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Sample records for absorption spectroscopy electron

  1. Molecular shock response of explosives: electronic absorption spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Mcgrne, Shawn D; Moore, David S; Whitley, Von H; Bolme, Cindy A; Eakins, Daniel E

    2009-01-01

    Electronic absorption spectroscopy in the range 400-800 nm was coupled to ultrafast laser generated shocks to begin addressing the question of the extent to which electronic excitations are involved in shock induced reactions. Data are presented on shocked polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) thin films and single crystal pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN). Shocked PMMA exhibited thin film interference effects from the shock front. Shocked PETN exhibited interference from the shock front as well as broadband increased absorption. Relation to shock initiation hypotheses and the need for time dependent absorption data (future experiments) is briefly discussed.

  2. Molecular Shock Response of Explosives: Electronic Absorption Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGrane, S. D.; Moore, D. S.; Whitley, V. H.; Bolme, C. A.; Eakins, D. E.

    2009-12-01

    Electronic absorption spectroscopy in the range 400-800 nm was coupled to ultrafast laser generated shocks to begin addressing the extent to which electronic excitations are involved in shock induced reactions. Data are presented on shocked polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) thin films and single crystal pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN). Shocked PMMA exhibited thin film interference effects from the shock front. Shocked PETN exhibited interference as well as broadband increased absorption. Relation to shock initiation and the need for time dependent absorption (future experiments) is briefly discussed.

  3. The electronic states of 2-furanmethanol (furfuryl alcohol) studied by photon absorption and electron impact spectroscopies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giuliani, A.; Walker, I. C.; Delwiche, J.; Hoffmann, S. V.; Limão-Vieira, P.; Mason, N. J.; Heyne, B.; Hoebeke, M.; Hubin-Franskin, M.-J.

    2003-10-01

    The photoelectron spectrum of 2-furanmethanol (furfuryl alcohol) has been measured for ionization energies between 8 and 11.2 eV and the first three ionization bands assigned to π3, π2, and no ionizations in order of increasing binding energy. The photoabsorption spectrum has been recorded in the gas phase using both a synchrotron radiation source (5-9.91 eV, 248-125 nm) and electron energy-loss spectroscopy under electric-dipole conditions (5-10.9 eV, 248-90 nm). The (UV) absorption spectrum has also been recorded in solution (4.2-6.36 eV, 292-195 nm). The electronic excitation spectrum appears to be dominated by transitions between π and π* orbitals in the aromatic ring, leading to the conclusion that the frontier molecular orbitals of furan are affected only slightly on replacement of a H atom by the -CH2OH group. Additional experiments investigating electron impact at near-threshold energies have revealed two low-lying triplet states and at least one electron/molecule shape resonance. Dissociative electron attachment also shows to be widespread in furfuryl alcohol.

  4. Electronic structure of warm dense copper studied by ultrafast x-ray absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Cho, B I; Engelhorn, K; Correa, A A; Ogitsu, T; Weber, C P; Lee, H J; Feng, J; Ni, P A; Ping, Y; Nelson, A J; Prendergast, D; Lee, R W; Falcone, R W; Heimann, P A

    2011-04-22

    We use time-resolved x-ray absorption spectroscopy to investigate the unoccupied electronic density of states of warm dense copper that is produced isochorically through the absorption of an ultrafast optical pulse. The temperature of the superheated electron-hole plasma, which ranges from 4000 to 10 000 K, was determined by comparing the measured x-ray absorption spectrum with a simulation. The electronic structure of warm dense copper is adequately described with the high temperature electronic density of state calculated by the density functional theory. The dynamics of the electron temperature is consistent with a two-temperature model, while a temperature-dependent electron-phonon coupling parameter is necessary.

  5. Disentangling atomic-layer-specific x-ray absorption spectra by Auger electron diffraction spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsui, Fumihiko; Matsushita, Tomohiro; Kato, Yukako; Hashimoto, Mie; Daimon, Hiroshi

    2009-11-01

    In order to investigate the electronic and magnetic structures of each atomic layer at subsurface, we have proposed a new method, Auger electron diffraction spectroscopy, which is the combination of x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) and Auger electron diffraction (AED) techniques. We have measured a series of Ni LMM AED patterns of the Ni film grown on Cu(001) surface for various thicknesses. Then we deduced a set of atomic-layer-specific AED patterns in a numerical way. Furthermore, we developed an algorithm to disentangle XANES spectra from different atomic layers using these atomic-layer-specific AED patterns. Surface and subsurface core level shift were determined for each atomic layer.

  6. Conformational study of the chromophore of C-phycocyanin by resonance raman and electronic absorption spectroscopy.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Margulies, L.; Toporowicz, M.

    1988-05-01

    The conformation of the chromophore of C-phycocyanin (PC) was investigated by using electronic absorption and resonance Raman spectroscopy, and theoretical calculations. Using an A-dihydrobilindione as model compound, the syn, syn, syn conformation was established for the isolated chromophore in solution. For the native PC, the best results were obtained by considering the syn, syn, anti conformation, although the possibility of having a syn, anti, anti conformation could not be excluded.

  7. Molecular scale shock response: electronic absorption spectroscopy of laser shocked explosives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGrane, Shawn; Whitley, Von; Moore, David; Bolme, Cindy; Eakins, Daniel

    2009-06-01

    Single shot spectroscopies are being employed to answer questions fundamental to shock initiation of explosives. The goals are to: 1) determine the extent to which electronic excitations are, or are not, involved in shock induced reactions, 2) test the multiphonon up-pumping hypothesis in explosives, and 3) provide data on the initial evolution of temperature and chemistry following the shock loading of explosives on scales amenable to comparison to molecular dynamics simulations. The data presented in this talk are focused on answering the first question. Recent experimental results measuring the time history of ultraviolet/visible absorption spectroscopy of laser shocked explosive thin films and single crystals will be discussed.

  8. Difference Between Far-Infrared Photoconductivity Spectroscopy and Absorption Spectroscopy: Theoretical Evidence of the Electron Reservoir Mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toyoda, Tadashi; Fujita, Maho; Uchida, Tomohisa; Hiraiwa, Nobuyoshi; Fukuda, Taturo; Koizumi, Hideki; Zhang, Chao

    2013-08-01

    The intriguing difference between far-infrared photoconductivity spectroscopy and absorption spectroscopy in the measurement of the magnetoplasmon frequency in GaAs quantum wells reported by Holland et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 93, 186804 (2004)] remains unexplained to date. This Letter provides a consistent mechanism to solve this puzzle. The mechanism is based on the electron reservoir model for the integer quantum Hall effect in graphene [Phys. Lett. A 376, 616 (2012)]. We predict sharp kinks to appear in the magnetic induction dependence of the magnetoplasmon frequency at very low temperatures such as 14 mK in the same GaAs quantum well sample used by Holland et al..

  9. Excited state X-ray absorption spectroscopy: Probing both electronic and structural dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neville, Simon P.; Averbukh, Vitali; Ruberti, Marco; Yun, Renjie; Patchkovskii, Serguei; Chergui, Majed; Stolow, Albert; Schuurman, Michael S.

    2016-10-01

    We investigate the sensitivity of X-ray absorption spectra, simulated using a general method, to properties of molecular excited states. Recently, Averbukh and co-workers [M. Ruberti et al., J. Chem. Phys. 140, 184107 (2014)] introduced an efficient and accurate L 2 method for the calculation of excited state valence photoionization cross-sections based on the application of Stieltjes imaging to the Lanczos pseudo-spectrum of the algebraic diagrammatic construction (ADC) representation of the electronic Hamiltonian. In this paper, we report an extension of this method to the calculation of excited state core photoionization cross-sections. We demonstrate that, at the ADC(2)x level of theory, ground state X-ray absorption spectra may be accurately reproduced, validating the method. Significantly, the calculated X-ray absorption spectra of the excited states are found to be sensitive to both geometric distortions (structural dynamics) and the electronic character (electronic dynamics) of the initial state, suggesting that core excitation spectroscopies will be useful probes of excited state non-adiabatic dynamics. We anticipate that the method presented here can be combined with ab initio molecular dynamics calculations to simulate the time-resolved X-ray spectroscopy of excited state molecular wavepacket dynamics.

  10. Excited state X-ray absorption spectroscopy: Probing both electronic and structural dynamics.

    PubMed

    Neville, Simon P; Averbukh, Vitali; Ruberti, Marco; Yun, Renjie; Patchkovskii, Serguei; Chergui, Majed; Stolow, Albert; Schuurman, Michael S

    2016-10-14

    We investigate the sensitivity of X-ray absorption spectra, simulated using a general method, to properties of molecular excited states. Recently, Averbukh and co-workers [M. Ruberti et al., J. Chem. Phys. 140, 184107 (2014)] introduced an efficient and accurate L(2) method for the calculation of excited state valence photoionization cross-sections based on the application of Stieltjes imaging to the Lanczos pseudo-spectrum of the algebraic diagrammatic construction (ADC) representation of the electronic Hamiltonian. In this paper, we report an extension of this method to the calculation of excited state core photoionization cross-sections. We demonstrate that, at the ADC(2)x level of theory, ground state X-ray absorption spectra may be accurately reproduced, validating the method. Significantly, the calculated X-ray absorption spectra of the excited states are found to be sensitive to both geometric distortions (structural dynamics) and the electronic character (electronic dynamics) of the initial state, suggesting that core excitation spectroscopies will be useful probes of excited state non-adiabatic dynamics. We anticipate that the method presented here can be combined with ab initio molecular dynamics calculations to simulate the time-resolved X-ray spectroscopy of excited state molecular wavepacket dynamics.

  11. Electronic topological transition in zinc under pressure: An x-ray absorption spectroscopy study

    SciTech Connect

    Aquilanti, G.; Trapananti, A.; Pascarelli, S.; Minicucci, M.; Principi, E.; Liscio, F.; Twarog, A.

    2007-10-01

    Zinc metal has been studied at high pressure using x-ray absorption spectroscopy. In order to investigate the role of the different degrees of hydrostaticity on the occurrence of structural anomalies following the electronic topological transition, two pressure transmitting media have been used. Results show that the electronic topological transition, if it exists, does not induce an anomaly in the local environment of compressed Zn as a function of hydrostatic pressure and any anomaly must be related to a loss of hydrostaticity of the pressure transmitting medium. The near-edge structures of the spectra, sensitive to variations in the electronic density of states above the Fermi level, do not show any evidence of electronic transition whatever pressure transmitting medium is used.

  12. Electronic transitions and fermi edge singularity in polar heterostructures studied by absorption and emission spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandey, S.; Cavalcoli, D.; Minj, A.; Fraboni, B.; Cavallini, A.; Gamarra, P.; Poisson, M. A.

    2012-12-01

    Optically induced electronic transitions in nitride based polar heterostructures have been investigated by absorption and emission spectroscopy. Surface photovoltage (SPV), photocurrent (PC), and photo luminescence spectroscopy have been applied to high quality InAlN/AlN/GaN structures to study the optical properties of two dimensional electron gas. Energy levels within the two dimensional electron gas (2DEG) well at the interface between the GaN and AlN have been directly observed by SPV and PC. Moreover, a strong enhancement of the photoluminescence intensity due to holes recombining with electrons at the Fermi Energy, known as fermi energy singularity, has been observed. These analyses have been carried out on InAlN/AlN/GaN heterojunctions with the InAlN barrier layer having different In content, a parameter which affects the energy levels within the 2DEG well as well as the optical signal intensity. The measured energy values are in a very good agreement with the ones obtained by Schrödinger-Poisson simulations.

  13. Electronic structure measurements of metal-organic solar cell dyes using x-ray absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Phillip S.

    The focus of this thesis is twofold: to report the results of X-ray absorption studies of metal-organic dye molecules for dye-sensitized solar cells and to provide a basic training manual on X-ray absorption spectroscopy techniques and data analysis. The purpose of our research on solar cell dyes is to work toward an understanding of the factors influencing the electronic structure of the dye: the choice of the metal, its oxidation state, ligands, and cage structure. First we study the effect of replacing Ru in several common dye structures by Fe. First-principles calculations and X-ray absorption spectroscopy at the C 1s and N 1s edges are combined to investigate transition metal dyes in octahedral and square planar N cages. Octahedral molecules are found to have a downward shift in the N 1s-to-pi* transition energy and an upward shift in C 1s-to-pi* transition energy when Ru is replaced by Fe, explained by an extra transfer of negative charge from Fe to the N ligands compared to Ru. For the square planar molecules, the behavior is more complex because of the influence of axial ligands and oxidation state. Next the crystal field parameters for a series of phthalocyanine and porphyrins dyes are systematically determined using density functional calculations and atomic multiplet calculations with polarization-dependent X-ray absorption spectra. The polarization dependence of the spectra provides information on orbital symmetries which ensures the determination of the crystal field parameters is unique. A uniform downward scaling of the calculated crystal field parameters by 5-30% is found to be necessary to best fit the spectra. This work is a part of the ongoing effort to design and test new solar cell dyes. Replacing the rare metal Ru with abundant metals like Fe would be a significant advance for dye-sensitized solar cells. Understanding the effects of changing the metal centers in these dyes in terms of optical absorption, charge transfer, and electronic

  14. Time-resolved X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy for Electron Transport Study in Warm Dense Gold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jong-Won; Bae, Leejin; Engelhorn, Kyle; Heimann, Philip; Ping, Yuan; Barbrel, Ben; Fernandez, Amalia; Beckwith, Martha Anne; Cho, Byoung-Ick; GIST Team; IBS Team; LBNL Collaboration; SLAC Collaboration; LLNL Collaboration

    2015-11-01

    The warm dense Matter represents states of which the temperature is comparable to Fermi energy and ions are strongly coupled. One of the experimental techniques to create such state in the laboratory condition is the isochoric heating of thin metal foil with femtosecond laser pulses. This concept largely relies on the ballistic transport of electrons near the Fermi-level, which were mainly studied for the metals in ambient conditions. However, they were barely investigated in warm dense conditions. We present a time-resolved x-ray absorption spectroscopy measured for the Au/Cu dual layered sample. The front Au layer was isochorically heated with a femtosecond laser pulse, and the x-ray absorption changes around L-edge of Cu, which was attached on the backside of Au, was measured with a picosecond resolution. Time delays between the heating of the `front surface' of Au layer and the alternation of x-ray spectrum of Cu attached on the `rear surface' of Au indicate the energetic electron transport mechanism through Au in the warm dense conditions. IBS (IBS-R012-D1) and the NRF (No. 2013R1A1A1007084) of Korea.

  15. Investigation of surface structure with X-ray absorption and electron emission spectroscopies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pauli, Mark Daniel

    The use of electron spectromicroscopy for the study of the chemical composition and electronic properties of surfaces, overlayers, and interfaces has become widely accepted. Improvements to the optics of instruments such as the X-ray photo electron emission microscope have pushed spectroscopic microscopies into the realm of very high spatial resolution, at and below 1 micrometer [1]. Coupled with the high spectral resolution available from third generation synchrotron sources, this spatial resolution allows the measurement of micro-X-ray absorption near-edge spectra in addition to the more typical electron emission spectra and diffraction patterns. Complementary to the experimental developments is the development of improved theoretical methods for computational modeling of X-ray absorption and emission spectroscopies. In the field of tribochemistry, zinc dialkyl dithiophosphate (ZDDP) has long been a topic of much study. ZDDP is widely used as an anti-wear additive in engine oils and there is interest in determining the decomposition products of ZDDP that provide this protection against friction. An analysis of X-ray absorption near-edge spectra of thermal films from ZDDP samples is presented, including a comparison of the Zinc L-edge spectra with model calculations [2]. It was found essential to carry out self-consistent calculations of the electronic structure for the modeling. For the techniques of electron diffraction, a new method for a full multiple-scattering calculation of diffraction patterns from crystals with two-dimensional periodicity parallel to the surface is presented [3]. The calculation makes use of Helmholtz's reciprocity principle to compute the path-reversed process of the back propagation of a photoelectron from the position of a distant detector to that of the emitting atom. Early application is demonstrated with simulations of 64 eV M2,3VV and 914 eV L 2,3VV Auger electron diffraction from a Cu(001) surface. The functionality of the path

  16. Electronic structure of fluorinated multiwalled carbon nanotubes studied using x-ray absorption and photoelectron spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brzhezinskaya, M. M.; Muradyan, V. E.; Vinogradov, N. A.; Preobrajenski, A. B.; Gudat, W.; Vinogradov, A. S.

    2009-04-01

    This paper presents the results of combined investigation of the chemical bond formation in fluorinated multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) with different fluorine contents (10-55wt%) and reference compounds (highly oriented pyrolytic graphite crystals and “white” graphite fluoride) using x-ray absorption and photoelectron spectroscopy at C1s and F1s thresholds. Measurements were performed at BESSY II (Berlin, Germany) and MAX-laboratory (Lund, Sweden). The analysis of the soft x-ray absorption and photoelectron spectra points to the formation of covalent chemical bonding between fluorine and carbon atoms in the fluorinated nanotubes. It was established that within the probing depth (˜15nm) of carbon nanotubes, the process of fluorination runs uniformly and does not depend on the fluorine concentration. In this case, fluorine atoms interact with MWCNTs through the covalent attachment of fluorine atoms to graphene layers of the graphite skeleton (phase 1) and this bonding is accompanied by a change in the hybridization of the 2s and 2p valence electron states of the carbon atom from the trigonal (sp2) to tetrahedral (sp3) hybridization and by a large electron transfer between carbon an fluorine atoms. In the MWCNT near-surface region the second fluorine-carbon phase with weak electron transfer is formed; it is located mainly within two or three upper graphene monolayers, and its contribution becomes much poorer as the probing depth of fluorinated multiwalled carbon nanotubes (F-MWCNTs) increases. The defluorination process of F-MWCNTs on thermal annealing has been investigated. The conclusion has been made that F-MWCNT defluorination without destruction of graphene layers is possible.

  17. A Complete Overhaul of the Electron Energy-Loss Spectroscopy and X-Ray Absorption Spectroscopy Database: eelsdb.eu.

    PubMed

    Ewels, Philip; Sikora, Thierry; Serin, Virginie; Ewels, Chris P; Lajaunie, Luc

    2016-06-01

    The electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS) and X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) database has been completely rewritten, with an improved design, user interface, and a number of new tools. The database is accessible at https://eelsdb.eu/ and can now be used without registration. The submission process has been streamlined to encourage spectrum submissions and the new design gives greater emphasis on contributors' original work by highlighting their papers. With numerous new filters and a powerful search function, it is now simple to explore the database of several hundred EELS and XAS spectra. Interactive plots allow spectra to be overlaid, facilitating online comparison. An application-programming interface has been created, allowing external tools and software to easily access the information held within the database. In addition to the database itself, users can post and manage job adverts and read the latest news and events regarding the EELS and XAS communities. In accordance with the ongoing drive toward open access data increasingly demanded by funding bodies, the database will facilitate open access data sharing of EELS and XAS spectra.

  18. Low-lying singlet states of carotenoids having 8-13 conjugated double bonds as determined by electronic absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Peng; Nakamura, Ryosuke; Kanematsu, Yasuo; Koyama, Yasushi; Nagae, Hiroyoshi; Nishio, Tomohiro; Hashimoto, Hideki; Zhang, Jian-Ping

    2005-07-01

    Electronic absorption spectra were recorded at room temperature in solutions of carotenoids having different numbers of conjugated double bonds, n = 8-13, including a spheroidene derivatives, neurosporene, spheroidene, lycopene, anhydrorhodovibrin and spirilloxanthin. The vibronic states of 1Bu+(v=0-4), 2Ag-(v=0-3), 3Ag- (0) and 1Bu- (0) were clearly identified. The arrangement of the four electronic states determined by electronic absorption spectroscopy was identical to that determined by measurement of resonance Raman excitation profiles [K. Furuichi et al., Chem. Phys. Lett. 356 (2002) 547] for carotenoids in crystals.

  19. Revealing electronic structure changes in Chevrel phase cathodes upon Mg insertion using X-ray absorption spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Wan, Liwen F.; Wright, Joshua; Perdue, Brian R.; Fister, Timothy T.; Kim, Soojeong; Apblett, Christopher A.; Prendergast, David

    2016-06-10

    Following previous work predicting the electronic response of the Chevrel phase Mo6S8 upon Mg insertion (Thole et al., Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys., 2015, 17, 22548), we provide the experimental proof, evident in X-ray absorption spectroscopy, to illustrate the charge compensation mechanism of the Chevrel phase compound during Mg insertion and de-insertion processes.

  20. Capturing Transient Electronic and Molecular Structures in Liquids by Picosecond X-Ray Absorption Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Gawelda, W.; Pham, V. T.; El Nahhas, A.; Kaiser, M.; Zaushitsyn, Y.; Bressler, C.; Chergui, M.; Johnson, S. L.; Grolimund, D.; Abela, R.; Hauser, A.

    2007-02-02

    We describe an advanced setup for time-resolved x-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) Spectroscopy with picosecond temporal resolution. It combines an intense femtosecond laser source synchronized to the x-ray pulses delivered into the microXAS beamline of the Swiss Light Source (SLS). The setup is applied to measure the short-lived high-spin geometric structure of photoexcited aqueous Fe(bpy)3 at room temperature.

  1. Interaction of chlorpromazine and trifluoperazine with ionic micelles: electronic absorption spectroscopy studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caetano, Wilker; Tabak, Marcel

    1999-10-01

    The characteristics of binding of two phenothiazine antipsychotic drugs, namely, chlorpromazine (CPZ) and trifluoperazine (TFP), to cationic cetyltrimethylammonium chloride (CTAC), zwitterionic N-hexadecyl- N, N-dimethyl-3-ammonio-1-propanesulfonate (HPS), neutral t-octylphenoxypolyethoxyethanol (TRITON X-100) and polyoxyethylene dodecyl ether (Brij-35) micelles were investigated using electronic absorption spectroscopy. Binding constants Kb and p Ka values of drugs in micelles were estimated using the red shifts of the maximum absorption upon alkalization or in the presence of detergents. The p Ka of TFP seems to be shifted by 2.5-4.1 units to lower values in the presence of different surfactants as compared to the experimental value of p Ka obtained in buffer which is around 7.0. Consideration of the second p Ka around 4.0 reported in the literature for TFP leads to a better rationalization of p Ka changes for this compound. The changes in p Ka contributed by electrostatic effects are all positive, small for CTAC (+0.2), and greater for HPS (+0.9). For CPZ the p Ka shift due to its interaction with micelles is in the 0.7-2.3 range, the direction of the shift depending on the charge of the polar head. The electrostatic contribution for the shift is great for CTAC (-0.8) and smaller for HPS (+0.2). This result suggests a more polar localization in the micelle of CPZ as compared to TFP. The values of binding constants Kb for TFP and CPZ in different protonation states show that electrostatic interactions are essential in the affinity of the drugs to micelles bearing different charges on their headgroups (CTAC, HPS). Data for Brij-35 demonstrate that the additional charge on the TFP ring at pH 2.0 leads to a decrease of binding constant probably due to the repulsion of the phenothiazine ring from the protons accumulated at the polar head of the micelle at acidic pH values. For this micelle at pH 5.0 TFP has a Kb 3-fold greater than that for CPZ while at pH 2.0 Kb for

  2. Correlated Single-Crystal Electronic Absorption Spectroscopy and X-ray Crystallography at NSLS Beamline X26-C

    SciTech Connect

    A Orville; R Buono; M Cowan; A Heroux; G Shea-McCarthy; D Schneider; J Skinner; M Skinner; D Stoner-Ma; R Sweet

    2011-12-31

    The research philosophy and new capabilities installed at NSLS beamline X26-C to support electronic absorption and Raman spectroscopies coupled with X-ray diffraction are reviewed. This beamline is dedicated full time to multidisciplinary studies with goals that include revealing the relationship between the electronic and atomic structures in macromolecules. The beamline instrumentation has been fully integrated such that optical absorption spectra and X-ray diffraction images are interlaced. Therefore, optical changes induced by X-ray exposure can be correlated with X-ray diffraction data collection. The installation of Raman spectroscopy into the beamline is also briefly reviewed. Data are now routinely generated almost simultaneously from three complementary types of experiments from the same sample. The beamline is available now to the NSLS general user population.

  3. Correlated single-crystal electronic absorption spectroscopy and X-ray crystallography at NSLS beamline X26-C

    SciTech Connect

    Orville, A.M.; Buono, R.; Cowan, M.; Heroux, A.; Shea-McCarthy, G.; Schneider, D. K.; Skinner, J. M.; Skinner, M. J.; Stoner-Ma, D.; Sweet, R. M.

    2011-05-01

    The research philosophy and new capabilities installed at NSLS beamline X26-C to support electronic absorption and Raman spectroscopies coupled with X-ray diffraction are reviewed. This beamline is dedicated full time to multidisciplinary studies with goals that include revealing the relationship between the electronic and atomic structures in macromolecules. The beamline instrumentation has been fully integrated such that optical absorption spectra and X-ray diffraction images are interlaced. Therefore, optical changes induced by X-ray exposure can be correlated with X-ray diffraction data collection. The installation of Raman spectroscopy into the beamline is also briefly reviewed. Data are now routinely generated almost simultaneously from three complementary types of experiments from the same sample. The beamline is available now to the NSLS general user population.

  4. Correlated single-crystal electronic absorption spectroscopy and X-ray crystallography at NSLS beamline X26-C

    PubMed Central

    Orville, Allen M.; Buono, Richard; Cowan, Matt; Héroux, Annie; Shea-McCarthy, Grace; Schneider, Dieter K.; Skinner, John M.; Skinner, Michael J.; Stoner-Ma, Deborah; Sweet, Robert M.

    2011-01-01

    The research philosophy and new capabilities installed at NSLS beamline X26-C to support electronic absorption and Raman spectroscopies coupled with X-ray diffraction are reviewed. This beamline is dedicated full time to multidisciplinary studies with goals that include revealing the relationship between the electronic and atomic structures in macromolecules. The beamline instrumentation has been fully integrated such that optical absorption spectra and X-ray diffraction images are interlaced. Therefore, optical changes induced by X-ray exposure can be correlated with X-ray diffraction data collection. The installation of Raman spectroscopy into the beamline is also briefly reviewed. Data are now routinely generated almost simultaneously from three complementary types of experiments from the same sample. The beamline is available now to the NSLS general user population. PMID:21525643

  5. Soliton absorption spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Kalashnikov, V. L.; Sorokin, E.

    2010-01-01

    We analyze optical soliton propagation in the presence of weak absorption lines with much narrower linewidths as compared to the soliton spectrum width using the novel perturbation analysis technique based on an integral representation in the spectral domain. The stable soliton acquires spectral modulation that follows the associated index of refraction of the absorber. The model can be applied to ordinary soliton propagation and to an absorber inside a passively modelocked laser. In the latter case, a comparison with water vapor absorption in a femtosecond Cr:ZnSe laser yields a very good agreement with experiment. Compared to the conventional absorption measurement in a cell of the same length, the signal is increased by an order of magnitude. The obtained analytical expressions allow further improving of the sensitivity and spectroscopic accuracy making the soliton absorption spectroscopy a promising novel measurement technique. PMID:21151755

  6. Near Edge X-Ray Absorption Fine Structure Spectroscopy with X-Ray Free-Electron Lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Bernstein, D.P.; Acremann, Y.; Scherz, A.; Burkhardt, M.; Stohr, J.; Beye, M.; Schlotter, W.F.; Beeck, T.; Sorgenfrei, F.; Pietzsch, A.; Wurth, W.; Fohlisch, A.; /Hamburg U.

    2009-12-11

    We demonstrate the feasibility of Near Edge X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy on solids by means of femtosecond soft x-ray pulses from a free-electron laser (FEL). Our experiments, carried out at the Free-Electron Laser at Hamburg (FLASH), used a special sample geometry, spectrographic energy dispersion, single shot position-sensitive detection and a data normalization procedure that eliminates the severe fluctuations of the incident intensity in space and photon energy. As an example we recorded the {sup 3}D{sub 1} N{sub 4,5}-edge absorption resonance of La{sup 3+}-ions in LaMnO{sub 3}. Our study opens the door for x-ray absorption measurements on future x-ray FEL facilities.

  7. Ozone absorption spectroscopy in search of low-lying electronic states

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, S. M.; Mauersberger, K.

    1995-01-01

    A spectrometer capable of detecting ozone absorption features 9 orders of magnitude weaker than the Hartley band has been employed to investigate the molecule's near-infrared absorption spectrum. At this sensitivity a wealth of information on the low-lying electronically excited states often believed to play a role in atmospheric chemistry is available in the form of vibrational and rotational structure. We have analyzed these spectra using a combination of digital filtering and isotope substitution and find evidence for three electronically excited states below 1.5 eV. The lowest of these states is metastable, bound by approximately 0.1 eV and probably the (3)A2 rather than the (3)B2 state. Its adiabatic electronic energy is 1.24 +/- 0.01 eV, slightly above the dissociation energy of the ground state. Two higher states, at 1.29 +/- 0.03 and 1.48 +/- 0.03 eV are identified as the (3)B2 and the (3)B1, respectively. Combined with other recent theoretical and experimental data on the low-lying electronic states of ozone, these results imply that these are, in fact, the lowest three excited states; that is, there are no electronically excited states of ozone lying below the energy of O(3P) + O2((3)Sigma(-), v = 0). Some of the implications for atmospheric chemistry are considered.

  8. Local versus global electronic properties of chalcopyrite alloys: X-ray absorption spectroscopy and ab initio calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Sarmiento-Pérez, Rafael; Botti, Silvana; Schnohr, Claudia S.; Lauermann, Iver; Rubio, Angel; Johnson, Benjamin

    2014-09-07

    Element-specific unoccupied electronic states of Cu(In, Ga)S{sub 2} were studied as a function of the In/Ga ratio by combining X-ray absorption spectroscopy with density functional theory calculations. The S absorption edge shifts with changing In/Ga ratio as expected from the variation of the band gap. In contrast, the cation edge positions are largely independent of composition despite the changing band gap. This unexpected behavior is well reproduced by our calculations and originates from the dependence of the electronic states on the local atomic environment. The changing band gap arises from a changing spatial average of these localized states with changing alloy composition.

  9. Electronic structure of barium strontium titanate by soft-x-ray absorption spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Uehara, Y.; Underwood, J.H.; Gullikson, E.M.; Perera, R.C.C.

    1997-04-01

    Perovskite-type titanates, such as Strontium Titanate (STO), Barium Titanate (BTO), and Lead Titanate (PTO) have been widely studied because they show good electric and optical properties. In recent years, thin films of Barium Strontium Titanate (BST) have been paid much attention as dielectrics of dynamic random access memory (DRAM) capacitors. BST is a better insulator with a higher dielectric constant than STO and can be controlled in a paraelectric phase with an appropriate ratio of Ba/Sr composition, however, few studies have been done on the electronic structure of the material. Studies of the electronic structure of such materials can be beneficial, both for fundamental physics research and for improving technological applications. BTO is a famous ferroelectric material with a tetragonal structure, in which Ti and Ba atoms are slightly displaced from the lattice points. On the other hand, BST keeps a paraelectric phase, which means that the atoms are still at the cubic lattice points. It should be of great interest to see how this difference of the local structure around Ti atoms between BTO and BST effects the electronic structure of these two materials. In this report, the authors present the Ti L{sub 2,3} absorption spectra of STO, BTO, and BST measured with very high accuracy in energy of the absorption features.

  10. Characterization of interfacially electronic structures of gold-magnetite heterostructures using X-ray absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Lin, Fang-hsin; Doong, Ruey-an

    2014-03-01

    Gold-magnetite heterostructures are novel nanomaterials which can rapidly catalyze the reduction reaction of nitroaromatics. In this study, the interfacially structural and electronic properties of various morphologies of Au-Fe3O4 heterostructures were systematically investigated using X-ray absorbance spectroscopy (XAS) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The effect of change in electronic structure and charge transfer on electrochemically catalytic activity of Au-Fe3O4 heterostructures was further evaluated by oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). The shifts in binding energy of Au4f and Fe2p peaks in XPS spectra indicate the charge transfer between the Au and Fe3O4 nanoparticles. The increase in d-hole population of Au seeds after the conjugation with iron oxides follows the order flower-like Au-Fe3O4 (FLNPs)>dumbbell-like Au-Fe3O4 (DBNPs)>Au seeds. In addition, the Fe(2+) valence state increases in Au-Fe3O4 heterostructures, which provides evidence to support the hypothesis of charge transfer between Au and Fe3O4 nanoparticles. The theoretical simulation of Au L3-edge XAS further confirms the production of Au-Fe and Au-O bonds at the interface of Au/Fe3O4 and the epitaxial linkage relationship between Au and Fe3O4 nanoparticles. In addition, the electron deficient of Au seeds increases upon increasing Fe3O4 nanoparticles on a single Au seed, and subsequently decreases the catalytic activity of Au in the Au-Fe3O4 heterostructures. The catalytic activity of Au-Fe3O4 toward ORR follows the order Au seeds>Au-Fe3O4 DBNPs>Au-Fe3O4 FLNPs, which is positively correlated to the extent of electronic deficiency of Au in Au-Fe3O4 heterostructures.

  11. Relic Neutrino Absorption Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Eberle, b

    2004-01-28

    Resonant annihilation of extremely high-energy cosmic neutrinos on big-bang relic anti-neutrinos (and vice versa) into Z-bosons leads to sizable absorption dips in the neutrino flux to be observed at Earth. The high-energy edges of these dips are fixed, via the resonance energies, by the neutrino masses alone. Their depths are determined by the cosmic neutrino background density, by the cosmological parameters determining the expansion rate of the universe, and by the large redshift history of the cosmic neutrino sources. We investigate the possibility of determining the existence of the cosmic neutrino background within the next decade from a measurement of these absorption dips in the neutrino flux. As a by-product, we study the prospects to infer the absolute neutrino mass scale. We find that, with the presently planned neutrino detectors (ANITA, Auger, EUSO, OWL, RICE, and SalSA) operating in the relevant energy regime above 10{sup 21} eV, relic neutrino absorption spectroscopy becomes a realistic possibility. It requires, however, the existence of extremely powerful neutrino sources, which should be opaque to nucleons and high-energy photons to evade present constraints. Furthermore, the neutrino mass spectrum must be quasi-degenerate to optimize the dip, which implies m{sub {nu}} 0.1 eV for the lightest neutrino. With a second generation of neutrino detectors, these demanding requirements can be relaxed considerably.

  12. Electronic absorption spectroscopy of PAHs in supersonic jets and ultracold liquid helium droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huisken, Friedrich; Staicu, Angela; Krasnokutski, Serge; Henning, Thomas

    Neutral and cationic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are discussed as possible carriers of the diffuse interstellar bands (DIBs), still unassigned astrophysical absorption features observed in the spectra of reddened stars (Salama et al. 1999). Despite the importance of this class of molecules for astrophysics and nanophysics (PAHs can be regarded as nanoscale fragments of a sheet of graphite), the spectroscopic characterization of PAHs under well-defined conditions (low temperature and collision-free environment) has remained a challenge. Recently we have set up a cavity ring-down spectrometer combined with a pulsed supersonic jet expansion to study neutral and cationic PAHs under astrophysical conditions. PAHs studied so far include the neutral molecules anthracene (Staicu et al. 2004) and pyrene (Rouillé et al. 2004) as well as the cationic species naphthalene+ and anthracene+ (Sukhorukov et al. 2004). Employing another molecular beam apparatus, the same molecules (except of the cationic species) were also studied in liquid helium droplets (Krasnokutski et al. 2005, Rouillé et al. 2004). This novel technique combines several advantages of conventional matrix spectroscopy with those of gas phase spectroscopy. Notable advantages are the possibility to study molecules with low vapor pressure and to use a mass spectrometer facilitating spectral assignments. The most recent studies were devoted to phenanthrene and the more complicated (2,3)-benzofluorene. These molecules were investigated in the gas phase by cavity ring-down spectroscopy and in liquid helium droplets using depletion spectroscopy. For benzofluorene the present studies constitute the first reported measurements both in the gas phase and in helium droplets. The origin of the S1 ← S0 gas phase transition could be located at 29 894.3 cm-1, and a series of vibronic bands was recorded below 31 500 cm-1. In contrast to previously studied PAHs, the shift induced by the helium droplets was very

  13. Electronic structure of nickel porphyrin NiP: Study by X-ray photoelectron and absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svirskiy, G. I.; Sergeeva, N. N.; Krasnikov, S. A.; Vinogradov, N. A.; Sergeeva, Yu. N.; Cafolla, A. A.; Preobrajenski, A. B.; Vinogradov, A. S.

    2017-02-01

    Energy distributions and properties of the occupied and empty electronic states for a planar complex of nickel porphyrin NiP are studied by X-ray photoemission and absorption spectroscopy techniques. As a result of the analysis of the experimental spectra of valence photoemission, the nature and energy positions of the highest occupied electronic states were determined: the highest occupied state is formed mostly by atomic states of the porphine ligand; the following two states are associated with 3 d states of the nickel atom. It was found that the lowest empty state is specific and is described by the σ-type b 1 g MO formed by empty Ni3{d_{{x^2} - {y^2}}}-states and occupied 2 p-states of lone electron pairs of nitrogen atoms. This specific nature of the lowest empty state is a consequence of the donor-acceptor chemical bond in NiP.

  14. Potential benefits of triethylamine as n-electron donor in the estimation of forskolin by electronic absorption and emission spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raju, Gajula; Ram Reddy, A.

    2016-02-01

    Diterpenoid forskolin was isolated from Coleus forskolii. The electronic absorption and emission studies of forskolin were investigated in various solvents with an aim to improve its detection limits. The two chromophores present in the diterpenoid are not conjugated leading to the poor absorption and emission of UV light. The absorption and fluorescence spectra were solvent specific. In the presence of a monodentate ligand, triethylamine the detection of forskolin is improved by 3.63 times in ethanol with the fluorescence method and 3.36 times in DMSO by the absorption spectral method. The longer wavelength absorption maximum is blue shifted while the lower energy fluorescence maximum is red shifted in the presence of triethylamine. From the wavelength of fluorescence maxima of the exciplex formed between excited forskolin and triethylamine it is concluded that the order of reactivity of hydroxyl groups in the excited state forskolin is in the reverse order to that of the order of the reactivity of hydroxyl groups in its ground state.

  15. Potential benefits of triethylamine as n-electron donor in the estimation of forskolin by electronic absorption and emission spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Raju, Gajula; Reddy, A Ram

    2016-02-05

    Diterpenoid forskolin was isolated from Coleus forskolii. The electronic absorption and emission studies of forskolin were investigated in various solvents with an aim to improve its detection limits. The two chromophores present in the diterpenoid are not conjugated leading to the poor absorption and emission of UV light. The absorption and fluorescence spectra were solvent specific. In the presence of a monodentate ligand, triethylamine the detection of forskolin is improved by 3.63 times in ethanol with the fluorescence method and 3.36 times in DMSO by the absorption spectral method. The longer wavelength absorption maximum is blue shifted while the lower energy fluorescence maximum is red shifted in the presence of triethylamine. From the wavelength of fluorescence maxima of the exciplex formed between excited forskolin and triethylamine it is concluded that the order of reactivity of hydroxyl groups in the excited state forskolin is in the reverse order to that of the order of the reactivity of hydroxyl groups in its ground state.

  16. Time-Resolved IR-Absorption Spectroscopy of Hot-Electron Dynamics in Satellite and Upper Conduction Bands in GaP

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cavicchia, M. A.; Alfano, R. R.

    1995-01-01

    The relaxation dynamics of hot electrons in the X6 and X7 satellite and upper conduction bands in GaP was directly measured by femtosecond UV-pump-IR-probe absorption spectroscopy. From a fit to the induced IR-absorption spectra the dominant scattering mechanism giving rise to the absorption at early delay times was determined to be intervalley scattering of electrons out of the X7 upper conduction-band valley. For long delay times the dominant scattering mechanism is electron-hole scattering. Electron transport dynamics of the upper conduction band of GaP has been time resolved.

  17. TiO2-SnO2:F interfacial electronic structure investigated by soft x-ray absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kronawitter, Coleman X.; Kapilashrami, Mukes; Bakke, Jonathan R.; Bent, Stacey F.; Chuang, Cheng-Hao; Pong, Way-Faung; Guo, Jinghua; Vayssieres, Lionel; Mao, Samuel S.

    2012-03-01

    The electronic structure of the titanium dioxide (TiO2)-fluorine-doped tin dioxide (SnO2:F) interface is investigated by soft x-ray absorption spectroscopy using synchrotron radiation. The measurements probe the site- and symmetry-selected unoccupied density of states and reflect the interaction between an early transition-metal-oxide (d0) semiconductor and a post-transition-metal-oxide (d10) degenerate semiconductor. The distinct interfacial electronic structure of TiO2-SnO2:F is established by contrasting spectra with those for anatase and rutile TiO2, SnO2:F, and ZnO-SnO2:F and CdO-SnO2:F interfaces. Oxygen 1s absorption spectra, which relate to the O 2p partial density of states of the conduction band, indicate that the interface is associated with a reduction in Ti d-O p orbital hybridization and an alteration of the TiO2 crystal field. These observations are consistent with measured titanium 2p absorption spectra, which in addition provide evidence for distortion of long-range order around the cation site in the interfacial TiO2. The TiO2-SnO2:F interface is a functional component of a number of optoelectronic devices, perhaps most notably within the anode structure of solar cell architectures. In nonequilibrium conditions, such as those found in operating solar cells, interfacial electronic structure directly influences performance by modifying, for instance, the quasi-Fermi level electrons and the potential distribution at the transparent electrode.

  18. Towards simultaneous measurements of electronic and structural properties in ultra-fast x-ray free electron laser absorption spectroscopy experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Gaudin, J.; Fourment, C.; Cho, B. I.; Engelhorn, K.; Galtier, E.; Harmand, M.; Leguay, P. M.; Lee, H. J.; Nagler, B.; Nakatsutsumi, M.; Ozkan, C.; Störmer, M.; Toleikis, S.; Tschentscher, Th.; Heimann, P. A.; Dorchies, F.

    2014-04-17

    The rapidly growing ultrafast science with X-ray lasers unveils atomic scale processes with unprecedented time resolution bringing the so called “molecular movie” within reach. X-ray absorption spectroscopy is one of the most powerful x-ray techniques providing both local atomic order and electronic structure when coupled with ad-hoc theory. Collecting absorption spectra within few x-ray pulses is possible only in a dispersive setup. We demonstrate ultrafast time-resolved measurements of the LIII-edge x-ray absorption near-edge spectra of irreversibly laser excited Molybdenum using an average of only few x-ray pulses with a signal to noise ratio limited only by the saturation level of the detector. The simplicity of the experimental set-up makes this technique versatile and applicable for a wide range of pump-probe experiments, particularly in the case of non-reversible processes.

  19. Towards simultaneous measurements of electronic and structural properties in ultra-fast x-ray free electron laser absorption spectroscopy experiments

    DOE PAGES

    Gaudin, J.; Fourment, C.; Cho, B. I.; ...

    2014-04-17

    The rapidly growing ultrafast science with X-ray lasers unveils atomic scale processes with unprecedented time resolution bringing the so called “molecular movie” within reach. X-ray absorption spectroscopy is one of the most powerful x-ray techniques providing both local atomic order and electronic structure when coupled with ad-hoc theory. Collecting absorption spectra within few x-ray pulses is possible only in a dispersive setup. We demonstrate ultrafast time-resolved measurements of the LIII-edge x-ray absorption near-edge spectra of irreversibly laser excited Molybdenum using an average of only few x-ray pulses with a signal to noise ratio limited only by the saturation level ofmore » the detector. The simplicity of the experimental set-up makes this technique versatile and applicable for a wide range of pump-probe experiments, particularly in the case of non-reversible processes.« less

  20. Temporally resolved characterization of shock-heated foam target with Al absorption spectroscopy for fast electron transport study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yabuuchi, T.; Sawada, H.; Regan, S. P.; Anderson, K.; Wei, M. S.; Betti, R.; Hund, J.; Key, M. H.; Mackinnon, A. J.; McLean, H. S.; Paguio, R. R.; Patel, P. K.; Saito, K. M.; Stephens, R. B.; Wilks, S. C.; Beg, F. N.

    2012-09-01

    The CH foam plasma produced by a laser-driven shock wave has been characterized by a temporally resolved Al 1s-2p absorption spectroscopy technique. A 200 mg/cm3 foam target with Al dopant was developed for this experiment, which used an OMEGA EP [D. D. Meyerhofer et al., J. Phys.: Conf. Ser. 244, 032010 (2010)] long pulse beam with an energy of 1.2 kJ and 3.5 ns pulselength. The plasma temperatures were inferred with the accuracy of 5 eV from the fits to the measurements using an atomic physics code. The results show that the inferred temperature is sustained at 40-45 eV between 6 and 7 ns and decreases to 25 eV at 8 ns. 2-D radiation hydrodynamic simulations show a good agreement with the measurements. Application of the shock-heated foam plasma platform toward fast electron transport experiments is discussed.

  1. Theoretical study of Raman chirped adiabatic passage by X-ray absorption spectroscopy: Highly excited electronic states and rotational effects

    SciTech Connect

    Engin, Selma; Sisourat, Nicolas Selles, Patricia; Taïeb, Richard; Carniato, Stéphane

    2014-06-21

    Raman Chirped Adiabatic Passage (RCAP) is an efficient method to climb the vibrational ladder of molecules. It was shown on the example of fixed-in-space HCl molecule that selective vibrational excitation can thus be achieved by RCAP and that population transfer can be followed by X-ray Photoelectron spectroscopy [S. Engin, N. Sisourat, P. Selles, R. Taïeb, and S. Carniato, Chem. Phys. Lett. 535, 192–195 (2012)]. Here, in a more detailed analysis of the process, we investigate the effects of highly excited electronic states and of molecular rotation on the efficiency of RCAP. Furthermore, we propose an alternative spectroscopic way to monitor the transfer by means of X-ray absorption spectra.

  2. Mapping of the photoinduced electron traps in TiO₂ by picosecond X-ray absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Rittmann-Frank, M Hannelore; Milne, Chris J; Rittmann, Jochen; Reinhard, Marco; Penfold, Thomas J; Chergui, Majed

    2014-06-02

    Titanium dioxide (TiO2) is the most popular material for applications in solar-energy conversion and photocatalysis, both of which rely on the creation, transport, and trapping of charges (holes and electrons). The nature and lifetime of electron traps at room temperature have so far not been elucidated. Herein, we use picosecond X-ray absorption spectroscopy at the Ti K-edge and the Ru L3-edge to address this issue for photoexcited bare and N719-dye-sensitized anatase and amorphous TiO2 nanoparticles. Our results show that 100 ps after photoexcitation, the electrons are trapped deep in the defect-rich surface shell in the case of anatase TiO2, whereas they are inside the bulk in the case of amorphous TiO2. In the case of dye-sensitized anatase or amorphous TiO2, the electrons are trapped at the outer surface. Only two traps were identified in all cases, with lifetimes in the range of nanoseconds to tens of nanoseconds.

  3. X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Yano, Junko; Yachandra, Vittal K.

    2009-07-09

    This review gives a brief description of the theory and application of X-ray absorption spectroscopy, both X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) and extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS), especially, pertaining to photosynthesis. The advantages and limitations of the methods are discussed. Recent advances in extended EXAFS and polarized EXAFS using oriented membranes and single crystals are explained. Developments in theory in understanding the XANES spectra are described. The application of X-ray absorption spectroscopy to the study of the Mn4Ca cluster in Photosystem II is presented.

  4. Probing local and electronic structure in Warm Dense Matter: single pulse synchrotron x-ray absorption spectroscopy on shocked Fe

    PubMed Central

    Torchio, Raffaella; Occelli, Florent; Mathon, Olivier; Sollier, Arnaud; Lescoute, Emilien; Videau, Laurent; Vinci, Tommaso; Benuzzi-Mounaix, Alessandra; Headspith, Jon; Helsby, William; Bland, Simon; Eakins, Daniel; Chapman, David; Pascarelli, Sakura; Loubeyre, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Understanding Warm Dense Matter (WDM), the state of planetary interiors, is a new frontier in scientific research. There exists very little experimental data probing WDM states at the atomic level to test current models and those performed up to now are limited in quality. Here, we report a proof-of-principle experiment that makes microscopic investigations of materials under dynamic compression easily accessible to users and with data quality close to that achievable at ambient. Using a single 100 ps synchrotron x-ray pulse, we have measured, by K-edge absorption spectroscopy, ns-lived equilibrium states of WDM Fe. Structural and electronic changes in Fe are clearly observed for the first time at such extreme conditions. The amplitude of the EXAFS oscillations persists up to 500 GPa and 17000 K, suggesting an enduring local order. Moreover, a discrepancy exists with respect to theoretical calculations in the value of the energy shift of the absorption onset and so this comparison should help to refine the approximations used in models. PMID:27246145

  5. Probing local and electronic structure in Warm Dense Matter: single pulse synchrotron x-ray absorption spectroscopy on shocked Fe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torchio, Raffaella; Occelli, Florent; Mathon, Olivier; Sollier, Arnaud; Lescoute, Emilien; Videau, Laurent; Vinci, Tommaso; Benuzzi-Mounaix, Alessandra; Headspith, Jon; Helsby, William; Bland, Simon; Eakins, Daniel; Chapman, David; Pascarelli, Sakura; Loubeyre, Paul

    2016-06-01

    Understanding Warm Dense Matter (WDM), the state of planetary interiors, is a new frontier in scientific research. There exists very little experimental data probing WDM states at the atomic level to test current models and those performed up to now are limited in quality. Here, we report a proof-of-principle experiment that makes microscopic investigations of materials under dynamic compression easily accessible to users and with data quality close to that achievable at ambient. Using a single 100 ps synchrotron x-ray pulse, we have measured, by K-edge absorption spectroscopy, ns-lived equilibrium states of WDM Fe. Structural and electronic changes in Fe are clearly observed for the first time at such extreme conditions. The amplitude of the EXAFS oscillations persists up to 500 GPa and 17000 K, suggesting an enduring local order. Moreover, a discrepancy exists with respect to theoretical calculations in the value of the energy shift of the absorption onset and so this comparison should help to refine the approximations used in models.

  6. Occupied and unoccupied electronic structures of an L-cysteine film studied by core-absorption and resonant photoelectron spectroscopies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamada, M.; Hideshima, T.; Azuma, J.; Yamamoto, I.; Imamura, M.; Takahashi, K.

    2016-04-01

    Unoccupied and occupied electronic structures of an L-cysteine film have been studied by absorption and resonant photoelectron spectroscopies. Core absorptions at S-L, C-K, N-K, and O-K levels indicate that the lower unoccupied states are predominantly composed of oxygen-2p, carbon-2p, and sulfur-4s+3d orbitals, while higher unoccupied states may be attributed dominantly to nitrogen-np (n ≥ 3), oxygen-np (n ≥ 3), and sulfur-ns+md (n ≥ 4, m ≥ 3) orbitals. Resonant photoelectron spectra at S-L23 and O-K levels indicate that the highest occupied state is originated from sulfur-3sp orbitals, while oxygen-2sp orbitals contribute to the deeper valence states. The delocalization lifetimes of the oxygen-1s and sulfur-2p excited states are estimated from a core-hole clock method to be about 9 ± 1 and 125 ± 25 fs, respectively.

  7. Binding of anti-prion agents to glycosaminoglycans: Evidence from electronic absorption and circular dichroism spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Zsila, Ferenc . E-mail: zsferi@chemres.hu; Gedeon, Gabor

    2006-08-11

    The polyanionic glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) are intimately involved in the pathogenesis of protein conformational disorders such as amyloidosis and prion diseases. Several cationic agents are known to exhibit anti-prion activity but their mechanism of action is poorly understood. In this study, UV absorption and circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopic techniques were used to investigate the interaction between heparin and chondroitin-6-sulfate and anti-prion drugs including acridine, quinoline, and phenothiazine derivatives. UV band hypochromism of ({+-})-quinacrine, ({+-})-primaquine, tacrine, quinidine, chlorpromazine, and induced CD spectra of ({+-})-quinacrine upon addition of GAGs provided evidence for the GAG binding of these compounds. The association constants ({approx}10{sup 6}-10{sup 7} M{sup -1}) estimated from the UV titration curves show high-affinity drug-heparin interactions. Ionic strength-dependence of the absorption spectra suggested that the interaction between GAGs and the cationic drugs is principally electrostatic in nature. Drug binding differences of heparin and chondroitin-6-sulfate were attributed to their different negative charge density. These results call the attention to the alteration of GAG-prion/GAG-amyloid interactions by which these compounds might exert their anti-prion/anti-amyloidogenic activities.

  8. Localized holes and delocalized electrons in photoexcited inorganic perovskites: Watching each atomic actor by picosecond X-ray absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Santomauro, Fabio G; Grilj, Jakob; Mewes, Lars; Nedelcu, Georgian; Yakunin, Sergii; Rossi, Thomas; Capano, Gloria; Al Haddad, André; Budarz, James; Kinschel, Dominik; Ferreira, Dario S; Rossi, Giacomo; Gutierrez Tovar, Mario; Grolimund, Daniel; Samson, Valerie; Nachtegaal, Maarten; Smolentsev, Grigory; Kovalenko, Maksym V; Chergui, Majed

    2017-07-01

    We report on an element-selective study of the fate of charge carriers in photoexcited inorganic CsPbBr3 and CsPb(ClBr)3 perovskite nanocrystals in toluene solutions using time-resolved X-ray absorption spectroscopy with 80 ps time resolution. Probing the Br K-edge, the Pb L3-edge, and the Cs L2-edge, we find that holes in the valence band are localized at Br atoms, forming small polarons, while electrons appear as delocalized in the conduction band. No signature of either electronic or structural changes is observed at the Cs L2-edge. The results at the Br and Pb edges suggest the existence of a weakly localized exciton, while the absence of signatures at the Cs edge indicates that the Cs(+) cation plays no role in the charge transport, at least beyond 80 ps. This first, time-resolved element-specific study of perovskites helps understand the rather modest charge carrier mobilities in these materials.

  9. Localized holes and delocalized electrons in photoexcited inorganic perovskites: Watching each atomic actor by picosecond X-ray absorption spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Santomauro, Fabio G.; Grilj, Jakob; Mewes, Lars; Nedelcu, Georgian; Yakunin, Sergii; Rossi, Thomas; Capano, Gloria; Al Haddad, André; Budarz, James; Kinschel, Dominik; Ferreira, Dario S.; Rossi, Giacomo; Gutierrez Tovar, Mario; Grolimund, Daniel; Samson, Valerie; Nachtegaal, Maarten; Smolentsev, Grigory; Kovalenko, Maksym V.; Chergui, Majed

    2016-01-01

    We report on an element-selective study of the fate of charge carriers in photoexcited inorganic CsPbBr3 and CsPb(ClBr)3 perovskite nanocrystals in toluene solutions using time-resolved X-ray absorption spectroscopy with 80 ps time resolution. Probing the Br K-edge, the Pb L3-edge, and the Cs L2-edge, we find that holes in the valence band are localized at Br atoms, forming small polarons, while electrons appear as delocalized in the conduction band. No signature of either electronic or structural changes is observed at the Cs L2-edge. The results at the Br and Pb edges suggest the existence of a weakly localized exciton, while the absence of signatures at the Cs edge indicates that the Cs+ cation plays no role in the charge transport, at least beyond 80 ps. This first, time-resolved element-specific study of perovskites helps understand the rather modest charge carrier mobilities in these materials. PMID:28083541

  10. Characterization and DNA binding studies of unexplored imidazolidines by electronic absorption spectroscopy and cyclic voltammetry.

    PubMed

    Shah, Afzal; Nosheen, Erum; Munir, Shamsa; Badshah, Amin; Qureshi, Rumana; Rehman, Zia-Ur-; Muhammad, Niaz; Hussain, Hidayat

    2013-03-05

    UV-Vis spectroscopic behavior of four imidazolidine derivatives i.e., [5-benzylideneimidazolidine-2,4-dione (NBI), 5-(2-hydroxybenzylidene)imidazolidine-2,4-dione (HBI), 5-(4-methoxybenzylidene)imidazolidine-2,4-dione (MBI) and 5-(3,4-di-methoxybenzylidene)imidazolidine-2,4-dione (DBI)] was studied in a wide pH range. Spectroscopic response of the studied compounds was found sensitive to pH and the attached substituents. Incited by anti-tumor activity, structural miscellany and biological applications of imidazolidines, the DNA binding affinity of some novel derivatives of this class of compounds was examined by cyclic voltammetry (CV) and UV-Vis spectroscopy at pH values of blood (7.4) and lysosomes (4.5). The CV results showed the following order of binding strength: KNBI (6.40×10(6)M(-1))>KHBI (1.77×10(5)M(-1))>KMBI (2.06×10(4)M(-1))>KDBI (1.01×10(4)M(-1)) at pH 7.4. The same order was also obtained from UV-Vis spectroscopy. The greater affinity of NBI justified its preferred candidature as an effective anti-cancer drug. The DNA binding propensity of these compounds was found comparable or greater than most of the clinically used anticancer drugs.

  11. Atomic Resolution Mapping of the Excited-State Electronic Structure of Cu2O with Time-Resolved X-Ray Absorption Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Hillyard, Patrick B.; Kuchibhatla, Satyanarayana V N T; Glover, T. E.; Hertlein, M. P.; Huse, N.; Nachimuthu, Ponnusamy; Saraf, Laxmikant V.; Thevuthasan, Suntharampillai; Gaffney, Kelly J.

    2009-09-29

    We have used time-resolved soft x-ray spectroscopy to investigate the electronic structure of optically excited cuprous oxide at the O K-edge and the Cu L3-edge. The 400 nm optical excitation shifts the Cu and O absorptions to lower energy, but does not change the integrated x-ray absorption significantly for either edge. The constant integrated x-ray absorption cross-section indicates that that the conduction band and valence band edges have very similar Cu 3d and O 2p orbital contributions. The 2.1 eV optical band gap of Cu2O significantly exceeds the one eV shift in the Cu L3- and O K-edges absorption edges induced by optical excitation, demonstrating the importance of core-hole excitonic effects and valence electron screening in the x-ray absorption process.

  12. Atomic resolution mapping of the excited-state electronic structure of Cu2O with time-resolved x-ray absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hillyard, P. W.; Kuchibhatla, S. V. N. T.; Glover, T. E.; Hertlein, M. P.; Huse, N.; Nachimuthu, P.; Saraf, L. V.; Thevuthasan, S.; Gaffney, K. J.

    2009-09-01

    We have used time-resolved soft x-ray spectroscopy to investigate the electronic structure of optically excited cuprous oxide at the OK edge and the CuL3 edge. The 400 nm optical excitation shifts the Cu and O absorptions to lower energy, but does not change the integrated x-ray absorption significantly for either edge. The constant integrated x-ray absorption cross-section indicates that the conduction-band and valence-band edges have very similar Cu3d and O2p orbital contributions. The 2.1 eV optical band gap of Cu2O significantly exceeds the one eV shift in the CuL3 - and OK -edges absorption edges induced by optical excitation, demonstrating the importance of core-hole excitonic effects and valence electron screening in the x-ray absorption process.

  13. Atomic resolution mapping of the excited-state electronic structure of Cu2O with time-resolved x-ray absorption spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Hillyard, P. W.; Kuchibhatla, S. V. N. T.; Glover, T. E.; Hertlein, M. P.; Huse, Nils; Nachimuthu, P.; Saraf, L. V.; Thevuthasan, S.; Gaffney, K. J.

    2010-05-02

    We have used time-resolved soft x-ray spectroscopy to investigate the electronic structure of optically excited cuprous oxide at the O K-edge and the Cu L3-edge. The 400 nm optical excitation shifts the Cu and O absorptions to lower energy, but does not change the integrated x-ray absorption significantly for either edge. The constant integrated x-ray absorption cross-section indicates that the conduction-band and valence-band edges have very similar Cu 3d and O 2p orbital contributions. The 2.1 eV optical band gap of Cu2O significantly exceeds the one eV shift in the Cu L3- and O K-edges absorption edges induced by optical excitation, demonstrating the importance of core-hole excitonic effects and valence electron screening in the x-ray absorption process.

  14. Silver Colloids in Bacteria: A Study by Transmission Electron Microscopy, Absorption Spectroscopy and Elemental Analysis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-07-01

    Coupled Plasma system. Results and Analysis Electron Microscopy Internal Colloid Figure 1 shows the main features we observe for E . coli bacteria treated...when prepared in E . coli bacteria using our procedure, and also 4-10 nm silver particle aggregates are often observed in our TEM micrographs. Thus...suspension of E . coli bacteria with an internal colloid, and the insert to that Figure shows the spectrum of the filtrate obtained after filtering the

  15. Bioacoustic Absorption Spectroscopy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-06-07

    seas in co-operation with fisheries biologists. The first planned experiment will be in the seas off California in co-operation with the Southwest... Fisheries Science Center of NOAA’s National Marine Fisheries Service. These experiments will be designed to investigate the “signatures” of the two major...formulating environmental adaptation strategies for tactical sonars. Fisheries applications: These results suggest that bioacoustic absorptivity can be used to

  16. Probing the Electronic Structure of a Photoexcited Solar Cell Dye with Transient X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Van Kuiken, Benjamin E.; Huse, Nils; Cho, Hana; Strader, Matthew L.; Lynch, Michael S.; Schoenlein, Robert W.; Khalil, Munira

    2012-06-21

    This study uses transient X-ray absorption (XA) spectroscopy and timedependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) to directly visualize the charge density around the metal atom and the surrounding ligands following an ultrafast metal-to-ligand charge-transfer (MLCT) process in the widely used RuII solar cell dye, Ru(dcbpy)2(NCS)2 (termed N3). We measure the Ru L-edge XA spectra of the singlet ground (1A1) and the transient triplet (3MLCT) excited state of N34 and perform TD-DFT calculations of 2p core-level excitations, which identify a unique spectral signature of the electron density on the NCS ligands. We find that the Ru 2p, Ru eg, and NCS orbitals are stabilized by 2.0, 1.0, and 0.6 eV, respectively, in the transient 3MLCT state of the dye. These results highlight the role of the NCS ligands in governing the oxidation state of the Ru center.

  17. Photoinduced electron transfer between 2-methylanthraquinone and triethylamine in an ionic liquid: Time-resolved EPR and transient absorption spectroscopy study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Guanglai; Wang, Yu; Fu, Haiying; Xu, Xinsheng; Cui, Zhifeng; Ji, Xuehan; Wu, Guozhong

    2015-02-01

    Photoinduced electron transfer between 2-methylanthraquinone (MeAQ) and triethylamine (TEA) in a room-temperature ionic liquid, 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium hexafluorophosphate ([bmim][PF6]), was investigated by comparing the time-resolved electron paramagnetic resonance (TR-EPR) spectroscopy and the transient absorption spectroscopy. The results of TR-EPR spectroscopy, in which MeAQ was 8 mmol L-1 and TEA was 150 mmol L-1, indicated that the transient radical would exist longer time in [bmim][PF6] than in acetonitrile. At the delay time of 8 μs after laser excitation, the TR-EPR signal transformed from an emissive peak into an absorptive peak when the experiment was performed in [bmim][PF6]. The results of the transient absorption spectroscopy, in which MeAQ was 0.1 mmol L-1 and TEA was 2.2 mmol L-1, showed that the efficiency and the rate of the photoinduced electron transfer reaction in [bmim][PF6] were obviously lower than that in acetonitrile. It was concluded that various factors, such as concentration, viscosity and local structural transformation of the solution, have an influence on the process of photoinduced electron transfer in [bmim][PF6].

  18. Measurement of the ionization state and electron temperature of plasma during the ablation stage of a wire-array Z pinch using absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Ivanov, V V; Hakel, P; Mancini, R C; Chittenden, J P; Anderson, A; Durmaz, T; Wiewior, P; Papp, D; Altemara, S D; Astanovitskiy, A L; Chalyy, O

    2011-06-03

    Wire-array plasmas were investigated in the nonradiative ablation stage via x-ray absorption spectroscopy. A laser-produced Sm plasma was used to backlight Al wire arrays. The Sm spectrum was simultaneously observed by two spectrometers: one recorded the unattenuated spectrum and the other the transmission spectrum with 1.45-1.55 keV K-shell absorption lines. Analysis of absorption spectra revealed electron temperature in the range of 10-30 eV and the presence of F-, O-, N- and C-like Al ions in the absorbing plasma. A comparison of this electron temperature with the postprocessed absorption spectra of a 2D MHD simulation yields results in general agreement with the data analysis.

  19. Core-level transient absorption spectroscopy as a probe of electron hole relaxation in photoionized H+(H2O)n.

    PubMed

    Li, Zheng; El-Amine Madjet, Mohamed; Vendrell, Oriol; Santra, Robin

    2014-01-01

    There is fundamental interest in understanding the coupled nuclear and electronic dynamics associated with charge transfer processes in complex molecules and materials, which are often mediated by electron, electron hole or proton motion. With dramatic improvements in the techniques to generate extreme ultraviolet (XUV) and X-ray femtosecond pulses, it now becomes possible to trigger and probe these kinds of processes in real time. Here we study the dynamics of an electron hole created by photoionization in the valence shell of protonated water clusters H(+)(H(2)O)(n). We demonstrate that the electron hole is strongly correlated with the protons forming the hydrogen bond network. We show that it is possible to probe key aspects of the valence electron hole dynamics and the coupled nuclear motion with femtosecond time resolution by resonantly exciting K-shell 1s electrons to fill the electron hole. This represents an opportunity for X-ray transient absorption spectroscopy.

  20. Electronic ground states of Fe2(+) and Co2(+) as determined by x-ray absorption and x-ray magnetic circular dichroism spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Zamudio-Bayer, V; Hirsch, K; Langenberg, A; Ławicki, A; Terasaki, A; V Issendorff, B; Lau, J T

    2015-12-28

    The (6)Π electronic ground state of the Co2 (+) diatomic molecular cation has been assigned experimentally by x-ray absorption and x-ray magnetic circular dichroism spectroscopy in a cryogenic ion trap. Three candidates, (6)Φ, (8)Φ, and (8)Γ, for the electronic ground state of Fe2 (+) have been identified. These states carry sizable orbital angular momenta that disagree with theoretical predictions from multireference configuration interaction and density functional theory. Our results show that the ground states of neutral and cationic diatomic molecules of 3d transition elements cannot generally be assumed to be connected by a one-electron process.

  1. Electronic and lattice structures in SmFeAsO1-xFx probed by x-ray absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, C. J.; Oyanagi, H.; Sun, Z. H.; Kamihara, Y.; Hosono, H.

    2010-03-01

    Local lattice and electronic structures in the Fe-As layer of SmFeAsO1-xFx superconductors were studied by x-ray absorption spectroscopy, the FeK -edge and the AsK -edge extended x-ray absorption fine-structure, and x-ray absorption near-edge-structure experiments, respectively. Temperature-dependent local lattice distortions were observed in the Fe-As bond mean-square relative displacement of the superconducting samples. A strong coupling of the carrier-induced local lattice distortion (polaron) to the superconducting transition temperature in the oxypnictide superconductors is indicated. The near-edge spectra showed systematic temperature-dependent energy shifts, which indicate an intralayer electron redistribution from Fed states to Asp states due to orbital-selective band filling at low temperatures.

  2. Theoretical study of electronic absorption spectroscopy of propadienylidene molecule vis-â-vis the observed diffuse interstellar bands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reddy, Samala Nagaprasad; Mahapatra, S.

    2012-07-01

    Observation of broad and diffuse interstellar bands (DIBs) at 4881 Å and 5440 Å assigned to the optical absorption spectrum of Y-shaped propadienylidene (H2Cdbnd Cdbnd C:) molecule is theoretically examined in this paper. This molecule apparently absorbs in the same wavelength region as the observed DIBs and was suggested to be a potential carrier of these DIBs. This assignment mostly relied on the experimental data from radioastronomy and laboratory measurements. Motivated by these available experimental data we attempt here a theoretical study and investigate the detailed electronic structure and nuclear dynamics underlying the electronic absorption bands of propadienylidene molecule. Our results show that this molecule indeed absorbs in the wavelength region of the recorded DIBs. Strong nonadiabatic coupling between its energetically low-lying electronic states plays major role, initiates ultrafast internal conversion and contributes to the spectral broadening. Theoretical findings are finally compared with the available experimental and theoretical data and discussed in connection with the recorded DIBs.

