Cimpean, Carla; Brehm, Georg; Sauer, Guido; Kryschi, Carola; Wiggers, Hartmut

    2008-03-01

    Excitonic properties of colloidal silicon quantum dots (Si qdots) with mean sizes of 4nm were examined using stationary and time-resolved optical spectroscopy. Chemically stable silicon oxide shells were prepared by controlled surface oxidation and silanization of HF-etched Si qdots. The ultrafast relaxation dynamics of photogenerated excitons in Si qdot colloids were studied on the picosecond time scale from 0.3psto2.3ns using femtosecond-resolved transient absorption spectroscopy. The time evolution of the transient absorption spectra of the Si qdots excited with a 150fs pump pulse at 390nm was observed to consist of decays of various absorption transitions of photoexcited electrons in the conduction band which overlap with both the photoluminescence and the photobleaching of the valence band population density. Gaussian deconvolution of the spectroscopic data allowed for disentangling various carrier relaxation processes involving electron-phonon and phonon-phonon scatterings or arising from surface-state trapping. The initial energy and momentum relaxation of hot carriers was observed to take place via scattering by optical phonons within 0.6ps . Exciton capturing by surface states forming shallow traps in the amorphous SiOx shell was found to occur with a time constant of 4ps , whereas deeper traps presumably localized in the Si-SiOx interface gave rise to exciton trapping processes with time constants of 110 and 180ps . Electron transfer from initially populated, higher-lying surface states to the conduction band of Si qdots (>2nm) was observed to take place within 400 or 700fs .

  11. Optical re-injection in cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Leen, J. Brian; O’Keefe, Anthony

    2014-01-01

    Non-mode-matched cavity-enhanced absorption spectrometry (e.g., cavity ringdown spectroscopy and integrated cavity output spectroscopy) is commonly used for the ultrasensitive detection of trace gases. These techniques are attractive for their simplicity and robustness, but their performance may be limited by the reflection of light from the front mirror and the resulting low optical transmission. Although this low transmitted power can sometimes be overcome with higher power lasers and lower noise detectors (e.g., in the near-infrared), many regimes exist where the available light intensity or photodetector sensitivity limits instrument performance (e.g., in the mid-infrared). In this article, we describe a method of repeatedly re-injecting light reflected off the front mirror of the optical cavity to boost the cavity's circulating power and deliver more light to the photodetector and thus increase the signal-to-noise ratio of the absorption measurement. We model and experimentally demonstrate the method's performance using off-axis cavity ringdown spectroscopy (OA-CRDS) with a broadly tunable external cavity quantum cascade laser. The power coupled through the cavity to the detector is increased by a factor of 22.5. The cavity loss is measured with a precision of 2 × 10−10 cm−1/\\documentclass[12pt]{minimal} \\usepackage{amsmath} \\usepackage{wasysym} \\usepackage{amsfonts} \\usepackage{amssymb} \\usepackage{amsbsy} \\usepackage{upgreek} \\usepackage{mathrsfs} \\setlength{\\oddsidemargin}{-69pt} \\begin{document} }{}$\\sqrt {{\\rm Hz;}}$\\end{document} Hz ; an increase of 12 times over the standard off-axis configuration without reinjection and comparable to the best reported sensitivities in the mid-infrared. Finally, the re-injected CRDS system is used to measure the spectrum of several volatile organic compounds, demonstrating the improved ability to resolve weakly absorbing spectroscopic features. PMID:25273701

  12. Optical re-injection in cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Leen, J Brian; O'Keefe, Anthony

    2014-09-01

    Non-mode-matched cavity-enhanced absorption spectrometry (e.g., cavity ringdown spectroscopy and integrated cavity output spectroscopy) is commonly used for the ultrasensitive detection of trace gases. These techniques are attractive for their simplicity and robustness, but their performance may be limited by the reflection of light from the front mirror and the resulting low optical transmission. Although this low transmitted power can sometimes be overcome with higher power lasers and lower noise detectors (e.g., in the near-infrared), many regimes exist where the available light intensity or photodetector sensitivity limits instrument performance (e.g., in the mid-infrared). In this article, we describe a method of repeatedly re-injecting light reflected off the front mirror of the optical cavity to boost the cavity's circulating power and deliver more light to the photodetector and thus increase the signal-to-noise ratio of the absorption measurement. We model and experimentally demonstrate the method's performance using off-axis cavity ringdown spectroscopy (OA-CRDS) with a broadly tunable external cavity quantum cascade laser. The power coupled through the cavity to the detector is increased by a factor of 22.5. The cavity loss is measured with a precision of 2 × 10(-10) cm(-1)/√Hz; an increase of 12 times over the standard off-axis configuration without reinjection and comparable to the best reported sensitivities in the mid-infrared. Finally, the re-injected CRDS system is used to measure the spectrum of several volatile organic compounds, demonstrating the improved ability to resolve weakly absorbing spectroscopic features. PMID:25273701

  13. Optical re-injection in cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Leen, J. Brian O’Keefe, Anthony

    2014-09-15

    Non-mode-matched cavity-enhanced absorption spectrometry (e.g., cavity ringdown spectroscopy and integrated cavity output spectroscopy) is commonly used for the ultrasensitive detection of trace gases. These techniques are attractive for their simplicity and robustness, but their performance may be limited by the reflection of light from the front mirror and the resulting low optical transmission. Although this low transmitted power can sometimes be overcome with higher power lasers and lower noise detectors (e.g., in the near-infrared), many regimes exist where the available light intensity or photodetector sensitivity limits instrument performance (e.g., in the mid-infrared). In this article, we describe a method of repeatedly re-injecting light reflected off the front mirror of the optical cavity to boost the cavity's circulating power and deliver more light to the photodetector and thus increase the signal-to-noise ratio of the absorption measurement. We model and experimentally demonstrate the method's performance using off-axis cavity ringdown spectroscopy (OA-CRDS) with a broadly tunable external cavity quantum cascade laser. The power coupled through the cavity to the detector is increased by a factor of 22.5. The cavity loss is measured with a precision of 2 × 10{sup −10} cm{sup −1}/√(Hz;) an increase of 12 times over the standard off-axis configuration without reinjection and comparable to the best reported sensitivities in the mid-infrared. Finally, the re-injected CRDS system is used to measure the spectrum of several volatile organic compounds, demonstrating the improved ability to resolve weakly absorbing spectroscopic features.

  14. Measurement of erosion rate by absorption spectroscopy in a Hall thruster

    SciTech Connect

    Yamamoto, Naoji; Yokota, Shigeru; Matsui, Makoto; Komurasaki, Kimiya; Arakawa, Yoshihiro

    2005-08-15

    The erosion rate of a Hall thruster was estimated with the objective of building a real-time erosion rate monitoring system using a 1 kW class anode layer type Hall thruster. This system aids the understanding of the tradeoff between lifetime and performance. To estimate the flux of the sputtered wall material, the number density of the sputtered iron was measured by laser absorption spectroscopy using an absorption line from ground atomic iron at 371.9935 nm. An ultravioletAl{sub x}In{sub y}Ga{sub (1-x-y)}N diode laser was used as the probe. The estimated number density of iron was 1.1x10{sup 16} m{sup -3}, which is reasonable when compared with that measured by duration erosion tests. The relation between estimated erosion rate and magnetic flux density also agreed with that measured by duration erosion tests.

  15. Picosecond time-resolved X-ray absorption spectroscopy of ultrafast aluminum plasmas.

    PubMed

    Audebert, P; Renaudin, P; Bastiani-Ceccotti, S; Geindre, J-P; Chenais-Popovics, C; Tzortzakis, S; Nagels-Silvert, V; Shepherd, R; Matsushima, I; Gary, S; Girard, F; Peyrusse, O; Gauthier, J-C

    2005-01-21

    We have used point-projection K-shell absorption spectroscopy to infer the ionization and recombination dynamics of transient aluminum plasmas. Two femtosecond beams of the 100 TW laser at the LULI facility were used to produce an aluminum plasma on a thin aluminum foil (83 or 50 nm), and a picosecond x-ray backlighter source. The short-pulse backlighter probed the aluminum plasma at different times by adjusting the delay between the two femtosecond driving beams. Absorption x-ray spectra at early times are characteristic of a dense and rather homogeneous plasma. Collisional-radiative atomic physics coupled with hydrodynamic simulations reproduce fairly well the measured average ionization as a function of time. PMID:15698184

  16. Reconstruction of an excited-state molecular wave packet with attosecond transient absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Yan; Chini, Michael; Wang, Xiaowei; González-Castrillo, Alberto; Palacios, Alicia; Argenti, Luca; Martín, Fernando; Chang, Zenghu

    2016-08-01

    Attosecond science promises to allow new forms of quantum control in which a broadband isolated attosecond pulse excites a molecular wave packet consisting of a coherent superposition of multiple excited electronic states. This electronic excitation triggers nuclear motion on the molecular manifold of potential energy surfaces and can result in permanent rearrangement of the constituent atoms. Here, we demonstrate attosecond transient absorption spectroscopy (ATAS) as a viable probe of the electronic and nuclear dynamics initiated in excited states of a neutral molecule by a broadband vacuum ultraviolet pulse. Owing to the high spectral and temporal resolution of ATAS, we are able to reconstruct the time evolution of a vibrational wave packet within the excited B'Σ1u+ electronic state of H2 via the laser-perturbed transient absorption spectrum.

  17. Absorption spectroscopy of wire-array plasma at the non-radiative stage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, V. V.; Hakel, P.; Mancini, R. C.; Wiewior, P.; Durmaz, T.; Anderson, A.; Astanovitskiy, A.; Chalyy, O.; Altemara, S. D.; Papp, D.; McKee, E.; Chittenden, J. P.; Niasse, N.; Shevelko, A. P.

    2010-11-01

    Absorption spectroscopy was applied to 1 MA wire-array Z-pinches. The 50 TW Leopard laser was coupled with the Zebra generator for x-ray backlighting of wire arrays. Wire-array plasmas were investigated at the ablation and implosion stages. Broadband x-ray radiation from a laser produced Sm plasma was used to backlight Al star wire arrays in the range of 7-9 å. Two time-integrated x-ray conical spectrometers recorded reference and main spectra. The backlighting radiation was separated from the powerful Z-pinch x-ray burst by collimators. A comparison of the backlighting radiation spectra that passed through the plasma with reference spectra indicates absorption lines in the range of 8.2-8.4 å. A plasma density profile was simulated with a 3D resistive MHD code. Simulations with atomic kinetics models derived an electron temperature of Al wire-array plasma.

  18. Improved Sensitivity for Frequency Modulation Laser Absorption Spectroscopy.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shum, Chi-Man

    1990-01-01

    We have developed and implemented a two-tone harmonic frequency modulation technique to reduce the residue amplitude modulation (RAM) background in frequency modulation (FM) laser absorption spectroscopy. This RAM noise, generated during electro-optically phase modulating the laser carrier, is several orders of magnitude larger than the shot-noise detection limit. When our two-tone method was used, the RAM signal was reduced by a factor of 4. We have also provided a thorough signal-to-noise analysis which leads to a detection limit consistent with out experimental results. A vital element in the work of FM spectroscopy is the electro-optic phase modulator. We have designed and fabricated two phase modulators, both employing a lithium tantalate single crystal. The first device is a broad -band design called the traveling wave phase modulator. With microstrip transmission line construction techniques, the impedance of the device is matched to 50 Omega within a bandwidth of more than 500 MHz. The second modulator was a novel design built to provide enhanced modulation index at a resonant frequency tunable over a frequency range of approximately 350 MHz. This resonant modulator can provide the same modulation efficiency as that from the traveling wave device with as much as 50% less modulation power. Both modulators have useful applications in FM spectroscopy depending on the experimental conditions.

  19. Monitoring of volcanic sulphur dioxide emissions using differential absorption lidar (DIAL), differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS), and correlation spectroscopy (COSPEC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weibring, P.; Edner, H.; Svanberg, S.; Cecchi, G.; Pantani, L.; Ferrara, R.; Caltabiano, T.

    1998-10-01

    The total fluxes of sulphur dioxide from the Italian volcanoes Etna, Stromboli, and Vulcano were studied using optical remote sensing techniques in three shipborne field experiments (1992, 1994, and 1997). The main purpose of the experiments was to compare active (laser) techniques with passive monitoring. Differential absorption lidar (DIAL) measurements were implemented by placing the Swedish mobile lidar system on board the Italian research vessel Urania, sailing under the volcanic plumes. Simultaneously, the passive differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS) technique was used for assessing the total overhead gas burden. Finally, correlation spectroscopy (COSPEC) was also implemented in one of the campaigns. Differences in integrated gas column assessment are expected and observed, mostly connected to complex scattering conditions influencing the passive measurements. Since such measurements are much employed in routine volcanic monitoring it is of great interest to model and provide corrections to the raw data obtained. Lidar measurements proved to be quite useful for this purpose. By combining the integrated gas concentration over the plume cross section with wind velocity data, SO2 fluxes of the order of 1000, 100, and 10 tonnes/day were measured for Mt. Etna, Stromboli, and Vulcano, respectively.

  20. Electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry determination of molybdenum in whole blood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burguera, J. L.; Rondón, C.; Burguera, M.; Roa, M. E.; Petit de Peña, Y.

    2002-03-01

    A method for the determination of molybdenum in whole blood by atomic absorption spectrometry with electrothermal atomization was developed and evaluated. Erbium (25 μg) was chosen from several potential chemical modifiers (Sm, Lu, Ho, Eu and Pd+Mg) as the most appropriate for the sensitive and reliable determination of molybdenum in such sample. The process used was direct dilution of the sample in a ratio 1:2 with a 0.1% (v/v) Triton X-100 solution. The injection of 20 μl of a solution of 15% (w/v) hydrogen peroxide and running the temperature program after 5 firings greatly reduced the effect of build-up of carbonaceous residues within the atomizer. The limit of detection and working ranges, respectively, were 0.6 and 2.0-100.0 μg l -1, and the characteristic mass was 7.2 pg. The relative standard deviation varied from 0.8 to 1.5% for within and between batch determinations, respectively. The determination of molybdenum in Seronorm™ Trace Elements in Whole Blood with known added amounts of the analyte was performed to asses the accuracy. The optimized procedure has been applied to the determination of molybdenum in whole blood specimens of 20 subjects taken before and 10-12 h after receiving an over-supply of 1 mg of molybdenum. The molybdenum concentrations (±S.D.) were 10.9±0.4 μg Mo l -1 (range 9.9-11.6 μg Mo l -1) and 15.4±0.4 μg Mo l -1 (range 13.1-16.9 μg Mo l -1) for the individuals before and after the administration of molybdenum.

  1. Solving a Mock Arsenic-Poisoning Case Using Atomic Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarr, Matthew A.

    2001-01-01

    A new upper-level undergraduate atomic spectroscopy laboratory procedure has been developed that presents a realistic problem to students and asks them to assist in solving it. Students are given arsenic-laced soda samples from a mock crime scene. From these samples, they are to gather evidence to help prosecute a murder suspect. The samples are analyzed by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy or by atomic absorbance spectroscopy to determine the content of specific metal impurities. By statistical comparison of the samples' composition, the students determine if the soda samples can be linked to arsenic found in the suspect's home. As much as possible, the procedures and interpretations are developed by the students. Particular emphasis is placed on evaluating the limitations and capabilities of the analytical method with respect to the demands of the problem.

  2. Structural Characterization of CO-Inhibited Mo-Nitrogenase by Combined Application of Nuclear Resonance Vibrational Spectroscopy, Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure, and Density Functional Theory: New Insights into the Effects of CO Binding and the Role of the Interstitial Atom

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The properties of CO-inhibited Azotobacter vinelandii (Av) Mo-nitrogenase (N2ase) have been examined by the combined application of nuclear resonance vibrational spectroscopy (NRVS), extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS), and density functional theory (DFT). Dramatic changes in the NRVS are seen under high-CO conditions, especially in a 188 cm–1 mode associated with symmetric breathing of the central cage of the FeMo-cofactor. Similar changes are reproduced with the α-H195Q N2ase variant. In the frequency region above 450 cm–1, additional features are seen that are assigned to Fe-CO bending and stretching modes (confirmed by 13CO isotope shifts). The EXAFS for wild-type N2ase shows evidence for a significant cluster distortion under high-CO conditions, most dramatically in the splitting of the interaction between Mo and the shell of Fe atoms originally at 5.08 Å in the resting enzyme. A DFT model with both a terminal −CO and a partially reduced −CHO ligand bound to adjacent Fe sites is consistent with both earlier FT-IR experiments, and the present EXAFS and NRVS observations for the wild-type enzyme. Another DFT model with two terminal CO ligands on the adjacent Fe atoms yields Fe-CO bands consistent with the α-H195Q variant NRVS. The calculations also shed light on the vibrational “shake” modes of the interstitial atom inside the central cage, and their interaction with the Fe-CO modes. Implications for the CO and N2 reactivity of N2ase are discussed. PMID:25275608

  3. Modular L-design of hydride atomizers for atomic absorption spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Řezáčová, Olga; Dědina, Jiří

    2009-07-01

    A novel modular L-shaped design of hydride atomizer for atomic absorption spectrometry is described. It makes it possible to replace the optical tube of the atomizer and, mainly, to employ optical tubes made also from other materials than fused quartz. The design is useful mainly for further improvement of hydride atomizers based on the multiatomizer concept. Employing selenium hydride as the analyte and arsine as the interferent, a preliminary evaluation of performance of three types of L-shaped multiatomizers based on various optical tubes in terms of sensitivity, linearity of calibration graph and resistance to atomization interferences is made. The "classical" T-shaped multiatomizer was employed as a reference. The L-shaped multiatomizer with the optical tube analogous to that employed in the "classical" T-shaped multiatomizer offers virtually the same performance as the reference multiatomizer. Optical tube made of fused quartz with holes with smaller diameters does not offer significantly better performance compared to the reference T-shaped multiatomizer. However, the L-shaped multiatomizer with optical tube fabricated from porous quartz glass overpowers all the other multiatomizers substantially in terms of the resistance against interferences: even the maximum As interferent concentration of 5 µg ml - 1 does not significantly influence the observed signal. This should be compared with multiatomizers based on plain fused quartz tubes with holes: tolerance limit around 0.5 µg ml - 1 ; interferent concentration of 1 µg ml - 1 causing 20% signal depression.

  4. Single-atom electron energy loss spectroscopy of light elements

    PubMed Central

    Senga, Ryosuke; Suenaga, Kazu

    2015-01-01

    Light elements such as alkali metal (lithium, sodium) or halogen (fluorine, chlorine) are present in various substances and indeed play significant roles in our life. Although atomic behaviours of these elements are often a key to resolve chemical or biological activities, they are hardly visible in transmission electron microscope because of their smaller scattering power and higher knock-on probability. Here we propose a concept for detecting light atoms encaged in a nanospace by means of electron energy loss spectroscopy using inelastically scattered electrons. In this method, we demonstrate the single-atom detection of lithium, fluorine, sodium and chlorine with near-atomic precision, which is limited by the incident probe size, signal delocalization and atomic movement in nanospace. Moreover, chemical shifts of lithium K-edge have been successfully identified with various atomic configurations in one-dimensional lithium compounds. PMID:26228378

  5. Decoherence Spectroscopy Theory and Application with an Atom Interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trubko, Raisa; Cronin, Alexander

    2016-05-01

    We developed decoherence spectroscopy as a method to improve the accuracy of a tune-out wavelength (λzero) measurement made with atom interferometry. Specifically, we used atom interference fringe contrast loss as a function of laser frequency in order to monitor Doppler shifts. This was particularly helpful since we used a multi-pass cavity to recycle laser light in this experiment. The resulting decoherence spectra have non-intuitive features. Therefore we present a theoretical model for decoherence spectroscopy and compare this model to several empirical examples.

  6. Sub millimeter absorption spectroscopy of oxygen containing fluorocarbon etching plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benck, Eric; Siegrist, Karen

    2004-09-01

    The role of oxygen in fluorocarbon etching plasmas is investigated using sub millimeter wavelength absorption spectroscopy. The plasmas were created in a specially modified capacitively coupled Gaseous Electronics Conference (GEC) Reference Reactor with a commercial electrostatic chuck. Photoresist and SiO2 blanket coated wafers were etched in C_4F_8/O_2/Ar, C_5F_8/O_2/Ar, and C_4F_6/O_2/Ar discharges. The absolute density of various radicals (CF, CF_2, CHF_3, COF_2, CO, etc.) were measured as a function of the percentage of oxygen in the feed gas mixture using a sub millimeter source based on a 48x frequency multiplication chain. These results are also compared with C_xF_y/O_2/Xe mixtures.

  7. La Saturated Absorption Spectroscopy for Applications in Quantum Information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, Patrick; Donoghue, Liz; Dungan, Kristina; Liu, Jackie; Olmschenk, Steven

    2015-05-01

    Quantum information may revolutionize computation and communication by utilizing quantum systems based on matter quantum bits and entangled light. Ions are excellent candidates for quantum bits as they can be well-isolated from unwanted external influences by trapping and laser cooling. Doubly-ionized lanthanum in particular shows promise for use in quantum information as it has infrared transitions in the telecom band, with low attenuation in standard optical fiber, potentially allowing for long distance information transfer. However, the hyperfine splittings of the lowest energy levels, required for laser cooling, have not been measured. We present progress and recent results towards measuring the hyperfine splittings of these levels in lanthanum by saturated absorption spectroscopy with a hollow cathode lamp. This research is supported by the Army Research Office, Research Corporation for Science Advancement, and Denison University.

  8. Investigating Actinide Molecular Adducts From Absorption Edge Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Den Auwer, C.; Conradson, S.D.; Guilbaud, P.; Moisy, P.; Mustre de Leon, J.; Simoni, E.; /SLAC, SSRL

    2006-10-27

    Although Absorption Edge Spectroscopy has been widely applied to the speciation of actinide elements, specifically at the L{sub III} edge, understanding and interpretation of actinide edge spectra are not complete. In that sense, semi-quantitative analysis is scarce. In this paper, different aspects of edge simulation are presented, including semi-quantitative approaches. Comparison is made between various actinyl (U, Np) aquo or hydroxy compounds. An excursion into transition metal osmium chemistry allows us to compare the structurally related osmyl and uranyl hydroxides. The edge shape and characteristic features are discussed within the multiple scattering picture and the role of the first coordination sphere as well as contributions from the water solvent are described.

  9. High Resolution Absorption Spectroscopy using Externally Dispersed Interferometry

    SciTech Connect

    Edelstein, J; Erskine, D J

    2005-07-06

    We describe the use of Externally Dispersed Interferometry (EDI) for high-resolution absorption spectroscopy. By adding a small fixed-delay interferometer to a dispersive spectrograph, a precise fiducial grid in wavelength is created over the entire spectrograph bandwidth. The fiducial grid interacts with narrow spectral features in the input spectrum to create a moire pattern. EDI uses the moire pattern to obtain new information about the spectra that is otherwise unavailable, thereby improving spectrograph performance. We describe the theory and practice of EDI instruments and demonstrate improvements in the spectral resolution of conventional spectrographs by a factor of 2 to 6. The improvement of spectral resolution offered by EDI can benefit space instruments by reducing spectrograph size or increasing instantaneous bandwidth.

  10. Simultaneous surface plasmon resonance and x-ray absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Serrano, A; Rodríguez de la Fuente, O; Collado, V; Rubio-Zuazo, J; Monton, C; Castro, G R; García, M A

    2012-08-01

    We present an experimental setup for the simultaneous measurement of surface plasmon resonance (SPR) and x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) on metallic thin films at a synchrotron beamline. The system allows measuring in situ and in real time the effect of x-ray irradiation on the SPR curves to explore the interaction of x-rays with matter. It is also possible to record XAS spectra while exciting SPR in order to study changes in the films induced by the excitation of surface plasmons. Combined experiments recording simultaneously SPR and XAS curves while scanning different parameters can be also carried out. The relative variations in the SPR and XAS spectra that can be detected with this setup range from 10(-3) to 10(-5), depending on the particular experiment. PMID:22938268

  11. Simultaneous surface plasmon resonance and x-ray absorption spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Serrano, A.; Rodriguez de la Fuente, O.; Collado, V.; Rubio-Zuazo, J.; Castro, G. R.; Monton, C.; Garcia, M. A.

    2012-08-15

    We present an experimental setup for the simultaneous measurement of surface plasmon resonance (SPR) and x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) on metallic thin films at a synchrotron beamline. The system allows measuring in situ and in real time the effect of x-ray irradiation on the SPR curves to explore the interaction of x-rays with matter. It is also possible to record XAS spectra while exciting SPR in order to study changes in the films induced by the excitation of surface plasmons. Combined experiments recording simultaneously SPR and XAS curves while scanning different parameters can be also carried out. The relative variations in the SPR and XAS spectra that can be detected with this setup range from 10{sup -3} to 10{sup -5}, depending on the particular experiment.

  12. Temperature and pressure measurement based on tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy with gas absorption linewidth detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Yunxia; Liu, Tiegen; Liu, Kun; Jiang, Junfeng; Wang, Tao; Wang, Ranran

    2014-11-01

    A gas temperature and pressure measurement method based on Tunable Diode Laser Absorption Spectroscopy (TDLAS) detecting linewidth of gas absorption line was proposed in this paper. Combined with Lambert-Beer Law and ideal gas law, the relationship between temperature, pressure and gas linewidth with Lorentzian line shape was investigated in theory. Taking carbon monoxide (CO) at 1567.32 nm for example, the linewidths of gas absorption line in different temperatures and pressures were obtained by simulation. The relationship between the linewidth of second harmonic and temperature, pressure with the coefficient 0.025 pm/K and 0.0645 pm/kPa respectively. According to the relationship of simulation results and detected linewidth, the undefined temperature and pressure of CO gas were measured. The gas temperature and pressure measurement based on linewidth detection, avoiding the influence of laser intensity, is an effective temperature and pressure measurement method. This method also has the ability to detect temperature and pressure of other gases with Lorentzian line shape.

  13. Measurement of Gas Temperature in Negative Hydrogen Ion Source by Wavelength-Modulated Laser Absorption Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishiyama, S.; Sasaki, K.; Nakano, H.; Goto, M.; Kisaki, M.; Tsumori, K.; NIFS-NBI Team

    2014-10-01

    Measurement of the energy distribution of hydrogen atom is important and essential to understand the production mechanism of its negative ion (H-) in cesium-seeded negative ion sources. In this work, we evaluated the temperature of atomic hydrogen in the large-scale arc-discharge negative hydrogen ion source in NIFS by wavelength-modulated laser absorption spectroscopy. The laser beam was passed through the adjacent region to the grid electrode for extracting negative ions. The frequency of the laser was scanned slowly over the whole range of the Doppler width (100 GHz in 1s). A sinusoidal frequency modulation at 600 Hz with a width of 30 GHz was superposed onto the slow modulation. The transmitted laser was detected using a photodiode, and its second harmonic component of the sinusoidal modulation was amplified using a lock-in amplifier. The obtained spectrum was in good agreement with an expected spectrum of the Doppler-broadened Balmer- α line. The estimated temperature of atomic hydrogen was approximately 3000 K. The absorption increased with the arc-discharge power, while the temperature was roughly independent of the power. This work is supported by the NIFS Collaboration Research Program NIFS13KLER021.

  14. Non-destructive plant health sensing using absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bledsoe, Jim; Manukian, Ara; Pearce, Michael; Weiss, Lee

    1988-01-01

    The sensor group of the 1988 EGM 4001 class, working on NASA's Controlled Ecological Life Support Systems (CELSS) project, investigated many different plant health indicators and the technologies used to test them. The project selected by the group was to measure chlorophyll levels using absorption spectroscopy. The spectrometer measures the amount of chlorophyll in a leaf by measuring the intensity of light of a specific wavelength that is passed through a leaf. The three wavelengths of light being used corresponded to the near-IR absorption peaks of chlorophyll a, chlorophyll b, and chlorophyll-free structures. Experimentation showed that the sensor is indeed measuring levels of chlorophyll a and b and their changes before the human eye can see any changes. The detector clamp causes little damage to the leaf and will give fairly accurate readings on similar locations on a leaf, freeing the clamp from having to remain on the same spot of a leaf for all measurements. External light affects the readings only slightly so that measurements may be taken in light or dark environments. Future designs and experimentation will concentrate on reducing the size of the sensor and adapting it to a wider range of plants.

  15. High-dispersion absorption-line spectroscopy of AE Aqr

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Echevarría, J.; Smith, Robert Connon; Costero, R.; Zharikov, S.; Michel, R.

    2008-07-01

    High-dispersion time-resolved spectroscopy of the unique magnetic cataclysmic variable AE Aqr is presented. A radial velocity analysis of the absorption lines yields K2 = 168.7 +/- 1kms-1. Substantial deviations of the radial velocity curve from a sinusoid are interpreted in terms of intensity variations over the secondary star's surface. A complex rotational velocity curve as a function of orbital phase is detected which has a modulation frequency of twice the orbital frequency, leading to an estimate of the binary inclination angle that is close to 70°. The minimum and maximum rotational velocities are used to indirectly derive a mass ratio of q = 0.6 and a radial velocity semi-amplitude of the white dwarf of K1 = 101 +/- 3kms-1. We present an atmospheric temperature indicator, based on the absorption-line ratio of FeI and CrI lines, whose variation indicates that the secondary star varies from K0 to K4 as a function of orbital phase. The ephemeris of the system has been revised, using more than 1000 radial velocity measurements, published over nearly five decades. From the derived radial velocity semi-amplitudes and the estimated inclination angle, we calculate that the masses of the stars are M1 = 0.63 +/- 0.05Msolar M2 = 0.37 +/- 0.04Msolar, and their separation is a = 2.33 +/- 0.02Rsolar. Our analysis indicates the presence of a late-type star whose radius is larger, by a factor of nearly 2, than the radius of a normal main-sequence star of the same mass. Finally, we discuss the possibility that the measured variations in the rotational velocity, temperature and spectral type of the secondary star as functions of orbital phase may, like the radial velocity variations, be attributable to regions of enhanced absorption on the star's surface.

  16. Spectroscopy for cold atom gases in periodically modulated optical lattice potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tokuno, Akiyuki; Giamarchi, Thierry

    2011-03-01

    Cold atoms in optical lattices are vigorously studied experimentally and theoretically as one of the candidates for a quantum simulator. At the same time, further development of probes to microscopic structure of systems is needed. We propose a novel spectroscopy in cold atom experiments by use of periodic phase-modulation of optical lattice potentials. Corresponding to the statistics of atoms, we formulate the different observables: The energy absorption rate for bosonic atom gases, and the doublon production rate for fermionic atom gases. These observables are formulated within the linear response theory. Interestingly they are given by the imaginary part of the retarded current-current correlation function which is familiar as a quantity corresponding to an optical conductivity. As an example, we discuss one-dimensional Mott insulating state, and also compare our spectroscopy with another known spectroscopy by amplitude-modulation of an optical lattice. This work was supported in part by the Swiss SNF under MaNEP and division II.

  17. An x-ray absorption spectroscopy study of Mo oxidation in Pb at elevated temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Shanshan; Olive, Daniel; Terry, Jeff; Segre, Carlo U.

    2009-06-30

    The corrosion of fuel cladding and structural materials by lead and lead-bismuth eutectic in the liquid state at elevated temperatures is an issue that must be considered when designing advanced nuclear systems and high-power spallation neutron targets. In this work, lead corrosion studies of molybdenum were performed to investigate the interaction layer as a function of temperature by X-ray absorption spectroscopy. In situ X-ray absorption measurements on a Mo substrate with a 3-6 {micro}m layer of Pb deposited by thermal evaporation were performed at temperatures up to 900 C and at a 15{sup o} angle to the incident X-rays. The changes in the local atomic structure of the corrosion layer are visible in the difference extended X-ray absorption fine structure and the linear combination fitting of the X-ray absorption near-edge structure to as-deposited molybdenum sample and molybdenum oxide (MoO{sub 2} and MoO{sub 3}) standards. The data are consistent with the appearance of MoO{sub 3} in an intermediate temperature range (650-800 C) and the more stable MoO{sub 2} phase dominating at high and low temperatures.

  18. Method for laser spectroscopy of metastable pionic helium atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hori, M.; Sótér, A.; Aghai-Khozani, H.; Barna, D.; Dax, A.; Hayano, R. S.; Murakami, Y.; Yamada, H.

    2015-08-01

    The PiHe collaboration is currently attempting to carry out laser spectroscopy of metastable pionic helium atoms using the high-intensity π - beam of the ring cyclotron facility of the Paul Scherrer Institute. These atoms are heretofore hypothetical three-body Coulomb systems each composed of a helium nucleus, a π - occupying a Rydberg state, and an electron occupying the 1s ground state. We briefly review the proposed method by which we intend to detect the laser spectroscopic signal. This complements our experiments on metastable antiprotonic helium atoms at CERN.

  19. Determination of maduramicin by liquid chromatography with atomic absorption spectrometric detection.

    PubMed

    Johnson, N A

    1989-01-01

    A liquid chromatograph was interfaced to an atomic absorption spectrometer for the detection and quantitation of maduramicin in feed matrixes at the 1-8 ppm level. Ionophores in general form strong 1:1 products with various metal cations, yielding complexes that are insoluble in water but very soluble in organic solvents. Maduramicin, a carboxylic, polyalcohol, polyether antibiotic, is labeled with the sodium cation and analyzed by atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS). The lower limit of detection is approximately 100-200 ng maduramicin sodium salt. Feeds containing 1-8 ppm maduramicin are extracted with acetone, the extract is passed through an alumina column, the column is eluted with acetonitrile-water (90 + 10), and the eluate is analyzed for maduramicin by liquid chromatography-AAS after concentration and conversion of maduramicin to the sodium salt. Recoveries of maduramicin averaged 89.5%. Liquid chromatography with AAS detection has been shown to be a sensitive and highly specific technique for the determination of ionophores in general and maduramicin in particular. PMID:2708270

  20. Chemical state of Ag in Conducting Bridge Random Access Memory cells: a depth resolved X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy investigation.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    d'Acapito, F.; Souchier, E.; Noe, P.; Blaise, P.; Bernard, M.; Jousseaume, V.

    2016-05-01

    Conducting Bridge Random Access Memories (CBRAM) are a promising substitute for FLASH technology but problems with limited retention of the low resistance ON state still hamper their massive deployment. Depth resolved X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy has been used to describe the chemical state of the atoms of the active electrode (in this case Ag) and to reveal the role of Sb as stabilizer of the metallic state.

  1. SPECTRW: A software package for nuclear and atomic spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalfas, C. A.; Axiotis, M.; Tsabaris, C.

    2016-09-01

    A software package to be used in nuclear and atomic spectroscopy is presented. Apart from analyzing γ and X-ray spectra, it offers many additional features such as de-convolution of multiple photopeaks, sample analysis and activity determination, detection system evaluation and an embedded code for spectra simulation.

  2. Single atom identification by energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Lovejoy, T. C.; Dellby, N.; Krivanek, O. L.; Ramasse, Q. M.; Falke, M.; Kaeppel, A.; Terborg, R.; Zan, R.

    2012-04-09

    Using aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscope and energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy, single, isolated impurity atoms of silicon and platinum in monolayer and multilayer graphene are identified. Simultaneously acquired electron energy loss spectra confirm the elemental identification. Contamination difficulties are overcome by employing near-UHV sample conditions. Signal intensities agree within a factor of two with standardless estimates.

  3. Perforated hollow-core optical waveguides for on-chip atomic spectroscopy and gas sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giraud-Carrier, M.; Hill, C.; Decker, T.; Black, J. A.; Schmidt, H.; Hawkins, A.

    2016-03-01

    A hollow-core waveguide structure for on-chip atomic spectroscopy is presented. The devices are based on Anti-Resonant Reflecting Optical Waveguides and may be used for a wide variety of applications which rely on the interaction of light with gases and vapors. The designs presented here feature short delivery paths of the atomic vapor into the hollow waveguide. They also have excellent environmental stability by incorporating buried solid-core waveguides to deliver light to the hollow cores. Completed chips were packaged with an Rb source and the F = 3 ≥ F' = 2, 3, 4 transitions of the D2 line in 85Rb were monitored for optical absorption. Maximum absorption peak depths of 9% were measured.

  4. Gas in Scattering Media Absorption Spectroscopy -- Laser Spectroscopy in Unconventional Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svanberg, Sune

    2010-02-01

    An overview of the new field of Gas in Scattering Media Absorption Spectroscopy (GASMAS) is presented. The GASMAS technique combines narrow-band diode-laser spectroscopy with optical propagation in diffuse media. Whereas solids and liquids have broad absorption features, free gas in pores and cavities in the material is characterized by sharp spectral signatures. These are typically 10,000 times sharper than those of the host material. Many applications in materials science, food packaging, pharmaceutics and medicine have been demonstrated. Molecular oxygen and water vapor have been studied around 760 and 935 nm, respectively. Liquid water, an important constituent in many natural materials, such as tissue, has a low absorption at such wavelengths, allowing propagation. Polystyrene foam, wood, fruits, food-stuffs, pharmaceutical tablets, and human sinus cavities have been studied, demonstrating new possibilities for characterization and diagnostics. Transport of gas in porous media can readily be studied by first immersing the material in, e.g., pure nitrogen gas, and then observing the rate at which normal air, containing oxygen, reinvades the material. The conductance of the human sinus connective passages can be measured in this way by flushing the nasal cavity with nitrogen, while breathing normally through the mouth. A clinical study comprising 40 patients has been concluded.

  5. Quantitative investigation of two metallohydrolases by X-ray absorption spectroscopy near-edge spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, W.; Chu, W. S.; Yang, F. F.; Yu, M. J.; Chen, D. L.; Guo, X. Y.; Zhou, D. W.; Shi, N.; Marcelli, A.; Niu, L. W.; Teng, M. K.; Gong, W. M.; Benfatto, M.; Wu, Z. Y.

    2007-09-01

    The last several years have witnessed a tremendous increase in biological applications using X-ray absorption spectroscopy (BioXAS), thanks to continuous advancements in synchrotron radiation (SR) sources and detector technology. However, XAS applications in many biological systems have been limited by the intrinsic limitations of the Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (EXAFS) technique e.g., the lack of sensitivity to bond angles. As a consequence, the application of the X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy changed this scenario that is now continuously changing with the introduction of the first quantitative XANES packages such as Minut XANES (MXAN). Here we present and discuss the XANES code MXAN, a novel XANES-fitting package that allows a quantitative analysis of experimental data applied to Zn K-edge spectra of two metalloproteins: Leptospira interrogans Peptide deformylase ( LiPDF) and acutolysin-C, a representative of snake venom metalloproteinases (SVMPs) from Agkistrodon acutus venom. The analysis on these two metallohydrolases reveals that proteolytic activities are correlated to subtle conformation changes around the zinc ion. In particular, this quantitative study clarifies the occurrence of the LiPDF catalytic mechanism via a two-water-molecules model, whereas in the acutolysin-C we have observed a different proteolytic activity correlated to structural changes around the zinc ion induced by pH variations.

  6. Current Status of Atomic Spectroscopy Databases at NIST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kramida, Alexander; Ralchenko, Yuri; Reader, Joseph

    2016-05-01

    NIST's Atomic Spectroscopy Data Center maintains several online databases on atomic spectroscopy. These databases can be accessed via the http://physics.nist.gov/PhysRefData web page. Our main database, Atomic Spectra Database (ASD), recently upgraded to v. 5.3, now contains critically evaluated data for about 250,000 spectral lines and 109,000 energy levels of almost all elements in the periodic table. This new version has added several thousand spectral lines and energy levels of Sn II, Mo V, W VIII, and Th I-III. Most of these additions contain critically evaluated transition probabilities important for astrophysics, technology, and fusion research. A new feature of ASD is providing line-ratio data for diagnostics of electron temperature and density in plasmas. Saha-Boltzmann plots have been modified by adding an experimental feature allowing the user to specify a multi-element mixture. We continue regularly updating our bibliography databases, ensuring comprehensive coverage of current literature on atomic spectra for energy levels, spectral lines, transition rates, hyperfine structure, isotope shifts, Zeeman and Stark effects. Our other popular databases, such as the Handbook of Basic Atomic Spectroscopy Data, searchable atlases of spectra of Pt-Ne and Th-Ne lamps, and non-LTE plasma-kinetics code comparisons, continue to be maintained.