  3. Conduction-band electronic states of YbInCu{sub 4} studied by photoemission and soft x-ray absorption spectroscopies

    SciTech Connect

    Utsumi, Yuki; Kurihara, Hidenao; Maso, Hiroyuki; Tobimatsu, Komei; Sato, Hitoshi; Shimada, Kenya; Namatame, Hirofumi; Hiraoka, Koichi; Kojima, Kenichi; Ohkochi, Takuo; Fujimori, Shin-ichi; Takeda, Yukiharu; Saitoh, Yuji; Mimura, Kojiro; Ueda, Shigenori; Yamashita, Yoshiyuki; Yoshikawa, Hideki; Kobayashi, Keisuke; Oguchi, Tamio; Taniguchi, Masaki

    2011-09-15

    We have studied conduction-band (CB) electronic states of a typical valence-transition compound YbInCu{sub 4} by means of temperature-dependent hard x-ray photoemission spectroscopy (HX-PES) of the Cu 2p{sub 3/2} and In 3d{sub 5/2} core states taken at h{nu}=5.95 keV, soft x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) of the Cu 2p{sub 3/2} core absorption region around h{nu}{approx}935 eV, and soft x-ray photoemission spectroscopy (SX-PES) of the valence band at the Cu 2p{sub 3/2} absorption edge of h{nu}=933.0 eV. With decreasing temperature below the valence transition at T{sub V}=42 K, we have found that (1) the Cu 2p{sub 3/2} and In 3d{sub 5/2} peaks in the HX-PES spectra exhibit the energy shift toward the lower binding-energy side by {approx}40 and {approx}30 meV, respectively, (2) an energy position of the Cu 2p{sub 3/2} main absorption peak in the XAS spectrum is shifted toward higher photon-energy side by {approx}100 meV, with an appearance of a shoulder structure below the Cu 2p{sub 3/2} main absorption peak, and (3) an intensity of the Cu L{sub 3}VV Auger spectrum is abruptly enhanced. These experimental results suggest that the Fermi level of the CB-derived density of states is shifted toward the lower binding-energy side. We have described the valence transition in YbInCu{sub 4} in terms of the charge transfer from the CB to Yb 4f states.

  4. Excited-state electronic asymmetry of the special pair in photosynthetic reaction center mutants: absorption and Stark spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Moore, L J; Zhou, H; Boxer, S G

    1999-09-14

    The electronic absorption line shape and Stark spectrum of the lowest energy Q(y)() transition of the special pair in bacterial reaction centers contain a wealth of information on mixing with charge transfer states and electronic asymmetry. Both vary greatly in mutants that perturb the chemical composition of the special pair, such as the heterodimer mutants, and in mutants that alter interactions between the special pair and the surrounding reaction center protein, such as those that add or remove hydrogen bonds. The conventional and higher-order Stark spectra of a series of mutants are presented with the aim of developing a systematic description of the electronic structure of the excited state of the special pair that initiates photosynthetic charge separation. The mutants L168HF, M197FH, L131LH and L131LH/M160LH/M197FH are known to have different hydrogen-bonding patterns to the special pair; however, they exhibit Stark effects that are very similar to wild type. By contrast, the addition of a hydrogen bond to the M-side keto carbonyl group of the special pair in M160LH greatly affects both the absorption and Stark spectra. The heterodimer special pairs, L173HL and M202HL, exhibit much larger Stark effects than wild type, with the greatest effect in the M-side mutant. Double mutants that combine the M-side heterodimer and a hydrogen-bond addition to the L-side of the special pair decrease the magnitude of the Stark effect. These results suggest that the electronic asymmetry of the dimer can be perturbed either by the formation of a heterodimer or by adding or deleting a hydrogen bond to a keto carbonyl group. From the pattern observed, it is concluded that the charge transfer state P(L)(+)P(M)(-) has a larger influence on the excited state of the dimer in wild type than the P(L)(-)P(M)(+)charge transfer state. Furthermore, asymmetry can be varied continuously, from extreme cases in which the heterodimer and hydrogen-bond effects work together, to cases in which

  5. UV-Visible Absorption Spectroscopy Enhanced X-ray Crystallography at Synchrotron and X-ray Free Electron Laser Sources.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Aina E; Doukov, Tzanko; Soltis, Michael S

    2016-01-01

    This review describes the use of single crystal UV-Visible Absorption micro-Spectrophotometry (UV-Vis AS) to enhance the design and execution of X-ray crystallography experiments for structural investigations of reaction intermediates of redox active and photosensitive proteins. Considerations for UV-Vis AS measurements at the synchrotron and associated instrumentation are described. UV-Vis AS is useful to verify the intermediate state of an enzyme and to monitor the progression of reactions within crystals. Radiation induced redox changes within protein crystals may be monitored to devise effective diffraction data collection strategies. An overview of the specific effects of radiation damage on macromolecular crystals is presented along with data collection strategies that minimize these effects by combining data from multiple crystals used at the synchrotron and with the X-ray free electron laser.

  6. Absorption Spectroscopy in Homogeneous and Micellar Solutions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shah, S. Sadiq; Henscheid, Leonard G.

    1983-01-01

    Describes an experiment which has helped physical chemistry students learn principles of absorption spectroscopy, the effect of solvent polarity on absorption spectra, and some micellar chemistry. Background information and experimental procedures are provided. (JN)

  7. Atomic absorption spectroscopy in ion channel screening.

    PubMed

    Stankovich, Larisa; Wicks, David; Despotovski, Sasko; Liang, Dong

    2004-10-01

    This article examines the utility of atomic absorption spectroscopy, in conjunction with cold flux assays, to ion channel screening. The multiplicity of ion channels that can be interrogated using cold flux assays and atomic absorption spectroscopy is summarized. The importance of atomic absorption spectroscopy as a screening tool is further elaborated upon by providing examples of the relevance of ion channels to various physiological processes and targeted diseases.

  8. Electronic Spectroscopy & Dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Mark Maroncelli, Nancy Ryan Gray

    2010-06-08

    The Gordon Research Conference (GRC) on Electronic Spectroscopy and Dynamics was held at Colby College, Waterville, NH from 07/19/2009 thru 07/24/2009. The Conference was well-attended with participants (attendees list attached). The attendees represented the spectrum of endeavor in this field coming from academia, industry, and government laboratories, both U.S. and foreign scientists, senior researchers, young investigators, and students. The GRC on Electronic Spectroscopy & Dynamics showcases some of the most recent experimental and theoretical developments in electronic spectroscopy that probes the structure and dynamics of isolated molecules, molecules embedded in clusters and condensed phases, and bulk materials. Electronic spectroscopy is an important tool in many fields of research, and this GRC brings together experts having diverse backgrounds in physics, chemistry, biophysics, and materials science, making the meeting an excellent opportunity for the interdisciplinary exchange of ideas and techniques. Topics covered in this GRC include high-resolution spectroscopy, biological molecules in the gas phase, electronic structure theory for excited states, multi-chromophore and single-molecule spectroscopies, and excited state dynamics in chemical and biological systems.

  9. Electronic structure and hybridization of CaS by means of X-ray absorption spectroscopy at Ca and S K-edges.

    PubMed

    Xu, Wei; Liu, Lijuan; Cui, Mingqi; Zheng, Lei; Hu, Yongfeng; Marcelli, Augusto; Wu, Ziyu

    2013-01-01

    The cubic calcium sulfide (CaS) is a well known system and an attractive building block material for many luminescence technological applications. However, it is essential to achieve an accurate understanding of its electronic structure in order to engineer its band structure for optimized applications. Here a study of the electronic structure of CaS by means of X-ray absorption spectroscopy performed at both Ca and S K-edges, and calculations performed in the framework of the multiple-scattering theory and of the finite difference method are presented. At the Ca K-edge the presence of an anomalous d states feature is discussed while in the S K-edge spectrum the presence of a pre-edge shoulder owing to the hybridization among Ca d states and S p states is pointed out. Although the l-projected density of states of CaS is in good agreement with previous first-principles calculations, the standard muffin-tin potential is inadequate to reproduce near-edge structures at both Ca and S K-edges in this system. Indeed, with its highly symmetric and less compact structure, CaS is characterized by a large set of collinear atomic configurations that pose severe constraints on the construction of the atomic potential. On the contrary, the finite-difference method with no muffin-tin approximation is more suitable for X-ray absorption calculations in this system.

  10. Electronic structure of individual hybrid colloid particles studied by near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy in the X-ray microscope.

    PubMed

    Henzler, Katja; Guttmann, Peter; Lu, Yan; Polzer, Frank; Schneider, Gerd; Ballauff, Matthias

    2013-02-13

    The electronic structure of individual hybrid particles was studied by nanoscale near-edge X-ray absorption spectromicroscopy. The colloidal particles consist of a solid polystyrene core and a cross-linked poly-N-(isopropylacrylamide) shell with embedded crystalline titanium dioxide (TiO(2)) nanoparticles (d = 6 ± 3 nm). The TiO(2) particles are generated in the carrier network by a sol-gel process at room temperature. The hybrid particles were imaged with photon energy steps of 0.1 eV in their hydrated environment with a cryo transmission X-ray microscope (TXM) at the Ti L(2,3)-edge. By analyzing the image stacks, the obtained near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectra of our individual hybrid particles show clearly that our synthesis generates TiO(2) in the anastase phase. Additionally, our spectromicroscopy method permits the determination of the density distribution of TiO(2) in single carrier particles. Therefore, NEXAFS spectroscopy combined with TXM presents a unique method to get in-depth insight into the electronic structure of hybrid materials.

  11. Electronic structure of self-doped layered Eu3F4Bi2S4 material revealed by x-ray absorption spectroscopy and photoelectron spectromicroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paris, E.; Sugimoto, T.; Wakita, T.; Barinov, A.; Terashima, K.; Kandyba, V.; Proux, O.; Kajitani, J.; Higashinaka, R.; Matsuda, T. D.; Aoki, Y.; Yokoya, T.; Mizokawa, T.; Saini, N. L.

    2017-01-01

    We have studied the electronic structure of Eu3F4Bi2S4 using a combination of Eu L3-edge x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) and space-resolved angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES). From the Eu L3-edge XAS, we have found that the Eu in this system is in mixed valence state with coexistence of Eu2 +/Eu3 + . The bulk charge doping was estimated to be ˜0.3 per Bi site in Eu3F4Bi2S4 , which corresponds to the nominal x in a typical REO1 -xFxBiS2 system (RE: rare-earth elements). From the space-resolved ARPES, we have ruled out the possibility of any microscale phase separation of Eu valence in the system. Using a microfocused beam we have observed the band structure as well as the Fermi surface that appeared similar to other compounds of this family with disconnected rectangular electronlike pockets around the X point. The Luttinger volume analysis gives the effective carrier to be 0.23 electrons per Bi site in Eu3F4Bi2S4 , indicating that the system is likely to be in the underdoped region of its superconducting phase diagram.

  12. Inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khanna, S. K.; Lambe, J.

    1983-01-01

    Inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy is a useful technique for the study of vibrational modes of molecules adsorbed on the surface of oxide layers in a metal-insulator-metal tunnel junction. The technique involves studying the effects of adsorbed molecules on the tunneling spectrum of such junctions. The data give useful information about the structure, bonding, and orientation of adsorbed molecules. One of the major advantages of inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy is its sensitivity. It is capable of detecting on the order of 10 to the 10th molecules (a fraction of a monolayer) on a 1 sq mm junction. It has been successfully used in studies of catalysis, biology, trace impurity detection, and electronic excitations. Because of its high sensitivity, this technique shows great promise in the area of solid-state electronic chemical sensing.

  13. Local electronic states of Fe4N films revealed by x-ray absorption spectroscopy and x-ray magnetic circular dichroism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ito, Keita; Toko, Kaoru; Takeda, Yukiharu; Saitoh, Yuji; Oguchi, Tamio; Suemasu, Takashi; Kimura, Akio

    2015-05-01

    We performed x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) and x-ray magnetic circular dichroism (XMCD) measurements at Fe L2,3 and N K-edges for Fe4N epitaxial films grown by molecular beam epitaxy. In order to clarify the element specific local electronic structure of Fe4N, we compared experimentally obtained XAS and XMCD spectra with those simulated by a combination of a first-principles calculation and Fermi's golden rule. We revealed that the shoulders observed at Fe L2,3-edges in the XAS and XMCD spectra were due to the electric dipole transition from the Fe 2p core-level to the hybridization state generated by σ* anti-bonding between the orbitals of N 2p at the body-centered site and Fe 3d on the face-centered (II) sites. Thus, the observed shoulders were attributed to the local electronic structure of Fe atoms at II sites. As to the N K-edge, the line shape of the obtained spectra was explained by the dipole transition from the N 1s core-level to the hybridization state formed by π* and σ* anti-bondings between the Fe 3d and N 2p orbitals. This hybridization plays an important role in featuring the electronic structures and physical properties of Fe4N.

  14. Local electronic states of Fe{sub 4}N films revealed by x-ray absorption spectroscopy and x-ray magnetic circular dichroism

    SciTech Connect

    Ito, Keita; Toko, Kaoru; Suemasu, Takashi; Takeda, Yukiharu; Saitoh, Yuji; Oguchi, Tamio; Kimura, Akio

    2015-05-21

    We performed x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) and x-ray magnetic circular dichroism (XMCD) measurements at Fe L{sub 2,3} and N K-edges for Fe{sub 4}N epitaxial films grown by molecular beam epitaxy. In order to clarify the element specific local electronic structure of Fe{sub 4}N, we compared experimentally obtained XAS and XMCD spectra with those simulated by a combination of a first-principles calculation and Fermi's golden rule. We revealed that the shoulders observed at Fe L{sub 2,3}-edges in the XAS and XMCD spectra were due to the electric dipole transition from the Fe 2p core-level to the hybridization state generated by σ* anti-bonding between the orbitals of N 2p at the body-centered site and Fe 3d on the face-centered (II) sites. Thus, the observed shoulders were attributed to the local electronic structure of Fe atoms at II sites. As to the N K-edge, the line shape of the obtained spectra was explained by the dipole transition from the N 1s core-level to the hybridization state formed by π* and σ* anti-bondings between the Fe 3d and N 2p orbitals. This hybridization plays an important role in featuring the electronic structures and physical properties of Fe{sub 4}N.

  15. The electronic states of oxazole studied by VUV absorption and electron energy-loss (EEL) spectroscopies, and ab initio configuration interaction methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmer, Michael H.; Ganzenmüller, Georg; Walker, Isobel C.

    2007-04-01

    The oxazole VUV absorption spectrum over the range 5-12 eV shows intense bands centred near 6.3, 7.5, 8.3, 9.6 and 10.8 eV. The electron energy-loss (EEL) spectrum shows additional structure with a strong peak (˜1.4 eV) arising from resonant vibrational excitation of the molecule via a shape resonance, and a spin-forbidden 3ππ ∗ state at 4.6 eV. Electronic excitation energies for valence and Rydberg-type states have been computed using ab initio multi-reference multi-root CI methods. The CI studies used a triple zeta + polarisation basis set, augmented by diffuse (Rydberg) orbitals, to generate the theoretical singlet and triplet energy manifolds. The correlation of theory and experiment shows the nature of the more intense Rydberg state types, and identification of the main valence and Rydberg bands. Calculated energies for low-lying Rydberg states are relatively close (SD 0.38) to those expected, and there is generally a good correlation between the theoretical and experimental envelopes. Two of the three lowest electronic states arise from ππ ∗ excitation of the outer (3a″ and 2a″) π-orbitals, with one state (LP Nπ ∗) originating from the lone pair on nitrogen (15a') between them.

  16. On the participation of photoinduced N-H bond fission in aqueous adenine at 266 and 220 nm: a combined ultrafast transient electronic and vibrational absorption spectroscopy study.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Gareth M; Marroux, Hugo J B; Grubb, Michael P; Ashfold, Michael N R; Orr-Ewing, Andrew J

    2014-11-26

    A combination of ultrafast transient electronic absorption spectroscopy (TEAS) and transient vibrational absorption spectroscopy (TVAS) is used to investigate whether photoinduced N–H bond fission, mediated by a dissociative 1πσ(*) state, is active in aqueous adenine (Ade) at 266 and 220 nm. In order to isolate UV/visible and IR spectral signatures of the adeninyl radical (Ade[-H]), formed as a result of N–H bond fission, TEAS and TVAS are performed on Ade in D2O under basic conditions (pD = 12.5), which forms Ade[-H](-) anions via deprotonation at the N7 or N9 sites of Ade's 7H and 9H tautomers. At 220 nm we observe one-photon detachment of an electron from Ade[-H](-), which generates solvated electrons (eaq(-)) together with Ade[-H] radicals, with clear signatures in both TEAS and TVAS. Additional wavelength dependent TEAS measurements between 240–260 nm identify a threshold of 4.9 ± 0.1 eV (∼250 nm) for this photodetachment process in D2O. Analogous TEAS experiments on aqueous Ade at pD = 7.4 generate a similar photoproduct signal together with eaq(-) after excitation at 266 and 220 nm. These eaq(-) are born from ionization of Ade, together with Ade(+) cations, which are indistinguishable from Ade[-H] radicals in TEAS. Ade(+) and Ade[-H] are found to have different signatures in TVAS and we verify that the pD = 7.4 photoproduct signal observed in TEAS following 220 nm excitation is solely due to Ade(+) cations. Based on these observations, we conclude that: (i) N–H bond fission in aqueous Ade is inactive at wavelengths ≥220 nm; and (ii) if such a channel exists in aqueous solution, its threshold is strongly blue-shifted relative to the onset of the same process in gas phase 9H-Ade (≤233 nm). In addition, we extract excited state lifetimes and vibrational cooling dynamics for 9H-Ade and Ade[-H](-). In both cases, excited state lifetimes of <500 fs are identified, while vibrational cooling occurs within a time frame of 4–5 ps. In contrast, 7H

  17. Electronic structure of d{sup 0} vanadates obtained by x-ray absorption and emission spectroscopies

    SciTech Connect

    Herrera, G.; Jimenez-Mier, J.; Chavira, E.; Moewes, A.; Wilks, R.

    2009-01-29

    We present experimental results for x-ray absorption at the L{sub 2,3}-edge of vanadium in V{sub 2}O{sub 5}, YVO{sub 4} and LaVO{sub 4} compounds and at the M{sub 4,5}-edge of lanthanum in LaVO{sub 4} compound. The data are interpreted in terms of the multiplet structure of the transition metal ion V{sup 5+} (d{sup 0}) and rare earth ion La{sup 3+} (d{sup 10}). The data are compared with calculations in the free-ion approximation for La and including the effects of the D{sub 4h} ligand field and charge transfer for V. These calculations allow a direct interpretation of the absorption spectra. Good overall agreement between experiment and theory is found. We also show resonant x-ray emission (XES) data for these compounds obtained at the top of the L{sub 2} excitation.

  18. Double point contact single molecule absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howard, John Brooks

    Our primary objective with the presentation of this thesis is to utilize superconducting transport through microscopic objects to both excite and analyze the vibrational degrees of freedom of various molecules of a biological nature. The technique stems from a Josephson junction's ability to generate radiation that falls in the terahertz gap (≈ 10 THz) and consequently can be used to excite vibrational modes of simple and complex molecules. Analysis of the change in IV characteristics coupled with the differential conductance dIdV allows determination of both the absorption spectra and the vibrational modes of biological molecules. Presented here are both the theoretical foundations of superconductivity relevant to our experimental technique and the fabrication process of our samples. Comparisons between our technique and that of other absorption spectroscopy techniques are included as a means of providing a reference upon which to judge the merits of our novel procedure. This technique is meant to improve not only our understanding of the vibrational degrees of freedom of useful biological molecules, but also these molecule's structural, electronic and mechanical properties.

  19. Electron spectroscopy analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregory, John C.

    1992-01-01

    The Surface Science Laboratories at the University of Alabama in Huntsville (UAH) are equipped with x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS or ESCA) and Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) facilities. These techniques provide information from the uppermost atomic layers of a sample, and are thus truly surface sensitive. XPS provides both elemental and chemical state information without restriction on the type of material that can be analyzed. The sample is placed into an ultra high vacuum (UHV) chamber and irradiated with x-rays which cause the ejection of photoelectrons from the sample surface. Since x-rays do not normally cause charging problems or beam damage, XPS is applicable to a wide range of samples including metals, polymers, catalysts, and fibers. AES uses a beam of high energy electrons as a surface probe. Following electronic rearrangements within excited atoms by this probe, Auger electrons characteristic of each element present are emitted from the sample. The main advantage of electron induced AES is that the electron beam can be focused down to a small diameter and localized analysis can be carried out. On the rastering of this beam synchronously with a video display using established scanning electron microscopy techniques, physical images and chemical distribution maps of the surface can be produced. Thus very small features, such as electronic circuit elements or corrosion pits in metals, can be investigated. Facilities are available on both XPS and AES instruments for depth-profiling of materials, using a beam of argon ions to sputter away consecutive layers of material to reveal sub-surface (and even semi-bulk) analyses.

  20. Electronic structure of KD2xH2(1-x)PO4 studied by soft x-ray absorption and emission spectroscopies

    SciTech Connect

    Kucheyev, S O; Bostedt, C F; van Buuren, T; Willey, T M; Land, T A; Terminello, L J; Felter, T E; Hamza, A V; Demos, S G; Nelson, A J

    2004-04-27

    The surface and bulk electronic structure of tetragonal (at 300 K) and orthorhombic (at 77 K) KD{sub 2x}H{sub 2(1-x)}PO{sub 4} single crystals (so-called KDP and DKDP), with a deuteration degree x of 0.0, 0.3, and 0.6, is studied by soft x-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) and non-resonant soft x-ray emission (XES) spectroscopies. High-resolution O K-edge, P L{sub 2,3}-edge, and K L{sub 2,3}-edge XANES and XES spectra reveal that the element-specific partial density of states in the conduction and valence bands is essentially independent of deuteration x. We give assignment of XANES and XES peaks based on previous molecular orbital and band-structure calculations. Projected densities of states in the conduction band also appear to be essentially identical for tetragonal (at 300 K) and orthorhombic (at 77 K) phases, consistent with previous band structure calculations. However, a decrease in sample temperature from 300 to 77 K results in an {approx} 0.5 eV shift in the valence band edge (probed by XES), with negligible changes to the conduction band edge (probed by XANES). Results also show that high-intensity x-ray irradiation results in decomposition of these hydrogen-bonded materials into water and KPO{sub 3} cyclo- and polyphosphates.

  1. X-ray absorption spectroscopy of ground and excited rhenium-carbonyl-diimine complexes: evidence for a two-center electron transfer.

    PubMed

    El Nahhas, A; van der Veen, R M; Penfold, T J; Pham, V T; Lima, F A; Abela, R; Blanco-Rodriguez, A M; Záliš, S; Vlček, A; Tavernelli, I; Rothlisberger, U; Milne, C J; Chergui, M

    2013-01-17

    Steady-state and picosecond time-resolved X-ray absorption spectroscopy is used to study the ground and lowest triplet states of [ReX(CO)(3)(bpy)](n+), X = Etpy (n = 1), Cl, or Br (n = 0). We demonstrate that the transient spectra at both the Re L(3)- and Br K-edges show the emergence of a pre-edge feature, absent in the ground-state spectrum, which is associated with the electron hole created in the highest occupied molecular orbital following photoexcitation. Importantly, these features have the same dynamics, confirming previous predictions that the low-lying excited states of these complexes involve a two-center charge transfer from both the Re and the ligand, X. We also demonstrate that the DFT optimized ground and excited structures allow us to reproduce the experimental XANES and EXAFS spectra. The ground-state structural refinement shows that the Br atom contributes very little to the latter, whereas the Re-C-O scattering paths are dominant due to the so-called focusing effect. For the excited-state spectrum, the Re-X bond undergoes one of the largest changes but still remains a weak contribution to the photoinduced changes of the EXAFS spectrum.

  2. L-Edge X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy of Dilute Systems Relevant to Metalloproteins Using an X-ray Free-Electron Laser

    PubMed Central

    Mitzner, Rolf; Rehanek, Jens; Kern, Jan; Gul, Sheraz; Hattne, Johan; Taguchi, Taketo; Alonso-Mori, Roberto; Tran, Rosalie; Weniger, Christian; Schröder, Henning; Quevedo, Wilson; Laksmono, Hartawan; Sierra, Raymond G.; Han, Guangye; Lassalle-Kaiser, Benedikt; Koroidov, Sergey; Kubicek, Katharina; Schreck, Simon; Kunnus, Kristjan; Brzhezinskaya, Maria; Firsov, Alexander; Minitti, Michael P.; Turner, Joshua J.; Moeller, Stefan; Sauter, Nicholas K.; Bogan, Michael J.; Nordlund, Dennis; Schlotter, William F.; Messinger, Johannes; Borovik, Andrew; Techert, Simone; de Groot, Frank M. F.; Föhlisch, Alexander; Erko, Alexei; Bergmann, Uwe; Yachandra, Vittal K.; Wernet, Philippe; Yano, Junko

    2013-01-01

    L-edge spectroscopy of 3d transition metals provides important electronic structure information and has been used in many fields. However, the use of this method for studying dilute aqueous systems, such as metalloenzymes, has not been prevalent because of severe radiation damage and the lack of suitable detection systems. Here we present spectra from a dilute Mn aqueous solution using a high-transmission zone-plate spectrometer at the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS). The spectrometer has been optimized for discriminating the Mn L-edge signal from the overwhelming O K-edge background that arises from water and protein itself, and the ultrashort LCLS X-ray pulses can outrun X-ray induced damage. We show that the deviations of the partial-fluorescence yield-detected spectra from the true absorption can be well modeled using the state-dependence of the fluorescence yield, and discuss implications for the application of our concept to biological samples. PMID:24466387

  3. Investigation of electronic and local structural changes during lithium uptake and release of nano-crystalline NiFe2O4 by X-ray absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Dong; Permien, Stefan; Rana, Jatinkumar; Krengel, Markus; Sun, Fu; Schumacher, Gerhard; Bensch, Wolfgang; Banhart, John

    2017-02-01

    Nano-crystalline NiFe2O4 particles were synthesized and used as active electrode material for a lithium ion battery that showed a high discharge capacity of 1534 mAh g-1 and charge capacity of 1170 mAh g-1 during the 1st cycle. X-ray absorption spectroscopy including XANES and EXAFS were used to investigate electronic and local structural changes of NiFe2O4 during the 1st lithiation and de-lithiation process. As lithium is inserted into the structure, tetrahedral site Fe3+ ions are reduced to Fe2+ and moved from tetrahedral sites to empty octahedral sites, while Ni2+ ions are unaffected. As a consequence, the matrix spinel structure collapses and transforms to an intermediate rock-salt monoxide phase. Meanwhile, the inserted Li is partially consumed by the formation of SEI and other side reactions during the conversion reaction. With further lithiation, the monoxide phase is reduced to highly disordered metallic Fe/Ni nanoparticles with a number of nearest neighbors of 6.0(8) and 8.1(4) for Fe and Ni, respectively. During subsequent de-lithiation, the metal particles are individually re-oxidized to Fe2O3 and NiO phases instead to the original NiFe2O4 spinel phase.

  4. Electronic structure and characteristics of Fe 3d valence states of Fe(1.01)Se superconductors under pressure probed by x-ray absorption spectroscopy and resonant x-ray emission spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Chen, J M; Haw, S C; Lee, J M; Chen, S A; Lu, K T; Deng, M J; Chen, S W; Ishii, H; Hiraoka, N; Tsuei, K D

    2012-12-28

    The electronic structure and characteristics of Fe 3d valence states of iron-chalcogenide Fe(1.01)Se superconductors under pressure were probed with x-ray absorption spectroscopy and resonant x-ray emission spectroscopy (RXES). The intensity of the pre-edge peak at ~7112.7 eV of the Fe K-edge x-ray absorption spectrum of Fe(1.01)Se decreases for pressure from 0.5 GPa increased to 6.9 GPa. The satellite line Kβ' was reduced in intensity upon applying pressure and became absent for pressure 52 GPa. Fe(1.01)Se shows a small net magnetic moment of Fe(2+), likely arising from strong Fe-Fe spin fluctuations. The 1s3p-RXES spectra of Fe(1.01)Se at pressures 0.5, 6.9, and 52 GPa recorded at the Fe K-edge reveal that unoccupied Fe 3d states exhibit a delocalized character, stemming from hybridization of Fe 3d and 4p orbitals arising from a local distortion around the Fe atom in a tetrahedral site. Application of pressure causes suppression of this on-site Fe 3d-Fe 4p hybridization, and thereby decreases the intensity of the pre-edge feature in the Fe K-edge absorption spectrum of Fe(1.01)Se. Compression enhances spin fluctuations at Fe sites in Fe(1.01)Se and increases the corresponding T(c), through a competition between nearest-neighbor ferromagnetic and next-nearest-neighbor antiferromagnetic superexchange interactions. This result aids our understanding of the physics underlying iron-based superconductors.

  5. Local electronic structure of aqueous zinc acetate: oxygen K-edge X-ray absorption and emission spectroscopy on micro-jets.

    PubMed

    Golnak, Ronny; Atak, Kaan; Suljoti, Edlira; Hodeck, Kai F; Lange, Kathrin M; Soldatov, Mikhail A; Engel, Nicholas; Aziz, Emad F

    2013-06-07

    Oxygen K-edge X-ray absorption, emission, and resonant inelastic X-ray scattering spectra were measured to site selectively gain insights into the electronic structure of aqueous zinc acetate solution. The character of the acetate ion and the influence of zinc and water on its local electronic structure are discussed.

  6. Nanowire Electron Scattering Spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunt, Brian; Bronikowsky, Michael; Wong, Eric; VonAllmen, Paul; Oyafuso, Fablano

    2009-01-01

    Nanowire electron scattering spectroscopy (NESS) has been proposed as the basis of a class of ultra-small, ultralow-power sensors that could be used to detect and identify chemical compounds present in extremely small quantities. State-of-the-art nanowire chemical sensors have already been demonstrated to be capable of detecting a variety of compounds in femtomolar quantities. However, to date, chemically specific sensing of molecules using these sensors has required the use of chemically functionalized nanowires with receptors tailored to individual molecules of interest. While potentially effective, this functionalization requires labor-intensive treatment of many nanowires to sense a broad spectrum of molecules. In contrast, NESS would eliminate the need for chemical functionalization of nanowires and would enable the use of the same sensor to detect and identify multiple compounds. NESS is analogous to Raman spectroscopy, the main difference being that in NESS, one would utilize inelastic scattering of electrons instead of photons to determine molecular vibrational energy levels. More specifically, in NESS, one would exploit inelastic scattering of electrons by low-lying vibrational quantum states of molecules attached to a nanowire or nanotube.

  7. A quantitative description of the ground-state wave function of Cu(A) by X-ray absorption spectroscopy: comparison to plastocyanin and relevance to electron transfer.

    PubMed

    DeBeer George, S; Metz, M; Szilagyi, R K; Wang, H; Cramer, S P; Lu, Y; Tolman, W B; Hedman, B; Hodgson, K O; Solomon, E I

    2001-06-20

    To evaluate the importance of the electronic structure of Cu(A) to its electron-transfer (ET) function, a quantitative description of the ground-state wave function of the mixed-valence (MV) binuclear Cu(A) center engineered into Pseudomonas aeruginosa azurin has been developed, using a combination of S K-edge and Cu L-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopies (XAS). Parallel descriptions have been developed for a binuclear thiolate-bridged MV reference model complex ([(L(i)(PrdacoS)Cu)(2)](+)) and a homovalent (II,II) analogue ([L(i)(Pr2tacnS)Cu)(2)](2+), where L(i)(PrdacoS) and L(i)(Pr2tacnS) are macrocyclic ligands with attached thiolates that bridge the Cu ions. Previous studies have qualitatively defined the ground-state wave function of Cu(A) in terms of ligand field effects on the orbital orientation and the presence of a metal--metal bond. The studies presented here provide further evidence for a direct Cu--Cu interaction and, importantly, experimentally quantify the covalency of the ground-state wave function. The experimental results are further supported by DFT calculations. The nature of the ground-state wave function of Cu(A) is compared to that of the well-defined blue copper site in plastocyanin, and the importance of this wave function to the lower reorganization energy and ET function of Cu(A) is discussed. This wave function incorporates anisotropic covalency into the intra- and intermolecular ET pathways in cytochrome c oxidase. Thus, the high covalency of the Cys--Cu bond allows a path through this ligand to become competitive with a shorter His path in the intramolecular ET from Cu(A) to heme a and is particularly important for activating the intermolecular ET path from heme c to Cu(A).

  8. Electronic structure of Al-doped ZnO transparent conductive thin films studied by x-ray absorption and emission spectroscopies

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, W. H.; Sun, S. J.; Chiou, J. W.; Chou, H.; Chan, T. S.; Lin, H.-J.; Kumar, Krishna; Guo, J.-H.

    2011-11-15

    This study used O K-, Zn L{sub 3}-, Zn K-, and Al K-edges x-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) and O K-edge x-ray emission spectroscopy (XES) measurements to investigate the electronic structure of transparent Al-doped ZnO (AZO) thin film conductors. The samples were prepared on glass substrates at a low temperature near 77 K by using a standard RF sputtering method. High-purity Ne (5N) was used as the sputtering gas. The crystallography of AZO thin films gradually transformed from the ZnO wurtize structure to an amorphous structure during sample deposition, which suggests the suitability to grow on flexible substrates, eliminating the severe degradation due to fragmentation by repeated bending. The O K- and Zn L{sub 3}-edges XANES spectra of AZO thin films revealed a decrease in the number of both O 2p and Zn 3d unoccupied states when the pressure of Ne was increased from 5 to 100 mTorr. In contrast, Al K-edges XANES spectra showed that the number of unoccupied states of Al 3p increased in conjunction with the pressure of Ne, indicating an electron transfer from Al to O atoms, and suggesting that Al doping increases the negative effective charge of oxygen ions. XES and XANES spectra of O 2p states at the O K-edge also revealed that Al doping not only raised the conduction-band-minimum, but also increased the valence-band-maximum and the band-gap. The results indicate that the reduction in conductivity of AZO thin films is due to the generation of ionic characters, the increase in band-gap, and the decrease in density of unoccupied states of oxygen.

  9. Electronic structure of an [FeFe] hydrogenase model complex in solution revealed by X-ray absorption spectroscopy using narrow-band emission detection.

    PubMed

    Leidel, Nils; Chernev, Petko; Havelius, Kajsa G V; Schwartz, Lennart; Ott, Sascha; Haumann, Michael

    2012-08-29

    High-resolution X-ray absorption spectroscopy with narrow-band X-ray emission detection, supported by density functional theory calculations (XAES-DFT), was used to study a model complex, ([Fe(2)(μ-adt)(CO)(4)(PMe(3))(2)] (1, adt = S-CH(2)-(NCH(2)Ph)-CH(2)-S), of the [FeFe] hydrogenase active site. For 1 in powder material (1(powder)), in MeCN solution (1'), and in its three protonated states (1H, 1Hy, 1HHy; H denotes protonation at the adt-N and Hy protonation of the Fe-Fe bond to form a bridging metal hydride), relations between the molecular structures and the electronic configurations were determined. EXAFS analysis and DFT geometry optimization suggested prevailing rotational isomers in MeCN, which were similar to the crystal structure or exhibited rotation of the (CO) ligands at Fe1 (1(CO), 1Hy(CO)) and in addition of the phenyl ring (1H(CO,Ph), 1HHy(CO,Ph)), leading to an elongated solvent-exposed Fe-Fe bond. Isomer formation, adt-N protonation, and hydride binding caused spectral changes of core-to-valence (pre-edge of the Fe K-shell absorption) and of valence-to-core (Kß(2,5) emission) electronic transitions, and of Kα RIXS data, which were quantitatively reproduced by DFT. The study reveals (1) the composition of molecular orbitals, for example, with dominant Fe-d character, showing variations in symmetry and apparent oxidation state at the two Fe ions and a drop in MO energies by ~1 eV upon each protonation step, (2) the HOMO-LUMO energy gaps, of ~2.3 eV for 1(powder) and ~2.0 eV for 1', and (3) the splitting between iron d(z(2)) and d(x(2)-y(2)) levels of ~0.5 eV for the nonhydride and ~0.9 eV for the hydride states. Good correlations of reduction potentials to LUMO energies and oxidation potentials to HOMO energies were obtained. Two routes of facilitated bridging hydride binding thereby are suggested, involving ligand rotation at Fe1 for 1Hy(CO) or adt-N protonation for 1HHy(CO,Ph). XAES-DFT thus enables verification of the effects of ligand

  10. In situ soft X-ray absorption spectroscopy of flames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frank, Jonathan H.; Shavorskiy, Andrey; Bluhm, Hendrik; Coriton, Bruno; Huang, Erxiong; Osborn, David L.

    2014-10-01

    The feasibility of in situ soft X-ray absorption spectroscopy for imaging carbonaceous species in hydrocarbon flames is demonstrated using synchrotron radiation. Soft X-rays are absorbed by core level electrons in all carbon atoms regardless of their molecular structure. Core electron spectroscopy affords distinct advantages over valence spectroscopy, which forms the basis of traditional laser diagnostic techniques for combustion. In core level spectroscopy, the transition linewidths are predominantly determined by the instrument response function and the decay time of the core-hole, which is on the order of a femtosecond. As a result, soft X-ray absorption measurements can be performed in flames with negligible Doppler and collisional broadening. Core level spectroscopy has the further advantage of measuring all carbonaceous species regardless of molecular structure in the far-edge region, whereas near-edge features are molecule specific. Interferences from non-carbon flame species are unstructured and can be subtracted. In the present study, absorption measurements in the carbon K-edge region are demonstrated in low-pressure ( P total = 20-30 Torr) methane jet flames. Two-dimensional imaging of the major carbonaceous species, CH4, CO2, and CO, is accomplished by tuning the synchrotron radiation to the respective carbon K-edge, near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) transitions and scanning the burner.

  11. Cavity Enhanced Ultrafast Transient Absorption Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allison, Thomas K.; Reber, Melanie Roberts; Chen, Yuning

    2015-06-01

    Ultrafast spectroscopy on gas phase systems is typically restricted to techniques involving photoionization, whereas solution phase experiments utilize the detection of light. At Stony Brook, we are developing new techniques for performing femtosecond time-resolved spectroscopy using frequency combs and high-finesse optical resonators. A large detection sensitivity enhancement over traditional methods enables the extension of all-optical ultrafast spectroscopies, such as broad-band transient absorption spectroscopy (TAS) and 2D spectroscopy, to dilute gas phase samples produced in molecular beams. Here, gas phase data can be directly compared to solution phase data. Initial demonstration experiments are focusing on the photodissociation of iodine in small neutral argon clusters, where cluster size strongly influences the effects solvent-caging and geminate recombination. I will discuss these initial results, our high power home-built Yb:fiber laser systems, and also extensions of the methods to the mid-IR to study the vibrational dynamics of hydrogen bonded clusters.

  12. Observation of proton-coupled electron transfer by transient absorption spectroscopy in a hydrogen-bonded, porphyrin donor-acceptor assembly.

    PubMed

    Damrauer, Niels H; Hodgkiss, Justin M; Rosenthal, Joel; Nocera, Daniel G

    2004-05-20

    Proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) kinetics of a Zn(II) porphyrin donor noncovalently bound to a naphthalene-diimide acceptor through an amidinium-carboxylate interface have been investigated by time-resolved spectroscopy. The S1 singlet excited-state of a Zn(II) 2-amidinium-5,10,15,20-tetramesitylporphyrin chloride (ZnP-beta-AmH+) donor is sufficiently energetic (2.04 eV) to reduce a carboxylate-diimide acceptor (DeltaG degrees = -460 mV, THF). Static quenching of the porphyrin fluorescence is observed and time-resolved measurements reveal more than a 3-fold reduction in the S1 lifetime of the porphyrin upon amidinium-carboxylate formation (THF, 298 K). Picosecond transient absorption spectra of the free ZnP-beta-AmH+ in THF reveal the existence of an excited-state isosbestic point between the S1 and T1 states at lambdaprobe = 650 nm, providing an effective 'zero-kinetics' background on which to observe the formation of PCET photoproducts. Distinct rise and decay kinetics are attributed to the build-up and subsequent loss of intermediates resulting from a forward and reverse PCET reaction, respectively (kPCET(fwd) = 9 x 108 s-1 and kPCET(rev) = 14 x 108 s-1). The forward rate constant is nearly 2 orders of magnitude slower than that measured for covalently linked Zn(II) porphyrin-acceptor dyads of comparable driving force and D-A distance, establishing the importance of a proximal proton network in controlling charge transport.

  13. The influence of surface passivation on electronic energy relaxation dynamics of CdSe and CdSe/CdS nanocrystals studied using visible and near infrared transient absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Yi, Chongyue; Knappenberger, Kenneth L

    2015-03-19

    Charge carrier relaxation dynamics of electronically excited CdSe and CdSe/CdS core/shell nanocrystals (NCs) were studied using femtosecond time-resolved transient absorption spectroscopy, employing both visible and near-infrared (NIR) probe laser pulses. Following 400 nm excitation, the combination of visible and NIR laser probe pulses were used to determine the influence of surface passivation on electronic relaxation dynamics for nanocrystals overcoated with either organic ligands or inorganic semiconductors. In particular, low-energy NIR photons were used to isolate transient absorption signals due to either electron and hole intraband transitions. Four relaxation components were detected for CdSe NCs passivated by organic molecules: (1) picosecond hole relaxation; (2) electron deep trapping; (3) electron surface trapping; and (4) exciton radiative recombination. Based on TA data collected over a broad energy range, electron deep trapping at Se(2-) sites was suppressed for CdSe NCs passivated by inorganic (CdS) semiconducting materials. By comparing the time-dependent transient absorption data of a series of CdSe/CdS NCs with different shell thicknesses, evidence for the transition from Type-I to quasi Type-II NCs was obtained. These data illustrate the sensitivity of femtosecond time-resolved transient absorption measurements carried out over visible and near infrared probe energies for determining the influence of nanocrystal structure on electronic relaxation dynamics.

  14. Triplet absorption spectroscopy and electromagnetically induced transparency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghafoor, F.; Nazmitdinov, R. G.

    2016-09-01

    Coherence phenomena in a four-level atomic system, cyclically driven by three coherent fields, are investigated thoroughly at zero and weak magnetic fields. Each strongly interacting atomic state is converted to a triplet due to a dynamical Stark effect. Two dark lines with a Fano-like profile arise in the triplet absorption spectrum with anomalous dispersions. We provide conditions to control the widths of the transparency windows by means of the relative phase of the driving fields and the intensity of the microwave field, which closes the optical system loop. The effect of Doppler broadening on the results of the triplet absorption spectroscopy is analysed in detail.

  15. Combined surface plasmon resonance and X-ray absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia, Miguel Angel; Serrano, Aida; Rodriguez de La Fuente, Oscar; Castro, German R.

    2012-02-01

    We present a system for the excitation and measurement of surface plasmons in metallic films based on the Kretschmann-Raether configuration that can be installed in a synchrotron beamline. The device was mounted an tested in a hard X-ray Absorption beamline, BM25 Spline at ESRF. Whit this device it is possible to carry on experiments combining surface plasmon and X-ray absorption spectroscopies. The surface plasmons can be use to monitor in situ changes induced by the X-rays in the metallic films or the dielectric overlayer. Similarly, the changes in the electronic configuration of the material when surface plasmons are excited can be measured by X-ray absorption spectroscopy. The resolution of the system allows to observe changes in the signals of the order of 10-3 to 10-5 depending on the particular experiment and used configuration. The system is available for experiments at the beamline.

  16. Time-Resolved Surface-Enhanced IR-Absorption Spectroscopy of Direct Electron Transfer to Cytochrome c Oxidase from R. sphaeroides

    PubMed Central

    Schwaighofer, Andreas; Steininger, Christoph; Hildenbrandt, David M.; Srajer, Johannes; Nowak, Christoph; Knoll, Wolfgang; Naumann, Renate L.C.

    2013-01-01

    Time-resolved surface-enhanced IR-absorption spectroscopy triggered by electrochemical modulation has been performed on cytochrome c oxidase from Rhodobacter sphaeroides. Single bands isolated from a broad band in the amide I region using phase-sensitive detection were attributed to different redox centers. Their absorbances changing on the millisecond timescale could be fitted to a model based on protonation-dependent chemical reaction kinetics established previously. Substantial conformational changes of secondary structures coupled to redox transitions were revealed. PMID:24359742

  17. SYNCHROTRON RADIATION, FREE ELECTRON LASER, APPLICATION OF NUCLEAR TECHNOLOGY, ETC.: A new cell for X-ray absorption spectroscopy study under high pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Li-Rong; Che, Rong-Zheng; Liu, Jing; Du, Yong-Hua; Zhou, Ying-Li; Hu, Tian-Dou

    2009-08-01

    X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) spectroscopy is a powerful technique for the investigation of the local environment around selected atoms in condensed matter. XAFS under pressure is an important method for the synchrotron source. We design a cell for a high pressure XAFS experiment. Sintered boron carbide is used as the anvils of this high pressure cell in order to obtain a full XAFS spectrum free from diffraction peaks. In addition, a hydraulic pump was adopted to make in-suit pressure modulation. High quality XAFS spectra of ZrH2 under high pressure (up to 13 GPa) were obtained by this cell.

  18. Optically generated small electron and hole polarons in nominally undoped and Fe-doped KNbO3 investigated by transient absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torbrügge, S.; Imlau, M.; Schoke, B.; Merschjann, C.; Schirmer, O. F.; Vernay, S.; Gross, A.; Wesemann, V.; Rytz, D.

    2008-09-01

    Transient light-induced absorption in nominally undoped and Fe-doped KNbO3 crystals is observed in the visible and infrared spectral ranges after single pulse illumination with λ=532nm . For nominally undoped KNbO3 the decay of the light-induced absorption in a single step can be explained by incoherent hopping transport of optically generated small bound O- hole and small free Nb4+ electron polarons and their mutual recombination. Iron doping causes an additional slow decay component and, remarkably, accelerates the initial decay process. A consistent model for the formation, hopping, and recombination paths of hole and electron polarons is deduced from the experimental data set for both nominally undoped and Fe-doped KNbO3 . The decrease in the polaron hopping-transport length in Fe-doped samples is attributed to the increased number densities of optically generated hole polarons by additional one-quantum excitations.

  19. Methane overtone absorption by intracavity laser spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Obrien, James J.

    1990-01-01

    Interpretation of planetary methane (CH4) visible-near IR spectra, used to develop models of planetary atmospheres, has been hampered by a lack of suitable laboratory spectroscopic data. The particular CH4 spectral bands are due to intrinsically weak, high overtone-combination transitions too complex for classical spectroscopic analysis. The traditional multipass cell approach to measuring spectra of weakly absorbing species is insufficiently sensitive to yield reliable results for some of the weakest CH4 absorption features and is difficult to apply at the temperatures of the planetary environments. A time modulated form of intracavity laser spectroscopy (ILS), has been shown to provide effective absorption pathlengths of 100 to 200 km with sample cells less than 1 m long. The optical physics governing this technique and the experimental parameters important for obtaining reliable, quantitative results are now well understood. Quantitative data for CH4 absorption obtained by ILS have been reported recently. Illustrative ILS data for CH4 absorption in the 619.7 nm and 681.9 nm bands are presented. New ILS facilities at UM-St. Louis will be used to measure CH4 absorption in the 700 to 1000 nm region under conditions appropriate to the planetary atmospheres.

  20. The electronic states of thiophene studied by optical (VUV) absorption, near-threshold electron energy-loss (EEL) spectroscopy and ab initio multi-reference configuration interaction calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmer, Michael H.; Walker, Isobel C.; Guest, Martyn F.

    1999-03-01

    A reinvestigation and extension of the observed VUV and EEL spectrum of thiophene has been carried out, and the spectra assigned by means of high level multi-reference multi-root CI studies. It is concluded that each of two strong absorption bands centred around 5.5 and 7.0 eV respectively owe their intensity to excitation of two1ππ ∗ states, one each of symmetry 1A 1 and 1B 2. The range of calculated valence states of ππ ∗-type has been extended to include those from both 3b 1 and 2b 1. A wide range of Rydberg states derived from the five least bound orbitals has been obtained. The adiabatic IPs for the lowest series of cationic states with C 2 v symmetry, obtained by open shell SCF/CI studies, occur in the order: 1a 2-1< 3b 1-1< 11a 1-1< 7b 2-1< 2b 1-1. The equilibrium structures for the cations, when compared with the ground state under the same procedures, show that the order of the bond lengths C 2C 3 < C 3C 4 is reversed in the 2A 2 cation, while the SC bond length is markedly increased in the 2B 2 and 2B 1 (2b 1-1) cations. Significant distortions of the ring skeleton in the higher ions suggest that lower symmetry states are formed on ionisation. The present Green's function, TDA and CI calculations all lead to the same order of vertical IPs for the first nine IPs.

  1. UV laser long-path absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dorn, Hans-Peter; Brauers, Theo; Neuroth, Rudolf

    1994-01-01

    Long path Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (DOAS) using a picosecond UV laser as a light source was developed in our institute. Tropospheric OH radicals are measured by their rotational absorption lines around 308 nm. The spectra are obtained using a high resolution spectrograph. The detection system has been improved over the formerly used optomechanical scanning device by application of a photodiode array which increased the observed spectral range by a factor of 6 and which utilizes the light much more effectively leading to a considerable reduction of the measurement time. This technique provides direct measurements of OH because the signal is given by the product of the absorption coefficient and the OH concentration along the light path according to Lambert-Beers law. No calibration is needed. Since the integrated absorption coefficient is well known the accuracy of the measurement essentially depends on the extent to which the OH absorption pattern can be detected in the spectra. No interference by self generated OH radicals in the detection lightpath has been observed. The large bandwidth (greater than 0.15 nm) and the high spectral resolution (1.5 pm) allows absolute determination of interferences by other trace gas absorptions. The measurement error is directly accessible from the absorption-signal to baseline-noise ratio in the spectra. The applicability of the method strongly depends on visibility. Elevated concentrations of aerosols lead to considerable attenuation of the laser light which reduces the S/N-ratio. In the moderately polluted air of Julich, where we performed a number of OH measurement spectra. In addition absorption features of unidentified species were frequently detected. A quantitative deconvolution even of the known species is not easy to achieve and can leave residual structures in the spectra. Thus interferences usually increase the noise and deteriorate the OH detection sensitivity. Using diode arrays for sensitive

  2. Remote laser evaporative molecular absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes, Gary B.; Lubin, Philip; Cohen, Alexander; Madajian, Jonathan; Kulkarni, Neeraj; Zhang, Qicheng; Griswold, Janelle; Brashears, Travis

    2016-09-01

    We describe a novel method for probing bulk molecular and atomic composition of solid targets from a distant vantage. A laser is used to melt and vaporize a spot on the target. With sufficient flux, the spot temperature rises rapidly, and evaporation of surface materials occurs. The melted spot creates a high-temperature blackbody source, and ejected material creates a plume of surface materials in front of the spot. Molecular and atomic absorption occurs as the blackbody radiation passes through the ejected plume. Bulk molecular and atomic composition of the surface material is investigated by using a spectrometer to view the heated spot through the ejected plume. The proposed method is distinct from current stand-off approaches to composition analysis, such as Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS), which atomizes and ionizes target material and observes emission spectra to determine bulk atomic composition. Initial simulations of absorption profiles with laser heating show great promise for Remote Laser-Evaporative Molecular Absorption (R-LEMA) spectroscopy. The method is well-suited for exploration of cold solar system targets—asteroids, comets, planets, moons—such as from a spacecraft orbiting the target. Spatial composition maps could be created by scanning the surface. Applying the beam to a single spot continuously produces a borehole or trench, and shallow subsurface composition profiling is possible. This paper describes system concepts for implementing the proposed method to probe the bulk molecular composition of an asteroid from an orbiting spacecraft, including laser array, photovoltaic power, heating and ablation, plume characteristics, absorption, spectrometry and data management.

  3. In vivo absorption spectroscopy for absolute measurement.

    PubMed

    Furukawa, Hiromitsu; Fukuda, Takashi

    2012-10-01

    In in vivo spectroscopy, there are differences between individual subjects in parameters such as tissue scattering and sample concentration. We propose a method that can provide the absolute value of a particular substance concentration, independent of these individual differences. Thus, it is not necessary to use the typical statistical calibration curve, which assumes an average level of scattering and an averaged concentration over individual subjects. This method is expected to greatly reduce the difficulties encountered during in vivo measurements. As an example, for in vivo absorption spectroscopy, the method was applied to the reflectance measurement in retinal vessels to monitor their oxygen saturation levels. This method was then validated by applying it to the tissue phantom under a variety of absorbance values and scattering efficiencies.

  4. Role of defects in BiFeO₃ multiferroic films and their local electronic structure by x-ray absorption spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Ravalia, Ashish; Vagadia, Megha; Solanki, P. S.; Shah, N. A.; Kuberkar, D. G.; Gautam, S.; Chae, K. H.; Asokan, K.

    2014-10-21

    Present study reports the role of defects in the electrical transport in BiFeO₃ (BFO) multiferroic films and its local electronic structure investigated by near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure. Defects created by high energy 200 MeV Ag⁺¹⁵ ion irradiation with a fluence of ∼5 × 10¹¹ ions/cm² results in the increase in structural strain and reduction in the mobility of charge carriers and enhancement in resistive (I-V) and polarization (P-E) switching behaviour. At higher fluence of ∼5 × 10¹² ions/cm², there is a release in the structural strain due to local annealing effect, resulting in an increase in the mobility of charge carriers, which are released from oxygen vacancies and hence suppression in resistive and polarization switching. Near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure studies at Fe L₃,₂- and O K-edges show a significant change in the spectral features suggesting the modifications in the local electronic structure responsible for changes in the intrinsic magnetic moment and electrical transport properties of BFO.

  5. Nanowire electron scattering spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunt, Brian D. (Inventor); Bronikowski, Michael (Inventor); Wong, Eric W. (Inventor); von Allmen, Paul (Inventor); Oyafuso, Fabiano A. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    Methods and devices for spectroscopic identification of molecules using nanoscale wires are disclosed. According to one of the methods, nanoscale wires are provided, electrons are injected into the nanoscale wire; and inelastic electron scattering is measured via excitation of low-lying vibrational energy levels of molecules bound to the nanoscale wire.

  6. Atmospheric Measurements by Cavity Enhanced Absorption Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Hongming; Wu, Tao; Coeur-Tourneur, Cécile; Fertein, Eric; Gao, Xiaoming; Zhao, Weixiong; Zhang, Weijun; Chen, Weidong

    2015-04-01

    Since the last decade, atmospheric environmental monitoring has benefited from the development of novel spectroscopic measurement techniques owing to the significant breakthroughs in photonic technology from the UV to the infrared spectral domain [1]. In this presentation, we will overview our recent development and applications of cavity enhanced absorption spectroscopy techniques for in situ optical monitoring of chemically reactive atmospheric species (such as HONO, NO3, NO2, N2O5) in intensive campaigns [2] and/or in smog chamber studies [3]. These field deployments demonstrated that modern photonic technologies (newly emergent light sources combined with high sensitivity spectroscopic techniques) can provide a useful tool to improve our understanding of tropospheric chemical processes which affect climate, air quality, and the spread of pollution. Experimental detail and preliminary results will be presented. Acknowledgements. The financial support from the French Agence Nationale de la Recherche (ANR) under the NexCILAS (ANR-11-NS09-0002) and the CaPPA (ANR-10-LABX-005) contracts is acknowledged. References [1] X. Cui, C. Lengignon, T. Wu, W. Zhao, G. Wysocki, E. Fertein, C. Coeur, A. Cassez,L. Croisé, W. Chen, et al., "Photonic Sensing of the Atmosphere by absorption spectroscopy", J. Quant. Spectrosc. Rad. Transfer 113 (2012) 1300-1316 [2] T. Wu, Q. Zha, W. Chen, Z. XU, T. Wang, X. He, "Development and deployment of a cavity enhanced UV-LED spectrometer for measurements of atmospheric HONO and NO2 in Hong Kong", Atmos. Environ. 95 (2014) 544-551 [3] T. Wu, C. Coeur-Tourneur, G. Dhont,A. Cassez, E. Fertein, X. He, W. Chen,"Application of IBBCEAS to kinetic study of NO3 radical formation from O3 + NO2 reaction in an atmospheric simulation chamber", J. Quant. Spectrosc. Rad. Transfer 133 (2014)199-205

  7. Ce electronic states in Nd(0.45-x)Ce(x)Sr0.55MnO3 probed by x-ray absorption spectroscopy and photoemission.

    PubMed

    Shirai, T; Imada, S; Higashiya, A; Sekiyama, A; Suga, S; Muro, T; Tanaka, Y; Tamasaku, K; Yabashi, M; Ishikawa, T; Miyasaka, S; Tokura, Y

    2013-10-16

    We have investigated the Ce 4f electronic states in the Ce-doped manganites Nd(0.45-x)Ce(x)Sr0.55MnO3 (NCSMO) by means of x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) and hard x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (HAXPES). The Ce 3d XAS shows that the Ce ions exist in the form of the Ce(3+) and Ce(4+) mixed-valent states, and we have found that the XAS spectral features change with temperature. The Ce 3d XAS and HAXPES spectra for NCSMO agree reasonably well with calculated results based on the single-impurity Anderson model, which takes into account the atomic multiplets and two valence bands. The estimated Ce bulk valence of Nd0.15Ce0.3Sr0.55MnO3 decreases from 3.44 to 3.30 with cooling.

  8. Highly sensitive detection using Herriott cell for laser absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Chongyi; Song, Guangming; Du, Yang; Zhao, Xiaojun; Wang, Wenju; Zhong, Liujun; Hu, Mai

    2016-11-01

    The tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy combined with the long absorption path technique is a significant method to detect harmful gas. The long optical path could come true by Herriott cell reducing the size of the spectrometers. A 15 cm long Herriott cell with 28.8 m optical absorption path after 96 times reflection was designed that enhanced detection sensitivity of absorption spectroscopy. According to the theory data of calculation, Herriott cell is analyzed and simulated by softwares Matlab and Lighttools.

  9. Metal Particle Growth During Glucose Hydrogenation over Ru/SiO2 Evaluated by X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy and Electron Microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Maris,E.; Ketchie, W.; Oleshko, V.; Davis, R.

    2006-01-01

    Biorenewable resources such as carbohydrates are considered alternative feedstocks for oxygenated chemicals. This work investigates the stability of silica-supported Ru catalysts in the aqueous phase conversion of glucose to sorbitol. In situ X-ray absorption spectroscopy at the Ru K edge revealed that air-exposed silica-supported Ru was in an oxidized state but was subsequently reduced in aqueous solutions saturated with 40 bar H{sub 2} at 373 K. Furthermore, exposure to aqueous phase conditions resulted in the sintering of Ru particles on the silica surface. However, the presence of glucose in the aqueous phase stabilized the growth of the Ru particles. Batchwise hydrogenation of glucose at 373 K and 80 bar H{sub 2} over a Ru/SiO{sub 2} (2.67 wt %) catalyst is nearly 100% selective to sugar alcohol with an average turnover frequency of 0.21 {+-} 0.04 s{sup -1}. The hydrogenation reaction was not mass transfer limited according to the Madon-Boudart criterion.

  10. Precision Saturated Absorption Spectroscopy of H3+

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guan, Yu-chan; Liao, Yi-Chieh; Chang, Yung-Hsiang; Peng, Jin-Long; Shy, Jow-Tsong

    2016-06-01

    In our previous work on the Lamb dips of the νb{2} fundamental band of H3+, the saturated absorption spectrum was obtained by the third-derivative spectroscopy using frequency modulation [1]. However, the frequency modulation also causes error in absolute frequency determination. To solve this problem, we have built an offset-locking system to lock the OPO pump frequency to an iodine-stabilized Nd:YAG laser. With this modification, we are able to scan the OPO idler frequency precisely and obtain the profile of the Lamb dips. Double modulation (amplitude modulation of the idler power and concentration modulation of the ion) is employed to subtract the interference fringes of the signal and increase the signal-to-noise ratio effectively. To Determine the absolute frequency of the idler wave, the pump wave is offset locked on the R(56) 32-0 a10 hyperfine component of 127I2, and the signal wave is locked on a GPS disciplined fiber optical frequency comb (OFC). All references and lock systems have absolute frequency accuracy better than 10 kHz. Here, we demonstrate its performance by measuring one transition of methane and sixteen transitions of H3+. This instrument could pave the way for the high-resolution spectroscopy of a variety of molecular ions. [1] H.-C. Chen, C.-Y. Hsiao, J.-L. Peng, T. Amano, and J.-T. Shy, Phys. Rev. Lett. 109, 263002 (2012).

  11. Imide photodissociation investigated by X-ray absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Phillip S; Cook, Peter L; Liu, Xiaosong; Yang, Wanli; Bai, Yiqun; Abbott, Nicholas L; Himpsel, F J

    2012-06-21

    X-ray absorption spectroscopy is used to investigate the photodissociation of the imides PMDI (pyromellitic diimide) and SSMCC (sulfosuccinimidyl 4-(N-maleimidomethyl) cyclohexane-1-carboxylate). PMDI contains only one type of imide, and its photodissociation can be explained by a simple conversion from imide to a mix of imine and nitrile after desorption of the oxygens from the imide. SSMCC contains two different imides. One reacts like PMDI, the other in a more complex multistep process. Eventually, N(2) is formed in the bulk of the sample at high radiation density. The sequence of reactions is inferred from the π* peaks in total electron yield and fluorescence yield absorption spectra at the N 1s and O 1s edges. First-order rate equations are used to model the evolution of the peak areas versus radiation dose.

  12. Polarization-controlled optimal scatter suppression in transient absorption spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Malý, Pavel; Ravensbergen, Janneke; Kennis, John T. M.; van Grondelle, Rienk; Croce, Roberta; Mančal, Tomáš; van Oort, Bart

    2017-01-01

    Ultrafast transient absorption spectroscopy is a powerful technique to study fast photo-induced processes, such as electron, proton and energy transfer, isomerization and molecular dynamics, in a diverse range of samples, including solid state materials and proteins. Many such experiments suffer from signal distortion by scattered excitation light, in particular close to the excitation (pump) frequency. Scattered light can be effectively suppressed by a polarizer oriented perpendicular to the excitation polarization and positioned behind the sample in the optical path of the probe beam. However, this introduces anisotropic polarization contributions into the recorded signal. We present an approach based on setting specific polarizations of the pump and probe pulses, combined with a polarizer behind the sample. Together, this controls the signal-to-scatter ratio (SSR), while maintaining isotropic signal. We present SSR for the full range of polarizations and analytically derive the optimal configuration at angles of 40.5° between probe and pump and of 66.9° between polarizer and pump polarizations. This improves SSR by (or compared to polarizer parallel to probe). The calculations are validated by transient absorption experiments on the common fluorescent dye Rhodamine B. This approach provides a simple method to considerably improve the SSR in transient absorption spectroscopy. PMID:28262765

  13. Polarization-controlled optimal scatter suppression in transient absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malý, Pavel; Ravensbergen, Janneke; Kennis, John T. M.; van Grondelle, Rienk; Croce, Roberta; Mančal, Tomáš; van Oort, Bart

    2017-03-01

    Ultrafast transient absorption spectroscopy is a powerful technique to study fast photo-induced processes, such as electron, proton and energy transfer, isomerization and molecular dynamics, in a diverse range of samples, including solid state materials and proteins. Many such experiments suffer from signal distortion by scattered excitation light, in particular close to the excitation (pump) frequency. Scattered light can be effectively suppressed by a polarizer oriented perpendicular to the excitation polarization and positioned behind the sample in the optical path of the probe beam. However, this introduces anisotropic polarization contributions into the recorded signal. We present an approach based on setting specific polarizations of the pump and probe pulses, combined with a polarizer behind the sample. Together, this controls the signal-to-scatter ratio (SSR), while maintaining isotropic signal. We present SSR for the full range of polarizations and analytically derive the optimal configuration at angles of 40.5° between probe and pump and of 66.9° between polarizer and pump polarizations. This improves SSR by (or compared to polarizer parallel to probe). The calculations are validated by transient absorption experiments on the common fluorescent dye Rhodamine B. This approach provides a simple method to considerably improve the SSR in transient absorption spectroscopy.

  14. Transient absorption spectroscopy of laser shocked explosives

    SciTech Connect

    Mcgrane, Shawn D; Dang, Nhan C; Whitley, Von H; Bolome, Cindy A; Moore, D S

    2010-01-01

    Transient absorption spectra from 390-890 nm of laser shocked RDX, PETN, sapphire, and polyvinylnitrate (PVN) at sub-nanosecond time scales are reported. RDX shows a nearly linear increase in absorption with time after shock at {approx}23 GPa. PETN is similar, but with smaller total absorption. A broad visible absorption in sapphire begins nearly immediately upon shock loading but does not build over time. PVN exhibits thin film interference in the absorption spectra along with increased absorption with time. The absorptions in RDX and PETN are suggested to originate in chemical reactions happening on picosecond time scales at these shock stresses, although further diagnostics are required to prove this interpretation.

  15. Applications of absorption spectroscopy using quantum cascade lasers.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lizhu; Tian, Guang; Li, Jingsong; Yu, Benli

    2014-01-01

    Infrared laser absorption spectroscopy (LAS) is a promising modern technique for sensing trace gases with high sensitivity, selectivity, and high time resolution. Mid-infrared quantum cascade lasers, operating in a pulsed or continuous wave mode, have potential as spectroscopic sources because of their narrow linewidths, single mode operation, tunability, high output power, reliability, low power consumption, and compactness. This paper reviews some important developments in modern laser absorption spectroscopy based on the use of quantum cascade laser (QCL) sources. Among the various laser spectroscopic methods, this review is focused on selected absorption spectroscopy applications of QCLs, with particular emphasis on molecular spectroscopy, industrial process control, combustion diagnostics, and medical breath analysis.

  16. Femtosecond transient absorption spectroscopy of silanized silicon quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuntermann, Volker; Cimpean, Carla; Brehm, Georg; Sauer, Guido; Kryschi, Carola; Wiggers, Hartmut

    2008-03-01

    Excitonic properties of colloidal silicon quantum dots (Si qdots) with mean sizes of 4nm were examined using stationary and time-resolved optical spectroscopy. Chemically stable silicon oxide shells were prepared by controlled surface oxidation and silanization of HF-etched Si qdots. The ultrafast relaxation dynamics of photogenerated excitons in Si qdot colloids were studied on the picosecond time scale from 0.3psto2.3ns using femtosecond-resolved transient absorption spectroscopy. The time evolution of the transient absorption spectra of the Si qdots excited with a 150fs pump pulse at 390nm was observed to consist of decays of various absorption transitions of photoexcited electrons in the conduction band which overlap with both the photoluminescence and the photobleaching of the valence band population density. Gaussian deconvolution of the spectroscopic data allowed for disentangling various carrier relaxation processes involving electron-phonon and phonon-phonon scatterings or arising from surface-state trapping. The initial energy and momentum relaxation of hot carriers was observed to take place via scattering by optical phonons within 0.6ps . Exciton capturing by surface states forming shallow traps in the amorphous SiOx shell was found to occur with a time constant of 4ps , whereas deeper traps presumably localized in the Si-SiOx interface gave rise to exciton trapping processes with time constants of 110 and 180ps . Electron transfer from initially populated, higher-lying surface states to the conduction band of Si qdots (>2nm) was observed to take place within 400 or 700fs .

  17. [Digestion-flame atomic absorption spectroscopy].

    PubMed

    Xu, Liang; Hu, Jian-Guo; Liu, Rui-Ping; Wang, Zhi-Min; Narenhua

    2008-01-01

    A microwave digestion-flame atomic absorption spectroscopy (FAAS) method was developed for the determination of metal elements Na, Zn, Cu, Fe, Mn, Ca and Mg in Mongolian patents. The instrument parameters for the determination were optimized, and the appropriate digestion solvent was selected. The recovery of the method was between 95.8% and 104.3%, and the RSD was between 1.6% and 4.2%. The accuracy and precision of the method was tested by comparing the values obtained from the determination of the standard sample, bush twigs and leaves (GSV-1) by this method with the reference values of GSV-1. The determination results were found to be basically consistent with the reference values. The microwave digestion technique was applied to process the samples, and the experimental results showed that compared to the traditional wet method, the present method has the merits of simplicity, saving agents, rapidness, and non-polluting. The method was accurate and reliable, and could be used to determine the contents of seven kinds of metal elements in mongolian patents.

  18. Simulating Ru L 3 -Edge X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy with Time-Dependent Density Functional Theory: Model Complexes and Electron Localization in Mixed-Valence Metal Dimers

    SciTech Connect

    Van Kuiken, Benjamin E.; Valiev, Marat; Daifuku, Stephanie L.; Bannan, Caitlin; Strader, Matthew L.; Cho, Hana; Huse, Nils; Schoenlein, Robert W.; Govind, Niranjan; Khalil, Munira

    2013-05-30

    Ruthenium L3-edge X-ray absorption (XA) spectroscopy probes unoccupied 4d orbitals of the metal atom and is increasingly being used to investigate the local electronic structure in ground and excited electronic states of Ru complexes. The simultaneous development of computational tools for simulating Ru L3-edge spectra is crucial for interpreting the spectral features at a molecular level. This study demonstrates that time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) is a viable and predictive tool for simulating ruthenium L3-edge XA spectroscopy. We systematically investigate the effects of exchange correlation functional and implicit and explicit solvent interactions on a series of RuII and RuIII complexes in their ground and electronic excited states. The TDDFT simulations reproduce all of the experimentally observed features in Ru L3-edge XA spectra within the experimental resolution (0.4 eV). Our simulations identify ligand-specific charge transfer features in complicated Ru L3-edge spectra of [Ru(CN)6]4- and RuII polypyridyl complexes illustrating the advantage of using TDDFT in complex systems. We conclude that the B3LYP functional most accurately predicts the transition energies of charge transfer features in these systems. We use our TDDFT approach to simulate experimental Ru L3-edge XA spectra of transition metal mixed-valence dimers of the form [(NC)5MII-CN-RuIII(NH3)5] (where M = Fe or Ru) dissolved in water. Our study determines the spectral signatures of electron delocalization in Ru L3-edge XA spectra. We find that the inclusion of explicit solvent molecules is necessary for reproducing the spectral features and the experimentally determined valencies in these mixed-valence complexes. This study validates the use of TDDFT for simulating Ru 2p excitations using popular quantum chemistry codes and providing a powerful interpretive tool for equilibrium and ultrafast Ru L3-edge XA spectroscopy.

  19. Electronic absorption spectra from first principles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hazra, Anirban

    Methods for simulating electronic absorption spectra of molecules from first principles (i.e., without any experimental input, using quantum mechanics) are developed and compared. The electronic excitation and photoelectron spectra of ethylene are simulated, using the EOM-CCSD method for the electronic structure calculations. The different approaches for simulating spectra are broadly of two types---Frank-Condon (FC) approaches and vibronic coupling approaches. For treating the vibrational motion, the former use the Born-Oppenheimer or single surface approximation while the latter do not. Moreover, in our FC approaches the vibrational Hamiltonian is additively separable along normal mode coordinates, while in vibronic approaches a model Hamiltonian (obtained from ab initio electronic structure theory) provides an intricate coupling between both normal modes and electronic states. A method called vertical FC is proposed, where in accord with the short-time picture of molecular spectroscopy, the approximate excited-state potential energy surface that is used to calculate the electronic spectrum is taken to reproduce the ab initio potential at the ground-state equilibrium geometry. The potential energy surface along normal modes may be treated either in the harmonic approximation or using the full one-dimensional potential. Systems with highly anharmonic potential surfaces can be treated and expensive geometry optimizations are not required, unlike the traditional FC approach. The ultraviolet spectrum of ethylene between 6.2 and 8.7 eV is simulated using vertical FC. While FC approaches for simulation are computationally very efficient, they are not accurate when the underlying approximations are unreasonable. Then, vibronic coupling model Hamiltonians are necessary. Since these Hamiltonians have an analytic form, they are used to map the potential energy surfaces and understand their topology. Spectra are obtained by numerical diagonalization of the Hamiltonians. The

  20. UV-VIS absorption spectroscopy: Lambert-Beer reloaded.

    PubMed

    Mäntele, Werner; Deniz, Erhan

    2017-02-15

    UV-VIS absorption spectroscopy is used in almost every spectroscopy laboratory for routine analysis or research. All spectroscopists rely on the Lambert-Beer Law but many of them are less aware of its limitations. This tutorial discusses typical problems in routine spectroscopy that come along with technical limitations or careless selection of experimental parameters. Simple rules are provided to avoid these problems.

  1. UV-VIS absorption spectroscopy: Lambert-Beer reloaded

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mäntele, Werner; Deniz, Erhan

    2017-02-01

    UV-VIS absorption spectroscopy is used in almost every spectroscopy laboratory for routine analysis or research. All spectroscopists rely on the Lambert-Beer Law but many of them are less aware of its limitations. This tutorial discusses typical problems in routine spectroscopy that come along with technical limitations or careless selection of experimental parameters. Simple rules are provided to avoid these problems.

  2. Optical absorption and scattering spectroscopies of single nano-objects.

    PubMed

    Crut, Aurélien; Maioli, Paolo; Del Fatti, Natalia; Vallée, Fabrice

    2014-06-07

    Developments of optical detection and spectroscopy methods for single nano-objects are key advances for applications and fundamental understanding of the novel properties exhibited by nanosize systems. These methods are reviewed, focusing on far-field optical approaches based on light absorption and elastic scattering. The principles of the main linear and nonlinear methods are described and experimental results are illustrated in the case of metal nanoparticles, stressing the key role played by the object environment, such as the presence of a substrate, bound surface molecules or other nano-objects. Special attention is devoted to quantitative methods and correlation of the measured optical spectra of a nano-object with its morphology, characterized either optically or by electron microscopy, as this permits precise comparison with theoretical models. Application of these methods to optical detection and spectroscopy for single semiconductor nanowires and carbon nanotubes is also presented. Extension to ultrafast nonlinear extinction or scattering spectroscopies of single nano-objects is finally discussed in the context of investigation of their nonlinear optical response and their electronic, acoustic and thermal properties.

  3. The electronic states of 1,2,5-oxadiazole studied by VUV absorption spectroscopy and CI, CCSD(T) and DFT methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmer, Michael H.

    2009-06-01

    The 1,2,5-oxadiazole VUV absorption spectrum in the range 5-11.5 eV, shows broad bands centred near 6.2, 7.1, 8.3, 8.8, 10.6 and 11.3 eV. Rydberg states associated with three ionisation energies (IE) were identified in the complex fine structure above 8.7 eV. Electronic vertical excitation energies for singlet and triplet valence, and Rydberg states were computed using ab initio multi-reference multi-root CI methods. There is generally a good correlation between the envelope of the theoretical intensities and the experimental spectrum. The nature of the more intense calculated Rydberg states, and positions of the main valence and Rydberg bands are discussed. The lowest triplet, singlet and Rydberg 3s excited states have equilibrium structures that are non-planar with CS symmetry, in a chair-like orientation where the O and H atoms lie out of the NCCN plane. This finding is consistent with the doubling of the low energy UV spectral lines [B.J. Forrest, A.W. Richardson, Can. J. Chem., 50 (1972) 2088]. The nearly degenerate IE of the UV-photoelectron spectrum (UV-PES, Palmer et al. 1977) makes analysis of the VUV spectrum difficult, leading to the necessity for reinvestigation. Vertical studies (IEV) using CI, Tamm-Dancoff (TDA) and Green's Function (GF) methods all gave similar results, with near degeneracy of the first 3IEV confirming the earlier study. Studies of the adiabatic IE (IEA) using CCSD(T) and B3LYP methods, showed the energy sequence 2A2 < 2B1 < 2B2, but these states are all saddle points, in contrast to the 4th state (2A1) which is a minimum. In contrast, MP2 study of the 2B2 state showed a minimum, with only two saddle points. Complete minima were found after minor twisting of the structures. The lowest energy cationic state is 2A″ (CS), which closely resembles the 2B2 state. The O-N-C-C skeleton is twisted by 8°. The corresponding 2A‧ state (CS) is effectively identical to the 2B1 state. Attempts to find minima for other symmetry states were

  4. Ultraviolet photochemical reaction of [Fe(III)(C2O4)3]3− in aqueous solutions studied by femtosecond time-resolved X-ray absorption spectroscopy using an X-ray free electron laser

    PubMed Central

    Ogi, Y.; Obara, Y.; Katayama, T.; Suzuki, Y.-I.; Liu, S. Y.; Bartlett, N. C.-M.; Kurahashi, N.; Karashima, S.; Togashi, T.; Inubushi, Y.; Ogawa, K.; Owada, S.; Rubešová, M.; Yabashi, M.; Misawa, K.; Slavíček, P.; Suzuki, T.

    2015-01-01

    Time-resolved X-ray absorption spectroscopy was performed for aqueous ammonium iron(III) oxalate trihydrate solutions using an X-ray free electron laser and a synchronized ultraviolet laser. The spectral and time resolutions of the experiment were 1.3 eV and 200 fs, respectively. A femtosecond 268 nm pulse was employed to excite [Fe(III)(C2O4)3]3− in solution from the high-spin ground electronic state to ligand-to-metal charge transfer state(s), and the subsequent dynamics were studied by observing the time-evolution of the X-ray absorption spectrum near the Fe K-edge. Upon 268 nm photoexcitation, the Fe K-edge underwent a red-shift by more than 4 eV within 140 fs; however, the magnitude of the redshift subsequently diminished within 3 ps. The Fe K-edge of the photoproduct remained lower in energy than that of [Fe(III)(C2O4)3]3−. The observed red-shift of the Fe K-edge and the spectral feature of the product indicate that Fe(III) is upon excitation immediately photoreduced to Fe(II), followed by ligand dissociation from Fe(II). Based on a comparison of the X-ray absorption spectra with density functional theory calculations, we propose that the dissociation proceeds in two steps, forming first [(CO2•)Fe(II)(C2O4)2]3− and subsequently [Fe(II)(C2O4)2]2−. PMID:26798796

  5. Electronic and molecular structure of photoexcited [Ru(II)(bpy)3]2+ probed by picosecond X-ray absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Gawelda, Wojciech; Johnson, Melanie; de Groot, Frank M F; Abela, Rafael; Bressler, Christian; Chergui, Majed

    2006-04-19

    L(2,3) X-ray absorption spectra of aqueous [Ru(II)(bpy)3]2+ have been recorded in its ground and excited states, 50 ps after short pulse laser excitation. Significant changes in both the XANES (X-ray Near-Edge Absorption Structure) and the EXAFS (Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure) regions of the excited state complex are detected. The XANES line shapes have been quantitatively simulated using a crystal field multiplet code in trigonal symmetry. In addition, spectral changes in the EXAFS region of both ground and excited states are analyzed in order to extract structural parameters of their corresponding molecular structures. We obtain a Ru-N bond contraction by approximately 0.03 angstroms in the excited-state complex, as compared to the ground-state compound. This contraction results from electrostatic and polarization contributions, limited by steric constraints on the bpy ligands.

  6. Electronic spectroscopy of diatomic molecules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Partridge, Harry; Langhoff, Stephen R.; Bauschlicher, Charles W., Jr.

    1994-01-01

    This article provides an overview of the principal computational approaches and their accuracy for the study of electronic spectroscopy of diatomic molecules. We include a number of examples from our work that illustrate the range of application. We show how full configuration interaction benchmark calculations were instrumental in improving the understanding of the computational requirements for obtaining accurate results for diatomic spectroscopy. With this understanding it is now possible to compute radiative lifetimes accurate to within 10% for systems involving first- and second-row atoms. We consider the determination of the infrared vibrational transition probabilities for the ground states of SiO and NO, based on a globally accurate dipole moment function. We show how we were able to assign the a(sup "5)II state of CO as the upper state in the recently observed emission bands of CO in an Ar matrix. We next discuss the assignment of the photoelectron detachment spectra of NO and the alkali oxide negative ions. We then present several examples illustrating the state-of-the-art in determining radiative lifetimes for valence-valence and valence-Rydberg transitions. We next compare the molecular spectroscopy of the valence isoelectronic B2, Al2, and AlB molecules. The final examples consider systems involving transition metal atoms, which illustrate the difficulty in describing states with different numbers of d electrons.

  7. Formation of a Manganese Tricarbonyl on the MgO Surface from Mn[subscript 2](CO)[subscript 10]: Characterization by Infrared, Electron Paramagnetic Resonance, and X-ray Absorption Spectroscopies

    SciTech Connect

    Khabuanchalad, Supattra; Wittayakun, Jatuporn; Lobo-Lapidus, Rodrigo J.; Stoll, Stefan; Britt, R. David; Gates, Bruce C.

    2010-12-07

    The goal of this work was to prepare structurally well-defined manganese complexes on high-area MgO powder by vapor deposition of Mn{sub 2}(CO){sub 10}. The supported species were characterized by infrared (IR), electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR), and X-ray absorption spectroscopies. The results show that when the manganese loading of the sample was 3.0 wt %, most of the Mn{sub 2}(CO){sub 10} was physisorbed, but when the loadings were less, chemisorbed species predominated, being formed by adsorption of Mn{sub 2}(CO){sub 10} on hydroxyl groups on the MgO surface. Treatment of samples containing 1.0 wt % Mn with O{sub 2} at room temperature resulted in oxidation of the manganese and the formation of surface species that are well represented as the d{sup 4} complex Mn(CO){sub 3}(Os){sub 3} (where O{sub s} is surface oxygen of MgO), as indicated by IR and extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectra. The EXAFS data show Mn-C, C{triple_bond}O, and Mn-O{sub s} bond lengths as 1.90, 1.43, and 1.98 {angstrom}, respectively.

  8. Ultrafast transient absorption spectroscopy: principles and application to photosynthetic systems.

    PubMed

    Berera, Rudi; van Grondelle, Rienk; Kennis, John T M

    2009-01-01

    The photophysical and photochemical reactions, after light absorption by a photosynthetic pigment-protein complex, are among the fastest events in biology, taking place on timescales ranging from tens of femtoseconds to a few nanoseconds. The advent of ultrafast laser systems that produce pulses with femtosecond duration opened up a new area of research and enabled investigation of these photophysical and photochemical reactions in real time. Here, we provide a basic description of the ultrafast transient absorption technique, the laser and wavelength-conversion equipment, the transient absorption setup, and the collection of transient absorption data. Recent applications of ultrafast transient absorption spectroscopy on systems with increasing degree of complexity, from biomimetic light-harvesting systems to natural light-harvesting antennas, are presented. In particular, we will discuss, in this educational review, how a molecular understanding of the light-harvesting and photoprotective functions of carotenoids in photosynthesis is accomplished through the application of ultrafast transient absorption spectroscopy.

  9. Photoelectron and X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy Of Pu

    SciTech Connect

    Tobin, J; Chung, B; Schulze, R; Farr, J; Shuh, D

    2003-11-12

    We have performed Photoelectron Spectroscopy and X-Ray Absorption Spectroscopy upon highly radioactive samples of Plutonium at the Advanced Light Source in Berkeley, CA, USA. First results from alpha and delta Plutonium are reported as well as plans for future studies of actinide studies.

  10. Time-resolved pump-probe spectroscopy of intraband absorption by a semiconductor nanorod

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leonov, Mikhail Y.; Rukhlenko, Ivan D.; Baranov, Alexander V.; Fedorov, Anatoly V.

    2013-09-01

    We develop a theory of time-resolved pump-probe optical spectroscopy of intraband absorption of a probe pulse inside an anisotropic semiconductor nanorod. The absorption is preceded by the absorption of the pump pulse resonant to an interband transition. It is assumed that the resonantly exited states of the nanorod are interrelated via the relaxation induced by their interaction with a bath. We reveal the conditions for which the absorption of the probe's pulse is governed by a simple formula regardless of the pulse's shape. This formula is useful for the analysis of the experimental data containing information on the relaxation parameters of the nanorod's electronic subsystem.

  11. State-Dependent Electron Delocalization Dynamics at the Solute-Solvent Interface: Soft-X-Ray Absorption Spectroscopy and Ab Initio Calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bokarev, Sergey I.; Dantz, Marcus; Suljoti, Edlira; Kühn, Oliver; Aziz, Emad F.

    2013-08-01

    Nonradiative decay channels in the L-edge fluorescence yield spectra from transition-metal-aqueous solutions give rise to spectral distortions with respect to x-ray transmission spectra. Their origin is unraveled here using partial and inverse partial fluorescence yields on the microjet combined with multireference ab initio electronic structure calculations. Comparing Fe2+, Fe3+, and Co2+ systems we demonstrate and quantify unequivocally the state-dependent electron delocalization within the manifold of d orbitals as one origin of this observation.

  12. Electronic absorption spectroscopy of matrix-isolated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon cations. II. The phenanthrene cation (C14H10+) and its 1-methyl derivative

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salama, F.; Joblin, C.; Allamandola, L. J.

    1994-01-01

    The ultraviolet, visible, and near infrared absorption spectra of phenanthrene (C14H10), 1-methylphenanthrene [(CH3)C14H9], and their radical ions [C14H10+; (CH3)C14H9+], formed by vacuum-ultraviolet irradiation, were measured in neon matrices at 4.2 K. The associated vibronic band systems and their spectroscopic assignments are discussed. The oscillator strengths were calculated for the phenanthrene ion and found lower than the theoretical predictions. This study presents the first spectroscopic data for phenanthrene and its methyl derivative trapped in a neon matrix where the perturbation of the isolated species by its environment is minimum; a condition crucial to astrophysical applications.

  13. Probing the electronic and geometric structure of ferric and ferrous myoglobins in physiological solutions by Fe K-edge absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Lima, Frederico A; Penfold, Thomas J; van der Veen, Renske M; Reinhard, Marco; Abela, Rafael; Tavernelli, Ivano; Rothlisberger, Ursula; Benfatto, Maurizio; Milne, Christopher J; Chergui, Majed

    2014-01-28

    We present an iron K-edge X-ray absorption study of carboxymyoglobin (MbCO), nitrosylmyoglobin (MbNO), oxymyoglobin (MbO2), cyanomyoglobin (MbCN), aquomet myoglobin (metMb) and unligated myoglobin (deoxyMb) in physiological media. The analysis of the XANES region is performed using the full-multiple scattering formalism, implemented within the MXAN package. This reveals trends within the heme structure, absent from previous crystallographic and X-ray absorption analysis. In particular, the iron-nitrogen bond lengths in the porphyrin ring converge to a common value of about 2 Å, except for deoxyMb whose bigger value is due to the doming of the heme. The trends of the Fe-Nε (His93) bond length is found to be consistent with the effect of ligand binding to the iron, with the exception of MbNO, which is explained in terms of the repulsive trans effect. We derive a high resolution description of the relative geometry of the ligands with respect to the heme and quantify the magnitude of the heme doming in the deoxyMb form. Finally, time-dependent density functional theory is used to simulate the pre-edge spectra and is found to be in good agreement with the experiment. The XAS spectra typically exhibit one pre-edge feature which arises from transitions into the unoccupied dσ and dπ - πligand* orbitals. 1s → dπ transitions contribute weakly for MbO2, metMb and deoxyMb. However, despite this strong Fe d contribution these transitions are found to be dominated by the dipole (1s → 4p) moment due to the low symmetry of the heme environment.

  14. Laser absorption spectroscopy system for vaporization process characterization and control

    SciTech Connect

    Galkowski, J.; Hagans, K.

    1993-09-07

    In support of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory`s (LLNL`s) Uranium Atomic Vapor Laser Isotope Separation (U-AVLIS) Program, a laser atomic absorption spectroscopy (LAS) system has been developed. This multi-laser system is capable of simultaneously measuring the line densities of {sup 238}U ground and metastable states, {sup 235}U ground and metastable states, iron, and ions at up to nine locations within the separator vessel. Supporting enrichment experiments that last over one hundred hours, this laser spectroscopy system is employed to diagnose and optimize separator system performance, control the electron beam vaporizer and metal feed systems, and provide physics data for the validation of computer models. As a tool for spectroscopic research, vapor plume characterization, vapor deposition monitoring, and vaporizer development, LLNL`s LAS laboratory with its six argon-ion-pumped ring dye lasers and recently added Ti:Sapphire and external-cavity diode-lasers has capabilities far beyond the requirements of its primary mission.

  15. Nearedge Absorption Spectroscopy of Interplanetary Dust Particles

    SciTech Connect

    Brennan, S.; Luening, K.; Pianetta, P.; Bradley, J.; Graham, G.; Westphal, A.; Snead, C.; Dominguez, G.; /SLAC, SSRL

    2006-10-25

    Interplanetary Dust Particles (IDPs) are derived from primitive Solar System bodies like asteroids and comets. Studies of IDPs provide a window onto the origins of the solar system and presolar interstellar environments. We are using Total Reflection X-ray Fluorescence (TXRF) techniques developed for the measurement of the cleanliness of silicon wafer surfaces to analyze these particles with high detection sensitivity. In addition to elemental analysis of the particles, we have collected X-ray Absorption Near-Edge spectra in a grazing incidence geometry at the Fe and Ni absorption edges for particles placed on a silicon wafer substrate. We find that the iron is dominated by Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}.

  16. Circuit Board Analysis for Lead by Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy in a Course for Nonscience Majors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weidenhammer, Jeffrey D.

    2007-01-01

    A circuit board analysis of the atomic absorption spectroscopy, which is used to measure lead content in a course for nonscience majors, is being presented. The experiment can also be used to explain the potential environmental hazards of unsafe disposal of various used electronic equipments.

  17. Attosecond Transient Absorption Spectroscopy of doubly-excited states in helium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Argenti, Luca; Ott, Christian; Pfeifer, Thomas; Martín, Fernando

    2014-04-01

    Theoretical calculations of the XUV attosecond transient absorption spectrum (ATAS) of helium in the doubly-excited state region reproduce recent high-precision measurements, reveal novel means of controlling the dynamics of transiently-bound electronic wavepackets in intense laser fields, and indicates a possible extension of 2D-spectroscopies to the XUV range.

  18. X-ray absorption spectroscopy to analyze nuclear geometry and electronic structure of biological metal centers--potential and questions examined with special focus on the tetra-nuclear manganese complex of oxygenic photosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Dau, Holger; Liebisch, Peter; Haumann, Michael

    2003-07-01

    X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) has become a prominent tool for the element-specific analysis of transition metals at the catalytic center of metalloenzymes. In the present study the information content of X-ray spectra with respect to the nuclear geometry and, in particular, to the electronic structure of the protein-bound metal ions is explored using the manganese complex of photosystem II (PSIII) as a model system. The EXAFS range carries direct information on the number and distances of ligands as well as on the chemical type of the ligand donor function. For first-sphere ligands and second-sphere metals (in multinuclear complexes), the determination of precise distances is mostly straightforward, whereas the determination of coordination numbers clearly requires more effort. The EXAFS section starts with an exemplifying discussion of a PSII spectrum data set with focus on the coordination number problem. Subsequently, the method of linear dichroism EXAFS spectroscopy is introduced and it is shown how the EXAFS data leads to an atomic resolution model for the tetra-manganese complex of PSII. In the XANES section the following aspects are considered: (1) Alternative approaches are evaluated for determination of the metal-oxidation state by comparison with a series of model compounds. (2) The interpretation of XANES spectra in terms of molecular orbitals (MOs) is approached by comparative multiple-scattering calculations and MO calculations. (3) The underlying reasons for the oxidation-state dependence of the XANES spectra are explored. Furthermore, the potential of modern XANES theory is demonstrated by presenting first simulations of the dichroism in the XANES spectra of the PSII manganese complex.

  19. Optoacoustic spectroscopy and its application to molecular and particle absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trees, Charles C.; Voss, Kenneth J.

    1990-09-01

    Light absorption in the ocean has been the least studied optical property because of the difficulties in making accurate measurements. With the previously used techniques, large differences have been reported for the specific absorption coefficient of phytoplankton (cultures and natural assemblages). It is difficult to determine if the diversity in these values are methodological or a function of actual variations in absorption. With the renewed interest and activity in optoacoustic spectroscopy (OAS), which accurately measures absorption, some of these discrepancies should be resolved. In this method, as molecules and particles absorb light from a modulated source, they thermally expand and contract, thereby generating acoustic waves, at the modulation frequency, which are detected by a hydrophone. Optoacoustic spectroscopy is ideally suited for measuring dissolved organic material and particle absorptions because of its high sensitivity (105m1) and the egligible effect of scattered light. In this paper the instrumental design for an optoacoustic spectrophotometer (OAS), which pecifically measures phytoplankton absorption (420-S5Onm), is described. The spectral absorption of dissolved organic material and a phytoplankton culture is presented. OAS holds promise in being able to measure absorption without use of either filtration or concentration techniques.

  20. Combined Electron Paramagnetic Resonance and Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy/Inductively Coupled Plasma Analysis As Diagnostics for Soluble Manganese Species from Mn-Based Positive Electrode Materials in Li-ion Cells.

    PubMed

    Shilina, Yuliya; Ziv, Baruch; Meir, Aviv; Banerjee, Anjan; Ruthstein, Sharon; Luski, Shalom; Aurbach, Doron; Halalay, Ion C

    2016-04-19

    Manganese dissolution from positive electrodes significantly reduces the durability of lithium-ion batteries. Knowledge of dissolution rates and oxidation states of manganese ions is essential for designing effective mitigation measures for this problem. We show that electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) combined with atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS) or inductively coupled plasma (ICP) can determine both manganese dissolution rates and relative Mn(3+) amounts, by comparing the correlation between EPR and AAS/ICP data for Mn(2+) standards with that for samples containing manganese cations dissolved from active materials (LiMn2O4 (LMO) and LiNi(0.5)Mn(1.5)O4 (LNMO)) into the same electrolyte solution. We show that Mn(3+), and not Mn(2+), is the dominant species dissolved from LMO, while Mn(2+) is predominant for LNMO. Although the dissolution rate of LMO varies significantly for the two investigated materials, due to particle morphology and the presence of Cr in one of them, the Mn speciation appears independent of such details. Thus, the relative abundance of dissolved manganese ions in various oxidation states depends mainly on the overall chemical identity of the active material (LMO vs LNMO). We demonstrate the relevance of our methodology for practical batteries with data for graphite-LMO cells after high-temperature cycling or stand at 4.2 V.

  1. Electronic structure of Li{sub 1+x}[Mn{sub 0.5}Ni{sub 0.5}]{sub 1−x}O{sub 2} studied by photoemission and x-ray absorption spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Yokoyama, Y.; Ootsuki, D.; Sugimoto, T.; Wadati, H.; Okabayashi, J.; Yang, Xu; Du, Fei; Chen, Gang; Mizokawa, T.

    2015-07-20

    We have studied the electronic structure of Li{sub 1+x}[Mn{sub 0.5}Ni{sub 0.5}]{sub 1−x}O{sub 2} (x = 0.00 and 0.05), one of the promising cathode materials for Li ion battery, by means of x-ray photoemission and absorption spectroscopy. The results show that the valences of Mn and Ni are basically 4+ and 2+, respectively. However, the Mn{sup 3+} component in the x = 0.00 sample gradually increases with the bulk sensitivity of the experiment, indicating that the Jahn-Teller active Mn{sup 3+} ions are introduced in the bulk due to the site exchange between Li and Ni. The Mn{sup 3+} component gets negligibly small in the x = 0.05 sample, which indicates that the excess Li suppresses the site exchange and removes the Jahn-Teller active Mn{sup 3+}.

  2. X-ray absorption spectroscopy of detwinned Pr{sub x}Y{sub 1{minus}x}Ba{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7{minus}y} single crystals: Electronic structure and hole distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Merz, M.; Nuecker, N.; Pellegrin, E.; Schweiss, P.; Schuppler, S.; Kielwein, M.; Knupfer, M.; Golden, M.S.; Fink, J.; Chen, C.T.; Chakarian, V.; Idzerda, Y.U.; Erb, A.

    1997-04-01

    Substituting Y in orthorhombic (Y,R)Ba{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7} by any rare-earth element R has generally little effect on the superconducting properties. For R=Pr, however, superconductivity is completely suppressed. To understand this effect we have studied the unoccupied electronic structure of Pr{sub x}Y{sub 1{minus}x}Ba{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7{minus}y} (x=0.0, 0.4, 0.8) using polarization-dependent O 1s near-edge x-ray absorption spectroscopy of detwinned single crystals. We identify the hole states in the CuO{sub 2} planes and the CuO{sub 3} chains and give estimates of the relative contributions of the O 2p{sub x}, O 2p{sub y}, and O 2p{sub z} orbitals to these states. Along with the comparison of oxygen-rich (y{approx}0.1) to the oxygen-depleted materials (y{approx}0.9), this allows a test of the current theoretical explanations for the Pr-induced suppression of superconductivity. While we can rule out models involving hole filling or charge transfer between the planes and the chains, our data are consistent with approaches based on Pr 4f{endash}O 2p{sub {pi}} hybridization. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  3. Element-Selective Observation of Electronic Structure Transitionbetween Semiconducting and Metallic States in Boron-Doped Diamond UsingSoft X-ray Emission and Absorption Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Ihara, J.; Muramatsu, Y.; Takebe, T.; Sawamura, A.; Namba, A.; Imai, T.; Denlinger, J.D.; Perera, R.C.C.

    2005-03-03

    The loss of mitochondrial function has been implicated in anumber of maladies such as Huntington's Disease, Parkinson's Disease,cancer and cardiovascular disease. The objective of this research was todevelop a radiolabeled mitochondrial probe. Two tracers, 7'-Z-iodorotenoland 7'-Z-iodorotenone, analogs of rotenone a natural product thatinhibits Complex I of the mitochondrial electron transport chain, havebeen labeled with iodine-125 in 45-85 percent yield in a single step fromthe corresponding tribuytylstannyl precursor. In vivo distribution inadult male Sprague-Dawley rats for both compounds showed highaccumulation in the heart (1.7-3.7 percentID/g at 1h), a tissue with highmitochondrial content. Z-Iodorotenol did not washout of most tissuesbetween 1 and 2 h post injection whereas Z-iodorotenone showed moderatewashout (7-26 percent) over the same period. By 24 h there wassignificant loss of both compounds from most tissues including the heart.Heart-to-blood, -lung and -liver ratios for Z-iodorotenone of 28.9, 10.7and 2.4, respectively, were two- to four-fold higher than theZ-iodorotenol ratios. Compared to the current clinical perfusion tracers,99mTc-sestamibi and 99mTc-tetrofosmin, Z-iodorotenone demonstratessimilar 1h heart accumulation and significantly higher heart-to-lungratio (P<0.001). Z-Iodorotenone heart-to-liver ratio is equivalent to99mTc-sestamibi. 7'-Z-Iodorotenone possesses distribution characteristicsof an improved tracer for SPECT perfusion studies.

  4. Photocarrier dynamics in anatase TiO{sub 2} investigated by pump-probe absorption spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Matsuzaki, H. E-mail: okamotoh@k.u-tokyo.ac.jp; Matsui, Y.; Uchida, R.; Yada, H.; Terashige, T.; Li, B.-S.; Sawa, A.; Kawasaki, M.; Tokura, Y.; Okamoto, H. E-mail: okamotoh@k.u-tokyo.ac.jp

    2014-02-07

    The dynamics of photogenerated electrons and holes in undoped anatase TiO{sub 2} were studied by femtosecond absorption spectroscopy from the visible to mid-infrared region (0.1–2.0 eV). The transient absorption spectra exhibited clear metallic responses, which were well reproduced by a simple Drude model. No mid-gap absorptions originating from photocarrier localization were observed. The reduced optical mass of the photocarriers obtained from the Drude-model analysis is comparable to theoretically expected one. These results demonstrate that both photogenerated holes and electrons act as mobile carriers in anatase TiO{sub 2}. We also discuss scattering and recombination dynamics of photogenerated electrons and holes on the basis of the time dependence of absorption changes.

  5. Electron heating due to resonant absorption

    SciTech Connect

    Mizuno, K.; Spielman, R.B.; DeGroot, J.S.; Bollen, W.M.

    1980-01-01

    Intense, p-polarized microwaves (v/sub os//v/sub eo-/<1) are incident on an imhomogeneous plasma (10/sup 2/absorption near the critical surface (where the plasma frequency equals microwave frequency). Suprathermal electrons are heated by resonantly driven electrostatic field to produce a hot Maxwellian distribution. Most of the heated electrons flow towards the overdense region and are absorbed by the anode at the far end of the overdense region. At high power (v/sub os//v/sub eo-/>0.2), strong heating of thermal electrons, large amplitude ion acoustic turbulence, and a self-consistent dc electric field are observed near the critical surface. This dc electric field is enhanced by applying a weak magnetic field (..omega../sub ce//..omega../sub o/ approx. = 10/sup -2/).

  6. The molecular and electronic states of 1,2,4,5-tetrazine studied by VUV absorption, near-threshold electron energy-loss spectroscopy and ab initio multi-reference configuration interaction studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmer, Michael H.; McNab, Hamish; Reed, David; Pollacchi, Anne; Walker, Isobel C.; Guest, Martyn F.; Siggel, Michele R. F.

    1997-01-01

    The VUV electronic absorption spectrum of 1,2,4,5-tetrazine has been re-investigated, and together with electron energy-loss spectra has led to identification of a number of new excited states. The valence and Rydberg excited states have been studied by multi-reference multi-root configuration interaction studies using MRDCI techniques. Initial studies with the RPA and TDA methods gave almost identical results for the excitation energies, but there is a substantial energy-lowering in the MRDCI calculations, which improves agreement with experiment substantially; these differences are a result of the double, triple and quadruple excited reference configurations included in the reference set of the latter method. The 1ππ ∗ excitations are calculated rather higher than experiment, except for the lowest-lying (weak) 1B 2u state at 5.0 eV. The calculated order for the next three ππ ∗ states is 1B 1u (weak) followed by 1B 2u (strong) and 1B 1u (strong), the last two bands being responsible for the dominant absorption near 7.5 and 8.5 eV. All of this group of four bands involve excitations from the pair of MOs 1b 2g and 1b 1g into the 1a u∗ and 4b 3u∗ VMOs. The sequence of nπ ∗ stakes are in a similar order to the ππ ∗ excitations, with respect to the upper state, and the two lowest singlet states, 1B 3u and 1A u are reasonably well determined. The triplet states follow a similar order to the singlets, and again the dominance of the effect of the two lowest VMOs is demonstrated, but considerable differences between the weighting of leading configurations occurs between singlet and triplet manifolds. The non-diagonal TDA method has been used to reconsider the UV-photoelectron spectrum. The ionisation potentials for tetrazine are reinterpreted with the first three bands being regrouped into 1, 2, 2 ionisations respectively. The ground state properties of tetrazine suggest that the NQR spectrum will show a principal axis 14N quadrupole coupling constant

  7. Absorption and Emission Spectroscopy of a Lasing Material: Ruby

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Esposti, C. Degli; Bizzocchi, L.

    2007-01-01

    Ruby is a crystalline material, which comes very expensive and is of great significance, as it helped in the creation of first laser. An experiment to determine the absorption and emission spectroscopy, in addition to the determination of the room-temperature lifetime of the substance is being described.

  8. Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy. The Present and the Future.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slavin, Walter

    1982-01-01

    The status of current techniques and methods of atomic absorption (AA) spectroscopy (flame, hybrid, and furnace AA) is discussed, including limitations. Technological opportunities and how they may be used in AA are also discussed, focusing on automation, microprocessors, continuum AA, hybrid analyses, and others. (Author/JN)

  9. Visualizing the Solute Vaporization Interference in Flame Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dockery, Christopher R.; Blew, Michael J.; Goode, Scott R.

    2008-01-01

    Every day, tens of thousands of chemists use analytical atomic spectroscopy in their work, often without knowledge of possible interferences. We present a unique approach to study these interferences by using modern response surface methods to visualize an interference in which aluminum depresses the calcium atomic absorption signal. Calcium…

  10. [Burner head with high sensitivity in atomic absorption spectroscopy].

    PubMed

    Feng, X; Yang, Y

    1998-12-01

    This paper presents a burner head with gas-sample separate entrance and double access, which is used for atomic absorption spectroscopy. According to comparison and detection, the device can improve sensitivity by a factor of 1 to 5. In the meantime it has properties of high stability and resistance to interference.

  11. Developing a Transdisciplinary Teaching Implement for Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drew, John

    2008-01-01

    In this article I explain why I wrote the set of teaching notes on Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy (AAS) and why they look the way they do. The notes were intended as a student reference to question, highlight and write over as much as they wish during an initial practical demonstration of the threshold concept being introduced, in this case…

  12. Electronic absorptions of the benzylium cation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dryza, Viktoras; Chalyavi, Nahid; Sanelli, Julian A.; Bieske, Evan J.

    2012-11-01

    The electronic transitions of the benzylium cation (Bz+) are investigated over the 250-550 nm range by monitoring the photodissociation of mass-selected C7H7+-Arn (n = 1, 2) complexes in a tandem mass spectrometer. The Bz+-Ar spectrum displays two distinct band systems, the S1←S0 band system extending from 370 to 530 nm with an origin at 19 067 ± 15 cm-1, and a much stronger S3←S0 band system extending from 270 to 320 nm with an origin at 32 035 ± 15 cm-1. Whereas the S1←S0 absorption exhibits well resolved vibrational progressions, the S3←S0 absorption is broad and relatively structureless. Vibronic structure of the S1←S0 system, which is interpreted with the aid of time-dependent density functional theory and Franck-Condon simulations, reflects the activity of four totally symmetric ring deformation modes (ν5, ν6, ν9, ν13). We find no evidence for the ultraviolet absorption of the tropylium cation, which according to the neon matrix spectrum should occur over the 260 - 275 nm range [A. Nagy, J. Fulara, I. Garkusha, and J. Maier, Angew. Chem., Int. Ed. 50, 3022 (2011)], 10.1002/anie.201008036.

  13. Femtosecond XUV transient absorption spectroscopy of small organic molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lackner, Florian; Chatterley, Adam S.; Neumark, Daniel M.; Leone, Stephen R.; Gessner, Oliver

    2015-05-01

    High-order harmonic generation has evolved as a powerful method for the generation of femtosecond XUV pulses with table-top laser systems. Femtosecond XUV transient absorption spectroscopy is an emerging application of these novel light sources for the investigation of molecular dynamics. Recording time-dependent XUV induced core-to-valence transitions traces a molecular response to an initial perturbation with IR, VIS or UV laser pulses from the perspective of distinct atomic sites. Preliminary results for sulfur and selenium containing organic molecules, such as thiophene (C4H4S) and selenophene(C4H4Se), are presented. While molecular orbital dynamics in thiophene will be monitored at the sulfur 2p edge around 165 eV, experiments at the Se 3d (57 eV) and Se 3p (163 eV) edges of selenophene will provide insight about the impact of specific inner-shell transitions within the same atom on the spectroscopic fingerprint of similar dynamics. The method's element-specificity and sensitivity to local valance electronic structures will be exploited to monitor the photo-induced opening of the aromatic rings at the S-C and Se-C bonds, thereby shining new light on the primary steps of photochemical reaction pathways in organic compounds.

  14. X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy of the Rare Earth orthophosphates

    SciTech Connect

    Shuh, D.K.; Terminello, L.J.; Boatner, L.A.; Abraham, M.M.

    1993-06-01

    X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy (XAS) of the Rare Earth (RE) 3d levels yields sharp peaks near the edges as a result of strong, quasi-atomic 3d{sup 10}4f{sup n} {yields} 3d-{sup 9}4f{sup n+1} transitions and these transitions exhibit a wealth of spectroscopic features. The XAS measurements of single crystal REPO{sub 4} (RE = La, Ce, Pr, Nd, Sm, Eu, Gd, Tb, Dy, Er) at the 3d edge were performed in the total yield mode at beam line 8-2 at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory (SSRL). The XAS spectra of the RE ions in the orthophosphate matrix generally resemble the XAS of the corresponding RE metal. This is not unexpected and emphasizes the major contribution of the trivalent state to the electronic transitions at the RE 3d edges. These spectra unequivocally identify the transitions originating from well-characterized RE cores and correlate well with previous theoretical investigations.

  15. Polarization-enhanced absorption spectroscopy for laser stabilization.

    PubMed

    Kunz, Paul D; Heavner, Thomas P; Jefferts, Steven R

    2013-11-20

    We demonstrate a variation of pump-probe spectroscopy that is particularly useful for laser frequency stabilization. The polarization-enhanced absorption spectroscopy (POLEAS) signal provides a significant improvement in signal-to-noise ratio over saturated absorption spectroscopy (SAS) for the important and commonly used atomic cycling transitions. The improvements can directly increase the short-term stability of a laser frequency lock, given sufficient servo loop bandwidth. The long-term stability of the POLEAS method, which is limited by environmental sensitivities, is comparable to that of SAS. The POLEAS signal is automatically Doppler-free, without requiring a separate Doppler subtraction beam, and lends itself to straightforward compact packaging. Finally, by increasing the amplitude of the desired (cycling) peak, while reducing the amplitude of all other peaks in the manifold, the POLEAS method eases the implementation of laser auto-locking schemes.

  16. Electronic absorption and ground state structure of carotenoid molecules.

    PubMed

    Mendes-Pinto, Maria M; Sansiaume, Elodie; Hashimoto, Hideki; Pascal, Andrew A; Gall, Andrew; Robert, Bruno

    2013-09-26

    Predicting the complete electronic structure of carotenoid molecules remains an extremely complex problem, particularly in anisotropic media such as proteins. In this paper, we address the electronic properties of nine relatively simple carotenoids by the combined use of electronic absorption and resonance Raman spectroscopies. Linear carotenoids exhibit an excellent correlation between (i) the inverse of their conjugation chain length N, (ii) the energy of their S0 → S2 electronic transition, and (iii) the position of their ν1 Raman band (corresponding to the stretching mode of their conjugated C═C bonds). For cyclic carotenoids such as β-carotene, this correlation is also observed between the latter two parameters (S0 → S2 energy and ν1 frequency), whereas their "nominal" conjugation length N does not follow the same relationship. We conclude that β-carotene and cyclic carotenoids in general exhibit a shorter effective conjugation length than that expected from their chemical structure. In addition, the effect of solvent polarizability on these molecular parameters was investigated for four of the carotenoids used in this study. We demonstrate that resonance Raman spectroscopy can discriminate between the different effects underlying shifts in the S0 → S2 transition of carotenoid molecules.

  17. Analyte-induced spectral filtering in femtosecond transient absorption spectroscopy

    DOE PAGES

    Abraham, Baxter; Nieto-Pescador, Jesus; Gundlach, Lars

    2017-03-06

    Here, we discuss the influence of spectral filtering by samples in femtosecond transient absorption measurements. Commercial instruments for transient absorption spectroscopy (TA) have become increasingly available to scientists in recent years and TA is becoming an established technique to measure the dynamics of photoexcited systems. Furthermore, we show that absorption of the excitation pulse by the sample can severely alter the spectrum and consequently the temporal pulse shape. This “spectral self-filtering” effect can lead to systematic errors and misinterpretation of data, most notably in concentration dependent measurements. Finally, the combination of narrow absorption peaks in the sample with ultrafast broadbandmore » excitation pulses is especially prone to this effect.« less

  18. Communication: XUV transient absorption spectroscopy of iodomethane and iodobenzene photodissociation.

    PubMed

    Drescher, L; Galbraith, M C E; Reitsma, G; Dura, J; Zhavoronkov, N; Patchkovskii, S; Vrakking, M J J; Mikosch, J

    2016-07-07

    Time-resolved extreme ultraviolet (XUV) transient absorption spectroscopy of iodomethane and iodobenzene photodissociation at the iodine pre-N4,5 edge is presented, using femtosecond UV pump pulses and XUV probe pulses from high harmonic generation. For both molecules the molecular core-to-valence absorption lines fade immediately, within the pump-probe time-resolution. Absorption lines converging to the atomic iodine product emerge promptly in CH3I but are time-delayed in C6H5I. We attribute this delay to the initial π → σ(*) excitation in iodobenzene, which is distant from the iodine reporter atom. We measure a continuous shift in energy of the emerging atomic absorption lines in CH3I, attributed to relaxation of the excited valence shell. An independent particle model is used to rationalize the observed experimental findings.

  19. Communication: XUV transient absorption spectroscopy of iodomethane and iodobenzene photodissociation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drescher, L.; Galbraith, M. C. E.; Reitsma, G.; Dura, J.; Zhavoronkov, N.; Patchkovskii, S.; Vrakking, M. J. J.; Mikosch, J.

    2016-07-01

    Time-resolved extreme ultraviolet (XUV) transient absorption spectroscopy of iodomethane and iodobenzene photodissociation at the iodine pre-N4,5 edge is presented, using femtosecond UV pump pulses and XUV probe pulses from high harmonic generation. For both molecules the molecular core-to-valence absorption lines fade immediately, within the pump-probe time-resolution. Absorption lines converging to the atomic iodine product emerge promptly in CH3I but are time-delayed in C6H5I. We attribute this delay to the initial π → σ* excitation in iodobenzene, which is distant from the iodine reporter atom. We measure a continuous shift in energy of the emerging atomic absorption lines in CH3I, attributed to relaxation of the excited valence shell. An independent particle model is used to rationalize the observed experimental findings.

  20. Estimation of molar absorptivities and pigment sizes for eumelanin and pheomelanin using femtosecond transient absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piletic, Ivan R.; Matthews, Thomas E.; Warren, Warren S.

    2009-11-01

    Fundamental optical and structural properties of melanins are not well understood due to their poor solubility characteristics and the chemical disorder present during biomolecular synthesis. We apply nonlinear transient absorption spectroscopy to quantify molar absorptivities for eumelanin and pheomelanin and thereby get an estimate for their average pigment sizes. We determine that pheomelanin exhibits a larger molar absorptivity at near IR wavelengths (750nm), which may be extended to shorter wavelengths. Using the molar absorptivities, we estimate that melanin pigments contain ˜46 and 28 monomer units for eumelanin and pheomelanin, respectively. This is considerably larger than the oligomeric species that have been recently proposed to account for the absorption spectrum of eumelanin and illustrates that larger pigments comprise a significant fraction of the pigment distribution.

  1. Estimation of molar absorptivities and pigment sizes for eumelanin and pheomelanin using femtosecond transient absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Piletic, Ivan R; Matthews, Thomas E; Warren, Warren S

    2009-11-14

    Fundamental optical and structural properties of melanins are not well understood due to their poor solubility characteristics and the chemical disorder present during biomolecular synthesis. We apply nonlinear transient absorption spectroscopy to quantify molar absorptivities for eumelanin and pheomelanin and thereby get an estimate for their average pigment sizes. We determine that pheomelanin exhibits a larger molar absorptivity at near IR wavelengths (750 nm), which may be extended to shorter wavelengths. Using the molar absorptivities, we estimate that melanin pigments contain approximately 46 and 28 monomer units for eumelanin and pheomelanin, respectively. This is considerably larger than the oligomeric species that have been recently proposed to account for the absorption spectrum of eumelanin and illustrates that larger pigments comprise a significant fraction of the pigment distribution.

  2. Photodissociation Structural Dynamics of TrirutheniumDodecacarbonyl Investigated by X-ray Transient Absorption Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harpham, Michael R.; Stickrath, Andrew, B.; Zhang, Xiaoyi,; Huang, Jier; Mara, Michael W.; Chen, Lin X.; Liu, Di-Jia

    2013-10-01

    The molecular and electronic structures of the transient intermediates generated from the photolysis of trirutheniumdodecacarbonyl, Ru3(CO)12, by ultrafast UV (351 nm) laser excitation were investigated using X-ray transient absorption (XTA) spectroscopy. The electronic configuration change and nuclear rearrangement after the dissociation of carbonyls were observed at ruthenium K-edge X-ray absorption near edge structure and X-ray absorption fine structure spectra. Analysis of XTA data, acquired after 100, 200, and 400 ps and 300 ns time delay following the photoexcitation, identified the presence of three intermediate species with Ru3(CO)10 being the most dominating one. The results set an example of applying XTA in capturing both transient electronic and nuclear configurations in metal clusters simulating catalysts in chemical reactions.

  3. Electron spectrometer for gas-phase spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Bozek, J.D.; Schlachter, A.S.

    1997-04-01

    An electron spectrometer for high-resolution spectroscopy of gaseous samples using synchrotron radiation has been designed and constructed. The spectrometer consists of a gas cell, cylindrical electrostatic lens, spherical-sector electron energy analyzer, position-sensitive detector and associated power supplies, electronics and vacuum pumps. Details of the spectrometer design are presented together with some representative spectra.

  4. Infrared absorption spectroscopy and chemical kinetics of free radicals

    SciTech Connect

    Curl, R.F.; Glass, G.P.

    1993-12-01

    This research is directed at the detection, monitoring, and study of chemical kinetic behavior by infrared absorption spectroscopy of small free radical species thought to be important intermediates in combustion. During the last year, infrared kinetic spectroscopy using excimer laser flash photolysis and color-center laser probing has been employed to study the high resolution spectrum of HCCN, the rate constant of the reaction between ethynyl (C{sub 2}H) radical and H{sub 2} in the temperature region between 295 and 875 K, and the recombination rate of propargyl (CH{sub 2}CCH) at room temperature.

  5. Sequential and Coupled Proton and Electron Transfer Events in the S2 → S3 Transition of Photosynthetic Water Oxidation Revealed by Time-Resolved X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Zaharieva, Ivelina; Dau, Holger; Haumann, Michael

    2016-12-20

    The choreography of electron transfer (ET) and proton transfer (PT) in the S-state cycle at the manganese-calcium (Mn4Ca) complex of photosystem II (PSII) is pivotal for the mechanism of photosynthetic water oxidation. Time-resolved room-temperature X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) at the Mn K-edge was employed to determine the kinetic isotope effect (KIE = τD2O/τH2O) of the four S transitions in a PSII membrane particle preparation in H2O and D2O buffers. We found a small KIE (1.2-1.4) for manganese oxidation by ET from Mn4Ca to the tyrosine radical (YZ(•+)) in the S0(n) → S1(+) and S1(n) → S2(+) transitions and for manganese reduction by ET from substrate water to manganese ions in the O2-evolving S3(n) → S0(n) step, but a larger KIE (∼1.8) for manganese oxidation in the S2(n) → S3(+) step (subscript, number of accumulated oxidizing equivalents; superscript, charge of Mn4Ca). Kinetic lag phases detected in the XAS transients prior to the respective ET steps were assigned to S3(+) → S3(n) (∼150 μs, H2O; ∼380 μs, D2O) and S2(+) → S2(n) (∼25 μs, H2O; ∼120 μs, D2O) steps and attributed to PT events according to their comparatively large KIE (∼2.4, ∼4.5). Our results suggest that proton movements and molecular rearrangements within the hydrogen-bonded network involving Mn4Ca and its bound (substrate) water ligands and the surrounding amino acid/water matrix govern to different extents the rates of all ET steps but affect particularly strongly the S2(n) → S3(+) transition, assigned as proton-coupled electron transfer. Observation of a lag phase in the classical S2 → S3 transition verifies that the associated PT is a prerequisite for subsequent ET, which completes Mn4Ca oxidation to the all-Mn(IV) level.

  6. Absorption/emission spectroscopy and applications using shock tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sulzmann, K. G. P.

    1988-09-01

    A historical overview is presented about the important contributions made by Penner, his co-workers, and his students to the application of shock-tube techniques for quantitative emission and absorption spectroscopy and its applications to chemical kinetics studies in high-temperature gases. The discussions address critical aspects related to valid determinations of quantitative spectroscopic data and chemical rate parameters and stress the requirements for uniformly heated gas samples, temperature determinations, gas-mixture preparations, selection of useful spectral intervals, verification of LTE conditions, time resolutions for concentration histories, uniqueness of kinetic measurements, as well as accuracies and reproducibilities of measurement results.The potential of absorption spectroscopy by molecule and/or radical resonance radiation and by laser transmission techniques is highlighted for kinetic studies in mixtures with very small reactant concentrations.Besides the work by the honoree and his school, the references include books, monographs and key articles related to the subjects discussed.

  7. Characterization of the manganese O2-evolving complex and the iron-quinone acceptor complex in photosystem II from a thermophilic cyanobacterium by electron paramagnetic resonance and X-ray absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    McDermott, A E; Yachandra, V K; Guiles, R D; Cole, J L; Dexheimer, S L; Britt, R D; Sauer, K; Klein, M P

    1988-05-31

    The Mn donor complex in the S1 and S2 states and the iron-quinone acceptor complex (Fe2+-Q) in O2-evolving photosystem II (PS II) preparations from a thermophilic cyanobacterium, Synechococcus sp., have been studied with X-ray absorption spectroscopy and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR). Illumination of these preparations at 220-240 K results in formation of a multiline EPR signal very similar to that assigned to a Mn S2 species observed in spinach PS II, together with g = 1.8 and 1.9 EPR signals similar to the Fe2+-QA- acceptor signals seen in spinach PS II. Illumination at 110-160 K does not produce the g = 1.8 or 1.9 EPR signals, nor the multiline or g = 4.1 EPR signals associated with the S2 state of PS II in spinach; however, a signal which peaks at g = 1.6 appears. The most probable assignment of this signal is an altered configuration of the Fe2+-QA- complex. In addition, no donor signal was seen upon warming the 140 K illuminated sample to 215 K. Following continuous illumination at temperatures between 140 and 215 K, the average X-ray absorption Mn K-edge inflection energy changes from 6550 eV for a dark-adapted (S1) sample to 6551 eV for the illuminated (S2) sample. The shift in edge inflection energy indicates an oxidation of Mn, and the absolute edge inflection energies indicate an average Mn oxidation state higher than Mn(II). Upon illumination a significant change was observed in the shape of the features associated with 1s to 3d transitions. The S1 spectrum resembles those of Mn(III) complexes, and the S2 spectrum resembles those of Mn(IV) complexes. The extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectrum of the Mn complex is similar in the S1 and S2 states. Simulations indicate O or N ligands at 1.75 +/- 0.05 A, transition metal neighbor(s) at 2.73 +/- 0.05 A, which are assumed to be Mn, and terminal ligands which are probably N and O at a range of distances around 2.2 A. The Mn-O bond length of 1.75 A and the transition metal at 2.7 A

  8. Label free detection of phospholipids by infrared absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, Tahsin; Foster, Erick; Vigil, Genevieve; Khan, Aamir A.; Bohn, Paul; Howard, Scott S.

    2014-08-01

    We present our study on compact, label-free dissolved lipid sensing by combining capillary electrophoresis separation in a PDMS microfluidic chip online with mid-infrared (MIR) absorption spectroscopy for biomarker detection. On-chip capillary electrophoresis is used to separate the biomarkers without introducing any extrinsic contrast agent, which reduces both cost and complexity. The label free biomarker detection could be done by interrogating separated biomarkers in the channel by MIR absorption spectroscopy. Phospholipids biomarkers of degenerative neurological, kidney, and bone diseases are detectable using this label free technique. These phospholipids exhibit strong absorption resonances in the MIR and are present in biofluids including urine, blood plasma, and cerebrospinal fluid. MIR spectroscopy of a 12-carbon chain phosphatidic acid (PA) (1,2-dilauroyl-snglycero- 3-phosphate (sodium salt)) dissolved in N-methylformamide, exhibits a strong amide peak near wavenumber 1660 cm-1 (wavelength 6 μm), arising from the phosphate headgroup vibrations within a low-loss window of the solvent. PA has a similar structure to many important phospholipids molecules like phosphatidylcholine (PC), phosphatidylinositol (PI), phosphatidylethanolamine (PE), phosphatidylglycerol (PG), and phosphatidylserine (PS), making it an ideal molecule for initial proof-of-concept studies. This newly proposed detection technique can lead us to minimal sample preparation and is capable of identifying several biomarkers from the same sample simultaneously.

  9. Temperature dependent soft x-ray absorption spectroscopy of liquids.

    PubMed

    Meibohm, Jan; Schreck, Simon; Wernet, Philippe

    2014-10-01

    A novel sample holder is introduced which allows for temperature dependent soft x-ray absorption spectroscopy of liquids in transmission mode. The setup is based on sample cells with x-ray transmissive silicon nitride windows. A cooling circuit allows for temperature regulation of the sample liquid between -10 °C and +50 °C. The setup enables to record soft x-ray absorption spectra of liquids in transmission mode with a temperature resolution of 0.5 K and better. Reliability and reproducibility of the spectra are demonstrated by investigating the characteristic temperature-induced changes in the oxygen K-edge x-ray absorption spectrum of liquid water. These are compared to the corresponding changes in the oxygen K-edge spectra from x-ray Raman scattering.

  10. Synchrotron radiation based Mössbauer absorption spectroscopy of various nuclides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masuda, Ryo; Kobayashi, Yasuhiro; Kitao, Shinji; Kurokuzu, Masayuki; Saito, Makina; Yoda, Yoshitaka; Mitsui, Takaya; Seto, Makoto

    2016-12-01

    Synchrotron-radiation (SR) based Mössbauer absorption spectroscopy of various nuclides is reviewed. The details of the measuring system and analysis method are described. Especially, the following two advantages of the current system are described: the detection of internal conversion electrons and the close distance between the energy standard scatterer and the detector. Both of these advantages yield the enhancement of the counting rate and reduction of the measuring time. Furthermore, SR-based Mössbauer absorption spectroscopy of 40K, 151Eu, and 174Yb is introduced to show the wide applicability of this method. In addition to these three nuclides, SR-based Mössbauer absorption spectroscopy of 61Ni, 73Ge, 119Sn, 125Te, 127I, 149Sm, and 189Os has been performed. We continue to develop the method to increase available nuclides and to increase its ease of use. The complementary relation between the time-domain method using SR, such as nuclear forward scattering and the energy-domain methods such as SR-based Mössbauer absorption spectroscopy is also noted.

  11. Atmospheric and environmental sensing by photonic absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, W.; Wu, T.; Zhao, W.; Wysocki, G.; Cui, X.; Lengignon, C.; Maamary, R.; Fertein, E.; Coeur, C.; Cassez, A.; Wang, Y.; Zhang, W.; Gao, X.; Liu, W.; Dong, F.; Zha, G.; Zheng, Xu; Wang, T.

    2013-01-01

    Chemically reactive short-lived species play a crucial role in tropospheric processes affecting regional air quality and global climate change. Contrary to long-lived species (such as greenhouse gases), fast, accurate and precise monitoring changes in concentration of atmospheric short-lived species represents a real challenge due to their short life time (~1 s for OH radical) and very low concentration in the atmosphere (down to 106 molecules/cm3, corresponding to 0.1 pptv at standard temperature and pressure). We report on our recent progress in instrumentation developments for spectroscopic sensing of trace reactive species. Modern photonic sources such as quantum cascade laser (QCL), distributed feedback (DFB) diode laser, light emitting diode (LED), difference-frequency generation (DFG) parametric source are implemented in conjunction with highsensitivity spectroscopic measurement techniques for : (1) nitrous acid (HONO) monitoring by QCL-based long optical pathlength absorption spectroscopy and LED-based IBBCEAS (incoherent broadband cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopy); (2) DFB laser-based hydroxyl free radical (OH) detection using WM-OA-ICOS (wavelength modulation off-axis integrated cavity output spectroscopy) and FRS (Faraday rotation spectroscopy), respectively; (3) nitrate radical (NO3) and nitrogen dioxide (NO2) simultaneous measurements with IBBCEAS approach. Applications in field observation and in smog chamber study will be presented.

  12. Use of absorption spectroscopy for refined petroleum product discrimination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Short, Michael

    1991-07-01

    On-line discrimination between arbitrary petroleum products is necessary for optimal control of petroleum refinery and pipeline operation and process control involving petroleum distillates. There are a number of techniques by which petroleum products can be distinguished from one another. Among these, optical measurements offer fast, non-intrusive, real-time characterization. The application examined here involves optically monitoring the interface between dissimilar batches of fluids in a gasoline pipeline. After examination of near- infrared and mid-infrared absorption spectroscopy and Raman spectroscopy, Fourier transform mid-infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy was chosen as the best candidate for implementation. On- line FTIR data is presented, verifying the applicability of the technique for batch interface detection.

  13. Reconstruction of an excited-state molecular wave packet with attosecond transient absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Yan; Chini, Michael; Wang, Xiaowei; González-Castrillo, Alberto; Palacios, Alicia; Argenti, Luca; Martín, Fernando; Chang, Zenghu

    2016-08-01

    Attosecond science promises to allow new forms of quantum control in which a broadband isolated attosecond pulse excites a molecular wave packet consisting of a coherent superposition of multiple excited electronic states. This electronic excitation triggers nuclear motion on the molecular manifold of potential energy surfaces and can result in permanent rearrangement of the constituent atoms. Here, we demonstrate attosecond transient absorption spectroscopy (ATAS) as a viable probe of the electronic and nuclear dynamics initiated in excited states of a neutral molecule by a broadband vacuum ultraviolet pulse. Owing to the high spectral and temporal resolution of ATAS, we are able to reconstruct the time evolution of a vibrational wave packet within the excited B'Σ1u+ electronic state of H2 via the laser-perturbed transient absorption spectrum.

  14. Intracavity Laser Absorption Spectroscopy of Platinum Nitride in the Near Infrared

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Brien, Leah C.; Womack, Kaitlin A.; O'Brien, James J.; Whittemore, Sean

    2013-06-01

    The (2,0) band of the A^{2}Σ^{-} - X^{2}Π_{1/2} electronic transition of PtN has been recorded using intracavity laser absorption spectroscopy. Transitions from ^{194}PtN, ^{195}PtN, and ^{196}PtN isotopologues are observed, as well as the nuclear hyperfine splitting due to ^{195}Pt with I=1/2. The results of the analysis will be presented and compared with ab initio calculations.

  15. Electronic Absorption Spectra of Neutral Perylene (C20H12), Terrylene (C30H16), and Quaterrylene (C40H20) and their Positive and Negative Ions: Ne Matrix-Isolation Spectroscopy and Time Dependent Density Functional Theory Calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halasinski, Thomas M.; Weisman, Jennifer L.; Lee, Timothy J.; Salama, Farid; Head-Gordon, Martin; Kwak, Dochan (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    We present a full experimental and theoretical study of an interesting series of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, the oligorylenes. The absorption spectra of perylene, terrylene and quaterrylene in neutral, cationic and anionic charge states are obtained by matrix-isolation spectroscopy in Ne. The experimental spectra are dominated by a bright state that red shifts with growing molecular size. Excitation energies and state symmetry assignments are supported by calculations using time dependent density functional theory methods. These calculations also provide new insight into the observed trends in oscillator strength and excitation energy for the bright states: the oscillator strength per unit mass of carbon increases along the series.

  16. Picosecond and femtosecond X-ray absorption spectroscopy of molecular systems.

    PubMed

    Chergui, Majed

    2010-03-01

    The need to visualize molecular structure in the course of a chemical reaction, a phase transformation or a biological function has been a dream of scientists for decades. The development of time-resolved X-ray and electron-based methods is making this true. X-ray absorption spectroscopy is ideal for the study of structural dynamics in liquids, because it can be implemented in amorphous media. Furthermore, it is chemically selective. Using X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) and extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) in laser pump/X-ray probe experiments allows the retrieval of the local geometric structure of the system under study, but also the underlying photoinduced electronic structure changes that drive the structural dynamics. Recent developments in picosecond and femtosecond X-ray absorption spectroscopy applied to molecular systems in solution are reviewed: examples on ultrafast photoinduced processes such as intramolecular electron transfer, low-to-high spin change, and bond formation are presented.

  17. Titanium-silicon oxide film structures for polarization-modulated infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Dunlop, Iain E.; Zorn, Stefan; Richter, Gunther; Srot, Vesna; Kelsch, Marion; van Aken, Peter A.; Skoda, Maximilian; Gerlach, Alexander; Spatz, Joachim P.; Schreiber, Frank

    2010-01-01

    We present a titanium-silicon oxide film structure that permits polarization modulated infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy on silicon oxide surfaces. The structure consists of a ~6 nm sputtered silicon oxide film on a ~200 nm sputtered titanium film. Characterization using conventional and scanning transmission electron microscopy, electron energy loss spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and X-ray reflectometry is presented. We demonstrate the use of this structure to investigate a selectively protein-resistant self-assembled monolayer (SAM) consisting of silane-anchored, biotin-terminated poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG). PEG-associated IR bands were observed. Measurements of protein-characteristic band intensities showed that this SAM adsorbed streptavidin whereas it repelled bovine serum albumin, as had been expected from its structure. PMID:20418963

  18. APPLICATION OF ABSORPTION SPECTROSCOPY TO ACTINIDE PROCESS ANALYSIS AND MONITORING

    SciTech Connect

    Lascola, R.; Sharma, V.

    2010-06-03

    The characteristic strong colors of aqueous actinide solutions form the basis of analytical techniques for actinides based on absorption spectroscopy. Colorimetric measurements of samples from processing activities have been used for at least half a century. This seemingly mature technology has been recently revitalized by developments in chemometric data analysis. Where reliable measurements could formerly only be obtained under well-defined conditions, modern methods are robust with respect to variations in acidity, concentration of complexants and spectral interferents, and temperature. This paper describes two examples of the use of process absorption spectroscopy for Pu analysis at the Savannah River Site, in Aiken, SC. In one example, custom optical filters allow accurate colorimetric measurements of Pu in a stream with rapid nitric acid variation. The second example demonstrates simultaneous measurement of Pu and U by chemometric treatment of absorption spectra. The paper concludes with a description of the use of these analyzers to supplement existing technologies in nuclear materials monitoring in processing, reprocessing, and storage facilities.

  19. Pathlength Determination for Gas in Scattering Media Absorption Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Mei, Liang; Somesfalean, Gabriel; Svanberg, Sune

    2014-01-01

    Gas in scattering media absorption spectroscopy (GASMAS) has been extensively studied and applied during recent years in, e.g., food packaging, human sinus monitoring, gas diffusion studies, and pharmaceutical tablet characterization. The focus has been on the evaluation of the gas absorption pathlength in porous media, which a priori is unknown due to heavy light scattering. In this paper, three different approaches are summarized. One possibility is to simultaneously monitor another gas with known concentration (e.g., water vapor), the pathlength of which can then be obtained and used for the target gas (e.g., oxygen) to retrieve its concentration. The second approach is to measure the mean optical pathlength or physical pathlength with other methods, including time-of-flight spectroscopy, frequency-modulated light scattering interferometry and the frequency domain photon migration method. By utilizing these methods, an average concentration can be obtained and the porosities of the material are studied. The last method retrieves the gas concentration without knowing its pathlength by analyzing the gas absorption line shape, which depends upon the concentration of buffer gases due to intermolecular collisions. The pathlength enhancement effect due to multiple scattering enables also the use of porous media as multipass gas cells for trace gas monitoring. All these efforts open up a multitude of different applications for the GASMAS technique. PMID:24573311

  20. [Influence of silver/silicon dioxide on infrared absorption spectroscopy of sodium nitrate].

    PubMed

    Yang, Shi-Ling; Yue, Li; Jia, Zhi-Jun

    2014-09-01

    Quickly detecting of ocean nutrient was one important task in marine pollution monitoring. We discovered the application of surface-enhanced infrared absorption spectroscopy in the detection of ocean nutrient through researching the evaporation of sodium nitrate solution. The silicon dioxide (SiO2) with highly dispersion was prepared by Stober method, The silver/silica (Ag/SiO2) composite materials were prepared by mixing ammonia solution and silicon dioxide aqueous solution. Three kinds of composite materials with different surface morphology were fabricated through optimizing the experimental parameter and changing the experimental process. The surface morphology, crystal orientation and surface plasmon resonance were investigated by means of the scanning electronic microscope (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), UV-Visible absorption spectrum and infrared ab- sorption spectroscopy. The SEM images showed that the sample A was purified SiO2, sample B and sample C were mixture of silver nanoparticle and silicon dioxide, while sample D was completed nanoshell structure. The absorption spectroscopy showed that there was surface plasmon resonance in the UV-visible region, while there was possibility of surface plasmon resonance in the Infrared absorption region. The effect of Ag/SiO2 composite material on the infrared absorption spectra of sodium nitrite solution was investigated through systematically analyzing the infrared absorption spectroscopy of sodium nitrate solution during its evaporation, i. e. the peak integration area of nitrate and the peak integration area of water molecule. The experimental results show that the integration area of nitrate was enhanced greatly during the evaporation process while the integration area of water molecule decreased continuously. The integration area of nitrate comes from the anti-symmetric stretch vibration and the enhancement of the vibration is attributed to the interface effect of Ag/SiO2 which is consistent with Jensen T

  1. Time-resolved x-ray absorption spectroscopy with a water window high-harmonic source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pertot, Yoann; Schmidt, Cédric; Matthews, Mary; Chauvet, Adrien; Huppert, Martin; Svoboda, Vit; von Conta, Aaron; Tehlar, Andres; Baykusheva, Denitsa; Wolf, Jean-Pierre; Wörner, Hans Jakob

    2017-01-01

    Time-resolved x-ray absorption spectroscopy (TR-XAS) has so far practically been limited to large-scale facilities, to subpicosecond temporal resolution, and to the condensed phase. We report the realization of TR-XAS with a temporal resolution in the low femtosecond range by developing a tabletop high-harmonic source reaching up to 350 electron volts, thus partially covering the spectral region of 280 to 530 electron volts, where water is transmissive. We used this source to follow previously unexamined light-induced chemical reactions in the lowest electronic states of isolated CF4+ and SF6+ molecules in the gas phase. By probing element-specific core-to-valence transitions at the carbon K-edge or the sulfur L-edges, we characterized their reaction paths and observed the effect of symmetry breaking through the splitting of absorption bands and Rydberg-valence mixing induced by the geometry changes.

  2. Undistorted X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy Using s-Core-Orbital Emissions.

    PubMed

    Golnak, Ronny; Xiao, Jie; Atak, Kaan; Unger, Isaak; Seidel, Robert; Winter, Bernd; Aziz, Emad F

    2016-05-12

    Detection of secondary emissions, fluorescence yield (FY), or electron yield (EY), originating from the relaxation processes upon X-ray resonant absorption has been widely adopted for X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) measurements when the primary absorption process cannot be probed directly in transmission mode. Various spectral distortion effects inherent in the relaxation processes and in the subsequent transportation of emitted particles (electron or photon) through the sample, however, undermine the proportionality of the emission signals to the X-ray absorption coefficient. In the present study, multiple radiative (FY) and nonradiative (EY) decay channels have been experimentally investigated on a model system, FeCl3 aqueous solution, at the excitation energy of the Fe L-edge. The systematic comparisons between the experimental spectra taken from various decay channels, as well as the comparison with the theoretically simulated Fe L-edge XA spectrum that involves only the absorption process, indicate that the detection of the Fe 3s → 2p partial fluorescence yield (PFY) gives rise to the true Fe L-edge XA spectrum. The two key characteristics generalized from this particular decay channel-zero orbital angular momentum (i.e., s orbital) and core-level emission-set a guideline for obtaining undistorted X-ray absorption spectra in the future.