  7. Light absorption during alkali atom-noble gas atom interactions at thermal energies: a quantum dynamics treatment.

    PubMed

    Pacheco, Alexander B; Reyes, Andrés; Micha, David A

    2006-10-21

    The absorption of light during atomic collisions is treated by coupling electronic excitations, treated quantum mechanically, to the motion of the nuclei described within a short de Broglie wavelength approximation, using a density matrix approach. The time-dependent electric dipole of the system provides the intensity of light absorption in a treatment valid for transient phenomena, and the Fourier transform of time-dependent intensities gives absorption spectra that are very sensitive to details of the interaction potentials of excited diatomic states. We consider several sets of atomic expansion functions and atomic pseudopotentials, and introduce new parametrizations to provide light absorption spectra in good agreement with experimentally measured and ab initio calculated spectra. To this end, we describe the electronic excitation of the valence electron of excited alkali atoms in collisions with noble gas atoms with a procedure that combines l-dependent atomic pseudopotentials, including two- and three-body polarization terms, and a treatment of the dynamics based on the eikonal approximation of atomic motions and time-dependent molecular orbitals. We present results for the collision induced absorption spectra in the Li-He system at 720 K, which display both atomic and molecular transition intensities. PMID:17059261

  8. X-ray absorption spectroscopy elucidates the impact of structural disorder on electron mobility in amorphous zinc-tin-oxide thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Siah, Sin Cheng E-mail: buonassisi@mit.edu; Lee, Yun Seog; Buonassisi, Tonio E-mail: buonassisi@mit.edu; Lee, Sang Woon; Gordon, Roy G.; Heo, Jaeyeong; Shibata, Tomohiro; Segre, Carlo U.

    2014-06-16

    We investigate the correlation between the atomic structures of amorphous zinc-tin-oxide (a-ZTO) thin films grown by atomic layer deposition (ALD) and their electronic transport properties. We perform synchrotron-based X-ray absorption spectroscopy at the K-edges of Zn and Sn with varying [Zn]/[Sn] compositions in a-ZTO thin films. In extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) measurements, signal attenuation from higher-order shells confirms the amorphous structure of a-ZTO thin films. Both quantitative EXAFS modeling and X-ray absorption near edge spectroscopy (XANES) reveal that structural disorder around Zn atoms increases with increasing [Sn]. Field- and Hall-effect mobilities are observed to decrease with increasing structural disorder around Zn atoms, suggesting that the degradation in electron mobility may be correlated with structural changes.

  9. Determination of gold in geologic materials by solvent extraction and atomic-absorption spectrometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Huffman, Claude; Mensik, J.D.; Riley, L.B.

    1967-01-01

    The two methods presented for the determination of traces of gold in geologic materials are the cyanide atomic-absorption method and the fire-assay atomic-absorption method. In the cyanide method gold is leached with a sodium-cyanide solution. The monovalent gold is then oxidized to the trivalent state and concentrated by extracting into methyl isobutyl ketone prior to estimation by atomic absorption. In the fire-assay atomic-absorption method, the gold-silver bead obtained from fire assay is dissolved in nitric and hydrochloric acids. Gold is then concentrated by extracting into methyl isobutyl ketone prior to determination by atomic absorption. By either method concentrations as low as 50 parts per billion of gold can be determined in a 15-gram sample.

  10. X-ray absorption spectroscopy of bacterial sulfur globules

    SciTech Connect

    George, Graham N.

    2002-08-01

    Sulfur K-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy is a powerful in situ probe of sulfur biochemistry in intact cells and tissues. Under favorable circumstances the technique can provide quantitative information on the chemical identify of the sulfur species that are present in a sample. Prange et al. have recently reported an X-ray absorption spectroscopic study of bacterial sulfur storage globules. Unfortunately there are substantial problems with the experimental technique employed that, they contend, lead to completely erroneous conclusions. In the more recent of their two papers Prange et al. employed a curve-fitting method similar to that used by us (for more than 10 years). In essence, the method employs simply fitting a linear combination of the spectra of standard compounds to that of the unknown, in this case cultures of bacterial cells. This type of analysis can provide quantitative estimates of the individual sulfur types in the sample, but is critically dependent upon the choice of reference spectra. Prange et al. deduce substantial differences between the chemical forms of sulfur stored in the globules of different organisms; they conclude that the globules of Beggiatoa alba and Thiomargarita namibiensis contain cyclo-octasulfur (S{sub 8}), while those of other organisms contain polythionates (Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans) and polymeric sulfur (e.g. Allochromatium vinosum). This is in contradiction with an earlier study, in which they found that sulfur in all globule species examined resembled that expected for various sized spherical particles of S{sub 8}. The discrepancy is due to an experimental artefact in the work of Prange et al. arising from their choice of transmittance detection, which is also discussed.

  11. Cavity-Enhanced Absorption Spectroscopy and Photoacoustic Spectroscopy for Human Breath Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wojtas, J.; Tittel, F. K.; Stacewicz, T.; Bielecki, Z.; Lewicki, R.; Mikolajczyk, J.; Nowakowski, M.; Szabra, D.; Stefanski, P.; Tarka, J.

    2014-12-01

    This paper describes two different optoelectronic detection techniques: cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopy and photoacoustic spectroscopy. These techniques are designed to perform a sensitive analysis of trace gas species in exhaled human breath for medical applications. With such systems, the detection of pathogenic changes at the molecular level can be achieved. The presence of certain gases (biomarkers), at increased concentration levels, indicates numerous human diseases. Diagnosis of a disease in its early stage would significantly increase chances for effective therapy. Non-invasive, real-time measurements, and high sensitivity and selectivity, capable of minimum discomfort for patients, are the main advantages of human breath analysis. At present, monitoring of volatile biomarkers in breath is commonly useful for diagnostic screening, treatment for specific conditions, therapy monitoring, control of exogenous gases (such as bacterial and poisonous emissions), as well as for analysis of metabolic gases.

  12. Absorption and emission spectroscopy of individual semiconductor nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDonald, Matthew P.

    The advent of controllable synthetic methods for the production of semiconductor nanostructures has led to their use in a host of applications, including light-emitting diodes, field effect transistors, sensors, and even television displays. This is, in part, due to the size, shape, and morphologically dependent optical and electrical properties that make this class of materials extremely customizable; wire-, rod- and sphere-shaped nanocrystals are readily synthesized through common wet chemical methods. Most notably, confining the physical dimension of the nanostructure to a size below its Bohr radius (aB) results in quantum confinement effects that increase its optical energy gap. Not only the size, but the shape of a particle can be exploited to tailor its optical and electrical properties. For example, confined CdSe quantum dots (QDs) and nanowires (NWs) of equivalent diameter possess significantly different optical gaps. This phenomenon has been ascribed to electrostatic contributions arising from dielectric screening effects that are more pronounced in an elongated (wire-like) morphology. Semiconducting nanostructures have thus received significant attention over the past two decades. However, surprisingly little work has been done to elucidate their basic photophysics on a single particle basis. What has been done has generally been accomplished through emission-based measurements, and thus does not fully capture the full breadth of these intriguing systems. What is therefore needed then are absorption-based studies that probe the size and shape dependent evolution of nanostructure photophysics. This thesis summarizes the single particle absorption spectroscopy that we have carried out to fill this knowledge gap. Specifically, the diameter-dependent progression of one-dimensional (1D) excitonic states in CdSe NWs has been revealed. This is followed by a study that focuses on the polarization selection rules of 1D excitons within single CdSe NWs. Finally

  13. Absorption-free Bragg reflector using Zeeman sublevels in atomic vapor.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhongjie; Luo, Bin; Guo, Hong

    2014-06-30

    Absorption-free Bragg reflector has been studied in ions doped in crystals. We propose a new scheme using Zeeman sublevels of atoms to construct an absorption-free Bragg reflector with practical laser power. Its spatial period of refractive index equals half of the wavelength of the incident standing-wave coupling light. The proposal is simulated in a helium atom scheme, and can be extended to alkali earth atoms. PMID:24977814

  14. Electrothermal atomic absorption spectrophotometry of nickel in tissue homogenates.

    PubMed

    Sunderman, F W; Marzouk, A; Crisostomo, M C; Weatherby, D R

    1985-01-01

    A method for analysis of Ni concentrations in tissues is described, which involves (a) tissue dissection with metal-free obsidian knives, (b) tissue homogenization in polyethylene bags by use of a "Stomacher" blender, (c) oxidative digestion with mixed nitric, sulfuric, and perchloric acids, and (d) quantitation of Ni by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrophotometry with Zeeman background correction. The detection limit for Ni in tissues is 10 ng per g, dry weight; the coefficient of variation ranges from 7 to 15 percent, depending on the tissue Ni concentration; the recovery of Ni added in concentration of 20 ng per g, dry weight, to kidney homogenates averages 101 +/- 8 percent (mean +/- SD). In control rats, Ni concentrations are highest in lung (102 +/- 39 ng per g, dry weight) and lowest in spleen (35 +/- 16 ng per g, dry wt.). In descending order of Ni concentrations, the tissues of control rats rank as follows: lung greater than heart greater than bone greater than kidney greater than brain greater than testis greater than fat greater than liver greater than spleen. In rats killed 24 h after sc injection of NiCl2 (0.125 mmol per kg, body weight) Ni concentrations are highest in kidney (17.7 +/- 2.5 micrograms per g, dry weight) and lowest in brain (0.38 +/- 0.14 micrograms per g, dry weight). In descending order of Ni concentrations, the tissues of NiCl2-treated rats rank as follows: kidney much greater than lung greater than spleen greater than testis greater than heart greater than fat greater than liver greater than bone greater than brain.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:4037701

  15. Electrothermal atomic absorption spectrophotometry of nickel in tissue homogenates

    SciTech Connect

    Sunderman, F.W. Jr.; Marzouk, A.; Crisostomo, M.C.; Weatherby, D.R.

    1985-01-01

    A method for analysis of Ni concentrations in tissues is described, which involves (a) tissue dissection with metal-free obsidian knives, (b) tissue homogenization in polyethylene bags by use by a Stomacher blender, (c) oxidative digestion with mixed nitric, sulfuric, and perchloric acids, and (d) quantitation of Ni by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrophotometry with Zeeman background correction. The detection limit for Ni in tissues is 10 ng per g, dry weight; the coefficient of variation ranges from 7 to 15%, depending on the tissue Ni concentration; the recovery of Ni added in concentration of 20 ng per g, dry weight, to kidney homogenates averages 101 +/- 8% (mean +/-SD). In control rats, Ni concentrations are highest in lung (102 +/- 39 ng per g, dry weight) and lowest in spleen (35 +/- 16 ng per g, dry wt.). In descending order of Ni concentrations, the tissues of control rats rank as follows: lung > heart > bone > kidney > brain > testis > fat > liver > spleen. In rats killed 24 h after sc injection of NiCl/sub 2/ (0.125 mmol per kg, body weight) Ni concentrations are highest in kidney (17.7 +/- 2.5 ..mu..g per g, dry weight) and lowest in brain (0.38 +/- 0.14 ..mu..g per g, dry weight). In descending order of Ni concentrations, the tissues of NiCl/sub 2/-treated rats rank as follows: kidney >> lung > spleen > testis > heart > fat > liver > bone > brain. The present method fills the need for an accurate, sensitive, and practical technique to determine tissue Ni concentrations, with stringent precautions to minimize Ni contamination during tissue sampling and processing. 35 references, 5 figures, 1 table.

  16. Photo-induced dynamics in heterocyclic aromatic molecules probed by femtosecond XUV transient absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lackner, Florian; Chatterley, Adam S.; Pemmaraju, Chaitanya D.; Neumark, Daniel M.; Leone, Stephen R.; Gessner, Oliver

    2016-05-01

    We report on the ring-opening and dissociation dynamics of strong-field ionized selenophene (C4 H4 Se), studied by transient XUV absorption spectroscopy at the Se 3d edge. The table-top experiments are facilitated by high-order harmonic generation coupled with a gas phase transient XUV absorption setup that is optimized for the study of organic compounds. Employing element-specific core-to-valence transitions, the ultrafast molecular dynamics are monitored from the perspective of the well-localized Se atoms. Spectral features are assigned based on first principles TDDFT calculations for a large manifold of electronic states. We observe signatures of rapidly (~ 35 fs) decaying highly excited molecular cations, the formation of ring-opened products on a 100 fs time scale and, most notably, the elimination of bare Se+ ions in a very rapid multi-step process. A delayed onset of the Se+ ions provides direct evidence that both selenium-carbon bonds are broken within only ~ 130 fs and that a sequential mechanism, presumably an initial ring-opening followed by a subsequent breaking of the second bond, is required to eliminate the atomic fragments.

  17. X-ray-absorption-spectroscopy study of manganese-containing compounds and photosynthetic spinach chloroplasts

    SciTech Connect

    Kirby, J.A.

    1981-05-01

    The manganese sites in chloroplasts, long thought to be involved in photosynthetic oxygen evolution have been examined and partially characterized by x-ray Absorption Spectroscopy (XAS) using synchrotron radiation. The local environment about the manganese atoms is estimated from an analysis of the extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (EXAFS). Comparisons with and simulations of the manganese EXAFS for several reference compounds leads to a model in which the chloroplast manganese atoms are contained in a binuclear complex similar to di-u-oxo-tetrakis-(2,2'-bipyridine) dimanganese. It is suggested that the partner metal is another manganese. The bridging ligands are most probably oxygen. The remaining manganese ligands are carbon, oxygen, or nitrogen. A roughly linear correlation between the X-ray K edge onset energy and the coordination charge of a large number of manganese coordination complexes and compounds has been developed. Entry of the chloroplast manganese edge energy onto this correlation diagram establishes that the active pool of manganese is in an oxidation state greater than +2.

  18. X-Ray Absorption Spectroscopy Imaging of Biological Tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pickering, Ingrid J.; George, Graham N.

    2007-02-01

    X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) is proving invaluable in determining the average chemical form of metals or metalloids in intact biological tissues. As most tissues have spatial structure, there is great additional interest in visualizing the spatial location of the metal(loid) as well as its chemical forms. XAS imaging gives the opportunity of producing maps of specific chemical types of elements in vivo in dilute biological systems. X-ray fluorescence microprobe techniques are routinely used to study samples with spatial heterogeneity. Microprobe produces elemental maps, with chemical sensitivity obtained by recording micro-XAS spectra at selected point locations on the map. Unfortunately, using these procedures spatial detail may be lost as the number of point spectra recorded generally is limited. A powerful extension of microprobe is XAS imaging or chemically specific imaging. Here, the incident energy is tuned to features in the near-edge which are characteristic of the expected chemical forms of the element. With a few simple assumptions, these XAS images can then be converted to quantitative images of specific chemical form, yielding considerable clarity in the distributions.

  19. X-Ray Absorption Spectroscopy of Dinuclear Metallohydrolases

    PubMed Central

    Tierney, David L.; Schenk, Gerhard

    2014-01-01

    In this mini-review, we briefly discuss the physical origin of x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) before illustrating its application using dinuclear metallohydrolases as exemplary systems. The systems we have selected for illustrative purposes present a challenging problem for XAS, one that is ideal to demonstrate the potential of this methodology for structure/function studies of metalloenzymes in general. When the metal ion is redox active, XAS provides a sensitive measure of oxidation-state-dependent differences. When the metal ion is zinc, XAS is the only spectroscopic method that will provide easily accessible structural information in solution. In the case of heterodimetallic sites, XAS has the unique ability to interrogate each metal site independently in the same sample. One of the strongest advantages of XAS is its ability to examine metal ion site structures with crystallographic precision, without the need for a crystal. This is key for studying flexible metal ion sites, such as those described in the selected examples, because it allows one to monitor structural changes that occur during substrate turnover. PMID:25229134

  20. Decay Heat Measurements Using Total Absorption Gamma-ray Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rice, S.; Valencia, E.; Algora, A.; Taín, J. L.; Regan, P. H.; Podolyák, Z.; Agramunt, J.; Gelletly, W.; Nichols, A. L.

    2012-09-01

    A knowledge of the decay heat emitted by thermal neutron-irradiated nuclear fuel is an important factor in ensuring safe reactor design and operation, spent fuel removal from the core, and subsequent storage prior to and after reprocessing, and waste disposal. Decay heat can be readily calculated from the nuclear decay properties of the fission products, actinides and their decay products as generated within the irradiated fuel. Much of the information comes from experiments performed with HPGe detectors, which often underestimate the beta feeding to states at high excitation energies. This inability to detect high-energy gamma emissions effectively results in the derivation of decay schemes that suffer from the pandemonium effect, although such a serious problem can be avoided through application of total absorption γ-ray spectroscopy (TAS). The beta decay of key radionuclei produced as a consequence of the neutron-induced fission of 235U and 239Pu are being re-assessed by means of this spectroscopic technique. A brief synopsis is given of the Valencia-Surrey (BaF2) TAS detector, and their method of operation, calibration and spectral analysis.

  1. Atom-wall interactions and their role in the spectroscopy of spatially constrained atomic vapors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vartanyan, T. A.; Khromov, V. V.; Przhibelskii, S. G.; Pazgalev, A. S.

    2013-03-01

    Atom-wall interactions play an unexpectedly important role in the atomic spectroscopy. J.L. Cojan was the first who observed and then interpreted the effects of the atom-wall interactions on the reflection spectra in the vicinity of the atomic spectral line. His observation was made on the mercury vapors of such a low concentration that the Doppler width was much larger than the homogeneous width of the atomic transition. Surprisingly, the width of the spectral line he observed in reflection was much smaller than the Doppler width. He pointed out that the atoms those leave the window posses a transient rather than the stationary polarization. This is the reason why their contribution to the reflected field differs from what was expected. M. Ducloy employed the tiny distortions of these narrow resonances in reflection spectra to measure for the first time the van der Waals constants in the excited atomic states. In our work we considered reflection from a narrow slice of atomic vapors and found a manifold of spectral line shapes depending on the width of the vapor slice that have nothing in common with the Fabri-Perot resonances. It was not until the invention of an Extremely Thin Cell (ETC) by D. Sarkisyan that the observation of these effects becomes possible in the optical domain. In the subsequent years ETC proved to be a very powerful tool of modern spectroscopy.

  2. Intracavity Dye-Laser Absorption Spectroscopy (IDLAS) for application to planetary molecules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lang, Todd M.; Allen, John E., Jr.

    1990-01-01

    Time-resolved, quasi-continuous wave, intracavity dye-laser absorption spectroscopy is applied to the investigation of absolute absorption coefficients for vibrational-rotational overtone bands of water at visible wavelengths. Emphasis is placed on critical factors affecting detection sensitivity and data analysis. Typical generation-time dependent absorption spectra are given.

  3. Uranium isotopes quantitatively determined by modified method of atomic absorption spectrophotometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, G. H.

    1967-01-01

    Hollow-cathode discharge tubes determine the quantities of uranium isotopes in a sample by using atomic absorption spectrophotometry. Dissociation of the uranium atoms allows a large number of ground state atoms to be produced, absorbing the incident radiation that is different for the two major isotopes.

  4. ODS steel raw material local structure analysis using X-ray absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cintins, A.; Anspoks, A.; Purans, J.; Kuzmin, A.; Timoshenko, J.; Vladimirov, P.; Gräning, T.; Hoffmann, J.

    2015-03-01

    Oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) steels are promising materials for fusion power reactors, concentrated solar power plants, jet engines, chemical reactors as well as for hydrogen production from thermolysis of water. In this study we used X-ray absorption spectroscopy at the Fe and Cr K-edges as a tool to get insight into the local structure of ferritic and austenitic ODS steels around Fe and Cr atoms and its transformation during mechanical alloying process. Using the analysis of X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) and extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) we found that for austenitic samples a transformation of ferritic steel to austenitic steel is detectable after 10 hours of milling and proceeds till 40 hours of milling; only small amount of a-phase remains after 80 hours of milling. We found that the Cr K-edge EXAFS can be used to observe distortions inside the material and to get an impression on the formation of chromium clusters. In-situ EXAFS experiments offer a reliable method to investigate the ferritic to austenitic transformation.

  5. Initial Results of Optical Vortex Laser Absorption Spectroscopy in the HYPER-I Device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshimura, Shinji; Asai, Shoma; Aramaki, Mitsutoshi; Terasaka, Kenichiro; Ozawa, Naoya; Tanaka, Masayoshi; Morisaki, Tomohiro

    2015-11-01

    Optical vortex beams have a potential to make a new Doppler measurement, because not only parallel but perpendicular movement of atoms against the beam axis causes the Doppler shift of their resonant absorption frequency. As the first step of a proof-of-principle experiment, we have performed the optical vortex laser absorption spectroscopy for metastable argon neutrals in an ECR plasma produced in the HYPER-I device at the National Institute for Fusion Science, Japan. An external cavity diode laser (TOPTICA, DL100) of which center wavelength was 696.735 nm in vacuum was used for the light source. The Hermite-Gaussian (HG) beam was converted into the Laguerre-Gaussian (LG) beam (optical vortex) by a computer-generated hologram displayed on the spatial light modulator (Hamamatsu, LCOS-SLM X10468-07). In order to make fast neutral flow across the LG beam, a high speed solenoid valve system was installed on the HYPER-I device. Initial results including the comparison of absorption spectra for HG and LG beams will be presented. This study was supported by NINS young scientists collaboration program for cross-disciplinary study, NIFS collaboration research program (NIFS13KOAP026), and JSPS KAKENHI grant number 15K05365.

  6. Low-loss electron energy loss spectroscopy: An atomic-resolution complement to optical spectroscopies and application to graphene

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Kapetanakis, Myron; Zhou, Wu; Oxley, Mark P.; Lee, Jaekwang; Prange, Micah P.; Pennycook, Stephen J.; Idrobo Tapia, Juan Carlos; Pantelides, Sokrates T.

    2015-09-25

    Photon-based spectroscopies have played a central role in exploring the electronic properties of crystalline solids and thin films. They are a powerful tool for probing the electronic properties of nanostructures, but they are limited by lack of spatial resolution. On the other hand, electron-based spectroscopies, e.g., electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS), are now capable of subangstrom spatial resolution. Core-loss EELS, a spatially resolved analog of x-ray absorption, has been used extensively in the study of inhomogeneous complex systems. In this paper, we demonstrate that low-loss EELS in an aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscope, which probes low-energy excitations, combined with amore » theoretical framework for simulating and analyzing the spectra, is a powerful tool to probe low-energy electron excitations with atomic-scale resolution. The theoretical component of the method combines density functional theory–based calculations of the excitations with dynamical scattering theory for the electron beam. We apply the method to monolayer graphene in order to demonstrate that atomic-scale contrast is inherent in low-loss EELS even in a perfectly periodic structure. The method is a complement to optical spectroscopy as it probes transitions entailing momentum transfer. The theoretical analysis identifies the spatial and orbital origins of excitations, holding the promise of ultimately becoming a powerful probe of the structure and electronic properties of individual point and extended defects in both crystals and inhomogeneous complex nanostructures. The method can be extended to probe magnetic and vibrational properties with atomic resolution.« less

  7. Low-loss electron energy loss spectroscopy: An atomic-resolution complement to optical spectroscopies and application to graphene

    SciTech Connect

    Kapetanakis, Myron; Zhou, Wu; Oxley, Mark P.; Lee, Jaekwang; Prange, Micah P.; Pennycook, Stephen J.; Idrobo Tapia, Juan Carlos; Pantelides, Sokrates T.

    2015-09-25

    Photon-based spectroscopies have played a central role in exploring the electronic properties of crystalline solids and thin films. They are a powerful tool for probing the electronic properties of nanostructures, but they are limited by lack of spatial resolution. On the other hand, electron-based spectroscopies, e.g., electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS), are now capable of subangstrom spatial resolution. Core-loss EELS, a spatially resolved analog of x-ray absorption, has been used extensively in the study of inhomogeneous complex systems. In this paper, we demonstrate that low-loss EELS in an aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscope, which probes low-energy excitations, combined with a theoretical framework for simulating and analyzing the spectra, is a powerful tool to probe low-energy electron excitations with atomic-scale resolution. The theoretical component of the method combines density functional theory–based calculations of the excitations with dynamical scattering theory for the electron beam. We apply the method to monolayer graphene in order to demonstrate that atomic-scale contrast is inherent in low-loss EELS even in a perfectly periodic structure. The method is a complement to optical spectroscopy as it probes transitions entailing momentum transfer. The theoretical analysis identifies the spatial and orbital origins of excitations, holding the promise of ultimately becoming a powerful probe of the structure and electronic properties of individual point and extended defects in both crystals and inhomogeneous complex nanostructures. The method can be extended to probe magnetic and vibrational properties with atomic resolution.

  8. Ionization and dissociation dynamics of vinyl bromide probed by femtosecond extreme ultraviolet transient absorption spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Ming-Fu; Neumark, Daniel M.; Gessner, Oliver; Leone, Stephen R.

    2014-02-14

    Strong-field induced ionization and dissociation dynamics of vinyl bromide, CH{sub 2}=CHBr, are probed using femtosecond extreme ultraviolet (XUV) transient absorption spectroscopy. Strong-field ionization is initiated with an intense femtosecond, near infrared (NIR, 775 nm) laser field. Femtosecond XUV pulses covering the photon energy range of 50-72 eV probe the subsequent dynamics by measuring the time-dependent spectroscopic features associated with transitions of the Br (3d) inner-shell electrons to vacancies in molecular and atomic valence orbitals. Spectral signatures are observed for the depletion of neutral C{sub 2}H{sub 3}Br, the formation of C{sub 2}H{sub 3}Br{sup +} ions in their ground (X{sup ~}) and first excited (A{sup ~}) states, the production of C{sub 2}H{sub 3}Br{sup ++} ions, and the appearance of neutral Br ({sup 2}P{sub 3/2}) atoms by dissociative ionization. The formation of free Br ({sup 2}P{sub 3/2}) atoms occurs on a timescale of 330 ± 150 fs. The ionic A{sup ~} state exhibits a time-dependent XUV absorption energy shift of ∼0.4 eV within the time window of the atomic Br formation. The yield of Br atoms correlates with the yield of parent ions in the A{sup ~} state as a function of NIR peak intensity. The observations suggest that a fraction of vibrationally excited C{sub 2}H{sub 3}Br{sup +} (A{sup ~}) ions undergoes intramolecular vibrational energy redistribution followed by the C–Br bond dissociation. The C{sub 2}H{sub 3}Br{sup +} (X{sup ~}) products and the majority of the C{sub 2}H{sub 3}Br{sup ++} ions are relatively stable due to a deeper potential well and a high dissociation barrier, respectively. The results offer powerful new insights about orbital-specific electronic processes in high field ionization, coupled vibrational relaxation and dissociation dynamics, and the correlation of valence hole-state location and dissociation in polyatomic molecules, all probed simultaneously by ultrafast table-top XUV spectroscopy.

  9. Infrared Absorption Spectroscopy and Chemical Kinetics of Free Radicals, Final Technical Report

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Curl, Robert F.; Glass, Graham P.

    2004-11-01

    This research was directed at the detection, monitoring, and study of the chemical kinetic behavior by infrared absorption spectroscopy of small free radical species thought to be important intermediates in combustion. Work on the reaction of OH with acetaldehyde has been completed and published and work on the reaction of O({sup 1}D) with CH{sub 4} has been completed and submitted for publication. In the course of our investigation of branching ratios of the reactions of O({sup 1}D) with acetaldehyde and methane, we discovered that hot atom chemistry effects are not negligible at the gas pressures (13 Torr) initially used. Branching ratios of the reaction of O({sup 1}D) with CH{sub 4} have been measured at a tenfold higher He flow and fivefold higher pressure.

  10. Localized high spin states in transition-metal dimers: X-ray absorption spectroscopy study

    SciTech Connect

    Lau, J. T.; Hirsch, K.; Langenberg, A.; Probst, J.; Richter, R.; Rittmann, J.; Vogel, M.; Zamudio-Bayer, V.; Moeller, T.; Issendorff, B. von

    2009-06-15

    X-ray absorption spectroscopy provides direct evidence for localized valence electrons in Cr{sub 2}{sup +}, Mn{sub 2}{sup +}, and CrMn{sup +} dimer cations. Bonding in these transition-metal molecules is predominantly mediated by 4s electrons. This behavior is markedly different from other 3d transition-metal dimers with open 3d subshells and can be ascribed to the highly stable 3d{sup 5}({sup 6}S) configuration of the 3d subshell in chromium and manganese atoms and ions. In Cr{sub 2}{sup +}, Mn{sub 2}{sup +}, and CrMn{sup +}, 3d electron localization indicates local high spin states.

  11. Structural analysis of sulfur in natural rubber using X-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Pattanasiriwisawa, Wanwisa; Siritapetawee, Jaruwan; Patarapaiboolchai, Orasa; Klysubun, Wantana

    2008-09-01

    X-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy (XANES) has been applied to natural rubber in order to study the local environment of sulfur atoms in sulfur crosslinking structures introduced in the vulcanization process. Different types of chemical accelerators in conventional, semi-efficient and efficient vulcanization systems were investigated. The experimental results show the good sensitivity and reproducibility of XANES to characterize the local geometry and electronic environment of the sulfur K-shell under various conditions of vulcanization and non-vulcanization of natural rubber. Several applications of XANES in this study demonstrate an alternative way of identifying sulfur crosslinks in treated natural rubber based on differences in their spectra and oxidation states. PMID:18728323

  12. VUV Absorption Spectroscopy of a Penning Surface - Negative Hydrogen Ion Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pitcher, Eric John

    The demand for energetic, high-current H ^- beams is ever-growing. Because H ^- is efficiently neutralized at high energies, these beams are ideally suited to applications where energetic neutral beams of particles are required to propagate across magnetic fields. Prime examples are neutral-beam heating of magnetic fusion plasmas and directed-energy weapons for ballistic missile defense. Such applications place demanding requirements on sources of H^ - ions, particularly with respect to the parameters of beam current, brightness, quiescence, reliability, and duty-factor. A class of sources that holds great promise for meeting these stringent requirements is the surface-plasma source (SPS), and in particular, the Penning type of SPS. It has long been conjectured that atomic hydrogen plays an important role in both H^- formation and transport in these sources. Understanding the interdependence of atomic hydrogen properties and those of H^ -, and how this relationship might be exploited to improve source performance is the motivation for this research. An overview of SPS's is presented. Previous measurements on the discharge are reviewed. Absorption spectroscopy, the diagnostic technique used to gather all of the data presented here, is discussed. Techniques that may potentially be used to measure the properties of H^ - in the discharge are discussed. The two absorption spectrometers used in this experiment are described. Measurements of ground-state atomic hydrogen density and temperature in a Penning SPS are presented. These measurements are the first of this kind for this type of discharge. An upper limit on the H^- density in the extraction region of the source is measured by the application of a novel diagnostic technique: the hydrogen atom density following H^- photodetachment by a Nd:YAG beam is measured and compared to the equilibrium atomic density. A simple model is derived that describes the dependence of the atomic temperature on the externally

  13. Vacuum ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy of atoms and molecules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Samson, J. A. R.

    1978-01-01

    For a complete study of the photoionization of atoms and molecules it is essential to make use of the technique of Photoelectron Spectroscopy and the continuum characteristics of synchrotron radiation. A brief review is given of the application of the above techniques in measuring partial photoionization cross sections and the angular distribution assymetry parameter beta. Selected results are given, which are compared to theoretical values.

  14. Atomic photoelectron-spectroscopy studies using synchrotron radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Kobrin, P.H.

    1983-02-01

    Photoelectron spectroscopy combined with tunable synchrotron radiation has been used to study the photoionization process in several atomic systems. The time structure of the synchrotron radiation source at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory (SSRL) was used to record time-of-flight (TOF) photoelectron spectra of gaseous Cd, Hg, Ne, Ar, Ba, and Mn. The use of two TOF analyzers made possible the measurement of photoelectron angular distributions as well as branching ratios and partial cross sections.

  15. Rapid analysis with transversely heated graphite furnace atomic absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhang; Carnrick, Glen; Slavin, Walter

    1993-09-01

    A new graphite furnace instrument using a transversely heated furnace tube with a longitudinal Zeeman correction system has been specifically designed to provide more nearly stabilized temperature platform furnace (STPF) conditions than previous furnace systems. Because there are no cold ends on this furnace tube on which to condense analyte and matrix materials, the vapor phase interferences are expected to be smaller. Also, the cooldown step can be avoided, thus saving time. This instrument permits the delivery of sample into a furnace already heated. The delivery rate of the autosampler can be slowed. These opportunities make it feasible for the sample to be dry on the platform by the time the delivery is complete. Several elements of environmental significance were chosen for test: As, Pb, Se, Tl, Cd, Cu, Cr and V. In almost all of these situations, the analyte was fully recovered without using a matrix modifier or a pyrolysis step. However, As and Pb in urine and As in sediment required a modifier and pyrolysis step for accurate results. A new fast furnace protocol was developed to accommodate use of a matrix modifier and this new protocol was successful for Pb and As in these matrices. All the procedures required less than 1 min total cycle times and produced results in agreement with certified values. This is in contrast with conventional methods which require 2-3 min per firing. These results confirm that graphite furnace methods can be accomplished with a throughput greater than 60 determinations per hour, and eventually, it may be possible to increase this rate beyond 100 determinations per hour.

  16. Evaluation of electrochemical generation of volatile zinc hydride by heated quartz tube atomizer atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Arbab-Zavar, Mohammad-Hossein; Chamsaz, Mahmoud; Youssefi, Abbas; Aliakbari, Mostafa

    2012-01-01

    Electrochemical hydride generation (EcHG) as a sample introduction system for determination of zinc was developed. It was directly coupled to an electrically heated quartz tube atomizer (QTA) atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS) system. The hydride generator is a laboratory-made semi-batch electrolytic cell that consists of a lead-tin alloy cathode and a platinum anode. The effects of typical parameters on the generation efficiency of the technique, such as types of cathode material and catholyte and anolyte solutions, were studied. The influences of numerical experimental operating parameters on the analytical signal were evaluated in detail and optimum conditions were obtained. The analytical figures of merit for the developed method were determined. The calibration curve was linear up to 300 ng mL(-1) of Zn. A concentration detection limit (3σ, n = 9) of 11 ng mL(-1) Zn and a relative standard deviation of 5.0% (RSD, n = 9) for 200 ng mL(-1) Zn were accessed. In addition, the susceptibility of interference from various ions was evaluated. The accuracy of the method was verified by determination of Zn in a certified reference material and in tap water. The achieved concentrations were found to be in good agreement with both the certified value and the data obtained using flame AAS. PMID:22790376

  17. Atomic-absorption determination of beryllium in geological materials by use of electrothermal atomization

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Campbell, E.Y.; Simon, F.O.

    1978-01-01

    A method is described for the atomic-absorption determination of beryllium in geological materials, that utilizes electrothermal atomization after a separation by solvent extraction. Samples are decomposed with hydrofluoric acid and nitric acid in Teflon-lined pressure decomposition vessels. Beryllium is isolated by its extraction as beryllium acetylacetonate at pH 8 into xylene and back-extraction in 3M hydrochloric acid. The method has been successfully applied to the determination of beryllium in 14 U.S. Geological Survey standard rocks. Four subsamples from four bottles of each standard sample were analysed in random order. The mean beryllium contents (ppm) are: AGV-1, 1.98; PCC-1, 0.024; MAG-1, 2.84; BHVO-1, 0.90; DTS-1, 0.026; SCo-1, 1.74; SDC-1, 2.52; BCR-1, 1.44; GSP-1, 1.22; SGR-1, 0.86; QLO-1, 1.83; RGM-1, 2.21; STM-1, 8.75; G-2, 2.29. An analysis of variance shows that all the samples may be considered homogeneous at F0.95 except AGV-1 and DTS-1 which may be considered homogeneous at F0.99. ?? 1978.

  18. Cascaded two-photon spectroscopy of Yb atoms with a transportable effusive atomic beam apparatus.

    PubMed

    Song, Minsoo; Yoon, Tai Hyun

    2013-02-01

    We present a transportable effusive atomic beam apparatus for cascaded two-photon spectroscopy of the dipole-forbidden transition (6s(2)(1)S0↔ 6s7s (1)S0) of Yb atoms. An ohmic-heating effusive oven is designed to have a reservoir volume of 1.6 cm(3) and a high degree of atomic beam collimation angle of 30 mrad. The new atomic beam apparatus allows us to detect the spontaneously cascaded two-photons from the 6s7s(1)S0 state via the intercombination 6s6p(3)P1 state with a high signal-to-noise ratio even at the temperature of 340 °C. This is made possible in our apparatus because of the enhanced atomic beam flux and superior detection solid angle. PMID:23464193

  19. X-ray absorption spectroscopy measurements of thin foil heating by Z-pinch radiation.

    PubMed

    MacFarlane, J J; Bailey, J E; Chandler, G A; Deeney, C; Douglas, M R; Jobe, D; Lake, P; Nash, T J; Nielsen, D S; Spielman, R B; Wang, P; Woodruff, P

    2002-10-01

    Absorption spectroscopy measurements of the time-dependent heating of thin foils exposed to intense z-pinch radiation sources are presented. These measurements and their analysis provide valuable benchmarks for, and insights into, the radiative heating of matter by x-ray sources. Z-pinch radiation sources with peak powers of up to 160 TW radiatively heated thin plastic-tamped aluminum foils to temperatures approximately 60 eV. The foils were located in open slots at the boundary of z-pinch hohlraums surrounding the pinch. Time-resolved Kalpha satellite absorption spectroscopy was used to measure the evolution of the Al ionization distribution, using a geometry in which the pinch served as the backlighter. The time-dependent pinch radius and x-ray power were monitored using framing camera, x-ray diode array, and bolometer measurements. A three-dimensional view factor code, within which one-dimensional (1D) radiation-hydrodynamics calculations were performed for each surface element in the view factor grid, was used to compute the incident and reemitted radiation flux distribution throughout the hohlraum and across the foil surface. Simulated absorption spectra were then generated by postprocessing radiation-hydrodynamics results for the foil heating using a 1D collisional-radiative code. Our simulated results were found to be in good general agreement with experimental x-ray spectra, indicating that the spectral measurements are consistent with independent measurements of the pinch power. We also discuss the sensitivity of our results to the spectrum of the radiation field incident on the foil, and the role of nonlocal thermodynamic equilibrium atomic kinetics in affecting the spectra. PMID:12443339

  20. Nocturnal Measurements of HONO by Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wojtal, P.; McLaren, R.

    2011-12-01

    Differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS) was used to quantify the concentration of HONO, NO2 and SO2 in the nocturnal urban atmosphere at York University over a period of one year. These measurements form a comprehensive HONO data set, including a large range of temperatures, relative humidity, surface conditions (snow, water, dry, etc.) and NO2 concentrations. Laboratory studies and observations within the nocturnal boundary layer reported in the literature suggest heterogeneous conversion of NO2 on surface adsorbed water as the major nighttime source of HONO. HONO formation and photolysis is believed to represent a major source term in the hydroxyl radical budget in polluted continental regions. Currently, most air quality models tend to significantly underpredict HONO, caused by the lack of understanding of HONO formation processes and the parameters that affect its concentration. Recently, we reported nocturnal pseudo steady states (PSS) of HONO in an aqueous marine environment and a conceptual model for HONO formation on aqueous surfaces was proposed. The data set collected at York University is being analyzed with a view towards further understanding the nighttime HONO formation mechanism and testing several hypotheses: 1) A HONO PSS can exist during certain times at night in an urban area in which the HONO concentration is independent of NO2, given the surface contains sufficient water coverage and is saturated with nitrogen containing precursors; 2) The concentration of HONO is positively correlated with temperature during periods where a PSS exists; 3) Different conversion efficiencies of NO2 to HONO exist on dry, wet and snow surfaces; 4) HONO formation has a NO2 order dependence between 0 and 2nd order, dependant on NO2 concentration, relative humidity, etc. The data set will be presented along with statistical analysis that sheds new light on the source of HONO in urban areas at night.