  3. Diagnostic potential of cosmic-neutrino absorption spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Barenboim, Gabriela; Requejo, Olga Mena; Quigg, Chris

    2005-04-15

    Annihilation of extremely energetic cosmic neutrinos on the relic-neutrino background can give rise to absorption lines at energies corresponding to formation of the electroweak gauge boson Z{sup 0}. The positions of the absorption dips are set by the masses of the relic neutrinos. Suitably intense sources of extremely energetic (10{sup 21}-10{sup 25}-eV) cosmic neutrinos might therefore enable the determination of the absolute neutrino masses and the flavor composition of the mass eigenstates. Several factors--other than neutrino mass and composition--distort the absorption lines, however. We analyze the influence of the time evolution of the relic-neutrino density and the consequences of neutrino decay. We consider the sensitivity of the line shape to the age and character of extremely energetic neutrino sources, and to the thermal history of the Universe, reflected in the expansion rate. We take into account Fermi motion arising from the thermal distribution of the relic-neutrino gas. We also note the implications of Dirac vs. Majorana relics, and briefly consider unconventional neutrino histories. We ask what kinds of external information would enhance the potential of cosmic-neutrino absorption spectroscopy, and estimate the sensitivity required to make the technique a reality.

  4. Diagnostic potential of cosmic-neutrino absorption spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Barenboim, Gabriela; Mena Requejo, Olga; Quigg, Chris; /Fermilab

    2004-12-01

    Annihilation of extremely energetic cosmic neutrinos on the relic-neutrino background can give rise to absorption lines at energies corresponding to formation of the electroweak gauge boson Z{sup 0}. The positions of the absorption dips are set by the masses of the relic neutrinos. Suitably intense sources of extremely energetic (10{sup 21} - 10{sup 25}-eV) cosmic neutrinos might therefore enable the determination of the absolute neutrino masses and the flavor composition of the mass eigenstates. Several factors--other than neutrino mass and composition--distort the absorption lines, however. We analyze the influence of the time-evolution of the relic-neutrino density and the consequences of neutrino decay. We consider the sensitivity of the lineshape to the age and character of extremely energetic neutrino sources, and to the thermal history of the Universe, reflected in the expansion rate. We take into account Fermi motion arising from the thermal distribution of the relic-neutrino gas. We also note the implications of Dirac vs. Majorana relics, and briefly consider unconventional neutrino histories. We ask what kinds of external information would enhance the potential of cosmic-neutrino absorption spectroscopy, and estimate the sensitivity required to make the technique a reality.

  5. Principles and calibration of collinear photofragmentation and atomic absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sorvajärvi, Tapio; Toivonen, Juha

    2014-06-01

    The kinetics of signal formation in collinear photofragmentation and atomic absorption spectroscopy (CPFAAS) are discussed, and theoretical equations describing the relation between the concentration of the target molecule and the detected atomic absorption in case of pure and impure samples are derived. The validity of the equation for pure samples is studied experimentally by comparing measured target molecule concentrations to concentrations determined using two other independent techniques. Our study shows that CPFAAS is capable of measuring target molecule concentrations from parts per billion (ppb) to hundreds of parts per million (ppm) in microsecond timescale. Moreover, the possibility to extend the dynamic range to cover eight orders of magnitude with a proper selection of fragmentation light source is discussed. The maximum deviation between the CPFAAS technique and a reference measurement technique is found to be less than 5 %. In this study, potassium chloride vapor and atomic potassium are used as a target molecule and a probed atom, respectively.

  6. The determination of vanadium in brines by atomic absorption spectroscopy

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Crump-Wiesner, Hans J.; Feltz, H.R.; Purdy, W.C.

    1971-01-01

    A standard addition method is described for the determination of vanadium in brines by atomic absorption spectroscopy with a nitrous oxide-acetylene flame. Sample pH is adjusted to 1.0 with concentrated hydrochloric acid and the vanadium is directly extracted with 5% cupferron in methyl isobutyl ketone (MIBK). The ketone layer is then aspirated into the flame and the recorded absorption values are plotted as a function of the concentration of the added metal. As little as 2.5 ??g l-1 of vanadium can be detected under the conditions of the procedure. Tungsten and tin interfere when present in excess of 5 and 10 ??g ml-1, respectively. The concentrations of the two interfering ions normally found in brines are well below interference levels. ?? 1971.

  7. Quantitative analysis of immobilized metalloenzymes by atomic absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Opwis, Klaus; Knittel, Dierk; Schollmeyer, Eckhard

    2004-12-01

    A new, sensitive assay for the quantitative determination of immobilized metal containing enzymes has been developed using atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS). In contrast with conventionally used indirect methods the described quantitative AAS assay for metalloenzymes allows more exact analyses, because the carrier material with the enzyme is investigated directly. As an example, the validity and reliability of the method was examined by fixing the iron-containing enzyme catalase on cotton fabrics using different immobilization techniques. Sample preparation was carried out by dissolving the loaded fabrics in sulfuric acid before oxidising the residues with hydrogen peroxide. The iron concentrations were determined by flame atomic absorption spectrometry after calibration of the spectrometer with solutions of the free enzyme at different concentrations.

  8. Fingerprints of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in infrared absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Tommasini, Matteo; Lucotti, Andrea; Alfè, Michela; Ciajolo, Anna; Zerbi, Giuseppe

    2016-01-05

    We have analyzed a set of 51 PAHs whose structures have been hypothesized from mass spectrometry data collected on samples extracted from carbon particles of combustion origin. We have obtained relationships between infrared absorption signals in the fingerprint region (mid-IR) and the chemical structures of PAHs, thus proving the potential of IR spectroscopy for the characterization of the molecular structure of aromatic combustion products. The results obtained here for the spectroscopic characterization of PAHs can be also of interest in Materials Science and Astrophysics.

  9. Electrochemical flowcell for in-situ investigations by soft x-ray absorption and emission spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Schwanke, C.; Lange, K. M.; Golnak, R.; Xiao, J.

    2014-10-15

    A new liquid flow-cell designed for electronic structure investigations at the liquid-solid interface by soft X-ray absorption and emission spectroscopy is presented. A thin membrane serves simultaneously as a substrate for the working electrode and solid state samples as well as for separating the liquid from the surrounding vacuum conditions. In combination with counter and reference electrodes this approach allows in-situ studies of electrochemical deposition processes and catalytic reactions at the liquid-solid interface in combination with potentiostatic measurements. As model system in-situ monitoring of the deposition process of Co metal from a 10 mM CoCl{sub 2} aqueous solution by X-ray absorption and emission spectroscopy is presented.

  10. Electrochemical flowcell for in-situ investigations by soft x-ray absorption and emission spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Schwanke, C; Golnak, R; Xiao, J; Lange, K M

    2014-10-01

    A new liquid flow-cell designed for electronic structure investigations at the liquid-solid interface by soft X-ray absorption and emission spectroscopy is presented. A thin membrane serves simultaneously as a substrate for the working electrode and solid state samples as well as for separating the liquid from the surrounding vacuum conditions. In combination with counter and reference electrodes this approach allows in-situ studies of electrochemical deposition processes and catalytic reactions at the liquid-solid interface in combination with potentiostatic measurements. As model system in-situ monitoring of the deposition process of Co metal from a 10 mM CoCl2 aqueous solution by X-ray absorption and emission spectroscopy is presented.

  11. Time-resolved postdischarge absolute silicon monoxide density measurement by resonant absorption spectroscopy in a nonthermal atmospheric plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Motret, Olivier; Coursimault, Fabien; Pouvesle, Jean-Michel

    2006-11-01

    In this study we present the technique of resonant absorption spectroscopy diagnostic developed to estimate the density of silicon monoxide (SiO) molecules during the postdischarge of an atmospheric dielectric barrier discharge plasma. The ultraviolet (0,0) rovibrational band of the SiO(A {sup 1}{pi}-X {sup 1}{sigma}{sup +}) electronic transition was investigated. Effective values of absorption coefficient and absorption cross section for the rotational transitions under consideration were calculated. The SiO concentration was estimated by comparison between experimental and computed spectra. The self-absorption in the probe reactor was taken into account in the computed spectra.

  12. Dynamical effects in electron spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Jianqiang Sky; Kas, J. J.; Sponza, Lorenzo; Reshetnyak, Igor; Guzzo, Matteo; Giorgetti, Christine; Gatti, Matteo; Sottile, Francesco; Rehr, J. J.; Reining, Lucia

    2015-11-01

    One of the big challenges of theoretical condensed-matter physics is the description, understanding, and prediction of the effects of the Coulomb interaction on materials properties. In electronic spectra, the Coulomb interaction causes a renormalization of energies and change of spectral weight. Most importantly, it can lead to new structures, often called satellites. These can be linked to the coupling of excitations, also termed dynamical effects. State-of-the-art methods in the framework of many-body perturbation theory, in particular, the widely used GW approximation, often fail to describe satellite spectra. Instead, approaches based on a picture of electron-boson coupling such as the cumulant expansion are promising for the description of plasmon satellites. In this work, we give a unified derivation of the GW approximation and the cumulant expansion for the one-body Green's function. Using the example of bulk sodium, we compare the resulting spectral functions both in the valence and in the core region, and we discuss the dispersion of quasi-particles and satellites. We show that self-consistency is crucial to obtain meaningful results, in particular, at large binding energies. Very good agreement with experiment is obtained when the intrinsic spectral function is corrected for extrinsic and interference effects. Finally, we sketch how one can approach the problem in the case of the two-body Green's function, and we discuss the cancellation of various dynamical effects that occur in that case.

  13. Dynamical effects in electron spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Jianqiang Sky Reshetnyak, Igor; Giorgetti, Christine; Sottile, Francesco; Reining, Lucia; Kas, J. J.; Rehr, J. J.; Sponza, Lorenzo; Guzzo, Matteo; Gatti, Matteo

    2015-11-14

    One of the big challenges of theoretical condensed-matter physics is the description, understanding, and prediction of the effects of the Coulomb interaction on materials properties. In electronic spectra, the Coulomb interaction causes a renormalization of energies and change of spectral weight. Most importantly, it can lead to new structures, often called satellites. These can be linked to the coupling of excitations, also termed dynamical effects. State-of-the-art methods in the framework of many-body perturbation theory, in particular, the widely used GW approximation, often fail to describe satellite spectra. Instead, approaches based on a picture of electron-boson coupling such as the cumulant expansion are promising for the description of plasmon satellites. In this work, we give a unified derivation of the GW approximation and the cumulant expansion for the one-body Green’s function. Using the example of bulk sodium, we compare the resulting spectral functions both in the valence and in the core region, and we discuss the dispersion of quasi-particles and satellites. We show that self-consistency is crucial to obtain meaningful results, in particular, at large binding energies. Very good agreement with experiment is obtained when the intrinsic spectral function is corrected for extrinsic and interference effects. Finally, we sketch how one can approach the problem in the case of the two-body Green’s function, and we discuss the cancellation of various dynamical effects that occur in that case.

  14. Monitoring PVD metal vapors using laser absorption spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Braun, D.G.; Anklam, T.M.; Berzins, L.V.; Hagans, K.G.

    1994-04-01

    Laser absorption spectroscopy (LAS) has been used by the Atomic Vapor Laser Isotope Separation (AVLIS) program for over 10 years to monitor the co-vaporization of uranium and iron in its separators. During that time, LAS has proven to be an accurate and reliable method to monitor both the density and composition of the vapor. It has distinct advantages over other rate monitors, in that it is completely non-obtrusive to the vaporization process and its accuracy is unaffected by the duration of the run. Additionally, the LAS diagnostic has been incorporated into a very successful process control system. LAS requires only a line of sight through the vacuum chamber, as all hardware is external to the vessel. The laser is swept in frequency through an absorption line of interest. In the process a baseline is established, and the line integrated density is determined from the absorption profile. The measurement requires no hardware calibration. Through a proper choice of the atomic transition, a wide range of elements and densities have been monitored (e.g. nickel, iron, cerium and gadolinium). A great deal of information about the vapor plume can be obtained from the measured absorption profiles. By monitoring different species at the same location, the composition of the vapor is measured in real time. By measuring the same density at different locations, the spatial profile of the vapor plume is determined. The shape of the absorption profile is used to obtain the flow speed of the vapor. Finally, all of the above information is used evaluate the total vaporization rate.

  15. Positron annihilation induced Auger electron spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weiss, Alex; Koymen, A. R.; Mehl, David; Jensen, K. O.; Lei, Chun; Lee, K. H.

    1990-01-01

    Recently, Weiss et al. have demonstrated that it is possible to excite Auger transitions by annihilating core electrons using a low energy (less than 30eV) beam of positrons. This mechanism makes possible a new electron spectroscopy, Positron annihilation induced Auger Electron Spectroscopy (PAES). The probability of exciting an Auger transition is proportional to the overlap of the positron wavefunction with atomic core levels. Since the Auger electron energy provides a signature of the atomic species making the transition, PAES makes it possible to determine the overlap of the positron wavefunction with a particular element. PAES may therefore provide a means of detecting positron-atom complexes. Measurements of PAES intensities from clean and adsorbate covered Cu surfaces are presented which indicate that approx. 5 percent of positrons injected into CU at 25eV produce core annihilations that result in Auger transitions.

  16. Mid-infrared absorption spectroscopy using quantum cascade lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haibach, Fred; Erlich, Adam; Deutsch, Erik

    2011-06-01

    Block Engineering has developed an absorption spectroscopy system based on widely tunable Quantum Cascade Lasers (QCL). The QCL spectrometer rapidly cycles through a user-selected range in the mid-infrared spectrum, between 6 to 12 μm (1667 to 833 cm-1), to detect and identify substances on surfaces based on their absorption characteristics from a standoff distance of up to 2 feet with an eye-safe laser. It can also analyze vapors and liquids in a single device. For military applications, the QCL spectrometer has demonstrated trace explosive, chemical warfare agent (CWA), and toxic industrial chemical (TIC) detection and analysis. The QCL's higher power density enables measurements from diffuse and highly absorbing materials and substrates. Other advantages over Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy include portability, ruggedness, rapid analysis, and the ability to function from a distance through free space or a fiber optic probe. This paper will discuss the basic technology behind the system and the empirical data on various safety and security applications.

  17. Azimuthal Doppler shift of absorption spectrum in optical vortex laser absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshimura, Shinji; Aramaki, Mitsutoshi; Ozawa, Naoya; Terasaka, Kenichiro; Tanaka, Masayoshi; Nagaoka, Kenichi; Morisaki, Tomohiro

    2016-10-01

    Laser spectroscopy is a powerful diagnostic tool for measuring the mean flow velocity of plasma particles. We have been developing a new laser spectroscopy method utilizing an optical vortex beam, which has helical phase fronts corresponding to the phase change in the azimuthal direction. Because of this phase change, a Doppler effect is experienced even by an atom crossing the beam vertically. The additional azimuthal Doppler shift is proportional to the topological charge of optical vortex and is inversely proportional to the distance from the beam axis in which the beam intensity is vanished by destructive interference or the phase singularity. In order to detect the azimuthal Doppler shift, we have performed a laser absorption spectroscopy experiment with the linear ECR plasma device HYPER-I. Since the azimuthal Doppler shift depends on a position in the beam cross section, the absorption spectra at various positions were reconstructed from the transmitted beam intensity measured by a beam profiler. We have observed a clear spatial dependence of the Doppler shift, which qualitatively agreed with theory. Detailed experimental results, as well as remaining issues and future prospect, will be discussed at the meeting. This study was partially supported by JAPS KAKENHI Grand Numbers 15K05365 and 25287152.

  18. Beyond structure: ultrafast X-ray absorption spectroscopy as a probe of non-adiabatic wavepacket dynamics.

    PubMed

    Neville, Simon P; Averbukh, Vitali; Patchkovskii, Serguei; Ruberti, Marco; Yun, Renjie; Chergui, Majed; Stolow, Albert; Schuurman, Michael S

    2016-12-16

    The excited state non-adiabatic dynamics of polyatomic molecules, leading to the coupling of structural and electronic dynamics, is a fundamentally important yet challenging problem for both experiment and theory. Ongoing developments in ultrafast extreme vacuum ultraviolet (XUV) and soft X-ray sources present new probes of coupled electronic-structural dynamics because of their novel and desirable characteristics. As one example, inner-shell spectroscopy offers localized, atom-specific probes of evolving electronic structure and bonding (via chemical shifts). In this work, we present the first on-the-fly ultrafast X-ray time-resolved absorption spectrum simulations of excited state wavepacket dynamics: photo-excited ethylene. This was achieved by coupling the ab initio multiple spawning (AIMS) method, employing on-the-fly dynamics simulations, with high-level algebraic diagrammatic construction (ADC) X-ray absorption cross-section calculations. Using the excited state dynamics of ethylene as a test case, we assessed the ability of X-ray absorption spectroscopy to project out the electronic character of complex wavepacket dynamics, and evaluated the sensitivity of the calculated spectra to large amplitude nuclear motion. In particular, we demonstrate the pronounced sensitivity of the pre-edge region of the X-ray absorption spectrum to the electronic and structural evolution of the excited-state wavepacket. We conclude that ultrafast time-resolved X-ray absorption spectroscopy may become a powerful tool in the interrogation of excited state non-adiabatic molecular dynamics.

  19. Precision atomic beam density characterization by diode laser absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oxley, Paul; Wihbey, Joseph

    2016-09-01

    We provide experimental and theoretical details of a simple technique to determine absolute line-of-sight integrated atomic beam densities based on resonant laser absorption. In our experiments, a thermal lithium beam is chopped on and off while the frequency of a laser crossing the beam at right angles is scanned slowly across the resonance transition. A lock-in amplifier detects the laser absorption signal at the chop frequency from which the atomic density is determined. The accuracy of our experimental method is confirmed using the related technique of wavelength modulation spectroscopy. For beams which absorb of order 1% of the incident laser light, our measurements allow the beam density to be determined to an accuracy better than 5% and with a precision of 3% on a time scale of order 1 s. Fractional absorptions of order 10-5 are detectable on a one-minute time scale when we employ a double laser beam technique which limits laser intensity noise. For a lithium beam with a thickness of 9 mm, we have measured atomic densities as low as 5 × 104 atoms cm-3. The simplicity of our technique and the details we provide should allow our method to be easily implemented in most atomic or molecular beam apparatuses.

  20. Optical re-injection in cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Leen, J. Brian; O’Keefe, Anthony

    2014-01-01

    Non-mode-matched cavity-enhanced absorption spectrometry (e.g., cavity ringdown spectroscopy and integrated cavity output spectroscopy) is commonly used for the ultrasensitive detection of trace gases. These techniques are attractive for their simplicity and robustness, but their performance may be limited by the reflection of light from the front mirror and the resulting low optical transmission. Although this low transmitted power can sometimes be overcome with higher power lasers and lower noise detectors (e.g., in the near-infrared), many regimes exist where the available light intensity or photodetector sensitivity limits instrument performance (e.g., in the mid-infrared). In this article, we describe a method of repeatedly re-injecting light reflected off the front mirror of the optical cavity to boost the cavity's circulating power and deliver more light to the photodetector and thus increase the signal-to-noise ratio of the absorption measurement. We model and experimentally demonstrate the method's performance using off-axis cavity ringdown spectroscopy (OA-CRDS) with a broadly tunable external cavity quantum cascade laser. The power coupled through the cavity to the detector is increased by a factor of 22.5. The cavity loss is measured with a precision of 2 × 10−10 cm−1/\\documentclass[12pt]{minimal} \\usepackage{amsmath} \\usepackage{wasysym} \\usepackage{amsfonts} \\usepackage{amssymb} \\usepackage{amsbsy} \\usepackage{upgreek} \\usepackage{mathrsfs} \\setlength{\\oddsidemargin}{-69pt} \\begin{document} }{}$\\sqrt {{\\rm Hz;}}$\\end{document} Hz ; an increase of 12 times over the standard off-axis configuration without reinjection and comparable to the best reported sensitivities in the mid-infrared. Finally, the re-injected CRDS system is used to measure the spectrum of several volatile organic compounds, demonstrating the improved ability to resolve weakly absorbing spectroscopic features. PMID:25273701

  1. Optical re-injection in cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Leen, J. Brian O’Keefe, Anthony

    2014-09-15

    Non-mode-matched cavity-enhanced absorption spectrometry (e.g., cavity ringdown spectroscopy and integrated cavity output spectroscopy) is commonly used for the ultrasensitive detection of trace gases. These techniques are attractive for their simplicity and robustness, but their performance may be limited by the reflection of light from the front mirror and the resulting low optical transmission. Although this low transmitted power can sometimes be overcome with higher power lasers and lower noise detectors (e.g., in the near-infrared), many regimes exist where the available light intensity or photodetector sensitivity limits instrument performance (e.g., in the mid-infrared). In this article, we describe a method of repeatedly re-injecting light reflected off the front mirror of the optical cavity to boost the cavity's circulating power and deliver more light to the photodetector and thus increase the signal-to-noise ratio of the absorption measurement. We model and experimentally demonstrate the method's performance using off-axis cavity ringdown spectroscopy (OA-CRDS) with a broadly tunable external cavity quantum cascade laser. The power coupled through the cavity to the detector is increased by a factor of 22.5. The cavity loss is measured with a precision of 2 × 10{sup −10} cm{sup −1}/√(Hz;) an increase of 12 times over the standard off-axis configuration without reinjection and comparable to the best reported sensitivities in the mid-infrared. Finally, the re-injected CRDS system is used to measure the spectrum of several volatile organic compounds, demonstrating the improved ability to resolve weakly absorbing spectroscopic features.

  2. Optical re-injection in cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Leen, J Brian; O'Keefe, Anthony

    2014-09-01

    Non-mode-matched cavity-enhanced absorption spectrometry (e.g., cavity ringdown spectroscopy and integrated cavity output spectroscopy) is commonly used for the ultrasensitive detection of trace gases. These techniques are attractive for their simplicity and robustness, but their performance may be limited by the reflection of light from the front mirror and the resulting low optical transmission. Although this low transmitted power can sometimes be overcome with higher power lasers and lower noise detectors (e.g., in the near-infrared), many regimes exist where the available light intensity or photodetector sensitivity limits instrument performance (e.g., in the mid-infrared). In this article, we describe a method of repeatedly re-injecting light reflected off the front mirror of the optical cavity to boost the cavity's circulating power and deliver more light to the photodetector and thus increase the signal-to-noise ratio of the absorption measurement. We model and experimentally demonstrate the method's performance using off-axis cavity ringdown spectroscopy (OA-CRDS) with a broadly tunable external cavity quantum cascade laser. The power coupled through the cavity to the detector is increased by a factor of 22.5. The cavity loss is measured with a precision of 2 × 10(-10) cm(-1)/√Hz; an increase of 12 times over the standard off-axis configuration without reinjection and comparable to the best reported sensitivities in the mid-infrared. Finally, the re-injected CRDS system is used to measure the spectrum of several volatile organic compounds, demonstrating the improved ability to resolve weakly absorbing spectroscopic features.

  3. High-resolution X-ray absorption spectroscopy of iron carbonyl complexes.

    PubMed

    Atkins, Andrew J; Bauer, Matthias; Jacob, Christoph R

    2015-06-07

    We apply high-energy-resolution fluorescence-detected (HERFD) X-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy (XANES) to study iron carbonyl complexes. Mono-, bi-, and tri-nuclear carbonyl complexes and pure carbonyl complexes as well as carbonyl complexes containing hydrocarbon ligands are considered. The HERFD-XANES spectra reveal multiple pre-edge peaks with individual signatures for each complex, which could not be detected previously with conventional XANES spectroscopy. These peaks are assigned and analysed with the help of TD-DFT calculations. We demonstrate that the pre-edge peaks can be used to distinguish the different types of iron-iron interactions in carbonyl complexes. This opens up new possibilities for applying HERFD-XANES spectroscopy to probe the electronic structure of iron catalysts.

  4. Ultrafast Extreme Ultraviolet Absorption Spectroscopy of Methylammonium Lead Iodide Perovskite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verkamp, Max A.; Lin, Ming-Fu; Ryland, Elizabeth S.; Vura-Weis, Josh

    2016-06-01

    Methylammonium lead iodide (perovskite) is a leading candidate for use in next-generation solar cell devices. However, the photophysics responsible for its strong photovoltaic qualities are not fully understood. Ultrafast extreme ultraviolet (XUV) absorption was used to investigate electron and hole dynamics in perovskite by observing transitions from a common inner-shell level (I 4d) to the valence and conduction bands. Ultrashort (30 fs) pulses of XUV radiation with a broad spectrum (40-70 eV) were generated via high-harmonic generation using a tabletop instrument. Transient absorption measurements with visible pump and XUV probe directly observed the relaxation of charge carriers in perovskite after above-band excitation in the femtosecond and picosecond time ranges.

  5. X-ray absorption spectroscopic investigation of the electronic structure differences in solution and crystalline oxyhemoglobin

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Samuel A.; Green, Evan; Mathews, Irimpan I.; Benfatto, Maurizio; Hodgson, Keith O.; Hedman, Britt; Sarangi, Ritimukta

    2013-01-01

    Hemoglobin (Hb) is the heme-containing O2 transport protein essential for life in all vertebrates. The resting high-spin (S = 2) ferrous form, deoxy-Hb, combines with triplet O2, forming diamagnetic (S = 0) oxy-Hb. Understanding this electronic structure is the key first step in understanding transition metal–O2 interaction. However, despite intense spectroscopic and theoretical studies, the electronic structure description of oxy-Hb remains elusive, with at least three different descriptions proposed by Pauling, Weiss, and McClure-Goddard, based on theory, spectroscopy, and crystallography. Here, a combination of X-ray absorption spectroscopy and extended X-ray absorption fine structure, supported by density functional theory calculations, help resolve this debate. X-ray absorption spectroscopy data on solution and crystalline oxy-Hb indicate both geometric and electronic structure differences suggesting that two of the previous descriptions are correct for the Fe–O2 center in oxy-Hb. These results support the multiconfigurational nature of the ground state developed by theoretical results. Additionally, it is shown here that small differences in hydrogen bonding and solvation effects can tune the ground state, tipping it into one of the two probable configurations. These data underscore the importance of solution spectroscopy and show that the electronic structure in the crystalline form may not always reflect the true ground-state description in solution. PMID:24062465

  6. Fe L-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy of low-spin heme relative to non-heme Fe complexes: delocalization of Fe d-electrons into the porphyrin ligand.

    PubMed

    Hocking, Rosalie K; Wasinger, Erik C; Yan, Yi-Long; Degroot, Frank M F; Walker, F Ann; Hodgson, Keith O; Hedman, Britt; Solomon, Edward I

    2007-01-10

    Hemes (iron porphyrins) are involved in a range of functions in biology, including electron transfer, small-molecule binding and transport, and O2 activation. The delocalization of the Fe d-electrons into the porphyrin ring and its effect on the redox chemistry and reactivity of these systems has been difficult to study by optical spectroscopies due to the dominant porphyrin pi-->pi(*) transitions, which obscure the metal center. Recently, we have developed a methodology that allows for the interpretation of the multiplet structure of Fe L-edges in terms of differential orbital covalency (i.e., differences in mixing of the d-orbitals with ligand orbitals) using a valence bond configuration interaction (VBCI) model. Applied to low-spin heme systems, this methodology allows experimental determination of the delocalization of the Fe d-electrons into the porphyrin (P) ring in terms of both P-->Fe sigma and pi-donation and Fe-->P pi back-bonding. We find that pi-donation to Fe(III) is much larger than pi back-bonding from Fe(II), indicating that a hole superexchange pathway dominates electron transfer. The implications of the results are also discussed in terms of the differences between heme and non-heme oxygen activation chemistry.

  7. Nile blue shows its true colors in gas-phase absorption and luminescence ion spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stockett, M. H.; Houmøller, J.; Brøndsted Nielsen, S.

    2016-09-01

    Nile blue is used extensively in biology as a histological stain and fluorescent probe. Its absorption and emission spectra are strongly solvent dependent, with variations larger than 100 nm. The molecule is charged due to an iminium group, and it is therefore an obvious target for gas-phase ion spectroscopy. Here we report the absorption and emission spectra of the mass-selected bare ions isolated in vacuo, and based on our results we revisit the interpretation of solution-phase spectra. An accelerator mass spectrometer was used for absorption spectroscopy where the absorption is represented by the yield of photofragment ions versus excitation wavelength (action spectroscopy). The luminescence experiments were done with a newly built ion trap setup equipped with an electrospray ion source, and some details on the mass selection technique will be given which have not been described before. In vacuo, the absorption and emission maxima are at 580 ± 10 nm and 628 ± 1 nm. These values are somewhat blue-shifted relative to those obtained in most solvents; however, they are much further to the red than those in some of the most non-polar solvents. Furthermore, the Stokes shift in the gas phase (1300 cm-1) is much smaller than that in these non-polar solvents but similar to that in polar ones. An explanation based on charge localization by solvent dipoles, or by counterions in some non-polar solvents, can fully account for these findings. Hence in the case of ions, it is nontrivial to establish intrinsic electronic transition energies from solvatochromic shifts alone.

  8. Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy, Atomic Emission Spectroscopy, and Inductively Coupled Plasma-Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Dennis D.; Rutzke, Michael A.

    Atomic spectroscopy has played a major role in the development of our current database for mineral nutrients and toxicants in foods. When atomic absorption spectrometers became widely available in the 1960s, the development of atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS) methods for accurately measuring trace amounts of mineral elements in biological samples paved the way for unprecedented advances in fields as diverse as food analysis, nutrition, biochemistry, and toxicology (1). The application of plasmas as excitation sources for atomic emission spectroscopy (AES) led to the commercial availability of instruments for inductively coupled plasma - atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES) beginning in the late 1970s. This instrument has further enhanced our ability to measure the mineral composition of foods and other materials rapidly, accurately, and precisely. More recently, plasmas have been joined with mass spectrometers (MS) to form inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometer ICP-MS instruments that are capable of measuring mineral elements with extremely low detection limits. These three instrumental methods have largely replaced traditional wet chemistry methods for mineral analysis of foods, although traditional methods for calcium, chloride, iron, and phosphorus remain in use today (see Chap. 12).

  9. Investigating Actinide Molecular Adducts From Absorption Edge Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Den Auwer, C.; Conradson, S.D.; Guilbaud, P.; Moisy, P.; Mustre de Leon, J.; Simoni, E.; /SLAC, SSRL

    2006-10-27

    Although Absorption Edge Spectroscopy has been widely applied to the speciation of actinide elements, specifically at the L{sub III} edge, understanding and interpretation of actinide edge spectra are not complete. In that sense, semi-quantitative analysis is scarce. In this paper, different aspects of edge simulation are presented, including semi-quantitative approaches. Comparison is made between various actinyl (U, Np) aquo or hydroxy compounds. An excursion into transition metal osmium chemistry allows us to compare the structurally related osmyl and uranyl hydroxides. The edge shape and characteristic features are discussed within the multiple scattering picture and the role of the first coordination sphere as well as contributions from the water solvent are described.

  10. Simultaneous surface plasmon resonance and x-ray absorption spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Serrano, A.; Rodriguez de la Fuente, O.; Collado, V.; Rubio-Zuazo, J.; Castro, G. R.; Monton, C.; Garcia, M. A.

    2012-08-15

    We present an experimental setup for the simultaneous measurement of surface plasmon resonance (SPR) and x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) on metallic thin films at a synchrotron beamline. The system allows measuring in situ and in real time the effect of x-ray irradiation on the SPR curves to explore the interaction of x-rays with matter. It is also possible to record XAS spectra while exciting SPR in order to study changes in the films induced by the excitation of surface plasmons. Combined experiments recording simultaneously SPR and XAS curves while scanning different parameters can be also carried out. The relative variations in the SPR and XAS spectra that can be detected with this setup range from 10{sup -3} to 10{sup -5}, depending on the particular experiment.

  11. Terahertz absorption spectroscopy of protein-containing reverse micellar solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murakami, H.; Toyota, Y.; Nishi, T.; Nashima, S.

    2012-01-01

    Terahertz time-domain spectroscopy has been carried out for AOT/isooctane reverse micellar solution with myoglobin at the water-to-surfactant molar ratios ( w0) of 0.2 and 4.4. The amplitude of the absorption spectrum increases with increasing the protein concentration at w0 = 0.2, whereas it decreases at w0 = 4.4. The molar extinction coefficients of the protein-filled reverse micelle, and the constituents, i.e., myoglobin, water, and AOT, have been derived by use of the structural parameters of the micellar solution. The experimental results are interpreted in terms of hydration onto the protein and surfactant in the reverse micelle.

  12. High Resolution Absorption Spectroscopy using Externally Dispersed Interferometry

    SciTech Connect

    Edelstein, J; Erskine, D J

    2005-07-06

    We describe the use of Externally Dispersed Interferometry (EDI) for high-resolution absorption spectroscopy. By adding a small fixed-delay interferometer to a dispersive spectrograph, a precise fiducial grid in wavelength is created over the entire spectrograph bandwidth. The fiducial grid interacts with narrow spectral features in the input spectrum to create a moire pattern. EDI uses the moire pattern to obtain new information about the spectra that is otherwise unavailable, thereby improving spectrograph performance. We describe the theory and practice of EDI instruments and demonstrate improvements in the spectral resolution of conventional spectrographs by a factor of 2 to 6. The improvement of spectral resolution offered by EDI can benefit space instruments by reducing spectrograph size or increasing instantaneous bandwidth.

  13. Investigating DNA Radiation Damage Using X-Ray Absorption Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Czapla-Masztafiak, Joanna; Szlachetko, Jakub; Milne, Christopher J.; Lipiec, Ewelina; Sá, Jacinto; Penfold, Thomas J.; Huthwelker, Thomas; Borca, Camelia; Abela, Rafael; Kwiatek, Wojciech M.

    2016-01-01

    The biological influence of radiation on living matter has been studied for years; however, several questions about the detailed mechanism of radiation damage formation remain largely unanswered. Among all biomolecules exposed to radiation, DNA plays an important role because any damage to its molecular structure can affect the whole cell and may lead to chromosomal rearrangements resulting in genomic instability or cell death. To identify and characterize damage induced in the DNA sugar-phosphate backbone, in this work we performed x-ray absorption spectroscopy at the P K-edge on DNA irradiated with either UVA light or protons. By combining the experimental results with theoretical calculations, we were able to establish the types and relative ratio of lesions produced by both UVA and protons around the phosphorus atoms in DNA. PMID:27028640

  14. La Saturated Absorption Spectroscopy for Applications in Quantum Information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, Patrick; Donoghue, Liz; Dungan, Kristina; Liu, Jackie; Olmschenk, Steven

    2015-05-01

    Quantum information may revolutionize computation and communication by utilizing quantum systems based on matter quantum bits and entangled light. Ions are excellent candidates for quantum bits as they can be well-isolated from unwanted external influences by trapping and laser cooling. Doubly-ionized lanthanum in particular shows promise for use in quantum information as it has infrared transitions in the telecom band, with low attenuation in standard optical fiber, potentially allowing for long distance information transfer. However, the hyperfine splittings of the lowest energy levels, required for laser cooling, have not been measured. We present progress and recent results towards measuring the hyperfine splittings of these levels in lanthanum by saturated absorption spectroscopy with a hollow cathode lamp. This research is supported by the Army Research Office, Research Corporation for Science Advancement, and Denison University.

  15. Two-dimensional vibrational-electronic spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Courtney, Trevor L.; Fox, Zachary W.; Slenkamp, Karla M.; Khalil, Munira

    2015-10-21

    Two-dimensional vibrational-electronic (2D VE) spectroscopy is a femtosecond Fourier transform (FT) third-order nonlinear technique that creates a link between existing 2D FT spectroscopies in the vibrational and electronic regions of the spectrum. 2D VE spectroscopy enables a direct measurement of infrared (IR) and electronic dipole moment cross terms by utilizing mid-IR pump and optical probe fields that are resonant with vibrational and electronic transitions, respectively, in a sample of interest. We detail this newly developed 2D VE spectroscopy experiment and outline the information contained in a 2D VE spectrum. We then use this technique and its single-pump counterpart (1D VE) to probe the vibrational-electronic couplings between high frequency cyanide stretching vibrations (ν{sub CN}) and either a ligand-to-metal charge transfer transition ([Fe{sup III}(CN){sub 6}]{sup 3−} dissolved in formamide) or a metal-to-metal charge transfer (MMCT) transition ([(CN){sub 5}Fe{sup II}CNRu{sup III}(NH{sub 3}){sub 5}]{sup −} dissolved in formamide). The 2D VE spectra of both molecules reveal peaks resulting from coupled high- and low-frequency vibrational modes to the charge transfer transition. The time-evolving amplitudes and positions of the peaks in the 2D VE spectra report on coherent and incoherent vibrational energy transfer dynamics among the coupled vibrational modes and the charge transfer transition. The selectivity of 2D VE spectroscopy to vibronic processes is evidenced from the selective coupling of specific ν{sub CN} modes to the MMCT transition in the mixed valence complex. The lineshapes in 2D VE spectra report on the correlation of the frequency fluctuations between the coupled vibrational and electronic frequencies in the mixed valence complex which has a time scale of 1 ps. The details and results of this study confirm the versatility of 2D VE spectroscopy and its applicability to probe how vibrations modulate charge and energy transfer in a

  16. Antimony quantification in Leishmania by electrothermal atomic absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Roberts, W L; Rainey, P M

    1993-05-15

    Tri- and pentavalent antimony were quantified in Leishmania mexicana pifanoi amastigotes and promastigotes by atomic absorption spectroscopy with electrothermal atomization. Leishmania grown in axenic culture were treated with either potassium antimony tartrate [Sb(III)] or sodium stibogluconate [Sb(V)]. The parasites were collected, digested with nitric acid, and subjected to atomic absorption spectroscopy. The method was linear from 0 to 7 ng of antimony. The interassay coefficients of variation were 9.6 and 5.7% (N = 5) for 0.52 and 3.7-ng samples of leishmanial antimony, respectively. The limit of detection was 95 pg of antimony. The assay was used to characterize Sb(III) and Sb(V) influx and efflux kinetics. Influx rates were determined at antimony concentrations that produced a 50% inhibition of growth (IC50). The influx rates of Sb(V) into amastigotes and promastigotes were 4.8 and 12 pg/million cells/h, respectively, at 200 micrograms antimony/ml. The influx rate of Sb(III) into amastigotes was 41 pg/million cells/h at 20 micrograms antimony/ml. Influx of Sb(III) into promastigotes at 1 microgram antimony/ml was rapid and reached a plateau of 175 pg/million cells in 2 h. Efflux of Sb(III) and Sb(V) from amastigotes and promastigotes exhibited biphasic kinetics. The initial (alpha) half-life of Sb(V) efflux was less than 4 min and that of Sb(III) was 1-2 h. The apparent terminal (beta) half-lives ranged from 7 to 14 h.

  17. Absorption and emission spectroscopy in natural and synthetic corundum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spinolo, G.; Palanza, V.; Ledonne, A.; Paleari, A.

    2009-04-01

    sapphires absorption spectra. In conclusion, both for metamorphic, synthetic and magmatic sapphires we reached a quite complete interpretation of the spectroscopic data in terms of "non interacting impurity ions". Orange, purple and green sapphires absorption spectra may also be discussed in terms of such interpretative approach. References Fontana I, LeDonne A, Palanza V, Binetti S and Spinolo G (2008) Optical spectroscopy study of type 1 natural and synthetic sapphires. J. Phys:Condens.Matter 20:125228-125232

  18. Non-destructive plant health sensing using absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bledsoe, Jim; Manukian, Ara; Pearce, Michael; Weiss, Lee

    1988-01-01

    The sensor group of the 1988 EGM 4001 class, working on NASA's Controlled Ecological Life Support Systems (CELSS) project, investigated many different plant health indicators and the technologies used to test them. The project selected by the group was to measure chlorophyll levels using absorption spectroscopy. The spectrometer measures the amount of chlorophyll in a leaf by measuring the intensity of light of a specific wavelength that is passed through a leaf. The three wavelengths of light being used corresponded to the near-IR absorption peaks of chlorophyll a, chlorophyll b, and chlorophyll-free structures. Experimentation showed that the sensor is indeed measuring levels of chlorophyll a and b and their changes before the human eye can see any changes. The detector clamp causes little damage to the leaf and will give fairly accurate readings on similar locations on a leaf, freeing the clamp from having to remain on the same spot of a leaf for all measurements. External light affects the readings only slightly so that measurements may be taken in light or dark environments. Future designs and experimentation will concentrate on reducing the size of the sensor and adapting it to a wider range of plants.

  19. Pulsed electron-nuclear-electron triple resonance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomann, Hans; Bernardo, Marcelino

    1990-05-01

    A new experimental technique, pulsed electron-nuclear-electron triple resonance spectroscopy, is demonstrated. It is based on a modification of the pulse sequence for electron-nuclear double resonance (ENDOR) in which two EPR and one NMR transition are irradiated. The irradiation of one EPR transition is detected via a second EPR transition. The nuclear hyperfine coupling, which separates these EPR transition frequencies, is the irradiated NMR transition. The major advantages of triple resonance spectroscopy include the ability to resolve overlapping nuclear resonances in the ENDOR spectrum and a more direct quantitative assignment of nuclear hyperfine and quadrupole couplings. The triple resonance experiment is an alternative to the recently proposed method of employing rapid magnetic field jumps between microwave pulses for generating hyperfine selective ENDOR spectra.

  20. Comparison of absorption, fluorescence, and polarization spectroscopy of atomic rubidium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashman, Seth; Stifler, Cayla; Romero, Joaquin

    2015-05-01

    An ongoing spectroscopic investigation of atomic rubidium utilizes a two-photon, single-laser excitation process. Transitions accessible with our tunable laser include 5P1 / 2F' <-- 5S1 / 2 F and 5P3 / 2F' <-- 5S1 / 2 F . The laser is split into a pump and probe beam to allow for Doppler-free measurements of transitions between hyperfine levels. The pump and probe beams are overlapped in a counter-propagating geometry and the laser frequency scans over a transition. Absorption, fluorescence and polarization spectroscopy techniques are applied to this basic experimental setup. The temperature of the vapor cell and the power of the pump and probe beams have been varied to explore line broadening effects and signal-to-noise of each technique. This humble setup will hopefully grow into a more robust experimental arrangement in which double resonance, two-laser excitations are used to explore hyperfine state changing collisions between rubidium atoms and noble gas atoms. Rb-noble gas collisions can transfer population between hyperfine levels, such as 5P3 / 2 (F' = 3) <-- Collision 5P3 / 2 (F ' = 2) , and the probe beam couples 7S1 / 2 (F'' = 2) <-- 5P3 / 2 (F' = 3) . Polarization spectroscopy signal depends on the rate of population transfer due to the collision as well as maintaining the orientation created by the pump laser. Fluorescence spectroscopy relies only on transfer of population due to the collision. Comparison of these techniques yields information regarding the change of the magnetic sublevels, mF, during hyperfine state changing collisions.

  1. Data Treatment in Electron and Ion Spectroscopy.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-12-01

    IA) Sprinter. It. W. and Pocker. D. J., Rcriew of Scientific Instruments, % ol. 48, 1977, p. 74. 171 Smith, 1). P., Journal of Applied Phyisics , Vol...Bonding" monitored by T. W. Haas. This report covers work conducted inhouse during the period July 1977 through July 1979. It was published in Applied ...Baun, W. L., "Data Treatment in Electron and Ion Spectroscopy," Applied SurjaceAnalysis. ASTMSTP699. T. L. Bart ,nd L. . Davis. Ids., American

  2. Image simulation for electron energy loss spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Oxley, Mark P.; Pennycook, Stephen J.

    2007-10-22

    In this paper, aberration correction of the probe forming optics of the scanning transmission electron microscope has allowed the probe-forming aperture to be increased in size, resulting in probes of the order of 1 Å in diameter. The next generation of correctors promise even smaller probes. Improved spectrometer optics also offers the possibility of larger electron energy loss spectrometry detectors. The localization of images based on core-loss electron energy loss spectroscopy is examined as function of both probe-forming aperture and detector size. The effective ionization is nonlocal in nature, and two common local approximations are compared to full nonlocal calculations. Finally, the affect of the channelling of the electron probe within the sample is also discussed.

  3. Image simulation for electron energy loss spectroscopy

    DOE PAGES

    Oxley, Mark P.; Pennycook, Stephen J.

    2007-10-22

    In this paper, aberration correction of the probe forming optics of the scanning transmission electron microscope has allowed the probe-forming aperture to be increased in size, resulting in probes of the order of 1 Å in diameter. The next generation of correctors promise even smaller probes. Improved spectrometer optics also offers the possibility of larger electron energy loss spectrometry detectors. The localization of images based on core-loss electron energy loss spectroscopy is examined as function of both probe-forming aperture and detector size. The effective ionization is nonlocal in nature, and two common local approximations are compared to full nonlocal calculations.more » Finally, the affect of the channelling of the electron probe within the sample is also discussed.« less

  4. Infrared intracavity laser absorption spectroscopy with a continuous-scan Fourier-transform interferometer.

    PubMed

    Cheng, J; Lin, H; Hu, S; He, S; Zhu, Q; Kachanov, A

    2000-05-01

    High-quality broadband infrared high-resolution spectra were obtained by use of the intracavity laser absorption spectroscopy technique with a Ti:sapphire laser in combination with a continuous-scan Fourier-transform (FT) interferometer. With electronic filtering used to smooth out the fluctuations of the laser power, the absorption of atmospheric water vapor in the range of 12,450-12,700 cm(-1) was recorded at a resolution of 0.05 cm(-1). A signal-to-noise ratio of greater than 300 was observed in this spectrum, corresponding to a minimum detectable absorption of approximately 2 x 10(-9) cm(-1). Comparison with previous measurements by use of a conventional FT technique shows that this method gives absorption spectra with highly accurate line positions along with reasonable line intensities. Investigation of the evolution of intracavity laser absorption spectra with the generation time is also shown to be possible with a continuous-scan FT spectrometer by use of the interleave rapid-scan method.

  5. (n,m)-Specific Absorption Cross Sections of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes Measured by Variance Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Sanchez, Stephen R; Bachilo, Sergei M; Kadria-Vili, Yara; Lin, Ching-Wei; Weisman, R Bruce

    2016-11-09

    A new method based on variance spectroscopy has enabled the determination of absolute absorption cross sections for the first electronic transition of 12 (n,m) structural species of semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs). Spectrally resolved measurements of fluorescence variance in dilute bulk samples provided particle number concentrations of specific SWCNT species. These values were converted to carbon concentrations and correlated with resonant components in the absorbance spectrum to deduce (n,m)-specific absorption cross sections (absorptivities) for nanotubes ranging in diameter from 0.69 to 1.03 nm. The measured cross sections per atom tend to vary inversely with nanotube diameter and are slightly greater for structures of mod 1 type than for mod 2. Directly measured and extrapolated values are now available to support quantitative analysis of SWCNT samples through absorption spectroscopy.

  6. Electronic and optical spectroscopy of molecular junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Preiner, Michael J.

    Electronic transport through molecules has been intensively studied in recent years, due to scientific interest in fundamental questions about charge transport and the technological promise of nanoscale circuitry. A wide range of range of experimental platforms have been developed to electronically probe both single molecules and molecular monolayers. However, it remains challenging to fabricate reliable electronic contacts to molecules, and the vast majority of molecular electronic architectures are not amenable to standard characterization techniques, such as optical spectroscopy. Thus the field of molecular electronics has been hampered with problems of reproducibility, and many fundamental questions about electronic transport remain unanswered. This thesis describes four significant contributions towards the fabrication and characterization of molecular electronic devices: (1) The development of a new method for creating robust, large area junctions where the electronic transport is through a single monolayer of molecules. This method utilizes atomic layer deposition (ALD) to grow an ultrathin oxide layer on top of a molecular monolayer, which protects the molecules against subsequent processing. (2) A new method for rapid imaging and analysis of single defects in molecular monolayers. This method also electrically passivates defects as it labels them. (3) Hot carrier spectroscopy of molecular junctions. Using optically excited hot carriers, we demonstrate the ability to probe the energy level lineup inside buried molecular junctions. (4) Efficient coupling of optical fields to metal-insulator-metal (MIM) surface plasmon modes. We show both theoretical and experimental work illustrating the ability to create very intense optical fields inside MIM systems. The intense fields generated in this manner have natural extensions to a variety of applications, such as photon assisted tunneling in molecular junctions, optical modulators, and ultrafast optoelectronic

  7. Self-calibration wavelength modulation spectroscopy for acetylene detection based on tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Qin-Bin; Xu, Xue-Mei; Li, Chen-Jing; Ding, Yi-Peng; Cao, Can; Yin, Lin-Zi; Ding, Jia-Feng

    2016-11-01

    The expressions of the second harmonic (2f) signal are derived on the basis of absorption spectral and lock-in theories. A parametric study indicates that the phase shift between the intensity and wavelength modulation makes a great contribution to the 2f signal. A self-calibration wavelength modulation spectroscopy (WMS) method based on tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (TDLAS) is applied, combining the advantages of ambient pressure, temperature suppression, and phase-shift influences elimination. Species concentration is retrieved simultaneously from selected 2f signal pairs of measured and reference WMS-2f spectra. The absorption line of acetylene (C2H2) at 1530.36 nm near-infrared is selected to detect C2H2 concentrations in the range of 0-400 ppmv. System sensitivity, detection precision and limit are markedly improved, demonstrating that the self-calibration method has better detecting performance than the conventional WMS. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 61172047, 61502538, and 61501525).

  8. Quantitative investigation of two metallohydrolases by X-ray absorption spectroscopy near-edge spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, W.; Chu, W. S.; Yang, F. F.; Yu, M. J.; Chen, D. L.; Guo, X. Y.; Zhou, D. W.; Shi, N.; Marcelli, A.; Niu, L. W.; Teng, M. K.; Gong, W. M.; Benfatto, M.; Wu, Z. Y.

    2007-09-01

    The last several years have witnessed a tremendous increase in biological applications using X-ray absorption spectroscopy (BioXAS), thanks to continuous advancements in synchrotron radiation (SR) sources and detector technology. However, XAS applications in many biological systems have been limited by the intrinsic limitations of the Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (EXAFS) technique e.g., the lack of sensitivity to bond angles. As a consequence, the application of the X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy changed this scenario that is now continuously changing with the introduction of the first quantitative XANES packages such as Minut XANES (MXAN). Here we present and discuss the XANES code MXAN, a novel XANES-fitting package that allows a quantitative analysis of experimental data applied to Zn K-edge spectra of two metalloproteins: Leptospira interrogans Peptide deformylase ( LiPDF) and acutolysin-C, a representative of snake venom metalloproteinases (SVMPs) from Agkistrodon acutus venom. The analysis on these two metallohydrolases reveals that proteolytic activities are correlated to subtle conformation changes around the zinc ion. In particular, this quantitative study clarifies the occurrence of the LiPDF catalytic mechanism via a two-water-molecules model, whereas in the acutolysin-C we have observed a different proteolytic activity correlated to structural changes around the zinc ion induced by pH variations.

  9. Surface studies of praseodymium by electron spectroscopies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krawczyk, Mirosław; Pisarek, Marcin; Lisowski, Wojciech; Jablonski, Aleksander

    2016-12-01

    Electron transport properties in praseodymium (Pr) foil samples were studied by elastic-peak electron spectroscopy (EPES). Prior to EPES measurements, the Pr sample surface was pre-sputtered by Ar ions with ion energy of 2-3 keV. After such treatment, the Pr sample still contained about 10 at.% of residual oxygen in the surface region, as detected by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) analyses. The inelastic mean free path (IMFP), characterizing electron transport within this region (4 nm-thick), was evaluated from EPES using both Ni and Au standards as a function of energy in the range of 0.5-2 keV. Experimental IMFPs, λ, were approximated by the simple function λ = kEp, where E is energy (in eV), and k = 0.1549 and p = 0.7047 were the fitted parameters. These values were compared with IMFPs for the praseodymium surface in which the presence of oxygen was tentatively neglected, and also with IMFPs resulting from the TPP-2M predictive equation for bulk praseodymium. We found that the measured IMFP values to be only slightly affected by neglect of oxygen in calculations. The fitted function applied here was consistent with the energy dependence of the EPES-measured IMFPs. Additionally, the measured IMFPs were found to be from 2% to 4.2% larger than the predicted IMFPs for praseodymium in the energy range of 500-1000 eV. For electron energies of 1500 eV and 2000 eV, there was an inverse correlation between these values, and then the resulting deviations of -0.4% and -2.7%, respectively, were calculated.

  10. Metastable argon atom density in complex argon/acetylene plasmas determined by means of optical absorption and emission spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sushkov, Vladimir; Herrendorf, Ann-Pierra; Hippler, Rainer

    2016-10-01

    Optical emission and absorption spectroscopy has been utilized to investigate the instability of acetylene-containing dusty plasmas induced by growing nano-particles. The density of Ar(1s5) metastable atoms was derived by two methods: tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy and with the help of the branching ratio method of emitted spectral lines. Results of the two techniques agree well with each other. The density of Ar(1s3) metastable atoms was also measured by means of optical emission spectroscopy. The observed growth instability leads to pronounced temporal variations of the metastable and other excited state densities. An analysis of optical line ratios provides evidence for a depletion of free electrons during the growth cycle but no indication for electron temperature variations.

  11. Absorption spectroscopy of wire-array plasma at the non-radiative stage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, V. V.; Hakel, P.; Mancini, R. C.; Wiewior, P.; Durmaz, T.; Anderson, A.; Astanovitskiy, A.; Chalyy, O.; Altemara, S. D.; Papp, D.; McKee, E.; Chittenden, J. P.; Niasse, N.; Shevelko, A. P.

    2010-11-01

    Absorption spectroscopy was applied to 1 MA wire-array Z-pinches. The 50 TW Leopard laser was coupled with the Zebra generator for x-ray backlighting of wire arrays. Wire-array plasmas were investigated at the ablation and implosion stages. Broadband x-ray radiation from a laser produced Sm plasma was used to backlight Al star wire arrays in the range of 7-9 å. Two time-integrated x-ray conical spectrometers recorded reference and main spectra. The backlighting radiation was separated from the powerful Z-pinch x-ray burst by collimators. A comparison of the backlighting radiation spectra that passed through the plasma with reference spectra indicates absorption lines in the range of 8.2-8.4 å. A plasma density profile was simulated with a 3D resistive MHD code. Simulations with atomic kinetics models derived an electron temperature of Al wire-array plasma.

  12. Infrared and near infrared transient absorption spectroscopy of molecular free radicals

    SciTech Connect

    Sears, T.J.; Wu, M.; Hall, G.E.; Chang, B.C.; Hansford, G.; Bloch, J.C.; Field, R.W.

    1993-12-31

    The advantages of absorption spectroscopy at low absorbances include a linear relationship between signal size and number of absorbing molecules, line of sight measurement, and easily interpretable lineshape functions. The main disadvantage is due to the necessity of measuring a small change in light intensity, usually in the presence of a strong background, which limits the sensitivity. In this work, recent results obtained using absorption techniques with continuous wave lasers to measure vibrational and electronic spectra in the mid- and near-infrared of small free radicals are reported. The radical of interest was generated by excimer laser photolysis of a chemically stable precursor molecule and detected by measuring the transient decrease in power of a continuous wave probe laser that traversed the photolyzed volume before being imaged onto a detector.

  13. Shape of impurity electronic absorption bands in nematic liquid crystal

    SciTech Connect

    Aver`yanov, E.M.

    1994-11-01

    The impurity-matrix anisotropic static intermolecular interactions, orientation-statistical properties, and electronic structure of uniaxial impurity molecules are shown to have a significant influence on spectral moments of the electronic absorption bands of impurities in the nematic liquid crystal. 14 refs., 3 figs.

  14. Solvation and Deprotonation Dynamics in Reverse Micelles via Broadband Femtoseond Transient Absorption (BFTA) Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cole, Richard

    2009-10-01

    Broadband femtosecond transient absorption (BFTA) spectroscopy is a useful tool in characterizing femtosecond and picosecond physical and chemical dynamics such as solvation, electron transfer, and deprotonation dynamics. This presentation will focus on our most recent results, which utilize BFTA spectroscopy in the ultraviolet-visible (UV-vis) spectral range to probe deprotonation and solvation dynamics in the nanoscopic confinement of reverse micelles. In these studies, pyranine, a `photo-acid', probes both solvation and deprotonation dynamics in reverse micelles formed from cationic (cetyl trimethylammonium bromide, CTAB), anionic (sodium dioctyl sulfosuccinate, AOT), and neutral (polyoxyethylene nonylphenylether, Igepal) surfactants. Dynamic behavior will be discussed in terms of the degree of nanoscopic confinement (micellar size) and the impact of varying interfacial environments.

  15. Determination of Aluminum Concentration in Seawater by Colorimetry and Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1972-11-30

    this was also high. 5 . ,Irj ~ - • lri*; llo. TALLE 2 ATOMIC ABSORPTION SPECTROSCOPY DETEPIJINATION OF ALUMINU1 CONCENTRATIO11 OF SEAWATER OCEAN...Concentration in Seawater by Colorimetr-y and Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy Charles A. Greene, Jr. and Everett N. Jones Ocean Science Department T14

  16. Multiple ligand-binding properties of the lipocalin member chicken alpha1-acid glycoprotein studied by circular dichroism and electronic absorption spectroscopy: the essential role of the conserved tryptophan residue.

    PubMed

    Zsila, Ferenc; Matsunaga, Hisami; Bikádi, Zsolt; Haginaka, Jun

    2006-08-01

    Multiple ligand-binding properties of the 30-kDa chicken alpha(1)-acid glycoprotein (cAGP), a member of the lipocalin protein family, were investigated for the first time by using circular dichroism (CD) and UV/Vis absorption spectroscopy methods. By measuring induced CD (ICD) spectra, high-affinity binding (K(a) approximately 10(5)-10(6) M(-1)) of several drugs, dyes and natural compounds to cAGP was demonstrated including antimalarial agents (quinacrine, primaquine), phenotiazines (chlorpromazine, methylene blue), propranolol, non-steroidal antiinflammatory drugs (ketoprofen, diclofenac), tamoxifen, diazepam, tacrine, dicoumarol, cationic dyes (auramine O, thioflavine T, ethidium bromide), benzo[a]pyrene, L-thyroxine, bile pigments (bilirubin, biliverdin), alkaloids (piperine, aristolochic acid), saturated and unsaturated fatty acids. Analysis of the extrinsic CD spectra with the study of the covalently modified protein and CD displacement experiments revealed that a single Trp26 residue of cAGP conserved in the whole lipocalin family is part of the binding site, and it is essentially involved in the ligand-binding process via pi-pi stacking interaction resulting in the appearance of strong induced CD bands due to the non-degenerate intermolecular exciton coupling between the pi-pi* transitions of the stacked indole ring-ligand chromophore. The finding that cAGP is able to accommodate a broad spectrum of ligands belonging to different chemical classes suggests that its core beta-barrel cavity is unusually wide containing overlapping sub-sites. Significance of these new data in understanding of the ligand-binding properties of other lipocalins, especially that of human AGP, and potential practical applications are briefly discussed. Overall, cAGP serves as a simple, ultimate model to extend our knowledge on ligand-binding properties of lipocalins and to study the role of tryptophan residues in molecular recognition processes.

  17. X-ray absorption and photoelectron spectroscopy studies on graphite and single-walled carbon nanotubes: Oxygen effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbas, M.; Wu, Z. Y.; Zhong, J.; Ibrahim, K.; Fiori, A.; Orlanducci, S.; Sessa, V.; Terranova, M. L.; Davoli, Ivan

    2005-08-01

    We have investigated the electronic states of highly oriented pyrolitic graphite and single-walled carbon nanotubes using x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) before and after annealing treatment in ultrahigh vacuum, and observed that the small peak between π* and σ* features, which has been previously assigned to free-electron-like interlayer states, disappears after in situ annealing treatment, suggesting that the signal may be assigned to a surface contamination, especially oxygen contamination introduced by chemical processing or gas adsorption. Additional experiments by photoelectron spectroscopy as well as XAS methods, performed after aging in air, fully support this interpretation.

  18. Determining the static electronic and vibrational energy correlations via two-dimensional electronic-vibrational spectroscopy

    DOE PAGES

    Dong, Hui; Lewis, Nicholas H. C.; Oliver, Thomas A. A.; ...

    2015-05-07

    Changes in the electronic structure of pigments in protein environments and of polar molecules in solution inevitably induce a re-adaption of molecular nuclear structure. Both changes of electronic and vibrational energies can be probed with visible or infrared lasers, such as two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy or vibrational spectroscopy. The extent to which the two changes are correlated remains elusive. The recent demonstration of two-dimensional electronic-vibrational (2DEV) spectroscopy potentially enables a direct measurement of this correlation experimentally. However, it has hitherto been unclear how to characterize the correlation from the spectra. In this report, we present a theoretical formalism to demonstrate themore » slope of the nodal line between the excited state absorption and ground state bleach peaks in the spectra as a characterization of the correlation between electronic and vibrational transition energies. In conclusion, we also show the dynamics of the nodal line slope is correlated to the vibrational spectral dynamics. Additionally, we demonstrate the fundamental 2DEV spectral line-shape of a monomer with newly developed response functions« less

  19. Determining the static electronic and vibrational energy correlations via two-dimensional electronic-vibrational spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Dong, Hui; Lewis, Nicholas H. C.; Oliver, Thomas A. A.; Fleming, Graham R.

    2015-05-07

    Changes in the electronic structure of pigments in protein environments and of polar molecules in solution inevitably induce a re-adaption of molecular nuclear structure. Both changes of electronic and vibrational energies can be probed with visible or infrared lasers, such as two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy or vibrational spectroscopy. The extent to which the two changes are correlated remains elusive. The recent demonstration of two-dimensional electronic-vibrational (2DEV) spectroscopy potentially enables a direct measurement of this correlation experimentally. However, it has hitherto been unclear how to characterize the correlation from the spectra. In this paper, we present a theoretical formalism to demonstrate the slope of the nodal line between the excited state absorption and ground state bleach peaks in the spectra as a characterization of the correlation between electronic and vibrational transition energies. We also show the dynamics of the nodal line slope is correlated to the vibrational spectral dynamics. Additionally, we demonstrate the fundamental 2DEV spectral line-shape of a monomer with newly developed response functions.

  20. Determining the static electronic and vibrational energy correlations via two-dimensional electronic-vibrational spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Dong, Hui; Lewis, Nicholas H C; Oliver, Thomas A A; Fleming, Graham R

    2015-05-07

    Changes in the electronic structure of pigments in protein environments and of polar molecules in solution inevitably induce a re-adaption of molecular nuclear structure. Both changes of electronic and vibrational energies can be probed with visible or infrared lasers, such as two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy or vibrational spectroscopy. The extent to which the two changes are correlated remains elusive. The recent demonstration of two-dimensional electronic-vibrational (2DEV) spectroscopy potentially enables a direct measurement of this correlation experimentally. However, it has hitherto been unclear how to characterize the correlation from the spectra. In this paper, we present a theoretical formalism to demonstrate the slope of the nodal line between the excited state absorption and ground state bleach peaks in the spectra as a characterization of the correlation between electronic and vibrational transition energies. We also show the dynamics of the nodal line slope is correlated to the vibrational spectral dynamics. Additionally, we demonstrate the fundamental 2DEV spectral line-shape of a monomer with newly developed response functions.

  1. Determining the static electronic and vibrational energy correlations via two-dimensional electronic-vibrational spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Dong, Hui; Lewis, Nicholas H. C.; Oliver, Thomas A. A.; Fleming, Graham R.

    2015-05-07

    Changes in the electronic structure of pigments in protein environments and of polar molecules in solution inevitably induce a re-adaption of molecular nuclear structure. Both changes of electronic and vibrational energies can be probed with visible or infrared lasers, such as two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy or vibrational spectroscopy. The extent to which the two changes are correlated remains elusive. The recent demonstration of two-dimensional electronic-vibrational (2DEV) spectroscopy potentially enables a direct measurement of this correlation experimentally. However, it has hitherto been unclear how to characterize the correlation from the spectra. In this report, we present a theoretical formalism to demonstrate the slope of the nodal line between the excited state absorption and ground state bleach peaks in the spectra as a characterization of the correlation between electronic and vibrational transition energies. In conclusion, we also show the dynamics of the nodal line slope is correlated to the vibrational spectral dynamics. Additionally, we demonstrate the fundamental 2DEV spectral line-shape of a monomer with newly developed response functions

  2. Absorption and emission spectroscopy of individual semiconductor nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDonald, Matthew P.

    The advent of controllable synthetic methods for the production of semiconductor nanostructures has led to their use in a host of applications, including light-emitting diodes, field effect transistors, sensors, and even television displays. This is, in part, due to the size, shape, and morphologically dependent optical and electrical properties that make this class of materials extremely customizable; wire-, rod- and sphere-shaped nanocrystals are readily synthesized through common wet chemical methods. Most notably, confining the physical dimension of the nanostructure to a size below its Bohr radius (aB) results in quantum confinement effects that increase its optical energy gap. Not only the size, but the shape of a particle can be exploited to tailor its optical and electrical properties. For example, confined CdSe quantum dots (QDs) and nanowires (NWs) of equivalent diameter possess significantly different optical gaps. This phenomenon has been ascribed to electrostatic contributions arising from dielectric screening effects that are more pronounced in an elongated (wire-like) morphology. Semiconducting nanostructures have thus received significant attention over the past two decades. However, surprisingly little work has been done to elucidate their basic photophysics on a single particle basis. What has been done has generally been accomplished through emission-based measurements, and thus does not fully capture the full breadth of these intriguing systems. What is therefore needed then are absorption-based studies that probe the size and shape dependent evolution of nanostructure photophysics. This thesis summarizes the single particle absorption spectroscopy that we have carried out to fill this knowledge gap. Specifically, the diameter-dependent progression of one-dimensional (1D) excitonic states in CdSe NWs has been revealed. This is followed by a study that focuses on the polarization selection rules of 1D excitons within single CdSe NWs. Finally

  3. Secondary Electron Emission Spectroscopy of Diamond Surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krainsky, Isay L.; Asnin, Vladimir M.; Petukhov, Andre G.

    1999-01-01

    This report presents the results of the secondary electron emission spectroscopy study of hydrogenated diamond surfaces for single crystals and chemical vapor-deposited polycrystalline films. One-electron calculations of Auger spectra of diamond surfaces having various hydrogen coverages are presented, the major features of the experimental spectra are explained, and a theoretical model for Auger spectra of hydrogenated diamond surfaces is proposed. An energy shift and a change in the line shape of the carbon core-valence-valence (KVV) Auger spectra were observed for diamond surfaces after exposure to an electron beam or by annealing at temperatures higher than 950 C. This change is related to the redistribution of the valence-band local density of states caused by hydrogen desorption from the surface. A strong negative electron affinity (NEA) effect, which appeared as a large, narrow peak in the low-energy portion of the spectrum of the secondary electron energy distribution, was also observed on the diamond surfaces. A fine structure in this peak, which was found for the first time, reflected the energy structure of the bottom of the conduction band. Further, the breakup of the bulk excitons at the surface during secondary electron emission was attributed to one of the features of this structure. The study demonstrated that the NEA type depends on the extent of hydrogen coverage of the diamond surface, changing from the true type for the completely hydrogenated surface to the effective type for the partially hydrogenated surface.

  4. "Stirred, Not Shaken": Vibrational Coherence Can Speed Up Electronic Absorption.

    PubMed

    Chang, Bo Y; Shin, Seokmin; Sola, Ignacio R

    2015-08-27

    We have recently proposed a laser control scheme for ultrafast absorption in multilevel systems by parallel transfer (J. Phys. Chem. Lett. 2015, 6, 1724). In this work we develop an analytical model that better takes into account the main features of electronic absorption in molecules. We show that the initial vibrational coherence in the ground electronic state can be used to greatly enhance the rate and yield of absorption when ultrashort pulses are used, provided that the phases of the coherences are taken into account. On the contrary, the initial coherence plays no role in the opposite limit, when a single long pulse drives the optical transition. The theory is tested by numerical simulations in the first absorption band of Na2.

  5. Spectroscopy of CuN in the Near Infrared by Intracavity Laser Absorption Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Brien, Leah C.; Womack, Kaitlin A.; O'Brien, James J.

    2012-06-01

    Transitions with red-degraded bandheads have been identified at 13005, 12963, 12957, and 12948 cm-1. One P and one R branch are identified in each transition. We have tentatively assigned these transitions as absorption from the X 3Σ- ground state of CuN. Rotational analyses of these bands are in progress, and results will be presented. A strong perturbation is observed in one of the excited states. The electronic structure of CuN will be discussed and compared with predicted electronic states from theoretical calculations. The gas phase CuN molecules were produced using a copper hollow cathode in a plasma discharge.

  6. Decay Heat Measurements Using Total Absorption Gamma-ray Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rice, S.; Valencia, E.; Algora, A.; Taín, J. L.; Regan, P. H.; Podolyák, Z.; Agramunt, J.; Gelletly, W.; Nichols, A. L.

    2012-09-01

    A knowledge of the decay heat emitted by thermal neutron-irradiated nuclear fuel is an important factor in ensuring safe reactor design and operation, spent fuel removal from the core, and subsequent storage prior to and after reprocessing, and waste disposal. Decay heat can be readily calculated from the nuclear decay properties of the fission products, actinides and their decay products as generated within the irradiated fuel. Much of the information comes from experiments performed with HPGe detectors, which often underestimate the beta feeding to states at high excitation energies. This inability to detect high-energy gamma emissions effectively results in the derivation of decay schemes that suffer from the pandemonium effect, although such a serious problem can be avoided through application of total absorption γ-ray spectroscopy (TAS). The beta decay of key radionuclei produced as a consequence of the neutron-induced fission of 235U and 239Pu are being re-assessed by means of this spectroscopic technique. A brief synopsis is given of the Valencia-Surrey (BaF2) TAS detector, and their method of operation, calibration and spectral analysis.

  7. The Absorption Spectrum of an Electron Solvated in Sodalite

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-05-15

    S. FUNDING NUMBERS The Absorption Spectrum of an Electron N00014-90-J-1159 Solvated in Sodalite C AUTHOR(S) K. Haug, V. Srdanov, G. Stucky, and H...words) We use a simple model to study the color change taking place when sodium atoms are absorbed in the zeolite sodalite . The Hamiltonian is that...the absorption spectrum on the magnitude of framework charges, the orientation of the Na 4 cluster in the sodalite cells, the localization of the

  8. Intracavity Dye-Laser Absorption Spectroscopy (IDLAS) for application to planetary molecules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lang, Todd M.; Allen, John E., Jr.

    1990-01-01

    Time-resolved, quasi-continuous wave, intracavity dye-laser absorption spectroscopy is applied to the investigation of absolute absorption coefficients for vibrational-rotational overtone bands of water at visible wavelengths. Emphasis is placed on critical factors affecting detection sensitivity and data analysis. Typical generation-time dependent absorption spectra are given.

  9. Determining crystal phase purity in c-BP through X-ray absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Huber, S P; Medvedev, V V; Gullikson, E; Padavala, B; Edgar, J H; van de Kruijs, R W E; Bijkerk, F; Prendergast, D

    2017-02-02

    We employ X-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy at the boron K-edge and the phosphorus L2,3-edge to study the structural properties of cubic boron phosphide (c-BP) samples. The X-ray absorption spectra are modeled from first-principles within the density functional theory framework using the excited electron core-hole (XCH) approach. A simple structural model of a perfect c-BP crystal accurately reproduces the P L2,3-edge, however it fails to describe the broad and gradual onset of the B K-edge. Simulations of the spectroscopic signatures in boron 1s excitations of intrinsic point defects and the hexagonal BP crystal phase show that these additions to the structural model cannot reproduce the broad pre-edge of the experimental spectrum. Calculated formation enthalpies show that, during the growth of c-BP, it is possible that amorphous boron phases can be grown in conjunction with the desired boron phosphide crystalline phase. In combination with experimental and theoretically obtained X-ray absorption spectra of an amorphous boron structure, which have a similar broad absorption onset in the B K-edge spectrum as the cubic boron phosphide samples, we provide evidence for the presence of amorphous boron clusters in the synthesized c-BP samples.

  10. Imaging molecular geometry with electron momentum spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Enliang; Shan, Xu; Tian, Qiguo; Yang, Jing; Gong, Maomao; Tang, Yaguo; Niu, Shanshan; Chen, Xiangjun

    2016-12-22

    Electron momentum spectroscopy is a unique tool for imaging orbital-specific electron density of molecule in momentum space. However, the molecular geometry information is usually veiled due to the single-centered character of momentum space wavefunction of molecular orbital (MO). Here we demonstrate the retrieval of interatomic distances from the multicenter interference effect revealed in the ratios of electron momentum profiles between two MOs with symmetric and anti-symmetric characters. A very sensitive dependence of the oscillation period on interatomic distance is observed, which is used to determine F-F distance in CF4 and O-O distance in CO2 with sub-Ångström precision. Thus, using one spectrometer, and in one measurement, the electron density distributions of MOs and the molecular geometry information can be obtained simultaneously. Our approach provides a new robust tool for imaging molecules with high precision and has potential to apply to ultrafast imaging of molecular dynamics if combined with ultrashort electron pulses in the future.

  11. Imaging molecular geometry with electron momentum spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Enliang; Shan, Xu; Tian, Qiguo; Yang, Jing; Gong, Maomao; Tang, Yaguo; Niu, Shanshan; Chen, Xiangjun

    2016-01-01

    Electron momentum spectroscopy is a unique tool for imaging orbital-specific electron density of molecule in momentum space. However, the molecular geometry information is usually veiled due to the single-centered character of momentum space wavefunction of molecular orbital (MO). Here we demonstrate the retrieval of interatomic distances from the multicenter interference effect revealed in the ratios of electron momentum profiles between two MOs with symmetric and anti-symmetric characters. A very sensitive dependence of the oscillation period on interatomic distance is observed, which is used to determine F-F distance in CF4 and O-O distance in CO2 with sub-Ångström precision. Thus, using one spectrometer, and in one measurement, the electron density distributions of MOs and the molecular geometry information can be obtained simultaneously. Our approach provides a new robust tool for imaging molecules with high precision and has potential to apply to ultrafast imaging of molecular dynamics if combined with ultrashort electron pulses in the future. PMID:28004794

  12. Imaging molecular geometry with electron momentum spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Enliang; Shan, Xu; Tian, Qiguo; Yang, Jing; Gong, Maomao; Tang, Yaguo; Niu, Shanshan; Chen, Xiangjun

    2016-12-01

    Electron momentum spectroscopy is a unique tool for imaging orbital-specific electron density of molecule in momentum space. However, the molecular geometry information is usually veiled due to the single-centered character of momentum space wavefunction of molecular orbital (MO). Here we demonstrate the retrieval of interatomic distances from the multicenter interference effect revealed in the ratios of electron momentum profiles between two MOs with symmetric and anti-symmetric characters. A very sensitive dependence of the oscillation period on interatomic distance is observed, which is used to determine F-F distance in CF4 and O-O distance in CO2 with sub-Ångström precision. Thus, using one spectrometer, and in one measurement, the electron density distributions of MOs and the molecular geometry information can be obtained simultaneously. Our approach provides a new robust tool for imaging molecules with high precision and has potential to apply to ultrafast imaging of molecular dynamics if combined with ultrashort electron pulses in the future.

  13. Visualizing interfacial charge transfer in dye sensitized nanoparticles using x-ray transient absorption spectroscopy.

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, X. Y.; Smolentsev, G.; Guo, J.; Attenkofer, K.; Kurtz, C.; Jennings, G.; Lockard, J. V.; Stickrath, A. B.; Chen, L. X.

    2011-01-01

    A molecular level understanding of the structural reorganization accompanying interfacial electron transfer is important for rational design of solar cells. Here we have applied XTA (X-ray transient absorption) spectroscopy to study transient structures in a heterogeneous interfacial system mimicking the charge separation process in dye-sensitized solar cell (DSSC) with Ru(dcbpy){sub 2}(NCS){sub 2} (RuN3) dye adsorbed to TiO{sub 2} nanoparticle surfaces. The results show that the average Ru-NCS bond length reduces by 0.06 {angstrom}, whereas the average Ru-N(dcbpy) bond length remains nearly unchanged after the electron injection. The differences in bond-order change and steric hindrance between two types of ligands are attributed to their structural response in the charge separation. This study extends the application of XTA into optically opaque hybrid interfacial systems relevant to the solar energy conversion.

  14. Pu electronic structure and photoelectron spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Joyce, John J; Durakiewicz, Tomasz; Graham, Kevin S; Bauer, Eric D; Moore, David P; Mitchell, Jeremy N; Kennison, John A; Martin, Richard L; Roy, Lindsay E; Scuseria, G. E.

    2010-01-01

    The electronic structure of PuCoGa{sub 5}, Pu metal, and PuO{sub 2} is explored using photoelectron spectroscopy. Ground state electronic properties are inferred from temperature dependent photoemission near the Fermi energy for Pu metal. Angle-resolved photoemission details the energy vs. crystaJ momentum landscape near the Fermi energy for PuCoGa{sub 5} which shows significant dispersion in the quasiparticle peak near the Fermi energy. For the Mott insulators AnO{sub 2}(An = U, Pu) the photoemission results are compared against hybrid functional calculations and the model prediction of a cross over from ionic to covalent bonding is found to be reasonable.

  15. Electronic Spectroscopy of Cobalt-Neon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, T. C.; Hasbrouck, S.; Duncan, M. A.

    2010-06-01

    Co^+Ne was generated via laser vaporization in a pulsed supersonic expansion source, mass selected, and analyzed by visible photodissociation spectroscopy. An electronic band system was observed with an origin beginning at 13503 cm-1. A progression of peaks beginning from the origin until the convergence limit can be seen, corresponding to the vibrational bands in the excited state of Co^+Ne. The excited state constants (we = 124 cm-1) were determined and the electronic cycle leads to a ground state binding energy (D_0 = 948 cm-1). The ground state binding energy can be compared to other rare gas binding energies, which is correlated to the polarizability of the rare gas.

  16. Concerning the Optical Absorption Band of the Hydrated Electron,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    methylene blue ) showed marked nonlinear absorption due to saturation of optical transitions, no such change was observed for hydrated electrons even though the light intensity was varied by > 10 to the 7th power up to 200 photons per hydrated electron per sq cm. Consequently the photoexcited state lifetime is estimated to be than 6 x 10 to the -12th power sec. This finding is discussed briefly in terms of three possible origins for the absorption band, namely that involving excitation to a bound excited state, as a photoionization efficiency profile or as a distribution

  17. Laser absorption and electron propagation in rippled plasma targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shukla, Chandrasekhar; Das, Amita; Patel, Kartik

    2016-10-01

    Efficient absorption of laser energy and the collimated propagation of relativistic electron beams (generated by the laser target interaction) in plasma are two issues which are of significant importance for applications such as fast ignition scheme of inertial confinement fusion (ICF). It is shown with the help of 2-D Particle- In- Cell simulations that introducing density ripples transverse to the laser propagation direction enhances the efficiency of laser power absorption. Furthermore, the density ripples are also instrumental in suppressing the Weibel instability of the propagating electron beam (which is responsible for the divergence of the beam). A physical understanding of the two effects is also provided.

  18. Chemical Modification of Graphene Oxide by Nitrogenation: An X-ray Absorption and Emission Spectroscopy Study

    PubMed Central

    Chuang, Cheng-Hao; Ray, Sekhar C.; Mazumder, Debarati; Sharma, Surbhi; Ganguly, Abhijit; Papakonstantinou, Pagona; Chiou, Jau-Wern; Tsai, Huang-Ming; Shiu, Hung-Wei; Chen, Chia-Hao; Lin, Hong-Ji; Guo, Jinghua; Pong, Way-Faung

    2017-01-01

    Nitrogen-doped graphene oxides (GO:Nx) were synthesized by a partial reduction of graphene oxide (GO) using urea [CO(NH2)2]. Their electronic/bonding structures were investigated using X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES), valence-band photoemission spectroscopy (VB-PES), X-ray emission spectroscopy (XES) and resonant inelastic X-ray scattering (RIXS). During GO:Nx synthesis, different nitrogen-bonding species, such as pyrrolic/graphitic-nitrogen, were formed by replacing of oxygen-containing functional groups. At lower N-content (2.7 at%), pyrrolic-N, owing to surface and subsurface diffusion of C, N and NH is deduced from various X-ray spectroscopies. In contrast, at higher N-content (5.0 at%) graphitic nitrogen was formed in which each N-atom trigonally bonds to three distinct sp2-hybridized carbons with substitution of the N-atoms for C atoms in the graphite layer. Upon nitrogen substitution, the total density of state close to Fermi level is increased to raise the valence-band maximum, as revealed by VB-PES spectra, indicating an electron donation from nitrogen, molecular bonding C/N/O coordination or/and lattice structure reorganization in GO:Nx. The well-ordered chemical environments induced by nitrogen dopant are revealed by XANES and RIXS measurements. PMID:28186190

  19. Chemical Modification of Graphene Oxide by Nitrogenation: An X-ray Absorption and Emission Spectroscopy Study.

    PubMed

    Chuang, Cheng-Hao; Ray, Sekhar C; Mazumder, Debarati; Sharma, Surbhi; Ganguly, Abhijit; Papakonstantinou, Pagona; Chiou, Jau-Wern; Tsai, Huang-Ming; Shiu, Hung-Wei; Chen, Chia-Hao; Lin, Hong-Ji; Guo, Jinghua; Pong, Way-Faung

    2017-02-10

    Nitrogen-doped graphene oxides (GO:Nx) were synthesized by a partial reduction of graphene oxide (GO) using urea [CO(NH2)2]. Their electronic/bonding structures were investigated using X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES), valence-band photoemission spectroscopy (VB-PES), X-ray emission spectroscopy (XES) and resonant inelastic X-ray scattering (RIXS). During GO:Nx synthesis, different nitrogen-bonding species, such as pyrrolic/graphitic-nitrogen, were formed by replacing of oxygen-containing functional groups. At lower N-content (2.7 at%), pyrrolic-N, owing to surface and subsurface diffusion of C, N and NH is deduced from various X-ray spectroscopies. In contrast, at higher N-content (5.0 at%) graphitic nitrogen was formed in which each N-atom trigonally bonds to three distinct sp(2)-hybridized carbons with substitution of the N-atoms for C atoms in the graphite layer. Upon nitrogen substitution, the total density of state close to Fermi level is increased to raise the valence-band maximum, as revealed by VB-PES spectra, indicating an electron donation from nitrogen, molecular bonding C/N/O coordination or/and lattice structure reorganization in GO:Nx. The well-ordered chemical environments induced by nitrogen dopant are revealed by XANES and RIXS measurements.

  20. Chemical Modification of Graphene Oxide by Nitrogenation: An X-ray Absorption and Emission Spectroscopy Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chuang, Cheng-Hao; Ray, Sekhar C.; Mazumder, Debarati; Sharma, Surbhi; Ganguly, Abhijit; Papakonstantinou, Pagona; Chiou, Jau-Wern; Tsai, Huang-Ming; Shiu, Hung-Wei; Chen, Chia-Hao; Lin, Hong-Ji; Guo, Jinghua; Pong, Way-Faung

    2017-02-01

    Nitrogen-doped graphene oxides (GO:Nx) were synthesized by a partial reduction of graphene oxide (GO) using urea [CO(NH2)2]. Their electronic/bonding structures were investigated using X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES), valence-band photoemission spectroscopy (VB-PES), X-ray emission spectroscopy (XES) and resonant inelastic X-ray scattering (RIXS). During GO:Nx synthesis, different nitrogen-bonding species, such as pyrrolic/graphitic-nitrogen, were formed by replacing of oxygen-containing functional groups. At lower N-content (2.7 at%), pyrrolic-N, owing to surface and subsurface diffusion of C, N and NH is deduced from various X-ray spectroscopies. In contrast, at higher N-content (5.0 at%) graphitic nitrogen was formed in which each N-atom trigonally bonds to three distinct sp2-hybridized carbons with substitution of the N-atoms for C atoms in the graphite layer. Upon nitrogen substitution, the total density of state close to Fermi level is increased to raise the valence-band maximum, as revealed by VB-PES spectra, indicating an electron donation from nitrogen, molecular bonding C/N/O coordination or/and lattice structure reorganization in GO:Nx. The well-ordered chemical environments induced by nitrogen dopant are revealed by XANES and RIXS measurements.

  1. Methanogenic activity tests by Infrared Tunable Diode Laser Absorption Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Martinez-Cruz, Karla; Sepulveda-Jauregui, Armando; Escobar-Orozco, Nayeli; Thalasso, Frederic

    2012-10-01

    Methanogenic activity (MA) tests are commonly carried out to estimate the capability of anaerobic biomass to treat effluents, to evaluate anaerobic activity in bioreactors or natural ecosystems, or to quantify inhibitory effects on methanogenic activity. These activity tests are usually based on the measurement of the volume of biogas produced by volumetric, pressure increase or gas chromatography (GC) methods. In this study, we present an alternative method for non-invasive measurement of methane produced during activity tests in closed vials, based on Infrared Tunable Diode Laser Absorption Spectroscopy (MA-TDLAS). This new method was tested during model acetoclastic and hydrogenotrophic methanogenic activity tests and was compared to a more traditional method based on gas chromatography. From the results obtained, the CH(4) detection limit of the method was estimated to 60 ppm and the minimum measurable methane production rate was estimated to 1.09(.)10(-3) mg l(-1) h(-1), which is below CH(4) production rate usually reported in both anaerobic reactors and natural ecosystems. Additionally to sensitivity, the method has several potential interests compared to more traditional methods among which short measurements time allowing the measurement of a large number of MA test vials, non-invasive measurements avoiding leakage or external interferences and similar cost to GC based methods. It is concluded that MA-TDLAS is a promising method that could be of interest not only in the field of anaerobic digestion but also, in the field of environmental ecology where CH(4) production rates are usually very low.

  2. Near-Edge X-ray Absorption Fine Structure Spectroscopy of Diamondoid Thiol Monolayers on Gold

    SciTech Connect

    Willey, T M; Fabbri, J; Lee, J I; Schreiner, P; Fokin, A A; Tkachenko, B A; Fokina, N A; Dahl, J; Carlson, B; Vance, A L; Yang, W; Terminello, L J; van Buuren, T; Melosh, N

    2007-11-27

    Diamondoids, hydrocarbon molecules with cubic-diamond-cage structures, have unique properties with potential value for nanotechnology. The availability and ability to selectively functionalize this special class of nanodiamond materials opens new possibilities for surface-modification, for high-efficiency field emitters in molecular electronics, as seed crystals for diamond growth, or as robust mechanical coatings. The properties of self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) of diamondoids are thus of fundamental interest for a variety of emerging applications. This paper presents the effects of thiol substitution position and polymantane order on diamondoid SAMs on gold using near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (NEXAFS) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). A framework to determine both molecular tilt and twist through NEXAFS is presented and reveals highly ordered diamondoid SAMs, with the molecular orientation controlled by the thiol location. C 1s and S 2p binding energies are lower in adamantane thiol than alkane thiols on gold by 0.67 {+-} 0.05 eV and 0.16 {+-} 0.04 eV respectively. These binding energies vary with diamondoid monolayer structure and thiol substitution position, consistent with different amounts of steric strain and electronic interaction with the substrate. This work demonstrates control over the assembly, in particular the orientational and electronic structure, providing a flexible design of surface properties with this exciting new class of diamond clusters.

  3. On the valence shell electronic spectroscopy of 2-vinyl furan.

    PubMed

    Giuliani, A; Walker, I C; Delwiche, J; Hoffmann, S V; Kech, C; Limao-Vieira, P; Mason, N J; Hubin-Franskin, M-J

    2004-06-15

    The vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) absorption spectrum (3.50-10.33 eV, 350-120 nm) of gaseous 2-vinyl furan has been measured for the first time using both synchrotron radiation source and electron energy loss spectroscopies with absolute cross section determinations. The He I photoelectron spectrum obtained at higher resolution than previously has been interpreted with the aid of semiempirical molecular orbital calculations. Three excited states of type (1)pipi(*) are found responsible for an intense and structured first band observed between 4.2 and 5.8 eV (295-214 nm). Three triplet states were detected for the first time at about 2.46, 3.35, and 3.8 eV (477, 370, and 328 nm) which are, from the calculations, assigned as (3)pipi(*). Some partial Rydberg series, linked to IE(1) and IE(2) are identified. The VUV absorption spectrum bears little resemblance to that of the parent compound, furan. The electronically excited molecule is found akin to a linear polyene.

  4. Rotationally resolved electronic spectroscopy of 5-methoxyindole.

    PubMed

    Brand, Christian; Oeltermann, Olivia; Pratt, David; Weinkauf, Rainer; Meerts, W Leo; van der Zande, Wim; Kleinermanns, Karl; Schmitt, Michael

    2010-07-14

    Rotationally resolved electronic spectra of the vibrationless origin and of eight vibronic bands of 5-methoxyindole (5MOI) have been measured and analyzed using an evolutionary strategy approach. The experimental results are compared to the results of ab initio calculations. All vibronic bands can be explained by absorption of a single conformer, which unambiguously has been shown to be the anti-conformer from its rotational constants and excitation energy. For both anti- and syn-conformers, a (1)L(a)/(1)L(b) gap larger than 4000 cm(-1) is calculated, making the vibronic coupling between both states very small, thereby explaining why the spectrum of 5MOI is very different from that of the parent molecule, indole.

  5. Moessbauer spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy of the Murchison meteorite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Christopher L.; Oliver, Frederick W.; Hammond, Ernest C., Jr.

    1989-01-01

    Meteorites provide a wealth of information about the solar system's formation, since they have similar building blocks as the Earth's crust but have been virtually unaltered since their formation. Some stony meteorites contain minerals and silicate inclusions, called chondrules, in the matrix. Utilizing Moessbauer spectroscopy, we identified minerals in the Murchison meteorite, a carbonaceous chondritic meteorite, by the gamma ray resonance lines observed. Absorption patterns of the spectra were found due to the minerals olivine and phyllosilicate. We used a scanning electron microscope to describe the structure of the chondrules in the Murchison meteorite. The chondrules were found to be deformed due to weathering of the meteorite. Diameters varied in size from 0.2 to 0.5 mm. Further enhancement of the microscopic imagery using a digital image processor was used to describe the physical characteristics of the inclusions.

  6. Monitoring spacecraft atmosphere contaminants by laser absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinfeld, J. I.

    1975-01-01

    Data were obtained which will provide a test of the accuracy of the differential absorption method for trace contaminant detection in many-component gas mixtures. The necessary accurate absorption coefficient determinations were carried out for several gases; acetonitrile, 1,2-dichloroethane, Freon-113, furan, methyl ethyl ketone, and t-butyl alcohol. The absorption coefficients are displayed graphically. An opto-acoustic method was tested for measuring absorbance, similar to the system described by Dewey.

  7. Studies of cavity enhanced absorption spectroscopy for weak absorption gas measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Liucheng; Duo, Liping; Gong, Deyu; Ma, Yanhua; Zhang, Zhiguo; Wang, Yuanhu; Zhou, Dongjian; Jin, Yuqi

    2017-01-01

    In order to determine the concentrations of trace amount metastable species in chemical lasers, an off-axis cavity enhanced absorption spectrometer for the detection of weak absorption gases has been built with a noise equivalent absorption sensitivity of 1.6x10-8 cm-1. The absorption spectrum of trace amount gaseous ammonia and water vapor was obtained with a spectral resolution of about 78 MHz. A multiple-line absorption spectroscopic method to determine the temperature of gaseous ammonia has been developed by use of multiple lines of ammonia molecule absorption spectrum.

  8. Sedimentation field flow fractionation and optical absorption spectroscopy for a quantitative size characterization of silver nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Contado, Catia; Argazzi, Roberto; Amendola, Vincenzo

    2016-11-04

    Many advanced industrial and biomedical applications that use silver nanoparticles (AgNPs), require that particles are not only nano-sized, but also well dispersed, not aggregated and not agglomerated. This study presents two methods able to give rapidly sizes of monodispersed AgNPs suspensions in the dimensional range of 20-100nm. The first method, based on the application of Mie's theory, determines the particle sizes from the values of the surface plasmon resonance wavelength (SPRMAX), read from the optical absorption spectra, recorded between 190nm and 800nm. The computed sizes were compared with those determined by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and dynamic light scattering (DLS) and resulted in agreement with the nominal values in a range between 13% (for 20nm NPs) and 1% (for 100nm NPs), The second method is based on the masterly combination of the Sedimentation Field Flow Fractionation (SdFFF - now sold as Centrifugal FFF-CFFF) and the Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (OAS) techniques to accomplish sizes and quantitative particle size distributions for monodispersed, non-aggregated AgNPs suspensions. The SdFFF separation abilities, well exploited to size NPs, greatly benefits from the application of Mie's theory to the UV-vis signal elaboration, producing quantitative mass-based particle size distributions, from which trusted number-sized particle size distributions can be derived. The silver mass distributions were verified and supported by detecting off-line the Ag concentration with the graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GF-AAS).

  9. Microscopic theory of electron absorption by plasma-facing surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bronold, F. X.; Fehske, H.

    2017-01-01

    We describe a method for calculating the probability with which the wall of a plasma absorbs an electron at low energy. The method, based on an invariant embedding principle, expresses the electron absorption probability as the probability for transmission through the wall’s long-range surface potential times the probability to stay inside the wall despite of internal backscattering. To illustrate the approach we apply it to a SiO2 surface. Besides emission of optical phonons inside the wall we take elastic scattering at imperfections of the plasma-wall interface into account and obtain absorption probabilities significantly less than unity in accordance with available electron-beam scattering data but in disagreement with the widely used perfect absorber model.

  10. Electronic Spectroscopy of Trapped PAH Photofragments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joblin, Christine; Bonnamy, Anthony

    2016-06-01

    The PIRENEA set-up combines an ion cyclotron resonance cell mass spectrometer with cryogenic cooling in order to study the physical and chemical properties of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) of astrophysical interest. In space, PAHs are submitted to UV photons that lead to their dissociation. It is therefore of interest to study fragmentation pathways and search for species that might be good interstellar candidates because of their stability. Electronic spectroscopy can bring major insights into the structure of species formed by photofragmentation. This is also a way to identify new species in space as recently illustrated in the case of C60^+. In PIRENEA, the trapped ions are not cold enough, and thus we cannot use complexation with rare gas in order to record spectroscopy, as was nicely performed in the work by Campbell et al. on C60^+. We are therefore using the dissociation of the trapped ions themselves instead, which requires in general a multiple photon scheme. This leads to non-linear effects that affect the measured spectrum. We are working on improving this scheme in the specific case of the photofragment obtained by H-loss from 1-methylpyrene cation (CH_3-C16H9^+). A recent theoretical study has shown that a rearrangement can occur from 1-pyrenemethylium cation (CH_2-C16H9^+) to a system containing a seven membered ring (tropylium like pyrene system). This study also reports the calculated electronic spectra of both isomers, which are specific enough to distinguish them, and as a function of temperature. We will present experiments that have been performed to study the photophysics of these ions using the PIRENEA set-up and a two-laser scheme for the action spectroscopy. J. Montillaud, C. Joblin, D. Toublanc, Astron. & Astrophys. 552 (2013), id.A15 E.K. Campbell, M. Holz, D. Gerlich, and J.P. Maier, Nature 523 (2015), 322-323 F. Useli-Bacchitta, A. Bonnamy, G. Malloci, et al., Chem. Phys. 371 (2010), 16-23; J. Zhen, A. Bonnamy, G. Mulas, C

  11. Aerosol particle absorption spectroscopy by photothermal modulation of Mie scattered light

    SciTech Connect

    Campillo, A.J.; Dodge, C.J.; Lin, H.B.

    1981-09-15

    Absorption spectroscopy of suspended submicron-sized aqueous ammonium-sulfate aerosol droplets has been performed by employing a CO/sub 2/ laser to photothermally modulate visible Mie scattered light. (AIP)

  12. Determination of tin in poly(vinyl chloride) by atomic-absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Anwar, J; Marr, I L

    1982-10-01

    A simple procedure is described for the determination of tin in PVC by atomic-absorption spectroscopy with an air-hydrogen flame, after wet digestion of the sample with sulphuric acid and hydrogen peroxide.

  13. An x-ray absorption spectroscopy study of Ni-Mn-Ga shape memory alloys.

    PubMed

    Sathe, V G; Dubey, Aditi; Banik, Soma; Barman, S R; Olivi, L

    2013-01-30

    The austenite to martensite phase transition in Ni-Mn-Ga ferromagnetic shape memory alloys was studied by extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) and x-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy. The spectra at all the three elements', namely, Mn, Ga and Ni, K-edges in several Ni-Mn-Ga samples (with both Ni and Mn excess) were analyzed at room temperature and low temperatures. The EXAFS analysis suggested a displacement of Mn and Ga atoms in opposite direction with respect to the Ni atoms when the compound transforms from the austenite phase to the martensite phase. The first coordination distances around the Mn and Ga atoms remained undisturbed on transition, while the second and subsequent shells showed dramatic changes indicating the presence of a modulated structure. The Mn rich compounds showed the presence of antisite disorder of Mn and Ga. The XANES results showed remarkable changes in the unoccupied partial density of states corresponding to Mn and Ni, while the electronic structure of Ga remained unperturbed across the martensite transition. The post-edge features in the Mn K-edge XANES spectra changed from a double peak like structure to a flat peak like structure upon phase transition. The study establishes strong correlation between the crystal structure and the unoccupied electronic structure in these shape memory alloys.

  14. β-Carotene Revisited by Transient Absorption and Stimulated Raman Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Quick, Martin; Kasper, Marc-André; Richter, Celin; Mahrwald, Rainer; Dobryakov, Alexander L; Kovalenko, Sergey A; Ernsting, Nikolaus P

    2015-12-21

    β-Carotene in n-hexane was examined by femtosecond transient absorption and stimulated Raman spectroscopy. Electronic change is separated from vibrational relaxation with the help of band integrals. Overlaid on the decay of S1 excited-state absorption, a picosecond process is found that is absent when the C9 -methyl group is replaced by ethyl or isopropyl. It is attributed to reorganization on the S1 potential energy surface, involving dihedral angles between C6 and C9 . In Raman studies, electronic states S2 or S1 were selected through resonance conditions. We observe a broad vibrational band at 1770 cm(-1) in S2 already. With 200 fs it decays and transforms into the well-known S1 Raman line for an asymmetric C=C stretching mode. Low-frequency activity (<800 cm(-1) ) in S2 and S1 is also seen. A dependence of solvent lines on solute dynamics implies intermolecular coupling between β-carotene and nearby n-hexane molecules.

  15. Study of electronic transitions by using attenuated total reflectance spectroscopy in the far-UV region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morisawa, Yusuke; Tachibana, Shin; Ehara, Masahiro; Ozaki, Yukihiro

    2016-09-01

    The wavelength region shorter than 200 nm, far-ultraviolet (FUV) region, is very rich in information about the electronic states and structure of a molecule. Since the molar absorption coefficient is very high ( 105 mol-1 dm3 cm-1) in the FUV region, the electronic states and structure mainly for gas molecules has been investigated for a long time. On the other hand, as to molecules in the condensed phase transmittance spectra could not measure because of high molecular density, and reflection spectroscopy has been used to observe spectra of solid samples in the FUV region. However, for liquid samples generally either absorption spectroscopy or specular reflection spectroscopy was difficult to observe. Accordingly, FUV spectroscopy for liquid samples has been a relatively undeveloped research area. To solve the above difficulties of FUV spectroscopy we have recently developed a totally new UV spectrometer based on attenuated total reflection (ATR) that enables us to measure spectra of liquid and solid samples in the 140-280 nm region. This paper shows the studies by the attenuated total reflection far-ultraviolet (ATR-FUV) spectroscopy. These investigations elucidate the electronic structure and electronic transition in the FUV region for molecules such as n- and branched alkanes, alcohols, ketones, amides, and nylons in the liquid or solid phase. The consistent assignments were performed with a help of quantum chemical calculation.

  16. {ELECTRONIC Structure and Spectroscopy of O_2 and O_2^+}

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vazquez, Gabriel J.; Lefebvre-Brion, H.; Liebermann, Hans P.

    2014-06-01

    We carried out a comprehensive SCF MRD--CI ab initio study of the electronic structure of O_2 and O_2^+. Potential energy curves (PECs) of about 150 electronic states of O_2 and about 100 of O_2^+, as well as a number of states of O_2++ were computed. The cc--pVQZ basis set augmented with diffuse functions was employed. Spectroscopic parameters (T_e, T_v, ω_e, ω_ex_e, B_e, D_e, D_0, μ, IP, etc.) are reported. A preliminary sample of the results will be presented. The electronic absorption spectrum of O_2 has proved difficult to analyze/interpret due to the unusually large number of electronic states which arise from the peculiar open--shell structure of both the oxygen atomic fragments and the O_2 molecule. For instance, there are 62 valence molecular electronic states which correlate to the six lowest dissociation limits resulting from the three valence O atom fragment states (^3P, ^1D, ^1S). In addition, there are several nlλ Rydberg series converging to the X^2Π_g ground ionic state and to the lowest two excited states of the cation, a^4Π_u_i and A^2Π_u. Furthermore, a number of interactions of various types among several electronic states result in rovibronic perturbations which manifest themselves, e.g., as irregular vibronic structure, hence severely complicating the assignment of the absorption features and the analysis and interpretation of the spectrum. An overview of the electronic states and spectroscopy of O_2 will be presented. A chief motivation of this study of O_2 was to try to provide a theoretical insight on the nature, energetic position, shape, and dissociation asymptotes, of electronic states located in the 4 eV energy region encompassed between the O_2^+ ground state X^2Π_g (IP=12.07 eV) and the first excited state of the cation a^4Π_u_i (IP=16.10 eV). This in order to aid in the interpretation of experimental data related to the mechanism(s) of the neutral dissociation of the O_2** (Rydberg) superexcited states, which competes with

  17. NO binding kinetics in myoglobin investigated by picosecond Fe K-edge absorption spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Silatani, Mahsa; Lima, Frederico A.; Penfold, Thomas J.; Rittmann, Jochen; Reinhard, Marco E.; Rittmann-Frank, Hannelore M.; Borca, Camelia; Grolimund, Daniel; Milne, Christopher J.; Chergui, Majed

    2015-01-01

    Diatomic ligands in hemoproteins and the way they bind to the active center are central to the protein’s function. Using picosecond Fe K-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy, we probe the NO-heme recombination kinetics with direct sensitivity to the Fe-NO binding after 532-nm photoexcitation of nitrosylmyoglobin (MbNO) in physiological solutions. The transients at 70 and 300 ps are identical, but they deviate from the difference between the static spectra of deoxymyoglobin and MbNO, showing the formation of an intermediate species. We propose the latter to be a six-coordinated domed species that is populated on a timescale of ∼200 ps by recombination with NO ligands. This work shows the feasibility of ultrafast pump–probe X-ray spectroscopic studies of proteins in physiological media, delivering insight into the electronic and geometric structure of the active center. PMID:26438842

  18. NO binding kinetics in myoglobin investigated by picosecond Fe K-edge absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Silatani, Mahsa; Lima, Frederico A; Penfold, Thomas J; Rittmann, Jochen; Reinhard, Marco E; Rittmann-Frank, Hannelore M; Borca, Camelia; Grolimund, Daniel; Milne, Christopher J; Chergui, Majed

    2015-10-20

    Diatomic ligands in hemoproteins and the way they bind to the active center are central to the protein's function. Using picosecond Fe K-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy, we probe the NO-heme recombination kinetics with direct sensitivity to the Fe-NO binding after 532-nm photoexcitation of nitrosylmyoglobin (MbNO) in physiological solutions. The transients at 70 and 300 ps are identical, but they deviate from the difference between the static spectra of deoxymyoglobin and MbNO, showing the formation of an intermediate species. We propose the latter to be a six-coordinated domed species that is populated on a timescale of ∼ 200 ps by recombination with NO ligands. This work shows the feasibility of ultrafast pump-probe X-ray spectroscopic studies of proteins in physiological media, delivering insight into the electronic and geometric structure of the active center.

  19. Structural analysis of sulfur in natural rubber using X-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Pattanasiriwisawa, Wanwisa; Siritapetawee, Jaruwan; Patarapaiboolchai, Orasa; Klysubun, Wantana

    2008-09-01

    X-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy (XANES) has been applied to natural rubber in order to study the local environment of sulfur atoms in sulfur crosslinking structures introduced in the vulcanization process. Different types of chemical accelerators in conventional, semi-efficient and efficient vulcanization systems were investigated. The experimental results show the good sensitivity and reproducibility of XANES to characterize the local geometry and electronic environment of the sulfur K-shell under various conditions of vulcanization and non-vulcanization of natural rubber. Several applications of XANES in this study demonstrate an alternative way of identifying sulfur crosslinks in treated natural rubber based on differences in their spectra and oxidation states.

  20. Instrument for x-ray absorption spectroscopy with in situ electrical control characterizations

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Chun-Chao; Chang, Shu-Jui; Yang, Chao-Yao; Tseng, Yuan-Chieh; Chou, Hsiung

    2013-12-15

    We report a synchrotron-based setup capable of performing x-ray absorption spectroscopy and x-ray magnetic circular dichroism with simultaneous electrical control characterizations. The setup can enable research concerning electrical transport, element- and orbital-selective magnetization with an in situ fashion. It is a unique approach to the real-time change of spin-polarized electronic state of a material/device exhibiting magneto-electric responses. The performance of the setup was tested by probing the spin-polarized states of cobalt and oxygen of Zn{sub 1-x}Co{sub x}O dilute magnetic semiconductor under applied voltages, both at low (∼20 K) and room temperatures, and signal variations upon the change of applied voltage were clearly detected.

  1. High resolution laser induced fluorescence Doppler velocimetry utilizing saturated absorption spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Aramaki, Mitsutoshi; Ogiwara, Kohei; Etoh, Shuzo; Yoshimura, Shinji; Tanaka, Masayoshi Y.

    2009-05-15

    A high resolution laser induced fluorescence (LIF) system has been developed to measure the flow velocity field of neutral particles in an electron-cyclotron-resonance argon plasma. The flow velocity has been determined by the Doppler shift of the LIF spectrum, which is proportional to the velocity distribution function. Very high accuracy in velocity determination has been achieved by installing a saturated absorption spectroscopy unit into the LIF system, where the absolute value and scale of laser wavelength are determined by using the Lamb dip and the fringes of a Fabry-Perot interferometer. The minimum detectable flow velocity of a newly developed LIF system is {+-}2 m/s, and this performance remains unchanged in a long-time experiment. From the radial measurements of LIF spectra of argon metastable atoms, it is found that there exists an inward flow of neutral particles associated with neutral depletion.

  2. Ionization and dissociation dynamics of vinyl bromide probed by femtosecond extreme ultraviolet transient absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Lin, Ming-Fu; Neumark, Daniel M; Gessner, Oliver; Leone, Stephen R

    2014-02-14

    Strong-field induced ionization and dissociation dynamics of vinyl bromide, CH2=CHBr, are probed using femtosecond extreme ultraviolet (XUV) transient absorption spectroscopy. Strong-field ionization is initiated with an intense femtosecond, near infrared (NIR, 775 nm) laser field. Femtosecond XUV pulses covering the photon energy range of 50-72 eV probe the subsequent dynamics by measuring the time-dependent spectroscopic features associated with transitions of the Br (3d) inner-shell electrons to vacancies in molecular and atomic valence orbitals. Spectral signatures are observed for the depletion of neutral C2H3Br, the formation of C2H3Br(+) ions in their ground (X̃) and first excited (Ã) states, the production of C2H3Br(++) ions, and the appearance of neutral Br ((2)P3/2) atoms by dissociative ionization. The formation of free Br ((2)P3/2) atoms occurs on a timescale of 330 ± 150 fs. The ionic à state exhibits a time-dependent XUV absorption energy shift of ∼0.4 eV within the time window of the atomic Br formation. The yield of Br atoms correlates with the yield of parent ions in the à state as a function of NIR peak intensity. The observations suggest that a fraction of vibrationally excited C2H3Br(+) (Ã) ions undergoes intramolecular vibrational energy redistribution followed by the C-Br bond dissociation. The C2H3Br(+) (X̃) products and the majority of the C2H3Br(++) ions are relatively stable due to a deeper potential well and a high dissociation barrier, respectively. The results offer powerful new insights about orbital-specific electronic processes in high field ionization, coupled vibrational relaxation and dissociation dynamics, and the correlation of valence hole-state location and dissociation in polyatomic molecules, all probed simultaneously by ultrafast table-top XUV spectroscopy.

  3. Measurements of parallel electron velocity distributions using whistler wave absorption

    SciTech Connect

    Thuecks, D. J.; Skiff, F.; Kletzing, C. A.

    2012-08-15

    We describe a diagnostic to measure the parallel electron velocity distribution in a magnetized plasma that is overdense ({omega}{sub pe} > {omega}{sub ce}). This technique utilizes resonant absorption of whistler waves by electrons with velocities parallel to a background magnetic field. The whistler waves were launched and received by a pair of dipole antennas immersed in a cylindrical discharge plasma at two positions along an axial background magnetic field. The whistler wave frequency was swept from somewhat below and up to the electron cyclotron frequency {omega}{sub ce}. As the frequency was swept, the wave was resonantly absorbed by the part of the electron phase space density which was Doppler shifted into resonance according to the relation {omega}-k{sub ||v||} = {omega}{sub ce}. The measured absorption is directly related to the reduced parallel electron distribution function integrated along the wave trajectory. The background theory and initial results from this diagnostic are presented here. Though this diagnostic is best suited to detect tail populations of the parallel electron distribution function, these first results show that this diagnostic is also rather successful in measuring the bulk plasma density and temperature both during the plasma discharge and into the afterglow.

  4. Direct and quantitative photothermal absorption spectroscopy of individual particulates

    SciTech Connect

    Tong, Jonathan K.; Hsu, Wei-Chun; Eon Han, Sang; Burg, Brian R.; Chen, Gang; Zheng, Ruiting; Shen, Sheng

    2013-12-23

    Photonic structures can exhibit significant absorption enhancement when an object's length scale is comparable to or smaller than the wavelength of light. This property has enabled photonic structures to be an integral component in many applications such as solar cells, light emitting diodes, and photothermal therapy. To characterize this enhancement at the single particulate level, conventional methods have consisted of indirect or qualitative approaches which are often limited to certain sample types. To overcome these limitations, we used a bilayer cantilever to directly and quantitatively measure the spectral absorption efficiency of a single silicon microwire in the visible wavelength range. We demonstrate an absorption enhancement on a per unit volume basis compared to a thin film, which shows good agreement with Mie theory calculations. This approach offers a quantitative approach for broadband absorption measurements on a wide range of photonic structures of different geometric and material compositions.

  5. VUV absorption spectroscopy of bacterial spores and DNA components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiebrandt, Marcel; Lackmann, Jan-Wilm; Raguse, Marina; Moeller, Ralf; Awakowicz, Peter; Stapelmann, Katharina

    2017-01-01

    Low-pressure plasmas can be used to inactivate bacterial spores and sterilize goods for medical and pharmaceutical applications. A crucial factor are damages induced by UV and VUV radiation emitted by the plasma. To analyze inactivation processes and protection strategies of spores, absorption spectra of two B. subtilis strains are measured. The results indicate, that the inner and outer coat of the spore significantly contribute to the absorption of UV-C and also of the VUV, protecting the spore against radiation based damages. As the sample preparation can significantly influence the absorption spectra due to salt residues, the cleaning procedure and sample deposition is tested for its reproducibility by measuring DNA oligomers and pUC18 plasmid DNA. The measurements are compared and discussed with results from the literature, showing a strong decrease of the salt content enabling the detection of absorption structures in the samples.

  6. In situ Gas Temperature Measurements by UV-Absorption Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fateev, A.; Clausen, S.

    2009-02-01

    The absorption spectrum of the NO A2Σ+ ← X2Πγ-system can be used for in situ evaluation of gas temperature. Experiments were performed with a newly developed atmospheric-pressure high-temperature flow gas cell at highly uniform and stable gas temperatures over a 0.533 m path in the range from 23 °C to 1,500 °C. The gas temperature was evaluated (1) from the analysis of the structure of selected NO high-resolution γ-absorption bands and (2) from the analysis of vibrational distribution in the NO γ-absorption system in the (211-238) nm spectral range. The accuracy of both methods is discussed. Validation of the classical Lambert-Beer law has been demonstrated at NO concentrations up to 500 ppm and gas temperatures up to 1,500 °C over an optical absorption path length of 0.533 m.

  7. The use of CNDO in spectroscopy. XV. Two photon absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchese, Francis T.; Seliskar, C. J.; Jaffé, H. H.

    1980-04-01

    Two-photon absorptivities have been calculated within the CNDO/S-CI molecular orbital framework of Del Bene and Jaffé utilizing the second order time dependent perturbation equations of Göppert-Mayer and polarization methods of McClain. Good agreement is found between this theory and experiment for transition energies, symmetries, and two-photon absorptivities for the following molecules: biphenyl, terphenyl, 2,2'-difluorobiphenyl, 2,2'-bipyridyl, phenanthrene, and the isoelectronic series: fluorene, carbazole, dibenzofuran.

  8. Trace gas absorption spectroscopy using laser difference-frequency spectrometer for environmental application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, W.; Cazier, F.; Boucher, D.; Tittel, F. K.; Davies, P. B.

    2001-01-01

    A widely tunable infrared spectrometer based on difference frequency generation (DFG) has been developed for organic trace gas detection by laser absorption spectroscopy. On-line measurements of concentration of various hydrocarbons, such as acetylene, benzene, and ethylene, were investigated using high-resolution DFG trace gas spectroscopy for highly sensitive detection.

  9. Studies of solvent effects on reaction dynamics using ultrafast transient absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, Don Ahmasi

    Ultrafast transient absorption spectroscopy was used to investigate the solvent dependent reaction dynamics of two prototypical chemical systems: (1) The ring-opening reaction of 1,3-cyclohexadiene, the isolated chromophore in Provitamin D, and (2) The photolysis of various Vitamin B12 cofactors. We investigated the influence of solvent polarity on the ground state conformational relaxation of 1,3,5-cis hexatriene subsequent to the ring opening of 1,3-cyclohexadiene in methanol and 1-propanol solvents. Comparisons to the conformational relaxation in alkane solvents studied earlier demonstrated a surprising influence of solvent polarity on single bond isomerization. Temperature dependent transient absorption measurements were performed on 1,3,5-cis hexatriene in cyclohexane and 1-propanol to determine the effect of solvent polarity on the activation energy barrier for ground state single bond isomerization. These measurements conclude that the polar solvent lowers the energy barrier for single bond isomerization allowing conformational relaxation to proceed faster in alcohol solvents compared to alkane solvents. With no perceived polar transition state for single bond isomerization, this result disagrees with the conventional view of solvation and differentiates the single bond isomerization dynamics of polyenes from alkanes. Transient absorption spectroscopy was also utilized to study the solvent effects in the photolysis of various B12 cofactors in different environments. We investigated the solvent dependent photolysis of adenosylcobalamin, methylcobalamin, and cyanocobalamin in water and ethylene glycol as a function of solvent temperature. In comparing the radical cage escape of adenosylcobalamin and cyanocobalamin, we determined a larger than expected hydrodynamic radii for the diffusing radicals in water compared to ethylene glycol, thus making necessary a revised perspective of solvent interaction with the diffusing radical. In addition, we investigated the

  10. Excited-state molecular structures captured by X-ray transient absorption spectroscopy: a decade and beyond.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lin X; Zhang, Xiaoyi; Lockard, Jenny V; Stickrath, Andrew B; Attenkofer, Klaus; Jennings, Guy; Liu, Di-Jia

    2010-03-01

    Transient molecular structures along chemical reaction pathways are important for predicting molecular reactivity, understanding reaction mechanisms, as well as controlling reaction pathways. During the past decade, X-ray transient absorption spectroscopy (XTA, or LITR-XAS, laser-initiated X-ray absorption spectroscopy), analogous to the commonly used optical transient absorption spectroscopy, has been developed. XTA uses a laser pulse to trigger a fundamental chemical process, and an X-ray pulse(s) to probe transient structures as a function of the time delay between the pump and probe pulses. Using X-ray pulses with high photon flux from synchrotron sources, transient electronic and molecular structures of metal complexes have been studied in disordered media from homogeneous solutions to heterogeneous solution-solid interfaces. Several examples from the studies at the Advanced Photon Source in Argonne National Laboratory are summarized, including excited-state metalloporphyrins, metal-to-ligand charge transfer (MLCT) states of transition metal complexes, and charge transfer states of metal complexes at the interface with semiconductor nanoparticles. Recent developments of the method are briefly described followed by a future prospective of XTA. It is envisioned that concurrent developments in X-ray free-electron lasers and synchrotron X-ray facilities as well as other table-top laser-driven femtosecond X-ray sources will make many breakthroughs and realise dreams of visualizing molecular movies and snapshots, which ultimately enable chemical reaction pathways to be controlled.

  11. Excited-state molecular structures captured by x-ray transient absorption spectroscopy : a decade and beyond.

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, L. X.; Zhang, X.; Lockard, J. V.; Stickrath, A. B.; Attenkofer, K.; Jennings, G.; Liu, D.-J.; Northwestern Univ.

    2010-03-02

    Transient molecular structures along chemical reaction pathways are important for predicting molecular reactivity, understanding reaction mechanisms, as well as controlling reaction pathways. During the past decade, X-ray transient absorption spectroscopy (XTA, or LITR-XAS, laser-initiated X-ray absorption spectroscopy), analogous to the commonly used optical transient absorption spectroscopy, has been developed. XTA uses a laser pulse to trigger a fundamental chemical process, and an X-ray pulse(s) to probe transient structures as a function of the time delay between the pump and probe pulses. Using X-ray pulses with high photon flux from synchrotron sources, transient electronic and molecular structures of metal complexes have been studied in disordered media from homogeneous solutions to heterogeneous solution-solid interfaces. Several examples from the studies at the Advanced Photon Source in Argonne National Laboratory are summarized, including excited-state metalloporphyrins, metal-to-ligand charge transfer (MLCT) states of transition metal complexes, and charge transfer states of metal complexes at the interface with semiconductor nanoparticles. Recent developments of the method are briefly described followed by a future prospective of XTA. It is envisioned that concurrent developments in X-ray free-electron lasers and synchrotron X-ray facilities as well as other table-top laser-driven femtosecond X-ray sources will make many breakthroughs and realise dreams of visualizing molecular movies and snapshots, which ultimately enable chemical reaction pathways to be controlled.

  12. NASA three-laser airborne differential absorption lidar system electronics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, R. J.; Copeland, G. D.

    1984-01-01

    The system control and signal conditioning electronics of the NASA three laser airborne differential absorption lidar (DIAL) system are described. The multipurpose DIAL system was developed for the remote measurement of gas and aerosol profiles in the troposphere and lower stratosphere. A brief description and photographs of the majority of electronics units developed under this contract are presented. The precision control system; which includes a master control unit, three combined NASA laser control interface/quantel control units, and three noise pulse discriminator/pockels cell pulser units; is described in detail. The need and design considerations for precision timing and control are discussed. Calibration procedures are included.

  13. High-Resolution Absorption Spectroscopy of NO2

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-08-31

    identify by block number) FIELD GROUP SUB-GROUP Atmospheric propagation, Laser spectroscopy, Nitrogen dioxide , Spectroscopy 19. RACT (Continue on reverse if...pulsed dye laser having a 0.05-A"-bandwidth (FWHM). This represents an improvement of at least a factor of three over the resolution employed in...concise interpretation of the observed features has yet to be made. Actual state-to-state assignments in the visible and near UV have been possible only

  14. Voltage-controlled magnetic anisotropy in Fe|MgO tunnel junctions studied by x-ray absorption spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Miwa, Shinji Matsuda, Kensho; Tanaka, Kazuhito; Goto, Minori; Suzuki, Yoshishige; Kotani, Yoshinori; Nakamura, Tetsuya

    2015-10-19

    In this study, voltage-controlled magnetic anisotropy (VCMA) in Fe|MgO tunnel junctions was investigated via the magneto-optical Kerr effect, soft x-ray absorption spectroscopy, and magnetic circular dichroism spectroscopy. The Fe|MgO tunnel junctions showed enhanced perpendicular magnetic anisotropy under external negative voltage, which induced charge depletion at the Fe|MgO interface. Despite the application of voltages of opposite polarity, no trace of chemical reaction such as a redox reaction attributed to O{sup 2−} migration was detected in the x-ray absorption spectra of the Fe. The VCMA reported in the Fe|MgO-based magnetic tunnel junctions must therefore originate from phenomena associated with the purely electric effect, that is, surface electron doping and/or redistribution induced by an external electric field.

  15. Method and apparatus for aerosol particle absorption spectroscopy

    DOEpatents

    Campillo, Anthony J.; Lin, Horn-Bond

    1983-11-15

    A method and apparatus for determining the absorption spectra, and other properties, of aerosol particles. A heating beam source provides a beam of electromagnetic energy which is scanned through the region of the spectrum which is of interest. Particles exposed to the heating beam which have absorption bands within the band width of the heating beam absorb energy from the beam. The particles are also illuminated by light of a wave length such that the light is scattered by the particles. The absorption spectra of the particles can thus be determined from an analysis of the scattered light since the absorption of energy by the particles will affect the way the light is scattered. Preferably the heating beam is modulated to simplify the analysis of the scattered light. In one embodiment the heating beam is intensity modulated so that the scattered light will also be intensity modulated when the particles absorb energy. In another embodiment the heating beam passes through an interferometer and the scattered light reflects the Fourier Transform of the absorption spectra.

  16. Review on VUV to MIR absorption spectroscopy of atmospheric pressure plasma jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reuter, Stephan; Santos Sousa, Joao; Stancu, Gabi Daniel; Hubertus van Helden, Jean-Pierre

    2015-10-01

    Absorption spectroscopy (AS) represents a reliable method for the characterization of cold atmospheric pressure plasma jets. The method’s simplicity stands out in comparison to competing diagnostic techniques. AS is an in situ, non-invasive technique giving absolute densities, free of calibration procedures, which other diagnostics, such as laser-induced fluorescence or optical emission spectroscopy, have to rely on. Ground state densities can be determined without the knowledge of the influence of collisional quenching. Therefore, absolute densities determined by absorption spectroscopy can be taken as calibration for other methods. In this paper, fundamentals of absorption spectroscopy are presented as an entrance to the topic. In the second part of the manuscript, a review of AS performed on cold atmospheric pressure plasma jets, as they are used e.g. in the field of plasma medicine, is presented. The focus is set on special techniques overcoming not only the drawback of spectrally overlapping absorbing species, but also the line-of-sight densities that AS usually provides or the necessity of sufficiently long absorption lengths. Where references are not available for measurements on cold atmospheric pressure plasma jets, other plasma sources including low-pressure plasmas are taken as an example to give suggestions for possible approaches. The final part is a table summarizing examples of absorption spectroscopic measurements on cold atmospheric pressure plasma jets. With this, the paper provides a ‘best practice’ guideline and gives a compendium of works by groups performing absorption spectroscopy on cold atmospheric pressure plasma jets.

  17. Electronic resonances in broadband stimulated Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batignani, G.; Pontecorvo, E.; Giovannetti, G.; Ferrante, C.; Fumero, G.; Scopigno, T.

    2016-01-01

    Spontaneous Raman spectroscopy is a formidable tool to probe molecular vibrations. Under electronic resonance conditions, the cross section can be selectively enhanced enabling structural sensitivity to specific chromophores and reaction centers. The addition of an ultrashort, broadband femtosecond pulse to the excitation field allows for coherent stimulation of diverse molecular vibrations. Within such a scheme, vibrational spectra are engraved onto a highly directional field, and can be heterodyne detected overwhelming fluorescence and other incoherent signals. At variance with spontaneous resonance Raman, however, interpreting the spectral information is not straightforward, due to the manifold of field interactions concurring to the third order nonlinear response. Taking as an example vibrational spectra of heme proteins excited in the Soret band, we introduce a general approach to extract the stimulated Raman excitation profiles from complex spectral lineshapes. Specifically, by a quantum treatment of the matter through density matrix description of the third order nonlinear polarization, we identify the contributions which generate the Raman bands, by taking into account for the cross section of each process.

  18. Direct and quantitative broadband absorptance spectroscopy with multilayer cantilever probes

    DOEpatents

    Hsu, Wei-Chun; Tong, Jonathan Kien-Kwok; Liao, Bolin; Chen, Gang

    2015-04-21

    A system for measuring the absorption spectrum of a sample is provided that includes a broadband light source that produces broadband light defined within a range of an absorptance spectrum. An interferometer modulates the intensity of the broadband light source for a range of modulation frequencies. A bi-layer cantilever probe arm is thermally connected to a sample arm having at most two layers of materials. The broadband light modulated by the interferometer is directed towards the sample and absorbed by the sample and converted into heat, which causes a temperature rise and bending of the bi-layer cantilever probe arm. A detector mechanism measures and records the deflection of the probe arm so as to obtain the absorptance spectrum of the sample.

  19. X-ray absorption spectroscopy and EPR studies of oriented spinach thylakoid preparations

    SciTech Connect

    Andrews, J.C. |

    1995-08-01

    In this study, oriented Photosystem II (PS II) particles from spinach chloroplasts are studied with electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) to determine more details of the structure of the oxygen evolving complex (OEC). The nature of halide binding to Mn is also studied with Cl K-edge and Mn EXAFS (extended x-ray absorption fine structure) of Mn-Cl model compounds, and with Mn EXAFS of oriented PS II in which Br has replaced Cl. Attention is focused on the following: photosynthesis and the oxygen evolving complex; determination of mosaic spread in oriented photosystem II particles from signal II EPR measurement; oriented EXAFS--studies of PS II in the S{sub 2} state; structural changes in PS II as a result of treatment with ammonia: EPR and XAS studies; studies of halide binding to Mn: Cl K-edge and Mn EXAFS of Mn-Cl model compounds and Mn EXAFS of oriented Br-treated photosystem II.

  20. Photo-induced dynamics in heterocyclic aromatic molecules probed by femtosecond XUV transient absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lackner, Florian; Chatterley, Adam S.; Pemmaraju, Chaitanya D.; Neumark, Daniel M.; Leone, Stephen R.; Gessner, Oliver

    2016-05-01

    We report on the ring-opening and dissociation dynamics of strong-field ionized selenophene (C4 H4 Se), studied by transient XUV absorption spectroscopy at the Se 3d edge. The table-top experiments are facilitated by high-order harmonic generation coupled with a gas phase transient XUV absorption setup that is optimized for the study of organic compounds. Employing element-specific core-to-valence transitions, the ultrafast molecular dynamics are monitored from the perspective of the well-localized Se atoms. Spectral features are assigned based on first principles TDDFT calculations for a large manifold of electronic states. We observe signatures of rapidly (~ 35 fs) decaying highly excited molecular cations, the formation of ring-opened products on a 100 fs time scale and, most notably, the elimination of bare Se+ ions in a very rapid multi-step process. A delayed onset of the Se+ ions provides direct evidence that both selenium-carbon bonds are broken within only ~ 130 fs and that a sequential mechanism, presumably an initial ring-opening followed by a subsequent breaking of the second bond, is required to eliminate the atomic fragments.

  1. Shock-tube measurements of excited oxygen atoms using cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Nations, Marcel; Wang, Shengkai; Goldenstein, Christopher S; Sun, Kai; Davidson, David F; Jeffries, Jay B; Hanson, Ronald K

    2015-10-10

    We report the use of cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopy (CEAS) using two distributed feedback diode lasers near 777.2 and 844.6 nm for sensitive, time-resolved, in situ measurements of excited-state populations of atomic oxygen in a shock tube. Here, a 1% O2/Ar mixture was shock-heated to 5400-8000 K behind reflected shock waves. The combined use of a low-finesse cavity, fast wavelength scanning of the lasers, and an off-axis alignment enabled measurements with 10 μs time response and low cavity noise. The CEAS absorption gain factors of 104 and 142 for the P35←S520 (777.2 nm) and P0,1,23←S310 (844.6 nm) atomic oxygen transitions, respectively, significantly improved the detection sensitivity over conventional single-pass measurements. This work demonstrates the potential of using CEAS to improve shock-tube studies of nonequilibrium electronic-excitation processes at high temperatures.

  2. [The Research for Trace Ammonia Escape Monitoring System Based on Tunable Diode Laser Absorption Spectroscopy].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Li-fang; Wang, Fei; Yu, Li-bin; Yan, Jian-hua; Cen, Ke-fa

    2015-06-01

    In order to on-line measure the trace ammonia slip of the commercial power plant in the future, this research seeks to measure the trace ammonia by using tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy under ambient temperature and pressure, and at different temperatures, and the measuring temperature is about 650 K in the power plant. In recent years lasers have become commercially available in the near-infrared where the transitions are much stronger, and ammonia's spectroscopy is pretty complicated and the overlapping lines are difficult to resolve. A group of ammonia transitions near 4 433.5 cm(-1) in the v2 +v3 combination band have been thoroughly selected for detecting lower concentration by analyzing its absorption characteristic and considering other absorption interference in combustion gases where H2O and CO2 mole fraction are very large. To illustrate the potential for NH3 concentration measurements, predictions for NH3, H2O and CO2 are simultaneously simulated, NH3 absorption lines near 4 433.5 cm(-1) wavelength meet weaker H2O absorption than the commercial NH3 lines, and there is almost no CO2 absorption, all the parameters are based on the HITRAN database, and an improved detection limit was obtained for interference-free NH3 monitoring, this 2.25 μm band has line strengths several times larger than absorption lines in the 1.53 μm band which was often used by NH3 sensors for emission monitoring and analyzing. The measurement system was developed with a new Herriott cell and a heated gas cell realizing fast absorption measurements of high resolution, and combined with direct absorption and wavelenguh modulation based on tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy at different temperatures. The lorentzian line shape is dominant at ambient temperature and pressure, and the estimated detectivity is approximately 0.225 x 10(-6) (SNR = 1) for the directed absorption spectroscopy, assuming a noise-equivalent absorbance of 1 x 10(-4). The heated cell

  3. Resolving molecular vibronic structure using high-sensitivity two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Bizimana, Laurie A; Brazard, Johanna; Carbery, William P; Gellen, Tobias; Turner, Daniel B

    2015-10-28

    Coherent multidimensional optical spectroscopy is an emerging technique for resolving structure and ultrafast dynamics of molecules, proteins, semiconductors, and other materials. A current challenge is the quality of kinetics that are examined as a function of waiting time. Inspired by noise-suppression methods of transient absorption, here we incorporate shot-by-shot acquisitions and balanced detection into coherent multidimensional optical spectroscopy. We demonstrate that implementing noise-suppression methods in two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy not only improves the quality of features in individual spectra but also increases the sensitivity to ultrafast time-dependent changes in the spectral features. Measurements on cresyl violet perchlorate are consistent with the vibronic pattern predicted by theoretical models of a highly displaced harmonic oscillator. The noise-suppression methods should benefit research into coherent electronic dynamics, and they can be adapted to multidimensional spectroscopies across the infrared and ultraviolet frequency ranges.

  4. Resolving molecular vibronic structure using high-sensitivity two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Bizimana, Laurie A.; Brazard, Johanna; Carbery, William P.; Gellen, Tobias; Turner, Daniel B.

    2015-10-28

    Coherent multidimensional optical spectroscopy is an emerging technique for resolving structure and ultrafast dynamics of molecules, proteins, semiconductors, and other materials. A current challenge is the quality of kinetics that are examined as a function of waiting time. Inspired by noise-suppression methods of transient absorption, here we incorporate shot-by-shot acquisitions and balanced detection into coherent multidimensional optical spectroscopy. We demonstrate that implementing noise-suppression methods in two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy not only improves the quality of features in individual spectra but also increases the sensitivity to ultrafast time-dependent changes in the spectral features. Measurements on cresyl violet perchlorate are consistent with the vibronic pattern predicted by theoretical models of a highly displaced harmonic oscillator. The noise-suppression methods should benefit research into coherent electronic dynamics, and they can be adapted to multidimensional spectroscopies across the infrared and ultraviolet frequency ranges.

  5. Studies of Arctic Middle Atmosphere Chemistry using Infrared Absorption Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindenmaier, Rodica

    The objective of this Ph.D. project is to investigate Arctic middle atmosphere chemistry using solar infrared absorption spectroscopy. These measurements were made at the Polar Environment Atmospheric Research Laboratory (PEARL) at Eureka, Nunavut, which is operated by the Canadian Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Change (CANDAC). This research is part of the CANDAC/PEARL Arctic Middle Atmosphere Chemistry theme and aims to improve our understanding of the processes controlling the stratospheric ozone budget using measurements of the concentrations of stratospheric constituents. The instrument, a Bruker IFS 125HR Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectrometer, has been specifically designed for high-resolution measurements over a broad spectral range and has been used to measure reactive species, source gases, reservoirs, and dynamical tracers at PEARL since August 2006. The first part of this research focuses on the optimization of ozone retrievals, for which 22 microwindows were studied and compared. The spectral region from 1000 to 1005 cm-1 was found to be the most sensitive in both the stratosphere and troposphere, giving the highest number of independent pieces of information and the smallest total error for retrievals at Eureka. Similar studies were performed in coordination with the Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Composition Change for nine other species, with the goal of improving and harmonizing the retrieval parameters among all Infrared Working Group sites. Previous satellite validation exercises have identified the highly variable polar conditions of the spring period to be a challenge. In this work, comparisons between the 125HR and ACE-FTS (Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment-Fourier transform spectrometer) from 2007 to 2010 have been used to develop strict criteria that allow the ground and satellite-based instruments to be confidently compared. After applying these criteria, the differences between the two instruments were generally

  6. Characterising legacy spent nuclear fuel pond materials using microfocus X-ray absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Bower, W R; Morris, K; Mosselmans, J F W; Thompson, O R; Banford, A W; Law, K; Pattrick, R A D

    2016-11-05

    Analysis of a radioactive, coated concrete core from the decommissioned, spent nuclear fuel cooling pond at the Hunterston-A nuclear site (UK) has provided a unique opportunity to study radionuclides within a real-world system. The core, obtained from a dividing wall and sampled at the fill level of the pond, exhibited radioactivity (dominantly (137)Cs and (90)Sr) heterogeneously distributed across both painted faces. Chemical analysis of the core was undertaken using microfocus spectroscopy at Diamond Light Source, UK. Mapping of Sr across the surface coatings using microfocus X-ray fluorescence (μXRF) combined with X-ray absorption spectroscopy showed that Sr was bound to TiO2 particles in the paint layers, suggesting an association between TiO2 and radiostrontium. Stable Sr and Cs sorption experiments using concrete coupons were also undertaken to assess their interactions with the bulk concrete in case of a breach in the coating layers. μXRF and scanning electron microscopy showed that Sr was immobilized by the cement phases, whilst at the elevated experimental concentrations, Cs was associated with clay minerals in the aggregates. This study provides a crucial insight into poorly understood infrastructural contamination in complex systems and is directly applicable to the UK's nuclear decommissioning efforts.

  7. Resonant photoemission and X-ray absorption spectroscopies of lithiated magnetite thin film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuchiya, Takashi; Kawamura, Kinya; Namiki, Wataru; Furuichi, Shoto; Takayanagi, Makoto; Minohara, Makoto; Kobayashi, Masaki; Horiba, Koji; Kumigashira, Hiroshi; Terabe, Kazuya; Higuchi, Tohru

    2017-04-01

    Resonant photoemission spectroscopy (RPES) and X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) were used to investigate the effect of lithiation on the electronic structure of Fe3O4 thin film relevant to the operation mechanism of nanoionic devices to enable magnetic property tuning. Comparison of the Fe 2p XAS spectrum for lithiated Fe3O4 (Li-Fe3O4) with that for pristine Fe3O4 clearly demonstrated that the number of Fe2+ ions at octahedral B sites is increased by lithiation. The valence band RPES spectra of Li-Fe3O4 further showed that lithiation increases the density of states near the Fermi level originating Fe2+ ions at octahedral B sites. These findings agree well with the observed decrease in the saturation magnetization in the magnetization-magnetic field (M-H) loop of Li-Fe3O4 thin film, indicating that minority spins (down spins) increase (i.e., total spins decrease) due to lithiation. The variation in the number of Fe2+ ions at B sites is suggested to be an underlying operating mechanism of a nanoionics-based magnetic property tuning device.

  8. Site- and phase-selective x-ray absorption spectroscopy based on phase-retrieval calculation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawaguchi, Tomoya; Fukuda, Katsutoshi; Matsubara, Eiichiro

    2017-03-01

    Understanding the chemical state of a particular element with multiple crystallographic sites and/or phases is essential to unlocking the origin of material properties. To this end, resonant x-ray diffraction spectroscopy (RXDS) achieved through a combination of x-ray diffraction (XRD) and x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) techniques can allow for the measurement of diffraction anomalous fine structure (DAFS). This is expected to provide a peerless tool for electronic/local structural analyses of materials with complicated structures thanks to its capability to extract spectroscopic information about a given element at each crystallographic site and/or phase. At present, one of the major challenges for the practical application of RXDS is the rigorous determination of resonant terms from observed DAFS, as this requires somehow determining the phase change in the elastic scattering around the absorption edge from the scattering intensity. This is widely known in the field of XRD as the phase problem. The present review describes the basics of this problem, including the relevant background and theory for DAFS and a guide to a newly-developed phase-retrieval method based on the logarithmic dispersion relation that makes it possible to analyze DAFS without suffering from the intrinsic ambiguities of conventional iterative-fitting. Several matters relating to data collection and correction of RXDS are also covered, with a final emphasis on the great potential of powder-sample-based RXDS (P-RXDS) to be used in various applications relevant to practical materials, including antisite-defect-type electrode materials for lithium-ion batteries.