  1. Cavity Enhanced absorption spectroscopy with an Optical Comb: Detection of atmospheric radicals in the near UV.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Méjean, G.; Kassi, S.; Romanini, D.

    2009-04-01

    spectrograph (HR4 Jobin-Yvon) and collected with a cooled CCD linear array (1024 pixels). As the cavity finesse was measured by the ringdown time, and the IO absorption cross section is known, we could estimate that we had produced 0.2 ppbv of IO. The absorption noise level (7E-10cm-1 after 10s averaging) corresponded to a detection limit of 3 ppt par racine de Hertz. It is to be noted that the mirrors yielding a finesse of 6000 around 436 nm were centered at 460 nm, where the cavity finesse was measured to be about 20 000. Moreover, modern solid state ML lasers are compact and could function reliably in environmental research stations. The spectral range from 500 down to 225 nm, accessible by efficient frequency doubling and tripling, includes strong absorption bands of important species; in particular, given their known optical cross sections, we estimate detection limits in the range 1-10 pptv for IO, BrO, OClO, OIO, and OBrO, sufficient for environmental measurements. ClO, HONO, HCHO, NO2, SO2, and O3 should be detectable down to 10-100 pptvs. The OH radical should be visible at 308 nm below 0.1 pptv, not far from typical ambient concentrations. [1] T. Gherman and D. Romanini, 2002, Mode-locked cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopy, Optics Express 10, 1033-1042. [2] T. Gherman, S. Kassi, A. Campargue, and D. Romanini, 2004, Overtone spectroscopy in the blue region by Cavity-Enhanced Absorption Spectroscopy with a Mode-Locked femtosecond laser: Application to acetylene, Chem. Phys. Lett 383, 353-358. [3] T. Gherman, E. Eslami, D. Romanini, S. Kassi, J.-C. Vial, and N. Sadeghi, 2004, High sensitivity broad-band mode-locked cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopy: Measurement of Ar*(3P2) atoms and N2+ ions densities, J. Phys. D: Appl. Phys. 37, 2408-2415. [4] G. Méjean, S. Kassi, and D. Romanini, 2008, Cavity Enhanced absorption spectroscopy with an Optical Comb: Detection of atmospheric radicals in the near UV, Optics Letters. 33, 1231-1234 (2008)

  2. Spectroscopy of lithium atoms using an optical frequency comb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stalnaker, Jason; Almaguer, Jose; Sherry, Leanne

    2011-05-01

    The atomic structure of lithium (Li) has aroused a significant amount theoretical and experimental interest as a system in which precision atomic calculations and spectroscopic measurements can be united to yield scientifically significant results. While there have been many experimental investigations of Li spectroscopy, particularly of the isotope shifts and hyperfine structure on the 22S1 / 2 --> 22P1 / 2 , 3 / 2 (D 1 , D 2) transitions, they suffer from significant disagreements and systematic effects. By utilizing the optical-to-microwave frequency conversion made possible by a stabilized optical frequency comb, we will be able to resolve the discrepancies and measure the optical frequencies of the D 1 and D 2 transitions to an accuracy of 5 kHz. We present preliminary data from an atomic beam source and discuss future plans to develop a laser-cooled and trapped source. Supported by NIST Precision Measurements Grant.

  3. Nonlinear spectroscopy of Sr atoms in an optical cavity for laser stabilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christensen, Bjarke T. R.; Henriksen, Martin R.; Schäffer, Stefan A.; Westergaard, Philip G.; Tieri, David; Ye, Jun; Holland, Murray J.; Thomsen, Jan W.

    2015-11-01

    We study the nonlinear interaction of a cold sample of 88Sr atoms coupled to a single mode of a low finesse optical cavity in the so-called bad cavity limit, and we investigate the implications for applications to laser stabilization. The atoms are probed on the weak intercombination line |5 s21S0>-|5 s 5 p 3P1> at 689 nm in a strongly saturated regime. Our measured observables include the atomic induced phase shift and absorption of the light field transmitted through the cavity represented by the complex cavity transmission coefficient. We demonstrate high signal-to-noise-ratio measurements of both quadratures—the cavity transmitted phase and absorption—by employing frequency modulation (FM) spectroscopy (noise-immune cavity-enhanced optical-heterodyne molecular spectroscopy). We also show that when FM spectroscopy is employed in connection with a cavity locked to the probe light, observables are substantially modified compared to the free-space situation in which no cavity is present. Furthermore, the nonlinear dynamics of the phase dispersion slope is experimentally investigated, and the optimal conditions for laser stabilization are established. Our experimental results are compared to state-of-the-art cavity QED theoretical calculations.

  4. Correlated Single-Crystal Electronic Absorption Spectroscopy and X-ray Crystallography at NSLS Beamline X26-C

    SciTech Connect

    A Orville; R Buono; M Cowan; A Heroux; G Shea-McCarthy; D Schneider; J Skinner; M Skinner; D Stoner-Ma; R Sweet

    2011-12-31

    The research philosophy and new capabilities installed at NSLS beamline X26-C to support electronic absorption and Raman spectroscopies coupled with X-ray diffraction are reviewed. This beamline is dedicated full time to multidisciplinary studies with goals that include revealing the relationship between the electronic and atomic structures in macromolecules. The beamline instrumentation has been fully integrated such that optical absorption spectra and X-ray diffraction images are interlaced. Therefore, optical changes induced by X-ray exposure can be correlated with X-ray diffraction data collection. The installation of Raman spectroscopy into the beamline is also briefly reviewed. Data are now routinely generated almost simultaneously from three complementary types of experiments from the same sample. The beamline is available now to the NSLS general user population.

  5. Correlated single-crystal electronic absorption spectroscopy and X-ray crystallography at NSLS beamline X26-C

    SciTech Connect

    Orville, A.M.; Buono, R.; Cowan, M.; Heroux, A.; Shea-McCarthy, G.; Schneider, D. K.; Skinner, J. M.; Skinner, M. J.; Stoner-Ma, D.; Sweet, R. M.

    2011-05-01

    The research philosophy and new capabilities installed at NSLS beamline X26-C to support electronic absorption and Raman spectroscopies coupled with X-ray diffraction are reviewed. This beamline is dedicated full time to multidisciplinary studies with goals that include revealing the relationship between the electronic and atomic structures in macromolecules. The beamline instrumentation has been fully integrated such that optical absorption spectra and X-ray diffraction images are interlaced. Therefore, optical changes induced by X-ray exposure can be correlated with X-ray diffraction data collection. The installation of Raman spectroscopy into the beamline is also briefly reviewed. Data are now routinely generated almost simultaneously from three complementary types of experiments from the same sample. The beamline is available now to the NSLS general user population.

  6. Correlated single-crystal electronic absorption spectroscopy and X-ray crystallography at NSLS beamline X26-C

    PubMed Central

    Orville, Allen M.; Buono, Richard; Cowan, Matt; Héroux, Annie; Shea-McCarthy, Grace; Schneider, Dieter K.; Skinner, John M.; Skinner, Michael J.; Stoner-Ma, Deborah; Sweet, Robert M.

    2011-01-01

    The research philosophy and new capabilities installed at NSLS beamline X26-C to support electronic absorption and Raman spectroscopies coupled with X-ray diffraction are reviewed. This beamline is dedicated full time to multidisciplinary studies with goals that include revealing the relationship between the electronic and atomic structures in macromolecules. The beamline instrumentation has been fully integrated such that optical absorption spectra and X-ray diffraction images are interlaced. Therefore, optical changes induced by X-ray exposure can be correlated with X-ray diffraction data collection. The installation of Raman spectroscopy into the beamline is also briefly reviewed. Data are now routinely generated almost simultaneously from three complementary types of experiments from the same sample. The beamline is available now to the NSLS general user population. PMID:21525643

  7. X-ray absorption spectroscopy study of prototype chemical systems: Theory vs. experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwartz, Craig Philip

    Understanding the details of the intensities and spectral shapes of x-ray absorption spectra is a long-standing problem in chemistry and physics. Here, I present detailed studies of x-ray absorption for prototypical liquids, solids and gases with the goal of enhancing our general understanding of core-level spectroscopy via comparisons of modern theory and experiment. In Chapter 2, I investigate the importance of quantum motions in the x-ray absorption spectra of simple gases. It is found that rare fluctuations in atomic positions can be a cause of features in the spectra of gaseous molecules. In Chapter 3, I explore a novel quantization scheme for the excited and ground state potential surfaces for an isolated nitrogen molecule. This allows for the explicit calculation of the "correct" transition energies and peak widths (i.e. without any adjustable parameters). In Chapter 4, the importance of nuclear motion in molecular solids is investigated for glycine. We find that the inclusion of these motions permits the spectrum to be accurately calculated without any additional adjustable parameters. In Chapter 5, I provide a detailed study of the hydroxide ion solvated in water. There has been recent controversy as to how hydroxide is solvated, with two principal models invoked. I show that some of the computational evidence favoring one model of solvation over the other has been either previously obtained with inadequate precision or via a method that is systematically biased. In Chapter 6, the measured and computed x-ray absorption spectra of pyrrole in both the gas phase and when solvated by water are compared. We are able to accurately predict the spectra in both cases. In Chapter 7, the measured x-ray absorption of a series of highly charged cationic salts (YBr3, CrCl3, SnCl4 , LaCl3 and InCl3) solvated in water are presented and explained. In Chapter 8, the measured x-ray absorption spectrum at the nitrogen K-edge of aqueous triglycine is presented, including

  8. Atomic jet with ionization detection for laser spectroscopy of Rydberg atoms under collisions and fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Philip, G.

    2008-03-01

    An efficient atomic jet setup offering many unprecedented advantages over a conventional heat pipe setup used in multi-photon spectroscopy, mainly of alkaline-earth metals, has been constructed by a scheme in which the sample material is encapsulated in a disposable cartridge oven located inside a thermally stabilised heat-pipe and is made to effuse in to a row of atomic beams merging to form a jet target. This novel scheme combines the advantages of both high density atomic beam with convenient geometry for orthogonal excitation and high sensitive ionisation detection capabilities of thermionic diodes, besides eliminating several problems inherent in the usual heat-pipe operation. Out of various designs, typical results are presented for a linear heat-pipe with vertical atomic jet used in two-photon spectroscopy of highly excited states of Sr I. Controlled excitations of both Rydberg and non-Rydberg states, which cannot otherwise be accessed from the ground state due to parity and spectroscopic selection rules, have been achieved by employing a weak electric field complimented by collisions. The atomic jet setup is also found very useful for the study of collisional broadening and shift of excited states and time evolution of Rydberg atoms.

  9. Research Toward Laser Spectroscopy of Trapped Atomic Hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandberg, Jon Carl

    An apparatus has been designed and constructed to perform laser spectroscopy on magnetically trapped atomic hydrogen. Earlier experiments demonstrated the feasibility of magnetic trapping and evaporative cooling of atomic hydrogen. The current apparatus has been designed to explore two areas of research: high resolution laser spectroscopy of hydrogen, and the possible production and detection of Bose condensation. The 1S{-}2S two-photon transition was chosen for study because of its extremely narrow natural linewidth. The techniques developed here should ultimately permit laser spectroscopy with a resolution approaching 1 part in 10^{15 } and should be well suited to the detection of Bose condensation. The apparatus consists of two subsystems: a cryogenic apparatus for magnetically trapping hydrogen, and a laser source for producing the ultraviolet light necessary to excite the 1S{-}2S transition. The two subsystems have independently demonstrated exceptional performance. The magnetic trap has produced gas densities approaching 10^{14} cm ^{-3} at temperatures as low as 100 muK, the closest approach to Bose condensation achieved to date with atomic hydrogen. The continuous wave laser source has produced 20 mW of 243 nm light with an estimated spectral linewidth of 2 kHz. The optimum experimental conditions for excitation and detection of the 1S{-}2S transition in trapped hydrogen have been identified. Initial trials with the apparatus revealed an unexpected operational problem, however several strategies have been proposed that should allow observation of the transition. The expected features of the 1S{-}2S transition lineshape with magnetically trapped hydrogen have been calculated. The possibilities for future research with laser spectroscopy of magnetically trapped hydrogen are described, and a promising strategy for the detection of Bose condensation is proposed. (Copies available exclusively from MIT Libraries, Rm. 14-0551 Cambridge, MA 02139-4307. Ph. 617

  10. DETERMINATION OF TOTAL MERCURY IN FISH TISSUES USING PYROLYSIS ATOMIC ABSORPTION SPECTROMETRY WITH GOLD AMALGAMATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    A simple and rapid procedure for measuring total mercury in fish tissues is evaluated and
    compared with conventional techniques. Using an automated instrument incorporating combustion, preconcentration by amalgamation with gold, and atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS), mill...

  11. THE STANDARD CALIBRATION INSTRUMENT AUTOMATION SYSTEM FOR THE ATOMIC ABSORPTION SPECTROPHOTOMETER. PART III: PROGRAM DOCUMENTATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report contains complete documentation for the 15 programs and 11 data files of the EPA Atomic Absorption Instrument Automation System. The system incorporates the following major features: (1) multipoint calibration using first, second, or third degree regression or linear ...

  12. Microbeam x-ray absorption spectroscopy study of chromium in large-grain uranium dioxide fuel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mieszczynski, C.; Kuri, G.; Bertsch, J.; Martin, M.; Borca, C. N.; Delafoy, Ch; Simoni, E.

    2014-09-01

    Synchrotron-based microprobe x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) has been used to study the local atomic structure of chromium in chromia-doped uranium dioxide (UO2) grains. The specimens investigated were a commercial grade chromia-doped UO2 fresh fuel pellet, and materials from a spent fuel pellet of the same batch, irradiated with an average burnup of ~40 MW d kg-1. Uranium L3-edge and chromium K-edge XAS have been measured, and the structural environments of central uranium and chromium atoms have been elucidated. The Fourier transform of uranium L3-edge extended x-ray absorption fine structure shows two well-defined peaks of U-O and U-U bonds at average distances of 2.36 and 3.83 Å. Their coordination numbers are determined as 8 and 11, respectively. The chromium Fourier transform extended x-ray absorption fine structure of the pristine UO2 matrix shows similar structural features with the corresponding spectrum of the irradiated spent fuel, indicative of analogous chromium environments in the two samples studied. From the chromium XAS experimental data, detectable next neighbor atoms are oxygen and uranium of the cation-substituted UO2 lattice, and two distinct subshells of chromium and oxygen neighbors, possibly because of undissolved chromia particles present in the doped fuels. Curve-fitting analyses using theoretical amplitude and phase-shift functions of the closest Cr-O shell and calculations with ab initio computer code FEFF and atomic clusters generated from the chromium-dissolved UO2 structure have been carried out. There is a prominent reduction in the length of the adjacent Cr-O bond of about 0.3 Å in chromia-doped UO2 compared with the ideal U-O bond length in standard UO2 that would be expected because of the change in effective Coulomb interactions resulting from replacing U4+ with Cr3+ and their ionic size differences. The contraction of shortest Cr-U bond is ~0.1 Å relative to the U-U bond length in bulk UO2. The difference in the

  13. Microbeam x-ray absorption spectroscopy study of chromium in large-grain uranium dioxide fuel.

    PubMed

    Mieszczynski, C; Kuri, G; Bertsch, J; Martin, M; Borca, C N; Delafoy, Ch; Simoni, E

    2014-09-01

    Synchrotron-based microprobe x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) has been used to study the local atomic structure of chromium in chromia-doped uranium dioxide (UO2) grains. The specimens investigated were a commercial grade chromia-doped UO2 fresh fuel pellet, and materials from a spent fuel pellet of the same batch, irradiated with an average burnup of ~40 MW d kg(-1). Uranium L3-edge and chromium K-edge XAS have been measured, and the structural environments of central uranium and chromium atoms have been elucidated. The Fourier transform of uranium L3-edge extended x-ray absorption fine structure shows two well-defined peaks of U-O and U-U bonds at average distances of 2.36 and 3.83 Å. Their coordination numbers are determined as 8 and 11, respectively. The chromium Fourier transform extended x-ray absorption fine structure of the pristine UO2 matrix shows similar structural features with the corresponding spectrum of the irradiated spent fuel, indicative of analogous chromium environments in the two samples studied. From the chromium XAS experimental data, detectable next neighbor atoms are oxygen and uranium of the cation-substituted UO2 lattice, and two distinct subshells of chromium and oxygen neighbors, possibly because of undissolved chromia particles present in the doped fuels. Curve-fitting analyses using theoretical amplitude and phase-shift functions of the closest Cr-O shell and calculations with ab initio computer code FEFF and atomic clusters generated from the chromium-dissolved UO2 structure have been carried out. There is a prominent reduction in the length of the adjacent Cr-O bond of about 0.3 Å in chromia-doped UO2 compared with the ideal U-O bond length in standard UO2 that would be expected because of the change in effective Coulomb interactions resulting from replacing U(4+) with Cr(3+) and their ionic size differences. The contraction of shortest Cr-U bond is ~0.1 Å relative to the U-U bond length in bulk UO2. The difference in the

  14. Monitoring spacecraft atmosphere contaminants by laser absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinfeld, J. I.

    1975-01-01

    Data were obtained which will provide a test of the accuracy of the differential absorption method for trace contaminant detection in many-component gas mixtures. The necessary accurate absorption coefficient determinations were carried out for several gases; acetonitrile, 1,2-dichloroethane, Freon-113, furan, methyl ethyl ketone, and t-butyl alcohol. The absorption coefficients are displayed graphically. An opto-acoustic method was tested for measuring absorbance, similar to the system described by Dewey.

  15. Laser cooling, trapping, and Rydberg spectroscopy of neutral holmium atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hostetter, James Allen

    This thesis focuses on progress towards using ensembles of neutral holmium for use in quantum computing operations. We are particularly interested in using a switchable interaction between neutral atoms, the Rydberg blockade, to implement a universal set of quantum gates in a collective encoding scheme that presents many benefits over quantum computing schemes which rely on physically distinct qubits. We show that holmium is uniquely suited for operations in a collective encoding basis because it has 128 ground hyperfine states, the largest number of any stable, neutral atom. Holmium is a rare earth atom that is very poorly described for our purposes as it has never been cooled and trapped, its spectrum is largely unknown, and it presents several unique experimental challenges related to its complicated atomic structure and short wavelength transitions. We demonstrate important progress towards overcoming these challenges. We produce the first laser cooling and trapping of holmium into a MOT. Because we use a broad cooling transition, our cooling technique does not require the use of a Zeeman slower. Using MOT depletion spectroscopy, we provide precise measurements of holmium's Rydberg states and its ionization potential. Our work continues towards cooling holmium into a dipole trap by calculating holmium's AC polarizability and demonstrating the results of early attempts at an optical dipole trap. We provide details of future upgrades to the experimental apparatus and discuss interesting potential for using holmium in quantum computing using single atoms in a magnetically trapped lattice. This thesis shows several promising indicators for continued work in this field.

  16. Atomic and molecular data for optical stellar spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heiter, U.; Lind, K.; Asplund, M.; Barklem, P. S.; Bergemann, M.; Magrini, L.; Masseron, T.; Mikolaitis, Š.; Pickering, J. C.; Ruffoni, M. P.

    2015-05-01

    High-precision spectroscopy of large stellar samples plays a crucial role for several topical issues in astrophysics. Examples include studying the chemical structure and evolution of the Milky Way Galaxy, tracing the origin of chemical elements, and characterizing planetary host stars. Data are accumulating from instruments that obtain high-quality spectra of stars in the ultraviolet, optical and infrared wavelength regions on a routine basis. These instruments are located at ground-based 2-10 m class telescopes around the world, in addition to the spectrographs with unique capabilities available at the Hubble Space Telescope. The interpretation of these spectra requires high-quality transition data for numerous species, in particular neutral and singly ionized atoms, and di- or triatomic molecules. We rely heavily on the continuous efforts of laboratory astrophysics groups that produce and improve the relevant experimental and theoretical atomic and molecular data. The compilation of the best available data is facilitated by databases and electronic infrastructures such as the NIST Atomic Spectra Database, the VALD database, or the Virtual Atomic and Molecular Data Centre. We illustrate the current status of atomic data for optical stellar spectra with the example of the Gaia-ESO Public Spectroscopic Survey. Data sources for 35 chemical elements were reviewed in an effort to construct a line list for a homogeneous abundance analysis of up to 105 stars.

  17. Time- and space-resolved X-ray absorption spectroscopy of aluminum irradiated by a subpicosecond high-power laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tzortzakis, S.; Audebert, P.; Renaudin, P.; Bastiani-Ceccotti, S.; Geindre, J. P.; Chenais-Popovics, C.; Nagels, V.; Gary, S.; Shepherd, R.; Girard, F.; Matsushima, I.; Peyrusse, O.; Gauthier, J.-C.

    2006-05-01

    The ionization and recombination dynamics of transient aluminum plasmas was measured using point projection K-shell absorption spectroscopy. An aluminum plasma was produced with a subpicosecond beam of the 100-TW laser at the LULI facility and probed at different times with a picosecond X-ray backlighter created with a synchronized subpicosecond laser beam. Fourier-Domain-Interferometry (FDI) was used to measure the electron temperature at the peak of the heating laser pulse. Absorption X-ray spectra at early times are characteristic of a dense and rather homogeneous plasma, with limited longitudinal gradients as shown by hydrodynamic simulations. The shift of the Al K-edge was measured in the cold dense plasma located at the edge of the heated plasma. From the 1s 2p absorption spectra, the average ionization was measured as a function of time and was also modeled with a collisional-radiative atomic physics code coupled with hydrodynamic simulations.

  18. Vacuum Ultraviolet Absorption Measurements of Atomic Oxygen in a Shock Tube

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, Scott Andrew

    1995-01-01

    The absorption of vacuum ultraviolet light by atomic oxygen has been measured in the Electric Arc-driven Shock Tube (EAST) Facility at NASA-Ames Research Center. This investigation demonstrates the instrumentation required to determine atomic oxygen concentrations from absorption measurements in impulse facilities. A shock wave dissociates molecular oxygen, producing a high temperature sample of atomic oxygen in the shock tube. A probe beam is generated with a Raman-shifted ArF excimer laser. By suitable tuning of the laser, absorption is measured over a range of wavelengths in the region of the atomic line at 130.49 nm. The line shape function is determined from measurements at atomic oxygen densities of 3x10(exp 17) and 9x10(exp 17) cm(exp -3). The broadening coefficient for resonance interactions is deduced from this data, and this value is in accord with available theoretical models.

  19. Vacuum Ultraviolet Absorption Measurements of Atomic Oxygen in a Shock Tube

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, Scott Andrew

    1995-01-01

    The absorption of vacuum ultraviolet light by atomic oxygen has been measured in the Electric Arc-driven Shock Tube (EAST) Facility at NASA-Ames Research Center. This investigation demonstrates the instrumentation required to determine atomic oxygen concentrations from absorption measurements in impulse facilities. A shock wave dissociates molecular oxygen, producing a high temperature sample of atomic oxygen in the shock tube. A probe beam is generated with a Raman-shifted ArF excimer laser. By suitable tuning of the laser, absorption is measured over a range of wavelengths in the region of the atomic line at 130.49 nm. The line shape function is determined from measurements at atomic oxygen densities of 3 x 10(exp 17) and 9 x 10(exp 17) cm(exp -3). The broadening coefficient for resonance interactions is deduced from this data, and this value is in accord with available theoretical models.

  20. Vacuum Ultraviolet Absorption Measurements of Atomic Oxygen in a Shock Tube.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, Scott Andrew

    The absorption of vacuum ultraviolet light by atomic oxygen has been measured in the Electric Arc-driven Shock Tube (EAST) Facility at NASA-Ames Research Center. This investigation demonstrates the instrumentation required to determine atomic oxygen concentrations from absorption measurements in impulse facilities. A shock wave dissociates molecular oxygen, producing a high temperature sample of atomic oxygen in the shock tube. A probe beam is generated with a Raman-shifted ArF excimer laser. By suitable tuning of the laser, absorption is measured over a range of wavelengths in the region of the atomic line at 130.49 nm. The line shape function is determined from measurements at atomic oxygen densities of 3 times 10 ^{17} and 9 times 10^{17} cm ^{-3}. The broadening coefficient for resonance interactions is deduced from this data, and this value is in accord with available theoretical models.

  1. Vacuum Ultraviolet Absorption Measurements of Atomic Oxygen in a Shock Tube

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, Scott Andrew

    1995-01-01

    The absorption of vacuum ultraviolet light by atomic oxygen has been measured in the Electric Arc-driven Shock Tube (EAST) Facility at NASA-Ames Research Center. This investigation demonstrates the instrumentation required to determine atomic oxygen concentrations from absorption measurements in impulse facilities. A shock wave dissociates molecular oxygen, producing a high temperature sample of atomic oxygen in the shock tube. A probe beam is generated with a Raman-shifted ArF excimer laser. By suitable tuning of the laser, absorption is measured over a range of wavelengths in the region of the atomic line at 130.49 nm. The line shape function is determined from measurements at atomic oxygen densities of 3 x 10(exp 17) and 9 x 10(exp 17)/cu cm. The broadening coefficient for resonance interactions is deduced from this data, and this value is in accord with available theoretical models.

  2. Some interferences in atomic-absorption spectrometry and extraction of iron and copper.

    PubMed

    Yanagisawa, M; Kihara, H; Suzuki, M; Takeuchi, T

    1970-09-01

    The effect of complexing agents on the atomic-absorption spectrometry of iron and copper extracts was investigated Thiocyanate complexes gave a marked depression of absorption by iron and copper, especially in fuel-rich flames. Chloride, diethyldithiocarbamate and hydroxyquinoline complexes of iron behaved alike, but differently from the thiocyanate complex. PMID:18960816

  3. Search for Ultralight Scalar Dark Matter with Atomic Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Van Tilburg, Ken; Leefer, Nathan; Bougas, Lykourgos; Budker, Dmitry

    2015-07-01

    We report new limits on ultralight scalar dark matter (DM) with dilatonlike couplings to photons that can induce oscillations in the fine-structure constant α. Atomic dysprosium exhibits an electronic structure with two nearly degenerate levels whose energy splitting is sensitive to changes in α. Spectroscopy data for two isotopes of dysprosium over a two-year span are analyzed for coherent oscillations with angular frequencies below 1  rad s-1. No signal consistent with a DM coupling is identified, leading to new constraints on dilatonlike photon couplings over a wide mass range. Under the assumption that the scalar field comprises all of the DM, our limits on the coupling exceed those from equivalence-principle tests by up to 4 orders of magnitude for masses below 3×10(-18)  eV. Excess oscillatory power, inconsistent with fine-structure variation, is detected in a control channel, and is likely due to a systematic effect. Our atomic spectroscopy limits on DM are the first of their kind, and leave substantial room for improvement with state-of-the-art atomic clocks. PMID:26182090

  4. Search for Ultralight Scalar Dark Matter with Atomic Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Tilburg, Ken; Leefer, Nathan; Bougas, Lykourgos; Budker, Dmitry

    2015-07-01

    We report new limits on ultralight scalar dark matter (DM) with dilatonlike couplings to photons that can induce oscillations in the fine-structure constant α . Atomic dysprosium exhibits an electronic structure with two nearly degenerate levels whose energy splitting is sensitive to changes in α . Spectroscopy data for two isotopes of dysprosium over a two-year span are analyzed for coherent oscillations with angular frequencies below 1 rad s-1 . No signal consistent with a DM coupling is identified, leading to new constraints on dilatonlike photon couplings over a wide mass range. Under the assumption that the scalar field comprises all of the DM, our limits on the coupling exceed those from equivalence-principle tests by up to 4 orders of magnitude for masses below 3 ×10-18 eV . Excess oscillatory power, inconsistent with fine-structure variation, is detected in a control channel, and is likely due to a systematic effect. Our atomic spectroscopy limits on DM are the first of their kind, and leave substantial room for improvement with state-of-the-art atomic clocks.

  5. Atomic-Scale Imaging and Spectroscopy Using Scanning Tunneling Microscopy.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Youngquist, Michael George

    Advances in scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) instrumentation and applications are presented. An ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) scanning tunneling microscope incorporating computer-controlled two-dimensional sample translation and in vacuo tip and sample transfer was developed. Its performance is documented through large-area and atomic -resolution imaging of highly stepped Si(111) 7 x 7 reconstructed surfaces and physisorbed clusters on graphite. An STM with automated approach and intra-Dewar spring suspension was developed for operation in cryogenic liquids. A high performance digital signal processor (DSP) based control system was constructed, and software with advanced spectroscopic imaging and data processing capabilities was developed. The feasibility of individual-molecule vibrational spectroscopy via STM-detected inelastic electron tunneling is assessed. In preliminary experiments, a low-temperature STM was used for energy gap and phonon spectroscopy of superconducting Pb films. The first STM observation of phonon density of states effects in a superconductor is reported. A systematic UHV STM imaging and spectroscopy study of 2H-MoS_2 was conducted. Atom -resolved images from three distinct imaging modes are presented. Occasional appearance of negative differential resistance (NDR) in I vs. V measurements is traced to changing tip electronic structure rather than localized surface states. Other potential NDR mechanisms are discussed including electron trap charging and resonant tunneling through a double-barrier quantum well structure arising from layer separation in the MoS_2 crystal. DNA was imaged at atomic resolution with a UHV STM. Images show double-helical structure, base pairs, and atomic-scale substructure. Experimental STM profiles have atom-for-atom correlation with the A-DNA van der Waals surface. This work demonstrates the potential of the STM for characterization of large biomolecular structures. Impurity-pinned steps on silicon and gold surfaces

  6. Strontium localization in bone tissue studied by X-ray absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Frankær, Christian Grundahl; Raffalt, Anders Christer; Stahl, Kenny

    2014-02-01

    Strontium has recently been introduced as a pharmacological agent for the treatment and prevention of osteoporosis. We determined the localization of strontium incorporated into bone matrix from dogs treated with Sr malonate by X-ray absorption spectroscopy. A new approach for analyzing the X-ray absorption spectra resulted in a compositional model and allowed the relative distribution of strontium in the different bone components to be estimated. Approximately 35-45% of the strontium present is incorporated into calcium hydroxyapatite (CaHA) by substitution of some of the calcium ions occupying highly ordered sites, and at least 30% is located at less ordered sites where only the first solvation shell is resolved, suggesting that strontium is surrounded by only oxygen atoms similar to Sr(2+) in solution. Strontium was furthermore shown to be absorbed in collagen in which it obtains a higher structural order than when present in serum but less order than when it is incorporated into CaHA. The total amount of strontium in the samples was determined by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry, and the amount of Sr was found to increase with increasing dose levels and treatment periods, whereas the relative distribution of strontium among the different components appears to be independent of treatment period and dose level. PMID:24101232

  7. X-ray absorption spectroscopy as a probe of dissolved polysulfides in lithium sulfur batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pascal, Tod; Prendergast, David

    2015-03-01

    There has been enormous interest lately in lithium sulfur batteries, since they have 5 times the theoretical capacity of lithium ion batteries. Large-scale adoption of this technology has been hampered by numerous shortcomings, chiefly the poor utilization of the active cathode material and rapid capacity fading during cycling. Overcoming these limitations requires methods capable of identifying and quantifying the products of the poorly understood electrochemical reactions. One recent advance has been the use of X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS), an element-specific probe of the unoccupied energy levels around an excited atom upon absorption of an X-ray photon, to identify the reaction products and intermediates. In this talk, we'll present first principles molecular dynamics and spectral simulations of dissolved lithium polysulfide species, showing how finite temperature dynamics, molecular geometry, molecular charge state and solvent environment conspire to determine the peak positions and intensity of the XAS. We'll present a spectral analysis of the radical (-1e charge) species, and reveal a unique low energy feature that can be used to identify these species from their more common dianion (-2e charge) counterparts.

  8. Calculation of the spatial resolution in two-photon absorption spectroscopy applied to plasma diagnosis

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia-Lechuga, M.; Fuentes, L. M.; Grützmacher, K.; Pérez, C. Rosa, M. I. de la

    2014-10-07

    We report a detailed characterization of the spatial resolution provided by two-photon absorption spectroscopy suited for plasma diagnosis via the 1S-2S transition of atomic hydrogen for optogalvanic detection and laser induced fluorescence (LIF). A precise knowledge of the spatial resolution is crucial for a correct interpretation of measurements, if the plasma parameters to be analysed undergo strong spatial variations. The present study is based on a novel approach which provides a reliable and realistic determination of the spatial resolution. Measured irradiance distribution of laser beam waists in the overlap volume, provided by a high resolution UV camera, are employed to resolve coupled rate equations accounting for two-photon excitation, fluorescence decay and ionization. The resulting three-dimensional yield distributions reveal in detail the spatial resolution for optogalvanic and LIF detection and related saturation due to depletion. Two-photon absorption profiles broader than the Fourier transform-limited laser bandwidth are also incorporated in the calculations. The approach allows an accurate analysis of the spatial resolution present in recent and future measurements.

  9. Resonant two-photon ionization spectroscopy of Al atoms and dimers solvated in helium nanodroplets

    SciTech Connect

    Krasnokutski, Serge A.; Huisken, Friedrich

    2015-02-28

    Resonant two-photon ionization (R2PI) spectroscopy has been applied to investigate the solvation of Al atoms in helium droplets. The R2PI spectra reveal vibrational progressions that can be attributed to Al–He{sub n} vibrations. It is found that small helium droplets have very little chance to pick up an aluminum atom after collision. However, the pick-up probability increases with the size of the helium droplets. The absorption band that is measured by monitoring the ions on the mass of the Al dimer is found to be very little shifted with respect to the Al monomer band (∼400 cm{sup −1}). However, using the same laser wavelength, we were unable to detect any Al{sub n} photoion with n larger than two.

  10. Measurement of aluminum in neuronal tissues using electrothermal atomization atomic absorption spectrophotometry

    SciTech Connect

    Pierson, K.B.; Evenson, M.A.

    1986-07-01

    Studies characterizing aluminum complexes isolated from neuronal tissues require accurate and precise techniques for aluminum measurement. A solution of 0.01 M nitric acid containing 0.2% Triton X-100 was the optimal diluent for aluminum measurement under the experimental conditions used. Three National Bureau of Standards Standard Reference Materials (SRM) were digested, and the aluminum concentration of each was measured with a Perkin-Elmer 503 atomic absorption spectrophotometer equipped with a Perkin-Elmer HGA 2100 controller. The calculated detection limit of aluminum was 120 pg using 15-..mu..L sample injections (8 ..mu..g/L). Aluminum concentrations present in citrus leaves (SRM 1572), pine needles (SRM 1575), and tomato leaves (SRM 1573) were 100 +- 12 (certified value, 92 +- 15), 522 +- 45 (certified value, 454 +- 30), and 1273 +- 112 (provisional value, 1200) ..mu..g/g, respectively. The within- and between-day precision had coefficients of variation for citrus leaves, pine needles, and tomato leaves of 18 and 12%, 6.3 and 8.6%, and 3.7 and 8.7%, respectively. Aluminum absorbance was enhanced at high pH values and by zinc.

  11. Aerosol particle absorption spectroscopy by photothermal modulation of Mie scattered light

    SciTech Connect

    Campillo, A.J.; Dodge, C.J.; Lin, H.B.

    1981-09-15

    Absorption spectroscopy of suspended submicron-sized aqueous ammonium-sulfate aerosol droplets has been performed by employing a CO/sub 2/ laser to photothermally modulate visible Mie scattered light. (AIP)

  12. DIRECT DETERMINATION OF PHOSPHORUS IN GASOLINE BY FLAMELESS ATOMIC ABSORPTION SPECTROMETRY

    EPA Science Inventory

    A new method is presented for the determination of phosphorus in gasoline using flameless atomic absorption. Lanthanum nitrate solution is inserted in a graphite furnace prior to direct addition of gasoline. The organic matrix is charred prior to atomization of the phosphorus. Th...

  13. Absorption spectroscopy in hollow-glass waveguides using infrared laser diodes

    SciTech Connect

    Blake, Thomas A.; Kelly, James F.; Stewart, Timothy L.; Hartman, John S.; Sharpe, Steven W.; Sams, Robert L.

    2002-07-10

    Hollow-glass waveguides may be a viable technology that, in some cases, may supplant heavier multi-pass cells such as White or Herriott cells for performing trace detection using tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy. We report here a series of experiments for testing the suitability of waveguides for infrared spectroscopy. The loss characteristics of 1 mm bore diameter waveguides have been measured for straight and coiled lengths. Using direct absorption spectroscopy we have found that the absorption pathlength is approximately equal to the physical length of the waveguide. Broadband FM diode laser spectroscopy produces a comparable signal-to-noise ratio with less than a second of signal averaging. Finally, we have also performed near-infrared spectroscopy of nitrous oxide flowing through a waveguide using a telecommunications diode laser.

  14. X-ray absorption spectroscopy of biomimetic dye molecules for solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Cook, Peter L.; Liu Xiaosong; Himpsel, F. J.; Yang Wanli

    2009-11-21

    Dye-sensitized solar cells are potentially inexpensive alternatives to traditional semiconductor solar cells. In order to optimize dyes for solar cells we systematically investigate the electronic structure of a variety of porphyrins and phthalocyanines. As a biological model system we use the heme group in cytochrome c which plays a role in biological charge transfer processes. X-ray absorption spectroscopy of the N 1s and C 1s edges reveals the unoccupied molecular orbitals and the orientation of the molecules in thin films. The transition metal 2p edges reflect the oxidation state of the central metal atom, its spin state, and the ligand field of the surrounding N atoms. The latter allows tuning of the energy position of the lowest unoccupied orbital by several tenths of an eV by tailoring the molecules and their deposition. Fe and Mn containing phthalocyanines oxidize easily from +2 to +3 in air and require vacuum deposition for obtaining a reproducible oxidation state. Chlorinated porphyrins, on the other hand, are reduced from +3 to +2 during vacuum deposition at elevated temperatures. These findings stress the importance of controlled thin film deposition for obtaining photovoltaic devices with an optimum match between the energy levels of the dye and those of the donor and acceptor electrodes, together with a molecular orientation for optimal overlap between the {pi} orbitals in the direction of the carrier transport.

  15. Absorption of twisted light by a mesoscopic atomic target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peshkov, A. A.; Serbo, V. G.; Fritzsche, S.; Surzhykov, A.

    2016-06-01

    The excitation of a hydrogen-atom target by a twisted Bessel light beam is investigated. The atoms are assumed to have a Gaussian spatial distribution in the target. Theoretical analysis is performed within a nonrelativistic framework using a first-order perturbation approach and density matrix formalism. By using this theory, we derive the expressions for excitation cross sections and for alignment parameters of the excited atomic state. In particular, we make calculations for the 1s\\to 2p transition caused by the interaction of Bessel beams with the atomic target. For this transition, we analyze the population of magnetic sublevels for the excited 2p state and study how it is affected by the projection of the total angular momentum of incident light. The calculations indicate that the projection of the total angular momentum of the incident Bessel beam affects the alignment of atoms for sufficiently small targets with size less than 200 nm. This can be observed experimentally by measuring the linear polarization of the subsequent fluorescent light.