  9. Site- and phase-selective x-ray absorption spectroscopy based on phase-retrieval calculation.

    PubMed

    Kawaguchi, Tomoya; Fukuda, Katsutoshi; Matsubara, Eiichiro

    2017-03-22

    Understanding the chemical state of a particular element with multiple crystallographic sites and/or phases is essential to unlocking the origin of material properties. To this end, resonant x-ray diffraction spectroscopy (RXDS) achieved through a combination of x-ray diffraction (XRD) and x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) techniques can allow for the measurement of diffraction anomalous fine structure (DAFS). This is expected to provide a peerless tool for electronic/local structural analyses of materials with complicated structures thanks to its capability to extract spectroscopic information about a given element at each crystallographic site and/or phase. At present, one of the major challenges for the practical application of RXDS is the rigorous determination of resonant terms from observed DAFS, as this requires somehow determining the phase change in the elastic scattering around the absorption edge from the scattering intensity. This is widely known in the field of XRD as the phase problem. The present review describes the basics of this problem, including the relevant background and theory for DAFS and a guide to a newly-developed phase-retrieval method based on the logarithmic dispersion relation that makes it possible to analyze DAFS without suffering from the intrinsic ambiguities of conventional iterative-fitting. Several matters relating to data collection and correction of RXDS are also covered, with a final emphasis on the great potential of powder-sample-based RXDS (P-RXDS) to be used in various applications relevant to practical materials, including antisite-defect-type electrode materials for lithium-ion batteries.

  10. Interfacial Electron Transfer and Transient Photoconductivity Studied with Terahertz Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milot, Rebecca Lee

    Terahertz spectroscopy is distinguished from other far infrared and millimeter wave spectroscopies by its inherent phase sensitivity and sub-picosecond time resolution making it a versatile technique to study a wide range of physical phenomena. As THz spectroscopy is still a relatively new field, many aspects of THz generation mechanisms have not been fully examined. Using terahertz emission spectroscopy (TES), THz emission from ZnTe(110) was analyzed and found to be limited by two-photon absorption and free-carrier generation at high excitation fluences. Due to concerns about the continued use of fossil fuels, solar energy has been widely investigated as a promising source of renewable energy. Dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) have been developed as a low-cost alternative to conventional photovoltaic solar cells. To solve the issues of the intermittency and inefficient transport associated with solar energy, researchers are attempting to adapt DSSCs for water oxidation and chemical fuel production. Both device designs incorporate sensitizer molecules covalently bound to metal oxide nanoparticles. The sensitizer, which is comprised of a chromophore and anchoring group, absorbs light and transfers an electron from its excited state to the conduction band of the metal oxide, producing an electric current. Using time-resolved THz spectroscopy (TRTS), an optical pump/THz probe technique, the efficiency and dynamics of electron injection from sensitizers to metal oxides was evaluated as a function of the chromophore, its anchoring group, and the metal oxide identity. Experiments for studying fully functioning DSSCs and water oxidation devices are also described. Bio-inspired pentafluorophenyl porphyrin chromophores have been designed and synthesized for use in photoelectrochemical water oxidation cells. Influences on the efficiency and dynamics of electron injection from the chromophores into TiO2 and SnO2 nanoparticles due to changes in both the central substituent to

  11. EPR and electronic absorption spectra of copper bearing turquoise mineral

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, K. B. N.; Moorthy, L. R.; Reddy, B. J.; Vedanand, S.

    1988-10-01

    Electron paramagnetic resonance and optical absorption spectra of turquoise have been studied both at room and low temperatures. It is concluded from the EPR spectra that the ground state of Cu 2+ ion in turquoise is 2A g(d x2- y2) and it is sited in an elongated rhombic octahedron (D 2π). The observed absorption bands at 14970 and 18354 cm -1 are assigned at 2A g→ 2B 1 g( dx2- y2→ xy) and 2A g→[ su2B 3g(d x 2-y 2→d yz) respectively assuming D 2π symmetry which are inconsistent with EPR studies. The three bands in the NIR region are attributed to combinations of fundamental modes of the H 2O molecule present in the sample.

  12. Electron-transfer acceleration investigated by time resolved infrared spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Vlček, Antonín; Kvapilová, Hana; Towrie, Michael; Záliš, Stanislav

    2015-03-17

    Ultrafast electron transfer (ET) processes are important primary steps in natural and artificial photosynthesis, as well as in molecular electronic/photonic devices. In biological systems, ET often occurs surprisingly fast over long distances of several tens of angströms. Laser-pulse irradiation is conveniently used to generate strongly oxidizing (or reducing) excited states whose reactions are then studied by time-resolved spectroscopic techniques. While photoluminescence decay and UV-vis absorption supply precise kinetics data, time-resolved infrared absorption (TRIR) and Raman-based spectroscopies have the advantage of providing additional structural information and monitoring vibrational energy flows and dissipation, as well as medium relaxation, that accompany ultrafast ET. We will discuss three cases of photoinduced ET involving the Re(I)(CO)3(N,N) moiety (N,N = polypyridine) that occur much faster than would be expected from ET theories. [Re(4-N-methylpyridinium-pyridine)(CO)3(N,N)](2+) represents a case of excited-state picosecond ET between two different ligands that remains ultrafast even in slow-relaxing solvents, beating the adiabatic limit. This is caused by vibrational/solvational excitation of the precursor state and participation of high-frequency quantum modes in barrier crossing. The case of Re-tryptophan assemblies demonstrates that excited-state Trp → *Re(II) ET is accelerated from nanoseconds to picoseconds when the Re(I)(CO)3(N,N) chromophore is appended to a protein, close to a tryptophan residue. TRIR in combination with DFT calculations and structural studies reveals an interaction between the N,N ligand and the tryptophan indole. It results in partial electronic delocalization in the precursor excited state and likely contributes to the ultrafast ET rate. Long-lived vibrational/solvational excitation of the protein Re(I)(CO)3(N,N)···Trp moiety, documented by dynamic IR band shifts, could be another accelerating factor. The last

  13. Mapping of the Local Interstellar Medium using Absorption Line Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penprase, Bryan Edward

    2017-01-01

    Using the Yale SMARTS 1.5-meter telescope at CTIO and the CHIRON spectrograph, we have developed a program for mapping the local interstellar medium using a sample of over 200 newly observed B stars previously unobserved using Na I absorption lines. This sample includes stars that extend out to map beyond the local bubble to 500 pc. The sample has been observed using high resolution absorption lines, and when combined with previously observed stars with Na I and Ca II data provides a more complete picture of the local ISM than previous surveys. The distances to the stars using the new GAIA database also allows for more accurate determination of distances to features in the lcoal ISM, and new maps of the structure of the ISM hav been prepared with the data.

  14. Low-loss electron energy loss spectroscopy: An atomic-resolution complement to optical spectroscopies and application to graphene

    SciTech Connect

    Kapetanakis, Myron; Zhou, Wu; Oxley, Mark P.; Lee, Jaekwang; Prange, Micah P.; Pennycook, Stephen J.; Idrobo Tapia, Juan Carlos; Pantelides, Sokrates T.

    2015-09-25

    Photon-based spectroscopies have played a central role in exploring the electronic properties of crystalline solids and thin films. They are a powerful tool for probing the electronic properties of nanostructures, but they are limited by lack of spatial resolution. On the other hand, electron-based spectroscopies, e.g., electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS), are now capable of subangstrom spatial resolution. Core-loss EELS, a spatially resolved analog of x-ray absorption, has been used extensively in the study of inhomogeneous complex systems. In this paper, we demonstrate that low-loss EELS in an aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscope, which probes low-energy excitations, combined with a theoretical framework for simulating and analyzing the spectra, is a powerful tool to probe low-energy electron excitations with atomic-scale resolution. The theoretical component of the method combines density functional theory–based calculations of the excitations with dynamical scattering theory for the electron beam. We apply the method to monolayer graphene in order to demonstrate that atomic-scale contrast is inherent in low-loss EELS even in a perfectly periodic structure. The method is a complement to optical spectroscopy as it probes transitions entailing momentum transfer. The theoretical analysis identifies the spatial and orbital origins of excitations, holding the promise of ultimately becoming a powerful probe of the structure and electronic properties of individual point and extended defects in both crystals and inhomogeneous complex nanostructures. The method can be extended to probe magnetic and vibrational properties with atomic resolution.

  15. Low-loss electron energy loss spectroscopy: An atomic-resolution complement to optical spectroscopies and application to graphene

    DOE PAGES

    Kapetanakis, Myron; Zhou, Wu; Oxley, Mark P.; ...

    2015-09-25

    Photon-based spectroscopies have played a central role in exploring the electronic properties of crystalline solids and thin films. They are a powerful tool for probing the electronic properties of nanostructures, but they are limited by lack of spatial resolution. On the other hand, electron-based spectroscopies, e.g., electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS), are now capable of subangstrom spatial resolution. Core-loss EELS, a spatially resolved analog of x-ray absorption, has been used extensively in the study of inhomogeneous complex systems. In this paper, we demonstrate that low-loss EELS in an aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscope, which probes low-energy excitations, combined with amore » theoretical framework for simulating and analyzing the spectra, is a powerful tool to probe low-energy electron excitations with atomic-scale resolution. The theoretical component of the method combines density functional theory–based calculations of the excitations with dynamical scattering theory for the electron beam. We apply the method to monolayer graphene in order to demonstrate that atomic-scale contrast is inherent in low-loss EELS even in a perfectly periodic structure. The method is a complement to optical spectroscopy as it probes transitions entailing momentum transfer. The theoretical analysis identifies the spatial and orbital origins of excitations, holding the promise of ultimately becoming a powerful probe of the structure and electronic properties of individual point and extended defects in both crystals and inhomogeneous complex nanostructures. The method can be extended to probe magnetic and vibrational properties with atomic resolution.« less

  16. Direct and Quantitative Photothermal Absorption Spectroscopy of Individual Particulates

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-01-01

    photovoltaics and photo detectors.17,22,23 To predict the absorptive properties of an individual silicon microwire, the well-established Mie theory was... silicon microwire is frequency limiting .43 It was also observed that vibration, thermal drift, and electrical noise were significant below 100 Hz. In...NOTES 14. ABSTRACT 15. SUBJECT TERMS 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT Same as Report (SAR) 18. NUMBER OF PAGES 7

  17. Aerosol particle microphotography and glare-spot absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Arnold, S; Holler, S; Li, J H; Serpengüzel, A; Auffermann, W F; Hill, S C

    1995-04-01

    The relative intensities of glare spots in the image of an electrodynamically trapped aerosol droplet are measured experimentally with an aerosol particle microscope and calculated theoretically. The theoretical calculations are in good agreement with these experiments and indicate that the intensities of these spots are extremely sensitive to the imaginary part of the refractive index. Experimentally, we obtain the molecular absorption spectrum of an impurity within a droplet by recording the spectrum of an individual glare spot produced by broadband illumination.

  18. Resonant two-photon absorption of extreme-ultraviolet free-electron-laser radiation in helium

    SciTech Connect

    Nagasono, Mitsuru; Suljoti, Edlira; Pietzsch, Annette; Hennies, Franz; Wellhoefer, Michael; Hoeft, Jon-Tobias; Martins, Michael; Wurth, Wilfried; Foehlisch, Alexander; Treusch, Rolf; Feldhaus, Josef; Schneider, Jochen R.

    2007-05-15

    We have investigated the nonlinear response of helium to intense extreme-ultraviolet radiation from the free-electron laser in Hamburg (FLASH). We observe a spectral feature between 24 and 26 eV electron kinetic energy in photoemission which shows a quadratic fluence dependence. The feature is explained as a result of subsequent processes involving a resonant two-photon absorption process into doubly excited levels of even parity (N=5 and 6), radiative decay to the doubly excited states in the vicinity of the He{sup +} (N=2) ionization threshold and finally the photoionization of the inner electron by the radiation of the next microbunches. This observation suggests that even-parity states, which have been elusive to be measured with the low pulse energy of synchrotron radiation sources, can be investigated with the intense radiation of FLASH. This also demonstrates a first step to bring nonlinear spectroscopy into the xuv and soft-x-ray regime.

  19. Single-electron detection and spectroscopy via relativistic cyclotron radiation

    DOE PAGES

    Asner, D. M.; Bradley, R. F.; de Viveiros, L.; ...

    2015-04-20

    Since 1897, we've understood that accelerating charges must emit electromagnetic radiation. Cyclotron radiation, the particular form of radiation emitted by an electron orbiting in a magnetic field, was first derived in 1904. Despite the simplicity of this concept, and the enormous utility of electron spectroscopy in nuclear and particle physics, single-electron cyclotron radiation has never been observed directly. We demonstrate single-electron detection in a novel radiofrequency spec- trometer. Here, we observe the cyclotron radiation emitted by individual magnetically-trapped electrons that are produced with mildly-relativistic energies by a gaseous radioactive source. The relativistic shift in the cyclotron frequency permits a precisemore » electron energy measurement. Precise beta electron spectroscopy from gaseous radiation sources is a key technique in modern efforts to measure the neutrino mass via the tritium decay endpoint, and this work demonstrates a fundamentally new approach to precision beta spectroscopy for future neutrino mass experiments.« less

  20. Single-electron detection and spectroscopy via relativistic cyclotron radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Asner, D. M.; Bradley, R. F.; de Viveiros, L.; Doe, P. J.; Fernandes, J. L.; Fertl, M.; Finn, E. C.; Formaggio, J. A.; Furse, D.; Jones, A. M.; Kofron, J. N.; LaRoque, B. H.; Leber, M.; McBride, E. L.; Miller, M. L.; Mohanmurthy, P.; Monreal, B.; Oblath, N. S.; Robertson, R. G. H.; Rosenberg, L. J.; Rybka, G.; Rysewyk, D.; Sternberg, M. G.; Tedeschi, J. R.; Thummler, T.; VanDevender, B. A.; Woods, N. L.

    2015-04-20

    Since 1897, we've understood that accelerating charges must emit electromagnetic radiation. Cyclotron radiation, the particular form of radiation emitted by an electron orbiting in a magnetic field, was first derived in 1904. Despite the simplicity of this concept, and the enormous utility of electron spectroscopy in nuclear and particle physics, single-electron cyclotron radiation has never been observed directly. We demonstrate single-electron detection in a novel radiofrequency spec- trometer. Here, we observe the cyclotron radiation emitted by individual magnetically-trapped electrons that are produced with mildly-relativistic energies by a gaseous radioactive source. The relativistic shift in the cyclotron frequency permits a precise electron energy measurement. Precise beta electron spectroscopy from gaseous radiation sources is a key technique in modern efforts to measure the neutrino mass via the tritium decay endpoint, and this work demonstrates a fundamentally new approach to precision beta spectroscopy for future neutrino mass experiments.

  1. Two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy using incoherent light: theoretical analysis.

    PubMed

    Turner, Daniel B; Howey, Dylan J; Sutor, Erika J; Hendrickson, Rebecca A; Gealy, M W; Ulness, Darin J

    2013-07-25

    Electronic energy transfer in photosynthesis occurs over a range of time scales and under a variety of intermolecular coupling conditions. Recent work has shown that electronic coupling between chromophores can lead to coherent oscillations in two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy measurements of pigment-protein complexes measured with femtosecond laser pulses. A persistent issue in the field is to reconcile the results of measurements performed using femtosecond laser pulses with physiological illumination conditions. Noisy-light spectroscopy can begin to address this question. In this work we present the theoretical analysis of incoherent two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy, I((4)) 2D ES. Simulations reveal diagonal peaks, cross peaks, and coherent oscillations similar to those observed in femtosecond two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy experiments. The results also expose fundamental differences between the femtosecond-pulse and noisy-light techniques; the differences lead to new challenges and new opportunities.

  2. X-Ray Absorption Spectroscopy Of Thin Foils Irradiated By An Ultra-short Laser Pulse

    SciTech Connect

    Renaudin, P.; Blancard, C.; Cosse, P.; Faussurier, G.; Lecherbourg, L.; Audebert, P.; Bastiani-Ceccotti, S.; Geindre, J.-P.; Shepherd, R.

    2007-08-02

    Point-projection K-shell absorption spectroscopy has been used to measure absorption spectra of transient plasma created by an ultra-short laser pulse. The 1s-2p and 1s-3p absorption lines of weakly ionized aluminum and the 2p-3d absorption lines of bromine were measured over an extended range of densities in a low-temperature regime. Independent plasma characterization was obtained using frequency domain interferometry diagnostic (FDI) that allows the interpretation of the absorption spectra in terms of spectral opacities. Assuming local thermodynamic equilibrium, spectral opacity calculations have been performed using the density and temperature inferred from the FDI diagnostic to compare to the measured absorption spectra. A good agreement is obtained when non-equilibrium effects due to non-stationary atomic physics are negligible at the x-ray probe time.

  3. X-Ray Absorption Spectroscopy Of Thin Foils Irradiated By An Ultra-short Laser Pulse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renaudin, P.; Lecherbourg, L.; Blancard, C.; Cossé, P.; Faussurier, G.; Audebert, P.; Bastiani-Ceccotti, S.; Geindre, J.-P.; Shepherd, R.

    2007-08-01

    Point-projection K-shell absorption spectroscopy has been used to measure absorption spectra of transient plasma created by an ultra-short laser pulse. The 1s-2p and 1s-3p absorption lines of weakly ionized aluminum and the 2p-3d absorption lines of bromine were measured over an extended range of densities in a low-temperature regime. Independent plasma characterization was obtained using frequency domain interferometry diagnostic (FDI) that allows the interpretation of the absorption spectra in terms of spectral opacities. Assuming local thermodynamic equilibrium, spectral opacity calculations have been performed using the density and temperature inferred from the FDI diagnostic to compare to the measured absorption spectra. A good agreement is obtained when non-equilibrium effects due to non-stationary atomic physics are negligible at the x-ray probe time.

  4. Multiple pre-edge structures in Cu K -edge x-ray absorption spectra of high- Tc cuprates revealed by high-resolution x-ray absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gougoussis, C.; Rueff, J.-P.; Calandra, M.; D'Astuto, M.; Jarrige, I.; Ishii, H.; Shukla, A.; Yamada, I.; Azuma, M.; Takano, M.

    2010-06-01

    Using high-resolution x-ray absorption spectroscopy and state-of-the-art electronic structure calculations we demonstrate that the pre-edge region at the Cu K edge of high- Tc cuprates is composed of several excitations invisible in standard x-ray absorption spectra. We consider in detail the case of Ca2-xCuO2Cl2 and show that the many pre-edge excitations (two for c -axis polarization, four for in-plane polarization and out-of-plane incident x-ray momentum) are dominated by off-site transitions and intersite hybridization. This demonstrates the relevance of approaches beyond the single-site model for the description of the pre edges of correlated materials. Finally, we show the occurrence of a doubling of the main edge peak that is most visible when the polarization is along the c axis. This doubling, that has not been seen in any previous absorption data in cuprates, is not reproduced by first-principles calculations. We suggest that this peak is due to many-body charge-transfer excitations while all the other visible far-edge structures are single particle in origin. Our work indicates that previous interpretations of the Cu K -edge x-ray absorption spectra in high- Tc cuprates can be profitably reconsidered.

  5. Non-coincident multi-wavelength emission absorption spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Baumann, L.E.

    1995-02-01

    An analysis is presented of the effect of noncoincident sampling on the measurement of atomic number density and temperature by multiwavelength emission absorption. The assumption is made that the two signals, emission and transmitted lamp, are time resolved but not coincident. The analysis demonstrates the validity of averages of such measurements despite fluctuations in temperature and optical depth. At potassium-seeded MHD conditions, the fluctuations introduce additional uncertainty into measurements of potassium atom number density and temperature but do not significantly bias the average results. Experimental measurements in the CFFF aerodynamic duct with coincident and noncoincident sampling support the analysis.

  6. Absorption spectroscopy of a laboratory photoionized plasma experiment at Z

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, I. M.; Durmaz, T.; Mancini, R. C.; Bailey, J. E.; Rochau, G. A.; Golovkin, I. E.; MacFarlane, J. J.

    2014-03-15

    The Z facility at the Sandia National Laboratories is the most energetic terrestrial source of X-rays and provides an opportunity to produce photoionized plasmas in a relatively well characterised radiation environment. We use detailed atomic-kinetic and spectral simulations to analyze the absorption spectra of a photoionized neon plasma driven by the x-ray flux from a z-pinch. The broadband x-ray flux both photoionizes and backlights the plasma. In particular, we focus on extracting the charge state distribution of the plasma and the characteristics of the radiation field driving the plasma in order to estimate the ionisation parameter.

  7. A GAS TEMPERATURE PROFILE BY INFRARED EMISSION-ABSORPTION SPECTROSCOPY

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buchele, D. R.

    1994-01-01

    This computer program calculates the temperature profile of a flame or hot gas. Emphasis is on profiles found in jet engine or rocket engine exhaust streams containing water vapor or carbon dioxide as radiating gases. The temperature profile is assumed to be axisymmetric with a functional form controlled by two variable parameters. The parameters are calculated using measurements of gas radiation at two wavelengths in the infrared spectrum. Infrared emission and absorption measurements at two or more wavelengths provide a method of determining a gas temperature profile along a path through the gas by using a radiation source and receiver located outside the gas stream being measured. This permits simplified spectral scanning of a jet or rocket engine exhaust stream with the instrumentation outside the exhaust gas stream. This program provides an iterative-cyclic computation in which an initial assumed temperature profile is altered in shape until the computed emission and absorption agree, within specified limits, with the actual instrument measurements of emission and absorption. Temperature determination by experimental measurements of emission and absorption at two or more wavelengths is also provided by this program. Additionally, the program provides a technique for selecting the wavelengths to be used for determining the temperature profiles prior to the beginning of the experiment. By using this program feature, the experimenter has a higher probability of selecting wavelengths which will result in accurate temperature profile measurements. This program provides the user with a technique for determining whether this program will be sufficiently accurate for his particular application, as well as providing a means of finding the solution. The input to the program consists of four types of data: (1) computer program control constants, (2) measurements of gas radiance and transmittance at selected wavelengths, (3) tabulations from the literature of gas

  8. Revealing the electronic structure of LiC6 by soft X-ray spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, L.; Li, X.; Augustsson, A.; Lee, C. M.; Rubensson, J.-E.; Nordgren, J.; Ross, P. N.; Guo, J.-H.

    2017-03-01

    The electronic structure of LiC6 has been investigated by soft X-ray absorption and emission spectroscopies. The results reveal that upon full lithiation of graphite, the Li 2s electrons are transferred into the carbon π* states in a near rigid-band behavior, resulting in the increased density of states near EF and the shift of σ* states to lower energies. In addition, the resonant inelastic X-ray scattering spectra of LiC6 do not show strong dispersive features as that of graphite, indicating that the crystal momentum is not conserved during the scattering process due to the delocalization of electrons in the intermediate state.

  9. Absorption effects in electron-sulfur-dioxide collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Machado, L. E.; Sugohara, R. T.; Santos, A. S. dos; Lee, M.-T.; Iga, I.; Souza, G. L. C. de; Homem, M. G. P.; Michelin, S. E.; Brescansin, L. M.

    2011-09-15

    A joint experimental-theoretical study on electron-SO{sub 2} collisions in the low and intermediate energy range is reported. More specifically, experimental elastic differential, integral, and momentum transfer cross sections in absolute scale are measured in the 100-1000 eV energy range using the relative-flow technique. Calculated elastic differential, integral, and momentum transfer cross sections as well as grand-total and total absorption cross sections are also presented in the 1-1000 eV energy range. A complex optical potential is used to represent the electron-molecule interaction dynamics, whereas the Schwinger variational iterative method combined with the distorted-wave approximation is used to solve the scattering equations. Comparison of the present results is made with the theoretical and experimental results available in the literature.

  10. X-Ray Absorption Spectroscopy of Uranium Dioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Tobin, J G

    2010-12-10

    After the CMMD Seminar by Sung Woo Yu on the subject of the x-ray spectroscopy of UO2, there arose some questions concerning the XAS of UO2. These questions can be distilled down to these three issues: (1) The validity of the data; (2) The monchromator energy calibration; and (3) The validity of XAS component of the figure shown. The following will be shown: (1) The data is valid; (2) It is possible to calibrate the monchromator; and (3) The XAS component of the above picture is correct. The remainder of this document is in three sections, corresponding to these three issues.

  11. Quasi zero-background tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy employing a balanced Michelson interferometer.

    PubMed

    Guan, Zuguang; Lewander, Märta; Svanberg, Sune

    2008-12-22

    Tunable diode laser spectroscopy (TDLS) normally observes small fractional absorptive reductions in the light flux. We show, that instead a signal increase on a zero background can be obtained. A Michelson interferometer, which is initially balanced out in destructive interference, is perturbed by gas absorption in one of its arms. Both theoretical analysis and experimental demonstration show that the proposed zero-background TDLS can improve the achievable signal-to-noise ratio.

  12. Calibration of effective optical path length for hollow-waveguide based gas cell using absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Lin; Du, Zhenhui; Li, Jinyi

    2016-10-01

    The Hollow Waveguide (HWG) has emerged as a novel tool to transmit laser power. Owing to its long Effective Optical Path Length (EOPL) within a relatively small volume, it is suitable for the application as a gas cell in concentration measurement by using laser spectroscopy. The measurement of effective optical path length for a hollow waveguide, which possesses the physical length of 284.0 cm, by using Tunable Diode Laser Absorption Spectroscopy (TDLAS) was demonstrated. Carbon dioxide was used as a sample gas for a hollow waveguide calibration. A 2004 nm Distributed Feed-Back (DFB) laser was used as the light source to cover a CO2 line near 2003 nm, which was selected as the target line in the measurement. The reference direct absorption spectroscopy signal was obtained by delivering CO2 into a reference cell possessing a length of 29.4 cm. Then the effective optical path length of HWG was calculated by least-squares fitting the measured absorption signal to the reference absorption signal. The measured EOPL of HWG was 282.8 cm and the repeatability error of effective optical path length was calculated as 0.08 cm. A detection limit of 0.057 cm (with integral time 5 s) characterized by the Allan variance, was derived. The effective optical path length is obtained as the significant parameter to calculate the concentration of gases and it is of great importance to precise measurement of absorption spectroscopy.

  13. On the linear and non-linear electronic spectroscopy of chlorophylls: a computational study.

    PubMed

    Graczyk, Alicja; Żurek, Justyna M; Paterson, Martin J

    2014-01-01

    A theoretical analysis of linear and non-linear (two-photon absorption) electronic spectroscopy of all known porphyrinic pigments has been performed using linear and quadratic density functional response theory, with the long-range corrected CAM-B3LYP functional. We found that higher Soret transitions often contain non-Gouterman contributions and that each chlorophyll has the possibility for resonance enhanced TPA in the Soret region, although there is also significant TPA in the Q region.

  14. Analysis of the absorption layer of CIGS solar cell by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seok H; Shim, Hee S; Kim, Chan K; Yoo, Jong H; Russo, Richard E; Jeong, Sungho

    2012-03-01

    Laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) was applied for the elemental analysis of the thin copper indium gallium diselenide (CuIn(1-x)Ga(x)Se(2) [CIGS]) absorption layer deposited on Mo-coated soda-lime glass by the co-evaporation technique. The optimal laser and detection parameters for LIBS measurement of the CIGS absorption layer (1.23 μm) were investigated. The calibration results of Ga/In ratio with respect to the concentration ratios measured by x-ray fluorescence and inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy showed good linearity.

  15. Near-infrared absorption spectroscopy of interstellar hydrocarbon grains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pendleton, Y. J.; Sandford, S. A.; Allamandola, L. J.; Tielens, A. G. G. M.; Sellgren, K.

    1994-01-01

    We present new 3600 - 2700/cm (2.8 - 3.7 micrometer) spectra of objects whose extinction is dominated by dust in the diffuse interstellar medium. The observations presented here augment an ongoing study of the organic component of the diffuse interstellar medium. These spectra contain a broad feature centered near 3300/cm (3.0 micrometers) and/or a feature with a more complex profile near 2950/cm (3.4 micrometers), the latter of which is attributed to saturated aliphatic hydrocarbons in interstellar grains and is the primary interest of this paper. As in our earlier work, the similarity of the absorption bands near 2950/cm (3.4 micrometers) along different lines of sight and the correlation of these features with interstellar extinction reveal that the carrier of this band lies in the dust in the diffuse interstellar medium (DISM). At least 2.5% of the cosmic carbon in the local interstellar medium and 4% toward the Galactic center is tied up in the carrier of the 2950/cm (3.4 micrometer) band. The spectral structure of the diffuse dust hydrocarbon C-H stretch absorption features is reasonably similar to UV photolyzed laboratory ice residues and is quite similar to the carbonaceous component of the Murchison meteorite. The similarity between the DISM and the meteoritic spectrum suggests that some of the interstellar material originally incorporated into the solar nebula may have survived relatively untouched in primitive solar system bodies. Comparisons of the DISM spectrum to hydrogenated amorphous carbon and quenched carbonaceous composite are also presented. The A(sub V)/tau ratio for the 2950/cm (3.4 micrometer) feature is lower toward the Galactic center than toward sources in the local solar neighborhood (approximately 150 for the Galactic center sources vs. approximately 250 for the local ISM sources). A similar trend has been observed previously for silicates in the diffuse medium by Roche & Aitken, suggesting that (1) the silicate and carbonaceous

  16. Total absorption spectroscopy of N = 51 nucleus 85Se

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goetz, K. C.; Grzywacz, R. K.; Rykaczewski, K. P.; Karny, M.; Fialkowska, A.; Wolinska-Cichocka, M.; Rasco, B. C.; Zganjar, E. F.; Johnson, J. W.; Gross, C. J.

    2014-09-01

    An experimental campaign utilizing the Modular Total Absorption Spectrometer (MTAS) was conducted at the HRIBF facility in January of 2012. The campaign studied 22 isotopes, many of which were identified as the highest priority for decay heat analysis during a nuclear fuel cycle, see the report by the OECD-IAEA Nuclear Energy Agency in 2007. The case of 85Se will be discussed. 85Se is a Z = 34, N = 51 nucleus with the valence neutron located in the positive parity sd single particle state. Therefore, its decay properties are determined by interplay between first forbidden decays of the valence neutron and Gamow-Teller decay of a 78Ni core. Analysis of the data obtained during the January 2012 run indicates a significant increase of the beta strength function when compared with previous measurements, see Ref..

  17. Monitoring spacecraft atmosphere contaminants by laser absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinfeld, J. I.

    1976-01-01

    Laser-based spectrophotometric methods which have been proposed for the detection of trace concentrations of gaseous contaminants include Raman backscattering (LIDAR) and passive radiometry (LOPAIR). Remote sensing techniques using laser spectrometry are presented and in particular a simple long-path laser absorption method (LOLA), which is capable of resolving complex mixtures of closely related trace contaminants at ppm levels is discussed. A number of species were selected for study which are representative of those most likely to accumulate in closed environments, such as submarines or long-duration manned space flights. Computer programs were developed which will permit a real-time analysis of the monitored atmosphere. Estimates of the dynamic range of this monitoring technique for various system configurations, and comparison with other methods of analysis, are given.

  18. Femtosecond X-ray absorption study of electron localization in photoexcited anatase TiO2

    PubMed Central

    Santomauro, F. G.; Lübcke, A.; Rittmann, J.; Baldini, E.; Ferrer, A.; Silatani, M.; Zimmermann, P.; Grübel, S.; Johnson, J. A.; Mariager, S. O.; Beaud, P.; Grolimund, D.; Borca, C.; Ingold, G.; Johnson, S.L.; Chergui, M.

    2015-01-01

    Transition metal oxides are among the most promising solar materials, whose properties rely on the generation, transport and trapping of charge carriers (electrons and holes). Identifying the latter’s dynamics at room temperature requires tools that combine elemental and structural sensitivity, with the atomic scale resolution of time (femtoseconds, fs). Here, we use fs Ti K-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) upon 3.49 eV (355 nm) excitation of aqueous colloidal anatase titanium dioxide nanoparticles to probe the trapping dynamics of photogenerated electrons. We find that their localization at Titanium atoms occurs in <300 fs, forming Ti3+ centres, in or near the unit cell where the electron is created. We conclude that electron localization is due to its trapping at pentacoordinated sites, mostly present in the surface shell region. The present demonstration of fs hard X-ray absorption capabilities opens the way to a detailed description of the charge carrier dynamics in transition metal oxides. PMID:26437873

  19. Femtosecond X-ray absorption study of electron localization in photoexcited anatase TiO2.

    PubMed

    Santomauro, F G; Lübcke, A; Rittmann, J; Baldini, E; Ferrer, A; Silatani, M; Zimmermann, P; Grübel, S; Johnson, J A; Mariager, S O; Beaud, P; Grolimund, D; Borca, C; Ingold, G; Johnson, S L; Chergui, M

    2015-10-06

    Transition metal oxides are among the most promising solar materials, whose properties rely on the generation, transport and trapping of charge carriers (electrons and holes). Identifying the latter's dynamics at room temperature requires tools that combine elemental and structural sensitivity, with the atomic scale resolution of time (femtoseconds, fs). Here, we use fs Ti K-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) upon 3.49 eV (355 nm) excitation of aqueous colloidal anatase titanium dioxide nanoparticles to probe the trapping dynamics of photogenerated electrons. We find that their localization at Titanium atoms occurs in <300 fs, forming Ti(3+) centres, in or near the unit cell where the electron is created. We conclude that electron localization is due to its trapping at pentacoordinated sites, mostly present in the surface shell region. The present demonstration of fs hard X-ray absorption capabilities opens the way to a detailed description of the charge carrier dynamics in transition metal oxides.

  20. VUV Absorption Spectroscopy of Planetary Molecules at Low Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jolly, A.; Benilan, Y.; Ferradaz, T.; Fray, N.; Schwell, M.

    2005-08-01

    A critical review of the available absorption coefficient in the vacuum ultraviolet domain (100-200 nm) has lead us to undertake new measurements at the Berlin synchrotron facility (BESSY). Many of the molecules detected in planetary atmospheres and in particular those which need to be synthesized in the laboratory, have never been measured at low temperature. The first molecules that we have studied are HCN, HC3N and C2N2. New absorption coefficients have been obtained including first spectra at low temperature (220 K). The effect of the temperature on the spectra can then be discussed in view of the application to the much colder atmosphere of Titan. The nitriles studied here play an important role in the chemistry taking place in Titan's atmosphere and are believed to be responsible for the formation of Titan's aerosols. From our measurements, we have calculated the photodissociation rates for each molecule which are essential to include in any photochemical model. This is true for Titan but also for cometary and interstellar medium models. To describe the formation of a solid phase, the models also need to include photodissociation rates for larger molecules which have not been detected yet. This will now be possible for HC5N since the first spectra of this molecule has been obtained by our team. Furthermore, the first stellar occultation measurement of Titan's atmosphere by the UV spectrometer (UVIS) on board the CASSINI spacecraft has permitted the detection of species not observed before in this wavelength domain. But it has also shown a lack of experimental data in this domain. So far, the model is not able to reproduce the observed spectral feature. C4H2 is the molecule that should explain some of the observed feature but absolute cross sections are missing. We will present our latest experimental measurements on this molecule.

  1. Ionization and dissociation dynamics of vinyl bromide probed by femtosecond extreme ultraviolet transient absorption spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Ming-Fu; Neumark, Daniel M.; Gessner, Oliver; Leone, Stephen R.

    2014-02-14

    Strong-field induced ionization and dissociation dynamics of vinyl bromide, CH{sub 2}=CHBr, are probed using femtosecond extreme ultraviolet (XUV) transient absorption spectroscopy. Strong-field ionization is initiated with an intense femtosecond, near infrared (NIR, 775 nm) laser field. Femtosecond XUV pulses covering the photon energy range of 50-72 eV probe the subsequent dynamics by measuring the time-dependent spectroscopic features associated with transitions of the Br (3d) inner-shell electrons to vacancies in molecular and atomic valence orbitals. Spectral signatures are observed for the depletion of neutral C{sub 2}H{sub 3}Br, the formation of C{sub 2}H{sub 3}Br{sup +} ions in their ground (X{sup ~}) and first excited (A{sup ~}) states, the production of C{sub 2}H{sub 3}Br{sup ++} ions, and the appearance of neutral Br ({sup 2}P{sub 3/2}) atoms by dissociative ionization. The formation of free Br ({sup 2}P{sub 3/2}) atoms occurs on a timescale of 330 ± 150 fs. The ionic A{sup ~} state exhibits a time-dependent XUV absorption energy shift of ∼0.4 eV within the time window of the atomic Br formation. The yield of Br atoms correlates with the yield of parent ions in the A{sup ~} state as a function of NIR peak intensity. The observations suggest that a fraction of vibrationally excited C{sub 2}H{sub 3}Br{sup +} (A{sup ~}) ions undergoes intramolecular vibrational energy redistribution followed by the C–Br bond dissociation. The C{sub 2}H{sub 3}Br{sup +} (X{sup ~}) products and the majority of the C{sub 2}H{sub 3}Br{sup ++} ions are relatively stable due to a deeper potential well and a high dissociation barrier, respectively. The results offer powerful new insights about orbital-specific electronic processes in high field ionization, coupled vibrational relaxation and dissociation dynamics, and the correlation of valence hole-state location and dissociation in polyatomic molecules, all probed simultaneously by ultrafast table-top XUV spectroscopy.

  2. Effect of Pressure on Magnetoelastic Coupling in 3d Metal Alloys Studied with X-Ray Absorption Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Pascarelli, S.; Trapananti, A.; Mathon, O.; Aquilanti, G.; Ruffoni, M. P.; Ostanin, S.; Staunton, J. B.; Pettifer, R. F.

    2007-12-07

    Using x-ray absorption spectroscopy, we have studied the effect of pressure on femtometer-scale bond strain due to anisotropic magnetostriction in a thin FeCo film. At 7 GPa local magnetostrictive strain is found to be larger than at ambient, in agreement with spin-polarized ab initio electronic structure calculations, but contrary to the expected effect of compression on bond stiffness. The availability of high pressure data on local magnetostrictive strain opens new capabilities for validating theoretical predictions and can lead to the development of materials with the desired properties.

  3. A reaction cell with sample laser heating for in situ soft X-ray absorption spectroscopy studies under environmental conditions.

    PubMed

    Escudero, Carlos; Jiang, Peng; Pach, Elzbieta; Borondics, Ferenc; West, Mark W; Tuxen, Anders; Chintapalli, Mahati; Carenco, Sophie; Guo, Jinghua; Salmeron, Miquel

    2013-05-01

    A miniature (1 ml volume) reaction cell with transparent X-ray windows and laser heating of the sample has been designed to conduct X-ray absorption spectroscopy studies of materials in the presence of gases at atmospheric pressures. Heating by laser solves the problems associated with the presence of reactive gases interacting with hot filaments used in resistive heating methods. It also facilitates collection of a small total electron yield signal by eliminating interference with heating current leakage and ground loops. The excellent operation of the cell is demonstrated with examples of CO and H2 Fischer-Tropsch reactions on Co nanoparticles.

  4. Charge Carrier Dynamics of Quantum Confined Semiconductor Nanoparticles Analyzed via Transient Absorption Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thibert, Arthur Joseph, III

    were passivated for water solubility via two different methods: hydrosilylation produced 3-aminopropenyl-terminated Si quantum dots, and a modified Stöber process produced silica-encapsulated Si quantum dots. Both methods produce water-soluble quantum dots with maximum emission at 414 nm, and after purification, the quantum dots exhibit intrinsic fluorescence quantum yield efficiencies of 15 and 23%, respectively. Even though the quantum dots have different surfaces, they exhibit nearly identical absorption and fluorescence spectra. Femtosecond transient absorption spectroscopy was used for temporal resolution of the photoexcited carrier dynamics between the quantum dots and ligand. The transient dynamics of the 3-aminopropenyl-terminated Si quantum dots is interpreted as a formation and decay of a charge-transfer excited state between the delocalized π electrons of the carbon linker and the Si core excitons. This charge transfer state is stable for ~4 ns before reverting back to a more stable, long-living species. The silica-encapsulated Si QDs show a simpler spectrum without charge transfer dynamics. Appendix I (Chem. Mat., 1220, 2010), addresses the long-time (μs) transient kinetics associated with TiO2 and layered titanates (TBA2 2Ti4O9), which were synthesized in the Osterloh laboratory (UCD). Transient absorption data reveal that photogenerated electrons become trapped in mid band-gap states, from which they decay exponentially with a time-constant of 43.67 + 0.28 ms in titanates, which is much slower than the 68 + 1 ns observed for TiO2 nanocrystals. The slower kinetics observed for the TBA 2Ti4O9 nanosheets originates either from the presence of deeper trap sites on the sheets vs. the nanoparticles, more trap sites, or from more effective electron-hole separation because of the micrometer dimensions of the 2D lattice. Appendix II, depicts the visible solar spectrum at sea level detailing the percentage of photons and energy that exist within certain

  5. Strong-Field Induced Dissociative Ionization of Vinyl Bromide Probed by Femtosecond Extreme Ultraviolet (xuv) Transient Absorption Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Ming-Fu; Neumark, Daniel; Leone, Stephen R.; Gessner, Oliver

    2014-06-01

    A table-top high harmonic XUV light source (50 eV to 70 eV) has been successfully utilized to explore the ultrafast dynamics of vinyl bromide (CH2=CHBr) with electronic state specificity and elemental sensitivity. Strong-field ionization (SFI) provides a method to produce ions in different ionic states. The production and dissociation dynamics of these ionic states are investigated by femtosecond XUV transient absorption spectroscopy. The XUV photons probe the time-dependent spectroscopic features associated with transitions of the Br (3d) inner-shell electrons to vacancies in molecular and atomic valence orbitals. The experimental observation shows that two ionic states are produced by SFI. The first ionic excited state is dissociative, leading to C-Br bond dissociation which is observed in real time as a shift in the absorption energy. The results offer powerful new insights about orbital-specific electronic processes in high field ionization, coupled vibrational relaxation and dissociation dynamics, and the correlation of valence hole-state location and dissociation in polyatomic molecules, all probed simultaneously by ultrafast table-top XUV spectroscopy.

  6. Time-Resolved Broadband Cavity-Enhanced Absorption Spectroscopy behind Shock Waves.

    PubMed

    Matsugi, Akira; Shiina, Hiroumi; Oguchi, Tatsuo; Takahashi, Kazuo

    2016-04-07

    A fast and sensitive broadband absorption technique for measurements of high-temperature chemical kinetics and spectroscopy has been developed by applying broadband cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopy (BBCEAS) in a shock tube. The developed method has effective absorption path lengths of 60-200 cm, or cavity enhancement factors of 12-40, over a wavelength range of 280-420 nm, and is capable of simultaneously recording absorption time profiles over an ∼32 nm spectral bandpass in a single experiment with temporal and spectral resolutions of 5 μs and 2 nm, respectively. The accuracy of the kinetic and spectroscopic measurements was examined by investigating high-temperature reactions and absorption spectra of formaldehyde behind reflected shock waves using 1,3,5-trioxane as a precursor. The rate constants obtained for the thermal decomposition reactions of 1,3,5-trioxane (to three formaldehyde molecules) and formaldehyde (to HCO + H) agreed well with the literature data. High-temperature absorption cross sections of formaldehyde between 280 and 410 nm have been determined at the post-reflected-shock temperatures of 955, 1265, and 1708 K. The results demonstrate the applicability of the BBCEAS technique to time- and wavelength-resolved sensitive absorption measurements at high temperatures.

  7. [High-order derivative spectroscopy of infrared absorption spectra of the reaction centers from Rhodobacter sphaeroides].

    PubMed

    2005-01-01

    The infrared absorption spectra of reduced and chemically oxidized reaction center preparations from the purple bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides were investigated by means of high-order derivative spectroscopy. The model Gaussian band with a maximum at 810 nm and a half-band of 15 nm found in the absorption spectrum of the reduced reaction center preparation is eliminated after the oxidation of photoactive bacteriochlorophyll dimer (P). This band was related to the absorption of the P(+)y excitonic band of P. On the basis of experimental results, it was concluded that the bleaching of the P(+)y absorption band at 810 nm in the oxidized reaction center preparations gives the main contribution to the blue shift of the 800 nm absorption band of Rb. sphaeroides reaction centers.

  8. The role of X-ray spectroscopy in understanding the geometric and electronic structure of nitrogenase.

    PubMed

    Kowalska, Joanna; DeBeer, Serena

    2015-06-01

    X-ray absorption (XAS) and X-ray emission spectroscopy (XES) provide element specific probes of the geometric and electronic structures of metalloprotein active sites. As such, these methods have played an integral role in nitrogenase research beginning with the first EXAFS studies on nitrogenase in the late 1970s. Herein, we briefly explain the information that can be extracted from XAS and XES. We then highlight the recent applications of these methods in nitrogenase research. The influence of X-ray spectroscopy on our current understanding of the atomic structure and electronic structure of iron molybdenum cofactor (FeMoco) is emphasized. Contributions of X-ray spectroscopy to understanding substrate interactions and cluster biosynthesis are also discussed. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Fe/S proteins: Analysis, structure, function, biogenesis and diseases.

  9. [Near infrared Cavity enhanced absorption spectroscopy study of NO2O].

    PubMed

    Wu, Zhi-wei; Dong, Yan-ting; Zhou, Wei-dong

    2014-08-01

    Using a tunable near infrared external cavity diode laser and a 650 mm long high finesse optical cavity consisting of two highly reflective (R=99.97% at 6561.39 cm(-1)) plan-concave mirrors of curvature radius approximately 1000 mm, a cavity enhanced absorption spectroscopy (CEAS) system was made. The absorption spectra centered at 6561.39 cm(-1) of pure N2O gas and gas mixtures of N2O and N2 were recorded. According to the absorption of N2O at 6561.39 cm(-1) in the cavity, the measured effective absorption path was about 1460 km. The spectra line intensity and line-width of N2O centered at 6561.39 cm(-1) were carefully studied. The relationship between the line-width of absorption spectra and the gas pressure was derived. The pressure broadening parameter of N2 gas for NO2O line centered at 6 561. 39 cm(-1) was deduced and given a value of approximately (0.114 +/- 0.004) cm(-1) x atm(-1). The possibility to detect trace N2O gas in mixture using this CEAS system was investigated. By recording the ab- sorption spectra of N2O gas mixtures at different concentration, the relationship between the line intensity and gas concentration was derived. The minimum detectable absorption was found to be 2.34 x 10(-7) cm(-1) using this cavity enhanced absorption spectroscopy system. And te measurement precision in terms of relative standard deviation (RSD) for N2O is approximately 1.73%, indicating the possibility of using the cavity enhanced absorption spectroscopy system for micro gas N2O analysis in the future.

  10. Characterization and speciation of mercury-bearing mine wastes using X-ray absorption spectroscopy

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kim, C.S.; Brown, Gordon E.; Rytuba, J.J.

    2000-01-01

    Mining of mercury deposits located in the California Coast Range has resulted in the release of mercury to the local environment and water supplies. The solubility, transport, and potential bioavailability of mercury are controlled by its chemical speciation, which can be directly determined for samples with total mercury concentrations greater than 100 mg kg-1 (ppm) using X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS). This technique has the additional benefits of being non-destructive to the sample, element-specific, relatively sensitive at low concentrations, and requiring minimal sample preparation. In this study, Hg L(III)-edge extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectra were collected for several mercury mine tailings (calcines) in the California Coast Range. Total mercury concentrations of samples analyzed ranged from 230 to 1060 ppm. Speciation data (mercury phases present and relative abundances) were obtained by comparing the spectra from heterogeneous, roasted (calcined) mine tailings samples with a spectral database of mercury minerals and sorbed mercury complexes. Speciation analyses were also conducted on known mixtures of pure mercury minerals in order to assess the quantitative accuracy of the technique. While some calcine samples were found to consist exclusively of mercuric sulfide, others contain additional, more soluble mercury phases, indicating a greater potential for the release of mercury into solution. Also, a correlation was observed between samples from hot-spring mercury deposits, in which chloride levels are elevated, and the presence of mercury-chloride species as detected by the speciation analysis. The speciation results demonstrate the ability of XAS to identify multiple mercury phases in a heterogeneous sample, with a quantitative accuracy of ??25% for the mercury-containing phases considered. Use of this technique, in conjunction with standard microanalytical techniques such as X-ray diffraction and electron probe microanalysis

  11. Studying metal ion-protein interactions: electronic absorption, circular dichroism, and electron paramagnetic resonance.

    PubMed

    Quintanar, Liliana; Rivillas-Acevedo, Lina

    2013-01-01

    Metal ions play a wide range of important functional roles in biology, and they often serve as cofactors in enzymes. Some of the metal ions that are essential for life are strongly associated with proteins, forming obligate metalloproteins, while others may bind to proteins with relatively low affinity. The spectroscopic tools presented in this chapter are suitable to study metal ion-protein interactions. Metal sites in proteins are usually low symmetry centers that differentially absorb left and right circularly polarized light. The combination of electronic absorption and circular dichroism (CD) in the UV-visible region allows the characterization of electronic transitions associated with the metal-protein complex, yielding information on the geometry and nature of the metal-ligand interactions. For paramagnetic metal centers in proteins, electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) is a powerful tool that provides information on the chemical environment around the unpaired electron(s), as it relates to the electronic structure and geometry of the metal-protein complex. EPR can also probe interactions between the electron spin and nuclear spins in the vicinity, yielding valuable information on some metal-ligand interactions. This chapter describes each spectroscopic technique and it provides the necessary information to design and implement the study of metal ion-protein interactions by electronic absorption, CD, and EPR.

  12. Single-electron detection and spectroscopy via relativistic cyclotron radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Asner, David M.; Bradley, Rich; De Viveiros Souza Filho, Luiz A.; Doe, Peter J.; Fernandes, Justin L.; Fertl, M.; Finn, Erin C.; Formaggio, Joseph; Furse, Daniel L.; Jones, Anthony M.; Kofron, Jared N.; LaRoque, Benjamin; Leber, Michelle; MCBride, Lisa; Miller, M. L.; Mohanmurthy, Prajwal T.; Monreal, Ben; Oblath, Noah S.; Robertson, R. G. H.; Rosenberg, Leslie; Rybka, Gray; Rysewyk, Devyn M.; Sternberg, Michael G.; Tedeschi, Jonathan R.; Thummler, Thomas; VanDevender, Brent A.; Woods, N. L.

    2015-04-01

    It has been understood since 1897 that accelerating charges should emit electromagnetic radiation. Cyclotron radiation, the particular form of radiation emitted by an electron orbiting in a magnetic field, was first derived in 1904. Despite the simplicity of this concept, and the enormous utility of electron spectroscopy in nuclear and particle physics, single-electron cyclotron radiation has never been observed directly. Here we demonstrate single-electron detection in a novel radiofrequency spectrometer. We observe the cyclotron radiation emitted by individual electrons that are produced with mildly-relativistic energies by a gaseous radioactive source and are magnetically trapped. The relativistic shift in the cyclotron frequency permits a precise electron energy measurement. Precise beta electron spectroscopy from gaseous radiation sources is a key technique in modern efforts to measure the neutrino mass via the tritium decay endpoint, and this work is a proof-of-concept for future neutrino mass experiments using this technique.

  13. Status of the X-Ray Absorption Spectroscopy (XAS) Beamline at the Australian Synchrotron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glover, C.; McKinlay, J.; Clift, M.; Barg, B.; Boldeman, J.; Ridgway, M.; Foran, G.; Garret, R.; Lay, P.; Broadbent, A.

    2007-02-01

    We present herein the current status of the X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy (XAS) Beamline at the 3 GeV Australian Synchrotron. The optical design and performance, details of the insertion device (Wiggler), end station capabilities and construction and commissioning timeline are given.

  14. DETERMINING BERYLLIUM IN DRINKING WATER BY GRAPHITE FURNACE ATOMIC ABSORPTION SPECTROSCOPY

    EPA Science Inventory

    A direct graphite furnace atomic absorption spectroscopy method for the analysis of beryllium in drinking water has been derived from a method for determining beryllium in urine. Ammonium phosphomolybdate and ascorbic acid were employed as matrix modifiers. The matrix modifiers s...

  15. Determination of sub microgram amounts of selenium in rocks by atomic-absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Golembeski, T

    1975-06-01

    Atomic-absorption spectroscopy was used to determine trace amounts of selenium accurately in U.S. Geological Survey standard rocks, GSP-1, W-1 and BCR-1. The results obtained were compared with those obtained by neutron-activation analysis and excellent agreement was found; in addition, the selenium:sulphur ratio was calculated and agreed with results obtained by other workers.

  16. Absorption and Scattering Coefficients: A Biophysical-Chemistry Experiment Using Reflectance Spectroscopy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cordon, Gabriela B.; Lagorio, M. Gabriela

    2007-01-01

    A biophysical-chemistry experiment, based on the reflectance spectroscopy for calculating the absorption and scattering coefficients of leaves is described. The results show that different plants species exhibit different values for both the coefficients because of their different pigment composition.

  17. LISA: the Italian CRG beamline for x-ray Absorption Spectroscopy at ESRF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    d'Acapito, F.; Trapananti, A.; Puri, A.

    2016-05-01

    LISA is the acronym of Linea Italiana per la Spettroscopia di Assorbimento di raggi X (Italian beamline for X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy) and is the upgrade of the former GILDA beamline installed on the BM08 bending magnet port of European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF). Within this contribution a full description of the project is provided.

  18. Diamond Analyzed by Secondary Electron Emission Spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krainsky, Isay L.

    1998-01-01

    Diamond is a promising semiconductor material for novel electronic applications because of its chemical stability and inertness, heat conduction properties, and so-called negative electron affinity (NEA). When a surface has NEA, electrons generated inside the bulk of the material are able to come out into the vacuum without any potential barrier (work function). Such a material would have an extremely high secondary electron emission coefficient o, very high photoelectron (quantum) yield, and would probably be an efficient field emitter. Chemical-vapor-deposited (CVD) polycrystalline diamond films have even more advantages than diamond single crystals. Their fabrication is relatively easy and inexpensive, and they can be grown with high levels of doping--consequently, they can have relatively high conductivity. Because of these properties, diamond can be used for cold cathodes and photocathodes in high-power electronics and in high-frequency and high-temperature semiconductor devices.

  19. Surface-enhanced infrared absorption spectroscopy (SEIRAS) to probe monolayers of membrane proteins.

    PubMed

    Ataka, Kenichi; Stripp, Sven Timo; Heberle, Joachim

    2013-10-01

    Surface-enhanced infrared absorption spectroscopy (SEIRAS) represents a variation of conventional infrared spectroscopy and exploits the signal enhancement exerted by the plasmon resonance of nano-structured metal thin films. The surface enhancement decays in about 10nm with the distance from the surface and is, thus, perfectly suited to selectively probe monolayers of biomembranes. Peculiar to membrane proteins is their vectorial functionality, the probing of which requires proper orientation within the membrane. To this end, the metal surface used in SEIRAS is chemically modified to generate an oriented membrane protein film. Monolayers of uniformly oriented membrane proteins are formed by tethering His-tagged proteins to a nickel nitrilo-triacetic acid (Ni-NTA) modified gold surface and SEIRAS commands molecular sensitivity to probe each step of surface modification. The solid surface used as plasmonic substrate for SEIRAS, can also be employed as an electrode to investigate systems where electron transfer reactions are relevant, like e.g. cytochrome c oxidase or plant-type photosystems. Furthermore, the interaction of these membrane proteins with water-soluble proteins, like cytochrome c or hydrogenase, is studied on the molecular level by SEIRAS. The impact of the membrane potential on protein functionality is verified by monitoring light-dark difference spectra of a monolayer of sensory rhodopsin (SRII) at different applied potentials. It is demonstrated that the interpretations of all of these experiments critically depend on the orientation of the solid-supported membrane protein. Finally, future directions of SEIRAS including cellular systems are discussed. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: FTIR in membrane proteins and peptide studies.

  20. The spectroscopy of singlets and triplets excites electronic states, spatial and electronic structure of hydrocarbons and quantum classifications in chemmotology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obukhov, A. E.

    2016-12-01

    In this work we demonstrate the physical foundations of the spectroscopy of the grounds states: E- and X-ray, (RR) Raman scattering the NMR 1H and 13C and IR-, EPR- absorption and the singlets and triplets electronic excited states in the multinuclear hydrocarbons in chemmotology. The parameters of UV-absorption, RR-Raman scattering of light, the fluorescence and the phosphorescence and day-lasers at the pumping laser and lamp, OLEDs and OTETs- are measurements. The spectral-energy properties are briefly studied. The quantum-chemical LCAO-MO SCF expanded-CI PPP/S and INDO/S methods in the electronic and spatial structure hidrocarbons are considered.

  1. Electronic absorption of Frenkel excitons in topologically disordered systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schweizer, Kenneth S.

    1986-10-01

    A self-consistent effective medium theory of the electronic absorption spectra of tightly bound dipolar excitons in simple fluids is developed within the adiabatic picture. The theoretical approach is based on the isomorphism between the path-integral formulation of quantum theory and classical statistical mechanics and is an extension of previous work [D. Chandler, K. S. Schweizer, and P. G. Wolynes, Phys. Rev. Lett. 49, 1100 (1982)]. The consequences of fluid structural disorder on resonant excitation transfer and the statistical fluctuations of single molecule energy levels are simultaneously treated. Detailed numerical calculations are performed to establish the dependence of the absorption spectrum on fluid density, short range order, and the relative magnitude of the resonant transfer vs the single site disorder. The density dependence of the spectral features are found to be a sensitive function of fluid structure and the relative strength of the localizing vs the delocalizing interactions. By comparing the liquid state results with the corresponding crystalline solid behavior, the consequences of topological disorder on the exciton spectrum are identified. The relevance of the theoretical predictions to spectroscopic probes of exciton delocalization in molecular liquids and glasses is discussed.

  2. X-ray absorption spectroscopy on the basis of hybrid X-pinch radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Tilikin, I. N. Shelkovenko, T. A.; Pikuz, S. A.; Knapp, P. F.; Hammer, D. A.

    2015-07-15

    Results of experiments on X-ray absorption spectroscopy carried out at the BIN (270 kA, 100 ns) and XP (450 kA, 45 ns) facilities are presented. Continuum radiation of a Mo hybrid X-pinch was used as probing radiation, against which absorption lines of the plasma of exploded Al wires placed in the return current circuit of a hybrid X-pinch, as well as in a two- and four-wire array, were observed. The experiments have demonstrated that the radiation of a hybrid X-pinch hot spot can be used as probing radiation for X-ray absorption spectroscopy and that, in many parameters, such a source surpasses those on the basis of laser-produced plasma. The plasma parameters in arrays made of two and four Al wires were studied experimentally.

  3. Spectrum sensing of trace C(2)H(2) detection in differential optical absorption spectroscopy technique.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xi; Dong, Xiaopeng

    2014-09-10

    An improved algorithm for trace C(2)H(2) detection is presented in this paper. The trace concentration is accurately calculated by focusing on the absorption spectrum from the frequency domain perspective. The advantage of the absorption spectroscopy frequency domain algorithm is its anti-interference capability. First, the influence of the background noise on the minimum detectable concentration is greatly reduced. Second, the time-consuming preprocess of spectra calibration in the differential optical absorption spectroscopy technique is skipped. Experimental results showed the detection limit of 50 ppm is achieved at a lightpath length of 0.2 m. This algorithm can be used in real-time spectrum analysis with high accuracy.

  4. X-ray absorption spectroscopy on the basis of hybrid X-pinch radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tilikin, I. N.; Shelkovenko, T. A.; Pikuz, S. A.; Knapp, P. F.; Hammer, D. A.

    2015-07-01

    Results of experiments on X-ray absorption spectroscopy carried out at the BIN (270 kA, 100 ns) and XP (450 kA, 45 ns) facilities are presented. Continuum radiation of a Mo hybrid X-pinch was used as probing radiation, against which absorption lines of the plasma of exploded Al wires placed in the return current circuit of a hybrid X-pinch, as well as in a two- and four-wire array, were observed. The experiments have demonstrated that the radiation of a hybrid X-pinch hot spot can be used as probing radiation for X-ray absorption spectroscopy and that, in many parameters, such a source surpasses those on the basis of laser-produced plasma. The plasma parameters in arrays made of two and four Al wires were studied experimentally.

  5. Solving the Structure of Reaction Intermediates by Time-Resolved Synchrotron X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Q.; Hanson, J; Frenkel, A

    2008-01-01

    We present a robust data analysis method of time-resolved x-ray absorption spectroscopy experiments suitable for chemical speciation and structure determination of reaction intermediates. Chemical speciation is done by principal component analysis (PCA) of the time-resolved x-ray absorption near-edge structure data. Structural analysis of intermediate phases is done by theoretical modeling of their extended x-ray absorption fine-structure data isolated by PCA. The method is demonstrated using reduction and reoxidation of Cu-doped ceria catalysts where we detected reaction intermediates and measured fine details of the reaction kinetics. This approach can be directly adapted to many time-resolved x-ray spectroscopy experiments where new rapid throughput data collection and analysis methods are needed.

  6. Ultrafast Absorption Spectroscopy of Aluminum Plasmas Created by LCLS using Betatron X-Ray Radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Albert, Felicie

    2016-10-12

    This document summarizes the goals and accomplishments of a six month-long LDRD project, awarded through the LLNL director Early and Mid Career Recognition (EMCR) program. This project allowed us to support beamtime awarded at the Matter under Extreme Conditions (MEC) end station of the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS). The goal of the experiment was to heat metallic samples with the bright x-rays from the LCLS free electron laser. Then, we studied how they relaxed back to equilibrium by probing them with ultrafast x-ray absorption spectroscopy using laser-based betatron radiation. Our work enabled large collaborations between LLNL, SLAC, LBNL, and institutions in France and in the UK, while providing training to undergraduate and graduate students during the experiment. Following this LDRD project, the PI was awarded a 5-year DOE early career research grant to further develop applications of laser-driven x-ray sources for high energy density science experiments and warm dense matter states.

  7. Atomic-scale roughness of Li metal surface evident in soft X-ray absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prendergast, David; Wan, Liwen; Liang, Yufeng; Chuang, Yi-De; Qiao, Ruimin; Yan, Shishen; Yang, Wanli

    2015-03-01

    Realizing Li metal electrodes depends on fundamental understanding and efficient control of surface properties, which requires reliable characterization of the Li metal surface. Controlled experiments of Li K-edge soft X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) reveal evidence of steady oxidation of the Li metal surface even under ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) conditions. The XAS of the short-lived Li metal surface, prepared by in-situ scratching, exhibits a prominent peak at 55.6 eV, more intense and at a slightly higher energy than the first peak expected for bulk Li metal at 55 eV. First-principles XAS calculations explain the origin of both the increased intensity and energy shift. This required the use of surface structural models with under-coordinated Li atoms and an estimated 4 Åinelastic mean-free-path for Auger electrons, implying extreme surface sensitivity of the measurements to the first 2-3 atomic layers. This work provides a benchmark on both experiment and theory for further studies of Li and other reactive metal surfaces, which are currently under scrutiny for next-generation energy storage devices. DP, LW, and YL acknowledge support from the Joint Center for Energy Storage Research, an Energy Innovation Hub funded by the US Dept. of Energy, Office of Science, Basic Energy Sciences.

  8. X-ray absorption spectroscopy of iron at multimegabar pressures in laser shock experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harmand, M.; Ravasio, A.; Mazevet, S.; Bouchet, J.; Denoeud, A.; Dorchies, F.; Feng, Y.; Fourment, C.; Galtier, E.; Gaudin, J.; Guyot, F.; Kodama, R.; Koenig, M.; Lee, H. J.; Miyanishi, K.; Morard, G.; Musella, R.; Nagler, B.; Nakatsutsumi, M.; Ozaki, N.; Recoules, V.; Toleikis, S.; Vinci, T.; Zastrau, U.; Zhu, D.; Benuzzi-Mounaix, A.

    2015-07-01

    Taking advantage of the new opportunities provided by x-ray free electron laser (FEL) sources when coupled to a long laser pulse as available at the Linear Coherent Light Source (LCLS), we have performed x-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy (XANES) of laser shock compressed iron up to 420 GPa (±50 ) and 10 800 K (±1390 ). Visible diagnostics coupled with hydrodynamic simulations were used to infer the thermodynamical conditions along the Hugoniot and the release adiabat. A modification of the pre-edge feature at 7.12 keV in the XANES spectra is observed above pressures of 260 GPa along the Hugoniot. Comparing with ab initio calculations and with previous laser-heated diamond cell data, we propose that such changes in the XANES pre-edge could be a signature of molten iron. This interpretation then suggests that iron is molten at pressures and temperatures higher than 260 GPa (±29 ) and 5680 K (±700 ) along the principal Fe Hugoniot.

  9. Properties of aqueous nitrate and nitrite from x-ray absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Jacob W.; Lam, Royce K.; Shih, Orion; Rizzuto, Anthony M.; Prendergast, David; Saykally, Richard J.

    2015-08-01

    Nitrate and nitrite ions are of considerable interest, both for their widespread use in commercial and research contexts and because of their central role in the global nitrogen cycle. The chemistry of atmospheric aerosols, wherein nitrate is abundant, has been found to depend on the interfacial behavior of ionic species. The interfacial behavior of ions is determined largely by their hydration properties; consequently, the study of the hydration and interfacial behavior of nitrate and nitrite comprises a significant field of study. In this work, we describe the study of aqueous solutions of sodium nitrate and nitrite via X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS), interpreted in light of first-principles density functional theory electronic structure calculations. Experimental and calculated spectra of the nitrogen K-edge XA spectra of bulk solutions exhibit a large 3.7 eV shift between the XA spectra of nitrate and nitrite resulting from greater stabilization of the nitrogen 1s energy level in nitrate. A similar shift is not observed in the oxygen K-edge XA spectra of NO3- and NO2-. The hydration properties of nitrate and nitrite are found to be similar, with both anions exhibiting a similar propensity towards ion pairing.

  10. X-ray absorption spectroscopy of lithium sulfur battery reaction intermediates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wujcik, Kevin; Pascal, Tod; Prendergast, David; Balsara, Nitash

    2015-03-01

    Lithium sulfur batteries have a theoretical energy density nearly five times greater than current lithium ion battery standards, but questions still remain regarding the reaction pathways through which soluble lithium polysulfide (Li2Sx, ``x'' ranging from 2 to 8) reaction intermediates are formed. Complicating spectroelectrochemical approaches to elucidate redox pathways is the challenge of obtaining spectral standards for individual Li2Sx species. Lithium polysulfides cannot be isolated as individual component and exist only in solution as a distribution of different Li2Sx molecules formed via disproportionation reactions (e.g. 2Li2S4 goes to Li2S3 + Li2S5). X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) at the sulfur K-edge has recently been employed as a technique to study Li-S chemistry. We have recently obtained XAS standards for individual Li2Sx species via first principles DFT simulations and the excited electron and core hole approach. Here, experimental sulfur K-edge XAS of Li2Sx species dissolved in poly(ethylene oxide) are compared to spectra obtained from analogous theoretical calculations. The impact that polysulfide solution concentration and the presence of other lithium salts (e.g. LiNO3) have on X-ray spectra of Li2Sx species is explored via experiment and theory.

  11. X-ray absorption spectroscopy of biomimetic dye molecules for solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Cook, Peter L.; Liu Xiaosong; Himpsel, F. J.; Yang Wanli

    2009-11-21

    Dye-sensitized solar cells are potentially inexpensive alternatives to traditional semiconductor solar cells. In order to optimize dyes for solar cells we systematically investigate the electronic structure of a variety of porphyrins and phthalocyanines. As a biological model system we use the heme group in cytochrome c which plays a role in biological charge transfer processes. X-ray absorption spectroscopy of the N 1s and C 1s edges reveals the unoccupied molecular orbitals and the orientation of the molecules in thin films. The transition metal 2p edges reflect the oxidation state of the central metal atom, its spin state, and the ligand field of the surrounding N atoms. The latter allows tuning of the energy position of the lowest unoccupied orbital by several tenths of an eV by tailoring the molecules and their deposition. Fe and Mn containing phthalocyanines oxidize easily from +2 to +3 in air and require vacuum deposition for obtaining a reproducible oxidation state. Chlorinated porphyrins, on the other hand, are reduced from +3 to +2 during vacuum deposition at elevated temperatures. These findings stress the importance of controlled thin film deposition for obtaining photovoltaic devices with an optimum match between the energy levels of the dye and those of the donor and acceptor electrodes, together with a molecular orientation for optimal overlap between the {pi} orbitals in the direction of the carrier transport.

  12. Properties of aqueous nitrate and nitrite from x-ray absorption spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Jacob W.; Lam, Royce K.; Saykally, Richard J.; Shih, Orion; Rizzuto, Anthony M.; Prendergast, David

    2015-08-28

    Nitrate and nitrite ions are of considerable interest, both for their widespread use in commercial and research contexts and because of their central role in the global nitrogen cycle. The chemistry of atmospheric aerosols, wherein nitrate is abundant, has been found to depend on the interfacial behavior of ionic species. The interfacial behavior of ions is determined largely by their hydration properties; consequently, the study of the hydration and interfacial behavior of nitrate and nitrite comprises a significant field of study. In this work, we describe the study of aqueous solutions of sodium nitrate and nitrite via X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS), interpreted in light of first-principles density functional theory electronic structure calculations. Experimental and calculated spectra of the nitrogen K-edge XA spectra of bulk solutions exhibit a large 3.7 eV shift between the XA spectra of nitrate and nitrite resulting from greater stabilization of the nitrogen 1s energy level in nitrate. A similar shift is not observed in the oxygen K-edge XA spectra of NO{sub 3}{sup −} and NO{sub 2}{sup −}. The hydration properties of nitrate and nitrite are found to be similar, with both anions exhibiting a similar propensity towards ion pairing.

  13. Auger electron spectroscopy, secondary ion mass spectroscopy and optical characterization of a-C-H and BN films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pouch, J. J.; Alterovitz, S. A.; Warner, J. D.

    1986-01-01

    The amorphous dielectrics a-C:H and BN were deposited on III-V semiconductors. Optical band gaps as high as 3 eV were measured for a-C:H generated by C4H10 plasmas; a comparison was made with bad gaps obtained from films prepared by CH4 glow discharges. The ion beam deposited BN films exhibited amorphous behavior with band gaps on the order of 5 eV. Film compositions were studied by Auger electron spectroscopy (AES), x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS). The optical properties were characterized by ellipsometry, UV/VIS absorption, and IR reflection and transmission. Etching rates of a-C:H subjected to O2 dicharges were determined.

  14. X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy Study of the Effect of Rh doping in Sr2IrO4

    PubMed Central

    Sohn, C. H.; Cho, Deok-Yong; Kuo, C.-T.; Sandilands, L. J.; Qi, T. F.; Cao, G.; Noh, T. W.

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the effect of Rh doping in Sr2IrO4 using X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS). We observed appearance of new electron-addition states with increasing Rh concentration (x in Sr2Ir1−xRhxO4) in accordance with the concept of hole doping. The intensity of the hole-induced state is however weak, suggesting weakness of charge transfer (CT) effect and Mott insulating ground states. Also, Ir Jeff = 1/2 upper Hubbard band shifts to lower energy as x increases up to x = 0.23. Combined with optical spectroscopy, these results suggest a hybridisation-related mechanism, in which Rh doping can weaken the (Ir Jeff = 1/2)–(O 2p) orbital hybridisation in the in-planar Rh-O-Ir bond networks. PMID:27025538

  15. Pharmaceutical applications of separation of absorption and scattering in near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS).

    PubMed

    Shi, Zhenqi; Anderson, Carl A

    2010-12-01

    The number of near-infrared (NIR) spectroscopic applications in the pharmaceutical sciences has grown significantly in the last decade. Despite its widespread application, the fundamental interaction between NIR radiation and pharmaceutical materials is often not mechanistically well understood. Separation of absorption and scattering in near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) is intended to extract absorption and scattering spectra (i.e., absorption and reduced scattering coefficients) from reflectance/transmittance NIR measurements. The purpose of the separation is twofold: (1) to enhance the understanding of the individual roles played by absorption and scattering in NIRS and (2) to apply the separated absorption and scattering spectra for practical spectroscopic analyses. This review paper surveys the multiple techniques reported to date on the separation of NIR absorption and scattering within pharmaceutical applications, focusing on the instrumentations, mathematical approaches used to separate absorption and scattering and related pharmaceutical applications. This literature review is expected to enhance the understanding and thereby the utility of NIRS in pharmaceutical science. Further, the measurement and subsequent understanding of the separation of absorption and scattering is expected to increase not only the number of NIRS applications, but also their robustness.

  16. X-ray and photoelectron spectroscopy of the structure, reactivity, and electronic structure of semiconductor nanocrystals

    SciTech Connect

    Hamad, Kimberly Sue

    2000-01-01

    Semiconductor nanocrystals are a system which has been the focus of interest due to their size dependent properties and their possible use in technological applications. Many chemical and physical properties vary systematically with the size of the nanocrystal and thus their study enables the investigation of scaling laws. Due to the increasing surface to volume ratio as size is decreased, the surfaces of nanocrystals are expected to have a large influence on their electronic, thermodynamic, and chemical behavior. In spite of their importance, nanocrystal surfaces are still relatively uncharacterized in terms of their structure, electronic properties, bonding, and reactivity. Investigation of nanocrystal surfaces is currently limited by what techniques to use, and which methods are suitable for nanocrystals is still being determined. This work presents experiments using x-ray and electronic spectroscopies to explore the structure, reactivity, and electronic properties of semiconductor (CdSe, InAs) nanocrystals and how they vary with size. Specifically, x-ray absorption near edge spectroscopy (XANES) in conjunction with multiple scattering simulations affords information about the structural disorder present at the surface of the nanocrystal. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and ultra-violet photoelectron spectroscopy (UPS) probe the electronic structure in terms of hole screening, and also give information about band lineups when the nanocrystal is placed in electric contact with a substrate. XPS of the core levels of the nanocrystal as a function of photo-oxidation time yields kinetic data on the oxidation reaction occurring at the surface of the nanocrystal.

  17. Determination of Calcium in Cereal with Flame Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy: An Experiment for a Quantitative Methods of Analysis Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bazzi, Ali; Kreuz, Bette; Fischer, Jeffrey

    2004-01-01

    An experiment for determination of calcium in cereal using two-increment standard addition method in conjunction with flame atomic absorption spectroscopy (FAAS) is demonstrated. The experiment is intended to introduce students to the principles of atomic absorption spectroscopy giving them hands on experience using quantitative methods of…

  18. Near-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy signature of image potential states in multilayer epitaxial graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coelho, P. M.; dos Reis, D. D.; Matos, M. J. S.; Mendes-de-Sa, T. G.; Goncalves, A. M. B.; Lacerda, R. G.; Malachias, A.; Magalhaes-Paniago, R.

    2016-02-01

    Single layer behavior in multilayer epitaxial graphene has been a matter of intense investigation. This is due to the layer decoupling that occurs during growth of graphene on some types of substrates, such as carbon-terminated silicon carbide. We show here that near-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy can be used to observe the signature of this decoupling. To this end, samples of multilayer graphene from silicon carbide sublimation were grown with different degrees of decoupling. Raman spectroscopy was used to infer the degree of structural decoupling. X-ray grazing-incidence diffraction and scanning tunneling microscopy showed that growth initiates with the presence of bilayer graphene commensurate structures, while layer decoupling is associated to the formation of incommensurate structures observed for longer sublimation time. Near-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy was used to probe the electronic states above the Fermi energy. Besides the σ* and π* empty states, image potential states are observed and show a clear change of intensity as a function of incident angle. These image potential states evolve from a graphite- to graphene-like behavior as a function of growth time and can be used to infer the degree of structural coupling among layers.

  19. Time-resolved characterization of a filamentary argon discharge at atmospheric pressure in a capillary using emission and absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schröter, Sandra; Pothiraja, Ramasamy; Awakowicz, Peter; Bibinov, Nikita; Böke, Marc; Niermann, Benedikt; Winter, Jörg

    2013-11-01

    An argon/nitrogen (0.999/0.001) filamentary pulsed discharge operated at atmospheric pressure in a quartz tube is characterized using voltage-current measurements, microphotography, optical emission spectroscopy (OES) and absorption spectroscopy. Nitrogen is applied as a sensor gas for the purpose of OES diagnostic. The density of argon metastable atoms Ar(3P2) is determined using tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (TDLAS). Using a plasma chemical model the measured OES data are applied for the characterization of the plasma conditions. Between intense positive pulses the discharge current oscillates with a damped amplitude. It is established that an electric current flows in this discharge not only through a thin plasma filament that is observed in the discharge image but also through the whole cross section of the quartz tube. A diffuse plasma fills the quartz tube during a time between intense current pulses. Ionization waves are propagating in this plasma between the spike and the grounded area of the tube producing thin plasma channels. The diameter of these channels increases during the pause between the propagation of ionization waves probably because of thermal expansion and diffusion. Inside the channels electron densities of ˜2 × 1013 cm-3, argon metastable densities ˜1014 cm-3 and a reduced electric field about 10 Td are determined.

  20. Recovery of acetylene absorption line profile basing on tunable diode laser spectroscopy with intensity modulation and photoacoustic spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Li; Thursby, Graham; Stewart, George; Arsad, Norhana; Uttamchandani, Deepak; Culshaw, Brian; Wang, Yiding

    2010-04-01

    A novel and direct absorption line recovery technique based on tunable diode laser spectroscopy with intensity modulation is presented. Photoacoustic spectroscopy is applied for high sensitivity, zero background and efficient acoustic enhancement at a low modulation frequency. A micro-electromechanical systems (MEMS) mirror driven by an electrothermal actuator is used for generating laser intensity modulation (without wavelength modulation) through the external reflection. The MEMS mirror with 10μm thick structure material layer and 100nm thick gold coating is formed as a circular mirror of 2mm diameter attached to an electrothermal actuator and is fabricated on a chip that is wire-bonded and placed on a PCB holder. Low modulation frequency is adopted (since the resonant frequencies of the photoacoustic gas cell and the electrothermal actuator are different) and intrinsic high signal amplitude characteristics in low frequency region achieved from measured frequency responses for the MEMS mirror and the gas cell. Based on the property of photoacoustic spectroscopy and Beer's law that detectable sensitivity is a function of input laser intensity in the case of constant gas concentration and laser path length, a Keopsys erbium doped fibre amplifier (EDFA) with opto-communication C band and high output power up to 1W is chosen to increase the laser power. High modulation depth is achieved through adjusting the MEMS mirror's reflection position and driving voltage. In order to scan through the target gas absorption line, the temperature swept method is adopted for the tunable distributed feed-back (DFB) diode laser working at 1535nm that accesses the near-infrared vibration-rotation spectrum of acetylene. The profile of acetylene P17 absorption line at 1535.39nm is recovered ideally for ~100 parts-per-million (ppm) acetylene balanced by nitrogen. The experimental signal to noise ratio (SNR) of absorption line recovery for 500mW laser power was ~80 and hence the

  1. NO_2 Trace Measurements by Optical-Feedback Cavity-Enhanced Absorption Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ventrillard-Courtillot, I.; Desbois, Th.; Foldes, T.; Romanini, D.

    2009-06-01

    In order to reach the sub-ppb NO_2 detection level required for environmental applications in remote areas, we develop a spectrometer based on a technique introduced a few years ago, named Optical-Feedback Cavity-Enhanced Absorption Spectroscopy (OF-CEAS) [1]. It allows very sensitive and selective measurements, together with the realization of compact and robust set-ups as was subsequently demonstrated during measurements campaigns in harsh environments [2]. OF-CEAS benefits from the optical feedback to efficiently inject a cw-laser in a V-shaped high finesse cavity (typically 10 000). Cavity-enhanced absorption spectra are acquired on a small spectral region (˜1 cm^{-1}) that enables selective and quantitative measurements at a fast acquisition rate with a detection limit of several 10^{-10} cm^{-1} as reported in this work. Spectra are obtained with high spectral definition (150 MHz highly precisely spaced data points) and are self calibrated by cavity rind-down measurements regularly performed (typically every second). NO_2 measurements are performed with a commercial extended cavity diode laser around 411 nm, spectral region where intense electronic transitions occur. We will describe the set-up developed for in-situ measurements allowing real time concentration measurements at typically 5 Hz; and then report on the measurements performed with calibrated NO_2 reference samples to evaluate the linearity of the apparatus. The minimum detectable absorption loss is estimated by considering the standard deviation of the residual of one spectrum. We achieved 2x10^{-10} cm^{-1} for a single spectrum recorded in less than 100 ms at 100 mbar. It leads to a potential detection limit of 3x10^8 molecules/cm^3, corresponding to about 150 pptv at this pressure. [1] J. Morville, S. Kassi, M. Chenevier, and D. Romanini, Appl. Phys. B, 80, 1027 (2005). [2] D. Romanini, M. Chenevrier, S. Kassi, M. Schmidt, C. Valant, M. Ramonet, J. Lopez, and H.-J. Jost, Appl. Phys. B, 83, 659

  2. Application of X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy to the study of nuclear structural materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Shanshan

    One of key technologies for the next generation nuclear systems are advanced materials, including high temperature structural materials, fast neutron resistance core materials and so on. Local structure determination in these systems, which often are crystallographically intractable, is critical to gaining an understanding of their properties. In this thesis, X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy (XAS), including Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (EXAFS) and X-ray Absorption Near Edge Structure (XANES), is used to examine the geometric and electronic structure of nuclear structural materials under varying conditions. The thesis is divided into two main sections. The first examines the structural analysis of nanostructured ferritic alloys (NFA) which are dispersion strengthened by an ultra high density of Y-Ti-O enriched nano-features, resulting in remarkable high temperature creep strength and radiation damage resistance. Titanium and Yttrium K-edge XAS shows commercial alloys MA957 and J12YWT more closely resemble the as received Fe-14Cr-3W-0.4Ti (wt. %) powders, and mechanically alloyed (MA) powders with 0.25Y2O3 (wt. %). It shows that a significant fraction of substitutional Ti remains dissolved in the (BCC) ferrite matrix. In contrast, annealed powders and hot isostatic press (HIP) consolidated alloys show high temperature heat treatments shift the Y and Ti to more oxidized states that are consistent with combinations of Y2Ti2O7 and, especially, TiO. The second section describes corrosion studies of Pb with 316L stainless steel, molybdenum and spinet (MgAl2O4) at high temperature by XAS. The corrosion of fuel cladding and structural materials by liquid lead at elevated temperatures is an issue that must be considered when designing advanced nuclear systems and high-power spallation neutron targets. The results of ex-situ studies show that a Mo substrate retained a smooth and less corroded surface than 316L stainless steel sample at elevated temperature. In

  3. Ultrafast carrier dynamics of titanic acid nanotubes investigated by transient absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Li; Zhao, Hui; Pan, Lin Yun; Weng, Yu Xiang; Nakato, Yoshihiro; Tamai, Naoto

    2010-12-01

    Carrier dynamics of titanic acid nanotubes (phase of H2Ti2O5.H2O) deposited on a quartz plate was examined by visible/near-IR transient absorption spectroscopy with an ultraviolet excitation. The carrier dynamics of titanic acid nanotubes follows the fast trapping process which attributed to the intrinsic tubular structure, the relaxation of shallow trapped carriers and the recombination as a second-order kinetic process. Transient absorption of titanic acid nanotubes was dominated by the absorption of surface-trapped holes in visible region around 500 nm, which was proved by the faster decay dynamics in the presence of polyvinyl alcohol as a hole-scavenger. However, the slow relaxation of free carriers was much more pronounced in the TiO2 single crystals, as compared with the transient absorption spectra of titanic acid nanotubes under the similar excitation.

  4. Detection of electron paramagnetic resonance absorption using frequency modulation.

    PubMed

    Hirata, Hiroshi; Kuyama, Toshifumi; Ono, Mitsuhiro; Shimoyama, Yuhei

    2003-10-01

    A frequency modulation (FM) method was developed to measure electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) absorption. The first-derivative spectrum of 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) powder was measured with this FM method. Frequency modulation of up to 1.6 MHz (peak-to-peak) was achieved at a microwave carrier frequency of 1.1 GHz. This corresponds to a magnetic field modulation of 57microT (peak-to-peak) at 40.3 mT. By using a tunable microwave resonator and automatic control systems, we achieved a practical continuous-wave (CW) EPR spectrometer that incorporates the FM method. In the present experiments, the EPR signal intensity was proportional to the magnitude of frequency modulation. The background signal at the modulation frequency (1 kHz) for EPR detection was also proportional to the magnitude of frequency modulation. An automatic matching control (AMC) system reduced the amplitude of noise in microwave detection and improved the baseline stability. Distortion of the spectral lineshape was seen when the spectrometer settings were not appropriate, e.g., with a lack of the open-loop gain in automatic tuning control (ATC). FM is an alternative to field modulation when the side-effect of field modulation is detrimental for EPR detection. The present spectroscopic technique based on the FM scheme is useful for measuring the first derivative with respect to the microwave frequency in investigations of electron-spin-related phenomena.

  5. Algebraic approach to electronic spectroscopy and dynamics.

    PubMed

    Toutounji, Mohamad

    2008-04-28

    Lie algebra, Zassenhaus, and parameter differentiation techniques are utilized to break up the exponential of a bilinear Hamiltonian operator into a product of noncommuting exponential operators by the virtue of the theory of Wei and Norman [J. Math. Phys. 4, 575 (1963); Proc. Am. Math. Soc., 15, 327 (1964)]. There are about three different ways to find the Zassenhaus exponents, namely, binomial expansion, Suzuki formula, and q-exponential transformation. A fourth, and most reliable method, is provided. Since linearly displaced and distorted (curvature change upon excitation/emission) Hamiltonian and spin-boson Hamiltonian may be classified as bilinear Hamiltonians, the presented algebraic algorithm (exponential operator disentanglement exploiting six-dimensional Lie algebra case) should be useful in spin-boson problems. The linearly displaced and distorted Hamiltonian exponential is only treated here. While the spin-boson model is used here only as a demonstration of the idea, the herein approach is more general and powerful than the specific example treated. The optical linear dipole moment correlation function is algebraically derived using the above mentioned methods and coherent states. Coherent states are eigenvectors of the bosonic lowering operator a and not of the raising operator a(+). While exp(a(+)) translates coherent states, exp(a(+)a(+)) operation on coherent states has always been a challenge, as a(+) has no eigenvectors. Three approaches, and the results, of that operation are provided. Linear absorption spectra are derived, calculated, and discussed. The linear dipole moment correlation function for the pure quadratic coupling case is expressed in terms of Legendre polynomials to better show the even vibronic transitions in the absorption spectrum. Comparison of the present line shapes to those calculated by other methods is provided. Franck-Condon factors for both linear and quadratic couplings are exactly accounted for by the herein calculated

  6. Two-photon absorption measurements in graphene fragments: Role of electron-electron interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandhu, A.; Roberts, A.; Aryanpour, K.; Shukla, A.; Mazumdar, S.

    2012-02-01

    Many-body interactions in graphene are an active field of research. There is a clear evidence of strong electron correlation effects in other carbon based materials which have the same sp^2 hybridization as graphene. For example, in linear-polyenes, the electron-electron interactions are considered responsible for the occurrence of lowest two-photon state below the optical one-photon state. The electronic correlation in these linear systems is a strong function of the chain length. Thus, it is pertinent to question if the two-dimensional graphene fragments also exhibit strong correlation effects and how these effects scale with fragment size. Using a white light super-continuum source, we perform z-scan measurements to extract frequency-dependent two-photon absorption coefficients in symmetric molecular fragments of graphene, e.g. coronene and hexabenzocoronene. A comparison of one-photon and two-photon absorption coefficients is then used to uncover the extent of correlation effects. In the smallest fragment, coronene, our results indicate a strong signature of the Coulomb interactions. We will discuss how the importance of electron-electron interaction varies with system size and its implication for the correlation effects in graphene.

  7. Minute Concentration Measurements of Simple Hydrocarbon Species Using Supercontinuum Laser Absorption Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Jihyung; Traina, Nicholas; Halloran, Michael; Lee, Tonghun

    2016-06-01

    Minute concentration measurements of simple hydrocarbon gases are demonstrated using near-infrared supercontinuum laser absorption spectroscopy. Absorption-based gas sensors, particularly when combined with optical fiber components, can significantly enhance diagnostic capabilities to unprecedented levels. However, these diagnostic techniques are subject to limitations under certain gas sensing applications where interference and harsh conditions dominate. Supercontinuum laser absorption spectroscopy is a novel laser-based diagnostic technique that can exceed the above-mentioned limitations and provide accurate and quantitative concentration measurement of simple hydrocarbon species while maintaining compatibility with telecommunications-grade optical fiber components. Supercontinuum radiation generated using a highly nonlinear photonic crystal fiber is used to probe rovibrational absorption bands of four hydrocarbon species using full-spectral absorption diagnostics. Absorption spectra of methane (CH4), acetylene (C2H2), and ethylene (C2H4) were measured in the near-infrared spectrum at various pressures and concentrations to determine the accuracy and feasibility of the diagnostic strategy. Absorption spectra of propane (C3H8) were subsequently probed between 1650 nm and 1700 nm, to demonstrate the applicability of the strategy. Measurements agreed very well with simulated spectra generated using the HITRAN database as well as with previous experimental results. Absorption spectra of CH4, C2H2, and C2H4 were then analyzed to determine their respective measurement accuracy and detection limit. Concentration measurements integrated from experimental results were in very good agreement with independent concentration measurements. Calculated detection limits of CH4, C2H2, and C2H4 at room temperature and atmospheric pressure are 0.1%, 0.09%, and 0.17%, respectively.

  8. Determining Concentrations and Temperatures in Semiconductor Manufacturing Plasmas via Submillimeter Absorption Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helal, Yaser H.; Neese, Christopher F.; De Lucia, Frank C.; Ewing, Paul R.; Agarwal, Ankur; Craver, Barry; Stout, Phillip J.; Armacost, Michael D.

    2016-06-01

    Plasmas used in the manufacturing processes of semiconductors are similar in pressure and temperature to plasmas used in studying the spectroscopy of astrophysical species. Likewise, the developed technology in submillimeter absorption spectroscopy can be used for the study of industrial plasmas and for monitoring manufacturing processes. An advantage of submillimeter absorption spectroscopy is that it can be used to determine absolute concentrations and temperatures of plasma species without the need for intrusive probes. A continuous wave, 500 - 750 GHz absorption spectrometer was developed for the purpose of being used as a remote sensor of gas and plasma species. An important part of this work was the optical design to match the geometry of existing plasma reactors in the manufacturing industry. A software fitting routine was developed to simultaneously fit for the background and absorption signal, solving for concentration, rotational temperature, and translational temperature. Examples of measurements made on inductively coupled plasmas will be demonstrated. We would like to thank the Texas Analog Center of Excellence/Semiconductor Research Corporation (TxACE/SRC) and Applied Materials for their support of this work.

  9. Absorption spectroscopy at the ultimate quantum limit from single-photon states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whittaker, R.; Erven, C.; Neville, A.; Berry, M.; O’Brien, J. L.; Cable, H.; Matthews, J. C. F.

    2017-02-01

    Absorption spectroscopy is routinely used to characterise chemical and biological samples. For the state-of-the-art in laser absorption spectroscopy, precision is theoretically limited by shot-noise due to the fundamental Poisson-distribution of photon number in laser radiation. In practice, the shot-noise limit can only be achieved when all other sources of noise are eliminated. Here, we use wavelength-correlated and tuneable photon pairs to demonstrate how absorption spectroscopy can be performed with precision beyond the shot-noise limit and near the ultimate quantum limit by using the optimal probe for absorption measurement—single photons. We present a practically realisable scheme, which we characterise both the precision and accuracy of by measuring the response of a control feature. We demonstrate that the technique can successfully probe liquid samples and using two spectrally similar types of haemoglobin we show that obtaining a given precision in resolution requires fewer heralded single probe photons compared to using an idealised laser.

  10. Rapid, Time-Division Multiplexed, Direct Absorption- and Wavelength Modulation-Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Klein, Alexander; Witzel, Oliver; Ebert, Volker

    2014-01-01

    We present a tunable diode laser spectrometer with a novel, rapid time multiplexed direct absorption- and wavelength modulation-spectroscopy operation mode. The new technique allows enhancing the precision and dynamic range of a tunable diode laser absorption spectrometer without sacrificing accuracy. The spectroscopic technique combines the benefits of absolute concentration measurements using calibration-free direct tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (dTDLAS) with the enhanced noise rejection of wavelength modulation spectroscopy (WMS). In this work we demonstrate for the first time a 125 Hz time division multiplexed (TDM-dTDLAS-WMS) spectroscopic scheme by alternating the modulation of a DFB-laser between a triangle-ramp (dTDLAS) and an additional 20 kHz sinusoidal modulation (WMS). The absolute concentration measurement via the dTDLAS-technique allows one to simultaneously calibrate the normalized 2f/1f-signal of the WMS-technique. A dTDLAS/WMS-spectrometer at 1.37 μm for H2O detection was built for experimental validation of the multiplexing scheme over a concentration range from 50 to 3000 ppmV (0.1 MPa, 293 K). A precision of 190 ppbV was achieved with an absorption length of 12.7 cm and an averaging time of two seconds. Our results show a five-fold improvement in precision over the entire concentration range and a significantly decreased averaging time of the spectrometer. PMID:25405508

  11. X-ray absorption spectroscopy systematics at the tungsten L-edge.

    PubMed

    Jayarathne, Upul; Chandrasekaran, Perumalreddy; Greene, Angelique F; Mague, Joel T; DeBeer, Serena; Lancaster, Kyle M; Sproules, Stephen; Donahue, James P

    2014-08-18

    A series of mononuclear six-coordinate tungsten compounds spanning formal oxidation states from 0 to +VI, largely in a ligand environment of inert chloride and/or phosphine, was interrogated by tungsten L-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy. The L-edge spectra of this compound set, comprised of [W(0)(PMe3)6], [W(II)Cl2(PMePh2)4], [W(III)Cl2(dppe)2][PF6] (dppe = 1,2-bis(diphenylphosphino)ethane), [W(IV)Cl4(PMePh2)2], [W(V)(NPh)Cl3(PMe3)2], and [W(VI)Cl6], correlate with formal oxidation state and have usefulness as references for the interpretation of the L-edge spectra of tungsten compounds with redox-active ligands and ambiguous electronic structure descriptions. The utility of these spectra arises from the combined correlation of the estimated branching ratio of the L3,2-edges and the L1 rising-edge energy with metal Zeff, thereby permitting an assessment of effective metal oxidation state. An application of these reference spectra is illustrated by their use as backdrop for the L-edge X-ray absorption spectra of [W(IV)(mdt)2(CO)2] and [W(IV)(mdt)2(CN)2](2-) (mdt(2-) = 1,2-dimethylethene-1,2-dithiolate), which shows that both compounds are effectively W(IV) species even though the mdt ligands exist at different redox levels in the two compounds. Use of metal L-edge XAS to assess a compound of uncertain formulation requires: (1) Placement of that data within the context of spectra offered by unambiguous calibrant compounds, preferably with the same coordination number and similar metal ligand distances. Such spectra assist in defining upper and/or lower limits for metal Zeff in the species of interest. (2) Evaluation of that data in conjunction with information from other physical methods, especially ligand K-edge XAS. (3) Increased care in interpretation if strong π-acceptor ligands, particularly CO, or π-donor ligands are present. The electron-withdrawing/donating nature of these ligand types, combined with relatively short metal-ligand distances, exaggerate

  12. X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy Systematics at the Tungsten L-Edge

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    A series of mononuclear six-coordinate tungsten compounds spanning formal oxidation states from 0 to +VI, largely in a ligand environment of inert chloride and/or phosphine, was interrogated by tungsten L-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy. The L-edge spectra of this compound set, comprised of [W0(PMe3)6], [WIICl2(PMePh2)4], [WIIICl2(dppe)2][PF6] (dppe = 1,2-bis(diphenylphosphino)ethane), [WIVCl4(PMePh2)2], [WV(NPh)Cl3(PMe3)2], and [WVICl6], correlate with formal oxidation state and have usefulness as references for the interpretation of the L-edge spectra of tungsten compounds with redox-active ligands and ambiguous electronic structure descriptions. The utility of these spectra arises from the combined correlation of the estimated branching ratio of the L3,2-edges and the L1 rising-edge energy with metal Zeff, thereby permitting an assessment of effective metal oxidation state. An application of these reference spectra is illustrated by their use as backdrop for the L-edge X-ray absorption spectra of [WIV(mdt)2(CO)2] and [WIV(mdt)2(CN)2]2– (mdt2– = 1,2-dimethylethene-1,2-dithiolate), which shows that both compounds are effectively WIV species even though the mdt ligands exist at different redox levels in the two compounds. Use of metal L-edge XAS to assess a compound of uncertain formulation requires: (1) Placement of that data within the context of spectra offered by unambiguous calibrant compounds, preferably with the same coordination number and similar metal ligand distances. Such spectra assist in defining upper and/or lower limits for metal Zeff in the species of interest. (2) Evaluation of that data in conjunction with information from other physical methods, especially ligand K-edge XAS. (3) Increased care in interpretation if strong π-acceptor ligands, particularly CO, or π-donor ligands are present. The electron-withdrawing/donating nature of these ligand types, combined with relatively short metal–ligand distances, exaggerate the difference

  13. Real-Time Probing of Electron Dynamics Using Attosecond Time-Resolved Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramasesha, Krupa; Leone, Stephen R.; Neumark, Daniel M.

    2016-05-01

    Attosecond science has paved the way for direct probing of electron dynamics in gases and solids. This review provides an overview of recent attosecond measurements, focusing on the wealth of knowledge obtained by the application of isolated attosecond pulses in studying dynamics in gases and solid-state systems. Attosecond photoelectron and photoion measurements in atoms reveal strong-field tunneling ionization and a delay in the photoemission from different electronic states. These measurements applied to molecules have shed light on ultrafast intramolecular charge migration. Similar approaches are used to understand photoemission processes from core and delocalized electronic states in metal surfaces. Attosecond transient absorption spectroscopy is used to follow the real-time motion of valence electrons and to measure the lifetimes of autoionizing channels in atoms. In solids, it provides the first measurements of bulk electron dynamics, revealing important phenomena such as the timescales governing the switching from an insulator to a metallic state and carrier-carrier interactions.

  14. X-ray absorption spectroscopy for wire-array Z-pinches at the non-radiative stage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, V. V.; Hakel, P.; Mancini, R. C.; Chittenden, J. P.; Anderson, A.; Shevelko, A. P.; Wiewior, P.; Durmaz, T.; Altemara, S. D.; Papp, D.; Astanovitskiy, A. L.; Nalajala, V.; Chalyy, O.; Dmitriev, O.

    2011-12-01

    Absorption spectroscopy was applied to wire-array Z-pinches on the 1 MA pulsed-power Zebra generator at the Nevada Terawatt Facility (NTF). The 50 TW Leopard laser was coupled with the Zebra generator for X-ray backlighting of wire arrays at the ablation stage. Broadband X-ray emission from a laser-produced Sm plasma was used to backlight Al star wire arrays in the range of 7-9 Å. Two time-integrated X-ray conical spectrometers recorded reference and absorption spectra. The spectrometers were shielded from the bright Z-pinch X-ray burst by collimators. The comparison of plasma-transmitted spectra with reference spectra indicates absorption lines in the range of 8.1-8.4 Å. Analysis of Al K-shell absorption spectra with detailed atomic kinetics models shows a distribution of electron temperature in the range of 10-30 eV that was fitted with an effective two-temperature model. Temperature and density distributions in wire-array plasma were simulated with a three-dimension magneto-hydrodynamic code. Post-processing of this code's output yields synthetic transmission spectrum which is in general agreement with the data.

  15. High sensitivity ultra-broad-band absorption spectroscopy of inductively coupled chlorine plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marinov, Daniil; Foucher, Mickaël; Campbell, Ewen; Brouard, Mark; Chabert, Pascal; Booth, Jean-Paul

    2016-06-01

    We propose a method to measure the densities of vibrationally excited Cl2(v) molecules in levels up to v  =  3 in pure chlorine inductively coupled plasmas (ICPs). The absorption continuum of Cl2 in the 250-450 nm spectral range is deconvoluted into the individual components originating from the different vibrational levels of the ground state, using a set of ab initio absorption cross sections. It is shown that gas heating at constant pressure is the major depletion mechanism of the Cl2 feedstock in the plasma. In these line-integrated absorption measurements, the absorption by the hot (and therefore rarefied) Cl2 gas in the reactor centre is masked by the cooler (and therefore denser) Cl2 near the walls. These radial gradients in temperature and density make it difficult to assess the degree of vibrational excitation in the centre of the reactor. The observed line-averaged vibrational distributions, when analyzed taking into account the radial temperature gradient, suggest that vibrational and translational degrees of freedom in the plasma are close to local equilibrium. This can be explained by efficient vibrational-translational (VT) relaxation between Cl2 and Cl atoms. Besides the Cl2(v) absorption band, a weak continuum absorption is observed at shorter wavelengths, and is attributed to photodetachment of Cl- negative ions. Thus, line-integrated densities of negative ions in chlorine plasmas can be directly measured using broad-band absorption spectroscopy.

  16. Evaluation of ammonia absorption coefficients by photoacoustic spectroscopy for detection of ammonia levels in human breath

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dumitras, D. C.; Dutu, D. C.; Matei, C.; Cernat, R.; Banita, S.; Patachia, M.; Bratu, A. M.; Petrus, M.; Popa, C.

    2011-04-01

    Photoacoustic spectroscopy represents a powerful technique for measuring extremely low absorptions independent of the path length and offers a degree of parameter control that cannot be attained by other methods. We report precise measurements of the ammonia absorption coefficients at the CO2 laser wavelengths by using a photoacoustic (PA) cell in an extracavity configuration and we compare our results with other values reported in the literature. Ammonia presents a clear fingerprint spectrum and high absorption strengths in the CO2 wavelengths region. Because more than 250 molecular gases of environmental concern for atmospheric, industrial, medical, military, and scientific spheres exhibit strong absorption bands in the region 9.2-10.8 μm, we have chosen a frequency tunable CO2 laser. In the present work, ammonia absorption coefficients were measured at both branches of the CO2 laser lines by using a calibrated mixture of 10 ppm NH3 in N2. We found the maximum absorption in the 9 μm region, at 9R(30) line of the CO2 laser. One of the applications based on the ammonia absorption coefficients is used to measure the ammonia levels in exhaled human breath. This can be used to determine the exact time necessary at every session for an optimal degree of dialysis at patients with end-stage renal disease.

  17. Detection of nitric oxide by electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Hogg, Neil

    2010-07-15

    Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy has been used in a number of ways to study nitric oxide chemistry and biology. As an intrinsically stable and relatively unreactive diatomic free radical, the challenges of detecting this species by EPR are somewhat different from those of transient radical species. This review gives a basic introduction to EPR spectroscopy and discusses its uses to assess and quantify nitric oxide formation in biological systems.

  18. Electron spectroscopy for chemical analysis: Sample analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carter, W. B.

    1989-01-01

    Exposure conditions in atomic oxygen (ESCA) was performed on an SSL-100/206 Small Spot Spectrometer. All data were taken with the use of a low voltage electron flood gun and a charge neutralization screen to minimize charging effects on the data. The X-ray spot size and electron flood gun voltage used are recorded on the individual spectra as are the instrumental resolutions. Two types of spectra were obtained for each specimen: (1) general surveys, and (2) high resolution spectra. The two types of data reduction performed are: (1) semiquantitative compositional analysis, and (2) peak fitting. The materials analyzed are: (1) kapton 4, 5, and 6, (2) HDPE 19, 20, and 21, and (3) PVDF 4, 5, and 6.

  19. Ballistic electron spectroscopy of individual buried molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirczenow, George

    2007-01-01

    A theoretical study is presented of the ballistic electron emission spectra (BEES) of individual insulating and conducting organic molecules chemisorbed on a silicon substrate and buried under a thin gold film. It is predicted that ballistic electrons injected into the gold film from a scanning tunneling microscope tip should be transmitted so weakly to the silicon substrate by alkane molecules of moderate length (decane, hexane) and their thiolates that individual buried molecules of this type will be difficult to detect in BEES experiments. However, resonant transmission by molecules containing unsaturated C-C bonds or aromatic rings is predicted to be strong enough for BEES spectra of individual buried molecules of these types to be measured. Calculated BEES spectra of molecules of both types are presented and the effects of some simple interstitial and substitutional gold defects that may occur in molecular films are also briefly discussed.

  20. Structure and Composition of Cu Doped CdSe Nanocrystals Using Soft X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Meulenberg, R W; van Buuren, T; Hanif, K M; Willey, T M; Strouse, G F; Terminello, L J

    2004-06-04

    The local structure and composition of Cu ions dispersed in CdSe nanocrystals is examined using soft x-ray absorption near edge spectroscopy (XANES). Using Cu L-edge XANES and X-ray photoelectron measurements (XPS), we find that the Cu ions exist in the Cu(I) oxidation state. We also find that the observed Cu L-edge XANES signal is directly proportional to the molar percent of Cu present in our final material. Se L-edge XANES indicates changes in the Se density of states with Cu doping, due to a chemical bonding effect, and supports a statistical doping mechanism. Photoluminescence (PL) measurements indicate the Cu ions may act as deep electron traps. We show that XANES, XPS, and PL are a powerful combination of methods to study the electronic and chemical structure of dopants in nanostructured materials.

  1. A laser flash absorption spectroscopy study of Anabaena sp. PCC 7119 flavodoxin photoreduction by photosystem I particles from spinach.

    PubMed

    Medina, M; Hervás, M; Navarro, J A; De la Rosa, M A; Gómez-Moreno, C; Tollin, G

    1992-11-30

    Electron transfer from P700 in photosystem I (PSI) particles from spinach to Anabaena sp. PCC 7119 flavodoxin has been studied using laser flash absorption spectroscopy. A non-linear protein concentration dependence of the rate constants was obtained, suggesting a two-step mechanism involving complex formation (k = 3.6 x 10(7) M-1.s-1) followed by intracomplex electron transfer (k = 270 s-1). The observed rate constants had a biphasic dependence on the concentrations of NaCl or MgCl2, with maximum values in the 40-80 mM range for NaCl and 4-12 mM for MgCl2. To our knowledge, this is the first time that the kinetics of PSI-dependent flavodoxin photoreduction have been determined.

  2. Influence of temperature and turbidity on water COD detection by UV absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Kun-peng; Bi, Wei-hong; Zhang, Qi-hang; Fu, Xing-hu; Wu, Guo-qing

    2016-11-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) absorption spectroscopy is used to detect the concentration of water chemical oxygen demand (COD). The UV absorption spectra of COD solutions are analyzed qualitatively and quantitatively. The partial least square (PLS) algorithm is used to model COD solution and the modeling results are compared. The influence of environmental temperature and turbidity is analyzed. These results show that the influence of temperature on the predicted value can be ignored. However, the change of turbidity can affect the detection results of UV spectra, and the COD detection error can be effectively compensated by establishing the single-element regression model.

  3. Thin-film absorption coefficients by attenuated-total-reflection spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Holm, R T; Palik, E D

    1978-02-01

    The application of attenuated-total-reflection spectroscopy to the measurement of the absorption coefficient of thin films is presented. For low absorption the sensitivity of ATR is discussed in terms of the concept of an effective thickness. Both the case in which the refractive index of the film is higher and the case in which it is lower than that of the ATR trapezoid are considered. Experimental ATR data for antireflection-coating materials for laser windows is analyzed and compared with calorimetric data.

  4. Assignment of benzodiazepine UV absorption spectra by the use of photoelectron spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khvostenko, O. G.; Tzeplin, E. E.; Lomakin, G. S.

    2002-04-01

    Correlations between singlet transition energies and energy gaps of corresponding pairs of occupied and unoccupied molecular orbitals were revealed in a series of benzodiazepines. The occupied orbital energies were taken from the photoelectron spectra of the compound investigated, the unoccupied ones were obtained from MNDO/d calculations, and the singlet energies were taken from the UV absorption spectra. The correspondence of the singlet transitions to certain molecular orbitals was established using MNDO/d calculations and comparing between UV and photoelectron spectra. It has been concluded that photoelectron spectroscopy can be applied for interpretation of UV absorption spectra of various compounds on the basis of similar correlations.

  5. Interactions of hypericin with a model mutagen - Acridine orange analyzed by light absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pietrzak, Monika; Szabelski, Mariusz; Kasparek, Adam; Wieczorek, Zbigniew

    2017-02-01

    The present study was designed to estimate the ability of hypericin to interact with a model mutagen - acridine orange. The hetero-association of hypericin and acridine orange was investigated with absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy methods in aqueous solution of DMSO. The data indicate that hypericin forms complexes with acridine orange and that the association constants are relatively high and depend on DMSO concentration. The absorption spectra of the hypericin - acridine orange complexes were examined as well. Owing to its ability to interact with flat aromatic compounds, hypericin may potentially be used as an interceptor molecule.

  6. High-Frequency Electron Paramagnetic Resonance Spectroscopy of Nitroxide-Functionalized Nanodiamonds in Aqueous Solution.

    PubMed

    Akiel, R D; Stepanov, V; Takahashi, S

    2016-06-21

    Nanodiamond (ND) is an attractive class of nanomaterial for fluorescent labeling, magnetic sensing of biological molecules, and targeted drug delivery. Many of those applications require tethering of target biological molecules on the ND surface. Even though many approaches have been developed to attach macromolecules to the ND surface, it remains challenging to characterize dynamics of tethered molecule. Here, we show high-frequency electron paramagnetic resonance (HF EPR) spectroscopy of nitroxide-functionalized NDs. Nitroxide radical is a commonly used spin label to investigate dynamics of biological molecules. In the investigation, we developed a sample holder to overcome water absorption of HF microwave. Then, we demonstrated HF EPR spectroscopy of nitroxide-functionalized NDs in aqueous solution and showed clear spectral distinction of ND and nitroxide EPR signals. Moreover, through EPR spectral analysis, we investigate dynamics of nitroxide radicals on the ND surface. The demonstration sheds light on the use of HF EPR spectroscopy to investigate biological molecule-functionalized nanoparticles.

  7. Electron Spectroscopy: Applications for Chemical Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hercules, David M.

    2004-12-01

    The development of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (ESCA, XPS) is reviewed from an historical perspective that is relevant to its use for analytical chemistry. The emphasis is on early development of the technique, primarily during the period, 1964 1977. During these years there were significant developments in instrumentation, accompanied by significant advances in understanding the fundamentals of the technique. First, a historical perspective is presented to establish the backdrop against which XPS was developed. The early work in the field dealt mainly with measuring and understanding chemical shifts for elements and particularly for organic compounds. This was an exciting time because XPS appeared to provide chemical information unavailable otherwise. A detailed summary of some of the early work on chemical shifts is presented. It was also established that XPS could be used for quantitative analysis of elements, compounds, and different oxidation states of the same element. As the development of XPS occurred, emphasis changed from measuring chemical shifts to developing XPS as a surface analytical tool, a role that it fills today. Early applications to the analysis of catalysts and polymers, use to study adsorption and surface reactions, application of XPS to electrochemistry and corrosion, and studies of atmospheric particulates are all reviewed.

  8. Electronic and Photoelectron Spectroscopy of Toluene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gardner, Adrian M.; Green, Alistair M.; Tame-Reyes, Victor; Wright, Timothy G.

    2012-06-01

    Electronic and photoelectron spectra of toluene are presented and discussed. The utilization of a recently reported scheme for assigning the normal vibrations of substituted benzenes allows these spectra to be compared to those of other molecules with unprecedented clarity. Changes in vibrational activity within a series of substituted benzene molecules will be discussed, specifically the increased rate of intramolecular vibrational energy redistribution observed in molecules where the substituent is a methyl group. A. M. Gardner and T. G. Wright, J. Chem. Phys., 135, 114305 (2011)

  9. High Pressure X-ray Absorption Studies on Correlated-Electron Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Cornelius, Andrew L.

    2016-08-26

    This project used high pressure to alter the electron-electron and electron-lattice interactions in rare earth and actinide compounds. Knowledge of these properties is the starting points for a first-principles understanding of electronic and electronically related macroscopic properties. The research focused on a systematic study of x-ray absorption measurements on rare earth and actinide compounds.

  10. Direct observation of ring-opening dynamics in strong-field ionized selenophene using femtosecond inner-shell absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lackner, Florian; Chatterley, Adam S.; Pemmaraju, C. D.; Closser, Kristina D.; Prendergast, David; Neumark, Daniel M.; Leone, Stephen R.; Gessner, Oliver

    2016-12-01

    Femtosecond extreme ultraviolet transient absorption spectroscopy is used to explore strong-field ionization induced dynamics in selenophene (C4H4Se). The dynamics are monitored in real-time from the viewpoint of the Se atom by recording the temporal evolution of element-specific spectral features near the Se 3d inner-shell absorption edge (˜58 eV). The interpretation of the experimental results is supported by first-principles time-dependent density functional theory calculations. The experiments simultaneously capture the instantaneous population of stable molecular ions, the emergence and decay of excited cation states, and the appearance of atomic fragments. The experiments reveal, in particular, insight into the strong-field induced ring-opening dynamics in the selenophene cation, which are traced by the emergence of non-cyclic molecules as well as the liberation of Se+ ions within an overall time scale of approximately 170 fs. We propose that both products may be associated with dynamics on the same electronic surfaces but with different degrees of vibrational excitation. The time-dependent inner-shell absorption features provide direct evidence for a complex relaxation mechanism that may be approximated by a two-step model, whereby the initially prepared, excited cyclic cation decays within τ1 = 80 ± 30 fs into a transient molecular species, which then gives rise to the emergence of bare Se+ and ring-open cations within an additional τ2 = 80 ± 30 fs. The combined experimental and theoretical results suggest a close relationship between σ* excited cation states and the observed ring-opening reactions. The findings demonstrate that the combination of femtosecond time-resolved core-level spectroscopy with ab initio estimates of spectroscopic signatures provide new insights into complex, ultrafast photochemical reactions such as ring-opening dynamics in organic molecules in real-time and with simultaneous sensitivity for electronic and structural

  11. Predicting X-ray absorption spectra of semiconducting polymers for electronic structure and morphology characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Gregory; Patel, Shrayesh; Pemmaraju, C. Das; Kramer, Edward; Prendergast, David; Chabinyc, Michael

    2015-03-01

    Core-level X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) reveals important information on the electronic structure of materials and plays a key role in morphology characterization. Semiconducting polymers are the active component in many organic electronics. Their electronic properties are critically linked to device performance, and a proper understanding of semiconducting polymer XAS is crucial. Techniques such as resonant X-ray scattering rely on core-level transitions to gain materials contrast and probe orientational order. However, it is difficult to identify these transitions based on experiments alone, and complementary simulations are required. We show that first-principles calculations can capture the essential features of experimental XAS of semiconducting polymers, and provide insight into which molecular model, such as oligomers or periodic boundary conditions, are best suited for XAS calculations. Simulated XAS can reveal contributions from individual atoms and be used to visualize molecular orbitals. This allows for improved characterization of molecular orientation and scattering analysis. These predictions lay the groundwork for understanding how chemical makeup is linked to electronic structure, and to properly utilize experiments to characterize semiconducting polymers.

  12. Submillimeter Absorption Spectroscopy in Semiconductor Manufacturing Plasmas and Comparison to Theoretical Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helal, Yaser H.; Neese, Christopher F.; De Lucia, Frank C.; Ewing, Paul R.; Agarwal, Ankur; Craver, Barry; Stout, Phillip J.; Armacost, Michael D.

    2015-06-01

    Plasmas used in the semiconductor manufacturing industry are of a similar nature to the environments often created for submillimeter spectroscopic study of astrophysical species. At the low operating pressures of these plasmas, submillimeter absorption spectroscopy is a method capable of measuring the abundances and temperatures of molecules, radicals, and ions without disturbing any of the properties of the plasma. These measurements provide details and insight into the interactions and reactions occurring within the plasma and their implications for semiconductor manufacturing processes. A continuous wave, 500 to 750 GHz, absorption spectrometer was designed and used to make measurements of species in semiconductor processing plasmas. Comparisons with expectations from theoretical plasma models provide a basis for validating and improving these models, which is a complex and difficult science itself. Furthermore, these comparisons are an evaluation for the use of submillimeter spectroscopy as a diagnostic tool in manufacturing processes.

  13. Determination of copper, zinc and iron in broncho-alveolar lavages by atomic absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Harlyk, C; Mccourt, J; Bordin, G; Rodriguez, A R; van der Eeckhout, A

    1997-11-01

    Concentrations of Zn, Cu and Fe were measured in 157 broncho-alveolar lavages (BAL), before and after centrifugation, collected at the Leuven University Hospital (Belgium). Zn was measured by flame-atomic absorption spectroscopy, using direct calibration, while Cu and Fe were determined by electrothermal atomic absorption spectroscopy, using the method of standard additions. For Fe only 56 samples were measured. Most of the studied elements are present in the liquid phase (supernatant). About 90% of Cu concentrations lie between 0 and 15 micrograms/kg, while 90% of Zn concentrations are lower than 230 micrograms/kg, with 30% between 30 and 70 micrograms/kg, and 50% between 100 and 200 micrograms/kg. There seems to be a reverse relationship between Cu and Zn levels with high Cu going along with low Zn and vice versa.

  14. Modulation scheme for electron-electron double resonance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehlkopf, A. F.; Kuiper, F. G.; Smidt, J.; Tiggelman, T. A.

    1983-06-01

    A modulation scheme for electron-electron double resonance (ELDOR) spectrometers is presented. With this scheme an optimum stabilization signal for locking the pump microwave generator to the pumped electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) line is generated. A separate pump power level and a separate magnetic field modulation amplitude are used for the purpose of locking. In general, such a modulation scheme introduces false ELDOR lines. These false lines disturb the real ELDOR signals, or introduce an ELDOR signal in the absence of any communication between the observed EPR line and the pumped EPR line. With the described modulation scheme the frequencies of the false ELDOR signals are limited to even multiples of the frequency of the wanted ELDOR signals. This makes a suppression of the false ELDOR lines easy.

  15. Probing interfacial electron dynamics with time-resolved X-ray spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neppl, Stefan

    2015-05-01

    Time-resolved core-level spectroscopy techniques using laser pulses to initiate and short X-ray pulses to probe photo-induced processes have the potential to provide electronic state- and atomic site-specific insight into fundamental electron dynamics at complex interfaces. We describe the implementation of femto- and picosecond time-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy at the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) and at the Advanced Light Source (ALS) in order to follow light-driven electron dynamics at dye-semiconductor interfaces on femto- to nanosecond timescales, and from the perspective of individual atomic sites. A distinct transient binding-energy shift of the Ru3d photoemission lines originating from the metal centers of N3 dye-molecules adsorbed on nanoporous ZnO is observed 500 fs after resonant HOMO-LUMO excitation with a visible laser pulse. This dynamical chemical shift is accompanied by a characteristic surface photo-voltage response of the semiconductor substrate. The two phenomena and their correlation will be discussed in the context of electronic bottlenecks for efficient interfacial charge-transfer and possible charge recombination and relaxation pathways leading to the neutralization of the transiently oxidized dye following ultrafast electron injection. First steps towards in operando time-resolved X-ray absorption spectroscopy techniques to monitor interfacial chemical dynamics will be presented.

  16. Progress in Applying Tunable Diode Laser Absorption Spectroscopy to Scramjet Isolators and Combustors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-05-01

    AFRL-RZ-WP-TP-2010-2146 PROGRESS IN APPLYING TUNABLE DIODE LASER ABSORPTION SPECTROSCOPY TO SCRAMJET ISOLATORS AND COMBUSTORS Michael S... COMBUSTORS 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER IN HOUSE 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 61102F 6. AUTHOR(S) Michael S. Brown, Skip Williams...paths -- scramjet engines in particular. In this report we summarize our progress in applying TDLAS to scramjet isolators and combustors . 15

  17. X-ray absorption spectroscopy beyond the core-hole lifetime

    SciTech Connect

    Haemaelaeinen, K.; Hastings, J.B.; Siddons, D.P.; Berman, L.

    1992-01-01

    A new technique to overcome the core-hole lifetime broadening in x-ray absorption spectroscopy is presented. It utilizes a high resolution fluorescence spectrometer which can be used to analyze the fluorescence photon energy with better resolution than the natural lifetime width. Furthermore, the high resolution spectrometer can also be used to select the final state in the fluorescence process which can offer spin selectivity even without long range magnetic order in the sample.

  18. X-ray absorption spectroscopy beyond the core-hole lifetime

    SciTech Connect

    Haemaelaeinen, K.; Hastings, J.B.; Siddons, D.P.; Berman, L.

    1992-10-01

    A new technique to overcome the core-hole lifetime broadening in x-ray absorption spectroscopy is presented. It utilizes a high resolution fluorescence spectrometer which can be used to analyze the fluorescence photon energy with better resolution than the natural lifetime width. Furthermore, the high resolution spectrometer can also be used to select the final state in the fluorescence process which can offer spin selectivity even without long range magnetic order in the sample.

  19. Atomic structure of machined semiconducting chips: An x-ray absorption spectroscopy study

    SciTech Connect

    Paesler, M.; Sayers, D.

    1988-12-01

    X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) has been used to examine the atomic structure of chips of germanium that were produced by single point diamond machining. It is demonstrated that although the local (nearest neighbor) atomic structure is experimentally quite similar to that of single crystal specimens information from more distant atoms indicates the presence of considerable stress. An outline of the technique is given and the strength of XAS in studying the machining process is demonstrated.

  20. Application of microemulsions in determination of chromium naphthenate in gasoline by flame atomic absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Du, B; Wei, Q; Wang, S; Yu, W

    1997-10-01

    A new method using microemulsified samples is presented. It is for the determination of chromium naphthenate in gasoline by flame absorption spectroscopy. The method has the advantage of simplicity, speed and the use of aqueous standards for calibration instead of organic standards. Coexistent elements do not disturb the determination. Results obtained by this method were better than those obtained by other methods for the same samples.

  1. Cyclotron-absorption measurement of the runaway-electron distribution in a tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Zvonkov, A.V.; Suvorov, E.V.; Timofeev, A.V.; Fraiman, A.A.

    1983-03-01

    The distribution function of runaway electrons in a tokamak can be determined in the slightly relativistic region from measurements of the absorption coefficient corresponding to electron cyclotron waves. The plasma should be probed in the vertical direction.

  2. X-RAY ABSORPTION SPECTROSCOPY OF YB3+-DOPED OPTICAL FIBERS

    SciTech Connect

    Citron, Robert; Kropf, A.J.

    2008-01-01

    Optical fibers doped with Ytterbium-3+ have become increasingly common in fiber lasers and amplifiers. Yb-doped fibers provide the capability to produce high power and short pulses at specific wavelengths, resulting in highly effective gain media. However, little is known about the local structure, distribution, and chemical coordination of Yb3+ in the fibers. This information is necessary to improve the manufacturing process and optical qualities of the fibers. Five fibers doped with Yb3+ were studied using Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy and X-ray Absorption Near Edge Spectroscopy (XANES), in addition to Yb3+ mapping. The Yb3+ distribution in each fiber core was mapped with 2D and 1D intensity scans, which measured X-ray fluorescence over the scan areas. Two of the five fibers examined showed highly irregular Yb3+ distributions in the core center. In four of the five fibers Yb3+ was detected outside of the given fiber core dimensions, suggesting possible Yb3+ diffusion from the core, manufacturing error, or both. X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) analysis has so far proven inconclusive, but did show that the fibers had differing EXAFS spectra. The Yb3+ distribution mapping proved highly useful, but additional modeling and examination of fiber preforms must be conducted to improve XAS analysis, which has been shown to have great potential for the study of similar optical fi bers.

  3. Probing battery chemistry with liquid cell electron energy loss spectroscopy

    DOE PAGES

    Unocic, Raymond R.; Baggetto, Loic; Veith, Gabriel M.; ...

    2015-01-01

    Electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) was used to determine the chemistry and oxidation state of LiMn2O4 and Li4Ti5O12 thin film battery electrodes in liquid cells for in situ scanning/transmission electron microscopy (S/TEM). Using the L2,3 white line intensity ratio method we determine the oxidation state of Mn and Ti in a liquid electrolyte solvent and discuss experimental parameters that influence measurement sensitivity.

  4. Supercontinuum high-speed cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopy for sensitive multispecies detection.

    PubMed

    Werblinski, Thomas; Lämmlein, Bastian; Huber, Franz J T; Zigan, Lars; Will, Stefan

    2016-05-15

    Cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopy is promising for many applications requiring a very high concentration sensitivity but often accompanied by low temporal resolution. In this Letter, we demonstrate a broadband cavity-enhanced absorption spectrometer capable of detection rates of up to 50 kHz, based on a spatially coherent supercontinuum (SC) light source and an in-house-built, high-speed near-infrared spectrograph. The SC spectrometer allows for the simultaneous quantitative detection of CO2, C2H2, and H2O within a spectral range from 1420 to 1570 nm. Using cavity mirrors with a specified reflectivity of R=98.0±0.3% a minimal spectrally averaged absorption coefficient of αmin=1·10-5  cm-1 can be detected at a repetition rate of 50 kHz.

  5. Gas trace detection with cavity enhanced absorption spectroscopy: a review of its process in the field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Siqi; Luo, Zhifu; Tan, Zhongqi; Long, Xingwu

    2016-11-01

    Cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopy (CEAS) is a technology in which the intracavity absorption is deduced from the intensity of light transmitted by the high finesse optical cavity. Then the samples' parameters, such as their species, concentration and absorption cross section, would be detection. It was first proposed and demonstrated by Engeln R. [1] and O'Keefe[2] in 1998. This technology has extraordinary detection sensitivity, high resolution and good practicability, so it is used in many fields , such as clinical medicine, gas detection and basic physics research. In this paper, we focus on the use of gas trace detection, including the advance of CEAS over the past twenty years, the newest research progresses, and the prediction of this technology's development direction in the future.

  6. Absorption spectroscopy setup for determination of whole human blood and blood-derived materials spectral characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wróbel, M. S.; Gnyba, M.; Milewska, D.; Mitura, K.; Karpienko, K.

    2015-09-01

    A dedicated absorption spectroscopy system was set up using tungsten-halogen broadband source, optical fibers, sample holder, and a commercial spectrometer with CCD array. Analysis of noise present in the setup was carried out. Data processing was applied to the absorption spectra to reduce spectral noise, and improve the quality of the spectra and to remove the baseline level. The absorption spectra were measured for whole blood samples, separated components: plasma, saline, washed erythrocytes in saline and human whole blood with biomarkers - biocompatible nanodiamonds (ND). Blood samples had been derived from a number of healthy donors. The results prove a correct setup arrangement, with adequate preprocessing of the data. The results of blood-ND mixtures measurements show no toxic effect on blood cells, which proves the NDs as a potential biocompatible biomarkers.

  7. Deep ultraviolet Raman spectroscopy: A resonance-absorption trade-off illustrated by diluted liquid benzene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chadwick, C. T.; Willitsford, A. H.; Philbrick, C. R.; Hallen, H. D.

    2015-12-01

    The magnitude of resonance Raman intensity, in terms of the real signal level measured on-resonance compared to the signal level measured off-resonance for the same sample, is investigated using a tunable laser source. Resonance Raman enhancements, occurring as the excitation energy is tuned through ultraviolet absorption lines, are used to examine the 1332 cm-1 vibrational mode of diamond and the 992 cm-1 ring-breathing mode of benzene. Competition between the wavelength dependent optical absorption and the magnitude of the resonance enhancement is studied using measured signal levels as a function of wavelength. Two system applications are identified where the resonance Raman significantly increases the real signal levels despite the presence of strong absorption: characterization of trace species in laser remote sensing and spectroscopy of the few molecules in the tiny working volumes of near-field optical microscopy.

  8. A sample holder for soft x-ray absorption spectroscopy of liquids in transmission mode.

    PubMed

    Schreck, Simon; Gavrila, Gianina; Weniger, Christian; Wernet, Philippe

    2011-10-01

    A novel sample holder for soft x-ray absorption spectroscopy of liquids in transmission mode based on sample cells with x-ray transparent silicon nitride membranes is introduced. The sample holder allows for a reliable preparation of ultrathin liquid films with an adjustable thickness in the nm-μm range. This enables measurements of high quality x-ray absorption spectra of liquids in transmission mode, as will be shown for the example of liquid H(2)O, aqueous solutions of 3d-transition metal ions and alcohol-water mixtures. The fine structure of the x-ray absorption spectra is not affected by the sample thickness. No effects of the silicon nitride membranes were observed in the spectra. It is shown how an inhomogeneous thickness of the sample affects the spectra and how this can be avoided.

  9. Sensitive and rapid laser diagnostic for shock tube kinetics studies using cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Sun, Kai; Wang, Shengkai; Sur, Ritobrata; Chao, Xing; Jeffries, Jay B; Hanson, Ronald K

    2014-04-21

    We report the first application of cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopy (CEAS) using a coherent light source for sensitive and rapid gaseous species time-history measurements in a shock tube. Off-axis alignment and fast scanning of the laser wavelength were used to minimize coupling noise in a low-finesse cavity. An absorption gain factor of 83 with a measurement time resolution of 20 µs was demonstrated for C2H2 detection using a near-infrared transition near 1537 nm, corresponding to a noise-equivalent detection limit of 20 ppm at 296 K and 76 ppm at 906 K at 50 kHz. This substantial gain in signal, relative to conventional single-pass absorption, will enable ultra-sensitive species detection in shock tube kinetics studies, particularly useful for measurements of minor species and for studies of dilute reactive systems.

  10. Mid-infrared laser absorption spectroscopy of NO2 at elevated temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sur, Ritobrata; Peng, Wen Yu; Strand, Christopher; Mitchell Spearrin, R.; Jeffries, Jay B.; Hanson, Ronald K.; Bekal, Anish; Halder, Purbasha; Poonacha, Samhitha P.; Vartak, Sameer; Sridharan, Arun K.

    2017-01-01

    A mid-infrared quantum cascade laser absorption sensor was developed for in-situ detection of NO2 in high-temperature gas environments. A cluster of spin-split transitions near 1599.9 cm-1 from the ν3 absorption band of NO2 was selected due to the strength of these transitions and the low spectral interference from water vapor within this region. Temperature- and species-dependent collisional broadening parameters of ten neighboring NO2 transitions with Ar, O2, N2, CO2 and H2O were measured and reported. The spectral model was validated through comparisons with direct absorption spectroscopy measurements of NO2 seeded in various bath gases. The performance of the scanned wavelength modulation spectroscopy (WMS)-based sensor was demonstrated in a combustion exhaust stream seeded with varying flow rates of NO2, achieving reliable detection of 1.45 and 1.6 ppm NO2 by mole at 600 K and 800 K, respectively, with a measurement uncertainty of ±11%. 2σ noise levels of 360 ppb and 760 ppb were observed at 600 K and 800 K, respectively, in an absorption path length of 1.79 m.

  11. Wafer-scale metasurface for total power absorption, local field enhancement and single molecule Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dongxing; Zhu, Wenqi; Best, Michael D; Camden, Jon P; Crozier, Kenneth B

    2013-10-04

    The ability to detect molecules at low concentrations is highly desired for applications that range from basic science to healthcare. Considerable interest also exists for ultrathin materials with high optical absorption, e.g. for microbolometers and thermal emitters. Metal nanostructures present opportunities to achieve both purposes. Metal nanoparticles can generate gigantic field enhancements, sufficient for the Raman spectroscopy of single molecules. Thin layers containing metal nanostructures ("metasurfaces") can achieve near-total power absorption at visible and near-infrared wavelengths. Thus far, however, both aims (i.e. single molecule Raman and total power absorption) have only been achieved using metal nanostructures produced by techniques (high resolution lithography or colloidal synthesis) that are complex and/or difficult to implement over large areas. Here, we demonstrate a metasurface that achieves the near-perfect absorption of visible-wavelength light and enables the Raman spectroscopy of single molecules. Our metasurface is fabricated using thin film depositions, and is of unprecedented (wafer-scale) extent.

  12. Nanoscale infrared absorption spectroscopy of individual nanoparticles enabled by scattering-type near-field microscopy.

    PubMed

    Stiegler, Johannes M; Abate, Yohannes; Cvitkovic, Antonija; Romanyuk, Yaroslav E; Huber, Andreas J; Leone, Stephen R; Hillenbrand, Rainer

    2011-08-23

    Infrared absorption spectroscopy is a powerful and widely used tool for analyzing the chemical composition and structure of materials. Because of the diffraction limit, however, it cannot be applied for studying individual nanostructures. Here we demonstrate that the phase contrast in substrate-enhanced scattering-type scanning near-field optical microscopy (s-SNOM) provides a map of the infrared absorption spectrum of individual nanoparticles with nanometer-scale spatial resolution. We succeeded in the chemical identification of silicon nitride nanoislands with heights well below 10 nm, by infrared near-field fingerprint spectroscopy of the Si-N stretching bond. Employing a novel theoretical model, we show that the near-field phase spectra of small particles correlate well with their far-field absorption spectra. On the other hand, the spectral near-field contrast does not scale with the volume of the particles. We find a nearly linear scaling law, which we can attribute to the near-field coupling between the near-field probe and the substrate. Our results provide fundamental insights into the spectral near-field contrast of nanoparticles and clearly demonstrate the capability of s-SNOM for nanoscale chemical mapping based on local infrared absorption.

  13. Gas Phase Molecular Spectroscopy: Electronic Spectroscopy of Combustion Intermediates, Chlorine Azide kinetics, and Rovibrational Energy Transfer in Acetylene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freel, Keith A.

    This dissertation is composed of three sections. The first deals with the electronic spectroscopy of combustion intermediates that are related to the formation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. Absorption spectra for phenyl, phenoxy, benzyl, and phenyl peroxy radicals were recorded using the technique of cavity ring-down spectroscopy. When possible, molecular constants, vibrational frequencies, and excited state lifetimes for these radicals were derived from these data. The results were supported by theoretical predictions. The second section presents a study of electron attachment to chlorine azide (ClN3) using a flowing-afterglow Langmuir-probe apparatus. Electron attachment rates were measured to be 3.5x10-8 and 4.5x10-8 cm3s-1 at 298 and 400 K respectively. The reactions of ClN3 with eighteen cations and seventeen anions were characterized. Rate constants were measured using a selected ion flow tube. The ionization energy (>9.6eV), proton affinity (713+/-41 kJ mol-1), and electron affinity (2.48+/-0.2 eV) for ClN 3 were determined from these data. The third section demonstrates the use of double resonance spectroscopy to observe state-selected rovibrational energy transfer from the first overtone asymmetric stretch of acetylene. The total population removal rate constants from various rotational levels of the (1,0,1,00,00) vibrational state were determined to be in the range of (9-17) x 10 -10 cm3s-1. Rotational energy transfer accounted for approximately 90% of the total removal rate from each state. Therefore, the upper limit of vibrational energy transfer from the (1,0,1,0 0,00) state was 10%.

  14. Two-Dimensional Electronic Spectroscopy in the Ultraviolet Wavelength Range.

    PubMed

    West, Brantley A; Moran, Andrew M

    2012-09-20

    Coherent two-dimensional (2D) spectroscopies conducted at visible and infrared wavelengths are having a transformative impact on the understanding of numerous processes in condensed phases. The extension of 2D spectroscopy to the ultraviolet spectral range (2DUV) must contend with several challenges, including the attainment of adequate laser bandwidth, interferometric phase stability, and the suppression of undesired nonlinearities in the sample medium. Solutions to these problems are motivated by the study of a wide range of biological systems whose lowest-frequency electronic resonances are found in the UV. The development of 2DUV spectroscopy also makes possible the attainment of new insights into elementary chemical reaction dynamics (e.g., electrocyclic ring opening in cycloalkenes). Substantial progress has been made in both the implementation and application of 2DUV spectroscopy in the past several years. In this Perspective, we discuss 2DUV methodology, review recent applications, and speculate on what the future will hold.

  15. Theory of Electron Spectroscopies in Strongly Correlated Semiconductor Quantum Dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rontani, Massimo

    2006-09-01

    Quantum dots may display fascinating features of strong correlation such as finite-size Wigner crystallization. We here review a few electron spectroscopies and predict that both inelastic light scattering and tunneling imaging experiments are able to capture clear signatures of crystallization.

  16. Theory of Electron Spectroscopies in Strongly Correlated Semiconductor Quantum Dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rontani, Massimo

    Quantum dots may display fascinating features of strong correlation such as finite-size Wigner crystallization. We here review a few electron spectroscopies and predict that both inelastic light scattering and tunneling imaging experiments are able to capture clear signatures of crystallization.

  17. Introduction to Spin Label Electron Paramagnetic Resonance Spectroscopy of Proteins

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Melanson, Michelle; Sood, Abha; Torok, Fanni; Torok, Marianna

    2013-01-01

    An undergraduate laboratory exercise is described to demonstrate the biochemical applications of electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy. The beta93 cysteine residue of hemoglobin is labeled by the covalent binding of 3-maleimido-proxyl (5-MSL) and 2,2,5,5-tetramethyl-1-oxyl-3-methyl methanethiosulfonate (MTSL), respectively. The excess…

  18. Electron Spectroscopy: Ultraviolet and X-Ray Excitation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, A. D.; And Others

    1980-01-01

    Reviews recent growth in electron spectroscopy (54 papers cited). Emphasizes advances in instrumentation and interpretation (52); photoionization, cross-sections and angular distributions (22); studies of atoms and small molecules (35); transition, lanthanide and actinide metal complexes (50); organometallic (12) and inorganic compounds (2);…

  19. [On using tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy to determine gas fluxes over cropland].