  16. Angular distribution and atomic effects in condensed phase photoelectron spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, R.F.

    1981-11-01

    A general concept of condensed phase photoelectron spectroscopy is that angular distribution and atomic effects in the photoemission intensity are determined by different mechanisms, the former being determined largely by ordering phenomena such as crystal momentum conservation and photoelectron diffraction while the latter are manifested in the total (angle-integrated) cross section. In this work, the physics of the photoemission process is investigated in several very different experiments to elucidate the mechanisms of, and correlation between, atomic and angular distribution effects. Theoretical models are discussed and the connection betweeen the two effects is clearly established. The remainder of this thesis, which describes experiments utilizing both angle-resolved and angle-integrated photoemission in conjunction with synchrotron radiation in the energy range 6 eV less than or equal to h ..nu.. less than or equal to 360 eV and laboratory sources, is divided into three parts.

  17. Results from Point Contact Tunnelling Spectroscopy and Atomic Layer Deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Proslier, Th.; Zasadzinski, J.; Ciovati, Gianluigi; Kneisel, Peter K.; Elam, J. W.; Norem, J.; Pellin, M. J.

    2009-11-01

    We have shown previously that magnetic niobium oxides can influence the superconducting density of states at the surface of cavity-grade niobium coupons. We will present recent results obtained by Point Contact Tunneling spectroscopy (PCT) on coupons removed from hot and cold spots in a niobium cavity, as well as a comparative study of magnetic oxides on mild baked/unbaked electropolished coupons. We will also describe recent results obtained from coated cavities, ALD films properties and new materials using Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD).

  18. Resonantly enhanced Bragg-scattering spectroscopy of an atomic transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xudong; Qiao, Cuifang; Li, Chuanliang; Chen, Fenghua

    2016-07-01

    A novel resonantly enhanced Bragg-scattering (REBS) spectroscopy from a population difference grating (PDG) is reported. The PDG is formed by a standing-wave (SW) pump field, which periodically modulates the space population distributions of two levels in the 87Rb D1 line. Then, a probe beam, having identical frequency and orthogonal polarization with the SW pump field, is Bragg-scattered by the PDG. The research achievement shows that the Bragg-scattered light is strongest at an atomic transition, and forms an REBS spectrum with a high signal-to-noise ratio and sub-natural linewidth. The observed REBS can be applied in precise frequency measurements.

  19. Laser sources for precision spectroscopy on atomic strontium.

    PubMed

    Poli, N; Ferrari, G; Prevedelli, M; Sorrentino, F; Drullinger, R E; Tino, G M

    2006-04-01

    We present a new laser setup designed for high-precision spectroscopy on laser cooled atomic strontium. The system, which is entirely based on semiconductor laser sources, delivers 200 mW at 461 nm for cooling and trapping atomic strontium from a thermal source, 4 mW at 497 nm for optical pumping from the metastable P23 state, 12 mW at 689 nm on linewidth less than 1 kHz for second-stage cooling of the atomic sample down to the recoil limit, 1.2 W at 922 nm for optical trapping close to the "magic wavelength" for the 0-1 intercombination line at 689 nm. The 689 nm laser was already employed to perform a frequency measurement of the 0-1 intercombination line with a relative accuracy of 2.3 x 10(-11), and the ensemble of laser sources allowed the loading in a conservative dipole trap of multi-isotopes strontium mixtures. The simple and compact setup developed represents one of the first steps towards the realization of a transportable optical standards referenced to atomic strontium. PMID:16527534

  20. Direct and quantitative photothermal absorption spectroscopy of individual particulates

    SciTech Connect

    Tong, Jonathan K.; Hsu, Wei-Chun; Eon Han, Sang; Burg, Brian R.; Chen, Gang; Zheng, Ruiting; Shen, Sheng

    2013-12-23

    Photonic structures can exhibit significant absorption enhancement when an object's length scale is comparable to or smaller than the wavelength of light. This property has enabled photonic structures to be an integral component in many applications such as solar cells, light emitting diodes, and photothermal therapy. To characterize this enhancement at the single particulate level, conventional methods have consisted of indirect or qualitative approaches which are often limited to certain sample types. To overcome these limitations, we used a bilayer cantilever to directly and quantitatively measure the spectral absorption efficiency of a single silicon microwire in the visible wavelength range. We demonstrate an absorption enhancement on a per unit volume basis compared to a thin film, which shows good agreement with Mie theory calculations. This approach offers a quantitative approach for broadband absorption measurements on a wide range of photonic structures of different geometric and material compositions.

  1. Miniaturized King furnace permits absorption spectroscopy of small samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ercoli, B.; Tompkins, F. S.

    1968-01-01

    Miniature King-type furnace, consisting of an inductively heated, small diameter tantalum tube supported in a radiation shield eliminates the disadvantages of the conventional furnace in obtaining absorption spectra of metal vapors.

  2. The use of CNDO in spectroscopy. XV. Two photon absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchese, Francis T.; Seliskar, C. J.; Jaffé, H. H.

    1980-04-01

    Two-photon absorptivities have been calculated within the CNDO/S-CI molecular orbital framework of Del Bene and Jaffé utilizing the second order time dependent perturbation equations of Göppert-Mayer and polarization methods of McClain. Good agreement is found between this theory and experiment for transition energies, symmetries, and two-photon absorptivities for the following molecules: biphenyl, terphenyl, 2,2'-difluorobiphenyl, 2,2'-bipyridyl, phenanthrene, and the isoelectronic series: fluorene, carbazole, dibenzofuran.

  3. Experimental study of the light absorption in sea water by thermal lens spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velásquez, A.; Sira, E.; Silva, S.; Cabrera, H.

    2016-01-01

    Thermal lens spectroscopy is well known as highly sensitive technique enabling measurements of low absorption and concentration determination of various compounds. The optical absorption coefficients of doubly distilled water and samples of water from different places of the open Ocean and different coastal regions have been measured at 532.8 nm wavelength using this technique. The method enables sensitive, rapid and reproducible determination of small variations of the absorption coefficient which are related with small trace contaminations in sea water.

  4. Spectroscopy and nonlinear optical absorption of bis(diphenylamino) diphenyl polyenes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Natarajan, Lalgudi V.; Kirkpatrick, Sean M.; Sutherland, Richard L.; Fleitz, Paul A.; Cooper, Thomas M.; Sowards, Laura A.; Spangler, Charles W.; Reeves, Benjamin

    1999-10-01

    The spectroscopy and nonlinear absorption of bis(diphenylamino) diphenyl polyenes have been studied in octane and dichloromethane solvents. The amines exhibit high fluorescence quantum yield and two photon excited emission. Two photon absorption cross section, (sigma) 2, was measured by Z-scan experiments. Strong two photon absorption is indicated by high values for (sigma) 2. Solvent has strong influence in the measurement of (sigma) 2 values.

  5. Targeting Inaccurate Atomic Data in the Eta Car Ejecta Absorption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nielsen, K. E.; Kober, G. Vieira; Gull, T. R.; Blackwell-Whitehead, R.; Nilsson, H.

    2006-01-01

    The input from the laboratory spectroscopist community has on many occasions helped the analysis of the eta Car spectrum. Our analysis has targeted spectra where improved wavelengths and oscillator strengths are needed. We will demonstrate how experimentally derived atomic data have improved our spectral analysis, and illuminate where more work still is needed.

  6. Determination of cadmium in biodiesel using microemulsion and electrothermal atomization atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Lima, Adriana S; Silva, Deise G; Teixeira, Leonardo S G

    2015-01-01

    This work aimed to prepare biodiesel microemulsions for the subsequent quantification of cadmium via graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GFAAS). The biodiesel samples were prepared using n-propanol as an emulsifier, 10% (v/v) nitric acid as the aqueous phase, and biodiesel. Pseudoternary phase diagrams were constructed to determine the microemulsion region with the specified components. The optimized conditions for microemulsion formation were 57.6% (v/v) n-propanol, 21.2% (v/v) biodiesel, and 21.2% (v/v) nitric acid solution. The stability of the microemulsified system was investigated using aqueous and organic standards, and the system was found to be stable for at least 240 min. The applied pyrolysis and atomization temperatures were 800 and 2000 °C, respectively, and 5 μg of aluminum was used as the chemical modifier. The obtained limits of detection and quantification were 0.2 and 0.5 μg kg(-1), respectively, and the characteristic mass was 1.6 pg. The precision, expressed as the relative standard deviation (% R.S.D., n = 10), was 2.5% for a sample with a cadmium concentration of 6.5 μg kg(-1). The accuracy was determined from addition and recovery experiments, with results varying from 93 to 108% recovery. This study demonstrates that the proposed method based on the use of a microemulsion formation in sample preparation can be applied as an efficient alternative for the determination of cadmium in biodiesel by GFAAS. Cadmium determination in biodiesel samples of different origins (soybean, corn, cotton, and sunflower) was evaluated after acid digestion using the inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) technique, and the obtained results were compared to the results obtained using the proposed method. The paired t test (95% confidence level) did not show significant differences. The concentrations of cadmium found ranged from 5.3 to 8.0 μg kg(-1). PMID:25381584

  7. Trace gas absorption spectroscopy using laser difference-frequency spectrometer for environmental application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, W.; Cazier, F.; Boucher, D.; Tittel, F. K.; Davies, P. B.

    2001-01-01

    A widely tunable infrared spectrometer based on difference frequency generation (DFG) has been developed for organic trace gas detection by laser absorption spectroscopy. On-line measurements of concentration of various hydrocarbons, such as acetylene, benzene, and ethylene, were investigated using high-resolution DFG trace gas spectroscopy for highly sensitive detection.

  8. Absorption of infrared radiation by electrons in the field of a neutral hydrogen atom

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stallcop, J. R.

    1974-01-01

    An analytical expression for the absorption coefficient is developed from a relationship between the cross-section for inverse bremsstrahlung absorption and the cross-section for electron-atom momentum transfer; it is accurate for those photon frequencies v and temperatures such that hv/kT is small. The determination of the absorption of infrared radiation by free-free transitions of the negative hydrogen ion has been extended to higher temperatures. A simple analytical expression for the absorption coefficient has been derived.

  9. Interlayer Potassium And Its Neighboring Atoms in Micas: Crystal-Chemical Modeling And Xanes Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Brigatti, M.F.; Malferrari, D.; Poppi, M.; Mottana, A.; Cibin, G.; Marcelli, A.; Cinque, G.

    2009-05-12

    A detailed description of the interlayer site in trioctahedral true micas is presented based on a statistical appraisal of crystal-chemical, structural, and spectroscopic data determined on two sets of trioctahedral micas extensively studied by both X-ray diffraction refinement on single crystals (SC-XRD) and X-ray absorption fine spectroscopy (XAFS) at the potassium K-edge. Spectroscopy was carried out on both random powders and oriented cleavage flakes, the latter setting taking advantage of the polarized character of synchrotron radiation. Such an approach (AXANES) is shown to be complementary to crystal-chemical investigation based on SC-XRD refinement. However, the results are not definitive as they focus on few samples having extreme features only (e.g., end-members, unusual compositions, and samples with extreme and well-identified substitution mechanisms). The experimental absorption K-edge (XANES) for potassium was decomposed by calculation and extrapolated into a full in-plane absorption component ({sigma}{parallel}) and a full out-of-plane absorption component ({sigma}{perpendicular}). These two patterns reflect different structural features: {sigma}{parallel}represents the arrangement of the atoms located in the mica interlayer space and facing tetrahedral sheets; {sigma}{perpendicular} is associated with multiple-scattering interactions entering deep into the mica structure, thus also reflecting interactions with the heavy atoms (essentially Fe) located in the octahedral sheet. The out-of-plane patterns also provide insights into the electronic properties of the octahedral cations, such as their oxidation states (e.g., Fe{sup 2+} and Fe{sup 3+}) and their ordering (e.g., trans- vs. cis-setting). It is also possible to distinguish between F- and OH-rich micas due to peculiar absorption features originating from the F vs. OH occupancy of the O4 octahedral site. Thus, combining crystal-chemical, structural, and spectroscopic information is shown to be a

  10. Method and apparatus for aerosol particle absorption spectroscopy

    DOEpatents

    Campillo, Anthony J.; Lin, Horn-Bond

    1983-11-15

    A method and apparatus for determining the absorption spectra, and other properties, of aerosol particles. A heating beam source provides a beam of electromagnetic energy which is scanned through the region of the spectrum which is of interest. Particles exposed to the heating beam which have absorption bands within the band width of the heating beam absorb energy from the beam. The particles are also illuminated by light of a wave length such that the light is scattered by the particles. The absorption spectra of the particles can thus be determined from an analysis of the scattered light since the absorption of energy by the particles will affect the way the light is scattered. Preferably the heating beam is modulated to simplify the analysis of the scattered light. In one embodiment the heating beam is intensity modulated so that the scattered light will also be intensity modulated when the particles absorb energy. In another embodiment the heating beam passes through an interferometer and the scattered light reflects the Fourier Transform of the absorption spectra.

  11. Direct and quantitative broadband absorptance spectroscopy with multilayer cantilever probes

    SciTech Connect

    Hsu, Wei-Chun; Tong, Jonathan Kien-Kwok; Liao, Bolin; Chen, Gang

    2015-04-21

    A system for measuring the absorption spectrum of a sample is provided that includes a broadband light source that produces broadband light defined within a range of an absorptance spectrum. An interferometer modulates the intensity of the broadband light source for a range of modulation frequencies. A bi-layer cantilever probe arm is thermally connected to a sample arm having at most two layers of materials. The broadband light modulated by the interferometer is directed towards the sample and absorbed by the sample and converted into heat, which causes a temperature rise and bending of the bi-layer cantilever probe arm. A detector mechanism measures and records the deflection of the probe arm so as to obtain the absorptance spectrum of the sample.

  12. Review on VUV to MIR absorption spectroscopy of atmospheric pressure plasma jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reuter, Stephan; Santos Sousa, Joao; Stancu, Gabi Daniel; Hubertus van Helden, Jean-Pierre

    2015-10-01

    Absorption spectroscopy (AS) represents a reliable method for the characterization of cold atmospheric pressure plasma jets. The method’s simplicity stands out in comparison to competing diagnostic techniques. AS is an in situ, non-invasive technique giving absolute densities, free of calibration procedures, which other diagnostics, such as laser-induced fluorescence or optical emission spectroscopy, have to rely on. Ground state densities can be determined without the knowledge of the influence of collisional quenching. Therefore, absolute densities determined by absorption spectroscopy can be taken as calibration for other methods. In this paper, fundamentals of absorption spectroscopy are presented as an entrance to the topic. In the second part of the manuscript, a review of AS performed on cold atmospheric pressure plasma jets, as they are used e.g. in the field of plasma medicine, is presented. The focus is set on special techniques overcoming not only the drawback of spectrally overlapping absorbing species, but also the line-of-sight densities that AS usually provides or the necessity of sufficiently long absorption lengths. Where references are not available for measurements on cold atmospheric pressure plasma jets, other plasma sources including low-pressure plasmas are taken as an example to give suggestions for possible approaches. The final part is a table summarizing examples of absorption spectroscopic measurements on cold atmospheric pressure plasma jets. With this, the paper provides a ‘best practice’ guideline and gives a compendium of works by groups performing absorption spectroscopy on cold atmospheric pressure plasma jets.

  13. Gold volatile species atomization and preconcentration in quartz devices for atomic absorption spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arslan, Yasin; Musil, Stanislav; Matoušek, Tomáš; Kratzer, Jan; Dědina, Jiří

    2015-01-01

    The on-line atomization of gold volatile species was studied and the results were compared with thermodynamic calculations in several quartz atomizers, namely: diffusion flame, flame-in-gas-shield, flame-in-plain-tube, externally heated T-tube and externally heated flame-in-T-tube. Atomization mechanism in the explored devices is proposed, where volatile species are converted to thermodynamically stable AuH at elevated temperature over 500 °C and then atomized by an interaction with a cloud of hydrogen radicals. Because of its inherent simplicity and robustness, diffusion flame was employed as a reference atomizer. It yielded atomization efficiency of 70 to 100% and a very good long time reproducibility of peak area sensitivity: 1.6 to 1.8 s μg- 1. Six and eleven times higher sensitivity, respectively, was provided by atomizers with longer light paths in the observation volume, i.e. externally heated T-tube and externally heated flame-in-T-tube. The latter one, offering limit of detection below 0.01 μg ml- 1, appeared as the most prospective for on-line atomization. Insight into the mechanism of atomization of gold volatile species, into the fate of free atoms and into subsequent analyte transfer allowed to assess possibilities of in-atomizer preconcentration of gold volatile species: it is unfeasible with quartz atomizers but a sapphire tube atomizer could be useful in this respect.

  14. Real-time atomic absorption mercury continuous emission monitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zamzow, Daniel S.; Bajic, Stanley J.; Eckels, David E.; Baldwin, David P.; Winterrowd, Chris; Keeney, Robert

    2003-08-01

    A continuous emission monitor (CEM) for mercury (Hg) in combustor flue gas streams has been designed and tested for the detection of Hg by optical absorption. A sampling system that allows continuous introduction of stack gas is incorporated into the CEM, for the sequential analysis of elemental and total Hg. A heated pyrolysis tube is used in the system to convert oxidized Hg compounds to elemental Hg for analysis of total Hg; the pyrolysis tube is bypassed to determine the elemental Hg concentration in the gas stream. A key component of the CEM is a laboratory-designed and -assembled echelle spectrometer that provides simultaneous detection of all of the emission lines from a Hg pen lamp, which is used as the light source for the optical absorption measurement. This feature allows for on-line spectroscopic correction for interferent gases such as sulfur dioxide and nitrogen dioxide, typically present in combustion stack gas streams, that also absorb at the Hg detection wavelength (253.65 nm). This article provides a detailed description of the CEM system, the characteristics and performance of the CEM, and the results of field tests performed at the Environmental Protection Agency-Rotary Kiln at Research Triangle Park, NC.

  15. Chlorine analysis by diode laser atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Koch, J; Zybin, A; Niemax, K

    2000-04-01

    The general characteristics of Diode Laser Absorption Spectrometry (DLAAS) in low pressure plasmas particularly with respect to the detection of non-metals are comprehensively recapitulated and discussed. Furthermore, a detector, which is based on DLAAS in a microwave-induced low pressure plasma as an alternative technique for halogene-specific analysis of volatile compounds and polymeric matrices is described. The analytical capability of the technique is demonstrated on the chlorine-specific analysis of ablated polymer fragments as well as gas chromatographically separated hydrocarbons. Since the measurements were carried out by means of a balanced-heterodyne detection scheme, different technical noise contributions, such as laser excess and RAM noise could efficiently be suppressed and the registered absorption was limited only by the principal shot noise. Thus, in the case of the polymer analysis a chlorine-specific absolute detection limit of 10 pg could be achieved. Furthermore, fundamental investigations concerning the influence of hydrocarbons on the dissociation capability of the microwave induced plasma were performed. For this purpose, the carbon-, chlorine- and hydrogen-specific stoichiometry of the compounds were empirically determined. Deviations from the expected proportions were found to be insignificant, implying the possibility of internal standardization relative to the response of a reference sample. PMID:12953476

  16. [The Research for Trace Ammonia Escape Monitoring System Based on Tunable Diode Laser Absorption Spectroscopy].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Li-fang; Wang, Fei; Yu, Li-bin; Yan, Jian-hua; Cen, Ke-fa

    2015-06-01

    In order to on-line measure the trace ammonia slip of the commercial power plant in the future, this research seeks to measure the trace ammonia by using tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy under ambient temperature and pressure, and at different temperatures, and the measuring temperature is about 650 K in the power plant. In recent years lasers have become commercially available in the near-infrared where the transitions are much stronger, and ammonia's spectroscopy is pretty complicated and the overlapping lines are difficult to resolve. A group of ammonia transitions near 4 433.5 cm(-1) in the v2 +v3 combination band have been thoroughly selected for detecting lower concentration by analyzing its absorption characteristic and considering other absorption interference in combustion gases where H2O and CO2 mole fraction are very large. To illustrate the potential for NH3 concentration measurements, predictions for NH3, H2O and CO2 are simultaneously simulated, NH3 absorption lines near 4 433.5 cm(-1) wavelength meet weaker H2O absorption than the commercial NH3 lines, and there is almost no CO2 absorption, all the parameters are based on the HITRAN database, and an improved detection limit was obtained for interference-free NH3 monitoring, this 2.25 μm band has line strengths several times larger than absorption lines in the 1.53 μm band which was often used by NH3 sensors for emission monitoring and analyzing. The measurement system was developed with a new Herriott cell and a heated gas cell realizing fast absorption measurements of high resolution, and combined with direct absorption and wavelenguh modulation based on tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy at different temperatures. The lorentzian line shape is dominant at ambient temperature and pressure, and the estimated detectivity is approximately 0.225 x 10(-6) (SNR = 1) for the directed absorption spectroscopy, assuming a noise-equivalent absorbance of 1 x 10(-4). The heated cell

  17. Studies of Arctic Middle Atmosphere Chemistry using Infrared Absorption Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindenmaier, Rodica

    The objective of this Ph.D. project is to investigate Arctic middle atmosphere chemistry using solar infrared absorption spectroscopy. These measurements were made at the Polar Environment Atmospheric Research Laboratory (PEARL) at Eureka, Nunavut, which is operated by the Canadian Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Change (CANDAC). This research is part of the CANDAC/PEARL Arctic Middle Atmosphere Chemistry theme and aims to improve our understanding of the processes controlling the stratospheric ozone budget using measurements of the concentrations of stratospheric constituents. The instrument, a Bruker IFS 125HR Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectrometer, has been specifically designed for high-resolution measurements over a broad spectral range and has been used to measure reactive species, source gases, reservoirs, and dynamical tracers at PEARL since August 2006. The first part of this research focuses on the optimization of ozone retrievals, for which 22 microwindows were studied and compared. The spectral region from 1000 to 1005 cm-1 was found to be the most sensitive in both the stratosphere and troposphere, giving the highest number of independent pieces of information and the smallest total error for retrievals at Eureka. Similar studies were performed in coordination with the Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Composition Change for nine other species, with the goal of improving and harmonizing the retrieval parameters among all Infrared Working Group sites. Previous satellite validation exercises have identified the highly variable polar conditions of the spring period to be a challenge. In this work, comparisons between the 125HR and ACE-FTS (Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment-Fourier transform spectrometer) from 2007 to 2010 have been used to develop strict criteria that allow the ground and satellite-based instruments to be confidently compared. After applying these criteria, the differences between the two instruments were generally

  18. NIST Atomic Spectroscopy Databases in Support of Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reader, Joseph; Kramida, A.; Ralchenko, Y.

    2012-01-01

    Joseph Reader1, Alexander Kramida1, Yuri Ralchenko1 1National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, Maryland. The NIST Atomic Spectroscopy Data Center maintains a number of online databases supporting astronomical observations of atomic spectra. The available numerical and bibliographic databases can be accessed from the NIST Physical Measurement Laboratory website www.nist.gov/pml/data/atomspec.cfm. The largest one, the Atomic Spectra Database (ASD), contains wavelength and energy level data for nearly 180,000 spectral lines including 73,400 oscillator strengths. ASD also includes 92,500 energy levels for various ions of 89 elements. In addition to tabular data, ASD can generate dynamic Grotrian diagrams and Saha/LTE spectra, which can be tailored to the user's needs. We continue to systematically expand this database according to needs of the astrophysics and fusion energy science communities. Our bibliographic databases for atomic spectra are updated about every two weeks; they serve as a valuable resource in searching for the latest data. We also provide online non-LTE codes for plasma modeling. Our compilations of spectral data are largely oriented to the needs of astronomers. Recently completed are extensive compilations for Ar, Cr, Ti, and Ni, and a new compilation for Ca is in progress. Recent updates of line lists and transition probabilities include data for H, He, Li, Be, B, C, N, F, Ne, Na, Mg Al, Cl, Sr, Tc, Ru, Rh, Pd, Ag, Cd, In, Sn, Sb, Te, I, Cs, and Ba. We welcome suggestions from astronomers regarding spectra to be compiled and added to the online databases. Spectral atlases of Pt/Ne and Th/Ar hollow cathode lamps for wavelength calibration of astronomical spectrometers can also be found at his website. Our Data Center is supported by NASA (agreement NNH09AL771) and by the Office of Fusion Energy Sciences of the U. S. Department of Energy.

  19. Double tungsten coil atomic absorption spectrometer based on an acousto-optic tunable filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jora, M. Z.; Nóbrega, J. A.; Rohwedder, J. J. R.; Pasquini, C.

    2015-01-01

    An atomic absorption spectrometer based on a quartz acousto-optic tunable filter (AOTF) monochromator operating in the 271-453 nm range, is described. The instrument was tailored to study the formation and evolution of electrothermal atomic cloud induced either by one or two tungsten coils. The spectrometer also includes a fast response programmable photomultiplier module for data acquisition, and a power supply capable of driving two parallel tungsten coils independently. The atomization cell herein described was manufactured in PTFE and presents a new design with reduced size. Synchronization between the instant of power delivering to start the atomization process and the detection was achieved, allowing for monitoring the atomization and thermal events synchronously and in real time. Absorption signals can be sampled at a rate of a few milliseconds, compatible with the fast phenomena that occur with electrothermal metallic atomizers. The instrument performance was preliminarily evaluated by monitoring the absorption of radiation of atomic clouds produced by standard solutions containing chromium or lead. Its quantitative performance was evaluated by using Cr aqueous solutions, resulting in detection limits as low as 0.24 μg L- 1, and a relative standard deviation of 3%.

  20. X-ray absorption spectroscopy of chicken sulfite oxidase crystals

    SciTech Connect

    George, G.N.; Pickering, I.J.; Kisker, C.

    1999-05-17

    Sulfite oxidase catalyzes the physiologically vital oxidation of sulfite to sulfate. Recently, the crystal structure of chicken sulfite oxidase has been reported at 1.9 {angstrom} resolution. In contrast to the information available from previous X-ray absorption spectroscopic studies, the active site indicated by crystallography was a mono-oxo species. Because of this the possibility that the crystals did in fact contain a reduced molybdenum species was considered in the crystallographic work. The authors report herein an X-ray absorption spectroscopic study of polycrystalline sulfite oxidase prepared in the same manner as the previous single-crystal samples, and compare this with data for frozen solutions of oxidized and reduced enzyme.

  1. Microsecond X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy Identification of Co(I) Intermediates in Cobaloxime-Catalyzed Hydrogen Evolution.

    PubMed

    Smolentsev, Grigory; Cecconi, Bianca; Guda, Alexander; Chavarot-Kerlidou, Murielle; van Bokhoven, Jeroen A; Nachtegaal, Maarten; Artero, Vincent

    2015-10-19

    Rational development of efficient photocatalytic systems for hydrogen production requires understanding the catalytic mechanism and detailed information about the structure of intermediates in the catalytic cycle. We demonstrate how time-resolved X-ray absorption spectroscopy in the microsecond time range can be used to identify such intermediates and to determine their local geometric structure. This method was used to obtain the solution structure of the Co(I) intermediate of cobaloxime, which is a non-noble metal catalyst for solar hydrogen production from water. Distances between cobalt and the nearest ligands including two solvent molecules and displacement of the cobalt atom out of plane formed by the planar ligands have been determined. Combining in situ X-ray absorption and UV/Vis data, we demonstrate how slight modification of the catalyst structure can lead to the formation of a catalytically inactive Co(I) state under similar conditions. Possible deactivation mechanisms are discussed. PMID:26388205

  2. Local versus global electronic properties of chalcopyrite alloys: X-ray absorption spectroscopy and ab initio calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Sarmiento-Pérez, Rafael; Botti, Silvana; Schnohr, Claudia S.; Lauermann, Iver; Rubio, Angel; Johnson, Benjamin

    2014-09-07

    Element-specific unoccupied electronic states of Cu(In, Ga)S{sub 2} were studied as a function of the In/Ga ratio by combining X-ray absorption spectroscopy with density functional theory calculations. The S absorption edge shifts with changing In/Ga ratio as expected from the variation of the band gap. In contrast, the cation edge positions are largely independent of composition despite the changing band gap. This unexpected behavior is well reproduced by our calculations and originates from the dependence of the electronic states on the local atomic environment. The changing band gap arises from a changing spatial average of these localized states with changing alloy composition.

  3. Mechanism of the CO oxidation reaction on O-precovered Pt(111) surfaces studied with near-edge x-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Nakai, I.; Kondoh, H.; Amemiya, K.; Nagasaka, M.; Shimada, T.; Yokota, R.; Nambu, A.; Ohta, T.

    2005-04-01

    The mechanism of CO oxidation reaction on oxygen-precovered Pt(111) surfaces has been studied by using time-resolved near-edge x-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy. The whole reaction process is composed of two distinct paths: (1) a reaction of isolated oxygen atoms with adsorbed CO, and (2) a reaction of island-periphery oxygen atoms after the CO saturation. CO coadsorption plays a role to induce the dynamic change in spatial distribution of O atoms, which switches over the two reaction paths. These mechanisms were confirmed by kinetic Monte Carlo simulations. The effect of coadsorbed water in the reaction mechanism was also examined.

  4. Total fluxes of sulfur dioxide from the Italian volcanoes Etna, Stromboli, and Vulcano measured by differential absorption lidar and passive differential optical absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edner, H.; Ragnarson, P.; Svanberg, S.; Wallinder, E.; Ferrara, R.; Cioni, R.; Raco, B.; Taddeucci, G.

    1994-09-01

    The total flux of sulfur dioxide from the Italian volcanoes Etna, Stromboli, and Vulcano was determined using the differential absorption lidar technique. The measurements were performed from an oceanographic research ship making traverses under the volcanic plumes with the lidar system sounding vertically. By combining the integrated gas concentration over the plume cross section with wind velocity data, it was possible to determine the total fluxes of SO2 from the three volcanoes, all measured within a 3-day period in September 1992. We found total fluxes of about 25, 180, and 1300 t/d for Vulcano, Stromboli, and Etna, respectively. These data, collected with an active remote-sensing technique, were compared with simultaneous recording with passive differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS) using the sky radiation as the light source. Since the geometry of the light paths crossing the volcanic plume is not well defined in the passive measurements, a correction to the DOAS data is required. The SO2 results are also compared with previously available data from correlation spectroscopy measurements. Lidar measurements on atomic mercury were also made for the plumes from Stromboli and Vulcano, but the system sensitivity and range only allowed estimates of upper limits for the Hg fluxes.

  5. Atomic data for stellar spectroscopy: recent successes and remaining needs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sneden, Christopher; Lawler, James E.; Wood, Michael P.; Den Hartog, Elizabeth A.; Cowan, John J.

    2014-11-01

    Stellar chemical composition analyses provide vital insights into galactic nucleosynthesis. Atomic line data are critical inputs to stellar abundance computations. Recent lab studies have made significant progress in refining and extending knowledge of transition probabilities, isotopic wavelength shifts, and hyperfine substructure patterns for the absorption lines that are of most interest to stellar spectroscopists. The observable neutron-capture (n-capture) element species (Z \\gt 30) have been scrutinized in lab studies by several groups. For many species the uncertainties in experimental oscillator strengths are ≤slant 10%, which permits detailed assessment of rapid and slow n-capture nucleosynthesis contributions. In this review, extreme examples of r-process-enriched stars in the galactic halo will be shown, which suggest that the description of observable n-capture abundances in these stars is nearly complete. Unfortunately, there are serious remaining concerns about the reliability of observed abundances of lighter elements. In particular, it is not clear that line formation in real stellar atmospheres is being modeled correctly. But for many elements with Z \\lt 30 the atomic transition data are not yet settled. Highlights will be given of some recent large improvements, with suggestions for the most important needs for the near future.

  6. Transient dispersion and absorption in a V-shaped atomic system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahrai, M.; Maleki, A.; Hemmati, R.; Mahmoudi, M.

    2010-01-01

    We investigate the dynamical behavior of the dispersion and the absorption in a V-type three level atomic system. It is shown that in the presence of decay-induced interference the probe dispersion and absorption are phase dependent. We find that an incoherent pumping field provides an additional control parameter for switching the group velocity of a light pulse. The required switching times for switching the group velocity of a probe field from subluminal to superluminal pulse propagation is then discussed.

  7. Data processing for atomic resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Cueva, Paul; Hovden, Robert; Mundy, Julia A; Xin, Huolin L; Muller, David A

    2012-08-01

    The high beam current and subangstrom resolution of aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopes has enabled electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) mapping with atomic resolution. These spectral maps are often dose limited and spatially oversampled, leading to low counts/channel and are thus highly sensitive to errors in background estimation. However, by taking advantage of redundancy in the dataset map, one can improve background estimation and increase chemical sensitivity. We consider two such approaches--linear combination of power laws and local background averaging--that reduce background error and improve signal extraction. Principal component analysis (PCA) can also be used to analyze spectrum images, but the poor peak-to-background ratio in EELS can lead to serious artifacts if raw EELS data are PCA filtered. We identify common artifacts and discuss alternative approaches. These algorithms are implemented within the Cornell Spectrum Imager, an open source software package for spectroscopic analysis. PMID:22697429

  8. [Determination of potassium in sodium by flame atomic emission spectroscopy].

    PubMed

    Xie, C; Wen, X; Jia, Y; Sun, S

    2001-06-01

    Sodium is used as a coolant in China experiment fast reactor (CEFR). Potassium in sodium has an influence on heat property of reactor. A analytical method has been developed to determinate potassium in sodium by flame atomic emission spectroscopy. Sodium sample is dissolved by ultrasonic humidifier. The working conditions of the instrument and inTerferences from matrix sodium, acid effect and concomitant elements have been studied. Standard addition experiments are carried out with potassium chloride. The percentage recoveries are 94.7%-109.8%. The relative standard deviation is 4.2%. The analytical range accords with sodium quality control standard of CFFR. The precision corresponds to the international analytical method in sodium coolant reactor. PMID:12947670

  9. Determination of cadmium in the livers and kidneys of puffins by carbon furnace atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ottaway, J M; Campbell, W C

    1976-01-01

    A carbon furnace atomic absorption procedure is described for the determination of cadmium in the livers and kidneys of puffins, fratercula arctica. Samples are dried and weighed and 2 to 100 mg are dissolved in sulphuric and nitric acids. These solutions are analysed directly in the carbon furnace against aqueous standards and provide accurate results in the range 0-1 to 100 micrograms/g dry weight. The method is simple and rapid and requires much less of the small total sample than would be required for flame atomic absorption. PMID:1030692

  10. Comparison of liposome entrapment parameters by optical and atomic absorption spectrophotometry.

    PubMed

    Yoss, N L; Popescu, O; Pop, V I; Porutiu, D; Kummerow, F A; Benga, G

    1985-01-01

    Methods for the complete characterization of liposomes prepared by ether-injection are described in detail. The validity of atomic absorption spectrophotometry for measuring markers of trapped volume was checked by comparative determinations of markers with established optical spectrophotometrical methods. The favorable results using atomic absorption spectrophotometry to quantitate the marker Mn2+ are of particular relevance as manganese ion is also the paramagnetic probe in n.m.r. measurements of water permeability of liposomes; our results indicate that in such measurements no other marker need be incorporated. PMID:3986305

  11. Effective Atomic Numbers of Lanthanides with Gamma Radiation for Photon Energy Absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shantappa, Anil; Hanagodimath, S. M.

    Effective atomic numbers for photon energy absorption, ZPEA,eff have been calculated for photon from 1 keV to 20 MeV for selected oxides of lanthanides, such as Lanthanum oxide, Cerium oxide, Samarium oxide, Europium oxide, Dysprosium oxide, Thulium oxide, Ytterbium oxide. The ZPEA,eff values then compared with ZPI,eff for photon interaction. The ZPEA,eff values have been found to change with energy and composition of selected lanthanides. Oxides of lanthanides are considered as better shielding materials to the exposure of gamma radiation. The values of effective atomic number for photon energy absorption help in the calculation of absorbed dose.

  12. Characterization of Metalloproteins by High-throughput X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    W Shi; M Punta; J Bohon; J Sauder; R DMello; M Sullivan; J Toomey; D Abel; M Lippi; et al.

    2011-12-31

    High-throughput X-ray absorption spectroscopy was used to measure transition metal content based on quantitative detection of X-ray fluorescence signals for 3879 purified proteins from several hundred different protein families generated by the New York SGX Research Center for Structural Genomics. Approximately 9% of the proteins analyzed showed the presence of transition metal atoms (Zn, Cu, Ni, Co, Fe, or Mn) in stoichiometric amounts. The method is highly automated and highly reliable based on comparison of the results to crystal structure data derived from the same protein set. To leverage the experimental metalloprotein annotations, we used a sequence-based de novo prediction method, MetalDetector, to identify Cys and His residues that bind to transition metals for the redundancy reduced subset of 2411 sequences sharing <70% sequence identity and having at least one His or Cys. As the HT-XAS identifies metal type and protein binding, while the bioinformatics analysis identifies metal-binding residues, the results were combined to identify putative metal-binding sites in the proteins and their associated families. We explored the combination of this data with homology models to generate detailed structure models of metal-binding sites for representative proteins. Finally, we used extended X-ray absorption fine structure data from two of the purified Zn metalloproteins to validate predicted metalloprotein binding site structures. This combination of experimental and bioinformatics approaches provides comprehensive active site analysis on the genome scale for metalloproteins as a class, revealing new insights into metalloprotein structure and function.

  13. Characterization of metalloproteins by high-throughput X-ray absorption spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Wuxian; Punta, Marco; Bohon, Jen; Sauder, J. Michael; D'Mello, Rhijuta; Sullivan, Mike; Toomey, John; Abel, Don; Lippi, Marco; Passerini, Andrea; Frasconi, Paolo; Burley, Stephen K.; Rost, Burkhard; Chance, Mark R.

    2011-01-01

    High-throughput X-ray absorption spectroscopy was used to measure transition metal content based on quantitative detection of X-ray fluorescence signals for 3879 purified proteins from several hundred different protein families generated by the New York SGX Research Center for Structural Genomics. Approximately 9% of the proteins analyzed showed the presence of transition metal atoms (Zn, Cu, Ni, Co, Fe, or Mn) in stoichiometric amounts. The method is highly automated and highly reliable based on comparison of the results to crystal structure data derived from the same protein set. To leverage the experimental metalloprotein annotations, we used a sequence-based de novo prediction method, MetalDetector, to identify Cys and His residues that bind to transition metals for the redundancy reduced subset of 2411 sequences sharing <70% sequence identity and having at least one His or Cys. As the HT-XAS identifies metal type and protein binding, while the bioinformatics analysis identifies metal- binding residues, the results were combined to identify putative metal-binding sites in the proteins and their associated families. We explored the combination of this data with homology models to generate detailed structure models of metal-binding sites for representative proteins. Finally, we used extended X-ray absorption fine structure data from two of the purified Zn metalloproteins to validate predicted metalloprotein binding site structures. This combination of experimental and bioinformatics approaches provides comprehensive active site analysis on the genome scale for metalloproteins as a class, revealing new insights into metalloprotein structure and function. PMID:21482623

  14. The x-ray absorption spectroscopy model of solvation about sulfur in aqueous L-cysteine

    PubMed Central

    Sarangi, Ritimukta; Frank, Patrick; Benfatto, Maurizio; Morante, Silvia; Minicozzi, Velia; Hedman, Britt; Hodgson, Keith O.

    2012-01-01

    The environment of sulfur in dissolved aqueous L-cysteine has been examined using K-edge x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS), extended continuum multiple scattering (ECMS) theory, and density functional theory (DFT). For the first time, bound-state and continuum transitions representing the entire XAS spectrum of L-cysteine sulfur are accurately reproduced by theory. Sulfur K-edge absorption features at 2473.3 eV and 2474.2 eV represent transitions to LUMOs that are mixtures of S–C and S–H σ* orbitals significantly delocalized over the entire L-cysteine molecule. Continuum features at 2479, 2489, and 2530 eV were successfully reproduced using extended continuum theory. The full L-cysteine sulfur K-edge XAS spectrum could not be reproduced without addition of a water-sulfur hydrogen bond. Density functional theory analysis shows that although the Cys(H)S⋯H–OH hydrogen bond is weak (∼2 kcal) the atomic charge on sulfur is significantly affected by this water. MXAN analysis of hydrogen-bonding structures for L-cysteine and water yielded a best fit model featuring a tandem of two water molecules, 2.9 Å and 5.8 Å from sulfur. The model included a Scys⋯H–Ow1H hydrogen-bond of 2.19 Å and of 2.16 Å for H2Ow1⋯H–Ow2H. One hydrogen-bonding water-sulfur interaction alone was insufficient to fully describe the continuum XAS spectrum. However, density functional theoretical results are convincing that the water-sulfur interaction is weak and should be only transient in water solution. The durable water-sulfur hydrogen bond in aqueous L-cysteine reported here therefore represents a break with theoretical studies indicating its absence. Reconciling the apparent disparity between theory and result remains the continuing challenge. PMID:23206038

  15. The x-ray absorption spectroscopy model of solvation about sulfur in aqueous L-cysteine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarangi, Ritimukta; Frank, Patrick; Benfatto, Maurizio; Morante, Silvia; Minicozzi, Velia; Hedman, Britt; Hodgson, Keith O.

    2012-11-01

    The environment of sulfur in dissolved aqueous L-cysteine has been examined using K-edge x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS), extended continuum multiple scattering (ECMS) theory, and density functional theory (DFT). For the first time, bound-state and continuum transitions representing the entire XAS spectrum of L-cysteine sulfur are accurately reproduced by theory. Sulfur K-edge absorption features at 2473.3 eV and 2474.2 eV represent transitions to LUMOs that are mixtures of S-C and S-H σ* orbitals significantly delocalized over the entire L-cysteine molecule. Continuum features at 2479, 2489, and 2530 eV were successfully reproduced using extended continuum theory. The full L-cysteine sulfur K-edge XAS spectrum could not be reproduced without addition of a water-sulfur hydrogen bond. Density functional theory analysis shows that although the Cys(H)S⋯H-OH hydrogen bond is weak (˜2 kcal) the atomic charge on sulfur is significantly affected by this water. MXAN analysis of hydrogen-bonding structures for L-cysteine and water yielded a best fit model featuring a tandem of two water molecules, 2.9 Å and 5.8 Å from sulfur. The model included a Scys⋯H-Ow1H hydrogen-bond of 2.19 Å and of 2.16 Å for H2Ow1⋯H-Ow2H. One hydrogen-bonding water-sulfur interaction alone was insufficient to fully describe the continuum XAS spectrum. However, density functional theoretical results are convincing that the water-sulfur interaction is weak and should be only transient in water solution. The durable water-sulfur hydrogen bond in aqueous L-cysteine reported here therefore represents a break with theoretical studies indicating its absence. Reconciling the apparent disparity between theory and result remains the continuing challenge.

  16. Observing random walks of atoms in buffer gas through resonant light absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aoki, Kenichiro; Mitsui, Takahisa

    2016-07-01

    Using resonant light absorption, random-walk motions of rubidium atoms in nitrogen buffer gas are observed directly. The transmitted light intensity through atomic vapor is measured, and its spectrum is obtained, down to orders of magnitude below the shot-noise level to detect fluctuations caused by atomic motions. To understand the measured spectra, the spectrum for atoms performing random walks in a Gaussian light beam is computed, and its analytical form is obtained. The spectrum has 1 /f2 (f is frequency) behavior at higher frequencies, crossing over to a different, but well-defined, behavior at lower frequencies. The properties of this theoretical spectrum agree excellently with the measured spectrum. This understanding also enables us to obtain the diffusion constant, the photon cross section of atoms in buffer gas, and the atomic number density from a single spectral measurement. We further discuss other possible applications of our experimental method and analysis.

  17. Magnetic-field-assisted atomic polarization spectroscopy of 4 He

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Sheng; Wang, Haidong; Wu, Teng; Peng, Xiang; Guo, Hong; Cream Team

    2016-05-01

    Atomic polarization spectroscopy (PS) is a high resolution sub-Doppler atomic spectroscopic technique with free modulation. It is always desirable to obtain a PS signal with zero background as it can provide a more preferable laser frequency stabilization performance. There are many factors that can affect the PS signal background, i.e., the laser power, the laser polarization and the magnetic field. Here, we demonstrate a method for observing and analyzing the effects on the PS signal of 4 He under different magnetic fields. At the beginning, under nearly zero magnetic field, the large asymmetrical PS signal background has been observed and cannot be eliminated by only optically adjusting. Then, we find that the PS signal profile can be changed and controlled by varying the magnetic field with transverse or longitudinal direction and different intensity. The optimized PS signal with symmetrical dispersive profile and zero background is obtained when the magnetic field is chosen and controlled in the transverse direction and more than 20000nT intensity. Similar phenomenon cannot be observed under the longitudinal magnetic field. A theoretical model is also presented, which explains and agrees well with our experimental results.

  18. Atomic Physics with Accelerators: Projectile Electron Spectroscopy (APAPES)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madesis, I.; Dimitriou, A.; Laoutaris, A.; Lagoyannis, A.; Axiotis, M.; Mertzimekis, T.; Andrianis, M.; Harissopulos, S.; Benis, E. P.; Sulik, B.; Valastyán, I.; Zouros, T. J. M.

    2015-01-01

    The new research initiative APAPES (http://apapes.physics.uoc.gr/) has already established a new experimental station with a beam line dedicated for atomic collisions physics research, at the 5 MV TANDEM accelerator of the National Research Centre "Demokritos" in Athens, Greece. A complete zero-degree Auger projectile spectroscopy (ZAPS) apparatus has been put together to perform high resolution studies of electrons emitted in ion-atom collisions. A single stage hemispherical spectrometer with a 2-dimensional Position Sensitive Detector (PSD) combined with a doubly-differentially pumped gas target will be used to perform a systematic isoelectronic investigation of K-Auger spectra emitted from collisions of preexcited and ground state He-like ions with gas targets using novel techniques. Our intention is to provide a more thorough understanding of cascade feeding of the 1s2s2p 4P metastable states produced by electron capture in collisions of He-like ions with gas targets and further elucidate their role in the non-statistical production of excited three-electron 1s2s2p states by electron capture, recently a field of conflicting interpretations awaiting further resolution. At the moment, the apparatus is being completed and the spectrometer will soon be fully operational. Here we present the project progress and the recent high resolution spectrum obtained in collisions of 12 MeV C4+ on a Neon gas target.

  19. Communication: Hydrogen bonding interactions in water-alcohol mixtures from X-ray absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lam, Royce K.; Smith, Jacob W.; Saykally, Richard J.

    2016-05-01

    While methanol and ethanol are macroscopically miscible with water, their mixtures exhibit negative excess entropies of mixing. Despite considerable effort in both experiment and theory, there remains significant disagreement regarding the origin of this effect. Different models for the liquid mixture structure have been proposed to address this behavior, including the enhancement of the water hydrogen bonding network around the alcohol hydrophobic groups and microscopic immiscibility or clustering. We have investigated mixtures of methanol, ethanol, and isopropanol with water by liquid microjet X-ray absorption spectroscopy on the oxygen K-edge, an atom-specific probe providing details of both inter- and intra-molecular structure. The measured spectra evidence a significant enhancement of hydrogen bonding originating from the methanol and ethanol hydroxyl groups upon the addition of water. These additional hydrogen bonding interactions would strengthen the liquid-liquid interactions, resulting in additional ordering in the liquid structures and leading to a reduction in entropy and a negative enthalpy of mixing, consistent with existing thermodynamic data. In contrast, the spectra of the isopropanol-water mixtures exhibit an increase in the number of broken alcohol hydrogen bonds for mixtures containing up to 0.5 water mole fraction, an observation consistent with existing enthalpy of mixing data, suggesting that the measured negative excess entropy is a result of clustering or micro-immiscibility.

  20. Communication: Hydrogen bonding interactions in water-alcohol mixtures from X-ray absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Lam, Royce K; Smith, Jacob W; Saykally, Richard J

    2016-05-21

    While methanol and ethanol are macroscopically miscible with water, their mixtures exhibit negative excess entropies of mixing. Despite considerable effort in both experiment and theory, there remains significant disagreement regarding the origin of this effect. Different models for the liquid mixture structure have been proposed to address this behavior, including the enhancement of the water hydrogen bonding network around the alcohol hydrophobic groups and microscopic immiscibility or clustering. We have investigated mixtures of methanol, ethanol, and isopropanol with water by liquid microjet X-ray absorption spectroscopy on the oxygen K-edge, an atom-specific probe providing details of both inter- and intra-molecular structure. The measured spectra evidence a significant enhancement of hydrogen bonding originating from the methanol and ethanol hydroxyl groups upon the addition of water. These additional hydrogen bonding interactions would strengthen the liquid-liquid interactions, resulting in additional ordering in the liquid structures and leading to a reduction in entropy and a negative enthalpy of mixing, consistent with existing thermodynamic data. In contrast, the spectra of the isopropanol-water mixtures exhibit an increase in the number of broken alcohol hydrogen bonds for mixtures containing up to 0.5 water mole fraction, an observation consistent with existing enthalpy of mixing data, suggesting that the measured negative excess entropy is a result of clustering or micro-immiscibility. PMID:27208929

  1. Americium characterization by X-ray fluorescence and absorption spectroscopy in plutonium uranium mixed oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Degueldre, Claude; Cozzo, Cedric; Martin, Matthias; Grolimund, Daniel; Mieszczynski, Cyprian

    2013-06-01

    Plutonium uranium mixed oxide (MOX) fuels are currently used in nuclear reactors. The actinides in these fuels need to be analyzed after irradiation for assessing their behaviour with regard to their environment and the coolant. In this work the study of the atomic structure and next-neighbour environment of Am in the (Pu,U)O2 lattice in an irradiated (60 MW d kg-1) MOX sample was performed employing micro-X-ray fluorescence (µ-XRF) and micro-X-ray absorption fine structure (µ-XAFS) spectroscopy. The chemical bonds, valences and stoichiometry of Am (˜0.66 wt%) are determined from the experimental data gained for the irradiated fuel material examined in its peripheral zone (rim) of the fuel. In the irradiated sample Am builds up as Am3+ species within an [AmO8]13- coordination environment (e.g. >90%) and no (<10%) Am(IV) or (V) can be detected in the rim zone. The occurrence of americium dioxide is avoided by the redox buffering activity of the uranium dioxide matrix.

  2. X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy Characterization of a Li/S Cell

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Ye, Yifan; Kawase, Ayako; Song, Min-Kyu; Feng, Bingmei; Liu, Yi-Sheng; Marcus, Matthew A.; Feng, Jun; Cairns, Elton J.; Guo, Jinghua; Zhu, Junfa

    2016-01-11

    The X-ray absorption spectroscopy technique has been applied to study different stages of the lithium/sulfur (Li/S) cell life cycle. We investigated how speciation of S in Li/S cathodes changes upon the introduction of CTAB (cetyltrimethylammonium bromide, CH3(CH2)15N+(CH3)3Br₋) and with charge/discharge cycling. The introduction of CTAB changes the synthesis reaction pathway dramatically due to the interaction of CTAB with the terminal S atoms of the polysulfide ions in the Na2Sx solution. For the cycled Li/S cell, the loss of electrochemically active sulfur and the accumulation of a compact blocking insulating layer of unexpected sulfur reaction products on the cathode surface duringmore » the charge/discharge processes make the capacity decay. Lastly, a modified coin cell and a vacuum-compatible three-electrode electro-chemical cell have been introduced for further in-situ/in-operando studies.« less

  3. An X-ray absorption spectroscopy study of Cd binding onto bacterial consortia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, Bhoopesh; Boyanov, Maxim I.; Bunker, Bruce A.; Kelly, Shelly D.; Kemner, Kenneth M.; Nerenberg, Robert; Read-Daily, Brenda L.; Fein, Jeremy B.

    2009-08-01

    In this study, we use extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy measurements to examine the atomic environment of Cd bound onto two experimental bacterial consortia: one grown from river water, and one grown from a manufacturing gas plant site. The experiments were conducted as a function of pH and demonstrate that the complex mixtures of bacteria, containing both Gram-positive and Gram-negative species, yield relatively simple EXAFS spectra, a result which indicates that only a limited number of functional group types contribute to Cd binding for each bacterial consortium. The EXAFS spectra indicate that the average Cd binding environment in the river water consortium varies significantly with pH, but the manufacturing gas plant consortium exhibits a Cd binding environment that remains relatively constant over the pH range examined. The EXAFS data for the river water consortium were modeled using carboxyl, phosphoryl and sulfhydryl sites. However, only carboxyl and phosphoryl sites were required to model the manufacturing gas plant consortium data under similar experimental conditions. This is the first EXAFS study to identify and quantify the relative importance of metal binding sites in bacterial consortia. Although our results indicate differences in the binding environments of the two consortia, the data suggest that there are broad similarities in the binding environments present on a wide range of bacterial cell walls.

  4. Microwave absorption properties of carbon nanocoils coated with highly controlled magnetic materials by atomic layer deposition.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guizhen; Gao, Zhe; Tang, Shiwei; Chen, Chaoqiu; Duan, Feifei; Zhao, Shichao; Lin, Shiwei; Feng, Yuhong; Zhou, Lei; Qin, Yong

    2012-12-21

    In this work, atomic layer deposition is applied to coat carbon nanocoils with magnetic Fe(3)O(4) or Ni. The coatings have a uniform and highly controlled thickness. The coated nanocoils with coaxial multilayer nanostructures exhibit remarkably improved microwave absorption properties compared to the pristine carbon nanocoils. The enhanced absorption ability arises from the efficient complementarity between complex permittivity and permeability, chiral morphology, and multilayer structure of the products. This method can be extended to exploit other composite materials benefiting from its convenient control of the impedance matching and combination of dielectric-magnetic multiple loss mechanisms for microwave absorption applications. PMID:23171130

  5. Atomic absorption spectrophotometric determination of microgram quantities of copper in tea after solvent extraction.

    PubMed

    Aziz-Alrahman, A M

    1985-01-01

    An atomic absorption spectrophotometric method is described for determining trace amounts of copper in tea. The method is based on the solvent extraction of the metal as tetraiodocuprate (I), from 2 M HCl solutions of tea samples which contain 12% (w/v) KI, into methylisobutyl ketone. The organic extracts, containing the ion-association complex of copper are atomized into an air-acetylene flame. The limit of detection is 1.14 micrograms g-1 Cu. PMID:4077371

  6. Multinozzle supersonic expansion for Fourier transform absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georges, R.; Durry, G.; Bach, M.; Pétrisse, R.; Jost, R.; Herman, M.

    1995-12-01

    A new supersonic expansion made of several, up to 31 aligned nozzles, on top of a set of powerful Roots blowers has been built. Adequate optics allowed the recording of infrared absorption spectra in a cell with a Fourier transform interferometer, at high spectral resolution. The system was tested with N 2O, between 2000 and 4800 cm -1. The ν1 + 2 ν2 + ν3 combination band, estimated to be some 10000 times weaker than the ν2 fundamental, could be observed among all the other expected bands, thus setting a limit for the sensitivity of the system. The formation of large N 2O clusters was observed.

  7. Single-dot absorption spectroscopy and theory of silicon nanocrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sychugov, Ilya; Pevere, Federico; Luo, Jun-Wei; Zunger, Alex; Linnros, Jan

    2016-04-01

    Photoluminescence excitation measurements have been performed on single, unstrained oxide-embedded Si nanocrystals. Having overcome the challenge of detecting weak emission, we observe four broad peaks in the absorption curve above the optically emitting state. Atomistic calculations of the Si nanocrystal energy levels agree well with the experimental results and allow identification of some of the observed transitions. An analysis of their physical nature reveals that they largely retain the indirect band-gap structure of the bulk material with some intermixing of direct band-gap character at higher energies.

  8. A GAS TEMPERATURE PROFILE BY INFRARED EMISSION-ABSORPTION SPECTROSCOPY

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buchele, D. R.

    1994-01-01

    This computer program calculates the temperature profile of a flame or hot gas. Emphasis is on profiles found in jet engine or rocket engine exhaust streams containing water vapor or carbon dioxide as radiating gases. The temperature profile is assumed to be axisymmetric with a functional form controlled by two variable parameters. The parameters are calculated using measurements of gas radiation at two wavelengths in the infrared spectrum. Infrared emission and absorption measurements at two or more wavelengths provide a method of determining a gas temperature profile along a path through the gas by using a radiation source and receiver located outside the gas stream being measured. This permits simplified spectral scanning of a jet or rocket engine exhaust stream with the instrumentation outside the exhaust gas stream. This program provides an iterative-cyclic computation in which an initial assumed temperature profile is altered in shape until the computed emission and absorption agree, within specified limits, with the actual instrument measurements of emission and absorption. Temperature determination by experimental measurements of emission and absorption at two or more wavelengths is also provided by this program. Additionally, the program provides a technique for selecting the wavelengths to be used for determining the temperature profiles prior to the beginning of the experiment. By using this program feature, the experimenter has a higher probability of selecting wavelengths which will result in accurate temperature profile measurements. This program provides the user with a technique for determining whether this program will be sufficiently accurate for his particular application, as well as providing a means of finding the solution. The input to the program consists of four types of data: (1) computer program control constants, (2) measurements of gas radiance and transmittance at selected wavelengths, (3) tabulations from the literature of gas

  9. Simulation-based comparison of noise effects in wavelength modulation spectroscopy and direct absorption TDLAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lins, B.; Zinn, P.; Engelbrecht, R.; Schmauss, B.

    2010-08-01

    A simulative investigation of noise effects in wavelength modulation spectroscopy (WMS) and direct absorption diode laser absorption spectroscopy is presented. Special attention is paid to the impact of quantization noise of the analog-to-digital conversion (ADC) of the photodetector signal in the two detection schemes with the goal of estimating the necessary ADC resolution for each technique. With laser relative intensity noise (RIN), photodetector shot noise and thermal amplifier noise included, the strategies used for noise reduction in direct and wavelength modulation spectroscopy are compared by simulating two respective systems. Results show that because of the combined effects of dithering by RIN and signal averaging, the resolutions required for the direct absorption setup are only slightly higher than for the WMS setup. Only for small contributions of RIN an increase in resolution will significantly improve signal quality in the direct scheme.

  10. [Retrieval of tropospheric NO2 by multi axis differential optical absorption spectroscopy].

    PubMed

    Xu, Jin; Xie, Pin-hua; Si, Fu-qi; Dou, Ke; Li, Ang; Liu, Yu; Liu, Wen-qing

    2010-09-01

    A method of retrieving NO2 in troposphere based on multi axis differential optical absorption spectroscopy (MAX-DOAS) was introduced. The differential slant column density (dSCD) of NO2 was evaluated by differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS), removing the Fraunhofer structure and Ring effect. Combining the results of different observing directions, the tropospheric NO2 differential slant column density (deltaSCD) was evaluated, and the air mass factor (AMF) was calculated with the radiative transfer model SCIATRAN and the tropospheric NO2 vertical column density (VCD) was retrieved. To ensure the accuracy of the results, it was compared with the results of long path differential optical absorption spectroscopy (LP-DOAS), a good accordance was shown with the correlation coefficients of 0.94027 and 0.96924. PMID:21105419

  11. Lead determination at ng/mL level by flame atomic absorption spectrometry using a tantalum coated slotted quartz tube atom trap.

    PubMed

    Demirtaş, İlknur; Bakırdere, Sezgin; Ataman, O Yavuz

    2015-06-01

    Flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS) still keeps its importance despite the relatively low sensitivity; because it is a simple and economical technique for determination of metals. In recent years, atom traps have been developed to increase the sensitivity of FAAS. Although the detection limit of FAAS is only at the level of µg/mL, with the use of atom traps it can reach to ng/mL. Slotted quartz tube (SQT) is one of the atom traps used to improve sensitivity. In atom trapping mode of SQT, analyte is trapped on-line in SQT for few minutes using ordinary sample aspiration, followed by the introduction of a small volume of organic solvent to effect the revolatilization and atomization of analyte species resulting in a transient signal. This system is economical, commercially available and easy to use. In this study, a sensitive analytical method was developed for the determination of lead with the help of SQT atom trapping flame atomization (SQT-AT-FAAS). 574 Fold sensitivity enhancement was obtained at a sample suction rate of 3.9 mL/min for 5.0 min trapping period with respect to FAAS. Organic solvent was selected as 40 µL of methyl isobutyl ketone (MIBK). To obtain a further sensitivity enhancement inner surface of SQT was coated with several transition metals. The best sensitivity enhancement, 1650 fold enhancement, was obtained by the Ta-coated SQT-AT-FAAS. In addition, chemical nature of Pb species trapped on quartz and Ta surface, and the chemical nature of Ta on quartz surface were investigated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Raman Spectroscopy. Raman spectrometric results indicate that tantalum is coated on SQT surface in the form of Ta2O5. XPS studies revealed that the oxidation state of Pb in species trapped on both bare and Ta coated SQT surfaces is +2. For the accuracy check, the analyses of standard reference material were performed by use of SCP SCIENCE EnviroMAT Low (EU-L-2) and results for Pb were to be in good agreement with

  12. Investigations on Freon-assisted atomization of refractory analytes (Cr, Mo, Ti, V) in multielement electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinrich, Hans-Joachim; Matschat, Ralf

    2007-08-01

    Premixed 1% Freon in argon inner gas of various composition (CCl 2F 2, CHClF 2, CHF 3) was applied to graphite furnace atomizer to minimize unfavorable effects of carbide formation, such as signal tailing and memory effects in the simultaneous determination of Cr, Mo, Ti and V refractory analytes by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry using a multielement atomic absorption spectrometer. The effect of these gaseous additives was investigated when applied separately in atomization, pyrolysis and clean-out steps. The halogenation effects were analytically useful only under the precondition of using Ar-H 2 outer gas to the furnace to all heating steps, and also using this gas in the pre-atomization (drying, pyrolysis) steps. Optimum analytical performance was obtained when mixtures of 1% Freon in argon were applied just before and during the atomization step at a flow rate of 50 mL min - 1 and 2% hydrogen was used as purge gas. Using optimum conditions, signal tailings and carry-over contamination were reduced effectively and good precision (relative standard deviation below 1%) could be attained. Applying 1% CHClF 2 and an atomization temperature of 2550 °C, the characteristic masses obtained for simple aqueous solutions were 8.8 pg for Cr, 17 pg for Mo, 160 pg for Ti, and 74 pg for V. The limits of detection were 0.05, 0.2, 2.3 and 0.5 μg L - 1 for Cr, Mo, Ti and V, respectively. The developed method was applied to the analysis of digests of advanced ceramics. The accuracy of the procedure was confirmed by analyzing the certified reference material ERM-ED 102 (Boron Carbide Powder) and a silicon nitride powder distributed in the inter-laboratory comparison CCQM-P74.

  13. Characterization of the physico-chemical properties of polymeric materials for aerospace flight. [differential thermal and atomic absorption spectroscopic analysis of nickel cadmium batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rock, M.

    1981-01-01

    Electrodes and electrolytes of nickel cadmium sealed batteries were analyzed. Different thermal analysis of negative and positive battery electrodes was conducted and the temperature ranges of occurrence of endotherms indicating decomposition of cadmium hydroxide and nickel hydroxide are identified. Atomic absorption spectroscopy was used to analyze electrodes and electrolytes for traces of nickel, cadmium, cobalt, and potassium. Calibration curves and data are given for each sample analyzed. Instrumentation and analytical procedures used for each method are described.

  14. Optical and structural properties of plasma-treated Cordyceps bassiana spores as studied by circular dichroism, absorption, and fluorescence spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Geon Joon; Sim, Geon Bo; Choi, Eun Ha; Kwon, Young-Wan; Kim, Jun Young; Jang, Siun; Kim, Seong Hwan

    2015-01-01

    To understand the killing mechanism of fungal spores by plasma treatment, the optical, structural, and biological properties of the insect pathogenic fungus Cordyceps bassiana spores were studied. A nonthermal atmospheric-pressure plasma jet (APPJ) was used to treat the spores in aqueous solution. Optical emission spectra of the APPJ acquired in air indicated emission peaks corresponding to hydroxyl radicals and atomic oxygen. When the APPJ entered the aqueous solution, additional reactive species were derived from the interaction of plasma radicals with the aqueous solution. Fluorescence and absorption spectroscopy confirmed the generation of hydroxyl radicals and hydrogen peroxide in the plasma-activated water (PAW). Spore counting showed that plasma treatment significantly reduced spore viability. Absorption spectroscopy, circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy, and agarose gel electrophoresis of the DNA extracted from plasma-treated spores showed a reduction in spore DNA content. The magnitude of the dip in the CD spectrum was lower in the plasma-treated spores than in the control, indicating that plasma treatment causes structural modifications and/or damage to cellular components. Tryptophan fluorescence intensity was lower in the plasma-treated spores than in the control, suggesting that plasma treatment modified cell wall proteins. Changes in spore viability and DNA content were attributed to structural modification of the cell wall by reactive species coming from the APPJ and the PAW. Our results provided evidence that the plasma radicals and the derived reactive species play critical roles in fungal spore inactivation.

  15. Optical and structural properties of plasma-treated Cordyceps bassiana spores as studied by circular dichroism, absorption, and fluorescence spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Geon Joon Sim, Geon Bo; Choi, Eun Ha; Kim, Jun Young; Jang, Siun; Kim, Seong Hwan

    2015-01-14

    To understand the killing mechanism of fungal spores by plasma treatment, the optical, structural, and biological properties of the insect pathogenic fungus Cordyceps bassiana spores were studied. A nonthermal atmospheric-pressure plasma jet (APPJ) was used to treat the spores in aqueous solution. Optical emission spectra of the APPJ acquired in air indicated emission peaks corresponding to hydroxyl radicals and atomic oxygen. When the APPJ entered the aqueous solution, additional reactive species were derived from the interaction of plasma radicals with the aqueous solution. Fluorescence and absorption spectroscopy confirmed the generation of hydroxyl radicals and hydrogen peroxide in the plasma-activated water (PAW). Spore counting showed that plasma treatment significantly reduced spore viability. Absorption spectroscopy, circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy, and agarose gel electrophoresis of the DNA extracted from plasma-treated spores showed a reduction in spore DNA content. The magnitude of the dip in the CD spectrum was lower in the plasma-treated spores than in the control, indicating that plasma treatment causes structural modifications and/or damage to cellular components. Tryptophan fluorescence intensity was lower in the plasma-treated spores than in the control, suggesting that plasma treatment modified cell wall proteins. Changes in spore viability and DNA content were attributed to structural modification of the cell wall by reactive species coming from the APPJ and the PAW. Our results provided evidence that the plasma radicals and the derived reactive species play critical roles in fungal spore inactivation.

  16. Time-resolved characterization of a filamentary argon discharge at atmospheric pressure in a capillary using emission and absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schröter, Sandra; Pothiraja, Ramasamy; Awakowicz, Peter; Bibinov, Nikita; Böke, Marc; Niermann, Benedikt; Winter, Jörg

    2013-11-01

    An argon/nitrogen (0.999/0.001) filamentary pulsed discharge operated at atmospheric pressure in a quartz tube is characterized using voltage-current measurements, microphotography, optical emission spectroscopy (OES) and absorption spectroscopy. Nitrogen is applied as a sensor gas for the purpose of OES diagnostic. The density of argon metastable atoms Ar(3P2) is determined using tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (TDLAS). Using a plasma chemical model the measured OES data are applied for the characterization of the plasma conditions. Between intense positive pulses the discharge current oscillates with a damped amplitude. It is established that an electric current flows in this discharge not only through a thin plasma filament that is observed in the discharge image but also through the whole cross section of the quartz tube. A diffuse plasma fills the quartz tube during a time between intense current pulses. Ionization waves are propagating in this plasma between the spike and the grounded area of the tube producing thin plasma channels. The diameter of these channels increases during the pause between the propagation of ionization waves probably because of thermal expansion and diffusion. Inside the channels electron densities of ˜2 × 1013 cm-3, argon metastable densities ˜1014 cm-3 and a reduced electric field about 10 Td are determined.

  17. Absorption spectroscopy in the ultraviolet and visible spectral range of hexavalent chromium aqueous solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mignani, Anna G.; Spadoni, Lorenzo

    1999-09-01

    In order to demonstrate the possibility of performing direct absorption spectroscopy of Hexavalent Chromium aqueous solutions, absorption measurements were performed at the dual- beam spectrophotometer in the 250 - 850 nm spectral range, with 10 mm and 100 mm path lengths. Low concentration (26 - 520 (mu) g/l) (and high concentration (2.6 - 52 mg/l) solutions were analyzed, showing that it is possible to implement a basic instrumentation for risk condition monitoring and a more advanced instrumentation for quantitative measurements.

  18. Strong-field induced dissociation dynamics in 1,2-dibromoethane traced by femtosecond XUV transient absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatterley, A. S.; Lackner, F.; Neumark, D. M.; Leone, S. R.; Gessner, O.

    2016-05-01

    Strong field induced dissociation dynamics of the small haloalkane 1,2-dibromoethane (DBE) have been explored using femtosecond XUV transient absorption spectroscopy. Dynamics are initiated by a near IR pump pulse with intensities between 75 and 220 TW cm-2, and are probed by the atomic site specific XUV absorption of the Br 3d levels. Immediately upon ionization, the spectral signatures of molecular ions appear. These molecular peaks decay in tandem with the appearance of atomic Br peaks in charge states of 0, + 1 and + 2, which are all monitored simultaneously. Neutral Br atoms are eliminated in 300 fs, presumably from statistical dissociation of vibrationally hot DBE+ ions, Br+ ions are eliminated in 70 fs from a more energetic dissociative ionization pathway, and Br++ ions are eliminated within the duration of the 35 fs pump pulse. The simultaneous recording of multiple parent molecule and fragment ion traces enables new insight into predominant dissociation pathways induced by strong field ionization of organic molecules.

  19. Monitoring spacecraft atmosphere contaminants by laser absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinfeld, J. I.

    1976-01-01

    Laser-based spectrophotometric methods which have been proposed for the detection of trace concentrations of gaseous contaminants include Raman backscattering (LIDAR) and passive radiometry (LOPAIR). Remote sensing techniques using laser spectrometry are presented and in particular a simple long-path laser absorption method (LOLA), which is capable of resolving complex mixtures of closely related trace contaminants at ppm levels is discussed. A number of species were selected for study which are representative of those most likely to accumulate in closed environments, such as submarines or long-duration manned space flights. Computer programs were developed which will permit a real-time analysis of the monitored atmosphere. Estimates of the dynamic range of this monitoring technique for various system configurations, and comparison with other methods of analysis, are given.

  20. Total absorption spectroscopy of N = 51 nucleus 85Se

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goetz, K. C.; Grzywacz, R. K.; Rykaczewski, K. P.; Karny, M.; Fialkowska, A.; Wolinska-Cichocka, M.; Rasco, B. C.; Zganjar, E. F.; Johnson, J. W.; Gross, C. J.

    2014-09-01

    An experimental campaign utilizing the Modular Total Absorption Spectrometer (MTAS) was conducted at the HRIBF facility in January of 2012. The campaign studied 22 isotopes, many of which were identified as the highest priority for decay heat analysis during a nuclear fuel cycle, see the report by the OECD-IAEA Nuclear Energy Agency in 2007. The case of 85Se will be discussed. 85Se is a Z = 34, N = 51 nucleus with the valence neutron located in the positive parity sd single particle state. Therefore, its decay properties are determined by interplay between first forbidden decays of the valence neutron and Gamow-Teller decay of a 78Ni core. Analysis of the data obtained during the January 2012 run indicates a significant increase of the beta strength function when compared with previous measurements, see Ref..

  1. Studies in atomic-fluorescence spectroscopy-V The fluorescence characteristics and determination of antimony.

    PubMed

    Dagnall, R M; Thompson, K C; West, T S

    1967-10-01

    Atomic-fluorescence of antimony may be generated in an air-propane flame by nebulizing aqueous solutions of antimony salts whilst irradiating the flame by means of a microwave-excited electrode-less discharge tube operating at 30 W. The strongest fluorescence is exhibited by the (4)S(11 2 ) --> (4)P(1 3 ) 2311 A resonance line and weaker signals are observed at the 2068 and 2176 A resonance lines and at four intercombination lines, at 2598, 2671, 2770 and 2878 A. A process of thermally assisted direct-line fluorescence is postulated to account for the otherwise inexplicable intensity of the 2598 A line emission. Atomic-fluorescence spectroscopy at 2176 A permits the determination of antimony in the range 0.1-120 ppm with a detection limit of 0.05 ppm. With the same equipment and source, the range of measurement for atomic-absorption was 6-120 ppm and the detection limit was 1 ppm. No interferences were observed from 100-fold molar amounts of Cd, Co, Cu, Fe, Hg, K, Mg, Mn, Mo, Na, NH(4), Pb and Zn or from arsenate, chloride, nitrate, phosphate and sulphate. PMID:18960212

  2. Absolute atomic oxygen and nitrogen densities in radio-frequency driven atmospheric pressure cold plasmas: Synchrotron vacuum ultra-violet high-resolution Fourier-transform absorption measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Niemi, K.; O'Connell, D.; Gans, T.; Oliveira, N. de; Joyeux, D.; Nahon, L.; Booth, J. P.

    2013-07-15

    Reactive atomic species play a key role in emerging cold atmospheric pressure plasma applications, in particular, in plasma medicine. Absolute densities of atomic oxygen and atomic nitrogen were measured in a radio-frequency driven non-equilibrium plasma operated at atmospheric pressure using vacuum ultra-violet (VUV) absorption spectroscopy. The experiment was conducted on the DESIRS synchrotron beamline using a unique VUV Fourier-transform spectrometer. Measurements were carried out in plasmas operated in helium with air-like N{sub 2}/O{sub 2} (4:1) admixtures. A maximum in the O-atom concentration of (9.1 {+-} 0.7) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 20} m{sup -3} was found at admixtures of 0.35 vol. %, while the N-atom concentration exhibits a maximum of (5.7 {+-} 0.4) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 19} m{sup -3} at 0.1 vol. %.

  3. Americium characterization by X-ray fluorescence and absorption spectroscopy in plutonium uranium mixed oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Degueldre, Claude Cozzo, Cedric; Martin, Matthias; Grolimund, Daniel; Mieszczynski, Cyprian

    2013-06-01

    Plutonium uranium mixed oxide (MOX) fuels are currently used in nuclear reactors. The actinides in these fuels need to be analyzed after irradiation for assessing their behaviour with regard to their environment and the coolant. In this work the study of the atomic structure and next-neighbour environment of Am in the (Pu,U)O₂ lattice in an irradiated (60 MW d kg⁻¹) MOX sample was performed employing micro-X-ray fluorescence (µ-XRF) and micro-X-ray absorption fine structure (µ-XAFS) spectroscopy. The chemical bonds, valences and stoichiometry of Am (~0.66 wt%) are determined from the experimental data gained for the irradiated fuel material examined in its peripheral zone (rim) of the fuel. In the irradiated sample Am builds up as Am³⁺ species within an [AmO₈]¹³⁻ coordination environment (e.g. >90%) and no (<10%) Am(IV) or (V) can be detected in the rim zone. The occurrence of americium dioxide is avoided by the redox buffering activity of the uranium dioxide matrix. - Graphical abstract: Americium LIII XAFS spectra recorded for the irradiated MOX sub-sample in the rim zone for a 300 μm×300 μm beam size area investigated over six scans of 4 h. The records remain constant during multi-scan. The analysis of the XAFS signal shows that Am is found as trivalent in the UO₂ matrix. This analytical work shall open the door of very challenging analysis (speciation of fission product and actinides) in irradiated nuclear fuels. - Highlights: • Americium was characterized by microX-ray absorption spectroscopy in irradiated MOX fuel. • The americium redox state as determined from XAS data of irradiated fuel material was Am(III). • In the sample, the Am³⁺ face an AmO₈¹³⁻coordination environment in the (Pu,U)O₂ matrix. • The americium dioxide is reduced by the uranium dioxide matrix.

  4. A COMPUTER INTERFACE FOR A PERKIN-ELMER 5000 ATOMIC ABSORPTION INSTRUMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    This document contains a detailed description of an ASCII Character Buffer Interface designed to store and forward serial ASCII data received from an EIA RS-232C Interface. The particular application described herein concerns a Perkin-Elmer Model 5000 Atomic Absorption instrument...

  5. [Determination of lead in beard hair by atomic absorption spectrometry (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Graef, V

    1976-04-01

    The lead content of hair from the electric razor can be determined by atomic absorption spectrometry, using the micro-sampling technique of Delves. 1--5 mg of the washed and dried hair are partially oxidized with hydrogen peroxide prior to analysis. The method is simple and quick and therefore suited for the serial investigation of persons exposed to lead. PMID:1271019

  6. Determination of arsenic and selenium in environmental and agricultural samples by hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Hershey, J.W.; Oostdyk, T.S.; Keliher, P.N.

    1988-11-01

    Agricultural and environmental samples are digested with acid, and arsenic and selenium are determined using hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometry. Interelement interferences are eliminated by high acid concentrations or cation-exchange resins. Agreement with standard reference material is excellent. The technique is also applied to actual samples.

  7. COMPREHENSIVE ANALYSIS OF BIOLOGICALLY RELEVANT ARSENICALS BY PH-SELECTIVE HYDRIDE GENERATION-ATOMIC ABSORPTION SPECTROMETRY

    EPA Science Inventory


    A method based on pH-selective generation and separation of arsines is commonly used for analysis of inorganic, methylated, and dimethylated trivalent and pentavalent arsenicals by hydride generation-atomic absorption spectrometry (HG-AAS). We have optimized this method to pe...

  8. THE STANDARD CALIBRATION INSTRUMENT AUTOMATION SYSTEM FOR THE ATOMIC ABSORPTION SPECTROPHOTOMETER. PART I: FUNCTIONAL SPECIFICATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This document contains a project definition, a set of functional requirements, and a functional design for the automation of flameless atomic absorption (AA) spectrophotometers. The system is a real-time data acquisition system with 'on line' data reduction, quality control and r...

  9. The Use of an Air-Natural Gas Flame in Atomic Absorption.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Melucci, Robert C.

    1983-01-01

    Points out that excellent results are obtained using an air-natural gas flame in atomic absorption experiments rather than using an air-acetylene flame. Good results are obtained for alkali metals, copper, cadmium, and zinc but not for the alkaline earths since they form refractory oxides. (Author/JN)

  10. X-ray absorption spectroscopy for wire-array Z-pinches at the non-radiative stage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, V. V.; Hakel, P.; Mancini, R. C.; Chittenden, J. P.; Anderson, A.; Shevelko, A. P.; Wiewior, P.; Durmaz, T.; Altemara, S. D.; Papp, D.; Astanovitskiy, A. L.; Nalajala, V.; Chalyy, O.; Dmitriev, O.

    2011-12-01

    Absorption spectroscopy was applied to wire-array Z-pinches on the 1 MA pulsed-power Zebra generator at the Nevada Terawatt Facility (NTF). The 50 TW Leopard laser was coupled with the Zebra generator for X-ray backlighting of wire arrays at the ablation stage. Broadband X-ray emission from a laser-produced Sm plasma was used to backlight Al star wire arrays in the range of 7-9 Å. Two time-integrated X-ray conical spectrometers recorded reference and absorption spectra. The spectrometers were shielded from the bright Z-pinch X-ray burst by collimators. The comparison of plasma-transmitted spectra with reference spectra indicates absorption lines in the range of 8.1-8.4 Å. Analysis of Al K-shell absorption spectra with detailed atomic kinetics models shows a distribution of electron temperature in the range of 10-30 eV that was fitted with an effective two-temperature model. Temperature and density distributions in wire-array plasma were simulated with a three-dimension magneto-hydrodynamic code. Post-processing of this code's output yields synthetic transmission spectrum which is in general agreement with the data.