    PubMed

    Tian, Yong-zhi; Liu, Jian-guo; Zhang, Yu-jun; Lu, Yi-huai; He, Ying

    2012-04-01

    Tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (TDLAS) is a compact, automated, high precision technique and fit for in-situ or field measurements. Two spectroscopy measurement systems, TDLAS and NDIR (non-dispersive infrared spectroscopy), were used to monitor trace gas emission over cropland at Fengqiu Agricultural Ecology Experimental Station for one month. The fluxes of carbon dioxide were estimated by flux-gradient and eddy covariance method, respectively. A footprint model was developed during experiment. Based on this model, the source areas of TDLAS and NDIR were investigated. The effects of different factors on the flux measurement were also analyzed. The authors concluded that the source areas for the two techniques are discrepant in most of the cases. The source areas increase with path length and detecting height. This result will help the installation of instruments.

  20. Soft X-ray Spectroscopy Study of the Electronic Structure of Oxidized and Partially Oxidized Magnetite Nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Gilbert, Benjamin; Katz, Jordan E.; Denlinger, Jonathan D.; Yin, Yadong; Falcone, Roger; Waychunas, Glenn A.

    2010-10-24

    The crystal structure of magnetite nanoparticles may be transformed to maghemite by complete oxidation, but under many relevant conditions the oxidation is partial, creating a mixed-valence material with structural and electronic properties that are poorly characterized. We used X-ray diffraction, Fe K-edge extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy, and soft X-ray absorption and emission spectroscopy to characterize the products of oxidizing uncoated and oleic acid-coated magnetite nanoparticles in air. The oxidization of uncoated magnetite nanoparticles creates a material that is structurally and electronically indistinguishable from maghemite. By contrast, while oxidized oleic acid-coated nanoparticles are also structurally indistinguishable from maghemite, Fe L-edge spectroscopy revealed the presence of interior reduced iron sites even after a 2-year period. We used X-ray emission spectroscopy at the O K-edge to study the valence bands (VB) of the iron oxide nanoparticles, using resonant excitation to remove the contributions from oxygen atoms in the ligands and from low-energy excitations that obscured the VB edge. The bonding in all nanoparticles was typical of maghemite, with no detectable VB states introduced by the long-lived, reduced-iron sites in the oleic acid-coated sample. However, O K-edge absorption spectroscopy observed a 0.2 eV shift in the position of the lowest unoccupied states in the coated sample, indicating an increase in the semiconductor band gap relative to bulk stoichiometric maghemite that was also observed by optical absorption spectroscopy. The results show that the ferrous iron sites within ferric iron oxide nanoparticles coated by an organic ligand can persist under ambient conditions with no evidence of a distinct interior phase and can exert an effect on the global electronic and optical properties of the material. This phenomenon resembles the band gap enlargement caused by electron accumulation in the

  1. Electron and proton absorption calculations for a graphite/epoxy composite model. [large space structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Long, E. R., Jr.

    1979-01-01

    The Bethe-Bloch stopping power relations for inelastic collisions were used to determine the absorption of electron and proton energy in cured neat epoxy resin and the absorption of electron energy in a graphite/epoxy composite. Absorption of electron energy due to bremsstrahlung was determined. Electron energies from 0.2 to 4.0 MeV and proton energies from 0.3 to 1.75 MeV were used. Monoenergetic electron energy absorption profiles for models of pure graphite, cured neat epoxy resin, and graphite/epoxy composites are reported. A relation is determined for depth of uniform energy absorption in a composite as a function of fiber volume fraction and initial electron energy. Monoenergetic proton energy absorption profiles are reported for the neat resin model. A relation for total proton penetration in the epoxy resin as a function of initial proton energy is determined. Electron energy absorption in the composite due to bremsstrahlung is reported. Electron and proton energy absorption profiles in cured neat epoxy resin are reported for environments approximating geosynchronous earth orbit.

  2. Elucidating light-induced charge accumulation in an artificial analogue of methane monooxygenase enzymes using time-resolved X-ray absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Moonshiram, Dooshaye; Picón, Antonio; Vazquez-Mayagoitia, Alvaro; Zhang, Xiaoyi; Tu, Ming-Feng; Garrido-Barros, Pablo; Mahy, Jean-Pierre; Avenier, Frédéric; Aukauloo, Ally

    2017-02-28

    We report the use of time-resolved X-ray absorption spectroscopy in the ns-μs time scale to track the light induced two electron transfer processes in a multi-component photocatalytic system, consisting of [Ru(bpy)3](2+)/ a diiron(iii,iii) model/triethylamine. EXAFS analysis with DFT calculations confirms the structural configurations of the diiron(iii,iii) and reduced diiron(ii,ii) states.

  3. Nucleotide-Specific Contrast for DNA Sequencing by Electron Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Schmid, Andreas K.; Davis, Ronald W.

    2016-01-01

    DNA sequencing by imaging in an electron microscope is an approach that holds promise to deliver long reads with low error rates and without the need for amplification. Earlier work using transmission electron microscopes, which use high electron energies on the order of 100 keV, has shown that low contrast and radiation damage necessitates the use of heavy atom labeling of individual nucleotides, which increases the read error rates. Other prior work using scattering electrons with much lower energy has shown to suppress beam damage on DNA. Here we explore possibilities to increase contrast by employing two methods, X-ray photoelectron and Auger electron spectroscopy. Using bulk DNA samples with monomers of each base, both methods are shown to provide contrast mechanisms that can distinguish individual nucleotides without labels. Both spectroscopic techniques can be readily implemented in a low energy electron microscope, which may enable label-free DNA sequencing by direct imaging. PMID:27149617

  4. Cyclic voltammetry and near edge X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy at the Ag L3-edge on electrochemical halogenation of Ag layers on Au(111)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Endo, Osamu; Nakamura, Masashi

    2011-05-01

    One to three layers of Ag grown on a Au(111) electrode were studied by cyclic voltammetry in chloride and bromide solutions and by ex-situ near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy at the Ag L3-edge (Ag L3-NEXAFS). The one and two layers obtained by underpotential deposition exhibited reduced intensity at the absorption edge in the Ag L3-NEXAFS spectra, which suggests the gain of d-electrons in these layers. The cyclic voltammograms and the Ag L3-NEXAFS spectra indicate that the second and third layers of Ag halogenated at positive potentials, whereas the first layer remained in metallic form.

  5. Determination of zinc in serum, blood, and ultrafiltrate fluid from patients on hemofiltration by graphite furnace/atomic absorption spectroscopy or flow injection analysis/atomic absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    de Blas, O J; Rodriguez, R S; Mendez, J H; Tomero, J A; Gomez, B de L; Gonzalez, S V

    1994-01-01

    Two methods were optimized for the determination of zinc in samples of blood, serum, and ultrafiltrate fluid from patients with chronic renal impairment undergoing hemofiltration. In the first procedure, after acid digestion of the samples, Zn in blood and serum is determined by a system coupled to flow injection analysis and atomic absorption spectroscopy. The method is rapid, automated, simple, needs small amounts of sample, and has acceptable analytical characteristics. The analytical characteristics obtained were as follows: determination range of method, 0.05-2.0 ppm of Zn; precision as coefficient of variation (CV), 5.3%; recovery, 95-105%; and detection limit (DL), 0.02 ppm. The second method is optimized for ultrafiltrate fluid because the sensitivity of the first procedure is not suitable for the levels of Zn (ppb or ng/mL) in these samples. The technique chosen was atomic absorption spectroscopy with electrothermal atomization in a graphite furnace. The analytical characteristics obtained were as follows: determination range of method, 0.3-2.0 ppb Zn; CV, 5.7%; recovery, 93-107%; and DL, 0.12 ppb. The methods were used to determine zinc in samples of blood, serum, and ultrafiltrate fluid from 5 patients with chronic renal impairment undergoing hemofiltration to discover whether there were significant differences in the zinc contents of blood, serum, and ultrafiltrate fluid after the hemofiltration process. An analysis of variance of the experimental data obtained from a randomly selected group of 5 patients showed that zinc concentrations in the ultrafiltrate fluid, venous blood, and venous serum do not vary during hemofiltration (p < 0.05), whereas in arterial blood and serum, the time factor has a significant effect.

  6. Study on the Coordination Structure of Pt Sorbed on Bacterial Cells Using X-Ray Absorption Fine Structure Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Kazuya; Watanabe, Naoko

    2015-01-01

    Biosorption has been intensively investigated as a promising technology for the recovery of precious metals from solution. However, the detailed mechanism responsible for the biosorption of Pt on a biomass is not fully understood because of a lack of spectroscopic studies. We applied X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy to elucidate the coordination structure of Pt sorbed on bacterial cells. We examined the sorption of Pt(II) and Pt(IV) species on bacterial cells of Bacillus subtilis and Shewanella putrefaciens in NaCl solutions. X-ray absorption near-edge structure and extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) of Pt-sorbed bacteria suggested that Pt(IV) was reduced to Pt(II) on the cell’s surface, even in the absence of an organic material as an exogenous electron donor. EXAFS spectra demonstrated that Pt sorbed on bacterial cells has a fourfold coordination of chlorine ions, similar to PtCl42-, which indicated that sorption on the protonated amine groups of the bacterial cells. This work clearly demonstrated the coordination structure of Pt sorbed on bacterial cells. The findings of this study will contribute to the understanding of Pt biosorption on biomass, and facilitate the development of recovery methods for rare metals using biosorbent materials. PMID:25996945

  7. Absolute Emission Spectroscopy of Electronically Excited Products of Dissociative Recombination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skrzypkowski, M. P.; Gougousi, T.; Golde, M. F.; Johnsen, R.

    1997-10-01

    We have employed spatially-resolved optical emission spectroscopy in a flowing afterglow plasma to investigate radiations in the 200-400 nm range resulting from electron-ion dissociative recombination. Calibrated emission data combined with Langmuir probe electron-density measurements are analyzed to obtain branching ratios for electronically excited recombination products. In particular, we will report absolute yields of CO(a^3Π) resulting from recombining CO_2^+ ions, NO(B^2Π) from N_2O^+, OH(A^2Σ^+) from HCO_2^+, as well as NH(A^3Π_i), and OH(A^2Σ^+) from the recombination of N_2OH^+ ions.

  8. Terahertz electromodulation spectroscopy of electron transport in GaN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engelbrecht, S. G.; Arend, T. R.; Zhu, T.; Kappers, M. J.; Kersting, R.

    2015-03-01

    Time-resolved terahertz (THz) electromodulation spectroscopy is applied to investigate the high-frequency transport of electrons in gallium nitride at different doping concentrations and densities of threading dislocations. At THz frequencies, all structures reveal Drude transport. The analysis of the spectral response provides the fundamental transport properties, such as the electron scattering time and the electrons' conductivity effective mass. We observe the expected impact of ionized-impurity scattering and that scattering at threading dislocations only marginally affects the high-frequency mobility.

  9. Terahertz electromodulation spectroscopy of electron transport in GaN

    SciTech Connect

    Engelbrecht, S. G.; Arend, T. R.; Kersting, R.; Zhu, T.; Kappers, M. J.

    2015-03-02

    Time-resolved terahertz (THz) electromodulation spectroscopy is applied to investigate the high-frequency transport of electrons in gallium nitride at different doping concentrations and densities of threading dislocations. At THz frequencies, all structures reveal Drude transport. The analysis of the spectral response provides the fundamental transport properties, such as the electron scattering time and the electrons' conductivity effective mass. We observe the expected impact of ionized-impurity scattering and that scattering at threading dislocations only marginally affects the high-frequency mobility.

  10. Characterization of the Electronic Structure of Silicon Nanoparticles Using X-ray Absorption and Emission

    SciTech Connect

    Vaverka, April Susan Montoya

    2008-01-01

    Resolving open questions regarding transport in nanostructures can have a huge impact on a broad range of future technologies such as light harvesting for energy. Silicon has potential to be used in many of these applications. Understanding how the band edges of nanostructures move as a function of size, surface termination and assembly is of fundamental importance in understanding the transport properties of these materials. In this thesis work I have investigated the change in the electronic structure of silicon nanoparticle assemblies as the surface termination is changed. Nanoparticles are synthesized using a thermal evaporation technique and sizes are determined using atomic force microscopy (AFM). By passivating the particles with molecules containing alcohol groups we are able to modify the size dependent band edge shifts. Both the valence and conduction bands are measured using synchrotron based x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) and soft x-ray fluorescence (SXF) techniques. Particles synthesized via recrystallization of amorphous silicon/SiO2 multilayers of thicknesses below 10 nm are also investigated using the synchrotron techniques. These samples also show quantum confinement effects but the electronic structure is different from those synthesized via evaporation methods. The total bandgap is determined for all samples measured. The origins of these differences in the electronic structures are discussed.

  11. Examining Electron-Boson Coupling Using Time-Resolved Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Sentef, Michael; Kemper, Alexander F.; Moritz, Brian; Freericks, James K.; Shen, Zhi-Xun; Devereaux, Thomas P.

    2013-12-26

    Nonequilibrium pump-probe time-domain spectroscopies can become an important tool to disentangle degrees of freedom whose coupling leads to broad structures in the frequency domain. Here, using the time-resolved solution of a model photoexcited electron-phonon system, we show that the relaxational dynamics are directly governed by the equilibrium self-energy so that the phonon frequency sets a window for “slow” versus “fast” recovery. The overall temporal structure of this relaxation spectroscopy allows for a reliable and quantitative extraction of the electron-phonon coupling strength without requiring an effective temperature model or making strong assumptions about the underlying bare electronic band dispersion.

  12. Cavity enhanced ultra-thin aluminum plasmonic resonator for surface enhanced infrared absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Wei; Jiang, Xiao; Nong, Jinpeng; Chen, Na; Lan, Guilian; Tang, Linlong

    2016-11-01

    Owing to the advantages of natural abundance, low cost, and amenability to manufacturing processes, aluminum has recently been recognized as a highly promising plasmonic material that attracts extensive research interest. Here, we propose a cavity-enhanced ultra-thin plasmonic resonator for surface enhanced infrared absorption spectroscopy. The considered resonator consists of a patterned ultra-thin aluminum grating strips, a dielectric spacer layer and a reflective layer. In such structure, the resonance absorption is enhanced by the cavity formed between the patterned aluminum strips and the reflective layer. It is demonstrated that the spectral features of the resonator can be tuned by adjusting the structural parameters. Furthermore, in order to achieve a deep and broad spectral line shape, the spacer layer thickness should be properly designed to realize the simultaneous resonances for the electric and the magnetic excitations. The enhanced infrared absorption characteristics can be used for infrared sensing of the environment. When the resonator is covered with a molecular layer, the resonator can be used as a surface enhanced infrared absorption substrate to enhance the absorption signal of the molecules. A high enhanced factor of 1.15×105 can be achieved when the resonance wavelength of resonator is adjusted to match the desired vibrational mode of the molecules. Such a cavity-enhanced plasmonic resonator, which is easy for practical fabrication, is expected to have potential applications for infrared sensing with high-performance.

  13. [Study on removing the lamp spectrum structure in differential optical absorption spectroscopy].

    PubMed

    Qu, Xiao-ying; Li, Yu-jin

    2010-11-01

    Differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS) technique has been used to measure trace gases in the atmosphere by their strongly structured absorption of radiation in the UV and visible spectral range, and nowadays this technique has been widely utilized to measure trace polluted gases in the atmosphere e.g. SO2, NO2, O3, HCHO, etc. However, there exists lamp (xenon lamp or deuteriumlamp) spectrum structure in the measured band (300-700 nm) of the absorption spectra of atmosphere, which badly impacts on precision of retrieving the concentration of trace gases in the atmosphere. People home and abroad generally employ two ways to handle this problem, one is segmenting band retrieving method, another is remedial retrieving method. In the present paper, a new retrieving method to deal with this trouble is introduced. The authors used moving-window average smoothing method to obtain the slow part of the absorption spectra of atmosphere, then achieved the lamp (xenon lamp in the paper) spectrum structure in the measured band of the absorption spectra of atmosphere. The authors analyzed and retrieved the measured spectrum of the atmosphere, and the result is better than the forenamed ways. Chi-square of residuum is 2.995 x 10(-4), and this method was proved to be able to avoid shortcoming of choosing narrowband and disadvantage of discovering the new component of atmosphere in retrieving the concentration of air pollutants and measuring the air pollutants.

  14. A split imaging spectrometer for temporally and spatially resolved titanium absorption spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Hager, J. D. Lanier, N. E.; Kline, J. L.; Flippo, K. A.; Bruns, H. C.; Schneider, M.; Saculla, M.; McCarville, T.

    2014-11-15

    We present a temporally and a spatially resolved spectrometer for titanium x-ray absorption spectroscopy along 2 axial symmetric lines-of-sight. Each line-of-sight of the instrument uses an elliptical crystal to acquire both the 2p and 3p Ti absorption lines on a single, time gated channel of the instrument. The 2 axial symmetric lines-of-sight allow the 2p and 3p absorption features to be measured through the same point in space using both channels of the instrument. The spatially dependent material temperature can be inferred by observing the 2p and the 3p Ti absorption features. The data are recorded on a two strip framing camera with each strip collecting data from a single line-of-sight. The design is compatible for use at both the OMEGA laser and the National Ignition Facility. The spectrometer is intended to measure the material temperature behind a Marshak wave in a radiatively driven SiO{sub 2} foam with a Ti foam tracer. In this configuration, a broad band CsI backlighter will be used for a source and the Ti absorption spectrum measured.

  15. New advances in the use of infrared absorption spectroscopy for the characterization of heterogeneous catalytic reactions.

    PubMed

    Zaera, Francisco

    2014-11-21

    Infrared absorption spectroscopy has proven to be one of the most powerful spectroscopic techniques available for the characterization of catalytic systems. Although the history of IR absorption spectroscopy in catalysis is long, the technique continues to provide key fundamental information about a variety of catalysts and catalytic reactions, and to also offer novel options for the acquisition of new information on both reaction mechanisms and the nature of the solids used as catalysts. In this review, an overview is provided of the main contributions that have been derived from IR absorption spectroscopy studies of catalytic systems, and a discussion is included on new trends and new potential directions of research involving IR in catalysis. We start by briefly describing the power of Fourier-transform IR (FTIR) instruments and the main experimental IR setups available, namely, transmission (TIR), diffuse reflectance (DRIFTS), attenuated total reflection (ATR-IR), and reflection-absorption (RAIRS), for advancing research in catalysis. We then discuss the different environments under which IR characterization of catalysts is carried out, including in situ and operando studies of typical catalytic processes in gas-phase, research with model catalysts in ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) and so-called high-pressure cell instruments, and work involving liquid/solid interfaces. A presentation of the type of information extracted from IR data follows in terms of the identification of adsorbed intermediates, the characterization of the surfaces of the catalysts themselves, the quantitation of IR intensities to extract surface coverages, and the use of probe molecules to identify and titrate specific catalytic sites. Finally, the different options for carrying out kinetic studies with temporal resolution such as rapid-scan FTIR, step-scan FTIR, and the use of tunable lasers or synchrotron sources, and to obtain spatially resolved spectra, by sample rastering or by 2D imaging, are

  16. The second derivative electronic absorption spectrum of cytochrome c oxidase in the Soret region.

    PubMed

    Horvath, M P; Copeland, R A; Makinen, M W

    1999-09-01

    The electronic absorption spectrum of solubilized beef heart cytochrome c oxidase was analyzed in the 400-500 nm region to identify the origin of doublet features appearing in the second derivative spectrum associated with ferrocytochrome a. This doublet, centered near 22,600 cm(-1), was observed in the direct absorption spectrum of the a(2+)a(3)(3+).HCOO(-) form of the enzyme at cryogenic temperatures. Since evidence for this doublet at room temperature is obtained only on the basis of the second derivative spectrum, a novel mathematical approach was developed to analyze the resolving power of second derivative spectroscopy as a function of parameterization of spectral data. Within the mathematical limits defined for resolving spectral features, it was demonstrated that the integrated intensity of the doublet feature near 450 nm associated with ferrocytochrome a is independent of the ligand and oxidation state of cytochrome a(3). Furthermore, the doublet features, also observed in cytochrome c oxidase from Paracoccus denitrificans, were similarly associated with the heme A component and were correspondingly independent of the ligand and oxidation state of the heme A(3) chromophore. The doublet features are attributed to lifting of the degeneracy of the x and y polarized components of the B state of the heme A chromophore associated with the Soret transition.

  17. Cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS) system for measuring atmospheric mercury using differential absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierce, A.; Obrist, D.; Moosmuller, H.; Moore, C.

    2012-04-01

    Atmospheric elemental mercury (Hg0) is a globally pervasive element that can be transported and deposited to remote ecosystems where it poses — particularly in its methylated form — harm to many organisms including humans. Current techniques for measurement of atmospheric Hg0 require several liters of sample air and several minutes for each analysis. Fast-response (i.e., 1 second or faster) measurements would improve our ability to understand and track chemical cycling of mercury in the atmosphere, including high frequency Hg0 fluctuations, sources and sinks, and chemical transformation processes. We present theory, design, challenges, and current results of our new prototype sensor based on cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS) for fast-response measurement of Hg0 mass concentrations. CRDS is a direct absorption technique that implements path-lengths of multiple kilometers in a compact absorption cell using high-reflectivity mirrors, thereby improving sensitivity and reducing sample volume compared to conventional absorption spectroscopy. Our sensor includes a frequency-doubled, dye-laser emitting laser pulses tunable from 215 to 280 nm, pumped by a Q-switched, frequency tripled Nd:YAG laser with a pulse repetition rate of 50 Hz. We present how we successfully perform automated wavelength locking and stabilization of the laser to the peak Hg0 absorption line at 253.65 nm using an external isotopically-enriched mercury (202Hg0) cell. An emphasis of this presentation will be on the implementation of differential absorption measurement whereby measurements are alternated between the peak Hg0 absorption wavelength and a nearby wavelength "off" the absorption line. This can be achieved using a piezo electric tuning element that allows for pulse-by-pulse tuning and detuning of the laser "online" and "offline" of the Hg absorption line, and thereby allows for continuous correction of baseline extinction losses. Unexpected challenges with this approach included

  18. [Second-harmonic detection with tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy of CO and CO2 at 1.58 microm].

    PubMed

    Tu, Xing-Hua; Liu, Wen-Qing; Zhang, Yu-Jun; Dong, Feng-Zhong; Wang, Min; Wang, Tie-Dong; Wang, Xiao-Mei; Liu, Jian-Guo

    2006-07-01

    Tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy has been applied in the fields of atmospheric chemistry and monitoring pollutant gases as a new method of measuring trace gases. The technique of remote sensing of CO and CO2 at 760 mm Hg pressure with tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy in the near-infrared region is introduced. And the relationship between the second-harmonic spectrum of CO2 in Lorentzian line shape and the modulation amplitude is also presented.

  19. Quantification of rapid environmental redox processes with quick-scanning x-ray absorption spectroscopy (Q-XAS).

    PubMed

    Ginder-Vogel, Matthew; Landrot, Gautier; Fischel, Jason S; Sparks, Donald L

    2009-09-22

    Quantification of the initial rates of environmental reactions at the mineral/water interface is a fundamental prerequisite to determining reaction mechanisms and contaminant transport modeling and predicting environmental risk. Until recently, experimental techniques with adequate time resolution and elemental sensitivity to measure initial rates of the wide variety of environmental reactions were quite limited. Techniques such as electron paramagnetic resonance and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopies suffer from limited elemental specificity and poor sensitivity to inorganic elements, respectively. Ex situ analysis of batch and stirred-flow systems provides high elemental sensitivity; however, their time resolution is inadequate to characterize rapid environmental reactions. Here we apply quick-scanning x-ray absorption spectroscopy (Q-XAS), at sub-second time-scales, to measure the initial oxidation rate of As(III) to As(V) by hydrous manganese(IV) oxide. Using Q-XAS, As(III) and As(V) concentrations were determined every 0.98 s in batch reactions. The initial apparent As(III) depletion rate constants (t < 30 s) measured with Q-XAS are nearly twice as large as rate constants measured with traditional analytical techniques. Our results demonstrate the importance of developing analytical techniques capable of analyzing environmental reactions on the same time scale as they occur. Given the high sensitivity, elemental specificity, and time resolution of Q-XAS, it has many potential applications. They could include measuring not only redox reactions but also dissolution/precipitation reactions, such as the formation and/or reductive dissolution of Fe(III) (hydr)oxides, solid-phase transformations (i.e., formation of layered-double hydroxide minerals), or almost any other reaction occurring in aqueous media that can be measured using x-ray absorption spectroscopy.

  20. High-resolution absorption spectroscopy of photoionized silicon plasma, a step toward measuring the efficiency of Resonant Auger Destruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loisel, Guillaume; Bailey, James; Hansen, Stephanie; Nagayama, Taisuke; Rochau, Gregory; Liedhal, Duane; Mancini, Roberto

    2013-10-01

    A remarkable opportunity to observe matter in a regime where the effects of General Relativity are significant has arisen through measurements of strongly red-shifted iron x-ray lines emitted from black hole accretion disks. A major uncertainty in the spectral formation models is the efficiency of Resonant Auger Destruction (RAD), in which fluorescent K α photons are resonantly absorbed by neighbor ions. The absorbing ion preferentially decays by Auger ionization, thus reducing the emerging K α intensity. If K α lines from L-shell ions are not observed in iron spectral emission, why are such lines observed from silicon plasma surrounding other accretion powered objects? To help answer this question, we are investigating photoionized silicon plasmas produced using intense x-rays from the Z facility. The incident spectral irradiance is determined with time-resolved absolute power measurements, multiple monochromatic gated images, and a 3-D view factor model. The charge state distribution, electron temperature, and electron density are determined using space-resolved backlit absorption spectroscopy. The measurements constrain photoionized plasma models and set the stage for future emission spectroscopy directly investigating the RAD process. Sandia is a multi-program laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, for the United States Department of Energy under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  1. Triplet excited state distortions in a pyrazolate bridged platinum dimer measured by X-ray transient absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Lockard, Jenny V; Rachford, Aaron A; Smolentsev, Grigory; Stickrath, Andrew B; Wang, Xianghuai; Zhang, Xiaoyi; Atenkoffer, Klaus; Jennings, Guy; Soldatov, Alexander; Rheingold, Arnold L; Castellano, Felix N; Chen, Lin X

    2010-12-09

    The excited-state structure of a dinuclear platinum(II) complex with tert-butyl substituted pyrazolate bridging units, [Pt(ppy)(μ-(t)Bu(2)pz)](2) (ppy = 2-phenylpyridine; (t)Bu(2)pz = 3,5-di-tert-butylpyrazolate) is studied by X-ray transient absorption (XTA) spectroscopy to reveal the transient electronic and nuclear geometry. DFT calculations predict that the lowest energy triplet excited state, assigned to a metal-metal-to-ligand charge transfer (MMLCT) transition, has a contraction in the Pt-Pt distance. The Pt-Pt bond length and other structural parameters extracted from fitting the experimental XTA difference spectra from full multiple scattering (FMS) and multidimensional interpolation calculations indicates a metal-metal distance decrease by approximately 0.2 Å in the triplet excited state. The advantages and challenges of this approach in resolving dynamic transient structures of nonbonding or weak-bonding dinuclear metal complexes in solution are discussed.

  2. Self-corrected sensors based on atomic absorption spectroscopy for atom flux measurements in molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Du, Y. E-mail: scott.chambers@pnnl.gov; Liyu, A. V.; Droubay, T. C.; Chambers, S. A. E-mail: scott.chambers@pnnl.gov; Li, G.

    2014-04-21

    A high sensitivity atom flux sensor based on atomic absorption spectroscopy has been designed and implemented to control electron beam evaporators and effusion cells in a molecular beam epitaxy system. Using a high-resolution spectrometer and a two-dimensional charge coupled device detector in a double-beam configuration, we employ either a non-resonant line or a resonant line with low cross section from the same hollow cathode lamp as the reference for nearly perfect background correction and baseline drift removal. This setup also significantly shortens the warm-up time needed compared to other sensor technologies and drastically reduces the noise coming from the surrounding environment. In addition, the high-resolution spectrometer allows the most sensitive resonant line to be isolated and used to provide excellent signal-to-noise ratio.

  3. Chiral-index resolved length mapping of carbon nanotubes in solution using electric-field induced differential absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wenshan; Hennrich, Frank; Flavel, Benjamin S.; Kappes, Manfred M.; Krupke, Ralph

    2016-09-01

    The length of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) is an important metric for the integration of SWCNTs into devices and for the performance of SWCNT-based electronic or optoelectronic applications. In this work we propose a rather simple method based on electric-field induced differential absorption spectroscopy to measure the chiral-index-resolved average length of SWCNTs in dispersions. The method takes advantage of the electric-field induced length-dependent dipole moment of nanotubes and has been verified and calibrated by atomic force microscopy. This method not only provides a low cost, in situ approach for length measurements of SWCNTs in dispersion, but due to the sensitivity of the method to the SWCNT chiral index, the chiral index dependent average length of fractions obtained by chromatographic sorting can also be derived. Also, the determination of the chiral-index resolved length distribution seems to be possible using this method.

  4. Sulfur K-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy as an experimental probe for S-nitroso proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Szilagyi, Robert K. . E-mail: Szilagyi@Montana.EDU; Schwab, David E.

    2005-04-29

    X-ray absorption spectroscopy at the sulfur K-edge (2.4-2.6 keV) provides a sensitive and specific technique to identify S-nitroso compounds, which have significance in nitric oxide-based cell signaling. Unique spectral features clearly distinguish the S-nitroso-form of a cysteine residue from the sulfhydryl-form or from a methionine thioether. Comparison of the sulfur K-edge spectra of thiolate, thiol, thioether, and S-nitroso thiolate compounds indicates high sensitivity of energy positions and intensities of XAS pre-edge features as determined by the electronic environment of the sulfur absorber. A new experimental setup is being developed for reaching the in vivo concentration range of S-nitroso thiol levels in biological samples.

  5. X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy of Bimetallic Pt-Re Catalysts for Hydrogenolysis of Glycerol to Propanediols

    SciTech Connect

    O Daniel; A DeLaRiva; E Kunkes; A Datye; J Dumesic; R Davis

    2011-12-31

    Bimetallic Pt-Re nanoparticles supported on Norit carbon were effective at converting aqueous glycerol to 1,3 (34 %) and 1,2 (33 %) propanediol at 443 K under 4 MPa of H{sub 2}. Results from X-ray absorption spectroscopy and analytical transmission electron microscopy confirmed that the nanoparticles were indeed bimetallic, with a particle size less than 2 nm in diameter. The Pt L{sub III} near edge spectra indicated that the Pt was reduced to the metallic state by treatment in H{sub 2} at 473 K, but that a partial positive charge remained on the Re. These oxidized Re species could be associated with charged Re atoms dispersed on the carbon support because spillover of H atoms from Pt was required to reduce Re in the bimetallic particles.

  6. Operando characterization of batteries using x-ray absorption spectroscopy: advances at the beamline XAFS at synchrotron Elettra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aquilanti, Giuliana; Giorgetti, Marco; Dominko, Robert; Stievano, Lorenzo; Arčon, Iztok; Novello, Nicola; Olivi, Luca

    2017-02-01

    X-ray absorption spectroscopy is a synchrotron radiation based technique that is able to provide information on both local structure and electronic properties in a chemically selective manner. It can be used to characterize the dynamic processes that govern the electrochemical energy storage in batteries, and to shed light on the redox chemistry and changes in structure during galvanostatic cycling to design cathode materials with improved properties. Operando XAS studies have been performed at beamline XAFS at Elettra on different systems. For Li-ion batteries, a multiedge approach revealed the role of the different cathode components during the charge and discharge of the battery. In addition, Li-S batteries for automotive applications were studied. Operando sulfur K-edge XANES and EXAFS analysis was used to characterize the redox chemistry of sulfur, and to relate the electrochemical mechanism to its local structure.

  7. Self-corrected sensors based on atomic absorption spectroscopy for atom flux measurements in molecular beam epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Y.; Droubay, T. C.; Liyu, A. V.; Li, G.; Chambers, S. A.

    2014-04-01

    A high sensitivity atom flux sensor based on atomic absorption spectroscopy has been designed and implemented to control electron beam evaporators and effusion cells in a molecular beam epitaxy system. Using a high-resolution spectrometer and a two-dimensional charge coupled device detector in a double-beam configuration, we employ either a non-resonant line or a resonant line with low cross section from the same hollow cathode lamp as the reference for nearly perfect background correction and baseline drift removal. This setup also significantly shortens the warm-up time needed compared to other sensor technologies and drastically reduces the noise coming from the surrounding environment. In addition, the high-resolution spectrometer allows the most sensitive resonant line to be isolated and used to provide excellent signal-to-noise ratio.

  8. Anisotropy of chemical bonds in collagen molecules studied by X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Lam, Raymond S K; Metzler, Rebecca A; Gilbert, Pupa U P A; Beniash, Elia

    2012-03-16

    Collagen type I fibrils are the major building blocks of connective tissues. Collagen fibrils are anisotropic supramolecular structures, and their orientation can be revealed by polarized light microscopy and vibrational microspectroscopy. We hypothesized that the anisotropy of chemical bonds in the collagen molecules, and hence their orientation, might also be detected by X-ray photoemission electron spectromicroscopy (X-PEEM) and X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy, which use linearly polarized synchrotron light. To test this hypothesis, we analyzed sections of rat-tail tendon, composed of parallel arrays of collagen fibrils. The results clearly indicate that XANES-PEEM is sensitive to collagen fibril orientation and, more specifically, to the orientations of carbonyl and amide bonds in collagen molecules. These data suggest that XANES-PEEM is a promising technique for characterizing the chemical composition and structural organization at the nanoscale of collagen-based connective tissues, including tendons, cartilage, and bone.

  9. UV-Vis Reflection-Absorption Spectroscopy at air-liquid interfaces.

    PubMed

    Rubia-Payá, Carlos; de Miguel, Gustavo; Martín-Romero, María T; Giner-Casares, Juan J; Camacho, Luis

    2015-11-01

    UV-Visible Reflection-Absorption Spectroscopy (UVRAS) technique is reviewed with a general perspective on fundamental and applications. UVRAS is formally identical to IR Reflection-Absorption Spectroscopy (IRRAS), and therefore, the methodology developed for this IR technique can be applied in the UV-visible region. UVRAS can be applied to air-solid, air-liquid or liquid-liquid interfaces. This review focuses on the use of UVRAS for studying Langmuir monolayers. We introduce the theoretical framework for a successful understanding of the UVRAS data, and we illustrate the usage of this data treatment to a previous study from our group comprising an amphiphilic porphyrin. For ultrathin films with a thickness of few nm, UVRAS produces positive or negative bands when p-polarized radiation is used, depending on the incidence angle and the orientation of dipole absorption. UVRAS technique provides highly valuable information on tilt of chromophores at the air-liquid interface, and moreover allows the determination of optical parameters. We propose UVRAS as a powerful technique to investigate the in situ optical properties of Langmuir monolayers.

  10. High-performance dispersive Raman and absorption spectroscopy as tools for drug identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pawluczyk, Olga; Andrey, Sam; Nogas, Paul; Roy, Andrew; Pawluczyk, Romuald

    2009-02-01

    Due to increasing availability of pharmaceuticals from many sources, a need is growing to quickly and efficiently analyze substances in terms of the consistency and accuracy of their chemical composition. Differences in chemical composition occur at very low concentrations, so that highly sensitive analytical methods become crucial. Recent progress in dispersive spectroscopy with the use of 2-dimensional detector arrays, permits for signal integration along a long (up to 12 mm long) entrance slit of a spectrometer, thereby increasing signal to noise ratio and improving the ability to detect small concentration changes. This is achieved with a non-scanning, non-destructive system. Two different methods using P&P Optica high performance spectrometers were used. High performance optical dispersion Raman and high performance optical absorption spectroscopy were employed to differentiate various acetaminophen-containing drugs, such as Tylenol and other generic brands, which differ in their ingredients. A 785 nm excitation wavelength was used in Raman measurements and strong Raman signals were observed in the spectral range 300-1800 cm-1. Measurements with the absorption spectrometer were performed in the wavelength range 620-1020 nm. Both Raman and absorption techniques used transmission light spectrometers with volume phase holographic gratings and provided sufficient spectral differences, often structural, allowing for drug differentiation.

  11. Time resolved metal line profile by near-ultraviolet tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vitelaru, C.; de Poucques, L.; Minea, T. M.; Popa, G.

    2011-03-01

    Pulsed systems are extensively used to produce active species such as atoms, radicals, excited states, etc. The tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (TD-LAS) is successfully used to quantify the density of absorbing species, but especially for stationary or slow changing systems. The time resolved-direct absorption profile (TR-DAP) measurement method by TD-LAS, with time resolution of μs is proposed here as an extension of the regular use of diode laser absorption spectroscopy. The spectral narrowness of laser diodes, especially in the blue range (˜0.01 pm), combined with the nanosecond fast trigger of the magnetron pulsed plasma and long trace recording on the oscilloscope (period of second scale) permit the detection of the sputtered titanium metal evolution in the afterglow (˜ms). TR-DAP method can follow the time-dependence of the temperature (Doppler profile) and the density (deduced from the absorbance) of any medium and heavy species in a pulsed system.

  12. [Signal analysis and spectrum distortion correction for tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy system].

    PubMed

    Bao, Wei-Yi; Zhu, Yong; Chen, Jun; Chen, Jun-Qing; Liang, Bo

    2011-04-01

    In the present paper, the signal of a tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (TDLAS) trace gas sensing system, which has a wavelength modulation with a wide range of modulation amplitudes, is studied based on Fourier analysis method. Theory explanation of spectrum distortion induced by laser intensity amplitude modulation is given. In order to rectify the spectrum distortion, a method of synchronous amplitude modulation suppression by a variable optical attenuator is proposed. To validate the method, an experimental setup is designed. Absorption spectrum measurement experiments on CO2 gas were carried out. The results show that the residual laser intensity modulation amplitude of the experimental system is reduced to -0.1% of its original value and the spectrum distortion improvement is 92% with the synchronous amplitude modulation suppression. The modulation amplitude of laser intensity can be effectively reduced and the spectrum distortion can be well corrected by using the given correction method and system. By using a variable optical attenuator in the TDLAS (tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy) system, the dynamic range requirements of photoelectric detector, digital to analog converter, filters and other aspects of the TDLAS system are reduced. This spectrum distortion correction method can be used for online trace gas analyzing in process industry.

  13. Surface arsenic speciation of a drinking-water treatment residual using X-ray absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Makris, Konstantinos C; Sarkar, Dibyendu; Parsons, Jason G; Datta, Rupali; Gardea-Torresdey, Jorge L

    2007-07-15

    Drinking-water treatment residuals (WTRs) present a low-cost geosorbent for As-contaminated waters and soils. Previous work has demonstrated the high affinity of WTRs for As, but data pertaining to the stability of sorbed As is missing. Sorption/desorption and X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS), both XANES (X-ray absorption near edge structure) and EXAFS (extended X-ray absorption fine structure) studies, were combined to determine the stability of As sorbed by an Fe-based WTR. Arsenic(V) and As(III) sorption kinetics were biphasic in nature, sorbing >90% of the initial added As (15,000 mg kg(-1)) after 48 h of reaction. Subsequent desorption experiments with a high P load (7500 mg kg(-1)) showed negligible As desorption for both As species, approximately <3.5% of sorbed As; the small amount of desorbed As was attributed to the abundance of sorption sites. XANES data showed that sorption kinetics for either As(III) or As(V) initially added to solution had no effect on the sorbed As oxidation state. EXAFS spectroscopy suggested that As added either as As(III) or as As(V) formed inner-sphere mononuclear, bidentate complexes, suggesting the stability of the sorbed As, which was further corroborated by the minimum As desorption from the Fe-WTR.

  14. Angle-tunable enhanced infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy via grating-coupled surface plasmon resonance.

    PubMed

    Petefish, Joseph W; Hillier, Andrew C

    2014-03-04

    Surface enhanced infrared absorption (SEIRA) spectroscopy is an attractive method for increasing the prominence of vibrational modes in infrared spectroscopy. To date, the majority of reports associated with SEIRA utilize localized surface plasmon resonance from metal nanoparticles to enhance electromagnetic fields in the region of analytes. Limited work has been performed using propagating surface plasmons as a method for SEIRA excitation. In this report, we demonstrate angle-tunable enhancement of vibrational stretching modes associated with a thin poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) film that is coupled to a silver-coated diffraction grating. Gratings are fabricated using laser interference lithography to achieve precise surface periodicities, which can be used to generate surface plasmons that overlap with specific vibrational modes in the polymer film. Infrared reflection absorption spectra are presented for both bare silver and PMMA-coated silver gratings at a range of angles and polarization states. In addition, spectra were obtained with the grating direction oriented perpendicular and parallel to the infrared source in order to isolate plasmon enhancement effects. Optical simulations using the rigorous coupled-wave analysis method were used to identify the origin of the plasmon-induced enhancement. Angle-dependent absorption measurements achieved signal enhancements of more than 10-times the signal in the absence of the plasmon.

  15. Electronic structure of cobalt doped CdSe quantum dots using soft X-ray spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Joshua T. Wright; Su, Dong; van Buuren, Tony; Meulenberg, Robert W.

    2014-08-21

    The electronic structure and magnetic properties of cobalt doped CdSe quantum dots (QDs) are studied using electron microscopy, soft X-ray spectroscopy, and magnetometry. Magnetometry measurements suggest these QDs are superparamagnetic, contrary to a spin-glass state observed in the bulk analogue. Moreover, the electron microscopy shows well formed QDs, but with cobalt existing as doped into the QD and as unreacted species not contained in the QD. X-ray absorption measurements at the Co L3-edge suggest that changes in spectra features as a function of particle size can be described considering combination of a cobalt ion in a tetrahedral crystal field and an octahedrally coordinated (impurity) phase. With decreasing particle sizes, the impurity phase increases, suggesting that small QDs can be difficult to dope.

  16. Broadband spectroscopy with external cavity quantum cascade lasers beyond conventional absorption measurements.

    PubMed

    Lambrecht, Armin; Pfeifer, Marcel; Konz, Werner; Herbst, Johannes; Axtmann, Felix

    2014-05-07

    Laser spectroscopy is a powerful tool for analyzing small molecules, i.e. in the gas phase. In the mid-infrared spectral region quantum cascade lasers (QCLs) have been established as the most frequently used laser radiation source. Spectroscopy of larger molecules in the gas phase, of complex mixtures, and analysis in the liquid phase requires a broader tuning range and is thus still the domain of Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. However, the development of tunable external cavity (EC) QCLs is starting to change this situation. The main advantage of QCLs is their high spectral emission power that is enhanced by a factor of 10(4) compared with thermal light sources. Obviously, transmission measurements with EC-QCLs in strongly absorbing samples are feasible, which can hardly be measured by FTIR due to detector noise limitations. We show that the high power of EC-QCLs facilitates spectroscopy beyond simple absorption measurements. Starting from QCL experiments with liquid samples, we show results of fiber evanescent field analysis (FEFA) to detect pesticides in drinking water. FEFA is a special case of attenuated total reflection spectroscopy. Furthermore, powerful CW EC-QCLs enable fast vibrational circular dichroism (VCD) spectroscopy of chiral molecules in the liquid phase - a technique which is very time consuming with standard FTIR equipment. We present results obtained for the chiral compound 1,1'-bi-2-naphthol (BINOL). Finally, powerful CW EC-QCLs enable the application of laser photothermal emission spectroscopy (LPTES). We demonstrate this for a narrowband and broadband absorber in the gas phase. All three techniques have great potential for MIR process analytical applications.

  17. Ballistic electron emission spectroscopy of magnetic multilayers (abstract)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    First, P. N.; Bonetti, J. A.; Guthrie, D. K.; Harrell, L. E.; Parkin, S. S. P.

    1997-04-01

    The giant magnetoresistance observed in magnetic multilayers arises from spin-dependent scattering and transmission of electrons at the Fermi energy. We will describe a method for the measurement of these quantities in a "CPP" geometry at electron energies both above and below the Fermi energy. Initial results will also be presented. The measurements employ ballistic electron emission spectroscopy (BEES) to detect the ballistic electron current transmitted through a multilayer as a function of magnetic field and electron energy. The experiments are similar in concept to the "spin-valve transistor,"1 except that the injector is the tip of a scanning tunneling microscope. This allows the injection energy to be varied over a wide range, and spectra can be correlated with the local surface morphology on a nanometer scale. Spectral broadening due to sample inhomogeneities is also eliminated. We anticipate that BEES measurements and complementary scanning tunneling spectroscopy will provide information that is easily compared with calculations of the multilayer band structure and the electron transmittance versus energy.

  18. The electronic characterization of biphenylene—Experimental and theoretical insights from core and valence level spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Lüder, Johann; Sanyal, Biplab; Eriksson, Olle; Brena, Barbara; Puglia, Carla; Simone, Monica de; Totani, Roberta; Coreno, Marcello; Grazioli, Cesare

    2015-02-21

    In this paper, we provide detailed insights into the electronic structure of the gas phase biphenylene molecule through core and valence spectroscopy. By comparing results of X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) measurements with ΔSCF core-hole calculations in the framework of Density Functional Theory (DFT), we could decompose the characteristic contributions to the total spectra and assign them to non-equivalent carbon atoms. As a difference with similar molecules like biphenyl and naphthalene, an influence of the localized orbitals on the relative XPS shifts was found. The valence spectrum probed by photoelectron spectroscopy at a photon energy of 50 eV in conjunction with hybrid DFT calculations revealed the effects of the localization on the electronic states. Using the transition potential approach to simulate the X-ray absorption spectroscopy measurements, similar contributions from the non-equivalent carbon atoms were determined from the total spectrum, for which the slightly shifted individual components can explain the observed asymmetric features.

  19. Optical absorption properties of electron bubbles and experiments on monitoring individual electron bubbles in liquid helium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Wei

    When a free electron is injected into liquid helium, it forms a microscopic bubble essentially free of helium atoms, which is referred to as an electron bubble. It represents a fine example of a quantum-mechanical particle confined in a potential well. In this dissertation, we describe our studies on bubble properties, especially the optical absorption properties of ground state electron bubbles and experiments on imaging individual electron bubbles in liquid helium. We studied the effect of zero-point and thermal fluctuations on the shape of ground state electron bubbles in liquid helium. The results are used to determine the line shape for the 1S to 1P optical transition. The calculated line shape is in very good agreement with the experimental measurements of Grimes and Adams. For 1S to 2P transition, the obtained transition line width agrees well with the measured data of Zipfel over a range of pressure up to 15 bars. Fluctuations in the bubble shape also make other "unallowed" transitions possible. The transition cross-sections from the 1S state to the 1D and 2D states are calculated with magnitude approximately two orders smaller than that of the 1S to 1P and 2P transitions. In our electron bubble imaging experiments, a planar ultrasonic transducer was used to generate strong sound wave pulse in liquid helium. The sound pulse passed through the liquid so as to produce a transient negative pressure over a large volume (˜ 1 cm3). An electron bubble that was passed by the sound pulse exploded for a fraction of a microsecond and grew to have a radius of around 10 microns. While the bubble had this large size it was illuminated with a flash lamp and its position was recorded. In this way, we can determine its position. Through the application of a series of sound pulses, we can then take images along the track of individual electrons. The motion of individual electron bubbles has been successfully monitored. Interesting bubble tracks that may relate to electrons

  20. Communication: Investigation of the electron momentum density distribution of nanodiamonds by electron energy-loss spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, Zhenbao; Yang, Bing; Lin, Yangming; Su, Dangsheng

    2015-12-07

    The electron momentum distribution of detonation nanodiamonds (DND) was investigated by recording electron energy-loss spectra at large momentum transfer in the transmission electron microscope (TEM), which is known as electron Compton scattering from solid (ECOSS). Compton profile of diamond film obtained by ECOSS was found in good agreement with prior photon experimental measurement and theoretical calculation that for bulk diamond. Compared to the diamond film, the valence Compton profile of DND was found to be narrower, which indicates a more delocalization of the ground-state charge density for the latter. Combining with other TEM characterizations such as high-resolution transmission electron spectroscopy, diffraction, and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy measurements, ECOSS was shown to be a great potential technique to study ground-state electronic properties of nanomaterials.

  1. REVIEWS OF TOPICAL PROBLEMS: Solid-surface electron spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomoyunova, M. V.

    1982-01-01

    Electron spectroscopy (ES) of the surface of a solid comprises a set of methods of studying its elemental composition, structure, electronic structure, and dynamics. The essence of almost all the methods consists in obtaining and studying the energy spectra and angular distributions of electrons emitted by the surface of the solid upon irradiation with fluxes of photons, electrons, or ions, or upon creating a strong electric field near it. Depending on the nature of the probe, one can distinguish photoelectron, secondary-electron, ion-electron, and field spectroscopy. Each of them is realized by several methods. In practically all the methods analysis of the characteristics that are obtained consists of singling out certain unitypical elementary events of interaction of the probe agent with the surface layers of the solid. As a rule, the depth of probing is determined by the mean free path of the electron with respect to inelastic interaction. In the electron energy range from tens to approximately hundreds of electron volts in various materials, it constitutes from one to several atomic layers. In determining elemental composition, the sensitivity of most of the ES methods is approximately equal to hundredths of a monolayer. One can employ a scanning probe to obtain the distribution of the elements over the surface of the specimen. Most of the ES methods have been invented in the past decade. At present the studies in the field of surface physics are intensively developing and have great scientific and important applied significance. This review briefly treats the physical fundamentals of the ES methods, their potentialities, classifies the methods, gives examples to illustrate them, and cursorily throws light on the fundamental technical means of realizing the methods.

  2. Temperature and multi-species measurements by supercontinuum absorption spectroscopy for IC engine applications.

    PubMed

    Werblinski, Thomas; Engel, Sascha R; Engelbrecht, Rainer; Zigan, Lars; Will, Stefan

    2013-06-03

    The first supercontinuum (SC) absorption spectroscopy measurements showing the feasibility of quantitative temperature evaluation are presented to the best of the authors' knowledge. Temperature and multi-species measurements were carried out at a detection rate of ~2 MHz in a high-temperature flow cell within a temperature range from 450 K to 750 K at 0.22 MPa, representing conditions during the suction and compression stroke in an internal combustion (IC) engine. The broadband SC pulses were temporally dispersed into fast wavelength sweeps, covering the overtone absorption bands 2ν(1), 2ν(3), ν(1) + ν(3) of H2O and 3ν(3) of CO2 in the near-infrared region from 1330 nm to 1500 nm. The temperature information is inferred from the peak ratio of a temperature sensitive (1362.42 nm) and insensitive (1418.91 nm) absorption feature in the ν(1) + ν(3) overtone bands of water. The experimental results are in very good agreement with theoretical intensity ratios calculated from absorption spectra based on HiTran data.

  3. Tunable Diode Laser Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy for Detection of Potassium under Optically Thick Conditions.

    PubMed

    Qu, Zhechao; Steinvall, Erik; Ghorbani, Ramin; Schmidt, Florian M

    2016-04-05

    Potassium (K) is an important element related to ash and fine-particle formation in biomass combustion processes. In situ measurements of gaseous atomic potassium, K(g), using robust optical absorption techniques can provide valuable insight into the K chemistry. However, for typical parts per billion K(g) concentrations in biomass flames and reactor gases, the product of atomic line strength and absorption path length can give rise to such high absorbance that the sample becomes opaque around the transition line center. We present a tunable diode laser atomic absorption spectroscopy (TDLAAS) methodology that enables accurate, calibration-free species quantification even under optically thick conditions, given that Beer-Lambert's law is valid. Analyte concentration and collisional line shape broadening are simultaneously determined by a least-squares fit of simulated to measured absorption profiles. Method validation measurements of K(g) concentrations in saturated potassium hydroxide vapor in the temperature range 950-1200 K showed excellent agreement with equilibrium calculations, and a dynamic range from 40 pptv cm to 40 ppmv cm. The applicability of the compact TDLAAS sensor is demonstrated by real-time detection of K(g) concentrations close to biomass pellets during atmospheric combustion in a laboratory reactor.

  4. [Concentration retrieving method of SO2 using differential optical absorption spectroscopy based on statistics].

    PubMed

    Liu, Bin; Sun, Chang-Ku; Zhang, Chi; Zhao, Yu-Mei; Liu, Jun-Ping

    2011-01-01

    A concentration retrieving method using statistics is presented, which is applied in differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS) for measuring the concentration of SO2. The method uses the standard deviation of the differential absorption to represents the gas concentration. Principle component analysis (PCA) method is used to process the differential absorption spectrum. In the method, the basis data for the concentration retrieval of SO2 is the combination of the PCA processing result, the correlation coefficient, and the standard deviation of the differential absorption. The method is applied to a continuous emission monitoring system (CEMS) with optical path length of 0.3 m. Its measuring range for SO2 concentration is 0-5 800 mg x m(-3). The nonlinear calibration and the temperature compensation for the system were executed. The full scale error of the retrieving concentration is less than 0.7% FS. And the measuring result is -4.54 mg x m(-3) when the concentration of SO2 is zero.

  5. Diffuse reflectance spectroscopy as a tool to measure the absorption coefficient in skin: system calibration.

    PubMed

    Karsten, A E; Singh, A; Karsten, P A; Braun, M W H

    2013-02-01

    An individualised laser skin treatment may enhance the treatment and reduces risks and side-effects. The optical properties (absorption and scattering coefficients) are important parameters in the propagation of laser light in skin tissue. The differences in the melanin content of different skin phototypes influence the absorption of the light. The absorption coefficient at the treatment wavelength for an individual can be determined by diffuse reflectance spectroscopy, using a probe containing seven fibres. Six of the fibres deliver the light to the measurement site and the central fibre collects the diffused reflected light. This is an in vivo technique, offering benefits for near-real-time results. Such a probe, with an effective wavelength band from 450 to 800 nm, was used to calibrate skin-simulating phantoms consisting of intralipid and ink. The calibration constants were used to calculate the absorption coefficients from the diffuse reflectance measurements of three volunteers (skin phototypes, II, IV and V) for sun-exposed and non-exposed areas on the arm.

  6. An x-ray absorption spectroscopy study of Mo oxidation in Pb at elevated temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Shanshan; Olive, Daniel; Terry, Jeff; Segre, Carlo U.

    2009-06-30

    The corrosion of fuel cladding and structural materials by lead and lead-bismuth eutectic in the liquid state at elevated temperatures is an issue that must be considered when designing advanced nuclear systems and high-power spallation neutron targets. In this work, lead corrosion studies of molybdenum were performed to investigate the interaction layer as a function of temperature by X-ray absorption spectroscopy. In situ X-ray absorption measurements on a Mo substrate with a 3-6 {micro}m layer of Pb deposited by thermal evaporation were performed at temperatures up to 900 C and at a 15{sup o} angle to the incident X-rays. The changes in the local atomic structure of the corrosion layer are visible in the difference extended X-ray absorption fine structure and the linear combination fitting of the X-ray absorption near-edge structure to as-deposited molybdenum sample and molybdenum oxide (MoO{sub 2} and MoO{sub 3}) standards. The data are consistent with the appearance of MoO{sub 3} in an intermediate temperature range (650-800 C) and the more stable MoO{sub 2} phase dominating at high and low temperatures.

  7. The analysis of time-resolved optical waveguide absorption spectroscopy based on positive matrix factorization.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ping; Li, Zhu; Li, Bo; Shi, Guolong; Li, Minqiang; Yu, Daoyang; Liu, Jinhuai

    2013-08-01

    Time-resolved optical waveguide absorption spectroscopy (OWAS) makes use of an evanescent field to detect the polarized absorption spectra of sub-monomolecular adlayers. This technique is suitable for the investigation of kinetics at the solid/liquid interface of dyes, pigments, fluorescent molecules, quantum dots, metallic nanoparticles, and proteins with chromophores. In this work, we demonstrate the application of positive matrix factorization (PMF) to analyze time-resolved OWAS for the first time. Meanwhile, PCA is researched to compare with PMF. The absorption/desorption kinetics of Rhodamine 6G (R6G) onto a hydrophilic glass surface and the dynamic process of Meisenheimer complex between Cysteine and TNT are selected as samples to verify experimental system and analytical methods. The results are shown that time-resolved OWAS can well record the absorption/desorption of R6G onto a hydrophilic glass surface and the dynamic formation process of Meisenheimer complexes. The feature of OWAS extracted by PMF is dynamic and consistent with the results analyzed by the traditional function of time/wavelength-absorbance. Moreover, PMF prevents the negative factors from occurring, avoids contradicting physical reality, and makes factors more easily interpretable. Therefore, we believe that PMF will provide a valuable analysis route to allow processing of increasingly large and complex data sets.

  8. Identifying anthropogenic uranium compounds using soft X-ray near-edge absorption spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Ward, Jesse D.; Bowden, Mark; Tom Resch, C.; Eiden, Gregory C.; Pemmaraju, C. D.; Prendergast, David; Duffin, Andrew M.

    2017-01-01

    Uranium ores mined for industrial use are typically acid-leached to produce yellowcake and then converted into uranium halides for enrichment and purification. These anthropogenic chemical forms of uranium are distinct from their mineral counterparts. The purpose of this study is to use soft X-ray absorption spectroscopy to characterize several common anthropogenic uranium compounds important to the nuclear fuel cycle. Non-destructive chemical analyses of these compounds is important for process and environmental monitoring and X-ray absorption techniques have several advantages in this regard, including element-specificity, chemical sensitivity, and high spectral resolution. Oxygen K-edge spectra were collected for uranyl nitrate, uranyl fluoride, and uranyl chloride, and fluorine K-edge spectra were collected for uranyl fluoride and uranium tetrafluoride. Interpretation of the data is aided by comparisons to calculated spectra. These compounds have unique spectral signatures that can be used to identify unknown samples.

  9. Measurement of temperature profiles in flames by emission-absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simmons, F. S.; Arnold, C. B.; Lindquist, G. H.

    1972-01-01

    An investigation was conducted to explore the use of infrared and ultraviolet emission-absorption spectroscopy for determination of temperature profiles in flames. Spectral radiances and absorptances were measured in the 2.7-micron H2O band and the 3064-A OH band in H2/O2 flames for several temperature profiles which were directly measured by a sodium line-reversal technique. The temperature profiles, determined by inversion of the infrared and ultraviolet spectra, showed an average disagreement with line-reversal measurements of 50 K for the infrared and 200 K for the ultraviolet at a temperature of 2600 K. The reasons for these discrepancies are discussed in some detail.

  10. The nature of arsenic in uranium mill tailings by X-ray absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cutler, J. N.; Chen, N.; Jiang, D. T.; Demopoulos, G. P.; Jia, Y.; Rowson, J. W.

    2003-05-01

    In order to understand the evolving world of environmental issues, the ability to characterize and predict the stability and bioavailability of heavy métal contaminants in mine waste is becoming increasingly more important. X-ray Absorption Near Edge Structure (XANES) and Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (EXAFS) spectroscopies were used to characterize a series of synthetic and natural samples associated with mine tailings processing. XANES was shown to be excellent as a tool to rapidly differentiate oxidation states of arsenic within the samples. The EXAFS spectra provided information on the mineralogy of the precipitated raffinate and tailings and showed that these samples are composed of a mixture of amorphous ferric arsenates, adsorbed arsenates and a mixture of other poorly ordered arsenates.

  11. Ablation-initiated Isotope-selective Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy of Lanthanide Elements

    SciTech Connect

    Miyabe, M.; Oba, M.; Iimura, H.; Akaoka, K.; Maruyama, Y.; Wakaida, I.; Watanabe, K.

    2009-03-17

    For remote isotope analysis of low-decontaminated trans-uranium (TRU) fuel, absorption spectroscopy has been applied to a laser-ablated plume of lanthanide elements. To improve isotopic selectivity and detection sensitivity of the ablated species, various experimental conditions were optimized. Isotope-selective absorption spectra were measured by observing the slow component of the plume produced under low-pressure rare-gas ambient. The measured minimum line width of about 0.9 GHz was close to the Doppler width of the Gd atomic transition at room temperature. The relaxation rate of high-lying metastable state was found to be higher than that of the ground state, which suggests that higher analytical sensitivity can be obtained using low-lying state transition. Under helium gas environment, Doppler splitting was caused from particle motion. This effect was considered for optimization for isotope selection and analysis. Some analytical performances of this method were determined under optimum conditions and were discussed.

  12. Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (DOAS) using Targets: SO2 and NO2 Measurements in Montevideo City

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Louban, Ilia; Píriz, Gustavo; Platt, Ulrich; Frins, Erna

    2008-04-01

    SO2 and NO2 were remotely measured in a main street of Montevideo city using Multiaxis-Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (MAX-DOAS) combined with on-field selected targets. Target-based measurements are the basis of a new experimental procedure called Topographic Target Light scattering-DOAS (TOTAL-DOAS) that provides a well define absorption path to measure the near surface distribution of trace gases in the boundary layer. It combines the measurement principles of the long-path DOAS and zenith-scattered sunlight DOAS, within the near UV and VIS spectral range. We give a general description of the procedure and present first results of the 2006 campaign at Montevideo.

  13. Reflection-absorption infrared spectroscopy of thin films using an external cavity quantum cascade laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, Mark C.; Craig, Ian M.; Blake, Thomas A.

    2013-01-01

    We present experimental demonstrations using a broadly tunable external cavity quantum cascade laser (ECQCL) to perform Reflection-Absorption InfraRed Spectroscopy (RAIRS) of thin layers and residues on surfaces. The ECQCL compliance voltage was used to measure fluctuations in the ECQCL output power and improve the performance of the RAIRS measurements. Absorption spectra from self-assembled monolayers of a fluorinated alkane thiol and a thiol carboxylic acid were measured and compared with FTIR measurements. RAIRS spectra of the explosive compounds PETN, RDX, and tetryl deposited on gold substrates were also measured. Rapid measurement times and low noise were demonstrated, with <1E-3 absorbance noise for a 10 second measurement time.

  14. Quantifying the effect of finite spectral bandwidth on extinction coefficient of species in laser absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Manjeet; Singh, Jaswant; Singh, Baljit; Ghanshyam, C.

    2016-11-01

    The aim of this study is to quantify the finite spectral bandwidth effect on laser absorption spectroscopy for a wide-band laser source. Experimental analysis reveals that the extinction coefficient of an analyte is affected by the bandwidth of the spectral source, which may result in the erroneous conclusions. An approximate mathematical model has been developed for optical intensities having Gaussian line shape, which includes the impact of source's spectral bandwidth in the equation for spectroscopic absorption. This is done by introducing a suitable first order and second order bandwidth approximation in the Beer-Lambert law equation for finite bandwidth case. The derived expressions were validated using spectroscopic analysis with higher SBW on a test sample, Rhodamine B. The concentrations calculated using proposed approximation, were in significant agreement with the true values when compared with those calculated with conventional approach.

  15. Space Launch System Base Heating Test: Tunable Diode Laser Absorption Spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, Ron; Carr, Zak; MacLean, Mathew; Dufrene, Aaron; Mehta, Manish

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes the Tunable Diode Laser Absorption Spectroscopy (TDLAS) measurement of several water transitions that were interrogated during a hot-fire testing of the Space Launch Systems (SLS) sub-scale vehicle installed in LENS II. The temperature of the recirculating gas flow over the base plate was found to increase with altitude and is consistent with CFD results. It was also observed that the gas above the base plate has significant velocity along the optical path of the sensor at the higher altitudes. The line-by-line analysis of the H2O absorption features must include the effects of the Doppler shift phenomena particularly at high altitude. The TDLAS experimental measurements and the analysis procedure which incorporates the velocity dependent flow will be described.

  16. Melting of iron determined by X-ray absorption spectroscopy to 100 GPa

    PubMed Central

    Aquilanti, Giuliana; Trapananti, Angela; Karandikar, Amol; Kantor, Innokenty; Marini, Carlo; Mathon, Olivier; Pascarelli, Sakura; Boehler, Reinhard

    2015-01-01

    Temperature, thermal history, and dynamics of Earth rely critically on the knowledge of the melting temperature of iron at the pressure conditions of the inner core boundary (ICB) where the geotherm crosses the melting curve. The literature on this subject is overwhelming, and no consensus has been reached, with a very large disagreement of the order of 2,000 K for the ICB temperature. Here we report new data on the melting temperature of iron in a laser-heated diamond anvil cell to 103 GPa obtained by X-ray absorption spectroscopy, a technique rarely used at such conditions. The modifications of the onset of the absorption spectra are used as a reliable melting criterion regardless of the solid phase from which the solid to liquid transition takes place. Our results show a melting temperature of iron in agreement with most previous studies up to 100 GPa, namely of 3,090 K at 103 GPa. PMID:26371317

  17. Reflection-Absorption Infrared Spectroscopy of Thin Films Using an External Cavity Quantum Cascade Laser

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, Mark C.; Craig, Ian M.; Blake, Thomas A.

    2013-02-04

    We present experimental demonstrations using a broadly tunable external cavity quantum cascade laser (ECQCL) to perform Reflection-Absorption InfraRed Spectroscopy (RAIRS) of thin layers and residues on surfaces. The ECQCL compliance voltage was used to measure fluctuations in the ECQCL output power and improve the performance of the RAIRS measurements. Absorption spectra from self-assembled monolayers of a fluorinated alkane thiol and a thiol carboxylic acid were measured and compared with FTIR measurements. RAIRS spectra of the explosive compounds PETN, RDX, and tetryl deposited on gold substrates were also measured. Rapid measurement times and low noise were demonstrated, with < 1E-3 absorbance noise for a 10 second measurement time.

  18. An improved approach to identify irradiated spices using electronic nose, FTIR, and EPR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Sanyal, Bhaskar; Ahn, Jae-Jun; Maeng, Jeong-Hwan; Kyung, Hyun-Kyu; Lim, Ha-Kyeong; Sharma, Arun; Kwon, Joong-Ho

    2014-09-01

    Changes in cumin and chili powder from India resulting from electron-beam irradiation were investigated using 3 analytical methods: electronic nose (E-nose), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy. The spices had been exposed to 6 to 14 kGy doses recommended for microbial decontamination. E-nose measured a clear difference in flavor patterns of the irradiated spices in comparison with the nonirradiated samples. Principal component analysis further showed a dose-dependent variation. FTIR spectra of the samples showed strong absorption bands at 3425, 3007 to 2854, and 1746 cm(-1). However, both nonirradiated and irradiated spice samples had comparable patterns without any noteworthy changes in functional groups. EPR spectroscopy of the irradiated samples showed a radiation-specific triplet signal at g = 2.006 with a hyper-fine coupling constant of 3 mT confirming the results obtained with the E-nose technique. Thus, E-nose was found to be a potential tool to identify irradiated spices.

  19. Vibrational photodetachment spectroscopy near the electron affinity of S2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrick, J. B.; Yukich, J. N.

    2016-02-01

    We have conducted laser photodetachment spectroscopy near the detachment threshold of the electron affinity of S2 in a 1.8-T field. The ions are prepared by dissociative electron attachment to carbonyl sulfide. The experiment is conducted in a Penning ion trap and with a narrow-band, tunable, Ti:sapphire laser. A hybrid model for photodetachment in an ion trap is fit to the data using the appropriate Franck-Condon factors. The observations reveal detachment from and to the first few vibrational levels of the anion and the neutral molecule, respectively. Evaporative cooling of the anion ensemble condenses the thermal distribution to the lowest initial vibrational states. The subsequent detachment spectroscopy yields results consistent with a vibrationally cooled anion population.

  20. Quantitative Determination of Absolute Organohalogen Concentrations in Environmental Samples by X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Leri,A.; Hay, M.; Lanzirotti, A.; Rao, W.; Myneni, S.

    2006-01-01

    An in situ procedure for quantifying total organic and inorganic Cl concentrations in environmental samples based on X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy has been developed. Cl 1s XANES spectra reflect contributions from all Cl species present in a sample, providing a definitive measure of total Cl concentration in chemically heterogeneous samples. Spectral features near the Cl K-absorption edge provide detailed information about the bonding state of Cl, whereas the absolute fluorescence intensity of the spectra is directly proportional to total Cl concentration, allowing for simultaneous determination of Cl speciation and concentration in plant, soil, and natural water samples. Absolute Cl concentrations are obtained from Cl 1s XANES spectra using a series of Cl standards in a matrix of uniform bulk density. With the high sensitivity of synchrotron-based X-ray absorption spectroscopy, Cl concentration can be reliably measured down to the 5-10 ppm range in solid and liquid samples. Referencing the characteristic near-edge features of Cl in various model compounds, we can distinguish between inorganic chloride (Cl{sub inorg}) and organochlorine (Cl{sub org}), as well as between aliphatic Cl{sub org} and aromatic Cl{sub org}, with uncertainties in the range of {approx}6%. In addition, total organic and inorganic Br concentrations in sediment samples are quantified using a combination of Br 1s XANES and X-ray fluorescence (XRF) spectroscopy. Br concentration is detected down to {approx}1 ppm by XRF, and Br 1s XANES spectra allow quantification of the Br{sub inorg} and Br{sub org} fractions. These procedures provide nondestructive, element-specific techniques for quantification of Cl and Br concentrations that preclude extensive sample preparation.