  11. Absorption spectroscopy of powdered materials using time-resolved diffuse optical methods.

    PubMed

    D'Andrea, Cosimo; Obraztsova, Ekaterina A; Farina, Andrea; Taroni, Paola; Lanzani, Guglielmo; Pifferi, Antonio

    2012-11-10

    In this paper a novel method, based on time-resolved diffuse optical spectroscopy, is proposed to measure the absorption of small amounts of nanostructured powder materials independent of scattering. Experimental validation, in the visible and near-infrared spectral range, has been carried out on India Inkparticles. The effectiveness of the technique to measure scattering-free absorption is demonstrated on carbon nanotubes. The comparison between the absorption spectra acquired by the proposed method and conventional measurements performed with a commercial spectrophotometer is discussed. PMID:23142900

  12. Lamb-Dicke spectroscopy of atoms in a hollow-core photonic crystal fibre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okaba, Shoichi; Takano, Tetsushi; Benabid, Fetah; Bradley, Tom; Vincetti, Luca; Maizelis, Zakhar; Yampol'Skii, Valery; Nori, Franco; Katori, Hidetoshi

    2014-06-01

    Unlike photons, which are conveniently handled by mirrors and optical fibres without loss of coherence, atoms lose their coherence via atom-atom and atom-wall interactions. This decoherence of atoms deteriorates the performance of atomic clocks and magnetometers, and also hinders their miniaturization. Here we report a novel platform for precision spectroscopy. Ultracold strontium atoms inside a kagome-lattice hollow-core photonic crystal fibre are transversely confined by an optical lattice to prevent atoms from interacting with the fibre wall. By confining at most one atom in each lattice site, to avoid atom-atom interactions and Doppler effect, a 7.8-kHz-wide spectrum is observed for the 1S0-3P1(m=0) transition. Atoms singly trapped in a magic lattice in hollow-core photonic crystal fibres improve the optical depth while preserving atomic coherence time.

  13. Lamb-Dicke spectroscopy of atoms in a hollow-core photonic crystal fibre.

    PubMed

    Okaba, Shoichi; Takano, Tetsushi; Benabid, Fetah; Bradley, Tom; Vincetti, Luca; Maizelis, Zakhar; Yampol'skii, Valery; Nori, Franco; Katori, Hidetoshi

    2014-01-01

    Unlike photons, which are conveniently handled by mirrors and optical fibres without loss of coherence, atoms lose their coherence via atom-atom and atom-wall interactions. This decoherence of atoms deteriorates the performance of atomic clocks and magnetometers, and also hinders their miniaturization. Here we report a novel platform for precision spectroscopy. Ultracold strontium atoms inside a kagome-lattice hollow-core photonic crystal fibre are transversely confined by an optical lattice to prevent atoms from interacting with the fibre wall. By confining at most one atom in each lattice site, to avoid atom-atom interactions and Doppler effect, a 7.8-kHz-wide spectrum is observed for the (1)S0-(3)P1(m=0) transition. Atoms singly trapped in a magic lattice in hollow-core photonic crystal fibres improve the optical depth while preserving atomic coherence time. PMID:24934478

  14. Difference Between Far-Infrared Photoconductivity Spectroscopy and Absorption Spectroscopy: Theoretical Evidence of the Electron Reservoir Mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toyoda, Tadashi; Fujita, Maho; Uchida, Tomohisa; Hiraiwa, Nobuyoshi; Fukuda, Taturo; Koizumi, Hideki; Zhang, Chao

    2013-08-01

    The intriguing difference between far-infrared photoconductivity spectroscopy and absorption spectroscopy in the measurement of the magnetoplasmon frequency in GaAs quantum wells reported by Holland et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 93, 186804 (2004)] remains unexplained to date. This Letter provides a consistent mechanism to solve this puzzle. The mechanism is based on the electron reservoir model for the integer quantum Hall effect in graphene [Phys. Lett. A 376, 616 (2012)]. We predict sharp kinks to appear in the magnetic induction dependence of the magnetoplasmon frequency at very low temperatures such as 14 mK in the same GaAs quantum well sample used by Holland et al..

  15. Testing interaction models by using x-ray absorption spectroscopy: solid Pb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Cicco, Andrea; Minicucci, Marco; Principi, Emiliano; Witkowska, Agnieszka; Rybicki, Jaroslaw; Laskowski, Robert

    2002-04-01

    Structural models obtained using classical molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and realistic interatomic potentials for solid metals are tested using experimental results obtained by x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS). Accurate L-edge extended x-ray absorption fine-structure (EXAFS) measurements of Pb grains dispersed in BN and graphite matrices have been collected for temperatures up to the melting point. The thermal expansion of the grains was measured by energy-dispersive x-ray diffraction techniques and found to be coincident with that of pure Pb up to the limit of the present measurements. L3-edge EXAFS measurements of solid Pb at various temperatures have been analysed using advanced data-analysis techniques (GNXAS) based on exact spherical-wave multiple-scattering simulation of the absorption cross-section. Realistic structural models for solid Pb were obtained from MD simulations using an empirical pair potential (Dzugutov, Larsson and Ebbsjo (DLE)), a tight-binding (TB) square-root functional, and an embedded-atom (EA) model potential parametrized by us. The short-range pair distribution function g(r) reconstructed by means of EXAFS is compared with those obtained by MD simulations. The empirical DLE potential, originally designed for the liquid state, is too soft, showing too-large values for the average distance R, variance σ2, and skewness β. The TB and EA potentials are both compatible with XAS data as regards the average distance and skewness of the first neighbours. The distance variance, associated with the thermal vibration amplitudes, is underestimated for the TB potential, while the EA model is found to be in agreement with XAS data. The present results are also compared with those from a previous EXAFS study on solid lead, where the cumulant expansion and a simple one-dimensional anharmonic oscillator model were used. The need for realistic interaction models and appropriate simulation schemes for reliable XAS data analysis is emphasized

  16. [Determination of sulfur in plant using a high-resolution continuum source atomic absorption spectrometer].

    PubMed

    Wang, Yu; Li, Jia-xi

    2009-05-01

    A method for the analysis of sulfur (S) in plant by molecular absorption of carbon monosulfide (CS) using a high-resolution continuum source atomic absorption spectrometer (CS AAS) with a fuel-rich air/acetylene flame has been devised. The strong CS absorption band was found around 258 nm. The half-widths of some absorption bands were of the order of picometers, the same as the common atomic absorption lines. The experimental procedure in this study provided optimized instrumental conditions (the ratio of acetylene to air, the burner height) and parameters, and researched the spectral interferences and chemical interferences. The influence of the organic solvents on the CS absorption signals and the different digestion procedures for the determination of sulfur were also investigated. The limit of detection achieved for sulfur was 14 mg x L(-1), using the CS wavelength of 257. 961 nm and a measurement time of 3 s. The accuracy and precision were verified by analysis of two plant standard reference materials. The major applications of this method have been used for the determination of sulfur in plant materials, such as leaves. Compared to the others, this method for the analysis of sulfur is rapid, easy and simple for sulfur determination in plant. PMID:19650504

  17. Quartz crystal microbalance and infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy characterization of bisphenol A absorption in the poly(acrylate) thin films.

    PubMed

    Li, Guifeng; Morita, Shigeaki; Ye, Shen; Tanaka, Masaru; Osawa, Masatoshi

    2004-02-01

    The absorption process of bisphenol A (BPA) in a number of poly(acrylate) thin films, such as poly(2-methoxyethyl acrylate) (PMEA), poly(ethyl acrylate) (PEA), poly(n-butyl methacrylate) (PBMA), and poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA), has been investigated by quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) and infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy (IRRAS) measurements. Both QCM and IRRAS measurements show that the BPA molecules absorb in PMEA, PEA, and PBMA thin films but not in PMMA thin film. The differences in the BPA absorption behavior are mainly attributed to the difference in the glass transition temperature (T(g)) between these polymers. This absorption behavior also depends on the BPA concentration and polymer film thickness. Furthermore, IRRAS characterization demonstrates that the hydrogen bonding is formed between the hydroxyl group in BPA and the carbonyl group in the poly(acrylate) thin films. BPA molecule absorbed in these polymer thin films can be removed by ethanol rinse treatment. By optimizing experimental conditions for the QCM electrode modified by PMEA thin film, detection limitation of approximately 1 ppb for BPA can be realized by the in situ QCM measurement. This method is expected to be a sensitive in situ detection way for trace BPA in the environmental study. PMID:14750877

  18. Multielement continuum-source atomic-absorption spectrometry with an echelle-spectrometer/image-dissector system.

    PubMed

    Masters, R; Hsiech, C; Pardue, H L

    1989-01-01

    The continued development of the echelle-spectrometer/image-dissector system for multielement determination by continuum-source atomic-absorption spectrometry is presented. Modifications of the instruments include the use of a 20-groove/mm echelle grating blazed at 76 degrees , and the removal of the magnetic shield from the image dissector. The spectral range is from 300 to 430 nm and the observed resolution is better than 0.005 nm at 400 nm. Calibration curves are linear up to an absorbance of 0.2, and absorption sensitivities are up to 4-fold better than with the previous design. Fundamental characteristics of the detector limit the application of the instrument to sequential single-element quantifications with the electrothermal atomizer, and to sequential multielement quantification with the flame atomizer. The further development of the instrument for simultaneous multielement qualification is discussed. PMID:18964682

  19. Enhanced Reverse Saturable Absorption and Optical Limiting in Heavy-Atom Substituted Phthalocyanines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perry, J. W.; Mansour, K.; Marder, S. R.; Alvarez, D., Jr.; Perry, K. J.; Choong, I.

    1994-01-01

    The reverse saturable absorption and optical limiting response of metal phthalocyaninies can be enhanced by using the heavy-atom effect. Phthalocyanines containing heavy metal atoms, such as In, Sn, and Pb show nearly a factor of two enhancement in the ratio of effective excited-state to ground-state absorption cross sections compared to those containing lighter atoms, such as Al and Si. In an f/8 optical geometry, homogeneous solutions of heavy metal phthalocyanines, at 30% linear transmission, limit 8-ns, 532-nm laser pulses to less than or equal to 3 (micro)J (the energy for 50% probability of eye damage) for incident pulses up to 800 (micro)J.

  20. Development of vacuum ultraviolet absorption spectroscopy system for wide measurement range of number density using a dual-tube inductively coupled plasma light source

    SciTech Connect

    Kuwahara, Akira; Matsui, Makoto; Yamagiwa, Yoshiki

    2012-12-15

    A vacuum ultraviolet absorption spectroscopy system for a wide measurement range of atomic number densities is developed. Dual-tube inductively coupled plasma was used as a light source. The probe beam profile was optimized for the target number density range by changing the mass flow rate of the inner and outer tubes. This system was verified using cold xenon gas. As a result, the measurement number density range was extended from the conventional two orders to five orders of magnitude.

  1. Development of vacuum ultraviolet absorption spectroscopy system for wide measurement range of number density using a dual-tube inductively coupled plasma light source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuwahara, Akira; Matsui, Makoto; Yamagiwa, Yoshiki

    2012-12-01

    A vacuum ultraviolet absorption spectroscopy system for a wide measurement range of atomic number densities is developed. Dual-tube inductively coupled plasma was used as a light source. The probe beam profile was optimized for the target number density range by changing the mass flow rate of the inner and outer tubes. This system was verified using cold xenon gas. As a result, the measurement number density range was extended from the conventional two orders to five orders of magnitude.

  2. A Simple LIBS (Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy) Laboratory Experiment to Introduce Undergraduates to Calibration Functions and Atomic Spectroscopy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chinni, Rosemarie C.

    2012-01-01

    This laboratory experiment introduces students to a different type of atomic spectroscopy: laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS). LIBS uses a laser-generated spark to excite the sample; once excited, the elemental emission is spectrally resolved and detected. The students use LIBS to analyze a series of standard synthetic silicate samples…

  3. Towards simultaneous measurements of electronic and structural properties in ultra-fast x-ray free electron laser absorption spectroscopy experiments

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Gaudin, J.; Fourment, C.; Cho, B. I.; Engelhorn, K.; Galtier, E.; Harmand, M.; Leguay, P. M.; Lee, H. J.; Nagler, B.; Nakatsutsumi, M.; et al

    2014-04-17

    The rapidly growing ultrafast science with X-ray lasers unveils atomic scale processes with unprecedented time resolution bringing the so called “molecular movie” within reach. X-ray absorption spectroscopy is one of the most powerful x-ray techniques providing both local atomic order and electronic structure when coupled with ad-hoc theory. Collecting absorption spectra within few x-ray pulses is possible only in a dispersive setup. We demonstrate ultrafast time-resolved measurements of the LIII-edge x-ray absorption near-edge spectra of irreversibly laser excited Molybdenum using an average of only few x-ray pulses with a signal to noise ratio limited only by the saturation level ofmore » the detector. The simplicity of the experimental set-up makes this technique versatile and applicable for a wide range of pump-probe experiments, particularly in the case of non-reversible processes.« less

  4. Towards simultaneous measurements of electronic and structural properties in ultra-fast x-ray free electron laser absorption spectroscopy experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Gaudin, J.; Fourment, C.; Cho, B. I.; Engelhorn, K.; Galtier, E.; Harmand, M.; Leguay, P. M.; Lee, H. J.; Nagler, B.; Nakatsutsumi, M.; Ozkan, C.; Störmer, M.; Toleikis, S.; Tschentscher, Th.; Heimann, P. A.; Dorchies, F.

    2014-04-17

    The rapidly growing ultrafast science with X-ray lasers unveils atomic scale processes with unprecedented time resolution bringing the so called “molecular movie” within reach. X-ray absorption spectroscopy is one of the most powerful x-ray techniques providing both local atomic order and electronic structure when coupled with ad-hoc theory. Collecting absorption spectra within few x-ray pulses is possible only in a dispersive setup. We demonstrate ultrafast time-resolved measurements of the LIII-edge x-ray absorption near-edge spectra of irreversibly laser excited Molybdenum using an average of only few x-ray pulses with a signal to noise ratio limited only by the saturation level of the detector. The simplicity of the experimental set-up makes this technique versatile and applicable for a wide range of pump-probe experiments, particularly in the case of non-reversible processes.

  5. Towards simultaneous measurements of electronic and structural properties in ultra-fast x-ray free electron laser absorption spectroscopy experiments

    PubMed Central

    Gaudin, J.; Fourment, C.; Cho, B. I.; Engelhorn, K.; Galtier, E.; Harmand, M.; Leguay, P. M.; Lee, H. J.; Nagler, B.; Nakatsutsumi, M.; Ozkan, C.; Störmer, M.; Toleikis, S.; Tschentscher, Th; Heimann, P. A.; Dorchies, F.

    2014-01-01

    The rapidly growing ultrafast science with X-ray lasers unveils atomic scale processes with unprecedented time resolution bringing the so called “molecular movie” within reach. X-ray absorption spectroscopy is one of the most powerful x-ray techniques providing both local atomic order and electronic structure when coupled with ad-hoc theory. Collecting absorption spectra within few x-ray pulses is possible only in a dispersive setup. We demonstrate ultrafast time-resolved measurements of the LIII-edge x-ray absorption near-edge spectra of irreversibly laser excited Molybdenum using an average of only few x-ray pulses with a signal to noise ratio limited only by the saturation level of the detector. The simplicity of the experimental set-up makes this technique versatile and applicable for a wide range of pump-probe experiments, particularly in the case of non-reversible processes. PMID:24740172

  6. Dielectric barrier discharge plasma atomizer for hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometry-Performance evaluation for selenium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duben, Ondřej; Boušek, Jaroslav; Dědina, Jiří; Kratzer, Jan

    2015-09-01

    Atomization of selenium hydride in a quartz dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) atomizer was optimized and its performance was compared to that of the externally heated quartz multiatomizer. Argon was found as the best DBD discharge gas employing a flow rate of 75 ml min- 1 Ar while the DBD power was optimized at 14 W. The detection limits reached 0.24 ng ml- 1 Se in the DBD and 0.15 ng ml- 1 Se in the multiatomizer. The tolerance of DBD to interferences is even better than with the multiatomizer.

  7. Subpicosecond IR transient absorption spectroscopy: measurement of internal conversion rates in DABCO vapor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glownia, J. H.; Misewich, J.; Sorokin, P. P.

    1987-09-01

    An apparatus combining subpicosecond 248.5 nm pump pulses with a time-resolved subpicosecond broadband infrared absorption spectroscopy probe has been utilized to measure an internal conversion rate in 1,4-diazabicyclo[2.2.2]octane vapor. A subpicosecond (⪅ 500 fs) internal conversion rate has been determined.

  8. LISA: the Italian CRG beamline for x-ray Absorption Spectroscopy at ESRF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    d'Acapito, F.; Trapananti, A.; Puri, A.

    2016-05-01

    LISA is the acronym of Linea Italiana per la Spettroscopia di Assorbimento di raggi X (Italian beamline for X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy) and is the upgrade of the former GILDA beamline installed on the BM08 bending magnet port of European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF). Within this contribution a full description of the project is provided.

  9. Application of x-ray absorption spectroscopy to the study of corrosion and inhibition

    SciTech Connect

    Davenport, A.J.; Isaacs, H.S.

    1991-01-01

    X-ray absorption spectroscopy is a powerful technique for determination of valency and coordination. Measurements can be made in air or in situ under electrochemical control. The technique will be described and its application to the analysis of passive oxide films, corrosion products, and inhibitors will be reviewed.

  10. Absorption and Scattering Coefficients: A Biophysical-Chemistry Experiment Using Reflectance Spectroscopy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cordon, Gabriela B.; Lagorio, M. Gabriela

    2007-01-01

    A biophysical-chemistry experiment, based on the reflectance spectroscopy for calculating the absorption and scattering coefficients of leaves is described. The results show that different plants species exhibit different values for both the coefficients because of their different pigment composition.

  11. Gas concentration measurement by optical similitude absorption spectroscopy: methodology and experimental demonstration.

    PubMed

    Anselmo, Christophe; Welschinger, Jean-Yves; Cariou, Jean-Pierre; Miffre, Alain; Rairoux, Patrick

    2016-06-13

    We propose a new methodology to measure gas concentration by light-absorption spectroscopy when the light source spectrum is larger than the spectral width of one or several molecular gas absorption lines. We named it optical similitude absorption spectroscopy (OSAS), as the gas concentration is derived from a similitude between the light source and the target gas spectra. The main OSAS-novelty lies in the development of a robust inversion methodology, based on the Newton-Raphson algorithm, which allows retrieving the target gas concentration from spectrally-integrated differential light-absorption measurements. As a proof, OSAS is applied in laboratory to the 2ν3 methane absorption band at 1.66 µm with uncertainties revealed by the Allan variance. OSAS has also been applied to non-dispersive infra-red and the optical correlation spectroscopy arrangements. This all-optics gas concentration retrieval does not require the use of a gas calibration cell and opens new tracks to atmospheric gas pollution and greenhouse gases sources monitoring. PMID:27410280

  12. Investigating single molecule adhesion by atomic force spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Stetter, Frank W S; Kienle, Sandra; Krysiak, Stefanie; Hugel, Thorsten

    2015-01-01

    Atomic force spectroscopy is an ideal tool to study molecules at surfaces and interfaces. An experimental protocol to couple a large variety of single molecules covalently onto an AFM tip is presented. At the same time the AFM tip is passivated to prevent unspecific interactions between the tip and the substrate, which is a prerequisite to study single molecules attached to the AFM tip. Analyses to determine the adhesion force, the adhesion length, and the free energy of these molecules on solid surfaces and bio-interfaces are shortly presented and external references for further reading are provided. Example molecules are the poly(amino acid) polytyrosine, the graft polymer PI-g-PS and the phospholipid POPE (1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine). These molecules are desorbed from different surfaces like CH3-SAMs, hydrogen terminated diamond and supported lipid bilayers under various solvent conditions. Finally, the advantages of force spectroscopic single molecule experiments are discussed including means to decide if truly a single molecule has been studied in the experiment. PMID:25867282

  13. X-ray absorption spectroscopy on the basis of hybrid X-pinch radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Tilikin, I. N. Shelkovenko, T. A.; Pikuz, S. A.; Knapp, P. F.; Hammer, D. A.

    2015-07-15

    Results of experiments on X-ray absorption spectroscopy carried out at the BIN (270 kA, 100 ns) and XP (450 kA, 45 ns) facilities are presented. Continuum radiation of a Mo hybrid X-pinch was used as probing radiation, against which absorption lines of the plasma of exploded Al wires placed in the return current circuit of a hybrid X-pinch, as well as in a two- and four-wire array, were observed. The experiments have demonstrated that the radiation of a hybrid X-pinch hot spot can be used as probing radiation for X-ray absorption spectroscopy and that, in many parameters, such a source surpasses those on the basis of laser-produced plasma. The plasma parameters in arrays made of two and four Al wires were studied experimentally.

  14. X-ray absorption spectroscopy on the basis of hybrid X-pinch radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tilikin, I. N.; Shelkovenko, T. A.; Pikuz, S. A.; Knapp, P. F.; Hammer, D. A.

    2015-07-01

    Results of experiments on X-ray absorption spectroscopy carried out at the BIN (270 kA, 100 ns) and XP (450 kA, 45 ns) facilities are presented. Continuum radiation of a Mo hybrid X-pinch was used as probing radiation, against which absorption lines of the plasma of exploded Al wires placed in the return current circuit of a hybrid X-pinch, as well as in a two- and four-wire array, were observed. The experiments have demonstrated that the radiation of a hybrid X-pinch hot spot can be used as probing radiation for X-ray absorption spectroscopy and that, in many parameters, such a source surpasses those on the basis of laser-produced plasma. The plasma parameters in arrays made of two and four Al wires were studied experimentally.

  15. Anisotropy of chemical bonding in semifluorinated graphite C2F revealed with angle-resolved X-ray absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Okotrub, Alexander V; Yudanov, Nikolay F; Asanov, Igor P; Vyalikh, Denis V; Bulusheva, Lyubov G

    2013-01-22

    Highly oriented pyrolytic graphite characterized by a low misorientation of crystallites is fluorinated using a gaseous mixture of BrF(3) with Br(2) at room temperature. The golden-colored product, easily delaminating into micrometer-size transparent flakes, is an intercalation compound where Br(2) molecules are hosted between fluorinated graphene layers of approximate C(2)F composition. To unravel the chemical bonding in semifluorinated graphite, we apply angle-resolved near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy and quantum-chemical modeling. The strong angular dependence of the CK and FK edge NEXAFS spectra on the incident radiation indicates that room-temperature-produced graphite fluoride is a highly anisotropic material, where half of the carbon atoms are covalently bonded with fluorine, while the rest of the carbon atoms preserve π electrons. Comparison of the experimental CK edge spectrum with theoretical spectra plotted for C(2)F models reveals that fluorine atoms are more likely to form chains. This conclusion agrees with the atomic force microscopy observation of a chain-like pattern on the surface of graphite fluoride layers. PMID:23214423

  16. Picosecond-TALIF and VUV absorption measurements of absolute atomic nitrogen densities from an RF atmospheric pressure plasma jet with He/O2/N2 gas mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    West, Andrew; Niemi, Kari; Schröter, Sandra; Bredin, Jerome; Gans, Timo; Wagenaars, Erik

    2015-09-01

    Reactive Oxygen and Nitrogen species (RONS) from RF atmospheric pressure plasma jets (APPJs) are important in biomedical applications as well as industrial plasma processing such as surface modification. Atomic oxygen has been well studied, whereas, despite its importance in the plasma chemistry, atomic nitrogen has been somewhat neglected due to its difficulty of measurement. We present absolute densities of atomic nitrogen in APPJs operating with He/O2/N2 gas mixtures in open air, using picosecond Two-photon Absorption Laser Induced Fluorescence (ps-TALIF) and vacuum ultra-violet (VUV) absorption spectroscopy. In order to apply the TALIF technique in complex, He/O2/N2 mixtures, we needed to directly measure the collisional quenching effects using picosecond pulse widths (32ps). Traditional calculated quenching corrections, used in nanosecond TALIF, are inadequate due to a lack of quenching data for complex mixtures. Absolute values for the densities were found by calibrating against a known density of Krypton. The VUV absorption experiments were conducted on the DESIRS synchrotron beamline using a unique VUV Fourier-transform spectrometer. Atomic nitrogen densities were on the order of 1020 m-3 with good agreement between TALIF and VUV absorption. UK EPSRC grant EP/K018388/1.

  17. Analytical control of wollastonite for biomedical applications by use of atomic absorption spectrometry and inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry.

    PubMed

    De Aza, P N; Guitián, F; De Aza, S; Valle, F J

    1998-04-01

    Preliminary in vitro experiments revealed that wollastonite (CaSiO3) is a potentially highly bioactive material that forms a hyroxyapatite (HA) surface layer on exposure to simulated body fluid with an ion concentration, pH and temperature virtually identical with those of human blood plasma. The formation of the HA layer is an essential requirement for an artificial material to be used as bioactive bone substitute. This finding opens up a wide field for biomedical applications of wollastonite. Biomaterials used as implants in the human body require strict control of trace elements and of the toxic species specified in American Society for Testing and Materials F-1185-88 (As, Cd, Hg and Pb) in ceramic hydroxyapatite for surgical implantation. In this work, two types of pseudowollastonite, the high temperature form of wollastonite, were analysed by using cold vapour atomic absorption spectrometry and hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometry, in order to determine the elements stated in the above-mentioned norm, and inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry to establish the SiO2/CaO ratio of the two materials and analyse for all other impurities introduced by the raw materials and by the processes of synthesis, sintering and grinding. Barium and Mg were especially prominent in raw materials, and Zr, Y, Mg, W, Co and Ni come mainly from the processing. PMID:9684401

  18. Ultra-soft x-ray absorption spectroscopy: A bulk and surface probe of materials

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, D.A. ); Mitchell, G.E.; Dekoven, B.M. ); Yeh, A.T.; Gland, J.L. ); Moodenbaugh, A.R. )

    1993-01-01

    Direct comparisons between surface and bulk of diverse materials can be made by simultaneous electron yield (5 nm depth sensitivity) and fluorescence yield (200 nm) ultra soft x-ray absorption spectroscopy measurements utilizing a rapid sample interchange apparatus. For example the orientations of functional groups have been characterized at and near the surface of a series of model polymeric materials highlighting the chemical and molecular sensitivity of ultra soft x-ray absorption spectroscopy. In addition we discuss a bulk sensitive use of fluorescence yield to non destructively study a buried metal polymer interface. A second bulk sensitive example is the use of fluorescence yield oxygen K near edge x-ray spectroscopy as a method to determine the hole state density of high Tc materials.

  19. Ultra-soft x-ray absorption spectroscopy: A bulk and surface probe of materials

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, D.A.; Mitchell, G.E.; Dekoven, B.M.; Yeh, A.T.; Gland, J.L.; Moodenbaugh, A.R.

    1993-06-01

    Direct comparisons between surface and bulk of diverse materials can be made by simultaneous electron yield (5 nm depth sensitivity) and fluorescence yield (200 nm) ultra soft x-ray absorption spectroscopy measurements utilizing a rapid sample interchange apparatus. For example the orientations of functional groups have been characterized at and near the surface of a series of model polymeric materials highlighting the chemical and molecular sensitivity of ultra soft x-ray absorption spectroscopy. In addition we discuss a bulk sensitive use of fluorescence yield to non destructively study a buried metal polymer interface. A second bulk sensitive example is the use of fluorescence yield oxygen K near edge x-ray spectroscopy as a method to determine the hole state density of high Tc materials.

  20. [The Diagnostics of Detonation Flow External Field Based on Multispectral Absorption Spectroscopy Technology].

    PubMed

    Lü, Xiao-jing; Li, Ning; Weng, Chun-sheng

    2016-03-01

    Compared with traditional sampling-based sensing method, absorption spectroscopy technology is well suitable for detonation flow diagnostics, since it can provide with us fast response, nonintrusive, sensitive solution for situ measurements of multiple flow-field parameters. The temperature and concentration test results are the average values along the laser path with traditional absorption spectroscopy technology, while the boundary of detonation flow external field is unknown and it changes all the time during the detonation engine works, traditional absorption spectroscopy technology is no longer suitable for detonation diagnostics. The trend of line strength with temperature varies with different absorption lines. By increasing the number of absorption lines in the test path, more information of the non-uniform flow field can be obtained. In this paper, based on multispectral absorption technology, the reconstructed model of detonation flow external field distribution was established according to the simulation results of space-time conservation element and solution element method, and a diagnostic method of detonation flow external field was given. The model deviation and calculation error of the least squares method adopted were studied by simulation, and the maximum concentration and temperature calculation error was 20.1% and 3.2%, respectively. Four absorption lines of H2O were chosen and detonation flow was scanned at the same time. The detonation external flow testing system was set up for the valveless gas-liquid continuous pulse detonation engine with the diameter of 80 mm. Through scanning H2O absorption lines with a high frequency of 10 kHz, the on-line detection of detonation external flow was realized by direct absorption method combined with time-division multiplexing technology, and the reconstruction of dynamic temperature distribution was realized as well for the first time, both verifying the feasibility of the test method. The test results

  1. [Influence of silver/silicon dioxide on infrared absorption spectroscopy of sodium nitrate].

    PubMed

    Yang, Shi-Ling; Yue, Li; Jia, Zhi-Jun

    2014-09-01

    Quickly detecting of ocean nutrient was one important task in marine pollution monitoring. We discovered the application of surface-enhanced infrared absorption spectroscopy in the detection of ocean nutrient through researching the evaporation of sodium nitrate solution. The silicon dioxide (SiO2) with highly dispersion was prepared by Stober method, The silver/silica (Ag/SiO2) composite materials were prepared by mixing ammonia solution and silicon dioxide aqueous solution. Three kinds of composite materials with different surface morphology were fabricated through optimizing the experimental parameter and changing the experimental process. The surface morphology, crystal orientation and surface plasmon resonance were investigated by means of the scanning electronic microscope (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), UV-Visible absorption spectrum and infrared ab- sorption spectroscopy. The SEM images showed that the sample A was purified SiO2, sample B and sample C were mixture of silver nanoparticle and silicon dioxide, while sample D was completed nanoshell structure. The absorption spectroscopy showed that there was surface plasmon resonance in the UV-visible region, while there was possibility of surface plasmon resonance in the Infrared absorption region. The effect of Ag/SiO2 composite material on the infrared absorption spectra of sodium nitrite solution was investigated through systematically analyzing the infrared absorption spectroscopy of sodium nitrate solution during its evaporation, i. e. the peak integration area of nitrate and the peak integration area of water molecule. The experimental results show that the integration area of nitrate was enhanced greatly during the evaporation process while the integration area of water molecule decreased continuously. The integration area of nitrate comes from the anti-symmetric stretch vibration and the enhancement of the vibration is attributed to the interface effect of Ag/SiO2 which is consistent with Jensen T

  2. X-ray absorption and photoemission spectroscopy of zinc protoporphyrin adsorbed on rutile TiO{sub 2}(110) prepared by in situ electrospray deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Rienzo, Anna; Mayor, Louise C.; Magnano, Graziano; Satterley, Christopher J.; O'Shea, James N.; Ataman, Evren; Schnadt, Joachim; Schulte, Karina

    2010-02-28

    Zinc-protoporphyrin, adsorbed on the rutile TiO{sub 2}(110) surface, has been studied using photoemission spectroscopy and near-edge absorption fine structure spectroscopy to deduce the nature of the molecule-surface bonding and the chemical environment of the central metal atom. To overcome the difficulties associated with sublimation of the porphyrin molecules, samples were prepared in situ using ultrahigh vacuum electrospray deposition, a technique which facilitates the deposition of nonvolatile and fragile molecules. Monolayers of Zn protoporphyrin are found to bond to the surface via the oxygen atoms of the deprotonated carboxyl groups. The molecules initially lie largely parallel to the surface, reorienting to an upright geometry as the coverage is increased up to a monolayer. For those molecules directly chemisorbed to the surface, the interaction is sufficiently strong to pull the central metal atom out of the molecule.

  3. The temperature measurement research for high-speed flow based on tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di, Yue; Jin, Yi; Jiang, Hong-liang; Zhai, Chao

    2013-09-01

    Due to the particularity of the high-speed flow, in order to accurately obtain its' temperature, the measurement system should has some characteristics of not interfereing with the flow, non-contact measurement and high time resolution. The traditional measurement method cannot meet the above requirements, however the measurement method based on tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (TDLAS) technology can meet the requirements for high-speed flow temperature measurement. When the near-infared light of a specific frequency is through the media to be measured, it will be absorbed by the water vapor molecules and then the transmission light intensity is detected by the detector. The temperature of the water vapor which is also the high-speed flow temperature, can be accurately obtained by the Beer-Lambert law. This paper focused on the research of absorption spectrum method for high speed flow temperature measurement with the scope of 250K-500K. Firstly, spectral line selection method for low temperature measurement of high-speed flow is discussed. Selected absorption lines should be isolated and have a high peak absorption within the range of 250-500K, at the same time the interference of the other lines should be avoided, so that a high measurement accuracy can be obtained. According to the near-infrared absorption spectra characteristics of water vapor, four absorption lines at the near 1395 nm and 1409 nm are selected. Secondly, a system for the temperature measurement of the water vapor in the high-speed flow is established. Room temperature are measured through two methods, direct absorption spectroscopy (DAS) and wavelength modulation spectroscopy (WMS) ,the results show that this system can realize on-line measurement of the temperature and the measurement error is about 3%. Finally, the system will be used for temperature measurement of the high-speed flow in the shock tunnel, its feasibility of measurement is analyzed.

  4. Laser spectroscopy of atoms in superfluid helium for the measurement of nuclear spins and electromagnetic moments of radioactive atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujita, T.; Furukawa, T.; Imamura, K.; Yang, X. F.; Hatakeyama, A.; Kobayashi, T.; Ueno, H.; Asahi, K.; Shimoda, T.; Matsuo, Y.

    2015-11-01

    A new laser spectroscopic method named "OROCHI (Optical RI-atom Observation in Condensed Helium as Ion catcher)" has been developed for deriving the nuclear spins and electromagnetic moments of low-yield exotic nuclei. In this method, we observe atomic Zeeman and hyperfine structures using laser-radio-frequency/microwave double-resonance spectroscopy. In our previous works, double-resonance spectroscopy was performed successfully with laser-sputtered stable atoms including non-alkali Au atoms as well as alkali Rb and Cs atoms. Following these works, measurements with 84-87Rb energetic ion beams were carried out in the RIKEN projectile fragment separator (RIPS). In this paper, we report the present status of OROCHI and discuss its feasibility, especially for low-yield nuclei such as unstable Au isotopes.

  5. Strong-Field Induced Dissociative Ionization of Vinyl Bromide Probed by Femtosecond Extreme Ultraviolet (xuv) Transient Absorption Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Ming-Fu; Neumark, Daniel; Leone, Stephen R.; Gessner, Oliver

    2014-06-01

    A table-top high harmonic XUV light source (50 eV to 70 eV) has been successfully utilized to explore the ultrafast dynamics of vinyl bromide (CH2=CHBr) with electronic state specificity and elemental sensitivity. Strong-field ionization (SFI) provides a method to produce ions in different ionic states. The production and dissociation dynamics of these ionic states are investigated by femtosecond XUV transient absorption spectroscopy. The XUV photons probe the time-dependent spectroscopic features associated with transitions of the Br (3d) inner-shell electrons to vacancies in molecular and atomic valence orbitals. The experimental observation shows that two ionic states are produced by SFI. The first ionic excited state is dissociative, leading to C-Br bond dissociation which is observed in real time as a shift in the absorption energy. The results offer powerful new insights about orbital-specific electronic processes in high field ionization, coupled vibrational relaxation and dissociation dynamics, and the correlation of valence hole-state location and dissociation in polyatomic molecules, all probed simultaneously by ultrafast table-top XUV spectroscopy.

  6. High pressure X-ray absorption spectroscopy studies of heavy-fermion cerium and uranium compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonio, Daniel

    Investigations into f- electron heavy-fermion materials have revealed a wide range of novel behavior. Hydrostatic pressure is a valuable "clean" non-thermal parameter that can be used to systematically study them by tuning their ground state properties. The rare earth compound CeCu2Ge 2 shows an unusual two-domed region of unconventional superconductivity under pressure, similar to its isostructural counterpart CeCu2Si2. While the lower pressure dome at about 10 GPa is caused by a magnetic quantum critical point (QCP), the higher one at about 16 GPa is less well understood. Previous structural measurements have indicated that it may be caused by critical valence fluctuations, so in this study the valence of CeCu 2Ge2 is directly measured using X-ray Absorption Near Edge Spectroscopy (XANES) under pressure in a diamond anvil cell up to 20 GPa. An expected valence discontinuity is not seen, but comparisons to CeCu 2Si2 show interesting similarities. Uranium's 5f electrons are intermediate between localized and delocalized. Studying the degree of localization is vital to completely understand the properties of actinides. Performing XANES and Partial Florescence Yield (PFY) measurements in a diamond anvil cell to tune the distance between uranium atoms, I have measured the energy shift in the white line of UCu2Si2, U3Ni 5Al19, and UCd11 with pressure. A positive shift in energy indicated a delocalization of 5f electrons, a change in 5f configurations, or a combination of both.

  7. Ritz wavelengths of Fe I, Si II and Ni II for quasar absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nave, Gillian

    2016-01-01

    The study of absorption lines in the spectra of galaxies along the line of sight to distant quasars can give important information about the abundances, ionization and kinematics of atoms within these galaxies. They have also been used to study the variability of the fine structure constant at high redshifts. However, the laboratory wavelengths need to be known to better than 6 parts in 108 (20 ms-1). A paper by M. Murphy and J. C. Berengut (2014, MNRAS 438,388) includes a table of spectral lines for which the laboratory wavelength uncertainties are greater than this, including 13 resonance lines of Fe I, 11 lines of Ni II, and 4 lines of Si II.Improved wavelengths for these lines were derived by re-analyzing archival spectra of iron hollow cathode lamps and a silicon carbide Penning discharge lamp. These spectra have previously been used in a comprehensive analysis of the spectrum of Fe I (Nave et al. 1994, ApJS 94, 221) and in a study of Si II, Si IV, and C IV for quasar spectroscopy (Griesmann & Kling, 2000, ApJ 536, L113). By re-optimizing the energy levels of Fe I, the absolute uncertainty of the resonance lines has been reduced by over a factor of 2 and the relative uncertainty by an order of magnitude. A similar analysis for Si II gives a improved values for the resonance lines with wavelength uncertainties of around 4 parts in 108. Analysis of new spectra of Ni II is in progress.

  8. Charge Carrier Dynamics of Quantum Confined Semiconductor Nanoparticles Analyzed via Transient Absorption Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thibert, Arthur Joseph, III

    Semiconductor nanoparticles are tiny crystalline structures (typically range from 1 - 100 nm) whose shape in many cases can be dictated through tailored chemical synthesis with atomic scale precision. The small size of these nanoparticles often results in quantum confinement (spatial confinement of wave functions), which imparts the ability to manipulate band-gap energies thus allowing them to be optimally engineered for different applications (i.e., photovoltaics, photocatalysis, imaging). However, charge carriers excited within these nanoparticles are often involved in many different processes: trapping, trap migration, Auger recombination, non-radiative relaxation, radiative relaxation, oxidation / reduction, or multiple exciton generation. Broadband ultrafast transient absorption laser spectroscopy is used to spectrally resolve the fate of excited charge carriers in both wavelength and time, providing insight as to what synthetic developments or operating conditions will be necessary to optimize their efficiency for certain applications. This thesis outlines the effort of resolving the dynamics of excited charge carriers for several Cd and Si based nanoparticle systems using this experimental technique. The thesis is organized into five chapters and two appendices as indicated below. Chapter 1 provides a brief introduction to the photophysics of semiconductor nanoparticles. It begins by defining what nanoparticles, semiconductors, charge carriers, and quantum confinement are. From there it details how the study of charge carrier dynamics within nanoparticles can lead to increased efficiency in applications such as photocatalysis. Finally, the experimental methodology associated with ultrafast transient absorption spectroscopy is introduced and its power in mapping charge carrier dynamics is established. Chapter 2 (JPCC, 19647, 2011) introduces the first of the studied samples: water-solubilized 2D CdSe nanoribbons (NRs), which were synthesized in the Osterloh

  9. Photocarrier dynamics in anatase TiO{sub 2} investigated by pump-probe absorption spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Matsuzaki, H. E-mail: okamotoh@k.u-tokyo.ac.jp; Matsui, Y.; Uchida, R.; Yada, H.; Terashige, T.; Li, B.-S.; Sawa, A.; Kawasaki, M.; Tokura, Y.; Okamoto, H. E-mail: okamotoh@k.u-tokyo.ac.jp

    2014-02-07

    The dynamics of photogenerated electrons and holes in undoped anatase TiO{sub 2} were studied by femtosecond absorption spectroscopy from the visible to mid-infrared region (0.1–2.0 eV). The transient absorption spectra exhibited clear metallic responses, which were well reproduced by a simple Drude model. No mid-gap absorptions originating from photocarrier localization were observed. The reduced optical mass of the photocarriers obtained from the Drude-model analysis is comparable to theoretically expected one. These results demonstrate that both photogenerated holes and electrons act as mobile carriers in anatase TiO{sub 2}. We also discuss scattering and recombination dynamics of photogenerated electrons and holes on the basis of the time dependence of absorption changes.

  10. Rate-equation model for quantitative concentration measurements in flames with picosecond pump-probe absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Fiechtner, G J; King, G B; Laurendeau, N M

    1995-02-20

    Measurement of radical concentrations is important in understanding the chemical kinetics involved in combustion. Application of optical techniques allows for the nonintrusive determination of specific radical concentrations. One of the most challenging problems for investigators is to obtain flame data that are independent of the collisional environment. We seek to obviate this difficulty by the use of picosecond pump-probe absorption spectroscopy. A picosecond pump-probe absorption model is developed by rate-equation analysis. Implications are discussed for a laser-pulse width that is much smaller than the excited-state lifetime of the absorbing atom or molecule. The possibility of quantitative, quenching-independent concentration measurements is discussed, and detection limits for atomic sodium and the hydroxyl radical are estimated. For a three-level absorber-emitter, the model leads to a novel pump-probe strategy, called dual-beam asynchronous optical sampling, that can be used to obtain both the electronic quenching-rate coefficient and the doublet mixing-rate coefficient during a single measurement. We discuss the successful demonstration of the technique in a companion paper [Appl. Opt. 34, XXX (1995)]. PMID:21037640

  11. THE STATE OF MANGANESE IN THE PHOTOSYNTHETIC APPARATUS: FIRST VIEW OF THE MANGANESE SITES BY X-RAY ABSORPTION SPECTROSCOPY

    SciTech Connect

    Kirby, Jon A.; Goodin, D. B.; Robertson, A. S.; Smith, J. P.; Thompson, A. C.; Klein, M. P.

    1980-11-01

    Manganese atoms have long been implicated as essential ingredients in photosynthetic oxygen evolution. Heretofore they have eluded direct observation. We report the first direct observation, by X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy, of the Mn sites in chloroplasts isolated from Spinacia oleracea. The manganese in chlorplasts is commonly thought to exist in two pools. The major pool, corresponding to two-thirds of the manganese, can be reversibly released with concomitant loss of oxygen evolving capacity, and has thus come to be assigned as the active pool. The role of the remanant one-third, or tightly bound pool is moot. Our analysis of the Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure of the active pool is consistent with a bridged dimeric structure involving two manganese atoms separated by about 2.7 {Angstroms}. The distance between manganese and bridging ligands is about 1.8 {Angstrom}. Analysis of the edge region suggests that the manganese in the active pool exists in oxidation states somewhat higher than Mn(II).

  12. The fabrication of superlow protein absorption zwitterionic coating by electrochemically mediated atom transfer radical polymerization and its application.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yichuan; Yang, Guang; Liang, Bo; Fang, Lu; Ma, Guanglong; Zhu, Qin; Chen, Shengfu; Ye, Xuesong

    2015-02-01

    A well-controllable electrochemically mediated surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization (e-siATRP) method for the fabrication of superlow protein absorption zwitterionic hydrogel coatings based on poly(sulbetaine methacrylate) (pSBMA) was developed in this work. The effects of the electric condition on polymerization as well as its antifouling performances both in vitro and in vivo were also investigated. Different potentials (-0.08 V, -0.15 V and -0.22 V) and polymerization times (from 8 to 48 h) were chosen to study the polymerization procedure. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy and ellipsometry measurements were used to characterize the properties of the polymer layers. Ellipsometry measurements showed that a higher potential provided faster polymerization and thicker polymer layers; however, the protein absorption experiments showed that the best polymerization condition was under a constant potential of -0.15 V and 32 h, under which the protein absorption was 0.8% in an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (compared to a bare gold electrode). The electrodes with a pSBMA coating effectively deduced the current sensitivity decay both in undiluted serum and in vivo. The usage of the commercially available polymerization monomer of SBMA, the simple convenient synthesis process regardless of the presence of oxygen and the excellent controllability of e-siATRP make it a very promising and universal technique in the preparation of zwitterionic polymer coatings, especially in the development of biocompatible material for implantable devices such as neural and biosensor electrodes. PMID:25463508

  13. Three-photon-absorption resonance for all-optical atomic clocks

    SciTech Connect

    Zibrov, Sergei; Novikova, Irina; Phillips, David F.; Taichenachev, Aleksei V.; Yudin, Valeriy I.; Walsworth, Ronald L.; Zibrov, Alexander S.

    2005-07-15

    We report an experimental study of an all-optical three-photon-absorption resonance (known as an 'N resonance') and discuss its potential application as an alternative to atomic clocks based on coherent population trapping. We present measurements of the N-resonance contrast, width and light shift for the D{sub 1} line of {sup 87}Rb with varying buffer gases, and find good agreement with an analytical model of this resonance. The results suggest that N resonances are promising for atomic clock applications.

  14. Atomic calculations and search for variation of the fine-structure constant in quasar absorption spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dzuba, V. A.; Flambaum, V. V.

    A brief review of the search for variation of the fine structure constant in quasar absorption spectra is presented. Special consideration is given to the role of atomic calculations in the analysis of the observed data. A range of methods which allow to perform calculations for atoms or ions with different electron structure and which cover practically all periodic table of elements is discussed. Critical compilation of the results of the calculations as well as a review of the most recent results of the analysis are presented.

  15. Evaluation of quartz tubes as atomization cells for gold determination by thermospray flame furnace atomic absorption spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morzan, Ezequiel; Piano, Ornela; Stripeikis, Jorge; Tudino, Mabel

    2012-11-01

    This work describes the development of a new analytical procedure able to determine gold by thermospray flame furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (TS-FF-AAS) using nickel tubes (NiT) and quartz tubes (QT) as atomization cells. Experiments involving changes in the flow injection operational parameters, reagent concentrations and sizes of the QT were performed in order to optimize sensitivity. Under the same operational conditions, it was observed that the employment of QT increases the sensitivity of gold determination when compared to the nickel tube. Since solutions of highly concentrated hydrochloric acid showed the best performance as carriers, quartz tubes were also preferred due to its greater tolerance to corrosion by mineral acids in comparison to NiT. In addition, changes in the internal diameter of the QT revealed an important improvement in sensitivity for smaller tubes. Under optimized conditions the main figures of merit showed values close to that of graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry with the addition of an excellent improvement of the sample throughput. They are: LOD (3 s): 0.004 μg mL- 1, sensitivity: 0.306 (μg mL- 1)- 1, RSD% (n = 10, 1 μg mL- 1): 2.5, linear range: 0.01-4 μg mL- 1 and sample throughput: 72 h- 1. This new method was employed for the determination of gold in homeopathic medicines with no need of sample digestion. Validation of the analytical results will be shown. A full discussion of the most relevant findings regarding the role of the atomization cell as a strategic key for improving sensitivity will be also provided.

  16. Electrothermal atomization atomic absorption spectrometry for the determination of lead in urine: results of an interlaboratory study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parsons, Patrick J.; Slavin, Walter

    1999-05-01

    Results of an interlaboratory study are reported for the determination of lead in urine. Two levels of a lyophilized material containing biologically-bound lead were prepared using pooled urine obtained from lead-poisoned children undergoing the CaNa 2EDTA mobilization test. The materials were circulated to a group of reference laboratories that participate in the `New York State Proficiency Testing Program for Blood Lead'. Results of the initial round-robin gave all-method consensus target values of 145±22 μg/l (S.D.) for lot 17 and 449±43 μg/l (S.D.) for lot 20. The interlaboratory exercise was repeated some 5 years later and consensus target values were re-calculated using the grand mean (excluding outliers) of results reported by laboratories using electrothermal atomization atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS). The re-calculated target values were 139±10 μg/l (S.D.) and 433±12 μg/l (S.D.). The urine reference materials were also analyzed for lead by several laboratories using other instrumental techniques including isotope dilution (ID), inductively coupled plasma (ICP) mass spectrometry (MS), flame atomic absorption with extraction, ICP-atomic emission spectrometry, ID-gas chromatography MS and flow injection-hydride generation AAS, thus providing a rich source of analytical data with which to characterize them. The materials were also used in a long-term validation study of an ETAAS method developed originally for blood lead determinations that has since been used unmodified for the determination of lead in urine also. Recently, urine lead method performance has been tracked in a proficiency testing program specifically for this analysis. In addition, a number of commercial control materials have been analyzed and evaluated.

  17. Minute Concentration Measurements of Simple Hydrocarbon Species Using Supercontinuum Laser Absorption Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Jihyung; Traina, Nicholas; Halloran, Michael; Lee, Tonghun

    2016-06-01

    Minute concentration measurements of simple hydrocarbon gases are demonstrated using near-infrared supercontinuum laser absorption spectroscopy. Absorption-based gas sensors, particularly when combined with optical fiber components, can significantly enhance diagnostic capabilities to unprecedented levels. However, these diagnostic techniques are subject to limitations under certain gas sensing applications where interference and harsh conditions dominate. Supercontinuum laser absorption spectroscopy is a novel laser-based diagnostic technique that can exceed the above-mentioned limitations and provide accurate and quantitative concentration measurement of simple hydrocarbon species while maintaining compatibility with telecommunications-grade optical fiber components. Supercontinuum radiation generated using a highly nonlinear photonic crystal fiber is used to probe rovibrational absorption bands of four hydrocarbon species using full-spectral absorption diagnostics. Absorption spectra of methane (CH4), acetylene (C2H2), and ethylene (C2H4) were measured in the near-infrared spectrum at various pressures and concentrations to determine the accuracy and feasibility of the diagnostic strategy. Absorption spectra of propane (C3H8) were subsequently probed between 1650 nm and 1700 nm, to demonstrate the applicability of the strategy. Measurements agreed very well with simulated spectra generated using the HITRAN database as well as with previous experimental results. Absorption spectra of CH4, C2H2, and C2H4 were then analyzed to determine their respective measurement accuracy and detection limit. Concentration measurements integrated from experimental results were in very good agreement with independent concentration measurements. Calculated detection limits of CH4, C2H2, and C2H4 at room temperature and atmospheric pressure are 0.1%, 0.09%, and 0.17%, respectively. PMID:27091905

  18. Spatial Resolution of Combined Wavelength Modulation Spectroscopy with Integrated Cavity Output Spectroscopy for Atomic Oxygen Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsui, Makoto; Nakajima, Daisuke

    2015-09-01

    For developments of thermal protection system, atomic oxygen plays important role. However, its measurement method has not been established because the pressure in front of TPS test materials is as high as a few kPa. Our group proposed combined wavelength modulation and integrated output spectroscopies based on the forbidden transition at OI 636 nm to measure the ground-state number densities. In this study, WM-ICOS system is developed and applied to a microwave oxygen plasma to evaluate measurable region. As a result, the estimated number density by ICOS could be measured as low as 1021 m21. For the condition, WM-ICOS was applied. The signal to noise ratio of the 2f signal was 40.4. Then, the sensitivity was improved about 26. This result corresponding to the measurement limit of the partial atomic oxygen pressure of 250 Pa. The sensitivity of WM-ICOS was found to enough to diagnose the shock layer in high enthalpy flows. However, the spatial resolution was as large as 8 mm. The size of the beam pattern depends on the cavity length, robust ness of the cavity and accuracy of the cavity alignment. In this presentation, the relationship among these parameters will be discussed.

  19. Rapid, Time-Division Multiplexed, Direct Absorption- and Wavelength Modulation-Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Klein, Alexander; Witzel, Oliver; Ebert, Volker

    2014-01-01

    We present a tunable diode laser spectrometer with a novel, rapid time multiplexed direct absorption- and wavelength modulation-spectroscopy operation mode. The new technique allows enhancing the precision and dynamic range of a tunable diode laser absorption spectrometer without sacrificing accuracy. The spectroscopic technique combines the benefits of absolute concentration measurements using calibration-free direct tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (dTDLAS) with the enhanced noise rejection of wavelength modulation spectroscopy (WMS). In this work we demonstrate for the first time a 125 Hz time division multiplexed (TDM-dTDLAS-WMS) spectroscopic scheme by alternating the modulation of a DFB-laser between a triangle-ramp (dTDLAS) and an additional 20 kHz sinusoidal modulation (WMS). The absolute concentration measurement via the dTDLAS-technique allows one to simultaneously calibrate the normalized 2f/1f-signal of the WMS-technique. A dTDLAS/WMS-spectrometer at 1.37 μm for H2O detection was built for experimental validation of the multiplexing scheme over a concentration range from 50 to 3000 ppmV (0.1 MPa, 293 K). A precision of 190 ppbV was achieved with an absorption length of 12.7 cm and an averaging time of two seconds. Our results show a five-fold improvement in precision over the entire concentration range and a significantly decreased averaging time of the spectrometer. PMID:25405508

  20. Symposium on atomic spectroscopy (SAS-83): abstracts and program

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1983-09-01

    Abstracts of papers given at the symposium are presented. Session topics include: Rydbergs, optical radiators, and planetary atoms; highly ionized atoms; ultraviolet radiation; theory, ion traps, and laser cooling; beam foil; and astronomy. (GHT)

  1. Determination of iodine in seaweed and table salt by an indirect atomic-absorption method.

    PubMed

    Wifladt, A M; Lund, W; Bye, R

    1989-03-01

    Decomposition methods based on fusion with alkali are discussed, with respect to the determination of iodine in biological material. It is shown that sodium hydroxide can be used for the decomposition of seaweed without loss of iodine. In spite of the oxidizing conditions, the iodine will be present as iodide in the final ash. The iodide can be determined by an indirect atomic-absorption method, based on the reaction between iodide and mercury(II), with determination of mercury by cold vapour atomic-absorption spectrometry. The basis of the method is discussed, and it is shown that the use of tin(II) as reductant is essential. The effect of the oxidation state of the iodine on the sensitivity of the method is pointed out. High concentrations of chloride interfere, but it is still possible to determine iodide in iodinated table salt. PMID:18964724

  2. Determination of tetraalkyllead compounds in gasoline by liquid chromatography-atomic absorption spectrometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Messman, J.D.; Rains, T.C.

    1981-01-01

    A liquid chromatography-atomic absorption spectrometry (LC-AAS) hybrid analytical technique is presented for metal speciation measurements on complex liquid samples. The versatility and inherent metal selectivity of the technique are Illustrated by the rapid determination of five tetraalkyllead compounds in commercial gasoline. Separation of the individual tetraalkyllead species is achieved by reversed-phase liquid chromatography using an acetonitrile/water mobile phase. The effluent from the liquid Chromatograph Is introduced directly into the aspiration uptake capillary of the nebulizer of an air/acetylene flame atomic absorption spectrometer. Spectral interferences due to coeluting hydrocarbon matrix constituents were not observed at the 283.3-nm resonance line of lead used for analysis. Detection limits of this LC-AAS hydrid analytical technique, based on a 20-??L injection, are approximately 10 ng Pb for each tetraalkyllead compound.

  3. Studies of the residual absorption of HTSC at submillimeter wavelengths by means of photothermal interference spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Barowski, H.S.; Arnold, A.; Eder, R.

    1996-12-31

    The determination of the residual, low temperature absorption of high temperature superconductors is of interest for applications of this new materials at submillimeter wavelengths and of basic interest. The photothermal interference spectroscopy allows to measure the residual, low temperature absorption of a HTSC. For the determination of the residual absorption of a superconductor a far-infrared beam is periodically modulated and focused on the sample. Absorption leads to a periodic change of the temperature of the sample surface and, due to heat diffusion, also in the gas volume adjacent to the sample. This temperature change in the gas is detected via the refractive index change using a two beam interferometer. The authors studied the residual losses of YBaCuO thin films on various substrates and of BiSrCaCuO (2212) single crystals at submillimeter wavelengths. They find that the frequency dependence of the absorptivity, which shows a frequency squared behavior at microwave frequencies, is less than quadratic at THz-frequencies. The YBaCuO thin films show a plateau between 0.6 THz and 4 THz with an absolute value of the absorptivity of about 10{sup {minus}2}. A BiSrCaCuO single crystal shows a plateau between 1 THz and 4 THz with an absorptivity in the order of 10{sup {minus}3}.

  4. Studies on mass energy-absorption coefficients and effective atomic energy-absorption cross sections for carbohydrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ladhaf, Bibifatima M.; Pawar, Pravina P.

    2015-04-01

    We measured here the mass attenuation coefficients (μ/ρ) of carbohydrates, Esculine (C15H16O9), Sucrose (C12H22O11), Sorbitol (C6H14O6), D-Galactose (C6H12O6), Inositol (C6H12O6), D-Xylose (C5H10O5) covering the energy range from 122 keV up to 1330 keV photon energies by using gamma ray transmission method in a narrow beam good geometry set-up. The gamma-rays were detected using NaI(Tl) scintillation detection system with a resolution of 8.2% at 662 keV. The attenuation coefficient data were then used to obtain the total attenuation cross-section (σtot), molar extinction coefficients (ε), mass-energy absorption coefficients (μen/ρ) and effective (average) atomic energy-absorption cross section (σa,en) of the compounds. These values are found to be in good agreement with the theoretical values calculated based on XCOM data.

  5. Infrared-laser spectroscopy using a long-pathlength absorption cell

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, K.C.; Briesmeister, R.A.

    1983-01-01

    The absorption measurements in an ordinary cell may require typically a few torr pressure of sample gas. At these pressures the absorption lines are usually pressure-broadened and, therefore, closely spaced transitions are poorly resolved even at diode-laser resolution. This situation is greatly improved in Doppler-limited spectroscopy at extremely low sample pressures. Two very long-pathlength absorption cells were developed to be used in conjunction with diode lasers. They were designed to operate at controlled temperatures with the optical pathlength variable up to approx. 1.5 km. Not only very low sample pressures are used for studies with such cells but also the spectroscopic sensitivity is enhanced over conventional methods by a factor of 10/sup 3/ to 10/sup 4/, improving the analytical capability of measuring particle densities to the order of 1 x 10'' molecules/cm/sup 3/. This paper presents some analytical aspects of the diode laser spectroscopy using the long-pathlength absorption cells in the areas of absorption line widths, pressure broadening coefficients, isotope composition measurements and trace impurity analysis.

  6. Photodissociation of thioglycolic acid studied by femtosecond time-resolved transient absorption spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Attar, Andrew R.; Blumling, Daniel E.; Knappenberger, Kenneth L. Jr.

    2011-01-14

    Steady-state and time-resolved spectroscopies were employed to study the photodissociation of both the neutral (HS-CH{sub 2}-COOH) and doubly deprotonated ({sup -}S-CH{sub 2}-COO{sup -}) forms of thioglycolic acid (TGA), a common surface-passivating ligand used in the aqueous synthesis and organization of semiconducting nanostructures. Room temperature UV-Vis absorption spectroscopy indicated strong absorption by the S{sub 1} and S{sub 2} excited states at 250 nm and 185 nm, respectively. The spectrum also contained a weaker absorption band that extended to approximately 550 nm, which was assigned to the {pi}{sub CO}{sup *}(leftarrow)n{sub O} transition. Femtosecond time-resolved transient absorption spectroscopy was performed on TGA using 400 nm excitation and a white-light continuum probe to provide the temporally and spectrally resolved data. Both forms of TGA underwent a photoinduced dissociation from the excited state to form an {alpha}-thiol-substituted acyl radical ({alpha}-TAR, S-CH{sub 2}-CO). For the acidic form of TGA, radical formation occurred with an apparent time constant of 60 {+-} 5 fs; subsequent unimolecular decay took 400 {+-} 60 fs. Similar kinetics were observed for the deprotonated form of TGA (70 {+-} 10 fs radical formation; 420 {+-} 40 fs decay). The production of the {alpha}-TAR was corroborated by the observation of its characteristic optical absorption. Time-resolved data indicated that the photoinduced dissociation of TGA via cleavage of the C-OH bond occurred rapidly ({<=}100 fs). The prevalence of TGA in aqueous semiconducting nanoparticles makes its absorption in the visible spectral region and subsequent dissociation key to understanding the behavior of nanoscale systems.

  7. Observation of an electromagnetically induced change of absorption in multilevel rubidium atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yong-Qing; Jin, Shao-Zheng; Xiao, Min

    1995-03-01

    A 64.4% reduction in absorption at the rubidium D2 line is observed when a pumping field at 775.8 nm is tuned on resonance to the transition between the excited states 5P3/2 and 5D5/2. As the pumping field is tuned off resonance, an absorption peak appears at the side of the Doppler-broadened D2 line. This modification in absorption is related to pumping-induced atomic coherence in this three-level ladder-type system. This experiment is done in a Rb vapor cell at room temperature and with cw diode lasers for both pumping and probe beams in a Doppler-free configuration.

  8. Chiral-index resolved length mapping of carbon nanotubes in solution using electric-field induced differential absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wenshan; Hennrich, Frank; Flavel, Benjamin S.; Kappes, Manfred M.; Krupke, Ralph

    2016-09-01

    The length of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) is an important metric for the integration of SWCNTs into devices and for the performance of SWCNT-based electronic or optoelectronic applications. In this work we propose a rather simple method based on electric-field induced differential absorption spectroscopy to measure the chiral-index-resolved average length of SWCNTs in dispersions. The method takes advantage of the electric-field induced length-dependent dipole moment of nanotubes and has been verified and calibrated by atomic force microscopy. This method not only provides a low cost, in situ approach for length measurements of SWCNTs in dispersion, but due to the sensitivity of the method to the SWCNT chiral index, the chiral index dependent average length of fractions obtained by chromatographic sorting can also be derived. Also, the determination of the chiral-index resolved length distribution seems to be possible using this method.

  9. Diagnostics of reactive pulsed plasmas by UV and VUV absorption spectroscopy and by modulated beam Mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cunge, Gilles

    2011-10-01

    Pulsed plasmas are promising for etching applications in the microelectronic industry. However, many new phenomena are involved when a high density discharge is pulsed. To better understand these processes it is necessary to probe the radicals' kinetics with a microsecond resolution. We have developed several diagnostics to reach this goal including broad band absorption spectroscopy with UV LEDs to detect small polyatomic radicals and with a deuterium VUV source to detect larger closed shell molecules and the modulated mass spectrometry to monitor atomic species. We will discuss the impact of the plasma pulsing frequency and duty cycle on the radical densities in Cl2 based plasmas, and the consequences on plasma processes. Work done in collaboration with Paul Bodart, Melisa Brihoum, Maxime Darnon, Erwin Pargon, Olivier Joubert, and Nader Sadeghi, CNRS/LTM.

  10. Spectroscopy of acetylene Rydberg states studied by VUV absorption and (3+1)-Resonantly Enhanced Multiphoton Ionisation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyé, Séverine; Campos, Andrea; Fillion, Jean-Hugues; Douin, Stéphane; Shafizadeh, Niloufar; Gauyacq, Dolores

    2004-03-01

    The ungerade ns+ nd Rydberg states of C 2H 2 converging to the ground state of the C 2H 2+ cation have been investigated in the energy range 74 000- 88 000 cm-1 by (3+1)-multiphoton ionisation (REMPI) and by VUV absorption spectroscopy at the Super-ACO synchrotron radiation facility. Both methods have allowed the selective analysis of the Rydberg transitions with rotational resolution. Mulliken's semi-united atom model, in which predissociation has been taken into account, was used to understand the relative three-photon intensities among the different electronic transitions within the same Rydberg supercomplex. Lifetimes have been evaluated and illustrate very different behaviours towards predissociation for the observed Rydberg states. To cite this article: S. Boyé et al., C. R. Physique 5 (2004).

  11. Temporally resolved characterization of shock-heated foam target with Al absorption spectroscopy for fast electron transport study

    SciTech Connect

    Yabuuchi, T.; Sawada, H.; Wei, M. S.; Beg, F. N.; Regan, S. P.; Anderson, K.; Betti, R.; Hund, J.; Paguio, R. R.; Saito, K. M.; Stephens, R. B.; Key, M. H.; Mackinnon, A. J.; McLean, H. S.; Patel, P. K.; Wilks, S. C.

    2012-09-15

    The CH foam plasma produced by a laser-driven shock wave has been characterized by a temporally resolved Al 1s-2p absorption spectroscopy technique. A 200 mg/cm{sup 3} foam target with Al dopant was developed for this experiment, which used an OMEGA EP [D. D. Meyerhofer et al., J. Phys.: Conf. Ser. 244, 032010 (2010)] long pulse beam with an energy of 1.2 kJ and 3.5 ns pulselength. The plasma temperatures were inferred with the accuracy of 5 eV from the fits to the measurements using an atomic physics code. The results show that the inferred temperature is sustained at 40-45 eV between 6 and 7 ns and decreases to 25 eV at 8 ns. 2-D radiation hydrodynamic simulations show a good agreement with the measurements. Application of the shock-heated foam plasma platform toward fast electron transport experiments is discussed.

  12. Assignment of benzodiazepine UV absorption spectra by the use of photoelectron spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khvostenko, O. G.; Tzeplin, E. E.; Lomakin, G. S.

    2002-04-01

    Correlations between singlet transition energies and energy gaps of corresponding pairs of occupied and unoccupied molecular orbitals were revealed in a series of benzodiazepines. The occupied orbital energies were taken from the photoelectron spectra of the compound investigated, the unoccupied ones were obtained from MNDO/d calculations, and the singlet energies were taken from the UV absorption spectra. The correspondence of the singlet transitions to certain molecular orbitals was established using MNDO/d calculations and comparing between UV and photoelectron spectra. It has been concluded that photoelectron spectroscopy can be applied for interpretation of UV absorption spectra of various compounds on the basis of similar correlations.

  13. Lamb-Dicke spectroscopy of atoms in a hollow-core photonic crystal fibre

    PubMed Central

    Okaba, Shoichi; Takano, Tetsushi; Benabid, Fetah; Bradley, Tom; Vincetti, Luca; Maizelis, Zakhar; Yampol'skii, Valery; Nori, Franco; Katori, Hidetoshi

    2014-01-01

    Unlike photons, which are conveniently handled by mirrors and optical fibres without loss of coherence, atoms lose their coherence via atom–atom and atom–wall interactions. This decoherence of atoms deteriorates the performance of atomic clocks and magnetometers, and also hinders their miniaturization. Here we report a novel platform for precision spectroscopy. Ultracold strontium atoms inside a kagome-lattice hollow-core photonic crystal fibre are transversely confined by an optical lattice to prevent atoms from interacting with the fibre wall. By confining at most one atom in each lattice site, to avoid atom–atom interactions and Doppler effect, a 7.8-kHz-wide spectrum is observed for the 1S0−3P1(m=0) transition. Atoms singly trapped in a magic lattice in hollow-core photonic crystal fibres improve the optical depth while preserving atomic coherence time. PMID:24934478

  14. Incorporation of Trace Elements in Ancient and Modern Human Bone: An X-Ray Absorption Spectroscopy Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pingitore, N. E.; Cruz-Jimenez, G.; Price, T. D.

    2001-12-01

    X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) affords the opportunity to probe the atomic environment of trace elements in human bone. We are using XAS to investigate the mode(s) of incorporation of Sr, Zn, Pb, and Ba in both modern and ancient (and thus possibly altered) human and animal bone. Because burial and diagenesis may add trace elements to bone, we performed XAS analysis on samples of pristine contemporary and ancient, buried human and animal bone. We assume that deposition of these elements during burial occurs by processes distinct from those in vivo, and this will be reflected in their atomic environments. Archaeologists measure strontium in human and animal bone as a guide to diet. Carnivores show lower Sr/Ca ratios than their herbivore prey due to discrimination against Sr relative to Ca up the food chain. In an initial sample suite no difference was observed between modern and buried bone. Analysis of additional buried samples, using a more sensitive detector, revealed significant differences in the distance to the second and third neighbors of the Sr in some of the buried samples. Distances to the first neighbor, oxygen, were similar in all samples. Zinc is also used in paleo-diet studies. Initial x-ray absorption spectroscopy of a limited suite of bones did not reveal any differences between modern and buried samples. This may reflect the limited number of samples examined or the low levels of Zn in typical aqueous solutions in soils. Signals from barium and lead were too low to record useful XAS spectra. Additional samples will be studied for Zn, Ba, and Pb. We conducted our XAS experiments on beam lines 4-1 and 4-3 at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory. Data were collected in the fluorescence mode, using a Lytle detector and appropriate filter, and a solid state, 13-element Ge-detector.

  15. Sulfur and nitrogen speciation in humic substances by x-ray absorption near-edge structure spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Vairavamurthy, M.A.; Wang, Shenghe; Maletic, D.

    1996-12-31

    Understanding the chemical composition and structure of complex macromolecules in the geosphere, such as humic substances and kerogen, poses a challenging analytical problem. Widely used chromatographic techniques, such as the pyrolysis GC-MS, cause severe changes in structure during preparation and analysis of the sample, and thus, may not give accurate information. An important non-destructive technique that is becoming popular in speciation studies of environmental and geochemical samples is x-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy. We used the x-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANFS) spectroscopy for examining the speciation of sulfur and nitrogen in humic substances of different origins, including soil and marine sediments. XANES provides information on the characteristics of the functional groups containing these atoms because of its sensitivity to the electronic structure, oxidation state, and the geometry of the neighboring atoms. Organic sulfides, di- and poly-sulfides, sulfonates and organic sulfates are the major forms of sulfur detected in all the humics we examined. The oxidized sulfonate-sulfur dominates the composition of sulfur species in soil humics accounting for more than 60% of the total sulfur. In marine humics, although sulfonates are abundant in near-surface sediments, reduced sulfur species, particularly di-and poly-sulfides, also constitute an important fraction. The nitrogen XANES indicates the dominance of amino and amide groups among nitrogen functionalities, although porphyrinic and pyridinic groups also are present. The significance of these results for the transformations of nitrogen and sulfur in soil and sedimentary systems will be presented.

  16. Speciation analysis of arsenic in biological matrices by automated hydride generation-cryotrapping-atomic absorption spectrometry with multiple microflame quartz tube atomizer (multiatomizer).

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper describes an automated system for the oxidation state specific speciation of inorganic and methylated arsenicals by selective hydride generation - cryotrapping- gas chromatography - atomic absorption spectrometry with the multiatomizer. The corresponding arsines are ge...

  17. Ultrathin atomic vapor film transmission spectroscopy: analysis of Dicke narrowing structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yuanyuan; Zhang, Yanpeng; Gan, Chenli

    2005-11-01

    Transmission sub-Doppler spectroscopy with confined atomic vapor film between two dielectric walls is theoretically studied. Because of atoms flying from wall to wall, where they get de-excited, the atom-field interaction time is anisotropic so that the contribution of slow atoms is enhanced, a sub-Doppler transmission spectroscopy (Dicke narrowing effect) can be obtained when the thickness of the film is much small or comparable with the wavelength even at small angle oblique incidence. It is feasible to get a sub-Doppler structure in a new region (L < ?/4) in experiments.

  18. Cadmium, copper, lead, and zinc determination in precipitation: A comparison of inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry and graphite furnace atomization atomic absorption spectrometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reddy, M.M.; Benefiel, M.A.; Claassen, H.C.

    1987-01-01

    Selected trace element analysis for cadmium, copper, lead, and zinc in precipitation samples by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission Spectrometry (ICP) and by atomic absorption spectrometry with graphite furnace atomization (AAGF) have been evaluated. This task was conducted in conjunction with a longterm study of precipitation chemistry at high altitude sites located in remote areas of the southwestern United States. Coefficients of variation and recovery values were determined for a standard reference water sample for all metals examined for both techniques. At concentration levels less than 10 micrograms per liter AAGF analyses exhibited better precision and accuracy than ICP. Both methods appear to offer the potential for cost-effective analysis of trace metal ions in precipitation. ?? 1987 Springer-Verlag.

  19. Mechanism of Pb Adsorption to Fatty Acid Langmuir Monolayers Studied by X-ray Absorption Fine Structure Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Boyanov, M.I.; Kmetko, J.; Shibata, T.; Datta, A.; Dutta, P.; Bunker, B.A.

    2010-09-30

    The local atomic environment of lead (Pb) adsorbed to a CH{sub 3}(CH{sub 2}){sub 19}COOH Langmuir monolayer was investigated in situ using grazing-incidence X-ray absorption fine structure (GI-XAFS) spectroscopy at the Pb L{sub III} edge. Measurements were performed at pH 6.5 of the 10{sup -5} M PbCl{sub 2} solution subphase, a condition under which grazing incidence diffraction (GID) revealed a large-area commensurate superstructure underneath the close-packed organic monolayer. The XAFS results indicate covalent binding of the Pb cations to the carboxyl headgroups, and the observed Pb-Pb coordination suggests that the metal is adsorbed as a hydrolysis polymer, rather than as individual Pb{sup 2+} ions. The data are consistent with a bidentate chelating mechanism and a one Pb atom to one carboxyl headgroup binding stoichiometry. We discuss how this adsorption model can explain the peculiarities observed with Pb in previous metal-Langmuir monolayer studies. A systematic study of lead perchlorate and lead acetate aqueous solutions is presented and used in the analysis. XAFS multiple scattering effects from alignment of the Pb-C-C atoms in the lead acetate solutions are reported.

  20. Proposal for efficient two-dimensional atom localization using probe absorption in a microwave-driven four-level atomic system

    SciTech Connect

    Ding Chunling; Li Jiahua; Yang Xiaoxue; Xiong Hao; Zhang Duo

    2011-10-15

    The behavior of two-dimensional (2D) atom localization is explored by monitoring the probe absorption in a microwave-driven four-level atomic medium under the action of two orthogonal standing-wave fields. Because of the position-dependent atom-field interaction, the information about the position of the atom can be obtained via the absorption measurement of the weak probe field. It is found that the localization behavior is significantly improved due to the joint quantum interference induced by the standing-wave and microwave-driven fields. Most importantly, the atom can be localized at a particular position and the maximal probability of finding the atom in one period of the standing-wave fields reaches unity by properly adjusting the system parameters. The proposed scheme may provide a promising way to achieve high-precision and high-resolution 2D atom localization.

  1. Determination of ytterbium in animal faeces by tungsten coil electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Lima, E C; Krug, F J; Nóbrega, J A; Nogueira, A R

    1998-11-01

    A method for ytterbium determination in animal faeces by tungsten coil electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (TCAAS) was developed. Faeces were dry-ashed in a muffle furnace, the ashes were treated with hydrochloric acid, and 10 mul of sample solution were delivered into 150-W tungsten coil atomizer. A matrix-matching procedure employing a 66-s heating program proved to be efficient for obtaining accurate results. Characteristic mass and detection limit were 7.1 pg and 0.35 mug g(-1) Yb, respectively. The tungsten coil atomizer lifetime exceeded 300 firings with digested solutions and R.S.D. of measurements was 1.9% after ten consecutive injections of 10.0 mug l(-1) Yb. Accuracy of the proposed method was assessed by employing a graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometric procedure. Application of the paired t-test did not reveal any significant difference for ytterbium contents determined by both methods at 95% confidence level. It was demonstrated that the proposed procedure can successfully be used for evaluation of kinetic passage rate of feed through digestive tract of animals. PMID:18967363

  2. Electrochemical flowcell for in-situ investigations by soft x-ray absorption and emission spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Schwanke, C.; Lange, K. M.; Golnak, R.; Xiao, J.

    2014-10-15

    A new liquid flow-cell designed for electronic structure investigations at the liquid-solid interface by soft X-ray absorption and emission spectroscopy is presented. A thin membrane serves simultaneously as a substrate for the working electrode and solid state samples as well as for separating the liquid from the surrounding vacuum conditions. In combination with counter and reference electrodes this approach allows in-situ studies of electrochemical deposition processes and catalytic reactions at the liquid-solid interface in combination with potentiostatic measurements. As model system in-situ monitoring of the deposition process of Co metal from a 10 mM CoCl{sub 2} aqueous solution by X-ray absorption and emission spectroscopy is presented.

  3. Undistorted X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy Using s-Core-Orbital Emissions.

    PubMed

    Golnak, Ronny; Xiao, Jie; Atak, Kaan; Unger, Isaak; Seidel, Robert; Winter, Bernd; Aziz, Emad F

    2016-05-12

    Detection of secondary emissions, fluorescence yield (FY), or electron yield (EY), originating from the relaxation processes upon X-ray resonant absorption has been widely adopted for X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) measurements when the primary absorption process cannot be probed directly in transmission mode. Various spectral distortion effects inherent in the relaxation processes and in the subsequent transportation of emitted particles (electron or photon) through the sample, however, undermine the proportionality of the emission signals to the X-ray absorption coefficient. In the present study, multiple radiative (FY) and nonradiative (EY) decay channels have been experimentally investigated on a model system, FeCl3 aqueous solution, at the excitation energy of the Fe L-edge. The systematic comparisons between the experimental spectra taken from various decay channels, as well as the comparison with the theoretically simulated Fe L-edge XA spectrum that involves only the absorption process, indicate that the detection of the Fe 3s → 2p partial fluorescence yield (PFY) gives rise to the true Fe L-edge XA spectrum. The two key characteristics generalized from this particular decay channel-zero orbital angular momentum (i.e., s orbital) and core-level emission-set a guideline for obtaining undistorted X-ray absorption spectra in the future. PMID:27101344

  4. Resonance ionization spectroscopy: counting noble-gas atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Hurst, G.S.; Payne, M.G.; Chen, C.H.; Willis, R.D.; Lehmann, B.E.; Kramer, S.D.

    1981-06-01

    New work on the counting of noble gas atoms, using lasers for the selective ionization and detectors for counting individual particles (electrons or positive ions) is reported. When positive ions are counted, various kinds of mass analyzers (magnetic, quadrupole, or time-of-flight) can be incorporated to provide A selectivity. It is shown that a variety of interesting and important applications can be made with atom-counting techniques which are both atomic number (Z) and mass number (A) selective.

  5. A metallic furnace atomizer in hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometry: Determination of bismuth and selenium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klassen, Aline; Kim, Manuela Leticia; Tudino, Mabel Beatriz; Baccan, Nivaldo; Arruda, Marco Aurélio Zezzi

    2008-08-01

    A flow injection hydride generation system with a metal furnace atomizer (Inconel 600® alloy) was employed for Bi and Se determination. The presented methods have linear ranges up to 200 and 500 μg L - 1 for Bi and Se, respectively, with good linearities ( r2 = 0.9997 and 0.9974, respectively). The limits of quantification obtained according to IUPAC recommendations were 2.3 μg L - 1 for Bi and 6 μg L - 1 for Se, and the relative standard deviations ( N = 6) based on Bi and Se analytical responses from real samples were 2.7% and 10%, respectively. Accuracy evaluations were based on certified materials such as SRM 361, SRM 363, and SRM 364 (steel alloys) for Bi, Mess-3 (marine sediment), SRM 397 (human hair), and Bio-Rad2 — 69042 (urine) for Se. Good agreements between the results were obtained at the 95% confidence level, according to the t-test.

  6. Determination of selenium using atomically imprinted polymer (AIP) and hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    de Lima, Grazielle Cabral; do Lago, Ayla Campos; Chaves, Arley Alves; Fadini, Pedro Sergio; Luccas, Pedro Orival

    2013-03-20

    This paper describes selenium determination based on Se(0) preconcentration in the imprinted polymer (synthesized with 2.25mmol SeO2, 4-vinylpyridine and 1-vinylimidazole) with subsequent detection on-line in HG-FAAS. During the synthesis, SeO2 is reduced to Se (0). Therefore, there are no MIP neither IIP in the present work, thus we denominated: AIP, i.e., atomically imprinted polymers. For the optimization of analytical parameters Doehlert design was used. The method presented limit of detection and limit of quantification of 53 and 177ngL(-1), respectively, and linear range from 0.17 up to 6μgL(-1) (r=0.9936). The preconcentration factor (PF), consumptive index (CI) and concentration efficiency (CE) were 232; 0.06mL and 58min(-1) respectively. The proposed method was successfully applied to determine Se in Brazil nuts (0.33±0.03mgkg(-1)), apricot (0.46±0.02mgkg(-1)), white bean (0.47±0.03mgkg(-1)), rice flour (0.47±0.02mgkg(-1)) and milk powder (0.22±0.01mgkg(-1)) samples. It was possible to do 12 analyzes per hour. Accuracy was checked and confirmed by analyzing certified reference material (DORM-2, dogfish muscle), and samples precision was satisfactory with RSD lower than 10%. PMID:23473247

  7. Near-infrared spectrum of ZrF by intracavity laser absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harms, Jack C.; O'Brien, Leah C.; Ni, Ann; Mahkdoom, Bilal; O'Brien, James J.

    2015-04-01

    The (1, 1) band of the CΩ = 3/2 - X2Δ3/2 transition of ZrF has been recorded at high resolution using intracavity laser absorption spectroscopy. The ZrF molecules were produced using a Zr-lined copper hollow cathode sputter source with a trace amount of SF6 as a fluoride source. Molecular constants from the analysis are presented and compared with previous work.

  8. Third order nonlinear optical susceptibility of fluorescein-containing polymers determined by electro-absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomez-Sosa, Gustavo; Beristain, Miriam F.; Ortega, Alejandra; Martínez-Viramontes, Jaquelin; Ogawa, Takeshi; Fernández-Hernández, Roberto C.; Tamayo-Rivera, Lis; Reyes-Esqueda, Jorge-Alejandro; Isoshima, Takashi; Hara, Masahiko

    2012-03-01

    Novel polymers containing xanthene groups with high dye concentrations were prepared, and their third order nonlinear optical properties were studied by electroabsorption spectroscopy technique. The polymers were amorphous with refractive indices above 1.6 in the non-resonant region. The UV-Visible absorption spectra indicate the fluoresceins molecules in the polymers are H-aggregated. They showed third order nonlinear susceptibility, χ(3) (-ω:ω, 0, 0), of 2.5-3.5 × 10-12 esu.

  9. Narrow-band, tunable, semiconductor-laser-based source for deep-UV absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Kliner, D A; Koplow, J P; Goldberg, L

    1997-09-15

    Tunable, narrow-bandwidth (<200-MHz), ~215-nm radiation was produced by frequency quadrupling the ~860-nm output of a high-power, pulsed GaAlAs tapered amplifier seeded by an external-cavity diode laser. Pulsing the amplifier increased the 860 nm?215 nm conversion efficiency by 2 orders of magnitude with respect to cw operation. Detection of nitric oxide and sulfur dioxide by high-resolution absorption spectroscopy was demonstrated. PMID:18188256

  10. Quantitation of vitamin B 12 by first-derivative absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karşilayan, Huriye

    1996-08-01

    Quantitation of vitamin B 12 by first-derivative absorption spectroscopy is described. Peak-to-peak (355 nm to 370 nm) amplitudes were measured from the first derivative spectra. The method permits rapid determination of vitamin B 12, and increases the detection limit while decreasing interference by impurities. The effects of the majority of other absorbing macromolecules which may also be present in biological samples are eliminated or very considerably minimized by this method.

  11. Capturing Transient Electronic and Molecular Structures in Liquids by Picosecond X-Ray Absorption Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Gawelda, W.; Pham, V. T.; El Nahhas, A.; Kaiser, M.; Zaushitsyn, Y.; Bressler, C.; Chergui, M.; Johnson, S. L.; Grolimund, D.; Abela, R.; Hauser, A.

    2007-02-02

    We describe an advanced setup for time-resolved x-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) Spectroscopy with picosecond temporal resolution. It combines an intense femtosecond laser source synchronized to the x-ray pulses delivered into the microXAS beamline of the Swiss Light Source (SLS). The setup is applied to measure the short-lived high-spin geometric structure of photoexcited aqueous Fe(bpy)3 at room temperature.

  12. X-RAY ABSORPTION SPECTROSCOPY OF YB3+-DOPED OPTICAL FIBERS

    SciTech Connect

    Citron, Robert; Kropf, A.J.

    2008-01-01

    Optical fibers doped with Ytterbium-3+ have become increasingly common in fiber lasers and amplifiers. Yb-doped fibers provide the capability to produce high power and short pulses at specific wavelengths, resulting in highly effective gain media. However, little is known about the local structure, distribution, and chemical coordination of Yb3+ in the fibers. This information is necessary to improve the manufacturing process and optical qualities of the fibers. Five fibers doped with Yb3+ were studied using Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy and X-ray Absorption Near Edge Spectroscopy (XANES), in addition to Yb3+ mapping. The Yb3+ distribution in each fiber core was mapped with 2D and 1D intensity scans, which measured X-ray fluorescence over the scan areas. Two of the five fibers examined showed highly irregular Yb3+ distributions in the core center. In four of the five fibers Yb3+ was detected outside of the given fiber core dimensions, suggesting possible Yb3+ diffusion from the core, manufacturing error, or both. X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) analysis has so far proven inconclusive, but did show that the fibers had differing EXAFS spectra. The Yb3+ distribution mapping proved highly useful, but additional modeling and examination of fiber preforms must be conducted to improve XAS analysis, which has been shown to have great potential for the study of similar optical fi bers.

  13. Electron impact spectroscopy. [for atom and molecule quantum state investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trajmar, S.

    1980-01-01

    The concepts of electron impact spectroscopy are discussed, comparing the electron spectroscopy techniques with those of the optical spectroscopy. The main advantage of the electron spectroscopy is to be found in the elimination of optical selection rules in excitation processes and the ability to scan the spectrum from the infrared to the X-ray region. The range of the method is indicated through a review of several examples, including electron impact excitation of Ba and rotational excitation of H2. The sensitivity of the method is demonstrated by vibrational excitation spectrum of N2. It is shown that the application of the method to the inner-shell excitation allows to obtain information about molecular species which are not commonly available, while spectroscopy of negative ions yields information about their energy and symmetry properties. However, the techniques are still under development and more data are expected to become available in the coming years.

  14. Long-path supercontinuum absorption spectroscopy for measurement of atmospheric constituents.

    PubMed

    Brown, David M; Shi, Kebin; Liu, Zhiwen; Philbrick, C R

    2008-06-01

    A supercontinuum source has been proposed as a new tool for measurement of minor species concentrations on long paths through the atmosphere. The present work describes results from recent experiments that demonstrate the potential for Differential Absorption Spectroscopy (DAS) and Spectral Pattern Recognition Differential Absorption Lidar (SPR-DIAL) measurements utilizing a supercontinuum source. As an initial example of this measurement approach, the results include the quantification of water vapor concentration through indoor and outdoor path absorption measurements using a collimated supercontinuum source. Experimental spectra are compared with equivalent simulations from MODTRAN??? versions 4 and 5 to examine the water vapor band between 1300 and 1500 nm to demonstrate the feasibility of the approach. PMID:18545560

  15. Absorption spectroscopy setup for determination of whole human blood and blood-derived materials spectral characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wróbel, M. S.; Gnyba, M.; Milewska, D.; Mitura, K.; Karpienko, K.

    2015-09-01

    A dedicated absorption spectroscopy system was set up using tungsten-halogen broadband source, optical fibers, sample holder, and a commercial spectrometer with CCD array. Analysis of noise present in the setup was carried out. Data processing was applied to the absorption spectra to reduce spectral noise, and improve the quality of the spectra and to remove the baseline level. The absorption spectra were measured for whole blood samples, separated components: plasma, saline, washed erythrocytes in saline and human whole blood with biomarkers - biocompatible nanodiamonds (ND). Blood samples had been derived from a number of healthy donors. The results prove a correct setup arrangement, with adequate preprocessing of the data. The results of blood-ND mixtures measurements show no toxic effect on blood cells, which proves the NDs as a potential biocompatible biomarkers.

  16. Deep ultraviolet Raman spectroscopy: A resonance-absorption trade-off illustrated by diluted liquid benzene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chadwick, C. T.; Willitsford, A. H.; Philbrick, C. R.; Hallen, H. D.

    2015-12-01

    The magnitude of resonance Raman intensity, in terms of the real signal level measured on-resonance compared to the signal level measured off-resonance for the same sample, is investigated using a tunable laser source. Resonance Raman enhancements, occurring as the excitation energy is tuned through ultraviolet absorption lines, are used to examine the 1332 cm-1 vibrational mode of diamond and the 992 cm-1 ring-breathing mode of benzene. Competition between the wavelength dependent optical absorption and the magnitude of the resonance enhancement is studied using measured signal levels as a function of wavelength. Two system applications are identified where the resonance Raman significantly increases the real signal levels despite the presence of strong absorption: characterization of trace species in laser remote sensing and spectroscopy of the few molecules in the tiny working volumes of near-field optical microscopy.

  17. Determination of tellurium by hydride generation with in situ trapping flame atomic absorption spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matusiewicz, Henryk; Krawczyk, Magdalena

    2007-03-01

    The analytical performance of coupled hydride generation — integrated atom trap (HG-IAT) atomizer flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS) system was evaluated for determination of Te in reference material (GBW 07302 Stream Sediment), coal fly ash and garlic. Tellurium, using formation of H 2Te vapors, is atomized in air-acetylene flame-heated IAT. A new design HG-IAT-FAAS hyphenated technique that would exceed the operational capabilities of existing arrangements (a water-cooled single silica tube, double-slotted quartz tube or an "integrated trap") was investigated. An improvement in detection limit was achieved compared with using either of the above atom trapping techniques separately. The concentration detection limit, defined as 3 times the blank standard deviation (3 σ), was 0.9 ng mL - 1 for Te. For a 2 min in situ pre-concentration time (sample volume of 2 mL), sensitivity enhancement compared to flame AAS, was 222 fold, using the hydride generation — atom trapping technique. The sensitivity can be further improved by increasing the collection time. The precision, expressed as RSD, was 7.0% ( n = 6) for Te. The designs studied include slotted tube, single silica tube and integrated atom trap-cooled atom traps. The accuracy of the method was verified using a certified reference material (GBW 07302 Stream Sediment) by aqueous standard calibration curves. The measured Te contents of the reference material was in agreement with the information value. The method was successfully applied to the determination of tellurium in coal fly ash and garlic.

  18. Wafer-scale metasurface for total power absorption, local field enhancement and single molecule Raman spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Dongxing; Zhu, Wenqi; Best, Michael D.; Camden, Jon P.; Crozier, Kenneth B.

    2013-01-01

    The ability to detect molecules at low concentrations is highly desired for applications that range from basic science to healthcare. Considerable interest also exists for ultrathin materials with high optical absorption, e.g. for microbolometers and thermal emitters. Metal nanostructures present opportunities to achieve both purposes. Metal nanoparticles can generate gigantic field enhancements, sufficient for the Raman spectroscopy of single molecules. Thin layers containing metal nanostructures (“metasurfaces”) can achieve near-total power absorption at visible and near-infrared wavelengths. Thus far, however, both aims (i.e. single molecule Raman and total power absorption) have only been achieved using metal nanostructures produced by techniques (high resolution lithography or colloidal synthesis) that are complex and/or difficult to implement over large areas. Here, we demonstrate a metasurface that achieves the near-perfect absorption of visible-wavelength light and enables the Raman spectroscopy of single molecules. Our metasurface is fabricated using thin film depositions, and is of unprecedented (wafer-scale) extent. PMID:24091825

  19. Study of exploding Al wire plasmas using X-ray absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pikuz, Sergey A.; Shelkovenko, Tatiana A.; Hoyt, Cad L.; Cahill, Adam D.; Hammer, David A.

    2012-10-01

    X-ray absorption spectroscopy is a powerful diagnostic technique useful for determining the charge state, temperature and density of plasmas under a wide range of conditions and situations. Our particular interest was the study of the core-corona system generated in electrically exploded wires and wire array Z-pinches. Two wide-bandwidth spectrographs with flat and concave cylindrically bent KAP crystals, and high-resolution spectrographs with spherically bent quartz crystals have been used on the XP and COBRA pulsers at Cornell University. The hybrid X-pinch was used as the continuum x-ray source in the photon energy range of interest for absorption spectroscopy with exploding Al wire experiments. This source is capable of producing broadband continuum x-ray pulses with micron source size and 100 ps duration. Absorption spectra of single exploded Al wires and 2 - 4 wire arrays were recorded with high spatial resolution. The parameters of the dense wire core plasmas and the ablating plasma streams were estimated under different experimental conditions. New spectral features in absorption spectra were observed.

  20. Correlation between Soft X-ray Absorption and Emission Spectra of the Nitrogen Atoms within Imidazolium-Based Ionic Liquids.

    PubMed

    Horikawa, Yuka; Tokushima, Takashi; Takahashi, Osamu; Hoke, Hiroshi; Takamuku, Toshiyuki

    2016-08-01

    Soft X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) has been performed on the N K-edge of two imidazolium-based ionic liquids (ILs), 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)amide ([C2mim][TFSA]) and 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium bromide ([C2mim][Br]), to clarify the electronic structures of the ILs. Soft X-ray emission spectroscopy (XES) has also been applied to the ILs by excitation at various X-ray energies according to the XAS spectra. It was possible to fully associate the XAS peaks with the XES peaks. Additionally, both XAS and XES spectra of the ILs were well reproduced by the theoretical spectra for a single-molecule model on [C2mim](+) and [TFSA](-) using density functional theory. The assignments for the XAS and XES peaks of the ILs were accomplished from both experimental and theoretical approaches. The theoretical XAS and XES spectra of [C2mim](+) and [TFSA](-) did not significantly depend on the conformations of the ions. The reproducibility of the theoretical spectra for the single-molecule model suggested that the interactions between the cations and anions are very weak in the ILs, thus scarcely influencing the electronic structures of the nitrogen atoms. PMID:27388151

  1. Phase Reconstruction of Strong-Field Excited Systems by Transient-Absorption Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zuoye; Cavaletto, Stefano M; Ott, Christian; Meyer, Kristina; Mi, Yonghao; Harman, Zoltán; Keitel, Christoph H; Pfeifer, Thomas

    2015-07-17

    The evolution of a V-type three-level system is studied, whose two resonances are coherently excited and coupled by two ultrashort laser pump and probe pulses, separated by a varying time delay. We relate the quantum dynamics of the excited multilevel system to the absorption spectrum of the transmitted probe pulse. In particular, by analyzing the quantum evolution of the system, we interpret how atomic phases are differently encoded in the time-delay-dependent spectral absorption profiles when the pump pulse either precedes or follows the probe pulse. This scheme is experimentally applied to atomic Rb, whose fine-structure-split 5s  (2)S{1/2}→5p(2)P{1/2} and 5s(2)S_{1/2}→5p(2)P{3/2} transitions are driven by the combined action of a pump pulse of variable intensity and a delayed probe pulse. The provided understanding of the relationship between quantum phases and absorption spectra represents an important step towards full time-dependent phase reconstruction (quantum holography) of bound-state wave packets in strong-field light-matter interactions with atoms, molecules, and solids. PMID:26230787

  2. Applications of AFM for atomic manipulation and spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Custance, Oscar

    2009-03-01

    Since the first demonstration of atom-by-atom assembly [1], atomic manipulation with scanning tunneling microscopy has yielded stunning realizations in nanoscience. A new exciting panorama has been recently opened with the possibility of manipulating atoms at surfaces using atomic force microscopy (AFM) [2-5]. In this talk, we will present two different approaches that enable patterning structures at semiconductor surfaces by manipulating individual atoms with AFM and at room temperature [2, 3]. We will discuss the physics behind each protocol through the analysis of the measured forces associated with these manipulations [3-5]. Another challenging issue in scanning probe microscopy is the ability to disclose the local chemical composition of a multi-element system at atomic level. Here, we will introduce a single-atom chemical identification method, which is based on detecting the forces between the outermost atom of the AFM tip and the atoms at a surface [6]. We demonstrate this identification procedure on a particularly challenging system, where any discrimination attempt based solely on topographic measurements would be impossible to achieve. [4pt] References: [0pt] [1] D. M. Eigler and E. K. Schweizer, Nature 344, 524 (1990); [0pt] [2] Y. Sugimoto, M. Abe, S. Hirayama, N. Oyabu, O. Custance and S. Morita, Nature Materials 4, 156 (2005); [0pt] [3] Y. Sugimoto, P. Pou, O. Custance, P. Jelinek, M. Abe, R. Perez and S. Morita, Science 322, 413 (2008); [0pt] [4] Y. Sugimoto, P. Jelinek, P. Pou, M. Abe, S. Morita, R. Perez and O. Custance, Phys. Rev. Lett. 98, 106104 (2007); [0pt] [5] M. Ternes, C. P. Lutz, C. F. Hirjibehedin, F. J. Giessibl and A. J. Heinrich, Science 319, 1066 (2008); [0pt] [6] Y. Sugimoto, P. Pou, M. Abe, P. Jelinek, R. Perez, S. Morita, and O. Custance, Nature 446, 64 (2007)

  3. Revisiting the electrochemical impedance spectroscopy of magnesium with online inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Shkirskiy, Viacheslav; King, Andrew D; Gharbi, Oumaïma; Volovitch, Polina; Scully, John R; Ogle, Kevin; Birbilis, Nick

    2015-02-23

    The electrochemical impedance of reactive metals such as magnesium is often complicated by an obvious inductive loop with decreasing frequency of the AC polarising signal. The characterisation and ensuing explanation of this phenomenon has been lacking in the literature to date, being either ignored or speculated. Herein, we couple electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) with online atomic emission spectroelectrochemistry (AESEC) to simultaneously measure Mg-ion concentration and electrochemical impedance spectra during Mg corrosion, in real time. It is revealed that Mg dissolution occurs via Mg(2+) , and that corrosion is activated, as measured by AC frequencies less than approximately 1 Hz approaching DC conditions. The result of this is a higher rate of Mg(2+) dissolution, as the voltage excitation becomes slow enough to enable all Mg(2+) -enabling processes to adjust in real time. The manifestation of this in EIS data is an inductive loop. The rationalisation of such EIS behaviour, as it relates to Mg, is revealed for the first time by using concurrent AESEC. PMID:25425247

  4. Single-molecule force spectroscopy: optical tweezers, magnetic tweezers and atomic force microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Neuman, Keir C.; Nagy, Attila

    2012-01-01

    Single-molecule force spectroscopy has emerged as a powerful tool to investigate the forces and motions associated with biological molecules and enzymatic activity. The most common force spectroscopy techniques are optical tweezers, magnetic tweezers and atomic force microscopy. These techniques are described and illustrated with examples highlighting current capabilities and limitations. PMID:18511917

  5. Electron-energy-loss spectroscopy and X-ray absorption spectroscopy as complementary probes for complex f-electron metals: cerium and plutonium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, K. T.; Wall, M. A.; Schwartz, A. J.; Chung, B. W.; Morton, S. A.; Tobin, J. G.; Lazar, S.; Tichelaar, F. D.; Zandbergen, H. W.; Söderlind, P.; van der Laan, G.

    2004-04-01

    In this paper, we demonstrate the power of electron-energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS) in a transmission electron microscope by investigating the electron structure of two f-electron metals: Ce and Pu. It is shown that EELS in a transmission electron microscope may be used to circumvent the difficulty of producing single-phase or single-crystal samples owing to its high spatial resolution, and that diffraction patterns and images can be acquired, providing unambiguous phase determination when acquiring spectra. EELS results are supported by synchrotron-radiation-based X-ray absorption, multielectron atomic spectral simulations, and local density approximation calculations based on density-functional theory with the generalized gradient approximation. For Ce, it is shown that changes in {111} stacking sequences can drive substantial modifications in the electronic structure of close-packed phases of Ce that have similar atomic volumes, contrary to previous assumptions in literature. For Pu, it is shown that Russell-Saunders (L-S) coupling fails for the 5f states and that either a j-j or an intermediate scheme must be used for the actinides because of the considerable spin-orbit interaction in the 5f states. We present a model showing how the 5f states behave along the light actinide series.

  6. Method 200.12 - Determination of Trace Elements in Marine Waters by StabilizedTemperature Graphite Furnace Atomic Absorption

    EPA Science Inventory

    This method provides procedures for the determination of total recoverable elements by graphite furnace atomic absorption (GFAA) in marine waters, including estuarine, ocean and brines with salinities of up to 35 ppt.

  7. Low-volume, high-sensitivity assay for cadmium in blood and urine using conventional atomic absorption spectrophotometry.

    SciTech Connect

    Cerny, E. A.; Bhattacharyya, M. H.; Biosciences Division

    2003-03-15

    An assay for cadmium in whole blood and urine using deuterium background-correction electrothermal atomic absorption spectroscopy (D2-ETAAS) was developed. Cadmium (in a 1- to 2-ml sample) was bound to 15 mg anion-exchange resin, interfering ions were removed in a 2-ml Bio-Spin column, and cadmium was extracted into 100 {mu}l 1 M nitric acid for analysis. Cadmium in the sample extract was concentrated 7-fold for blood and 10-fold for urine over the starting material. These steps produced cadmium atomic absorption traces with high signal to background ratios and allowed analysis against aqueous standards. At {approx}0.1 ng Cd/ml, mean intra- and interassay coefficients of variation were 11-12%. Cadmium recovery for 0.1 to 0.6 ng added cadmium was 107{+-}4% for blood and 94{+-}4% for urine (mean{+-}SE, n=3). The mean detection limit (mean + 3x SD of blank) was 0.008 ng/ml for blood and 0.003 ng/ml for urine. Samples from 'unexposed' animals including humans ranged from 0.051{+-}0.000 to 0.229{+-}0.035 ng/ml. Values were approximately 10-fold lower than those obtained by the method of Stoeppler and Brandt using Zeeman background-correction ETAAS. This new high-sensitivity, low-volume assay will be useful for epidemiological studies, even those involving children, and will provide a means to help determine the contribution of cadmium to disease incidence in the general population.

  8. Spectro web: oscillator strength measurements of atomic absorption lines in the sun and procyon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lobel, A.

    2008-10-01

    We update the online SpectroWeb database of spectral standard reference stars with 1178 oscillator strength values of atomic absorption lines observed in the optical spectrum of the Sun and Procyon (α CMi A). The updated line oscillator strengths are measured with best fits to the disk-integrated KPNO-FTS spectrum of the Sun observed between 4000 Å and 6800 Å using state-of-the-art detailed spectral synthesis calculations. A subset of 660 line oscillator strengths is validated with synthetic spectrum calculations of Procyon observed with ESO-UVES between 4700 Å and 6800 Å. The new log(gf)-values in SpectroWeb are improvements upon the values offered in the online Vienna Atomic Line Database (VALD). We find for neutral iron-group elements, such as Fe I, Ni I, Cr I, and Ti I, a statistically significant over-estimation of the VALD log((gf)-values for weak absorption lines with normalized central line depths below 15 %. For abundant lighter elements (e.g. Mg I and Ca I) this trend is statistically not significantly detectable, with the exception of Si I for which the log(gf)-values of 60 weak and medium-strong lines are substantially decreased to best fit the observed spectra. The newly measured log(gf)-values are available in the SpectroWeb database at http://spectra.freeshell.org, which interactively displays the observed and computed stellar spectra, together with corresponding atomic line data.

  9. Faraday rotation spectroscopy in multi-pass atomic vapor cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shuguang; Vachaspati, Pranjal; Dural, Nezih; Romalis, Michael

    2011-05-01

    Many important applications of atomic vapors, such as quantum measurements, light storage experiments, and atomic magnetometers benefit from large optical depth of the atomic ensemble. We explore multi-pass cells using cylindrical mirrors with a hole for the entrance and exit of the laser beam to achieve very high optical depth while sampling a large number of atoms. Such cells are much less sensitive to mirror quality and alignment compared to optical cavities and do not require laser frequency locking, mode matching or power coupling matching. Cells with more than 100 passes have been fabricated using internal high-reflectivity mirrors. We have performed paramagnetic Faraday rotation measurements on Rb vapor and have observed atomic rotation angles in excess of 60 radians. Quantum spin noise from unpolarized atomic vapor has also been observed with a high signal-to-noise ratio. This system also exhibits non-linear spin relaxation due to spin-exchange collisions, opening the possibility of using spin-squeezing techniques to improve long-term sensitivity of frequency measurements. We will report on the development of a scalar atomic magnetometer using such spin-squeezing techniques.

  10. Theory of dynamic absorption spectroscopy of nonstationary states. 4. Application to 12-fs resonant impulsive Raman spectroscopy of bacteriorhodopsin

    SciTech Connect

    Pollard, W.T.; Peteanu, L.A.; Mathies, R.A.

    1992-07-23

    A time-dependent theory for femtosecond dynamic absorption spectroscopy is used to describe the creation and observation of molecular ground-state vibrational coherence through the resonance impulsive stimulated Raman mechanism. Model calculations show that the oscillatory absorption signal that arises from this ground-state coherence is maximized for a limited range of pulse lengths and that there is a complex relationship between the probe wavelength and the strength of the spectral oscillations. The generalized time-dependent linear susceptibility of the nonstationary system created by the impulsive pump pulse is defined and used to discuss the strong dependence of the measured signals on the properties of the probe pulse. Finally, calculations are presented to analyze the high-frequency oscillations ({approximately}20-fs period) recently observed in the transient absorption spectra of light-adapted bacteriorhodopsin (BR{sub 568}) following excitation with a 12-fs optical pulse. At the probe wavelengths used in this experiment, the contribution of stimulated emission is negligible at long times because of the extremely rapid excited-state isomerization; as a result, the spectral oscillations observed after this time are due to the impulsive excitation of coherent vibrations in the ground state. The transient response observed for BR{sub 568} is calculated using a 29-mode harmonic potential surface derived from a prior resonance Raman intensity analysis. Both the oscillatory signals and their dependence on the probe wavelength are satisfactorily reproduced. 68 refs., 11 figs.

  11. Absorption spectroscopy of three-dimensional bacteriorhodopsin crystals at cryogenic temperatures: effects of altered hydration.

    PubMed

    Portuondo-Campa, E; Schenkl, S; Dolder, M; Chergui, M; Landau, E M; Haacke, S

    2006-04-01

    A comparative study of absorption spectroscopy at 100 K has been performed on three-dimensional crystals of bacteriorhodopsin extracted from a lipidic cubic phase and on native purple membrane. A modified microspectrophotometer has been designed which yields absorption data with a high signal-to-noise ratio and remarkable reproducibility. Excellent agreement of the absorption spectra of the three-dimensional crystals and the purple membrane is observed provided that a rigorous crystal-handling procedure is followed. This result supports the equivalence of the protein structure in both the cubic phase crystals and the native purple membrane. On the other hand, it is shown that dramatic deviations of the crystal spectrum can be induced by minor changes in the extraction method. Exposure to air at room temperature can lead within a short time to an irreversible dehydration manifested by a distinct species with an absorption maximum at 500 nm. Exposure of the crystals to a buffer with lower ionic strength than the crystallization solution produces a different spectral form with an absorption maximum at 477 nm, which was assigned to a distorted protein conformation induced by osmotic stress. The extreme sensitivity of these crystals to experimental conditions is relevant for X-ray structural studies, in particular as different experimental treatments are implemented to trap the intermediates of the protein's photocycle. PMID:16552137

  12. A split imaging spectrometer for temporally and spatially resolved titanium absorption spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Hager, J. D. Lanier, N. E.; Kline, J. L.; Flippo, K. A.; Bruns, H. C.; Schneider, M.; Saculla, M.; McCarville, T.

    2014-11-15

    We present a temporally and a spatially resolved spectrometer for titanium x-ray absorption spectroscopy along 2 axial symmetric lines-of-sight. Each line-of-sight of the instrument uses an elliptical crystal to acquire both the 2p and 3p Ti absorption lines on a single, time gated channel of the instrument. The 2 axial symmetric lines-of-sight allow the 2p and 3p absorption features to be measured through the same point in space using both channels of the instrument. The spatially dependent material temperature can be inferred by observing the 2p and the 3p Ti absorption features. The data are recorded on a two strip framing camera with each strip collecting data from a single line-of-sight. The design is compatible for use at both the OMEGA laser and the National Ignition Facility. The spectrometer is intended to measure the material temperature behind a Marshak wave in a radiatively driven SiO{sub 2} foam with a Ti foam tracer. In this configuration, a broad band CsI backlighter will be used for a source and the Ti absorption spectrum measured.

  13. [Study on removing the lamp spectrum structure in differential optical absorption spectroscopy].

    PubMed

    Qu, Xiao-ying; Li, Yu-jin

    2010-11-01

    Differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS) technique has been used to measure trace gases in the atmosphere by their strongly structured absorption of radiation in the UV and visible spectral range, and nowadays this technique has been widely utilized to measure trace polluted gases in the atmosphere e.g. SO2, NO2, O3, HCHO, etc. However, there exists lamp (xenon lamp or deuteriumlamp) spectrum structure in the measured band (300-700 nm) of the absorption spectra of atmosphere, which badly impacts on precision of retrieving the concentration of trace gases in the atmosphere. People home and abroad generally employ two ways to handle this problem, one is segmenting band retrieving method, another is remedial retrieving method. In the present paper, a new retrieving method to deal with this trouble is introduced. The authors used moving-window average smoothing method to obtain the slow part of the absorption spectra of atmosphere, then achieved the lamp (xenon lamp in the paper) spectrum structure in the measured band of the absorption spectra of atmosphere. The authors analyzed and retrieved the measured spectrum of the atmosphere, and the result is better than the forenamed ways. Chi-square of residuum is 2.995 x 10(-4), and this method was proved to be able to avoid shortcoming of choosing narrowband and disadvantage of discovering the new component of atmosphere in retrieving the concentration of air pollutants and measuring the air pollutants. PMID:21284148

  14. A split imaging spectrometer for temporally and spatially resolved titanium absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Hager, J D; Lanier, N E; Kline, J L; Flippo, K A; Bruns, H C; Schneider, M; Saculla, M; McCarville, T

    2014-11-01

    We present a temporally and a spatially resolved spectrometer for titanium x-ray absorption spectroscopy along 2 axial symmetric lines-of-sight. Each line-of-sight of the instrument uses an elliptical crystal to acquire both the 2p and 3p Ti absorption lines on a single, time gated channel of the instrument. The 2 axial symmetric lines-of-sight allow the 2p and 3p absorption features to be measured through the same point in space using both channels of the instrument. The spatially dependent material temperature can be inferred by observing the 2p and the 3p Ti absorption features. The data are recorded on a two strip framing camera with each strip collecting data from a single line-of-sight. The design is compatible for use at both the OMEGA laser and the National Ignition Facility. The spectrometer is intended to measure the material temperature behind a Marshak wave in a radiatively driven SiO2 foam with a Ti foam tracer. In this configuration, a broad band CsI backlighter will be used for a source and the Ti absorption spectrum measured. PMID:25430177

  15. Quantitative Evaluation of the Carbon Hybridization State by Near Edge X-ray Absorption Fine Structure Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Mangolini, Filippo; McClimon, J Brandon; Carpick, Robert W

    2016-03-01

    The characterization of the local bonding configuration of carbon in carbon-based materials is of paramount importance since the properties of such materials strongly depend on the distribution of carbon hybridization states, the local ordering, and the degree of hydrogenation. Carbon 1s near edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy is one of the most powerful techniques for gaining insights into the bonding configuration of near-surface carbon atoms. The common methodology for quantitatively evaluating the carbon hybridization state using C 1s NEXAFS measurements, which is based on the analysis of the sample of interest and of a highly ordered pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) reference sample, was reviewed and critically assessed, noting that inconsistencies are found in the literature in applying this method. A theoretical rationale for the specific experimental conditions to be used for the acquisition of HOPG reference spectra is presented together with the potential sources of uncertainty and errors in the correctly computed fraction of sp(2)-bonded carbon. This provides a specific method for analyzing the distribution of carbon hybridization state using NEXAFS spectroscopy. As an illustrative example, a hydrogenated amorphous carbon film was analyzed using this method and showed good agreement with X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (which is surface sensitive). Furthermore, the results were consistent with analysis from Raman spectroscopy (which is not surface sensitive), indicating the absence of a structurally different near-surface region in this particular thin film material. The present work can assist surface scientists in the analysis of NEXAFS spectra for the accurate characterization of the structure of carbon-based materials. PMID:26814796

  16. Possible atomic structures responsible for the sub-bandgap absorption of chalcogen-hyperdoped silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Ke-Fan; Shao, Hezhu; Liu, Kong; Qu, Shengchun E-mail: wangyx@henu.edu.cn; Wang, Zhanguo; Wang, Yuanxu E-mail: wangyx@henu.edu.cn

    2015-09-14

    Single-crystal silicon was hyperdoped with sulfur, selenium, and tellurium using ion implantation and nanosecond laser melting. The hyperdoping of such chalcogen elements led to strong and wide sub-bandgap light absorption. Annealing the hyperdoped silicon, even at low temperatures (such as 200–400 °C), led to attenuation of the sub-bandgap absorption. To explain the attenuation process, we modeled it as chemical decomposition reaction from an optically absorbing structure to a non-absorbing structure. Attenuation of the experimental absorption coefficient was fit using the Arrhenius equation. From the fitted data, we extracted the reaction activation energies of S-, Se-, and T-hyperdoped silicon as 0.338 ± 0.029 eV, 0.471 ± 0.040 eV, and 0.357 ± 0.028 eV, respectively. We discuss these activation energies in terms of the bond energies of chalcogen–Si metastable bonds, and suggest that several high-energy interstitial sites, rather than substitutional sites, are candidates for the atomic structures that are responsible for the strong sub-bandgap absorption of chalcogen hyperdoped silicon.

  17. Alternative approaches to correct interferences in the determination of boron in shrimps by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasias, I. N.; Pappa, Ch.; Katsarou, V.; Τhomaidis, N. S.; Piperaki, E. A.

    2014-02-01

    The aim of this study is to propose alternative techniques and methods in combination with the classical chemical modification to correct the major matrix interferences in the determination of boron in shrimps. The performance of an internal standard (Ge) for the determination of boron by the simultaneous multi-element atomic absorption spectrometry was tested. The use of internal standardization increased the recovery from 85.9% to 101% and allowed a simple correction of errors during sampling preparation and heating process. Furthermore, a new preparation procedure based on the use of citric acid during digestion and dilution steps improved the sensitivity of the method and decreased the limit of detection. Finally, a comparative study between the simultaneous multi-element atomic absorption spectrometry with a longitudinal Zeeman-effect background correction system, equipped with a transversely-heated graphite atomizer and the single element atomic absorption spectrometry with a D2 background correction system, equipped with an end-heated graphite atomizer was undertaken to investigate the different behavior of boron in both techniques. Different chemical modifiers for the determination of boron were tested with both techniques. Ni-citric acid and Ca were the optimal chemical modifiers when simultaneous multi-element atomic absorption spectrometry and single-element atomic absorption spectrometry were used, respectively. By using the single-element atomic absorption spectrometry, the calculated characteristic mass was 220 pg and the calculated limit of detection was 370 μg/kg. On the contrary, with simultaneous multi-element atomic absorption spectrometry, the characteristic mass was 2200 pg and the limit of detection was 5.5 mg/kg.

  18. Coherent population trapping on 87Rb atoms in small-size absorption cells with buffer gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ermak, S. V.; Petrenko, M. V.; Semenov, V. V.

    2016-02-01

    Coherent population trapping (CPT) on 87Rb atoms in neon atmosphere has been studied in small-size glass absorption cells under conditions of pumping with narrow-band laser radiation at the D2 line of the main doublet. Parameters of the absorption signal have been measured in 3-mm-diameter cells at buffer gas (Ne) pressures varied within 200-400 Torr, cell temperatures within 65-120°C, and pumping radiation power densities within 30-400 μW/cm2. Optimum values of the buffer gas pressures, cell temperature, and pumping power are determined at which the short-term instability of the resonance line is at minimum. Orientational shifts of the CPT resonance signal in gas-filled cells and small-size cells with antirelaxation coating have been compared.

  19. The physical basis for absorption of light. [effects on wave functions of gas molecules and atoms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pickett, H. M.

    1979-01-01

    The effects of light absorption on the wave functions of gas-phase molecules and atoms are investigated by high resolution spectral measurements of radiation emerging from a sample. A Stark-modulated sample of methyl fluoride was irradiated at the 102 GHz rotational transition and the emergent radiation was resolved by means of a spectrum analyzer. For signal oscillator frequencies below or above the molecular resonance by one modulation frequency, the amplitudes of the upper and lower modulation sidebands are found to be of nonuniform intensity, which is inconsistent with amplitude modulation. Emission due to polarization is, however, calculated to be consistent with the results observed, indicating that light absorption should be considered as a subtractive stimulated emission.

  20. Interstellar X-Ray Absorption Spectroscopy of the Crab Pulsar with the LETGS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paerels, Frits; Weisskopf, Martin C.; Tennant, Allyn F.; ODell, Stephen L.; Swartz, Douglas A.; Kahn, Steven M.; Behar, Ehud; Becker, Werner; Whitaker, Ann F. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    We study the interstellar X-ray absorption along the line of sight to the Crab Pulsar. The Crab was observed with the Low Energy Transmission Grating Spectrometer on the Chandra X-ray Observatory, and the pulsar, a point source, produces a full resolution spectrum. The continuum spectrum appears smooth, and we compare its parameters with other measurements of the pulsar spectrum. The spectrum clearly shows absorption edges due to interstellar Ne, Fe, and O. The O edge shows spectral structure that is probably due to O bound in molecules or dust. We search for near-edge structure (EXAFS) in the O absorption spectrum. The Fe L absorption spectrum is largely due to a set of unresolved discrete n=2-3 transitions in neutral or near-neutral Fe, and we analyze it using a new set of dedicated atomic structure calculations, which provide absolute cross sections. In addition to being interesting in its own right, the ISM absorption needs to be understood in quantitative detail in order to derive spectroscopic constraints on possible soft thermal radiation from the pulsar.